High Pressure Water
Cleaner
Guidance Manual
Telephone: 08 9358 2323, Facsimile: 08 9358 2301
212 Welshpool Road, Welshpool WA 6106
Welcome to Pumps Australia!!
Hi, my name is John Warne and I am the owner of
Pumps Australia. I would like to congratulate and
thank you for purchasing your Pumps Australia
product.
You will no doubt be pleased with the quality and
design of your manufactured goods. My staff and I pride ourselves on
the research and development we invest in our products.
Your questions and comments are always welcome. We provide friendly,
knowledgeable technical support by telephone, fax and email to all our
customers.
The information provided to you in this guide has been developed in good
faith, I hope that it provides you with some interesting and helpful
information. Please ensure you read through this guide before operating
your machine.
I hope you enjoy your product and please do not hesitate to contact us if
you have any queries.
Kind Regards
J D Warne
John Warne
Page 2 of 32
Contents
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
Introduction
Medical Advice
Applications
High Pressure Equipment
Water Supply Hoses
The High Pressure Pump
High Pressure Hoses
Pressure Guns and Other Equipment
Working Safely
Minimising Hazards
Spot The Hazard
Assessing the Risk
Making the Changes
General Safe Practices
Training
Safety and Equipment Prestart Checklist
Troubleshooting
Setting Up Your High Pressure Cleaner
Limited Warranty
Classification Formula
Nozzle Selection
Conversion Table
Maintenance Section
Regular Maintenance
Planned Maintenance
Boiler Use and Maintenance
Page 3 of 32
1. Introduction
This guidance note has been prepared to assist individuals and companies who
use small high-pressure water cleaners and pumps to provide a safe system of
work.
The Guidance note applies only to “A” class equipment, for information and
guidance on larger machines, please refer to the Code of Practice for the use of
High Pressure Water Jetting Equipment and The Australian / New Zealand
Standard for High Pressure Water Jetting Systems – AS/NZS 4233.1:1999
Class A high-pressure equipment refers to smaller pumps and systems, usually
used for washing or cleaning purposes. “A” class machines are defined as
follows:
The maximum pressure of the pump in bar, multiplied by the maximum flow of
the pump in litres must be less than 5600 Bar-Litres. If the pump’s performance
exceeds this, then additional controls and practices need to be applied.
2. Medical Advice
Please be aware that injuries resulting from the use of high pressure water
equipment, have been reported to produce unusual infections with micro
aerophilic organisms occurring at lower temperatures. These may be gram
negative pathogens such as found in sewage.
Another particular hazard is Weil’s disease (Leptospirosis), this may cause
serious and even fatal illness which presents itself in the early stages as a flulike illness with severe headaches and sometimes aseptic meningitis. Early
treatment may prevent the onset of more serious symptoms.
Page 4 of 32
If injured using high pressure water equipment, please make any medical staff
aware of your occupation as this will aid them in your diagnosis.
If ever in doubt please check with your doctor.
3. Applications
High-pressure water is used in a multitude of applications including:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Domestic Cleaning
Commercial Roof Cleaning
Paint Stripping
Abrasive Blasting
Drain Cleaning
Industrial Cleaning
Heavy Vehicles
Drilling Rigs
Refinery Clean Up
Descaling
Cutting
Marine
When Used correctly, pressure cleaning is a particularly useful, safe and
environmentally sound alternative to many traditional cleaning methods.
Used without adequate precautions and controls, high-pressure water can
cause serious injury to the people using it or in the vicinity.
4. High Pressure Equipment
Any equipment that utilises liquid under pressure to perform work carries with it
certain inherent potential hazards. These however can be minimised or
eliminated by using adequate maintenance and inspection or checking
processes.
Components of a high-pressure system generally consist of:
•
•
Water supply and hoses
The high pressure pump
Page 5 of 32
•
•
The high pressure delivery hose fittings
The gun or any other equipment attached to the hose to do the work
It is a good idea to develop a checklist of the equipment to be used which can
assist in identifying equipment and other potential hazards prior to start of work.
A sample checklist is included at the back of this guidance note.
5. Water supply hoses
Water for the high-pressure pump is usually drawn from a low volume domestic
tap or in an industrial situation from a water supply on site. The main thing to
ensure with water delivery hoses is that they are in good condition. Hoses or
fittings with leaks can create hazardous slippery areas away from the work area
as well as wasting water.
6. The High Pressure Pump
The high-pressure pumps used to generate the water pressure generally require
very little maintenance. They should be kept clean; all fittings should be checked
before and after use and the entire system should be flushed with a water hose
after every use.
Page 6 of 32
Services and maintenance are usually specified by the equipment supplier and
should be carried out accordingly.
All high-pressure pumps should be fitted with a shut off switch, which should be
tested prior to every use.
7. High Pressure Hoses
High-pressure hoses deliver the pressurised water from the pump to the
workface. The condition of them is critical to the safety of the operation. Hoses
are generally made up of a steel woven inner core, covered by a protective
rubber outer sheath and fitted with crimped screw or quick connect couplings.
The woven or braded inner core is what actually gives the hose its strength.
Hoses should be inspected prior to and after use for:
•
•
•
•
Broken or damaged wires
Kinks or bends
Damaged fittings or threads
Deep cuts or punctures
Hoses which are found to be damaged should be marked with a tag and not
used.
8. Pressure Guns and Other Equipment
A wide variety of tasks can be carried out using high-pressure water and
consequently many different devices have been developed by various
manufactures to enable these tasks to be carried out. These include:
•
•
•
High pressure guns & various nozzles
Pipe cleaning nozzles and attachments
Floor cleaners
Page 7 of 32
•
•
•
Abrasive blasting attachments
Chemical induction or injection systems
Water heating systems
These devices should always be compatible with the pump unit you are using.
Couplings rated at the pumps maximum working pressure should always be
used and must be intended for the purpose they are to be used for. Always fit
and use attachments according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
9. Working Safely
All work carries with it an element of risk. It is important to recognise this and
consistently minimise risk to people who may be exposed to it.
10. Minimising Hazards
Hazards are situations in the work environment, which if left unchecked can
result in:
•
•
•
Injury to people
Impact on the environment
Damage to equipment
Risks associated with hazards can be easily minimised or preferably eliminated
by following some simple steps.
11. Spot the Hazard
Inspect all of the equipment and the work environment for likely hazards, walk
through the job or task and talk to others who have done it before. Try to
methodically analyse each step and identify hazards associated with it.
Page 8 of 32
12. Assessing the Risk
All hazards have a level of risk associated with them. It is important to assess
them and then to take appropriate action. To assess any risk, it’s simply a
matter of asking two questions about it.
1. How likely is it to occur?
2. What will happen if it does occur?
Based on the answers from these two questions, a level of risk can be
determined. If either the event is likely to occur or the outcome of the
occurrence will be serious i.e. someone will get hurt, the risk must be
controlled.
13. Making the Changes
Ideally, the hazard should be eliminated altogether. For instance, if the work
area is cluttered with rubbish, the rubbish can be removed. This is the best way
to control any hazard.
Unfortunately, this is not always possible, for instance, if someone was working
on a roof and the water from the cleaning process was making the tiles slippery,
it would be impossible to eliminate this hazard. The only thing that can be done
in this instance is to control it, to put a system in place to prevent the person
falling from the roof and making sure they are aware of the hazard.
14. General Safe Practices
•
Always make sure that people not involved with the job are not going to be
inadvertently exposed to hazards. Barricade, tape or warning flags should be
used to cordon off the work area. When working from heights, remember the
water spray either needs to be contained or a larger area barricaded off.
Page 9 of 32
•
•
•
Inspect all equipment prior to use and do not use equipment which is not
designed for the job or that is defective
Shut off devices such as gun triggers should be checked and tested for
operation prior to use in a controlled environment.
Wear correct Personal Protective Equipment. This applies to anyone who is
in the immediate vicinity of the work or who may be exposed to it. The
minimum Personal Protective Equipment for high pressure work is:
o
o
o
o
o
•
•
Eye protection, goggles or a face mask
Long trousers or leg coverings
Hearing protection where required
Steel capped footwear
Gloves where required
Where chemicals, abrasives or other hazardous materials are present,
additional precautions may be required such as full body protection or
respiratory protection
Never allow people to come into contact with the water jet. Water jets
can cause serious or fatal injuries.
Page 10 of 32
•
•
•
People using the equipment should be competent in all aspects of it.
If working in an industrial environment or for an employer and an accident or
incident occurs, it must be reported immediately to the employer. Injuries
may appear small on the surface however there is the possibility of more
serious internal injuries and medical advice should be sought.
Hazards in the workplace should be rectified immediately or reported if
additional assistance is required to control or eliminate them.
15. Training
General
Everyone who uses high pressure cleaning equipment must be competent to do
so. Operators or people who use the equipment should, as a minimum, be
competent in the following areas:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Have an understanding of basic duty of care – Further information can be
obtained from your state regulatory body.
Understand the system operation and all controls.
Understand the need to control hazards in the workplace and be able to do
so.
Have some experience or instruction in the operation of the equipment and
be aware of the associated potential hazards.
Have experience or instruction in the particular application of the
equipment.
If the equipment is to be used in unusual environments or situations, the
operators needs to be competent to do so, for example working at heights.
If the equipment is supplied by a hirer, the hirer needs to inform the user of
the potential hazards associated with it.
Safety or other shut off devices must never be tampered with or nullified.
If chemical cleaning agents are to be used, the appropriate material safety
data sheet (MSDS) should be obtained from the supplier prior to use.
Page 11 of 32
16. Safety and Equipment Prestart Checklist
Check
Hoses
Visual Inspection
All joints in good order
Barriers
Area Secure
All barriers clearly visible
Shut Down Device
In use
Tested
Tagging
Isolation and tagging if required
Hazard Inspection
Completed and all identified hazards
controlled
Emergencies
All personnel familiar with emergency
procedures
Page 12 of 32
Confirm
()
Check
House keeping
Completed and area inspected
Controls
All pump controls tested
Pump Checks
All required pump checks completed
Nozzles and Other
Cleaning Devices
All nozzles and any other equipment
checked and in serviceable condition
Faulty Equipment
Faulty equipment has been tagged and
isolated to prevent use
Personal Protective
Equipment
All crew members are equipped with the
required PPE and any other protective
equipment required for the job
Confirm
()
If In Doubt Ask Your Supervisor
Page 13 of 32
17.Troubleshooting
Symptom
Possible Cause(s)
Oil leak between
crankcase and pumping
section
Frequent or premature
failure of the packing
Worn rod oil seals
Replace crankcase
piston rod seals
1
Cracked, damaged
or worn plunger
1
Replace plungers
2
Overpressure to inlet
manifold
2
Reduce inlet pressure
3
Material in the fluid
being pumped
3
Install proper filtration on
pump inlet plumbing
4
Excessive pressure
and/or temperature
of fluid being
pumped
4
Check pressures and
fluid inlet temperature;
be sure they are within
specified range
5
Running pump dry
5
Do not run pump without
water
Pump fails to prime
Pump looses prime,
chattering noise,
pressure fluctuates
Corrective Action
Air is trapped inside
pump
1
Air leak in suction
hose or inlet
1
2
Clogged suction
strainer
2
Page 14 of 32
Disconnect discharge
hose from pump. Flood
suction hose, restart
pump and run pump until
all air has been
evacuated
Remove suction line and
inspect it for a loose liner
or debris lodged in hose.
Avoid all unnecessary
bends. Do not kink hose
Clean strainer
Symptom
Possible Cause(s)
Corrective Action
Pump is not primed
Flood suction then
restart pump
Pump runs but produces
no flow
Low pressure at nozzle
Low pressure
1
Unloader valve is bypassing
1
2
Incorrect or worn
nozzle
2
3
3
1
Worn packing or
valves
Worn nozzle
2
Belt slippage
2
Tighten or replace with
correct belt
3
Air leak in inlet
plumbing
3
Disassemble, reseal and
reassemble
4
Relief valve stuck,
partially plugged or
improperly adjusted
valve seat worn
4
Clean and adjust relief
valve; check for worn or
dirty valve seats
5
Worn packing.
Abrasive in pumped
in cavitation.
Inadequate water
5
Install proper filter
suction at inlet manifold
must be limited to lifting
less than 20 feet of
water or 8.5 psi vacuum
6
Worn inlet, discharge
valve blocked or dirty
6
Replace inlet and
discharge valve
Page 15 of 32
1
Make sure unloader is
adjusted property and
by-pass seat is not
leaking
Make sure nozzle is
matched to the flow and
pressure of the pump. If
the nozzle is worn,
replace
Replace packing or
valves
Replace with nozzle of
proper size
Symptom
Possible Cause(s)
Corrective Action
Pressure gauge
fluctuates
1
Valves worn or
blocked by foreign
bodies
Packing worn
Inlet restrictions
and/or air leaks.
1
Clean or replace valves
2
1
Replace packing
Clean out foreign
material
Stuck inlet or
discharge valve
2
Replace worn valves
Pump runs extremely
rough, pressure very low
2
1
2
Water leakage from
under manifold
Slight leak, oil leaking in
the area of crankshaft
Worn packing or
cracked plunger
1
Worn crankshaft seal
or improperly
installed oil seal oring
Bad bearing
Worn main bearing
from excessive
tension on drive belt
1
Remove oil seal retainer
and replace damaged 0ring and/or seals
2
Replace bearing
Replace crankcase
bearing and/or tension
drive belt
Humid air
condensing into
water inside the
crankcase
Worn packing and/or
cracked plunger
1
Change oil intervals
2
Replace packing.
Replace plunger
1
Cavitation or sucking
air
1
Check water supply is
turned on
2
Pulley loose on
crankshaft
2
Check key and tighten
set screw
3
Broken or worn
bearing
3
Replace bearing
2
Excessive play in the end
of the crankshaft pulley
Water in crankcase
1
2
Loud knocking noise in
pump
Install new packing or
plunger
Page 16 of 32
18. Setting Up Your High Pressure Cleaner
•
Ensure that twice the stated water flow (located on name plate, on
machine) from the pump is available from your water supply.
• Check oils – engine, gearbox and pump prior to starting.
• Pull trigger on gun when starting electric, petrol and diesel
engines.
• Ensure pressure cleaner is not run for more than 2-3 minutes
without trigger on gun being pulled. This will avoid overheating in
the pump head and any damage to seals.
• Ensure that there are no leaks in the high pressure pump, hose,
lance and gun. All leaks need to be fixed immediately.
• Check oil levels regularly and change at first service (50 hours)
and every 750 hours after that or, at anytime when the oil turns
from honey to grey in pump, gearbox or engine.
Page 17 of 32
• On a regular basis, check to ensure that all fasteners, nuts and
bolts are tight.
• Water filters are recommended and will maintain the performance
of your pump.
If In Doubt Contact Pumps Australia
Page 18 of 32
19. Limited Warranty
We certify that all pumps supplied and manufactured by Pumps Australia
are guaranteed against defects in materials and workmanship for 12
months from the date of purchase.
Repair or replacement of parts or whole will be performed without charge.
General terms and conditions;
The purchaser must pay all labor and shipping charges for the return of
the product covered by this warranty.
This warranty shall not apply to products which, in the sole judgement of
Pumps Australia or its appointed service representative, have been
subject to negligence, abuse, accident, misapplication, tampering,
alteration, or have failed due to improper installation, operation or
maintenance procedures.
IF THE PUMP SHOULD FAIL WITHIN THIS 12 MONTH PERIOD.
RETURN THE PUMP TO:
Pumps Australia 32 Railway Parade Bayswater 6053.
Warranty is limited to the value of the product. Pumps Australia does not accept consequential damages.
Page 19 of 32
20. Classification Formula
Page 20 of 32
21. Nozzle Selection
Flow in Lts per minute at the indicated pressures
110
bar
120
bar
130
bar
140
bar
150
bar
160
bar
180
bar
200
bar
220
bar
250
bar
280
bar
310
bar
340
bar
Nozzle
Size
Hole
1595
psi
1740
psi
1885
psi
2030
psi
2175
psi
2320
psi
2610
psi
2900
psi
3190
psi
3625
psi
4060
psi
4560
psi
5000
psi
02
0.99
4.7
4.9
5.1
5.3
5.5
5.7
6
6.4
6.7
7.6
8.5
9.4
10.3
03
1.09
7.2
7.4
7.7
8
8.3
8.7
9.2
9.6
10
11.4
12.8
14.2
15.6
035
1.15
8.4
8.8
9.2
9.6
9.9
10.4
10.9
11.4
12
13
14.2
15.4
16.6
04
1.19
9.8
10.3
10.7
11.1
11.5
11.9
12.4
13.2
14.1
14.8
15.5
16.2
16.9
045
1.27
10.6
11.2
11.6
11.8
12.5
12.6
13.2
14.4
15
15.8
16.6
17.4
18.2
05
1.35
11.7
12.1
12.9
13.4
13.8
14.3
15.1
15.9
16.9
17.9
18.9
19.9
20.9
055
1.4
13
13.5
14.1
14.7
15.2
15.7
16.4
17.5
18.6
19.6
20.6
21.6
22.6
06
1.47
14.2
14.9
15.5
16
16.6
17.2
18
19.2
20.4
21.5
22.6
23.7
24.9
065
1.52
15.5
16.1
16.7
17.4
18
18.6
19.4
20.7
22
23.2
24.4
25.6
26.8
07
1.6
16.6
17.3
18
18.7
19.3
20.1
21.3
22.3
23.7
25
26.3
27.6
28.9
075
1.65
17.7
18.5
19.2
20
20.7
21.4
22.6
23.8
25.3
26.7
28.1
29.5
30.9
08
1.7
18.9
19.7
20.5
21.3
22
22.8
23.8
25.4
27
28.5
30
31.5
33
085
1.75
20
20.9
21.7
22.5
23.4
24
25.5
27
28.2
30
31.8
33.6
35.4
09
1.8
21.2
22.1
23
23.9
24.7
25.5
26.7
28.5
30.3
31.9
33.5
35.1
36.7
095
1.85
22.7
23.8
24.7
25.9
26
26.9
28.5
30
31.5
33.2
34.9
36.6
38.3
10
1.9
23.6
24.6
25.6
26.6
27.5
28.5
29.8
31.8
33.7
35.6
37.5
39.4
41.3
11
1.98
25.5
26.7
27.7
28.8
29.9
30.8
32.6
34.4
36
38.4
40.8
43.2
45.6
12
2.08
28.8
29.4
36
31.8
32.9
34
36
38
39.8
42.4
45
47.6
50.2
12.5
2.13
29.5
30.8
32.1
33.3
34.5
35.6
37.8
39.8
41.8
44.5
47.2
49.9
52.6
13
2.16
30.8
32.2
33.5
34.8
36
37.2
38.9
42.5
44
46.6
49.2
51.8
54.4
14
2.26
33.2
34.7
36.1
37.5
38.8
40.1
42.5
44.8
47
50.1
53.2
56.3
59.4
15
2.34
35.6
37.2
38.7
40.2
41.6
43
45.6
48
50.4
53.7
57
60.3
63.6
16
2.41
37.8
39.5
41.1
42.7
44.2
45.6
48.4
51
53.5
57
60.5
64
67.5
18
2.54
40.2
43.9
45.7
47.4
49
50.7
53.7
56.6
59.4
63.3
67.2
71.1
75
20
2.69
47.3
49.2
51.2
53.2
55
56.8
60.3
63.5
66.6
71
73.4
77.8
82.2
25
2.99
59.1
61.8
64.3
67
69.1
71.3
75.1
79.8
84
89.3
94.6
99.9
105.2
Page 21 of 32
22. Conversion Table
Convert From
X By
Convert To
Bar
14.503
psi - Pounds per sq. inch
psi - Pounds per sq. inch
0.0689
Bar
psi - Pounds per sq. inch
6894.8
N/m2 - Newtons per sq. metre
L/s - Litres per second
2.119
cfm - Cubic feet per minute
dm3/s-Cubic decimetres per sec
2.119
cfm - Cubic feet per minute
L/m - litres per minute
0.0353
cfm - Cubic feet per minute
m3/h - Cubic metres per hour
0.5885
cfm - Cubic feet per minute
cfm - Cubic feet per minute
1.699
m3/h - Cubic metres per hour
cfm - Cubic feet per minute
0.4719
l/s - litres per seconds
cfm - Cubic feet per minute
28.316
l/min - Litres per minute
BAR = 14.5psi = 100kpa =10 metres water
Column= 1Kg cm2
Page 22 of 32
23. MAINTENANCE
SECTION
(Pump and Boilers only)
For Service of Petrol/Diesel Engines
Refer to Manufacturers Service Manual
Page 23 of 32
High pressure water cleaners are complex machines that require regular
maintenance.
The schedule below indicates the average working times of the most
important components of the high pressure cleaner. Working times are
based on a hot water pressure washer that works 750 hours a year in
normal usage conditions eg. Faultless pressure cleaner, supplied with
medium hard water and water cooling before switching off. When ideal
conditions change, times of servicing will also change.
Component
Pump
Pump oil (1st time)
Pump oil (following times)
Water Seal packing
Valves
Oil seals
Roller bearings
Replacing times
After 50 hours
After 750 hours
After 2500 hours*
After 2500 hours*
After 2500 hours*
After 3500 hours
* Or when pressure reduces
Heater
Fuel filter in line
Fuel pump filter
Fuel nozzle
Electrodes
Electrode caps
Ignition transformer
After 500 hours
After 500 hours
After 1000 hours
After 1000 hours
After 1000 hours
After 2500 hours
Internal components of the high pressure washer
By-pass valve
After 2000 hours
Inlet water filter
After 750 hours
Page 24 of 32
Accessories
HP nozzle
Quick couplings or Orings
Spray gun
After 750 hours
After 500 hours
After 1500 hours
The pressure cleaner needs periodic maintenance, especially for some
components that have to be regularly cleaned and other ones that have
to be regularly settled, these are as follows;
Component
Heater
Fuel filters cleaning
Burner combustion
Fuel pressure
Electrodes
Fuel tank
How often to clean
How often to set
250 hours
500 hours
500 hours
500 hours
1000 hours
500 hours
Internal components of the high pressure cleaner
By-pass valve
2500 hours
Safety valve
2500 hours
Inlet water filter
250 hours
Descaling
750 hours
24. Regular Maintenance
It is recommended that you follow a regular maintenance schedule for
your high pressure cleaner as follows;
The first place to start is by assembling a daily checklist. This list should
include sections covering all the vital components of the equipment: fluid
system, pump, engine or motor, burner, hose assembly etc. Each section
Page 25 of 32
should have subdivisions, which encompass the components in that
section. Use this checklist as a visual inspection.
Example:
Daily Inspection: (i.e. cold water). Start with the inlet side.
Water Supply: Look for leaks, clean the filter and make sure there is
adequate flow.
Pump: Look for water leaks around the pump and check the oil for proper
level and make sure there is no water in the oil.
Engine: Check the oil level, fuel, air filter if clean.
Drive System: Check the drive belt(s) tension, condition (if your system is
driven in this manner), pulley tightness, and the belt guard fits properly.
Direct drive? Mounting bolts tightness, Gearbox drive? Mounting bolts
tight, oil level, leaks.
Hose: Is it in good shape, fitting/connections tight, and no leaks.
Spray Gun: Proper size for the system, connected properly.
Lance: good condition.
Nozzle: In place, correct size.
Now start and test the system under pressure look for leaks, engine
running properly, pressure okay?, any vibration?, everything okay?
The above list is only a sample. Time is important to everybody; this
inspection will only take a few minutes, and can save you time and
money and expensive down time in the long run.
Page 26 of 32
25. Planned Maintenance
As well as regular maintenance when using the machine, a planned
maintenance program should also be implemented.
Initially, your pump should be serviced when it reaches 50 hours of use.
The oil should be replaced and a general inspection should be
conducted.
The planned maintenance program shown in the following table is
recommended for your pressure cleaner.
Page 27 of 32
Maintenance Guidelines
Component
500
1000
1500
R
R
C
R
R
R
C
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
C
R
R
R
R
IR
R
IR
R
IR
2000
2500
Pump
By pass valve
Fuel filter
Fuel pump filter
Fuel tank
Gear box oil
Hp nozzle
Inlet water filter
Orings
Oil seal
Pump oil
Pump valves
Quick coupling
Safety valve
Seal packing
Spray gun
R
R
R
C
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
C
R
R
R
R
IR
R
IR
R
IR
IR
R
Boiler
Burner Combust
Descaling
Electrodes
Electrode caps
Fuel Pressure
Ignition transformer
IR
I
IR
C
R
R
I
IR
C
I
IR
C
R
R
I
IR
C
I
R
C = Clean, R = Replace, IR = Inspect/Replace, I = Inspect
Page 28 of 32
26. Boiler Use and Maintenance
Important note: It is important to ensure that when operating a hot and
cold high pressure cleaner in a confined space, that appropriate venting
is in place. This will ensure that the gases emitted from the boiler are not
inhaled by the operator or by-standers.
When a hot and cold pressure cleaner becomes smokey it is more than
likely due to the coil containing soot and carbon residues. This can be
prevented by ensuring that a good maintenance program is implemented.
If the soot and carbon residues exceed a certain quantity you will have a
reduction of thermal exchange and thermal passages. If you want to
clean the coil then you have to take it away from the air conveyer.
Chalk deposits settle inside the coil during usage; these deposits must be
taken away using a special pump and a descaling liquid.
Page 29 of 32
NOTES
Page 30 of 32
NOTES
Page 31 of 32
High Pressure Accessories
For more information, contact Pumps Australia Pty Ltd
Phone: 08 9358 2323 Fax: 08 9358 2301
Email: sales@pumpsaustralia.com.au
Page 32 of 32
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