Hardware/Handheld Devices
Keep e-mail, photos, music,
books, games, and your world
at your fingertips with iPad!
• Magic touch — learn to navigate the multitouch screen, use the
onscreen keyboard, and let your fingers surf the web
• Chill out — listen to your favorite tunes, watch videos, play games,
or curl up with an e-book
• Maximize your App-titude — find the best apps to indulge your
interests, get applications onto your iPad, and keep them all up to date
• Go places — use Google services to view maps, get directions,
and search for your next destination
Open the book and find:
iPad
• Steps for getting started with
your iPad
• How to video chat with FaceTime®
• Tips for downloading content
from the iTunes® Store, the App
Store, and the iBookstore
• Easy ways to organize your
e-mail, calendar, and contacts
• How to stay connected with
Facebook and Twitter
• Details about connecting to a
Wi-Fi network
• Advice on troubleshooting
your iPad
• Instructions for video mirroring
your iPad screen on an HDTV
Making Everything Easier! ™
Learn to:
• Set up your iPad, use the multitouch
interface, and get connected
Go to Dummies.com®
for videos, step-by-step examples,
how-to articles, or to shop!
• Surf the web, listen to music, watch
movies, and make FaceTime® video calls
• Utilize your iPad as an e-book reader,
portable game console, or HD
video camera
$24.99 US / $29.99 CN / £17.99 UK
Edward C. Baig is the Personal Technology columnist for USA TODAY and
the author of Macs For Dummies, 11th Edition. Bob “Dr. Mac” LeVitus pens
the popular “Dr. Mac” column for the Houston Chronicle and is the author
of Incredible iPad Apps For Dummies.
2nd Edition
2nd Edition
®
• Do you see me now? — video chat with FaceTime, record HD video
and shoot photos with the iPad 2’s cameras, and share it all online
nd iPad 2 !
Covers the iPad a
iPad
There are many tablets, but there’s just one iPad. Part iPod, part
game console, part e-reader, and all amazing, the iPad combines
the best of your favorite gadgets into one ultraportable device.
This full-color guide helps you get up to speed and on the go
with Apple’s latest iPad and iOS software. From surfing the web
to playing games, watching and recording videos, downloading
cool apps and more, the fun begins right here.
In
Color
IN FULL COLOR!
ISBN 978-1-118-02444-7
Baig
LeVitus
Edward C. Baig
Bob “Dr. Mac” LeVitus
®
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iPad®
FOR
DUMmIES
‰
2ND
EDITION
by Edward C. Baig
and Bob “Dr. Mac” LeVitus
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iPad® For Dummies®, 2nd Edition
Published by
Wiley Publishing, Inc.
111 River Street
Hoboken, NJ 07030-5774
www.wiley.com
Copyright © 2011 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana
Published by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana
Published simultaneously in Canada
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or its affiliates in the United States and other countries, and may not be used without written permission.
iPad is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective
owners. Wiley Publishing, Inc., is not associated with any product or vendor mentioned in this book.
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About the Authors
Edward C. Baig writes the weekly Personal Technology column in USA
TODAY and is cohost of USA TODAY’s Talking Tech podcast with Jefferson
Graham. Ed is also the author of Macs For Dummies, 11th Edition. (Wiley
Publishing) and cowriter of iPhone For Dummies. Before joining USA TODAY
as a columnist and reporter in 1999, Ed spent six years at Business Week,
where he wrote and edited stories about consumer tech, personal finance,
collectibles, travel, and wine tasting, among other topics. He received the
Medill School of Journalism 1999 Financial Writers and Editors Award for
contributions to the “Business Week Investor Guide to Online Investing.” That
followed a three-year stint at U.S. News & World Report, where Ed was the
lead tech writer for the News You Can Use section but also dabbled in numerous other subjects.
Ed began his journalist career at Fortune magazine, gaining the best basic
training imaginable during his early years as a fact checker and contributor
to the Fortune 500. Through the dozen years he worked at the magazine, Ed
covered leisure-time industries, penned features on the lucrative “dating”
market and the effect of religion on corporate managers, and was heavily involved in the Most Admired Companies project. Ed also started up
Fortune’s Products to Watch column, a venue for low- and high-tech items.
Bob LeVitus, often referred to as “Dr. Mac,” has written or cowritten nearly
60 popular computer books, with millions of copies in print. His titles
include Mac OS X For Dummies, iPhone For Dummies, Incredible iPhone
Apps For Dummies, and Microsoft Office 2008 For Mac For Dummies for Wiley
Publishing, Inc.; Stupid Mac Tricks and Dr. Macintosh for Addison-Wesley; and
The Little iTunes Book, 3rd Edition and The Little iDVD Book, 2nd Edition for
Peachpit Press.
Bob has also penned the popular Dr. Mac column for the Houston Chronicle
for more than 12 years and has been published in pretty much every magazine that ever used the word Mac in its title. His achievements have been
documented in major media around the world. (Yes, that was him juggling a
keyboard in USA TODAY a few years back!)
Bob is known for his expertise, trademark humorous style, and ability to
translate techie jargon into usable and fun advice for regular folks. Bob is
also a prolific public speaker, presenting more than 100 Macworld Expo training sessions in the United States and abroad, keynote addresses in three
countries, and Macintosh training seminars in many U.S. cities.
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Dedications
I dedicate this book to my beautiful wife, Janie, for inspiring me in myriad
ways; every day I am with her. And to my incredible kids: my adorable little
girl, Sydney (one of her first words was iPod) and my little boy, Sammy (who
is all smiles from the moment he wakes up in the morning). My kids are
already hooked on the iPad. This book is also dedicated to the memory of
my “canine” son, Eddie Jr. I am madly in love with you all. —Ed Baig
This book is dedicated to my wife, Lisa, who taught me almost everything I
know about almost everything except computers. And to my children, Allison
and Jacob, who love my iPad almost as much as I love them (my kids, not
my iPad). Last but certainly not least, to my dear friend Robyn Ray, who just
ordered an iPad 2: This one’s for you, kid. —Bob LeVitus
Authors’ Acknowledgments
Special thanks to everyone at Apple who helped us turn this book around so
quickly: Katie Cotton, Natalie Kerris, Natalie Harrison, Teresa Brewer, Janette
Barrios, Keri Walker, Jennifer Bowcock, Jason Roth, and everyone else who
lent a hand from the mothership out in Cupertino. We couldn’t have done it
without you.
Big-time thanks to the gang at Wiley: Bob “Can’t you work any faster?”
Woerner, Rebecca Huehls, John Edwards, Andy “The Boss” Cummings, Jen
Riggs, and our incredible technical editor Dennis R. Cohen, who did a rocking
job in record time as always. Finally, thanks to everyone at Wiley we don’t
know by name. If you helped with this project in any way, you have our everlasting thanks.
Ed adds: Thanks to my agent Matt Wagner for again turning me into a For
Dummies author. Matt had the right instincts to push this book, even back
when we were calling the first edition of the book Project X For Dummies.
I’d also like to thank Jim Henderson, Geri Tucker and Nancy Blair, and all my
USA TODAY friends and colleagues for your continuing support and encouragement of such projects. Most of all, thanks to my loving family for understanding my nightly (and weekend) disappearances as we raced to get this
project completed on time. You are quite simply the greatest.
And Bob says: Extra special thanks to my agent, Carole “Swifty” Jelen, who
has guided my writing career for more than 20 years and is still the best in
the business. Here’s to 20 more years of friendship and success together.
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Publisher’s Acknowledgments
We’re proud of this book; please send us your comments at http://dummies.custhelp.com.
For other comments, please contact our Customer Care Department within the U.S. at 877-762-2974,
outside the U.S. at 317-572-3993, or fax 317-572-4002.
Some of the people who helped bring this book to market include the following:
Acquisitions and Editorial
Composition Services
Project Editor: Rebecca Huehls
Project Coordinator: Patrick Redmond
Executive Editor: Bob Woerner
Copy Editor: Jen Riggs
Layout and Graphics: Samantha K. Cherolis,
Joyce Haughey
Technical Editor: Dennis Cohen
Proofreader: Susan Hobbs
Sr. Editorial Manager: Leah P. Cameron
Indexer: BIM Indexing & Proofreading Services
Editorial Assistant: Amanda Graham
Special Art: Credits for chapter opener art are
as follows:
Sr. Editorial Assistant: Cherie Case
Cartoons: Rich Tennant
(www.the5thwave.com)
Corbis Digital Stock — pages 63, 79, 245, 295, 305
Image Source — page 317
iStockPhoto.com — Ronen, page 41; Matt
Jeacock, page 103; HannahmariaH, page 151;
Vasko Miokovic, page 187
PhotoDisc, Inc. — page 267
PhotoDisc/Getty Images — pages 169, 205, 223
Publishing and Editorial for Technology Dummies
Richard Swadley, Vice President and Executive Group Publisher
Andy Cummings, Vice President and Publisher
Mary Bednarek, Executive Acquisitions Director
Mary C. Corder, Editorial Director
Publishing for Consumer Dummies
Diane Graves Steele, Vice President and Publisher
Composition Services
Debbie Stailey, Director of Composition Services
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Table of Contents
Introduction ................................................................. 1
About This Book .............................................................................................. 1
Conventions Used in This Book ..................................................................... 1
How This Book Is Organized .......................................................................... 2
Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad ........................................................ 2
Part II: The Internet iPad ....................................................................... 2
Part III: The iPad at Work and Play ...................................................... 2
Part IV: The Undiscovered iPad ........................................................... 3
Part V: The Part of Tens ........................................................................ 3
Icons Used in This Book ................................................................................. 3
Where to Go from Here ................................................................................... 4
Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad ................................. 5
Chapter 1: Unveiling the iPad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Exploring the iPad’s Big Picture .................................................................... 7
The iPad as an iPod ............................................................................... 9
The iPad as an Internet communications device............................... 9
The iPad as an e-book reader ............................................................. 10
The iPad as a multimedia powerhouse ............................................. 10
The iPad as a platform for third-party apps ..................................... 10
What do you need to use an iPad?..................................................... 11
Touring the iPad Exterior ............................................................................ 11
On the top ............................................................................................. 11
On the bottom ...................................................................................... 13
On the right side ................................................................................. 14
On the front and back ......................................................................... 15
Status bar .............................................................................................. 16
The iPad’s Fabulous 14 or Superb 17:
Discovering the Home Screen Icons ........................................................ 18
Chapter 2: iPad Basic Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
Getting Started on Getting Started .............................................................. 22
Turning the iPad On and Off ........................................................................ 23
Locking the iPad ............................................................................................ 24
Mastering the Multitouch Interface............................................................. 25
Training your digits ............................................................................. 25
Navigating beyond the Home screen ................................................ 26
The incredible, intelligent, and virtual iPad keyboard ................... 26
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iPad For Dummies, 2nd Edition
Discovering the special-use keys ....................................................... 29
Finger-typing on the virtual keyboards ............................................. 30
Editing mistakes ................................................................................... 33
Select, cut, copy, and paste ................................................................ 33
Multitasking .......................................................................................... 35
Organizing icons into folders ............................................................. 37
Printing .................................................................................................. 38
Searching for content on your iPad ................................................... 38
Chapter 3: The Kitchen Sync: Getting Stuff
to and from Your iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
Starting to Sync .............................................................................................. 42
Disconnecting the iPad ................................................................................. 46
Synchronizing Your Data .............................................................................. 46
Contacts ................................................................................................ 47
Calendars .............................................................................................. 49
Mail Accounts ....................................................................................... 49
Other...................................................................................................... 50
Advanced .............................................................................................. 51
Synchronizing Your Media ........................................................................... 51
Apps ....................................................................................................... 52
Music, music videos, and voice memos............................................ 53
Movies ................................................................................................... 55
TV shows............................................................................................... 56
Podcasts ................................................................................................ 57
iTunes U ................................................................................................ 58
Books ..................................................................................................... 58
Photos ................................................................................................... 59
Part II: The Internet iPad ............................................ 61
Chapter 4: Going on a Mobile Safari. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
Surfin’ Dude .................................................................................................... 65
Exploring the browser ......................................................................... 65
Blasting off into cyberspace ............................................................... 65
I Can See Clearly Now ................................................................................... 68
Opening multiple web pages at a time .............................................. 69
Looking at lovable links ...................................................................... 70
Book(mark) ’em, Dano ........................................................................ 72
Altering bookmarks ............................................................................. 73
Printing a web page ............................................................................. 73
Clipping a web page............................................................................. 74
Letting history repeat itself ................................................................ 74
Launching a mobile search mission .................................................. 75
Saving web pictures............................................................................. 76
Smart Safari Settings ..................................................................................... 77
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Chapter 5: The E-Mail Must Get Through. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79
Prep Work: Setting Up Your Accounts ........................................................ 80
Set up your account the easy way ..................................................... 80
Set up your account the less easy way ............................................. 80
See Me, Read Me, File Me, Delete Me: Working with Messages ............... 86
Reading messages ................................................................................ 86
Managing messages ............................................................................. 89
Searching e-mails ................................................................................. 91
Don’t grow too attached to attachments .......................................... 91
More things you can do with messages ............................................ 93
Darling, You Send Me (E-Mail) ..................................................................... 93
Sending an all-text message ................................................................ 94
Sending a photo with a text message ................................................ 96
Saving an e-mail to send later............................................................. 96
Replying to, forwarding, or printing an e-mail message ................. 97
Settings for sending e-mail.................................................................. 98
Setting Your Message and Account Settings.............................................. 99
Checking and viewing e-mail settings ............................................... 99
Altering account settings .................................................................. 101
Chapter 6: Surfin’ the Web without a Board
(or at Least without Safari). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Maps Are Where It’s At ............................................................................... 103
Finding your current location with Maps ....................................... 104
Finding a person, place, or thing ..................................................... 105
Views, zooms, and pans .................................................................... 106
Connecting maps and contacts ........................................................ 108
Saving time with Bookmarks, Recents, and Contacts ................... 108
Smart map tricks ................................................................................ 111
Hey You, It’s YouTube ................................................................................ 117
Hunting for YouTube gems ............................................................... 118
Watch this: Watching YouTube videos ........................................... 120
Restricting YouTube (and other) usage ......................................... 122
Socializing with Social Media Apps ........................................................... 122
Game Center ....................................................................................... 123
Facebook ............................................................................................. 124
MySpace .............................................................................................. 126
Twitter ................................................................................................. 127
Chapter 7: Apply Here (to Find Out about iPad Apps) . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
Tapping the Magic of Apps......................................................................... 130
Using Your Computer to Find Apps .......................................................... 131
Browsing the App Store from your computer ................................ 131
Using the Search field ........................................................................ 133
Getting more information about an app ......................................... 134
Downloading an app .......................................................................... 138
Updating an app ................................................................................. 139
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iPad For Dummies, 2nd Edition
Using Your iPad to Find Apps .................................................................... 139
Browsing the App Store on your iPad ............................................. 140
Using the Search field ........................................................................ 141
Finding details about an app ............................................................ 141
Downloading an app .......................................................................... 142
Updating an app ................................................................................. 144
Working with Apps ...................................................................................... 144
Deleting an app .................................................................................. 144
Writing an app review ....................................................................... 146
Reporting a problem.......................................................................... 147
Part III: The iPad at Work and Play ........................... 149
Chapter 8: Get in Tune(s): Audio on Your iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151
Introducing the iPod inside Your iPad...................................................... 152
Checking Out Your Library ........................................................................ 154
Finding music with the Search field ................................................ 154
Browsing among the tabs ................................................................. 154
Taking Control of Your Tunes.................................................................... 157
Playing with the audio controls ....................................................... 157
Twiddling with podcast and audiobook controls .......................... 161
It doesn’t take a Genius ..................................................................... 162
Creating playlists ............................................................................... 163
Customizing Volume and Equalizer Settings ........................................... 165
Play all songs at the same volume level.......................................... 165
Choose an equalizer setting ............................................................. 165
Set a volume limit for music (and videos) ...................................... 166
Shopping with the iTunes App................................................................... 166
Chapter 9: iPad Video: Seeing Is Believing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169
Finding Stuff to Watch ................................................................................. 170
Playing Video ............................................................................................... 174
Finding and Working the Video Controls ................................................. 176
Watching Video on a Big TV ....................................................................... 177
Restricting Video Usage .............................................................................. 178
Deleting Video from Your iPad .................................................................. 178
Shooting Your Own Videos ........................................................................ 179
Editing what you shot ....................................................................... 179
Sharing video ...................................................................................... 181
Seeing Is Believing with FaceTime............................................................. 182
Getting started with FaceTime ......................................................... 182
Making a FaceTime call ..................................................................... 183
Receiving a FaceTime call ................................................................. 184
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Chapter 10: You Oughta Be in Pictures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .187
Shooting Pictures ........................................................................................ 188
Importing Pictures ....................................................................................... 189
Syncing pix .......................................................................................... 190
Connecting a digital camera or memory card ................................ 190
Saving images from e-mails and the web ........................................ 191
Where Have All My Pictures Gone? ........................................................... 192
Admiring Pictures ........................................................................................ 194
Launching Slide Shows ............................................................................... 197
Adding special slide show effects .................................................... 197
Admiring pictures on the TV ............................................................ 198
Turning the iPad into a picture frame ............................................. 199
More (Not So) Stupid Picture Tricks ......................................................... 199
Deleting Pictures.......................................................................................... 202
Entering the Photo Booth ........................................................................... 202
Chapter 11: Curling Up with a Good iBook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .205
Why E-Books? ............................................................................................... 206
Beginning the iBook Story .......................................................................... 207
Reading a Book ............................................................................................ 209
Turning pages ..................................................................................... 209
Jump to a specific page ..................................................................... 211
Go to the Table of Contents.............................................................. 211
Add bookmarks .................................................................................. 212
Add highlights and notes .................................................................. 213
Change the type size and font .......................................................... 214
Searching inside and outside a book............................................... 215
Shopping for E-Books .................................................................................. 215
Just browsing iBookstore ................................................................. 216
Searching iBookstore ........................................................................ 217
Deciding whether a book is worth it ............................................... 217
Buying a book from iBookstore ....................................................... 218
Buying books beyond Apple............................................................. 219
Finding free books outside iBookstore ........................................... 220
Reading Newspapers and Magazines ........................................................ 220
Chapter 12: The iPad at Work. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .223
Taking Note of Notes ................................................................................... 223
Working with the Calendar......................................................................... 225
Choosing a calendar view ................................................................. 225
Searching appointments ................................................................... 227
Adding calendar entries .................................................................... 228
Letting your calendar push you around ......................................... 231
Responding to meeting invitations .................................................. 232
Subscribing to calendars .................................................................. 233
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iPad For Dummies, 2nd Edition
Sifting through Contacts ............................................................................. 233
Adding and viewing contacts ........................................................... 234
Searching contacts ............................................................................ 235
Contacting and sharing your contacts ............................................ 235
Linking contacts ................................................................................. 236
Removing a contact ........................................................................... 236
Apps for Work .............................................................................................. 236
The keys to Keynote .......................................................................... 237
Page me with Pages ........................................................................... 240
Playing with Numbers ....................................................................... 241
Part IV: The Undiscovered iPad ................................. 243
Chapter 13: Setting You Straight on Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245
Checking Out the Settings Screen ............................................................. 246
Flying with Sky-High Settings ..................................................................... 247
Controlling Wi-Fi Connections ................................................................... 247
Roaming among Cellular Data Options ..................................................... 249
Turning Notifications On and Off .............................................................. 249
Location, Location, Location Services ...................................................... 251
Settings for Your Senses ............................................................................. 251
Brightening your day ......................................................................... 252
Wallpaper ............................................................................................ 252
Sounds ................................................................................................. 253
Exploring Settings in General ..................................................................... 253
About About ....................................................................................... 253
Usage settings .................................................................................... 255
VPN settings ....................................................................................... 255
Bluetooth ............................................................................................ 256
Spotlight Search ................................................................................. 258
Auto-Lock ............................................................................................ 258
Passcode ............................................................................................. 258
Cover Lock/Unlock ............................................................................ 259
Restrictions......................................................................................... 259
Side Switch.......................................................................................... 259
Date and Time .................................................................................... 260
Keyboard............................................................................................. 260
International ....................................................................................... 261
Accessibility ....................................................................................... 261
Reset .................................................................................................... 264
Find My iPad ................................................................................................. 265
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Chapter 14: When Good iPads Go Bad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .267
Resuscitating an iPad with Issues ............................................................. 267
Recharge ............................................................................................. 268
Restart ................................................................................................. 269
Reset your iPad .................................................................................. 269
Remove content ................................................................................. 270
Reset settings and content ............................................................... 270
Restore ................................................................................................ 271
Recovery mode .................................................................................. 271
Problems with Networks ............................................................................ 272
Sync, Computer, or iTunes Issues ............................................................. 274
More Help on the Apple Website............................................................... 275
If Nothing We Suggest Helps ...................................................................... 276
Chapter 15: Accessorizing Your iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .279
Accessories from Apple .............................................................................. 280
Casing the iPad ................................................................................... 280
Exploring virtual keyboard alternatives ......................................... 281
Connecting a camera ......................................................................... 283
Connecting an iPad to a TV or projector ........................................ 284
Keeping a spare charger ................................................................... 285
Listening and Talking with Earphones, Headphones, and Headsets .... 285
Wired headphones, earphones, and headsets ............................... 286
Bluetooth stereo headphones, earphones, and headsets ............ 286
Listening with Speakers .............................................................................. 288
Desktop speakers ............................................................................... 288
Bluetooth speakers ............................................................................ 288
Docking your iPad with an extender cable ..................................... 289
Wrapping Your iPad in Third-Party Cases ............................................... 289
But Wait . . . There’s More! ......................................................................... 290
Protecting the screen with film ........................................................ 290
Standing up your iPad with Griffin A-Frame ................................... 291
Sharing your iPad with a 2-into-1 stereo adapter .......................... 292
Part V: The Part of Tens ............................................ 293
Chapter 16: Ten Appetizing (and Free) Apps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .295
Pocket Legends ............................................................................................ 296
Shazam .......................................................................................................... 297
ABC Player .................................................................................................... 298
Flixster .......................................................................................................... 298
IMDb .............................................................................................................. 299
Netflix ............................................................................................................ 300
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iPad For Dummies, 2nd Edition
Comics .......................................................................................................... 301
Epicurious Recipes & Shopping List ......................................................... 302
Flipboard ...................................................................................................... 302
Pandora Internet Radio ............................................................................... 303
Chapter 17: Ten Apps Worth Paying For. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .305
Bill Atkinson PhotoCard ............................................................................. 305
Words with Friends HD ............................................................................... 307
Scrabble ........................................................................................................ 307
ArtStudio....................................................................................................... 309
The Pinball.................................................................................................... 310
Art Authority for iPad ................................................................................. 311
Magic Piano .................................................................................................. 311
The Elements: A Visual Exploration .......................................................... 312
Bento for iPad .............................................................................................. 313
ZAGAT TO GO .............................................................................................. 315
Chapter 18: Ten Hints, Tips, and Shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .317
Sliding for Accuracy and Punctuation ...................................................... 317
Auto-Correction Is Your Friend ................................................................. 318
Autoapostrophes are good for you ................................................. 319
Make rejection work for you ............................................................ 319
Viewing the iPad’s Capacity ....................................................................... 319
The Way-Cool Hidden iTunes Scrub Speed Tip ....................................... 320
Tricks with Links and E-Mail Addresses ................................................... 322
Share the Love ............................................................................................. 323
Choosing a Home Page for Safari............................................................... 323
Storing Files .................................................................................................. 324
Making Phone Calls on the iPad ................................................................ 325
Taking a Snapshot of the Screen ............................................................... 326
Index ....................................................................... 327
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Introduction
A
s Yogi Berra would say, “It was déjà vu all over again”: Front-page
treatment, top billing on network TV and cable, and diehards lining up
days in advance to ensure landing a highly lusted-after product from Apple.
Only the product generating the remarkable buzz this time around wasn’t
the iPhone or even the first iPad. This time around it was iPad 2. We trust
you didn’t pick up this book to read yet another account about how the
iPhone launch followed by the iPad launch followed by the iPad 2 launch
were epochal events. We trust you did buy the book to find out how to get
the very most out of your remarkable device, and that goes for the original
iPad as well as its successor. Our goal is to deliver that information in a light
and breezy fashion. We expect you to have fun using your iPad or iPad 2. We
equally hope that you have fun spending time with us.
About This Book
We need to get one thing out of the way right from the get-go. We think
you’re pretty darn smart for buying a For Dummies book. That says to us that
you have the confidence and intelligence to know what you don’t know. The
For Dummies franchise is built around the core notion that everyone feels
insecure about certain topics when tackling them for the first time, especially
when those topics have to do with technology.
As with most Apple products, iPads are beautifully designed and intuitive to
use. And though our editors may not want us to reveal this dirty little secret
(especially on the first page, for goodness sake), the truth is you’ll get pretty
far just by exploring the iPad’s many functions and features on your own,
without the help of this (or any other) book.
Okay, now that we spilled the beans, we’ll tell you why you shouldn’t run
back to the bookstore and request a refund. This book is chock-full of useful
tips, advice, and other nuggets that should make your iPad experience all the
more pleasurable. We’d even go so far as to say you wouldn’t find some of
these nuggets anywhere else. So keep this book nearby and consult it often.
Conventions Used in This Book
First, we want to tell you how we go about our business. iPad For Dummies
makes generous use of numbered steps, bullet lists, and pictures. Web
addresses are shown in a special monofont typeface, like this.
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2
iPad For Dummies, 2nd Edition
We also include a few sidebars with information that isn’t required reading
(not that any of this book is) but that we hope will provide a richer understanding of certain subjects. Overall, we aim to keep technical jargon to a
minimum, under the guiding principle that with rare exceptions, you need
not know what any of it really means.
How This Book Is Organized
Here’s something we imagine you’ve heard before: Most books have a
beginning, a middle, and an end, and you do well to adhere to that linear
structure — unless you’re one of those knuckleheads out to ruin it for the
rest of us by revealing that the butler did it.
Fortunately, there is no ending to spoil in a For Dummies book. So although
you may want to digest this book from start to finish — and we hope you
do — we won’t penalize you for skipping ahead or jumping around. Having
said that, we organized iPad For Dummies in an order that we think makes the
most sense, as follows.
Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
In the introductory chapters of Part I, you tour the iPad inside and out, find
out what all those buttons and other nonvirtual doodads do, as well as get
some hands-on (or, more precisely, fingers-on) experience with the iPad’s
unique virtual multitouch display. And, of course, you’ll see how easy it is to
synchronize stuff on your Mac or PC with your dynamic device.
Part II: The Internet iPad
Part II is all about getting connected with your iPad. Along the way, you discover how to surf the web with the Safari web browser; set up mail accounts;
send and receive mail; work with maps, YouTube, and social media apps; and
buy and use apps from the iTunes App Store.
Part III: The iPad at Work and Play
Part III is where the fun truly begins as well as where we show you how to get
serious about using your iPad for work. You discover how to use your iPad
for music, video, movies, and photos, as well as how to buy and read iBooks
from the iBookstore. If you have an iPad 2, this is the part where you read
all about the tablet’s front and rear cameras. You also spend quality time
with your Calendar and Contacts apps and find out just a bit about Apple’s
(optional) productivity iWork apps — Pages, Numbers, and Keynote.
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Introduction
3
Part IV: The Undiscovered iPad
In Part IV, you find out how to apply your preferences through the iPad’s
internal settings, discover where to go for troubleshooting assistance if your
iPad should misbehave, and find out about some must-have accessories you
may want to consider.
Part V: The Part of Tens
The Part of Tens: Otherwise known as the For Dummies answer to David
Letterman (which, as it happens, both have close ties to Indianapolis). The
lists presented in Part V steer you to some of our favorite iPad apps as well
as some very handy tips and shortcuts.
Icons Used in This Book
Little round pictures (or icons) appear in the left margins throughout this
book. Consider these icons as miniature road signs, telling you something
extra about the topic at hand or hammering a point home.
Here’s what the five icons used in this book look like and mean.
These are the juicy morsels, shortcuts, and recommendations that might
make the task at hand faster or easier.
This icon emphasizes the stuff we think you ought to retain. You may even
jot down a note to yourself in the iPad.
Put on your propeller beanie hat and pocket protector; this text includes the
truly geeky stuff. You can safely ignore this material, but if it weren’t interesting or informative, we wouldn’t have bothered to write it.
You wouldn’t intentionally run a stop sign, would you? In the same fashion,
ignoring warnings may be hazardous to your iPad and (by extension) your
wallet. There, you now know how these warning icons work, for you have just
received your very first warning!
We put a New icon next to anything that’s new since last edition, including
hardware updates for iPad 2 as well as software updates, extra accessories,
or anything else that’s new for either version of the iPad.
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4
iPad For Dummies, 2nd Edition
Where to Go from Here
Why straight to Chapter 1, of course (without passing Go).
In all seriousness, we wrote this book for you, so please let us know what
you think. If we screwed up, confused you, left out something, or — heaven
forbid — made you angry, drop us a note. And if we hit you with one pun too
many, it helps to know that as well.
Because writers are people too (believe it or not), we also encourage positive feedback if you think it’s warranted. So kindly send e-mail to Ed at
baigdummies@aol.com and to Bob at iPadLeVitus@boblevitus.com.
We do our best to respond to reasonably polite e-mail in a timely fashion.
Most of all, we want to thank you for buying our book. Please enjoy it along
with your new iPad.
Note: At the time we wrote this book, all the information it contained was
accurate for the Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + 3G iPads and iPad 2s, version 4.3 of the
iOS (operating system) used by the iPad, and version 10.2.1 of iTunes. Apple
is likely to introduce new iPad models and new versions of iOS and iTunes
between book editions. If you’ve bought a new iPad and its hardware, user
interface, or the version of iTunes on your computer looks a little different,
be sure to check out what Apple has to say at www.apple.com/ipad. You’ll
no doubt find updates on the company’s latest releases. When a change is
very substantial, we may add an update or bonus information that you can
download at this book’s companion web site, www.dummies.com/go/ipad.
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Part I
Getting to Know
Your iPad
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Y
In this part . . .
ou have to crawl before you walk, so consider this part basic training for crawling.
The three chapters that make up Part I serve as a
gentle introduction to your iPad.
We start out nice and easy in Chapter 1, with a
big-picture overview, even letting you know
what’s in the box (if you haven’t already peeked).
Then we examine just some of the cool things
your iPad can do. We finish things off with a quickand-dirty tour of the hardware and the software
so that you’ll know where things are when you
need them.
Next, after you’re somewhat familiar with where
things are and what they do, we move right along
to a bunch of useful iPad skills, such as turning
the darn thing on and off (which is very important) and locking and unlocking your iPad (which
is also very important). Chapter 2 covers useful
tips and tricks to help you master the iPad’s
unique multitouch interface so that you can use it
effectively and efficiently.
Then, in Chapter 3, we explore the process of synchronization and how to get data — contacts,
appointments, movies, songs, podcasts, books,
and so on — from your computer into your iPad,
quickly and painlessly.
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1
Unveiling the iPad
In This Chapter
▶ Looking at the big picture
▶ Touring the outside of the iPad
▶ Checking out the iPad’s applications
C
ongratulations! You’ve selected one of the most incredible handheld
devices we’ve ever seen. Of course, the iPad is a combination of a killer
audio and video iPod, an e-book reader, a powerful Internet communications
device, a superb handheld gaming device, a still and video camera (iPad 2
only), and a platform for over 150,000 apps at the time this was written —
and probably a lot more by the time you read this.
In this chapter, we offer a gentle introduction to all the pieces that
make up your iPad, plus overviews of its revolutionary hardware and software features.
Exploring the iPad’s Big Picture
The iPad has many best-of-class features, but perhaps its most unusual feature is the lack of a physical keyboard or stylus. Instead, it has a 9.7-inch
super-high-resolution touchscreen (132 pixels per
inch, if you care about such things) that you operate using a pointing device you’re already intimately
familiar with: your finger.
And what a display it is. We venture that you’ve never
seen a more beautiful screen on a handheld device other than
the iPhone 4.
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
Another feature that knocked our socks off was the iPad’s built-in sensors. An
accelerometer detects when you rotate the device from portrait to landscape
mode and instantly adjusts what’s on the display accordingly.
What’s in the box
Somehow we think you’ve already opened the
handsome box that the iPad came in. But if you
didn’t, here’s what you can expect to find inside:
✓ Dock connector–to–USB cable: Use this
handy cable to sync or charge your iPad.
You can plug the USB connector into your
Mac or PC to sync or plug it into the USB
power adapter, which we describe next.
Note: If you connect the USB cable to USB
ports on your keyboard, USB hub, display,
or other external device, or even the USB
ports on an older Mac or PC, you may be
able to sync, but more than likely can’t
charge the battery. For the most part, only
your computer’s built-in USB ports (and
only recent vintage computers at that) have
enough juice to recharge the battery. If you
use an external USB port, you probably see
a Not Charging message next to the Battery
icon at the top of the screen.
✓ USB power adapter: Use this adapter to
recharge your iPad from a standard AC
power outlet.
✓ Some Apple logo decals: Of course.
✓ iPad instruction sheet: Unfortunately (or
fortunately if you’re the author of a book
about using the iPad), this little one-page,
two-sided “manual” offers precious little
useful information about the new object of
your affection.
✓ Important Product Information Guide pamphlet: Well, it must be important because
it says so right on the cover. You’ll find
basic safety warnings, a bunch of legalese,
05_9781118024447-ch01.indd 8
warranty information, and info on how to
dispose of or recycle the iPad. What! You’re
getting rid of it already? A few other pieces
of advice: Don’t drop the iPad if you can
help it, keep the thing dry, and — as with
all handheld electronic devices — give full
attention to the road while driving (or walking, for that matter).
✓ SIM eject tool (iPad 2 with 3G only): A little
metal doohickey that does just what its
name implies. Most people go through their
entire lives without ever ejecting a SIM
card, but at least now you know.
Tip: Original iPad with 3G owners can use
a straightened paper clip to eject the SIM
card. Not as cool as a special tool, but it
works.
✓ iPad: You were starting to worry. Yes, the
iPad itself is also in the box.
What’s not in the box is a stereo headset. If
you want to use a headset for music, video,
games, or anything else, you have to find one
elsewhere. Might we suggest you find one that
includes a built-in microphone? Although the
iPad doesn’t come with the VoiceNotes app
found on the iPhone, it can record to many of
the apps that are available in the App Store,
such as the free iTalk Recorder app from Griffin
Technology or the Voice Memos for iPad app
from KendiTech, Inc.
The aforementioned iPhone headset works
great with the iPad as will any other headset
that works with an iPhone. If you use one with
your iPhone, give it a try with your iPad.
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Chapter 1: Unveiling the iPad
9
The screen rotates, that is, unless the Screen Rotation Lock is engaged. We
tell you more about this feature shortly.
And a light sensor adjusts the display’s brightness in response to the current
ambient lighting conditions.
In addition to the aforementioned sensors, the iPad 2 also has a three-axis
gyro sensor that works in conjunction with the accelerometer and built-in
compass. Although all iPads can sense their orientation and direction, the
iPad 2 senses such things even better and faster.
In the following sections, we’re not just gawking over the wonderful screen.
We take a brief look at some of the iPad’s features, broken down by product
category.
The iPad as an iPod
We agree with Steve Jobs on this one: The iPad is magical — and without a
doubt, the best iPod Apple has ever produced. You can enjoy all your existing
iPod content — music, audiobooks, audio and video podcasts, music videos,
television shows, and movies — on the iPad’s gorgeous high-resolution color
display, which is bigger, brighter, and richer than any iPod or iPhone display
that came before it.
Bottom line: If you can get the content — be it video, audio, or whatever —
into iTunes on your Mac or PC, you can synchronize it and watch or listen to
it on your iPad.
Chapter 3 is all about syncing, but for now, just know that some video content may need to be converted to an iPad-compatible format (with proper
resolution, frame rate, bit rate, and file format) to play on your iPad. If you try
to sync an incompatible video file, iTunes alerts you that there’s an issue.
If you get an error message about an incompatible video file, select the file in
iTunes and choose Advanced➪Create iPad or Apple TV Version. When the
conversion is finished, sync again. Chapter 9 covers video and video compatibility in more detail.
The iPad as an Internet communications device
But wait — there’s more! Not only is the iPad a stellar iPod, but it’s also a
full-featured Internet communications device with — we’re about to drop a
bit of industry jargon on you — a rich HTML e-mail client that’s compatible
with most POP and IMAP mail services, with support for Microsoft Exchange
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10
Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
ActiveSync. (For more on this topic, see Chapter 5.) Also onboard is a worldclass web browser (Safari) that, unlike on many mobile devices, makes web
surfing fun and easy on the eyes. Chapter 4 explains how to surf the web
using Safari.
Another cool Internet feature is Maps, a killer mapping application based on
Google Maps. By using GPS (Wi-Fi + 3G model) or triangulation (Wi-Fi model),
the iPad can determine your location, let you view maps and satellite imagery, and obtain driving directions and traffic information regardless of where
you happen to be. (See Chapter 6 for the scoop on Maps.) You can also find
businesses, such as gas stations, pizza restaurants, hospitals, and Apple
Stores, with just a few taps.
We daresay that the Internet experience on an iPad is far superior to the
Internet experience on any other handheld device.
The iPad as an e-book reader
Download the free iBooks app or any of the excellent (and free) third-party
e-book readers such as the Kindle and Nook apps and you’ll discover a whole
new way of finding and reading books. The iBookstore, covered in Chapter 11,
is chock-full of good reading at prices that are lower than a hardcover copy.
Better still, when you read an e-book, you’re helping the environment and
saving trees. And best of all, a great number of books are absolutely free. If
you’ve never read a book on your iPad, give it a try. We think you’ll like (or
love) it.
The iPad as a multimedia powerhouse
The spectacular screen found on both iPad models is superb for personal
video viewing. Add an adapter cable as discussed in Chapter 15 and it turns
into a superb device for watching video on an HDTV (or even a non-HD TV),
with support for output resolutions up to 1080p (iPad 2).
And the iPad 2, with its pair of cameras and FaceTime video chatting app,
takes iPad’s multimedia acumen to new heights. Chapter 9 gets you started
with FaceTime.
The iPad as a platform for third-party apps
Over 300,000 iPhone apps are available at this writing, in categories that
include games, business, education, entertainment, healthcare and fitness, music, photography, productivity, travel, sports, and many more.
The cool thing is that most of those iPhone apps run flawlessly on the iPad.
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Chapter 1: Unveiling the iPad
11
Meanwhile, at the time we wrote this, the App Store offered more than 65,000
apps designed specifically for the iPad’s large screen, with many more on
the way. Chapter 7 helps you fill your iPad with all the cool apps your heart
desires. We share our favorite free and for-sale apps in Chapters 16 and 17,
respectively.
What do you need to use an iPad?
To actually use your iPad, only a few simple things are required. Here’s a list
of everything you need:
✓ An iPad
✓ An iTunes Store account (assuming you want to acquire apps, videos,
music, iBooks, podcasts, and the like, which you almost certainly do)
✓ Internet access — broadband wireless Internet access recommended
Plus you need one of the following:
✓ A Mac with a USB 2.0 port, Mac OS X version 10.5.8 or later, and iTunes
10.2.1 or later
✓ A PC with a USB 2.0 port; Windows 7, Windows Vista, or Windows XP
Home or Professional with Service Pack 3 or later; and iTunes 10.2.1
or later
Touring the iPad Exterior
The iPad is a harmonious combination of hardware and software. In the following sections, we take a brief look at the hardware — what’s on the outside.
On the top
On the top of your iPad, you find the headphone jack, and the Sleep/Wake
button, as shown in Figure 1-1:
✓ Sleep/Wake button: This button is used to put your iPad’s screen to
sleep or to wake it up. It’s also how you turn your iPad on or off. To put
it to sleep or wake it up, just press the button. To turn it on or off, press
and hold the button for a few seconds.
Your iPad’s battery will run down faster when your iPad is awake, so we
suggest that you make a habit of putting it to sleep when you’re not
using it.
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12
Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
When your iPad is sleeping, nothing happens if you touch its screen. To
wake it up, merely press the button again or press the Home button on
the front of the device (as described in a moment).
iPad 2 owners with an Apple Smart Cover can just open the cover to
wake their iPad and close the cover to put iPad 2 to sleep.
Headphone jack
Microphone
On/Off, Sleep/Wake
Microphone
On/Off, Sleep/Wake
Headphone jack
Figure 1-1: The top side of the iPad 2 (top) and iPad (bottom).
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Chapter 1: Unveiling the iPad
13
Find out how to make your iPad go to sleep automatically after a period
of inactivity in Chapter 13.
✓ Headphone jack: This jack lets you plug in a headset. You can use the
Apple headsets or headphones that came with your iPhone or iPod. Or,
you can use pretty much any headphones or headset that plugs into a
3.5-mm stereo headphone jack.
Throughout this book, we use the words headphones, earphones, and
headset interchangeably. Strictly speaking, a headset includes a microphone so that you can talk (or record) as well as listen; headphones or
earphones are for listening only. Either type works with your iPad.
✓ Microphone: The tiny dot next to the headphone jack on the original
iPad and in the middle of the top on the iPad 2 is actually a pretty good
microphone.
Although your iPad doesn’t include the VoiceNotes app that comes with
the iPhone, the App Store offers several free voice-recording apps for
the iPad and/or iPhone.
On the bottom
On the bottom of your iPad are the speaker and dock connector, as shown in
Figure 1-2:
Built-in speaker
30-pin dock connector
iPad
iPad 2
Figure 1-2: The bottom side of the iPad and iPad 2.
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
✓ Speaker: The speaker plays audio — music or video soundtracks — if no
headset is plugged in.
✓ 30-pin dock connector: This connector has two purposes. One, you can
use it to recharge your iPad’s battery: Simply connect one end of the
included dock connector–to–USB cable to the dock connector and the
other end to the USB power adapter. Two, you can use the dock connector to recharge your iPad’s battery as well as to synchronize: Connect
one end of the same cable to the dock connector and the other end to a
USB port on your Mac or PC.
In the “What’s in the box” sidebar earlier in this chapter, reread the
note about using the USB ports on anything other than your Mac or PC
including keyboards, displays, and hubs.
On the right side
On the right side of your iPad are the Volume Up/Down control and Mute
switch, as shown in Figure 1-3:
✓ Mute switch: When the switch is set to Silent mode — the down position, with an orange dot visible on the switch — your iPad doesn’t
make any sound when you receive new mail or an alert pops up on the
screen. Note that the Mute switch doesn’t silence what we think of as
“expected” sounds, which are sounds you expect to hear in a particular
app. Therefore, it doesn’t silence the iTunes or Videos apps, nor will it
mute games and other apps that emit noises. About the only thing the
Mute switch will mute are “unexpected” sounds, such as those associated with notifications from apps or the iPad operating system (iOS).
If the switch doesn’t mute your notification sounds when engaged (that
is, you can see the little orange dot on the switch), look for a little No
Rotation icon (shown here in the margin) to the left of the Battery icon
near the top of your screen.
If you see this icon when you flick the Mute switch, there are two possible
reasons. Reason 1: Your iPad is running an older version (version 3) of
iOS. Reason 2: Your iPad is running version 4 or higher of iOS, and you
have selected the Lock Rotation option in the Settings app’s General pane.
Reason 1 occurs because iOS 3 treats the switch as a rotation lock,
period, with no option for you to use it as a Mute switch. If that’s the
case, may we suggest you connect your iPad to your computer and use
iTunes to upgrade your iPad to the current version by clicking the Check
for Updates button on the Summary tab (as described in Chapter 3) and
following the instructions for updating your iPad.
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Chapter 1: Unveiling the iPad
15
The current version of iOS 4 treats it as a Mute switch by default, but
you can change it to a Rotation Lock in the Settings app’s General pane.
✓ Volume Up/Down control: The Volume Up/Down control is a single
button that’s just below the Screen Rotation Lock. The upper part of the
button increases the volume; the lower part decreases it.
iPad 2
iPad
Mute
Volume Up/Down
Screen rotation lock
Volume Up/Down
Figure 1-3: The right side has two buttons.
On the front and back
On the front of your iPad, you find the following (labeled in Figure 1-4):
Touchscreen
Front camera
Back camera
Application buttons
Home
Figure 1-4: The front of the iPad is a study in elegant simplicity.
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
✓ Touchscreen: You find out how to use the iPad’s gorgeous high-resolution color touchscreen in Chapter 2. All we have to say at this time is . . .
try not to drool all over it.
✓ Home button: No matter what you’re doing, you can press the Home
button at any time to display the Home screen, as shown in Figure 1-3.
✓ Front camera (iPad 2 only): It’s not the greatest still camera on earth,
but it’s serviceable and captures decent video.
✓ Application buttons: Each of the 14 (17 on the iPad 2) buttons (icons)
shown on the screen in Figure 1-3 launches an included iPad application. You read more about these applications later in this chapter and
throughout the rest of the book.
Finally, if you have an iPad 2, you have a second camera just below the Sleep/
Wake on the back side.
Status bar
The status bar, which is at the top of the screen, displays tiny icons that provide a variety of information about the current state of your iPad:
✓ Airplane mode (Wi-Fi + 3G models only): You’re allowed to use your
iPod on a plane after the captain gives the word. But you can’t use a cellphone or iPad Wi-Fi + 3G except when the plane is in the gate area before
takeoff or after landing. Fortunately, your iPad offers an Airplane mode,
which turns off all wireless features of your iPad — the cellular, 3G,
GPRS (General Packet Radio Service), and EDGE networks; Wi-Fi; and
Bluetooth — and makes it possible to enjoy music or video during your
flight.
✓ 3G (Wi-Fi + 3G models only): This icon informs you that the high-speed
3G data network from your wireless carrier (that’s AT&T or Verizon in
the United States) is available and that your iPad can connect to the
Internet via 3G. (Wondering what 3G and these other data networks are?
Check out the nearby sidebar, “Comparing Wi-Fi, 3G, GPRS, and EDGE.”)
✓ GPRS (Wi-Fi + 3G models only): This icon says that your wireless
carrier’s GPRS data network is available and that your iPad can use it
to connect to the Internet.
✓ EDGE (Wi-Fi + 3G models only): This icon tells you that your wireless
carrier’s EDGE network is available and you can use it to connect to the
Internet.
✓ Wi-Fi: If you see the Wi-Fi icon, your iPad is connected to the Internet
over a Wi-Fi network. The more semicircular lines you see (up to three),
the stronger the Wi-Fi signal. If you have only one or two semicircles of
Wi-Fi strength, try moving around a bit. If you don’t see the Wi-Fi icon in
the status bar, Internet access is not currently available.
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Chapter 1: Unveiling the iPad
17
✓ Activity: This icon tells you that some network or other activity is
occurring, such as over-the-air synchronization, sending or receiving
e-mail, or loading a web page. Some third-party applications also use
this icon to indicate network or other activity.
✓ VPN: This icon shows that you are currently connected to a virtual private network (VPN).
✓ Lock: This icon tells you when your iPad is locked. See Chapter 2 for
information on locking and unlocking your iPad.
✓ Screen Orientation Lock: This icon appears when the Screen Rotation
Lock is engaged.
✓ Play: This icon informs you that a song is currently playing. You find out
more about playing songs in Chapter 8.
✓ Bluetooth: This icon indicates the current state of your iPad’s Bluetooth
connection. If you see this icon in the status bar, Bluetooth is on and a
device (such as a wireless headset or keyboard) is connected. If the icon
is gray (as shown on the right in the picture in the margin), Bluetooth is
turned on but no device is connected. If the icon is white (as shown on
the left in the picture in the margin), Bluetooth is on and one (or more)
device is connected. If you don’t see a Bluetooth icon at all, Bluetooth is
turned off. Chapter 13 goes into more detail about Bluetooth.
✓ Battery: This icon reflects the level of your battery’s charge. It’s completely filled when you aren’t connected to a power source and your battery is fully charged (as shown in the margin). It then empties as your
battery becomes depleted. The icon shows when you’re connected to a
power source, and when the battery is fully charged or is currently
charging. You see an onscreen message when the charge drops to 20
percent or below and another when it reaches 10 percent.
Comparing Wi-Fi, 3G, GPRS, and EDGE
Wireless (that is, cellular) carriers may offer
one of three data networks. The fastest is a 3G
data network, which as you probably guessed,
is available only on the iPads with 3G. The
device first looks for a 3G network and then, if it
can’t find one, looks for a slower EDGE or GPRS
data network.
So all iPads connect to a Wi-Fi network if one is
available, even if a 3G, GPRS, or EDGE network
is also available.
Last but not least, if you don’t see one of these
icons — 3G, GPRS, EDGE, or Wi-Fi — you don’t
currently have Internet access. Chapter 2 offers
more details about these different networks.
Wi-Fi networks, however, are even faster than
any cellular data network — 3G, EDGE, or GPRS.
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
The iPad’s Fabulous 14 or Superb 17:
Discovering the Home Screen Icons
The Home screen offers 14 icons on both the original iPad and iPad 2, each
representing a different built-in application or function. If you have an iPad 2,
you have three additional apps — FaceTime, Camera, and Photo Booth — for
a total of 17. Because the rest of the book covers each and every one of these
babies in full and loving detail, we merely provide brief descriptions here.
To get to your Home screen, tap the Home button. If your iPad is asleep when
you tap, the unlock screen appears. After your iPad is unlocked, you see
whichever page of icons was on the screen when it went to sleep. If that happens to have been the Home screen, you’re golden. If it wasn’t, merely tap the
Home button again to summon your iPad’s Home screen.
You can rearrange icons on your iPad in three steps:
1. Press and hold any icon until all the icons begin to “wiggle.”
2. Drag the icons around until you’re happy with their positions.
3. Press the Home button to save your arrangement and stop the
“wiggling.”
If you haven’t rearranged your icons, you see the following applications on
your Home screen, starting at the top left:
✓ Calendar: No matter what calendar program you prefer on your Mac or
PC (as long as it’s iCal, Microsoft Entourage, or Microsoft Outlook), you
can synchronize events and alerts between your computer and your
iPad. Create an event on one device, and the event is automatically synchronized with the other device the next time the two devices are connected. Neat stuff.
✓ Contacts: This handy little app contains information about the people
you know. Like the Calendar app, it synchronizes with the Contacts app
on your Mac or PC (as long as it’s Address Book, Microsoft Entourage,
or Microsoft Outlook), and you can synchronize contacts between your
computer and your iPad. If you create a contact on one device, the contact is automatically synchronized with the other device the next time
your devices are connected. Chapter 12 explains how to start using the
Calendar and Contacts apps.
✓ Notes: This program enables you to type notes while you’re out and
about. You can send the notes to yourself or to anyone else through
e-mail, or just save them on your iPad until you need them. For help as
you start using Notes, flip to Chapter 12.
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Chapter 1: Unveiling the iPad
19
✓ Maps: This application is among our favorites. View street maps or satellite imagery of locations around the globe, or ask for directions, traffic
conditions, or even the location of a nearby pizza joint. You can find
your way around the Maps app with the handy tips in Chapter 6.
✓ Videos: This handy app is the repository for your movies, TV shows,
and music videos. You add videos via iTunes on your Mac or PC, or by
purchasing them from the iTunes Store using the iTunes app on your
iPad. Check out Chapter 9 to read more.
✓ YouTube: This application lets you watch videos from the popular
YouTube web site. You can search for a particular video or browse
through thousands of offerings. It’s a great way to waste a lot of time.
Chapter 6 also explains the joys of YouTube.
✓ iTunes: Tap this puppy to purchase music, movies, TV shows, audiobooks, and more, and also download free podcasts and courses from
iTunes U. There’s more info about iTunes (and the iPod app) in Chapter 8.
✓ App Store: This icon enables you to connect to and search the iTunes
App Store for iPad applications that you can purchase or download for
free over a Wi-Fi or cellular data network connection. Chapter 7 is your
guide to buying and using apps from the App Store.
✓ Game Center: Apple’s social networking app for game enthusiasts.
Compare achievements, boast of your conquests and high scores, or
challenge your friends to battle. You hear more about social networking
and Game Center near the end of Chapter 6.
If you have an iPad 2, you see the following three icons between your
Game Center and Settings icons.
• FaceTime: Use this app to participate in FaceTime video chats, as
you’ll discover in Chapter 9.
• Camera: This app’s for shooting pictures or videos with the iPad
2’s front- or rear-facing camera.
• Photo Booth: This one’s a lot like those old-time photo booths but
you don’t have to feed it money.
If you just can’t wait, flip to the details on FaceTime in Chapter 9
and Camera and Photo Booth in Chapter 10.
✓ Settings: This is where you change settings for your iPad and its apps.
D’oh. With so many different settings in the Settings app, you’ll be happy
to hear that Chapter 13 is dedicated exclusively to Settings.
✓ Safari: Safari is your web browser. If you’re a Mac user, you know that
already. If you’re a Windows user who hasn’t already discovered the
wonderful Safari for Windows, think Internet Explorer on steroids.
Chapter 4 shows you how to start using Safari on your iPad.
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
✓ Mail: This application lets you send and receive e-mail with most POP3
and IMAP e-mail systems and, if you work for a company that grants
permission, Microsoft Exchange, too. Chapter 5 helps you start e-mailing
everyone you know from your iPad.
✓ Photos: This application is the iPad’s terrific photo manager. It lets you
view pictures from a camera or SD card (using the optional Camera
Connection Kit), synced from your computer, saved from an e-mail or
Safari, or saved from one of the myriad of third-party apps that save
their handiwork in the Photos app. You can zoom in or out, create slide
shows, e-mail photos to friends, and much more. To get started, see
Chapter 10.
✓ iPod: Last but not least, this icon unleashes all the power of an iPod
right on your iPad, so you can listen to music or podcasts. You discover
how it works in Chapter 8.
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2
iPad Basic Training
In This Chapter
▶ Getting going
▶ Turning the device on and off
▶ Locking your iPad
▶ Mastering multitouch
▶ Cutting, copying, and pasting
▶ Multitasking with your iPad
▶ Printing on your iPad
▶ Spotlighting search
B
y now you know that the original iPad and the iPad 2 are very
different from other computers. You also know that these
slate-style machines are rewriting the rulebook for mainstream computing. How so? For starters, iPads don’t
have a mouse or any other kind of pointing device.
They lack traditional computing ports or connectors,
such as USB. And they have no physical or built-in
keyboard.
iPads even differ from other so-called tablet PCs,
some of which feature a pen or stylus and let you
write in digital ink. As we point out (pun intended)
in Chapter 1, the iPad relies on an input device that
you always have with you: your finger.
Tablet computers of one form or another have actually
been around since the last century. They just never captured the fancy of Main Street. Apple’s very own Newton, an illfated 1990s personal digital assistant, was among the machines that
barely made a dent in the market.
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
What’s past is past, of course, and technology, not to mention Apple itself,
has come a long way since Newton. And suffice it to say that tablets moving
forward, led by the iPad brigade of course, promise to enjoy a much rosier
outlook. Indeed, just since the iPad burst onto the scene, numerous tech
titans (as well as smaller companies) have introduced their own touchenabled tablets, many that rely on Google’s Android mobile operating
system. Some solid machines are among them, but the iPad remains the
market leader and a true pioneer in the space.
If you got caught up in the initial mania surrounding the iPad, you probably
plotted for weeks about how to land one. After all, the iPad, like its close
cousin the iPhone, rapidly emerged as the hippest computer you could find.
(We consider you hip just because you’re reading this book.)
Speaking of the iPhone, if you own one or its close relative, Apple’s iPod
touch, you already have a gigantic start in figuring out how to master the
iPad multitouch method of navigating the interface with your fingers. You
have our permission to skim over the rest of this chapter, but we urge you to
stick around anyway because some things on the iPad work in subtly different ways than on the iPhone or iPod touch. If you’re a total novice, don’t fret.
Nothing about multitouch is painful.
Getting Started on Getting Started
To enjoy the iPad, you need the following four things, and there’s a darn
good chance you already have them:
✓ Another computer: This can be either a Macintosh running Mac OS X
Version 10.5.8 or later, or a PC running Windows 7, Windows Vista, or
Windows XP Home or Professional with Service Pack 3 or later. That’s
the official word from Apple anyway; we got the original iPad to make
nice with a Dell laptop that had XP Pro and SP2 and we’ve known XP
Home systems that play nice.
✓ iTunes software: More specifically, you need version 10.2.1 or later
of iTunes — emphasis on the later because by the time you read this,
it probably will be later. That is, unless you’re a fan of the popular
TV show Lost and no longer have any sense of what’s now, what was,
and what’s next. All kidding aside, Apple constantly tweaks iTunes
to make it better. Because Apple doesn’t supply iTunes software in
the box, head to www.itunes.com/download to fetch a copy. Or,
launch your current version of iTunes and then choose iTunes (Help on
Windows)➪Check for Updates.
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Chapter 2: iPad Basic Training
23
For the uninitiated, iTunes is the nifty Apple jukebox software that
owners of iPods and iPhones, not to mention others, use to manage
music, videos, applications, and more. iTunes is at the core of the iPad
as well because an iPod is built into the iPad. You use iTunes to synchronize a bunch of stuff from your Mac or PC to and from an iPad, including
(but not limited to) applications, photos, movies, TV shows, podcasts,
iTunes U lectures, and of course, music.
Syncing is such a vital part of this process that we devote an entire
chapter (see Chapter 3) to the topic.
✓ An iTunes Store account: Read Chapter 8 for details on how to set one
up, but like most things Apple, the process isn’t difficult.
✓ Internet access: Your iPad can connect to the Internet in either of two
ways: Wi-Fi or 3G (if you bought an iPad with 3G capabilities and connect to a 3G service). You can connect your iPad to cyberspace via Wi-Fi
in your home, office, school, favorite coffeehouse, bookstore, or numerous other spots.
A 3G (third generation) wireless data connection at press time was available only in the United States through AT&T or Verizon Wireless. Unlike
with the cellphone contract you may have with AT&T or Verizon (or
most every other cellular carrier), no long-term service commitment is
required to connect your iPad to the network. That means you can come
and go as you please without penalty. Instead, you prepay 30 days worth
of 3G connectivity through your credit card. The charge doesn’t show up
in your iTunes account, or AT&T or Verizon statement (if you have one).
As this book goes to press, data rates are quite reasonably priced, too:
• AT&T: $25 a month for 2 gigabytes (GB) or $14.99 a month for 250
megabytes (MB). Overages are $10 per additional GB.
• Verizon: $20 a month for 1GB, $35 for 3GB, $50 for 5GB, and $80 for
10GB. As with AT&T, overages are $10 per GB.
Turning the iPad On and Off
Apple has taken the time to partially charge your iPad, so you get some measure of instant gratification. After taking your iPad out of the box, press and
hold the Sleep/Wake button on the top-right edge. (See Chapter 1 for the location of all the buttons.) The first thing you likely see is an image of a cable
with a dock connector, signifying that you connect the iPad to iTunes to set
it up. If the iPad was instead set up on your behalf at the Apple Store, you see
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
the famous Apple logo, followed less than a minute or so later by an image
of what looks to be a gray glass scene doused in raindrops. (You can replace
this scene with one of your own pictures, as we describe in Chapter 10.)
To turn the device completely off, press and hold the Sleep/Wake button
again until a red arrow appears at the top of the screen. Then drag the arrow
from the left to the right with your finger. Tap Cancel at the bottom of the
screen if you change your mind.
Locking the iPad
Carrying a naked cellphone in your pocket is begging for trouble. Unless the
phone has a locking mechanism, you may inadvertently dial a phone number
at odd hours.
You don’t have to worry about dialing your boss at 4 a.m. on an iPad — it’s
not a phone after all (though such apps as Line2 or Skype can turn it into
one). But you still have sound reasons for locking an iPad:
✓ You can’t inadvertently turn it on.
✓ You keep prying eyes at bay.
✓ You spare the battery some juice.
Apple makes locking the iPad a cinch.
In fact, you don’t need to do anything to lock the iPad; it happens automatically as long as you don’t touch the screen for a minute or two. As you find
out in Chapter 13, you can also set the amount of time your iPad must be idle
before it automatically locks.
Can’t wait? To lock the iPad immediately, press the Sleep/Wake button.
Unlocking the iPad is easy, too; here’s how:
1. Press the Sleep/Wake button. Or, press the Home button on the front
of the screen.
Either way, the onscreen slider appears.
2. Drag the slider to the right with your finger.
3. In some cases, you also need to enter a passcode.
See Chapter 13 to find out how to password-protect your iPad.
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Chapter 2: iPad Basic Training
25
Mastering the Multitouch Interface
With very few exceptions, until the iPad came along, most every computer
known to mankind has had a physical mouse and a typewriter-style QWERTY
keyboard to help you accomplish most of the things you can do on a computer. (The term QWERTY is derived from the first six letters on any standard
typewriter or computer keyboard.)
The iPad, like the iPhone, dispenses with a physical mouse and keyboard.
Apple (as is its wont) is once again living up to an old company advertising
slogan to “Think Different.”
Indeed, the iPad (and iPhone and iPod touch) remove the usual physical buttons in favor of a multitouch display. And this beautiful and responsive fingercontrolled screen is at the heart of the many things you do on the iPad.
In the following sections, you discover how to move around the multitouch
interface with ease.
Training your digits
Rice Krispies have Snap! Crackle! Pop! Apple’s response for the iPad is Tap!
Flick! Pinch! (Yikes, another ad comparison!) Oh yeah, and Drag!
Fortunately, tapping, flicking, pinching, and dragging are not challenging gestures, so you can master many of the iPad’s features in no time:
✓ Tap: Tapping serves multiple purposes. Tap an icon to open an application from the Home screen. Tap to start playing a song or to choose the
photo album you want to look through. Sometimes, you double-tap (tapping twice in rapid succession), which has the effect of zooming in (or
out) of web pages, maps, and e-mails.
✓ Flick: Flicking is just what it sounds like. A flick of the finger on the
screen itself lets you quickly scroll through lists of songs, e-mails, and
picture thumbnails. Tap the screen to stop scrolling, or merely wait for
the scrolling list to stop.
✓ Pinch/spread: Place two fingers on the edges of a web page, map, or picture and then spread your fingers apart to enlarge the images. Or, pinch
your fingers together to make the map or picture smaller. Pinching and
spreading (or what we call unpinching) are cool gestures that are easy to
master and sure to wow an audience.
✓ Drag: Here’s where you slowly press your finger against the touchscreen
without lifting it. You might drag to move around a web page or map
that’s too large for the iPad’s display area.
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
Navigating beyond the Home screen
The Home screen we discuss in Chapter 1 is not the only screen of icons on
your tablet. After you start adding apps from the iTunes App Store (which
you discover in Chapter 7), you may see two or more tiny dots among the
Safari, Mail, Photos, and iPod icons and the row of icons directly above them,
plus a tiny Spotlight search magnifying glass to the left of the dots. Those
dots denote additional screens, each containing up to 20 additional icons, not
counting the 4 to 6 separate icons that are docked at the bottom of each of
these Home screens. (You can actually have fewer than 4 docked icons at the
bottom, but we can’t think of a decent reason why you’d want to ditch any of
them. In any case, more on these in a moment.)
To navigate between screens, flick your finger from right to left or left to right
across the middle of the screen, or tap directly on the dots. You can also
drag your finger in either horizontal direction to get to a different screen.
Unlike flicking — you may prefer the term swiping — dragging your finger
means keeping it pressed against the screen until you reach your desired
page.
You must be very precise, or you’ll open one of the application icons instead
of switching screens.
The number of dots you see represents the current number of screens on
your iPad. The dot that’s all white denotes the screen that you’re currently
viewing. Finally, the four icons in the bottom row — Safari, Mail, Photos,
and iPod — are in a special part of the screen known as the Dock. When you
switch from screen to screen as we describe earlier in this chapter, these
icons remain on the screen. In other words, only the first 20 icons on the
screen change when you move from one screen to another. You can add
one or two more icons to the Dock if you so choose. Or move one of the four
default icons into the main area of the Home screen to make space available
for additional app icons you may use more often.
Press the Home button to jump back to the Home screen.
The incredible, intelligent, and virtual iPad keyboard
Instead of a physical keyboard, several “soft” or “virtual” English-language
keyboard layouts slide up from the bottom of the iPad screen, all variations
on the alphabetical keyboard, the numeric and punctuation keyboard, and
the more punctuation and symbols keyboard. Figure 2-1 shows six examples
of different iPad keyboards.
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Chapter 2: iPad Basic Training
27
Indeed, the beauty of a software keyboard is that you see only the keys that
are pertinent to the task at hand. The layout you see depends on the application. The keyboards in Safari differ from the keyboards in Notes. For example,
while having a dedicated .com key in the Safari keyboard makes perfect
sense, having such a key in the Notes keyboard isn’t essential.
Keyboards in Notes
Keyboards in Safari
Figure 2-1: Six faces of the iPad keyboard.
Before you consider how to actually use the keyboard, we want to share a bit
of the philosophy behind its so-called intelligence. Knowing what makes this
keyboard smart can help you make it even smarter when you use it:
✓ It has a built-in English dictionary that even includes words from today’s
popular culture. It has dictionaries in other languages too, automatically
activated when you use a given international keyboard as described in
the sidebar “A keyboard for all borders,” elsewhere in this chapter.
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
✓ It adds your contacts to its dictionary automatically.
✓ It uses complex analysis algorithms to predict the word you’re trying to
type.
✓ It suggests corrections as you type. It then offers you the suggested
word just below the misspelled word. When you decline a suggestion
and the word you typed is not in the iPad dictionary, the iPad adds that
word to its dictionary and offers it as a suggestion if you mistype a similar word in the future.
Remember to decline suggestions (by tapping the characters you typed
as opposed to the suggested words that appear beneath what you’ve
typed) because doing so helps your intelligent keyboard become even
smarter.
✓ It reduces the number of mistakes you make as you type by intelligently
and dynamically resizing the touch zones for certain keys. You can’t
see it, but it is increasing the zones for keys it predicts might come next
and decreasing the zones for keys that are unlikely or impossible to
come next.
A keyboard for all borders
Apple is expanding the iPad’s reach globally
with international keyboard layouts on the
iPad for more than four-dozen languages. To
access a keyboard that isn’t customized for
Americanized English, tap Settings➪General➪
Keyboard➪International Keyboards➪Add New
Keyboard. Then flick through the list to select
any keyboard you want to use. (Alternatively,
tap Settings➪General➪International➪Key
boards.) Up pops the list shown in the figure
included here, with custom keyboards for
German, Japanese, Portuguese, and so on.
Apple even supplies two versions of French
(including a keyboard geared to Canadian customers) and several keyboards for Chinese.
Heck, there’s even a U.K. version of English.
Have a multilingual household? You can select
as many of these international keyboards as you
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might need by tapping the language in the list. Of
course, you can call upon only one language at
a time. So when you’re inside an application that
summons a keyboard, tap the little International
Keyboard button sandwiched between the
Toggle and spacebar (refer to Figure 2-1) or
Toggle and : keys until the keyboard you want
to call on for the occasion shows up. Tap again
to pick the next keyboard on the corresponding
list of international keyboards that you turned
on in Settings. If you keep tapping, you come
back to your original English keyboard.
To remove a keyboard that you’ve already
added to your list, tap the Edit button in the
upper-right corner of the screen and then tap
the red circle with the white horizontal line that
appears next to the language to which you want
to say adios.
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Chapter 2: iPad Basic Training
One more note about the Chinese keyboards:
You can use handwriting character recognition
for simplified and traditional Chinese, as shown
here. Just drag your finger in the box provided.
29
We make apologies in advance for not knowing
what the displayed characters here mean (we
neither speak nor read Chinese).
Discovering the special-use keys
The iPad keyboard contains several keys that don’t actually type a character.
Here’s the scoop on each of these keys:
✓ Shift: If you’re using the alphabetical keyboard, the Shift key (arrow
pointing up) switches between uppercase and lowercase letters. You
can tap the key to change the case, or hold down Shift and slide to the
letter you want to be capitalized.
✓ #+= or 123: If you’re using keyboards that just show numbers and symbols, the traditional Shift key is replaced by a key labeled #+= or 123
(sometimes shown as .?123). Pressing that key toggles between keyboards that just have symbols and numbers.
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
✓ Caps Lock: To turn on Caps Lock and type in all caps, you first need to
enable Caps Lock (if not already enabled). You do that by tapping the
Settings icon (usually found on the first Home screen), tapping
General➪Keyboard. Tap the Enable Caps Lock item to turn it on. After
the Caps Lock setting is enabled, double-tap the Shift key to turn on
Caps Lock. (The Shift key turns blue whenever Caps Lock is on.) Tap the
Shift key again to turn off Caps Lock. To disable Caps Lock completely,
just reverse the process by turning off the Enable Caps Lock setting (tap
Settings➪General➪Keyboard).
✓ Toggle: Switches between the different keyboard layouts.
✓ International Keyboards: Only shows up if you’ve turned on an international keyboard, as explained in the sidebar “A keyboard for all borders.”
✓ Delete: Otherwise known as Backspace, tapping this key erases the
character immediately to the left of the cursor.
✓ Return: Moves the cursor to the beginning of the next line.
✓ Hide Keyboard: Tap to hide the keyboard. Tap the screen in the appropriate app to bring back the keyboard.
If you have an iPhone or iPad touch, it’s worth noting that keyboards on the
iPad more closely resemble the keyboard layout of a traditional computer
rather than those smaller model devices. That is, the Backspace key is on the
upper right, the Return key is just below it, and Shift keys are on either side.
This similarity to traditional keyboard layouts certainly improves the odds of
successful touch-typing.
Finger-typing on the virtual keyboards
The virtual keyboards in Apple’s multitouch interface just might be considered a stroke of genius. And they just might as equally drive you nuts, at least
initially.
If you’re patient and trusting, in a week or so, you’ll get the hang of fingertyping — which is vital to moving forward, of course, because you rely on a
virtual keyboard to tap a text field, enter notes, type the names of new contacts, and so on.
As we already note, Apple has built intelligence into its virtual keyboard, so
it can correct typing mistakes on the fly and take a stab at predicting what
you’re about to type next. The keyboard isn’t exactly Nostradamus, but it
does an excellent job in coming up with the words you have in mind.
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Chapter 2: iPad Basic Training
31
As you start typing on the virtual keyboard, we think you’ll find the following
tips extremely helpful:
✓ See what letter you’re typing. As you press your finger against a letter
or number on the screen, the individual key you press darkens until
you lift your finger, as shown in Figure 2-2. That way, you know that you
struck the correct letter or number.
✓ Slide to the correct letter if you tap the wrong one. No need to worry if
you touched the wrong key. You can slide your finger to the correct key
because the letter isn’t recorded until you release your finger.
✓ Tap and hold to access special accent marks, alternate punctuation, or
URL endings. Sending a message to an overseas pal? Keep your finger
pressed against a letter, and a row of keys showing variations on the
character for foreign alphabets pops up, as shown in Figure 2-3. This lets
you add the appropriate accent mark. Just slide your finger until the key
with the relevant accent mark is pressed.
Figure 2-2: The ABCs of virtual typing.
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
Figure 2-3: Accenting your letters.
Meanwhile, if you press and hold the .com key in Safari, it offers you the
choice of .com, .net, .edu, or .org, with additional options if you also use
international keyboards. Pretty slick stuff.
✓ Tap the spacebar to accept a suggested word, or tap the suggested
word to decline the suggestion. Alas, mistakes are common at first. Say
that you meant to type a sentence in the Notes application that reads, “I
am typing an important . . .” But because of the way your fingers struck
the virtual keys, you actually entered “I am typing an importsnt . . .”
Fortunately, Apple knows that the a you meant to press is next to the s
that showed up on the keyboard, just as t and y and e and r are side by
side. So the software determines that important was indeed the word
you had in mind and places it in red under the suspect word. To accept
the suggested word, merely tap the Space key. And if for some reason
you actually did mean to type importsnt instead, tap the suggested word
(important in this example) to decline it.
If you don’t appreciate this feature, you can turn off Auto-Correction in
Settings. See Chapter 13 for details.
Because Apple knows what you’re up to, the virtual keyboard is fine-tuned
for the task at hand. This is especially true when you need to enter numbers,
punctuation, or symbols. The following tips help you find common special
characters or special keys that we know you’ll want to use:
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✓ Finding keys for web addresses: If you’re entering a web address, the
keyboard inside the Safari web browser (see Chapter 4) includes dedicated period, forward slash, and .com keys but no spacebar.
If you’re using the Notes application (see Chapter 12), the keyboard
does have a spacebar.
✓ Putting the @ in an e-mail address: And if you’re composing an e-mail
message (see Chapter 5), a dedicated @ key pops up on the keyboard.
✓ Switching from letters to numbers: When you’re typing notes or sending e-mail and want to type a number, symbol, or punctuation mark, tap
the 123 key to bring up an alternative virtual keyboard. Tap the ABC key
to return to the first keyboard. This toggle isn’t hard to get used to, but
some may find it irritating.
✓ Adding apostrophes: If you press and hold the Exclamation Mark/
Comma key on the iPad, it changes to an apostrophe.
Editing mistakes
We think typing with abandon, without getting hung up over mistyped characters, is a good idea. The self-correcting keyboard can fix many errors. That
said, plenty of typos are likely to turn up, especially in the beginning, and you
have to correct them manually.
A neat trick for doing so is to hold your finger against the screen to bring up
the magnifying glass, as shown in Figure 2-4. Use the magnifying glass to position the pointer on the spot where you need to make the correction. Then
use the Backspace key (also called the Delete key) to delete the error, and
press whatever keys you need to type the correct text.
Select, cut, copy, and paste
Being able to select and then copy and paste from one place on a computer
to another has seemingly been a divine right since Moses, and that’s the case
on the Apple tablet as well. You can copy and paste (and cut) with pizzazz.
On the iPad, you might copy text or images from the web and paste them into
an e-mail or a note. Or, you might copy a bunch of pictures or video into an
e-mail.
Say you’re jotting down ideas in the Notes application that you’ll eventually
copy into an e-mail. Here’s how to exploit the copy-and-paste feature, using
this scenario as an example:
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
Figure 2-4: Magnifying errors while typing in Notes.
1. Double-tap a word to select it.
2. Tap Select to select the adjacent word or tap Select All to grab
everything.
You can also drag the blue grab points or handles to select a larger
block of text or to contract the text you’ve already selected, as shown in
Figure 2-5. This too may take a little practice.
3. After you select the text, tap Copy. If you want to delete the text block,
tap Cut instead.
4. Open the Mail program (see Chapter 5) and start composing a message.
5. When you decide where to insert the text you just copied, tap the
cursor.
Up pops commands to Select, Select All, and Paste, as shown in Figure 2-6.
6. Tap Paste to paste the text into the message.
Here’s the pizzazz part. If you made a mistake when you were cutting,
pasting, or typing, shake the iPad. Doing so undoes the last edit (provided you tap the Undo Typing option when it appears).
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If you happen to Select a word with a typo, you’ll have the option, in
addition to Cut, Copy and Paste, to Replace it. Tap Replace and the iPad
may show you possible replacement words. For example, replacement
words for test might be fest, rest or text. Tap the word to sub for the word
you originally typed.
Figure 2-5: Drag the grab points to select text.
Figure 2-6: Tap Paste to make text appear
from nowhere.
Multitasking
When iOS 4 first appeared, it added a bevy of important features, of which
multitasking was arguably the most significant. (Apple had moved to iOS 4.3
by the time this book went to press.) Multitasking simply lets you run numerous apps in the background simultaneously or easily switch from one app to
another. For example, a third-party app, such as Slacker Personal Radio, continues to play music while you surf the web, peek at pictures, or check e-mail.
Without multitasking, Slacker would shut down the moment you opened
another app. (Previously, Apple did let you multitask by, for example, playing
audio in the background with its own iTunes app. But multitasking was limited to Apple’s own apps, not those produced by outside developers.)
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Among other tricks, the multitasking feature lets a navigation app update
your position while you’re listening, say, to Pandora Internet radio. From
time to time, the navigation app will pipe in with turn-by-turn directions, lowering the volume of the music so you can hear the instructions.
And if you’re uploading images to a photo web site and the process is taking
longer than you want, you can switch to another app, confident that the
images will continue to upload behind the scenes. We’ve also been able to
leave voice notes in the Evernote app while checking out a web page.
Multitasking couldn’t be simpler. Double-press the Home button, and a tray
appears, as shown in Figure 2-7. The tray holds icons for applications running
in the background or “suspended.” Swipe from right to left on the tray to see
more apps. Tap the app you want to switch to; the app remembers where
you left off.
Figure 2-7: A tray for recently used apps.
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37
Or swipe the tray from left to right for instant access to convenient controls
for iPod audio (Volume, Play/Pause, Next/Previous Track), Brightness, and
Screen Rotation Lock.
To remove an app from the tray holding icons of apps running in the background or suspended — and thus remove the app from those in the multitasking rotation — press and hold your finger against any app until they all
start to wiggle. Then tap the red circle with the white line that appears inside
the app you want to remove. Poof, it’s gone.
Multitasking on the iPad differs from multitasking on a Mac or PC. You can’t
display more than one screen at a time. Moreover, there’s some philosophical debate about whether this feature is multitasking, fast task switching, or
a combination. Rather than getting bogged down in the semantics, we’re just
glad that multitasking, or whatever you want to call it, has arrived.
Organizing icons into folders
Finding the single app you want to use among apps spread out over 11 pages
may seem like a daunting task. But Apple felt your pain and added a handy
organizational tool — Folders. The Folders feature lets you create folder
icons, each with up to 20 icons for apps.
To create a folder, follow these steps:
1. Press your finger against an icon until all the icons on the screen
jiggle.
2. Decide which apps you want to move to a folder, and drag the icon for
the first app on top of the second app.
The two apps now share living quarters inside a newly created folder.
Apple names the folder according to the category of apps inside the
folder.
3. (Optional) Change the folder name by tapping the X in the bar where
the folder name appears and substituting a new name.
To launch an app that’s inside a folder, tap that folder’s icon and then tap the
icon for the app that you want to open.
You can drag apps into and out of any folder as long as there’s room for them.
When you drag all the apps from a folder, the folder disappears automatically.
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
Printing
Apple didn’t include built-in printer functionality with the first generation
iPad. A variety of third-party apps helped fill the bill to some degree, but still
the faithful waited for Apple to come up with a solution. The AirPrint feature,
that subsequently arrived, provided just such a remedy — to a point. You can
print wirelessly from the iPad to an AirPrint-capable printer. The first of these
compatible printers emerged on more than a dozen HP models. The expectation is other printer manufacturers will unveil AirPrint printers of their own
perhaps by the time you read this. We sure hope so. For that matter we hope
that Apple will support Bluetooth wireless printing, but that’s not happened
as of this writing either. AirPrint works with Mail, Photos, Safari, and iBooks
(PDFs). You can also print from apps in Apple’s optional iWork software
suite, as well as third-party apps with built-in printing.
Although AirPrint printers don’t need any special software, they do have to
be connected to the same Wi-Fi network as the iPad.
To print, follow these steps:
1. Tap the Print command, which appears in different places depending
on the app you’re using.
2. Tap Select Printer to select a printer, which the iPad locates in short
order.
3. Depending on the printer, specify the number of copies you want
to print, the number of double-sided copies, and a range of pages to
print.
4. When you’re happy with your settings, tap Print.
If you happen to double-click the Home button while a print job is underway,
the Print Center app icon appears on the multitasking tray along with all your
other recently used apps. A red badge indicates how many documents are in
the print queue, along with the currently printing document.
Searching for content on your iPad
Using the Safari browser (see Chapter 4), you can search the web via the
Google or Yahoo! search engines.
But you can also search people and programs across your iPad and within
specific applications. We show you how to search within apps in the various
chapters dedicated to Mail, Contacts, Calendar, and the iPod.
Searching across the iPad, meanwhile, is based on the powerful Spotlight feature familiar to Mac owners. Here’s how it works:
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1. To access Spotlight, flick to the left of the main Home screen (or, as we
mention earlier in this chapter, press the Home button from the main
Home screen).
2. Tap the bar at the top of the screen that slides into view and enter
your search query using the virtual keyboard.
The iPad spits out results the moment you type a single character, and
the list narrows as you type additional characters.
The results are pretty darn thorough. Say you entered Ring as your
search term, as shown in Figure 2-8. Contacts whose last names have
Ring in them show up, along with friends who might do a trapeze act in
the Ringling Bros. circus. All the songs on your iPad by Ringo Starr show
up too, as do such song titles as Tony Bennett’s “When Do The Bells
Ring For Me,” if that happens to be in your library. Same goes for apps,
videos, audiobooks, events, and notes with the word Ring.
3. Tap any listing to jump to the contact, ditty, or application you seek.
Figure 2-8: Putting the Spotlight on search.
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
In Settings (see Chapter 13), you can specify the order of search results so
that apps come first, contacts second, songs third, and so on.
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3
The Kitchen Sync: Getting Stuff
to and from Your iPad
In This Chapter
▶ Starting your first sync
▶ Disconnecting during a sync
▶ Synchronizing contacts, calendars, e-mail accounts, and bookmarks
▶ Synchronizing music, podcasts, video, photos, books, and applications
W
e have good news and . . . more good news. The good news is that
you can easily copy any or all of your contacts, appointments, events,
mail settings, bookmarks, books, music, movies, TV shows, podcasts,
photos, and applications from your computer to your iPad.
And the more good news is that after you do that, you can
choose to synchronize your contacts, appointments, and
events so that they’re kept up to date automatically in
both places — on your computer and your iPad —
whenever you make a change in one place or the
other. So when you add or change an appointment,
an event, or a contact on your iPad, that information automatically appears on your computer the
next time your iPad and computer communicate.
This communication between your iPad and computer is syncing (short for synchronizing). Don’t
worry: It’s easy, and we walk you through the entire
process in this chapter.
But wait. There’s even more good news. Items you manage on
your computer, such as movies, TV shows, podcasts, and e-mail
account settings, are synchronized only one way: from your computer to
your iPad, which is the way it should be.
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
The information in this chapter is based on iTunes version 10.2.1 and iPhone
OS version 4.3, which were the latest and greatest when these words were
written. If your screens don’t look exactly like ours, you probably need to
upgrade to iTunes 10.2.1 or higher (choose iTunes➪Check for Updates) and
iPhone OS 4.3 or higher (click the Check for Updates button on the Summary
tab shown in the upcoming Figure 3-2 and follow the instructions for updating your iPad). By the way, both upgrades are free, and both offer significant
advantages over their predecessors.
Starting to Sync
Synchronizing your iPad with your computer is a lot like syncing an iPod or
iPhone with your computer. If you’re an iPod or iPhone user, the process will
be a piece of cake. But it’s not too difficult even for those who’ve never used
an iPod, an iPhone, or iTunes. Follow these steps:
1. Start by connecting your iPad to your computer with the USB cable
that came with your iPad.
When you connect your iPad to your computer, iTunes should launch
automatically. If it doesn’t, chances are that you plugged the cable into
a USB port on your keyboard, monitor, or hub. Try plugging it into one
of the USB ports on your computer instead. Why? Because USB ports
on your computer supply more power to a connected device than USB
ports on a keyboard, monitor, or most hubs and the iPad requires a lot
of that power — even more than an iPod or an iPhone.
If iTunes still doesn’t launch automatically, try launching it manually.
2. Select your iPad in the iTunes sidebar.
You see the Set Up Your iPad pane, as shown in Figure 3-1. If you’ve
already set up and named your iPad, you can skip Steps 3 and 4a, and
continue with Step 4b.
If you don’t see an iPad in the sidebar, and you’re sure that it’s connected to a USB port on your computer (not the keyboard, monitor, or
hub), restart your computer.
3. Name your iPad by typing a name in the Name text box.
We’ve named this one BobLiPad.
4a. Decide whether you want iTunes to automatically synchronize the
items shown in Figure 3-1 with your iPad every time you connect it to
your computer.
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Figure 3-1: This is the first thing you see in iTunes.
• If you do want iTunes to do any of these things automatically, select
the check box next to the appropriate option so that it displays
a check mark, click the Done button, and continue with the
“Synchronizing Your Media” section, later in this chapter.
• If you want to synchronize manually, make sure that all three check
boxes are deselected, as shown in Figure 3-1, and click Done. The
“Synchronizing Your Data” section, later in this chapter, tells
you all about how to configure your contacts, calendars, bookmarks, notes, e-mail accounts, and applications manually; the
“Synchronizing Your Media” section shows you how to sync apps,
music, and so on.
You don’t have to decide now. If you’re not sure, just leave all
three check boxes deselected for now. It’s easy to enable one or all
three at any time.
We’ve chosen to not select any of the three check boxes so that we can
show you how to manually set up each type of sync in the upcoming
sections.
After you click the Done button (applies only to those who just performed Steps 3 and 4a), the Summary pane appears.
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
4b. If the Summary pane doesn’t appear, make sure that your iPad is still
selected in the sidebar on the left side of the iTunes window and
then click the Summary tab near the top of the window, as shown in
Figure 3-2.
5. (Optional) If you want iTunes to launch automatically whenever you
connect your iPad to your computer, select the Open iTunes When
This iPad Is Connected check box (in the Options area).
Why might you choose not to enable this option? If you intend to connect your iPad to your computer to charge it, for example, you might not
want iTunes to launch every time you connect it.
If you do choose to enable it, iTunes launches and synchronizes automatically every time you connect your iPad.
Don’t worry about this too much right now. If you change your mind,
you can always come back to the Summary tab and deselect the Open
iTunes When This iPad Is Connected check box.
Figure 3-2: The Summary pane is pretty painless.
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If you do select the Open iTunes When This iPad Is Connected check
box but don’t want your iPad to sync automatically every time it’s connected, launch iTunes and choose iTunes➪Preferences (Mac) or Edit➪
Preferences (PC). Click the Devices tab at the top of the window and
select the Prevent iPods, iPhones, and iPads from Syncing Automatically
check box. This method prevents your iPad from syncing automatically
even if the Open iTunes When This iPad Is Connected option is enabled. If
you choose this option, you can sync your iPad by clicking the Sync or
Apply button that appears in the lower-right corner of the iTunes window
when your iPad is selected in the sidebar (it says “Apply” in Figure 3-2).
6. (Optional) If you want to sync only items that have check marks to
the left of their names in your iTunes library, select the Sync Only
Checked Songs and Videos check box.
7. (Optional) If you want high-definition videos you import to be automatically converted into smaller standard-definition video files when
you transfer them to your iPad, select the Prefer Standard Definition
Videos check box.
Standard-definition video files are significantly smaller than highdefinition video files. You’ll hardly notice the difference when you watch
the video on your iPad but you can have more video files on your iPad
because they take up less space.
The conversion from HD to standard definition takes a long time, so be
prepared for very long sync times when you sync new HD video and
have this option enabled.
If you plan to use Apple’s $39 Digital AV Adapter to display movies on an
HDTV, you might want to consider going with high definition. Although
the files will be bigger and your iPad will hold fewer videos, the HD versions look spectacular on a big screen TV.
8. (Optional) If you want songs with bit rates higher than 128 kbps converted into smaller 128-kbps AAC files when you transfer them to
your iPad, select the Convert Higher Bit Rate Songs to 128 kbps AAC
check box.
A higher bit rate means that the song will have better sound quality but
use a lot of storage space. Songs that you buy at the iTunes Store or on
Amazon, for example, have bit rates of around 256 kbps. So, a 4-minute
song with a 256-kbps bit rate is around 8MB; convert it to 128-kbps AAC
and it’s roughly half that size (that is, around 4MB), while sounding
almost as good.
Bob tested bit rates and ears extensively when he was writing The Little
iTunes Book (published by Peachpit Press) many years ago and concluded that most people don’t notice much (if any) difference in audio
quality when listening to music on most consumer audio gear. So unless
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
you have your iPad hooked up to a great amplifier and superb speakers or headphones, you probably won’t hear much difference, but your
iPad can hold roughly twice as much music if you enable this option. Put
another way, we’re very picky about our audio and we both enable this
option to allow us to carry more music around with us on our iPads. And
neither of us has noticed much impact on sound quality with the headphones or speakers we use with our iPads.
9. (Optional) To turn off automatic syncing in the Music and Video
panes, select the Manually Manage Music and Videos check box.
10. (Optional) To password-protect your iPad backups (your iPad creates
a backup of its contents automatically every time you sync), select the
Encrypt iPad Backup check box.
And, of course, if you decide to select the Prevent iPods, iPhones, and iPads
from Syncing Automatically check box on the iTunes Preferences (that’s
iTunes➪Preferences on a Mac and Edit➪Preferences on a PC), in the Devices
tab, you can still synchronize manually by clicking the Sync or Apply button
in the lower-right corner of the window.
Why the Sync or Apply button? Glad you asked. If you’ve changed any sync
settings since the last time you synchronized, the Sync button instead says
Apply. When you click that button — regardless of its name — your iPad will
start to sync.
Disconnecting the iPad
When the iPad is syncing with your computer, its screen says Sync in
Progress, and iTunes displays a message that says that it’s syncing with
your iPad. After the sync is finished, iTunes displays a message that the iPad
sync is complete and that it’s okay to disconnect your iPad.
If you disconnect your iPad before a sync is completed, all or part of the sync
may fail.
To cancel a sync so that you can safely disconnect your iPad, drag the Slide
to Cancel slider on the iPad during the sync.
Synchronizing Your Data
Did you choose to set up data synchronization manually by not selecting any
of the three check boxes in the Set Up Your iPad pane, as shown in Figure 3-1?
If so, your next order of business is to tell iTunes what data you want to
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synchronize between your iPad and your computer. You do this by selecting
your iPad in the sidebar on the left side of the iTunes screen. Then click the
Info tab, which is to the right of the Summary tab.
The Info pane has five sections: Contacts, Calendars, Mail Accounts, Other,
and Advanced.
Unless your Mac or PC has an absolutely humongous display you see only
one or two sections at any time and have to scroll to see the others.
The following sections take a look at the Info pane sections one by one, but
first you may want to check out the brief interlude . . . er, sidebar, “MobileMe.”
Contacts
The Contacts section of the Info pane determines how iTunes handles
synchronization for your contacts. One method is to synchronize all your
contacts, as shown in Figure 3-3. Or, you can synchronize any or all groups
of contacts you’ve created in your computer’s address book program. Just
select the appropriate check boxes in the Selected Groups list, and only
those groups will be synchronized.
MobileMe
MobileMe is Apple’s $99-a-year service for
keeping your iPad, iPod touch, Macs, and PCs
synchronized. MobileMe is the latest iteration of
what Apple used to call .Mac (pronounced dot
Mac) and, before that, iTools. The big allure of
MobileMe is that it can “push” information such
as e-mail, calendars, contacts, and bookmarks
from your computer to and from your iPad, and
keep those items synchronized on your iPad
and computer(s) wirelessly and without human
intervention. It also includes non-synchronizing
options including beautiful, easy-to-create
online photo galleries as well as e-mail, web
space, 20GB of online storage, and more.
If you want to have your e-mail, calendars,
contacts, and bookmarks synchronized automatically and wirelessly, click the Set Up
Now button. Your web browser launches, and
instructions appear for subscribing to MobileMe
if you’re not already a subscriber or for setting
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up each of your devices for MobileMe if you are
already a subscriber.
If you’re going to use MobileMe to sync your
e-mail, calendars, contacts, and bookmarks,
you can safely ignore the information in three of
the next five sections: “Contacts,” “Calendars,”
and “Advanced.” Those three sections deal with
using iTunes for synchronization, and you don’t
need them if you’re using MobileMe. The other
two sections, “Mail Accounts” and “Other,”
both contain information even MobileMe users
may find useful.
And here’s a final MobileMe tip: Although the
suggested retail price of a year’s subscription
to MobileMe is $99, Amazon is currently offering
it for $72.18, and we’ve seen it offered for even
less by other vendors. The point is that when
it comes to MobileMe, it might pay to shop
around.
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
Figure 3-3: Want to synchronize your contacts? This is where you set up things.
Note that the section is named Sync Address Book Contacts because Figure 3-3
was captured in iTunes on a Mac and Address Book is what it syncs with. If
you use a PC, you see a drop-down list that gives you the choices of Outlook,
Google Contacts, Windows Address Book, or Yahoo! Address Book. Don’t
worry — the process works the same on either platform.
The iPad syncs with the following address book programs:
✓ Mac: Address Book
✓ PC: Outlook or Windows Address Book
✓ Mac and PC: Yahoo! Address Book and Google Contacts
On a Mac, you can sync contacts with multiple applications. On a PC, you can
sync contacts with only one application at a time.
If you use Yahoo! Address Book, select the Sync Yahoo! Address Book
Contacts check box and then click the Configure button to enter your Yahoo!
ID and password. If you use Google Contacts, select the Sync Google Contacts
check box and then click the Configure button to enter your Google ID and
password.
Syncing doesn’t delete a contact from your Yahoo! Address Book if it has a
Yahoo! Messenger ID, even if you delete that contact on the iPad or on your
computer.
To delete a contact that has a Yahoo! Messenger ID, log on to your Yahoo!
account with a web browser and delete the contact in your Yahoo! Address
Book.
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If you sync with your employer’s Microsoft Exchange calendar and contacts,
any personal contacts or calendars already on your iPad will be wiped out.
Calendars
The Calendars section of the Info pane determines how synchronization is
handled for your appointments and events. You can synchronize all your calendars, as shown in Figure 3-4. Or, you can synchronize any or all individual
calendars you’ve created in your computer’s calendar program. Just select
the appropriate check boxes.
Figure 3-4: Set up sync for your calendar events here.
The Calendars section is named Sync iCal Calendars because Figure 3-4 was
captured in iTunes for the Mac. If you use a PC, this section is named Sync
Calendars with Outlook. As before, don’t worry — regardless of its name, it
works the same on either platform.
The iPad syncs with the following calendar programs:
✓ Mac: iCal
✓ PC: Microsoft Outlook 2003, 2007, 2010
On a Mac, you can sync calendars with multiple applications. On a PC, you
can sync calendars with only one application at a time.
Mail Accounts
You can sync account settings for your e-mail accounts in the Mail Accounts
section of the Info pane. You can synchronize all your e-mail accounts (if you
have more than one), or you can synchronize individual accounts, as shown
in Figure 3-5. Just select the appropriate check boxes.
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
Figure 3-5: Transfer e-mail account settings to your iPad here.
The iPad syncs with the following mail programs:
✓ Mac: Mail
✓ PC: Microsoft Outlook 2003, 2007, 2010
E-mail account settings are synchronized only one way: from your computer
to your iPad. If you make changes to any e-mail account settings on your iPad,
the changes aren’t synchronized back to the e-mail account on your computer.
Trust us, this is a very good feature and we’re glad Apple did it this way.
By the way, the password for your e-mail account may or may not be saved
on your computer. If you sync an e-mail account and the iPad asks for a
password when you send or receive mail, do this: Tap Settings on the Home
screen, tap Mail, tap your e-mail account’s name, and then type your password in the appropriate field.
Other
The Other section has a mere two items: Sync Safari Bookmarks and Sync
Notes.
Select the check box for Sync Safari Bookmarks if you want to sync your
Safari bookmarks; don’t select it if you don’t.
Just so you know, the iPad syncs bookmarks with the following web browsers:
✓ Mac: Safari
✓ PC: Microsoft Internet Explorer and Safari
Select the check box for Sync Notes to sync notes in the Notes application on
your iPad with notes in Apple Mail (Mac) or Microsoft Outlook (PC).
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Note that on a Mac, you must have Mac OS X 10.5.8 or later installed to sync
notes.
Advanced
Every so often the contacts, calendars, mail accounts, or bookmarks on your
iPad get so screwed up that the easiest way to fix things is to erase that information on your iPad and replace it with information from your computer.
If that’s the case, just click to select the appropriate check boxes, as shown
in Figure 3-6. Then, the next time you sync, that information on your iPad will
be replaced with information from your computer.
Figure 3-6: Replace the information on your iPad with the information on your computer.
Because the Advanced section is at the bottom of the Info pane and you have
to scroll down to see it, you can easily forget that the Advanced section is
there. Although you probably won’t need to use this feature very often (if
ever), you’ll be happy you remembered that it’s there if you do need it.
Synchronizing Your Media
If you chose to let iTunes manage synchronizing your data automatically, welcome. This section looks at how you get your media — your music, podcasts,
video, and photos — from your computer to your iPad.
Podcasts and video (but not photos) are synced only one way: from your
computer to your iPad. Deleting any of these items from your iPad does not
delete them from your computer when you sync. The exceptions are songs,
podcasts, videos, iBooks, and apps that you purchase or download on your
iPad, and playlists you create on your iPad. Such items are, as you’d expect,
copied back to your computer automatically when you sync. And if you save
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
pictures from e-mail messages, the iPad 2 camera, web pages (by pressing
and holding on an image and then tapping the Save Image button), or screen
shots (which can be created by pressing the Home and Sleep/Wake buttons
simultaneously), these too can be synced.
Taking a screen shot creates a photo of what’s on your screen. It’s a handy
tool and it’s what we used to generate almost every figure in this book.
You use the Apps, Music, Podcasts, Movies, TV Shows, Podcasts, iTunes U,
Books, and Photos panes to specify the media that you want to copy from
your computer to your iPad. The following sections explain the options you
find on each pane.
To view any of these panes, make sure that your iPad is still selected in the
sidebar and then click the appropriate tab near the top of the window.
The following sections focus only on syncing. If you need help acquiring
apps, music, movies, podcasts, or anything else for your iPad, this book contains chapters dedicated to each of these topics. Just flip to the most applicable chapter for help.
The last step in each section is “Click the Sync or Apply button in the lowerright corner of the window.” You have to do this only when enabling that
item for the first time and if you make any changes to the item after that.
Apps
If you’ve downloaded or purchased any iPad apps from the iTunes App Store,
set your automatic syncing options as follows:
1. Click the Apps tab, and then select the Sync Apps check box.
2. Choose the individual apps you want to transfer to your iPad by
selecting their check boxes.
For your convenience, you can sort your applications by name, category, or date acquired. Or, you can type a word or phrase into the
Search field (the oval with the magnifying glass in the upper right corner
of the iTunes window) to search for a specific app.
3. (Optional) Rearrange app icons in iTunes by dragging them where you
want them to appear on your iPad (see Figure 3-7).
If you have a lot of apps, you’re sure to love this feature (which was
introduced in iTunes 9) as much as we do.
4. Click the Sync or Apply button in the lower-right corner of the window.
Your apps are synced, and your icons are rearranged on your iPad just
the way you arranged them in iTunes.
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Drag Dictation icon from here (A) to here (B)
A
B
Home
screen 1
Home
screen 2
Figure 3-7: We’re dragging the Dictation icon from Home screen 2 to Home screen 1 to make
it easier to get to.
Note that apps are so darn cool we’ve given them an entire chapter of their
very own, namely Chapter 7. There you discover how to find, rearrange,
review, and delete apps, and much, much more.
Music, music videos, and voice memos
To transfer music to your iPad, follow these steps:
1. Click the Music tab, and then select the Sync Music check box in the
Music pane.
2. Select the button for Entire Music Library or Selected Playlists, Artists,
and Genres.
If you choose the latter, select the check boxes next to particular
playlists, artists, and genres you want to transfer. You can also choose
to include music videos, voice memos, or both by selecting the appropriate check boxes at the top of the pane (see Figure 3-8).
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If you select the Automatically Fill Free Space with Songs check box,
iTunes fills any free space on your iPad with music.
3. Click the Sync or Apply button in the lower-right corner of the
window.
Your music, music videos, and voice memos are synced.
Music, podcasts, and video are notorious for chewing up massive amounts of
storage space on your iPad. If you try to sync too much media, you see error
messages that warn you there’s not enough room on your iPad for everything
you tried to sync. Forewarned is forearmed. To avoid these errors, select
playlists, artists, and/or genres that total less than the free space on your
iPad.
Figure 3-8: Use the Music pane to copy music, music videos, and voice memos from your
computer to your iPad.
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How much free space does your iPad have? Glad you asked. Look near the
bottom of the iTunes window while your iPad is selected. You see a chart
that shows the contents of your iPad, color-coded for your convenience. See
Chapter 18 for a tip on working with this graph.
Movies
To transfer movies to your iPad, follow these steps:
1. Click the Movies tab and select the Sync Movies check box.
2. Choose an option for movies that you want to include automatically
from the pop-up menu, as shown in Figure 3-9, or select the check box
for each movie you want to sync.
Regardless of the choices you make in the pop-up menu, you can always
select individual movies by selecting their check boxes.
3. Click the Sync or Apply button in the lower-right corner of the window.
Your movies are synced.
Figure 3-9: Your choices in the Movies pane determine which movies are copied to your iPad.
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TV shows
The procedure for syncing TV shows is slightly different from the procedure
for syncing movies. Here’s how it works:
1. Click the TV Shows tab and select the Sync TV Shows check box to
enable TV show syncing.
2. Choose how many episodes to include from the pop-up menu in the
upper-left corner, as shown in Figure 3-10.
3. In the upper-right corner, choose whether you want all shows or only
selected shows from the pop-up menu (again, see Figure 3-10).
4. If you want to also include individual episodes or episodes on playlists,
select the appropriate check boxes in the Episodes (which is labeled
Family Guy Episodes in Figure 3-10) and the Include Episodes from
Playlists sections (lower left in Figure 3-10) of the TV Shows pane.
Figure 3-10: These menus determine how TV shows are synced with your iPad.
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5. Click the Sync or Apply button in the lower-right corner of the window.
Your TV shows are synced.
Regardless of the choices you make in the pop-up menus, you can
always select individual episodes by selecting their check boxes.
Podcasts
To transfer podcasts to your iPad, follow these steps:
1. Click the Podcasts tab and select the Sync Podcasts check box in the
Podcasts pane.
Two pop-up menus allow you to specify which episodes and which podcasts you want to sync, as shown in Figure 3-11.
Figure 3-11: These menus determine how podcasts are synced with your iPad.
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
2. Select how many episodes of a podcast you want to sync in the pop-up
menu on the left.
3. Choose whether to sync all podcasts or just selected podcasts from the
pop-up menu in the upper-right corner.
4. If you have podcast episodes on playlists, you can include them by
selecting the appropriate check boxes under Include Episodes from
Playlists.
5. Click the Sync or Apply button in the lower-right corner of the window.
Your podcasts are synced.
Regardless of the choices you make in the pop-up menus, you can
always select individual episodes by selecting their check boxes.
iTunes U
To sync educational content from iTunes U, follow these steps:
1. Click the iTunes U tab and select the Sync iTunes U check box to
enable iTunes U syncing.
2. Choose how many items to include using the first pop-up menu.
3. Choose whether you want all collections or only selected collections
from the second pop-up menu.
4. If you want to also include individual items on playlists, select the
appropriate check boxes in the iTunes U Collections and Items sections of the iTunes U pane.
5. Click the Sync or Apply button in the lower-right corner of the window.
Your iTunes U episodes are synced.
Regardless of the choices you make in the pop-up menus, you can
always select individual items by selecting their check boxes.
Books
To sync e-books and audiobooks, follow these steps:
1. Click the Books tab and select the Sync Books check box to enable
book syncing.
Two pop-up menus at the top of the Books section may make it easier to
manage your book collection. The first pop-up lets you see Only Books,
Only PDF files, or both. The second lets you sort your books by either
Title or Author.
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2. Choose All Books or Selected Books by clicking the appropriate radio
button.
3. If you chose Selected Books, select the check boxes of the books you
wish to sync.
4. Scroll down the page a little and select the Sync Audiobooks check
box to enable audiobook syncing.
5. Choose All Audiobooks or Selected Audiobooks.
6. If you chose Selected Audiobooks, select the check boxes of the audiobooks you wish to sync.
If the book is divided into parts, you can select check boxes for the individual parts if you wish.
7. Click the Sync or Apply button in the lower-right corner of the window.
Your books and audiobooks are synced.
Photos
The iPad syncs photos with the following programs:
✓ Mac: iPhoto or Aperture
✓ PC: Adobe Photoshop Elements or Adobe Photoshop Album
You can also sync photos with any folder on your computer that contains
images. To sync photos, follow these steps:
1. Click the Photos tab and select the Sync Photos From check box.
2. Choose an application or folder from the pop-up menu (which says
iPhoto in Figure 3-12).
3. To further refine what photos are synced, you may have any of the following options:
• Select albums, events, and more: If you choose an application that
supports photo albums, events, and/or facial recognition, as we
have in Figure 3-12, by choosing iPhoto, you can automatically
include events by making a selection from the pop-up menu or
select specific albums, events, and/or faces to sync by selecting
them in the areas below.
• Search for photos to sync: If you’re using iPhoto, you can also type a
word or phrase into the Search field (the oval with the magnifying
glass) to search for a specific event(s).
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Part I: Getting to Know Your iPad
• Select a folder of images: If you choose a folder full of images, you
can create subfolders inside it that appear as albums on your iPad.
But if you choose an application that doesn’t support albums or events,
or a single folder full of images with no subfolders, you have to transfer
all or nothing.
Because we selected iPhoto in the Sync Photos From menu, and iPhoto
’09 and ’11 — the two most recent releases — support events and
faces in addition to albums, we also have the option of syncing events,
albums, faces, or all three.
4. Click the Sync or Apply button in the lower-right corner of the window.
Your photos are synced.
Figure 3-12: The Photos pane determines which photos will be synchronized with your iPad.
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Part II
The Internet iPad
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T
In this part . . .
he first thing most people want to do with
their iPad is surf the Internet with the delightfully large and colorful touchscreen. Safari, the
iPad’s Web browser, is the place to start, and
that’s where this part begins as well — with an
introduction to navigating the Web with Safari.
Then we visit the Mail program and see how easy
it is to set up e-mail accounts and to send and
receive real honest-to-goodness e-mail messages
and attachments.
In Chapter 6, we examine a few superb Webenabled applications. In Maps, you determine the
businesses and restaurants you’d like to visit, get
driving directions and the traffic en route, and
take advantage of the iPad’s capability to find you.
And because everyone loves social media, find out
the best ways to use Facebook, Twitter, and
YouTube from your iPad, too.
We love going on a shopping spree as much as the
next guy. Chapter 7 is all about finding out how to
shop in the App Store, an emporium replete with a
gaggle of neat little programs and applications.
Best of all, unlike most of the stores you shop in, a
good number of the items can be had for free.
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4
Going on a Mobile Safari
In This Chapter
▶ Surfing the ’Net
▶ Opening and displaying web pages
▶ Having fun with links, bookmarks, and History lists
▶ Securing Safari
“Y
ou feel like you’re actually holding the web right in the palm of your
hand.”
Marketers use lines like that because, well, that’s what marketers do. Only
when an Apple marketer says such a thing to describe surfing the web on the
iPad, a lot of truth is behind it. The iPad 2’s glorious display, in combination
with the snappy new Apple-designed dual-core A5 chip inside
the machine, makes browsing on Apple’s tablet an absolute
delight. Not that the robust single-core A4 predecessor
chip in the original iPad was any slouch.
In this chapter, you discover the pleasures — and
the few roadblocks — in navigating cyberspace on
your iPad.
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Part II: The Internet iPad
Living on the EDGE
Wi-Fi is the chief way to prowl the virtual corridors of cyberspace (or send e-mail, access the
App Store or iTunes Store, or check out YouTube)
on the iPad. But for all the places you can find
an Internet hotspot nowadays — airports, colleges, coffeehouses, offices, schools, and yes,
homes — Wi-Fi still isn’t available everywhere.
If you buy the Wi-Fi + 3G iPad model, you often
have a viable alternative when Wi-Fi isn’t
available. In the United States, such models
from AT&T work with Wi-Fi, AT&T EDGE, and
AT&T 3G. Verizon’s iPad 3G version works with
Verizon Wireless’ so-called CDMA EV-DO Rev
network. You can safely avoid the jargon. (They
also work with another wireless technology,
Bluetooth, but that serves a different purpose
and is addressed in Chapter 13.)
Cellular customers prepay for 3G access using
a credit card, and monthly data is relatively
inexpensive ($14.99 for 250MB of data or $25
for 2 gigabytes on AT&T; $20 for 1GB on up to
$80 for 10GB on Verizon). Moreover, no one- or
two-year contract commitment is required, as is
most likely the case with the cellphone in your
pocket. That means if you’re hiking in the Swiss
Alps for a month, or otherwise indisposed, you
don’t have to pay AT&T or Verizon for Internet
access you’ll never use.
The iPad automatically hops onto the fastest
available network, which is almost always Wi-Fi,
the friendly moniker applied to the far geekier
802.11 designation. And eight-oh-two-dot-eleven
(as it’s pronounced) is followed by a letter —
typically (but not always) b, g, or n. You see it
written as 802.11b, 802.11g, and so on. The letters
relate to differing technical standards that have
to do with the speed and range you can expect
from the Wi-Fi configuration. But we certainly
wouldn’t have you lose any sleep over this issue
if you haven’t boned up on this geeky alphabet.
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For the record, because the iPad adheres to
802.11a, b, g, and n standards, you’re good to go
pretty much anywhere you can find Wi-Fi. If you
have to present a password to take advantage
of a for-fee hotspot, you can enter it by using the
iPad’s virtual keyboard.
As we pointed out, the problem with Wi-Fi is
that it’s far from ubiquitous, which leads us right
back to the cellular data network, typically 3G
or when not available the pokier EDGE on AT&T
or EV-DO on Verizon, which is their faster 3G
network.
If you’re ever on a million-dollar game show and
have to answer the question, EDGE is shorthand
for Enhanced Datarate for GSM Evolution. It’s
based on the global GSM phone standard. You
may also see an indicator for GPRS, shorthand
for General Packet Radio Service, another poky
data service.
3G, which stands for third generation, is your
best bet among available cellular options for
the iPad as of this writing. Even faster nascent
4G networks being developed by AT&T, Verizon,
and every other major network provider are
incompatible with the iPad; 3G websites typically download two times faster than EDGE, in
our experience, and sometimes faster than that.
But again, Wi-Fi downloads are even zippier.
The bottom line is this: Depending on where you
live, work, or travel, you may feel like you’re teetering on the EDGE in terms of acceptable Internet
coverage, especially if Wi-Fi or true 3G is beyond
your reach. We’ve used the iPad’s cousin, the
iPhone, in areas where web pages load extremely
slowly, not-so-vaguely reminiscent of dialup telephone modems for your computer.
But the picture is brightening. 3G is in more
places than ever. And the same can be said of
Wi-Fi.
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Chapter 4: Going on a Mobile Safari
65
Surfin’ Dude
A version of the Apple Safari web browser is a major reason that the ’Net on
the iPad is very much like the ’Net you’ve come to expect on a more traditional computer. Come to think of it, the ’Net often looks a lot better on the
iPad thanks to its beautiful screen. Safari for the Mac and for Windows is
one of the very best web browsers in the business. In our view, Safari on the
iPhone has no rival as a cellphone browser. As you might imagine, Safari on
the iPad is equally appealing.
Moreover, with the iOS 4.3 software upgrade, Apple revved-up Safari’s performance with what the company refers to as a Nitro JavaScript engine. Even
a consumer-friendly company like Apple can’t help but rely on geeky terms
every now and then.
Exploring the browser
We start our cyber expedition with a quick tour of the Safari browser. Take a
gander at Figure 4-1: Not all browser controls found on a Mac or PC are present. Still, Safari on the iPad has a familiar look and feel. We describe these
controls and others throughout this chapter.
Before plunging in, we recommend a little detour. Read the “Living on the
EDGE” sidebar, earlier in this chapter, to find out more about the wireless
networks that enable you to surf the web on the iPad in the first place.
Blasting off into cyberspace
Surfing the web begins with a web address, of course. When you start by tapping the address field in iPad’s Safari, the virtual keyboard appears. Here are
a few tips for using the keyboard in Safari (and see Chapter 2 for more help
with using the virtual keyboard):
✓ Because so many web addresses end with the suffix .com (pronounced
dot com), the virtual keyboard has a dedicated .com key. For other
common web suffixes — .edu, .net, .org, .us, .ro, .eu — press
and hold the .com key and choose the relevant domain type.
✓ Of equal importance, both the period (.) and the slash (/) are on the
virtual keyboard because you frequently use them when you enter web
addresses.
✓ The moment you tap a letter, you see a list of web addresses that match
those letters. For example, if you tap the letter E (as we did in the example
shown in Figure 4-2), you see web listings for ESPN, eBay, and others.
Tapping U or H instead may display listings for USA TODAY or the Houston
Chronicle (shameless plugs for the newspapers where we’re columnists).
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Part II: The Internet iPad
Previous
Next Page
Address field
New Page
Bookmarks
Go To...
Search Google,
Bing, or Yahoo!
Reoload Web Page
Figure 4-1: The iPad’s Safari browser.
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67
Figure 4-2: Web pages that match your search letter.
The iPad has two ways to determine websites to suggest when you tap certain letters:
✓ Bookmarks: One method is the websites you already bookmarked from
the Safari or Internet Explorer browsers on your computer (and synchronized, as we describe in Chapter 3). More on bookmarks later in
this chapter.
✓ History: The second method iPad uses when suggesting websites when
you tap a particular letter is to suggest sites from the History list —
those cyber destinations where you recently hung your hat. Because history repeats itself, we also tackle that topic later in this chapter.
You might as well open your first web page now — and it’s a full HTML page,
to borrow from techie lingo:
1. Tap the Safari icon docked at the bottom of the Home screen.
It’s another member of the Fantastic Four (along with Mail, Photos, and
iPod). Chapter 1 introduces the Home screen.
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2. Tap the address field (refer to Figure 4-1).
3. Begin typing the web address, or URL, on the virtual keyboard that
slides up from the bottom of the screen.
4. Do one of the following:
a. To accept one of the bookmarked (or other) sites that show up on the
list, merely tap the name.
Safari automatically fills in the URL in the address field and takes
you where you want to go.
b. Keep tapping the proper keyboard characters until you enter the complete web address for the site you have in mind and then tap the Go
key on the right side of the keyboard.
You don’t need to type www at the beginning of a URL. So, if you
want to visit www.theonion.com (for example), typing theonion.
com is sufficient to transport you to the humor site. For that
matter, Safari can take you this site even if you type theonion without the .com.
Because Safari on the iPad runs a variation of the iPhone mobile operating
system, every so often you may run into a site that serves up the light, or
mobile, version of a website, sometimes known as a WAP site. Graphics may be
stripped down on these sites. Alas, the producers of these sites may be unwittingly discriminating against you for dropping in on them by using an iPad. In
fact, you may be provided a choice of which site you want — the light or the
full version. Bravo! If not, you have our permission to berate these site producers with letters, e-mails, and phone calls until they get with the program.
I Can See Clearly Now
If you know how to open a web page (if you don’t, read the preceding section
in this chapter), we can show you how radically simple it is to zoom in on
pages so that you can read what you want to read and see what you want to
see, without enlisting a magnifying glass.
Try these neat tricks:
✓ Double-tap the screen so that portion of the text fills the entire screen.
It takes just a second before the screen comes into focus. By way of
example, check out Figure 4-3, which shows two views of the same
Sports Illustrated web page. In the first view, you see what the page looks
like when you first open it. In the second one, you see how the picture
takes over much more of the screen after you double-tap it. The area of
the screen you double-tapped is the area that swells up. To return to the
first view, double-tap the screen again.
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69
Figure 4-3: Doing a double-tap dance zooms in and out.
✓ Pinch the page. Sliding your thumb and index finger together and then
spreading them apart (or as we like to say, unpinching) also zooms in
and out of a page. Again, wait just a moment for the screen to come into
focus.
✓ Press down on a page and drag it in all directions, or flick through a
page from top to bottom. You’re panning and scrolling, baby.
✓ Rotate the iPad to its side. Watch what happens to the White House
website, as shown in Figure 4-4; it reorients from portrait to a widescreen landscape view. The keyboard (not shown in the image) is also
wider, making it a little easier to enter a new URL. This little magic won’t
happen if you set the Rotate Lock described in Chapter 1.
Opening multiple web pages at a time
When we surf the web on a Mac or PC, we rarely go to a single web page and
call it a day. In fact, we often have multiple web pages open at the same time.
Sometimes, we choose to hop around the web without closing the pages we
visit. Sometimes, a link (see the next section) automatically opens a new page
without shuttering the old one. (If these additional pages are advertisements,
this isn’t always welcome.)
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Part II: The Internet iPad
Figure 4-4: Going wide.
Safari on the iPad lets you open up to nine pages simultaneously. After you
have one page open, here’s how to open additional web pages in Safari:
1. Tap the New Page icon (refer to Figure 4-1) on the left side of the navigation bar at the top of the screen.
You see a tic-tac-toe grid with thumbnails of recently opened sites or
pages, similar to Figure 4-5.
2. Tap the page you want to view or tap New Page to open a fresh page.
If you tap New Page, you need to tap the address field and type a URL for
your new page.
To close one of your open web pages, tap the white X inside the black circle,
which appears in the upper-left corner of each web page thumbnail.
Looking at lovable links
Surfing the web would be a real drag if you had to enter a URL every time
you want to navigate from one page to another. That’s why bookmarks are so
useful, and, it’s why handy links are welcome, too. Because Safari functions
on the iPad the same way browsers work on your Mac or PC, links on the
device behave much the same way, too.
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Chapter 4: Going on a Mobile Safari
71
Figure 4-5: All open for business.
Text links that transport you from one site to another are typically underlined or shown in blue or bold type, or merely as items in a list. Tap the link
to go directly to that site or page.
Tapping other links leads to different outcomes:
✓ Open a map: Tapping a map launches the Google Maps application that
is, um, addressed in Chapter 6.
✓ Prepare an e-mail: Tap an e-mail address, and the iPad opens the Mail
program (see Chapter 5) and prepopulates the To field with that address.
The virtual keyboard is also summoned so that you can add other e-mail
addresses and compose a subject line and message. This shortcut
doesn’t always work when an e-mail address appears on a web page.
To see the URL for a link, press your finger against the link and keep it there.
Use this method also to determine whether a picture has a link.
Not every web link cooperates with the iPad. As this book goes to press, the
iPad doesn’t support some common web standards — most notably, Adobe
Flash video. It’s a void that we hope is addressed in the future because Flash
is the backbone for video and animations across cyberspace. We’re not holding our breath. But all is not lost, even with the absence of Flash. Apple does
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support an emerging standard for audio and video — HTML5, among others.
In the meantime, if you see an incompatible link, nothing may happen — or a
message may appear, asking you to install a plug-in.
News flash about Flash: You may be able to open Flash videos on the iPad
through a couple of workarounds. Skyfire Labs sells a $4.99 iPad app that
can support Flash on many sites. But Skyfire’s alternative browser is limited
to videos; it does not support Flash games or animations. Meanwhile, the
free-to-try iSwifter app from YouWeb promises to address this shortcoming.
So along with video, iSwifter’s browser can deliver Flash games. You’ll be
encouraged to pay 99 cents for the iSwifter browser.
Book(mark) ’em, Dano
You already know how useful bookmarks are and how you can synchronize
bookmarks from the browsers on your computer. It’s equally simple to bookmark a web page directly on the iPad:
1. Make sure that the page you want to bookmark is open and then tap
the Add Bookmark icon at the top of the screen.
The Add Bookmark icon looks like an arrow trying to escape a rectangle
and is labeled in Figure 4-1.
You have the opportunity to tap Add Bookmark, Add to Home Screen, or
Mail Link to This Page or Print.
2. Tap Add Bookmark, among the options mentioned in the previous
step.
A new window opens with a default name for the bookmark, its web
address, and its folder location.
3. To accept the default bookmark name and default bookmark folder,
tap Save.
4. To change the default bookmark name, tap the X in the circle next to
the name, enter the new title (using the virtual keyboard), and then
tap Save.
5. To change the location where the bookmark is saved, tap the > symbol
in the Bookmarks field, tap the folder where you want the bookmark
to be kept, tap the Add Bookmark button in the upper-left corner of
the screen, and then tap Save.
To open a bookmarked page after you set it up, tap the Bookmarks icon in
the upper-left portion of the screen (refer to Figure 4-1) and then tap the
appropriate bookmark.
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If the bookmark you have in mind is buried inside a folder, tap the folder
name first and then tap the bookmark you want.
If you tapped Add to Home Screen rather than Add Bookmark in Step 1 of the
preceding set of steps, your iPad adds an icon to your Home screen to let you
quickly access the site, a topic we discuss in detail in the section “Clipping a
web page,” later in this chapter. If you tapped Mail Link to This Page instead,
the Mail program opens, with a link for the page in the message and the name
of the site in the subject line.
Altering bookmarks
If a bookmarked site is no longer meaningful, you can change it or get rid of it:
✓ To remove a bookmark (or folder), tap the Bookmarks icon and then
tap Edit. Tap the red circle next to the bookmark you want to toss off
the list, and then tap Delete.
✓ To change a bookmark name or location, tap Edit and then tap the
bookmark. The Edit Bookmark screen appears, showing the name, URL,
and location of the bookmark already filled in. Tap the fields you want to
change. In the Name field, tap the X in the gray circle and then use the
keyboard to enter a new title. In the Location field, tap the > symbol and
scroll up or down the list until you find a new home for your bookmark.
✓ To create a new folder for your bookmarks, tap Edit and then tap the
New Folder button. Enter the name of the new folder and choose where
to put it.
✓ To move a bookmark up or down in a list, tap Edit and then drag the
three bars to the right of the bookmark’s name to its new resting place.
You can constantly display a Bookmarks bar in Safari by turning on the
Always Show Bookmarks Bar setting in Settings. Tap Safari in Settings to display this option. As with many other settings, make sure that the blue On setting is shown rather than the gray Off setting. For more on Settings, head to
Chapter 13.
Printing a web page
If you come to a web page that you want to print, tap the icon at the top of
the screen that looks like an arrow trying to escape a rectangle. Tap Print
from the menu that appears. You need a compatible AirPrint printer, as we
touch upon in Chapter 2.
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Clipping a web page
You frequent lots of websites, but some way more than others. You’re constantly online to consult your daily train schedule, for example. In their
infinite wisdom, the folks at Apple let you bestow special privileges on frequently visited sites, not just by bookmarking pages but by affording them
their unique Home screen icons. Apple calls these Web Clips, and creating
one is dead simple:
1. Open the web page in question and tap the Add Bookmarks icon.
2. Tap Add to Home Screen.
Apple creates an icon out of the area of the page that was displayed
when you saved the clip, unless the page has its own custom icon.
3. Type a new name for your Web Clip or leave the one that Apple
suggests.
4. Tap Add.
The icon appears on your Home screen.
As with any icon, you can remove a Web Clip by pressing and holding its icon
until it starts to wiggle. Then tap the X in the corner of the icon and tap
Delete. The operation is completed when you press the Home button.
Letting history repeat itself
Sometimes, you want to revisit a site that you failed to bookmark, but you
can’t remember the darn destination or what led you there in the first place.
Good thing you can study the history books.
Safari records the pages you visit and keeps the logs on hand for several
days. Here’s how to access your history:
1. Tap the Bookmarks icon and then tap History.
The History option is at the top of the Bookmarks list.
2. Tap the day you think you hung out at the site.
3. When you find it, tap the listing.
You’re about to make your triumphant return.
To clear your history so that nobody else can trace your steps — and just
what is it you’re hiding? — tap Clear History at the upper-right corner of the
History list. Alternatively, tap Settings on the Home screen, tap Safari, and
then tap Clear History. In both instances, per usual, you have a chance to
back out without wiping the slate clean.
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Launching a mobile search mission
Most people spend a lot of time using search engines on the Internet. And,
the search engines we summon most often are Google, Yahoo!, or Microsoft’s
Bing. So it goes on the iPad.
Although you can certainly use the virtual keyboard to type google.com,
yahoo.com, or bing.com in the Safari address field, Apple doesn’t require
that tedious effort. Instead, you tap into Google, Yahoo!, or Bing by using the
dedicated search box shown in Figure 4-6. The default search engine on the
iPad is Google.
Figure 4-6: Conducting a Google search about iPads on the iPad.
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To conduct a web search on the topic of the iPad, follow these steps:
1. Tap the search field shown earlier, in Figure 4-1.
A funny thing happens. The search field expands (as if Google, Yahoo!,
or Bing expected you to enter more text than could fit in the field initially). At the same time, the address bar gets smaller and your everobedient virtual keyboard slides up from the bottom. In Chapter 2, we
explain how the keyboard adapts to what you’re doing. The one that
shows up now has a Search key.
2. Enter your search term or phrase, and then tap the Search key to generate pages of results.
3. Tap any search result that looks promising.
An iOS upgrade brought the ability to find a search word or phrase on the
very web page you have opened onscreen. Just enter a search term in the
search field as before. At the bottom of the search results list, tap On This
Page (refer to Figure 4-6). You may have to scroll down the list to see On This
Page. The first occurrence of your search term is highlighted. Tap the Next
button at the bottom-left corner of the screen to find the next match. Tap
Next again for the match after that, and so on.
To switch the search box from Google to Yahoo! to Bing or whatever is your
preference, tap Settings on the Home screen, scroll down and tap Safari,
tap Search Engine, and then tap to prioritize one search behemoth over the
other.
Saving web pictures
You can capture most pictures you come across on a website — but be mindful of any potential copyright violations, depending on what you plan to do
with the images. To copy an image from a website, follow these steps:
1. Press your finger against the image.
2. Tap the Save Image button that appears, as shown in Figure 4-7 (or tap
Copy, depending on what you want to do with the image):
• Saved images end up in your Photos library, from which they can
be synced back to a computer.
• If you tap Copy instead, you can paste the image into an e-mail or
as a link in a program, such as Notes.
In some cases, typically advertisements, you also see an Open button or
an Open in New Page button, which takes you to the ad image.
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Figure 4-7: Hold your finger against a picture in
Safari to save it to the iPad.
Smart Safari Settings
Along with the riches galore found on the Internet are places in cyberspace
where you’re hassled. You might want to take pains to protect your privacy
and maintain your security.
To get started, tap the Settings icon on the Home screen and then tap Safari.
The following settings enable you to tell your iPad what you want to be private and how you want to set your security options:
✓ Fill out forms with AutoFill: When AutoFill is turned on, Safari can automatically fill out web forms by using your personal contact information,
usernames and passwords, or information from other contacts in your
address book. But turning on AutoFill could also compromise your security if someone gets hold of your computer.
✓ Fraud Warning: Safari can warn you when you land on a site whose
producers have sinister intentions. The protection is better than nothing
but don’t give up your guard. The Fraud Warning isn’t foolproof. The setting is on by default.
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✓ Turn JavaScript on or off: Programmers use JavaScript to add various
kinds of functionality to web pages, from displaying the date and time to
changing images when you mouse over them. However, some security
risks have also been associated with JavaScript. If you do turn it off,
though, some things might not work as you expect.
✓ Block pop-ups: Pop-ups are those web pages that appear whether you
want them to or not. Often, they’re annoying advertisements. But at
some sites, you welcome the appearance of pop-ups, so remember to
turn off blocking under such circumstances.
✓ Accept cookies: We’re not talking about crumbs you may have accidentally dropped on the iPad. Cookies are tiny bits of information that
a website places on the iPad when you visit so that the site recognizes
you when you return. You need not assume the worst; most cookies are
benign.
If this concept wigs you out, you can take action: Tap Accept Cookies
and then tap Never. Theoretically, you will never again receive cookies
on the iPad. A good middle ground is to accept cookies only from the
sites you visit. To do so, tap From Visited. You can also tap Always to
accept cookies from all sites.
If you set the iPad so that it doesn’t accept cookies, certain web pages
won’t load properly.
Tap Safari to return to the main Safari Settings page.
✓ Clear the cache: The cache stores content from some web pages so that
they load faster the next time you stop by. Tap Clear Cache and then tap
Clear Cache again on the next screen to (you guessed it) clear the cache.
✓ Developer tool: Unless you happen to be a developer, we don’t ask you
to pay much attention to this setting. It lets you turn a debug console
(showing errors, warnings, tips, logs, and similar details that developers
find useful) on or off.
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5
The E-Mail Must Get Through
In This Chapter
▶ Setting up your accounts
▶ Reading and managing e-mail messages
▶ Searching for e-mail messages
▶ Sending e-mail messages
▶ Setting e-mail preferences
O
n any computing device, e-mails come and go with a variety of emotions. Messages may be amusing or sad, frivolous or serious. Electronic
missives on the iPad are almost always touching.
The reason, of course, is that you’re touching the display to compose
and read messages. Okay, so we’re having a little fun with the
language. But the truth is, the built-in Mail application on the
iPad is a modern program designed not only to send and
receive text e-mail messages, but also to handle rich
HTML e-mail messages — formatted with font and type
styles and embedded graphics. If someone sends you
mail with a picture, it’s quite likely (depending on
the sender’s e-mail capabilities) that the picture is
visible right in the body of the message.
Furthermore, your iPad can read several types of
file attachments, including (but not limited to) PDFs,
JPG images, Microsoft Word documents, PowerPoint
slides, and Excel spreadsheets, as well as stuff produced through Apple’s own iWork software. Better still,
all this sending and receiving of text, graphics, and documents can happen in the background so that you can surf the
web or play a game while your iPad quietly and efficiently handles
your e-mail behind the scenes.
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Prep Work: Setting Up Your Accounts
First things first. To use Mail, you need an e-mail address. If you have broadband Internet access (that is, a cable modem, FIOS, or DSL), you probably
received one or more e-mail addresses when you signed up. If you’re one of
the handful of readers who doesn’t already have an e-mail account, you can
get one for free from Yahoo! (http://mail.yahoo.com), Google (http://
mail.google.com), AOL (http://www.aol.com), or numerous other service providers.
Many (if not all) free e-mail providers add a small bit of advertising at the end
of your outgoing messages. If you’d rather not be a billboard for your e-mail
provider, either use the address(es) that came with your broadband Internet
access (yourname@comcast.net or yourname@att.net, for example) or pay a
few dollars a month for a premium e-mail account that doesn’t tack advertising (or anything else) onto your messages. You can get a me.com e-mail
account as part of Apple’s $99-a-year MobileMe service.
Set up your account the easy way
Chapter 3 explains the option of automatically syncing the e-mail accounts
on your Mac or Windows PC with your iPad. If you chose that option, your
e-mail accounts should be configured on your iPad already. You may proceed
directly to the later section “Darling, You Send Me (E-Mail).”
If you haven’t yet chosen that option but want to set up your account the
easy way now, go to Chapter 3 and read that section, sync your iPad, and
then you, too, can proceed directly to the section “Darling, You Send Me
(E-Mail),” later in this chapter.
Set up your account the less easy way
If you don’t want to sync the e-mail accounts on your Mac or PC, you can set
up an e-mail account on your iPad manually. It’s not quite as easy as clicking
a box and syncing your iPad, but it’s not rocket science either. Here’s how
you get started:
✓ If you have no e-mail accounts on your iPad, the first time you launch
Mail, you see the Welcome to Mail screen, as shown in Figure 5-1. Your
choices are Microsoft Exchange (business e-mail), MobileMe, Gmail,
Yahoo! Mail, AOL, and Other.
Merely tap the account type you want to add to the iPad and follow the
steps in the section “Setting up an e-mail account with Yahoo!, Google,
AOL, or MobileMe,” “Setting up an account with another provider,” or
“Setting up corporate e-mail,” later in this chapter.
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✓ If you have one or more e-mail accounts on your iPad already and
want to add a new account manually, tap Settings on the Home screen
and then tap Mail, Contacts, Calendars➪Add Account.
You see an Add Account screen with the same account options that are
shown on the Welcome to Mail screen. Proceed to one of the next three
sections, depending on the type of e-mail account you selected.
Figure 5-1: Tap a button to set up an account.
Setting up an e-mail account with Yahoo!, Google, AOL, or MobileMe
If your account is with Yahoo!, Google (Gmail), AOL, or Apple’s MobileMe service, follow these steps:
1. Tap the appropriate button on the Add Account screen. (Refer to
Figure 5-1.)
2. Enter your name, e-mail address, and password, as shown in Figure 5-2.
You can describe this account (such as Work or Personal), but the field
tends to fill in automatically with the same contents in the Address field
unless you tell it differently.
3. Tap the Next button in the upper-right corner of the screen.
You’re finished. That’s all there is to setting up your account.
Setting up an account with another provider
If your e-mail account is with a provider other than Yahoo!, Google, AOL, or
MobileMe, you have a bit more work ahead of you. You’re going to need a
bunch of information about your e-mail account that you may not know or
have handy.
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Figure 5-2: Just fill ’em in and tap Next and you’re ready to rock.
We suggest that you scan the following instructions, note the items you don’t
know, and go find the answers before you continue. To find the answers,
look at the documentation you received when you signed up for your e-mail
account or visit the account provider’s website and search there.
Here’s how you set up an account:
1. Starting at the Home screen, tap Settings➪Mail, Contacts, Calendars➪
Add Account➪Other.
2. Under Mail, tap Add Mail Account.
3. Fill in the name, address, password, and description in the appropriate fields, and then tap Next.
With any luck, that’s all you’ll have to do. The iPad will look up and
hopefully be able to retrieve your account credentials. If not, continue
with Step 4.
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4. Tap the button at the top of the screen that denotes the type of e-mail
server this account uses: IMAP or POP, as shown in Figure 5-3.
Figure 5-3: If you’re not a Yahoo!, Google, AOL, or MobileMe user,
you may have a few more fields to fill in before you can rock.
5. Fill in the Internet hostname for your incoming mail server, which
looks something like mail.providername.com.
6. Fill in your username and password.
7. Enter the Internet hostname for your outgoing mail server, which
looks something like smtp.providername.com.
8. Enter your username and password in the appropriate fields.
9. Tap the Next button in the upper-right corner to create the account.
Some outgoing mail servers don’t need your username and password. The
fields for these items on your iPad note that they’re optional. Still, we suggest that you fill them in anyway. It saves you from having to add them later
if your outgoing mail server does require an account name and password,
which many do these days.
Setting up corporate e-mail
The iPad makes nice with the Microsoft Exchange servers that are a staple in
large enterprises, as well as many smaller businesses.
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What’s more, if your company supports Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync, you
can exploit push e-mail so that messages arrive pronto on the iPad, just as they
do on your other computers. (To keep everything up to date, the iPad also supports push calendars and push contacts.) For push to work with an Exchange
Server — at press time anyway — your company must be simpatico with
Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync 2003 (Service Pack 2) or 2007 (Service Pack 1).
Ask your company’s IT or tech department if you run into an issue.
Setting up Exchange e-mail isn’t particularly taxing, and the iPad connects to
Exchange right out of the box. You still might have to consult your employer’s
techie-types for certain settings.
Start setting up your corporate e-mail on your iPad by following these steps:
1. Tap the Microsoft Exchange icon on the Add Account screen. (Refer to
Figure 5-1.)
2. Fill in what you can: your e-mail address, domain, username (sometimes domain\user), and password. Or, call on your IT staff for assistance. Tap Next when you’re done.
3. On the next screen, as shown in Figure 5-4, enter the Server address,
assuming that the Microsoft Autodiscover service didn’t already find
it. Tap Next when you’re done.
That server address may begin with exchange.company.com.
Figure 5-4: You’re on your way to a corporate e-mail account.
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4. Choose which information you want to synchronize through Exchange
by tapping each item you want.
You can choose Mail, Contacts, and Calendars. After you choose an
item, you see the blue On button next to it, as shown in Figure 5-5.
5. Tap Save.
Figure 5-5: Keeping your mail, contacts, and calendars in sync.
The company you work for doesn’t want just anybody having access to your
e-mail — heaven forbid if your iPad is lost or stolen. So your bosses may
insist that you change the passcode lock inside Settings on your iPad. (This is
different from the password for your e-mail account.) Skip over to Chapter 13
to find instructions for adding or changing a passcode. (We’ll wait for you.)
And, if your iPad ends up in the wrong hands, your company can remotely
wipe the contents clean.
By default, the iPad keeps e-mail synchronized for three days. To sync for a
longer period, head to Settings and tap Mail, Contacts, Calendars and then
tap the Mail account using ActiveSync. Tap Mail Days to Sync and tap No
Limit or pick another time frame (1 day, 1 week, 2 weeks, or 1 month).
If you’re moonlighting at a second job, you can now configure more than one
Exchange ActiveSync account on your iPad; there used to be a limit of just
one such account per device.
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See Me, Read Me, File Me, Delete Me:
Working with Messages
Now that your e-mail accounts are all set up, it’s time to figure out how to
receive and read the stuff. Fortunately, you’ve already done most of the
heavy lifting when you set up your e-mail accounts. Getting and reading your
mail is a piece of cake.
Your first clue that there’s unread mail comes when you look at the Mail icon
at the bottom of the Home screen. The cumulative number of unread messages appears in a little red circle in the upper-right area of the icon.
In the following sections, you find out how to read messages and attached
files and send messages to the Trash or maybe a folder when you’re done
reading them. Or, if you can’t a find a message, check out the section on
searching your e-mail messages. You can read your e-mail just like you can
on a desktop or notebook computer; the way you do so just works a little differently on the iPad’s touchscreen.
Reading messages
To read your mail, tap the Mail icon on the Home screen. Remember that
what appears on the screen depends on whether you’re holding the iPad in
landscape or portrait mode, and what was on the screen the last time you
opened the Mail application.
✓ Landscape: Held in landscape mode, you see All Inboxes at the top of
the Inboxes section (see Figure 5-6), which as its name suggests, is a
repository for all the messages across all your accounts. The number
to the right of All Inboxes matches the number on the Mail icon on your
Home page. Again, it’s the cumulative tally of unread messages across
all your accounts.
Depending on the last time the Mail application was open, you may alternatively see previews of the actual messages in your inbox in the left
panel mentioned previously. Previews show the name of the sender, the
subject header, and the first two lines of the message. (In Settings, you
can change the number of lines shown in the preview from one line to
five. Or, you can show no preview lines.)
✓ Portrait: When you hold the iPad in portrait mode, the last incoming
message fills the entire screen. Figure 5-7 shows this view. You have to
tap an Inbox button (in the upper-left corner of the screen) to summon
a panel that shows other accounts or message previews. These overlay
the message that otherwise fills the screen.
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Compose New Message
Reply, Forward, or Print
Tap to see All Inboxes
or individual accounts
Trash Message
Move Message
Check for new messages
Figure 5-6: When holding the iPad sideways, Mail looks something like this.
Below the All Inboxes listing are the inboxes for your individual accounts.
The tally this time is only for the unread messages in those accounts. If you
tap the listings here, you see any subfolders for each individual account
(Drafts, Sent Mail, Trash, and so on). Messages display in threads, or conversations, making them easy to follow. Of course, you can still view accounts
individually. Follow these steps to read your e-mail:
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Figure 5-7: When holding the iPad in portrait mode, the message
fills the screen.
1. If the e-mail mailbox you want to see isn’t front and center, tap the
Mailboxes button in the upper-left corner of the screen to summon the
appropriate one.
Again, this button may say Inbox or some other folder name, and it
may say the name of the e-mail account that is currently open. Within
an e-mail account, you can see the number of unread messages in each
mailbox.
2. (Optional) Tap the Check for New Messages icon (refer to Figure 5-6)
to summon new messages.
3. Tap one of the inboxes or accounts to check for any new messages
within those mailboxes. To summon the unified inbox, tap All Inboxes
instead.
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If a blue dot appears next to a message, the message hasn’t been read.
When you open a mailbox by tapping it, the iPad displays the number of
“recent” messages that you specify in Settings — 50 by default, though
you can display up to 200. To see more than the number you specified,
tap Load Additional Messages.
4. Tap a message to read it.
When a message is on the screen, the buttons for managing incoming
messages appear at the top, most of which you’re already familiar with.
If you’re holding the iPad in portrait mode, you see up/down arrows that
correspond to the next or previous message (see Figure 5-7).
5. In landscape mode (and from within an account), tap a preview listing
to the left of a message to read the next or previous message or any
other visible message on the list. Scroll up or down to find other messages you may want to read.
A number next to one of the previews indicates the number of related messages in a thread.
Under a thread, only the first message of the conversation displays in the
inbox. Tap that message to reveal the entire back and forth. You can turn
off message threading by choosing Settings➪Mail, Contacts, Calendars.
Then tap Organize by Thread to toggle the setting on or off, depending on
your preference.
Managing messages
Managing messages typically involves either moving the messages to a folder
or deleting them. To herd your messages into folders, you have the following
options:
✓ To create a folder to organize messages you want to keep, manage
your mail account on your Mac or PC. You can’t create a Mail folder on
the iPad.
✓ To file a message in another folder, tap the File Message icon. When the
list of folders appears, tap the folder where you want to file the message.
✓ To move messages to another folder in bulk, tap Edit. In both portrait and landscape, Edit appears at the top of your inbox or another
mailbox when those mail folders are selected. After tapping Edit, it
becomes a Cancel button and Delete (in red) and Move (in blue) buttons appear at the bottom of the screen. Tap the circle to the left of
each message you want to move so that a check mark appears. Tap
Move (see Figure 5-8) and then tap the new folder in which you want
those messages to hang out.
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✓ To read a message that you’ve filed away, tap the folder where the
message now resides, and then tap the header or preview for the message in question.
✓ To print a message, tap the Reply, Forward, Print button (see Figure 5-8)
and then tap Print.
Figure 5-8: Wiping out or moving messages, en masse.
Delete a message by tapping the Delete Message icon. You have a chance to
cancel in case you tap the Delete Message icon by mistake. You can delete
e-mail messages without opening them in two ways:
✓ Swipe left or right across the message in its preview pane, and then tap
the red Delete button that appears to the right of the message.
✓ Tap the Edit button and then tap the little circle to the left of each message you want to remove. Tapping that circle puts a check mark in it and
brightens the red Delete button at the bottom of the screen. Tap that
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Delete button to erase all messages you checked off, as shown in Figure
5-8. Deleted messages are moved to the Trash folder. (On some e-mail
accounts — Gmail, for example — you can to turn on an Archive setting
in Settings. If you do go with the Archive option, the red Delete button
appears as an Archive button instead and messages are not be deposited in the Trash but rather archived.)
Searching e-mails
With Spotlight search, you can easily search through a bunch of messages to
find the one you want to read fast — such as that can’t-miss stock tip from
your broker. You can type stock or whichever search term seems relevant
in the search box at the top of a mailbox preview pane. All matching e-mails
that have already been downloaded appear. When you tap the search box in
Mail, tabs appear that let you narrow the search to the From, To, or Subject
fields. It’s too bad that (at press time, anyway) you can’t run a search to find
words within the body of an e-mail message.
If you’re using Exchange, MobileMe, or certain IMAP-type e-mail accounts,
you may even be able to search messages that are stored out on the server.
When available, tap Continue Search on Server.
Don’t grow too attached to attachments
Your iPad can even receive e-mail messages with attachments in a wide variety of popular file formats. Which file formats (see sidebar) does the iPad
support? Glad you asked:
✓ Images: .jpg, .tiff, .gif, .png
✓ Microsoft Word: .doc, .docx
✓ Microsoft PowerPoint: .ppt, .pptx
✓ Microsoft Excel: .xls, .xlsx
✓ Web pages: .htm, .html
✓ Apple Keynote: .key
✓ Apple Numbers: .numbers
✓ Apple Pages: .pages
✓ Preview and Adobe Acrobat: .pdf
✓ Rich Text: .rtf
✓ Text: .txt
✓ Contact information: .vcf
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Keeping files in order
In very simple terms, computers of any type,
including tablets like the iPad, and the software
that runs on such machines, have to have some
way to recognize and appropriately act upon
the files that run on the system. Long ago the
bright minds in technology cooked up standard
ways to organize the layout of data so that files
that serve a particular purpose adhere to a similar structure. You recognize such files by their
extensions, the three or four letter suffix that
is separated by a dot or period after its name.
Needless to say there are many more file formats than most folks will ever need to become
familiar with. But you, or more precisely the
hardware and software you are working with,
will encounter some popular file types over
and over, including such formats as .doc for
Microsoft Word documents and .jpg for
images. If you ever encounter files on any computer you are using that don’t seem to open up
or respond, it’s likely because you don’t have
the software on the machine to recognize such
files. The good news is that the iPad supports
most of the common file types it encounters. But
not quite everything.
If the attachment is a file format that the iPad doesn’t support (for example, a
Photoshop .psd file), you see the name of the file but you can’t open it on
your iPad.
Here’s how to read an attachment:
1. Open the mail message that contains the attachment.
2. Tap the attachment (it appears at the bottom of the message, so you
probably need to scroll down to see it).
The attachment downloads to your iPad and opens automatically.
3. Read the attachment.
4. Tap the document you’re reading (in the case of a document) and tap
Done to return to the message text.
Or, you can (again, for a document) open the Pages word processor if
you have purchased that application for your iPad. See Chapter 12 for
more on Pages.
You can open an attachment from a different app than may have otherwise
been summoned to duty. Just touch and hold the attachment in the e-mail,
and then tap the app from the options that present themselves. For example,
you might open a Word document with Apple’s Pages word processor if that
optional app resides on your iPad.
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More things you can do with messages
Wait! You can do even more with your incoming e-mail messages:
✓ To see all recipients of a message, tap Details (displayed in blue) to the
right of the sender’s name.
If all recipients are displayed, the word in blue is Hide rather than
Details; tap it to hide all names except the sender’s.
✓ To add an e-mail recipient or sender to your contacts, tap the name
or e-mail address at the top of the message, and then tap Create New
Contact or Add to Existing Contact.
✓ To mark a message as unread, tap Mark as Unread, which appears in
the subject line of an open message. When you do, the message is again
included in the unread message count on the Mail icon on your Home
screen, and its mailbox again has a blue dot next to it in the message list
for that mailbox.
✓ To zoom in and out of a message, use the pinch and unpinch gestures,
at which we suspect you now excel at. See Chapter 2 if you need help
with your touchscreen moves.
✓ To follow a link in a message, tap the link. Links typically display in
blue but sometimes other colors and sometimes underlined. If the link
is a URL, Safari opens and displays the web page. If the link is a phone
number, the iPad gives you the chance to add it to your contacts. If the
link is a map, Maps opens and displays the location. And, last but not
least, if the link is an e-mail address, a new preaddressed blank e-mail
message is created.
If the link opens Safari, Contacts, or Maps and you want to return to
your e-mail, press the Home button on the front of your iPad and then
tap the Mail icon. Or double-press Home and select it from the gallery of
running apps.
Darling, You Send Me (E-Mail)
Sending e-mail on your iPad is a breeze. You’ll encounter several subspecies of messages: pure text, text with a photo, a partially finished message
(a draft) that you want to save and complete later, or a reply to an incoming
message. You can also forward an incoming message to someone else — and
in some instances print messages. The following sections examine these message types, one at a time.
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Sending an all-text message
To compose a new e-mail message, tap Mail on the Home screen. Once again,
what you see next depends on how you’re holding your iPad. In landscape
mode, your e-mail accounts or e-mail folders are listed in a panel along the
left side of screen, with the actual message filling the larger window on the
right.
Now, to create a new message, follow these steps:
1. Tap the Compose New Message button (refer to Figure 5-6).
The New Message screen like the one shown in Figure 5-9 appears.
Figure 5-9: The New Message screen appears, ready for you
to start typing the recipient’s name.
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2. Type the names or e-mail addresses of the recipients in the To field, or
tap the + button to the right of the To field to choose a contact(s) from
your iPad’s contacts list.
3. (Optional) Tap the field labeled Cc/Bcc, From.
Doing so breaks the field into separate Cc, Bcc, and From fields.
The Cc/Bcc label stands for carbon copy/blind carbon copy. Carbon copy
(a throwback term from another era) is kind of an FYI to a recipient. It’s
like saying, “We figure you’d appreciate knowing this, but you don’t
need to respond.”
When using Bcc, you can include a recipient on the message but other
recipients can’t see that this recipient has been included. It’s great for
those secret agent e-mails! Tap the respective Cc or Bcc field to type
names. Or, tap the + symbol that appears in those fields to add a contact.
4. (Optional) If you tap From, you can choose to send the message from
any of your e-mail accounts on the fly, assuming, of course, that you
have more than one account set up on the iPad.
If you start typing an e-mail address, e-mail addresses that match what
you typed appear in a list below the To or Cc field. If the correct one is
in the list, tap it to use it.
5. Type a subject in the Subject field.
The subject is optional, but it’s considered poor form to send an e-mail
message without one.
6. Type your message in the message area.
The message area is immediately below the Subject field. You have
ample space to get your message across.
7. Tap the Send button in the upper-right corner of the screen.
Your message wings its way to its recipients almost immediately. If you aren’t
in range of a Wi-Fi network or the AT&T or Verizon Wireless data networks
when you tap Send, the message is sent the next time you’re in range of one
of these networks.
Apple includes a bunch of landscape-orientation keyboards in various applications, including Mail. When you rotate the iPad to its side, you can compose a new message using a wider-format virtual keyboard.
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Sending a photo with a text message
Sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words. When that’s the case, here’s
how to send an e-mail message with a photo enclosed:
1. Tap the Photos icon on the Home screen.
2. Find the photo you want to send.
3. Tap the button that looks like a little rectangle with a curved arrow
springing out of it in the upper-right corner of the screen.
4. Tap the Email Photo button.
An e-mail message appears onscreen with an icon for the photo already
attached. In fact, the image may appear to be embedded in the body of
the message, but the recipient receives it as a regular e-mail attachment.
On the CC/Bcc line of your outgoing message, you see the size of the
attached image. If you tap Image Size, a new line appears, giving you the
option to choose an alternative size among Small, Medium, Large, or
Actual Size. Tap the size you want.
5. Address the message and type whatever text you like, as you did for
an all-text message in the preceding section, and then tap the Send
button.
Saving an e-mail to send later
Sometimes you start an e-mail message but don’t have time to finish it.
When that happens, you can save it as a draft and finish it some other time.
Here’s how:
1. Start an e-mail message, as described in one of the two previous
sections.
2. When you’re ready to save the message as a draft, tap the Cancel
button in the upper-left corner of the screen.
3. Tap the Save Draft button if you want to save this message as a draft
and complete it another time.
If you tap the Delete Draft button, the message disappears immediately without a second chance. Don’t tap Delete Draft unless you mean it.
To work on the message again, tap the Drafts mailbox. A list of all messages
you saved as drafts appears. Tap the draft you want to work on, and it reappears on the screen. When you’re finished, you can tap Send to send it or tap
Cancel to save it as a draft again.
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The number of drafts appears to the right of the Drafts folder, the same way
that the number of unread messages appears to the right of other mail folders, such as your inbox.
Replying to, forwarding, or printing
an e-mail message
When you receive a message and want to reply to it, open the message and
then tap the Reply/Reply All/Forward/Print button — or what we like to call
the “act on it” button. It looks like a curved arrow at the upper-right corner
of the screen, as shown in Figure 5-10. Then tap the Reply, Reply All, Forward,
or Print button.
Figure 5-10: Reading and managing an e-mail message.
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✓ Reply and Reply All: The Reply button creates a blank e-mail message
addressed to the sender of the original message. The Reply All button
creates a blank e-mail message addressed to the sender and all other
recipients of the original message, plus CCs. (The Reply All option
appears only if more than one recipient was on the original e-mail.) In
both cases, the subject is retained with a Re: prefix added. So if the original subject were iPad Tips, the reply’s subject would be Re: iPad Tips.
✓ Forward: Tapping the Forward button creates an unaddressed e-mail
message that contains the text of the original message. Add the e-mail
address(es) of the person or people you want to forward the message
to, and then tap Send. In this case, rather than a Re: prefix, the subject is
preceded by Fwd:. So this time, the subject would be Fwd: iPad Tips.
✓ Print: Of course, you’d tap Print if you wanted to print using an AirPrint
capable printer.
You can edit the subject line of a reply or a forwarded message or edit the
body text of a forwarded message the same way you’d edit any other text. It’s
usually considered good form to leave the subject lines alone (with the Re: or
Fwd: prefix intact), but you may want to change them sometimes. Now that
you know you can.
To send your reply or forwarded message, tap the Send button as usual.
Settings for sending e-mail
You can customize the mail you send and receive in lots of ways. In this section, we explore settings for sending e-mail. Later in this chapter, we show
you settings that impact the way you receive and read messages. In each
instance, start by tapping Settings on the Home screen. Then:
✓ To hear an alert when you successfully send a message: From the main
Settings screen, tap General➪Sounds. Make sure that the Sent Mail setting is turned on (so that the blue On button is showing rather than the
gray Off button). If you want to change other settings, tap the General
button at the top of the screen, which is shaped like a left-pointing
arrow. If you’re finished setting the settings, tap the Home button on the
front of your iPad.
The preceding paragraph is similar for all the settings we discuss in this
section and later sections, so we don’t repeat them again. To summarize, if you want to continue using settings, tap whichever left-pointing
button appears at the top of the screen — sometimes it’s General,
sometimes Mail, sometimes Contacts, or sometimes something else. The
point is that the button always returns you to the previous screen so
that you can change other settings. The same concept applies to tapping
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the Home button on the front of your iPad when you’re finished setting a
setting. That action always saves the change you just made and returns
you to the Home screen.
✓ To add a signature line, phrase, or block of text to every e-mail message you send: Tap Settings➪Mail, Contacts, Calendars➪Signature on
the right. The default signature is Sent from my iPad. You can add text
before or after it, or delete it and type something else. Your signature is
affixed to the end of all your outgoing e-mail.
✓ To have your iPad send you a copy of every message you send: Tap
Settings➪Mail, Contacts, Calendars and then turn on the Always Bcc
Myself setting.
✓ To set the default e-mail account for sending e-mail from outside the
Mail application: Tap the Settings icon on the Home screen, and then
tap Mail, Contacts, Calendars➪Default Account. Tap the account you
want to use as the default. For example, when you want to e-mail a picture directly from the Photos application, this designated e-mail account
is the one that’s used. Note that this setting applies only if you have
more than one e-mail account on your iPad.
Setting Your Message and Account Settings
This final discussion of Mail involves more settings that deal with your various e-mail accounts. (If you’re looking for settings that let you apply a signature and other settings related to sending e-mail, read the preceding section
“Settings for sending e-mail.”)
Checking and viewing e-mail settings
Several settings affect the way you can check and view e-mail. You might
want to modify one or more, so we describe what they do and where to find
them:
✓ To specify how often the iPad checks for new messages: Tap the
Settings icon on the Home screen; tap Mail, Contacts, Calendars➪
Fetch New Data. You’re entering the world of fetching or pushing. Check
out Figure 5-11 to glance at your options. If your e-mail program (or
more precisely the e-mail server behind it) supports push and you have
it turned on (the On button displays), fresh messages are sent to your
iPad automatically as soon as they hit the server. If you turned off push
or your e-mail program doesn’t support it in the first place (Off displays),
the iPad fetches data instead. Choices for fetching are Every 15 Minutes,
Every 30 Minutes, Hourly, and Manually. Tap the one you prefer.
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Figure 5-11: Fetch or push? It’s your call.
Tap Advanced to determine these push and fetch settings for each individual account. Tap the account in question. Push is shown as an option
only if the e-mail account you tapped supports the feature.
✓ To hear an alert sound when you receive a new message: Tap General
on the main Settings screen, tap Sounds, and then turn on the New Mail
setting.
✓ To set the number of recent messages that appears in your inbox:
From the main Settings screen, tap Mail, Contacts, Calendars➪Show.
Your choices are 25, 50, 75, 100, and 200 recent messages. Tap the
number you prefer.
You can always see more messages in your inbox regardless of this setting by scrolling all the way to the bottom and tapping Load Additional
Messages.
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✓ To set the number of lines of each message to be displayed in the message list: From the main Settings screen, tap Mail, Contacts, Calendars➪
Preview; then choose a number. Your choices are 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 lines
of text. The more lines of text you display in the list, the fewer messages
you can see at a time without scrolling. Think before you choose 4 or 5.
✓ To set the font size for messages: From the main Settings screen, tap
Mail, Contacts, Calendars➪Minimum Font Size. Your options are Small,
Medium, Large, Extra Large, and Giant. Use trial and error to find out
which size you prefer. Choose one and then read a message. If it’s not
just right, choose a different size. Repeat until you’re happy.
✓ To specify whether the iPad shows the To and Cc labels in message
lists: From the main Settings screen, tap Mail, Contacts, Calendars and
turn the Show To/Cc Label setting on or off.
✓ To turn the Ask before Deleting warning on or off: From the main
Settings screen, tap Mail, Contacts, Calendars; then turn the Ask before
Deleting setting on or off. If this setting is turned on, you need to tap
the Trash icon at the bottom of the screen and then tap the red Delete
button to confirm the deletion. When the setting is turned off, tapping
the Trash icon deletes the message and you never see a red Delete
button.
✓ To specify whether the iPad will automatically load remote images:
Tap Load Remote Images so that the On button displays. If it’s off, you
can still manually load remote images. Certain security risks have been
associated with loading remote images.
✓ To organize your mail by thread: Tap Organize by Threads so that the
setting is toggled On.
Altering account settings
The last group of settings we explore in this chapter deals with your e-mail
accounts. You most likely will never need most of these settings, but we’d be
remiss if we didn’t at least mention them briefly. So here they are, whether
you need ’em or not:
✓ To stop using an e-mail account: Tap the Settings icon on the Home
screen; tap Mail, Contacts, Calendars➪Account Name➪Delete Account➪
Keep on My iPad to turn off the account.
This setting doesn’t delete the account; it only hides it from view and
stops it from sending or checking e-mail until you turn it on again.
✓ To delete an e-mail account: Tap the Settings icon on the Home screen;
tap Mail, Contacts, Calendars➪Account Name➪Delete Account➪Delete.
Tap Cancel if you change your mind and don’t want your account blown
away.
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You can find still more advanced Mail settings, reached the same way: Tap
the Settings icon on the Home screen; tap Mail, Contacts, Calendars; and then
tap the name of the account you want to work with.
The settings you see under Advanced and how they appear vary by account.
This list describes some of the ones you might see:
✓ To specify how long until deleted messages are removed permanently
from your iPad: Tap Advanced➪Remove. Your choices are Never, After
One Day, After One Week, and After One Month. Tap the choice you
prefer.
✓ To choose whether drafts, sent messages, and deleted messages are
stored on your iPad or on your mail server: Tap Advanced, and then
choose the setting under Mailbox Behaviors stored On My iPad or
stored On the Server. You can decide for Drafts, Sent Messages, and
Trash. If you choose to store any or all of them on the server, you can’t
see them unless you have an Internet connection (Wi-Fi, or cellular). If
you choose to store them on your iPad, they’re always available, even if
you don’t have Internet access.
We strongly recommend that you don’t change these next two items
unless you know exactly what you’re doing and why. If you’re having
problems with sending or receiving mail, start by contacting your ISP
(Internet service provider), e-mail provider, or corporate IT person or
tech department. Then change these settings only if they tell you to.
Again, these settings and exactly where and how they appear, vary by
account.
✓ To reconfigure mail server settings: Tap Host Name, User Name, or
Password in the Incoming Mail Server or Outgoing Mail Server section of
the account settings screen and make your changes.
✓ To adjust Use SSL, Authentication, IMAP Path Settings, or Server Port:
Tap Advanced, and then tap the appropriate item and make the necessary changes.
And that, as they say in baseball, retires the side. You’re now fully qualified
to set up e-mail accounts and send and receive e-mail on your iPad.
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6
Surfin’ the Web without a Board
(or at Least without Safari)
In This Chapter
▶ Mapping your route with Maps
▶ YouTube and you
▶ Social media: It’s even better on an iPad
I
n this chapter, you look at apps that require Internet access to function
but don’t rely on your iPad’s web browser (Safari). We call them
Internet-enabled apps because they display information collected over
your Internet connection — whether Wi-Fi or cellular data network — in real
time. These include apps for maps, YouTube videos, and social
networking.
Maps Are Where It’s At
In our other book, iPhone For Dummies, we said
that the Maps feature was one of the sleeper hits of
our iPhone experience and an application we both
use more than we expected because it’s so darn
handy. Since we first discovered the Maps app via
our iPhones, the app has become better and more
capable. With Maps, you can quickly and easily
discover exactly where you are, find nearby restaurants
and businesses, get turn-by-turn driving instructions
from any address to any other address, and see real-time
traffic information and a photographic street view of many
locations as well.
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You can’t use the apps in this chapter unless you’re connected to the
Internet via either Wi-Fi or 3G.
Finding your current location with Maps
We start with something supremely simple yet extremely useful — determining
your current location. At the risk of sounding like self-help gurus, here’s how to
find yourself:
1. Make sure Location Services is enabled by tapping Settings➪General➪
Location Services.
2. Tap the Maps icon on your Home screen.
3. Tap the little arrow icon in the middle of the gray bar at the top of the
screen.
You’ll soon see a blue circle (see Figure 6-1), which indicates your
approximate location. And if you move around, your iPad can update
your location and adjust the map so that the location indicator stays in
the middle of the screen.
Figure 6-1: A blue marker shows your GPS location.
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Just so you know, if you tap, drag the map, or zoom in and/or out, your iPad
continues to update your location, but it doesn’t continue to center the
marker. That’s a good thing, but it also means that the location indicator can
move off the screen.
Finding a person, place, or thing
To find a person, place, or thing with Maps, follow these steps:
1. Tap the Search field in the upper-right corner of the screen to make
the keyboard appear and then type what you’re looking for.
You can search for addresses, zip codes, intersections, towns, landmarks,
and businesses by category and by name, or combinations, such as New
York, NY 10022; pizza 60645; or Auditorium Shores Austin, TX.
2. (Optional) If the letters you type match names in your contacts list, the
matching contacts appear in a list below the Search field; tap a name
to see a map of that contact’s location.
Maps is smart about it, too; it displays only the names of contacts that
have a street address. See the section “Connecting maps and contacts,”
later in this chapter, for more details.
3. When you finish typing, tap Search.
After a few seconds, a map appears. If you searched for a single location,
it’s marked with a pushpin. If you searched for a category (pizza 60645,
for example), you see multiple pushpins, one for each matching location,
as shown in Figure 6-2.
You can tap the little circle with three horizontal lines on the right in the
Search field, and a drop-down list of matching locations appears, as shown in
Figure 6-2.
How does Maps do that?
Maps uses iPad’s Location Services to
determine your approximate location using
available information from your wireless data
network. Wi-Fi-only models use local Wi-Fi
networks; iPad Wi-Fi + 3G models use
assisted GPS plus cellular data. If you’re
not using Location Services, turning it off
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conserves your battery. (To turn it off, tap
Settings➪General➪Location Services.) Don’t
worry if Location Services is turned off when
you tap the Compass icon — you’re prompted
to turn it on. Finally, Location Services may not
be available in all areas at all times.
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Figure 6-2: Search for pizza 60645 and you see pushpins for all nearby
pizza joints.
Views, zooms, and pans
The preceding section talks about how to find just about anything with Maps.
Now here’s a look at some ways you can use what you find. First, find out
how to work with what you see on the screen. Four views are available at
any time: Classic, Satellite, Hybrid, and Terrain. (Figure 6-2 shows the Classic
view.) Select one view by tapping the curling page in the lower-right corner of
the screen. The map then curls back and reveals several buttons, as shown in
Figure 6-3.
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Figure 6-3: The map curls back to reveal these
buttons.
In Classic, Satellite, Hybrid, or Terrain view, you can zoom to see either more
or less of the map — or scroll (pan) to see what’s above, below, or to the left
or right of what’s on the screen:
✓ To zoom out: Pinch the map or tap using two fingers. To zoom out even
more, pinch or tap using two fingers again.
This may be a new concept to you. To tap with two fingers, merely tap
with two fingers touching the screen simultaneously (rather than the
usual one finger).
✓ To zoom in: Unpinch the map (some people refer to this as a spread) or
double-tap (the usual way — with just one finger) the spot you want to
zoom in on. Unpinch or double-tap with one finger again to zoom in even
more.
An unpinch is the opposite of a pinch. Start with your thumb and a finger
together and then spread them apart.
You can also unpinch with two fingers or two thumbs, one from each
hand, but you’ll probably find that a single-handed pinch and unpinch
are handier.
✓ To scroll: Flick or drag up, down, left, or right.
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Connecting maps and contacts
Maps and contacts go together like peanut butter and jelly. For example, here
are two helpful tasks that illustrate maps and contacts at work.
To see a map of a contact’s street address, follow these steps:
1. Tap the little Bookmarks icon to the left of the Search field.
2. Tap the Contacts button at the bottom of the overlay.
3. Tap the contact’s name whose address you want to see on the map.
Alternatively, just type the first few letters of a contact’s name in the
Search field and then tap the name in the Suggestions list that appears
below the Search field whenever what you type matches one or more
contact names.
If you find a location by typing an address into the Search field, you can add
that location to one of your contacts or create a new contact with a location
you’ve found. To do either one, follow these steps:
1. Tap the location’s pushpin on the map.
2. Tap the little i in a blue circle to the right of the location’s name or
description (as shown next to Gullivers Pizzeria in Figure 6-2) to
display its Info screen (see Figure 6-4).
3. Tap the Add to Contacts button to create a new entry for the location
in your contacts list.
4. Tap Create New Contact or Add to Existing Contact, whichever is
applicable.
5. Fill in the new contact information and tap Done. Or, select an existing
contact from the list that appears.
You work with your contacts by tapping the Contacts icon on your Home
screen.
You can also get driving, walking, and public transit directions from most
locations including a contact’s address to any other location including
another contact’s address. You see how to do that in the “Smart map tricks”
section, later in this chapter.
Saving time with Bookmarks, Recents, and Contacts
In Maps, three tools can save you from typing the same locations over and
over again. You see these options on the overlay displayed when you tap the
little Bookmarks icon to the left of the Search field.
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Figure 6-4: The Info screen for Gullivers Pizzeria
appears as an overlay when you tap the little i
in a blue circle on the right side of Gullivers’ name.
At the bottom of this overlay, you see three buttons: Bookmarks, Recents,
and Contacts. The following sections give you the lowdown on these buttons.
Bookmarks
Bookmarks in the Maps application work like bookmarks in Safari. When you
have a location you want to save as a bookmark so that you can reuse it later
without typing a single character, follow these steps:
1. Tap the little i in a blue circle to the right of the location’s name or
description.
The Info screen for that location appears (refer to Figure 6-4).
2. Tap the Add to Bookmarks button.
You may have to scroll down the Info screen to see the Add to
Bookmarks button.
After you add a bookmark, you can recall it at any time. To do so, tap the
Bookmarks icon, tap the Bookmarks button at the bottom of the overlay, and
then tap the bookmark name to see it on a map.
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The first things you should bookmark are your home and work addresses
and your zip codes. These are things you use all the time with Maps, so you
might as well bookmark them now to avoid typing them over and over.
Use zip code bookmarks to find nearby businesses. Choose the zip code
bookmark, and then type what you’re looking for, such as 78729 pizza, 60645
gas station, or 90201 Starbucks.
You can also drop a pin anywhere on the map. A pin is similar to a bookmark
but is often handier than a bookmark because you can drop it by hand. Why?
If you don’t know the exact address or zip code for a location but can point it
out on a map, you can drop a pin (but you couldn’t create a bookmark). You
drop a pin as follows:
1. Tap the curling page in the lower-right corner.
2. Tap the Drop Pin button (refer to Figure 6-3).
A pin drops onscreen, and you see the words Tap and Hold
Anywhere to Drop a Pin with a little i in a blue circle after it.
3. Tap and hold on the location you want to mark with a pin.
4. Tap the little i.
The Dropped Pin overlay appears, where you can fill in some details
about the pin and take similar actions to those that appear in the screen
shown in Figure 6-4.
To manage your bookmarks, tap the Edit button in the upper-left corner of
the Bookmarks overlay. Then:
✓ To move a bookmark up or down in the Bookmarks list: Drag the little
icon with three gray bars that appears to the right of the bookmark
upward to move the bookmark higher in the list or downward to move
the bookmark lower in the list.
✓ To delete a bookmark from the Bookmarks list: Tap the – sign in a red
circle to the left of the bookmark’s name and then tap the red Delete
button.
When you’re finished using bookmarks, tap anywhere outside the overlay to
return to the map.
Recents
Maps automatically remembers locations you’ve searched for and directions
you’ve viewed in its Recents list. To see this list, tap the Bookmarks icon and
then tap the Recents button at the bottom of the overlay. To see a recent
item on the map, tap the item’s name.
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To clear the Recents list, tap the Clear button in the upper-left corner of the
overlay and then tap the big red Clear All Recents button at the bottom of the
overlay or tap Cancel if you change your mind.
When you’re finished using the Recents list, tap anywhere outside the
overlay to return to the map.
Contacts
To see a list of your contacts, tap the Bookmarks icon and then tap the
Contacts button at the bottom of the overlay. To see a map of a contact’s
location, tap the contact’s name in the list.
To limit the contacts list to specific groups (assuming that you have some
groups in your contacts list), tap the Groups button in the upper-left corner
of the overlay and then tap the name of the group. Now only contacts in this
group display in the list.
When you’re finished using the contacts list, tap the Done button in the
upper-right corner of the overlay to return to the map.
Smart map tricks
The Maps application has more tricks up its sleeve. Here are a few nifty
features you may find useful.
Get route maps and driving directions
You can get route maps and driving directions to any location from any
location as follows:
1. Tell your iPad to get directions for you.
You can do so in a couple of ways:
• If a pushpin is already on the screen: Tap the pushpin and then tap
the little i in a blue circle to the right of the name or description.
This action displays the item’s Info screen. Tap the Directions to
Here or Directions from Here button to get directions to or from
that location, respectively.
• When you’re looking at a map screen: Tap the Directions button in
the upper-left corner of the screen. The Search field transforms
into Start and End fields.
2. Tap in the Start or End field to designate the starting and ending
points of your trip.
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You can either type them or choose them from a list of your bookmarks,
recent maps, or contacts.
3. (Optional) If you need to swap the starting and ending locations, tap
the little swirly arrow button between the Start and End fields.
4. When the start and end locations are correct, tap the Start button in
the blue banner overlay near the lower-right corner of the screen, as
shown in Figure 6-5.
Figure 6-5: The route map from Bob’s first house
in Skokie to Gullivers Pizza in Chicago.
When you tap the Start button, it changes into left- and right-arrow
buttons.
5. Navigate your directions using the arrows or a list:
• Arrows: Tap the arrow buttons, as shown in Figure 6-6, to display
the next or previous step in your route. Tap the right-arrow button
to see the first of your turn-by-turn driving directions. Then, to see
the next step in the directions, tap the right arrow again; to see the
preceding step, tap the left arrow.
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List button
113
Left arrow
(previous step)
Right arrow
(next step)
Figure 6-6: The blue banner shows you each step of your route.
• List: If you prefer to see your driving directions displayed as a list
with all the steps at once, tap the List button on the left side of
the blue banner; the directions appear in an overlay, as shown in
Figure 6-7. Tap any step in the list to see that leg of the trip displayed
on the map.
Figure 6-7: Step-by-step driving directions
displayed as a list with the final leg of the trip
displayed on the map.
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If you want to return to the step-by-step directions in the blue banner
and use the arrow buttons to navigate again, tap the little rectangle to
the left of the word Directions in the overlay. The list disappears and the
banner reappears.
6. When you’re finished with the step-by-step directions, tap the Search
button at the top of the screen to return to the regular map screen and
single Search field.
As well as step-by-step directions work, we wish the iPad offered the type of
audible turn-by-turn directions feature found on some dedicated GPS devices.
You know — where some friendly male or female voice barks out instructions
(such as “turn right on Main Street”).
However, several companies, including TomTom (www.tomtom.com),
NAVIGON (www.navigon.com), Magellan (www.magellangps.com), and
MotionX (http://drive.motionx.com), offer iPhone apps that do just
that. And although none of them has released an iPad version of their GPS
navigation app at the time of this writing, we think it’s only a matter of time
before some (or all) do. Chapter 7 explains how to determine whether you
can use iPhone apps on your iPad and how to find iPad-specific apps.
Get public transportation information and walking directions
After you provide a starting and ending location but before you tap the Start
button, the blue banner displays three icons on its left side: a car, a bus, and
a person walking (refer to Figure 6-5). In the preceding example, we showed
directions by car, which is the default.
For public transportation information, tap the Bus icon. You then have the
following options:
✓ To see the departure and arrival times for the next bus or train, as shown
in Figure 6-8, tap the little clock that appears on the blue banner. Tap the
Load More Times button to see additional departures and arrivals.
These schedules are occasionally out of date, so you might want to
confirm the schedule with another source.
✓ To see the route directions, tap the Start button. Then, to see the next
step in the directions, tap the right-arrow button; to see the preceding
step, tap the left arrow.
Or, if you prefer to see the public transportation directions displayed as
a list with all the steps at once, tap the List button on the left side of the
blue banner; the directions appear in an overlay, as shown in Figure 6-9.
Tap any item in the list to see that leg of the trip displayed on the map.
If you want to return to the step-by-step directions in the blue banner
and use the arrow buttons to navigate again, tap the little rectangle to
the left of the word Directions in the overlay. The list disappears and the
banner reappears.
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Figure 6-8: The bus route and schedule.
Figure 6-9: Step-by-step directions for public
transportation to Gullivers with the second step
showing on the map.
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For step-by-step directions for walking, tap the Person Walking icon. Walking
directions generally look a lot like driving directions except for your travel
time. For example, driving time in Figure 6-5 is approximately 10 minutes with
traffic; walking time (not shown) is estimated at 1 hour and 25 minutes.
Get traffic info in real time
You can find out the traffic conditions for the map you’re viewing by tapping
the curling page in the lower-right corner of the screen and then tapping
the Traffic switch so that it says On. When you do this, major roadways are
color-coded to inform you of the current traffic speed, as shown in Figure 6-10.
Here’s the key:
✓ Green: 50 or more miles per hour
✓ Yellow: 25 to 50 miles per hour
✓ Red: Under 25 miles per hour
✓ Gray: No data available at this time
Figure 6-10: Lower Manhattan in mid-afternoon
has more traffic than most cities at rush hour.
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Traffic info doesn’t work in every location, but the only way to find out is to
give it a try. If no color codes appear, assume that it doesn’t work for that
particular location.
More about the Info screen
If a location has a little i in a blue circle to the right of its name or description
(refer to Figure 6-2), you can tap it to see additional information about that
location.
As we explain earlier in this chapter, you can get directions to or from that
location, add the location to your bookmarks or contacts, or create a new
contact from it. You can do two more things with some locations from their
Info screen:
✓ Tap its e-mail address to launch the Mail application and send an e-mail
to it.
✓ Tap its URL to launch Safari and view its web site.
Not all locations have any or all of these three options, but we thought you
should know anyway.
See a location in Street View
If you see the little icon shown in the margin on an Info screen, tap it to see
that location in Street View. Drag your finger left or right to scroll up to 360°.
A tiny proxy map in the lower right corner even shows you the direction of
what’s shown on the screen.
Hey You, It’s YouTube
YouTube has come to define video sharing on the Internet. The wildly
popular site, now owned by Google, has become so powerful that American
presidential hopefuls and even politicians in other countries campaign and
hold debates there. As you might imagine, YouTube has also generated
controversy. The site has been banned in some foreign countries. And
Viacom has sued YouTube for more than $1 billion over alleged copyright
infringements. (Let the lawyers fight over such matters.)
All the while, YouTube staked a humongous claim on mainstream culture.
That’s because YouTube is, well, about you and us, and our pets, and so
on. It is the cyber destination, as YouTube boldly proclaims, to “Broadcast
Yourself.”
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Apple has afforded YouTube its own cherished icon on the Home screen.
Many millions of videos are available on the iPad, nearly the complete
YouTube catalog.
Hunting for YouTube gems
So where exactly do YouTubers find the videos that can offer them a blissful
respite from their day? You might want to start by tapping one of the seven
buttons along the bottom of the screen.
But before we start down that road, if you know what you’re looking for, you
can search for it, be it a specific video, topic, videographer’s name, or almost
anything else you might want to search for, from any of the seven “departments”
we’re about to describe. You see, all seven of ’em offer a Search field in their
upper-right corner. Just tap in it, and the by-now-familiar virtual keyboard
appears. Type a search phrase and then tap the Search key on the keyboard
to generate results.
In Figure 6-11, we typed (what else?) iPad.
Figure 6-11: Finding iPad videos on YouTube.
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Now all you have to do is tap one of ’em to watch it.
Time to go over those seven buttons at the bottom of the screen, namely:
✓ Featured: Videos recommended by YouTube’s staff. Flick upward to
scroll down the page and see more videos.
When you get to the bottom of the page, tap the Load More button to
see even more featured videos.
✓ Top Rated: These are videos that are rated highly by YouTube viewers.
Tap the Today, This Week, or All button in the upper-left corner of the
screen to filter the videos you see.
You can rate videos on your iPad as long as you have a YouTube
account, but don’t waste your time trying to figure out how to create
one from within the YouTube app — you can’t. You have to launch
Safari or another web browser (on your iPad or computer) and surf to
www.youtube.com to create your account. We suggest you do that now
because several of the features we’re about to describe are useful only if
you’re signed in to your (you guessed it) YouTube account.
✓ Most Viewed: These are the videos that most YouTube viewers are
watching. Tap All to see the most watched YouTube videos of all time.
Tap Today or This Week to check out the videos most currently in
vogue.
✓ Favorites: If you’re signed in to your YouTube account, you can add
videos that you like to your Favorites list. Tap the Favorites button,
which looks like an open book at the bottom of the screen and also
appears when you’re watching a video, We think it’s supposed to be an
open book, but we could be wrong.
At the top of the Favorites screen are two tabs: Favorites and Playlists,
with Favorites selected by default. Favorites is one big list of videos
you like; Playlists are individual lists of your favorite videos categorized
however you like. Bob, for example, has a Family Guy playlist, a South
Park playlist, a Stupid Mac Tricks playlist, and so on.
If you tap the Playlists tab, you can see a list of your playlists. Of course,
you must be signed in to a YouTube account to use this feature. And,
surprisingly, you can’t create a playlist while using the YouTube app.
You have to visit www.youtube.com with a web browser to create one.
After you create a playlist, you can add videos to it the same way you
add them to your Favorites list (which, as we mentioned, you find out
how to do very soon).
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The Edit button in the upper-left corner of the Favorites and Playlists
screens lets you delete videos that are no longer your favorites. Tap the
button and then tap the little X in the upper-left corner of each video
that you want to remove from your Favorites list or playlists. When
you’re finished deleting videos, tap the Done button (also found in the
upper-left corner).
Your Favorites list and playlists are automatically saved and synced
among all your devices — Mac, PC, iPhone, iPod touch, and/or iPad.
Add a video to your Favorites list or a playlist on your iPad, and the next
time you visit YouTube with your web browser, you see the video in
your Favorites list or playlist. Nice touch!
✓ Subscriptions: These are videos from any YouTube accounts you
subscribe to. Say it together now: You can’t subscribe to a videographer’s
YouTube channel with the YouTube app. And you need to be logged on
to your YouTube account to use this feature.
✓ My Videos: These are videos you’ve uploaded to YouTube. Of course,
you must be logged on to your YouTube account to use this feature.
What else is new? And, of course, if you’ve never uploaded a video to
YouTube, this screen will be blank even if you are logged on.
✓ History: This is a list of all the videos you’ve viewed recently.
Watch this: Watching YouTube videos
To watch a YouTube video regardless of how you got to it — through one of
the seven methods we describe in the preceding section or by searching for
it — just tap it. The movie begins to load, and after a brief wait — how long
a wait is determined by the speed of your Wi-Fi or 3G network — the video
begins to play.
You should see the controls described in this section, but if you don’t, just
tap the video to bring up the video controls if they’re hidden. Many of these
controls are identical to the video controls we explain in Chapter 9, but
YouTube videos also display special controls of their own, including buttons
for adding this video to your Favorites list or playlists, sharing this video
with friends, rating this video, and several others, as shown in Figure 6-12.
In the gray banner across the top of the screen, you have (from left to right)
the Back button (which says Favorites because that’s the screen I was on
when I tapped this video), the name of this video (Idiot rides bike off picnic
table EPIC FAIL!), and the Search field.
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Figure 6-12: YouTube video controls.
Below the gray banner are four buttons:
✓ Add: Add this video to your Favorites list or a playlist.
✓ Share: Opens a new e-mail message with the title of the video as its
subject and Check out this video on YouTube, and the URL for the video
as the message. Just tap the blue plus button to choose an addressee
from your contacts list or type an e-mail address and then tap the Send
button.
✓ Rate: Lets you rate this video from one to five stars.
✓ Flag: Lets you flag this video as inappropriate.
Beneath the video in another gray banner (from left to right) is the Play/
Pause button (a pair of vertical lines in Figure 6-12), the Scrubber bar, the
playhead, and a pair of arrows. The first three are self-explanatory; tap the
arrows to expand the video to full-screen.
If you don’t see the controls and Scrubber bar, tap anywhere on the movie,
and they magically reappear.
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While viewing a video full-screen, a slightly different set of controls appears.
To make them go away, tap the video once. The only button you may not
recognize is the one in the upper-right corner, which looks like either a movie
screen (top) or TV screen (bottom), as shown in the margin. This button
toggles the video between widescreen and normal modes. If you don’t know
what that means, tap it a few times and you will. Tap the Done button in the
upper-left corner of the screen or the little arrows (refer to Figure 6-12) to
return to the video’s Info screen.
Last but not least, you can see a gray banner below the Scrubber bar with
four additional buttons: Info, Related, More From, and Comments. Tap one to
see that particular information about this video.
Restricting YouTube (and other) usage
If you’ve given an iPad to your kid or someone who works for you, you may
not want that person spending time watching YouTube videos. You want
him to do something more productive, such as homework or the quarterly
budget.
That’s where parental (or might we say “mean boss”) restrictions come in.
Please note that the use of this iron-fist tool can make you really unpopular.
To restrict access to YouTube, follow these steps:
1. Tap Settings➪General➪Restrictions➪Enable Restrictions.
2. When prompted, establish or enter a previously established
passcode — twice.
3. Tap YouTube so that the Off button rather than the On button displays.
If you made YouTube a no-no, when you return to the Home screen, the
YouTube icon is missing in action. Same goes for any other restricted activities.
To restore YouTube or other privileges, go back into Restrictions and tap
Disable Restrictions or tap the Off switch so that it says On again. Of course,
you have to reenter your passcode before you can do so.
Restrictions can also be applied to iTunes, Safari, the App Store, new app
installation, and location settings, as you see when we delve into Settings
further (see Chapter 13).
Socializing with Social Media Apps
Your iPad doesn’t include any specific social media apps right out of the box,
but you can add free client apps for the major social media networks including
Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, and the new kid on the block, Apple’s Game
Center.
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That’s the good news. The bad news is that as of this writing, only Game
Center and Twitter offer client apps that run natively on the iPad. Although
we’re certain they’ll get around to releasing bigger, better, iPad-friendly apps
soon, for now all we can show you are the iPhone versions of their apps
running at iPhone resolution.
Note: You don’t necessarily need an app to participate in social networking.
Three of the four networks we mentioned can be fully utilized using Safari on
your iPad. And frankly, unlike the iPhone, where the Safari experience was
hampered by the tiny screen and keyboard, all three web sites are eminently
usable on your iPad. So, if you want to check them out and don’t feel like
downloading their apps, here are their URLs:
✓ Facebook: www.facebook.com
✓ MySpace: www.myspace.com
✓ Twitter: http://twitter.com
Now we’d be remiss if we didn’t at least point out some of the niceties you
get when you access one of these social media networks using an app instead
of a browser, so the following sections offer a few of our insights.
Note: Both of your authors grew up in an era when telephones had cords and
dials, televisions used rabbit-ear antennas, and gas was a mere 30 cents a
gallon. In other words, we’re both long past the age where social networking is
as important to us as breathing. That said, Bob has a couple of kids who are
of an age (18 and 21) where they’d rather be without food or water than be
without Facebook. And although Bob’s not exactly a prolific social networker,
he does maintain a modest presence on Facebook (Bob LeVitus) and Twitter
(@LeVitus). Give him a shout on either service if you’re a social networking
type. Being a social guy, Ed is a semiregular in all these places, so feel free to
say hi. You can find and follow him as @edbaig on Twitter. And if you’re the
social networking type yourself, kindly spread the word about our book here,
assuming of course that you do like it (which we hope very much).
Game Center
Game Center is the odd duck of the bunch. Unlike the others, Game Center
has no web site; you have to use the Game Center app that came with your
iPad. And unlike the others, which are broad-based and aimed at anyone and
everyone, Game Center is designed for a specific segment of the iPad (and
iPhone and iPad touch) universe, namely users who have one or more games
on their iPads (or other devices).
Game Center acts as a match-up service, letting you challenge your friends
or use the Auto-Match Invite Friend button to challenge a stranger who also
happens to be looking for someone to play against. Figure 6-13 shows Bob
about to initiate a two-player game of Flight Control HD.
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Of course, to make a social network like Game Center a success, there need
to be lots of games that support Game Center. And therein lies the rub.
Because Game Center is relatively new (born in late 2010), there are only a
few dozen games available with Game Center support, some of which are
seen in Figure 6-14.
Figure 6-13: Invite a stranger to play (AutoMatch) or click the Invite Friend button to
challenge a friend.
Figure 6-14: Some of the games with Game
Center support.
Although not many games are Game Center-aware yet, the ones that are
available already include such top sellers as Angry Birds, Real Racing HD,
Pinball HD, and the World Series of Poker.
Facebook
The Facebook iPhone app, as shown in Figure 6-15, makes it easy to access
the most popular Facebook features with a single finger tap.
That said, we hope the Facebook iPad app is something more than just a
higher-resolution version of the iPhone app. Why? Well, the iPad, unlike the
iPhone, has a thoroughly usable web browser, and quite frankly, we’d rather
look at our Facebook News Feed in Safari, as shown on the left in Figure 6-16,
than in the current version of the Facebook iPhone app, as shown on the
right in Figure 6-16.
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Figure 6-15: The Facebook iPhone app sports a
clean interface with quick access to many
popular Facebook features.
Figure 6-16: Bob’s Facebook News Feed as seen in Safari (left) and in the Facebook iPhone app (right).
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On the other hand, Safari can’t provide push notifications for Facebook
events such as messages, Wall posts, friend requests and confirmations,
photo tags, events, and comments, whereas the iPhone app does all that and
more.
The bottom line is that there’s nothing to prevent having the best of both
worlds. So if you’re a heavy Facebook user, consider using the Facebook
iPhone app for some things (such as push notifications and status updates)
and Safari for others (such as reading your Wall or News Feeds).
Disclaimer: We reserve the right to take back everything we just said if
an iPad version of the Facebook app becomes available and if it’s more
appropriate for the iPad than the iPhone app.
MySpace
The MySpace app provides us with the same dilemma as the Facebook app
(and the official Twitter app, which we get to in a minute): As of this moment,
an iPad version isn’t available. And as far as we can see, you don’t have any
reason to use the iPhone app ’cause it doesn’t even offer push notifications
(as the Facebook app does).
Take a look at the MySpace app and MySpace viewed with Safari in Figure 6-17
and then decide.
Figure 6-17: Bob’s MySpace home page as seen in Safari (left) and in the MySpace iPhone app (right).
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Again, we reserve the right to say something nice about the MySpace iPad
app if they introduce one. But for now, we think you’ll enjoy interacting with
MySpace more if you use Safari.
Twitter
Twitter puts a slightly different spin on social networking. Unlike Facebook
or MySpace, it doesn’t try to be encompassing or offer dozens of features,
hoping that some of them will appeal to you. Instead, Twitter does one thing
and does it well. That thing is letting its users post short messages, or tweets,
quickly and easily from a variety of platforms including web browsers, mobile
phones, smartphones, and other devices.
Twitter users then have the option of following any other Twitter user’s
tweets. The result is a stream of short messages like the ones shown in
Figure 6-18.
Figure 6-18: The official Twitter iPad app
through the eyes of Bob (@LeVitus).
Just how short are tweets? Glad you asked. You’re limited to a mere
140 characters. That’s barely longer than this Tip. So be as concise as
possible.
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7
Apply Here (to Find Out
about iPad Apps)
In This Chapter
▶ Getting a handle on the different types of apps
▶ Searching for specific apps
▶ Getting apps onto your iPad
▶ Managing iPad apps
▶ Deleting, reviewing, and reporting apps
O
ne of the best things about the iPad is that you can download and
install apps created by third parties, which is to say apps not
created by Apple (the first party) or you (the second party).
At the time of this writing, more than 300,000 apps are
available in the iTunes App Store. Furthermore, iPhone,
iPod touch, and iPad owners have downloaded over
10,000,000,000 (yes, ten billion) apps. Many apps are
free, but others cost money; some apps are useful,
but others are lame; and some apps are perfectly
well-behaved, but others quit unexpectedly (or
worse). The point is that among the many apps,
some are better than others.
In this chapter, we take a broad look at apps you can
use with your iPad. You discover how to find apps on
your computer or your iPad, and you find some basics
for managing your apps. Don’t worry: We have plenty to
say about specific third-party apps in Chapters 16 and 17.
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Tapping the Magic of Apps
Apps enable you to use your iPad as a game console, a streaming Netflix
player, a recipe finder, a sketchbook, and much, much more. You can run
three categories of apps on your iPad:
✓ Apps made exclusively for the iPad: This is the newest kind, so you
find fewer of these than the other two types. These apps won’t run on an
iPhone or iPod touch, so don’t bother to try them on either device.
✓ Apps made to work properly on an iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch: This
type of app can run on any of the three devices at full resolution. What
is the full-screen resolution for each device? Glad you asked. For most
iPhones and iPod touch, it’s 320 x 480 pixels; for the iPhone 4 it’s 960 x
640; for the iPad and iPad 2, it’s 1024 x 768 pixels.
✓ Apps made for the iPhone and iPod touch: These apps run on your
iPad but only at iPhone/iPod touch resolution (320 x 480) rather than
the full resolution of your iPad (1024 x 768).
You can double the size of an iPhone/iPod touch app by tapping the
little 2x button in the lower-right corner of the screen; to return it to its
native size, tap the 1x button.
Frankly, most iPhone/iPod apps look pretty good at 2x size, but we’ve
seen a few that have jagged graphics and don’t look as nice. Still, with
300,000 or more to choose from, we’re sure that you can find a few that
make you happy.
Figure 7-1 shows you what this looks like.
You can obtain and install apps for your iPad in two ways:
✓ On your computer
✓ On your iPad
To use the App Store on your iPad, it must be connected to the Internet. And,
if you obtain an app on your computer, it isn’t available on your iPad until
you sync it with your computer.
But before you can use the App Store on your iPad or your computer, you
first need an iTunes Store account. If you don’t already have one, we suggest
that you launch iTunes on your computer, click Sign In near the upper-right
corner of the iTunes window, click Create New Account, and follow the
onscreen instructions.
If you don’t have an iTunes Store account, you can’t download a single cool
app or iBook for your iPad. ’Nuff said.
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Figure 7-1: iPhone/iPod touch apps run at a smaller size (left), but can be “blown up” to
double size (right).
Using Your Computer to Find Apps
Okay, start by finding cool iPad apps using iTunes on your computer. Follow
these steps:
1. Launch iTunes.
2. Click the iTunes Store link in the sidebar on the left.
3. Click the App Store link.
The iTunes App Store appears, as shown in Figure 7-2.
4. (Optional) If you want to look only for apps designed to run at the full
resolution of your iPad, click the iPad tab at the top of the window.
Browsing the App Store from your computer
After you have the iTunes App Store on your screen, you have a couple of
options for exploring its virtual aisles. Allow us to introduce you to the
various “departments” available from the main screen.
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Scroll bar
iTunes Store (in sidebar)
iPad tab
App Store link
Search iTunes Store
Figure 7-2: The iTunes App Store in all its glory (with the iPad tab selected).
The main departments are featured in the middle of the screen, and ancillary
departments appear on either side of them. We start with the ones in the
middle:
✓ The New and Noteworthy department has 12 visible icons in Figure 7-2.
These represent apps that are — what else? — new and noteworthy.
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Only 12 icons are visible, but the New and Noteworthy department
actually has more than that. Look to the right of the words New and
Noteworthy. See the See All link? Click it to see all apps in this department
on a single screen. Or, you can click and drag the scroll bar to the right
to see more icons.
✓ The What’s Hot department actually displays 12 icons, as shown in
Figure 7-2, representing apps that are popular with other iPad users.
✓ The Staff Favorites department appears below the What’s Hot department
and is not visible in Figure 7-2.
Apple has a habit of redecorating the iTunes Stores every so often, so allow
us to apologize in advance if things aren’t exactly as described here when
you visit.
You also see display ads for four featured apps between the New and
Noteworthy department and the What’s Hot department (Games,
GarageBand, Elle, and AirPlay-enabled apps in Figure 7-2).
Three other departments appear to the right, under the Top Charts heading:
Paid Apps; one of our favorite departments, Free Apps; and Top Grossing
Apps (which is not visible in Figure 7-2). The number-one app in each
department displays both its icon and its name; the next nine apps show text
links only.
The App Store link near the top of the screen is also a drop-down list (as are
most of the other department links to its left and right). If you click and
hold most of these department links, a menu with a list of the department’s
categories appears. For example, if you click and hold the App Store
link, you can choose specific categories such as Great Free Apps, Books,
Entertainment, Apps Starter Kit, and others from the drop-down list, allowing
you to bypass the App Store home page and go directly to that category.
One last thing: The little triangle to the right of each item’s price is another
drop-down list, as shown for the Flashlight 3D app in Figure 7-3. This dropdown list lets you give this app to someone as a gift, add it to your wish list
(selected in Figure 7-3), send an e-mail to a friend with a link to it, copy the
link to this product to the Clipboard so that you can paste it elsewhere, or
share this item on Facebook or Twitter.
Using the Search field
Browsing the screen is helpful, but if you know exactly what you’re looking for,
we have good news and bad news. The good news is that there’s a faster way:
Just type a word or phrase into the Search field in the upper-right corner of
the main iTunes window, refer to Figure 7-3, and then press Return or Enter
to initiate the search.
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Figure 7-3: I want to use my iPad as a flashlight, so I searched for flashlight.
The bad news is that you have to search the entire iTunes Store, which includes
music, television shows, movies, and other stuff in addition to iPad apps.
Ah, but we have more good news: Your search results are segregated into
categories — one of which is iPad Apps (refer to Figure 7-3). And, here’s even
more good news: If you click the See All link to the right of the words iPad
Apps in Figure 7-3, all the iPad apps that match your search word or phrase
appear on a single screen.
If you search for a common word, such as Twilight or Rat, the screen displays
choices from Albums, Songs, Movies, TV Shows, Music Videos, and more, so
you might have to scroll down to see the iPad Apps section.
Fortunately, it’s easy to filter by media type. Just tap Apps in the Filter by
Media Type list near the upper-left corner of the screen, and everything but
iPhone and iPad apps disappears from the screen. Sweet!
Getting more information about an app
Now that you know how to find apps in the App Store, this section delves a
little deeper and shows you how to find out more about an application that
interests you.
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To find out more about an application icon, a featured app, or a text link on
any of the iTunes App Store screens, just click it. A detail screen like the one
shown in Figure 7-4 appears.
This screen tells you most of what you need to know about the application,
such as basic product information and a narrative description, what’s new in
this version, the language it’s presented in, and the system requirements to
run it. In the following sections, you take a closer look at the various areas on
the screen.
Finding the full app description
Notice the blue More link in the lower-right corner of the Description section;
click it to see a much longer description of the app.
Figure 7-4: The detail screen for SketchBook Pro, a nifty drawing and painting app for your iPad.
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Bear in mind that the application description on this screen was written by
the application’s developer and may be somewhat biased. Never fear, gentle
reader: In an upcoming section, we show you how to find reviews of the
application — written by people who have used it (and, unfortunately,
sometimes people who haven’t).
Understanding the app rating
Notice that the SketchBook Pro app is rated 4+, as you can see below the Buy
App button, near the top of the screen shown in Figure 7-4. The rating means
that this app contains no objectionable material. Here are the other possible
ratings:
✓ 9+: May contain mild or infrequent occurrences of cartoon, fantasy, or
realistic violence; or infrequent or mild mature, suggestive, or horrorthemed content that may not be suitable for children younger than the
age of 9.
✓ 12+: May contain infrequent mild language; frequent or intense cartoon,
fantasy, or realistic violence; mild or infrequent mature or suggestive
themes; or simulated gambling that may not be suitable for children
younger than the age of 12.
✓ 17+: May contain frequent and intense offensive language; frequent and
intense cartoon, fantasy, or realistic violence; mature, frequent, and
intense mature, suggestive, or horror-themed content; sexual content;
nudity; or depictions of alcohol, tobacco, or drugs that may not be
suitable for children younger than the age of 17. You must be at least
17 years old to purchase games with this rating.
Following related links
Just below the application description, notice the collection of useful links,
such as Autodesk Inc. Web Site and SketchBook Pro Support. We urge you to
explore these links at your leisure.
Checking requirements and device support for the app
Last but not least, remember the three categories of apps we mention earlier
in the chapter, in the section “Tapping the Magic of Apps?” If you look
between the rating (Rated 4+) and Customer Ratings (4.5 stars), you can
see the requirements for this particular app. Because it says Compatible
with iPad. Requires iPhone OS 3.2 or later and doesn’t mention
the iPhone or iPod touch, this app falls into the first category — apps made
exclusively for the iPad. Another clue that it falls into the first category is
that it says iPad Screenshots above the two and a half pictures shown in
Figure 7-4.
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If the app belonged to the second or third categories — apps made to work
properly on an iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch, or apps made for the iPhone or
iPod touch — it would say Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch,
and iPad rather than Compatible with iPad.
Now you’re probably wondering how you can tell whether an app falls into
the second or third category. The first clue is the little gray plus sign under
the price. Apps with this symbol are “Universal,” and run at full resolution
on iPhones and iPads. Another clue is to look at the screen shots. If you see
two tabs — iPhone and iPad — after Screenshots, the app will work at the full
resolution of an iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch. Conversely, if you only see one
tab that says iPhone Screenshots, the app will run at iPhone/iPod touch
resolution on your iPad.
One way to ensure that you look only for apps that take advantage of your
iPad’s big screen is to click the iPad tab on the front page of the App Store
(shown in Figure 7-2). All the apps displayed under the iPad tab are of the
first or second type and can run at the full resolution of your iPad.
Reading reviews
If you scroll down the detail screen, near the bottom you find a series of
customer reviews written by users of this app. You can see the first of these
in Figure 7-4. Each review includes a star rating, from zero to five. If an app
is rated four or higher, as SketchBook Pro is, the app is well-liked by people
who use it.
In Figure 7-4, you can see that this application has an average rating of 41⁄2
stars based on 1,832 user ratings for all versions. That means it’s probably a
pretty good app.
You see a few more reviews with star ratings below the review shown in
Figure 7-4. If you care to read even more reviews than are shown on the
detail page, click the small buttons on the right side of the Customer Reviews
section — Back, 1, 2, and Next — to navigate to the second page of comments
for this app.
Finally, just above these icons is a pop-up Sort By menu that says Most
Helpful in Figure 7-4. This menu lets you sort the customer reviews by your
choice of Most Helpful, Most Favorable, Most Critical, or Most Recent.
Don’t believe everything you read in reviews. Some people buy an app
without reading its description or try to use it without following the included
instructions. Then, when the app doesn’t do what they expected, they give it
a low rating. The point is, take the ratings and reviews with a grain of salt.
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Downloading an app
This part is simple. When you find an application you want to try, while
browsing the App Store on your computer, just click the app’s Free App or
Buy App button. When you do so, you have to log on to your iTunes Store
account, even if the app is free.
After you log on, the app begins downloading. When it’s finished, it appears
in the Apps section of your iTunes library, as shown in Figure 7-5.
Downloading an app to your iTunes library is only the first half of getting
it onto your iPad. After you download an app, you have to sync your iPad
before the application will be available on it. Chapter 3 covers syncing in
detail.
Figure 7-5: Apps that you download appear in the Apps section of your iTunes library.
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By the way, if your iTunes App library doesn’t look like ours (with big icons
in a grid pattern), try clicking the third icon from the left in the quartet of
icons to the right of the Search field, near the top of the iTunes window.
Just so you know, the leftmost icon displays your apps in a list; the next one
shows them in a list with icons; the third one displays them as a grid; and the
rightmost icon displays your apps in the Cover Flow view.
Updating an app
Every so often, the developer of an iPad application releases an update.
Sometimes these updates add new features to the application, sometimes
they squash bugs, and sometimes they do both. In any event, updates are
usually a good thing for you and your iPad, so it makes sense to check for
them every so often.
To do this in iTunes, try any of the following methods:
✓ Click the Check for Updates link near the lower-right corner of the Apps
screen. Note that if any updates are available, this link tells you how
many updates are available (three updates are available in Figure 7-5)
instead of Check for Updates.
✓ Look at the little number in a circle next to the Apps item in the iTunes
sidebar (which is 3 in Figure 7-5).
✓ Check the App Store icon on your iPad — it sprouts a little number in a
circle in its upper-right corner when updates are waiting.
To grab any available updates, either click the Download All Free Updates
button or click the Get Update button next to each individual app. After you
download an update this way, it replaces the older version on your iPad
automatically the next time you sync.
If you click the Get More Apps link next to the Check for Updates link, you
find yourself back at the main screen of the iTunes App Store (refer to
Figure 7-2).
Using Your iPad to Find Apps
Finding apps with your iPad is almost as easy as finding them by using
iTunes. The only requirement is that you have an Internet connection of
some sort — Wi-Fi or wireless data network — so that you can access the
iTunes App Store and browse, search, download, and install apps.
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Browsing the App Store on your iPad
To get started, tap the App Store icon on your iPad’s Home screen. After
you launch the App Store, you see five icons at the bottom of the screen,
representing five ways to interact with the store, as shown in Figure 7-6. The
first four icons at the bottom of the screen — Featured, Genius, Top Charts,
and Categories — offer four different ways to browse the virtual shelves of
the App Store. (The fifth icon we cover a little later, in the section “Updating
an app.”)
Figure 7-6: The icons across the bottom
represent the five sections of the App Store.
These icons are described as follows:
✓ The Featured section has three tabs at the top of the screen: New (see
Figure 7-6), What’s Hot, and Release Date. Tap one to see the apps for
that category.
✓ The Genius section has two tabs at the top: The iPad Apps tab displays
the Genius’s app recommendations based on the apps you already
own. The iPad Upgrades tab has upgrades to the iPad version of your
iPhone apps.
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✓ The Top Charts section offers lists of the Top Paid iPad apps and the
Top Free iPad apps. These are, of course, the most popular apps that
either cost money or don’t.
In the upper-left corner of the Top Charts screen is a Categories button.
Tap it and you see a list of categories such as Books, Education, Games,
Music, News, and Productivity, to name a few. Tap one of these categories
to see the Top Paid and Top Free iPad apps for that category.
✓ The Categories section works a little differently: It has no tabs, and its
main page contains no apps. Instead, it offers a list of categories such as
Games, Entertainment, Utilities, Music, and Lifestyle, to name a few. Tap
a category to see a page full of apps of that type.
Most pages in the App Store display more apps than can fit on the screen at
once. For example, the New and Noteworthy section in Figure 7-6 contains
more than six apps. A few tools help you navigate the multiple pages of apps:
✓ The little triangles at the top and bottom of the New and Noteworthy
section are actually buttons you click to see the next or previous page of
apps in that section. Tap them to see the next or previous page of apps.
✓ The little dots in the middle of the gray area above and below most
sections (four dots appear in Figure 7-6) tell you how many pages the
section contains; the white dot indicates which page you’re currently
viewing (the first one in Figure 7-6).
✓ Finally, tap the See All link at the top of most sections to (what else?)
see all the apps in the section on the same screen.
Using the Search field
If you know exactly what you’re looking for, rather than simply browsing, you
can tap the Search field in the upper-right corner of the iPad screen and type
a word or phrase; then tap the Search key on the keyboard to initiate the
search.
Finding details about an app
Now that you know how to find apps in the App Store, the following sections
show you how to find out more about a particular application. After tapping
an app icon as you browse the store or in a search result, your iPad displays
a detail screen like the one shown in Figure 7-7.
Remember that the application description on this screen was written by the
developer and may be somewhat biased.
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Figure 7-7: Pocket Legends is an awesome free
3D Massively-Multiplayer Online Role-Playing
Game (MMORPG) for the iPad.
The information you find on the detail screen on your iPad is similar to that
in the iTunes screen on your computer. The links, rating, and requirements
simply appear in slightly different places on your iPad screen. (See the section
“Getting more information about an app,” earlier in this chapter, for
explanations of the main onscreen items.)
The Reviews section differs most from the computer version. To read reviews
from your iPad, scroll down to the bottom of any detail screen and you find a
star rating for that application. It’s also the link to that application’s reviews;
tap it to see a page full of them. At the bottom of that page is another link:
More Reviews. Tap it to see (what else?) more reviews.
Downloading an app
To download an app to your iPad (while using your iPad), follow these steps:
1. Tap the price button near the top of its detail screen.
In Figure 7-7, it’s the gray Free button. The button is replaced by a green
Install App button.
2. Tap the Install App button.
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3. When prompted, type your iTunes Store account password.
After you do, the App Store closes and you see the Home screen where
the new application’s icon will reside. The new app’s icon is slightly
dimmed and has the word Loading beneath it, with a blue progress bar
near its bottom to indicate how much of the app remains to be downloaded, as shown in Figure 7-8.
Progress bar
Figure 7-8: The app above the iPod icon is
downloading; the blue progress bar indicates
that it’s half done.
4. If necessary, if the app is rated 17+, click OK in the warning screen
that appears after you type your password to confirm that you’re older
than 17 before the app downloads.
The application is now on your iPad, but it isn’t copied to your iTunes library
on your Mac or PC until your next sync. If your iPad suddenly loses its
memory (unlikely) or if you delete the application from your iPad before you
sync (as we describe later in this chapter, in the section “Deleting an app”),
that application is gone forever. That’s the bad news.
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The good news is that after you pay for an app, you can download it again if
you need to — from iTunes on your computer or the App Store app on your
iPad — and you don’t have to pay for it again.
After you download an app to your iPad, the next time you sync your iPad,
the application is transferred to your iTunes Apps library.
Updating an app
As we mention earlier in this chapter, every so often the developer of an iPad
application releases an update. If an update awaits you, a little number in a
circle appears on the Updates icon at the bottom of the iPad screen. (That
number happens to be 1 in Figures 7-6 and 7-7.) Follow these steps to update
your apps from your iPad:
1. Tap the Updates icon if any of your apps needs updating.
If you tap the Updates button and see (in the middle of the screen) a
message that says All Apps are Up-to-Date, none of the apps on
your iPad requires an update at this time. If apps need updating, they
appear with Update buttons next to them.
2. Tap the Update button that appears next to any app to update it.
If more than one application needs updating, you can update them all at
once by tapping the Update All button in the upper-right corner of the
screen.
If you try to update an application purchased from any iTunes Store account
except your own, you’re prompted for that account’s ID and password. If you
can’t provide them, you can’t download the update.
Working with Apps
Most of what you need to know about apps involves simply installing third-party
apps on your iPad. However, you might find it helpful to know how to delete,
review, or report a problem with an app.
Deleting an app
You can delete an application in two ways: in iTunes on your computer, or
directly from your iPad.
To delete an application in iTunes (that is, from your computer), click Apps
in the sidebar and then do one of the following:
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✓ Click the app to select it and press the Delete or Backspace key on the
keyboard.
✓ Click the app to select it and then choose Edit➪Delete.
✓ Right-click the app and choose Delete.
After taking any of the actions in this list, you see a dialog that asks whether
you’re sure that you want to remove the selected application. If you click the
Remove button, the application is removed from your iTunes library, as well
as from any iPad that syncs with your iTunes library.
Here’s how to delete an application on your iPad:
1. Press and hold any icon until all the icons begin to “wiggle.”
2. Tap the little x in the upper-left corner of the app that you want to
delete, as shown in Figure 7-9.
A dialog appears, informing you that deleting this app also deletes all its
data.
3. Tap the Delete button.
Little X
Figure 7-9: Tap an app’s little x, and then tap
Delete to remove the app from your iPad.
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To stop the icons from wiggling, just press the Home or Sleep/Wake button.
Deleting an app from your iPad this way doesn’t get rid of it permanently.
The app remains in your iTunes library until you delete it from iTunes, as we
describe earlier in this section. Put another way: Even though you deleted
the app from your iPad, it’s still in your iTunes library. If you want to get rid
of an app for good after you delete it on your iPad, you must also delete it
from your iTunes library.
You also make icons wiggle to move them around on the screen or move
them from page to page (as we describe in Chapter 3). To rearrange wiggling
icons, press and drag them one at a time. If you drag an icon to the left or
right edge of the screen, it moves to the next or previous Home screen. You
can also drag two additional icons to the Dock (where Safari, Mail, Photos,
and iPod live) and have a total of six apps available from every Home screen.
Writing an app review
Sometimes you love or hate an application so much that you want to tell the
world about it. In that case, you should write a review. You can do this in two
ways: in iTunes on your computer or directly from your iPad.
To write a review using iTunes on your computer, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the detail page for the application in the iTunes App Store.
2. Scroll down the page to the Reviews section and click the Write a
Review link.
You may or may not have to type your iTunes Store password.
3. Click the button for the star rating (1 to 5) you want to give the app.
4. In the Title field, type a title for your review; and in the Review field,
type your review.
5. Click the Submit button when you’re finished.
The Preview screen appears. If the review looks good to you, you’re
done. If you want to change something, click the Edit button.
To write a review from your iPad, follow these steps:
1. Tap the App Store icon to launch the App Store.
2. Navigate to the detail screen for the app.
3. Scroll down the page and tap the Write a Review link.
You probably have to type your iTunes Store password.
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147
4. Tap one to five of the stars at the top of the Write a Review screen to
rate the app.
5. In the Title field, type a title for your review; and in the Review field,
type your review.
6. Tap the Submit button in the upper-right corner of the screen.
Whichever way you submit your review, Apple reviews your submission. As
long as the review doesn’t violate the (unpublished) rules of conduct for app
reviews, it appears in a day or two in the App Store, in the Reviews section
for the particular app.
Reporting a problem
Every so often, you find an app that’s recalcitrant — a dud that doesn’t work
properly or else crashes, freezes, or otherwise messes up your iPad. When
this happens, you should definitely report the problem so that Apple and the
developer know about it and (hopefully) can fix it.
If you try to report a problem using iTunes on your computer, you click
a number of times, only to end up at a web page that says, If you are
having issues with your application, report the issue
directly to the developer of the app by visiting the
developer’s website. Don’t bother.
You can, however, report a problem from your iPad. Here’s how:
1. Tap the App Store icon to launch the App Store.
2. Navigate to the detail screen for the app.
3. Tap the Report a Problem button near the upper-right corner of the
detail screen.
You probably have to type your iTunes Store password.
4. Tap one of the three buttons to identify the type of problem you’re
reporting: This Application Has a Bug, This Application Is Offensive,
or My Concern Is Not Listed Here.
5. Type your report in the Comments field.
6. Tap the Report button in the upper-right corner of the screen to
submit the report.
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Part III
The iPad at Work
and Play
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Y
In this part . . .
our iPad is arguably the best iPod ever
invented. So in this part we look at the multimedia side of your tablet — audio, video, pictures,
and books. Never before has a tablet been this
much fun to use; in this part, we show you how to
wring the most out of every multimedia bit of it.
First we explore how to enjoy listening to music,
podcasts, and audiobooks on your iPad. Then we
look at some video, both literally and figuratively.
You find out how to use the iPad 2 video camera,
how to find good video for your iPad, and instructions for watching video on your iPad.
In Chapter 10, you find everything you always
wanted to know about taking, managing, and displaying photos: how take still photos with iPad 2,
how to find photos on your iPad, how to use the
iPad’s unique Picture Frame feature, how to create
and display slideshows, and how to do other interesting things with them.
In Chapter 11, you visit the iBook Store, Apple’s
newest shopping destination — a nifty digital
bookstore. You’ll be amazed at how many books
you can carry without breaking your back.
Chapter 12 is all about getting down to business
with your iPad. As journalists, we especially
appreciate Notes, the the bundled app that
enables to become a champion note-taker.
Chapter 12 also helps you to stay on top of your
appointments and messages with Calendar and
Contacts. And check out the sections on Pages,
Keynote, and Numbers — iWork apps for creating
documents, presentations, and spreadsheets on
the go.
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8
Get in Tune(s): Audio on Your iPad
In This Chapter
▶ Checking out your iPad’s inner iPod
▶ Browsing your library
▶ Taking control of your tunes
▶ Customizing your audio experience
▶ Shopping with the iTunes app
Y
our iPad is perhaps the best iPod ever — especially for working with
audio and video. In this chapter, we show you how to use your iPad for
audio; in Chapter 9, we cover video.
We start with a quick tour of the iPad’s iPod application. Then we
look at how to use your iPad as an audio player. After you’re
nice and comfy with using it this way, we show you how
to customize the listening experience so that it’s just
the way you like it. Then we offer a few tips to help
you get the most out of using your iPad as an audio
player. Finally, we show you how to use the iTunes
application to buy music, audiobooks, videos, and
more and how to download free content, such as
podcasts.
We assume that you already synced your iPad with
your computer and that your iPad contains audio
content — songs, podcasts, or audiobooks. If you
don’t have any audio on your iPad yet, we humbly
suggest that you get some (flip to Chapter 3 and follow
the instructions) before you read the rest of this chapter —
or Chapter 9, for that matter.
Okay, now that you have some audio content on your iPad to play with, are
you ready to rock?
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Introducing the iPod inside Your iPad
To use your iPad as an iPod, just tap the iPod icon on the right side of the
Dock at the bottom of the screen (unless you’ve moved it elsewhere).
Here’s a quick overview of what you see when the iPod app starts:
✓ Audio library: Along the left side of the screen you see your iPad audio
library, which contains all the music, podcasts, audiobooks, and
playlists you’ve synced with or purchased on your iPad. For the sake of
this demonstration, we’re going to ask you to tap on the first item in the
library — the one labeled Music — now.
Along the right side of the screen, running from top to bottom, you
see the letters of the alphabet from A to Z (unless you’re looking at the
Genres tab, which doesn’t need them). Tap one to jump to that letter
instantly when you’re browsing Songs, Artists, Albums, or Composers.
If you don’t see the alphabet on the right side of the screen, you either
didn’t tap Music in the library when we asked you to or you’ve selected
the Genres tab. So tap Music in the library and then tap any tab at the
bottom of the screen except Genres, and we’re on the same page as you
again.
✓ Player controls: At the top of the screen, from left to right, you can see
the volume control, the Rewind/Previous Track button, the Play/Pause
button, the Fast Forward/Next Track button, and the Search field.
✓ Playlist and tab navigation: At the bottom of the screen, from left
to right, you can see a plus sign for adding new playlists, the Genius
symbol for creating Genius playlists, and five tabs: Songs, Artists,
Albums, Genres, and Composers.
If you don’t see five tabs at the bottom of the screen, chances are you
didn’t tap Music in the library when we asked you to a few paragraphs
back.
We take a closer look at all these features, but for now, Figure 8-1 shows them
all for your enjoyment and edification.
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Chapter 8: Get in Tune(s): Audio on Your iPad
Library
Play/Pause button
Volume Rewind/Previous
control
Track button
Genius Playlist
New Playlist
153
Alphabet
Fast Forward/Next Search
Track button
field
Tabs
Scrubber bar
and
Playhead
Figure 8-1: These components are what you find on the iPod app’s main
screen.
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Checking Out Your Library
The Music item in your library displays every single song on your iPad.
So while the Music item is selected, you can always see every song, artist,
album, genre, or composer, depending on the tab you’ve selected at the
bottom of the screen — Songs, Artists, Albums, Genres, or Composers.
If you don’t see every song in your library, chances are you’ve typed
something into the Search field.
You can find a particular song, artist, album, genre, or composer using the
Search box or the tabs. The following sections show you how.
Finding music with the Search field
With the iPod app open, the easiest way to find music is to type a song, artist,
album, or composer name into the Search field in the upper-right corner of
the screen.
You can also find songs (or artists, for that matter) without opening the iPod
app by typing their names in a Spotlight search, as we mention in Chapter 2.
Browsing among the tabs
If you’d rather browse your music library, tap the appropriate tab at the
bottom of the screen — Songs, Artists, Albums, Genres, or Composers — and
the items of that type appear.
Now you can find a song, artist, album, genre, or composer by
✓ Flicking upward or downward to scroll up and down the list until you
find what you’re looking for
or
✓ Tapping one of the little letters on the right side of the screen to jump
to that letter in the list (all tabs except Genres)
Then, when you find what you’re looking for, here’s what happens based on
which tab is selected:
✓ Songs: The song plays.
If you’re not sure which song you want to listen to, try this: Tap the
Shuffle button at the top of the list (just above the first song). Your iPad
then plays songs from your music library at random.
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✓ Artists: A list of artists’ names appears. Tap an artist, and all the albums
and songs by that artist appear; tap a song, and it plays; tap an album
cover, and the whole album plays; or tap the Play All Songs button just
below the Search field to play all songs from all the albums by that
artist. To see the list of artists, you can either tap the Artists button to
the right of the word Library at the top of the screen or tap the Artists
tab at the bottom of the screen.
Figure 8-2 is what you see after you tap an artist’s name (in this case,
that artist is Bleu, one of Bob’s favorite singer/songwriters).
Figure 8-2: Bob tapped Bleu in the list of artists,
and this is appeared.
✓ Albums: Albums works pretty much the same way as Artists, except you
see a grid of album covers instead of a list of artists. Tap an album, and
its contents appear in an overlay, as shown in Figure 8-3.
To play one of the songs on the album, tap it. To return to the grid of
album covers, tap anywhere outside the overlay.
✓ Genres: When you tap the Genres tab, a grid of genres — Comedy, Rock,
Pop, Hip Hop/Rap, and so on — appears. Tap a genre, and a list of the
songs in that genre appears in an overlay.
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Figure 8-3: We tapped the Todd Rundgren
Anthology album cover, and this appeared.
If the list of songs in an overlay is longer than the one in Figure 8-3, you
may have to flick upward to see the rest of the songs.
✓ Composers: A list of composers appears. Tap a composer, and all the
albums and songs by that composer appear. Tap a song, and it plays;
tap an album cover, and all the songs from that album play; or tap the
Play All Songs button just below the Search field to play all songs from
all the albums by that composer. Tap the Composers button near the
top of the screen and just to the right of the word Library, or tap the
Composers tab at the bottom of the screen to return to the list of
composers.
One last thing: You don’t see any tabs at the bottom of the screen if you
select Podcasts, Audiobooks, or iTunes U in the sidebar. These libraries
work pretty much the same as we’ve just described except instead of songs,
artists, albums, genres, or composers, you see podcasts, audiobooks, and
iTunes U courses.
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What’s the difference between
artists and composers?
If you’re wondering about the difference
between an artist and a composer, imagine
this if you will: You have a recording in your
iTunes Library of a track entitled “Symphony
No. 5 in C Minor.” The composer will always
be Ludwig van Beethoven, but the artist could
be the London Symphony Orchestra, the Los
Angeles Philharmonic, the Austin Klezmer
Ensemble, or many other performers. Here’s
another example: The ballad “Yesterday” was
composed by John Lennon and Paul McCartney
but has been performed by artists that include
the Beatles, Ray Charles, Boyz II Men, Dave
Grusin, Marianne Faithful, and many others.
Now you may be wondering where your iPad
gets this kind of info because you know you
didn’t supply it. Check this out: Click a track
in iTunes on your computer, choose File➪Get
Info, and then click the Info tab at the top of the
window.
That’s just some of the information that can be
“embedded” in an audio track. This embedded
information, sometimes referred to as the
track’s tags, is what your iPad uses to
distinguish between artists and composers. If a
track doesn’t have a composer tag, you won’t
find it in the Composers tab on your iPad.
Taking Control of Your Tunes
If you’ve read along so far, you have down the basics and can find and play
songs (and podcasts, audiobooks, and iTunes U courses), here we take a look
at some of the things you can do with your iPad when it’s in iPod mode.
Playing with the audio controls
First things first: We look at the controls you use after you tap a song,
podcast, audiobook, or iTunes U course. We refer to these things —
songs, podcasts, audiobooks, and iTunes U courses — as tracks to avoid
confusion (and unnecessary typing).
Take a peek at Figure 8-1 and you see exactly where all these controls are
located on the screen:
✓ Volume control: Drag the little dot left or right to reduce or increase the
volume level.
✓ Previous Track/Rewind button: When a track is playing, tap once to
go to the beginning of the track or tap twice to go to the start of the
preceding track in the list. Touch and hold this button to rewind the
track at double speed.
✓ Play/Pause button: Tap to play or pause the track.
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✓ Next Track/Fast Forward button: Tap to skip to the next track in the list.
Touch and hold this button to fast-forward at double speed.
You can display playback controls anytime a track is playing. Better
still, this trick works even when you’re using another app or your Home
screen(s): Just double-tap the Home button and swipe the icon tray
from left to right, and the controls appear at the bottom of the screen, as
shown in Figure 8-4.
Figure 8-4: These controls appear — even if you’re using another
app — when you double-click the Home button and swipe the tray
while a track plays.
The playback controls don’t appear if you’re using an app that has its
own audio, such as many games, any app that records audio, and VoIP
(Voice over Internet Protocol) apps like Skype.
A similar set of controls appears at the top of the screen when you
double-tap the Home button while your iPad is locked.
✓ Scrubber bar and Playhead: Drag the little dot (the Playhead) along the
Scrubber bar to skip to any point within the track.
You can adjust the scrub rate by sliding your finger downward on the screen
as you drag the Playhead along the Scrubber bar. Check out the section
“The Way-Cool Hidden iTunes Scrub Speed Tip” in Chapter 18 for additional
details. By the way, this slick trick also works in many other apps that use a
Scrubber, most notably You Tube.
But wait, there’s more. You see additional controls after you tap the album
art in the Now Playing area near the lower-left corner of the screen. Now, tap
anywhere on the artwork that fills the screen and several additional controls
appear, as shown in Figure 8-5.
Earlier in this section, we explain how to use the volume control, Rewind/
Previous Track button, Play/Pause button, Fast Forward/Next Track button,
and Scrubber bar/Playhead. They may look slightly different on this screen,
but they work in exactly the same way.
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Repeat
Back
159
Shuffle
Genius
Track List
Figure 8-5: You see these additional controls
after you tap the album art in the Now Playing
area.
The new controls you see are as follows:
✓ Repeat: Tap once to repeat all songs in the current list (that is, playlist,
album, artist, composer, or genre) and play them all over and over. Tap
again to repeat the current song again and again. Tap again to turn off
repeat.
The button appears in blue after one tap, in blue with a little 1 inside
after two taps, and in black and white when repeat is turned off.
✓ Shuffle: Tap this button to play songs at random; tap again to play songs
in the order they appear onscreen.
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✓ Track List: Tap this button to see all the tracks on the album that
contains the song currently playing, as shown in Figure 8-6.
Tap any song on this list to play it. Or, swipe your finger across the dots
just beneath the Scrubber bar to rate the song from one to five stars. In
Figure 8-6, we’ve rated the song four stars.
Why would you want to assign star ratings to songs? One reason is that
you can use star ratings to filter songs in iTunes on your Mac or PC.
Another is that you can use them when you create Smart Playlists in
iTunes. And last but not least, they look cool.
✓ Genius: This feature is so cool, we devote an entire section to it. See the
section “It doesn’t take a Genius,” later in this chapter.
✓ Back: Tap this button to return to the previous screen.
Figure 8-6: We’ve given this tune a four (out of
five) star rating.
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A brief AirPlay interlude
There’s one more icon that you may or may
not see in your iPad’s iPod app, and it’s the
AirPlay Selector icon, which appears in Figures
8-1 and 8-4.
Girls Love Alice” in the figure) to the Apple TV
in his den. The Apple TV is, in turn, connected
to his home theatre audio system and HDTV via
HDMI and/or optical audio cable.
But before we get into why you may or may
not see it, we talk for a moment about AirPlay,
which is a wicked-cool technology baked into
every copy of iOS (version 4.2 or higher). AirPlay
lets you wirelessly stream music, photos, and
video to AirPlay-enabled devices such as
Apple’s AirPort Extreme, AirPort Express Wi-Fi
base stations, and Apple TV, as well as thirdparty AirPlay-enabled devices including (but not
limited to) speakers and HDTVs.
AirPlay Selector is a shy little icon that appears
only if it detects an AirPlay-enabled device on
the same Wi-Fi network. As it happens, Bob has
an Apple TV in his den, so he sees the options
in the following figure when he taps the AirPlay
Selector icon.
Tapping Family Room Apple TV sends whatever
is playing on the iPod app (Elton John’s “All the
But wait — there’s more! If you use an Apple
TV as your AirPlay-enabled device, you can also
stream music, video, and photos from your Mac
or PC or even from your iPhone (to your HDTV).
If you have an HDMI-equipped TV and/or a
decent sound system and have decent Wi-Fi
bandwidth, you’ll love Apple TV.
Twiddling with podcast and audiobook controls
When what’s playing is a podcast or audiobook, you see a somewhat different
set of controls when you tap the cover art in the Now Playing area. (If you
don’t see the controls, tap the cover art to make them reappear.)
We explain the basic controls in the preceding section. The controls that are
unique to podcasts and audiobooks, as shown in Figure 8-7, are as follows:
✓ E-Mail (podcasts only): Tap this button to send someone an e-mail link
to this podcast.
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✓ Playback Speed: Tap this button to toggle between normal speed (1X),
double speed (2X), or half speed (1⁄2X).
✓ 30-Second Repeat: Tap this button to hear the last 30 seconds of the
podcast or audiobook.
E-mail
Playback speed
30-Second Repeat
Figure 8-7: These controls appear only when
you listen to a podcast or audiobook.
It doesn’t take a Genius
Genius selects songs from your music library that go great together. To use it,
tap the Genius button, and your iPad generates a Genius playlist of 25 songs
that it picked because it thinks they go well with the song that’s playing.
To use the Genius feature on your iPad, you need to turn on Genius in iTunes
on your computer and then sync your iPad at least once.
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If you tap the Genius button on the main screen (see Figure 8-1) and no song
is currently playing, an alphabetical list of songs appears, and you need to
select a song before the Genius playlist can be generated.
When you create a Genius playlist, you find an item called Genius in your
library list; tap it and you see the 25 songs that Genius selected. You see
three buttons in the upper-right corner of the list:
✓ New: Select a different song to use as the basis for a Genius playlist.
✓ Refresh: See a list of 25 songs that “go great with” the song you’re
listening to (or the song you selected).
✓ Save: Save this Genius playlist so that you can listen to it whenever you like.
When you save a Genius playlist, it inherits the name of the song it’s based
upon and appears in your library with a Genius icon that looks like the
Genius button. And the next time you sync your iPad, the Genius playlist
magically appears in iTunes.
The less popular the song, artist, or genre, the more likely Genius will choke
on it. When that happens, you see an alert that asks you to try again because
this song doesn’t have enough related songs to create a Genius playlist.
If you like the Genius feature, you can also create a new Genius playlist in
iTunes and then sync it with your iPad.
Creating playlists
Playlists let you organize songs around a particular theme or mood: operatic
arias, romantic ballads, British invasion — whatever. Younger folks sometimes
call them mixes.
Your playlists appear in alphabetical order on the left side of the screen,
below your music, podcasts, audiobooks, and iTunes U courses. If you don’t
see podcasts, audiobooks, and/or iTunes U in your library, don’t worry. That
merely means you don’t have any podcasts, audiobooks, or iTunes U courses
in your iPad’s library. And don’t worry if you don’t have any playlists. Just
know that if you had some, you’d see them here.
Although it may be easier to create playlists in iTunes on your computer,
your iPad makes it relatively easy to create (and listen to) playlists:
✓ To create a playlist on your iPad, click the New Playlist (+) button (refer
to Figure 8-1 for its location). You’re asked to name your playlist. Do so
and then tap Save. After you do this, you see a list of the songs on your
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iPad in alphabetical order. Tap the ones you want to have in this playlist,
and they turn gray, as shown in Figure 8-8. When you’ve tapped every
song you want in the list, tap the Done button just below the Search field.
✓ To listen to a playlist, tap its name in your library and you see a list of
the songs it contains. If the list is longer than one screen, flick upward to
scroll down. Tap a song in the list, and the song plays. When that song is
over or you tap the Next Song button, the next song in the playlist plays.
This continues until the last song in the playlist has played, at which
point your iPad shuts up.
When you use any playlist — Smart, Genius, or Plain — you can tap the
word Shuffle at the top of the playlist to hear a song from that playlist
(and all subsequent songs) at random. When all songs in the playlist
have been played, your iPad shuts up.
Although you can’t create Smart Playlists on your iPad, they totally rock.
What is a Smart Playlist? Glad you asked. A Smart Playlist is a special
playlist that selects tracks based on criteria you specify, such as Artist
Name, Date Added, Rating, Genre, Year, and many others. Fire up iTunes
on your computer and choose File➪New Smart Playlist to get started.
Figure 8-8: This is how to create a playlist on
your iPad.
And that’s all there is to selecting, creating, and playing songs in a playlist.
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Customizing Volume and Equalizer Settings
You can tweak volume and equalizer settings to customize your iPad-as-aniPod experience. If you’ve noticed and been bothered that the volume of
some songs is higher than others, check out the iTunes Sound Check feature.
If you want to adjust certain frequencies, the equalizer enables you to do so.
And if you want to set a maximum volume limit, tell your iPad to make it so.
The following sections explain how.
Play all songs at the same volume level
The iTunes Sound Check option automatically adjusts the level of songs
so that they play at the same volume relative to each other. That way, one
song never blasts out your ears even if the recording level is much louder
than that of the song before or after it. To tell the iPad to use these volume
settings, you first have to turn on the feature in iTunes on your computer.
Here’s how to do that:
1. Choose iTunes➪Preferences (Mac) or Edit➪Preferences (PC).
2. Click the Playback tab.
3. Select the Sound Check check box to enable it.
Now you need to tell the iPad to use the Sound Check settings from iTunes.
Here’s how to do that:
1. Tap the Settings icon on the iPad’s Home screen.
2. Tap iPod in the list of settings.
3. Tap the Sound Check On/Off switch so that it says On.
Choose an equalizer setting
An equalizer increases or decreases the relative levels of specific frequencies
to enhance the sound you hear. Some equalizer settings emphasize the bass
(low end) notes in a song; other equalizer settings make the higher frequencies
more apparent. The iPad has more than a dozen equalizer presets, with
names such as Acoustic, Bass Booster, Bass Reducer, Dance, Electronic, Pop,
and Rock. Each one is ostensibly tailored to a specific type of music.
The way to find out whether you prefer using equalization is to listen to
music while trying different settings. To do that, first start listening to a song
you like. Then, while the song is playing, follow these steps:
1. Tap the Home button on the front of your iPad.
2. Tap the Settings icon on the Home screen.
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3. Tap iPod in the list of settings.
4. Tap EQ in the list of iPod settings.
5. Tap different EQ presets (Pop, Rock, R&B, or Dance, for example), and
listen carefully to the way they change how the song sounds.
6. When you find an equalizer preset that you think sounds good, tap
the Home button and you’re finished.
If you don’t like any of the presets, tap Off at the top of the EQ list to turn off
the equalizer.
At the risk of giving away one of the tips in Chapter 18, we feel obliged to
mention that you may get somewhat longer battery life if you keep EQ
turned off.
Set a volume limit for music (and videos)
You can instruct your iPad to limit the loudest listening level for audio or
video. To do so, here’s the drill:
1. Tap the Settings icon on the Home screen.
2. Tap iPod in the list of settings.
3. Tap Volume Limit in the list of iPod settings.
4. Drag the slider to adjust the maximum volume level to your liking.
5. (Optional) Tap Lock Volume Limit to assign a four-digit passcode to
this setting so that others can’t easily change it.
The Volume Limit setting limits the volume of only music and videos; it
doesn’t apply to podcasts or audiobooks. And, although the setting works
with any headset, headphones, or speakers plugged into the headset jack on
your iPad, it doesn’t affect sound played on your iPad’s internal speaker.
By the way, speaking of that lone internal iPad speaker, it’s not in stereo
although it sounds pretty good just the same. Of course, when you plug in
headphones, you hear rich stereo output.
Shopping with the iTunes App
Last but certainly not least, the iTunes application lets you use your iPad to
download, buy, or rent just about anything you can download, buy, or rent
with the iTunes application on your Mac or PC, including music, audiobooks,
iTunes U classes, podcasts, and videos. And, if you’re fortunate enough to
have an iTunes gift card or gift certificate in hand, you can redeem it directly
from your iPad.
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If you want to do any of that, however, you must first sign in to your iTunes
Store account:
1. Tap the Settings icon on the Home screen.
2. Tap Store in the list of settings.
3. Tap Sign In.
4. Type your username and password.
Or, in the unlikely event that you don’t have an iTunes Store account already:
1. Tap the Settings icon on the Home screen.
2. Tap Store in the list of settings.
3. Tap Create New Account.
4. Follow the onscreen instructions.
After the iTunes Store knows who you are (and, more importantly, knows
your credit card number), tap the iTunes icon on your Home screen and
shop until you drop. It works almost exactly the same as the iTunes App
Store, which you read about in Chapter 7.
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9
iPad Video: Seeing Is Believing
In This Chapter
▶ Finding and playing videos
▶ Restricting movies
▶ Capturing, editing, and deleting video on your iPad
▶ Facing up to FaceTime
P
icture this scene: The smell of popcorn permeates the room as you and
your family congregate to watch the latest Hollywood blockbuster. A
motion picture soundtrack swells up. The images on the screen are stunning.
And all eyes are fixed on the iPad.
Okay, here comes the reality check. The iPad is not going to replace a wallsized high-definition television as the centerpiece of your home theater
(though as you discover, you can watch material that originates on the iPad on
the bigger screen). But we do want to emphasize that with
its gorgeous, nearly 10-inch, high-definition display —
one of the best we’ve seen on a handheld device —
watching movies and other videos on the iPad can be
a cinematic delight. The screen looks terrific even
when you’re not viewing it straight on.
What’s more if you have the iPad 2, you now have
front and rear cameras that can help turn you,
under certain circumstances, into a filmmaker —
right from the device.
And video on the iPad ventures into another area, video
chat. You can keep in touch with friends and loved ones
by gazing into each other’s pupils. It’s all done through a version of FaceTime, a clever video chat program built right into your tablet.
We get to FaceTime later in this chapter. For now, and without any further
ado, we get on with the show!
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Finding Stuff to Watch
You have a few main ways to find and watch videos on your iPad. You can
fetch all sorts of fare from the iTunes Store, whose virtual doors you can
open directly from the iPad.
Or, you can sync content that already resides on your Mac or PC. (If you
haven’t done so yet, now is as good a time as any to read Chapter 3 for all the
details.)
The videos you can watch on the iPad generally fall into one of the following
categories:
✓ Movies, TV shows, and music videos that you purchase or fetch free
in the iTunes Store: You can watch these by tapping the Videos icon on
the Home screen.
The iTunes Store features dedicated sections for purchasing or renting
episodes of TV shows (from Glee to Modern Family), as shown in Figure
9-1, and for buying or renting movies (from Love and Other Drugs to 127
Hours), as shown in Figure 9-2.
Figure 9-1: Buying and watching TV on the
iPad is gleeful.
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Figure 9-2: You can spend hours watching
movies on the iPad.
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Pricing varies but it’s not atypical as of this writing to fork over $1.99 to
pick up an episode of a popular TV show in standard definition or $2.99
for high-def versions. You can rent certain shows commercial-free for
99 cents. And a few shows are free. You can also purchase a complete
season of a favorite show. The final season of a classic show, such as
Lost, for example, costs $32.99 in standard-def and $49.99 in high-def.
Feature films fetch prices from $9.99 to $19.99.
You can also rent some movies, typically for $2.99, $3.99, or $4.99. We’re
not wild about current rental restrictions — you have 30 days to begin
watching a rented flick and a day to finish watching after you’ve started,
though you can watch as often you want during the 24-hour period. But
that’s showbiz for you. Such films appear in their own Rented Movies
section in the video list, which you get to by tapping Videos. The number
of days before your rental expires displays. And you have to completely
download a movie onto your iPad before you can start watching it.
As shown in Figure 9-3, by tapping a movie listing in iTunes, you can
generally preview a trailer before buying (or renting) and check out
additional tidbits: the plot summary, credits, reviews, and customer ratings, as well as other movies that appealed to the buyer of this one. And
you can search films by genre or top charts (the ones other people are
buying or renting), or rely on the Apple Genius feature for recommendations based on stuff you’ve already watched. (Genius works for movies
and TV much the way it works for music, as we explain in Chapter 8.)
Figure 9-3: Bone up on a movie before buying or renting it.
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✓ The boatload of video podcasts, just about all free, featured in the
iTunes Store: Podcasts started out as another form of Internet radio,
although instead of listening to live streams, you download files onto your
computer or iPod to take in at your leisure. You can still find lots of audio
podcasts, but the focus here is on video. You can watch free episodes
that cover Sesame Street videos, sports programming, investing strategies,
political shows (across the ideological spectrum), and so much more.
✓ Videos that play via entertainment apps: For example, Netflix offers an
app that enables you to use your Netflix subscription, if you have one, to
stream video on your iPad. We like it so much, it made our list of favorites in Chapter 16. Similarly, the ABC television network offers an appealing app so that you can catch up on its shows on your iPad. The Hulu
Plus subscription app also lets you catch up on favorite TV.
✓ Seminars at Harvard, Stanford, or numerous other prestigious institutions: iTunes U boasts more than 250,000 free lectures from around the
world, many of them videos. Better yet, you get no grades, and you don’t
have to apply for admission, write an essay, or do homework. Figure 9-4
shows the iTunes U description for Open University’s The Galapagos,
one of the learned videos we watched. Bring on our sheepskins.
✓ Homegrown videos from the popular YouTube Internet site: Apple
obviously thinks highly of YouTube because it devoted a dedicated
Home screen icon to the site. You can read more on YouTube’s special
status on the iPad in Chapter 6.
Figure 9-4: Get smart. iTunes U offers a slew of lectures on diverse topics.
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✓ The movies you’ve created in iMovie software or other software on
the Mac or, for that matter, other programs on the PC: Plus all the
other videos you may have downloaded from the Internet.
✓ Videos you’ve given birth to using the rear- or front-facing camera on
the iPad 2: Oh, and there’s now a version of iMovie made especially for
the iPad 2. The optional app costs $4.99. Check out the “Shooting Your
Own Videos” section, later in this chapter, for direction on creating
movies with iPad 2.
You may have to prepare some videos so that they’ll play on your iPad. To
do so, highlight the video in question after it resides in your iTunes library. In
iTunes choose Advanced➪Create iPad or Apple TV Version. Alas, creating an
iPad version of a video doesn’t work for all the video content you download
off the Internet, including video files in the AVI, DivX, MKV, and Xvid formats.
For a somewhat technical workaround without potential conversion hassles,
try the $2.99 Air Video app from InMethod s.r.o. The utility app can deliver
AVI, DivX, MKV, and other videos that wouldn’t ordinarily play on your
iPad. You can also check out a free version. You have to download Air Video
server software on your Mac or PC to stream content to your iPad.
For more on compatibility, check out the nearby “Are we compatible?” sidebar (but read it at your own risk).
Are we compatible?
The iPad works with a whole bunch of video,
although not everything you’ll want to watch
will make it through. Several Internet video
standards — notably Adobe Flash — are not
supported.
The absence of Flash is a bugaboo because
Flash is the technology behind much of the
video on the web.
Apple backs other standards — HTML5, CSS
3, and JavaScript — and is apparently sensitive enough to the issue that in the early days
of the iPad, Apple made mention of several
sites where video would play on the iPad. The
list included CNN, The New York Times, Vimeo,
Time, ESPN, Major League Baseball, NPR, The
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White House, Sports Illustrated, TED, Nike, CBS,
Spin, and National Geographic. What’s more,
entertainment apps from Netflix and ABC help
fill the TV/movie void as well.
With the appropriate utility software, you might
also be able to convert some nonworking video
to an iPad-friendly format on your computer.
But if something doesn’t play now, it may in
the future because Apple has the capability to
upgrade the iPad through software.
In the meantime, you can find a description of
the video formats that iPad supports on Apple’s
website; point your browser to www.apple.
com/ipad/specs.
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Playing Video
Now that you know what you want to watch, here’s how to watch it:
1. On the Home screen, tap the Videos icon.
Videos stored on your iPad are segregated by category — Movies,
Rented Movies, TV Shows, Podcasts, Music Videos, iTunes U, and
Shared. For each category, you see the program’s poster art, as shown
in Figure 9-5. Categories such as Rented Movies, Podcasts, and iTunes
U appear only if you have that type of content loaded on the machine.
Ditto for the Shared category, which is enabled if you take advantage
of iTunes Home Sharing, a feature we discuss in Chapter 8. You can use
iTunes Home Sharing to watch videos that reside in the iTunes library
on your Mac or PC as well.
2. At the top of the screen, select the tab that corresponds to the type of
video you want to watch.
Movies
TV Shows
Music Videos
iTunes U
Figure 9-5: Choosing the movie, TV show, lecture, or music video to watch from Ed’s Shared library.
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3. Tap the poster that represents the movie, TV show, or other video you
want to watch.
You see a full description of the movie you want to watch, along with a
listing of cast and filmmakers, as shown in Figure 9-6. Tap the Chapters
tab to browse the chapters. You see thumbnail images and the length of
the chapter. Tap the Info tab to return to a description.
4. To start playing a movie (or resume playing from where you left off),
tap the Play button, labeled in Figure 9-6.
Alternatively, from the Chapters view (see Figure 9-7), tap any chapter
to start playing from that point.
If you go to Settings from the Home screen and tap Video, you can
change the default setting to start playing from where you left off to start
playing from the beginning.
5. (Optional) Rotate your iPad to landscape mode to maximize a movie’s
display.
Play movie
Figure 9-6: Getting a description of the movie
you’re about to watch.
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Figure 9-7: Start playing from any chapter.
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If you hold the iPad in portrait mode, you can see black bars on top of
and below the screen where the movie is playing. Those bars remain
when you rotate the device to its side, but the iPad plays the film in a
wider-screen mode.
For movies, this is a great thing. You can watch flicks as the filmmaker
intended, in a cinematic aspect ratio.
The iPad doesn’t give you a full high-definition presentation because that
requires 1280-x-720-pixel resolution and the iPad’s screen is 1024 x 768, meaning that it’s scaled down slightly. Having said that, we don’t think too many
viewers are going to complain or even notice about the quality of the images.
Finding and Working the Video Controls
While a video is playing, tap the screen to display the controls shown in
Figure 9-8. Then you can tap a control to activate it. Here’s what each of the
controls can do:
Playhead
Scrubber bar
Restart/Rewind
Scale
Volume
AirPlay
Play/Pause Fast Forward
Figure 9-8: Controlling the video.
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✓ To play or pause the video, tap the Play/Pause button.
✓ To adjust the volume, drag the volume slider to the right to raise the
volume and to the left to lower it. Alternatively, use the physical Volume
buttons to control the audio levels.
✓ To restart or go back, tap the Restart/Rewind button to restart the
video, or tap and hold the same button to rewind.
✓ To skip forward, tap and hold Fast Forward to advance the video. Or,
skip ahead by dragging the playhead along the Scrubber bar.
✓ To set how the video fills the screen, tap the Scale button, which
toggles between filling the entire screen with video or fitting the video
to the screen. Alternatively, you can double-tap the video to go back and
forth between fitting and filling the screen. You see this button or can
double-tap to change the scale only when the iPad is in landscape mode.
Fitting the video to the screen displays the film in its theatrical aspect
ratio. Again, you may see black bars above or below the video (or to its
sides), which some people don’t like. Filling the entire screen with the
video may crop or trim the sides or top of the picture, so you don’t see
the complete scene that the director shot.
✓ To select language and subtitle settings, tap the Audios and Subtitles
button. You see options to select a different language, turn on or hide
subtitles, and turn on or hide closed captioning. The control appears
only if the movie supports any of these features or if you’ve turned on
closed captioning choosing Settings➪Video.
✓ To make the controls go away, tap the screen again (or just wait for
them to go away on their own).
✓ To tell your iPad you’re done watching a video, tap Done. You return
to the last Videos screen that was visible before you started watching
the movie.
Watching Video on a Big TV
We love watching movies on the iPad, but we also recognize the limitations of
a smaller screen. For starters, friends won’t crowd around to watch with you.
As good as it is, the iPad screen doesn’t match the HDTV in your living room,
so Apple offers two ways to display video from your iPad to a TV:
✓ AirPlay: Through the AirPlay feature, you can wirelessly stream
movies — commercial flicks or videos you shot — as well as photos
and music from the iPad to an Apple TV box that’s connected to an
HDTV. Start watching the movie on the iPad and tap the AirPlay button
that appears in the video controls (refer to Figure 9-8). You can watch
only one screen at a time. Tap Apple TV to stream to the TV through
the Apple TV box. Tap iPad to watch on the iPad.
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You can multitask while streaming a video. Therefore, while the kids are
watching a flick on the TV, you can surf the web or catch up on e-mail.
Although you can stream from an iPad to an Apple TV and switch
screens between the two, you can’t stream a movie that you start watching on Apple TV to the iPad.
✓ Digital AV Adapter and HDMI cable: Apple sells a $39 Digital AV
Adapter accessory that lets you connect the iPad or iPad 2 to a highdefinition television, projector, or other device that has an HDMI port.
The adaptor lets you mirror the iPad screen on the connected TV or projector. So you can watch a movie, or for that matter, view anything else
that’s on the tablet screen: web pages, apps, you name it. You have to
supply your own HDMI cable. For more on accessories, check out
Chapter 15.
Restricting Video Usage
If you’ve given an iPad to your kid or someone who works for you, you may
not want that person spending time watching movies or television. You might
want him to do something more productive, such as homework or the quarterly budget. That’s where parental restrictions come in. Please note that the
use of this iron-fist tool can make you really unpopular.
Tap Settings➪General➪Restrictions➪Enable Restrictions. You’re asked to
establish or enter a previously established passcode. Twice. Having done so
you can set restrictions based on movie ratings (PG, R, and so on) and TV
shows. You can also restrict FaceTime usage or use of the camera (which
when turned off also turns off FaceTime). For more on restrictions, flip to
Chapter 13, where we explain the stings for controlling (and loosening)
access to iPad features.
Deleting Video from Your iPad
Video takes up space — lots of space. After the closing credits roll and you
no longer want to keep a video on your iPad, here’s what you need to know
about deleting video:
✓ To delete a video manually, tap and hold its movie poster until the small
circled x shows up on the poster. To confirm your intention, tap the
larger Delete button that appears or tap Cancel if you change your mind.
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✓ Deleting a movie from the iPad only removes it from the iPad. It remains
in the iTunes library on your Mac or PC, assuming you synced it to your
computer in the first place. That means if you want to watch it on your
iPad again in the future, you can do so, as long as you sync it again.
✓ If you delete a rented movie before watching it on your iPad, it’s gone.
You have to spend (more) loot if you hope to watch it in the future on
the iPad.
Shooting Your Own Videos
The iPad 2 is the first iPad with a camera — um two cameras to be more precise. The rear camera can record video up to the high-definition techie standard of 720p and at 30 frames-per-second (fps), or full motion video. Come
again? That’s a fancy way to say the video ought to play back smoothly. The
front camera can also perform at 30 fps, but the VGA (video graphics array)
quality isn’t quite as good.
Now that we’ve dispensed with that little piece of business, here’s how to
shoot video on the iPad:
1. Tap the Camera icon on the Home screen.
2. Drag the little onscreen button at the bottom-right corner of the display from the camera position to the video camera position.
The button is labeled in Figure 9-9. The camera button is for stills, a subject we cover in Chapter 10.
You can’t switch from the front to the rear camera or vice versa while
you’re capturing a scene. So before shooting anything, think about which
camera you want to use and then tap the front/rear camera button at the
top-right corner of the screen when you’ve made your choice.
3. Tap the red record bottom at the bottom center to begin shooting a
scene.
4. Tap the red record button again to stop recording.
Your video is automatically saved to the Camera Roll, alongside any
other saved videos and digital stills.
Editing what you shot
We assume you captured some really great footage, but you probably shot
some stuff that belongs on the cutting room floor as well. No big whoop
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because you can perform simple edits right on your iPad 2. Remember to
tap the Camera Roll at the bottom-left corner of the Camera app to find your
recordings. Then:
Front/Rear Camera
Camera Roll Start/Stop video capture Camera/Video switch
Figure 9-9: Lights, camera, action.
1. Tap a video recording to display the onscreen controls, as shown in
Figure 9-10.
2. Drag the start and end points along the timeline to select only the
video you want to keep.
Hold your finger over the section to expand the timeline to make it
easier to apply your edits. Tap the Play button to preview your surgery.
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3. Choose what to do with your trimmed clip:
• Tap Trim Original to permanently remove scenes from the original clip.
• Tap Save as New Clip to create a newly trimmed video clip; the
original video remains intact, and the new clip is stored in the
Camera Roll.
• Tap Cancel to start over.
For more ambitious editing on the iPad 2, consider iMovie for iPad, a $4.99
app that resembles a bare-bones version of iMovie for Mac computers.
Through iMovie, you can export your finished video to YouTube, Vimeo, and
Facebook.
Drag either edge to trim
Figure 9-10: Getting a trim.
Sharing video
Unlike other video on your iPad, you can play back what you’ve just shot in
portrait or landscape mode. And if the video is any good, you likely want to
share it with a wider audience. To do so, display the playback controls by
tapping the screen and then tap the icon that resembles an arrow trying to
escape a rectangle. From here you can e-mail the video, send it to YouTube
(see Chapter 6), or copy it.
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Seeing Is Believing with FaceTime
We bet you can come up with a lengthy list of people you’d love to be able to
eyeball in real time from afar. Maybe it’s your old college roommate. Maybe
it’s your old college sweetheart. And maybe it’s your grandparents, who’ve
long since retired to warm climates somewhere.
That’s the beauty of FaceTime, the video chat app on the iPad 2. FaceTime
exploits the two cameras built into the device, each serving a different purpose. The front camera lets you talk face to face. The back camera shows the
person you’re talking to what you’re seeing.
To take advantage of FaceTime, here’s what you need:
✓ Access to Wi-Fi: And the people you’re talking to need Internet access,
too. On an iOS device, you need Wi-Fi. On a Mac, you need an upstream
or downstream Internet connection of at least 128 Kbps. You also need
at least a 1 Mbps upstream and downstream connection for HD-quality
video calls.
✓ FaceTime: On your conversation partner’s own iPad 2, on an Intel-based
Mac computer, on a recent model iPod touch, or an iPhone 4 (FaceTime
first appeared on Apple’s prized smartphone).
The iPad’s large inviting screen would seem to be made for FaceTime, but we’d
be remiss if we didn’t point out that some critics have been underwhelmed by
the quality of the cameras. We think the cameras do just fine for FaceTime, at
least with halfway decent lighting and a robust Wi-Fi connection.
Getting started with FaceTime
When you use FaceTime for the first time, after you tap the app’s icon from
the Home screen, you’re required to sign in to FaceTime using your Apple
ID, which can be your iTunes Store account, MobileMe account, or another
Apple account. If you don’t have an account, tap Create New Account to set
one up within FaceTime. You also must supply an e-mail address that callers
use to call you from their own FaceTime-capable iPads, Macs, iPhones, or
iPod touches.
If this is the first time you’ve used a particular e-mail address for FaceTime,
Apple sends an e-mail to that address to verify the account. Click (or tap)
Verify Now and enter your Apple ID and password to complete the FaceTime
setup. If the e-mail address resides in Mail on the iPad, you’re already good
to go.
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If you have multiple e-mail addresses, callers can use any of them for
FaceTime. To add an e-mail address after the initial setup, tap Settings➪
FaceTime➪Add another Email.
You can turn FaceTime on or off within Settings, but if you don’t turn it off,
you don’t have to sign back in when you launch the app.
Making a FaceTime call
Now the real fun begins — making an actual call.
Follow these steps:
1. Start the FaceTime app from the Home screen.
You can check out what you look like in a window prior to making a
FaceTime call. So powder your nose and put on a happy face.
2. Choose someone to call. Pick among:
• Your Contacts: Tap a name or number, and then tap the e-mail
address or phone number they have associated with FaceTime. To
add a contact, tap Contacts and tap +.
• Your recent calls: Tap Recents and then tap the appropriate
number or name.
• Your favorites: You can add frequent callers to a favorites list. Once
again merely tap a name to call.
3. Check or change what you display on the screen if needed.
When a call is underway, you can still see what you look like to the other
person through a small picture-in-picture window that you can drag to
any corner of the video call window. It’s a great way to know if your mug
has dropped out of sight.
4. (Optional) To toggle among the front and rear cameras, tap the
camera button that is also labeled in Figure 9-11.
5. Tap End when you’re ready to hang up.
While you’re on a FaceTime call, the following tips are handy to know:
✓ Rotate the iPad to its side to change the orientation.
✓ Silence or mute a call by tapping the Microphone icon (labeled in
Figure 9-11). Be aware that you can still be seen even if not heard (and
you can still see and hear the other person).
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✓ Momentarily check out another iPad app by pressing the Home button
and then tapping the icon for the app you have in mind. At this juncture, you can still talk over FaceTime, but you can no longer see the
person. Tap the green bar at the top of the iPad screen to bring the
person and the FaceTime app back in front of you.
How you look
to other person
Call window shows
who you’re talking to
Mute Voice
Switch Cameras
Hang up
Figure 9-11: Bob can see Ed, and Ed can see Bob in FaceTime.
Receiving a FaceTime call
Of course, you can get FaceTime calls as well as make them. FaceTime
doesn’t have to be open for you to receive a video call. Here’s how incoming
calls work:
✓ Hearing the call: When a call comes in, the caller’s name prominently
displays on the iPad’s screen, as shown in Figure 9-12. You simultaneously hear the phone ring.
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✓ Accepting or declining the call: Tap Accept to answer the call or
Decline if you’d rather not. If your iPad is locked when a FaceTime call
comes in, slide the green arrow button to the right to answer. To decline
it, do nothing and wait for the caller to give up.
✓ Silencing the ring: You can press the Sleep/Wake button at the top of
the iPad to silence the incoming ring. If you know you don’t want to be
disturbed by FaceTime calls before the phone even rings, flip the side
switch on the iPad 2 to mute. Make sure you’re using the side switch as
a mute control rather than as a rotation lock. Otherwise head to Settings
(see Chapter 13) to change the function of this switch back to mute.
Figure 9-12: Tap Accept to answer the call.
And with that, we hereby silence this chapter. But there’s more to do with
the cameras on your iPad 2. And we get to that in Chapter 10.
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10
You Oughta Be in Pictures
In This Chapter
▶ Shooting pictures (iPad 2 only)
▶ Importing your pictures
▶ Viewing and admiring pictures
▶ Creating a slide show
▶ Working with pictures even more
▶ Deleting your photos
▶ Hamming it up in Photo Booth
T
hroughout this book, we sing the praises of the iPad’s vibrant multitouch
display. You’d be hard-pressed to find a more appealing portable
screen for watching movies or playing games. As you might imagine, the iPad you have recently purchased (or are lusting
after) is also a spectacular photo viewer. Images are crisp
and vivid, at least those that were properly shot by you.
(C’mon, we know Ansel Adams is a distant cousin.)
What’s more, if you snapped up an iPad 2, you can
shoot some of those pictures directly with your
prized tablet. The reasons, of course, are the front
and rear cameras built into the device. If you read
Chapter 9, you already know you can put those
cameras to work capturing video. In this chapter,
you get the big picture on shooting still images.
Okay, we need to get a couple of things out of the way:
The iPad is never going to substitute for a point-and-shoot
digital camera, much less a pricey digital SLR. As critics, we
can quibble about the grainy images you get shooting in low light
or the fact that there’s no flash.
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But we’re here, friends, to focus on the positive. And having cameras on your
iPad may prove to be a godsend when no better option is available. And we
can think of certain circumstances — selling real estate, say, or shopping for
a new home — where tablet cameras are quite convenient.
Meanwhile, you’re in for a real treat if you’re new to Photo Booth, a yuk-it-up
Mac program that makes its way onto the iPad 2. That may be the best, or at
least the most fun, use of the cameras yet.
We get to Photo Booth at the end of this chapter. But over the next few
pages, you discover the best ways to make the digital photos on the iPad
come alive, no matter how they managed to arrive on your machine.
Shooting Pictures
To start shooting pictures on the iPad 2, tap the Camera icon on the Home
screen. The screen resembles a closed camera shutter. When that shutter
opens an instant later, you’re peering through one of the largest viewfinders
imaginable in the near 10-inch display of the iPad 2. Here’s what to do next:
1. For the purposes of this exercise, make sure the Camera/Video switch
at the bottom-right corner of the screen (and shown in Figure 10-1) is
turned to Camera mode. If not, slide the switch from right to left.
2. Use the viewfinder to frame your image.
3. Tap the portion of the screen in which you see the face or object you
want as the image’s focal point.
A small square (not shown in Figure 10-1) surrounds your selection, and
the iPad automatically adjusts the exposure of that part of the image.
4. (Optional) To zoom in or out, tap the screen and drag the slider.
The iPad 2 has a 5X digital zoom, which basically crops and resizes an
image. Such zooms are nowhere near as effective quality-wise as optical zooms on many digital cameras. Be aware that zooming works only
with the rear camera still in Camera mode; it doesn’t work with the front
camera or when you shoot video.
5. To toggle among the front and rear cameras, tap the front/rear camera
button (see Figure 10-1) on the upper-right corner of the screen.
6. When you’re satisfied and ready to snap an image, tap the camera
button on the bottom of the screen.
You hear a shutter sound unless you turned the side switch to silent, as
we explain in Chapter 1.
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The image you shoot lands in the Camera Roll at the bottom-left corner
of the screen. We explain what you can do with the images on the iPad
later in this chapter.
Front/Rear camera
Camera Roll
Camera/Video switch
Figure 10-1: Using the iPad 2 as a camera.
Importing Pictures
Even in the absence of a digital camera on the original iPad, you’ll discover a
few ways to add pictures to the iPad. (Obviously, you can employ these strategies on the iPad 2, too.) Alas, one of the methods involves buying an accessory. We zoom in in the following sections.
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Syncing pix
We devote an entire chapter (see Chapter 3) to synchronizing data with the
iPad, so we don’t dwell on it here. But because syncing pictures is still the
most common way to import images to the iPad, we’d be remiss for not mentioning it in this chapter. (The assumption in this section is that you already
know how to get pictures onto your computer.)
Quickie reminder: On a Mac, you can sync photos (and videos) via iPhoto
software version 6.06 or later and Aperture 3.02 or later. On a PC, you can
sync with Adobe Photoshop Elements 8.0 or later. Alternatively, with both
computers, you can sync with any folder that contains pictures.
When the iPad is connected to your computer, click the Photos tab on the
iPad Device page in iTunes on the Mac or PC. Then select the appropriate
check boxes to specify the Albums, Events, and Faces you want to synchronize. Or, select All Photos, Albums, Events, and Faces if you have ample storage on the iPad to accommodate them all.
So what are Events and Faces anyway? Here’s a quick look at these staple features in iPhoto on the Mac:
✓ Events: In their infinite wisdom, the folks at Apple figured that most pictures shot on a given day are tied to a specific occasion, such as Junior’s
birthday party or a wedding ceremony. So the iPhoto program on a Mac
automatically groups them as such by placing all the pictures taken on
that day into a single collection. Don’t worry: You can split a day’s worth
of pictures into more than one event, if say, the birthday party was in
the morning and the wedding was at night. Apple automatically names
an event by its date; you can change it to something more descriptive
(such as Timmy’s Softball Game or Geri’s Graduation).
✓ Faces: As its name implies, Faces is a collection of pictures on a single
common thread: Whose mug is in them. In our experience with Faces,
the technology, although pretty darn impressive, isn’t perfect.
Connecting a digital camera or memory card
Almost all the digital cameras we’re aware of come with a USB cable that can
be used to transfer images to a computer. Of course, the iPad isn’t a regular
computer, and it isn’t equipped with a USB port.
Instead, Apple sells an optional $29 iPad Camera Connection Kit; here’s how
it works:
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1. Connect your camera to your iPad using one of the two connectors in
the kit.
Two small connectors are included, and each fits into the iPad’s dock
connector at the bottom of the machine. One connector has a USB port,
the other an SD slot.
If you’re going the USB route, kindly use the cable that comes with your
camera because no such cable comes with Apple’s kit.
2. Make sure that the iPad is unlocked.
3. If you haven’t already done so, turn on the camera and ensure that it’s
set to transfer pictures.
Consult the manual that came with the camera if you’re unsure of which
setting to use.
The Photos app on the iPad opens and displays the pictures that you
can import from the camera.
4. Tap Import All to select the entire bunch or tap the individual pictures
you want to include if you’d rather cherry-pick.
A check mark appears next to each image you select. And that’s pretty
much it: The Pad organizes the pictures into albums and such, as we
describe later in this chapter.
You’re free at this point to erase the pictures from your camera.
The SD Card Reader connector accommodates the SD memory cards
common to so many digital camera models. The procedure works almost
identically to the USB connector, except you’re inserting the SD gizmo into
the dock connector port rather than the USB connector mentioned previously. Just be careful to insert the SD gently, to prevent any damage.
The Camera Connection Kit supports many common photo formats, including JPEG and Raw. The latter is a format favored by photo enthusiasts.
Saving images from e-mails and the web
You can save pictures that arrive in e-mails or pictures that you come across
on the web very easily: Just press and hold your finger against the image, and
then tap Save Image when the button pops up a second later. Pictures are
stored in a Saved Photos album on the original iPad or in the Camera Roll on
the iPad 2.
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Where Have All My Pictures Gone?
So where exactly do your pictures hang out on the iPad? Well, we explain in the
preceding section what happens to images saved from e-mails and the Internet:
They reside in a Saved Photos album on the original iPad or the Camera Roll on
the iPad 2. (We wanted to see whether you were paying attention.)
Other imported images are grouped in the same albums as they were on the
computer, or lumped together as Events, Faces, and — when the embedded
metadata inside an image identifies where a picture was shot — under a very
cool Places feature. We have more to say about Places later in this chapter.
So now that you know where the pictures are, you’re ready to discover how
best to display them and share them with others — and how to dispose the
duds that don’t measure up to your lofty photographic standards.
Get ready to literally get your fingers on the pics (without worrying about
smudging them). The following steps walk you through the basics of navigating among your pictures with the Photos app:
1. Tap the Photos app on the Home screen.
The app opens with a grid of thumbnail images on top of a black background, as shown in Figure 10-2. The Photos tab at the top of the screen
is highlighted because you’re in the Photos view. If the thumbnail you
have in mind doesn’t appear on this screen, flick your finger up or down
to scroll through the pictures rapidly or use a slower dragging motion
to pore through the images more deliberately. So, if you have more
photos than can possibly show up on the screen at any one time, which
is highly probable, your flicking or dragging skills will improve quickly.
2. Tap or pinch the photo you want to display.
These lead to slightly different outcomes. When you tap an image, the
picture rapidly gets bigger, practically jumping off the screen. If you
pinch or unpinch instead, by putting your thumb and forefinger together
and then spreading them apart, you have more control over how the
image shrinks or grows in size. You can also keep your finger pressed
against the image to drag it around.
3. To navigate through collections of images, tap Albums, Events, Faces,
or Places at the top of your iPad screen. Or pinch them.
You see stacks or collections of pictures. Tap an album, event, or faces
pile, and all the underlying pictures scatter into a mass of individual
images. It’s an orderly escape because the individual pictures once again
appear in a grid. Most likely, you’ll again have to scroll up or down to
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see all the pictures in the collection. As before, tap any of the individual
pictures you want to focus on.
But what if you unpinch a collection instead of tapping? The answer
depends on how you pinched. If you pinched just a little bit, the pictures
spread out slowly enough that you can preview some of the images in
the pile. Let go, and the collection opens (unless, that is, you hadn’t
pinched far enough, and the images retreat into a stack). If you do a
wider pinch by spreading your fingers even more, the entire collection
opens. As before, tap a picture to see a large view of it.
4. With an individual photo on the screen, tap the picture to open the
picture controls at the top and bottom of the screen.
These are shown in Figure 10-3. We discuss what they do later but want
you to know how to summon them, because we’re certain at some point
or another you’ll be calling on them.
5. To make the controls disappear, tap the screen again; or just wait a
few seconds, and they go away on their own.
6. Tap the Home button when you’re finished with the Photos app.
Figure 10-2: The landing spot for photos.
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Tap to e-mail,
send to MobileMe,
assign to contact,
Tap to see use as wallpaper,
print, or copy
a slideshow
Number of photos
in current album
Tap to return
to Album view
Slide finger to skim through album
Figure 10-3: Picture controls.
Admiring Pictures
Photographs are meant to be seen, of course, not buried in the digital equivalent of a shoebox. And, the iPad affords you some neat ways to manipulate,
view, and share your best photos.
You’ve no doubt already figured out (from the preceding section) how to find
a photo, view it full-screen, and display picture controls. But you can do a lot
of maneuvering of your pictures without summoning those controls. Here are
some options:
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✓ Skip ahead or view the previous picture: Flick your finger left or right.
✓ Landscape or portrait: The iPad’s wizardry (or, more specifically, the
device’s accelerometer sensor) is at work. When you turn the iPad
sideways, the picture automatically reorients itself from portrait to landscape mode, as the images in Figure 10-4 show. Pictures shot in landscape mode fill the screen when you rotate the iPad. Rotate the device
back to portrait mode, and the picture readjusts accordingly.
The screen orientation lock to the left of the iPad controls in the multitasking tray (see Chapter 2) must be switched off.
Figure 10-4: The same picture in portrait (left) and landscape (right) modes.
Show a picture to a friend by flipping the iPad over. The iPad always
knows which is right side up.
✓ Zoom: Double-tap to zoom in on part of an image. Double-tap again to
zoom out. Alternatively, spread and pinch with your thumb and index
finger to zoom in and zoom out. The downside to zooming is that you
can’t see the entire image.
✓ Pan and scroll: This cool little feature is practically guaranteed to make
you the life of the party. After you zoom in on a picture, drag it around
the screen with your finger. Besides impressing your friends, you can
bring front and center the part of the image you most care about. That
lets you zoom in on Fido’s adorable face as opposed to, say, the unflattering picture of the person holding the dog in his lap.
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✓ Skim: A bar appears at the bottom of the screen when you summon
picture controls. Drag your finger across the bar in either direction to
quickly view all the pictures in an open album.
✓ Map it: If you tap the Places tab instead of an album, or event or faces
collection, a map like the one shown in Figure 10-5 appears. Notice the
red pins on the map shown at the left. These indicate that pictures were
taken in the location shown on the map. Now tap a pin, and a stack of all
the images on the iPad shot in that area appears, as shown in the image
on the right. As before, you can tap or pinch the collection to open it.
The iPad 2 is pretty smart when it comes to geography. So as long as
Location Services are turned on in Settings and the specific Location settings (also under Location Services in Settings) for the camera are
turned on, pictures you take with the iPad 2 cameras are geotagged, or
identified by where they were shot.
Think long and hard before permitting images to be geotagged if you plan on
sharing those images with people for whom you want to keep your address
and other locations private.
Figure 10-5: Mapping out your pictures.
You can spread your fingers on a map to enlarge it and narrow the pictures
taken to a particular area, town, or even neighborhood. For more on Maps,
flip to Chapter 6.
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Launching Slide Shows
Those who store a lot of photographs on computers are familiar with running
slide shows of those images. You can easily replicate the experience on the
iPad, and through AirPlay, stream the slide show wirelessly to an Apple TV, or
lacking that device, via an optional cable that connects to a TV or projector:
1. Open an album by tapping it or display all your photos in the Photos
view.
2. Tap the Slideshow button in the upper-right corner of the screen.
The Slideshow Options window, as shown in Figure 10-6 appears. We
explore these and other options in the next section. But if you just want
to start the slide show from here, continue to Step 3.
3. Tap Start Slideshow.
Your only obligation is to enjoy the show.
Figure 10-6: Tap the Slideshow button to see slide show options.
Adding special slide show effects
Both the Settings options and the Slideshow button enable you to add special effects to your slide shows. Under Settings, you can alter the length of
time each slide is shown, change the transition effects between pictures, and
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display images in random order. With Slideshow Options, you can add transitions and music.
From the Home screen, tap Settings➪Photos. Then tap any of the following to
make changes:
✓ Play Each Slide For: You have five choices (2 seconds, 3 seconds, 5 seconds, 10 seconds, and 20 seconds). When you’re finished, tap the Photos
button to return to the main Settings screen for Photos.
✓ Repeat: If this option is turned on, the slide show continues to loop until
you stop it. The Repeat control may be counterintuitive. If Off displays,
tap it to turn on the Repeat function. If On displays, tap it to turn off the
Repeat function.
✓ Shuffle: Turning on this feature plays slides in random order. As with
the Repeat feature, tap Off to turn on shuffle or tap On to turn off
random playback.
Tap the Home button to leave Settings and return to the Home screen.
To select transitions and music for your slide shows, tap the Slideshow
button to select options (refer to Figure 10-6):
✓ Transitions: You can change the effect you see when you move from
one slide to the next. Again, you have five cool choices (Cube, Dissolve,
Ripple, Wipe, or a personal favorite of ours, Origami, in which the
images fold out in ways similar to the Japanese folk art of paper folding).
Why not try them all to see what you like? Tap the Photos button when
you’re finished.
✓ Music: Adding music to a slide show couldn’t be easier. From the
Slideshow Options window, tap the Play Music option so that it’s turned
on. Then tap Music to choose your soundtrack from the songs stored
on the device. Ed loves backing up slide shows with Sinatra, Sarah
Vaughan, or Gershwin, among numerous other artists. Bob loves using
Beatles songs or stately classical music.
Admiring pictures on the TV
The AirPlay feature that lets you stream music and videos from the iPad to an
Apple TV (see Chapter 9) works with photos, too.
To watch the slide show (or view individual pictures) on a big screen TV via
Apple TV, tap the AirPlay button shown in the upper-right corner of Figure
10-3 and then tap Apple TV from the list. If the AirPlay button isn’t visible,
make sure the iPad and Apple share the same Wi-Fi network. Tap the iPad
button to view the slide show again on the iPad. We can tell you the experience is very cool.
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Turning the iPad into a picture frame
Even when the iPad is locked, it can do something special — turn into a handsome animated digital picture frame, a variation on the slide show feature. To
turn on this feature, tap the Picture Frame icon in the lower-right corner of
the Lock screen.
Inside Picture Frame Settings, reachable like all other settings when you tap
the Settings icon on the Home screen, you can choose one of two transitions
(Dissolve or Origami), turn a “zoom in on faces” feature on or off, and arrange
to play slides in random or shuffle mode. And, of course, you can pick the
albums, faces, or events to include in your slide show.
To truly take advantage of the frame feature, prop up the iPad so that you
can see it by using Apple’s optional $29 iPad Dock on the original iPad or the
Smart Cover accessory that’s usable with the iPad 2.
You can pause or stop a slide show by tapping the Picture Frame icon or
sliding the slider to unlock the iPad. To disable the feature altogether, tap
General under Settings, tap Passcode Lock so that it’s on (you have to enter
your passcode at this point, if you have one), and tap Picture Frame so that
the setting is off.
More (Not So) Stupid Picture Tricks
You can take advantage of the photos on the iPad in a few more ways. In
each case, you tap the picture and make sure that the picture controls are
displayed. Then tap the icon in the upper-right corner that looks like an
arrow trying to escape from a rectangle. That displays the choices shown in
Figure 10-3.
Here’s what each choice does:
✓ Email Photo: Some photos are so precious that you just have to share
them with family members and friends. When you tap Email Photo, the
picture is automatically embedded in the body of an outgoing e-mail
message. Use the virtual keyboard to enter the e-mail addresses, subject
line, and any comments you want to add — you know, something profound, like “Isn’t this a great-looking photo?” (Check out Chapter 5 for
more info on using e-mail.)
✓ Send to MobileMe: If you’re a member of Apple’s $99-a-year MobileMe
online service (formerly .Mac and before that iTools), you can publish a
photo to an album in the MobileMe Gallery. Tap the Send to MobileMe
control (it appears only if you’ve set up a MobileMe account on the
iPad) and then tap the appropriate gallery album to which you want to
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add the picture. Enter the title of the photo and an optional description
in the spaces provided on the Publish Photo screen that pops up. Tap
Publish. Your photo is on its way to the Internet cloud.
✓ Assign to Contact: You can assign a picture to someone in your contacts list. To make it happen, tap Assign to Contact. Your list of contacts
appears on the screen. Scroll up or down the list to find the person who
matches the picture of the moment. You can drag and resize the picture
to get it just right. Then tap Set Photo.
You can also assign a photo to a contact by starting out in Contacts, as
we explain in Chapter 12. Sneak peek on that chapter: From Contacts,
choose the person, tap Edit, and then tap Add Photo. At that point, you
can select an existing portrait from one of your on-board picture albums.
To change the picture you assigned to a person, tap her name in the
contacts list, tap Edit, and then tap the person’s thumbnail picture,
which also carries the label Edit. From there, you can select another
photo from one of your albums, edit the photo you’re already using (by
resizing and dragging it to a new position), or delete the photo you no
longer want.
✓ Use as Wallpaper: The default background image on the iPad when you
unlock the device is raindrops on a gray background. But you have a
sunny demeanor, and probably have an even better photograph to use
as the iPad’s wallpaper. A picture of your spouse, your kids, or your pet,
perhaps?
When you tap the Use as Wallpaper button, you see what the present
image looks like as the iPad background picture. You can move and
resize the picture through the now-familiar action of dragging or pinching across the screen with your fingers. When you’re satisfied with the
wallpaper preview, tap the Set Home Screen button to make it your new
Home background, or tap Set Lock Screen to have the image appear
when the iPad is locked. Or, you can tap Set Both to make that image
your Home and Locked wallpaper screens. These choices are shown in
Figure 10-7. Per usual, you also have the option to tap Cancel. (You can
find out more about wallpaper in Chapter 13.)
✓ Copy Photo: Tap this button when you want to copy a photo and paste
it elsewhere.
Alternatively, you can also press and hold your finger against a photo
until a Copy button appears. Tap that button, and you can paste the
image into an e-mail, for example, by preparing a message, holding your
finger against the screen until a Paste button appears, and then pressing
the button to paste it into the body of the message.
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Figure 10-7: Choose your own photo for your iPad wallpaper.
✓ Print a Picture: In the 21st century, people are accustomed to viewing
pictures on computer screens, digital frames, smartphones, and tablets.
In the last century, most viewed prints. But there’s still something special about printing pictures to give away, carry around, or place in an
old-fashioned photo frame. Through AirPrint, you can print photos from
an iPad onto a compatible printer. Tap the icon with the arrow that’s
trying to escape a rectangle and then tap Print. The iPad tries to find the
printer. You can select the number of copies. If your printer has a tray
for photo paper in addition to plain paper, the printer may automatically
switch to that tray when you try to print a picture.
In addition to the photo tricks that come ready to use on your iPad, we
encourage you to check out the App Store, which we explore in greater depth
in Chapter 7. As of this writing, dozens of photography-related applications,
some free, are available. These come from a variety of sources and range
from Photobucket for iPad, which is free, to Alterme’s 99-cent Photo Splash
Effects, which lets you convert a picture to black and white, except for a
single object in the image that can retain a splash of color.
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Deleting Pictures
We told a tiny fib by intimating that photographs are meant to be seen. We
should have amended that statement by saying that some pictures are meant
to be seen. Others, well . . . you can’t get rid of them fast enough. Fortunately,
the iPad makes it a cinch to bury the evidence:
✓ Deleting photos in the Saved Photos or Camera Roll albums: Some pictures, namely those you saved from an e-mail or web page and that now
reside in the aptly named Saved Photos album (or Camera Roll album),
are easy to dispose of. Just tap the soon-to-be-whacked picture to open
it, and then tap the Trash icon that appears in the upper-right corner
when you summon picture controls. To finish the job, tap the big red
Delete Photo button. Or, tap anywhere else on the screen if you have
second thoughts and decide to keep the picture on your iPad.
✓ Deleting multiple photos in Saved Photos or Camera Roll: When the
Saved Photos or Camera Roll albums are open, tap the icon in the upperright corner that resembles a right-pointing arrow that leans out of a
rectangle. A red Delete button appears in the upper-left corner of the
screen. Now tap each photo that you want to get rid of; a check mark
appears on each one. When you’ve identified the doomed bunch, tap
Delete, or tap Cancel to save them.
✓ Removing synced photos: The Trash icon appears only in the Saved
Photos or Camera Roll album. That’s because the other pictures on
your iPad — those that you synced through your Mac or PC — must be
deleted from the photo album on your computer first. Then when you
resync those albums, the photos are no longer on your iPad.
Entering the Photo Booth
Remember the old-fashioned photo booths at the local 5 and Dime? Remember
the 5 and Dime? Okay, if you don’t remember such variety stores, your parents
probably do, and if they don’t, their parents no doubt do. The point is that
photo booths (which do still exist) are fun places to ham it up solo or with a
friend as the machine captures and spits out wallet-size pictures.
In the Photo Booth app included on the iPad 2, Apple has cooked up a
modern alternative to a real photo booth. The app is a close cousin to a similar application on the Mac. Here’s how Photo Booth works on iPad 2:
1. Tap the Photo Booth icon on the iPad 2.
A red curtain opens, revealing the tic-tac-toe style grid, as shown in
Figure 10-8.
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2. Point the front-facing camera at your face.
You see your mug through a prism of eight rather whacky special
effects: Thermal Camera, Mirror, X-Ray, Kaleidoscope, Light Tunnel,
Squeeze, Twirl, and Stretch. The center square — what is this Hollywood
Squares? — is the only one in which you come off looking normal — or
as we like to kid, like you’re supposed to look.
You can also use the rear camera in Photo Booth, to subject your friends
to this form of, um, visual abuse.
3. Choose one of the special effects (or stick with Normal) by tapping one
of the thumbnails.
Ed chose Mirror for the example shown in Figure 10-9, because, after all,
two Eds are better than one. (Sorry, couldn’t resist.)
Figure 10-8: Photo Booths of yesteryear weren’t like this.
4. If you’re not satisfied with the effect you’ve chosen, tap the icon at the
bottom-left corner of the app to return to the Photo Booth grid and
select another.
5. After choosing an effect, you can doctor things up even further by
pinching or unpinching with your fingers.
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6. When you have your bizarre look just right, tap the camera button on
the screen to snap the picture.
Your pic lands (as do other pictures taken with the iPad 2 camera) on
the Camera Roll album.
From the Camera Roll album, pictures can be shared, or — you might
want to seriously consider this given the distortions you’ve just applied
to your face — deleted.
Figure 10-9: When one co-author just isn’t enough.
Nah, we’re only kidding. Keep the image and take a lot more. Photo Booth
may be a blast from the past. But it’s also a blast.
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Curling Up with a Good iBook
In This Chapter
▶ Getting the skinny on e-books
▶ Opening up to iBooks
▶ Reading books
▶ Shopping for iBooks
▶ Reading electronic periodicals
D
on’t be surprised if you have to answer this question from an inquisitive child someday: “Is it true, Grandpa, that people once read books
on paper?”
That time may still be a ways off, but it somehow doesn’t seem as
farfetched anymore, especially now that Apple has signed on
as a major proponent in the burgeoning electronic books
revolution.
Don’t get us wrong; we love physical books as much
as anyone and are in no way urging their imminent
demise. But we also recognize the real-world benefits behind Apple’s digital publishing efforts, and
those by companies like Amazon, which manufactures what is, for now, the market-leading Kindle
electronic reader. As you discover in this chapter,
the Kindle plays a role on the iPad as well.
For its part, the iPad makes a terrific electronic reader,
with color and dazzling special effects, including pages
that turn like a real book.
We open the page on this chapter to see how to find and purchase
books for your iPad, and how to read them after they land on your virtual
bookshelf. But first we look at why you might want to read books and periodicals on your iPad.
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Why E-Books?
We’ve run into plenty of skeptics who beg the question, “What’s so wrong
with the paper books that folks have only been reading for centuries that
we now have to go digital?” The short answer is there’s nothing wrong with
physical books — except maybe that paper, over the long term, is fragile, and
they tend to be bulky, a potential impediment for travelers.
On the other hand, when asked why he prefers paper books, Bob likes to
drop one from shoulder height and ask, “Can your iPad (or Kindle) do that?”
Having said that, though, now consider the electronic advantages:
✓ No more weighty or bulky constraints: You can cart a whole bunch of
e-books around when you travel, without breaking your back. To the avid
bookworm, this potentially changes the whole dynamic in the way you
read. Because you can carry so many books wherever you go, you can
read whatever type of book strikes your fancy at the moment, kind of like
listening to a song that fits your current mood. You have no obligation
to read a book from start to finish before opening a new bestseller, just
because that happens to be the one book, maybe two, that you have in
your bag. In other words, weighty constraints are out the window.
✓ Feel like reading a trashy novel? Go for it. Rather immerse yourself in
classic literature? Go for that. You might read a textbook, cookbook, or
biography. Or gaze in wonder at an illustrated beauty. What’s more, you
can switch among the various titles and styles of books at will, before
finishing any single title.
✓ Flexible fonts and type sizes: With e-books, or what Apple prefers
to call iBooks, you can change the text size and fonts on the fly, quite
useful for those with less than 20/20 vision.
✓ Get the meaning of a word on the spot: No more searching for a physical dictionary. You can look up an unfamiliar word on the spot.
✓ Search with ease: Looking to do research on a particular subject? Enter
a search term to find each and every mention of the subject in the book
you’re reading.
✓ Read in the dark: The iPad has a high-resolution backlit display so that
you can read without a lamp nearby, which is useful in bed when your
partner is trying to sleep.
✓ See all the artwork in color: Indeed, you’re making no real visual sacrifices anymore. For example, the latest iBooks software from Apple lets
you experience (within certain limits) the kind of stunning art book once
reserved for a coffee table. Or you can display a colorful children’s picture book.
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Truth is, there are two sides to this backlit story. The grayscale electronic ink
displays found on Amazon’s Kindle and several other e-readers may be easier
on the eyes and reduce fatigue, especially if you read for hours on end. And
although you may indeed have to supply your own lighting source to read
in low-light situations, those screens are easier to see than the iPad screen
when you’re out and about in bright sunshine.
Beginning the iBook Story
To start reading electronic books on your iPad, you have to fetch the iBooks
app in the App Store. (For more on the App Store, consult Chapter 7.)
As you might imagine, the app is free, and it comes with access to Apple’s
brand new iBookstore, of which we have more to say later in this chapter.
For now just know that iBookstore is an inviting place to browse and shop for
books 24 hours a day. And as a bonus for walking into this virtual bookstore,
you receive a free electronic copy of Winnie-the-Pooh.
A.A. Milne’s children’s classic and all the other books you end up purchasing
for your iPad library turn up on the handsome wooden bookshelf, as shown
in Figure 11-1. The following basics help you navigate the iBooks main screen:
✓ Change the view: If you prefer to view a list of your books rather than
use this Bookshelf view, tap the button toward the upper-right corner of
the screen (labeled in Figure 11-1). In this view, you can sort the list by
title, author, or category (as shown in Figure 11-2), or you can rearrange
where books appear on the bookshelf.
✓ Rearrange books on the bookshelf: To perform this feat, tap Bookshelf
from the List view and then tap Edit (in the upper-right corner). Press
your finger against the icon to the right with the three horizontal lines of
the book title you want to move. Drag the book up or down the list.
✓ Remove a book from the bookshelf: In the List view, tap Edit and then
tap the red circle with the white line to the left of the book title you want
to remove. Then tap Delete. In the Bookshelf view, tap Edit and then tap
the black circle with the white X that appears in the upper-left corner of
a book cover. Then tap Delete.
✓ Organize books by collections: If you have a vast library of e-books, you
might want to segregate titles by genre or subject by creating collections
of like-minded works. You might have collections of mysteries, classics,
biographies, how-to’s, even all the For Dummies books you (hopefully)
own. Apple has already created two collections on your behalf: Books
(for all titles) and PDFs (for the Adobe PDF files you may have on your
iPad). (Apple doesn’t let you edit or remove the premade Books or PDFs
collections.) To create, rename, or remove a collection of your own, tap
the Collections button (also labeled in Figure 11-1) to show off your current list of collections and choose from the following options:
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• Tap New to add a new collection.
• Tap Edit and the red circle with the white dash to delete a collection. Tap Delete to finish the job.
• If you want to change the name of a collection, tap its name.
• If you want to move a book or PDF to a collection, go to the bookshelf, tap each work you want to move, and then tap Move. Select
the new collection for these titles.
A book can reside only in one collection at a time.
Tap to open iBookstore
Tap to view
books by
collections
Tap a cover
to open a book
Bookshelf
view
List
view
Figure 11-1: You can read a book by its cover.
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Figure 11-2: Sort a list of your books by title,
author, category, or bookshelf.
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Of course, here we are telling you how to move or get rid of a book before
you’ve even had a chance to read it. How gauche. The next section helps you
start reading.
Reading a Book
To start reading a book, tap it — you can start with the Pooh book now. The
book leaps off the shelf, and at the same time, it opens to either the beginning of the book or the place where you left off. (And you may have left off on
an iPhone, iPod touch, or another iPad because through your Apple IDn your
virtual place in a book is transported from device to device.)
Even from the very title page, you can appreciate the color and beauty of
Apple’s app as well as the navigation tools, as shown in Figure 11-3.
If you rotate the iPad to the side, the one-page book view becomes a twopage view, though all the navigational controls remain the same.
While lounging around reading, and especially if you’re lying down, we recommend that you use the Screen Rotation Lock (shown in Chapter 1) to stop
the iPad from inadvertently rotating the display.
But you can take advantage of the iPad’s VoiceOver feature to have the iPad
read to you out loud. It may not be quite like having Mom or Dad read you
to sleep, but it can be a potential godsend to those with impaired vision. For
more on the VoiceOver feature, consult Chapter 13.
Turning pages
You’ve been turning pages in books your entire life, so you don’t want this
simple feat to become a complicated ordeal just because you’re now reading
electronically. Fear not, it’s not. You have no buttons to press.
Instead, to turn to the next page of a book, do any of the following:
✓ Tap or flick your finger near the right margin of the page. If you tap or
flick, the page turns in a blink.
✓ Drag your finger near the margin, and the page folds down as it turns,
as if you were turning pages in a real book.
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Tap to add
bookmark
Search
Table
of
Contents
Text size
and
Fonts
Brightness
Slider
Figure 11-3: Books on the iPad offer handy reading and navigation tools.
✓ Drag down from the upper-right corner of the book, and the page curls
from that spot. The effect is so dazzling, you can make out the faint type
bleeding from the previous page on the next folded down page.
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✓ Drag up from the lower-right corner, and the page curls up from that
spot.
✓ Drag from the middle-right margin, and the entire page curls.
To turn to the previous page in a book, tap, flick, or drag your finger in a
similar fashion, except now do so closer to the left margin. You’ll witness the
same cool page-turning effects.
That’s what happens by default anyway. If you go into the main iPad Settings
and tap iBooks under Apps on the left side of the screen, you have the option
to go to the next page instead of the previous page when you tap near the left
margin.
The iPad is smart, remembering where you left off. So if you close a book
by tapping the Library button in the upper-left corner or by pressing the
main Home button, you automatically return to this page when you reopen
the book. It isn’t necessary to bookmark the page (though you can, as we
describe later in this chapter).
Jump to a specific page
When you’re reading a book, you often want to go to a specific page.
Here’s how:
1. Tap anywhere near the center of the page you’re reading to summon
page navigator controls, if they’re not already visible.
The controls are labeled in Figure 11-2.
2. Drag your finger along the slider at the bottom of the screen until the
chapter and page number you want appear.
3. Release your finger and voilà — that’s where you are in the book.
Go to the Table of Contents
Most books you read on your iPad have Tables of Contents, just like many
other books. Here’s how you use a Table of Contents on your iPad:
1. With a book open on your iPad, tap the Table of Contents button near
the top of the screen.
The Table of Contents screen, as shown in Figure 11-4, appears.
2. Tap the chapter, title page, or another entry to jump to that page.
Alternatively, tap the Resume button that appears at the upper-left
corner of the screen to return to the previous location in the book.
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Figure 11-4: The Table of Contents for Frommer’s Alaska 2011.
Add bookmarks
Moving around to a particular location on the iPad is almost as simple as
moving around a real book, and as we explain in the earlier section “Turning
pages,” Apple kindly returns you to the last page you were reading when you
close a book.
Still, occasionally, you want to bookmark a specific page so that you can
easily return. To insert a bookmark somewhere, merely tap the Bookmark
icon near the upper-right reaches of the screen. A red ribbon slides down
over the top of the Bookmark icon signifying that a bookmark is in place. Tap
the ribbon if you want to remove the bookmark. Simple as that.
After you set a bookmark, here’s how to find it later:
1. Tap the Table of Contents/Bookmark button.
2. Tap Bookmarks (if it’s not already selected).
Your bookmark is listed along with the chapter and page citations, the
date you bookmarked the page, and a phrase or two of surrounding text,
as the example in Figure 11-5 shows.
3. Tap your desired bookmark to return to that page in the book.
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Figure 11-5: Finding the pages you bookmarked.
You can also remove a bookmark from the Bookmarks list by swiping your
finger in either direction along a bookmark and then tapping the red Delete
button that appears.
Add highlights and notes
Bookmarks are great for jumping to pages you want to read again and again.
Of course you may instead want to highlight specific words or passages
within a page. And sometimes you want to add your own annotations or comments, as well, which is handy for school assignments. Pardon the pun, but
Apple is on the same page. Here’s how to do both.
1. Press your finger and hold it down against any text on a page. Then
lift your finger to summon the Highlight and Note buttons.
These two buttons appear side-by-by side (sandwiched along with
Dictionary and Search buttons that we address in a moment).
You see grab points along the highlighted word.
2. (Optional) Refine the highlighted section by expanding the grab points.
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3. Choose a button to add a highlight or note.
• When you tap the Highlight button, the word or passage you
selected is highlighted in yellow. You can later read the highlight
by returning to the Table of Contents page in the same way that
you find a bookmark. (See the preceding section and refer to
Figure 11-4.)
• Tap Notes, and a post-it like note appears on the screen. Using the
virtual keyboard, type your note.
After you add a highlight or note, the following tips are handy to know:
✓ To remove a highlight or note: Press and hold the word or passage, and
then tap Remove Highlight or Delete Note when the respective option
appears. Alternatively, from the Highlights & Notes section under the
Bookmarks list, swipe your finger in either direction along an entry and
tap the red Delete button that appears.
✓ To change the highlighted color of a highlight or note: You can change
the color from the default yellow to green, blue, pink, or purple. Touch
the highlighted selection for a moment and lift your finger. Tap the
Colors button and tap to choose your new highlight color.
✓ To e-mail or print notes: From the Table of Contents page, in the upperright corner of the screen, tap the icon that looks like an arrow trying to
escape a rectangle. Tap Email to e-mail your notes, or tap Print to print
them (provided you have an AirPrint printer). See Chapter 2 for details
about printing.
Change the type size and font
If you want to enlarge the typeface size (or make it smaller), here’s how:
1. Tap the fonts button, labeled in Figure 11-2, at the upper-right corner
of the screen.
2. Tap the uppercase A.
The text swells right before your eyes so that you can pick a size that’s
comfortable for you.
To make the font smaller, tap the lowercase a instead.
If you want to change the fonts, tap the fonts button and then tap Fonts and
the font style you want to switch to. Your choices are Baskerville, Cochin,
Georgia, Palatino, Times New Roman, and Verdana. We don’t necessarily
expect you to know what these look like just by the font names — fortunately
you get to examine the change right before your eyes. A check mark indicates
the currently selected font style.
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Searching inside and outside a book
If you want to find a passage in a book but just can’t remember where it is,
try searching for it. Here’s how:
1. Tap the magnifying glass Search icon to enter a search phrase on the
virtual keyboard that slides up from the bottom.
All the occurrences in the book turn up in a window under the Search
icon, complete with a few lines of text and a page citation.
2. Tap one of the items to jump to that portion of the book.
You can also search Google or the Wikipedia online encyclopedia using the
corresponding buttons at the bottom of the search results. If you do so, the
iBooks app closes and the Safari browser fires up Google or Wikipedia, with
your search term already entered.
If you search Google or Wikipedia in this fashion, you are for the moment,
closing the iBooks application and opening Safari. To return to the book
you’re reading, you must tap the iBooks icon again to reopen the app.
Fortunately, you’re brought back to the page in the book where you left off.
Shopping for E-Books
Bob and Ed love browsing in a physical bookstore. But the experience of
browsing Apple’s new iBookstore, although certainly different, is equally
pleasurable. Apple makes it a cinch to search for books you want to read, and
even lets you peruse a sample prior to parting with your hard-earned dollars.
To enter the store, tap the Store button in the upper-left corner of your virtual bookshelf or your library List view.
A few things to keep in mind: The iBooks app and iBookstore, is available to
U.S. customers, with versions of the store also available in the U.K., Germany,
France, and Canada. Apple’s iBookstore had some 150,000 titles at the time our
book was being published, including some works — Jay-Z’s memoir Decoded,
for example — that are enhanced with video. Meanwhile, the store includes
titles from all six major trade publishers: Hachette Book Group, HarperCollins,
Macmillan, Penguin Group, Simon & Schuster, and Random House, as well as
several independents. Wiley is also represented, of course. Random House had
been the only holdout among big-name publishers when Apple first launched the
iBookstore, but the largest trade book publisher in the U.S. finally came aboard.
Publishers, not Apple, set the prices. Many bestsellers in the joint cost
$12.99, though some fetch $9.99 or less. In fact, Apple even has a $9.99-orless section, the virtual equivalent of the bargain rack. And free selections
are available. On the other hand, the Donald Rumsfeld memoir, Known and
Unknown commands $19.99.
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Just browsing iBookstore
You have several ways to browse for books in the iBookstore. The top half
of the screen shows ever-changing ads for books that fit a chosen category
(Children & Teens in the example shown in Figure 11-6). But you can also
browse Release Date in the particular category you have in mind. The leftand right-pointing arrows indicate more recent releases to peek at. Or tap See
All for many more selections.
To choose another category of books, tap the Categories button to summon
the list shown in Figure 11-7; you have to scroll to see the bottom of the list.
Look at the bottom of the screen. You see the following icons:
✓ Featured: This is where we’ve been hanging out so far. Featured works
are the books being promoted in the store. These may include popular
titles from Oprah’s Book Club or an author spotlight from the likes of
Twilight writer Stephenie Meyer.
✓ NYTimes: Short for The New York Times, of course. These books make
the newspaper’s famous bestsellers lists, which are divided into fiction
and nonfiction works. The top ten books in each list are initially shown.
To see more titles, tap Show More at the bottom of the screen. You have
to scroll down to see it.
Figure 11-6: The featured page for Children &
Teens is pushing Magic Tree House.
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Figure 11-7: So many books, so many category
choices.
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✓ Top Charts: Here Apple shows you the most popular books in the
iBookstore. You find a list for Top Paid Books and Top Free Books. Once
more, you can see more than the top ten shown in each category by tapping Show More.
✓ Browse: Tapping the Browse icon lets you find books by poring through
a list of popular authors, shown in a scrollable pane on the left half of
the screen. Flick your finger up or down to scroll the list, or tap one of
the letters in the margin to jump to authors whose name begins with
that letter. When you tap an author’s name, a list of her available titles
appears in a scrollable pane on the right.
✓ Purchases: Tapping here shows you the books you’ve already bought. In
this area, you can also check out your iTunes account information, tap a
button that transports you to iTunes customer service, and redeem any
iTunes gift cards or gift certificates.
Searching iBookstore
In the upper-right corner of the iBookstore is a Search field, similar to the
Search field you see in iTunes. Using the virtual keyboard, type an author
name or title to find the book you seek.
If you like freebies, search for free in the iBookstore. You’ll find tons of
(mostly classic) books that cost nothing, and you won’t even have to import
them. See the section “Finding free books outside iBookstore,” later in this
chapter, for more places to find free books.
Deciding whether a book is worth it
To find out more about a book you come across in the iBookstore, you can
check out the detail page and other readers’ reviews, or read a sample of the
book. Follow these steps to navigate the detail page:
1. Tap its cover.
An information screen similar to the one shown for I Am Ozzy in Figure
11-8 appears. You can see when the book was published, read a description, and more.
2. Tap Author Page to see other books by that writer or Alert Me to add
the author to your custom alerts, perhaps to be notified when he
writes a new book.
3. (Optional) Tap Tell a Friend and the iPad fires up your e-mail app,
with the subject line filled in with “Check out I Am Ozzy” in the case
of this example.
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Figure 11-8: Find out all you can about a book.
A picture of the book cover, its release date and rating, and a View Item
link are embedded in the body of the message.
4. Check out the sections for Customers Also Bought, Customer Reviews,
and Customer Ratings. Flick or drag to scroll down the overlay and
see all the reviews.
You can throw in your own two cents if you’ve already read it by tapping
Write a Review.
Of course the best thing you can do to determine whether a book is worth
buying is to read a sample. Tap Get Sample, and the book cover almost immediately lands on your bookshelf. You can read it like any book, up until that
juncture in the book where your free sample ends. Apple has placed a Buy
button inside the pages of the book to make it easy to purchase it if you’re
hooked. The word Sample also appears on the cover, to remind you that this
book isn’t quite yours — yet.
Buying a book from iBookstore
Assuming that the book exceeds your lofty standards, and you’re ready to
purchase it, here’s how to do so:
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1. Tap the price shown in the gray button on the book’s information
page (refer to Figure 11-8).
Upon doing so, the dollar amount disappears, and the button becomes
green and carries a Buy Book label. If you tap a free book instead, the
button is labeled Get Book.
2. Tap the Buy Book/Get Book button.
3. Enter your iTunes password to proceed with the transaction.
The book appears on your bookshelf in an instant, ready for you to tap it
and start reading.
If you buy another book within 15 minutes of your initial purchase, you aren’t
prompted for your iTunes password again.
Buying books beyond Apple
The business world is full of examples where one company competes with
another on some level only to work with it as a partner on another. When the
iPad first burst onto the scene in early April 2010, pundits immediately compared it to Amazon’s Kindle, the market-leading electronic reader. Sure the
iPad had the larger screen and color, but Kindle had a few bragging points
too, including longer battery life (up to about a month on the latest Kindle
versus about 10 hours for the iPad), a lighter weight, and a larger selection of
books in its online bookstore.
But Amazon has long said it wants Kindle books to be available for all sorts
of electronic platforms, and the iPad, like the iPhone and iPod touch before
it, is no exception. So we recommend taking a look at the free Kindle app
for the iPad, especially if you’ve already purchased a number of books in
Amazon’s Kindle Store and want access to that wider selection of titles. And
you can tap a Shop in Kindle Store button inside the app, which fires up
Safari on the iPad.
The Barnes & Noble NOOK app is also worth a look. Meanwhile, we haven’t
tried them all, and we know it’s hard enough competing against Apple (or
Amazon). But we’d be selling our readers short if we didn’t at least mention that you can find several other e-book-type apps for the iPad in the App
Store. As this book goes to press, you can have a look at the following apps,
just to name a few:
✓ CloudReaders from Satoshi Nakajima (free)
✓ Free eBooks by Kobo
✓ Stanza from Lexcycle (free)
See Chapter 7 for details about finding and downloading apps.
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Finding free books outside iBookstore
Apple supports a technical standard — ePub, the underlying technology
behind thousands of free public-domain books. You can import these to the
iPad without shopping in the iBookstore. Such titles must be DRM-free, which
means they’re free of digital rights restrictions.
To import ePub titles, you have to download them to your Mac or PC (assuming that they’re not already there) and then sync them to the iPad through
iTunes.
You can find ePub titles at numerous cyberspace destinations, among them
✓ Feedbooks: www.feedbooks.com
✓ Google Books: Not all the books here are free, and Google has a downloadable app. http://books.google.com/ebooks
✓ Project Gutenberg: www.gutenberg.us
✓ Smashwords: www.smashwords.com
✓ Baen: www.baen.com
Reading Newspapers and Magazines
Those in the newspaper business know that it’s been tough sledding in
recent years. The Internet, as it has in so many areas, has proved to be a disruptive force in media.
It remains to be seen what role Apple generally, and the iPad specifically, will
play in the future of electronic periodicals or in helping to turn around sagging media enterprises. It’s also uncertain which pricing models will make the
most sense from a business perspective.
What we can tell you is that reading newspapers and magazines on the iPad
is not like reading newspapers and magazines in any other electronic form.
The experience is really slick, but only you can decide whether it’s worth
paying the tab (in the cases where you do have to pay).
Fine publishing apps worth checking out include USA TODAY (where Ed
works), The Wall Street Journal, Time magazine, The New York Times, Reuters
News Pro, BBC News, and Popular Science. We also highly recommend fetching the free Zinio Magazine Newsstand & Reader app. It’s a terrific way to
read magazines like Rolling Stone, The Economist, Macworld, PC Magazine,
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Car and Driver, National Geographic, Spin, Business Week, Sporting News, and
many more. You can buy single issues of a magazine or subscribe, and sample
and share some articles without a subscription.
You have to pay handsomely or subscribe to some of these newspapers and
magazines, which you find not in the iBookstore but in the regular App Store,
which we cover in Chapter 7. You also see ads (somebody’s got to pay the
freight).
We want to pause a moment here in the middle of the book to thank you
again for reading our book because as this chapter points out, you have a lot
of rich reading to do on your iPad. And maybe you’re even reading our book
on it.
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12
The iPad at Work
In This Chapter
▶ Noting Notes
▶ Understanding the calendar’s different views and functions
▶ Mingling with Contacts
▶ Keying in on Keynote
▶ Mastering Pages
▶ Crunching Numbers
W
e hate to break the news to you, but your iPad isn’t all fun and games;
it has a serious side. The iPad can remind you of appointments, help
you keep all your contacts straight, and if you’re willing to purchase iWork
apps, deliver a first-class spreadsheet, word processor, and presentation program.
Over the next several pages, we look at some of the less
sexy functions of your iPad. Indeed, we’d venture to
say that no one bought an iPad because of its calendar, note-taking ability, or Address Book. Still, having
these programs is awfully handy, and we’re confident
you’ll feel the same way if you spring for some or all
the optional iWork apps.
Taking Note of Notes
Notes is an application that creates text notes that you
can save or send through e-mail. To create a note, follow
these steps:
1. Tap the Notes icon on the Home screen.
2. Tap the + button in the upper-right corner to start a new note.
The virtual keyboard appears.
3. Type a note, such as the one shown in Figure 12-1.
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Figure 12-1: The Notes application revealed.
Other things you can do before you quit the Notes app include
✓ Tap the Notes button in the upper-left corner of the screen to see a list
of all your notes. When the list is onscreen, just tap a note to open and
view, edit, or modify it.
✓ Tap the left- or right-arrow button at the bottom of the screen to read
the previous or next note.
✓ Tap the Letter icon at the bottom of the screen to e-mail the note using
the Mail application (see Chapter 5 for more about Mail).
✓ Tap the Trash icon at the bottom of the screen to delete the note.
Like most iPad apps, your notes are saved automatically while you type them
so you can quit Notes at any time without losing a single character.
We’d be remiss if we didn’t remind you that you can sync notes with your
computer (see Chapter 3).
And that’s all she wrote. You now know everything there is to know about
creating and managing notes with Notes.
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Working with the Calendar
The Calendar program lets you keep on top of your appointments and events
(birthdays, anniversaries, and so on). You open it by tapping the Calendar
icon on the Home screen. The icon is smart in its own right because it
changes daily; the day of the week and date display.
Mac users can sync their calendars with either iCal or the discontinued
Microsoft Entourage (but strangely, not with Outlook 2011 for the Mac); PC
users can sync calendars with Microsoft Outlook. See Chapter 3 for more info
on how to sync.
You can’t create new calendars on your iPad — they must be created on your
Mac or PC and then synced.
You have four main ways to peek at your calendar(s): Day, Week, Month,
and List views. Choosing one is as simple as tapping the Day, Week, Month,
or List button at the top of the Calendar screen. From each view, you can
always return to the current day by tapping the Today button in the lowerleft corner.
Choosing a calendar view
From a single calendar view, you can look at appointments from an individual
calendar, or consolidate several calendars — like one for home, one for your
kid’s activities, and one for your job — in a single view. Here’s how:
To pick the calendars you want to display, follow these steps:
1. Tap the Calendars button at the upper-left corner of the screen.
That summons a Show Calendars window.
2. Tap each calendar you want to view by tapping its entry.
A check mark appears. Tap an entry again so that a given calendar won’t
appear, and the check mark disappears. To show all the calendars, tap
the All option. To make them disappear, tap All again. In the example
shown in Figure 12-2, all the calendars are selected.
Be careful: To-do items created on your Mac or PC calendars aren’t synced
and don’t appear on your iPad.
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Figure 12-2: Making sure that bowling night doesn’t conflict
with the kids’ soccer game.
You can also choose to view your calendar(s) in different views:
✓ List view: List view isn’t complicated. As its name indicates, List view, as
shown in Figure 12-3, presents a list of current and future appointments
on the left side of the screen, and an hour-by-hour view of the day that’s
highlighted on the right. About eight hours of the highlighted date are
visible in landscape mode; about ten are visible in portrait mode. You
can drag the list up or down with your finger or flick to rapidly scroll
through the list. To switch the day shown, tap the right or left arrow on
the bottom of the screen, or tap or drag the timeline.
✓ Day view: Day view, as shown in Figure 12-4, reveals the appointments
of a given 24-hour period (though you have to scroll up or down to see
an entire day’s worth of entries). As in the List view, you can drag or tap
the timeline to move to a new date or press the left or right arrows for
the same purpose.
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Figure 12-3: List view.
227
Figure 12-4: Day view.
✓ Week view: As you’d expect, the Week view displayed in Figure 12-5
shows your appointments over a seven-day period. Again, use the
arrows or timeline at the bottom of the screen to change the time frame
that you see. You’ll notice of course that the timeline now reflects oneweek intervals, which is the way it should be.
✓ Month view: By now, you’re getting the hang of these different views.
When your iPad is in Month view, as it is in Figure 12-6, you can see
appointments from January to December. In this monthly calendar view,
a colored dot (designating a specific calendar) and short description
appear on any day that has appointments or events scheduled. Tap that
day to see the list of activities the dot represents.
Searching appointments
Consider that you scheduled an appointment with your dentist months ago,
but now you can’t remember the date or the time. You could pore through
your daily, weekly, or monthly calendars or scroll through a List view until
you land on the appointment. But that is the very definition of inefficiency.
The much faster way is to just type the name of your dentist in the Search
box in the upper-right corner of the various Calendar screens. You’re
instantly transported to the date and time of the entry from your current calendar view.
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Figure 12-5: Week view.
Figure 12-6: Month view.
Adding calendar entries
In Chapter 3, you discover pretty much everything there is to know about
syncing your iPad, including syncing calendar entries from your Mac (using
iCal or Microsoft Entourage) or PC (using Microsoft Outlook).
Of course, in plenty of situations, you enter appointments on the fly. Adding
appointments directly to the iPad is easy. Follow these steps:
1. Tap the Calendar icon at the top of the screen, and then tap the Day,
Week, Month, or List button.
2. Tap the plus sign (+) button in the lower-right corner of the screen.
The Add Event screen, as shown in Figure 12-7, appears along with the
virtual keyboard.
If you use a Bluetooth keyboard (see Chapter 15), that pesky virtual keyboard stays out of your way so you see more of whatever is on the screen.
3. Tap the Title and Location fields and finger-type as much (or as little)
information as you feel is necessary.
4. Set the time for the entry by tapping the Starts/Ends field and then
proceeding as follows:
If your calendar entry has a start time or end time (or both):
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a. In the Start & End screen that appears (see Figure 12-8), choose the
time the event starts and then the time it ends.
Use your finger to roll separate wheels for the date, hour, and
minute (in five-minute intervals) and to specify AM or PM. It’s a
little like manipulating one of those combination bicycle locks or
an old-fashioned date stamp used with an inkpad.
b. Tap Done when you’re finished.
If you’re entering a birthday or another all-day milestone:
a. Tap the All-Day button so that On (rather than Off) displays.
b. Tap Done.
Because the time isn’t relevant for an all-day entry, note that the bottom
half of the screen now has wheels for just the month, day, and year, and
not hours and minutes.
5. (Optional) If you’re setting up a recurring entry, such as an anniversary, tap the Repeat window, tap to indicate how often the event in
question recurs, and then tap Done.
The options are Every Day, Every Week, Every 2 Weeks, Every Month,
and Every Year.
6. (Optional) If you want to set a reminder or alert for the entry, tap
Alert, tap a time, and then tap Done.
Figure 12-7: You’re about to add an event to your iPad.
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Figure 12-8: Controlling the Starts
and Ends fields is like manipulating
a bike lock.
Alerts can be set to arrive on the actual date of an event, 2 days before, 1
day before, 2 hours before, 1 hour before, 30 minutes before, 15 minutes
before, or 5 minutes before. When the appointment time rolls around,
you hear a sound and see a message like the one shown in Figure 12-9.
Tap View Event to check out the details of the appointment or tap Close
if you feel the reminder you just received will suffice.
Figure 12-9: Alerts make it hard to forget.
If you’re the kind of person who needs an extra nudge, set another
reminder by tapping the Second Alert field, which appears only after
you’ve set one alert.
7. Tap Calendar to assign the entry to a particular calendar, and then tap
the calendar you have in mind (Home or Work, for example), assuming that you have multiple calendars. Then tap Done.
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8. (Optional) If you want to enter notes about the appointment or event,
tap Notes, type your note on the virtual keyboard, and then tap Done
to return to the Add Event screen.
9. Back on the Add Event screen, tap Done after you finish entering
everything.
After you create calendar entries, check out the following tips for working
with your calendar:
✓ Turn off a calendar alert by tapping Settings➪General➪Sounds. Make
sure that the Calendar Alerts button is turned off.
✓ To modify an existing calendar entry, tap the entry, tap Edit, and then
make whichever changes need to be made.
✓ To wipe out a calendar entry altogether, tap the entry, tap Edit, and
then tap Delete Event. You have a chance to confirm your choice by tapping either Delete Event (again) or Cancel. To delete an entry in the Day
view, just tap the event and then tap Delete Event. There’s no need to
tap an Edit button as well.
✓ Calendar entries you create on your iPad are synchronized with the
calendar you specified in the iTunes Info pane.
Letting your calendar push you around
If you work for a company that uses Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync, calendar
entries and meeting invitations from co-workers can be pushed to your device
so that they show up on the screen moments after they’re entered, even if
they’re entered on computers at work. Setting up an account to facilitate this
pushing of calendar entries to your iPad is a breeze, although you should
check with your company’s tech or IT department to make sure that your
employer allows it. Then follow these steps, which are similar to adding an
e-mail account, covered in Chapter 5:
Setting your default calendar and time zone
Choose a default calendar by tapping
Settings➪Mail, Contacts, Calendars and then
flicking the screen until the Calendar section
appears. Tap Default Calendar and select the
calendar you want new events you create on
your iPad to appear on.
If you travel long distances for your job, you
can also make events appear according to
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whichever time zone you selected for your calendars. In the Calendar settings, tap Time Zone
Support to turn it on, and then tap Time Zone.
Type the time zone location on the keyboard
that appears.
When Time Zone Support is turned off, events
display according to the time zone of your current location.
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1. Tap Settings➪Mail, Contacts, Calendars.
2. From the Add Account list, tap Microsoft Exchange.
3. Fill in the e-mail address, username, password, and description fields,
and then tap Next.
4. Enter your server address on the next screen that appears.
The rest of the fields are filled in with the e-mail address, username, and
password you just entered.
5. Tap Next.
If your company uses Microsoft Exchange 2007, you don’t have to
enter the address of your Exchange server — your iPad can determine
it automatically.
6. Tap the On switches for all the information types you want to synchronize using Microsoft Exchange, from among Mail, Contacts, Calendars.
You’re good to go now, although some employers may require you to
add passcodes to safeguard company secrets.
If your business-issued iPad is ever lost or stolen — or it turns out that you’re
a double agent working for a rival company — your employer’s IT administrators can remotely wipe your device clean. You, too, can wipe the slate clean,
using a free component in Apple’s MobileMe (formerly .Mac) service, and
take advantage of the Find My iPad feature that we explain in Chapter 13.
Responding to meeting invitations
The iPad has one more important button — but you see it only when the
Exchange calendar-syncing feature is turned on (see the preceding section)
and you have a supported so-called CalDAV account or a MobileMe calendar. This Invitations button to attend a meeting or event is represented by
an arrow pointing downward into a half-rectangle. If you get an invitation in
this manner, the listing appears in your calendar with a dotted line around it
and an Invitations button appears in the upper-left corner of the Calendars
screen. You need an Internet connection to respond to an invitation. The following steps walk you through the process:
1. Tap the Invitations button to view your pending invitations.
2. Tap any of the items on the list to see more details.
For example, suppose that a meeting invitation arrives from your boss.
You can see who else is attending the shindig (by tapping Invitees); send
them an e-mail, if need be; and check scheduling conflicts, among other
options.
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3. Tap Accept to let the meeting organizer know you’re attending; tap
Decline if you have something better to do (and aren’t worried about
upsetting the person who signs your paycheck); or tap Maybe if you’re
waiting for a better offer.
You can choose to receive an alert every time someone sends you an invitation. In the Calendar settings of Mail, Contacts, Calendars, tap New Invitation
Alerts so that the On button in blue displays.
MobileMe subscribers can keep calendar entries synchronized between your
iPad and Mac or PC (or iPhone or iPod touch for that matter). When you make
a scheduling change on your iPad, it’s automatically updated on your computer
and vice versa. Choose MobileMe from the Add Account screen to get started.
You can also import events from an e-mail. Open the message and tap the
calendar file, which adheres to the .ics standard. When the events show up,
tap Add All, choose the calendar you want to add it to, and then tap Done.
Subscribing to calendars
You can subscribe to calendars that meet the CalDAV and iCalendar (.ics)
standards, which are supported by the popular Google and Yahoo! calendars,
or iCal on the Mac. Although you can read entries on the iPad from the calendars you subscribe to, you can’t create new entries from the iPad or edit the
entries that are already present.
To subscribe to one of these calendars, follow these steps:
1. Tap Settings➪Mail, Contacts, Calendars➪Add Account➪Other.
2. Choose either Add CalDAV Account or Add Subscribed Calendar.
3. Enter the URL of the calendar you want to subscribe to.
4. If prompted, enter a username, password, and optional description.
After you subscribe to a calendar, it appears just like any another calendar on your iPad.
Calendars you subscribe to are read-only. In other words, you can’t
change existing events or add new ones.
Sifting through Contacts
If you read the chapter on syncing (see Chapter 3), you know how to get
the snail-mail addresses, e-mail addresses, and phone numbers that reside
on your Mac or PC into the iPad. Assuming that you went through that drill
already, all those addresses and phone numbers are hanging out in one
place. Their not-so-secret hiding place is revealed when you tap the Contacts
icon on the Home screen.
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Adding and viewing contacts
To add contacts from within the Contacts app, tap the + button at the bottom
of the screen and type as much or as little profile information as you have for
the person. Tap Add Photo to add a picture from your photo albums (or to
take a snapshot on the iPad 2). You can edit the information later by tapping
the Edit button when a contact’s name is highlighted.
A list of your contacts appears on the left panel of the screen, with one contact
name, Rosemarie Hall in the example shown in Figure 12-10, highlighted in blue.
On the right you can see a mug shot of Rosemarie plus her phone number,
e-mail address, regular address, and birthday. You also find an area to scribble
notes on a contact. We guess there was not much to say about Rosemarie.
Figure 12-10: A view of all contacts.
You have three ways to land on a specific contact:
✓ Flick your finger so that the list of contacts on the left side scrolls rapidly up or down, loosely reminiscent of the spinning Lucky 7s (or other
pictures) on a Las Vegas slot machine. Think of the payout you’d get
with that kind of power on a One-Armed Bandit.
✓ Slide your thumb or another finger along the alphabet on the left edge
of the contacts list or tap one of the teeny-tiny letters to jump to names
that begin with that letter.
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✓ Start to type the name of a contact in the Search field near the top of
the contacts list. Or, type the name of the place your contact works.
When you’re at or near the appropriate contact name, stop the scrolling
by tapping the screen.
When you tap to stop the scrolling, that tap doesn’t select an item in the
list. This may seem counterintuitive the first few times you try it, but we
got used to it and now we really like it this way.
You can change the way your contacts are displayed. Tap Settings➪
Mail, Contacts, Calendars. Then scroll down to Contacts settings on the
right side of the screen, if it’s not already visible. Tap Sort Order or Display
Order, and for each one, choose the First, Last option or Last, First to indicate
whether you want to sort or display entries by a contact’s first or last name.
Searching contacts
You can search contacts by entering a first or last name in the Search field,
or by entering a company name.
You can locate people on your iPad without actually opening the Contacts
app. Type a name in the Spotlight Search field (see Chapter 2), and then tap
the name in the search results. If you’re searching contacts with a Microsoft
Exchange account, you may be able to search your employer’s Global Address
List, GAL for short. This typically works in one of two ways:
✓ Tap the Groups button in the upper-left corner of the All Contacts
screen and tap the appropriate Exchange server name to find folks.
Groups on your computer might reflect, say, different departments in
your company, friends from work, friends from school, and so on.
✓ Or, you might search a so-called LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access
Protocol) server. It strikes us that there’s nothing “lightweight” about
something called an LDAP server, but we digress. Similarly, if you have
a CardDAV account, you can search for any contacts that have been
synced to the iPad.
Contacting and sharing your contacts
You can initiate an e-mail from within Contacts by tapping an e-mail address
under a contact’s listings. Doing so fires up the Mail program on the iPad
with the person’s name already in the To field. For more on the Mail app, we
direct you to Chapter 5.
You can also share a contact’s profile with another person. Tap the Share
button, and once again, the Mail program answers the call of duty. This time,
the contact’s vCard is embedded in the body of a new Mail message. Just
address the message and send it on its merry way. A vCard is kind of like an
electronic business card. You can identify it by its .vcf file format.
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Finally, you can tap a contact’s snail-mail address to launch the Maps app
and see it there.
Linking contacts
There’s a great chance the people you know have contact entries in more
than one account, meaning you might end up with redundant entries for
the same person. The iPad solution is to link contacts. Find the contact in
question, tap Edit, and tap the silhouette icon with the + at the bottom-right
corner of the entry. Choose the related contact entry and then tap Link. It’s
worth noting that the linked contacts in each account remain separate and
are not merged.
Removing a contact
Hey, it happens. A person falls out of favor. Maybe he is a jilted lover. Or
maybe you just moved cross country and no longer will call on the services
of your old gardener.
Removing a contact is easy, if unfortunate. Tap a contact and then tap Edit.
Scroll to the bottom of the Edit screen and tap Delete Contact. You get one
more chance to change your mind.
Apps for Work
Because Apple is pretty much without equal when it comes to manufacturing
beautiful-looking hardware, it’s sometimes easy to overlook the fact that the
company knows a thing or two about making great software, too. So although
the vast majority of apps in the App Store are created not by Apple itself but by
outside software developers, the gang in Cupertino knows how to pick its spots
when it comes to producing its own apps. Nowhere is that truer than with the
iWork software suite that Apple has completely redesigned for the iPad.
If you’re unfamiliar with iWork, it’s a “productivity” package that’s popular
with the Mac faithful that includes the Pages word processor, the Keynote
presentation program, and the Numbers spreadsheet — in other words, the
kind of programs you use for, well, work.
In the App Store, each iPad version of these programs costs $9.99. If you buy
all three, you’re still paying less than half the $79 it costs for the complete
iWork version for Mac OS X.
Of course, iWork on the iPad, although slick and simple, isn’t quite as fullfeatured as its Mac sibling. And we’ve heard the arguments, valid for some,
that when it comes to doing heavy duty-work work, you might want to get
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a more traditional desktop or laptop computer. Still, with iWork, you can
indeed do a lot, if not most, of the stuff you need to accomplish work-wise —
and with the kind of style and (dare we even say it) fun that you expect from
Apple products. We recommend tooling around with Keynote by touching
and holding objects and moving them around.
With that, we describe an overview of each iWork app in the following sections.
The keys to Keynote
Keynote is all about producing polished business presentations for clients,
customers, and would-be clients and customers.
When you initially open Keynote — and for that matter when you open the
other two apps in the iWorks suite for the first time — you’re treated to helpful tutorials on how to use the programs.
The basics: Down the left side of the Keynote screen is the Navigator, a vertical strip that contains every slide in your presentation. Flick up or down in
the list to see all the slides. You can drag slides around to rearrange them
in any order. You can tap them to cut, copy, paste, delete, or skip them.
And just below the Navigator is the Add Slide + button that you tap — you
guessed it — to add a new slide.
It’s worth noting that Keynote, unlike Pages, Numbers, and most other apps
for the iPad, only works in landscape mode, probably because presentations
look better that way.
You find the following on the Keynote toolbar:
✓ My Presentations/New Presentation button: Tap this button in the
upper-left corner of the screen to summon any presentation you’ve
already completed or still have in progress. This button and all others
are labeled in Figure 12-11.
✓ Undo: A potential lifesaver (okay, presentation saver). If you make a
mistake, just tap the Undo button, and it’s like whatever turned you off
in the first place never happened. Don’t you wish real life had an Undo
button sometimes?
✓ Info: Tap here to change the properties of an object or text, with different borders and effects. For example, you might add shadows and reflections to an object.
✓ Insert: Tap this icon to insert photos, tables, charts, or shapes to a slide.
✓ Animate Slides: You have all sorts of neat choices, from a Flash Bulbs
effect to twirling objects around.
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✓ Tools: You find a bevy of helpful instruments. You can check spellings,
number slides, turn on edge guides, print (with a compatible AirPrint
printer), consult an online user guide, and use a Find function to search
for words in presentations.
✓ Play: The most exciting control of all. Tap Play to watch your presentation come to life full-screen.
Play presentation
Navigator
My Presentations/New Presentation
Undo
Animate Slides
Insert Tools
Info
Add slide
Figure 12-11: Presenting Keynote basics.
Now that you know the basics, here’s how to get going:
1. Tap the New Presentation button.
2. Choose a theme.
Out of the gate, you have a dozen handsomely themed templates to
choose from, including those visible in Figure 12-12. Think of themes as
a great head start; they come with text and image placeholders that you
can substitute with your own words and pictures.
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Figure 12-12: Choose a theme.
3. (Optional) Import a Keynote ’09 or ’11 or Microsoft PowerPoint presentation from your computer.
Connect the iPad to your computer, open iTunes, and choose iPad under
Devices. On the Summary page, choose Apps, and then scroll to the
bottom of the screen on your computer and select Keynote in the Apps
list in the File Sharing section. Click Add and find the presentation you
want to transfer to your iPad in the Choose a File: iTunes window that
opens. Click Choose when you find the file in question.
In much the same way, you can also transfer iWork documents between your
computer and the iPad for Pages and Numbers.
You can export iWork documents from the iPad to your computer in a similar
fashion. But although Keynote documents can be exported in the Keynote or
PDF file formats, you can’t export a file in the Microsoft PowerPoint or PPT
file format. It’s too bad, given that PowerPoint remains the 800-pound gorilla
of the presentation software field.
To print slides, you have to export your presentation to a computer through
iTunes, e-mail, or the iWork.com public beta, which you can access using the
same Apple ID and password you use to buy apps, songs, and other items in
the iTunes Store.
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Page me with Pages
The toolbar at the top of the Pages word processor has a similar look and feel
to the Keynote toolbar and is shown in Figure 12-13. A My Documents/New
Document button is in the upper-left corner, adjacent to the Undo button.
At the upper right are the now-familiar Info (for changing fonts and styles),
Insert (for adding pictures, tables, charts, and so on), and Tools buttons for
printing and other functions. You also find a Full Screen button in the rightmost corner of the screen.
Like its iWork brethren, Pages allows you to start with a custom template,
though a blank page may work best for most people. Templates cover résumés, formal letters, party invites, and term papers, among others.
Tools
Insert
Info
Full
Screen
Figure 12-13: The Pages toolbar.
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As you start working in Pages, the following tips are handy to know:
✓ When you double-tap text, a style ruler appears at the top, for changing
paragraph and character styles (for example, bold, italic, and underline),
text alignments, and page breaks.
✓ As with Keynote, you can move, resize, and rotate objects in a document
and add your own pictures.
✓ Double-tap any word in a document and then tap More➪Definition for a
dictionary entry. You may not find the meaning of life here, but at least
you’ll find the meaning for the word in question. In other words, we
think it’s a nice feature.
✓ Tap and hold your finger along the right edge of the screen to make the
Pages Navigator appear. Drag this handy tool up and down the screen to
preview your document inside its transparent window. The number on
the right tells you the page you’re on.
✓ If you plan on doing a lot of writing in Pages, consider getting Apple’s
optional physical iPad Keyboard Dock (for the original iPad only at
press time) or using a Bluetooth wireless keyboard. This is a matter of
personal preference, of course.
✓ Tap the Share button after tapping the My Documents button to send a
Pages document via e-mail, to share it at iWork.com (you have to enter
your Apple ID or MobileMe credentials), or to send it to iTunes. You can
also copy it to an iDisk storage locker in the cloud. Still another option is
to copy the document to a so-called WebDAV server (you have to enter
the server address, username, and password). You can send off your
document in the Pages, PDF, or Microsoft Word .doc file formats.
When you import documents to work inside Pages (and for that matter, the
other iWork apps), they don’t always come through clean. Fonts from the
original document may be missing or altered, and when that happens, you
see a warning message. The same goes for headers and bookmarks. Hopefully
such formatting challenges will be fixed in the future.
Playing with Numbers
Perhaps more than any other iWork app, Numbers best exploits multitouch
and lets you become a whiz at number crunching in no time. As with Keynote
and Pages, the Numbers spreadsheet relies on a similar button scheme at
the top of the screen. The button in the upper-left corner is labeled New
Spreadsheet or My Spreadsheets, depending on the view you’re in.
Apple has supplied 16 useful Getting Started templates that appear when
you tap the New Spreadsheet button. Your options range from Checklist and
Expense Report sheets to Invoice and Employee Schedule sheets.
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A few tips can help you start working with Numbers:
✓ You can import spreadsheets from Numbers on your Mac, or Microsoft
Excel on a Mac or PC. And of course, you can start out on the iPad with a
blank slate as well.
✓ To enter data in a spreadsheet cell, just double-tap the cell to automatically bring up the keyboard you need for the sheet you’re working on
(digits, duration, date and time, or text).
✓ Numerous functions and formulas are built into the app, in such areas as
engineering, finance, and statistics.
✓ Tables and charts have the kind of pizzazz Apple is famous for.
✓ As with Keynote and Pages, you can export spreadsheets to iWork or
elsewhere, or send them via e-mail. To do so, tap the icon on the My
Spreadsheets page that looks like a right-pointing arrow coming out of a
rectangle. It’s labeled in Figure 12-14.
There you have it — your iPad at work. Okay, you can admit it now. That
wasn’t so bad. In fact, it was even fun!
E-mail, share, export, or
copy your spreadsheet
Delete spreadsheet
New or duplicate spreadsheet
Copy from iTunes, iDisk, or WebDAV
Figure 12-14: Sharing your spreadsheet.
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Part IV
The Undiscovered
iPad
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T
In this part . . .
his part is where we show you what’s under
the hood and how to configure your iPad to
your liking. Then we look at the things to do if
your iPad ever becomes recalcitrant.
In Chapter 13, we explore every single iPad setting
that’s not discussed in depth elsewhere in the
book. The iPad offers dozens of different preferences and settings to make your iPad your very
own; by the time you finish with Chapter 13, you’ll
know how to customize every part of your iPad
that can be customized.
iPads are well-behaved little beasts for the most
part, except when they’re not. Like the little girl
with the little curl, when they’re good they’re
very, very good, but when they’re bad, they’re
horrid. So Chapter 14 is your comprehensive
guide to troubleshooting the iPad. It details what
to do when almost anything goes wrong, offering
step-by-step instructions for specific situations as
well as describing a plethora of tips and techniques you can try if something else goes awry.
You may never need Chapter 14 (and we hope you
won’t), but you’ll be very glad we put it here if
your iPad ever goes wonky on you.
Carrying cases, physical keyboards — in Chapter
15, we take a look at some iPad accessories that
we recommend. No, they’re not included with
your iPad purchase, but we consider them essential just the same.
Photo courtesy of
Griffin Technology
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13
Setting You Straight on Settings
In This Chapter
▶ Getting the lowdown on Settings
▶ Taking off in Airplane mode
▶ Preparing networks
▶ Uncovering usage statistics
▶ Setting up notifications
▶ Figuring out your location
▶ Seeking sensible sounds and screen brightness
▶ Brushing up on Bluetooth
▶ Finding a lost iPad
D
o you consider yourself a control freak? The type of
person who has to have it your way? Boy, have you
landed in the right chapter.
Settings is kind of the makeover factory for the iPad.
You open Settings by tapping its Home screen icon,
and from there, you can do things like change
the tablet’s background or wallpaper and specify
Google, Yahoo!, or Bing as the search engine of
choice. You can also alter security settings in
Safari, tailor e-mail to your liking (among other
modifications), and get a handle on how to fetch or
push new data.
The Settings area on the iPad is roughly analogous to
System Preferences on a Mac and the Control Panel in
Windows.
Because we cover some settings elsewhere in this book, we don’t dwell on
every setting here. But you still have plenty to digest to help you make the
iPad your own.
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Checking Out the Settings Screen
When you first open Settings, you see a display that looks something like
Figure 13-1, with a scrollable list on the left side of the screen and a panel on
the right that corresponds to whichever setting is highlighted in blue. We say
“something like this” because the Settings on your iPad may differ slightly
from those of your neighbor’s.
One other general thought to keep in mind: If you see a greater-than symbol
(>) appear to the right of a listing, the listing has a bunch of options.
Throughout this chapter, you tap the > symbol to check out those options.
Figure 13-1: Presenting your list of settings.
As you scroll to the bottom of the list on the left, you come to all the settings
that pertain to some of the specific third-party apps you’ve added to the iPad
(see Chapter 7). Everybody has a different collection of apps on his iPad, so
any settings related to those programs will also obviously be different.
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Flying with Sky-High Settings
Your iPad offers settings to keep you on the good side of air-traffic communications systems. However, the settings for the iPad Wi-Fi + 3G model
differ from those of the Wi-Fi-only model. The original Wi-Fi-only iPad didn’t
have an Airplane Mode setting that the original iPad + 3G had. Airplane mode
subsequently did arrive on the first Wi-Fi-only iPad with an iOS update. And
the Airplane Mode setting appears on the iPad 2 regardless of which wireless
model you own.
Using a cellular radio on an airplane is a no-no. But there’s nothing verboten
about using an iPad on a plane to listen to music, watch videos, and peek at
pictures — at least, after the craft has reached cruising altitude.
So how do you take advantage of the iPad’s built-in iPod (among other
capabilities) at 30,000 feet, while temporarily turning off your wireless gateway
to e-mail and Internet functions? The answer is, by turning on Airplane mode.
To do so, merely tap Airplane Mode on the Settings screen to display On
(rather than Off).
That act disables each of the iPad’s wireless radios (depending on the
model): Wi-Fi, cellular, and Bluetooth. While your iPad is in Airplane Mode,
you can’t surf the web, get a map location, send or receive e-mails, stream
YouTube, sync contacts, use iTunes or the App Store, or do anything else
that requires an Internet connection. If there’s a silver lining here, it’s that
the iPad’s long-lasting battery ought to last even longer — good news if the
flight you’re on is taking you halfway around the planet.
The appearance of a tiny Airplane icon on the status bar at the top left corner
of the screen reminds you that Airplane mode is turned on. Just remember to
turn it off when you’re back on the ground.
If you have the Wi-Fi-only model, you have to manually turn off Wi-Fi in
Settings before your flight takes off, as discussed in the next section.
Controlling Wi-Fi Connections
As we mention in Chapter 4, Wi-Fi is typically the fastest wireless network
you can use to surf the web, send e-mail, and perform other Internet tricks
on the iPad. You use the Wi-Fi setting to determine which Wi-Fi networks are
available to you and which one to exploit based on its signal.
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Tap Wi-Fi so that the setting is on and all Wi-Fi networks in range display, as
shown in Figure 13-2. (Alternatively, you can reach this screen by tapping the
General setting➪Network➪Wi-Fi.)
Tap the Wi-Fi switch to off when you’re on a plane or don’t have access to a
network and don’t want to drain the battery.
Figure 13-2: Checking out your Wi-Fi options.
A signal-strength indicator can help you choose the network to connect to if
more than one is listed; tap the appropriate Wi-Fi network when you reach a
decision. If a network is password-protected, you see a Lock icon.
You can also turn the Ask to Join Networks setting on or off. Networks that
the iPad are already familiar with are joined automatically, regardless of
which one you choose. If the Ask feature is off and no known networks are
available, you have to manually select a new network. If the Ask feature is on,
you’re asked before joining a new network. Either way, you see a list with the
same Wi-Fi networks in range.
If you used a particular network automatically in the past but you no longer
want your iPad to join it, tap the > symbol next to the network in question
(within Wi-Fi settings) and then tap Forget This Network. The iPad develops a
quick case of selective amnesia.
In some instances, you have to supply other technical information about a
network you hope to glom on to. You encounter a bunch of nasty-sounding
terms: DHCP, BootP, or Static IP Addresses, Subnet Mask, Router, DNS,
Search Domains, Client ID, HTTP Proxy, and Renew Lease. (At least this last
one has nothing to do with renting an apartment or the vehicle you’re driving.)
Chances are that none of this info is on the tip of your tongue — but that’s
okay. For one thing, it’s a good bet that you’ll never need to know this stuff.
What’s more, even if you do have to fill in or adjust these settings, a network
administrator or techie friend can probably help you.
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Sometimes, you may want to connect to a network that’s closed and not
shown on the Wi-Fi list. If that’s the case, tap Other and use the keyboard
to enter the network name. Then tap to choose the type of security setting
the network is using (if any). Your choices are WEP, WPA, WPA2, WPA
Enterprise, and WPA2 Enterprise. Again, it’s not exactly the friendliest
terminology in the world, but we figure that someone nearby can lend a hand.
If no Wi-Fi network is available, you have to rely on 3G or a slower cellular
connection if you have a Wi-Fi + 3G model. If you don’t or you’re out of reach
of a cellular network, you can’t rocket into cyberspace until you regain
access to a network.
Roaming among Cellular Data Options
You see another set of settings only if you have the Wi-Fi + 3G iPad. Your
options here are as follows:
✓ Data Roaming: You may unwittingly rack up lofty roaming fees when
exchanging e-mail, surfing with Safari, or engaging in other data-heavy
activities while traveling abroad. Turn off Data Roaming to avoid such
potential charges.
✓ Cellular Data Network: If you know you don’t need the cellular network
when you’re out and about or are in an area where you don’t have
access to the network, turn it off. Your battery will thank you later.
✓ Account Information: Tap View Account to see or edit your account
information.
✓ Add a SIM PIN (AT&T model only): The tiny SIM, or Subscriber Identity
Module, card inside your iPad holds important data about your account.
To add a PIN or a passcode to lock your SIM card, tap SIM PIN. That way,
if someone gets hold of your SIM, she can’t use it in another iPad without the passcode.
If you assign a PIN to your SIM, you have to enter it to turn the iPad on
or off, which some might consider a minor hassle.
Turning Notifications On and Off
Through Apple’s Push Notification service, app developers can send you
alerts related to programs you’ve installed on your iPad. Such alerts are
typically in text form but may include sounds as well. The idea is that you’ll
receive notifications even when the application they apply to isn’t running.
Notifications may also appear as numbered “badges” on their corresponding
Home screen icon.
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The downside to keeping notifications turned on is that they can curtail
battery life (though honestly we’ve been pretty satisfied with the iPad’s
staying power even when notifications are active). And some may find
notifications distracting at times.
To turn off all the notifications on your iPad, tap Notifications on the left
side of the Settings screen and then tap the Notifications button, as shown in
Figure 13-3, so that Off displays. To turn them back on, tap the Off button so
that it turns blue and shows as an On button. Simple as that.
Figure 13-3: Notify the iPad of your notification
intentions.
You can turn notifications on or off for specific apps, too, and you have two
ways to accomplish this feat. We recommend trying both methods because
different notifications are controlled in each example:
✓ Method 1: Tap to highlight Notifications on the left side of the screen
and then tap an app on the right, as shown in Figure 13-3. Within that
specific app, you can turn sounds, alerts, or badges on or off.
✓ Method 2: Scroll down to the Apps section on the left side of Settings
and tap the app with the notifications you want to alter. Note that the
app you hope to fiddle with doesn’t always appear in the Apps section of
Settings. For that matter, many of the apps that do appear on the list do
not push notifications to you anyway.
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One app that does have a variety of notifications is Facebook. You can
choose to have the giant social network push notifications related to Wall
posts, friend requests, photo tags, events, and more. Or, choose not to be
notified about any or all of these. You can only tweak such settings under
Method 2 because Method 1 lets you alter only sounds, alerts, or badges.
Location, Location, Location Services
By using the onboard Maps app or any number of third-party apps, the iPad
makes good use of knowing where you are. The iPad with 3G exploits built-in
GPS. The Wi-Fi-only iPad can find your general whereabouts (by triangulating
signals from Wi-Fi base stations and cellular towers).
If that statement creeps you out a little, don’t fret. To protect your right to
privacy, individual apps pop up quick messages (similar to the one shown in
Figure 13-4) asking whether you want them to use your current location. But
you can also turn off Location Services right in Settings (refer to Figure 13-1).
Not only is your privacy shielded, but you also keep your iPad battery juiced
a little longer.
Figure 13-4: The AOL Radio app
wants to know where you are.
Settings for Your Senses
The next bunch of settings control what the iPad looks like and sounds like.
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Brightening your day
Who doesn’t want a bright, vibrant screen? Alas, the brightest screens exact
a trade-off: Before you drag the brightness slider shown in Figure 13-5 to the
max, remember that brighter screens sap the life from your battery more
quickly. The control appears when Brightness & Wallpaper is highlighted.
Figure 13-5: Sliding this control adjusts screen
brightness.
That’s why we recommend tapping the Auto-Brightness control so that it’s
on. The control automatically adjusts the screen according to the lighting
environment in which you’re using the iPad while at the same time being
considerate of your battery.
Wallpaper
Choosing wallpaper is a neat way to dress up the iPad according to your
aesthetic preferences. You can sample the pretty patterns and designs that
the iPad has already chosen for you as follows:
1. Tap the thumbnails shown when you highlight the Brightness &
Wallpaper setting. (Refer to Figure 13-5.)
2. Choose an image.
You can choose a favorite picture from your photo albums or select one
of the gorgeous images that Apple has supplied, as shown in Figure 13-6.
3. Tap one of the following options to set where your wallpaper appears:
• Set Lock Screen makes your selected image the wallpaper of choice
when the iPad is locked.
• Set Home Screen makes the wallpaper decorate only your Home
screen.
• Set Both makes your image the wallpaper for locked and Home
screens.
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Figure 13-6: Choosing a majestic background.
From Settings, you can also turn your iPad into an animated picture frame.
See Chapter 10 for more on the Picture Frame feature and the settings to get
it just the way you like it.
Sounds
Consider the Sounds settings area, found after you highlight General in the
Settings list to the left, the iPad’s soundstage. There, you can turn audio alerts
on or off for a variety of functions: new e-mail, sent mail, and calendar alerts. You
can also decide whether you want to hear lock sounds and keyboard clicks.
On iPad 2, you can alter the ringtone you hear in FaceTime and tap a button
to buy more tones if you’re not satisfied with those that Apple supplies.
To raise the decibel level of alerts, drag the volume slider to the right. Drag in
the opposite direction to bring down the noise.
An alternative way to adjust sound levels is to use the physical Volume
buttons on the side of the iPad for this purpose, as long as you’re not already
using the iPad’s iPod to listen to music or watch video.
Exploring Settings in General
Certain miscellaneous settings are difficult to pigeonhole. Apple wisely
lumped these under the General settings moniker, and we’ve just told you
about one of these, Sounds. Here’s a closer look at other General options.
About About
You aren’t seeing double. This section, as shown in Figure 13-7, is all about
the About setting. And About is full of trivial (and not-so-trivial) information
about the device. What you find here is straightforward:
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Figure 13-7: You find info about your iPad under
About.
✓ Network you use: AT&T or Verizon
✓ Number of songs stored on the device
✓ Number of videos
✓ Number of photos
✓ Number of applications
✓ Storage capacity used and available: Because of the way the device
is formatted, you always have a little less storage than the advertised
amount of flash memory.
✓ Software version: As this book goes to press, we’re up to version 4.3.
But as the software is tweaked and updated, your device takes on a new
“build” identifier indicating it’s just a little bit further along than some
previous build. So you see, in parentheses next to the version number,
a string of numbers and letters that looks like 8F191 and tells you more
precisely what software version you have. The number/letter string
changes whenever the iPad’s software is updated and is potentially
useful to some tech support person who might need to know the precise
version you’re working with.
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✓ Carrier and cellular data (Wi-Fi + 3G version only): Yep, that’s AT&T
or Verizon in the United States.
✓ Serial and model numbers
✓ Cellular Data Number
✓ Wi-Fi address
✓ Bluetooth address: More on Bluetooth in an upcoming section.
✓ MEID: It’s a geeky acronym for Mobile Equipment Identifier associated
with CDMA gear. That’s why you see this only on the Verizon iPad.
✓ Modern Firmware: Another geeky term; it’s software programmed into
the iPad’s memory.
✓ Legal and Regulatory: You had to know that the lawyers would get in
their two cents somehow. All the fine print is here. And fine print it is
because you can’t unpinch to enlarge the text. (Not that we can imagine
more than a handful will bother to read this legal mumbo jumbo.)
Usage settings
The About setting we cover in the preceding section gives a lot of information
about your device. But after you back out of About and return to the main
General settings, you can find other settings for statistics on iPad usage:
✓ Battery percentage: You almost always see a little battery meter in the
upper-right corner of the screen, except in those instances when you
watch videos in which the whole top bar disappears. If you also want to
see your battery life presented in percentage terms, make sure that the
Battery Percentage setting is turned on.
✓ Cellular network data: This is the amount of network data you sent and
received over the AT&T or Verizon networks, a setting that appears only
if you have a Wi-Fi + 3G iPad. You can reset these statistics by tapping
the Reset Statistics button.
If you choose to pay for only 250MB per month, this is where you can
check whether you’re close to exceeding your data limit.
VPN settings
After you tap Network on the General settings screen, you see two controls:
Wi-Fi and VPN. We address Wi-Fi earlier in this chapter, in the section
“Controlling Wi-Fi Connections.” We tackle VPN here.
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A virtual private network, or VPN, is a way for you to securely access your
company’s network behind the firewall — using an encrypted Internet connection that acts as a secure “tunnel” for data.
You can configure a VPN on the iPad by following these steps:
1. Tap Settings➪General➪Network➪VPN➪Add VPN Configuration.
2. Tap one of the protocol options.
The iPad software supports the protocols L2TP (Layer 2 Tunneling
Protocol), PPTP (Point-To-Point Tunneling Protocol), and Cisco IPSec,
which apparently provides the kind of security that satisfies network
administrators.
3. Using configuration settings provided by your company, fill in the
appropriate server information, account, password, and other
information.
4. Choose whether to turn on RSA SecurID authentication.
Better yet, lend your iPad to the techies where you work and let them fill
in the blanks on your behalf.
After you configure your iPad for VPN usage, you can turn that capability on
or off by tapping (yep) the VPN On or Off switch inside Settings.
Bluetooth
Of all the peculiar terms you may encounter in techdom, Bluetooth is one
of our favorites. The name is derived from Harald Blåtand, a tenth century
Danish monarch, who, the story goes, helped unite warring factions. And,
we’re told, Blåtand translates to Bluetooth in English. (Bluetooth is all about
collaboration between different types of devices — get it?)
Blåtand was obviously ahead of his time. Although we can’t imagine that he
ever used a slate computer, he now has an entire short-range wireless
technology named in his honor. On the iPad, you can use Bluetooth to
communicate wirelessly with a compatible Bluetooth headset or to use an
optional wireless keyboard. Such accessories are made by Apple and many
others. To ensure that the iPad works with one of these devices, it has to
be wirelessly paired, or coupled, with the chosen device. If you’re using a
third-party accessory, follow the instructions that came with that headset or
keyboard so that it becomes discoverable, or ready to be paired with your
iPad. Then turn on Bluetooth (under General on the Settings screen) so that
the iPad can find such nearby devices and the device can find the iPad. In
Figure 13-8, an Apple Wireless Keyboard and the iPad are successfully paired
when you enter a designated passkey on the keyboard. Bluetooth works up
to a range of about 30 feet.
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You know Bluetooth is turned on when you see the Bluetooth icon on the
status bar. If the symbol is white, the iPad is communicating wirelessly with a
connected device. If it’s gray, Bluetooth is turned on in the iPad but a paired
device isn’t nearby or isn’t turned on. If you don’t see a Bluetooth icon, the
setting is turned off.
To unpair a device, select it from the device list, and tap Unpair. We guess
breaking up isn’t hard to do.
Figure 13-8: Pairing an Apple Wireless
Keyboard with the iPad.
The iPad supports stereo Bluetooth headphones, so you can now stream
stereo audio from the iPad to those devices.
The iPad can tap into Bluetooth in other ways. One is through peer-to-peer
connectivity, so you can engage in multiplayer games with other nearby iPad,
iPhone, or iPod touch users. You can also do such things as exchange business
cards, share pictures, and send short notes. And, you don’t even have to pair
the devices as you do with a headset or wireless keyboard.
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You can’t use Bluetooth to exchange files or sync between an iPad and a
computer. Nor can you use it to print stuff from the iPad on a Bluetooth
printer (though the AirPrint feature added with iOS 4.2 handles that chore in
some instances). That’s because the iPad doesn’t support any of the
Bluetooth profiles (or specifications) required to allow such wireless stunts
to take place — at least not as of this writing. We think that’s a shame.
Spotlight Search
Tell the iPad the apps that you want to search. Touch the three horizontal
lines next to an app you want to include in your search and drag it up or
down to rearrange the search order.
Auto-Lock
Tap Auto-Lock in the General settings pane, and you can set the amount of
time that elapses before the iPad automatically locks or turns off the display.
Your choices are 15 minutes before, 10 minutes, 5 minutes, or 2 minutes. Or,
you can set it so that the iPad never locks automatically.
If you work for a company that insists on a passcode (see the next section),
the Never Auto-Lock option isn’t on the list that your iPad shows you.
Don’t worry if the iPad is locked. You can still receive notification alerts and
adjust the volume.
Passcode
You can choose a 4-digit simple passcode to prevent people from unlocking
the iPad. Tap Passcode Lock. Then use the virtual keypad to enter a 4-digit
code. During this setup, you have to enter the code a second time before it’s
accepted.
You can also determine whether a passcode is required immediately, after 1
minute, after 5 minutes, or after 15 minutes. Shorter times are more secure,
of course. On the topic of security, the iPad can be set to automatically erase
your data if someone makes ten failed passcode attempts.
You can also change the passcode or turn it off later (unless your employer
dictates otherwise), but you need to know the present passcode to apply any
changes. If you forget the passcode, you have to restore the iPad software, as
we describe in Chapter 14.
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Cover Lock/Unlock
The iPad 2 gives you the choice to automatically lock and unlock your iPad
when you close and open the clever iPad Smart Cover accessory. If you set a
passcode, you still have to enter it to wake the iPad from siesta-land.
Restrictions
Parents and bosses may love the Restrictions tools, but kids and employees
usually think otherwise. You can clamp down, er, provide proper parental
guidance to your children, by preventing them at least some of the time from
using the Safari browser, YouTube, Camera, FaceTime, iTunes, Ping, Location
Services, or Game Center. Or, you might not let them install new apps or
make purchases inside the apps you do allow. When restrictions are in place,
icons for off-limit functions can no longer be seen. Tap Enable Restrictions,
set or enter your passcode — you have to enter it twice if you are setting
up the passcode — and tap the buttons next to each item in the Allow or
Allowed Content lists that you plan to restrict. Their corresponding settings
show Off.
Moreover, parents have more controls to work with. For instance, you can
allow Junior to watch a movie on the iPad but prevent him from watching a
flick that carries an R or NC-17 rating. You can also restrict access to certain
TV shows, explicit songs and podcasts, and apps, based on age-appropriate
ratings. In Game Center, you can decide whether your kid can play a multiplayer
game or add friends. Stop feeling guilty: You have your users’ best interests
at heart.
If guilt gets the better of you, you can turn off Restrictions. Open the
Restrictions setting by again typing your passcode. Then switch the On/
Off setting back to On for each setting you free up. Tap Disable Restrictions.
You have to enter your passcode one more time before your kids and office
underlings return you to their good graces.
Side Switch
You can use the side switch for one of two purposes: You can lock the
rotation so that the screen orientation doesn’t change when you turn the
iPad to the side, or you can mute certain sounds. Here’s where you get to
make that choice.
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Date and Time
In our neck of the woods, the time is reported as 11:32 p.m. (or whatever time
it happens to be). But in some circles, it’s reported as 23:32. If you prefer the
latter format on the iPad’s status bar, tap the 24-Hour Time setting (under
Date & Time) so that it’s on.
This setting is just one that you can adjust under Date & Time. You can also
have the iPad set the time in your time zone.
Here’s how:
1. Tap Set Date & Time.
You see fields for setting the time zone and the date and time.
2. Tap the Time Zone field.
The current time zone and virtual keyboard are shown.
3. Tap the letters of the city or country whose time zone you want to
enter until the one you have in mind appears. Then tap the name of
that city or country.
The Time Zone field is automatically filled in for that city.
4. Tap the Set Date & Time field so that the time is shown; then roll the
bicycle-lock-like controls until the proper time displays.
5. Tap the date shown so that the bicycle-lock-like controls pop up for
the date; then roll the wheels for the month, day, and year until the
correct date appears.
6. Tap the Date & Time button to return to the main Date & Time settings
screen.
You can dispense with these settings and just have the iPad set the time
automatically based on its knowledge of where you happen to be.
Keyboard
Under Keyboard settings, you have the following options:
✓ Auto-Capitalization: You can turn Auto-Capitalization on or off.
Auto-Capitalization, which the iPad turns on by default, means that the
first letter of the first word you type after ending the preceding sentence
with a period, a question mark, or an exclamation point is capitalized.
✓ Auto-Correction: When turned on, the iPad takes a stab at what it thinks
you meant to type.
✓ Check Spelling: When on, the keyboard can check spelling while you
type.
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✓ Caps Lock: If Caps Lock is enabled, all letters are uppercased LIKE THIS
if you double-tap the Shift key. (The Shift key is the one with the arrow
pointing up.) Double-tap Shift again to exit Caps Lock.
✓ Automatic period and space: You can also turn on a keyboard setting
that inserts a period followed by a space when you double-tap the
spacebar. The “.” setting that permits this is turned on by default.
Additionally, you can choose to use an international keyboard (as we discuss
in Chapter 2), which you choose from the International setting — the next
setting after Keyboard in the General settings area. See the next section for
details.
International
The iPad is an international sensation just as it is in the United States. In the
International section, you can set the language you type (by using a custom
virtual keyboard), the language in which the iPad displays text, and the date,
time, and telephone format for the region in question. You can choose a
Gregorian, Japanese, or Buddhist calendar, too.
Accessibility
The Accessibility or Universal Access Features tools on your iPad are targeted at helping people with certain disabilities. The following sections
explain each one in turn.
VoiceOver
This screen reader describes aloud what’s on the screen. It can read e-mail
messages, web pages, and more. With VoiceOver active, you tap an item on
the screen to select it. VoiceOver places a black rectangle around it, and
either speaks the name or describes an item. For example, if you tap, say,
Brightness & Wallpaper, the VoiceOver voice speaks the words “Brightness &
Wallpaper button.” VoiceOver even lets you know when you alternately position the iPad in landscape or portrait mode or when your screen is locked or
unlocked.
Within the VoiceOver setting, you have several options. For instance, if you
turn on Speak Hints, VoiceOver may provide instructions on what to do next,
along the lines of “double-tap to open.” You can drag a Speaking Rate slider
to speed up or slow down the speech. You can also determine the kind of
typing feedback you get, from among characters, words, characters and
words, or no feedback. Additional controls let you turn on Phonetics and
Pitch Change settings.
The voice you hear speaks in the language you specified in International
settings, which we explain earlier.
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You have to know a whole new set of finger gestures when VoiceOver is on,
which may seem difficult, especially when you first start using VoiceOver.
When you stop to think about it, the reason makes a lot of sense. You want
to be able to hear descriptions on the screen before you actually activate
buttons. Different VoiceOver gestures use different numbers of fingers. Here’s
a rundown on many of these:
✓ Tap: Speak the item.
✓ Flick right or left: Select the next or previous item.
✓ Flick up or down: This gesture has multiple outcomes that depend on
how you set the so-called “rotor control” gesture. Think of the rotor
control like you’d think about turning a dial. You rotate two fingers on
the screen. The purpose is to switch to a different set of commands
or features. Which leads us back to the flick up or down gestures. Say
you’re reading text in an e-mail. By alternately spinning the rotor, you
can switch between hearing the body of a message read aloud word by
word or character by character. After you set the parameters, flick up
or down to hear stuff read back. The flicking up or down gestures serve
a different purpose when you type an e-mail: The gestures move the
cursor left or right within the text.
✓ Two-finger tap: Stop speaking.
✓ Two-finger flick up: Read everything from the top of the screen.
✓ Two-finger flick down: Read everything from your current position on
the screen.
✓ Three-finger flick up or down: Scroll a page.
✓ Three-finger flick right or left: Go to the next or previous page.
✓ Three-finger tap: Lets you know which page or rows are on the screen.
✓ Four-finger flick up or down: Go to the first or last part of the page.
✓ Four-finger flick right or left: Go to the next or previous section.
✓ Double-tap: Activate a selected icon or button to launch an app, turn a
switch from On to Off, and more.
✓ Touch an item with one finger and tap the screen with another:
Otherwise known as split-tapping, when you touch an item, a voice
identifies what you touched (for example “Safari button” or
“Notifications on button”). A tap with the second finger selects whatever
was identified with the first finger (that is, “Safari button selected,”
“Notifications on button selected.”) Now you can double-tap to launch
the button or whatever else was selected.
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✓ Double-tap, hold for a second, and then add a standard gesture: Tell
the iPad to go back to using standard gestures for your next move. You
can also use standard gestures with VoiceOver by double-tapping and
holding the screen. You hear tones that remind you that standard
gestures are now in effect. They stay that way until you lift your finger.
✓ Two-finger double-tap: Play or pause. You use the double-tap in the
iPod, YouTube, and Photos apps.
✓ Three-finger double-tap: Mute or unmute the voice.
✓ Three-finger triple-tap: Turn the display on or off.
After all this you may be thinking, “Geez, that’s a lot to take in.” It surely
is. But Apple helps you practice VoiceOver gestures by tapping a Practice
VoiceOver Gestures button.
Zoom
The Zoom feature offers a screen magnifier for those who are visually
challenged. To zoom by 200 percent, double-tap the screen with three fingers.
Drag three fingers to move around the screen. To increase magnification, use
three fingers to tap and drag up. Tap with three fingers and drag down to
decrease magnification.
When magnified, the characters on the screen aren’t as crisp, and you can’t
display as much in a single view.
Large Text
You can make text larger in the Mail and Notes apps. You have the choice of
six point sizes (from 20pt to 56pt), in addition to the default.
White on Black
The colors on the iPad can be reversed to provide a higher contrast for
people with poor eyesight. The screen resembles a film negative.
Mono Audio
If you suffer hearing loss in one ear, the iPad can combine the right and left
audio channels so that both can be heard in both earbuds of any headset you
plug in.
The iPad, unlike its cousins the iPhone or the iPod touch, doesn’t come with
earbuds or headphones. You have to supply your own.
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Speak Auto-Text
When this setting is on, the iPad automatically speaks auto-corrections and
capitalizations.
Triple-Click Home
Set the Triple-Click Home feature to summon the following accessibility tools.
Clicking Home three times rapidly can be used to toggle VoiceOver on or off,
toggle White on Black on or off, or toggle Zoom on or off. You can also set up
a prompt to be asked which of these functions you want to accomplish.
Closed Captioning
To turn on closed captioning subtitles for a movie or video in which they’re
available, tap Video Settings and turn on the feature.
Reset
As little kids playing sports, we ended an argument by agreeing to a “doover.” Well, the Reset settings on the iPad are one big do-over. Now that
you’re (presumably) grown up, think long and hard about the consequences
before implementing do-over settings. Regardless, you may encounter good
reasons for starting over; some of these are addressed in Chapter 14.
Here are your reset options:
✓ Reset All Settings: Resets all settings, but no data or media is deleted.
✓ Erase All Content and Settings: Resets all settings and wipes out all
your data.
✓ Reset Network Settings: Deletes the current network settings and
restores them to their factory defaults.
✓ Subscriber Services: Here you have options to reprovision your account
and reset your authentication code.
✓ Reset Keyboard Dictionary: Removes added words from the dictionary.
Remember that the iPad keyboard is intelligent. And, one reason it’s so
smart is that it learns from you. So when you reject words that the iPad
keyboard suggests, it figures that the words you specifically banged out
ought to be added to the keyboard dictionary.
✓ Reset Home Screen Layout: Reverts all icons to the way they were at
the factory.
✓ Reset Location Warnings: Restores factory defaults.
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Find My iPad
We hope you never have to use the Find My iPad feature — though we have
to say that it’s pretty darn cool. If you inadvertently leave your iPad in a taxi
or restaurant, Find My iPad may just help you retrieve it. The feature used
to require a MobileMe paid subscription, but now it’s free on MobileMe to
anyone running iOS 4.2 or later on the iPad.
To turn on Find My iPad, tap Settings➪Mail, Contacts, Calendars and then tap
the me.com e-mail account you added to the iPad. You get a me.com e-mail
account when you subscribe to MobileMe. If necessary, see Chapter 5 to see
how to add an e-mail account to the iPad. If you don’t have a paid MobileMe
account, and thus no me.com e-mail address, use your Apple ID to add a free
MobileMe account. You can turn on the Find My iPad feature, but can’t take
advantage of other MobileMe goodies.
Now suppose that you lost your tablet — and we can only assume that you’re
beside yourself. Follow these steps to see whether the Find My iPad feature
can help you:
1. Log on to your MobileMe me.com account from any browser on your
computer.
2. Click the Find My iPhone icon.
If you don’t see it, click the icon with a cloud in it that appears in the
upper-left corner of the MobileMe site. You see a panel with icons that
are tied to various MobileMe services including Find My iPhone. (Yes,
even though the feature is Find My iPad on the iPad, it shows up as Find
My iPhone on the MobileMe site. Don’t worry, it’ll still locate your iPad
and for that matter, a lost iPhone, too.)
Assuming that your tablet is turned on and in the coverage area, its
general whereabouts turn up on a map (as shown in Figure 13-9), in
satellite view, or a hybrid of the two. In our tests, Find My iPad found
our iPads quickly.
The truth is that even seeing your iPad on a map may not help you
much, especially if the device is lost somewhere in midtown Manhattan.
Take heart.
3. At the MobileMe site, click the Display Message or Play Sound button.
4. Type out a plea to the Good Samaritan that you hope picked up your
iPad.
The message appears on the lost iPad’s screen. Don’t forget to include
in the message a way for the person to reach you, such as the message
displayed on the iPad in Figure 13-10.
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Figure 13-9: Locating a lost iPad.
Figure 13-10: An appeal to return the iPad.
To get someone’s attention, you can also sound an alarm that plays for two
minutes, even if the volume is off. Hey, that alarm may come in handy if the
iPad turns up under a couch in your house. Stranger things have happened.
After all this labor, if the iPad is seemingly gone for good, click Wipe at the
MobileMe site to delete your personal data from afar and return the iPad to its
factory settings. (A somewhat less drastic measure is to remotely lock your
iPad using a four-digit passcode.) And, if you ever get your iPad back, you can
always restore the information from an iTunes backup on your Mac or PC.
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14
When Good iPads Go Bad
In This Chapter
▶ Fixing iPad issues
▶ Dealing with network problems
▶ Eliminating that sinking feeling when you can’t sync
▶ Perusing the Apple website and discussion forums
▶ Sending your iPad to an Apple Store
I
n our experience, all Apple’s iOS devices — namely the iPad, iPhone, and
iPod touch — are fairly reliable. But every so often a good iPad might just
go bad. We don’t expect it to be a common occurrence, but it does happen
occasionally. So in this chapter, we look at the types of bad things that can
happen, along with suggestions for fixing them.
What kind of bad things are we talking about? Well, we’re
referring to problems involving
✓ Frozen or dead iPads
✓ Wireless networks
✓ Synchronization of computers (both Mac and
PC) or iTunes
After all the troubleshooting, we tell you how to get
even more help if nothing we suggest does the trick.
Finally, if your iPad is so badly hosed that it needs to
go back to the mother ship for repairs, we offer ways to
survive the experience with a minimum of stress or fuss.
Resuscitating an iPad with Issues
Our first category of troubleshooting techniques applies to an iPad that’s
frozen or otherwise acting up. The recommended procedure when this
happens is to perform the seven Rs in sequence:
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1. Recharge
2. Restart
3. Reset your iPad
4. Remove your content
5. Reset settings and content
6. Restore
7. Recovery mode
But before you even start those procedures, Apple recommends you take
these steps:
1. Verify that you have the current version of iTunes installed on your
Mac or PC.
You can always download the latest and greatest version here: www.
apple.com/itunes/download.
2. Verify that you’re connecting your iPad to your computer using a USB
2.0 port.
3. Make sure that your iPad software is up to date.
To do so:
a. Connect your iPad to your computer, launch iTunes (if necessary),
and then click your iPad in the iTunes sidebar.
b. Click the Summary tab and then click the Check for Update button.
If those three easy steps didn’t get you back up and running and your iPad is
still acting up — if it freezes, doesn’t wake up from sleep, doesn’t do something it used to do, or in any other way acts improperly — don’t panic. The
rest of this section describes the things you should try, in the order that we
(and Apple) recommend.
If the first technique doesn’t do the trick, go on to the second. If the second
one doesn’t work, try the third. And so on.
Recharge
If your iPad acts up in any way, shape, or form, the first thing you should try
is to give its battery a full recharge before you proceed.
Don’t plug the iPad’s dock connector–to–USB cable into a USB port on your
keyboard, monitor, or USB hub. You need to plug it into one of the USB ports
on your computer itself. That’s because the USB ports on your computer
supply more power than the other ports. Although other USB ports may do
the trick, you’re better off using the built-in ones on your computer.
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If your computer is more than a few years old, even your built-in USB ports
may not supply enough juice to recharge your iPad. It’ll sync just fine; it just
won’t recharge. If it says Not Charging next to the battery icon at the top of
the screen, use the included USB power adapter to recharge your iPad from
an AC outlet rather than from a computer.
If you’re in a hurry, charge your iPad for a minimum of 20 minutes. We
think a full charge is a better idea, but a 20+ minute charge is better than no
charge at all.
Restart
If you recharge your iPad and it still misbehaves, the next thing to try is
restarting it. Just as restarting a computer often fixes problems, restarting
your iPad sometimes works wonders.
Here’s how to restart:
1. Press and hold the Sleep/Wake button.
2. When the red slider appears, slide it to turn off the iPad and then wait
a few seconds.
3. Press and hold the Sleep/Wake button again until the Apple logo
appears on the screen.
4. If your iPad is still frozen, misbehaves, or doesn’t start, press and hold
the Home button for 6 to 10 seconds to force any frozen applications
to quit.
5. Repeat Steps 1 to 3 again.
If these steps don’t get your iPad back up and running, move on to the third
R, resetting your iPad.
Reset your iPad
To reset your iPad, merely press and hold the Sleep/Wake button and then
press and hold the Home button, continuing to press both for at least ten
seconds. When you see the Apple logo, release both buttons.
Resetting your iPad is like forcing your computer to restart after a crash.
Your data shouldn’t be affected by a reset — and in many cases, it cures
whatever was ailing your iPad. So don’t be shy about giving this technique a
try. In many cases, your iPad goes back to normal after you reset it this way.
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Sometimes you have to press and hold the Sleep/Wake button before you
press and hold the Home button. That’s because if you press both at the
same time, you might create a screen shot — a picture of whatever is on
your screen at the time — rather than reset your iPad. (This type of screen
picture, by the way, is stored in the Photos app’s Saved Photos album in its
Albums tab. Find out more about this feature at the end of Chapter 18.) A
screen shot should only happen if you press and release both buttons at the
same time, but sometimes pressing and holding both buttons triggers the
screen shot mechanism instead of restarting your iPad.
Unfortunately, sometimes resetting doesn’t do the trick. When that’s the case,
you have to take stronger measures.
Remove content
If you’ve been reading along in this chapter, nothing you’ve done should have
taken more than a minute or two. We hate to tell you, but that’s about to
change because the next thing you should try is removing some of or all your
data to see whether it’s causing your troubles.
To do so, you need to sync your iPad and reconfigure it so that some of or
all your files are not synchronized (which removes them from the iPad). The
problem could be contacts, calendar data, songs, photos, videos, or podcasts.
You can apply one of two strategies to this troubleshooting task:
✓ If you suspect a particular data type — for example, you suspect your
photos because whenever you tap the Photos icon on the Home screen,
your iPad freezes — try removing that data first.
✓ If you have no suspicions, deselect every item and then sync. When
you’re finished, your iPad should have no data on it.
If that method fixes your iPad, try restoring your data, one type at a
time. If the problem returns, you have to keep experimenting to
determine which particular data type or file is causing the problem.
If you’re still having problems, the next step is to reset your iPad’s settings.
Reset settings and content
Resetting involves two steps: The first one, resetting your iPad settings,
resets every iPad setting to its default — the way it was when you took it
out of the box. Resetting the iPad’s settings doesn’t erase any of your data
or media. The only downside is that you may have to go back and change
some settings afterward — so you can try this step without trepidation. To
reset your settings, tap the Settings icon on your Home screen and then tap
General➪Reset➪Reset All Settings.
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Be careful not to tap Erase All Content and Settings, at least not yet. Erasing
all content takes more time to recover from (because your next sync takes a
long time), so try Reset All Settings first.
Now, if resetting all settings didn’t cure your iPad, you have to try Erase All
Content and Settings. You find it in the same place as Reset All Settings (tap
Settings➪General➪Reset➪Erase All Content and Settings).
The Erase All Content strategy deletes everything from your iPad — all
your data, media, and settings. Because all these items are stored on your
computer — at least in theory — you should be able to put things back
the way they were during your next sync. But you lose any screen shots or
photos you’ve taken (iPad 2 only), as well as e-mail, apps purchased on your
iPad, contacts, calendar events, playlists, and anything else you’ve created or
modified on the iPad since your last sync.
After using Erase All Content and Settings, check to see whether your iPad
works properly. If it doesn’t cure what ails your iPad, the final R, restoring
your iPad using iTunes, can help.
Restore
Before you give up the ghost on your poor, sick iPad, you can try one more
thing. Connect your iPad to your computer as though you were about to
sync. But when the iPad appears in the iTunes Source list, click the Restore
button on the Summary tab. This action erases all your data and media and
resets all your settings.
Because all your data and media still exist on your computer (except for
photos you’ve taken, contacts, calendar events, notes, and On-the-Go playlists
you’ve created or modified since your last sync, as noted previously), you
shouldn’t lose anything by restoring. Your next sync will take longer than
usual, and you may have to reset settings you’ve changed since you got your
iPad. But other than those inconveniences, restoring shouldn’t cause you any
additional trouble.
Recovery mode
So, if you’ve tried all the other steps or you couldn’t try some or all of them
because your iPad is so messed up, you can try one last thing: Recovery
mode. Here’s how it works:
1. Disconnect the USB cable from your iPad, but leave the other end of
the cable connected to the USB port on your computer.
2. Turn off the iPad by pressing and holding the Sleep/Wake button for a
few seconds until the red slider appears onscreen, and then slide the
slider.
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Wait for the iPad to turn off.
3. Press and hold the Home button while you reconnect the USB cable to
your iPad.
When you reconnect the USB cable, your iPad should power on.
If you see a battery icon with a thin red band and an icon of a wall plug,
an arrow, and a lightning bolt, you need to let your iPad charge for at
least 10 or 15 minutes. When the battery picture goes away or turns
green instead of red, go back to Step 2 and try again.
4. Continue holding the Home button until you see the Connect to
iTunes screen, and then release the Home button.
If you don’t see the Connect to iTunes screen on your iPad, try Steps 1–4
again.
If iTunes didn’t open automatically already, launch it now. You should
see a Recovery Mode alert on your computer screen telling you that
your iPad is in Recovery mode and that you must restore it before it can
be used with iTunes.
5. Use iTunes to restore the device, as we describe in the preceding section.
Okay. So that’s the gamut of things you can do when your iPad acts up. If you
tried all this and none of it worked, skim through the rest of this chapter to
see whether anything else we recommend looks like it might help. If not, your
iPad probably needs to go into the shop for repairs.
Never fear, gentle reader. Be sure to read the last section in this chapter, “If
Nothing We Suggest Helps.” Your iPad may be quite sick, but we help ease
the pain by sharing some tips on how to minimize the discomfort.
Problems with Networks
If you’re having problems with Wi-Fi or your wireless carrier’s data network (Wi-Fi + 3G models only), this section may help. The techniques here
are short and sweet — except for the last one, restore. Restore, which we
describe in the previous section, is still inconvenient and time-consuming,
and it still entails erasing all your data and media and then restoring it.
First, here are some simple steps that may help:
✓ Make sure you have sufficient Wi-Fi or 3G signal strength, as shown in
Figure 14-1.
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Figure 14-1: Wi-Fi (top) and 3G (bottom) signal
strength from best (left) to worst (right).
✓ Try moving around. Changing your location by as little as a few feet can
sometimes mean the difference between great wireless reception and no
wireless reception at all. If you’re inside, try moving around or even a
step or two in one direction. If you’re outside, try moving 10 or 20 paces
in any direction. Keep an eye on the cell signal or Wi-Fi icon as you move
around, and stop when you see more bars than you saw before.
✓ Restart your iPad. If you’ve forgotten how, refer to the “Restart” section,
earlier in this chapter. As we mention, restarting your iPad is often all it
takes to fix whatever is wrong.
If you have a Wi-Fi + 3G iPad, try the following two bullet points.
✓ Make sure that you haven’t left your iPad in Airplane mode, as we
describe in Chapter 13. In Airplane mode (Wi-Fi + 3G models only), all
network-dependent features are disabled, so you can’t send or receive
messages, or use any of the applications that require a Wi-Fi or data
network connection (that is, Mail, Safari, Maps, YouTube, and the iTunes
and App Store apps).
✓ Toggle Airplane mode on/off. Turn on Airplane mode by tapping
Settings on the Home screen and then tapping the Airplane mode On/Off
switch to turn it on. Wait 15 or 20 seconds, and then turn it off again.
Toggling Airplane mode on and off like this resets both the Wi-Fi and
wireless data-network connections. If your network connection was the
problem, toggling Airplane mode on and off may correct it.
Apple offers two very good articles that may help you with Wi-Fi issues. The
first offers some general troubleshooting tips and hints; the second discusses
potential sources of interference for wireless devices and networks. You can
find them here:
http://support.apple.com/kb/TS3237
and here:
http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1365
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If none of the preceding suggestions fixes your network issues, try restoring
your iPad, as we describe previously in the “Restore” section.
Performing a restore deletes everything on your iPad — all your data, media,
and settings. You should be able to put things back the way they were with
your next sync. If that doesn’t happen, for whatever reason, you can’t say we
didn’t warn you.
Sync, Computer, or iTunes Issues
The last category of troubleshooting techniques in this chapter applies to
issues that involve synchronization and computer–iPad relations. If you’re
having problems syncing or your computer doesn’t recognize your iPad
when you connect it, here are some things to try.
Once again, we suggest that you try these procedures in the order they’re
presented here:
1. Recharge your iPad.
If you didn’t try it previously, try it now. Go back to the “Resuscitating
an iPad with Issues” section, at the beginning of this chapter, and read
what we say about recharging your iPad. Every word there also applies
here.
2. Try a different USB port or a different cable if you have one available.
It doesn’t happen often, but occasionally USB ports and cables go bad.
When they do, they invariably cause sync and connection problems.
Always make sure that a bad USB port or cable isn’t to blame.
If you don’t remember what we said about using USB ports on your
computer rather than the ones on your keyboard, monitor, or hub, we
suggest that you reread the “Recharge” section, earlier in this chapter.
3. Restart your iPad and try to sync again.
We describe restarting in full and loving detail in the “Restart” section,
earlier in this chapter.
4. Reinstall iTunes.
Even if you have an iTunes installer handy, you probably should visit the
Apple website and download the latest-and-greatest version, just in case.
You can find the latest version of iTunes at www.apple.com/itunes/
download.
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More Help on the Apple Website
If you try everything we suggest earlier in this chapter and still have problems,
don’t give up just yet. This section describes a few more places you may
find help. We recommend that you check out some or all of them before you
throw in the towel and smash your iPad into tiny little pieces (or ship it back
to Apple for repairs, as we describe in the next section).
First, Apple offers an excellent set of support resources on its website at
www.apple.com/support/ipad/getstarted. You can browse support
issues by category, search for a problem by keyword, read or download
technical manuals, and scan the discussion forums.
Speaking of the discussion forums, you can go directly to them at http://
discussions.apple.com. They’re chock-full of useful questions and
answers from other iPad users, and our experience has been that if you can’t
find an answer to a support question elsewhere, you can often find it in these
forums. You can browse by category (Syncing, for example, as shown in
Figure 14-2) or search by keyword.
Figure 14-2: Page 1 of 18 pages of discussions about syncing your iPad.
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Either way, you find thousands of discussions about almost every aspect of
using your iPad. Better still, you can frequently find the answer to your
question or a helpful suggestion.
Now for the best part: If you can’t find a solution by browsing or searching,
you can post your question in the appropriate Apple discussion forum. Check
back in a few days (or even in a few hours), and some helpful iPad user may
well have replied with the answer. If you’ve never tried this fabulous tool,
you’re missing out on one of the greatest support resources available anywhere.
Last, but certainly not least, before you throw in the towel, you might want to
try a carefully worded Google search. It couldn’t hurt, and you might just find
the solution you spent hours searching for.
If Nothing We Suggest Helps
If you tried every trick in the book (this one) and still have a malfunctioning
iPad, consider shipping it off to the iPad hospital (better known as Apple,
Inc.). The repair is free if your iPad is still under its one-year limited warranty.
You can extend your warranty for as long as two years from the original
purchase date, if you want. To do so, you need to buy the AppleCare
Protection Plan for your iPad. You don’t have to do it when you buy your
iPad, but you must buy it before your one-year limited warranty expires.
The retail price is $99, but we’ve seen it for a lot less, so it might pay to shop
around.
Here are a few things you need to know before you take your iPad in to be
repaired:
✓ Your iPad may be erased during its repair, so you should sync your iPad
with iTunes before you take it in, if you can. If you can’t and you entered
data on the iPad since your last sync, such as a contact or an appointment,
the data may not be there when you restore your iPad upon its return.
✓ Remove any third-party accessories, such as a case or screen protector.
Although you may be able to get your iPad serviced by Best Buy or another
authorized Apple reseller, we recommend that you take it to your nearest
Apple Store, for two reasons:
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✓ No one knows your iPad like Apple. One of the geniuses at the Apple
Store may be able to fix whatever is wrong without sending your iPad
away for repairs.
✓ The Apple Store will, in some cases, swap out your wonky iPad for a
brand new one on the spot. You can’t win if you don’t play, which is
why we always visit our local Apple Store when something goes wrong
(with our iPads, iPhones, iPods, and even our laptops and iMacs).
And that retires the side. If you’ve done everything we’ve suggested, we’re
relatively certain you’re now holding an iPad that works flawlessly. Again.
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Accessorizing Your iPad
In This Chapter
▶ Apple cases, keyboards, and chargers
▶ Apple connection options (camera, TV, and projector)
▶ Earphones, headphones, and headsets
▶ Speakers
▶ Third-party cases
▶ Other protection products
▶ Miscellaneous other accessories
A
nyone who has purchased a new car in recent years is aware that it’s
not always a picnic trying to escape the showroom without the
salesperson trying to get you to part with a few extra bucks.
You can only imagine what the markup is on roof racks,
navigation systems, and rear-seat DVD players.
We don’t suppose you’ll get a hard sell when you
snap up an iPad or iPad 2 at an Apple Store (or
elsewhere). But Apple and several other companies
are all too happy to outfit whichever iPad model
you choose with extra doodads from wireless
keyboards and stands to battery chargers and
carrying cases. So just as your car might benefit
from dealer (or third-party) options, so too might
your iPad benefit from a variety of spare parts.
The iPad features the standard 30-pin dock connector
that’s familiar to iPod and iPhone owners. If you own
either or both of these products, you also know that a bevy
of accessories fit perfectly into that Dock connector. Heck, you
might even try to plug the battery chargers or other iPod/iPhone accessories
you have laying around into the iPad. No guarantee these will work, but they
probably will. And you have nothing to lose by trying.
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One thing is certain: If you see a Made for iPad label on the package, the
developer is certifying that an electronic accessory has been designed
to connect specifically to the iPad and meets performance standards
established by Apple.
We start this accessories chapter with the options that carry Apple’s own
logo and conclude with worthwhile extras from other companies.
Accessories from Apple
You’ve come to expect a certain level of excellence from Apple hardware
and software, so you should expect no different when it comes to various
Apple-branded accessories. That said, you will find a variety of opinions on
some of these products, so we recommend a visit to http://store.apple.
com, where you can read mini-reviews and pore over ratings from real people
just like you. They’re not shy about telling it like it is.
Casing the iPad
The thing about accessories is that half the time, you wish they weren’t
accessories at all. You wish they came in the box. Among the things we
would have liked to have seen included with the iPad was a protective case.
Alas, it wasn’t to be — neither the iPad nor the iPad 2 comes with a case, but
you can find cases aplenty just the same. You read about Apple’s here and
other cases a bit later in this chapter.
Apple’s entry in this category for the original iPad carries the most straightforward of names: Apple iPad Case. It’s a lightweight $39 soft black microfiber
case that we both think is kind of classy looking (though nothing like the
brown crocodile-skin iPad and iPad 2 cases from Orbino, which at $689 will
take quite a bite out of your paycheck).
Apple’s case-like offering for the iPad 2, shown in Figure 15-1, is more cover
than case, which is probably why it’s called a Smart Cover instead of a Smart
Case. Made specifically for the iPad 2, it’s ultra-thin and attaches magnetically.
Flip the cover open (even just a little), and your iPad 2 wakes up instantly;
flip it shut, and your iPad 2 goes right to sleep. Available in ten bright colors
in polyurethane ($39) or leather ($69). Bob says the aniline-dyed Italian
leather on his PRODUCT RED Smart Cover is gorgeous and soft as butter.
Both the iPad Case and Smart Cover can be configured so your iPad rests at
about a 30-degree angle, which makes it much easier for typing on its virtual
keyboard. And both can also be folded into pseudo iPad stands that prop up
the iPad for hands-free movie watching or slide-show viewing.
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Courtesy of Apple
Figure 15-1: Apple’s Smart Cover for iPad 2.
The Apple iPad Case has a very snug fit, which we generally consider a
positive. Not always. If you want to use Apple’s iPad Keyboard Dock that we
discuss in the next section (and certain other peripherals that use the Dock
connector), you have to remove the Apple case to do so. Because of that
tight fit, sliding the iPad in and out of the case is a bit of a nuisance.
Exploring virtual keyboard alternatives
We think the various virtual keyboards that pop up just as you need them
on the iPad are perfectly fine for shorter typing tasks, whether it’s composing
e-mails or tapping a few notes. For most longer assignments, however, we
writers are more comfortable pounding away on a real-deal physical keyboard,
and we suspect you feel the same way.
Fortunately a physical keyboard for the iPad is an easy addition. Apple sells
two alternatives as follows, each for $69.
The Apple iPad Keyboard Dock
The Apple iPad Keyboard Dock combines a full-size anodized aluminum
keyboard with a built-in Dock you can use to sync, charge, or connect other
accessories to the iPad. Actually this keyboard has a pair of Dock connectors,
one in the front just above the top row of keys that you use to slide and
connect the iPad itself, and the other on the rear for hooking up those other
accessories. You also find a standard-sized 3.5mm jack on the rear for
connecting powered speakers with an optional audio cable.
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This keyboard is a decent option for people who want to listen to music in
stereo without donning headphones. Remember, the iPad has only a single
built-in mono speaker.
The easy-to-type-on keyboard has dedicated one-touch function keys along
the top row to summon the Home screen, open Spotlight search, increase or
decrease brightness, initiate a Picture Frame slide show (see Chapter 10),
call upon the virtual keyboard, and lock or unlock the screen. You also find
playback, mute, and volume controls for the iPod.
We’ve already pointed out one drawback to the Keyboard Dock: having to
remove the optional Apple iPad Case before sliding in the iPad.
Another drawback: Despite being lightweight, the keyboard’s design makes
traveling with it a little awkward because the Dock on the rear sticks out in a
triangular fashion. In any event, it’s just one more piece to account for.
And another drawback: You can only prop up the iPad in portrait mode when
connected to the keyboard. You can’t connect it in landscape mode and type.
Oh, and this keyboard is for the original iPad only. An iPad 2 just won’t fit.
You can purchase an iPad Dock from Apple without a keyboard for $29.
The Dock is virtually identical to the one on the Keyboard Dock minus the
aforementioned keyboard. In other words, it has the same audio cable jack
and Dock connectors and the same drawbacks: You still can’t slide the iPad
into the Dock when it’s outfitted in Apple’s Case, and you still can’t stand it
up in the landscape mode. Plus we’re obliged to point out that early reviews
for the Dock without the keyboard on Apple’s website have been mixed.
The Apple Wireless Keyboard
The Apple Wireless Keyboard, as shown in Figure 15-2, is a way to use a
top-notch aluminum physical keyboard without tethering it to the iPad. It
operates from up to 30 feet away from the iPad via Bluetooth, the wireless
technology we spend time with in Chapter 13. Which begs us to ask, can you
see the iPad screen from 30 feet away?
As with any Bluetooth device that the iPad makes nice with, you have to pair
it to your tablet. Pairing is also discussed in Chapter 13.
The Bluetooth keyboard takes two AA batteries. It’s smart about power
management, too; it powers itself down when you stop using it to avoid
draining those batteries. It wakes up when you start typing.
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Courtesy of Apple
Figure 15-2: The Apple Wireless Keyboard.
The Wireless Keyboard doesn’t do any of the docking tricks, of course, that
are possible with the iPad Keyboard Dock. On the other hand, it’s very thin,
so it’s easier to take with you than the Apple Keyboard Dock. If you use a
backpack, briefcase, messenger bag, or even a large purse, there’s almost
certainly room for the Apple Wireless Keyboard.
Though we have tested only a few third-party Bluetooth keyboards, the iPad
ought to work fine with any keyboard that supports Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR
technology. Bob is currently using a Verbatim Wireless Bluetooth Mobile
Keyboard ($80 at Amazon; $104 on the Verbatim website) that includes
iPad- and iPhone-specific keys, folds in half, and includes a nice leather
carrying case.
Connecting a camera
The iPad doesn’t include a USB port or SD memory card slot, which happen
to be the most popular methods for getting pictures (and videos) from a
digital camera onto a computer.
All the same, the iPad delivers a marvelous photo viewer. That’s why if you
take a lot of pictures, Apple’s $29 iPad Camera Connection Kit, which we also
discuss in Chapter 10, is worth considering. As a reminder, the Kit consists
of the two components shown in Figure 15-3, either of which plugs into the
30-pin dock connector at the bottom of the iPad. One sports a USB interface
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that you can use with the USB cable that came with your camera to download
pictures. The other is an SD Card Reader that lets you insert the memory
card that stores your pictures.
Though the official line from Apple is that this USB adapter is meant to work
with the USB cable from your digital camera, we tried connecting other
devices. We got an old Dell USB keyboard to work with it. There’s a possibility
other devices will work, too, including readers for non-SD type memory
cards, USB speakers, and more. But don’t expect all your USB devices to be
compatible because of the power requirements of those devices, and the fact
that the requisite software drivers and such aren’t loaded on the iPad.
Figure 15-3: You have two ways to import images using the iPad
Camera Connection Kit.
We only hope that despite this helpful accessory, Apple will get around to
adding USB and an SD slot, but it didn’t happen on iPad 2. Of course, Apple
did add two cameras.
Connecting an iPad to a TV or projector
The iPad has a pretty big screen for what it is, a tablet computer. But that
display is still not nearly as large as a living room TV or a monitor you might
see in a conference room or auditorium. To send iPad content to a bigger
screen, you can choose from three connectors:
✓ VGA Adapter cable: Projecting what’s on the iPad’s 1024 x 768 screen
to a larger display is the very reason behind the iPad Dock Connector
to VGA Adapter cable that Apple is selling for $29. You can use it to
connect your iPad to TVs, projectors, and VGA displays. What for? To
watch videos, slide shows, and presentations on the big screen.
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VGA (video graphics array) delivers, by today’s standards, low-resolution
video output, compared, say to the more advanced HDMI (HighDefinition Multimedia Interface).
✓ Component AV Cable: You may otherwise have decent results playing
movies off iPad to a TV using yet another cable that Apple sells. It’s the
$39 Apple Component AV Cable. The hookup is from the Dock connector
on the iPad to the so-called component video ports of your home
theater or stereo receiver; such component connectors are red, blue,
and green. As part of this setup, you also need to hook up red and white
audio connectors to analog ports on the receiver.
Some buyers of the Apple Component AV Cable have been disappointed,
however, because the product doesn’t exactly mirror the iPad display
at all times. In fact it all-too-frequently doesn’t. The app you’re trying
to project must support playing video to an external display, and only
some do such as
• Videos, Photos, and YouTube among the iPad’s built-in apps
• The optional Keynote, Netflix, and Air Video programs
• Safari, which works for some videos, but not everything you’re
viewing through the browser
✓ Digital AV Adapter cable: Finally, there’s the newest addition to the
Apple adapter family, the $39 Apple Digital AV Adapter. If you have
an original iPad, this cable does what the other two adapters do, but
instead of using VGA or Component video connectors, it uses HDMI. If
you have an iPad 2, however, this adapter includes a nice bonus: It lets
you mirror the display on your iPad on a big screen TV, which is great
for demos and presentations. Ed has used this adapter to, among other
things, to play Angry Birds on the bigger TV screen.
Keeping a spare charger
With roughly ten hours of battery life, a single charge can more than get you
through a typical work day with your iPad. But why chance it? Having a spare
charger at the office can spare you (!) from having to commute with one.
The Apple iPad 10W USB Power Adapter goes for $29 and includes a lengthy
6-foot cord.
Listening and Talking with Earphones,
Headphones, and Headsets
You’ve surely noticed that your iPad did not include earphones or a headset.
That’s probably a blessing because the earphones and headsets Apple has
included with iPods and iPhones since time immemorial aren’t all that good.
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In fact, Bob refers to them as, “mediocre and somewhat uncomfortable” in
almost every article he’s written about the iPod or iPhone.
Without an included pair of earphones, you can select a pair of headphones,
earphones, or a headset that suits your needs and your budget.
Wired headphones, earphones, and headsets
Search Amazon for headphones, earphones, or headsets and you’ll find thousands
of each are available at prices ranging from around $10 to more than $1,000. Or,
if you prefer to shop in a brick-and-mortar store, Target, Best Buy, and the Apple
Store all have decent selections, with prices starting at less than $20.
Much as we love the shopping experience at Apple Stores, you won’t find any
bargains there. Bargain-hunting doesn’t matter that much for Apple-branded
products because they’re rarely discounted. However, you can almost always
find widely available non-Apple items such as headphones, earphones, and
headsets cheaper somewhere else.
With so many brands and models of earphones, headphones, and headsets
available from so many manufacturers at so many price points, we can’t
possibly test even a fraction of the ones available today. That said, we’ve
probably tested more of them than most people, and we have our favorites.
When it comes to headphones, Bob is partial to his Grado SR60i’s, which are
legendary for offering astonishingly accurate audio at an affordable price
(around $80). He’s tried headphones that cost twice, thrice, or even more
times as much that he didn’t think sounded nearly as good. Find out more at
www.gradolabs.com.
Ed goes with sweet-sounding, albeit pricey, (about $350) Bose QuietComfort
3 acoustic noise-canceling headphones.
For earphones and earphone-style headsets, Bob likes the Klipsch Image S4
Headphones and S4i In-Ear Headset with Mic and 3-Button Remote. At around
$79 and $99, respectively, they sound better than many similarly priced
products and better than many more expensive offerings.
Bluetooth stereo headphones, earphones, and headsets
Neither of us has much experience with Bluetooth (wireless) stereo headphones
and headsets, but we thought we’d at least plant the seed. The idea is that
with Bluetooth stereo headphones/earphones/headsets, you can listen to
music wirelessly up to 33 feet away from your iPad. If this sounds good to
you, we suggest that you look for reviews of such products on the web before
you decide which one to buy. A search of Amazon for stereo Bluetooth headset
brought up over 300 items, with prices starting as low as $15.
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Earphones? Headphones? Headsets?
We have referred to headphones and headsets
several times and thought you might be wondering whether there’s a difference, and if so,
what it is. When we talk about headphones or
earphones, we’re talking about the things you
use to listen to music. A headset adds a microphone so that you can use it for voice chatting,
recording voice notes, and (in the case of the
iPhone or Internet VoIP services such as Skype)
for phone calls. So headphones and earphones
are for listening, and headsets are for both talking and listening.
Now you may be wondering whether earphones
and headphones are the same. To some people
they may be, but to us, headphones (shown on
the left in the figure) have a band across the top
(or back) of your head, and the listening apparatus is big and covers the outside of your ears.
Think of the big fat things you see covering a
radio disk jockey’s ears. Earphones (sometimes
referred to as earbuds and shown on the right
in the figure), on the other hand, are smaller, fit
entirely in your ear, and have no band across
the top or back of your head.
Photos courtesy of iStockPhoto.com
Headsets can be earphone style or, less commonly, headphone style. The distinguishing
factor is that headsets always include a microphone. And some headsets are designed specifically for use with Apple i-products (iPhone,
iPod, iPad) and have integrated Play/Pause and
volume control buttons.
One last thing: Some companies refer to their
earbud products as headphones, but we think
that’s confusing and wrong. So in this book,
headphones are those bulky, outside-the-ear
things and earphones are teeny-tiny things that
fit entirely in your ear canal.
For what it’s worth, Bob has a Cardo S-2 Bluetooth stereo headset that he
occasionally uses with his iPhone when he walks his dog. He tested it with
his iPad, and it worked just fine. The only problem is that the model he has is
apparently discontinued. On the other hand, you can find them occasionally
on the web for around $70, and Bob says they perform well and sound better
than you might expect for a wireless headset. On the other hand, his are over
three years old, so you can probably find something better that costs less
by now.
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Listening with Speakers
You can connect just about any speakers to your iPad, but if you want
decent sound, we suggest you look only at powered speakers and not passive
(unpowered) ones. The difference is that powered speakers contain their
own amplification circuitry and can deliver much better (and louder) sound
than unpowered speakers.
Prices range from well under $100 to hundreds (or even thousands) of dollars.
Most speaker systems designed for use with your computer, iPod, or iPhone
work well as long as they have an auxiliary input or a Dock connector that
can accommodate your iPad. (We haven’t seen any with the Dock connector
yet, but surely some will be available soon.)
Desktop speakers
Logitech (www.logitech.com) makes a range of desktop speaker systems
priced from less than $25 to more than $300. But that $300 system is the
Z5500 THX-certified 505-watt 5.1 digital surround system — surely overkill
for listening to music or video on your iPad, which doesn’t support surround
sound anyway. The point is that Logitech makes a variety of decent systems
at a wide range of price points. If you’re looking for something inexpensive,
you can’t go wrong with most Logitech-powered speaker systems.
Bob is a big fan of Audioengine (www.audioengineusa.com) desktop
speakers. They deliver superior audio at prices that are quite reasonable for
speakers that sound this good. Audioengine 5 is the premium product priced
at $349 a pair; Audioengine 2 is its smaller but still excellent-sounding sibling
priced at $199 a pair. They’re available only direct from the manufacturer,
but the company is so confident you’ll love them that it offers a free audition
for their speaker systems. If you order a pair and don’t love them, return
them within 30 days for a full refund. Bob knows a lot of people who have
ordered them, and so far no one has sent them back.
Bluetooth speakers
Like Bluetooth headsets, Bluetooth speakers let you listen to music up to
33 feet away from your iPad. They’re great for listening by the pool or hot tub
or anywhere else you might not want to take your iPad.
Bob recently reviewed the Tenqa SP-109 Stereo Bluetooth Speaker ($49.99)
and said it was “easy to set up and simple to use at a reasonable price,”
though he did also say he thought the sound quality was okay at best. Bob
uses the soundmatters’ foxL v2 ($199) regularly; it’s a palm-sized travel
speaker with some spiffy advanced technology that makes it sound noticeably
better than any other ultra-portable speakers he’s tested (and he’s tested a
lot). foxL v2 also serves as a nifty wireless speakerphone with his iPhone 4, but
should work equally well with most other mobile phones and smartphones.
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Ed gave a favorable review to the $199.99 wireless JAMBOX by Jawbone,
which offers good sound despite being able to fit into the palm of your hand.
You can connect via Bluetooth or an auxiliary stereo jack. Added bonus:
JAMBOX doubles as a speaker phone. Again, neither one of us has much
experience with Bluetooth (wireless) stereo speakers, but we’d be remiss if
we didn’t at least mention them.
Docking your iPad with an extender cable
Because the iPad is much larger than an iPod or iPhone, you can’t just dock
the iPad into a speaker system designed for the smaller devices. All is not
lost if you’re partial to those speakers and still want to connect the iPad.
CableJive (http://cablejive.com) sells Dock Extender cables that let
you dock your iPad from a distance; it’s described as a 30-pin Male to Female
Extension cable.
Versions come in black or white and two standard lengths, $25.95 for a 2-foot
length and $31.95 for 6 feet.
The cable doesn’t work with S-video output, component video, and audio in
for recording.
Wrapping Your iPad in Third-Party Cases
Much as we like the Apple iPad Case, other vendors offer some excellent
options:
✓ Abas: Abas (www.abas.net) offers very nice leather cases that won’t
set you back $689 like the Orbino crocodile-skin case we mention earlier
in the chapter.
✓ Targus: Targus (www.targus.com) has a full line of iPad cases in a
variety of material and prices. The nice part is that none of them,
including the leather portfolio, costs more than $60.
✓ Griffin Technology: Griffin Technology (www.griffintechnology.
com) also has a pretty good selection of iPad cases at reasonable prices
(that is, none more than $50).
✓ iLuv: iLuv (www.i-luv.com) is yet another case maker with a range of
affordable cases fabricated from leather, fabric, and silicone, none of
which costs more than $40.
✓ Vario: ZeroChroma (www.zerochroma.com) has Bob’s current favorite
Vario iPad (and iPhone) case ($69.95). The big attraction is the 16-angle
rotating theatre-stand on the back that folds flush when not in use.
Sweet!
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✓ BookBook for iPad/iPad 2: The BookBook case from Twelve South
looks like a fine vintage hardbound book but is actually a very handsome
iPad case and stand.
✓ The iPad Bubble Sleeve: From Hard Candy Cases (www.hardcandy
cases.com), the iPad Bubble Sleeve ($49.95) offers significantly better
protection against bumps and scratches than any other case we’ve seen.
If we expected our iPads to be exposed to moderate impacts, this case’s
rigid exterior and additional shock-absorbing rubber bumpers for the
screen make it the case we’d choose.
But Wait . . . There’s More!
Before we leave the topic of accessories, we think you should know about a
few more products, namely film protection products that guard your iPad’s
exterior (or screen) without adding a bit of bulk: the Griffin Technology
A-Frame tabletop stand for your iPad, and 2-into-1 stereo adapters.
Protecting the screen with film
Some people prefer not to use a case with their iPad, and that’s okay, too.
But if you’re one of those people (or even if you’re not), you might want to
consider protective film for the iPad screen or even the whole device. We’ve
tried these products on our iPhones in the past and have found them to
perform as promised. If you apply them properly, they’re nearly invisible and
protect your iPad from scratches and scrapes without adding any bulk.
Bob has tested film products from invisibleShield by ZAGG (www.zagg.com),
BodyGuardz (www.bodyguardz.com), and Best Skins Ever (www.bestskins
ever.com) and says, in a nutshell, they’re more similar than they are different. invisibleShield is the most expensive and possibly the best-quality film.
BodyGuardz products are roughly 25 percent cheaper than invisibleShield
and of comparable quality. Both invisibleShield and BodyGuardz offer free
lifetime replacement of their products. Best Skins Ever products are 25–55
percent less expensive than invisibleShield or BodyGuardz, yet the product is,
if not just as good, darn close to it. The difference is that Best Skins Ever has
minimal packaging, and rather than including the “special liquid” you need
to apply it (like invisibleShield and BodyGuardz), Best Skins Ever includes
instructions for making it yourself. And unlike the others, Best Skins Ever
has no free replacement policy, though it does offer a 30-day money-back
guarantee. Finally, all three offer total protection (front, back, and sides) as
well as separate products for the front or back.
Which one to choose? If you think you might take advantage of the lifetime
replacement policy, you want either invisibleShield or BodyGuardz. If you
want a good product at the lowest price but with a 30-day money-back
guarantee instead of lifetime replacement, look at Best Skins Ever.
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Any or all of the “skins” can be tricky to apply. Follow the instructions
closely, watch videos on the vendors’ websites and YouTube, and take your
time. If you do, you’ll be rewarded with clear film protection that’s nearly
invisible yet protects your iPad from scratches, nicks, and cuts.
One last thing: RadTech (www.radtech.us) offers two types of Mylar screen
protectors — clear transparent, and antiglare. These screen protectors are
somewhat stiffer than the film products, and unlike film, they can be cleaned
and reapplied multiple times with no reduction in performance. They effectively
hide minor scratches, surface defects, and abrasions, and the hard Mylar
surface not only resists scratches and abrasions but is also optically correct.
Finally, they’re reasonably priced at $19.95 for a pair of protectors of the
same type.
Standing up your iPad with Griffin A-Frame
The Griffin A-Frame ($39.99) is so unusual we just had to include it. As you
can see in Figure 15-4, it’s a dual-purpose Desktop stand made of heavy-duty
aluminum. You can open it to hold your iPad in either portrait or landscape
mode for video watching, displaying pictures (a great way to exploit the
Picture Frame mode, as we describe in Chapter 10), or even reading. In
this upright mode, it’s also the perfect companion for the Apple Wireless
Keyboard (or any other Bluetooth keyboard for that matter). Or, close the
legs and lay it down, and it puts your iPad at the perfect angle for using the
onscreen keyboard.
Photos courtesy of Griffin Technology
Figure 15-4: The Griffin A-Frame is a unique, dual-purpose tabletop stand for your iPad.
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Soft silicone padding keeps your iPad from getting scratched or sliding
around, and the bottom lip is designed to accommodate the charging cable in
portrait mode. Furthermore, it works with many third-party cases, including
Griffin’s flexible and hard-shell cases, among others.
Bob says, “I really, really like this thing; it’s where my iPad resides pretty
much anytime it’s not in my backpack.”
Sharing your iPad with a 2-into-1 stereo adapter
A 2-into-1 stereo adapter is a handy little device that lets two people plug their
headphones/earphones/headsets into one iPad (or iPod or iPhone for that
matter). They’re quite inexpensive (less than $10) and extremely useful if you
are traveling with a friend by air, sea, rail, or bus. They’re also great when
you want to watch a movie with your BFF but don’t want to risk waking the
neighbors or roommates.
We call ’em 2-into-1 stereo adapters, but that’s not the only name they go by.
Other names you might see for the same device are as follows:
✓ 3.5mm stereo Y-splitter
✓ 1⁄8-inch stereo 1-plug to 2-jacks adapter
✓ 1⁄8-inch stereo Y-adapter
✓ 3.5mm dual stereo headphone jack splitter
✓ And many others
You really only need to know two things. The first is that 1⁄8-inch and 3.5mm
are used interchangeably in the adapter world (even though they’re not
really the same).
Some measurements to keep in mind: 1⁄8 of an inch = 0.125 inch, whereas
3.5mm = 0.1378 inch. Not the same, but close enough for rock ’n’ roll.
The second is that you want to make sure that you get a stereo adapter. Some
monaural adapters work but pump exactly the same sound into both ears,
instead of sending the audio information for the left stereo channel to your
left ear and the right stereo channel to your right.
In other words, you need a 1⁄8-inch or 3.5mm stereo adapter that has a single
stereo plug on one end (to plug into your iPad) and two stereo jacks on the
other (to accommodate two sets of headphones/earphones/headsets).
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The Part of Tens
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I
In this part . . .
t’s written in stone somewhere at Wiley world
headquarters that we For Dummies authors
must include a Part of Tens in every single For
Dummies book we write. It is a duty we take quite
seriously. So in this part, you’ll find a list of ten of
our favorite free applications plucked from the
iPad App Store. These include a couple of really
addictive games and even an app to help you find
a recipe for your favorite dish. We then move on
to our diverse collection of ten fabulous apps
every user should consider buying including an
art studio, a database, and a piano for your iPad.
We close the show with one of our favorite topics:
hints, tips, and shortcuts that make life with your
iPad even better. Among the ten, you discover
how to look at the capacity of your newly favored
device in different ways, find out how to share
Web pages, and pick up another trick or two on
using the iPad’s virtual keyboard.
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16
Ten Appetizing (and Free) Apps
In This Chapter
▶ Pocket Legends
▶ Shazam
▶ ABC Player
▶ Flixster
▶ IMDb
▶ Netflix
▶ Comics
▶ Epicurious Recipes & Shopping List
▶ Flipboard
▶ Pandora Internet Radio
K
iller app is familiar jargon to anyone who has spent
any time around computers. The term refers to
an application so sweet or so useful that just about
everybody wants or must have it.
You could make the argument that the most compelling killer app on the iPad is the very App Store
we expound on in Chapter 7. This online emporium
has an abundance of splendid programs — dare we
say killer apps in their own right? — many of which
are free. These cover everything from food (hey, you
gotta eat) to show biz. Okay, so some rotten apples
(aren’t we clever) are in the bunch, too. But we’re here
to accentuate the positive.
With that in mind, in this chapter, we offer ten of our favorite free
iPad apps. In Chapter 17, we tell you about our favorite iPad apps that aren’t
free but are worth every penny.
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We show you ours, and we encourage you to show us yours. If you discover
your own killer iPad apps, by all means, let us know — our e-mail addresses
are at the end of the intro to this book — so that we can check them out.
Pocket Legends
If you’re a fan of MMORPG-style gaming, we’re happy to inform you that
Pocket Legends for iPad is an incredibly cool 3D MMO game that doesn’t (or
at least doesn’t have to) cost you a cent.
For those who aren’t already fans of the genre, MMORPG is the acronym for
Massively-Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game.
What that means is that you can join thousands of players from all over the
world when you play. You begin by choosing one of three character classes
to play as: an archer, an enchantress, or a warrior. Then, you (and, optionally, other players) wander around dungeons, forests, and castles killing zombies, skeletons, demons, and other bad guys and collecting gold pieces. Every
so often, your character finds weapons, armor, and shields, or you can buy
them with the gold you find. The longer you play, the more powerful your
character becomes and the more powerful the weapons, armor, and shields
you can use.
Figure 16-1 shows a character (Doc) in a forest shooting fireballs at a bad guy.
Figure 16-1: The in-game help system shows you pretty much everything
you need to know to play Pocket Legends.
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Did you notice we said “doesn’t have to cost you money” rather than the
more absolute “doesn’t cost you money” back in the first paragraph? The
reason: If you enjoy playing (as we do), you’ll probably want to purchase
additional dungeon campaigns ($1.99 each), platinum (30 pieces for $4.99),
additional characters (just $0.99 each), or one of the other goodies that are
available for in-app purchase. You can have a lot of fun for a good long time
without laying out a dime — but if you like playing, you’ll probably find yourself considering a purchase or two.
Here is one last thing: Bob’s character is an archer named Doc. So, if you
happen to run into him in a dungeon or forest, use the chat system to give
him a shoutout.
Shazam
Ever heard a song on the radio or television, in a store, or at a club and wondered what it was called or who was singing it? With the Shazam app, you
may never wonder again. Just launch Shazam and point your iPad’s microphone at the source of the music. In a few seconds, the song title and artist’s
name magically appear on your iPad screen as shown in Figure 16-2.
Figure 16-2: After listening for 15 seconds, Shazam told us all this about the song that was playing.
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In Shazam parlance, that song has been tagged. Now if tagging were all
Shazam could do, that would surely be enough. But wait, there’s more. After
Shazam tags a song you can
✓ Buy the song at the iTunes Store.
✓ Watch related videos on YouTube.
✓ Tweet the song on Twitter.
✓ Read a biography, a discography, or lyrics.
✓ Take a photo and attach it to the tagged item in Shazam.
✓ E-mail a tag to a friend.
Shazam isn’t great at identifying classical music, jazz, or opera, nor is it adept
at identifying obscure indie bands. But if you use it primarily to identify
popular music, it rocks (pun intended). It has worked for us in noisy airport
terminals, crowded shopping malls, and even once at a wedding ceremony.
ABC Player
Do you watch any ABC-TV shows like Grey’s Anatomy, Dancing with the Stars,
or Bob’s favorite, Lost, or Ed’s fave, Modern Family? If so, grab your copy of
the free ABC Player now. Go ahead; we’ll wait.
With this app and a Wi-Fi connection, you can watch complete episodes of
your favorite ABC TV shows anytime you like. You can find the shows and
episodes you want to watch in lots of ways.
And (not to repeat ourselves) it’s all free! Yes, the shows do have commercials, but would you rather pay $1.99 (the average cost of an episode of a TV
show in the iTunes Store) for the commercial-free version?
We thought not.
Flixster
We like movies, so we both use the Flixster app a lot. Feed it your zip code,
and then browse local theaters by movie, show time, rating, or distance from
your current location. Or browse to find a movie you like and then tap to find
theatres, show times, and other info, as shown in Figure 16-3. Another nice
feature is the ability to buy tickets to most movies from your iPad with just a
few additional taps.
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299
Figure 16-3: Find out show times, watch the
trailer, or get more info on the director or cast
with a single tap.
We appreciate that we can read reviews, play movie trailers, and e-mail
movie listings to others with a single click. We also enjoy the movie trailers
for soon-to-be-released films and DVDs. Other free movie showtime apps are
out there, but we like Flixster best.
IMDb
While we’re on the subject of the silver screen, we couldn’t resist opening
IMDb, shorthand for Internet Movie Database. And what a database it is, especially for the avid filmgoer. This vast and delightful repository of all things
cinema is the place to go for complete cast/crew listings, actor/filmmaker
bios, plot summaries, movie trailers, critics’ reviews, user ratings, parental
guidance, famous quotations, and all kinds of trivia.
You can always search for movies, TV shows, actors, and so on by typing
a name in the search box in the upper-right corner of the screen. Or tap
Browse at the lower left to find current movies by showtimes, what’s coming
soon, or box office results. You can browse TV recaps, too, or find people
born on the day you happen to be looking and poking around the app. It’s
also fun to check out the most-viewed celebs on IMDb. The recent roster
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included Charlie Sheen, Natalie Portman, Olivia Wilde, Amber Heard, and
Mila Kunis, among others.
One piece of advice to movie buffs: Avoid the IMDb if you have a lot of work
to do. You’ll have a hard time closing the curtain on this marvelous app.
Netflix
Flixster, IMDb, and now Netflix. You’ve no doubt detected a real trend by
now — and that is indeed our affection for movies. If you love movies, too,
you’re sure to be a fan of the Netflix app. Over time, Netflix, the company that
built its reputation by sending DVDs to subscribers through the mail, started
streaming movies over the Internet to computers, TVs, and other consumer
electronics gear. You can now add the iPad to that list.
From the iPad, you have more or less instant access to more than 20,000
movies on demand, including 1,000 or so from the Starz movie service. And
although these titles aren’t exactly current blockbusters, we know you’ll
find plenty of films worth seeing. You can search by genre (classics, comedy,
drama, and so on) and subgenre (courtroom dramas, political dramas, romantic dramas, and so on). Figure 16-4 shows a small sample of the movies and
shows you can watch instantly.
Figure 16-4: Stream a movie instantly through
Netflix.
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301
Although the app is free, as are the movies you choose to watch on the fly,
you have to pay Netflix subscription fees that start at $8.99 a month. You also
need an Internet connection, preferably through Wi-Fi, though Netflix works
on 3G models as well.
Comics
Comics is actually three apps rolled into one. First and foremost, it’s a fantastic way to read comic books on a 9.7-inch touchscreen. Second, it’s a comic
bookstore with hundreds of comics and comic series from dozens of publishers, including Arcana, Archie, Marvel, Devil’s Due, Digital Webbing, Red 5,
Zenescope, and many more (see Figure 16-5).
Finally, it’s a great way to organize the comics you own on your iPad so that
you can find the one you want quickly and easily.
Figure 16-5: Comics lets you shop for and read (d’oh!) comics on your iPad.
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The free Comics app gives you access to hundreds of free comics, or you can
use the built-in store to purchase comics, usually 99 cents to $1.99 per issue.
New releases are available every Wednesday, so visit the store often to check
out the latest and greatest offerings. Both the store and your personal comic
collection are well organized and easy to use. And reading comics in Comics is
a pleasure you won’t want to miss if you’re a fan of comics or graphic novels.
Epicurious Recipes & Shopping List
We love to eat. But we’re writers, not gourmet chefs, so we’ll take all the help we
can get when it comes to preparing a great meal. And we get a lot of that culinary
assistance from Epicurious, which easily lives up to its billing as the “Cook’s
Companion.” This tasty recipe app comes courtesy of Condé Nast Digital.
Tap the Control Panel button in the upper-left corner of the screen to get
started, and you can find a yummy recipe in no time. Tap Featured inside
the Control Panel (if it’s not already highlighted) to find recipes that have
been lumped into categories, often timed to the season. Around the time we
were writing this book, recipe collection categories included Spring Dinner,
Mother’s Day, Graduation Party, and Grilling Entrees.
If you tap Search inside the Control Panel instead, you can fine-tune your
search for a recipe by food or drink, by main ingredient (banana, chicken,
pasta), cuisine type, and dietary consideration (low-carb, vegan, kosher, and
so on), among other parameters.
When you discover a recipe you like, you can add it to a collection of
Favorites, e-mail it to a friend, pass along the ingredients to your shopping
list, or summon nutritional information. Some recipes also carry reviews.
Bon appétit.
Flipboard
The media stars of today aren’t necessarily those employed by old fashion publications. Nope. The stars of today are you and all your buddies on
Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, and lots of other places. Flipboard transforms the
social web into a gorgeous digital magazine. And you’re the editor who gets
to customize the content. Add Facebook pals, the folks you follow on Twitter,
stuff from your Google Reader account, Instagram photos, and photos
uploaded to Flickr. You can request nuggets from more traditional media
too, including outlets CNN, The Economist, The Huffington Post, Fox News,
BBC World News, NPR, USA TODAY, and many more. Figure 16-6 provides a
glimpse of what your tweets and feeds can look like through Flipboard.
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303
Figure 16-6: We think you’ll flip over Flipboard.
Pandora Internet Radio
We’ve long been fans of Pandora on other computers and mobile devices. So
we’re practically delirious that this custom Internet radio service is available
gratis on the iPad. Moreover, the addition of multitasking means you can play
Pandora music in the background while doing other stuff.
Pandora works on the iPad in much the same way that it does on a Mac or
PC. In the box at the upper left, type the name of a favorite artist, song title,
or composer via the iPad keyboard, and Pandora creates an instant personalized radio station with selections that exemplify the style you chose. Along
the left panel of Figure 16-7, you see some of the eclectic stations Ed created.
Tapping QuickMix at the top of the list plays musical selections across all
your stations.
Suppose that you type Beatles. Pandora’s instant Beatles station includes performances from John, Paul, George, and Ringo, as well as tunes from other acts.
And say that you type in a song title, such as Have I Told You Lately. Pandora
constructs a station with similar music after you tell it whether to base tunes
on the Van Morrison, Rod Stewart, or another rendition.
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Search for artist, song, or composer
Station list
Bookmark or buy a song
Figure 16-7: Have we told you lately how much
we like Pandora?
Pandora comes out of the Music Genome Project, an organization of musicians
and technologists who analyze music according to hundreds of attributes
(such as melody, harmony, and vocal performances).
You can help fine-tune the music Pandora plays by tapping the thumbs-up or
thumbs-down icon at the top of the screen above the album covers associated with the music you’ve been listening to during the current session.
Pandora also takes advantage of the generous screen real estate of the iPad
to deliver artist profiles. (Refer to Figure 16-7.)
If you tap the Menu button below an album cover of the currently playing
song, you can bookmark the song or artist that is playing, or head to iTunes
to purchase the song or other material from the artist directly on the iPad (if
available).
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17
Ten Apps Worth Paying For
In This Chapter
▶ Bill Atkinson PhotoCard
▶ Words with Friends HD
▶ Scrabble
▶ Art Studio for iPad
▶ The Pinball
▶ Art Authority
▶ Magic Piano
▶ The Elements
▶ Bento for iPad
▶ ZAGAT TO GO
I
f you read Chapter 16, you know that lots of great free
applications are available for your iPad. But as the
old cliché goes, some things are worth paying for.
Still, none of the ten for-pay apps we’ve chosen as
some of our favorites are likely to break the bank.
As you’re about to discover, some applications on
this list are practical and some are downright silly.
The common theme? We think you’ll like carrying
these apps around on your iPad.
Bill Atkinson PhotoCard
Who is Bill Atkinson? He had a hand (or both hands) in
the first Macintosh computer, as well as the MacPaint and
HyperCard Mac applications. Today he’s a world-renowned nature
photographer, which brings us to his app. Bill Atkinson PhotoCard is an inexpensive ($4.99) app that lets you create gorgeous high-resolution postcards
and send them via either e-mail or the U.S. Postal Service. E-mail is, of course,
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free. And though sending by USPS costs between $1.50 and $2.00 per card
depending on how many print-and-mail credits you purchase, the 8.25-x-5.5inch postcards are stunning. Printed on heavy glossy stock and on a stateof-the-art HP Indigo Digital Press, they’re as beautiful as any postcard you’ve
ever seen.
You can use 1 of the 150 included Bill Atkinson nature photos, as shown on
the left in Figure 17-1), or you can use any picture in your Photos library. You
can add stickers and stamps, as shown in Figure 17-1, and you can even add
voice notes to e-mailed cards.
Figure 17-1: Your postcard can feature one of the gorgeous nature
photos on the left, or you can use your own image (not shown here).
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You get the first USPS card free, so the effective price of the app is only
around $3 (and worth every penny). Or if you’re still uncertain, download Bill
Atkinson PhotoCard Lite, which has fewer included photos and no free printand-mail credit.
Words with Friends HD
This brings us to perhaps the only time in this whole book that your authors
had a disagreement. Both of us love word games and puzzles, but Bob loves
Words with Friends HD whereas Ed prefers the real thing, namely Scrabble.
Because neither of us wanted to eliminate our favorite word game from this
chapter, we decided it would be best if each of us wrote about our fave. So
the description of Words with Friends here was written by Bob, and the writeup of Scrabble later in the chapter is all Ed.
Social media is all the rage these days, but most multiplayer iPad games are
either boring or not particularly social. Words with Friends HD ($2.99), on
the other hand, is the most social game I’ve found and a ton of fun, too. It’s
kind of like playing Scrabble with a friend, but because it’s turn-based, you
can make a move and then quit the app and do other stuff. When your friend
makes his next move, you can choose to be notified that it’s your turn by
sound, onscreen alert, and/or a number on the Words with Friends icon on
your Home screen. Figure 17-2 shows a game I’m currently winning 299 to
242, as you can see near the top of the figure.
Try the free version (Words With Friends HD Free), and I’m sure you’ll
be hooked. Then challenge me if you like; my username is boblevitus
(although I often have the maximum 20 games going, so keep trying if I don’t
accept your challenge right away).
Scrabble
You already know we work with words for a living — and that we have a
(slight) disagreement about favorite apps for playing such games. Ed appreciates a good game of Scrabble, whereas Bob, as we told you earlier in this
chapter, prefers the virtual knock-off Words with Friends HD.
Playing the $9.99 iPad version of Scrabble (from Electronic Arts and Hasbro)
is the closest thing yet to replicating the experience of the famous crossword
board game on an electronic device. For starters, check out the gorgeous
high-definition graphics, as shown in Figure 17-3. The sounds of tiles placed
on the virtual board are realistic, too.
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Figure 17-2: It’s my (Bob’s) move in five games,
as you see in the overlay.
Figure 17-3: Ed says it’s hard to top Scrabble
on the iPad.
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In fact, you can build a decent case that Scrabble on the iPad even beats the
original board game. Consider the following:
✓ You can play up to 25 multiplayer games at a time. Challenge wordsmiths on Facebook or play over the same home network (as we have)
against someone with another iPad, an iPod touch, or an iPhone. Or play
against the computer and choose your level of difficulty (easy, normal,
hard).
✓ Through Party Play mode, you can manage your private tile rack on your
iPhone or iPod touch and seamlessly place tiles onto the iPad Scrabble
game board. Works with up to four devices. You have to download the
Tile Rack app from the App Store, but it’s free.
✓ You can play iTunes music in the background for inspiration.
✓ A Scrabble Teacher Feature lets you see the best available word choice
from your previous moves.
✓ Personal stats are kept on the iPad. You don’t need to keep score.
✓ You won’t lose any letter tiles or have to fret that your small child or pet
will swallow any.
Though I’m an obvious fan of this app, I did experience one quandary playing
over a home network — I wanted to use the word quandary because the letter
Q is worth ten points in Scrabble. The app did crash on that occasion.
ArtStudio
Do you fancy yourself an artist? We know our artistic talent is limited, but
if we were talented, ArtStudio for iPad is the program we’d use to paint our
masterpieces. Even if you have limited artistic talent, you can see that this
app has everything you need to create awesome artwork.
We were embarrassed to show you our creations, so instead we whipped
up a composite illustration (see Figure 17-4) that shows all the ArtStudio for
iPad’s tools and palettes at once.
Here are just some of ArtStudio for iPad’s features:
✓ Offers 25 brushes, including pencils, a smudge tool, bucket fill, airbrush,
and more. Brushes are resizable and simulate brush pressure.
✓ Up to five layers with options, such as delete, reorder, duplicate, merge,
and transparency.
✓ Filters, such as blur, sharpen, detect edges, sepia, and more.
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Figure 17-4: ArtStudio for iPad’s tools from left
to right: brushes, colors, layers, special effects,
file management options, and settings.
Don’t believe us? AppSmile.com (www.appsmile.com) rated it 5 out of 5,
saying, “This is what Photoshop Mobile wishes it had been.” SlapApp.com
(www.slappapp.com) also rated it 5 out of 5 and said, “I’ve dabbled in quite
a few painting and drawing apps and this one has ’em all beat by a long shot.”
And by all means, check out what talented artists can do with ArtStudio
for iPad at www.flickr.com/groups/artstudioimages and www.
artistinvermont.com.
One last thing: The app was only $0.99 when we bought our copies — a “special launch sale” price. Even if the price has gone up, we think this app is
easily worth $5 or even $10 if you like to draw or paint.
The Pinball
Good pinball games require supremely realistic physics, and The Pinball
($2.99) nails it. The way the ball moves around the tables and interacts with
bumpers and flippers is so realistic you’ll think you’re at an arcade. It’s
so realistic, in fact, that you can “shake” the table to influence the ball’s
movement.
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Another hallmark of a great pinball game is great sound effects, and The
Pinball doesn’t disappoint. The sounds the ball makes when it bounces off
a bumper, is hit with a flipper, or passes through a rollover are spot-on and
totally authentic.
One thing that takes some getting used to is the moving camera used by
the game in portrait mode. Although it occasionally pulls back to reveal the
entire table at once, most of the time, it’s zoomed in on the action and following the ball while showing only part of the table.
Fortunately, if you rotate your iPad a quarter turn to landscape mode, you
get to play in the “full table” view. We prefer this view but encourage you
to try it both ways and see whether you like the moving camera view better
than we do.
If you like pinball, we think you’ll love The Pinball on your iPad.
Art Authority for iPad
We’ve already admitted to being artistically challenged. But that only applies
to making art. But we both appreciate good art as much as the next person or
even more. That’s why we’re so enthusiastic about Art Authority ($9.99).
Art Authority is like an art museum you hold in your hand; it contains over
40,000 paintings and sculptures by more than 1,000 of the world’s greatest
artists. The works are organized into eight period-specific rooms, such as
Early (up to 1400s), Baroque, Romanticism, Modern, and American. In each
room, the artworks are subdivided by movement. The Modern room, for
example, has works of surrealism, cubism, Fauvism, Dadaism, sculpture, and
several more.
You find period overviews, movement overviews, timelines, and slide shows,
plus a searchable index of all 1,000+ artists and separate indices for each
room.
Since we first wrote about this app, Open Door Networks has added an Art
Near Me feature that lets you search for art in your vicinity.
Magic Piano
Smule’s 99-cent Magic Piano app transforms your iPad into just that, an
entrancing magic piano that is already among the iPad’s most popular thirdparty programs.
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Magic Piano is an oddly soothing app that presents you with a few ways to
masquerade as Mozart. You can pound away on spiral or circular onscreen
piano keyboards, play on a linear keyboard, or play by following beams of
light with your fingers. Tap, drag, or pinch: Each gesture produces real notes.
The generous-sized iPad screen means that you can play with all your fingers.
You can freelance, that is, play notes at will. Or, you can select the Nutcracker
March, Eine Kliene Nachtmusik, or (as this book was being published) more
than three-dozen other gems from a classic songbook.
What’s more, you can perform in a solo act or play in a duet with a stranger
halfway around the world. Choose a name for your piano and a tagline to
identify yourself.
You can listen to other people play, too, without performing with them, by
traveling through what Smule describes as a warp hole. A 3D representation
of a globe shows you where on Earth the music is coming from.
Had he been around today, we’re sure that Mozart would have made wondrous magic on the iPad.
The Elements: A Visual Exploration
Think back to chemistry class when you first learned about the periodic table
of the elements. Many probably found it rather dull. And even if the subject
got you jazzed in your school days, we’d venture to say it was completely dissimilar to the treat of exploring the elements through this $13.99 app of pure
gold. In fact, to call it an app is a bit of a misnomer because it has more —
forgive the pun — elements of an e-book than a traditional app. It’s based on
the best-selling hard-cover edition of The Elements, by Theodore Gray. But
the program is sold in the App Store, not the iBookstore.
Launch the app, and it starts with a 1959 song by Harvard mathematician
and musical humorist Tom Lehrer about each of the chemical elements that
were known back then. When you tap an element — iodine in the example
shown in Figure 17-5 — a stunning photograph takes over a huge portion of
the screen, adjacent to such statistics as atomic weight, density, and boiling
point. Now tap the right-pointing arrow to bring up the next iodine page. You
see a complete text explanation of the element, along with additional pictures, such as iodine-based chewing gum and vintage bottles.
You pay a price for all this stunning detail, beyond the $13.99 tab in the App
Store. At around 1.8 gigabytes, The Elements is a sizable app, nearly as large,
in fact, as a high-definition movie you may have loaded on your iPad. So it
hogs a lot of space, is slow to load, and sometimes crashes, though the developer has improved stability in subsequent versions.
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Figure 17-5: A chosen element up close.
All that said, even when we weren’t rediscovering the elements ourselves,
we used this app to show off the dazzling beauty of the iPad to friends. And if
you, or perhaps your kids, are really into the science, you’re especially going
to be blown away.
Bento for iPad
Full-featured database programs have traditionally been the province for professionals and employees in a variety of job types and industries. FileMaker’s
Bento “personal database” programs for the Mac and iPhone, however, tend
to be more inviting for mainstream consumers. The same goes for the iPad
version, which, at $4.99, strikes a real bargain.
Indeed, Bento should appeal not only to salespeople, marketers, and field
workers but also to students and pretty much anyone who wants to keep on
top of hobbies, projects, lists, events, and then some.
The simple-to-use app comes with a variety of premade templates, covering
exercise logs, vehicle maintenance, donations, recipes, expenses, and so on.
It contains a gaggle of “field types” for such things as text, numbers, ratings,
durations, currency, and phone numbers. And Bento is tightly integrated
with the iPad’s Contacts, Mail program, Safari (you can view web pages without leaving the app), and Google Maps. You can even record Voice Memos.
If you have a recent version of Bento for the Mac, you can sync the two
programs so that any changes you make to a database on one machine are
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reflected in the corresponding database on the other machine. You need a
Wi-Fi connection to sync the iPad version with the Mac version. However,
because of memory constraints, Bento for iPad may not be able to handle the
largest databases that you created for Bento on the Mac.
Bento for iPad makes good use of the tablet’s large screen. In portrait mode,
you can zero in on a single record. Rotate the iPad to landscape mode for a
split-view listing of records on the left next to the details of a selected record
on the right. Other neat stunts include text fields that expand and shrink
when you tap them, visual check boxes, and the ability to admire photos, dispatch e-mails, and watch videos.
It’s rather easy to get going with Bento. You can start out by tapping the
Libraries button in the upper-left corner of the screen. As shown in Figure
17-6, libraries are groups of records you might want to track: Address Book,
To Do Items, Projects, Inventory, Notes, Expenses, and so on. Tap the +
button to add a new library with one of the aforementioned (or other) templates or create one of your own.
Access syncing, passcode, and more
Delete Current Record
Add Record to Collection
Customize Library
New library
Add Record
Figure 17-6: Keeping track of your wine collection in Bento.
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Bento is particularly smart about the Address Book library. It lifts all the
names in your iPad contacts and automatically prepopulates them in your
Bento Address Book. (Don’t worry; they remain in contacts, too.)
From the Library window, you can remove an already created library, rename
a library, or change the order in which a library appears on the list. Start by
tapping the Edit button in the Libraries window. And then:
✓ To remove a library, tap the white dash in the red circle next to the
item in question. Then tap the Delete button that appears.
✓ To rename a library, tap the library listing and type a new name. It’s
that easy.
✓ To reorder the way in which a library is organized, press and hold
your finger against the three horizontal lines to the right of the library
whose order you want to change and then drag it up or down in the list
to a slot you prefer.
It’s a breeze to move from record to record inside the app. Double-tap the
right side of a record to advance to the next record, or double-tap the left
side to go to the previous record. You can also swipe right to left or left to
right to move in either direction. Or, tap left/right arrows to advance or go
back.
Customizing records is also a cinch. Take note of the labels in Figure 17-6 for
an overview on how to add a new record, add new fields, add records to collections, delete records, and more.
ZAGAT TO GO
Hey, you have to eat sometime (and we’re especially hungry after writing
this book). ZAGAT TO GO from Handmark lets you access the popular Zagat
ratings for restaurants, hotels, nightspots, and shopping locales around the
world — you find more than 40,000 listings.
You can search and filter results by cuisine and food, décor, cost, and service
ratings, and read Zagat’s famous thumbnail commentaries. Foodies can tap
into GPS to find decent restaurants when they’re traveling and overlay the
results on an integrated Google Map. Tap a Zagat pin, and the ratings and
restaurant summaries appear, as shown in Figure 17-7. As you drag a map
around, restaurant pins pop up in real time. Moreover, you can tap inside a
listing to make it a Favorite, reserve a table online (through OpenTable), or
save it to your contacts. Zagat also lets you download a database that lets
you tap into ratings when you’re offline.
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Figure 17-7: Finding an upscale Indian restaurant.
The $9.99 price (for annual up-to-date listings) is less than the print version of a local Zagat edition. We should point out that iPhone owners who
purchase the app can also use the iPad app for no extra charge. It works the
other way too, so if you buy the app first for the iPad, you can also have a
version of it on an iPhone.
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18
Ten Hints, Tips, and Shortcuts
In This Chapter
▶ Typing faster with the slide and Auto-Correction
▶ Viewing the iPad’s capacity
▶ Altering the speed of scrubbing in iTunes
▶ Sharing links and web pages
▶ Choosing a Safari home page
▶ Storing your files
▶ Using the iPad as a phone
▶ Capturing what’s onscreen
A
fter spending a lot of quality time with our iPads, it’s only
natural that we’ve discovered more than a few helpful
hints, tips, and shortcuts. In this chapter, we share some
of our faves.
Sliding for Accuracy
and Punctuation
Our first tip can help you type faster in two ways.
One, it helps you type more accurately; two, it lets
you type punctuation and numerals faster than ever
before.
Over the course of this book, you find out how to tap,
how to double-tap, and even how to double-tap with two fingers. Now we want to introduce you to a new gesture we like to
call the slide.
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To do the slide, start by performing the first half of a tap. That is, you touch
your finger to the screen but don’t lift it. Now, without lifting your finger,
slide it onto the key you want to type. You know you’re on the right key
because it changes from one shade of gray to another.
First, try the slide during normal typing. Stab at a key and if you miss, rather
than lifting your finger, backspacing, and trying again, do the slide onto the
proper key. After you get the hang of it, you’ll see that it saves a lot of time
and improves your accuracy as well.
Now here’s the best part: You can use the slide to save time with punctuation
and numerals, too. The next time you need to type a punctuation mark or
number, try this technique:
1. Start a slide action with your finger on the 123 key (the key to the left
of the Space key when the alphabetical keyboard is active).
This is a slide, not a tap, so don’t lift your finger just yet.
2. When the punctuation and numeric keyboard appears onscreen, slide
your finger onto the punctuation mark or number you want to type.
3. Lift your finger.
The cool thing is that the punctuation and numeric keyboard disappears and
the alphabetical keyboard reappears — all without tapping the 123 key to
display the punctuation and numeric keyboard and without tapping the ABC
key (the key to the left of the Space key when the punctuation and numeric
keyboard is active).
Practice the slide for typing letters, punctuation, and numerals, and we guarantee that in a few days, you’ll be typing faster and more accurately.
If you’re an iPhone or iPad touch user, you may not have noticed that four
frequently used punctuation marks — comma, period, exclamation point, and
question mark — appear on the iPad alphabetical keyboard in the lower-right
corner. There’s also a fifth very useful punctuation mark — the apostrophe —
hidden on your alphabetical keyboard, but you have to read the next tip to
find out exactly where it’s hidden.
Auto-Correction Is Your Friend
Here are two related tips about Auto-Correction that can also help you type
faster and more accurately.
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Autoapostrophes are good for you
First, before moving on from the subject of punctuation, know that you can
type dont to get to don’t, and cant to get to can’t. We’ve told you to put some
faith in the iPad’s Auto-Correction software. And that applies to contractions.
In other words, save time by letting the iPad’s intelligent keyboard insert the
apostrophes on your behalf for these and other common words.
We’re aware of at least one exception. The iPad can’t distinguish between it’s,
the contraction of it is, and its, the possessive adjective and possessive pronoun. So if you need, say, e-mails to important business clients to be grammatically correct, remember that Auto-Correction doesn’t get it (or it’s or its)
right all the time.
In a similar vein, if you ever need to type an apostrophe (for example, when
you want to type it’s), you don’t need to visit the punctuation and numeric
keyboard. Instead, press the Exclamation Mark/Comma key for at least one
second, and an apostrophe magically appears. Slide your finger onto it and
then lift your finger, and presto — you’ve typed an apostrophe without
touching the punctuation and numeric keyboard.
Make rejection work for you
Along those same lines, if the Auto-Correction suggestion isn’t the word you
want, instead of ignoring it, reject it. Finish typing the word and then tap the
x to reject the suggestion before you type another word. Doing so makes
your iPad more likely to accept your word the next time you type it and less
likely to make the same incorrect suggestion again.
If you’re using a real keyboard (either Apple’s Keyboard Dock or any
Bluetooth wireless one), you can reject an autosuggestion by pressing the
Esc key.
Here you thought you were buying a tech book, and you get grammar and
typing lessons thrown in at no extra charge. Just think of us as full-service
authors.
Viewing the iPad’s Capacity
When your iPad is selected in the sidebar in iTunes, you see a colorful chart
at the bottom of the screen that tells you how your media and other data use
your iPad’s capacity.
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By default, the chart shows the amount of space that your audio, video, and
photo files use on your iPad in megabytes (MB) or gigabytes (GB). But you
knew that. What you probably don’t know is that when you click the colorful
chart, it cycles through two more slightly different displays. The first click
changes the display from the amount of space used to the number of items
(audio, video, and photos) you have stored. Click once more, and the display
changes to the total playing time for audio and video, as shown in Figure 18-1.
The total playing time display is particularly helpful before you go on a trip.
Knowing that you have 8.2 days of audio and 13.7 hours of video is far more
useful than knowing how many gigabytes you’re packing.
Figure 18-1: Click the colorful chart, and what’s stored on your iPad is expressed
in different ways.
The Way-Cool Hidden iTunes Scrub Speed Tip
Here’s the situation: You’re listening to a podcast or audiobook and trying
to find the beginning of a specific segment by moving the Scrubber left and
right. The only problem is that the Scrubber isn’t very precise and your
fat finger keeps moving it too far one way or the other. Never fear — your
iPad has a wonderful (albeit somewhat hidden) fix. Just press your finger
on the Scrubber (that little round dot on the Scrubber bar), but instead of
sliding your finger to the left or right, slide it downward toward the bottom
of the screen (see Figure 18-2). As you slide, the scrubbing speed changes
like magic and the amount of change displays below the Scrubber bar. The
default (normal) speed is hi-speed scrubbing. When you slide your finger
downward an inch or two, the speed changes to half-speed scrubbing. Drag
another inch or two, and it changes to quarter-speed scrubbing. Drag downward to near the bottom of the screen, and it changes to fine scrubbing.
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While you’re sliding, keep an eye on the elapsed time and remaining time
indicators because they provide useful feedback on the current scrubbing
speed.
This scrub trick is easier to do than to explain, so give it a try.
Scrubber
Elasped time
Scrubber bar
Remaining time
Scrubbing
speed
Drag finger to here
for quarter-speed
scrubbing
Drag finger to here
for half-speed
scrubbing
Drag finger to here
for fine-speed
scrubbing
Figure 18-2: Press the Scrubber and slide your finger downward to change the scrubbing rate.
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Assault on batteries
Because this is a chapter of tips and hints, we’d
be remiss if we didn’t include some ways that
you can extend your battery life. First and foremost: If you use a carrying case, charging the
iPad while it’s in that case may generate more
heat than is healthy. Overheating is bad for both
battery capacity and battery life. So take the
iPad out of the case before you charge it. The
Smart Cover available for the iPad 2 isn’t actually a case, so if you use one of those, you’re
good to go.
If you’re not using power-thirsty 3G or Wi-Fi
networks, or a Bluetooth device (such as a
headset), consider turning off the features you
don’t need in Settings. Doing so could mean the
difference between running out of juice and
seeing the end of a movie.
Activate Auto-Brightness to enable the screen
brightness to adjust based on current lighting
conditions. Using this setting can be easier on
your battery. Tap Settings on the Home screen,
tap Brightness, and then tap the On/Off switch,
if necessary, to turn it on.
Turning off Location Services (tap Settings➪
General➪On/Off switch to turn off Location
Services) and Push (tap Settings➪Fetch New
Data➪On/Off switch to turn off Push) can also
help to conserve battery life.
Finally, turning on EQ (see Chapter 8) when you
listen to music can make it sound better, but
it also uses more processing power. If you’ve
selected an equalizer preset for a track in the
iTunes Track Info window and you want to retain
the EQ from iTunes when you listen on your
iPad, set the EQ on your iPad to flat. Because
you’re not turning off EQ, your battery life will be
slightly worse, but your songs will sound just the
way you expect them to sound. Either way, to
alter your EQ settings, tap Settings➪iPod➪EQ.
Tricks with Links and E-Mail Addresses
The iPad does something special when it encounters an e-mail address or a
URL in e-mail messages. The iPad interprets character sequences that look
like web addresses (URLs), such as http://www.websitename.com or
www.websitename.com, and any sequences that look like e-mail addresses,
such as yourname@yourmailhost.com. When the iPad sees what it assumes
to be a URL or e-mail address, it appears as a blue link on your screen.
If you tap a URL or e-mail address like the ones just shown, the iPad launches
Safari, takes you to the appropriate web page for a URL, and starts a new
e-mail message for an e-mail address. So don’t bother with copy and paste
if you don’t have to — tap those blue links, and the right thing will happen
every time.
Here’s another cool Safari trick, this time with links. If you press and hold a
link rather than tapping it, a little floating text bubble appears and shows you
the underlying URL. In addition it offers three options:
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✓ Open: Opens the page.
✓ Open in New Page: Opens the page while stashing the current page
in one of the nine slots available through the Bookmarks icon, as we
describe in Chapter 4.
✓ Copy: Copies the URL to the Clipboard (so that you can paste it into an
e-mail message, save it in Notes, or whatever).
You also see the underlying URL if you press and hold a URL in Mail with buttons to open or copy it. Having this information in Mail is even more useful
because it enables you to spot bogus links without switching to Safari or
actually visiting the URL.
Finally, here’s one last Safari trick. If you press and hold most images, Save
Image and Copy buttons appear. Tap Save Image, and the picture is saved
to the Saved Photos album (Camera Roll on an iPad 2) in the Albums tab of
the Photos app; tap Copy, and it’s copied to the Clipboard so that you can
paste it into an e-mail message or document created in another app (such as
Apple’s Pages or Keynote).
Share the Love
Ever stumble onto a web page you just have to share with a buddy? The
iPad makes it dead simple. From the site in question, tap the + button at
the bottom of the browser. Then tap the Mail Link to This Page button that
appears onscreen. A mail message appears with the subject line prepopulated with the name of the website you’re visiting and the body of the message prepopulated with the URL. Just type something in the message body
(or don’t), supply your pal’s e-mail address, and then tap the Send button.
Choosing a Home Page for Safari
You may have noticed that there’s no home page website on the iPad version
of Safari as there is in the Mac and PC versions of the browser (and for that
matter, every other web browser in common use today). Instead, when you
tap the Safari icon, you return to the last site you visited.
The trick is to create an icon for the page you want to use as your home page.
This technique is called creating a web clip of a web page. Here’s how to do it:
1. Open the web page you want to use as your home page and tap the +
button.
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2. Tap the Add to Home Screen button.
An icon that will open this page appears on your Home screen (or one of
your Home screens if you have more than one).
3. Tap this new Web Clip icon instead of the Safari icon, and Safari
opens to your home page instead of the last page you visited.
You can even rearrange the icons so that your Home Page icon, instead of or
in addition to the Safari icon, appears in the Dock (the bottom row that
appears on every Home screen), as shown in Figure 18-3.
See the tip in Chapter 1 for rearranging icons if you’ve forgotten how. And
consider moving the Safari icon to a different Home screen so you never tap
it by accident. Finally, remember that the Dock has room for six icons even
though it only has four by default. So you could, if you like, have both Safari
and your new Web Clip icon in the Dock so you can tap either one depending
upon your needs.
Figure 18-3: The B.L. Dot Com icon appears where Safari usually appears
in the Dock.
Storing Files
A tiny Massachusetts software company — Ecamm Network — sells an inexpensive piece of Mac OS X software, PhoneView ($19.95), which lets you
copy files from your computer to your iPad and copy files from the iPad to
a computer. (No Windows version is available.) Better still, you can try the
program for a week before deciding whether you want to buy it. Go to www.
ecamm.com to fetch the free demo.
In a nutshell, here’s how PhoneView works. After downloading the software
to your Mac, double-click the program’s icon to start it. Then do one of the
following:
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✓ To transfer files and folders to the iPad (assuming that you have room
on the device), click the Copy to iPad button on the toolbar and then
select the files you want to copy. The files are copied into the appropriate folder on the iPad. Alternatively, you can drag files and folders from
the Mac Desktop or a folder into the PhoneView browser.
✓ To go the other way and copy files from your iPad to your computer,
highlight the files or folders you want to be copied and then click the
Copy from iPad button on the toolbar. Select the destination on your
Mac where you want to store the files and then click Save. You can
also drag files and folders from the PhoneView file browser onto the
Mac Desktop or folder. Or, you can double-click a file in the PhoneView
browser to download it to your Mac’s Documents folder.
If you need access to the files on your iPad or if you want to use your iPad as
a pseudo–hard drive, PhoneView is a bargain.
Making Phone Calls on the iPad
Many people, including us, have compared the iPad to an iPhone on steroids.
Only the iPad isn’t actually a phone.
Don’t let that stop you from making or even receiving phone calls on the
tablet.
Come again?
You read right. You can make and even receive phone calls on your iPad.
After all, two of the key components to calling are built into the iPad: a
speaker and microphone. Now all you’ll have to do is head to the App Store
to fetch a third, an app that takes advantage of VoIP, or Voice over Internet
Protocol. In plain-speak, that means turning the iPad into a giant iPhone. And
yes, you can find more than one app to do the trick.
We’ve checked out Skype and Line2 (both iPhone apps as this book went to
press), along with Truphone, which has a version for the large iPad screen.
The apps themselves are free, although you have to pay for calls to regular
phones.
✓ Line2: We especially like Line2, although it costs $9.95 a month. It can
receive calls through Wi-Fi or cellular data network (if you have the iPad
with 3G). It boasts such features as visual voice mail (like the iPhone)
and conference calling. And it taps right into your iPad contacts list.
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✓ Skype: Skype’s app permits free Skype-to-Skype calls, instant messages,
and video chats; calls to regular phones around the world cost pennies
per minute.
✓ Truphone: This app permits free Wi-Fi calls to Truphone and Google
Talk users. Other rates are cheap.
Taking a Snapshot of the Screen
True confession: We threw in this final tip because, well, it helps people like us.
Permit us to explain. We hope you’ve admired the pictures of the iPad
screens that are sprinkled throughout this book. We also secretly hope that
you’re thinking what marvelous photographers we must be.
Well, the fact is, we couldn’t take a blurry picture of the iPad using its built-in
(and undocumented) screen-grab feature if we wanted to.
Press the Sleep/Wake button at the same time you press the Home button,
but just for an instant. The iPad grabs a snapshot of whatever is on the
screen.
The picture lands in the Saved Photos album (original iPad) or Camera Roll
(iPad 2) in the Albums tab of the Photos app; from there, you can synchronize it with your Mac or PC, along with all your other pictures, or e-mail it to
yourself or anyone else. And from there, the possibilities are endless. Why,
your picture could wind up just about anywhere, including in a For Dummies
book.
If you have an iPad 2, you can show what’s happening on your iPad’s screen on
an HDTV in real time. All you need is a television that has at least one HDMI
port and the $39 Apple Digital AV Adapter to connect your iPad to the TV.
By the way, although the original iPad (and the iPhone and iPod touch for that
matter) can’t mirror their screen on an HDTV with this cable, you can use it to
show video playing in certain apps — such as Videos and YouTube — on an
HDTV.
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Index
• Special
Characters and
Numerics •
’ (apostrophes), 33, 319
#+= key, 29
. (period key), 65
.?123 key, 29
/ (slash key), 65
@ key, 33
+ (New Playlist) button,
iPod, 163
2-into-1 stereo adapters, 292
3G icon, 16
3G networks
overview, 17
troubleshooting, 272–274
9+ app rating, 136
12+ app rating, 136
17+ app rating, 136
30-pin dock connector,
13–14
30-Second Repeat button,
162
123 key, 29
•A•
Abas cases, 289
ABC Player app, 298
About settings, 253–255
accelerometer, 8–9, 195
accent marks, 31
Accept cookies option,
Safari settings, 78
Accessibility tools
(Universal Access
Features)
Closed Captioning, 264
Large Text, 263
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Mono Audio, 263
Speak Auto-Text, 264
Triple-Click Home, 264
VoiceOver, 261–263
White on Black, 263
Zoom, 263
accessories
2-into-1 stereo adapters,
292
camera connections,
283–284
cases, 280–281, 289–290
chargers, 285
earphones, 285–287
Griffin A-Frame, 291–292
headphones, 285–287
headsets, 285–287
keyboards, 281–283
overview, 279–280
protective film, 290–291
speakers, 288–289
TV and projector
connectors, 284–285
USB adapters, 283–284
Account Information
option, Cellular Data
settings, 249
accounts, e-mail
corporate, 83–85
setting up, 80–83
Activity icon, 17
Add a SIM PIN option,
Cellular Data settings,
249
Add Account screen, Mail,
81
Add Bookmark icon, Safari,
72–73
Add New Keyboard option,
Keyboard settings, 28
Add to Bookmarks button,
Maps, 109
Add to Contacts button,
Maps, 108
Add to Home Screen icon,
Safari, 73
Address Book programs,
syncing with, 48
Advanced section, Info tab,
iTunes, 51
Airplane mode, 16, 247, 273
AirPlay technology, 161,
177–178, 198
AirPrint feature, 38
Albums tab, iPod, 155
All Apps are Up-toDate message, 144
All Audiobooks option,
Books tab, iTunes, 59
All Books option, Books
tab, iTunes, 59
All Inboxes section, Mail,
86–87
alternate punctuation, 31
Always Show Bookmarks
Bar setting, Safari, 73
Amazon Kindle app, 220
Amazon Kindle e-reader,
207
Animate Slides button,
Keynote, 237
AOL e-mail accounts, 81
apostrophes (‘), 33, 319
App Store
browsing from computers,
131–133
browsing from iPad,
140–141
deleting apps, 144–146
downloading apps,
138–139, 142–144
finding details about apps,
141–142
finding full description of
apps, 135–136
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iPad For Dummies, 2nd Edition
App Store (continued)
ratings, 136
reading reviews, 137
related links, 136
reporting problems with
apps, 147
requirements and device
support for apps,
136–137
searching for apps,
133–134, 141
updating apps, 139, 144
writing reviews, 146–147
App Store icon, 19
Apple support resources,
275–276
Apple Wireless Keyboard,
282–283
Application buttons, 15–16
applications. See apps; free
apps; shopping for
apps
Apply button, iTunes, 46
appointments, searching,
227–228
apps (applications).
See also free apps;
shopping for apps
browsing App Store from
computers, 131–133
browsing App Store from
iPad, 140–141
deleting, 144–146
downloading, 138–139,
142–144
finding details about,
141–142
finding full description of,
135–136
overview, 129–131
ratings, 136
reading reviews, 137
related links, 136
reporting problems with,
147
requirements and device
support for, 136–137
27_9781118024447-bindex.indd 328
searching for, 133–134,
141
syncing, 52–53
updating, 139, 144
writing reviews, 146–147
arrow buttons, Maps, 112
Art Authority app, 311
Artists tab, iPod, 155
artists versus composers,
157
ArtStudio app, 309–310
Ask before Deleting
warning, Mail, 101
Ask to Join Networks
setting, Wi-Fi settings,
248
attachments, e-mail, 91–92
audio
controls, 157–160, 162
equalizer settings, 165–166
Genius feature, 162–163
iTunes app, shopping
with, 166–167
library, 154–157
overview, 151–153
playlists, creating, 163–164
syncing music, 53–55
volume, 15, 157, 165–166
audiobook controls, iPod,
160, 162
autoapostrophes, 319
Auto-Brightness setting,
Brightness & Wallpaper
settings, 252, 322
Auto-Capitalization option,
Keyboard settings, 260
Auto-Correction feature
autoapostrophes, 319
overview, 318
rejections, 319
turning on/off, 260
AutoFill option, Safari, 77
Auto-Lock settings, General
settings, 258
Automatically Fill Free
Space with Songs check
box, iTunes, 54
•B•
Back button, iPod, 160
back camera, 15
Backspace key (Delete key),
30, 33
Barnes & Noble NOOK app,
220
batteries, 322
Battery icon, 17
Battery Percentage setting,
General settings, 255
Bcc label, Mail, 95
Bento app, 313–315
Best Skins Ever film, 290
Bill Atkinson PhotoCard
app, 305–307
bit rates, 45
Block pop-ups option,
Safari, 78
Bluetooth
headphones, earphones,
and headsets, 286–287
settings for, 256–258
speakers, 288–289
Bluetooth icon, 17
BodyGuardz film, 290
BookBook cases, 290
bookmarks
iBooks app, 213–214
Maps app, 109–110
Safari browser, 67, 72–73
syncing, 50
books. See e-books
Bookshelf options, iBook,
208
Brightness & Wallpaper
settings, 252–253, 322
brightness of screen
Auto-Brightness setting,
Brightness & Wallpaper
settings, 252, 322
brightness slider,
Brightness & Wallpaper
settings, 252
Browse icon, iBookstore,
217
4/8/11 1:44 PM
Index
browsing. See also Safari
browser
App Store, 131–133,
140–141
iBookstore, 216–217
with Safari, 65–68
Bubble Sleeve case, 290
built-in speaker, 13–14
Bus icon, Maps, 114–115
Buy Book/Get Book button,
iBookstore, 219
•C•
cables
component AV, 285
digital AV adapter, 178,
285
dock connector–to–USB, 8
Dock Extender, 289
HDMI, 178
VGA adapter, 284
cache, 78
Calendar app
adding entries, 228–231
overview, 18, 225
pushing entries, 231–232
responding to meeting
invitations, 232–233
searching appointments,
227–228
selecting views, 225–227
subscribing to calendars,
233
Calendars section, Info tab,
iTunes, 49
calls, FaceTime
making, 183–184
overview, 182–183
receiving, 184–185
calls, phone, 325–326
Camera app. See also
pictures
overview, 19
shooting pictures, 179
shooting video, 179
27_9781118024447-bindex.indd 329
Camera Roll (Saved Photos
album)
deleting pictures from,
202
editing video, 180–181
cameras
built-in, 15–16
connecting, 190–191,
283–284
capacity chart, iTunes,
319–320
Caps Lock option,
Keyboard settings, 30,
261
cases
Apple, 280–281
third-party, 289–290
Categories section, App
Store, 141
Cc label, Mail, 95
Cellular Data Network
setting, Settings area,
249
Cellular Network Data
statistic, General
settings, 255
charging iPad, 8, 268–269,
285
Check for New Messages
icon, Mail, 88
Check for Update button,
Summary tab, iTunes,
268
Check for Updates link,
Apps screen, iTunes,
139
Check Spelling option,
Keyboard settings, 260
Chinese keyboards, 29
Classic view, Maps, 106–107
Clear Cache option, Safari,
78
Clear History option, Safari,
74
Closed Captioning setting,
General settings, 264
.com suffix, 65
329
Comics app, 301–302
component AV cables, 285
Compose New Message
button, Mail, 94
Composers tab, iPod, 156
composers versus artists,
157
computers
browsing App Store from,
131–133
troubleshooting, 274
contacts
adding, 234–235
connecting to maps, 108
contacting, 235–236
linking, 236
removing, 236
searching, 235
sharing, 235–236
syncing, 47–49
viewing, 234–235
viewing in Maps app, 111
Contacts app
adding contacts, 234–235
contacting contacts,
235–236
linking contacts, 236
overview, 233
removing contacts, 236
searching contacts, 235
sharing contacts, 235–236
viewing contacts, 234–235
cookies, 78
copying
between apps, 33–35
pictures, 200
URLs, 323
corporate e-mail accounts,
83–85
Cover Lock/Unlock setting,
General settings, 259
Create iPad or Apple TV
Version option, iTunes,
9
current location, finding in
Maps app, 104–105
4/8/11 1:44 PM
330
iPad For Dummies, 2nd Edition
•D•
Data Roaming option,
Settings area, 249
Date & Time settings,
General settings, 260
Day view, Calendar, 226
Delete key (Backspace key),
30, 33
deleting
apps, 144–146
contacts, 236
e-mail messages, 90, 96
iPad content, 270
pictures, 202
video, 178–179
desktop speakers, 288
detail page, iBookstore,
218–219
Developer tool, Safari, 78
dictionaries, 27
digital AV adapter cables,
178, 285
directions
driving, 111–114
walking, 114–116
disconnecting iPad while
syncing, 46
dock connector, 13–14
dock connector–to–USB
cable, 8
Dock Extender cables, 289
Download All Free Updates
button, iTunes, 139
downloading apps
from computer, 138–139
from iPad, 142–144
drag gesture, 25
driving directions, Maps,
111–114
Drop Pin button, Maps, 110
•E•
earbuds, defined, 287
earphones
Bluetooth, 286–287
defined, 287
27_9781118024447-bindex.indd 330
overview, 13, 285–286
wired, 286
e-books
bookmarks, adding,
213–214
fonts, changing, 215
free, 220
highlighting, adding, 214
iBookstore, 216–219
jumping to specific pages,
211–212
notes, adding, 214
overview, 10, 206–207,
209–211
searching, 215
syncing, 58–59
Table of Contents, 212
third-party bookstores,
219–220
turning pages, 211
type size, changing, 215
EDGE (Enhanced Datarate
for GSM Evolution)
data networks, 16–17,
64
editing
bookmarks, 73
typing mistakes, 33
video, 179–181
The Elements app, 312–313
e-mail
addresses, 322–323
attachments, 91–92
deleting messages, 90, 96
forwarding messages,
97–98
managing messages,
89–91, 93
overview, 79
printing messages, 97–98
pushing messages, 99–100
reading messages, 86–89
replying to messages,
97–98
saving messages to send
later, 96–97
saving pictures from, 191
searching messages, 91
sending all-text messages,
94–95
sending pictures with, 96
setting up accounts, 80–85
settings, 98–102
E-Mail button, iPod, 162
encryption, 46
Enhanced Datarate for GSM
Evolution (EDGE) data
networks, 16–17, 64
entries, calendar
adding, 228–231
pushing, 231–232
Epicurious app, 302
ePub technology, 220
equalizer settings, 165–166
Erase All Content and
Settings option, Reset
settings, 264, 271
Erase All Content option,
Reset settings, 271
Events feature, iPhoto, 190
Exchange servers, 83–84
Exclamation Mark/Comma
key, 33, 319
extender cables, docking
iPad with, 289
•F•
Facebook app, 124–126
Faces feature, iPhoto, 190
FaceTime app
making calls, 183–184
overview, 19, 182–183
receiving calls, 184–185
Family Room Apple TV
option, iPod, 161
Favorites button, YouTube,
119
Featured button
iBookstore, 216
YouTube, 119
Featured section, App
Store, 140
fetching. See pushing
file formats, 91–92
File Message icon, Mail, 89
4/8/11 1:44 PM
Index
film, protective screen,
290–291
finding lost iPad, 265–266
finger-typing on virtual
keyboards, 30–33
flagging videos as
inappropriate, 121
Flash videos, 72
flick gesture, 25–26
Flipboard app, 302–303
Flixster app, 298–299
folders, organizing icons
into, 37
fonts
changing in e-books, 215
Mail app, 101
forwarding e-mail
messages, 97–98
Fraud Warning, Safari, 77
free apps
ABC Player, 298
Comics, 301–302
Epicurious, 302
Flipboard, 302–303
Flixster, 298–299
IMDb, 299–300
Netflix, 300–301
overview, 295–296
Pandora Internet Radio,
303–304
Pocket Legends, 296–297
Shazam, 297–298
front camera, 15, 16
full motion video, 179
Fwd: prefix, 98
•G•
Game Center app, 19,
123–124
General settings, Settings
app
About, 253–255
Auto-Lock, 258
Bluetooth, 256–258
Closed Captioning, 264
Cover Lock/Unlock, 259
27_9781118024447-bindex.indd 331
Date and Time, 260
International, 261
Keyboard, 260–261
Large Text, 263
Mono Audio, 263
Passcode, 258
Reset, 264
Restrictions, 259
Side Switch, 259
Speak Auto-Text, 264
Spotlight Search, 258
Triple-Click Home, 264
Usage settings, 255
VoiceOver, 261
VPN settings, 255–256
White on Black, 263
Zoom, 263
Genius feature, 160, 162–163
Genius section, App Store,
140
Genres tab, iPod, 155–156
geotagged pictures, 196
gestures
drag, 25
flick, 25–26
pinch, 25
scrolling, 107
slide, 317–318
spread, 25, 69, 107
swipe, 26
tap, 25
Get Update button, iTunes,
139
Google Contacts program,
48
Google e-mail accounts, 81
Google Maps, 10
GPRS data networks, 16–17
Griffin A-Frame, 291–292
Griffin Technology cases,
289
•H•
Hard Candy cases, 290
HDMI cables, 178
headphone jack, 12–13
331
headphones/ headsets
Bluetooth, 286–287
defined, 287
overview, 13, 285–286
wired, 286
Hide Keyboard key, 30
highlighting, adding to
e-books, 214
History list
Safari, 67, 74
YouTube, 120
Home button, 16, 24, 36
home pages, selecting,
323–324
Home screens
icons, 18–20
navigating between, 26
Hybrid view, Maps, 106–107
•I•
iBook app
bookmarks, adding,
213–214
e-books, 206–207
fonts, changing, 215
free books, 220
highlighting, adding, 214
iBookstore, 216–219
jumping to specific pages,
211–212
magazines, 221
newspapers, 221
notes, adding, 214
overview, 205, 207–211
searching e-books, 215
Table of Contents, 212
third-party bookstores,
219–220
turning pages, 211
type size, changing, 215
iBookstore
browsing, 216–217
buying from, 219
searching, 217–218
4/8/11 1:44 PM
332
iPad For Dummies, 2nd Edition
icons
Home screen, 18–20
organizing into folders, 37
rearranging, 18
iLuv cases, 289
IMDb (Internet Movie
Database) app, 299–300
Important Product
Information Guide
pamphlet, 8
importing pictures
from cameras, 190–191
from memory cards,
190–191
overview, 189
saving from e-mail
messages, 191
saving from web, 191
syncing, 190
Inboxes section, Mail, 86–87
Info button, Keynote, 237
Info screen, Maps, 117
Insert icon, Keynote, 237
instruction sheet, 8
interface. See multitouch
interface
International Keyboard
button, 28, 30
International settings,
General settings, 261
Internet. See also Safari
browser
browsing via Safari, 65–68
iPad as communications
device for, 9–10
saving pictures from, 191
Internet Movie Database
(IMDb) app, 299–300
invitations, responding to,
232–233
iPad
capacity chart, 319–320
docking with extender
cables, 289
as e-book reader, 10
27_9781118024447-bindex.indd 332
Home screen icons, 18–20
as Internet
communications
device, 9–10
as iPod, 9, 152–153
locking, 24
lost, finding, 265–266
making phone calls on,
325–326
as multimedia
powerhouse, 10
overview, 7–9
as platform for third-party
apps, 10–11
repairing, 276–277
replacing, 276–277
troubleshooting, 267–272
turning into picture frame,
199
turning on/off, 23–24
usage requirements, 11
versions of, 4
iPad Keyboard Dock,
281–282
iPod app
controls, 157–160, 162
equalizer settings, 165–166
Genius feature, 162–163
iTunes app, shopping
with, 166–167
library, 154–157
overview, 9, 20, 151–153
playlists, creating, 163–164
syncing music, 53–55
volume, 157, 165–166
iSwifter app, 72
iTunes. See also
synchronizing
controls, 157–160, 162
equalizer settings, 165–166
Genius feature, 162–163
library, 154–157
overview, 9, 19–20, 22–23,
151–153
playlists, creating, 163–164
shopping with, 166–167
troubleshooting, 274
volume, 157, 165–166
iTunes U, syncing content
from, 58
•J•
JavaScript, 78
•K•
keyboards
international, 28–29
iPad Keyboard Dock,
281–282
settings for, 260–261
virtual, 26–33
wireless, 282–283
Keynote app, 237–239
keys, special-use, 29–30
Kindle app, 220
Kindle e-reader, 207
•L•
landscape mode, 86, 89
Large Text settings, 263
library, iPod
browsing among tabs,
154–157
finding music with Search
field, 154
overview, 152
Line2 app, 325
linking contacts, 236
links, 70–72, 322–323
List button, Maps, 113
List view, Calendar, 226
Load Remote Images
option, Mail settings,
101
Location Services feature,
Maps, 104–105, 251, 322
locking iPad, 17, 24, 259
lost iPads, finding, 265–266
4/8/11 1:44 PM
Index
•M•
magazines, 221
Magic Piano app, 311–312
Mail app
addresses, 322–323
attachments, 91–92
deleting messages, 90, 96
forwarding messages,
97–98
managing messages,
89–91, 93
overview, 79
printing messages, 97–98
reading messages, 86–89
replying to messages,
97–98
saving messages to send
later, 96–97
saving pictures from, 191
searching messages, 91
sending all-text messages,
94–95
sending pictures with, 96
setting up accounts, 80–85
settings, 98–102
syncing accounts, 49–50
Mail Link to This Page
button, Safari, 323
mail server settings, 102
Manually Manage Music
and Videos check box,
iTunes, 46
Maps app
bookmarks, 109–110
connecting maps and
contacts, 108
contacts, viewing list of,
111
current location, finding,
104–105
driving directions, 111–114
Info screen, 117
overview, 19, 103–104
panning, 106–107
public transportation
information, 114–116
27_9781118024447-bindex.indd 333
Recents list, 110–111
route maps, 111–114
searching, 105–106
Street View, 117
traffic information, 116–117
views, 106–107
walking directions, 114–116
zooming, 106–107
Mark as Unread option,
Mail, 93
meeting invitations,
responding to, 232–233
memory cards, connecting,
190–191
messages, e-mail
all-text, 94–95
attachments, 91–92
deleting, 90, 96
forwarding, 97–98
managing, 89–91, 93
printing, 97–98
pushing, 99–100
reading, 86–89
replying to, 97–98
searching, 91
sending photos with, 96
settings, 98–102
microphone, 12–13
Microsoft Exchange
servers, 83–84
Microsoft Outlook, 48
Minimum Font Size option,
Mail, 101
mixes, creating, 163–164
MobileMe service, 47, 80–81
Mono Audio setting,
General settings, 263
Month view, Calendar, 227
Most Viewed button,
YouTube, 119
movies. See video
multitouch interface
copying, 33–35
cutting, 33–35
editing typing mistakes, 33
gestures, 25–26, 107,
317–318
333
navigating between Home
screens, 26
organizing icons into
folders, 37
overview, 15–16
pasting, 33–35
selecting, 33–35
virtual keyboards, 26–33
music. See audio
Music Genome Project, 304
Music option, Photos, 198
Mute switch, 14
My Presentations/New
Presentation button,
Keynote, 237
My Videos option,
YouTube, 120
MySpace app, 126–127
•N•
Netflix app, 172, 300–301
networks
cellular, 17, 249, 255,
272–274
comparison of, 17
troubleshooting, 272–274
virtual private, 255–256
Wi-Fi, 17, 64, 247–249, 273
New and Noteworthy
department, App Store,
132–133
New Page icon, Safari, 70
New Playlist (+) button,
iPod, 163
newspapers, 221
Next Track/Fast Forward
button, iPod, 158
NOOK app, 220
Not Charging message,
269
notes, adding to e-books,
214
Notes app, 18, 27, 223–224
Numbers app, 241–242
NYTimes icon, 216
4/8/11 1:44 PM
334
iPad For Dummies, 2nd Edition
•O•
On/Off button, 12
Open in New Page option,
Safari, 323
Open iTunes When This
iPad Is Connected
check box, iTunes,
44–45
Open option, Safari, 323
Organize by Thread option,
Mail settings, 89, 101
Outlook, 48
•P•
pages, e-book
jumping to, 211–212
turning, 211
pages, web
clipping, 74, 323–324
opening multiple, 69–70
printing, 73
saving pictures from,
76–77
Pages app, 240–241
Pandora Internet Radio
app, 303–304
panning
Maps app, 106–107
Photos app, 195
Passcode settings, General
settings, 258
passive speakers, 288
pasting, 33–35
peer-to-peer connectivity,
257
period key (.), 65
Person Walking icon, Maps,
116
phone calls, 325–326
Photo Booth app, 19,
202–204
photos. See pictures
27_9781118024447-bindex.indd 334
Photos app, 20, 192, 195.
See also pictures
pictures
connecting cameras,
190–191
connecting memory
cards, 190–191
deleting, 202
iPad features for using,
199–201
overview, 187–188
saving from e-mail
messages, 191
saving from web, 76–77,
191
sending e-mail messages
with, 96
sharing, 194–196
shooting, 188
slide shows, 197–199
storing, 192–194
syncing, 59–60, 190
Pinball app, 310–311
pinch gesture, 25
Play Each Slide For option,
Photos, 198
Playback Speed button,
iPod, 162
Playhead, iPod, 158
playlists, creating, 163–164
Play/Pause button, iPod,
157
Pocket Legends app,
296–297
podcasts
controls, 160–162
syncing, 57–58
pop-ups, blocking, 78
portrait mode, 86
powered speakers, 288
Prefer Standard Definition
Videos check box,
iTunes, 45
presentations, 237–239
Prevent iPods, iPhones,
and iPads from Syncing
Automatically check
box, iTunes, 45
Previous Track/Rewind
button, iPod, 157
printing
e-mail messages, 97–98
overview, 38
web pages, 73
projectors, connecting to,
284–285
public transportation
information, 114–116
punctuation, 31
Purchases icon, iBookstore,
217
pushing (fetching)
app alerts, 231–232,
249–251
calendar entries, 231–232
e-mail messages, 99–100
•Q•
QWERTY keyboard, 25
•R•
RadTech screen protectors,
291
ratings
app, 136
video, 121
Re: prefix, 98
reading e-books
bookmarks, adding,
213–214
fonts, changing, 215
highlighting, adding, 214
jumping to specific pages,
211–212
notes, adding, 214
overview, 209–211
searching e-books, 215
4/8/11 1:44 PM
Index
Table of Contents, 212
turning pages, 211
type size, changing, 215
real time traffic
information, 116–117
rearranging Home screen
icons, 18
Recents list, Maps, 110–111
recharging iPad, 8, 268–269,
285
recipients of e-mail
messages, viewing, 93
Recovery mode, 271–272
rejecting Auto-Correction
suggestions, 319
repairing iPad, 276–277
Repeat option, 159, 198
replacing iPad, 276–277
replying to e-mail
messages, 97–98
Report a Problem button,
iTunes, 147
Reset All Settings option,
Reset settings, 264
Reset Home Screen Layout
option, Reset settings,
264
Reset Keyboard Dictionary
option, Reset settings,
264
Reset Location Warnings
option, Reset settings,
264
Reset Network Settings
option, Reset settings,
264
resetting
content, 269–270
settings, 264, 269–270
restarting iPad, 269
restoring iPad, 271
Restrictions settings
overview, 259
video usage, 178
YouTube app access, 122
27_9781118024447-bindex.indd 335
Return key, 30
reviews, app
reading, 137
writing, 146–147
Reviews section, App Store,
142
route maps, 111–114
•S•
Safari browser
bookmarks, 72–73
browsing Internet, 65–68
History list, 74
home pages, selecting,
323–324
links, 70–72
opening multiple web
pages, 69–70
overview, 19, 63–-65,
68–69
printing web pages, 73
saving web pictures,
76–77
searching with, 38, 75–76
settings, 77–78
Web Clips, 74
Satellite view, Maps, 106–107
Saved Photos album. See
Camera Roll
saving
edited video, 181
e-mail messages to send
later, 96–97
pictures from e-mail
messages, 191
pictures from web, 76–77
Scrabble app, 307–309
Screen Orientation Lock
icon, 17
screen protection film,
290–291
Screen Rotation Lock
feature, 9, 210
screen shots, 52, 270, 326
335
scrolling, gestures for, 107
Scrubber bar
iPod app, 158, 320–322
YouTube app, 121
searching
App Store, 141
appointments, 227–228
contacts, 235
e-books, 215
e-mail messages, 91
iBookstore, 217–218
iPad content, 38–40
iTunes, 133–134
music, 154
pictures for
synchronization, 59
with Safari browser, 38,
75–76
YouTube videos, 118–120
See All link, App Store, 141
selecting with multitouch
interface, 33–35
Set Up Now button,
MobileMe, 47
Set Up Your iPad pane,
iTunes, 42–43
setting wallpaper, 252
Settings app
About settings, 253–255
Airplane Mode settings,
247
Auto-Lock setting, 258
Battery Percentage
setting, 255
Bluetooth settings, 256–258
Brightness & Wallpaper
settings, 252–253
Cellular Data Network
settings, 249
Cellular Network Data
statistic, 255
Closed Captioning setting,
264
Cover Lock/Unlock
setting, 259
4/8/11 1:44 PM
336
iPad For Dummies, 2nd Edition
Settings app (continued)
Date & Time settings, 260
Find My iPad feature,
265–266
International settings, 261
Keyboard settings,
260–261
Large Text settings, 263
Location Services settings,
251
Mono Audio setting, 263
Network settings, 255–256
Notifications settings,
249–251
overview, 19, 245–246
Passcode setting, 258
Reset settings, 264,
269–271
Restrictions settings, 259
Safari settings, 77–78
Side Switch settings, 259
Sounds settings, 253
Speak Auto-Text setting,
264
Spotlight Search settings,
258
Triple-Click Home setting,
264
VoiceOver settings,
261–263
White on Black setting,
263
Wi-Fi settings, 247–249
Zoom settings, 263
sharing
contacts, 235–236
pictures, 194–196
videos, 121, 181
Shazam app, 297–298
Shift key, 29
shooting pictures, 188
shooting video
editing after, 179–181
overview, 179
sharing after, 181
27_9781118024447-bindex.indd 336
shopping for apps
browsing App Store from
computers, 131–133
browsing App Store from
iPad, 140–141
deleting apps, 144–146
downloading apps,
138–139, 142–144
finding details about apps,
141–142
finding full description of
apps, 135–136
ratings, 136
reading reviews, 137
related links, 136
reporting problems with
apps, 147
requirements and device
support for apps,
136–137
searching for apps,
133–134, 141
updating apps, 139, 144
writing reviews, 146–147
shopping for e-books
browsing iBookstore,
216–217
buying beyond Apple,
219–220
detail page, 218–219
free e-books, 220
overview, 215–216
searching iBookstore,
217–218
third-party bookstores,
219
shopping with iTunes app,
166–167
Shuffle option
iPod app, 159, 164
Photos app, 198
Side Switch settings,
General settings, 259
signatures, e-mail, 99
Silent mode, 14
SIM eject tool, 8
Skim option, Photos, 196
Skyfire Labs app, 72
Skype app, 326
slash key (/), 65
Sleep/Wake button, 11–12,
24
slide gesture, 317–318
slide shows
special effects, 197–198
turning iPad into picture
frame, 199
viewing on TV, 198
Smart Cover, 280
Smart Playlists, 164
snapshots of screen, 52,
270, 326
social media apps
Facebook, 124–126
Game Center, 123–124
MySpace, 126–127
overview, 122–123
Twitter, 127
software version, 254
Songs tab, iPod, 154
Sound Check option,
iTunes, 165
Sounds settings, General
settings, 253
spacebar, 32
spare chargers, 285
Speak Auto-Text setting,
General settings, 264
speakers
Bluetooth, 288–289
built-in, 13–14
desktop, 288
Dock Extender cables, 289
special effects, adding to
pictures, 197–198
special-use keys, 29–30
spelling checking and
correction, 28, 260
Spotlight feature, 38–39,
258. See also searching
4/8/11 1:44 PM
Index
spread gesture
(unpinching), 25, 69, 107
Staff Favorites department,
App Store, 133
stereo adapters, 292
storing
files, 324–325
pictures, 192–194
Street View, Maps, 117
Subscriber Services option,
Reset settings, 264
subscribing
to calendars, 233
to YouTube videos, 120
Summary tab, iTunes, 43–46
swipe gesture, 26
synchronizing
apps, 52–53
audiobooks, 58–59
bookmarks, 50–51
calendars, 49
contacts, 47–49
disconnecting iPad, 46
e-books, 58–59
e-mail accounts, 49–50
iTunes U content, 58
music, 53–55
music videos, 53–55
notes, 50–51
overview, 41–42
pictures, 59–60, 190
podcasts, 57–58
settings, 43–46
starting process, 42–46
troubleshooting, 274
TV shows, 56–57
videos, 55
voice memos, 53–55
•T•
Table of Contents, e-books,
212
tap gesture, 25
Targus cases, 289
27_9781118024447-bindex.indd 337
television. See TV
Terrain view, Maps,
106–107
third-party apps, 10–11
third-party bookstores, 219
third-party cases, 289–290
threads, 87, 89, 101
time zone settings, 231
Toggle key, 30
Tools button, Keynote, 238
Top Charts section
App Store, 141
iBookstore, 217
Top Rated button,
YouTube, 119
touchscreen. See
multitouch interface
Track List button, iPod,
159–160
traffic information, 116–117
Transitions option, Photos,
198
Trim Original option,
Photos, 181
Triple-Click Home settings,
General settings, 264
troubleshooting
Apple support, 275–276
computers, 274
iTunes, 274
networks, 272–274
overview, 267–268
recharging iPad, 268–269
Recovery mode, 271–272
removing iPad content,
270
repairing iPad, 276–277
replacing iPad, 276–277
resetting content, 270–271
resetting iPad, 269–270
resetting settings, 270–271
restarting iPad, 269
restoring iPad, 271
syncing, 274
Truphone app, 326
337
TV
connecting to, 284–285
syncing shows, 56–57
viewing pictures on, 198
viewing video on, 177–178
Twitter app, 127
type size, changing in
e-books, 215
•U•
Undo button, Keynote, 237
Universal Access Features.
See Accessibility tools
unpinching (spread
gesture), 25, 69, 107
unread e-mail messages, 93
updating apps, 139, 144
URL endings, 31, 65
Usage settings, General
settings, 255
USB adapter, 8, 42, 283–284
•V•
Vario cases, 289
vCards, 235
.vcf file format, 235
versions
iPad, 4
software, 254
VGA (video graphics array)
adapter cables, 284
video
controls, 176–177
deleting, 178–179
editing, 179–181
FaceTime app, 182–185
overview, 169
playing, 174–176
restricting usage, 178
searching for, 170–173
searching YouTube,
118–120
4/8/11 1:44 PM
338
iPad For Dummies, 2nd Edition
video (continued)
setting volume limit for,
166
sharing, 181
shooting, 179
syncing, 53–55
viewing on TV, 177–178
viewing with YouTube
app, 120–122
video graphics array (VGA)
adapter cables, 284
Videos app, 19
views
Calendar app, 225–227
Maps app, 106–107
Safari browser, 68–69
virtual keyboards. See
keyboards
virtual private networks
(VPNs), 17, 255–256
voice memos, syncing,
53–55
VoiceOver settings, General
settings, 261–263
volume
control of, 15, 157
playing all songs at same,
165
setting limits, 166
VPNs (virtual private
networks), 17, 255–256
27_9781118024447-bindex.indd 338
•W•
•Y•
walking directions, Maps,
114–116
wallpapers, 252–253
web pages
opening multiple, 69–70
printing, 73
saving pictures from,
76–77
Web Clips, 74, 323–324
Week view, Calendar, 227
What’s Hot department,
App Store, 133
White on Black settings,
General settings, 263
Wi-Fi icon, 16
Wi-Fi networks, 17, 64,
247–249, 273
Windows Address Book
program, 48
wired headphones,
earphones, and
headsets, 286
Words with Friends HD
app, 307
Write a Review link, App
Store, 146
Yahoo! Address Book
program, 48
Yahoo! e-mail accounts, 81
YouTube app
finding videos, 118–120
overview, 19, 117–118
restricting access to, 122
viewing videos, 120–122
•Z•
ZAGAT TO GO app, 315–316
ZAGG film, 290
ZeroChroma cases, 289
zooming
Maps app, 106–107
Photos app, 195
settings, 263
4/8/11 1:44 PM
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• How to stay connected with
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• Advice on troubleshooting
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Edward C. Baig is the Personal Technology columnist for USA TODAY and
the author of Macs For Dummies, 11th Edition. Bob “Dr. Mac” LeVitus pens
the popular “Dr. Mac” column for the Houston Chronicle and is the author
of Incredible iPad Apps For Dummies.
2nd Edition
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• Do you see me now? — video chat with FaceTime, record HD video
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Covers the iPad a
iPad
There are many tablets, but there’s just one iPad. Part iPod, part
game console, part e-reader, and all amazing, the iPad combines
the best of your favorite gadgets into one ultraportable device.
This full-color guide helps you get up to speed and on the go
with Apple’s latest iPad and iOS software. From surfing the web
to playing games, watching and recording videos, downloading
cool apps and more, the fun begins right here.
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Edward C. Baig
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