System Description Manual for UC 7.1.2 release

Cisco Unified Communications System
Description
Release 7.1(2)
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Text Part Number: OL-9991-01
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Cisco Unified Communications System Description, Release 7.1(2)
© 2009 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
CONTENTS
Preface
7
Overview
1-7
Organization
1-7
Related Documentation
CHAPTER
1
1-8
Cisco Unified Communications System Overview
System Definition
1-1
System Release Strategy
Service Offerings
1-2
1-2
Career Certifications
Solution Bundling
1-3
1-3
Intelligent Information Network
1-3
Business Productivity Applications
Customer Interaction Network
IP Communications
Security
1-5
1-6
1-6
Deployment and Migration
2
1-4
1-5
Network Management
CHAPTER
1-1
Deployment Models
1-6
2-1
Deployment Overview
2-1
Single-Site Model 2-2
Organization Suitability 2-2
Design Characteristics 2-2
User Roles and Endpoints 2-3
Supported Applications 2-3
Multisite Centralized Call Processing Model
Organization Suitability 2-4
Design Characteristics 2-4
User Roles and Endpoints 2-5
Supported Applications 2-5
2-4
Multisite Distributed Call Processing Model
Organization Suitability 2-6
2-6
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Contents
Design Characteristics 2-7
User Roles and Endpoints 2-7
Supported Applications 2-7
Clustering Over IP WAN Call Processing Model
Organization Suitability 2-8
Design Characteristics 2-8
User Roles and Endpoints 2-9
Supported Applications 2-9
Major Components of Deployment Models
CHAPTER
2-8
2-10
Cisco Unified Communications Component Overviews
3
3-1
Cisco 1800, 2800, and 3800 Series Integrated Services Routers
Cisco Emergency Responder
Cisco FAX Server
3-3
3-3
Cisco Unified Border Element
Cisco RSVP Agent
3-2
3-3
3-4
Cisco IP Communicator
3-4
Cisco Unified Application Environment
3-5
Cisco Unified Communications Manager
3-5
Cisco Unified Communications Manager Attendant Console
Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express
3-6
Cisco Unified Communications Manager Business Edition
Cisco Unified Contact Center Enterprise
Cisco Unified Contact Center Express
Cisco Unified Expert Advisor
3-7
3-7
3-8
3-9
Cisco Unified MeetingPlace
3-11
Cisco Unified MeetingPlace Express
Cisco Unified Mobility
3-7
3-8
Cisco Unified Customer Voice Portal
Cisco Unified IP Phones
3-6
3-11
3-12
Cisco Unified Mobile Communicator
Cisco Unified Messaging Gateway
Cisco Unified Personal Communicator
3-12
3-13
3-13
Cisco Unified Communications Integration™ for Microsoft Office Communicator
Cisco Unified Presence
3-14
Cisco Unified SIP Proxy
3-15
3-14
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Cisco Unified Communications Widgets
3-15
Cisco Unified Survivable Remote Site Telephony
Cisco Unified Video Advantage
3-16
Cisco Unified Videoconferencing
Cisco Unity
3-16
3-16
3-17
Cisco Unity Connection
Cisco Unity Express
3-18
3-18
Cisco VG200 Series Gateways
3-19
Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6)
Security Components
3-20
3-20
Cisco 7800 Series Media Convergence Servers
Management and Serviceability Components
CHAPTER
4
Component Protocols and APIs
3-21
3-22
4-1
Call Control Signaling Protocols
4-1
Cisco Unified Communications Application Program Interfaces
CHAPTER
5
Deployment Methodology
5-1
Step 1: Determine Your Requirements
5-1
Step 2: Determine the Solution Requirements
5-2
Step 3: Assess Your Network and Infrastructure Readiness
Step 4: Assess Your Operational Readiness
Step 5: Develop Site Requirements
5-3
Step 6: Develop a Detailed Design
5-3
APPENDIX
A
5-2
5-3
Step 7: Develop Your Implementation Plan
5-4
Step 8: Stage and Configure Your Solution
5-4
Step 9: Install the Solution
4-3
5-4
Cisco Unified Communications Architecture Basics
A-1
Overview A-1
Voice over IP A-2
Video over IP A-3
Fax over IP A-3
VoIP Protocols
A-4
Voice and Video Codecs
A-5
Voice- and Video-enabled Infrastructure
A-8
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Contents
Quality of Service A-8
High Availability A-10
Security A-10
IP Multicast A-11
Summary
A-12
INDEX
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Preface
Overview
This document provides an overview of the Cisco Unified Communications 7.1(2) system. It describes
the Cisco Unified Communications system-level approach, lists key features of the Cisco Unified
Communications components, and illustrates the various Cisco Unified Communications deployment
models. This document also provides an overview of the steps you follow when you deploy a
Cisco Unified Communications solution.
Organization
This manual is organized as follows:
Chapter 1, “Cisco Unified
Communications System Overview”
Provides an overview of the Cisco Unified Communications
system-level approach and architecture
Chapter 2, “Deployment Models”
Introduces various options for deploying the Cisco Unified
Communications solution
Chapter 3, “Cisco Unified
Communications Component
Overviews”
Provides a general overview of the features provided by the
Cisco Unified Communications solution and links to
additional information
Chapter 4, “Component Protocols and
APIs”
Lists the protocols and application program interfaces
(APIs) that are supported by various Cisco Unified
Communications solution components
Chapter 5, “Deployment Methodology”
Provides an overview of the steps that are involved in
implementing a Cisco Unified Communications solution
Appendix A, “Cisco Unified
Communications Architecture Basics”
Provides an overview of the technologies related to voice
and video over an IP network
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Preface
Related Documentation
Related Documentation
The Cisco Unified Communications solution provides a suite of interactive documentation that covers
details of the system architecture and components, installation and upgrade information,
troubleshooting, related information. You can access this documentation at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/go/unified-techinfo
Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request
For information on obtaining documentation, submitting a service request, and gathering additional
information, see the monthly What’s New in Cisco Product Documentation, which also lists all new and
revised Cisco technical documentation, at:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/general/whatsnew/whatsnew.html
Subscribe to the What’s New in Cisco Product Documentation as a Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feed
and set content to be delivered directly to your desktop using a reader application. The RSS feeds are a free
service and Cisco currently supports RSS version 2.0.
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CH A P T E R
1
Cisco Unified Communications System Overview
The Cisco Unified Communications 7.1(2) system securely integrates voice, video, and other
collaborative data applications into intelligent network communications solutions. This system, which
includes IP telephony, unified communications, rich-media conferencing, IP video broadcasting, and
customer contact solutions, takes full advantage of the power, resiliency, and flexibility of an IP network.
The elements of this system were designed, developed, documented, and tested as part of a
comprehensive, end-to-end Unified Communications System.
The Cisco Unified Communications system reduces the cost and complexity associated with managing
multiple and remote sites, meets stringent quality of service (QoS) requirements, and provides optimal
availability and security when deployed as part of a converged network. In addition, the solution
interoperates with existing time-division multiplexing (TDM)-based systems and enterprise business
applications, allowing organizations to migrate to full-featured IP Communications while maintaining
existing technology investments.
This topic provides an overview of the key features and benefits of Cisco Unified Communications. It
includes these sections:
•
System Definition
•
System Release Strategy
•
Service Offerings
•
Career Certifications
•
Solution Bundling
•
Intelligent Information Network
•
Business Productivity Applications
•
Customer Interaction Network
•
IP Communications
•
Security
•
Deployment and Migration
System Definition
The Cisco Unified Communications system is designed for a single, secure, converged network. Part of
an integrated, comprehensive Cisco architecture, the communications applications reside “in” the
network, not “on” the network, and can easily incorporate emerging business processes, applications,
and new devices. Applications can be deployed in a single instance, rather than in multiple instances,
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Chapter 1
Cisco Unified Communications System Overview
System Release Strategy
and managed services offerings further increase deployment flexibility. Standards-based Cisco Unified
Communications products let organizations migrate based on business needs, not technical limitations,
to keep pace with new technology.
The Cisco Unified Communications system offers the following solutions:
•
Enterprise solution for large businesses, which supports 30,000 users with Cisco Unified
Communications Manager as the call processing component.
•
Mid-market solution, which supports up to 500 users with Cisco Unified Communications Manager
Business Edition as the call processing component.
•
Small and Medium (SMB) solution with:
– Cisco Unified Communications Express suitable for businesses with 50 to 250 users
– Unified Communications 500 Series which is an integral component of Smart Business
Communication System (SBCS) suitable for businesses with less than 50 users.
The Cisco Unified Communications System also includes a suite of network management applications
that allow you to monitor, manage, and troubleshoot your system. It also includes tools that allow you
to analyze the readiness of your infrastructure to support the Unified Communications system.
System Release Strategy
The Cisco Unified Communications system includes the following types of releases:
•
Major release—Marks the beginning of a major new release version. This release type typically is
based on a major release of at least one of these components: Cisco Unified Communications
Manager, Cisco Unity, Cisco Unified MeetingPlace, or Cisco Customer Response Solutions.
•
Minor release—Adds features and fixes to an existing major release. This release type can consist
of revisions to existing components and new versions of components.
Service Offerings
Using the Cisco Lifecycle Services approach, Cisco Systems and its partners offer a broad portfolio of
end-to-end services. These services are based on proven methodologies for deploying, operating, and
optimizing Unified Communications solutions. Planning and design services, for example, can help you
meet aggressive deployment schedules and minimize network disruption during implementation.
Operate services reduce the risk of communications downtime with expert technical support. Optimize
services enhance solution performance for operational excellence. Cisco and its partners offer a
system-level service and support approach that can help you create and maintain a resilient, converged
network that meets your business needs.
Service offerings include:
•
Cisco Unified Communications Software Subscription, which allows you to purchase major
software version upgrades of various Cisco Unified Communications products at a reduced cost
through a one-, two-, or three-year subscription.
•
Cisco Unified Communications Essential Operate Service, which provides 24-hour, 365-day-a-year
access to Cisco Systems engineers and certified partners who are highly trained and have a deep
understanding of Cisco Unified Communications products and technologies.
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Career Certifications
•
Cisco Unified Communications Select Operate Service, which provides a proactive support solution
that combines 24-hour, 365-day-a-year access to technical support representatives plus a
simple-to-install monitoring solution designed for Cisco Unified Communications.
•
Cisco Unified Communications SMB Network Operate & Optimize Service, is a partner-led service
offering (designed specifically for the medium-sized businesses) that enables the delivery of
affordable, ongoing, high-availability network support.
Career Certifications
The Cisco Certified Voice Professional (CCVP) certification and related certifications are designed for
IT professionals who are responsible for integrating voice technology into underlying network
architectures. Individuals who earn a CCVP certification can help create a telephony solution that is
transparent, scalable, and manageable. Earning a CCVP certification validates a robust set of skills in
implementing, operating, configuring, and troubleshooting a converged IP network. The certification
content focuses on many components of the Cisco Unified Communications system, including Cisco
Unified Communications Manager, quality of service (QoS), gateways, gatekeepers, IP phones, voice
applications, and utilities on Cisco routers and Cisco Catalyst switches.
Solution Bundling
In addition to providing traditional solution ordering, where you choose the individual components and
quantities that you require, the Cisco Unified Communications system provides flexible bundling
options. A bundled solution simplifies the way in which you order applications and services and makes
it easy to add options.
This release of the Cisco Unified Communications system introduces two new bundling options for SMB
businesses. These options include the Cisco Unified Communications Express designed specifically to
address the call processing and messaging needs of medium-sized businesses with up to 250 users, and
Smart Business Communication System (SBCS) suitable for businesses with less than 50 users.
Intelligent Information Network
The Cisco Intelligent Information Network facilitates the evolution of networking to systems. It allows
the network to be used as a strategic asset and provides capabilities that include:
•
Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP)—A simple broadcast protocol that devices use to advertise their
presence, it operates in the background and facilitates communication between a Cisco Unified IP
Phone plugged into a network and the network switch.
•
QoS—Cisco provides an end-to-end solution to ensure quality of service. QoS starts at the phone
and LAN distribution layer, where packets are classified and marked as high priority traffic. Traffic
markings originating from Cisco Unified IP Phones are automatically trusted by the Cisco switch
infrastructure, which typically remarks traffic from nontrusted end user workstations. Configuration
is made easier through Cisco AutoQoS, which automatically handles a range of tasks traditionally
done manually, including classifying applications, generating policies, configuring the proper QoS
configurations, monitoring and reporting to test QoS effectiveness, and enforcing service-level
consistency.
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Business Productivity Applications
As traffic flows through the access layer, priority queuing and buffer management ensure that
real-time traffic is prioritized over less time-critical data. Where bandwidth is most restricted, across
the WAN, the Cisco solution provides RSVP for reserving the bandwidth needed for voice.
Fragmentation and interleaving of large blocks of data ensure a steady stream of voice traffic, and
voice packet header compression minimizes bandwidth consumed.
•
VLAN—When a Cisco Unified IP Phone boots up on the IP network, it advertises its presence using
CDP, and it requests an IP address lease from a DHCP server. The Cisco LAN switch learns of the
new phones via CDP and automatically reconfigures to add that port to the VLAN used for voice.
With this feature, the LAN infrastructure can distinguish a phone from a PC and does not require
manual configuration every time a phone is added, moved, or removed.
•
Wireless—Cisco wireless access points allow Cisco wireless phone users to roam a campus without
losing voice connectivity. If a user roams to a different site, the system will discover the new
physical location for emergency 911 information purposes.
•
Power over Ethernet (POE)—Eliminates the need for local power connections for every phone.
Cisco switches can be configured with redundant power supplies connected to uninterruptible power
supplies in a data center to ensure that the power to the phone is preserved, even when local power
for other equipment at the desk is lost. Most Cisco Unified IP Phone models support the
industry-standard 802.3af power and the Cisco pre-standard inline power.
•
Gigabit Ethernet (GigE)—Allows certain Cisco Unified IP Phone models to take advantage of the
emerging Gigabit Ethernet LAN infrastructure.
Business Productivity Applications
The Cisco Unified Communications system provides a wide array of applications that enhance business
and organizational productivity and efficiency. These applications offer capabilities that include:
•
Rich-media conferencing—Cisco Unified MeetingPlace provides intuitive interfaces for setting up,
attending, and managing meetings. Extensive voice, video using Cisco Unified Videoconferencing,
and web conferencing capabilities enable a range of meeting applications, including
highly-collaborative meetings, training sessions, and presentations.
•
Messaging—Cisco Unity provides users with access to voice, e-mail, and fax messages from a Cisco
Unified IP Phone or from a PC. These solutions combine unified messaging with personal
productivity tools to help manage communications quickly and conveniently. For midsize
organizations, Cisco Unity Connection provides voice messaging, speech recognition, call routing
rules, and desktop PC message access in a system that is easy to manage and deploy. For small
organizations, Cisco Unity Express offers a voice messaging solution that integrates with your
router.
•
Common interface—Cisco Unified Personal Communicator is a presence-based desktop application
that provides a focal point for phone services, directory services, messaging, and conferencing.
•
Cisco Unified Presence—The focal point of all status processing, including attributes and
capabilities. It links the various knowledge within each application to provide a ubiquitous and
broad view of a defined user within the Cisco Unified Communications system.
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Customer Interaction Network
Customer Interaction Network
The Cisco Customer Interaction Network component provides a single, integrated platform for all
contact center locations. It is a distributed, IP-based customer-service infrastructure that easily integrates
with legacy contact center platforms and networks, providing multi-channel services and integration
with customer relationship management applications.
•
Intelligent contact routing and multi-channel automatic call distribution (ACD)—Enables
interaction with customers via phone (inbound or outbound), video, web, e-mail or chat. The
application provides call handling tailored to different classes of customers and to individual
customers, providing flexible contact center operational profiles based on varying business needs.
•
Voice, Video, and web self-service—Extracts and parses web content and presents this data to
customers through a telephony interface, allowing simple transactional requests to be handled by the
interactive voice response (IVR) system instead of by agents. This application provides self-service
automation with automatic speech recognition (ASR) and TTS. It also performs prompt-and-collect
functions to obtain user data such as passwords or account identification that it can then pass to
contact center agents, and it delivers proactive notification users through e-mail, fax, pager, and
short message service (SMS).
•
Agent and supervisor options—Provide full support for agent or supervisor interaction using chat
capabilities. Instant messaging offers the capability to communicate with any or all the agents on a
supervisor’s team. Other options include:
– Agent status monitoring (agent types such as mobile agents, remote agents, and expert adviser)
– Silent monitoring
– Barge-in
– Intercept
– Real-time and historical reporting
– ACD
IP Communications
IP communications provides powerful and efficient voice, data, and video communications, and related
capabilities. Key features include:
•
Video telephony—Allows video calls to be placed and received over an IP telephony network using
the familiar phone interface. Video endpoints support common call features such as forward,
transfer, conference, and hold. Use of a single infrastructure also enables a unified dial plan and user
directory for voice and video calls. This release of the Cisco Unified Communications system also
includes Cisco Unified Conferencing for TelePresence, which is a new technology that combines
rich audio, high-definition video, and interactive elements to deliver a unique in-person experience.
•
Mobility—Provides for several forms of user mobility, including:
– Extension Mobility—Allows users to access any phone within a single Cisco Unified
Communications cluster as their own, by simply logging in to the phone. After log in, the phone
assumes all of the user profile information, including line numbers, speed dials and service
links.
– Site/campus mobility—Allows users to access the Cisco Unified Communications network
through the wireless Cisco Unified Wireless IP Phones 7920G and 7921G. In addition, this
release includes enhanced mobile IP phone applications that allow users to:
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Security
Dynamically manage how and when mobile calls take place
Intelligently screen calls based on urgency, subject matter, and caller identity
Identify which users are available to talk and which users choose not to be disturbed
Increase accessibility of corporate calendar and contact information from mobile phones.
•
Emergency caller response/safety and security—Enables emergency calls in an IP network to be
directed to the appropriate Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP). In this way, emergency agencies
can identify the location of 911 callers without a system administrator needing to keep location
information current.
Security
The Cisco Unified Communications system takes a layered approach to protecting against various
attacks, including denial of service (DOS), privacy, and toll fraud. Security features include:
•
Encryption of signaling and media—Ensures that the signaling and the actual phone conversations
are protected against unintended interception by third parties.
•
Catalyst Integrated Security Features (CISF)—Includes private VLANs, port security, DHCP
snooping, IPSource Guard, secure Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) detection, and dynamic ARP
inspection. These features protect the network against attacks such as man-in-the-middle attacks and
other spoofing.
•
Integration with firewalls—Ensures that system platforms are accessible only by authorized devices.
The firewall acts as a guardian between all IP devices and the Cisco Unified Communications
system platforms, ensuring that only specific transactions are allowed.
•
Secure platforms—Provides features, such as host-based intrusion detection, optional security
scripts, and anti-virus software, that ensure that the platform is hardened against intruders and
malicious code.
•
Enhanced phone security features—Provides configurable levels of security. Options include
configuring the phone to ignore Gratuitous Address Resolution Protocol (GARP) requests, disabling
the PC port on the phone, disabling access to network configuration settings on a phone, and
configuring a phone to accept only digitally signed firmware images.
Network Management
The Cisco Unified Communications system uses the following network management products to monitor
the various devices deployed in the Unified Communications system:
•
Cisco Unified Operations Manager
•
Cisco Unified Provisioning Manager
•
Cisco Unified Service Statistics Manager
•
Cisco Unified Service Monitor
Deployment and Migration
The Cisco Unified Communications system is designed to be deployed efficiently and effectively. The
solution offers:
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Deployment and Migration
•
Flexible deployment models—Cisco Unified Communications supports LAN and WAN
connectivity and can be configured for single-site or multi-site networks. Headquarters, contact
centers, branch offices, and telecommuter configurations can be interconnected without geographic
constraints. Call processing and administration can be centralized or distributed.
•
Integration with existing equipment and networks—Cisco Unified Communications provides
gateway support to enable integration and interoperability with existing call processing equipment,
phones, and TDM networks. This capability ensures compatibility with and migration from legacy
systems, and supports:
– Integration with PBXs through QSIG, Digital Private Network Signaling System (DPNSS), and
PRI links
– Integration with ACD platforms via CTI interface
– Integration with legacy phones through gateways
– Integration with TDM networks through gateways via T1, E1, and PRI links
•
Open IP connectivity through SIP—Cisco Unified Communications provides enhanced support for
SIP trunking and to a variety of SIP endpoints. An integrated Cisco Unified Presence provides user
information and status and enables interconnection to popular messaging networks.
•
High availability—Cisco Unified Communications networks can be built to meet high availability
requirements as business needs dictate. Networks can be designed to ensure no single point of failure
in either network topology or applications. Cisco Unified Survivable Remote Site Telephony
(Unified SRST) allows remote branch offices to remain in service even when the WAN access link
is lost.
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Deployment and Migration
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CH A P T E R
2
Deployment Models
This chapter provides an overview of the Cisco Unified Communications deployment models that Cisco
has tested and verified. These models are not the only ways in which you can deploy the Cisco Unified
Communications system, nor are they design recommendations. Rather, they are designed to provide
sample configurations that address typical system-level requirements.
For additional guidelines, recommendations, and best practices for implementing enterprise networking
solutions, refer to the Cisco Solution Reference Network Design (SRND) guides and related documents,
which are available at this URL:
www.cisco.com/go/srnd
For additional information about the deployment models, including details about all components in each
model, refer to the Cisco Unified Communications System Technical Information site at:
http://www.cisco.com/go/unified-techinfo.
This chapter includes these sections:
•
Deployment Overview, page 2-1
•
Single-Site Model, page 2-2
•
Multisite Centralized Call Processing Model, page 2-4
•
Multisite Distributed Call Processing Model, page 2-6
•
Clustering Over IP WAN Call Processing Model, page 2-8
•
Major Components of Deployment Models, page 2-10
Deployment Overview
The sample Cisco Unified Communications deployments demonstrate a variety of business applications
based on the following criteria:
•
End-to-end IP communications requirement
•
Interoperability between sites
•
Administrative requirements (centralized or distributed)
•
Messaging requirements
•
Conferencing requirements
•
Availability requirements
•
Mobility requirements
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Chapter 2
Deployment Models
Single-Site Model
•
Scalability requirements
•
Customer interaction network requirements
Single-Site Model
The Single-Site model is designed for autonomous offices in which most or all employees are IPC users.
This model supports up to 30,000 users.
Figure 2-1 shows an example of this model.
Figure 2-1
Single-Site Model
UCC
IP
IP
PSTN
230138
V
Organization Suitability
The Single-Site model is suitable for medium-sized businesses and government operations that reside at
one site and that need basic call processing, some contact center capabilities, and basic messaging and
conferencing. Such operations include legal and financial professional offices, and municipal
government offices.
Design Characteristics
The Single-Site model is designed to be locally managed and administered. It can operate on a wired or
wireless LAN. Local and long distance calling is achieved through gateway connectivity with the PSTN
by various combinations of T1/E1 CAS and PRI.
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Deployment Models
Single-Site Model
User Roles and Endpoints
The Single-Site model provides flexible communications features for operators and administrative
assistants. There are some executive phones, some of which are video-capable. Most other employees
use digital telephones, including wireless telephones, and a voice messaging system, which this model
also provides. In addition, some staff may take orders or provide technical support. This model provides
basic contact center capabilities to handle these requirements.
Some users, such as building services and shipping and receiving employees, may require mobile
phones. This model provides on-campus device mobility features for these users.
Supported Applications
The Single-Site model supports applications that provide a wide array of advanced features. These
applications include:
•
Call processing:
– Cisco Unified Communications Manager
– Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express
– Cisco Unified Communications Manager Business Edition
•
Contact Center:
– Cisco Unified Contact Center Express
– Cisco Unified Contact Center Enterprise
– Cisco Unified IP IVR
– Cisco Unified Customer Voice Portal
•
Messaging:
– Cisco Unity
– Cisco Unity Connection
– Cisco Unity Express
•
Instant messaging and presence: Cisco Unified Presence
•
Conferencing:
– Cisco Unified MeetingPlace Express
– Cisco Unified Videoconferencing
•
System management:
– Cisco Unified Communications Manager Serviceability Tools
– Cisco Unified Operations Manager
– Cisco Unified Service Monitor
– Cisco Unified Service Statistics Manager
– Cisco Unified Provisioning Manager
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Chapter 2
Deployment Models
Multisite Centralized Call Processing Model
Multisite Centralized Call Processing Model
The Multisite Centralized Call Processing model is designed for distributed operations with a large
central or headquarters site and multiple remote or branch sites. This model can support up to a total of
30,000 phones distributed among up to a maximum of 1000 sites. Based upon the bandwidth available,
each site can support any number of users up to the overall total of 30,000 phones.
Figure 2-2 shows an example of this model.
Figure 2-2
Multisite Centralized Call Processing Model
Branch A
UCC
U
IP
IP
PSTN
IP WAN
IP
SBC
IP
IP
Headquarters
IP
155591
IP
Branch B
Organization Suitability
The Multisite Centralized Call Processing model is suitable for businesses such as banks, which include
a corporate headquarters and many local or regional offices.
Design Characteristics
In the Multisite Centralized Call Processing model, each branch site connects to the headquarters site or
sites through a WAN. Branch sites receive call processing functions from the headquarters site. Failover
capabilities at each branch site ensure that it can continue to operate if the WAN connection to the
headquarters site is lost. Branch sites include small contact center capabilities.
The WAN connection between the headquarters and branch sites can be frame relay, MPLS, or
site-to-site VPN. Each branch site can operate on a wired or wireless LAN.
Connectivity with legacy PBXs in the headquarters site can be provided T1/E1 CAS, PRI, Q SIG, and
DPNSS. Connectivity to the PSTN in the headquarters site is provided through various combinations of
T1/E1 CAS and PRI.
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Chapter 2
Deployment Models
Multisite Centralized Call Processing Model
Local calling is achieved through gateway connectivity. Long distance calling for branch sites uses the
WAN for on-net calling. Off-net long distance traffic is backhauled over the WAN to one or more
drop-off gateways.
This model is designed to be administered at the headquarters location.
User Roles and Endpoints
Headquarters roles and endpoints are identical to those described in the “Single-Site Model” section on
page 2-2. Branch sites access the call processing capabilities in the headquarters site. While there are
some executive phones, most employees use digital telephones and the central voice messaging system.
Some staff may take orders or provide technical support. This model provides basic contact center
capabilities in the branches to handle these requirements.
Supported Applications
The Multisite Centralized Call Processing model supports applications that provide comprehensive
features for all sites. These applications include:
•
Call processing:
– Cisco Unified Communications Manager (in central site)
– Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express for fixed remote teleworker applications (in
central site)
– Cisco Unified Communications Manager Business Edition (in central site)
– Unified SRST or Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express in SRST mode (as backup
for Cisco Unified Communications Manager in branch sites and for Cisco Unified
Communications Manager Business Edition in branch or central sites).
•
Contact Center:
– Cisco Unified Contact Center Enterprise (in headquarters)
– Cisco Unified Contact Center Express (based in headquarters)
– Cisco Unified Customer Voice Portal (for queueing and self-service at headquarters or
branches). Unified Customer Voice Portal is an interactive voiceXML-based response (IVR)
solution that provides carrier-class IVR and IP switching services on Voice over IP (VoIP)
networks. You can integrate Unified CVP with Unified Contact Center Enterprise or can deploy
as a self-service IVR solution.
– Cisco unified IP IVR for centralized queuing.
•
Messaging:
– Cisco Unity (based in headquarters)
– Cisco Unity Connection
– Cisco Unity Express
•
Instant messaging and presence: Cisco Unified Presence (based in headquarters)
•
Conferencing:
– Cisco Unified MeetingPlace (based in headquarters)
– Cisco Unified Videoconferencing
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Chapter 2
Deployment Models
Multisite Distributed Call Processing Model
•
System management:
– Cisco Unified Operations Manager (based in headquarters)
– Cisco Unified Service Monitor (based in headquarters)
– Cisco Unified Service Statistics Manager (based in headquarters)
– Cisco Unified Provisioning Manager
– LAN Management Solution
Multisite Distributed Call Processing Model
The Multisite Distributed Call Processing model is designed for organizations with large user
populations or large numbers of geographically distributed sites resulting in the need for more than a
single call processing entity. This model is suited for deployments that require multiple Cisco Unified
Communications Manager clusters or Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express platforms. Each
call processing entity in this model is configured as a Single-Site Model (see the “Single-Site Model”
section on page 2-2) or Multisite Centralized Call Processing Model (see the “Multisite Centralized Call
Processing Model” section on page 2-4) and each has a common dial plan and feature set.
Figure 2-3 shows an example of this model.
Figure 2-3
Multisite Distributed Call Processing Model
UCC
UCC
U
U
IP WAN
SBC
SBC
IP
IP
IP
IP
IP
IP
155593
PSTN
Organization Suitability
The Multisite Distributed Call Processing model is suitable for business operations that consist of
multiple sites in various regions. Such operations include technology, manufacturing, transportation, and
distribution and logistics companies.
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Chapter 2
Deployment Models
Multisite Distributed Call Processing Model
Design Characteristics
Each site in the Multisite Distributed Call Processing model can operate on a wired or wireless LAN.
The intersite WAN connection can be frame relay, MPLS, or site-to-site VPN. Each branch site can
operate on a wired or wireless LAN.
Local calling is achieved through gateway connectivity at each site. Long distance calling for each site
uses the WAN for on-net calling. Off-net long distance traffic is backhauled over the WAN to one or more
drop-off gateways.
User Roles and Endpoints
Each site in the Multisite Distributed Call Processing model has the same user roles and endpoints that
are described in the “Multisite Centralized Call Processing Model” section on page 2-4.
Supported Applications
The Multisite Distributed Call Processing model supports applications that provide powerful, flexible,
and scalable features. These applications include:
•
Call processing:
– Cisco Unified Communications Manager (large sites or deployments)
– Cisco Unified Communications Manager Business Edition
– Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express (smaller sites or deployments)
•
Contact Center:
– Cisco Unified Contact Center Enterprise (in one or more locations)
– Cisco Unified IP IVR (for centralized queueing)
– Cisco Unified Customer Voice Portal (for centralized or distributed queuing and self-service).
Unified Customer Voice Portal is an interactive voiceXML-based response (IVR) solution that
provides carrier-class IVR and IP switching services on Voice over IP (VoIP) networks. You can
integrate Unified CVP with Unified Contact Center Enterprise or can deploy as a self-service
IVR solution.
•
Messaging:
– Cisco Unity
– Cisco Unity Connection
– Cisco Unity Express
•
Instant messaging and presence: Cisco Unified Presence (in one or more locations)
•
Conferencing:
– Cisco Unified MeetingPlace
– Cisco Unified Videoconferencing
•
System management:
– Cisco Unified Operations Manager
– Cisco Unified Service Monitor
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Chapter 2
Deployment Models
Clustering Over IP WAN Call Processing Model
– Cisco Unified Service Statistics Manager
– Cisco Unified Provisioning Manager
– LAN Management Solution
Clustering Over IP WAN Call Processing Model
The Clustering Over IP WAN Call Processing model is designed for organizations with large user
populations across multiple sites that are connected by an IP WAN with the QoS features enabled. The
Clustering Over IP WAN supports the two deployment models:
•
Local Failover Deployment Model
Local failover requires that you place the Unified Communications Manager subscriber and backup
servers at the same site, with no WAN between them. This deployment model is ideal for two to four
sites with Unified Communications Manager.
•
Remote Failover Deployment Model
Remote failover allows you to deploy primary and backup call processing servers split across the
WAN. Using this deployment model, you may have up to eight sites with Unified Communications
Manager subscribers being backed up by Unified Communications Manager subscribers at another
site.
You can also use a combination of the two deployment models to satisfy specific site requirements. For
example, two main sites may each have primary and backup subscribers, with another two sites
containing only a primary server each and utilizing either shared backups or dedicated backups at the
two main sites.
Organization Suitability
The Clustering Over IP WAN Call Processing model is suitable for business operations that consist of
multiple sites in various regions connected over an IP WAN. Such operations include technology,
manufacturing, transportation, and distribution and logistics companies.
Design Characteristics
The local failover and remote failover sites in the Clustering Over IP WAN Call Processing model
operates over an IP WAN. The intersite WAN connection can be frame relay, MPLS, or site-to-site VPN.
The IP WAN must conform to the following maximum delay and minimum bandwidth requirements:
•
The maximum allowed round-trip time (RTT) between any two servers in the Unified
Communication Manager cluster is 80 ms.
•
A minimum of 1.544 Mbps (T1) bandwidth is required for Intra-Cluster Communication Signaling
(ICCS) for every 10,000 busy hour call attempts (BHCA) between sites that are clustered over the
WAN. This is a minimum bandwidth requirement for call control traffic, and it applies to
deployments where directory numbers are not shared between sites that are clustered over the WAN.
•
In addition to the bandwidth required for Intra-Cluster Communication Signaling (ICCS) traffic, a
minimum of 1.544 Mbps (T1) bandwidth is required for database and other inter-server traffic for
every remote subscriber server.
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Chapter 2
Deployment Models
Clustering Over IP WAN Call Processing Model
The IP WAN network should also be engineered to provide sufficient prioritized bandwidth for all ICCS
traffic, especially the priority ICCS traffic. Standard QoS mechanisms must be implemented to avoid
congestion and packet loss. If packets are lost due to line errors or other conditions, the ICCS packet will
be retransmitted because it uses the TCP protocol for reliable transmission. The retransmission might
result in a call being delayed during setup, disconnect (teardown), or other supplementary services
during the call.
For additional details on IP WAN delay, bandwidth requirements, and QOS engineering, refer to the
Clustering Over the IP WAN section in the Unified Communications Deployment Models chapter of
Unified Communications SRND at http://www.cisco.com/go/srnd.
User Roles and Endpoints
The local failover and remote failover sites in the Clustering Over IP WAN Call Processing model has
the same user roles and endpoints that are described in the “Multisite Centralized Call Processing
Model” section on page 2-4.
Some of the key advantages of clustering over the WAN are:
•
Single point of administration for users for all sites within the cluster
•
Feature transparency
•
Shared line appearances
•
Extension mobility
•
Unified dial plan
Supported Applications
The Clustering Over IP WAN Call Processing model supports applications that provide powerful,
flexible, and scalable features. These applications include:
•
Call processing:
– Cisco Unified Communications Manager (subscriber and backup)
– Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express (smaller sites or deployments)
– Unified SRST or Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express in SRST mode.
•
Contact Center:
– Cisco Unified Contact Center Enterprise
– Cisco Unified IP IVR (for centralized queueing)
– Cisco Unified Customer Voice Portal (for centralized or distributed queuing and self-service).
Unified Customer Voice Portal is an interactive voiceXML-based response (IVR) solution that
provides carrier-class IVR and IP switching services on Voice over IP (VoIP) networks. You can
integrate Unified CVP with Unified Contact Center Enterprise or can deploy as a self-service
IVR solution.
•
Messaging:
– Cisco Unity
– Cisco Unity Connection
– Cisco Unity Express
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Chapter 2
Deployment Models
Major Components of Deployment Models
•
Instant messaging and presence: Cisco Unified Presence
•
Conferencing:
– Cisco Unified MeetingPlace
– Cisco Unified Videoconferencing
•
System management:
– Cisco Unified Operations Manager
– Cisco Unified Service Monitor
– Cisco Unified Service Statistics Manager
– Cisco Unified Provisioning Manager
– LAN Management Solution
Major Components of Deployment Models
Table 2-1 shows the major Cisco components in each Cisco Unified Communications deployment
model.
Table 2-1
Deployment Models Components Summary
Components Single-Site Model
Scale
Multisite Centralized Call
Processing Model
•
Up to 30,000
phones with Cisco
Unified
Communications
Manager
•
Up to 30,000 phones and
1,000 sites with Cisco
Unified
Communications
Manager
•
Up to 240 phones
with Cisco Unified
Communications
Manager Express
•
•
Up to 575 phones
(and up to 500
users) with Cisco
Unified
Communications
Manager Business
Edition
Up to 240 phones with
Cisco Unified
Communications
Manager Express for
small or branch site or
fixed remote teleworker
applications
•
Up to 575 phones (and
500 users) and up to a
total of 20 sites with
Cisco Unified
Communications
Manager Business
Edition
Multisite Distributed Call
Processing Model
•
Up to 30,000 phones
per Cisco Unified
Communications
Manager instance
•
Up to 240 phones per
Cisco Unified
Communications
Manager Express
instance.
Clustering Over IP WAN
Call Processing model
•
Up to 30,000 phones
per Cisco Unified
Communications
Manager instance
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Chapter 2
Deployment Models
Major Components of Deployment Models
Table 2-1
Deployment Models Components Summary (continued)
Components Single-Site Model
Call
Processing
•
Cisco Unified
Communications
Manager
•
Cisco Unified
Communications
Manager
•
Cisco Unified
Communications
Manager Express
•
Cisco Unified
Communications
Manager Business
Edition (in central site)
•
Contact
Center
Messaging
Cisco Unified
Communications
Manager Business
Edition
•
Cisco Unified
Communications
Manager Express for
fixed remote teleworker
applications (in central
site)
•
Unified SRST or Cisco
Unified
Communications
Manager Express (as
backup to Cisco Unified
Communications
Manager and Cisco
Unified
Communications
Manager Business
Edition)
Multisite Distributed Call
Processing Model
•
Cisco Unified
Communications
Manager (in one or
more locations)
•
Cisco Unified
Communications
Manager Express (in
one or more
locations)
•
Cisco Unified
Contact Center
Enterprise (in one or
more locations)
•
Cisco Unified IP IVR
•
Cisco Unified
Customer Voice
Portal
•
Cisco Unified
Contact Center
Enterprise
•
Cisco Unified Contact
Center Enterprise (based
in head- quarters)
•
Cisco Unified
Contact Center
Express
•
Cisco Unified Contact
Center Express (based in
headquarters)
•
Cisco Unified IP
IVR
•
•
Cisco Unified
Customer Voice
Portal
Cisco Unified Customer
Voice Portal (in headquarters or branches)
•
Cisco Unity
•
•
•
Cisco Unity
Connection
Cisco Unity (based in
head- quarters)
Cisco Unity (in one
or more locations)
•
Cisco Unity Connection
•
Cisco Unity
Express
•
Cisco Unity Express
Cisco Unity
Connection
•
Cisco Unity Express
Cisco Unified
Presence
•
•
Cisco Unified
Presence (in one or
more locations)
•
Instant
Messaging
and
Presence
Multisite Centralized Call
Processing Model
•
Cisco Unified Presence
(in head- quarters)
Clustering Over IP WAN
Call Processing model
•
Cisco Unified
Communications
Manager (subscriber
and backup)
•
Cisco Unified
Contact Center
Enterprise
•
Cisco Unified
Customer Voice
Portal
•
Cisco Unity
•
Cisco Unity
Connection
•
Cisco Unity Express
•
Cisco Unified
Presence
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Chapter 2
Deployment Models
Major Components of Deployment Models
Table 2-1
Deployment Models Components Summary (continued)
Components Single-Site Model
Conferencin
g
System
Managemen
t
Off-Premise
s Calling
•
Cisco Unified
Meeting- Place
•
Cisco Unified
Videoconferencing
•
Cisco Unified
Operations
Manager
•
Cisco Unified
Service Monitor
•
Cisco Unified
Service Statistics
Manager
•
Cisco Unified
Provisioning
Manager
•
LAN Management
Solution
•
PSTN via gateway
Multisite Centralized Call
Processing Model
•
Cisco Unified MeetingPlace (based in headquarters)
•
Cisco Unified Videoconferencing
Based in head- quarters:
Multisite Distributed Call
Processing Model
•
•
•
Cisco Unified Service
Monitor
•
•
Cisco Unified Service
Statistics Manager
•
•
Cisco Unified
Provisioning Manager
•
•
•
Cisco Unified
Meeting- Place
•
Cisco Unified Videoconferencing
•
Cisco Unified
Operations Manager
Cisco Unified
Operations Manager
•
Cisco Unified
Service Monitor
Cisco Unified
Service Monitor
•
Cisco Unified
Service Statistics
Manager
Cisco Unified
Service Statistics
Manager
•
Cisco Unified
Provisioning
Manager
•
Site to Site over IP
WAN
Cisco Unified Videoconferencing
Distributed:
Cisco Unified
Operations Manager
•
Cisco Unified
Meeting- Place (in
one or more
locations)
•
Cisco Unified
Provisioning
Manager
•
LAN Management
Solution
LAN Management
Solution
Clustering Over IP WAN
Call Processing model
•
Site to Site over IP WAN
•
•
PSTN as backup for
branch sites
Site to Site over IP
WAN
•
PSTN for
off-network calling
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CH A P T E R
3
Cisco Unified Communications Component
Overviews
This chapter provides brief descriptions of the following Cisco Unified Communications system
components:
•
Cisco 1800, 2800, and 3800 Series Integrated Services Routers, page 3-2
•
Cisco Emergency Responder, page 3-3
•
Cisco FAX Server, page 3-3
•
Cisco Unified Border Element, page 3-3
•
Cisco RSVP Agent, page 3-4
•
Cisco IP Communicator, page 3-4
•
Cisco Unified Application Environment, page 3-5
•
Cisco Unified Communications Manager, page 3-5
•
Cisco Unified Communications Manager Attendant Console, page 3-6
•
Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express, page 3-6
•
Cisco Unified Communications Manager Business Edition, page 3-7
•
Cisco Unified Contact Center Enterprise, page 3-7
•
Cisco Unified Contact Center Express, page 3-7
•
Cisco Unified Expert Advisor, page 3-8
•
Cisco Unified Customer Voice Portal, page 3-8
•
Cisco Unified IP Phones, page 3-9
•
Cisco Unified MeetingPlace, page 3-11
•
Cisco Unified MeetingPlace Express, page 3-11
•
Cisco Unified Mobility, page 3-12
•
Cisco Unified Mobile Communicator, page 3-12
•
Cisco Unified Messaging Gateway, page 3-13
•
Cisco Unified Personal Communicator, page 3-13
•
Cisco Unified Communications Integration™ for Microsoft Office Communicator, page 3-14
•
Cisco Unified Presence, page 3-14
•
Cisco Unified SIP Proxy, page 3-15
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Chapter 3
Cisco Unified Communications Component Overviews
Cisco 1800, 2800, and 3800 Series Integrated Services Routers
•
Cisco Unified Communications Widgets, page 3-15
•
Cisco Unified Survivable Remote Site Telephony, page 3-16
•
Cisco Unified Video Advantage, page 3-16
•
Cisco Unified Videoconferencing, page 3-16
•
Cisco Unity, page 3-17
•
Cisco Unity Connection, page 3-18
•
Cisco Unity Express, page 3-18
•
Cisco VG200 Series Gateways, page 3-19
•
Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6), page 3-20
•
Security Components, page 3-20
•
Cisco 7800 Series Media Convergence Servers, page 3-21
•
Management and Serviceability Components, page 3-22
Cisco 1800, 2800, and 3800 Series Integrated Services Routers
Cisco 1800, 2800, and 3800 series integrated services routers can be deployed as voice gateway routers
as part of the Cisco IP Communications solution. Deployments can use these routers as voice gateways
with call component process for Cisco Unified Communications Manager.
Cisco 2800 and 3800 series integrated services routers communicate directly with Cisco Unified
Communications Manager, allowing for the deployment of IP telephony solutions for large enterprises
and service providers that offer managed network services. These routers provide a highly flexible and
scalable solution for small and medium-sized branches and regional offices.
The Cisco 2800 and 3800 series voice gateway routers support a wide range of packet telephony-based
voice interfaces and signaling protocols, providing connectivity support for more than 90 percent of PBX
and PSTN connection points. Signaling support includes T1/E1 Primary Rate Interface (PRI), T1
channel associated signaling (CAS), E1-R2, T1/E1 QSIG protocol, T1 Feature Group D (FGD), Basic
Rate Interface (BRI), foreign exchange office (FXO), ear and mouth (E&M), and foreign exchange
station (FXS). These voice gateway routers can be configured to support from 2 to 540 voice channels.
The Cisco 1800 Series integrated services routers are ideal for small to medium-sized businesses and
small enterprise branch offices. The 1800 series routers help businesses to reduce costs by deploying a
single, resilient system for fast, secure delivery of multiple mission-critical business services. The Cisco
1861 integrated services router is a modular platform that provides voice, data, voice-mail, automated
attendant, video, and security capabilities while integrating with existing desktop applications such as
calendar, e-mail, and customer relationship management (CRM) programs and with built-in security. It
includes:
•
Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express or Survivable Remote Site Telephony for call
processing for up to 8 users
•
Optional Cisco Unity Express, for voice messaging and automated attendant
•
LAN switching with Power over Ethernet (PoE) expandable through Cisco Catalyst Switches
•
Onboard voice ports for PSTN, PBX, and key system connections
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/routers/index.html
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Chapter 3
Cisco Unified Communications Component Overviews
Cisco Emergency Responder
Cisco Emergency Responder
Cisco Emergency Responder enhances emergency calling from Cisco Unified Communications
Manager. It helps assure that Cisco Unified Communications Manager sends emergency calls to the
appropriate Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) for the caller’s location, and that the PSAP can
identify the caller’s location and, if necessary, return the call. Cisco Emergency Responder can also
notify customer security personnel of an emergency call in progress and of a caller’s location.
Cisco Emergency Responder helps Cisco Unified Communications Manager customers comply more
effectively with their legal or regulatory obligations and reduce their risk of liability related to
emergency calls. It includes these key features:
•
Automatically tracks IP phone location
•
Provides emergency call routing instructions to Cisco Unified Communications Manager
•
Identifies caller location to local exchange carriers and PSAPs
•
Alerts customer security personnel to emergency calls in progress
•
Supports Emergency callback
•
Logs emergency calls and location record changes
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps842/index.html
Cisco FAX Server
The Cisco Fax Server is an easy-to-use, easy-to-manage fax and e-document delivery solution that helps
enterprises integrate voice, fax, data, and desktop applications as part of an enterprise IP
communications architecture. It enables users to send, receive, and manage documents directly from
desktop, e-mail, and other business applications. Based on the Captaris RightFax 9.0 Enterprise Suite,
the Cisco Fax Server can be coupled with enterprise messaging applications such as Cisco Unity
software to create a powerful unified messaging solution.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6178/index.html
Cisco Unified Border Element
The Cisco Unified Border Element is an integrated application within Cisco IOS software load that runs
on the Cisco Integrated Service Routers—Cisco 2800 and Cisco 3800 series for integrated voice, video
and data services, and on Cisco 7200VXR and Cisco 7301 series of routing and gateway platforms.
Designed to meet enterprise and service provider Session Border Controller (SBC) needs, the
Cisco Multiservice Cisco Unified Border Element facilitates simple and cost-effective connectivity
between independent VoIP and video networks. It provides a network-to-network interface point for:
•
Signaling interworking (H.323, SIP)
•
Media interworking (DTMF, fax, modem and codec transcoding)
•
Address and port translations (privacy and topology hiding)
•
Billing and CDR Normalization
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3-3
Chapter 3
Cisco Unified Communications Component Overviews
Cisco RSVP Agent
•
QoS and bandwidth management (QoS marking using TOS, DSCP and bandwidth enforcement
using RSVP and codec filtering)
The Cisco Multiservice Cisco Unified Border Element integrates SBC needs into the network layer to
interconnect VoIP and video networks in intra-enterprise, inter-enterprise, enterprise to service provider,
and inter-service provider architectures.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps5640/index.html
Cisco RSVP Agent
Cisco RSVP Agent is a Cisco IOS Software feature that uses the network to deliver call admission
control and quality of service for Cisco Unified Communications Manager deployments. Cisco RSVP
Agent employs Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP), an IETF standards-based signaling protocol for
reserving bandwidth in an IP network. The RSVP protocol enables dynamic adjustment to changes in
the network, supports complex network topologies, and enables call admission decisions.
Cisco RSVP Agent offer benefits such as:
•
Provides guaranteed WAN bandwidth for Cisco Unified Communications Manager calls
•
Supports complex network topologies, including meshed designs, redundant links, and dynamically
changing topologies
•
Controls the quality and availability of voice and video calls, and authorization of calls
•
Provides seamless interworking of any call control signaling that Cisco Unified Communications
Manager supports such as SIP, H.323, Media Gateway Control Protocol (MGCP), and Skinny Client
Control Protocol (SCCP).
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6832/index.html
Cisco IP Communicator
Cisco IP Communicator provides personal computers with the functionality of IP phones. This Microsoft
Windows-based application provides high-quality voice calls to users from wherever they have access to
the corporate network. It can serve as a supplemental telephone, a telecommuting device, or a primary
desktop telephone.
When registered to Cisco Unified Communications Manager, Cisco IP Communicator has the
functionality of a full-featured Cisco Unified IP Phone, including the ability to transfer calls, forward
calls, and conference additional participants to an existing call. In addition, a Cisco IP Communicator
that is registered to Cisco Unified Communications Manager can be provisioned like any other Cisco
Unified IP Phone, which greatly simplifies phone management.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps5475/index.html
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Chapter 3
Cisco Unified Communications Component Overviews
Cisco Unified Application Environment
Cisco Unified Application Environment
Cisco Unified Application Environment enables the rapid development, reliable execution, and
automated management of applications that converge voice and video with enterprise applications and
data. It is a suite of products including:
•
Cisco Unified Application Designer—Enables developers to visually construct applications by
dragging and dropping prebuilt functions onto a graphical communications business logic canvas
and visually updating parameters associated with the graphical functions.
•
Cisco Unified Application Server—Abstracts the complexity of telephony protocols, separates
application logic from core call routing to protect Cisco Unified Communications Manager, and
provides a standard way to manage all of an organization's unified communications applications.
•
Cisco Unified Media Engine—Provides ready-to-use, sophisticated media processing capabilities
for all applications built using the Cisco Unified Application Designer-functions such as interactive
voice response (IVR), conferencing, transcoding, text-to-speech (TTS), speech recognition, and
speaker verification.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6789/Products_Sub_Category_Home.html
Cisco Unified Communications Manager
Cisco Unified Communications Manager software is the call-processing component of the Cisco Unified
Communications system. Cisco Unified Communications Manager extends enterprise telephony features
and capabilities to packet telephony network devices such as IP phones, media processing devices, voice
over IP (VoIP) gateways, and multimedia applications. Additional services such as unified messaging,
multimedia conferencing, collaborative contact centers, and interactive multimedia response systems are
made possible through Cisco Unified Communications Manager open telephony APIs. Cisco Unified
Communications Manager offers a suite of integrated voice applications and utilities, including the
Cisco Unified Communications Manager Attendant Console, an ad-hoc conferencing application, the
Cisco Unified Communications Manager Bulk Administration Tool, the Cisco Unified Communications
Manager CDR (call detail record) Analysis and Reporting Tool, the Cisco Unified Communications
Manager Real-Time Monitoring Tool, and the Cisco Unified Communications Manager Assistant
application.
The dial plan feature in Unified Communications Manager enable you to:
•
Route calls based on the physical location context of the caller.
•
Represent calling and called party numbers in a global form such as that described by the
International Telecommunications Union's E.164 recommendation.
•
Present calls to users in a format based on local dialing habits.
•
Present calls to external networks (for example, the PSTN) in a manner compatible with the local
requirements for calling party number, called party number, and their respective numbering types.
•
Derive the global form of the calling party number on incoming calls from gateways, based on the
calling number digits and the numbering type.
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Cisco Unified Communications Manager Attendant Console
Cisco Unified Communications Manager Attendant Console
The three types of Cisco Attendant Console supported by Cisco Unified Communications Manager are:
•
Cisco Unified Communications Manager Attendant Console (AC)—native AC within Cisco Unified
Communications Manager
•
Cisco Unified Business Attendant Console—OEM'd version of ARC Console
•
Cisco Unified Department Attendant Console—OEM'd version of ARC Console
Cisco Attendant Console integrates traditional time-division multiplexing (TDM) telephony functions
with advanced IP telephony applications and services such as Lightweight Directory Access Protocol
(LDAP) directory. Cisco Unified Communications Manager Attendant Console gives the user the ability
to monitor the state of every line in the system and to efficiently dispatch calls.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps555/index.html
Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express
Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express is an entry-level call processing system that provides
a wide range of IP telephony features for small to medium-sized businesses and autonomous small
enterprise branch offices with up to 240 phones.
All files and configurations for IP phones are stored internally on a single Cisco Integrated Services
router or on the new Unified Communications 500 Series router for a cost-effective, highly reliable, IP
communications solution. Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express helps ensure investment
protection and offers scalability because all hardware and software is fully compatible with
Cisco Unified Communications Manager and Cisco Unified Survivable Remote Site Telephony.
Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express provides key system and PBX modes of operation on
a single network and several industry-unique features, including:
•
Call processing for local IP and analog phones attached to a Cisco router
•
Support for analog phones in SCCP mode, Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) line side support with
supported Cisco Unified IP phones, and a robust set of PSTN interfaces
•
Call routing over a WAN with calling party name and number information, and compressed voice
for reduced WAN bandwidth utilization
•
Support for peripheral services such as voice mail, automated attendant, and IP-based XML and
Telephony Application Programming Interface (TAPI) applications
•
Interoperability with Cisco Unified CallManger and the Cisco Unity Express
•
Simple software configuration change on the Cisco router converts system to a highly available
survivable telephony gateway with support for more features than SRST for a remote site in a
centralized Cisco Unified Communications Manager deployment
System management features in the Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express environment
enable you to:
•
Accomplish initial installation of Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express easily using the
Quick Configuration Tool (QCT) that prompts for answers to pertinent questions
•
Perform everyday administration and remote troubleshooting using the Cisco IOS software
command-line interface (CLI)
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Cisco Unified Communications Manager Business Edition
•
Add users, phones, and extensions or make changes for system and integrated voice-mail using a single
web-based GUI designed for nontechnical staff
•
Use Cisco Configuration Agent (CCA) for configuration tasks
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps4625/index.html
Cisco Unified Communications Manager Business Edition
The Cisco Unified Communications Manager Business Edition is the call-processing, mobility, and
messaging component of the Cisco Unified Communications system for medium-sized businesses. It
includes the features and capabilities of Cisco Unified Communications Manager, Cisco Unified
Mobility, and Cisco Unity Connection co-resident on a single, low-cost Media Convergence Server.
The Cisco Unified Communications Manager Business Edition is designed to support 150 to 500 users
in one main and up to five remote locations. It also supports up to 575 Skinny Client Control Protocol
(SCCP) or Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) IP phones or video endpoints per Cisco Unified
Communications Manager Business Edition autonomous system. Installation is simplified as the
applications come pre-loaded onto the server. And management of all applications can be performed
through a consolidated interface.
The Cisco Unified Communications Manager Business Edition supports corporate directory
synchronization. This feature enables Cisco Unified Communications Manager Business Edition to
synchronize directly with an existing corporate directory using LDAP integration. This feature enables
administrators to provision users automatically from the corporate directory into the Cisco Unified
Communications Manager Business Edition database, thus allowing administrators to maintain a single
directory. This method avoids having to add, remove, or modify core user information manually in Cisco
Unified Communications Manager Business Edition each time a change occurs in the corporate
directory. This feature also helps the end-users authenticate using single sign-on functionality, thus
reducing the number of passwords across the network.
Cisco Unified Contact Center Enterprise
Cisco Unified Contact Center Enterprise provides a full-featured distributed contact center
infrastructure, which segments customers, monitors resource availability, and delivers each contact to
the most appropriate resource. It provides a VoIP contact center solution that integrates inbound and
outbound voice applications with Internet applications, including real-time chat, web collaboration and
e-mail. Cisco Unified Contact Center Enterprise is made up of Unified Intelligent Contact Management
Enterprise, which provides pre-routing and post-routing capabilities, Cisco Unified Communications
Manager, Cisco Unified IP IVR, and Cisco Unified Customer Voice Portal.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/custcosw/ps1844/index.html
Cisco Unified Contact Center Express
Cisco Unified Contact Center Express provides departmental, enterprise branch, or small to
medium-sized companies with easy-to-deploy, easy-to-use, and sophisticated customer interaction
management for up to 300 agents. It provides a VoIP contact center solution that integrates inbound and
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Cisco Unified Expert Advisor
outbound voice applications with Internet applications, including real-time chat, web collaboration and
e-mail. To provide presence information, Cisco Agent Desktop (CAD) can be integrated with Cisco
Unified Presence. These applications securely support a virtual contact center with integrated
self-service applications across numerous sites. They provide support for powerful agent-based assisted
service and fully integrated self-service applications and offer distributed automatic call distributor
(ACD), interactive voice response (IVR), computer telephony integration (CTI), and agent and desktop
services.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/custcosw/ps1846/index.html
Cisco Unified Expert Advisor
Cisco Unified Expert Advisor is an optional component in a Cisco Unified Intelligent Contact
Management Enterprise deployment. It allows calls to be routed to expert advisors in addition to
traditional contact center agents. An expert advisor differs from a traditional agent such that it is not the
expert advisor’s main job to answer the phone and also the advisor is often mobile and can be reachable
at different numbers at different times. The expert advisor is a part of the enterprise but usually not a part
of the call center. They are involved only by those traditional agents who have already received calls and
who wish to consult an advisor. The agent may consult and, if the company's business practices permit
it, conference or transfer to the advisor. However, the expert advisor has an expertise that may be tapped
by traditional agents or tapped directly by callers into the contact center bypassing the traditional contact
center completely and allowing outside callers to reach members of the enterprise directly. Thus, the
company may develop a business model that allows the call center to reach into the enterprise to involve
specifically designated expert advisors.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/custcosw/ps1844/index.html
Cisco Unified Customer Voice Portal
The Cisco Unified Customer Voice Portal provides call-management and call-treatment solutions with
self-service IVR capabilities, allowing callers to obtain personalized answers to complex questions and
to conduct business without interacting with a live agent.
The Cisco Unified Customer Voice Portal includes support for agent queuing and for multisite call
switching capabilities. It uses standard Internet technologies to provide a smooth customer experience
even when transferring calls between several locations. With support for the Cisco Unified Intelligent
Contact Management and Cisco Unified Contact Center products, the Cisco Unified Customer Voice
Portal delivers self-service as part of a comprehensive customer contact strategy that provides unique,
personalized interactions.
The Cisco Unified Customer Voice Portal supports speech-enabled and touch-tone applications, which
can be quickly integrated with back-end data and business rules that are available on the web. Using the
standard Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE) and Voice Extensible Markup Language
(VoiceXML) with the graphical development tools provided with the portal (which are compliant with
the Eclipse standard for building web applications), you can develop complex voice applications quickly
and cost-effectively.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/custcosw/ps1006/index.html
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Cisco Unified IP Phones
Cisco Unified IP Phones
Cisco Unified IP Phones are full-featured telephones that provide voice communication over an IP
network. They function much like digital business phones, allowing you to place and receive phone calls
and to access features such as mute, hold, transfer, speed dial, call forward, and more. In addition,
because Cisco IP Phones are connected to your data network, they offer enhanced IP telephony features,
including access to network information and services, and customizeable features and services. Many
phone models also support security features that include file authentication, device authentication,
signaling encryption, and media encryption.
The Cisco Unified Communications system supports these Cisco Unified IP Phone models:
•
Cisco Unified SIP Phone 3911—Suitable for public spaces, lobbies, workshops, and warehouses
where the phone is not assigned to any one user. Includes one line (DN), fixed feature keys, and a
2-line x 24-character display along with two menu select keys and a two-way rocker for scrolling
control. The Cisco Unified SIP Phone 3911 supports IEEE 802.3af Power over Ethernet (PoE), or
local power through an optional power adaptor.
•
The Cisco Unified IP Phone 6900 Series is a new and innovative portfolio of endpoints, delivering
cost-effective business-grade voice communication services to customers worldwide. Three models
are introduced: 6921 (two-line), 6941 (four-line) and 6961 (twelve-line). All three models support
full duplex speakerphones and single call-per-line appearance, resulting in a more productive,
flexible and easier-to-use endpoint experience. The Cisco Unified IP Phone 6900 Series offers
greater personalization, with the choice of two colors and two handset weight options. Right-to-left
language presentation is also supported on the displays, addressing the language localization needs
of global customers. The Cisco Unified IP Phone 6900 Series is also more energy efficient,
consuming less power in support customer green initiatives
•
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7902G—Suitable for public spaces, lobbies, workshops, and warehouses
where the phone is not assigned to any one user. Includes one line (DN), four fixed feature keys, and
no display. Offers basic security features and several power options.
•
Cisco Unified IP Phones 7905G / 7906G—Suitable for a user who conducts low to moderate
telephone traffic and does not have a PC connected to the phone. Includes one line (DN), four
dynamic softkeys, a pixel-based display, and support for Extensible Markup Language (XML)
services. Offers security features and several power options, including IEEE 802.3af power on the
7906G.
•
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7910G and 7910G+SW—The Cisco Unified IP Phone 7910G supports only
a single line, and the speaker operates in one-way listen mode only. The Cisco Unified IP Phone
7910G also has six feature access keys that can be configured in the customized phone button
template by the administrator to provide the end-user with various call features. Because there are
only six feature access keys on this phone model, one phone button template cannot provide the
end-user with all the call features. Both the Cisco Unified IP Phone 7910G and 7910+SW support
SCCP but have no support for SIP. The only difference between the Cisco Unified IP Phone 7910G
and 7910G+SW is that the former has a 10 Base-T Ethernet port and the latter has two 10/100
Base-T Ethernet ports
•
Cisco Unified IP Phones 7911G / 7912G—Suitable for a user who conducts low to moderate
telephone traffic and has a PC connected to the phone. Includes one line (DN), Ethernet switch and
PC port, four dynamic softkeys, a pixel-based display, and support for XML services. Offers security
features and several power options, including IEEE 802.3af power on the 7911G.
•
Cisco Unified Wireless IP Phone 7920G (IEEE 802.11b wireless IP phone)—Supports up to six
lines, security features, XML services, and many telephony features.
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Cisco Unified IP Phones
•
Cisco Unified Wireless IP Phone 7921G (IEEE 802.11a/b/g wireless IP phone)—Supports up to six
lines, enhances security features, XML services and many telephony features as well as a full color
display and built-in speaker phone. Offers security and QoS features and several power options,
including IEEE 802.11a, b, and g standards that allow customers to use 7921G in the 2.4 GHz or 5
GHz bands.
•
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7931G—Suitable for a user in retail, commercial, or manufacturing who
conducts moderate telephone traffic.Includes twenty-four lighted line keys, each of which can be
assigned to a different line, dedicated keys for hold, redial, and transfer, as well as four soft keys.
Also includes high-quality speakerphone, built-in headset port, integrated Ethernet switch, and
audio controls for full-duplex speakerphone, handset, and headset. Supports XML services, security
features, and power options.
•
Cisco Unified IP Conference Station 7936G—Suitable for a 20-foot by 30-foot room with 360
degree coverage. Includes one line (DN), a backlit LCD display, and two ports for optional extension
microphones.
•
Cisco Unified IP Conference Station 7937G—Extends the capabilities of the 7936G, which includes
access to network data, XML applications, and web-based services. Suitable for 40 feet by 40 feet
conference rooms. Adds IEEE 802.3af inline power, wideband codec, internationalization and
localization, IP Phone XML services, and wireless lapel microphone.
•
Cisco Unified IP Phones 7940G / 7960G—Suitable for the needs of a transaction-type worker.
Provides two lines (DNs) or a combination of lines and direct access to telephony features on the
7940G, and six lines or combination of lines and direct access to telephony features on the 7960G.
Also includes a large LCD display, programmable line and feature keys, dynamic softkeys,
high-quality speakerphone, built-in headset port, integrated Ethernet switch, and audio controls for
full-duplex speakerphone, handset, and headset. Supports XML services, security features, and
power options.
•
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7941G / 7941G-GE / 7961G / 7961G-GE—Provides similar capabilities to
the Cisco Unified IP Phone 7940G / 7960G, with the addition of a higher-resolution grayscale
pixel-based LCD and IEEE 802.3af power. Includes two lines (DNs) or combination of lines and
direct access to telephony features on the 7941G / 7941G-GE, and six lines or combination of lines
and direct access to telephony features on the 7961G / 61G-GE. GE models include a gigabit
Ethernet port for integration with PCs or desktop servers.
•
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7942G / 7962G—Suitable for advanced business use, managers and
executives. Provides support for high-quality wideband audio (G.722 / TIA920-adherent) and a
high-resolution 4-bit grey scale display.
•
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7945G / 7965G / 7975G—Suitable for enhanced business use, manager and
executive. Provides support for high-quality wideband audio (G.722 / TIA920-adherent), a backlit
TFT color display, and an integrated Gigabit Ethernet switch and a four-way navigation rocker with
Select key.
•
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7970G / 7971G-GE—Suitable for managers and executives. Includes a
backlit, high-resolution color touch-screen display. Supports up to eight telephone lines or
combination of lines and direct access to telephony features and provides hands-free speakerphone,
built-in headset connection, and many telephony features. Offers security features and several power
options, including IEEE 802.3af power. GE model includes a gigabit Ethernet port.
•
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7975G—The Cisco Unified IP Phone 7975G, like the 7971G-GE, can have
up to eight directory numbers and two 10/100/1000 Base-T Ethernet connections. Unlike the
7971G-GE, however, the 7975G adds the G.722 wideband codec and high-fidelity speaker,
microphone, and handset. The 7975G also has a touchscreen color display.
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Cisco Unified MeetingPlace
•
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7985G—A personal desktop video phone for the Cisco Unified IP
Communications solution. Provides all components needed for video calls, including camera, LCD
screen, speaker, keypad, and handset. Includes one line (DN) and a backlit, high-resolution color
video display. Supports hands-free speakerphone, high-quality voice codecs, built-in headset
connection, and many telephony features. Offers security features and several power options
including IEEE 802.3af power.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/phones/ps379/index.html
Cisco Unified MeetingPlace
Cisco Unified MeetingPlace is a complete rich-media conferencing solution that integrates voice, video,
and web collaboration capabilities. It allows users from any location to meet at any time and to easily
integrating web, voice, and video conferencing into everyday communications.
Cisco Unified MeetingPlace provides intuitive interfaces for setting up, attending, and managing
meetings. It allows immediate or future voice, video, and web conferences to be set up and attended in
a single step—from Cisco Unified IP Phones, instant messaging clients, web browsers, and Microsoft
Outlook and Lotus Notes calendars. Meeting participants have complete control over voice, video, and
web conferences from a single browser interface.
Cisco Unified MeetingPlace can be deployed “on network,” behind a firewall, and integrated directly into
an organization’s private voice and data networks and collaborative applications. This deployment
enables cost savings because organizations can use their IP network infrastructures to reduce transport
costs paid to service providers. In addition, on-network deployment results in a secure meeting
environment by allowing organizations to isolate confidential meetings and content behind the firewall
while providing the flexibility to meet with external parties. To prevent unauthorized access and toll
fraud, Cisco Unified MeetingPlace integrates with the corporate directory to provide synchronized
updates as an employee’s status changes.
Cisco MeetingPlace can be located in on-premises or hosted in off-site facilities. It can be managed
in-house or management can be outsourced.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/ps5664/ps5669/index.html
Cisco Unified MeetingPlace Express
Cisco Unified MeetingPlace Express is an integrated voice, video (up to 150 concurrent video users),
and web conferencing solution for medium-sized organizations. It allows users to communicate and
collaborate from any place at any time through a phone or video and a web browser. Cisco MeetingPlace
Express integrates meeting management and control capabilities directly into web and Cisco Unified IP
Phone interfaces. Users can easily set up meetings from a variety of interfaces, including Microsoft
Outlook, web browsers, telephones, and the included IP phone application.
Cisco Unified MeetingPlace Express supports industry standard protocols to ensure connectivity with a
range of telephony systems, including Cisco Unified Communications Manager and Cisco Unified
Communications Manager Express.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6533/index.html
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Cisco Unified Mobility
Cisco Unified Mobility
Cisco Unified Mobility provides features and functionality for Cisco Unified Communications Manager
users who want to consolidate all their business calls with a single enterprise IP phone number. The
Cisco Mobile Connect service helps mobile workers direct their inbound business calls to both their IP
desk phone as well as their mobile phone or other remote phone numbers while Cisco Mobile Voice
Access and Cisco Enterprise Feature Access 2-Stage Dialing provide users the ability to initiate
outbound business calls as if they were at their IP phone—all from a mobile phone or other remote
destination phone. To support Cisco Mobile Connect, Cisco Mobile Voice Access, and Enterprise
Feature Access 2-Stage Dialing, Cisco Unified Mobility uses the web-based system administration and
user configuration facilities built in to the Cisco Unified Communications Manager, which enables
enterprise mobile workers to take advantage of these features.
Cisco Unified Mobility includes these features:
•
Simultaneous desktop ringing
•
Desk phone pickup
•
Mobile phone or remote destination pickup
•
Security and privacy for Cisco Mobile Connect calls
•
Access Lists to Allow or Block Mobile Connect Calls
•
Cisco Mobile Voice Access which provides IVR-based remote access to the system with user
identification and personal identification number protection for making calls
•
Single enterprise voice mailbox
•
Caller identification
•
System administrator-controllable user profile access
•
Remote on/off control
•
Call tracing
•
Cisco Enterprise Feature Access 2-Stage Dialing
•
Mid-call features (Hold, Resume, Transfer, Conference, Directed Call Park)
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6567/index.html
Cisco Unified Mobile Communicator
Cisco Unified Mobile Communicator is a graphical client that works in conjunction with a server
running the Cisco Unified Mobility Advantage software to provide a rich user interface for accessing
and controlling mobile phone features and functionality. The system integrates into existing corporate
LDAP directories, allowing users to use a single set of credentials across all devices. Further, all traffic
between Unified Mobile Communicator and Unified Mobility Advantage is protected by the Secure
Socket Layer (SSL) protocol. Cisco Unified Mobile Communicator provides users traveling outside the
organization with the ability to use their mobile device to access and utilize various Unified
Communications applications that reside inside the enterprise such as:
•
Access to corporate and personal directories
•
Presence and buddy synchronization with the enterprise
•
Visual access to corporate voicemail
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Cisco Unified Messaging Gateway
•
Visibility into desk phone history of missed, placed, and received calls
•
Secure store-and-forward text messaging
•
Reception of conference notifications
•
Dial-via-office using Cisco Unified CM
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps7271/index.html
Cisco Unified Messaging Gateway
The Cisco Unified Messaging Gateway provides an open and secure method of intelligently routing
messages and exchanging subscriber and directory information within a unified messaging network. It
acts as the central hub in a network of Cisco unified messaging solutions and third-party gateways that
interface with older voicemail systems.
The Cisco Unified Messaging Gateway:
•
Unified messaging network scale as required for branch office customers and larger distributed
enterprises
•
Centralize voicemail system management
•
Transparently integrate Cisco Unified Communications solutions into existing voicemail
installations
•
Integrates small to large-scale unified messaging deployments that consist of 5 Cisco Unity Express
systems and above and supports up to 10,000 mixed Cisco Unity Express, Cisco Unity, and Cisco
Unity Connection systems.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/partner/products/ps8605/tsd_products_support_series_home.html
Cisco Unified Personal Communicator
Cisco Unified Personal Communicator integrates a wide array of communications applications and
services into a single desktop computer application. It provides access to a variety of communications
tools, including voice (Cisco Unity or Unity Connection), video (Cisco Unified Videoconferencing),
web conferencing (Cisco Unified MeetingPlace or MeetingPlace Express), call management (Unified
CM), directories (LDAP), and presence (Unified Presence) information. Cisco Unified Personal
Communicator offers an easy-to-use interface that streamlines the communications experience and
facilitates collaboration. With Cisco Unified Personal Communicator, users can communicate virtually
anytime, from anywhere, and can easily escalate communication methods as required.
Cisco Unified Personal Communicator operates in Desk Phone (CTI control of the user’s desk phone for
Click to Call) and Soft Phone (software client operation) modes, and is supported on Apple Macintosh
and Microsoft Windows platforms.
For additional information, go to:
www.cisco.com/go/unifiedpersonalcomm
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Cisco Unified Communications Integration™ for Microsoft Office Communicator
Cisco Unified Communications Integration™ for Microsoft
Office Communicator
Cisco Unified Communications Integration™ for Microsoft Office Communicator provides seamless
collaboration with Cisco Unified Communications and Microsoft instant messaging (IM) and Presence
capabilities.
It extends proven Cisco Unified Communications services to Microsoft Office Communicator with a
single easy-to-manage communications platform. This provides interoperability with Microsoft Office
Communicator Server 2007 (OCS) and Microsoft Office Communicator (MOC) client. Cisco UC
Integration™ for Microsoft Office Communicator uses the Client Services Framework (CSF) and
incorporates it into a tab integration of Microsoft Office Communicator. This tab integration allows for
the use of audio telephony of existing Cisco Unified Communications Manager endpoints, acting both
as a softphone (softphone mode) and controlling a Cisco Unified IP Phone (desk phone mode).
This integration for Microsoft Office Communicator leverages a common unified client services
framework to:
•
Increase productivity—Instantly connect with colleagues, partners, and customers from anywhere
and have a business-class communication experience with an integrated Cisco IP softphone.
•
Streamline communications—View telephony presence status, access corporate voicemail and
communications history, or simply click to call through Cisco Unified IP Phone directly from your
desktop.
•
Enhance collaboration—Initiate multiparty conference calls and quickly add more participants as
needed.
•
Reduced complexity—Extend proven attributes of Cisco Unified Communications Manager directly
to your desktop with an easy-to-deploy integration and benefit from reduced management
complexity of a single call control architecture.
•
Protect investments—Make an immediate business impact with interoperable Cisco Unified
Communications while protecting your investments in existing desktop applications.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps10317/index.html
Cisco Unified Presence
Cisco Unified Presence enables the deployment of Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) technology to
support new voice services in an enterprise environment. SIP enhances the voice network by providing
a core set of behaviors for session establishment and control that can be applied in a wide array of
features and services. In addition to core SIP support, Cisco Unified Presence uses SIMPLE (SIP for
Instant Messaging and Presence Leveraging Extensions) technology to support instant messaging (IM)
and presence.
Cisco Unified Presence consists of a SIP presence engine and a SIP proxy function. The presence engine
collects user presence information (such as busy, idle, away, or available status) and user capabilities
(such as the ability to support voice, video, instant messaging, and web collaboration), and compiles the
data in a repository for each user. This repository is accessed by the applications and features that each
user employs. A user can apply unique user rules and privacy to ensure that only authorized applications
and users have access to presence information. The SIP proxy function allows for efficient and accurate
routing of presence and general SIP messaging through the enterprise.
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Cisco Unified SIP Proxy
Cisco Unified Presence integrates with various desktop clients and applications. It enables Cisco Unified
Personal Communicator to perform functions such as click-to-dial and phone control as well as voice,
video, and web collaboration. In addition, Cisco Unified Presence provides a core IM service for Cisco
Unified IP Phones that are connected to Cisco Unified Communications Manager. Cisco Unified
Presence also supports interoperability with Microsoft Live Communications Server (LCS) 2005,
Microsoft Office Communications Server (OCS) 2007, and Microsoft Office Communicator client,
enabling specific Office Communicator functions to work with Cisco Unified IP Phones supported on
Cisco Unified Communications Manager. Finally, the SIP and SIMPLE interface on the Cisco Unified
Presence can provide value add presence and call control capabilities to any SIP/ SIMPLE standards
based application or service.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6837/index.html
Cisco Unified SIP Proxy
The Cisco Unified SIP Proxy provides SIP proxy functionality on a Cisco NME-522 network module
that can be plugged into a network module slot on the Cisco 3800 Series Integrated Services Routers
(ISRs). This ISR does not need to be dedicated to hosting the network module and running the proxy
alone, but can be used simultaneous for other network functions such as to run the Cisco Unified Border
Element.
The Cisco Unified SIP Proxy brings the following benefits to a network using Unified communications
Manager SIP trunks:
•
Aggregation and routing—The Unified SIP Proxy is capable of connecting several SIP servers to
each other without each of the servers connecting to every other one in a full-mesh configuration
•
Scalability—The Unified SIP Proxy can be used to terminate calls to and from the enterprise and
IP-PSTN service providers. The proxy, in turn, distributes the calls across a pool of Unified Border
Elements. More Unified Border Elements may be added to increase capacity.
•
Availability and load balancing—The Unified SIP Proxy distributes calls over the pool of available
Unified Border Elements and monitors the status of each Unified Border Element to ensure reliable
call completion.
•
Message normalization—The Unified SIP Proxy serves to hide differences in SIP protocol
messaging by providing the means to manipulate headers and contents of the messages as they pass
through the Unified SIP Proxy.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps10140/index.html
Cisco Unified Communications Widgets
Cisco Unified Communications Widgets helps you to streamline business communications and instantly
access rich Cisco Unified Communications and have a customized and familiar collaboration experience
in every workspace.
Cisco Unified Communications Widgets include the following applications:
•
Phone Designer—enables you to quickly customize Cisco Unified IP Phone displays with
wallpapers of your choice and to create or change ring tones
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Cisco Unified Survivable Remote Site Telephony
•
Click to Call—for PCs lets you connect and collaborate with everyone instantly by allowing you to
place Cisco Unified Communications Manager calls directly from your desktop productivity
applications and web browsers.
•
Visual Voicemail—enables you to view, listen, and respond to Cisco Unity and Cisco Unity
Connection voicemail messages right from the Cisco Unified IP Phone display, without having to
dial into your corporate voicemail box.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps9829/index.html
Cisco Unified Survivable Remote Site Telephony
Cisco Unified Communications Manager with Cisco Unified Survivable Remote Site Telephony (SRST)
allows companies to extend high-availability IP telephony to their remote branch offices with a
cost-effective solution that is easy to deploy, administer, and maintain. The SRST capability is embedded
in the Cisco IOS Software that runs on the Cisco 1800, 2800, and 3800 integrated services routers.
SRST software automatically detects a connectivity failure between Cisco Unified Communications
Manager and IP phones at a branch office. SRST initiates a process to automatically configure the Cisco
2800 and 3800 series integrated services routers to provide call-processing backup redundancy for the
IP phones and PSTN access in the affected office. The router provides essential call-processing services
for the duration of the failure, helping ensure that critical phone capabilities are operational. Upon
restoration of the connectivity to the Cisco Unified Communications Manager, the system automatically
shifts call-processing functions back to the primary Cisco Unified Communications Manager cluster.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps2169/index.html
Cisco Unified Video Advantage
Cisco Unified Video Advantage brings video telephony functionality to the Cisco Unified IP Phone 7900
Series and to Cisco IP Communicator. It is composed of Cisco Unified Video Advantage software and
Cisco VT Camera II, a video telephony USB camera. System administrators provision a Cisco Unified
IP Phone with Cisco Unified Video Advantage just as they would provision a phone for audio calls. Users
make and receive calls on their Cisco Unified IP Phones using the familiar phone interface, and calls
display with video on user PCs without additional user action required.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps5662/index.html
Cisco Unified Videoconferencing
Cisco Unified Videoconferencing provides organizations with a reliable, easy-to-manage, versatile, and
cost-effective network infrastructure for videoconferencing applications. In addition to integrating
legacy and IP-based room systems over a single infrastructure, Cisco Unified Videoconferencing
solutions offer video-enable telephony endpoints and rich media applications, enabling participants to
collaborate and share information in real time. Cisco Unified Videoconferencing offers simple dialing
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Cisco Unity
options, a range of dynamic layouts, and many in-conference controls. Cisco Unified Videoconferencing
provides support for H.323, H.320, SIP and SCCP video endpoints with a variety of formats, speeds and
functionality
The Cisco Unified Videoconferencing product family is composed of the Cisco Unified
Videoconferencing MCU 3515, 3522, 3527, and 3545. These products work with Cisco IOS gatekeepers
and gateways.
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/video/ps1870/index.html
Cisco Unity
Cisco Unity is a messaging platform designed for enterprises of all sizes. It provides unified messaging
(e-mail, voice, and fax messages sent to one inbox) and full-featured voice mail. Cisco Unity
interoperates with most legacy TDM PBXs and with Cisco Unified Communications Manager to enable
a transition to IP telephony while protecting existing infrastructure investments.
Key features of Cisco Unity include:
•
Integration with Outlook or Lotus Notes desktop clients.
•
Telephone interface (TUI) for DTMF-based control of messages. An intuitive interface allows
accessing, creating, replying to, and forwarding messages using a traditional telephone, and allows
managing and customizing mailbox features.
•
Web-based desktop interface that allows users to manage and customize their mailbox features and
to access their voice messages directly from a PC.
•
Text-to-speech (TTS) for telephone access to e-mail messages.
•
Integration with Exchange or Lotus Domino to provide a single location to store and manage all of
messages.
•
Unity Digital Networking using integration into a common Active Directory or Lotus Domino
Directory to provide seamless message exchange between users at several sites on different
Cisco Unity servers.
•
Mobile message access for Unified Messaging subscribers using Blackberry or Treo devices.
•
Cisco FAX server support or integration with third-party FAX vendors to provide FAX messages in
a single, unified inbox.
•
Interoperability with a wide range of legacy TDM PBX systems using analog DTMF, serial SMDI,
or digital set emulation.
•
Interoperability with a wide range of legacy voice messaging system using AMIS, VPIM, or
Cisco Unity Bridge (for Octel node emulation).
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps2237/index.html
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Cisco Unified Communications Component Overviews
Cisco Unity Connection
Cisco Unity Connection
Cisco Unity Connection provides messaging capabilities for mid-size offices and small enterprises. It
includes an intuitive telephone interface, voice-enabled navigation of messages, and desktop access to
messages directly from a PC. Cisco Untiy Connection integrates with Cisco Unified CallManger,
Cisco Unified CallManger Express, and various legacy PBX models (using the PIMG) to support a
variety of deployment models and configurations.
Key features of Cisco Unity Connection include:
•
Voice-enabled message navigation (such as play, delete, reply, forward)
•
Voice-enabled dialing to other system users
•
Desktop messaging with the Unity Inbox web client
•
Desktop messaging with IMAP-based e-mail clients
•
Personal call transfer rules, which allow call routing based on caller, time of day, Outlook calendar
status, and other parameters
•
Text-to-speech (TTS), which allows access to Exchange e-mails from a telephone
•
Message notifications to pagers, SMS phones, and other devices
•
Automated attendant capabilities
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6509/index.html
Cisco Unity Express
Cisco Unity Express provides integrated, entry-level, voice mail and automated attendant services for
small and medium offices or branches in Cisco Unified Communications Manager or Cisco Unified
Communications Manager Express environments. In Cisco Unified Communications Manager
environments, Cisco Unity Express provides local storage and processing of voice mail and automated
attendant services, alleviating WAN bandwidth and QOS concerns for the branch office. Combining
Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express with Cisco Unity Express provides a centralized
voicemail solution for up to 10 Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express sites and a core set of
phone features for everyday business needs while offering a variety of telephony feature sets that have
been provided by traditional key systems and hybrid PBXs.
Cisco Unity Express voice messaging and auto-attendant includes the following key features:
•
Networking across several sites—Voice Profile for Internet Mail version 2 (VPIMv2) provides
support for voice mail messaging interoperability between Cisco Unity Express sites and between
Cisco Unity Express and Cisco Unity, with Non-Delivery Record (NDR) for networked messages
and blind addressing
•
Distribution lists—Public and private distribution lists of local and remote users can be created for
sending messages to more than one subscriber
•
Broadcast messages—Privileged subscribers can send messages to all users on the network
•
Password and PIN length flexibility—Network administrators can set minimum lengths and expiry
times for passwords and personal identification numbers (PINs) for greater network security
•
SNMP MIB support—Network administrators can remotely monitor the health and performance of
the Cisco Unity Express system.
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Cisco VG200 Series Gateways
•
Support for caller ID information in incoming messages—Permits playing of caller identification
information as part of the message envelope for new incoming voice mail messages
•
Addition of remote users to the local directory—The voice-mail administrator can add frequently
called remote users to the local directory, which permits local users to address voice mail messages
to remote users using dial-by-name and to receive spoken name verification of the remote user
address
•
Undelete voice messages—Voice-mail users can restore a voice-mail message that was deleted
during the current voice message retrieval session.
•
Audio prompts in a variety of languages.
•
Support for Cisco Fax Server
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps5520/index.html
Cisco VG200 Series Gateways
The Cisco Unified Communications System supports the following VG200 Series Gateways:
•
Cisco VG224 Analog Voice Gateway
•
Cisco VG204 Analog Voice Gateway
•
Cisco VG202 Analog Voice Gateway
The Cisco VG224 Analog Phone Gateway combines a high-density RJ21 analog interface with
Cisco IOS Software manageability to provide a cost-effective platform for maximum functionality of
existing analog phone equipment. It offers the following key benefits:
•
High-density 24-port gateway for analog phones, fax machines, modems, and speakerphones
•
DSP technology for fax and modem support
•
Enhances an enterprise voice system architecture that is based on Cisco Unified Communications
Manager or Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express
•
Compact, 19-inch rack-mount chassis
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/gatecont/ps2250/ps5627/index.html
The Cisco VG204 Analog Voice Gateway combines granular RJ11 analog interfaces with Cisco IOS
Software manageability to deliver a platform designed to maximize the functionality of existing
distributed analog equipment in a Cisco Unified Communications system deployment. It offers the
following key benefits:
•
Low-density four-port gateway for analog phones, fax machines, modems, and speakerphones
•
Enhances an enterprise voice system architecture that is based on a Cisco Integrated Services
Router, Cisco modular access router or a Cisco VG224 in a Cisco Unified Communications Manager
or Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express deployment
•
Compact, fanless, desktop form-factor chassis that is wall-mountable
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps9810/index.html
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Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6)
The Cisco VG202 Analog Voice Gateway combines granular RJ11 analog interfaces with Cisco IOS
Software manageability to deliver a platform designed to maximize the functionality of existing
distributed analog equipment in a Cisco Unified Communications system deployment. It offers the
following key benefits:
•
Low-density two-port gateway for analog phones, fax machines, modems, and speakerphones
•
Enhances an enterprise voice system architecture that is based on a Cisco Integrated Services
Router, Cisco modular access router, or a Cisco VG224 in a Cisco Unified Communications
Manager or Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express deployment.
•
Compact, fanless, desktop form-factor chassis that is wall-mountable
For additional information, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps9809/index.html
Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6)
Cisco Unified Communications Manager 7.1(2) supports a very specific implementation of IPv6 which
may or may not meet enterprise customer requirements. Therefore, we require that enterprise customers
interested in deploying IPv6 in their lab or production environments utliize the Controlled Release
Process as below:
1.
Email the Controlled Release team at ipv6release@cisco.com.
2.
An application will be sent back to you for review and completion.
3.
Send back to ipv6release@cisco.com for review and approval.
4.
You will then be provided with a set of instructions and reference material listing caveats of IPv6
solution in Unified Communications Manager 7.1(2) as well as general instructions for use.
General queries about the Controlled Release Process for Unified Communications Manager 7.1(2) may
also use the email alias listed above.
Security Components
To provide voice security, the Cisco Unified Communications System includes the following
components:
•
Cisco Firewall Services Module—Integrated services module for the Cisco Catalyst 6500 Series
switches and Cisco 7600 Series routers that tracks the state of all network communications and
prevents unauthorized network access. It delivers strong application-layer security through
intelligent, application-aware inspection engines that examine network flows at Layers 4-7,
including protection for voice, multimedia, instant messaging, and peer-to-peer applications.
•
Cisco IOS Firewall—Suitable for branch offices, small to medium business environments, or
managed services, Cisco IOS Firewall effectively controls application traffic on the network. It helps
ensure your network's availability and the security of your company's resources by protecting the
network infrastructure against network- and application-layer attacks, viruses, and worms. It
protects unified communications by guarding Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) endpoints and
call-control resources. Cisco IOS Firewall is a stateful firewall solution, certified by Common
Criteria (EAL4).
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Cisco 7800 Series Media Convergence Servers
•
Cisco Adaptive Security Appliance—Integrates the features of the Cisco PIX 500 Series security
appliances, Cisco IPS 4200 Series sensors, and Cisco VPN 3000 Series concentrators to provide
proactive threat defense, network activity and application traffic control, and VPN connectivity.
•
Cisco Intrusion Prevention System—Stand-alone device (IPS 4200) and integrated services module
(IDSM) for the Cisco Catalyst 6500 Series switches that detects, classifies, and stops threats
including worms, spyware/adware, network viruses, and application abuse.
•
Cisco Network Admission Control Appliance (formerly Cisco Clean Access)—Automatically
detects, isolates, and cleans infected or vulnerable devices that attempt to access the network. It
determines whether machines are compliant with security policies and repairs any vulnerabilities
before permitting them to access the network.
•
CiscoWorks Management Center for Cisco Security Agents—Provides centralized security event
log collection from and centralized policy or version upgrades for Cisco Security Agents.
For more information about these components, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/vpndevc/index.html#products
Cisco 7800 Series Media Convergence Servers
Cisco Media Convergence Servers (MCS) provide highly available server platforms to host applications
within the Cisco Unified Communications system. These platforms address enterprise customer
requirements for Cisco Unified Communications Manager installations from two to 30,000 IP phones
within a single Cisco Unified Communications Manager cluster.
Cisco Unified Communications Manager is supported on specific Cisco MCS 7815, 7816, 7825, 7835,
and 7845 servers or on customer-provided HP and IBM servers that have been verified by Cisco to meet
the following minimum requirements:
•
Processor speed must be 2.0 GHz or greater
•
Physical memory size must be 2 GB or greater
•
Physical hard disk size must be 72 GB or larger
The following Media Convergence Servers are introduced:
•
MCS-7816-I4
•
MCS-7825-H4 and MCS-7825-14
•
MCS-7828-H4 and MCS-7828-14
•
MCS-7835-H2 and MCS-7835-12
•
MCS-7845-H2 and MCS-7845-12
For a complete list of currently supported hardware configurations, refer to the documentation available
at:
http://www.cisco.com/go/swonly
Note
The Cisco MCS 7828 servers support only Unified CMBE.
For more information about these components, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/voiceapp/ps378/index.html
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Cisco Unified Communications Component Overviews
Management and Serviceability Components
Management and Serviceability Components
The Cisco Unified Communications Solution includes the following complementary products, solutions,
and services to help centrally manage an entire deployment:
•
Resource Management Essentials—Allows network administrators to view and update the status
and configuration of all Cisco devices, including switches, access servers, and routers, from
anywhere on the network through a standard web client.
RME can rapidly and reliably deploy Cisco software images and view configurations of Cisco
routers and switches.
•
Cisco Unified Campus Manager—Provides graphical views of network topology and manages
VLANs.
•
Cisco Unified Operations Manager—Used for comprehensive monitoring with proactive and
reactive diagnostics for the Cisco Unified Communications system. It provides:
– Built-in rules, which provide contextual diagnostics and enable troubleshooting of
service-impacting outages.
– A real-time, service-level view of the Cisco Unified Communications system, including the
current operational status of each element.
– Capabilities for application-level testing of telephony functions, which can be used proactively
and reactively to identify problems and ensure that applications are functioning properly, for
dial-plan validation, as well as for monitoring video-enabled endpoints.
•
Cisco Unified Service Monitor—Used to monitor and evaluate the quality of voice in Cisco Unified
Communications solutions. It provides:
– Continuous monitoring of active calls supported by the Cisco Unified Communications system
with near-real-time notification when the voice quality of a call fails to meet a user-defined
mean opinion score (MOS).
– Reports that characterize the user experience as measured by the system and details on the
endpoints that are most frequently related to voice-quality alerts.
•
Cisco Unified Network Manager—Used for proactive, operational and performance monitoring for
small and medium sized businesses that deploy unified communications. It provides:
– A visual representation of the network topology,1 highlighting unified communications
application dependencies with the ability to inspect and act on operational outages from within
the topology
– Inventory and status information of all the devices and phones in the deployment.
•
Cisco Unified Provisioning Manager—Used for the provisioning and activation of Cisco Unified
Communications products. It allows administrators to manage initial deployments and
implementations, and then permits delegation of the ongoing operational provisioning and
activation tasks that are required for changes to services for individual subscribers. It provides:
– A single, consolidated view of subscribers across the organization.
– A set of business-level, policy-driven management abstractions for managing subscriber
services across the Cisco Unified Communications infrastructure.
•
Cisco Unified Service Statistics Manager—Provides statistics management, analysis, and reporting
capabilities for a Unified Communications deployment. It leverages the data collection capabilities
of Unified Operations Manager and Service Monitor to gather Cisco Unified Communications
statistics information from a variety of Cisco devices and systems (including Unified
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Management and Serviceability Components
Communications Manager, Unity, Unity Connection, Unified Communications Manager Express,
Unity Express, Unified Contact Center, and Unified Contact Center Express). It stores the statistics
in a database and provides statistical analysis and reporting.
•
CiscoWorks LAN Management Solution (LMS)—Provides a suite of management tools that
simplify configuring, administrating, monitoring, and troubleshooting Cisco networks. These tools
provide an integrated system for sharing device information across applications, and offer
capabilities that include:
– Network discovery, topology views, end-station tracking, and VLAN management
– Hardware and software inventory management, centralized configuration tools, and syslog
monitoring
– Network response time and availability monitoring and tracking
– Real-time device, link, and port traffic management, analysis, and reporting
– Presentation of current operational status of an IP Communications deployment and
service-level views of the network
– Contextual diagnostic tools to assist with troubleshooting
– Presentation of service-quality alerts by using the information available through
Cisco Unified Service Monitor (when deployed)
– Presentation of current information about connectivity- and registration-related outages that are
affecting IP phones in the network, and information that identifies the IP phones
– Tracking of IP Communications devices and the IP phone inventory, tracking of IP phone status
changes (providing reports that document move, add, and change operations on IP phones in the
network)
– Real-time notifications using SNMP traps, syslog notifications, and e-mail
– Real-time voice quality monitoring and real-time voice quality alerts
– Network discovery, topology views, end-station tracking, and VLAN management
•
Cisco Unified Communication Essential Operate service—Provides hardware and software
maintenance and support for Cisco voice applications. Support activities include:
– Incident troubleshooting
– Incident remediation
– Network infrastructure device replacement
– Access to applications software updates
– Assistance using leading practices
•
Cisco Unified Communications Select Operate Service—Provides proactive support for Cisco voice
technologies that combines Cisco technical support with voice application monitoring and
reporting. Support activities include:
– Incident troubleshooting
– Incident remediation
– Provisioning monitoring solution
– Monitoring and notification
– Network infrastructure device replacement
– Access to applications software updates
– Assistance using leading practices
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Cisco Unified Communications Component Overviews
Management and Serviceability Components
•
Cisco Unified Communications Remote Management Service—Provides a remote management
service that offers comprehensive monitoring, issue resolution, and day-to-day management of
voice applications and converged networks. Support and management activities include:
– IPC system monitoring
– Incident diagnosing
– Defining remediation actions required to resolve incident
– Incident resolution, which can include managing break/fix service request, applying software
updates and patches, or managing hardware replacements
– Day-to-day operational changes in a network, including logical move, adds, changes, and
deletions
– Daily backup configurations for Cisco OS, Cisco Catalyst OS, and servers
– Reporting
– Maintenance management of third-party equipment
For more information about these components, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/netmgtsw/index.html
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4
Component Protocols and APIs
This chapter lists the protocols and call control application program interfaces (APIs) that are supported
by various Cisco Unified Communications components.
This chapter includes these topics:
•
Call Control Signaling Protocols, page 4-1
•
Cisco Unified Communications Application Program Interfaces, page 4-3
Call Control Signaling Protocols
Cisco Unified Communications components support an array of call control signaling protocols.
Table 4-1 shows the call control signaling protocols that are supported by each component.
Table 4-1
Call Control Signaling Protocol Support
DPNSS
H.320
H.323
SCCP
SIP
Cisco
Emergency
Responder
‹
‹
Cisco IP
Communicator
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
Cisco Unified
‹
Communications
Manager
‹
Cisco Unified
Communications
Manager
Express
‹
Cisco Unified
‹
Communications
Manager
Business Edition
‹
Cisco Unified
Contact Center
Enterprise
‹
ISDN
‹
‹
MGCP
‹
‹
QSIG
T1 CAS
‹1
‹
‹
‹
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Chapter 4
Component Protocols and APIs
Call Control Signaling Protocols
Table 4-1
Call Control Signaling Protocol Support (continued)
DPNSS
H.320
H.323
ISDN
MGCP
SCCP
SIP
Cisco Unified
Contact Center
Express
‹
‹
‹
Cisco Unified
Customer Voice
Portal
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
Cisco Unified IP
Phones
Cisco Unified
MeetingPlace
‹
‹
Cisco Unified
MeetingPlace
Express
‹
‹
T1 CAS
‹
‹
‹
Cisco Unified
MeetingPlace
Express VT
Cisco Unified
Personal
Communicator
‹
Cisco Unified
Presence
‹2
‹
Cisco Unified
Survivable
Remote Site
Telephony
‹
‹
Cisco Unified
Video Advantage
‹3
Cisco Unity
‹
‹
Cisco Unity
Connection
‹
‹
‹
Cisco Unity
Express
Gateways
QSIG
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹4
‹
1. Cisco Unified Communications Manager does not support QSIG protocol directly, but only through a MGCP gateway. In such cases Cisco Unified
Communications Manager also supports DPNSS, ISDN, and T1 CAS protocols.
2. Also supports SIMPLE.
3. Cisco Unified Video Advantage does not support SCCP directly, but only through a SCCP based endpoint.
4. VG248 and VG224 supports SCCP. ISR platforms can also register their FXS ports to Cisco Unified Communication Manager through SCCP.
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Component Protocols and APIs
Cisco Unified Communications Application Program Interfaces
Cisco Unified Communications Application Program Interfaces
Cisco Unified Communications Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) provide you with the
flexibility to customize the capabilities of many Cisco Unified Communications components.
Table 4-2 shows the call control signaling APIs that are supported by each component.
Table 4-2
Cisco Unified Communications Application Programing Interfaces
AXL CTIQBE HTTP IMAP JTAPI LDAP MRCP SNMP SOAP SQL TAPI TFTP VPIM VXML XML1
‹
Cisco
Emergency
Responder
Cisco Unified
‹
Communication
s Manager
‹
Cisco Unified
‹
Communication
s Manager
Express
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
Cisco Unified
‹
Communication
s Manager
Business
Edition
‹
‹
Cisco Unified
Contact Center
Enterprise
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹2
Cisco Unified
Contact Center
Express
‹
‹
‹
Cisco Unified
Customer Voice
Portal
‹
Cisco Unified IP
Phones
‹
Cisco Unified
MeetingPlace
‹
‹
‹
Cisco Unified
MeetingPlace
Express
‹
‹
‹
Cisco Unified
MeetingPlace
Express VT
‹
‹
‹
Cisco Unified
Personal
Communicator
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹3
‹
‹
‹
‹4
‹
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Chapter 4
Component Protocols and APIs
Cisco Unified Communications Application Program Interfaces
Table 4-2
Cisco Unified Communications Application Programing Interfaces
AXL CTIQBE HTTP IMAP JTAPI LDAP MRCP SNMP SOAP SQL TAPI TFTP VPIM VXML XML1
Cisco Unified
Presence
‹
‹
Cisco Unity
Cisco Unity
Connection
‹
‹
Cisco Unity
Express
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹5
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
‹
Gateways
1. For Cisco IP Phones
2. Supported in Windows platforms
3. Support between Video Integration and Video Admin
4. Cisco Unified Meeting Place supports XML between Video Integration and Video Admin and between Video Admin and MCU
5. Cisco Unity Express is not fully IMAP compliant. IMAP integration is supported only for Outlook, Outlook Express, Lotus Notes and Entourage 2008
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CH A P T E R
5
Deployment Methodology
Deploying a Cisco Unified Communications system involves a series of several steps. These steps
include analyzing your requirements, designing your system, and implementing the
Cisco Unified Communications components. This process will likely involve collaboration between
your business and technical personnel and various representatives and experts from Cisco.
This chapter provides a high-level overview of some of the key steps that you will follow when you
deploy a Cisco Unified Communications system.
This chapter includes these sections:
•
Step 1: Determine Your Requirements, page 5-1
•
Step 2: Determine the Solution Requirements, page 5-2
•
Step 3: Assess Your Network and Infrastructure Readiness, page 5-2
•
Step 4: Assess Your Operational Readiness, page 5-3
•
Step 5: Develop Site Requirements, page 5-3
•
Step 6: Develop a Detailed Design, page 5-3
•
Step 7: Develop Your Implementation Plan, page 5-4
•
Step 8: Stage and Configure Your Solution, page 5-4
•
Step 9: Install the Solution, page 5-4
Step 1: Determine Your Requirements
The first step in deploying the Cisco Unified Communications system is to determine the requirements
for your situation. This step involves:
•
Analyzing your business operations to determine features and functions that you need. For example,
consider the requirements that are described in Table 5-1.
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Step 2: Determine the Solution Requirements
Table 5-1
Representative System Requirements
Requirement
Business needs
Site requirements
Availability
Capacity
Integration
Deployment schedule
Example Considerations
•
Do calls to a customer service number need to be distributed
among agents at various locations?
•
Do voice messages need to be recorded?
•
Is intra-office abbreviated dialing required?
•
Where are the locations that the system will serve?
•
How should the system components be distributed across
sites?
•
Is availability needed 24 hours a day or only during normal
business hours?
•
What is the required recovery time after failure?
•
How many users must be supported?
•
How many simultaneous calls must be supported?
•
Will the Cisco Unified Communications system need to
integrate with an existing application or phone system?
•
Are there legacy components that must be maintained?
•
When must the system be installed and operating?
•
How will the system be phased in?
•
Review options and determine the implications of each alternative.
•
Define the components that meet your requirements.
Step 2: Determine the Solution Requirements
After you determine your requirements, you are ready to define the solution that meet your requirements.
In this step, you determine the component and component options that meet your business and
operational needs.
The solution consists of the Cisco Unified Communications platforms and systems that make up the
architecture. It also includes the features, functions, and applications that provide the services that you
require.
The solution also may include third-party products.
Step 3: Assess Your Network and Infrastructure Readiness
Network and infrastructure readiness assessment involves the review and audit of all network
infrastructure areas that will be affected by the deployment. The assessment should be performed at each
site where you will deploy Cisco Unified Communications. Items to assess include:
•
Network design (routing and switching network)
•
Software
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Step 4: Assess Your Operational Readiness
•
Hardware
•
Power/environment
•
Network links
•
Network services
Step 4: Assess Your Operational Readiness
Operational readiness assessment involves determining your ability to administer and manage
Cisco Unified Communications. Based on this assessment, you will determine whether additional
products and services are required, either temporarily or long-term, when you deploy the system.
Operational areas to consider include:
•
System configuration
•
System monitoring
•
System upgrading
Step 5: Develop Site Requirements
When you develop your site requirements, you identify the hardware, software, and physical and
environmental needs that relate to the implementation and operation of the
Cisco Unified Communications system at each location where you will deploy the solution.
To assist with this process, review the high-level design documents to understand the component
requirements for the solution at each location. Consider these issues:
•
Solution hardware components
•
Solution software levels
•
Telephone company circuits
•
WAN connectivity
•
Solution equipment electrical requirements
•
Solution environmental/physical space requirements
•
Solution equipment rack and cabinet locations and layouts
Step 6: Develop a Detailed Design
After you develop your site requirements, you are ready to develop a detailed design for the
Cisco Unified Communications system based on the requirements that you identified.
The detailed design will address a wide variety of issues regarding each Cisco Unified Communications
component that you will implement. These issues include:
•
Network infrastructure
•
Interoperability requirements
•
Call processing system requirements
•
Application software requirements
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Step 7: Develop Your Implementation Plan
•
Customer interaction requirements
•
Corporate directory architecture and requirements
•
Messaging system architecture and requirements
•
Conferencing requirements
•
Current utilization of voice messaging system, integration plans and migration strategy
•
Enterprise directory and messaging security requirements
Step 7: Develop Your Implementation Plan
Developing an implementation plan involves defining the processes required to carry out the
implementation the Cisco Unified Communications system. In this step, make sure to consider:
•
Accurate scheduling of any site-specific actions needed prior to implementation
•
Equipment delivery and staging
•
Resource requirements for network and site-specific implementation, including third-party support
requirements
•
Project phases and deadlines
•
Acceptance criteria for each project phase
•
Training
Step 8: Stage and Configure Your Solution
Staging and configuring your Cisco Unified Communications system can help make final installation
more efficient. For this step, you can perform some or all of these tasks:
•
Assemble the components that will be installed at each site
•
Perform basic testing of the hardware and software
•
Pre-configure of the devices as appropriate
Step 9: Install the Solution
Installing the Cisco Unified Communications system involves installing and configuring your network
infrastructure and installing and setting up the system components. After you verify the readiness of this
equipment, you perform the following general steps to install the solution:
•
Catalog and inventory the system components
•
Install equipment in data racks
•
Complete cabling and other physical connectivity
•
Place phone units in workspaces
•
Verify that all units power up correctly
•
Capture Installation-specific information, including:
– Rack layouts
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Step 9: Install the Solution
– Phone placement
– Server placements and configurations
– Key connectivity specifics in routers and switches
– Port-specific details
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Step 9: Install the Solution
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A P P E N D I X
A
Cisco Unified Communications Architecture
Basics
This appendix provides a high-level overview of some of the basic architectural concepts and elements
upon which the Cisco Unified Communications System is built.
Additional information regarding Voice over IP technologies is available at:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk652/tsd_technology_support_category_home.html
Overview
The Cisco Unified Communications System provides support for the transmission of voice, video, and
data over a single, IP-based network, which enables companies to consolidate and streamline
communications. The Cisco Unified Communications System is a key part of the Cisco Unified
Communications Solution, which also includes network infrastructure, security, and network
management products, wireless connectivity, third-party communications applications, and a lifecycle
services approach for preparing, planning, designing, implementing, operating and optimizing
(PPDIOO) the system.
The Cisco Unified Communications System leverages an existing IP infrastructure (built on the Open
System Interconnection [OSI] reference model) and adds support for voice and video-related devices,
features, and applications. Support for major signaling protocols, such as the Session Initiation Protocol
(SIP), the Media Gateway Control Protocol (MGCP), and H.323 is provided, as is the ability to integrate
with legacy voice and video networks.
Table A-1 shows the relationship between the OSI reference model and the voice and video protocols
and functions of the Cisco Unified Communications System.
Table A-1
Voice and Video over IP in the OSI Reference Model
OSI Layer
Number
OSI Layer Name
Voice
Video
7
Application
Unified IP Phone, Unified
Personal Communicator, etc.
Video endpoint, Unified Video
Advantage, etc.
6
Presentation
G.711, G.722, G.723, G.729
H.261, H.263, H.264
5
Session
H.323/MGCP/SIP/SCCP
H.323/SIP/SCCP
4
Transport
RTP/UDP, TCP
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Cisco Unified Communications Architecture Basics
Overview
OSI Layer
Number
OSI Layer Name
Voice
3
Network
IP
2
Data Link
Frame Relay, ATM, Ethernet, PPP, MLP, and more
Video
Following this model:
•
Layer 6—Digital signal processors (DSPs) compress/encode (decompress/decode) the voice or
video signal using the chosen codec. The DSP then segments the compressed/encoded signal into
frames and stores them into packets.
•
Layer 5—The packets are transported in compliance with a signaling protocol, such as Skinny
Client Control Protocol (SCCP), H.323, MGCP, or SIP.
•
Layer 4—Signaling traffic (call setup and teardown) uses TCP as its transport medium.
Media streams use Real-time Transport Protocol (RTP) over UDP for the transport protocol. RTP is
used because it inserts timestamps and sequence numbers in each packet to enable synchronization
at the receiving end. UDP is used because TCP would introduce delays (due to acknowledgements)
that are not easily tolerated by real-time traffic.
•
Layer 3—The IP layer provides routing and network-level addressing.
•
Layer 2—The data-link layer protocols control and direct the transmission of the information over
the physical medium.
Voice over IP
In general, the components of a VoIP network fall into the following categories:
•
Infrastructure—Provides the foundation for the transmission of voice over an IP network. In
addition to routers and switches, this includes the interfaces, devices, and features necessary to
integrate VoIP devices, legacy PBX, voicemail, and directory systems, and to connect to other VoIP
and legacy telephony networks. Typical products used to build the infrastructure include Cisco voice
gateways (non-routing, routing, and integrated), Cisco IOS and Catalyst switches, and Cisco routers,
as well as security devices, such as firewalls, virtual private networks (VPNs), and intrusion
detection systems. In addition, Quality of Service (QoS), high-availability, and bandwidth
provisioning (for WAN devices) should be deployed.
•
Call processing—Provides signaling and call control services from the time a call is initiated until
the time a call is terminated. The call processing component also provides feature services, such as
call transfer and forwarding capabilities. In the Cisco Unified Communications System, call
processing is performed by Cisco Unified Communications Manager or Communications Manager
Express.
•
Applications—Includes components that supplement the basic call processing to provide users with
a complete suite of communications options. Applications in the Cisco Unified Communications
System include Cisco Unity for voice messaging products, Cisco Unified MeetingPlace conference
scheduling software, Cisco Emergency Responder, and applications that enhance the usability of the
system and allow users to be more productive, such as the Cisco Unified Presence.
•
Voice-enabled endpoints—Includes IP phones, soft phones, wireless IP phones, and analog
gateways, which provide access to the PSTN and enable interoperability with legacy telephony
devices (such as a Plain Old Telephone System [POTS] phone). For IP phones and softphones, the
supported protocols are SCCP, H.323, and SIP. For gateways, the supported protocols are SCCP,
H.323, SIP, and MGCP.
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Cisco Unified Communications Architecture Basics
Overview
For a more in depth discussion of Voice over IP, see Voice over IP Fundamentals from Cisco Press.
Video over IP
Typical IP videoconferencing components include:
•
Gateways—Performs translation between different protocols, audio encoding formats, and video
encoding formats that may be used by the various standards. The Cisco Unified Videoconferencing
gateways enable conferences using H.323, H.320, SCCP, or SIP endpoints.
•
Gatekeepers— Works with the call-processing component to provide management of H.323
endpoints. The gatekeeper handles all Registration, Admission, and Status (RAS) signaling, while
the call-processing component handles all of the call signaling and media negotiations.
•
Conference bridges—Enables conferencing between three or more participants. Video endpoints are
generally point-to-point devices, allowing only two participants per conversation. A conference
bridge or multipoint conference unit (MCU) is required to extend a video conference to three or
more participants.
•
Video-enabled endpoints—Includes stand-alone video terminals, IP phones with integrated video
capabilities, and video conferencing software on a PC. These endpoints can be H.323, H.320, SCCP,
or SIP.
For additional information about videoconferencing, see the IP Videoconferencing Solution Reference
Network Design guide.
Fax over IP
Fax over IP enables the interworking of standard fax machines over packet-based networks. With fax
over IP, the fax image is extracted from the analog signal and converted to digital data for transmission
over the IP network.
The components of the Cisco Unified Communications System support three methods for transmitting
fax over IP: real-time fax, store-and-forward fax, fax pass-through.
•
For real-time fax, Cisco supports Cisco fax relay and T.38 fax relay (from the International
Telecommunications Union [ITU-T]). With this method, the DSP breaks down the fax tones from
the sending fax machine into their specific frames (demodulation), transmits the information across
the IP network using the fax relay protocol, and then converts the bits back into tones at the far side
(modulation). The fax machines on either end send and receive tones as they would over the PSTN
and are not aware that information is actually going across an IP network.
•
For store-and-forward fax, Cisco supports T.37 (from the ITU-T). With this method, the on-ramp
gateway receives a fax from a traditional fax device and converts it into a Tagged Image File Format
(TIFF) file attachment. The gateway then creates a standard Multipurpose Internet Mail Extension
(MIME) e-mail message and attaches the TIFF file to the e-mail. The gateway forwards the e-mail,
now called a fax mail, and its attachment to the messaging infrastructure of a designated Simple
Mail Transport Protocol (SMTP) server.
Store-and-forward fax allows for fax transmissions to be stored and transmitted across a
packet-based network in a bulk fashion, which allows faxes to use least-cost routing and enables
faxes to be stored and transmitted when toll charges are more favorable. When using
store-and-forward fax, however, the user must be willing to accept fax delays that range from
seconds to hours, depending upon the particular method of deployment.
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Cisco Unified Communications Architecture Basics
VoIP Protocols
•
For fax pass-through, fax data is not demodulated or compressed for its transit through the packet
network. With this method, the fax traffic is carried between the two gateways in RTP packets using
an uncompressed format resembling the G.711 codec. The gateway does not distinguish fax calls
from voice calls.
VoIP Protocols
For signaling and call control, the Cisco Unified Communications System supports the Cisco proprietary
VoIP protocol, SCCP, as well as the major industry-standard protocols of H.323, SIP, and MGCP. These
protocols can be categorized as using either a client-server or peer-to-peer model.
•
The client-server model is similar to that used in traditional telephony, in which in which dumb
endpoints (telephones) are controlled by centralized switches. With a client-server model, the
majority of the of the intelligence resides in the centralized call processing component, which
handles the switching logic and call control, and with very little processing is done by the phone
itself.
The advantages of the client-server model are that it centralizes management, provisioning, and call
control; it simplifies call flows for replicating legacy voice features; it reduces the amount of
memory and CPU required on the phone; and it is easier for legacy voice engineers to understand.
MGCP and SCCP are examples of client-server protocols.
•
The peer-to-peer model allows network intelligence to be distributed between the endpoints and
call-control components. Intelligence in this instance refers to call state, calling features, call
routing, provisioning, billing, or any other aspect of call handling. The endpoints can be VoIP
gateways, IP phones, media servers, or any device that can initiate and terminate a VoIP call.
The advantages of the peer-to-peer model are that it is more flexible, more scalable, and more easily
understood by engineers who are accustomed to running IP data networks.
SIP and H.323 are examples of peer-to-peer protocols.
Table A-2
Protocols Supported by Cisco Unified Communications
Components
Protocol
Description
SCCP
A proprietary protocol from Cisco Systems. SCCP uses the client-server model.
Call control is provided by the Cisco Unified Communications Manager or
Communications Manager Express. Unified IP Phones run a “skinny” client, which
requires very little processing to be done by the phone itself.
SCCP is supported by all Cisco IP Phones, by Cisco Unified Video Advantage, by
many third-party video endpoints, and by select Cisco gateways.
MGCP
The recommendation from the ITU-T for multimedia communications over LANs.
MGCP uses the client-server model and is used primarily to communicate with
gateways.
MGCP provides easier configuration and centralized management. It is supported
by most Cisco gateways.
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Cisco Unified Communications Architecture Basics
Voice and Video Codecs
Protocol
Description
SIP
A recommendation from the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) for
multimedia communications over LANs. SIP uses the peer-to-peer model. Call
control is provided through a SIP proxy or redirect server. In Cisco Unified
Communications Manager, SIP call control is provided through a built-in
back-to-back user agent (B2BUA).
SIP uses a simple messaging scheme and is highly scalable. It is supported by an
increasing number of Cisco IP phones, by a number of third-party video endpoints,
and on the trunk side of many Cisco gateways.
H.323
The recommendation from the ITU-T for multimedia communications over LANs.
H.323 uses the peer-to-peer model. It is based on the Integrated Services Digital
Network (ISDN) Q.931 protocol. Call control is provided through a gatekeeper.
H.323 provides robust support for interfaces and interoperates easily with PSTN
and SS7. It is supported by a number of third-party video endpoints and by most
Cisco gateways.
Voice and Video Codecs
As previously mentioned, codecs are used to encode and compress analog streams (such as voice or
video) into digital signals that can then be sent across an IP network.
Tip
As a general recommendation, if bandwidth permits, it is best use a single codec throughout the
campus to minimize the need for transcoding resources, which can add complexity to network design.
Characteristics of a codec are as follows:
•
Codecs are either narrowband or wideband. Narrowband (used by traditional telephony systems)
refers to the fact that the audio signals are passed in the range of 300-3500 Hz. With wideband, the
audio signals are passed in the range of 50 to 7000 Hz. Therefore, a wideband codec allows for audio
with richer tones and better quality.
•
The sampling rate (or frequency) corresponds to the number of samples taken per second, expressed
in Hz or kHz. For digital audio, typical sampling rates are 8 kHz (narrowband), 16 kHz (wideband)
and 32 kHz (ultra-wideband). For digital video, typical sampling rates are 50Hz (for
Phase-Alternating Line, PAL, used largely in Western Europe) and 59.94 Hz (for National
Television System Committee, NTSC, used largely in North America). Both rates are supported by
all the video codec listed in Table A-3.
•
The compression ratio indicates the relative difference between the original size and the compressed
size of the audio or video stream. Lower compression ratios yield better quality but require greater
bandwidth. In general, low-compression codecs are best suited for voice over LANs and are capable
of supporting DTMF and fax. High-compression codecs are better suited for voice over WANs.
•
The complexity refers to the amount of processing required to perform the compression. Codec
complexity affects the call density—the number of calls reconciled on the DSPs. With higher codec
complexity, fewer calls can be handled.
The components of the Cisco Unified Communications System support one or more of the audio and
video codecs described in Table A-3.
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Appendix A
Cisco Unified Communications Architecture Basics
Voice and Video Codecs
Table A-3
Codecs Supported by Cisco Unified Communications
Components
Codec
Description
G.711
A narrowband audio codec defined by the ITU-T that provides toll-quality audio at
64 Kbps. It uses pulse code modulation (PCM) and samples audio at 8 kHz. G.711
supports two companding algorithms; mu-law (used in the US and Japan) and a-law
(used in Europe and other parts of the world).
G.711 is a low-compression, medium-complexity codec.
G.722
A wideband audio codec defined by the ITU-T that provides high-quality audio at
32 to 64 Kbps. It uses Adaptive Differential PCM (ADPCM) and samples audio at
16 kHz.
G.722 is similar to G.711 in compression and complexity, but provides higher
quality audio.
G.722.1
A wideband audio codec defined by the ITU-T that provides high-quality audio at
24 and 32 Kbps. It uses Modulated Lapped Transform (MLT) and samples audio at
16 kHz.
G.722.1 is a high-compression, low-complexity codec.It provides better quality than
G.722 at lower bit-rates.
G.723.1
A narrowband audio codec defined by the ITU-T for videoconferencing that
provides near toll-quality audio at 6.3 or 5.3 Kbps. It uses Algebraic Code Excited
Linear Prediction (ACELP) and Multi Pulse-Maximum Likelihood Quantization
(MP-MLQ) and samples audio at 8 kHz.
G.723.1 is a high-compression, high-complexity codec. However, the quality is
slightly lower than that of G.711.
G.726
A narrowband codec defined by the ITU-T that provides toll-quality audio at 32
Kbps. It uses ADPCM and samples audio at 8 kHz.
G.726 is a medium-complexity codec. It requires half the bandwidth of G.711, while
providing nearly the same quality. Note that G.726 supersedes G.723, but has no
effect on G.723.1.
G.728
A narrowband codec defined by the ITU-T that provides near toll-quality audio at
16 Kbps. It uses Low Delay CELP (LD-CELP) and samples audio at 8 kHz.
G.728 is a high-compression, high-complexity codec.
G.729a
A narrowband audio codec defined by the ITU-T that provides toll-quality audio at
8 Kbps. It uses Conjugate-Structure ACELP (CS-ACELP) and samples audio at 8
kHz.
G.729a is a high-compression, medium-complexity codec. The quality is lower than
that of G.711 and it is not appropriate for DTMF, but it is good for situations where
bandwidth is limited.
iLBC (internet
Low Bitrate
Codec)
A narrowband audio codec standardized by the IETF that provides better than
toll-quality audio at either 13.33 or 15.2 Kbps. It uses block-independent
linear-predictive coding (LPC) samples audio at 8 kHz.
iLBC provides higher basic quality than G.729 and is royalty free. It enables
graceful speech quality degradation in a lossy network. This codec is suitable for
real-time communications, streaming audio, archival, and messaging.
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Cisco Unified Communications Architecture Basics
Voice and Video Codecs
Codec
Description
AAC (Advanced
Audio Codec)
A wideband audio codec standardized by the Moving Pictures Experts Group (as
MPEG-4 AAC). It provides high-quality audio at rates of 32 Kbps and above. It uses
AAC-LD (low delay) samples audio at 20 kHz.
L16
A wideband audio codec defined by the IETF as a MIME subtype. It provides
reasonable quality audio at 256 Kbps. It is based on PMC and samples audio at 16
kHz.
GSM-FR (Global
System for
Mobile
CommunicationsFull Rate)
An audio codec defined by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute
(ETSI). It was originally designed for GSM digital mobile phone systems and
provides somewhat less than toll-quality audio at 13 Kbps. It uses Regular Pulse
Excitation with Long-Term Prediction (RPE-LTP) and samples audio at 8 kHz.
GSM-EFR
(Enhanced Full
Rate)
An audio codec defined by the ETSI for digital voice that provides toll-quality audio
at 12.2 Kbps. It uses ACELP and samples audio at 8 kHz.
QCELP
(Qualcomm Code
Excited Linear
Prediction)
An audio codec defined by the Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) for
wideband spread spectrum digital communication systems that provides toll-quality
audio at either 8 or 13 Kbps. As indicated by the name, it uses CELP and samples
audio at 8 kHz.
GSM-FR is a medium-complexity codec.
GSM-EFR is a high-complexity codec and provides better sound quality than
GSM-FR.
QCELP is a high-complexity codec.
H.261
One of the first video codecs defined by the ITU-T. It was originally used for video
over ISDN. It is designed to support data rates in multiples of 64 Kbps. H.261
supports Common Intermediate Format (CIF - 352 × 288) and QCIF (176 × 144)
resolutions.
H.261 is similar to MPEG, however, H.261 requires significantly less computing
overhead than MPEG for real-time encoding. Because H.261 uses constant bitrate
encoding, it is better suited for use with relatively static video.
H.263
A video codec defined by the ITU-T as an improvement to H.261. It is used in
H.323, H.320, and SIP networks. In addition to CIF and QCIF, H.263 supports
SQCIF (128 x 96), 4CIF (704 x 576), and 16CIF (1408 x 1152) resolutions.
H.263 provides lower bitrate communication, better performance, and improved
error recovery. It uses half pixel precision and variable bitrate encoding, which
makes H.263 better suited to accommodate motion in video.
H.264
The next in the evolution of video codecs. It was defined by the ITU-T in
conjunction with the MPEG (as MPEG-4 Part 10) and is designed to provide
higher-quality video at lower bit rates.
H.264 provides better video quality, compression efficiency, and resilience to packet
and data loss than that of H.263. It also makes better use of bandwidth, resulting in
the ability to run more channels over existing systems.
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Cisco Unified Communications Architecture Basics
Voice- and Video-enabled Infrastructure
Voice- and Video-enabled Infrastructure
By default, an IP data network transmits data based on the concept of “best effort.” Depending on the
volume of traffic and the bandwidth available, data networks can often experience delays. However,
these delays are typically a matter of seconds (or fractions of seconds) and go unnoticed by users and
applications, such as e-mail or file transfers. In the event of significant network congestion or minor
route outages, receiving devices can wait and reorder any out-of-sequence packets and sending devices
can simply resend any dropped packets.
Voice and video are very time-dependant media, which suffer greatly when subjected to the delays that
data applications easily tolerate. In the event of significant congestion or outages, voice applications can
only attempt to conceal dropped packets, often resulting in poor quality. Therefore, voice and video
require an infrastructure that provides for smooth, guarenteed delivery.
A network infrastructure that transmits voice and video, especially that delivered in real-time, requires
special mechanisms and technologies to ensure the safety and quality of the media as well as the efficient
use of the network resources. In a voice- or video-enabled network, the following must be built into the
infrastructure:
•
Quality of service
•
High availability
•
Voice security
•
Multicast capabilities
Quality of Service
Quality of Service (QoS) is defined as the measure of performance for a transmission system that reflects
its transmission quality and service availability. The transmission quality of the network is determined
by the following factors:
•
Loss—Also known as packet loss, is a measure of packets faithfully transmitted and received
compared to the total number that were transmitted. Loss is expressed as the percentage of packets
that were dropped.
Loss is typically a function of availability (see the “High Availability” section on page A-10). If the
network is Highly Available, then loss (during periods of non-congestion) would essentially be zero.
During periods of congestion, however, QoS mechanisms can be employed to selectively determine
which packets are more suitable to be dropped.
•
Delay—Also known as latency, is the finite amount of time it takes a packet to reach the receiving
endpoint after being transmitted from the sending endpoint. In the case of voice, this equates to the
amount of time it takes for sounds to leave the speaker’s mouth and be heard in the listener’s ear.
This time period is termed the “end-to-end delay.”
There are three types of delay:
– Packetization delay—The time required to sample and encode analog voice signals and digitize
them into packets.
– Serialization delay—The time required to place the packet bits onto the physical media.
– Propagation delay—The time required to transmit the packet bits across the physical media.
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Cisco Unified Communications Architecture Basics
Voice- and Video-enabled Infrastructure
•
Delay Variation—Also known as interpacket delay, is the difference in the end-to-end delay between
packets. For example, if one packet required 100 ms to traverse the network from the
source-endpoint to the destination-endpoint and the following packet required 125 ms to make the
same trip, then the delay variation would be calculated as 25 ms.
Each end station in a VoIP or Video over IP conversation has a jitter buffer. Jitter buffers are used to
smooth out changes in arrival times of data packets containing voice. A jitter buffer is dynamic and
adaptive, and can adjust for up to a 30 ms average change in arrival times of packets. If you have
instantaneous changes in arrival times of packets that are outside of the capabilities of a jitter
buffer’s ability to compensate you will have jitter buffer over-runs and under-runs.
– A jitter buffer under-run occurs when the arrival times of packets increases to the point where
the jitter buffer has been exhausted and contains no packets to be processed by the DSPs when
it is time to play out the next piece of voice or video.
– A jitter buffer over-run occurs when packets containing voice or video arrive faster than the
jitter buffer can dynamically resize itself to accommodate. When this happens, packets are
dropped when it is time to play out the voice or video samples, resulting in degraded voice
quality.
Cisco provides a QoS toolset that allows network administrators to minimize the effects of loss, delay,
and delay variation. These tools (as shown in Figure A-1) enable the classification, scheduling, policing
and shaping of traffic—the goal being to give preferential treatment to voice and video traffic.
Figure A-1
Cisco QoS Toolkit
Policing and
Markdown
STOP
Classification
and Marking
Scheduling
(Queuing and
Dropping)
Traffic Shaping
Link-Specific
Mechanisms
119473
Admission
Control
•
Classification tools mark a frame or packet with a specific value. This marking (or remarking)
establishes a trust boundary on which the scheduling tools depend.
•
Scheduling tools determine how a traffic exits a device. Whenever traffic enters a device faster than
it can exit it (as with speed mismatches), then a point of congestion develops. Scheduling tools use
various buffers to allow higher-priority traffic to exit sooner than lower priority traffic. This
behavior is controlled by queueing algorithms, which are activated only when a devices is
experiencing congestion and are deactivated when the congestion clears.
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A-9
Appendix A
Cisco Unified Communications Architecture Basics
Voice- and Video-enabled Infrastructure
•
Policers and shapers are the oldest forms of QoS mechanisms. These tools have the same
objectives—to identify and respond to traffic violations. Policers and shapers identify traffic
violations in an identical manner; however, they respond differently to these violations. A policer
typically drops traffic; a shaper typically delays the excess traffic using a buffer to hold packets and
shape the flow when the data rate of the source is higher than expected.
For more information about QoS considerations and tools, see the Enterprise QoS Solution Reference
Network Design Guide.
High Availability
The objective of high availability is to prevent or minimize network outages. This is particularly
important in networks that carry voice and video. More than a single technology, high availability is an
approach to implementing a mixture of policies, technologies, and inter-related tools to ensure
end-to-end availability for services, clients, and sessions. High availability heavily on network
redundancy and software availability.
Network redundancy depends on redundant hardware, processors, line cards, and links. The network
should be designed so that it has no single points of failure for critical hardware (for example, core
switches). Hardware elements, such as cards, should be “hot swappable,” meaning they can be replaced
without causing disruption to the network. Power supplies and sources should also be redundant.
Software availability depends on reliability-based protocols, such as Spanning Tree and Hot Standby
Routing Protocol (HSRP). Spanning Tree, HSRP, and other protocols provide instructions to the network
and/or to components of the network on how to behave in the event of a failure. Failure in this case could
be a power outage, a hardware failure, or a disconnected cable. These protocols provide rules to reroute
packets and reconfigure paths. The speed at which these rules are applied is called convergence. A
converged network is one that, from a user standpoint, has recovered from a failure and can now process
instructions and/or requests.
For more information about high availability, see Designing a Campus Network for High Availability.
Security
As with important data traffic, voice (and often video) traffic on an IP network must be secured. In some
cases, the same technologies that can be used to secure a data network are employed in a VoIP network.
In other cases, unique technologies must be implemented. In both cases, one of the key objectives is to
protect the voice or video stream without impacting the quality.
When securing the network, it is important to consider all possible areas of vulnerability. This means
protecting the network from internal and external threats, securing internal and remote connectivity, and
limiting network access to devices, applications, and users that can be trusted. Comprehensive security
is achieved first by securing the network itself, and then by extending that security to endpoints and
applications. For voice and video communications, security must protect four critical elements:
•
Network infrastructure—The switches, routers, and connecting links comprising the foundation
network that carries all IP data, voice, and video traffic. This includes using tools such as:
– Firewalls
– Network intrusion detection and prevention systems
– Voice- and video-enabled VPNs
– VLAN segmentation
– Port security
Book Title
A-10
OL-9991-01
Appendix A
Cisco Unified Communications Architecture Basics
Voice- and Video-enabled Infrastructure
– Access control server/user authentication and authorization
– Dynamic Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) inspection
– IP source guard and Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) snooping
– Wireless security technologies, such as wired equivalent privacy (WEP) and Lightweight
Extensible Authentication Protocol (LEAP)
•
Call processing systems—Servers and associated equipment for call management, control, and
accounting. This includes using tools such as:
– Digital certificates
– Signed software images
•
Endpoints—IP phones, soft phones, video terminals, and other devices that connect to the IP
Communications network. This includes using tools such as:
– Digital certificates
– Endpoint authentication
– Secure RTP stream encryption
– Switch port security
– Virus protection and integrated Cisco Security Agent
•
Applications—User applications such as unified messaging, conferencing, customer contact, and
custom tools that extend the capabilities of IP Communications systems. This includes using tools
such as:
– Secure management
– Multilevel administration
– Media encryption
– Use of H.323 and SIP signaling
– Hardened platform
– Virus protection and integrated Cisco Security Agent
IP Multicast
IP multicast allows for a streamlined approach to delivering data to multiple hosts that need to receive
the same data at the same time, such as with distance learning. With IP multicast, an audio or video
stream can be sent from a single server to multiple endpoints. For example:
•
When configured for IP multicast services, Music-on-Hold (MoH) can stream the same audio file to
multiple IP phones without the overhead of duplicating that stream one time for each phone on hold.
•
IP/TV allows for the streaming of audio, video, and slides to thousands of receivers simultaneously
across the network. High-rate IP/TV streams that would normally congest a low-speed WAN link
can be filtered to remain on the local campus network.
In contrast to unicast, which would send individual streams to each of the recipients, IP multicast
simultaneously delivers a single stream of information to thousands of recipients, thereby reducing
bandwidth consumption, as shown in Figure A-2.
Book Title
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Appendix A
Cisco Unified Communications Architecture Basics
Summary
Figure A-2
IP Multicast
Receiver
Unicast
Source
Receiver
3 copies sent
Receiver
Router
Receiver
Receiver
Multicast
Source
1 copy sent
Router
76642
Receiver
Multicast packets are replicated in the network by Cisco routers and switches enabled with Protocol
Independent Multicast (PIM) and other supporting multicast protocols. These routers create
“distribution trees,” which control the path that IP Multicast traffic takes through the network in order
to deliver traffic to all the receivers.
For more information about IP multicast, see the Cisco Network Infrastructure IP Multicast Design
Guide.
Summary
The components and technologies of the Cisco Unified Communications System and the enabling
infrastructure work in concert to deliver converged voice, video, and data communications.
Book Title
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Appendix A
Cisco Unified Communications Architecture Basics
Summary
Figure A-3
Cisco Unified Communications System
Voice Gateways
Voice Endpoints
Fax
Video Endpoints
V
IP
V
IP
IP
V
Call Processing
Applications
Switches
Routers
Firewalls
230111
V
V
•
The components and technologies employed in the infrastructure (such as QoS and IP Multicast)
provide a secure, robust, reliable, and efficient foundation.
•
Building on the infrastructure, the gateways and call-processing components perform the necessary
conversion, integration, and control functions to enable efficient, streamlined communications.
•
The applications augment the call processing to provide features an services required by users.
•
And the endpoints provide access to the network services and features—enabling users to make the
most of their communications system and increase their productivity.
Book Title
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A-13
Appendix A
Cisco Unified Communications Architecture Basics
Summary
Book Title
A-14
OL-9991-01
INDEX
description
A
3-5
Cisco Unified CallManager Express
agent interaction
1-5
APIs supported
application program interface
audience, for this document
4-3
call control signaling protocol supported
1-7
description
automatic call distribution (ACD)
4-3
1-5
automatic speech recognition (ASR)
3-6
Cisco Unified Campus Manager
1-5
4-1
3-22
Cisco Unified Communication Essential Operate
service 3-23
Cisco Unified Communications Remote Management
Service 3-24
C
call control signaling protocols
Cisco Unified Communications Select Operate
Service 3-23
4-1
Catalyst Integrated Security Features (CISF)
Cisco Adaptive Security Appliance
3-21
Cisco Customer Interaction Network
1-3
1-5
1-3
migration
4-1
3-3
Cisco Fax Server
1-5
1-3
3-4
1-2
description
3-21
4-3
3-3
4-1
3-7
3-21
APIs supported
4-3
call control signaling protocol supported
Cisco Unified Application Environment
Cisco Unified CallManager
4-3
Cisco Unified Contact Center Express
3-4
Cisco Unified Border Element
3-15
call control signaling protocol supported
Cisco Network Admission Control Appliance
APIs supported
1-3
Cisco Unified Contact Center Enterprise
APIs supported
Cisco Media Convergence Servers
Cisco RSVP Agent
1-2
Cisco Unified Communications Widgets
3-20
Cisco Lifecycle Services
2-1
1-6
solution bundling
Cisco Intelligent Information Network
Cisco IP Communicator
2-1
1-6
release strategy
security
3-3
Cisco IOS Firewall
1-6, 5-1
deployment overview
4-3
Cisco Extension Mobility
3-1
1-1
deployment models
call control signaling protocol supported
description
definition
deployment
Cisco Emergency Responder
APIs supported
Cisco Unified Communications system
component overview
Cisco Certified Voice Professional (CCVP)
Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP
1-6
3-5
description
4-2
3-7
Cisco Unified Customer Voice Portal
APIs supported
4-3
call control signaling protocol supported
4-2
Book Title
OL-9991-01
IN-1
Index
Cisco Unified IP Conference Station 7936G
3-10
description
Cisco Unified IP Conference Station 7937G
3-10
overview
Cisco Unified IP Phone
advertising presence
APIs supported
APIs supported
1-4
4-4
call control signaling protocol supported
4-3
description of models
traffic markings
1-4
Cisco Unified Presence Server
call control signaling protocol supported
power methods
3-13
description
4-2
overview
3-9
3-14
1-4, 1-7
Cisco Unified Provisioning Manager
1-4
Cisco Unified Service Monitor
1-3
Cisco Unified IP Phone 6900 Series
3-22
3-22
Cisco Unified Service Statistics Manager
3-9
3-22
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7902G
3-9
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7905G
3-9
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7906G
3-9
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7911G
3-9
call control signaling protocol supported
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7912G
3-9
description
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7921G
3-10
Cisco Unified Videoconferencing
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7931G
3-10
Cisco Unified Wireless IP Phone 7920G
Cisco Unified Survivable Remote Site Telephony
See Unified SRST
Cisco Unified Video Advantage
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7940G / 7960G
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7942G / 7962G
description
3-10
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7941G / 7941G-GE
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7985G
3-10
overview
APIs supported
4-4
call control signaling protocol supported
4-2
3-17
1-4
4-4
call control signaling protocol supported
4-3
4-2
description
4-2
3-18
Cisco Unity Express
call control signaling protocol supported
1-4
description
4-3
call control signaling protocol supported
4-2
3-11
Cisco Unified Network Manager
Cisco Unified Operations Manager
3-18
Cisco VG202 Analog Voice Gateway
3-20
Cisco VG204 Analog Voice Gateway
3-19
Cisco VG224 Analog Phone Gateway
3-19
3-23
CiscoWorks Management Center for Cisco Security
Agents 3-21
3-22
Customer Unified Voice Portal
4-3
call control signaling protocol supported
4-2
CiscoWorks LAN Management Solution (LMS)
3-22
Cisco Unified Personal Communicator
APIs supported
3-9
APIs supported
Cisco Unified MeetingPlace Express
description
1-4, 3-16
Cisco Unity Connection
3-11
3-11
APIs supported
3-10
overview
3-10
call control signaling protocol supported
description
3-16
1-5
description
3-10
Cisco Unified MeetingPlace
APIs supported
4-2
Cisco Unity
3-10
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7961G / 7961G-GE
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7971G-GE
mobility
3-10
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7945G / 7965G / 7975G
Cisco Unified IP Phone 7970G
4-2
3-8
4-2
Book Title
IN-2
OL-9991-01
Index
interactive voice response (IVR)
D
Intrusion Prevention System
1-5
3-21
deployment
of Cisco Unified Communications system
overview
5-1
M
1-6
deployment model
major release
component overview
2-10
Medium Single-Site Centralized model
device, advertising presence
1-2
media encryption
2-2
1-3
1-6
Medium Single-Site Centralized model
2-2
messaging
overview
1-4
migration, to Cisco Unified Communications system
E
minor release
emergency caller response
1-6
1-2
mobility
encryption
Cisco Extension Mobility
media encryption
1-6
signaling encryption
1-6
overview
1-6
1-5
site and campus mobility
F
1-5
1-5
N
firewall
1-6
network management
Firewall Services Module
3-20
3-22
See also serviceability
G
P
gateways
power over Ethernet (POE)
APIs supported
4-4
call control signaling protocol supported
4-2
Q
QoS
H
high availability
1-4
1-3
1-7
R
release strategy
I
for Cisco Unified Communications system
integration
with existing equipment
1-7
major release
1-2
minor release
1-2
with existing network
1-7
Resource Management Essentials (RME)
intelligent contact routing
1-5
rich-media conferencing
1-2
3-22
1-4
Book Title
OL-9991-01
IN-3
Index
S
U
secure platforms
Unified SRST, call control signaling protocol
supported 4-2
1-6
security
Catalyst Integrated Security Features (CISF)
Cisco Adaptive Security Appliance
3-21
Cisco Intrusion Prevention System
3-21
1-6
V
Cisco Network Admission Control Appliance
3-21
CiscoWorks Management Center for Cisco Security
Agents 3-21
components
1-4
W
1-6
Firewall Services Module
3-20
wireless devices
1-6
1-4
See also Cisco Unified Wireless IP Phone 7920
phone security features
secure platforms
1-6
1-6
signaling encryption
Serviceability
VLAN
1-5
3-20
firewall integration
overview
video telephony
1-6
3-22
serviceability
Cisco Unified Campus Manager
3-22
Cisco Unified Network Manager
3-22
Cisco Unified Operations Manager
Cisco Unified Provisioning Manager
Cisco Unified Service Monitor
3-22
3-22
3-22
Cisco Unified Service Statistics Manager
3-22
CiscoWorks LAN Management Solution (LMS)
overview
3-23
3-22
Resource Management Essentials (RME)
signaling encryption
1-6
site and campus mobility
solution bundling
3-22
1-5
1-3
supervisor interaction
system management
1-5
3-22
T
text-to-speech (TTS)
1-5
Book Title
IN-4
OL-9991-01
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