ESSNA
MORE PEOPLE BUY AND
AIRPLANES
FLY CESSNA
THAN ANY OTHER MAKE
1975
WORLD S LARGEST PROER ONF GERNC
°,"
SINCE
1956
RJ
OWNER'S
MANUAL
PERFORMANCE
GROSS WEIGHT
Commutet*
-
1600 lbs
SPEED:
Top Speed at Sea Level
Cruise, 75% Power at 7000 ft
RANGE:
Cruise, 75% Power at 7000 ft
22. 5 Gallons, No Reserve
.
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,
75% Power at 7000 ft
No Reserve
CruiEe,
SPECIFICATIONS
-
,
-
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-
-
-
-
-
,
.
125 mph
-
.
122 mph
.
500 mi
4. 1 hrs
122 mph
755 mi
6. 2 hrs
122 mph
660 mi
6.9 brs
95 mph
1025 mi
10. 8 hrs
95 mph
670 fpm
14, 000 ft
-
35 Gallons,
Maximum
Range at 10,000 ft
22.5 Ga,llons,
No Reserve
Range at 10,000
No Reserve
Maximum
.
-
ft
35 Gallons,
RATE OF CLIMB AT SEA LEVEL
CEILING
SERVICE
TAKE-OFF:
GroundRun
Total Distance
Over 50-Ft Obstacle
.
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,
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........-
735ft
1385 ft
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LANDING:
GroundRoll
Total Distance
Over 50-Ft Obstacle
STALL SPEEDS:
Flaps Up, Power OffFlaps Down, Power Off
BAGGAGE
POWER LOADING: Pounds/HP
FUEL CAPACITY:
Total
Standard
Tanks
Optional
Long Range Tanks
OILCAPACITY..............--............-PROPELLER:
Fixed Pitch,
Diameter
ENGINE:
Continental Engine
100 rated HP at 2750 RPM
.......
,,.........
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55 mph
48 mph
1201bs
16. O
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445ft
1075 It
...
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26 gal.
38 gaL
·
·
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·
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·
·
6qts
69 inches
O-200-A
·
F150
(Approximate)
EMPTY WEÏGHT:
USEFUL
LOAD:
(Approximate)
Pounds/Sq
Foot
WING LOADING:
NOTE:
150
1000 lbs
600 lbs
10. 2
Commuter
1065 lbs
535 lbs
10. 0
Commuter II
1085 lbs
515 lbs
10. 0
F160
1030 lbs
570 lbs
10. 0
Commuter
1080 lbs
figures
include the effect of speed fairings
All performance
which improve
the speeds by approximately two mph. Speed fairings are st:mdard equipment on the Commuter and Commuter
11 and are optional equipment on the
150, F150. and F150 Commuter.
‡This manual covers operation of the Model 150 which is certificated as Model 150M
under FAAType CertificateNo. 3Al9. The manual also covers operation of theMode!
Reims/Cessna Fl50 which is certificated as ModelFISOMunder French Type Certificate
No. 38/3 and FAAType Certificate No. AI3EU. The Model fl50, manufactured by Reims
Aviation SK, Reims (Marne), France, is identical to lhe 150 except that it is powered
by an 0-200-A engine manufactured undet license by Rolls Royce, Crewe,England.
D1033-13-RAND--6000-6/76
520 lbs
10. 0
CONGRATULATIONS
.
.
.
.
.
Your Cessna has been designed and conWelcome to the ranks of Cessna owners!
and comfort.
It is our destructed
to give you the most in performance,
economy,
sire that you will find flying it, either for business
a pleasant and
or pleasure,
profitable
experience.
This Owner's Manual has been prepared
as a guide to help you get the most pleasure
and utility from your Model 150. It contains information
about your Cessna's equipand
for its servicing
and performance;
and suggestions
procedures,
ment, operating
We urge you to read it from cover to cover, and to refer to it frequently.
care.
Our interest
World-wide,
ment stands
Dealers:
has not ceased with your purchase
of a Cessna.
in your flying pleasure
backed by the Cessna
Service Departthe Cessna Dealer Organization
ready to serve you. The following services
are offered by most Cessna
It is designed to provide
THE CESSNA WARRANTY
comprehensive
coverage possible:
No exclusions
a.
b.
Coverage
includes parts and labor
world wide
Available at Cessna Dealers
c.
--
d.
Best
in
the
you with the most
industry
of the warranty
plus other important
Specific benefits and provisions
book
Care Program
benefits for you are contained in your Customer
service is available
Warranty
supplied with your aircraft.
to you at
Cessna Dealer throughout the world upon presentation
any authorized
under
Care Card which establishes
of your Customer
your eligibility
the warranty.
FACTORY
service.
TRAINED
PERSONNEL
to provide
you with courteous
FACTORY APPROVED
SERVICE EQUIPMENT to provide
possible.
workmanship
most efficient and accurate
A' STOCK OF GENUINE
need them.
CESSNA
SERVICE
expert
you with the
PARTS on hand when you
INFORMATION FOR SERVICING
THE LATEST AUTHORITATIVE
CESSNA AIRPLANES,
since Cessna Dealers have all of the Service
and
kept current by Service Letters
Manuals and Parts Catalogs,
Company.
published
by Cessna Aircraft
Service News Letters,
We urge all Cessna
owners
to use the Cessna
Dealer
Organization
A current Cessna Dealer
accompanies
Directory
your new airplane,
is revised frequently,
and a current
copy can be obtained from your
flight plamling aids;
Make your Directory
one of your cross-country
awaits you at every Cessna Dealer.
to the fullest.
The Directory
Cessna Dealer.
a warm welcome
i
Maximum height
properly
inflated,
Maximum
lights are
span
wing
of airplane
with nose gear depressed,
and optional flashing beacon installed.
wing span if optional
conical
installed.
If standard
wing
is 32'-8 1/2'
camber
all
tires and nose strut
wing tips and optional strobe
strobe lights are installed,
tips without
"MAX.
-0"
PRINCIPAL
DIMENSIONS
**
e'
7'-7¼"
ii
TABLE
OF CONTENTS
Page
SECTION
I
SECTION
11
-
-
OPERATING
CHECKLIST..........
DESCRIPTION
OPERATING
SECTION
Ill
SECTION
IV
SECTION
V
SECTION
VI
SECTION
Vil-
ALPHABETICAL
-
-
-
-
=
1-i
AND
DETAILS
2-1
.............
EMERGENCY
PROCEDURES.....
3-1
OPERATING
LIMITATIONS........
4-1
CARE
OF
THE
OPERATIONAL
OPTIONAL
AIRPLANE...___..
5-1
DATA.____________.
6-1
SYSTEMS.______.....--
INDEX...-...-----.....__________
7-1
index-1
This
manual describes
of
the operation and performance
Model 150, the Commuter,
and the Commuter II.
Equipment
described
as "Optional" denotes that the subis optional on the Model 150. Much of
ject equipment
this equipment is standard on the Commuter and Commuter II.
the
iii
Jecti0R
OPERATING
Í
CHECKLIST
service,
steps in obtaining the utmost performance,
with
yourself
from your Cessna is to familiarize
best
be done
This
controls.
and
systems,
can
equipment,
your aircraft's
items
Those
aircraft.
in
while
the
equipment
sitting
reviewing
this
by
II.
whose function and operation are not obvious are covered in Section
One of the first
and flying enjoyment
to
Section I lists, in Pilot's Checklist form, the steps necessary
checklist
in its
not
is
safely.
It
and
efficiently
a
aircraft
operate your
longer, but it does cover briefly all of the
true form as it is considerably
plastic
for
know
should
a typical flight. A more convenient
points that you
is available for
stowed in the map compartment,
enclosed checklist,
have been performed.
quickly checking that all important procedures
in crowded terminal
Since vigilance for other traffic is so important
that preoccupation with checklists be avoided in
areas, it is important
and performed from
Procedures
should be carefully memorized
flight.
scanned
quickly
checklist
to ensure that
should be
Then the
memory.
missed.
been
has
nothing
of your aircraft
characteristics
are normal
The flight and operational
characteristics
or operaThere are no "unconventional"
in all respects.
respond
in the normal
controls
way
mastered,
All
be
need
to
tions that
All airspeeds mentioned in Sections
within the entire range of operation.
calibrated airspeed
Corresponding
airspeeds.
I, II and III are indicated
in Section VI.
Table
may be obtained from the Airspeed Correction
1-1
Refer to inside back cover of this manual
for quantities, materials,and specifications
of frequently used service items.
6
4
INSPECTION
EXTERIOR
2
Note
Visually
check aircraft for general
during walkcondition
around inspection.
In cold weather,
remove
even small
of frost, ice or snow from wing, tail and
accumulations
control
surfaces.
Also, make sure that control surfaces
of ice or debris.
If
contain no internal accumulations
night flight is planned,
check operation
of all lights, and
make sure a flashlight
is available.
d.
wheel lock.
switch OFF.
Turn on master
switch and check fuel quantity
turn master switch OFF.
Check fuel shutoff valve handle ON.
a.
b.
Remove rudder gust lock,
Disconnect
tail tie-down.
a.
b.
c.
Remove
control
Check ignition
indicators,
then
if installed.
ngure
1-2
for freedom
c.
Check control
surfaces
a.
Check aileron
for freedom
a.
b.
c.
d.
a.
b.
c.
d.
Disconnect
wing
of movement
of movement
and security.
and security.
tie-down.
tire for proper
inflation.
Before first flight of day and after each refueling,
use sampler
of
fuel
from
fuel
small
quantity
and
drain
tank
cup
sump quickand proper fuel grade,
drain valve to check for water, sediment,
Visually check fuel quantity; then check fuel filler cap secure.
Check main wheel
with less than four quarts.
Do not operate
Check oil level.
flight.
Fill to six quarts for extended
pull out
Before first flight of the day and after each refueling,
drain knob for about four seconds
strainer
to clear fuel strainer
drain closed.
of possible water and sediment.
Check strainer
If water is observed,
the fuel system may contain additional
fuel
and further
draining
water,
of the system at the strainer,
and fuel line drain plug will be necessary.
tank sumps,
and spinner for nicks and security,
Check propeller
by dust or other
air filter for restrictions
Check carburetor
foreign
matter.
e.
f.
Check landing light for condition and cleanliness.
Check nose wheel strut and tire for proper inflation.
g.
Disconnect
nose tie-down.
static
Inspect flight instrument
of fuselage for stoppage.
h.
a.
b.
c.
source
opening
tire for proper inflation.
first flight of day and after each refueling,
use sampler
cup and drain small quantity of fuel from fuel tank sump quickand proper fuel grade.
sediment
drain valve to check for water,
fuel
filler cap secure.
check fuel quantity;
Visually
check
then
Check main wheel
Before
b.
c.
d.
if installed,
pitot tube cover,
and check
for stoppage.
Check stall warning vent opening for stoppage.
Check fuel tank vent opening for stoppage.
Disconnect
wing tie-down.
a.
Check aileron
a.
on left side
Remove
opening
for freedom
of movement
pitot tube
and security.
1-1.
1-3
BEFORE STARTING ENGINE.
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
Exterior
Preflight
COMPLETE,
Seats,
Belts,
ADJUST
Shoulder Harnesses
Fuel Shutofî Valve
ON.
Radios,
Electrical
OFF.
Equipment
Brakes
TEST and SET.
--
--
and
LOCK.
--
--
--
STARTING ENGINE.
RICH.
(1) Mixture
(2) Carburetor Heat
(3) Master Switch
--
COLD.
ON.
Prime
AS REQUIRED.
OPEN 1/4 INCH.
Throttle
CLEAR.
Propeller
Area
Ignition Switch
START (release when
CHECK.
Oil Pressure
--
--
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
--
--
--
engine starts).
--
--
BEFORE TAKE-OFF.
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
LATCHED.
Cabin Doors
Flight Controls
FREE and CORRECT.
Elevator
Trim
TAKE-OFF.
Fuel Shutoff Valve
ON.
SET.
Brakes
Throttle
1700 RPM.
Magnetos
CHECK (RPM drop should not exceed
150 RPM
a.
between
magnetos).
on either magneto or 75 RPM differential
b.
Heat
CHECK (for RPM drop).
Carburetor
Engine Instruments
CHECK.
and Ammeter
c.
d.
CHECK.
Suction Gage
Flight Instruments
and Radios
SET.
Throttle
Friction
Lock
ADJUST.
0°.
Wing Flaps
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
(7)
(8)
(9)
--
--
--
TAKE-OFF.
NORMAL TAKE-OFF.
(1)
1-4
Wing Flaps
--
0°.
Heat
FULL
(2) Carburetor
(3)
Throttle
Elevator
--
COLD.
--
OPEN.
LIFT NOSE
Control
(4)
70-80 MPH.
(5) Climb Speed
--
WHEEL
(at 55
MPH).
--
MAXIMUM
0°.
COLD.
Heat
HOLD.
FULL OPEN.
RELEASE.
SLIGHTLY
Control
(1)
Wing Flaps
Carburetor
(3)
Brakes
Throttle
Brakes
Elevator
(2)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
TAKE-OFF.
PERFORMANCE
--
--
--
--
--
TAIL LOW.
ahead).
--
Climb Speed
--
70 MPH
(withobstacles
ENROUTE CLIMB.
(1) Airspeed
--
75-85 MPH.
NOTE
climb is necessary,
performance
If a maximum
speeds shown in the Maximum Rate-Of-Climb
chart in Section VI.
(2) Throttle
(3) Mixture
OPEN.
FULL
--
RICH
--
use
Data
(unless engine
is rough).
CRUISE.
(1)
(2)
(3)
Power
Elevator
Mixture
--
2000 to 2750 RPM
ADJUST.
Trim
LEAN.
(no more than 75Ÿo).
--
--
BEFORE LANDING.
(1)
Mixture
--
(2) Carburetor
RICH.
Heat
--
ON
(apply full
heat before
closing
throttle).
1-5
(3) Airspeed
(4)
70-80 MPH
--
Wing Flaps
(5) Airspeed
--
--
(flaps UP).
AS DESIRED (below100 MPH).
60-70 MPH (flaps DOWN).
BALKED LANDING.
(1)
(2)
Throttle
FULL OPEN.
Heat
COLD.
RETRACT
TO 20°.
65 MPH.
RETRACT
(slowly).
--
Carburetor
(3) Wing Flaps
(4) Airspeed
(5) Wing Flaps
--
--
--
--
NORMAL LANDING.
(1)
(2)
(3)
Touchdown
MAIN WHEELS FIRST.
Landing Roll
LOWER NOSE WHEEL
Braking
MINIMUM REQUIRED.
--
--
GENTLY.
--
AFTER LANDING.
(1)
Wing Flaps
(2)
Carburetor
SECURING
(1) Parking
(2) Radios,
(3) Mixture
(4) Ignition
(5) Master
(6) Control
1-6
UP.
Heat
--
--
COLD.
AIRCRAFT.
SET.
Brake
Equiprnent
Electrical
--
IDLE CUT-OFF
Switch
OFF.
Switch
OFF.
Lock
INSTALL.
--
--
--
--
--
OFF.
(pulled full out).
1-7
INSTRUMENT
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
PANEL
9 10 11
12
13
36 35 34 33 32 31 30
2245 23
27
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
(Opt.)
Turn Coordinator
Airspeed
ludicator
Directional
Gyro (Opt.)
Gyro Horizon
(Opt.)
Clock (Opt.)
Aircraft
Registration
Number
Speed Indicator
(Opt-)
Vertical
Altimeter
Marker
Beacon Indicator
Lights and Switches/Radio
Transmitter
Selector
Switch
(Opt.)
10. Omni Course
Indicator
(Opi.)
Indicator
11. ADF Bearing
(Opt,
)
15 18 17
22
21
20
18
19
26
sy
,
and Control
12. Rear View Mirror
(Opt.)
13. Radios (Opt.)
14, Tachometer
Space
15. Optional
Instrument
16. Fuel and Oil Gages
17. Suction Gage (Opt.)
18. Ammeter
Warning
Light
19, Over-Voltage
20. Map Compartment
Control
Knobs
2L Cabin Air/Heat
22. Wing Flap Switch
Figure
1-8
14
2-1
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
Cigar
Lighter
(Opt.)
Mixture
Control
Knob
Throttle
(With Friction
Lock)
Microphone
(Opt.)
Elevator
Trim Control
Wheel
Carburetor
Heat Control
Knob
Electrical
Switches
Fuses
Radio Dial Light Rheostat
Panel Lights
Rheostat
Ignition/Starter
Switch
Master
Switch
Primer
Parking
Brake Knob
Jeetion H
DESCRIPTION
AND
DETAILS
OPERATING
describe
the systems and equipment whose
The following paragraphs
This
is not obvious when sitting in the aircraft.
function and operation
detail some of the items listed
section also covers in somewhat greater
further explanation.
in Checklist form in Section I that require
FUEL SYSTEM.
is supplied
Fuel
these tanks,
to the
From
fuel strainer
Refer
information,
to
figure
refer
FUEL TANK
tate
to the engine from
fuel flows by gravity
carburetor.
two tanks, one in each wing.
through a fuel shutoff valve
and
2-2 for fuel quantity data.
For fuel system servicing
Servicing
Requirements
on
the inside back cover.
to
SUMP
VALVES.
QUICK-DRAIN
Each fuel tank sump is equipped with a fuel quick-drain
and/or examination of fuel for contamination
draining
FUEL QUANTITY
TANKS
valve to faciliThe
and grade.
DATA (U.S. GALLONS)
USABLE FUEL
ALL FLIGHT
CONDITIONS
FUEL
TOTAL
FUEL
VOLUME
UNUSABLE
STANDARD WING
(13GAL. EACH)
22.5
3.5
26.0
TWO ' LONG RANGE WING
35.0
3.0
38.0
TWO
'
(19 GAL.
EACH)
Figure
2-2.
2-1
FUEL
SYSTEM
SCHEMATIC
VENT
LEFT
FUEL
TANK
i::
°
o
5
FUEL
TANK
°
FUEL
22
°"
FUEL SHUTOFF
VALVE
RIGHT
G^ts
OFF
e
Due to crossfeeding between fuel
tanks, the tanks should be retopped after each refueling to
assure maximum capacity.
FUEL
STRAINER
V
TO INTAKE
MANIFOLD
ENGINE
PRIMER
THROTTLE
CODE
CARBURETOR
FUEL
C
VENT
MECHANICAL
LINKAGE
TO ENGINE
CYLINDERS
Figure
2-2
<
SUPPLY
2-3.
MIXTURE
CONTROL
KNOB
valve extends through
cabin door.
A sampler
fuel.
Insert
the probe
drain valve and push.
pler cup until pressure
lower surface of the wing just outboard
of the
is used to examine
cup stored in the aircraft
the
in the sampler cup into the center
of the quickFuel will drain from the tank sump into the samon the valve is released.
the
LONG RANGE FUEL TANKS.
Special wings with long range fuel tanks are available
to replace
endurance
wings and fuel tanks for greater
and range.
the
standard
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM.
Electrical
by a 14-volt,
direct-current
is supplied
system
energy
powered by an engine-driven
alternator
(see figure 2-4). A 12-volt
battery is located on the right, forward side of the firewall
just inside the
Power is supplied through a single bus bar; a master
cowl access door.
except the engine
switch controls
ignition sys
this power to all circuits,
tem, optional clock and optional flight hour recorder
(operative only when
the en'gine is operating).
-
MASTER SWITCH.
The master
switch is a split-rocker
type switch labeled MASTER,
The right
and is ON in the up position and OFF in the down position.
all electrical
half of the switch, labeled BAT, controls
power to the
The left half, labeled ALT, controls
aircraft.
the alternator.
Normally,
both sides of the master
switch should be used simultaneously;
however,
the BAT side of the switch could be turned ON separately to check equipment
while on the ground.
The ALT side of the
switch, when placed in the OFF position,
removes
the alternator from
With this switch in the OFF position, the entire
the electrical system.
electrical load is placed on the battery.
Continued operation with the
switch OFF will reduce battery power low enough to open the
alternator
battery
field, and prevent
contactor,
remove
power from the alternator
restart.
alternator
AMMETER.
The ammeter
the flow of current, in amperes, from
or from the battery to the aircraft electrical
indicates
ternator to the battery
the alsys2-3
ELECTRICAL
REGULATOR
SYSTEM
SCHEMATIC
,
TO IGNITION
OVER-
r
FLAP
SLO BLO
ALTERNATOR
LIGHT
TO WlNG
SWITCH
FLAP
SYSTEM
TO LANDING
LIGHT
(OPT)
tog
LT
ALTERNATOR
WING
TIP STROBE
STROSSE
OVERVOLTAGE
SENSOR
-
BEACON
60
ALT
BCN
TO PITOT HEAT
SYSTEM
(OPT)
-TO
CIGAR LIGHTER (OPT)
WNH
ECOHRDEHOUOPT
AMMETER
-TO
OIL PRESSURE
SWITCH
(OPT
(OPT]
NAVIGATION
LIGHTS
PNAL HCONTROL
E
TRANSMITTER
RELAY
NAV
DOME
STARTER
-TO
DOME
LIGHT
TO RADIO
(OPT)
TO
RADIO
(OPT)
TO
RAD10
(OPT)
CLOCK
OPT)
STARTER
CONTACTOR
BATTERY
CONTACTOR
I
TO
WING FLAP
FUSE
4.
BATTERY
3
RADIO
2
RADIO
l
-
•I
-
RADIO
-
-TO
OPTIONAL
COORDINATOR
OPTNKONNAL
CT
GROUND SERVICE
PLUG RECEPTACLE (OPT)
IGNITION
SWITCH
FUEL IND
INT LTS
CODE
CIRCUIT
BREAKER
(AUTO.RESET)
CIRCUlT
BREAKER
(PUSH.TO
FUSE
DIODE
g
CAPACITOR
(NOISE
FitTER)
5
RESET)
RES1STOR
MAGNETOS
FUSE
Figure
2-4
2-4.
TURN
OR
AND-
-TO
INSTRUMENT AND
COMPASS LIGHTS
FUEL QUANTITY
-TO
INDICATORS
When the engine is operating
switch is ON, the
and the master
indicates
In the event
the charging rate applied to the battery.
load exceeds
is not functioning or the electrical
the output
the alternator
of the alternator,
rate of the battery.
the ammeter indicates the discharge
tem.
ammeter
OVER-VOLTAGE
SENSOR
AND
WARNING
LIGHT.
The aircraft
is equipped with an automatic over-voltage
protection
panel
system consisting of an over-voltage
sensor behind the instrument
and a red warning light, labeled HIGH VOLTAGE,
near the ammeter.
condition
In the event an over-voltage
occurs,
senthe over-voltage
field current
alternator
and shuts down the
removes
sor automatically
light will then turn on, indicating
The red warning
alternator.
to the
pilot that the alternator
battery
is supis not operating
and the aircraft
plying
all electrical
power.
The over-voltage
switch
sensor
may be reset by turning the master
off and back on again.
If the warning
light does not illuminate,
normal
alternator
charging
if the light does illuminate
has resumed;
however,
has occurred,
again, a malfunction
and the flight should be terminated
as soon as practical.
The over-voltage
off the ALT portion
turned on.
FUSES AND
of
CIRCUIT
warning
light may be tested by momentarily
turning
the master switch and leaving the BAT portion
BREAKERS.
panel protect
Fuses on the left lower portion of the instrument
the
of electrical
Labeling
below each fuse
majority
circuits
in the airplane.
Fuse capacity
indicates
by the fuses.
retainer
is
the circuits protected
by pressing
shown on each fuse retainer
Fuses are removed
cap.
the
inward and rotating
until they disfuse retainers
them counterclockwise
Spare fuses
The faulty fuse may then be lifted out and replaced.
engage.
are held in a clip inside the map compartment.
NOTE
A special
SLO-BLO fuse protects
the wing flaps circuit.
If this fuse is replaced,
care should be taken to assure
fuse is of the proper
that the replacement
type and capacity.
A SLO-BLO fuse is identified
by an integrally
mounted
encircling
spring
the fuse element.
2-5
Two additional
fuses are located adjacent
to the battery; one fuse probattery
contactor
closing circuit,
and the other fuse protects
the
optional
circuits.
clock and optional flight hour recorder
The cigar lightin an in-line
by a 9 amp fuse contained
fuseholder
located
er is protected
adjacent
to the back of the lighter.
tects the
utilizes
two
circuit
breakers
for circuit protection.
A
is located
on the left side
panel near the fuses and protects the alternator
circuit.
of the instrument
The alternator
field and wiring is protected
resetting
by an automatically
circuit breaker
mounted behind the left side of the instrument
panel.
The airplane
"push-to-reset" circuit
breaker
(labeledALT)
the radio transmitter relay
than one radio is installed,
is protected by the fuse labeled
of the radio installation)
NAV-DOME.
It is important
in other
that any malfunction
to remember
dome light, or optional
systems
protected
by this fuse (navigation lights,
control wheel map light) which causes the fuse to open will de-activate
these systems and the transmitter relay. In this event, the switches for
these lighting systems should be turned off to isolate the circuits;
then
replace
the transmitter relay and perthe NAV-DOME fuse to re-activate
mit its usage.
Do not turn on any of the lights protected
by the fuse until
has been corrected.
the malfunction
When more
(which is a part
LIGHTING
EXTERIOR
EQUIPMENT.
LIGHTING.
lights are located
Conventional navigation
on the wing tips and top of
rudder.
Optional lighting includes a single landing light or dual landing/taxi
lights in the cowl nose cap, a flashing
beacon on the top of the
vertical
fin, and a strobe light on each wing tip. All exterior
lights are
controlled
by rocker type switches
on the left switch and control panel.
The switches
are ON in the up position and OFF in the down position.
the
The flashing
beacon should not be used when flying through clouds or
in
the flashing light reflected from water droplets or particles
particularly
at night, can produce
vertigo
and loss of
the atmosphere,
orientation.
overcast;
The
tection.
vicinity
2-6
high intensity
strobe lights will enhance anti-collision
proHowever,
the lights should be turned off when taxiing in the
of other aircraft,
fog or haze.
or during flight through clouds,
two
INTERIOR
LIGHTING.
Illumination
of the instrument
panel is provided by red flood lighting
portion
of the overhead console.
The magnetic
compass
and flap position indicator
by integral
lighting.
are illuminated
A dimming rheostat
on the left switch and control panel operates
these lights.
A second rheostat
optional
radio lighting.
Lighting
on the panel controls
intensity
is decreased
as the rheostats
are turned counterclockwise.
in
the forward
An optional map light may be mounted on the bottom of the pilot's
control wheel.
The light illuminates
the lower portion of the cabin just
forward of the pilot and is helpful when checking maps and other flight
data during night operations.
To operate
the light, first turn on the NAV
LT switch,
then adjust the map light's intensity with the rheostat disc
located
at the bottom of the control wheel.
A cabin dome light in the overhead console is controlled by a rockerThe switch is ON in the
on the left switch and control panel.
up position and OFF in the down position.
type switch
WING FLAP SYSTEM.
The wing flaps are electrically
operated
by a flap motor located in
right wing.
Flap position
is controlled
by a switch, labeled WING
FLAPS, on the lower center portion of the instrument
Flap posipanel.
indicated
by a pointer housed in the left front doortion is mechanically
the
post.
To extend the wing flaps,
and held
the flap switch must be depressed
DOWN position
degree of extension is reached.
until the desired
Releasing the switch allows it to return to the center off position.
Normal
in flight will require
full flap extension
After
approximately
9 seconds.
limit switches will autothe flaps reach maximum extension or retraction,
matically
shut off the flap motor.
in
the
To retract
the flaps, place the flap switch in the
switch will remain in the UP position without manual
design of the switch.
Full flap retraction
over-center
approximately
More gradual
flap retraction
6 seconds.
operation
of the flap switch to
plished by intermittent
After full retraction,
the switch is normally returned
UP position.
The
assistance
due to an
in flight requires
can be accomthe UP position.
to the center off
position.
2-7
CABIN HEATING AND VENTILATING SYSTEM.
The temperature
to any degree desired
and volume of airflow into the cabin can be regulated
of the push-pull
CABIN HT and
by manipulation
CABIN AIR knobs.
Heated fresh air and outside air are blended in a cabin manifold
just
aft of the firewall by adjustment
of the heat and air controls;
this air is
then vented into the cabin from outlets in the cabin manifold near the
pilot's
Windshield
feet.
defrost
and passenger's
air is also supplied by
a duct leading from the manifold.
A separate
adjustable
supplies
additional
shield
PARKING
ventilator
of
near each upper corner
outside air to the pilot and passenger.
the
wind-
BRAKE SYSTEM.
To set the parking
brake, pull out on the parking brake knob, apply
and release
toe pressure
to the pedals, and then release the parking brake
knob.
To release
the parking brake, apply and release toe pressure
on
the pedals while checking to see that the parking brake knob is full in.
SEATS.
Standard
seating consists of individually
adjustable pilot and front
seats with two-position reclining
backs.
By raising
passenger
a lever at
the front of the seat on the inboard side, the seat can be adjusted fore and
aft. A control knob near the center of the front edge of the seat is used
to adjust the reclining angle of the seat back. To recline the back, pull
The control will
the knob forward firmly and lean back against the seat.
remain
extended as long as the seat back is reclined.
To return
the back
of the seat to the upright position,
pull forward
on the bottom edge of the
back. The back of these seats will also fold forward and lay down flat as
articles from the baggage area.
an aid to stowing or retrieving
A child's
seat
is available
The seat back is secured
attached
2-8
to
brackets
on
for installation
to the cabin sidewalls,
The child's
the floors.
in
the rear of the cabin.
and the seat bottom is
seat is not adjustable.
HARNESSES.
SHOULDER
are provided for the pilot and front seat passenjust above window
is attached to the rear doorpost
Each harness
ger.
each cabin door.
mounted
above
sheath
behind
stowage
a
line and is stowed
sheath.
it
behind
the
fold it and place
When stowing the harness,
Shoulder
harnesses
fasten and adjust the seat belt first.
harness,
shoulder
position,
and lengthen as required
stowed
from the
Remove the harness
Snap
release
strap.
narrow
and
of
harness
end
the
the
by pulling on the
seat
adjacent
retaining
slot
the
to
into
the
the harness metal stud firmly
Then adjust to length by pulling down on the free end of the
belt buckle.
will permit
adjusted
harness
the occupant to lean
A properly
harness.
enough to prevent
erect
excompletely
but
is
tight
forward enough to sit
forward movement and contact with objects during sudden decelcessive
easily.
pilot will want the freedom to reach all controls
Also,
To use
the
the
eration.
and removing
Releasing
the shoulder harness is accomplished by
stud
release
the harness
strap and removing
narrow
pulling upward
on the
harshoulder
the
In
belt
buckle.
an emergency,
from the slot in the seat
by releasing
the seat belt first, and then pulling the
ness may be removed
strap.
harness
over the head by pulling up on the release
INTEGRATED SEAT BELT/SHOULDER
WITH INERTIA REELS.
HARNESSES
harnesses with inertia reels
seat belt/shoulder
Optional integrated
The seat belt/
seat passenger.
are available for the pilot and front
attach
points on the outreels
inertia
extend from
to
shoulder harnesses
and buckle is
half
A separate seat belt
board side of the front seats.
reels
inertia
are located
The
of
side
the seats.
located on the inboard
reels
Inertia
cabin door.
each
of
aft
sidewall
just
cabin
in the upper
of a
event
in
However,
the
movement.
allow complete freedom of body
protect the occuautomatically
to
lock
will
deceleration,
up
they
sudden
pants.
adjust the metal buckle half
harness,
To use the seat belt/shoulder
drawn across the lap of
be
it
to
up far enough to allow
on the harness
Adjust
inboard
seat belt buckle.
the occupant and be fastened into the
To
remove
the
harness.
shoulder
seat belt tension by pulling up on the
buckle and allow the
belt
seat
release
belt/shoulder
harness,
the
seat
draw the harness
reel
to the outboard side of the seat.
inertia
to
2-9
STARTING ENGINE.
Ordinarily the engine starts easily with one or two strokes of primer
in warm temperatures
with the throttle
to six strokes in cold weather,
1/4 inch.
In extremely
cold temperatures,
open approximately
it may
be necessary
to continue priming while cranking.
Weak intermittent
firing followed by puffs of black smoke from the
exhaust stack indicates
overpriming
Excess
fuel can be
or flooding.
cleared from the combustion
chambers
by the following procedure:
Set
mixture
control
in the idle cut-off position,
throttle full open, and crank
the engine through several revolutions
with the starter.
Repeat the starting procedure
without any additional
priming.
If
engine)
the engine
is underprimed
(most likely in cold weather with a cold
it will not fire at all, and additional priming
will be necessary.
As soon as the cylinders
begin to fire, open the throttle slightly to keep
it running.
if the oil gage does not begin to show pressure
After starting,
within 30 seconds in the summertime
and about twice that long in very cold
weather,
stop engine and investigate.
Lack of oil pressure
can cause
serious
engine damage.
After starting,
avoid the use of carburetor
heat
unless icing conditions
prevail.
TAXIIN G.
When
a minimum
2-5)
to
taxiing, it is important
that speed and
and that all controls be utilized (see
maintain
Taxiing
over
directional
loose
speed to avoid abrasion
control
be held to
use of brakes
Taxiing
Diagram, figure
and balance.
gravel or cinders
and stone damage
should
to the
be done
propeller
at low engine
tips.
The nose wheel is designed to automatically
center
straight
ahead
when the nose strut is fully extended.
In the event the nose strut is overinflated
and the airplane
is loaded to a rearward
center
of gravity position, it may be necessary
to partially
compress
the strut to permit steering.
This can be accomplished
prior to taxiing by depressing
the airplane
nose (by hand) or during taxi by sharply
applying brakes.
2-10
DIAGRAM
TAXIING
USE
UP AILERON
I.N
NU
L
USE
All
'AN
EHON
A
TOR
USE DOWN AILERON
ON RII WING AND
DOWN ELEVATOR
USE IX)WN AILERON
ON Llf WING AND
DOWN ELEVATOR
NOTE
CODE
WIND DIRECTION
UP
li
Strong quartering
tail winds require caution.
Avoid sudden bursts of the throttle and sharp
is in this attitude.
braking when the airplane
Use the steerable
nose wheel and rudder to
maintain direction.
Figure
2-5.
2-11
BEFORE TAKE-OFF.
WARM-UP.
Most of the warm-up
will have been conducted
during taxi, and addibefore
warm-up
take-off should be restricted
to the checks outlined in Section I. Since the engine is closely cowled for efficient
in-flight
cooling,
precautions
should be taken to avoid overheating
on the ground.
tional
MAGNETO
CHECK.
The magneto
check should be made at 1700 RPM as follows.
Move
ignition switch first to R position and note RPM.
Next move switch back
to BOTH to clear the other set of plugs. Then move switch to the E posiRPM drop
tion, note RPM and return the switch to the BOTH position.
should not exceed 150 RPM on either magneto or show greater than 75
RPM differential
between
If there is a doubt concerning
magnetos.
operaRPM checks at higher engine speeds will
tion of the ignition system,
whether
usually confirm
exists.
a deficiency
An absence of RPM drop may be an indication
of faulty grounding
one side of the ignition system or should be cause for suspicion
that
magneto timing is set in advance of the setting
specified.
of
the
ALTERNATOR CHECK.
Prior to flights where verification
of proper
alternator
and voltage
regulator
operation
is essential
flights),
(such as night or instrument
a
positive
verification
system
can be made by loading the electrical
momentarily (3 to 5 seconds) with the optional landing light, (if so equipped),
or
by operating
the wing flaps during the engine runup (1700 RPM). The ammeter will remain
within a needle width of zero if the alternator
and voltage regulator are operating properly.
TAKE-OFF.
POWER
CHECKS.
It is important
engine operation
early in the taketo check full-throttle
off run.
Any signs of rough engine operation
engine acceleraor sluggish
tion is good cause for discontinuing
the take-off. If this occurs,
you are
justified in making a thorough full-throttle,
static runup before another
2-12
take-off
mately
is attempted.
The engine should
2460 to 2560 RPM with carburetor
run smoothly
heat off.
and turn approxi-
Full throttle runups over loose gravel are especially
harmful
to propeller tips. When take-offs must be made over a gravel
surface,
it is
This allows the airvery important
that the throttle be advanced slowly.
plane to start rolling
before high RPM is developed,
and the gravel will
be blown back of the propeller
rather
than pulled into it. When unavoidable small dents appear
in the propeller
blades,
they should be immediately corrected
in Section V.
as described
to take-off from fields
to give maximum
Prior
should be leaned
After full throttle is applied,
above 5000 feet elevation,
the mixture
RPM in a full-throttle,
static runup.
adjust the throttle friction
lock clock-
wise to prevent
the throttle from creeping back from a maximum power
position.
Similar friction lock adjustment should be made as required
in other flight conditions
to maintain a fixed throttle setting.
FLAP SETTINGS.
and obstacle
clearance
Normal
with flaps up.
take-offs are performed
10¶ÿ but
The use of 10° flaps will shorten the ground run approximately
Therefore
this advantage is lost in the climb to a 50-foot obstacle.
the
for minimum
ground runs or for take-off from
use of 10° flaps is reserved
soft or rough fields.
ahead,it
If 10° of flaps are used on soft or rough fields with obstacles
is preferable
to leave them extended rather than retract them in the climb
The exception
to the obstacle.
to this rule would be in a high altitude takeoff in hot weather
where climb would be marginal
with flaps 10°.
Flap deflections
greater
at any time for take-off.
than 10° are not recommended
PERFORMANCE
CHARTS.
Distance
chart in Section VI for take-off disunder various
altitude
and headwind
conditions.
Consult the Take-Off
tances at
gross
CROSSWIND
weight
TAKE-OFFS.
Take-öffs
with the
into strong crosswinds
normally
are performed
minimum
flap setting necessary
for the field length, to minimize
the
drift angle immediately
after take-off.
The airplane is accelerated
to
a speed slightly higher than normal,
then pulled off abruptly to prevent
possible
When clear of the
settling back to the runway while drifting.
2-13
ground,
make
a coordinated
turn
into
the
wind
to
correct
for drift.
ENROUTE CLIMB.
CLIMB
DATA.
For detaileddataseeMaximumRate-Of-ClimbDatachartin
Section
VI.
CLIMB SPEEDS.
at 75 to 85 MPH with flaps up and full
climbs
are conducted
should be full rich unless
The mixture
best engine cooling.
The best rate-of-climb
rough due to too rich a mixture.
If an
speeds range from 78 MPH at sea level to 71 MPH at 10, 000 feet.
obstruction
dictates the use of a steep climb angle, climb at an obstacle
speed of 70 MPH with flaps retracted.
clearance
Normal
throttle, for
the engine is
NOTE
Steep
climbs
allow
tion to
at low speeds should be of short
improved
engine cooling.
dura-
CRUISE.
Normal
cruising
is done at power settings
The
up to 75°70 power.
fuel consumption
engine RPM and corresponding
for various
altitudes
can
be determined
by using your Cessna Power Computer or the Operational
Data in Section VI.
The Operational
Data in Section VI
improved
fuel economy
that is obtainable
settings
and higher altitudes.
The use
selection
of cruise
altitude
on the basis
factors
tions are significant
that should
reduce fuel consumption.
shows
range
and
the increased
at lower power
when operating
of lower power settings
and the
of the most favorable
wind condibe considered
on every trip to
The Cruise Performance
table on page 2-15 shows the true airspeed
for various
altitudes and percent powper gallon during cruise
This table should be used as a guide,
along with the available
winds
ers.
aloft information,
altitude and power
to determine
the most favorable
setting for a given trip.
and miles
2-14
CRUISE
PERFORMANCE
COMMUTER
75%
TAS
ALTITUDE
POWER
65%
POWER
55%
POWER
MPG
TAS
MPG
TAS
MPG
Sea Level
115
20. 5
108
22. 0
102
24. 3
3500 Feet
118
21. 1
112
22. 9
105
25. 0
7000 Feet
122
21. 8
115
23. 5
108
25. 7
Standard
Zero
Conditions
figures
To achieve
the lean mixture fuel consumption
should be leaned as follows:
Section VI, the mixture
Pull the mixture
fall off.
(1)
to
(2)
Enrichen
slightly
control
out until
engine
shown
Wind
in
RPM peaks and begins
back to peak RPM.
at the leanest
For best fuel economy at 55% power or less, operate
mixture
that results in smooth engine operation or at 50 RPM on the lean
This will result in approxi
first.
side of the peak RPM, whichever
occurs
mately 5% greater
range than shown in this manual.
drop in RPM, can be
by an unexplained
ice, as evidenced
regaining
heat.
Upon
of
application
the origifull
carburetor
removed
by
amount of heat (by trial and
nal RPM (withheat off), use the minimum
Since the heated air causes a richer
error) to prevent ice from forming.
heat is to be used
readjust
mixture,
the mixture setting when carburetor
flight.
continuously
in cruise
Carburetor
during flight in very
heat is recommended
The use of full carburetor
due to excessive
of engine stoppage
heavy rain to avoid the possibility
for smoothest
setting should be readjusted
The mixture
water ingestion.
operation.
2-15
STALLS.
The stall characteristics
for
are conventional
down condition.
Slight elevator buffeting may occur
with flaps down.
the
flaps up and flaps
before the stall
just
Stall speeds are shown in Section VI for aft c.g.,
full gross weight
conditions.
They are presented
airspeeds
because
indicated
as calibrated
airspeeds
The stall warning
horn produces
are unreliable
near the stall.
and remains
a steady signal 5 to 10 MPH before the actual stall is reached
is changed.
on until the airplane flight attitude
SPINS.
Spins are approved
in this aircraft
from an inadvertent
spin,
or intentional
be used.
(1)
(2)
(see
the
Section IV). For recovery
following
procedure
should
RETARD THROTTLE
TO IDLE POSITION.
APPLY FULL RUDDER OPPOSITE TO THE DIRECTION
OF
ROTATION.
(3) AFTER ONE-FOURTH TURN, MOVE THE CONTROL WHEEL
FORWARD OF NEUTRAL
IN A BRISK MOTION.
(4) AS ROTATION STOPS, NEUTRALIZE
RUDDER,
AND MAKE A
SMOOTH RECOVERY
FROM THE RESULTING
DIVE.
Application
of aileron
in the direction
rate
rotation
and delay the recovery.
neutral
position
throughout the spin and
with flaps extended
are prohibited.
the
of
the
spin
will
greatly
increase
Ailerons
should be held in a
Intentional
the recovery.
spins
LANDING.
Normal landing approaches
can be made with power-on
or power-off
of 70 to 80 MPH with flaps up, and 60 to 70 MPH with flaps
down.
Surface winds and air turbulence are usually
the primary factors
in determining
the most comfortable
approach speeds.
at speeds
Actual touchdown should be made with power-off
and on the main
wheel should be lowered
smoothly
to the runway
wheels first.
The nose
as speed is diminished.
2-16
SHORT
FIELD LANDINGS.
short field landing in smooth air condiperformance
For a maximum
at 60 MPH with 40° flaps using enough power to
make an approach
control
are cleared, prothe glide path. After all approach obstacles
60 MPH by lowering
the nose of the
gressively
reduce power and maintain
power-off
made
with
and
the main
be
on
Touchdown
should
airplane.
Immediately
after touchdown, lower the nose wheel and
wheels first.
brake effectiveness,
For maximum
reapply heavy braking as required.
brake
and
maximum
elevator,
full
apply
hold
flaps,
nose-up
tract the
without sliding the tires.
pressure
tions,
Slightly
conditions.
CROSSWIND
higher
approach
speeds
should be used under
turbulent
air
LANDINGS.
flap setting
use the minimum
When landing in a strong crosswind,
Use a wing low, crab,
or a combination
required
for the field length.
level attitude.
and land in a nearly
method of drift correction
with the
can hinder nose wheel alignment
landing at touchdown and durcrosswind
by firmly lowering
This can be counteracted
the nose wheel
ing ground roll.
partially
This
contact.
initial
action
after
the
ground
compresses
to the
ground steering.
nose wheel swiveling and positive
nose strut, permitting
Excessive nose strut inflation
aircraft ground track in a drifting
BALKED LANDING
In a balked landing (go-around)climb,
the wing flap setting should
Upon reachafter full power is applied.
be reduced
to 20° immediately
retracted
slowly
should
flaps
be
the full up
ing a safe airspeed,
to
the
position.
situations where undivided attention to the aircraft is reIn critical
by holding the flap switch
quired,
the 20° flap setting can be approximated
allow the pilot to obwill
This
seconds.
technique
for approximately
two
tain the 20° setting without having to divert his attention to the flap position indicator.
COLD WEATHER OPERATION.
Prior
to starting
on cold mornings,
it is advisable
to pull the
pro2-17
peller through several
times by hand
oil, thus conserving
battery
energy.
to "break loose"
"limber" the
or
NOTE
When pulling the propeller
through by hand, treat
as if the ignition switch is turned on. A loose or
broken ground wire on either magneto
could cause
it
.
the engine to fire.
cold (0°F and lower) weather,
In extremely
heater is recommended
whenever
possible
the engine and electrical
system.
Cold weather
starting
procedures
the use
to reduce
of an external
prewear and abuse to
are as follows:
With Preheat:
(1)
With ignition
four
to ten strokes
switch OFF and throttle closed,
as
the
propeller
is being
turned
prime
over
the engine
by hand.
NOTE
Use heavy strokes
of primer for best atomization of
fuel.
After priming,
push primer
all the way in and
turn to locked position to avoid possibility
of engine
drawing fuel through the primer.
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
Propeller
CLEAR.
Area
Master
Switch
ON.
Throttle
OPEN 1/4 INCH.
Mixture
FULL RICH.
Ignition Switch
START.
Release
ignition switch to BOTH when engine
Oil Pressure
CHECK.
--
--
--
--
--
Without
(1)
Preheat:
Prime
the
engine
eight
to ten
strokes
while
being turned by hand with the throttle closed.
charged
and ready for a stroke.
CLEAR.
(2) Propeller
Area
--
(3)
(4)
(5)
2-18
starts.
--
Mixture
Master
Ignition
--
FULL
Switch
Switch
--
--
RICH.
ON.
START.
the
Leave
propeller
is
the primer
(6) Pump
position.
(7) Release
rapidly
throttle
to
full open
Return
twice.
to
1/4"
open
ignition
switch to BOTH when engine starts.
engine until it is running
prime
smoothly, or alternately,
over first 1/4 of total travel.
pump throttle rapidly
CHECK.
(9) Oil Pressure
knob full on after engine has started.
Pull
carburetor
heat
Leave
(10)
on until engine is running smoothly.
LOCK.
(11) Primer
(8) Continue to
--
--
NOTE
If the engine does not start during the first few attempts,
in strength,
it is probable
or if engine firing diminishes
Preheat
that the spark plugs have been frosted over.
must be used before another start is attempted.
IMPORTANT
Pumping
the throttle may cause raw fuel to accumulate
in the intake air duct, creating
a fire hazard in the event
If this occurs,
maintain
of a backfire.
action
a cranking
An outside attendant
with
to suck flames into the engine.
without preis advised for cold starts
a fire extinguisher
heat.
will be apparent
operations,
During cold weather
on the
no indication
oil temperature gage prior to take-off if outside air temperatures are very
period ( 2 to 5 minutes
cold. After a suitable warm-up
at 1000 RPM), acIf the engine achigher
RPM.
engine
several
celerate
engine
the
times to
normal
remains
and steady,
cele,rates
smoothly and the oil pressure
the
aircraft is ready for take-off.
retor
the
in sub-zero
When operating
temperature, avoid using
air
Partial
heat may increase
heat.
the carburetor
32° to 70° range, where icing is critical under certain
partial
carbu-
temperature
to
atmospheric
conditions.
Refer to Section VII for cold weather
equipment.
NOISE ABATEMENT.
Increased
emphasis
on improving
the
quality
of our
environment
re-
2-19
quires
craft
renewed
noise on
effort on
public.
the
part
of all pilots
the
to
minimize
the
effect
We, as pilots,
can demonstrate
for environmental
our concern
provement,
by application
of the following
suggested
procedures,
thereby tend to build public support for aviation:
of airim-
and
(1) Pilots operating aircraft under VFR over outdoor assemblies
of persons,
recreational
and park areas, and other noise-sensitive
areas should make every effort to fly not less than 2, 000 feet above
the surface, weather permitting,
even though flight at a lower level
may be consistent
with the provisions
of government
regulations.
(2) During departure from or approach to an airport, climb after
take-off and descent for landing should be made so as to avoid prolonged flight at low altitude near noise-sensitive
areas.
NOTE
The above recommended
procedures
do not apply where
would conflict with Air Traffic
Control clearances
or instructions,
or where, in the pilot's
judgment, an
altitude
of less than 2, 000 feet is necessary
for him to
adequately exercise
his duty to see and avoid other aircraft.
they
2-20
Jeeties HI
PROCEDURES
EMERGENCY
caused by aircraft
Emergencies
are extremely
or engine malfunctions
Eninspections
pre-flight
and maintenance
are practiced.
rare if proper
emergencies
or eliminated by careful
route weather
can be minimized
weather
is encountered.
flight planning and good judgement when unexpected
in this
described
guidelines
basic
arise
the
should
However,
an emergency
to correct the proband applied as necessary
section
should be considered
lem.
ENGINE
FAILURE.
AFTER
FAILURE
ENGINE
TAKE-OFF.
a glide
of the nose to maintain airspeed and establish
lowering
Prompt
most
In
after
take-off.
to an engine failure
attitude is the first response
changes
the landing should be planned straight ahead with only small
cases,
Altitude and airspeed are seldom suffiin direction
to avoid obstructions.
The
to return to the runway.
cient to execute
a 180° gliding turn necessary
procedures
following
that adequate time exists to secure the fuel
assume
and ignition systems prior to touchdown.
70 MPH.
(1) Airspeed
IDLE CUT-OFF.
(2) Mixture
OFF.
(3) Fuel Shutoff Valve
OFF.
Ignition
Switch
(4)
AS REQUIRED
(5) Wing Flaps
--
--
--
--
--
(6)
Master
ENGINE
Switch
FAILURE
--
DURING
FLIGHT.
gliding toward a suitable
cause of the failure.
to
is feasible,
proceed as follows:
While
identify
the
(40° recommended).
OFF.
landing area, an effort should be made
and an engine restart
If time permits,
3-1
75 MPH.
(1) Airspeed
ON.
(2) Carburetor Heat
ON.
(3) Fuel Shutoff Valve
RICH.
(4) Mixture
BOTH (or START
(5) Ignition Switch
--
--
--
--
--
(6)
If
the
Primer
engine
executed.
paragraph.
FORCED
is not windmilling)
cannot be restarted,
a forced landing without power must be
procedure
A recommended
for this is given in the following
LANDINGS.
EMERGENCY LANDING
nent,
if propeller
IN and LOCKED.
--
WITHOUT
ENGINE
POWER.
If all attempts
to restart the engine fail and a forced landing is immiselect a suitable field and prepare for the landing as follows:
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
(9)
Airspeed
75 MPH
65 MPH
--
(flaps UP)
(flaps DOWN).
Mixture
IDLE CUT-OFF.
Fuel Shutoff Valve
OFF.
Ignition Switch
OFF.
Wing Flaps
AS REQUIRED (40° recommended).
Master
Switch
OFF.
Doors
UNLATCH PRIOR TO TOUCHDOWN.
Touchdown
SLIGHTLY
TAIL LOW.
Brakes
APPLY HEAVILY.
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
PRECAUTIONARY
LANDING
WITH ENGINE
POWER.
Before attempting
airport" landing,
an
one should drag the landing area at a safe but low altitude to inspect
the terrain for obstructions
and surface
conditions,
proceeding as follows:
"off
(1) Drag over selected field with flaps 20° and 70 MPH airspeed,
noting the preferred
area for touchdown for the next landing approach.
Then retract
flaps upon reaching
a safe altitude and airspeed.
OFF.
Switches
(2) Radio, Electrical
40°.
(3) Wing Flaps
65 MPH.
(4) Airspeed
--
--
--
3-2
OFF.
PRIOR TO TOUCHDOWN.
UNLATCH
TAIL LOW.
SLIGHTLY
Touchdown
OFF.
Ignition Switch
APPLY
HEAVILY.
Brakes
(5) Master Switch
(6)
(7)
(8)
(9)
Doors
--
--
--
--
--
DITCHING.
for ditching
Prepare
by securing
the baggage area, and collect folded
occupant's face at touchdown. Transmit
in
jettisoning
or
heavy
or cushions
Mayday message
coats
objects located
for protection of
on 121. 5 MHz.
and intentions.
giving location
Plan approach into wind if winds are high and seas are heavy.
With heavy swells and light wind, land parallel to swells.
(2) Approach with flaps 40° and sufficient power for a 300 ft./min.
rate of descent at 65 MPH.
(3) Unlatch the cabin doors.
(4) Maintain a continuous descent until touchdown in level attitude.
Avoid a landing flare because of difficulty in judging airplane height
over a water surface.
at time of touchdown.
(5) Place folded coat or cushion in front of face
If
doors.
cabin
necessary, open win(6) Evacuate airplane through
for equalizing pressure
dow to flood cabin compartment
so that door
can be opened.
(7) Inflate life vests and raft (if available) after evacuation of cabin.
The aircraft
cannot be depended on for flotation for more than a few
(1)
minutes.
FIRES.
ENGINE FIRE DURING
START ON GROUND.
procedures
starting
during a difficult cold weather start can
could
ignite
fuel that has accumulated in the intake
which
backfire
cause a
follows:
proceed
duct.
In this event,
as
Improper
(1) Continue
the flames
engine.
If
minutes
(2)
the
cranking
start
before
to get a start which would suck
and into the
fuel through the carburetor
in an attempt
and accumulated
is successful,
run the engine at 1700 RPM for a few
shutting it down to inspect the damage.
3-3
(3) If engine
minutes
with
start is unsuccessful,
throttle full
open while
continue
cranking
ground attendants
for two or
obtain fire
three
ex-
tinguishers.
cranking and turn off
(4) When ready to extinguish fire, discontinue
master
switch,
ignition
switch, and fuel shutoff valve.
wool blanket,
seat cushion,
(5) Smother flames with fire extinguisher,
If practical,
air filter if it is
or loose dirt.
try to remove carburetor
ablaze.
Make a thorough inspection
of fire
damaged
components
before conducting
(6)
damage,
another
and repair
flight.
or replace
ENGINE FIRE IN FLIGHT.
Although engine fires are extremely
be taken if one is encountered:
in flight,
rare
should
(1)
(2)
the
following
steps
Mixture
IDLE CUT-OFF.
Fuel Shutoff Valve
OFF.
OFF.
Master
Switch
(3)
OFF (except overhead vents).
(4) Cabin Heat and Air
100 MPH.
If fire is not extinguished,
increase
glide
(5) Airspeed
which will provide
mixture.
speed to find an airspeed
an incombustible
--
--
--
--
--
Execute
a forced landing
as outlined
in preceding
paragraphs.
ELECTRICAL FIRE IN FLIGHT.
The initial
ing insulation.
indication
of an electrical
The following
procedure
(1) Master Switch
(2) All Radio/Electrical
--
(3)
(4)
If fire
of flight:
(5)
(6)
--
--
odor
of burn-
--
--
out and electrical
Master
Switch
Fuses and Circuit
the
OFF.
CLOSED.
ACTIVATE
(if available).
Switches
Air/Heat
Extinguisher
appears
is usually
OFF.
Vents/Cabin
Fire
fire
should then be used:
power
ON.
Breaker
--
is necessary
CHECK
for faulty
for continuance
circuit,
do not
reset.
Radio/Electrical
Switches
ON one at a
each until short circuit
is localized.
(7)
3-4
--
time,
with delay after
(8) Vents/Cabin
Air/Heat
--
OPEN
when it is ascertained
that
fire
extinguished.
is completely
DISORIENTATION
IN CLOUDS.
failure
during flight in marginal
In the event of a vacuum system
and the
weather, the directional
gyro and gyro horizon will be disabled,
or the turn and bank indipilot will have to rely on the turn coordinator
The following instructions
flies into clouds.
cator if he inadvertently
coordinator
only
electrically-powered
or the turn
turn
the
assume that
and that the pilot is not completely
is operative,
and bank indicator
proflying.
ficient in partial panel instrument
EXECUTING A 180°
back
Upon entering
as follows:
the
TURN IN CLOUDS.
clouds,
an immediate
plan
should
Note the time of the minute hand and observe
sweep second hand on the clock.
(1)
be made
the position
to turn
of
the
(2) When the sweep second hand indicates the nearest half-minute,
rate left turn, holding the turn coordinator
initiate
syma standard
bolic aircraft wing opposite
the lower left index mark for 60 seconds.
aircraft.
Then roll back to level flight by leveling
the miniature
(3) Check accuracy of the turn by observing the compass heading
of the original
heading.
which should be the reciprocal
with
heading
skidding motions
If
primarily
adjust
necessary,
(4)
rather
than rolling motions so that the compass will read more accurately.
(5) Maintain altitude and airspeed by cautious application of elevator
by keeping the hands off the control
control.
Avoid overcontrolling
wheel and steering only with rudder.
EMERGENCY
LET-DOWNS
THROUGH
CLOUDS.
descent
obtain radio clearance
If possible,
for an emergency
through
To guard against a spiral dive, choose an easterly
clouds.
or westerly
bank angles.
card swings due to changing
heading to minimize
compass
In addition, keep hands off the control wheel and steer a straight course
control by monitoring
with rudder
Occasionally
the turn coordinator.
check the compass heading and make minor corrections
to hold an approxiinto the clouds,
mate course.
Before descending
set up a stabilized letdown condition as follows:
3-5
(1)
Apply full rich mixture.
heat.
(2) Use full carburetor
(3) Reduce power to set up a 500 to 800 ft. /min. rate
(4) Adjust the elevator trim tab for a stabilized descent
(5) Keep hands off the control wheel.
and make corrections
(6) Monitor turn coordinator
by
(7) Check trend of compass card movement and make
rections
with rudder
to stop the
(8) Upon breaking out of clouds,
FROM
RECOVERY
If a spiral
of descent.
at 80 MPH.
rudder
cautious
alone.
cor-
turn.
resume
normal
cruising
flight.
A SPIRAL DIVE.
is encountered,
proceed
as follows:
(1) Close the throttle.
(2)
Stop
the turn
align the symbolic
reference
line.
by using
aircraft
coordinated
aileron and rudder control
in the turn coordinator
with the horizon
to
(3)
Cautiously apply elevator back pressure to slowly reduce the indicated airspeed to 80 MPH.
(4) Adjust the elevator trim control to maintain an 80 MPH glide.
(5) Keep hands off the control wheel, using rudder control to hold
a straight heading.
(6) Apply carburetor heat.
but avoid using enough power to dis(7) Clear engine occasionally,
turb the trimmed glide.
(8) Upon breaking out of clouds, apply normal cruising power and resume
flight.
FLIGHT IN ICING CONDITIONS.
icing
Although flying in known icing conditions
encounter
should be handled as follows:
(1)
(2)
is prohibited,
an unexpected
Turn pitot heat switch ON (if installed).
Turn back or change altitude
to obtain an outside air temperature
that is less conducive to icing.
(3) Pull cabin heat control full out to obtain windshield defroster airflow. Adjust cabin air control to get maximum
defroster
heat and air-
flow.
3-6
(4) Open the throttle to increase engine speed and minimize ice
blades.
build-up on propeller
air filter ice and apply carburetor
(5) Watch for signs of carburetor
loss in engine speed could be
An unexplained
heat as required.
Lean the mixture
ice or air intake filter ice.
caused by carburetor
heat is used continuously.
RPM if carburetor
for maximum
rapid
With an extremely
(6) Plan a landing at the nearest airport.
landing
site.
ice build-up,
select a suitable "off airport"
of 1/4 inch or more on the wing leading
(7) With an ice accumulation
edges, be prepared for significantly higher stall speed.
With a severe ice build-up
on the
(8) Leave wing flaps retracted.
caused by
horizontal
tail, the change in wing wake airflow direction
effectiveness.
could result in a loss of elevator
wing flap extension
ice
if
from
left
window
practical,
and,
Open
a portion of
scrape
(9)
the windshield for visibility in the landing approach.
(10) Perform a landing approach using a forward slip, if necessary,
for improved
visibility.
75 to 85 MPH,
(11) Approach at
depending
upon
the
amount
of ice
accumulation.
(12)
Perform
ROUGH
a landing
in level
attitude.
ENGINE OPERATION
CARBURETOR
A gradual
OR LOSS OF POWER.
ICING.
loss
may result from
of RPM and eventual engine roughness
To clear the ice, apply full throttle and
ice.
the formation of carburetor
heat knob full
pull the carburetor
out until the engine runs smoothly;
then
heat and readjust
carburetor
the throttle. If conditions require
remove
flight,
heat in cruise
use the minimum
the continued use of carburetor
amount of heat necessary
to prevent ice from forming and lean the mixture slightly for smoothest engine operation.
SPARK
PLUG FOULING.
in flight may be caused by one or more
A slight engine roughness
This may be
fouled by carbon or lead deposits.
spark plugs becoming
from BOTH to either
verified by turning the ignition switch momentarily
is
L or R position.
An obvious power loss in single ignition operation
evidence of spark plug or magneto trouble. Assuming that spark plugs
are the more likely cause, lean the mixture to the normal lean setting
does not clear up in several minutes,
for cruising
flight. If the problem
3-7
determine
if a richer
mixture setting will produce smoother operation.
If
not, proceed
to the nearest airport for repairs using the BOTH position of
the ignition switch unless extreme roughness
dictates
the use of a single
ignition position.
MAGNETO
MALFUNCTION.
A sudden engine roughness
is usually
or misfiring
evidence of magneto problems.
Switching from BOTH to either
L or R ignition
switch
position
will identify
which magneto
is malfunctioning.
Select different
power settings and enrichen
if continued
the mixture to determine
operation on BOTH magnetos is practicable.
If not, switch to the good
magneto and proceed to the nearest
airport for repairs.
LOW
OIL PRESSURE.
If low oil pressure
is accompanied by normal oil temperature,
is a possibility
the oil pressure gage or relief valve is malfunctioning.
leak in the line to the gage is not necessarily
cause for an immediate
cautionary
landing because an orifice in this line will
loss of oil from the engine sump.
port would be advisable
to inspect
prevent
However,
the
source
a landing at
of trouble.
there
A
pre-
a sudden
air-
the nearest
If a total loss of oil pressure
is accompanied by a
ture, there is good reason to suspect an engine failure
rise in oil temperais imminent.
Reduce engine power immediately
and select a suitable forced landing field.
Leave the engine running at low
power during the approach, using only the
minimum
power required
to reach the desired touchdown spot.
ELECTRICALPOWER SUPPLY SYSTEM MALFUNCTIONS.
Malfunctions
in the electrical
power supply system
can be detected by
periodic
monitoring
of the ammeter and over-voltage
warning
light; however,
is usually
the cause of these malfunctions
difficult
determine.
to
Broken or loose alternator
wiring is most likely the cause of alternator
failures,
although other factors
could cause the problem.
A damaged or
improperly adjusted voltage regulator
can also cause malfunctions.
Problems of this nature
constitute an electrical
and should be dealt
emergency
with immediately.
Electrical power malfunctions
usually
fall into two categories:
excessive
rate of charge and insufficient
rate of charge.
The
paragraphs
below describe
remedy
the recommended
for each situation.
3-8
EXCESSIVE RATE OF CHARGE.
After engine starting
and heavy
electrical usage at low engine speeds
battery
condition
will be low enough to
accept above normal charging during the initial part of flight.
However,
a
after thirty minutes
of cruising
flight, the ammeter should be indicating
less than two needle widths of charging current.
If the charging
rate
to remain above this value on a long flight, the battery would overheat were
and
(such as
evaporate
extended
taxiing) the
the electrolyte
at an excessive
rate.
Electronic
components
in
electrical
system could be adversely affected by higher than normal
voltage if a faulty voltage regulator
setting is causing the overcharging.
To preclude these possibilities,
an over.-voltage sensor will automatically
shut down the alternator
and the over-voltage
warning light will illuminate
if the charge voltage reaches
approximately
16 volts.
Assuming that the
malfunction
was only momentary,
an attempt should be made to reactivate
the alternator system.
To do this, turn both sides of the master switch
off and then on again. If the problem no longer exists, normal alternator
charging will resume and the warning light will
go off. If the light comes
on again, a malfunction is confirmed.
In this event, the flight should be
terminated and/or the current drain on the battery minimized
because the
the
battery
system for only a limited period of time.
can supply the electrical
the emergency occurs at night, power must be conserved for later use
of the landing light and flaps during landing.
If
INSUFFICIENT RATE OF CHARGE.
If the ammeter indicates
rate in flight, the
a continuous discharge
alternator
is not supplying power to the system and should be shut down
since the alternator field circuit may be placing
load on
an unnecessary
All non-essential
the system.
equipment should be turned off and the
flight terminated as soon
as practical.
EMERGENCY LOCATOR TRANSMITTER (ELT).
The ELT consists
of a self-contained
dual-frequency
radio transmitpower supply, and is activated by an impact
of Sg or more
in a crash landing.
as may be experienced
The ELT emits an omnidirecdistress
tional signal on the international
of 121. 5 and 243.0
frequencies
MHz.
General aviation and commercial
aircraft,
CAP
FAA,
ter and battery
and
the
monitor 121. 5 MHz, and 243. O MHz is monitored by the military.
Following a crash landing,
the ELT will provide line-of-sight
transmission up to
100 miles at 10, 000 feet. The duration of ELT transmissions is affected
3-9
At temperatures
by ambient
temperature.
transmission
shorten the
for 115 hours can be expected;
duration
to 70 hours.
of +70° to +130°F,
continuous
a temperature of -40°F will
The ELT is readily
identified as a bright orange unit mounted behind
To gain
wall on the right side of the fuselage.
compartment
baggage
unit,
baggage
black
fasteners
comparout
pull
the
the
on
to
the
on
access
ment wall, and lift the wall out. The ELT is operated by a control panel
at the forward facing end of the unit (see figure 3-1).
the
ELT OPERATION.
NORMAL OPERATION:
As long as the function selector switch
activates followin the ARM position, the ELT automatically
ing an impact of 5 g or more over a short time period.
(1)
remains
(2)
ELT
a minor
selector
(3)
FAILURE:
If
"g" switch actuation is questioned following
crash landing, gain access to the ELT and place the function
switch in the ON position.
PRIOR TO SIGHTING RESCUE AIRCRAFT:
Do not activate radio transceiver.
Conserve
aircraft
battery.
Place ELT function
AFTER SIGHTING RESCUE AIRCRAFT:
preventing radio interference.
selector switch in the OFF position,
with the radio transceiver set
Attempt contact with rescue aircraft
return the
to a frequency of 121. 5 MHz. If no contact is established,
function selector switch to ON immediately.
(4)
(5)
FOLLOWING RESCUE:
the OFF position,
Place
ELT function
terminating emergency
selector
switch in
transmissions.
Following
ACTIVATION:
INADVERTENT
a lightning strike or an
exceptionally hard landing,
the ELT may activate although no emerIf the
Select 121. 5 MHz on your radio transceiver.
gency exists.
ELT can be heard transmitting, place the function selector switch
return the switch to ARM.
in the OFF position; then immediately
(6)
3-10
ELT
CONTROL
PANEL
L
COVER
2.
FUNCTION
ON
-
-
Removable
ARM
-
-
Activates
Deactivates
and following
Activates
(3-position toggle
instantly.
is inoperative.
transmitter
"g" switch
or more
3.
to battery.
SELECTOR SWITCH
and if
OFF
for access
transmitter.
Used
for
switch):
test
Used during shipping,
purposes
storage
rescue.
transmitter
only when
impact.
ANTENNA RECEPTACLE
top of the tailcone.
-
Figure
Connection
"g" switch
to
antenna
receives
mounted
5g
on
3-1.
3-11
Secties H
LIMITATIONS
OPERATING
AUTHORIZED.
OPERATIONS
of airworthiness
Your Cessna exceeds the requirements
under
certificated
and
is
Government,
United
States
by the
Cessna Model No. 150M.
No. 3A19
tificate
as set forth
FAA Type Cer-
as
The airplane may be equipped
Your Cessna Dealer will be happy
best suited to your needs.
for day, night, VFR, or IFR operation.
you in selecting equipment
to assist
with all FAA-approved
in accordance
Your airplane must be operated
in this
If there is any information
and placards in the airplane.
placards,
it is
markings
and
FAA-approved
contradicts
the
section which
disregarded.
be
to
markings
MANEUVERS-UTILITY
CATEGORY.
and is designed
in the utility category
is certificated
certificates
of
various
flight.
In
acquisition
for limited aerobatic
the
certain
pilot and flight instructor,
pilot, instrument
such as commercial
of
maneuvers
FAA.
All
required
by
are perthese
the
maneuvers
are
In connection with the foregoing,
the following
mitted in this airplane.
entry speeds
gross weight and flight.load factors apply, with maximum
shown:
for maneuvers
as
This
airplane
GrossWeight
16001bs
...................
-1.76
*FlapsUp.
FlightLoadFactor,
Flight
Load
*The
Factor,
design
all cases,
+4.4
*Flaps
load factors
the
structure
.
Down
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
+3.
5
are 150°/oof the above, and in
meets or exceeds design loads.
4-1
No aerobatic
are approved
maneuvers
except
.
..
.
.
.
.
.
.
LazyEights.................109MPH(95knots)
Steep Turns
.
.
.
.
.
.
Spins
Stalls (Except Whip Stalls)
.
*
Higher
.
.
below:
MAXIMUM ENTRY
MANEUVER
Chandelles
listed
those
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
109 MPH
.
(95 knots)
109 MPH (95 knots)
Use Slow Deceleration
Use Slow Deceleration
.
can be used if abrupt use of the controls
speeds
SPEED*
is avoided.
The
Aerobatics that may impose high loads should not be attempted.
important
thing to bear in mind in flight maneuvers is that the airplane is
clean in aerodynamic
design and will build up speed quickly with the nose
for execution
of
down. Proper speed control is an essential requirement
and care should always be exercised to avoid excessive
any maneuver,
In the execution of all
speed which in turn can impose excessive loads.
avoid abrupt use of controls.
maneuvers,
AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS (CAS).
calibrated
is a list of the certificated
for the airplane.
The following
limitations
air)
Never Exceed Speed (glide or dive, smooth
Maximum
Speed
Structural Cruising
Maximum
Speed, Flaps Extended.
*Maneuvering
Speed
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
AIRSPEED INDICATOR
(glideor
Caution Range
Normal
Operating
.
Flap
4-2
Operating
.
.
.
Range
Range
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
(CAS)
162 MPH
120 MPH
100 MPH
109 MPH
control travel.
MARKINGS.
is a list of the certificated
(CAS) for the airplane.
Exceed
.
.
calibrated
The following
Never
.
.
speed at which you may use abrupt
*The maximum
ings
airspeed
smooth air)
dive,
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
airspeed
mark-
162 MPH (red line)
120-162 MPH (yelloware)
56-120 MPH (green are)
49-100 MPH (white are)
.
.
.
LIMITATIONS.
ENGINE OPERATION
Power
and Speed
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
100 BHP at 2750 RPM
.
ENGINE INSTRUMENT MARKINGS.
OIL TEMPERATURE GAGE.
Normal Operating Range
Maximum Allowable
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
,
,
.
OIL PRESSURE GAGE.
Minimum
Idling
Normal Operating Range
Maximum...................100PSI(redline)
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
FUEL QUANTITY INDICATORS.
Empty (1.75 gallons unusable
(1. 50 gallons unusable
TACHO METER.
Normal
Operating Range.
Maximum
Allowable
.
SUCTION GAGE (GYRO
Norma10peratingRange
.
each standard
each
long range
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
SYSTEM).
.
.
.
.
.
-
.
Arc
(red line)
.
tank)
tank)
.
Green
.
240°F
10 PSI (red line)
30-60 PSI (green arc)
2000-2750
.
.
.
.
.
.
RPM
E
(red line)
(green
2750 RPM
are)
(red line)
4.6-5.4in.Hg(greenarc)
4-3
WEIGHT AND BALANCE.
will enable you to operate
The following information
your Cessna
weight and center of gravity limitations.
To figure
within the prescribed
Loading Graph,
weight and balance,
use the Sample Loading Problem,
and Center of Gravity Moment Envelope as follows:
licensed
weight
empty weight and moment from appropriate
carried
records
in your airplane,
and write them down in the
Problem.
titled "YOUR AIRPLANE"
on the Sample Loading
Take
the
and balance
column
NOTE
The licensed
empty
weight and moment
on the Weight and Balance and Installed
are recorded
Equipment
Data sheet, or on revised weight and balance records,
and are included in the aircraft file. In addition to
the licensed empty weight and moment noted on these
records,
the c. g. arm (fuselage station) is also shown,
but need not be used on the Sample Loading Problem.
The moment which is shown must be divided by 1000
and this value used as the moment/1000
on the loading
problem.
Use the Loading Graph to determine
the moment/1000 for each
item to be carried;
then list these on the loading problem.
addi-
tional
NOTE
Loading
Graph information
for the pilot, passengers
is based on seats positioned
for average
occupants
and baggage loaded in the center of the
baggage areas as shown on the Loading Arrangements
diagram.
For loadings which may differ from these,
the Sample Loading Problem lists fuselage stations
for these items to indicate
their forward and aft c. g.
range limitation
(seat travel or baggage area limitabased on the
tion). Additional moment calculations,
actual weight and c.g. arm (fuselage station) of the
of the
item being loaded, must be made if the position
load is different from that shown on the Loading Graph.
and baggage
Total
the
weights
and moments/1000
and plot
these
Center of Gravity Moment Envelope to determine whether
within the envelope, and if the loading is acceptable.
4-4
values
the
on the
point falls
LOADING
ARRANGEMENTS
STATION
*Pilot
center of
or passenger
(C.G. ARM)
gravity
on adjustable
seats
positioned
for average occupant. Numbers in parentheses
indicate
forward
and aft limits
of occupant center of gravity
*39
range.
--
STATION
(C.G. ARM)
i
i
i
*39
-
**64
---
**84
----
-
__
(33 TO 41)
**Arms measured
to the center
of the areas shown.
--
i
(33 TO
AREA 1
64
41)
-
CHILD SEAT
-----
-
NOTE
The aft baggage
wall (approximate station
94) can be used
referas a convenient interior
ence point for determining the
94
atinon of baggage area fuselage
BAGGAGE
AREA 2
-
**84
---
94
STANDARD
SEATING
LOADING
UTILITY
AREA 2
e
---
OPTIONAL
SEATING
AND
TIE-DOWN
SHELF
BAGGAGE AREA
MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE LOADS
(Ï)
(Ï)
AREAS (i)
(Ï)
AREA
AREA
+
TIE-DOWN
=
=
=
120 POUNDS
40 POUNDS
120 POUNDS
NET ATTACH POINTS
A tie-down not is provided to
secure baggage in the baggage area.
The net attaches to six tie-down rings.
Two rings
are located on the floor
just aft of the seat backs and one ring is cated
two inches above the floor
each
cabin
wall
at
the aft end of area
on
Two additional rings are
located
at the top, aft end of area 2
least four rings should be used
to restrain the maximum baggage load of 120#.
.
.
If the airplane is equipped with an optional utility shelf, it should be
removed prior to loading and tying down large baggage items.
(Slide the tab of
the locking clips on each end of the shelf to disengage the shelf from
the
aircraft structure.)
After baggage is loaded and secured, either stow the
shelf or, if space permits, install it for storing small articles.
4-5
SAMPLE
SAMPLE LOADING PROBLEM
1. Licensed
Weight (Use the data pertaining
equipped.
it is presently
unusable fuel)
YOUR
AIRPLANE
Weight
Moment
Weight
Moment
(lbs.)
(lb.-ins.
/1000)
(lbs.)
(lb.-ins.
/1000)
1089
36.0
Empty
to your airplane as
Includes
AIRPLANE
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
The weight of full oil may be
2. Oil (6 Qts.
11 Lbs. at
used for all calculations.
6 Qts
Moment/1000)
-
=
-0.1
-0.1
-0.1
.
Fuel
3. Usable
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
(At 6 Lbs./Gal.)
StandardTanks(22.5Gal.Maximum)
Long Range
4. Pilot
11
11
Tanks
and Passenger
(35 Gal.
(Sta.
Maximum)
33 to 41)
.
.
.
Area 1 (or Passenger
5. Baggage
on Child's
Seat) (Sta. 50 to 76, 120 Lbs. Max.)
135
5.7
340
13. 3
-
.
6. Baggage
7. TOTAL
-
Area 2 (Sta. 76 to 94, 40 Lbs.
WEIGHT
.
Max.)
1.6
.
1600
AND MOMENT
8. Locate this point (1600 at 56. 5) on the Center
and since this point falls within the envelope,
25
of Gravity
the loading
56. 5
Moment Envelope,
is acceptable.
CODE
400
----
PILOT, PASSENGER AND
FUEL (LONG RANGE TANKS)
@ 6#/GAL.
FUEL (STANDARD TANKS)
6# GAL.
----
2
--
BAGGAGE IN AREA
(OR
PASSENGER ON CHILD'S SEAT)
120# MAX.
--
300
BAGGAGE IN AREA
250
404 MAX
35 MAX.
200
LOADING
GRA
H
."*"
10
O
0
1
NOTES:
2
3
4
5
7
6
LOAD MOMENT/1000
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
(POUND-INCHES)
(1)
Line representing
adjustable
seats shows the pilot or passenger
center of gravity on adjustable
seats positioned for an average
occupant.
Refer to the Loading Arrangements
Diagram for forward and aft limits of occupant
c.g. range.
(2)
Engine Oil: 6
Qts.
=
11 lbs.
at
-0.
1 Moment/1000.
15
I
C
I l
TER OF
MOMENT
i
i
!
l
I
GRAVITY
ENVELOPE
1E00
145
1400
1250
1300
1250
19nn
1150
1103
15
f0
40
45
MOMENT/1000
AIRCRAFT
LOADED
05
60
(POUND-INCHES)
Jection f
CARE
OF
THE
AIRPLANE
and dependperformance
If your airplane is to retain that new-plane
must be followed.
requirements
and maintenance
ability, certain inspection
and preventive mainIt is wise to follow a planned schedule of lubrication
in your loencountered
conditions
climatic
and
flying
based
tenance
on
cality.
and take advantage of his
Keep in touch with your Cessna Dealer,
and experience.
knowledge
He knows your airplane and how to maintain
it.
and oil changes are necessary
He will remind
you when lubrications
services.
and periodic
and about other seasonal
GROUND HANDLING.
by hand with the
The airplane is most easily and safely maneuvered
do not
When towing with a vehicle,
attached
to the nose wheel.
of
center,
dam30°
side
of
either
angle
or
exceed the nose gear turning
If the airplane is towed or pushed over a
age to the gear will result.
watch that the normal cushioning action
rough surface during hangaring,
of the tail
movement
of the nose strut does not cause excessive vertical
A flat nose
structure.
hangar
doors
resulting
with
low
or
contact
and the
tail height.
tire or deflated strut will also increase
tow-bar
MOORING
YOUR AIRPLANE.
Proper
tie-down is the best precaution against damage
airplane
by gusty or strong winds.
To tie down your airplane
proceed
as follows:
to
your parked
securely,
control wheel lock.
Set parking brake and install
and flap.
lock
control
Install
between each aileron
surface
(2)
a
strong ropes or chains (700 pounds tensile
(3) Tie sufficiently
strength)
and secure each rope
to wing and tail tie-down fittings,
(1)
5-1
ramp tie-down.
Install a surface control lock over the fin and rudder.
Install a pitot tube cover.
Tie a rope to an exposed portion of the engine mount
the opposite end to a ramp tie-down.
to
(4)
(5)
(6)
and secure
WINDSHIELD-WINDOWS.
The plastic windshield
and windows should be cleaned with an aircraft
windshield
with soft cloths, and rub
Apply the cleaner sparingly
cleaner.
until all dirt, oil scum and bug stains are rewith moderate
pressure
Allow the cleaner to dry, then wipe it off with soft flannel cloths.
moved.
cleaner is not available,
If a windshield
the plastic can be cleaned
with Stoddard solvent to remove oil and grease.
with soft cloths moistened
NOTE
Never
use gasoline,
benzine,
alcohol,
acetone,
carbon
fluid, lacquer
tetrachloride, fire extinguisher
or anti-ice
These mathinner or glass cleaner to clean the plastic.
terials will attack the plastic and may cause it to craze.
Follow by carefully
washing with a mild detergent and plenty of water.
Do not rub the
Rinse thoroughly, then dry with a clean moist chamois.
plastic
with a dry cloth since this builds up an electrostatWarge
which
attracts dust. Waxing with a good commercial
wax will finish the cleaning job. A thin, even coat of wax, polished
out by hand with clean soft flannel cloths,
will fill in minor scratches
and help prevent further scratching.
Do not use a canvas cover on the windshield
sleet is anticipated since the cover may scratch
unless freezing rain
surface.
plastic
or
the
PAINTED SURFACES.
The painted exterior
surfaces of your new Cessna have a durable,
conditions,
require
long lasting finish and, under normal
no polishing
or
for the paint to cure comApproximately
buffing.
15 days are required
pletely;
in most cases, the curing period will have been completed
prior
In the event that polishing
or buffing is reto delivery of the airplane.
it is recommended
quired within the curing period,
that the work be done
5-2
experienced
in handling
by someone
this work.
can accomplish
uncured
paint.
Any Cessna
Dealer
Generally,
the painted surfaces can be kept bright by washing with
and mild soap, followed by a rinse with water and drying with cloths
which cause corHarsh or abrasive
soaps or detergents
or a chamois.
Remove
stubborn oil and
rosion or scratches
should never be used.
with a cloth moistened
with Stoddard solvent.
grease
water
Waxing is
if desired,
the
heavier
coating
the engine nose
encountered in
However,
unnecessary
to keep the painted surfaces bright.
airplane
may be waxed with a good automotive wax. A
of wax on the leading edges of the wings and tail and on
spinner will help reduce the abrasion
cap and propeller
these areas.
and it is necesis parked outside in cold climates
ice before flight,
care should be taken to protect the paintliquids.
with chemical
A 50-50 solution
during ice removal
ed surfaces
ice accumulaof isopropyl
remove
alcohol and water will satisfactorily
tions without damaging the paint. A solution with more than 50°/o alcohol
While applying the de-icing
solution,
is harmful and should be avoided.
and cabin windows since the alcohol will
keep it away from the windshield
attack the plastic and may cause it to craze.
When
the airplane
sary to remove
ALUMINUM
SURFACES.
only minimum
of your Cessna require
care
clean.
The airplane may be washed
with water to
naphtha,
dirt; oil and grease may be removed with gasoline,
carremove
Dulled aluminum sursolvents.
bon tetrachloride or other non-alkaline
faces may be cleaned effectively with an aircraft aluminum polish.
The clad aluminum
surfaces
to keep them bright and
and periodically
thereafter, waxing with a good autoAfter cleaning,
motive wax will preserve
the bright appearance and retard corrosion.
recommended
for airplanes operated in salt
waxing is especially
Regular
against corrosion.
water areas as a protection
PROPELLER CARE.
Preflight
inspection
of propeller
blades
for nicks,
and wiping
them
5-3
occasionally with an oily cloth to clean off grass and bug stains will asSmall nicks on the blades, particularly
sure long, trouble-free service.
out as soon as
should be dressed
near the tips and on the leading edges,
possible
since these nicks produce
and if ignored,
stress concentrations,
in cracks.
Never use an alkaline cleaner
may result
on the blades;
remove grease and dirt with carbon tetrachloride or Stoddard solvent.
INTERIOR CARE.
dust and loose dirt from the upholstery,
headliner,
clean the interior regularly
with a vacuum cleaner.
To remove
carpet,
and
Blot up any spilled liquid promptly,
with cleansing
tissue or rags.
Don't pat the spot; press the blotting material
firmly and hold it for several seconds.
Continue blotting until no more liquid is taken up. Scrape
with a dull knife, then spot-clean
off sticky materials
the area.
used sparOily spots may be cleaned with household spot removers,
Before using any solvent, read the instructions
on the container
Never satuand test it on an obscure place on the fabric to be cleaned.
rate the fabric with a volatile solvent; it may damage the padding and backing materials.
ingly.
Soiled upholstery and carpet may be cleaned with foam-type detergent,
instructions.
To minimize
wetting
according to the manufacturer's
the fabric, keep the foam as dry as possible and remove it with a vacuum
cleaner.
used
panel and control knobs need only be
Oil and grease on the control wheel and conwith Stoddard solvent.
trol knobs can be removed with a cloth moistened
such as mentioned
in paragraphs
Volatile solvents,
on care of the windshield, must never be used since they soften and craze the plastic.
The plastic
trim,
instrument
wiped off with a damp cloth.
MAA
PLATE/FINISH
AND TRIM PLATE.
Information
(TC), Production
Number
concerning the Type Certificate
Number
(PC), Model Number and Serial Number of your parCertificate
Aircraft
Associticular aircraft can be found on the MAA (Manufacturers
ation) plate located on the cabin floor below the left rear corner of the
5-4
is accessible
The plate
seat.
pilot's
carpet
in
area.
this
the
the seat forward
by sliding
and lifting
the interior color
A Finish and Trim plate contains a code describing
The
aircraft.
code may be
combination
of
exterior
paint
the
scheme and
used in conjunction with an applicable Parts Catalog if finish and trim inThis plate is located adjacent to the MAA plate.
formation is needed.
AIRCRAFT FILE.
data, information
and licenses
that are a
There are miscellaneous
In
for that file.
is
checklist
aircraft
The
following
of
part
a
the
nle.
Aviation
check should be made of the latest Federal
addition, a periodic
Regulations
are met.
to ensure that all data requirements
A.
To be displayed
Aircraft
(2) Aircraft
(3) Aircraft
Form 556).
(1)
B.
To be carried
in
the
aircraft
Airworthiness
at all times:
Certificate
Registration
Certificate
Radio Station License,
in
the aircraft
if
(FAA Form 8100-2).
(FAA Form 8050-2).
transmitter
Weight and Balance,
and associated
FAA Form
Repair
and Alteration Form,
(2) Aircraft Equipment List.
To be made
available
(1) Aircraft
(2) Engine
Log Book.
Log Book.
upon
(FCC
at all times:
(1)
C.
installed
papers (latest copy of the
337, if applicable).
request.
by the United States Federal
Most of the items listed are required
of other nations
may require
Since the regulations
Aviation Regulations.
should check with
other documents and data, owners of exported aircraft
requirements.
their own aviation officials to determine their individual
Cessna recommends
that these items, plus the Owner's Manual,
book and
Checklist,
Customer Care Program
Computer, Pilot's
Customer Care Card, be carried in the aircraft at all times.
Power
5-5
FLYABLE STORAGE.
of 30 days
placed in non-operational
storage for a maximum
operational
only intermittent
use for the first 25
receive
Every seventh day during
hours are considered in flyable storage status.
should be rotated by hand through five revoluthe propeller
these periods,
of cortions. This action "limbers" the oil and prevents any accumulation
rosion on engine cylinder walls.
Aircraft
or
those
which
IMPORTANT
safety, check that the ignition switch is
For maximum
OFF, the throttle is closed,
the mixture control is in
and the airplane is secured
the idle cut-off position,
by hand. Do not stand
before rotating
the propeller
blades while turning the
within the are of the propeller
propeller.
After
30 days,
the
aircraft
should
be flown for 30 minutes
or a ground
within
runup should be made just long enough to produce an oil temperature
avoided.
should
be
Excessive
ground
runup
the lower green are range.
of water
runup also helps to eliminate excessive accumulations
full
Keep
fuel
engine.
tanks
other
in
and
spaces
the
air
system
fuel
in the
charged
to
to minimize condensation in the tanks. Keep the battery fully
is to
If the aircraft
in cold weather.
from freezing
prevent the electrolyte
refer to the Service Manual for
be stored temporarily, or indefinitely,
storage
procedures.
proper
Engine
INSPECTION REQUIREMENTS.
of U. S.
all civil aircraft
by Federal Aviation Regulations,
As required
calendar
each
inspection
twelve
complete
must undergo
registry
(annual)
a
aircraft operated
ANNUAL inspection,
In addition to the required
months.
100 hours
inspection
complete
must
every
hire)
commercially
have
a
(for
of operation.
in
may be inspected
an aircraft
In lieu of the above requirements,
which allows the work
schedule,
inspection
with a progressive
accordance
in
operations that can be accomplished
load to be divided into smaller
periods.
shorter
time
5-6
CARE PROGRAM has been developed to
The CESSNA PROGRESSIVE
provide a modern
progressive
inspection schedule that satisfies the complete aircraft
inspection requirements
of both the 100 HOUR and ANNUAL
inspections
to Cessna aircraft.
as applicable
CESSNA
PROGRESSIVE
The Cessna
maximum
realize
time. Under
four operations
erations
are
vided Aircraft
CARE.
Progressive
Care Program
has been designed to help you
of your aircraft at a minimum
cost and downis inspected and maintained
in
your aircraft
this
at 50-hour intervals during a 200-hour period.
The opin a specially prorecycled each 200 hours and are recorded
is conducted.
Inspection Log as each operation
utilization
program,
The Cessna Aircraft
Progressive
Company recommends
Care for aircraft that are being flown 200 hours or more per year, and the 100-hour
inspection
for all other aircraft.
The procedures
for the Progressive
Care Program and the 100-hour inspection have been carefully worked
out by the factory and are followed by the Cessna Dealer Organization.
The complete
of Cessna Dealers with Cessna equipment and
familiarity
factory-approved
procedures
provides
the highest level of service possible
at lower cost to Cessna owners.
CESSNA
CUSTOMER
CARE PROGRAM.
Specific benefits and provisions
of the CESSNA WARRANTY plus other
important
in your CUSTOMER CARE
benefits for you are contained
PROGRAM
book supplied with your aircraft.
You will want to thoroughly
review your Customer Care Program
book and keep it in your aircraft
at
all times.
book entitle you to an initial inspecCoupons attached to the Program
and either a Progressive
Care Operation No. 1 or the first 100-hour
inspection
within the first 6 months of ownership at no charge
to you. If
will have been
you take delivery from your Dealer,
the initial inspection
performed
before delivery of the aircraft
to you. If you pick up your aircraft at the factory,
plan to take it to your Dealer
reasonably
soon after
allowing the
you take delivery,
so the initial inspection may be performed
Dealer
to make any minor adjustments which may be necessary.
tion
5-7
You will also want to return
to your Dealer either at 50 hours for your
Care Operation,
or at 100 hours for your first 100-hour
first Progressive
you choose to establish for your
inspection depending on which program
for you by
inspections
will be performed
While these important
aircraft.
from
prefer
Dealer
have
most
will
the
to
in
Dealer,
cases you
any Cessna
whom you purchased the aircraft accomplish this work.
SERVICING
REQUIREMENTS.
materials,
quantities,
service items (suchas fuel, oil,
on the inside back cover of this manual.
For quick and ready
tions for frequently used
reference,
and specificaetc.) are shown
INSPECTION covered in Section I,
In addition to the EXTERIOR
for your airinspection,
and test requirements
COMPLETE
servicing,
The Service Manual
craft are detailed in the aircraft Service Manual.
at 50, 100, and 200 hour inoutlines
all items which require attention
and/or
inspection,
require
servicing,
items
which
plus
those
tervals
testing at special intervals.
inspection,
and test proSince Cessna Dealers conduct all service,
it is recommendcedures in accordance with applicable Service Manuals,
and begin
these requirements
ed that you contact your Dealer concerning
intervals.
scheduling your aircraft for service at the recommended
Care ensures that these requirements
are
Cessna Progressive
required
intervals
to comply with the 100-hour or
accomplished
at the
ANNUAL inspection as previously covered.
flight operations,
Depending
your local Government
on various
or tests.
additional service, inspections,
Aviation Agency may require
check with local
should
requirements,
regulatory
owners
For these
where the aircraft is being operated.
aviation officials
OWNER
FOLLOW-UP
SYSTEM.
System to notify you
Cessna Dealer has an Owner Follow-Up
In addition, if
Cessna.
information
applies
receives
when he
that
to your
notification,
in the form of
receive
similar
wish,
choose
to
may
you
you
directly
from the Cessna Customer Services Department.
Service Letters,
Your
5-8
form is supplied in your Customer Care Program book for
A subscription
Your Cessna Dealer
should
you choose to request this service.
your use,
follow-up
concerning
programs,
with
details
these
supply
you
will be glad to
to supply you with
and stands ready,
through his Service Department,
low-cost service.
fast, efficient,
PU BLICATIONS.
aids are furnished in the
Various
publications and flight operation
These items are listed below.
when delivered from the factory.
aircraft
CUSTOMER
CARE
PROGRAM
BOOK
OWNER'S MANUALS FOR YOUR
AIRCRAFT
AVIONICS
are
COMPUTER
e
POWER
e
SALES AND SERVICE
e
DO'S AND DON'TS
DEALER DIRECTORY
ENGINE
BOOKLET
plus many other supplies that
additional publications,
The following
applicable
to your aircraft, are available from your Cessna Dealer.
O
SERVICE
MANUALS AND PARTS
AIRCRAFT
ENGINE AND ACCESSORIES
CATALOGS
FOR YOUR
AVIONICS
Services
Your Cessna Dealer has a current catalog of all Customer
Supplies
many of which he keeps on hand.
Supplies that are available,
which are not in stock, he will be happy to order for you.
5-9
Jection il
OPERATIONAL
DATA
data shown on the following
The operational
pages are compiled from
actual tests with the aircraft
and engine in good condition and using averYou will find this data a valuable
aid when planage piloting technique.
ning your flights.
A power setting selected from the range chart usually will be more
efficient
than a random setting, since it will permit you to estimate your
You will find that using the chart and
fuel consumption
more accurately.
efficiency.
dividends
in overall
Power
Computer
will
your
pay
shown in this section is based on the
Cruise and range performance
use of a McCauley 1A102 OCM6948 propeller and a standard equipped
data are shown in the
for the performance
Other conditions
Commuter.
headwinds,
chart headings.
Allowances for fuel reserve,
take-off and
climb,
and variations
in mixture
leaning technique should be made and
variables
Other indeterminate
are in addition to those shown on the chart.
engine and propeller
metering
condicharacteristics,
such as carburetor
tions,
sphere
externally-mounted
optional
may account for variations
and
equipment
of 10c/oor more
turbulence
in maximum
of
the atmorange.
Remember
that the charts contained herein are based on standard day
infuel consumption,
and endurance
conditions.
For more precise power,
formation,
consult the Cessna Power Computer supplied with your airWith the Power Computer,
craft.
you can easily take into account temperat any flight altitude.
from standard
ature variations
6-1
AIRSPEED
FLAPS
CORRECTION
TABLE
UP
IAS-MPH
50
60
70
80
90
CAS-MPH
53
60
69
78
87
IAS-MPH
40
50
60
70
CAS-MPH
40
50
61
72
FLAPS
STALL
1600
107 117 128
138
80
90
100
83
94 105
MPH
OF
CAS
BANK
lbs.
/
/
POWER
80°
O
20
40
55
57
63
78
49
51
56
70
48
49
54
67
OFF
Figure
6-2
-
ANGLE
weight
Flops
UP
o'"
97
6-1.
SPEEDS
CONDITION
aof
140
DOWN
Figure
Gross
100 110 120 130
---
6-2.
AFT CG
-TA
GROSS
WT.
LBS.
KE -OFFD
MEi..D
IAS
50 Fr.
MPH
WIND
KNOTS
735
500
305
0
1600
70
10
20
NOTES:
1.
2.
I 5 TA NCE
AT SEA LEVEL & 59° F.
TOTAL
GROUND
TO CLEAR
RUN
50 FT.OBS
IAS. MPH
1600
78
730
TE
OF
CLIMB
FT. /MIN.
AT
5000
F.
TOTAL
TO CLEAR
50 FT.OBS
1115
1985
1510
780
505
890
HARD SURFACE
& 41
FT.
GROUND
RUN
1660
1250
AT
7500
RUNWAY
670
0. 6
IAS, MPH
RATE
OF
CLIMB
FT, /MIN
74
TOTAL
RUN
TO CLEAR
50 FT.OBS
1360
2440
970
640
1090
AT 10000 FT.
FUEL
USED
S.
470
IAS, MPH
1875
1375
GROSS
AryauALB
WEIGHT
SPEED,
LBS.IAS,MPH
L.
71
L 6
DISTANCE
60
GROUND
ROLL
445
TOTAL
TO CLEAR
50FT.OBS
1075
by
7%of the
& 23° F.
RATE OF
CLIMB
FT. MIN
FUEL
USED
S.
260
Flaps retracted,
full throttle,
mixture leaned to smooth
operation above 5000 ft.
Fuel used includes
and take-off allowances.
warm-up
rate of climb 15 ft./min.
For hot weather,
decrease
for each 10°F above standard
& 59* F.
& 32* F.
FT.
GROUND
DATA-------
AT 5000 FT. & 41* F.
FUEL
USED.
GAL.
AT SEA LEVEL
1.
2.
3.
F.
TOTAL
TO CLEAR
50 FT.OBS
RATE-OF-CLIMB
---LANDING
1600
& 50
RETRACTED
10%for each 35°F. increase
in temperature
Increase the distances
above standard for the particular
altitude.
For operation on a dry, grass runway, increase
distances
(both "ground run" and "total to clear 50 ft. obstacle")
"total
to clear 50 ft. obstacle" figure.
GROSS
WEIGHT
LBS-
NOTES:
2500 FT.
910
630
395
AT SEA LEVEL & 59° F.
1.
2.
3.
FLAPS
GROUND
RUN
1385
1035
--MAXIMUM
NOTES:
AT
L.
2. 8
day temperature
for particular
altitude.
'afo'sŠ¾ËË°aË°
z°io"w°iÃo
AT 2500 FT.
GROUND
ROLL
470
& 50* F.
TOTAL
TO CLEAR
50FT.OBS
1135
AT 5000 FT.
GROUND
ROLL
495
Decrease the distances
shown by 10% for each 4 knots of headwind.
increase
Increase the distance by 10%for each 60°F.
above standard.
temperature
For operation on a dry, grass runway,
increase distances
(both "ground roll" and
the "total to clear 50 ft. obstacle" figure.
Figure
6-3.
& 41* F.
TOTAL
TO CLEAR
50FT.OBS
1195
"total to
clear
AT 7500
FT.
& 32° F.
GROUND
ROLL
TOTAL
TO CLEAR
50FT.OBS
520
1255
50 ft. obstacle")
by 20% of
1600
Gross Weight
Conditions
Standard
-
CRUISE
--
NOTES:
PERFORMANCE
COMMUTER
%
2500
5000
7500
10000
12500
Mixture
BHP
35.0
GAL/
HOUR
ENDR.
HOURS
RANGE
MILES
ENDR.
HOURS
124
121
116
110
105
99
94
6.6
6.1
5.4
4.8
4.3
3.8
3.4
3.4
3.7
4.2
4.7
5.2
5.9
425
445
480
515
550
585
5.3
5.7
6.5
7.3
88
3.1
6.5
7.3
615
640
123
120
6.0
5.6
5.0
4.5
4.0
3.6
3.2
3.8
4.0
4.5
5.0
5.6
6.2
460
480
515
550
585
6.9
640
5.5
5. 2
4.7
4.2
3.8
3.4
3.1
4.1
4. 3
4.8
5.4
6.0
6.6
7.2
515
550
585
615
640
655
4.8
4.3
3.9
3. 5
3.2
4.7
5.2
5.8
6. 3
6.9
550
585
615
645
660
4.3
4.1
3.7
3.4
3.1
5.3
5.6
6.1
6.7
7.2
605
620
81
82
72
64
56
50
44
38
2950
2700
2600
2500
2400
2300
2200
80
75
67
59
52
41
2750
2700
2600
2500
2400
2300
2200
73
69
62
55
49
43
39
2700
2600
2500
2400
2300
64
57
51
45
41
2650
2600
2500
2400
56
53
47
114
111
105
43
99
2300
39
91
115
109
104
98
92
122
119
114
108
103
97
90
118
112
107
101
95
615
500
645
660
660
6-4.
fairings)
GAL (NO RESERVE)
TAS
MPH
2750
2700
2600
2500
2400
2300
2200
2100
46
GAL (FO RESERVE)
Figure
6-4
wind
cruise is normally
limited to 75% power.
1. Maximum
Model 150 (without speed
2. Cruise speeds for the standard
2 MPH Iower than shown.
are approximately
climb
3.Nc allow incesfortake-oH,
or reserve.
22.5
ALTITUDE RPM
Zero
Lean
--
Lbs.
RANGE
MILES
665
690
745
800
8.2
855
9.2
10.2
910
11.3
5.8
6.2
7.0
7.8
8.7
9.7
10.8
6.4
6. 7
7.5
8.4
9.3
955
990
720
745
800
855
905
955
995
775
800
855
905
955
10.3
995
11.3
1015
7.3
8.1
8.9
9.9
910
960
10.8
8.2
8.6
9.5
10.4
11.2
860
1000
1025
940
965
1005
1030
1025
MAXIMUM GLIDE
•SPEED 70 MPH (IAS)
•PROPELLER WINDMILLING
•FLAPS UP •ZERO WIND
12,000
z
10,000
--------
--------
--
8000
O
4000
2000
m
O
5
GROUND
10
15
20
DISTANCE (STATUTE MILES)
Figure
6-5.
6-5
Jeetion TH
OPTIONAL
SYSTEMS
operating procedures,
and perThis section contains a description,
data (whenapplicable)
formance
for some of the optional equipment which
in your Cessna.
Owner's Manual Supplements are promay be installed
vided to cover operation of other optional equipment systems when installed
in your airplane.
Contact your Cessna Dealer for a complete
list of available
optional equipment.
COLD WEATHER EQUIPMENT
WINTERIZATION
KIT.
below 20°F,
operation
in temperatures consistently
kit should be installed
winterization
to improve engine operation. The kit consists of two shields to partially cover the cowl nose cap
opening,
the addition of heat ducting from the right exhaust manifold for
airbox heat outlet cap, and insulation
additional cabin heat, a carburetor
the crankcase
breather line. Once installed,
for the engine crankcase
is approved for permanent use in both cold and hot
breather insulation
For
continuous
the Cessna
weather.
GROUND
SERVICE PLUG RECEPTACLE.
to permit the use
A ground service plug receptacle may be installed
starting and during lengthy
of an external power source for cold weather
and electronic equipment.
work on the electrical
maintenance
Just before connecting
an external power source (generator type or
cart),
battery
the master switch should be turned ON. This is especially
important
since it will enable the battery to absorb transient voltages
7-1
which otherwise
might
damage
the transistors
in
the electronic
equipment.
The battery and external
have been designed
power circuits
to completely eliminate the need to "jumper" across the battery contactor
to
close it for charging
A special fused cira completely "dead"battery.
cuit in the external power system
supplies the needed "jumper"across
the contacts so that with a "dead"battery and an external power source
applied, turning the master switch ON will close the battery contactor.
RADIO TRANSMITTER
SELECTORSWITCH
Operation
of the radio equipment is normal
as covered in the respecmanuals.
When the aircraft
is equipped with more than one
radio having transmitter capabilities,
a transmitter selector switch is
installed
to switch the microphone
to the radio unit the pilot desires to
The switch is located under the glare shield and is
use for transmission.
labeled TRANS, 1 and 2. Placing the switch in the upper position, labeled
1, switches the microphone
to the upper transmitter; the lower position,
labeled 2, switches the microphone
to the lower transmitter.
tive radio
OIL QUICK-DRAIN VALVE
valve is optionally offered to replace
An oil quick-drain
the drain
plug in the oil sump drain port.
The valve provides
quicker
and cleaner
a
method of draining engine oil.
To drain the oil with this valve installed,
slip a hose over the end of the valve, route the hose to a suitable container, then push upward on the end of the valve until it snaps into the
Spring clips will hold the valve open.
After draining,
open position.
use
or suitable tool to snap the valve into the extended
a screwdriver
(closed)
position
and remove the drain hose.
'l-2
TRUE AIRSPEED INDICATOR
A true airspeed indicator is available to replace the standard airspeed
indicator
in your airplane.
has a calibrated
The true airspeed indicator
rotatable
ring which works in conjunction with the airspeed
indicator
dial
in a manner similar to the operation of a flight computer.
TO OBTAIN TRUE AIRSPEED,
rotate ring until pressure
is aligned with outside air temperature in degrees
Fahrenheit.
read true airspeed
ring opposite airspeed
needle.
on rotatable
altitude
Then
NOTE
Pressure
altitude.
altitude
should not be confused with indicated
pressure altitude, set barometric
scale on altimeter
to 29. 92 and read pressure altitude
Be sure to return
altimeter barometric
on altimeter.
setting after pressure
scale to original barometric
altitude has been obtained.
To obtain
7-3
ALPHABETICAL
A
After Landing,
Aircraft,
file, 5-5
mooring,
securing,
Airspeed
Airspeed
Airspeed
Airspeed
Alternator
Aluminum
Ammeter,
Authorized
1-6
5-1
1-6
Correction
Table,
6-2
Indicator,
True,
7-3
Indicator
Markings, 4-2
Limitations,
4-2
Check,
Surfaces,
2-12
5-3
2-3
Operations,
4-1
Baggage Loading
and Tie-Down,
1-6, 2-16
1-5
Engine, 1-4
Before Take-Off, 1-4, 2-12
check,
alternator
2-12
magneto check, 2-12
warm-up, 2-12
Brake,
Parking,
2-8
Balked
Before
Before
4-5
Landing,
Landing,
Starting
INDEX
Center of Gravity Moment
Envelope,
4-8
Cessna Customer Care Program,
5-7
Cessna Progressive
Care, 5-7
Circuit Breakers and Fuses,
2-5
Climb,
data, 2-14
enroute, 1-5, 2-14
maximum rate-of-climb
chart, 6-3
speeds, 2-14
Cold Weather Equipment,
7-1
ground service
plug
receptacle,
7-1
kit, 7-1
winterization
Cold Weather Operation, 2-17
Correction Table, Airspeed, 6-2
Crosswind Landing,
2-17
Crosswind Take-Offs,
2-13
Cruise, 1-5, 2-14
Cruise Performance
Chart, 2-15,
6-4
Diagram,
Cabin Heating
Capacity,
and Ventilating,
fuel, inside back cover
oil, inside back cover
Carburetor
Icing,
3-7
Care,
interior,
propeller,
5-4
5-3
2-8
baggage loading and tie-down,
4-5
system,
electrical
2-4
ELT control panel,
3-11
exterior inspection,
1-2
fuel quantity data, 2-1
fuel system,
2-2
instrument
panel,
1-8
loading arrangements,
4-5
maximum
glide, 6-5
principal
dimensions,
ii
Index-1
taxiing, 2-11
Dimensions,
Disorientation
Principal,
ii
In Clouds, 3-5
let-down through
3-5
executing 180° turn in
clouds, 3-5
from spiral dive, 3-6
recovery
Ditching,
3-3
emergency
clouds,
E
Power Supply System
3-8
3-9
excessive rate of charge,
insufficient
rate of charge, 3-9
Electrical
System, 2-3
ammeter,
2-3
2-5
fuses and circuit breakers,
ground service plug receptacle,
7-1
master
switch, 2-3
over-voltage
sensor and
warning light, 2-5
schematic,
2-4
Emergency
Landing without Engine
Malfunctions,
Clouds,
3-2
Let-Downs
Through
3-5
Emergency
Locator
Transmitter
(ELT),
3-9
ELT operation,
3-10
Empty Weight,
inside front cover
Engine,
before starting,
1-4
instrument
markings,
4-3
oil, inside back cover
4-3
limitations,
1-4, 2-10
Engine Failure,
3-1
after take-off, 3-1
during flight,
3-1
Enroute
Climb, 1-5, 2-14
operation
starting,
Index-2
F
File, Aircraft,
Fires, 3-3
Electrical
Power,
Emergency
Equipment,
Cold Weather,
7-1
Excessive Rate of Electrical
Charge, 3-9
Executing 180° Turn in Clouds,
3-5
Diagram,
1-2
Exterior Inspection
Exterior Lighting,
2-6
6-4
electrical
fire in flight, 3-4
during start on
ground,
3-3
3-4
engine fire in flight,
Flight in Icing Conditions,
3-6
Flyable Storage,
5-6
engine fire
Forced
Landings,
3-2
ditching,
3-3
emergency landing without
engine power, 3-2
landing with
precautionary
engine power, 3-2
Fuel System, 2-1
capacity, inside back cover
fuel grade, inside back cover
fuel quantity data, 2-1
4-3
fuel quantity indicators,
long range fuel tanks, 2-3
2-2
schematic,
tank sump quick-drain valves,
2-1
Fuses and Circuit Breakers,
2-5
G
Graph, Loading,
4-7
Gross Weight, inside front cover
Ground Handling,
5-1
Ground Service Plug Receptacle,
7-1
Handling Airplane on Ground, 5-1
Harnesses,
Shoulder, 2-9
Heating and Ventilating System, 2-8
Loading Graph, 4-7
Loading Problem,
Sample, 4-6
Long Range Fuel Tanks, 2-3
Low Oil Pressure,
3-8
I
Indicator,
Inspection
Instrument
Instrument
Insufficient
Airspeed, 7-2
Requirements,
5-6
Markings, Engine, 4-3
Panel,
1-8
Rate of Electrical
Charge, 3-9
Integrated
Seat Belt/Shoulder
Harnesses
with Inertia
Reels, 2-9
Interior
Care, 5-4
Interior
Lighting, 2-7
L
Landing,
after,
M
True
2-16
1-6
balked,
1-6, 2-17
before,
1-5
crosswind,
2-17
distance,
6-3
forced,
3-2
normal,
1-6
with power,
precautionary
3-2
short field, 2-17
Landing Gear Servicing,
inside
back cover
main/nose
wheel tire pressure,
inside back cover
nose gear shock strut servicing,
inside back cover
Lighting
Equipment,
2-6
exterior lighting,
2-6
interior
lighting,
2-7
Limitations,
Airspeed,
4-2
Limitations,
Engine Operation,
4-3
Loading Arrangements
Diagram,
4-5
MAA Plate/Finish
Trim Plate,
5-4
Magneto Check, 2-12
Magneto Malfunction,
3-8
Maneuvers, Utility Category, 4-1
Markings,
Airspeed Indicator,
4-2
Markings,
Engine Instrument,
4-3
Master Switch, 2-3
Maximum
Glide Diagram,
6-5
Maximum Performance
Take-Off,
1-5
Maximum
Data
Rate-Of-Climb
Chart, 6-3
Moment Envelope,
Center of
Gravity, 4-8
Mooring Your Airplane,
5-1
N
Noise Abatement,
2-19
Normal Landing,
1-6
Normal Take-Off,
1-4
Nose Gear Shock Strut, inside back
cover
Û
Oil System,
capacity,
oil/filter
inside
change,
back cover
inside back
cover
oil grade, inside back cover
pressure gage, 4-3
quick-drain
valve, 8-3
temperature gage, 4-3
Index-3
2-17
Operation, Cold Weather,
Engine,
Operation Limitations,
4-3
4-1
Operations Authorized,
Sensor and Warning
Over-Voltage
Light, 2-5
System, 5-8
Owner Follow-Up
5-9
publications,
5-2
Painted Surfaces,
Parking Brake System, 2-8
Charts, 2-13
Performance
Specifications,
Performance
inside front cover
Power Checks, 2-12
Landing with Engine
Precautionary
Power, 3-2
Principal
ii
Dimensions Diagram,
Care, Cessna, 5-6
Progressive
Care, 5-3
Propeller
5-9
Publications,
-
Quick-Drain
Quick-Drain
4-6
Sample Loading Problem,
Seats, 2-8
1-6
Securing Aircraft,
5-8
Servicing Requirements,
inside back cover
engine oil, inside back cover
fuel, inside back cover
landing gear, inside back cover
2-17
Short Field Landing,
2-9
Shoulder Harnesses,
Spark Plug Fouling, 3-7
Spins, 2-16
Stalls, 2-16
speed chart, 6-2
1-4, 2-10
Starting Engine,
Storage, Flyable,
5-6
Suction Gage, 4-3
5-2
Surfaces, Painted,
System,
cabin heating and ventilating,
2-8
2-3
electrical,
fuel, 2-1
5-8
owner follow-up,
wing flap, 2-7
Valve, Oil, 7-2
Valves, Fuel, 2-1
I
of Contents, iii
4-3
Tachometer,
Take-Off, 1-4, 2-12
before, 1-4, 2-12
2-13
crosswind,
distance, 6-3
maximum
1-5
performance,
normal,
1-4
power check, 2-12
wing flap settings,
2-13
Taxiing, 2-10
diagram, 2-11
Tire Pressure,
inside back cover
Table
R
Radio Transmitter
Selector
Switch,
7-2
Recovery From Spiral Dive,
3-6
Rough Engine Operation Or Loss
Power,
3-7
icing, 3-7
carburetor
low oil pressure,
3-8
malfunction,
magneto
3-8
spark plug fouling, 3-7
Index-4
of
Transmitter
Selector Switch, 7-2
True Airspeed Indicator,
7-3
baggage
and cargo
tie-down,
4-5
of gravity moment
envelope, 4-8
diagram,
loading arrangements
4-5
loading graph, 4-7
4-6
sample loading problem,
Windshield
Windows, 5-2
2-7
Wing Flap System,
Kit, 7-1
Winterization
center
W
Warm-Up,
2-12
Weight,
empty,
inside front cover
inside front cover
gross,
Weight and Balance,
4-4
-
Index-5
REQUIREMENTS
SERVICING
ENGINE
OIL:
Grade SAE 40 Above 40°F.
Grade SAE 10W30 or SAE 20 Below 40°F.
for
Multi-viscosity
oil with a range of SAE 10W30 is recommended
oil, conDetergent or dispersant
improved starting in cold weather.
forming to Continental Motors Specification MHS-24A, must be used.
GRADE
--
Aviation
Aviation
NOTE
Your Cessna was delivered from
rosion preventive
aircraft engine
with a coroil.
If oil must be
use only aviatiori grade
the factory
added during the first 25 hours,
straight mineral
oil (non-detergent) conforming
fication
No.
to Speci-
MIL-L-6082.
CAPACITY
OF ENGINE SUMP
6 Quarts.
To minimize
loss of oil through
Do not operate
on less than 4 quarts.
breather,
fill to 5 quart level for normal flights of less than 3 hours.
refer to oil
These quantities
For extended
flight, fill to 6 quarts.
During oil and oil filter changes,
dipstick level readings.
one additional quart is required when the filter element is changed.
OIL AND OIL FILTER CHANGE
drain engine oil sump and clean
After the first 25 hours of operation,
change
If an optional oil filter is installed,
the oil pressure
screen.
filter element at this time. Refill sump with straight mineral oil
(non-detergent)and use until a total of 50 hours has accumulated or
oil.
oil consumption has stabilized;
On airthen change to detergent
craft not equipped with an optional oil filter, drain the engine oil
On
screen each 50 hours thereafter.
sump and clean the oil pressure
aircraft which have an optional oil filter, the oil change interval
may
providing
be extended to 100-hour intervals,
the oil filter element is
changed at 50-hour intervals.
Change engine oil at least every 6
months even though less than the recommended
hours have accumucold
for prolonged
operation
in dusty areas,
lated. Reduce intervals
result in sludgclimates,
or when short flights and long idle periods
ing conditions.
--
--
REQUIREMENTS'
SERVICING
FUEL:
80/87 Minimum Grade Aviation Fuel.
Alternate fuels which are also approved are:
100/130 Low Lead AVGAS (maximumlead content
GRADE
--
gallon)
100/130 Aviation Grade Fuel
(maximum lead
per gallon)
of 2 c. c. per
content
of 4. 6 c. c.
NOTE
substituting
a higher octane fuel, low lead AVGAS
100 should be used whenever possible since it will result
in less lead contamination of the engine.
When
CAPACITY
CAPACITY
EACH STANDARD TANK
EACH LONG RANGE TANK
--
--
13 Gallons.
19 Gallons.
NOTE
Due to cross-feeding
between fuel tanks, the tanks should
be re-topped after each refueling
to assure maximum
capacity.
LANDING
GEAR:
NOSE WHEEL
TIRE
MAIN WHEEL TIRE
NOSE GEAR SHOCK
Keep filled with
20 PSL Do not
PRESSURE
PRESSURE
STRUT
For
complete
to
30 PSI on 5. 00-5,
21 PSI on 6. 00-6,
4-Ply
4-Ply
Rated
Rated
Tire.
Tires.
-
MIL-H-5606
over-inflate.
refer
--
-
the
hydraulic
servicing
aircraft
fluid and inflated
requirements,
Service
Manual.
with air
to
ESSNA
"TAKE YOUR CESSNA
HOME
FOR SERVICE AT THE SIGN
OF THE CESSNA SHIELD".
CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY
WICHITA,
KANSAS
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