Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Planning
Guide
5.0.0
Downloaded from www.sonomapartners.com
Copyright
This document is provided "as-is". Information and views expressed in this document, including URL and other Internet Web site
references, may change without notice. You bear the risk of using it.
Some examples depicted herein are provided for illustration only and are fictitious. No real association or connection is intended or
should be inferred.
This document does not provide you with any legal rights to any intellectual property in any Microsoft product. You may copy and
use this document for your internal, reference purposes.
© 2010 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Microsoft, Active Directory, Excel, Hyper-V, Internet Explorer, Microsoft Dynamics, Microsoft Dynamics logo, MSDN, Outlook,
Notepad, SharePoint, Silverlight, Visual C++, Windows, Windows Azure, Windows Live, Windows PowerShell, Windows Server,
and Windows Vista are trademarks of the Microsoft group of companies.
All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.
Table of Contents
Copyright ....................................................................................................................... 2 Overview ........................................................................................................................ 5 Planning Microsoft Dynamics CRM ......................................................................................................... 5 Microsoft Dynamics CRM editions and licensing ..................................................................................... 6 What's new in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011? ...................................................................................... 6 New application features ..................................................................................................................... 6 Claims-based authentication support .................................................................................................. 7 Add or remove a server role................................................................................................................ 7 Sandbox Processing Service .............................................................................................................. 8 What's new in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 E-mail Router? .......................................................... 8 What's new in Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook? ....................................................................... 8 Business Manager's Role in a Microsoft Dynamics CRM Implementation .............. 9 Tools, training, and documentation to help you plan ............................................................................... 9 Tools for business management ......................................................................................................... 9 Microsoft Dynamics Sure Step methodology .................................................................................... 10 Business management training ......................................................................................................... 10 Help ................................................................................................................................................... 10 Planning a Microsoft Dynamics CRM implementation ........................................................................... 10 Planning tasks for business managers ............................................................................................. 10 Development tasks for business managers ...................................................................................... 11 Deployment tasks for business managers ........................................................................................ 11 Post-deployment tasks for business managers ................................................................................ 12 Managing a Microsoft Dynamics CRM implementation project ........................................................ 12 Implementation overview ....................................................................................................................... 13 Planning ............................................................................................................................................ 14 Development ..................................................................................................................................... 14 Deployment ....................................................................................................................................... 14 Post-deployment: operating and maintaining .................................................................................... 14 Planning tasks ................................................................................................................................... 14 Deployment tasks .............................................................................................................................. 20 Post-deployment tasks ...................................................................................................................... 20 System Requirements and Required Components .................................................. 21 Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 hardware requirements............................................................ 21 Microsoft SQL Server hardware requirements....................................................................................... 22 Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 software requirements ............................................................. 22 Windows Server operating system.................................................................................................... 22 Supported Windows Server 2008 editions ........................................................................................ 22 Server virtualization ........................................................................................................................... 23 Active Directory modes ..................................................................................................................... 23 Internet Information Services (IIS) .................................................................................................... 23 SQL Server editions .......................................................................................................................... 23 Claims-based authentication and IFD requirements ......................................................................... 24 SQL Server Reporting Services ........................................................................................................ 25 Software component prerequisites.................................................................................................... 25 Verify prerequisites............................................................................................................................ 26 i
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions ................................................................................... 26 Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions general requirements ........................................... 26 SharePoint Document Management software requirements ................................................................. 27 Office Communications Server Integration ............................................................................................ 27 Microsoft Dynamics CRM E-mail Router hardware requirements ......................................................... 27 Microsoft Dynamics CRM E-mail Router software requirements........................................................... 28 Exchange Server ............................................................................................................................... 28 Messaging and transport protocols ................................................................................................... 29 Exchange Online ............................................................................................................................... 29 Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook hardware requirements.............................................................. 29 Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook software requirements ............................................................... 30 Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook software component prerequisites........................................ 30 Microsoft Dynamics CRM Web client software requirements ................................................................ 31 64-bit supported configurations .............................................................................................................. 31 Language support .................................................................................................................................. 32 Requirements .................................................................................................................................... 32 Examples........................................................................................................................................... 32 Currency support .................................................................................................................................... 33 Planning Deployment .................................................................................................. 39 Planning deployment prerequisites and considerations ........................................................................ 39 Hardware requirements ..................................................................................................................... 40 Software requirements ...................................................................................................................... 40 Active Directory considerations ......................................................................................................... 40 SQL Server installation and configuration ......................................................................................... 41 Planning requirements for Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services .............................................. 46 Planning e-mail integration ................................................................................................................ 47 Operating system and software component security considerations..................................................... 48 Securing Windows Server ................................................................................................................. 48 Securing SQL Server ........................................................................................................................ 49 Securing Exchange Server and Outlook ........................................................................................... 49 Security considerations for Microsoft Dynamics CRM ........................................................................... 50 Minimum permissions required for Microsoft Dynamics CRM Setup, services, and components.... 50 Microsoft Dynamics CRM installation files ........................................................................................ 52 Microsoft Dynamics CRM security best practices ............................................................................. 52 Microsoft Dynamics CRM administration best practices ................................................................... 53 Microsoft Dynamics CRM security model ......................................................................................... 53 Network ports for Microsoft Dynamics CRM ..................................................................................... 54 Known risks and vulnerabilities ......................................................................................................... 56 Supported configurations ....................................................................................................................... 57 Active Directory requirements ........................................................................................................... 58 Single-server deployment ................................................................................................................. 58 Multiple-server deployment ............................................................................................................... 58 Support for multiple-server topologies .............................................................................................. 62 Upgrading from Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0....................................................................................... 64 Microsoft Dynamics CRM software and components not supported for in-place upgrade ............... 65 Upgrade product key ......................................................................................................................... 66 User permissions and privileges ....................................................................................................... 66 Multiple Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 versions in the same domain ................................ 66 Sharing a SQL Server ....................................................................................................................... 66 ii
Tips for a successful upgrade ........................................................................................................... 66 Upgrading Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook ............................................................................. 67 Upgrade issues and considerations .................................................................................................. 68 Planning Deployment Advanced Topics ................................................................... 71 Advanced deployment options for Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 ........................................... 71 Update Setup files by using a local package .................................................................................... 71 Add or remove server roles ............................................................................................................... 71 Configure a Microsoft Dynamics CRM Internet-facing deployment .................................................. 71 Key management in Microsoft Dynamics CRM ................................................................................ 73 Multi-organization deployment .......................................................................................................... 74 Advanced deployment options for Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook ............................................. 74 iii
Chapter 1
Overview
This guide is part of the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Implementation Guide, which consists of the following
three documents:
•
Planning Guide: Use this guide to determine what you have to plan for Microsoft Dynamics CRM. It
includes coverage in the following areas:
Technical. These topics focus on supported topologies, system requirements, and technical
considerations to address before installation.
Implementation Methodology. Learn about the business management, system requirements, and
project management aspects that are needed when you deploy a CRM system. In addition, there are
several documents that you can use as tools to plan the implementation of Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
These tools are available for download at Planning Tools
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=189326).
•
Installing Guide: Use this guide to learn about how you install Microsoft Dynamics CRM applications.
This guide includes step-by-step instructions for running Setup, command-line installation instructions,
and guidance about how to remove Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
Operating and Maintaining Guide: You can read this guide to learn how to back up, restore, and
perform system recovery for Microsoft Dynamics CRM data. Also, this guide has troubleshooting steps
for known issues.
•
In This Chapter
Planning Microsoft Dynamics CRM .............................................................................................. 5
Microsoft Dynamics CRM editions and licensing.......................................................................... 6
What's new in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011? ........................................................................... 6
Planning Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Planning Microsoft Dynamics CRM, like any enterprise-wide software, is a significant task for an organization.
This guide is written for the team of people responsible for planning Microsoft Dynamics CRM, and provides
information and tools that are needed to design a successful implementation. In smaller organizations,
several roles may be filled by one person. In larger organizations, each role may be divided among several
people. These roles include the following:
•
Business managers: Responsible for determining how your business will use Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
This includes mapping your processes to Microsoft Dynamics CRM, deciding on default values, and
identifying any required customizations.
• Customization technical staff: Responsible for implementing the planned customizations.
• Network technical staff: Responsible for determining how Microsoft Dynamics CRM will be installed on
the network.
• Project manager: Responsible for managing an enterprise-wide implementation project.
Organizations that implement Microsoft Dynamics CRM software may use the services of an independent
software vendor (ISV) or value-added reseller, a consultant, or other organization that is partnered with
Microsoft and will help you with implementing and maintaining your Microsoft Dynamics CRM installation.
Because of this assumption, there may be references in this guide to these "partners" who are expected to
provide services to you.
5
Chapter 1: Overview
Microsoft Dynamics CRM editions and licensing
Microsoft Dynamics CRM offers editions that cover implementations for small, to mid-level, to even very large
organizations.
Editions
•
•
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Server. There is no user limit for this edition. Additional features include
support for multiple organizations, multiple server instances, and separate role-based service installation.
Role-based services let you increase performance by installing component services on different
computers.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Workgroup Server 2011. This edition is limited to five, or fewer, users. This
version is limited to a single organization and a single computer that is running Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Server 2011.
Licensing
A Microsoft Dynamics CRM deployment operates by using a single product key. Microsoft Dynamics CRM
2011 does not require additional product keys to be added when changes are made, such as adding a client
access license (CAL). The single product key contains the Microsoft Dynamics CRM version, server license,
and the CALs.
You can view and upgrade a license in Deployment Manager. Deployment Manager is a Microsoft
Management Console (MMC) snap-in that system administrators can use to manage organizations, servers,
and licenses for deployments of Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
Client Access License Types
You can view and modify client access license types for each user in the Users area of the Settings area in
the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Web client.
For more information about Microsoft Dynamics licensing, see How to buy Microsoft Dynamics
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=111388).
What's new in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011?
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 includes several new features that offer flexibility, scalability, and ease of use.
New application features
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 includes several new application features:
Advanced user personalization. Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 lets you configure a workspace that is
personalized to meet your unique role and information needs. Personalizing a workspace means that you can
set the default pane and tab that display when you open Microsoft Dynamics CRM. You also have control
over what links appear in the workplace view, how many records appear in lists, how numbers and dates
display, and the language for your user interface. Combine this personalization with the new dashboard
feature to create a personalized dashboard for your default view.
Improved Microsoft Office interface. Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 introduces a new Office 2010
contextual ribbon for the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online and Microsoft Dynamics CRM browser clients and
for Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Microsoft Office Outlook. The new ribbon delivers a consistent, familiar
navigation and user experience that helps you better integrate Microsoft Dynamics CRM with your Office
2010 environment.
Better Office Outlook experience. Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 improves the integration of Microsoft
Dynamics CRM into Microsoft Office Outlook with the Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Microsoft Office Outlook.
It takes full advantage of native Outlook functionality, such as previews and conditional formatting, and
presents Microsoft Dynamics CRM areas as sub-folders in Outlook mail folders. With a few exceptions, these
Microsoft Dynamics CRM areas in Outlook include all of the same functionality as the browser clients.
6
Chapter 1: Overview
Dashboards. Dashboards are a powerful feature in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011. Use a dashboard to see
at a glance all the important information you need to make key business decisions every day. Assemble and
present information from several places in Microsoft Dynamics CRM in a quickly-read format. This means
that you do not have to search multiple areas for the information you want. Dashboards are easy to create,
and are easy to revise as your changing business needs require.
Goal management. Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 gives you the ability to define key performance and
business health indicators. This way you can track and measure results against your organization's goals or
metrics. Easily and quickly define goals for a campaign or fiscal period. Combine smaller goals, such as for
specific teams or territories, into the overall goals for your organization. Create a rollup of all the goals into
the actuals that show how you are tracking.
Interactive process dialogs. Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 expands its workflow capability by adding
interactive dialogs. Dialogs present a consistent message to your customers. Also, dialogs collect and
process information by using step-by-step scripts to direct users through every process. At one level, you can
use dialogs to guide customer interactions and internal processes. At another level, you can increase dialog
performance and versatility by incorporating workflow logic. This logic invokes automated tasks by using the
responses a customer or user makes during the dialog script.
Role-based forms and views. Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 displays forms and views based on user
roles. This role-tailored design ensures that the business professionals in your organization have fast access
to the relevant information they need. Role-based forms and views also prevent users from viewing data that
they are not authorized to view.
Solution management. Solutions in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 are a new way to save customizations
and share them with other users. You can create a solution or import a solution created by a developer
outside your organization. It is easy to share a solution with other users. A managed solution can be edited
only by specific users. An unmanaged solution can be edited by any user with an appropriate user role. A
solution can have version numbering, relationships with entities and other components, and security features
based on user roles.
Cloud development. Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 is at the leading edge of cloud computing. Developers
can take advantage of the Windows Azure platform to develop and deploy custom code for Microsoft
Dynamics CRM Online by using powerful tools, such as Microsoft Visual Studio. Using the Microsoft .NET
Framework 4.0, developers can also incorporate Microsoft Silverlight, Windows Communication Foundation,
and .NET Language Integrated Query (LINQ) into their cloud solutions. Cloud development for Microsoft
Dynamics CRM 2011 is a powerful tool for customizing your Microsoft Dynamics CRM solution for optimal
performance and business results.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Marketplace. Microsoft Dynamics Marketplace is your online solutions catalog.
These solutions help you accelerate and extend your Microsoft Dynamics CRM implementation.
Quickly discover and apply industry-specific applications and extensions from Microsoft and its partners.
Then, Marketplace distributes your solution directly to you.
Microsoft Dynamics Marketplace is fully integrated with Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011. Find your solution
directly from Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
Claims-based authentication support
Using federation identity technology such as Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS) 2.0, Microsoft
Dynamics CRM supports claims-based authentication. This technology helps simplify access to applications
and other systems by using an open and interoperable claims-based model that provides simplified user
access and single sign-on to applications on-premises, cloud-based, and even across organizations. For
more information about AD FS 2.0, see Active Directory Federation Services 2.0
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=200771).
Add or remove a server role
You can now install individual server roles by using the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup Wizard.
Similarly, you can add a server role, or change or remove installed server roles from Programs and
Features in Control Panel.
7
Chapter 1: Overview
Sandbox Processing Service
The Sandbox Processing Service server role enables an isolated environment to allow for the execution of
custom code, such as plug-ins.
What's new in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 E-mail Router?
The Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 E-mail Router includes the following new features:
•
•
•
•
•
You can upgrade from the Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 E-mail Router to the Microsoft Dynamics CRM
2011 E-mail Router without uninstalling and losing your configuration data.
The E-mail Router and the Rule Deployment Wizard support Microsoft Exchange Server 2010. The Email Router also supports Exchange Online.
You can use Autodiscover to obtain the Exchange Web Services (EWS) URL. This capability is
supported for Exchange Server 2007 SP1 and later versions.
You can use the E-mail Router with either Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online or Microsoft Dynamics CRM
(On-Premises Edition). You can switch between these two options after installing the E-mail Router. For
more information, see "Set e-mail access type" in the Installing Guide.
On supported operating systems, the E-mail Router can now use claims-based authentication when
connecting to Microsoft Dynamics CRM. For more information about supported operating systems, see
"Microsoft Dynamics CRM E-mail Router software requirements (on page 28)" in the Planning Guide.
What's new in Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook?
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 for Outlook includes the following new features:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The setup of Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook has been simplified. It now uses a single installer
mechanism for both Online and On-Premises clients. Update support is now available through Microsoft
Update.
Both 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Microsoft Office are now supported.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook can now connect to multiple organizations.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook is simpler to use, requiring fewer clicks to perform tasks, for
example when you track or reply to e-mail messages.
The Microsoft Dynamics CRM views create an experience that is more like working in Microsoft Office
Outlook.
You can now import contacts more quickly from Microsoft Dynamics CRM, keep those contacts
synchronized automatically, and administer synchronization filters centrally.
The new Microsoft Dynamics CRM tracking pane shows Microsoft Dynamics CRM associations and user
options in-line. Additionally, users can now track and synchronize recurring appointments.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook now offers Microsoft Dynamics CRM e-mail templates and a rich
Outlook e-mail editing surface.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook now offers the ability to control the scope of Microsoft Dynamics
CRM e-mail messages, appointments, and tasks that are pushed to Outlook by using synchronization
through personalized filters.
----------------------- Send Feedback About This Chapter ---------------------We appreciate hearing from you. To send your feedback, click the following link and type your comments in
the message body.
Note
The subject-line information is used to route your feedback. If you remove or modify the
subject line, we may be unable to process your feedback.
Send Feedback (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=200778)
8
Chapter 2
Business Manager's Role in a Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Implementation
Business managers play a key role during all the phases of a successful implementation of Microsoft
Dynamics CRM: planning, development, deployment, and post-deployment. This chapter describes the role
of the business manager in the implementation process and the planning tools available for that process.
Each organization has a set of business processes unique to that organization. To run smoothly,
organizations should standardize processes across the organization, and encourage all users to follow these
standards. By mapping your business processes to Microsoft Dynamics CRM, you determine areas where
you either have to modify your processes to match Microsoft Dynamics CRM, or configure and customize
Microsoft Dynamics CRM to match your business processes.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM enables you to automate internal business processes by creating work flow rules
that describe routine and repetitive tasks involving daily business operations. These processes can be
designed to make sure that appropriate and timely information is sent to the correct people. They also help
participants keep track of the steps they have to take to complete their work. You must decide which
processes to automate.
When Microsoft Dynamics CRM is deployed in your organization, one of your roles is to make sure that
employees are trained correctly, and that everyone understands their responsibilities for data management.
In addition, because configuration and customization can be done through the user interface in Microsoft
Dynamics CRM, business managers in many organizations are responsible for adding and removing users,
changing security roles to meet employees' data access needs, changing team and queue memberships, and
even customizing the user interface.
After your employees start using Microsoft Dynamics CRM, you must have a process for deciding when
changing business needs require changes to Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
In This Chapter
Tools, training, and documentation to help you plan .................................................................... 9
Planning a Microsoft Dynamics CRM implementation ................................................................ 10
Implementation overview............................................................................................................. 13
Tools, training, and documentation to help you plan
This section describes the tools, training, and documentation that are available to help you perform the
Business Manager's role in planning a Microsoft Dynamics CRM implementation.
Tools for business management
The following table describes tools that you can modify and use for determining how your business processes
map to Microsoft Dynamics CRM. These tools are available for download at Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Planning Tools (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=189326).
Tool
Description
Business Process Questions
(.doc)
A document that contains questions to answer to help decide
how your business processes map to Microsoft Dynamics
CRM.
9
Chapter 2: Business Manager's Role in a Microsoft Dynamics CRM Implementation
Tool
Description
Sample Sales Process Flowchart A sample flowchart of sales processes.
(.vsd)
Sample Service Process
Flowchart (.vsd)
A sample flowchart of service processes.
Configuration Data Collection
(.xls)
A Microsoft Office Excel worksheet to collect all the business
data required to configure Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
Customization Requirements
Summary (.xls)
An Excel worksheet for tracking customization changes.
Workflow Planning (.xls)
An Excel worksheet for summarizing needed workflow rules.
•
•
•
At a minimum, use the Configuration Data Collection spreadsheet to collect the data required for
configuration of Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
If you want to customize any fields, forms, views, or reports, use the Customization Requirements
Summary.
If you want to create workflow rules to automate business processes, use the sample process diagrams
to create your own process diagram, and then use the Workflow Planning spreadsheet to document the
triggers and actions required.
Microsoft Dynamics Sure Step methodology
Microsoft Dynamics Sure Step provides a complete Microsoft Dynamics CRM implementation methodology.
This includes project management discipline and field-tested best practices, plus user-friendly tools that can
help you deploy, migrate, configure, and upgrade Microsoft Dynamics products.
Microsoft Dynamics Sure Step is available to Microsoft partners to help reduce risk and guide you through the
tasks associated with deployment and configuration of Microsoft Dynamics solutions. For more information
about Microsoft Dynamics Sure Step, including training, methodology, and tool downloads, visit the
PartnerSource Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=88066).
Business management training
Business management training consists of the business needs, process analysis, and the project
management skills that are required to perform a successful implementation of a CRM system. For more
information, see "Identifying training requirements" in this guide.
Help
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Help has conceptual information about how Microsoft Dynamics CRM can support
the sales, service, and marketing functions in your organization. Help also has information about how to
configure and customize Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
Planning a Microsoft Dynamics CRM implementation
This section describes how to plan a Microsoft Dynamics CRM implementation.
Planning tasks for business managers
During planning, business managers should:
1. Plan how your business structure maps to Microsoft Dynamics CRM. Take an organization chart for your
area, and decide which security roles each user needs. Define the teams and queues and who should be
on each.
10
Chapter 2: Business Manager's Role in a Microsoft Dynamics CRM Implementation
2. Decide whether you want to automate any business processes. Microsoft Dynamics CRM is a solution for
automating internal business processes by creating workflow rules that describe routine and repetitive
tasks involving daily business operations.
To use the workflow feature, you build rules. For each rule, you define the trigger and the resulting action.
Rules can be triggered when a record changes state (open to closed, active to inactive), when a record is
created, when a record is assigned, or manually.
The following scenarios are examples of how to automate a business process by using workflow.
Assign different kinds of cases to specific service representatives.
A workflow rule could determine the category of the case (shipping problem, product problem, or
billing problem), and assign it to the appropriate queue. If a case stays in a queue for two days
without a resolution, the rule could automatically assign the case to the manager. If after four days,
the case is still not resolved, it might be routed to an escalation queue.
Communicate with other databases at your organization.
A workflow rule could notify your billing system whenever an invoice is created in Microsoft Dynamics
CRM.
Notify customers automatically when an order ships.
When the invoice status changes to Fully Shipped, the customer can be automatically notified of the
shipment through e-mail, by using a predefined e-mail template.
Automatically e-mail a message to new leads.
After a lead is created, depending on the stage that the lead is identified at, different activities can be
scheduled. For a stage 1 lead, an introductory e-mail letter can be automatically sent and an activity
scheduled with a due date of one month for follow-up. For a stage 2 lead, an activity can be
scheduled for a specific salesperson to call the lead and mail a product catalog. For a stage 3 or 4
lead, an activity is scheduled for a specific salesperson to fax promotions and collateral to the
customer, with another task activity to follow up in a week.
Coordinate handling of dissatisfied customers between sales and support.
After a case is resolved with customer satisfaction set to "dissatisfied," an activity can be
automatically scheduled for a salesperson to call the customer. If the satisfaction is set to "very
dissatisfied," an activity can be automatically scheduled for a manager to call the customer.
3. Collect configuration data about your products and competitors.
For more information products and competitor data, see the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Help topics.
4. Decide whether you have to customize Microsoft Dynamics CRM to meet your business needs.
For more information about customization, see the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Help topics.
5. Look at the default reports provided with Microsoft Dynamics CRM and determine whether additional
reports are needed.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM includes standard reports that you can use to answer common business
questions. You can modify these reports or create your own if you have additional reporting needs.
As you design your Microsoft Dynamics CRM system, the managers should review the reports for their
areas to make sure that the reports will meet their needs. The Help includes a topic for the default reports
in each area of Microsoft Dynamics CRM, with a link to a detailed topic that describes the business
questions the report is designed to answer.
Development tasks for business managers
During development, business managers should:
•
•
•
Closely monitor configuration and customization changes to make sure that they meet business needs.
Be available to answer detailed questions as they occur.
Get trained on the management tasks that you can do, such as adding and removing users, and entering
configuration changes.
Deployment tasks for business managers
During deployment, business managers should:
11
Chapter 2: Business Manager's Role in a Microsoft Dynamics CRM Implementation
1. Ensure that the training needs of all employees are met.
2. Document and analyze the initial experiences of Microsoft Dynamics CRM users and determine if
additional configuration and customization of the Microsoft Dynamics CRM implementation must be done.
Post-deployment tasks for business managers
During post-deployment, also known as the operation phase in Microsoft Dynamics Sure Step, business
managers should:
1. Continue to document and analyze the initial experiences of Microsoft Dynamics CRM users and
determine if additional configuration and customization of the Microsoft Dynamics CRM implementation
must be done.
2. Use the data in Microsoft Dynamics CRM reports to strengthen the organization's sales, marketing, and
service functions.
Managing a Microsoft Dynamics CRM implementation project
As you plan your implementation, the first step is to determine the scope of the project. Because the tasks
depend on the complexity of your implementation project, this section of the documentation divides
implementations into two categories:
•
Rapid implementation. Expect to spend 30 work days if you are doing a rapid implementation that
requires minimal customization, no migration of source data or integration with other applications, and
training up to ten users.
• Measured or Full implementation. Expect to spend 60 work days for a medium-to-large
implementation, with much of the additional time spent in planning. A large business with multiple
locations will experience different challenges than a smaller business with one location and only a few
users.
Experience has shown that those organizations that use the methods discussed in this section achieve their
implementations successfully and in a timely manner. Beyond these two categories, implementations that
have extensive data migration and customizations may take more than 60 days.
Tools for project management
The following tables describe tools that you can modify and use for managing your implementation project.
For project plans, two versions are provided: one for rapid implementations, and one for measured or full
implementations. These tools are available for download at Microsoft Dynamics CRM Planning Tools
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=189326).
More information about project management can also be found in the Microsoft Dynamics Sure Step
Methodology.
Project planning tools
Tool
Description
Project Plan Rapid
(Office Excel document)
An Excel worksheet for creating the implementation schedule
for rapid implementations.
Project Plan
(Office Excel document)
An Excel worksheet for creating the implementation schedule
for measured implementations.
Assessing Implementation
Capacity
(Office Word document)
A document that has questions to help you determine whether
your organization has sufficient resources for implementing
Microsoft Dynamics CRM, or whether a consultant is required.
Estimating Implementation
Time
(Office Word document)
A document of guidelines for determining how long an
implementation is likely to take.
12
Chapter 2: Business Manager's Role in a Microsoft Dynamics CRM Implementation
Tool
Description
Project Scope
(Office Word document)
A document that has questions to determine the scope of the
project, based on rough estimates of the customization
required and the state of your current IT infrastructure.
Rapid Implementation
Guidelines
(Office Word document)
A document that contains guidelines for when a rapid
implementation is appropriate.
Test Case Template
(Office Word document)
A sample form to use for people testing Microsoft Dynamics
CRM before deployment.
Go Live Checklist
(Office Word document)
A checklist for tasks that must be finished before you deploy
Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
Server Tracking Form
(Office Word document)
A form for documenting server and network configuration.
Responsibility Checklist
(Office Word document)
A checklist of all areas that need owners, to guarantee that
Microsoft Dynamics CRM continues to work well after the
implementation.
Project Review Survey
(Office Word document)
An agenda for a project review meeting to be held when
Microsoft Dynamics CRM is deployed.
Project Plan
(Microsoft Project document)
A sample project plan containing the tasks needed for a full
deployment of Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
Project Plan Rapid
(Microsoft Project document)
A sample project plan containing the tasks needed for a rapid
deployment of Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
Project status tools
Tool
Description
Project Status
(Office Word document)
A sample project status form that you can use to report on
status.
Weekly Summary
(Office Excel document)
A sample weekly log sheet.
Change management tools
Tool
Description
Scope Change Log
(Office Word document)
A sample scope change form that you can use to track scope
changes.
Scope Change Request Form
(Office Word document)
A sample scope change request form that business managers
can use to request scope changes.
Implementation overview
This section expands on the tasks that are required for a successful Microsoft Dynamics CRM
implementation.
13
Chapter 2: Business Manager's Role in a Microsoft Dynamics CRM Implementation
Planning
Planning is the critical phase that starts with understanding how your organization plans to use Microsoft
Dynamics CRM. This includes the following:
• Developing commitment from key managers.
• Defining the implementation project team.
• Deciding whether to hire consultants or to use your own staff.
• Defining the scope of the project.
• Writing an implementation plan.
• Making sure key managers in your organization understand and support the plan.
For a detailed task list, see "Planning Tasks" in this guide .
Development
There are three tasks in the development phase:
1. Installing and configuring the hardware and software.
2. Using the data that is collected in planning to configure Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
3. Using the data that is collected in planning to customize Microsoft Dynamics CRM, if necessary.
Depending on the options selected for your organization, performing those tasks may also include the
following:
•
•
•
Migrating data from source applications.
Setting up a test or pilot environment.
Integrating Microsoft Dynamics CRM with an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system, such as
Microsoft Dynamics GP.
For a detailed task list, see "Development tasks" in this guide.
Deployment
The deployment phase starts with user training, followed by deployment to the production environment.
For a detailed task list, see Deployment tasks in this guide.
Post-deployment: operating and maintaining
As your business evolves, post-deployment maintenance makes sure that Microsoft Dynamics CRM
continues to support your business practices.
For a detailed task list, see "Post-Deployment Tasks" in this guide.
Planning tasks
This section describes the planning tasks that are essential for a successful Microsoft Dynamics CRM
implementation. A good implementation plan includes definitions of the general goals you want to achieve,
the system requirements that you have to meet, and the time frame to complete the plan. Business
requirements and processes are also mapped to the application.
Defining the scope of the project
The project scope section should include the following:
•
•
Identifying the business goals. Determine what the business goals are and calculate the return-oninvestment (ROI) and the total cost of ownership (TCO). Define your vision for why you are using
Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
Identifying the risk factors. Make contingency plans to reduce risks and dependencies. These plans
might include additional training, internal public relations, and support. Risk factors might include delivery
of new hardware and software, dependencies on important personnel or outside vendors, deployment
timing, and users' resistance to change.
14
Chapter 2: Business Manager's Role in a Microsoft Dynamics CRM Implementation
•
•
•
•
•
Identifying the implementation team. Designate a person who will be responsible for tracking costs,
schedules, performance, and risk factors. Determine executive sponsors, project managers, and project
team members. This task includes deciding if an outside consultant is needed. Define an escalation
process and determine who is responsible for making final decisions.
Planning usage. Define who will be expected to use Microsoft Dynamics CRM, what tasks will be done
by using Microsoft Dynamics CRM, and what old systems will be discontinued (if any).
Identifying equipment and software needs. Document the state of the current technical infrastructure,
and the hardware, software, and network changes that are required for Microsoft Dynamics CRM. Include
information about technical risks and constraints.
Determining the budget and schedule. Include estimates. If you plan a phased deployment by location,
functionality, or both, set target dates and budgets for each part.
Planning for change management. Determine how to request, review, and approve changes during the
implementation process.
Responsibilities of the implementation team
The responsibility for a successful Microsoft Dynamics CRM implementation should be shared by several
people and organizations. Some of these include your software vendor, consultant, or other value-added
partner, and the people in your own organization who are needed to participate in your implementation team.
These people will implement Microsoft Dynamics CRM for your business.
The responsibilities of an implementation team include the following:
• Develop an installation strategy.
• Determine who will perform the various tasks.
• Create an implementation schedule.
• Define a progress-reporting plan.
Members of the implementation team should include people with organizational and planning skills, a
comprehensive knowledge of the day-to-day business operations of your organization, and knowledge of
Microsoft Dynamics CRM. The team should also include the system administrators whose technical
experience should include Microsoft Windows security, client/server networks, database administration, and
Web technology.
The number of people involved in implementing Microsoft Dynamics CRM depends on the size of your
organization. To avoid task and time-responsibility conflicts, make sure that members of the implementation
team are either full-time resources or can schedule implementation-related tasks as a priority, especially if
deployment is to a large number of users. Team members and their managers must understand and accept
the commitment required.
Each member of the team must have a well-defined role and set of responsibilities. These roles include the
following:
•
Business owners and managers
Business owners and managers provide the leadership necessary for success, and guide decisions
about the way Microsoft Dynamics CRM is deployed. Although they do not have to understand the details
of installation and configuration, they must be aware of the system configuration and maintenance
requirements.
•
Executive sponsor
In small organizations, this role may be the same as the business owner or managers. In larger
organizations, this person provides the link between the project manager and upper management. This
person must understand the details of the installation and configuration, understand the schedule, and
work with outside vendors.
•
Implementation project manager
The project manager is the person who directs the work and makes things happen. This person must
understand the details of the installation and configuration, understand the schedule, know the other
team members and their contributions, and work with outside vendors.
•
System administrator/database administrator
15
Chapter 2: Business Manager's Role in a Microsoft Dynamics CRM Implementation
The system administrator sets up and configures hardware, installs operating systems and supporting
software, and installs the Microsoft Dynamics CRM software. In smaller organizations, a Microsoft
Partner may handle these tasks.
The database administrator maintains and backs up business data. Depending on the size of your
organization, the system administrator or another person (such as someone in operations) might be
assigned the database administrator role.
•
Operations personnel
Your operations personnel are responsible for maintaining the system on a day-to-day basis. This
ensures good system health and failure recovery. In smaller organizations, these roles may be shared
with the system or database administrator.
Creating a schedule
Creating a schedule is one of the important jobs of the implementation team. A schedule should list the steps
that you must follow to implement and deploy Microsoft Dynamics CRM, the time requirements for each step,
and who is responsible to make sure that the tasks are completed. It may also determine any risks and
dependencies.
For example, the following list identifies main deployment tasks associated with Microsoft Dynamics CRM:
1. Hardware and software
a. Determine requirements and specifications
b. Obtain, install, and configure
2. Install Microsoft Dynamics CRM
3. Customize the Microsoft Dynamics CRM application
a. Analyze the business process
b. Determine customization requirements and specifications
c. Approve and freeze customization specifications
d. Develop the customization
e. Review the customization
f. Test the system
g. Get a pilot group to use the product
h. Finish the customization
i. Process audit
4. Training
a. Schedule administrator training
b. Schedule user training
5. Deployment
a. Deploy Microsoft Dynamics CRM to the organization
b. Perform the import of legacy data (if importing)
c. Validate legacy data after installation
6. Post-deployment follow-up
a. Hold a post-implementation audit or review (after about 3 months)
Among the Planning Tools are more detailed sample project plans: Project_Plan.mpp, Project_Plan.xlsx,
Project_Plan_Rapid.mpp, and Project_Plan_Rapid.xlsx. These tools are available for download at Planning
Tools (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=189326).
16
Chapter 2: Business Manager's Role in a Microsoft Dynamics CRM Implementation
Analyzing your business processes
You must have a thorough understanding of how your sales, service, service scheduling, marketing
processes, and existing data collection systems work. In addition, you have to have a vision of how you want
these processes to work. The best way to analyze your business processes is to use members of your
organization who know your business processes. Usually, the experts are the department heads or the
people they appoint to do the tasks as part of their job.
The tasks to analyze your business processes are as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Learn what processes are in place. For example, how are accounts created and managed, how are
orders recorded, how is inventory tracked, and how are customers billed?
Learn what users think about the current system. For example, is it effective, is it time-consuming, and
are there processes that can be streamlined or dropped completely?
Examine the current processes and find out whether they stand up to the scrutiny of smart business
practices or whether they continue to exist because no one wants change.
Learn the features of the Microsoft Dynamics CRM product and how they relate to current organization
processes and procedures.
Determine what reports are necessary and are part of your current business process.
Determine the components and features that will be implemented and deployed first and when additional
components and features will be added later.
Incorporate the processes into Microsoft Dynamics CRM. Determine whether the processes can be recreated as they currently are or whether changes must be made to incorporate the application and use its
new functionality.
Learn what expectations users have of Microsoft Dynamics CRM. For example, are they excited about
how to use an automated CRM system, or do they have reservations and questions?
Tasks for development, deployment, and post-deployment
Tasks for development, deployment, and post-deployment include the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Define a testing or pilot plan.
Define deployment support requirements.
Deliver an implementation scope document.
Prepare a gap analysis document.
Prepare an initial user interface (UI) design guide.
Prepare and deliver report design changes.
If data migration is required, prepare an initial data migration plan.
If integration is required, prepare an initial integration plan.
Identifying optional components
Determine which of the following optional components will be included in your Microsoft Dynamics CRM
system:
•
•
Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Microsoft Office Outlook
Microsoft Dynamics CRM E-mail Router
Identifying hardware and software requirements
An inventory of your current hardware and software will help determine what you already have that can be
used as part of your Microsoft Dynamics CRM implementation, and what must be purchased before
implementation can continue.
If you have to purchase additional hardware or software, verify availability and delivery dates. These dates,
and the time that is required for installation, are external dependencies that affect the schedule. For more
information about the hardware and software requirements of the Microsoft Dynamics CRM components, see
"System Requirements and Required Components" in this document.
17
Chapter 2: Business Manager's Role in a Microsoft Dynamics CRM Implementation
Determining data import requirements
The primary method for loading existing data into Microsoft Dynamics CRM is by using the Import Data
Wizard. The Import Data Wizard includes tools for importing and migrating data for most entities.
Determining customization needs
For each record type, you must determine:
•
•
•
•
•
Field-level changes, such as labels to change, fields to add, and drop-down list values to modify.
Form-level changes, such as incorporating new fields, removing unused fields, and reordering fields to
match business processes.
View-level changes, such as incorporating new fields, removing unused fields, and reordering fields to
match business processes.
Reports that have to change to incorporate field-level changes.
New reports that are needed.
Identifying training requirements
One of the keys to a successful implementation is to provide training and support for all users to make sure
that everyone can use the system correctly. All users will need training on the general use of Microsoft
Dynamics CRM, and on your business processes. An effective method is to schedule hands-on training
immediately before organization-wide deployment. In this manner, users will be able to quickly put what they
have learned into practice.
The training plan should include training for several groups of people:
•
Business managers
Training should include how to manage users and their access privileges, make changes to department
structure, generate reports, review and analyze data, and use any other system features that are relevant
to their job responsibilities.
Sales managers should learn how to track sales quotas.
Service manager should learn how to track resources, manage queues, and manage the service subject
list.
Marketing manager training should include how to manage lists and campaigns.
•
Sales representatives
Training should include how to create and manage accounts and activities by using the Microsoft
Dynamics CRM Web client and Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook, import lists, manage direct e-mail,
create e-mail templates, and generate reports.
•
Service representatives
Training should include how to manage cases and articles, and how to use queues.
•
Service schedulers
Training should include how to define resources.
•
Marketing staff
Training should include how to define resources.
•
Other users (such as the accounting department staff)
Training should include how to manage contracts, process commissions, view and access data, and
other job responsibilities.
•
Information technology staff
Training should include how to configure Microsoft Dynamics CRM, perform backups and other data
maintenance tasks, make changes to organizational structure and business policies, customize dropdown lists, provide support to users, create templates, and create workflow rules.
In addition to knowing the Microsoft Dynamics CRM product, the technology staff may need experience
with the following:
The Windows operating system
18
Chapter 2: Business Manager's Role in a Microsoft Dynamics CRM Implementation
Active Directory
Internet Information Services (IIS)
SQL Server, including Reporting Services
Exchange Server or POP3-compliant e-mail server (Required if implementing Microsoft Dynamics
CRM E-mail Router)
Microsoft Office Outlook (Required if implementing Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook)
Training resources in Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Microsoft Dynamics CRM includes several tools to help users train while on the job:
•
•
•
Help has step-by-step instructions on how to do specific tasks.
The Microsoft Dynamics CRM Resource Center is an integrated part of the application and provides rich
content and links to valuable resources. Much of the content in the Resource Center is created by
experts in the Microsoft Dynamics CRM community.
Tool Tips and the Getting Started pane are embedded in the interface and have brief descriptions of the
various components on the screen. These tools help users learn about the product interface.
Defining ongoing support and maintenance needs
Although users may be given training and job aids to help them become accustomed to a new product, if they
do not use the product, the organization will not realize a return on its investment. A successful
implementation plan should include change-management efforts and post-deployment follow-up to determine
whether your workforce is using Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
Development tasks
Development tasks can include any of the following activities, depending on your implementation plan.
Project-manager tasks
• Communicate progress.
• Coordinate timing of deployment.
Business manager tasks
• Provide required configuration information, such as your organizational structure, and the security role
that you want each employee to have.
• Answer questions from the project manager and the installer. Questions will occur as they start
configuring and customizing, regardless of how thorough your planning was.
• Establish a small group of employees to use Microsoft Dynamics CRM first, who can help determine
areas that need changes and then help other users. This group should perform the common activities
that their jobs require, such as creating accounts, reviewing data, and sending e-mail. Notice their actions
to find out what difficulties may exist and address these issues during training.
Installer tasks
• Install Microsoft Dynamics CRM. If it makes sense for your organization, implement a pilot or test
installation.
• Import or migrate your existing customer data.
• Configure Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
• If it is necessary, integrate Microsoft Dynamics CRM into existing systems, such as Microsoft Dynamics
GP or Microsoft Dynamics AX
• Microsoft Dynamics AX.
• Test the installation.
Customizer tasks
• Customize the application and the reporting features.
• Test the customizations.
19
Chapter 2: Business Manager's Role in a Microsoft Dynamics CRM Implementation
Deployment tasks
To deploy Microsoft Dynamics CRM, the following tasks must be performed.
Project manager tasks
•
•
Verify that all users are trained, and coordinate the actual date that everyone will start to use Microsoft
Dynamics CRM.
Turn off old systems, and start using Microsoft Dynamics CRM. You may have to make old systems
available in a read-only mode.
Business manager tasks
•
•
•
•
Verify that you understand what is expected from you for using and managing Microsoft Dynamics CRM,
and that your employees know what is expected of them.
Train users.
Watch users as they start to use Microsoft Dynamics CRM so that you can determine and correct
process issues.
Use reports to track adoption and usage so that you can remove obstacles for your employees.
Installer tasks
•
Verify that all users are set up in Microsoft Dynamics CRM, assigned the needed security roles, and that
they have access to Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
Because the Microsoft Dynamics CRM user interface is browser-based, no special software installations
are needed on networked desktop computers. However, for client computers that will use Microsoft
Dynamics CRM by using Microsoft Office Outlook, installation of Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook is
required.
Customizer tasks
•
Watch users as they start to use Microsoft Dynamics CRM and determine whether additional
customizations are necessary to optimize your organization's workflow.
Post-deployment tasks
Deploying a CRM system may involve significant change in process and daily tasks for members of the
organization. A successful deployment guarantees that issues and areas of resistance related to this change
are identified and addressed through training, coaching, and other change-management practices. As your
company uses Microsoft Dynamics CRM, you will likely determine additional areas that need changes in
order to match your changing business processes.
Department managers must be available to set an example and support the implementation, both by talking
about it and by using it. Executive managers must demonstrate an ongoing commitment to show that using
Microsoft Dynamics CRM is a permanent change.
----------------------- Send Feedback About This Chapter ---------------------We appreciate hearing from you. To send your feedback, click the following link and type your comments in
the message body.
Note
The subject-line information is used to route your feedback. If you remove or modify the
subject line, we may be unable to process your feedback.
Send Feedback (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=200780)
20
Chapter 3
System Requirements and Required Components
Microsoft Dynamics CRM requires several software applications and components that work together to create
an effective system. Before you install Microsoft Dynamics CRM, use this chapter for guidance to verify that
system requirements are met and the necessary software components are available.
Important
Unless specified otherwise, Microsoft Dynamics CRM supports the latest version and service
pack (SP) for all required components, such as Windows Server, SQL Server, Internet
Explorer, and Exchange Server. However, to fully support the latest version of a required
component you should apply the latest update for Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
In This Chapter
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 hardware requirements ................................................ 21
Microsoft SQL Server hardware requirements ........................................................................... 22
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 software requirements ................................................. 22
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions........................................................................ 26
SharePoint Document Management software requirements ..................................................... 27
Office Communications Server Integration ................................................................................. 27
Microsoft Dynamics CRM E-mail Router hardware requirements.............................................. 27
Microsoft Dynamics CRM E-mail Router software requirements ............................................... 28
Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook hardware requirements .................................................. 29
Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook software requirements ................................................... 30
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Web client software requirements .................................................... 31
64-bit supported configurations .................................................................................................. 31
Language support ....................................................................................................................... 32
Currency support ........................................................................................................................ 33
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 hardware requirements
The following table lists the minimum and recommended hardware requirements for Microsoft Dynamics
CRM Server 2011 running in a Full Server configuration. These requirements assume that additional
components such as Microsoft SQL Server, Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services, Microsoft SharePoint,
or Microsoft Exchange Server are not installed or running on the system.
Component
*Minimum
*Recommended
Processor
x64 architecture or compatible dual- Quad-core x64 architecture 2 GHz
core 1.5 GHz processor
CPU or higher such as AMD Opteron
or Intel Xeon systems
Memory
2-GB RAM
8-GB RAM or more
21
Chapter 3: System Requirements and Required Components
Component
*Minimum
*Recommended
Hard disk
10 GB of available hard disk space
Note Computers with more than
16GB of RAM will require more disk
space for paging, hibernation, and
dump files.
40 GB or more of available hard disk
space
Note Computers with more than
16GB of RAM will require more disk
space for paging, hibernation, and
dump files.
* Actual requirements and product functionality may vary based on your system configuration and operating
system.
The minimum and recommended requirements are based on 320-user load simulation tests.
Microsoft SQL Server hardware requirements
The following table lists the minimum and recommended hardware requirements for Microsoft SQL Server.
These requirements assume that additional components such as Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011,
Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services, Microsoft SharePoint, or Microsoft Exchange Server are not
installed or running on the system.
Component
*Minimum
*Recommended
Processor
x64 architecture or compatible dualcore 1.5 GHz processor
Quad-core x64 architecture 2
GHz CPU or higher such as AMD
Opteron or Intel Xeon systems
Memory
4-GB RAM
16-GB RAM or more
Hard disk
SAS RAID 5 or RAID 10 hard disk array SAS RAID 5 or RAID 10 hard disk
array
* Actual requirements and product functionality may vary based on your system configuration and operating
system.
The minimum and recommended requirements are based on 320-user load simulation tests.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 software requirements
This section lists the software and application requirements for Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011.
Windows Server operating system
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Server can be installed only on Windows Server 2008 x64-based computers.
The specific versions and editions of Windows Server that are supported for installing and running Microsoft
Dynamics CRM Server 2011 are listed in the following section.
Important
The Windows Server 2003 family of operating systems are not supported for installing and
running Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Server.
Supported Windows Server 2008 editions
The following editions of the Microsoft Windows Server 2008 operating system are supported for installing
and running Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Server:
•
•
•
•
•
Windows Server 2008 Standard (x64 versions) SP2 or later version
Windows Server 2008 Enterprise (x64 versions) SP2 or later version
Windows Server 2008 Datacenter (x64 versions) SP2 or later version
Windows Web Server 2008 (x64 versions) SP2 or later version
Windows Small Business Server 2008 Premium x64 or later version
22
Chapter 3: System Requirements and Required Components
•
Windows Small Business Server 2008 Standard x64 or later version
Important
•
Windows Server 2008 installed by using the Server Core installation option is not supported
for installing and running Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Server.
•
Virtualization technology such as Hyper-V is only required if you want to install and run
Microsoft Dynamics CRM in a virtual environment.
•
Windows Server 2008 for Itanium-based systems is not supported for installing and running
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011.
•
The Windows Small Business Server 2008 Standard edition does not include SQL Server.
You must have a supported version of SQL Server available to install Microsoft Dynamics
CRM on Windows Small Business Server 2008 Standard edition.
Server virtualization
Microsoft Dynamics CRM servers can be deployed in a virtualized environment by using Windows Server
2008 with Hyper-V or virtualization solutions from vendors who participate in the Microsoft Windows Server
Virtualization Validation Program (SVVP). You must understand the limitations and best practices of server
virtualization before you try to virtualize your installation of Microsoft Dynamics CRM. For information about
Hyper-V, see the Microsoft Virtualization (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=145119) Web site.
Active Directory modes
The computer on which Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 is running must be a domain member in a domain
that is running in one of the following Active Directory directory service domain modes:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Windows 2000 Mixed
Windows 2000 Native
Windows Server 2003 Interim
Windows Server 2003 Native
Windows Server 2008 Interim
Windows Server 2008 Native
Important
•
The computer on which Microsoft Dynamics CRM is running cannot function as an Active
Directory domain controller, unless it is running Windows Small Business Server 2008.
•
When you install Microsoft Dynamics CRM in a Windows 2000 Mixed-mode domain, you
cannot add users to Microsoft Dynamics CRM that are located in a different domain.
•
Installing Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 in a domain that is running in Active
Directory Application Mode (ADAM) is not supported.
All Active Directory forest modes are supported. For more information about Active Directory domain and
forest modes, see the Active Directory Domains and Trusts MMC snap-in Help.
Internet Information Services (IIS)
We recommend that you install and run IIS 7.0 or a later version in Native Mode before you install Microsoft
Dynamics CRM Server 2011. However, if IIS is not installed and it is required for a Microsoft Dynamics CRM
server role, Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup will install it.
SQL Server editions
Any one of the following Microsoft SQL Server editions is required and must be installed on a Windows
Server 2008 64-bit or later version, running, and available for Microsoft Dynamics CRM:
•
•
•
Microsoft SQL Server 2008, Standard Edition, x64 SP1 or later version
Microsoft SQL Server 2008, Enterprise Edition, x64 SP1 or later version
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Datacenter x64 SP1 or later version
23
Chapter 3: System Requirements and Required Components
•
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Developer x64 SP1 or later version (for non-production environments only)
Important
•
32-bit versions of SQL Server 2008 database engine or Reporting Services are not supported
for this version of Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
•
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Workgroup, Web, Compact, or Microsoft SQL Server 2008
Express Edition editions are not supported for running Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011.
•
Microsoft SQL Server 2000 and Microsoft SQL Server 2005 editions and are not supported
for this version of Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
•
Running 64-bit SQL Server 2008 versions for Itanium (IA-64) systems in conjunction with
Microsoft Dynamics CRM will receive commercially reasonable support. Commercially
reasonable support is defined as all reasonable support efforts by Microsoft Customer
Service and Support that do not require Microsoft Dynamics CRM code fixes. Microsoft
Dynamics CRM Server 2011 supports a named instance of SQL Server for configuration and
organization databases.
Claims-based authentication and IFD requirements
The following items are required or recommended for Internet-facing deployments (IFD). This topic assumes
you will be using Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS) 2.0 as the security token service (STS). For
more information about configuring Microsoft Dynamics CRM for claims-based authentication, download the
Claims-based Authentication White Paper (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=202394) from the Microsoft
Download Center.
•
•
The computer where Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup is installed must have access to a STS
service, such as AD FS 2.0 federation server.
Note the following conditions for the Web components before you configure IFD:
If you are installing Microsoft Dynamics CRM in a single server configuration, be aware that AD FS
2.0 installs on the Default Web Site. Therefore, you must create a new Web site for Microsoft
Dynamics CRM.
When you run the Internet-Facing Deployment Configuration Wizard, Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Server 2011 must be running on a Web site that is configured to use Secure Sockets Layer (SSL).
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup will not configure the Web site for SSL.
We recommend that the Web site where the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 Web application
will be installed has the “Require SSL” setting enabled in IIS.
The Web site should have a single binding. Multiple IIS bindings, such as a Web site with an HTTPS
and an HTTP binding or two HTTPS or two HTTP bindings, are not supported for running Microsoft
Dynamics CRM.
Access to the AD FS 2.0 federation metadata file from the computer where the Configure ClaimsBased Authentication Wizard is run. Note the following:
ƒ The federation metadata endpoint must use the Web services trust model (WS-Trust) 1.3 standard.
Endpoints that use a previous standard, such as the WS-Trust 2005 standard, are not supported. In
AD FS 2.0, all WS-Trust 1.3 endpoints contain /trust/13/ in the URL path.
Encryption certificates. The following encryption certificates are required. You can use the same
encryption certificate for both purposes, such as when you use a wildcard certificate:
ƒ Claims encryption. Claims-based authentication requires identities to provide an encryption
certificate for authentication. This certificate should be trusted by the computer where you are
installing Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 so it must be located in the local Personal store
where the Configure Claims-Based Authentication Wizard is running.
24
Chapter 3: System Requirements and Required Components
ƒ SSL (HTTPS) encryption. The certificates for SSL encryption should be valid for host names similar
to org.contoso.com, auth.contoso.com, and dev.contoso.com. To satisfy this requirement you can
use a single wildcard certificate (*.contoso.com), a certificate that supports Subject Alternative
Names, or individual certificates for each name. Individual certificates for each host name are only
valid if you use different servers for each Web server role. Multiple IIS bindings, such as a Web site
with two HTTPS or two HTTP bindings, is not supported for running Microsoft Dynamics CRM. For
more information about the options that are available to you, contact your certificate authority
service company or your certificate authority administrator.
The CRMAppPool account of each Microsoft Dynamics CRM Web application must have read
permission to the private key of the encryption certificate specified when configuring claims-based
authentication. You can use the Certificates snap-in to edit permissions for the encryption certificate
found in the Personal store of the local computer account.
SQL Server Reporting Services
Specific SQL Server Reporting Services editions are used for reporting functionality.
Any one of the following Microsoft SQL Server editions is required and must be installed on a Windows
Server 2008 64-bit or later version, running, and available for Microsoft Dynamics CRM:
•
•
•
•
Microsoft SQL Server 2008, Standard Edition, x64 SP1 or later version
Microsoft SQL Server 2008, Enterprise Edition, x64 SP1 or later version
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Datacenter x64 SP1 or later version
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Developer x64 SP1 or later version (for non-production environments only)
Important
•
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Workgroup, Web, Compact, or Microsoft SQL Server 2008
Express Edition editions are not supported for running Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011.
•
Running 64-bit SQL Server 2008 versions for Itanium (IA-64) systems in conjunction with
Microsoft Dynamics CRM will receive commercially reasonable support. Commercially
reasonable support is defined as all reasonable support efforts by Microsoft Customer
Service and Support that do not require Microsoft Dynamics CRM code fixes.
•
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Workgroup is not supported for running the Microsoft Dynamics
CRM Reporting Extensions. This is because SQL Server 2008 Workgroup does not support
custom data extensions. Therefore, features such as creating, running, or scheduling Fetchbased or SQL-based reports will not work.
Software component prerequisites
The following SQL Server components must be installed and running on the computer that is running SQL
Server before you install Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011:
•
SQL word breakers
This is only required for some Microsoft Dynamics CRM language editions. For more information about
word breaker versions for languages supported by SQL Server see Word Breakers and Stemmers
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=127754).
• SQL Server Agent service
• SQL Server Full Text Indexing
The following components must be installed and running on the computer where Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Server 2011 will be installed:
•
Services
Indexing Service
To install this service, see the Windows Server documentation.
IIS Admin
World Wide Web Publishing
25
Chapter 3: System Requirements and Required Components
•
•
Windows Data Access Components (MDAC) 6.0 (This is the default version of MDAC with Windows
Server 2008.)
Microsoft ASP .NET (Must be registered, but does not have to be running.)
Verify prerequisites
Before you install Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011, you should understand the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Microsoft SQL Server can be, but is not required to be, installed on the same computer as Microsoft
Dynamics CRM Server 2011.
If Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 and SQL Server are installed on different computers, both
computers must be in the same Active Directory directory service domain.
SQL Server can be installed by using either Windows authentication or mixed-mode authentication.
(Windows authentication is recommended for increased security and Microsoft Dynamics CRM will use
only Windows authentication).
The service account that SQL Server uses to log on to the network must be either a domain user account
(recommended) or the local system account. Installation of Microsoft Dynamics CRM will fail if the SQL
Server service account is the local administrator.
The SQL Server service must be started and can be configured to automatically start when the computer
is started.
The SQL Server Reporting Services service must be started and configured to automatically start when
the computer is started.
The SQL Server Agent service must be started. This service can be configured to automatically start
when the computer is started.
Although it is optional, we recommend that you accept the SQL Server default settings for Collation
Designator, Sort Order, and SQL Collation. Microsoft Dynamics CRM supports both case-sensitive and
case-insensitive sort orders.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup requires at least one network protocol to be enabled to
authenticate by using SQL Server. By default, TCP/IP protocol is enabled when you install SQL Server.
You can view network protocols in SQL Server Configuration Manager.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions is not required to run Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011;
however, to create, use, and schedule reports in Microsoft Dynamics CRM, you must install Microsoft
Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions. Additionally, Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions is
required to create or import an organization in a Microsoft Dynamics CRM deployment.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions are data processing extensions that are installed on the SQL
Server Reporting Services server. The Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions accept the
authentication information from the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 and passes it to the SQL Server
Reporting Services server.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions Setup includes two data processing extensions: Fetch data
processing extension and SQL data processing extension. These extensions are installed by default during
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions Setup.
The Fetch data processing extension is required to create, run, and schedule Fetch-based reports.
The SQL data processing extension is required to run and schedule the default (out-of-box) or SQL-based
custom reports in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011.
For SQL-based reports, the SQL data processing extension eliminates the need to enable delegation for the
Kerberos double-hop authentication that is required when SQL Server Reporting Services are installed on a
separate computer. For more information about reporting scenarios, see "Planning requirements for Microsoft
SQL Server Reporting Services" in the Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Planning Guide.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions general requirements
The Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions component has the following general requirements:
26
Chapter 3: System Requirements and Required Components
•
•
•
•
You must complete Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup before you run Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Reporting Extensions Setup.
You can install and run Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions on only one instance of SQL
Server Reporting Services on a computer.
Separate deployments of Microsoft Dynamics CRM cannot share one SQL Server Reporting Services
server. However, a single deployment of Microsoft Dynamics CRM that has multiple organizations can
use the same SQL Server Reporting Services server.
You must run the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions Setup on a computer that has
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Reporting Services installed. For smaller data sets and fewer users, you can
use a single-server deployment or a multiple-server deployment. With larger datasets or more users,
performance will decrease quickly when complex reports are run. Use a multi-server deployment with one
computer that is running SQL Server for Microsoft Dynamics CRM, and another server for Microsoft SQL
Server Reporting Services.
SharePoint Document Management software requirements
Microsoft SharePoint is not required to install Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011. However, to use document
management functionality with SharePoint one of the following Microsoft SharePoint editions is required and
must be installed, running, and at least one Microsoft SharePoint site collection configured and available for
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011:
• Microsoft SharePoint 2010 (all editions)
• Microsoft Office SharePoint Server (MOSS) 2007
You enable document management functionality with SharePoint in the Settings area of the Microsoft
Dynamics CRM Web application.
Important
For documents to appear in Microsoft SharePoint 2010 by using the grid view, the grid
component must be installed. If the component is not installed the data will appear in a
windowless inline floating frame (IFrame).
Although, you can use document management functionality with Microsoft Office SharePoint
Server (MOSS) 2007, the data will always appear in an IFrame.
Office Communications Server Integration
If your organization has Microsoft Office Communications Server 2007 or later version enabled and users are
running Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook or the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Web application together with
Microsoft Office Communicator 2007 or later version, you can use Microsoft Office Communicator 2007
features such as send an instant message or check user availability from within Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM E-mail Router hardware requirements
The following table lists the minimum and recommended hardware requirements for Microsoft Dynamics
CRM E-mail Router.
Component
*Minimum
*Recommended
Processor (32-bit)
750-MHz CPU or comparable
Multi-core 1.8-GHz CPU or higher
Processor (64-bit)
x64 architecture or compatible 1.5
GHz processor
Multi-core x64 architecture 2GHz
CPU or higher such as AMD
Opteron or Intel Xeon systems
Memory
1-GB RAM
2-GB RAM or more
Hard disk
100 MB of available hard disk space
100 MB of available hard disk
space
27
Chapter 3: System Requirements and Required Components
*Actual requirements and product functionality may vary based on your system configuration and operating
system.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM E-mail Router software requirements
This section lists the software and application software requirements for Microsoft Dynamics CRM E-mail
Router.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM E-mail Router Setup consists of two main components: the E-mail Router and the
Rule Deployment Wizard. The E-mail Router component installs the E-mail Router service and E-mail Router
Configuration Manager. You use the E-mail Router Configuration Manager to configure the E-mail Router.
The Rule Deployment Wizard component deploys the rules that enables received e-mail messages to be
tracked.
Important
Unless specified otherwise, E-mail Router supports the latest service pack (SP) for all
required software components.
You can install the E-mail Router and Rule Deployment Manager on any computer that is running one of the
following operating systems, and that has network access to both Microsoft Dynamics CRM and the e-mail
server:
•
•
Microsoft Windows 7 32-bit and 64-bit editions
Microsoft Windows Server 2008 or later version x64-bit editions only
Important
•
Windows Server 2008 32-bit editions, Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista, and Microsoft
Windows XP editions are not supported for installing and running Microsoft Dynamics CRM
E-mail Router or E-mail Router Configuration Manager.
•
Running Microsoft Dynamics CRM E-mail Router and E-mail Router Configuration Manager
(32-bit) is not supported on a Windows Server 64-bit operating system, in Windows-OnWindows (WOW) mode. Install and run the 64-bit version of the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Email Router.
Rule Deployment Wizard Requires MAPI
The Rule Deployment Wizard requires the Microsoft Exchange Server Messaging API (MAPI) client runtime
libraries. To install the MAPI client runtime libraries, see Microsoft Exchange Server MAPI Client and
Collaboration Data Objects 1.2.1 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=198514).
Notes
MAPI versions 6.5.8147 (or later) are supported by Microsoft Exchange Server 2010.
If you already have a version of the MAPI download installed, you must uninstall it before
installing the new version.
If you are installing the Rule Deployment Wizard on a system that uses Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 as
its e-mail server, you must also have installed Update Rollup 2 (or later) of Microsoft Exchange Server 2010.
For more information, see Update Rollup 2 for Exchange Server 2010 (KB979611)
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=195275.
Exchange Server
Microsoft Exchange Server is only required if you want to use the E-mail Router to connect to an Exchange
Server e-mail messaging system. To do this, you can install the E-mail Router on any of the supported
Windows or Windows Server operating systems that have a connection to the Exchange Server. The E-mail
Router supports the following versions of Exchange Server:
•
•
•
•
•
Exchange 2003 Standard Edition SP2 or later edition
Exchange 2003 Enterprise Edition SP2 or later edition
Exchange Server 2007 Standard Edition
Exchange Server 2007 Enterprise Edition
Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Standard Edition
28
Chapter 3: System Requirements and Required Components
•
•
Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Enterprise Edition
Microsoft Exchange Online
Important
Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server editions are not supported when using these versions of
Microsoft Dynamics CRM E-mail Router and Rule Deployment Manager.
If missing, E-mail Router Setup installs the Microsoft .NET Framework 4.0 on the computer where you install
the E-mail Router.
The Rule Deployment Wizard component must be installed on a computer that is running any of the
supported Windows or Windows Server operating systems and that has the Microsoft Exchange Server
Messaging API (MAPI) client runtime libraries installed.
Download the MAPI client runtime libraries (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=78805) from the Microsoft
Download Center.
Messaging and transport protocols
Microsoft Dynamics CRM E-mail Router supports a variety of e-mail messaging and transport options.
POP3
POP3-compliant e-mail systems are supported for incoming e-mail message routing.
Important
When you use the Forward Mailbox option on the User form, the POP3 e-mail server must
provide support where an e-mail message can be sent as an attachment to another e-mail
message.
If you configure the Microsoft Dynamics CRM E-mail Router to connect to a POP3-compliant e-mail server,
the server must support RFC 1939.
Transport protocols
Both SMTP and Exchange Online with Exchange Web Services (EWS) are messaging transport protocols
that are supported for outgoing e-mail message routing.
If you configure the Microsoft Dynamics CRM E-mail Router to use an SMTP-compliant transport service, the
server must support RFC 2821 and RFC 2822.
Exchange Online
Microsoft Exchange Online is a hosted enterprise messaging service from Microsoft. It provides the robust
capabilities of Microsoft Exchange Server as a cloud-based service. To learn more, see Exchange Online
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=197112).
Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook hardware requirements
The following table lists the minimum and recommended hardware requirements for Microsoft Dynamics
CRM for Microsoft Office Outlook.
Component
*Minimum
*Recommended
Processor (32-bit)
750-MHz CPU, or comparable
Multi-core 1.8-GHz CPU or higher
Processor (64-bit)
x64 architecture or compatible 1.5
GHz processor
Multi-core x64 architecture 2GHz
CPU or higher such as AMD
Opteron or Intel Xeon systems
Memory
2-GB RAM
4-GB RAM or more
Hard disk
1.5 GB of available hard disk space
2 GB of available hard disk space
29
Chapter 3: System Requirements and Required Components
Component
*Minimum
*Recommended
Display
Super VGA with a resolution of 1024 Super VGA with a resolution higher
x 768
than 1024 x 768
* Actual requirements and product functionality may vary based on your system configuration and operating
system.
Note
Successful network installation of Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook requires a reliable
and high-throughput network. Otherwise, installation might fail. The recommended minimum
available bandwidth of the network connection is 300 Kbps.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook software requirements
Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook works the way that you do by providing a seamless combination of
Microsoft Dynamics CRM features in the familiar Outlook environment. This section lists software and
software requirements for Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook and Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook
with Offline Access.
Any one of the following operating systems is required:
•
•
•
•
•
Windows 7 (both 64-bit and 32-bit versions)
Windows Vista (both 64-bit and 32-bit versions)
Microsoft Windows XP Professional SP3
Microsoft Windows XP Tablet SP3
Windows XP Professional x64 Edition
Important
•
Windows XP Media Center Edition is not supported for installing and running Microsoft
Dynamics CRM for Outlook.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook software component prerequisites
The following components must be installed and running on the computer before you run Microsoft Dynamics
CRM for Outlook Setup:
•
Microsoft Internet Explorer
Internet Explorer 7 or a later version
Internet Explorer 8 or a later version
•
Microsoft Office
Microsoft Office 2003 with SP3 or later version
2007 Microsoft Office system
Office 2010
Indexing Service (must be installed and running)
Important
Microsoft Internet Explorer 6 or earlier versions are not supported.
Microsoft Office XP and Microsoft Outlook 2000 versions are not supported for installing and
running Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook.
To install and run the 64-bit version of Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook, a 64-bit version
of Office 2010 is required.
Before you run the Configuration Wizard to configure Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook, a
Microsoft Office Outlook profile must exist for the user. Therefore, Outlook must be run at
least once to create the user's Outlook profile.
If the following components are missing, they will be installed by Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook Setup:
30
Chapter 3: System Requirements and Required Components
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Express Edition (Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook with Offline Access
only)
Microsoft .NET Framework 4.0
Microsoft Windows Installer (MSI) 4.5.
MSXML 4.0
Microsoft Visual C++ Redistributable
Microsoft Report Viewer 2010
Microsoft Application Error Reporting
Windows Identity Framework (WIF)
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Web client software requirements
This section lists the operating system and software requirements for the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Web
client.
The following operating systems are supported for the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Web client:
• Windows 7 (all versions)
• Windows Vista (all versions)
• Microsoft Windows XP Professional SP3
• Microsoft Windows XP Home SP3
• Windows XP Media Center Edition SP3
• Microsoft Windows XP Tablet SP3
In addition, the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Web client requires one of the following Internet Explorer Web
browser versions:
• Internet Explorer 8 or a later version
• Internet Explorer 7 or a later version
To use Microsoft Dynamics CRM with Microsoft Office integration features, such as Export to Excel and Mail
Merge, you must have one of the following installed Microsoft Office versions on the computer that is running
the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Web client:
•
•
•
Microsoft Office 2003 SP3 or later version
2007 Microsoft Office system SP2 or later version
Office 2010
Note
Microsoft Windows 2000 editions are not supported for installing and running the Microsoft
Dynamics CRM Web client.
64-bit supported configurations
Installing and running Microsoft Dynamics CRM and connecting to database, reporting services, and e-mail
components running on other 32-bit computers is generally supported. For example:
•
•
•
Exchange Server 2007 and Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 editions, which are available only for 64-bit
systems, are supported, and can run 64-bit, or 32-bit, editions of the Microsoft Dynamics CRM E-mail
Router.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook includes a 64-bit version that can be installed on any of the
supported 64-bit Windows operating systems.
The 32-bit version of Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook can be installed and run on a Windows 64-bit
operating system but the version of Outlook must be 32-bit.
Important
32-bit versions of SQL Server 2008 database engine are not supported with Microsoft
Dynamics CRM 2011 Server. You cannot use a computer that is running a SQL Server 2008
32-bit edition as the database server for Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Server.
31
Chapter 3: System Requirements and Required Components
Language support
This section describes the supported configurations for different language versions of a Microsoft Dynamics
CRM system. This section does not include information about Microsoft Dynamics CRM Language Pack
support, but instead explains the supported configurations for the base-language versions. For more
information about Microsoft Dynamics CRM Language Packs, see the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Help.
Requirements
The following requirements must be met when you run Microsoft Dynamics CRM and components such as
SQL Server.
Microsoft
Dynamics CRM
Component
Requirement
Language Supported
Microsoft Dynamics
CRM Server 2011
The base language of Windows Server,
SQL Server, Microsoft .NET Framework,
MDAC, and MSXML must be either the
same language version as Microsoft
Dynamics CRM Server 2011 or English. If
a component is not available in a certain
language, the English version of that
component can be used.
All available Microsoft
Dynamics CRM languages
versions
Microsoft Dynamics
CRM for Outlook
The base language of Windows Server,
Microsoft SQL Server Express Edition,
Internet Explorer, Office, Microsoft .NET
Framework, MDAC, and MSXML do not
have to be the same language versions as
Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook.
Each client stack in a single deployment
can be in a different language.
All available Microsoft
Dynamics CRM languages
versions
Microsoft Dynamics
CRM Server 2011
and Microsoft
Dynamics CRM for
Outlook
The base language version of Microsoft
All available Microsoft
Dynamics CRM Server 2011 must match
Dynamics CRM languages
that used for Microsoft Dynamics CRM for versions
Outlook.
For example, you cannot have some users
who run the German version of Microsoft
Dynamics CRM for Outlook while other
users run the English version. For this
scenario, we recommend provisioning the
appropriate Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Language Pack.
Examples
The following table describes an example of a supported language configuration for Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Server 2011 where all language editions match.
Server Component
Language
Windows Server 2008
German
SQL Server 2008
German
32
Chapter 3: System Requirements and Required Components
Server Component
Language
Microsoft Exchange Server 2010
German
MSXML
German
.NET Framework
German
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011
German
The following table describes an example of a supported language configuration for Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Server 2011 where not all language editions match.
Server Component
Language
Windows Server 2008
English
SQL Server 2008
English
Microsoft Exchange Server 2010
English
MSXML
English
.NET Framework
English
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011
Swedish
Currency support
During Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 Setup, you must select a base currency, which is used as the
basis to calculate additional currencies that can be used for transaction-based records. The base currency is
also used in financial reporting.
The following table lists the currencies that are supported.
Country\Region
ISO Three-Letter Currency Code
Afghanistan
AFN
Albania
ALL
Algeria
DZD
Argentina
ARS
Armenia
AMD
Australia
AUD
Austria
EUR
Azerbaijan
AZM
Bahrain
BHD
Bangladesh
BDT
Belarus
BYR
Belgium
EUR
Belize
BZD
Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela
VEF
33
Chapter 3: System Requirements and Required Components
Country\Region
ISO Three-Letter Currency Code
Bolivia
BOB
Bosnia and Herzegovina
BAM
Brazil
BRL
Brunei Darussalam
BND
Bulgaria
BGL
Cambodia
KHR
Canada
CAD
Caribbean
USD
Chile
CLP
Columbia
COP
Costa Rica
CRC
Croatia
HRK
Czech Republic
CZK
Denmark
DKK
Dominican Republic
DOP
Ecuador
USD
Egypt
EGP
El Salvador
USD
Estonia
EEK
Ethiopia
ETB
Faroe Islands
DKK
Finland
EUR
France
EUR
Georgia
GEL
Germany
EUR
Greece
EUR
Greenland
DKK
Guatemala
GTQ
Honduras
HNL
Hong Kong S.A.R.
HKD
Hungary
HUF
Iceland
ISK
India
INR
Indonesia
IDR
Iran
IRR
34
Chapter 3: System Requirements and Required Components
Country\Region
ISO Three-Letter Currency Code
Iraq
IQD
Ireland
EUR
Islamic Republic of Pakistan
PKR
Israel
ILS
Italy
EUR
Jamaica
JMD
Japan
JPY
Jordan
JOD
Kazakhstan
KZT
Kenya
KES
Korea
KRW
Kuwait
KWD
Kyrgyzstan
KGS
Lao P.D.R.
LAK
Latvia
LVL
Lebanon
LBP
Libya
LYD
Liechtenstein
CHF
Lithuania
LTL
Luxembourg
EUR
Macao S.A.R.
MOP
Macedonia (FYROM)
MKD
Malaysia
MYR
Maldives
MVR
Malta
MTL
Mexico
MXN
Mongolia
MNT
Morocco
MAD
Montenegro
EUR
Nepal
NPR
Netherlands
EUR
New Zealand
NZD
Nicaragua
NIO
Norway
NOK
Oman
OMR
35
Chapter 3: System Requirements and Required Components
Country\Region
ISO Three-Letter Currency Code
Panama
PAB
Paraguay
PYG
People's Republic of China
CNY
Peru
PEN
Philippines
PHP
Poland
PLN
Portugal
EUR
Principality of Monaco
EUR
Puerto Rico
USD
Qatar
QAR
Romania
RON
Russia
RUB
Rwanda
RWF
Saudi Arabia
SAR
Senegal
XOF
Serbia
RSD
Serbia and Montenegro
CSD
Singapore
SGD
Slovakia
EUR
Slovenia
EUR
South Africa
ZAR
Spain
EUR
Sweden
SEK
Switzerland
CHF
Syria
SYP
Taiwan
TWD
Tajikistan
TJS
Thailand
THB
Trinidad and Tobago
TTD
Tunisia
TND
Turkey
TRY
Turkmenistan
TMT
U.A.E.
AED
Ukraine
UAH
United Kingdom
GBP
36
Chapter 3: System Requirements and Required Components
Country\Region
ISO Three-Letter Currency Code
United States
USD
Uruguay
UYU
Uzbekistan
YZS
Vietnam
VND
Yemen
YER
Zimbabwe
ZWL
----------------------- Send Feedback About This Chapter ---------------------We appreciate hearing from you. To send your feedback, click the following link and type your comments in
the message body.
Note
The subject-line information is used to route your feedback. If you remove or modify the
subject line, we may be unable to process your feedback.
Send Feedback (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=197121)
37
Chapter 4
Planning Deployment
The deployment architecture you will use depends on your business needs. This chapter provides guidelines
for planning a Microsoft Dynamics CRM deployment on three representative computer system architectures:
a single-computer server deployment based on Microsoft Windows Small Business Server, a two-server
deployment, and multiple-server deployments involving a minimum of six servers. These deployments are
discussed in detail in the "Supported configurations" section of this chapter.
Use this chapter as a reference if you have no existing Windows Server infrastructure, and you are planning
a new Microsoft Dynamics CRM deployment.
If most or all the Microsoft Windows Server infrastructure already exists, we recommend that you read this
chapter to make sure that your current infrastructure meets the prerequisites for a successful Microsoft
Dynamics CRM deployment.
In This Chapter
Planning deployment prerequisites and considerations.............................................................. 39
Operating system and software component security considerations .......................................... 48
Security considerations for Microsoft Dynamics CRM ................................................................ 50
Supported configurations ............................................................................................................ 57
Upgrading from Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 ............................................................................ 64
Planning deployment prerequisites and considerations
This section contains lists of what you must have before you install Microsoft Dynamics CRM, such as
needed hardware and software. Use this section for preparing your network and to make sure that all
requirements are satisfied before you run Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup.
In this chapter, the following topics are discussed:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Hardware and software requirements. A brief overview of the computer hardware and software
requirements, and where you can find more information about the requirements.
Active Directory considerations. Supported Active Directory directory service forest and domain
modes.
SQL Server and SQL Server Reporting Services installation and configuration. A summary of how
Microsoft SQL Server and SQL Server Reporting Services must be deployed and configured to install
Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
Planning Microsoft Exchange or POP3. A summary of how Exchange Server or a POP3-compliant email server must be deployed to install and use the E-mail Router to send and receive Microsoft
Dynamics CRM e-mail messages.
Security considerations. Information about how you can make the Microsoft Dynamics CRM system
more secure.
Supported configurations. Information about the supported network, domain, and server configurations
for Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
Upgrading from a previous version of Microsoft Dynamics CRM. How Microsoft Dynamics CRM
upgrades your current system and what happens to items such as existing reports and customizations.
39
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
Hardware requirements
Depending on how you plan to deploy the system, as a single-server solution, a multiple-server solution, or a
clustered solution, the computer hardware that Microsoft Dynamics CRM and components will run on is
important for acceptable application performance.
There are many factors that you must consider that can affect the hardware requirements. They include the
following:
•
•
Number of users the Microsoft Dynamics CRM implementation will support and the way the application
will be used, such as for intensive reporting.
Number of servers and how they are configured.
• Microsoft SQL Server performance and availability.
• Integration of Microsoft Dynamics CRM with the Microsoft Exchange Server or POP3 e-mail servers.
• Integration with Microsoft SharePoint.
• Performance of your servers and the local area network (LAN).
• Whether users will be connecting from untrusted domains and forests or from the Internet.
For a list of the suggested hardware requirements, see System Requirements and Required Components (on
page 21) in this guide.
Software requirements
Before you install Microsoft Dynamics CRM, there are several operating system, application, and software
components that must be installed, configured, and running. Some of these operating system and software
components include Microsoft Windows Server, Microsoft SQL Server, SQL Server Reporting Services, and
Microsoft .NET Framework.
For a complete list of the software requirements, see System Requirements and required components (on
page 21) in this guide.
Active Directory considerations
Active Directory directory service is a component of the Microsoft Windows Server operating systems. Active
Directory provides a directory and security structure for network applications such as Microsoft Dynamics
CRM.
As with most applications that rely on a directory service, Microsoft Dynamics CRM has dependencies that
are important for operation, such as use of Active Directory to store user and group information and to create
application security.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM should only be installed on a Windows Server that is a domain member or, if you
are installing on Microsoft Small Business Server, a domain controller. The domain where the server is
located must be running in one of the following Active Directory modes:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Windows 2000 Mixed Mode
Windows 2000 Native
Windows Server 2003 Native
Windows Server 2003 Interim
All Windows Server 2008 Modes
All Active Directory forest modes are supported. For more information about Active Directory domain and
forest modes, see:
How to raise Active Directory domain and forest functional levels
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52205)
Active Directory (Windows Server 2008 R2) (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=200995)
Federation and claims-based authentication support
When you configure Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Internet-facing access, Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011
requires federated services that support claims-based authentication. We recommend Active Directory
Federation Services 2.0 (AD FS 2.0).
40
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
Active Directory Federation Services 2.0
Active Directory Federation Services is a highly secure, highly extensible, and Internet-scalable identity
access solution that allows organizations to authenticate users from partner organizations. Using Active
Directory Federation Services 2.0 in Windows Server 2008, you can simply and very securely grant external
users access to your organization’s domain resources. AD FS can also simplify integration between untrusted
resources and domain resources within your own organization.
AD FS 2.0 is a feature in Windows Server 2008 R2 and earlier versions that can be downloaded and installed
(see the AD FS 2.0 RTW download link in table below).
Digital Certificates
AD FS 2.0 requires two types of digital certificates:
ƒ Claims encryption. Claims-based authentication requires identities to provide an encryption
certificate for authentication. This certificate should be trusted by the computer where you are
installing Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 so it must be located in the local Personal store
where the Configure Claims-Based Authentication Wizard is running.
ƒ SSL (HTTPS) encryption. The certificates for SSL encryption should be valid for host names similar
to org.contoso.com, auth.contoso.com, and dev.contoso.com. To satisfy this requirement you can
use a single wildcard certificate (*.contoso.com), a certificate that supports Subject Alternative
Names, or individual certificates for each name. Individual certificates for each host name are only
valid if you use different servers for each Web server role. Multiple IIS bindings, such as a Web site
with two HTTPS or two HTTP bindings, is not supported for running Microsoft Dynamics CRM. For
more information about the options that are available to you, contact your certificate authority
service company or your certificate authority administrator.
To meet these requirements, your organization should have a public key infrastructure or a contract with a
digital certificate provider such as VeriSign, GoDaddy, or Comodo.
For more information about Active Directory, see the resources in the following table.
Topic
Link
Active Directory Domain Services Active Directory Domain Services for Windows Server 2008
R2 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=200770)
Planning an Active Directory
Deployment Project (Windows
Server 2003)
Overview of Planning an Active Directory Deployment Project
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=88219)
Active Directory Site Design
(Windows Server 2003)
Designing the Site Topology
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=88203)
Domain Controller Roles
(Windows Server 2003)
FSMO placement and optimization on Active Directory domain
controllers (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=88220)
Active Directory Federation
Services
Active Directory Federation Services 2.0
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=200771)
AD FS 2.0 RTW Download
Active Directory Federation Services 2.0 RTW
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=200773)
Digital certificates overview
Certificates (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=200774)
SQL Server installation and configuration
To plan your use of Microsoft SQL Server with Microsoft Dynamics CRM, you must understand how Microsoft
Dynamics CRM uses SQL Server, and what Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup does and does not do:
•
Microsoft Dynamics CRM requires SQL Server 64-bit versions for storing the databases that contain
Microsoft Dynamics CRM data and metadata. For specific details, see the SQL Server editions section in
this guide.
41
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
•
Reports in Microsoft Dynamics CRM depend on SQL Server Reporting Services, a feature in SQL
Server. Reporting Services includes two server components that are used to store, display, and manage
reports: Report Server and Report Manager. A third component, Report Designer, is used to customize
reports and write new reports. The Report Designer component is available with Microsoft Visual Studio
and is typically installed on a workstation, instead of on the computer that is running SQL Server.
• Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup does not install SQL Server or SQL Server Reporting Services.
There are many configurations possible based on your expected usage of Microsoft Dynamics CRM. For
information about the licensing implications when you install SQL Server Reporting Services on a separate
computer, see SQL Server 2008 R2 Licensing (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=92675).
•
Although we do not recommend it, you can install SQL Server on the same computer as Microsoft
Dynamics CRM Server 2011. For better performance, install and run SQL Server on a separate
dedicated computer. For better performance and improved availability, install and run SQL Server on
separate multiple dedicated computers in a clustered configuration.
• You can install SQL Server Reporting Services on the computer that stores the Microsoft Dynamics CRM
databases, or on a separate report server that is running SQL Server.
• Multiple Microsoft Dynamics CRM front-end servers that run in a network load balancing cluster can use
the same computer that is running SQL Server.
The following information describes:
•
•
SQL Server requirements common to most scenarios.
Considerations about how to use one computer that is running SQL Server with multiple computers that
are running Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011.
For more information about SQL Server, see "Additional resources for SQL Server" in this guide.
SQL Server requirements and recommendations for Microsoft Dynamics CRM
These requirements apply to new and existing installations of SQL Server:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Microsoft Dynamics CRM requires an instance of Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services be installed,
running, and available. All installations of the supported SQL Server editions can be used as the reporting
server. However, the Reporting Services edition must match the SQL Server edition.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 is not supported on Microsoft SQL Server 2000, Microsoft SQL Server
2005, or 32-bit versions of Microsoft SQL Server 2008.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 is not supported on SQL Server that is running on Windows Server 2003
or Windows 2000 Server.
When Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 and SQL Server are installed on different computers, they
must be in the same Active Directory directory service domain.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup and Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Deployment Manager
support the default instance or a named instance of SQL Server.
Although you can install SQL Server by using either Windows authentication or mixed-mode
authentication, Windows authentication is a prerequisite for Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
The service account that SQL Server uses to log on to the network must be either a domain user account
(recommended) or the Network Service account (you cannot use a local user account on the server).
Using a low-privilege account strategy is recommended to help avoid compromising the security of the
server.
The SQL Server service must be started. This service can be configured to automatically start when the
computer is started.
SQL Server Agent must be started. This service can be configured to automatically start when the
computer is started.
SQL Server Full-Text Search must be installed and started. This service can be configured to
automatically start when the computer is started.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup requires a network library to authenticate SQL Server. By default,
TCP/IP network libraries are enabled when you install SQL Server 2008. SQL Server can use both
TCP/IP or Named Pipes for authentication. However, the computer that is running SQL Server must be
configured for at least one of the two network libraries.
42
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
•
•
•
We recommend that the computer that is running SQL Server be located on the same local area network
(LAN) as the computer that is running Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011.
The computer that is running SQL Server must be configured to have sufficient disk space, memory, and
processing power to support the Microsoft Dynamics CRM environment. For more information see the
Microsoft SQL Server hardware requirements topic.
Although it is optional, consider accepting the SQL Server default settings for Collation Designator, Sort
Order, and SQL Collation. Microsoft Dynamics CRM supports the following collation orders:
Case-sensitive
Case-insensitive
Accent-sensitive
Accent-insensitive
Binary sort order (such as Latin1_General_100_BIN)
Note
Microsoft Dynamics CRM sets the collation order at the database level. This setting might
differ from that set at the SQL Server level.
•
•
Review all SQL Server installation options and be prepared to make the needed selections when you run
Setup. For more information, see SQL Server Installation (SQL Server 2008 R2)
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=149070).
If you plan to install SQL Server in a location other than the default file location, see File Locations for
Default and Named Instances of SQL Server 2008 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=102987).
You should also consider where the Microsoft Dynamics CRM databases are located on the server, and
the hard-disk configuration that will support them.
Note
To achieve the best combination of disk fault tolerance and performance, consider the many
specifications for redundant array of independent disks (RAID) available from hardware
vendors. Format the disks where the SQL Server database files reside for the fault-tolerance
requirements of the application and performance parameters for the I/O activity occurring on
that partition.
•
If you are using an operating system with regional settings other than English (United States), or if you
are customizing character-set or sort-order settings, review topics on collation settings. For more
information, see International Considerations for SQL Server 2008
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=92514).
SQL Server deployment
If your organization uses SQL Server for applications other than Microsoft Dynamics CRM, performance may
degrade as resources are consumed by other applications. If you use a computer that is running SQL Server
that is used for other applications, you must carefully analyze the effect that Microsoft Dynamics CRM will
have on the existing installation of SQL Server. For information about monitoring SQL Server, see
Performance Monitoring and Tuning How-To Topics (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=200083).
For best results, we recommend that you install the Microsoft Dynamics CRM databases on a computer that
is running SQL Server and that will support only Microsoft Dynamics CRM and no other databases or
database applications.
SQL Server deployment considerations
Microsoft Dynamics CRM is a database-intensive application. Before you deploy Microsoft Dynamics CRM to
an instance of SQL Server, you should consider the following requirements and database configurations.
•
•
Modification of system tables. The SQL Server system tables should not be modified before you install
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011. Some database applications may modify the SQL Server system
tables. If this occurs, problems with Microsoft Dynamics CRM and data may result.
Indexing. Full-text indexing must be installed. This is required for Microsoft Dynamics CRM knowledgebase functionality.
43
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
•
•
•
•
Compatibility level. During an upgrade or a new installation, Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup
sets the database compatibility level to 100, which is the compatibility level of SQL Server 2008.
Autogrowth. By default, Microsoft Dynamics CRM organization database files are created to have an
autogrowth setting of 256 megabytes. Earlier versions of Microsoft Dynamics CRM used the default
setting of 1 megabyte autogrowth. If you perform intensive database transactions, such as large data
imports, consider increasing the autogrowth value to improve performance. For information about how to
change the autogrowth setting for a database, see the SQL Server Management Studio Help.
Max server memory. We recommend that, if you run SQL Server on a computer that is also running
other applications, that the SQL Server max server memory be set to no more than one half of the
installed RAM. By default, max server memory is set to 2147483647 bytes in SQL Server 2008, which
has demonstrated resource issues with SQL Server during intensive use of Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
For more information about the memory options in SQL Server see Server Memory Options
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=204645).
Max degree of parallelism. We recommend that, if you are run SQL Server on a computer that is also
running other applications, that the SQL Server max degree of parallelism be set to 1 to help improve
performance. For more information about the max degree of parallelism see max degree of parallelism
Option (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=204646).
Language locale collation and sort order
Installing SQL Server in a language other than English (US) may require changing the Collation designator.
The following table indicates the Collation designator to use for some of the available languages.
Windows Locale
Locale Identifier
(LCID)
Collation Designator
Code Page
Danish
0X406
Danish_Norwegian
1252
Dutch (Standard)
0X413
Latin1_General
1252
English (United States)
0X409
Latin1_General
1252
French (France)
0X40C
French
1252
German (Germany)
0X407
Latin1_General
1252
Italian
0X410
Latin1_General
1252
Portuguese (Brazil)
0X416
Latin1_General
1252
Spanish (Traditional Sort)
0XC0A
Modern_Spanish
1252
Disk configurations and file locations
For the default instance of SQL Server, the default directory for both program and data files is \Program
Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL10.MSSQLSERVER\MSSQL\. You can specify a file path other than
the default for both program and data files.
Note
The default locations for program and data files are not necessarily the best locations. For the
best combination of disk fault tolerance and performance, consider the RAID specifications
available from hardware vendors. You can create the Microsoft Dynamics CRM databases on
your partitions, especially for these files, and specify the existing databases when you run
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup. The databases created by Microsoft Dynamics CRM
are noted in the specified data file location. For more information, see "SQL Server data file
location" later in this chapter.
By default, Shared Tools are installed in \Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\100\Tools on the system
drive. This folder contains the default and named files shared by all instances of SQL Server. Tools include
the T-SQL command line utility and the OSQL SQL query tool.
SQL Server Setup also installs files in the Windows system directory. The system file location cannot be
changed.
44
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
SQL Server program file location
The SQL Server program files are located in \Program Files\Microsoft SQL
Server\MSSQL10.MSSQLSERVER\MSSQL\Binn.
The binary file location is in the root directory where Setup creates the folders that contain program files and
other files that typically do not change this path as you use SQL Server. Although these files are not readonly, the folders do not contain data, logs, back-up files, or replication data. Therefore, the space
requirements for these files should increase only marginally as SQL Server is used, and over time as updates
are applied.
Important
Program files cannot be installed on a removable disk drive.
SQL Server data file location
Each SQL Server database consists of one or more database files and one or more transaction log files.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM creates at least two databases:
•
MSCRM_CONFIG. This database contains Microsoft Dynamics CRM metadata, such as configuration
and location information that is specific to each organization database.
• OrganizationName_MSCRM. This is the organization database where Microsoft Dynamics CRM data is
stored, such as all records and activities. Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 supports multiple
organizations so that you can have multiple-organization databases.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM also relies on the SQL Server system databases to store Microsoft Dynamics CRM
configuration information. These databases include the master and msdb databases. The database files that
accompany a database contain all its data and properties. Transaction log files contain a record of the write
activity in the database, such as when a row is added, changed, or removed. Transaction log files are binary
and cannot be used for auditing database activity.
The transaction log is used for recovery, if a failure occurs, and to roll back (undo) transactions (writes) that
cannot be finished. You may also periodically back up the transaction log as a way to perform an incremental
backup while users are working in the application, with very low effect on available server resources.
To have the best chance of recovery if there is a disk failure, and the best performance for the application,
put the database files and transaction log files on separate sets of physical disks. The location that you
specify for a file does not have to be the original location for data files specified during SQL Server Setup.
You can select an alternative location for the database and transaction log files any time that you create or
change the database. For more information, see the note about disk fault tolerance and performance in the
Disk configurations and file locations (on page 44) topic.
If the partition that contains a database file has failed and the database has become unusable, but the
partition that contains the transaction log is still available, you can back up the transaction log for that
database. This can be the last backup in your back-up set. When you restore, this transaction log backup,
made after the failure, will be the last restored backup. If all transaction log backups in the back-up set are
restored successfully, you will have restored all the committed (100 percent successful) transactions up to the
moment of the failure. This limits the data loss.
When the database files and transaction log files are on separate sets of disks, performance is optimized.
Transaction log files can be write-intensive during periods when a lot of data is being added, changed, or
removed from the application.
For example, you have a server wherein drive C is the system partition (the drive where the Windows and
program file folders are located).The Windows pagefile is also located on drive C. Drives D and E are RAID-5
partitions on separate sets of physical disks. Select the partitioning scheme for the database files that will
give you the combination of performance and disk fault tolerance that you want. Drive D contains only data
files for one or more databases, and drive E contains only log files for one or more databases. If you verify
that performance will decrease because one database will have much more hard disk activity than other
databases, you should put them all on separate sets of disks. If you estimate that data will significantly grow
over time, make sure drive D has at least 100 gigabytes (GB) available for the database files. Because the
log files will be truncated every time that a transaction-log backup is performed, make sure drive E has at
least 10 GB available. Specify the location of the database file to be on drive D and the transaction log file to
be on drive E when you create the database.
45
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
Note
It is best to dedicate a partition to SQL Server data files. We recommend that you do not put a
data file on the same partition as a Windows pagefile because of the degree of fragmentation
that will occur.
By default, the directory where all database files and transaction log files are located is \Program Files\SQL
Server\MSSQL10.MSSQLSERVER\MSSQL\Data. When you run SQL Server Setup, you can specify a
different location as the default location for data files. The data file location is the root directory where SQL
Server Setup creates the folders that contain database and log files, in addition to directories for the System
log, back-up, and replication data. SQL Server Setup creates database and log files for the master, model,
tempdb, and msdb databases. If you are selecting different locations for each file in the application, you do
not have to change the default setting.
Note
Data files cannot be installed on a file system that uses compression.
Specifying file paths
Because you can install multiple instances of SQL Server on one computer, an instance name is used in
addition to the user-specified location for program and data files. For tools and other shared files, instance
names are not required.
Default-instance file path for program and data files
For the default instance of SQL Server, the default SQL Server directory name (MSSQL.10) is used as the
default instance name, with the directory that you specify.
For example, if you specify the SQL Server default instance to be installed on D:\MySqlDir, the file paths are
as follows:
D:\MySqlDir\MSSQL10.MSSQLSERVER\MSSQL\Binn (for program files)
D:\MySqlDir\MSSQL10.MSSQLSERVER\MSSQL\Data (for data files)
Note
The program and data file locations can be changed, depending on the drive configuration of
the computer that is running SQL Server.
SQL Server 2008 transparent data encryption
The Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Transparent Data Encryption feature is supported for use with Microsoft
Dynamics CRM. However, based on test results conducted internally, using this feature can cause a
decrease in overall performance of approximately 10% when run against a compressed database with the
same workload.
Additional resources for SQL Server
For more information about how to plan for and install SQL Server, see the following resources:
•
•
•
Microsoft SQL Server Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=53219)
SQL Server Books Online (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=99647)
Microsoft SQL Server Solution Center (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=92519)
Planning requirements for Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services
The Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions are data processing extensions that are installed on the
Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services server. Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions accept the
authentication information from the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 and passes it to the Microsoft SQL
Server Reporting Services server. Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions Setup includes Fetch and
SQL data processing extensions.
The Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions are required for all major reporting tasks in Microsoft
Dynamics CRM such as, working with default (out-of-box) Microsoft Dynamics CRM reports, uploading
custom reports, creating Report Wizard reports, or scheduling reports. Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting
Extensions must also be installed before you import or provision new organizations.
46
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
The Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions Setup does the following:
1. Installs Fetch and SQL data processing extensions on the Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services
server.
2. Installs custom assemblies used by default reports and wizard reports on Microsoft SQL Server
Reporting Services server.
3. Creates default reports (SQL-based) for the default organization both on Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Server 2011 and Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services server.
The following table explains what reporting options will be available to you if you install Microsoft Dynamics
CRM Reporting Extensions.
Installed?
What reports will work?
Default reports
Custom SQL-based
reports
Fetch-based
Wizard reports
Custom Fetchbased reports
No
Clean installation:
Will not be available.
ƒ Cannot be scheduled.
ƒ Can be uploaded and
run if Microsoft
Dynamics CRM Server
2011 and SQL Server
are installed on one
computer or Trust for
Delegation is
configured.
Will not be
available.
Cannot be
uploaded and
run.
Yes
Will be published for the
default organization.
Can be uploaded and run.
Can be created,
run, and
scheduled.
Can be
uploaded, run,
and scheduled.
Important
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions should not be installed on an instance of
Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services that is running under an account that is a member
of the SQL Access Group. This can occur when Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services is
running under the same account as a Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 component. This
configuration can make the system vulnerable to certain attacks. During installation, Setup
detects this scenario. You can click Help for information about how to work around the issue.
Note that when you install Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions, you have the option of installing
the component on a different server that is running Reporting Services. Therefore, by isolating Microsoft
Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions on a separate instance of SQL Server, which does not store the
Microsoft Dynamics CRM databases, report performance may be improved.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions requirements
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions has the following requirements:
•
•
You must complete Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup before you run the Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Reporting Extensions Setup.
You must run the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions Setup on a computer that has SQL
Server 2008 Reporting Services installed. For smaller data sets and fewer users, you can use either a
single-server deployment, or a multiple-server deployment with one computer that is running SQL Server
for Microsoft Dynamics CRM, and another server for Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services. With
larger datasets or more users, performance will decrease quickly when complex reports are run.
Planning e-mail integration
You can control the tracking and routing of incoming and outgoing e-mail by using the following Microsoft
Dynamics CRM components:
47
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
•
The E-mail Router, which provides e-mail routing for users and queues. If your organization uses the Email Router, you can establish a dedicated forward mailbox to which all incoming e-mail messages are
forwarded from the e-mail server. You can also enable smart-matching, which automatically associates
incoming e-mail messages with their cases..
• Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Microsoft Office Outlook, which gives users access to the same data as the
Web application, and provides e-mail routing capabilities. Note that Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook
does not require the E-mail Router.
For more information about how to use and configure these components, see Planning e-mail integration
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=207847).
Operating system and software component security
considerations
In the broadest sense, security involves planning and considering tradeoffs. For example, a computer can be
locked in a vault and available only to one system administrator. This computer may be secure, but it is not
very usable because it is not connected to any other computer. If your business users need access to the
Internet and your corporate intranet, you must consider how to make the network both secure and usable.
The following sections contain links to information about how you can make your computing environment
more secure. Ultimately, Microsoft Dynamics CRM data security largely depends on the security of the
operating system and software components that it uses.
Securing Windows Server
Microsoft Windows Server, the foundation of Microsoft Dynamics CRM, provides sophisticated network
security. The Kerberos version-5 authentication protocol that is integrated into Active Directory directory
service and Active Directory Federation Services 2.0 allows you to federate Active Directory domains by
using claims-based authentication. Both give you powerful standards-based authentication. These
authentication standards let users input a single user name and password logon combination for resource
access across the network. Windows Server also includes several features that help make the network more
secure.
The following links take you to information about these features. You can learn how to help make your
deployment of Windows Server more secure:
•
•
•
Secure Windows Server (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=200362)
Windows Server 2008 Security Guide (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=200364)
Download the Security Compliance Manager (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=200365)
Windows error reporting
Microsoft Dynamics CRM requires the Windows Error Reporting (WER) service, which Setup will install it if it
is missing. The WER service collects information, such as IP addresses. These are not used to identify users.
The WER service does not intentionally collect names, addresses, e-mail addresses, computer names, or
any other form of personally identifying information. It is possible that such information may be captured in
memory or in the data collected from open files, but Microsoft does not use it to identify users. In addition,
some information that is transmitted between the Microsoft Dynamics CRM application and Microsoft may not
be secure. For more information about the type of information that is transmitted, see Privacy statement for
the Microsoft Error Reporting Service (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=200371).
Important
By default, automatic error reporting is not enabled in Microsoft Dynamics CRM. For
information about how to enable automatic error reporting for Microsoft Dynamics CRM see
"Enable Windows Error Reporting" in the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Operating and
Maintaining Guide.
Virus protection
To help protect your system against viruses, see the following:
48
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
•
•
Microsoft Security (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=92540). This page is an entry point for tips,
training, and guidance about how to keep your computer up-to-date and prevent your computer from
being susceptible to exploitation, spyware, and viruses.
Security TechCenter (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=92541). This page has links to technical
bulletins, advisories, updates, tools, and guidance designed to make computers and applications up-todate and more secure.
Update management
Microsoft Dynamics CRM updates include security, performance, and functional improvements. Making sure
that your Microsoft Dynamics CRM applications have the latest updates helps make sure that your system is
running as efficiently and reliably as it can.
For information about how to manage updates, see the following:
•
•
•
Windows Server Update Services (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=200474)
Update Management in System Center Essentials (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=200475)
Managing Software Updates in Windows Small Business Server 2008
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=200476)
Securing SQL Server
Because Microsoft Dynamics CRM relies on SQL Server, make sure that you take the following measures to
improve the security of your SQL Server database:
•
Make sure that the latest operating system and SQL Server service packs (SP) and updates are applied.
Check the Microsoft Security (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=92540) Web site for the latest details.
• Make sure that all SQL Server data and system files are installed on NTFS partitions for file system-level
security. You should make the files available only to administrative or system-level users through NTFS
permissions. This helps to safeguard against users who access those files when the MSSQLSERVER
service is not running.
• Use a low-privilege domain account. Or, you can specify the Network Service or the Local System
account for SQL Server services. However, we do not recommend that you use these accounts because
Domain User accounts are more appropriate for the SQL Server services. This account should have
minimal rights in the domain and should help contain (but will not stop) an attack on the server if there is
a compromise. In other words, this account should have only local user-level permissions in the domain.
If SQL Server is installed by using a Domain Administrator account to run the services, a compromise of
SQL Server will lead to a compromise of the entire domain. If you have to change this setting, use SQL
Server Enterprise Manager to make the change, because the access control lists (ACLs) on files, the
registry, and user rights will be changed automatically.
• SQL Server authenticates users who have either Windows authentication or SQL Server credentials. We
recommend that you use Windows authentication for single sign-on ease of use and to provide the most
secure authentication method.
• By default, the auditing of the SQL Server system is disabled so that no conditions are audited. This
makes intrusion detection difficult and aids attackers with covering their tracks. At a minimum, you should
enable auditing of failed logins.
• Each SQL login is configured to use the master database as the default database. Although users should
not have rights to the master database, as a best practice, you should change the default for every SQL
login (except those with the SYSADMIN role) to use OrganizationName_MSCRM as the default
database.
For more information, see Securing SQL Server (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=200479).
Securing Exchange Server and Outlook
The following considerations are for Microsoft Exchange Server, and some are specific to Exchange Server
in a Microsoft Dynamics CRM environment:
49
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
•
Exchange Server contains a rich series of mechanisms for precise administrative control of its
infrastructure. In particular, you can use administrative groups to collect Exchange Server objects, such
as servers, connectors, or policies, and then modify the access control lists (ACL) on those administrative
groups to make sure that only certain users can access them. You may, for example, want to give
Microsoft Dynamics CRM administrators some control over servers that directly affect their applications.
When you implement efficient use of administrative groups, you can make sure that you give Microsoft
Dynamics CRM administrators only the rights that they require to perform their jobs.
• Frequently, you may find it convenient to create a separate organizational unit (OU) for Microsoft
Dynamics CRM users, and give Microsoft Dynamics CRM administrators limited administrative rights
over that OU. They can make the change for any user in that OU, but not for any user outside it.
• You should make sure that you adequately protect against unauthorized e-mail relay. E-mail relay is a
feature that lets an SMTP client use an SMTP server to forward e-mail messages to a remote domain. By
default, Exchange Server 2003, Exchange Server 2007, and Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 are
configured to prevent e-mail relay. The settings that you configure will depend on your message flow and
configuration of your Internet service provider's (ISP) e-mail server. However, the best way to approach
this problem is to lock down your e-mail relay settings and then gradually open them to allow e-mail to
flow successfully. For more information, see the Exchange Server Help.
• If you use forward mailbox monitoring, the E-mail Router requires an Exchange Server or POP3compliant mailbox. We recommend that the ACLs on this mailbox be set to prevent other users from
adding server-side rules.
• The Microsoft Dynamics CRM E-mail Router service operates under the Local System account. This
enables the E-mail Router to access a specified user's mailbox and process e-mail in that mailbox.
For more information about how to make Exchange Server more secure, see the following:
•
•
•
Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 Security Hardening Guide
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=92543).
Microsoft Exchange Server 2007, see Security and Protection
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=92544) information in the Microsoft TechNet Library.
Microsoft Exchange Server 2010, see the Deployment Security Checklist
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=200484) on Microsoft TechNet.
Security considerations for Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 introduces several improvements that help make your deployment more
secure. This section provides information and best practices for the Microsoft Dynamics CRM application.
Minimum permissions required for Microsoft Dynamics CRM Setup, services,
and components
Microsoft Dynamics CRM is designed so that its components can run under separate identities. By specifying
a domain user account that is granted only the permissions necessary to enable a particular component to
function, you help secure the system and reduce the likelihood of exploitation.
This topic describes the minimum permissions that are required by the user account for Microsoft Dynamics
CRM services and components.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup
The user account used to run Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup that includes the creation of databases
requires the following minimum permissions:
•
•
•
•
Be a member of the Active Directory Domain Users group. By default, Active Directory Users and
Computers adds new users to the Domain Users group.
Be a member of the Administrators group on the local computer where Setup is running.
Have Local Program Files folder read and write permission.
Be a member of the Administrators group on the local computer where the instance of SQL Server is
located that will be used to store the Microsoft Dynamics CRM databases.
50
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
•
•
•
Have sysadmin membership on the instance of SQL Server that will be used to store the Microsoft
Dynamics CRM databases.
Have organization and security group creation permission in Active Directory directory service.
Alternatively, you can use a Setup XML configuration file to install Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011
when security groups have already been created. For more information see Use the Command Prompt to
Install Microsoft Dynamics CRM (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=207601).
If Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services is installed on a different server, you must add the Content
Manager role at the root level for the installing user account. You must also add the System Administrator
role at the site-wide level for the installing user account.
Services and CRMAppPool IIS application pool identity permissions
The user account that is used for the Microsoft Dynamics CRM services and IIS application pools require the
following permissions:
Important
Microsoft Dynamics CRM services and application pool identity accounts must not be
configured as a Microsoft Dynamics CRM user. Doing so can cause authentication issues and
unexpected behavior in the application for all Microsoft Dynamics CRM users.
Managed service accounts, introduced in Windows Server 2008 R2, are not supported for
running Microsoft Dynamics CRM services.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Sandbox Processing Service
•
•
•
•
•
Domain User membership.
That account must be granted the Logon as service permission in the Local Security Policy.
Folder read and write permission on the \Trace, by default located under \Program Files\Microsoft
Dynamics CRM\Trace, and user account %AppData% folders on the local computer.
Read permission to the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\MSCRM subkey in the
Windows Registry.
The service account may need an SPN for the URL used to access the Web site that is associated with it.
To set the SPN for the Sandbox Processing Service account, run the following command at a command
prompt on the computer where the service is running.
SETSPN –a MSCRMSandboxService/<ComputerName> <service account>
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Asynchronous Processing Service and Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Asynchronous Processing Service (maintenance) services
•
•
•
•
•
•
Domain User membership.
Performance Log Users membership.
That account must be granted the Logon as service permission in the Local Security Policy.
Folder read and write permission on the Trace folder, by default located under \Program Files\Microsoft
Dynamics CRM\, and user account %AppData% folder on the local computer.
Read and write permission to the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\MSCRM and
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\services\MSCRMSandboxService subkeys in the
Windows Registry.
The service account may need an SPN for the URL used to access the Web site that is associated with it.
Deployment Web Service (CRMDeploymentServiceAppPool Application Pool identity)
•
•
•
•
•
Domain User membership
That account must be granted the Logon as service permission in the Local Security Policy.
Local administrator group membership on the computer where the Deployment Web Service is running.
Local administrator group membership on the computer where SQL Server is running.
Sysadmin permission on the instance of SQL Server to be used for the configuration and organization
databases.
51
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
•
•
•
•
Folder read and write permission on the Trace and CRMWeb folders, by default located under \Program
Files\Microsoft Dynamics CRM\, and user account %AppData% folder on the local computer.
Read and write permission to the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\MSCRM and
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\services\MSCRMSandboxService subkeys in the
Windows Registry.
CRM_WPG group membership. This group is used for IIS worker processes. The group is created and
the membership is added during Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup.
The service account may need an SPN for the URL used to access the Web site that is associated with it.
Application Service (CRMAppPool IIS Application Pool identity)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Member of the Active Directory Domain Users group.
Member of the Active Directory Performance Log Users group.
Administrators local group membership on the computer where SQL Server is running.
Administrators local group membership on the computer where the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Web site is
installed.
Folder read and write permission on the Trace and CRMWeb folders, by default located under \Program
Files\Microsoft Dynamics CRM\, and user account %AppData% folder on the local computer.
Read and write permission to the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\MSCRM and
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\services\MSCRMSandboxService subkeys in the
Windows Registry.
CRM_WPG group membership. This group is used for IIS worker processes. The group is created and
the membership is added during Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup.
The service account may need an SPN for the URL used to access the Web site that is associated with it.
IIS Application Pool identities running under Kernel-Mode authentication and SPNs
By default, Internet Information Services (IIS) 7.0 and later versions Web sites are configured to use KernelMode authentication. When you run the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Web site by using Kernel-Mode
authentication, you may not need configure additional Service Principal Names (SPNs) for the Microsoft
Dynamics CRM Application Pool identities.
To determine whether your IIS deployment requires SPNs, see Service Principal Name (SPN) checklist for
Kerberos authentication with IIS 7.0/7.5 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=201806).
Microsoft Dynamics CRM installation files
If you plan to install Microsoft Dynamics CRM from a location on the network, such as a network share, you
must make sure that the correct permissions are applied to the folder, preferably on an NTFS volume, where
the installation files are located. For example, you may want to allow only members of the Domain Admins
group permissions for the folder. This practice can help to reduce the risk of attacks on the installation files
that may compromise or alter them. For more information about how to set permissions on files and folders
on Microsoft Windows operating systems, see Windows Help.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM security best practices
Internet Information Services (IIS) is a mature Web service that is included with Microsoft Windows Server.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM depends on an efficient and secure IIS Web service. Consider the following:
•
•
In the machine.config and web.config configuration files you can determine whether debugging is
enabled, and also if detailed error messages are sent to the client. You should make sure that debugging
is disabled on all production servers, and that a generic error message is sent to the client if a problem
occurs. This avoids unnecessary information about the Web server configuration being sent to the client.
We recommend that the Internet Information Services (IIS) Web root is installed on a non-system NTFS
partition for file system-level security. A non-system partition is other than the partition that contains the
operating system files. (For example, C:\Inetpub is on a typical system partition, whereas D:\Inetpub is
not.)
52
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
•
•
Make sure that the latest operating system and IIS service packs and updates are applied. For the latest
information, see the Microsoft Security (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=92540) Web site.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup creates application pools called CRMAppPool and
CRMDeploymentServiceAppPool that operate under user credentials that you specify during Setup. To
facilitate a least-privileged model, we recommend that you specify separate domain user accounts for
these application pools instead of using the Network Service account. Additionally, we recommend that
no other ASP.NET-connected application be installed under these application pools. For information
about the minimum permissions required for these components, see "Minimum permissions required for
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Setup, service and components (see "Minimum permissions required for
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Setup, services, and components" on page 50)," in this guide.
Important
•
All Web sites that are running on the same computer as the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Web
site can also have access to the Microsoft Dynamics CRM database.
•
If you use a domain user account, before you run Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup,
you may need to verify that the Service Principal Name (SPN) is set correctly for that account,
and if necessary, set the correct SPN. For more information about SPNs and how to set
them, see How to use SPNs when you configure Web applications that are hosted on IIS
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=99582).
Microsoft Dynamics CRM administration best practices
By following some simple rules of administration, you can significantly improve the security of the Microsoft
Dynamics CRM environment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Typically, there is no need for Microsoft Dynamics CRM users to have administrative privileges over the
domain. Therefore, all Microsoft Dynamics CRM user accounts should be restricted to Domain Users
membership. Also, following the principle of least-privilege, anyone who uses the Microsoft Dynamics
CRM system should have minimal rights. This starts at the domain level. A domain user account should
be created and used to run Microsoft Dynamics CRM. Domain administrator accounts should never be
used to run Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
Limit the number of Microsoft Dynamics CRM Deployment Administrator and System Administrator roles
to a few people who are responsible for rule changes. Others who are SQL Server, Microsoft Exchange
Server, or Active Directory directory service administrators do not have to be members of the Microsoft
Dynamics CRM users group.
Make sure that at least two or three trusted people have the Deployment Administrator role. This avoids
system lockout if the primary deployment administrator is unavailable.
In some organizations it is a common practice to reuse passwords across systems and domains. For
example, an administrator responsible for two domains may create Domain Administrator accounts in
each domain that use the same password, and even set local administrator passwords on domain
computers that are the same across the domain. In such a case, a compromise of a single account or
computer could lead to a compromise of the entire domain. Passwords should never be reused in this
manner.
It is also common practice to use Domain Administrator accounts as service accounts for common
services such as back-up systems. However, it is a security risk to use Domain Administrator accounts as
service accounts. The password can easily be retrieved by anyone who has administrative rights over the
computer. In such a case, the compromise could affect the entire domain. Service accounts should never
be domain administrator accounts, and they should be limited in privilege as much as possible.
A domain user account that is specified to run a Microsoft Dynamics CRM service must not also be
configured as a Microsoft Dynamics CRM user. This can cause unexpected behavior in the application.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM security model
Microsoft Dynamics CRM gives you a security model that protects data integrity and privacy and also
supports efficient data access and collaboration. The Microsoft Dynamics CRM security model supports
recommended security best practices. The goals of the model are as follows:
•
Support a licensing model for users.
53
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
•
•
•
•
Give users access only to the needed levels of information that are required to do their jobs.
Categorize users and teams by role and restrict access based on those roles.
Support data sharing so that users can be granted access to objects they do not own for a one-time
collaborative effort.
Prevent access to objects a user does not own or share.
Role-based security
Role-based security in Microsoft Dynamics CRM is a grouping of a set of privileges that consists of the
responsibilities (or tasks that can be performed) of a user or team. Microsoft Dynamics CRM includes a set of
predefined security roles, each of which is a set of rights aggregated to make user security management
easier. Each application deployment can also have its own roles to meet the needs of different users.
Entity-based security
Entity-based security in Microsoft Dynamics CRM is about user and team rights to entities. This applies to
individual instances of entities and is provided by user rights. The relationship between a user right and a
privilege is that user rights apply only after privileges have taken effect. For example, if users do not have the
privilege to read accounts, they will be unable to read any account, regardless of the user rights another user
might grant them to a specific account through sharing.
You combine role-based security and object security to define the overall security rights that users have in
your custom Microsoft Dynamics CRM application.
Object field-based security
You can restrict access to or set field-level security for custom fields in the client application.
You combine role-based security, object security, and field-based security for custom fields to define the
overall security rights that users have in your custom Microsoft Dynamics CRM application.
Deployment-wide administrative-level security
During installation, Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup creates a special deployment-wide administrator
role and attaches it to the user account that is used to run Setup. The Deployment Administrators role is not a
security role and does not appear in the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Web application as such.
Deployment Administrators have complete and unrestricted access to all organizations in Deployment
Manager in the deployment. For example, Deployment Administrators can create new organizations or
disable any existing organization in the deployment. On the other hand, members of the System
Administrators security role only have permissions where the user and security role are located.
Important
When organizations are created by different Deployment Administrators, the associated user
accounts of other Deployment Administrators must be granted db_owner privileges to the
databases that they did not create in order have full access to those organizations.
For more information about security roles and privileges, see the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Help. For more
information about the Deployment Administrators role, see the Deployment Manager Help.
Network ports for Microsoft Dynamics CRM
This section describes the ports that are used for Microsoft Dynamics CRM. This information is helpful as you
configure the network when users connect through a firewall.
Network ports for the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Web application
The following table lists the ports used for a server that is running a Full Server installation of Microsoft
Dynamics CRM. Moreover, except for the Microsoft SQL Server role, and the Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Connector for SQL Server Reporting Services server role, all server roles are installed on the same
computer.
54
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
Protocol
Port
Description
Explanation
TCP
80
HTTP
Default Web application port. This port may be
different as it can be changed during Microsoft
Dynamics CRM Server Setup. For new Web
sites, the default port number is 5555.
TCP
135
MSRPC
RPC endpoint resolution.
TCP
139
NETBIOS-SSN
NETBIOS session service.
TCP
443
HTTPS
Default secure HTTP port. The port number
may differ from the default port. This secure
network transport must be manually
configured. Although this port is not required to
run Microsoft Dynamics CRM, we strongly
recommend it. For information about how to
configure HTTPS for Microsoft Dynamics CRM,
see "Make Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 clientto-server network communications more
secure" in the Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Installing GuideMake Microsoft Dynamics CRM
client-to-server network communications more
secure .
TCP
445
Microsoft-DS
Active Directory directory service required for
Active Directory access and authentication.
UDP
123
NTP
Network Time Protocol.
UDP
137
NETBIOS-NS
NETBIOS name service.
UDP
138
NETBIOS-dgm
NETBIOS datagram service.
UDP
445
Microsoft-DS
Active Directory service required for Active
Directory access and authentication.
UDP
1025
Blackjack
DCOM, used as an RPC listener.
Network ports that are used by the SQL Server that runs the Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Connector for SQL Server Reporting Services server roles
The following table lists the ports that are used for a computer that is running SQL Server and has only SQL
Server and the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Connector for SQL Server Reporting Services server roles installed.
Protocol
Port
Description
Explanation
TCP
135
MSRPC
RPC endpoint resolution.
TCP
139
NETBIOS-SSN
NETBIOS session service.
TCP
445
Microsoft-DS
Active Directory required for Active Directory
access and authentication.
TCP
1433
ms-sql-s
SQL Server sockets service. This port is
required for access to SQL Server.This
number may be different if you have
configured your default instance of SQL
Server to use a different port number or you
are using a named instance.
UDP
123
NTP
Network Time Protocol.
55
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
Protocol
Port
Description
Explanation
UDP
137
NETBIOS-NS
NETBIOS name service.
UDP
138
NETBIOS-dgm
NETBIOS datagram service.
UDP
445
Microsoft-DS
Active Directory service required for Active
Directory access and authentication.
UDP
1025
Blackjack
DCOM, used as an RPC listener.
Known risks and vulnerabilities
This topic describes the risks and vulnerabilities that may exist when you use Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
Mitigations and workarounds are also described when applicable.
Risks when users connect to Microsoft Dynamics CRM over an unsecured network
Issues that can occur when you run Microsoft Dynamics CRM without using Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)
(HTTPS) are as follows:
•
Visual chart definitions can be altered over an unsecured HTTP connection by using "man in the middle"
type attacks. To mitigate this vulnerability, configure Microsoft Dynamics CRM to only use SSL. For
information about how to configure Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 to use SSL, see "Make
Microsoft Dynamics CRM client-to-server network communications more secure" in the Microsoft
Dynamics CRM Installing Guide.
Security recommendations on server role deployments
The following recommendations can help make your Microsoft Dynamics CRM deployment more reliable and
secure.
Server role
Recommendation
Sandbox Processing
Service
Install this role to a dedicated server on a separate virtual
LAN (VLAN) from other computers that are running
Microsoft Dynamics CRM roles. Then, if there is a
malicious plug-in running in the sandbox that exploits the
computer, the network isolation from a separate VLAN can
help protect other Microsoft Dynamics CRM resources
from being compromised.
Help Server
Install this role on a separate computer if you implement
an Internet-facing deployment (IFD). For more information,
see "Isolate the Help Server role for Internet-facing
deployments (see "Isolate the HelpServer role for Internetfacing deployments" on page 56)" in this guide.
Isolate the HelpServer role for Internet-facing deployments
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Internet-facing deployments (IFDs) require anonymous authentication. Because
anonymous Web site authentication is used, the virtual directory used by the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Help
site can be targeted for denial of service (DoS) attacks.
To isolate the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Help pages, and help protect the other Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Server 2011 roles from potential DoS attacks, consider installing the HelpServer role on a separate computer
if you implement an IFD.
For information about the options for installing Microsoft Dynamics CRM roles on separate computers, see
the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Installing Guide.
56
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
For more information about reducing the risk of DoS attacks, see Improving Web Application Security:
Threats and Counter-measures (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=128944).
Claims-based authentication issues and limitations
This topic describes issues and limitations when you use claims-based authentication with Microsoft
Dynamics CRM.
Verify that the identity provider uses a strong password policy
When you use claims-based authentication, we recommend that you verify that the identity provider that is
trusted by the security token service (STS) and, in turn, Microsoft Dynamics CRM, enforces strong password
policies. Microsoft Dynamics CRM itself does not enforce strong passwords. By default, when it is used as an
identity provider, Active Directory directory service enforces a strong password policy.
AD FS 2.0 federation server sessions are valid up to 8 hours even for invalid users
By default, Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS) 2.0 server tokens allocate a Web single sign-on
(SSO) cookie expiration of eight (8) hours. Therefore, even when a user is deactivated or deleted from an
authentication provider, such as AD FS 2.0, as long as the user session is still active the user can continue to
be authenticated to secure resources.
To work around this issue, you can reduce the Web SSO lifetime. To do this, see the AD FS 2.0 Management
Help.
Secure the web.config file
The web.config file that is created by Microsoft Dynamics CRM does not contain connection strings or
encryption keys. However, the web.config file does contain configuration information about the authentication
mode and strategy, ASP.NET view state information, and debug error message display. If this file is modified
with malicious intent it can threaten the server where Microsoft Dynamics CRM is running. To help secure the
web.config file, we recommend the following:
•
•
•
Grant permissions to the folder where the web.config file is located to include only those user accounts
that require it, such as administrators. By default, the web.config file is located in the <drive:>Program
Files\Microsoft Dynamics CRM\CRMWeb folder.
Limit the number of users who have interactive access to Microsoft Dynamics CRM servers, such as
console logon permission.
Disable directory browsing on the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Web site. By default, this is disabled. For
information about how to disable directory browsing, see Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager
Help.
Secure server-to-server communication
By default, Microsoft Dynamics CRM server-to-server communication, such as communication between the
Web application server role and the server that is running Microsoft SQL Server, is not executed over a
security channel. Therefore, information that is transmitted between servers may be susceptible to certain
attacks, such as man-in-the-middle attacks.
We recommend that you implement Internet Protocol security (IPsec) to help protect information that is
transmitted between servers in your organization. IPsec is a framework of open standards for protecting
communications over Internet Protocol (IP) networks through the use of cryptographic security services. For
more information, see IPsec (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=204951).
Supported configurations
This section describes the supported network, domain, and server configurations for Microsoft Dynamics
CRM, which supports multiple domains in either a native- or interim-mode environment.
57
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
Active Directory requirements
The Active Directory directory service requirements are as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The computer that runs Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 and the computer that runs SQL Server,
where the Microsoft Dynamics CRM databases are located, must be in the same Active Directory
directory service domain.
The Active Directory domain where the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 is located must run in
Windows 2000 native, Windows Server 2003 interim, Windows Server 2003 native, or any Windows
Server 2008 domain modes.
The Active Directory forest where the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 is located can run in
Windows 2000, Windows Server 2003 interim, Windows Server 2003, or Windows Server 2008 forest
functional levels.
The accounts that are used to run the Microsoft Dynamics CRM services must be in the same domain as
the computer that is running Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011.
The Microsoft Dynamics CRM security groups (PrivUserGroup, SQLAccessGroup, ReportingGroup,
and PrivReportingGroup) must be in the same domain as the computer that is running Microsoft
Dynamics CRM. These security groups can be located in the same organizational unit (OU) or in different
OUs. To use security groups that are located in different OUs, you must install Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Server 2011 by using an XML configuration file and specify the correct distinguished name for each preexisting security group within the <Groups> element. For more information see the Sample server XML
configuration file for installing with pre-created groups topic in the Installing Guide.
For users who access Microsoft Dynamics CRM from another domain and are not using claims-based
authentication, a one-way trust must exist in which the domain where the Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Server 2011 is located trusts the domain where the users are located.
For users who access Microsoft Dynamics CRM from another forest and are not using claims-based
authentication, a two-way trust must exist between the forests.
Single-server deployment
For small user bases, a Microsoft Dynamics CRM server (any edition) can be deployed in a single-server
configuration, with Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011, SQL Server, SQL Server Reporting Services, and
optionally Microsoft Exchange Server installed and running on the same computer.
Single-server deployments are not recommended for best experience in application performance and disaster
recovery.
There is one limitation to single-server deployments: the server where Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011
is installed cannot also function as a domain controller, unless it is running Microsoft Windows Small
Business Server. If the computer is a member server (not functioning as a domain controller), you can deploy
a single-server Microsoft Dynamics CRM solution on any other supported version of Windows Server.
Important
Except for Microsoft Windows Small Business Server, Microsoft Dynamics CRM is not
supported when you install it on an Active Directory directory service domain controller.
Multiple-server deployment
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 deployments can include multiple servers, which provide additional
performance and scaling benefits. However, with Microsoft Dynamics CRM Workgroup Server 2011, server
roles cannot be installed on separate computers. Therefore, all server roles are installed on every computer
where you install Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011.
58
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
Server Roles (Deployment Manager)
In Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Server, you can install specific server functionality, components, and
services on different computers. These components and services correspond to specific server roles. For
example, customers who have larger user bases can install the Front End Server role on two or more servers
that run Internet Information Services (IIS) to increase throughput performance for users. Or, a Full Server
role can be installed on one computer and Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions on another. If a
server role is missing, Deployment Manager displays a message in the Messages area.
Use one of the following options to install server roles:
•
•
Run the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup Wizard to select one or more server role groups or one
or more individual server roles. If Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 is already installed, you can use
Programs and Features in Control Panel to add or remove server roles.
Configure an XML Setup configuration file and then run Setup at the command prompt to specify a server
role group or one or more individual server roles.You cannot explicitly select the SQL Server "role" for
installation during Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup. This is a logical role that SQL Server sets
when you specify a particular instance of SQL Server, either local or on another computer
(recommended) for use in the Microsoft Dynamics CRM deployment.
Note
At any time after the initial installation of server roles, you can add or remove server roles in
Control Panel. For more information, see the Uninstall, change, or repair, Microsoft Dynamics
CRM Server 2011 topic in the Installing Guide.
Available group server roles
Although these server role groups are recommended for most deployments, any individual server role may be
installed during Setup.
All server roles must be running in your organization’s network to provide a fully functioning system.
Server Role Group
Description
Scope
Installation
Method
Full Server
Contains all roles from Front End Server, Back Deployment
End Server, and Deployment Administration
Server. By default, Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Server Setup deploys the system as Full
Server. In a Full Server deployment, server
roles are not listed separately in Control Panel.
To view the installed roles or make changes,
right-click Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011
Server, click Uninstall/Change, and then click
Configure.
Full
Front End Server
Enables the server roles for running client
applications and applications developed with
the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Software
Development Kit.
Deployment
Group or Full
Back End Server
Includes the server roles that handle
processing asynchronous events, such as
workflows and custom plug-ins. These roles
are usually not exposed to the Internet.
For a list of server roles that are included in
this group, see the following table.
Deployment
Group or Full
Deployment
Enables the server roles for components that
Deployment
Administration Server are used to manage the Microsoft Dynamics
CRM deployment either by using the methods
described in the Microsoft Dynamics CRM
2011 Deployment Software Development Kit or
Group or Full
59
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
Server Role Group
Description
Scope
Installation
Method
the deployment tools.
For a list of server roles that are included in
this group, see the following table.
Available individual server roles
Server Role
Description
Server Group
Scope
Installation
Method
Discovery Web
Service
Finds the organization that a user Front End Server Deployment
belongs to in a multi-tenant
deployment.
Individual,
Group, or Full
Organization
Web Service
Supports running applications that Front End Server Deployment
use the methods described in the
Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Software Development Kit.
Individual,
Group, or Full
Web Application
Server
Runs the Web Application Server
that is used to connect users to
Microsoft Dynamics CRM data.
The Web Application Server role
requires the Organization Web
Service role.
Front End Server Deployment
Individual,
Group, or Full
Help Server
Makes Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Help available to users.
Front End Server Deployment
Individual,
Group, or Full
Asynchronous
Service
Processes queued asynchronous Back End Server Deployment
events, such as workflows, bulk email, or data import.
Individual,
Group, or Full
Sandbox
Processing
Service
Enables an isolated environment Back End Server Deployment
to allow for the execution of
custom code, such as plug-ins.
This isolated environment
reduces the possibility of custom
code affecting the operation of the
organizations.
Individual,
Group, or Full
Deployment
Web Service
Manages the deployment by
using the methods described in
the Microsoft Dynamics CRM
2011 Deployment Software
Development Kit.
Deployment
Administration
Server
Deployment
Individual,
Group, or Full
Deployment
Tools
Consists of the Deployment
Deployment
Manager and Windows
Administration
PowerShell cmdlets. Microsoft
Server
Dynamics CRM administrators
can use the Windows PowerShell
cmdlets to automate Deployment
Manager tasks.
Deployment Manager is a
Microsoft Management Console
(MMC) snap-in that system
Deployment
Individual,
Group, or Full
60
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
Server Role
Description
Server Group
Scope
Installation
Method
administrators can use to manage
organizations, servers, and
licenses for deployments of
Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
Microsoft
Dynamics CRM
Reporting
Extensions
Provides reporting functionality by N/A
interfacing with the Microsoft
Dynamics CRM system and
Microsoft SQL Server Reporting
Services.
Organization
Individual by
using
srsDataConnec
torSetup.exe.
SQL Server
Installs the MSCRM_CONFIG
database on the SQL Server.
Deployment
Individual
during
Microsoft
Dynamics CRM
Server Setup
or from
Deployment
Manager Edit
Organization
Wizard.
N/A
Scope definition
•
•
Deployment. Each instance of the server role services the entire deployment.
Organization. Each instance of the server role services an organization. Therefore, you can use a
different server role instance for a given organization.
Installation method definition
•
Individual, Group, or Full. During Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup, you can install a server role
individually, install one of the three predefined groups of server roles, or perform a Full Server installation
that includes all roles. Or, you can select multiple individual server roles.
• srsDataConnectorSetup.exe. Install this role on the computer where Microsoft SQL Server Reporting
Services is running by using Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services Setup.
For more information about Microsoft Dynamics CRM server roles and multiple server deployment, see the
multiple-server deployment topics in the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Planning Guide that is in the Microsoft
Dynamics CRM 2011 Implementation Guide.
Install server roles by running Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup
During Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 Setup, you can select to install a server role individually, one of
the three predefined group of server roles, or a full server installation that includes all roles. Server roles let
you increase flexibility and scalability of the Microsoft Dynamics CRM deployment. Note that all server roles
must be running and available on the network to provide a fully functioning Microsoft Dynamics CRM system.
Install server roles by running Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 at the command
prompt
For more information see Use the Command Prompt to Install Microsoft Dynamics CRM
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=207601).
61
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 placement
For improved application performance, the computer or computers that run the Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Server 2011 roles and the computer that is running SQL Server should be on the same LAN. This is because
of the large amount of network traffic passing between the computers. This is also recommended with Active
Directory where the computer or computers on which Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 and the Active
Directory domain controller are running should be on the same LAN to guarantee efficient Active Directory
access to Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
SQL Server and Active Directory domain controller placement
For each organization, Microsoft Dynamics CRM stores all customer relationship management data in a SQL
Server database. Make sure that the computer on which SQL Server is running that maintains the Microsoft
Dynamics CRM databases is located near the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011. This means there
should be a high-speed, permanent network connection between the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011
and the computer that is running SQL Server. A network communications failure between these computers
can result in data loss and service becoming unavailable.
The same is true for Active Directory directory service because Microsoft Dynamics CRM depends on it for
security information. If communication with Active Directory is lost, Microsoft Dynamics CRM will not function
correctly. If communication with Active Directory is inefficient, Microsoft Dynamics CRM performance will be
affected. Therefore, it is important to put an Active Directory domain controller on the same high-speed,
permanent network connection as the Microsoft Dynamics CRM and SQL Server computers.
Support for multiple-server topologies
This section provides examples of various multiple-server topologies.
Two-server (team) topology
The two-server topology is intended for organizations that have a small number of users. This example does
not include the required Active Directory directory service domain controllers that must be available on the
network. The following example depicts a possible configuration running a particular version of Windows
Server and component software such as Microsoft Office. For a complete list of the supported versions of
these components, see the topics under System Requirements and Required Components, in this guide.
A two-server deployment topology can consist of the following configuration:
•
•
Computer 1: Running Windows Server 2008 R2, that has Internet Information Services (IIS) (but not a
version that is older than IIS 7.0). Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 is installed as a Full Server.
Computer 2: Running Windows Server 2008 R2 running an instance of Microsoft SQL Server 2008,
Standard Edition.
Five-server (division) topology
For small to midsize user bases, the five-server topology can deliver increased performance. The following
example depicts a possible configuration running a particular version of Windows Server and component
software such as Microsoft Office. For a complete list of the supported versions of these components, see the
topics under System Requirements and Required Components, in this guide.
A five server topology can consist of the following configuration:
•
•
•
•
•
Computer 1: Running on Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2003, or Windows 2000 Server as a
functioning domain controller.
Computer 2: Running on Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2003, or Windows 2000 Server as a
secondary domain controller.
Computer 3: Running on Windows Server 2008 Standard R2, running IIS 7.0 with a Full Server
installation of Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
Computer 4: Running on Windows Server 2008 with an instance of Microsoft SQL Server 2008, and
running Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions.
Computer 5: Running on Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2003 with Microsoft Exchange
Server.
62
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
•
CRMROUTER and CRMCLIENT. These desktop computers are running the E-mail Router and Microsoft
Dynamics CRM for Outlook.
Basic Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 five-server topology
Multi-forest and multi-domain Active Directory topology
For very large user bases that span multiple domains and, in some cases, forests, the following configuration
is supported. The following example depicts a possible configuration running a particular version of Windows
Server and component software such as Microsoft Office. For a complete list of the supported versions of
these components, see the topics under System Requirements and Required Components, in this guide.
Forest A: Parent Domain
•
Computer 1: Running on Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2003, or Windows 2000 Server as a
functioning domain controller.
• Computer 2: Running on Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2003, or Windows 2000 Server as a
secondary domain controller.
• Computer 3: Running Windows Server 2008 R2 with a Full Server installation of Microsoft Dynamics
CRM.
• Computer 4: Running Windows Server 2008 R2 with an instance of SQL Server 2008.
• Computer 5: Running Windows Server 2008 R2 with an instance of Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Reporting
Services.
• Computer 6: Running on Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2003, with Exchange Server.
Forest A: Child Domain
•
Computer 7: Running on Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2003, or Windows 2000 Server as a
functioning domain controller.
• Computer 8: Running on Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2003, or Windows 2000 Server as a
secondary domain controller.
• Computer 9: Running on Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2003 with an instance of Exchange
Server.
• Computer 10: Running Windows Server 2008 or Windows 7 with the E-mail Router.
Forest B: Parent Domain
•
•
•
Computer 11: Running on Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2003, or Windows 2000 Server as a
functioning domain controller.
Computer 12: Running on Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2003, or Windows 2000 Server as a
secondary domain controller.
Computer 13: Running on Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2003 with an installation of
Exchange Server.
63
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
Multi-forest with client Internet access
The following diagram shows a possible deployment that lets users access Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011
through the Internet by implementing AD FS 2.0 federation supported by front-end server roles that are
isolated from user and resource domains on a perimeter network (also known as DMZ, demilitarized zone,
and screened subnet) model.
The following example depicts a possible configuration running a particular version of Windows Server and
component software such as Microsoft Office. For a complete list of the supported versions of these
components, see the topics under System Requirements and Required Components, in this guide.
Internet access to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 topology example
Upgrading from Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0
The only supported upgrade path to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 is from Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0.
This section provides guidelines for preparing for an upgrade to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011. Performing
these tasks in advance can help minimize system downtime and ensure a successful upgrade. Also, this
section describes how Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 upgrades your current system and what happens to
items such as existing reports, customizations, and solutions.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 server roles are not compatible with a Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011
deployment. Therefore, after you upgrade the first Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 server, other Microsoft
Dynamics CRM 4.0 servers that are running in the deployment will become disabled. As each server is
upgraded, the corresponding server will be enabled.
64
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
You can upgrade Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 server roles in any order. However, to have a fully functioning
Microsoft Dynamics CRM deployment, all servers and server roles must be upgraded.
Upgrade options
There are three different upgrade options:
•
Migrate by using a new instance of SQL Server. We recommend this option for upgrading from
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011. Although this option requires a different
computer for Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Server and a different instance of SQL Server, it provides
the least amount of potential downtime for Microsoft Dynamics CRM users since the Microsoft Dynamics
CRM 4.0 deployment can remain functioning until the upgrade is completed and verified.
• Migrate by using the same instance of SQL Server. This option requires a different computer for
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Server, but will upgrade in-place the configuration and default
organization databases using the same instance of SQL Server. If issues occur during the upgrade, you
must roll back to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 to avoid significant downtime.
• In-place upgrade. Although this option does not require a different computer for Microsoft Dynamics
CRM 2011 Server or a different instance of SQL Server, it poses the greatest risk if upgrade issues occur
because a roll back and reinstall of Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 Server will be required to avoid
potential downtime.
For detailed procedures for each of these options, see the Upgrade from Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 topics
in the Installing Guide.
For the latest product information, see the Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Server Readme
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=144915).
Important
Always run a full backup of the Microsoft Dynamics CRM databases before you upgrade to a
new version of the product. For information about database backups, see "Backing up the
Microsoft Dynamics CRM System" in the Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Operating and
Maintaining Guide.
We recommend that for each organization that you upgrade, the volume have free space that
is at least three times the size of the organization database file and four times the size of the
log file. Therefore, if a single organization database and log file are located on the same
volume and are one gigabyte in total, you should have at least seven gigabytes of available
disk space before you perform the upgrade.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM software and components not supported for inplace upgrade
The following products and solutions are not supported by Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 and will not be
upgraded during Microsoft Dynamics CRM Setup. If you upgrade a Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 system that
includes the product or solution listed below, or you install these components after you install Microsoft
Dynamics CRM, these products or solutions may not function correctly. We recommend that you uninstall or
manually remove the component before you upgrade.
•
•
•
•
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Connector for Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Connector for Microsoft Dynamics GP
Microsoft Dynamics BizTalk Adapter
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 List Web Part
Important
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 32-bit versions are not supported for in-place upgrade. Because
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 is available only in 64-bit versions, 32-bit versions must be
migrated. For more information, see "Upgrade Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 for Outlook to
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 for Outlook." For instructions, see "Migrate from 32-bit
versions of Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 Server to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Server" in
the Installing Guide.
65
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 3.0 is not supported for upgrade. However, you can upgrade
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 3.0 to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 by using a trial product key,
and then upgrade to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011. For instructions about how to migrate
from Microsoft Dynamics CRM 3.0 to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011, see "Migrate from
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 3.0 Server to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Server," in the
Installing Guide.
Upgrade product key
Before the upgrade, obtain the product key that you will enter during the upgrade. In Microsoft Dynamics
CRM 2011, the server and client keys are combined so that you enter only one key.
For more information, see "Microsoft Dynamics CRM editions and licensing" in this document.
If you want to make system changes that require changes to your existing Microsoft Dynamics CRM licensing
agreement, see How to buy Microsoft Dynamics (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=111388).
User permissions and privileges
To perform a successful upgrade, the user who runs Microsoft Dynamics CRM Setup must:
•
•
•
•
Have an account in the same Active Directory directory service domain as the server or servers that are
being upgraded.
Be a member of both the Deployment Administrators role and the Microsoft Dynamics CRM System
Administrator security role.
Have administrator rights on the SQL Server and Reporting Services associated with the deployment that
is being upgraded.
Have sufficient permissions to create new security groups in the Active Directory organizational unit that
contains the existing Microsoft Dynamics CRM groups.
Multiple Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 versions in the same domain
Microsoft CRM 1.2, Microsoft Dynamics CRM 3.0, and Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 can coexist in the same
Active Directory directory service domain. However, each version must be installed on a separate server. We
recommend that you associate each version of Microsoft Dynamics CRM with a separate Active Directory
organizational unit. This can prevent confusion if you have to add users or troubleshoot Active Directory
issues.
Sharing a SQL Server
Only one Microsoft Dynamics CRM deployment per instance of SQL Server is supported. This is because
each Microsoft Dynamics CRM deployment requires its own MSCRM_Config database, and multiple
instances of the MSCRM_Config database cannot coexist on the same instance of SQL Server. If you have
multiple SQL Server instances running on the same computer, you can host the databases for multiple
Microsoft Dynamics CRM deployments on the same computer. However, this might decrease system
performance.
Because Microsoft Dynamics CRM 3.0 does not have a database named MSCRM_Config, you can configure
the databases for this version of the product to coexist on the same SQL Server as Microsoft Dynamics CRM
2011 databases. However, to optimize performance we recommend that each version have its own computer
that is running SQL Server.
Tips for a successful upgrade
The following issues, if applicable to your current Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 deployment, should be
resolved before you start the upgrade.
66
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
Maximum number of attributes exceeded
If you have more than 1023 attributes defined for an entity, you must delete the additional attributes before
you run the upgrade. The upgrade will fail with the following message if you have more than 1023 attributes.
CREATE VIEW failed because column 'column_name' in view 'view_name' exceeds the maximum of 1024
columns.
Remove custom database objects
We suggest that, if you have added custom database objects such as triggers, statistics, stored procedures,
and certain indexes, that you remove from the configuration and organization databases. In many cases,
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup displays a warning when these objects are detected.
Remove the ignorechecks registry subkey
If you have manually added the ignorechecks registry subkey on the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011
remove it before you start the upgrade. For more information, see You cannot deploy Microsoft Dynamics
CRM 4.0 by using an account that does not have local administrator permissions on Microsoft SQL Server
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=204888).
Upgrading Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook
Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Microsoft Office Outlook is a Microsoft Office Outlook add-in that lets Microsoft
Dynamics CRM users complete Microsoft Dynamics CRM tasks in the familiar Outlook environment. For
information about the hardware and software requirements for Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook, see the
System Requirements and Required Components section that is part of this guide.
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 for Outlook compatibility with Microsoft Dynamics
CRM 2011 Server
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 for Outlook with Update Rollup 7 or later is compatible with Microsoft Dynamics
CRM 2011 Server. This compatibility eases the upgrade timeline to allow administrators to do a phased
rollout without work stoppages for Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 for Outlook users who have not been
upgraded to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011.
Important
Only Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 for Outlook with Update Rollup 7 or a later Update Rollup
is compatible with Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Server.
When you perform a new installation or migration of Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Server to
a server that has a different computer name, all Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 for Outlook
users must run the Configuration Wizard to point to the new URL. For more information, see
"Upgrade Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 for Outlook to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 for
Outlook" in the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Installing Guide.
In an Internet-facing deployment (IFD), the URL of the Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 Server
will probably change when you upgrade it to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Server. This URL
change is likely because of the requirements for Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) and the Internet
Information Services (IIS) binding limitations (see "Claims-based authentication and IFD
requirements" in this guide). If there is a URL change, either upgrade to Microsoft Dynamics
CRM 2011 for Outlook or use the Configuration Wizard to point Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0
to the new URL. For more information about how to configure Microsoft Dynamics CRM for
Outlook, see "Task 2: Configure Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook" in the Microsoft
Dynamics CRM Installing Guide.
Suggestions for how to avoid client reconfiguration due to a change in the URL
To avoid Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook reconfiguration and the potential down time or data loss that
may occur during the period of application inaccessibility, we recommend that you consider one of the
possible solutions to avoid a change in the Microsoft Dynamics CRM URL:
67
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
•
Add the appropriate DNS resource record. Then, users will automatically be redirected to the new
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Server after database import and upgrade. For information about how to
add resource records, see your DNS documentation, such as DNS Manager Help.
• For migration scenarios, one possible strategy is to use the same computer name of the existing
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 Server computer. This strategy requires removing the Microsoft Dynamics
CRM 4.0 server before joining the Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 server to the domain, configuring the
IIS bindings to use the same bindings as the Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 Web site, and updating DNS
records as necessary to correctly resolve to the new Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Web site.
For information about how to migrate Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Server, see "Upgrade from Microsoft
Dynamics CRM 4.0 Server 32-bit editions" in the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Installing Guide.
Notes about upgrading Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook
•
•
Base languages must match. To upgrade Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook, the base language of
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 for Outlook must match the base language of Microsoft Dynamics CRM
4.0 for Outlook.
Upgrade is required to continue offline access after server upgrade. After the Microsoft Dynamics
CRM Server 2011 in an organization has been upgraded to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Server, users
must upgrade to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 for Outlook to continue accessing data offline. For
example, a particular user runs Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 for Outlook and accesses data offline. This
user's organization is upgraded from Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011.
Although there now exists a client-server mismatch, the user can still connect to the server and can still
access data online. However, to go offline again, the user must upgrade to Microsoft Dynamics CRM
2011 for Outlook.
Cross-architecture upgrade of Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook
If you intend to change to a different architecture (move from 32-bit to 64-bit or vice versa) while upgrading,
note the following:
•
In-place cross-architecture upgrade is not supported. Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 for Outlook was
available only in a 32-bit architecture. If you are running Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 for Outlook, you
can perform an in-place upgrade only to 32-bit Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 for Outlook. This also
applies to Office 2010: If you are running and intend to retain 32-bit Office 2010, you can upgrade only to
32-bit Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 for Outlook.
• Cross-architecture upgrade requires uninstalling and reinstalling. To change to a different
architecture, perform the following steps in the order listed:
1. Uninstall Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 for Outlook.
2. Uninstall Microsoft Office.
3. Install Microsoft Office in the new architecture.
4. Install Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 for Outlook in the new architecture.
For more information about installing Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 for Outlook, see "Task 1: Install
Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook", in the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Installing Guide.
Upgrade issues and considerations
This section describes the known issues that may occur as a result of upgrading from Microsoft Dynamics
CRM 4.0 to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011. This section also describes the things that may impact your
deployment after the upgrade is complete.
What happens to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 queues?
In Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011, managing and using queues is significantly simplified. There are three
types of queues in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0:
•
•
•
Public queues created by the business unit.
Private queues that contain items assigned to users that they have not started working on.
Work in progress (WIP) queues that contain items assigned to users that they are currently working on.
68
Chapter 4: Planning Deployment
In Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011, public, private, and WIP queues are replaced with a general purpose
queue that can be owned by a user or team. Access to a queue is determined by the ownership type, security
roles, and entity privileges granted to users or teams.
When you upgrade Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 Server to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011, the following
behavior occurs:
•
Each user’s private queue is converted to the user’s default queue and renamed using the user’s full
name.
• All WIP queues remain unchanged.
• All public queues remain unchanged.
• The Route Message (CrmService) message and the Handle Message (CrmService) message will
continue to work as they did in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0.
If you want upgraded queues to function in a manner that is similar to a new installation of Microsoft
Dynamics CRM 2011, you can implement the following steps after the upgrade to Microsoft Dynamics CRM
2011 is complete:
1. Route all the items contained in the WIP queue to the user's default queue from the Queue Item grid.
2. Delete or deactivate the WIP queue from the Queues grid.
In addition, you can revise and change the security roles and privileges of the users in your organization to
give them the appropriate level of access to queues.
For more information about queues, see the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Help.
For more information about how the new queue behavior impacts solutions that use the methods that are
described in the Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 Software Development Kit (SDK), see the Microsoft Dynamics
CRM Software Development Kit.
What happens to ISV solutions?
During upgrade, independent software vendor (ISV) solutions will be moved from
<drive>:\InetPub\wwwroot\ISV to the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 installation folder. By default, the
installation folder is located at <drive>:\Program Files\Microsoft Dynamics CRM\CRMWeb\ISV.
Warning
These solutions may not work correctly after you upgrade. Contact the ISV for the solution to
determine if it is compatible with Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011.
What happens to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 Mobile Express?
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 Mobile Express is now integrated into Microsoft Dynamics CRM. During
upgrade, Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 Mobile Express will also be upgraded.
----------------------- Send Feedback About This Chapter ---------------------We appreciate hearing from you. To send your feedback, click the following link and type your comments in
the message body.
Note
The subject-line information is used to route your feedback. If you remove or modify the
subject line, we may be unable to process your feedback.
Send Feedback (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=200785)
69
Chapter 5
Planning Deployment Advanced Topics
This chapter describes some of the advanced topics about how to plan the deployment of Microsoft
Dynamics CRM for an enterprise business.
In This Chapter
Advanced deployment options for Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 ................................ 71
Advanced deployment options for Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook .................................. 74
Advanced deployment options for Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Server 2011
This section describes advanced deployment options for Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011.
Update Setup files by using a local package
The update Setup feature can indicate if you have the latest updates to Microsoft Dynamics CRM before you
run Setup. With this feature, you can specify where Setup locates the MSP package that is applied to the
Setup files. This gives you additional control over the update, and also lets you apply the update package
locally without the need of an Internet connection.
To specify the location, you must edit the XML Setup configuration file <Patch> element and then run Setup
from the command prompt. For more information see Use the Command Prompt to Install Microsoft
Dynamics CRM (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=207601).
Add or remove server roles
Use one of the following options to install server roles:
•
Run the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup Wizard to select one or more server role groups or one
or more individual server roles. If Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 is already installed, you can use
Programs and Features in Control Panel to add or remove server roles.
Configure an XML Setup configuration file and then run Setup at the command prompt to specify a server
role group or one or more individual server roles.
Configure a Microsoft Dynamics CRM Internet-facing deployment
You can deploy Microsoft Dynamics CRM so that remote users can connect to the application through the
Internet. The following Internet-facing deployment (IFD) configurations are supported:
• Microsoft Dynamics CRM for internal users only
• Microsoft Dynamics CRM for internal users and IFD access
• Microsoft Dynamics CRM for IFD-only access
Configuring an IFD enables access to Microsoft Dynamics CRM from the Internet, outside the company
firewall, without using a virtual private network (VPN) solution. Microsoft Dynamics CRM configured for
Internet access uses claims-based authentication to verify credentials of external users. When you configure
Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Internet access, integrated Windows authentication must remain in place for
internal users.
71
Chapter 5: Planning Deployment Advanced Topics
To let users access the application over the Internet, the server that is running Internet Information Services
(IIS) where the Microsoft Dynamics CRM application is installed must be available over the Internet.
For more information, see Claims-based authentication and IFD requirements in the "System Requirements
and Required Components" section of this guide.
Claims-based authentication
The claims-based security model extends traditional authentication models to include other directory sources
that contain information about users. This identity federation lets users from various sources, such as Active
Directory Domain Services (AD DS), customers via the Internet, or business partners, authenticate with
native single sign-on.
The claims-based model has three components: the relying party, which needs the claim to decide what it is
going to do; the identity provider, which provides the claim; and the user, who decides what if any information
they want to provide. Microsoft provides a claims-based access solution called Active Directory Federation
Services (AD FS) 2.0. AD FS 2.0 enables Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) to be an identity
provider in the claims-based access platform.
AD FS 2.0 consists of the following components:
•
AD FS 2.0 Framework provides developers pre-built .NET security logic for building claims-aware
applications, enhancing either ASP.NET or WCF applications.
• Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS) 2.0 is a security token service (STS) for issuing and
transforming claims, enabling federations, and managing user access. Active Directory Federation
Services (AD FS) 2.0 supports the WS-Trust, WS-Federation, and Security Assertion Markup Language
(SAML) protocols. Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS) 2.0 can also issue manage information
cards for AD DS users.
• Windows CardSpace helps users navigate access decisions and is designed for developers to build
customer authentication experiences for users.
For more information about AD FS 2.0, see:
•
•
AD FS 2.0 home page: Active Directory Federation Services 2.0
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=204234)
AD FS 2.0: AD FS 2.0 RTW (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=204237)
Implement a strong password policy
To reduce the risk of "brute-force attacks" we strongly recommend that you implement a strong password
policy for remote users who are accessing the domain where Microsoft Dynamics CRM is installed. For more
information about how to implement a strong password policy in Microsoft Windows Server, see Creating a
Strong Password Policy (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=203901) on Microsoft TechNet and the
"Understanding User Accounts" topic in Active Directory Users and Computers Help.
Internet connection firewall
The Windows Server 2008 family provides firewall software to prevent unauthorized connections to the server
from remote computers. For more information about how to configure the Internet connection firewall for
Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager, see the "Before Configuring IIS" topic in IIS Help.
For information about how to make a Web site available on the Internet, see the "Domain Name Resolution"
topic in the IIS Help.
Proxy/firewall server
If you do not have a secure proxy and firewall solution on your network, we recommend that you use a
dedicated proxy and firewall server, such as Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration Server (ISA). ISA
Server can act as a gateway between the Internet and the Microsoft Dynamics CRM application. ISA Server
protects your IT infrastructure while providing users with fast and secure remote access to applications and
data. For more information, see Internet Security and Acceleration Server
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=102704).
72
Chapter 5: Planning Deployment Advanced Topics
Use the following steps as configuration guidelines.
Step 1: Configure Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 for Internet access
You can configure Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 for Internet access. To do this, run the Configure
Claims-Based Authentication Wizard, and then when you run the Internet-Facing Deployment Configuration
Wizard Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 is installed. For more information, see the Deployment
Manager Help.
Step 2: Configure Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook to connect to the Microsoft
Dynamics CRM Server 2011 by using the Internet
For Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Microsoft Office Outlook to be able to access the Microsoft Dynamics CRM
Server 2011 over the Internet, you must specify the external Web address that will be used to access the
Internet-facing Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011. To do this, you must install Microsoft Dynamics CRM
for Outlook, and then run the Configuration Wizard. Then, during configuration, type the external Web
address in the External Web address box. If you install server roles, this Web address must specify where
the Discovery Web Service role is installed. For more information about how to configure Microsoft Dynamics
CRM for Outlook, see "Task 2: Configure Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook" in the Microsoft Dynamics
CRM Installing Guide.
Key management in Microsoft Dynamics CRM
To verify the identity of people and organizations, and to guarantee content integrity, Microsoft Dynamics
CRM generates digital certificates. These electronic credentials bind the identity of the certificate owner to a
pair of electronic keys (public and private) that can be used to digitally encrypt and sign information. The
credentials ensure that the keys actually belong to the person or organization specified.
Key types
Microsoft Dynamics CRM uses three kinds of private encryption keys for deployments accessed over the
Internet:
•
•
•
CRM ticket key (Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 clients only). This key creates CRM tickets, which are
generated when a Microsoft Dynamics CRM user logs on to the system. In addition, every time that a
request is made to the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011, the CRM ticket key decrypts the CRM
ticket to validate users without forcing the user to re-enter credentials.
Web remote procedure call (WRPC) token key. This key is used to generate a security token, which
helps make sure that the request originated from the user who made the request. This security token
decreases the likelihood of certain attacks, such as a cross-site request forgery (one-click) attack.
CRM e-mail credentials key. This key encrypts the credentials for the E-mail Router, an optional
component of Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
Key regeneration and renewal
CRM ticket keys are automatically generated and renewed and then distributed, or deployed, to all computers
running Microsoft Dynamics CRM or running a specific Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 role. These
keys are regenerated periodically and, in turn, replace the previous keys. By default, key regeneration occurs
every 24 hours.
Key-management logging
Microsoft Dynamics CRM records encryption-key events in the Application log. By using the Event Viewer,
you can filter on the Source column and look for MSCRMKeyServiceName entries, where ServiceName is
the key management service, such as MSCRMKeyArchiveManager or MSCRMKeyGenerator.
Key storage
Cryptographic keys are stored in the Microsoft Dynamics CRM configuration database (MSCRM_CONFIG).
73
Chapter 5: Planning Deployment Advanced Topics
Warning
By default, encryption keys are not stored in the configuration database in an encrypted
format. We strongly recommend that you specify encryption when you run Setup.
How to encrypt Microsoft Dynamics CRM keys
Before you run Microsoft Dynamics CRM Setup, you can add the <encryptionkeys> entry in the XML
configuration file, and then run Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup at the command prompt. During the
installation, Setup creates a server master key and database master key, which are used to encrypt Microsoft
Dynamics CRM certificates.
For more information see Use the Command Prompt to Install Microsoft Dynamics CRM
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=207601).
Multi-organization deployment
In the Organizations area of the Deployment Manager, you create, add, enable, disable, or remove
organizations.
Important
There are several names that cannot be used to name an organization. To view a list of
reserved names, open the dbo.ReservedNames table in the MSCRM_CONFIG database,
and review the names in the ReservedName column.
For more information about organization management in Microsoft Dynamics CRM, see the Deployment
Manager Help.
Advanced deployment options for Microsoft Dynamics CRM for
Outlook
This section describes advanced deployment options that can be used to deploy Microsoft Dynamics CRM
for Outlook, such as by using deployment management software or by using Group Policy.
For more information see Advanced deployment options for Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook
(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=207603).
----------------------- Send Feedback About This Chapter ---------------------We appreciate hearing from you. To send your feedback, click the following link and type your comments in
the message body.
Note
The subject-line information is used to route your feedback. If you remove or modify the
subject line, we may be unable to process your feedback.
Send Feedback (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=200787)
74
Download PDF
Similar pages