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Lookout
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Lookout Operator’s Manual
Lookout Operator’s Manual
September 2004
371383A-01
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Conventions
The following conventions appear in this manual:
»
The » symbol leads you through nested menu items and dialog box options
to a final action. The sequence File»Page Setup»Options directs you to
pull down the File menu, select the Page Setup item, and select Options
from the last dialog box.
This icon denotes a tip, which alerts you to advisory information.
This icon denotes a note, which alerts you to important information.
bold
Bold text denotes items that you must select or click in the software, such
as menu items and dialog box options. Bold text also denotes parameter
names.
italic
Italic text denotes variables, emphasis, a cross reference, or an introduction
to a key concept. This font also denotes text that is a placeholder for a word
or value that you must supply.
monospace
Text in this font denotes text or characters that you should enter from the
keyboard, sections of code, programming examples, and syntax examples.
This font is also used for the proper names of disk drives, paths, directories,
programs, subprograms, subroutines, device names, functions, operations,
variables, filenames, and extensions.
monospace bold
Bold text in this font denotes the messages and responses that the computer
automatically prints to the screen. This font also emphasizes lines of code
that are different from the other examples.
monospace italic
Italic text in this font denotes text that is a placeholder for a word or value
that you must supply.
Contents
Chapter 1
Introduction to Lookout
Hardware and Software Requirements ..........................................................................1-1
Installing Lookout..........................................................................................................1-2
Activating Lookout ........................................................................................................1-3
Starting Lookout for the First Time.................................................................1-3
Changing I/O Count Activation.......................................................................1-4
Adding Client Connections .............................................................................1-4
Lookout Environment ....................................................................................................1-5
Menu Bar .........................................................................................................1-6
Status Bar.........................................................................................................1-6
Lookout Workspace.........................................................................................1-6
Control Panels .................................................................................................1-6
Alarms Window...............................................................................................1-7
Operator Input and Navigation ......................................................................................1-7
Virtual Keypad ................................................................................................1-7
Virtual Keyboard .............................................................................................1-7
Setting System Options..................................................................................................1-8
Chapter 2
Serial COM Port Communication
Defining Serial COM Port Settings ...............................................................................2-1
Setting Receive Gap ........................................................................................2-3
Selecting the Serial Connection.......................................................................2-3
Hardwired Serial Connection............................................................2-3
Dial-Up Serial Communication ........................................................2-3
Radio (RTS/CTS) Serial Connection ................................................2-5
Serial Port Hangup ..........................................................................................2-7
Diagnosing Serial COM Port Problems.........................................................................2-7
Chapter 3
Alarms and Events
Selecting Processes to Monitor for Alarms ...................................................................3-1
Viewing Alarms and Events ..........................................................................................3-2
Viewing Alarms and Events in the Alarms Window ......................................3-3
Setting Alarm Display Options .......................................................................3-5
Filtering Alarms in the Alarms Window .........................................................3-5
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Lookout Operator’s Manual
Contents
Printing Alarms and Events........................................................................................... 3-7
Printing Alarms and Events Manually ............................................................ 3-7
Printing Alarms and Events as They Happen ................................................. 3-8
Acknowledging and Clearing Alarms ........................................................................... 3-8
Silencing Audible Alarms ............................................................................................. 3-9
Data Quality Problems .................................................................................................. 3-9
Chapter 4
Security
Creating and Editing User Accounts ............................................................................. 4-1
Logging On and Off ...................................................................................................... 4-1
Control Security............................................................................................................. 4-2
Chapter 5
Networking and Running an Application
Synchronizing Lookout Computers............................................................................... 5-1
Monitoring Windows Services ...................................................................................... 5-3
Running Lookout Processes .......................................................................................... 5-3
Selecting Startup Process Files ....................................................................... 5-3
Appendix A
Technical Support and Professional Services
Glossary
Index
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1
Introduction to Lookout
This chapter explains how to install and run Lookout and describes the
basics of the Lookout environment.
Hardware and Software Requirements
Lookout requires the following:
•
Pentium class or equivalent PC running at 266 MHz or faster
•
At least 128 MB RAM
•
200 MB free disk space, plus possibly 100 MB or more, depending
on how much historical data you intend to log to the Citadel database;
you should also have about 50 MB of disk space for file swapping on
Windows 2000/NT/XP computers
•
Windows 2000, Windows NT version 4 or later with service pack 6, or
Windows XP
•
Internet Explorer 5 or later
•
Monitor display setting of at least 800 × 600 pixels
•
Network card and TCP/IP networking installed on the computers
you want to connect, if you intend to take advantage of Lookout
networking
Performance of Lookout depends on the number, size, and complexity of processes
you are running. While the minimum requirements are fine for some processes, you should
plan on using more powerful computer configurations for complex and data intensive
applications.
Note
•
You must be properly set up on a network with TCP/IP protocols
installed if you want to use the networking capabilities of Lookout.
You must be able to ping any computer on your network that you
intend to have as a part of your Lookout network. To test this, access
a command prompt and enter the following command:
Ping compname
where compname is the name of the computer you want to ping.
© National Instruments Corporation
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Lookout Operator’s Manual
Chapter 1
Introduction to Lookout
If TCP/IP is functioning properly on your computer, you should
receive a response that looks something like the following example:
Pinging compname [123.45.67.89] with 32 bytes of
data:
Reply from 123.45.67.89: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
Reply from 123.45.67.89: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
Reply from 123.45.67.89: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
Reply from 123.45.67.89: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
If TCP/IP is not working properly on your computer, consult your system
administrator. Refer to Chapter 5, Networking and Running
an Application, for more information on networking and network
configuration with Lookout.
If your computer does not have a command prompt available in the Windows Start
menu or in Start»Programs, select Start»Run and enter cmd.exe in the Run dialog box.
This opens a command prompt you can use for the ping command.
Tip
Installing Lookout
This section describes how to install Lookout. For more information about
upgrading from earlier versions of Lookout, refer to the release notes for
this version of Lookout.
1.
Shut down all applications that may currently be using ODBC such as
spreadsheets, word processors, database programs, MS Query, and
similar applications.
2.
Insert the Lookout CD into your CD drive.
3.
The Lookout CD-ROM has autorun capability. If for some reason the
autorun fails to start the CD installation routine, select Start»Run
and enter N:\Lookout\setup.exe where N represents your
CD-ROM drive. (To install the free client version, enter
N:\Free_Client\setup.exe. To install the Lookout Player,
enter N:\LookoutPlayer\lk60_web.exe.) Then click OK.
Choosing a custom installation provides you with certain installation
options, including the following:
•
Lookout Operator’s Manual
Lookout allows you to choose whether to install its help. Use
Browse to enter the name of an alternate directory or click Next
to accept the recommended directory name.
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Chapter 1
4.
Introduction to Lookout
•
During installation, Lookout can install its ODBC driver. You are
able to access Lookout’s Citadel database via ODBC.
•
When installing Lookout on a Windows 2000/NT/XP system, you
are presented with a list of options on what you may install. Make
sure you install the optional NT Keyboard Driver Filter under
Windows NT if you want to be able to block unauthorized users
from using certain keyboard commands such as <Alt-Tab> to
switch out of Lookout.
Follow the remaining instructions to complete the Lookout
installation.
Activating Lookout
If this is the first installation of Lookout on the computer you are using, or
if you have any lost or corrupted your activation, you are prompted to
activate Lookout the first time you launch it. Until you activate it, Lookout
is limited to 50 I/O points and one client connection, and it only runs for
30 days.
When you activate Lookout, you unlock it for permanent use at your
appropriate I/O count. If you do not activate Lookout by the end of the
30-day period, it lapses to a demo system.
Starting Lookout for the First Time
Launch Lookout by selecting Start»Programs»National Instruments
Lookout 6.0.
A dialog box appears asking you to activate Lookout. If you are ready to
activate Lookout, click Activate Lookout. The NI Activation Wizard
appears. Follow the instructions on the screen to activate Lookout.
Serial numbers for earlier versions of Lookout do not work to activate
Lookout 6. To upgrade to Lookout 6, contact National Instruments for
assistance.
If you enter the proper information correctly, Lookout launches with the
default process running. If you are certain that you typed the information
correctly and the activation fails, contact National Instruments for
assistance.
© National Instruments Corporation
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Chapter 1
Introduction to Lookout
Changing I/O Count Activation
If you want to change the number of Lookout I/O points you are using,
or make other changes in system capabilities, first contact National
Instruments to obtain a new Lookout serial number. Then select
Options»System»Activate Lookout and re-activate Lookout with the new
serial number.
Adding Client Connections
You are limited in the number of client connections you are allowed to
maintain in Lookout. You can add or change client connection licenses
from any copy of Lookout. For example, if you have a copy of Lookout
running a server process with four clients connected and need to increase
the number of client connections to 10, you need only get a client
connection upgrade serial number and re-activate Lookout with the new
serial number.
If you are logged on to a Windows 2000/NT/XP computer as Guest or Restricted
User, certain Lookout tasks will not work correctly, because they require writing to the
registry or WINNT folder. These tasks include creating a user account, adding a client
license, and registering a Logos computer.
Note
To add or change client connection information in Lookout, select
Options»System from the menu, and click the Activate Client
Connection button. The NI Activation Wizard appears. Follow the
instructions on the screen.
If your activation attempt fails, check to make sure you entered all of the
information correctly. Contact National Instruments if correcting these
entries does not fix the problem.
A newly installed version of Lookout will run with one client connection
for 30 days before reverting to demo program mode.
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Chapter 1
Introduction to Lookout
Lookout Environment
Figure 1-1 shows a Lookout screen.
3
2
1
4
11
5
6
10
1
2
3
Menu Bar
Title Bar
Process Name
8
9
4
5
6
Control Panel
Alarms Window
Active Alarms
7
8
9
Navigation Arrows
Organization
User Logged In
7
10 Time and Date
11 Minimized Control Panel
Figure 1-1. Lookout Environment
Depending on the security access level of the user logged in to Lookout,
certain menus and tools may be unavailable. Refer to the Lookout Help for
more information about Lookout Menu Commands.
© National Instruments Corporation
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Lookout Operator’s Manual
Chapter 1
Introduction to Lookout
Menu Bar
The menu bar displays the currently available menu commands, which
change depending on whether Lookout is in run mode, edit mode, or is open
without any processes running. These commands may or may not be
available to the operator, depending on his or her security level.
Status Bar
When Lookout is in run mode, the status bar is gray. The time and date are
displayed on the left end of the bar. The account name of the currently
logged on operator comes next. The company name as entered during
activation appears in the middle, and the alarm status is on the right end of
the status bar. The control panel navigation arrows, which scroll through
various control panels, may or may not be visible, depending on your
system options settings.
Lookout Workspace
The workspace is the area in which you view and operate control panels.
The visible workspace on your screen is only a window into the Lookout
virtual workspace. If control panels or their associated icons are partially or
completely outside the visible workspace, Lookout automatically displays
horizontal and vertical scroll bars.
Control Panels
Control panels provide the display area for any switches, knobs, bar graphs,
digital displays, trend graphs, and other components that you want to use to
monitor and control your operations.
You can move the panels around the screen by grabbing the title bar of a
panel with the cursor and dragging it to a new location. There is no limit on
the number of control panels you can create or the number of objects
displayed on any one panel.
There are three types of control panels: normal, pop-up, and pop-up with
no icon. A normal control panel can be maximized, normal size, or
minimized within the Lookout workspace. Control panels can also
“pop up” when an event occurs, such as when a pushbutton is pressed or
when an alarm is activated. When a pop-up control panel is displayed, it
remains on top of all other panels until you minimize it.
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Chapter 1
Introduction to Lookout
Alarms Window
You can choose how the Alarms Window is displayed by selecting
Alarms»Display Options. In Figure 1-1, the Alarms Window is set to
display at the bottom of the workspace.
Operator Input and Navigation
Operators may navigate using a mouse, trackball, touchscreen, or
keyboard. When the cursor moves over a controllable object, the cursor
turns into a hand, indicating you now have control of the object.
Controllable objects include such things as Switches, Pots, and
Pushbuttons.
When using a keyboard, the arrow keys move the cursor around the screen.
The <Tab> key jumps the cursor from one controllable object to another,
and the <Space> bar acts as the left mouse button, so you can click a
controllable object without actually using a mouse.
Virtual Keypad
When you are in run mode, you can click a digital Pot control and bring up
a virtual keypad to enter numeric values, either with a mouse or a
touchscreen.
Virtual Keyboard
Lookout also has a virtual keyboard you can use with a touchscreen or a
mouse.
To enable the virtual keyboard, select Options»System and then check
Left Mouse Click or Right Mouse Click in the Virtual Keyboard
Pops Up On section of the dialog box.
© National Instruments Corporation
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Lookout Operator’s Manual
Chapter 1
Introduction to Lookout
When this feature is enabled, clicking in a data entry field or touching
the field on a touchscreen displays the virtual keyboard, as shown in the
following figure.
Setting System Options
You can configure certain system options in Lookout that determine the
way your version of Lookout operates. Select Options»System from
the menu bar. The System Options dialog box appears as shown in the
following figure. Some default settings may be different for your computer.
Only users logged on with security levels of 9 or greater can access the System
Options dialog box.
Note
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Chapter 1
Introduction to Lookout
•
If security level is below (0-9)—You can set local limits on how
Lookout runs when users with different security levels are logged on.
Use these selection boxes to set these limits. Refer to Chapter 4,
Security, for full details on the security features of Lookout.
•
Log alarms to—If you have a printer directly connected to your
computer, you can direct that all alarms be printed when they occur.
Set this field to the communications port to which your printer is
connected. Refer to Chapter 3, Alarms and Events, for information on
the alarm and event logging features of Lookout.
•
Virtual Keyboard Pops Up On—Lookout features a virtual keyboard
that you can access by clicking a control that accepts a text or numeric
input. You can set whether a right-click or a left-click pops up this
keyboard.
© National Instruments Corporation
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Lookout Operator’s Manual
Chapter 1
Introduction to Lookout
•
Show panel navigation arrows in status bar—Select this checkbox
if you want to use panel navigation arrows. These arrows, which
appear in the right side of the status bar, activate control panels in the
order in which you last accessed them. This feature is most convenient
when you have a large number of control panels in a process and need
to cycle through a subset of them several times in a short period
of time.
•
Always show Object Explorer in edit mode—Select this checkbox
if you want to always show Object Explorer when you switch Lookout
from run mode to edit mode.
•
Computer Name—This field shows the network name of the
computer you are working on. If this field is blank, and you intend to
use the networking capability of Lookout, you need to check your
network settings to make sure your computer is properly named for
network operations.
•
Citadel Database—These fields set the default destination for
historical data logged by Lookout. All processes running under a
single instance of Lookout will use this database to log data to Citadel,
unless this setting was overwritten when the process was created.
You set the Default Name and the Default Computer separately. Use
the database name for the Default Name setting and the fully qualified
computer name for the Default Computer setting. Click Browse to
select an existing database or to create a new database. Default Path
is the computer-relative path to the database shown in Default Name.
Default Path is filled in automatically and is read-only.
•
Lookout Operator’s Manual
Activate Lookout and Activate Client Connection—Click these
buttons to enter new activation or serial number information.
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Serial COM Port Communication
2
This chapter describes how Lookout regulates serial port usage so that
objects gain access to serial ports in an orderly and timely fashion.
Defining Serial COM Port Settings
Complete the following steps to configure serial port settings for
hardwired, radio, and dial-up communications.
You must define serial port communication settings on every copy of Lookout.
If you have more than one instance of Lookout running on the same computer, each
instance must use a different serial port.
Note
Because multiple Lookout instances cannot share the same serial port, if it is necessary
for two processes to access the same serial port, they need to be run in the same Lookout
instance. If you are designing a system with multiple server process files, and those server
files all access the same serial port on a single computer, they need to be run in the same
Lookout instance.
© National Instruments Corporation
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Lookout Operator’s Manual
Chapter 2
Serial COM Port Communication
Lookout Operator’s Manual
1.
In Lookout, select Options»Serial Ports. The Serial Port Settings
dialog box appears.
2.
In the Serial port field, select the communication port you are
defining. Microsoft Windows supports up to 64 serial ports; however,
most computers support only two serial ports without additional
hardware.
3.
Define the serial port configuration for the appropriate communication
port. The rest of this chapter contains complete descriptions of the
configuration options.
4.
Click Accept to save the configuration for the serial port.
5.
Click Quit to exit.
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Chapter 2
Serial COM Port Communication
Setting Receive Gap
The Receive gap setting is available for all serial connection types.
This number specifies the number of empty bytes (or amount of time) a
driver receives from a controller before the driver recognizes the end of a
message frame and asks for another message. Normally you should leave
this at the default setting of 20. However, if you are experiencing garbled
communication alarms, you might try increasing this number to as high as
100 to allow more time before Lookout determines it has received a
complete message.
Selecting the Serial Connection
Hardwired Serial Connection
Hardwired serial connections require no hardware handshaking for line
control. Use this setting for all serial communication types except dial-up
telephone and remote radio transceivers. You should also use this setting
when directly connecting Lookout to the master repeater on a radio system
or through a leased-line modem. Because a master repeater is a full-duplex
device that does not require keying and unkeying of the frequency, it acts
much like a physically hardwired network. Other hardwired connection
types include RS-232, RS-422, RS-485, and leased telephone lines.
Dial-Up Serial Communication
Use the Dial-up serial connection when you use a modem in conjunction
with a switched telephone line (not leased line). You can customize the
dial-up settings for your particular modem and phone line.
The default Dialing prefix settings are based on the Hayes Corporation
AT command set, which is an industry standard for data modems. Table 2-1
explains the Lookout default settings. For additional commands, refer to
your modem operation documentation.
© National Instruments Corporation
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Lookout Operator’s Manual
Chapter 2
Serial COM Port Communication
Table 2-1. Dialing Prefix
Prefix
Description
AT
Attention code that must precede all commands
Xn
Result code and dialing options: X4 waits for dial tone
before dialing, and recognizes busy signal
Mn
Speaker on or off: M for speaker always off
Vn
Verbal or numeric result codes: V for numeric result codes
En
Local echo mode: E for no echo
D
Dial phone number with modifiers: P for pulse; T for tone
When you use an external dial-up modem with Lookout, the DTR line in
your cable between the modem and the computer must be wired straight
through. This line is pin 20 on a 25-pin RS-232 connector and pin 4 on
a 9-pin connector. Lookout uses the DTR line to command the modem to
disconnect (hang up) and return to the command mode.
Some factory modems are not configured to respond to the DTR line. After
Lookout first successfully dials out to a remote modem and finishes the
polling cycle, it drops the DTR line but the modem remains connected. If
the modem does not respond after several seconds of Lookout attempting
to raise and drop the DTR line, Lookout generates an alarm stating that the
modem is not responding. If you receive this alarm message, your modem
is not configured to monitor the DTR line.
The Hayes Corporation standard command for configuring the modem to
hang up and enter command mode upon loss of DTR is &D2. You can use a
terminal program to make this setting permanent on most modems by
entering the modem command AT&D2&W to store the setting permanently in
nonvolatile modem memory, or you can just add &D2 into the Dialing
prefix. The default Dialing prefix is ATX4MVEDT, so you might change it
to AT&D2X4MVEDT.
Retries specifies the number of times Lookout dials the specified phone
number and attempts to connect to the modem at the other end of the line.
If Lookout fails to connect after the specified Retries, it generates an alarm
and moves on to the next phone number in the polling queue (if a queue has
formed).
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Wait for connection specifies the length of time Lookout waits to receive
a connect signal back from the modem it is calling. The time period begins
when Lookout first sends the local modem the dialing prefix command. The
time should be long enough for the local modem to receive a dial tone, dial
the phone number, allow the remote modem to pick up the line, and send
back a connect message. If the specified time is too short, your system
could be operating correctly but never make a connection.
Pause between calls is the length of time Lookout waits after hanging
up before it sends the local modem the next dialing prefix signal. If the
specified time is too brief, your system might not hang up the existing call
but still attempt to call the next number.
Your specific modems, radios, and local phone lines might operate faster or slower
than the default settings. You might need to use a trial-and-error approach to find the best
settings for your system.
Note
For information about troubleshooting dial-up connections, refer to the
NI Developer Zone resources at ni.com/zone.
Radio (RTS/CTS) Serial Connection
RTS/CTS is a local hardware handshaking mechanism between the local
computer and the local communication device. Use the Radio (RTS/CTS)
serial connection when you connect the serial port to a device that requires
RTS/CTS hardware handshaking, such as a radio transceiver that must be
keyed up during data transmission and unkeyed during data reception.
Other half-duplex communication media, such as RS-485, might require
RTS/CTS hardware handshaking. Although the RTS/CTS scheme works
identically for other RTS/CTS communication schemes, this example
assumes that you are communicating through radio.
When you select RTS/CTS hardware handshaking, Lookout controls the
RTS, or request-to-send pin, and monitors the CTS, or clear-to-send pin,
during data transmission (pins 4 and 5 on a 25-pin RS-232 connector).
Therefore, you must have at least the RTS pin (pin 4) wired straight
through on your RS-232 cable. The CTS pin (pin 5) is optional.
Lookout initiates a serial transmission on an RTS/CTS port by first
asserting RTS to key the radio. Lookout then begins monitoring the state
of the CTS pin. When the radio transmitter is fully keyed and ready to
transmit, the radio asserts CTS and Lookout immediately begins data
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transmission. If the radio does not assert CTS within the CTS timeout
setting (default is 100 ms), Lookout assumes the radio is ready to transmit
and transmits anyway.
The CTS timeout setting is the maximum amount of time that Lookout
waits after asserting RTS for CTS before transmitting. Most radios
typically take between 10 and 80 milliseconds to key up. Consult your radio
specifications and DIP switch settings to determine the key-up delay on
your radio.
If your radio can assert CTS when it is ready to transmit, add about
50 milliseconds to the radio key-up delay specification and use this total
value for the CTS timeout. If your radio does not assert CTS, you should
begin by adding about 20 milliseconds to your radio key-up time. Then,
increase this value in 10 millisecond increments until the remote radio
begins to correctly receive the first bytes of the message.
Some radios might assert CTS before they are actually ready to transmit. In
this case, disconnect the CTS line (pin 5 on a 25-pin RS-232 connector) and
set the CTS timeout to a value high enough to let the radio fully key before
transmission.
After it transmits the last byte of data, Lookout continues to assert RTS,
keeping the radio keyed until the RTS delay off time period expires. You
should set this value to the default of 0 milliseconds so that Lookout unkeys
the radio as soon as possible to prepare to receive the response.
When unkeyed, most radios generate an audible squelch tail that the remote
device might decode as unexpected garbage bytes. Some remote devices
reject the entire message instead of just decoding the valid data and
ignoring the extra garbage bytes. In this case, keep the radio keyed for
several milliseconds using the RTS delay off setting. This time period
delays the squelch tail long enough for the remote device to recognize
the last data frame as valid before receiving garbage bytes caused by the
squelch tail.
If you set the RTS delay off setting too high, the remote device begins
transmitting its response before the local radio is unkeyed, causing a
communication alarm in Lookout.
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Serial Port Hangup
You can configure your serial port to use +++ATH hangup as well as DTR
hangup. Every serial port you have configured will have a configuration
section in the lookout.ini file under the port name, such as [COM1].
Add the following entry to the file to set your hangup mode:
DTR_Hangup=N
When N = 1 (default), that port uses DTR hangup. When N = 0, the port
uses +++ATH hangup.
Diagnosing Serial COM Port Problems
You can create serial port diagnostic files to help solve serial port
communication problems.
1.
Select Options»Serial Ports.
2.
Check the Enable checkbox.
3.
Enter the File name to which you want Lookout to log
communications, as shown in the following illustration. If you enter a
file name only, Lookout creates the file in the Lookout directory. You
can create a diagnostic file for each serial port you have configured. If
you use the same file name for each port, all messages are logged to
the same file.
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4.
If you want timestamps for each communication, check the
Timestamp Enable checkbox and choose a Timestamp Format.
5.
To log all parts of a message in hexadecimal, select the Value in HEX
checkbox. Otherwise, printable characters print as their character
representation instead of in hex format. International characters are
logged as 2 bytes (printable or non-printable).
The serial diagnostic file is a text file consisting of requests and replies.
Any byte that can be represented by a printable character is displayed
as the character, unless the Value in HEX checkbox was checked. All
non-printable bytes are represented by their hex codes enclosed in square
brackets. The following text shows how a typical request and reply might
appear.
Modbus1 ->
[01][03][00][00][00][02][C4][0B]
Modbus1 <[01][03][04][00]A[00][00][AA]'
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In the first line, the Modbus1 object sent out (->) a message, the message
shown in line two. The third line shows that Modbus1 received (<-) a
message, the message in line four.
If timestamps are enabled for each message, you can match messages in
the diagnostic file with alarms in the Alarms Window. A logged
communication with timestamps enabled might look like the following
example:
09/27/2001 15:08:12 - Modbus1 ->
[01][03][00][0A][00][01][A4][08]
The diagnostic file might expose a missing reply from the hardware, as in
the following example:
Modbus1 ->
[01][03][00][0A][00][01][A4][08]
Modbus1 ->
[01][03][00][0A][00][01][A4][08]
Modbus1 ->
[01][03][00][0A][00][01][A4][08]
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3
Alarms and Events
This chapter describes Lookout alarms and events.
An event can be anything that happens within the Lookout environment,
such as adjusting a control, entering or leaving edit mode, or logging in and
out. An alarm in Lookout denotes an abnormal condition and must be
acknowledged by the operator. For the purposes of logging and retrieval,
events and alarms are combined.
Selecting Processes to Monitor for Alarms
Before you can monitor alarms or events from processes running on other
computers, you must add them to the list of processes that your monitoring
computer is tracking. Complete the following steps to select other
processes to monitor for alarms.
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1.
Select Alarms»Select Processes. The following dialog box appears.
2.
Navigate to the process you want to monitor in the Available
Processes list, click the process, and click the Add button. (If you do
not see the computer that is running the process you want to monitor,
right-click the Network node, and select Register Computer.)
3.
To stop monitoring a process, select the process in the Selected
Processes list and click the Delete button.
4.
Click OK.
Viewing Alarms and Events
You can view recent or active alarms and events in the Alarms Window in
Lookout. You can also view historical alarm and event information that has
been logged, using the Historical Data Viewer in National Instruments
Measurement & Automation Explorer (MAX).
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Viewing Alarms and Events in the Alarms Window
The Alarms Window lists all active and unacknowledged alarms and/or
events. Alarms are listed in chronological order with the most recent alarm
at the top of the list. If there are too many alarms to see at once, you can use
the scroll bar at the right of the Alarms Window to scroll through the list.
If you have your Alarms Window minimized, you can view it by pressing
<Ctrl-A>, selecting Alarms»Show, or clicking the alarm indicator box on
the far right side of Lookout status bar, at the bottom of the screen. The
number of alarms and events currently shown in the Alarms Window is
displayed in the alarm indicator box.
To quickly identify alarm status, use the Lookout Alarms Window color
scheme, as defined in Table 3-1.
Table 3-1. Alarms Window Color Scheme
Color
Alarm Status
Red
Active
Blue
Unacknowledged, Inactive
Red and Black
Acknowledged, Active (Alarm information, including
time, description, priority, and name, appears in black
and the area appears in red)
Green
Event
Because a new line is added to the list every time an alarm activates or event
occurs, Lookout might list the same item multiple times.
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You can sort the alarms and events by clicking the column headers in the
Alarms Window. To view detailed information about a particular alarm
or event, right-click it and select Properties. The following dialog box
appears, listing specific information about the alarm or event.
You can scroll through alarms and events using the Previous and Next
buttons.
Right-clicking in the Alarms Window displays the Alarms menu, which
includes options you can use to acknowledge alarms and access all other
alarm properties.
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Setting Alarm Display Options
With the Alarms»Display Options command, you can change the display
style of the Alarms Window. The Alarm Display Options dialog box
appears, as shown in the following figure.
•
Window style—Determines the position of the Alarms Window in the
Lookout workspace. If you select Floating, it appears as a pop-up style
control panel that you can resize, move around, and minimize at any
time. If you use either the Top or Bottom window style, the Window
height specifies the number of items Lookout can display in the
Alarms Window. The actual height of the window adjusts
automatically depending on the selected font and Window height
setting. If more alarms occur than can be displayed in the window
at once, a scroll bar appears along the right side of the window.
•
Date format—Set the date format using the Date format
selection box.
Filtering Alarms in the Alarms Window
To filter the alarms and events that appear in your Alarms Window, select
Alarms»Filter Options, or right-click in the Alarms Window and select
Filter Options. Select the filter options to use.
•
Priority—To monitor alarms with specific priorities, check this box
and set the Min and Max criteria.
•
User Name—Check this box and enter a user account name, to restrict
your display to alarms and events generated while that particular user
is logged on. You can select only one user name at a time, but you can
use wildcard characters (*, ?, #) to widen the scope.
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Tip The wildcard characters supported are * (substitutes for zero or more characters),
? (substitutes for any single character), and # (substitutes for any single numeral).
•
Object Name—Check this box and enter an object name, including
the full path, to restrict your display to alarms and events involving that
particular object. You can only enter one name at a time, but you can
use wildcard characters (*, ?, #) to widen the scope of those objects
reported.
•
Description—Check this box and type a description to restrict your
display to alarms and events that meet your criteria. You can filter on
only one description at a time, but you can use wildcard characters
(*, ?, #) to widen the scope of the alarms reported.
•
Area Name—Check this box and enter an area name to restrict your
display to only alarms in the alarm area you choose. You can enter only
one alarm area at a time. Click the Browse Areas button to locate and
select the alarm area you want to use as a filter.
•
Show—You can choose to have the Alarms Window show alarms only,
events only, or both alarms and events.
•
Old Alarms—This option allows you to display alarms on a server
computer after they have been acknowledged. Number specifies the
number of acknowledged alarms to show. Any alarms older than Start
time are not displayed. You can enter Start time using any time format
supported in Lookout. This option is not available on client computers
and is not an option when you are filtering alarms for printing.
•
Audible Alarms—Check this box to enable a sound alert when an
alarm takes place. The sound depends on your Windows system setting
for error sounds.
•
Aditional Filter Criteria options appear if you are filtering alarms for
printing:
–
Ack User Name—Check this box and enter a user account name
to restrict your display to alarms and events acknowledged by that
particular user. You can only enter one user name at a time, but
you can use wildcard characters (*, ?, #) to widen the scope.
–
Ack Comment—Check this box and type a comment to restrict
your alarms displayed to those with the specified
acknowledgement comment.
Note If you use international characters in any filter options other than Description,
no alarms will match.
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Printing Alarms and Events
You can print alarms and events manually, or you can set up your process
to print them as they happen.
Printing Alarms and Events Manually
You can print alarms and events in Lookout, based on your filtering.
To print alarms, select Alarms»Print.
•
Print Range—Select the time range you want to print alarms and
events from with the items in the Print Range section of the dialog
box. Notice that when you define your own range, you use month, day,
and year, followed by hour and minute.
•
Printouts—Determines the exact alarm information included in your
printout. Snapshot prints only the status of alarms at the beginning of
the specified Range but does not indicate what happened during the
time span. Journal creates a printout of everything that happened
during the time span from the beginning of the Range.
•
Columns—Specifies which columns you want printed. Specific
information about each alarm is presented in columnar format, and
Lookout prints only the information you designate.
•
Print to CSV file—Prints the results to a comma separated file
(.csv). Enter the file names for your Snapshot and Journal files,
including a complete path to where you want the files written. If you
enter a file name only, Lookout will create the file in the Lookout
directory.
•
Alarm level—Sets the alarm level for the error generated if there is a
problem printing to a .csv file. You must be in edit mode with Print
to CSV files selected in order to change this setting.
•
Time Format—Sets the format for printing times.
•
Filter Options—You can adjust your filter settings by clicking this
button.
Note If you use international characters in any filter options other than Description,
no alarms will match.
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Printing Alarms and Events as They Happen
You can print alarms as they happen. Complete the following steps to print
the contents of the Alarms Window using the filter criteria you have
configured:
1.
Select Options»System. The System Options dialog box appears.
2.
Specify a printer port in the Log alarms to field of the dialog box.
3.
Click OK.
This method works well for a printer directly connected to your computer
that has a line-by-line option. Some printers may queue an entire page of
data before printing. To print alarms directly to a network computer, you
must capture a port in the network printer driver and link it to your
networked printer. Refer to your operating system documentation for
detailed instructions on how to capture a port for a printer driver.
Acknowledging and Clearing Alarms
Complete the following steps to acknowledge an alarm or event in the
Alarms Window.
The security level for alarm acknowledgement is set in the System Options dialog
box, accessed by selecting Options»System.
Note
Lookout Operator’s Manual
1.
Select an alarm in the Alarms Window. <Ctrl-click> to select multiple
alarms; <Shift-click> to select blocks. Right-click in the Alarms
Window and choose Select All or Acknowledge All to select all
alarms for acknowledgment.
2.
Right-click in the Alarms Window and choose Acknowledge.
A dialog box appears for you to enter a comment.
3.
(Optional) Enter a comment, as shown in the following illustration.
Comments are optional, and you can click OK to finish acknowledging
alarms without entering a comment. However, you can search
historical data for alarms, or print out the alarms, based on comments.
So, using certain standard comments or comments on specific
circumstances can be beneficial.
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When an alarm is inactive and has been acknowledged, Lookout removes it
from the Alarms Window.
Silencing Audible Alarms
To permanently silence alarms, select Alarms»Filter Options and
uncheck the Audible Alarms checkbox. If the Audible Alarms checkbox
is checked, you can temporarily silence alarms by selecting Alarms»
Silence or pressing <Ctrl-S>, but new alarms will produce an audible beep.
Data Quality Problems
When a red X appears over a display or control on a panel, there is a data
quality problem. You can hover over the red X in run mode to see a
description of the problem in the middle of the status bar.
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4
Security
This chapter describes Lookout security.
Creating and Editing User Accounts
You use the User Account Manager to create and edit the properties of
groups, create or edit the properties of user accounts, assign users to one
or more groups, and otherwise manage security accounts for Lookout
applications. Only an Administrator or someone whose account is a
member of the Administrator group can create or delete system user
accounts. Select Options»User Manager to open the User Account
Manager, and refer to its help.
User Account Manager does not support international character sets, so user names,
group names, and passwords must not include international characters.
Note
Logging On and Off
Server and client run-time versions of Lookout open with the (nobody) user
account logged in.
Select File»Log Off or press <Ctrl-D> to log off. To log back on, select
File»Log on, press <Ctrl-L>, or click the account name in the status bar.
When no one is logged into Lookout, the (nobody) account is automatically
logged in.
If the (nobody) account is logged on, any functions of a process that require a
security level greater than zero do not receive or report data until someone logs on using
an account with a high enough security level.
Note
Note If yours is the only account that is a member of the Administrators group, and you
forget your password, there is no way to access the System»User Manger command, and
there is no way to modify account settings. Contact National Instruments for assistance.
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In run mode the name of the user account logged in to Lookout is shown in
the status bar at the bottom of the screen.
Control Security
Control security for a Lookout user interface object, such as a Pot or a
Switch, is stored in the process file and implements security at the operator
level. This security level is compared to the security level assigned to a user
account or a group to prevent or enable access.
If the user is allowed access, the mouse cursor changes into a hand when
positioned over the object and the operator can adjust and control the
object. If the user is not allowed access, the cursor changes into the
international symbol for forbidden, and the operator cannot control the
object.
Control Access Is Denied
Control Is Accessible
•
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User cannot open or close processes—This option prevents an
unauthorized operator from opening or closing processes.
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Networking and Running
an Application
5
This chapter describes how to network and run Lookout applications.
Synchronizing Lookout Computers
To keep your data properly time stamped, you must make sure the times
on your computers are properly synchronized. The Lookout time
synchronization service is installed as a service in Windows 2000/NT/XP
that runs every time you run your computer.
If your primary server is offline for some reason, a computer scheduled
to synchronize automatically seeks out the second computer on the
synchronization server list. At the time of the next synchronization,
the computer first looks for the primary server before seeking a secondary
synchronization server. If no computer is set as a primary time server, your
computer runs on its own clock.
Complete the following steps to configure time synchronization.
1.
© National Instruments Corporation
Select Options»Time Synchronization or click the date/time display
in the status bar. The following dialog box appears.
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2.
Determine the time synchronization order that you want to use.
If you have some computers running Windows Me/98 and other
computers running Windows 2000/NT/XP in your network, you
should list your Windows 2000/NT/XP computers first in the server
search list.
3.
Set the order that you want in the Time Server Search Order. Any
computer that is running the time synchronization service can serve
as a time server or a time client. The primary time server is the first
computer listed in the Time Server Search Order field. Do not
include a computer in its own list of time synchronization services.
•
To add a computer to the Time Server Search Order field, click
the Add button. If you know the name of the computer you want
to add, you can type it into the Computer name field. If you do
not know the exact name of the computer, you can browse for it in
the network tree contained in the second field.
•
To remove a computer from the Time Server Search Order field,
highlight the computer name and click the Remove button.
•
To change the order in which your computers search for a time
synchronization server, select the computer name and click the Up
or Down buttons.
•
Use Sleep Time (seconds) to set how long each computer waits
between each synchronization. You should set the primary time
synchronization server sleep time to 60 seconds.
Suppose you have four computers you need to have synchronized.
If one fails, the others look for the next in line to synchronize to as time
servers. For computers A, B, C and D, you would use the following
time server search order in each computer.
Table 5-1. Time Synchronization Order
Computer A
Computer B
Computer C
Computer D
None listed
A
A
A
—
—
B
B
—
—
—
C
As the primary time server, Computer A would have no other servers
listed. As long as Computer A is running, it in effect synchronizes to
itself. Computer B should synchronize to Computer A as long as A is
running. If A is not running, B should synchronize to itself. Computer
C should synchronize to Computer A if it is running, Computer B if A
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is not running, and to itself if neither A not B is running. This pattern
should be used for all the computers you want in one synchronized set.
4.
Click OK.
5.
Implement this same search order for all of the computers on your
network running Lookout, similar to what is shown in Table 5-1.
Monitoring Windows Services
Lookout requires three background services that run in Windows outside of
the Lookout application itself to be running on your computer while it is
running: National Instruments Citadel, Lookout Classifieds, and Lookout
TimeService. In your Windows NT task manager, these services appear as
nicitdl5.exe, lkads.exe, and lktsrv.exe. Under Windows NT
systems, these services run automatically as NT services.
Running Lookout Processes
You can run many processes at one time. You cannot, however, run two
processes with the same process name on a single computer.
Selecting Startup Process Files
If your computer runs Lookout 24 hours a day, you may want to ensure that,
if the computer temporarily loses power, it will automatically reboot and
begin executing your processes when power returns.
Complete the following steps to select startup processes.
1.
© National Instruments Corporation
Select Options»Startup, and the following dialog box appears.
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2.
To add a file to your list of startup processes, click the Add button.
A dialog box you can use to browse for a file appears.
3.
Select the file you want to run when Lookout opens and click Open.
You can add as many process files as you want. The files will open in
the order in which they are entered in the Startup Process Files dialog
box. However, the number of processes that you can load is limited to
what you can list using about 2,600 characters total, which includes
process names and paths.
To edit a path to a file, highlight the file name and click the Edit button.
Lookout Operator’s Manual
4.
Click OK when you are done.
5.
To make sure Lookout loads and runs when your computer boots or
reboots, consult your operating system documentation instructions on
how to set a default startup application.
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Technical Support and
Professional Services
A
Visit the following sections of the National Instruments Web site at
ni.com for technical support and professional services:
•
Support—Online technical support resources at ni.com/support
include the following:
–
Self-Help Resources—For answers and solutions, visit the
award-winning National Instruments Web site for software drivers
and updates, a searchable KnowledgeBase, product manuals,
step-by-step troubleshooting wizards, thousands of example
programs, tutorials, application notes, instrument drivers, and
so on.
–
Free Technical Support—All registered users receive free Basic
Service, which includes access to hundreds of Application
Engineers worldwide in the NI Developer Exchange at
ni.com/exchange. National Instruments Application Engineers
make sure every question receives an answer.
For information about other technical support options in your
area, go to ni.com/services or contact your local branch at
ni.com/contact.
•
Training and Certification—Visit ni.com/training for
self-paced training, eLearning virtual classrooms, interactive CDs,
and Certification program information. You also can register for
instructor-led, hands-on courses at locations around the world.
•
System Integration—If you have time constraints, limited in-house
technical resources, or other project challenges, National Instruments
Alliance Partner members can help. To learn more, call your local
NI office or visit ni.com/alliance.
If you searched ni.com and could not find the answers you need, contact
your local office or NI corporate headquarters. Phone numbers for our
worldwide offices are listed at the front of this manual. You also can visit
the Worldwide Offices section of ni.com/niglobal to access the branch
office Web sites, which provide up-to-date contact information, support
phone numbers, email addresses, and current events.
© National Instruments Corporation
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Glossary
ACK
Acknowledge (an alarm or event).
alarm
Software notification of an abnormal condition in a process.
Citadel
The Lookout historical database that stores your data for access later.
client
A Lookout process that monitors a Lookout server process. Lookout
clients should be computer independent so that they can be run from any
computer on your network.
.csv files
Comma Separated Value file, a format widely accepted by spreadsheet and
other data handling programs.
CTS
Clear to Send. Part of a handshaking protocol for certain devices that
connect the serial port of a computer.
database
Collection of data stored for later retrieval, display, or analysis.
dialing prefix
Part of the Hayes AT command set for use with modems.
DTR
Data Terminal Ready.
event
An event can be anything that happens within the Lookout environment.
In Lookout, events include such things as adjusting a control value,
entering or leaving edit mode, opening or closing a control panel, and
logging in or logging out of the system.
frame
In a communication, sequence of bytes sent from a computer to a
device or vice versa.
I/O
Input/Output.
I/O point
Every read-only, write-only, or read-write connection Lookout makes to
external hardware is counted as an I/O point. Lookout is licensed for use
with a set number of I/O points. If you exceed the number you are licensed
to use with your copy of Lookout, a warning message appears on your
computer screen warning you to shut down one of your processes within
a specified time before Lookout cuts back on I/O usage.
IP
Internet Protocol.
© National Instruments Corporation
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Glossary
logging
The process of storing data in a computer database file.
Logos
National Instruments proprietary networking.
MAX
National Instruments Measurement & Automation Explorer.
ODBC
Open DataBase Connectivity, a standard application programming
interface (API) for accessing a database. You can use ODBC statements to
access files in a number of different databases, including Access, dBase,
DB2, and Excel.
ODBC is compatible with the Structured Query Language (SQL)
Call-Level Interface. ODBC handles SQL requests by converting them
into requests an ODBC database can use.
ping
A utility program in Windows and DOS that checks to see if a computer
can be reached across a network. Also used to indicate the running of that
program.
PLC
Programmable Logic Controller.
pop-up panel
One variety of Lookout control panel that can only be displayed at the size
set by the process developer, and which cannot be maximized. When open,
a pop-up panel remains on top of other panels until minimized.
process
In Lookout, process refers to a Lookout “program,” used for industrial
automation, control, monitoring, or reporting.
receive gap
A serial communications setting that determines the number of empty
bytes (or amount of time) a driver receives before recognizing the end
of a message frame and requesting another message.
RTS
Request to Send, part of a handshaking protocol for certain devices that
connect the serial port of a computer.
server
A process that provides data (services) to client processes. In Lookout,
server processes are intended to have direct connections to field hardware.
Client processes interact with field hardware through server processes.
Lookout Operator’s Manual
G-2
ni.com
Glossary
startup file
A Lookout process file (.l4p) you designate to open and run any time
Lookout is opened.
TCP/IP
Transmission Control Protocol, a method (protocol) for sending data
between computers. Used with IP, the Internet Protocol. TCP/IP sends
data as packets, with IP handling the delivery of data and TCP keeping
track of the individual packets.
trend
Historical data showing the change in a value over time. Often used in
connection with graphing the data for display.
© National Instruments Corporation
G-3
Lookout Operator’s Manual
Index
A
D
accounts, managing. See user accounts
acknowledging and clearing alarms, 3-8
alarms
data quality problems, 3-9
printing
as alarms and events happen, 3-8
manually, 3-7
selecting processes for monitoring, 3-1
silencing audible alarms, 3-9
viewing
filtering alarms, 3-5
in Alarms Window, 3-3
setting display options, 3-5
Alarms Window
display options, setting, 3-5
filtering alarms, 3-5
overview, 1-7
viewing alarms, 3-3
diagnosing, serial port problems, 2-7
diagnostic tools (NI resources), A-1
Dialing prefix settings, 2-3
dial-up modem settings, 2-3
documentation, conventions used in the
manual, v
drivers (NI resources), A-1
E
events
printing
as they occur, 3-8
manually, 3-7
viewing in Alarms Window, 3-3
examples (NI resources), A-1
F
filters for alarms, 3-5
international characters (note), 3-6
C
Citadel Database settings, 1-10
client connections, adding, 1-4
communications service. See serial port
communication
computer name, setting, 1-10
control panels, overview, 1-6
control security, 4-2
conventions used in the manual, v
CTS timeout setting, 2-6
customer
professional services, A-1
technical support, A-1
© National Instruments Corporation
H
hangup setting, serial port communications, 2-7
hardware, Lookout requirements, 1-1
Hardwired option, serial connections, 2-3
help
professional services, A-1
technical support, A-1
I
I/O points, for unregistered Lookout
package, 1-3
installing Lookout, 1-2
I-1
Lookout Operator’s Manual
Index
N
instrument drivers (NI resources), A-1
international characters, 2-8, 3-6, 3-7, 4-1
National Instruments
professional services, A-1
technical support, A-1
National Instruments support and
services, A-1
networking
monitoring Windows services, 5-3
running Lookout processes, selecting
startup process files, 5-3
synchronizing Lookout computers, 5-1
K
keyboard, virtual keyboard, 1-7, 1-9
keycode, registering Lookout, 1-3
keypad, virtual, 1-7
KnowledgeBase, A-1
L
log alarms setting, 1-9
logging on and off (security), 4-1
Lookout
environment
Alarms Window, 1-7
control panels, 1-6
edit mode (figure), 1-5
menu bar, 1-6
status bar, 1-6
workspace, 1-6
hardware and software requirements, 1-1
installing, 1-2
operator input and navigation, 1-7
registering, 1-3
setting system options, 1-8
starting for first time, 1-3
testing TCP/IP, 1-1
virtual keyboard, 1-7
virtual keypad, 1-7
O
objects, security, control security, 4-2
online technical support, A-1
P
panel navigation arrows, 1-10
Pause between calls (modem) setting, 2-5
printing
alarms and events
as they occur, 3-8
manually, 3-7
processes
monitoring alarms, 3-1
running Lookout processes on networks
launching Lookout automatically
selecting startup process files, 5-3
professional services, A-1
programming examples (NI resources), A-1
M
R
menu bars, overview, 1-6
modem settings for dial-up serial
communication, 2-3
Lookout Operator’s Manual
Radio (RTS-CTS) serial connection, 2-5
Receive gap setting, 2-3
I-2
ni.com
Index
support, technical, A-1
synchronization, Lookout computers on the
network, 5-1
System Options dialog box (figure), 1-9
system options, setting, 1-8
registering Lookout
adding client connections, 1-4
changing registration information, 1-10
limitations of unregistered package, 1-3
starting Lookout for first time, 1-3
Retries (modem) setting, 2-4
RTS delay off time period, 2-6
RTS/CTS handshaking settings, 2-5
T
TCP/IP, testing, 1-1
technical support, A-1
training and certification (NI resources), A-1
troubleshooting (NI resources), A-1
S
security
control security, 4-2
logging on and off, 4-1
overview, 4-1
system options, setting, 1-8
serial port communication
defining settings, 2-1
diagnosing problems, 2-7
dial-up modem settings, 2-3
hangup setting, 2-7
Hardwired connection, 2-3
international characters, 2-8
overview, 2-1
Receive gap setting, 2-3
RTS/CTS serial connection, 2-5
selecting serial connection, 2-3
Serial Port Settings dialog box
(figure), 2-2
Serial port field, 2-2
silencing audible alarms, 3-9
software, requirements, 1-1
software (NI resources), A-1
starting Lookout for first time, 1-3
status bar for Lookout, 1-6
© National Instruments Corporation
U
user accounts, international characters
(note), 4-1
V
virtual keyboard
overview, 1-7
setting mouse clicks for pop-up
feature, 1-9
virtual keypad, 1-7
W
Wait for connection (modem) setting, 2-5
Web
professional services, A-1
technical support, A-1
Windows services, monitoring, 5-3
workspace in Lookout, 1-6
I-3
Lookout Operator’s Manual
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