Data Protector NDMP Integration QuickStart Guide

Data Protector NDMP Integration
Quickstart Guide
How to setup the Data Protector software NDMP integration
and the HP StoreOnce Backup Systems to protect data
stored in the HP X9000 and NetApp FAS3070 NAS filers
Technical white paper
Table of contents
Executive Summary .............................................................................................................................. 2
Audience ............................................................................................................................................ 2
Disclaimer........................................................................................................................................... 2
NAS Concept...................................................................................................................................... 3
NAS NDMP 2-way or local backup concept........................................................................................ 3
NDMP Backup .................................................................................................................................... 4
Preparation - Prerequisite .................................................................................................................. 4
Configuration Steps .......................................................................................................................... 5
Creating a NDMP backup specification ............................................................................................ 16
Performance and Implementation Considerations ................................................................................... 18
Configuring Data Protector block size and the NDMP blocking factor .................................................. 19
Deduplication Performance Test Results ............................................................................................. 21
Licensing Considerations ................................................................................................................. 22
Conclusions ...................................................................................................................................... 22
For more information .......................................................................................................................... 24
Executive Summary
This white paper provides quick start information on integrating Data Protector with the HP X9000
Network Storage System or NetApp FAS3070 Universal Storage System, for NDMP (Network Data
Management Protocol) based backup tasks where the backup target is a HP StoreOnce Backup
System.
Key take-away:
• When using HP Data Protector for direct NDMP backups of HP X9000 and NetApp filers the HP
StoreOnce Backup System can be used as deduplicating disk backup target
• Additional Data Protector licenses are needed to enable NDMP backups
• The StoreOnce Backup System must be configured to emulate tape devices (Virtual Tape) for the
backup targets
• Backing up to the HP StoreOnce Backup System delivers backup storage capacity savings of 90%+
with deduplication in the range 12:1 to 16:1 after around 30 backups. These deduplication ratios
are similar to the best deduplication ratios achieved using regular file system backup, that is file
system backups using the largest Data Protector configurable block size.
• StoreOnce Backup System replication can be used to create DR copies of virtual tapes at a remote
location
Audience
This document is intended for solution architects, project managers, engineers, and support personnel
involved in planning, designing and configuring NDMP backup/recovery solutions using HP Data
Protector software with HP X9000 NAS technology, NetApp FAS filer technology and HP
StorageWorks Backup to Disk technology utilizing HP StoreOnce deduplication for backup data
reduction.
Familiarity with the following topics is recommended:
• HP X9000 architecture
• HP Data Protector software
• HP StoreOnce Backup System (formerly: HP StorageWorks D2D) architecture
• NetApp FAS3070 architecture
• NDMP (Network Data Management Protocol)
Disclaimer
The configurations in this document are HP recommended configurations. They are provided as a
reference only, as configurations vary with specific customer needs. If mentioned - Memory, processor
count and speed, and I/O storage recommendations - should be considered as a minimum
recommendation.
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NAS Concept
Network-attached storage (NAS) is file-level computer data storage connected to a computer network
providing data access to heterogeneous network clients.
Although it may technically be possible to run other software on a NAS unit, it is not designed to be a
general purpose server. For example, NAS units usually do not have a keyboard or display, and are
controlled and configured over the network, often using a browser.
A fully-featured operating system is not needed on a NAS device, so often a stripped-down or
customized standard operating system is used e.g.: Linux.
NAS systems contain one or more hard disks, often arranged into logical, redundant storage
containers or RAID arrays (redundant arrays of inexpensive/independent disks) often referred to
“Primary Storage”.
NAS removes the responsibility of file serving from other servers on the network.
NAS uses file-based protocols such as NFS (popular on UNIX systems), SMB/CIFS (Server Message
Block/Common Internet File System) (used with MS Windows systems), AFP (used with Apple
Macintosh computers), WebDAV, HTTP/HTTPS and FTP/FTPS to serve data to applications or users.
NAS units rarely limit clients to a single protocol.
The backup of data residing on filer to what often is called “Secondary Storage” can now be done in
two different ways:
1. on the Application Server
2. direct from filer to tape using NDMP
The first case would be a “normal” backup, using the Data Protector DA (disk agent), which is
installed on each Application Server. In case of a backup data would be transferred via LAN to the
system where a tape device is connected to.
The second way uses the NDMP integration of HP Data Protector and performs the backup locally on
the NDMP server.
This has two major advantages:
1. The backup data has not to be transferred over LAN
2. No performance degradation on the application server
NAS NDMP 2-way or local backup concept
The NDMP architecture uses a client-server model in which HP Data Protector is the NDMP client
(DMA-Data Management Application) to the NDMP-Host Data Mover (NDMP server or DSP-Data
Service Provider).
In the event of a NDMP backup, backup data flows from the Primary Storage system to the Data
Mover and further on to the Secondary Storage system which can be an attached tape library backup
device, without traversing the Ethernet network. Only the backup software’s control data, catalog
data, and tape library commands are send over the network utilizing the NDMP protocol.
In a 2-way or local backup scenario (Figure 1) both, Primary and Secondary Storage is directly
attached to the filer using either SCSI or Fiber channel connections.
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The Data Mover maintains a state machine for each NDMP client connection that executes and
maintains the backup and/or restore processes.
Note: Please refer to the filer vendor documentation to find supported NDMP session concurrency
scheme. HP Data Protector software up to version 6.2 only supports the 2-way or local backup
concept.
Figure 1: NDMP 2-way backup architecture
NDMP Backup
Preparation - Prerequisite
StoreOnce Backup System (secondary Storage):
• Setup StoreOnce system and create at least one virtual tape library with the appropriate number of
tape drives. Select desired tape emulation and number of tape slots. Make sure library is mapped
to an available fiber channel port
• Connect the configured library to your SAN segment.
SAN Router:
• Create Alias for each WWN (secondary (StoreOnce backup device), primary storage (NAS
appliance).
• Create zone and include Aliases
• Enable zone
NAS appliance (primary Storage):
• Setup HP X9000/NetApp FAS3070 system and create at least one file system. Apply LTU were
applicable.
• Connect the NAS appliance to your SAN segment (via FC).
• Detect the newly attached tape library/device.
• Configure DSP (NDMP) on NAS appliance.
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Data Management Application (DMA) &NDMP Client
• Setup HP Data Protector 6.2 cell manager
• Install NDMP Media Agent, which promotes cell manager to a NDMP client
– Note: The NDMP media agent can be installed on any client within the cell on which operating
system it is supported. Always consult the latest support matrix relevant for the used components
to find any potential incompatibilities.
• Ensure proper HP Data Protector software licensing for NDMP backups
– NDMP LTU for all platforms: 1xTB B7022BA, 10xTB B7022DA, 100xTB TD186AA
– Appropriate number of library slot LTU : 1x 61-250/unlimited slots B6957BA/B6958BA,
upgrade to unlimited slots B6958CA
– Appropriate number of tape drive LTU for SAN,UNIX,NAS: B6953AA
Alternative licensing to tape drive LTU
– Advanced Backup to Disk LTU for all platforms: 1xTB B7038AA, 10xTB B7038BA, 100xTB
B7038CA
• Configure NDMP client
• Configure backup library on the HP Data Protector cell manager.
Figure 2: NDMP 2-way backup topology
Note: HP Data Protector software supports library sharing in a SAN environment.
Configuration Steps
The following pages will highlight the necessary steps to properly configure the backup target
(StoreOnce), the DSP (NAS appliance) and the DMA (NDMP client & Library configuration on the cell
manager). It will not cover SAN, LAN configuration aspects. Furthermore all DMA (NDMP client)
settings are non-modified standard settings.
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StoreOnce Backup System (secondary Storage):
The StoreOnce backup system requires just a few steps in order to create and configure a new virtual
tape library (VTL). Figure 3 depicts the StoreOnce management GUI. The following are the five steps
to create and configure a new library:
1. Logon to the StoreOnce web administration GUI.
Enter the administrator user credentials and password.
2. Select “Virtual Tape Devices” from the menu list
3. Select “Create Library”
This will change the screen in the lower part allowing you to make changes to the library
characteristics.
4. Change library characteristics according to your needs. This includes:
o
Library Name
Robotic emulation type, tape drive emulation
o
Total number of cartridge slots, number of tape drives
o
Tape media labeling (barcode) details
o
Cartridge size, FC port through which this library will be made accessible
5. Select “Create” in order to create the virtual tape library according to your specification
Figure 3: StoreOnce Backup System Administration GUI
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Note: Make sure the robotic emulation type and the drive emulation is supported by the DSP as well
as the DMA. Always consult the latest support matrix relevant for the used components to find any
potential incompatibilities.
The creation of the virtual library will make the new library appear on the StoreOnce management
GUI. To verify the interface information you may proceed as following:
6. Select “Interface Information” in the lower part of the screen
Figure 4 depicts a snapshot of the interface information screen.
Figure 4: Interface Information
Note:”Device Serial Number” and “World Wide Node Name” are configuration details which are
used in further configuration tasks such as setting up FC SAN zones on the SAN router or identifying
tape devices attached to the DSP (NAS appliance).
DSP on NAS appliance (primary Storage):
HP X9000 models
The HP X9000 Network Storage System requires just a few steps in order to configure the cluster for
the NDMP backup feature. Figure 5 depicts a management GUI of an X9000 Network Storage
Gateway consisting of two nodes. The following are the steps:
1. Logon to the HP X9000 web management GUI.
Enter the administrator user credentials and password.
2. Select “Cluster Configuration” in the navigator list
3. Select ”NDMP Backup” in the Cluster Configuration
4. Select “Modify” and make the necessary changes in the appearing web form. This includes the
following details:
o
NDMP Sessions = Yes
o
Username / Password (must be a user with appropriate backup user rights)
o
Enable NDMP Sessions = 1
o
Listener port (typically port: 10000)
o
DMA (NDMP client) IP Addresses
Note: The remaining configuration items can be left unmodified.
Select “Synchronize” to distribute the configuration change to all nodes of the cluster
Once the configuration change got distributed make sure all backup libraries which have been
configured in the previous step are discovered and visible on the HP X9000 Network Storage System.
5. Select “Tape Devices” to verify discovered backup components. Refer to Figure 6 for details.
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6. Select “Rescan Devices” if newly attached devices have not shown up.
Figure 5: HP X9000 Network Storage Gateway Administration GUI
Figure 6: Discover Tape Devices
Note: “Hostname” and “Device ID” are configuration details which are used in further configuration
tasks within the DMA (NDMP client) configuration. Each segment server (Hostname) of the X9000
cluster might discover the attached backup devices (Device ID).
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NetApp FAS3070
The NetApp FAS3070 platform has very limited access to NDMP configuration items through either
the web GUI or through the NetApp System Manager plug-in.
Note: Interaction to NDMP commands through the web GUI is limited to the following:
• Enable/Disable NDMP - (The Enable/Disable NDMP Services page enables you to enable or
disable the NDMP service on the storage system).
• Terminate NDMP sessions - (The Terminate an NDMP Session page enables you to terminate a
current active NDMP session).
There is no NDMP management functionality available through the NetApp System Manager plug-in.
It is recommended to use a FTP/SSH client such as PUTTY in order to manage the NDMP functionality
using the CLI of the FAS3070 controller.
To verify newly attached tape library components such as tape libraries (medium changers) or tape
devices which are recognized and configured on the FAS3070 controller proceed as following:
Logon to the FAS3070 controller using the telnet/ssh client. Provide administrator credentials and
password to get the system prompt.
To verify the supported tape device types enter:
tpc008> storage show tape supported [-v]
If no options are given, the list of supported tape drives is displayed. The following option is
supported:
-v
The -v option displays all the information about the supported tape drives including their supported
density and compression settings.
Note: Make sure to only select backup tape device types in your StoreOnce backup system
configuration which appear on the appearing list (e.g.: LTO4)
To display information about attached tape drives and tape libraries (medium changers), and their
associated serial numbers enter the following command:
tpc008> storage show {tape | mc} [{alias | PPN | WWN}]
alias is the logical name of the tape drive or medium changer.
PPN is the physical path name.
WWN is the worldwide name.
The following paragraph shows the result of a medium (mc) changer query:
Medium Changer:
Description:
Serial Number:
WWNN:
WWPN:
fcs009:0.129
HP
MSL G3 Series
CZJ04002H3
5:001:438007:5a2878
5:001:438007:5a2879
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Alias Name(s):
Device State:
mc4
available
Note: The “Serial Number” must match the device serial number of the configured library on the
StoreOnce backup system. The “Alias Name” is the device file to be used in the DMA (NDMP client)
configuration
The following paragraph shows the result of a tape (tape) device query:
Tape Drive:
Description:
Serial Number:
WWNN:
WWPN:
Alias Name(s):
Device State:
fcs009:0.124
HP
Ultrium 4-SCSI
CZJ04002D1
5:001:438007:5a27ba
5:001:438007:5a27bb
st41
available
Note: The “Serial Number” must match the device serial number of the configured tape device on the
StoreOnce backup system.
The “Alias Name” is the device file to be used in the DMA (NDMP client) configuration and can be
verified by issuing the following command:
tpc008> sysconfig -t
The sysconfig –t command displays device and configuration information for each tape drive.
If you have a tape device that Network Appliance has not qualified, the sysconfig -t command output
for that device is different from that for qualified devices. If the filer has never accessed this device,
the output indicates that this device is a non-qualified tape drive, even though there is an entry for this
device in the /etc/clone_tape file. Otherwise, the output provides information about the qualified
tape drive that is being emulated by this device.
The following paragraph shows the result of a sysconfig -t device query:
Tape drive
rst41l nrst41l urst41l rst41m nrst41m urst41m rst41h nrst41h urst41h rst41a nrst41a urst41a -
(fcs009:0.124) HP
rewind device,
no rewind device,
unload/reload device,
rewind device,
no rewind device,
unload/reload device,
rewind device,
no rewind device,
unload/reload device,
rewind device,
no rewind device,
unload/reload device,
Ultrium 4-SCSI
format is: LTO-2(ro)/3 2/400GB
format is: LTO-2(ro)/3 2/400GB
format is: LTO-2(ro)/3 2/400GB
format is: LTO-2(ro)/3 4/800GB cmp
format is: LTO-2(ro)/3 4/800GB cmp
format is: LTO-2(ro)/3 4/800GB cmp
format is: LTO-4 800GB
format is: LTO-4 800GB
format is: LTO-4 800GB
format is: LTO-4 1600GB cmp
format is: LTO-4 1600GB cmp
format is: LTO-4 1600GB cmp
Note: The device file for the DMA (NDMP client) configuration can now be verified. It is advisable to
choose a “no rewind device” such as “nrst41a” or “nrst41h”.
To enable NDMP services on the NDMP host/server issue the following command:
tcp008> ndmpd on
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Note: The NDMP listener is on port 10000
To create a NDMP user password which is used in the DMA (NDMP client) configuration, issue the
following command:
tcp008> ndmpd password <username>
This will create a NDMP user password similar to:
tpc008> ndmpd password Administrator
password ZVC5D0JUOJUw0BhV
Note: Cut and paste the generated password into your “Import Client” task used on the DMA.
NDMP Client & DMA
The following are high-level steps which are required to setup the NDMP backup environment from a
HP Data Protector perspective:
1. Push NDMP Media Agent component to designated NDMP Client.
2. Import NDMP host/server
3. Create dedicated NDMP media pool.
4. Create backup library configuration
5. Scan library slots
6. Format media in NDMP media pool
The following screenshots depict the sequence of tasks to complete the above listed high-level steps.
Step 1: Push NDMP Media Agent component to NDMP client.
You can install/upgrade Data Protector clients remotely, by distributing the software using the
Installation Server.
Note: The NDMP client can be any client in the cell as long as the NDMP media agent is supported
on the OP/Sys platform this client runs on. Even though the installation process reports that the
standard media agent got removed it will still be listed on the client’s component list because the
NDMP media agent provides the same functionality plus NDMP backup/restore functionality. Hence
the NDMP media agent fulfills the legacy role of that client too.
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Figure 7: Push NDMP Media Agent component to NDMP client
Step 2: Import NDMP host/server.
Figure 8: Import NDMP host/server
Note: Importing a client means manually adding a computer to a DP cell. On NDMP hosts/servers
there will no Data Protector component be installed. When added to a Data Protector cell, the system
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becomes a Data Protector client. Once the system is a client of the cell, information about the new
client is written to the IDB, which is located on the Cell Manager.
Specify information about the NDMP Server.
NDMP Server Type
Select one of the available NDMP host types that matches your setup: NetApp, Celerra, BlueArc,
Hitachi or HPX9000.
Port
Specify the TCP/IP port number of the NDMP Server. The default is 10000.
User Name
Type the user name that Data Protector will use to establish the connection to the NDMP Server.
Default might be “ndmp”. Check vendor documentation for a valid “ndmp” user name and password.
Password
Type the password of the user. For NetApp FAS3070 use the generated password shown in one of
the previous steps.
Step 3: Create NDMP media pool
Figure 9: Create NDMP media pool
Note: Data Protector provides default media pools, but you must create your own media pool to suit
your needs. You must select the “Media Type” that matches the tape drive technology on your
StoreOnce backup device. E.g.: select LTO-Ultrium if you have selected LTO4 on the backup device.
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Figure 10: Create a Backup library configuration
Preparation of a backup device consists of connecting the device to the system or in a SAN
environment to the SAN segment and knowing which of the (working) associated device files (SCSI
address) is to be used in the HP Data Protector configuration.
The library robotic as well as any of the tape drive units requires the following common configuration
items:
1. In the Device Name text box, enter the unique name of the device.
2. In the Description text box, enter a description (optional).
3. In the Device Type list, select the SCSI Library device type.
4. In the Interface Type list, select the SCSI interface type.
Note: Depending on which host, the NDMP host or NDMP client should control the library robotic
you select the proper host which controls the library robotic. Useful for library sharing purposes.
5. In the Client list, select the client which handles the NDMP communication (NDMP client).
6. In the NDMP server list, select the NDMP server.
7. Enter a valid URL of the library management console in the Management Console URL text box.
(Optional for the robotic configuration)
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Figure 11: Enter SCSI and Media Handling details
SCSI library devices are large backup devices, also called autoloaders. They consist of a number of
media cartridges in a device’s repository and can have multiple drives handling multiple media at a
time.
A typical library device has a SCSI ID (Windows) or a device file (UNIX) for each drive in the device
and one for the library's robotic mechanism, which moves media from slots to drives and back again.
(For example, a library with four drives has five SCSI IDs, four for the drives and one for the robotic
mechanism).
A medium is stored in a slot in the device’s repository. Data Protector assigns a number to each slot,
starting from one. When managing a library, you refer to the slots using their numbers.
Continue with the following steps:
8. Enter the SCSI address of the library robotics.
Note: Use the SCSI address as it appears on the X9000 GUI (Device ID; e.g.:
HP_MSL_G3_Series_CZJ1030J0R) or as device file as it appears on the NetApp CLI (e.g.: mc4)
9. In the Busy Drive Handling list, select the action Data Protector should take if the drive is busy
10. Select SCSI Reserve/Release (robotic control).
11. Specify the slots for the device. Use a dash to enter slot ranges and then click Add. For example,
enter 1-3 and click Add to add slot 1, 2, and 3 at once. Do not use letters or leading zeros.
12. In the Media Type drop-down list, select a media type for the device that you are configuring.
13. Click Finish to exit this wizard. You are prompted to configure a library drive. Click Yes and the
drive configuration wizard appears.
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Note: Creating a tape drive configuration requires the same steps as for the library robotic except
that you have to care about the following details:
• Enter the correct drive index
• Assign the previously created NDMP media pool to every drive configuration you create
• Verify the correct tape block size
• Use “Lock Names” when appropriate
The SCSI address follows the same convention as described for the library robotic.
Once the device configuration is finished you must scan the library slots and format the tape media to
prepare the media pool for NDMP backups.
Creating a NDMP backup specification
Creating a NDMP backup specification in the Data Protector GUI follows a similar approach as for
regular file system backups using the “normal” Disk agent (DA) except for a view details.
In the backup context expand “Backup Specifications” and right-click on “Filesystem” to start the
backup specification wizard (see Figure 12) by selecting “Add Backup”.
Figure 12: Adding a Backup specification using the GUI Wizard
Select “Data mover backup” as the Backup type and your NDMP interface type in the Sub type field.
Continue in the wizard (see Figure 13) and start adding the backup source to the new backup
specification.
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Figure 13: Adding the Backup source for HP X9000
As there is no Data Protector DA (Disk Agent) installed on any of the NDMP server platforms you must
manually specify the mount point to be included into the backup specification. You cannot browse
existing file systems and have them added to the backup specification.
Each filer vendor has a specific syntax on how to add mount points to the backup specification.
For HP X9000 you must enter the file system name right after the root slash for e.g.: /fs2, whereas for
NetApp FAS3070 the syntax is as following: /vol/fs2 (see Figure 14).
Figure 14: Add Disk mount point syntax for NetApp FAS3070
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Continue in the wizard and make your selection for the backup destination, global file system options
and backup schedule. On the Backup Object Summary tab of the wizard you may configure each
backup object individually (see Figure 15).
Figure 15: Backup Summary
On the Advanced NDMP Object Properties you can now specify your backup specific environment
variable such as EXCLUDE to exclude specific file types or directories.
Note: Consult the NAS filer administrator handbook for supported environment variables and their
usage.
Performance and Implementation Considerations
As described earlier in this paper there are two methods of backing up the data on the NAS filers.
The first method uses a regular file system backup of application server. The NAS share is backed up
using the same process as the backup of a file system on a local disk. This method is well understood
and simple but not optimized for NAS filer protection.
The second method uses NDMP to enable a direct backup from the filer to the HP StoreOnce Backup
System. This requires additional setup and licensing, as covered in detail in this paper, but is
optimized for NAS filer protection. The performance and implementation considerations for both
methods are summarized in Table 1.
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Table 1: Summary of performance and implementation differences between the two methods of protecting NAS filer data
Impact on production
servers
Impact on data network
Backup flexibility
Regular file system backup
NDMP controlled backup
Higher, the Data Protector Disk Agent runs on
each protected machine. Requires a backup
window.
Higher, all backup data is transmitted over the
data network contending for bandwidth with
the production data. Additional impact if the
StoreOnce Backup System is connected using
the data network.
Simple process to include and/or exclude files
and directories for backup through the Data
Protector GUI.
None, all processing is done on the filer. No
impact on data network.
Backup throughput
Depends upon ‘front end’ performance of filer
to the clients: protocol used and filer
connections to the data network (10GbE) and
design of backup infrastructure. Protection can
be configured using multiple backup objects to
enable multiple parallel backup streams to be
written to StoreOnce Backup System for best
performance.
Backup data
deduplication
(for a given data set
and change rate)
StoreOnce Backup
System backup targets
supported
Restore flexibility
Key variable is the block size set in Data
Protector – larger block sizes have higher
deduplication ratio.
Data Protector licensing
(assuming this is a new
installation)
For backup and recovery management:
• Cell Manager
• Disk Agents (no cost)
• Media Agent (no cost)
For StoreOnce Backup System
• Advanced Backup To Disk license for usable
capacity of appliance
---- or ---• Drive and Slot licenses for virtual tape
library(ies) used
All: Virtual tape drives via FC or iSCSI and
Data Protector File Library on NAS Share.
All or selected files/directories restored to
original or alternate location.
None, the backup data is written over the
storage network to the StoreOnce Backup
System.
Standard dump format enables control over
what is backed up via file and directory
exclusion policies implemented using vendor
specific environment variables.
Depends on ‘back end’ performance of filer to
the StoreOnce Backup System (8Gb Fibre
Channel) and performance of backup format
(dump). Multiple virtual tape drives (one per
backup object) can be used to enable multiple
parallel backup streams during backup to be
written to StoreOnce Backup System for best
performance. Data Protector supports load
balancing for NDMP backups for optimal
virtual drive usage.
Test results showed block size set in Data
Protector and NDMP BLOCKING_FACTOR
have no significant effect of deduplication
ratio.
Requires a virtual tape target. Connectivity over
FC because no iSCSI support on filers.
All or selected files/directories restored to
same or alternate location on same or same
model of filer if HISTORY environmental
variable = “YES”.
For backup and recovery management:
• Cell Manager
• NDMP Media Agent (no cost)
• Direct Backup Using NDMP license for
capacity of protected data on filer
For StoreOnce Backup System
• Advanced Backup To Disk license for usable
capacity of appliance
---- or ---• Drive and Slot licenses for virtual tape
library(ies) used
Configuring Data Protector block size and the NDMP blocking factor
The Data Protector block size determines, within the limits of the backup device, the size of the data
units processed. These data units are called blocks. The backup device processes data in the specified
block sizes. The block size is specified as backup device parameter as shown in Figure 16.
The default block size value for all devices is 64kB. Increasing the block size can improve backup
performance and deduplication ratio for regular file system backup. For NDMP backup changing the
block size has no significant effect on deduplication ratios.
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Figure 16: Specifying the Data Protector block size used to write the backup to the virtual tape drive.
For a NDMP controlled backup the data stream is not in a Data Protector format. The default format is
dump (others are possible). This can use different blocking factors. The blocking factor determines the
size of the units of backup data moved and processed by the NDMP Server.
The blocking factor is specified in Data Protector as a NDMP environment variable in the backup
object properties as shown in Figure 17. The syntax and default values for the blocking factor
parameter are different for the HP X9000 and NetApp FAS3070 as shown in Table 2.
Figure 17: Specifying the blocking factor environment variable in the backup object properties.
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Table 2: HP X9000 and NetApp FAS3070 vendor specific variables and values for the NDMP Blocking Factor.
NAS Filer
Blocking Factor Parameter
Default Value
Other Available Settings
HP X9000
BLOCKING_FACTOR
128kB
64kB - 256kB
NetApp FAS3070
MOVER_RECORD_SIZE
63kB
4kB - 256kB
Deduplication Performance Test Results
As part of the validation of Data Protector managed protection of HP and NetApp NAS filers using a
HP StoreOnce Backup System as the backup storage the backup data deduplication rates were
measured. The test data set was made up of unstructured file data from a production environment. A
backup scheme that stimulated daily full backups was used. Between each backup a random selection
of 5% of the data was changed.
The tests were run multiple times from the HP X9000 and the NetApp FAS3070 to investigate the
effects of varying the Data Protector block size and the NDMP blocking factor. The results are shown
in Figure 18.
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Figure 18: Comparison of deduplication ratio using different tape block sizes and different NDMP blocking factors versus a
regular file system backup of the same data to a HP StoreOnce Backup System. Backup configuration was for full backups with
a random 5% of the data changed between each backup.
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X9000 NDMP backup (Default values: 64kB block size, 128kB BLOCKING_FACTOR)
X9000 NDMP backup (256kB block size, 256kB BLOCKING_FACTOR)
Standard File System backup (1MB block size)
FAS 3070 NDMP backup (Default values: 64kB block size, 63kB MOVER_RECORD_SIZE)
FAS 3070 NDMP backup (256kB block size, 256kB MOVER_RECORD_SIZE)
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14
Deduplication Ratio (x:1)
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
Backup (5% random data change between backups)
Licensing Considerations
As shown in Table 1, the file system and NDMP controlled methods of protecting the NAS filer require
different Data Protector licenses. Both require a Data Protector Cell Manager and either Advanced
Backup To Disk or Drive and Slot licenses for the StoreOnce Backup System.
The difference is that the NDMP controlled backup requires a Direct Backup Using NDMP license. The
licensing for this is calculated based on the configured capacity of the NAS filer. The result is the
NDMP based method will have higher Data Protector licensing costs.
Conclusions
• The main benefits of NDMP direct backups are delivered when:
– There is a need to minimize the backup load on the data network, application servers and
backup media servers.
– The filer is required to be backed up as a complete entity. (Although files can be excluded using
exclude commands in the NDMP environmental variables set in the NDMP backup job.)
• The benefits of NDMP direct backups should be traded off against the fact that NDMP backup s can
be more expensive to implement (require additional licensing such as HP Data Protector Direct
NDMP backup license) and more complex to manage/configure compared to regular file system
backups.
• Backing up to a HP StoreOnce Backup System enables a deduplication ratio of between 12:1 and
16:1 over a period of 20+ backups with a simulated typical daily change rate of 5%. This provides
22
approximately 90% + increase in backup storage utilization compared to backing up the same
data to a physical tape device or non- deduplicating disk.
• NDMP direct backups achieve similar deduplication ratios as file system backups using the largest
Data Protector block size. (NDMP backups achieve higher deduplication ratios than file system
backups using smaller Data Protector block sizes).
• The NDMP direct backup testing was conducted with various HP Data Protector tape block sizes
along with HP X9000 NDMP BLOCKING_FACTORS and NetApp FAS3070 NDMP
MOVER_RECORD _SIZES. The results show that changing tape block size and NDMP blocking
factor had no appreciable effect on the backup data deduplication ratio. The recommendation is to
use the default values in both HP Data Protector and the NAS filer.
• Testing showed that the HP X9000 implementation of NDMP backup delivers an approximate 10%
+ better backup data deduplication ratio compared to the NetApp FAS3070.
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For more information
To read more about:
HP Data Protector software, go to www.hp.com/go/dataprotector
HP X9000 Network Storage System, go to www.hp.com/go/x9000
HP StoreOnce Backup System, go to www.hp.com/go/d2d
HP Data Deduplication, go to www.hp.com/go/storeonce
© Copyright 2011 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to
change without notice. The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty
statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an
additional warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.
HP Data Protector is a registered trademark of Hewlett-Packard.
4AA3-5894ENW, Created August 2011
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