NSRD(1m)
NSRD(1m)
NAME
nsrd − daemon providing the NetWorker service
SYNOPSIS
nsrd [ −k virtual-service-name ]
ansrd [ commentary ]
DESCRIPTION
The nsrd daemon provides an RPC-based save and recover service. This service allows users to save,
query for, and recover their files across a network. The RPC program number provided by nsrd is 390103.
Normally nsrd is invoked from a startup shell script (for example rc.local, rc.boot) at boot-time, and
should never need to be started directly by a user. After it is started, nsrd starts up the other daemons it
needs to provide the NetWorker service.
The nsrd command must be run on a machine with appropriate resources. These resources include devices
(for example, tape drives) which are under the control of the media multiplexor software (see nsrmmd(1m)), and sufficient disk space for the index daemons, (see nsrindexd(1m) and nsrmmdbd(1m)) to
maintain the index of saved user files and volumes with corresponding files.
Each time a backup, recover, or another session begins, nsrd starts the program, ansrd, to process the
requested session. The ansrd program is called an agent. The agent is in charge of monitoring that
backup, recover, or another session, and automatically exits when a session completes. Using ps(1) or
another process monitoring tool, you can inspect the subsequent parameters of ansrd to see what kind of
session it is monitoring. If necessary, agents can be forcibly terminated to abort a backup or recover session. Agents cannot be run directly; they can only be started by nsrd.
When nsrd is started with the −k option, it checks to see whether it has been installed as a cluster service
and that the virtual host which owns /nsr/res matches virtual-service-name. If either of these validation
steps fails, nsrd exits immediately. (To check whether NetWorker has been installed as a cluster service,
nsrd checks for a file called NetWorker.clustersvr in the directory containing the nsrd binary. To check
that /nsr/res is owned by virtual-service-name, nsrd queries the cluster management software.)
If the −k option is not used when starting NetWorker in a cluster, the server assumes the identity of the virtual host which owns /nsr/res. If no virtual host owns /nsr/res, then nsrd will not start.
OPTIONS
−k virtual-service-name
Instructs nsrd to start up in cluster failover mode using virtual-service-name as its hostname/identity. This option is used by the NetWorker cluster control script which starts NetWorker.
FILES
/nsr/logs/daemon.log
The file to which nsrd and other NetWorker daemons send information about various error
conditions that cannot otherwise be logged using the NetWorker event mechanism.
/nsr/res/nsr.res
Attributes describing the NetWorker service and its resources (See nsr_service(5)).
/nsr/res/nsrjb.res
Attributes describing the jukebox resources of the NetWorker service.
NetWorker.clustersvr
If this file exists in the directory containing NetWorker’s daemons, it indicates that the NetWorker server has been installed as a cluster service.
SEE ALSO
nsr(1m), nsr_service(5), nsrmmd(1m), nsrmmdbd(1m), nsrindexd(1m), ps(1), rc(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
CHANGERS(1m)
CHANGERS(1m)
NAME
changers − list SCSI autochangers attached to the system
SYNOPSIS
changers [ -dv ] [ -a b.t.l ] [ -l ]
DESCRIPTION
The changers program lists all of the SCSI autochangers (jukeboxes) connected to the current system.
OPTIONS
−d
Determines the names and addresses of the autochanger’s media elements (for example, tape
drives).
-v
Lists more detailed information about each autochanger. The details provided may indicate how
many media transports (MT, for example, robot arm), storage transports (ST, for example, slot),
import/export elements (IE, for example, mail slot), of data transport (DT) elements the
autochanger contains. The -v option also provides information about the element movement matrix
supported by the autochanger.
−a b.t.l Selects a specific ordinal SCSI address, where b is the logical SCSI bus, t is the SCSI target, and l
is the SCSI logical unit number (LUN) on that target. See libscsi(1m).
−l
Performs a complete LUN search for all SCSI adapters in the system. This argument is accepted
on all systems, but does not have any effect on HP-UX systems. Due to the method used to scan
for available devices on HP-UX systems, all accessible devices are always shown, and the −l
option has no additional effect. On all other platforms, the normal behavior is to start checking at
LUN 0 for SCSI deivces. The first empty LUN found will end the search for a given target ID.
With the −l option, all LUNS present on all target IDs for all SCSI busses in the system will be
checked for devices. This can take a very long time and should therefore only be used when necessary. For example, a Fibre Channel adapter can support 126 target IDs, each of which may have
80 or more LUNs. Checking all LUNs on this single adapter may take over 10 minutes.
EXAMPLE
Sample output is shown below: hal$ changers -dv -a 0.2.0
scsidev@0.2.0:Vendor <SPECTRA>, Product <4000>
Data Transfer Element at address 80 is scsidev@0.5.0
Device:Vendor <HP>, Product <C1533A>
Type:Tape
System Name: /dev/rmt2.1
Data Transfer Element at address 81 is scsidev@0.6.0
Device:Vendor <HP>, Product <C1533A>
Type:Tape
System Name: /dev/rmt3.1
1 MT Element starting at address 79
60 ST Elements starting at address 1
1 IE Element starting at address 0
2 DT Elements starting at address 80
Element Movement Matrix
->DT, ->IE, ->ST, ->MT
MT->DT,MT->IE,MT->ST,______
ST->DT,ST->IE,ST->ST,ST->MT
IE->DT,______,IE->ST,IE->MT
DT->DT,DT->IE,DT->ST,DT->MT
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
CHANGERS(1m)
CHANGERS(1m)
______,______,______,______
______,______,______,______
______,______,______,______
______,______,______,______
SEE ALSO
libscsi(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
EMASS_silo_files(8)
EMASS_silo_files(8)
NAME
dasadmin − ADIC/EMASS/Grau silo administrative utility
libstlemass − shared library for communication to
ADIC/EMASS/Grau silo
SYNOPSIS
dasadmin command [options] [parameters]
dasadmin.exe command [options] [parameters]
libstlemass.so (Solaris)
libstlemass.so.a (AIX)
libstlemass.sl (HPUX)
libstlemass.so.1 (SGI)
libstlemass.so (DECAXP)
libstlemass.dll (NT i386)
(NT only)
DESCRIPTION
dasadmin
This is not a complete listing of all possible dasadmin commands, but does include those commands that
are of use with NetWorker. For a complete discussion, please see the DAS Installation and Administration
guide provided by ADIC, EMASS or Grau.
mo[unt] [ −t type ] volser [ drive-name ]
mounts the tape with the barcode label of volser into either the first available drive (if drive-name
is not specified) or into the drive specicified by drive-name If the tape is not the type defined by
DAS_MEDIUM or ACI_MEDIA_TYPE , you can use the −t type option to get the tape
mounted. If the type of the tape and the defined type for the drive do not match, the silo will not
load the tape. Note that the drive you are attempting to use must be allocated for your use before
you can mount or dismount tapes. See listd and allocd below.
dism[ount] [ −t type ] volser | −d drive-name
dismounts the tape that is either specified by volser or whatever is in the drive specified by drivename. If the tape or drive are of a different type than your default, use the −t type parameter. As
with mount, you must have the drive allocated to you to use this command.
ej[ect] [ −c ] [ −t type ] volser-range area-name
ejects one or more tapes to the specified eject area. As with other commands, if the type of the
tape you are ejecting is different from that defined by DAS_MEDIUMorACI_MEDIA_TYPE,
you will need the −t type option. The −c specifies a ’complete’ ejection for the specified volsers.
A complete ejection removes the entry for that volser from the silo controller’s internal database.
A NON-complete ejection will eject the tape, but the volser’s entry in the database will remain,
and the volser’s state will be set to ’ejected’. This is useful if you anticipate replacing the tape
into the silo soon.
in[sert] area-name
Moves all tapes that are currently in the specified insert area-name from the insert area to the
normal storage locations for tapes.
inventory
Starts a full inventory of the silo. USE WITH CAUTION! An inventory of this sort can take a
very long time! An inventory of our silo with 180 slots takes over 20 minutes.
view [ −t type ] volser
Will display the current status of volser. This will show the volser, type, attribute and coordinate.
all[ocd] drive-name UP|DOWN clientname
allocd is used to allocate and deallocate drives for different clients. Before you can use a tape
drive, the drive must be allocd’ed UP for your system. If it is currently allocd’ed UP for a
different client, if must first be allocd’ed DOWN for that client before being allocd’ed UP for
your system. You cannot allocd DOWN a drive that has a tape in it. The tape must be
dismounted first.
l[ist]d
listdorld will show the current state of all the tape drives defined in the silo. The information
presented will include the drive-name, the amu drive (the location in the silo), status (UP or
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
EMASS_silo_files(8)
EMASS_silo_files(8)
DOWN), type, client the drive is allocated to, and the volser of any loaded tape.
show −op | −ac client-name
Shows the operational or access parameters for the specified client-name. You must include
either −ac if you wish to see access parameters, or −op if you wish to see operational parameters
for the client-name. Access parameters include volser ranges and drive ranges that the clientname is allowed to use. Operational parameters include whether the client-name has complete
access, dismount priviledges along with the IP address entered for client-name
list client-name
Lists any outstanding requests that have been made by client-name. If there are any, they are
shown, along with the request number and type.
can[cel] request-id
Allows you to cancel an outstanding request, assuming that you have the necessary priviledges.
Use the request-id that was shown by the list command.
qversion
This shows the version of the DAS server that you are connected to and the version of the ACI
protocol you are using to talk to DAS over.
qvolsrange beginvolser endvolser count [ clientname ]
qvolsrange is the way to obtain a list of the volsers that are available in the silo. beginvolser and
endvolser are volsers of the form "123456". To use the first available or the last available, you
can use "". count specifies the maimum number of volsers you wish to see.
ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
These environment variables affect the operation of the silo, and since the processes that are using them
include both commands the user will enter and processes that are spawned from nsrd, they need to be
set in a location where they will be in place when nsrd is started. The three DAS_ variables are used by
libstlemass, while dasadmin uses ACI_MEDIA_TYPE instead of DAS_MEDIUM
For Solaris, the definitions should be placed in /etc/rc.2/S95networker.
For AIX, the definitions should be placed in /etc/rc.nsr.
For HPUX, the definitions should be placed in /sbin/rc2.d/S900networker.
DAS_SERVER
This is either the network name of the IP address of the system that is running DAS. For a single silo,
this will usually be the silo controller system. In larger installations, there will probably be only one
DAS server for the whole network. It is case sensitive.
DAS_CLIENT
This is the network name of the system that NetWorker is running on. It is case-sensitive.
DAS_MEDIUM
This variable is used by libstlemass. It should be the same as ACI_MEDIA_TYPE.
This is the type of tape drive you are connected to. If this is not specified, the default value of DLT will
be used. Acceptable values are:
3480, 3590, OPTICAL_THICK, OPTICAL_THIN, DECDLT, DLT, 8MM, 4MM, D2, VHS, CD,
TRAVAN and DTF
ACI_MEDIA_TYPE
This variable is used by dasadmin. It should be the same as DAS_MEDIUM
This is the type of tape drive you are connected to. If this is not specified, the default value of DLT will
be used. Acceptable values are the same as those listed under DAS_MEDIUM.
EXAMPLES
NOTE on ranges:
dasadmin will accept volser ranges for some commands. There are three acceptable variations for these
ranges:
single volser: "000635"
multiple volsers: "000635, 000789, 098732"
true range: "000610 - 000745"
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
EMASS_silo_files(8)
EMASS_silo_files(8)
NOTE on area-name and drive-name:
area-names usually consist of a letter and 2 digits. The letter corresponds to whether you are referring to
an insert area ("I") or an eject area ("E"). You will need to get the correct values from your silo
administrator before using them.
drive-names are essentially free-form labels concocted by whomever installed the silo. They may or may
not have any relevance to physical reality, so you will need to see the silo admin to get the correct names.
If the silo admin is not available, you can get the same information using dasadmin listd along with
dasadmin show −op client-name followed by dasadmin show −ac client-name commands.
To setup the environment variables necessary for silo operations:
setenv DAS_SERVER emask
setenv DAS_CLIENT aurora
setenv DAS_MEDIUM DLT
setenv ACI_MEDIA_TYPE DECDLT
To see a listing of all volsers available in the silo:
dasadmin qvolsrange "" "" 10000
To see the current status of the drives in the silo:
dasadmin listd
To change the allocation of a drive from client a4 to client aurora:
dasadmin allocd DLT1 DOWN a4
dasadmin allocd DLT1 UP aurora
SEE ALSO
nsrjb(1m), jbconfig(1m), libstlstk(1m), mini_el(1m), ssi(1m), libstlibm(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
The only available diagnostic information is error messages that may be printed out by dasadmin and
libstlemass in the course of normal operations.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
3
DDMGR(1m)
DDMGR(1m)
NAME
ddmgr − Device detection manager. Manages auto-detection on local and remote storage nodes.
SYNOPSIS
ddmgr [ −S ] [ −M ] [ −q ] [ −v ]
DESCRIPTION
ddmgr is the main daemon for auto-detection that runs on the networker server machine. It spawns child
processes (of dvdetect) for each storage node on which devices are to be detected.
It starts the child processes with the help of the nsrmon(1m) process, and depends on nsrmon to report on
the success or failure of the remote dvdetect process.
Once dvdetect on a storage node has finished its work of detecting devices, ddmgr takes up the task of creating resources for these detected devices, and in case of jukeboxes, tries to find out the device mapping
(element id to device path) by spawning another process, dtbind. dtbind determines the device mapping by
loading each drive in the jukebox that was detected and then trying to access it via various device paths till
it finds the right one. This might take a long time depending on the type of the jukebox.
ddmgr is invoked by the nsrd process and is not be invoked on the command-line.
OPTIONS
−q
Tells ddmgr to detect and create device resources but not to enable them.
−M
This option tells ddmgr that it has been invoked by the server and to direct messages to the daemon log.
−q
This option tells ddmgr to run in the ’quiet’ mode without printing any messages.
−v
This option is used to run ddmgr in the verbose mode for more debug messages.
EXIT STATUS
Exits with 0 on sucess and 1 on error. See error messages for more detail on errors.
SEE ALSO
nsrmon(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
Most, if not all, of ddmgr error reports is preceded by the phrase "Detection process for host X reports", followed by the actual error message. This error message is based on the error reported by the nsrmon process
monitoring the dvdetect process, or in cases where nsrmon itself cannot be started, about the nsrmon process. The following are the error messages that ddmgr might produce along with their implications and possible solutions.
remote dvdetect exec failure. Errno 76
The remote storage node was unable to start the dvdetect process on the remote storage node. This
could happen for various reasons, like the dvdetect binary not having execute permissions, or more
commonly, the remote storage node not being configured to service requests from this server.
remote auto-detect feature not supported
Auto-detect was being performed on a host that does not support this feature. The client/storagenode should be 6.x or higher.
dvdetect process failed on signal
The remote dvdetect process was killed by a signal. This could happen even when the process
encounters a memory fault. Check for core files in the nsr/cores directory.
dvdetect terminated due to timeout
The dvdetect process was terminated because of its inactivity for a certain period of time. The
timeout is set by default to 15 minutes. This is not user configurable. dvdetect process exited on
signal The local dvdetect process was killed by a signal. This could happen even when the process
encounters a memory fault. Check for core files in the nsr/cores dir ectory.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
DDMGR(1m)
DDMGR(1m)
dvdetect exec failure
The ddmgr process was unable to start the dvdetect process on the server. Check for execute permissions on the dvdetect binary.
nsrmon exec failure
The ddmgr process was unable to start the nsrmon process on the server. Check for execute permissions on the nsrmon binary.
nsrmon process exited on signal
The nsrmon process exited on a signal. This could even happen whenthe process encounters a
memory fault. Check the nsr/cores direcotry for a core file.
dvdetect failed with unknown error
ddmgr was unable to determine the cause of the failure of the dvdetect process.
nsrmon failed. No info in the resdb
The nsrmon process exited without loggin any information about either the remote dvdetect process or itself. Ddmgr is unable to verify status of both.
nsrmon failed. Invalid request or hostname
The nsrmon process was started with an invalid option or hostname. Check if the remote storage
node is reachable from the server.
nsrmon failed. Authorization failure
The nsrmon process could not get authorization from the networker server to talk to the remote
storage node.
nsrmon exited on resdb access failure
The nsrmon process encountered errors in reading the networker RAP database.
nsrmon exited on memory failure
The nsrmon process ran out of physical memory while processing. Add more memory.
nsrmon failed. Invalid request value
The nsrmon process was asked to perform a request it is not familiar with.
process exited with error
There was a problem with the detection process but ddmgr could not determine the exact cause of
the failure.
RPC error Remote systems
The nsrmon process was unable to connect to the remote host. This could be because of network
problems, or if the networker processes were not installed on the remote system.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
EMASS_silo_files(8)
EMASS_silo_files(8)
NAME
dasadmin − ADIC/EMASS/Grau silo administrative utility
libstlemass − shared library for communication to
ADIC/EMASS/Grau silo
SYNOPSIS
dasadmin command [options] [parameters]
dasadmin.exe command [options] [parameters]
libstlemass.so (Solaris)
libstlemass.so.a (AIX)
libstlemass.sl (HPUX)
libstlemass.so.1 (SGI)
libstlemass.so (DECAXP)
libstlemass.dll (NT i386)
(NT only)
DESCRIPTION
dasadmin
This is not a complete listing of all possible dasadmin commands, but does include those commands that
are of use with NetWorker. For a complete discussion, please see the DAS Installation and Administration
guide provided by ADIC, EMASS or Grau.
mo[unt] [ −t type ] volser [ drive-name ]
mounts the tape with the barcode label of volser into either the first available drive (if drive-name
is not specified) or into the drive specicified by drive-name If the tape is not the type defined by
DAS_MEDIUM or ACI_MEDIA_TYPE , you can use the −t type option to get the tape
mounted. If the type of the tape and the defined type for the drive do not match, the silo will not
load the tape. Note that the drive you are attempting to use must be allocated for your use before
you can mount or dismount tapes. See listd and allocd below.
dism[ount] [ −t type ] volser | −d drive-name
dismounts the tape that is either specified by volser or whatever is in the drive specified by drivename. If the tape or drive are of a different type than your default, use the −t type parameter. As
with mount, you must have the drive allocated to you to use this command.
ej[ect] [ −c ] [ −t type ] volser-range area-name
ejects one or more tapes to the specified eject area. As with other commands, if the type of the
tape you are ejecting is different from that defined by DAS_MEDIUMorACI_MEDIA_TYPE,
you will need the −t type option. The −c specifies a ’complete’ ejection for the specified volsers.
A complete ejection removes the entry for that volser from the silo controller’s internal database.
A NON-complete ejection will eject the tape, but the volser’s entry in the database will remain,
and the volser’s state will be set to ’ejected’. This is useful if you anticipate replacing the tape
into the silo soon.
in[sert] area-name
Moves all tapes that are currently in the specified insert area-name from the insert area to the
normal storage locations for tapes.
inventory
Starts a full inventory of the silo. USE WITH CAUTION! An inventory of this sort can take a
very long time! An inventory of our silo with 180 slots takes over 20 minutes.
view [ −t type ] volser
Will display the current status of volser. This will show the volser, type, attribute and coordinate.
all[ocd] drive-name UP|DOWN clientname
allocd is used to allocate and deallocate drives for different clients. Before you can use a tape
drive, the drive must be allocd’ed UP for your system. If it is currently allocd’ed UP for a
different client, if must first be allocd’ed DOWN for that client before being allocd’ed UP for
your system. You cannot allocd DOWN a drive that has a tape in it. The tape must be
dismounted first.
l[ist]d
listdorld will show the current state of all the tape drives defined in the silo. The information
presented will include the drive-name, the amu drive (the location in the silo), status (UP or
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
EMASS_silo_files(8)
EMASS_silo_files(8)
DOWN), type, client the drive is allocated to, and the volser of any loaded tape.
show −op | −ac client-name
Shows the operational or access parameters for the specified client-name. You must include
either −ac if you wish to see access parameters, or −op if you wish to see operational parameters
for the client-name. Access parameters include volser ranges and drive ranges that the clientname is allowed to use. Operational parameters include whether the client-name has complete
access, dismount priviledges along with the IP address entered for client-name
list client-name
Lists any outstanding requests that have been made by client-name. If there are any, they are
shown, along with the request number and type.
can[cel] request-id
Allows you to cancel an outstanding request, assuming that you have the necessary priviledges.
Use the request-id that was shown by the list command.
qversion
This shows the version of the DAS server that you are connected to and the version of the ACI
protocol you are using to talk to DAS over.
qvolsrange beginvolser endvolser count [ clientname ]
qvolsrange is the way to obtain a list of the volsers that are available in the silo. beginvolser and
endvolser are volsers of the form "123456". To use the first available or the last available, you
can use "". count specifies the maimum number of volsers you wish to see.
ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
These environment variables affect the operation of the silo, and since the processes that are using them
include both commands the user will enter and processes that are spawned from nsrd, they need to be
set in a location where they will be in place when nsrd is started. The three DAS_ variables are used by
libstlemass, while dasadmin uses ACI_MEDIA_TYPE instead of DAS_MEDIUM
For Solaris, the definitions should be placed in /etc/rc.2/S95networker.
For AIX, the definitions should be placed in /etc/rc.nsr.
For HPUX, the definitions should be placed in /sbin/rc2.d/S900networker.
DAS_SERVER
This is either the network name of the IP address of the system that is running DAS. For a single silo,
this will usually be the silo controller system. In larger installations, there will probably be only one
DAS server for the whole network. It is case sensitive.
DAS_CLIENT
This is the network name of the system that NetWorker is running on. It is case-sensitive.
DAS_MEDIUM
This variable is used by libstlemass. It should be the same as ACI_MEDIA_TYPE.
This is the type of tape drive you are connected to. If this is not specified, the default value of DLT will
be used. Acceptable values are:
3480, 3590, OPTICAL_THICK, OPTICAL_THIN, DECDLT, DLT, 8MM, 4MM, D2, VHS, CD,
TRAVAN and DTF
ACI_MEDIA_TYPE
This variable is used by dasadmin. It should be the same as DAS_MEDIUM
This is the type of tape drive you are connected to. If this is not specified, the default value of DLT will
be used. Acceptable values are the same as those listed under DAS_MEDIUM.
EXAMPLES
NOTE on ranges:
dasadmin will accept volser ranges for some commands. There are three acceptable variations for these
ranges:
single volser: "000635"
multiple volsers: "000635, 000789, 098732"
true range: "000610 - 000745"
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
EMASS_silo_files(8)
EMASS_silo_files(8)
NOTE on area-name and drive-name:
area-names usually consist of a letter and 2 digits. The letter corresponds to whether you are referring to
an insert area ("I") or an eject area ("E"). You will need to get the correct values from your silo
administrator before using them.
drive-names are essentially free-form labels concocted by whomever installed the silo. They may or may
not have any relevance to physical reality, so you will need to see the silo admin to get the correct names.
If the silo admin is not available, you can get the same information using dasadmin listd along with
dasadmin show −op client-name followed by dasadmin show −ac client-name commands.
To setup the environment variables necessary for silo operations:
setenv DAS_SERVER emask
setenv DAS_CLIENT aurora
setenv DAS_MEDIUM DLT
setenv ACI_MEDIA_TYPE DECDLT
To see a listing of all volsers available in the silo:
dasadmin qvolsrange "" "" 10000
To see the current status of the drives in the silo:
dasadmin listd
To change the allocation of a drive from client a4 to client aurora:
dasadmin allocd DLT1 DOWN a4
dasadmin allocd DLT1 UP aurora
SEE ALSO
nsrjb(1m), jbconfig(1m), libstlstk(1m), mini_el(1m), ssi(1m), libstlibm(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
The only available diagnostic information is error messages that may be printed out by dasadmin and
libstlemass in the course of normal operations.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
3
EMCDISCOVER(1m)
EMCDISCOVER(1m)
NAME
emcdiscover − Discover Symmetrix configuration information
SYNOPSIS
emcdiscover [ −v ]
DESCRIPTION
The emcdiscover program scans all devices on the host looking for Symmetrix devices and builds or
rebuilds the Symmetrix host database.
You must run emcdiscover before your first backup and anytime after you reconfigure your Symmetrix by
adding or removing devices.
The emcdiscover program must be run as the root user and on both the primary and secondary host
machines involved in a backup.
OPTIONS
−v
Verbose: Instruct the shell to print commands and their arguments as they are executed.
SEE ALSO
oraemcasm(1m), oraemcmap(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
ERASE(1m)
ERASE(1m)
NAME
erase − erase a tape
SYNOPSIS
erase [ -slr ] -a b.t.l
DESCRIPTION
The erase program will send the SCSI ERASE command to the named device, using the LONG erase
option unless the optional -s argument is specified.
The required -a argument must be used to select a specific ordinal SCSI address (see libscsi(1m)) for the
device that has the tape.
The optional -r argument sends a REWIND command to the named device prior to issuing an erase command.
WARNINGS
Be careful! This command destroys data! It does not prompt you to see whether you’re sure you want to do
thi.s
SEE ALSO
libscsi(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
HPFLIP(1m)
HPFLIP(1m)
NAME
hpflip − flip device type of HP optical disk drives
SYNOPSIS
hpflip [ -a b.t.l ] [ -r ]
DESCRIPTION
The hpflip program reads a Vendor Unique mode page from an HP Optical disk drive, and toggles the
device type setting to the appropriate device type. The device type can either be OPTICAL or DIRECT
ACCESS. Typically, most systems have drivers that can handle removable DIRECT ACCESS device types
(often limited to 512 byte/sector formatted disks). Systems with these device types do not often have device
drivers for additional OPTICAL device types. The hpflip program enables you to control how an HP Optical Disk Drive reports itself, and therefore makes the OPTICAL device available where it otherwise would
have required an additional device driver.
OPTIONS
−a
Selects a specific ordinal address (see libscsi(1m)). This is a required option.
−r
Resets the specified device to Optical, regardless of its current state. Without this argument, the
device setting is toggled between OPTICAL and DIRECT ACCESS types.
SEE ALSO
libscsi(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
IBM_silo(8)
IBM_silo(8)
NAME
libstlibm − shared library for communication to IBM 3494 silos
SYNOPSIS
libstlibm.so (Solaris)
libstlibm.so.a (AIX)
DESCRIPTION
libstlibm.xxx is a shared library that handles the communication between nsrjb and the IBM silo driver
(on AIX) or daemon (on Solaris). The IBM driver/daemon then handles the communication over the
network to the silo. There are no options, parameters or environment variables that affect the operation of
libstlibm. The correct path to this file should be entered when an IBM silo is configured using jbconfig.
The default values specified by jbconfig match the default locations chosen for the installation program,
and in most cases can be accepted.
For NetWorker to work with the 3494, you must have first installed IBM’s Automated Tape Library
support.
On AIX, this will install a driver called atldd (Automated Tape Library Device Driver). You may also
require IBM’s atape driver (Enhanced Tape and Medium Changer Device Driver) if you are using 3590
drives in your 3494.
On Solaris, you will need to install the lmcpd package, (IBM Automated Tape Library Daemon) to use the
silo. Again, if you are using 3590 drives, you will also need to install the IBMtape driver. Note that when
you are using IBMtape, there will be two sets of device files that will access a given tape drive. There will
be the standard Solaris style /dev/rmt/Xmbn type, and there will be the IBMtape supported files of the
type /dev/rmt/Xstbn. You should use the IBM supported device files for proper operation of you tape
drives.
NOTE: Legato cannot supply these IBM drivers. They may be available on an IBM Device Driver ftp site
(208.200.29.244), but this is just something we found, and is not necessarily a long-term IBM committed
site.
SEE ALSO
nsrjb(1m), jbconfig(1m), dasadmin(1m), libstlemass(1m), ssi(1m), mini_el(1m), libstlstk(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
Errors in communication between the NetWorker server and the IBM 3494 silo are difficult to diagnose.
The best method is to use the IBM supplied utility mtlib to verify that you have properly configured the
3494 to communicate with your host, and that the entire pathway from either the lmcp driver (on AIX) or
the lmcpd daemon (on Solaris) is functionong properly. If mtlib does not work, then there is no chance that
NetWorker will work.
If there are any questions about the connection between your host and the 3494, it is best to consult IBM, as
they support the connection between the the host and the silo. IBM supports both network and serial cable
connections to the silo. Since the nature of the connection is hidden from NetWorker by the driver/daemon,
there is no difference to NetWorker between the two. Customers have successfully used both.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
IELEM(1m)
IELEM(1m)
NAME
ielem − initialize element status
SYNOPSIS
ielem [ -a b.t.l ] [ -r eladdr.nel ]
DESCRIPTION
The ielem program sends an INITIALIZE ELEMENT STATUS command to the named device.
Some changers support the ability to initialise element status for a range of elements. The command used
for this is the Vendor Unique EXABYTE changer command:
INITIALIZE ELEMENT STATUS (with range)
(command opcode 0xE7).
OPTIONS
−a b.t.l Selects a specific ordinal SCSI address, where b is the logical SCSI bus, t is the SCSI target, and l
is the SCSI logical unit number (LUN) on that target. See libscsi(1m). This is a required option.
−r eladdr.nel
Specifies the range of elements, where eladdr is the starting decimal address (in the autochangers
numbering) of the element to start from, and nel is the number of elements of status to read. This
option can be used if your autochanger supports the Vendor Unique EXABYTE autochanger INITALIZE ELEMENT STATUS command.
SEE ALSO
libscsi(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
INQUIRE(1m)
INQUIRE(1m)
NAME
inquire - list devices available
SYNOPSIS
inquire [ -a b.t.l ] [ −l ] [ −N ndmp option ] [ −f filename ]
DESCRIPTION
The inquire program lists SCSI devices available. The inquire program returns INQUIRY data either for
the named SCSI device (with the -a option), or for all SCSI devices attached to the system.
OPTIONS
−a b.t.l Selects a specific ordinal SCSI address, where b is the logical SCSI bus, t is the SCSI target, and l
is the SCSI logical unit number (LUN) on that target. See libscsi(1m).
−f
Use with −N to provide a location to the configuration file of the NDMP Server. The config file
needs to be created by running the ndmpjbconf program before running the inquire program.
The default location for the NetWorker Server on Solaris is /usr/lib/nsr. This location can be
changed while running ndmpjbconf.
The filename argument should be the path of the NDMP jukebox config file such as
/usr/lib/nsr/ndmpjbconf_<ndmp hostname>
−l
Performs a complete LUN search for all SCSI adapters in the system. This argument is accepted
on all systems, but does not have any effect on HP-UX systems. Due to the method used to scan
for available devices on HP-UX systems, all accessible devices are always shown, and the −l
option has no additional effect. For all other systems, the normal behavior is to start checking at
LUN 0 for SCSI deivces. The first empty LUN found will end the search for a given target ID.
With the −l option, all LUNs present on all target IDs for all SCSI busses in the system will be
checked for devices. This can take a very long time and should therefore only be used when necessary. For example, a Fibre Channel adapter can support 126 target IDs, each of which may have
80 or more LUNs. Checking all LUNs on this single adapter may take over 10 minutes.
−N
For Solaris, performs an INQUIRY command to the NDMP Server with the provided NDMP
Server information in the default location /usr/lib/nsr/ndmpjbconf_<NDMP_hostname>. This
location can be set by the LGTO_NDMP_LIBSCSI_CONFIG_FILENAME environment variable
or by specifying −f <filename>. The ndmpjbconf program needs to be previously run to create
the above configuration file. If neither environment variable nor −f is provided, inquire will try to
get NDMP Server information from /usr/lib/nsr/ndmpjbconf file.
The ndmp option argument should be standard for devices on one of the Standard NDMP servers,
netapp for devices on an NetApp NDMP server, or celestra-hp for devices on a Celestra HP NDMP
server. However, celestra is still a valid option, for backward compatibility.
SEE ALSO
libscsi(1m)
LIMITATIONS
The inquire program always uses the built-in system drivers to test SCSI devices. The device type or path
name printed by the inquire program may be incorrect for devices that require special, third-party drivers.
The inquire program cannot retrieve device filenames for NDMP devices on an NDMP server. For a
NetApp Filer, information for all drives cannot be retrieved.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
JBCONFIG(1m)
JBCONFIG(1m)
NAME
jbconfig − jukebox resource configuration tool
SYNOPSIS
jbconfig [ −s server ] [ -l ]
DESCRIPTION
The jbconfig program provides an interactive script for configuring a jukebox (Media Autochanger Device)
for use with a NetWorker server. The script pauses periodically for you to enter a response to a prompt. If
you want to accept the default choice displayed in braces, press [RETURN] or [ENTER].
After the jukebox is configured, use the nsrcap(1m) command or the Registration window to enter the
enabler code for your Autochanger Software Module. You must have a separate enabler code for each jukebox you want to use with NetWorker.
OPTIONS
−s server
Specifies the controlling server, when jbconfig is being used from a storage node. To define a
jukebox resident on a storage node, the jbconfig command must be run on the storage node. See
nsr_storage_node(5) for additional information on storage nodes.
−l
Performs a complete LUN search for all SCSI adapters in the system when performing Autodetection. This argument is accepted on all systems, but does not have any effect on HP-UX systems.
Due to the method used to scan for available devices on HP-UX systems, all accessible devices are
always shown, and the −l option has no additional effect. On all other systems, the normal behavior is to start checking at LUN 0 for SCSI deivces. The first empty LUN found will end the search
for a given target ID. With the −l option, all LUNS present on all target IDs for all SCSI busses in
the system will be checked for jukeboxes. This can take a very long time and should therefore
only be used when necessary. For example, a Fibre Channel adapter can support 126 target IDs,
each of which may have 80 or more LUNs. Checking all LUNs on this single adapter may take
over 10 minutes.
CONFIGURATION DIALOG
The first question jbconfig will ask you, is to select a type of jukebox to install.
1) Install a SmartMedia Jukebox.
2) Install an Autodetected SCSI Jukebox.
3) Install an Autodetected NDMP SCSI Jukebox.
4) Install an SJI Jukebox.
5) Install an STL Silo.
What kind of Jukebox are you installing?
Enter the number corresponding to the jukebox type you are installing.
An Autodetected SCSI Jukebox is any SCSI (Small Computer System Interface) based jukebox
connected to a system that NetWorker can automatically detect.
Autodetected NDMP SCSI Jukebox is any SCSI (Small Computer System Interface) based jukebox connected directly to an NDMP Server, that NetWorker will automatically detect, with the
provided NDMP hostname, user-id, user-password, and jukebox handle. (See example).
An SJI Jukebox is a Standard Jukebox Interface compliant jukebox. This is a list of well known
SCSI based jukeboxes, plus any additional third party jukebox devices that adhere to this protocol
that the you may have added to the system.
If you select the second choice (Install an Autodetected SCSI Jukebox), jbconfig will print out a
list of jukeboxes it detects on the system.
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JBCONFIG(1m)
JBCONFIG(1m)
For example:
These are the SCSI Jukeboxes currently attached to your system:
1) scsidev@0.2.0: other, Vendor <AIWA>, Product <AL-17D>
2) scsidev@2.2.0: DLI Libra Series
3) scsidev@1.4.1: ARC-DiamondBack
Which one do you want to install?
When this message appears, enter the number corresponding to the jukebox that you wish to configure.
If you choose to install a Serial Jukebox, jbconfig will print a list of known Serial Jukeboxes and
ask which one you wish to select.
For example:
Enter the number corresponding to the type of jukebox you are installing:
1) Lago Datawheel (serial)
2) STK-9709/Odetics (serial)
3) ATL (serial)
Choice?
When this messages appears, you should enter the number corresponding to the jukebox that
you want to configure.
If you choose to install an SJI compliant jukebox, jbconfig will print a list of known SJI
Jukeboxes and will prompt you for the appropriate type that you want to configure.
For example:
Enter the number corresponding to the type of jukebox you are installing:
1) ADIC-1200c/ADIC-1200d
2) ADIC-VLS
3) ARC-DiamondBack
4) Breece Hill
5) DLI Libra Series
6) Quantum DLT/Digital DLT
7) EXB-10e/EXB-10h
8) EXB-10i
9) EXB-60
10) EXB-120
11) EXB-210
12) EXB-218
13) EXB-400 Series
14) HP-C1553A/Surestore 12000e
15) Metrum (SCSI)
16) Qualstar
17) Spectralogic
18) STK-9704/Lago 340
19) STK-9708/Lago 380 (SCSI) Datawheel
20) IBM 7331/IBM 9427
21) ATL/Odetics SCSI
22) HP-Optical 630MB/1.3GB
23) other
Choice?
When this message appears, enter the number corresponding to the appropriate model, for
example, if you are installing an HP optical jukebox select the number "22".
For all jukebox types, jbconfig prompts you for the name you want to call this jukebox. This
is a convenient way for you to identify the jukebox for yourself and NetWorker, for example,
NetWorker 6.1.1
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JBCONFIG(1m)
JBCONFIG(1m)
Engineering Autochanger. NetWorker will store this name as a NetWorker resource (see
nsr_resource(5)). When defining a jukebox attached to a storage node, jbconfig prefixes
the hostname of the storage node to the beginning of the names using the remote device syntax ("rd=hostname:"). See nsr_storage_node(5) for additional information on storage
nodes.
For all jukebox types, jbconfig prompts you for a description of this jukebox. This is
another convenient way for you to identify the jukebox for yourself, for example, Engineering 4 Drive DLT Autochanger on Rack #2.
For all jukebox types, jbconfig prompts you for the name of the control port associated with
the jukebox being configured. For Autodetected SCSI jukeboxes, the correct name is presented as the default choice, because autodetection involves determining the correct name.
The name is in the form of libscsi devices (see libscsi(1m)). For Serial jukeboxes, the
default name varies based on the appropriate serial line name used for the platform which
NetWorker is located (for example, /dev/ttya for SunOS or Solaris, or /dev/tty0 for AIX).
For SJI compliant jukeboxes, no default selection exists. The name you enter should either
be the device name for the device as described in any third party SJI compliant driver
installed, or the format used for autodetected jukeboxes. A list of attached autochangers can
be obtained by running the changers(1m) command.
Once a control port is entered, jbconfig will check to see if the model selected is a SCSI or
SJI based jukebox. If the jukebox model is a SCSI or SJI based jukebox, jbconfig will
attempt to query the jukebox about various internal parameters (for example, number of slots
and drives). If this query fails, it is possible that there is a device driver installation problem
or hardware problem. If the jukebox is a Serial jukebox, jbconfig attempts to establish serial
communications with it. If this fails, then there is either a setup problem or a hardware problem.
Next, if the jukebox contains tape devices you are asked if automated cleaning of devices in
the jukebox should be turned on. If automated cleaning is enabled, the jukebox and all
devices in the jukebox are configured for automated cleaning. If the jukebox is successfully
installed, the information that pertains to device cleaning from the jukebox and all devices in
the jukebox are displayed.
For each physical drive in the jukebox, jbconfig asks whether the drive will be shared by
more than one device path. These device paths would be located on various storage nodes
within a data zone, under the control of one NetWorker server. If the physical drive will be
shared, the user is asked to enter the hardware id of the drive, which uniquely identifies the
drive. See nsr_device(5) for a description of the hardware id attribute. After this prompt is
answered, the user is prompted to enter information about each device path that will share
the drive, which is described below.
Next, jbconfig asks for the hostname that owns the device path. This prompt allows the
devices within a jukebox to be controlled by more than one host. Note that all of the owning
hosts must be storage nodes within the same data zone, under the control of one NetWorker
server.
jbconfig then prompts you to enter the pathnames for all the media devices configured in the
jukebox. You must add an entry for each device. If the device has not been configured for
NetWorker, then you are prompted to enter the media device type.
If you select Autodetected SCSI jukeboxes, NetWorker determines the name of each media
device by sending inquiries for information to the jukebox. Not all jukeboxes support this
capability, but many do (for example, the Exabyte 210). This inquiry does not take place
when the owning host is different than where jbconfig is running.
jbconfig then asks whether the devices to be configured are Network Data Management Protocol (NDMP) devices. NDMP devices require a user name and password to be entered for
each device. The user name and password correspond to the entries set in the NDMP server.
NetWorker 6.1.1
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JBCONFIG(1m)
JBCONFIG(1m)
Finally, NetWorker asks you if the jukebox supports a bar code label reader, and if so,
whether NetWorker support for it should be turned on. If support for the bar code label
reader is turned on, then you are asked if the media volume labels should match the bar code
labels on the media. If you select this option, the label templates will not be used by the
jukebox, and each media volume must have a readable bar code label.
If the jukebox has been configured successfully you will see the following message:
Jukebox has been added successfully
JBCONFIG FILE
The file /nsr/jbconfig is the jukebox models configuration file. This file can be used to configure a nonstandard list of jukebox models.
VECTOR-TYPE MODEL-NAME<NEWLINE>, where VECTOR-TYPE is either SJI (the Standard
Jukebox Interface) or ATL (RS232-based devices speaking the IGM-ATL serial communications protocol).
The MODEL-NAME can be any string.
EXAMPLES
(User entries are in italics).
Example 1)
# jbconfig
1) Install a SmartMedia Jukebox.
2) Install an Autodetected SCSI Jukebox.
3) Install an Autodetected NDMP SCSI Jukebox.
4) Install an SJI Jukebox.
5) Install an STL Silo.
What kind of Jukebox are you installing? [2] <RETURN>
These are the SCSI Jukeboxes currently attached to your system:
1) scsidev@0.6.0: EXB-210
Which one do you want to install? 1<RETURN>
Installing an ’EXB-210’ jukebox.
Name you would like to assign to the jukebox device? Engineering<RETURN>
Pathname of the control port for the jukebox device? [scsidev@0.6.0] <RETURN>
Do you want automated device cleaning support enabled? (yes/no) yes<RETURN>
Will media drive 1 be shared by multiple device paths? (yes/no) no<RETURN>
Enter hostname that owns media drive 1: ? [host1] <RETURN>
Enter pathname of media drive 1: [/dev/rmt/0mbn]? <RETURN>
Should the drive be configured as a NDMP device? (yes/no) no<RETURN>
Will media drive 2 be shared by multiple device paths? (yes/no) no<RETURN>
Enter hostname that owns media drive 2: ? [host1] <RETURN>
Enter pathanme of media drive 2: [/dev/rmt/1mbn]? <RETURN>
Should the drive be configured as a NDMP device? (yes/no) no<RETURN>
Following are attributes that define cleaning cartridge support for the jukebox ’Engineering’:
auto clean: Yes
default cleanings: 12
cleaning slots: 1
Cleaning cartridge volumes
Slot number
------------------------------------
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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JBCONFIG(1m)
JBCONFIG(1m)
Cleaning Tape (12 uses left)
1
Make sure that the slots set aside for cleaning cartridges containing cleaning cartridges with the designated
number of usable cleanings left.
Following are attributes that define the cleaning schedule for each device in the jukebox.
name: /dev/rmt/0mbn
date last cleaned: Thu Apr 13 11:41:58 1995
cleaning interval: 2 weeks
cleaning required: No
name: /dev/rmt/1mbn
date last cleaned: Thu Apr 13 11:41:58 1995
cleaning interval: 2 weeks
cleaning required: No
Verify that the values for these attributes are appropriate for your installation. If not check documentation
on how to set up automated cleaning cartridge support.
Jukebox has been added successfully
Example 2)
Here is an example of a SmartMedia autoloader configured with NDMP devices on a storage node.
# jbconfig -s server
On a storage node, the hostname is a prefix to the jukebox name.
Enter the hostname to use as a prefix? [brown.legato.com] <RETURN>
using ’brown.legato.com’ as the hostname prefix
1) Install a SmartMedia Jukebox.
2) Install an Autodetected SCSI Jukebox.
3) Install an Autodetected NDMP SCSI Jukebox.
4) Install an SJI Jukebox.
5) Install an STL Silo.
What kind of Jukebox are you installing? [1] <RETURN>
Installing an SmartMedia jukebox.
Name you would like to assign to the SmartMedia jukebox? myautoloader<RETURN>
Name of host machine for SmartMedia server? [brown.legato.com] <RETURN>
Port number of SmartMedia server? [44444] <RETURN>
How many devices are to be configured (1 to 64)? [4] 2<RETURN>
Are devices NDMP devices? (yes/no) yes<RETURN>
Enter hostname that owns logical device 1: ? [brown.legato.com] <RETURN>
Enter name of logical device 1: ? stk1<RETURN>
Enter NDMP user name: ? root<RETURN>
Enter NDMP password (characters will not be echoed): password<RETURN>
Enter hostname that owns logical device 2: ? [brown.legato.com] <RETURN>
Enter name of logical device 2: ? stk2<RETURN>
Enter NDMP user name: ? root<RETURN>
Enter NDMP password (characters will not be echoed): password<RETURN>
Enter application name defined in SmartMedia for NetWorker? [NetWorker@server] <RETURN>
Enter application key defined in SmartMedia for NetWorker? [<none>] <RETURN>
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
5
JBCONFIG(1m)
JBCONFIG(1m)
The barcode reader is enabled and volume labels are set to match barcode labels.
Jukebox has been added successfully
Would you like to configure another jukebox? (yes/no) no<RETURN>
Example 3)
Here is an example of configuring a Celestra/Solaris NDMP jukebox.
# jbconfig
1) Install a SmartMedia Jukebox.
2) Install an Autodetected SCSI Jukebox.
3) Install an Autodetected NDMP SCSI Jukebox.
4) Install an SJI Jukebox.
5) Install an STL Silo.
What kind of Jukebox are you installing? 3<RETURN>
Enter NDMP Server name: ? amx<RETURN>
Enter NDMP user name: ? root<RETURN>
Enter NDMP password (characters will not be echoed): password<RETURN>
Enter NDMP jukebox handle: ? /dev/rsjb0<RETURN>
What is the NDMP type of ’amx’?
1) Celestra.
2) NetApp.
Choice? 1<RETURN>
Communicating to devices on NDMP Server ’amx’, this may take a while...
These are the SCSI Jukeboxes currently attached to your system:
1) scsidev@1024.0.0: Standard SCSI Jukebox, Vendor <HP>, Product <C7200-8000>
2) scsidev@1025.1.0: Standard SCSI Jukebox, Vendor <ADIC>, Product <Scalar DLT 448>
Which one do you want to install? 1<RETURN>
Installing an ’Standard SCSI Jukebox’ jukebox.
Name you would like to assign to the jukebox device? hp<RETURN>
Pathname of the control port for the jukebox device? [scsidev@1024.0.0] <RETURN>
Do you want automated device cleaning support enabled? (yes/no) yes<RETURN>
Will media drive 1 be shared by multiple device paths? (yes/no) no<RETURN>
Enter hostname that owns media drive 1: ? [boxster] amx<RETURN>
Enter pathname of media drive 1: ? /dev/rmt/0mbn<RETURN>
using ’rd=amx:/dev/rmt/0mbn’ as device name
Should the drive be configured as a NDMP device? (yes/no) yes<RETURN>
This media device has not been configured yet. Please select a media device type for
rd=amx:/dev/rmt/0mbn.
1) 3480
NetWorker 6.1.1
21) sdlt
October 15, 2001
6
JBCONFIG(1m)
JBCONFIG(1m)
2) 3570
22) tz85
3) 3590
23) tz86
4) 4890
24) tz87
5) 4mm
25) tz88
6) 4mm 4GB
26) tz89
7) 4mm 8GB
27) tzs20
8) 4mm 12GB
28) tkz90
9) 4mm 20GB
29) dst (NT)
10) 8mm
30) dst
11) 8mm 5GB
31) dtf
12) 8mm 20GB
32) himt
13) 8mm AIT
33) LTO Ultrium
14) 8mm AIT-2
34) qic
15) 8mm Mammoth-2
35) SD3
16) 9490
36) vhs
17) 9840
37) VXA-1
18) dlt
38) file
19) dlt7000
39) logical
20) dlt8000
40) optical
Choice? 20<RETURN>
Enter NDMP user name: ? root<RETURN>
Enter NDMP password (characters will not be echoed): password<RETURN>
Your jukebox has a bar code reader.
Do you want bar code reader support enabled? (yes/no) yes<RETURN>
Do you want volume labels to match bar code labels? (yes/no) no<RETURN>
Following are attributes that define cleaning cartridge support for the jukebox ‘hp’:
auto clean: Yes
default cleanings: 5
cleaning slots: 19
Cleaning cartridge volumes
Slot number
-----------------------------------19
Make sure that the slots set aside for cleaning cartridges contain cleaning cartridges. NetWorker must know
the number of times it can use each cleaning cartridge. You can control how many times NetWorker will
use each cleaning cartridge by using the command: nsrjb -U (number of uses) -S (slot number). For more
details please refer to nsrjb man pages.
Following are attributes that define the cleaning schedule for each device in the jukebox.
name: rd=amx:/dev/rmt/0mbn
date last cleaned:
cleaning interval: 2 weeks
cleaning required: No
Verify that the values for these attributes are appropriate for your installation. If not check documentation
on how to set up automated cleaning cartridge support.
Jukebox has been added successfully
Would you like to configure another jukebox? (yes/no) no<RETURN>
NetWorker 6.1.1
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JBCONFIG(1m)
JBCONFIG(1m)
SEE ALSO
jbexercise(1m), nsr_device(5), nsr_jukebox(5), nsr_storage_node(5), nsr(5), nsrcap(1m).
DIAGNOSTICS
unknown model invalid choice for ’model’ (35022)
Problem: The NetWorker system does not recognize the model chosen. If you added a
/nsr/jbconfig* file after starting the daemons, you will see this error. Solution: Restart NetWorker.
root on computer host is not on type:
NSR’s administrator list
Problem: The user ’root’ on the storage node ’host’ is not on the administrator list of the NetWorker server. Solution: Add such an entry to the NetWorker server’s administrator list. Note
that the entry can be removed after this command completes.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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JBEXERCISE(1m)
JBEXERCISE(1m)
NAME
jbexercise − NetWorker jukebox exerciser
SYNOPSIS
jbexercise −m model −c control_port [ −V vendor_type ] [ −CdsIv ] [ −D drive ] [ −S slot ]
DESCRIPTION
The jbexercise command tests the functionality of a jukebox. Before the command can be run, all contents
of the jukebox must be emptied except for media loaded in the first and last slots. These pieces of media
will be moved around the jukebox as part of the various tests performed by jbexercise.
There are two major tests of functionality: drives and slots. Normally both the drive and slot tests are run.
Individual component types can be tested by using the −d (for drives) and −s (for slots) options. In addition, specific components can be singled out in the −D and −S options. When these are options are given,
the only test run is on that particular component, i.e. if a specific slot is named the drives test is not run. For
drives, the logical address of the component should be given. For slots, the physical address should be
given.
Upon startup, the program queries the user for the non-rewinding pathnames of the drives, if any, found in
the configuration of the jukebox. This query is not performed if the user is using a jukebox which does not
require media to be ejected from a device, i.e. the device has automatic ejection capabilities.
The first test moves the media from the first slot to each of the drives. No operator intervention is required.
The second test loads the media from various slots to the first drive. The default is to test the media in the
first and last slots in the jukebox. If a specific slot is being tested, the operator must first load that slot with
media.
OPTIONS
−C
This makes jbexercise return the configuration of the jukebox. No tests are run.
−c
Specify the control port which is used to interface with the jukebox (e.g. 1.5.0 from scsidev@1.5.0
which could be found by issueing the ’inquire’ command).
−d
Only drives are tested.
−D
Only the specified drive is tested.
−I
Return only an inventory of the jukebox. No tests are run.
−m
Specify a jukebox model. (For a list of currently supported jukebox models run this command
without any arguments to print the usage string.)
−s
Only slots are tested.
−S
Only the specified slot is tested.
−v
Verbose mode. Print out more information.
−V
Specify a particular vendor id. This allows vendor to use the same driver for a number of jukebox
models.
SEE ALSO
nsrjb(1m), nsr_jukebox(5).
DIAGNOSTICS
Most diagnostic messages are specific to each type of jukebox. General messages include the following:
invalid <component> specified
An invalid id for the <component> was given. The id must be within the valid ranges of the jukebox configuration. <component> can be a drive, port or slot.
status incorrect, media present
There is media loaded in a component but the component status operation doesn’t indicate this.
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status incorrect, invalid slot location
The component status operation is giving the incorrect source slot of the loaded media.
no drives found!!!
No drives were listed in the configuration.
no slots found!!!
No slots were listed in the configuration.
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JBINFO(1m)
NAME
jbinfo − test the SJI Jukebox Interface SJIINQ command on HPUX
SYNOPSIS
jbinfo devname
DESCRIPTION
The jbinfo program tests the SJIINQ command on SJI compliant Jukeboxes This command prints information that identifies a Jukebox. If a Jukebox doesn’t support this feature, an appropriate error message will be
printed out. devname argument should be any device name that can be used to reach a SJI compliant Jukebox driven by the system. jbinfo is usually used to determine whether or not a newly created device file is
valid. The information reported by jbinfo can also be used to construct a new jbcap entry for the jukebox.
EXAMPLE
# jbinfo /dev/sjid1u1
Vendor: EXABYTE
Product: EXB-10E
Version: 1.5
Medium Transport Element Address: 11
Number of Medium Transport Element: 1
First Storage Element Address:
1
Number of Storage Elements:
10
First Import/Export Element Address: 0
Number of Import/Export Elements: 0
First Data Transfer Element Address: 0
Number of Data Transfer Elements: 1
SEE ALSO
libsji(1m)
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NAME
jbverify − check jukebox/device configurations in NetWorker.
SYNOPSIS
jbverify [ −a ] [ −d { −i|−u } ] [ −D devicename ]...
[ −f filename ] [ −F ] [ −h ] [ −H hostname ]...
[ −I Invoker ] [ −j ] [ −J JB name ]... [ −l ] [ −M ] [ −n ]
[ −N ] [ −P port ] [ −q ] [ −Q ] [ −r no. of retries ]
[ −R ] [ −S slot ] [ −s server ] [ −t ] [ −v ]... [ −Z ]
DESCRIPTION
jbverify verifies the devices defined in the NetWorker database, making sure that each one of them is configured properly by checking them for accessibility and usability. To do this, jbverify makes use of NetWorker processes and requires that the NetWorker server (nsrd) be running on the server machine, and the
NetWorker client (nsrexecd) be running on the client machines.
By default, jbverify checks all devices in the NetWorker database, but can be instructed to check only jukeboxes, only stand-alone drives or only local devices using the -j, -d and -l options respectively. Individual
jukeboxes and drives can also be checked for by using the -J and -D options. Devices belonging to specific
hosts can be checked using the -H option.
For jukeboxes, jbverify ensures proper configuration by loading a tape into each drive and unloading them,
without performing any write operations on the tape. The only exception to this is if the -t option is used,
explained below. A slot to be used for the test can be specified by using the -S option. If no slot is specified,
jbverify goes through all the slots defined as available to NetWorker and loads the first one available.
Apart from checking for accessibility and usability, jbverify can run a series of tests on tapes loaded into
the drives being tested by calling on NetWorker’s tapeexer program (see tapeexercise (1m)), when used
with the -t option.
Running tapeexercise involves writing to the tape to determine the tape drive’s usability, so when -t is specified, any volume which has a NetWorker label on it is immediately rejected as unusable and the next slot is
tried. If there are no non-NetWorker tapes in any of the slots, jbverify exits without doing any tests.
jbverify can be run on any storage node, and can be used to test any device on that storage node provided
the device has been configured in NetWorker. When run on the NetWorker server, it can be used to test any
device on the network which has been configured in NetWorker. For a storage node which is not a NetWorker server to be able to test devices other than its own, the nsrexecd on the target machine will have to
be started with the -s option with the invoking storage node as the argument, or have the invoking storage
node listed in the target machine’s ’servers’ file.
For example, if the NetWorker server is node NS, and there are two storage nodes Sto1 and Sto2: for Sto1
to test devices on Sto2, the nsrexecd on Sto2 should be started as "nsrexecd -s NS -s Sto1." Or the
servers/rservers file on Sto2 should have Sto1 listed as one of the valid servers.
SmartMedia devices are not tested by jbverify.
jbverify has extensive verbose messages built into it. In case of error in operation or inexplicable
behaviour, it is always helpful to use the -v options to diagnose the behaviour.
OPTIONS
−a
Tells jbverify to check all devices, even if they are disabled. By default, disabled devices are not
tested. This option is not supported at present.
−d
This option tells jbverify to check only stand-alone drives. No jukebox devices are tested.
−D
This option is used to test a specific drive. The drive name should exactly match the name specified in the NetWorker drive resource. Multiple drives can be specified by using the -D option multiple times. If a jukebox drive is specified using this option, it is treated as a stand-alone drive.
−f
Used to redirect jbverify’s output to a file. The argument is the file name to which the output is to
be redirected.
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−F
Reserved. This option is used internally by jbverify to indicate that this is a remotely forked jbverify.
−h
Show the help options.
−H
Tests the devices on the hostname mentioned. Use this option multiple times to test multiple hosts.
Any other option specified on the command-line along with -H will be propagated to the remote
host being tested, except for the -D and -J options. When -H is used, only devices belonging to that
host are tested and hence only those -D and -J options which specify devices belonging to that host
are propagated forward.
−i
Go into interactive mode. Used with -d for stand-alone devices. This option is useful when testing
stand-alone devices on the local machine. If a particular stand-alone device does not have a tape
loaded, the -i option prompts the user to load a tape or cancel the operation so that it can skip to
the next drive. The -l option has to be specified with the -i option. Cannot be used with jukeboxes.
−I
Reserved. Used internally by jbverify to specify the name of the invoking host machine to a
remote jbverify.
−j
Check jukebox devices only. jbverify checks only jukebox devices defined in the NetWorker
database. All other devices are ignored.
−J
This option is used to test a specific jukebox. The jukebox name should exactly match the name
specified in the NetWorker jukebox resource. Multiple jukeboxes can be specified by using the −J
option multiple times.
−l
Check local devices only.
−M
Reserved. Used internally by jbverify to indicate that it is being invoked by a NetWorker process.
Messages are sent to the NetWorker server instead of being echoed to the stdout.
−n
Perform tests in the no-op mode. Jbverify runs through the motions of testing the devices after
duly processing all given options but does not actually do the tests.
−N
For a remote jbverify, put nsrexec into the same verbose mode as the jbverify. Usually redundant,
but may be useful for debugging.
−P
Reserved. Used internally by the jbverify process to indicate to a remote jbverify the port number
on which the server is listening.
−q
Run both the local and the remote jbverify in the quiet mode.
−Q
Run only the remote jbverify in the quiet mode. The results of the remote jbverify operation can
still be seen in the final status report printed out by the local jbverify. If -v is used on the command-line with -Q, the local jbverify will run in the verbose mode while the remote jbverify runs
quietly. -q and -v are mutually exclusive. Specifying both will result in jbverify running in level 1
verbose mode.
−r
Number of retries on error. Chiefly used on load and unload errors. jbverify will retry the number
of times specified if there is an error in operation.
−S
Slot to be used for jukebox devices. The given slot will be used for loading tapes into jukebox
devices during the test. If multiple jukeboxes are to be tested, make sure that the same slot in each
of those jukeboxes has a valid tape. If -t is specified, the tape in the slot has to be a non-NetWorker
tape, else jbverify exits with an error.
−s
Name of NetWorker server being tested.
−t
Perform tapeexercise on tapes. see tapepexercise (1m) for details on tapeexercise. If -t is specified,
there has to be a non-NetWorker tape in one of the slots for the exercise to proceed. If -S is specified, the specified slot has to contain a non-NetWorker tape.
−u
Run in unattended mode. Similar to the -i option and used for stand-alone devices only. If any
device is not loaded with a tape, the -u option skips the device and goes on to the next one in the
list. Either -u or -i has to be specified with the -d option.
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−v
Run in verbose mode. Multiple -v options can be specified to increase the level of verbosity.
Higher the level, more verbose the output. Currently has a maximum of 5.
−Z
Reserved.
EXIT STATUS
The following are the error numbers with which jbverify could exit:
ENWTAPE (501) : Found NetWorker tape when trying to run
tapeexercise.
ELOADDETECT (502) : Unable to detect loaded state of a
device.
EMEMORY (503) : Out of memory.
ESRCEMPTY (504) : The source slot was empty.
EDSTFULL (505) : The destination drive was full.
EUNLOAD (506) : Error in unload.
EUNKNOWN (507) : Unexpected error.
ERDLABEL (508) : Error in read label operation.
ESPAWN (509)
: Error in spawn operation.
EREAP (510)
: Error in reaping tapeexercise
program.
ELOADED (511) : Drive already loaded.
ECONNECT (512) : Error in connect operation.
EBASICTEST(111) : Error in basic test in
tapeexercise.
EEOTTEST(222) : Error in EOT test in
tapeexercise.
EFSFTEST(333) : Error in FSF test in
tapeexercise.
EXAMPLES
Testing all devices without tapeexercise:
To test all stand-alone and jukebox devices, just run jbverify without any options:
jbverify
To test all devices with verbose messages, use the -v option the required number of times:
jbverify -v -v -v
Testing only stand-alone devices, in interactive
mode:
To test only stand-alone devices, use the -d option. -i sets the interactive mode:
jbverify -d -i -l
The -l option has to be specified when using the -i option since interactive mode is not supported
for remote devices.
Testing only jukebox devices:
To test only jukebox devices, use the -j option:
jbverify -j -v -v
Redirecting output to a file:
To redirect the output of jbverify to a file, use the -f option:
jbverify -j -f output.jbv −v −v −v
Testing remote hosts
To test all the jukebox devices on hosts A and B, use the -H option:
jbverify −H A −H B −j −f outputfile
This tests only the jukebox devices on both hosts A and B and redirects the output to outputfile.
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Running in quiet mode
To run jbverify in the quiet mode, use the −q option:
jbverify −q
This will result in only the final status report being printed. To run the local jbverify in the verbose
mode, but all remote operations quietly, use the −Q option:
jbverify -v -v -v -Q
This will result in verbose output for all local operations but none for the remote ones. The status
of the remote operations can be seen in the final status report.
Specifying no. of retries on load/unload operations:
To specify a certain no. of retries on errors, use the −r option:
jbverify −j −r 10 −S 12 −v
The above command makes jbverify use slot 12 of the jukebox for load and unload operations and
makes it retry 10 times on errors.
Running tapeexercise on tapes:
To run tapeexercise on tapes loaded into devices, use the −t option:
jbverify −j −S 12 −t −v
FILES
/nsr/res/nsr.res
The NetWorker resource database.
SEE ALSO
jbconfig(1m), jbexercise(1m), nsrjb(1m), nsr_device(1m), nsr_jukebox(5), nsr_storage_node(5),
tapeexercise(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
The following are the error messages that jbverify might produce along with their implications and possible
solutions.
Bad resource database file!
jbverify was unable to get the resource information about devices from the NetWorker RAP
database. Check if the NetWorker Server is up and running and if it is reachable from the current
host.
Basic Test in tape exercise failed!
The Basic Test in tapeexercise failed on the loaded tape. See tapeexercise (1m) for more details.
Can’t specify both -i and -u at the same time!
The -i and the -u options are mutually exclusive. Choose one of them and retry operation.
Cannot use slot for stand-alone devices! Ignoring...
The -S option is useful only for jukeboxes. This is just a warning that the option is being ignored.
Cannot run in interactive mode for remote devices
-- use -l!
The -i option is currently supported only for local devices. Specify -l to test only the local devices.
Could not connect to server! Quitting...
The remote jbverify could not connect to the main jbverify for some reason. Examine other error
messages to establish cause.
Could not establish server socket! Quitting...
jbverify could not open a socket to receive requests from remote jbverifys. Examine previous error
messages for exact cause of problem.
Could not extract control port info.
jbverify was unable to parse the jukebox resource information it obtained about a jukebox from the
RAP database. This might indicate a corruption of the RAP database in NetWorker. Check if you
can see the contents of the jukebox resource from the nwadmin GUI. Retry operation.
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Couldn’t find control port in JB definition!
jbverify was unable to parse the jukebox resource information it obtained about a jukebox from the
RAP database. This might indicate a corruption of the RAP database in NetWorker. Check if you
can see the contents of the jukebox resource from the nwadmin GUI. Retry operation.
Could not find enabled drive <name> in database!
A device was specified to be tested and jbverify could not find this device in the resource database
of NetWorker. The most common reason would be incorrectly specifying a device name. The
device name has to exactly match the name given in the NetWorker device resource, including the
"rd=..." prefix, if any.
Could not find jukebox <name> in database!
A jukebox was specified to be tested and jbverify could not find this jukebox in the resource
database of NetWorker. The most common reason would be incorrectly specifying a jukebox
name. The name has to exactly match the name given in the NetWorker jukebox resource, including the "rd=..." prefix, if any.
Could not get block size for this tape!
jbverify could not find the defined blocksize for this tape. A default of 32k is usually assumed.
EOT Test in tape exercise failed!
The EOT Test in tapeexercise failed on the loaded tape. See tapeexercise (1m) for more details.
Error in checkmedia operation on host <name>!
The remote jbverify reported an error in checking the status of the device. See earlier error messages for more information.
Error! Directory <name> doesn’t exist!
This message is printed when processing a disk file drive and the said directory does not exist.
Error in eject tape from drive <name>! Skipping...
There was a problem in ejecting the tape in the said drive. jbverify will skip testing this device and
continue on with the next in line.
Error in read label operation! Cannot proceed with test!
There was a problem while trying to read data off the loaded tape. Check previous error messages
to find the cause.
Error in resdb_query in getting device info.
jbverify was unable to get the resource information about devices from the NetWorker RAP
database. Check if the NetWorker Server is up and running and if it is reachable from the current
host.
Error in resdb_query in getting JB info.
jbverify was unable to get the resource information about jukeboxes from the NetWorker RAP
database. Check if the NetWorker Server is up and running and if it is reachable from the current
host.
Error in unload. Drive <num> (<name>), slot <num>
There was an error in the unload operation of the said drive. Check previous error messages for
possible cause and error no. Try operation again in a higher verbose mode.
Error in unloading jukebox drives: <name>
There was an error while trying to unload the said drive. Check other error messages for cause.
Error reported in eject tape from drive <name>! Device is
offline.
There was an error reported by the NetWorker process during the eject operation, but the tape
seems to have been ejected; jbverify will continue to unload the tape to its slot.
FSF Test in tape exercise failed!
The FSF Test in tapeexercise failed on the loaded tape. See tapeexercise (1m) for more details.
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Failed to create xdr stream!
This usually denotes lack of enough physical memory in the system. Check earlier error messages
for more information.
Failed to detect loaded volume on drive <name> even
after <num> tries. Giving up...
jbverify failed to detect a loaded tape drive after putting a tape into the drive. Sometimes this
might happen if the drive is slow and the delay is too little. Try the operation again with a high
number as the argument to the -r option or increase the load sleep attribute in the jukebox
resource.
Failed to get connection from remote jbverify!
errno: <num>
jbverify started a remote jbverify and is waiting for it to connect to it but has timed out without
getting a connection request. Examine other error messages to find the cause. One common cause
is that the machine you are running jbverify on does not have the permission to request execution
on the remote machine. To obtain permission, the nsrexecd on the remote machine has to be
started with "-s <local machine name>." See example in the main section of this man page for
more information.
Failed to get response for check media from remote
host <name>
jbverify failed to get response from the remote jbverify on a request for checking the status of a
device. This could be because the remote jbverify was killed or terminated abnormally, the remote
machine went down, or just network problems. Check if you can ping the machine and retry operation.
Failed to get stat packet!
jbverify failed to receive an expected status packet from the remote jbverify. This could be because
the remote jbverify was killed or terminated abnormally, the remote machine went down, or just
network problems. Check if you can ping the machine and retry operation.
Failed to read request packet from server!
A remote jbverify failed to receive a request packet from the main jbverify. This could be because
the main jbverify was killed or terminated abnormally, the machine went down, or just network
problems. Check if you can ping the machine and retry operation.
Failed to redirect output to <name>. Errno <num>
A system call failed. Run in verbose mode and contact support with error numbers and messages.
Failed to send FMEDIA on sock <num>! Errno <num>
jbverify failed to send a request to check device status to the remote jbverify. This could be
because the remote jbverify was killed or terminated abnormally, the remote machine went down,
or just network problems. Check if you can ping the machine and retry operation.
Failed to spawn tapeexer!
Failed to exec the NetWorker binary tapeexer. Check if the binary exists and if it has the adequate
permissions. Check other error messages for causes.
Failed to start nsrexec! errno: <num>
jbverify failed to start the nsrexec process on the local machine. Examine previous error messages
for exact cause. Some of the causes could be missing nsrexec binary, missing execute permissions,
corrupt file etc.
Failed to start remote jbverify on <host>! errno <num>
jbverify was unable to start jbverify on a remote machine. Check earlier messages for more information. Some of the causes could be that nsrexecd is not running on the remote machine, nsrexecd
is of a version prior to 6.1, you are running jbverify on a machine which is not the server and
which is not allowed to request execution on the remote machine. The last can be rectified by running the remote nsrexecd with "-s <server> -s <machine>" option where <server> is the
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NetWorker Server machine and <machine> is the machine on which you are running jbverify. See
explanation and example in the main section of this man-page for more details.
Have to specify -i or -u with -d option.
The -d option has to be specified with either the interactive (-i) or the unattended mode (-u).
Choose one of them and retry operation.
Invalid option specified: <option>.
An invalid option was specified. Use the -h option to get a list of valid options.
Malloc error
System is out of physical memory. jbverify failed to allocate the required memory for an operation. Exit some applications and retry the operation or increase the amount of memory on the
machine.
NetWorker tape (<label>) in the drive. Cannot proceed
with test!
The drive has a tape with the said NetWorker label on it. If jbverify is run with -t, it needs a tape
without a NetWorker label on it to successfully run the tapeexercise program on it. If there is no
non-NetWorker tape in any of the slots, place one into one of the slots and retry the operation.
No block size found for this device: <name>!
jbverify could not find a blocksize defined for this device in the NetWorker database. This usually
means that a default of 32k is assumed for this device.
No enabled stand alone devices found.
The current configuration has no stand-alone device defined. This is just an informational message.
No enabled jukeboxes found in database.
The current configuration has no jukeboxes defined. This is just an informational message.
No tape in slot <num>. Quitting...
If -S was specified and there is no tape in the specified slot, jbverify posts this message and quits.
Put a tape in the slot or specify another slot with a tape in it and retry operation.
Query resdb failed, err: <errmsg>.
A RAP query to the NetWorker database failed. Check if the NetWorker Server is up and running
and if it is reachable from the current host.
Ran out of slots to choose from! Quitting...
While trying to find a slot to use to load a tape into a jukebox device, jbverify has run out of slots
to try. If run with -t, jbverify needs to find a slot which has a tape without a NetWorker label on it
as it will not overwrite NetWorker tapes even if they are no longer in the media database.
Received invalid request from server:type: %d
jbverify received an unexpected request from the main jbverify. This could happen if the two
machines involved are running different versions of jbverify. Check and make sure that this is not
so. This could also mean memory corruption. Retry operation at verbose level 5 and if error persists, send log to customer support at Legato.
Received unknown packet from remote host <name>!
jbverify received an unexpected packet from the remote jbverify. This could mean memory corruption. Retry operation at verbose level 5 and if error persists, send log to customer support at
Legato.
SCO postion Test in tape exercise failed!
The SCO position Test in tapeexercise failed on the loaded tape. See tapeexercise (1m) for more
details.
Skipping disabled drive <name>
jbverify, at present, does not test drives disabled in NetWorker. In the future, the -a option may be
enabled to do so.
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Skipping to next drive in list...
After a load/unload error, jbverify is stopping the test of a drive and moving on to the next one in
its list.
Slot <slot num> has Networker tape.
The -t option was used and the slot from which the drive was loaded contained a NetWorker tape.
If the -S option was used, this is a fatal error. If not, jbverify will try other slots to see if it can find
a non-NetWorker tape.
Slot needs to be a valid number!
The slot specified with the -S option has to be a real number.
Source slot empty! <slot num>
The -S option was used but the specified slot did not contain a tape. Specify a slot which has a tape
in it. If the -t option is also being used, specify a slot with a non-NetWorker tape in it.
Tapeexer executable not found!
The tapeexer executable was not found. Check if it exists.
Tapeexer exited on signal <num>
The tapeexer process was killed by the given signal.
Tapeexer exited abnormally with exit code <num>
The tapeexer process exited abnormally with the given exit code.
Tapexercise on <name> exited without an exit status!
jbverify was unable to get the exit status of the tapeexer process. This is a very rare case and might
never happen unless the OS has a bug.
Unable to authenticate remote process!
jbverify was unable to authenticate a connection request from the remote process.
Unable to get JB name! Skipping to next...
jbverify was unable to find any name specified for the jukebox in the jukebox resource. Check the
jukebox resource for any corruption and restore the NetWorker resource directory if needed.
Unable to find any devices in jukebox!
jbverify was unable to find any devices configured for the jukebox. This is an error condition since
it is not usually possible to have an enabled jukebox in NetWorker with no defined devices. Check
NetWorker configuration and run jbverify again.
Unable to get device info for <name>
jbverify could not find any info for this device in the NetWorker database. Check that the name of
the device matches exactly with the name defined in the NetWorker resource, including the "rd=..."
prefix if it is a remote device/jukebox.
Unable to get JB name! Skipping to next...
jbverify was unable to parse the jukebox resource information it obtained about a jukebox from the
RAP database. This might indicate a corruption of the RAP database in NetWorker. Check if you
can see the contents of the jukebox resource from the nwadmin GUI. Retry operation.
Unable to load tape into drive <num> (<name>) as it seems
to be loaded!
The said drive contains a tape even though jbverify must have unloaded it before trying the load.
This might happen if the drives are not configured in the right order in the jukebox. Check if the
order of the drives is correctly configured in NetWorker.
Unable to to malloc for connlst! errno: <num>
System is out of physical memory. jbverify failed to allocate the required memory for an operation. Exit some applications and retry the operation or increase the anount of memory on the
machine.
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JBVERIFY(1m)
Unable to open <name>. Errno: <num>
jbverify was unable to open the filename specified with the -f option. Check if you have permissions.
Unable to proceed to test drive <no>(<name>) in
JB <name> as device is still loaded!
jbverify found the said drive to be loaded inspite of unloading it before accessing it. Check if any
other application is using this jukebox. Also check if the previous unload operation by jbverify failed
by looking at the error messages or by running in higher verbose mode.
Unable to unload drive <num> (<name>)! May not be
configured right!
jbverify was unable to unload the said drive. This might happen if the drives are not configured in
the right order in the jukebox. Check if the order of the drives is correctly configured in NetWorker.
Unknown state. Quitting...
jbverify cannot determine the status of a load. This might happen with corrupted memory. Try
operation again and contact support in case of failure.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
9
LDUNLD(1m)
LDUNLD(1m)
NAME
ldunld − load or unload a tape device
SYNOPSIS
ldunld { -u | -l } [ -a b.t.l ]
DESCRIPTION
The ldunld program sends a load or unload command to a specified device.
OPTIONS
-a b.t.l
Selects a specific ordinal SCSI address, where b is the logical SCSI bus, t is the SCSI target, and l
is the SCSI logical unit number (LUN) on that target (see libscsi(1m)). This is a required option.
-u
Unloads media from the specified device.
-l
Loads media to the specified device.
SEE ALSO
libscsi(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
LGTOLIC(1m)
LGTOLIC(1m)
NAME
lgtolic − Legato license utility command
SYNOPSIS
lgtolic [ −s server ] −c enabler_code
lgtolic −i [ −m hostfile_dir ]
lgtolic [ −s server ] −l
lgtolic [ −s server ] −r [ −m hostfile_dir ] [ −f output_file ]
lgtolic [ −s server ] −u enabler_code −a authorization_code
lgtolic [ −s server ] −v enabler_code
DESCRIPTION
The lgtolic command is used to manipulate Legato licenses that are stored within a license resource
database. The license resource database is administered by a Legato license daemon. For a description of
the license daemon, see lgtolmd(1m).
OPTIONS
−a authorization_code
Authorizes a license with the specified authorization code, making the license permanent. Specify
the license to be authorized by using the −u option and the −a option. To obtain authorization
codes for this product via the World Wide Web, simply point your web browser to
license.legato.com. You will be asked to enter the enabler code for each authorization code that
you request. For more details on product licensing, including other methods to obtain authorization codes, refer to the product Installation and Administration Guide and the latest Release Supplement.
−c enabler_code
Creates the license indicated by the specified enabler code. Enabler codes are listed on enabler
certificates provided to you when you purchased this product. An authorization code is required to
make each license permanent.
−f output_file
Captures customer registration data into the specified output_file. Once this text file is created,
forward it to Legato customer support to register your product. If the −f output_file option is not
specified, the −r option encapsulates customer registration information into a file named register.txt.
Note: This option can only be used in conjunction with the −r option.
−i
Prints out the hostid of the machine on which this command is running.
−l
Lists all of the Legato product licenses currently stored within the license resource database.
−m hostfile_dir
Specifies the directory where the hostids file resides. If this option is specified, the program will
use the list of hostid(s) in the hostids file that resides in this directory to generate a composite
hostid. This option is useful if the licensing manager is installed on a cluster machine or to force
the hostid to be IP address-based instead of machine security ID-based on an NT machine. For
NetWorker, the typical directory for the hostids file is /nsr/res. For a stand-alone licensing manager running on a machine that does not have the NetWorker server installed, the typical path is
/nsr/lic/res. The format for the list of hostids in a hostids file is: hostid1:hostid2:hostid3 where
hostid is a hexadecimal string. This option must be used to specify a hostid file.
−r
Creates or modifies customer registration data stored within the license resource database. The −f
option captures this customer registration data into a text file.
−s server
Specifies the hostname, RPC program number, and version for the license daemon whose database
you are targeting. License daemon information is displayed in the following format:
< hostname >:< rpc_number >:< version >
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LGTOLIC(1m)
LGTOLIC(1m)
Note: If you do not specify the −s server option, lgtolic uses the default values that map to the
daemon used by the product shipped. The current default for the hostname is localhost, the default
for the RPC program number is 390115, and the default for the RPC version number is 2. You can
also use environment variables to change these three defaults. LMD_HOSTNAME changes the
default hostname of the machine where the license daemon is running. LMD_PROGNUM
changes the default RPC program number for connecting to the license daemon. You should never
have to use this. LMD_VERSION changes the default RPC version number for connecting to the
license daemon. The following example uses default hostname and RPC program number, but
uses RPC version number 1 to list all licenses.
Example: lgtolic -s "::1" -l
To specify a license daemon located on an alternative machine, use the −s < hostname > option.
−u enabler_code
Updates an installed base license with the given base enabler specified at the command line.
−v enabler_code
Deciphers the specified enabler code. The generated output includes information about the license
name, type, serial number, and count.
NOTES
The daemon information provided by the −s option can also be obtained by using the following environment variables:
LMD_HOSTNAME, The name of the host for the license daemon
LMD_PROGNUM, The program number for the license daemon
LMD_VERSION, The version number for the license daemon
DIAGNOSTICS
Program not registered
lgtolmd is not running.
Unknown host
Either the default hostname is invalid or the hostname specified with the −s option is invalid.
SEE ALSO
lgtolmd(1m)
NetWorker Recovery Manager 6.1.1.Build.238
October 15, 2001
2
LGTOLMD(1m)
LGTOLMD(1m)
NAME
lgtolmd − Legato license daemon
SYNOPSIS
lgtolmd −p product −n version
DESCRIPTION
The lgtolmd daemon is an RPC-based licensing service. This service allows applications to store and
manipulate license data. The RPC program number provided by lgtolmd is 390115. To support multiple
instances of the protocol, the version number is unique to each application. The required parameters are
determined by each product’s installation script.
OPTIONS
−p product
Specify the product that will be interfacing with the license daemon. The currently supported
products are gems (for GEMS default install directory /gems) and opt/SmartMedia (for SmartMedia default install directory /opt/SmartMedia) on UNIX platforms. For NetWorker, nsr/lic (for
NetWorker default install directory /nsr) on UNIX platforms.
−n version
Specify the version number. Some products use a unique version number. Currently, SmartMedia
uses version 2 and GEMS Storage Reporter uses version 3. Both GEMS and NetWorker use version 1. The future plan is to have all Legato products use the same license manager, that is, version number 1.
FILES
/[product]/res/lgtolm.res
Attributes describing the license daemon’s license resources. This file should not be manually
removed or modified in any way.
/[product]/res/lictype.res
For internal use only. This file should not be manually removed or modified in any way.
/[product]/logs/lgtolmd.log
Log file for diagnostic and informational messages on the license daemon. For example, if a
license has expired, this information will be printed to this log as well as to the console.
SEE ALSO
lgtolic(1m)
NetWorker Recovery Manager 6.1.1.Build.238
October 15, 2001
1
LIBSCSI(1m)
LIBSCSI(1m)
NAME
libscsi − SCSI device library
DESCRIPTION
The SCSI device library is a private set of interfaces that NetWorker uses to communicate with SCSI
devices.
Important: SCSI devices are named independently of the platform.
There are several functions in this library. The name of a SCSI device is identified as a combination of bus,
target, and logical unit number (LUN) (b.t.l), where b is the logical scsi bus, t is the SCSI target, and l is the
SCSI LUN on that target. Do not assume that a logical SCSI bus number is related to any specific platform
or hardware bus number. Rather, a logical SCSI bus number is a dense positive integer address space that is
consistent as long as the hardware configuration of the system remains the same. Target and LUN information is based upon the attached SCSI peripheral devices and their settings. Some platforms enable dynamic
addition and removal of SCSI devices, but may require flushing of cached device information (see lrescan(1m)).
PERMISSIONS
Typically, if a device has no system driver, system privileges are not required for users to send commands
to this device. If a device has a system driver (for example, a tape drive), then system privileges are required
in order to send a command to these devices.
SEE ALSO
lrescan(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
LIBSJI(1m)
LIBSJI(1m)
NAME
libsji − Standard Jukebox Interface (SJI) Library
DESCRIPTION
The Standard Jukebox Interface (SJI) is a public set of interfaces that NetWorker uses to communicate with
jukeboxes. Generally the function of this library is to convert SJI commands, as formed by NetWorker, to
the appropriate SCSI commands (since most autochangers are SCSI based). But the underlying attachment
to the jukebox is irrelevant to the functioning of this interface.
There are three entry points into this library:
void * sji_open ( char * devname )
This opens a channel to an SJI compliant jukebox, named devname. A channel token, of type void
* is returned if the channel is opened successfully, otherwise a channel token of type NULL is
returned. The device name devame can be a specific ordinal SCSI address, for example,
scsidev@b.t.l, where b is the logical scsi bus, t is the SCSI target, and l is the SCSI logical unit
number (LUN) on that target. For platforms that do not use Legato device drivers, the device
name can also be a platform-specific style device name, for example, /dev/sjid1u1.
int sji_cmd ( void *token, int cmd, void *arg )
This sends an SJI command to the device opened by the sji_open command.
void sji_close ( void *token )
This closes a channel to the device opened by the call made to the sji_open command.
FILES
The location of the SJI library varies from platform to platform.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
EMASS_silo_files(8)
EMASS_silo_files(8)
NAME
dasadmin − ADIC/EMASS/Grau silo administrative utility
libstlemass − shared library for communication to
ADIC/EMASS/Grau silo
SYNOPSIS
dasadmin command [options] [parameters]
dasadmin.exe command [options] [parameters]
libstlemass.so (Solaris)
libstlemass.so.a (AIX)
libstlemass.sl (HPUX)
libstlemass.so.1 (SGI)
libstlemass.so (DECAXP)
libstlemass.dll (NT i386)
(NT only)
DESCRIPTION
dasadmin
This is not a complete listing of all possible dasadmin commands, but does include those commands that
are of use with NetWorker. For a complete discussion, please see the DAS Installation and Administration
guide provided by ADIC, EMASS or Grau.
mo[unt] [ −t type ] volser [ drive-name ]
mounts the tape with the barcode label of volser into either the first available drive (if drive-name
is not specified) or into the drive specicified by drive-name If the tape is not the type defined by
DAS_MEDIUM or ACI_MEDIA_TYPE , you can use the −t type option to get the tape
mounted. If the type of the tape and the defined type for the drive do not match, the silo will not
load the tape. Note that the drive you are attempting to use must be allocated for your use before
you can mount or dismount tapes. See listd and allocd below.
dism[ount] [ −t type ] volser | −d drive-name
dismounts the tape that is either specified by volser or whatever is in the drive specified by drivename. If the tape or drive are of a different type than your default, use the −t type parameter. As
with mount, you must have the drive allocated to you to use this command.
ej[ect] [ −c ] [ −t type ] volser-range area-name
ejects one or more tapes to the specified eject area. As with other commands, if the type of the
tape you are ejecting is different from that defined by DAS_MEDIUMorACI_MEDIA_TYPE,
you will need the −t type option. The −c specifies a ’complete’ ejection for the specified volsers.
A complete ejection removes the entry for that volser from the silo controller’s internal database.
A NON-complete ejection will eject the tape, but the volser’s entry in the database will remain,
and the volser’s state will be set to ’ejected’. This is useful if you anticipate replacing the tape
into the silo soon.
in[sert] area-name
Moves all tapes that are currently in the specified insert area-name from the insert area to the
normal storage locations for tapes.
inventory
Starts a full inventory of the silo. USE WITH CAUTION! An inventory of this sort can take a
very long time! An inventory of our silo with 180 slots takes over 20 minutes.
view [ −t type ] volser
Will display the current status of volser. This will show the volser, type, attribute and coordinate.
all[ocd] drive-name UP|DOWN clientname
allocd is used to allocate and deallocate drives for different clients. Before you can use a tape
drive, the drive must be allocd’ed UP for your system. If it is currently allocd’ed UP for a
different client, if must first be allocd’ed DOWN for that client before being allocd’ed UP for
your system. You cannot allocd DOWN a drive that has a tape in it. The tape must be
dismounted first.
l[ist]d
listdorld will show the current state of all the tape drives defined in the silo. The information
presented will include the drive-name, the amu drive (the location in the silo), status (UP or
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
EMASS_silo_files(8)
EMASS_silo_files(8)
DOWN), type, client the drive is allocated to, and the volser of any loaded tape.
show −op | −ac client-name
Shows the operational or access parameters for the specified client-name. You must include
either −ac if you wish to see access parameters, or −op if you wish to see operational parameters
for the client-name. Access parameters include volser ranges and drive ranges that the clientname is allowed to use. Operational parameters include whether the client-name has complete
access, dismount priviledges along with the IP address entered for client-name
list client-name
Lists any outstanding requests that have been made by client-name. If there are any, they are
shown, along with the request number and type.
can[cel] request-id
Allows you to cancel an outstanding request, assuming that you have the necessary priviledges.
Use the request-id that was shown by the list command.
qversion
This shows the version of the DAS server that you are connected to and the version of the ACI
protocol you are using to talk to DAS over.
qvolsrange beginvolser endvolser count [ clientname ]
qvolsrange is the way to obtain a list of the volsers that are available in the silo. beginvolser and
endvolser are volsers of the form "123456". To use the first available or the last available, you
can use "". count specifies the maimum number of volsers you wish to see.
ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
These environment variables affect the operation of the silo, and since the processes that are using them
include both commands the user will enter and processes that are spawned from nsrd, they need to be
set in a location where they will be in place when nsrd is started. The three DAS_ variables are used by
libstlemass, while dasadmin uses ACI_MEDIA_TYPE instead of DAS_MEDIUM
For Solaris, the definitions should be placed in /etc/rc.2/S95networker.
For AIX, the definitions should be placed in /etc/rc.nsr.
For HPUX, the definitions should be placed in /sbin/rc2.d/S900networker.
DAS_SERVER
This is either the network name of the IP address of the system that is running DAS. For a single silo,
this will usually be the silo controller system. In larger installations, there will probably be only one
DAS server for the whole network. It is case sensitive.
DAS_CLIENT
This is the network name of the system that NetWorker is running on. It is case-sensitive.
DAS_MEDIUM
This variable is used by libstlemass. It should be the same as ACI_MEDIA_TYPE.
This is the type of tape drive you are connected to. If this is not specified, the default value of DLT will
be used. Acceptable values are:
3480, 3590, OPTICAL_THICK, OPTICAL_THIN, DECDLT, DLT, 8MM, 4MM, D2, VHS, CD,
TRAVAN and DTF
ACI_MEDIA_TYPE
This variable is used by dasadmin. It should be the same as DAS_MEDIUM
This is the type of tape drive you are connected to. If this is not specified, the default value of DLT will
be used. Acceptable values are the same as those listed under DAS_MEDIUM.
EXAMPLES
NOTE on ranges:
dasadmin will accept volser ranges for some commands. There are three acceptable variations for these
ranges:
single volser: "000635"
multiple volsers: "000635, 000789, 098732"
true range: "000610 - 000745"
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
EMASS_silo_files(8)
EMASS_silo_files(8)
NOTE on area-name and drive-name:
area-names usually consist of a letter and 2 digits. The letter corresponds to whether you are referring to
an insert area ("I") or an eject area ("E"). You will need to get the correct values from your silo
administrator before using them.
drive-names are essentially free-form labels concocted by whomever installed the silo. They may or may
not have any relevance to physical reality, so you will need to see the silo admin to get the correct names.
If the silo admin is not available, you can get the same information using dasadmin listd along with
dasadmin show −op client-name followed by dasadmin show −ac client-name commands.
To setup the environment variables necessary for silo operations:
setenv DAS_SERVER emask
setenv DAS_CLIENT aurora
setenv DAS_MEDIUM DLT
setenv ACI_MEDIA_TYPE DECDLT
To see a listing of all volsers available in the silo:
dasadmin qvolsrange "" "" 10000
To see the current status of the drives in the silo:
dasadmin listd
To change the allocation of a drive from client a4 to client aurora:
dasadmin allocd DLT1 DOWN a4
dasadmin allocd DLT1 UP aurora
SEE ALSO
nsrjb(1m), jbconfig(1m), libstlstk(1m), mini_el(1m), ssi(1m), libstlibm(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
The only available diagnostic information is error messages that may be printed out by dasadmin and
libstlemass in the course of normal operations.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
3
IBM_silo(8)
IBM_silo(8)
NAME
libstlibm − shared library for communication to IBM 3494 silos
SYNOPSIS
libstlibm.so (Solaris)
libstlibm.so.a (AIX)
DESCRIPTION
libstlibm.xxx is a shared library that handles the communication between nsrjb and the IBM silo driver
(on AIX) or daemon (on Solaris). The IBM driver/daemon then handles the communication over the
network to the silo. There are no options, parameters or environment variables that affect the operation of
libstlibm. The correct path to this file should be entered when an IBM silo is configured using jbconfig.
The default values specified by jbconfig match the default locations chosen for the installation program,
and in most cases can be accepted.
For NetWorker to work with the 3494, you must have first installed IBM’s Automated Tape Library
support.
On AIX, this will install a driver called atldd (Automated Tape Library Device Driver). You may also
require IBM’s atape driver (Enhanced Tape and Medium Changer Device Driver) if you are using 3590
drives in your 3494.
On Solaris, you will need to install the lmcpd package, (IBM Automated Tape Library Daemon) to use the
silo. Again, if you are using 3590 drives, you will also need to install the IBMtape driver. Note that when
you are using IBMtape, there will be two sets of device files that will access a given tape drive. There will
be the standard Solaris style /dev/rmt/Xmbn type, and there will be the IBMtape supported files of the
type /dev/rmt/Xstbn. You should use the IBM supported device files for proper operation of you tape
drives.
NOTE: Legato cannot supply these IBM drivers. They may be available on an IBM Device Driver ftp site
(208.200.29.244), but this is just something we found, and is not necessarily a long-term IBM committed
site.
SEE ALSO
nsrjb(1m), jbconfig(1m), dasadmin(1m), libstlemass(1m), ssi(1m), mini_el(1m), libstlstk(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
Errors in communication between the NetWorker server and the IBM 3494 silo are difficult to diagnose.
The best method is to use the IBM supplied utility mtlib to verify that you have properly configured the
3494 to communicate with your host, and that the entire pathway from either the lmcp driver (on AIX) or
the lmcpd daemon (on Solaris) is functionong properly. If mtlib does not work, then there is no chance that
NetWorker will work.
If there are any questions about the connection between your host and the 3494, it is best to consult IBM, as
they support the connection between the the host and the silo. IBM supports both network and serial cable
connections to the silo. Since the nature of the connection is hidden from NetWorker by the driver/daemon,
there is no difference to NetWorker between the two. Customers have successfully used both.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
libstlstk(8)
libstlstk(8)
NAME
ssi − StorageTek silo interface module (Unix only)
mini_el − event logger for use with ssi (Unix only)
libstlstk − shared library for communication to ssi
SYNOPSIS
ssi
[ ACSLS server ] [ socket ] [ retry count ] &
mini_el [ −l logfile ] [ −d ] [ −h ] &
libstlstk.so (Solaris)
libstlstk.so.a (AIX)
libstlstk.sl (HPUX)
libstlstk.so.1 (SGI)
libstlstk.so.1 (DYNIX/ptx)
libstlstk.so (DECAXP)
libstlstk.dll (NT i386)
DESCRIPTION
NOTE: in this document, the term "ACSLS server" will be used to indicate the name of the system that is
running any one of StorageTek’s library manager programs: ACSLS on a Solaris or AIX host, Library
Station on an MVS host, or Horizon Library Manager on a system running Windows NT or Windows 2000.
(Unix only)
The ssi command is used indirectly by nsrjb to communicate with an ACSLS server. nsrjb loads libstlstk
, which handles the TCP calls to and from ssi. ssi then handles all of communication to and from the
ACSLS server. Starting with ACSLS version 5.3, it is possible to run NetWorker (either a server or a
storage node) on the same host that ACSLS is running on.
ssi and mini_el must be running on the system on which jbconfig was run to create the jukebox resource.
ssi and mini_el are almost always run as background processes, and are usually started automatically by the
system.
In addition to ssi and mini_el , a shared library file (usually called libstlstk.xxx where xxx is an operating
system dependent extension) is also required. An appropriate version of this library is installed as part of
NetWorker.
New in version 1.06 of ssi:
ssi now supports communication to more than one ACSLS server at any given time. Previous versions of
ssi were limited to a fixed TCP port for communication with NetWorker, and hence were limited to having
only one instance running at a time. In version 1.06, ssi and libstlstk have an added private communication
channel that lets libstlstk ask any of the running ssi instances which ACSLS server it is connecting to, and
to select the proper ssi for the current NetWorker silo. To make it easier to set up a configuration with the
possibilility of many ssi processes running, the command line for ssi has changed.
While you can still start ssi the same way as before - using the environment variable CSI_HOSTNAME to
select the ACSLS server to connect to - you can also simply specify the ACSLS server hostname on the
command line. You may also specify the port number used for communication between NetWorker and
that particular instance of ssi. The allowed values for this port number are 50004 (for the first instance),
50011 to 50019, and 50021 to 50099. Note that if you specify a port number that is already being used by
an instance of ssi, the specified port cannot be used, and the next available port in the allowed range will be
selected. If the port number is not specified, each successive instance of ssi will take the next available port
starting from 50004 and going upwards. If there are no available ports in the range, ssi will fail to load and
should display an error message. Note that specifying the port number is not necessary for normal
operation. You do not need to insure that a given ACSLS server is always accessed over a given port.
NetWorker and ssi use the name of the ACSLS server to establish a connection on the fly.
If there is not a hostname specified on the ssi command line, before ssi is started, one environment variable
MUST be set: CSI_HOSTNAME must be set to the name of the library server. If this variable is not
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libstlstk(8)
found, ssi will exit with an error message.
mini_el is an event logger used by ssi to maintain a log of certain events. It should be started before ssi.
Multiple instances of ssi will share a single instance of mini_el. A header consisting of the ACSLS server
name and the local TCP port that ssi will be listening on is included at the start of any message placed into
the log by any instance of ssi
(NT only)
On NT, the software equivalent to ssi and mini_el must be obtained from StorageTek as their product
"Library Attach for NT". This package must be installed prior to configuring a Silo in NetWorker.
NOTE: Library Attach version 1.1 includes a portmapper function that will only install properly if the
NetWorker services are not running. You should use Control Panel to stop the "NetWorker Backup and
Recover Server" and the "NetWorker Remote Exec Service" before installing Library Attach. After Library
Attach is installed, you should use Control Panel to start "NetWorker Remote Exec Service" and
"NetWorker Backup and Recover Server".
NOTE: Since Legato does not supply "Library Attach for NT", we are unable to add the multiple ACSLS
host functionality to our NT version of NetWorker.
(All platforms)
libstlstk.xxx is a shared library that handles the communication between nsrjb and ssi or Library Attach.
ssi or Library Attach then handles the communication over the network to the library server (either ACSLS,
Library Station or Horizon Library Manager). There are no options, parameters or environment variables
that affect the operation of libstlstk. The correct path to this file should be entered when an STK silo is
configured using jbconfig. The default values specified by jbconfig match the default locations chosen for
the installation program, and in most cases can be accepted.
OPTIONS
mini_el
−l
logfile Specifies the filename of the logfile to be created by mini_el. The default value is
/nsr/logs/ssi_event.log. If present, logfile must be the complete path to the logfile. If the file does
not exist, it will be created. If the file does exist, it will be appended to. If there is not a −l
parameter, the default logfile /nsr/logs/ssi_event.log will be used
−d
Sets the debug flag. mini_el will output debug information
−h
Displays usage information for mini_el
PARAMETERS
ssi
ACSLS server is required if the CSI_HOSTNAME environment variable has not been set to the name of
the system running ACSLS, LibraryStation or Horizon.
socket is only required if you need to specify the socket used for communication between NetWorker and
ssi
retry count is only required if you need to increase the retry count for communication between ssi and the
ACSLS server due to network problems.
These parameters are not position sensitive. The command line code in ssi uses the value of the parameter
to decide which of the three acceptable parameters any given command line parameter actually is:
If the input parameter evaluates to zero using the atoi function, then it is assumed to be the ACSLS
server name. Only the first parameter that evaluates to zero will be used as the server hostname.
If the parameter evaluates to a number between 50004 and 50100, then it is assumed to be the socket
value to be used. All parameters that fit this case will be saved as the socket value, so the last
matching parameter on the command line will be the one actually used.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
libstlstk(8)
libstlstk(8)
If a parameter evaluates to a number between 1 and 500, then it is assumed to be the retry count. As
with the socket parameter, the last matching parameter on the command line wins.
Any parameter that falls outside of these cases will simply be ignored.
ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
ssi
CSI_HOSTNAME (text, up to 256 chars, there is no
default)
If an ACSLS server name is not found on the command line, ssi will use the hostname specified by
this variable. It is limited to 256 characters, and should simply be the hostname running the
library server program that you are trying to connect to. If neither the command line hostname nor
this environment variable specify a hostname for ssi to use, ssi will exit with an error message.
SSI_HOSTNAME (text, up to 256 chars, there is no
default)
This variable is intended for use on multi-homed systems. Normally, ssi uses the gethostbyname
system function to determine the name to use for this side of the connection to the ACSLS server.
On a system with several network interfaces, the name supplied by that function may not result in
the use of the network interface needed to communicate with the ACSLS server. On these
systems, you can explicitly specify the exact name of the network interface that ssi will use to
connect to the ACSLS server. This variable needs to be set before ssi is started, and may be
different for various instances of ssi In all cases, a message will be logged in the event log stating
if this environment variable was found, and if not, that ssi will be using the hostname returned by
gethostbyname. This is not an error message.
SSI_BASE_SOCKET (numeric, 0 < x < 64k, no default)
If you need to restrict the socket values that ssi communicates on, this variable specifies the
starting number for ssi to use when it needs to open a socket to talk to the ACSLS server. It
appears that ssi will only open two sockets if this variable is set. The first, at
SSI_BASE_SOCKET will be used to connect to any host. The second, at SSI_BASE_SOCKET
+ 1, will be used for direct communication to the ACSLS server. Note that there will still be the
default sockets at 50001 and 50004 used to communicate between mini_el and ssi, but any
communication between this host and the ACSLS server should occur using the two sockets
starting at SSI_BASE_SOCKET.
TIME_FORMAT (time format string,
default = "%m-%d-%y %H:%M:%S")
If you wish to see time values printed in a format other than the default of Month-Day-Year
Hour:Minute:Seconds, use this variable.
%m is replaced by the current month
%d is replaced by today’s date
%y is replaced by the current year
%H is replaced by the current hour
%M is replaced by the current minute
%S is replaced by the current second
CSI_CONNECT_AGETIME (seconds, 0 < x < 31536000,
default = 600)
This will set the number of seconds for network connect aging purposes.
CSI_RETRY_TIMEOUT (seconds, 0 < x < ??, default = 4)
This will set how long ssi will wait before retrying a network request.
CSI_RETRY_TRIES (numeric, 0 < x < 100, default = 5)
This will set the number of times ssi will retry a network message before reporting an error.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
3
libstlstk(8)
libstlstk(8)
CSI_TCP_RPCSERVICE (boolean, default is TRUE)
This sets whether ssi will use TCP sockets to connect with the library server.
CSI_UDP_RPCSERVICE (boolean, default is FALSE)
This sets whether ssi will use UDP sockets to connect with the library server. Setting
CSI_UDP_RPCSERVICE to TRUE will allow ssi to communicate with a csi that is running on
the same system
EXAMPLES
Normal STK silo setup:
mini_el &
ssi acsls1 &
− or −
mini_el &
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls1
ssi &
Connect to 3 different ACSLS servers:
mini_el &
ssi acsls1 &
ssi acsls2 &
ssi acsls3 &
− or −
mini_el &
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls1
ssi &
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls2
ssi &
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls3
ssi &
Connect to 3 different ACSLS servers over 3 different
network interfaces:
mini_el &
setenv SSI_HOSTNAME myhost_on_net1
ssi acsls1 &
setenv SSI_HOSTNAME myhost_on_net2
ssi acsls2 &
setenv SSI_HOSTNAME myhost_on_net3
ssi acsls3 &
Connect to ACSLS server on socket 50025
mini_el &
ssi acsls1 50025 &
− or −
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls1
mini_el &
ssi 50025 &
To have mini_el use /nsr/logs/ssi.log.today as its log file
mini_el -l /nsr/logs/ssi.log.today &
ssi acsls1 &
FILES
/nsr/logs/ssi_event.log
default logfile created/appended to by mini_el
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
4
libstlstk(8)
libstlstk(8)
SEE ALSO
nsrjb(1m), jbconfig(1m), dasadmin(1m), libstlemass(1m), libstlibm(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
Several startup and shutdown messages along with any errors in communication between the NetWorker
server and the ACSLS server will be logged in the logfile /nsr/logs/ssi_event.log (or other logfile as specified on the mini_el command line). The messages from any one ssi instance will be preceded by the name
of the ACSLS server that that instance will be communicating with plus the local TCP port number that
will be used between NetWorker and ssi.
For example:
10-12-00 12:31:44 SSI[0]:
[devlab-acsls/50004] ONC RPC: csi_init(): Initiation Started
source csi_init.c; line 165
10-12-00 12:33:20 SSI[0]:
[acsls2/50011] ONC RPC: csi_init(): Initiation Completed
ONC RPC: csi_init(): ACSLS server acsls2 accessed through port 50011
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
5
LRESCAN(1m)
LRESCAN(1m)
NAME
lrescan − rescan for devices
SYNOPSIS
lrescan
DESCRIPTION
The lrescan program tells the underlying SCSI library to discard any cached information and scan again for
new devices (see libscsi(1m)).
SEE ALSO
libscsi(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
LRESET(1m)
LRESET(1m)
NAME
lreset − reset SCSI bus
SYNOPSIS
lrescan busnumber
DESCRIPTION
The lreset program tells the underlying SCSI library (see libscsi(1m)) to reset the named logical scsi bus.
You must have system privileges to execute this command.
WARNINGS
This command can cause the destruction of vital data since it will cause a SCSI bus reset. This may also
crash your system. You should only use it as an extreme last resort to abort a hung command.
SEE ALSO
libscsi(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
LUSBINFO(1m)
LUSBINFO(1m)
NAME
lusbinfo − print SCSI information
SYNOPSIS
lusbinfo [ -v ]
DESCRIPTION
The lusbinfo program prints a limited amount of information about the SCSI busses attached to the computer.
If you use the optional -v argument, additional information about the devices in the attached SCSI busses
will also printed.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
LUSDEBUG(1m)
LUSDEBUG(1m)
NAME
lusdebug − set library debugging level
SYNOPSIS
lusdebug debug-level
DESCRIPTION
The lusdebug command sets a debugging level for the underlying NetWorker SCSI device drivers.
Debugging level 0 (zero) turns off debugging. Larger numbers enable greater levels of debugging.
The lusdebug level can now be specified as a bitmask - bit X set will show messages that are set to show at
debug level X+1. e.g. bit 0 set will cause messages at debug level 1 to be displayed. The exact level for
any given message is listed at the end of the message in parentheses, such as (1m) for a message displayed
for debug level 8.
Using the bitmask allows you to display any or all levels of debugging information. The old method only
allowed you to set the highest level you wished to see - all levels lower that the selected level were always
displayed, whether you wanted to see them or not.
You may still specify debugging levels the old way using by using the values old1 through old9. The
results will be displayed using the new bitmask format.
Values can be entered in decimal (0 to 65535), hex (0x0 - 0xffff) or binary (0b0 - 0b1111111111111111).
Zeros after the 0x or 0b prefixes are not required for binary or hex values.
Values
that
old
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Values
old
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
NetWorker 6.1.1
correspond
new
decimal
1
3
7
15
31
63
127
255
511
1023
2047
4095
8191
16383
32767
65535
corresponding
new
decimal
1
2
4
8
16
32
64
to
previous
new
hex
0x0001
0x0003
0x0007
0x000f
0x001f
0x003f
0x007f
0x00ff
0x01ff
0x03ff
0x07ff
0x0fff
0x1fff
0x3fff
0x7fff
0xffff
to
debug
levels
new
binary
0x0000000000000001
0x0000000000000011
0x0000000000000111
0x0000000000001111
0x0000000000011111
0x0000000000111111
0x0000000001111111
0x0000000011111111
0x0000000111111111
0x0000001111111111
0x0000011111111111
0x0000111111111111
0x0001111111111111
0x0011111111111111
0x0111111111111111
0x1111111111111111
individual
new
hex
0x0001
0x0002
0x0004
0x0008
0x0010
0x0020
0x0040
October 15, 2001
debug
level
are:
are:
new
binary
0x0000000000000001
0x0000000000000010
0x0000000000000100
0x0000000000001000
0x0000000000010000
0x0000000000100000
0x0000000001000000
1
LUSDEBUG(1m)
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
LUSDEBUG(1m)
128
256
512
1024
2048
4096
8192
16384
32768
0x0080
0x0100
0x0200
0x0400
0x0800
0x1000
0x2000
0x4000
0x8000
0x0000000010000000
0x0000000100000000
0x0000001000000000
0x0000010000000000
0x0000100000000000
0x0001000000000000
0x0010000000000000
0x0100000000000000
0x1000000000000000
LIMITATIONS
Invalid debug levels are quietly treated the same as debug level zero.
Debug level values greater than 65535 (0xffff, binary 0x1111111111111111) will be treated as 65535 (0ffff,
binary..oh, you get the idea...).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
LUSMODE(1m)
LUSMODE(1m)
NAME
lusmode − print out SCSI mode information
SYNOPSIS
lusmode
DESCRIPTION
The lusmode program prints out a rather large amount of MODE information about attached SCSI devices
attached to the system.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
mini_el(8)
mini_el(8)
NAME
ssi − StorageTek silo interface module (Unix only)
mini_el − event logger for use with ssi (Unix only)
libstlstk − shared library for communication to ssi
SYNOPSIS
ssi
[ ACSLS server ] [ socket ] [ retry count ] &
mini_el [ −l logfile ] [ −d ] [ −h ] &
libstlstk.so (Solaris)
libstlstk.so.a (AIX)
libstlstk.sl (HPUX)
libstlstk.so.1 (SGI)
libstlstk.so.1 (DYNIX/ptx)
libstlstk.so (DECAXP)
libstlstk.dll (NT i386)
DESCRIPTION
NOTE: in this document, the term "ACSLS server" will be used to indicate the name of the system that is
running any one of StorageTek’s library manager programs: ACSLS on a Solaris or AIX host, Library
Station on an MVS host, or Horizon Library Manager on a system running Windows NT or Windows 2000.
(Unix only)
The ssi command is used indirectly by nsrjb to communicate with an ACSLS server. nsrjb loads libstlstk
, which handles the TCP calls to and from ssi. ssi then handles all of communication to and from the
ACSLS server. Starting with ACSLS version 5.3, it is possible to run NetWorker (either a server or a
storage node) on the same host that ACSLS is running on.
ssi and mini_el must be running on the system on which jbconfig was run to create the jukebox resource.
ssi and mini_el are almost always run as background processes, and are usually started automatically by the
system.
In addition to ssi and mini_el , a shared library file (usually called libstlstk.xxx where xxx is an operating
system dependent extension) is also required. An appropriate version of this library is installed as part of
NetWorker.
New in version 1.06 of ssi:
ssi now supports communication to more than one ACSLS server at any given time. Previous versions of
ssi were limited to a fixed TCP port for communication with NetWorker, and hence were limited to having
only one instance running at a time. In version 1.06, ssi and libstlstk have an added private communication
channel that lets libstlstk ask any of the running ssi instances which ACSLS server it is connecting to, and
to select the proper ssi for the current NetWorker silo. To make it easier to set up a configuration with the
possibilility of many ssi processes running, the command line for ssi has changed.
While you can still start ssi the same way as before - using the environment variable CSI_HOSTNAME to
select the ACSLS server to connect to - you can also simply specify the ACSLS server hostname on the
command line. You may also specify the port number used for communication between NetWorker and
that particular instance of ssi. The allowed values for this port number are 50004 (for the first instance),
50011 to 50019, and 50021 to 50099. Note that if you specify a port number that is already being used by
an instance of ssi, the specified port cannot be used, and the next available port in the allowed range will be
selected. If the port number is not specified, each successive instance of ssi will take the next available port
starting from 50004 and going upwards. If there are no available ports in the range, ssi will fail to load and
should display an error message. Note that specifying the port number is not necessary for normal
operation. You do not need to insure that a given ACSLS server is always accessed over a given port.
NetWorker and ssi use the name of the ACSLS server to establish a connection on the fly.
If there is not a hostname specified on the ssi command line, before ssi is started, one environment variable
MUST be set: CSI_HOSTNAME must be set to the name of the library server. If this variable is not
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
mini_el(8)
mini_el(8)
found, ssi will exit with an error message.
mini_el is an event logger used by ssi to maintain a log of certain events. It should be started before ssi.
Multiple instances of ssi will share a single instance of mini_el. A header consisting of the ACSLS server
name and the local TCP port that ssi will be listening on is included at the start of any message placed into
the log by any instance of ssi
(NT only)
On NT, the software equivalent to ssi and mini_el must be obtained from StorageTek as their product
"Library Attach for NT". This package must be installed prior to configuring a Silo in NetWorker.
NOTE: Library Attach version 1.1 includes a portmapper function that will only install properly if the
NetWorker services are not running. You should use Control Panel to stop the "NetWorker Backup and
Recover Server" and the "NetWorker Remote Exec Service" before installing Library Attach. After Library
Attach is installed, you should use Control Panel to start "NetWorker Remote Exec Service" and
"NetWorker Backup and Recover Server".
NOTE: Since Legato does not supply "Library Attach for NT", we are unable to add the multiple ACSLS
host functionality to our NT version of NetWorker.
(All platforms)
libstlstk.xxx is a shared library that handles the communication between nsrjb and ssi or Library Attach.
ssi or Library Attach then handles the communication over the network to the library server (either ACSLS,
Library Station or Horizon Library Manager). There are no options, parameters or environment variables
that affect the operation of libstlstk. The correct path to this file should be entered when an STK silo is
configured using jbconfig. The default values specified by jbconfig match the default locations chosen for
the installation program, and in most cases can be accepted.
OPTIONS
mini_el
−l
logfile Specifies the filename of the logfile to be created by mini_el. The default value is
/nsr/logs/ssi_event.log. If present, logfile must be the complete path to the logfile. If the file does
not exist, it will be created. If the file does exist, it will be appended to. If there is not a −l
parameter, the default logfile /nsr/logs/ssi_event.log will be used
−d
Sets the debug flag. mini_el will output debug information
−h
Displays usage information for mini_el
PARAMETERS
ssi
ACSLS server is required if the CSI_HOSTNAME environment variable has not been set to the name of
the system running ACSLS, LibraryStation or Horizon.
socket is only required if you need to specify the socket used for communication between NetWorker and
ssi
retry count is only required if you need to increase the retry count for communication between ssi and the
ACSLS server due to network problems.
These parameters are not position sensitive. The command line code in ssi uses the value of the parameter
to decide which of the three acceptable parameters any given command line parameter actually is:
If the input parameter evaluates to zero using the atoi function, then it is assumed to be the ACSLS
server name. Only the first parameter that evaluates to zero will be used as the server hostname.
If the parameter evaluates to a number between 50004 and 50100, then it is assumed to be the socket
value to be used. All parameters that fit this case will be saved as the socket value, so the last
matching parameter on the command line will be the one actually used.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
mini_el(8)
mini_el(8)
If a parameter evaluates to a number between 1 and 500, then it is assumed to be the retry count. As
with the socket parameter, the last matching parameter on the command line wins.
Any parameter that falls outside of these cases will simply be ignored.
ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
ssi
CSI_HOSTNAME (text, up to 256 chars, there is no
default)
If an ACSLS server name is not found on the command line, ssi will use the hostname specified by
this variable. It is limited to 256 characters, and should simply be the hostname running the
library server program that you are trying to connect to. If neither the command line hostname nor
this environment variable specify a hostname for ssi to use, ssi will exit with an error message.
SSI_HOSTNAME (text, up to 256 chars, there is no
default)
This variable is intended for use on multi-homed systems. Normally, ssi uses the gethostbyname
system function to determine the name to use for this side of the connection to the ACSLS server.
On a system with several network interfaces, the name supplied by that function may not result in
the use of the network interface needed to communicate with the ACSLS server. On these
systems, you can explicitly specify the exact name of the network interface that ssi will use to
connect to the ACSLS server. This variable needs to be set before ssi is started, and may be
different for various instances of ssi In all cases, a message will be logged in the event log stating
if this environment variable was found, and if not, that ssi will be using the hostname returned by
gethostbyname. This is not an error message.
SSI_BASE_SOCKET (numeric, 0 < x < 64k, no default)
If you need to restrict the socket values that ssi communicates on, this variable specifies the
starting number for ssi to use when it needs to open a socket to talk to the ACSLS server. It
appears that ssi will only open two sockets if this variable is set. The first, at
SSI_BASE_SOCKET will be used to connect to any host. The second, at SSI_BASE_SOCKET
+ 1, will be used for direct communication to the ACSLS server. Note that there will still be the
default sockets at 50001 and 50004 used to communicate between mini_el and ssi, but any
communication between this host and the ACSLS server should occur using the two sockets
starting at SSI_BASE_SOCKET.
TIME_FORMAT (time format string,
default = "%m-%d-%y %H:%M:%S")
If you wish to see time values printed in a format other than the default of Month-Day-Year
Hour:Minute:Seconds, use this variable.
%m is replaced by the current month
%d is replaced by today’s date
%y is replaced by the current year
%H is replaced by the current hour
%M is replaced by the current minute
%S is replaced by the current second
CSI_CONNECT_AGETIME (seconds, 0 < x < 31536000,
default = 600)
This will set the number of seconds for network connect aging purposes.
CSI_RETRY_TIMEOUT (seconds, 0 < x < ??, default = 4)
This will set how long ssi will wait before retrying a network request.
CSI_RETRY_TRIES (numeric, 0 < x < 100, default = 5)
This will set the number of times ssi will retry a network message before reporting an error.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
3
mini_el(8)
mini_el(8)
CSI_TCP_RPCSERVICE (boolean, default is TRUE)
This sets whether ssi will use TCP sockets to connect with the library server.
CSI_UDP_RPCSERVICE (boolean, default is FALSE)
This sets whether ssi will use UDP sockets to connect with the library server. Setting
CSI_UDP_RPCSERVICE to TRUE will allow ssi to communicate with a csi that is running on
the same system
EXAMPLES
Normal STK silo setup:
mini_el &
ssi acsls1 &
− or −
mini_el &
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls1
ssi &
Connect to 3 different ACSLS servers:
mini_el &
ssi acsls1 &
ssi acsls2 &
ssi acsls3 &
− or −
mini_el &
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls1
ssi &
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls2
ssi &
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls3
ssi &
Connect to 3 different ACSLS servers over 3 different
network interfaces:
mini_el &
setenv SSI_HOSTNAME myhost_on_net1
ssi acsls1 &
setenv SSI_HOSTNAME myhost_on_net2
ssi acsls2 &
setenv SSI_HOSTNAME myhost_on_net3
ssi acsls3 &
Connect to ACSLS server on socket 50025
mini_el &
ssi acsls1 50025 &
− or −
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls1
mini_el &
ssi 50025 &
To have mini_el use /nsr/logs/ssi.log.today as its log file
mini_el -l /nsr/logs/ssi.log.today &
ssi acsls1 &
FILES
/nsr/logs/ssi_event.log
default logfile created/appended to by mini_el
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
4
mini_el(8)
mini_el(8)
SEE ALSO
nsrjb(1m), jbconfig(1m), dasadmin(1m), libstlemass(1m), libstlibm(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
Several startup and shutdown messages along with any errors in communication between the NetWorker
server and the ACSLS server will be logged in the logfile /nsr/logs/ssi_event.log (or other logfile as specified on the mini_el command line). The messages from any one ssi instance will be preceded by the name
of the ACSLS server that that instance will be communicating with plus the local TCP port number that
will be used between NetWorker and ssi.
For example:
10-12-00 12:31:44 SSI[0]:
[devlab-acsls/50004] ONC RPC: csi_init(): Initiation Started
source csi_init.c; line 165
10-12-00 12:33:20 SSI[0]:
[acsls2/50011] ONC RPC: csi_init(): Initiation Completed
ONC RPC: csi_init(): ACSLS server acsls2 accessed through port 50011
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
5
MM_DATA(5)
MM_DATA(5)
NAME
mm_data − NetWorker media multiplexor data (tape and disk) format
DESCRIPTION
This documents the data format that the NetWorker media multiplexor daemon, nsrmmd(1m), writes to
long term storage media such as tapes and optical disks. See nsr_device(5) and nsrmm(1m) for a discussion of supported device families and types. The format described here applies to any fixed record device,
such as raw disks, or fixed record tape devices with file marks. NetWorker uses the eXternal Data Representation (XDR) standard to write media which can be interchanged among a wide variety of machines.
Only the mechanism used to multiplex save set streams onto the storage media is described here; the formats of save set streams depend on the type of NetWorker client, and are described in nsr_data(5).
A volume is one physical piece of media such as a tape reel or disk cartridge. A tape volume is made up of
multiple media files, and each media file may contain several media records. These media files and records
should not be confused with a client’s (for example UNIX or DOS) user files or records; the two do not
necessarily correspond. For example, a given media file or even a single media record may contain many
small client user files. On the other hand, a single large client file may be split across several media files,
and even across several volumes. Media files do not span volume boundaries. Save sets may span media
files and even volumes.
On most tapes, media files can be skipped very quickly by the device’s hardware or associated device driver
software, and the hardware can detect when an end of a file has been reached. On some tapes, records can
also be quickly skipped forward. Otherwise, access to the media is sequential.
Media records are described by the mrecord structure. Label records are fixed in size, MINMRECSIZE
bytes. Other records can potentially be a larger size that must be some constant for the rest of the volume.
NetWorker always writes, reads and skips data in units of full-sized media records. Each mrecord contains
zero or more mchunks These mrecords are used for storing one or more client save sessions or used by
NetWorker for synchronization and labelling. The XDR format of a media file’s mrecords and mchunks
are as follows:
const MINMRECSIZE = 32768;
const MMAXCHK = 2048;
const MHNDLEN = 120;
/* minimum media record size */
/* maximum number of chunks in record */
/* private area length for handlers */
enum mrec_version {
MREC_VER5 = 0,
MREC_VER6 = 6
};
/* mrecord version */
/* older format mrecord */
/* current format mrecord */
/*
* For media record format version 5, the data types lgui_t, lg_off64_t,
* and lg_time64_t are defined as:
*/
typedef struct lgui_t unsigned long;
typedef struct lg_off64_t unsigned long;
typedef struct lg_time64_t unsigned long;
/*
* For media record format version 6, the data types lgui_t, lg_off64_t,
* and lg_time64_t are defined as:
*/
typedef struct lgui_t {
/* XDR encoded Unique Id. */
char _bytes[20];
} lgui_t;
typedef struct lg_off64_t unsigned long long;
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
MM_DATA(5)
MM_DATA(5)
typedef struct lg_time64_t unsigned long long;
typedef lgui_t ssid_t;
typedef lgui_t volid_t;
/* save set id */
/* key for the volume database */
struct mchunk {
ssid_t mc_ssid;
/* owning save set id */
lg_off64_t mc_low;
/* 1st byte, relative to save stream */
opaque mc_data<MINMRECSIZE>;/* chunk’s data */
};
struct mrecord {
opaque mr_handler[MHNDLEN]; /* private to media handler */
mrec_version mr_version;
/* Media record version number */
u_long mr_orec;
/* record size */
volid_t mr_volid;
/* encompassing volume’s id */
u_long mr_fn;
/* encompassing file number */
u_long mr_rn;
/* record number within the file */
u_long mr_len;
/* record byte length */
mchunk mr_chunk<MMAXCHK>;/* chunks of save streams */
};
The first field of an mrecord, mr_handler, is reserved for media-specific data (currently it is not used by any implementation). The mr_version field is the version number of the media record format. The size of the rest of the
fields in the media record depends on the version number. The mr_orec field is the size of the current record. A
media record’s header fields, mr_volid, mr_fn, and mr_rn, are used to check the tape position and the data read
from the record. The file numbers and record numbers start at zero and increment sequentially. The record number
is reset each time the file number is incremented. On disks, file numbers are always zero. The mr_len field is the
actual number of valid bytes in this record, as opposed to the size of the device’s read or write request.
If file or record skipping is unreliable, NetWorker can still recover from isolated errors, at worst by rewinding and
reading the tape from the start. If a volume can be physically unmounted or mounted without notice to the media
management daemon, then the volume identifier in each record provides a quick way of verifying when this happens, without the need for a full rewind and reading of the label in most cases.
The mchunks within an mrecord contain client data from one or more save sessions. The mc_ssid and mc_low
values are used to reconstruct the save streams from the chunks within the records. The mc_data field holds the
actual data of each chunk. For a given save set, mc_low plus the length of mc_data should equal the following
chunk’s value for mc_low. Save sets may by intermingled arbitrarily within media records.
The first chunk of the first record of the first media file on the volume encapsulates the volume label information;
for some media, the second chunk contains additional volume information, for example, the media pool the volume
belongs to: Subsequent data in the first file is reserved for future expansion. The label may be duplicated in a second
file for redundancy, in case the first copy of the label gets accidentally overwritten. The formats of the volume label
and additional label information are described by the following XDR data structures:
const MVOLMAGIC = 0x070460;
const NSR_LENGTH = 64;
const RAP_MAXNAMELEN = 64;
/* volume magic number */
/* length of several strings */
/* maximum length of attribute name */
struct mvollabel {
u_long mvl_magic;
/* medium volume verification number */
lg_time64_t mvl_createtime; /* time at which volume labeled */
lg_time64_t mvl_expiretime; /* time for volume to expire */
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u_long mvl_recsize;
/* expected size of mrecords */
volid_t mvl_volid;
/* medium volume id */
string mvl_volname<NSR_LENGTH>;/* medium volume name */
};
struct vallist {
vallist *next;
string value<>;
};
/* attribute value */
struct attrlist {
attrlist *next;
string name<RAP_MAXNAMELEN>;/* attribute name */
vallist *values;
/* attribute values */
};
/*
* Additional information may includes the following attributes
* (listed by the name they are stored with):
* "volume pool" : the media pool
*/
struct mvolinfo {
struct attrlist *mvi_attributes;
/* any other information */
};
The mvl_magic field must be equal to MVOLMAGIC in order for the chunk to represent a valid volume label. If
the volume label changes in the future, the new format will have another ‘‘magic’’ number, but the format described
here must still be allowed. The mvl_volid is an internal identifier assigned and managed by the media manager.
The mvl_volname is the volume name that is assigned when the media is first labeled. The time fields are in UST
format − the number of seconds elapsed since 00:00 GMT, January 1, 1970. The mvl_recsize is the size of all subsequent media records found on the tape.
The mvp_pool is the pool name that is assigned when the media is first labeled. Different media pools allow administrators to segregate their data onto sets of volumes. Media cannot be reassigned from one media pool to another.
Pool names are a maximum of NSR_LENGTH characters long.
Synchronization marks, called schunks, are also written periodically to the media for each save set. Synchronization chunks are used by scanner(1m) when verifying or extracting directly from a volume. They are also used by
nsrmmd when trying to recover from media errors during file recovery. The following XDR data structure
describes a synchronization chunk:
typedef lgui_t clientid_t;
struct
lg_time64_t ssc_cloneid;
u_long ssc_flag;
u_long ssc_frag;
};
ssclone_t {
/* unique UST stamp wrt ss_ssid */
/* lots of status buried here*/
/* not used, always 0 */
/*
* Synchronization chunk of the newer MREC_VER6 media format.
*/
struct schunk {
u_long ssi_gen;
/* Not used. */
ssid_t ssi_ssid;
/* save set identifier */
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ssid_t ssi_prev;
u_long ssi_level;
lg_time64_t ssi_time;
lg_time64_t ssi_create;
lg_time64_t ssi_insert;
lg_time64_t ssi_complete;
clientid_t ssi_clientid;
u_long ssi_flags;
string ssi_host<>;
string ssi_name<>;
lg_uint64_t ssi_size;
lg_uint64_t ssi_nfiles;
u_long ssi_browse;
u_long ssi_recycle;
struct attrlist *ssi_al;
ssclone_t ssi_clones<>;
/* non-zero iff continuation */
/* backup level*/
/* save time on client */
/* creation time on server */
/* insertion time on server */
/* completion time on server */
/* client name identifier */
/* more details about this ss */
/* client name - save set owner */
/* symbolic name, for example "/usr" */
/* actual number of bytes saved */
/* number of client files saved */
/* browse time offset */
/* recycle time offset */
/* generic RAP attribute list */
/* information about this clone */
};
/*
* Synchronization chunk of the older MREC_VER5 media format.
*/
struct old_schunk {
opaque ssi_host[NSR_LENGTH];
/* save set host */
opaque ssi_name[NSR_LENGTH]; /* symbolic name */
u_long ssi_time;
/* save time */
u_long ssi_expiry;
/* expiration date */
u_long ssi_size;
/* actual size saved */
u_long ssi_nfiles;
/* number of files */
ssid_t ssi_ssid;
/* ssid for this save set */
u_long ssi_flag;
/* various flags, see below */
u_long ssi_info;
/* volid or ssid, see below */
};
#define SSI_START
#define SSI_SYNC
#define SSI_CONT
#define SSI_END
#define SSI_SSMASK
#define SSI_LBIAS
#define SSI_LMASK
#define SSI_LSHIFT
#define SSI_INCOMPLETE
#define SSI_CONTINUED
1
2
3
4
0x0000000f
0x10000000
0xff000000
24
0x00010000
0x00800000
/* start of a save set */
/* synchronization point */
/* continued from another volume */
/* end of this save set */
/* save set sync chunk type */
/* the level is included in the flags */
/* mask to cover bits for level */
/* shift amount for the level */
/* not finished (aborted) */
/* continued save set series */
The ssi_ssid is the save set identifier of this save set. The ssi_time field contains the create time of the save set in
UST based on the client’s clock. The ssi_create field contains the create time of the save set in UST based on the
server’s clock. The ssi_insert field contains the time the save set was inserted into the media database in UST based
on the server’s clock. The ssi_complete field contains the completion time of the save set in UST based on the
server’s clock. The ssi_clientid and ssi_host are the client identifier and name of the index which contains this save
set. Traditionally this is the client identifier and name of the client where the save set originated. The ssi_name is
the save set name to be presented to the user. These are both null-terminated strings, even though the fields are fixed
length in the older version media records. The ssi_size and ssi_nfiles are the number of bytes and number of files
saved so far for this save set. The ssi_browse is the time offset in seconds from the save set insertion time to the
time this save set is no longer browsable. The ssi_recycle is the time offset in seconds from the save set insertion
time to the time this save set becomes recyclable. The ssi_al is the generic save set attribute.
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The ssi_flag indicates the type of this synchronization chunk and other information about the save set. In the older
version synchronization chunk, this field also contains the level of this save set. There are four basic types of synchronization marks that can be found from examining ssi_flag & SSI_SSMASK. SSI_START is used to mark the
beginning of a save set. SSI_SYNC marks a periodic synchronization point and is only written at an exact file
boundary in the save set. SSI_CONT indicates that this is the continuation of a save set that started on a different
volume. When ssi_flag & SSI_SSMASK is SSI_CONT, ssi_prev or ssi_info contains the volume identifier for the
save set’s preceding volume. These synchronization chunks are used when a save set spans a volume boundary.
SSI_END marks the end of a save set.
On the new version of synchronization chunk, the ssi_level field contains the save set backup level. On the older
version of synchronization chunk. Should the SSI_LBIAS bit be set then ssi_flag & SSI_LMASK shifted to the
right by the value of SSI_LSHIFT specifies the level of the save set. The SSI_INCOMPLETE bit indicates that
this save set did not finish properly. This could be caused by a user interrupting an in progress save.
The SSI_CONTINUED bit indicates that this save set is logically continued to or from another save set. These continued save sets are used to handle very large save sets. If the SSI_CONTINUED bit is set and ssi_flag &
SSI_SSMASK is SSI_START, then ssi_prev or ssi_info gives the previous save set id that this save set was continued from. If the SSI_CONTINUED bit is set and ssi_flag & SSI_SSMASK is SSI_END, then ssi_prev or ssi_info
gives the next save set id that this save set is continued to.
The ssi_expiry field is the expiration date, in UST, for this save set. This field is zero if an explicit save set expiration time was not specified when the save set was created. This field no longer exists in the new synchronization
chunk.
SEE ALSO
nsr_device(5), nsr_data(5), nsrmm(1m), nsrmmd(1m), nsrmmdbd(1m), nsr(1m), scanner(1m).
RFC 1014 XDR: External Data Representation Specification
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NAME
mminfo − NetWorker media database reporting command
SYNOPSIS
mminfo
[ −avV ] [ −o order ] [ −s server ] [ report ] [ query ] [ volname... ]
< report >: [ −m | −p | −B | −S | −X | −r reportspec ]
< query >: [ −c client ] [ −N name ] [ −t time ] [ −q queryspec ]
DESCRIPTION
The mminfo command reports information about NetWorker media and save sets. The mminfo command
can produce several different reports depending on the flags specified. Several built-in reports can be specified using short-hand flags. Custom reports can also be specified. The default report, along with the builtin reports printed by the use of the −v, −V, −m, −p, −S, −B, and −X flags, are described first below. The
custom query and report generators, using the −q queryspec and −r reportspec options, are described in the
CUSTOM QUERIES AND REPORTS section. Other options are described in the OPTIONS section.
Without any options, mminfo displays information about the save sets that completed properly during the
last twenty four hours, and are still contained in an on-line file index (browsable save sets). The following
information is printed for each save set: the containing volume name, the client’s name, the creation date,
the size saved on that volume, the save set level, and the save set name. The size field is displayed in Bytes
(B), KiloBytes (KB), MegaBytes (MB), GigaBytes (GB), TeraBytes (TB), PetaBytes (PB), or ExaBytes
(EB). The save set level will display ‘full’, ‘incr’, ‘migration’ or 1 through 9, for full, incremental, migration save sets, level 1 through 9, respectively. The level is only kept for scheduled saves and file migration;
save sets generated by explicitly running the save(1m) command (called ad hoc saves) do not have an associated level.
Specifying the −v flag causes three additional fields to be displayed: the creation time, the internal save set
identifier (ssid), and two flags. One character is used per flag.
The first flag indicates which part of the save set is on the volume. When the save is completely contained
on the volume, a c is displayed. An h is displayed when the save set spans volumes and the head is contained on this volume. The remaining sections will be on other volumes. An m is displayed when the save
set spans volumes and a middle section is contained on this volume. The head and tail sections will be on
different volumes. There may be more than one middle section. A t is displayed when the tail section of a
spanning save set is contained on this volume. Again, the other sections will be on other volumes.
The second flag indicates the status of the save set. A b indicates that the save set is in the on-line index
and is browsable via the recover(1m) command. An r indicates that the save set is not in the on-line index
and is recoverable via the scanner(1m) command. An E indicates that the save set has been marked eligible for recycling and may be over-written at any time. An S denotes that the save set was scanned in (or
rolled in). Rolled in save sets are not subject to the standard index management procedures and will remain
in the file index until the user manually purges the save set. An a indicates that the save was aborted before
completion. Aborted save sets are removed from the on-line file index by nsrck(1m). An i indicates that
the save is still in progress. The −v flag prints aborted, purged, and incomplete save sets in addition to the
complete, browsable save sets printed by default.
The −V flag displays even more detail than the −v flag, and is generally used for debugging. This format
also displays information (such as, media file number and record number) that can be used to speed the
operation of the scanner(1m) command. Rather than displaying one line per save set per volume, three
lines are displayed each time a section of a save set occurs within a file on a volume. A single save set will
have multiple index entries if it starts in one file on a volume and ends in another. This report contains all
of the information reported via the −v flag, but, because of the additional detail, some of this information is
reordered. The first line will contain the volume name, the client’s name, the size saved in that section, the
save set level, and the save set name. The size field lists the number of bytes that are contained in the section, rather than the total amount of the save set on this volume. The second line contains the following
fields: the internal save set identifier (ssid), the save time in seconds since 00:00:00 GMT, Jan 1, 1970, the
creation data and time of day, the internal save set identifier (ssid), the browse time, and the retention time.
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The third line contains: the offset of the first and last bytes of the save set contained within section, the
media file number, the first record within the media file containing data for this save set, the internal volume
identifier (volid), the total size of the save set, and the flags, described in the −v paragraph above, indicating
which part of the save set is contained in this media file (c, h, m, or t) and the save set’s status (b, r, a, or i).
The −p flag causes mminfo to display a report on the browse and retention times for save sets. Each line of
the report displays the save set creation date, and the stored browse and retention dates (‘undef’ is displayed when connecting to a downrev server), the save set identifier, the client’s name, and the save set’s
name. The −v and −V options have no effect on the columns included in this report.
The −m flag causes mminfo to display the name of each volume in the media database, the number of bytes
written to it, the percent of space used (or the word ‘full’ indicating that the volume is filled to capacity),
the retention (expiration) time, the number of bytes read, the number of times the volume has been
mounted, and the volume’s capacity. Volumes that are recyclable (see nsrim(1m)) are flagged by an E in
the first column (meaning Eligible for recycling). If a volume has been marked as manually-recyclable, an
M is displayed instead of the E. If a volume is both manually-recyclable and eligible for recycling, an X
will be displayed. Archive and migration volumes are flagged by an A, also in the first column. If the volume is not an archive or migration volume, and is not recyclable, no flag appears.
Specifying the −v flag with the −m flag causes three additional fields to be displayed: the internal volume
identifier (volid), the number of the next file to be written, and the type of media.
Using a −V flag with the −m adds a column of flags to the output. There are currently two possible flags.
The d flag is set if the volume is currently being written (dirty). The r flag is set if the volume is marked as
read-only. If neither condition is present, the flags column will be empty.
The −S flag displays a long, multi-line save set report, which is used for debugging. The number of lines
varies per save set. Due to the length, there are no column headers. Instead, each attribute of the save set is
displayed in a ‘name=value’ manner, except the client and save set name, which are displayed as
‘client:name’, and the extended attributes, described below. The first line of each multi-line group starts on
the left margin and includes the save set identifier (ssid), save time as both a date/time string and seconds
since 00:00:00 GMT, Jan 1, 1970, and the client and save set names. Subsequent lines for this save set are
indented. If the save set is part of a save set series (a ‘continued save set’) and is not the first in the series,
the save set identifier of the previous save set in the series in shown on the second line by itself. The next
line displays the level, the save set flags (in ‘ssflags’ format, as described in the table in the CUSTOM
QUERIES AND REPORTS section), the save set size in bytes, the number of files in the save set, and the
save set insertion date. The next line displays the save set’s create, completion, browse and retention (aka
expiration) dates. The string ‘undef’ for any of the values on these two lines generally means an older
server that does not store these values is being queried. If the client identifier is set, it is printed on the next
line. If the save set has extended attributes (such as the group to which the save set was a part or the
archive annotation), they are printed next, at most one attribute per line. The format of each extended
attribute is "name: values;". The clones or instances of the save set are shown last (every save set has at
least once instance). The first line of each clone shown the clone identifier, the date and time the instance
was created, and the per-clone flags (in ‘clflags’ format from the CUSTOM QUERIES AND REPORTS
table). For each instance, each section of that instance is shows as a fragment line. The fragment line
shows the offset of that fragment from the beginning of the save set, the volume identifier (volid) containing
the fragment, the media file and record numbers of start of the fragment, an absolute positioning identifier
(unused by existing servers), and the date of last access of the fragment. The −v and −V options have no
effect on this report.
The −X flag prepares a save set summary report instead of one or more lines per save set. Note that the
entire media database must be examined to resolve this query, making it very slow and expensive. The
summary lists the total number of save sets, and breaks the total down into several overlapping categories
summarizing the save set types. The recent save set usage, if appropriate to the query, is also printed. The
categories are the number of fulls, the number of incrementals, the number of other non-full, nonincremental saves, the number of ad hoc, archive, migration, empty and purged save sets, the number of
index save sets, and finally, the number of incomplete save sets. For recent usage, the number of save sets
per day is shown, up to a week ago, along with a summary of the week’s save sets and, if applicable, a
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summary of the month’s save sets. For each line, the number of files (saved in the time interval specified),
number of save sets, total size, average size per save set, and average size per file are listed. The percentage
of the amount saved for incrementals versus fulls and the percentage of browsable files are also printed,
when appropriate. The −v and −V options have no effect on the summary report.
The −B flag performs a canned query to output, in a convenient format, the list of bootstraps generated in
the previous five weeks. In this format, there is one line of output for each matched save set. Each line
contains the save date and time, save level, save set identifier (ssid), starting file number, starting record
number, and the volume. The equivalent query is described below in the EXAMPLES section. The −v
and −V options have no effect on the bootstrap display.
OPTIONS
−a
Causes queries to apply to all complete, browsable save sets, not just those in the last 24 hours.
This option is implied by the −c, −N, −q, −m, and −o options, described below. When combined
with a media-only report (−m or a custom report showing only media information), −a applies to
all volumes, not just those with complete and browsable save sets.
−c client
Restricts the reported information to the media and/or save sets pertaining to the specified client.
−m
Displays a media report instead of the default save set report (in other words, a report about the
media containing save sets, not the save sets themselves).
−N name
Restricts the reported information to the media and/or save sets pertaining to the specified save set
name.
−o order
Sorts the output in the specified order. Before displaying the save sets, they are sorted by various
fields. Numeric fields are sorted least to greatest, other fields are sorted alphabetically. order may
be any combination of the letters celmontR, representing client, expiration date, length, media
name, name of save set, offset on media (file and record number), time, and Reverse, respectively.
The default sorting order for save set reports is mocntl. The offset fields (file and record) are only
considered when the −V option has been selected and for custom reports that show save set section
(fragment) information. When applied to −m media-only reports, the length is the amount used on
the volume, the time is the last time the media was accessed, and the other order flags are ignored.
−q queryspec
Adds the given query constraint to the list of constraints on the current query. Multiple −q options
may be given. See the CUSTOM QUERIES AND REPORTS section below for the syntax of
the queryspec.
−r reportspec
Appends the given report specification to the list of attributes to be displayed for the current query.
Multiple −r options may be given. See the CUSTOM QUERIES AND REPORTS section
below for the syntax of the reportspec.
−s server
Displays volume and save set information from the NetWorker system on server. See nsr(1m) for
a description of server selection. The default is the current system.
−t time Restricts the reported information to the media and/or save sets pertaining to the save sets created
on or after time. See nsr_getdate(3) for a description of the recognized time formats. The default
is ‘yesterday’.
−v
Turns on the verbose display reports, described above.
−B
Runs the canned query to report bootstraps which have been generated in the past five weeks, as
described above. This option is used by savegrp(1m) when saving the server’s index and bootstrap.
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−S
Displays a long, multi-line save set report, as described above.
−V
Displays additional verbose report output, as described above.
−X
Prepares a summary report, as described above.
CUSTOM QUERIES AND REPORTS
The custom query and report options of mminfo allow one to generate media and save set reports matching
complex constraints without resorting to pipelines and scripts. This section describes the syntax of custom
query and report specifications, and gives some simple examples. Further examples are shown in the
EXAMPLES section, below.
The custom query option, −q queryspec, is an extension to the short-hand query options, such as −c client,
which allow you to make queries based on almost any media or save set attribute in the database, and allow
various comparisons in addition to the simple equality comparison provided by the short-hand options. The
format of a queryspec is
[!] name [ comp value ] [ , ... ]
where name is the name of a database attribute, listed in the table below, comp is a valid comparator for the
attribute, from the set ‘>’, ‘>=’, ‘=’, ’<=’, ’<’, and value is the value being compared. Leading and trailing
spaces can be used to separate the individual components of the specification. The comparator and value
must be specified for all but flag attributes. Generally numeric attributes allow all five comparators, and
character string attributes generally only allow equality. When comparing flags whose values are normally
‘true’ and ‘false’, one may alternatively use the ‘[ ! ] name’ syntax. The ‘!name’ form is equivalent to
‘name=false’, and ‘name’ by itself is equivalent to ‘name=true’. The comparisons in the specification are
separated by commas. If a time or a string contains commas, you must quote the value with single or double quotes. Quotes are escaped within a string by repeating them. The following is a valid string comparison:
name="Joe’s daily, ""hot"" Save Set"
Note that command line shells also interpret quotes, so you will need to enclose the entire query within
quotes, and quote the single value inside the query, possibly with a different kind of quote, depending on
the shell. Except for multiple character string values, explained below, all of the specified constraints must
match a given save set and/or media volume before a line will be printed in the report. Multiple −q options
may be specified, and may be combined with the short-hand query constraints −c, −N and −t. The order of
the above query constraints is unimportant.
Numeric constraints, except for identifiers (volume, save set and clone identifiers), allow ranges to be specified, and all character string constraints allow multiple possible values to be specified. Note that times and
levels are considered to be numeric values, not character strings. The upper and lower bounds of a numeric
range are specified as two separate constraints. For example,
%used>20,%used<80
matches volumes that are between 20% and 80% used. Each possible value of a given character string
attribute is specified as a separate equality constraint. For example,
client=pegasus,client=avalon
matches save sets from the client ‘pegasus’ or the client ‘avalon’.
The custom report option, −r reportspec, allows one to specify exactly which media and save set attributes
should be shown in the report, the order of the columns, the column widths, and where line breaks should
be placed. The format of a reportspec is
name [ (width) ] [ , name [ (width) ] ... ]
where name is the name of a database attribute, listed below, and the optional width, enclosed in parentheses, specifies how wide the column should be. Leading and trailing spaces are ignored. The default column width depends on the attribute; default widths are also shown in the table below. Multiple −r options
may be specified. The order of the columns in the report will be left to right, and correspond to the order of
the attribute names specified. Each line of output will contain all of the data requested (you can cause line
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breaks within a logical line by using the newline attribute name). If a value does not fit in the requested
column width, subsequent values in the line will be shifted to the right (values are truncated at 256 characters).
The table below lists all of the recognized attribute names, their valid range of query values (or ‘NA’ for
attributes that are only valid for report specifications), their default column width in characters (or ‘NA’ for
flag attributes that are only valid for query specifications), and a short description.
Numeric attributes (shown as number in the valid range column of the table) can be specified using any of
the comparators listed above, and can be used in range comparisons.
The =id attributes are used for various identifiers (volume identifier, save set identifier, and so on) and only
allow equality comparisons. In most cases, if the column is narrow (less that 50 characters), only the short
ID is shown, which correponds to the ID used by downrev servers. If the column is wide enough, the full
ID is shown. Client identifiers always display as full IDs, and clone identifiers always display as short IDs.
Flag attributes have the values ‘true’ or ‘false’, only apply as query constraints, and have corresponding
flag summary strings for report specifications.
Time attributes are specified in nsr_getdate(3) format and are otherwise treated as numeric attributes (note
that you will need to quote times that contain commas). The special time ‘forever’, when used as an expiration date, means a save set or volume will never expire. The special time ‘undef’ is displayed when the
time is undefined. When output, times are displayed as MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS for numeric month, day
year (last two digits), hours, minutes, and seconds, respectively. If the column is very narrow (less that 14
characters), only the date is shown. Columns less than 17 characters wide drop the seconds, and columns
17 or more characters wide print the full date.
Size and kbsize attributes may have a scale factor appended to them: ‘KB’ for kilobytes, ‘MB’ for
MegaBytes, ‘GB’ for GigaBytes, ‘TB’ for TeraBytes, ‘PB’ for PetaBytes, or ‘EB’ for ExaBytes. The
default scale (when no scale is explicitly specified) on query constraints for attributes is bytes; the default
for kbsize attributes is kilobytes. The scale varies in reports, depending on the actual value.
String attributes may be any arbitrary character string, enclosed in quotes if necessary, as described above
in the query syntax paragraph.
attribute
value
width
description
name
range
space
NA
1 White space before the next column.
newline
NA
1 Line break(s) within a logical line.
Width is actually the number of
newlines desired.
volume
string
15 The volume name.
volid
=id
11 The unique volume identifier.
barcode
string
15 The volume barcode, when set.
family
string
4 The media family (for example, tape, disk).
type
string
7 The media type (for example, 8mm, optical).
volflags
NA
5 Volume summary flags, d and r,
for dirty (in use) and read-only.
state
NA
3 Volume state summary, E, M, X and A,
meaning eligible for recycling,
manually-recyclable, both, and archive
or migration volumes, respectively.
full
flag
NA Matches full volumes.
inuse
flag
NA Matches in-use (dirty) volumes.
volrecycle flag
NA Matches recyclable volumes.
readonly
flag
NA Matches read-only volumes.
manual
flag
NA Matches manually-recyclable volumes.
pool
string
15 The pool containing the volume.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
5
MMINFO(1m)
location
capacity
written
%used
MMINFO(1m)
read
next
nrec
volaccess
string
size
kbsize
number
or ‘full’
kbsize
number
number
time
15
8
7
5
volretent
time
9
olabel
labeled
time
time
9
9
mounts
number
6
recycled
number
4
avail
NA
3
8
5
5
9
near
flag
smartmedia flag
metric
number
NA
NA
6
savesets
volattrs
NA
NA
6
31
name
savetime
nsavetime
string
time
NA
sscreate
ssid
level
client
attrs
pssid
ssflags
NetWorker 6.1.1
The volume’s location.
The volume’s estimated capacity.
Kbytes written to volume.
Estimated percentage used, or ‘full’
for volumes marked as full.
Kbytes read (recovered) from the volume.
Next media file for writing.
Next media record for writing.
Last time volume was accessed
(written to or labeled). Old servers
do not provide this value reliably.
The date the last save set on this
volume will expire.
The first time the volume was labeled.
The most recent time the media
volume was (re)labeled.
Number of times the volume was mounted
explicitly (reboots do not count).
Number of times the volume
was relabeled.
Summary of volume availability, current
valid values, n meaning nearline
(that is, in a jukebox), and ov meaning
the volume is being managed by SmartMedia.
Matches nearline volumes.
Matches volumes managed by SmartMedia.
Volume speed and desirability metric
(unused by existing servers).
Number of save sets on a volume.
The extended volume attributes.
31 The save set name.
9 The save time (on the client).
11 The save time, printed as seconds
since 00:00:00 GMT, Jan 1, 1970.
time
9 The creation time (on the server).
If the client and server clocks are out of
sync, this time may be different from the
save time.
=id
11 The unique save set identifier.
0..9,
5 The backup level. Manual backups
full, incr,
are printed as blank column
migration
values in reports.
or manual
string
11 The client name for the save set.
NA
31 The extended save set attributes.
=id
11 When part of a save set series, the
previous save set identifier in the
series, zero for the first or only
save set in a series.
NA
7 The save set flags summary, one or more
characters in the set CvrSENRiIF, for
continued, valid, purged (recoverable),
scanned-in (rolled-in), eligible for
October 15, 2001
6
MMINFO(1m)
MMINFO(1m)
continued
recoverable
ssrecycle
incomplete
rolledin
ndmp
raw
valid
flag
flag
flag
flag
flag
flag
flag
flag
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
sumflags
NA
3
fragflags
NA
3
totalsize
nfiles
number
number
ssbrowse
time
9
ssretent
time
9
ssinsert
time
9
sscomp
time
9
clientid
=id
9
copies
number
6
cloneid
clonetime
clflags
=id
time
NA
11
9
5
suspect
flag
NA
11
5
recycling, NDMP generated, raw, incomplete,
in-progress and finished (ended),
respectively.
Matches continued save sets.
Matches recoverable (purged) save sets.
Matches recyclable save sets.
Matches incomplete save sets.
Matches rolled-in save sets.
Matches NDMP save sets.
Matches raw save sets.
Matches valid save sets. All save sets
are marked ‘valid’ by current servers.
Per-volume save set summary flags,
as described for the −v report.
Per-section save set summary flags,
as described for the −V report.
The total save set size.
The number of the client’s files
in the save set.
The save set’s browse time. This is
the time limit that the save set will
remain browsable. ‘undef’ is displayed
when connected to a downrev server.
The save set’s retention time
(expiration time). This is the time limit that
the save set will remain in the media
database.
The save set’s insertion time. This is
the time the save set was most recently
introduced into the database (for example, by a
backup or by running scanner(1m)).
The save set’s completion time. This is
the time the save set backup was completed.
The globally unique client identifier for
the host that was backed up in this save set.
The number of copies (instances or
clones) of the save set, all with the
same save time and save set identifier.
The clone identifier of one copy.
The time a copy was made.
The clone flags summary, from the
set ais for aborted, incomplete
and suspect (read error), respectively.
Matches suspect save set copies, copies
that had errors during file recovery.
The (archive) save set’s annotation. In a
queryspec, the string is a regular expression
in the form used by grep(1).
The group of this save set. This is the
group that backed up this save set.
annotation string
31
group
string
12
first
number
last
NA
11 The offset of the first byte of the
save set contained within the section.
11 The calculated offset of the last byte
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
7
MMINFO(1m)
MMINFO(1m)
fragsize
NA
7
sumsize
NA
7
mediafile
number
5
mediarec
number
5
mediamark number
5
ssaccess
9
time
of the save set contained within the
current section.
The calculated size of the current
section of the save set.
The calculated total size of all of the
sections of the save set on this volume.
The media file number containing
the current section of the save set.
The media record number where the
first bytes of the save set are found
within the current media file.
The absolute positioning data for
the current section (not used by
existing servers).
The last time this section of the save
set was accessed (for backup or recover).
EXAMPLES
In the following examples, the equivalent short-hand and custom versions of the report are shown, when a
short-hand option exists for a given report or query.
Display all bootstraps generated in the previous five weeks, as reported by savegrp(1m):
mminfo −B
mminfo −N bootstrap −t ’5 weeks ago’ −ot
-r ’savetime(17),space,level(6),ssid’
-r ’mediafile(6),mediarec(1m),space(3),volume’
Display information about all of the volumes:
mminfo −m
mminfo −a −r ’state,volume,written,%used,read,space’
-r ’mounts(5),space(2),capacity’
Display media information from volumes mars.001 and mars.002:
mminfo −m mars.001 mars.002
mminfo −m -q ’volume=mars.001,volume=mars.002’
Display all save sets named /usr:
mminfo −N /usr
mminfo −q name=/usr
Display save sets named /usr, generated by client venus, in the past week:
mminfo −N /usr −c venus
mminfo −q ’name=/usr,client=venus’
Display save sets named /usr, generated by client venus, on volume mars.001:
mminfo −N /usr −c venus mars.001
mminfo −q ’name=/usr,client=venus,volume=mars.001’
Display a media report of all volumes written on in the past week:
mminfo −m -t ’last week’
mminfo −m -q ’savetime>=last week’
Display a media report of all non-full volumes, showing the percent-used, pool and location of each volume:
mminfo −a −r ’volume,%used,pool,location’ -q ’!full’
Display a media report similar to the −m report but showing the barcode instead of the volume label:
mminfo −a −r ’state,barcode,written,%used,read,space’
-r ’mounts(5),space(2),capacity’
Display a verbose list of the instances of all save sets with more than one copy, sorted by save time and
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
8
MMINFO(1m)
MMINFO(1m)
client name:
mminfo −otc −v −q ’copies>1’
Display all archive save sets with an annotation of "project data" for the past four months.
mminfo −q’annotation=project data’
-r"volume,client,savetime,sumsize,ssid,name,annotation"
-t’four months ago’
FILES
/nsr/mm/mmvolume
The save set and media volume databases (actually accessed by nsrmmdbd(1m)).
SEE ALSO
grep(1), nsr_getdate(3), nsr_layout(5), nsradmin(1m), nsrmmdbd(1m), recover(1m), savegrp(1m),
scanner(1m).
DIAGNOSTICS
no matches found for the query
No save sets or volumes were found in the database that matched all of the constraints of the
query.
invalid volume name ‘volname’
The volume name given is not in a valid format. Note that volume names may not begin with a
dash. Queries that match no volumes will return the error ‘no matches found for the query’.
only one of −m, −B, −S, −X or −r may be specified
Only one report can be generated at a time. Use separate runs of mminfo to obtain multiple
reports.
invalid sorting order specifier, choose from ‘celmnotR’
Only letters from celmnotR may be used with the −o option.
only one −o allowed
Only one sorting order may be specified.
only one −s allowed
Only one server can be queried at one time. Use multiple runs of mminfo to obtain reports from
multiple servers.
Out of Memory
The query exhausted available memory. Try issuing it again, using the sorting order −om, or make
the query more restrictive (for example, list specific volumes, clients, and/or save set names).
invalid value specified for ‘attribute’
The value specified is either out of range (for example, a negative number for a value that can only
take positive numbers), the wrong type (an alphabetic string value specified for a numeric
attribute), or just poorly formatted (for example, non-blank characters between a close quote and
the next comma or a missing close quote).
value of ‘attribute’ is too long
The value specified for attribute is longer than the maximum accepted value. Query attributes
must have values less than 65 characters long.
non-overlapping range specified for ‘attribute’
The range specified for attribute is a non-overlapping numeric range, and cannot possibly match
any save set or volume in the database.
unknown query constraint: attribute
The given query attribute is not valid. See the CUSTOM QUERIES AND REPORTS table for a
list of all valid attribute names.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
9
MMINFO(1m)
MMINFO(1m)
need a value for query constraint ‘attribute’
The attribute is not a flag, and must be specified in the ‘name comparator value’ format.
constraint ‘attribute’ is only valid for reports
The attribute specified for a query may only by used in report (−r) specifications. Calculated values, flag summaries, save set extended attributes, and formatting tools (space and newline) may
not be used in queries.
invalid comparator for query constraint ‘attribute’
The comparator used is not valid for the given attribute. See the CUSTOM QUERIES AND
REPORTS section for a list of the valid comparators for attribute.
query constraint ‘attribute’ specified more than once
The given attribute was specified more than once with the same comparator, and is not a string
attribute (string attributes can match one of several specific values).
unknown report constraint: attribute
The given report attribute is not valid; see the CUSTOM QUERIES AND REPORTS table for a
list of all valid attribute names.
constraint ‘attribute’ is only valid for queries
The attribute specified for a report is a flag matching attribute and may only be used in query (−q)
specifications. See the CUSTOM QUERIES AND REPORTS table for the appropriate flag
summary attribute that one may use in reports of a given flag.
column width of ‘attribute’ is invalid
The width specified for attribute is out of range. Column widths must be positive numbers less
than 256.
missing close parenthesis after report constraint
‘attribute’
The width of attribute is missing a close parenthesis.
missing comma after report constraint ‘attribute’
There are non-blank characters after the width specification for attribute without any comma preceding them.
No data requested, no report generated
The given report specification contains only formatting, no data attribute names.
LIMITATIONS
You cannot specify save set extended attributes as query constraints.
You cannot list several possible equality matches for numbers, only for strings.
Some queries, namely those that are not highly selective (few query constraints) and use a sorting order
where the volume name is not the primary sort key, still require mminfo to retrieve the entire database
before printing any of it. Such queries use large amounts of memory in mminfo, but not, as was the case
with older versions, in nsrmmdbd.
You cannot make a report that shows save set or media instances and a summary without running mminfo
at least twice.
You cannot specify query constraints that compare database attributes with each other.
You cannot make a report that uses -B flag with -c flag.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
10
MMLOCATE(1m)
MMLOCATE(1m)
NAME
mmlocate − NetWorker media location reporting command
SYNOPSIS
mmlocate [ −s server ] [ −l
{ −n volname | −i volid | location }] [ −L ] [ −d location ]
[ −c { −n volname | −i volid }] [ −u { −n volname| −i volid| location }]
DESCRIPTION
The mmlocate command is used to access and manage the volume location information contained in the
media database. The information contained in a volume’s location field is meant to give the user an idea of
where the volume can physically be found. Other NetWorker commands will display the location along
with the volume name (see the versions sub-command of recover(1m)). Any user can use this command
with the -l (default) or -L options. The -c, -d and -u options are limited to NetWorker administrators (see
nsr(1m)). -l is assumed by mmlocate if a -L, -c, -d or -u option is not specified.
Running mmlocate without any arguments lists all volumes and their locations for the specified server (if
you do not specify a server, the current host is used).
Note that each time nsrjb(1m) moves a piece of media inside a jukebox, the location of a volume is set to
the name of the jukebox. When using storage nodes, the name of the jukebox is used to indicate on which
node the volume can be mounted. Hence, the first portion of this field containing the jukebox name should
not be changed. When using volumes on a storage node that are not contained within a jukebox, this field
can be used to indicate on which node a volume should be mounted, by giving it a value of any remote
device on that node. See nsr_storage_node(5) for additional detail on storage nodes.
OPTIONS
−c
Clears the location field for the specified volume.
−d location
Deletes all volumes associated with the specified location. A confirmation prompt appears prior to
the deletion of each volume.
−i volid Restricts the mmlocate operation to the specified volume ID (volid).
−l
Lists entries. Performs a database query using the supplied volume name, volume ID or location.
If a volume name or volume id is given, then only the volume’s location information is displayed.
If a location is provided, then only volumes in that location are displayed. When the -l option is
used without specifying any other options (volume name, volume id, or location), volumes without
a set location are displayed.
−L
Lists all locations found in the database.
−n volname
Restricts the operation to the volume name (volname) listed.
−s server
Accesses the server’s media database.
−u
Updates the location for a volume. Locations are limited to a maximum length of 64 characters.
The -n volname or -i volid and location options must be used in conjunction with the -u option.
EXAMPLES
Update the media database to show that volume Offsite.011 is now at location ’Media Vault’
mmlocate −u −n Offsite.011 ’Media Vault’
Delete volumes at location ’Media Shelf 6’
mmlocate −d ’Media Shelf 6’
Delete location information for volume NonFull.001
mmlocate −c −n NonFull.001
List the location of volume NonFull.001
mmlocate −n NonFull.001
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
MMLOCATE(1m)
MMLOCATE(1m)
List all volumes stored in the location ’Media Vault’
mmlocate ’Media Vault’
FILES
/nsr/mm/mmvolume
The media database.
SEE ALSO
nsrmm(1m), mminfo(1m), nsr(1m), nsrjb(1m), recover(1m) nsr_storage_node(5)
DIAGNOSTICS
Server server does not support remote update
operations...
If you are running mmlocate against an old server, you are not allowed to use the -u or -c options.
You must login to that server and run the mmlocate program there.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
MMPOOL(1m)
MMPOOL(1m)
NAME
mmpool − NetWorker media pool reporting command
SYNOPSIS
mmpool [ −s server ] [ volume... ]
[ −d pool ] [ −l pool ] [ −L ]
DESCRIPTION
The mmpool command is used to access pool information stored in the NetWorker server’s media database.
This command can also be used to delete all the volumes in a particular pool. If you specify one or more
volume names with the mmpool command, the report shows the pool that each named volume belongs to.
By default, all volumes and their pools are displayed.
You cannot change the pool to which a volume belongs without relabeling the volume, which destroys all
data stored on the volume. Pools are configured through a NetWorker administration tool, such as nwadmin(1m) or nsradmin(1m). These tools are used to create and modify unique pool (see nsr_pool(5))
resources.
OPTIONS
−d pool
Deletes all volumes for the given pool. The user will be prompted for deletion of each volume.
−l pool Lists all volumes and the pools to which they belong. If a pool is specified, mmpool only lists the
volumes belonging to that pool.
−L
Lists the names of all pool resources configured on the server.
−s server
Specifies the NetWorker server to act upon. See nsr(1m) for a description of server selection.
FILES
/nsr/mm/mmvolume (UNIX)
The media database on the server.
SEE ALSO
nsr(1m), nsr_device(5), nsr_pool(5), nsradmin(1m), nsrjb(1m), nsrmm(1m) nwadmin(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
MMRECOV(1m)
MMRECOV(1m)
NAME
mmrecov − recover a NetWorker media index
SYNOPSIS
mmrecov [ −q | −v ]
DESCRIPTION
The mmrecov command is used in recovering from the loss of a NetWorker server’s critical files. mmrecov restores the media index and the server’s resource files. Typical events causing such disasters are accidental removal of these files by a user or a disk crash on the NetWorker server itself. See nsr_crash(1m)
for a discussion of general issues and procedures for NetWorker client and server crash recovery if you are
running NetWorker for UNIX.
mmrecov is used to recover the NetWorker server’s media database and resource files from the media
(backup tapes or disks) when the media database or resource files have been lost or damaged. Note that this
command overwrites the server’s existing media index. The mmrecov command is not used to recover
NetWorker clients’ online indexes; you must use the nsrck(1m) command for this purpose.
The NetWorker system must be fully installed and correctly configured prior to using this command. If any
of the NetWorker software is lost, re-install NetWorker from the distribution files before you run mmrecov.
Use the same release of NetWorker, and install it in the same location as it was before the software was lost.
The mmrecov program extracts the contents of a bootstrap save set, which contains the media index and
resource files. Once mmrecov is done running, you shut the NetWorker server down, move the recovered
resource files into place, and restart the server. At this point, the file indexes for the server and client may
be restored by using nsrck.
When mmrecov is started, it will ask for the device from which the bootstrap save set will be extracted.
Next, it will ask for the bootstrap save set identifier. This number is found in the fourth column (labeled
ssid) of the last line of the bootstrap information sheet printed by savegrp and mminfo -B, an example of
which is shown below:
Jun 17 22:21 1992 mars’s NetWorker bootstrap information Page 1
date time level
6/14/92 23:46:13 full
6/15/92 22:45:15
9
6/16/92 22:50:34
9
6/17/92 22:20:25
9
ssid file record volume
17826163 48
0 mars.1
17836325 87
0 mars.2
17846505 134
0 mars.2 mars.3
17851237 52
0 mars.3
In the example above, the ssid of the most recent bootstrap save set is ‘17851237’. If you are cloning save
sets, your bootstrap save set is also cloned, and you need to use the second to last save set. See the
RECOVERING FROM CLONE MEDIA section for an example of boostrap information with cloned
save sets.
Next, mmrecov prompts for the file and record location of the bootstrap save set. Both values may default
to zero if they are not known. Note, however, that specifying the correct file and record numbers will allow
NetWorker to more quickly locate the bootstrap save set. The file and record locations are the fifth and
sixth columns of the bootstrap information sheet. In the example above, the values for the file and record
locations are 52 and 0, respectively. Finally, mmrecov will prompt that the volume (‘mars.3’ in the example above) containing the selected bootstrap save set be inserted into the specified device. The ssid, file
location, record location, and the physical volume must be determined by the user from the printed sheet,
since mmrecov has no way of determining this information. On the other hand, if the volume containing
the bootstrap is not known, the -B option of scanner(1m) can be used to determine the file and record locations.
If the bootstrap save set spans more than one volume, multiple volume names are printed. The order
printed is the order required by mmrecov. In the example above, the third save set produced on 6/16/92
begins on volume ‘mars.2’ and spans to volume ‘mars.3’. If a bootstrap save set spans volumes, mmrecov
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
MMRECOV(1m)
MMRECOV(1m)
will prompt for the name of the device where the next volume has been loaded when an end-of-volume
occurs. The volume is then scanned, and the bootstrap save set extracted.
After the volume scan completes, mmrecov will complete. At this point, if your original server resource
files were lost, you must shut down the NetWorker server, move the new resource files into place, and
restart the NetWorker server. Now the indexes can be recovered.
In order to recover the indexes for the server and client, you must run nsrck -L7. This command will
reconstruct complete indexes from the save sets generated by the server’s save schedule. Since the save sets
may be spread across multiple volumes, nwadmin(1m) or nsrwatch(1m) should be run, and the volumes
mounted as they are requested.
When nsrck completes, the message "completed recovery of index for client ’<client-name>’" is displayed. Once a NetWorker client’s index is recovered, that client can start recovering its files using
recover. Note that it is not necessary for the server’s index to be restored before the client indexes may be
restored.
As stated earlier, the NetWorker resource files are saved as part of the bootstrap save set. If your resource
files were also deleted, you may quickly replace them by copying or moving them from /nsr/res.R to
/nsr/res. Before restoring them to /nsr/res, the daemons must be shut down (see nsr_shutdown(1m)).
Sometimes it is neccessary to recover the NetWorker server onto a new machine, for example, after a major
hardware failure. When this occurs, the NetWorker Licensing software will detect the move. Once the
NetWorker server has been moved to a new machine, it must be re-registered with Customer Support within
15 days of the move, or the server will disable itself. After disabling itself, you will only be able to recover
files; new backups cannot be performed until the server is re-registered. Notifications will be sent by the
NSR Registration notification, warning of the need to re-register the product.
RECOVERING FROM CLONE MEDIA
If you are running mmrecov with clone media only, for example, at a remote site, you will need to perform
the recovery using a slightly different method. When selecting the bootstrap identifier, make sure that you
are using the information associated with the cloned save set: the last save set listed in the bootstrap output.
Consider the following list of save sets:
Jun 17 22:21 1996 mars’s NetWorker bootstrap information Page 1
date time level
6/14/96 23:46:13 full
6/14/96 23:46:13 full
6/15/96 22:45:15
9
6/15/96 22:45:15
9
6/17/96 22:20:25
9
6/17/96 22:20:25
9
ssid file record volume
17826163 48
0 mars.1
17826163 12
0 mars_c.1
17836325 87
0 mars.2
17836325 24
0 mars_c.2
17851237 52
0 mars.3
17851237 6
0 mars_c.3
In the example above, the ssid of the most recent bootstrap save set is ‘17851237’. The cloned save set
resides on mars_c.3 and the values for the file and record locations are 6 and 0, respectively.
If you lost your resource files and need to use the ones restored from mmrecov, the NetWorker server
needs to be shut down so that you can replace the installation resource files with your recovered ones.
Once the original resource files are in place, the NetWorker server should be restarted. After it is restarted,
you may recover the indexes for the server and clients by issuing the nsrck -L7 command. This command
queries the media database for the index backups and restores the indexes for the server and each client. If
all clone volumes needed are online when the index recovery proceeds, nsrck will complete on its own.
If some of the volumes are not online, then nsrck will attempt to recover the index from the original volume it was backed up to, and therefore request the original media. In the example bootstrap output above,
mars_c.1 and mars_c.3 would both need to be online. If volume mars_c.3 was the only volume online,
then nsrck would also request mars.1. To finish recovering the server’s index in this case, you need to perform the following steps:
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
MMRECOV(1m)
1.
MMRECOV(1m)
Note what volumes are needed for recovery and delete them from the media database.
nwadmin(1m) or nsrwatch(1m) lists the volumes needed for recovery in the Pending messages
panel. Use nwadmin(1m) or nsrmm(1m) to delete the volumes from the media database.
Given the scenario in the example above where only mars_c.3 was mounted, we would have to
delete mars.1 from the media database, for example, nsrmm -d mars.1.
2.
Restart the server to terminate the index recovery in progress.
Use nsr_shutdown(1m) to bring the server down. Run nsrd(1m) to start the server again.
3.
Recover the server’s index by using nsrck -L7 servername.
When nsrck completes, the message "The index is now fully recovered" appears.
OPTIONS
−q
Quiet. Displays only error messages.
−v
Verbose. Generates debugging information.
/nsr
If this was a symbolic link when the bootstrap save set was created, it needs to be re-created manually prior to running mmrecov.
FILES
/nsr/res
This directory and its contents are saved as part of the bootstrap save set. mmrecov restores this
directory, and then renames it to /nsr/res.R. The original directory is temporarily renamed to
/nsr/res.org while the bootstrap save set is being recovered.
/nsr/mm/mmvolume
The NetWorker server’s media index saved as part of the bootstrap save set, and unconditionally
recovered by mmrecov.
BUGS
The name mmrecov is misleading; as a result, mmrecov is often used when it is not needed. A name like
"recover_server_media_database_or_resource_files_when_missing" is more descriptive. Note that any part
of the bootstrap save set contents are recoverable using normal recover procedures provided that the
server’s on-line index, resource files, and media index are intact.
To recover files that are not in the on-line file index (for example, files saved after the last run of savegrp),
scanner must be used to rebuild the media and on-line file indexes from the contents of the volumes generated between the time of the last run of savegrp and the loss of the original index.
SEE ALSO
mminfo(1m), nsr_crash(1m), nsr(1m), nsrck(1m), nsrd(1m), nsr_client(5), nsr_schedule(5),
nsr_shutdown(1m), recover(1m), save(1m), savefs(1m), savegrp(1m), scanner(1m), nsrindexasm(1m),
nsrmm(1m), nsrmmdbdasm(1m), nwadmin(1m), nsrwatch(1m), nsr_getdate(3)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
3
MSENSE(1m)
MSENSE(1m)
NAME
msense − get mode sense data
SYNOPSIS
msense -a b.t.l [ -p pagecode ]
DESCRIPTION
The msense program will send a MODE SENSE command to the named device.
OPTIONS
The required -a argument must be used to select a specific ordinal SCSI address (see libscsi (1m)).
The optional -p pagecode argument may be used to select a specific mode page, else all pages are fetched
(code 0x3f). This argument must be specified in hexadecimal notation.
BUGS
The output is not readable. It is intended as input to pmode (1m).
SEE ALSO
libscsi(1m), pmode(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NDMPJBCONF(1m)
NDMPJBCONF(1m)
NAME
ndmpjbconf − NDMP Server information configuration tool
SYNOPSIS
ndmpjbconf
DESCRIPTION
The ndmpjbconf program is an user-interactive program to get information of the NDMP server, which has
a jukebox (Media Autochanger Device) directly attached, including NDMP server name, user name and
password on the NDMP server, and jukebox handle on the NDMP server. With the provided information,
the user will be able to issue a set of scsi commands from NetWorker Server to communicate with the
NDMP server remotely.
NOTE: The ndmpjbconf program is only required to run before issuing NetWorker "inquire -N -f ..." and all
sji commands. However, it is not necessary to run this program before running jbconfig.
A NDMP configuration file will be generated in a location as the user prefers, or the default location. The
name of the NDMP config file will be "ndmpjbconf_<NDMP server name>". A default config file named
"ndmpjbconf" with the same content as the above config file will also be generated in the same directory
that the user chose. This default config file will be used by inquire command if -f is not specified.
The format of the NDMP config file is a one-line text file:
server user password jukebox_handle
EXAMPLE
# ndmpjbconf
Enter NDMP Server name: hawaii<RETURN>
Enter NDMP user name: root<RETURN>
Enter NDMP user password (characters will not be echoed): password<RETURN>
Enter NDMP Jukebox handle: mc0<RETURN>
Enter location for NDMP Configuration file? [/usrlib/nsr] <RETURN>
PERMISSIONS
Require super user privilege to execute the ndmpjbconf program in order to create directory for storing the
config file. The NDMP config file will be generated with super user read-only permission.
SEE ALSO
inquire(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NWADMIN(1m)
NWADMIN(1m)
NAME
nwadmin, networker − graphical administration interface to NetWorker
SYNOPSIS
nwadmin [ −s server ]
networker [ −s server ]
DESCRIPTION
nwadmin is an X Window System application. It is used to administer and monitor NetWorker servers.
The server’s name may be specified with the −s server argument. When no server is specified, nwadmin
uses the server selection rules found in nsr(1m). When multiple NetWorker servers are accessible, they
may be selected from within the nwadmin command.
The nwadmin command is used to administer NetWorker servers. Clients may be added and deleted.
Schedules controlling save levels may be created and modified. Groups of clients may be formed and controlled together. Directives controlling how data is saved may be defined and changed. Cloning of save
sets and recover by save sets may be specified. Cloning of entire backup volumes may also be specified.
The notification messages may be displayed. In general, there is a panel for each component.
The current state of NetWorker servers may be monitored. The amount of data saved, the number of clients
saving, and requests for mounting and unmounting volumes, are among the items displayed. This information is displayed on the console panel.
The graphical interfaces for backup and recover are available through nwbackup(1m) and nwrecover(1m),
respectively.
A complete explanation of the nwadmin command may be found in the NetWorker Administrator’s Guide.
OPTIONS
−s server
Set the current NetWorker server to server.
FILES
/usr/lib/X11/app-defaults/Networker
The X11 resources for nwadmin.
NOTE
networker is linked to nwadmin.
SEE ALSO
nsr(1m), nsradmin(1m), nwbackup(1m), nwrecover(1m), The NetWorker Administrator’s Guide
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
SAVEGEMS(1m)
SAVEGEMS(1m)
NAME
savegems, newgems − backup a GEMStation with NetWorker, migrate to a new version of GEMS
SYNOPSIS
savegems <save options>
newgems [ −n ] −V version −E directory
DESCRIPTION
savegems saves the information in a GEMStation to a NetWorker server (see savegrp(1m)). This command
is intended to be specified as the backup command value for the client resource that is configured to
backup a GEMS server (see nsr_client(5)). savegems will backup a GEMStation by bringing down the
GEMS server software, exporting the configuration data for each GEMS subsystem, then backing-up the
exported data using the NetWorker save command. Once save has completed, the GEMStation is brought
up. A directory named backup will be created during the backup process (see FILES section below). This
directory will contain the files exported from GEMS. This directory should be explicitly listed as a value
for the save set attribute in the NSR client resource (see nsr_client(5)). After the save command completes
the backup, the backup directory is deleted.
Before the save process is started, savegems verifies the integrity of the exported files. If the exported files
appear to be intact, the save process executes, and the success of the save set is determined by the execution
of the save command. However, if the integrity of any exported file is in question, the savegems process
will not execute save, but will print a save set failed message. A failed backup will also terminate with an
abnormal exit code. The cause of a failed GEMStation backup can be determined by perusing the log files
listed below.
newgems creates the files necessary to migrate from an existing GEMS installation to a new GEMS
release. The directory argument is a directory where the files used in the migration process will be stored.
When newgems is executed, log files (see FILES below) will be stored in this directory as well, instead of
the location used by savegems.
To recover a successfully backed-up GEMS server, or complete the GEMS upgrade process, see
recgems(1m).
OPTIONS
savegems
Please see the save(1m) man page for a description of the options supported by savegems.
newgems
−n
Do not restart the GEMStation after the files have been exported.
−V version
version is the currently installed version of GEMS. This flag and value are irrelevant, but
are required for backward-compatibility.
−E directory
Specify the directory where export and log files will be written. The path specified must
be an existing directory.
FILES
/gems/logs/savegems.out.log
The standard output of the export processes. This file contains information useful for tracking the
progress of a backup. When executing newgems, this file will be directory/newgems.out.log.
/gems/logs/savegems.err.log
The error output of the export processes. This file contains information useful for determining the
cause of a failed backup. When executing newgems, this file will be directory/newgems.err.log.
/gems/tmp/backup
The directory where exported data files are stored. This directory should be specified as the sole
save set value for the client resource used to backup a GEMStation.
1.3.Build.149a
May 04, 2001
1
SAVEGEMS(1m)
SAVEGEMS(1m)
SEE ALSO
nsr_client(5), recgems(1m), recover(1m), save(1m), savefs(1m), savegrp(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
Exit Codes
0
<>0
Normal exit. This means that the backup executed normally, and a save set was correctly created
on the server.
Abnormal exit. This means that one or more files created during the backup process failed to be
backed-up, and/or a save set was not correctly created on the server.
Messages
host: /gems/tmp/backup level=level, size time count files.
This message (with the appropriate client host name, level, total save set size, elapsed time, and
file count) is printed whenever savegems is run by savegrp(1m) and exits normally.
host: /gems/tmp/backup: failed
Messages of this form indicate that the GEMStation backup failed. The log files listed above
should be perused to determine the cause of the failure.
Log Messages
Several messages may be present in the log files listed above. Diagnostics pertaining to integrity checks on
exported files begin with ‘Status:’, ‘Warning:’, or ‘Error:’. Status messages indicate successful verification
of a given file, while warning messages indicate a condition that can be safely ignored. Error messages indicate a condition that must be corrected to perform a successful backup.
NOTES
The savegrp(1m) command may retry a failed GEMStation backup depending on the value of the client
retries attribute in the NSR group resource (see nsr_group(5)). If the value of this attribute is greater than
zero, the process described in this document is invoked one more than the value of the client retries
attribute. Determining the cause of an initial failure may be difficult since the log files created are overwritten upon each savegems invocation.
1.3.Build.149a
May 04, 2001
2
NSR(1m)
NSR(1m)
NAME
NSR − introduction and overview of NetWorker
DESCRIPTION
NetWorker facilitates the backup and recovery of files on a network of computer systems. Files and filesystems may be backed up on a scheduled basis. Recovery of entire filesystems and single files is simplified
by use of an on-line index of saved files.
NetWorker uses a client-server model to provide the file backup and recover service. At least one machine
on the network is designated as the NetWorker server, and the machines with disks to be backed up are
NetWorker clients. Five daemons provide the NetWorker service, control access to the system, and provide
index and media support. On the clients, there are special programs to access the file systems and communicate with the NetWorker server.
The NetWorker system has several parts. Commands and files are only briefly mentioned here; see the
appropriate reference manual page for more detailed information. Each command has a manual page entry
in section 8. The files and their formats are explained in section 5 manual pages.
The Legato NetWorker Administrator’s Guide provides information on configuring and administering a
NetWorker system. It includes many examples and rationales for setting up and running a successful
backup operation.
INSTALLATION
How NetWorker is installed depends on the architecture of the machine upon which you are installing. For
detailed installation instructions, see the Legato NetWorker Installation Guide for your specific platform.
nsr_ize(1m)
The NetWorker installation script. The script will install both clients and servers. The
nsr_ize script can also be used to de-install NetWorker. Note that some systems use other
methods for installing and de-installing NetWorker, in which case the nsr_ize script will not
exist.
nsr_layout(5)
Describes where NetWorker programs, files, and manual pages are installed.
SERVER DAEMONS
NetWorker uses a client-server model to provide a backup and recover service. The following daemons
encompass the server side of NetWorker.
nsrd(1m)
The main NetWorker daemon. nsrd handles initial communication with clients, and starts
and stops the other NetWorker server daemons.
ansrd(1m)
The agent nsrd process, spawned by nsrd in response to a recovery, clone, or other session.
The ansrd daemon is invoked on an as-needed basis and is only present when there are sessions active to the NetWorker server. Modern versions of save(1m) do not require use of
an ansrd daemon.
nsrindexd(1m)
This server daemon provides access to the NetWorker on-line index. The index holds
records of saved files. The index allows clients to selectively browse and choose files to
recover without having to access the backup media.
nsrmmdbd(1m)
The media management database daemon provides an index of save sets and media. The
nsrmmdbd daemon provides a much coarser view of the saved files than does nsrindexd,
and therefore the resultant index is usually much smaller.
nsrmmd(1m) The media multiplexor daemon provides device support for NetWorker. When more than
one client is saving files, the data from each client is multiplexed. During recovery operations, the data is demultiplexed and sent back to the requesting clients. When the multiple
devices are enabled, several of these daemons may be active simultaneously.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSR(1m)
NSR(1m)
ADMINISTRATION
NetWorker is administered via resources and attributes. Every resource has one or more attributes associated with it. For example, a device is a NetWorker resource type; an attribute of devices is the device type,
for example, 4mm or 8mm. The NetWorker resource format is documented in nsr_resource(5). There is
also a manual page for each NetWorker resource in section 5 of the manual.
Resource files are not normally edited by hand. Rather, a NetWorker tool (usually nwadmin(1m) or nsradmin(1m)) is used to modify resource files dynamically so that values can be checked and changes can be
propagated automatically to the interested programs. The following are tools that are used to administer
various aspects of NetWorker.
nwadmin(1m)
Monitors the activity of and administers NetWorker servers. The nwadmin command is an
X Window System application, using a Motif look and feel. The nwadmin command is
most users’ primary interface to NetWorker.
nsradmin(1m)
A curses(3) based tool for the administration of NetWorker servers.
nsrwatch(1m)
A curses(3) based tool to monitor the activity of NetWorker servers.
nsrmm(1m)
Media manager command. The nsrmm command is used to label, mount, unmount, delete
and purge volumes. Mount requests are generated by nsrmmd, and displayed by nwadmin
or nsrwatch. The size of the on-line user file indexes may be controlled by deleting and
purging volumes.
nsrjb(1m)
The NetWorker jukebox-controlling command. When dealing with a jukebox, nsrjb, rather
than nsrmm, should be used to label, load, and unload the volumes contained within a jukebox.
nsrim(1m)
Automatically manages the on-line index. It is usually run periodically by savegrp.
mminfo(1m) Provides information about volumes and save sets.
nsrck(1m)
Checks and repairs the NetWorker on-line index. It is run automatically when nsrd starts up
if the databases were not closed cleanly due to a system crash.
nsr_shutdown(1m)
A shell script used to safely shut down the local NetWorker server. The nsr_shutdown
script can only be run by the super user.
SAVING FILES
NetWorker supports both scheduled and manual saving of files and filesystems. Each client may be scheduled to save all or part of its filesystems. Different clients may be scheduled to begin saving at different
times.
save(1m)
A command-line-based tool used to back up a specified file or group of files. The save command may be run manually by users and administrators, or automatically by savegrp.
nwbackup(1m)
A Motif-based tool for backing up files. The nwbackup command is the graphical equivalent of save.
savegrp(1m) Used to initiate the backup of a group of client machines. Usually started automatically by
the NetWorker server. The savegrp command also backs up the clients’ on-line file indexes,
which are stored on the server. When backing up the server itself, a bootstrap save set is
also created.
nsrexec(1m) The agent savegrp process, spawned by savegrp. The nsrexec command monitors the
progress of NetWorker commands.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSR(1m)
NSR(1m)
nsrclone(1m)
The NetWorker save set/volume cloning command. Using nsrclone, clones, or exact replicas, of save sets or entire volumes can be made. Clone data is indistinguishable from the
original data, except for the NetWorker media volumes upon which the data reside.
nsrexecd(1m)
NetWorker-specific remote execution service which runs on NetWorker clients. Used by
savegrp to start save and savefs on client machines.
savefs(1m)
Used by savegrp to determine characteristics of a client, and to map the save set All to the
current list of all save sets on a client.
RECOVERING FILES
NetWorker maintains an on-line index of user files that have been saved. Users may browse the index and
select files for recovery. This information is used to build a representation of the file heirarchy as of any
time in the past. NetWorker then locates the correct volume and recovers the requested files.
recover(1m)
Browses the on-line user file index and selects files and filesystems to recover.
nwrecover(1m) A Motif-based tool for recovering files. The nwrecover command is the graphical equivalent of recover.
mmrecov(1m)
Used only for disaster recovery. Recovers the special bootstrap index and the server’s online file index. The recover or nwrecover commands are used to recover other on-line
file indexes.
scanner(1m)
Verifies correctness and integrity of NetWorker volumes. Can also recover complete save
sets and rebuild the on-line file and media indexes.
nsr_crash(1m) A man page describing crash recovery techniques.
nsrinfo(1m)
Used to generate reports about the contents of a client’s file index.
APPLICATION SPECIFIC MODULES
In order to process user files in an optimal manner, NetWorker provides the ASM mechanism. Pattern
matching is used to select files for processing by the different ASMs. The patterns and associated ASMs are
described in nsr(5). The save command keeps track of which ASMs were used to process a file so that
recover may use the same ASMs to recover the file.
uasm(1m)
UNIX filesystem specific save/recover module. The uasm man page documents the general rules for all ASMs. The uasm command and its man page actually comprise several
additional ASMs, including compressasm, mailasm, and xlateasm, to name a few.
nsrindexasm(1m)
Processes the on-line user file indexes.
nsrmmdbasm(1m)
Processes the on on-line media database.
SERVER LOCATION
On large networks there may be several NetWorker servers installed. Each NetWorker client command
must select a server to use.
For server selection, the client commands are classified into two groups: administration and operation. The
administration commands include nwadmin, nsrwatch, and mminfo. The operation commands include
save, savefs, and recover. Both groups of commands accept a −s server option to explicitly specify a NetWorker server.
When a server is not explicitly specified, the operation commands use the following steps to locate one.
The first server found is used.
1)
The local machine is examined to see if it is a NetWorker server. If it is, then it is used.
2)
The machine where the current directory is actually located is examined to see if it is a NetWorker
server. If it is, then it is used.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
3
NSR(1m)
NSR(1m)
3)
The machine specified with the −c option is examined to see if it is a NetWorker server. If it is, then
it is used.
4)
The list of trusted NetWorker servers is obtained from the local machine’s nsrexecd(1m). Each
machine on the list is examined to see if it is a NetWorker server. The first machine determined to be
a NetWorker server is used.
5)
A broadcast request is issued. The first NetWorker server to respond to the request is used.
6)
If a NetWorker server still has not been found, then the local machine is used.
The administrative commands only use step 1.
SECURITY
Before a save is allowed, there must be an NSR client resource created for the given client. Before a recovery is allowed, the server validates client access by checking the remote access attribute in the NSR client
resource (see nsr_client(5)).
The savegrp(1m) command initiates the save(1m) command on each client machine in an NSR group by
using the nsrexecd(1m) remote save execution service. See the nsrexecd(1m) man page for details. For
backward compatibility with older versions of NetWorker, savegrp(1m) will fall back on using the rsh(1)
protocol for remote execution if nsrexecd is not running on a particular client.
Access to the NSR resources through the nsradmin(1m) or nwadmin(1m) commands is controlled by the
administrator attribute on the NSR server resource (see nsr_service(5)). This attribute has a list of names
of the users who have permission to administer that resources. Names that begin with an ampersand (&)
denote netgroups (see netgroup(5)). Also names can be of the form user@host or user=user,host=host to
authorize a specific user on a specific host.
ROOT PRIVILEGES
The system administrator can grant root privileges to specific groups of users by changing the mode of a
NetWorker program to setuid-root and setgid-group. (See chgrp(1) and chmod(1) for more details.)
When a user invokes a program that is both setuid-root and setgid-group, he may retain root privileges if
one of the following is true:
1.
The user’s name and the program’s group name are identical.
2.
One of the process’s supplementary group id names is identical to the program’s group name.
(See getgroups(2) for more details.)
3.
The user’s name is an element of the netgroup whose name is identical to the program’s group
name. (See getgrnam(3) for more details.)
For example, the mode and group owner of the recover command can be changed such that the ls output
looks like:
-rws--s--x 1 root staff 548808 Apr 18 16:04 recover
A user invoking this command will retain root privileges if (1) his name is ‘‘staff’’, or (2) he is a member of
the group ‘‘staff’’, or (3) his name appears as an element of the netgroup ‘‘staff’’.
Granting root privileges may be applied to the following NetWorker programs: nsrexec(1m), nsrports(1m), recover(1m), nwretrieve(1m), nwrecover(1m), nwadmin(1m), nsrclone(1m), nsrssc(1m),
nsrmm(1m), mmpool(1m), mmlocate(1m), nsrjb(1m), nsrinfo(1m), nsrstage(1m), nsrcap(1m),
save(1m), nsrpmig(1m), nwbackup(1m), nsrck(1m), nsrim(1m), jbconfig(1m), nsrcnct(1m), and scanner(1m).
NAMING AND AUTHENTICATION
As described above, the NSR server only accepts connections initiated from the machines listed as clients
or listed in the remote access list (for recovering). Since machines may be connected to more than one
physical network and since each physical network connection may have numerous aliases, the policies
below are used as a compromise between security and ease of use. For further information about naming in
the UNIX environment, refer to gethostent(3) or other documentation on name services.
A client determines its own name as follows. First the client’s UNIX system name is acquired via the
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
4
NSR(1m)
NSR(1m)
gethostname(2) system call. The UNIX system name is used as a parameter to the gethostbyname(3)
library routine. The client declares its name to be the official (or ‘‘primary’’) name returned by gethostbyname. This name is passed to the NetWorker server during connection establishment.
A server authenticates a client connection by reconciling the connection’s remote address with client’s
stated name. The address is mapped to a list of host names via the gethostbyaddr(3) library function.
Next, the client’s stated name is used as a parameter to gethostbyname to acquire another list of host
names. The client is successfully authenticated only if a common name between the two lists exists.
The NetWorker server maps a client’s name to an on-line index database name by resolving the client’s
name to the official name returned by gethostbyname. This mapping takes place both at client creation
time and at connection establishment time.
To ensure safe and effective naming, the following rules should be employed:
1)
The NetWorker clients and servers should access consistent host name databases. NIS (YP) and the
Domain Name System (DNS) are naming subsystems that aid in host name consistency.
2)
All hosts entries for a single machine should have at least one common alias among them.
3)
When creating a new client, use a name or alias that will map back to the same official name that the
client machine produces by backward mapping its UNIX system name.
SEE ALSO
rsh(1), gethostname(2), gethostent(3), netgroup(5), nsr(5), nsr_layout(5), nsr_resource(5), ypfiles(5),
ypmake(5), mminfo(1m), nsr_crash(1m), nsr_ize(1m), nsr_service(5), nsr_shutdown(1m),
nsradmin(1m), nsrck(1m), nsrclone(1m), nsrd(1m), nsrexecd(1m), nsrim(1m), nsrindexasm(1m),
nsrindexd(1m), nsrinfo(1m), nsrjb(1m), nsrls(1m), nsrmm(1m), nsrmmd(1m), nsrmmdbasm(1m),
nsrmmdbd(1m), nsrwatch(1m), nwadmin(1m), nwbackup(1m), nwrecover(1m), recover(1m),
mmrecov(1m), save(1m), savefs(1m), savegrp(1m), scanner(1m), uasm(1m).
The Legato NetWorker Administrator’s Guide
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
5
NSR(5)
NSR(5)
NAME
nsr − NetWorker directive file format
DESCRIPTION
This man page describes the format of .nsr directive files. These files are interpreted by save(1m) and
Application Specific Module (ASM) programs, during NetWorker backup processes. This format is also
used in the directive attribute of the nsr_directive(5) resource.
Directives control how particular files are to be backed-up, how descendent directories are searched, and
how subsequent directives are processed. For each file backed-up, any ASM information required to
recover that file is also backed-up. This enables recover(1m), or any ASM directly invoked, to recover a file
correctly, even if the current directives have changed since the file was backed-up. See uasm(1m) for a
general description of the various ASMs.
The .nsr directive file in each directory is parsed before anything in that directory is backed up, unless NetWorker is being run in ignore mode. Each line of a .nsr directive file, and each line of the directive
attribute, contains one directive. Any text after a "#" character until the end of the line is treated as a comment and discarded. Directives appear in one of three distinct forms:
[+] ASM [args ...] : pattern ...
save environment
<< dir >>
The three forms are referred to as ASM specifications, save environment directives, and << dir >> directives, respectively.
Use ASM specifications (name and any arguments) to specify how files or directories with a matching pattern are backed-up. When a pattern matches a directory, the specified ASM is responsible for handling the
directory and its contents. Any pattern or ASM arguments requiring special control or white space characters should be quoted using double quotes (").
A colon (:) is used as the separator between the ASM specification (and any arguments) and the pattern
specification list. The pattern list for each ASM specification consists of simple file names or patterns. The
pattern cannot be ".." and must not contain any "/" characters (all names must be within the current directory). The string "." can be used to match the current directory. Standard sh(1) file pattern matching (*,
[...], [!...], [x-y], ?) can be used to match file names. If a "+" precedes the ASM name, then the directive is
propagated to subdirectories. When a directory is first visited, it is searched for a .nsr file. If one is found,
it is then read. Each .nsr file is only read once. When starting a save at a directory below /, any .nsr files
on the normalized path of the current working directory are read before any files are saved to catalog any
propagated directives.
The following algorithm is used to match files to the appropriate ASM specification. First the .nsr file in
the current directory (if any) is scanned from top to bottom for an ASM specification without a leading "+"
whose pattern matches the file name. If no match is found, then the .nsr in the current directory is rescanned for an ASM specification with a leading "+" whose pattern matches the file name (for clarity, we
recommend placing all propagating ("+") directives after all the non-propagating directives in a .nsr file).
If no match is found, then the .nsr file found in the ".." directory (if any) is scanned from top to bottom
looking for a match with an ASM specification that has a leading +. This process continues until the .nsr
file in the "/" directory (if any) is scanned. If no match is found (or a match is found with an ASM specification whose name is the same as the currently running ASM), then the currently running ASM will handle
the save of the file.
Use save environment directives to change how ASM specifications and future .nsr files are used. The save
environment directives do not take any file patterns. They affect the currently running ASM and subsequent
ASMs invoked below this directory. There are three different possible save environment directives that can
be used:
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NSR(5)
forget
Forget all inherited directives (those starting with a "+" in parent directories).
ignore
Ignore subsequent .nsr files found in descendent directories.
allow Allow .nsr file interpretation in descendent directories.
The << dir >> directive can be used to specify a directory where subsequent ASM specifications from the
current .nsr file should be applied. This directive is intended to be used to consolidate the contents of several .nsr files to a single location or directory. The dir portion of this directive must resolve to a valid
directory at or below the directory containing this directive or subsequent ASM specifications will be
ignored. Relative path names should be used for file names to ensure the interpretation of subsequent ASM
directives is consistent, even if a directory is mounted in a different absolute part of the filesystem.
There must be a << dir >> as the first directive in a directive file used in conjunction with the −f option to
save(1m), savefs(1m) or with an ASM program. Also, when << dir >> directives are used in this manner,
whether first or later in the file, absolute path names should be used to ensure appropriate interpretation.
Absolute path names should also be used for each directory specified within the directive attribute of the
NSR directive resource (see nsr_directive(5)).
When a << dir >> directive is used, subsequent directives are parsed and logged for later use. When a
directory specified by dir is opened, any save environment directives specified for that directory (for example, allow, ignore, and forget) are processed first. If the ASM is not currently ignoring .nsr files and a local
.nsr file exists, the file is read and processed. Finally, any of the non save environment directives specified
for that directory are handled as if they where appended to the end of a .nsr file in that directory. If multiple << dir >> specifications resolve to the same directory, then the corresponding save directives are handled logically in "last seen first" order.
EXAMPLES
Having a /usr/src/.nsr file containing:
+skip: errs *.o
+compressasm: .
will cause all files (or directories) located in the /usr/src directory named errs or *.o (and anything contained within them) to be skipped. In addition, all other files contained in the /usr/src directory will be
compressed during save and will be set up for automatic decompression on recover.
Having a /var/.nsr file containing:
compressasm: adm .nsr
null: * .?*
causes all files (or directories) and their contents located within the /var directory and anything contained
within them (except for those files located in the /var/adm directory and the .nsr file itself) to be skipped,
although all the names in the directory would be backed-up. In addition, since compressasm is a searching
directive (see uasm(1m)), the files contained within the /var/adm directory will be compressed during
backup and will be set up for automatic decompression on recover.
The following is an example of using the /.nsr file as a master save directive file for the entire filesystem by
using << dir >> directives to consolidate the various ASM save directives to a single location:
# Master NetWorker directive file for this machine
<< ./ >>
# /mnt and /a are used for temporary fs mounting
# and need not be saved
skip: mnt a
+skip: core errs dead.letter *% *˜
# Don’t bother saving anything within /tmp
<< ./tmp >>
skip: .?* *
NetWorker 6.1.1
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NSR(5)
NSR(5)
<< ./export/swap >>
swapasm: *
# Translate all mailboxes. Also, use mailasm to save each
# mail file to maintain mail file locking conventions and
# to preserve the last file access time.
<< ./usr/spool/mail >>
xlateasm: .
mailasm: *
# Allow .nsr files to be interpreted in /nsr, even if we
# are currently ignoring .nsr files. NetWorker
# applications (such as nsrindexd) set up their own private
# .nsr files which save index files more intelligently.
<< ./nsr >>
allow
# We can rebuild any .o files in /usr/src
# from sources except those in /usr/src/sys.
<< ./usr/src >>
+skip: *.o
<< ./usr/src/sys >>
forget
FILES
.nsr
save directive file in each directory
SEE ALSO
sh(1), nsr_directive(5), nsrindexasm(1m), nsrmmdbasm(1m), recover(1m), save(1m), savefs(1m),
uasm(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
3
NSR_ARCHIVE_REQUEST(5)
NSR_ARCHIVE_REQUEST(5)
NAME
nsr_archive_request − NetWorker resource type ‘‘NSR archive request’’
SYNOPSIS
type: NSR archive request
DESCRIPTION
Each NSR archive request is described by a single resource of type NSR archive request (see
nsr_resource(5)). To edit the NSR archive request resources for a NetWorker server type:
nsradmin -c "type:NSR archive request"
See the nsradmin(1m) manual page for more information on using the NetWorker administration program.
The archive request resource may also be edited using the nwadmin(1m) command.
This resource allows administrators to set up an archive to occur later or to set up frequent archives of a set
of data. The administrator can run an archive on a specified client within the next 24 hours. The archive is
executed via the nsralist(1m)) command.
ATTRIBUTES
The following attributes are defined for resource type NSR archive request. The information in parentheses describes how the attribute values are accessed. Read-only indicates that the value cannot be changed
by an administrator. Read/write means the value can be set as well as read. Hidden means it is an
attribute of interest only to programs or experts. Hidden attributes can only be seen when the hidden option
is turned on in nsradmin(1m) or by selecting the details Menu Item in the View Menu for a particular window in nwadmin(1m). Choice means that the value of the attribute can only be one from a list specific to
that attribute (for example, status can be start now or start later). Dynamic attributes have values which
change rapidly. Encrypted attributes contain data that is not displayed in its original form. The assumption is that the data is sensitive in nature and needs to be protected from accidental disclosure. Several
additional attributes (for example, administrator) are common to all resources, and are described in
nsr_resource(5).
annotation
(read/write)
This attribute contains the annotation text associated with the archive save set generated from this
archive request.
Example: annotation: Product Release 4.1;
archive clone pool
(read/write)
This attribute indicates the archive clone media pool the archive request should use when cloning
the archive save set generated by this archive request.
Example: archive clone pool: Archive clone;
archive completion
(read/write)
A notification action to be executed to send status of the archive request to.
Example: archive completion: /usr/ucb/mail -s "Product Archive" systemadmin;
archive pool
(read/write)
This attribute can be used to override the normal media pool selection applied to the archive save
set generated from the archive request. Selecting a pool will direct the archive to that media pool.
Example: archive pool: Archive;
client
(read/write)
This attribute indicates what NetWorker archive client the archive request is to be executed on.
Example: client: neptune;
clone
(read/write)
This attribute controls whether the archive save set generated by the archive request is to be
cloned. A value of Yes implies the archive save set should be cloned. A value of No does not
imply cloning.
Example: clone: No;
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NSR_ARCHIVE_REQUEST(5)
cloned
NSR_ARCHIVE_REQUEST(5)
(read/write, hidden)
This attribute is unused.
Example: cloned: No;
completion time (read/write, hidden)
This attribute indicates when the archive request completed. The format is "day-of-week month
day hours:minutes:seconds year".
Example: "Thu Oct 22 17:00:37 1994";;
directive
(read/write)
This attribute specifies the directive to use when running the archive. The default value is nothing
selected. The valid choices for the directive resource are names of the currently defined ‘NSR
directive’ resources, see nsr_directive(5).
Example: directive: Default with compression;
grooming
(read/write)
This attribute indicates any grooming actions to be taken once the archive save set generated by
the archive request has been created, verified, and cloned. A value of none implies no action. A
value of remove implies the files and directories specified in the save set attribute will be removed
via the rmdir(2) and unlink(2) system calls.
Example: grooming: none;
log
(read/write, hidden)
This attribute contains any information pertaining to the execution of the nsralist command.
Example: log:; name
(read/write) This attribute specifies the name of this NetWorker
archive request.
Example: name: Product Source Tree;
save set (read/write)
This attribute lists the path names to be archived on the archive client. The names should be separated by a comma and a space (", ").
Example: save set: /product/src, /accounting/db;
start time
(read/write)
This attribute determines when the archive request will be run. The status attribute (see above)
must be set to start later for the archive request to be scheduled. The 24 hour clock format is
"hours:minutes".
Example: start time: 3:33;
status
(read/write, choice)
This attribute determines if an archive request should be run. No value implies the archive request
is not scheduled. Selecting start now causes the archive request to be run immediately. Selecting
start later causes the archive request to be run at the time specified by the start time attribute.
Example: status:;
verified (read/write, hidden)
This attribute is unused.
Example: verified: No;
verify
(read/write, choice)
This attribute indicates the archive request should verify the archive. See nsr_archive(5) for more
information on archiving. Selecting the Yes choice causes the verification to occur. Selecting the
No choice will not cause any verification. If the user also requests that the archive save set be
cloned, the verification is done on the clone since the cloning operation will have verified the original archive save set.
Example: verify: Yes;
EXAMPLE
Note: the hidden options are not shown in this example.
A resource to define an archive request, called Product:
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NSR_ARCHIVE_REQUEST(5)
type:
name:
annotation:
status:
start time:
client:
save set:
directive:
archive pool:
verify:
clone:
archive clone pool:
grooming:
archive completion:
NSR_ARCHIVE_REQUEST(5)
NSR archive request;
Product Source;
Product Release 3.0;
Start later;
"2:00";
space;
/product/source;
Default with compression;
Archive;
Yes;
Yes;
Archive Clone;
none;
mail -s Product Source Archive productteam;
SEE ALSO
nsr(5), nsr_directive(5), nsr_resource(5), nsradmin(1m), nwadmin(1m), rmdir(2), unlink(2).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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NSR_CLIENT(5)
NSR_CLIENT(5)
NAME
nsr_client − NetWorker resource type ‘‘NSR client’’
SYNOPSIS
type: NSR client
DESCRIPTION
Each NSR client is described by a single resource of type NSR client (see nsr_resource(5)). To edit the
NSR client resources for a NetWorker server type:
nsradmin -c "type:NSR client"
See the nsradmin(1m) manual page for more information on using the NetWorker administration program.
The client resource may also be edited using the nwadmin(1m) command.
For each NetWorker client, this resource describes which files should be saved, the schedule used to save
these files, which directive should be used to omit files from the save, how long the files’ index entries
should be kept in the on-line file index and the media index, and who is allowed to back up, browse, and
recover this client’s files. A client may have more than one resource describing it.
ATTRIBUTES
The following attributes are defined for resource type NSR client. The information in parentheses
describes how the attribute values are accessed. Read-only indicates that the value cannot be changed by
an administrator. Read/write means the value can be set as well as read. Hidden means it is an attribute of
interest only to programs or experts. Hidden attributes can only be seen when the hidden option is turned
on in nsradmin(1m) or by selecting the details Menu Item in the View Menu for a particular window in
nwadmin(1m). Dynamic attributes have values which change rapidly. Encrypted attributes contain data
that is not displayed in its original form. The assumption is that the data is sensitive in nature and needs to
be protected from accidental disclosure. Several additional attributes (for example, administrator) are common to all resources, and are described in nsr_resource(5).
name
(read-only, single string)
This attribute specifies the hostname of this NetWorker client.
Example: name: venus;
server (constant, single string)
This attribute specifies the hostname of this client’s NetWorker server. The server‘s hostname will
be used as the default value.
Example: server: jupiter;
archive services (read/write, choice)
This attribute determines if this system can use archive services. This attribute can only be set if
archive support has been enabled on the server. The choices are enabled or disabled. Example:
archive services: enabled;
schedule
(read/write, choice)
This attribute specifies the name of the schedule controlling the backup levels for the save sets
listed in the ‘save set’ attribute. The default value is ‘Default’. Any currently defined schedule
names may be used, see nsr_schedule(5).
Example: schedule: Default;
browse policy
(read/write, choice)
This attribute specifies the name of the policy controlling how long entries will remain in this
client’s on-line file index. The default value is ‘Month’. Any currently defined policy name may
be used as long as the period defined by the policy is not longer than the retention policy’s period,
see nsr_policy(5).
Example: browse policy: Month;
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NSR_CLIENT(5)
NSR_CLIENT(5)
retention policy
(read/write, choice)
This attribute specifies the name of the policy controlling how long entries will remain in the
media index before they are marked as recyclable. The default value is ‘Year’. Any currently
defined policy name may be used as long as the period defined by the policy is not shorter than the
browse policy’s period, see nsr_policy(5).
Example: retention policy: Year;
directive
(read/write, choice)
This attribute specifies the directive to use when backing up the client. The default value is
NULL. The valid choices for the directive resource are names of the currently defined ‘NSR
directive’ resources, see nsr_directive(5).
Example: directive: Unix with compression directives;
group
(read/write, choice list)
This attribute specifies the group this client is a member of. The group controls the start time for
automatic backups. The value may be one of the currently defined ‘NSR group’ resources, see
nsr_group(5). The default value is ‘Default’.
Example: group: Default;
save set
(read/write, list)
This attribute lists the path names to be saved for this client. The names should be separated by
comma space (, ). The default value is ‘All’. On Unix clients, ‘All’ refers to the mounted file systems. On DOS clients, ‘All’ refers to file systems that have been specified on the client via the
‘Change Automatic Backup’ selection of the NetWorker for DOS. By default, all of a DOS
client’s hard disks are backed up.
When a client needs to have different file systems saved on different schedules, a client resource is
needed for each set of file systems on a particular schedule. For all the client resources with the
same name in a group, a given path name may only appear once. When a client resource lists the
save set ‘All’, it must be the only client resource with its name belonging to its group.
Example: save set: /, /usr, /usr/src;
priority
(hidden, read/write, choice)
This attribute controls the backup priority of this client. Priority 1 is the highest, 1000 is the lowest. Automated savegrp’s will attempt to back up clients with higher priorities before clients with
lower priorities. Note that this is only one factor used to determing the next client. The savegrp
command has many parameters to consider, and may choose a lower priority client while trying to
balance the load.
Example: priority: 500;
remote access
(read/write, string list)
This attribute controls who may back up, browse, and recover a client’s files. By default this
attribute is an empty list, signifying that only users on the client are allowed to back up, browse,
and recover its files. Additional users, hosts, and netgroups may be granted permission to access
this client’s files by adding their names to this attribute. Netgroup names must be preceded by an
ampersand (’&’). Input of the form <user>@<host> or <host>/<user>, grants access to the
client’s files to the specified users. The <user> and/or <host> may be a wild card, "*". If a user
name is a wild card, it means all users at the host are granted access to the client’s data. When a
host name is a wild card, that user on all hosts is granted access to the client’s data. All users on a
host may also be granted access to the client’s data by just listing the host’s name, that is, <host> is
equivalent to *@<host> or <host>/*. Note that this attribute does not override file system permissions, the user still needs the necessary file system permissions to back up, browse, or recover a
file. The following example grants access to the client’s data for all users that satisfy at least one
of the following criteria, <user name, user’s hostname, server’s domain> is a member of the netgroup "netadmins", the user is from the host mars, the user is from the host jupiter, the user’s name
is sam from host pluto, or the user’s id is root from any host.
Example: remote access: &netadmins, mars, *@jupiter, sam@pluto, */root;
NetWorker 6.1.1
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NSR_CLIENT(5)
NSR_CLIENT(5)
remote user
(read/write, string)
This attribute has several uses. For those clients that are accessed via the rsh(1) protocol (new
clients use nsrexecd(1m) instead), this attribute specifies the user login name the NetWorker
server will use to authenticate itself with the client. The default value is NULL, implying that
‘root’ should be used. When savegrp-p (see savegrp(1m)) is run on the NetWorker server, the
server runs commands on the client to determine which files to save. Note that when the nsrexecd(1m) protocol is used to access the client, the remote user attribute is not used for authentication.
Certain clients, such as NetWare fileservers, use this attribute along with the password attribute,
below, to gain access to the files being backed up. Other clients that back up application data, such
as Sybase databases, use this attribute along with the password to gain access to the application
data. There may be a different value of this attribute for each resource that describes the same
client.
NDMP clients use this attribute along with the password attribute to configure access to a NDMP
server. The same username (remote user attribute) and password should be configured in the
device resource as they are configured for the NDMP server.
Example: remote user: operator;
password
(read/write, encrypted)
The savegrp command uses this attribute when initiating the savefs and save commands on the
client’s machine. The savefs and save commands use the password to gain access to the files
being backed up. If a password is given, then the "remote user" attribute for the client resource
must also be defined. There may be a different value of this attribute for each resource that
describes the same client.
This attribute does not need to be set for existing Unix clients that are not backing up any application specific data.
This attribute is also used in conjunction with the remote user attribute to configure access to a
NDMP server.
backup command
(read/write, string)
The remote command to run to back up data for this client and save sets. This command can be
used to perform pre and post backup processing and defaults to the save command. The value
must not include a path and must start with the prefix "save" or "nsr".
Example: backup command: savemsg;
executable path
(read/write, string, hidden)
This attribute specifies the path to use when the NetWorker server is executing commands on the
client. When no path is specified, the "remote user’s" $PATH is used.
Example: executable path: /etc/nsr;
server network interface (read/write, string, hidden)
The name of the network interface on the server to be used for saves and recovers.
Example: server network interface: mars-2;
aliases (read/write, string list, hidden)
This attribute is a list of aliases (nicknames) for the client machine that queries can match. If this
list is empty, match on client name alone.
Example: aliases: mars;
owner notification
(read/write, hidden)
A notification action to be executed to send the contents of status messages to the owner/primary
user of a machine (for example, savegrp completion messages).
Example: owner notification: /usr/ucb/mail -s "mars’ owner notification" carl@mars;
statistics
(constant, hidden, dynamic)
This attribute contains three values: the size of the client’s on-line file index in kilobytes, the number of kilobytes actually used, and the number of entries in the index.
Example:
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NSR_CLIENT(5)
NSR_CLIENT(5)
statistics: elapsed = 1761860, index size (KB) = 776,
amount used (KB) = 680, entries = 2216;
index save set (update-only, hidden, dynamic)
This attribute specifies the client file index save set to purge when the index operation is set to
purging oldest cycle.
Example: index save set: /;
index path
(read/write, hidden)
This attribute is used to allow the NetWorker administrator to balance NetWorker online file index
disk utilization across multiple disk partitions. If set, this attribute contains the full path to the
directory containing the client’s online file index. Note that the last component of the path must
match the name attribute of the client resource (see above). If left blank, the index path defaults to
the path /nsr/index/name, where name is the name attribute from the client resource.
Example: index path: /disk2/index/venus;
index message
(update-only, hidden, dynamic)
This attribute contains the ending status message for the previous index operation. This attribute is
typically blank, indicating that the previous operation completed successfully.
Example: index message:;
index operation start (update-only, hidden, dynamic)
This attribute contains the starting time of the current index operation. This attribute is a null
string ("") when the operation is ‘Idle’. The format is weekday followed by hour and minutes.
Example: index operation start: Wednesday 02:45;
index progress
(update-only, hidden, dynamic)
This attribute contains the progress the index has made towards finishing the current task. This
attribute is blank when the operation is ‘Idle’. The progress is expressed as a percentage.
Example: index progress: 45;
index operation
(update-only, hidden, dynamic)
This attribute contains the current index operation. It is normally ‘Idle’.
Example: index operation: Reclaiming space;
parallelism
(read/write, hidden)
This attribute specifies the maximum number of saves that should be run at the same time for the
client.
Example: parallelism: 2;
archive users
(read/write, string list)
This attribute specifies a list of users that are allowed to use the archive services on the client.
This attribute can only be set if archive support has been enabled on the server. To schedule an
archive request for a client, root (or equivalent) must be on that client’s Archive users list, or else
root@client must be in the server’s Administrator list. If no users are listed and the client resides
in same machine as the server, only administrators and the local root user (that is, root@server) are
allowed to use the archive services on the client. A value of ’*’ implies any user is allowed to
archive or retrieve data. The ’/’ and ’@’ characters are not allowed as part of the user name.
Example: archive users: paul;
application information (read/write, hidden,
string list)
This attribute contains client application information. The use of this attribute is client specific
and should be utilized as indicated by the documentation received with the product. NDMP
clients fill in various parameters and values in this attribute separated by an equals sign (’=’).
Example: application information: HIST=yes;
NDMP
NetWorker 6.1.1
(read/write, choice)
This attribute indicates whether or not the client resource is configured for NDMP backups. If the
client is used for NDMP backups, the remote user and password attributes must be filled in. The
October 15, 2001
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NSR_CLIENT(5)
NSR_CLIENT(5)
application information attribute may also be used.
Example: ndmp: yes;
storage nodes
(read/write, string list)
This attribute is an ordered list of storage nodes for the client to use when saving its data. Its saves
are directed to the first storage node that has an enabled device and a functional media daemon,
nsrmmd(1m). The default value of ’nsrserverhost’ represents the server. See
nsr_storage_node(5) for additional detail on storage nodes.
clone storage nodes (read/write, string list)
This attribute is an ordered list of storage nodes for the storage node to use when its data is being
cloned. Cloned data originating from the storage node will be directed to the first storage node
that has an enabled device and a functional media daemon, nsrmmd(1m). There is no default
value. If this attribute has no value, the server’s ’clone storage nodes’ will be consulted. If this
attribute also has no value, then the server’s ’storage nodes’ attribute will be used to select a target
node for the clone. See nsr_storage_node(5) for additional detail on storage nodes.
EXAMPLES
Note: The hidden attributes are not shown in these examples.
A resource to define a client, called venus, backing up all of its files to the NetWorker server mars:
type: NSR client;
name: venus;
server: mars;
archive services: Disabled;
schedule: Full Every Friday;
browse policy: Month;
retention policy: Quarter;
directive: Unix with compression directives;
group: Default;
save set: All;
remote access: ;
remote user: ;
password: ;
backup command: ;
aliases: venus, venus.legato.com;
archive users: ;
storage nodes: nsrserverhost;
clone storage nodes: ;
The resources for a client backing up different file systems on different schedules:
type: NSR client;
name: saturn;
server: mars;
archive services: Disabled;
schedule: Default;
browse policy: Month;
retention policy: Quarter;
directive: ;
group: engineering;
save set: /, /usr, /usr/src;
remote access: venus, sam@*, jupiter/john;
remote user: operator;
password: ;
backup command: ;
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
5
NSR_CLIENT(5)
NSR_CLIENT(5)
aliases: saturn.legato.com;
archive users: ;
storage nodes: nsrserverhost;
clone storage nodes: ;
type: NSR client;
name: saturn;
server: mars;
archive services: Disabled;
schedule: Full on 1st Friday of Month;
browse policy: Month;
retention policy: Quarter;
directive: Unix standard directives;
group: Default;
save set: /usr/src/archive;
remote access: sam@venus, &netadmins, root@*;
remote user: operator;
password: ;
backup command: ;
aliases: saturn.legato.com;
archive users: ;
storage nodes: nsrserverhost;
clone storage nodes: ;
SEE ALSO
rsh(1), ruserok(3), nsr(5), nsr_schedule(5), nsr_directive(5), nsr_group(5), nsr_policy(5),
nsr_storage_node(5), save(1m), savegrp(1m), savefs(1m), nsradmin(1m), nsrexecd(1m), nwadmin(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
6
NSR_CRASH(1m)
NSR_CRASH(1m)
NAME
nsr_crash − How to recover from a disaster with NetWorker
DESCRIPTION
NetWorker can be used to recover from all types of system and hardware failures that result in loss of files.
When a NetWorker client has lost files, the recover command can be used to browse, select, and recover
individual files, selected directories, or whole filesystems. If the networker recover command is lost or
damaged, it will have to be copied either from a NetWorker client or from the NetWorker distribution
media.
When recovering a large number of files onto a filesystem that was only partially damaged, you may not
want to overwrite existing versions of files. To do this, wait until recover asks for user input to decide how
to handle recovering an existing file. You can then answer N meaning ‘‘always no’’ to cause recover to
avoid overwriting any existing files, or n if you want to protect this file but you want recover to ask again
on other files.
If you do want to replace the existing version of a file or set of files with the saved versions, answer Y or y
when recover asks if it should overwrite existing files (Y means ‘‘always yes’’ for future overwrite cases; y
means just overwrite this one file).
For more information on using the recover command, see the recover(1m) manual page.
If the NetWorker server daemons or commands are lost, it may be necessary to re-install the server from the
NetWorker distribution media. Once the NetWorker server is installed and the daemons are running, other
NetWorker server files can be recovered using the recover command. When re-installing NetWorker you
must be sure to install the /nsr directory in exactly the same place as it was originally installed. The
machine used to recover files may be different that the one used to save the files, but it must have the same
hostname as the original machine. Recovery of the NetWorker server and client indexes requires that the
destination machine be of the same kind as the one used to save the indexes.
If the NetWorker server’s media database is lost, it will be necessary to recover the bootstrap from media.
mmrecov recovers the bootstrap which contains the media database and the NetWorker server resource
files. Since the resource files cannot be restored on top of the ones the NetWorker server is using, it is necessary to shut down NetWorker, rename the recovered resource files, and restart NetWorker. The save set
identifier and other information about the bootstrap save set is printed by savegrp at the end of each scheduled save. It can also be displayed using mminfo -B or scanner -B.
See the savegrp(1m), mminfo(1m), and scanner(1m) man pages for more details.
If the index of any NetWorker server or client is lost, the index must be recovered from backup media
before the recover command can be used to browse and recover files that were saved from that client. To
recover the NetWorker server or any other client’s index once the media database and server resource files
have been recovered, use the nsrck command. The nsrck command recovers the lost index for a NetWorker server or client by locating the index:clientname save set produced by the savegrp(1m) command
at the end of a scheduled save. nsrck queries the media database to determine which save sets to extract
from which volumes to recover the index to the latest time. See the nsrck (1m) man page for more details.
To summarize, these are the steps you must do to recover your server after mmrecov completes.
1.
Shut down your NetWorker server (nsr_shutdown -a).
2.
Change to the /nsr directory (cd /nsr).
3.
Save the temporary resource directory created when you reinstalled the NetWorker server (mv res
res.save).
4.
Move the recovered resource directory into place (mv res.R res).
5.
Restart the NetWorker server (cd / ; nsrd).
6.
After verifying that the recovered resources are valid, remove the temporary resource directory
(rm -r /nsr/res.save).
NetWorker 6.1.1
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NSR_CRASH(1m)
7.
NOTE:
NSR_CRASH(1m)
Recover your server and client indexes (nsrck -L7).
The mmrecov command is only used to recover the NetWorker server’s media database and
resource files. Use nsrck to recover the server and client indexes.
Once the media database and server resource files have been recovered, you may recover any of your server
or client indexes in any order. It is not necessary to recover the server’s index before recovering the clients’
indexes. Moreover, if your clients have the NetWorker client installed, you may run on-demand and scheduled saves once the media database and server resource files have been recovered. However, you will not
be able to browse the saves for a client until you recover the client’s file index. You may use save set
recover to recover files before a client’s file index has been recovered.
See the recover(1m) man page for details on running recover by save set.
If the server is damaged so badly that it will not run at all, you will need to follow the manufacturer’s
instructions for re-installing and rebooting a multiuser system. Once you have the system up and running
in multiuser mode, you can re-install NetWorker (that is extract NetWorker from the distribution media and
install it, using nsr_ize(1m), pkgadd(1M), or any other installation utility depending on your system), use
mmrecov to recover the media database and resource files, and use nsrck to rebuild the on-line indexes for
the server and each client. Finally, you will want to recover files which previously existed on the machine,
but which do not exist on the manufacturer’s distribution media. This may include system files which had
been customized, a specially tailored kernel, new special device entries, locally developed software, and
users’ personal files.
SEE ALSO
nsr_ize(1m), nsr_layout(5), nsr(1m), nsrck(1m), recover(1m), savegrp(1m), mmrecov(1m),
scanner(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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NSR_DATA(5)
NSR_DATA(5)
NAME
nsr_data − Data formats for NetWorker Save and Recover
DESCRIPTION
All data in the NetWorker system is encoded using the eXternal Data Representation (XDR) standard.
When files are passed between client (see save(1m) and recover(1m)) and server (see nsrd(1m)) and media
(see nsrmmd(1m)), they are represented as a savestream, which is encoded as a linked list of savefiles.
There are currently 2 different savefile formats. A magic number at the start of each file indicates the particular type of the following savefile thus allowing for self identifying savestreams containing more than
one savefile type. Logically each savefile consists of some header information followed by file data. The
original savefile1 format uses a doubly wrapped set of client attributes describing the file attributes and the
file data is encoded as a bucketlist. The newer savefile2 format uses an alternate singularly wrapped client
attributes with the file data encoded as a bucket-less succession of self describing sections each containing a
type, a length, and bytes of data. The file data section of a file is terminated by an ending section with a
type of 0 (NSR_ASDF_END).
The XDR language description of the OS independent portion of the savestream data structures is shown
below.
const NSR_IDLEN = 1024;
const NSR_MAXNAMELEN = 1024;
const NSR_MAXCATTRSIZE = 8192;
const NSR_MAXBUCKETDATA = 8192;
const NSR_MAXBUCKETSIZE = 9000;
const NSR_MAXCLNTSIZE = 16384;
/* length of file id */
/* max length of file system name */
/* max size of client specific attributes */
/* max size of file bucket’s data (w/o slop) */
/* max total size of file bucket (w/ slop) */
/* max size of a clntrec */
typedef opaque fileid<NSR_IDLEN>;
/* file identifier */
typedef string nsrname<NSR_MAXNAMELEN>;
/* file name type */
typedef opaque clientattr<NSR_MAXCATTRSIZE>; /* client attributes */
typedef opaque wraposaverec<NSR_MAXCLNTSIZE>;/* wrapped osaverec */
typedef nulong_t checksum;
/* 4 bytes for checksum */
typedef u_long sfid_t;
/* savefile id (offset) */
struct id {
string id_str<>;
id *id_next;
};
/* id string */
/* next such structure */
struct asmrec {
id *ar_info;
nsrname *ar_path;
asmrec *ar_next;
};
/* name and args to ASM */
/* not currently used */
/* next such structure */
const NSR_MAGIC1 = 0x09265900;
/* older format using buckets & ssaverec’s */
struct osaverec {
nsrname sr_filename;
fileid sr_fid;
asmrec *sr_ar;
u_long sr_catype;
clientattr sr_cattr;
};
/* name of this file */
/* client specific file id */
/* ASM list for this file */
/* client specific attribute type */
/* client specific file attributes */
struct ssaverec {
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NSR_DATA(5)
sfid_t sr_id;
u_long sr_size;
nulong_t sr_savetime;
wraposaverec sr_wcr;
/* savefile id in the savestream */
/* size of encoded savefile */
/* savetime of this saveset */
/* a wrapped osaverec */
};
/*
* File data for older style savestream is logically
* expressed as a linked list of file buckets.
*/
struct bucketlist {
bucket bl_bucket;
bucketlist *bl_next;
};
/*
* XDR description of the original savefile1 format.
*/
struct savefile1 {
u_long sf_magic;
/* magic number (must be NSR_MAGIC1) */
u_long sf_chksumtype;
/* file checksum type */
ssaverec sf_saverec;
/* wrapped file attributes */
bucketlist *sf_data;
/* file data in buckets */
checksum sf_checksum;
/* checksum value */
};
/*
* New savestream defines and structures.
*/
const NSR_MAGIC2 = 0x03175800;
/* newer bucketless format */
const NSRAPP_BACKUP = 1;
const NSRAPP_HSM = 2;
const NSRAPP_ARCHIVE = 3;
/* backup application name space */
/* HSM application name space */
/* Archive application name space */
struct saverec {
sfid_t sr_id;
u_long sr_size;
nulong_t sr_savetime;
nulong_t sr_appid;
nsrname sr_filename;
fileid sr_fid;
asmrec *sr_ar;
u_long sr_catype;
clientattr sr_cattr;
};
/* savefile id in the savestream */
/* size of encoded savefile */
/* savetime of this saveset */
/* application id */
/* name of encoded file */
/* client specific file id */
/* ASM list for this file */
/* client specific attribute type */
/* client specific file attributes */
/*
* Defines for self describing data sections.
* The NSR_ASDF_END type defines the end of the file data.
* The NSR_ASDF_FILE_DATA_TYPE type has the file data preceded by an
* nulong_t that is the relative offset from the last block into the file.
*/
const NSR_ASDF_END = 0x0;
/* end of ASDF data */
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NSR_DATA(5)
NSR_DATA(5)
const NSR_ASDF_FILE_DATA_TYPE = 0x100;
/* normal file data */
/*
* Describes a section of NetWorker "file data" when
* using ASM Structured Data Format (ASDF) sections.
*/
struct asdf_hdr {
nulong_t typevers;
/* type of file data */
nulong_t length;
/* section length */
};
/*
* Pseudo XDR description of the newer savefile2 format.
* The new savefile2 format uses the unwrapped saverec structure
* and a "bucketless" file data format that is based on ASDF.
* The data portion ends with a 0 sized section of type NSR_ASDF_END.
*/
struct savefile2 {
u_long sf_magic;
/* magic number (must be SF_MAGIC2) */
u_long sf_chksumtype;
/* file checksum type */
saverec sf_saverec;
/* new saverec structure */
<asdf_hdr & data>
/* ASDF section sans buckets */
...
<asdf_hdr & data>
/* ASDF section sans buckets */
<asdf_hdr.typevers = 0>
/* final ASDF section type = NSR_ASDF_END */
<asdf_hdr.length = 0>
/* final ASDF section len = 0 */
checksum sf_checksum;
/* checksum value */
};
SEE ALSO
mm_data(5), nsr(1m), nsrmmd(1m), nsrd(1m), recover(1m), save(1m), xdr(3n)
RFC 1014 XDR Protocol Spec
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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NSR_DEVICE(5)
NSR_DEVICE(5)
NAME
nsr_device − NetWorker resource type "NSR device"
SYNOPSIS
type: NSR device
DESCRIPTION
Each storage device used by a NetWorker server is described by a single resource of type NSR device. See
nsr_resource(5) for information on NetWorker resources. To edit the NSR device resources run:
nsradmin -c "type:NSR device"
Be sure to include quotation marks and to insert a space between "NSR" and "device". See nsradmin(1m)
for information on using the NetWorker administration program. The mounting and unmounting of individual volumes (tapes or disks) is performed using the nsrmm(1m), nsrjb(1m), and nwadmin(1m) commands.
ATTRIBUTES
The following attributes are defined for resource type NSR device. The information in parentheses
describes how the attribute values are accessed. Read-only indicates that the value cannot be changed by
an administrator. Read/write indicates a value that can be set as well as read. Hidden indicates a hidden
attribute of interest only to programs or experts. These attributes can only be seen when the hidden option
is turned on in nsradmin(1m), or if the Details View option is selected in the Media Devices window in
nwadmin(1m). Static attributes change values rarely, if ever. Dynamic attributes have values that change
rapidly. For example, an attribute marked (read-only, static) has a value that is set when the attribute is
created and never changes.
name
(read-only, static)
The name attribute specifies the path name of the device. Only non-rewinding tape devices are
supported. For systems that support "Berkeley style" tape positioning,use the BSD tape device
name. The name given to Optical disks is typically the name given to the "c" partition of the raw
device.
A logical device type has been defined to facilitate interaction with external media management
services. When interacting with external media management services, the device name may be
determined by the media management service associated with the device where a volume is
loaded. The logical device is used to define a NetWorker device resource. The number of device
resources that can exist is limited by the number of volumes managed by the service that NetWorker may access simultaneously. The name given to a logical device is not related to any specific device, but is required to be a unique name for the device. For logical devices both the media
type and the family are set to logical. The name, type, and family are determined after the media
management service has loaded a volume into a device in response to a request made by NetWorker. The name, type, and family of the actual device are then stored in the attributes logical
name , logical type , and logical family , respectively. The association between the logical device
and the actual device only exists when the volume is loaded into the device and allocated for use
by NetWorker.
When defining a remote device on a storage node, include the prefix "rd=hostname:", in the path
name; where hostname is the system to which the device is directly attached (the storage node).
For more information, see nsr_storage_node(5).
Example: name: /dev/rmt/0hbn;
description
(read/write)
This attribute is used to store a brief description about the device. The description is used to help
administrators identify the device, and it can be in any format.
Example: description: DLT8000 tape drive in Engineerning Lab rack #2;
media type
(read-only, static)
This attribute indicates the type of media a device uses. The media type varies depending on the
Operating System/platform. Potential values, their meaning, and default capacities are:
4mm − 4mm digital audio tape (1 GB); 8mm − 8mm video tape (2 GB); 8mm 5GB − 8mm video
tape (5 GB); dlt − digital linear tape cartridge (10 GB); vhs − VHS data grade video tape (14 GB);
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NSR_DEVICE(5)
NSR_DEVICE(5)
3480 − high-speed cartridge tape (200 MB); qic − quarter inch data cartridge (150 MB); himt −
half inch magnetic tape (100 MB); tk50 − DEC TK50 cartridge tape (94 MB); tk70 − DEC TK70
cartridge tape (296 MB); optical − optical disks, Write Once Read Many (WORM), Erasable
Optical Disks (EOD), or standard UNIX files are supported; file − file device type, standard UNIX
file system is supported; logical − used when interacting with an external media management service.
Example: media type: 8mm 5GB;
enabled
(read-write)
This attribute indicates whether a device is available for use. The value for this attribute is either
yes or no. If the value is set to no, no volumes may be mounted into the device. This value cannot
be changed if a volume is mounted.
Example: enabled: yes;
shared devices
(read-write, hidden)
This attribute enables or disables all devices that have the same value for their hardware id
attribute, and so are sharing the same physical drive. Possible values are enable all, disable all or
done. After the value is set to either enable all or disable all, and the action is performed, the
value will be reset to done. The action will enable or disable as many devices as it can, regardless
of any error conditions. For example, it is not possible to disable a device that has a mounted volume. So when this attribute is set to disable all, as many devices as possible will be disabled,
excluding those with mounted volumes. For such cases, an error message will be logged.
Example: shared devices: done;
read only
(read-write)
This attribute indicates whether a device is reserved for read only operations, such as recover or
retrieve. The value for this attribute can be either yes or no. If the value is set to yes, only read
operations are permitted on the device. This value cannot be changed if when the volume is
mounted.
Example: read only: yes;
target sessions
(read/write)
This attribute indicates the target number of sessions that will write to a device. When all devices
on a host have the same value for this attribute, sessions are assigned to a device, until the device’s
target sessions is reached; then sessions are assigned to the next device on the host. Once all
devices have reached their target sessions, new sessions are assigned equally across all devices.
When this attribute has different values for devices on a host, and the nsrmmd(1m) has not yet
been assigned to a device, then sessions are assigned to an nsrmmd(1m) based on the lowest
attribute value among the host’s devices. Once the nsrmmd(1m) is assigned to a device, the target sessions value for the assigned device is used.
Use higher values to multiplex more clients onto each tape. This attribute is not a maximum number for a device, but is used for load-balancing.
Example: target sessions: 3;
NDMP
(read-only)
The NDMP attribute is used to note which devices are associated with NDMP servers. This
attribute cannot be changed after the resource has been created. The resource must be deleted and
recreated if the user needs to change this attribute for this device. The same username (remote
user attribute) and password should be configured in the device resource as they are configured
for the NDMP server.
Example: NDMP: yes;
remote user
(read/write, string)
The remote user attribute is used when the NDMP attribute is set to a value of yes. The value
entered for this attribute should be the username configured for the NDMP server.
Example: remote user: root;
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NSR_DEVICE(5)
password
(read/write, encrypted)
This attribute is used in conjunction with the remote user attribute to configure access to a NDMP
server.
Example: password: ;
media family
(read-only, static, hidden)
The media family attribute describes the class of storage media, as determined from the media
type. The only legal values are: tape − tape storage device; disk − disk storage device; logical −
used when interacting with an external media management service.
Example: media family: tape;
message
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute specifies the last message received from the NetWorker server regarding this device.
The values for this attribute may include information on the progress or rate of the operation.
Example: message: "Tape full, mount volume mars.017 on /dev/nrst8";
volume name
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute monitors the mounting and unmounting of volumes for a device. When a volume is
mounted, the value is the volume name, otherwise there is no value.
Example: volume name: mars.017;
write enabled
(read/write, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute indicates whether writing to the current volume is allowed. The value for this
attribute may be set to yes or no. This value can only be set when a volume is not mounted.
Example: write enabled: no;
volume operation
(read/write, dynamic, hidden)
The volume operation attribute manipulates the media (volume) currently located inside the
device. This attribute can be set to one of the following values: Unmount, Mount, Verify label,
Verify write time, Label, Label without mount, Eject, or Monitor device. Each of these operations may require parameters to be set.
When the value is Unmount, NetWorker releases the device. The Unmount operation is asynchronous.
When the value is Mount, NetWorker mounts the loaded volume into the device. The Mount
operation is asynchronous.
When the value is Verify label, the volume’s label is read by NetWorker, and the attributes volume label and volume expiration are set. The Verify label operation is synchronous, and therefore the operation may take a long time to complete.
When the value is Verify write time, the volume’s label is read by NetWorker, and the attributes
volume label, volume expiration, and volume write time are set. The Verify write time operation is synchronous, and therefore the operation may take a long time to complete.
When the value is Label or Label without mount, the volume receives a new label as determined
by the attributes below. When the value is Label, the volume is then mounted. These operations
are asynchronous.
When the value is Eject, NetWorker ejects the volume from the device. The Eject operation is
asynchronous.
When the value is Monitor device and the device is idle (no volume loaded into the device), NetWorker will periodically check the device to determine whether a volume has been loaded into the
device. When a volume containing a readable NetWorker label is loaded, the volume is placed
into the NetWorker media database. The volume can then be written to by NetWorker if the volume is mounted with write permissions turned on; otherwise, the volume is mounted as read only,
and cannot be written to by NetWorker. When a volume without a readable NetWorker label is
loaded into the device, the device’s unlabeled volume loaded attribute is set to yes, and the volume may be labeled at a later date. The Monitor device operation is never performed on jukebox
devices, because NetWorker only monitors non-jukebox devices.
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volume label
(read/write, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute is set by the Verify label operation and can be performed before the Label operation. If this attribute is blank during the labeling process, then the volume’s current label is reused.
volume default capacity (read/write, static, hidden)
This attribute is used by the Label operation when the volume current capacity attribute is blank.
A non-blank value is used to override the default capacity associated with the media type. The
value of this attribute must end with K, M, or G, where K represents Kilobytes, M represents
Megabytes, and G represents Gigabytes.
This hidden attribute can be modified by a user, and can be used to override default sizes when
using devices (and/or tapes) with different capacities than the defaults.
Example: To override the default capacity of a tape drive to 10 Gb for all future volume label
operations, set the value as follows:
volume default capacity: 10G;
volume current capacity (read/write, dynamic, hidden)
If the attribute’s value is non-blank, it determines the capacity of a volume during the Label operation. Its format is the same as volume default capacity.
Example: volume current capacity: 5G;
volume expiration
(read/write, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute is set by the Verify label operation and can also be used by the Label operation.
The value for this attribute is specified in nsr_getdate(3) format. A blank value causes the default
expiration to be used during labeling.
Example: volume expiration: next year;
volume pool
(read/write, hidden)
This attribute indicates the pool that a mounted volume belongs to. If this attribute is set during a
Label or Label without mount operation, this value will indicate the pool a volume is being
assigned to. See nsr_pool(5) for more information on volume pools.
Example: volume pool: Default;
NSR operation
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute indicates the current operation being performed by a device. The valid values for
this attribute are: Idle, Write, Read, Eject, Verify label, or Label.
Example: NSR operation: Write;
minor mode
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute indicates the current state of a device. The NSR operation attribute is the major
mode. The valid values for this attribute are: idle, reading, writing, rewinding, moving forward,
moving backward, error, done, writing eof, or finding eom.
Example: minor mode: moving forward;
statistics
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute reports the statistics for the operation of this device. The statistics include:
the time of operation ("elapsed"), the number of errors ("errors"), the last writing rate ("last
rate"), the max number of concurrent clients ("max clients"), the number of file marks written
("file marks"), the number of rewinds ("rewinds"), the number of files skipped ("files skipped"),
the number of records skipped ("records skipped"), the current file number ("current file"), the
current record number ("current record"), the relative nhumber of files being spaced over ("seek
files"), the relative number of records being spaced over ("seek records"), the total estimated
amount read/written on the volume, in KB ("estimated KB", to be implemented in a future
release), the total amount read/written on the volume, in KB ("amount KB"), the current amount
read/written on this file, in KB ("file amount KB"), and the current number of sessions assigned to
this device ("sessions").
cleaning required
(read/write)
This attribute indicates whether a device needs to cleaned. The value for this attribute may be
either yes or no. If the value of this attribute changes from yes to no and the value of date last
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cleaned attribute is not updated, then the date last cleaned attribute is set to the current time. NetWorker might set this attribute to yes if at the time the device is next scheduled to be cleaned it is
not available to be cleaned. In this case, the following message is displayed: device cleaning
required . This message indicates that the device needs to be cleaned. This attribute can only be
used for a device whose media family is tape and jukebox device is yes. For all other devices the
value of this attribute is always no.
cleaning interval
(read/write)
This attribute indicates the amount of time from the date last cleaned until the next scheduled
cleaning for the device. This value can be specified in days, weeks, or months. One day, week, or
month is implied if a number is not specified. If this attribute is set and date last cleaned is blank,
date last cleaned is set to the current time. This attribute may only be used for a device whose
media family is tape and jukebox device is yes.
Example: cleaning interval: 2 weeks;
date last cleaned
(read/write)
This attribute indicates the time and day a device was last cleaned. Input may be in any format
acceptable to nsr_getdate(3). Some values acceptable to nsr_getdate(3) are relative, for example, now. For that reason all input is converted into ctime(3) format, weekday, month, day, time,
year. As noted in the description of cleaning required and cleaning interval , the value of this
attribute might be set automatically by NetWorker. This attribute can only be used for a device
whose media family is tape and jukebox device is yes.
volume block size
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute indicates the block size of the currently mounted volume.
volume id
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute indicates the volume id for the currently mounted volume.
long volume id
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute indicates the volume id for the currently mounted volume in the long globally
unique format.
accesses
(read-only, hidden)
This attribute indicates the total number of operations performed on the device since it was configured as a NetWorker device. Changes to this attribute are propagated to all devices that have the
same hardware id value.
access weight
(read/write, hidden)
This attribute indicates the weight of a single operation performed on the device. The "accesses"
attribute will be incremented by "access weight" each time an operation is performed on the
device. The higher the weight, the less often the device will be selected for new operations.
Changes to this attribute are propagated to all devices that have the same hardware id value.
consecutive errors
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute indicates the current number of consecutive errors on a device. Changes to this
attribute are propagated to all devices that have the same hardware id value.
max consecutive errors
(read/write, hidden)
This attribute indicates the maximum number of consecutive errors allowed before disabling the
device. Changes to this attribute are propagated to all devices that have the same hardware id
value.
operation arg
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute indicates extra parameters to be used during device operations. Parameters are
packed into a string and parsed by the associated operation’s function.
event tag
(read/write, single number, hidden)
This attribute contains the tag (unique identifier) of the last notification event sent to the nsrd (1m)
daemon. The tag is used to clear the previous event. This attribute is used to pass information
between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed manually by the administrator.
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NSR_DEVICE(5)
NSR_DEVICE(5)
volume message
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute indicates the result of the last volume operation.
volume write time
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute indicates the time that a save set was first written to the volume.
volume flags
(read/write, hidden)
This attribute displays the new flags for the volume being operated on. This attribute is used during "Label" or "Label without mount" operations.
jukebox device
(read/write, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute indicates the media device that is part of a jukebox device. This value can be either
yes or no.
volume error number (read only, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute indicates the last error number reported for this device. This is a numeric value
encoded with the source, severity and the actual error number. Processes check for this value only
on error in a media operation when the media operation is known to update this field, e.g., a label
verify. The error number is not reset on a successful media operation, so it is not an indication of
the status of the last media operation, but just the last error number reported for this device.
unlabeled volume loaded (read only, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute indicates whether a volume loaded into the device has a readable NetWorker volume
label. This value can be either yes or no. This attribute is set to yes when NetWorker is monitoring
the device, a volume is loaded into the device, and the volume does not have a valid NetWorker
label that can be read by this device. This attribute is set to no when the volume in the device is
labeled or ejected from the device.
auto media management (read-write)
This attribute indicates whether "automated media management" is enabled for a device. For jukebox devices this value is always no. See nsr_jukebox(5) for a description of auto media management for a jukebox. For non-jukebox devices, this value can be either yes or no. If this value
is set to yes, then any recyclable volumes loaded into the device might be automatically re-labeled
by NetWorker for re-use, and unlabeled volumes loaded into the device can be automatically
labeled. When NetWorker is labeling a volume that is not expected to have a valid NetWorker
label, it verifies that the volume is unlabeled before labeling the volume. A volume is considered
to be unlabeled if the volume does not contain a label that may be read by this device.
Note: If a volume contains a label, but the label is written at a density that cannot be read by the
associated device, the volume is considered to be unlabeled. If the volume contains data written
by an application other than NetWorker, it most likely does not have a label recognizable by NetWorker, and the volume is considered to be unlabeled. With this attribute enabled, care should be
taken when loading any volume considered to be unlabeled or recyclable into the device. The volume might be re-labeled and the data previously on the volume over-written by NetWorker.
When this attribute is set to yes for a device, and the device is idle (no tape loaded into the device),
NetWorker will monitor the device and wait for a volume to be loaded. See the description of
Monitor device in the discussion of the volume operation attribute.
Example: auto media management: yes;
logical name
(read-only, hidden, no create)
This attribute indicates the name of the actual device associated with the logical device. This
attribute is only used for logical devices.
Example: logical name: /dev/rmt/0hbn;
logical type
(read-only, hidden, no create)
This attribute indicates the actual device type associated with the logical device. The values that
can be associated with this attribute are the values that are valid for the attribute media type . The
only exception is that the value of this attribute cannot be set to logical. This attribute is only used
for logical devices.
Example: logical type: 8mm 5GB;
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
6
NSR_DEVICE(5)
NSR_DEVICE(5)
logical family
(read-only, hidden, no create)
This attribute indicates the family of the actual device currently associated with the logical device.
The values that can be associated with this attribute are the values that are valid for the attribute
media family . The only exception is that the value of this attribute cannot be set to logical. This
attribute is only used for logical devices.
Example: logical family: tape;
connection process id (read only, hidden, no create)
This attribute indicates the process identifier maintaining the connection with an external media
management service.
External media management services often require a connection to be maintained while an application is using allocated resources. If the connection is not maintained the service may attempt to
reclaim any resources allocated to an application. This may include unloading a volume currently
mounted into a device. Therefore, while NetWorker has a volume mounted into a device being
managed by such a service, a process must maintain an open connection with the media management service.
connection message (read only, hidden, no create)
This attribute records any error message(s) reported upon exit by a process maintaining a connection with an external media management service.
connection status (read only, hidden, no create)
This attribute records the exit status reported by a process maintaining a connection with an external media management service. A status of zero indicates that the process exited successfully. A
non-zero status indicates an error occured while the process was exiting.
hardware id
(read/write)
This attribute represents the unique identification of a shared physical drive, which can be
accessed by multiple device resources. Each device resource that shares the same physical drive
must have the same value for this attribute. It can only be updated when the device is disabled and
not within a jukebox resource. When a value is defined for this attribute, corresponding device
messages will contain a number that uniquely represents the hardware id attribute, and will be
visible in administrator commands, such as nwadmin(1m) and nsrwatch(1m). This number identifies the devices that share the same physical drive.
save mount timeout (read/write, hidden, no create)
This attribute indicates the timeout value for an initial save mount request for the storage node on
which a device is located. If the request is not satisfied within the indicated time, the storage node
will be locked from receiving save processes for the "save lockout" time. See
nsr_storage_node(5) for a description of storage nodes. This attribute can be used for local
devices as well, but "save lockout" cannot be changed from its default value of zero. Hence, local
devices cannot be locked out from save requests.
save lockout
(read/write, hidden, no create)
This attribute indicates the number of minutes a storage node will be locked from receiving save
assignments after it reaches the save mount timeout time during a save mount request. A value of
zero indicates that the node will not be locked. This attribute cannot be changed for local devices.
autodetect id
(read/write, hidden)
This attribute is for identifying auto-detected devices. It is used by NetWorker programs only, and
should not be changed manually by the administrator.
EXAMPLE
A complete example follows:
type:NSR device;
name:/dev/nrst8;
message:writing, done
volume name:mars.017;
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
7
NSR_DEVICE(5)
NSR_DEVICE(5)
media family:tape;
media type:8mm 5GB;
enabled:Yes;
shared devices:done;
write enabled:Yes;
read only:No;
target sessions:4;
volume label:mars.017;
volume default capacity:;
volume current capacity:5000 MB;
volume expiration:"Thu Sep 21 17:23:37 1996";
volume pool:Default;
volume flags:;
volume operation:;
volume write time:;
volume block size:32 KB;
volume id:32449;
accesses:199;
access weight:1;
consecutive errors:0;
max consecutive errors:20;
operation arg:;
volume message:;
NSR operation:;
minor mode:idle;
jukebox device:Yes;
statistics:elapsed = 257572, errors = 0, last rate = 397,
max clients = 3, file marks = 22, rewinds = 4,
files skipped = 1976, records skipped = 0,
current file = 2389, current record = 162,
seek files = 0, seek records = 0,
estimated kb = 0, amount kb = 6273,
file amount kb = 6273, sessions = 1;
cleaning required:No;
cleaning interval:2 weeks;
date last cleaned:"Tue Apr 11 15:10:32 1995";
auto media management:No;
unlabeled volume loaded:No;
logical name:;
logical type:;
logical family:;
connection process id:;
connection message:;
connection status:;
hardware id:;
save mount timeout:30;
save lockout:0;
FILES
/nsr/res/nsr.res − this file should never be edited directly. Use nsrmm(1m), nsradmin(1m), or nwadmin(1m) instead.
SEE ALSO
nsr_getdate(3), ctime(3), nsr_resource(5), nsr_pool(5), nsr_schedule(5), nsr_service(5),
nsr_storage_node(5), nsr(1m), nsrmmd(1m), nsrmm(1m), nsradmin(1m), nwadmin(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
8
NSR_DIRECTIVE(5)
NSR_DIRECTIVE(5)
NAME
nsr_directive − NetWorker resource type ‘‘NSR directive’’
SYNOPSIS
type: NSR directive
DESCRIPTION
Each NSR directive is described by a single resource of type NSR directive (see nsr_resource(5)). To edit
the NSR directive resources for a NetWorker server use nsradmin(1m) or nwadmin(1m). See the corresponding manual page for more information on the use of these NetWorker administration programs.
These resources are used by the NetWorker asm family of commands when processing files, see uasm(1m)
and nsr(5). Directives can be used to improve the efficiency of backups by controlling which files get
saved and specifying special handling on certain types of files.
ATTRIBUTES
The following attributes are defined for resource type NSR directive. The information in parentheses
describes how the attribute values are accessed. Create-only indicates that the value cannot be changed
after the resource has been created. Read/write means the value can be updated by authorized administrators. Hidden means it is an attribute of interest only to programs or experts, and these attributes can only
be seen when the hidden option is turned on in nsradmin(1m) or the details view is enabled in nwadmin(1m). Dynamic attributes have values which change rapidly. Several additional attributes (e.g. administrator) are common to all resources, and are described in nsr_resource(5).
name
(create-only)
The names of directive resources are displayed as choices when creating or updating NetWorker
client resources, see nsr_client(5). The name can generally be chosen at the administrator’s convenience, but it must be unique for this NetWorker server. The directive resource named ‘Unix
standard directives’ may be modified, but it may not be deleted. Other directives can only be
deleted if no clients or archive lists are using them.
Example: name: Unix standard directives;
directive
(read/write)
This attribute contains the rules defining the directive. The value of this attribute is similar to the
contents of a .nsr file except that absolute path names must be specified for each << path >> directive. See nsr(5) for more information on the format of NetWorker directives.
Example: directive: "<< / >> skip : core";
NOTE
NetWorker comes with four directive resources already defined, "Unix standard directives", "Unix with
compression directives", "DOS standard directives", and "NetWare standard directives". The first two are
meant for use with clients running on Unix platforms. "DOS standard directives" is intended for use with
clients on machines running DOS. The last directive, "NetWare standard directives", is meant for use with
clients running on NetWare platforms. There may also be two other directives "Default" and "Default with
compression". These are old names for "Unix standard directives" and "Unix with compression directives",
respectively. NetWorker will remove the directive resources using the old names when they are no longer
of use.
EXAMPLE
An example NSR directive resource, named ‘Unix directive’, follows:
type:
name:
directive:
NetWorker 6.1.1
NSR directive;
Unix directive;
"
<< / >>
+skip : core
skip : tmp
<< /usr/spool/mail >>
mailasm : *
October 15, 2001
1
NSR_DIRECTIVE(5)
NSR_DIRECTIVE(5)
<< /nsr >>
allow
";
SEE ALSO
nsr(5), nsr_resource(5), savegroup(1m), savefs(1m), uasm(1m), nsradmin(1m), nwadmin(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSR_GETDATE(3)
NSR_GETDATE(3)
NAME
nsr_getdate − convert time and date from ASCII
SYNOPSIS
#include <sys/types.h>
time_t nsr_getdate(buf)
char *buf;
DESCRIPTION
The nsr_getdate() routine converts most common time specifications to standard UNIX format. It takes a
character string containing time and date as an argumant and converts it to a time format.
The character string consists of zero or more specifications of the following form:
tod
A tod is a time of day, which is of the form hh[:mm[:ss]] (or hhmm) [meridian] [zone]. If no
meridian − am or pm − is specified, a 24-hour clock is used. A tod may be specified as just hh followed by a meridian. If no zone (e.g. GMT) is specified, the current timezone, as determined by
the second parameter, now, is assumed.
date
A date is a specific month and day, and possibly a year. The acceptable formats are mm/dd[ /yy]
and monthname dd[, yy] If omitted, the year defaults to the current year. If a year is specified as a
number in the range 70 and 99, 1900 is added. If a year is in the range 00 and 30, 2000 is added.
The treatment of other years less than 100 is undefined. If a number not followed by a day or relative time unit occurs, it will be interpreted as a year if a tod, monthname, and dd have already been
specified; otherwise, it will be treated as a tod. This rule allows the output from date(1) or
ctime(3) to be passed as input to nsr_getdate.
day
A day of the week may be specified; the current day will be used if appropriate. A day may be
preceded by a number, indicating which instance of that day is desired; the default is 1. Negative
numbers indicate times past. Some symbolic numbers are accepted: last, next, and the ordinals
first through twelfth (second is ambiguous, and is not accepted as an ordinal number). The symbolic number next is equivalent to 2; thus, next monday refers not to the immediately coming
Monday, but to the one a week later.
relative time
Specifications relative to the current time are also accepted. The format is [number] unit; acceptable units are year, month, fortnight, week, day, hour, minute, and second.
The actual date is formed as follows: first, any absolute date and/or time is processed and converted. Using
that time as the base, day-of-week specifications are added; last, relative specifications are used. If a date or
day is specified, and no absolute or relative time is given, midnight is used. Finally, a correction is applied
so that the correct hour of the day is produced after allowing for daylight savings time differences.
Nsr_getdate accepts most common abbreviations for days, months, etc.; in particular, it will recognize them
with upper or lower case first letter, and will recognize three-letter abbreviations for any of them, with or
without a trailing period. Units, such as weeks, may be specified in the singular or plural. Timezone and
meridian values may be in upper or lower case, and with or without periods.
SEE ALSO
ctime(3), date(1), ftime(3c), localtime(2), time(2).
BUGS
The grammar and scanner are rather primitive; certain desirable and unambiguous constructions are not
accepted. Worse yet, the meaning of some legal phrases is not what is expected; next week is identical to 2
weeks.
The daylight savings time correction is not perfect, and can get confused if handed times between midnight
and 2:00 am on the days that the reckoning changes.
Because localtime(2) accepts an old-style time format without zone information, passing nsr_getdate a current time containing a different zone will probably fail.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSR_GROUP(5)
NSR_GROUP(5)
NAME
nsr_group − NetWorker resource type ‘‘NSR group’’
SYNOPSIS
type: NSR group
DESCRIPTION
Each NetWorker group is described by a single resource of type NSR group (see nsr_resource(5)). To
edit the NSR group resources for a NetWorker server type:
nsradmin −c "type:NSR group"
or use the nwadmin(1m) GUI. See the nsradmin(1m) manual page for more information on using the
NetWorker administration program.
These resources control when a group of NetWorker clients begin saving data and whether backups are
started automatically each day. Each NSR client resource (see nsr_client(5)) lists the groups of which that
client (or save sets for that client) is a member. Groups can only be deleted if no clients are members of
them.
ATTRIBUTES
The following attributes are defined for resource type NSR group. The information in parentheses
describes how the attribute values are accessed. Create-only indicates that the value cannot be changed by
an administrator once the resource is created. Read/write means the value can be set as well as read at any
time. Choice indicates that the value can only be selected from a given list. Yes/no means only a yes or no
choice is possible. Static attributes change values rarely, if ever. Dynamic attributes have values which
change rapidly. Hidden means it is an attribute of interest only to programs or experts, and these attributes
can only be seen when the hidden option is turned on in nsradmin(1m). For example, an attribute marked
(create-only, static) has a value which is set when the attribute is created and never changes. Several additional attributes (e.g. administrator) are common to all resources, and are described in nsr_resource(5).
name
(create-only)
This attribute contains the name of the group defined by this resource. The name must be unique
for this NetWorker server, but otherwise can be anything that makes sense to the administrator.
This name will appear as a choice attribute of each NSR client and NSR pool(5) resource. The
NSR group resource named ‘Default’ may be modified, but it may not be removed. The name can
only be specified when the group is created.
Example: name: marketing;
autostart
(read/write, choice)
The autostart attribute determines if this group will be saved automatically every day. It may be
one of three values: Enabled, Disabled or Start now. When the value is Enabled, the members
of this group will start saving data at the time specified in the start time attribute. When the value
is Disabled, the member of this group will not automatically start saving their data. When the
Start now value is specified, the member clients will start saving their data immediately. The
attribute will then return to its prior value.
Example: autostart: Enabled;
autorestart
(read/write, choice, hidden)
This controls whether this group should be automatically restarted when an incomplete run (due to
a power failure or administrator intervention) is noticed during NetWorker server startup. Like the
autostart attribute, setting this attribute’s value to Restart now causes NetWorker to restart the
group immediately. Enabling autorestart only has an effect if autostart is also enabled.
stop now
(read/write, choice, hidden)
Setting this value to ‘True’ when this group is running causes this group to abort all of its saves
immediately. Once the group is stopped, the value is set back to ‘False’. These are the only valid
values.
start time
(read/write)
The start time attribute specifies the time of day when this group will start saving. The NetWorker
server’s local time is used. The time is specified as "hours:minutes". Note that the quotes may be
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSR_GROUP(5)
NSR_GROUP(5)
necessary when using character-based administration tools such as the nsradmin program because
of the colon in the value. The hours may range from 0 to 23 (using a 24 hour clock) and the minutes range from 0 to 59.
Example: start time: "4:53";
last start
(read/write, hidden)
The last time this group was started. This attribute is for informational purposes only, and changing it has no effect on the system.
interval
(read/write, static, hidden)
The interval time specifies how often this group is to be run automatically by NetWorker. Manually starting a group overrides the interval. The default value is 24:00, which means run once a
day.
force incremental (read/write, static, hidden, choice)
Setting this attribute to ‘Yes’ will force an incremental level of a savegroup, when the interval
attribute is less than 24 hours. The default value is ‘Yes,’ which means force an incremental if the
group is run more than once a day. A value of ‘No’ would allow more than one full per day.
client retries
(read/write)
The number of times failed clients should be retried before savegroup gives up and declare them
failed. Zero means don’t retry. Abandoned saves are not retried, because they may eventually
complete. A client’s save sets are retried by savegroup whenever savegroup would otherwise not
be able to start a new save set. That is, savegroup prefers to start new save sets first, and only
retries when there is nothing else to do.
Example: client retries: 1;
clones (read/write, static, yes/no, choice)
Setting this value to ‘Yes’ causes saves of this group to automatically make a clone of every save
set backed up. The save set clones will be sent to the pool named in the clone pool attribute.
clone pool
(read/write, static, choice)
The pool to which save set clones should be sent when ‘clones’ is ‘Yes’. Only pools of type
‘Backup Clone’ are allowed (see nsr_pool(5)).
options
(read/write, static, hidden)
The values specify flags with which this group will be run. The values No Monitor, No index
save, No save, Verbose, Estimate, and Preview map to the the savegroup command line flags -m,
-I, -n, -v, -E, and -p respectively. Some of these values (Preview and No save) are automatically
reset when a run of savegroup completes normally.
Example: options: Verbose;
level
(read/write, hidden, choice)
This is an explicit level the savegroup will use when started automatically by NetWorker. This
hidden attribute can be modified by a user. This value is not cleared automatically, i.e. if one sets
this attribute to full this savegroup will run with a full level until this value is manually cleared.
When not specified (the normal case), the NSR Schedule for each client filesystem will be used to
determine the level. Manually running savegroup from the command line overrides this value.
The choices are the standard level identifiers ‘full’, ‘consolidate’, ‘incr’, ‘skip’ and the number
levels ‘1’ through ‘9’.
printer
(read/write, static, hidden)
The printer to which the bootstrap save set information will be printed, if one is generated by the
run of this group. This hidden attribute can be modified by a user. If an invalid printer name is
specified, bootstrap information will be included in the savegroup completion information piped
through the savegroup completion notification (see nsr_notification(5)).
Example: printer: ps;
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSR_GROUP(5)
NSR_GROUP(5)
schedule
(read/write, choice, hidden)
The schedule to use for determining what level of save to perform. This hidden attribute can be
modified by a user. This value is not cleared automatically, i.e. if one sets this attribute to a particular schedule, all clients which are part of this group will have their schedules overridden until this
value is manually cleared. This overrides the schedule specified for individual clients. See
nsr_schedule(5)).
schedule time (read/write, hidden)
An explicit time can be specified when looking at a schedule to determine which level of save to
perform. A null value (normal setting) means use the current date to determine the level.
Example: schedule time: "3:00 am 01/11/93";
inactivity timeout
(read/write, static, hidden)
The number of minutes that the savegroup command waits for any kind of activity on the server
before concluding that a savegroup descendant is hung. This hidden attribute can be modified by
a user. Once a hang is detected, savegroup prints a message indicating that a save is being
aborted, kills or aborts the backup, and moves on to its next task. Inactivity is defined as the last
time a client has sent data to the server. If a client has a very large filesystem and an incremental
is run, it is possible for savegrp to abort a save set that only appears to be hung. In these cases,
the inactivity timeout should be increased to accomodate the particular client.
Example: inactivity timeout: 30;
work list
(read/write, dynamic, hidden)
The list of saves still not completed. These come in sets of 3 values: the client name, the level of
save, and the path to save.
Example: work list: mars, incr, /usr, mars, incr, /g, mars, venus, /usr
completion
(read/write, dynamic, hidden)
The status of each save set that has been completed. These come in sets of 4 values: the client
name, the path saved, a status message (succeeded, failed, or unexpectedly exited), and the output
from the save.
Example: completion: "mars", "/usr", "succeeded", "mars: /
level=full, 6577 KB 00:06:41
625 files"
status
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
The current status of this NSR group. Currently, this can have the values ‘idle’, ‘running’ and
‘cloning’. The value ‘idle’ is set when the group is not active, it is ‘running’ while backups are in
progress, and it is ‘cloning’ when the backups are complete and clones are automatically being
made.
EXAMPLE
The default NSR group resource automatically starts its members at 33 minutes past 3 o‘clock in the morning:
type:
name:
autostart:
start time:
administrator:
NSR group;
Default;
Enabled;
"3:33";
root;
A complete example follows, with the hidden attributes shown with values reasonable for an active group:
type: NSR group;
name: Default;
autostart: Enabled;
start time: "3:33";
options: Restartable;
printer: lp2;
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
3
NSR_GROUP(5)
NSR_GROUP(5)
inactivity timeout:
work list:
30;
mars, incr, /g, mars, incr, index,
venus, incr, /usr, venus, incr, index,
jupiter, full, /, jupiter, full, /usr,
jupiter, full, index
completion: mars, /, succeeded,
"mars: / level=incr, 31 KB 00:01:01 72 files
",
mars, /usr, succeeded,
"mars: /usr level=incr,
2 KB 00:00:48
5 files
",
venus, /, succeeded,
"venus: / level=incr, 7711 KB 00:04:37 29 files
";
administrator: root, &operator;
SEE ALSO
nsr(1m), nsr_notification(5), nsr_pool(5), nsr_resource(5), nsr_schedule(5), nsradmin(1m),
nwadmin(1m), savegroup(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
4
NSR_IZE(1m)
NSR_IZE(1m)
NAME
nsr_ize − NetWorker installation and removal
SYNOPSIS
nsr_ize [ −i | −r | −u ] [ −c | −t | −l | −s ] [ −kmnqxv ]
DESCRIPTION
nsr_ize is an interactive program that installs or removes NetWorker software and files to or from a
machine. In either case, the user is prompted with a series of questions. Most questions also provide
default answers that produce the desired results in a standard environment.
Since this command installs all NetWorker software in one directory per machine architecture (the default
is /usr/bin), one should plan for the NetWorker client software to consume 13 Mbytes of disk space per
machine architecture installed. The NetWorker server software requires an additional 8 Mbytes per
machine architecture.
The NetWorker server also requires disk space for its on-line indexes of all files saved by the NetWorker
clients. On the average, each instance of a file saved to the NetWorker server requires 200 bytes of disk
space. Generally, 2% - 5% of the total amount of data backed up has to be allocated to the online index.
The script modifies many administrative files, including /etc/rpc. If YP is being used, then the administrator should consider modifying the YP master’s /etc/rpc file with the same modifications that nsr_ize makes
to the local copy.
When invoked with no options, this command makes an intelligent guess as to whether the user is installing
or removing NetWorker software, and confirms its guess with the user. If the −s , −t , −l or −c flags are not
specified when installing, nsr_ize will prompt and ask whether the machine being installed is going to be a
NetWorker server.
OPTIONS
−c
Performs NetWorker client side−only operations.
−i
Installs the NetWorker software and associated files.
−k
Kills daemons if running, without confirming.
−l
Performs NetWorker license management−only operations.
−m
Does not remove or install man pages.
−n
Does not perform any actions that actually change the filesystem, just print what would be done if
an installation or removal took place.
−q
Quiet. Does not print as many reassuring messages as in the normal case.
−r
Removes the NetWorker software and associated files.
−s
Performs NetWorker server−side operations.
−t
Performs NetWorker Storage Node side−only operations.
−u
Prepares for a software upgrade. NetWorker software is removed, but associated files are preserved.
−v
Sets verbose mode.
−x
Sets debugging flag.
/nsr
This symbolic link is created by nsr_ize when installing the NetWorker server; it points to the
directory where the NetWorker server keeps the on-line indexes of clients’ saved files. Alternatively, /nsr may be a directory that exists before invoking this command.
FILES
SEE ALSO
nsr(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSR_IZE(1m)
NSR_IZE(1m)
Legato NetWorker Installation Guide UNIX Version
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSR_JUKEBOX(5)
NSR_JUKEBOX(5)
NAME
nsr_jukebox − NetWorker resource type ‘‘NSR jukebox’’
SYNOPSIS
type: NSR jukebox
DESCRIPTION
Each jukebox known to NetWorker is described by a single resource of type NSR jukebox. A jukebox
may also be used to keep track of the resources, volumes and devices, being managed by an external media
management service that are available to this NetWorker server. An example of an external media management service is OpenVault. This resource describes the physical characteristics of a jukebox. See
nsr_resource(5). To edit the NSR jukebox resources for a NetWorker server, type:
nsradmin -c "type:NSR jukebox"
or use the nwadmin(1m) GUI. See the nsradmin(1m) manual page for more information on using the
NetWorker administration program.
ATTRIBUTES
The following attributes are defined for resource type NSR jukebox. The information in parentheses
describes how the attribute values are accessed. Create-only indicates that the value cannot be changed by
an administrator, except when the resource is created. Read-only indicates that the value cannot be
changed by an administrator. Read/write means the value can be set as well as read at any time. Choice
list means that any number of values can be chosen from the given list. Yes/no means only a yes or no
choice is possible. Single string means that only a single value is allowed. Number means that only
numeric values are allowed. Static attributes change values rarely, if ever. Dynamic attributes have values
which change rapidly. Hidden means it is an attribute of interest only to programs or experts, and these
attributes can only be seen when the hidden option is turned on in nsradmin(1m) (or the View Details
menu pulldown in nwadmin(1m)). For example, an attribute marked (read-only, dynamic) has a value
which cannot be changed by the administrator but which may change each time it is retrieved from the NetWorker server due to underlying state changes. Several additional attributes (for example, administrator)
are common to all resources, and are described in nsr_resource(5).
name
(create-only, single string)
This attribute specifies the name of this jukebox. The value of this attribute may follow the
"rd=hostname:" syntax of a remote device, when the jukebox is defined on a storage node. See
nsr_storage_node(5) for additional detail on storage nodes.
Example: name: Huntington;
description
(read/write)
This attribute is used to store a brief description about the jukebox. The description is used to help
administrators identify the jukebox, and it can be in any format.
Example: description: DLT Changer drive in Engineerning Lab;
model
(create-only, single string)
This attribute specifies the jukebox model.
Example: model: ADIC-VLS;
physical slots (read-only, list of numbers, hidden)
This attribute specifies the first and last physical slot numbers in the jukebox. The first slot number must be less than or equal to the last slot number. The numbers must also be specified as two
separate attribute values.
For Silo Tape Libraries (STL), this attribute is equal to the number of volumes allocated to this
NetWorker server, nsrjb(5) −a or −x. The number of physical slots changes as volumes are added
or removed from the STL.
Example: physical slots: 1, 54;
control port
(read/write, single string)
This attribute specifies the path of the control port for the jukebox robotics. Control commands
(load slot 47 into drive b, for example) are sent to the jukebox via the control port.
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For an STL, this attribute specifies the information required to set up a connection to the STL
server. Form and contents of the attribute depend on the type of the STL, but most often it merely
contains the hostname of STL server.
The value of this attribute may follow the "rd=hostname:" syntax of a remote device, when the
jukebox is defined on a storage node. See nsr_storage_node(5) for additional detail on storage
nodes.
Example: control port: scsidev@0.6.0;
devices
(read/write, list of strings)
This attribute lists the device pathnames of the devices in the jukebox. Each entry that appears in
this attribute must have a corresponding NSR device resource. There must be the same number of
entries in the devices attribute as there are physical drives in the jukebox, if none of the drives are
being shared by multiple device resources. In addition, they must be listed in the same order as
they are physically installed in the jukebox. The entries are specified as separate attribute values.
Example: devices: /dev/rmt/0mbn, /dev/rmt/1mbn;
number devices (read/write, single number, hidden)
The number of configured devices in the jukebox. This value corresponds to the number of entries
in the devices attribute.
Example: number devices: 2;
number drives (read/write, single number, hidden)
The number of unique physical drives configured in the jukebox. When multiple device resources
share a physical drive, each drive is represented by a unique hardware id attribute, that is specified in all of the device resources sharing the same drive.
Example: number drives: 2;
device hardware ids
(read-only, hidden)
The hardware ids of the jukebox’s devices. This attribute will have a hardware id entry for each
of the entries in the devices attribute of the jukebox resource. The entries of those devices sharing
a physical drive will have the same value.
idle device timeout
(read/write, hidden)
This attribute specifies the number of minutes to wait before unmounting a volume in an idle
device. Setting this attribute’s value to zero disables unmounting idle volumes. The function of
this attribute only applies to SmartMedia jukeboxes, or silo and native jukeboxes with device sharing enabled.
Example: idle device timeout: 10;
SmartMedia update interval
(read/write, hidden)
This attribute specifies the number of hours between calls to update the SmartMedia server’s
database. The SmartMedia database contains information copied from the NetWorker media
database. The information includes the pool to which a volume belongs, whether the volume is
full, and so forth. This information is used by the SmartMedia server when selecting a volume for
writing. Since this information may change over time, it is necessary to periodically make sure
that the data replicated in the SmartMedia server’s database is current. This attribute determines
the time period between attempts to update the SmartMedia server’s database. This attribute only
applies to SmartMedia jukeboxes.
Example: SmartMedia update interval: 12;
write enabled (read/write, yes/no, hidden)
This attribute indicates whether writing can be done to the mounted volume. This attribute is only
used during a jukebox ‘‘Load’’ operation. This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: write enabled: Yes;
bar code reader (read/write, yes/no)
This attribute indicates whether NetWorker should use the barcode label from the media if the
jukebox has a barcode label reader. This should only be enabled if the jukebox has a barcode label
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reader.
Example: bar code reader: No;
match bar code labels (read/write, yes/no)
This attribute indicates whether NetWorker should use the barcode label instead of a label template when labeling media volumes. This should only be enabled if the jukebox has a barcode
label reader and the attribute "bar code reader" is enabled.
Example: match bar code labels: No;
volume expiration (read/write, single string, hidden)
This attribute specifies the expiration time of a volume currently being labeled. For jukeboxes
interacting with external media management services, this attribute specifies the minimum expiration time for the volume to be loaded. This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed manually by the administrator.
available slots (read/write, list of numbers)
This attribute specifies the slots containing volumes available to automatically satisfy NetWorker
requests for writable volumes. When automatically selecting a writable volume, nsrjb(1m) will
only consider volumes from the list of available slots. The slots are specified as a list of ranges,
one range per attribute value. A range may be a single slot number or a pair of slot numbers separated by a dash. The first number of a pair must be less than or equal to the second.
For Silo Tape Libraries, this attribute is automatically updated when adding or removing volumes,
nsrjb(1m) −a or −x.
When satisfying requests to mount a particular volume (that is, by its volume name) or slot, all of
the volumes in the slots listed in physical slots can be used. This allows the jukebox to be partitioned, with saves restricted to a group of volumes while all of the volumes contained within the
jukebox are accessible for recovers.
Example: available slots: 1-10;
enabler code
(read-only, single string, hidden)
This attribute lists the enabler code for the NSR license resource (see nsr_license(5)) corresponding to this jukebox resource. A jukebox cannot be used until a license enabler has been loaded to
control that jukebox.
Example: enabler code: 123456-123456-123456;
enabled slots (read-only, single string, hidden)
The value of this attribute is the number of slots enabled for this jukebox. This attribute’s value is
set by the server when an enabler code is loaded to the jukebox.
Example: enabled slots: 8;
operation
(read/write, choice list, hidden)
This attribute shows the operation currently being performed on the jukebox. This attribute is used
to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed manually by the
administrator.
Example: operation: Load;
operation message (read-only, single string, hidden)
This attribute displays an error message after a jukebox operation fails.
Example: operation message: ;
operation device (read/write, single string, hidden)
This attribute is used to pass the name of the device to which the current operation refers. This
attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed
manually by the administrator.
Example: operation device: /dev/rmt/0mbn;
operation slots (read/write, single string, hidden)
This attribute is used to pass the slots on which the current operation will be performed. This
attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed
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manually by the administrator.
Example: operation slots: 1-10;
operation options (read/write, single string, hidden)
This attribute is used to pass the mode of the volume used when the current operation will be performed, nsrjb(5) −o option. This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: operation options: manual;
operation barcodes (read/write, list of strings,
hidden)
This attribute is used to pass the volume tags or barcodes on which the current operation will be
performed. This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should
not be changed manually by the administrator. This attribute is only used for Silo Tape Libraries
and is only defined on platforms which provide support for Silo Tape Libraries.
Example: operation barcodes: A01B, A0/3−5/B;
operation response (read/write, choice list, hidden)
This attribute designates a default response to questions that may be asked while performing the
operation. This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not
be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: operation response: Yes;
operation report mode (read/write, choice list,
hidden)
This attribute designates the amount of output generated during the execution of the operation.
This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not be
changed manually by the administrator.
Example: operation report mode: verbose;
operation label state (read/write, choice list,
hidden)
This attribute designates whether a volume being labeled is to be recycled or is expected to be
unlabeled. If a volume is to be recycled, it must already have a NetWorker label. You can recycle
a volume while it is being mounted. This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker
programs, and should not be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: operation label state: recycle;
operation volume capacity (read/write, single string,
hidden)
This attribute specifies the capacity of a volume being labeled. This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: operation volume capacity: 10G;
operation volume type (read/write, choice list,
hidden)
This attribute specifies types of volumes that may be considered when allocating a volume. It is
only used when interacting with an external media management service. This attribute is used to
pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed manually by the
administrator.
Example: operation volume type: 8mm, dlt;
operation ineligible
(read/write, hidden)
This attribute specifies volumes which are ineligible for the current operation. Only used when
interacting with an external media management service. This attribute is used to pass information
between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: operation ineligible: ;
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operation task (read/write, choice list, hidden)
This attribute designates a secondary task or operation to be performed with the current operation.
For example, choosing the mount after label task will cause the volume to be mounted after it has
been labeled. Currently, this attribute is only used when interacting with an external media management service. This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and
should not be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: operation task: mount after label;
operation result (read only, hidden)
Some jukeboxes support multiple simultaneous operations. This attribute is similar to the operation message attribute except that this attribute reports error messages for multiple operations. It
maintains error messages for the last 32 simultaneous operations that failed for this jukebox. The
instance of the operation that failed is stored with any error message generated by the operation.
This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not be
changed manually by the administrator.
operation instance (read/write, single string, hidden)
This attribute designates an instance number to be associated with the operation. The instance
must be unique for all current operations. The value used must be obtained from the operation
next instance attribute. This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs,
and should not be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: operation instance: 3;
operation next instance (read only, single string,
hidden)
This attribute designates an instance number to be associated with the next simultaneous operation. The value of this attribute should be applied to the next simultaneous operation request for
this jukebox. This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should
not be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: operation next instance: 3;
operation instances
(read only, hidden)
This attribute reports the instance number of every simultaneous operation currently executing.
This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not be
changed manually by the administrator.
Example: operation instances: 1, 2;
operation hostname (read only, single string, hidden)
This attribute designates the name of the machine on which the operation is to be executed. This
attribute is only used for those jukeboxes which support devices attached to multiple hosts. The
host machine may be inferred from other attributes for the operation, such as operation device. If
a device is specified, the operation will be executed on the host for the device. Otherwise the host
will be inferred from the name of the jukebox, unless a value is specified for this attribute. This
attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed
manually by the administrator.
Example: operation hostname: host1;
operation dev hostname (read only, single string,
hidden)
This attribute designates the name of the machine from which a device is to be selected for the
operation. It applies to shared jukeboxes, which can have drives attached to multiple hosts. This
attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed
manually by the administrator.
Example: operation dev hostname: host1;
operation template (read/write, single string, hidden)
This attribute shows the template that the label operation will use. The verify operation sets this to
the volume name found on a piece of media. This attribute is used to pass information between
NetWorker programs, and should not be changed manually by the administrator.
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Example: operation template: Default;
operation volume pool (read/write, choice list,
hidden)
This attribute specifies the default volume pool to use when labeling. This attribute is used to pass
information between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: operation volume pool: NonFull;
operation source pool (read/write, choice list,
hidden)
This attribute specifies the pool from which a volume may be selected when recycling a volume.
This attribute is only supported on jukeboxes for volumes being managed by an external media
management package. This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs,
and should not be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: operation source pool: Default;
operation uses left (read/write, single string,
hidden)
This attribute sets the number of times a cleaning cartridge may be used. This attribute is used to
pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed manually by the
administrator.
Example: operation uses left: 12;
volumes (read/write, list of strings, hidden)
This attribute contains a list of resident volume names. The order corresponds to the slot number.
This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not be
changed manually by the administrator.
Example: volumes: mars.001, mars.002, mars.003, mars.004;
volume ids (read/write, list of strings, hidden)
Every volume labeled by NetWorker is assigned a volume identifier, often referred to as a volid.
This attribute contains a list of volume identifiers for the resident volumes. The volume identifiers
stored could be the new long volume ids or the older and shorter volume ids. The type of volume
identifiers stored depends on whether the storage node on which the device belonging to the jukebox resides on, supports the new long volume id or not. The order corresponds to the slot number.
This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not be
changed manually by the administrator.
Example: volumes: 24198, 24199, 24200, 24197;
volume cartridge ids (read/write, list of strings,
hidden)
Some jukeboxes track volumes that are managed by external media management services. There
may be multiple volumes on the same media, for example, a volume on each side of an optical
disk. This attribute is used to track the identifier for each cartridge on which a volume resides.
The order corresponds to the slot number. This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed manually by the administrator.
loaded volumes (read/write, list of strings, hidden)
This attribute contains the names of the volumes currently loaded on the jukebox devices. The
order is with respect to the devices attribute. This attribute is used to pass information between
NetWorker programs, and should not be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: loaded volumes: mars.089, mars.003;
Using the names specified in the previous devices attribute, mars.089 is loaded in ‘/dev/rmt/0mbn’
and mars.003 is loaded in ‘/dev/rmt/1mbn’.
loaded bar codes (read/write, list of strings, hidden)
This attribute contains the barcodes of the loaded volumes, if the use of barcodes is enabled for the
jukebox. The order is with respect to the devices attribute. This attribute is used to pass
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information between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: loaded barcodes: 12345, 67890;
Using the names specified in the previous devices attribute, the volume with barcode 12345 is
loaded in ‘/dev/rmt/0mbn’ and the volume with barcode 67890 is loaded in ‘/dev/rmt/1mbn’.
loaded slots (read/write, list of numbers, hidden)
This attribute contains the slot numbers of the loaded volumes. The order is with respect to the
devices attribute. This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and
should not be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: loaded slots: 48, 3;
Using the names specified in the previous devices attribute, the volume in slot 48 is loaded in
‘/dev/rmt/0mbn’ and the volume in slot 3 is loaded in ‘/dev/rmt/1mbn’.
event tag
(read/write, single number, hidden)
This attribute contains the tag (unique identifier) of the last notification event sent to the nsrd(1m)
daemon. The tag is used by nsrjb(1m) to clear the previous event. This attribute is used to pass
information between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: event tag: 6319962287;
event message (read/write, single string, hidden)
This attribute contains the text of the last notification event sent to the nsrd(1m) daemon. The
nsrjb(1m) command will send a notification event to nsrd when operator intervention is needed
before nsrjb can proceed. This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: event message: could not unload device /dev/rmt/1mbn into slot 4;
messages
(read/write, list of strings, hidden)
This attribute contains a log of messages reflecting previous operations nsrjb(1m) has done. Generally, an entry is made each time nsrjb is invoked and for each mechanical operation. Each entry
is time stamped. This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and
should not be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: messages: 04/01/91 01:15:08 loaded slot 4 into drive a;
minimum space (read/write, single string, hidden)
This attribute contains the low water mark for remaining space. When the remaining space on the
volumes contained in the available slots is less than the minimum space, a notification is sent to
nsrd. This hidden attribute can be modified by a user.
The minimum space may be specified as a number of gigabytes or megabytes. Either ‘G’ or ‘g’
may be used for gigabytes, ‘M’ or ‘m’ for megabytes.
Example: minimum space: 7g;
jukebox options (read-only, list of strings, hidden)
This attribute contains a list of the options for this jukebox. This option is automatically set after
jukebox creation.
Example: jukebox options: two_sided;
auto clean
(read/write, yes/no)
This attribute specifies whether automatic cleaning of devices in the the jukebox is enabled.
Example: auto clean: Yes;
cleaning slots
(read/write, list of numbers)
This attribute designates a range of slots in the jukebox that has been set aside for cleaning cartridges. A range may be a single slot number or a pair of slot numbers separated by a dash. If a
pair of slot numbers is given, the first number of the pair must be less than or equal to the second.
Only one range of slots may be set aside for cleaning cartridges. If auto clean is set to no, the
value of cleaning slots is ignored and these slots may contain regular volumes. When auto clean
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is set to yes, the range of slots specified for this attribute are assumed to contain cleaning cartridges, and the range of slots specified by available slots and this attribute must not overlap.
For Silo Tape Libraries this attribute should not be changed directly. This attribute is automatically
updated, when adding (nsrjb −U) or removing (nsrjb −x) cleaning cartridges.
Example: cleaning slots: 9-10;
default cleanings(read/write, single number)
This attribute designates the number of uses assigned to a new cleaning cartridge during an inventory of a jukebox by nsrjb(1m). A cleaning cartridge is considered to be new when a slot set aside
for cleaning cartridges that was empty is discovered to be full during an inventory of a jukebox.
Example: default cleanings: 12;
auto media management (read-write)
This attribute indicates whether automated media management for the jukebox is enabled. The
value can be yes or no. If the value is set to yes, then unlabeled volumes in the jukebox may be
automatically labeled by NetWorker. NetWorker verifies that the volume is unlabeled before
labeling the volume. A volume is considered to be unlabeled if the volume does not contain a
label that may be read by the device in the jukebox into which the volume is loaded. Note that if
the volume contains a label, but the label is written at a density that cannot be read by the device
the volume is considered to be unlabeled. If the volume contains data written by an application
other than NetWorker, it most likely does not have a label recognizable by NetWorker and the volume is considered to be unlabeled. With this attribute enabled, care should be taken when loading
any volume considered to be unlabeled into the jukebox. The volume may be re-labeled and the
data previously on the volume over-written by NetWorker. For devices in a jukebox the value of
their auto media management attribute is always no.
Example: auto media management: yes;
STL device names
(read/write, list of strings)
This attribute lists the corresponding Silo device names of the devices listed in the devices
attribute. If several device resources are sharing the same physical Silo drive, as indicated by a
common hardware id value, this attribute will only have an entry for each of the physical drives.
This attribute is only used for Silo Tape Libraries and is only defined on platforms which provide
support for Silo Tape Libraries.
STL interface lib
(read/write, single string)
The path name of the dynamically linked interface library. This attribute is only used for Silo Tape
Libraries and is only defined on platforms which provide support for Silo Tape Libraries.
Example: STL interface lib: /usr/lib/libstl.so.1;
STL device sharing
(read/write, single string)
This attribute specifies how to handle device sharing. Device sharing means automatic, load
dependent, device switching of devices in a Silo Tape Library between different hosts connected to
the library. This feature can only be used if it is supported by the STL interface lib. Possible values for this attribute are an empty string (device sharing disabled) or "perm-max", where perm and
max are numbers with perm < max. perm is the number of devices, which can be reserved permanently, that is, do not have to be released, when not in use. max is the maximum of devices, which
can be reserved. This attribute is only used for Silo Tape Libraries and is only defined on platforms which provide support for Silo Tape Libraries.
Example: STL device sharing: 2-4;
STL barcodes (read-only, list of strings, hidden)
The barcodes of the volumes in the library, which are available for NetWorker. This attribute
maintains the volume names used by the Silo Tape Libraries for the corresponding volumes in the
volumes attribute. This attribute is only used for Silo Tape Libraries and OpenVault virtual jukeboxes. The attribute is only defined on platforms which provide support for Silo Tape Libraries or
OpenVault.
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STL device reservation (read-only, list of strings,
hidden)
This list contains the reservation state of shared devices in a tape library. The possible states are
"Yes" (device is reserved), "No" (device is not reserved) and "Error" (an error occurred during
release of this device). The order of the reservation state matches the ‘devices’ attribute. This
attribute is only used for Silo Tape Libraries with device sharing enabled and is only defined on
platforms which provide support for Silo Tape Libraries.
application name (read/write, encrypted, hidden)
This attribute is only used for OpenVault jukeboxes. OpenVault requires any application to identify itself when submitting a request. This is the name used by this server to identify itself to
OpenVault when submitting a request to access resources listed in this jukebox.
application key (read/write, encrypted, hidden)
This attribute is only used for OpenVault jukeboxes. OpenVault requires any application to identify itself when submitting a request. This is the key used by this server to identify itself to OpenVault when submitting a request to access resources listed in this jukebox.
read hostname (read/write, single string)
The hostname that is used in selecting a storage node for recover and read-side clone requests. For
recover requests, if the required volume is not mounted, and the client’s "storage nodes" attribute
does not match one of the owning hosts in the jukebox, then this attribute is used. For clone
requests, if the required volume is not mounted, then this attribute is used.
jukebox lock
(read only, single string, hidden)
This attribute synchronizes access to resources in a jukebox that supports multiple simultaneous
operations. This attribute is used to lock the entire jukebox. When locked, this is the only operation that has access to the jukebox. The value is equal to the instance number assigned to the
simultaneous operation holding the lock. This attribute is used to pass information between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: jukebox lock: 10;
device locks
(read only, hidden)
This attribute synchronizes access to device resources in a jukebox that supports multiple simultaneous operations. Each value for this attribute is a list of three numbers separated by "-". The first
two numbers identify a range of devices locked. Each number identifies a device by the corresponding order the devices are listed in the devices attribute. The third number is the instance
number assigned to the simultaneous operation which holds the lock. This attribute is used to pass
information between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: device locks: 1-1-10;
volume/slot locks
(read only, hidden)
This attribute synchronizes access to volume and slot resources in a jukebox which supports multiple simultaneous operations. Each value for this attribute is a list of three numbers separated by
"-". The first two numbers identify the range of volumes/slots locked. The third number is the
instance number assigned to the simultaneous operation which holds the lock. Holding a lock
grants access to the slot and any volume associated with the slot. This attribute is used to pass
information between NetWorker programs, and should not be changed manually by the administrator.
Example: volume/slot locks: 1-5-10;
autodetect id
(read/write, hidden)
This attribute is for identifying auto-detected devices. It is used by NetWorker programs only, and
should not be changed manually by the administrator.
EXAMPLE
A resource defining a jukebox named Huntington is shown. The model attribute specifies a ‘Exabyte 210’
jukebox. The control port attribute specifies the bus, target, and LUN id for the robotics device
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‘scsidev@0.6.0’. The device attribute lists the pathnames of the two tape devices in the jukebox,
‘/dev/rmt/0mbn’ and ‘/dev/rmt/1mbn’. Since the jukebox has a bar code reader, the two bar code yes/no
attributes are both set to ‘Yes’. The available slots attribute lists the slots to consider when automatically
selecting a volume to load for writing. The available slots are 2 through 11. The hidden attributes are displayed. auto clean is yes so automatic cleaning of devices is enabled for this jukebox. cleaning slots is set
to slot 1. This slot is reserved for a cleaning cartridge.
type:
name:
model:
physical slots:
control port:
devices:
number devices:
number drives:
device hardware ids:
idle device timeout: 10;
SmartMedia update interval: 12;
write enabled:
bar code reader:
match bar code labels:
volume expiration:
available slots:
enabler code:
operation:
operation message:
operation device:
operation slots:
operation ports:
operation options:
operation barcodes:
operation response:
operation report mode:
operation label state:
operation volume capacity:
operation volume type:
operation ineligible:
operation task:
operation result:
operation instance:
operation next instance:
operation hostname:
operation dev hostname:
operation template:
operation number uses:
operation volume pool:
operation source pool:
volumes:
volume ids:
STL barcodes:
STL device sharing:
STL device reservation:
STL interface lib:
event tag:
NetWorker 6.1.1
NSR jukebox;
Huntington;
EXB-210;
1-11;
scsidev@0.6.0;
/dev/rmt/0mbn, /dev/rmt/1mbn;
2;
2;
"", "";
Yes;
Yes;
Yes;
;
2-11;
012345-6789ab-cdef00;
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
2;
;
;
;
;
;
;
-, -, -, -, -, -, -, -, -, -, -;
"", "", "", "", "", "", "", "", "", "", "";
;
;
;
;
;
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NSR_JUKEBOX(5)
event message:
messages:
minimum space:
jukebox options:
auto clean:
cleaning slots:
default cleanings:
auto media management:
reset class:
application name:
application key:
read hostname:
jukebox lock:
device locks:
volume/slot locks:
NSR_JUKEBOX(5)
;
"09/12/97 11:50:56 CREATED";
7g;
;
Yes;
1;
12;
Yes;
initialize unload;
;
;
hostname;
;
;
;
SEE ALSO
nsr(5), nsr_device(5), nsr_storage_node(5), nsradmin(1m), nsrd(1m), nsrjb(1m), nwadmin(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
11
NSR_LABEL(5)
NSR_LABEL(5)
NAME
nsr_label − NetWorker resource type ‘‘NSR label’’
SYNOPSIS
type: NSR label
DESCRIPTION
Each NSR label template is described by a single resource of type NSR label (see nsr_resource(5)). To
edit the NSR label resources for a NetWorker server, type:
nsradmin -c "type:NSR label"
or use the nwadmin(1m) GUI. See the nsradmin(1m) manual page for more information on using the
NetWorker administration program.
This resource describes the templates used to generate volume labels.
ATTRIBUTES
The following attributes are defined for resource type nsr_label. The information in parentheses describes
how the attribute values are accessed. Read-only indicates that the value cannot be changed by an administrator. Read/write means the value can be set as well as read. Choice means that the value of the attribute
can only be one from a list specific to that attribute (for example, separator can be ’-’, or ’.’). Several additional attributes (for example, administrator) are common to all resources, and are described in
nsr_resource(5).
fields
(read/write, list of strings)
This attribute specifies the constituent fields of a label template. When generating a volume name,
the current value of each field is concatenated. The first field is considered the most significant,
the last field the least. If there is a separator (see below) defined, then it will be placed between
fields as they are concatenated to form a volume name. The fields are separated by commas.
There are four different types of fields: ‘numeric range’, ‘lower-case range’, ‘upper-case range’,
and a ‘list of strings’. A ‘list of strings’ consists of space (‘ ’) separated strings. The other types
are specified as starting and ending values separated by a dash (‘-’) . The starting and ending values of a range must have the same number of characters.
The next attribute (see below) contains the current position or value of each field. After a volume
name has been assigned to a volume, the next attribute is incremented. When the ending value is
reached, the current value will wrap around to the starting value. A ‘list of strings’ field is incremented by selecting the next string in the list. A numeric range field is incremented by adding 1 to
its current value. Lower-case and upper-case ranges are incremented by moving on to the next letter in the least significant position. In the example below, after aa.99, the next label would be
ab.00.
Example: fields: aa-zz, 00-99;
name
(create only, single string, static)
This attribute specifies the name of this label template. The label template is referred to by its
name in the jukebox resource, see nsr_jukebox(5).
Example: name: Default;
next
(read/write, single string)
This attribute specifies the next volume name to use. After it is assigned to a volume, the next volume name will be generated and remembered here. The attribute consists of a component for each
of the specified fields and the separator.
Example:
next: aa.00;
Using the separator and field attributes shown above, the next attribute would show: next: aa.01;
This would be followed by: next: aa.02; separator
(read/write, single choice, null ok) This
attribute specifies the character to use to separate the label fields. It may be one of ‘.’, ‘_’, ‘:’, ‘-’
or NULL.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSR_LABEL(5)
NSR_LABEL(5)
Example: separator: .;
EXAMPLES
A label resource named engineering is shown below. (Hidden options are not shown.) There are two
range-type fields defined, the first ranging from ‘aa’ to ‘zz’, the second from ‘00’ to ‘99’. The separator
attribute has the value ‘.’ and it will be inserted in between the two fields. The next attribute holds the next
name that will be generated by this template. After aa.00 is used, the 00 will be incremented. The new
name will be aa.01. After 98 more names have been generated, the next attribute will hold the name aa.99.
When this name is incremented, the next attribute will hold ab.00. After generating 67,500 more names,
the next attribute will hold zz.99. This will be followed by aa.00.
type:
name:
fields:
separator:
next:
NSR label;
engineering;
aa-zz, 00-99;
.;
aa.00;
A label resource named accounting is shown below. The field attribute defines five component fields. The
separator attribute has the value ‘.’. It will be inserted in between adjacent fields. The next attribute holds
the next name that will be used with this template. After 0.23.aa.AA.first is used, the fifth field will be
incremented. The new name will be 0.23.aa.AA.second. This will be followed by 0.23.aa.AB.first. After
1349 more volume names, the name will be 0.23.aa.ZZ.second. This will be followed by 0.23.ab.AA.first.
After using 9.45.zz.ZZ.second, the name will wrap around to 0.23.aa.AA.first.
type:
name:
fields:
separator:
next:
NSR label;
accounting;
0-9, 23-45, aa-zz, AA-ZZ, first second;
.;
0.23.aa.AA.first;
SEE ALSO
nwadmin(1m), nsradmin(1m), nsrjb(1m), nsrmm(1m), nsr(1m), nsr_jukebox(5)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSR_LAYOUT(5)
NSR_LAYOUT(5)
NAME
nsr_layout - NetWorker file layout
SYNOPSIS
type: NSR layout
DESCRIPTION
The NetWorker server filesystem has a directory called /nsr that contains log files, on-line indexes, and
configuration information. This directory can be created in any filesystem with /nsr set up as a symbolic
link to the actual directory (this is determined at installation time). The format of this directory is as follows:
/nsr/logs
Contains server logging messages. The files in this directory are in ASCII format.
/nsr/res
Contains the configuration files for various components of the NetWorker server. For example, the
server stores configuration files in /nsr/res/nsr.res and /nsr/res/nsrjb.res.
/nsr/mm
Contains the media index. Information about the contents of this index file can be printed with the
nsrls(1m) command. See the nsrmm(1m) and mminfo(1m) manual pages on how to view and
manipulate the media index information.
/nsr/index
This directory contains subdirectories with names that correspond to the NetWorker clients that
have saved files. Each index directory contains files that allow the NetWorker server to provide an
on-line database of the client’s saved files. The most important element is the db6 directory which
contains the NetWorker save records and access indexes to those records. The disk space utilized
by the index grows with the number of files saved by the NetWorker service. Administrators
should plan to use about 200 bytes per saved file instance placed in this index. There are no practical limits on the maximum size of an online index, except that it must reside entirely within a
single file system.
The format of the db6 directory is subject to change, and is accessible only through an RPC interface to nsrindexd(1m). However, the nsrls(1m) command can be used to obtain some useful
statistics from this directory. The nsrck(1m) command is used for checking and rebuilding index
files as well as recovering index files from backup media.
The data in the files in the db6 directory are stored in platform-independent order, so these files
may be migrated from one NetWorker server to another. Moving the media database from one
NetWorker server to another of unlike architecture is not currently supported.
The files in the db6 directory include the files listed below. Note that these files are for the internal use of the server and are not to be modified or changed for any purposes.
<savetime>.rec
These files contain the index records for each file saved at the savetime, where
<savetime> is a hexadecimal representation of the time.
<savetime>.k0
These files contain the keys on the <savetime>.rec file based on file name.
<savetime>.k1
These files contain the keys on the <savetime>.rec file based on inode. These may be
zero length files if the client file index is for a windows client.
<savetime>.sip
This is a save-in-process file and only exists when a save has been started and is not yet
complete. Once the save is complete, this file is renamed to <savetime>.rec.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSR_LAYOUT(5)
v6hdr
NSR_LAYOUT(5)
This file contains a summary of all the <savetime>.rec files that exist in a client’s db6
directory.
v6journal
This file contains updates to the v6hdr file that are waiting to be merged into the v6hdr
file. Any index operation includes the entries here as well as the ones in the v6hdr.
v6ck.lck
This file is a lock that nsrck uses to ensure that only one nsrck operates on a client’s
index at any given time.
v6hdr.lck
This file locks the v6hdr for reading and the v6journal for reading and writing.
v6tmp.ptr
This file refers to the working directory in which conversion and recovery will take place.
tmprecov
This is a working directory in which conversion and recovery take place.
recovered
This directory contains intermediate results of an index that has been converted or recovered. The results here are complete and will be integrated into the file index when nsrck
is run against this client file index.
/nsr/cores
Contains directories that correspond to the NetWorker server daemons and certain executables.
Each directory may contain core files from NetWorker server daemons or executables that have
abnormally terminated.
/nsr/drivers
This directory may contain any device drivers for use with NetWorker.
/nsr/tmp
This directory contains temporary files used by the Networker system.
The executables for the NetWorker system are usually installed in the /usr/etc or /usr/bin, directories
though alternate locations may be chosen when the nsr_ize(1m) installation script is run. Alternate locations are not available on SCO systems that install with custom(ADM). See pkgadd(1M) for details on
alternate executable locations for Solaris 2.x.
When executables for more than one architecture are installed, the non-native architectures are by default
put in the directory /export/exec/arch/etc, where arch refers to a given architecture name. A different location to install non-native executables can be chosen at installation time.
FILES
/nsr
NetWorker indexes, log files, and configuration information.
/usr/etc, /usr/bin
Where NetWorker executables for the native architectures are normally installed.
/export/exec/arch/etc
Where NetWorker executables for non−native architectures are normally installed.
/usr/bin, /usr/sbin, /usr/lib/nsr
Where NetWorker executables for Solaris 2.x are normally installed.
SEE ALSO
nsrck(1m), nsrindexd(1m), nsrls(1m), nsrmm(1m), mminfo(1m), nsr_ize(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSR_LICENSE(5)
NSR_LICENSE(5)
NAME
nsr_license − NetWorker resource type ‘‘NSR license’’
SYNOPSIS
type: NSR license
DESCRIPTION
A resource of type NSR license is used to describe each feature enabled in your NetWorker installation.
See nsr_resource(5) for more information on NetWorker resources. To inspect the NSR license resources
type:
nsradmin −c "type:NSR license"
or use the nwadmin(1m) GUI. NSR license resources may be created, enabled and authorized from the
GUI, but the nsrcap(1m) command must be used to update an existing license resource. See nsradmin(1m) for more information on using the NetWorker administration program.
ATTRIBUTES
The following attributes are defined for resource type NSR license. The information in parentheses
describes how the attribute values are accessed. Create-only indicates that the value cannot be changed by
an administrator, except when the resource is created. Read/write means the value can be changed at any
time by authorized administrators. Read-only means the value cannot be changed by authorized administrators. Static attributes change values rarely, if ever. Dynamic attributes may change often. Hidden
means it is an attribute of interest only to programs or experts, and these attributes can only be seen when
the hidden option is turned on in nsradmin(1m) or by selecting the details Menu Item in the View Menu
for the Server Registration window in nwadmin(1m). For example, an attribute marked (create-only,
static) has a value which is set when the attribute is created and never changes. Several additional
attributes (for example, administrator) are common to all resources, and are described in nsr_resource(5).
name (create-only, static)
This attribute holds the name of the license resource.
enabler code (create-only, static)
This code is identical to the code entered into the nsrcap(1m) command to enable the feature
named in this resource. The enabler code consists of 18 hexidecimal digits, printed in groups of 6
digits.
Example: enabler code: 123456-123456-123456;
host id (read-only, dynamic)
The unique host id associated with the computer or licensed operating system on which the
enabler has been loaded. This value will often be an 8 digit hexidecimal number; however, other
formats are possible, depending on specific platform requirements.
Example: host id: 7260d859;
expiration date (read-only)
The date on which this enabler will expire, if the enabler is an evaluation enabler or an otherwise
un-registered license enabler. The enabler expires at 12:00:01 am on the date listed. The special
prefix G means that a grace period has been allowed for this enabler. Enablers with the grace
period allowed should be registered immediately. If the enabler has been registered, and the auth
code is filled in with a valid value, the value will be as shown in the example, below.
Example: expiration date: Authorized - no expiration date;
auth code (read/write)
An 8 digit hexidecimal value used to permanently authorize an enabler. The unique, valid authorization code for an enabler is obtained from Legato by registering each purchased license enabler.
Evaluation enablers cannot be permanently authorized. If the server’s host id changes, all authorization codes will immediately be invalidated, and the enablers must be re-registered with Legato
to obtain new authorization codes.
Example: auth code: abcdef00;
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSR_LICENSE(5)
NSR_LICENSE(5)
license type (create-only, hidden)
A special code, used internally to describe the specific feature or features enabled by this license
enabler.
Example: license type: J16;
checksum (read/write, hidden)
A coded checksum used to maintain consistency of a NSR license resource, and between license
resources.
EXAMPLE
Below is a complete NSR license resource for an authorized base enabler:
type: NSR license;
name: NetWorker Advanced/10;
enabler code: 123456-123456-123456;
host id: 7260d859;
expiration date: Authorized - no expiration date;
auth code: abcdef00;
license type: B10;
checksum: xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx;
FILES
/nsr/res/nsr.res − this file should never be edited directly. Use nsradmin(1m) instead.
SEE ALSO
nsr_resource(5), nsr(1m), nwadmin(1m), nsradmin(1m), nsrcap(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSR_MIGRATION(5)
NSR_MIGRATION(5)
NAME
nsr_migration − NetWorker resource type ‘‘NSR migration’’
SYNOPSIS
type: NSR migration
DESCRIPTION
Each NSR migration client is described by a single resource of type NSR migration (see nsr_resource(5)).
To edit the NSR migration resources for a NetWorker server type:
nsradmin -c "type:NSR migration"
See the nsradmin(1m) manual page for more information on using the NetWorker administration program.
The client resource may also be edited using the nwadmin(1m) command.
For each NetWorker migration client, this resource describes which files should be saved, the schedule used
to save these files, which directive should be used to omit files from the save, the group that files will be
pre-migrated with, the high-water mark for migration, the low-water mark for migration, the minimum last
access time for file migration, the minimum file size for migration, a list of file owners and groups to
include or exclude for migration, and a list of file name patterns to skip migration of. A client may have
more than one resource describing it.
ATTRIBUTES
The following attributes are defined for resource type NSR migration. The information in parentheses
describes how the attribute values are accessed, and how they are entered in the migration setup. Readonly indicates that the value cannot be changed by an administrator. Read/write means the value can be
set as well as read. Hidden means it is an attribute of interest only to programs or experts, and these
attributes can only be seen when the hidden option is turned on in nsradmin(1m) or by selecting the details
Menu Item in the View Menu for a particular window in nwadmin(1m). Dynamic attributes have values
which change rapidly. Encrypted attributes contain data that is not displayed in its original form. The
assumption is that the data is sensitive in nature and needs to be protected from accidental disclosure. Single String indicates that only one value can be entered. List indicates that multiple values can be entered.
Choice indicates that the value can be selected from a checkbox selection. Several additional attributes (for
example, administrator) are common to all resources, and are described in nsr_resource(5).
client
(read-only, single string)
This attribute identifies the HSM client whose save sets are to be placed under migration control.
This name must be a valid name for an existing NSR client resource.
Example: client: elantra;
directive
(read/write, choice)
Directives tell the client how to migrate certain files. The choices are defined by the set of existing
directives. The default value is NULL. The valid choices for the directive resource are names of
the currently defined ‘NSR directive’ resources, see nsr_directive(5).
Example: directive: Unix with compression directives;
enabled
(read/write, choice)
This attribute determines whether the save set named in this resource should be automatically
migrated. A resource can be disabled to temporarily keep migration from occuring. On update,
any ongoing migration operations will complete. This attribute has no affect on recall operations.
Example: enabled: No;
file group
(read/write, list)
A list of the groups whose files should be migrated. A leading dash (‘-’) in a group name indicates
negation, in which case all groups except the named group’s files will be migrated.
Example: file group: staff, developers;
file owner
(read/write, list)
A list of the users whose files should be migrated. A leading dash (‘-’) in a user name indicates
negation, in which case all users except the named user’s files will be migrated.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSR_MIGRATION(5)
NSR_MIGRATION(5)
Example: file owner: pgupta, dbinder;
group
(read/write, list)
The groups this client/saveset is part of for pre-staging migrated files. The choices are defined by
the set of existing groups.
Example: group: Default;
highwater mark %
(read/write, single string)
The point at which files should start being replaced by stubs, measured as the percentage of available space used on the filesystem. Migration (stub replacement) will continue until the lower
water mark is reached.
Example: high water mark (%): 90;
last access time (read/write, single string)
Migrate only those files that have not been accessed in the past specified relative time. If this
value is empty, the last access time is not considered.
Example values: 5 days ago, 1 month ago, 1 second ago.
Example: last access time: 7 days ago
low water mark %
(read/write, single string)
The point at which files should be stop being replaced by stubs, measured as the percentage of
available space used on the filesystem.
Example: low water mark (%): 80;
minimum file size (KB) (read/write, single string)
Migrate only those files that are larger than the specified size (in Kilobytes). Setting this value to
zero causes file size to not be considered.
Example: minimum file size (KB): 5;
name
(read-only, single string)
This attribute identifies the NetWorker client and save set whose migration attributes are stored in
this resource.
Example: name: venus All;
fingerprint size (KB) (read/write, single string)
The fingerprint size specifies the size (in kilobytes) of the HSM stub file that remains on the client
filesystem after migration. Read and write operations within the fingerprint area do not cause the
file to be recalled. The default fingerprint size is 32 KB. The minimum value for the fingerprint
size is 0 KB. This attribute is only valid for XDSM HSM on Solaris. XDSM filesystems may
round the fingerprint size to a different value when migrating a file.
Example: fingerprint size (KB): 8;
file owner
(read/write, list)
A list of the users whose files should be migrated. A leading dash (‘-’) in a user name indicates
negation, in which case all users except the named user’s files will be migrated.
Example: file owner: karl, cohrs;
file group
(read/write, list)
A list of the groups whose files should be migrated. A leading dash (‘-’) in a group name indicates
negation, in which case all groups except the named group’s files will be migrated.
Example: file group: staff, developers;
preserve
(read/write, list)
A list of regular expressions, in the client shell syntax (for example, /bin/sh syntax on Unix). A
file name which matches any pattern in the list will be preserved and will never be migrated.
Example: preserve: *.exe *.dll;
save set
NetWorker 6.1.1
(read/write, list)
This attribute lists the path names of filesystems or sub-trees within filesystems to put under
migration control for this client. The names should be separated by comma space (, ). The default
value is ‘All’. On Unix clients, ‘All’ refers to all mounted filesystems, except for the filesystems /,
October 15, 2001
2
NSR_MIGRATION(5)
NSR_MIGRATION(5)
/usr, /var (and /opt on solaris), where migration of files is not allowed.
Example: save set: /usr/src, /spare;
statistics
(read/write, hidden, list)
A list of statistics about recent migration activity for the save set(s) managed using this resource.
The first value is the last update time. Subsequent groups of values contain a save set name and
statistics. The statistics are currently a date, K-bytes pre-migrated, files pre-migrated, K-bytes
stubbed, files stubbed, K-bytes de-migrated and files de-migrated.
update statistics (read/write, hidden, choice)
This controls whether the statistics in this resource should be updated to match the current values
on the client. Selecting "Yes" causes the statistics to be updated, but the attribute value will not
actually change.
Example: update statistics: No;
EXAMPLES
Note: The hidden options are not shown in these examples.
A resource to define an HSM client, called elantra, migrating and recalling files in the /test filesystem from
a NetWorker server:
client: elantra;
directive: Unix with compression directives ;
enabled: Yes;
file group: staff, developers;
file owner: pgupta, dbinder;
group: Default;
high water mark (%): 90;
last access time:;
low water mark (%): 80;
minimum file size (KB): 5;
name: "elantra:/test";
preserve: *.exe *.dll;
save set: /test;
statistics:;
type: NSR migration;
A resource to define an HSM client, called elantra, migrating and recalling files owned by the user "pgupta"
in all filesystems except for /, /usr, and /var (and /opt on solaris), to the NetWorker server jupiter:
client: elantra;
directive: Unix with compression directives ;
enabled: Yes;
file group:;
file owner:;
group: Default ;
high water mark (%): 90;
last access time:;
low water mark (%): 60;
minimum file size (KB): 10;
name: "elantra:All";
preserve:;
save set: All;
statistics:;
type: NSR migration;
SEE ALSO
nsr(5), nsr_directive(5), nsr_group(5), savegrp(1m), savefs(1m), nsrpmig(1m), nsrmig(1m),
nsrhsmck(1m), nsradmin(1m), nsrexecd(1m), nwadmin(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
3
NSR_NOTIFICATION(5)
NSR_NOTIFICATION(5)
NAME
nsr_notification − NetWorker resource type ‘‘NSR notification’’
SYNOPSIS
type: NSR notification
DESCRIPTION
A resource of type NSR notification is used for each combination of an event, priority, and action handled
by the NetWorker notification system. A NetWorker notification consists of a single event type, a single
priority, and a message. The notification system posts each message to the action of each NSR notification
resource (by executing the command listed in the action, with the message on standard input) that includes
that event type and priority. See nsr_resource(5) for more information on NetWorker resources. To edit
the NSR notification resources type:
nsradmin −c "type:NSR notification"
or use the nwadmin(1m) GUI. See nsradmin(1m) for more information on using the NetWorker administration program.
ATTRIBUTES
The following attributes are defined for resource type NSR notification. The information in parentheses
describes how the attribute values are accessed. Create-only indicates that the value cannot be changed by
an administrator, except when the resource is created. Read/write means the value can be changed at any
time by authorized administrators. Choice list means that any number of values can be chosen from the
given list. Single string means that only a single value is allowed. Static attributes change values rarely, if
ever. Hidden means it is an attribute of interest only to programs or experts, and these attributes can only
be seen when the hidden option is turned on in nsradmin(1m) or expert mode (−x) in nwadmin(1m). For
example, an attribute marked (create-only, static) has a value which is set when the attribute is created and
never changes. Several additional attributes (for example, administrator) are common to all resources, and
are described in nsr_resource(5).
action
(read/write, single string)
The value is a command line to be executed when the given event occurs. The command line is
run (see popen(3s)) with the event information connected to standard input. Typical actions are to
log the message with the syslog(3) package, or send electronic mail to a system operator.
Example: action: /usr/ucb/mail −s "savegroup completion" root;
event
(create-only, choice list, hidden)
Each value is a class of events that will trigger the given notification. More than one class may be
selected. Valid values are: Media for events related to the media multiplexor subsystem,
Savegroup for events generated by the savegrp(1m) command (usually the nightly automatic
backups), Index for events related to the on-line file index subsystem, Registration for events
caused by changes in the product’s registration status (for example, a license that will soon time
out), and Server for other NetWorker server events, such as restarting.
Example: event: Media;
name
(create-only, static)
This attribute holds the name of the notification resource.
priority (create-only, choice list, hidden)
Each value is a priority at which the notification will be triggered. More than one priority may be
selected. The valid values in increasing priority order are Info − supplies information about the
current state of the server; Notice − an important piece of information; Warning − information
about a non-fatal error; Waiting − the server is waiting for an operator to perform a routine task,
such as mounting a tape; Critical − the server detected an error condition that should be fixed by a
qualified operator; Alert − a severe error condition that demands immediate attention; Emergency
− a condition that may cause NetWorker to fail unless corrected immediately.
Example: priority: Notice;
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSR_NOTIFICATION(5)
NSR_NOTIFICATION(5)
EXAMPLE
A complete example follows with two resources, one for mail and one using the syslog mechanism:
type: NSR notification;
name: savegroup completion;
administrator: root;
action: \
/usr/ucb/mail -s \"savegroup completion\" root;
event: Savegroup;
priority: Notice;
type: NSR notification;
name: log default;
administrator: root;
action: /usr/ucb/logger -p daemon.notice -f -;
event: Media, Savegroup, Index, Server, Registration;
priority: Info, Notice, Warning, Waiting,
Critical, Alert, Emergency;
FILES
/nsr/res/nsr.res − this file should never be edited directly. Use nsradmin(1m) instead.
SEE ALSO
nsr_resource(5), nsr_service(5), nsr_device(5), nsr(1m), nsrmm(1m), syslog.conf(5), syslog(3),
nsradmin(1m), nsrmmd(1m), nwadmin(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSR_POLICY(5)
NSR_POLICY(5)
NAME
nsr_policy − NetWorker resource type ‘‘NSR policy’’
SYNOPSIS
type: NSR policy
DESCRIPTION
Each NetWorker policy is described by a single resource of type NSR policy (see nsr_resource(5)). To
view the NSR policy resources for a NetWorker server, enter nsradmin at the command prompt to start the
nsradmin program. At the nsradmin prompt, enter:
nsradmin>print type:NSR policy
See nsradmin(1m) for more information on using the NetWorker administration program.
These resources control how long entries remain in a client’s on-line file index and when to mark a save set
as recyclable. Each NSR client resource (see nsr_client(5)) uses two policies, a browse policy and a retention policy. Policies can only be deleted if no clients are using them.
Each policy defines an amount of time. The amount of time is determined by the period and the number of
periods.
ATTRIBUTES
The following attributes are defined for resource type NSR policy. The information in parentheses
describes how the attribute values are accessed. Create-only indicates that the value cannot be changed by
an administrator once the resource is created. Read/write means the value can be set as well as read at any
time. Several additional hidden attributes (for example, administrator) are common to all resources, and are
described in nsr_resource(5).
name
(create-only)
This attribute contains the name of the policy defined by this resource. The name must be unique
for this NetWorker server, but otherwise can be anything that makes sense to the administrator.
This name will appear as a choice attribute of each NSR client resource. The NSR policy
resources named "Quarter" and "Year" may be modified, but may not be removed. The name can
only be specified when the group is created.
Example: name: life cycle;
comment
(read/write)
This attribute is provided for the administrator to keep any explanatory remarks or supplementary
information about the policy.
number of periods (read/write)
The number of periods attribute specifies the number of base units to use.
Example: number of periods: 3;
period
(read/write)
The period attribute determines the base unit for this policy. It may be one of four values: Days,
Weeks, Months or Years. A week is defined as 7 days, a month as 31 days, and a year as 366
days.
Example: period: Months;
EXAMPLE
The following NSR policy resource named "Quarter" defines a period of 3 months, or one quarter of a year:
type: NSR policy;
name: Quarter;
period: Months;
number of periods: 3;
SEE ALSO
nsr(1m), nsrim(1m), nsr_resource(5), nsr_client(5), nwadmin(1m), nsradmin(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSR_POOL(5)
NSR_POOL(5)
NAME
nsr_pool − NetWorker resource type ‘‘NSR pool’’
SYNOPSIS
type: NSR pool
DESCRIPTION
Each NSR pool is described by a single resource of type NSR pool (see nsr_resource(5)). To edit the NSR
pool resources for a NetWorker server type:
nsradmin −c "type:NSR pool"
Be careful to include the quotes and the space between ‘‘NSR’’ and ‘‘pool’’. See the nsradmin(1m) manual page for more information on using the NetWorker administration program.
These resources are used by NetWorker to determine what volumes save sets should reside on depending
upon the characteristics, for example, Group or Level, of the save. Consult your NetWorker Administrator’s
Guide for more guidelines on using pools.
There are four types of pools. Backup pools accept data from savegrp and manual backups. Archive pools
accept archive data. Data cloned from a backup pool can be directed to a backup clone pool. Likewise,
archive data can be cloned to an archive clone pool.
There are four pools shipped pre-enabled with NetWorker. The Default pool is meant to collect any backup
data not directed to a pool a user creates with selection criteria. Any archive data not directed to a pool
with selection criteria is collected in the Archive pool. When cloning data, the user must select a destination pool for the operation. The Default clone pool is available for users to clone backup data to. The
Archive clone pool is available for users to clone archive data to.
There are also a few pools shipped with NetWorker that are not enabled by default. The Full and NonFull
pools can be used to segregate full level backups from other backups, for example, fulls versus incrementals. The Offsite pool can be used to generate offsite backups, because no index entries are stored for the
media pool and will not be referenced during normal recovers. Note that one can also clone media to produce copies of data to be taken offsite. Save sets that are generated without index entries can still be recovered using the ‘‘Save Set Recover’’ feature of nwadmin(1m) or recover(1m).
ATTRIBUTES
The following attributes are defined for resource type NSR pool. The information in parentheses describes
how the attribute values are accessed. Create-only indicates that the value cannot be changed after the
resource has been created. Read/write means the value can be updated by authorized administrators.
Yes/no means only a yes or no choice is possible. Choice indicates that the value can only be selected from
a given list. Hidden means it is an attribute of interest only to programs or experts, and these attributes can
only be seen when the hidden option is turned on in nsradmin(1m) or if the Details View option is selected
in the Media Pools window in nwadmin(1m).
archive only (read/write, yes/no, hidden, create)
If yes is selected, only archive saves are allowed to this pool. This hidden attribute can be modified by a user.
Example: archive only: no;
auto media verify
(read/write, yes/no, choice)
If set to yes, NetWorker verifies data written to volumes from this pool. Data is verified by repositioning the volume to read a portion of the data previously written to the media and comparing
the data read to the original data written. If the data read matches the data written, verification
succeeds; otherwise it fails. Media is verified whenever a volume becomes full while saving and it
is necessary to continue onto another volume, or when a volume goes idle because all save sets
being written to the volume are complete. When a volume fails verification, it is marked full so
NetWorker will not select the volume for future saves. The volume remains full until it is recycled
or a user marks it not full. If a volume fails verification while attempting to switch volumes, all
save sets writing to the volume are terminated.
Example: auto media verify: yes;
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSR_POOL(5)
NSR_POOL(5)
clients (read/write, choice)
What clients (nsr_client(5)) are allowed in this pool. If a group is specified, only clients that are
members of that group are allowed to be listed.
Example: clients: mars;
devices (read/write, choice)
This attribute lists the ONLY devices that volumes from this pool are allowed to be mounted onto.
If no devices are listed, volumes from this pool may be mounted on any device.
Example: devices: /dev/nrst8;
groups (read/write, choice)
What groups (nsr_group(5)) are allowed in this pool.
Example: groups: Accounting;
label template (read/write, choice)
Determine what label template (nsr_label(5)) is referenced when generating volume names for
this pool.
Example: label template: Accounting;
levels
(read/write, choice)
What levels (nsr_schedule(5)) are allowed in this pool.
Example: levels: full;
name
(create-only)
The names of pool resources are used when labeling volumes and when determining what volumes
a save set should reside on. The name can be chosen at the administrator’s convenience, but it
must be unique for this NetWorker server. The pool resources named Default, Default Clone,
Archive, and Archive Clone cannot be modified or deleted. The pool resource named Full and
NonFull cannot be deleted. Other pools can only be deleted if no volumes still reference them.
Example: name: Accounting;
recycle from other pools (read/write, yes/no, choice)
This attribute determines whether or not a given pool can recycle volumes from other pools when
it exhausts all its write-able and recyclable volumes.
Example: recycle from other pools: yes;
recycle to other pools (read/write, yes/no, choice)
This attribute determines whether or not a given pool allows other pools to recycle its recyclable
volume for their use.
Example: recycle to other pools: yes;
save sets
(read/write, choice)
What save sets (nsr_client(5)) are allowed in this pool. Save sets can be matched using the regular expression matching algorithm described in nsr_regexp(5)).
Example: save sets: /, /usr, C:\windows\system, *.JPG ;
status
(read/write, hidden, choice)
If set to enabled, this pool is considered for determining what pools a save set should be saved to
when performing backup volume selection. If set to clone, this pool is considered only as the destination of cloning operations. If set to disabled, this pool is completely ignored. This hidden
attribute can be modified by a user.
Example: status: enabled;
store index entries (read/write, yes/no, choice)
If set to yes, entries are made into the file indexes for the backups. Otherwise, only media
database entries for the save sets are created.
Example: store index entries: yes;
volume type preference(read/write, choice)
This attribute is used as a selection factor when a request is made for a write-able volume. The
preferred type will be considered first within a priority level such as jukebox or stand alone device
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSR_POOL(5)
NSR_POOL(5)
.
Example: volume type preference: 4mm;
EXAMPLE
A complete NSR pool resource, named ‘Default’, follows:
type:
archive only:
clients:
devices:
groups:
label template:
levels:
name:
save sets:
status:
store index entries:
auto media verify:
recycle from other pools:
recycle from other pools:
volume type preference:
NSR pool;
No;
;
;
;
Default;
;
Default;
;
Enabled;
Yes;
Yes;
Yes;
Yes;
4mm;
SEE ALSO
nsr(5), nsr_label(5), nsr_resource(5), nsradmin(1m), nwrecover(1m), recover(1m), savegroup(1m),
savefs(1m), uasm(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
3
NSR_REGEXP(5)
NSR_REGEXP(5)
NAME
nsr_regexp − regular expression syntax
DESCRIPTION
This manual page describes the regular expression handling used in NetWorker. The regular expressions
recognized are described below. This description is essentially the same as that for ed(1).
A regular expression specifies a set of strings of characters. A member of this set of strings is said to be
matched by the regular expression.
Form
Description
1.
Any character except a special character matches itself. Special characters are the regular expression delimiter plus a backslash(\), brace([), or period(.) and sometimes a carat(ˆ), asterik(*), or
dollar symbol($), depending upon the rules below.
2.
A . matches any character.
3.
A \ followed by any character except a digit or a parenthesis matches that character.
4.
A nonempty string s, bracketed string [s] (or [ˆs]) matches any character in (or not in) s. In s, \ has
no special meaning and ] may only appear as the first letter. A substring a-b, with aandb in
ascending ASCII order, stands for the inclusive range of ASCII characters.
5.
A regular expression of form 1 through 4 followed by * matches a sequence of 0 or more matches
of the regular expression.
6.
A bracketed regular expression x of form 1 through 8, \(x\), matches what x matches.
7.
A \ followed by a digit n matches a copy of the string that the bracketed regular expression beginning with the nth \(x\) matched.
8.
A regular expression x of form 1 through 8 followed by a regular expression y of form 1 through 7
matches a match for x followed by a match for y, with the x match being as long as possible while
still permitting a y match.
9.
A regular expression of form 1 through 8 preceded by ˆ (or followed by $), is constrained to
matches that begin at the left (or end at the right) end of a line.
10.
A regular expression of form 1 through 9 picks out the longest among the leftmost matches in a
line.
11.
An empty regular expression stands for a copy of the last regular expression encountered.
SEE ALSO
ed(1), nsr_client(5).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSR_RESOURCE(5)
NSR_RESOURCE(5)
NAME
nsr_resource − NetWorker resource format
SYNOPSIS
resource ::= attribute list <blank line>
attribute list ::= attribute [ ; attribute ]*
attribute ::= name [ : value [ , value ]* ]
name, value ::= <printable string>
DESCRIPTION
The NetWorker system uses files containing resources to describe itself and its clients. Each resource represents a component of the NetWorker system that might need administration. Devices, schedules, and
clients are examples of NetWorker resources. The system administrator manipulates resources to control
the NetWorker system. The file and the resources in them are accessible through the nwadmin(1m) and
nsradmin(1m) programs. They can also be viewed with a normal text editor.
The files all share a common format. The same format is used by the nsradmin(1m) program. Each
resource is described by a list of attributes, and ends in a blank line. Each attribute in the attribute list has a
name and an optional list of values. The attribute name is separated from the attribute values by a colon (:),
attribute values are separated by commas (,), and each attribute ends in a semicolon (;). A comma, semicolon or back-slash (\) at the end of a line continues the line. A line beginning with a pound-sign (#) is a
comment and the rest of the line is ignored. The back-slash character can also be used to escape the special
meaning of other characters (comma, semicolon, pound-sign, and back-slash).
The attribute name and values can contain any printable character. Upper and lower case is not distinguished on comparisons, and extra white space is removed from both ends but not from inside of names and
values. For example,
Name: this is a test;
matches
name : This Is A Test ;
but is different than
Name: this
is a test;
In the following example resource, there are eight attributes. They are type, name, server, schedule,
directive, group, save set, and remote access. The remote access attribute has no value.
type: NSR client;
name: venus;
server: earth;
schedule: Default;
directive: Unix standard directives;
group: Default;
save set: All;
remote access: ;
In the following resource, there are six attributes. The administrator attribute has three values: &engineering, root, and operator. Note that the three values are separated by commas. The action attribute has
one value: incr incr incr incr incr full incr. Note that this is a single value − it just happens to have
spaces separating its words.
type: NSR schedule;
action: incr incr incr incr incr full incr;
administrator: &engineering, root, operator;
name: engineering servers;
override: ;
period: Week;
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSR_RESOURCE(5)
NSR_RESOURCE(5)
SPECIAL ATTRIBUTES
Each NetWorker resource includes seven special attributes: type, name, administrator, hostname, ONC
program number, ONC version number, and ONC transport. The type and name attributes are normally visible, but the others attributes are hidden. That an attribute is hidden indicates that it is infrequently
used and perhaps esoteric. Hidden attributes should usually not be changed by the user.
The type attribute defines which other attributes a resource can contain. For example, a resource with type
NSR client will always include the attribute server, while a resource of type NSR schedule does not.
The name attribute is a descriptive name of the object that a resource represents. In the first example
above, the name attribute is the name of the NetWorker client machine. In the second example, the name
attribute describes a schedule used to back up the the servers in the engineering department.
The administrator attribute is the list of users that have permission to modify or delete this resource. This
attribute is inherited from the type: NSR resource when a new resource is created. The administrator of the
NSR resource also controls who has permission to create and delete NetWorker resources.
The hostname attribute specifies the hostname of the machine on which the service that controls this
resource is running. It is used internally and cannot be changed by the administrator.
The remaining attributes (ONC program number, ONC version number, and ONC transport) specify
the Open Network Computing information for this service. They should never be changed manually.
In some cases, the resource identifier will be visible. Although it may look like an attribute, it is an internal
value that is set and used by the NetWorker system to provide unique identification of each resource. When
new resources are created in the edit command of nsradmin(1m), the resource identifier attribute should be
left off. This signals that this is a new resource and a new identifier will be assigned.
NetWorker resources are implemented by the Legato Resource Administration Platform, which is described
in the resource(5) manual page. This flexible architecture means that in future releases of NetWorker, more
resource types or attributes may be added, and the administration tools in this release will automatically be
able to use them. To make this possible, each server provides type descriptors that are used internally to
describe the attributes of each type, between the administration tools and the services. These type descriptors may cause limitation on the values, such as only allowing a single value, allowing no value, or only
numeric values.
RESOURCE TYPES
This release of NetWorker defines the following types of resources:
NSR
This resource describes a NetWorker server. It contains attributes that control administrator authorization, information about operations in progress, and statistics and error information about past
operations. For more information see the nsr_service(5) manual page.
NSR client
This resource describes a NetWorker client. It includes attributes that specify the files to save,
which schedule to use, and which group this client belongs to. There may be more than one client
resource for a NetWorker client. This allows a client to save files on different schedules. For more
information see the nsr_client(5) manual page.
NSR device
This resource type describes a storage device. It includes attributes that specify a particular device
name (for example, /dev/nrst1), media type (for example, 8mm), and the name of the currently
mounted volume. It also provides status and statistics on current and past operations. For more
information see the nsr_device(5) manual page.
NSR directive
This resource describes a directive. Directives control how a client’s files are processed as they are
being saved. For more information see the nsr_directive(5), nsr(5) and uasm(1m) manual pages.
NSR group
This resource specifies a logical grouping of NetWorker clients and a starting time. Each day, at
the specified time, all members of the group will start their saves. For more information see the
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSR_RESOURCE(5)
NSR_RESOURCE(5)
nsr_group(5) manual page.
NSR jukebox
This resource type describes a jukebox. It includes attributes such as the jukebox model, the first
and last slot numbers in the jukebox, and the names of the devices within the jukebox. For more
information see the nsr_jukebox(5) manual page.
NSR label
This resource type specifies a template describing a sequence of names to be used when labeling
volumes. For more information see the nsr_label(5) manual page.
NSR license
This resource contains licensing information for each feature currently enabled in this NetWorker
installation. It contains various enabler and authorization codes that are used by NetWorker to validate licensed capabilities. For more information see the nsr_license(5) and nsrcap(1m) manual
pages.
NSR notification
A notification specifies an action to be performed when a particular type of NetWorker event takes
place. For more information see the nsr_notification(5) manual page.
NSR policy
Policy resources are used as part of the index management process in NetWorker. These policies
control how long entries remain in a client’s on-line file index and when to mark a save set as recyclable. For more information see the nsr_policy(5) manual page.
NSR pool
This resource type is used by NetWorker to determine what volumes save sets should reside on
based on the characteristics of the save (for example, group or level). For more information see
the nsr_pool(5) manual page.
NSR schedule
Schedule resources define a sequence of save levels and an override list. The override list is made
up of pairs of levels and dates. The level controls the amount of data saved when a client is
backed up. For more information see the nsr_schedule(5) manual page.
NSR stage
Each stage resource describes a staging policy. The resource includes attributes that define control
parameters for the policy, and devices managed by the policy. For more information see the
nsr_stage(5) manual page.
FILES
/nsr/res/nsr.res
Holds the NetWorker server’s resources.
SEE ALSO
resource(5), nsr(5), nsr_client(5), nsr_device(5), nsr_directive(5), nsr_group(5), nsr_jukebox(5),
nsr_label(5), nsr_license(5), nsrcap(1m), nsr_notification(5), nsr_policy(5), nsr_pool(5),
nsr_schedule(5), nsr_service(5), nsr_stage(5), nsr(1m), nwadmin(1m), savegroup(1m), savefs(1m),
nsradmin(1m), uasm(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
3
NSR_SCHEDULE(5)
NSR_SCHEDULE(5)
NAME
nsr_schedule − NetWorker resource type "NSR schedule"
SYNOPSIS
type: NSR schedule
DESCRIPTION
Each NetWorker schedule is described by a single resource of type NSR schedule (see nsr_resource(5)).
To edit the NSR schedule resources for a NetWorker server, type:
nsradmin −c "type:NSR schedule"
or use the nwadmin(1m) GUI. See nsradmin(1m) for more information on using the NetWorker administration program.
This resource describes a sequence of levels controlling the amount of data saved by NetWorker clients (see
nsr_client(5)). There is one NSR schedule resource for each NetWorker schedule.
ATTRIBUTES
The following attributes are defined for resource type NSR schedule. The information in parentheses
describes how the attribute values are accessed. Read-only indicates that the value cannot be changed by
an administrator. Read/write means the value can be set as well as read. Several additional hidden
attributes (e.g., administrator) are common to all resources, and are described in nsr_resource(5).
name
(read/write)
This attribute specifies the schedule’s name. The schedule is referred to by its name in client
resources.
Example: name: monthly_fulls;
period
(read-only)
This attribute specifies the length of the schedule’s period. It may be either "Week" or "Month".
"Week" schedules repeat every 7 days and start on Sunday. "Month" schedules start over at the
first of each month. The default is "Week."
Example: period: Month;
action
(read/write)
This attribute specifies the sequence of save levels making up the schedule. One entry is used for
each day of the schedule. The entries must be separated by whitespace, i.e., blanks or tabs. The
valid levels are "consolidate," "full," "incr," "skip," and the numbers 1 through 9. The actions consolidate, full, incr, and skip may be abbreviated "c," "f," "i," and "s," respectively.
When the action attribute does not contain enough entries to account for every day in the period,
NetWorker will repeat the list of actions when the end of the action list is reached.
Example: action: f i i i i i i;
override
(read/write)
This attribute specifies a list of actions and dates overriding the actions specified in the action
attribute. The format of the override specification is action date. action must be one of "full,"
"incr," "skip," or one of the numbers 1 through 9. date must be either a fixed date or recurring
date. Fixed date is of the form "month/day/year." Month and day are 2 digit numbers, year may
be either 2 or 4 digits. If the year is 2 digits, numbers in the range 70-99 are assumed to be offsets
from 1900, those in the range 00-69 are assumed to be offset from 2000. Recurring date is of the
form ‘[ number ] weekday every [ number ] period’. number can be a number (1, 2, 3, etc.) or an
ordinal (first, second, third, etc.), and it is optional. weekday must be one of "monday," "tuesday,"
"wednesday," "thursday," "friday," "saturday," "sunday." period must be one of "week," "month,"
"quarter," or "year." Action/date pairs are separated by commas (‘,’).
Example: override: full 1/1/1994, full first friday every 2 week;
EXAMPLE
The following defines a NSR schedule resource named "Default." The Default schedule may be modified,
but it may not be deleted. Each NetWorker server must have a Default schedule. This schedule has a
period of one week, does a full save on Sunday, followed by 6 incremental saves. There are no override
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSR_SCHEDULE(5)
NSR_SCHEDULE(5)
actions specified.
type: NSR schedule;
name: Default;
period: Week;
action: f i i i i i i;
override:;
The following defines a schedule named "quarterly." It has a period of one month. The action attribute
specifies level 5, 9, and incremental saves. In the override attribute, full saves are specified for the first day
of each quarter. Note that there are only 7 entries in the action attribute. Upon reaching the end of the list,
NetWorker will start over at the beginning of the list, performing a level 5 save.
type:
name:
period:
action:
override:
NSR schedule;
quarterly;
Month;
5 incr incr incr 9 incr incr;
f 1/1/1994, f 3/1/1994, f 6/1/1994, f 9/1/1994, f 1/1/1995;
SEE ALSO
nsr(1m), savefs(1m), mminfo(1m), nsradmin(1m), nsr_client(5), nsr_policy(5), nsr_resource(5), nwadmin(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSR_SERVICE(5)
NSR_SERVICE(5)
NAME
nsr_service − NetWorker server resource type ‘‘NSR’’
SYNOPSIS
type: NSR
DESCRIPTION
Each NetWorker server is described by a resource of type NSR. See nsr_resource(5) for general information on NetWorker resources. To edit the NSR resource use the command:
nsradmin −c "type:NSR"
or use the nwadmin(1m) GUI. See nsradmin(1m) for information on using the NetWorker administration
program.
ATTRIBUTES
The following attributes are defined for the NSR resource. The information in parentheses describes how
the attribute values are accessed. Read-only indicates that the value cannot be changed by an administrator. Read/write means the value can be set and read. Choice list means that any number of values can be
chosen from the given list. Static attributes change values rarely. Dynamic attributes have values which
can change rapidly. Hidden means it is an attribute of interest only to programs or experts, and these
attributes can only be seen when the hidden option is turned on in nsradmin(1m) or details option is set in
nwadmin(1m). For example, an attribute marked (read-only, static) has a value which is set when the
resource is created and never changes, or is changed only by the server.
name
(read-only, static)
This attribute specifies the hostname of this NetWorker server.
Example name: mars;
version
(read-only, dynamic)
This is the software version of the NetWorker server daemon, nsrd(1m). This includes a slash and
the number of clients currently licensed.
Example: version: NetWorker 4.1 Turbo/110;
save totals
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
Save statistics. A string containing the total number of save sessions, the number of saves with
errors (if any) and the total number of bytes saved (if any). This attribute is updated after each
save session completes.
Example: save totals: "37 sessions, 457 MB total";
recover totals
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
Recovery statistics. A string containing the total number of recover sessions, the number of recovers with errors (if any) and the total number of bytes recovered (if any). This attribute is updated
after each recover session completes.
Example: recover totals: "347 sessions, 48 MB total";
totals since
(read-only, dynamic)
The time statistics collection started. This is usually the last time the NetWorker server was
rebooted.
Example: totals since: "Fri Jun 1 09:35:02 1992";
NSR operation
(read-only, choice list, hidden)
This attribute is currently unused and is provided for backward compatibility.
parallelism
(read/write, static)
This attribute sets the number of concurrent save sessions that this server will allow. The value
can be set by an administrator. Use higher values for better performance on a fast system with lots
of main memory and swap space. Use lower values to avoid overloading a slow system, or systems
with little main memory and/or swap space. Warning: due to defects in some versions of UNIX,
high values of parallelism may cause the system to lock up.
Example: parallelism: 4;
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSR_SERVICE(5)
NSR_SERVICE(5)
session statistics (read-only, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute reports the statistics of each active session. There are 14 values for each set of
statistics, namely, id (session’s unique identifier), name (session’s name), mode (read, write,
browse), pool (current pool), volume (current volume), rate kb (current data transfer rate for save
session), amount kb (current amount read/written by session), total kb (total amount to be read
by session), amount files (current number of files recovered; to be implemented in a future
release), total files (current number of files to recover; to be implemented in a future release), connect time (time session has been connected), num volumes (number of volumes to be used by
recover session), used volumes (number of volumes processed by recover session), and completion (running, complete, or continued)
Example: sessions statistics: ;
manual saves
(read/write, hidden)
This attribute allows the administrator to disable manual backups to the server. Scheduled backups continue to work normally.
volume priority
(read/write)
If a NetWorker server has volumes in locally managed jukeboxes and volumes being managed by
SmartMedia, this attribute allows the administrator to assign a priority for volume selection when
saving data. Determines whether the server has a preference for volumes being managed by SmartMedia, SmartMedia Priority, or whether the server has a preference for volumes in a locally
managed jukebox, NearLine Priority. The default value is NearLine Priority.
Example: volume priority: NearLine Priority;
SmartMedia save mount
(read/write)
This attribute controls the form of the request made to SmartMedia to mount a volume for saving
data. Setting this attributes value to volume by characteristics causes NetWorker to request a
volume meeting specified criteria, and lets SmartMedia select an appropriate volume from all
media which satisfy the criteria specified. When this attribute’s value is set to, volume by name ,
NetWorker will request the volume by name and SmartMedia mounts the volume requested. The
default value is volume by characteristics .
Example: SmartMedia save mount: volume by characteristics;
license server
(read/write, hidden)
The name of the server on which a Legato license manager is installed and running. This attribute
used to be called "GEMS server". You can set the value to a GEMStation where a GEMS license
manager is running or to a machine where a Legato license manager is running. Example: license
server: jupiter;
message
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
The last message of any kind logged. A time stamp is included at the start of the string.
Example: message: "Mon 12:25:51 Tape full, mount volume mars.001 on /dev/nrst1";
message list
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
A list of recent messages, with a time stamp and a string message for each value.
Example: message: "Mon 12:25:51 Tape full, mount volume mars.001 on /dev/nrst1";
server message
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
Lists recent concise general messages about the status of the server.
Example: message: "Tape full, mount volume mars.001 on /dev/nrst1";
sequence number (read-only, dynamic, hidden)
The sequence number of the corrosponding server message.
server message time (read-only, dynamic, hidden)
The time at which the server message was generated.
server message priority (read-only, dynamic, hidden)
The priority of the server message. Currently these are for Networker internal use.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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NSR_SERVICE(5)
NSR_SERVICE(5)
server message source (read-only, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute gives the networker component that generated the message on the server. This can be
a client, a device etc.
server message category (read-only, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute is the category the server message belongs to. Currently these are for Networker
internal use.
session
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
The value of this attribute is a list of session information strings. Each string includes the NetWorker client name, type of operation (saving, browsing, or recovering) and information about the
save set, including name, number of bytes, and number of files. All sizes and rates are in bytes per
second, Kilobytes (1024), Megabytes (a thousand Kilobytes), etc.
Example:
session: "venus:/usr saving to mars.001 20MB",
"mars:/usr/src done saving 24MB";"
session message (read-only, dynamic, hidden)
Concise session message string of the session attribute described above.
Example:
session: "venus:/usr saving to mars.001",
"mars:/usr/src done saving";"
session client name (read-only, dynamic, hidden)
The name of each client for which each session is active.
session rate
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
The rate of data transfer for the active session.
session rate label (read-only, dynamic, hidden)
Unit of data transfer for the active sessons.
session device name (read-only, dynamic, hidden)
The name of the device on which the session is active.
pending
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
A list of events pending with the NetWorker event notification system (see nsr_notification(5)).
The first three fields are the time, priority, and event name.
Example: pending: "Fri 14:40:15 alert: media mount of mars.001 suggested on /dev/nrst1";
status
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
A list of status flags for the NetWorker server. These flags are only for use by NetWorker serverside programs (for example, savegrp) and list various features enabled in the running server. The
format is currently name=boolean (true or false). The listed features and their states can change at
any time.
statistics
(read-only, dynamic, hidden)
A list of strings of the form name=number that give a number of server statistics.
types created
(read-only, static)
A list of all the other resource types this NetWorker server can create and about which clients can
query.
Example: types created: NSR device, NSR group;
administrator
(read/write, static)
This is a list of names (or netgroups) of users who are allowed to administer NetWorker. Only
users in this list can see or modify this attribute. Normally this list is inherited by all other
resources on this server. Administrators can change the values of attributes for the resource which
lists them. The administrator list also determines who can add and delete resources of the other
NSR types. The user "root" on the local host of the server is always an administrator. Entries
specifying other administrators are of the form:
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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NSR_SERVICE(5)
NSR_SERVICE(5)
user, user@host, user@domain, group@host, group@domain, host/user &netgroup, or
user_attribute=value[, ...]
where user is a user name; host is a host name; group is a user group name; domain is a domain
name; user_attribute can be user, group, host, domain, or domaintype (type of the domain, NIS
or WINDOMAIN)
value can be any string delimited by white space. If the value has space in it, then it can be quoted
with double quotes. The value may contain wild cards, "*". Entering just a user name allows that
user to administer NetWorker from any host (equivalent to user@* or */user or user=user). Netgroup names are always preceded by an "&".
The following example grants NetWorker administrative privileges to, "root" from any host, the
user "operator" from the hosts "jupiter" and "mars", the user "admin" from any host, and all <user
name, user’s hostname, server’s domain> in the netgroup "netadmins".
Example: administrator: root, operator@jupiter, mar/operator, admin@*, &netadmins;
The following example grants NetWorker administrative privileges to the user "root" on host
"pluto", users in group "Backup Operators" from windows domain "Accounting". and user "joe" in
NIS domain "YP.fubar.COM".
Example:
administrator:
"user=root,host=pluto",
"group=\"Backup
Operators\",
domain=Accounting, domaintype=windomain", "user=joe, domain=YP.fubar.COM, domaintype=NIS";
contact name
(read/write, static)
This attribute is used for product licensing/registration purposes. It must be specified before printing the registration information from the registration window.
Example: contact name: contact_name;
company
(read/write, static)
This attribute is used for product licensing/registration purposes. Your company name must be
specified before printing the registration information from the registration window.
Example: company: Legato;
street address
(read/write, static)
This attribute is used for product licensing/registration mailing purposes. Specify your mailing
street address.
Example: street address: 3145, Porter Drive;
city/town
(read/write, static)
This attribute is used for product licensing/registration mailing purposes.
Example: city/town: Palo Alto;
state/province
(read/write, static)
This attribute is used for product licensing/registration mailing purposes.
Example: state/province: CA;
zip/postal code
(read/write, static)
This attribute is used for product licensing/registration mailing purposes.
Example: zip/postal code: 94304;
country
(read/write, static)
This attribute is used for product licensing/registration mailing purposes.
Example: country: USA;
phone
(read/write, static)
This attribute is used for product licensing/registration purposes. This attribute must to be specified before printing the registration information from the registration window.
Example: phone: 650-812-6100;
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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NSR_SERVICE(5)
fax
NSR_SERVICE(5)
(read/write, static)
This attribute is used for product licensing/registration purposes.
Example: fax: 650-812-6031;
email address
(read/write, static)
This attribute is used for product licensing/registration purposes.
Example: email address: support@legato.com;
server OS type
(read/write, static)
This attribute is used for product licensing/registration purposes.
Example: server OS type: Solaris;
purchase date
(read/write, static)
This attribute is used for product licensing/registration purposes. It specifies the purchase date of
the product enabler code. This attribute must be specified before printing the registration information from the registration window.
product serial number
(read/write, static)
This attribute is used for product licensing/registration purposes. It must be specified before printing the registration information from the registration window.
mm op message (read/write, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute lists the descriptive message for the most recently completed media database operation. The NetWorker program (such as nsrmm(1m)) that requested the operation clears this
attribute as soon as it has read the result. An administrator should never change this attribute manually.
mm operation value (read/write, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute is used by programs such as nsrmm(1m) to pass the desired media database operation location or flags to the NetWorker server. The value is automatically cleared when the operation completes. An administrator should never change this attribute manually.
mm operation (read/write, choice list, dynamic,
hidden)
This attribute is used by programs such as nsrmm(1m) to pass the media database operation type
currently desired to the NetWorker server. The possible choices are: purge volume, purge save set,
delete volume, delete save set, mark volume, mark save set, unmark volume, unmark save set,
specify volume location, specify volume flags, and specify save set flags. The server serializes
such operations and performs the appropriate queries on nsrmmdbd(1m). The value is automatically cleared when the operation completes. An administrator should never change this attribute
manually.
mm operation id (read/write, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute is used by programs such as nsrmm(1m) to pass the desired media database operation identifier to the NetWorker server. The value is automatically cleared when the operation
completes. An administrator should never change this attribute manually.
nsrmon info
(read/write, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute is used by programs such as nsrmon(1m) to pass information about remote daemon
requests to the NetWorker server. The value is automatically cleared when the request completes.
An administrator should never change this attribute manually. See nsr_storage_node(5) for a
description of storage nodes and remote daemons.
nsrmmd count (read-only, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute is used by programs such as nsrd(1m) to track the number and location of the media
daemons, nsrmmd(1m).
nsrmmd polling interval (read/write, hidden)
This attribute specifies the number of minutes between polling events of a remote nsrmmd(1m).
nsrd(1m) polls a remote nsrmmd(1m) at this interval, to determine whether it is running. If it
determines from this poll that the daemon is no longer running, it will restart the nsrmmd(1m),
NetWorker 6.1.1
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NSR_SERVICE(5)
NSR_SERVICE(5)
with a delay set by the ‘nsrmmd restart interval’; see the nsrmmd restart interval description. See
nsr_storage_node(5) for additional details on this attribute and storage nodes.
nsrmmd restart interval (read/write, hidden)
This attribute specifies the number of minutes between restart attempts of a remote nsrmmd(1m).
When nsrd(1m) determines that a remote nsrmmd(1m) has terminated, it periodically attempts to
restart the remote daemon. A value of zero for this attribute means the daemon should be restarted
immediately. See nsr_storage_node(5) for additional details on this attribute and storage nodes.
nsrmmd control timeout (read/write, hidden)
This attribute specifies the number of minutes nsrd(1m) waits for storage node requests.
enabler code
(read/write, dynamic, hidden)
This attribute specifies the enabler code for the base enabler of the server software.
SS cutoff size
(read/write, hidden)
This attribute sets the default "save set cut off size" to be used when saving. A blank value uses
the built in default value. A non blank value for this attribute consists of a number followed by
KB, MB, or GB signifying Kilobytes, Megabytes, or Gigabytes. Note that this field only affects
clients older than version 6.0. Continuation save sets have been eliminated for version 6.0 and
above.
EXAMPLE
A complete example follows:
type: NSR;
name: mars;
version: NetWorker 4.1 Turbo/110;
save totals: "84 sessions, 3597 MB total";
recover totals: 1 session;
totals since: "Fri Oct 14 12:41:31 1994";
NSR operation: Idle Write Read Verify label Label ;
parallelism: 4;
manual saves: Enabled Disabled ;
message: \
"Mon 14:37:25 media alert event: recover waiting for 8mm tape mars.001";
message list: \
"Mon 07:10:12 media info: loading volume man.001 into /dev/nrst11"
"Mon 07:10:33 /dev/nrst11 mount operation in progress"
"Mon 07:11:15 /dev/nrst11 mounted 8mm 5GB tape man.001
session: "mars:george browsing",
"mars:/home/mars starting recovery of 9K bytes";
session statistics: ;
pending: \
"Mon 14:40:15 media alert: recover waiting for 8mm tape mars.001";
status: disabled=false, jukebox=true, dm=true,
archive=true, cds=true, turbo=true,
single=false;
statistics: elapsed = 257415, saves = 1176, recovers = 12,
save KB = 12050007, recover KB = 28272839,
bad saves = 0, bad recovers = 0,
current saves = 1, current recovers = 0,
max saves = 12, max recovers = 1, mounts = 0,
recover delays = 0, saving daemons = 0,
recovering daemons = 0, idle daemons = 0;
types created: NSR device, NSR group, NSR directive,
NSR notification, NSR client, NSR policy,
NetWorker 6.1.1
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NSR_SERVICE(5)
administrator:
contact name:
company:
street address:
city/town:
state/province:
zip/postal code:
country:
phone:
fax:
email address:
purchase date:
product serial number:
mm op message:
mm operation value:
mm operation:
mm operation id:
nsrmon info:
nsrmmd count:
nsrmmd polling interval:
nsrmmd restart interval:
nsrmmd control timeout:
enabler code:
SS cutoff size:
NSR_SERVICE(5)
NSR schedule, NSR pool, NSR label, NSR jukebox,
NSR license, NSR archive client,
NSR archive list;
root;
Technical Support;
Legato;
3145, Porter Drive;
Palo Alto;
CA;
94304;
USA;
650-812-6100;
650-812-6220;
support@legato.com;
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
"mars:2";
3;
2;
5;
;
;
FILES
/nsr/res/nsr.res − this file should never be edited directly. Use nwadmin(1m) or nsradmin(1m) instead.
SEE ALSO
netgroup(5), nsr(5), nsr(1m), nsr_device(5), nsr_group(5), nsr_notification(5), nsr_resource(5),
nsr_storage_node(5), nsradmin(1m), nsrd(1m), nsrmm(1m), nsrmmdbd(1m), nsrmon(1m), nwadmin(1m), recover(1m), save(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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NSR_SHUTDOWN(1m)
NSR_SHUTDOWN(1m)
NAME
nsr_shutdown − stop a NetWorker server’s processes
SYNOPSIS
nsr_shutdown [ −a ] [ −A ] [ −d ] [ −n ] [ −q ] [ −s ] [ −v ]
DESCRIPTION
nsr_shutdown terminates NetWorker processes on a NetWorker server. This command is simpler than the
procedure of using ps(1), grep(1), and kill(1).
OPTIONS
−a
Terminates all daemons; this is the same as using the −A, −d, and −s options.
−A
Terminates any nsralist(1m) processes.
−d
This is the default option; it terminates the server daemons. These may include nsrd(1m),
ansrd(1m), nsrindexd(1m), nsrexecd(1m), nsrib(1m), nsrmmd(1m), and nsrmmdbd(1m).
Since savegrp(1m), nsrexec(1m), and nsralist(1m) processes depend on the service daemons,
they are also terminated.
−n
Echoes the kill(1) command without actually invoking it.
−q
Perform the shutdown quietly; don’t prompt for confirmation.
−s
Terminates any savegrp(1m) (and nsrexec(1m)) processes.
−v
Verbose: Instruct the shell to print commands and their arguments as they are executed.
SEE ALSO
ansrd(1m), nsralist(1m), nsrd(1m), nsrexec(1m), nsrexecd(1m), nsrindexd(1m), nsrmmd(1m), nsrmmdbd(1m), savegrp(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSR_STAGE(5)
NSR_STAGE(5)
NAME
nsr_stage − NetWorker resource type ‘‘NSR stage’’
SYNOPSIS
type: NSR stage
DESCRIPTION
Each staging policy used by a NetWorker server is described by a single resource of type NSR stage. See
nsr_resource(5) for information on NetWorker resources. To edit the NSR stage resources run:
nsradmin -c "type:NSR stage"
Be careful to include the space between ‘‘NSR’’ and ‘‘stage’’ and the surrounding quotes. See nsradmin(1m) for information on using the NetWorker administration program.
ATTRIBUTES
The following attributes are defined for resource type NSR stage. The information in parentheses describes
how the attribute values are accessed. Read-only indicates that the value cannot be changed by an administrator. Read/write means the value can be set as well as read. Hidden means it is an attribute of interest
only to programs or experts, and these attributes can only be seen when the hidden option is turned on in
nsradmin(1m) or if the Details View option is selected in the Stage window in nwadmin(1m). Static
attributes change values rarely, if ever. Dynamic attributes have values which change rapidly. For example, an attribute marked (read-only, static) has a value which is set when the attribute is created and may
never change. Additional attributes (for example, administrator) are common to all resources, and are
described in nsr_resource(5).
name
(read-only, single string)
The name attribute specifies the staging policy name.
enabled
(read/write, choice)
The enabled attribute determines whether or not save sets are automatically staged from devices
associated with this policy. It also enables and disables the periodic recover space operations. It
may be one of two values: Yes, No
max storage period
(read/write)
Specifies the maximum number of days for a save set in a given volume before it is staged to a different volume.
high water mark %
(read/write)
The point at which save sets should be staged, measured as the percentage of available space used
on the file system. Staging will continue until the lower mark is reached.
Example: high water mark (%): 90;
low water mark %
(read/write)
The point at which the staging process should stop, measured as the percentage of available space
used on the file system.
Example: low water mark (%): 80;
Save set selection
(read/write)
Save set selection criteria for staging. It may be one of four values:
largest save set
smallest save set
oldest save set
or
youngest save set.
Destination pool
(read/write)
The pool to which save sets should be sent (see nsr_pool(5)).
Devices
NetWorker 6.1.1
(read/write, multiple choice)
This attribute lists the file type devices associated with this policy.
October 15, 2001
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NSR_STAGE(5)
NSR_STAGE(5)
Recover space interval
(read/write, hidden)
The number of hours between recover space operations for save sets with no entries in the media
database form file devices.
Fs check interval
(read/write, hidden)
The number of hours between file system check operations.
Start now
(read/write)
Updating this aribute will cause the selected operation to be triggered immediately on all devices
associated with this policy. The attribute value will not actually change. Operation can be one of
the following:
Check fs - check file system and stage data if neccessary.
Recover space - recover space for save sets with no entries in the media database.
Stage all save sets - stage all save sets to the destination pool.
EXAMPLES
Note: the hidden options are not shown in the first example.
The following example shows a resource that defines a stage policy called ‘test stage1’. Save sets will be
staged from device ‘/disk/fd0’ to pool ‘Default Clone’ when the file system is 90% full or 7 days after the
date of the backup, whichever comes first. The largest save set will be the first to stage to the destination
pool:
type: NSR stage;
name: test stage1;
autostart: Enabled;
max storage period: 7;
high water mark (%): 90;
low water mark (%): 85;
save set selection: largest save set;
destination pool: Default Clone;
devices: /disk/fd0;
start now: ;
The following example shows a resource that defines a stage policy called ‘test stage2’. Save sets will be
staged from device ‘/disk/fd2’ to pool ‘Default’ when the file system is 95% full or 14 days after the date of
the backup, whichever comes first. The smallest save set will be the first to stage to the destination pool.
The file system will be checked every 1 hour and a staging operation will be triggered if necessary. A
recover-space operation (for save sets with no entries in the media database) will be triggered every 3 hours
on all devices associated with the policy:
type: NSR stage;
name: test stage2;
autostart: Enabled;
max storage period: 14;
high water mark (%): 95;
low water mark (%): 80;
save set selection: smallest save set;
destination pool: Default;
devices: /disk/fd2;
recover space interval: 3;
fs check interval: 1;
start now: ;
administrator: root@omni;
hostname: omni;
SEE ALSO
nsrstage(1m), nsrclone(1m), nsradmin(1m), nwadmin(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSR_STORAGE_NODE(5)
NSR_STORAGE_NODE(5)
NAME
nsr_storage_node − description of the storage node feature
SYNOPSIS
The storage node feature provides central server control of distributed devices for saving and recovering
client data.
DESCRIPTION
A storage node is a host that has directly attached devices that are used and controlled by a NetWorker
server. These devices are called remote devices, because they are remote from the server. Clients may
save and recover to these remote devices by altering their "storage nodes" attribute (see nsr_client(5)). A
storage node may also be a client of the server, and may save to its own devices.
The main advantages provided by this feature are central control of remote devices, reduction of network
traffic, use of faster local saves and recovers on a storage node, and support of heterogeneous server and
storage node architectures.
There are several attributes which affect this function. Within the NSR resource (see nsr_service(5)) there
are the "nsrmmd polling interval", "nsrmmd restart interval" and "nsrmmd control timeout" attributes.
These attributes control how often the remote media daemons (see nsrmmd(1m)) are polled, how long
between restart attempts, and how long to wait for remote requests to complete.
Within the "NSR device" resource (see nsr_device(5)) the resource’s name will accept the
"rd=hostname:dev_path" format when defining a remote device. The "hostname" is the hostname of the
storage node and "dev_path" is the device path of the device attached to that host. There are also hidden
attributes called "save mount timeout" and "save lockout," which allow a pending save mount request to
timeout, and a storage node to be locked out for upcoming save requests.
Within the "NSR client" resource (see nsr_client(5)), there are "storage nodes" and "clone storage nodes"
attributes. The "storage nodes" attribute is used by the server in selecting a storage node when the client is
saving data. The "clone storage nodes" attribute is used during cloning, to direct cloned data from a volume
on the storage node (the node represented by this client resource).
The "NSR jukebox" resource (see nsr_jukebox(5)), contains the "read hostname" attribute. When all of a
jukebox’s devices are not attached to the same host, this attribute specifies the hostname that is used in
selecting a storage node for recover and read-side clone requests. For recover requests, if the required volume is not mounted, and the client’s "storage nodes" attribute does not match one of the owning hosts in the
jukebox, then this attribute is used. For clone requests, if the required volume is not mounted, then this
attribute is used.
INSTALL AND CONFIGURE
In order to install a storage node, choose the client and storage node packages, where given the choice. For
those platforms that do not have a choice, the storage node binaries are included in the client package. In
addition, install any appropriate device driver packages. If not running in evaluation mode, a storage node
enabler must be configured on the server for each node.
As with a client, ensure that the nsrexecd(1m) daemon is started on the storage node. To define a device on
a storage node, from the controlling server define a device with the above mentioned "rd=" syntax. For a
remote jukebox (on a storage node), run jbconfig(1m) from the node, after adding root@storage_node to
the server’s administrator list, (where root is the user running jbconfig(1m) and storage_node is the hostname of the storage node). This administrator list entry may be removed after jbconfig(1m) completes.
In addition to jbconfig(1m), when running scanner(1m) on a storage node, root@storage_node must be on
the adminstrator list.
When a device is defined (or enabled) on a storage node, the server will attempt to start a media daemon
(see nsrmmd(1m)) on the node. In order for the server to know whether the node is alive, it polls the node
every "nsrmmd polling interval" minutes. When the server detects a problem with the node’s daemon or
the node itself, it attempts to restart the daemon every "nsrmmd restart interval" minutes, until either the
daemon is restarted or the device is disabled (by setting "enabled" to "no" in the device’s "enabled"
attribute).
UNRELEASED
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1
NSR_STORAGE_NODE(5)
NSR_STORAGE_NODE(5)
In addition to needing a storage node enabler for each storage node, each jukebox will need its own jukebox
enabler.
OPERATION
A storage node is assignable for work when it is considered functional by the server - nsrexecd(1m) running, device enabled, nsrmmd(1m) running, and the node is responding to the server’s polls. When a
client save starts, the client’s "storage nodes" attribute is used to select a storage node. This attribute is a
list of storage node hostnames, which are considered in order, for assignment to the request.
The exception to this node assignment approach is when the server’s index or bootstrap is being saved these save sets are always directed to the server’s local devices, regardless of the server’s "storage nodes"
attribute. Hence, the server will always need a local device to backup such data, at a minimum. These save
sets can later be cloned to a storage node, as can any save set.
If a storage node is created first (by defining a device on the host), and a client resource for that host is then
added, that hostname is added to its "storage nodes" attribute. This addition means the client will back up
to its own devices. However, if a client resource already exists, and a device is later defined on that host,
then the client’s hostname must be added manually to the client’s "storage nodes" attribute. This attribute is
an ordered list of hostnames; add the client’s own name as the first entry.
The volume’s location field is used to determine the host location of an unmounted volume. The server
looks for a device or jukebox name in this field, as would be added when a volume resides in a jukebox.
Volumes in a jukebox are considered to be located on the host to which the jukebox is connected. The location field can be used to bind a stand-alone volume to a particular node by manually setting this field to any
device on that node (using the "rd=" syntax). For jukeboxes which do not have all of their devices attached
to the same host, see the previous description of the "read hostname" attribute.
There are several commands that interact directly with a device, and so must run on a storage node. These
include jbconfig(1m), nsrjb(1m) and scanner(1m), in addition to those in the device driver package.
Invoke these commands directly on the storage node rather than on the server, and use the server option ("-s
server_host", where server_host is the controlling server’s hostname).
CLONING FUNCTION
A single clone request may be divided into multiple sub-requests, one for each different source machine
(the host from which save sets will be read). For example, suppose a clone request must read data from
volumeA and volumeB, which are located on storage nodes A and B, respectively. Such a request would be
divided into two sub-requests, one to read volumeA from storage node A and another to read volumeB from
storage node B.
A clone request involves two sides, the source that reads data and the target that writes data. These two
sides may be on the same host or on different hosts, depending on the configuration. The source host is
determined first and then the target host. If the volume is mounted, the source host is determined by its current mount location. If the volume is not mounted at the time of the clone request and it resides in a jukebox, then the source host is determined by the value of the jukebox’s "read hostname" attribute.
Once the source host is known, the target host is determined by examining the "clone storage nodes"
attribute of the client resource of the source host. If this attribute has no value, the "clone storage nodes"
attribute of the server’s client resource is consulted. If this attribute has no value, the "storage nodes"
attribute of the server’s client resource is used.
LIMITATIONS
A server cannot be a storage node of another server.
SEE ALSO
jbconfig(1m), mmlocate(1m), nsr_client(5), nsr_device(5), nsr_jukebox(5), nsr_service(5), nsrclone(1m), nsrexecd(1m), nsrjb(1m), nsrmmd(1m), nsrmon(1m), scanner(1m).
UNRELEASED
October 15, 2001
2
NSRADMIN(1m)
NSRADMIN(1m)
NAME
nsradmin − NetWorker administrative program
SYNOPSIS
nsradmin [ −c ] [ −i file ] [ −s server ] [ −p prognum ] [ −v version ] [ query ]
nsradmin [ −c ] [ −i file ] [ −d resdir . . . ] [ −t typefile ] [ query ]
nsradmin [ −c ] [ −i file ] [ −f resfile . . . ] [ −t typefile ] [ query ]
DESCRIPTION
The nsradmin command is a command-line based administrative program for the NetWorker system. Normally nsradmin monitors and modifies NetWorker resources over the network. Commands are entered on
standard input, and output is produced on standard output.
If nsradmin is started without a query it uses a default query that selects all resources involved in NetWorker products.
OPTIONS
−c
Uses the termcap(5) and curses(3) packages to implement a full-screen display mode, just like
the visual command described below. (UNIX Only)
−d resdir
Uses the NetWorker resource database resdir instead of opening a network connection. The
database resdir must be in directory format. This should be used sparingly, and only when the
NetWorker server is not running. Multiple −d and resdir arguments can be used to start nsradmin
with access to more than one database at a time.
−f resfile
Similar to the −d resdir option except that it opens a resource file, rather than a resource directory.
Some configuration databases are stored in file format, others in directory format.
−i file
Takes input commands from file instead of from standard input. In this mode, the interactive
prompt will not be printed.
−s server
Opens a connection to the named NetWorker server instead of allowing administration of all
servers. Useful to limit the number of resources if there are many servers, or to administer when
the RAP location service is not working.
−p program
Uses the given RPC program number instead of the standard program number. The standard number is 390109. This option is generally used only for debugging.
−t typefile
Uses the alternate file typefile to define RAP types.
−v version
Binds to the NetWorker RAP service with the given version number. The default is 2. This option
is generally used only for debugging.
query
If a query is specified (in the form of an attribute list), the edit operation is performed on the
results of the query. See COMMANDS for more information on how the edit command works.
RESOURCES
Each NetWorker resource is made up of a list of named attributes. Each attribute can have zero or more
values. The attribute names and values are all represented by printable strings. Upper and lower case is not
distinguished on comparisons, and spaces are ignored except inside the names and values.
The format for specifying attributes and attribute lists is:
attribute ::= name [ : value [ , value ]* ]
An attribute is a name optionally followed by a colon, followed by zero or more values, with values separated by commas. A comma at the end of a line continues the line.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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NSRADMIN(1m)
NSRADMIN(1m)
attribute list ::= attribute [ ; attribute ]*
An attribute list is one or more attributes separated by semicolons. A semicolon at the end of a
line continues the line. The list is ended by a newline that is not preceded by a comma or semicolon.
Here is an example of an attribute list:
name: mars;
type: NSR client;
remote access: mars, venus, jupiter;
For more information on attributes, attribute lists and the NetWorker resource types, see the resource(5),
nsr_resource(5), and rap(1m) manual pages.
COMMANDS
At each input prompt, nsradmin expects a command name and some optional arguments. Command names
can be shortened to the smallest unique string (for example, p for print). Command arguments are always
specified in the form of an attribute list. Most commands operate on a set of resources returned by a query.
The query is specified as an attribute list which is used to match resources with the following rules:
1) The resource must match all the given attributes.
2) If more than one value is specified the resource can match any one of the values.
3) Values in a query may be in the form of ed(1) style regular expressions. A pattern match is
attempted against all resources that contain the specified attribute.
4) If an attribute is specified with no value the resource must contain an attribute of that name.
Thus, a query:
type:NSR device;
name:mars, venus;
test
will match all resources that have a type attribute with the value NSR device and a name attribute with a
value of either mars or venus, and an attribute test with any value.
If the query has only one name and no values (for example, if there is no semi-colon or colon in it), then the
program tries to guess a more reasonable query. If the name is a host name, then the query will select all the
resources on the given host. Otherwise, the name will be interpreted as a type name, and all resources of
that given type will be selected.
bind [query]
Bind to the service that owns the resource described by query. If no query is specified, queries are
sent to the RAP Resource Directory, and update, create, and delete commands to the service that
owns the resource being changed. On failure, the previous service will continue to be used.
create attribute list
Create a resource with the given attributes. One of the attributes must be type to specify a NetWorker type that can be created. The types command can be used to find out which NetWorker
types a server supports.
delete [query]
Delete the resources that match the current query. If a query is specified, it becomes the current
query.
edit [query]
Edit the resources that match the current query. If a query is specified, it becomes the current
query. If the environment variable EDITOR is set, then that editor will be invoked, otherwise vi(1)
will be started. When the editor exits, nsradmin applies update, delete and create operations based
on the changes to the resources. Be careful to not edit the resource identifier attribute, and to write
the file out before exiting the editor. (UNIX Only)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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NSRADMIN(1m)
NSRADMIN(1m)
help [command]
Print a message describing a command. If no command name is given a synopsis of all of the commands is printed.
option [list]
This command enables some options to change the display of resources. With no arguments it displays the current options; with a list of options it turns the specified ones on. The options are:
Dynamic displays all dynamic attributes, even the normally hidden ones. Hidden displays all
attributes, even the normally hidden ones. Resource ID displays the resource identifier on each
resource, a number that is used internally to provide sequencing and uniqueness.
print [query]
Print the resources that match the current query. If a query is specified, it becomes the current
query. If a name has been specified for the the current show list, only the attributes for the specified name in the show list will be displayed.
quit
Exits nsradmin.
server [servername]
Bind to the given NetWorker server name. If no server is specified, the RAP location service will
be used. On failure, the previous server will continue to be used.
show [name; ...]
If a name list (really an attribute list with no values) is specified, add those names to the show list.
Only these attributes will be displayed in subsequent print commands. If no name list is given the
show list is cleared, resulting in all attributes being shown.
types
Print a list of all known types.
unset [list]
This command turns off the specified option.
update attributes
Update the resources given by the current query to match attributes.
visual [query]
Enter a full-screen mode using the curses(3) package to step through commands in a perhaps more
user-friendly manner than the command line interface. You can get this mode directly using the
−c command line argument. (UNIX Only)
. [query]
If a query is specified, this command will set the current query without printing the results of the
query. Otherwise, it will display the current query, show list, server binding, and options.
? [command]
Same as the help command above.
EXAMPLES
print type:NSR device
Print all resources of type NSR device and make this the current query.
show type; name
Set the show list to display only the attributes type and name.
delete
Delete all resources that match the current query.
delete type:NSR device; hostname: mars
Delete the resource with attributes: type: NSR device and hostname: mars.
edit type:NSR notification
Edit all resources of type NSR notification.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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NSRADMIN(1m)
NSRADMIN(1m)
SEE ALSO
ed(1), vi(1), curses(3), nsr_resource(5), termcap(5), nsr(1m) rap(1m).
DIAGNOSTICS
The following exit status values are meaningful:
0
Interactive mode exited normally.
1
There was a usage or other non-query related error.
2
When reading input from a file (−i file), one or more RAP operations failed. This status is never
returned interactively.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
4
NSRALIST(1m)
NSRALIST(1m)
NAME
nsralist − NetWorker archive request executor
SYNOPSIS
nsralist −R archive request name
DESCRIPTION
The nsralist command is used to execute an archive request (see nsr_archive_request(5)). The nsralist
command is run automatically by nsrd(1m), as specified by each archive request resource.
The nsralist command will set up an RPC connection to nsrexecd(1m) to run nsrarchive(1m) on the specified client. If nsrexecd is unavailable, nsralist will fall back on using the rcmd(3) protocol and the clientside rshd(1m).
The nsralist monitors the execution of the archive command and stores any output in the log of the archive
request. The nsrarchive command running on the client updates the server with its progress, including
whether or not optional verification and cloning operations have completed successfully. See nsrclone(1m)
for more information on cloning.
OPTIONS
−R archive request name
This option specifies which archive request is supposed to be run.
FILES
/nsr/tmp/al.request_name
A lock file to keep multiple runs of the same archive list from running simultaneously.
SEE ALSO
nsrarchive(1m), nsrclone(1m), nsrexecd(1m), nsr_archive_request(5).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRARCHIVE(1m)
NSRARCHIVE(1m)
NAME
nsrarchive − archive files to long term storage with NetWorker
SYNOPSIS
nsrarchive [ −BinpqvxVy ] [ −b pool ] [ −C clone pool ] [ −f directive filename ] [ −G remove ] [ −N name
] [ −R name ] [ −s server ] [ −T annotation ] [ −W width ] [ path . . . ]
DESCRIPTION
nsrarchive archives files, including directories or entire filesystems, to the NetWorker server (see nsr(1m)).
The progress of an archive can be monitored using the X Window System based nwadmin(1m) program or
the curses(3X) based nsrwatch(1m) program for other terminal types. Use of nsrarchive is restricted to
users on the administrator and archive users lists.
If no path arguments are specified, the current directory is archived. nsrarchive archives a directory by
archiving all the files and subdirectories it contains, but it does not cross mount points or follow symbolic
links.
The directive files (see nsr(5)) encountered in each directory is read by default, The files contain special
instructions directing how particular files are to be archived (that is, compressed, skipped, etc.). These files
are named ’.nsr’.
Each file in the subdirectory structures specified by the path arguments is encapsulated in a NetWorker
archive stream. This stream of data is sent to a receiving process (see nsrd(1m)) on the NetWorker server.
Entries are added to the media database for the archive save set. The data eventually resides on a long term
storage medium (see nsrmmd(1m)).
Details about handling media are discussed in nsrmm(1m) and nsr_device(5).
If the grooming option remove is requested, all files and directories archived are removed. If verification is
requested, the files will not be removed if the verification failed. Likewise, the files will not be removed if a
requested cloning operation fails. The user is prompted for confirmation before the files are removed
unless the −y option is supplied.
If the user does not supply a −T option on the command line, the user is prompted to enter an annotation
for the archive.
OPTIONS
−b pool
Specify a destination pool for the archive save set. This option overrides the automatic pool selection which normally occurs on the server.
−B
Force archive of all connecting directory information from root (‘‘/’’) down to the point of invocation. The connecting directory information is always archived even without this option if client
file index is generated.
−C clone pool
Generate a clone of this archive save set to the specified clone pool.
−E
Estimate the amount of data which will be generated by the archive, then perform the actual
archive. The estimate is generated from the inode information, and thus the data is only read once.
−f filename
The file from which to read default directives (see nsr(5)). A filename of - causes the default
directives to be read from standard input.
−i
Ignore directive files as they are encountered in the subdirectory structures being archived.
−G remove
Groom the files after they have been archived. If cloning or verification is requested, no grooming
is performed until those operations have completed successfully. The user is prompted for
removal of top-level directories unless the y option is supplied. nsrarchive creates a temporary
file which contains a list of all files and directories to be removed. The temporary file is placed in
/tmp unless the environment variable TMPDIR is set.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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NSRARCHIVE(1m)
−n
NSRARCHIVE(1m)
No archive. Estimate the amount of data which will be generated by the archive, but do not perform the actual archive.
−N name
The symbolic name of this archive save set. By default, the first path argument is used as the
name.
−v
Verbose. Cause the nsrarchive program to tell you in great detail what it is doing as it proceeds.
−p
Exit with status 0. Used by server to determine if client installed properly.
−q
Quiet. Display only summary information and error messages.
−R name
This option should only be used by the nsralist program, which handles executing archive
requests. Updates to the named archive request resource occur when this option is specified.
−s server
Specify which machine to use as the NetWorker server.
−T annotation
Archive save sets can be annotated with arbitrary text. This option specifies an annotation for the
archive save set being generated.
−V
Verify the archive save set after it completes.
−W width
The width used when formatting summary information output.
−x
Cross mount points.
−y
Answer yes to any questions.
SEE ALSO
curses(3X), nsr_getdate(3), nsr(5), nsr(1m), nsr_service(5), nsr_device(5), nsrmm(1m), nsrmmd(1m),
nsrd(1m), nsrwatch(1m), nsrretrieve(1m), nwadmin(1m).
DIAGNOSTICS
Exit Codes
0
Normal exit.
Non-zero
Abnormal exit.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSRCAP(1m)
NSRCAP(1m)
NAME
nsrcap − update the capabilities of a NetWorker installation
SYNOPSIS
nsrcap [ −vn ] { −c | −d | −u } enabler-code
DESCRIPTION
The nsrcap program is primarily used to enable new features on NetWorker. You can also use nsrcap to
upgrade or downgrade NetWorker software features that are currently being used. (Upgrades and downgrades should be performed carefully. Read the options descriptions below). Enablers are separate from
the NetWorker software, and are specified by an 18-digit code, usually displayed as 3 groups of 6 digits
each. To enable a new feature, the nsrd(1m) program must be running on the system where the NetWorker
server software is installed. To enable a new feature you must be logged in to the NetWorker server as
administrator or root. The nsrcap program is run once for each feature you want to enable by specifying
the 18-digit code each time. If no errors occur, no output is printed. You can inspect the enablers currently
loaded by viewing the NSR license resources using nwadmin(1m) or nsradmin(1m).
OPTIONS
−c
Causes nsrcap to enable a feature that is not currently installed, using the specified enabler code.
You can only load a feature once; an error is returned if you attempt to load the enabler more than
once. You can only specify one of the −c, −d, or −u options.
−d
Causes nsrcap to downgrade an existing Base or Jukebox enabler. After you downgrade the
enabler, you cannot return to the previous level enabled on the system. Do not use the -u option
unless instructed to do so by Legato Technical Support. You must specify one of the −c, −d, or −u
options.
−u
Causes nsrcap to enter an enabler that upgrades an existing Base or Jukebox enabler. After you
upgrade the enabler, you cannot return to the previous level enabled on the system. Do not use the
-u option unless instructed to do so by Legato Technical Support.
−v
Causes nsrcap to display more verbose information, describing the enabler being loaded. You
must specify one of the −c, −d, or −u options.
−n
No load. Causes nsrcap to inspect the enabler code for validity. When you specify the -n option,
the enabler code you enter on the command line is inspected and verified, but is not entered into
the NetWorker server’s nsr_license resource.
SEE ALSO
nwadmin(1m), jbconfig(1m), nsradmin(1m), nsrd(1m).
DIAGNOSTICS
enabler-code is too long
Enabler codes must be 18 digits in length. The code entered is longer than 18 digits, and is invalid.
invalid code: xxxxxx-xxxxxx-xxxxxx
The 18-digit code entered on the command line is invalid. Re-check the enabler-code on your
enabler sheet.
cannot find a jukebox resource to enable
The code word entered is a jukebox license enabler, but there are no jukebox resources to enable.
You need to run jbconfig(1m) to complete the jukebox installation before running nsrcap.
found a jukebox, but it had more than N slots.
Jukebox enablers can only enable jukeboxes with at most N physical slots, where N is the type of
jukebox enabler. Either the jukebox was installed incorrectly, or you need to obtain a larger jukebox enabler.
this enabler-code is already assigned
The enabler-code entered is already loaded onto the system and cannot be used again for an
upgrade.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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NSRCAP(1m)
no appropriate jukeboxes to upgrade
An upgrade was attempted, but no jukebox resources were found. Only use the −u option for
jukeboxes when upgrading from one jukebox level to another, not on the initial installation. You
also need to run jbconfig(1m) before running nsrcap.
this enabler-code previously loaded
The enabler-code entered has been loaded onto the system previously and cannot be used again.
You need to purchase a new enabler-code for the upgrade.
don’t know how to upgrade this enabler
don’t know how to downgrade this enabler
The enabler-code entered is not for a base or jukebox enabler. These are the only types of enablers
that you can currently upgrade or downgrade.
base enabler must be loaded before upgrading
base enabler must be loaded before downgrading
You cannot perform an upgrade or downgrade until a base product has been installed. Install a
base enabler, and then perform the upgrade or downgrade.
cannot find the enabler to upgrade
A jukebox upgrade was attempted, but the license enabler for the jukebox is not currently loaded.
You must use the −c option for the initial installation of a jukebox enabler, not the −u option.
RPC error: Program not registered
The nsrcap program requires that the NetWorker daemons be running. Start your NetWorker daemons (cd /; nsrd) and re-run the nsrcap program. If nsrd is already running, you have probably
reached a resource limit on the server (for example, not enough memory, or no more processes).
RAP error: user login name needs to be of the
type:NSR administrator list.
Your login name is not listed in the administrator’s list for the server. You need to be a valid
administrator to run nsrcap.
RAP error: ...
Various other errors can be returned from nsrd if the enabler is invalid. For example, if you try to
load a base enabler onto a system that already has a base enabler loaded, or if you attempt to load
a jukebox enabler before the jukebox has been completely installed. The specific problem will follow the RAP error prefix.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSRCAT(1m)
NSRCAT(1m)
NAME
nsrcat − NetWorker notification redirector for tty devices
SYNOPSIS
nsrcat [-n]
DESCRIPTION
The nsrcat command appends a carriage return to all newlines. This allows NetWorker notification messages can be redirected to the /dev/console or /dev/tty directory on systems with tty drivers that do not
append a carriage return to output lines. This command reads text messages from standard input, appends a
carriage return to the newline character, and writes the message to standard out.
OPTIONS
−n
Indicates that the codeset is to be converted from UTF-8 to the user’s native character encoding.
EXAMPLES
type: NSR notification;
name: Log default;
action: nsrcat > /dev/console;
SEE ALSO
console(4), tty(4), nsr_notification(5), nsr(5).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRCK(1m)
NSRCK(1m)
NAME
nsrck − NetWorker index consistency check, repair, and recovery program
SYNOPSIS
nsrck [ −qMv ] | [ −R [ −Y ] ] [ −L check-level [ −t date ] | −X [ −x percent ] | −C | −F | −m | −c ] [ −T
tempdir ] [ clientname . . . ]
DESCRIPTION
nsrck is used to check the consistency of the NetWorker online index of clients’ save records. Normally,
nsrck is started automatically and synchronously by the nsrindexd(1m) program when nsrindexd starts.
You can modify the nsrck modes to allow normal users to run nsrck and retain root privileges (see nsr(1m)
for more details).
When nsrindexd starts up, it determines whether any further checking of a client’s index is necessary. This
phase checks certain internal state of the index database, and if that state is consistent, avoids further
passes. This phase also reports any suspicious-looking index names (that is indexes whose names cannot
be mapped into network addresses). These online file indexes are then checked more rigorously.
nsrck detects whether any client indexes need to be converted and does the proper conversion. Converting
the indices takes free space on the volume that contains the indices; if there is not sufficient free space, you
may use the −T tempdir flag to specify a different directory which the conversion will use as its work
space. You may also manually convert client indices by issuing the nsrck commmand manually.
There are seven different checking levels supported by nsrck. If client names are supplied, the check is
performed on the given client names. If no names are given, the checks are performed for all client
indexes. The check levels work as follows for each client checked:
Level 1 validates the online file index header, merging a journal of changes with the existing header.
Level 2 does a level 1 check and checks the online file index for new and cancelled saves. New saves are
added to the online file index, and cancelled saves are removed.
Level 3 does a level 2 check and reconciles the online file index with the online media index. Records that
have no corresponding media save sets are discarded.
Level 4 does a level 3 check and checks the validity of the online file index’s internal key files. If any of
these key files are invalid, they are rebuilt.
Level 5 does a level 4 check and verifies the digest of individual save times against their key files.
Level 6 does a level 5 check and extracts each record from each save time, verifying that each record can be
extracted from the database. The digest of each save time is re-computed and compared against the stored
digest, and the internal key files are rebuilt.
Level 7 recovers an online file index from backup media, rebuilds the internal key files, and rebuilds the
index header. The −t date option may be used to recover the index as of a specific time. Note that recovering the index to a specific time adds the entire contents of the index as of that time to the current index contents. This option allows browsing of save sets that have passed their browse policy and are still recoverable. The save sets referred to by the recovered index will be marked as browsable. They will remain
browsable for the length of time they were originally browsable.
Checks of a higher level generally take longer than checks at a lower level. Checks at a higher level provide a more thorough checking of the online file index. Level 7 is used when the online file index on disk
needs to be recovered from backup media. The nsrck program is restartable at any time during its execution. Therefore, it can survive system crashes or exhaustion of resources without losing data.
OPTIONS
−C
This option validates the client’s online file index header. It is identical to specifying the −L 1
option.
−c
This option is the same as using −L 2.
−F
This option is the same as using −L 2.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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NSRCK(1m)
NSRCK(1m)
−t date Recover the index as of the specified date (in nsr_getdate(3) format). This option is only valid
with the −L 7 option.
−T tempdir
Specifies a different directory to use for conversion. This is useful if your client indexes are on file
systems that are nearly full. It will enable the conversion to use the tempdir specified as a work
space for converting indexes. It is not recommended to use /tmp, since its contents are lost if your
machine is rebooted.
−L level
Specifies the level of checking to use. The valid levels are 1-7.
−M
Master mode (not advised for manual operation). This advises nsrck that it is being run by
nsrd(1m) or another NetWorker daemon and should log messages with timestamps, and perform
any other behavior expected by nsrd.
−m
Forces nsrck to check and rebuild the media database b-tree indexes, instead of checking a client’s
online file index.
−q
Quiet mode. All advisory messages are suppressed.
−v
Verbose mode. Advisory messages are emitted.
−R
Removes the index for the client. This is valid only when the −Y option is also specified. If the
nsrck is not in master mode, the user will be prompted with a warning indicating which online file
indexes will be completely removed and given an opportunity to kill the commmand if this was
not what the user intended.
−X
This is the same as using −L 3
−x percent
This is the same as using −L 1. The "percent" value is ignored, but permitted. This allows customer scripts using this option to continue working.
−Y
Used in conjunction with −R to remove online file indexes. Using this flag means that you really
do wish to remove the online file index(es). If you fail to use this flag with the −R option, you will
be warned that you need to add the −Y flag to the nsrck command.
FILES
/nsr/index/ clientname /db6/nsrck.lck
nsrck locks this file thereby insuring that only one copy of nsrck is checking a client’s index.
/nsr/index/clientname
/nsr/index/clientname/db6
SEE ALSO
nsr_layout(5), nsr_policy(5), hosts(5), nsr(1m), nsrd(1m), nsrindexd(1m), nsrmmdbd(1m), nsrim(1m),
savegrp(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
checking index for clientname
Informative message that the files associated with the named client are being inspected.
WARNING no valid savetimes - cross-check not performed
for clientname
During a cross-check, no save sets were found for this client. Since this situation can occur during
disaster recovery, nsrck avoids deleting the entire contents client index.
cross-checking index for clientname
Displayed when the −L 3 option is in effect.
completed checking count clients
Displayed as the program finishes, provided some form of checking was accomplished.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSRCK(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
NSRCK(1m)
October 15, 2001
3
NSRCLONE(1m)
NSRCLONE(1m)
NAME
nsrclone − NetWorker save set cloning command
SYNOPSIS
nsrclone
[ −v ] [ −s server ] [ −b pool ] { −f file | volname... }
nsrclone
[ −v ] [ −s server ] [ −b pool ] −S { −f file | ssid... }
nsrclone
[ −v ] [ −s server ] [ −b pool ] −V { −f file | volid... }
and on HSM enabled server:
nsrclone
[ −v ] [ −s server ] [ −b pool ] −c client −N saveset
DESCRIPTION
The nsrclone program makes new copies of existing save sets. These copies are indistinguishable from the
original, except for the volume(s) storing the copies. The copies are placed on different media volumes,
allowing for higher reliability than a single copy provides. The copies may be made onto any kind of
media (for example, save sets on an 8mm tape may be copied to a set of optical disks). However, all media
used as the destination of an nsrclone operation must be in a clone pool. See nsr_pool(1m) for a description of the various pool types.
Although the command line parameters allow you to specify volume names or volume identifiers, nsrclone
always copies complete save sets. Save sets that are only partially contained on a specified volume will be
completely copied, so volumes may be requested during the cloning operation in addition to those specified
on the command line. Note that nsrclone does not perform simple volume duplication, but rather, copies
full save sets to a set of destination volumes in a given pool. If the first destination volume chosen cannot
hold all of the save sets to be copied, another volume will be chosen. This allows you to use different kinds
of media for each copy, allowing for variable sized volumes, such as tapes.
If you use the −c and −N options together, nsrclone will create a super-full clone for the given client save
set. A super-full clone is a feature that is supported only with HSM (most useful on HSM enabled servers).
It automatically creates a clone of the most recent complete full backup of the named client and save set,
along with any HSM migration save sets referenced to by the backup. Super-full clones should be cloned
to a volume from a pool of type Migration Clone. If no migration save sets are referenced by the most
recent backup, only the full save set is cloned.
The nsrclone program, in conjunction with nsrmmd(1m), guarantees that each save set will have at most
one clone on a given volume. When you specify a volume name or identifier, the copy of the save sets on
that volume are used as the source. When save sets are specified explicitly, those with existing multiple
copies are automatically chosen (copies of save sets that exist on volumes in a jukebox are chosen over
those that require operator intervention). You can also specify which copy (clone) of a save set to use as the
source, (see the −S option,in the options section).
Cloning between storage nodes is accomplished by an nsrmmd(1m) on the source node reading from a volume, and another nsrmmd(1m) on the target node writing to a volume. The source node is determined by
the location of a source volume, which is given by where the volume is currently mounted or by its "location" field if unmounted (see mmlocate(1m)). The target node of a clone is determined by the "clone storage nodes" attribute of the storage node’s client resource, the "clone storage nodes", or the "storage nodes"
attribute of the server’s client resource in decending priority. See nsr_storage_node(5) and nsr_client(5)
for additional detail on how these attributes are used and on other storage node information.
OPTIONS
−b pool
Specifies the media pool to which the destination clones should be sent. The pool may be any
pool currently registered with nsrd(1m) that has its status set to clone. The possible values can be
viewed by selecting the Pools menu item from the Administration menu of nwadmin(1m). If you
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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NSRCLONE(1m)
NSRCLONE(1m)
omit this option, the cloned save sets are automatically sent to the Default Clone pool.
−c client
Specifies a client whose save sets should be considered in the creation of a super-full clone. This
option must always be specified in conjunction with the −N option.
−f file
Instructs nsrclone to read the volume names, volume identifiers or save set identifiers from the file
specified, instead of listing them on the command line. The values must be listed one per line in
the input file. The file may be "-", in which case the values are read from standard input.
−N saveset
Specifies which save set name is used to create a super-full clone. This option must always be
specified in conjunction with the −c option.
−s server
Specifes a NetWorker server to migrate save sets from. See nsr(1m) for a description of server
selection. The default is the current system.
−v
Enable verbose operation. In this mode, additional messages are displayed about the operation of
nsrclone, such as save sets that cross volumes, or save set series expansions.
−S
Causes nsrclone to treat subsequent command line parameters as save set identifiers, not volume
names. Save set identifiers are unsigned numbers. You can find out the save set identifier of a
save set using the mminfo -v command (see mminfo(1m)). The −S option is useful when you
want to copy individual save sets from a volume or all save sets matching an mminfo query (see
the examples below). The save set identifiers may also specify exactly which copy of a save set
with multiple copies to use as the source. To specify exact copies, use the ssid/cloneid format for
each save set identifier. In this case, the ssid and the cloneid are unsigned numbers, separated by a
single slash (/). You can find out the cloneid for a particular copy by using the mminfo -S report,
or a custom report.
−V
Causes nsrclone to treat subsequent command line parameters as volume identifiers, not volume
names. Volume identifiers can be found using the mminfo -mv report, for example. This option
can not be used in conjunction with the −S option.
EXAMPLES
Copy all save sets on the volume mars.001 to a volume in the Offsite Clone pool:
nsrclone −b ’Offsite Clone’ mars.001
Copy all complete save sets created during the previous weekend (recall that nsr_getdate(3) dates without
time-of-day match midnight at the beginning of that day). Only complete save sets can be copied by nsrclone(1m):
nsrclone -S ‘mminfo −r ssid \
-q ’!incomplete,savetime>last saturday,savetime<last monday’‘
Copy a specific clone of a specific save set:
nsrclone -S 1538800517/770700786
SEE ALSO
nsr_getdate(3), nsr_pool(5), nsr_storage_node(5), mminfo(1m), nsr(1m), nsrd(1m), nsrmmd(1m),
nwadmin(1m).
DIAGNOSTICS
The exit status is zero if all of the requested save sets were cloned successfully, non-zero otherwise.
Several messages are printed signalling that nsrd(1m) is unavailable for cloning data; these are selfexplanatory. You may also see a message from the following list.
adding save set series which includes ssid
If running in verbose mode, this message is printed when nsrclone notices that a requested save
set is continued, requiring the entire series to be cloned (even if only part of the series was specified in the command line parameters).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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NSRCLONE(1m)
NSRCLONE(1m)
Cannot contact media database
The media database (and most likely other NetWorker services as well) on the named server is not
answering queries. The server may need to be started, or if it was just started, it needs to finish its
startup checks before answering queries.
cannot clone save set number, series is corrupt
The given save set is part of a save set series (used for saving very large files or filesystems), but
not all of the save sets in the series were found in the media database. This can happen if, for
example, you relabel a tape that contains part of a save set series.
cannot clone backup and archive data together
Archive and backup data is fundamentally different and cannot be cloned to the same pool. You
need to run nsrclone twice, once to clone the backup save sets and once more for the archive save
sets.
cannot open nsrclone session with server
This message is printed when the server does not accept clone sessions.
cloning not supported; upgrade required
Another enabler is required to use this feature.
cloning requires at least 2 devices
Cloning requires at least one read/write device and one read-only or read/write device, since data
is copied from one volume directly to another.
server does not support cloning
The named server is not capable of cloning.
each clone host needs at least two enabled devices
When cloning between two storage nodes that share the same physical drive, each node must have
at least two enabled devices.
error, no valid clones of ssid number
The listed save set exists, but cannot be cloned because there are no complete copies of the save
set. The save set was either aborted or is in progress. Only complete save sets can be copied.
error, user username needs to be on administrator list
error, user username needs to be on archive users list
Only NetWorker administrators are allowed to make clones of backup save sets. NetWorker
administrators are listed in the NSR server resource, see nsr_service(5) for more information. For
servers with archive capability, users listed in the NSR archive client’s user list are allowed to
clone archive save sets.
no complete, full backup of client:saveset
During an attempt to create a super-full clone, nsrclone could not find a complete, full backup of
the requested save set.
no complete save sets to clone
Only complete save sets can be copied, and no complete save sets were found matching the
requested command line parameters.
number is not a valid save set
The given save set identifier is not valid. Two forms are understood: simple save set identifiers
and those with a cloneid specified. Simple save sets are unsigned numbers. The save set with the
cloneid form is specified as two unsigned numbers separated by a single slash (/).
pool is not a cloning pool
The pool specified with the −b pool option is not a clone pool. You must always use a pool with a
type of "Backup Clone" or "Archive Clone" for the −b option.
save set number does not exist
The given save set (from a −S save set list) does not exist. Verify your save set identifiers using
mminfo(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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NSRCLONE(1m)
NSRCLONE(1m)
save set number crosses volumes; requesting
additional volumes
This message is printed in verbose mode when volume names or IDs were specified, but the given
save set is only partially resident on the listed volumes. Since only complete save sets can be
cloned, nsrclone automatically requests additional volumes.
save set clone number/cloneid does not exist
A specific clone of a save set was specified, but that save set has no clones with that clone identifier. Verify your save set identifiers using mminfo(1m).
volume name-or-number does not exist
The given volume (either a volume name or a volume id specified in the −V option) does not exist
in the media database.
waiting 30 seconds then retrying
A temporary error occurred and nsrclone will automatically retry the request until the condition is
cleared. For example, an error will occur if all devices are busy saving or recovering and nsrclone
must wait for these devices become available.
Warning: No candidate migration save sets of
client:saveset
If you are using nsrclone to create a super-full clone, and the most recent full backup of the named
client and save set does not refer to any migration save sets, this warning is printed as nsrclone
begins cloning the full backup.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
4
NSRD(1m)
NSRD(1m)
NAME
nsrd − daemon providing the NetWorker service
SYNOPSIS
nsrd [ −k virtual-service-name ]
ansrd [ commentary ]
DESCRIPTION
The nsrd daemon provides an RPC-based save and recover service. This service allows users to save,
query for, and recover their files across a network. The RPC program number provided by nsrd is 390103.
Normally nsrd is invoked from a startup shell script (for example rc.local, rc.boot) at boot-time, and
should never need to be started directly by a user. After it is started, nsrd starts up the other daemons it
needs to provide the NetWorker service.
The nsrd command must be run on a machine with appropriate resources. These resources include devices
(for example, tape drives) which are under the control of the media multiplexor software (see nsrmmd(1m)), and sufficient disk space for the index daemons, (see nsrindexd(1m) and nsrmmdbd(1m)) to
maintain the index of saved user files and volumes with corresponding files.
Each time a backup, recover, or another session begins, nsrd starts the program, ansrd, to process the
requested session. The ansrd program is called an agent. The agent is in charge of monitoring that
backup, recover, or another session, and automatically exits when a session completes. Using ps(1) or
another process monitoring tool, you can inspect the subsequent parameters of ansrd to see what kind of
session it is monitoring. If necessary, agents can be forcibly terminated to abort a backup or recover session. Agents cannot be run directly; they can only be started by nsrd.
When nsrd is started with the −k option, it checks to see whether it has been installed as a cluster service
and that the virtual host which owns /nsr/res matches virtual-service-name. If either of these validation
steps fails, nsrd exits immediately. (To check whether NetWorker has been installed as a cluster service,
nsrd checks for a file called NetWorker.clustersvr in the directory containing the nsrd binary. To check
that /nsr/res is owned by virtual-service-name, nsrd queries the cluster management software.)
If the −k option is not used when starting NetWorker in a cluster, the server assumes the identity of the virtual host which owns /nsr/res. If no virtual host owns /nsr/res, then nsrd will not start.
OPTIONS
−k virtual-service-name
Instructs nsrd to start up in cluster failover mode using virtual-service-name as its hostname/identity. This option is used by the NetWorker cluster control script which starts NetWorker.
FILES
/nsr/logs/daemon.log
The file to which nsrd and other NetWorker daemons send information about various error
conditions that cannot otherwise be logged using the NetWorker event mechanism.
/nsr/res/nsr.res
Attributes describing the NetWorker service and its resources (See nsr_service(5)).
/nsr/res/nsrjb.res
Attributes describing the jukebox resources of the NetWorker service.
NetWorker.clustersvr
If this file exists in the directory containing NetWorker’s daemons, it indicates that the NetWorker server has been installed as a cluster service.
SEE ALSO
nsr(1m), nsr_service(5), nsrmmd(1m), nsrmmdbd(1m), nsrindexd(1m), ps(1), rc(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSREXEC(1m)
NSREXEC(1m)
NAME
nsrexec − remotely execute NetWorker commands on NetWorker clients
SYNOPSIS
nsrexec [ −a auth ] [ −vR ] [ −T hangseconds ] [ −c client ] [ −f file | - ] [ −N ] [ −− ... ]
DESCRIPTION
The nsrexec command is run only by other NetWorker commands. It is used to remotely execute commands on NetWorker clients running nsrexecd and monitor the progress of those commands.
OPTIONS
−a
the authentication type to use.
−T
the inactivity timeout.
−c
the client on which to run the command.
−R
a filesystem probe is being performed.
−v
verbose output has been requested.
−f
data is read from a file or the standard input.
−N
client is an NDMP client.
−−
(double dash) information after the double dash is used for descriptive purposes only.
SEE ALSO
nsr(5), nsr(1m), nsrexecd(1m), savegrp(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSREXECD(1m)
NSREXECD(1m)
NAME
nsrexecd − NetWorker client execution service
SYNOPSIS
nsrexecd [ −s server [ −s server ... ]] [ −f serverfile ] [ −p savepath ] [ −i ]
DESCRIPTION
nsrexecd is used by NetWorker servers to perform automatic operations on NetWorker clients. It is currently used by savegrp(1m) to start saves, pre-migrations and storage node functions on NetWorker client
machines. When migration is enabled on a NetWorker client, nsrexecd monitors disk usage, starts migration runs using nsrmig(1m), and also manages file recall using nsrib(1m). When storage node functions
are in use, nsrexecd starts nsrmmd(1m) daemons and nsrjb(1m) commands on the host, and responds to
polling requests from the server. See nsr_storage_node(5) for additional detail on storage nodes. The
nsrexecd service is normally started at boot time on each NetWorker client machine. Since NetWorker
servers are usually expected to be clients of themselves, nsrexecd runs on all NetWorker servers as well.
The nsrexecd service exports an RPC-based service to remotely execute NetWorker operations. All
requests must be authenticated, and can optionally be restricted to specific NetWorker servers. Only save
requests (for example, save(1m) or savefs(1m)), migration requests (for example, nsrpmig(1m) or nsrmig(1m)), and storage node requests are allowed.
When command execution is requested, nsrexecd first verifies that the request is authenticated, and that it
comes from a valid NetWorker server. Next, nsrexecd verifies that the command is a save or migration
command (for example, save(1m) or nsrpmig(1m)). It then executes the specified command from the NetWorker binary directory. This directory is normally determined by the location of the nsrexecd executable,
but can be specified on the command line.
OPTIONS
−i
As part of the NetWorker server authentication, the server’s network address is mapped to a name.
The name is then reverse-mapped to a network address. The server is authenticated if and only if
the original network address matches the reverse-mapped address. The −i flag skips the address
comparison thereby allowing workarounds to misconfigured or misfeatured naming systems. This
option should be used with care since it may allow the NetWorker client to send its data to an
unauthorized machine.
−f serverfile
Specifies a file containing a list of NetWorker servers which can initiate saves. This file should list
one server name per line. If no −f or −s options are specified, nsrexecd looks for a default file in
this same format (or Mac preferences on the Mac client). The location of this default file is listed
in the FILES section of this man page.
−p savepath
Tells nsrexecd to look for save commands in the savepath directory, rather than the default (the
directory in which nsrexecd exists).
−s server
Allows save requests to be initiated only by the given NetWorker server. Multiple −s options may
be given to allow access by several NetWorker servers. If a NetWorker server has multiple network interfaces, it is often best to list the hostname corresponding to each network interface, to
avoid failed saves.
FILES
/nsr/res/nsrla.res
/nsr/res/servers
The file with attributes describing the NetWorker nsrexecd service and
its resources (see nsr_service(5)).
The file containing the default list of servers that can back up or migrate
the NetWorker client.
SEE ALSO
nsr_service(5), nsr_storage_node(5), nsrib(1m), nsrmig(1m), nsrpmig(1m), nsrports(1m), save(1m),
save(1m), savefs(1m), savegrp(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NAME
nsrfile - NetWorker module to aid in
ASMs
writing
shell
script
SYNOPSIS
nsrfile -s [-N asmname] [-C command] <ASM args> file...
nsrfile -r [-F] [-N asmname] [-C command] <ASM args> file...
DESCRIPTION
The nsrfile command is an external ASM (Application Specific
Module) that makes it easy to implement shell script based
ASMs for saving and recovering databases, raw devices, and
other site-specific special data.
It is intended that nsrfile be invoked by a shell script
which is in turn invoked by uasm(8) during save(8) or
recover(8) operations.
In save mode, nsrfile creates a NetWorker protocol save
record on standard-out for each file given on the command
line. A command (see -C option below) is executed for each
file name and the data produced by that command is converted
into NetWorker protocol save record data and emitted on
standard-out. In this way, nsrfile can be used to create a
save record from the data produced by any UNIX command. Save
mode looks like:
save-command | nsrfile -s ==> save record
In recover mode, nsrfile reads a NetWorker protocol save
stream from standard-in and executes a command for each save
record in the stream. The save data for each save record is
written to the standard-input of the executing command.
Recover mode looks like:
save record ==> nsrfile -r | recover-command
OPTIONS
See uasm(8) for a general description of ASM's and the
args>.
1 of 4
<ASM
-s
Save mode.
-r
Recover mode.
-F
Don't create the target file. This flag is only valid
in recover mode (with the -r flag). This flag is used
when the data being recovered contains the information
necessary to create the target file (e.g. tar or cpio
data).
-C command
Execute the given command for each file in either save
or recover mode. In save mode (-s flag), the command
is executed once for each file given on the command
line.
The stdout of the command is piped to the stdin
of nsrfile which produces a NetWorker save record on
stdout. In recover mode (-r flag), the command is executed once for each file in the recover data stream.
The stdout of nsrfile is connect through a pipe to the
stdin of the command. The command can include an argument % which will be replaced with the current pathname
on each invocation of command.
-N asmname
Pretend to be the ASM called asmname.
This option
allows nsrfile to take the name of the shell script ASM
that invoked it so that warnings and error messages are
prepended with asmname instead of nsrfile.
file ...
List of files and directories for command, see option C.
IMPLEMENTING ASM SHELL SCRIPTS
Several support procedures are necessary to implement an ASM
shell script. The hideasm(8) command is implemented as a
shell script ASM and it can be used as the source of these
shell procedures.
asm_echo
Works like the shell echo command, but it writes to
stderr instead of stdout. This procedure should be used
instead of echo throughout the ASM script because
stdout is used for the save record output in save mode
and to pipe to a command in recover mode.
asm_error
Like asm_echo above, but it prepends the
2 of 4
name
of
the
ASM script to the message.
asm_setup
Parses the ASM script arguments and breaks them into
several shell variables.
This procedure expects as
arguments all of the arguments to the ASM shell script.
The shell variables defined by asm_setup are:
Nsrfile_args
The arguments that nsrfile should be invoked with.
These arguments are derived from the shell script arguments.
Files
The list of files and directories to operate on.
Mode The ASM mode. The value of this variable can
RECOVER, or COUNT.
be
SAVE,
Myname
The name that the ASM shell script was invoked with.
The directory path is stripped off. Exec_path The
directory path name that should be used to explicitly
invoke nsrfile or other ASM executables.
EXAMPLE
To implement a shell script ASM that uses tar(1) to back up
and recover files and directories the following shell script
(plus the shell procedures described above) would be used:
asm_setup $0 $*
if [ $Mode = SAVE ]; then
$Exec_path/nsrfile -C "tar cf - %" $Nsrfile_args $Files
elif [ $Mode = RECOVER ]; then
$Exec_path/nsrfile -F -C "tar xBf -" $Nsrfile_args $Files
else # $Mode = COUNT
$Exec_path/nsrfile $Nsrfile_args $Files
fi
If this tarasm script were executed with the command line:
tarasm -s foo
the Mode variable would be set to SAVE and nsrfile would run
as though the following command line had been typed:
tar cf - foo | nsrfile -N tarasm -s foo
3 of 4
SEE ALSO
nsr(5), hideasm(8), save(8), recover(8), uasm(8).
4 of 4
NSRHSMCK(1m)
NSRHSMCK(1m)
NAME
nsrhsmck − check and correct consistency for an HSM-managed filesystem
SYNOPSIS
nsrhsmck [ −cdfMv ] [ −s server ] path
DESCRIPTION
The nsrhsmck command checks and corrects consistency between HSM migrated files stored in NetWorker and on-disk files. There are four situations handled by nsrhsmck.
The first situation occurs when the stub for a migrated file is renamed. This is known as the rename case.
In this situation, the stub with the original filename no longer exists. The corrective action taken by
nsrhsmck in this instance is to update the HSM file index to reflect the new name.
The second situation occurs when a symbolic link is created that points to the same name in the NetWorker
IB namespace as another symbolic link. This is known as the duplicated link case. The corrective action
for a duplicated link is to replace the duplicate with another symbolic link. The replacement must point to
the original symbolic link, and not directly into the NetWorker IB namespace.
The third situation occurs when the stub pointing to a migrated file has been deleted. This is known as the
possible delete case. The term "possible" is used here, because the stub may reappear at some later point in
time, possibly if a recover of the stub is done using NetWorker. The corrective action for a possible deletion is to mark the index entry for the migrated file as possibly deleted. Note that if a file marked as possibly deleted is detected on disk before the index entry can be deleted, the index entry will be unmarked as a
possible deletion.
The fourth situation handled by nsrhsmck is an index entry that is marked as a possible deletion, but has
passed the 60-day expiration period. This is known as the expired delete case. The corrective action for
this case is to remove the expired entries from the HSM file index. Before an entry is deleted from the
HSM file index, a final check is made to make sure the file does not exist on disk.
You must specify a path on the command line when nsrhsmck is run. Only files and index entries that fall
under the path specified will be examined for consistency.
OPTIONS
−c
Scans the HSM file index, and deletes index entries that are marked as possibly deleted but have
passed the 60-day expiration period.
−d
Scans the HSM file index, and marks any possible deletions that are detected.
−f
Scans the filesystem on disk, and searches for duplicated links and renames them.
−M
Master mode (not advised for manual operation). This advises nsrhsmck that it is being run by
nsrexecd(1m) or another NetWorker daemon and should log messages with timestamps, and perform any other behavior expected by nsrexecd.
−n
Does not correct inconsistencies found, but just reports them.
−s server
Use server as the NetWorker server.
−v
Increases the verbosity level incrementally. This flag may be specified up to three times to achieve
the maximum verbosity. Note that verbose mode can produce an extremely large quantity of output, and is not recommended for use in most situations.
DIAGNOSTICS
Exit Codes
0
1
Normal exit.
Abnormal exit.
SEE ALSO
nsr(5), nsr(1m), nsr_migration(5), nsrexecd(1m), nsrmig(1m), nsrpmig(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRHSMCLEAR(1m)
NSRHSMCLEAR(1m)
NAME
nsrhsmclear − destroy outstanding HSM events and sessions
SYNOPSIS
nsrhsmclear [ −vn ]
DESCRIPTION
If killed, HSM processes may leave sessions, tokens, and file locks. Other processes trying to access a
locked file will block until the lock is released. nsrhsmclear will release those locks.
nsrhsmclear destroys all XDSM HSM tokens and sessions that may have outstanding file locks, and may
be associated with HSM filesystem read, write, or truncate requests. Those requests will be aborted with an
I/O error.
Note: nsrhsmclear should be used with caution because file system clients and HSM processes will receive
I/O errors.
OPTIONS
−n
Print tokens and sessions, but do not destroy any.
−v
Print verbose descriptions of tokens.
SEE ALSO
nsrhsmd(1m), nsrhsmls(1m), nsrpmig(1m), nsrmig(1m), nsr_migration(5),
DIAGNOSTICS
Exit Codes
0
1
NetWorker 6.1.1
Normal exit.
An error occurred.
October 15, 2001
1
NSRHSMD(1m)
NSRHSMD(1m)
NAME
nsrhsmd − XDSM HSM event daemon
nsrhsmrc − recall migrated file
SYNOPSIS
nsrhsmd [ -v ] [ -C parallelism ] [ −s <NWserver> ]
nsrhsmrc NWserver client session token fsid ino igen ofsid ofid savetime path
DESCRIPTION
nsrhsmd listens for XDSM file system events that may require recalling migrated files. nsrhsmd is started
by nsrexecd if Migration resources are configured for the client.
nsrhsmrc is started by nsrhsmd to recall each migrated file.
OPTIONS
−v
Verbose output
−C parallelism
Specifies the maximum number of recalls that will be executed in parallel. Default is 8.
−s <NWserver>
Specifies which machine to use as the NetWorker server (by hostname or IP address).
NWserver
The Networker server for the migrated file.
client
The Networker client which originally migrated the file.
session token
The XDSM session and token that describe the file system event that caused the recall of the
migrated file. The session and token need an exclusive lock on the file.
fsid ino igen
The file system identifier, inode number, and inode generation number of the requested file.
ofsid oino
The file system identifier and inode number of the file when it was premigrated.
savetime
The savetime identifying the save set where the file data is stored.
path
The name of the file when it was premigrated.
FILES
/nsr/logs/daemon.log
The file to which nsrhsmd , nsrhsmrc , and other NetWorker daemons
send information about various error conditions.
/nsr/res/nsrla.res
Attributes describing the NetWorker nsrexecd service and its resources.
Local Migration resources are described here, as well as in the Networker server’s /nsr/res/nsr.res file.
SEE ALSO
nsrhsmls(1m), nsrpmig(1m), nsrmig(1m), nsr_migration(5), nsrexecd(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRHSMLS(1m)
NSRHSMLS(1m)
NAME
nsrhsmls − list contents of a XDSM HSM configured directory
SYNOPSIS
nsrhsmls [ −abim ] [ −lv ] [ −R | −r <level> ] [ −s <NWserver> ] [ <path> ]
DESCRIPTION
nsrhsmls is a NetWorker XDSM HSM-specific "ls" command to display the premigration and migration
status of a file or directory, and other information.
It works much like an "ls" command, but it will list HSM-related information. For example, it will indicate
whether or not a file has been premigrated and migrated, number of disk blocks currently being used by the
file, the file size and full filename.
If none of the display options ( -a, -b, -i, or -m ) are specified, nsrhsmls will display migration summary
information for each file. The migration summary output is as follows:
The first character shows the migration status of the file:
r
m
d
x
File is resident (it has not been migrated)
File has been migrated
Unable to determine file’s migration status
Is a directory
Is not a file or a directory
The second character shows the premigration status of the file:
n
p
File has not been premigrated
File has been premigrated
The next entry gives the number of disk blocks, including indirect blocks, currently being used by the file.
The next entry gives the file size in bytes.
OPTIONS
−l
For the migration summary display, separates the displayed columns with "|".
−v
Displays more detailed migration information.
−R
Runs down all subdirectories in recursive manner.
−r <level>
runs down the specified level of subdirectories in a recursive manner. Level 1, the default, works in
the current directory. Level 2 causes nsrhsmls to run down one level below the current directory,
and so on.
−s <NWserver>
Specifies which machine to use as the NetWorker server (hostname or IP address).
−a
Prints the allocation information. The allocation information shows which regions of a file have
space allocated on the file system. A hole may be caused by migration of a file or by a creation of
a unix hole.
−b
Prints the XDSM attribute in hexadecimal format. The XDSM attribute is used by Networker to
find the data that was premigrated. The attributes used by Networker include: the Networker
server, the Networker client, save set, file system identifier, inode number, and a managed region
map.
−i
Prints the XDSM handle in hexadecimal format. The handle information contains the file system
identifier, the inode number, and the inode generation of the file.
−m
Prints the managed region map. The managed region map indicates which regions of a file have
read, write, and truncate events enabled for HSM.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRHSMLS(1m)
NSRHSMLS(1m)
EXAMPLES
To display migration status of files upto three levels down in the /export/home/hsmfs directory, with the
NetWorker server being "jupiter", you would enter the following command:
nsrhsmls -r 4 -s jupiter /export/home/hsmfs
SEE ALSO
ls(1), nsrpmig(1m), nsrmig(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSRHSMNFS(1m)
NSRHSMNFS(1m)
NAME
nsrhsmnfs − perform HSM operations on NFS mounted file systems
SYNOPSIS
nsrhsmnfs migrate [ (nsrpmig and nsrmig options) ]
nsrhsmnfs ls [ (nsrhsmls options) ]
nsrhsmnfs recall [ (nsrhsmrecall options) ]
DESCRIPTION
nsrhsmnfs is a NetWorker XDSM HSM-specific command used to perform HSM commands on NFS
mounted file systems. nsrhsmnfs submits the command to execute on the NFS server. If the file system is
not NFS mounted, nsrhsmnfs executes the command locally.
nsrhsmnfs translates pathnames if necessary. Output of the invoked commands is the output of nsrhsmnfs. No translation of the output is done by nsrhsmnfs.
nsrhsmnfs migrate invokes nsrpmig, followed by nsrmig. The -l 0 option is automatically added to the
nsrmig command to set the low water mark to zero percent. Without this option, file migration would only
take place if file system usage is above the low water mark.
nsrhsmnfs ls invokes nsrhsmls with the specified options.
nsrhsmnfs recall invokes nsrhsmrecall with the specified options.
SEE ALSO
nsrhsmls(1m), nsrhsmrecall(1m), nsrpmig(1m), nsrmig(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRHSMD(1m)
NSRHSMD(1m)
NAME
nsrhsmd − XDSM HSM event daemon
nsrhsmrc − recall migrated file
SYNOPSIS
nsrhsmd [ -v ] [ -C parallelism ] [ −s <NWserver> ]
nsrhsmrc NWserver client session token fsid ino igen ofsid ofid savetime path
DESCRIPTION
nsrhsmd listens for XDSM file system events that may require recalling migrated files. nsrhsmd is started
by nsrexecd if Migration resources are configured for the client.
nsrhsmrc is started by nsrhsmd to recall each migrated file.
OPTIONS
−v
Verbose output
−C parallelism
Specifies the maximum number of recalls that will be executed in parallel. Default is 8.
−s <NWserver>
Specifies which machine to use as the NetWorker server (by hostname or IP address).
NWserver
The Networker server for the migrated file.
client
The Networker client which originally migrated the file.
session token
The XDSM session and token that describe the file system event that caused the recall of the
migrated file. The session and token need an exclusive lock on the file.
fsid ino igen
The file system identifier, inode number, and inode generation number of the requested file.
ofsid oino
The file system identifier and inode number of the file when it was premigrated.
savetime
The savetime identifying the save set where the file data is stored.
path
The name of the file when it was premigrated.
FILES
/nsr/logs/daemon.log
The file to which nsrhsmd , nsrhsmrc , and other NetWorker daemons
send information about various error conditions.
/nsr/res/nsrla.res
Attributes describing the NetWorker nsrexecd service and its resources.
Local Migration resources are described here, as well as in the Networker server’s /nsr/res/nsr.res file.
SEE ALSO
nsrhsmls(1m), nsrpmig(1m), nsrmig(1m), nsr_migration(5), nsrexecd(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRHSMRECALL(1m)
NSRHSMRECALL(1m)
NAME
nsrhsmrecall − recall HSM files to file system
SYNOPSIS
nsrhsmrecall [ −qRuv ] [ −I includefile ] [ path1 path2 ... ]
DESCRIPTION
nsrhsmrecall is a NetWorker XDSM HSM-specific command used to recall one or more files from nearline
storage to the file system. nsrhsmrecall can be used before reading a large number of files. For two or
more files, nsrhsmrecall is usually faster than automatic transparent recalls caused by read or write system
calls.
If no path arguments and no includefile are specified, nsrhsmrecall recalls files in the current directory.
OPTIONS
−q
Quiet. Turns off the verbose output. nsrhsmrecall normally runs with verbose output.
−R
Recurse subdirectories of directories specified on the command line, or in the input file. By
default, nsrhsmrecall does not recurse into subdirectories.
−u
Stops when an error occurs during recall. Normally, nsrhsmrecall treats errors as warnings and
tries to continue to recall the rest of the files requested. However, when this option is used,
nsrhsmrecall will stop recalling on the first error it encounters.
−v
Enables more verbose output.
−I includefile
Takes the paths to recall from the command line, and reads paths to recall from the file includefile.
The paths must be listed one per line. If no paths are specified on the command line, only those
paths specified in includefile will be recovered.
EXAMPLES
To recall all of the files in the current directory, you would enter the following command:
nsrhsmrecall
To recall all files named Index, you would enter the following command:
find . -name Index -print | nsrhsmrecall -I BUGS
The file name printed on recall is the file name at the time the file was premigrated.
Recover of HSM stub files to a different location will cause two HSM stubs to refer to the same data, however only one of the HSM stubs can be recalled at a time. Run nsrhsmrecall again to recall the files that
could not be recalled.
SEE ALSO
nsrhsmls(1m), nsrpmig(1m), nsrmig(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRIB(1m)
NSRIB(1m)
NAME
nsrib − NetWorker index browser daemon
nsriba − NetWorker index browser agent daemon
SYNOPSIS
nsrib [ −s server ] [ −t timeout ] [ −v ] [ −M ] [ −i # ] [ −C # ] [ −D # ] [ −R # ] [ −T rdir ] [ dir ]
nsriba [ −s server ] [ −c client ] [ −p path ] [ −v ] [ −t browse_date ] [ −I index_type ] [ −N session_name ]
[ −i # ] [ −C # ] [ −D # ] [ −R # ] [ −T rdir ] [ dir ]
DESCRIPTION
The nsrib (index browser) and nsriba (index browser agent) daemons provide a convenient NFS interface
in which to view NetWorker indexes. Using nsrib is the preferred method as it will launch and manage the
appropriate nsriba processes as needed. The nsriba daemon gives you an NFS filesystem view of a particular NetWorker client’s index as of a given time. Also, it can be used directly for situations where the flexibility provided by nsrib is not required. The nsrib and nsriba daemons appear to be an NFS server to the
local kernel in a manner similar to automount(1m).
The nsrib daemon will interpret names referenced in dir without an ‘@’ as a NetWorker client index to
browse. You can also construct names of the form client@date to browse a particular index as of a particular time. You can also use the name of the form @date to browse the index for the local machine. The date
is interpreted as a nsr_getdate(3) style string after replacing any underscores (_) with a space and all
dashes (-) with a slash (/). When nsrib gets such a name request, it will launch and manage the appropriate
nsriba process on a mount point that it builds in dir automatically. If the nsriba filesystem is not accessed
within an appropriate interval, nsrib will attempt an umount of the nsriba filesystem. If successful, the
symbolic link and mount directory created in dir is removed.
Below the dir/client@date directory for nsrib (or within the dir directory for nsriba), a read-only filesystem consisting of the entire NetWorker index for the specified client can be seen. At times, a local machine
may not have NetWorker recover access rights for the specified client. See nsr_client(5). There may be no
entries in the NetWorker index for the specified client at the appropriate time. In either of those cases, the
directory will be empty (nsrib) or the command will fail (nsriba). The files and directories with in the
nsriba filesystem will appear as normal UNIX files just as in recover(1m), except that the access time
(atime) of all files will be the "save time" of the file, not the access time of the file as stored in the index.
Thus running ls -lu within an nsriba directory will show all the file save times. If an file within an nsriba
filesystem is read, then nsriba will either recover the file and then return the resultant file as needed, or
return an NFSERR_OPNOTSUPP ("Operation not supported") error. The actual behavior is dependent on
the −R and −C flags and whether the file appears to be currently "online" to NetWorker. If a file is to be
recovered, the actual operation may take a long time depending primarily on the speed and location of the
underlying media that will be needed to recover the file. A separate process is used to do the actual file
recovery so that the nsriba process can still respond to new NFS operations.
Within nsriba filesystems, hidden directories can be referenced for each file or directory to give information similar to the recover(1m) version command. These hidden directories are named file.V. Since these
hidden directories names are never returned for function calls such as readdir(3), programs such as find(1)
that traverse the filesystem will never see these directories. The files and directories within these hidden
directories are built up using the NetWorker file location information. The hidden directories for directories
can either be named as ".V" within the directory or as dirname.V from above the directory. But when using
nsrib, you can only use dir/client@date/.V to see all the versions for "/". Files within the hidden directories
can be read (recovered) as any other file within the nsriba filesystem.
nsrib and nsriba must not be terminated with the SIGKILL signal (kill -9). Without an opportunity to
unmount itself and clean up properly, the nsrib and nsriba mount points appear to the kernel as a nonresponding NFS server. The recommended way to terminate an nsrib or nsriba process is to send a
SIGTERM (kill -15) signal to the daemon. When nsriba receives a SIGTERM signal, it attempts to unmount
itself and exit if the unmount is successful (the filesystem is not currently busy). When nsrib receives a
SIGTERM signal, it attempts to signal any child nsriba processes, that it started, to exit. If all child nsriba
processes exit, nsrib then attempts to unmount dir itself and exits if the unmount is successful (the
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRIB(1m)
NSRIB(1m)
filesystem is not currently busy).
OPTIONS
Common nsrib and nsriba options:
−s server
Indicates the NetWorker server to use.
−i #
Specifies "in place" mode if the corresponding file in the system is a symlink whose target
string has the filename at the end.
0 - never do "in place" recovers
1 - do "in place" recovers only for exact matches with names of "file@date"
2 - do "in place" recovers on any matching symlink target
Default value is 1.
−v
Runs in verbose mode. This should only be used for debugging purposes.
−C #
Sets an upper limit on the number of concurrent file recovers. A value of 0 will disable all
recovers (independent of the −R value). Default value is 2.
−D #
Specifies the debug level for messages. Using a number from 1 - 3 to get various (reasonable) levels of output. When running in a debugging mode, nsrib will not automatically run
itself in the background. Default value is 0.
−R #
Specifies recover mode on read.
0 - never recover the file on NFS read.
1 - recover the file on NFS read if "online".
2 - always attempt a recovery of a file on NFS read.
Default value is 2.
−T rdir
Temporary directory to use
"/usr/tmp/nsrib/Rtmp.client".
to
cache
recovered
files.
Default
value
is
The −i, −s, −v, −C, −D, −R, and −T options to nsrib are passed through to each nsriba program started.
The following options apply only to nsrib:
−t timeout
Indicates the time in minutes to attempt umounts of nsriba browsing directories. Default is
30 minutes.
−M
Indicates that nsrib is being monitored by another process (such as nsrexecd(1m)), and
should not run in the background.
The following options apply only to nsriba:
−c client
Indicates the NetWorker client index name to browse.
−p path
Indicates the NetWorker index path to browse.
−t browse_date
Indicates a nsr_getdate(3) string giving the "browse as of" time. Default value is now.
−I index_type
Indicats the type of index that is being browsed. The default is a backup index.
−N session_name
Indicates the name to use to generate the NetWorker session name. Default value is the
mount directory dir.
EXAMPLES
These examples assume that nsrib has been started on the /ib directory.
Finding files
To find all versions of a file named foo that were owned by user last week, use this command.
Note that when using find(1), you should cd(2) to the directory first to avoid using the symbolic
link instead of the resultant directory.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSRIB(1m)
NSRIB(1m)
cd /ib/@last_week; find . −name foo −user user −ls
Seeing saved versions
To see all the saved versions of /var/adm/messages for a NetWorker client clientname, use this
command. Note that by using the −u flag to ls(1), the file save times will be displayed in the ls date
field.
ls -lu /ib/clientname/var/adm/messages.V
Recovering files
To recover /etc/fstab as of yesterday into the /tmp directory, use this command:
cp /ib/@yesterday/etc/fstab /tmp/fstab
FILES
/etc/mtab
This is the file that is updated on SunOS 4.1.x as nsrib and nsriba processes are mounted
and umounted.
/etc/mnttab
This is the file that is updated on Solaris 2.x as nsrib and nsriba processes are mounted and
umounted.
/ib
This is the directory on which nsrib will mount itself.
/usr/tmp/nsrib
This is the default file cache directory tree.
LIMITATIONS
The pwd(1) command fails from within a hidden ".V" directory.
The filesystem statistics returned to programs like df(1) are of minimal use.
An unreliable heuristic is used to determine if a file is currently "online" for recovery if the NetWorker
server version is 3.x or earlier. In particular, if a volume on a pre-4.0 NetWorker server is marked to be at
some location using the mmlocate(1m) command, nsriba always performs as if the volume is "online".
SEE ALSO
mount(2V), umount(2V), signal(3), nsr_getdate(3),
nsrindexd(1m), nsrexecd(1m), recover(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
nsr(5),
nsr_client(5),
automount(1m),
3
NSRIB(1m)
NSRIB(1m)
NAME
nsrib − NetWorker index browser daemon
nsriba − NetWorker index browser agent daemon
SYNOPSIS
nsrib [ −s server ] [ −t timeout ] [ −v ] [ −M ] [ −i # ] [ −C # ] [ −D # ] [ −R # ] [ −T rdir ] [ dir ]
nsriba [ −s server ] [ −c client ] [ −p path ] [ −v ] [ −t browse_date ] [ −I index_type ] [ −N session_name ]
[ −i # ] [ −C # ] [ −D # ] [ −R # ] [ −T rdir ] [ dir ]
DESCRIPTION
The nsrib (index browser) and nsriba (index browser agent) daemons provide a convenient NFS interface
in which to view NetWorker indexes. Using nsrib is the preferred method as it will launch and manage the
appropriate nsriba processes as needed. The nsriba daemon gives you an NFS filesystem view of a particular NetWorker client’s index as of a given time. Also, it can be used directly for situations where the flexibility provided by nsrib is not required. The nsrib and nsriba daemons appear to be an NFS server to the
local kernel in a manner similar to automount(1m).
The nsrib daemon will interpret names referenced in dir without an ‘@’ as a NetWorker client index to
browse. You can also construct names of the form client@date to browse a particular index as of a particular time. You can also use the name of the form @date to browse the index for the local machine. The date
is interpreted as a nsr_getdate(3) style string after replacing any underscores (_) with a space and all
dashes (-) with a slash (/). When nsrib gets such a name request, it will launch and manage the appropriate
nsriba process on a mount point that it builds in dir automatically. If the nsriba filesystem is not accessed
within an appropriate interval, nsrib will attempt an umount of the nsriba filesystem. If successful, the
symbolic link and mount directory created in dir is removed.
Below the dir/client@date directory for nsrib (or within the dir directory for nsriba), a read-only filesystem consisting of the entire NetWorker index for the specified client can be seen. At times, a local machine
may not have NetWorker recover access rights for the specified client. See nsr_client(5). There may be no
entries in the NetWorker index for the specified client at the appropriate time. In either of those cases, the
directory will be empty (nsrib) or the command will fail (nsriba). The files and directories with in the
nsriba filesystem will appear as normal UNIX files just as in recover(1m), except that the access time
(atime) of all files will be the "save time" of the file, not the access time of the file as stored in the index.
Thus running ls -lu within an nsriba directory will show all the file save times. If an file within an nsriba
filesystem is read, then nsriba will either recover the file and then return the resultant file as needed, or
return an NFSERR_OPNOTSUPP ("Operation not supported") error. The actual behavior is dependent on
the −R and −C flags and whether the file appears to be currently "online" to NetWorker. If a file is to be
recovered, the actual operation may take a long time depending primarily on the speed and location of the
underlying media that will be needed to recover the file. A separate process is used to do the actual file
recovery so that the nsriba process can still respond to new NFS operations.
Within nsriba filesystems, hidden directories can be referenced for each file or directory to give information similar to the recover(1m) version command. These hidden directories are named file.V. Since these
hidden directories names are never returned for function calls such as readdir(3), programs such as find(1)
that traverse the filesystem will never see these directories. The files and directories within these hidden
directories are built up using the NetWorker file location information. The hidden directories for directories
can either be named as ".V" within the directory or as dirname.V from above the directory. But when using
nsrib, you can only use dir/client@date/.V to see all the versions for "/". Files within the hidden directories
can be read (recovered) as any other file within the nsriba filesystem.
nsrib and nsriba must not be terminated with the SIGKILL signal (kill -9). Without an opportunity to
unmount itself and clean up properly, the nsrib and nsriba mount points appear to the kernel as a nonresponding NFS server. The recommended way to terminate an nsrib or nsriba process is to send a
SIGTERM (kill -15) signal to the daemon. When nsriba receives a SIGTERM signal, it attempts to unmount
itself and exit if the unmount is successful (the filesystem is not currently busy). When nsrib receives a
SIGTERM signal, it attempts to signal any child nsriba processes, that it started, to exit. If all child nsriba
processes exit, nsrib then attempts to unmount dir itself and exits if the unmount is successful (the
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRIB(1m)
NSRIB(1m)
filesystem is not currently busy).
OPTIONS
Common nsrib and nsriba options:
−s server
Indicates the NetWorker server to use.
−i #
Specifies "in place" mode if the corresponding file in the system is a symlink whose target
string has the filename at the end.
0 - never do "in place" recovers
1 - do "in place" recovers only for exact matches with names of "file@date"
2 - do "in place" recovers on any matching symlink target
Default value is 1.
−v
Runs in verbose mode. This should only be used for debugging purposes.
−C #
Sets an upper limit on the number of concurrent file recovers. A value of 0 will disable all
recovers (independent of the −R value). Default value is 2.
−D #
Specifies the debug level for messages. Using a number from 1 - 3 to get various (reasonable) levels of output. When running in a debugging mode, nsrib will not automatically run
itself in the background. Default value is 0.
−R #
Specifies recover mode on read.
0 - never recover the file on NFS read.
1 - recover the file on NFS read if "online".
2 - always attempt a recovery of a file on NFS read.
Default value is 2.
−T rdir
Temporary directory to use
"/usr/tmp/nsrib/Rtmp.client".
to
cache
recovered
files.
Default
value
is
The −i, −s, −v, −C, −D, −R, and −T options to nsrib are passed through to each nsriba program started.
The following options apply only to nsrib:
−t timeout
Indicates the time in minutes to attempt umounts of nsriba browsing directories. Default is
30 minutes.
−M
Indicates that nsrib is being monitored by another process (such as nsrexecd(1m)), and
should not run in the background.
The following options apply only to nsriba:
−c client
Indicates the NetWorker client index name to browse.
−p path
Indicates the NetWorker index path to browse.
−t browse_date
Indicates a nsr_getdate(3) string giving the "browse as of" time. Default value is now.
−I index_type
Indicats the type of index that is being browsed. The default is a backup index.
−N session_name
Indicates the name to use to generate the NetWorker session name. Default value is the
mount directory dir.
EXAMPLES
These examples assume that nsrib has been started on the /ib directory.
Finding files
To find all versions of a file named foo that were owned by user last week, use this command.
Note that when using find(1), you should cd(2) to the directory first to avoid using the symbolic
link instead of the resultant directory.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSRIB(1m)
NSRIB(1m)
cd /ib/@last_week; find . −name foo −user user −ls
Seeing saved versions
To see all the saved versions of /var/adm/messages for a NetWorker client clientname, use this
command. Note that by using the −u flag to ls(1), the file save times will be displayed in the ls date
field.
ls -lu /ib/clientname/var/adm/messages.V
Recovering files
To recover /etc/fstab as of yesterday into the /tmp directory, use this command:
cp /ib/@yesterday/etc/fstab /tmp/fstab
FILES
/etc/mtab
This is the file that is updated on SunOS 4.1.x as nsrib and nsriba processes are mounted
and umounted.
/etc/mnttab
This is the file that is updated on Solaris 2.x as nsrib and nsriba processes are mounted and
umounted.
/ib
This is the directory on which nsrib will mount itself.
/usr/tmp/nsrib
This is the default file cache directory tree.
LIMITATIONS
The pwd(1) command fails from within a hidden ".V" directory.
The filesystem statistics returned to programs like df(1) are of minimal use.
An unreliable heuristic is used to determine if a file is currently "online" for recovery if the NetWorker
server version is 3.x or earlier. In particular, if a volume on a pre-4.0 NetWorker server is marked to be at
some location using the mmlocate(1m) command, nsriba always performs as if the volume is "online".
SEE ALSO
mount(2V), umount(2V), signal(3), nsr_getdate(3),
nsrindexd(1m), nsrexecd(1m), recover(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
nsr(5),
nsr_client(5),
automount(1m),
3
NSRIM(1m)
NSRIM(1m)
NAME
nsrim − NetWorker index management program
SYNOPSIS
nsrim [ −c client ] [ −N saveset ] [ −x percent ] [ −lnqvMX ]
DESCRIPTION
The nsrim program is used to manage the NetWorker online file and media indexes. Normally, nsrim is
invoked by nsrmmdbd(1m) at startup, by the savegrp(1m) command on completion, and by nsrd(1m)
when Remove oldest cycle is selected from the NetWorker Administrator program. nsrim is not normally
run manually. However, the command’s modes can be modified such that normal users may run the command while retaining root privileges; see nsr(1m) for more details.
nsrim uses policies to determine how to manage online entries. (See nsr_policy(5), nsr_client(5), and the
Legato NetWorker Administrator’s Guide for an explanation of index policies). Entries that have been in an
online file index longer than the period specified by the respective client’s browse policy are removed. Save
sets that have existed longer than the period specified by a client’s retention policy are marked as recyclable
in the media index. When all of the save sets on a volume have been marked recyclable, then the volume is
considered recyclable. Recyclable volumes may be selected by NetWorker (and automatically relabeled by
a jukebox) when a writable volume is needed to hold new backups. When a recyclable volume is reused,
the old data is erased and is no longer recoverable.
Unless the −q option is used, nsrim prints header and trailer information for each group of save sets. The
header lists the save set type, the client name, the save set name, and the applicable browse and retention
policies that apply to the save set. (See the example in this man page). There are four types of save sets:
Normal All save sets backed up automatically using savegrp that are associated with a schedule, a browse
policy, and a retention policy.
Ad hocs
User-initiated save sets are designated by appending ad hocs to the header line.
Archives
Save sets that never expire automatically are designated by appending archives to the save set line.
Migrations
Save sets that never expire automatically, and were created by a file migration application, are designated by appending migrations to the save set line.
The trailer lists four utilization statistics of the save set after nsrim has applied the policies to it. The four
statistics are the total number of browsable files remaining in the online index, the total of files currently
associated with the save set, and the amount of recoverable data out of the total of data associated with the
save set. For example, nsrim may print the following output for one save set name:
mars:/usr, retention policy: Year, browse policy: Month, ad hocs
8481 browsable files of 16481 total, 89 MB recoverable of 179 MB total
mars:/usr, retention policy: Year, browse policy: Month, ad hocs
0 browsable files of 13896 total, 163 MB recoverable of 163 MB total
mars:/usr, retention policy: Year, browse policy: Month 43835
browsable files of 427566 total, 6946 MB recoverable of 7114 MB total
When the −v option is used, the following information is also printed for each save set: the save set id, creation date, level, file count, size, and status. A save set’s status is one of the following:
browse The file entries for the save set are browsable (the save set files still exist in the online index).
These files are easily restored using the NetWorker recover mechanisms.
recover The age of the save set does not exceed the retention policy for the save set, but its entries have
been purged from the NetWorker online index. This means that save set is recoverable from the
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backup media using recover. (See recover(1m).) scanner(1m) may be also be used to recover
the save set, but users should use recover first.
recycle The save set is older than its associated retention policy and may be overwritten (deleted) once its
backup media is recycled. Until the media is recycled, the save set is also recoverable from the
backup media.
delete
The save set will be deleted from the media database. nsrim deletes only recyclable save sets that
have zero files.
The save set status may be followed by any of the following modifiers:
(archive)
The save set never expires, and is exempt from any status change.
(migration)
The save set was created by a file migration application and never expires, and is exempt from any
status change.
(scanned in)
The save set was restored using the scanner command, and is exempt from any status change.
(aborted)
A save set of questionable size, consuming backup media space.
If nsrim changes the status of a save set, then it prints the transition symbol −> followed by the new status.
For example:
17221062
17212499
17224025
17226063
17226963
17227141
3/05/92
3/19/92
5/23/92
6/05/92
6/09/92
6/10/92
f
f
i
f
f
f
23115 files 158 MB recycle
625 files 26 MB recover(aborted)->recycle
0 files 0 KB recover->recycle->delete
3115 files 58 MB recover
3197 files 114 MB browse->recover
3197 files 115 MB browse
Once nsrim has processed all of the save sets, it flags the file index for cross-checking in nsrindexd(1m).
If the −l flag is specified, the cross-check is attempted synchronously, otherwise, it is simply scheduled and
nsrindexd performs the cross-check when the index is idle. At the same time, nsrim processes the status
of any affected NetWorker volumes. With the absence of the −q flag, a line is printed for each volume.
The line includes the volume name, the amount of space used, the total number of save sets, and the status.
The status will be one of the following:
appendable
More save sets may be appended to the volume. The status may also be modified with (currently
mounted) which signifies that the volume could transition to the recyclable state if it was not
mounted for writing.
read-only, full
No more save sets can be appended to the volume, nor can the volume be reused since it contains
some valuable save sets.
recyclable
No more save sets can be appended to the volume, and all save sets on the volume have expired.
In addition, the following modifier applies to all three of these states:
(manual-recyclable)
The volume will not be automatically eligible for recycling when all of its save sets have expired.
Instead, the volume may only be recycled by a manual relabel operation. Note that a read-only
volume can still be recycled unless the manual-recyclable flag is also set. The manual-recyclable
flag can be set using the NetWorker Administrator GUI (nwadmin(1m)) or the nsrmm(1m) and
nsrjb(1m) commands when volumes are labeled or at any time thereafter. This flag is never set
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automatically.
If the volume status changes, then nsrim appends −>recyclable to the status. If the volume contains some
browsable save sets, then this is noted; recoverable save sets are also noted. The odd case where an
appendable volume has only recyclable save sets is also noted. For example:
jupiter.20: 3474 MB used, 398 save sets, full->recyclable
jupiter.21: 4680 MB used, 440 save sets, full, 249 recoverable
jupiter.22: 4689 MB used, 351 save sets, full, 351 browsable
jupiter.24: 1488 MB used, 141 save sets, appendable, 141 browsable
RETENTION AND BROWSE POLICIES
Under normal circumstances, the association between browse or retention policies and client save sets is
obvious. However, since a save set may be listed by more than one client resource with the same name, and
each client resource may specify different browse and retention policies, determining the policies applicable to a save set is not always straight forward. nsrim(1m), uses the following steps to select an instance of
a client resource with the client’s name. Once the client resource is selected, its browse or retention policy
is used for managing information about the save set.
1)
Locate all the client resources which belong to the same group that the save set belongs to. Within
this set of client resources, apply the following rules to get the best match. If no client resource
belongs to the save set’s group, or if the group no longer exists, or if the saveset is from a backup earlier than version 5 (when group information was not recorded in the save set), apply the following
rules to all the client resources to get the best match.
2)
Locate a client resource explicitly listing the save set. If more than one client resource lists the save
set, choose the client resource with the longest policy.
3)
Search for a client resource listing the save set "All". If more than one client resource lists the save
set "All", choose the client resource with the longest policy.
4)
Find the client resource listing a save set with the most common prefix (longest) of the target save
set. If more than one client resource lists the save set with the most common prefix, choose the client
resource with the longest policy.
5)
Among all of the client resources, choose the client resource with the longest policy.
Note that if two or more client resources with the same name exist, it is possible that the browse policy
from one instance of the client resource and the retention policy of another instance may be used for managing save set information.
Save sets that have no corresponding NetWorker client resource use the NetWorker client resources of the
server to determine the browse or retention policies.
A save set cannot be purged from the index or marked for recycling until all of its dependent save sets are
also eligible for purging or recycling. See the Legato NetWorker Administrator’s Guide for an explanation
of dependent save sets.
The last (and only) Full save set will not be purged from the online index until it is also marked for recycling. In this case, the header line of the save set omits the browse policy and prints a message stating that
only one browsable cycle exists.
With the exception of the −l option, manual ad hoc save sets are treated as full save sets that have no dependents. However, unlike true Full save sets, the last manual save set is not given any special consideration
with regard to index purging.
The retention time applied to save sets is rounded up to midnight when the elapsed time implied by the
policies is greater than or equal to a day. Therefore, nsrim should produce the same results whether it is
run at 8 a.m. or 5 p.m. on the same day.
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OPTIONS
−c client
Only process the online file index for the specified client. Normally, all client indexes are processed. This option may be repeated to process multiple clients.
−l
Removes the oldest full save and all save sets dependant on it from the online index. Browse and
retention policies are ignored. The save set header information will print the number of browsable
full cycles currently in the online index. Archive and migration save sets are ignored. With this
option, manual save sets are treated as normal incremental save sets. This option also sets the utilization threshold to 30 percent.
−M
Master mode (not advised for manual operation). Advises nsrim that it is being run by nsrd(1m)
or another NetWorker daemon and that it should log messages with timestamps, and perform any
other behavior expected by nsrd.
−N save set
Process only save sets named; all others are skipped. This option can be repeated to process multiple save sets.
−n
Do nothing. Instead, emulate the actions of this command without the index cross-check. Note
that trailer statistics reflect current (and not emulated) results.
−q
Run quietly. This option will not generate header, trailer or save set messages.
−v
Produce a more detailed report. This may produce a large amount of output. When both −v and
−q are issued, they cancel each other.
−X
Check the consistency of the data structures of the save set with the data structures of the volume.
This is only required after a NetWorker crash. This option also sets the utilization threshold to 30
percent.
−x percent
Sets the utilization threshold. If, after removing entries, the utilization of an online file index is
less than the specified amount, the index is compressed automatically by passing this percentage to
nsrindexd when requesting a cross-check. The default value is 50 (percent). Note that specifying
−X or −l changes the default to 30 (percent).
FILES
/nsr/tmp/.nsrim
nsrim locks this file, preventing more than one copy of itself from thrashing the media database.
SEE ALSO
nsr_client(5), nsr_layout(5), nsr_policy(5), nsr(1m), nsrd(1m), nsrindexd(1m), nsrmm(1m), nsrmmdbd(1m), nwadmin(1m), recover(1m), savegrp(1m), scanner(1m).
DIAGNOSTICS
You are not authorized to run this command
Only root or NetWorker administrators may run nsrim to modify the online indexes. However,
any user may invoke the command with the −n option.
nsrim has finished (cross) checking the media db
This notification message appears in the NetWorker messages window when nsrim completes and
the command was invoked with the −q option, but without the −c and −N options.
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NSRINDEXASM(1m)
NAME
nsrindexasm − NetWorker module for recovering indexes
SYNOPSIS
nsrindexasm [standard-asm-arguments]
DESCRIPTION
The nsrindexasm is a standard, external ASM (Application Specific Module). It assists in the recovery of
NetWorker on-line save record index files that were saved with NetWorker versions earlier than version 6.
See uasm(1m) for a general description of ASM and the [standard-asm-arguments]. It is intended that
nsrindexasm be invoked by uasm during nsrck(1m) index recovery operations.
FILES
/nsr/index/clientname/db6
This is directory whose data is recovered by this ASM.
SEE ALSO
nsr_layout(5), nsrck(1m), nsrindexd(1m), mmrecov(1m), uasm(1m).
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NSRINDEXD(1m)
NAME
nsrindexd − NetWorker file index daemon
SYNOPSIS
nsrindexd
DESCRIPTION
The nsrindexd daemon is started by the server nsrd(1m) daemon. It should not be started by hand. The
daemon provides an RPC-based service to the server nsrd(1m) daemon; direct network access to this service is not allowed. The RPC program and version numbers provided by nsrindexd are 390105 and 4,
respectively.
The service provided to the NetWorker system is designed for high performance insertion and deletion of
save records into indexes. This performance is obtained by keeping information cached in the nsrindexd
process address space. When the NetWorker system wishes to commit a save session’s records, it notifies
the nsrindexd daemon (via a remote procedure call) to flush its volatile state to its file(s).
Since the daemon (or the server machine) may crash at any time, the index files may be left in an inconsistent state. Therefore, the maintenance program, nsrck(1m) is run automatically by the nsrd daemon before
the NetWorker service is started.
Since nsrindexd and nsrck are run at the same time, both programs use an advisory file locking mechanism on the file db.SCAVENGE to synchronize their access to an index.
FILES
/nsr/index/clientname/db Where the client’s index records are stored and accessed.
/nsr/index/clientname/db.SCAVENGE
When this file exists and nsrindexd is not running, the nsrck program must be
run before nsrindexd is restarted.
SEE ALSO
nsr_layout(5), nsr(1m), nsrck(1m), nsrd(1m), nsrim(1m), nsrindexasm(1m), nsrls(1m), nsrmm(1m),
nwadmin(1m).
DIAGNOSTICS
waiting for lock on filename.
This message indicates that another program is accessing the same file that is required by this daemon. The daemon will wait for the advisory lock to be cleared.
lock on filename acquired.
Informative message that will eventually follow the previous message.
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NSRINFO(1m)
NAME
nsrinfo − NetWorker file index reporting command
SYNOPSIS
nsrinfo [ −vV ] [ −s server | −L ] [ −n namespace ] [ −N filename ] [ −t time ] [ −X application ] client
DESCRIPTION
The nsrinfo command generates reports about the contents of a client file index. Given a required NetWorker client name and no options, nsrinfo will produce a report of all files and objects, one per line, in the
backup name space for that client. It can also generate reports as follows: for a specific file index name
space, for all name spaces at once, or for a particular XBSA application. Reports can also be restricted to a
single time (the time at which the entry was entered into the file index, called the savetime).
For example, to generate a report of all files backed up in the most recent backup of the /usr file system for
the client mars, use the following sequence of commands (assuming the % character is the shell prompt):
% mminfo −r nsavetime −v −N /usr −c pegasus −ot | tail −1
809753754
% nsrinfo −t 809753754 mars
Note: The time used in the query is obtained by running the mminfo(1m) command with a custom report to
print the save time for the most recent save set for /usr. The time printed is passed to nsrinfo along with the
name of the client (mars).
Unless you use the −L option, you must have NetWorker Administrator privilege to use this command. In
the case of −L, you must be a system administrator (that is, root on a UNIX system).
OPTIONS
−v
Verbose mode. In addition to the filename, it prints the type of the file, the internal file index identifier (if any), the size (if a UNIX file), and the savetime. This option may be combined with the
−V option.
−V
Alternate verbose mode. In addition to the filename, it prints the offset within the save set containing the file, the size within the save set, the application name space (see the −n option for a list of
values), and the save time. This option may be combined with the −v option.
−s server
Indicates the name of the NetWorker system to be queried. By default, the server on the local system is queried.
−L
Opens a file index directly without using the server. This option is used for debugging, or to query
the file index while NetWorker is not running.
−n namespace
Indicates the file index name space to query. By default the backup name space is used. The other
recognized values are: migrated, archive (reserved for future use), nsr (for internal use), informix
(for INFORMIX data), sybase (for Sybase data), msexch (for Exchange data), mssql (for SQL
Server data), notes (for Lotus Notes data), db2 (for DB/2 data), oracle (for Oracle data), and all.
The name space field is case sensitive.
−N filename
Indicates an exact filename to look for in the file index. Only index entries matching this name
exactly print. Note that for some clients, such as NetWare, the name stored in the file index is
often not made up of printable ASCII characters, giving this option limited use.
−t time Restricts the query to a single, exact save time. The time can be in any of the NetWorker
nsr_getdate(3) formats. Every save set created by NetWorker has a unique save time; these times
can be determined by using the mminfo(1m) command.
−X application
Restricts the query to list information for only a specific X/Open Backup Services (XBSA) application. Valid application types are All, Informix, and None. The application type is not case sensitive. See the APPLICATION TYPES section of this man page for more information.
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FILE TYPES
The file index can store entries for all types of clients. Each index entry includes an index entry type. In
general, only the client that created the index entry can decode the entry.
This section lists index entry types recognized by nsrinfo. However, even though these types are recognized, nsrinfo can only completely decode one entry type: the UNIX version decodes UNIX entry types,
and the NT version decodes NT entry types. For other recognized types, some information may be incomplete.
old UNIX
Clients running versions earlier than 3.0 of NetWorker for UNIX.
UNIX
Clients running versions earlier than 4.0 of NetWorker for UNIX.
UNIX ASDF
Index entries including extended ASM Structured Data Format (ASDF) information
for clients running versions 4.1 and later of NetWorker for UNIX.
UNIX ASDF v2
Index entries from agentless saves for clients running versions 4.2 and later of NetWorker for UNIX.
UNIX ASDF v3
Index entries for large files (files > 2 gigabytes) for clients running versions 5.1 for
UNIX and later NetWorker for UNIX.
old DOS
DOS clients running versions 2.0 and earlier of NetWorker for DOS.
DOS
DOS, Windows, or OS/2 clients running version 2.0 of NetWorker for DOS, Windows, or OS/2.
DOS old ASDF
DOS, Windows, or OS/2 clients running version 2.0 of NetWorker for DOS, Windows
or OS/2.
WIN ASDF
Windows or NT clients running NetWorker for Windows NT 4.2 and above.
WIN ASDF v2
Windows or NT clients running NetWorker for Windows NT 4.2 and above, created
by using agentless saves.
old NetWare
NetWare clients running version 3.0 and earlier of NetWorker for NetWare.
NetWare
NetWare clients running version 3.0 and later of NetWorker for NetWare 3.0.
OSF 64bit
A client running OSF/1 with 64bit file sizes and offsets.
continuation
A special internal index entry, that is generated when a file crosses save set boundaries
in a save set series.
APPLICATION TYPES
All
This application type prints out all of the X/Open Backup Services API (XBSA) information available for each object; only XBSA objects are printed. The -v and -V flags
have the same effect here as they do on files.
Informix
This application type prints out only those objects recognized as Informix Database
objects (XBSA ObjectOwner.bsaObjectOwner is INFORMIX). The -v flag behaves as
it does with files, while the -V flag prints out all the XBSA information about the
object (see All, above), including the normal -V information.
None
This application type prints out objects that are not XBSA objects, but match the given
criteria. For example, this option can be used to print a list of files backed up from a
client.
FILES
/nsr/index/client/db6
SEE ALSO
nsr_getdate(3), mminfo(1m), nsrck(1m), nsrindexd(1m).
DIAGNOSTICS
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bad time value ‘time’
The time value specified in the −t option is not in a valid nsr_getdate(3) format.
cannot open index for client client: reason
The file could not be opened using the −L option. The specific reason is printed, although there
may be several. The most likely reasons are permission denied if the user is not the superuser, and
service busy, try again if the file index is already locked (for example, by nsrindexd(1m)).
cannot create db scan on client
An internal error occurred while attempting to query the file index. Contact Legato Technical
Support.
number bad records for client client
This diagnostic prints at the end of a report if any bad index records were detected. This is a sign
that the index is damaged, and may need to be recovered.
cannot connect to server server
The index server is not available for one of many reasons. For example, the NetWorker server
may be down, or nsrinfo may not be able to connect to a running server due to either a resource
shortage or a network problem.
cannot start session with server server
The index server is running, but refused the connection. The exact reason is printed on the subsequent line of output. The most likely reasons are permission denied if the user is not a NetWorker
administrator, and service busy, try again if the file index is locked (for example, by nsrck(1m)).
lookup failed to server server
The index server is running, but was unable to process the query. The exact reason is printed on
the subsequent line of output.
LIMITATIONS
The command line options should be made as powerful as those of mminfo(1m).
The −v and −V reports are not formatted into columns.
A query for a specific time can take a very long time due to the schema of the file index.
The queries are limited due to the lack of a cross-platform browser.
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NSRJB(1m)
NAME
nsrjb − NetWorker jukebox control command
SYNOPSIS
nsrjb [ −C ] [ −j name ] [ −s server ] [ −v ] [ −f media device ] [ −S slots | −T Tags | volume names ]
nsrjb
−L [ −j name ] [ −s server ] [ −gimnqvMG ] [ −Y | −N ] [ −R | −B ] [ −b pool ] [ −f media device |
−J hostname ] [ −e forever ] [ −c capacity ] [ −o mode ] [ −S slots | −T tags | −W current pool |
volume names ]
nsrjb
−l [ −j name ] [ −s server ] [ −nvqrMG ] [ −R [ −b pool ] ] [ −f media device | −J hostname ] { −S
slot | −T tags | −W current pool [ −D volume name ] [ −e forever ] | volume names }
nsrjb
−u [ −j name ] [ −s server ] [ −qvM ] [ −f media device ] [ −S slot | −T tags | volume names ]
nsrjb
−I [ −j name ] [ −s server ] [ −Evpq ] [ −f media device ] [ −S slots | −T tags ]
nsrjb
−p [ −j name ] [ −s server ] [ −vq ] [ −f media device ] −S slot | −T tag | volume name
nsrjb
−o mode [ −j name ] [ −s server ] [ −Y ] { −S slots | −T tags | volume names }
nsrjb
−H [ −j name ] [ −s server ] [ −EHvp ]
nsrjb
−h [ −j name ] [ −s server ] [ −v ]
nsrjb
−U uses [ −j name ] [ −s server ] [ −S slots | −T tags ]
nsrjb
−V [ −j name ] [ −s server ] [ −v ]
nsrjb
−d [ −j name ] [ −s server ] [ −v ] [ −N ] [ −P ports ] [ −S slots ] [ −T tags ] [ volume names ]
nsrjb
−w [ −j name ] [ −s server ] [ −v ] [ −N ] [ −P ports ] { −S slots | −T tags | volume names }
nsrjb
−a [ −j name ] [ −s server ] [ −vd ] [ −A media type ] { −T tags | [ −T tags ] volume names }
nsrjb
−x [ −j name ] [ −s server ] [ −vwX ] −T tags
nsrjb
−F [ −j name ] [ −s server ] [ −v ] −f media device
DESCRIPTION
The nsrjb program manages resources in two broad classes of jukeboxes, remotely managed jukeboxes
and locally managed jukeboxes. Remotely managed jukeboxes are controlled through an external agent.
nsrjb communicates with this agent to gain access to jukebox resources. The agent allows multiple applications, including multiple NetWorker servers, to share resources in the jukebox. Examples of agents are
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NSRJB(1m)
SmartMedia and StorageTek’s ACSLS . nsrjb communicates directly with a locally managed jukebox,
there is no intervening agent. Resources in a locally managed jukebox can be used by only one Networker
server.
For a locally managed jukebox, the jukebox resource is used to track the state of the entire jukebox. The
resource records the number of drives and slots in the jukebox. It is also used to track whether devices are
loaded, whether there is media residing the slots, and the name of any volume on the media, as well as
other information. See nsr_jukebox(5).
The jukebox resource for a remotely managed jukebox does not reflect the current state of the entire jukebox, only NetWorker’s view. Media must be allocated, before NetWorker may use media in a remotely
managed jukebox the media. For more details, see the description of the −a option. The number of slots in
a remote jukebox resource increases as media is allocated for NetWorker’s use and decreases as media is
deallocated after NetWorker has no further use for the media. The order in which media is listed in the
jukebox resource does not necessarily reflect physical location within the jukebox. The number of drives
in a remote jukebox is an upper bound on the number of volumes in the jukebox that NetWorker may
access simultaneously.
The nsrjb command is used to manage all jukeboxes for a NetWorker server. Use this command, rather
than nsrmm(1m), to label, load, and unload the volumes contained within a jukebox. Multiple nsrjb commands may access a jukebox at any given time. Each nsrjb program determines the resources in a jukebox
that the command will require, and locks all needed resources before execution begins. For additional
details see the description of the jukebox attributes, slot/volume locks , drive locks , and jukebox lock , in
nsr_jukebox(5).
Manually entered nsrjb commands which require use of jukebox resources do not directly perform the
requested operation. Instead a manually run nsrjb makes a request of the NetWorker server process, which
assigns a lockid to the command and starts another instance of nsrjb which performs the requested operation. The server process starts the second nsrjb with the −O option added to the original options to service
the request. Users should never use the −O option on a manually entered command. This may result in
locks for resources in a jukebox resource not being released when the command terminates. The only
method for clearing such locks is to stop and start the NetWorker server process.
A volume is a physical piece of media, for example, a tape cartridge or optical disk. Each volume within a
jukebox and each jukebox has a name recognized by NetWorker. A volume name is specified when the volume is first labeled by NetWorker. You can change the volume name when a volume is relabeled. NetWorker refers to volumes by their volume names. For example, when requesting the mount of a volume,
NetWorker asks for it by volume name. The volume name ’cleaning tape’ may be used to load a cleaning
cartridge to clean a tape device.
Before using nsrjb, the jukebox and its device resources must be added to the NetWorker server. Use
jbconfig to add the jukebox resource and its device resources to the NetWorker server. The jukebox
resource is described in nsr_jukebox(5).
When a NetWorker server requires a volume for backup or recovery and an appropriate volume is not
already mounted, the server checks the media database to verify whether a jukebox contains a volume that
satisfies the media request. If so, nsrjb is invoked to load the media into an idle device. The Available
Slots attribute specifies the slots containing volumes available to automatically satisfy NetWorker requests
for writable volumes. When automatically selecting a writable volume for backup, NetWorker only considers volumes from the list of available slots. It is important to note that the Available Slots attribute does not
limit what slots the user running nsrjb can operate on.
nsrjb attempts to determine which jukebox to use based on the options −j , −f , or a volume name . If one
or more of these options do not uniquely identify a jukebox and one must be selected, the nsrjb program
prompts you to select a jukebox. You can set the NSR_JUKEBOX environment variable to the name of
the jukebox you want the nsrjb program to use by default.
OPTIONS
Options are separated into two groups. The first are the options which specify the operation to be performed, e.g. label or load media. The second group list the additional options which provide arguments for
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the operation, e.g. specifying the media to be labeled or loaded.
OPERATION OPTIONS
−a
This option is used in conjunction with the −T tags option, to allocate volumes in a remotely managed jukebox. A volume must be allocated before it can be labeled and used by a NetWorker
server.
For STL silos a −d option can be added for silos that support depositing (also known as importing
or entering) tapes from their I/O ports. The −d must appear after the −a on the command line.
This function is usually handled by the silo management software, but is added here for ease of
use. This option may not be supported on all silos supported by NetWorker.
There are two types of media which may be allocated or added to a SmartMedia jukebox resource,
scratch or foreign. The term scratch, is used to indicate volumes currently not being used by NetWorker. A foreign tape is one that was being used by NetWorker before being imported into
SmartMedia.
Use −a in conjunction with −T tags option to allocate scratch volumes for NetWorker’s use. By
specifying the barcode or physical cartridge label with this option a volumes from specific media
cartridges may be allocated. This option can also be used to allocate a given number of volumes
from unspecified media.
After importing a foreign volume (an existing NetWorker volume) into SmartMedia, this option is
also used to inform NetWorker that the imported volumes are available through SmartMedia. Use
−a, in conjunction with −T tags and volume names to add foreign media to a SmartMedia jukebox resource. The tag is the name given to the volume when it was imported into SmartMedia.
The volume name is the volume name recorded in NetWorker’s media database.
See −x for a description of how volumes are removed from a remote jukebox’s list of volumes
available for use by a NetWorker server.
−C
Displays the current volumes in the jukebox and the devices associated with the jukebox. This is
the default command option, used if no other command options are specified. It displays a list of
slot numbers, volume names, media pools, optional bar code information, volume ids and volume
modes. If the jukebox attribute Bar Code Reader is enabled and there are bar code labels on the
media volumes, then the bar code label is included in the list. If Bar Code Reader is set and the
volume does not have a bar code label, a dash prints, indicating that there is no bar code label on
the media. By default the short volume id of a volume is displayed. Using the verbose option (-v)
displays the long volume id along with other information described below. The -C option does not
perform an actual jukebox inventory; nsrjb only reports on the volumes currently contained within
the jukebox resource. Volumes may be succeeded by one of the following flags: an (R), to indicate the volume is read-only; or an (A), to indicate the volume is either an archive or a migration
volume. When combined with the −v option, the capacity of the volumes that have been filled is
also displayed. Volumes that are not contained in the NetWorker media database are marked with
an asterisk, "*".
The Mode column contains additional information about the mode of the volume. The Mode field
can have one of three values: manually recyclable to indicate that the volume will not be automatically recycled or relabeled; recyclable, to indicate that the volume is eligible for automatic recycling; or blank to indicate that neither of the other two values apply.
After the slot map prints, a line about each device is displayed. For each enabled device, the following information is provided: drive number, device pathname, slot number and name of the currently loaded volume, and an indication if NetWorker has the volume mounted. If the device is
disabled, only the drive number and pathname are displayed, along with the message disabled.
When several device resources share a physical drive in the jukebox, via the same hardware id
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attribute value, the drive number is only displayed on the first device pathname sharing the drive.
−d
Deposits (loads into the jukebox) one or more cartridges from the cartridge access ports (also
called import/export elements, mail slots, or I/E ports).
The number of cartridges to deposit is determined by the number of specified slots or tags. All
empty slots in the jukebox are deposited, if slots or tags are not specified. Multiple destination slot
ranges may be specified, full slots are skipped. If all available import ports are empty and there
are cartridges to deposit, the operator will be prompted to fill the import ports. When the −N
option is used in conjunction with the jukebox polling feature, the jukebox will poll for cartridges
in the import ports until all of the cartridges are deposited or an error occurs. Exceeding the
polling timeout waiting for additional cartridges is considered an error.
Specifying volume names on the command line is not recommended. The inventory command
should be run to accurately determine the volume names.
If −d is used with a −T tags option, then the command is assumed to be running on a silo, and is
treated internally as if it had been run with the −a and −d options. Specified volume tags (barcodes) will be deposited into the silo and then NetWorker will attempts to allocate them for its use.
Depending on the exact type of silo used, this allocation step may or may not succeed. You should
verify the success of the allocation, and retry the command with just the −a option for all of the
tag values specified. If the tags have already been allocated, you will see a message indicating
this. This is not an error, and only means that the volumes had already been successfully allocated
for use by NetWorker.
−F
Releases a shared device contained within an STL silo. This option is only available for tape
libraries with device sharing. See nsr_jukebox(5).
−h
Displays the actions and results of the past 120 jukebox commands issued. These include commands issued on the command line by the user, or nsrjb commands that were started automatically by NetWorker. Starting with Version 5.5, many nsrjb commands issued from the command
line will not actually perform the requested jukebox options. Instead, the manually run nsrjb
sends a message to the NetWorker server process, which will then start the required nsrjb command(s). Therefore, it is not unusual to see two entries generated in the history for each command
issued on the command line. Instances of nsrjb that are started by the server have an extra command line option set ( −O <instance number>). If you wish to change the number of command
lines saved in the history, you may set the environment variable NSRJB_HISTORY_COUNT to
a value between 20 and 2000. Values smaller than 20 will result in 20 being used, and values
larger than 2000 will result in 2000 being used.
−H
Resets the jukebox hardware (and the NetWorker database representing the jukebox) to a consistent state. The jukebox clears the transport and then unmounts and unloads volumes from the
drives to slots. An actual inventory is not performed; (see the −I option). If the jukebox senses
that the inventory is out-of-date, it prints an appropriate message.
For silos, only devices which NetWorker thinks are loaded are unloaded. You can use the silo controller to empty other drives.
For SmartMedia jukeboxes, resets the jukebox devices and the NetWorker database representing
the jukebox to a consistent state. The operation synchronizes the state of the devices in the jukebox and the media in the jukebox resource with SmartMedia. nsrjb queries SmartMedia for information about volumes in the jukebox resource and which volumes are currently mounted. It uses
this information to synchronize the jukebox and device resources to be consistent with the information reported by SmartMedia. If the -p option is also specified a check operation will be performed on the loaded volumes.
nsrjb with −H option is executed for every SmartMedia jukebox, by NetWorker whenever the
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server is started.
−I
Performs an inventory on the jukebox’s contents. Use this option to ensure that the mapping
between slot number and volume name is correct. If necessary, the volumes in the specified slots
may be loaded into a device, so their labels may be read. This option can take a long time to complete. For jukeboxes that have element status capability (for example, EXB-120, EXB-60, or HP
optical), you can use the −E option in conjunction with the −I option to reinitialize the jukebox’s
inventory state. The -E option increases the amount of time it takes to inventory a jukebox,
because the hardware must check every component, including all slots and drives, for the presence
of media. You should only use this option if you are manually swapping media in or out of a jukebox.
If a jukebox has a bar code label reader, and the jukebox resource attribute Bar Code Reader is set,
then volume name associated with a slot is derived from the media bar code label. If the bar code
label is not unique or does not exist in the NetWorker media database, the volume name is read
from the media. If a bar code label on the media has changed, then the NetWorker media database
is updated with the new bar code label. Proper use of a jukebox’s bar code reader can minimize
the time it takes to perform an inventory.
For SmartMedia jukeboxes, this operation is used to synchronize NetWorker and SmartMedia
database. It insures that SmartMedia and NetWorker agree to the state of all volumes allocated to
this NetWorker server and listed in this jukebox resource. If the −p option is also specified nsrjb
requests the volumes be loaded so that labels on each volume may be verified.
To allocate slots in a jukebox for cleaning cartridges, set the jukebox resource attribute Auto Clean
to Yes and the Cleaning Slots attribute to a non-empty range of slots. For further information see
nsr_jukebox(1m). Volumes from slots that are reserved for cleaning cartridges are not loaded
during the inventory of a jukebox. For jukeboxes that do not support element status or have a bar
code reader, the −U uses option must be used to enter a cleaning cartridge into the jukebox’s
inventory. For jukeboxes that support element status or have a bar code reader, cleaning cartridge
slots that were previously empty but now contain a cartridge have the number of uses for the
cleaning cartridge is the value set in the jukebox attribute Default Cleanings.
−l
Loads and mounts specified volumes. Volumes are specified by name, by the slot in which the volume resides, or for remote jukeboxes by the tag associated with the volume. The operation fails, if
the number of volumes specified is greater than the number of available drives.
For SmartMedia jukeboxes, the command may only be used to mount volumes into devices accessible from the storage node upon which nsrjb is running. You can use, the −W option to load and
mount a volume in a SmartMedia jukebox which belongs to the specified pool.
This option can also be used to clean a device by loading a cleaning cartridge. To load a cleaning
cartridge use the volume name ’cleaning tape’ or specify a slot that has been set aside for a cleaning cartridge. When the volume name ’cleaning tape’ is used to load a cleaning cartridge, and
more than one cleaning cartridge in the jukebox has any uses left, the cleaning cartridge selected is
the one with the fewest remaining uses. See −I for a discussion of how the slots of a jukebox are
set aside for cleaning cartridges.
The −f option can be used to specify a media devices into which volumes are loaded.
−L
NetWorker 6.1.1
Labels the volumes in the specified slots, or for remotely managed jukeboxes, by specified tags.
Names for the volumes labeled are derived from media bar code labels, volume names specified on
the command line, or generated by referencing the label template resource for the given pool. If
you do not specify any slots, the range of slots is as described in the NSR_jukebox resource for
the jukebox. Labeling a complete jukebox may take a long time.
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If the jukebox has a bar code label reader, and the NSR_jukebox resource attributes Bar Code
Reader and Match Bar Code Labels are set, then the volume label is derived from the bar code
label on the media. If the jukebox resource attribute Match Bar Code Labels is not set, or the
jukebox does not have a bar code reader, then the volume label is derived from volume names
specified on the command line. If more volumes are being labeled then volume names specified
on the command line, then the volume label is derived from the label template. No matter how the
volume label is derived, if the media labeled has a media bar code label, the bar code is stored in
the NetWorker media database so that it can be used during inventory operations.
Volumes located in slots set aside for cleaning cartridges cannot be labeled. See −I for a discussion of how the slots of a jukebox are set aside for cleaning cartridges.
If an empty slot is encountered, an informational message is displayed and the operation continues.
See the −m option if you want the volume to be automatically mounted after being labeled.
−o mode
Sets the mode of a volume or range of slots. The following mode values are available:
[not]recyclable, [not]readonly, [not]full, or [not]manual. The [not]manual mode values are
only valid when used in conjunction with the −L option. If the −Y option is not used, you are
prompted to confirm the operation for each volume. See nsrim(1m) for a discussion of the pervolume flags.
−p
Verifies and prints a volume label. A slot or for remotely managed jukeboxes a tag may be specified. The device used to read the volume may also may be specified. See nsrmm(1m).
−u
Unloads a volume from a device. To unload a volume from a device, specify the name of the volume, the device in which the volume is loaded, or the slot from which the volume was loaded. If
no volume, device or slot is specified, media is unloaded from all loaded devices.
−U uses
Sets the number of times a cleaning cartridge can be used. Slots can also be specified. Any slot
specified must be in the range of slots set aside for cleaning cartridges in the jukebox. If a range of
slots is not specified, all slots set aside for cleaning cartridges are updated. For slots that are currently empty in the jukebox’s inventory, this option updates the inventory to indicate that the slot is
occupied by a cleaning cartridge. For a discussion of how slots of a jukebox are set aside for
cleaning cartridges, see −I.
Uses must be either a positive integer, or the reserved words remove or default. The reserved word
remove can be used (for example, -U remove) to delete the cleaning cartridge(s) from the NetWorker inventory. Specifying default sets the number of times a cleaning cartridge may be used to
the value of the default cleanings attribute for the jukebox. See nsr_jukebox(5).
You can use the −T option in conjunction with the −U option to add cleaning cartridges to a Silo
Tape Library (STL). This option sets aside a cleaning slot in the STL each time a cleaning cartridge is added. For a description of how to remove cleaning cartridges from an STL, see −x. See
−I for a discussion of how slots in a non-STL jukebox are set aside for cleaning cartridges.
−V
Displays vendor-specific status information. When combined with the −v option, the configuration of the jukebox is displayed.
−w
Withdraws (ejects media from the jukebox) one or more cartridges to the cartridge access ports.
Cartridges must be specified by slot, volume name or tag. Multiple slot ranges and volume names
may be specified, empty and duplicate slots are ignored. If the available export ports are full and
there are cartridges to withdraw, the operator will be prompted to empty the export ports. When
the −N option is used in conjunction with the jukebox polling feature, the jukebox will poll for
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empty export ports until all cartridges are withdrawn or an error occurs. Exceeding the polling
timeout waiting for empty ports is considered an error.
If −w is used with a −T tags option, then the command is assumed to be running on a silo, and is
treated internally the same as if it had been run with the −x and −w options. Specified volume tags
(barcodes) are withdrawn from the silo. Then NetWorker deallocates them from its list of volumes
for that silo. In general, you can only withdraw at most about 40 volumes from a silo at one time,
although this limit differs on different silo models. If a given command does not cause any tapes
to be withdrawn from the silo, try again using fewer tag values on the command line.
−x
This option, when used in conjunction with the −T tags option, is used to remove volumes from a
remote jukebox. The specified volumes are removed from the remote jukebox’s list of volumes
available for use by a NetWorker server.
For STL silos, a −w option can be added to withdraw or eject tapes from the silo or to physically
remove the tapes from the silo. The −w must appear after the −x on the command line. This function is normally handled by the silo management software, but is added here for ease of use. This
option may not be supported on all silos supported by NetWorker.
See −a for a description of how volumes are allocated for use by a NetWorker server.
ADDITIONAL OPTIONS
−A media type
This option may be used n conjunction with −a option to specify the type of media on which volumes allocated for use by a server may reside. Valid values for media type, include all choices for
the device resource attribute media type except logical, see nsr_device(5). This option is supported only for SmartMedia jukeboxes and may appear multiple times on a command line.
−b pool
Specifies the media pool to which the volume should belong. The pool may be any pool currently
registered with the NetWorker server. The pool names can be viewed by selecting the Pools menu
item from the Media menu of nwadmin(1m). The pool name is referenced by the NetWorker
server when determining what save sets can reside on the volume. If you omit this option the volume is automatically assigned to the Default pool. If you specify a pool name without a volume
name, nsrjb will use the next volume name associated with the specified pool’s label template
resource. See nsr_label(5).
−c capacity
Overrides the volume’s default capacity. See nsrmm(1m).
−B
Verifies that the volume currently being labeled does not have a readable NetWorker label. Before
labeling a volume, NetWorker attempts to read any existing labels written on the volume. If you
specify this option and the volume has a NetWorker label that is readable by the device currently
being used, the label operation is canceled and an error message is displayed. If the volume does
not have a label, or has a label that is not readable by the current device, then the volume can be
labeled. This option is used by nsrd(1m) to label volumes automatically when nsrmmd(1m)
makes a request for a volume while saving data.
−D volume name
Used with the -l, option when mounting a volume from a particular pool to exclude this volume
from consideration. This option is supported for SmartMedia jukeboxes only and may appear
multiple times on a command line.
−e forever
Specifies the volume to be an Archive volume. (see nsrmm(1m)).
−E
NetWorker 6.1.1
Initializes element status for jukeboxes that support this feature. You can use this option in conjunction with the −I or −H options. Some jukeboxes have the ability to keep track of whether or
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not there is media in a component in the jukebox. This feature is known as an "element status"
capability. The −V option may be used to determine whether a jukebox has this capability. When
swapping media into the jukebox where media was not previously loaded, it may be necessary to
reinventory (−I) the jukebox with the −E option so the jukebox reinitializes its element status.
−f media device
Specifies a media device to be used for an operation. Use the pathname of the media device as it is
configured in the jukebox resource. When more than a single media device has been configured
for a jukebox, nsrjb selects available devices with the lowest value for the device resource
attribute accesses. See nsr_device(5). When loading or verifying volumes, the number of devices
available must at least be greater than or equal to the number of volumes specified for the operation. For other operations, the value of the jukebox attribute max parallelism is an upper bound
on the number of devices that may be used by any nsrjb command. See nsr_jukebox(5). You can
override the device selection by using the −f option. You can use this option multiple times, to
specify more than one media device.
For SmartMedia jukeboxes, the device resource is not tied to a physical device. It is a logical
device resource. An association between this logical device and the physical device lasts as long as
media is loaded in a device. NetWorker never asks SmartMedia to load media into a particular
device. It allows SmartMedia choose the device into which the media is loaded. Then nsrjb creates an association between the actual device and NetWorker logical device resource by assigning
values to the device’s logicalname, logicaltype, and logicalfamily attributes. See nsr_device(5).
SmartMedia and NetWorker have different names for device and media types. nsrjb maintains a
table to map between SmartMedia and NetWorker names to be able to correctly set the values of
these attributes. This table can be updated dynamically to support additional SmartMedia drive
and/or media types. The file /nsr/res/smdevmap.txt is used to make additions to nsrjb’s map
table. Each line in this file contains four columns, SmartMedia cartridge type, SmartMedia bitformat, NetWorker device resource media type, and NetWorker device resource family type. The
SmartMedia bitformat maybe a regular expression, all other values are strings. As an example the
line,
DTL7000
DLT8000.*
DLT8000
tape
maybe used for the DLT8000 device using SmartMedia DLT7000 cartridge type.
−g
This option is kept for historical reasons only. It has no affect.
−G
This option is used only by the server to have the autoloader mount or label a volume in a Network
Data Management Protocol (NDMP) device.
−i
This option is kept for historical reasons only. It has no affect.
−j name
Specifies a particular jukebox to use. The given name is the one assigned by the user when the
jukebox resource is created. This option overrides the NSR_JUKEBOX environmental variable.
−J hostname
Specifies a particular hostname to use. Drive selection by nsrjb will be restricted to a drive on the
given hostname. This option can be used with the −l (load) or −L (label) options, and cannot be
used with the −f option.
−m
Mount a volume after it has been labeled. There must be enough available drives to mount all volumes to be labeled.
−M
Sends messages to the NetWorker daemon reporting progress and errors. This is used by
nsrd(1m) when mounting, unmounting, and labeling volumes in response to requests made by
nsrmmd(1m). This option is ignored if nsrjb is run manually.
−n
Loads, but does not mount, the volume when specified with the −l option. NetWorker is not notified that this volume has been loaded.
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−N
Tells nsrjb to skip the confirmation prompt when used in conjunction with the −LR options.
When NetWorker recycles volumes, NetWorker prompts you to confirm that it is okay to overwrite
any volumes considered to be nonrecyclable. See nsrim(1m) for a discussion of the per-volume
flags.
−O instance
Indicates the lock id used by the command when locking resources in a jukebox. Should only be
used with a command run by the server. You should never specify this option on a command line.
Doing so may result in resource locks never being released once the command exits. The only way
to clear such locks is to stop and start the NetWorker server.
−P ports
Specifies a cartridge access port or range of ports to deposit or withdraw volumes.
Ranges are specified as low to high. Both low and high must be integers; low must be less than or
equal to high. Both numbers are checked for validity against the resource describing the jukebox.
You can specify only one port range for a command.
−q
Runs the nsrjb program in quiet mode. Turns off all of the messages normally produced when
verifying, labeling, loading, or unloading volumes, or inventorying a jukebox. You can use this
option only with the −p −L, −l, −u or −I options.
−r
Loads the volume as read-only. You can use this option only with the −l option. See nsrmm(1m).
−R
Recycles the volume. If a volume is recyclable, you are not prompted for confirmation as to
whether or not this volume may be overwritten. See nsrmm(1m) for a discussion of the pervolume flags.
−s server
Specifies the controlling server when nsrjb is used on a storage node. To use nsrjb on a storage
node, the command must be run on the storage node. See nsr_storage_node(5) for additional
information on storage nodes.
−S slots
Specifies a slot or range of slots on which to operate. Specify the slot range from low to high integer order. Both low and high must be integers; low must be less than or equal to high. Both numbers are checked for validity against the resource describing the jukebox. You can specify multiple slot ranges for a command.
−T tags
Specifies tags or barcodes of volumes in a remote jukebox. You can specify this option more than
once for a command.
tags can specify a single volume tag or a volume tag template similar to a label template. See
nsr_label(5). The volume tag Template is a list of template fields separated by slashes "/". A template field is a constant alphanumeric string or an alphabetic or numeric range represented by the
low and high value separated by "-".
This template differs from the templates used in NetWorker GUI. Each portion of the template is
entered into a separate line in the GUI’s dialog box instead of using "/" as a separator.
The tag is used to identify the media when a request is made of the agent managing the remote
jukebox. This identifier is determined by the remote agent. A tag often is a bar code label. When
making a request to load media into a device, NetWorker sends the tag with the request to the
agent to identify the media to be loaded. Volumes in a jukebox resource are listed in alphanumeric order of their tags. Therefore, the order in the jukebox resource may change as media is
allocated and deallocated, and has no relation to the slot in which the media may reside in a physical library.
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−v
NSRJB(1m)
Verbose. See other arguments for specific details.
−W current pool
This option is supported only for SmartMedia jukeboxes.
When labeling a volume, this options designates the pool from which a recyclable volume is to be
selected. Only to be used in conjunction with the −L and −R options. When SmartMedia selects
the volume to be labeled, it currently must be recyclable and in the current pool . The volume will
be added to the pool specified by the −b option.
For the load operation, this option is used to mount an unspecified volume that belongs to the current pool . In such cases, SmartMedia selects which volume is to be loaded from all volumes
which possess the required characteristics. This feature is used when mounting a volume for writing data, e.g. saving or cloning data.
−X
You can use this option in conjunction with −x to purge a volume from NetWorker’s media
database when the volume is being deallocated. A prompt is displayed to confirm that the volume
is to be purged from the media database, unless −Y is also specified.
−Y
Disables confirmation prompting. Rather than prompting for confirmation, a yes answer is
assumed. Prompts are normally generated when a volume is being relabeled before its expiration
date, or when a volume is still registered in the NetWorker media database. If the operation is to
label ( −L ) a volume or to load ( −l ) a volume, with the −R option also specified, and the volume
is recyclable, there is no prompt to confirm whether the volume may be overwritten.
volume name
Specifies the name to be used when labeling a volume. After a volume has been labeled, the volume name is used to select media for an operation. Multiple volumes names may be specified for
a single command, and must come at the end of the command line.
EXAMPLES
Labeling volumes:
To label all of the volumes in a jukebox, use the −L option:
nsrjb −L
To specify a particular pool, use the −b option:
nsrjb −L −bOffsite
Labeling the volumes in slots 5 through 19:
To label the volumes in slots 5 through 19, use the −S option:
nsrjb −L −S 5−19
Labeling a volume with a non-standard name:
To label the volume in slot 20 with a name that does not match the label template associated with a
pool, specify the name along with the −L option:
nsrjb −L −S 20 mars.special
When more than one volume is to be labeled, the name must match the label template associated
with the pool. This ensures that nsrjb generates the subsequent names.
Mounting a volume after it has been labeled:
To mount a volume after it has been labeled use the −m option:
nsrjb −L −S 20 −m
The command fails if there are not be enough drives to mount all volumes to be labeled.
Labeling volumes with a standard name:
To label the volumes in slots 21 through 28, starting with a name different than that referenced by
the label template associated with the pool resource, specify the first name along with the −L
option. In order for nsrjb to generate the additional names, the specified name must match the
layout of the label template.
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nsrjb −L −bOffsite −S 21−28 Offsite.501
After labeling the volume in slot 21 with ‘Offsite.501’ nsrjb uses the label template to generate
names for the volumes in slots 22 (‘Offsite.502’) through 28 (‘Offsite.508’). If the next volume
name in the sequence for a label template is already in use, the name is skipped.
Loading a volume:
To load volumes, use the −l option.
nsrjb −l
nsrjb will select volumes to load into selected devices. It will continue loading volumes until all
of the devices are loaded.
Loading specific volumes:
To load a volume named mars.001, specify the volume name along with the −l option:
nsrjb −l mars.001
To load the volume in slot 5, use the −S option:
nsrjb −l −S 5
To load the selected volume into device /dev/nrst1, include the −f option.
nsrjb −l −f /dev/nrst1 mars.005
Load a cleaning cartridge to clean a device
To load the cleaning cartridge with fewest remaining uses into a device, use the volume name
’cleaning tape’ along with the −l option. To clean device /dev/nrst1, include the −f option.
nsrjb −l −f /dev/nrst1 ’cleaning tape’
To clean a device by loading the cleaning cartridge in slot 6, use the −S option. Slot 6 must be a
slot in the jukebox set aside for cleaning cartridges, and must contain a cleaning cartridge with
uses remaining. To clean device /dev/nrst1, include the −f option.
nsrjb −l −S 6 −f /dev/nrst1
Unloading a volume
You can unload a particular volume, slot, or device. To unload volume mars.0028, use the -u
option:
nsrjb −u mars.0028
To unload the volume in slot 28, use the −S option:
nsrjb −u −S 28
To unload the volume in device /dev/nrst3, use the −f option.
nsrjb −u −f /dev/nrst3
Displaying the jukebox’s current volumes
To display a list of slots and volumes, and which volumes are loaded in to a jukebox’s devices, use
the -C option:
nsrjb −C
The −C option is the default and is used when no other options are selected. A range of slots may
also be specified. For example, to display the volumes in slots 10 through 23, use the -S option:
nsrjb −S 10−23
Setting the number of uses for a cleaning cartridge:
To set the number of times all cleaning cartridges in a jukebox may be used to 12, use the -U
option:
nsrjb −U 12
To set the number of times the cleaning cartridge in slot 10 may be used, use the -S option:
nsrjb −U 25 −S 10
Slot 10 must be a slot set aside for cleaning cartridges in the jukebox.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
11
NSRJB(1m)
NSRJB(1m)
Inventorying the volumes:
To reconcile the actual volumes and the list of volumes produced by nsrjb, use the −I option.
Each volume may be loaded into a device and examined for a NetWorker label (depending on bar
code settings and other factors). The internal list is then updated with the new information. After
all volumes have been examined, the new list is compared to the NetWorker media database, and a
message listing any volumes located in the jukebox but not in the database is produced. To inventory the volumes in slots 17 through 43, use the -S option:
nsrjb −I −S 17−43
Like labeling, volume inventory may take considerable time.
Using the NetWorker notification system:
When NetWorker needs a volume, a "media event" is generated. To have nsrjb automatically
respond to these events, the NetWorker notification system is used. This notification resource is
automatically generated.
Using the cartridge access port:
To withdraw cartridges from jukebox slot 7 through 11 to the cartridge access port 5 through 10,
use the -w option along with the -S and -P options:
nsrjb −w −S 7−11 −P 5−10
To deposit cartridges into jukebox slot 8 through 10 from the cartridge access port 3 through 5, use
the -d option along with the -S and -P options:
nsrjb −d −S 8−10 −P 3−5
Using barcode templates on tape libraries:
To add volumes with barcodes D001A, D002A, ..., D100A to the volumes available for NetWorker
in the tape library, use the -a and -T options:
nsrjb −a −T D/001−100/A
For a SmartMedia jukebox, to allocate 3 volumes from any media and to make the volumes available for NetWorker, use the -a and -a options:
nsrjb −a −T +3
To deposit tapes labeled with barcodes D001A, D002A, ..., D012A into the silo and also to make
the volumes available for NetWorker in the tape library, use the -a and -T options along with the
-d option:
nsrjb −a −T D/001−012/A −d
To remove volume with barcode D055A from the volumes available for NetWorker in the tape
library, use the -x and -T options:
nsrjb −x −T D055A
To remove volume with barcode D055A from the volumes available for NetWorker in the tape
library, and to withdraw it from the tape library physically (for example, for off-site storage), use
the -x and -T options, along with the -w option:
nsrjb −x −T D055A −w
To label volumes with barcodes D010A, D011A, ... , D020A, use the -L and -T options:
nsrjb −L −T D0/10−20/A
To add cleaning cartridge with barcodes C010A, that can be used the default number of time for
this jukebox, use the -U and -T options:
nsrjb −U default −T C010A
FILES
/nsr/mm/mmvolume
The NetWorker media database.
/nsr/res/nsrjb.res
NetWorker 6.1.1
The jukebox resource descriptors.
October 15, 2001
12
NSRJB(1m)
NSRJB(1m)
/nsr/res/smdevmap.txt
The file used to map from SmartMedia media and drive types to a NetWorker device
resource media type. jukebox.
SEE ALSO
jbconfig(1m), jbexercise(1m), mminfo(1m), nwadmin(1m), nsr(1m), nsrd(1m), nsr_layout(5),
nsr_device(5), nsr_jukebox(5), nsr_notification(5), nsr_storage_node(5), nsradmin(1m), nsrim(1m),
nsrmm(1m), nsrmmd(1m), nsrwatch(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
Some errors have been classified and can be identified by the last three digits of the error number returned
by the nsrjb command. Nonclassified errors are listed first.
must be run by root
A normal (non-super) user has attempted to use this command.
No drives are available for use (busy,
secure, or disabled).
This message is logged when the jukebox tries to acquire a drive to satisfy a backup or recover
media request. If the drives are not actively saving or recovering, then the device is secured or disabled. Devices are secured in the pool resources. Devices are enabled or disabled in the device
resources.
All drives are busy or disabled.
If the drives are not actively saving or recovering, then the device is disabled. Devices are enabled
or disabled in the devices window.
/dev/nrst2: verifying label, error opening: waiting
to become ready
Some tape drives take time to position to the beginning of the tape. While repositioning, the
device cannot be accessed. After the tape reaches the correct position it is available for use and
nsrjb resumes. If the device does not have a tape loaded, an I/O error message similar to the following appears: read open error, I/O error (5).
All volume names for ‘xyz’ are in use
All the volume names for the given template have been used. The operator should change the template to accommodate more volume names.
No volumes found in the media database...continuing.
The media database is empty. The user will typically see this message when the module has been
newly installed or all volumes have been deleted.
Another nsrjb is already running, please wait...
Another nsrjb command is accessing a jukebox. The current command will keep attempting to
access the device periodically. Once it has acquired the jukebox device, it will display the message ’Continuing,’.
slot ‘xyz’ does not have a bar code label
An inventory operation was attempted with the jukebox resource attribute match bar code labels
enabled, while the media did not have a label. Either disable the attribute with nsradmin or
nwadmin, or place a bar code label on the media.
slot ‘xyz’ has a duplicate bar code label ‘xyz‘
Two or more media volumes have the same bar code label attached. Either disable the attribute
with nsradmin or nwadmin, or place a unique bar code label on the media volume.
(001) Unknown jukebox model
The model for this jukebox is not known to the NetWorker jukebox module.
(006) Unknown control port
There is no control port listed for this jukebox.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
13
NSRJB(1m)
NSRJB(1m)
(007) Invalid range
The given range could not be parsed by nsrjb .
(010) Source component empty
The jukebox attempted to move media between components in the jukebox (for example, from a
slot to a drive), but found nothing in the source component.
(011) Destination component full
The jukebox attempted to move media between components in the jukebox (for example, from a
slot to a drive), but found something already in the destination component.
(012) All slots full
The jukebox attempted to unload a drive as part of a reset (−H) operation, with all slots containing
media. Empty one of the slots or remove the media located in the drive from the jukebox.
(013) Slot xxx is empty.
This is often seen during a label operation. The labeling process stops as soon as an empty slot is
encountered. If you attempt to label a range of slots on jukeboxes that have the ability to sense
whether or not the slots are loaded, the error message is as follows:
Slot xxx is empty, attempted to label the slot range xxx-yyy. Specify a slot range which is full of
volumes. No volumes were labeled.
(016) Slot empty
The source slot did not have a volume in it.
(017) Unsupported operation
This jukebox does not have the functionality to support the requested operation.
(025) Vendor error occurred
Normally you would not see the message Vendor error occurred. Instead, you would see an error
string retrieved directly from the jukebox or device driver. The operator should consult the hardware or driver manual to determine the cause of the error.
(027) All drives full/busy
All drives are loaded and/or busy at the moment. Free up one of the drives by unloading the
device. If all drives are in use, you must wait for a drive to become idle.
(029) Unable to retrieve any volume information from
the media database
Indicates that nsrjb could not access any volumes in the media database.
(036) All of the devices are in use by nsrmmd
The jukebox could not acquire a drive to use for a save or recover.
(038) All drives must be unloaded before jukebox
resource can be deleted
You cannot delete a jukebox resource if any volumes are loaded in the media drives. Unload all
media drives before attempting to delete the jukebox resource. If no devices are loaded, issue the
nsrjb command with the −H option.
(039) This command only valid with a single
slot specified
You can only specify a single slot is, not a range of slots, for example, -S 4-6, on which to operate.
(040) The drive is loaded with a volume from a
different slot
The user specified both a volume and the −f option, but the drive already has a volume loaded
from a different slot.
(041) The drive is empty
Need a volume loaded on which to operate.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
14
NSRJB(1m)
NSRJB(1m)
(042) Will not overwrite volume without confirmation
NetWorker does not allow you to overwrite a volume with a valid NetWorker label without confirmation.
(043) The volume name does not match what has been
inventoried. Please re-inventory the volume.
The jukebox encountered a volume with a different label than expected. The operator should reinventory the jukebox.
(044) The volume from that slot is loaded in another
drive
The user specified both the −f and −s options, but the volume from the given slot is loaded in
another drive.
(045) The volume does not exist in the jukebox
The named volume is not loaded in the jukebox.
(047) The alternate side of the media is busy
The other side of the optical media is in use. The side you are trying to access is unavailable until
the alternate side is idle.
(048) Too many devices
The user tried to add too many devices during the creation of the jukebox.
(049) Unlabeled volume, loaded but not mounted
The user tried to load a volume, but no label was found on the media.
(050) Drive door closed
The user was trying to perform an unload operation. When the jukebox went to move the media
from the drive to a slot, the transport found the media drive door closed.
(051) Unable to select a suitable volume in response
to media request
The jukebox module could not find any volumes in the devices to respond to a media request.
(054) The drive is busy. Please try again later.
An operation was attempted on a media device assigned a save or recover session. Try the operation again later when the media drive is free.
(055) No element status capability for this jukebox.
-E ignored.
The jukebox does not have element status capability. The -E option is ignored.
(056) The drive is disabled. Enable the drive or
choose another.
The media drive specified is disabled. If this media device is the only one in the jukebox, then it
must be enabled for use by nsrjb. If there are other media devices enabled, try selecting one of
them.
(057) The media pool is not allowed on this device.
The media drive specified is not allowed to mount volumes from the media pool specified. Either
change the media pool configuration to allow mounts of the pool on this device, or try using
another device.
(058) All the media drives are disabled.
All the media drives are disabled. Enable one or more devices, or select another jukebox or media
device outside the currently selected jukebox.
(059) The media pool is not allowed on any of the drives.
None of the media drives in this jukebox are allowed to mount volumes from the media pool specified. Either change the media pool configuration to allow mounts of the pool on these devices, or
try using another jukebox device or media device outside the currently selected jukebox.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
15
NSRJB(1m)
NSRJB(1m)
(060) All drives are busy, disabled, or do not allow media
from this pool.
See error descriptions (027), (058), and (059). Some combination of these three errors is preventing the requested operation.
(062) Can only reset jukebox when all drives are idle.
When attempting to unload a media device, the device was found to be busy. Wait for the device
to become idle and reattempt the reset operation.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
16
NSRLIC(1m)
NSRLIC(1m)
NAME
nsrlic − NetWorker license reporting command
SYNOPSIS
nsrlic [ −vi ] [ −s server ]
DESCRIPTION
The nsrlic command generates reports about all license information currently active on a NetWorker
server. This command queries the NetWorker resource database, and formats and displays the results to
standard output.
The nsrlic program reports: the number of server or universal client licenses, the number of server client
licenses used, the number of server client licenses borrowed by workstation clients, the number of remaining server client licenses, the list of server clients connected to the named NetWorker server, the list of
server clients defined in the specified NetWorker server, the number of workstation client licenses, the number of workstation licenses needed or used, the number of remaining workstation client licenses, the list of
workstation clients connected to the specified NetWorker server, the list of workstation clients defined on
the specified NetWorker server, the number of server clients listed by platform, the number of workstation
clients listed by platform, the list of valid client paks installed on the system, and the list of client types
allowed by client paks and server enablers installed on the system.
When applications exist which require licensing, nsrlic also reports them in the same manner. In this case,
however, the output will not contain any references unless either there are licenses available, or a connected
client is utilizing a license count for such applications.
OPTIONS
−i
Selects interactive mode. In this mode, you can request different reports, refresh the information,
or switch to a different server. The information is requested once and cached until another connect command is issued.
−s server
Selects which NetWorker server to query. By default, the server on the local system is queried.
−v
Selects verbose mode. In addition to the number of licenses or the number of clients, a list of connected and defined clients is gathered and displayed.
USAGE
The following commands are supported in the interactive mode:
connect [ server ]
Connects to the named server. By default, this is the server on the local system.
detail
Produces a detailed report. Displays a list of connected clients (clients that saved to NetWorker)
and a list of defined clients (clients that are defined in the NetWorker server, but not yet saved).
help
Displays a list of available commands.
summary
Displays a summary report.
?
Is the same as online help.
quit
Performs an immediate exit from nsrlic.
DIAGNOSTICS
nsrlic displays a "usage" message describing the available options when characters are used that are not
valid for this command.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRLIC(1m)
NSRLIC(1m)
command not found
Indicates that the command is not a supported command.
RPC error: Remote system error RPC error: Program not registered
Indicates that some problems were encountered while connecting to the NetWorker server on the
specified system. The nsrlic command requires that the NetWorker daemons be running. Start
your NetWorker daemons (nsrd) and rerun nsrlic. If nsrd is already running, you have probably
reached a resource limit on the server (for example, not enough memory or no more processes).
Server xxx does NOT have Self-Identifying capability
Indicates that the specified NetWorker server does not have the capability to report license information.
SEE ALSO
nsrd(1m), nsradmin(1m), nwadmin(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSRLS(1m)
NSRLS(1m)
NAME
nsrls − list statistics of NetWorker index files
SYNOPSIS
nsrls [ { clientname . . . | −m } ]
DESCRIPTION
When nsrls is used without any specified options being specified, the number of records in an online index
and the usage of the online index with respect to the number of kilobytes allocated to its UNIX files is
printed. Administrators can use this command to establish how many files have been saved by a client.
OPTIONS
When invoked with the −m option, nsrls prints the information for the media database. The media
database has the following four statistics associated with it: an internal file ID (Fid), the size of the file
(Size), the number of logical records in the file (Count), and a descriptive name for the internal file
(Name).
The internal files are interpreted as follows:
saveset files
These are the internal record files which store the actual data (for example, ss).
volume files
These are the internal record files which store the volumes (for example, vol).
index files
These internal b-tree index files hold the index records used for optimizing media database
queries. The names of these files contain the extension "_i*" (for example, ss_i0 and vol_i1).
temporary files
These files (beginning with the filename "temp_*") contain temporary records used during sorting.
Temporary files are present only while a database is currently being modified.
The number, name, function, and interpretation of the internal files can change at any time.
An empty argument list prints the statistics for all known clients.
EXAMPLE
% nsrls -m
Database id 0: /nsr/mm/mmvolume
Fid |
Size | Count | Name
-----------------------------------------0 | 16 KB |
6 | vol
1 | 136 KB |
484 | ss
2 | 16 KB |
6 | vol_i0
3 | 16 KB |
5 | vol_i1
4 | 16 KB |
5 | vol_i2
5 | 16 KB |
5 | vol_i3
6 | 16 KB |
0 | vol_i4
7 | 24 KB |
484 | ss_i0
8 | 24 KB |
484 | ss_i1
9 | 16 KB |
164 | ss_i2
10 | 24 KB |
483 | ss_i3
11 |
8 KB |
1 | temp_0
% nsrls jupiter
/space2/nsr/index/jupiter: 292170 records requiring 50 MB
/space2/nsr/index/jupiter is currently 100% utilized
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRLS(1m)
NSRLS(1m)
SEE ALSO
nsr_layout(5), nsrindexd(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
... is not a registered client
The client named is not a valid NetWorker client.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSRMIG(1m)
NSRMIG(1m)
NAME
nsrmig − migrate files for long-term storage with NetWorker HSM
SYNOPSIS
nsrmig [ −aMnvx ] [ −l percent ] [ −s server ] [ −t savetime ] [ −W width ] [ path ]
DESCRIPTION
nsrmig migrates files to the NetWorker server. Migration means replacing a file with a "stub" that points to
a copy of the file made from premigration. If the stub is accessed at some later time, the file is automatically recalled to disk by the NetWorker server.
Criteria specified in the NetWorker migration client resource are used to select files for migration. Currently, only regular files are premigrated and migrated.
If no path argument is specified, the current directory is migrated. nsrmig does not cross mount points, nor
does it follow symbolic links.
OPTIONS
−a
Sort files by access time. Valid for XDSM HSM only. Files selected for migration are sorted by
access time before being replaced by stubs. Files that have been least recently accessed will be
migrated first.
−M
Use Networker’s migration index to find lists of files that have been premigrated. Valid for XDSM
HSM only. Without this option nsrmig walks the directory specified searching for files that are
eligible for premigration. Using the index might be faster finding the files that have be premigrated recently, but will not find files that have been recovered since premigration. Symbolic link
HSM always uses the migration index.
−l percent
Specify a goal percentage for nsrmig. Migration stops when the goal percentage is reached. If
the goal percentage is already reached when nsrmig is run, then nsrmig will do nothing and exit.
If the −l option is not specified, then the goal percentage is read from the appropriate migration
client resource.
−n
Indicates no stub replacement. Estimates the total number of files and the total size that is freed by
stub replacement, but does not actually replace qualified files with stubs.
−s server
Uses the NetWorker server named server.
−t savetime
Migrates files that were premigrated at savetime.
−v
Verbose. Causes the nsrmig program to tell you in detail what it is doing as it proceeds. If you
specify multiple −v options, then the verbosity level increases.
−W width
Indicates the width that is used when summary information output is formatted.
−x
Cross mount points that are encountered.
DIAGNOSTICS
Exit Codes
0
−1
Normal exit.
Abnormal exit.
SEE ALSO
nsr_getdate(3), hosts(5), nsr(5), nsr(1m), nsr_client(5), nsr_device(5), nsr_group(5), nsr_service(5),
nsrd(1m), nsrhsmck(1m), nsrindexd(1m), nsrpmig(1m), nsrmm(1m), nsrmmd(1m), nsrwatch(1m),
savefs(1m), savegrp(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRMM(1m)
NSRMM(1m)
NAME
nsrmm − NetWorker media management command
SYNOPSIS
nsrmm
[ −C ] [ −v | −q ] [ −s server ] [ −f device ]
nsrmm
−m [ −v | −q ] [ −s server ] [ −f device ] [ −r ] [ volume ]
nsrmm
−l [ −v | −q ] [ −s server ] [ −f device ] [ −myB ] [ −e forever ] [ −c capacity ] [ −o mode ] [ −b pool
] [ −R | volume ]
nsrmm
{ −u | −j } [ −v | −q ] [ −s server ] [ −y ] [ −f device | volume.. ]
nsrmm −p [ −v | −q ] [ −s server ] [ −f device ]
nsrmm
{ −d | −o mode } [ −v | −q ] [ −s server ] [ −Py ] [ −S ssid[/cloneid] | −V volid | volume ... ]
nsrmm
−S ssid [ −w browse-time ] [ −e retention-time ]
DESCRIPTION
nsrmm a command line interface to manage the media and devices (tapes, disks, and files) used by NetWorker servers and storage nodes.
A volume is a physical piece of media, for example, a tape or disk cartridge. When dealing with file type
devices, volume refers to a directory on a file system. NetWorker must have exclusive use of this directory,
as files will be created and removed. The NetWorker system keeps track of which user files have been
saved on which volumes, so they can be more easily recovered. Every volume managed by NetWorker has
a volume name (also known as a volume label) selected by an operator. A volume name is specified when
the volume is first introduced to the system. It can only be changed when a volume is relabeled. The volume should have an external label displaying its volume name for future reference. NetWorker refers to
volumes by their volume names, for example, when requesting a volume for recovery.
The NetWorker system automatically manages an index that maps saved user files to volumes. NetWorker
also keeps other attributes associated with a volume, including the expected capacity of the volume.
The NetWorker server requests that specific volumes be mounted by their name for recoveries, or any
writable volumes for saves. These requests are submitted through the nsr_notification(5) mechanism. The
nwadmin(1m) console window or the nsrwatch(1m) command can be used to monitor pending mount
requests. Typically, the requests will also be written to the system console, or logged in a file. The same
requests can be used as input for software that controls a jukebox (a device that automatically loads and
unloads volumes).
Before the nsrmm command can be used (that is, before any data can be saved or recovered), at least one
device must be configured for the NetWorker server. The NetWorker configuration may be modified with
the nwadmin(1m) Administration menus or the nsradmin(1m) command after NetWorker has been
installed.
OPTIONS
−B
NetWorker 6.1.1
Verifies that the volume you want to label does not have a readable NetWorker label. Before labeling the volume, an attempt is made to read any existing label the volume may already possess. If
you specify this option and the volume has a valid NetWorker label that is readable by the device
currently being used, the label operation is canceled and an error message is displayed. If the volume does not contain a label that is readable by the current device, the volume may be labeled.
This option is used by nsrd(1m) when automatically labeling volumes on behalf of nsrmmd(1m)
requests.
October 15, 2001
1
NSRMM(1m)
NSRMM(1m)
−b pool
Specifies the pool to which the volume belongs. −b pool can name any pool currently registered
with nsrd. The possible values can be viewed by selecting the Pools menu item from the Administration menu of nwadmin(1m) or using the nsradmin(1m) command. The pool name is referenced by nsrd when determining which save sets can reside on the volume. If you omit this
option, the volume is automatically assigned to the Default pool. If you specify a pool name without specifying a volume name, the next volume name associated with the pool’s label template
resource is used.
−C
Displays a list of NetWorker configured devices and the volumes currently mounted in them. This
list displays only the devices and volumes assigned to the server, not the actual devices and volumes. The −p option verifies the volume label. −C is the default option.
−c capacity
Overrides the default capacity of a volume. NetWorker normally uses built-in default capacities
based on the device type. This option overrides these defaults. The format of the specification is
number multiplier. Multiplier can be one of ‘K’ (1024 bytes), ‘M’ (1000 KB), or ‘G’ (1000 MB).
Lower case letters are also accepted, as are extra characters like spaces, or an extra ‘B’ after ‘K’,
‘M’, or ‘G’. Number may be any value, including an integer or real number, with up to three decimal places.
−d
Deletes the client file indexes and media database entries from the NetWorker databases. The
action does not destroy the volume: instead, it removes all references used by NetWorker to the
volume and the user files contained on it. This option can be used to control the size of the NetWorker databases.
−e time When used in conjunction with the −S option, it sets the retention time of the specified save set.
The retention time should be specified in the format that is acceptable to the function
nsr_getdate(1m). Note that the save set retention time may not be set such that the save set would
become recyclable while it is still browsable. Refer to the −w option for more details on browse
time. When used in conjunction with volumes, the volume labeled will be an Archive volume if
the value of time is forever (Archive volumes mean that the volume label never expires). Any
other value of time are not applicable to a volume.
−f device
Specifies a device explicitly. When more than one device has been configured, nsrmm will select
the first device by default. This option overrides the selection made by nsrmm.
−j
Ejects a volume from the device. This option is similar to performing an unmount operation,
except that the volume is also physically ejected from the device, if possible. This feature is not
supported by some device types, disk devices, and tapes.
−l
Labels (initializes) a volume for NetWorker to use and recognize. Labeling must be performed
after the desired volume is physically loaded into the device, either by an operator or a jukebox.
−m
Mounts a volume into a device. Mounting is performed after a volume is placed into a device and
labeled. You can mount only labeled volumes. The labeling and mounting operations can be combined into a single command line. See the EXAMPLES section.
−o mode
Sets the mode of a volume, save set, or save set instance (clone). The mode can be one of the following: [not]recyclable, [not]readonly, [not]full, [not]manual or [not]suspect. The
[not]recyclable mode applies to both volumes or save sets, but not clones. The [not]readonly,
[not]full and [not]manual modes apply only to volumes. The [not]manual mode is the only
valid mode when used with the −l option. The [not]suspect mode applies only to save set
instances, meaning it must be specified along with −S ssid/cloneid, not just −S ssid by itself.
(Remember that every instance of a save set has a clone id, even the original.) See nsrim(1m) for
a discussion of the per-volume flags. The suspect flag is set automatically when a recover(1m)
encounters a media error recovering data from a particular save set clone.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSRMM(1m)
NSRMM(1m)
−P
When used in conjunction with the −d option the corresponding file index entries are purged, without deleting the entries in the media database. The scanner(1m) command can then be used to
recover the file index entries.
−p
Verifies and prints a volume’s label. To confirm that the external volume label matches the internal label, load a volume into a drive and use this option to display the volume name in the label.
Verifying a label unmounts mounted volumes.
−q
Quiet mode. This option tells nsrmm to print out as little information as possible while performing the requested operation. Generally, only error messages are printed.
−R
Relabels a volume. This option rewrites the volume label and purges the NetWorker indexes of all
user files previously saved on the volume. Some of the volume usage information is maintained.
−r
Mounts a volume as read-only. To prevent NetWorker from writing to a volume, specify the readonly flag when mounting the volume. Volumes marked as full and those in the read-only mode
(−o readonly) are automatically mounted read-only.
−s server
Specifies the NetWorker server to perform the nsrmm operation on. See nsr(1m) for a description
of server selection.
−S ssid Changes ( −o) or removes ( −d) a save set from the NetWorker databases, or used in changing the
browse time (specified with −w) or the retention time (specified with −e) of the specified save set
record. The save set is identified by a save set identifier, ssid. A save set instance, or clone, can be
specified using the format ssid/cloneid (but, it is ignored when used for the options −w and −e).
The mminfo(1m) program may be used to determine save set and clone identifiers.
−u
Unmounts a volume. A volume should always unmount a volume before you unload it from a
device.
−V volid
Removes a volume from the NetWorker databases when used in conjunction with the −d option.
The volume is identified by a volume identifier, or volid. The mminfo(1m) command can be used
to determine volume identifiers.
−v
Verbose mode. This option polls the NetWorker server to print out more information as the operation proceeds.
−w browse time
Specifies the browse time for the specified save set (supplied with the −S option). The browse
time should be specified in the format that is acceptable to the function nsr_getdate(1m). The
browse time has to be after the insert time in the save set record, but it cannot be after the retention
time. If the option −e was not used, the existing retention time in the save set record is used for
comparing with the specified browse time. See under the option −e for more details on retention
time.
−y
Do not confirm (potentially destructive) operations before performing them. This option must be
used with extreme care.
EXAMPLES
Labeling new tapes:
To introduce a new tape, named mars.001, to the NetWorker system, load the tape in an empty
drive, then use the command:
nsrmm −l mars.001
The tape is labeled with mars.001 and an entry is made in the appropriate NetWorker indexes.
The mminfo(1m) command may be used to inspect the volume database and display information
about the volumes:
mminfo −m
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
3
NSRMM(1m)
NSRMM(1m)
Mounting a tape:
To mount a NetWorker volume, use the −m option. Note that the volume must have been labeled
previously and loaded in the drive:
nsrmm −m
When mounting, a volume name can also be specified:
nsrmm −m mars.001
The mount will fail unless the given volume name matches the one read from the media.
By mounting a volume, you make the volume available to NetWorker. When nsrmmd(1m) needs
the volume, the label will be read again and confirmed, preventing accidental data loss. Volumes
are also verified and mounted automatically if the server recovers after a crash.
Labeling and mounting a tape:
A volume may be labeled and mounted with a single nsrmm command by combining the −m and
−l options. The following example labels a volume as mars.003 and mounts it on device
/dev/nrst0:
nsrmm −m −l −f /dev/nrst0 mars.003
Unmounting or ejecting a volume:
When a volume needs to be unmounted, use either the −u or −j option, depending on whether or
not the device can physically eject a volume.
nsrmm −u
When more than one volume is mounted, you can specify either the volume name or device to
select the desired volume. The following example ejects the volume named mars.003.
nsrmm −j mars.003
Displaying the current volumes:
The −C option displays the configured devices and the mounted volumes. This is the default
option.
nsrmm −C
Deleting a volume:
To remove references to a volume and the user files saved on it from the NetWorker indexes, use
the −d option. This option does not modify the physical volume, and should only be used when
the physical volume is destroyed. By deleting a volume, you free up space in the NetWorker file
index and the NetWorker media index, but not much more than if you had purged it. The amount
of space released depends on the number of user files saved on the volume. The following example deletes the volume mars.003:
nsrmm −d mars.003
The scanner(1m) command can be used to rebuild the database entries.
Purging file index entries:
The file index contains information about each file saved by NetWorker. Due to size constraints, it
may be necessary to purge information from the file index. When a volume or save set is deleted,
the corresponding file index entries are also removed. It is also possible to preserve the media
database entries of a volume while purging the file index by specifying the −P option when deleting.
The following example purges all of the file index entries for volume mars.001:
nsrmm −d −P mars.001
The scanner(1m) command can be used to recover the file index.
SEE ALSO
nsr(1m), nsr_getdate(3), nsr_layout(5), nsr_device(5), nsr_notification(5), mminfo(1m),
nwadmin(1m), nsrmmd(1m), nsradmin(1m), nsrim(1m), recover(1m), scanner(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
4
NSRMM(1m)
NSRMM(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
type family volume mounted on device, write enabled
Message indicating that the −m (mount) option was successfully performed on a device with the
given media type and media family, for example, 8mm tape.
‘saveset’ is not a valid save set id
The given save set identifier is not in the valid format. The format is either a single number (for
the save set without reference to its instances), or two numbers separated by a slash (/) (representing a save set and clone (instance) identifier pair).
duplicate name; pick new name or delete old one
It is illegal to label two tapes with the same name. If you wish to reuse a name, remove that volume from the index using the −d option.
Are you sure you want to over-write volume with a
new label?
An attempt is being made to relabel a volume. A positive confirmation will overwrite the existing
data on that tape.
Purge file index entries for type family volume? ...
After confirmation, the file index entries are removed.
volume not in media index
The media index has no entry associated with volume, so the −m command cannot be used. This
problem may be caused by mistyping the volume name when the tape was originally labeled, or
deleting it.
No valid family label
The tape or disk in the named device does not have a valid NetWorker label.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
5
NSRMMD(1m)
NSRMMD(1m)
NAME
nsrmmd − NetWorker media multiplexor daemon
SYNOPSIS
nsrmmd [−v] [−s server] [−r system] −n number
DESCRIPTION
The nsrmmd daemon provides an RPC-based media multiplexing and demultiplexing service. The RPC
program and version numbers provided by nsrmmd are 390104 and 5, respectively. However, to support
multiple instances of the protocol (if the Concurrent Device Support feature is enabled), the version numbers used have the daemon number times one hundred added to them. The daemon numbers always start at
one, so the first version registered will be 105, then 205, and so on. One nsrmmd per enabled device is
started automatically by nsrd. Additional nsrmmd daemons may be started when a mount request is pending. To change the number of daemons, alter the number of enabled devices.
OPTIONS
−n number
Specify the daemon number.
−s server
Specify the controlling server. This option is used on a storage node (see nsr_storage_node(5)).
−r system
Some nsrmmd programs run on the server but are controlling a device attached to a Networker
Data Management Protocol (NDMP) system. Such instances of nsrmmd have an optional −r
argument specifying the system that is being controlled.
−v
Verbose: Print out messages about what the daemon is doing.
SEE ALSO
nsr(1m), nsr_layout(5), nsr_service(5), nsr_storage_node(5), nsrd(1m), nsrmm(1m), mm_data(5)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRMMDBASM(1m)
NSRMMDBASM(1m)
NAME
nsrmmdbasm − NetWorker module for saving and recovering media databases
SYNOPSIS
nsrmmdbasm [ standard-asm-arguments ]
DESCRIPTION
The nsrmmdbasm is a standard, external ASM (Application Specific Module) that assists in the saving and
recovering of the NetWorker media multiplexor’s database files.
See uasm(1m) for a general description of ASM’s and the [standard-asm-arguments]. It is intended that
nsrmmdbasm only be invoked by nsrmmdbd(1m) or mmrecov(1m) operations.
Actions performed by nsrmmdbasm, specific to the NetWorker application during a save are:
Architecture independence:
The high speed access methods and data structures implemented by the database code are machine
dependent. This ASM saves only the records (and not access indexes) in an architecture independent manner. Therefore, NetWorker media databases may be saved from one machine architecture
and recovered to another.
Conservation:
Since only changed records are saved, and not internal indexes, considerable network bandwidth
and tape space are conserved.
The recover operation of this ASM is the inverse of the save operation.
FILES
/nsr/mm/.nsr
This directive file causes most files in the directory to be skipped during normal
save operations. nsrmmdbasm ignores this directive.
/nsr/mm/mmvolume6 The directory which is saved and recovered by this ASM.
/nsr/mm/mmvolume.r A temporary file that stores the contents of a recovered media database until nsrmmdbd(1m) has completed building a new media database.
/nsr/mm/mmvolume.s A temporary file that this ASM reads when backing up data.
/nsr/mm/volume.tmp
A temporary file created when converting an older media database schema to the
present schema during recovery.
SEE ALSO
nsr(5), nsr_layout(5), mmrecov(1m), nsrmmd(1m), nsrmmdbd(1m), nsrindexasm(1m), recover(1m),
savegrp(1m), uasm(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRMMDBD(1m)
NSRMMDBD(1m)
NAME
nsrmmdbd − NetWorker media (volume) management database daemon
SYNOPSIS
nsrmmdbd
DESCRIPTION
The nsrmmdbd daemon provides an RPC-based database service to the local nsrd(1m) and nsrmmd(1m)
daemons, and query-only network access to NetWorker clients. The RPC program number provided by
nsrmmdbd is 390107. The RPC version numbers provided by nsrmmdbd are 3, 4, and 5. Nsrmmdbd is
normally started by nsrd(1m).
The daemon manages a ‘‘media and save set database’’ located in the file /nsr/mm/mmvolume. The primary purpose of the database is to remember which save sets reside on which backup volumes. Numerous
access methods are provided to both save set and volume records within the database.
FILES
/nsr/mm/mmvolume
File containing the volume data base.
/nsr/mm/cvt A temporary file created when converting an older media database schema to the present
schema.
/nsr/mm/.cmprssd
For performance and space reasons, the database is periodically rebuilt (or compressed).
This file is created each time the database is rebuilt; its associated ctime is used to determine
when to rebuild the database again. To forcibly compress the database, remove this file and
run nsrim.
/nsr/mm/mmvolume.s
This temporary file is created to hold the media database information that will be saved to
tape by nsrmmdbasm(1m).
/nsr/mm/mmvolume.r
The file (created by nsrmmdbasm) that is read when the media database information is
being recovered.
SEE ALSO
mmrecov(1m), nsr(1m), nsrd(1m), nsrim(1m), nsrmmd(1m), nsrmmdbasm(1m), nsrmm(1m),
mminfo(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
The nsrmmdbd diagnostic messages will normally be logged to the /nsr/logs/daemon.log file.
Besides the messages listed below, nsrmmdbd may generate other diagnostics. Any diagnostics other than
those listed below indicate a serious problem with the media database. It may be necessary to recover your
media database using mmrecov(1m) if that occurs.
media db is converting path to version 5
media converting to version 5
Any media databases created prior to the NetWorker 4.2 release have to be converted (once) to the
new database format. Plan on allowing one second for every 100 save sets.
media conversion done
Printed when the conversion is completed successfully.
media conversion failed! reason
Printed when the conversion is terminates unsuccessfully. A more detailed reason may be
appended to the message. NetWorker cannot work until the media database is converted successfully.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRMMDBD(1m)
NSRMMDBD(1m)
media db is converting count volumes
This is printed after the volumes’ data has been dumped from the old database, but before it has
been loaded into the new database.
media db is converting count save sets
This is printed after the save sets’ data has been dumped from the old database, but before it has
been loaded into the new database.
media db is saving its data, this may take a while
Printed when the daemon is dumping its records to a temporary file when the database is being
backed up. The service is unavailable while the database is dumping.
media db is recovering, this may take a while
Printed when the daemon is reloading its database. The service is unavailable while the data is
being reloaded.
media db is recovering old data, this may take a while
Similar to the previous message, except that a pre-4.0 database is being recovered and it will have
to be converted before service resumes.
media db is cross checking the save sets
Printed each time the daemon is restarted. Upon start-up, the daemon sanity checks its records
before providing its service.
media db is open for business
Printed after any of the previous messages are printed to indicate that the service is once again
available.
A copy of this process is already running!
Another copy of nsrmmdbd(1m) is currently running and has exclusive access to the media
database. Only one nsrmmdbd process should be running on a given machine at a time. This can
happen if the previous nsrmmdbd was not properly killed off. Use nsr_shutdown(1m) or ps(1)
and kill(1) to identify and kill off all the NetWorker daemons before restarting nsrd(1m) again.
Cannot open lock file
An internal error, check the permissions on the /nsr/tmp and /nsr/mm directories.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSRMON(1m)
NSRMON(1m)
NAME
nsrmon − command to remotely control NetWorker commands and daemons
SYNOPSIS
nsrmon
DESCRIPTION
The nsrmon command is run only by NetWorker daemons. nsrd(1m) starts the command to remotely control other commands and daemons on NetWorker storage nodes running nsrexecd(1m). Commands and
daemons started remotely include nsrjb(1m) and nsrmmd(1m). See nsr_storage_node(5) for additional
detail on storage nodes.
SEE ALSO
nsr(1m), nsr_storage_node(5), nsrd(1m), nsrexecd(1m), nsrjb(1m) nsrmmd(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRNDMP_RECOVER(1m)
NSRNDMP_RECOVER(1m)
NAME
nsrndmp_recover − use NetWorker and Network Data Management Protocol(NDMP) to recover data
SYNOPSIS
nsrndmp_recover [ −c client ] [ −s server ] { -r raw device -S ssid -m mount point | -F }
DESCRIPTION
nsrndmp_recover is used to coordinate recover operations with NetWorker and a Network Data Management Protocol(NDMP) system. Only the super-user may run this command. There are two ways to
recover data: destructive recovers and file-level recovers. Destructive recovers occur when a raw partition
is specifed by the −r option along with a save set id (−S) option. Only a single save set can be specified at
a time since the target raw device pathname must be specified. Users may opt to use the administrative user
interface, nwadmin(1m), to perform the destructive recover operation through the save set recover window.
Users can determine save set ids using the user interfaces or the mminfo(1m) command. File level recovers
are specified by the −F option in conjunction with the use of the nwrecover(1m) or recover(1m) commands. Users should not specify this option.
The status of a recover can be monitored using the X Window System-based nwadmin(1m) program or the
curses(3X) based nsrwatch(1m) program for other terminal types. Only volume information is available at
this time. The amount of data that has been recovered is not provided.
nsrndmp_recover is not responsible for moving data on the NDMP system. All such activity is handled
by the NDMP system. nsrndmp_recover receives messages from the NDMP system and processes them
appropriately. Such messages could request a new tape be mounted or to post a log message. Refer to the
NDMP specification and documentation available at www.ndmp.org for more details.
In order to recover data for another system, make sure the user performing the nsrndmp_recover operation
is on the remote access attribute list of the client resource. See nsr_client(5).
OPTIONS
−c client
Client is the name of the machine that saved the files.
−F
Specifies that a file-level recovery is going to be performed. This option should only be specified
by nwrecover(1m) or recover(1m).
−m mount point
The mount point of the raw device specified by the -r option. The filesystem will be unmounted
for the recover operation and mounted after the operation is complete.
−r raw device
This option specifies the pathname of the raw device the data is to be recovered to. You must use
this option for destructive recovers.
−s server
This option selects which NetWorker server to use.
−S ssid This mandatory option is used to specify save set recover mode. This mode can be used to implement fast batch file recovery without requiring the NetWorker file index entries. ssid specifies the
save set id for the save set to be recovered. NDMP-generated save sets cannot be cloned, so no
cloneid applies as it does for the standard recover(1m) command.
DIAGNOSTICS
Skipping file due to incomplete save set: /core
The user has marked a file that is associated with an incomplete save set. The user should run
nsrim -X to resynchronize the file index and media database.
SEE ALSO
nsr_client(5), nsrndmp_save(1m), recover(1m), nwrecover(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRNDMP_SAVE(1m)
NSRNDMP_SAVE(1m)
NAME
nsrndmp_save − use NetWorker and Network Data Management Protocol(NDMP) to save data
SYNOPSIS
nsrndmp_save −T backup-type [ −Lnq ] [ −c client-name ] [ −g group ] [ −l level ] [ −m masquerade ] [
−N name ] [ −s server ] [ −t date ] [ −e expiration ] [ −w browse_time ] [ −y retention_time ] [ −W width ]
path
DESCRIPTION
nsrndmp_save coordinates the backup process with NetWorker and a target Network Data Management
Protocol(NDMP) system. Only the super-user may run this command. The user must specify a backup
type, client-name, server, and path.
The behavior of the backup depends on the NDMP system being protected. Certain environment variables
may be needed depending upon the target system. Documentation for such backups should be consulted
for more details.
The status of a backup can be monitored using the X Window System-based nwadmin(1m) program or the
curses(3X) based nsrwatch(1m) program for other terminal types.
nsrndmp_save is not responsible for moving data on the NDMP system. All such activity is handled by
the NDMP system. nsrndmp_save receives messages from the NDMP system and processes them appropriately. Such messages could request a new tape be mounted or a file index entry to be created. Refer to
the NDMP specification and documentation available at www.ndmp.org for more details.
Details about handling media are discussed in nsrmm(1m) and nsr_device(5).
In order to save data for another system, make sure the user performing the nsrndmp_save operation is on
the remote access attribute list of the client resource. See nsr_client(5).
OPTIONS
−c client-name
Specifies the client name for starting the save session. This is useful on clients with multiple network interfaces, and hence multiple host names. It can be used to create multiple index databases
for the same physical client. Note that this does not specify the network interface to use. This is
specified in the server network interface attribute of the client resource. See nsr_client(5).
−g group
Is used by savegrp(1m) and savefs(1m) to denote the group of the save. See nsr_client(5) and
nsr_group(5). It is also used by the NetWorker server to select the specific media pool.
−l level Indicates the level of the save. This option is used by savegrp(1m) and savefs(1m) to specify a
particular level for a scheduled save.
−L
When two −L options are specified, this option causes an extra line to be printed at the end of the
form ‘‘complete savetime=number’’, where number is the savetime of the save set created by this
backup. Used by savegrp(1m).
−m masquerade
Specifies the tag to precede the summary line. This option is used by savegrp(1m) and
savefs(1m) to aid in savegrp summary notifications.
−n
Indicates no save. Not supported, but provided for compatibility.
−N name
Indicates the symbolic name of this save set. By default, the most common prefix of the path
arguments is used as the save set name.
−q
Indicates quiet. Not supported, but provided for compatibility.
−s server
Specifies which machine to use as the NetWorker server.
−t date Indicates the date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) after which files must have been modified before
they will be saved. This option is used by savegrp(1m) and savefs(1m) to perform scheduled
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRNDMP_SAVE(1m)
NSRNDMP_SAVE(1m)
saves by consulting with the media database to determine the appropriate time value based on the
previous saves for the save set and the level of the scheduled save.
−T backup-type
The type of backup on the NDMP server, for example celestra.
−e expiration
Set the date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) when the saved data will expire. When a save set has an
explicit expiration date, the save set remains both browsable and non-recyclable until it expires.
After it expires and it has passed its browse time, its state will become non-browsable. If it has
expired and it has passed its retention time, the save set will become recyclable. The special value
forever is used to indicate that a volume that never expires (i.e. an archive or a migration volume)
must be used. By default, no explicit expiration date is used.
−w browse
Sets the date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) after which the saved data will no longer be browsable.
By default, the server determines the browse date for the save set based on the browse policies in
effect. This option allows overriding the existing policies on a save by save basis.
−y retention
Sets the date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) when the saved data will become recyclable. The special
value forever is used to indicate that a volume that never expires (i.e. an archive or a migration
volume) must be used. By default, the server determines this date for the save set based on the
retention policies in effect. This option allows overriding the existing policies on a save by save
basis.
−W width
The width used when formatting summary information output.
SEE ALSO
curses(3X), nsr_getdate(3), nwadmin(1m), nsr_client(5), nsr_device(5), nsr_group(5), nsr_service(5),
nsrd(1m), nsrim(1m), nsrindexd(1m), nsrmm(1m), nsrmmd(1m), nsrndmp_recover(1m), nsrwatch(1m), recover(1m), savefs(1m), savegrp(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSRPM(8)
NSRPM(8)
NAME
nsrpm − NetWorker Power Monitor Service
SYNOPSIS
This executable is run only as an MS Windows service.
DESCRIPTION
The nsrpm program (NetWorker Power Monitor Service) supports Windows 2000 Microsoft Advanced
Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI). The executable for this service is installed and configured for
automatic startup during NetWorker setup.
For successful scheduled backups of Windows 2000 clients, each NetWorker client must be able to respond
when a NetWorker server contacts it for backup. Therefore, by default, the NetWorker Power Monitor service does not allow a NetWorker server or client host to enter the ACPI standby mode. This helps ensure
that scheduled backups may be performed as configured and unscheduled operations may be performed at
any time.
WARNINGS
Do not place a NetWorker server host or client host in standby mode during a time period when either computer is to participate in a scheduled backup.
Do not put a NetWorker client or server host in standby or hibernation mode while a NetWorker backup or
restore operation (involving that host) is in progress. Doing so will likely have severe consequences and
yield unpredictable results. In such a case, the NetWorker operation might fail or hang, and there might be
other severe consequences or unpredictable results. Moreover, depending on the devices and configuration,
if a server is powered down while NetWorker operations are in progress, the server’s peripheral devices
might be powered down as well. If this occurs, when the server’s power is restored, the tape devices will
probably rewind and NetWorker’s tape processes (which otherwise never would have stopped) will have
incorrect positioning information.
1
NSRPMIG(1m)
NSRPMIG(1m)
NAME
nsrpmig − premigrate files for long-term storage with NetWorker HSM
SYNOPSIS
nsrpmig [ −BEiLnpqvx ] [ −LL ] [ −s server ] [ −N name ] [ −f dirfile ] [ −b pool ] [ −g group ] [ −m masquerade ] [ −W width ] [ −I input file ] path
DESCRIPTION
nsrpmig premigrates files to the NetWorker server. Premigration means making a copy of a file on NetWorker storage in preparation for migration. When a file is later migrated, the on-disk copy of the file is
replaced with a reference to the premigrated copy in NetWorker.
Currently, only regular files are premigrated. Criteria specified in the NetWorker migration client resource
are used to select files for premigration. The progress of a nsrpmig session can be monitored using the X
Window System based nwadmin(1m) program or the curses(3X) based nsrwatch(1m) program for other
terminal types.
The nsrpmig command will not cross mount points, nor will it follow symbolic links. If the path to be
saved is mounted from a network file server, nsrpmig will instruct the user to run the save on the remote
machine or use the -L option.
The directive files, see nsr(5), encountered in each directory will be read by default. They contain special
instructions directing how particular files are to be saved, such as compressed or skipped. These files are
named .nsrhsm. Note that the directive files used by NetWorker for save and recover named .nsr are
ignored by nsrpmig.
Each file in the subdirectory structures specified by the path arguments will be encapsulated in a NetWorker
save stream. This stream of data is sent to a receiving process on the NetWorker server. See nsrd(1m). The
server processes the data, adding entries to the online index for each file in the stream. See nsrindexd(1m).
The data finally resides on some long term storage media. See nsrmmd(1m).
Details about handling media are discussed in nsrmm(1m) and nsr_device(5).
OPTIONS
−E
Estimates the amount of data which will be generated by the save, then perform the actual save.
Note that the estimate is generated from the inode information, and thus the data is only actually
read once.
−i
Ignores any .nsrhsm directive files as they are encountered in the subdirectory structures being
saved.
−L
Indicates local. Saves will be performed from the local NetWorker client, even when files are
from a network file server. To recover these files, run recover(1m) with the −c client arguments,
where client is the name of the NetWorker client that did the save.
−LL
In addition to treating the backup as a local backup, this option causes an extra line to be printed at
the end of the form ‘‘complete savetime=number’’, where number is the savetime of the save set
created by this backup. This option is meant to be used by the savegrp(1m) command in performing automatic cloning.
−m masquerade
Specifies the tag to precede the summary line with. This option is used by savegrp(1m) and
savefs(1m) to aid in savegrp summary notifications.
−n
Indicates no save. Estimates the amount of data which will be generated by the save, but does not
perform the actual save.
−v
Indicates verbose. Causes the save program to report its progress.
−p
Exits with status 0. Is used by server to determine if client installed properly.
−q
Indicates quiet. Displays only summary information and error messages.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRPMIG(1m)
NSRPMIG(1m)
−s server
Specifies which machine to use as the NetWorker server.
−N name
Indicates the symbolic name of this save set. By default, the path argument is used as the save set
name.
−f dirfile
Indicates the file from which to read prototype default directives. See nsr(5). A dirfile of - causes
the default directives to be read from standard input.
−b pool
Specifies a particular destination pool for the save.
−g group
Is used by savegrp(1m) and savefs(1m) to denote the group of the save. See nsr_client(5) and
nsr_group(5). It is also used by the NetWorker server to select the specific media pool.
−I input_file
In addition to taking the paths to save from the command line, this option reads paths to save from
the named file. The paths must be listed one per line. If no paths are specified on the command
line, then only those paths specified in the file will be saved.
−W width
Indicates the width used when formatting summary information output.
−x
Indicates that if a subdirectory is a mount point, scan it also. This option currently has no effect.
−B
Forces a save of all connecting directory information from root (/) down to the point of invocation.
DIAGNOSTICS
Exit Codes
0
−1
Normal exit.
Abnormal exit.
SEE ALSO
curses(3X), nsr_getdate(3), nsr(5), nsr(1m), nsr_client(5), nsr_device(5), nsr_group(5), nsr_service(5),
nsrd(1m), nsrhsmck(1m), nsrindexd(1m), nsrmig(1m), nsrmm(1m), nsrmmd(1m), nsrwatch(1m),
nwadmin(1m), recover(1m), save(1m), savefs(1m), savegrp(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSRPORTS(1m)
NSRPORTS(1m)
NAME
nsrports − port configuration tool
SYNOPSIS
nsrports [ −s server ] [ −a auth_server ] [ −S | −C ] [ range ]
DESCRIPTION
The nsrports command is used to display and set ranges of ports used by the NetWorker software. The
port ranges are stored by nsrexecd(1m) in the NSR system port ranges resource. When nsrports is
executed without any options, the program displays the configured ranges for the system on which the command is being run.
Only users executing a tool on the system can change the system ports. These changes can be made only
by using nsradmin(1m) to modify the administrator attribute for the resource storing the ranges.
There are also two additional options for viewing and setting the port ranges. The first is by using the
graphical user interface, nwadmin(1m). The second is by using nsradmin(1m). Execute the program as
follows:
# nsradmin -s server -p nsrexec
where server is the system to display ports for.
OPTIONS
−s server
Specifies the system to contact.
−a auth_server
Specifies a NetWorker server. This option is required if nsrports is connecting to a remote system
that is located on a platform different than the system on which the command is being executed.
−S
Sets the system’s service ports range to the one specified.
−C
Sets the system’s connection ports range to the one specified.
SEE ALSO
nsrexecd(5), nsradmin(1m), nwadmin(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRRETRIEVE(1m)
NSRRETRIEVE(1m)
NAME
nsrretrieve − retrieve NetWorker archive save sets
SYNOPSIS
nsrretrieve [ −fnqu ] [ −i {nNyYrR} ] [ −d destination ] [ −s server ] { [ −S ssid[/cloneid] ]. . . [ −A
annotation ]. . . } [ path . . . ]
DESCRIPTION
nsrretrieve is used to restore archive save sets from a NetWorker server. No browsing is available via nsrretrieve. Use of nsrretrieve is restricted to listed administrators and users of an archive client resource.
See the nsr_client(5) man page for further details. When not running as root, only the files that the user
owns can be retrieved.
When no path arguments are specified, the entire save set contents will be retrieved. To restrict the archive
save set retrieval to only particular directories or files matching a given path prefix, exact matching path’s
can be specified to limit which directories and files are retrieved.
OPTIONS
-A annotation
The annotation is a regular expression which uniquely identifies a single archive save set. See
nsrarchive(1m). The regular expression is as used by grep(1). At least one annotation or ssid
(see below) must be specified.
-S ssid[/cloneid]
The ssid specifies the save set IDs for the save sets to be retrieved. When there are multiple clone
instances for an archive save set, you can specify the cloneid to select the particular clone instance
to be retrieved. At least one annotation (see above) or ssid must be specified.
-d destination
Specifies the destination directory to relocate retrieved files.
-s server
Selects which NetWorker server to use.
-q
The nsrretrieve command normally runs with verbose output. This flag turns off the verbose output.
-f
Indicates that retrieved files will overwrite existing files whenever a name conflict occurs.
-n
Does not actually create any directories or files while retrieving.
-i {nNyYrR}
Specifies the initial default overwrite response to use when retrieving files and the file already
exists. You may specify only one letter. This option is the same as the uasm -i option when running in recover mode. See the uasm(1m) man page for a detailed explanation of this option.
-u
Stop when an error occurs during retrieval. Normally, nsrretrieve treats errors as warnings and
tries to continue to retrieve the rest of the files requested. However, when this option is used, nsrretrieve will stop recovering on the first error it encounters.
SEE ALSO
grep(1), nsrarchive(1m), nsr_client(5), nsr_service(5), nsr(1m), nsrd(1m), uasm(1m).
DIAGNOSTICS
Exit Codes
0
<>0
Normal exit. This means that all of the requested data was successfully retrieved.
Abnormal exit.
Messages
The nsrretrieve command reports invalid options by printing a ‘‘usage’’ message describing the available
options.
Cannot contact media database on server
This message indicates that some problem was encountered connecting to the NetWorker server on
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRRETRIEVE(1m)
NSRRETRIEVE(1m)
the named machine.
cannot retrieve backup save sets
The nsrretrieve command can only be used to restore archive save set data.
cannot retrieve migration save sets
The nsrretrieve command can only be used to restore archive save set data.
more than one saveset have the annotation
The specified annotation matched more than one archive save set. Use nwretrieve(1m) for retrieving save set that has non-unique annotation key.
cannot find saveset with unique annotation
The specified annotation matched no archive save set.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSRSSC(1m)
NSRSSC(1m)
NAME
nsrssc − NetWorker save set consolidation program
SYNOPSIS
nsrssc −c client −N saveset [ −p pool ] [ -r ] [ −vq ]
DESCRIPTION
nsrssc consolidates the most recent level 1 (partial) save set and its corresponding full-level save set into a
new full-level save set. This consolidation process effectively achieves the same outcome as a full-level
backup at the time partial backup was done.
Normally, nsrssc is invoked within savegrp(1m) as part of a consolidation-level backup. During the consolidation-level backup, savegrp(1m) automatically generates a level 1 backup, then calls nsrssc to create a
consolidated backup, using the latest full-level save set.
Using nsrssc allows for greater flexibility in scheduling backups and save set consolidation. Unlike the
savegrp(1m) command, which completes a consolidation backup prompty after the level 1 backup is completed, nsrssc allows you to schedule the consolidation at a different time. Scheduling a time between the
full backup and consolidation backup frees up NetWorker to complete other processes.
If you execute nsrssc manually, the most recently backed-up save set must be a level 1 save set; otherwise,
the consolidation will not be successful.
The nsrssc command requires at least two active devices. The consolidation process uses simultaneous
device reads and writes to create its consolidated save set. This mechanism creates a restriction upon the
location of the newly created save set. The new save set cannot be created on the same volume where the
partial or full save set was derived. Also, volumes containing the previous full and level 1 save sets must
reside on the same storage node.
OPTIONS
−c client
Indicates the name of the client whose save set should be included for the consolidation process.
−N saveset
Indicates the name for the generated consolidated save set.
−p pool
Specifies the destination media pool to build the consolidated full save set. The pool may be any
pool currently registered with nsrd(1m). The selected pool must be the same pool type as the previous full-level save set. You can view pool values by selecting Pools from the Administration
menu of networker(1m). Pool values are also listed in the NSRpool resource. See nsr_pool(5).
If this option is omitted, then the consolidated save sets are automatically built on volume(s)
whose media pool is the same as that of the previous full-level save set.
−r
Removes the level 1 save set. If the level 1 save set is on tape, then the save set will expire. If the
level 1 save set is on diskfile type volume, then the save set (including its index entries, its media
database entries, and the actual save set data on disk) is removed. Please note that nsrssc will
never attempt to remove the level 1 if consolidation fails.
−v
Enables verbose operation. In this mode, additional messages may be generated during the consolidation process.
−q
Runs quietly. This is the default mode.
EXAMPLES
The following examples demonstrate how save set consolidation can be performed. In both examples, a
save set defined in group name elmanco is consolidated for client delepanto. The save set data for group
elmanco is /etc and /users .
Example:
To perform a save set consolidation, use the following commands:
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRSSC(1m)
NSRSSC(1m)
savegrp −l 1 −I −G elmanco
nsrssc −c delepanto −N /etc
nsrssc −c delepanto −N /users
Note that this example is almost the same as doing a savegrp −G elmanco −l c. The only differences are:
1) No index and bootstrap is backed up after data is consolidated.
2) If there is a failure during the consolidated process, a full backup is not performed.
Example:
To direct level 1 data to a disk cache (file-type device) and have the level 1 save set removed after a fulllevel save set is built on tape, perform the following operations:
1. Set up a pool which only accepts level 1 data and its devices are only file type devices.
2. Run the following commands:
savegrp −G elmanco −l 1 −I
nsrssc −c delepanto −N /etc −r
nsrssc −c delepanto −N /users −r
This process removes the level 1 completely. Also, since fast media (disk-file type) is involved, this process
may be a much faster way of generating a full-level save set when compared to doing a regular full-level
backup.
DIAGNOSTICS
On successful completion, nsrssc returns zero; otherwise, a non-zero value is returned.
Some error codes are:
98 Failed because the level 1 and previous full are not in the same storage node.
99 Failed, most likely due to a renamed/deleted directory condition
You may also see one of the following messages:
You are not authorized to run this command
Only root may run nsrssc
Cannot contact media database
Most likely, nsrmmd(1m) is unavailable to answer queries, or an additional NetWorker daemon
may have completed processing. In either case, the system administrator needs to determine if the
NetWorker services need to be restarted. Note, there may be a small interval during startup when
the services may be unavailable to answer any queries.
SEE ALSO
nsr_schedule(5), nsr_mminfo(1m), savegrp(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSRSTAGE(1m)
NSRSTAGE(1m)
NAME
nsrstage − NetWorker save set staging command
SYNOPSIS
nsrstage
[ −v ] [ −d ] [ −s server ] [ −b pool ] −m −S { −f file | ssid... }
nsrstage
[ −v ] [ −s server ] −C −V volume
DESCRIPTION
The nsrstage program is used to migrate existing save sets on a manual basis. Migration is the process of
moving one or more save sets between volumes. The process begins with a clone of the specific save sets
to the new volume specified, followed by the deletion of cloned save set entries from the media data base,
and finally the possible removal of the save sets from the original source volumes. The second and the third
operations are triggered by the successful completion of the previous operation. The data is moved to new
media volumes, making room for new data on the original volumes.
Migration can be onto any media type (for example, save sets on a file volume can be migrated to an optical
disk). The nsrstage program does not perform simple volume migration; it migrates full save sets.
You can specify exactly which copy (clone) of a save set to use as the source. Ssee the −S option description.
OPTIONS
−b pool
Specifies the name of the media pool to which the data should migrate. The pool may be any pool
currently registered with nsrd(1m). You can view values by selecting Pools from the Administration menu of nwadmin(1m). If you omit this option, the cloned save sets are automatically
assigned to the Default Clone pool.
−m
Performs the actual migration operation.
−s server
Specifies a NetWorker server with save sets to migrate. See nsr(1m) for a description of server
selection. The default is the current system.
−v
Enables verbose operation. In this mode, additional messages are displayed about the operation of
nsrstage, such as save sets that cross volumes, or save set series expansions.
−d
Deletes the input file that specifies the save set identifiers to be staged. This option must always be
specified in conjunction with a -f option.
−C
Instructs nsrstage to perform a volume cleaning operation. Scans a volume for save sets with no
entries in the media data base and recovers their space. You can perform this operation on file
type volumes.
−S ssid Causes nsrstage to treat subsequent command line parameters as save set identifiers. Save set
identifiers are unsigned numbers. You can find out the save set identifier of a save set using the
mminfo -v command. See mminfo(1m). The −S option is useful when you want to migrate individual save sets from a volume, or to migrate all save sets matching some mminfo query. The
save set identifiers also specify exactly which copy of a save set to use as the source. To specify
exact copies, use the ssid/cloneid format for each save set identifier. In this case, the ssid and the
cloneid are unsigned numbers, separated by a single slash (/). You can find out the cloneid for a
particular copy by referring to the mminfo -S report.
−f file
Instructs nsrstage to read the save set identifiers from the file specified, instead of listing them on
the command line. The values must be listed one per line in the input file. The file may be -, in
which case the values are read from standard input.
−V
Specifies the name of the volume to be cleaned. This option cannot be used with −S or −m
options.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRSTAGE(1m)
NSRSTAGE(1m)
EXAMPLES
Migrate save sets 1234 and 4568 to a volume in the Offsite Clone pool:
nsrstage −b ’Offsite Clone’ -m -S 1234 4567
Migrate clone instance 12345678 of save set 1234 to a volume in the Default Clone pool:
nsrstage −m −S 1234/12345678
Migrate all save sets created since last Saturday to a volume in the Default Clone pool:
nsrstage −m −S ‘mminfo −r ssid \
-q ’savetime>last saturday’‘
Recover space from volume jupiter.013:
nsrstage −C −V jupiter.013
Only complete save sets can be migrated by nsrstage(1m):
DIAGNOSTICS
The exit status is zero if all of the requested save sets migrated successfully; otherwise status is non-zero.
Several messages are printed denoting a temporary unavailability of nsrd(1m) for migrating data. These
are self-explanatory. In addition, you may see one of the following messages:
Adding save set series which includes ssid
If running in verbose mode, this message prints when nsrstage notices that a requested save set is
continued and requires the entire series to be migrated (even if only part of the series was specified
by the command line parameters).
Cannot contact media database on server
The media database (and probably other NetWorker services as well) on the named server is not
answering queries. The server may need to be started. Or if it was just started, it needs to finish its
startup checks before answering queries.
Cannot open nsrstage session with server
This message prints when the server is not accepting migration sessions. A more detailed reason
prints on the previous line.
number is not a valid save set
The given save set identifier is not valid. Two forms are understood: simple save set identifiers
and those with a cloneid specified. Simple save set are unsigned numbers. You specify the save
set with the cloneid form as two unsigned numbers separated by a single slash (/).
save set number does not exist
The given save set (from a −S save set list) does not exist. Verify your save set identifiers using
mminfo(1m).
save set clone number/cloneid does not exist
You specified a specific clone of a save set, but that save has no clones with that clone identifier.
Verify your save set identifiers using mminfo(1m).
volume name does not exist
The given volume (if you specified the −V option) does not exist in the media database.
waiting 30 seconds then retrying
A temporary error occur. nsrstage automatically retries its request until the condition is cleared.
For example, if all of the devices are busy saving or recovering, nsrstage cannot use these devices
and must wait for two of them to become free.
Space can only be recoverd from file type devices.
The given volume (if you specified the −V option) is not a file type volume. This message also
prints after a successfull migration of data from volumes of type other than file.
SEE ALSO
nsrclone(1m) nsr_getdate(3), mminfo(1m), nsr(1m), nsr_pool(5), nsrd(1m), nsrmmd(1m), nwadmin(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NSRTRAP(1m)
NSRTRAP(1m)
NAME
nsrtrap − snmp notification scheme for NetWorker messages
SYNOPSIS
nsrtrap [ −c community ] [ −t trap-type ] [ −s specific-type ] network_management_station
DESCRIPTION
nsrtrap is a mechanism to send NetWorker notifications using the Simple Network Management Protocol
(SNMP) trap mechanism. A NetWorker administrator could create a custom NetWorker notification
scheme based on nsrtrap, by configuring the NetWorker events and priorities.
A NetWorker administrator could create notification schemes to receive messages on different network
management consoles by configuring the events and priorities and specifying the desired network management station as the location to receive the trap messages.
To create a new SNMP notification, follow the steps below:
1. Open the Notifications window from the Customize menu.
2. Choose the Details option under the View menu.
3. Click on the Create button.
4. Enter the name of the new notification in the Name field.
5. In the Action field, enter the command nsrtrap along with the network management station name to
which the networker SNMP notification should be sent.
6. Set the events and priorities desired.
7. Click on the Apply button.
OPTIONS
−c community
the SNMP community string. This defaults to the community "public".
−s specific-type
the SMI (System Management Interface) Network Management Private Enterprise Code.
−t trap-type
could be one of the SNMP trap types[0-6]. The default is 6, the "enterprise-specific trap
type.
SEE ALSO
nsr(1m) nsr_resource(5)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NSRWATCH(1m)
NSRWATCH(1m)
NAME
nsrwatch − command for character-based display of NetWorker status
SYNOPSIS
nsrwatch [ −s server ] [ −p polltime ]
DESCRIPTION
The nsrwatch command displays a NetWorker server’s status. The server’s name is specified by the
optional −s server argument. If no server is specified, it defaults to the same server that would be used by a
command, such as recover(1m) in the current directory. If there is no NetWorker service on the selected
machine, the command issues an error message. The polling interval is specified by the optional −p polltime argument (in seconds). The default is two seconds.
Users can run nsrwatch from any terminal that has enough termcap(5) capabilities for cursor positioning;
it does not require any particular window system. The nsrwatch program gets its information via remote
procedure calls to the specified server. This way it can be used from any machine that can access the server
through the network.
The nsrwatch display is divided into a header and several panels: the server panel, the device panel, the
sessions panel, the messages panel, and the pending message panel. The panel sizes are adjusted depending
on the size of the terminal or window being used.
The header contains the name of the server and the current time. The server panel provides current status
of the server. The first line of the panel is reserved for error messages. This line is usually blank. The next
line tells how long the server has been up, and the server’s release version (which may not be the same as
the client’s release version). The following lines display how many saves and recovers the current server
has performed.
The device panel displays the devices known to the current server. For each device, the panel displays its
name, the device type, the name of the mounted volume, or (unmounted) if no volume is mounted, and
device status. The name may be followed by (J) if the device is configured as part of a jukebox device.
The sessions panel provides current save set information for each active session (saving, recovering, or
browsing). The messages panel displays a history of messages of general interest to the operator. Finally,
the pending message panel displays messages that require operator intervention.
The nsrwatch program runs continuously until quit, stopped, or interrupted (Control-C, for example). Typing the q character quits the program, the Control-L forces a screen clear and redraw, while any other character forces the status to be updated.
The nsrwatch program checks for new devices at a slower rate than the polling rate, so it might take up to a
minute after a new device is added before the device is noticed. To recognize the devices immediately,
either restart the program or press Control-L. Deleted devices may cause a ‘‘resource does not exist’’ message temporarily, but otherwise they are noticed immediately.
The nsrwatch program adapts to changes in the screen size, if supported by the underlying environment.
For example, if a window terminal emulator is resized, the size of each field may change to match the window. If the window is too small, all the devices, sessions, and messages, might not be displayed. For best
results, use a window of at least 30 lines.
OPTIONS
−s server
Sets the current NetWorker server to server.
−p polltime
Sets the polling interval to be polltime seconds.
SEE ALSO
termcap(5), nsr_notification(5), nsr_device(5), nsr_service(5), recover(1m), nsradmin(1m), nsr(1m),
nsrd(1m), nwadmin(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NWADMIN(1m)
NWADMIN(1m)
NAME
nwadmin, networker − graphical administration interface to NetWorker
SYNOPSIS
nwadmin [ −s server ]
networker [ −s server ]
DESCRIPTION
nwadmin is an X Window System application. It is used to administer and monitor NetWorker servers.
The server’s name may be specified with the −s server argument. When no server is specified, nwadmin
uses the server selection rules found in nsr(1m). When multiple NetWorker servers are accessible, they
may be selected from within the nwadmin command.
The nwadmin command is used to administer NetWorker servers. Clients may be added and deleted.
Schedules controlling save levels may be created and modified. Groups of clients may be formed and controlled together. Directives controlling how data is saved may be defined and changed. Cloning of save
sets and recover by save sets may be specified. Cloning of entire backup volumes may also be specified.
The notification messages may be displayed. In general, there is a panel for each component.
The current state of NetWorker servers may be monitored. The amount of data saved, the number of clients
saving, and requests for mounting and unmounting volumes, are among the items displayed. This information is displayed on the console panel.
The graphical interfaces for backup and recover are available through nwbackup(1m) and nwrecover(1m),
respectively.
A complete explanation of the nwadmin command may be found in the NetWorker Administrator’s Guide.
OPTIONS
−s server
Set the current NetWorker server to server.
FILES
/usr/lib/X11/app-defaults/Networker
The X11 resources for nwadmin.
NOTE
networker is linked to nwadmin.
SEE ALSO
nsr(1m), nsradmin(1m), nwbackup(1m), nwrecover(1m), The NetWorker Administrator’s Guide
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NWARCHIVE(1m)
NWARCHIVE(1m)
NAME
nwarchive − NetWorker graphical archive interface
SYNOPSIS
nwarchive [ −s server ]
DESCRIPTION
nwarchive is an X Window System application. It is a front end to nsrarchive(1m) and used to archive
files to a NetWorker server on an ad hoc basis. Normally, files are archived automatically.
The server’s name may be specified with the −s server argument. When no server is specified, nwarchive
uses the server selection rules found in nsr(1m). When multiple NetWorker servers are accessible, they
may be selected from within the nwarchive command.
NetWorker supports both scheduled network-wide archives and manual archives of client system files and
directories. To request an immediate manual archive, run nwarchive
Check that the correct NetWorker server is selected. The Server is identified in the Main window. You can
change servers using the Change Server command if necessary. This is the Server to which the client files
will be backed up. The hostname of the current client is displayed in the Client field. The pathname of the
current directory is displayed in the Selection field.
Change directories by entering the full pathname in the Selection field or by highlighting the icon in the
Archive window.
To perform a manual archive, first mark the files and directories that you want to back up by selecting their
checkboxes. Then select Start archive... from the File menu of the Archive window. You must enter an
annotation for the archive.
Monitor the progress of the archive in the Archive Status window. Check to see that an archive volume is
mounted in the Pending display of the Main window.
A complete explanation of the nwarchive command may be found in the NetWorker Administrator’s Guide,
UNIX Version.
OPTIONS
−s server
Set the current NetWorker server to server.
FILES
/usr/lib/X11/app-defaults/Networker
The X11 resources for nwarchive.
SEE ALSO
nsr(1m), nsradmin(1m), nsrarchive(1m), nsrretrieve(1m)
The NetWorker Administrator’s Guide, UNIX Version
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NWBACKUP(1m)
NWBACKUP(1m)
NAME
nwbackup − NetWorker graphical backup interface
SYNOPSIS
nwbackup [ −s server ] [ path ]
DESCRIPTION
nwbackup is an X Window System application. It is a front end to save(1m) and used to save files to a
NetWorker server on an ad hoc basis. Normally, files are saved automatically.
The server’s name may be specified with the −s server argument. When no server is specified, nwbackup
uses the server selection rules found in nsr(1m). When multiple NetWorker servers are accessible, they
may be selected from within the nwbackup command. If path is specified, nwbackup will set initialize
the current selection to the given path. The default selection if path is not specified is the current working
directory.
NetWorker supports both scheduled network-wide backups and manual backups of client system files and
directories. To request an immediate manual backup, run nwbackup
Check that the correct NetWorker server is selected. The Server is identified in the Main window. You can
change servers using the Change Server command if necessary. This is the Server to which the client files
will be backed up. The hostname of the current client is displayed in the Client field. The pathname of the
current directory is displayed in the Selection field.
Change directories by entering the full pathname in the Selection field or by highlighting the icon in the
Backup window.
To perform a manual backup, first mark the files and directories that you want to back up by selecting their
checkboxes. Then select Start backup... from the File menu of the Backup window. You must select
whether to compress files or exclude patterns in the Backup Options dialog box to continue the backup.
Monitor the progress of the backup in the Backup Status window. Check to see that a backup volume is
mounted in the Pending display of the Main window.
A complete explanation of the nwbackup command may be found in the NetWorker User’s Guide.
OPTIONS
−s server
Set the current NetWorker server to server.
FILES
/usr/lib/X11/app-defaults/Networker
The X11 resources for nwbackup.
SEE ALSO
nsr(1m), nsradmin(1m), nwbackup(1m), nwrecover(1m), save(1m)
The NetWorker User’s Guide
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NWRECOVER(1m)
NWRECOVER(1m)
NAME
nwrecover − NetWorker graphical recover interface
SYNOPSIS
nwrecover [ −s server ] [ −c client ] [ −T browse time ] [ path ]
DESCRIPTION
nwrecover is an X Window System application. It is used to recover lost files that have been saved with
NetWorker. If you are running in a non-X11 environment, recover(1m) may be used to recover files.
The server’s name may be specified with the −s server argument. When no server is specified, nwrecover
uses the server selection rules found in nsr(1m). When multiple NetWorker servers are accessible, they
may be selected from within the nwrecover command. If path is specified, nwrecover will attempt to initialize the current selection to the given path. The default attempted selection if path is not specified is the
current working directory.
If you are recovering files that were saved with Access Control Lists (ACLs), you need to be root or the file
owner to recover the file. Files with an ACL have a trailing ’+’ (e.g., -rw-r--r--+) after the mode bits when
viewing file details. See recover(1m) for more information about ACLs.
There are three basic steps to recover a lost file: (1) Browse NetWorker’s index in the Recover window to
find the lost file, (2) Mark the file for recovery by selecting its checkbox and (3) Start the recovery. In addition, there are recover commands for relocating recovered files (Relocate), finding past versions of a file
(Versions), changing the browse time (Change Browse Time), showing the files you have marked for recovery (Show Marked), and overwriting or renaming recovered files that are in conflict with existing files
(Conflict Resolution).
Opening the Recover window connects the client to its indexes maintained on the server. The entries in the
index represent previously backed-up files and are organized exactly like the filesystem. To browse the
index for another filesystem, enter the pathname in the Selection field.
To browse the index: Use the Recover window View menu to select the browsing level of your directories.
Use the mouse to open a directory and display its contents.
To mark files: After you have located your files by browsing the index, mark the files you want to recover
by selecting their checkboxes. Or, highlight a file and use the Mark command from the File menu to mark
files. You can list the files that you have marked for recovery with the Show Marked command from the
View menu.
To start the recovery: Select the Start recover command from the File menu. The Conflict Resolution dialog
box appears, where you tell NetWorker what to do when a conflict occurs between a recovered file and an
existing file. You select whether to be prompted for each individual conflict or to select one global resolution for all conflicts. Then you tell NetWorker whether to Rename the recover file with a .R extension to
preserve both files, to Discard the recover file and preserve the existing file, or to Overwrite the existing file
to preserve the recover file as the only copy of the file.
After you press OK in the Conflict Resolution dialog box, the recover continues. NetWorker will then automatically determine the media needed to complete the recovery, prompt the operator to mount the media,
and execute the recovery. You can monitor the status of the recovery in the Recover Status window.
Before starting the recovery, you have the option of relocating the recover files with the Relocate command.
Enter the pathname of a new or existing directory in which to place your recovered files.
The Recover window also offers two commands for browsing the index in the past. Versions shows you the
entire backup history for a file. Change Browse Time allows you to change the time at which you are viewing the on-line index.
A complete explanation of the nwrecover command may be found in the NetWorker User’s Guide.
OPTIONS
−s server
Set the current NetWorker server to server.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NWRECOVER(1m)
NWRECOVER(1m)
−c client
Set the current NetWorker client index to browse to client.
−T browse time
Set the current index browse time to browse time (in nsr_getdate(3) format). Using this option is
equivalent to using the change browse time dialog within nwrecover.
FILES
/usr/lib/X11/app-defaults/Networker
The X11 resources for nwrecover.
SEE ALSO
nsr_getdate(3), nsr(1m), nsradmin(1m), nwbackup(1m), recover(1m)
The NetWorker User’s Guide
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
NWRETRIEVE(1m)
NWRETRIEVE(1m)
NAME
nwretrieve − NetWorker graphical retrieve interface
SYNOPSIS
nwretrieve [ −s server ]
DESCRIPTION
nwretrieve is an X Window System application. It is used to retrieve files that have been archived with
NetWorker. If you are running in a non-X11 environment, nsrretrieve(1m) may be used to retrieve files.
The server’s name may be specified with the −s server argument. When no server is specified, nwretrieve
uses the server selection rules found in nsr(1m). When multiple NetWorker servers are accessible, they
may be selected from within the nwretrieve command.
If you are retrieving files that were archived with Access Control Lists (ACLs), you need to be in group
operator or the file owner to retrieve the file. See nsrretrieve(1m) for more information about ACLs.
There are three basic steps to retrieve a lost file: (1) Browse NetWorker’s list of Archives in the Retrieve
window. (2) Select the Archive you wish to retrieve. (3) Start the retrieve.
Opening the Retrieve window connects with the NetWorker server indexes. Selecting the Query button displays a list of archive available on the server. The entries in the list represent previously archived files.
To start the retrieve: Select the Start retrieve command from the File menu. The Retrieve Status dialog box
appears, and you may enter a path to relocate to and select if you want to overwrite existing files.
After you press OK in the Retrieve Status dialog box, the Retrieve will begin retrieving the selected
archives and status will be displayed in the Status field. NetWorker will then automatically determine the
media needed to complete the retrieve, prompt the operator to mount the media, and execute the retrieve.
A complete explanation of the nwretrieve command may be found in the NetWorker Administrator’s Guide,
UNIX Version.
OPTIONS
−s server
Set the current NetWorker server to server.
FILES
/usr/lib/X11/app-defaults/Networker
The X11 resources for nwretrieve.
SEE ALSO
nsr(1m), nsradmin(1m), nwarchive(1m), nsrarchive(1m), nsrretrieve(1m)
The NetWorker Archive User’s Guide
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
ORAEMCASM(1m)
ORAEMCASM(1m)
NAME
oraemcasm − A utility, which is part of the NetWorker Module for EMC Symmetirx for Oracle, used for
saving an Oracle database which resides on an EMC Symmetrix disk array
SYNOPSIS
oraemcasm [ −avXZ ] [ −C | -F ] [ −h server ] [ −c client-name ] [ −S oracle-sid ] [ −H oracle-home ] [ −u
resfile ] [ −p directory ] [ −g group ] [ −b pool ] [ −T tablespace . . . ] [ −P pfile ]
DESCRIPTION
The oraemcasm module is a standard external Application Specific Module (ASM) that uses EMC
TimeFinder or SRDF technology to save an Oracle datebase that resides on an EMC Symmetrix unit. See
uasm(1m) for a general description of ASM’s.
One or more tablespaces or an entire database can be processed by one backup operation. The oraemcasm
module provides the flexibility to perform archive log only backups, hot (online) backups, or cold (offline)
backups.
Multiple tablespaces may be specified following a single −T option. To backup an entire database omit the
−T option. Backups may also be performed by running the save(1m) command and specifying a dummy
file. The dummy file must be in a directory which contains a directive file specifying oraemcasm should be
run against the tablespace or database. Refer to save(1m) for details.
Two databases sharing EMC Symmetrix devices cannot be backed up in parallel. After performing a
backup the user should run and keep the output from oraemcmap(1m) to help with recovery.
OPTIONS
oraemcasm accepts the options described below.
−a
Archive log backups. With this option, only the backup control file and archive logs are saved.
Default is to save the entire database.
−X
Encryption. Causes the xlateasm to be called when saving tablespaces (see uasm(1m) for details
on xlateasm). Default is to not encrypt files.
−Z
Compression. Causes the compressasm to be called when saving tablespaces (see uasm(1m) for
details on compressasm). Default is to not compress files.
−v
Verbose. Cause the program to tell you in great detail what it is doing as it proceeds. Default is
quiet (no verbosity).
−C
Cold backup, normal. Used for cold backups. Database will be shutdown using the "shutdown
normal" command. Default is "hot" or online backups. If both -C and -F are specified, -F takes
precedence.
−F
Cold backup, immediate. Used for cold backups. Database will be shutdown using the "shutdown
immediate" command. Default is "hot" or online back ups. If both -C and -F are specified, -F
takes precedence.
−b pool
Specify which volume pool should be used for the save set.
−h server
Specify which machine to use as the NetWorker server. If not specified, use local machine as
server.
−c client-name
Specify the client name for starting the save session. This is useful on clients with multiple network interfaces, and hence multiple host names. It can be used to create multiple index databases
for the same physical client. If not specified, use local machine as client-name.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
ORAEMCASM(1m)
ORAEMCASM(1m)
−S oracle-sid
Specify the Oracle SID of the database to be backed up. If not set, $ORACLE_SID from the environment is used.
−H oracle-home
Specify the Oracle home directory of the database to be backed up. If not set, $ORACLE_HOME
from the environment is used.
−u resfile
Specify the resource file for the configuration information. If not set, /nsr/res/oraemcasm.res is
used.
−p directory
Specify the location for the "backup" control file. If not set, the Oracle "log_archive_dest" directory is used.
−g group
Specify the save group that will be used to select the volume pool.
−T tablespace
Specify the tablespace to be backed up. The user can enter multiple tablespaces following the −T
option. If this option is omitted, then all tablespaces (or the entire database) are backed up.
−P pfile
Specify the Oracle parameter file to be used to re-start the Oracle database after a cold backup. If
not specified, $ORACLE_HOME/dbs/init$ORACLE_SID.ora is used.
EXAMPLES
Backup a Single Tablespace
In this example, the Oracle SID is ’EMC2’, the Oracle home directory is ’/usr/oracle’, and the
resource file is /nsr/res/neptune.res. To backup tablespace ’Test1’ and ’Test2’, use:
oraemcasm -S EMC2 -H /usr/oracle -u neptune.res -T Test1 Test2
Backup Entire Database
To backup the entire ’EMC2’ database using the resource file ’/nsr/res/pluto.res’ use:
oraemcasm -S EMC2 -H /usr/oracle -u pluto.res
FILES
/nsr/res/oraemcasm.res
Sample oraemcasm resource file.
SEE ALSO
emcdiscover(1m), oraemcmap(1m), nsr(5), nsr(1m), nsr_directive(5), nsrindexasm(1m),
nsrmmdbasm(1m), recover(1m), save(1m), scanner(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
ORAEMCMAP(1m)
ORAEMCMAP(1m)
NAME
oraemcmap − A utility, which is part of the NetWorker Module for EMC Symmetrix for Oracle, used for
showing the configuration of Oracle tablespaces and datafiles installed on an EMC Symmetrix disk array.
SYNOPSIS
oraemcmap [ −S oraclesid ] [ −H oraclehome ] [ −M BCV | RDFBCV ] [ −T tablespace . . . ]
DESCRIPTION
The oraemcmap utility displays the current Oracle database and EMC Symmetrix TimeFinder or SRDF
configuration. This program should be run after each successful oraemcasm(1m) backup, and the output
permanantely saved. Recovering an Oracle database which was saved from a BCV, or remote BCV device
(across an SRDF link) using oraemcasm(1m) requires knowing the original tablespace layout on the Symmetrix devices and datafile names, which this utility will provide for you.
The oraemcmap(1m) utility queries the Symmetrix unit and your Oracle database to locate tablespace
names and how these tablespaces are mapped onto the Symmetrix devices.
When available, oraemcmap(1m) will display the following information for each tablespace in the
database:
Tablespace: tablesapce-name
Datafile: datafile-name
Disk Group: group-name Volume: volume-name
Std Dev: device-info paired dev: device-info
Note:
On HP/UX, the "Disk Group" field label is called "Vol. Group".
The "device-info" is displayed as SymmID-SymmDev
The "paired dev" output varies depending upon which backup method is being employed. Possible field label values are:
BCV - for BCV backups
Remote BCV - for remote BCV (or RDFBCV) backups
OPTIONS
−S oraclesid
Specify which instance of the Oracle database should be queried. If not specified, $ORACLE_SID, from the environment, is used.
−H oraclehome
Specify the Oracle home directory (for the instance being queried). If not specifed, $ORACLE_HOME, from the environment, is used.
−M BCV | RDFBCV
Specify the backup method that will be employed against this database. Backup methods correspond to values entered into your oraemcasm resource file. If no backup method is specified, BCV
is used.
−T tablespace . . .
Specify the tablespace (or tablespaces), you wish to display mapping information about. The
default is to list all tablespaces in the database.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
ORAEMCMAP(1m)
ORAEMCMAP(1m)
EXAMPLES
Display Configuration Information
The following example displays remote BCV device information about the TOOLS tablespace:
oraemcmap -S EMCSOL2 -H /oracle/oracle_733 -M RDFBCV -T TOOLS
Tablespace: TOOLS
Datafile: /lvms/lv01dg01/oradata/EMCSOL2/tools02.dbf
Disk Group: dg01
Volume: vol01
Std Dev: 000183500313-0B9 Remote BCV: 000183500311-051
Std Dev: 000183500313-0B8 Remote BCV: 000183500311-050
Datafile: /symm02/oradata/EMCSOL2/tools03.dbf
Device: /dev/rdsk/c1t1d1s1
Std Dev: 000183500313-0B1 Remote BCV: 000183500311-049
Datafile: /dev/rdsk/c1t1d3s4
Std Dev: 000183500313-0B3 Remote BCV: 000183500311-04B
In this example, notice that the TOOLS tablespace is comprised of three datafiles. Also notice, the Symmetrix ID is 000183500313 for the standard devices and 000183500311 is the Symmetrix ID where remote
BCVs are located.
This example displays BCV device information (default) for the USERS tablespace. Also, $ORACLE_HOME and $ORACLE_SID have both been set.
oraemcmap -T USERS
Tablespace: USERS
Datafile: /symmvxfs01/oradata/EMCHP1/users01.dbf
Vol. Group: vg01
Volume: lvol2
Std Dev: 000183500311-0C7
BCV: 0EF
Std Dev: 000183500311-0C6
BCV: 0EE
Notice that this was run from an HP/UX machine (i.e. "Vol. Group" instead of "Disk Group"). Also notice
that the Symmetrix ID is not displayed for the BCV device.
An appropriate message will be displayed if the device is not a Symmetrix device.
Send oraemcmap output to the printer
Assuming $ORACLE_SID contains the name of your Oracle instance, and $ORACLE_HOME
points to the Oracle home directory, you can run oraemcmap and send the output to your default
printer by running:
oraemcmap | lpr
SEE ALSO
oraemcasm(1m), emcdiscover(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
pathownerignore(5)
pathownerignore(5)
NAME
pathownerignore − ignore path-ownership rules during scheduled saves
SYNOPSIS
<nsr_bin>/pathownerignore
DESCRIPTION
In a clustered environment, the NetWorker software must distinguish between filesystems associated with
the physical client, and those that are managed by a resource group (a virtual client). These criteria are
referred to as the path-ownership rules. These rules determine which client index a save set is written to.
If a filesystem owned by a virtual client is defined in the save set list for a physical client resource, by
default the filesystem will not be backed up during a scheduled save. The same is true for a filesystem
owned by a physical client defined in the save set list for a virtual client resource. In both cases, the filesystem is omitted. This occurs because the NetWorker software views the client (which owns the filesystem) as
not having matched the client of the current scheduled save.
To check the NetWorker path-ownership rule:
1. Run the following command on the NetWorker server:
# savegrp -p -c client_name
2. Review which filesystems are owned by client_name. This procedure is part of the normal cluster installation setup. For detailed instructions, refer to the appropriate Legato NetWorker Installation Guide.
To test for the existence of misappropriated save sets, run a test probe with the verbose option set. The command output will warn you to which client indexes a save set will be saved. For example:
# savegrp -pv -c client_name group_name
To ignore NetWorker default path-ownership rules, you can create the <nsr_bin>/pathownerignore file. This
file causes the NetWorker software to back up the filesystem in question; however, the filesystem will be
saved under the index of its correct owner. Creating the <nsr_bin>/pathownerignore file is not recommended, but it might be required under special circumstances. The <nsr_bin>/pathownerignore file does
not override the default path-ownership rules. It causes the path-ownership rules to be ignored when determining if a filesystem should be backed up during a scheduled save.
SEE ALSO
save(1m), savegrp(1m), savefs(1m)
NOTES
To override the path-ownership rules and have a save set written to an index other than its default owner,
one must use the "save -c client_name " command. Refer to save (1m) for more information.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
PMODE(1m)
PMODE(1m)
NAME
pmode − print mode sense data
SYNOPSIS
pmode [ -f filename ]
DESCRIPTION
The pmode program will parse the data output by the msense(1m) program and print in technological
English. (C-style variables with hexadecimal numbers)
OPTIONS
−f filename Specifies input; otherwise standard input is assumed.
EXAMPLE
Sample output might look like:
viper# msense -a 0.0.0 -p 0x03 | pmode
Mode Header: mdl=35 mtype=0x0 dparm=0x10 bdlen=8
Block Desc[0]: dens=0x0 nblks=3933040 blklen=512
Fixed Page, code 0x03 (Format Device):
tracks_per_zone: 0xf
alt_sectors_per_zone: 0x22
alt_tracks_per_zone: 0x0
alt_tracks_per_vol: 0x0
sectors_per_track: 0x5e
data_bytes_per_sect: 0x200
interleave: 0x1
track_skew_factor: 0x8
cylinder_skew_factor: 0x11
SSEC: 0x0
HSEC: 0x1
RMB: 0x0
SURF: 0x0
SEE ALSO
msense(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
PMODE(1m)
PMODE(1m)
NAME
pmode − print mode sense data
SYNOPSIS
pmode [ -f filename ]
DESCRIPTION
The pmode program will parse the data output by the msense(1m) program and print in technological
English. (C-style variables with hexadecimal numbers)
OPTIONS
−f filename Specifies input; otherwise standard input is assumed.
EXAMPLE
Sample output might look like:
viper# msense -a 0.0.0 -p 0x03 | pmode
Mode Header: mdl=35 mtype=0x0 dparm=0x10 bdlen=8
Block Desc[0]: dens=0x0 nblks=3933040 blklen=512
Fixed Page, code 0x03 (Format Device):
tracks_per_zone: 0xf
alt_sectors_per_zone: 0x22
alt_tracks_per_zone: 0x0
alt_tracks_per_vol: 0x0
sectors_per_track: 0x5e
data_bytes_per_sect: 0x200
interleave: 0x1
track_skew_factor: 0x8
cylinder_skew_factor: 0x11
SSEC: 0x0
HSEC: 0x1
RMB: 0x0
SURF: 0x0
SEE ALSO
msense(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
PRECLNTSAVE(1m)
PRECLNTSAVE(1m)
NAME
preclntsave − Child process to run pre-processing commands for Networker savepnpc.
SYNOPSIS
preclntsave −s server −c client −g group [−D debuglevel]
DESCRIPTION
The preclntsave process verifies if there is an existing /nsr/tmp/<grpname>.tmp file, which indicates that
the pre-processing commands had been run. If so, it exits with status 0 to let savepnpc resume its normal
save task. Otherwise, it locks the /nsr/res/<grpname>.res.lck file, invokes all the pre-processing commands
specified in the /nsr/res/<grpname>.res file, then creates /nsr/tmp/<grpname>.tmp file, spawns the pstclntsave process, and exits with status 0.
Note: This is to be invoked by savepnpc program only. It is not meant for users to use.
OPTIONS
−s server
Specifies the controlling server.
−c client
The name of the client where the pre-processing commands will be performed on.
−g group
Specifies the group name that is being run.
−D debuglevel
For debugging purpose, the debug level could be 1, 2 or 3.
SEE ALSO
savepnpc(1m), pstclntsave(1m), save(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
PSTCLNTSAVE(1m)
PSTCLNTSAVE(1m)
NAME
pstclntsave − Child process of preclntsave to run post-processing commands for Networker savepnpc.
SYNOPSIS
pstclntsave −s server −c client −g group [−p pollinterval] [−t timeout] [−D debuglevel]
DESCRIPTION
The pstclntsave process checks the WORKLIST attribute of the CLIENT resource from the server every
number of seconds specified in the poll interval. Whenever the time_out condition or the WORKLIST is
NIL (whichever comes first) pstclntsave performs all the post-processing commands specified in
/nsr/res/<grpname>.res file, unlinks /nsr/tmp/<grpname>.tmp and /nsr/res/<grpname>.lck, then records the
results (success or failure) in /nsr/log/savepnpc.log file.
Note: This is to be invoked by preclntsave program only. It is not meant for users to use.
OPTIONS
−s server
Specifies the controlling server.
−c client
The name of the client where the pre-processing commands will be performed on.
−g group
Specifies the group name that is being run.
−p pollinterval
Specifies how often (in seconds) to poll the server.
−t timeout
The timeout condition in nsr_getdate() format string to start the post-processing commands. This
can also be specified in the /nsr/res/<grpname>.res file.
−D debuglevel
For debugging purpose, the debug level could be 1, 2 or 3.
SEE ALSO
preclntsave(1m), savepnpc(1m), save(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
RECGEMS(1m)
RECGEMS(1m)
NAME
recgems − recover a GEMStation, migrate to a new version of GEMS
SYNOPSIS
recgems [ −nispmglNh ] [ −E directory ] [ −L directory ]
DESCRIPTION
recgems recovers the information in a GEMStation previously backed-up with savegems(1m). recgems
will restore a GEMStation by bringing down the GEMS server software, then importing the configuration
data for each GEMS subsystem. Once all imports have completed, the GEMStation is brought up.
OPTIONS
−n
Do not restart the GEMStation after recovery.
−i
Do not initialize the RCSM database. The default is to initialize the RCSM database.
−s
Do not initialize the JMAPI database. The default is to initialize the JMAPI database.
−p
Do not import the policy engine database. The default is to import the policy engine
database.
−m
Do not import the managed object database. The default is to import the managed object
database.
−g
Do not import the GEMS software manager database. The default is to import the software manager database.
−l
Do not import the GEMS license manager database. The default is to import the license
manager database.
−N
Do not remove the recovered directory when done. The recovered directory is where
recgems expects files to be located. The default location for this directory is listed in the
FILES section below. The −E option used for upgrading from a previous version of
GEMS changes where the files are located. The default behavior is to remove the recovered directory.
−h
Prints the usage for recgems, then exits.
−E directory
Specify the directory where import files will be read. See the −N option. Using this
option implies that recgems is being used to upgrade a GEMStation from a previous version of GEMS.
−L directory
Enables log files and places them in the specified directory. See the FILES section
below.
FILES
recgems.out.log
The standard output of the import processes. This file contains information useful for tracking the
progress of a recovery. This file is only created when recgems is executed with the −L option.
recgems.err.log
The error output of the import processes. This file contains information useful for determining the
cause of a failed recovery. This file is only created when recgems is executed with the −L option.
/gems/tmp/backup
The directory where import data files are read. This directory is usually recovered from a NetWorker save set prior to recovering a GEMStation with recgems. If recgems is executed with the
−E option, then recgems will reference the directory specified instead of this directory.
SEE ALSO
newgems(1m), nwrecover(1m), recover(1m), savegems(1m)
1.3.Build.149a
May 04, 2001
1
RECGEMS(1m)
RECGEMS(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
Exit Codes
0
<>0
Normal exit. This means that the recover executed normally.
Abnormal exit. This means that recgems was not executed with the correct arguments, or that one
of the GEMS subsystems responsible for importing could not be found.
Log Messages
Several messages may be present in the log files listed above.
NOTES
The log files generated (see FILES above) should be checked to insure that the recovery process was successfully completed by each subsystem responsible for importing data into the GEMStation.
1.3.Build.149a
May 04, 2001
2
RECOVER(1m)
RECOVER(1m)
NAME
recover − browse and recover NetWorker files
SYNOPSIS
recover [-f] [-n] [-q] [-u] [-i {nNyYrR}] [-d destination] [-c client] [-t date] [ -s server] [ dir]
recover [-f] [-n] [-u] [-q] [-i {nNyYrR}] [-I input file] [-d destination] [-c client] [-t date] [ -s server] -a
path. . .
recover [-f] [-n] [-u] [-q] [-i {nNyYrR}] [-d destination] -s server -S ssid[/cloneid] [-S ssid[/cloneid]]. . . [
path]. . .
recover [-f] [-n] [-q] [-i {NYR}] -R recover-target -c client [-d destination] [-t date] [ -s server] [ dir ]
recover [-f] [-n] [-q] [-i {nNyYrR}] [-t date] [-s server] [-N system save set]
DESCRIPTION
recover browses the saved file index and recovers selected files from the NetWorker system. The file index
is created when files are saved with save(1m). When in interactive mode (the default), the user is presented
with a view of the index similar to a UNIX filesystem, and may move through the index to select and
recover files or entire directories. In automatic mode (−a option), the files specified on the command line
are recovered immediately without browsing. While in save set recover mode (−S option), the save set(s)
specified are retrieved directly without browsing the NetWorker file index. Use of save set recover mode is
restricted to root.
When using recover without the −S option, users who are root may recover any file. The remaining permission checking rules described in the paragraph apply to users who are not root. For files that don’t have an
Access Control List (ACL), the normal Unix mode bits must allow you to read the file in order to recover it.
Files with an ACL can only be recovered by their owner or by root.
OPTIONS
−a
Specifies automatic file recovery with no interactive browsing. Path specifies one or more files or
directories to be recovered. Symbolic links are not followed, though the link file itself will be
recovered. Mount points are also not followed unless the most recent save(1m) was performed
with the ’-x’ option.
−S ssid[/cloneid]
Specifies save set recover mode and can only be used by root. This mode can be used to implement fast batch file recovery without requiring the NetWorker file index entries. ssid specifies the
save set id’s for the save set(s) to be recovered. When there are multiple clone instances for a save
set, the cloneid can also be specified to select the particular clone instance to be recovered from.
When no path arguments are specified, the entire save set contents will be recovered. One more or
more path’s can be specified to limit which directories and files are actually recovered. If path’s
are supplied, then the beginning of each path name as it exists in the save set must exactly match
one of the path’s before it will be recovered. Shell like file name matching using meta characters
like ‘*’, ‘?’, and ‘[...]’ is not done. You can use a path that ends in with a slash (‘/’) to force a
directory only match (e.g., use a path of /etc/fs/ instead of /etc/fs to prevent files like /etc/fsck
from being recovered as well).
−d destination
Specifies the destination directory to relocate recovered files. Using this option is equivalent to
using the relocate command when in interactive mode (see usage). Relative paths are interpreted
relative to the current working directory.
−s server
Selects which NetWorker server to use.
−c client
Client is the name of the machine that saved the files. When browsing a directory that was saved
by another client, the pathnames will reflect the file tree of the client that saved the files. By
default save and recover determine the client name from the filesystem table. This option might
be necessary if the −L option was used on the save command. This option cannot be used in conjunction with the −S ssid option (save set recover mode).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
RECOVER(1m)
RECOVER(1m)
−t date Display/recover files as of the specified date (in nsr_getdate(3) format). Using this option is
equivalent to using the changetime command with the given date when in interactive mode (see
usage). This option cannot be used in conjunction with the −S ssid option (save set recover mode).
−q
Turns off the verbose output. The recover command normally runs with verbose output.
−f
Forces recovered files to overwrite any existing files whenever a name conflict occurs. This is the
same as specifying −iY.
−n
Does not write or create any files or directories when recovering.
−i {nNyYrR}
Specifies the initial default overwrite response to use when recovering existing files. Only one letter may be specified. This option is the same as the uasm −i option when running in recover
mode. See the uasm(1m) man page for a detailed explanation of this option. For directed recovers (see the -R option), only ’N’, ’Y’, and ’R’ are valid values.
−I input file
Takes the paths to recover from the command line, and read paths to recover from the named file.
The paths must be listed one per line. If no paths are specified on the command line, then only
those paths specified in the file will be recovered. To be used in conjunction with -a option.
−R recover-target
Specifies the name of the remote machine to direct the recovery. This is used in conjunction with
the -c option to specify browsing of another client’s index. When the -R option is used, either the
-f or the -i option must also be specified in order to instruct the recover target what to do when it is
recovering existing files. Note that the values ’N’, ’Y’, and ’R’ are the only valid ones to use with
the -i option for directed recovers. Note also that the -a option is not supported with the -R option.
−N system save set
Used to recover the following system save sets: SYSTEM DB, SYSTEM FILES, or SYSTEM
STATE. (Windows Only)
−u
Stops when an error occurs during recovery. Normally, recover treats errors as warnings and tries
to continue to recover the rest of the files requested. However, when this option is used, recover
will stop recovering on the first error it encounters. This option is not valid for directed recovers.
USAGE
When using recover in the interactive mode, an image of the filesystem at a particular time is presented.
Using commands similar to the shell, you can change the view and traverse the filesystem. Files may be
selected for recovering, and the actual recover command issued.
The following commands manipulate the view of the filesystem and build the list of files to recover. In all
of the commands that take a name argument pattern matching characters can be used. The pattern matching
characters and regular expression format are the same as for the UNIX shell sh(1).
ls [ options ] [ name ... ]
List information about the given files and directories. When no name arguments are given, ls lists
the contents of the current directory. When a name is given and name is a directory, its contents
are displayed. If name is a file, then just that file is displayed. The current directory is represented
by a ‘.’ (period). The options to this command correspond to those of the UNIX command, ls(1).
An additional recover specific −S option can be used to select the save time instead of the last
modified time for sorting (with the −t option) and/or printing (with the −l option). Files that have
been added to the recover list are preceded by a ‘+’. Files that have an ACL have a trailing ’+’
(e.g. -rw-r--r--+) after the mode bits when viewing file details.
lf [ name ... ]
is the same as ls −F. Directories are marked with a trailing ‘/’, symbolic links with a trailing ‘@’,
sockets with a trailing ‘=’, FIFO special files with a trailing ‘|’, and executable files with a trailing
‘*’.
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RECOVER(1m)
ll [ name ... ]
is the same as ls −lgsF. Generates a long format listing of files and directories. This command
can be used to find the value of a symbolic link.
cd [ directory ]
Change the current working directory to [ directory ]. The default directory is the directory
recover was executed in. If directory is a simple symbolic link, cd will follow the symbolic link.
However, if directory is a path containing symbolic links anywhere but at the end of the path, the
cd command will fail; you should cd a component of the path at a time instead.
pwd
Print the full pathname of the current working directory.
add [ name ... ]
Add the current directory, or the named file(s) or directory(s) to the recover list. If a directory is
specified, it and all of its descendent files are added to the recover list. Symbolic links are not followed, though the link file itself will be recovered. Mount points are also not followed unless the
most recent save(1m) was performed with the ’-x’ option.
delete [ name ... ]
Delete the current directory, or the named file(s) or directory(s) from the recover list. If a directory
is specified, that directory and all its descendents are deleted from the list. The most expedient
way to recover a majority of files from a directory is to add the directory to the recover list, and
then delete the unwanted files.
list [ −l ] | [ −c ]
Display the files on the recover list. With no arguments the recover list is displayed as a list of full
path names, one per line, followed but a total count of the files to be recovered. The -c argument
prints just the total count of files to be recovered. The -l argument prints the files in the same format as the ll command with the −dS options.
volumes
Prints a list of the volumes needed to recover the current set of files on the recover list.
recover
Recover all of the files on the recover list from the NetWorker server. Upon completion the
recover list is empty.
verbose
Toggle the status of the ‘‘verbose’’ option. When verbose mode is on, recover displays information about each file as it is recovered. When verbose mode is off, recover only prints information
when a problem occurs. The default is verbose mode on.
force
If name conflicts exist, overwrite any existing files with recovered files.
noforce
Cancel the force option. When in ‘noforce’ mode, a prompt is issued each time a naming conflict
arises between a file being recovered and an existing file. At each prompt, six choices are presented: ‘y’, ‘Y’, ‘n’, ‘N’, ‘r’ and ‘R’. To overwrite the existing file, select ‘y’. To rename the file
to an automatically generated alternative name, select ‘r’. Selecting ‘n’ causes the recovered file
to be discarded. The capital letters invoke the same action for all subsequent conflicts without further prompting. Hence, selecting ‘Y’ will cause all existing conflicting files to be overwritten, ‘N’
will cause all conflicting recovered files to be discarded, and ‘R’ will automatically rename all
conflicting recovered files (except when an external ASM has a conflicting file name that already
ends in the rename suffix).
relocate [ directory ]
Change the target recover location to directory. If directory is not specified then the user will be
prompted for a destination directory. Relative paths are interpreted relative to the current working
directory within the recover program. The recovered files will be placed into this directory, which
will be created if necessary. When files from multiple directories are being recovered, they will be
placed below this directory with a path relative to the first common parent of all the files to be
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recovered. For example, if /usr/include/sys/errno.h and /usr/include/stdio.h are being recovered,
and the relocation directory is set to /tmp, then the first common parent of these two files is
include, so the recovered files will be named /tmp/sys/errno.h, and /tmp/stdio.h.
destination
Print destination location for recovered file.
exit
Immediately exit from recover.
help
Display a summary of the available commands.
?
Same as help.
quit
Immediately exit from recover. Files on the recover list are not recovered.
changetime [ time ]
Display the filesystem as it existed at a different time. If no time is specified the ‘current’ time is
displayed, and a prompt is issued for a ‘new’ time. The new time is given in nsr_getdate(3) format. This format is very flexible. It accepts absolute dates, such as March 17, 1997, and relative
dates, such as last Tuesday. Absolute dates can be given in two formats: MM/DD[/YY], and
Month DD[, YYYY]. Times can also be specified as either absolute or relative, with absolute times
in the format: HH[[:MM][:SS]] [am|pm] [time zone]. For example, 12:30 am, 14:21, and 10 pm
PST. The current time is used to calculate unspecified parts of a relative date (e.g. 2 days ago
means 2 days ago at the current time), and the end of the day is assumed for unspecified times on
an absolute date (e.g. July 2 means July 2 at 11:59:59 PM). By default, the present is used as the
current time. The resolution of the filesystem image at a time in the past depends on how often
save was run and how far back the NetWorker file index information goes.
versions [ name ]
All instances of the current directory, if name is not specified, or the named file or directory, found
in the NetWorker file index are listed. For each instance, three lines of data are displayed. The
first line is similar to the ll output. The second line lists the instance’s save time. The third line
specifies which tape(s) this instance may be recovered from. With appropriate use of the changetime command, any one of the entries may be added to the recover list. As with ls, lf, and ll, files
that have been added to the recover list are preceded by a ‘+’.
SEE ALSO
ls(1), nsr_getdate(3), nsr_service(5), nsr(1m), nsrd(1m), nsrindexd(1m), nwrecover(1m), save(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
Recover complains about bad option characters by printing a ‘‘usage’’ message describing the available
options.
Message from server: other clones exist for failed save set
The request failed on a save set that had multiple clones. The server automatically picks a different clone on each attempt. Recover automatically re-submits its recover request to the server, if
any files remain to be recovered.
Path name is within machine:export-point
An informative message that lets you know that the given path name is mounted from a network
file server and that the recovery will use the index for the named file server. If the machine is not a
NetWorker client, then the −c option may be necessary.
Browsing machine’s on-line file index
An informative message that explicitly states which NetWorker client’s index is being browsed for
interactive recovers that resolve to another machine.
Using server as server for client
An informative message that lets you know which NetWorker server was selected for client’s
index.
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RECOVER(1m)
RECOVER(1m)
Cannot open recover session with server
This message indicates that some problem was encountered connecting to the NetWorker server on
the named machine.
error, name is not on client list
This message indicates that the client invoking the recover command is not in the server’s client
list. See nsr_service(5) for details.
path: Permission denied
The file name cannot be recovered because you are not root, and you don’t have read permission
for the file.
path: Permission denied (has acl)
The file name cannot be recovered because you are not root, the file has an ACL (Access Control
List), and you are not the owner of the file.
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REGCNSRD(8)
REGCNSRD(8)
NAME
regcnsrd <option> − used to create or delete a NetWorker server resource, or register and unregister a
resource extension.
SYNOPSIS
regcnsrd [ options ]
options:
[ −c | −C ] [ −d | −D ] [ −r | −R ] [ −u | −U ]
DESCRIPTION
The regcnsrd command must be run in an MS Windows NT MSCS cluster environment.
This command is used for the following:
1.)
To create and register the resource-type "NetWorker Server" in a cluster where this resource-type
does not exist.
Usage Tips:
a)
Use the option −c or −C to create and register the resource-type NetWorker Server.
b)
You need to use the command regcnsrd only once (from any ONE node) in the cluster
to create the resource-type NetWorker Server (assuming the resource-type NetWorker
Server does not already exist in the cluster).
Once this resource-type is created, you can run the command with −r option from all other
nodes in the cluster to register (See below for details on −r option).
c)
Using the option −c will fail if the resource-type NetWorker Server already exists in the
cluster.
d)
Use the −C option when you want to create the resource-type NetWorker Server, so that the
resource of this type can be managed by MSCS cluster.
IMPORTANT: You must ensure that there is only one resource of the resource-type NetWorker Server created.
2.)
Register the resource-type NetWorker Server in any node(s) in the cluster where the resource-type
NetWorker Server was already created (using the −c option as explained above). Registering the
resource-type NetWorker Server in a node allows the resource of this resource-type (NetWorker
Server) to be managed using Cluster Administrator in this particular node.
Usage tips:
a)
Use the option −r or −R to register the resource-type NetWorker Server.
b)
It is better to run this command with the −r option in all nodes except in the node that was
used to create the resource-type NetWorker Server (using −c option). So that, the resource of
resource-type can be managed from all nodes in the cluster.
It is not needed to run the command with the -r option in the node that was used to create the
resource-type NetWorker Server because the −c option does both the creating and registering of this resource.
1
REGCNSRD(8)
c)
REGCNSRD(8)
When you use the −r option, the following output might be displayed. Select the appropriate
option and continue:
Is this machine a member of the cluster on which you want to register Resource Extension
for NetWorker Server resource?
Enter ’y’ if the command was run from any node in the cluster where the resource-type NetWorker Server exists.
Enter ’n’ if the NT machine on which this command was run is not part of the cluster (where
the resource-type NetWorker Server exists).
Choosing the second option (’n’) allows you to manage the resource-type NetWorker Server
in a remote cluster. To use this second option, the NT host must already have the cluster
software, or cluster administrator software installed.
d)
3.)
Use −r to manage the NetWorker Server resource from a node other than the node used to
create the resource-type NetWorker (with the −c option).
Unregister the resource-type NetWorker Server in any nodes in the cluster where the resource-type
NetWorker Server exists. Once unregistered, the resource-type NetWorker Server cannot be managed or might not function properly in the node where the command was run.
Usage tips:
a)
Use the option −u or −U to unregister.
b)
Do not unregsiter the resource-type NetWorker Server from a node if this is the only node
from which the resource-type NetWorker Server can be managed. That is, the resource-type
has already been unregistered from all other nodes in the cluster (or, not registered at all in
them).
Once you finished running the command with this option ( −u ) in all nodes except the last
one, you can run the command with the option −d in the last node to unregister (from the last
node) and delete the resource-type NetWorker Server (from cluster). Further information on
the −d option appears later in this document.
c)
When you use the −u option, the following output might be displayed. Choose the appropriate option and continue:
Is this machine a member of the cluster on which you want to unregister Resource Extension for NetWorker Server resource?
Enter ’y’ if the command was run from any node in the cluster where the resource-type NetWorker Server exists.
Enter ’n’ if the NT machine on which the command was run is not part of the cluster (where
the resource-type NetWorker Server exists).
With the second option (’n’), you give up the ability to manage the resource-type NetWorker
Server installed on a remote cluster.
To use this second option, the NT host must have either the cluster software, or the cluster
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administrator software installed.
4.)
Delete the resource-type NetWorker Server from the cluster so that it is no longer
managed as a cluster resource in the cluster.
Usage tips:
a)
Use the option −d to unregister the resource-type NetWorker Server from a node, and
delete this resource-type from the cluster.
b)
Before you run this command, do the following if a resource-type NetWorker
Server exists in the cluster:
- Bring the the resource of resource-type NetWorker Server offline.
- Delete this resource
You may use the Cluster Administrator to do both of the above steps.
Refer to the NetWorker Administrator’s Guide for information explaining how to
bring NetWorker server off-line and then delete it. You may also refer to the HELP
that comes with Cluster Administrator.
c)
Before running this command from the last node, make sure the resource-type NetWorker Server has been already unregistered (using −r option) from all other nodes in
the cluster. You can designate any node as the last node in the cluster to run the command with −d option.
IMPORTANT NOTE BEFORE YOU UNINSTALL:
Do the following before uninstalling NetWorker Server software from the MSCS cluster if NetWorker Server is configured to run as cluster managed resource with failover capability:
1)
Bring the resource of resource-type NetWorker Server offline.
2)
Delete the resource of resource-type NetWorker.
3)
Unregister the resource-type NetWorker Server from all nodes except one node (designate as last node and it can be any node). Use the command regcnsrd -u to unresgister. See above for the details.
4)
Unregister the resource-type (NetWorker Server) from the last node, and delete the
resource-type from the cluster. Use the command regcnsrd -d to unresgister, and
delete. See above for the details.
OPTIONS
−c |
−C To Create NetWorker Server resource and Register Resource Extension.
−d |
−D To Delete NetWorker Server resource and Un-register Resource Extension.
−r |
−R To Register Resource Extension.
−u |
−U To Unregister Resource Extension.
3
RELEM(1m)
RELEM(1m)
NAME
relem − read element status
SYNOPSIS
relem [ -a b.t.l ] [ -fvtb ] [ -m {0|1|2} ] [ -r eladdr.nel ] [ -l ]
DESCRIPTION
The relem program will send a READ ELEMENT STATUS command to all changers, or to the (optionally,
with the -a option) named device.
SIMPLE OPTIONS
−a b.t.l Selects a specific ordinal SCSI address, where b is the logical SCSI bus, t is the SCSI target, and l
is the SCSI logical unit number (LUN) on that target. See libscsi(1m).
−f
generates full output (somewhat verbose).
−v
generates very verbose output.
−t
causes volume tags, if present, to be printed.
−b
causes the returned element status data to be dumped as hexadecimal codes rather than interpreted.
−l
Performs a complete LUN search for all SCSI adapters in the system when performing Autodetection. This argument is accepted on all systems, but does not have any effect on HP-UX systems.
Due to the method used to scan for available devices on HP-UX systems, all accessible devices are
always shown, and the −l option has no additional effect. On all other systems, the normal behavior is to start checking at LUN 0 for SCSI deivces. The first empty LUN found will end the search
for a given target ID. With the −l option, all LUNS present on all target IDs for all SCSI busses in
the system will be checked for jukeboxes. This can take a very long time and should therefore
only be used when necessary. For example, a Fibre Channel adapter can support 126 target IDs,
each of which may have 80 or more LUNs. Checking all LUNs on this single adapter may take
over 10 minutes.
METHOD OPTIONS
-m 0
all element status data is fetched in one call
-m 1
element status data is fetched per element type (e.g., all drive elements are read at once, then all
slot elements, etc.)
-m 2
element data is fetched per element (which is the default method)
One trivial reason to specify these different ways of fetching element data is that the SCSI specification
allows each one of these ways. A more important real reason is that some changers have bugs with respect
to one way or another. For example, one changer may be accurate in reporting all elements in a class, but
return all zeros if asked for all elements at once.
RANGE OPTIONS
−r
eladdr.nel is used to read a range of addresses, where eladdr is the starting decimal address (in the
particular changer’s numbering scheme) of the element to start from, and nel is the number of elements of status to read. Use changers to get the particular addresses used by your changer.
SEE ALSO
libscsi (1m)
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RESOURCE(5)
RESOURCE(5)
NAME
resource descriptors − RAP resource file format
SYNOPSIS
resource ::= attribute list <blank line>
attribute list ::= attribute [ ; attribute ]*
attribute ::= name [ : value [ , value ]* ]
name, value ::= <printable string>
DESCRIPTION
Files with the .res suffix use a common format to describe resources. Generally, a resource represents
something that a system administrator might want to manage (for example, devices, backup schedules, file
systems), or that a user might want to locate. The encoding of the information describing a resource is
called the resource descriptor. Resource description files are are accessed by applications and services that
use the Resource Administration Platform (RAP), but they can also be viewed with a normal text editor.
Each resource descriptor is made up of a list of attributes, and ends in a blank line. Each attribute in the
attribute list has a name and an optional list of values. The attribute name is separated from the attribute
values by a colon (:), attribute values are separated by commas (,), and attributes are separated by semicolons (;). A comma at the end of a line continues the line, as does a back-slash (\) character. The backslash character can also be used to escape the special meaning of a single character (such as comma, semicolon, double quote, and back-slash), or the string can be included in quotes. A line beginning with a
pound-sign (#) is a comment and the rest of the line is ignored. The end of a resource attribute list is
marked with a blank line.
The attribute name and values can contain any printable character. Upper and lower case is ignored on
comparisons, and extra white space is ignored on both ends but not in the middle of names and values. For
example,
Name: testing 1 2;
will match
name : Testing 1 2 ;
but is different than
Name: testing 1 2;
Below is an example which includes two resources. The first resource has eight attributes: type, name,
server, schedule, directive, group, save set, and remote access. The group attribute has two values: marketing and sales. The remote access attribute has no value. The second example includes an attribute that
needs quotes because it contains a colon.
type: NSR client;
name: venus;
server: mars;
schedule: Default;
directive: custom;
group: marketing, sales;
save set: /, /usr;
remote access: ;
type: NSR group;
name: engineering servers;
autostart: Enabled;
start time: "3:33";
Each resource includes the special attribute type. The type attribute defines which other attributes a
resource can contain. For example, a resource with type printer might include an attribute paper size, while
in a resource of type NFS filesystem this attribute makes no sense.
The name attribute is a descriptive name of the object that a resource represents. In the example above, the
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name of the second resource is engineering servers, which describes a group of machines to be saved
together.
The administrator attribute is the list of users that have permission to modify this resource. This attribute
is inherited from the server resource when a new resource is created. The administrator in the server
resource also controls who has permission to create new resources and delete old ones.
The resource identifier is set and used internally by the RAP system. It provides a unique identification of
each resource, and although it is sometimes printed like an attribute, it is stored differently. When new
resources are created the resource identifier attribute should be left off. This signals the system that this is
a new resource and a new identifier will be assigned.
TYPES
There are special resources that define the attributes found in a given type. They are called resource type
descriptors. Type descriptors have the same syntax as other resources except that they have a type attribute
with the value type and a type name attribute with the value of the type they describe. For example, the
resource type descriptor for type NFS filesystem would have, among its other attributes:
type:type; type name:NFS filesystem
Type descriptors are used internally, and should normally never be stored in files or seen by administrators.
For each of the other attributes in a type descriptor, there are three or more values. The first value gives the
base type, the second value gives a list of flags separated by spaces, the third value is a string for on-line
help, and any subsequent strings are default values. This type information is used by system administration
tools to improve the user interface.
FILES
*.res
Files that contain resource descriptors.
SEE ALSO
rap(1m).
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SAVE(1m)
SAVE(1m)
NAME
save − save files to long term storage with NetWorker
savepnpc − save files to long term storage with NetWorker and performs pre and post processing commands
on a NetWorker client.
SYNOPSIS
save [ −BEiKLnquSVvx ] [ −s server ] [ −c client-name ] [ −N name ] [ −e expiration ] [ −f dirfile ] [ −b
pool ] [ −F file ] [ −I input_file ] [ −g group ] [ −l level ] [ −t date ] [ −m masquerade ] [ −w browse_time ] [
−y retention_time ] [ −W width ] [ path . . . ]
savepnpc [ −BEiKLnquSVvx ] [ −s server ] [ −c client-name ] [ −N name ] [ −e expiration ] [ −f dirfile ] [
−b pool ] [ −F file ] [ −I input_file ] [ −g group ] [ −l level ] [ −t date ] [ −m masquerade ] [ −W width ] [
−w browse_time ] [ −y retention_time ] [ path . . . ]
DESCRIPTION
save saves files, including directories or entire filesystems, to the NetWorker server (see nsr(1m)). The
progress of a save can be monitored using the X Window System based nwadmin(1m) program or the
curses(3X) based nsrwatch(1m) program for other terminal types.
The user of this command may retain root privileges if the command’s modes are properly set as described
in nsr(1m).
If no path arguments are specified on the command line or via the −I option, the current directory will be
saved. save will save a directory by saving all the files and subdirectories it contains, but it will not cross
mount points, or follow symbolic links. If the paths to be saved are mounted from a network file server,
save instructs the user to run the save on the remote machine or use the -L option.
The directive files (see nsr(5)) encountered in each directory are read by default, and they contain special
instructions directing how particular files are to be saved (i.e. compressed, skipped, etc.). These files are
named ’.nsr’.
Each file in the subdirectory structures specified by the path arguments is encapsulated in a NetWorker save
stream. This stream of data is sent to a receiving process (see nsrd(1m)) on the NetWorker server, which
processes the data, adding entries to the on-line index (see nsrindexd(1m)) for each file in the stream, with
the data finally ending up on a long term storage media (see nsrmmd(1m)).
Details about handling media are discussed in nsrmm(1m) and nsr_device(5).
savepnpc consists of the same command options as save and behaves just like save. In addition, prior to
the actual save on a Networker client, savepnpc performs pre-processing commands if any exists in the
/nsr/res/<grpname>.res file, and at the end of the save of the last save set on the client, the post-processing
commands (if any) will be invoked. In the condition of failure to run the pre-processing commands, savepnpc aborts itself. All results are logged in /nsr/logs/savepnpc.log file on the client. A timeout condition can
be set by the user to indicate at which point in time the post-processing commands need to be run without
waiting for all the save sets to be backed up. This timeout attribute resides in the /nsr/res/<grpname>.res
file. The timeout should be specified in such a format that nsr_getdate() can understand (see
nsr_getdate(3)).
An example of /nsr/res/<grpname>.res can be described as:
type: savepnpc;
precmd: /bin/true;
pstcmd: /bin/true, "/bin/sleep 5";
timeout: "12:00pm";
The precmd field can be manually modified to contain any number of commands that are needed to be run
at the beginning of the save of the 1st save set. The pstcmd is to hold any commands that are needed to be
run at the end of the save of the last save set. The post-processing commands are run after the save of the
last save set or the timeout condition, whichever comes first.
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SAVE(1m)
SAVE(1m)
OPTIONS
−b pool
Specifies a particular destination pool for the save.
−c client-name
Specifies the client name for starting the save session. This is useful on clients with multiple network interfaces, and multiple host names. It can be used to create multiple index databases for the
same physical client. This does not specify the network interface to use. This is specified in the
server network interface attribute of the client resource (see nsr_client(5)). This option can also
be used on a cluster when performing manual saves, or in specifying a non-default backup command for scheduled saves. This option directs NetWorker to override the cluster path-ownership
rules, saving the path argument(s) as belonging to client-name and making index entries in the
index for client-name instead of using the name of the physical host or virtual host which owns the
path, according to the cluster management software. Refer to pathownerignore(5) for more information about path-ownership rules.
−e expiration
Set the date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) when the saved data will expire. When a save set has an
explicit expiration date, the save set remains both browsable and non-recyclable until it expires.
After it expires and it has passed its browse time, its state will become non-browsable. If it has
expired and it has passed its retention time, the save set will become recyclable. The special value
forever is used to indicate that a volume that never expires (i.e. an archive or a migration volume)
must be used. By default, no explicit expiration date is used.
−f dirfile
The file from which to read prototype default directives (see nsr(5)). A dirfile of - causes the
default directives to be read from standard input.
−g group
This option is used by savegrp(1m) and savefs(1m) to denote the group of the save (see
nsr_client(5) and nsr_group(5)) and is used by the NetWorker server to select the specific media
pool.
−i
Ignores any .nsr directive files as they are encountered in the subdirectory structures being saved.
−l level The level of the save. This option is used by savegrp(1m) and savefs(1m) to specify a particular
level for a scheduled save.
−m masquerade
Specifies the tag to precede the summary line. This option is used by savegrp(1m) and
savefs(1m) to aid in savegrp summary notifications. savepnpc(1m) also uses this tag to identify
client operations on the savegrp’s work list that should complete before pstclntsave(1m) will trigger its post-processing.
−n
No save. Estimate the amount of data which will be generated by the save, but do not perform the
actual save.
−q
Quiet. Displays only summary information and error messages.
−s server
Specifies which machine to use as the NetWorker server.
−t date The date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) by which files must have been modified for them to be saved.
This option is used by savegrp(1m) and savefs(1m) to perform scheduled saves by consulting with
the media database to determine the appropriate time value based on the previous saves for the
save set and the level of the scheduled save.
−u
NetWorker 6.1.1
Stop the save if an error occurs. The save program normally treats errors as warnings and continues to save the rest of the files in the backup. When this option is set, errors will cause save to exit
and abort the save. This option is not recommended for general use, although it can be useful
when a group of files needs to be backed up as a set.
October 15, 2001
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SAVE(1m)
−v
SAVE(1m)
Verbose. Causes the save program to provide great detail about the save as it proceeds.
−y retention
Sets the date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) when the saved data will become recyclable. The special
value forever is used to indicate that a volume that never expires (i.e. an archive or a migration
volume) must be used. By default, the server determines this date for the save set based on the
retention policies in effect. This option allows overriding the existing policies on a save by save
basis.
−w browse_time
Sets the date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) after which this save set will no longer be browsable. By
default, the server determines the browse date for the save set based on the browse policies in
effect. This option allows overriding the existing policies on a save by save basis.
−x
Cross mount points.
−B
Force save of all connecting directory information from root (‘‘/’’) down to the point of invocation.
−E
Estimate the amount of data which will be generated by the save, then perform the actual save.
Note that the estimate is generated from the inode information; thus, the data is only read once.
−F file Only save files whose change time is newer than the file modification date of file.
−I input_file
In addition to taking the paths to save from the command line, read paths to save from the named
file. The paths must be listed one per line. If no paths are specified on the command line, then
only those paths specified in the file will be saved.
−K
Does not build connecting directory index entries.
−L
Local. Saves will be performed from the local NetWorker client, even when files are from a network file server. To recover these files, run recover(1m) with the −c client arguments, where
client is the name of the NetWorker client that did the save.
−LL
In additional to treating the backup as a local backup, causes an extra line to be printed at the end
of the completion output of the form ‘‘complete savetime=number’’, where number is the savetime
of the save set created by this backup. This option is meant to be used by the savegrp(1m) command in performing automatic cloning.
−N name
The symbolic name of this save set. By default, the most common prefix of the path arguments is
used as the save set name. If the -N option is used when saving any of the SYSTEM save sets
(SYSTEM STATE, SYSTEM FILES, and SYSTEM DB), the path must also be specified and must
match the name value assigned with the -N option.
−S
Allows only save set recovery. This performs the save without creating any index entries. This
means that the save set will not be browsable, although save set recovery may be used to recover
the data.
−V
Prevent the OFC mechanism from creating a point-in-time copy of the source volume. (Included
for compatibility with NT NetWorker servers.)
−W width
The width used when formatting summary information output.
SEE ALSO
curses(3X), nsr_getdate(3), nwadmin(1m), nsr(5), nsr(1m), nsr_client(5), nsr_device(5), nsr_group(5),
nsr_service(5), nsrd(1m), nsrim(1m), nsrindexd(1m), nsrmm(1m), nsrmmd(1m), nsrwatch(1m),
recover(1m), savefs(1m), savegrp(1m), pathownerignore(5).
DIAGNOSTICS
Exit Codes
0
NetWorker 6.1.1
Normal exit. This means that a save set was correctly created on the server. Messages about individual file backup failures are warnings, and do not cause abnormal exit.
October 15, 2001
3
SAVE(1m)
<>0
SAVE(1m)
Abnormal exit. A save set was not correctly created on the server.
Messages
host: saveset level=level, size time count files.
This message (with the appropriate client host name, saveset name, level, total save set size,
elapsed time, and file count) is printed whenever save is run by savegrp(1m) and exits normally.
host: filename: warning
Messages of this form are warnings about difficulties backing up individual files. Such messages
do not normally cause the save to fail, and therefore may appear in the save output found in the
‘‘Savegroup Completion’’ message’s Successful section.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
4
SAVEFS(1m)
SAVEFS(1m)
NAME
savefs − save filesystem to a NetWorker server
SYNOPSIS
savefs [ options ] filesystem
savefs −p [ options ] [ filesystem ... ] [ −M filesystem ... ]
options: [ −BEFnpqRv ] [ −s server ] [ −N name ] [ −g group ] [ −c client ] [ −l level | −C schedule ] [ −e
expiration ] [ −w browse ] [ −y retention ] [ −f filename ] [ −W width ] [ −t date ] [ −T seconds ]
DESCRIPTION
The savefs command saves a filesystem (using save(1m)) to a NetWorker server. Mount points are not
crossed, and symbolic links are not followed. NOTE: running savefs directly is not recommended; use
savegrp(1m) instead.
A level-based system (similar to dump(1m)) is used to save only those files which have been modified
since some previous save (a partial save).
The nsr_schedule(5) for the local NetWorker client is examined to determine the proper level of save for
the current date.
The set of files saved depends on when, and at what level, previous saves have been performed, in addition
to the effects of the default directives (see nsr_directive(5)), and the various directive files (see nsr(5))
which are encountered while processing the filesystem.
FILESYSTEM PROBES
The savefs command may also be used to probe a client for its filesystems and recent save times. When
probing, savefs does not save data, but instead produces a machine-parsable report describing the layout of
the client’s filesystems. When used with the −p probe option, the local NetWorker client’s nsr_client(5)
resources are examined, and the filesystems listed in the save set attribute are probed (if no filesystems are
listed on the command line). If the save set list consists of the keyword All, then the /etc/fstab file
(/etc/vfstab on Solaris, /etc/mnttab on SCO, and a kernel table on AIX) are examined to determine which
filesystems should be saved, making sure to save only local, mounted filesystems.
Note that metadevices within the Sun Solaris Online DiskSuite and Logical Volumes within the HP-UX
Logical Volume Manager are treated like independent disks. This approach allows each to be saved in its
own session, assuming sufficient parallelism.
Care should be taken when the NSR client resource explicitly lists the save sets, for two primary reasons.
First, this list must be manually updated when new filesystems are added which need saving. Second, since
savefs only stops at the end of a path or a mount point, if you list two save sets in the same filesystem, and
one is a subdirectory of the other, the subdirectory will be saved twice.
Filesystem arguments can be specified to limit the filesystem saves to only those specified, but the specified
filesystems must appear on some Save Set list for this client (see the −F option).
Probes are also useful when testing how NetWorker will behave in a clustered environment. In this setup
ownership of shared filesystems must be determined, and performing a probe with the verbose option set
allows one to examine the default ownership rules. Refer to pathownerignore(5) for a description of pathownership rules.
OPTIONS
−B
Force save of all connecting directory information from root (‘‘/’’) down to the point of invocation.
This option is used by savegrp(1m), for example, when saving the server’s bootstrap information.
−c client
The name of the client whose filesystem needs to be saved. This option is especially needed in a
cluster environment where a physical host can represent its own hostname as well as hostnames of
any virtual (also known as "logical") hosts that exist in this physical host. Without this option, the
hostname of the physical host is assumed by default. This option is required if a filesystem that
belongs to any of the virtual hosts needs to be saved.
NetWorker 6.1.1
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SAVEFS(1m)
SAVEFS(1m)
−C schedule
The name of the schedule (see nsr_schedule(5)) to use when automatically determining the save
level. If this option is not specified, savefs uses the schedule named by the NSR client resource
for the specified filesystem.
−e expiration
Set the date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) when the saved data will expire. When a save set has an
explicit expiration date, the save set remains both browsable and non-recyclable until it expires.
After it expires and it has passed its browse time, its state will become non-browsable. If it has
expired and it has passed its retention time, the save set will become recyclable. The special value
forever is used to indicate that a volume that never expires (i.e. an archive or a migration volume)
must be used. By default, no explicit expiration date is used.
−w browse
Sets the date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) after which this save set will no longer be browsable. By
default, the server determines the browse date for the save set based on the browse policies in
effect. This option allows overriding the existing policies on a save by save basis.
−y retention
Sets the date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) when the saved data will become recyclable. By default,
the server determines this date for the save set based on the retention policies in effect.
−E
Estimate. Before saving any data, browse the filesystem trees to be saved and accurately estimate
the amount of data that will be generated. Without this flag, the estimate size is zero. This flag
consumes an amount of time proportional to the number of files in each filesystem. This is
because the entire directory is browsed before any saving begins and browsed again when actually
saving the directory, but the file data is only read from the disk the last time. In many cases, the
overhead for using this flag is small and is well-justified.
−f filename
The file from which application specific modules (or ASMs) should take their directives (see
nsr(5)). By default, these are taken from the NSR directive resource named by the directive
attribute in the NSR client resource for each client (see nsr_directive(5)).
−F
Force. Save every argument like a filesystem, even if it is not listed in fstab(5) or nsr_client(5).
−M
As part of a probe, signifies that all subsequent filesystems should be probed for their ability to be
migrated. This option is quietly ignored on systems that do not support file migration.
−g group
Restrict the scope of the client to a particular group. If this option is not specified, save sets from
all instances of the NSR client resource for this client will be used, regardless of the group. This
value is also passed on to save(1m), which uses it to select a specific media pool.
−l level The level of save to perform. There are 12 levels: full, levels 1 though 9, incr, and skip. Full
specifies that all files are to be saved. It is analogous to a level 0 dump in dump(1m). Incr specifies incremental saves in which only those files that have been modified since the most recent save,
at any level, are saved. This level has no exact analogue in dump(1m) since the last save at any
level, including previous incremental saves, are considered when determining what to save. Skip
causes no files to be saved. The levels 1 though 9 cause all files to be saved which have been modified since any lower level save was performed. As an example, if you did a full save on Monday,
followed by a level 3 save on Tuesday, a subsequent level 3 save on Wednesday would contain all
files modified or added since the Monday full save. By default, the save level is determined automatically from the NetWorker client’s schedule (see nsr_schedule(5)). By using the history of
previous saves maintained by nsrmmd(1m) on the NetWorker server, the needed time for the
given level can correctly be computed. By using media information on the server, times computed
for saves that are based on previous save levels will automatically be adjusted as required when
tapes are deleted.
NetWorker 6.1.1
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SAVEFS(1m)
−n
SAVEFS(1m)
No save. Accurately estimates the amount of data that would be generated (as described for −E,
but doesn’t save any data.
−N name
The symbolic name this set of saves is to be known by. By default, the first filesystem argument is
used as the name.
−p
List the name of the filesystems, the level of save that would be performed, and the time since
which files must have been modified to be saved, but don’t actually do the save. This information
is gleaned from the /etc/fstab file (or another operating system specific file, as described above)
and the nsr_schedule(5).
−q
Quiet. Display only summary information and error messages.
−qq
Really quiet. Display only error messages.
−R
Cause savefs to report on its success or failure, by echoing a simple "succeeded" or "failed" message. This is used by savegrp(1m) when it is running savefs.
−s server
Specifies which machine to use as the NetWorker server. See nsr(1m) for the algorithm NetWorker uses to choose a server when none is specified.
−t date The date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) from which to base schedule level calculations. If not specified, the current time is used.
−T seconds
Specifies the ‘‘inactivity timeout’’ in seconds. If savefs detects that the (local) server has made no
progress in the specified time, then it concludes that the save command is hung. A message is
printed to stderr and savefs exits normally. This option should only be used on NetWorker server
machines.
−v
Verbose. Causes lots of debugging style output. This option is also used by savegrp(1m) when it
is probing for the capabilities of the client’s savefs, for supporting multiple versions.
−W width
The width used when formatting output or notification messages. By default, this is 80.
RESOURCE TYPES
NSR client
These resources specify the client’s save sets, default schedule, and directives to use when saving
them.
NSR directive
A resource of this type is named by the directive attribute in each NSR client resource. These are
the directives used for the save sets specified in the associated NSR client resource.
NSR schedule
A resource of this type is named by the schedule attribute in each NSR client resource. This is the
schedule used for the save sets specified in the associated NSR client resource.
FILES
/etc/fstab
If All is specified in the save set attribute for a NSR client resource, then the list of local filesystems is taken from this file.
/etc/vfstab
Solaris only. The same as /etc/fstab on other operating systems.
/etc/mnttab
SCO only. The same as /etc/fstab on other operating systems.
SEE ALSO
nsr_getdate(3), fstab(5), mnttab(F) (SCO only), vfstab(5) (Solaris only), nsr(5), nsr_service(5),
nsr_schedule(5), dump(1m), nsr(1m), nsrd(1m), nsrindexd(1m), nsrmmd(1m), recover(1m), save(1m),
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
3
SAVEFS(1m)
SAVEFS(1m)
savegrp(1m), pathownerignore(5).
DIAGNOSTICS
Exit Codes
0
255
NetWorker 6.1.1
Normal exit.
Abnormal exit.
October 15, 2001
4
SAVEGEMS(1m)
SAVEGEMS(1m)
NAME
savegems, newgems − backup a GEMStation with NetWorker, migrate to a new version of GEMS
SYNOPSIS
savegems <save options>
newgems [ −n ] −V version −E directory
DESCRIPTION
savegems saves the information in a GEMStation to a NetWorker server (see savegrp(1m)). This command
is intended to be specified as the backup command value for the client resource that is configured to
backup a GEMS server (see nsr_client(5)). savegems will backup a GEMStation by bringing down the
GEMS server software, exporting the configuration data for each GEMS subsystem, then backing-up the
exported data using the NetWorker save command. Once save has completed, the GEMStation is brought
up. A directory named backup will be created during the backup process (see FILES section below). This
directory will contain the files exported from GEMS. This directory should be explicitly listed as a value
for the save set attribute in the NSR client resource (see nsr_client(5)). After the save command completes
the backup, the backup directory is deleted.
Before the save process is started, savegems verifies the integrity of the exported files. If the exported files
appear to be intact, the save process executes, and the success of the save set is determined by the execution
of the save command. However, if the integrity of any exported file is in question, the savegems process
will not execute save, but will print a save set failed message. A failed backup will also terminate with an
abnormal exit code. The cause of a failed GEMStation backup can be determined by perusing the log files
listed below.
newgems creates the files necessary to migrate from an existing GEMS installation to a new GEMS
release. The directory argument is a directory where the files used in the migration process will be stored.
When newgems is executed, log files (see FILES below) will be stored in this directory as well, instead of
the location used by savegems.
To recover a successfully backed-up GEMS server, or complete the GEMS upgrade process, see
recgems(1m).
OPTIONS
savegems
Please see the save(1m) man page for a description of the options supported by savegems.
newgems
−n
Do not restart the GEMStation after the files have been exported.
−V version
version is the currently installed version of GEMS. This flag and value are irrelevant, but
are required for backward-compatibility.
−E directory
Specify the directory where export and log files will be written. The path specified must
be an existing directory.
FILES
/gems/logs/savegems.out.log
The standard output of the export processes. This file contains information useful for tracking the
progress of a backup. When executing newgems, this file will be directory/newgems.out.log.
/gems/logs/savegems.err.log
The error output of the export processes. This file contains information useful for determining the
cause of a failed backup. When executing newgems, this file will be directory/newgems.err.log.
/gems/tmp/backup
The directory where exported data files are stored. This directory should be specified as the sole
save set value for the client resource used to backup a GEMStation.
1.3.Build.149a
May 04, 2001
1
SAVEGEMS(1m)
SAVEGEMS(1m)
SEE ALSO
nsr_client(5), recgems(1m), recover(1m), save(1m), savefs(1m), savegrp(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
Exit Codes
0
<>0
Normal exit. This means that the backup executed normally, and a save set was correctly created
on the server.
Abnormal exit. This means that one or more files created during the backup process failed to be
backed-up, and/or a save set was not correctly created on the server.
Messages
host: /gems/tmp/backup level=level, size time count files.
This message (with the appropriate client host name, level, total save set size, elapsed time, and
file count) is printed whenever savegems is run by savegrp(1m) and exits normally.
host: /gems/tmp/backup: failed
Messages of this form indicate that the GEMStation backup failed. The log files listed above
should be perused to determine the cause of the failure.
Log Messages
Several messages may be present in the log files listed above. Diagnostics pertaining to integrity checks on
exported files begin with ‘Status:’, ‘Warning:’, or ‘Error:’. Status messages indicate successful verification
of a given file, while warning messages indicate a condition that can be safely ignored. Error messages indicate a condition that must be corrected to perform a successful backup.
NOTES
The savegrp(1m) command may retry a failed GEMStation backup depending on the value of the client
retries attribute in the NSR group resource (see nsr_group(5)). If the value of this attribute is greater than
zero, the process described in this document is invoked one more than the value of the client retries
attribute. Determining the cause of an initial failure may be difficult since the log files created are overwritten upon each savegems invocation.
1.3.Build.149a
May 04, 2001
2
SAVEGRP(1m)
SAVEGRP(1m)
NAME
savegrp − start a group of NetWorker clients saving their filesystems
SYNOPSIS
savegrp [ options ] [ −R | −G ] [ groupname ]
options:
[ −EIOFXmnpv ] [ −l level | −C schedule ] [ −N parallelism ] [ −e expiration ] [ −w browse ] [ −y
retention ] [ −t date ] [ −r retries ] [ −P printer ] [ −W width ] [ −c client [ −c client ... ] ]
DESCRIPTION
The savegrp command runs a group of NetWorker clients through the process of saving their filesystems
(using save(1m)). The group of clients is selected by naming a NetWorker group (see nsr_group(5)), from
which individual clients can be selected by using one or more −c options. If no group name is specified,
the NetWorker group Default is used. If a NetWorker group is named, clients whose nsr_client(5)
resources specify the named group in their group attribute will be saved. If an explicit client list is also
specified, savegrp will only back up those clients, with respect to the named group. The savegrp command
will automatically make a clone of the newly saved data when the appropriate attributes are set on the NSR
group resource (see below).
The savegrp command is normally run automatically by nsrd(1m), as specified by each group’s
nsr_group(5) resource.
The savegrp command will set up an RPC connection to nsrexecd(1m) to run save(1m) on each client (and
will fall back on using the rcmd(3) protocol and the client-side rshd(1m) if nsrexecd is unavailable on the
client) for each filesystem listed in the nsr_client(5) resource save set attribute. If a save set of All is specified for a client, savegrp will request from the client a list of filesystems to be saved (this is called the
probe operation). The probe expands All into a list by looking for filesystems that are both local and automatically mounted on that client machine (e.g. NFS mount points and filesystems mounted manually are
generally ignored). The exact determination of which filesystems to save varies between different operating
systems. See savefs(1m) for additional details on the probe operation. To see which filesystems a client
saves, run a savegrp preview, savegrp -c client -p (assuming the client is in the Default group). Each
filesystem saved is called a save set.
The savegrp command attempts to keep multiple clients busy by individually scheduling the client save
sets. As save sets complete, the output is collected and another save set will be started by savegrp.
The parallelism attribute in the nsr_service(5) resource is the maximum number of save sets to run simultaneously. Modifications to this parameter will take effect as save sets complete − if the value is reduced,
no new save set will be started until the number of active save sets running drops below the new value.
When all of the save sets are completed on a client, the client’s index on the NetWorker server are saved. If
the NetWorker server is one of the machines being saved, its index is saved after all the other clients are
completely done. When the server’s index is saved, the bootstrap save set information is printed to the
default printer (or another specified printer). If savegrp detects that the NetWorker server is not listed in
any active group (a group with its autostart attribute set), then the server’s bootstrap is saved with every
group.
The savegrp command detects other active invocations of the same group, and exits with an error message.
If two different NetWorker groups are running simultaneously, they each will run up to parallelism save
sessions simultaneously; however, the NetWorker server will only allow parallelism of these sessions to
write to the backup devices at a time. Note that running multiple savegrp commands simultaneously can
use up significant server resources, due to the number of pending saves.
The progress of the actively saving clients can be monitored using the X11 based nwadmin(1m) program
or the curses(3X) based nsrwatch(1m) program. The nsradmin(1m) browser may also be used to examine the completion status and work list of each NSR group resource, although the hidden attribute display
option must be selected (see nsradmin(1m)). These two attributes allow you to track the progress of each
savegrp. See nsr_group(5) for more details.
When savegrp starts, it sends an NSR notification (see nsr_notification(5)) with an event of savegrp and
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SAVEGRP(1m)
priority of info to the NSR notification system. This event is normally logged in the messages attribute of
the nsr_service(5) resource, and in the log file specified in the Log default NSR notification resource.
The save sets are automatically cloned, when all the save sets have finished, and the NSR group resource
has the clones attribute enabled. The client save sets and their indexes are cloned before the bootstrap save
set is generated so the bootstrap information can track both the original set of save sets and their clones.
The bootstrap save set is also cloned. Clones will be sent to the pool named in the clone pool attribute.
Changing the values of these attributes while savegrp is running has no effect; they must be set before
savegrp starts. The nsrclone(1m) command is used to clone the save sets. savegrp uses a heuristic to
determine which save sets were generated as part of the group; it may occasionally clone more save sets
than expected, if a client has its filesystems separated into multiple groups that run at the same time. Note
that at least two enabled devices are required to clone save sets.
When the save sets are all complete and cloned (if cloning is enabled), an NSR notification with an event
of savegrp and priority of notice is sent to the NSR notification system. This is generally set up to cause email to be sent to the root user specifying the list of clients who failed (if any), and all the output collected
from all clients. The format and common error messages included in the savegrp notification are explained
in the SAVEGRP COMPLETION NOTIFICATION MESSAGE section.
OPTIONS
−E
Causes save(1m) on each client to estimate the amount of data which will be generated by each
save set before performing it. This will result in the filesystem trees being walked twice − once to
generate a estimate of how much data would be generated, and again to generate a save stream to
the NetWorker server. Note that the data is only read from the disk on the final filesystem walk, as
the estimate is performed by using inode information.
−I
Disables the saving of each client’s index.
−O
Saves only each client’s index (the bootstrap is also saved).
−m
Disable monitor status reporting, including all NSR notification actions.
−n
No save. Cause save to perform an estimate as described for −E, but not to perform any actual
saves. This option also sets −m.
−p
Runs the probe step on each client, so you can see which filesystem would be saved and at what
level, but do not actually save any data. This option also sets −m. The output generated by the −p
option may show several save levels for each save set at different points in the output, as savegrp
learns the correct level. This is the expected behavior, and can be useful for debugging. The
actual level the savegrp uses is shown the last time each save set is displayed in the output. The
media pool the save set would be directed to is also listed in the preview output.
−v
Verbose. Prints extra information about what savegrp is doing. The −q flag is also not passed to
the save command.
−G
Run the group; apply no restart semantics. This is the default mode of operation; the option is provided for compatibility with other versions of savegrp.
−R
Restart. This option is used to restart a group that was stopped or if savesets failed and they need
to be retried.
−l level The level of save (see nsr_schedule(5)) to perform on each client. This overrides the save level
which savegrp would normally automaticly determine. −l and −C cannot be specified together.
−C schedule
The name of the NSR schedule (see nsr_schedule(5)) to be used in the automatic save level selection process which savegrp normally performs. This overrides the save schedule which savegrp
would normally use for a given client. −l and −C cannot be specified together.
−e expiration
Set the date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) when the saved data will expire. When a save set has an
explicit expiration date, the save set remains both browsable and non-recyclable until it expires.
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After it expires and it has passed its browse time, its state will become non-browsable. If it has
expired and it has passed its retention time, the save set will become recyclable. The special value
forever is used to indicate that a volume that never expires (i.e. an archive or a migration volume)
must be used. By default, no explicit expiration date is used.
−w browse
Sets the date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) after which the saved data will no longer be browsable.
By default, the server determines the browse date for the save set based on the browse policies in
effect. This option allows overriding the existing policies on a save by save basis.
−y retention
Sets the date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) when the saved data will become recyclable. The special
value forever is used to indicate that a volume that never expires (i.e. an archive or a migration
volume) must be used. By default, the server determines this date for the save set based on the
retention policies in effect. This option allows overriding the existing policies on a save by save
basis.
−t date The time to use instead of the current time for determining which level to use for this savegrp (in
nsr_getdate(3) format). By default, the current time is used.
−F
Automatically perform a full level backup if save set consolidation fails. This option is ignored if
the backup level is not "c".
−X
Automatically remove the level 1 save set after save set consolidation builds a full level save set.
This option is ignored if the backup level is not "c". It is also ignored if the backup level is "c" but
the save set consolidation process fails.
−r retries
The number of times failed clients should be retried before savegrp gives up and declares them
failed. The default is taken from the group resource. Abandoned saves are not retried, because
they may eventually complete. Retries are not attempted if −p is specified.
−P printer
The printer which savegrp should use for printing bootstrap information.
−W width
The width used when formatting output or notification messages. By default, this is 80.
group
Specifies the NetWorker group of clients that should be started, rather than the default NSR group
(which has the name attribute of default). See nsr_group(5) for more details.
−c client
The name of a client on which to save filesystems. There can be multiple −c client specifications.
When −c options are specified, only the named clients from the specified group (which is
"Default" if no group is specified) will be run.
−N parallelism
The parallelism value overrides any other parallelism considerations that savegrp may use to
avoid over-utilizing the system’s resources.
RESOURCE TYPES
NSR
NSR group
Use the parallelism attribute for the maximum number of saves to start simultaneously.
The attribute work list contains values in groups of 3, specifying the client name, level of
save, and path to save, for each save set not yet completed. The attribute completion contains values in groups of 4, specifying the client name, path saved, status, and the output,
for each save set completed.
NSR schedule Used by the savegrp command with each client’s nsr_client(5) resource to determine
which level of save to perform for each specified save set.
NSR client
Each client resource names the groups it should be saved by, the names of the save sets
which should be saved, the name of the schedule to use (see nsr_schedule(5)) and the
name of the directives to use (see nsr_directive(5)).
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NSR notification
Three kinds of notices are sent to the NSR notification system, both with the event attribute
of savegrp. While a savegrp is in progress, status notices are sent with the priority of info.
At completion of a savegrp, a notice is sent containing the collected output of all saves, and
the name of clients which had a save which failed (if any). This notice will have an event
type of savegrp, and a priority of notice. If savegrp is interrupted, a notice stating the
group was terminated, with an event type of savegrp, and a priority of alert will be sent.
These last two typically will result in the notice being encapsulated in a mail message to
root.
SAVEGROUP COMPLETION NOTIFICATION MESSAGE
The savegroup completion notification message contains 5 parts: the header, the Never Started Save Sets,
the Unsuccessful Save Sets, the Successful Save Sets, and the Cloned Save Sets. Each client in the group
will be listed in one or more of sections categories (more than one if some save sets are in one category, and
other save sets in another category). The clients are listed in alphanumeric order, with the server listed last.
The header shows the name of the group and lists which clients failed. If the group was aborted, the header
includes an indicator of this as well. The header also shows the time the group was started (or restarted, if
the −R option was used), and the time the savegrp completed. The failed clients list in the header shows
only those clients for which saves were attempted, not those for which saves never started.
The Never Started Save Sets section is optional and is included only if there are some save sets of some
clients in the group that were never started. This should only occur when a savegrp is aborted, either by
killing the master savegrp daemon or by selecting the Stop function in the Group Control window or the
Stop Now attribute in the Group window of nwadmin(1m). Each entry listed in this section shows the
client and save set that was never started (or All if no save sets were saved for that client). No other error
messages should appear in this section.
The Unsuccessful Save Sets section shows all of the saves that were attempted but failed. This section will
only be present if at least one save set failed. There are many reasons for a save to fail. The most common
are listed below. More reasons will be listed in the future. It is important to differentiate between the many
reasons for a save to fail, so that the administrator can quickly determine the cause and fix it.
Each entry in the Unsuccessful Save Sets section lists the client and save set that failed, along with one or
more lines of error and information messages. Each client is separated by a blank line, and all the failed
save sets for a client a listed together. Typical error or information messages are listed at the end of this
section, (without the client:saveset prefix), with the necessary action(s) to take to correct the problem.
Each entry in the Successful Save Sets section lists the client and save set that succeeded, along with level
of the save, the amount of data saved, the time to run the save set, and the number of files saved. Each
entry may also be preceded by one or more warning or informational messages, the most common of which
are listed below. These warning or informational messages are usually (but not always) prefixed by ‘‘* ’’.
A save set’s output may include warnings; these do not necessarily mean the save set was unsuccessful.
The Cloned Save Sets section refers to the save sets cloned, and not the clients that originated those save
sets. The output shown in this section is the output of the nsrclone command. See the nsrclone(1m) man
page for information on the output of nsrclone.
The following is a list of common informational, warning and error messages found in the completion notification. This list is not complete. The messages you see may vary slightly from those shown here due to
differences in the operating system vendor-supplied error messages. Since many messages include client or
server names, it is most efficient to look for a keyword in the error message. The messages are listed below
in alphabetical order, by the first non-variable word in the message. (Note: initial words like "save", "asm"
and "savefs" may or may not vary, and initial pathnames are always assumed to vary).
aborted
This informational message only occurs when you abort a running savegrp, generally by selecting
Stop from the Group Control Window of the nwadmin(1m) interface. It means that the specified
save set had started saving, but had not completed when the savegrp was aborted. The session (in
the Sessions display of nwadmin(1m)) for this save set may not disappear immediately, especially
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if savegrp’s attempt to kill the save session fails. The save set will be retried if and when you
Restart the savegrp (e.g. from the Group Control Window).
Access violation from client - insecure port N
This message, generated by the save command on client, means that save is not setuid root. Make
sure that the save command on the client is owned by root and has its setuid bit set. If save is on
an NFS mounted filesystem, make sure the filesystem was not mounted on that client using the
"-nosuid" option.
Access violation − unknown host: client
This message is caused when then the client’s hostname and IP address are not correctly listed in
one or more of /etc/hosts, NIS or DNS on the server. You must change the appropriate host table
(depending on which one(s) are in use on your server) to list the client’s name as it is known to
NetWorker (client’s primary name), or you must add the name listed at the end of the error message to the aliases attribute of the client’s Client resource(s).
asm: cannot open path: I/O error
This message generally means that there are bad blocks on the disk(s) containing the specified file
or directory. You should immediately run a filesystem check on the named client filesystem and
check your client’s system error log. If there are bad block, repair them if possible, or move the
filesystem to a different disk.
asm: cannot stat path: Stale NFS file handle
asm: cannot stat path: Missing file or filesystem
These informational messages (or variants of them for other operating systems) mean that the
when save attempted to test the named directory (to determine if it was a different filesystem from
the one currently being saved), the filesystem was NFS mounted, but the mount point was bad.
While this message does not affect the saved data, it does mean you have a network or NFS problem between the specified client and one or more of its fileservers. You may need to remount
filesystems on the client, or perhaps reboot it to correct the problem.
/path/nsrexecd: Can’t make pipe
/path/nsrexecd: Can’t fork
fork: No more processes
The specified client-side resource has been exceeded. There are too many other services running
on the client while savegrp is running. Inspect the client and determine why it has run out of
resources. The client may need to be rebooted. You should also consider re-scheduling any jobs
automatically started on the client (e.g. via cron(1m)) that run while savegrp is running.
asm: chdir failed path: Permission denied
This message means that while backing up the specified save set, save was unable to enter the
named directory. This may mean that save is not setuid root on the specified client, or that the
directory is an NFS mount point for which root is not allowed access. Check the permissions on
save on the specified client (using ls(1)) and make sure that save is owned by root and that the
setuid bit is set.
connect to address AA.BB.CC.DD: message
Trying AA.BB.CC.DD...
These informational messages are displayed only when the −v option is used. They mean that the
connection to the client failed on the address specified in the first line of the message. If the client
has more than one IP address, savegrp has attempted the address listed in the second line. Subsequent lines of the completion mail show if this second address succeeded. You may want to check
and change your network routing tables to avoid getting these messages.
Connection refused
This means the client machine is up, but it is not accepting new network connections for nsrexecd
(or rshd). This could mean the client was in the process of booting when the savegrp attempted to
connect, or that the client had exceeded some resource limit, and was not accepting any new connections. You should attempt to log into the client and verify that it is accepting remote
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connections. If the client is a non-Unix machine, you may need to start the NetWorker client on
that machine. Refer to your ClientPak installation for more information.
Connection timed out
This usually means the client has crashed or is hung. Make sure the client has rebooted, and that
nsrexecd is running on it (if you are using nsrexecd). If the client is a non-Unix machine, you
may need to ensure that the network protocols are loaded, and that the NetWorker client is running
on that machine. Refer to your ClientPak installation for more information.
asm: external ASM ‘asm2’ exited with code 1
This message generally accompanies another message reporting a specific problem while saving a
file or directory on the named save set. The backup will attempt to continue and attempt to save
other data. Generally, the backup will not be listed in the failed save sets section of the completion
mail if any files on the save set are saved successfully, even if it only saves the top directory of the
save set.
save: path file size changed!
This informational message is often generated when NetWorker backs up log files. It may also
occur for other files. For files that you expect to grow while savegrp is running, you can use a
directive specifying that the logasm(1m) should be used to back up the file. See also nsr(5) and
nsr_directive(5).
asm: getwd failed
This message means that while backing up the specified save set, an attempt to determine the current directory’s name failed. This occurs on clients, generally running older versions of the NetWorker ClientPak, on which the getwd(3) library call is broken. You may want to contact Legato
Tech Support to find out if there is a patch available for your client platform to work around this
vendor-specific bug, or contact your operating system vendor to see if a more recent OS version
addresses this problem.
Group groupname aborted, savegroup is already running
This message is only delivered by itself. It occurs when the named group has already been started
or restarted (eg after a reboot, or when requested via the Group Control Window of nwadmin(1m)), either automatically by nsrd(1m) or manually, from the command line. You can use
ps(1) to find out the process id of a running savegrp. The existance of a running group is determined by looking for a file named /nsr/tmp/sg.group which, if existing and locked, means a
savegrp is running.
nsrexec: Attempting a kill on remote save
client:saveset aborted due to inactivity
The client has not sent any data to the server for the specified inactivity timeout. savegrp will
attempt to kill the backup in progress so that the hung client will not impede other backups or
cloning operations.
has been inactive for N minutes since time.
client:saveset is being abandoned by savegrp.
A backup of the specified save set started, but after N minutes of no activity, savegrp gave up on
the save set. Generally, this means that the client is hung waiting for an NFS partition. Unfortunately, NetWorker (or any other program) has no way of reliably telling if an NFS partition will
hang until after it tries to access the partition. When the partition comes back on line, the save will
complete, despite that savegrp abandoned it. You should check the client, since you sometimes
may need to reboot the client to unhang NFS partitions. Non-Unix clients also hang for other reasons such as defects in the operating system implementation of their network protocols.
Host is unreachable
The NetWorker server cannot make TCP/IP connections to the client. This generally means the
network itself is not configured correctly; most commonly, one or more gateways or routers are
down, or the network routes were not set up correctly. You should verify that the server can connect to the client, and if not, check and, if necessary, reconfigure your routers, gateways or routing
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tables.
Login incorrect
This message is generated when the remote user attribute for the client is not set to a valid login on
the client. Verify that the remote user attribute for the client is set to the correct login name. You
may see this message even when running nsrexecd if nsrexecd has not been started (or was killed)
on the client.
asm: missing hard links not found:
This message is generated when a backed-up file had one or more hard links that were not found.
The message is followed by a list of one or more file names which were backed up minus some
links. The message means that the files were either created (with multiple hard links) while the
backup was occurring, so some of the links were missed due to the order of filesystem tree walking, or the file (or some links) were removed while the backup was occurring. Only those links
that were found can be recovered; additional links will have been lost. One can do an additional
incremental backup of the affected filesystem if a consistent state for the affected file is essential.
lost connection to server, exiting
save: network error, server may be down
The backup of the named filesystem was begun, but the connection to the NetWorker server closed
part way through. This typically means that the server machine rebooted, one or more NetWorker
server daemon processes were killed by the system administrator or by the system itself (e.g. due
to overwriting the binary or a disk error in swap space), or there was some transport problem that
caused the network connection to dropped by the operating system. Restart the save at a later
time.
No save sets with this name were found in the media database;
performing a full backup
This informational message is added by savegrp to any save set that is saved at the level full
instead of the level found in the client’s schedule. Due to timing problems, you can occasionally
see this message when the clocks on the client and server are out of sync, or when savegrp starts
before midnight and ends after midnight. You may also get spurious messages of this type from
some versions of NetWorker client software backing up a NetWare BINDERY, which ignore the
schedule and perform a full save. In both these cases, the client re-checks the level, and overrides
the server’s requested level.
No more processes
See "Can’t make pipe" message information.
No ’NSR client’ resource for client clienthostname
savefs: cannot retrieve client resources
This pair of messages occurs if the the client’s hostname changed (in /etc/hosts, NIS or DNS).
You may also have deleted the client’s Client resource while savegrp was running. In the former
case, you will need to add the client’s new name to the aliases attribute of the client (this is a hidden attribute) using nsradmin(1m) (selecting the Hidden display option) or nwadmin(1m)
(selecting the Details View option for the Client window). In the latter case, no additional action is
required if this deletion was intentional (the next run of savegrp will not attempt to save the
client). If it was accidental, and you did not want to delete the client, you should add the client
back again and add the client back into the appropriate group(s). The next time savegrp runs, it
will back up the client, just as if the client had been down the previous day.
no output
The save set completed, but returned no status output. The most common reasons are that the
client crashed or lost its network connection (i.e.. a router between the client and server crashed)
while the client was being backed up. Another is that the disk on which the client status was being
logged filled up (perform a df /nsr/tmp to see if this was the case). To determine if the save set
was saved, you can use mminfo(1m). For example, run mminfo -v -c clientname -t ’1 day ago’
and look at the flags column for the completion status. An ’a’ flag means it aborted. Use a more
distant time (the −t option) to look further back in time.
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filesystem: No such file or directory
An explicit save set was named in the Client resource for the specified client, and that save set
does not exist (or is not currently mounted) on the client. Make sure you spelled the save set name
correctly (and that it is capitalized correctly), and log into the client and verify that the save set is
mounted.
/path/nsrexecd: Couldn’t look up address for your host
/path/nsrexecd: Host address mismatch for server
The nsrexecd daemon on the client managed to look up the server in the client’s host table, but the
address listed there did not match the address of the server. Every interface of the server must
have a unique name listed in the host table (possibly with non-unique aliases or CNAME’s), and
each unique name must be listed as a valid server to nsrexecd.
/path/nsrexecd: Host server cannot request command execution
/path/nsrexecd: Your host cannot request command execution
The server is not listed in nsrexecd’s list of valid servers on the specified client. The list of valid
servers is either on the nsrexecd command line (with one or more −s server options to nsrexecd),
or in a file (with the −f file option to nsrexecd). If neither is specified, nsrexecd will look for a
file named servers in the same directory that contains the nsrdb configuration database (e.g.
/nsr/res/nsrdb on a typical Unix server). Also the server may not be listed in one or more of
/etc/hosts, NIS, or DNS, on the client, in which case nsrexecd cannot validate the server until the
client’s host naming configuration is fixed.
/path/nsrexecd: Invalid authenticator
/path/nsrexecd: Invalid command
These two messages should never occur in a savegroup completion message. They mean that
savegrp did not follow its protocol correctly.
/path/nsrexecd: Permission denied
Permission denied
These similar messages are generated by nsrexecd and rshd, respectively. In either case, the
server does not have permission to execute commands on the client. In the case of the first message, make sure that the server is listed as a valid server on the client (see "Host server cannot
request command execution", above, for details). In the case of the second message, which does
not mention nsrexecd, make sure that "servername" is listed in the client’s /.rhosts file (or, if you
have set the remote user attribute for this client, the .rhosts file in the home directory for that user
on the client).
/path/savegrp: printing bootstrap information failed
See "unknown printer" message information.
reading log file failed
After the specified save set completed, savegrp was unable to read the log file of the output status
from the save set. This generally means that someone, or an automated non-NetWorker administrative program or script, removed the log file. This message can also occur if the filesystem on
which the client logs are stored has run out of space (use df /nsr/tmp to determine if this is the
case). Verify that no scripts remove files from /nsr/tmp (which is where savegrp stores the save set
log files).
request from machine server rejected
The server is not listed in the PC (NetWare or DOS) client’s list of acceptable servers. See your
ClientPak installation guide for instructions on adding the server to the client-side list.
N retries attempted
1 retry attempted
One of these informational messages is prepended to a save set’s output if savegrp is unable to
backup the data on the first try and if the client retries attribute for the group has a value greater
than zero. In this case, the specified number of retries was performed before the backup of the
save set succeeded or was finally marked as failed.
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RPC error: details...
Cannot open save session with ‘server’
The save command generates this message if it is unable to back up data to the NetWorker server.
There are several possible details. The most likely causes are: resources are exceeded on the
server so nsrd cannot accept new save sessions, nsrd actually died since savegrp started (however,
this is unlikely, since you cannot normally receive a savegrp completion message after nsrd dies,
but you can see this when using the −p option), there are numerous network errors occurring and
save cannot open a session to save its data (check this by running netstat -s and see how many network errors are occurring; you may need to do this several times a few minutes apart to get the
change in errors). Save cannot tell which of these three causes are the real cause. If you see these
errors frequently, and it looks like a server resource problem, you might consider increasing the
value of the client retries attribute of the group resource having these problems. This won’t
decrease the resource utilization, but will make savegrp more robust. (The trade-off is that
increasing client retries will increase the load on the server even more).
nsrexecd on client is unavailable. Using rsh instead.
This informational message is only displayed when the −v flag has been used for verbose information. This message means that nsrexecd is not running on the client, and that savegrp is attempting to use the rshd service instead for backward compatibility with older versions of savegrp.
save: clientname2 is not on client’s access list
This error occurs when the named client has more than one name, for example, a short name,
client, and a fully-qualified domain name, client.legato.com. When the client attempts to connect
back to the NetWorker server to start a save, that client is calling itself by the name client, which
matches the client resource name, but when the server looks up the client’s network address, it is
getting back the name clientname2. If this is correct, add the name clientname2 to the client’s
aliases attribute and re-run the save.
save: path length of xxxx too long, directory not saved
This message can occur if you have a directory tree that is very deep, or directory names that are
very long. This message can also occur if there are bad blocks in the specified filesystem, or if the
filesystem is corrupt. NetWorker limits the full pathname to 1024 characters which is the system
imposed maximum on most systems. To save such directories, you need to rename or move the
directories so that the full pathname is shorter than 1024 characters. If the filesystem appears to be
corrupted (for example, a very long pathname that looks like it has a loop in the name), perform a
filesystem check on the specified client.
/path/save: Command not found
/path/savefs: Command not found
/path/save: Not found
/path/savefs: Not found
The save or savefs command could not be found in the specified path. If you are using nsrexecd,
this probably means that the save or savefs command is not in the same directory in which nsrexecd is installed (or that save or savefs was removed). If you are using rshd for remote execution,
then you need to set the executable path attribute in the Client resource for this client to be the
directory in which the NetWorker executables are installed on the client.
savefs: error starting save of filesystem
This informational message accompanies several other save or asm messages listed here. This
message means that savefs has detected the failed save and has marked the save set as failed.
save: unknown host name: server
savefs: unknown host name: server
The host table on the specified client (either /etc/hosts, NIS or DNS, depending on that client’s
configuration) does not include the server’s name. Add the server’s hostname to the specified
client’s host table. If you use DNS but the server’s Client resource name (i.e. the client resource
for the server itself) is not fully qualified (i.e. it looks like "server", not "server.dom.ain"), and the
server is in a different domain from the client, add the name server to the domain table for the
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domain containing the client. If you use NIS, this error means that either the NIS hosts map does
not contain the server, the /etc/hosts file does not list the server, or the NIS master for the specified
client is otherwise mis-configured (the server is a secondary server and there is no yppush(1m)
from the primary; run ypwhich -m on the client to find which NIS server is providing master
translation).
savegrp: client rcmd(3) problem for command ’command’
This error message normally accompanies another, more specific, error message. It is generated
when the attempt to run the specified command (usually save or savefs with several command line
parameters) failed on the specified save set. The previous line of error output should include the
more specific error message (look for that message elsewhere in this section). Generally, the problem is a bad hosttable configuration, or various permissions denied errors (server not specified
when starting nsrexecd, or missing permissions in .rhosts if not using nsrexecd). If not, log into
the NetWorker server as root and run the command savegrp -p -v -c clientname groupname giving
the appropriate client for clientname and groupname . This verbose output should include the necessary additional information needed for fixing the problem.
savegrp: suppressed N lines of verbose output
Sometimes a backup will generate a huge amount of output, such as when one runs savegrp -v.
When savegrp updates the group completion attribute in the server, it may suppress some initial
lines of of this output, since logging all of the output to the completion attribute can cause nsrd to
use an unexpectedly large amount of memory. The entire output of savegrp -v can be found in the
log files or the savegrp completion mail, rather than the completion attribute.
socket: All ports in use
The NetWorker server has run out of socket descriptors. This means that you have exceeded the
socket resource limit on your server. To avoid such future messages, you should determine what
other network services are running while savegrp is running, and consider re-scheduling either
savegrp or the other service(s). You can also reduce the parallelism in the nsr_service(5)
resource, to reduce the resource utilization.
socket: protocol failure in circuit setup.
The client does not seem to support the TCP/IP protocol stack, or has not used a privileged port for
setting up its connection. The latter could occur if you use nsrexecd but did not start it as root on
the specified client. The nsrexecd daemon must run as root on each client.
path: This data set is in use and cannot be accessed at this time
This message is generated by save sets on PC clients running DOS or NetWare. The NetWorker
client software on these systems cannot back up files open for writing, due to the interface provided by the operating system. This message actually comes from Novell’s TSA and is not
changeable.
unknown host
The specified client is not listed in the host table on the server (note: a similar "save" or "savefs"
specific message is described above). Depending on your host configuration, this means the client
is not listed in one (or more) of /etc/hosts, NIS, or the Domain Name Service. If you use fully
qualified domain names, you may need to make a new client resource for this client, using that
fully qualified domain name (i.e. name the client resource "mars.legato.com", not "mars").
printer: unknown printer
path/savegrp: printing bootstrap information failed
(reproduced below)
This message, or similar messages, accompanies the bootstrap information when savegrp was
unable to print the bootstrap on the printer. You need to either specify a different printer in the
printer attribute for the group, or configure your print server to recognize the printer (by default,
your system’s default printer is used). The bootstrap information is listed as part of the savegrp
completion mail. You should print out this information immediately, in case your server has a disaster and loses a disk, and fix the printer name used by savegrp.
Warning − file ‘path’ changed during save
This warning message is generated when save notices that the file’s modification time changed
while the file was being backed up. NetWorker does not attempt to lock files before saving them,
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as this would make backups run extremely slowly. You may wish to backup files which generate
this message manually, to ensure that a consistent copy is saved. NetWorker does not attempt this
automatically, to avoid trying forever on the same file.
Warning: ‘client’ is not in the hosts table!
This message is generated by a save or savefs command run on the specified client to save that
client’s filesystems. The client’s hostname is not listed in the host table on the client (either
/etc/hosts, NIS or DNS, depending on that client’s configuration). This almost always results in a
failed save. Fix the client’s host table and re-run the save.
asm: path was not successfully saved
This message generally accompanies one or more other more-specific messages for the save set.
The specified path within the current save set was not saved successfully. The backup will continue trying to back up other files and directories on the save set.
asm: xdr_op failed for path
This error can be caused by several possible conditions (for example, out of memory, defective
networking software in the operating system, an external ASM unexpectedly exiting, a lost network connection). If it was due to a lost network connection, then the NetWorker server most
likely exited (due to nsr_shutdown). After restarting the server, rerun the group. If due to an
ASM exiting unexpectedly (in this case, the message should be accompanied by a message
describing which ASM exited unexpectedly), you may have found a bad block on the disk, or perhaps a defect. Check if the client ran out of memory (there may be console messages), and verify
that there are no bad blocks on the save set’s disk. If there were network errors, there may also
have been messages logged by other programs on the system console (client or server), or to system log files.
FILES
/nsr/tmp/sg.group
/nsr/tmp/sg.group.client.*
/nsr/tmp/ggroup*
A lock file to keep multiple savegrps of the same group from running
simultaneously.
Temporary files used to log the output of individual save sets for the
named group and client.
On filesystems with short names (less than 64 characters), the temporary
files used to log the output of individual save sets for the named group.
SEE ALSO
ls(1), ps(1), nsr_getdate(3), rcmd(3), fstab(5), nsr(5), nsr_directive(5), nsr_notification(5),
nsr_service(5), nsr_group(5), nsr_schedule(5), nsr_resource(5), mminfo(1m), nsrssc(1m), netstat(1m),
nsr(1m), nsradmin(1m), nsrexec(1m), nsrexecd(1m), nsrwatch(1m), nwadmin(1m), rshd(1m),
save(1m), savefs(1m), pathownerignore(5), yppush(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
11
SAVE(1m)
SAVE(1m)
NAME
save − save files to long term storage with NetWorker
savepnpc − save files to long term storage with NetWorker and performs pre and post processing commands
on a NetWorker client.
SYNOPSIS
save [ −BEiKLnquSVvx ] [ −s server ] [ −c client-name ] [ −N name ] [ −e expiration ] [ −f dirfile ] [ −b
pool ] [ −F file ] [ −I input_file ] [ −g group ] [ −l level ] [ −t date ] [ −m masquerade ] [ −w browse_time ] [
−y retention_time ] [ −W width ] [ path . . . ]
savepnpc [ −BEiKLnquSVvx ] [ −s server ] [ −c client-name ] [ −N name ] [ −e expiration ] [ −f dirfile ] [
−b pool ] [ −F file ] [ −I input_file ] [ −g group ] [ −l level ] [ −t date ] [ −m masquerade ] [ −W width ] [
−w browse_time ] [ −y retention_time ] [ path . . . ]
DESCRIPTION
save saves files, including directories or entire filesystems, to the NetWorker server (see nsr(1m)). The
progress of a save can be monitored using the X Window System based nwadmin(1m) program or the
curses(3X) based nsrwatch(1m) program for other terminal types.
The user of this command may retain root privileges if the command’s modes are properly set as described
in nsr(1m).
If no path arguments are specified on the command line or via the −I option, the current directory will be
saved. save will save a directory by saving all the files and subdirectories it contains, but it will not cross
mount points, or follow symbolic links. If the paths to be saved are mounted from a network file server,
save instructs the user to run the save on the remote machine or use the -L option.
The directive files (see nsr(5)) encountered in each directory are read by default, and they contain special
instructions directing how particular files are to be saved (i.e. compressed, skipped, etc.). These files are
named ’.nsr’.
Each file in the subdirectory structures specified by the path arguments is encapsulated in a NetWorker save
stream. This stream of data is sent to a receiving process (see nsrd(1m)) on the NetWorker server, which
processes the data, adding entries to the on-line index (see nsrindexd(1m)) for each file in the stream, with
the data finally ending up on a long term storage media (see nsrmmd(1m)).
Details about handling media are discussed in nsrmm(1m) and nsr_device(5).
savepnpc consists of the same command options as save and behaves just like save. In addition, prior to
the actual save on a Networker client, savepnpc performs pre-processing commands if any exists in the
/nsr/res/<grpname>.res file, and at the end of the save of the last save set on the client, the post-processing
commands (if any) will be invoked. In the condition of failure to run the pre-processing commands, savepnpc aborts itself. All results are logged in /nsr/logs/savepnpc.log file on the client. A timeout condition can
be set by the user to indicate at which point in time the post-processing commands need to be run without
waiting for all the save sets to be backed up. This timeout attribute resides in the /nsr/res/<grpname>.res
file. The timeout should be specified in such a format that nsr_getdate() can understand (see
nsr_getdate(3)).
An example of /nsr/res/<grpname>.res can be described as:
type: savepnpc;
precmd: /bin/true;
pstcmd: /bin/true, "/bin/sleep 5";
timeout: "12:00pm";
The precmd field can be manually modified to contain any number of commands that are needed to be run
at the beginning of the save of the 1st save set. The pstcmd is to hold any commands that are needed to be
run at the end of the save of the last save set. The post-processing commands are run after the save of the
last save set or the timeout condition, whichever comes first.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
SAVE(1m)
SAVE(1m)
OPTIONS
−b pool
Specifies a particular destination pool for the save.
−c client-name
Specifies the client name for starting the save session. This is useful on clients with multiple network interfaces, and multiple host names. It can be used to create multiple index databases for the
same physical client. This does not specify the network interface to use. This is specified in the
server network interface attribute of the client resource (see nsr_client(5)). This option can also
be used on a cluster when performing manual saves, or in specifying a non-default backup command for scheduled saves. This option directs NetWorker to override the cluster path-ownership
rules, saving the path argument(s) as belonging to client-name and making index entries in the
index for client-name instead of using the name of the physical host or virtual host which owns the
path, according to the cluster management software. Refer to pathownerignore(5) for more information about path-ownership rules.
−e expiration
Set the date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) when the saved data will expire. When a save set has an
explicit expiration date, the save set remains both browsable and non-recyclable until it expires.
After it expires and it has passed its browse time, its state will become non-browsable. If it has
expired and it has passed its retention time, the save set will become recyclable. The special value
forever is used to indicate that a volume that never expires (i.e. an archive or a migration volume)
must be used. By default, no explicit expiration date is used.
−f dirfile
The file from which to read prototype default directives (see nsr(5)). A dirfile of - causes the
default directives to be read from standard input.
−g group
This option is used by savegrp(1m) and savefs(1m) to denote the group of the save (see
nsr_client(5) and nsr_group(5)) and is used by the NetWorker server to select the specific media
pool.
−i
Ignores any .nsr directive files as they are encountered in the subdirectory structures being saved.
−l level The level of the save. This option is used by savegrp(1m) and savefs(1m) to specify a particular
level for a scheduled save.
−m masquerade
Specifies the tag to precede the summary line. This option is used by savegrp(1m) and
savefs(1m) to aid in savegrp summary notifications. savepnpc(1m) also uses this tag to identify
client operations on the savegrp’s work list that should complete before pstclntsave(1m) will trigger its post-processing.
−n
No save. Estimate the amount of data which will be generated by the save, but do not perform the
actual save.
−q
Quiet. Displays only summary information and error messages.
−s server
Specifies which machine to use as the NetWorker server.
−t date The date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) by which files must have been modified for them to be saved.
This option is used by savegrp(1m) and savefs(1m) to perform scheduled saves by consulting with
the media database to determine the appropriate time value based on the previous saves for the
save set and the level of the scheduled save.
−u
NetWorker 6.1.1
Stop the save if an error occurs. The save program normally treats errors as warnings and continues to save the rest of the files in the backup. When this option is set, errors will cause save to exit
and abort the save. This option is not recommended for general use, although it can be useful
when a group of files needs to be backed up as a set.
October 15, 2001
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SAVE(1m)
−v
SAVE(1m)
Verbose. Causes the save program to provide great detail about the save as it proceeds.
−y retention
Sets the date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) when the saved data will become recyclable. The special
value forever is used to indicate that a volume that never expires (i.e. an archive or a migration
volume) must be used. By default, the server determines this date for the save set based on the
retention policies in effect. This option allows overriding the existing policies on a save by save
basis.
−w browse_time
Sets the date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) after which this save set will no longer be browsable. By
default, the server determines the browse date for the save set based on the browse policies in
effect. This option allows overriding the existing policies on a save by save basis.
−x
Cross mount points.
−B
Force save of all connecting directory information from root (‘‘/’’) down to the point of invocation.
−E
Estimate the amount of data which will be generated by the save, then perform the actual save.
Note that the estimate is generated from the inode information; thus, the data is only read once.
−F file Only save files whose change time is newer than the file modification date of file.
−I input_file
In addition to taking the paths to save from the command line, read paths to save from the named
file. The paths must be listed one per line. If no paths are specified on the command line, then
only those paths specified in the file will be saved.
−K
Does not build connecting directory index entries.
−L
Local. Saves will be performed from the local NetWorker client, even when files are from a network file server. To recover these files, run recover(1m) with the −c client arguments, where
client is the name of the NetWorker client that did the save.
−LL
In additional to treating the backup as a local backup, causes an extra line to be printed at the end
of the completion output of the form ‘‘complete savetime=number’’, where number is the savetime
of the save set created by this backup. This option is meant to be used by the savegrp(1m) command in performing automatic cloning.
−N name
The symbolic name of this save set. By default, the most common prefix of the path arguments is
used as the save set name. If the -N option is used when saving any of the SYSTEM save sets
(SYSTEM STATE, SYSTEM FILES, and SYSTEM DB), the path must also be specified and must
match the name value assigned with the -N option.
−S
Allows only save set recovery. This performs the save without creating any index entries. This
means that the save set will not be browsable, although save set recovery may be used to recover
the data.
−V
Prevent the OFC mechanism from creating a point-in-time copy of the source volume. (Included
for compatibility with NT NetWorker servers.)
−W width
The width used when formatting summary information output.
SEE ALSO
curses(3X), nsr_getdate(3), nwadmin(1m), nsr(5), nsr(1m), nsr_client(5), nsr_device(5), nsr_group(5),
nsr_service(5), nsrd(1m), nsrim(1m), nsrindexd(1m), nsrmm(1m), nsrmmd(1m), nsrwatch(1m),
recover(1m), savefs(1m), savegrp(1m), pathownerignore(5).
DIAGNOSTICS
Exit Codes
0
NetWorker 6.1.1
Normal exit. This means that a save set was correctly created on the server. Messages about individual file backup failures are warnings, and do not cause abnormal exit.
October 15, 2001
3
SAVE(1m)
<>0
SAVE(1m)
Abnormal exit. A save set was not correctly created on the server.
Messages
host: saveset level=level, size time count files.
This message (with the appropriate client host name, saveset name, level, total save set size,
elapsed time, and file count) is printed whenever save is run by savegrp(1m) and exits normally.
host: filename: warning
Messages of this form are warnings about difficulties backing up individual files. Such messages
do not normally cause the save to fail, and therefore may appear in the save output found in the
‘‘Savegroup Completion’’ message’s Successful section.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
4
SCANNER(1m)
SCANNER(1m)
NAME
scanner − NetWorker media verifier and index rebuilder
SYNOPSIS
scanner [ options ] −B device
scanner [ options ] −B −S ssid [ −im ] device
scanner [ options ] −i [ -S ssid ] [ -c client ] [ -N name ] device
scanner [ options ] −m [ -S ssid ] device
scanner [ options ] [ −S ssid] [-c client] [-N name] device <command>
options: [ −npqv ] [ −f file ] [ −r record ] [ −s server ] [ −t type ] [ −b pool ]
command: −x command [ arg ... ]
DESCRIPTION
The scanner command reads NetWorker media, such as backup tapes or disks, to confirm the contents of a
volume, to extract a save set from a volume, or to rebuild the NetWorker online indexes. As installed, only
the super-user may run this command. However, the command’s modes can be modified such that normal
users may run the command while retaining root privileges; see nsr(1m) for more details. The device must
always be specified, and is usually one of the device names used by the NetWorker server. For tape drives,
it must be the name of a ‘‘no-rewind on close’’ device.
When scanner is invoked with either no options or −v, the volume on the indicated device is opened for
reading, scanned, and a table of contents is generated. The table of contents contains information about
each save set found on the volume. By default, one line of information is written to standard output for
each save set found containing the client name, save set name, save time, level, size, files, ssid and a flag.
The client name is the name of the system that created this save set. The name is the label given to this
save set by save(1m), usually the path name of a file system. The save time is the date and time the save
set was created. The level values are one-letter abbreviated versions of full, incremental, levels 0 through 9,
or blank for manual saves. The size is the number of bytes in the save set. The files labeled by column provide the number of client files contained in the save set. The ssid (save set identifier) is an identifier used
internally to reference and locate this save set. This same identifier may be specified explicitly with the −S
option to extract a particular save set.
The table of contents is based on synchronization (sometimes called ‘‘note’’) chunks (see mm_data(5))
interspersed with the actual save set data. There are four types of note chunks: Begin, Continue, Synchronize, and End, symbolized by a flag of B, C, S or E respectively. The Begin note is used to mark the start of
a save set. When a beginning chunk is written, the save set size and number of files are not known. The
Continue note is used to indicate that this save set started on a different volume. The Synchronize note
marks locations in the save set where you may resume extracting data in the event of previous media damage (a client file boundary). The End note marks the end of the save set, and causes the table of contents
line to be printed. The other notes are displayed only when the −v option is selected.
OPTIONS
−b pool
Specifies which pool the volume should belong to. This option only applies for versions of NetWorker that do not store the pool information on the media. For these versions, you might need to
specify the media pool the volume should belong to if the user does not want the volume to be a
member of the Default pool. For volumes where the pool information is stored on the media, the
media must be relabeled (destroying all data on the media) to assign the media to a different pool.
−B
NetWorker 6.1.1
When used in absence of the −S option, scanner quickly scans the tape for the start of bootstrap
save sets. The program only reads the first record at each file mark on the media to see if a save
set with the name ‘‘bootstrap’’ exists. When the entire media has been exhausted, the save set id
and file location of the most recent bootstrap save set is printed. When used in conjunction with
the −S option, the save set id specified is flagged as that of a bootstrap.
October 15, 2001
1
SCANNER(1m)
SCANNER(1m)
−c client
Process only save sets that come from the specified NetWorker client machine. This option can be
used multiple times and in conjunction with the −N option, but only in presence of the −i or −x
option.
−f file
Starts the scan at the specific media file number. This option is not useful on media such as optical
disks and file device types, for example.
−i
Rebuilds both the media and the online file indexes from the volumes read. If you specify a single
save set with the −S ssid option, only entries for the specified save set are copied to the online file
index. Note that for version 6.0 and later, if you have the tape that contain the index backups that
go along with the data backups, the recommended way of restoring your indexes is to run scanner
−m to reload the media database entries for the index and data backups. Once that is done, you
should run nsrck −L7 −t date <clientname> to recover the index for the client as of the time of
the backups on the tape. This will roll the index entries for that time back into the index. However, if you have tapes for which there are no index backups, then you will need to use the −i
option to reconstruct the index entries.
−m
Rebuild the media indexes for the volumes read. If you specify a single save set with the −S ssid
option, only entries for the specified save set are copied to the online file index.
−n
Checks all media without rebuilding the media or index databases. When used with the −i option,
this option provides the most complete media checking available, while not modifying the
databases at all.
−N name
Only processes save sets specified by name (a literal string only). This option can be used multiple times and in conjunction with the −c option, but only in presence of the −i or −x option.
−p
Prints out information save set notes as they are processed.
−q
Displays only errors or important messages.
−r record
Starts the scan at the specific media record number.
−s server
Specifies the controlling server when using scanner on a storage node. See nsr_storage_node(5)
for additional detail on storage nodes.
−S ssid Extracts the specified save set(s). When used with the −i or −x option, this option can be used
multiple times and is in addition to any save sets selected using the −c and −N options. Otherwise,
the volume is scanned for save set ssid, which will be written to the standard output. Most often
this is piped to a uasm(1m) program running in recover mode to process the save set (potentially
with a directory list to limit the files to be recovered and potentially using a −m argument to map
the file location). When using −S without −i or −m, scanner prompts for the volume block size if
the volume label is not readable. If the volume information is still in the media database, the user
has the option of running recover by save set (see recover(1m)). When −B is also specified, ssid
is taken to be that of a bootstrap. Only one ssid is allowed in this case.
−t type Specifies the type of media, for example, optical for an optical disk, or 8mm 5GB for an 8mm 5GB
tape). Normally the media type is obtained from the NetWorker server, if a known device is being
used (see nsr_device(5)).
−v
Displays more verbose messages, such as a log of each note chunk, and a message after every 100
media records. When the −i option is used, a line is printed for each client file (an enormous
amount of output can be produced).
−x command arg ...
Specifies an arbitrary UNIX command to process each new selected save set. This argument can
only occur once at the end of the argument list (after device). The save stream for each save set is
connected to the stdin of a new instance of the command. Most often this command is uasm(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
SCANNER(1m)
SCANNER(1m)
running in recover mode to process each save set (potentially using a −m argument to map the file
location). If the volume information is still in the media database, the user has the option of running recover by save set (see recover(1m)). Do not attempt console I/O by specified UNIX command. Instead specify conflict resolution parameters as arguments passed to the command (e.g.:
scanner -S <ssid> -x uasm -iR -rv). If console interaction is required, pipe scanner output to the
desired Unix command instead of invoking the command using the -x option.
EXAMPLES
Verifying a tape:
scanner /dev/nrst0
scanner: scanning 8mm tape mars.001 on /dev/nrst0
client name
save set
save time level
space
/export
10/07/94 12:38 f
space
/usr
10/07/94 13:14 f
space
/nsr
10/07/94 12:40 f
space
/
10/07/94 13:22 f
scanner: reached end of 8mm tape mars.001
size
100762460
27185116
77292280
1693192
files
10035
3185
8436
518
ssid S
16983 E
16984 E
16980 S
16985 S
Rebuilding the online file index for a client from a tape:
scanner -m /dev/nrst8
scanner: scanning 4mm tape monday.fulls on /dev/nrst8
scanner: ssid 17458697: scan complete
scanner: ssid 17458694: scan complete
scanner: ssid 17458698: scan complete
scanner: ssid 17458693: NOT complete
scanner: reached end of 4mm tape monday.fulls
scanner: when next tape is ready, enter device name [/dev/nrst8]?
nsrck -L7 -t "06/07/99" supernova
nsrck: checking index for ’supernova’
nsrck: The file index for client ’supernova’ will be recovered.
nsrck: Recovering index savesets of ’supernova’ from ’quasar’
Recover completion time: Fri Jun 16 14:03:16 2000
nsrck: completed recovery of index for client ’supernova’
nsrck: /disk1/nsr/index/supernova contains 85782 records occupying 14 MB
nsrck: Completed checking 1 client(s)
Extracting a save set for /usr and relocating to /mnt:
scanner -S 637475597 /dev/nrst8 | uasm -rv -m /usr=/mnt
or
scanner -S 637475597 /dev/nrst8 -x uasm -rv -m /usr=/mnt
Extracting all save sets from client mars and relocating to /a:
scanner -c mars /dev/nrst8 -x uasm -rv -m/=/a
SEE ALSO
mm_data(5), mminfo(1m), nsrmmdbasm(1m), nsr(1m), nsrck(1m), nsrindexasm(1m), nsrmmd(1m),
nsr_device(5), nsr_storage_node(5), uasm(1m).
DIAGNOSTICS
xdr conversion error, fn %d, rn %d, chunk %d out of %d
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
3
SCANNER(1m)
SCANNER(1m)
unexpected file number, wanted %d got %d
unexpected record number, wanted %d got %d
All three preceding messages are indicative of media errors (tape blocks are either lost or damaged). In the case of an xdr conversion error, a non-zero ‘‘chunk’’ number means that the block
may be partially salvageable. Unexpected file numbers are normal when scanner reaches the logical end of the media that has been recycled.
continuation of data in nsrscan.NNNNN.MMMMMM
After an XDR decode error (an error denoted by one or more of the messages described above),
scanner attempts to re-synchronize and send the rest of the stream. However, because programs
like uasm(1m) are unable to handle decoding streams with parts missing in the middle, scanner
sends the remainder of the stream to a file. You can decode this stream manually. For example, if
your original command was:
scanner -S ssid | uasm -r
and a synchronization error occurs, you can decode the rest of the stream with the following command:
uasm -r < nsrscan.NNNNN.MMMMMM
where the file name you enter corresponds to the name printed in the diagnostic message.
unexpected volume id, wanted volid1 got volid2
This message normally appears when running in verbose mode on a tape or disk that has been
recycled. It does not indicate an error condition, but details the conditions normally treated as the
end of the volume.
ssid %d: finished, but incomplete
Scanner has detected the end of a save stream, but the stream was aborted, and is of dubious
value. If online indexes are being rebuilt, the end of the aborted stream may precipitate the next
message.
(ssid %d): error decoding save stream
As indexes are being rebuilt, scanner detected that the bytes in the save stream are invalid. This is
usually caused by processing an aborted save stream. Other causes may include a damaged tape.
Once this condition is detected, the process of rebuilding the indexes for the particular save stream
exits. This may precipitate the next message.
write failed, Broken pipe
Printed by scanner when a process rebuilding a save stream’s indexes exits before consuming the
entire stream.
You are not authorized to run this command
A normal (non-root) user invoked this command.
could not convert ‘arg’ to a file number
The −f and −r options require a numeric argument for the starting file or record number of the
media.
already exists in the media index
The −i or −m option was specified and the volume was already listed in the media database. This
message is purely informational, and means that the volume is not being added to the media
database because it is already listed there.
fn %d rn 0 read error I/O error
done with tape_type tape volid volume_name
These messages, when occurring together, are a consequence of scanner encountering consecutive
filemarks at end of the media. They do not indicate an error condition and can be ignored.
LIMITATIONS
scanner can run without the NetWorker services (for example, nsrd(1m) and nsrmmdbd(1m)) when not
reconstructing the media or the online file indexes with most device types. For logical and NDMP devices,
the NetWorker services have to be running in order to query these device configurations.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
4
SCANNER(1m)
SCANNER(1m)
File index backups imported from volumes from other Networker servers cannot be recovered by nsrck
-L7. You must use mmrecov to recover the Bootstrap of that NetWorker server before the file indexes can
be recovered.
When scanning a relabeled optical volume (that is, a re-writable optical volume that had been written once,
then re-labeled and used again), scanner may read off the end of the new data, and attempt to read the old
data from the previous version of the volume, terminating with an ‘‘unexpected volume id’’ error. This
error occurs after all the good data has been read, and can be ignored.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
5
SJIDOPEN(1m)
SJIDOPEN(1m)
NAME
sjidopen − test the SJI Jukebox Interface SJIDOOROPEN command
SYNOPSIS
sjidopen devname
DESCRIPTION
The sjidopen program tests the SJIDOOROPEN command on SJI compliant Jukeboxes (see libsji(1m)).
This command tests the open/close capability of the main door to a Jukebox. If a Jukebox doesn’t support
this feature, an appropriate error message will be printed out.
The devname argument should be any device name that can be used to reach a SJI compliant Jukebox
driven by the system. Typical usage is in constructing the name that contains the SCSI Bus, the SCSI Target
ID and the SCSI Lun on that target, e.g., scsidev@0.4.0.
SEE ALSO
libsji(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
SJIIELM(1m)
SJIIELM(1m)
NAME
sjiielm − test the SJI Jukebox Interface SJIIELEM command
SYNOPSIS
sjiielm devname [ { drive | slot | inlt | mt } address nelements ]
DESCRIPTION
The sjiielm program tests the SJIIELEM command on SJI compliant Jukeboxes (see libsji(1m)). This
command tests the Initialize Element Status interface for a Jukebox. If a Jukebox doesn’t support this feature, an appropriate error message will be printed out.
The devname argument should be any device name that can be used to reach a SJI compliant Jukebox
driven by the system. Typical usage is in constructing the name that contains the SCSI Bus, the SCSI Target
ID and the SCSI Lun on that target, e.g., scsidev@0.4.0.
The additional optional arguments are for Jukeboxes that support the initialization of a specific range of elements. In this case, you select one of element types of drive, or slot, or inlt (Import/Export element), or mt
(Media Transport, or the "Robot Arm"), and give an SJI normalized (i.e., starting from 1) address and number of elements to initialize.
SEE ALSO
libsji(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
SJIINQ(1m)
SJIINQ(1m)
NAME
sjiinq − test the SJI Jukebox Interface SJIINQ command
SYNOPSIS
sjiinq devname
DESCRIPTION
The sjiinq program tests the SJIINQ command on SJI compliant Jukeboxes (see libsji(1m)). This command returns a string that identifies a Jukebox. If a Jukebox doesn’t support this feature, an appropriate
error message will be printed out.
The devname argument should be any device name that can be used to reach a SJI compliant Jukebox
driven by the system. Typical usage is in constructing the name that contains the SCSI Bus, the SCSI Target
ID and the SCSI Lun on that target, e.g., scsidev@0.4.0.
SEE ALSO
libsji(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
SJIRDP(1m)
SJIRDP(1m)
NAME
sjirdp − test the SJI Jukebox Interface SJIRDP command
SYNOPSIS
sjirdp devname
DESCRIPTION
The sjirdp program tests the SJIRDP command on SJI compliant Jukeboxes (see libsji(1m)). This command reads SJI ordinal device positions from a Jukebox.
Typical output for this command might look like:
scsidev@1.0.0 has
scsidev@1.0.0 has
scsidev@1.0.0 has
scsidev@1.0.0 has
2 DATA TRANSPORT Elements starting at address 1
1 MEDIA TRANSPORT Element starting at address 1
25 STORAGE Elements starting at address 1
1 IMPORT/EXPORT Element starting at address 1
The devname argument should be any device name that can be used to reach a SJI compliant Jukebox
driven by the system. Typical usage is in constructing the name that contains the SCSI Bus, the SCSI Target
ID and the SCSI Lun on that target, e.g., scsidev@0.4.0.
SEE ALSO
libsji(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
SJIRDTAG(1m)
SJIRDTAG(1m)
NAME
sjirdtag − test the SJI Jukebox Interface SJIRTAG command
SYNOPSIS
sjirdtag devname
DESCRIPTION
The sjirdtag program tests the SJIRTAG command on SJI compliant Jukeboxes (see libsji(1m)). This
command reads media presence and tag data from a Jukebox.
Example output for this command:
Tag Data for 0.2.1, Element Type DATA TRANSPORT:
Elem[001]: tag_val=0 pres_val=1 med_pres=1 med_side=0
Tag Data for 0.2.1, Element Type STORAGE:
Elem[001]: tag_val=0 pres_val=1 med_pres=1 med_side=0
Elem[002]: tag_val=0 pres_val=1 med_pres=1 med_side=0
Elem[003]: tag_val=0 pres_val=1 med_pres=1 med_side=0
Elem[004]: tag_val=0 pres_val=1 med_pres=1 med_side=0
Elem[005]: tag_val=0 pres_val=1 med_pres=0 med_side=0
Elem[006]: tag_val=0 pres_val=1 med_pres=1 med_side=0
Elem[007]: tag_val=1 pres_val=1 med_pres=1 med_side=0
VolumeTag=<00000098>
Tag Data for 0.2.1, Element Type MEDIA TRANSPORT:
Elem[001]: tag_val=0 pres_val=1 med_pres=0 med_side=0
The devname argument should be any device name that can be used to reach a SJI compliant Jukebox
driven by the system. Typical usage is in constructing the name that contains the SCSI Bus, the SCSI Target
ID and the SCSI Lun on that target, e.g., scsidev@0.4.0.
The output is sorted by types available, and then by ascending order.
The boolean token tag_val states whether the tag data is available (valid). In the example above, only the
seventh storage element had valid tag data (which was the bar code numbered ’00000098’).
The boolean token med_pres states whether the Jukebox believes that there is media present at this location.
The boolean token pres_val is a subtle and overloaded indicator that states (if set to true, or 1), that the the
token med_pres should be believed absolutely. If pres_val is not true (set to zero), or med_pres is true (set
to one), it is probable that there is media at that location, but that there is some exception associated with it.
A possible exception is that a tape has a missing, upsidedown, or unreadable bar code label. Also, a Jukebox cannot determine whether media that existed at one point (for example, prior to a power failure) has
been removed from a Data Transport element (tape drive). If the token pres_val is not true (set to zero),
and med_pres is also not true (set to zero), there probably isn’t media in that location. This uncertainty is
eliminated the next time an INITIALIZE ELEMENT STATUS is done (see sjiielm(1m)).
The token med_size is for two sided media (e.g., optical disks), where the Jukebox has kept track of which
side is up.
SEE ALSO
libsji(1m)
sjiielem(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
SJIRELEM(1m)
SJIRELEM(1m)
NAME
sjirelem − test the SJI Jukebox Interface SJIRELEM command
SYNOPSIS
sjirelem devname
DESCRIPTION
The sjirelem program tests the SJIRELEM command on SJI compliant Jukeboxes (see libsji(1m)). This
command reads media presence and origin data from a Jukebox.
Typical output for this command might look like:
Element Data for 0.2.1, Element Type DATA TRANSPORT:
Elem[001]: pres_val=1 med_pres=1 med_side=0
Origin: type STORAGE, address 5
Element Data for 0.2.1, Element Type STORAGE:
Elem[001]: pres_val=1 med_pres=1 med_side=0
Elem[002]: pres_val=1 med_pres=1 med_side=0
Elem[003]: pres_val=1 med_pres=1 med_side=0
Elem[004]: pres_val=1 med_pres=1 med_side=0
Elem[005]: pres_val=1 med_pres=0 med_side=0
Elem[006]: pres_val=1 med_pres=1 med_side=0
Elem[007]: pres_val=1 med_pres=1 med_side=0
Element Data for 0.2.1, Element Type MEDIA TRANSPORT:
Elem[001]: pres_val=1 med_pres=0 med_side=0
The devname argument should be any device name that can be used to reach a SJI compliant Jukebox
driven by the system. Typical usage is in constructing the name that contains the SCSI Bus, the SCSI Target
ID and the SCSI Lun on that target, e.g., scsidev@0.4.0.
The output is sorted by types available, and then by ascending order.
The boolean token med_pres states whether the Jukebox believes that there is media present at this location.
The boolean token pres_val is a subtle and overloaded indicator that states (if set to true, or 1), that the the
token med_pres should be believed absolutely. If pres_val is not true (i.e., set to zero), and med_pres is
true (i.e., set to one), it is probable that there is media at that location, but that there is some exception associated with it. This may mean (in some cases and for some Jukeboxes) that a tape has a missing, upside
down, or unreadable bar code label. It may also mean, hoever, in the case of media located inside a DATA
TRANSPORT element (tape drive) that the Jukebox cannot really tell, but that as far as it knew, there was
media there at some point in the past (say, prior to a power failure). If the token pres_val is not true (i.e.,
set to zero), and med_pres is also not true (i.e., set to zero), it is pretty likely that there isn’t media in that
location. Typically, most of this uncertainty gets eliminated the next time an INITIALIZE ELEMENT
STATUS is done (see sjiielm(1m)).
The token med_size is for two sided media (e.g., optical disks), where the Jukebox has kept track of which
side is up.
When the Jukebox can, it might also say where the last place a piece of media had been prior to its current
location, in which case sjirelem will print that out.
SEE ALSO
libsji(1m)
sjiielem(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
SJIRJC(1m)
SJIRJC(1m)
NAME
sjirjc − test the SJI Jukebox Interface SJIRJC command
SYNOPSIS
sjirjc devname
DESCRIPTION
The sjirjc program tests the SJIRJC command on SJI compliant Jukeboxes (see libsji(1m)). This command reads internal configuration information and options about a Jukebox and prints it out.
Typical output for this command might look like:
Device: scsidev@0.2.1
Number of Drives: 1
Number Drive Pairs: 1
Number of Import/Export Elements: 0
Number of Import/Export Pairs: 1
Number of Slots: 7
Number of Slot Pairs: 1
Number of Transport Elements: 1
Number of Transport Pairs: 1
Initialize Element Status Supported
Auto Eject Supported
The devname argument should be any device name that can be used to reach a SJI compliant Jukebox
driven by the system. Typical usage is in constructing the name that contains the SCSI Bus, the SCSI Target
ID and the SCSI Lun on that target, e.g., scsidev@0.4.0.
Since the SJI specification allows for multiple disjoint sets of elements, you will always see a count of
’Pairs’ (but the author has never run across a value other than ’1’). The output tells you how man drives,
slots, transports (gripper arm), and import/export elements there are.
In addition, various internal library options are printed out.
SEE ALSO
libsji(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
ssi(8)
ssi(8)
NAME
ssi − StorageTek silo interface module (Unix only)
mini_el − event logger for use with ssi (Unix only)
libstlstk − shared library for communication to ssi
SYNOPSIS
ssi
[ ACSLS server ] [ socket ] [ retry count ] &
mini_el [ −l logfile ] [ −d ] [ −h ] &
libstlstk.so (Solaris)
libstlstk.so.a (AIX)
libstlstk.sl (HPUX)
libstlstk.so.1 (SGI)
libstlstk.so.1 (DYNIX/ptx)
libstlstk.so (DECAXP)
libstlstk.dll (NT i386)
DESCRIPTION
NOTE: in this document, the term "ACSLS server" will be used to indicate the name of the system that is
running any one of StorageTek’s library manager programs: ACSLS on a Solaris or AIX host, Library
Station on an MVS host, or Horizon Library Manager on a system running Windows NT or Windows 2000.
(Unix only)
The ssi command is used indirectly by nsrjb to communicate with an ACSLS server. nsrjb loads libstlstk
, which handles the TCP calls to and from ssi. ssi then handles all of communication to and from the
ACSLS server. Starting with ACSLS version 5.3, it is possible to run NetWorker (either a server or a
storage node) on the same host that ACSLS is running on.
ssi and mini_el must be running on the system on which jbconfig was run to create the jukebox resource.
ssi and mini_el are almost always run as background processes, and are usually started automatically by the
system.
In addition to ssi and mini_el , a shared library file (usually called libstlstk.xxx where xxx is an operating
system dependent extension) is also required. An appropriate version of this library is installed as part of
NetWorker.
New in version 1.06 of ssi:
ssi now supports communication to more than one ACSLS server at any given time. Previous versions of
ssi were limited to a fixed TCP port for communication with NetWorker, and hence were limited to having
only one instance running at a time. In version 1.06, ssi and libstlstk have an added private communication
channel that lets libstlstk ask any of the running ssi instances which ACSLS server it is connecting to, and
to select the proper ssi for the current NetWorker silo. To make it easier to set up a configuration with the
possibilility of many ssi processes running, the command line for ssi has changed.
While you can still start ssi the same way as before - using the environment variable CSI_HOSTNAME to
select the ACSLS server to connect to - you can also simply specify the ACSLS server hostname on the
command line. You may also specify the port number used for communication between NetWorker and
that particular instance of ssi. The allowed values for this port number are 50004 (for the first instance),
50011 to 50019, and 50021 to 50099. Note that if you specify a port number that is already being used by
an instance of ssi, the specified port cannot be used, and the next available port in the allowed range will be
selected. If the port number is not specified, each successive instance of ssi will take the next available port
starting from 50004 and going upwards. If there are no available ports in the range, ssi will fail to load and
should display an error message. Note that specifying the port number is not necessary for normal
operation. You do not need to insure that a given ACSLS server is always accessed over a given port.
NetWorker and ssi use the name of the ACSLS server to establish a connection on the fly.
If there is not a hostname specified on the ssi command line, before ssi is started, one environment variable
MUST be set: CSI_HOSTNAME must be set to the name of the library server. If this variable is not
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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ssi(8)
ssi(8)
found, ssi will exit with an error message.
mini_el is an event logger used by ssi to maintain a log of certain events. It should be started before ssi.
Multiple instances of ssi will share a single instance of mini_el. A header consisting of the ACSLS server
name and the local TCP port that ssi will be listening on is included at the start of any message placed into
the log by any instance of ssi
(NT only)
On NT, the software equivalent to ssi and mini_el must be obtained from StorageTek as their product
"Library Attach for NT". This package must be installed prior to configuring a Silo in NetWorker.
NOTE: Library Attach version 1.1 includes a portmapper function that will only install properly if the
NetWorker services are not running. You should use Control Panel to stop the "NetWorker Backup and
Recover Server" and the "NetWorker Remote Exec Service" before installing Library Attach. After Library
Attach is installed, you should use Control Panel to start "NetWorker Remote Exec Service" and
"NetWorker Backup and Recover Server".
NOTE: Since Legato does not supply "Library Attach for NT", we are unable to add the multiple ACSLS
host functionality to our NT version of NetWorker.
(All platforms)
libstlstk.xxx is a shared library that handles the communication between nsrjb and ssi or Library Attach.
ssi or Library Attach then handles the communication over the network to the library server (either ACSLS,
Library Station or Horizon Library Manager). There are no options, parameters or environment variables
that affect the operation of libstlstk. The correct path to this file should be entered when an STK silo is
configured using jbconfig. The default values specified by jbconfig match the default locations chosen for
the installation program, and in most cases can be accepted.
OPTIONS
mini_el
−l
logfile Specifies the filename of the logfile to be created by mini_el. The default value is
/nsr/logs/ssi_event.log. If present, logfile must be the complete path to the logfile. If the file does
not exist, it will be created. If the file does exist, it will be appended to. If there is not a −l
parameter, the default logfile /nsr/logs/ssi_event.log will be used
−d
Sets the debug flag. mini_el will output debug information
−h
Displays usage information for mini_el
PARAMETERS
ssi
ACSLS server is required if the CSI_HOSTNAME environment variable has not been set to the name of
the system running ACSLS, LibraryStation or Horizon.
socket is only required if you need to specify the socket used for communication between NetWorker and
ssi
retry count is only required if you need to increase the retry count for communication between ssi and the
ACSLS server due to network problems.
These parameters are not position sensitive. The command line code in ssi uses the value of the parameter
to decide which of the three acceptable parameters any given command line parameter actually is:
If the input parameter evaluates to zero using the atoi function, then it is assumed to be the ACSLS
server name. Only the first parameter that evaluates to zero will be used as the server hostname.
If the parameter evaluates to a number between 50004 and 50100, then it is assumed to be the socket
value to be used. All parameters that fit this case will be saved as the socket value, so the last
matching parameter on the command line will be the one actually used.
NetWorker 6.1.1
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ssi(8)
ssi(8)
If a parameter evaluates to a number between 1 and 500, then it is assumed to be the retry count. As
with the socket parameter, the last matching parameter on the command line wins.
Any parameter that falls outside of these cases will simply be ignored.
ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
ssi
CSI_HOSTNAME (text, up to 256 chars, there is no
default)
If an ACSLS server name is not found on the command line, ssi will use the hostname specified by
this variable. It is limited to 256 characters, and should simply be the hostname running the
library server program that you are trying to connect to. If neither the command line hostname nor
this environment variable specify a hostname for ssi to use, ssi will exit with an error message.
SSI_HOSTNAME (text, up to 256 chars, there is no
default)
This variable is intended for use on multi-homed systems. Normally, ssi uses the gethostbyname
system function to determine the name to use for this side of the connection to the ACSLS server.
On a system with several network interfaces, the name supplied by that function may not result in
the use of the network interface needed to communicate with the ACSLS server. On these
systems, you can explicitly specify the exact name of the network interface that ssi will use to
connect to the ACSLS server. This variable needs to be set before ssi is started, and may be
different for various instances of ssi In all cases, a message will be logged in the event log stating
if this environment variable was found, and if not, that ssi will be using the hostname returned by
gethostbyname. This is not an error message.
SSI_BASE_SOCKET (numeric, 0 < x < 64k, no default)
If you need to restrict the socket values that ssi communicates on, this variable specifies the
starting number for ssi to use when it needs to open a socket to talk to the ACSLS server. It
appears that ssi will only open two sockets if this variable is set. The first, at
SSI_BASE_SOCKET will be used to connect to any host. The second, at SSI_BASE_SOCKET
+ 1, will be used for direct communication to the ACSLS server. Note that there will still be the
default sockets at 50001 and 50004 used to communicate between mini_el and ssi, but any
communication between this host and the ACSLS server should occur using the two sockets
starting at SSI_BASE_SOCKET.
TIME_FORMAT (time format string,
default = "%m-%d-%y %H:%M:%S")
If you wish to see time values printed in a format other than the default of Month-Day-Year
Hour:Minute:Seconds, use this variable.
%m is replaced by the current month
%d is replaced by today’s date
%y is replaced by the current year
%H is replaced by the current hour
%M is replaced by the current minute
%S is replaced by the current second
CSI_CONNECT_AGETIME (seconds, 0 < x < 31536000,
default = 600)
This will set the number of seconds for network connect aging purposes.
CSI_RETRY_TIMEOUT (seconds, 0 < x < ??, default = 4)
This will set how long ssi will wait before retrying a network request.
CSI_RETRY_TRIES (numeric, 0 < x < 100, default = 5)
This will set the number of times ssi will retry a network message before reporting an error.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
3
ssi(8)
ssi(8)
CSI_TCP_RPCSERVICE (boolean, default is TRUE)
This sets whether ssi will use TCP sockets to connect with the library server.
CSI_UDP_RPCSERVICE (boolean, default is FALSE)
This sets whether ssi will use UDP sockets to connect with the library server. Setting
CSI_UDP_RPCSERVICE to TRUE will allow ssi to communicate with a csi that is running on
the same system
EXAMPLES
Normal STK silo setup:
mini_el &
ssi acsls1 &
− or −
mini_el &
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls1
ssi &
Connect to 3 different ACSLS servers:
mini_el &
ssi acsls1 &
ssi acsls2 &
ssi acsls3 &
− or −
mini_el &
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls1
ssi &
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls2
ssi &
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls3
ssi &
Connect to 3 different ACSLS servers over 3 different
network interfaces:
mini_el &
setenv SSI_HOSTNAME myhost_on_net1
ssi acsls1 &
setenv SSI_HOSTNAME myhost_on_net2
ssi acsls2 &
setenv SSI_HOSTNAME myhost_on_net3
ssi acsls3 &
Connect to ACSLS server on socket 50025
mini_el &
ssi acsls1 50025 &
− or −
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls1
mini_el &
ssi 50025 &
To have mini_el use /nsr/logs/ssi.log.today as its log file
mini_el -l /nsr/logs/ssi.log.today &
ssi acsls1 &
FILES
/nsr/logs/ssi_event.log
default logfile created/appended to by mini_el
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
4
ssi(8)
ssi(8)
SEE ALSO
nsrjb(1m), jbconfig(1m), dasadmin(1m), libstlemass(1m), libstlibm(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
Several startup and shutdown messages along with any errors in communication between the NetWorker
server and the ACSLS server will be logged in the logfile /nsr/logs/ssi_event.log (or other logfile as specified on the mini_el command line). The messages from any one ssi instance will be preceded by the name
of the ACSLS server that that instance will be communicating with plus the local TCP port number that
will be used between NetWorker and ssi.
For example:
10-12-00 12:31:44 SSI[0]:
[devlab-acsls/50004] ONC RPC: csi_init(): Initiation Started
source csi_init.c; line 165
10-12-00 12:33:20 SSI[0]:
[acsls2/50011] ONC RPC: csi_init(): Initiation Completed
ONC RPC: csi_init(): ACSLS server acsls2 accessed through port 50011
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
5
stk_eject(1m)
stk_eject(1m)
NAME
stk_eject − eject tapes from a StorageTek silo
SYNOPSIS
stk_eject
acsls_hostname cap_id mode volser0 ... volsern
DESCRIPTION
The stk_eject command allows you to eject one to 42 tapes at a time from a StorageTek silo. By dealing
directly with ACSLS (through ssi on the NetWorker system), this utility originally was intended to avoid
nsrjb’s limitation of ejecting only one tape per command. The limitation in nsrjb was removed in NetWorker version 5.5 Patch 3. However, stk_eject is being maintained for compatability and for use in customer developed scripts.
Starting with version 1.1 of stk_eject, you will be able to eject volumes from devices controlled by more
than one ACSLS server, as long as you are also using ssi version 1.06 or greater. The correct ssi to use will
be automatically detected by stk_eject based on the ACSLS hostname passed in on the command line.
NOTE: stk_eject does NOT deallocate volumes for NetWorker. You MUST perform the deallocation separately using the nsrjb -x -Txxx command to properly maintain NetWorker’s idea of what is and what is
not present in the silo.
All parameters are required, and the list of volsers can be from 1 to 42 elements long. Volsers beyond the
limit of 42 will be ignored.
acsls_hostname − 1 word host ID of system running ACSLS or Library Station - e.g. expo1
cap_id − STK cap name, no internal spaces - e.g. 0,0,0
mode − should this command wait until the eject is completed?
values are WAIT or NOWAIT for QUIET mode
− or −
WAITV or NOWAITV for VERBOSE mode
volser − 6 character STK volser list - not checked for size or form - only first 6 characters are used. Volsers
should be separated by a single space character.
*** You may eject up to 42 VOLSERS per command ***
NOTE: in NOWAIT or NOWAITV mode, there is no confirmation of ejection on this system.
If you require confirmation, you should use the WAIT or WAITV modes. This program will then receive
confirmation from ACSLS, but it will not return to the caller until all ejected tapes have been removed from
the CAP.
You will not receive any messages regarding emptying the CAP when it fills, or when the eject is done you must use the ACSLS console to see what the CAP status is.
This utility uses ssi to communicate with ACSLS, so ssi must be properly configured and running on the
system where this command is used. Note that this utility does not depend on any other NetWorker files, so
it can be run on any system that is running ssi which can communicate with the desired ACSLS system.
SEE ALSO
STK_silo(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
STK_silo(8)
STK_silo(8)
NAME
ssi − StorageTek silo interface module (Unix only)
mini_el − event logger for use with ssi (Unix only)
libstlstk − shared library for communication to ssi
SYNOPSIS
ssi
[ ACSLS server ] [ socket ] [ retry count ] &
mini_el [ −l logfile ] [ −d ] [ −h ] &
libstlstk.so (Solaris)
libstlstk.so.a (AIX)
libstlstk.sl (HPUX)
libstlstk.so.1 (SGI)
libstlstk.so.1 (DYNIX/ptx)
libstlstk.so (DECAXP)
libstlstk.dll (NT i386)
DESCRIPTION
NOTE: in this document, the term "ACSLS server" will be used to indicate the name of the system that is
running any one of StorageTek’s library manager programs: ACSLS on a Solaris or AIX host, Library
Station on an MVS host, or Horizon Library Manager on a system running Windows NT or Windows 2000.
(Unix only)
The ssi command is used indirectly by nsrjb to communicate with an ACSLS server. nsrjb loads libstlstk
, which handles the TCP calls to and from ssi. ssi then handles all of communication to and from the
ACSLS server. Starting with ACSLS version 5.3, it is possible to run NetWorker (either a server or a
storage node) on the same host that ACSLS is running on.
ssi and mini_el must be running on the system on which jbconfig was run to create the jukebox resource.
ssi and mini_el are almost always run as background processes, and are usually started automatically by the
system.
In addition to ssi and mini_el , a shared library file (usually called libstlstk.xxx where xxx is an operating
system dependent extension) is also required. An appropriate version of this library is installed as part of
NetWorker.
New in version 1.06 of ssi:
ssi now supports communication to more than one ACSLS server at any given time. Previous versions of
ssi were limited to a fixed TCP port for communication with NetWorker, and hence were limited to having
only one instance running at a time. In version 1.06, ssi and libstlstk have an added private communication
channel that lets libstlstk ask any of the running ssi instances which ACSLS server it is connecting to, and
to select the proper ssi for the current NetWorker silo. To make it easier to set up a configuration with the
possibilility of many ssi processes running, the command line for ssi has changed.
While you can still start ssi the same way as before - using the environment variable CSI_HOSTNAME to
select the ACSLS server to connect to - you can also simply specify the ACSLS server hostname on the
command line. You may also specify the port number used for communication between NetWorker and
that particular instance of ssi. The allowed values for this port number are 50004 (for the first instance),
50011 to 50019, and 50021 to 50099. Note that if you specify a port number that is already being used by
an instance of ssi, the specified port cannot be used, and the next available port in the allowed range will be
selected. If the port number is not specified, each successive instance of ssi will take the next available port
starting from 50004 and going upwards. If there are no available ports in the range, ssi will fail to load and
should display an error message. Note that specifying the port number is not necessary for normal
operation. You do not need to insure that a given ACSLS server is always accessed over a given port.
NetWorker and ssi use the name of the ACSLS server to establish a connection on the fly.
If there is not a hostname specified on the ssi command line, before ssi is started, one environment variable
MUST be set: CSI_HOSTNAME must be set to the name of the library server. If this variable is not
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STK_silo(8)
found, ssi will exit with an error message.
mini_el is an event logger used by ssi to maintain a log of certain events. It should be started before ssi.
Multiple instances of ssi will share a single instance of mini_el. A header consisting of the ACSLS server
name and the local TCP port that ssi will be listening on is included at the start of any message placed into
the log by any instance of ssi
(NT only)
On NT, the software equivalent to ssi and mini_el must be obtained from StorageTek as their product
"Library Attach for NT". This package must be installed prior to configuring a Silo in NetWorker.
NOTE: Library Attach version 1.1 includes a portmapper function that will only install properly if the
NetWorker services are not running. You should use Control Panel to stop the "NetWorker Backup and
Recover Server" and the "NetWorker Remote Exec Service" before installing Library Attach. After Library
Attach is installed, you should use Control Panel to start "NetWorker Remote Exec Service" and
"NetWorker Backup and Recover Server".
NOTE: Since Legato does not supply "Library Attach for NT", we are unable to add the multiple ACSLS
host functionality to our NT version of NetWorker.
(All platforms)
libstlstk.xxx is a shared library that handles the communication between nsrjb and ssi or Library Attach.
ssi or Library Attach then handles the communication over the network to the library server (either ACSLS,
Library Station or Horizon Library Manager). There are no options, parameters or environment variables
that affect the operation of libstlstk. The correct path to this file should be entered when an STK silo is
configured using jbconfig. The default values specified by jbconfig match the default locations chosen for
the installation program, and in most cases can be accepted.
OPTIONS
mini_el
−l
logfile Specifies the filename of the logfile to be created by mini_el. The default value is
/nsr/logs/ssi_event.log. If present, logfile must be the complete path to the logfile. If the file does
not exist, it will be created. If the file does exist, it will be appended to. If there is not a −l
parameter, the default logfile /nsr/logs/ssi_event.log will be used
−d
Sets the debug flag. mini_el will output debug information
−h
Displays usage information for mini_el
PARAMETERS
ssi
ACSLS server is required if the CSI_HOSTNAME environment variable has not been set to the name of
the system running ACSLS, LibraryStation or Horizon.
socket is only required if you need to specify the socket used for communication between NetWorker and
ssi
retry count is only required if you need to increase the retry count for communication between ssi and the
ACSLS server due to network problems.
These parameters are not position sensitive. The command line code in ssi uses the value of the parameter
to decide which of the three acceptable parameters any given command line parameter actually is:
If the input parameter evaluates to zero using the atoi function, then it is assumed to be the ACSLS
server name. Only the first parameter that evaluates to zero will be used as the server hostname.
If the parameter evaluates to a number between 50004 and 50100, then it is assumed to be the socket
value to be used. All parameters that fit this case will be saved as the socket value, so the last
matching parameter on the command line will be the one actually used.
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STK_silo(8)
If a parameter evaluates to a number between 1 and 500, then it is assumed to be the retry count. As
with the socket parameter, the last matching parameter on the command line wins.
Any parameter that falls outside of these cases will simply be ignored.
ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
ssi
CSI_HOSTNAME (text, up to 256 chars, there is no
default)
If an ACSLS server name is not found on the command line, ssi will use the hostname specified by
this variable. It is limited to 256 characters, and should simply be the hostname running the
library server program that you are trying to connect to. If neither the command line hostname nor
this environment variable specify a hostname for ssi to use, ssi will exit with an error message.
SSI_HOSTNAME (text, up to 256 chars, there is no
default)
This variable is intended for use on multi-homed systems. Normally, ssi uses the gethostbyname
system function to determine the name to use for this side of the connection to the ACSLS server.
On a system with several network interfaces, the name supplied by that function may not result in
the use of the network interface needed to communicate with the ACSLS server. On these
systems, you can explicitly specify the exact name of the network interface that ssi will use to
connect to the ACSLS server. This variable needs to be set before ssi is started, and may be
different for various instances of ssi In all cases, a message will be logged in the event log stating
if this environment variable was found, and if not, that ssi will be using the hostname returned by
gethostbyname. This is not an error message.
SSI_BASE_SOCKET (numeric, 0 < x < 64k, no default)
If you need to restrict the socket values that ssi communicates on, this variable specifies the
starting number for ssi to use when it needs to open a socket to talk to the ACSLS server. It
appears that ssi will only open two sockets if this variable is set. The first, at
SSI_BASE_SOCKET will be used to connect to any host. The second, at SSI_BASE_SOCKET
+ 1, will be used for direct communication to the ACSLS server. Note that there will still be the
default sockets at 50001 and 50004 used to communicate between mini_el and ssi, but any
communication between this host and the ACSLS server should occur using the two sockets
starting at SSI_BASE_SOCKET.
TIME_FORMAT (time format string,
default = "%m-%d-%y %H:%M:%S")
If you wish to see time values printed in a format other than the default of Month-Day-Year
Hour:Minute:Seconds, use this variable.
%m is replaced by the current month
%d is replaced by today’s date
%y is replaced by the current year
%H is replaced by the current hour
%M is replaced by the current minute
%S is replaced by the current second
CSI_CONNECT_AGETIME (seconds, 0 < x < 31536000,
default = 600)
This will set the number of seconds for network connect aging purposes.
CSI_RETRY_TIMEOUT (seconds, 0 < x < ??, default = 4)
This will set how long ssi will wait before retrying a network request.
CSI_RETRY_TRIES (numeric, 0 < x < 100, default = 5)
This will set the number of times ssi will retry a network message before reporting an error.
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STK_silo(8)
CSI_TCP_RPCSERVICE (boolean, default is TRUE)
This sets whether ssi will use TCP sockets to connect with the library server.
CSI_UDP_RPCSERVICE (boolean, default is FALSE)
This sets whether ssi will use UDP sockets to connect with the library server. Setting
CSI_UDP_RPCSERVICE to TRUE will allow ssi to communicate with a csi that is running on
the same system
EXAMPLES
Normal STK silo setup:
mini_el &
ssi acsls1 &
− or −
mini_el &
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls1
ssi &
Connect to 3 different ACSLS servers:
mini_el &
ssi acsls1 &
ssi acsls2 &
ssi acsls3 &
− or −
mini_el &
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls1
ssi &
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls2
ssi &
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls3
ssi &
Connect to 3 different ACSLS servers over 3 different
network interfaces:
mini_el &
setenv SSI_HOSTNAME myhost_on_net1
ssi acsls1 &
setenv SSI_HOSTNAME myhost_on_net2
ssi acsls2 &
setenv SSI_HOSTNAME myhost_on_net3
ssi acsls3 &
Connect to ACSLS server on socket 50025
mini_el &
ssi acsls1 50025 &
− or −
setenv CSI_HOSTNAME acsls1
mini_el &
ssi 50025 &
To have mini_el use /nsr/logs/ssi.log.today as its log file
mini_el -l /nsr/logs/ssi.log.today &
ssi acsls1 &
FILES
/nsr/logs/ssi_event.log
default logfile created/appended to by mini_el
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SEE ALSO
nsrjb(1m), jbconfig(1m), dasadmin(1m), libstlemass(1m), libstlibm(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
Several startup and shutdown messages along with any errors in communication between the NetWorker
server and the ACSLS server will be logged in the logfile /nsr/logs/ssi_event.log (or other logfile as specified on the mini_el command line). The messages from any one ssi instance will be preceded by the name
of the ACSLS server that that instance will be communicating with plus the local TCP port number that
will be used between NetWorker and ssi.
For example:
10-12-00 12:31:44 SSI[0]:
[devlab-acsls/50004] ONC RPC: csi_init(): Initiation Started
source csi_init.c; line 165
10-12-00 12:33:20 SSI[0]:
[acsls2/50011] ONC RPC: csi_init(): Initiation Completed
ONC RPC: csi_init(): ACSLS server acsls2 accessed through port 50011
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STLI(1m)
STLI(1m)
NAME
stli − Standard Tape Library Interface
DESCRIPTION
STLI is the documented interface for connecting tape libraries to NetWorker.
Tape libraries are often referred to as silos. Examples of tape libraries are StorageTek ACSLS silos,
ABBA systems from Grau or the IBM 3494. Tape libraries differ from other jukeboxes supported by NetWorker in two major points:
o The tape libraries have their own volume and slot management.
The volumes are accessed by
NetWorker via their barcode labels. The exact location of a given tape is unknown to NetWorker.
o The interface to the library for issuing requests like mount or unmount of particular volumes differs from
that of jukeboxes, which are normally connected via a SCSI or V24 interface. Standard Tape Library
commands are transmitted to a Standard Tape Library server, which receives these commands and
invokes the appropriate library actions. Usually, the connection between NetWorker and the Library controller is over the network, although serial (RS-232) connections are also used. Note that the actual connection is hidden from NetWorker by the STL library. Accordingly NetWorker and other applications
calling the STL server are called library clients.
To keep applications independent of differing interfaces to various tape library systems, an API called STLI
(Standard Tape Library Interface) has been defined, which is used by NetWorker to invoke library requests.
The STLI specifies a shared library with well defined functions, which is dynamically linked to NetWorker.
These STLI interface libraries, which transform the STLI function calls to library-specific calls to the proprietary tape library server, may be provided by Legato or the manufacturers of the tape library.
Not all functions specified in this paper must be implemented in the STLI library. These functions are the
minimum necessary for a functional library:
stl_open()
stl_close()
stl_mount()
stl_unmount()
Implementation of stl_error() is recommended for easier use of the library and better troubleshooting.
If you wish to support dynamic device reservation these are the relevant functions:
stl_reserve_dev()
stl_release_dev()
stl_dev_reservation()
Optional fucntions for added features:
stl_query_volume()
stl_withdraw_volume()
stl_withdraw_volumes()
stl_deposit_volume()
stl_deposit_volumes()
stl_version()
stl_close()
Declaration:
int stl_close(char* stl);
Description:
Close the connection to the tape library.
<stl> is the handle returned by stl_open().
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The return value on success is STL_ERR_NOERR. For error return values see appendix.
stl_deposit_volume
Declaration:
int stl_deposit_volume(char *stl, char *volume, char *capname)
Description:
Causes the specified volume to be inserted into the library from the specified cartridge access port
(inport/export facility, mailslot....)
<stl> is the handle returned by stl_open().
<volume> is the barcode of the volume to be deposited into the library.
<capname> specifies the cartridge access port/inport-export area/mailslot to be used to insert the
volume into the library. It is a character string, which is understood by the tape library as a name
for that device. This argument can be NULL, in which case the default CAP will be used.
This function returns STL_ERR_NOERR if the volume is successfully inserted.
STL_ERR_NOVOL is returned if the volume is not present and was not inserted. Other return
values are possible if errors occur. See appendix for possible values.
NOTE: on some libraries, this function may not be needed.
o The IBM 3494 will automatically import any tapes placed into its in/out area. There is no ’deposit’ function in the 3494’s API.
o StorageTek libraries with the CAP set to automatic mode behave in the same manner as the 3494. However, if their CAP is set to manual, then a deposit call is required.
o On EMASS/Grau libraries, a single call to deposit one volume from the EIF will in fact deposit all available volumes. However, subsequent deposit calls will return quickly and the error can be ignored.
stl_deposit_volumes
Declaration:
int stl_deposit_volumes(char *stl, char *volumes, char *capname)
Description:
Causes the specified volumes to be inserted into the library from the specified cartridge access port
(inport/export facility, mailslot....). This function will be used instead of stl_deposit_volume() if it
is defined and stl_version returns 1.3 or greater. Therefore, it should be capable of functioning
with either a single volume specified or with a comma separated list.
<stl> is the handle returned by stl_open().
<volumes> is a comma separated list of barcodes of the volumes to be deposited into the library.
There should be no extraneous spaces added between the individual barcodes since the space character (ASCII 32) is a valid barcode character itself.
<capname> specifies the cartridge access port/inport-export area/mailslot to be used to insert the
volume into the library. It is a character string, which is understood by the tape library as a name
for that device. This argument can be NULL, in which case the default CAP will be used.
This function returns STL_ERR_NOERR if the volume is successfully inserted.
STL_ERR_NOVOL is returned if the volume is not present and was not inserted. Other return
values are possible if errors occur. See appendix for possible values.
NOTE: on some libraries, this function may not be needed.
o The IBM 3494 will automatically import any tapes placed into its in/out area. There is no ’deposit’ function in the 3494’s API.
o StorageTek libraries with the CAP set to automatic mode behave in the same manner as the 3494. However, if their CAP is set to manual, then a deposit call is required.
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o On EMASS/Grau libraries, a single call to deposit one volume from the EIF will in fact deposit all available volumes. However, subsequent deposit calls will return quickly and the error can be ignored.
stl_dev_reservation()
Declaration:
int stl_dev_reservation(char *stl, char *device, int *state)
Description:
Get the reservation state of device <device>.
<stl> is the handle returned by stl_open().
<device> specifies the device to get the reservation state of. It is a character string, which is
understood by the tape library as a name for that device.
*<state> returns the reservation state:
STL_DEV_FREE:
Free
STL_DEV_RESERVED: Reserved for NetWorker’s use
STL_DEV_OCCUPIED: Occupied by another host
The return value on success is STL_ERR_NOERR. For error return values see appendix.
stl_error()
Declaration:
char *stl_error(void)
Description:
Gives a printable error message belonging to the preceding STLI function call. The function
returns the address of a buffer which contains a message describing the status of the last STLI
function call. These messages can be constant strings, for instance the messages contained in stl.h
for error codes less than 100. But these messages can also be built up with actual parameters,
which describe more exactly the error situation.
Error and other status information should be maintained in global static variables in the library,
since this call is made without any parameters.
The function returns NULL if no message available. See appendix.
stl_mount()
Declaration:
int stl_mount(char* stl, char* volume, char* device);
Description:
Move volume <volume> into drive <drive>.
<stl> is the handle returned by stl_open().
<volume> is the barcode of the volume to be mounted.
<device> specifies the device, on which the volume shall be mounted. It is a character string,
which is understood by the tape library as a name for that device.
This call may not return until the volume is loaded into the drive and the drive has come ready.
The exact sequence is dependent on the library. It can therefore take several minutes to complete.
The return value on success is STL_ERR_NOERR. For error return values see appendix.
stl_open()
Declaration:
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STLI(1m)
int stl_open(char* server, char** stl);
Description:
Connect to the tape library.
<server> is a character string which contains all information necessary to establish a connection to
the tape library. The information in this string is proprietary to the special type of tape library.
Generally it should be of the form:
[<host>] [<par1>=<val1> [<par2>=<val2>]...]
In most cases the string contains merely <host>, the nodename of a library server, which receives
and serves the STLI requests over the network.
*<stl> is a handle returned for use by the other STLI functions. This handle can be used to store
internal information between subsequent function calls. For some libraries, the parameter to this
call may or may not be used, as environment variables may be used to hold the required configuration information.
The return value on success is STL_ERR_NOERR. For error return values see appendix
stl_query_volume
Declaration:
int stl_query_volume(char *stl, char *volume)
Description:
Queries a silo to establish the presence of a volume. This function is currently used to verify the
presence of a volume before allocating that volume for use with NetWorker.
<stl> is the handle returned by stl_open().
<volume> is the barcode of the volume to be mounted.
This function returns STL_ERR_NOERR if the volume is present, or STL_ERR_NOVOL if the
volume is not present.
Other return values are possible if errors occur. See appendix for possible values.
stl_release_dev()
Declaration:
int stl_release_dev(char *stl, char *device);
Description:
Release device <device>, which has previously been reserved by stl_reserve_dev().
<stl> is the handle returned by stl_open().
<device> specifies the device to be released. It is a character string, which is understood by the
tape library as a name for that device.
The return value on success is STL_ERR_NOERR. For error return values see appendix.
stl_reserve_dev()
Declaration:
int stl_reserve_dev(char *stl, char *device);
Description:
Reserves device <device> for NetWorker’s use.
<stl> is the handle returned by stl_open().
<device> specifies the device to be reserved. It is a character string, which is understood by the
tape library as a name for that device.
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STLI(1m)
The return value on success is STL_ERR_NOERR. For error return values see appendix.
stl_version()
Declaration:
int stl_version(void)
Description:
Returns STLI version information for the STL library
This function returns the version of the STL library * 10. I.e., it returns a value of 12 for an STL
library that supports the functions for STLI version 1.2.
STLI version 1.0 specified the following calls:
stl_close()
stl_dev_reservation()
stl_mount()
stl_open()
stl_release_dev()
stl_reserve_dev()
stl_unmount()
STLI version 1.1 added the following calls:
stl_query_volume()
stl_version()
STLI version 1.2 added the following calls:
stl_deposit_volume()
stl_withdraw_volume()
STLI version 1.3 added the following calls:
stl_deposit_volumes()
stl_withdraw_volumes()
Note that stl_version does not return a value that can be interpreted as an ’STL_’ error. Attempting to do so will result in unpredictable results.
stl_unmount()
Declaration:
int stl_unmount(char* stl, char* volume, char* device);
Description:
Remove volume <volume> from drive <drive>.
<stl> is the handle returned by stl_open().
<volume> is the barcode of the volume to be removed.
<device> specifies the device, from which the volume shall be removed. It is a character string,
which is understood by the tape library as a name for that device.
Either <volume> or <device> can be NULL. If both values are specified, they must be consistent.
This call will not return until the volume is ejected from the drive and returned to its slot by the
library. It can therefore take several minutes to complete.
The return value on success is STL_ERR_NOERR. For error return values see appendix.
stl_withdraw_volume
Declaration:
int stl_withdraw_volume(char *stl, char *volume, char *capname)
Description:
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Causes the specified volume to be ejected from the library through the specified cartridge access
port (inport/export facility, mailslot....)
<stl> is the handle returned by stl_open().
<volume> is the barcode of the volume to be withdrawn.
<capname> specifies the cartridge access port/inport-export area/mailslot to be used to remove the
volume from the silo. It is a character string, which is understood by the tape library as a name for
that device. This argument can be NULL, in which case the default CAP will be used.
This function returns STL_ERR_NOERR if the volume is successfully withdrawn from the
library. STL_ERR_NOVOL is returned if the volume is not present and STL_ERR_VOLBUSY is
returned if the volume is currently in use and cannot be withdrawn.
Other return values are possible if errors occur. See appendix for possible values.
stl_withdraw_volumes
Declaration:
int stl_withdraw_volumes(char *stl, char *volumes, char *capname)
Description:
Causes the specified volume to be ejected from the library through the specified cartridge access
port (inport/export facility, mailslot....) This function will be used instead of
stl_withdraw_volume() if it is defined and stl_version returns 1.3 or greater. Therefore, it should
be capable of functioning with either a single volume specified or with a comma separated list.
<stl> is the handle returned by stl_open().
<volumes> is a comma separated list of barcodes of the volumes to be deposited into the library.
There should be no extraneous spaces added between the individual barcodes since the space character (ASCII 32) is a valid barcode character itself.
<capname> specifies the cartridge access port/inport-export area/mailslot to be used to remove the
volume from the silo. It is a character string, which is understood by the tape library as a name for
that device. This argument can be NULL, in which case the default CAP will be used.
This function returns STL_ERR_NOERR if the volume is successfully withdrawn from the
library. STL_ERR_NOVOL is returned if the volume is not present and STL_ERR_VOLBUSY is
returned if the volume is currently in use and cannot be withdrawn.
Other return values are possible if errors occur. See appendix for possible values.
Appendix: Return Values
Return values 0 - 99 are reserved for common, library type independent error codes. The header file stl.h
defines the common return values together with a short error message.
Return values greater 100 can be used by each STLI implementation for proprietary error codes.
It is recommended, that a STLI implementation should map all error situations to the common STLI error
codes and should provide the function stl_error() for more detailed error messages. This allows NetWorker
to react on known error codes, but also to forward the more detailed error messages via the user interface.
No proprietary error codes are allowed in situations, where the common
STL_ERR_DEVEMPTY, STL_ERR_DEVFULL or STL_ERR_ALRDYMNTED apply.
error
codes
The currently defined return codes are:
Error value
Meaning
------------------------------------------------------STL_ERR_NOERR
Successful call return - no error
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STLI(1m)
STLI(1m)
STL_ERR_UNKNOWN
Error, no details available
STL_ERR_CONNECT
Cannot connect to tape library
STL_ERR_BUSY
Tape library busy, try later
STL_ERR_ACCESS
Permission denied (to access the library, the requested device, volume or operation)
STL_ERR_NODEV
Device not known to the tape library or physically not available
STL_ERR_NOVOL
Volume not known to the tape library or physically not available
STL_ERR_DEVFULL
Device already loaded with another volume
STL_ERR_DEVEMPTY
Device empty
STL_ERR_DEVBUSY
Device busy
STL_ERR_ERRNO
Local UNIX error, see errno
STL_ERR_INVALID
Invalid parameter
STL_ERR_VOLBUSY
Volume already loaded in another drive or is otherwise occupied
STL_ERR_LIBRARY
Tape library internal error
STL_ERR_CONFIG
Request doesn’t comply with tape library configuration
STL_ERR_DEVOCC
Device reserved by another host
STL_ERR_DEVRES
Device already reserved
STL_ERR_DEVNOTRES
Device not reserved
STL_ERR_NOTINST
STLI-Library is a dummy library
STL_ERR_NOTSUPP
Dummy function return
STL_ERR_ALRDYMNTED
Requested volume already mounted in requested device
SEE ALSO
nsrjb(1m), nsr_jukebox(5), IBM_silo(1m), EMASS_silo(1m), STK_silo(1m).
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SYM2XDM(1m)
SYM2XDM(1m)
NAME
sym2xdm − convert symbolic link HSM files to XDSM HSM files
SYNOPSIS
sym2xdm [ −v ] [ −s <NWserver> ] [ <path> ]
DESCRIPTION
sym2xdm is a NetWorker XDSM HSM-specific command to convert HSM symbolic links used by previous versions of NetWorker HSM. sym2xdm searches for HSM symbolic links in the directory tree specified by path.
If no path is specified on the command line, sym2xdm uses the current directory.
OPTIONS
−v
Displays more detailed information.
−s <NWserver>
Specifies which machine to use as the NetWorker server (hostname or IP address).
SEE ALSO
nsrpmig(1m), nsrmig(1m).
NetWorker 6.1.1
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TAPEEXERCISE(1m)
TAPEEXERCISE(1m)
NAME
tapeexercise − exercise a tape drive
SYNOPSIS
tapeexercise [ −vBEFP ] devname
DESCRIPTION
The tapeexercise program writes sample data to a tape, and tests to see if positioning and read operations
perform as expected. It needs a write-enabled tape on the indicated (no-rewind) drive. Tapeexercise should
be used with extreme caution. Successful completion is indicated by a ‘‘<test name>: test begin,’’
‘‘<test name>: test ok’’ pair for each test that is run. An example is as follows:
BasicTest: test begin
BasicTest: test ok
OPTIONS
−v
Operate in verbose mode.
−B
Perform only the basic test.
−E
Perform only the EOT test.
−F
Perform only the File Space Forward test.
−P
Perform only the ’SCO’ positioning test.
If none of the options BEFP are set, then all of the tests are performed.
devname
The device name of the tape device under test. This should be a non-rewind device, following the
local operating system convention.
SEE ALSO
nsrmmd(1m), Hardware Compatibility Guide.
LIMITATIONS
The tapeexercise program will generally fail for QIC drives, because these devices do not support all of the
functionality assumed by tapeexercise, most importantly, they do not support back-skip-file. Such devices
may work with nsrmmd(1m); consult the Hardware Compatibility Guide for a complete list of supported
devices.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
TUR(1m)
TUR(1m)
NAME
tur − test unit ready
SYNOPSIS
tur [ -a b.t.l ] [ -l ]
DESCRIPTION
The tur program will send a TEST UNIT READY command to all SCSI devices attached to the system.
−a b.t.l Selects a specific ordinal SCSI address, where b is the logical SCSI bus, t is the SCSI target, and l
is the SCSI logical unit number (LUN) on that target. See libscsi(1m).
−l
Performs a complete LUN search for all SCSI adapters in the system. This argument is accepted
on all systems, but does not have any effect on HP-UX systems. Due to the method used to scan
for available devices on HP-UX systems, all accessible devices are always shown, and the −l
option has no additional effect. On all other systems, the normal behavior is to start checking at
LUN 0 for SCSI deivces. The first empty LUN found will end the search for a given target ID.
With the −l option, all LUNS present on all target IDs for all SCSI busses in the system will be
checked for devices. This can take a very long time and should therefore only be used when necessary. For example, a Fibre Channel adapter can support 126 target IDs, each of which may have
80 or more LUNs. Checking all LUNs on this single adapter may take over 10 minutes.
SEE ALSO
libscsi(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
UASM(1m)
UASM(1m)
NAME
uasm − NetWorker module for saving and recovering UNIX filesystem data
SYNOPSIS
uasm −s [ -benouv ] [ -ix ] [ −t time ] [ −f proto ]
[ −p path ] path...
uasm −r [ −dnuv ] [ −i {nNyYrR} ] [ −m <src>=<dst> ] −z suffix ] [ path ]...
uasm −c [−nv] [ path ]...
DESCRIPTION
The uasm command is the default filesystem ASM (Application Specific Module). It is built into save(1m)
and recover(1m). uasm may also be called directly in a manner similar to tar(1). This description of
uasm applies to all ASMs. For clarity, only uasm is mentioned in many of the descriptions in this man
page.
uasm has three basic modes: saving, recovering, and comparing. When saving, uasm will browse directory
trees and generate a save stream (see nsr_data(5)), to the associated stdout file representing the file and
directory organization. When recovering, uasm reads a save stream from the associated stdin file and creates the corresponding directories and files. When comparing, uasm reads a save stream from its stdin file
and compares the save stream with the files already located in the file system.
During backup sessions, the behavior of uasm can be controlled by directives. Directives control how
descendent directories are searched, which files are ignored, how the save stream is generated, and how
subsequent directive files are processed. (See nsr(5)). When browsing a directory tree, symbolic links are
never followed, except in the case of rawasm.
ASMs can recover save streams from current or earlier versions of NetWorker. Note: older ASMs may not
be able to recover files generated by newer ASMs.
The following list provides a brief description of the ASMs supplied with NetWorker:
always The always ASM always performs a back up of a file, independent of the change time of the file.
atimeasm
The atimeasm is used to backup files without changing the access time of the file. This functionality is a subset of mailasm. On most systems, atimeasm uses the file mtime for selection and
then resets the file atime after the backup (which changes the file ctime). On systems that support
interfaces for maintaining the file atime without changing the file ctime, atimeasm has no effect,
since the file atime is normally preserved.
compressasm
The compressasm uses a software compression algorithm to compress file data. This ASM does
not compress directories. The amount of compression achieved is data-dependent. compressasm
uses considerable amounts of CPU resources, so its benefits may be limited on low-powered systems.
holey
The holey ASM handles holes or blocks of zeros when backing up files and preserves these holes
during recovery. On some filesystems interfaces can be used to find out the location of file hole
information. Otherwise, blocks of zeros that are read from the file are skipped. This ASM is normally applied automatically and does not need not be specified.
logasm The logasm enables file changes during backup sessions. logasm can be used for “log” files and
other similar files where a file changes during a backup operation is not worth noting.
mailasm
The mailasm uses mail-style file locking and maintains the access time of a file, preserving “new
mail has arrived” flag on most mail handlers.
mtimeasm
The mtimeasm is used to backup files using the file mtime for file selection instead of the file
ctime.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
UASM(1m)
UASM(1m)
nsrindexasm
The nsrindexasm is used to recover from NetWorker file index backups performed prior to Version 6. During recovery from these older index backups, nsrindexasm is invoked automatically
by nsrck and mmrecov.
nsrmmdbasm
The nsrmmdbasm is used to process NetWorker’s media index. Normally, nsrmmdbasm is
invoked automatically by savegrp and mmrecov, and should not be used in NetWorker directives.
null
The null ASM does not back up the specified files and directories, but keeps the file name in the
online index of the parent directory.
nullasm
nullasm is an alternate name for the null ASM, named for backward compatibility with earlier
releases where nullasm was a separate executable program instead of an internal ASM.
posixcrcasm
The posixcrcasm is used to calculate a 32-bit CRC for a file during a backup. This CRC is stored
along with the file and is verified when the file is restored; no verification occurs during the
backup itself. Using this ASM it is possible to validate a file at restore time, but it does not provide
a way to correct any detected errors.
rawasm
The rawasm is used to back up /dev entries (for example, block− and character−special files) and
their associated raw disk partition data. On some systems, /dev entries are actually symbolic links
to device specific names. Unlike other ASMs, rawasm follows symlinks, allowing the shorter /dev
name to be configured. When recovering, rawasm requires that the filesystem node for the raw
device exist prior to the recovery. This protects against the recovery of a /dev entry and the overwriting of data on a reconfigured disk. You can create the /dev entry, having it refer to a different
raw partition, and force an overwrite if desired. If you create the /dev entry as a symbolic link, the
data is recovered to the target of the symbolic link. Precautions should be taken when using
rawasm, see the CAVEATS section.
skip
The skip ASM does not back up the specified files and directories, and does not place the filename
in the online index of the parent directory.
swapasm
The swapasm does not backup actual file data, but recreates a zero-filled file of the correct size on
recovery. This ASM is used on systems where the swapping device is a swap file that must be
recovered with the correct size, but the contents of the swap file are not important and do not need
to be backed up.
xlateasm
The xlateasm translates file data so that data backed up is not immediately recognizable.
Internal ASMs are not separate programs, but are contained within all ASMs. External ASMs are separate
programs, and are invoked as needed. External ASMs provided with NetWorker are nsrmmdbasm and
nsrindexasm. All other ASMs previously listed are internal.
For security reasons, external ASM names must end in asm and be located in the origin directory, which is
the same directory as the originally invoked program (typically save or recover). In some system architectures, other directories relative to the origin will be searched if an ASM cannot be located in the origin
directory.
Walking ASMs traverse directory trees. The skip, null, and nullasm ASMs do not walk.
The internal ASMs described here are modes, and a number of different internal ASMs may be applied at the
same time. When an external ASM is needed to process a file, the new ASM is invoked and generates the
save stream. When a filtering ASM is traversing a directory tree and invokes another ASM, that ASMs save
stream is processed by the filtering ASM. Hence, while using compressasm to backup a directory, the
mailasm can still be used to process the mail files correctly. Note that once different modes are set, the
only way to turn them off is to explicitly match an ASM directive for uasm.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
2
UASM(1m)
UASM(1m)
Auto-applied ASMs are used under certain conditions, and do not need to be specifically mentioned in a
directive file. For example, when a large file only has a small number of disk blocks allocated, the holey
ASM is automatically invoked to process the file. Auto-applied ASMs are not used when a file name
matches an explicit directive.
When used in conjunction with recover, all standard ASMs support security at recovery time. If a file is
saved with an access control list (ACL), then only the owner of the file, root or Administrator may recover
the file. For files that do not contain an ACL, the standard mode bits are used to determine who may
recover a file. The file’s owner, root and Administrator may always recover the file. Note that when ASMs
are invoked by hand, these security checking rules do not apply.
OPTIONS
All ASMs accept the options described in this section. These options are generally referred to as the standard-asm-arguments. ASMs may also have additional options, which must be capital letters.
Either −s (saving), −r (recovering) or -c (comparing) mode must be specified and must precede any other
options. When saving, at least one path argument must be specified. Path can be either a directory or file
name.
The following options are valid for all modes:
−n
Performs a dry run. When backing up, browse the file system, create the save stream, but do not
attempt to open any files. When recovering or comparing, consume the input save stream and perform basic sanity checks, but do not create any directories or files when recovering or comparing
file data.
−u
This option makes the ASM stop when an error that would normally cause a warning occurs. This
can be useful if you are recovering to a file system that may not have enough disk space or you are
performing a save and you want any warnings to stop the save. If you use this option with uasm
on recovery, it will stop if it runs out of disk space. Without this option, uasm will continue to try
to recover each file until it has processed the entire save stream.
−v
Turns on verbose mode. The current ASM, its arguments, and the file being processed are displayed. When a filtering ASM operating in filtering mode (processing the save stream of another
ASM) modifies the stream, its name, arguments and the current file are displayed within square
brackets.
When saving, the following options may also be used:
−b
Produces a byte count. This option is similar to the −n option, but byte count mode will estimate
the amount of data that would be produced instead of actually reading file data. (It is faster but
less accurate than the −n option.) Byte count mode produces three numbers: the number of
records (for example, files and directories), the number of bytes of header information, and the
approximate number of bytes of file data. Byte count mode does not produce a save stream; its
output cannot be used as input to another ASM in recover mode.
−e
Do not generate the final "end of save stream" boolean string. This flag should only be used when
an ASM invokes an external ASM and as an optimization chooses not to consume the generated
save stream itself.
−f proto
Specifies the location of a .nsr directive file to interpret before processing any files (see nsr(5)).
Within the directive file specified by proto, <<path>> directives must resolve to files within the
directory tree being processed, otherwise their subsequent directives will be ignored.
−i
Ignores all save directives from .nsr directive files found in the directory tree.
−o
Produces a (see nsr_data(5)) save stream that can be handled by older NetWorker servers.
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
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UASM(1m)
UASM(1m)
−p path
This string is prepended to the name of each file as it is output. This argument is used internally
when one ASM executes another external ASM. Ppath must be a properly formatted path that is
either the current working directory or a trailing component of the current working directory.
−t date The date (in nsr_getdate(3) format) after which files were modified will be backed up.
−x
Cross filesystem boundaries. Normally, filesystem boundaries are not crossed during walking.
Symbolic links are never followed, except in the case of rawasm. 1.0v
When recovering, the following options may also be used:
−i {nNyYrR}
Specifies the initial default overwrite response. Only one letter can be used. When the name of
the file being recovered conflicts with an existing file, the user is prompted for overwrite permission. The default response, selected by pressing [Return], is displayed within square brackets.
Unless otherwise specified with the −i option, "n" is the initial default overwrite response. Each
time a response other than the default is selected, the new response becomes the default. When
either N, R, or Y is specified, there is no prompting (except when auto-renaming files that already
end with the rename suffix) and each subsequent conflict is resolved as if the corresponding lower
case letter had been selected.
The valid overwrite responses and their meanings are:
n
Do not recover the current file.
N
Do not recover any files with conflicting names.
y
Overwrite the existing file with the recovered file.
Y
Overwrite files with conflicting names.
r
Rename the conflicting file. A dot, “.”, and a suffix are appended to the name of
the recovered file. If a conflict still exists, the user will be prompted again.
R
Automatically renames conflicting files by appending a dot, (“.”), and a suffix.
If a conflicting file name already ends in a “.” suffix, the user is prompted to
avoid potential auto rename looping condition.
−m src=dst
This option maps the file names that are created. Any files that start exactly with src will be
mapped to have the path of dst, replacing the leading src component of the path name. This option
is useful for the relocation of recovered files that were backed up using absolute pathnames into an
alternate directory (for example, −m /usr/etc=.).
−z suffix
Specifies the suffix to append when renaming conflicting files. The default suffix is “R”.
path
Used to restrict the files being recovered. Only files with prefixes matching path will be recovered. This checking is performed before any potential name mapping is done using the −m specification. When path is not specified, no checking is done.
CAVEATS
Raw partitions are often used to store active DBMS data. If your raw partition contains data managed and
updated by an active DBMS product, rawasm alone will not give a consistent backup. The database must
not be updating the data in an uncontrolled fashion while rawasm saves or recovers data on the partition.
The partition must be offline, the database manager shutdown, or the partition placed in an appropriate state
for backup. Legato has products to assist with online database backup. Similarly if rawasm is used to save
a partition containing a Unix filesystem, the filesystem must be unmounted or mounted read-only to obtain
a consistent backup.
Ideally, recovery of a raw partition should take place on a system configured with the same disk environment and same size partitions as the system which performed the backup. If the new partition is smaller
than the original partition, the recovery will not complete successfully. If the new partition is larger than
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
4
UASM(1m)
UASM(1m)
the original partition, only the amount of data originally saved will be recovered.
If the partition backed up includes the disk label − the label often contains the disk geometry − recovering
this partition to a new disk also recovers the label, changing the new disks geometry to match the original
disk. Similarly, if a Unix filesystem partition is backed up using rawasm, recovering the partition resets all
information on the partition, including timestamps concerning mount times (if applicable).
Since rawasm does not discover the size of the partition it backs up until the backup is completed, the
estimated size reported on recovery is not accurate.
EXAMPLES
Copying files
To copy all of the files in the current directory to target_dir, use:
uasm −s . | (cd target_dir; uasm −rv)
This preserves ownership, time, and the other Unix attributes. Only the data in holey files is
copied; the holes are not copied.
Copying a file tree to an archive directory
To copy the file tree under the directory here to archive and overwrite any files with conflicting
names, use: cd here
uasm −s . | (cd archive; uasm −r −iY)
Change directory (cd) to here first and give the first uasm determining the save a relative path so that the
second uasm performing the recover will recreate the file tree under archive.
Another way to achieve the same result is to use the −m option on the second uasm performing the recover
to explicitly map the path names.
uasm −s here | uasm −r −iY −m here=archive
FILES
.nsr
Save directive files located throughout the filesystem.
SEE ALSO
nsr(5), nsr_directive(5), nsrmmdbasm(1m), nsrindexasm(1m), nsrck(1m), nsr_data(5), recover(1m),
save(1m), scanner(1m), XDR(3N).
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
5
WRITEBUF(1m)
WRITEBUF(1m)
NAME
writebuf − write device buffer
SYNOPSIS
writebuf -a b.t.l [ -m mode ] [ -b buffer-id ] [ -o buffer-offset ] [ -p plist-len ] -f filename
DESCRIPTION
The writebuf program will send a WRITE BUFFER command to the named SCSI device. It is typically
used to download new microcode to SCSI devices.
The required -a argument must be used to select a specific ordinal SCSI address (see libscsi(1m)).
The required argument set of -f filename must refer to a file containing the data to write.
OPTIONS
−b buffer-id Specifies the identity of the buffer to be written.
−o buffer-offset Specifies the offset from the beginning of the buffer to begin writing.
−p plist-len Specifies the parameter list length.
SEE ALSO
The ANSI SCSI-2 specification for more in-depth explanation of the arguments.
BUGS AND WARNINGS
Some microcode files are large. Be sure that the platform that you run this command on, and the host
adapter that attaches the device to which you are directing this command, can support sending all of the
microcode in one command. Loading a fraction of the microcode and failing can be disastrous and can
damage a device requiring it to be sent back to the factory. Use the lusbinfo(1m) command and find the I/O
transfer limit size for these constraining factors. Exercise caution using this command.
SEE ALSO
libuscsi(1m)
lusbinfo(1m)
NetWorker 6.1.1
October 15, 2001
1
NRM(8)
NRM(8)
NAME
nrm - Introduction and overview of NetWorker Recovery Manager
DESCRIPTION
NetWorker Recovery Manager facilitates the protection and recovery of network computer systems. NetWorker Recovery Manager depends upon Networker for file backup. The machine being protected must be
regularly backed up using Networker. (see nsr(8)).
NetWorker Recovery Manager uses a client-server model to provide the disaster protection service. At least
one machine on the network is designated as the Recovery Manager server and the machines with SCSI
disks to protect are Recovery Manager clients. Currently it protects only SCSI disks attached to Sparc
Solaris machine.
The Legato NetWorker Recovery Manager Administrator’s Guide provides information on configuring and
administering a Recovery Manager system. It includes examples and rationales for setting up and running a
successful disaster protection operation.
INSTALLATION
See the NetWorker Recovery Manager Installation Guide for detailed installation instructions.
SERVER COMMANDS
NetWorker Recovery Manager uses a client-server model to provide disaster recovery services. The following commands encompass the server side of Recovery Manager.
nrmplan (8) - The NetWorker Recovery Manager planning tool. The nrmplan command prepares a machine
for disaster recovery.
nrmgatherdata (8) - The NetWorker Recovery Manager information gathering tool. The nrmgatherdata
command is run on a regular basis. It protects a computer from disaster.
nrminfo (8) - The NetWorker Recovery Manager information display tool. The nrminfo command displays
information about a specified client.
nrmrestore (8) - The NetWorker Recovery Manager restore command. The nrmrestore command is used to
recover SCSI disks attached to a Sparc Solaris computer.
CLIENT COMMANDS
The following command encompasses the client side of Recovery Manager.
nrmlcient (8) - The NetWorker Recovery Manager client daemon. During the planning phase, this nrmclient
daemon collects information about disk partitions, filesystems, etc. This information is sent to nrmgatherdata, which stores it in the NetWorker Recovery Manager repository.
SEE ALSO
nrmplan (8), nrmsbsplan (8), nrmgatherdtata (8), nrminfo (8), nrmrestore (8), nrmclient (8)
NetWorker Recovery Manager 6.1.Build.149a
May 04, 2001
1
NRMCLIENT(8)
NRMCLIENT(8)
NAME
nrmclient − NetWorker Recovery Manager daemon.
SYNOPSIS
nrmclient [ −p port ] [ −v ]
DESCRIPTION
The nrmclient daemon runs on both NetWorker Recovery Manager Server and NetWorker Recovery Manager client. Various programs on server connect to this daemon and send it requests.
During the planning phase this daemon collects the information about disk partitions, file systems etc. This
information is sent to nrmgatherdata , which stores it in the NetWorker Recovery Manager repository.
This information is then used by nrmrestore during the client recovery.
During the recovery process, nrmrestore sends the necessary information to this daemon, which performs
the actual recovery operations like, partitioning the disk, making file systems, installing the boot block etc.
OPTIONS
−p port The port number on which the daemon will run.
By default nrmclient runs on port 999. Port number can be specified through either command line option
or the /etc/services file. The service called ’nrm’ for tcp is used to get the port number. If the port number is
specified through command line option, the port number in /etc/services is ignored.
−v Turn the verbose mode on.
SEE ALSO
nrmrestore(8),nrmgatherdata(8),nrminfo(8),nrmplan(8)
NetWorker Recovery Manager 6.1.Build.149a
May 04, 2001
1
NRMGATHERDATA(8)
NRMGATHERDATA(8)
NAME
nrmgatherdata − Gathers information about NetWorker Recovery Manager client.
SYNOPSIS
nrmgatherdata −c client [ −p port ] [ −v ]
nrmgatherdata −l [ −p port ] [ −v ]
DESCRIPTION
The nrmgatherdata command is run from NetWorker Recovery Manager server on regular basis. It protects the machine from the disaster. It contacts the nrmclient daemon running on the protected machine and
collects the necessary information to automate the recovery.
The nrmclient daemon collects the information about the partitions, file systems etc, and sends it to nrmgatherdata . The nrmgatherdata stores this information in the NetWorker Recovery Manager repository.
This information is then used by nrmrestore during a client recovery.
OPTIONS
−c client
Name of the client which is to be protected from disaster.
−p port The port for client-server communications (default is 999).
−l
Use the list of clients from /nrm/hostlist file. This file lists all the clients, one on each line, that
will be protected from disaster. This option is used to specify multiple hosts.
−v
turn the verbose output mode on.
NOTE
The -l and -c options are mutually exclusive.
SEE ALSO
nrmplan(8),nrmrestore(8),nrmclient(8),nrminfo(8)
NetWorker Recovery Manager 6.1.Build.149a
May 04, 2001
1
NRMINFO(8)
NRMINFO(8)
NAME
nrminfo − Displays the information about a NetWorker Recovery Manager client.
SYNOPSIS
nrminfo [ −B ] −c client
DESCRIPTION
The nrminfo command displays the information about the specified client. It displays the information
about the SCSI disks attached to the client. The information displayed includes which controller the disk is
attached to, and disk’s SCSI-ID. It also shows the partitioning information and file systems on each partition.
If the specified client is a Networker server, the nrminfo command can also display the information about
the server’s bootstrap save sets.
OPTIONS
−B
Use this option if the client is a Networker Server. This option displays the information about the
save sets of a server’s bootstrap backups.
−c client
Use this option to specify the machine to display information about.
SEE ALSO
nrmgatherdata(8)
NetWorker Recovery Manager 6.1.Build.149a
May 04, 2001
1
NRMPLAN(8)
NRMPLAN(8)
NAME
nrmplan − Prepares a NetWorker Recovery Manager client for remote boot procedure.
SYNOPSIS
nrmplan −c client −n boot_image_dir [ −N Subnet_Boot_Server:/boot_server_dir ]
DESCRIPTION
nrmplan prepares the specified machine, for remote boot procedure used during disaster recovery. see (
nrmrestore(8)). This command also copies appropriate Networker binaries to the boot image.
This command must be executed from NetWorker Recovery Manager server, once for each client, after
completing installation of NRMclnt on NetWorker Recovery Manager client. After executing nrmplan for
each client nrmgatherdata can be run on a regular basis.
OPTIONS
−c client
Name of the client which is to be protected from disaster.
−n boot_image_dir
The name of the directory containing the installable boot image created by setup_install_server
see ( install_scripts(1M))
−N Subnet_Boot_Server:/boot_server_dir
The complete path of the Subnet Boot Server image directory. Required only if the client is on a
different subnet than the NetWorker Recovery Manager Server.
SEE ALSO
nrmsbsplan(8),nrmgatherdata(8),install_scripts(1M)
NetWorker Recovery Manager 6.1.Build.149a
May 04, 2001
1
NRMRESTORE(8)
NRMRESTORE(8)
NAME
nrmrestore − NetWorker Recovery Manager recover command.
SYNOPSIS
nrmrestore −c client [ −p port ] [ −v ]
DESCRIPTION
nrmrestore is used to recover the SCSI disk(s) attached to Sparc Solaris machine. When the command is
run, it displays a list of all the SCSI disks protected on a client and allows you to choose which disks to
recover.
Before recovering a disk, it may be neccessary to replace a damaged disk. The nrminfo command can be
used to display information needed to replace the disk. The replacement disk should be as large as the damaged disk. Additionally the replacement disk should be connected to same cotroller and have same SCSIID, as the damaged disk.
After replacing the disk, boot the machine using ’boot net’ command from the openboot prompt. Once the
boot process is complete, start nrmclient from the command shell. Next, start nrmrestore from the NetWorker Recovery Manager server and select which disk to recover. On the machine being recovered,
answer the questions asked and wait for recovery to finish.
OPTIONS
−c client
Name of the client that needs to be recovered from a disaster.
−p port The port for client-server communications (default is 999).
−v
Turn the verbose mode on.
SEE ALSO
nrmgatherdata(8),nrmclient(8),nrminfo(8)
NetWorker Recovery Manager 6.1.Build.149a
May 04, 2001
1
NRMSBSPLAN(8)
NRMSBSPLAN(8)
NAME
nrmsbsplan − Prepares a NetWorker Recovery Manager client for remote boot procedure from a different
subnet.
SYNOPSIS
nrmsbsplan −c client −n boot_server_dir −N NRM_Server:/boot_image_dir
DESCRIPTION
nrmsbsplan prepares the specified machine, for remote boot procedure used during disaster recovery. see (
nrmrestore(8)).
This command must be executed from the Solaris Subnet Boot Server, once for each client on that subnet,
after completing installation of NRMclnt on NetWorker Recovery Manager client. After executing nrmsbsplan for each client nrmgatherdata can be run on a regular basis.
OPTIONS
−c client
Name of the client which is to be protected from disaster.
−n boot_server_dir
The name of the directory containing the boot server image created by setup_install_server -b see
( install_scripts(1M))
−N NRM_Server:/boot_image_dir
The complete path (along with the NetWorker Recovery Manager Server name) of the directory
containing the complete boot image created by setup_install_server see ( install_scripts(1M))
SEE ALSO
nrmplan(8),nrmgatherdata(8),install_scripts(1M)
NetWorker Recovery Manager 6.1.Build.149a
May 04, 2001
1
DB2UEXT2 ( 8 )
Maintenance Procedures
DB2UEXT2 ( 8 )
NAME
db2uext2 − User Exit program that archives and retrieves db2 database transactional log files from the NetWorker server
SYNOPSIS
db2uext2 −OSos −RLrelease −RQrequest −DBdbname −NNnodenumber −LPlogpath −LNlogname
DESCRIPTION
The db2uext2 program saves and retrieves db2 transactional log files from the NetWorker server.
If a db2 database is enabled for rollforward recovery (by having the USEREXIT database configuration
parameter set to ON) db2 database manager invokes the db2uext2 program whenever a transactional log
requires archiving. It will be saved for the long term storage using NetWorker. During db2 database rollforward recovery, db2 database manager will invoke db2uext2 to retrieve the logs from the NetWorker
server. For more information on the db2uext2 user exit program refer to the DB2 UDB Administation
Guide, Legato NetWorker Module for DB2 UDB Administrator’s Guide and Release Supplement.
OPTIONS
−OSos operating system. For example, it can be Solaris or AIX.
−RLrelease
DB2 UDB release. For example, for DB2 UDB V6.1 Enterprise Edition you should specify
SQL06010.
−RQrequest
request. Only ARCHIVE or RETRIEVE are valid options.
−DBdbname
database name. Specify the database name in capital letters.
−NNnodenumber
nodegroup. This is the node partition that contains the database. For example, for the first node
use NODE0000.
−LPlogpath
log file path. During the retrieval of a transactional log, specify the database log path directory that
the log was backed up.
−LNlogname
log file name.
DIAGNOSTICS
Exit Codes
0
12
16
20
28
32
The transactional log was successfully archived or retrieved. During log retrieval, if the log backup
is not found on NetWorker server db2uext2 returns 0.
hardware error
software error
invalid parameters
unknown error
user terminated
LOGS
Set NSR_DB2UEXT2_DEBUG_FILE environment variable to a path of a file. When the user exit is
invoked, debugging information about db2uext2 execution will be directed to it. If a file cannot be opened
by db2uext2, the default /nsr/nsrdb2uext2.log will be used. If you execute db2uext2 manually, you should
set NSR_DB2UEXT2_DEBUG_FILE in the environment, if db2uext2 is called by db2 database manager,
NSR_DB2UEXT2_DEBUG_FILE environment variable should be set in db2 vendor configuration file. For
more information refer to your Legato NetWorker Module for DB2 UDB Administrator’s Guide and
Release Supplement.
NetWorker rt_2001_1Q
Last change: March 22, 2001
1
DB2UEXT2 ( 8 )
NetWorker rt_2001_1Q
Maintenance Procedures
Last change: March 22, 2001
DB2UEXT2 ( 8 )
2
NMI_CONFIG(8)
NMI_CONFIG(8)
NAME
nmi_config − Legato NetWorker Module for Informix configuration tool
SYNOPSIS
nmi_config [ −s server ]
DESCRIPTION
nmi_config is used during the Legato NetWorker Module for Informix installation process to connect to a
NetWorker server and create the appropriate resources. Most users need to separate their data by storing
their database backups in one pool and their transaction log backups in another. This script creates media
pool (nsr_pool(5)) and label template (nsr_label(5)) resources named "DBMIData" and "DBMILogs".
nmi_config uses nsradmin(8) to create the resources. Two messages are displayed if this script succeeds
in connecting to a NetWorker server and creating the resources. Typical output will look like the following:
# ./nmi_config
Creating appropriate resources.
Done creating resources.
See the documentation accompanying the product for more information.
OPTIONS
−s server
Connect to the specified NetWorker server.
FILES
None.
SEE ALSO
nsr(8), nsr_pool(5), nsr_label(5), nsradmin(8).
NetWorker 6.1
May 04, 2001
1
nsrdb2(8)
nsrdb2(8)
NAME
nsrdb2 − Legato NetWorker Module for DB2 command
SYNOPSIS
nsrdb2 <save options>
DESCRIPTION
This shell script is used by savegrp(8) to trigger backups on a DB2 database server in conjunction with the
use of db2 backup command, the backup interface provided by IBM. nsrdb2 is normally only run by
savegrp and not run manually. To use this command for scheduled backups, the client resource (see
nsr_client(5)) should list nsrdb2 in the backup command attribute.
If you want to modify this command, use the nsrdb2 file, which is a copy of the original template nsrdb2.sh.
So that you always have a reference to the original behavior, do not modify the template file nsrdb2.sh.
There are several configurable variables that must be set in the script to control backups to the NetWorker
server. For more information refer to the latest version of the Legato NetWorker Module for DB2 Administrator’s Guide or Release Supplement.
OPTIONS
Refer to the the save(8) man page for a description of options supported by nsrdb2.
FILES
nsrdb2
A template of this command is provided in nsrdb2.sh.
SEE ALSO
mminfo(8), nsr_client(5), nsr_pool(5), nwadmin(8), save(8), savegrp(8).
NetWorker 6.1
May 04, 2001
1
NSRDB2SV(8)
NSRDB2SV(8)
NAME
nsrdb2sv − save DB2 databases to long term storage with NetWorker
SYNOPSIS
nsrdb2sv <save options>
DESCRIPTION
nsrdb2sv saves DB2 databases to the NetWorker server (see nsr(8)). The progress of a nsrdb2sv can be
monitored using the X Window System based nwadmin(8) program or the curses(3X) based nsrwatch(8)
program for other terminal types.
nsrdb2sv should not be evoked manually. nsrdb2sv executes as part of a scheduled DB2 database backup
and is called by nsrdb2 script with appropriate arguments. Environment variables in nsrdb2 script and for
DB2 instance must be set correctly. For more information refer to the latest version of the Legato NetWorker Module for DB2 Administrator’s Guide or Release Supplement.
OPTIONS
Refer to the the save(8) man page for a description of options supported by nsrdb2sv.
SEE ALSO
nwadmin(8), nsrwatch(8), save(8), savegrp(8), savefs(8), nsrdb2(8), nsr(5), nsr(8), nsr_client(5),
nsr_device(5), nsr_group(5), nsr_service(5), nsr_pool(5), nsrd(8), nsrim(8), nsrindexd(8), nsrmm(8),
nsrmmd(8)
NetWorker 6.1
May 04, 2001
1
nsrdbmi(8)
nsrdbmi(8)
NAME
nsrdbmi − Legato NetWorker Module for Informix command
SYNOPSIS
nsrdbmi [ −v ] [ −s server ] [ −c client ] [ −N saveset_name ] [ −e expiration ] [ −g group ] [ −l level ] [
path . . . ]
DESCRIPTION
This shell script is used by savegrp(8) to trigger backups on an Informix database server in conjunction
with the use of ON-Bar, the backup interface provided by Informix. nsrdbmi is normally only run by
savegrp and not run manually. To use this command for scheduled backups, the client resource (see
nsr_client(5)) should list nsrdbmi in the backup command attribute.
Users wishing to modify this command should use the template provided in /etc/nsrdbmi.sh. Do not modify the template file so you always have a reference to the original behavior.
There are several configurable variables users can set in the command to control backups to the NetWorker
server.
Variable: PRECMD
Default value: NONE
Description: This variable can be used to run a command before dbspace and log file backups. If this command does not run successfully (in other words, if it returns a non-zero status), nsrdbmi will exit.
Variable: POSTCMD
Default value: NONE
Description: This variable can be used to run a command after dbspace and log file backups have completed. This command is not run if onbar returns a non-zero exit code.
Variable: NSR_DATA_VOLUME_POOL
Default value: DBMIData
Description: If this variable is set to name a media pool, then dbspace backups will be directed to the given
media pool.
Variable: DO_LOGFILE_BACKUPS
Default value: YES
Description: If this variable is set to YES, then logfile backups will be executed after dbspace backups. If
set to NO, no logfile backups will occur.
Variable: NSR_LOG_VOLUME_POOL
Default value: DBMILogs
Description: If this variable is set to name a media pool, then logfile backups will be directed to the named
media pool.
Variable: DO_BOOTFILE_BACKUPS
Default value: YES
Description: If this variable is set to YES, then Informix critical file backups will be executed after
dbspace backups.
Variable: BOOTFILE_LIST
Default value: NONE
Description: This environment variable specifies the file name that lists the Informix critical files to
backup. If not specified and DO_BOOTFILE_BACKUPS is set to YES, a default list of files will be backed
up. Note that the default list might not include all the necessary files for XPS.
Variable: NSR_COMPRESSION
NetWorker 6.1
May 04, 2001
1
nsrdbmi(8)
nsrdbmi(8)
Default value: FALSE
Description: This environment variable determines if compression is performed on the data. The default
value is "FALSE" indicating no compression should take place. Set this value to "TRUE" to turn on clientside compression.
Variable: PATH
Default value: $INFORMIXDIR/bin:/bin:/usr/sbin
Description: Set up PATH environment variable. This must be configured to include the path to the onbar
executable and the NetWorker program mminfo(8).
Variable: INFORMIXDIR
Default value: /usr/informix
Description: Set up INFORMIXDIR environment variable which lists the directory where the Informix
RDBMS is installed.
Variable: ONCONFIG
Default value: onconfig.std
Description: Lists the name of the Informix RDBMS configuration file being used.
Variable: INFORMIXSQLHOSTS
Default value: $INFORMIXDIR/etc/sqlhosts
Description: Describes where the sqlhosts file is located.
The nsrdbmi command also backs up the emergency boot file and $ONCONFIG file using the save command. These files will be backed up to the same pool as the dbspace backups. If you wish to have these
files sent to another pool, the shell script should be modified appropriately.
OPTIONS
Please see the save(8) man page for a description of options supported by nsrdbmi.
Note
that
each
optional
path
argument
INFORMIX:/<IDS_server_name>/<dbspace_name>.
is
typically
of
the
form
FILES
/etc/nsrdbmi.sh
A template of this command is provided in /etc.
SEE ALSO
mminfo(8), nsr_client(5), nsr_pool(5), nwadmin(8), save(8), savegrp(8).
NetWorker 6.1
May 04, 2001
2
NSRDOCRC(8)
NSRDOCRC(8)
NAME
nsrdocrc − NetWorker Module for Lotus Notes deleted document(s) recovery command
SYNOPSIS
nsrdocrc
[ −c client ] [ −D debug_level ] { −p database } [ −s server ] [ −t date ] [ −T temporary_directory
]
DESCRIPTION
The nsrdocrc command restores all deleted data documents in a Notes database since a specified backup of
the database. The database to be restored must be backed up to a NetWorker server’s online client index.
nsrdocrc works by first recovering the specified version of the database to a temporary directory and then
copying the deleted documents from this database to the existing database. Once the deleted documents are
copied to the existing database, the database recovered to the temporary directory is deleted.
OPTIONS
−c client
Specifies the name of the client where the files originated. Use this option when restoring to a
client other than the one from where the files originated.
−D debug_level
Specifies the level of debugging to use. 1-9 where level 9 is the highest.
−p database
Specifies the database name with the full path containing deleted documents to be restored.
−s server
Specifies the NetWorker server to which the data was backed up.
−t
Specifies the date in nsr_getdate(3) format to recover data that was backed up previous to the
most recent back up.
−T temporary_directory
Specifies the the temporary directory to use. The default directory is /nsr/applogs.
EXAMPLE
An example of the command to recover the deleted data documents since the last full backup of the
database to NetWorker server neptune:
nsrdocrc -s neptune -T /tmp −p /usr/lotusdata/mail/jsmith.nsf
SEE ALSO
nsrnotesrc(8)
DIAGNOSTICS
" nsrdocrc does not load "
The value for LD_LIBRARY_PATH (Solaris) / LIBPATH (AIX) variable in the environment
does not point to the libnotes.so file (Solaris) or libnotes_r.a file (AIX).
1
nsrnmo(8)
nsrnmo(8)
NAME
nsrnmo − NetWorker Module for Oracle scheduled backup command script
SYNOPSIS
nsrnmo <save options>
DESCRIPTION
The nsrnmo shell script is used by the NetWorker server program savegrp(8) to trigger scheduled backups
on an Oracle8 or Oracle8i database server. The nsrnmo script sets specific environment variables for the
scheduled Oracle backup and invokes the Oracle Recovery Manager (RMAN), the backup interface provided by Oracle8 and Oracle8i.
The nsrnmo script is usually run by savegrp only. It is not run manually. To use the nsrnmo script for a
scheduled Oracle backup, you must specify nsrnmo in the Backup command attribute of the client resource
(see nsr_client(5)) for the scheduled Oracle backup.
To modify the nsrnmo command script, you should copy the template file /etc/nsrnmo.sh to the nsrnmo
file and modify the nsrnmo file. Do not modify the template file /etc/nsrnmo.sh. Keep the template file
unchanged, as a reference to the original nsrnmo script.
For information on how to create a separate nsrnmo script file for each Oracle instance, refer to Chapter 5
on scheduled Oracle backups in the latest NetWorker Module for Oracle Administrator’s Guide.
There are several environment variables in the nsrnmo script that you can customize for a particular scheduled Oracle backup. The variables ORACLE_HOME and PATH are mandatory for each scheduled Oracle
backup. The other variables are optional, and you can leave them undefined in the script, if desired. Note
that the variables in the nsrnmo file are all initially undefined. Please refer to the /etc/nsrnmo.sh template,
your site-specific nsrnmo script, and the latest NetWorker Module for Oracle Administrator’s Guide for
descriptions of the various environment variables.
OPTIONS
Please see the save(8) man page for a description of options supported by nsrnmo.
FILES
/etc/nsrnmo.sh
A template of this command is provided in /etc.
SEE ALSO
nsrnmostart(8), mminfo(8), nsr_client(5), nsr_pool(5), nwadmin(8), save(8), savegrp(8).
NetWorker 6.1
May 04, 2001
1
nsrnmostart(8)
nsrnmostart(8)
NAME
nsrnmostart − NetWorker Module for Oracle scheduled backup executable program
SYNOPSIS
nsrnmostart <backup options>
DESCRIPTION
The nsrnmostart executable program is used by the nsrnmo script to invoke scheduled backups on an Oracle8 or Oracle8i database server. The nsrnmostart program launches Oracle Recovery Manager
(RMAN) by passing the appropriate arguments.
The nsrnmo script runs the nsrnmostart program. Do not run it manually. nsrnmostart uses environment
variables set in the nsrnmo script and backup options passed by nsrnmo (see nsrnmo (8)). If the mandatory environment variables are not set in the nsrnmo script, nsrnmostart returns a nonzero status code. For
details on the environment variables to set in the nsrnmo script, see Chapter 5 in the NetWorker Module for
Oracle Administrator’s Guide.
The directory where nsrnmostart is located must be included in the PATH environment variable in the
nsrnmo script.
The nsrnmostart program writes debugging information into the debug file specified by the
NSR_SB_DEBUG_FILE environment variable in the nsrnmo script.
The nsrnmostart program runs a pre-command script specified by the PRECMD environment variable--if
the variable is set in the nsrnmo script. If the pre-command does not run successfully, nsrnmostart returns
a nonzero status code to nsrnmo without performing the scheduled Oracle backup.
The nsrnmostart program invokes RMAN for Oracle database backups based on the inputs from nsrnmo
and savegrp (see nsrnmo (8) and savegrp (8)).
When RMAN execution is finished, the nsrnmostart program runs a post-command script specified by the
POSTCMD environment variable--if the variable is set in the nsrnmo script. If the post-command does not
run successfully nsrnmostart returns a nonzero status code to nsrnmo. Even if RMAN fails, the postcommand is executed.
SEE ALSO
nsrnmo(8), save(8), savegrp(8)
NetWorker 6.1
May 04, 2001
1
NSRNOTESRC(8)
NSRNOTESRC(8)
NAME
nsrnotesrc − NetWorker Module for Lotus Notes recover command
SYNOPSIS
nsrnotesrc [ −qNXZ ] [ −s server ] [ −c client ] [ −d destination_path ] [ −D debug_level ] [ −t date ] [ −T
temporary_directory ] { NOTES| filename [ filename [ ... ] ] }
nsrnotesrc [ −N ] [ −s server ] { −l number_of_logs } { −d destination_path } [ −c client ] [ −D
debug_level ]
DESCRIPTION
The nsrnotesrc command is used restore Notes data backed up to a NetWorker server’s online client index.
The information contained in the client and media indexes is used for restoring data from NetWorker backups.
The NetWorker Module for Lotus Notes recover command allows you to identify the scope of restore and
restore to different clients and directories when needed.
OPTIONS
−q
Specify this option to set verbosity to zero.
−N
Specify this option during disaster recovery to skip initialization of Notes API.Please see admin
guide for more details on disaster recovery.
−X
Specify this option if you do not wish to apply the transaction logs to the recovered file.
−Z
Specify this option to assign a new DBIID to the recovered database. Use this option when you are
recovering a database to different directory and you already have a database with same name in
Domino server’s data directory.
Specify -ZZ, to assign a new DBID as well as a new ReplicaID to the database being recovered.
−s server
Specifies NetWorker server to which the data was backed up.
−c client
Specifies name of the client where the files originated. Use this option when restoring files to a
client other than the one where the files originated.
−d destination_path
Specifies a destination path to restore the data to. If this path is not specified then the data will be
restored to the same directory it was backed up from.
−D debug_level
Specifies level of debugging to use. 1-9 where level 9 is the highest.
−l number_of_logs
Specifies number of transaction logs to be recovered. This option is used only during disaster
recovery. Please see admin guide for more details on disaster recovery.
−t
Specifies date in nsr_getdate(3) format to restore data that was backed up previous to the most
recent back up.
−T temporary_directory
Specifies temporary directory to be used. The default is /nsr/applogs.
NOTES
Specify this option to restore all the databases backed up by nsrnotesv command.
EXAMPLE
An example of a recover command for restore two Notes databases from the NetWorker server, mars at a
specified point in time:
nsrnotesrc -s mars -t 01/02/00 /usr/lotusdata/accounting.nsf /usr/lotusdata/payroll.nsf
1
NSRNOTESRC(8)
NSRNOTESRC(8)
An example of a recover command to restore a database file from last full backup from the NetWorker
server neptune to a different directory:
nsrnotesrc -s neptune -d /usr/lotusdata/accounting /usr/lotusdata/payroll97.nsf
SEE ALSO
nsrnotesv(8)
2
NSRNOTESV(8)
NSRNOTESV(8)
NAME
nsrnotesv − NetWorker Module for Lotus Notes backup command
SYNOPSIS
nsrnotesv
[ -CIZ ] [ −s server ] [ −a comfort_span ] [ −b pool ] [ −c client ] [ −d temporary_directory ] [ −D
debug_level ] [ −E exclude_list_file ] [ −g group ] { −R|-S|-T| filename [ filename [ ... ] ] }
DESCRIPTION
The nsrnotesv command provides effective backups of both online and offline Lotus Notes database and
system files. This is important as database files, such as the Notes public mailbox, are rarely offline. Lotus
files with extensions .nsf, .ntf, .njf, .ncf, .box, .id, .dsk, .dic and notes.ini are backed up by nsrnotesv.
nsrnotesv offers many backup options, such as compression and encryption, which allow the users to identify the scope and type of backup to perform.
To perform scheduled backups use the options identified below, within the backup script, to specify the
backup requirements for each client’s system. The default setting is myArgs=-R, which performs a backup
of all Notes data residing in the notes recommended directory. The specification of an incremental or full is
taken from the client’s resource on the NetWorker server.
The nsrnote backup script is installed on each client and coordinates scheduled backup processes between
the NetWorker server and the NetWorker Module for Lotus Notes. nsrnote calls upon nsrnotesv to perform
backup of Notes data.
Use the nsrnotesv command on a Notes/Domino server or client to perform manual backups of the system.
Backup processes can be monitored from either the NetWorker Administrator or the NetWorker Module for
Lotus Notes. Upon backup completion NetWorker provides reports in the NetWorker messages log and the
NetWorker server’s bootstrap file.
OPTIONS
−C
Specifies data compression during backup before the data is moved over the network or written to
tape.
Compressing data may speed up the backup process, as long as the Notes/Domino database system is able
to send data to the NetWorker server fast enough to keep the tape drive streaming. Also, data compression
will increase CPU usage but will reduce the amount of data sent to the NetWorker server.
−I
Specifies this option to take an incremental backup.
−Z
Specifies data encryption during backup.
−s server
Specifies the NetWorker server to backup client data to.
−a comfort_span
Specifies the Comfort span in kilo bytes for incremental backup. When this option is specified,
nsrnotesv determines whether to perform a full backup or incremental backup, based on the argument. If 4000 is specified as comfort span, then nsrnotesv will perform full backup if the amount
of data changed since the last backup, for this file, is more than 4000KB. Using this option
reduces the number of incremental backups required for recovery.
−b pool
Specifies a particular destination pool for a save set.
1
NSRNOTESV(8)
NSRNOTESV(8)
−c client
Specifies a client name to be used for client indexing.
−d temporary_directory
Specifies the temporary directory to use. The default directory is /nsr/applogs.
−D debug_level
Specifies the level of debugging to use. 1-9 where level 9 is the highest.
−E exclude_list_file
Specifies the full path of file containing list of filenames or regular expressions to be excluded during backup. Each entry in the list should be separated by newline.
−g
Specifies a backup group to be used by savegrp to denote the group used by the NetWorker server
to select a specific media pool.
−R
Specifies that the database files being backed up reside in the Lotus Notes recommended directory.
Lotus Notes recommended directory is the directory where the file notes.ini is present. nsrnotesv
identifies this directory by going through each component in the PATH environment variable and
looking for the notes.ini file in that path component.
−S
Specifies that the database files being backed up reside outside the recommended Lotus Notes
directory.
−T
Specifies that the database files being backed up may reside within or outside of the recommended
Lotus Notes directory.
EXAMPLE
An example of a backup command for backing up notes databases to the default NetWorker server, mars:
nsrnotesv -s mars -R
An example of a backup command to perform a backup with compression and encryption of a Lotus Notes
data file to the NetWorker server neptune:
nsrnotesv -s neptune -g mygroup -C −Z /usr/lotusdata/log.nsf
SEE ALSO
nsrnotesrc(8)
DIAGNOSTICS
" Scheduled backups are not functional"
The value for LD_LIBRARY_PATH (Solaris)or LIBPATH (AIX) environment variable specified in the nsrnote script does not point to the libnotes.so file (Solaris)or the libnotes_r.a (AIX).
Another reason could be that the name of the backup command specified, in the client’s resource
on the NetWorker server, is not the same as the name of the backup script nsrnote.
2
NSRSAPSV(8)
NSRSAPSV(8)
NAME
nsrsapsv − NetWorker Module for SAP R/3 on Oracle scheduled backup command
SYNOPSIS
nsrsapsv -f filename
DESCRIPTION
The nsrsapsv command provides scheduled backups of SAP R/3 on Oracle databases.
The required -f filename option is used to identify the absolute path and filename to the NetWorker Module
for SAP R/3 on Oracle scheduled backup configuration file. This file contains information about your SAP
R/3 on Oracle environment. For a complete description of the scheduled backup configuration file, see the
Legato NetWorker Module for SAP R/3 on Oracle Administrator’s Guide.
The nsrsapsv command should not normally be launched from the command line. Rather, this command
should be entered in the Backup Command attribute field for this client’s Client Resource in the NetWorker
Administrator program. For more information about configuring your Client Resource to perform scheduled backups of your SAP R/3 on Oralce database environment, see the Legato NetWorker Module for SAP
R/3 on Oracle Administrator’s Guide.
OPTIONS
−f filename
Specifies the absolute path and filename of the NetWorker Module for SAP R/3 on Oracle scheduled backup configuration file. This file contains information that is required for the NetWorker
Module to find the appropriate SAP R/3 on Oracle environment. For a complete description of the
scheduled backup configuration file, see the Legato NetWorker Module for SAP R/3 on Oracle
Administrator’s Guide.
The default location and filename for this file is /nsr/res/nsrsapsv.res.
SEE ALSO
None
1
nsrsyb(8)
nsrsyb(8)
NAME
nsrsyb − BusinesSuite Module for Sybase backup command
SYNOPSIS
nsrsyb <save options>
DESCRIPTION
This shell script is used by savegrp(8) to trigger backups on a Sybase SQL Server. This command sets
environment variables, constructs a database consistency check PRECMD by default, and calls nsrsybsv to
perform the backups.
nsrsyb is only run by savegrp and is not run manually. To use this command for scheduled backups, the
client resource (see nsr_client(5)) should list nsrsyb in the backup command attribute, the Sybase SQL
Server userid in the username attribute, and the SQL Server password in the password attribute.
There are several configurable variables users can set in the command to control backups to the NetWorker
server.
Variable: USE_CONSISTENCY_CHECK
Default value: TRUE
Description: This variable specifies whether a database consistency check should be constructed as the
PRECMD and issued before the scheduled backup. The database consistency check ensures that the
database is not corrupt before it is backed up. There are cases where the underlying dbcc commands can
incorrectly report errors when the -o ckal option is set (which it is by default for Systems prior to 11.5.)
See the nsrsybcc(8) man page for more information.
Note that if the consistency check is to be performed, the Sybase username and password specified in the
client resource must have sufficient permissions to run the dbcc command. Although an account with the
Sybase oper role has sufficient permissions for doing backups, it does not have sufficient permissions for
performing a database consistency check.
Variable: DBCCOPT
Default value: NONE
Description: This specifies the nsrsybcc options that are to be used for the database consistency check.
The default value for this is none, which means that the defaults from the nsrsybcc command are used. See
the man page for nsrsybcc(8) for more information on the default consistency check options.
Variable: PRECMD
Default value: NONE
Description: This variable can be used to run a command before database backups. If this command does
not run successfully (in other words, if it returns a non-zero status), nsrsyb will not backup the database(s).
The POSTCMD will be executed, however. If the USE_CONSISTENCY_CHECK option is TRUE and the
PRECMD is set, a database consistency check will not be performed. If USE_CONSISTENCY_CHECK is
TRUE and the PRECMD is not set, the a database consistency check will be constructed as the PRECMD.
Variable: POSTCMD
Default value: NONE
Description: This variable can be used to run a command after database backups have completed. This
command is always run, even if nsrsybsv returns a non-zero exit code.
Variable: NSR_DATA_VOLUME_POOL
Default value: NONE
Description: If this variable is set to name a media pool, then database (full) backups will be directed to the
given media pool. If this is not set, then backups will be directed to pools based on the server policy. If no
policy is set up at the server, backups will be directed into the default pool.
NetWorker 6.1
May 04, 2001
1
nsrsyb(8)
nsrsyb(8)
Variable: NSR_LOG_VOLUME_POOL
Default value: NONE
Description: If this variable is set to name a media pool, then transaction log (incremental) backups will be
directed to the given media pool. If this is not set, then backups will be directory to pools based on the
server policy. If no policy is set up at the server, backups will be directed into the default pool.
Variable: NSR_COMPRESSION
Default value: FALSE
Description: This environment variable determines if compression is performed on the data. The default
value is FALSE indicating no compression should take place. Set this value to TRUE to turn on client-side
compression.
Variable: PATH
Default value:/bin:/usr/sbin:/opt/networker/bin:/usr/bin:/usr/sbin/nsr
Description: Set up PATH environment variable. This must be configured to include the path to the NetWorker programs nsrsybsv(8), nsrsybcc(8),and mminfo(8).
Variable: SYBASE
Default value: NONE
Description: Set this variable to the directory where the Sybase "interfaces" file exists. This is the top level
directory in which Sybase SQL Server was installed. If this is not set, then Sybase will look for the interfaces file in the user’s home directory. Because nsrsyb is run as root, it is extremely unlikely that the
Sybase interfaces file will be found in the user’s home directory.
OPTIONS
Please see the save(8) man page for a description of options supported by nsrsyb. There are a number of
options supported by save(8) that are accepted by nsrsybsv(8) but are not used. See the man page for
nsrsybsv(8) for a description of which options are used by nsrsybsv(8).
SEE ALSO
mminfo(8), nsr_client(5), nsrsybsv(8), nsrsybcc(8), nsr_pool(5), nwadmin(8), save(8), savegrp(8).
DIAGNOSTICS
Exit Codes
0
1
Normal exit. This means that the save set was correctly created on the server.
Abnormal exit. A save set was not correctly created on the server.
Messages
This is a listing of messages that nsrsyb can generate. It may also produce any errors that nsrsybsv and
nsrsybcc can generate.
nsrsybsv returned status of number
nsrsyb exiting.
This indicates that nsrsybsv returned a non-zero status and that the save set was not correctly created on the server.
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NSRSYBCC(8)
NSRSYBCC(8)
NAME
nsrsybcc − consistency check Sybase database(s)
SYNOPSIS
nsrsybcc [ −hqv? ] [ −o ckdb ] [ −o ckdbnoidx ] [ −o ckal ] [ −o ckcat ] [ −o ckstor ] [ −U user-name ] [ −P
password ] [ −g group ] [ −c client-name ] [ −s server ] [ −D debug-level ] SYBASE:/sql-servername[/database-name]
DESCRIPTION
nsrsybcc consistency checks Sybase SQL Server databases by running SQL Server "dbcc" consistency
checks on the database.
The database(s) to be checked are specified by the SYBASE:/sql-server-name[/database-name] value. The
database-name is optional; if omitted, all databases on the SQL Server except the tempdb database will be
checked.
The user-name and password provide the information necessary to log in to the SQL Server to be backed
up. The user-name must have sufficient permissions to run the dbcc command on the databases to be
checked. If the user-name and password are not supplied, the SQL Server name and database name, clientname, group, and server are used to query the client resource defined on the server for the user-name and
password.
If no checking options are supplied, the default for Sybase Adaptive Server 11.5 and later is the -o ckstor
option. For earlier versions of Sybase SQL Server, the default is a combination of the -o ckdbnoidx, -o
ckal, and -o ckcat options.
The -o ckstor option is available only with Sybase Adaptive Server version 11.5 or later. The -o ckstor
option is preferable to the other options because it provides higher concurrency. The -o ckal option may
occasionally cause errors 2540 or 2546 to occur when no real error conditions exist. Running SQL Server
in single user mode will prevent these condition from being incorrectly reported. See the SQL Server(TM)
Troubleshooting and Error Messages Guide for more information on interpreting these and other consistency check errors.
The results of the consistency check are written to stdout. There may be a large quantity of informational
messages, and these informational messages may be suppressed by using the −q flag.
OPTIONS
−h
Display usage.
−v
Verbose. Cause the nsrsybcc program to tell in great detail what it is doing as it proceeds.
−q
Quiet. Display only error messages.
−o ckdb
This performs a dbcc checkdb check on the given database(s). This checks index and data pages,
the sorting of indices, pointers, and data rows for each table in the database.
−o ckdbnoidx
This performs a dbcc checkdb check on the given database(s) with the skip non clustered index
option. Non clustered indices may be easily (although not necessarily speedily) recreated, and this
option only checks clustered indices. It causes a faster consistency check at the cost of possible
greater recovery time if one of the non clustered indices were corrupt.
−o ckal This performs a dbcc checkalloc check on the given database(s). The checkalloc option checks the
page allocations of the database for inconsistency.
−o ckcat
This performs a dbcc checkcatalog check on the given database(s). This checks the system tables
in the database for consistency.
−o ckstor
This performs a dbcc checkstorage check on the given database(s). This option is available for
Sybase Adaptive Server version 11.5 and later. It performs a faster consistency check than the
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other options, and it has greater concurrency capabilities than the −o ckal option.
−U user-name
Specify the SQL Server user that will check the databases.
−P password
Specifies the password for the SQL Server user that will perform the consistency checks.
−s server
Specify which machine to use as the NetWorker server.
−D debug-level
Set the NSR_DEBUG_LEVEL for this command. Valid values range from 0 (no information) to
10 (much information.) The default value is 2.
−c client-name
Specify the client name for querying the user-name and password. This is useful on clients with
multiple network interfaces, and hence multiple host names. It can be used to create multiple
index databases for the same physical client. Note that this does not specify the network interface
to use. This is specified in the server network interface attribute of the client resource (see
nsr_client(5)).
−g group
This option is used by savegrp(8) and savefs(8) to denote the group to query for the username and
password (see nsr_client(5) and nsr_group(5)).
EXAMPLES
Consistency checking a database:
To consistency check database "accounting" on SQL Server "production", enter the following
command:
nsrsybcc −U sa −P password SYBASE:productionaccounting
This will issue the default consistency checks, which will be a -o ckal, -o ckdbnoidx, and -o ckcat
for Sybase SQL Servers prior to 11.5. For 11.5 systems, this will perform a -o ckstor check.
Consistency checking all database in a SQL Server:
To consistency check all databases on SQL Server "production", with the -o ckdb and -o ckal
options enter the following command:
nsrsybcc −U sa −P password −o ckdb −o ckal SYBASE:production
SEE ALSO
curses(3X), nsr_getdate(3), nwadmin(8), nsr(5), nsr(8), nsr_client(5), nsr_device(5), nsr_group(5),
nsr_service(5), nsrd(8), nsrim(8), nsrindexd(8), nsrmm(8), nsrmmd(8), nsrsyb(8), nsrsybcc(8), nsrsybrc(8), nsrwatch(8), recover(8), savefs(8), savegrp(8)
DIAGNOSTICS
Exit Codes
0
1
Normal exit. This means the consistency check completed without error.
Abnormal exit. There may be consistency errors in the checked databases.
Messages
This is a partial listing of common error messages. Refer to the Administrator’s Guide for more complete
listing of error messages and how to resolve them.
The context allocation routine failed...
Cannot access file /sybase/config/objectid.dat
This message indicates that the $SYBASE environment variable was not set. This environment
variable needs to be set so that nsrsybcc can find the Sybase localization files required at runtime.
The $SYBASE environment variable should be set to the directory where Sybase was installed
(the one where the interfaces file is.) This error may also appear if the Sybase Open Client
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software is not installed. Sybase Open Client must be installed for nsrsybcc to run.
Error from server: Msg number, Level number, State number
Error text
This message indicates that there was an error message returned from Sybase. Refer to the Sybase
Troubleshooting and Errors Guide for an explanation of the error and its resolution.
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NSRSYBRC(8)
NSRSYBRC(8)
NAME
nsrsybrc − recover Sybase database(s) from NetWorker.
SYNOPSIS
nsrsybrc [ −hkqv? ] [ −U user-name ] [ −P password ] [ −d SYBASE:/sql-server-name[ /database-name ]
] [ −s server ] [ −c client-name ] [ −t date ] [ −D debug-level ] { SYBASE:/sql-server-name |
SYBASE:/sql-server-name/database-name [ SYBASE:/sql-server-name/database-name ... ] }
DESCRIPTION
nsrsybrc restores Sybase SQL Server 11.0 and later databases from NetWorker. The progress of a nsrsybrc
can be monitored using the X Window System based nwadmin(8) program or the curses(3X) based nsrwatch(8) program for other terminal types.
The database(s) to be restored are specified by the SYBASE:/sql-server-name[/database-name] value. The
database-name is optional; if omitted, all databases on the SQL Server will be restored except the master
database.
This command should be issued from the same operating system userid that launched the Sybase Backup
Server. That is the userid that owns the backups, and it should be used to restore them. Other operating
system userids may be unable to see the savesets that the Sybase Backup Server created.
Note that the master database must be restored before the other system and user databases. The order for
restoring a complete SQL Server system is to first restore the master database and then to restore the
remainder of the databases. In order to restore the master database, you must restart the SQL Server in
master recovery mode (the -m option of startserver.) Using nsrsybrc, you would first issue the command:
nsrsybrc -U sa -P password SYBASE:/sql-server-name/master Once this successfully restores the master
database, the SQL Server will automatically shut itself down. You will need to restart the SQL server and
restore the rest of the databases with the
nsrsybrc -U sa -P password SYBASE:/sql-server-name command. This will restore the rest of the system
databases and the user databases.
Exercise extreme caution when restoring the master database. If you are restoring it to a new database,
remember that it has path names to the device files. If you restore the master database to another SQL
Server on the same machine, the new SQL Server will attempt to use the same device files as the old SQL
Server.
The user-name and password provide the information necessary to log in to the SQL Server to be restored.
The user-name must have sufficient permissions to perform database loads on the databases to be restored.
OPTIONS
−k
Perform a database consistency check on each database once it is restored. The results of the
database consistency check are written to stdout. The default is not to perform a database consistency check, and if this option is supplied, the consistency check is done with the default options
described in the man page for nsrsybcc(8).
−h
Display usage.
−v
Verbose. Cause the nsrsybrc program to tell you in great detail what it is doing as it proceeds.
−?
Display usage.
−q
Quiet. Display only summary information and error messages.
−U user-name
Specify the SQL Server user that will perform the backups.
−P password
Specifies the password for the SQL Server user that will perform the backups.
−d SYBASE:/sql-server-name[ /database-name ]
Specify a new destination for this database. If this option is not set, the database is restored to its
original SQL Server and database name. If this option is specified, the database is restored to this
new destination. This can be used to restore a database to a new SQL Server and database name or
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a new database name in the same SQL Server. If a new destination is supplied, only one database
name (or sql-server-name) can be specified on the command line for this restore. The destination
database(s) must already exist; nsrsybrc does not create them automatically. For the fastest loading, new databases created to be restored to should be created with the "for load" option.
−s server
Specify which machine to use as the NetWorker server.
−c client-name
Specify the client name for starting the restore session. This is useful on clients with multiple network interfaces, and hence multiple host names. It can be used to use multiple index databases for
the same physical client. Note that this does not specify the network interface to use. This is
specified in the server network interface attribute of the client resource (see nsr_client(5)).
−D debug-level
Set the NSR_DEBUG_LEVEL for this command. Valid values range from 0 (no information) to
10 (much information.) The default value is 2.
−t date This specifies the date and time to restore to. The default for this is the current date and time. If
the SQL Server is Sybase Adaptive Server version 11.5 or later, and the database supports transaction log backups, this time will be used as the "until_time" that the database will be restored to. In
Sybase SQL Server 11.x Systems earlier than 11.5, the database will be restored to the latest time
possible that is not after the date supplied.
EXAMPLES
Restoring a database:
To restore the model database in SQL Server "production" to the current time from the NetWorker
Server called "networker", use the following command:
nsrsybrc −U sa −P password −s networker SYBASE:productionmodel
Restoring the master database:
To restore the master database in server "production" to the current time, restart "production" in
master recover mode (with the "-m" option) and issue the command
nsrsybrc −U sa −P password −s networker SYBASE:productionmaster
Once the master database is restored, the SQL Server will shut itself down. To restore the rest of
the databases, restart the SQL Server and issue the command
nsrsybrc −U sa −P password −s networker SYBASE:production
This will restore the rest of the databases on the production SQL Server.
Restoring a database to a new server:
To restore a database to a new server, use the "-d" option to specify the new server name. To
restore the database "accounting" from "production" to "test", issue the command
nsrsybrc −U sa −P password −s networker −d SYBASE:testaccounting
SYBASE:productionaccounting
The destination database must already exist in the server, and the user name and password are ones
that apply to the test server.
SEE ALSO
curses(3X), nsr_getdate(3), nwadmin(8), nsr(5), nsr(8), nsr_client(5), nsr_device(5), nsr_group(5),
nsr_service(5), nsrd(8), nsrim(8), nsrindexd(8), nsrmm(8), nsrmmd(8), nsrsyb(8), nsrsybcc(8),
nsrsybsv(8), nsrwatch(8), recover(8), savefs(8), savegrp(8)
DIAGNOSTICS
Exit Codes
0
1
NetWorker 6.1
Normal exit. This means that the database(s) were correctly restored.
Abnormal exit. The database(s) were not all restored.
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2
NSRSYBRC(8)
NSRSYBRC(8)
Messages
This is a partial listing of common error messages. Refer to the Administrator’s Guide for more complete
listing of error messages and how to resolve them.
The context allocation routine failed...
Cannot access file /sybase/config/objectid.dat
This message indicates that the $SYBASE environment variable was not set. This environment
variable needs to be set so that nsrsybrc can find the Sybase localization files required at runtime.
The $SYBASE environment variable should be set to the directory where Sybase was installed
(the one where the interfaces file is.) This error may also appear if the Sybase Open Client software is not installed. Sybase Open Client must be installed for nsrsybrc to run.
Archive API error...Unable to open API library for device...
Library path is /sybase/lib/libbms.ext
This message indicates that the symbolic link to the libbms.ext library is missing from the
$SYBASE/lib directory. Make sure the link exists. The libbms.ext file to link to is in the same
directory as the NetWorker binary files.
Archive API error...Attempting to open byte stream device...
network error (Severity 5 Number 12): Business Suite Module for Sybase has not been properly enabled.
This message indicates that the server from which you are restoring is not enabled for Sybase.
Install an enabler for the Sybase module on the server and retry the operation.
Archive API error...Attempting to open byte stream device...
network error (Severity 5 Number 13): client is not a registered client
This message indicates that the client on which nsrsybrc is being run is not a registered client of
the server from which the backup is to be restored. Create a client resource for this client on the
server and retry the operation.
Error: no backup was found for database database-name
This message indicates that there are no backups found for the database requested. Make sure that
the Operating System user used to restore the backups is the same as the one that created the backups. Use nsrinfo to see the objectowner field for each backup. The objectowner is the Operating
System user that must restore the data.
Error from server: Msg 3108, Level 16, State 1
LOAD DATABASE must be used in single user mode if trying to restore the Master
database.
In order to restore the master database, the SQL Server needs to be restarted in single user mode.
Shut down the SQL Server and restart it with the −m option.
CT_LIBRARY error: ...operation terminated due to disconnect
CT_LIBRARY error: ...The connection has been marked dead.
These messages are expected when the master database is recovered. They indicate that the SQL
Server has shut down on the successful restoration of the master database. The SQL Server will
need to be restarted in order to restore the user databases or in order to make it available to users.
Not restoring database master. It needs to be loaded
separately before the rest of the instance is loaded.
This message indicates that the entire SQL server is being restored (because no database-name
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was specified on the command line), and that the master database will not be restored. The master
database must be restored before all of the other databases, and it will shut down the SQL Server
once it is restored. Therefore, no other databases can be restored at the same time as master.
Error from server: Msg number, Level number, State number
Error text
This message indicates that there was an error message returned from Sybase. Refer to the Sybase
Troubleshooting and Errors Guide for an explanation of the error and its resolution.
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NSRSYBSV(8)
NSRSYBSV(8)
NAME
nsrsybsv − save Sybase databases to long term storage with NetWorker
SYNOPSIS
nsrsybsv [ −CEGRThvq? ] [ −U user-name ] [ −P password ] [ −s server ] [ −S stripe-count ] [ −c clientname ] [ −N SYBASE:/sql-server-name[ /database-name ] ] [ −b pool ] [ −g group ] [ −l level ] [ −W width
] [ −D debug-level ] SYBASE:/sql-server-name[ /database-name ]
DESCRIPTION
nsrsybsv saves Sybase SQL Server databases to the NetWorker server (see nsr(8)). The progress of a
nsrsybsv can be monitored using the X Window System based nwadmin(8) program or the curses(3X)
based nsrwatch(8) program for other terminal types.
The database(s) to be saved are specified by the SYBASE:/sql-server-name[/database-name] value. The
database-name is optional; if omitted, all databases on the SQL Server will be saved except the tempdb
database.
The user-name and password provide the information necessary to log in to the SQL Server to be backed
up. The user-name must have sufficient permissions to perform database dumps on the databases to be
saved. If the user-name and password are not supplied, the name, client-name, group, and server are used
to query the client resource defined on the server for the user-name and password.
Each database saved is created in its own save stream. If all databases on the SQL Server are saved, there
will be a save stream for each database and a save stream for the SQL Server. This stream of data is sent to
a receiving process (see nsrd(8)) on the NetWorker server, which will process the data, adding entries to
the on-line index (see nsrindexd(8)) for each database, with the data finally ending up on some long term
storage media (see nsrmmd(8)).
The stripe-count option allows striping each database to multiple save streams.
When command line backups are run, the client index (and bootstrap for the server) are not automatically
saved. Scheduled backups save these automatically, which ensures that disaster recovery takes the minimum time possible. If command line backups are run, the savegrp(8) command should be used with the
"-O" option to save the client index and server bootstrap. This will ensure that recovery from a catastrophic
failure can occur in the most expedient fashion.
Details about handling media are discussed in nsrmm(8) and nsr_device(5).
OPTIONS
−C
Use client-side compression for this save. Compression is not used by default.
−E
Use encryption for this save. Encryption is not used by default.
−G
Perform a dump with the NO_LOG options. This option is not used for normal backups, but may
be necessary in cases where there is a device failure or full log device.
−R
Do not truncate the transaction log for the database after this backup. The transaction log is normally truncated after each backup for all databases. When this option is used, the transaction log
is left intact. This is useful for backing up a database when there has been a device failure.
−T
Truncate the transaction log but do not perform a backup. This is not normally used, but it can be
useful once the transaction log has filled. This command should be followed by a full backup in
order to ensure the database can be restored.
−h
Display usage.
−v
Verbose. Cause the nsrsybsv program to tell you in great detail what it is doing as it proceeds.
−q
Quiet. Display only summary information and error messages.
−U user-name
Specify the SQL Server user that will perform the backups.
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−P password
Specifies the password for the SQL Server user that will perform the backups.
−s server
Specify which machine to use as the NetWorker server.
−S stripe-count
Specify the number of stripes to use in backing up each of the databases in this set. The default
value for the stripe-count is 1.
−c client-name
Specify the client name for starting the save session. This is useful on clients with multiple network interfaces, and hence multiple host names. It can be used to create multiple index databases
for the same physical client. Note that this does not specify the network interface to use. This is
specified in the server network interface attribute of the client resource (see nsr_client(5)).
−N SYBASE:/sql-server-name[ /database-name ]
The symbolic name of this save set. By default, the name of the database is used for the name
(SYBASE:/sql-server-name/database-name.)
−b pool
Specifies a particular destination pool for the databases and transaction logs.
−g group
This option is used by savegrp(8) and savefs(8) to denote the group of the save (see nsr_client(5)
and nsr_group(5)) and is used by the NetWorker server to select the specific media pool.
−l level The level of the save. This option is used by savegrp(8) and savefs(8) to specify a particular level
for a scheduled save. Valid levels are "incr" and "full". The default level is "full". A full backup
is a backup of the entire database. An incremental backup is a backup of the database’s transaction log and is only available when the transaction log is on its own device.
−W width
The width used when formatting summary information output.
ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
−D debug-level
Set the NSR_DEBUG_LEVEL for this command. Valid values range from 0 (no information) to
10 (much information.) The default value is 2.
SYBASE
The SYBASE environment variable must have the path to the Sybase SQL Server interfaces file.
This has no default value, but if if is not set, Sybase attempts to find the interfaces file in the user’s
home directory.
PRECMD
The PRECMD environment variable contains a command to execute before the database is backed
up. If the PRECMD exits with a non zero return code, the database will not be backed up. The
default value for the PRECMD is no command if nsrsybsv is executed from the command line. If
a scheduled backup initiates nsrsybsv, then the default PRECMD is a consistency check of the
databases to be backed up.
POSTCMD
The POSTCMD environment variable contains a command to execute after the database is backed
up. The POSTCMD is always executed, even if the PRECMD returns a result of 1. The default
value for the POSTCMD is no command.
EXAMPLES
Backing up a database:
To back up database model in SQL Server "production" to NetWorker server networker, enter the
following command:
nsrsybsv −U sa −P password −s networker SYBASE:productionmodel
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Backing up an entire SQL Server:
To back up all databases (except tempdb) in SQL Server "production" to NetWorker server networker, enter the following command:
nsrsybsv −U sa −P password −s networker −l full SYBASE:production
Backing up an entire SQL Server to multiple stripes:
To back up all databases (except tempdb) in SQL Server "production" to NetWorker server networker using three stripes, enter the following command:
nsrsybsv −U sa −P password −s networker −l full −S3 SYBASE:production
Backing up a transaction log:
To back up the transaction log for database "orders" in SQL Server "production" to NetWorker
server networker, enter the following command:
nsrsybsv −U sa −P password −s networker −l incr SYBASE:productionorders
SEE ALSO
curses(3X), nsr_getdate(3), nwadmin(8), nsr(5), nsr(8), nsr_client(5), nsr_device(5), nsr_group(5),
nsr_service(5), nsrd(8), nsrim(8), nsrindexd(8), nsrmm(8), nsrmmd(8), nsrsyb(8), nsrsybcc(8), nsrsybrc(8), nsrwatch(8), recover(8), savefs(8), savegrp(8)
DIAGNOSTICS
Exit Codes
0
1
Normal exit. This means that a save set was correctly created on the server.
Abnormal exit. A save set was not correctly created on the server.
Messages
This is a partial listing of common error messages. Refer to the Administrator’s Guide for more complete
listing of error messages and how to resolve them.
host: saveset level=level, size time count files.
This message (with the appropriate client host name, saveset name, level, total save set size,
elapsed time, and file count) is printed whenever nsrsybsv is run by savegrp(8) and exits normally.
The context allocation routine failed...
Cannot access file /sybase/config/objectid.dat
This message indicates that the $SYBASE environment variable was not set. This environment
variable needs to be set so that nsrsybsv can find the Sybase localization files required at runtime.
The $SYBASE environment variable should be set to the directory where Sybase was installed
(the one where the interfaces file is.) This error may also appear if the Sybase Open Client software is not installed. Sybase Open Client must be installed for nsrsybsv to run.
Archive API error...Unable to open API library for device...
Library path is /sybase/lib/libbms.ext
This message indicates that the symbolic link to the libbms.ext library is missing from the
$SYBASE/lib directory. Make sure the link exists. The libbms.ext file to link to is in the same
directory as the NetWorker binary files.
Archive API error...Attempting to open byte stream device...
network error (Severity 5 Number 22): volume pool not found
This message indicates that the backup attempted to write to a volume pool that does not exist on
the NetWorker server. Check the server to see which pools are defined and try to backup to an
existing pool.
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Archive API error...Attempting to open byte stream device...
network error (Severity 5 Number 12): Business Suite Module for Sybase has not been properly enabled.
This message indicates that the server to which your backups are directed is not enabled for
Sybase backups. Install an enabler for the Sybase backup product on the server and retry the operation.
Archive API error...Attempting to open byte stream device...
network error (Severity 5 Number 13): client is not a registered client
This message indicates that the client on which the backup is being run is not a registered client of
the server to which the backup is directed. Create a client resource for this client on the server and
retry the operation.
Archive API error...Attempting to open byte stream device...
network error (Severity 5 Number 13): no group group configured on server
This message indicates that the group supplied on the command line is not defined in the server to
which the backup is directed. Check the group name supplied to make sure it exists on the server.
nsrsybsv does not require a group name, so the command may be retried without specifying a
group name.
Error from server: Msg number, Level number, State number
Error text
This message indicates that there was an error message returned from Sybase. Refer to the Sybase
Troubleshooting and Errors Guide for an explanation of the error and its resolution.
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SAVEGEMS(1m)
SAVEGEMS(1m)
NAME
savegems, newgems − backup a GEMStation with NetWorker, migrate to a new version of GEMS
SYNOPSIS
savegems <save options>
newgems [ −n ] −V version −E directory
DESCRIPTION
savegems saves the information in a GEMStation to a NetWorker server (see savegrp(1m)). This command
is intended to be specified as the backup command value for the client resource that is configured to
backup a GEMS server (see nsr_client(5)). savegems will backup a GEMStation by bringing down the
GEMS server software, exporting the configuration data for each GEMS subsystem, then backing-up the
exported data using the NetWorker save command. Once save has completed, the GEMStation is brought
up. A directory named backup will be created during the backup process (see FILES section below). This
directory will contain the files exported from GEMS. This directory should be explicitly listed as a value
for the save set attribute in the NSR client resource (see nsr_client(5)). After the save command completes
the backup, the backup directory is deleted.
Before the save process is started, savegems verifies the integrity of the exported files. If the exported files
appear to be intact, the save process executes, and the success of the save set is determined by the execution
of the save command. However, if the integrity of any exported file is in question, the savegems process
will not execute save, but will print a save set failed message. A failed backup will also terminate with an
abnormal exit code. The cause of a failed GEMStation backup can be determined by perusing the log files
listed below.
newgems creates the files necessary to migrate from an existing GEMS installation to a new GEMS
release. The directory argument is a directory where the files used in the migration process will be stored.
When newgems is executed, log files (see FILES below) will be stored in this directory as well, instead of
the location used by savegems.
To recover a successfully backed-up GEMS server, or complete the GEMS upgrade process, see
recgems(1m).
OPTIONS
savegems
Please see the save(1m) man page for a description of the options supported by savegems.
newgems
−n
Do not restart the GEMStation after the files have been exported.
−V version
version is the currently installed version of GEMS. This flag and value are irrelevant, but
are required for backward-compatibility.
−E directory
Specify the directory where export and log files will be written. The path specified must
be an existing directory.
FILES
/gems/logs/savegems.out.log
The standard output of the export processes. This file contains information useful for tracking the
progress of a backup. When executing newgems, this file will be directory/newgems.out.log.
/gems/logs/savegems.err.log
The error output of the export processes. This file contains information useful for determining the
cause of a failed backup. When executing newgems, this file will be directory/newgems.err.log.
/gems/tmp/backup
The directory where exported data files are stored. This directory should be specified as the sole
save set value for the client resource used to backup a GEMStation.
1.3.Build.149a
May 04, 2001
1
SAVEGEMS(1m)
SAVEGEMS(1m)
SEE ALSO
nsr_client(5), recgems(1m), recover(1m), save(1m), savefs(1m), savegrp(1m)
DIAGNOSTICS
Exit Codes
0
<>0
Normal exit. This means that the backup executed normally, and a save set was correctly created
on the server.
Abnormal exit. This means that one or more files created during the backup process failed to be
backed-up, and/or a save set was not correctly created on the server.
Messages
host: /gems/tmp/backup level=level, size time count files.
This message (with the appropriate client host name, level, total save set size, elapsed time, and
file count) is printed whenever savegems is run by savegrp(1m) and exits normally.
host: /gems/tmp/backup: failed
Messages of this form indicate that the GEMStation backup failed. The log files listed above
should be perused to determine the cause of the failure.
Log Messages
Several messages may be present in the log files listed above. Diagnostics pertaining to integrity checks on
exported files begin with ‘Status:’, ‘Warning:’, or ‘Error:’. Status messages indicate successful verification
of a given file, while warning messages indicate a condition that can be safely ignored. Error messages indicate a condition that must be corrected to perform a successful backup.
NOTES
The savegrp(1m) command may retry a failed GEMStation backup depending on the value of the client
retries attribute in the NSR group resource (see nsr_group(5)). If the value of this attribute is greater than
zero, the process described in this document is invoked one more than the value of the client retries
attribute. Determining the cause of an initial failure may be difficult since the log files created are overwritten upon each savegems invocation.
1.3.Build.149a
May 04, 2001
2
SAPCLONE(8)
SAPCLONE(8)
NAME
sapclone − Clone all or selected SAP R/3 savesets
SYNOPSIS
sapclone [ −a ] [ −p pool ] [ −n ] [ −s server ] −u user
DESCRIPTION
sapclone is available for cloning savesets created by the SAP Interface. For instance, you may want to
clone your SAP backup data to an "offsite" media pool.
The sapclone command is executed by a NetWorker server system. If periodic execution is desired, the
sapclone command can be scheduled by (cron(1m)) or another scheduling mechanism.
OPTIONS
−a
Clone all SAP saveset, not just those from the last 24 hours.
−n
Trial run. Don’t actually initiate the cloning operation.
−p pool
Clone to this pool instead of the default clone pool.
−s server
Operate against the designated NetWorker server.
SEE ALSO
cron(1m), nsr(8), nsr_pool(5), nsradmin(8)
SAP R/3 Backup 1.0.1
$Date: 2000/06/29 13:04:35 $
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