Evaluation of th Packet STNS Firew Traversal Solutio e Direct all n

Evaluation
of
th
e
Direct
Evaluation of the
Packet
STNS
Firew
all
TANDBERG Codian
Traversal
Solutio
n
MCU 4500 Series
Research and Metrics for
Video
Bridge
Transitioning
Green Intentions
to Green Outcomes
Evaluation of the
TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500
Series Video Bridge
February 2008
Table of Contents
Executive Summary ....................................................................................................................... 1 Evaluation Results ......................................................................................................................... 2 The TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Series ................................................................................ 6 Installation and Configuration...................................................................................................... 8 User Interface................................................................................................................................. 9 System Address Book ................................................................................................................... 10 Call Creation & Launch .............................................................................................................. 11 Connectivity.................................................................................................................................. 13 Participant Experience ................................................................................................................ 15 Conference Management............................................................................................................. 16 Summary....................................................................................................................................... 17 About Wainhouse Research ........................................................................................................ 18 About the Author .................................................................................................................................... 18 About TANDBERG...................................................................................................................... 18 Appendix A – Video Bridge Basics.............................................................................................. 19 Appendix B – Call Connection Methods..................................................................................... 24 Appendix C – Test Environment & Testing Notes...................................................................... 25 Appendix D – Test Call Documentation...................................................................................... 26 List of Figures
Figure 1: Evaluation Results - By Category ................................................................................................. 2 Figure 2: Evaluation Results - Summary ...................................................................................................... 2 Figure 3: Evaluation Results - Radar Chart without TMS............................................................................ 3 Figure 4: Evaluation Results - Radar Chart with TMS ................................................................................. 3 Figure 5: Cost per Port - Rating Criteria....................................................................................................... 4 Figure 6: Integration Options - Rating Criteria............................................................................................. 5 Figure 7: Basic Product Information............................................................................................................. 6 Figure 8: The TANDBERG Codian Video Bridge Family........................................................................... 6 Figure 9: Features / Functionality / Capabilities ........................................................................................... 7 Figure 10: Conference Creation / Connection Methods Supported .............................................................. 7 Figure 11: TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 - User Interface...................................................................... 9 Figure 12: TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 - Address Book.................................................................... 10 Figure 13: TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 - Conference List Page ........................................................ 11 Figure 14: TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 - Virtual Lobby Capability .................................................. 12 Figure 15: TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 - Conference Management Screen ...................................... 16 Figure 16: Comparison of Full Screen and Continuous Presence Layouts................................................. 21 Figure 17: Endpoints Used Within the Testing Environment ..................................................................... 25 Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
Executive Summary
In Q4 2007 and Q1 2008, Wainhouse Research (WR) conducted an evaluation of the TANDBERG
Codian MCU 4500 Series video bridge. Specific areas of focus during the evaluation included the
following:
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¾
¾
¾
¾
¾
¾
¾
¾
System Installation / Configuration
User Interface / Usability
Call Creation and Launch
Connectivity
Conference Management
Overall Conference Experience
Items (Software) Included
Cost Per Port
Integration Options
Throughout the evaluation, the TANDBERG
Codian MCU 4500 video bridge performed
exceptionally well.
To facilitate the testing, WR (with the support of TANDBERG) deployed a TANDBERG Codian MCU
4500 video bridge within our Atlanta test lab. The TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500, like the other
devices and endpoints from numerous vendors within our lab, was assigned a public IP address within the
same network subnet, so all video traffic remained local within our facility. The test team then placed
dozens of calls between the Codian MCU 4500 and the installed endpoints at various connection rates.
Throughout the evaluation, the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 video bridge performed exceptionally
well. Based on the rating system described within, the Codian MCU 4500 earned an overall weighted
rating of 3.9 out of 5. In performance related areas, the Codian MCU 4500 earned a weighted rating of
4.5. Specific areas of strength included strong video and audio protocol support, industry-leading
connectivity and interoperability, support for transcoding for all supported video resolutions, and robust
HD720p support. Current weaknesses include the lack of integrated ISDN capability (an external
gateway is required1) and a functional, but not particularly easy to use web interface.
This document provides detailed information about the testing methodology and results of this evaluation.
Important Notes:
1) Within this document, the terms MCU and video bridge are used interchangeably and have the
same meaning.
2) Please refer to Appendix A (Video Bridge Basics) for detailed information about the features,
functions, and capabilities of video bridges / MCUs.
3) This evaluation was sponsored by TANDBERG.
1
Although optional integrated ISDN support would be a welcomed addition to the MCU 4500, using external
gateways allows an organization the flexibility to deploy the video bridge and gateway in different locations.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
1
Evaluation Results
Based on our testing and evaluation, WR gave the evaluated video bridge a rating from one to five (where
five is the best possible score in each category) as shown below.
Recognizing that each enterprise will have different needs and priorities, we have included a weighting
factor that WR believes represents the need of many enterprises. WR recommends that enterprises
considering an MCU investment recalculate the averages below using weighting factors appropriate for
their environment.
Ratings:
Higher = Better
WR Weighting
Factor
TANDBERG
Codian
MCU 4500
1
4
5
5
4
4
5
3.5
4
5
4.75
4.5
4
4.5
2
4
4
3/41
1
3/41
Performance Related Areas
Install / Configure
MCU User Interface
Call Creation / Launch
Connectivity – SD
Connectivity - HD
Conference Management
Conference Experience
Non-Performance Related Areas
Items Included
Cost Per Port / Connection
Integration Options
Figure 1: Evaluation Results - By Category
Ratings:
Higher = Better
Overall Ratings
TANDBERG Codian
MCU 4500
Un-weighted Average
Weighted Average
3.7 / 3.9 1
3.9 / 4.0 1
Rating – Performance Areas
Un-weighted Average
Weighted Average
4.3
4.5
Rating – Non-Performance Areas
Un-weighted Average
Weighted Average
2.3 / 3 1
2.2 / 2.8 1
Figure 2: Evaluation Results - Summary
1
The first rating is for the Codian MCU 4500 only, and the second rating includes
the TANDBERG Management Suite (see comment on the next page).
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
2
Comment on Ratings:
TANDBERG offers a FREE version of TMS with support for up to 3 devices (ex. 1 Codian MCU 4500
and 2 endpoints). When used in conjunction with the Codian MCU 4500, the ratings for items included
and integration options improve. Note that organizations seeking to manage more than 3 devices with
TMS will need to purchase the appropriate licenses from TANDBERG.
TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Without TMS
Install / Configure
5
Integration Options
MCU User Interface
4
3
Cost Per Port /
Call Creation /
2
Connection
Launch
1
0
Items Included
Connectivity - SD
Conference
Experience
Connectivity - HD
Conference
Management
Figure 3: Evaluation Results - Radar Chart without TMS
TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 With TMS
Install / Configure
5
MCU User Interface
Integration Options
4
3
Call Creation /
Cost Per Port /
2
Launch
Connection
1
0
Connectivity - SD
Items Included
Conference
Experience
Connectivity - HD
Conference
Management
Figure 4: Evaluation Results - Radar Chart with TMS
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
3
Install / Configure – Reflects a variety of install / configuration related items including the time required,
overall difficulty and complexity, and the need for additional software or specialized technical
knowledge. Note that a typical MCU should require less than an hour or two to install and configure.
MCU User Interface – Reflects WR’s opinion of the system user interface including the UI’s
organization and structure, responsiveness, general utility and usability, and our assessment of the
learning curve associated with using the UI.
Call Creation and Launch – Based on the number of call connection options (as described in the prior
section) supported by the MCU. A rating of 5 indicates that the MCU supported all options.
Connectivity – For the purposes of this report, “connectivity” is an indication of how “well” the MCU
connected to each of the endpoints. In other words, this reflects whether we noted any significant
interoperability issues, or whether the MCU forced connection compromises in specific situations. This
is typically related to the number of encodes supported by the MCU since this has a tendency to cause
connectivity compromises (lower than optimal connection speeds, less than ideal protocols, etc.). Other
factors include each MCU’s AES / encryption, transcoding abilities, and H.239 performance.
Conference Management – Highlights the production / conference management capabilities of the MCU
including whether conference settings can be changed on the fly, access to connection / call statistics, and
the ability to quickly mute sites and change layouts.
Conference Experience – This rating highlights WR’s opinion of the conference experience provided by
the MCU. For the most part, all current MCUs provide solid audio and video quality during conferences.
The most notable differences relate to protocols and resolutions supported and MCU generated latency.
Items Included – A high rating in this category indicates that the MCU ships with a variety of additional
software and components. For example, some MCUs include web and client / server interfaces, H.323
gatekeepers, scheduling and management systems, reporting systems (or at least the ability to export
usage data) at no additional cost.
Cost Per Port / Connection – For this category, MCUs are given a rating based on its cost per port /
connection as evaluated at 384 kbps using the following breakdown:
Cost Per Port @ 384 kbps
< $1,000
$1,000 - $1,500
$1,501 - $2,000
$2,001 to $2,500
> $2,500
Rating (1 to 5)
5
4
3
2
1
Figure 5: Cost per Port - Rating Criteria
For MCUs with variable capacity (based on video resolution, etc.), the cost / port is calculated for a single
connection using CIF video resolution in transcoded mode.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
4
Integration Options – Provides an indication of the available options to integrate this MCU with other
systems including scheduling / management systems, external reporting / chargeback systems, and
enterprise directory systems based on the following criteria:
Integration Options
Integrates with no other systems (operates independently)
Integrates with systems from same vendor only
Integrates with at least one 3rd party video management system
Integrates with more than one 3rd party video management system
Integrates with basically all available video management systems
Rating (1 to 5)
1
2
3
4
5
Figure 6: Integration Options - Rating Criteria
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
5
The TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Series
The TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 was the first video bridge designed from the ground up to support
full motion, transcoded, high definition (HD720p) connections.
System Specifications
Video Bridge / MCU
TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500
Initial Release
December 2006
SW Revision
2.2(1.3) Build 6.11(1.3)
System Type
Appliance
System Architecture
Modular
Networks Supported Natively (for video)
IP (H.323, SIP1)
Maximum Bandwidth Per Connection (IP)
5 Mbps
Capacity - IP @ 2 Mbps - Maximum Configuration
40 ports / connections
Capacity - IP @ 4 Mbps - Maximum Configuration
40 ports / connections
System As Evaluated
Capacity - IP @ 2 Mbps - As Evaluated
12 ports / connections
Capacity - IP @ 4 Mbps - As Evaluated
12 ports / connections
Cost (List Price in US $) - As Evaluated
$79,000
1
SIP support does not include protocol transcoding (the administrator must select a single audio and video codec to be used
for all SIP connections).
Figure 7: Basic Product Information
The TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 is available in 12, 20, 30, and 40 port versions and can support
connections of up to 5 Mbps per port with H.263 and H.264. TANDBERG’s Codian product line also
includes the Codian MCU 4200 standard definition video bridge (not shown) and the MSE 8000 modular
bridge (shown below on the right) which supports up to 360 ports of video bridging.
MCU 4500
MSE 8000
Figure 8: The TANDBERG Codian Video Bridge Family
All of the TANDBERG Codian MCUs, regardless of form factor and capacity, are appliance-based,
utilize the same web-based user interface, and provide constant capacity – regardless of video resolution
or bandwidth utilized. In addition, the systems include a standards-based gatekeeper at no extra charge.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
6
For this evaluation, TANDBERG provided a Codian MCU 4505 supporting 12 video and 12 voice
participants.
Basic Capabilities
The TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Series boasts support for the following features:
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¾
¾
¾
¾
¾
Constant (flat) capacity – regardless of bandwidth, resolution, etc.
64 kbps to 5 Mbps conference data rates
G.722.1C, Siren14, AAC-LC and AAC-LD wide-band audio
H.264, H.263, H.263+, and H.261 video protocols
Video resolutions ranging from QCIF to HD720p during transcoded conferences
Audio protocol, video protocol, video resolution, and frame rate transcoding
More than 50 different continuous presence layouts
Audio and video auto attendant
Individual layout selection for each site using handheld remote
H.239 and AES encryption
The tables below highlight the features, functions, and capabilities of the video bridge evaluated.
Features / Functionality / Capabilities
Web Interface
Client/Server Interface
Integrated scheduling
Integrated address book
# of Video Encodes (per conference)
Allows setting changes during conferences
Ability to hide local image from CP view
TANDBERG
Codian MCU 4500
Y
N
Y
Y
Unlimited
Y
Y
Figure 9: Features / Functionality / Capabilities
Call Creation / Connection Methods
1) Ad-Hoc via MCU UI
2) Ad-Hoc via Dial-In to Meeting Room
3) Ad-Hoc via Dial-In to New ID / E.164
4) Ad-Hoc via Dial-In to Lobby / Create Conference
5) Ad-Hoc via Dial-In to Lobby / Conference Select
6) Ad-Hoc Blast Dial
7) Scheduled via MCU UI
TANDBERG
Codian MCU 4500
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Figure 10: Conference Creation / Connection Methods Supported
For detailed information about the various call creation / connection methods, please refer to Appendix B
(Call Connection Methods).
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
7
Installation and Configuration
Like its little brother, the MCU 4200, the installation of the MCU 4500 took less than 30 minutes to
complete.
Step 1 – Basic Network Configuration
Setting the network configuration on the 4500 requires the following steps:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
Connecting the provided serial cable to the 4500 and to our PC / notebook
Powering up the 4500
Running HyperTerminal on the PC / notebook
Issuing the “ethertype” command to the MCU to set the Ethernet port’s speed and duplex.
Issuing the “static” command to set the basic IP address information (address, subnet, gateway,
DNS, etc.)2
Step 2 – Additional Configuration Items
With the basic network settings in place, we were able to complete the remainder of the configuration
items using a standard browser to access the 4500’s user interface. This included the following:
1) Enabling / allowing certain TCP and UDP services (like port 80 web access, incoming H.323
traffic on port 1720, etc.) on the network ports.
2) Configuring the MCU to use our gatekeeper by entering the gatekeeper address and the service
prefix (allows simplified calling into the MCU)
Step 3 – MCU-Wide Conference Defaults
The final configuration step involved setting a few MCU-wide settings including the maximum video size
/ resolution, motion / sharpness prioritization, available aspect ratios (4:3 and/or 16:9), default bandwidth
to and from the MCU, available audio and video codecs, streaming settings, H.239 settings, encryption
settings, etc.
Once these steps were completed, the 4500 was ready to host video calls.
2
The default setting for the MCU is to use DHCP to obtain an IP address, which means that defining a static IP is, in
theory, optional. For most environments, WR recommends the use of static IP addresses for video infrastructure
devices – including MCUs.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
8
User Interface
The 4500’s user interface is very straight forward. In fact, this UI feels more like a well organized
website than a device management interface. The web pages are clean and well labeled, and the page
flips and screen refreshes are very fast. Although functional, the web interface is not as user friendly or
intuitive as those of competing products. For example, there is no conference creation wizard within the
system. In addition, the interface does not support the typical navigation shortcuts we’ve come to expect
from today’s UIs including right click, double-click, and multi-select.
To check system status, you click on the “Status” tab. To create or manage conferences, you click on the
“Conferences” tab. In many cases, selecting the top menu provides access to a number of related submenus. For example, the Gatekeeper, H.239, Encryption, and Upgrade screens are sub-menus under the
Settings menu.
Unlike other bridges, the Codian MCU 4500 does not use conference templates or service definitions to
pre-define specific types of meetings. Instead, the Codian MCU 4500 follows the MCU-wide default
settings and allows any standards-based endpoint to connect to any meeting using any supported call
speed, video resolution, or audio / video protocol. This level of flexibility simplifies conference creation
and is, in WR’s opinion, more consistent with the true concept of ad-hoc (totally unplanned)
conferencing.
Figure 11: TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 - User Interface
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
9
System Address Book
The Codian MCU 4500’s address book (endpoint list) is somewhat basic in that it doesn’t support any
form of organizational hierarchy. In addition, there is no search / quick find capability. While true that
these items should be addressed, WR believes that a high percentage of the calls hosted on the Codian
MCU 4500 will be dial-in / ad-hoc created via the system lobby or by dialing an unused E.164 meeting
ID. In addition, it is likely that scheduled calls will be created using a videoconferencing scheduling /
management system, such as TANDBERG’s Management Suite (TMS), and not via the MCU’s user
interface.
Adding an endpoint to the address book is very simple. Only two fields are required, the system name
(open text field) and some form of address (IP, E.164). Assuming one uses the system defaults for the
remaining options (which we did as we populated the address book for our testing), it should take only a
minute or so to add a new system to the list.
Figure 12: TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 - Address Book
One interesting and innovative capability of the TANDBERG Codian product line is that the address
book allows one to specify call-in match parameters (name, IP address, and/or E.164 address) that allow
the MCU to identify endpoints as they dial in, and then apply endpoint-specific conferencing settings on
that endpoint’s connection. For example, one could specify that whenever the CEO’s video system dials
into a meeting, it will automatically be set to receive a full-screen view of the current speaker, regardless
of the conference settings in place. Similarly, one could set the MCU-wide and/or conference maximum
call speed to 768 kbps, but allow the CEO’s video system to connect at 5 Mbps. Given the everincreasing expectations of video users, WR would not be surprised to see other manufacturers follow suit
by adding some version of this feature to their video bridging platforms.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
10
Call Creation & Launch
The TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 supports a wide variety of call creation and launch methods. In
fact, the 4500 is one of a handful of MCUs (others include the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4200 and the
Polycom MGC) that support every entry in our list of common call connection methods (see Appendix B
for detailed information).
Creating a meeting from within the TANDBERG Codian UI is relatively simple. After selecting the
“Add New Conference” button from the Conferences main page, one arrives at the Add Conference page.
Although this page allows the system administrator to define and modify virtually every possible
conference setting, the only required entry is a unique conference name. The rest of the settings are
optional and by-default are set to the MCU-wide defaults.
The Add Conference screen also allows administrators to schedule the conference to start at specific date
and time (with an option to create a recurring reservation) and invite / include pre-configured participants
from the endpoint list. Once the meeting is created, the system immediately dials out to all invited
participants and sends the user back to the Conference List page shown below.
Figure 13: TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 - Conference List Page
The TANDBERG Codian virtual lobby / auto-attendant function is worthy of additional discussion. For
years, MCUs have allowed users to enter multipoint meetings directly by dialing pre-defined ISDN
numbers, IP addresses, or E.164 aliases. Some MCUs even allow users to dial into a virtual receptionist
and either join a conference by entering the meeting ID (using DTMF tones) or create a new conference.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
11
The TANDBERG Codian MCUs, however, have taken this one step further by providing a user-navigable
video lobby (see below).
Figure 14: TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 - Virtual Lobby Capability
When users dial into the MCU without using a specific conference ID / number, they are greeted by an
on-screen menu system with associated voice prompts showing a list of the currently active video
meetings. Using the far-end camera control (FECC) on their endpoint, users can navigate through the
menu system and either select the meeting they’d like to join or opt to create a new meeting. Should the
user try to enter a password protected meeting, the system prompts them to enter the proper pin. In
addition, the system allows administrators to define a conference as private so that it is not listed in the
public lobby.
In addition to the above call creation methods, users can also dial directly into an existing meeting (using
the meeting’s E.164 address) or create a new meeting on-the-fly by dialing an unused E.164 address.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
12
Connectivity
The TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 receives exceptional marks for its ability to connect to the various
endpoints within our test environment.
For the test calls below, the 4500’s Motion / Sharpness Tradeoff setting was set for one of three video
quality modes; favor motion, favor sharpness, or balanced.
1) Endpoints Connected at Different Speeds (Balanced)
This part of the testing involved four test calls (calls 1 through 4 in the call results) with each endpoint
using one of four different call speeds (384, 768, 1.5 Mbps, and 2 Mbps) and the TANDBERG Codian
MCU 4500 set to balanced.
Note that in order to connect each endpoint at a specific speed, we had two options;
a) modify the entry for the preferred bandwidth to and from the MCU in each endpoints Address Book
entry, or b) add each endpoint manually by IP or E.164 address and choose the proper speed.
As shown in the call results, the connections varied widely and included:
-
Several video protocols (H.263, H.263+, H.264)
Numerous video resolutions (CIF, SIF, w288p, 400p, 4SIF, w4CIF, HD720p, etc.)
Both 4:3 and 16:9 aspect ratios
Multiple narrow and wide-band audio protocols (G.711, G.722, G.722.1C / Siren14, AAC-LC,
and AAC-LD)
The wide range of connections – with absolutely NO interoperability issues - highlights perhaps the most
powerful feature of this MCU; the ability to allow each endpoint to make the best possible connection
based on its own capabilities and call speed. In an industry so ridden with interoperability problems, the
ability to flawlessly host a video call including 9 endpoints from 6 different vendors is significant.
2) Endpoints Connected at Same Speeds (Balanced)
This part of the testing involved four test calls (calls 5 through 8 in the call results) with each endpoint
connected at the same call speed and the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 set to balanced. Note that in
order to connect each endpoint as the same speed, we set each endpoint’s “preferred bandwidth to the
MCU” and “preferred bandwidth from the MCU” settings to use default value, and then set the MCU’s
bridge-wide settings for default bandwidth to and from the MCU to the desired call speed.
Note that although the same call speeds were used for these test calls, these conferences were fully
transcoded and a 3 x 3 continuous presence layout was used.
The call results for this round of testing were the same as those in section 1 above with one exception;
during the 384 kbps test call, the Polycom HDX 9004 displayed the 16:9 image received from the MCU
4500 as a 4:3 image. As a result, the top and bottom of the incoming image was cut off. It is strange that
this issue did not surface during the prior call with the same endpoints connected at different speeds.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
13
3) Endpoints Connected at Same Speed (Sharpness)
This part of the testing involved two test calls (calls 9 and 10 in the call results) with each endpoint
connected at the same call speed and the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 (but not the endpoints) set to
favor sharpness. Note that although the same call speeds were used for these test calls, these conferences
were fully transcoded and a 3 x 3 continuous presence layout was used.
As one might expect with the MCU set to favor sharpness, many of the connections used enhanced
resolutions (4CIF, XGA, and HD720p). Although no connectivity or interoperability issues were noted,
several of the endpoints in the test call, especially those designed for SD resolution, struggled to process
the HD720p signals provided by the MCU 4500 during the 768 kbps test call.
It is also worth pointing out that this was the only test during which the MCU 4500 sent HD720p signals
to the TANDBERG 6000MXP. Additional testing revealed that either the bridge itself or the Address
Book entry for the endpoint have to be set for sharpness in order for the MCU 4500 to send HD720p to
the TANDBERG 6000MXP.
4) Endpoints Connected at Same Speed (Motion)
This part of the testing involved two test calls (calls 11 and 12 in the call results) with each endpoint
connected at the same call speed and the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 set to favor motion. Note that
although the same call speeds were used for these test calls, these conferences were fully transcoded and a
3 x 3 continuous presence layout was used.
The call results for this round of testing were the same as the calls in section 3 above, with some
connections using a lower video resolution (as one would expect with the MCU set to favor motion).
5) Bi-Directional HD (Balanced)
This part of the testing involved two test calls (calls 13 and 14 in the call results) with each endpoint
connected at the same call speed and the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 set to balanced. In this case,
however, we disabled the MCU 4500’s “video receive bit rate optimization” setting to ensure that each
participating endpoint sent its maximum supported resolution to the video bridge – even if such a high
resolution was not absolutely necessary for the call.
As expected, all 7 of the participating HD-capable endpoints sent the MCU 4500 an HD720p signal. The
Polycom and LifeSize endpoints received HD720p signals from the MCU 4500, while the TANDBERG
systems received 448p or w4CIF.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
14
5) H.239 Calls
As was the case with prior MCU evaluations conducted by WR, the H.239 testing was conducted as an
add-on to a prior test call. In this case, call #8 (transcoded, 2 Mbps, MCU 4500 set for balanced) was
used.
For the H.239 testing, WR utilized an IBM X40 ThinkPad (providing an XGA / 1024x768 resolution
signal with a 4:3 aspect ratio) connected to a Polycom HDX 9004 video system as the signal source.
The H.239 testing proceeded as one might expect with the MCU 4500 able to negotiate successful H.239
connections to all participating endpoints (see the test call results for detailed information). In all cases,
the endpoints received a native-resolution XGA signal from the MCU 4500.
6) Encryption
The MCU 4500 was able to make encrypted connections to all of the test endpoints with the exception of
the Huawei 8039 which does not support standards-based media encryption.
The MCU 4500 allows the user to set system-wide encryption defaults that can be modified on a perconference basis. This video bridge also supports a function that WR believes should be standard on all
MCUs; encrypt if possible, but connect nevertheless.
Participant Experience
From a conference participant perspective, the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 offers an exceptionally
strong meeting experience using both full-screen and continuous presence layouts. Video images were on
par with or better than other MCUs we’ve tested, and the system’s support for numerous wide-band audio
protocols (G.722.1C / Siren14, AAC-LC, and AAC-LD) provided solid (and typically wide-band) audio
performance throughout the testing.
In full screen mode, the system’s voice-activated video switching was crisp and clean. In addition, the
MCU-generated latency was amazingly low (average of ~ 28 milliseconds based on more than 50 latency
measurements taken) and enabled highly interactive video meetings. This low latency figure is especially
noteworthy considering the fact that ALL conferences on this MCU are fully transcoded.
Codian’s ClearVision Feature:
The 4500’s architecture is such that each port is populated with sufficient processors to support HDresolution signals, which means that whenever an SD endpoint is connected to a port, some of the
processors dedicated to that particular port are not required. Codian uses those extra processors for
ClearVision, an innovative feature available only on the MCU 4500 that enhances the incoming image
quality of connected SD endpoints. Although not formally tested as a part of this evaluation, Codian
claims that ClearVision delivers a resolution improvement of up to 4 times (e.g. CIF looks like 4CIF,
4CIF looks like HD, etc.). Based on two brief demonstrations of ClearVision, WR is able to confirm that
ClearVision provides a notable improvement in the image quality of SD resolution signals.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
15
Conference Management
The TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500’s conference control screen (shown below) provides a variety of
meeting management capabilities including the ability to change layouts on-the-fly, add or remove
participants, mute sites, and more.
Figure 15: TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 - Conference Management Screen
As shown above, the conference management view provides detailed connection information for each
participating video system. Although it shouldn’t be necessary on this MCU since it doesn’t really
enforce connectivity limits on a per-endpoint basis, the system does allow the conference settings to be
updated on-the-fly.
One minor nit – when participants are added to an existing meeting via the MCU UI, the screen refreshes
several times, which makes it difficult to control the conference for a few seconds. For example, after a
site connects the administrator will be unable to mute that site’s incoming audio for a few seconds
(although one can configure an endpoint to automatically be muted when joining a conference). WR
believes that most enterprises will find this to be annoying, but not significant.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
16
Summary
The TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 offers a compelling combination of ease-of-use, exceptional
flexibility, industry-leading connectivity, and innovative features like the virtual lobby / auto-attendant
and support for personal layouts.
In the past, the Codian products suffered from two primary issues; limited brand recognition and limited
connectivity to conferencing management systems. Thanks to TANDBERG’s acquisition of Codian in
2007 and the recent update of TMS to support the Codian MCUs, these issues are a thing of the past. The
only remaining concern is the estimated $6,000 list price per port; a figure which is reasonable for an HD
port, but expensive for an SD port.
With its small form factor and industry-leading performance, the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 is well
suited to support the needs of virtually any enterprise seeking to host its own HD, SD, or mixed resolution
multipoint video calls.
PROs / Strengths
¾ Simple, straight-forward user interface with crisp screen refreshes
¾ Support for up to 5 Mbps per connection
¾ Flat capacity regardless of video resolution or call speed used
¾ Strong video and audio (narrow and wide-band) protocol support
¾ Industry-leading connectivity and interoperability
¾ Support for 4:3 and 16:9 aspect ratios
¾ Support for transcoding for all supported resolutions (QCIF to HD720p)
¾ Exceptional flexibility in terms of meeting creation (no service definitions req’d)
¾ Support for universal encoding (creates an outgoing video signal per endpoint)
¾ Innovative video lobby / auto attendant feature
¾ Innovative feature allowing each site to select its own personal layout
¾ Exceptionally low latency (~ 30 ms) during transcoded conferences
¾ Includes both system-wide and context-sensitive help screens
¾ Integration with several 3rd party conferencing management systems
(today supported by TANDBERG TMS, TANDBERG Codian CMP, and MyVRM)
CONs / Weaknesses
¾ Relatively high cost per connection when used to host non-HD connections
¾ No integrated ISDN capability (requires external gateway)
¾ Lack of support for advanced web features (multi-select, drag and drop, right click, etc.) in the
web interface. This makes it functional on various browsers, but makes controlling the MCU less
convenient.
¾ Integrated address book is limited to 200 sites and does not support hierarchy / groupings. Those
seeking advanced functionality can use TANDBERG TMS’ address book.
¾ No integrated usage reporting system (although one can export usage data or manage the MCU
using TANDBERG’s TMS management system)
WR Wish List
¾ Addition of LCD display and controls on front of the device (for setting IP addresses, checking
system status)
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
17
About Wainhouse Research
Wainhouse Research (www.wainhouse.com) is an independent market research firm that focuses on
critical issues in rich media communications and conferencing. The company conducts multi-client and
custom research studies, consults with end users on key implementation issues, publishes white papers
and market statistics, and delivers public and private seminars as well as speaker presentations at industry
group meetings. Wainhouse Research publishes Conferencing Markets & Strategies, a three-volume
study that details the current market trends and major vendor strategies in the multimedia networking
infrastructure, endpoints, and services markets, as well as a variety of segment reports, the free newsletter
The Wainhouse Research Bulletin, and the PLATINUM (www.wrplatinum.com) content website.
About the Author
Ira M. Weinstein is a Senior Analyst and Partner at Wainhouse Research, and a 15-year veteran of the
conferencing, collaboration and audio-visual industries. Prior to joining Wainhouse Research, Ira was the
VP of Marketing and Business Development at IVCi, managed a technology consulting company, and ran
the global conferencing department for a Fortune 50 investment bank. Ira’s current focus includes IP
video conferencing, network service providers, global management systems, scheduling and automation
platforms, ROI and technology justification programs, and audio-visual integration. Mr. Weinstein holds
a B.S. in Engineering from Lehigh University and can be reached at iweinstein@wainhouse.com.
About TANDBERG
TANDBERG is a leading global provider of telepresence, high-definition videoconferencing and mobile
video products and services with dual headquarters in New York and Norway. TANDBERG designs,
develops and markets systems and software for video, voice and data. The company provides sales,
support and value-added services in more than 90 countries worldwide. TANDBERG is publicly traded
on the Oslo Stock Exchange under the ticker TAA.OL. Please visit www.tandberg.com for more
information.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
18
Appendix A – Video Bridge Basics
Video bridges / MCUs come in a various shapes and sizes, and support a variety of features and functions
as described below:
Type of System – MCUs are available in either appliance (dedicated hardware) or PC-based
architectures. The primary advantage of an appliance solution is that the system’s processing power and
reliability are not limited by / dependent upon the host PC. The primary advantage of a PC-based
solution is cost-effectiveness.
System Architecture – MCUs are available in either fixed or modular (customizable using blades /
cards) configurations. In some cases, the same MCU platform can be purchased in either configuration
(ex. TANDBERG’s Codian MCU 4500 is a fixed configuration MCU, while Polycom’s MGC and RMX
are modular systems). Fixed configurations are typically (but not always) more cost-effective, while
modular offerings offer greater flexibility and expansion capability.
Networks and Protocols Supported – Today’s videoconferencing traffic runs on either IP or ISDN
networks. Some MCUs, most commonly the fixed configuration systems, support only IP network traffic
directly and require an external or 3rd party gateway to host ISDN calls. Other MCUs support IP and
ISDN networks directly.
MCUs that support IP video calls will most likely support both of the most common IP videoconferencing
protocols, H.323 (an ITU recommendation / standard for IP-based videoconferencing) and Session
Initiation Protocol / SIP (an IP telephony signaling protocol developed by the IETF commonly used for
audio / VoIP calls, but also able to support video). Some MCUs also support connections to 3G (mobile
wireless) devices. Finally, MCUs that support ISDN will use the H.320 ITU standard for ISDN
videoconferencing.
Connection Rates Supported – In the videoconferencing world, a higher connection rate or call
bandwidth typically provides a superior call experience. Today’s MCUs support video connection rates
ranging from 64 kbps to 4 Mbps or more. Connection rates of 384 kbps, 512 kbps and 768 kbps are most
common today, but the introduction of HD-capable video systems has resulted in a great need for higher
(1 Mbps+) connection rates.
Capacity – In the MCU world, capacity typically refers to the number of connections to systems / devices
the bridge can support simultaneously and is often quoted in terms of ports (1 port = 1 connection). Fixed
MCU capacities range from 6 to 64 ports, while modular MCUs can be configured to support hundreds of
connections.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
19
Depending upon the MCU, port capacity may depend upon a number of factors:
1) Type of Connection - Some MCUs offer much greater capacity when hosting audio-only (H.323
or SIP) calls.
2) Network Type - Depending upon the MCU, port capacity for IP calls may be different from that
provided for ISDN.
3) Connection Rate - For some MCUs, the port capacity depends upon the connection rate utilized.
For example, the RADVISION SCOPIA-100-12 MCU supports 12 connections at 768 kbps or 18
connections at 384 kbps.
4) Additional Factors - Depending upon the MCU, there may be other items that impact or limit
capacity. For example, some MCUs lose capacity when certain features (H.239, encryption, etc.)
or higher resolution video signals (4CIF, HD) are used.
For these reasons, with some MCUs it is easy to determine the exact port capacity, while with others the
actual capacity may vary depending upon the active calls at the time.
Audio Quality – The audio quality of a multipoint video call depends upon several factors including the
audio standards (G.711, G.722, G.722.1, G.722.1C, Siren14, G.728, MPEG4-AAC, etc.) used and
supported by the participating endpoints and the MCU, the MCU’s ability to process the audio, the delay
(a.k.a. latency) associated with the video call, and the synchronization between the video and the audio
(called lip sync). Although audio performance was not specifically evaluated as a part of this initiative,
the test call results do indicate the audio protocols used.
Video Quality – The video quality of a multipoint video call depends upon a number of items including:
¾ the video standards (H.264, H.263, H.261, etc.) and video resolution (CIF, 4CIF, HD / 720p, etc.)
used and supported by the participating endpoints and the MCU
¾ the MCU’s support for video transcoding
¾ the MCU’s processing power, which impacts its ability to process the signals and provide full
motion (30 frames per second (fps) for NTSC, 25 fps for PAL) images to the participating
systems
User Interface – There are two basic types of user interfaces (UIs); web-based and client-server based.
Web-based UIs offer the advantage of accessibility (no download is required since a browser is used),
while client / server interfaces require the user to install a program on his PC, but typically offer better
performance, immediate status updates and additional functionality.
Transcoding – Videoconferencing systems support a variety of networks (IP, ISDN), protocols (H.323,
SIP, H.320), connection rates, video (H.264, H.263, H.261, etc.) and audio (G.722, MPEG4-AAC, etc.)
protocols, and video resolutions (CIF, 400/448p, 4CIF, HD720p, etc.). In order to support a variety of
networks, rates, protocols, and resolution in a single conference, an MCU must be able to convert (or
transcode) between the various signals. For example, an MCU that supports video transcoding will allow
video systems using different video protocols, H.263 and H.264 for example, to participate in the same
conference. Without transcoding, an MCU would force all endpoints to use the same protocols and to
connect at the same speeds.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
20
The advantage of transcoding is connection flexibility, and in the ideal world all sessions would support
full transcoding. However, transcoding requires additional processing power and can also cause
additional call latency (delay). Depending upon the MCU and the operating mode (see below),
transcoding support varies from very limited (perhaps connection rate only) to advanced.
Screen Layouts – MCUs typically support three different screen layout modes; full screen, continuous
presence, and a combination of the two. In full-screen mode (often called voice activated switching or
VAS), the MCU sends a full-screen view of the video image from the currently speaking system to all
participating sites. In continuous presence mode (also called CP or quad-screen mode), the MCU
combines the incoming video signals together to create a new signal that includes video images from
multiple locations. The result is that several (or perhaps all) of the participating sites are on screen (or
present) continuously. Finally, hybrid mode involves adding voice activated switching to a single
window within a continuous presence layout.
It is worth pointing out that full screen conferences can either be non-transcoded or transcoded, but
continuous presence sessions are typically transcoded.
Figure 16: Comparison of Full Screen and Continuous Presence Layouts
Number of Encodes Supported – In order to host a multipoint video call, an MCU must
i) receive (or decode) the incoming video signals, and ii) create (or encode) the signal (or signals) to be
sent to the participating sites, and iii) transmit the newly created (encoded) signals. The number of
encodes an MCU can provide determines the number of different signals that can be sent to the
participating endpoints.
For example, a single-encode MCU is able to create only one output signal per conference, and thus ALL
participating endpoints will receive the same exact video image (typically at the same speed, using the
same protocol) from the bridge. Such a situation forces the participating endpoints to use the same
connection speed and/or protocols – regardless of whether or not that represents the best possible
connection profile for each system. On the other hand, an MCU that supports universal encoding is able
to create an individual signal (encode) that is best suited for each participating system.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
21
Call Profiles / Services - In order to simplify and expedite conference creation, most video bridges utilize
pre-configured templates (a.k.a. call profiles, services, meeting rooms, etc.). For example, one might
create a template called VAS-768-Open referring to a pre-defined, non-encrypted VAS conference that
supports connection speeds up to 768 kbps. Typically the MCUs allow a user to create a conference
based on a template and then to modify the settings as required.
Change Settings On The Fly – Some MCUs allow users / administrators to change some or all of the
call settings while the call is in progress and without having to disconnect the users. The benefit afforded
by this capability ranges from limited (perhaps allowing one to improve call quality by selecting a
different protocol) to dramatic (allowing one to save a failed conference by activating a required feature).
Integrated Scheduling Capability – Many MCUs allow users (or admins) to schedule conferences in
advance using the MCU’s graphical user interface (GUI). Those that do not include integrated scheduling
within the UI typically provide scheduling capabilities via a separate scheduling / management
application. The ability to schedule conferences in advance is a key part of automating the conferencing
environment.
Address Books – To simplify call creation, most MCUs include some form of address book for video
systems. In some cases the address book entries must be typed in manually, while in others the list is
based on external databases, enterprise directory systems (LDAP / AD), or system gatekeepers.
Encryption Support – The use of encryption during video calls provides a degree of security for the
audio, video, and data content. Support for AES (and in some cases DES) encryption is now standard on
the leading MCUs. However, interoperability issues related to encryption remain common, and some
MCUs are not able to make encrypted connections to certain video systems.
H.239 Support – Over the years the inclusion of a second source of content, in addition to the primary
video image, has become commonplace during videoconferences. For example, a video conference might
include camera signals and a PC-based PowerPoint presentation. The ITU recommendation / standard for
dual-stream conferencing is H.239. Although almost all MCUs available today support H.239,
interoperability issues remain.
Latency / Delay – In the videoconferencing world, latency refers to the time delay between when a
person speaks and when his voice is heard by participants at the remote site(s). Latency can have a
significant negative impact on the call / conference experience, and depending upon the video bridge, the
MCU-generated latency can range from limited (less than 100 ms) to significant (200 ms or more).
Error Resiliency - As more video traffic is hosted over “imperfect” networks (like the public Internet),
the ability of an MCU to tolerate and compensate for network errors and packet loss becomes increasingly
important. In the ideal world, an MCU would mask out all error-related artifacts and protect the call
experience. In reality, different MCUs provide different degrees of error protection / resiliency.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
22
Call Connection Methods – There are many different ways to launch / connect a multipoint video call.
For example, an administrator could create a call using the MCU UI and then dial out to all participating
endpoints. Alternatively, all participating systems could dial in to the MCU using a pre-defined
conference ID / E.164 address. Depending upon the MCU, the support for the various call connection
methods varies.
Cost Per Port – One way to compare the cost of different MCUs is to calculate the cost per port or
connection, which is based on the purchase price and the number of connections supported. If the MCU’s
port capacity changes based on call speed, video resolution, protocols, use of specific features, etc., the
cost per port would also change.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
23
Appendix B – Call Connection Methods
The text below provides descriptions of some of the common conference creation / connection methods
supported on leading video bridges.
Method 1: Ad-Hoc via MCU UI
The administrator (or user) creates a conference on the fly using the system’s UI and has the MCU dialout to / accept inbound calls from participating systems.
Method 2: Ad-Hoc via Dial-In to Meeting Room
The participating systems / users dial directly into a pre-configured meeting room using the pre-defined
meeting ID (requires gatekeeper).
Method 3: Ad-Hoc via Dial-In to New ID / E.164
The participating systems / users dial directly into the MCU using a non-existent conference ID / E.164
address, and the system creates a new conference automatically.
Method 4: Ad-Hoc via Dial-In to Lobby / Create Conference
The participating systems / users dial directly into the MCU’s lobby / waiting room / entry queue and
select the “create a new conference” option using IVR / DTMF / far end camera control.
Method 5: Ad-Hoc via Dial-In to Lobby / Conference Select
The participating systems / users dial directly into the MCU’s lobby / waiting room / entry queue and
select the pre-defined / existing conference using IVR / DTMF / far-end camera control.
Method 6: Ad-Hoc Blast Dial
The participating systems / users dial directly into a pre-configured conference ID (directly or via the
lobby), at which point the MCU blast dials to a pre-defined list of participants.
Method 7: Scheduled via MCU UI
The administrator (or user) creates a conference to be launched at a future date / time using the MCU’s
user interface, and the MCU launches the conference at a defined start time and either dials out to or
accepts inbound calls from participating systems.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
24
Appendix C – Test Environment & Testing Notes
Videoconferencing Endpoints
As a part of this testing, the following video endpoints were used.
Manufacturer
Model
SW Version
Aethra
Emblaze-VCON
Huawei
LifeSize
Polycom
Polycom
TANDBERG
TANDBERG
Sony
Vega X3
HD-5000
8039
Room
HDX-9004
VSX-7000
880MXP
6000MXP
G-50
10.02.0014
7.1.97
5.3.12
LS_RM1_3.0.10 (1)
RC - 2.0.0-2198
8.7
F6.0
F6.1
Host: 2.5 / DSP: 03.56
Figure 17: Endpoints Used Within the Testing Environment
Network Environment
1) To avoid the complexities and costs of ISDN, WR used only IP connections for this evaluation.
2) To avoid potential network issues and transport latency, all call traffic was hosted on our local area
network. No wide area network was used.
3) To avoid NAT related complications and to facilitate remote support from the participating vendors, all
systems / devices (MCUs, endpoints, gatekeepers, etc.) were assigned publicly accessible IP addresses on
the same subnet.
Gatekeepers / Dial-Plans
For this evaluation, WR used the Radvision ECS gatekeeper (in direct mode) already deployed within
WR’s test environment.
System / Device Settings
Unless otherwise stated, the default settings were used for all MCUs and endpoints.
Test Calls
1) Protocols - Unless otherwise noted, the audio and video protocols selections were set to AUTO on all
MCUs and endpoints.
2) Connection Method - Although inbound dialing capabilities were tested, the majority of the test calls /
connections were placed outbound from the MCUs to the endpoints.
Testing Notes
Connection Rate Maximums - One of the test endpoints, the TANDBERG 880MXP, has a maximum
connection rate of 1152 kbps. As a result, some of the call connection rates were automatically decreased
to 1152 kbps during the testing.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
25
Appendix D – Test Call Documentation
The pages that follow include the results of the test calls conducted using the TANDBERG Codian MCU
4500 video bridge.
Evaluation of the TANDBERG Codian MCU 4500 Video Bridge
Copyright © 2008 Wainhouse Research. All rights reserved.
26
Tandberg Codian MCU 4500
Notes:
SW Release: 2.2(1.3) Build 6.11(1.3)
Unless otherwise noted, all endpoints were set to favor MOTION during this testing.
Unless otherwise noted, all audio protocols used a bandwidth of 64 kbps
Endpoints connected at different speeds (Balanced)
Mode:
Layout:
Quality:
Encrypt:
H.239:
Transcoded (all meetings on this MCU are fully transcoded)
3x3
MCU Motion / Sharpness Tradeoff - Set to Balanced
Yes
No
Call#
EP
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Aethra Vega X3 - (7013)
Emblaze-VCON HD-5000 - (7016)
Huawei 8039 - (7012)
Polycom VSX 7000 - (7017)
Tandberg 880 MXP - (7011)
Sony G-50 - (7014)
LifeSize Room - (7006)
Polycom HDX 9004 - (7002)
Tandberg 6000 MXP - (7004)
Requested Call Configuration
BW
Encrypt
Call Results
BW
Encrypt
Actual Outgoing Stats (from MCU / to the Endpoint)
V Protocol
Resol
FPS
A Protocol
Actual Incoming Stats (from Endpoint / to the MCU)
V Protocol
Resol
FPS
A Protocol
384
768
1.5 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
384
768
1.5 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
384
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
384
768
1.5 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
384
768
1.5 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
384
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
H.263+
H.264
H.263
H.263+
H.264
H.263
H.264
H.264
H.264
4CIF (704x576)
HD720p (1280x720)
4CIF (704x576)
4CIF (704x576)
w4CIF (1024x576)
4CIF (704x576)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
w4CIF (1024x576)
15
30
30
15
30
15
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC (96kbps)
AAC-LC (96kbps)
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.263+
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
CIF (352x288)
400p (528x400)
CIF (352x288)
656x368
HD720p (1280x720)
w288p (512x288)
30
14
30
15
30
30
30
15
30
G.722
AAC-LD
G.711U
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
AAC-LC (96kbps)
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
768
1.5 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
384
768
1.5 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
384
768
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
768
1.5 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
384
768
1.5 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
384
768
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
H263+
H.264
H.263
H.263+
H.264
H.263
H.264
H.264
H.264
4CIF (704x576)
HD720p (1280x720)
4CIF (704x576)
4CIF (704x576)
w4CIF (1024x576)
4CIF (704x576)
HD720p (1280x720)
848x480
w4CIF (1024x576)
15
30
30
15
30
30
30
15
30
G.722
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC (96kbps)
AAC-LC (96kbps)
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
400p (528x400)
CIF (352x288)
656x368
SIF (352x240)
w288p (512x288)
30
15
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
G.711U
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC (96kbps)
AAC-LC (96kbps)
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
1.5 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
384
768
1.5 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
384
768
1.5 Mbit/s
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
1.5 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
384
768
1152
2 Mbit/s
384
768
1.5 Mbit/s
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
H.263+
H.264
H.263
H.263+
H.264
H.263
H.264
H.264
H.264
4CIF (704x576)
HD720p (1280x720)
4CIF (704x576)
4CIF (704x576)
w4CIF (1024x576)
4CIF (704x576)
XGA (1024x768)
HD720p (1280x720)
w4CIF (1024x576)
15
30
30
15
30
30
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC (96kbps)
AAC-LC
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
H.263+
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
400p (528x400)
CIF (352x288)
656x368
352x480
w288p (512x288)
30
15
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
G.711U
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC (96kbps)
G.722.1C (32kbps)
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
CIF (352x288)
400p (528x400)
CIF (352x288)
736x416
4SIF (704x480)
w288p (512x288)
30
15
30
30
30
15
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
G.711U
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
AAC-LC (96kbps)
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
Notes:
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
Aethra Vega X3 - (7013)
Emblaze-VCON HD-5000 - (7016)
Huawei 8039 - (7012)
Polycom VSX 7000 - (7017)
Tandberg 880 MXP - (7011)
Sony G-50 - (7014)
LifeSize Room - (7006)
Polycom HDX 9004 - (7002)
Tandberg 6000 MXP - (7004)
Notes:
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Aethra Vega X3 - (7013)
Emblaze-VCON HD-5000 - (7016)
Huawei 8039 - (7012)
Polycom VSX 7000 - (7017)
Tandberg 880 MXP - (7011)
Sony G-50 - (7014)
LifeSize Room - (7006)
Polycom HDX 9004 - (7002)
Tandberg 6000 MXP - (7004)
Notes:
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Aethra Vega X3 - (7013)
Emblaze-VCON HD-5000 - (7016)
Huawei 8039 - (7012)
Polycom VSX 7000 - (7017)
Tandberg 880 MXP - (7011)
Sony G-50 - (7014)
LifeSize Room - (7006)
Polycom HDX 9004 - (7002)
Tandberg 6000 MXP - (7004)
Notes:
(c) Wainhouse Research 2008
The connection rate between the Tandberg 880MXP and the Tandberg Codian MCU 4500 was limited by the Tandberg 880MXP's bandwidth limitation of 1152 kbps.
Although the Polycom HDX 9004 sent 2SIF resolution to the 4500, the MCU's call statistics showed the incoming resolution to be 352x480.
2 Mbit/s
384
768
1.5 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
384
768
1.5 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
2 Mbit/s
384
768
1.5 Mbit/s
1152
384
768
1.5 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
H.263+
H.264
H.263
H.263+
H.264
H.263
H.264
H.264
H.264
4CIF (704x576)
XGA (1024x768)
4CIF (704x576)
4CIF (704x576)
w4CIF (1024x576)
4CIF (704x576)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
w4CIF (1024x576)
15
30
30
15
30
15
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
AAC-LC (96kbps)
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
H.263+
H.264
H.264
H.263+
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
The connection rate between the Tandberg 880MXP and the Tandberg Codian MCU 4500 was limited by the Tandberg 880MXP's bandwidth limitation of 1152 kbps.
Page 1 of 4
2/12/2008
Tandberg Codian MCU 4500
Notes:
SW Release: 2.2(1.3) Build 6.11(1.3)
Unless otherwise noted, all endpoints were set to favor MOTION during this testing.
Unless otherwise noted, all audio protocols used a bandwidth of 64 kbps
Endpoints connected at same speeds (Balanced)
Mode:
Layout:
Quality
Encrypt:
H.239:
Transcoded (all meetings on this MCU are fully transcoded)
3x3
MCU Motion / Sharpness Tradeoff - Set to Balanced
Yes
No
Call#
EP
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
Aethra Vega X3 - (7013)
Emblaze-VCON HD-5000 - (7016)
Huawei 8039 - (7012)
Polycom VSX 7000 - (7017)
Tandberg 880 MXP - (7011)
Sony G-50 - (7014)
LifeSize Room - (7006)
Polycom HDX 9004 - (7002)
Tandberg 6000 MXP - (7004)
Requested Call Configuration
BW
Notes:
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
Aethra Vega X3 - (7013)
Emblaze-VCON HD-5000 - (7016)
Huawei 8039 - (7012)
Polycom VSX 7000 - (7017)
Tandberg 880 MXP - (7011)
Sony G-50 - (7014)
LifeSize Room - (7006)
Polycom HDX 9004 - (7002)
Tandberg 6000 MXP - (7004)
Notes:
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
Aethra Vega X3 - (7013)
Emblaze-VCON HD-5000 - (7016)
Huawei 8039 - (7012)
Polycom VSX 7000 - (7017)
Tandberg 880 MXP - (7011)
Sony G-50 - (7014)
LifeSize Room - (7006)
Polycom HDX 9004 - (7002)
Tandberg 6000 MXP - (7004)
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
Aethra Vega X3 - (7013)
Emblaze-VCON HD-5000 - (7016)
Huawei 8039 - (7012)
Polycom VSX 7000 - (7017)
Tandberg 880 MXP - (7011)
Sony G-50 - (7014)
LifeSize Room - (7006)
Polycom HDX 9004 - (7002)
Tandberg 6000 MXP - (7004)
Notes:
Notes:
(c) Wainhouse Research 2008
384
384
384
384
384
384
384
384
384
Encrypt
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Call Results
BW
Encrypt
384
384
384
384
384
384
384
384
384
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Actual Outgoing Stats (from MCU / to the Endpoint)
V Protocol
Resol
FPS
A Protocol
H.263+
H.264
H.263+
H.263+
H.264
H.263+
H.264
H.264
H.264
4CIF (704x576)
XGA (1024x768)
4CIF (704x576)
4CIF (704x576)
w4CIF (1024x576)
4CIF (704x576)
XGA (1024x768)
4SIF (704x480)
w4CIF (1024x576)
15
30
30
15
30
15
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
AAC-LC
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
Actual Incoming Stats (from Endpoint / to the MCU)
V Protocol
Resol
FPS
A Protocol
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
CIF (352x288)
736x416
SIF (352x240)
w288p (512x288)
30
15
20
30
30
15
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
G.711U
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
G.722.1C (32kbps)
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.263
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
400p (528x400)
CIF (352x288)
656x368
352x480
w288p (512x288)
30
10
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
G.711U
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
AAC-LC (96kbps)
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
H.263+
H.264
H.264
H.263+
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
CIF (352x288)
400p (528x400)
CIF (352x288)
656x368
4SIF (704x480)
w288p (512x288)
30
10
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
G.711U
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC (96kbps)
AAC-LC (96kbps)
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
CIF (352x288)
428x400
CIF (352x288)
656x368
HD720p (1280x720)
w288p (512x288)
30
15
30
30
30
30
30
15
30
G.722
AAC-LD
G.711U
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC (96kbps)
AAC-LC (96kbps)
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
The Polycom HDX 9004 did not display the image properly. It displayed 4:3 images instead of 16:9, which caused the top and bottom of the image to be clipped.
768
768
768
768
768
768
768
768
768
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
768
768
768
768
768
768
768
768
768
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
H.263+
H.264
H.263
H.263+
H.264
H.263
H.264
H.264
H.264
4CIF (704x576)
HD720p (1280x720)
4CIF (704x576)
4CIF (704x576)
w4CIF (1024x576)
4CIF (704x576)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
w4CIF (1024x576)
15
30
30
15
30
15
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC (96kbps)
AAC-LC (96kbps)
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
Although the Polycom HDX 9004 sent 2SIF resolution to the 4500, the MCU's call statistics showed the incoming resolution to be 352x480.
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1152
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
H.263+
H.264
H.263
H.263+
H.264
H.263
H.264
H.264
H.264
4CIF (704x576)
HD720p (1280x720)
4CIF (704x576)
4CIF (704x576)
w4CIF (1024x576)
4CIF (704x576)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
w4CIF (1024x576)
15
30
30
15
30
30
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC (96kbps)
AAC-LC (96kbps)
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
The connection rate between the Tandberg 880MXP and the Tandberg Codian MCU 4500 was limited by the Tandberg 880MXP's bandwidth limitation of 1152 kbps.
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
1152
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
H.263+
H.264
H.263
H.263+
H.264
H.263
H.264
H.264
H.264
4CIF (704x576)
HD720p (1280x720)
4CIF (704x576)
4CIF (704x576)
w4CIF (1024x576)
4CIF (704x576)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
w4CIF (1024x576)
15
30
30
15
30
30
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC (96kbps)
AAC-LC (96kbps)
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
H.263+
H.264
H.264
H.263+
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
The connection rate between the Tandberg 880MXP and the Tandberg Codian MCU 4500 was limited by the Tandberg 880MXP's bandwidth limitation of 1152 kbps.
Page 2 of 4
2/12/2008
Tandberg Codian MCU 4500
Notes:
SW Release: 2.2(1.3) Build 6.11(1.3)
Unless otherwise noted, all endpoints were set to favor MOTION during this testing.
Unless otherwise noted, all audio protocols used a bandwidth of 64 kbps
H.239 (Dual Stream) Testing (Balanced)
Notes:
Testing H.239 capability by adding H.239 content signal to test call #8 above.
Call#
EP
8a
8a
8a
8a
8a
8a
8a
8a
8a
Aethra Vega X3 - (7013)
Emblaze-VCON HD-5000 - (7016)
Huawei 8039 - (7012)
Polycom VSX 7000 - (7017)
Tandberg 880 MXP - (7011)
Sony G-50 - (7014)
LifeSize Room - (7006)
Polycom HDX 9004 - (7002)
Tandberg 6000 MXP - (7004)
Call Configuration
H.239
Success
Rx
Rx
Rx
Rx
Rx
Rx
Rx
Tx
Rx
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
H.239 Connection Statistics
Bit Rate
D Protocol
544
544
544
544
544
544
544
544
544
H.263+
H.263+
H.263+
H.263+
H.263+
H.263+
H.263+
H.264
H.263+
FPS
Resol
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
7
1
XGA
XGA
XGA
XGA
XGA
XGA
XGA
XGA
XGA
Notes:
Endpoints connected at same speeds (Sharpness)
Notes:
For this round of testing, the Motion / Sharpness Tradeoff on the Codian 4500 was set to Favor Sharpness (other options are Favor Motion or Balanced)
Mode:
Layout:
Quality
Encrypt:
H.239:
Transcoded (all meetings on this MCU are fully transcoded)
3x3
MCU Motion / Sharpness Tradeoff - Set to Sharpness
Yes
No
Call#
EP
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
Aethra Vega X3 - (7013)
Emblaze-VCON HD-5000 - (7016)
Huawei 8039 - (7012)
Polycom VSX 7000 - (7017)
Tandberg 880 MXP - (7011)
Sony G-50 - (7014)
LifeSize Room - (7006)
Polycom HDX 9004 - (7002)
Tandberg 6000 MXP - (7004)
Requested Call Configuration
BW
Encrypt
Call Results
BW
Encrypt
Actual Outgoing Stats (from MCU / to the Endpoint)
V Protocol
Resol
FPS
A Protocol
Actual Incoming Stats (from Endpoint / to the MCU)
V Protocol
Resol
FPS
A Protocol
768
768
768
768
768
768
768
768
768
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
768
768
768
768
768
768
768
768
768
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
H.263+
H.264
H.263
H.263+
H.264
H.263
H.264
H.264
H.264
XGA (1024x768)
HD720p (1280x720)
4CIF (704x576)
4CIF (704x576)
HD720p (1280x720)
4CIF (704x576)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
10
30
30
15
30
15
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC (96kbps)
AAC-LC (96kbps)
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.263
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
400p (528x400)
CIF (352x288)
736x416
352x480
w288p (512x288)
30
10
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
G.711U
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
AAC-LC (96kbps)
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1152
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
H.263+
H.264
H.263
H.263+
H.264
H.263
H.264
H.264
H.264
XGA (1024x768)
HD720p (1280x720)
4CIF (704x576)
4CIF (704x576)
HD720p (1280x720)
4CIF (704x576)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
10
30
30
15
30
30
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC (96kbps)
AAC-LC (96kbps)
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
H.263+
H.264
H.264
H.263+
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
CIF (352x288)
400p (528x400)
CIF (352x288)
736x416
4SIF (704x480)
w288p (512x288)
30
10
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
G.711U
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC (96kbps)
AAC-LC (96kbps)
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
Notes:
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
Aethra Vega X3 - (7013)
Emblaze-VCON HD-5000 - (7016)
Huawei 8039 - (7012)
Polycom VSX 7000 - (7017)
Tandberg 880 MXP - (7011)
Sony G-50 - (7014)
LifeSize Room - (7006)
Polycom HDX 9004 - (7002)
Tandberg 6000 MXP - (7004)
Notes:
(c) Wainhouse Research 2008
The connection rate between the Tandberg 880MXP and the Tandberg Codian MCU 4500 was limited by the Tandberg 880MXP's bandwidth limitation of 1152 kbps.
Page 3 of 4
2/12/2008
Tandberg Codian MCU 4500
Notes:
SW Release: 2.2(1.3) Build 6.11(1.3)
Unless otherwise noted, all endpoints were set to favor MOTION during this testing.
Unless otherwise noted, all audio protocols used a bandwidth of 64 kbps
Endpoints connected at same speeds (Motion)
Notes:
For this round of testing, the Motion / Sharpness Tradeoff on the Codian 4500 was set to Favor Motion (other options are Favor Sharpness or Balanced)
Mode:
Layout:
Quality
Encrypt:
H.239:
Transcoded (all meetings on this MCU are fully transcoded)
3x3
MCU Motion / Sharpness Tradeoff - Set to Motion
Yes
No
Call#
EP
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
Aethra Vega X3 - (7013)
Emblaze-VCON HD-5000 - (7016)
Huawei 8039 - (7012)
Polycom VSX 7000 - (7017)
Tandberg 880 MXP - (7011)
Sony G-50 - (7014)
LifeSize Room - (7006)
Polycom HDX 9004 - (7002)
Tandberg 6000 MXP - (7004)
Requested Call Configuration
BW
Encrypt
Call Results
BW
Encrypt
Actual Outgoing Stats (from MCU / to the Endpoint)
V Protocol
Resol
FPS
A Protocol
Actual Incoming Stats (from Endpoint / to the MCU)
V Protocol
Resol
FPS
A Protocol
768
768
768
768
768
768
768
768
768
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
768
768
768
768
768
768
768
768
768
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
H.264
H.264
H.263
H.263+
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
CIF (352x288)
HD720p (1280x720)
4CIF (704x576)
4CIF (704x576)
448p (576x448)
CIF (352x288)
XGA (1024x768)
HD720p (1280x720)
448p (576x448)
30
30
30
15
30
30
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC (96kbps)
AAC-LC (96kbps)
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
400p (528x400)
CIF (352x288)
656x368
352x480
w288p (512x288)
30
15
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
G.711U
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
AAC-LC (96kbps)
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1152
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
1.5 Mbit/s
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
H.263+
H.264
H.263
H.263+
H.264
H.263
H.264
H.264
H.264
XGA (1024x768)
HD720p (1280x720)
4CIF (704x576)
4CIF (704x576)
448p (576x448)
4CIF (704x576)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
448p (576x448)
10
30
30
15
30
30
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
AAC-LC
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC (96kbps)
AAC-LC (96kbps)
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
H.263+
H.264
H.264
H.263+
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
SIF (352x240)
CIF (352x288)
400p (528x400)
CIF (352x288)
736x416
4SIF (704x480)
w288p (512x288)
30
10
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
G.722
AAC-LD
G.711U
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LC (96kbps)
AAC-LC (96kbps)
G.722.1C (48kbps)
AAC-LD
Notes:
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
Aethra Vega X3 - (7013)
Emblaze-VCON HD-5000 - (7016)
Huawei 8039 - (7012)
Polycom VSX 7000 - (7017)
Tandberg 880 MXP - (7011)
Sony G-50 - (7014)
LifeSize Room - (7006)
Polycom HDX 9004 - (7002)
Tandberg 6000 MXP - (7004)
Notes:
The connection rate between the Tandberg 880MXP and the Tandberg Codian MCU 4500 was limited by the Tandberg 880MXP's bandwidth limitation of 1152 kbps.
High Definition (HD) Testing (Balanced)
Notes:
For this round of testing, the "Video Receive Bit Rate Optimization" function was disabled
Mode:
Layout:
Quality:
Encrypt:
H.239:
Transcoded (all meetings on this MCU are fully transcoded)
3x3
MCU Motion / Sharpness Tradeoff - Set to Balanced
Yes
No
Call#
EP
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
LifeSize Room - (7006)
LifeSize Room - (7007)
Polycom HDX 9004 - (7002)
Polycom HDX 9004 - (7003)
Tandberg 6000 MXP - (7004)
Tandberg 6000 MXP - (7005)
Tandberg 1700 MXP - (7018)
Requested Call Configuration
BW
Encrypt
Call Results
BW
Encrypt
Actual Outgoing Stats (from MCU / to the Endpoint)
V Protocol
Resol
FPS
A Protocol
Actual Incoming Stats (from Endpoint / to the MCU)
V Protocol
Resol
FPS
A Protocol
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
w4CIF (1024x576)
w4CIF (1024x576)
w4CIF (1024x576)
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
G.722
G.722
Siren14 (48kbps)
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LD
AAC-LD
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
G.722
G.722
Siren14 (48kbps)
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LD
AAC-LD
4 Mbit/s
4 Mbit/s
4 Mbit/s
4 Mbit/s
4 Mbit/s
4 Mbit/s
4 Mbit/s
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
4 Mbit/s
4 Mbit/s
4 Mbit/s
4 Mbit/s
4 Mbit/s
4 Mbit/s
2 Mbit/s
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
w4CIF (1024x576)
w4CIF (1024x576)
w4CIF (1024x576)
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
G.722
G.722
Siren14 (48kbps)
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LD
AAC-LD
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
H.264
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
HD720p (1280x720)
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
G.722
G.722
Siren14 (48kbps)
Siren14 (48kbps)
AAC-LD
AAC-LD
AAC-LD
Notes:
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
LifeSize Room - (7006)
LifeSize Room - (7007)
Polycom HDX 9004 - (7002)
Polycom HDX 9004 - (7003)
Tandberg 6000 MXP - (7004)
Tandberg 6000 MXP - (7005)
Tandberg 1700 MXP - (7018)
Notes:
(c) Wainhouse Research 2008
The connection rate between the Tandberg 1700MXP and the Tandberg Codian MCU 4500 was limited by the Tandberg 1700MXP's bandwidth limitation of 2 Mbit/s
Page 4 of 4
2/12/2008
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