Beechcraft Debonair - Flying Club of Kansas City

Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
SECTION I
GENERAL
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SUBJECT
PAGE
IMPORTANT NOTICE........................................................................ 3
USE OF THE HANDBOOK................................................................ 4
REVISING THE HANDBOOK ............................................................ 6
SUPPLEMENTS REVISION RECORD.............................................. 6
AIRPLANE THREE VIEW.................................................................. 7
GROUND TURNING CLEARANCE................................................... 8
DESCRIPTIVE DATA......................................................................... 9
ENGINE........................................................................................... 9
PROPELLER................................................................................... 9
FUEL ............................................................................................. 10
OIL CAPACITY.............................................................................. 10
WEIGHTS...................................................................................... 10
CABIN AND ENTRY DIMENSIONS............................................... 10
BAGGAGE SPACE AND ENTRY DIMENSIONS........................... 11
SPECIIFIC LOADINGS ................................................................. 11
GENERAL AIRSPEED TERMINOLOGY AND SYMBOLS ............. 11
METEORLOGICAL TERMINOLOGY .............................................. 13
POWER TERMINOLOGY ................................................................ 14
ENGINE CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS................................... 14
AIRPLANE PERFORMANCE AND FLIGHT PLANNING
TERMINOLOGY............................................................................... 15
WEIGHT AND BALANCE TERMINOLOGY .................................... 16
August 1979
1-1
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
August 1979
1-2
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
THANK YOU . . . . . for displaying confidence in us by selecting a
BEECHCRAFT airplane. Our design engineers, assemblers and
inspectors have utilized their skills and years of experience to ensure
that the BEECHCRAFT Debonair meets the high standards of quality
and performance for which BEECHCRAFT airplanes have become
famous throughout the world.
IMPORTANT NOTICE
This handbook must be read carefully by the owner and operator in
order to become familiar with the operation of the BEECHCRAFT
Debonair.
The
handbook
presents
suggestions
and
recommendations to help obtain safe and maximum performance
without sacrificing economy. The BEECHCRAFT Debonair must be
operated according to the Pilot’s Operating Handbook and FAA
Approved Airplane Flight Manual, and/or placards located in the
airplane.
As a further reminder, the owner and operator of this airplane should
also be familiar with the applicable Federal Aviation Regulations
concerning operation and maintenance of the airplane and FAR Part
91 General Operating and Flight Rules. Likewise this airplane must
be operated and maintained in accordance with FAA Airworthiness
Directives which may be issued against it.
The Federal Aviation Regulations place the responsibility for the
maintenance of this airplane on the owner and the operator who must
ensure that all maintenance is done by qualified mechanics in
conformity with all airworthiness requirements established for this
aircraft.
All limits, procedures, safety practices, time limits, servicing, and
maintenance requirements contained in this handbook are
considered mandatory for the continued airworthiness of this aircraft
in a condition equal to that of its original manufacture.
August 1979
1-3
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Authorized BEECHCRAFT Aero or Aviation Centers or International
Distributors or Dealers can provide recommended modifications,
service, and operating procedures issued by both FAA and Beech
Aircraft Corporation, designed to get maximum utility and safety from
this airplane.
USE OF THE HANDBOOK
The Pilot’s Operating Handbook is designed so that necessary
documents may be maintained for the safe and efficient operation of
the BEECHCRAFT Debonair. The handbook has been prepared in
loose leaf form for the ease in maintenance and in a convenient size
for storage. Then handbook has been arranged with quick reference
tabs imprinted with the title of each section and contains ten basic
divisions.
Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Section 6
Section 7
Section 8
Section 9
Section 10
August 1979
General
Limitations
Emergency Procedures
Normal Procedures
Performance
Weight and Balance / equipment List
Systems Description
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
Supplements
Safety Information
1-4
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
NOTE
Except as noted, all airspeeds quoted in this handbook are
Indicated Airspeeds (IAS) and assume zero instrument error.
In an effort to provide as complete coverage as possible, application
to any configuration of the airplane, some optional equipment has
been included in the scope of the handbook. However, due to the
variety of airplane appointments and arrangements available, optional
equipment described and depicted herein may not be designated as
such in every case.
Neither Service Publications Reissues, nor Revisions are
automatically provided to the holder of this handbook.
For
information on how to obtain “Revision Service” applicable to this
handbook, consult any BEECHRAFT Aero or Aviation Center or
International Distributor or Dealer or refer to the latest revision of
BEECHCRAFT Service Instructions No. 0250-010.
BEECH AIRCRAFT CORPORATION EXPRESSLY RESERVES THE
RIGHT TO SUPERCEDE, CANCEL, AND/OR DECLARE
OBSOLETE, WITHOUT PRIOR NOTICE, ANY PART, PART
NUMBER, KIT OR PUBLICATION REFERENCED IN THIS
HANDBOOK.
August 1979
1-5
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
REVISING THE HANDBOOK
Immediately following the title page is the “Log of Revisions” page(s).
The Log of Revisions pages are used for maintaining a listing of all
effective pages in the handbook (except the SUPPLEMENTS
section), and as a record of revisions to these pates. In the lower
right corner of the outlined portion of the Lot Revisions is a box
containing a capital letter which denotes the issue or reissue of the
handbook. This letter may be suffixed by a number which indicates
the numerical revision. When a revision to any information in the
handbook is made, a new Log of Revisions will be issued. All Logs
Revisions must be retained in the handbook to provide a current
record of material status until a reissue is made.
WARNING
When this handbook is used for airplane operational purpose it
is the pilot’s responsibility to maintain it in current status.
SUPPLEMENTS REVISION RECORD
Section IX contains supplements and a Log of Supplements page.
On the “Log” page is a listing of supplemental equipment available for
installation on the BEECHCRAFT Debonair. When new supplements
are received or existing supplements revised, a new “Log” page will
replace the previous one. Be sure to check and retain the “Log” page
with the latest date that is shown at the bottom of the page. The
supplemental material will be added to the grouping in accordance
with the descriptive listing.
August 1979
1-6
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
AIRPLANE THREE VIEW
August 1979
1-7
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
GROUND TURNING CLEARANCE
A – Radius for Wing Tip
B – Radius for Nose Wheel
C – Radius for inside Gear
D – Radius for Outside Gear
26 ft. 4 in.
12 ft. 2 in.
5 ft. 1 in.
14 ft. 8 in.
TURNING RADII ARE CALCULATED USING FULL STEERING,
ONE BRAKE AND PARTIAL POWER.
August 1979
1-8
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
DESCRIPTIVE DATA
ENGINE
The BEECHCRAFT Debonair A33 and B33 are both powered by a
Continental six-cylinder, horizontally-opposed engine. The IO470-J
(installed on 33 series airplanes, serials prior to CD-301 and including
CD-386 and CD-387) is a wet sump, fuel-injected engine, rated at
225 hp at 2600 rpm for take-off and maximum continuous operation.
The IO-470-K (CD-301 through CD 813 except CD-386 and CD-387)
is identically rated but not directly interchangeable with the IO-470-J
engine.
PROPELLER
(A33 and B33)
Hartzell constant speed, two blade, 84-inch diameter propeller using
a Hartzell BHC-922F-1D1 hub with 8447 blades.
or
Flottorp constant speed, two blade, 84 inch diameter propeller using
a Flottorp F12A series hub with 8400-0 blades.
(B33 only)
McCauley constant speed, two blade, 84inch diameter propeller using
a McCauley 2A36C23 hub with 84B-0 blades.
NOTE
Other propellers are approved by not installed as original equipment.
These are listed in the FAA Aircraft Specification 3A15 or approved
by Supplemental Type Certificate.
August 1979
1-9
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
FUEL
Aviation Gasoline 80/87 (red) minimum grade or alternate grades
100LL (blue) or 100 (green). See Engine Manufacturer’s Bulletin.
STANDARD SYSTEM
Total Capacity
Total Usable
50 gal.
44 gal.
OPTIONAL SYSTEM (A33)
Total Capacity
Total Usable
70 gal.
63 gal.
OPTIONAL SYSTEM (B33)
Total Capacity
Total Usable
80 gal.
74 gal.
OIL CAPACITY
The oil capacity is 10 quarts.
WEIGHTS
Maximum Ramp Weight
3010 lbs
Maximum Take-off Weight
3000 lbs
Maximum Landing Weight
3000 lbs
Maximum Zero-Fuel Weight
Not Structural Limit
Maximum Weight in Baggage Compartment 270 lbs
CABIN AND ENTRY DIMENSIONS
Length
Height
Width
Cabin Door
August 1979
6 ft 11 in.
4 ft 2 in
3 ft 6 in
37 in wide by 36 in. high
1 - 10
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
BAGGAGE SPACE AND ENTRY DIMENSIONS
Compartment Volume
With Utility Shelf
Door Width (Minimum)
Door Height (Minimum)
16.5 cu. ft.
22.4 cu. ft.
18.5 in
22.5 in
SPECIIFIC LOADINGS
(Maximum Take-off Weight)
Wing Loading at gross weight
Power Loading at gross weight
16.9 lbs / sq ft
13.3 lbs/hp
GENERAL AIRSPEED TERMINOLOGY AND SYMBOLS
CAS
Calibrated Airspeed is the indicated speed of an airplane,
corrected for position and instrument error. Calibrated
airspeed is equal to true airspeed at sea level.
GS
Ground Speed is the speed of an airplane relative to the
ground.
IAS
Indicated Airspeed is the speed of an airplane as shown on
the airspeed indicator when corrected for instrument error.
IAS values published in this handbook assume zero
instrument error.
KCAS Calibrated Airspeed expressed in “knots”.
KIAS
Indicated Airspeed expressed in “knots”.
August 1979
1 - 11
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
TAS
True Airspeed of an airplane relative to undisturbed air which
is the CAS corrected for altitude, temperature, and
compressibility.
VA
Maneuvering Speed is the maximum speed at which
application of full available aerodynamic control will not
overstress the airplane.
VFE
Maximum Flap Extended Speed is the highest speed
permissible with wing flaps in a prescribed extended position.
VLE
Maximum Landing Gear Extended speed is the maximum
speed at which an airplane can be safely flown with the
landing gear extended.
VLO
Maximum Landing Gear Operating Speed is the maximum
speed at which the landing gear can be safely extended or
retracted.
VNE
Never Exceed Speed is the speed limit that may not be
exceeded at any time.
VNO
or VC
Maximum Structural Cruising Speed is he speed that should
not be exceeded except in smooth air and then only with
caution.
VS
Stalling Speed or the minimum steady flight speed at which
the airplane is controllable.
VSO
Stalling Speed or the minimum steady flight speed at which
the airplane is controllable in the landing configuration.
August 1979
1 - 12
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
VX
Best Angle-of-Climb Speed is the airspeed which delivers the
greatest gain of altitude in the shortest possible horizontal
distance.
VY
Best Rate-of-Climb Speed is the airspeed which delivers the
greatest gain in altitude in the shortest possible time.
METEORLOGICAL TERMINOLOGY
ISA
International Standard Atmosphere in which:
1. The air is a dry perfect gas
2. The temperature at sea level is 15° Celsius (59°
Fahrenheit)
3. The pressure at seal level is 29.92 in. Hg. (1013.2
millibars)
4. The temperature gradient from sea level to the
altitude at which the temperature is -56.6° C (-9.7°F)
is -0.00198°C (-0.003566° F) per foot above that
altitude.
OAT
Outside Air Temperature is the free air static temperature,
obtained either from in-flight temperature indications
adjusted for instrument error and compressibility effects, or
ground meteorological sources.
Indicated The number actually read from an altimeter when the
Pressure barometric sub-scale has been set to 29.92 in. Hg. (1013.2
Altitude millibars)
August 1979
1 - 13
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Pressure Altitude measured from standard sea-level pressure
Altitude (29.92 in. Hg.) by a pressure or barometric altimeter. It is
the indicated pressure altitude corrected for position and
instrument error. In this handbook, altimeter instrument
errors are assumed to be zero. Position errors may be
obtained from the Altimeter Correction Chart.
Station
Actual atmospheric pressure at field elevation.
Pressure
Wind
The wind velocities as variables on the charts of this
handbook are to be understood as the headwind or
tailwind components of the reported winds.
POWER TERMINOLOGY
Takeoff
Highest power rating not limited by time.
and
Continuous
Cruise
Climb
Power recommended for cruise climb.
ENGINE CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS
Throttle
Control
August 1979
Used to control power by introducing fuel-air mixture
into the intake passages of the engine. Settings are
reflected by readings on the manifold pressure.
1 - 14
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Propeller
Control
This control requests the propeller governor to
maintain engine/propeller rpm at a selected value by
controlling propeller blade angle.
Mixture
Control
This control is used to set fuel pressure (flow) in all
modes of operation and cuts of fuel completely for
engine shut down.
This indicator is used to identify the lean and best
EGT
power fuel pressure (flow) for various power settings.
(Engine
Exhaust
Temperature
Indicator)
Tachometer
Indicates the rpm of the engine/propeller
Propeller
Governor
Regulates the rpm of the engine/propeller by
increasing or decreasing the propeller pitch through a
pitch change mechanism in the propeller hub.
AIRPLANE PERFORMANCE AND FLIGHT PLANNING
TERMINOLOGY
Climb
Gradient
The ratio of the change in height during apportion of a
climb to the horizontal distance traversed in the same
time interval.
Demonstrated The demonstrated crosswind velocity is the velocity
Crosswind
of the crosswind component for which adequate
Velocity
control of the airplane during takeoff and landing was
actually demonstrated during certification tests. The
value shown is considered to be limiting.
August 1979
1 - 15
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
MEA
Minimum Enroute IFR altitude
Route
Segment
A part of a route. Each end of that pare is identified
by (1) a geographical location, or (2) a point at which
a definite radio fix can be established.
GPH
U.S. Gallons per hour.
PPH
Pounds per hour
WEIGHT AND BALANCE TERMINOLOGY
Reference
Datum
An imaginary vertical plane from which all horizontal
distances are measured for balance purposes.
Station
A location along the airplane fuselage usually given in
terms of distance from the reference datum.
Airplane
The point at which an airplane would balance if
Center of
suspended. Its distance from the reference datum is
Gravity (C.G.) found by dividing the total moment by the total weight
of the airplane.
C. G. Limits
The extreme center of gravity location within which
the airplane must be operated at a given weight.
Usable Fuel
Fuel available for flight planning.
Unusable
Fuel
Fuel remaining after a runout test has been
completed in accordance with governmental
regulations.
Standard
Weight of a standard airplane including unusable fuel,
Empty Weight full operating fluids and full oil.
August 1979
1 - 16
Section I
General
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Basic Empty
Weight
Standard empty weight plus optional equipment.
Payload
Weight of occupants, cargo and baggage.
Useful Load
Difference between take-off weight, or ramp weight if
applicable, and basic empty weight.
Maximum
Maximum weight approved fro ground maneuvering.
Ramp Weight (It includes weight of start, taxi, and run-up fuel.)
Maximum
Take-off
Weight
Maximum weight approved for the start of the take-off
run.
Maximum
Landing
Weight
Maximum weight approved for the landing
touchdown.
Zero Fuel
Weight
Weight exclusive of usable fuel.
Tare
The weight of chocks, blocks, stands, etc., used on
the scales when weighing the airplane.
Leveling
Points
The points which are sued during the weight process
to level the airplane.
Jack Points
Points on the airplane identified by the manufacturer
as suitable for supporting the airplane for weighting or
other purposes.
August 1979
1 - 17
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
SECTION II
GENERAL LIMITATIONS
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SUBJECT
PAGE
AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS ................................................................. 3
AIRSPEED INDICATOR MARKINGS................................................ 4
POWER PLANT LIMITATIONS ......................................................... 5
ENGINE........................................................................................... 5
OPERATING LIMITATIONS......................................................... 5
FUEL GRADES ............................................................................... 5
OIL SPECIFICATIONS.................................................................... 5
PROPELLER SPECIFICATIONS .................................................... 6
POWER PLANT INSTRUMENT MARKINGS .................................... 7
MISCELLANEOUS INSTRUMENT MARKINGS ............................... 8
WEIGHT LIMITS ................................................................................ 8
CENTER OF GRAVITY LIMITS ......................................................... 9
MANEUVER LIMITS .......................................................................... 9
APPROVED MANEUVERS ............................................................... 9
FLIGHT LOAD FACTORS ............................................................... 10
MINIMUM FLIGHT CREW ............................................................... 10
KINDS OF OPERATION LIMITS ..................................................... 10
REQUIRED EQUIPMENT FOR VARIOUS CONDITIONS OF FLIGHT
......................................................................................................... 10
FUEL ................................................................................................ 16
SEATIING ........................................................................................ 16
PLACARDS ..................................................................................... 17
August 1979
2- 1
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
The limitations included in this section have been approved by the
Federal Aviation Administration.
August 1979
2- 2
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
The following limitations must be observed in the operation of this
airplane:
AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS
SPEED
CAS
IAS
REMARKS
KNOTS MPH KNOTS MPH
Never Exceed VNE
195
225
197
227 Do not exceed this
speed in any operation
Maximum Structural
161
185
162
186 Do not exceed this
Cruising Speed VNO
speed except in smooth
or VC
air, and then with
caution.
Maneuvering VA
128
147
129
148 Do not make full or
abrupt control
movements above this
speed.
Maximum Flap
104
120
106
122 Do not extend flaps or
Extension/Extended
operate with flaps
Speed VFE
extended above this
speed
Maximum Landing
A33
Do not extend, retract or
Gear Operating /
122
140
122
140 operate with landing
Extended VLO and
gear extended above
B33
VLE
143
165
144
166 this speed except in an
emergency
August 1979
2- 3
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
AIRSPEED INDICATOR MARKINGS
MARKING
CAS
KNOTS
IAS
MPH
KNOTS
SIGNIFICANCE
MPH
White Arc
52 -104
60 - 120
52 - 106
60 - 122
Green Arc
62 – 161
71 - 185
61 - 162
70 - 186
Yellow Arc
161 – 195
185 – 225
162 - 197
186 – 227
195
225
197
227
Red Line
Full Flap
Operating
Range
Normal
Operating
Range
Operate With
Caution Only in
Smooth Air
Maximum
Speed For All
operations
The Airspeed Indicator is marked in CAS values.
August 1979
2- 4
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
POWER PLANT LIMITATIONS
ENGINE
Continental IO-470-J or IO-470-K (A33) or IO-470-K (B33) fuel
injected engine
OPERATING LIMITATIONS
Engine Speed ........................................................................ 2600 rpm
Cylinder Head Temperature ..........................................460°F / 238° C
Oil Temperature............................................................225° F / 107° C
Oil Pressure
Minimum.....................................................................30 psi
Maximum....................................................................80 psi
Fuel Pressure
Minimum....................................................................1.5 psi
Maximum.................................................................17.5 psi
Mixture – Set per leaning instructions on performance charts.
FUEL GRADES
Aviation Gasoline 80/87 (red) minimum grade or alternate grades
100LL (blue) or 100 (green). See Engine Manufacturer’s Bulletin.
OIL SPECIFICATIONS
Ashless dispersant oils must meet Teledyne Continental Motors
Corporation Specification MHS-24B. Refer to APPROVED ENGINE
OILS in the Handling, Servicing, and Maintenance section.
August 1979
2- 5
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
PROPELLER SPECIFICATIONS
(A33 and B33)
Hartzell constant speed propeller
Hub: BHC-92ZF-1D1
Blades: 8447
Diameter: Maximum 84 in., Minimum 82 in.
Pitch settings at 33 in. sta.:
Low 11°, High not under 26°
OR
Flottrop constant speed, two blade propeller
Hub: Flottrop F12A-4
Blades: 8400-0
Diameter: Maximum 84 in., Minimum 82 in.
Pitch settings at 33 in. sta.:
Low 11.7° +/- 0.2° each blade within 0.2° of each other
High not under 30°
B33 only
Flottrop constant speed, two blade propeller
Hub: Flottrop F12A-5
Blades: 8400-0
Diameter: Maximum 84 in., Minimum 82 in.
Pitch settings at 33 in. sta.:
Low 11.7° +/- 0.2° each blade within 0.2° of each other
High not under 30°
McCauley constant speed propeller
Hub: 2A36C23
Blades: 848-0
Diameter: Maximum 84 in., Minimum 82 in.
Pitch settings at 33 in. sta.:
Low 12°, High not under 29.2°
August 1979
2- 6
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
NOTE
Other propellers are approved but not installed as original
equipment. These are listed in the FAA Aircraft Specification
3A15 or approved by Supplemental Type Certificate.
POWER PLANT INSTRUMENT MARKINGS
OIL TEMPERATURE
Caution (Yellow Radial) ....................................................100°F / 38°C
Operating Range
(Green Arc) ........................... 100°F to 225° / 38° to 107°C
Maximum (Red Radial)...................................................225°F / 107°C
OIL PRESSURE
Minimum Pressure (Red Radial) .................................................30 psi
Operating Range (Green Arc) ............................................30 to 60 psi
Maximum Pressure (Red Radial) ................................................80 psi
TACHOMETER
Operating Range (Green Radial).............................. 2000 to 2600 rpm
Maximum RPM (Red Radial)................................................. 2600 rpm
FUEL PRESSURE (A33)
Minimum (Red Radial)................................................................1.5 psi
Operating Range (Green Arc) ................................... 4.25 psi to 17 psi
Maximum (Red Radial).............................................................17.5 psi
FUEL FLOW (B33)
Minimum (Red Radial)................................................................1.5 psi
Operating Range (Green Arc) .....................................6.9 to 21.6 GPH
Maximum (Red Radial).............................................................17.5 psi
August 1979
2- 7
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
CYLINDER HEAD TEMPERATURE
Operating Range
(Green Arc) ............................. 200° to 460°F/93° to 238°C
Maximum Temperature
(Red Radial).................................................460°F / 238°C
MANIFOLD PRESSURE
Operating Range
(Green Arc) .............................................. 15 to 29.6 in. Hg
Maximum Temperature
(Red Radial)...................................................... 29.6 in. Hg
MISCELLANEOUS INSTRUMENT MARKINGS
INSTRUMENT VACUUM
A33 with autopilot
Minimum (Red Radial) ....................................... 3.75 in Hg
Operating Range (Green Arc)................ 3.75 to 4.25 in Hg
Maximum (Red Radial) ........................................ 4.6 in Hg
Without autopilot
Minimum (Red Radial) ......................................... 4.4 in Hg
Operating Range (Green Arc) .................... 4.8 to 5.2 in Hg
Maximum (Red Radial) ........................................ 5.5 in Hg
B33
Minimum (Red Radial) ....................................... 3.75 in Hg
Operating Range (Green Arc)................ 3.75 to 5.25 in Hg
Maximum (Red Radial) ...................................... 5.25 in Hg
FUEL QUANTITY
Yellow Band (44-gallon system) ........................ E to ½ full
Yellow Band (63-gal system, main tanks) .......... E to ½ full
Yellow Band (74-gallon system) ...................... E to 3/8 full
WEIGHT LIMITS
Maximum Ramp Weight........................................3010 lbs
Maximum take-off and
Landing Weight ..................................................3000 lbs
Zero Fuel Weight .......................... No Structural Limitation
Maximum Baggage Compartment Load .................270 lbs
August 1979
2- 8
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
CENTER OF GRAVITY LIMITS
(Gear Down)
Forward: 77.0 inches aft of datum to 2500 lbs (A33) / 2600 lbs (B33)
with straight line variation to 82.1 inches at 3000 lbs
Aft: 86.7 inches aft of datum at all weights
REFERENCE DATUM
Datum is 83.1 inches forward of center line through forward jack
points.
MAC leading edge is 66.7 inches aft of datum.
MAC length is 65.3 inches.
MANEUVER LIMITS
This is a utility category airplane. Spins are prohibited. No acrobatic
maneuvers are approved except those listed below. Maximum slip
duration is 30 seconds for airplanes with baffled main fuel cells in
both wings and 20 seconds for airplanes with unbaffled fuel cells in
either wing.
APPROVED MANEUVERS (3000 POUNDS)
Maneuver .............................................................Entry Speed (CAS)
Chandelle...............................................128 kts / 147 mph
Steep Turns ...........................................128 kts / 147 mph
Lazy Eight ..............................................128 kts / 147 mph
Stall (Except whip) .......................... Use slow deceleration
Minimum fuel for above maneuvers – 10 gallons each main tank.
Spins are prohibited.
August 1979
2- 9
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
FLIGHT LOAD FACTORS (3000 POUNDS)
Positive Maneuvering Load Factors
Flaps Up.....................................................................4.4 G
Flaps Down ................................................................2.0 G
MINIMUM FLIGHT CREW
One (1) Pilot
KINDS OF OPERATION LIMITS
1. VFR day and night
2. IFR day and night
REQUIRED EQUIPMENT FOR VARIOUS CONDITIONS OF FLIGHT
Federal Aviation Regulations (91.3a, 91.24, 91.25, 91.32, 91.33,
91.52, 91.90, 91.97, 91.170) specify the minimum number and types
of airplane instruments and equipment which must be installed and
operable for various kinds of flight conditions. This includes VFR day,
VFR night, IFR day and IFR night.
Regulations also require that all airplanes be certificated by the
manufacturer for operations under various flight conditions. At
certification, all required equipment must be in operating conditions
and should be maintained to assure continued airworthiness. If
deviations from the installed equipment were not permitted, or if the
operating rules did not provide for various flight conditions, the
airplane could not be flown unless all equipment was operable. With
appropriate limitations, the operation of ever system or component
installed in the airplane is not necessary, when the remaining
operative instruments and equipment provide for continued safe
operation. Operation in accordance with limitations established to
maintain airworthiness, can permit continued or uninterrupted
operation of the airplane temporarily.
August 1979
2- 10
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
For the sake of brevity, the Required Equipment Listing does not
include obviously required items such as wings, rudders, flaps,
engine, landing gear, etc. Also the list does not include items which
do not affect the airworthiness of the airplane such as entertainment
systems, passenger convenience items, etc. However, it is important
to note that ALL ITEMS WHICH ARE RELATED TO THE
AIRWORTHINESS OF THE AIRPLANE AND NOT INCUDED ON
THE LIST ARE AUTOMATICALLY REQUIRED TO BE OPERATIVE.
To enable pilots to rapidly determine the FAA equipment
requirements necessary for a flight into specific conditions the
following equipment requirements and exceptions are presented. It is
the responsibility of the pilot to determine whether the lack of. Or
inoperative status of a piece of equipment on his airplane, will limit
the conditions under which he may operate the airplane.
WARNING
FLIGHT IN KNOWN ICING CONDITIONS PROHIBITED.
LEGEND
(-) Indicates that the item may be inoperative for the specified
condition
(*) refer to REMARKS AND/OR EXCEPTIONS column for explicit
information or reference
August 1979
2- 11
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
VFR Day
VFR Night
SYSTEM and/or
COMPONENT
GENERAL
Overwater flight
ATA 100 Chapter
23
Communications
IFR Day
IFR Night
Remarks Exceptions
X
X
X
X
Per FAR 91.33
X
X
X
X
Per FAR 91.33
Battery
1
1
1
1
DC alternator /
generator
1
1
1
1
Seat Belts
1
1
1
1
Per person or Per FAR 91.33
Shoulder Harness
*
*
*
*
* Pilot and copilot if installed
*
*
*
*
* Optional
VHF
communications
system
ATA 100
CHAPTER 24
ELECTRICAL
POWER
ATA 100
CHAPTER 25
EQUIPMENT AND
FURNISHING
ATA 100
CHAPTER 26
FIRE
PROTECTION
Portable fire
extinguisher
August 1979
2- 12
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
ATA 100
CHAPTER 27
FLIGHT
CONTROLS
Elevator trim tab
indicator
1
1
1
1
May be inoperative for ferry flight
provided tabs are visually checked
in the neutral position prior to
take-off and checked for full range
of operation
Flap position
indication lights
2
2
2
2
May be inoperative providing flap
travel is visually inspected prior to
take-off.
Stall Warning
1
1
1
1
Auxiliary fuel pump 1
1
1
1
Engine driven fuel
pump
1
1
1
1
Fuel quantity
indicator
2
2
2
2
Fuel pressure
(flow) indicator
1
1
1
1
*
*
1
1
ATA 100
CHAPTER 28
FUEL
EQUIPMENT
One may be inoperative provided
other side is operational and
amount of fuel on board can be
established to be adequate for the
intended flight
ATA 100
CHAPTER 30 ICE
AND RAIN
PROTECTION
Pitot heat
August 1979
* Optional
2- 13
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
ATA 100
CHAPTER 32
LANDING GEAR
Landing gear
motor
1
1
1
1
May be inoperative provided
operations are continued only to a
point where repairs can be
accomplished. Gear must be left
down. Do not retract gear with
hand crank
Landing gear
position lights
2
2
2
2
Landing gear aural
warning horn
1
1
1
1
Cockpit and
instrument lights
-
*
-
*
* Lights must be operative
Landing light
Rotating beacon
-
*
1
-
*
1
* Per FAR 91.33
Position light
-
3
-
3
Altimeter
1
1
1
1
Airspeed indicator
1
1
1
1
Vertical speed
*
*
*
*
Magnetic compass
1
1
1
Attitude indicator
*
*
1
ATA 100
CHAPTER 33
LIGHTS
ATA 100
CHAPTER 34
NAVIGATION
INSTRUMENTS
August 1979
* Optional
1
2- 14
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Turn and slip
indicator
-
-
1
1
Directional gyro
-
-
1
1
Clock
Navigation
equipment
*
-
*
-
1
*
1
*
Per FAR 91.24, 91.90, 91.97
*
*
*
*
* Per FAR 91.32
Vacuum system
for instrument air
-
-
1
1
Vacuum gage
-
-
1
1
Engine tachometer
indicator
1
1
1
1
Manifold pressure
indicator
1
1
1
1
Oil pressure
indicator
1
1
1
1
Oil temperature
indicator
1
1
1
1
ATA 100
CHAPTER 35
OXYGEN
Oxygen system
ATA 100
CHAPTER 37
VACUUM
ATA 100
CHAPTER 7
VACUUM
ATA 100
CHAPTER 79
ENGINE OIL
INSTRUMENTS
August 1979
2- 15
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
FUEL
STANDARD SYSTEM
Total Capacity ...........................................................50 gal
Total Usable..............................................................44 gal
OPTIONAL SYSTEM (A33)
Total Capacity ...........................................................70 gal
Total Usable..............................................................63 gal
OPTIONAL SYSTEM (B33)
Total Capacity ...........................................................80 gal
Total Usable..............................................................74 gal
FUEL MANAGEMENT
Take off on left main tank (A33)
Use auxiliary fuel in level flight only and do not use for take off or
landing. Use at least 10 gallons from the left main tank before use of
auxiliary fuel.
Take off on the main tank that is more nearly full. (B33)
When operating fuel selector, feel for detent position.
Do not take off when Fuel Quantity Gauges indicate in Yellow Band
or with less than 13 gallons in each main tank.
Maximum slip duration:
30 seconds for airplanes with baffled main fuel cells in both wings
20 seconds for airplanes with unbaffled fuel cells in either wing
SEATIING
All seats must be in the upright position for takeoff and landing.
August 1979
2- 16
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
PLACARDS
On fuel selector panel (A33)
DO NOT TAKE OFF IF FUEL QUANTITY GAGES
INDICATE IN YELLOW BAND OR WITH LESS
THAN 13 GALLONS IN EACH MAIN TANK
Standard 44 Gallon (Usable) System (A33)
Optional 63 Gallon (Usable) System (A33)
August 1979
2- 17
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
On fuel selector panel (B33)
DO NOT TAKE OFF IF FUEL QUANTITY GAGES
INDICATE IN YELLOW BAND OR WITH LESS
THAN 13 GALLONS IN EACH MAIN TANK
Standard 44 Gallon (Usable) System (B33)
Optional 74 Gallon (Usable) System (B33)
August 1979
2- 18
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
PLACARDS
Above Emergency Landing Gear Extension Handle:
(A33 and B33)
EMERGENCY LANDING GEAR
INSTRUCTIONS TO EXTEND
ENGAGE HANDLE IN REAR OF FRONT SEAT
AND TURN COUNTERCLOCKWISE AS FAR AS
POSSIBLE (50 TURNS)
Above Landing Gear Mechanical Position Indicator When Winter
Baffles are Installed (A33 and B33)
NOTICE
REMOVE WINTER
BAFFLES WHEN
OAT EXCEEDS 70°F
On Right Hand Subpanel (A33)
FIRE DOOR
PULL TO CLOSE
August 1979
2- 19
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
On Left Hand Subpanel (A33)
VENT SHUTOFF
PULL TO CLOSE
On Inner Side of Baggage Compartment Door (A33 and B33)
BAGGAGE COMPARTMENT
LOAD IN ACCORDANCE WITH
AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL
MAXIMUM STRUCTURAL CAPACITY – 270 POUNDS
On Storm Window (A33 and B33)
CAUTION
DO NOT OPEN ABOVE
145 MPH (126 KNOTS)
August 1979
2- 20
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
PLACARDS
In Full view of Pilot (A33)
UTILITY CATEGORY AIRPLANE
OPERATE IN ACCORDANCE WITH FAA
APPROVED AIRPLANE FIGHT MANUAL
INTENTIONAL SPINS PROHIBITED
NO ACROBATIC MANEUBERS APPROVED
EXCEPT THOSE LISTED IN THE AIRPLANE
FLIGHT MANUAL
(B33)
AIR SPEED LIMITATION
MAXIMUM SPEED WITH LANDING GEAR
EXTENDED (NORMAL) 165 MPH (143
KTS) MAXIMUM DESIGN MANEUVERING
SPEED 147 MPH (128 KTS)
UTILITY CATEGORY AIRPLANE
OPERATE IN ACCORDANCE WITH FAA
APPROVED AIRPLANE FIGHT MANUAL
INTENTIONAL SPINS PROHIBITED
NO ACROBATIC MANEUVERS APPROVED
EXCEPT THOSE LISTED IN THE AIRPLANE
FLIGHT MANUAL
August 1979
2- 21
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
(A33 and B33)
AUX FUEL PUMP OPERATION
TAKE-OFF AND LAND WITH AUX FUEL
PUMP OFF EXCEPT IN CASE OF LOSS
OF FUEL PRESSURE
(A33)
AIRSPEED LIMITATION
MAXIMUM SPEED WITH LANDING GEAR EXTENDED (NORMAL) 140 MPH
MAXIMUM DESIGN MANEUVEREING SPEED 147 MPH
Above Inside Door Handle (A33)
CAUTION
AFTER CLOSING
DOOR ROTATE
HANDLE TO FULL
LOCKED POSITION
August 1979
2- 22
Section II
General Limitations
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Above Inside Door Handle (Cont)
(B33)
ROTATE
HANDLE TO
FULL LOCKED
POSITION
In full View of the Pilot
(Unless baffled main cells are installed in both wings)
TURNING TYPE TAKEOFFS, AND
TAKEOFF IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING
FAST TAXI TURN PROHIBITED. AVOID
PROLONGED SLIPS (20 SECONDS OR
MORE) WITH FUEL TANKS LESS THAN
HALF FULL
August 1979
2- 23
Section III
Emergency Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
SECTION II
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SUBJECT
PAGE
EMERGENCY AIRSPEEDS............................................................... 3
ENGINE FAILURE ............................................................................. 4
DURING TAKEOFF GROUND ROLL ........................................................ 4
AFTER LIFTOFF AND IN FLIGHT ............................................................ 4
ENGINE DISCREPANCY CHECKS .......................................................... 4
ROUGH RUNNING ENGINE ................................................................... 5
LOSS OF ENGINE POWER .................................................................... 5
AIR START PROCEDURE ................................................................ 5
ENGINE FIRE..................................................................................... 6
IN FLIGHT .......................................................................................... 6
ON THE GROUND ............................................................................... 6
MAXIMUM GLIDE CONFIGURATION............................................... 6
EMERGENCY DESCENT .................................................................. 7
LANDING EMERGENCIES................................................................ 7
LANDING WITHOUT POWER ................................................................. 7
LANDING WITH GEAR RETRACTED – WITH POWER ............................... 7
SYSTEMS EMERGENCIES............................................................... 8
PROPELLER OVERSPEED .................................................................... 8
GENERATOR OUT PROCEDURES ......................................................... 8
LANDING GEAR MANUAL EXTENSION ................................................... 8
LANDING GEAR RETRACTION AFTER PRACTICE MANUAL EXTENSION ...... 9
UNLATCHED DOOR IN FLIGHT ............................................................ 10
SPINS............................................................................................... 10
EMERGENCY SPEED REDUCTION............................................... 10
August 1979
3- 1
Section III
Emergency Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
August 1979
3- 2
Section III
Emergency Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Emergency Airspeeds
Emergency Descent .................................................144 kts / 166 mph
Glide .........................................................................105 kts / 121 mph
Emergency Landing Approach .....................................79 kts / 91 mph
CAUTION
The approach airspeed is higher than normal to assure the
availability of control during flare without power.
All airspeeds quoted in this section are indicated airspeeds (IAS)
The following information is presented to enable the pilot to form, in
advance, a definite plan of action for coping with the most probable
emergency situations which could occur in the operation of the
airplane. Where practicable, the emergencies requiring immediate
corrective action are treated in checklist form of easy reference and
familiarization. Other situations, in which more time is usually
permitted to decide on and execute a plan of action, are discussed at
some length.
August 1979
3- 3
Section III
Emergency Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Engine Failure
During Takeoff Ground Roll
1.
2.
3.
4.
Throttle – CLOSED
Braking – MAXIMUM
Fuel Selector Valve – OFF
Battery and Generator Switches - OFF
After Liftoff and in Flight
Landing straight ahead is usually advisable. If sufficient altitude is
available for maneuvering, accomplish the following:
1. Fuel Selector Valve – SELECT OTHER MAIN TANK (Check to
feel detent)
2. Auxiliary Fuel Pump – ON
3. Mixture - FULL RICH, then LEAN as required
4. Magnetos – CHECK LEFT and RIGHT, then BOTH
NOTE
The most probable cause of engine failure would be loss of fuel
flow or improper functioning of the ignition system
If No Restart
1. Select most favorable landing site.
2. See EMERGENCY LANDING procedure
3. The use of landing gear is dependent on the terrain where
landing must be made
August 1979
3- 4
Section III
Emergency Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Engine Discrepancy Checks
Rough Running Engine
1. Mixture – FULL RICH, then LEAN as required
2. Ignition Switch – CHECK LEFT and RIGHT, then BOTH
Loss of Engine Power
1. If fuel pressure is abnormally low:
a. Mixture – FULL RICH
b. Auxiliary Fuel Pump – ON (Lean as required)
c. Auxiliary Fuel Pump – OFF if performance does not improve in
a few minutes
2. Fuel Quantity Indicator – CHECK for fuel supply in tank being
used.
If tank being used is empty:
Fuel Tank Selector Valve – SELECT ANOTHER FUEL TANK (feel for
detent)
Air Start Procedure
a. Fuel Selector Valve – SELECT MAIN TANK MORE NEARLY
FULL (check to feel detent)
b. Throttle - RETARD
c. Mixture - FULL RICH
d. Auxiliary Fuel Pump – ON until power is regained, then OFF.
(Leave on if engine driven fuel pump is inoperative)
e. Throttle – ADVANCE to desired power
f. Mixture - LEAN as required
August 1979
3- 5
Section III
Emergency Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Engine Fire
In Flight
The red FIRE DOOR control on the outboard side of the right lower
subpanel (A33) or red VENT SHUTOFF control on the outboard side
of the left lower subpanel (B33) is used to close off all heating system
outlets so that smoke and fumes will not enter the cabin. In the event
of engine fire, shut down the engine as follows and make a landing:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Fire Door / Vent Shutoff Control – PULL TO COSE
Mixture – IDLE CUT-OFF
Fuel Selector Valve – OFF
Battery and Generator Switches – OFF (Extending the landing
gear can be accomplished manually if desired
5. Do not attempt to restart engine.
On the Ground
1.
2.
3.
4.
Mixture – IDLE CUT-OFF
Fuel Selector Valve – OFF
Battery, Generator, and Ignition Switches – OFF
Extinguish with Fire Extinguisher
Maximum Glide Configuration
1. Mixture – IDLE CUT-OFF
2. Flaps – UP
3. Propeller – PULL for LOW RPM
4. Airspeed – 105 kts / 121 mph
Glide distance is approximately 1.7 nautical miles (2 stature miles)
per 1000 feet of altitude above the terrain
August 1979
3- 6
Section III
Emergency Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Emergency Descent
1. Power – IDLE
2. Propeller – HIGH RPM
3. Landing Gear – DOWN
4. Airspeed – ESTABLISH 144 kts / 166 mph
Landing Emergencies
Landing Without Power
The approach speed is higher than normal to assure the availability of
control during the flare without power. When assured of reaching the
landing site selected, and on final approach:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Airspeed – 79 kts / 91 mph
Fuel Selector Valve – OFF
Mixture – IDLE CUT-OFF
Flaps – AS REQUIRED
Landing Gear – DOWN OR UP, DEPENDING ON THE
TERRAIN
6. Battery and Generator Switches – OFF
Landing With Gear Retracted – With Power
If possible, choose firm sod or foamed runway. Make a normal
approach, using flaps as necessary. When you are sure of making
the selected landing spot:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Throttle – CLOSED
Mixture – IDLE CUT-OFF
Battery and Generator Switches – OFF
Fuel Selector Valve – OFF
Keep wings level during touchdown.
Get clear of the airplane as soon as possible after it stops.
August 1979
3- 7
Section III
Emergency Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Systems Emergencies
Propeller Overspeed
1. Throttle – RETARD TO RED LINE
2. Airspeed – REDUCE
3. Oil Pressure – CHECK
WARNING
If loss of oil pressure was the cause of Overspeed, the engine
will seize after a short period of operation.
4. Land – SELECT NEAREST SUITABLE SITE and follow
LANDING EMERGENCIES procedure.
Generator Out Procedure
A failure of the generator will place the entire electrical operation of
the aircraft on the battery. Generator failure may be indicated by the
ammeter. When a generator failure occurs in flight, all non-essential
electrical loads should be discontinued to conserve the battery life.
Landing Gear Manual Extension
Manual extension of the landing gear can be facilitated by first
reducing airspeed. Then proceed as follows:
1.
2.
3.
4.
LDG GEAR Circuit Breaker – OFF (PULL OUT)
Landing Gear Switch Handle – DOWN position
Handcrank Handle Cover (at rear of front seats) – REMOVE
Handcrank – ENGAGE and TURN COUNTERCLOCKWISE AS
FAR AS POSSIBLE (approximately 50 turns)
August 1979
3- 8
Section III
Emergency Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
CAUTION
The manual extension system is designed to lower the landing
gear only. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO RETRACT THE GEAR
MANUALLY.
5. If electrical system is operative, check landing gear position
lights and warning horn. (Check LDG GEAR INDICATOR and
LDG GEAR WARNING circuit breakers engaged).
6. Check mechanical landing gear indicator – DOWN
7. Handcrank – DISENGAGE. Always keep it stowed when not in
use
WARNING
Do not operate the landing gear electrically with the handcrank
engaged, as damage to the mechanism could occur. After
emergency landing gear extension, do no move any landing
gear controls or reset any switches or circuit breakers until
airplane is on jacks as failure may have been in the gear up
circuit and gear might retract on the ground.
Landing Gear Retraction after Practice Manual Extension
After practice manual extension of the landing gear, the gear may be
retracted electrically, as follows:
1. Handcrank – CHECK, STOWED
2. Landing Gear Motor Circuit Breaker – IN
3. landing Gear – RETRACT
August 1979
3- 9
Section III
Emergency Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Unlatched Door in Flight
If the cabin door is not locked it may come unlatched in flight. This
may occur during or just after take-off. The door will trail in a position
approximately 3 inches open, but the flight characteristics of the
airplane will not be affected, except that the rate of climb will be
reduced. Return to the field in a normal manner. If practicable,
during the landing flare-out have a passenger hold the door to
prevent it from swinging open.
Spins
Spins are prohibited. If a spin is entered inadvertently:
Immediately move the control column full forward and simultaneously
apply full redder opposite to the direction of the spin; apply full rudder
opposite to the direction of the spin; continue to hold this control
position until rotation stops and then neutralize all controls and
execute a smooth pullout. Ailerons should be neutral and throttle in
idle position at all times during recovery.
Emergency Speed Reduction
In an emergency, the landing gear may be used to create additional
drag. Should disorientation occur under instrument conditions, the
lowering of the landing gear will reduce the tendency for excessive
speed build-up. This procedure would also be appropriate for a noninstrument rated pilot who unavoidably encounters instrument
conditions or in other emergencies such as severe turbulence.
Should the landing gear be used at speeds higher than the maximum
extension speed, a special inspection of the gear doors in
accordance with shop manual procedures is required, with repair as
necessary.
August 1979
3- 10
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
SECTION IV
NORMAL PROCEDURES
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SUBJECT
PAGE
SPEEDS FOR PROPER OPERATION.............................................. 3
PREFLIGHT INSPECTION ................................................................ 4
BEFORE STARTING ......................................................................... 7
EXTERNAL POWER.......................................................................... 7
STARTING ENGINE USING EXTERNAL POWER UNIT.................. 8
STARTING (A33) ............................................................................... 8
STARTING B33.................................................................................. 9
AFTER STARTING AND TAXI ........................................................ 10
BEFORE TAKEOFF......................................................................... 11
TAKEOFF ........................................................................................ 12
CLIMB .............................................................................................. 12
CRUISE ............................................................................................ 12
DESCENT ........................................................................................ 12
BEFORE LANDING ......................................................................... 13
BALKED LANDING ......................................................................... 13
AFTER LANDING ............................................................................ 13
SHUTDOWN .................................................................................... 14
ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS ........................................................ 14
HEATING VENTILATION ...................................................................... 14
COLD WEATHER OPERATION...................................................... 14
August 1979
4-1
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
PREFLIGHT INSPECTION .................................................................... 14
ENGINE ........................................................................................... 15
ICING CONDITIONS ........................................................................ 16
NEW ENGINE BREAK-IN INFORMATION ..................................... 16
August 1979
4-2
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
All airspeeds quoted in this section are indicated airspeeds (IAS)
Speeds for Proper Operation
Take-off
Lift-off
50 ft
Maximum Climb
Best Rate (VY)
Best Angle (VX)
Cruise Climb
Maximum Turbulent Air Penetration
Balked Landing
Landing Approach
Maximum Demonstrated Crosswind
August 1979
68 kts / 78 mph
74 kts / 85 mph
90 kts / 104 mph
75 kts / 86 mph
104 kts / 120 mph
128 kts / 147 mph
61 kts / 70 mph
69 kts / 79 mph
17 kts / 20 mph
4-3
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Preflight Inspection
Emergency Locator Transmitter – ARMED
Location may vary with individual airplanes
1. CABIN
a. Parking Brake – SET
b. Control Lock – REMOVE
c. All Switches – OFF
2. RIGHT FUSELAGE:
a. Baggage Compartment Door – SECURE
b. Static Pressure Button - UNOBSTRUCTED
August 1979
4-4
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
3. EMPENNAGE:
a. Control Surfaces – CHECK
b. Tie Down – REMOVE
c. Position Light – CHECK
4. LEFT FUSELAGE
a. Static Pressure Button – UNOBSTRUCTED
b. All Antennas – CHECK
5. LEFT WING TRAILING EDGE
a. Flap – CHECK
b. Aileron – CHECK
c. Wing Tip – CHECK
d. Position Light – CHECK
6. LEFT WING LEADING EDGE
a. Stall Warning – CHECK
b. Pitot Tube – CHECK (Remove Cover)
c. Fuel Tank(s) – CHECK QUANTITY, Filler Cap(s) –
SECURE
d. Tie Down and Chocks – REMOVE
7. LEFT LANDING GEAR
a. Wheel Well Door, Tire and Strut – CHECK
b. Fuel Vent – CHECK
c. Fuel Sump(s) – CHECK
d. Fuel Selector Valve Sump and Auxiliary Fuel Cell
Interconnect Line – DRAIN (If installed); Cover –
SECURE
August 1979
4-5
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
8. NOSE SECTION:
a. Engine Oil – CHECK (See Servicing, Section 8) Cap and
Dipstick – SECURE
b. Left Cowl – SECURE
c. Propeller – CHECK General Condition, Nicks, etc.
9. RIGHT LANDING GEAR:
a. Fuel Vent – CHECK
b. Fuel Sump(s) – DRAIN
c. Wheel Well Door, Tire and Strut – CHECK
10. RIGHT WING LEADING EDGE:
a. Tie Down and Chocks – REMOVE
b. Fuel Tank(s) – CHECK QUANTITY; Filler Cap(s) –
SECURE
11. RIGHT WING TRAILING EDGE:
a. Position Light – CHECK
b. Wing Tip – CHECK
c. Aileron – CHECK
d. Flap – CHECK
CAUTION
NEVER TAXI IF ANY STRUT IS FLAT
August 1979
4-6
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Before Starting
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Seats – POSITION AND LOCK; Seat Backs – UPRIGHT
Seat Belts – FASTEN
Parking Brake – SET
All Avionics – OFF
Circuit Breakers – IN
Landing Gear Handle – DOWN
Flaps – UP
Light Switches – AS REQUIRED
Fuel Selector Valve – CHECK OPERATION; SELECT LEFT
MAIN TANK (A33) or TANK MORE NEARLY FULL (B33)
10. Battery and Generator Switches – ON (If external pwer is
used, turn Generator Switch – OFF) See Section 7
11. Fuel Quantity Indicators – CHECK QUANTITY
WARNING
Do not take off if gages indicated in yellow arc or with less than 13
gallons in each main tank.
External Power
When using external power, it is very important that the following
precautions be observed:
1. The airplane has a negative ground system. Exercise care to
avoid reversed polarity. Be sure to connect the positive lead of
the external power unit to the positive terminal of the airplane’s
external power receptacle and the negative lead to the negative
terminal of the external power receptacle. A positive voltage
must also be applied to the small guide pin
2. To prevent arcing, made certain no power is being supplied
when the connection is made.
August 1979
4-7
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
3. Make certain that the battery switch is ON, all avionics and
electrical switches OFF, and a battery is in the system before
connecting an external power unit. This protects the voltage
regulators and associated electrical equipment from voltage
transients (power fluctuations.)
Starting Engine Using External Power Unit
1. Battery Switch – ON
2. Generator / Alternator, Electrical, and Avionics Equipment –
OFF
3. Auxiliary Power Unit – CONNECT
4. Auxiliary Power Unit – SET OUTPUT (13.5 to 14.25 volts)
5. Auxiliary Power Unit – ON
6. Engine – START using normal procedures
7. Auxiliary Power Unit – OFF (after engine has bee started)
8. Auxiliary Power Unit – DISCONNECT
9. Generator / Alternator Switch – ON
Starting (A33)
CAUTION
Vernier-type engine controls should not be rotated clockwise after
being advanced to the full forward position.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Mixture – FULL RICH
Propeller – HIGH RPM
Throttle – Approximately ½ inch open
Ignition Switch – BOTH
Auxiliary Fuel Pump – ON (Until fuel pressure stabilizes, then
OFF)
August 1979
4-8
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
6. Starter Button – Press until engine starts
7. In the Event of Overprime Condition:
a.
b.
c.
d.
Mixture – IDLE CUT-OFF
Throttle – OPEN
Starter Button – PRESS
As engine starts reduce throttle to IDLE and advance
mixture to FULL RICH
NOTE
During hot starts, if there is an indication of vapor in the fuel system
(fluctuating fuel pressure), switch the auxiliary fuelpump to ON to
purge the system. Then turn it OFF
8. Throttle – 1000 to 1200 rpm
9. Oil Pressure – CHECK
10. External Power (if used) – DISCONNECT. Battery and
Generator / Alternator Switches – ON
11. All Engine Indicators - CHECK
Starting B33
CAUTION
Vernier-type engine controls should not be rotated clockwise after
being advanced to the full forward position.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Mixture – FULL RICH
Propeller – HIGH RPM
Throttle – Approximately ½ inch open
Ignition Switch – BOTH
Auxiliary Fuel Pump – ON (Until fuel pressure stabilizes, then
OFF)
August 1979
4-9
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
6. Throttle – Approximately ¼ inch open
7. Ignition Switch – START position; release to BOTH when
engine fires
8. In the Event of Overprime Condition:
a.
b.
c.
d.
Mixture – IDLE CUT-OFF
Throttle – OPEN
Ignition Switch – START position
As engine starts reduce throttle to IDLE and advance
mixture to FULL RICH
NOTE
During hot starts, if there is an indication of vapor in the fuel system
(fluctuating fuel pressure), switch the auxiliary fuel pump to ON to
purge the system. Then turn it OFF
9. Throttle – 1000 to 1200 rpm
10. Oil Pressure – CHECK
11. External Power (if used) – DISCONNECT. Battery and
Generator / Alternator Switches – ON
12. All Engine Indicators - CHECK
After Starting and Taxi
1. Brakes – RELEASE AND CHECK
2. Avionics Equipment – ON, AS REQUIRED
3. Lights – AS REQUIRED
CAUTION
Do not operate engine above 1200 RPM until oil temperature
reaches 75° F (24°C).
August 1979
4 - 10
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Before Takeoff
1. Seat Belts – CHECK
NOTE
All reclining seats much be in the upright position during take-off
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Parking Brake – Set
Radios – CHECK
Engine Instruments – CHECK
Flight Instruments – CHECK AND SET
Auxiliary Fuel Pump – CHECK OFF
Throttle – 1900 RPM
Propeller – EXERCISE to obtain 300 to 400 rpm drop: return to
high rpm
9. Magnetos – CHECK at 1900 rpm on each magneto, variance
between individual magnetos should not exceed 50 rpm,
maximum drop not to exceed 100 rpm.
10. Trim – SET
a. Aileron – NEUTRAL
b. Elevator – 0° (3° nose up if only front seats are occupied)
11. Flaps – UP
12. Door and Window – SECURE
13. Controls – CHECK FREEDOM OF MOVEMENT
14. Mixture – FULL RICH (or as required for field elevation)
15. Brakes - RELEASED
16. Instruments – CHECK (Make final check of manifold
pressure, fuel pressure (flow), and rpm at the start of the takeoff run.)
August 1979
4 - 11
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Takeoff
Take-Off Power .............................................. Full Throttle, 2600 RPM
1. Power – SET TAKE-OFF POWER (Mixture – SET as required
by field elevation.)
2. Brakes – RELEAE THEN ACCELERATE to recommended
speeds
3. Landing Gear – RETRACT (when positive rate of climb is
established and insufficient runway remains for landing)
4. Airspeed – ESTABLISH DESIRE CLIMB SPEED (when clear of
obstacles)
Climb
Maximum Continuous..................................... Full Throttle, 2600 RPM
Cruise Climb ................................. 25 in. Hg (or full throttle) 2500 RPM
1. Engine Temperatures – MONITOR
2. Power – SET AS DESIRED
3. Mixture – SET FUEL FLOW/PRESSURE
Cruise
See Cruise Charts in PERFORMANCE Section
1. Power – SET
2. Mixture – SET FUEL FLOW/PRESSURE
Descent
1. Altimeter – SET
2. Power – AS REQUIRED (avoid prolonged idle settings and low
cylinder heat temperatures
3. Mixture – ENRICH AS REQUIRED
August 1979
4 - 12
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Before Landing
1. Seat Belts – SECURE
NOTE
All reclining seats must be in the upright position during landing.
2. Fuel Selector Valve – SELECT MAIN TANK MORE NEARLY
FULL
3. Mixture – FULL RICH (or as required by field elevation)
4. Landing Gear – DOWN and CHECK (Observe maximum
extension speed)
5. Landing Light – AS REQUIRED
6. Flaps – DOWN (Observe maximum extension speed)
7. Airspeed – ESTABLISH LANDING APPROACH SPEED
8. Propeller – HIGH RPM
Balked Landing
1. Power – FULL THROTTLE, 2600 RP<
2. Airspeed – 61 kts / 70 mph until clear of obstacles, then trim to
normal climb speed
3. Landing Gear – UP
4. Flaps - UP
After Landing
1. Landing Light – AS REQUIRED
2. Flaps – UP
3. Trim Tab – SET to 0°
August 1979
4 - 13
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Shutdown
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Brakes – SET
Electrical and Radio Equipment – OFF
Throttle – CLOSE
Mixture – IDLE CUT-OFF
Ignition Switch – OFF, after engine stops
Battery and Generator Switches – OFF
Control Lock – INSTALL, in conditions warrant
Install wheel chocks and release brakes if he airplane is to be
left unattended.
Environmental Systems
Heating ventilation
Refer to the SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION Section for operation of
heating and ventilation controls.
Cold Weather Operation
Preflight Inspection
All accumulations of ice, snow and frost must be removed from the
wings, tail, control surfaces and hinges propeller, windshield, fuel cell
filler caps, crankcase vents and fuel vents. If such accumulations are
not removed completely, the airplane shall not be flown. The
deposits will not blow off in flight. While an adverse weight factor is
clearly involved in the case of heavy deposits, it is less obvious that
even slight accumulations will disturb or completely destroy the
designed aerodynamic properties of the airfoils.
The normal preflight procedures should be completed, with particular
attention give to check of flight controls for complete freedom of
movement.
August 1979
4 - 14
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Engine
Use engine oil in accordance with Consumable Materials in the
HANDLING, SERVICING AND MAINTENANCE Section. Always pull
the propeller through by hand, opposite the direction of rotation,
several times to “limber up” the cold, heavy oil before using the
starter. This will also lessen the load on the battery if external power
is not used.
Under very cold conditions, it may be necessary to preheat the
engine prior to a start. Particular attention should be given to the oil
cooler, engine sump and propeller hub to ensure proper preheat. A
start with congealed oil in the system may produce an indication of
normal pressure immediately after start, but then the oil pressure may
decrease when the residual oil in the engine is pumped back with
congealed oil in the sump. If an engine heater capable of heating
both the engine sump and cooler is not available, the oil should be
drained while the engine is hot and stored in a warm area until the
next flight.
If there is no oil pressure within the first 30 seconds of running, or if
oil pressure drops after a few minutes of ground operation, shut down
and check for broken oil lines, oil cooler leaks or the possibility of
congealed oil.
NOTE
It is advisable to use external power for starting in cold weather
During warm-up, monitor engine temperatures closely, since it is
quite possible to exceed the cylinder head temperature limit in trying
to bring up the oil temperature.
August 1979
4 - 15
Section IV
Normal Procedures
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Exercise the propeller several times to remove cold oil from the pitch
change mechanism.
The propeller should also be cycled
occasionally in flight.
During the letdown and landing, give special attention to engine
temperatures, since the engine will have a tendency toward
overcooling.
Icing Conditions
Flight into Known Icing Conditions Prohibited
New Engine Break-in Information
See Systems Description section
August 1979
4 - 16
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
PERFORMANCE
SECTION V
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SUBJECT
PAGE
INTRODUCTION TO PERFORMANCE AND FLIGHT PLANNING
CONDITIONS............................................................................................... 3
COMMENTS PERTINENT TO THE USE OF PERFORMANCE
CHARTS........................................................................................................ 9
AIRSPEED CALIBRATION – NORMAL SYSTEM............................. 10
ALTIMETER CORRECTION – NORMAL SYSTEM ......................... 11
TEMPERATURE CONVERSION ........................................................... 12
ISA CONVERSION.................................................................................... 13
STALL SPEEDS – POWER IDLE ........................................................... 14
WIND COMPONENTS ............................................................................. 15
TAKE-OFF DISTANCE ............................................................................ 16
CLIMB ......................................................................................................... 18
TIME, FUEL AND DISTANCE TO CLIMB .......................................... 19
CRUISE POWER SETTINGS .................................................................. 20
75% MAXIMUM CONTINUOUS POWER (OR FULL THROTTLE)........................ 20
65% MAXIMUM CONTINOUS POWER (OR FULL THROTTLE)..... 21
55% MAXIMUM CONTINOUS POWER (OR FULL THROTTLE)..... 22
45% MCP (OR FULL THROTTLE) ........................................................ 23
CRUISE SPEEDS ....................................................................................... 24
MANIFOLD PRESSURES VERSUS RPM ............................................. 25
FUEL FLOW VERSUS BRAKE HORSEPOWER ................................ 26
FUEL FLOW VS FUEL PRESSURE....................................................... 27
August 1979
5-1
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
RANGE PROFILE – 74 GALLONS......................................................... 28
RANGE PROFILE – 63 GALLONS......................................................... 29
RANGE PROFILE – 44 GALLONS......................................................... 30
ENDURANCE PROFILE – 74 GALLONS ............................................. 31
ENDURANCE PROFILE – 63 GALLONS ............................................. 32
ENDURANCE PROFILE – 44 GALLONS ............................................. 33
LANDING DISTANCE.............................................................................. 34
August 1979
5-2
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Introduction to Performance and Flight Planning Conditions
The graphs and tables in this section present performance
information for light planning at various parameters of weight, power,
altitude and temperature. Examples have been presented on all
performance graphs. In addition, the calculations for flight time block
speed and fuel required for a proposed flight are detailed below. All
examples and calculations utilize the conditions below:
CONDITIONS
At Denver
Outside Air Temperature
Field Elevation
Altimeter Setting
Wind
Runway 26 Length
15° C (59° F)
5330 feet
29.60 inches Hg
270° at 10 knots
10,010 feet
Route of Flight
*DEN – V-81 – AMA
For VFR Cruise at 11,500 feet
Route
Segment
Mag
Course
Dist NM
DEN-COS
COS-PUB
PUB-TBE
TBE- DHT
DHT - AMA
161°
153°
134°
132°
125°
55
40
74
87
65
Wind,
11,500’
Dir/Kts
010 / 30
010 / 30
100 / 20
200 / 20
200 / 20
OAT
11,500
°C
-5
-5
0
9
10
Alt
Setting
In Hg
29.60
29.60
29.56
29.56
29.56
* Reference – Low Altitude Chart L-6
August 1979
5-3
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
At Amarillo
Outside Air Temperature
Field Elevation
Altimeter Setting
Wind
Runway 21 Length
25° C (77° F)
3605 feet
29.56 inches Hg
150° at 10 knots
13,500 feet
To determine the pressure altitude at origin and destination, airports,
add 100 feet to field elevation for each .1 Hg below 29.92 and
subtract 100 feet from field elevation for each .1 Hg above 29.92.
Pressure Altitude at DEN
29.92 – 29.60 = .32 in Hg
The pressure altitude at DEN is 320 feet above field elevation.
5330 + 320 = 5650 feet
Pressure Altitude at AMA
29.92 – 29.56 = .36 in Hg
The pressure altitude at AMA is 360 feet above field elevation.
3605 + 360 = 3965 feet
NOTE
For flight planning, the difference between cruise altitude and
cruise pressure altitude has been ignored.
Calculations for flight time, block speed, and fuel requirement:
August 1979
5-4
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
CRUISE CLIMB
Enter the graph for TIME, FUEL AND DISTANCE to climb at 15°C
and 5650 feet and 3,000 lbs. Enter at -5°C to 11,500 feet and to
3,000 pounds. Read
Time to climb = (21 – 8.5) = 12.5 minutes
Fuel used to climb = (5.8 – 2.4) = 3.4 gallons
Distance traveled = (39 – 15) = 24 nautical miles
The cruise power setting is assumed to be 2450 RPM. Since cruise
at 11,500 requires full throttle, the manifold pressure and fuel flow
should be read from either the cruise power setting table for 75% or
65% maximum continuous power.
The temperatures for cruise are presented for a standard day (ISA)
20°C (36°F) above a standard day (ISA+20°C) and 20°C (36°F)
below a standard day (ISA-20°C). These should be used for flight
planning. The IOAT are true temperature values which have been
adjusted for compressibility effects. IOAT should be used for setting
cruise power while enroute.
Enter the graph for ISA conversion at 11,500 and the temperature for
the route segment.
DEN – PUB
OAT
ISA Condition
=
=
-5°C
ISA + 3°C
PUB – TBE
OAT
ISA Condition
=
=
0°C
ISA + 8°C
TBE – DHT
OAT
ISA Condition
=
=
9°C
ISA + 17°C
DHT – AMA
OAT
ISA Condition
=
=
10°C
ISA + 18°C
August 1979
5-5
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Enter the cruise power settings table for 75% maximum continuous
power (or full throttle) at 10,000 and 12,000 feet ISA and ISA + 20°C.
TEMPERATURE
ISA
ALTITUDE MANIFOLD
FEET
PRESSURE
In Hg.
10,000
12,000
20.1
18.6
ISA + 20°C
FUEL
FLOW
GPH
TAS
KNOTS
MANIFOLD
PRESSURE
In Hg.
FUEL
FLOW
GPH
TAS
KNOTS
12.0
11.1
155
152
20.1
18.6
11.2
10.5
154
151
Interpolate for 11,500 ft and the temperature for the appropriate route
segment. Results of the interpolations are:
ROUTE
SEGMENT
DEN – PUB
PUB – TBE
TBE – DHT
DHT – AMA
MANIFOLD
PRESSURE
In Hg.
18.9
18.9
18.9
18.9
FUEL FLOW
GPH
11.2
11.1
10.8
10.7
TAS
KNOTS
153
152
152
152
NOTE
The above are exact values for the assumed conditions.
August 1979
5-6
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Time and fuel used were calculated as follows:
Time = Distance / Groundspeed
Fuel Used = (Time) X (Fuel Flow)
ROUTE
SEGMENT
DISTANCE
NM
DEN – COS
COS - PUB
PUB – TBE
TBE – DHT
DHT – AMA
* 31
40
74
87
65
EST
GROUND
SPEED
KNOTS
181
180
138
141
143
TIME AT
CRUISE
ALTITUDE
HRS:MIN
0:10
0:13
0:32
0:37
0:27
FUEL
USED FOR
CRUISE
(GAL)
1.9
2.4
5.9
6.7
4.8
* Distance required to climb has been subtracted from route segment.
TIME -- FUEL -- DISTANCE
ITEM
Start, runup
taxi, and takeoff
acceleration
Climb
Cruise
Total
August 1979
TIME
HRS:MIN
0:00
FUEL (GAL)
1.7
DISTANCE
NM
0
0:13
1:59
2:12
3.4
21.7
26.8
24
297
321
5-7
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Flight Time: 2 hours and 12 minutes
Block speed: 321 nm divided by 2 hours 12 minutes = 146 knots
Reserve fuel (45 minutes at 45% maximum continuous power)
Enter the cruise power settings table for 45% MCP (or full throttle).
The fuel flow for 45% MCP is 8.3 gallons per hour.
Reserve fuel = (45 minutes) X (8.3 gph) = 6.2 gallons.
Total fuel = 26.8 gallons + 6.2 gallons = 33.0 gallons
The estimated landing weight is determined by subtracting the fuel
required from the trip from the ramp weight:
Assumed ramp weight = 3010 pounds
Estimated fuel from DEN to AMA = (26.8 gal) X (6 lb/gal) = 161 lbs
Estimated landing weight = 3010 lbs – 161 lbs = 2849 lbs
Examples have been provided on the performance charts. The
above conditions have been used throughout. Rate of climb was
determined for the initial cruise altitude conditions.
August 1979
5-8
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Comments Pertinent to the Use of Performance Charts
1. The example, in addition to presenting an answer for a
particular set of conditions, also presents the order in which the
graphs should normally be used, i.e., if the first item in the
example is OAT, then enter the graph at the known OAT
2. The reference lines indicate where to begin following
guidelines. Always project to the reference line first, then follow
the guidelines to the next known item.
3. Indicated airspeeds (IAS) were obtained by using the
AIRSPEED CALIBRATION NORMAL SYSTEM graph.
4. The associated conditions define the specific conditions from
which the performance parameters have been determined.
They are not intended to be used as instructions, however,
performance values determined from the charts can only be
achieved if the specified conditions exist.
5. The full amount of usable fuel is available for all approved flight
conditions.
August 1979
5-9
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Airspeed calibration – normal system
Note – airspeed calibration assumes zero instrument error
EXAMPLE
IAS
Flaps
CAS
August 1979
90 knots (104 mph)
Down
88 knots (101 mph)
5 - 10
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
ALTIMETER CORRECTION – NORMAL SYSTEM
Note – Indicated airspeed and indicated altitude assume zero instrument error.
EXAMPLE
IAS
112 knots FLAPS Up
Indicated Pressure Altitude 5,000 ft
Altimeter Correction -10 feet
Actual Pressure Altitude 5,000 ft – 10 ft = 4090 ft
August 1979
5 - 11
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
TEMPERATURE CONVERSION
August 1979
5 - 12
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
ISA CONVERSION
PRESSURE ALTITUDE VRS OUTSIDE AIR TEMPERATURE
August 1979
5 - 13
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
STALL SPEEDS – POWER IDLE
Note:
1. The maximum altitude loss experienced
while conducting stalls in accordance with
CAM 3120 was 200 feet
2. A normal stall recovery technique may be used
Example:
Weight:
2600 lbs
Flaps:
Up
Angle of bank 30°
Stall speed – 62 knots
August 1979
5 - 14
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
WIND COMPONENTS
Demonstrated Crosswind Component is 17 knots
Example
Wind Speed
Angle between wind direction and flight path
Headwind Component
Crosswind Component
August 1979
20 knots
60°
13 knots
26 knots
5 - 15
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
TAKE-OFF DISTANCE
Associated Conditions:
Power:
Full Throttle, 2600 RPM
Mixture:
Lean to appropriate fuel flow
Flaps
Up
Landing gear Retract after positive climb
established
Takeoff speed
Weight
–
Lift off
50 ft
pounds Knots
Mph
Knots Mph
3,000
67
77
73
85
2,800
66
76
71
82
2,600
64
74
70
81
2,400
63
73
68
78
Example:
OAT:
15°C
Pressure Altitude 5650 ft
Takeoff weight 3,000 lbs
Headwind component 9.5 knots
Solution
Ground roll 1950 ft
Total distance over a 50’ obstacle 3200 ft
Take off speed at liftoff 67 knots
Speed at 50 ft 73 knots
Continued on next page
August 1979
5 - 16
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
TAKE-OFF DISTANCE (CONTINUED)
August 1979
5 - 17
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
CLIMB
Climb Speed 90 knots IAS) all weights
Associated Conditions:
Power:
Full Throttle, 2600 RPM
Mixture:
Lean to appropriate fuel flow
Flaps
Up
Landing gear Up
August 1979
Example:
OAT:
-5°C
Pressure Altitude 11,500 ft
Weight 3,000 lbs
Solution
Rate of Climb 420 ft per min
Climb Gradient 3.9%t
Climb Speed 90 knots
5 - 18
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
TIME, FUEL AND DISTANCE TO CLIMB
Associated Conditions:
Power:
25” Hg or Full Throttle,
2600 RPM
Mixture:
Lean to appropriate fuel flow
Fuel Density 6 lb / gal
p
August 1979
Example:
OAT: at takeoff
-15°C
OAT: at cruise
-5°C
Airport Pressure Altitude 5,500 ft
Cruise Pressure Altitude 11,500 ft
Initial Climb Weight 3,000 lbs
Solution
Time to Climb (25 – 11) 14 min
Fuel to Climb (6.5 – 3) 3.5 gal
Distance to Climb (41 - 15) 26 NM
5 - 19
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
CRUISE POWER SETTINGS
75% maximum continuous power (or full throttle)
@ AVERAGE CRUISE WEIGHT – 2,800 POUNDS
PRESS
ALT.
FEET
SL
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
16000
°F
26
19
12
5
-1
-9
-18
-23
-31
°C
-3
-7
-11
-15
-19
-23
-27
-31
-35
SL
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
16000
63
56
49
42
35
27
20
13
5
17
13
9
5
1
-3
-7
-11
-15
SL
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
16000
99
92
85
78
71
63
56
49
41
37
33
29
25
21
17
13
9
5
OAT
ISA - 36°F (-20°C)
ENGINE
MAN
FUEL
SPEED PRESS
FLOW
RPM
IN HG
PSI
GPH
2450
23.4
7.4
13.4
2450
22.9
7.4
13.4
2450
22.4
7.4
13.4
2450
21.8
7.4
13.4
2450
21.3
7.4
13.4
2450
20.1
6.7
12.7
2450
18.6
6.0
11.8
2450
17.3
5.4
10.9
2450
16.0
4.9
10.1
STANDARD DAY (ISA)
2450
24.0
7.4
13.4
2450
23.4
7.4
13.4
2450
22.8
7.4
13.4
2450
22.2
7.4
13.4
2450
21.6
6.9
12.9
2450
20.1
6.2
12.0
2450
18.6
5.5
11.1
2450
17.3
5.0
10.3
2450
16
4.6
9.6
ISA -+36°F (+20°C)
2450
24.5
7.4
13.4
2450
24
7.4
13.4
2450
23.5
7.4
13.4
2450
23.1
7.2
13.2
2450
21.7
6.3
12.1
2450
20.1
5.8
11.2
2450
118.6
5.1
10.5
2450
17.3
4.7
9.7
2450
16.0
4.4
9.1
TAS
KTS
145
148
141
153
156
156
153
150
146
MPH
167
170
173
176
180
179
177
173
168
148
151
154
157
157
155
152
149
144
171
174
177
180
181
179
176
171
166
152
154
157
159
158
154
151
148
140
174
178
181
183
180
177
173
169
161
NOTES
1. Full throttle manifold pressure settings are approximate.
2. Shaded area represents operation with full throttle.
August 1979
5 - 20
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
65% MAXIMUM CONTINOUS POWER (OR FULL THROTTLE)
@ AVERAGE CRUISE WEIGHT – 2,800 POUNDS
PRESS
ALT.
FEET
SL
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
16000
°F
26
19
12
5
-1
-9
-18
-23
-31
°C
-3
-7
-11
-15
-19
-23
-27
-31
-35
SL
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
16000
63
56
49
42
35
27
20
13
5
17
13
9
5
1
-3
-7
-11
-15
SL
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
16000
99
92
85
78
71
63
56
49
41
37
33
29
25
21
17
13
9
5
OAT
ISA - 36°F (-20°C)
ENGINE
MAN
FUEL
SPEED PRESS
FLOW
RPM
IN HG
PSI
GPH
2450
21.2
5.8
11.5
2450
20.7
5.8
11.5
2450
20.3
5.8
11.5
2450
19.8
5.8
11.5
2450
19.4
5.8
11.5
2450
18.9
5.8
11.5
2450
18.5
5.8
11.5
2450
17.3
5.4
10.9
2450
16.0
4.9
11.1
STANDARD DAY (ISA)
2450
21.7
5.8
11.5
2450
21.3
5.8
11.5
2450
20.8
5.8
11.5
2450
20.4
5.8
11.5
2450
19.9
5.8
11.5
2450
19.5
5.8
11.5
2450
18.8
5.5
11.1
2450
17.3
5.0
10.3
2450
16.0
4.6
9.6
ISA -+36°F (+20°C)
2450
22.3
5.8
11.5
2450
21.8
5.8
11.5
2450
21.4
5.8
11.5
2450
20.9
5.8
11.5
2450
20.4
5.8
11.5
2450
20.0
5.6
11.2
2450
18.6
5.4
10.5
2450
17.3
4.7
9.7
2450
16.0
4.4
9.1
TAS
KTS
136
139
142
144
147
149
152
150
146
MPH
157
160
163
166
169
172
175
173
169
140
142
145
147
150
152
152
149
144
161
164
166
169
172
175
175
171
166
143
145
148
150
153
154
151
146
140
164
167
170
173
176
177
173
168
161
NOTES
1. Full throttle manifold pressure settings are approximate.
2. Shaded area represents operation with full throttle.
August 1979
5 - 21
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
55% MAXIMUM CONTINOUS POWER (OR FULL THROTTLE)
@ AVERAGE CRUISE WEIGHT – 2,800 POUNDS
PRESS
ALT.
FEET
SL
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
16000
°F
26
19
12
5
-1
-9
-18
-23
-31
°C
-3
-7
-11
-15
-19
-23
-27
-31
-35
SL
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
16000
63
56
49
42
35
27
20
13
5
17
13
9
5
1
-3
-7
-11
-15
SL
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
16000
99
92
85
78
71
63
56
49
41
37
33
29
25
21
17
13
9
5
OAT
ISA - 36°F (-20°C)
ENGINE
MAN
FUEL
SPEED PRESS
FLOW
RPM
IN HG
PSI
GPH
2300
20.2
4.7
9.8
2300
19.7
4.7
9.8
2300
19.2
4.7
9.8
2300
18.7
4.7
9.8
2300
18.2
4.7
9.8
2300
17.8
4.7
9.8
2300
17.3
4.7
9.8
2300
16.8
4.7
9.8
2300
16.2
4.4
9.2
STANDARD DAY (ISA)
2300
20.7
4.7
9.8
2300
20.3
4.7
9.8
2300
19.8
4.7
9.8
2300
19.3
4.7
9.8
2300
18.8
4.7
9.8
2300
18.3
4.7
9.8
2300
17.9
4.7
9.8
2300
17.3
4.6
9.5
2300
16.2
4.3
8.9
ISA -+36°F (+20°C)
2300
21.1
4.7
9.8
2300
20.7
4.7
9.8
2300
20.2
4.7
9.8
2300
19.8
4.7
9.8
2300
19.3
4.7
9.8
2300
18.8
4.7
9.8
2300
18.4
4.6
9.6
2300
17.3
4.3
9.0
2300
16.2
4.1
8.5
TAS
KTS
127
129
131
133
136
138
140
142
138
MPH
146
149
151
154
156
159
161
163
159
130
132
134
136
138
140
142
142
138
149
152
154
157
159
162
164
163
157
132
134
136
139
141
143
143
138
130
152
155
157
159
162
164
164
159
150
NOTES
1. Full throttle manifold pressure settings are approximate.
2. Shaded area represents operation with full throttle.
August 1979
5 - 22
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
45% MCP (OR FULL THROTTLE)
@ AVERAGE CRUISE WEIGHT – 2,800 POUNDS
PRESS
ALT.
FEET
SL
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
16000
°F
26
19
12
5
-1
-9
-18
-23
-31
°C
-3
-7
-11
-15
-19
-23
-27
-31
-35
SL
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
16000
63
56
49
42
35
27
20
13
5
17
13
9
5
1
-3
-7
-11
-15
SL
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
16000
99
92
85
78
71
63
56
49
41
37
33
29
25
21
17
13
9
5
OAT
ISA - 36°F (-20°C)
ENGINE
MAN
FUEL
SPEED PRESS
FLOW
RPM
IN HG
PSI
GPH
2100
20.0
4.0
8.3
2100
19.5
4.0
8.3
2100
19.1
4.0
8.3
2100
18.6
4.0
8.3
2100
18.2
4.0
8.3
2100
17.7
4.0
8.3
2100
17.3
4.0
8.3
2100
16.8
4.0
8.3
2100
16.0
3.8
7.5
STANDARD DAY (ISA)
2100
20.4
4.0
8.3
2100
19.9
4.0
8.3
2100
19.5
4.0
8.3
2100
19.1
4.0
8.3
2100
18.7
4.0
8.3
2100
18.2
4.0
8.3
2100
17.8
4.0
8.3
2100
17.3
4.0
8.2
2100
16.0
3.8
7.8
ISA -+36°F (+20°C)
2100
20.9
4.0
8.3
2100
20.5
4.0
8.3
2100
20.0
4.0
8.3
2100
19.5
4.0
8.3
2100
19.1
4.0
8.3
2100
18.6
4.0
8.3
2100
18.2
4.0
8.3
2100
17.3
3.8
7.6
2100
16.0
3.7
7.5
TAS
KTS
115
117
119
120
122
123
124
125
119
MPH
133
134
136
138
140
142
143
144
137
117
119
121
122
123
125
126
124
113
135
137
139
140
142
143
145
143
130
119
121
122
124
125
126
126
116
--
137
139
141
142
144
145
145
134
--
NOTES
1. Full throttle manifold pressure settings are approximate.
2. Shaded area represents operation with full throttle.
August 1979
5 - 23
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Cruise Speeds
ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS
AVERGE CRUISE WEIGHT 2800lbs
TEMPERATURE
STANDARD DAY ISA
EXAMPLE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE
11,500 FEET
POWER SETTING
FULL THROTTLE
2450 RPM
TRUE AIRSPEED
153 KNOTS
A – 101.3 BHP – 2100 RPM (45%)
B – 123.8 BHP – 2300 RPM (55%)
C – 146.3 BHP – 2450 RPM (65%)
D – 168.8 BHP – 2450 RPM (75%)
August 1979
5 - 24
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Manifold Pressures versus RPM
EXAMPLE
ENGINE SPEED
MANIFOLD PRESSURE
WITHIN LIMITS
August 1979
2450 RPM
18.9 IN. HG
5 - 25
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Fuel Flow versus Brake Horsepower
.EXAMPLE
1. BRAKE HORSEPOWER
CONDITION
FUEL FLOW
2. FUEL FLOW
CONDITION
BRAKE HORSEPOWER
August 1979
146.3
(65% MCP)
LEVEL FLIGHT
CRUISE LEAN
11.4 GAL / HR
11.0 GAL / HR
LEVEL FLIGHT
CRUISE LEAN
141
5 - 26
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Fuel Flow vs Fuel Pressure
EXAMPLE
FUEL PRESSURE 5.2 PSI
FUEL FLOW
10.6 GAL / HR
August 1979
5 - 27
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Range Profile – 74 Gallons
STANDARD DAY ISA
ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS
WEIGHT 3010 BEFORE ENGINE START
FUEL AVIATION GASOLINE
FUEL DENSITY 6.0 LBS/GAL
INITIAL FULE LOADING 74 US GAL (444
LBS.)
August 1979
NOTE:
RANGE INCLUES START,
TAXI, AND CLIMB:
EXAMPLE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE 11,500 FT
POWER SETTING FULL THROTTLE
2450 RPM
RANGE 860 NM
5 - 28
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Range Profile – 63 Gallons
STANDARD DAY ISA
ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS
WEIGHT 3010 BEFORE ENGINE START
FUEL AVIATION GASOLINE
FUEL DENSITY 6.0 LBS/GAL
INITIAL FULE LOADING 63 US GAL (378
LBS.)
August 1979
NOTE:
RANGE INCLUES START,
TAXI, AND CLIMB:
EXAMPLE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE 11,500 FT
POWER SETTING FULL THROTTLE
2450 RPM
RANGE 707 NM
5 - 29
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Range Profile – 44 Gallons
STANDARD DAY ISA
ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS
WEIGHT 3010 BEFORE ENGINE START
FUEL AVIATION GASOLINE
FUEL DENSITY 6.0 LBS/GAL
INITIAL FULE LOADING 44 US GAL (264
LBS.)
August 1979
NOTE:
RANGE INCLUES START,
TAXI, AND CLIMB:
EXAMPLE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE 11,500 FT
POWER SETTING FULL THROTTLE
2450 RPM
RANGE 444 NM
5 - 30
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Endurance Profile – 74 Gallons
STANDARD DAY ISA
ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS
WEIGHT 3010 BEFORE ENGINE START
FUEL AVIATION GASOLINE
FUEL DENSITY 6.0 LBS/GAL
INITIAL FULE LOADING 74 US GAL (444
LBS.)
August 1979
NOTE:
ENDURANCE INCLUES
START, TAXI, AND CLIMB
WITH 45 MINUTES
RESERVE AT 45% MCP:
EXAMPLE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE 11,500 FT
POWER SETTING FULL THROTTLE
2450 RPM
ENDURANCE 4.7 HOURS
4 HOURS 42 MIN
5 - 31
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Endurance Profile – 63 Gallons
STANDARD DAY ISA
ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS
WEIGHT 3010 BEFORE ENGINE START
FUEL AVIATION GASOLINE
FUEL DENSITY 6.0 LBS/GAL
INITIAL FULE LOADING 63 US GAL (378
LBS.)
August 1979
NOTE:
ENDURANCE INCLUES
START, TAXI, AND CLIMB
WITH 45 MINUTES
RESERVE AT 45% MCP:
EXAMPLE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE 11,500 FT
POWER SETTING FULL THROTTLE
2450 RPM
ENDURANCE 4.7 HOURS
4 HOURS 42 MIN
5 - 32
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Endurance Profile – 44 Gallons
STANDARD DAY ISA
ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS
WEIGHT 3010 BEFORE ENGINE START
FUEL AVIATION GASOLINE
FUEL DENSITY 6.0 LBS/GAL
INITIAL FULE LOADING 44 US GAL (264
LBS.)
August 1979
NOTE:
ENDURANCE INCLUES
START, TAXI, AND CLIMB
WITH 45 MINUTES
RESERVE AT 45% MCP:
EXAMPLE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE 11,500 FT
POWER SETTING FULL THROTTLE
2450 RPM
ENDURANCE 3.02 HOURS
3 HOURS 1 MIN
5 - 33
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Landing Distance
ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS
POWER
RETARDED TO MAINTAIN 900
FT. MIN ON FINAL APPROACH
FLAPS
DOWN
LANDING GEAR DOWN
RUNWAY
PAVED, LEVEL, DRY SURFACE
BRAKING
MAXIMUM
EXAMPLE
OAT
PRESSURE ALTITUDE
WEIGHT
WIND COMPONENT
GROUND ROLL
TOTAL OVER A 50-FOOT OBSTACLE
APPROACH SPEED
SPEED AT 50 FT
WEIGHT IN
POUNDS
3000
2800
2600
2400
2300
KNOTS
69
67
65
64
63
MPH
79
77
75
74
73
25°C (77°F)
3965 FT
2849 POUNDS
9.0 KNOTS (HEADWIND)
1150 FT
1775 FT
67 KNOTS (77 MPH)
Continued on next page
August 1979
5 - 34
Section V
Performance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Landing Distance (continued)
August 1979
5 - 35
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
SECTION VI
WEIGHT AND BALANCE / EQUIPMENT LIST
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SUBJECT
PAGE
WEIGHING INSTRUCTIONS ............................................................. 3
BASIC EMPTY WEIGHT AND BALANCE ........................................ 5
WEIGHT AND BALANCE RECORD ................................................. 7
LOADING INSTRUCTIONS ............................................................... 8
SEATING, BAGGAGE AND EQUIPMENT ARRANGEMENTS ........ 9
CENTER OF GRAVITY.................................................................... 10
MOMENT LIMITS VS. WEIGHT....................................................... 11
COMPUTING PROCEDURE ................................................................. 15
SAMPLE WEIGHT AND BALANCE LOADING FORM .................. 17
WEIGHT AND BALANCE LOADING FORM................................... 18
USEFUL LOAD WEIGHTS AND MOMENTS .................................. 19
OCCUPANTS................................................................................ 19
BAGGAGE .................................................................................... 19
CARGO (WITH REAR SEAT REMOVED)............................................. 20
USABLE FUEL .............................................................................. 21
AUXILLIARY WING TANKS .......................................................... 21
OIL * .............................................................................................. 21
EQUIPMENT LIST (PROVIDED FOR EACH AIRPLANE) .............. 21
August 1979
6-1
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
August 1979
6-2
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Weighing Instructions
Periodic weighing of the airplane may be required to keep the Basic
Empty Weight current. All changes to the airplane affecting weight
and balance are the responsibility of the airplane’s operator.
1. Three jack points are provided for weighing: two on the wing
front spar at Fuselage Station 83.1 and one on the aft fuselage
at Fuselage Station 271.0
2. Fuel should be drained preparatory to weighing. Tanks are
drained from the regular drain ports with the airplane in static
ground attitude. When tanks are drained, 1.5 pounds of
undrainable fuel remain in the airplane at Fuselage Station
76.0. The remained of the unusable fuel to be added to a
drained system is 34.5 pounds at Fuselage Station 79.1 and 5
pounds at Fuselage Station 94.0 for airplanes with auxiliary
tanks installed.
3. Engine oil must be at the full level or completely drained. Total
engine oil when full is 22 pounds at Fuselage Station 25.3
(Includes 3 pounds of undrainable oil.)
4. To determine airplane configuration at time of weighing,
installed equipment is checked against the equipment list or
superseding forms. All installed equipment must be in its
proper place during weighing.
5. At the time of weighing, the airplane must be level both
longitudinally and laterally, and the landing gear must be fully
extended. Leveling screws are located on the left side of the
fuselage at approximately Fuselage Station 152.5.
Longitudinally level attitude is determined with a plumb bob.
Laterally level attitude is obtained when the vertical distance
from each wing tip to the floor is equal.
August 1979
6-3
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
6. Measurement of the reaction arms for a wheel weighing is
made using a steel measuring tape. Measurements are taken,
with the airplane level on the scales, from the reference (a
plumb bob dropped from the center of either main jack point to
the axle center line of the main gear and them to the nose
wheel axle center line. The main wheel axle center line is best
located by stretching a string across from one main wheel to
the other. All measurements are to be taken with the tape level
with the hangar floor and parallel to the fuselage center line.
The locations of the wheel reactions will be approximately at
Fuselage Station 96.7 for the main wheels and Fuselage
Station 12.7 for the nose wheel.
7. Jack point weighings are accomplished by placing scales at the
jack points specified in step 1 above. Since the center of
gravity of the airplane is forward of Fuselage Station 83.1, the
tail reaction of the airplane will be in an up direction. This can
be measured on regular scales by placing ballast of
approximately 200 pounds on the scales and attached to the aft
weighing point by cable of adjustable length. The up reaction
will then be total ballast weight minus the scale reading and is
entered in the weighing form as a negative quantity.
August 1979
6-4
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
BASIC EMPTY WEIGHT AND BALANCE
DEBONAIR SER. NO __________REG. NO.___________DATE_________
STRUT POSITION
EXTENDED
COMPRESSED
NOSE
MAIN
JACK POINT
LOC.
11.8
13.1
96
97
FORWARD
AFT
PREPARED BY
83.1
271.0
COMPANY
SIGNATURE
REACTION WHEELSCALE
TARE
NET
ARM
MOMENT
JACK POINTS
READING
WEIGHT
LEFT MAIN
RIGHT MAIN
NOSE OR TAIL
TOTAL (AS
WEIGHED)
Space below provided for additions and subtractions to “as weighed” condition
EMPTY WEIGHT
(DRY
ENGINE OIL
UNUSABLE FUEL
WITH AUX TANKS
INSTALLED
BASIC EMPTIY
WEIGHT
August 1979
22
36
5
79
94
557
2844
470
6-5
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
BASIC EMPTY WEIGHT AND BALANCE
DEBONAIR SER. NO CD-229
STRUT POSITION
EXTENDED
COMPRESSED
REG. NO
.N334Z
NOSE
MAIN
JACK POINT
LOC.
11.8
13.1
96
97
FORWARD
AFT
DATE July 31, 1979
PREPARED BY
83.1
271.0
Lancaster
Aviation
REACTION WHEELSCALE
TARE
NET
ARM
MOMENT
JACK POINTS
READING
WEIGHT
LEFT MAIN
932
76.6
90031.2
RIGHT MAIN
944
96.6
91190.4
NOSE OR TAIL
488
12.5
6100.0
TOTAL (AS
2363
187321.6
WEIGHED)
Space below provided for additions and subtractions to “as weighed” condition
AC weighed with full fuel and oil
Usable fuel main 44 gal
- 264
75.0
-19800
Aux 19.8 gal
- 114
93.9
- 10700
EMPTY WEIGHT
(DRY
ENGINE OIL
UNUSABLE FUEL
WITH AUX TANKS
INSTALLED
BASIC EMPTIY
WEIGHT
August 1979
1985
79.0
156821.6
6-6
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
WEIGHT AND BALANCE RECORD
SERIAL. NO __________REGISTRATION NO.________PAGE NO.__________
DATE
ITEM NO.
IN
August 1979
OUT
DESCRIPTION
OF ARTICLE
OR CHANGE
WEIGHT CHANGE
WT
(LBS)
ARM
(IN)
MOM
(100)
RUNNING BASIC
EMPTY WEIGHT
WT (LBS
MOM
(100)
6-7
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
NOTE
Each new airplane is delivered with a completed sample loading
empty weight and center of gravity, and equipment list, all pertinent to
that specific airplane. It is the owner’s responsibility to ensure that
changes in equipment are reflected in anew weight and balance and
in an addendum to the equipment list. There are many ways of doing
this; it is suggested that a running tally of equipment changes and
their effect on empty weight and c.g. is a suitable means of meeting
both requirements.
The current equipment list and empty weight and c.g. information
must be retained with the airplane when it changes ownership.
Beech Aircraft Corporation cannot maintain this information. The
current status is known only to the owner. If these papers become
lost, the FAA will require the airplane be reweighed to establish the
empty weight and the c.g. and that an inventory of installed
equipment be conducted to create a new equipment list.
Loading Instructions
It is the responsibility of the airplane operator to ensure that the
airplane is properly loaded. At the time of delivery, Beech Aircraft
Corporation provides the necessary weight and balance data to
compute individual loadings. All subsequent changes in airplane
weight and balance are the responsibility of the airplane owner and/or
operator.
The empty weight and moment of the airplane at the time of delivery
are shown on the airplane Empty Weight and Balance form. Useful
load items which may be loaded into the airplane are shown on the
Useful Load Weight and Moment tables.
The minimum and
maximum moments are indicated on the Moment Limits vs. Weight
table. These moments correspond to the forward and aft center of
gravity flight limits for a particular weight. All moments are divided by
100 to simplify computations.
August 1979
6-8
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Seating, Baggage and Equipment Arrangements
Pilot and F. Pass
Forward
Aft
F.S.
86
89
Rear Seat Pass
118
1. Maximum weight – 270 pounds including equipment and
baggage.
2. Maximum weight – 200 pounds forward of rear spar including
equipment and cargo when rear seat removed.
3. Maximum weight – 270 pounds aft of rear spar including
equipment and cargo when rear seat removed.
All baggage and equipment must be secured.
August 1979
6-9
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Center of Gravity
August 1979
6 - 10
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Moment Limits vs. Weight
Moment limits are based on the following weight and center of gravity
limit data (gear down)
WEIGHT
CONDITION
3000 POUNDS
TAKEOFF OR
LANDING
2500 POUNDS
OR LESS
WEIGHT
FORWARD CG
LIMIT
82.1
AFT CG
LIMIT
86.7
77.0
86.7
2100
2110
2120
2130
2140
2150
2160
2170
2180
2190
MINIMUM MOMENT
/100
1617
1625
2632
1640
1648
1656
1663
1671
1679
1686
MAXIMUM MOMENT
/100
1821
1829
1838
1847
1855
1864
1873
1881
1890
1899
2200
2210
2220
2230
2240
2250
2260
2270
2280
2290
1694
1702
1709
1717
1725
1733
1740
1748
1756
1763
1907
1916
1925
1933
1942
1951
1959
1968
1977
1985
August 1979
6 - 11
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
WEIGHT
CONDITION
3000 POUNDS
TAKEOFF OR
LANDING
2500 POUNDS
OR LESS
WEIGHT
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
FORWARD CG
LIMIT
82.1
AFT CG
LIMIT
86.7
77.0
86.7
2300
2310
2320
2330
2340
2350
2360
2370
2380
2390
MINIMUM MOMENT
/100
1771
1779
1786
1794
1802
1810
1817
1825
1833
1840
MAXIMUM MOMENT
/100
1994
2003
2011
2020
2029
2037
2046
2055
2063
2072
2400
2410
2420
2430
2440
2450
2460
2470
2480
2490
1848
1856
1863
1871
1879
1887
1894
1902
1910
1917
2081
2089
2098
2107
2115
2124
2133
2141
2150
2159
August 1979
6 - 12
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
WEIGHT
CONDITION
3000 POUNDS
TAKEOFF OR
LANDING
2500 POUNDS
OR LESS
WEIGHT
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
FORWARD CG
LIMIT
82.1
AFT CG
LIMIT
86.7
77.0
86.7
2500
2510
2520
2530
2540
2550
2560
2570
2580
2590
MINIMUM MOMENT
/100
1925
1935
1946
1956
1966
1977
1987
1997
2008
2018
MAXIMUM MOMENT
/100
2168
2176
2185
2194
2202
2211
2220
2228
2237
2246
2600
2610
2620
2630
2640
2650
2660
2670
2680
2690
2029
2039
2049
2060
2070
2081
2092
2102
2113
2123
2254
2263
2272
2280
2289
2298
2306
2315
2324
2332
August 1979
6 - 13
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
WEIGHT
CONDITION
3000 POUNDS
TAKEOFF OR
LANDING
2500 POUNDS
OR LESS
WEIGHT
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
FORWARD CG
LIMIT
82.1
AFT CG
LIMIT
86.7
77.0
86.7
2700
2710
2720
2730
2740
2750
2760
2770
2780
2790
MINIMUM MOMENT
/100
2134
2145
2155
2166
2177
2188
2198
2209
2220
2231
MAXIMUM MOMENT
/100
2341
2350
2358
2367
2376
2384
2393
2402
2410
2419
2800
2810
2820
2830
2840
2850
2860
2870
2880
2890
2242
2253
2263
2274
2285
2296
2307
2318
2329
2340
2428
2436
2445
2454
2462
2471
2480
2488
2497
2506
August 1979
6 - 14
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
WEIGHT
CONDITION
3000 POUNDS
TAKEOFF OR
LANDING
2500 POUNDS
OR LESS
WEIGHT
2900
2910
2920
2930
2940
2950
2960
2970
2980
2990
3000
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
FORWARD CG
LIMIT
82.1
AFT CG
LIMIT
86.7
77.0
86.7
MINIMUM MOMENT
/100
2351
2362
2373
2385
2396
2407
2418
2429
2441
2452
2463
MAXIMUM MOMENT
/100
2514
2523
2532
2540
2549
2558
2566
2575
2584
2592
2601
Computing Procedure
1. Record the *Basic Empty Weight and Moment from the Basic
Empty Weight and Balance form (or from the latest superseding
form) under the Basic Empty Condition block. The moment
must be divided by 100 to correspond to the Useful Load
Weights and Moments tables.
2. Record the weight and corresponding moment from the
appropriated table of each of the useful load items (except fuel)
to be carried in the airplane.
August 1979
6 - 15
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
3. Total the weight column and moment column.
TOTAL is the Zero Fuel Condition.
The SUB-
4. Determine the weight and corresponding moment for the fuel
loading to be used. This fuel loading includes fuel for the flight,
plus that required for start, taxi, and take-off. Add the Fuel to
Zero Condition to obtain the SUB-TOTAL Ramp Condition.
5. Subtract the fuel to be used for start, taxi, and take-off to arrive
at the SUB-TOTAL Take-Off Condition
6. Subtract the weight and moment of the fuel in the incremental
sequence in which it is to be used from the take-off weight and
moment. The Zero Fuel Condition, the Take-Off Condition, and
the Landing Condition moment must be within the minimum and
maximum moments shown on the Moment Limit vs. Weight
table for that weight. If the total moment is less than the
minimum moment allowed, useful load items must be shifted aft
or forward load items reduced. If the total moment is greater
than the minimum moment allowed, useful load items must be
shifted forward or aft load items reduced. If the quantity or
location of load items is changed, the calculations must be
revised and the moments rechecked.
* The Empty Weight for the airplane may be converted to
Basic Empty Weight by adding the weight and moment for
full oil (19 lbs. and 494 in-lb)
August 1979
6 - 16
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
The following Sample Loading chart is presented to depict the sample
method of computing a load. Weights used DO NOT reflect an actual
airplane loading
SAMPLE WEIGHT AND BALANCE LOADING FORM
DEBONAIR
A33
DATE__________
SERIAL NO. CD-XXX
REG. NO. NXXX
ITEM
1. Basic Empty Condition
2. Front Seat Occupants
3. Rear Seat Occupants
4. Baggage
5. Cargo
6. Cargo
7. Subtotal zero fuel condition
8. Fuel – Main (44 gal)
Fuel – Aux (19 gal)
9. Sub-total Ramp Condition
10. Less fuel for start, taxi, take-off
11. Sub-total takeoff condition
12. Less fuel – Left Main (15 gal)
13. Sub-total
14. Less fuel – aux (19 gal)
15. Sub-total 16. Less fuel – Main (20 gal)
17. Landing Condition
WEIGHT
1907
340
45
MOM/100
1486
402
63
2632
264
114
3010
-10
3000
-90
2910
-114
2796
-120
2676
2243
198
107
2548
-8
2540
-68
-68
-107
2365
-90
2275
Fuel for start, taxi and take-off is normally 10 lbs at an average
mom/100 of 8
August 1979
6 - 17
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
WEIGHT AND BALANCE LOADING FORM
DEBONAIR
A33
DATE____Sept 1, 2010
SERIAL NO. CD-229
REG. NO. N344Z
ITEM
1. Basic Empty Condition
2. Front Seat Occupants
3. Rear Seat Occupants
4. Baggage
5. Cargo
6. Cargo
7. Subtotal zero fuel condition
8. Fuel – Main (44 gal)
Fuel – Aux (19 gal)
9. Sub-total Ramp Condition
10. Less fuel for start, taxi, take-off
11. Sub-total takeoff condition
12. Less fuel – Left Main (15 gal)
13. Sub-total
14. Less fuel – aux (19 gal)
15. Sub-total 16. Less fuel – Main (20 gal)
17. Landing Condition
WEIGHT
1988.60
MOM/100
1564
Fuel for start, taxi and take-off is normally 10 lbs at an average
mom/100 of 8
August 1979
6 - 18
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
USEFUL LOAD WEIGHTS AND MOMENTS
OCCUPANTS
WEIGHT
120
130
140
150
160
170
180
190
200
Front Seats
Fwd Position
Aft Position
ARM 86
ARM 89
MOM/100
MOM/100
103
107
112
116
120
125
129
134
138
142
146
151
155
160
163
169
172
178
Rear Seat
ARM 118
MOM/100
142
153
165
177
189
201
212
224
236
NOTE: Occupant positions for adjustable seats are shown for their
extreme positions. Intermediate positions will require interpolation of
moment/100 values
BAGGAGE
ARM 140
WEIGHT
10
20
30
40
50
60
August 1979
MOM/100
14
28
42
56
70
84
WEIGHT
70
80
90
100
110
120
MOM/100
98
112
126
140
154
168
6 - 19
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
BAGGAGE (Continued)
ARM 140
130
140
150
160
170
180
190
200
182
196
210
224
238
252
266
280
210
220
230
240
250
260
270
294
308
322
336
350
364
378
CARGO (With Rear Seat Removed)
AHEAD OF SPAR
ARM 108
Weight
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
200
August 1979
Moment / 100
22
43
62
86
108
130
151
173
194
216
AFT OF SPAR
ARM 135
Weight
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
200
220
240
260
270
Moment / 100
27
54
81
108
135
162
189
216
243
270
297
324
351
364
6 - 20
Section VI
Weight and Balance / Equipment List
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
USABLE FUEL
MAIN WING TANKS
ARM 75
Gallons
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
44
Weight
30
60
90
120
150
180
210
240
264
Moment/100
22
45
68
90
112
135
158
180
198
AUXILLIARY WING TANKS
ARM 94
Gallons
5
10
15
19
Weight
30
60
90
114
Moment/100
28
56
85
107
Quarts
10
OIL *
Weight
19
Moment/100
5
* Included in Basic Empty Weight
Equipment List (provided for each airplane)
August 1979
6 - 21
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
SECTION VII
SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SUBJECT
PAGE
AIRFRAME ........................................................................................ 4
FLIGHT CONTROLS ......................................................................... 4
CONTROL SURFACES .................................................................. 4
CONTROL COLUMN ...................................................................... 4
RUDDER PEDALS .......................................................................... 4
TRIM CONTROLS ........................................................................... 5
INSTRUMENT PANEL....................................................................... 5
FLIGHT INSTRUMENTS ................................................................. 5
POWER PLANT INSTRUMENTS.................................................... 6
CLUSTER TYPE POWER PLANT INSTRUMENTS .................... 6
INSTRUMENT PANEL SCHEMATIC A33 ....................................... 7
A33 TYPICAL INSTRUMENT PANEL ............................................. 8
INSTRUMENT PANEL SCHEMATIC B33 ....................................... 9
B33 TYPICAL INSTRUMENT PANEL ........................................... 10
SWITCHES (A33).......................................................................... 14
SWITCHES (B33).......................................................................... 14
GROUND CONTROL....................................................................... 14
WING FLAPS ................................................................................... 15
LANDING GEAR SYSTEM .............................................................. 15
CONTROL SWITCH ...................................................................... 16
POSITION INDICATORS .............................................................. 16
CIRCUIT BREAKER............................................................................ 16
SAFETY SWITCH .............................................................................. 16
WARNING HORN .............................................................................. 17
BRAKES .......................................................................................... 17
August 1979
7- 1
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
MANUAL EXTENSION ........................................................................ 17
BAGGAGE COMPARTMENT.......................................................... 18
SEATS AND SEAT BELTS ............................................................. 18
SEAT ADJUSTMENTS ........................................................................ 18
DOORS, WINDOWS AND EXITS .................................................... 18
CABIN DOOR ................................................................................... 18
CONTROL COLUMN LOCK PIN..................................................... 19
POWER PLANT ............................................................................... 19
ENGINE CONTROLS .......................................................................... 20
Throttle, Propeller, and Mixture .................................................. 20
INDUCTION SYSTEM ICING ................................................................. 20
LUBRICATION SYSTEM ...................................................................... 20
STARTER ......................................................................................... 21
PROPELLER ................................................................................... 21
FUEL SYSTEM ................................................................................ 22
FUEL CELLS A33 ............................................................................. 22
FUEL SYSTEM SCHEMATIC A33......................................................... 23
FUEL CELLS B33 ............................................................................. 24
FUEL QUANTITY INDICATION SYSTEM ..................................... 24
FUEL SYSTEM SCHEMATIC B33......................................................... 25
AUXILIARY FUEL PUMP ..................................................................... 26
FUEL TANK SELECTION ..................................................................... 26
FUEL REQUIRED FOR FLIGHT ............................................................ 26
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM ................................................................... 27
BATTERY ......................................................................................... 27
Generator ................................................................................... 27
EXTERNAL POWER RECEPTACLE ....................................................... 28
LIGHTING SYSTEM......................................................................... 28
INTERIOR LIGHTING .......................................................................... 28
EXTERIOR LIGHTING ......................................................................... 28
ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS ........................................................ 29
August 1979
7- 2
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
CABIN HEATING ............................................................................... 29
A33 HEATING AND VENTILATION SYSTEM SCHEMATIC ......................... 30
B33 HEATING AND VENTILATION SYSTEM SCHEMATIC ......................... 31
HEATER AND DEFROSTER OPERATION ............................................... 32
CABIN VENTILATION ......................................................................... 32
Cabin Fresh Air Outlets .............................................................. 32
Exhaust Vents ............................................................................ 33
PITOT AND STATIC SYSTEMS ...................................................... 33
PITOT SYSTEM ................................................................................. 33
Pitot Heat (Optional)................................................................... 33
STATIC AIR SYSTEM ......................................................................... 34
VACUUM SYSTEM .......................................................................... 34
STALL WARNING ........................................................................... 34
ENGINE BREAK-IN INFORMATION............................................... 34
August 1979
7- 3
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
AIRFRAME
The BEECHCRAFT A33 and B33 Debonairs are 4-place, all-metal,
low-wing, single-engine airplanes with retractable tricycle landing
gear and conventional horizontal and vertical stabilizers.
FLIGHT CONTROLS
CONTROL SURFACES
Control surfaces are operated through push-pull
conventional cable systems terminating in bellcranks.
rods
and
CONTROL COLUMN
The throw-over type control column for elevator and aileron control
can be placed in front of either front seat. Pull the T-handle latch at
the back of the control arm dad position the control wheel as desired.
The aileron trimmer on the control column hub should be held until
the column is repositioned. Check for full freedom of movement after
repositioning the control.
The optional dual control is required for flight instruction.
RUDDER PEDALS
To adjust the rudder pedals, press the spring-loaded lever on each
pedal arm and move the pedal forward or aft. The adjustment lever
can also be used to place the right set of rudder pedals against the
floor when not in use.
August 1979
7- 4
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
TRIM CONTROLS
Elevator trim is controlled by a handwheel located to the left of the
throttle. An elevator tab indicator dial is located near the control
column.
The aileron trimmer on the control column hub displaces the ailerons.
Displacement is maintained by cable loads imposed by the trimmer.
INSTRUMENT PANEL
The instrument panel for the A33 Debonair consists of fixed and
floating panels, an engine instrument cluster on the center of the
instrument panel above the control column, a radio grouping on the
left side of the instrument panel, and subpanels which provide a
compact circuit breaker group on the right side, and switch panels on
both sides.
The instrument panel for the B33 Debonair consists of fixed and
floating panels, an engine instrument cluster on the left subpanel, a
radio grouping on the right side of the instrument panel and
subpanels which provide a compact circuit breaker group across the
base of the instrument panel.
FLIGHT INSTRUMENTS
Standard flight instrumentation on the Debonair includes an airspeed
indicator and altimeter mounted in the instrument panel and a
magnetic compass mounted on the windshield divider.
In addition of several radio-navigation combinations, optional
instruments for which openings are provided in the instrument panel
include vertical speed and turn and bank indicators, a vacuum
operated directional gyro and attitude gyro, and the suction gage
necessary when theses instruments are installed. An outside air
August 1979
7- 5
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
temperature indicator and clock are also included as optional
equipment.
POWER PLANT INSTRUMENTS
The engine instruments include: cylinder head temperature, oil
temperature, oil pressure indicators, tachometer, manifold pressure,
fuel pressure (flow), fuel quantity indicators, and an ammeter.
CLUSTER TYPE POWER PLANT INSTRUMENTS
Except for the tachometer, manifold pressure gage and fuel pressure
(flow) gage, the power plant instruments are grouped together in a
cluster. The engine gage cluster includes the fuel quantity gages, oil
pressure gage, the oil temperature and cylinder head temperature
indicators and ammeter.
Each fuel quantity gage gives an
instantaneous and continuous indication of fuel quantity in the
particular cell.
The cylinder head temperature sensor is installed in the engine
cylinder which, because of location in the compartment, has the
highest temperature reading. Monitor cylinder head temperature after
power setting adjustments are made, to assure that the engine
operating temperature remains in the desired range.
The oil pressure normal operating range is 30 to 60 psi. The oil
pressure should be checked when starting the engine and with extra
attention during cold weather. The oil temperature operating range is
100°F to 240°F. Monitor the oil temperature after starting to assure
temperature is above the minimum before advancing the throttle
above warm-up rpm and on descent with power reduced to avoid
overcooling.
August 1979
7- 6
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
INSTRUMENT PANEL SCHEMATIC A33
August 1979
7- 7
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
A33
TYPICAL INSTRUMENT PANEL
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Radio Switches
Stall Warning Indicator
Radio Lights
Flap Indicator Lights
Aux Fuel
Main Fuel
Oil Temperature
Cylinder Head Temperature
Ammeter
Oil Pressure
Landing Gear Indicator Lights
Elevator Tab Position Indicator
Instrument Lights
Landing Gear Switch
Fire Door Control
Beacon Switch
August 1979
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
Generator Switch
Battery Switch
Nav Lights Switch
Landing Light Switch
Cabin Heat Control
Parking Brake Control
Propeller Control
Ignition Key Switch
Aux Fuel Pump Switch
Mixture Control
Throttle
Starter Switch
Elevator Trim Tab Control
Flap Switch
Aux Fuel Gage Switch
Main Fuel Gage Switch
7- 8
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
INSTRUMENT PANEL SCHEMATIC B33
August 1979
7- 9
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
B33
TYPICAL INSTRUMENT PANEL
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Vent Shutoff Control
Left Fuel Gage
Oil Pressure Gage
Cylinder head Temperature Gage
Oil Temperature Gage
Ammeter
Right Fuel Gage
Elevator Tab Indicator
Elevator Trim Tab Control
Throttle
Mixture Control
Flap Position Switch
Auxiliary Fuel Pump Switch
August 1979
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
Alternate Air Control (If Installed)
Propeller Control
Radio Lights Rheostat
Instrument Lights Rheostat
Landing Gear Position Switch
Lower Landing Light Switch
Upper Landing Light Switch
Parking Brake Control
Rotating Beacon Switch
Navigation Lights Switch
Pitot Heat Switch
Cabin Heat Control
Defrost Control
7- 10
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
TACHOMETER, MANIFOLD PRESSURE AND FUEL PRESURE
(FLOW) GAGE
The manifold pressure gage, fuel pressure (flow) gage, and
tachometer are mounted in the instrument panel proper.
The tachometer is driven by a flexible shaft from the engine
accessory section. Incorporated in the tachometer is an engine hour
meter which automatically records total engine operating time.
The manifold pressure instrument indicates the pressure of the fuelair mixture entering the engine cylinders and is calibrated in inches of
mercury.
By observing the manifold pressure indications and
adjusting the propeller and throttle controls the power output of the
engine can be regulated. To avoid excessive cylinder pressures
A33 FUEL PRESSURE INDICATOR
August 1979
7- 11
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
during cruise operations, observe the maximum recommended rpm
and manifold pressure as indicated on the Manifold Pressure vs RPM
graph in the PERFORMANCE section.
(A33)
The pressure indicator is calibrated in psi, the green arc indicating the
fuel pressure for normal operating limits. Red radials are placed at
the minimum and maximum allowable fuel pressures.
B33 FUEL FLOW INDICATOR
(B33)
The fuel flow indicator is calibrated in gallons per hour, the green arc
indicating fuel flow for normal operating limits. Red radials are placed
at the minimum and maximum allowable fuel pressures.
August 1979
7- 12
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
B33 FUEL FLOW INDICATOR
In the cruise power range, the green sectors cover the fuel pressure
(flow) required from 45% to 75% power. The lowest value of a given
sector is the cruise-lean setting, and the highest value in the sector is
the best-power setting for that particular power range.
The takeoff and climb range is covered by green sectors for full
power at various altitudes. The high side of each green sector
represents the fuel pressure (flow) setting required to achieve
maximum power at the specified altitude when operating full throttle
at 2600 rpm. These values should correspond to the fuel pressure
(flow) values on the Climb graph in the PERFORMANCE Section.
August 1979
7- 13
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
SWITCHES (A33)
The battery master switch and generator switch are located on the
inboard side of the right subpanel. The auxiliary fuel pump and key
operated ignition switch are located below the control column and the
push button start switch to the left of the control column.
Switches on the right and left subpanels operate landing gear, flaps,
exterior lighting and radios. Attached to the lower center section of
the subpanel are the powerplant controls and interior lighting
rheostats. Flap indicator lights are to the left of the control column
and landing gear indicator lights are to the right.
SWITCHES (B33)
The battery master switch, generator switch and key operated
magneto/start switch are located on an escutcheon assembly at the
left side of the instrument panel.
Switches on the upper subpanel operate the landing gear, flaps, and
interior and exterior lighting. Attached to the lower center subpanel
are the powerplant controls and auxiliary fuel pump switch. Flap
indicator lights are to the left of the control column and landing gear
indicator lights to the right.
GROUND CONTROL
Steering is accomplished by use of the rudder pedals through a
linkage arrangement which connects the nose strut to the rudder
pedal shaft.
Nose wheel straightening is accomplished by
engagement of a roller with a track as the nose wheel is retracted.
The steering link attaches to the steering mechanism on the nose
strut with a swivel connection which permits the mechanism to
disengage when the nose wheel is retracted and operation of the
August 1979
7- 14
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
rudder pedals will have no tendency to turn the nose wheel with the
gear retracted.
The minimum wing tip turning radius, using full steering, one brake
and partial power, is 26 feet 4 inches.
WING FLAPS
The wing flaps are controlled by a three-position switch, UP, OFF,
and DOWN, located on the subpanel to the left of the center console.
The control must be pulled out of the detent before it can be
repositioned.
The flap position lights on the left side of the control console show
green for the up position and red for the full-down landing position –
intermediate 20 degree and 10 degree positions are indicated by
lines painted on the leading edge of the left flap. The intermediate
positions are reached when the marks are aligned with the trailing
edge of the wing.
Limit switches automatically turn off the electric motor when the flaps
reach the extremes of travel. Intermediate flap positions an be
obtained by placing the switch in the OFF position as the flaps reach
the desired position during flap extension or retraction.
LANDING GEAR SYSTEM
CAUTION
Never taxi with a flat strut.
The landing gears are operated through adjustable linkage connected
to an actuator assembly mounted beneath the front seats. The
actuator assembly is driven by an electric motor. The landing gears
may be electrically retracted and extended, and in an emergency may
be extended manually.
August 1979
7- 15
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
CONTROL SWITCH
The landing gear is controlled by a two-position switch on the right
side of the subpanel. The switch must be pulled out of the safety
detent before it can be moved to the opposite position.
POSITION INDICATORS
Landing gear position indicator lights on the right side of the control
console show red when the gear is up, or green when it is down,
illuminating only when the actuator assembly reaches either extreme.
In addition, a mechanical indicator on the floorboard beneath the
control console shows the position of the nose gear. Its pointer is
linked by a cable to the actuation mechanism and moves
simultaneously with it.
Limit switches and a dynamic brake
automatically stop the retract mechanism when the gear reaches its
full up or full down position.
Circuit Breaker
The landing gear circuit breaker is located on the (right- A22) (left B33) sub-panel. This circuit breaker is a pull-and-reset type breaker.
The breaker will pop out under overload conditions.
Safety Switch
To prevent inadvertent retraction of the landing gear on the ground, a
main strut safety switch opens the control circuit when the strut is
compressed.
WARNING
Never rely on the safety switch to keep the gear down during
taxi or take-off, landing roll, or in a static position. Always make
certain that the landing gear switch is in the down position
during these operations.
August 1979
7- 16
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Warning Horn
With the landing gear retracted, if the throttle is retracted below
approximately 12 in. Hg manifold pressure, a warning horn will sound
intermittently.
Brakes
The brakes on the main landing gear wheels are operated by
applying toe pressure to the rudder pedals.
CAUTION
Continuous brake application of either the pilot’s or copilot’s
brake pedals in conjunction with an overriding pumping action
from the opposite brake pedals could result in the loss of
braking action on the side which continuous pressure is being
applied.
The parking brake push-pull control is located on the right subpanel.
To set the parking brakes, pull control out and depress both toe
pedals until firm. Push the control in to release the brakes.
CAUTION
The parking brake should be left off and wheel chock installed if
the airplane is to be left unattended. Changes in ambient
temperature can cause the brake to release or to exert
excessive pressure
Manual Extension
The landing gear can be manually extended by operating a
handcrank at the rear of the front seats. This procedure is described
in the EMERGENCY PROCEDURES section
August 1979
7- 17
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Baggage Compartment
The baggage compartment is accessible through the baggage door
on the right side of the fuselage. Loading within the baggage
compartment must be in accordance with the data in the WEIGHT
AND BALANCE Section. All baggage must be secured.
WARNING
Do not carry hazardous material anywhere in the airplane.
Do not carry children in the baggage compartment.
Seats and Seat Belts
Seat Adjustments
Both of the individual front seats are adjustable fore-and-aft, by
pulling up on the small lever in front of each seat cushion and pulling
or pushing on the seat. In addition, the A33 front seat backs are
adjustable by a set screw located on the inboard side of both seat
backs. Moving the seat back forward and turning the set screw in or
out regulates the position of the seat back either backward forward.
The B33 front seat backs are adjustable to any of four positions by
operating a release lever on the inboard side of each seat.
Armrests for both front and rear seat passengers are built into the
cabin sidewalls and the door. In addition, an armrest between the
two front seats may be raised into position or lowered flush with the
seat cushions.
Headrests are available for the B33 model.
Doors, Windows and Exits
Cabin Door
The outside cabin door handle is spring loaded to fit into a recess in
the door to create a flat aerodynamically clean surface. To open the
August 1979
7- 18
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
door from the outside, lift the handle from its recess and pull until the
door opens.
To close the cabin door from the inside, observe that the door handle
is in the unlocked position. In this position, the latch handle is free to
move approximately one inch in either direction before engagement
of the locking mechanism. Then grasp the door and firmly pull the
door closed. Rotate the door handle fully counterclockwise into the
locked position. When the door is properly locked, the door latch
handle is free to move approximately one inch in either direction.
NOTE
When checking the door latch handle, do not move it far
enough to engage the door latch release mechanism
Press firmly outward at the top rear corner of the door. If any
movement of the door is detected, completely open the door and
close again following the above instructions.
To open the door from the inside, depress the lock button and rotate
the handle clockwise.
Control Column Lock Pin
1. Rotate control wheel and move column so the hole in the
bracket and the column align to accept pin.
2. Push the control column lock pin through the hole provided in
the control column hanger and into the hole in the control tube
assembly.
3. Ensure positive retention of the lock pin by positioning the
attached red plate on top of the throttle and propeller controls.
WARNING
Before starting engine, remove the lock
Power Plant
The BEECHCRAFT Debonair A33 and B33 are both powered by a
Continental six-cylinder horizontally-opposed engine. The IO-470J
(installed on 33 series airplanes, serials prior to CD-301 and including
August 1979
7- 19
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
CD-386 and CD-387) is a wet sump, fuel-injected engine, rated at
225 hp at 2600 rpm for take-off and maximum continuous operation.
The IO-47K (CD-301 through CD-383 except for CD-386 and CD387) is identically rated but not directly interchangeable with the IO470 engine.
Engine Controls
Throttle, Propeller, and Mixture
The push-pull throttle, propeller and mixture controls are located on
the control console. The throttle and propeller controls are released
for repositioning by pushing a button on the knob. With the button
extended, fine adjustments are accomplished by rotating the knob,
clockwise to increase and counter-clockwise to decrease. Do not
rotate clockwise wit the control fully advanced. The mixture control
may be repositioned by pushing or pulling and locked into position be
rotating the knob clockwise.
Induction System Icing
The possibility of induction system icing is reduced by the non-icing
characteristics of the fuel injected engine and the automatic alternate
air source. Under certain conditions, however, impact ice can form at
several points in the induction system. If the air intake or filter
becomes clogged with ice, a spring-loaded door in the air intake duct
will open automatically and the induction system will operate on
alternate air.
Lubrication System
The engine oil system is the full pressure, wet sump type and has a
10-quart capacity. Oil operating temperatures are controlled by an
automatic thermostat bypass control. The bypass control will limit oil
flow through the oil cooler when operating temperatures are below
normal and will permit the oil to bypass the cooler if it should become
blocked.
August 1979
7- 20
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Starter
The starter is relay-controlled to minimize the length of heavy cable
required to carry the high amperage of the starter circuit.
The A33 starter is actuated by a push-button, momentary-on switch
located on the left of the control column. To energize the circuit,
rotate the magneto switch to the BOTH position, then press the
starter button.
The B33 starter is actuated by a rotary type, momentary-on switch
incorporated in the magneto/start switch. To energize the starter
circuit, rotate the magneto/start switch beyond the BOTH position to
START. After starting, release the switch and observe that it returns
to the BOTH position.
Propeller
(A33 and B33)
Hartzell constant speed, two blade 84 inch diameter propeller using a
Hartzell BHC-92ZF-1D1 hub with 8447 blades.
or
Flottorp constant speed, two speed, two blade 84 inch diameter
propeller using a Flottorp F12A series hub with 8400-0 blades.
(B33 only)
McCauley constant speed, two blade 84 inch diameter propeller using
a McCauley 2A36C23 hub with 848-0 blades.
Propeller rpm is controlled by a governor which regulates hydraulic oil
pressure on the blades. A push-pull knob on the control console
allows the pilot to select the governor’s rpm range.
If oil pressure is lost, the propeller will go to the full high rpm position.
This is because propeller low rpm is obtained by governor boosted
August 1979
7- 21
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
engine oil pressure working against the centrifugal twisting moment of
the blades.
Fuel System
The airplane is designed for operation on 80/87 grade (red) aviation
gasoline. In the event this grade is not available only a higher rated
fuel shall be used.
CAUTION
Before refueling, make certain the airplane and fuel dispensing
unit are properly grounded. Failure to do so creates a fire
hazard.
Fuel Cells A33
Either the 44-gallon usable (50-gallon capacity) standard system or
the 63-gallon usable (70-gallon capacity) options system is available.
The standard system consists of a rubber fuel cell in each wing
leading edge with a flush type filler cap. If installed an additional 19
gallons usable fuel is available in two auxiliary 10-gallon fuel cells in
the wings, outboard of the wheel wells. Both auxiliary cells are
connected to a common port in the fuel selector valve, so that both
feed simultaneously when the fuel selector is set to AUX.
The two optional 10-gallon auxiliary tanks may be filled after
removing the pressure-type filler caps, located aft and outboard of the
main tank filler caps. Do not overfill the tanks.
The fuel injection system returns about 10 gallons per hour of excess
fuel. Fuel return lines are routed through the selector valve to each
main cell. Except for the auxiliary cells, fuel is returned to the cell
from which it is drawn. The auxiliary cells return fuel to the left main
cell only. To provide space for the returned fuel form the auxiliary
August 1979
7- 22
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
cells, the left main cell should be used to approximately half full
before switching to auxiliary.
If the engine is allowed to stop firing, due to insufficient fuel, refer to
the EMERGENCY PROCEDURES Section for the Air Start
Procedure.
Fuel System Schematic A33
August 1979
7- 23
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Fuel Cells B33
Either the 44-gallon usable (50-gallon capacity) standard fuel system
or the 74-gallon usable (80-gallon capacity) optional fuel system is
available. The fuel system consists of a rubber fuel cell in each wing
leading edge with a flush type filler cap. On CD-514 and after, a
visual measuring tab is attached to the filler neck of the optional
system. The bottom of the tab indicates 27 gallons of usable fuel and
the detent on the tab indicates 32 gallons of usable fuel in the tank.
The engine driven fuel injector pump delivers approximately 10
gallons of excess fuel per hour, which bypasses the fuel control and
returns to the tank being used. Three fuel drains are provided, one in
each fuel sump on the underside of each wing and one in the fuel
selector valve inboard of the left wing root. These points should be
drained daily before the first refueling.
FUEL QUANTITY INDICATION SYSTEM
Fuel quantity is measured by float operated sensors located in each
fuel tank. These transmit electrical signals to the individual indicators
that indicate fuel remaining in the tank
Individual main and auxiliary fuel quantity indicators for the A33 are
located on the engine instrument cluster. Fuel quantity for each main
or auxiliary tank may be read by positioning the fuel gage selector
switches (located on the left subpanel) either RIGHT or LEFT. The
B33 fuel quantity may be read directly from the two fuel indicators
located on the left subpanel.
August 1979
7- 24
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Fuel System Schematic B33
August 1979
7- 25
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Auxiliary Fuel Pump
The electric auxiliary fuel pump is controlled by an ON-OFF toggle
switch on the control console. It provides pressure for starting and
emergency operation. Immediately after starting, the auxiliary fuel
pump can be used to purge the system of vapor caused by an
extremely high ambient temperature or a start with the engine hot.
The auxiliary fuel pump provided for near maximum engine
performance should the engine driven pump fail.
Fuel Tank Selection
The fuel selector unit handle is located forward and the left of the
pilot’s seat. Take-offs should be made using the left main tank (A33)
or the more nearly full (B33). Landings should be made using the
main tank that is more nearly full. In no case should a take-off be
made is the fuel indicators show less than 13 gallons of fuel in each
main tank.
If the engine stops because of insufficient fuel, refer to the
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES Section for the Air Start procedures.
Fuel Required for Flight
It is the pilot’s responsibility to ascertain that the fuel quantities are
functioning and maintaining a reasonable degree of accuracy, and be
certain of ample fuel for a flight. Takeoff is prohibited if the fuel
quantity indicators do not indicate above the yellow arc. An
inaccurate indicator could give an erroneous indication of fuel
quantity. A minimum of 13 gallons of fuel is required in each main
tank before takeoff.
The filler caps should be removed and fuel quantity checked to give
the pilot an indication of fuel on board. The airplane must be
approximately level for visual inspection of the tank. If he pilot is not
sure that at least 13 gallons are in each tank, add necessary fuel so
August 1979
7- 26
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
that the amount of fuel will be not less than 13 gallons per tank at
takeoff. Plan for an ample margin of fuel for any flight.
Electrical System
The system circuitry is the single-wire, ground-return type, in which
the airplane structure itself is used as the ground return.
The battery ON-OFF switch and the generator ON-OFF switch are
located on the right subpanel of the A33 and to the left of the
instrument panel with the magneto/start switch on the B33. The
IGNITION key switch of the A33 is located below the control column.
The circuit breaker panel is located on the right subpanel for the A33
and both subpanels for the B33 and contains the protective circuit
breakers for the various electrical systems.
Battery
A 35-ampere-hour, 12-volt battery is located on the right (aft A33 /
forward B33) side of the firewall. Battery servicing procedures are
described in the HANDLING, SERVICING AND MAINTENANCE
section.
Generator
Direct-current electric power is supplied by a 12-volt engine-driven
generator of 35-ampere capacity, controlled by a voltage regulator
which automatically adjusts generator output to its load, including the
battery. A 50-ampere generator is available.
The ammeter is of the conventional charge-discharge type, showing
the rate of charge or discharge of the battery. A zero reading, which
should be the normal condition in cruising flight, indicates that the
battery is fully charged and the generator output has been adjusted
by the regulator to balance the load of electrical equipment then in
use.
August 1979
7- 27
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
External Power Receptacle
The external power receptacle accepts a standard AN type plug.
Before connecting an external power unit turn the generator
/alternator switch and avionic equipment OFF.
CAUTION
A negative ground power source is required. Check polarity
before using external power.
If the external power unit does not have a standard AN type plug,
connect the positive lead from the external power source to the
positive battery terminal and the negative lead to the negative battery
lead.
Lighting System
Interior Lighting
Lighting for the instrument panel is furnished by lights in the cabin
ceiling. They are controlled by a rheostat control located below and
to the right of the control column on the A33. The rheostat is located
on the right subpanel on the B33.
On the A33 a control rheostat is located to the left of the instrument
light rheostat. It controls the internal lights in the radio installation.
The RADIO & POST LIGHTS rheostat for the B33 controls radio
lights and individual post lights next to each instrument.
The cabin dome light is operated by an ON-OFF switch next to the
overhead light.
Exterior Lighting
The switches for all of the exterior lights are located on the pilot’s
right subpanel.
August 1979
7- 28
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
The exterior lights consist of navigation lights on the wing tips and tail
cone, rotating beacon (optional), and a landing light. For longer
battery and lamp life, use the landing light sparingly, avoid prolonged
operation which could cause overheating during ground
maneuvering.
NOTE
Particularly at night, reflections from anti-collision lights on
clouds, dense haze or dust can produce optical illusions and
intense vertigo. Such lights, when installed, should be turned
off before entering an overcast; their use may not be advisable
under instrument or limited VFR conditions.
Environmental Systems
Cabin Heating
A heater muffler on the left (right on serial numbers CD 736 and after)
exhaust stack provides for heated air to outlets in forward and aft
areas of the cabin. Two forward outlets are located above and
forward of each set of rudder pedals. One aft outlet is installed
behind the right front seat. Heated air is also supplied to the
windshield for defrosting.
In flight, ram air enters an intake on the left side of the nose, passes
through the heater muffler, then into a mixer valve on the forward side
of the firewall. In the mixer valve, the heated air is combined with a
controlled quantity of untreated ram air.
Air of the desired
temperature is then ducted from the mixer valve to the outlets in the
cabin.
August 1979
7- 29
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
A33 Heating and Ventilation System Schematic
August 1979
7- 30
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
B33 Heating and Ventilation System Schematic
August 1979
7- 31
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Heater and Defroster Operation
The cabin heat control is located on the lower right pilot’s subpanel to
obtain heated air to the cabin outlets, pull the CABIN HEAT control.
The control regulates the amount of cold air that is mixed with the air
from the heater muff. When the control is pulled fully out, the cold air
is shut off and only heated air enters the cabin. The control may be
monitored at intermediated positions to obtain the desired cabin
temperature.
The forward vents, located on the firewall forward of the rudder
pedals, deliver heated air to the forward cabin when the CABIN HEAT
control is pulled out. For maximum heat the control is pulled fully out.
To obtain air for defrosting the windshield, close the toe-pedal type
valves on the front seat hot air outlets (A33) or pull the DEFROST
control out (B33). The DEFROST control is on the subpanel. To
close all air from heater system, pull the red FIREDOOR control
(A33) or red VENT SHUT-OFF control (B33) located on the lower
subpanel.
Cabin Ventilation
In moderate temperatures, ventilation air can be obtained from the
same outlets used for heating, by pushing the CABIN HEAT control
full forward. However, in extremely high temperatures, it may be
desirable to pull the FIREDOOR control (A33) or VENT SHUT-OFF
control (B33) and use only the fresh air outlets described in the
following paragraphs.
Cabin Fresh Air Outlets
A duct in the left wing root is connected directly to an adjustable
outlet in the upholstery panel just below the instrument panel. The
volume of air from the outlet is regulated, and the direction of airflow
August 1979
7- 32
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
is controlled by rotating louvered cover with the small knob on the
rim. The large knob is the center of this outlet is a friction lock which
may be tightened to hold the valve position selected.
Individual Overhead Fresh Air Outlets
An air scoop on to of the cabin conducts outside air to four individual
fresh-air outlets in the overhead upholstery panel. The outlets can be
manually adjusted to control both the quantity and direction of air
flow. The air scoop on CD-314 and after may be closed by operating
a push-pull control located on the overhead panel. On CD-314 and
after, adjacent to the fresh air outlets in the overhead upholstery
panel, a manually controlled diffuser valve admits fresh air to the
cabin and distributes it in all directions.
Exhaust Vents
Air is exhausted from the cabin through two vents in the sides of the
baggage compartment which flows to an exhaust vent in the belly.
Pitot and Static Systems
Pitot System
The pitot system provides a source of impact air for operations of the
airspeed indicator. The pitot mast is located on the leading edge of
the left wing.
Pitot Heat (Optional)
The pitot mast is provided with an electric heating element which is
turned on and off with a switch on the instrument panel. The switch
should be turned ON when flying in visible moisture. It is not
advisable to operate the pitot heating element on the ground except
for testing or for short intervals to remove ice or snow.
August 1979
7- 33
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Static Air System
The static air system provides a source of static air to the flight
instruments through a flush static fitting on each side of the airplane
fuselage. Drain moisture accumulations from the system by opening
the access door on the side panel of the baggage compartment and
removing the section of rubber hose. The rubber hose section should
be removed and the moisture drained from the line every 100 hours
and after exposure to visible moisture, either in the air or on the
ground.
Vacuum System
Vacuum for the air driven gyroscopic flight instruments and other air
driven equipment is supplied by an engine-driven vacuum pump. An
adjustable relief valve controls suction by bleeding outside air into the
vacuum pump. The relief valve and an oil separator, which removes
oil from the air, are located on the forward side of the firewall.
A suction gage indicates system vacuum in inches Hg. This
instrument is located on the instrument panel; exact location may
vary according to panel configuration. The vacuum should be
maintained within the green arc for proper operation of the air driven
instruments.
Stall Warning
A stall warning indicator flashes a red light on the instrument panel
(A33) or sounds a warning (B33) as the airplane approaches a stall
condition. The stall warning indicator is triggered by a sensing vane
on the leading edge of the left wing. Irregular and intermittent at first
the warning signal will become steady as the airplane approaches a
complete stall.
Engine Break-in Information
Use a straight mineral oil as recommended by the engine
manufacturer throughout the break-in period. Drain the initial oil at 20
August 1979
7- 34
Section VII
Systems Description
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
to 30 hours; replace with new mineral oil which is to be used until the
oil consumption stabilizes, usually a total of about 50 hours.
Drain and replace the engine oil as recommended in HANDLING,
SERVICING AND MAINTANCE.
If operating conditions are
unusually dusty or dirty, more frequent oil changes may be
necessary. Oil changes are more critical during the break-in period
than at any other time.
Use full throttle at recommended rpm for every take-off and maintain
until at least 400 feet AGL, then reduce as necessary for cruise climb
or cruise. Maintain the highest power recommended for cruise
operations during the break-in period, avoiding altitudes above 8,000
feet. Interrupt cruise power every 30 minutes or so by smoothly
advancing to take-off power settings for about 30 seconds, then
returning to cruise power settings.
Avoid long power-off descents especially during the break-in period.
Maintain sufficient power during descent to permit cylinder head
temperatures to remain in the green arc.
Minimize ground operation time, especially during warm weather.
During the break-in period, avoid engine idling in excess of 15
minutes, especially in high ambient temperatures.
August 1979
7- 35
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
SECTION VIII
HANDLING, SERVICING AND MAINTENANCE
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SUBJECT
PAGE
INTRODUCTION ................................................................................ 5
PUBLICATIONS................................................................................. 6
AIRPLANE INSPECTION PERIODS ................................................. 6
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE THAT MAY BE ACCOMPLISHED
BY A CERTIFIED PILOT ................................................................... 7
ALTERATIONS OR REPAIRS TO AIRPLANE ................................. 7
GROUND HANDLING........................................................................ 8
TOWING ............................................................................................ 8
PARKING ........................................................................................... 9
TIE-DOWN ......................................................................................... 9
MAIN WHEEL JACKING ...................................................................... 10
PROLONGED OUT OF SERVICE CARE........................................ 10
FLYABLE STORAGE - - 7 TO 30 DAYS .................................................. 10
Mooring ...................................................................................... 10
Engine Preparation For Storage................................................. 11
Fuel Cells ................................................................................... 11
Flight Control Surfaces............................................................... 11
Grounding................................................................................... 11
Pitot Tube ................................................................................... 11
Windshield and Windows ........................................................... 11
During Flyable Storage............................................................... 12
PREPARATION FOR SERVICE ............................................................. 12
EXTERNAL POWER........................................................................ 13
August 1979
8-1
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
CHECKING ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT .................................................. 13
SERVICING...................................................................................... 14
FUEL SYSTEM .................................................................................. 14
Fuel Cells ................................................................................... 14
Fuel Drains ................................................................................. 15
Fuel Strainers ............................................................................. 15
OIL SYSTEM ..................................................................................... 16
Oil Change Procedure................................................................ 16
BATTERY ......................................................................................... 17
TIRES.............................................................................................. 18
SHOCK STRUTS ............................................................................... 19
To Inflate Struts .......................................................................... 19
To Replenish Strut Hydraulic Fluid............................................. 20
SHOCK STRUT SHIMMY DAMPER ....................................................... 20
BRAKES .......................................................................................... 21
VACUUM SYSTEM ............................................................................. 22
INDUCTION AIR FILTER ..................................................................... 22
To Remove and Clean the Filter ................................................ 22
PROPELLER BLADES ........................................................................ 23
MINOR MAINTENANCE .................................................................. 23
RUBBER SEALS ................................................................................ 23
GENERATOR .................................................................................... 23
MAGNETOS...................................................................................... 24
CLEANING....................................................................................... 25
EXTERIOR PAINTED SURFACES ......................................................... 25
WINDSHIELD AND WINDOWS ............................................................. 26
INTERIOR ......................................................................................... 26
ENGINE ........................................................................................... 27
RECOMMENDED SERVICING SCHEDULE ................................... 28
LUBRICATION POINTS .................................................................. 32
CONSUMABLE MATERIALS.......................................................... 40
APPROVED ENGINE OILS ............................................................. 42
BULB REPLACEMENT GUIDE....................................................... 44
August 1979
8-2
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
OVERHAUL OR REPLACEMENT SCHEDULE .............................. 45
SPECIAL CONDITIONS CAUTIONARY NOTICE ....................................... 45
LANDING GEAR ................................................................................ 46
POWER PLANT ................................................................................. 46
FUEL SYSTEM .................................................................................. 47
INSTRUMENTS .................................................................................. 48
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM........................................................................ 48
FLAPS AND FLIGHT CONTROLS .......................................................... 49
MISCELLANEOUS .............................................................................. 49
August 1979
8-3
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
August 1979
8-4
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Introduction
The purpose of this section is to outline the requirements for
maintaining the airplane in a condition equal to that of its original
manufacture. This information sets the time frequency intervals at
which the airplane should be taken to a BEECHCREAFT Aero or
Aviation Center or International Distributor or Dealer for periodic
servicing or preventive maintenance.
The Federal Aviation Regulations place the responsibility for the
maintenance of this airplane on the owner and operator of the
airplane who must ensure that all maintenance is done by qualified
mechanics in conformity with all airworthiness requirements
established for this airplane.
All limits, procedures, safety practices, time limits, servicing and
maintenance requirements contained in this handbook are
considered mandatory.
BEECHCREAFT Aero or Aviation Centers or International
Distributors or Dealers will have recommended modification, service,
and operating procedures issued by both FAA and Beech Aircraft
Corporation, designed to get maximum utility and safety from the
airplane.
If there is a question concerning the care of the airplane, it is
important to include the airplane serial number in any
correspondence.
The serial number appears on the model
designation placard attached to the underside of the fuselage just
forward of the tiedown.
August 1979
8-5
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Publications
The following publications are available through BEECHCREAFT
Aero or Aviation Centers or International Distributors or Dealers.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Shop Manual
Parts Catalog
Service Instructions
Various Inspection Forms
NOTE
Neither Service Publications, Reissues, nor Revisions are
automatically provided to the holder of this handbook. For
information on how to obtain “Revision Service” applicable to
this handbook, consult any BEECHCREAFT Aero or Aviation
Center or International Distributor or Dealer or refer to the latest
revision of BEECHCRAFT Service Instructions No. 0250-010.
Airplane Inspection Periods
1.
2.
3.
4.
FAA Required Annual Inspections.
BEECHCRAFT Recommended Inspection Guide
Continuing Care Inspection Guide
See “Recommended Servicing Schedule” and “Overhaul or
Replacement Schedule” for further inspection schedules.
NOTE
In event of emergency gear or flap extension at speeds above
the respective normal extension speeds and before the next
flight, inspect gear retract rods, gear doors and flaps for
damage or distortion.
August 1979
8-6
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Preventive Maintenance That May Be Accomplished by a
Certified Pilot
1. A certificated pilot may perform limited maintenance. Refer to
FAR Part 43 for the items which may be accomplished.
To ensure proper procedures are followed, obtain a
BEECHCRAFT Shop Manual for performing preventative
maintenance.
2. All other maintenance must be performed by licensed
personnel
NOTE
Pilots operating airplanes of other than U.S. registry should
refer to the regulations of the registering authority for
information concerning preventative maintenance that may be
performed by pilots.
Alterations or Repairs to Airplane
The FAA should be contacted prior to any alterations on the airplane
to ensure the airworthiness of the airplane is not violated
NOTE
Alterations and repairs to the airplane must be made by
properly licensed personnel.
August 1979
8-7
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Ground Handling
The three-view drawing in Section 1 shows the minimum hangar
clearances for a standard airplane. Allowances must be made for
any special radio antennas.
CAUTION
To ensure adequate propeller clearance, always observe
recommended shock strut servicing procedures and tire
inflation pressures.
Towing
One man can move the airplane on a smooth and level surface using
a hand tow bar. Attach the tow bar to the tow lugs on the nose gear
lower torque knee.
Where movement is restricted, two men can pivot the airplane on the
main wheels. One man should push on the wing leading edge or
hold the wing tip, while the other operates the tow bar.
CAUTION
Do not exert force on the propeller or control surfaces. Do not
place weight on the stabilizers to raise the nose wheel. When
towing with a tug, limit turns to prevent damage to the nose
gear. Do not attempt to tow airplane backward by the tail tie
down ring.
Care should be used when removing the tow bar to prevent damage
to the lubrication fittings on the landing gear.
August 1979
8-8
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Parking
The parking brake push-pull control is located to the right of the
control console. To set the parking brakes, pull control out and
depress both toe pedals until firm. Push the control in to release the
brakes.
CAUTION
The parking brake should be left off and wheel chocks installed
if the airplane is to be left unattended. Changes in ambient
temperature can cause the brakes to release or to exert
excessive pressures.
Tie-down
It is advisable to nose the airplane into the wind. Three tie-down lugs
are provided: one on the lower side of each wing and a third at the
rear of the fuselage.
1. Install control column lock pin
2. Chock the main wheels, fore and aft.
3. Using nylon line or chain of sufficient strength, secure the
airplane at the three points provided. DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN; if the line at the rear of the fuselage is excessively
tight, the nose may rise and produce lift due to the angle of
attack on the wings.
4. Release the parking brake.
If high winds are anticipated, a vertical tail post should be installed at
the rear tie-down lug and a tie-down line attached to the nose gear.
August 1979
8-9
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Main Wheel Jacking
1. Check the shock strut for proper inflation to prevent damage to
the landing gear door by the jack adapter and to facilitate
installation of the adapter.
CAUTION
Persons should not be in or on the airplane while it is on a main
wheel jack.
2. Insert the main wheel jack adapter into the main wheel axle.
3. A scissors-type jack is recommended for raising and lowering
the wheel.
Prolonged Out of Service Care
Storage procedures are intended to protect the airplane from
deterioration while it is not in use. The primary objectives of these
measures are to prevent corrosion and damage from exposure to the
elements.
Flyable Storage (7-30 days) has been considered here. For more
extended storage periods, consult the Beech Airplane Shop Manual
and Continental Service Bulletin M 74-9 or later issue
Flyable Storage - - 7 to 30 days
Mooring
If airplane cannot be place in a hangar, tie down securely at the three
points provided.
Do not use hemp or manila rope.
It is
recommended a tail support be used to compress the nose strut and
reduce the angle of attack on the wings. Attach a line to the nose
gear.
August 1979
8 - 10
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Engine Preparation For Storage
Engines in airplanes that are flown only occasionally tend to exhibit
cylinder wall corrosion much more than engines that are flow
frequently.
Run engine at least five minutes at 1200 to 1500 rpm with oil and
cylinder head temperatures in the normal operating range.
Check for correct oil level and add oil if necessary to bring level to full
mark.
Fuel Cells
Fill to capacity to minimize fuel vapor and protect cell inner liners
Flight Control Surfaces
Lock with internal and external locks
Grounding
Static ground airplane securely and effectively.
Pitot Tube
Install cover.
Windshield and Windows
Close all windows and window vents. It is recommended that covers
be installed over windshield and windows.
August 1979
8 - 11
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
During Flyable Storage
Each seven days during flyable storage, the propeller shall be rotated
by hand. After rotating the engine six revolutions, stop the propeller
60° or 120° from the position it was in.
WARNING
Before rotation of propeller blades, ascertain the ignition switch
is OFF, throttle in CLOSED position, and the mixture control is
in the IDLE CUT-OFF position. Always stand clear while
turning the propeller.
If at the end of 30 days airplane will not be removed from storage the
engine shall be started and run. The preferred method will be to fly
the airplane for 30 minutes, and up to, but not exceeding normal oil
and cylinder temperatures.
Preparation For Service
Remove all covers and tape, clean the airplane and give it a thorough
inspection, particularly wheel wells, flaps and control openings.
If the engine has a total time of more than 25 hours drain the break-in
oil after a ground warm-up and install straight mineral oil, which is to
be used until oil consumption stabilizes. After break-in, install
Teledyne Continental Motors recommended oil.
Preflight the airplane.
August 1979
8 - 12
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
External Power
When using external power, it is very important that the following
precautions be observed:
1. The airplane has a negative ground system. Exercise care to
avoid reversed polarity. Be sure to connect the positive lead of
the external power unit to the positive terminal of the airplane’s
external power receptacle and the negative lead to the negative
terminal of the external power receptacle. A positive voltage
must also be applied to the small guide pin.
2. To prevent arcing, make certain no power is being supplied
when the connection is made.
3. Make certain that the battery switch is ON, all avionics and
electrical switches OFF, and a battery is in the system before
connecting an external power unit. This protects the electronic
voltage regulators and associated electrical equipment form
voltage transients (power fluctuations.
Checking Electrical Equipment
Connect an auxiliary power unit as outlined above. Ensure that the
current is stabilized prior to making any electrical equipment or
avionics check.
CAUTION
If auxiliary power unit has poor voltage regulations or produces
voltage transients the equipment connected to the unit may be
damaged.
August 1979
8 - 13
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Servicing
Fuel System
Fuel Cells
See Consumable Materials for recommended fuel grades.
CAUTION
Never leave bladder cells completely empty for more than a few
days, as the cell inner liners may dry out and crack, permitting
fuel to diffuse through the walls of the cell after refueling. If the
cells are to be left empty for a week or more, a thin coating of
light engine oil should be sprayed or flushed on the inner liner
of the cells.
(A33)
The standard fuel cell installation consists of a 25-gallon capacity fuel
cell (22-gallon usable) and filler cap in each wing leading edge. In
the optional installation an auxiliary tank in each wing adds 20 gallons
(19 gallons usable) to the standard system. A filler neck for each
auxiliary is outboard and aft of the main cell filler neck.
(B33)
The standard fuel cell installation consists of a 25-gallon capacity fuel
cell (22-gallon usable) and filler cap in each wing leading edge. In
the optional installation a 40-gallon capacity fuel cell (37 gallon
usable) replaces the smaller capacity cell. On CD-514 and after, the
filler neck in this installation contains a visual measuring tab to permit
partial filling of the tank. Filling the tank until the fuel touches the
August 1979
8 - 14
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
bottom of the tab indicates 27 gallons of fuel, and filling to the slot in
the tab indicates 32 gallons of usable fuel. The airplane must be
level for the tabs to indicate accurately.
Fuel Drains
On the fuel system main cells open the three snap-type fuel drains
daily to purge any water from the system. Each fuel cell drain is
located on the bottom of the wing just outboard of the fuselage. The
system low spot drain is at the bottom of the fuel selector valve. The
drain is accessible through a door in the fuselage adjacent to the
wings. When the optional auxiliary fuel system is installed, (A33),
also open the snap-type fuel drains on the auxiliary tanks and a drain
on the auxiliary cell interconnect line at the selector valve.
Fuel Strainers
At each 50-hour inspection the strainer plug should be removed from
the fuel injection control valve and the fuel injection control valve
screen washed in fresh cleaning solvent. After the strainer plug has
been reinstalled and safetied, the installation should be checked for
leakage. The strainer at the bottom of the fuel selector valve should
also be removed and cleaned with solvent every 100 hours. To
reduce the possibility of contaminated fuel, always cap any
disconnected fuel lines or fittings.
Ordinarily the finger strainers in the fuel cell outlets should not require
cleaning unless there is a definite indication of solid foreign material
in the cells or the airplane has been stored for an extended period.
August 1979
8 - 15
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Oil system
CAUTION
Oil consumption tends to be higher during break-in periods on
new engines. Therefore, maximum range flights should be
avoided and oil level brought to full after each flight during this
period.
The engine oil filler cap and the dipstick are accessible by opening
the access door on the left upper engine cowl. The sump capacity is
10 quarts. Normal operating level should be 8 to 10 quarts.
The oil should be changed and the oil screen should be cleaned
every 50 hours under normal operating conditions. To assure
complete drainage, the engine should be at operating temperature.
Oil Change Procedure
1. Remove the access plate from the engine cowl on the lower
right side.
2. Locate the oil sump drain plug at the low point of the engine
sump.
3. Remove the plug button below the sump drain and insert the oil
drain duct.
4. Remove the oil sump drain plug.
5. Remove the oil screen and flush thoroughly.
screen.
Replace the
6. Replace the oil sump drain plug and fill the engine with oil
August 1979
8 - 16
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
See Consumable Materials and Approved Engine Oils for specified
oils.
The engine manufacturer recommends Ashless dispersant oils. In
order to promote faster ring seating and oil control, a straight mineral
oil should be used for the first oil change period or until oil
consumption stabilizes.
Oils must meet Continental Motors
Corporation Specification MHS-24B. Refer to APPROVED ENGINE
OILS.
Battery
The A33 battery is accessible by opening the right door of the engine
cowling then through the access door on the firewall. The B33
battery is on the right forward side of the firewall. (NOTE: THE
BATTERY FOR AIRCRAFT N334Z IS ON THE RIGHT FORWARD
SIDE OF THE FIREWALL.) Check the electrolyte level after each 25
hours of operation and add distilled water as necessary. Do not
overfill the battery.
Excessive water consumption may be an indication that the voltage
regulator requires resetting. The specific gravity of the electrolyte
should be checked periodically and maintained within the limits
placarded on the battery.
The battery box is vented overboard to dispose of electrolyte and
hydrogen gas fumes discharged during the normal charging
operation. To ensure disposal of the fumes the vent tube should be
checked frequently for obstructions and should be kept open.
August 1979
8 - 17
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Tires
An inflation pressure of 30 psi should be maintained on the 6.00 x 6
main wheel tires. The 5.00 x 5 nose wheel tire should be inflated to
40 psi. Maintaining proper tire inflation will minimize tread wear and
aid in preventing tire failure caused from running over sharp stones.
When inflating tires, visually inspect them for cracks and breaks.
NOTE
Beech Aircraft Corporation cannot recommend the use of
recapped tires. Recapped tires have a tendency to swell as a
result of the increase temperatures generated during takeoff.
Increased tire size can jeopardize proper function of the landing
gear retract system, with the possibility of damage to the
landing gear doors and retract mechanism.
August 1979
8 - 18
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Shock Struts
The following procedures may be used for servicing both the main
and the nose gear shock struts.
To Inflate Struts
1. Check to see that the airplane is empty except for full fuel and
oil.
2. While rocking the airplane gently to prevent possible binding of
the piston in the barrel, inflate the shock strut until the main
gear piston is extended 3 inches. ( 3 – ½ inches on the nose
gear.)
CAUTION
If a compressed air bottle containing air under extremely high
pressure is used, exercise care to avoid over-inflating the shock
strut
WARNING
NEVER FILL SHOCK STRUTS WITH OXYGEN.
3. Remove all foreign material from the exposed piston with a soft
cloth moistened with hydraulic fluid..
August 1979
8 - 19
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
To Replenish Strut Hydraulic Fluid
1. Support the airplane on jacks at the wing jack points.
2. Remove the air valve cap, depress the valve core, and allow
the strut to fully deflate.
3. Raise and block the strut ¼ inch from the compressed position.
WARNING
Do not remove the valve body assembly until all air pressure has
been released or it may blow off, causing injury to personnel or
damage to equipment.
4. Carefully remove the valve body assembly
5. Fill the strut to the level of the valve body assembly with
hydraulic fluid (see Consumable Materials.)
6. Slowly extend the strut from the blocked position and replace
the valve body assembly.
7. Depress the valve core and completely compress the strut to
release excess air and oil.
8. Inflate the strut as described in the preceding inflation
procedure.
Shock Strut Shimmy Damper
The shimmy damper has a reservoir of fluid carried in the piston rod.
Two coil springs installed in the piston rod keep fluid in the shimmy
damper under pressure. As fluid is lost through leakage, it is
automatically replenished from the reservoir until the reservoir supply
is exhausted.
August 1979
8 - 20
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
To check the fluid level in the shimmy damper, insert a wire,
approximately 1/32 inch in diameter, through the hole in the disc at
the aft end of the piston rod until it touches the bottom of the hole in
the floating piston. Mark the wire, remove it, and measure the depth
of the insertion. When the shimmy damper is full, insertion depth is 2
– 3/16 inches, when empty 3 – 1/16 inches.
NOTE
The measuring wire should be inserted in the hole in the
floating piston rather than against the piston face to five a more
accurate reading. To determine if the wire is inserted in the
hole in the floating piston, insert the wire several times, noting
insertion depth each time. When the wire is inserted in the
hole, the depth will be about ¼ inch greater than when it rests
against the piston face.
When the shimmy damper is found empty or nearly empty, it should
be refilled. See Shop Manual.
Brakes
The brake hydraulic fluid reservoir is located on the firewall in the
engine compartment. A dipstick is attached to the reservoir cap.
Refer to Consumable Materials for hydraulic fluid specification.
The brakes require no adjustments since the pistons move to
compensate for lining wear.
August 1979
8 - 21
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Vacuum System
The vacuum system incorporates two screens; a relief valve screen
and an oil separator screen. These screens should be cleaned every
100 hours. If the airplane is operated in dusty conditions, the screen
should be cleaned more frequently.
Clean the suction relief valve screen by removing and washing in
cleaning solvent. Remove and clean the oil separator screen by
backflushing or submerging the unit in cleaning fluid. Blow dry with
air pressure.
The filter assemblies on the air driven instruments should be replaced
every 100 hours under normal operating conditions, and more often if
operated under dusty conditions.
Induction Air Filter
This filter should be inspected for foreign matter at least once during
each 50-hour operating period. In adverse climatic conditions, or if
the airplane is stored, preflight inspection is recommended.
To Remove and Clean the Filter
1. Remove the fuselage nose section grill.
2. Remove the wing nuts securing the filter and remove the filter.
3. Clean as described in the manufacturer’s instructions on the
filter.
August 1979
8 - 22
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Propeller Blades
The daily preflight inspection should include a careful examination of
the propeller blades for nicks and scratches.
Each blade leading edge should receive particular attention. It is very
important that all nicks and scratches be smoothed out and polished.
The BEECHCRAFT Aero or Aviation Center and International
Distributors or Dealers will be glad to answer any questions
concerning propeller blade repair.
WARNING
When servicing a propeller, always make certain the ignition
switch is off and that the engine has cooled completely. WHEN
MOVING A PROPELLER, STAND IN THE CLEAR.; there is
always some danger of a cylinder firing when a propeller is
moved.
Minor Maintenance
Rubber Seals
To prevent sticking of the rubber seals around the windows, doors,
and engine cowling, the seals should be coated with Oakite 6
compound. The compound is noninjurious to paint and can be
removed by normal cleaning methods.
Generator
Since the generator and voltage regulator are designed for use on
only one polarity system, the following precautionary measures much
August 1979
8 - 23
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
be observed when working or the charging circuit, or serious damage
to the electrical equipment will result:
1. When installing a battery, make certain that the ground polarity
of the battery and ground polarity of the generator are the
same.
2. When connecting a booster battery, be sure to connect the
negative battery terminals together and the positive battery
terminals together.
3. When using a battery charger, connect the positive lead of the
charger to the positive battery terminal and the negative lead of
the charger to the negative battery terminal.
Magnetos
Ordinarily, the magnetos will require only occasional adjustment,
lubrication and breaker pint replacement. This work should be done
by a BEECHCRAFT Aero or Aviation Center and International
Distributor or Dealer.
WARNING
To be safe, treat the magnetos as hot whenever a switch lead
is disconnected at any point; they do not have an internal
automatic grounding device. The magnetos can be grounded
by replacing the switch lead at the noise filter capacitor with a
wire which is grounded to the engine case. Otherwise, all spark
plug lead should be disconnected or the cable outlet plate on
the rear of the magneto should be removed.
August 1979
8 - 24
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Cleaning
Exterior Painted Surfaces
CAUTION
Do not apply wax or polish for a paint cure period of 90 days
after delivery. Waxes and polishes seal the paint from the air
and prevent curing. Wash uncured painted surfaces with cold
or lukewarm water and a MILD NON-DETERGENT SOAP. Any
rubbing of the surface should be done gently and held to a
minimum to avoid cracking the paint film
When washing the airplane with mild soap and water, use
special care to avoid washing away grease fro any lubricated
area. After washing with solvent in the wheel well areas,
lubricate all lubrication points. Premature wear of lubricated
surfaces may result if the above precautions are not taken.
Prior to cleaning, cover the wheels, making certain the brake discs
are covered. Attach the pitot cover securely, and plug or mask off all
other openings. Be particularly careful to mask off both static air
buttons before washing or waxing.
Flush loose dirt away with clean water, then wash with a mild soap
and water. Avoid harsh, abrasive, or alkaline soaps or detergents
which could cause corrosion or scratches. To remove stubborn oil
and grease, use a cloth dampened with aliphatic naphtha (see
Consumable Materials). After being cleaned with naphtha, the
surface should be re-waxed and polished. To prevent scratches, sue
soft cleaning cloths or chamois when cleaning and polishing. Any
good grade of automotive wax or polish can be used on painted
surfaces.
August 1979
8 - 25
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Windshield and Windows
The windshield and plastic windows should be kept clean and waxed
at all times. To prevent scratches, wash the windows carefully with
plenty of soap and water, using the palm of the hand to feel and
dislodge dirt and mud. A soft cloth chamois or sponge may be used,
but only to carry water to the surface. Rinse thoroughly, then dry with
a clean, moist chamois. Rubbing the surface of the plastic with a dry
cloth builds up an electrostatic charge which attracts dust particles in
the air.
Remove oil and grease with a cloth moistened with isopropyl alcohol.
Never use gasoline, benzene, alcohol, acetone, carbon tetrachloride,
fire extinguisher fluid, anti-ice fluid, laquer thinner, or glass cleaner.
These materials will soften the plastic and my cause it to craze.
After thoroughly cleaning, the surface should be waxed with a good
grade of commercial wax. The wax will fill in minor scratches and
help prevent further scratching. Apply a thin, even coat of wax and
bring it to a high polish by rubbing lightly with a clean, dry soft flannel
cloth. Do not use a power buffer; the heat generated by the buffing
pad may soften the plastic.
Interior
To remove dust and loose dirt from the upholstery, head-liner, and
carpet, clean the interior regularly with a vacuum cleaner.
Blot up any spilled liquid promptly with cleansing tissue or rags. Do
not pat the spot; press the blotting material firmly an hold it for several
August 1979
8 - 26
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
seconds. Continue blotting until no more liquid is taken up. Scrape
off sticky material with a dull knife, then spot clean the area.
Oily spots may be cleaned with household spot removers, used
sparingly. Before using any solvents, read the instructions on the
container and test it on an obscure place on the fabric to be cleaned.
Never saturate the fabric with a volatile solvent; it may damage the
padding and backing materials.
Soiled upholstery and carpet may be cleaned with foam-type
detergent used according to the manufacturer’s instructions. To
minimize wetting the fabric, keep the foam as dry as possible and
remove it with a vacuum cleaner.
The plastic trim, instrument panel, and control knobs need only be
wiped with a damp cloth. Oil and grease on the control wheel and
control knobs can be removed with a cloth moistened with isopropyl
alcohol. Volatile solvents, such as mentioned in the article on care of
plastic windows should never be used since they soften and craze
the plastic.
Engine
Clean the engine with neutral solvent. Spray or brush the fluid over
the engine, then wash off with water and allow to dry. Solutions
which may attack rubber or plastic should not be used.
August 1979
8 - 27
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Recommended Servicing Schedule
INTERVAL
Preflight
25 hours
50 hours
August 1979
ITEM
Check engine oil level
Drain fuel cells drains
LOCATION
LUBRICANT
(Letters refer to
Lubrication Points
Diagram)
(Number refers
to item on
consumables
Materials)
Upper left side of engine
Bottom of wing near
wing root
Drain fuel system low Bottom of fuselage, left
spot drain
side
Drain auxiliary fuel
Bottom of fuselage, left
cells drain (A33)
side
Service cells, main
Top of wings, leading
edge
Service auxiliary fuel
Aft and outboard of main
cells (A33)
cells
Check battery
Under right cowling door
electrolyte
(B33) and thru access
door in firewall (A33)
Change engine oil
Lower side of engine
Clean fuel injection
Lower engine
control screen
compartment
Clean induction air
Behind nose section grill
filter
Drain static air lines
Behind aft cabin side
panel access door
Lubricate landing gear Wheel wells (K)
retract mechanism and
uplock rollers
5
6
6
See Shop
Manual
5
7
4
8 - 28
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
INTERVAL
100 hours
August 1979
ITEM
Clean fuel selector
valve strainer
Clean vacuum pump
regulator screen
Lubricate
aileron
control linkage
Lubricate cabin door
mechanism
Lubricate control
column linkage
Lubricate elevator and
rudder control
mechanism
Lubricate elevator tab
chain
Lubricate landing gear
door hinges
Lubricate landing gear
retract mechanism and
uplock rollers
Lubricate nose wheel
steering mechanism
Lubricate rudder
pedals
Lubricate trim tab
control
Lubricate wheel
bearings
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
LOCATION
LUBRICANT
(Letters refer to
Lubrication Points
Diagram)
(Number refers
to item on
consumables
Materials)
Left side belly
7
Engine compartment
7
Each wing (J)
4
Aft edge of cabin door
(D)
Forward of instrument
panel (C)
Forward of tail bulkhead
(H)
4
In each horizontal
stabilizer (I)
Edge of wheel well (L)
(N)
Wheel wells (A)(K)
4
4
4
4
3,4
Nose wheel well (B)
3
Cockpit (M)
4
Control pedestal (D)
4
Nose and main wheels
(A) (K)
1
8 - 29
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
INTERVAL
300 hours
600 hours
900 hours
Ad Req.
ITEM
Flap motor (brushes)
Service landing gear
actuator gear box
Service landing gear
motor-reduction gears
Service flap motor
gear box
Lubricate flap
actuators
Lubricate flap flex
driveshafts
Lubricate elevator tab
actuators
Clean spark plugs
Service main and nose
shock struts
Service shimmy
damper
Drain static air lines
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
LOCATION
LUBRICANT
(Letters refer to
Lubrication Points
Diagram)
(Number refers
to item on
consumables
Materials)
Under front seats in
cabin (G)
Under front seats in
cabin (F)
Under front seats in
cabin (F)
Under front seats in
cabin (G)
Inside wing aft of wheel
well
8
8
3
10
9,10
Inside each horizontal
stabilizer (I)
Engine compartment
Landing gear
10
Nose gear
2
Behind aft cabin side
panel access door
-
2
Remove one end of the hose which forms the static line drain and
permit the system to drain.
NOTE
The static air line should be drained frequently during periods of
high humidity. Also drain the line each time is flown through heavy
rain or is washed down.
Note 3
August 1979
Replace emergency
locator transmitter
battery
At emergency locator
8 - 30
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
NOTES:
August 1979
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
1. Anytime the control surfaces are altered, repaired, or
repainted, the must be rebalanced per the Shop
Manual
2. Check the wing bolts for proper torque at the first
100-hour inspection and at the first 100-hour
inspection after each reinstallation of the wing attach
bolts
3. Non-rechargeable Batteries: Replace after one
cumulative hour or as noted on the battery.
8 - 31
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Lubrication Points
August 1979
8 - 32
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
NOSE GEAR RETRACT
NOSE WHEEL STEERING
August 1979
8 - 33
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
CONTROL COLUMN LINKAGE
ELEVATOR TRIM CONTROL
August 1979
8 - 34
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
CABIN DOOR
LANDING GEAR ACTUATOR GEAR BOX
August 1979
8 - 35
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
FLAP MOTOR AND ACTUATOR
ELEVATORS AND RUDDER CONTROL MECHANISM
August 1979
8 - 36
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
ELEVATOR TAB MECHANISM
AILERON BELL CRANKS
August 1979
8 - 37
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
MAIN GEAR RETRACT
MAIN GEAR DOOR HINGES
August 1979
8 - 38
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
RUDDER PEDALS
NOSE GEAR DOOR HINGES
NOTE: letters are keyed to the Service Schedule; Numbers refer to
items in the Consumables Materials Chart.
August 1979
8 - 39
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Consumable Materials
ITEM
MATERIAL
SPECIFICATION
1. Lubricating Grease, High
Aeroshell No 5 or MIL-GTemperature
81322
CAUTION
Do not mix Aeroshell No. 5 with MIL-G-81322. Thoroughly clean
grease from bearings and bearing area before changing grease.
2 Hydraulic Fluid
*3. Lubricating Grease, General
Purpose
4. Lubricating Oil
**5. Engine Oil
***6. Engine Fuel
MIL-H-5606
MIL –H- 81322
SAE 20 or
SAE 10W-.30
SAE No. 30 (Below 40°F)
SAE No. 50 (Above 40°F)
Grade 80/87 (Red)
7. Solvent
Federal Specification, PD 680
8. Lubricant
Mobil Compound GG
9. Lubricating Oil, Gear
MIL-L-10324 or
MIL-L-2105C,
Grade 75W
10. Grease, Aircraft and
Instrument
 11. Lubricant, Rubber Seal
Oakite 6 Compound
12. Naphtha, Aliphatic
Federal Specification TT-N-95
August 1979
MIL-G-23827
8 - 40
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
* In extremely cold climates use MIL-G-23287 grease in place of
MIL-G-81322 (These greases harmful to paint)
** Ashless dispersant oil (Teledyne Continental Motors Corp.
Spec. MHS-24B) recommended; straight mineral oils
recommended during break-in period. See servicing data.
*** If 80 / 87 (Red) grade fuel not available, use 100LL (Blue) or
100(Green) grade fuel
 Product of Oakite Products, Inc. 50 Valley Road, Berkley
Heights NJ 07922
August 1979
8 - 41
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Approved Engine Oils
COMPANY
BRAND AND WEIGHT
BP Oil Corporation
BP Aero Oil D 65/80
Castrol Limited (Australia)
Grade 40, Castorlaero AD, Type III
Grade 50, Castorlaero AD, Type II
Continental Oil Co.
Delta Petroleum Co
Conoco Aero S
Delta Avoil – Grades 30, 40, 50
Gulf Oil Corporation
Gulfpride Aviation AD
Humble Oil & Refining Co
Esso Aviation Oil
Enco Aviation Oil
Penzoil Company
Penzoil Aircraft Engine Oil, Heavy Duty
Dispersant
Phillips Petroleum Co
Phillips 66 Aviation Oil
(Replaced HD Aviation Oil)
Quaker State Refining Co
Quaker State AD Aviation Engine Oil,
Grades 20W30, 40 – 50
Sinclair Refining Co
Sinclair Avoil 20W40
Socony-Mobil
Mobil (Aero Oil 65)
Mobil (Aero Oil 80)
Mobil (Aero Oil 100)
Mobil (Aero Oil 120)
August 1979
Type
A
Ashless
Dispersant
Engine Oil
8 - 42
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
COMPANY
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
BRAND AND WEIGHT
Shell Oil Co
Aeroshell Oil W
Aeroshell Oil W (in 4 grades)
Grade 120 (Nominal SAE 60) – Military
Grade 1120
Grade 100 (Nominal SAE 50) – Military
Grade 1100
Grade 80 (Nominal SAE 40) – Military
Grade 1080
Grade 65 (Nominal SAE 20 or 30) –
Military Grade 1065
Texaco, Inc.
Texaco Aircraft Engine Oil Premium
AD, Grades 65, 80, 100
Union Oil of California
Union Aircraft Engine Oil HD Grades
80 - 100
NOTE
This chart lists all oils which were certified as meeting the
requirements of Teledyne Continental Motors Specification MHS-34B
at the time this handbook was published. Any other oil which
conforms to this specification may be used.
August 1979
8 - 43
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Bulb Replacement Guide
LOCATION
NUMBER
Compass light
330
Dome light
89
Elevator tab position indicator light
53
Fuel selector placard light (B33)
53
Aux fuel pump placard light (A33)
1813
Instrument light, overhead
89
Instrument light, post (B33)
330
Landing gear visual position light
53
Landing light
Navigation light, tail cone
Navigation light, wing
Rotating beacon (Grimes)
Rotating beacon (Whelen)(B33)
Stall warning light (A33)
August 1979
45222
93
1512
A-7079-12
WRM-44
1813
8 - 44
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Overhaul or Replacement Schedule
The first overhaul or replacement should be performed not later than
the required period. The condition of the item at the end of the first
period can be used as a criterion for determining subsequent periods
applicable to the individual airplane or fleet operation, providing the
operator has an approved monitoring system.
The time periods for inspection noted in this handbook are based on
average usage and average environmental conditions.
Special Conditions Cautionary Notice
Airplanes operated for Air Taxi or other than normal operation and
airplanes operated in humid tropics or cold and damp climates, etc,
may need more frequent inspections for wear, corrosion and/or lack
of lubrication.
In these areas periodic inspections should be
performed until the operator can set his own inspection periods based
on experience.
NOTE
The required periods do not constitute a guarantee that the item
will reach the period without malfunction, as the aforementioned
factors cannot be controlled by the manufacturer.
August 1979
8 - 45
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
COMPONENT
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
OVERHAUL OR REPLACE
Landing Gear
Main gear
Nose gear
Actuator Assembly
All except -13
P/N 35-810075-13
Retract motor
Retract motor brushes
Shimmy damper
Wheels and tires
Brake assembly
Brake lining
Master cylinder
Shuttle valve assembly
Parking brake valve
All hose
Ever 2000 hours
Ever 2000 hours
Ever 2000 hours
Ever 4000 hours
Ever 1000 hours
Ever 500 hours or on condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
Power Plant
NOTE
When an engine has been overhauled, or a new engine
installed, it is recommended that low power settings no be used
until oil consumption has stabilized. The average time for
piston ring seating is approximately 50 hours
Engine
Engine controls
Engine vibration isolator mounts
Exhaust system
August 1979
*Every 1500 hours
On Condition
Engine change or on condition
On Condition
8 - 46
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
COMPONENT
Starter
Generator/Alternator
Oil cooler
Propeller (Hartzell)
Propeller (McCauley)
Propeller (Flottorp)
Propeller controls
Propeller governor
Fuel pressure pump
Cabin heat muff
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
OVERHAUL OR REPLACE
Inspect at engine overhaul,
overhaul or replace on condition
On Condition
On Condition
1500 hours or 4 years. Reduce
to 1000 hours or 3 years if
airplane is store out in the
weather
At engine overhaul not to exceed
1500 hours if accumulated within
3 calendar years, otherwise 1200
hours.
At engine overhaul but not to
exceed 1000 hours
On Condition
At engine overhaul buy not to
exceed 1500 hours or 3 years
Every 1500 hours
Inspect every 100 hours
Fuel System
Wing cells
Wing fuel quantity transmitters
Fuel cell drain valve
Fuel system check valves
Fuel selector valve
Auxiliary fuel pump
All hose
COMPONENT
August 1979
On Condition
On Condition
On Condition
On Condition
Inspect every 600 hours
Overhaul every 1200 hours
Every 1200 hours
Hose carrying flammable liquids
at engine overhaul or every 5
years.
All other hose on condition
OVERHAUL OR REPLACE
8 - 47
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
Instruments
Turn coordinator
Altimeter
Directional Gyro
Gyro pressure
Engine indicator units
Airspeed indicator
Rate of climb
Fuel quantity indicator
Fuel pressure (flow) indicator
Manifold pressure indicator
Tachometer
Free air temperature indicator
Al hose
Vacuum system filter
Vacuum regulator valve
On condition
Every 24 months per FAA
directive (Inspect and calibrate)
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
Every 100 hours
On condition
Electrical System
Battery master relay
All other relays
Voltage regulator
Starter relay
August 1979
On condition
On condition
On condition
On condition
8 - 48
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
COMPONENT
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
OVERHAUL OR REPLACE
Flaps and Flight Controls
Flight controls
Elevator tab actuator
Flap motor and drives
Flap motor brushes
Flap gear box
Flap actuators
Flap flexible shaft
On condition
On condition
Every 2000 hours
On condition
Every 2000 hours
Every 2000 hours
Every 2000 hours
Miscellaneous
Seat belts
Inspect every 12 months, replace
on condition
Hand fire extinguisher
Inspect
every
12
months,
recharge as necessary
Cabin heating and ventilating On condition, inspect every 12
ducts
months
*Reference Teledyne Continental Motors Corporation Service Bulletin
M74-20, Rev. 1, dated November 7, 1974 or later issue.
With particular attention to throttle response, smooth power and oil
consumption, a qualified certificated mechanic must determine that
the engine is operating normally at the time of each periodic
inspection.
August 1979
8 - 49
Section VIII
Handling, Servicing and Maintenance
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
August 1979
8 - 50
Section IX
Supplements
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
SECTION IX
SUPPLEMENTS
NOTE
The supplemental data contained in this section is for
equipment that was delivered on the airplane including
standard optional equipment that was available, whether it was
installed or not. Supplements for equipment for which the
vendor obtained a Supplemental Type Certificate were included
as loose equipment with the airplane at the time of delivery.
These and other Supplements for other equipment that was
installed after the airplane was delivered new from the factory
should be placed in the SUPPLEMENTS Section of this Pilot’s
Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight
Manual.
August 1979
9-1
Section IX
Supplements
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
August 1979
9-2
Section IX
Supplements
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
PILOT’S OPERATING HANDBOOK
and
FAA APPROVED AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL
LOG OF SUPPLEMENTS
FAA Supplements must be in the airplane for flight operation when
subject equipment is installed
Supp.
No.
1
Part
Number
35-590013-1
2
Date
Tactair T-2 Autopilot
Rev.
No.
1
33-590013-3
Tactair T-3 Autopilot
2
9/77
3
35-590101-9
McCauley Propeller
1
6/77
4
35-500013-65
Power Flite Control
August 1979
Subject
6/77
10/78
9-3
Section IX
Supplements
BEECHCRAFT
Debonair A33 and B33
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
August 1979
9-4
BEECHCRAFT LANDPLANES
35-33, 35 – A33 and B33
PILOT’S OPERATING HANDBOOK AND
FAA APPROVED AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL
SUPPLEMENT
for the
TACTAIR T-2 AUTOPILOT
GENERAL
This document is to be attached to the Pilot’s Operating Handbook
and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual when the airplane is
equipped with a Tactair T-2 autopilot, which has been installed in
accordance with BEECHCRAFT FAA approved data.
The information in this document supersedes the Pilot’s Operating
Handbook only where covered in the items contained herein.
LIMITATIONS
1. Autopilot operation not certificated above 20,000 feet.
2. Do not use autopilot during take-off or landing
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
1. If a drop in suction below 3.5 is noted on the Instrument Suction
Gage, push Master Pilot “OFF to return instruments to normal
flight operation. Check for leaks in Autopilot system at earliest
convenience.
2. The Autopilot can be disengaged by pushing the Master “ONOFF” to the “OFF” position, in the event of malfunction. It can
also be overpowered manually be exerting enough force on the
controls to override the Autopilot.
FAA Approved
Revised: June 1977
P/N 33-590013-1
NORMAL PROCEDURES
1. To Engage Autopilot:
Trim airplane for cruising flight. Cage the directional gyro. Have
Course Selector Card coincide with Directional Gyro heading.
Center the Roll Trim Knob.
Pull Master “ON-OFF” to “ON” position to engage Autopilot.
Adjust Roll Trim Knot for level flight.
Uncage directional gyro.
2. Operation of Autopilot:
Heading can be selecting by setting the upper card of the Directional
Gyro with “Course” Selector Knob. Autopilot will bring the airplane to
desired heading if within 80° of either side of desired heading. Past
80°, the Heading Lock will turn the airplane to the reciprocal of the
heading requested. All corrections using the Course Selector Knob
have a turn rate of approximately 1° per second. The Roll Trim Knob
can be moved left or right to shift the roll zero point in the
corresponding direction.
PERFORMANCE – No Change
Approved:
Chester A. Rembleske
Beech Aircraft Corporation
DOA CE-2
FAA Approved
Revised: June 1977
P/N 33-590013-1
BEECHCRAFT LANDPLANES
35-33, 35 – A33 and B33
PILOT’S OPERATING HANDBOOK AND
FAA APPROVED AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL
SUPPLEMENT
for the
TACTAIR T-3 AUTOPILOT
GENERAL
This document is to be attached to the Pilot’s Operating Handbook
and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual when the airplane is
equipped with a Tactair T-2 autopilot, which has been installed in
accordance with BEECHCRAFT FAA approved data.
The information in this document supersedes the Pilot’s Operating
Handbook only where covered in the items contained herein.
LIMITATIONS
1. Autopilot operation not certificated above 20,000 feet.
2. Do not use autopilot during take-off or landing
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
1. Maximum altitude lost during malfunctioning tests in cruise
configuration, 100 feet.
2. Maximum altitude lost during malfunctioning tests in
approach configuration, 100 feet.
3. If a drop in suction below 3.5 is noted on the Instrument
Suction Gage, push Master Pilot “OFF to return instruments
to normal flight operation. Check for leaks in Autopilot
system at earliest convenience.
FAA Approved
Revised: June 1977
P/N 33-590013-3
4. The Autopilot can be disengaged by pushing the Master
“ON-OFF” to the “OFF” position, in the event of malfunction.
It can also be overpowered manually be exerting enough
force on the controls to override the Autopilot.
5. Altitude Hold (if installed). If altitude deviates excessively
from set altitude, disengage Altitude Hold by pushing knob
in. Then reengage Altitude Hold as indicated above. If it still
deviates, a malfunction exists, and the Altitude Hold should
be disengaged.
Check for leakage at the earliest
convenience.
NOTE
The Altitude Hold may be overpowered manually however,
upon release of the controls, the airplane will attempt to return
to the set altitude, unless Altitude Hold is disengaged before
changing altitude.
NORMAL PROCEDURES
3. To Engage Autopilot:
Trim airplane for cruising flight. Have Course Selector Card coincide
with Directional Gyro heading.
Set Pitch Control Knob for level flight (raised pointer near center of
Knob range).
Center the Turn Knob.
Pull Master “ON-OFF” to “ON” position to engage Autopilot
If necessary, readjust Pitch Knob.
2. Operation of Autopilot:
FAA Approved
Revised: June 1977
P/N 33-590013-3
Pitch angle (climb or Dive) can be controlled within limits by rotation
of Pitch Control Knob.) Command limits are approximately 10° down
and 15° up).
Controlled turns left or right, up to 26° bank angles, can be made by
rotating Turn Control Knob off center. Operation of the Turn Knob off
center disconnects the “Heading Lock”
When the Turn Knob is set at center for level flight, the “Heading
Lock” button can be pushed in to provide heading reference to the
Directional Gyro. Heading can be selected by setting the upper card
and the Directional Gyro with the “Course” Selector Knob. Autopilot
will bring the airplane to desired heading if within 80° of either side of
desired heading. Past 80°, the Heading Lock will turn the airplane to
the reciprocal of the heading requested. All corrections using the
Course Selector Knob have a turn rate of approximately 1° per
second. The tab beneath the Turn Knob can be moved left or right to
shift the roll zero point up to two degrees in the corresponding
direction. When desired altitude is attained, engage Altitude Hold (if
installed) by pulling out Altitude Hold Knob on right side of Command
Control Unit.
Disengage Altitude Hold by pushing in Altitude Hold Knob whenever
a change to another altitude is desired.
PERFORMANCE – No Change
Approved:
Chester A. Rembleske
Beech Aircraft Corporation
DOA CE-2
FAA Approved
Revised: June 1977
P/N 33-590013-3
BEECHCRAFT LANDPLANES
35-33, 35 – A33 and B33
PILOT’S OPERATING HANDBOOK AND
FAA APPROVED AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL
SUPPLEMENT
for the
McCauley 2A36C23/84 B–O PROPELLER
GENERAL
This document is to be attached to the Pilot’s Operating Handbook
and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual when the McCauley
2A36C23/84 B–O Propeller is installed.
LIMITATIONS
Propeller
Hub............................................................................... 2A36C23
Blade ............................................................................... 84 B–O
Spinner.............................................................................D-3290
Pitch Setting ....................................................................Refer to
Aircraft Specification 3A15
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES – No Change
NORMAL PROCEDURES – No Change
PERFORMANCE – No Change
Approved:
Chester A. Rembleske
Beech Aircraft Corporation
DOA CE-2
FAA Approved
Revised: June 1977
P/N 33-590101-9
BEECHCRAFT LANDPLANES
35 – B33 and P35
PILOT’S OPERATING HANDBOOK AND
FAA APPROVED AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL
SUPPLEMENT
for the
BEECHCRAFT POWER FLITE CONTROL
GENERAL
This document is to be attached to the Pilot’s Operating Handbook
and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual when the airplane is
equipped with a BEECHCRAFT Power Flite Control which has been
installed in accordance with BEECHCRAFT FAA approved data.
The information in this document supersedes the Pilot’s Operating
Handbook only where covered in the items contained herein.
LIMITATIONS
1. Autopilot operation not certificated above 20,000 feet.
2. Do not use autopilot during take-off or landing
3. Speed limitations for Autopilot same as airplane speed limitations.
FAA Approved
Revised: June 1978
P/N 33-5900013-65
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
1. If a drop in suction below 3.5 is noted on the Instrument
Suction Gage, push MAIN Knob “OFF to return instruments
to normal flight operation. Check for leaks in Autopilot
system at earliest convenience.
2. The Autopilot can be disengaged by pushing the MAIN Knob
to the “OFF” position, in the event of malfunction. It can also
be overpowered manually be exerting enough force on the
controls to override the Autopilot.
NORMAL PROCEDURES
1. To Engage Autopilot:
a. Trim airplane for cruising flight
b. Turn the Command Knob to the center detent position
and pull “out”
c. Center the TRIM Knob
d. On Power Flite Control with “course selector” directional
gyro installed: Align the course selector card with the
directional gyro compass card heading
e. Pull MAIN Knob to “ON’ position to engage Autopilot
f. If necessary, readjust TRIM Knob to maintain a wings
level flight condition.
FAA Approved
Revised: June 1978
P/N 33-5900013-65
2. Operation of Autopilot:
a. Controlled turns left or right, up to a rate of 3 degrees per
second, can be made by pulling the Command Knob to
the “out” detent position and turning off center. To return
the airplane to level flight, rotate the Command Knob to
the extreme opposite position, until the airplane returns to
level flight, then center the Command Knob to the detent
position. A new heading may be obtained by manually
overriding the Autopilot.
b. On Power Flite Control with “course selector” directional
gyro installed:
i. When the Command Knob is set at center for level
flight, the Knob can be pushed in to provide heading
reference to the directional gyro. Heading can be
selected by setting the upper card of the directional
gyro with “Course” Selector Knob. Autopilot will
bring the airplane to desired heading if within 80° of
either side of desired heading. Past 80°, the
Heading Lock will turn the airplane to the reciprocal
of the heading requested. All corrections using the
Course Selector Knob have a turn rate of
approximately 1° per second.
ii. When the “course selector” heading signal is
engaged, the TRIM Knob is used to align the
heading on the directional gyro compass card with
the selected heading on the course selector card.
iii. The heading feature may be disengaged by pulling
the Command Knob to the “out” detent position.
Pulling the Command Knob to the “out” detent
position disengages the heading signal completely,
and turns can be made by rotating the Command
Knob. Turns cannot be made when the Command
FAA Approved
Revised: June 1978
P/N 33-5900013-65
Knob is in the “in” detent position, engaging the
heading signal.
PERFORMANCE – No Change
Approved:
Chester A. Rembleske
Beech Aircraft Corporation
DOA CE-2
FAA Approved
Revised: June 1978
P/N 33-5900013-65
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
SECTION X
SAFETY INFORMATION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SUBJECT
PAGE
INTRODUCTION............................................................................. 3
GENERAL ...................................................................................... 5
DO'S ............................................................................................ 5
DON'TS........................................................................................ 6
SOURCES OF INFORMATION ...................................................... 7
PILOT'S OPERATING HANDBOOK AND FAA APPROVED
AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL ....................................................... 7
BEECHCRAFT SERVICE PUBLICATIONS................................... 8
FEDERAL AVIATION REGULATIONS........................................ 10
AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES .............................................. 10
AIRMAN'S INFORMATION MANUAL ........................................ 11
ADVISORY INFORMATION ...................................................... 12
FAA ADVISORY CIRCULARS ................................................... 12
FAA GENERAL AVIATION NEWS ............................................. 16
FAA ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROGRAM ............................. 16
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ................................................... 17
GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPECIFIC TOPICS.................... 18
MAINTENANCE......................................................................... 18
HAZARDS OF UNAPPROVED MODIFICATIONS..................... 20
FLIGHT PLANNING ................................................................... 21
PASSENGER INFORMATION CARDS ..................................... 22
STOWAGE OF ARTICLES ........................................................ 22
FLIGHT OPERATIONS .............................................................. 23
GENERAL............................................................................... 23
PREFLIGHT INSPECTION ........................................................ 23
WEIGHT AND BALANCE........................................................... 23
October, 1990
10-1
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
AUTOPILOTS AND ELECTRIC TRIM SYSTEMS...................... 24
TURBULENT WEATHER........................................................... 28
WIND SHEAR ............................................................................ 30
WEATHER RADAR.................................................................... 31
MOUNTAIN FLYING .................................................................. 33
VFR - LOW CEILINGS ............................................................... 34
VFR AT NIGHT .......................................................................... 34
VERTIGO - DISORIENTATION.................................................. 35
STALLS, SLOW FLIGHT AND TRAINING ................................. 37
SPINS ........................................................................................ 37
DESCENT.................................................................................. 39
VORTICES - WAKE TURBULENCE .......................................... 40
TAKEOFF AND LANDING CONDITIONS .................................. 41
MEDICAL FACTS FOR PILOTS .................................................. 41
GENERAL.................................................................................. 41
FATIGUE ................................................................................... 42
HYPOXIA ................................................................................... 42
HYPERVENTILATION ............................................................... 44
ALCOHOL.................................................................................. 45
DRUGS ...................................................................................... 46
SCUBA DIVING ......................................................................... 47
CARBON MONOXIDE AND NIGHT VISION .............................. 47
A FINAL WORD ........................................................................... 47
October, 1990
10-2
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
INTRODUCTION
Beech Aircraft Corporation has developed this special summary
publication of safety information to refresh pilots' and owners'
knowledge of safety related subjects. Topics in this publication are
dealt with in more detail in FAA Advisory Circulars and other
publications pertaining to the subject of safe flying.
The skilled pilot recognizes that safety consciousness is an integral and never-ending - part of his or her job. Be thoroughly familiar with
your airplane. Know its limitations and your own. Maintain your
currency, or fly with a qualified instructor until you are current and
proficient. Practice emergency procedures at safe altitudes and
airspeeds, preferably with a qualified instructor pilot, until the required
action can be accomplished without reference to the manual.
Periodically review this safety information as part of your recurrency
training regimen.
BEECHCRAFT airplanes are designed and built to provide you with
many years of safe and efficient transportation. By maintaining your
BEECHCRAFT properly and flying it prudently you will realize its full
potential.
............ Beech Aircraft Corporation
October, 1990
10-3
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
WARNING
Because your aircraft is a high performance, high
speed transportation vehicle, designed for
operation in three-dimensional environment,
special safety precautions must be observed to
reduce the risk of fatal or serious injuries to the
pilot(s) and occupants).
It is mandatory that you fully understand the contents of this manual
and the other manuals which accompany the aircraft; that FAA
requirements for ratings, certifications and review be scrupulously
complied with; and that you allow only persons who are properly
licensed and rated, and thoroughly familiar with the contents of the
Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight
Manual to operate the aircraft IMPROPER OPERATION OR
MAINTENANCE OF AN AIRCRAFT, NO MATTER HOW WELL
BUILT INITIALLY, CAN RESULT IN CONSIDERABLE DAMAGE OR
TOTAL DESTRUCTION OF THE AIRCRAFT ALONG WITH
SERIOUS OR FATAL INJURIES TO ALL OCCUPANTS,
October, 1990
10-4
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
GENERAL
As a pilot, you are responsible to yourself and to those who fly with
you, to other pilots and their passengers and to people on the ground,
to fly wisely and safely.
The following material in this Safety Section covers several subjects
in limited detail. Here are some condensed Do's and Don'ts.
DO'S
Be thoroughly familiar with your airplane, know its limitations and your
own.
Be current in your airplane, or fly with a qualified instructor until you
are current. Practice until you are proficient.
Preplan all aspects of your flight - including a proper weather briefing
and adequate fuel reserves.
Use services available - weather briefing, inflight weather and Flight
Service Station.
Carefully preflight your airplane.
Use the approved checklist.
Have more than enough fuel for takeoff, plus the trip, and an
adequate reserve.
Be sure your weight and C.G. are within limits. Use seatbelts and
shoulder harnesses at all times.
Be sure all loose articles and baggage are secured.
October, 1990
10-5
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
Check freedom and proper direction of operation of all controls during
preflight inspection.
Maintain the prescribed airspeeds in takeoff, climb, descent, and
landing.
Avoid wake turbulence (Vortices).
Preplan fuel and fuel tank management before the actual flight. Utilize
auxiliary tanks only in level cruise flight. Take off and land on the
fullest main tank, NEVER use auxiliary tanks for takeoff or landing.
Practice emergency procedures at safe altitudes and airspeeds,
preferably with a qualified instructor pilot, until the required action can
be accomplished without reference to the manual.
Keep your airplane in good mechanical condition. Stay informed and
alert; fly in a sensible manner.
DON'TS
Don't take off with frost, ice or snow on the airplane.
Don't take off with less than minimum recommended fuel, plus
adequate reserves, and don't run the tank dry before switching.
Don't fly in a reckless, show-off, or careless manner. Don't fly into
thunderstorms or severe weather.
Don't fly in possible icing conditions.
Don't fly close to mountainous terrain.
Don't apply controls abruptly or with high forces that could exceed
design loads of the airplane.
Don't fly into weather conditions that are beyond your ratings or
current proficiency.
October, 1990
10-6
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
Don't fly when physically or mentally exhausted or below par.
Don't trust to luck.
SOURCES OF INFORMATION
There is a wealth of information available to the pilot created for the
sole purpose of making your flying safer, easier and more efficient.
Take advantage of this knowledge and be prepared for an emergency
in the event that one should occur.
PILOT'S OPERATING HANDBOOK AND FAA APPROVED
AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL
You must be thoroughly familiar with the contents of your operating
manuals, placards, and check lists to ensure safe utilization of your
airplane. When the airplane was manufactured, it was equipped with
one or more of the following: placards, Owner's Manual, FAA Flight
Manual, Approved Flight Manual Supplements, Pilot's Operating
Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual. Beech has
revised and reissued many of the early manuals for certain models of
airplanes in GAMA Standard Format as Pilot's Operating Handbooks
and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manuals. For simplicity and
convenience, all official manuals in various models are referred to as
the Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Flight Manual. If
the airplane has changed ownership, the Pilot's Operating Handbook
and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual may have been misplaced
or may not be current. Replacement handbooks may be obtained
from any BEECHCRAFT Aviation Center.
October, 1990
10-7
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
BEECHCRAFT SERVICE PUBLICATIONS
Beech Aircraft Corporation publishes a wide variety of manuals,
service letters, service instructions, service bulletins, safety
communiqués and other publications for the various models of
BEECHCRAFT airplanes. Information on how to obtain publications
relating to your airplane is contained in BEECHCRAFT Service
Bulletin number 2001, entitled "General - BEECHCRAFT Service
Publications -What is Available and How to Obtain It."
Beech Aircraft Corporation automatically mails original issues and
revisions of BEECHCRAFT Mandatory and Optional Service
Bulletins, FAA Approved Flight Manual Supplements, reissues and
revisions of FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manuals, Flight
Handbooks, Owners Manuals, Pilot's Operating Manuals and Pilot's
Operating Handbooks, and original issues and revisions of
BEECHCRAFT Safety Communiqués to BEECHCRAFT Owners
addresses as listed by the FAA Aircraft Registration Branch List and
the BEECHCRAFT International Owner Notification Service List.
While this information is distributed by Beech Aircraft Corporation,
Beech can not make changes in the name or address furnished by
the FAA. The owner must contact the FAA regarding any changes to
name or address. Their address is: FAA Aircraft Registration Branch
(AAC250) P.O. Box 25082, Oklahoma City, OK 73125, Phone (405)
680-2131.
It is the responsibility of the FAA owner of record to ensure that any
mailings from Beech are forwarded to the proper persons. Often the
FAA registered owner is a bank or financing company or an individual
not in possession of the airplane. Also, when an airplane is sold,
there is a lag in processing the change in registration with the FAA. If
you are a new owner, contact your BEECHCRAFT dealer and ensure
your manuals are up to date.
October, 1990
10-8
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
Beech Aircraft Corporation provides a subscription service which
provides for direct factory mailing of BEECHCRAFT publications
applicable to a specific serial number airplane. Details concerning the
fees and ordering information for this owner subscription service are
contained in Service Bulletin number 2001.
For owners who choose not to apply for a Publications Revision
Subscription Service, Beech provides a free Owner Notification
Service by which owners are notified by post card of BEECHCRAFT
manual reissues, revisions and supplements which are being issued
applicable to the airplane owned. On receipt of such notification, the
owner may obtain the publication through a BEECHCRAFT Aviation
Center, Aero Center or International Distributor. This notification
service is available when requested by the owner. This request may
be made by using the owner notification request card furnished with
the loose equipment of each airplane at the time of delivery, or by a
letter requesting this service, referencing the specific airplane serial
number owned.
Write to:
Supervisor, Special Services Dept. 52
Beech Aircraft Corporation P.O. Box 85
Wichita, Kansas 67201-0085
From time to time Beech Aircraft Corporation issues BEECHCRAFT
Safety Communiqués dealing with the safe operation of a specific
series of airplanes, or airplanes in general. It is recommended that
each owner/ operator maintain a current file of these publications.
Back issues of BEECHCRAFT Safety Communiqués may be
obtained without charge by sending a request, including airplane
model and serial number, to the Supervisor, Special Services, at the
address listed above.
Airworthiness Directives (AD's) are not issued by the manufacturer.
They are issued and available from the FAA.
October, 1990
10-9
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
FEDERAL AVIATION REGULATIONS
FAR Part 91, General Operating and Flight Rules, is a document of
law governing operation of aircraft and the owner's and pilot's
responsibilities. Some of the subjects covered are:
Responsibilities and authority of the pilot-in-command
Certificates required
Liquor and drugs
Flight plans
Preflight action
Fuel requirements
Flight rules
Maintenance, preventive maintenance, alterations, inspection and
maintenance records
You, as a pilot, have responsibilities under government regulations.
The regulations are designed for your protection and the protection of
your passengers and the public. Compliance is mandatory.
AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES
FAR Part 39 specifies that no person may operate a product to which
an Airworthiness Directive issued by the FAA applies, except in
accordance with the requirements of that Airworthiness Directive.
October, 1990
10-10
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
AIRMAN'S INFORMATION MANUAL
The Airman's Information Manual (AIM) is designed to provide airmen
with basic flight information and ATC procedures for use in the
national airspace system of the United States. It also contains items
of interest to pilots concerning health and medical facts, factors
affecting flight safety, a pilot/controller glossary of terms in the Air
Traffic Control system, information on safety, and accident/hazard
reporting. It is revised at six-month intervals and can be purchased
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing
Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.
This document contains a wealth of pilot information. Among the
subjects are:
Controlled Airspace Emergency Procedures Services Available to
Pilots
Weather and Icing
Radio Phraseology and Technique Mountain Flying
Airport Operations
Wake Turbulence - Vortices Clearances and Separations
Medical Facts for Pilots
Preflight
Bird Hazards Departures - IFR
Good Operating Practices
En route – IFR
Airport Location Director
Arrival - IFR
October, 1990
10-11
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
All pilots must be thoroughly familiar with and use the information in
the AIM.
ADVISORY INFORMATION
NOTAMS (Notices to Airmen) are documents that have information of
a time-critical nature that would affect a pilot's decision to make a
flight; for example, an airport closed, terminal radar out of service, or
enroute navigational aids out of service.
FAA ADVISORY CIRCULARS
The FAA issues Advisory Circulars to inform the aviation public in a
systematic way of non-regulatory material of interest. Advisory
Circulars contain a wealth of information with which the prudent pilot
should be familiar. A complete list of current FAA Advisory Circulars is
published in AC 00-2, which lists Advisory Circulars that are for sale,
as well as those distributed free of charge by the FAA, and provides
ordering information. Many Advisory Circulars which are for sale can
be purchased locally in aviation bookstores or at FBO's. These
documents are subject to periodic revision. Be certain the Advisory
Circular you are using the latest revision available. Some of the
Advisory Circulars of interest to pilots are:
*00-6
Aviation Weather
00-24
Thunderstorms
00-30
Rules of Thumb for Avoiding or Minimizing
Encounters with Clear Air Turbulence
*00-45
Aviation Weather Services
00-46
Aviation Safety Reporting
Program
October, 1990
10-12
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
20-5
Plane Sense
20-32
Carbon Monoxide (CO) Contamination
Aircraft Detection and Prevention
20-35
Tie-Down Sense
20-43
Aircraft Fuel Control
20-105
Engine Power-Loss Accident Prevention
20-113
Pilot Precautions and Procedures to be Taken
in Preventing Aircraft Reciprocating Engine
Induction System & Fuel System Icing
Problems
20-125
Water in Aviation Fuel
21-4
Special Flight Permits
Overweight Aircraft
43-9
Maintenance Records: General Aviation Aircraft
43-12
Preventive Maintenance
60-4
Pilot's Spatial Disorientation
60-6
Airplane Flight Manuals (AFM), Approved
Manual Materials, Markings and Placards
Airplanes
60-12
Availability of Industry-Developed Guidelines
for the Conduct of the Biennial Flight Review
60-13
The Accident
Program
*61-9
Pilot Transition Courses for Complex SingleEngine and Light Twin-Engine Airplanes
*61-21
Flight Training Handbook
*61-23
Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge
October, 1990
Prevention
for
in
Operation
of
Counselor
10-13
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
*61-27
Instrument Flying Handbook
61-67
Hazards Associated with Spins in Airplanes
Prohibited from Intentional Spinning
61-84
Role of Preflight Preparation
*67-2
Medical Handbook for Pilots
90-23
Aircraft Wake Turbulence
90-42
Traffic Advisory Practices at Non-tower Airports
90-48
Pilot's Role in Collision Avoidance
90-66
Recommended Standard Traffic Patterns for
Airplane Operations at Uncontrolled Airports
90-85
Severe Weather Avoidance Plan (SWAP)
91-6
Water, Slush and Snow on the Runway
91-13
Cold Weather Operation of Aircraft
*91-23
Pilot's Weight and Balance Handbook
91-26
Maintenance and Handling of Air Driven
Gyroscopic Instruments
91-33
Use of Alternate Grades of Aviation Gasoline
for Grade 80! 87 and Use of Automotive
Gasoline
91-35
Noise, Hearing Damage,
General Aviation Pilots
91-43
Unreliable Airspeed Indications
91-44
Operational and Maintenance Practices for
Emergency Locator Transmitters and Receivers
91-46
Gyroscopic Instruments - Good Operating
Practices
October, 1990
and
Fatigue
in
10-14
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
91-50
Importance of Transponder Operations and
Altitude Reporting
91-51
Airplane Deice and Anti-ice Systems
91-59
Inspection and Care of General Aviation Aircraft
Exhaust Systems
91-65
Use of Shoulder Harness in Passenger Seats
103-4
Hazards Associated with Sublimation of Solid
Carbon Dioxide (Dry Ice) Aboard Aircraft
210-5A
Military Flying Activities
NOTE:
* For Sale
October, 1990
10-15
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
FAA GENERAL AVIATION NEWS
FAA General Aviation News is published by the FAA in the interest of
flight safety. The magazine is designed to promote safety in the air by
calling the attention of general aviation airmen to current technical,
regulatory and procedural matters affecting the safe operation of
aircraft. FAA General Aviation News is sold on subscription by the
Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office,
Washington D.C., 20402.
FAA ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROGRAM
The FAA assigns accident prevention specialists to each Flight
Standards and General Aviation District Office to organize accident prevention program activities. In addition, there are over 3,000
volunteer airmen serving as accident prevention counselors, sharing
their technical expertise and professional knowledge with the general
aviation community. The FAA conducts seminars and workshops, and
distributes invaluable safety information under this program.
Usually the airport manager, the FAA Flight Service Station (FSS), or
Fixed Base Operator (FBO), will have a list of accident prevention
counselors and their phone numbers available. All Flight Standards
and General Aviation District Offices have a list of the counselors
serving the District.
Before flying over unfamiliar territory, such as mountainous terrain or
desert areas, it is advisable for transient pilots to consult with local
counselors. They will be familiar with the more desirable routes, the
wind and weather conditions, and the service and emergency landing
areas that are available along the way. They can also offer advice on
the type of emergency equipment you should be carrying.
October, 1990
10-16
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation
Administration periodically issue, in greater detail, general aviation
pamphlets concerning aviation safety. FAA Regional Offices also
publish material under the FAA General Aviation Accident Prevention
Program. These can be obtained at FAA Offices, Weather Stations,
Flight Service Stations or Airport Facilities. Some of these are titled:
12 Golden Rules for Pilots
Weather or Not
Disorientation
Plane Sense
Weather Info Guide for Pilots Wake Turbulence
Don't Trust to Luck, Trust to Safety
Rain, Fog, Snow
Thunderstorm - TRW
Icing
Pilot's Weather Briefing Guide
Thunderstorms Don't Flirt .. , Skirt 'em
IFR-VFR - Either Way Disorientation Can Be Fatal
IFR Pilot Exam-a-Grams
VFR Pilot Exam-a-Grams
Tips on Engine Operation in Small General Aviation Aircraft
Estimating Inflight Visibility
Is the Aircraft Ready for Flight
Tips on Mountain Flying
Tips on Desert Flying
Always Leave Yourself An Out
Safety Guide for Private Aircraft Owners
October, 1990
10-17
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
Tips on How to Use the Flight Planner
Tips on the Use of Ailerons and Rudder
Some Hard Facts About Soft Landings
Propeller Operation and Care
Torque "What it Means to the Pilot"
Weight and Balance. An Important Safety Consideration for
Pilots
GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPECIFIC TOPICS
MAINTENANCE
Safety of flight begins with a well maintained airplane. Make it a habit
to keep your aircraft and all its equipment in airworthy condition. Keep
a "squawk list" on board, and see that all discrepancies, however
minor, are noted and promptly corrected.
Schedule your maintenance regularly, and have your aircraft serviced
by a reputable organization. Be suspicious of bargain prices for
maintenance, repair and inspections.
It is the responsibility of the owner and the operator to assure that the
airplane is maintained in an airworthy condition and that proper
maintenance records are kept.
Use only genuine BEECHCRAFT or BEECHCRAFT approved parts
obtained from BEECHCRAFT approved sources, in connection with
the maintenance and repair of Beech airplanes.
October, 1990
10-18
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
Genuine BEECHCRAFT parts are produced and inspected under
rigorous procedures to insure airworthiness and suitability for use in
Beech airplane applications. Parts purchased from sources other
than BEECHCRAFT, even though outwardly identical in appearance,
may not have had the required tests and inspections performed, may
be different in fabrication techniques and materials, and may be
dangerous when installed in an airplane.
Salvaged airplane parts, reworked parts obtained from nonBEECHCRAFT approved sources or parts, components, or structural
assemblies, the service history of which is unknown or cannot be
authenticated, may have been subjected to unacceptable stresses or
temperatures or have other hidden damage not discernible through
routine visual or usual nondestructive testing techniques. This may
render the part, component, or structural assembly, even though
originally manufactured by BEECHCRAFT, unsuitable and unsafe for
airplane use.
BEECHCRAFT expressly disclaims any responsibility for
malfunctions, failures, damage or injury caused by use of nonBEECHCRAFT parts.
Airplanes operated for Air Taxi or other than normal operation, and
airplanes operated in humid tropics, or cold and damp climates, etc.,
may need more frequent inspections for wear, corrosion and/or lack
of lubrication. In these areas, periodic inspections should be
performed until the operator can set his own inspection periods based
on experience.
October, 1990
10-19
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
NOTE
The required periods do not constitute a guarantee
that the item will reach the period without
malfunction, as the aforementioned factors cannot
be controlled by the manufacturer.
Corrosion and its effects must be treated at the earliest possible
opportunity. A clean, dry surface is virtually immune to corrosion.
Make sure that all drain holes remain unobstructed. Protective films
and sealants help to keep corrosive agents from contacting metallic
surfaces. Corrosion inspections should be made most frequently
under high-corrosion-risk conditions, such as in areas of excessive
airborne salt concentrations (e.g., near the sea) and in high-humidity
areas (e.g., tropical regions).
If you have a used aircraft, have your mechanic inspect the aircraft
records, and maintenance records. An unexplained period of time
for which the aircraft has been out of service, or unexplained
significant may well indicate the aircraft has been seriously damaged
in a prior accident. Have your mechanics inspect a used aircraft
carefully. Take the time to ensure that you really know what you are
buying when you buy a used aircraft.
HAZARDS OF UNAPPROVED MODIFICATIONS
Many aircraft modifications are approved under Supplemental Type
Certificates (STC's). Before installing an STC on your airplane, check
to make sure that the STC does not conflict with other STC's that
have already been installed. Because approval of an STC is obtained
by the individual STC holder based upon modification of the original
type design, it is possible for STC's to interfere with each other when
both are installed. Never install an unapproved modification of any
type, however innocent the apparent modification may seem. Always
obtain proper FAA approval.
October, 1990
10-20
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
Aircraft owners and maintenance personnel are particularly cautioned
not to make attachments to, or otherwise modify, seats from original
certification without approval from the FAA Engineering and
Manufacturing District Office having original certification responsibility
for that make and model.
Any unapproved attachment or modification to seat structure may
increase load factors and metal stress which could cause failure of
seat structure at a lesser "G" force than exhibited for original
certification.
Examples of unauthorized attachments found are drilling holes in seat
tubing to attach fire extinguishers and drilling holes to attach
approach plate book bins to seats.
FLIGHT PLANNING
FAR Part 91 requires that each pilot in command, before beginning a
flight, familiarize himself with all available information concerning that
flight.
Obtain a current and complete preflight briefing. This should consist
of local, en route and destination weather and enroute navaid
Information. Enroute terrain and obstructions, alternate airports,
airport runways active, length of runways, and takeoff and landing
distances for the airplane for conditions expected should be known.
The prudent pilot will review his planned en route track and stations
and make a list for quick reference. It is strongly recommended a
flight plan be filed with Flight Service Stations, even though the flight
may be VFR. Also, advise Flight Service Stations of changes or
delays of one hour or more and remember to close the flight plan at
destination.
October, 1990
10-21
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
The pilot must be completely familiar with the performance of the
airplane and performance data in the Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual. The resultant effect of
temperature and pressure altitude must be taken into account in
performance if not accounted for on the charts. An applicable FAA
Approved Flight Manual must be aboard the airplane at all times and
include the weight and balance forms and equipment list.
PASSENGER INFORMATION CARDS
Beech has available, for most current production airplanes,
passenger information cards which contain important information on
the proper use of restraint systems, oxygen masks, emergency exits
and emergency bracing procedures. Passenger information cards
may be obtained at any BEECHCRAFT Aviation or Aero Center. A
pilot should not only be familiar with the information contained in the
cards, but should always, prior to flight, inform the passengers of the
information contained in the information cards. The pilot should orally
brief the passengers on the proper use of restraint systems, doors
and emergency exits, and other emergency procedures, as required
by Part 91 of the FAR's.
STOWAGE OF ARTICLES
The space between the seat pan and the floor is utilized to provide
space for seat displacement. If hard, solid objects are stored beneath
seats, the energy absorbing feature is lost and severe spinal injuries
can occur to occupants.
October, 1990
10-22
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
Prior to flight, pilots should insure that articles are not stowed beneath
seats that would restrict seat pan energy absorption or penetrate the
seat in event of a high vertical velocity accident.
FLIGHT OPERATIONS
GENERAL
The pilot MUST be thoroughly familiar with ALL INFORMATION
published by the manufacturer concerning the airplane, and is
required by law to operate the airplane in accordance with the FAA
Approved Airplane Flight Manual and placards installed.
PREFLIGHT INSPECTION
In addition to maintenance inspections and preflight information
required by FAR Part 91, a complete, careful preflight inspection is
imperative.
Each airplane has a checklist for the preflight inspection which must
be followed. USE THE CHECKLIST!
WEIGHT AND BALANCE
Maintaining center of gravity within the approved envelope throughout
the planned flight is an important safety consideration.
The airplane must be loaded so as not to exceed the weight and
center of gravity (C.G.) limitations. Airplanes that are loaded above
the maximum takeoff or landing weight limitations will have an overall
lower level of performance compared to that shown in the
Performance section of the Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA
Approved Airplane Flight Manual. If loaded above maximum takeoff
weight, takeoff distance and the landing distance will be longer than
that shown in the Performance section; the stalling speed will be
higher, rate of climb, the cruising speed, and the range of the airplane
October, 1990
10-23
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
at any level of fuel will all be lower than shown in the Performance
section.
If an airplane is loaded so that the C.G. is forward of the forward limit,
it will require additional control movements for maneuvering the
airplane with correspondingly higher control forces. The pilot may
have difficulty during takeoff and landing because of the elevator
control limits.
If an airplane is loaded aft of the aft C.G. limitation, the pilot will
experience a lower level of stability. Airplane characteristics that
indicate a lower stability level are; lower control forces, difficulty in
trimming the airplane, lower control forces for maneuvering with
attendant danger of structural overload, decayed stall characteristics,
and a lower level of lateral-directional damping.
Ensure that all cargo and baggage is properly secured before takeoff.
A sudden shift in balance at rotation can cause controllability
problems.
AUTOPILOTS AND ELECTRIC TRIM SYSTEMS
Because there are several different models of autopilots and electric
trim systems installed in Beech airplanes and different installations
and switch positions are possible from airplane to airplane, it is
essential that every owner/ operator review his Airplane Flight Manual
(AFM) Supplements and ensure that the supplements properly
describe the autopilot and trim installations on his specific airplane.
Each pilot, prior to flight, must be fully aware of the proper procedures
for operation, and particularly disengagement, for the system as
installed.
In addition to ensuring compliance with the autopilot manufacturer's
maintenance requirements, all owners operators should thoroughly
familiarize themselves with the operation, function and procedures
October, 1990
10-24
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
described in the Airplane Flight Manual Supplements. Ensure a full
understanding of the methods of engagement and disengagement of
the autopilot and trim systems.
Compare the descriptions and procedures contained in the
Supplements to the actual installation in the airplane to ensure that
the supplement accurately describes your installation. Test that all
buttons, switches and circuit breakers function as described in the
Supplements. If they do not function as described, have the system
repaired by a qualified service agency. If field service advice or
assistance is necessary, contact Beech Aircraft Corporation,
Customer Support Department.
As stated in all AFM Supplements for autopilot systems and trim
systems installed on Beech airplanes, the preflight check must be
conducted before every flight. The preflight check assures not only
that the systems and all of their features are operating properly, but
also that the pilot, before flight, is familiar with the proper means of
engagement and disengagement of the autopilot and trim system.
Autopilot Airplane Flight Manual Supplements caution against trying
to override the autopilot system during flight without disengaging the
autopilot because the autopilot will continue to trim the airplane and
oppose the pilot's actions. This could result in a severely out of trim
condition. This is a basic feature of all autopilots with electric trim
follow-up.
October, 1990
10-25
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
Do not try to manually override the autopilot during flight.
IN CASE OF EMERGENCY, YOU CAN OVERPOWER THE
AUTOPILOT TO CORRECT THE ATTITUDE, BUT THE AUTOPILOT
AND ELECTRIC TRIM MUST THEN IMMEDIATELY BE
DISENGAGED.
It is often difficult to distinguish an autopilot malfunction from an
electric trim system malfunction. The safest course is to deactivate
both. Do not re-engage either system until after you have safely
landed. Then have the systems checked by a qualified service facility
prior to further flight.
Depending upon the installation on your airplane, the following
additional methods may be available to disengage the autopilot or
electric trim in the event that the autopilot or electric trim does not
disengage utilizing the disengage methods specified in the
Supplements.
CAUTION
Transient control forces may occur when the
autopilot is disengaged.
1. Turn off the autopilot master switch, if installed.
2. Pull the autopilot and trim circuit breaker(s) or turn off the
autopilot switch breaker, if installed.
3. Turn off the RADIO MASTER SWITCH, if installed, and if the
autopilot system and the trim system are wired through this
switch.
October, 1990
10-26
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
CAUTION
Radios, including VHF COMM are also disconnected when
the radio master switch is off.
4. Turn off the ELECTRIC MASTER SWITCH.
WARNING
Almost all electrically powered systems will be
inoperative. Consult the AFM for further information.
5. Push the GA switch on throttle grip, if installed, depending upon
the autopilot system.
6. Push TEST EACH FL T switch on the autopilot controller, if
installed.
NOTE
After the autopilot is positively disengaged, it may be
necessary to restore other electrical functions. Be
sure when the master switches are turned on that the
autopilot does not re-engage.
The above ways mayor may not be available on your autopilot. It is
essential that you read your airplane's AFM SUPPLEMENT for your
autopilot system and check such function and operation on your
system.
The engagement of the autopilot must be done in accordance with
the instructions and procedures contained in the AFM
SUPPLEMENT.
October, 1990
10-27
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
Particular attention must be paid to the autopilot settings prior to
engagement. If you attempt to engage the autopilot when the airplane
is out of trim, a large attitude change may occur.
IT IS ESSENTIAL THAT THE PROCEDURES SET FORTH IN THE
APPROVED AFM SUPPLEMENTS FOR YOUR SPECIFIC
INSTALLATION BE FOLLOWED BEFORE ENGAGING THE
AUTOPILOT.
TURBULENT WEATHER
A complete and current weather briefing is a requirement for a safe
trip.
Updating of weather information en route is also essential. The wise
pilot knows that weather conditions can change quickly, and treats
weather forecasting as professional advice, rather than an absolute
fact. He obtains all the advice he can, but stays alert to any sign or
report of changing conditions.
Plan the flight to avoid areas of reported severe turbulence. It is not
always possible to detect individual storm areas or find the inbetween clear areas.
The National Weather Service classifies turbulence as follows:
Class of Turbulence
Effect
Extreme
Aircraft is violently tossed about and is
practically impossible to control. May cause
structural damage.
Severe
Aircraft may be momentarily out of control.
Occupants are thrown violently against the
belts and back into the seat. Unsecured
objects are tossed about.
October, 1990
10-28
Section X
Safety information
Moderate
Light
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
Occupants require seat belts and occasionally
are thrown against the belt. Unsecured objects
move about.
Occupants may be required to use seat belts,
but objects in the aircraft remain at rest.
Thunderstorms, squall lines and violent turbulence should be
regarded as extremely dangerous and must be avoided. Hail and
tornadic wind velocities can be encountered in thunderstorms that
can destroy any airplane, just as tornadoes destroy nearly everything
in their path on the ground.
Thunderstorms also pose the possibility of a lightning strike on an
aircraft. Any structure or equipment which shows evidence of a
lightning strike, or of being subjected to a high current flow due to a
strike, or is a suspected part of a lightning strike path through the
aircraft should be thoroughly inspected and any damage repaired
prior to additional flight.
A roll cloud ahead of a squall line or thunderstorm is visible evidence
of extreme turbulence; however, the absence of a roll cloud should
not be interpreted as denoting that severe turbulence is not present.
Even though flight in severe turbulence must be avoided, flight in
turbulent air may be encountered unexpectedly under certain
conditions.
The following recommendations should be observed for airplane
operation in turbulent air:
Flying through turbulent air presents two basic problems, the answer
to both of which is proper airspeed. On one hand, if you maintain an
excessive airspeed, you run the risk of structural damage or failure;
on the other hand, if your airspeed is too low, you may stall.
October, 1990
10-29
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
If turbulence is encountered, reduce speed to the turbulent air
penetration speed, if given, or to the maneuvering speed, which is
listed in the Limitations section of the Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual. These speeds give the best
assurance of avoiding excessive stress loads, and at the same time
providing the proper margin against inadvertent stalls due to gusts.
Beware of over-controlling in an attempt to correct for changes in
attitude; applying control pressure abruptly will build up G-forces
rapidly and could cause structural damage or even failure. You
should watch particularly your angle of bank, making turns as wide
and shallow as possible. Be equally cautious in applying forward or
back pressure to keep the airplane level. Maintain straight and level
attitude in either up or down drafts. Use trim sparingly to avoid being
grossly out of trim as the vertical air columns change velocity and
direction. If necessary to avoid excessive airspeeds, lower the
landing gear.
WIND SHEAR
Wind shears are rapid, localized changes in wind direction, which can
occur vertically as well as horizontally. Wind shear can be very
dangerous to all aircraft, large and small, particularly on approach to
landing when airspeeds are slow.
A horizontal wind shear is a sudden change in wind direction or
speed that can, for example, transform a headwind into a tailwind,
producing a sudden decrease in indicated airspeed because of the
inertia of the aircraft. A vertical wind shear, is a sudden updraft or
downdraft.
October, 1990
10-30
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
Microbursts are intense, highly localized severe downdrafts.
The prediction of wind shears is far from an exact science. Monitor
your airspeed carefully when flying near storms, particularly on
approach. Be mentally prepared to add power and go around at the
first indication that a wind shear is being encountered.
WEATHER RADAR
Airborne weather avoidance radar is, as its name implies, for avoiding
severe weather--not for penetrating it. Whether to fly into an area of
radar echoes depends on echo intensity, spacing between the
echoes, and the capabilities of you and your aircraft. Remember that
weather radar detects only precipitation drops; it does not detect
turbulence. Therefore, the radar scope provides no assurance of
avoiding turbulence. The radar scope also does not provide
assurance of avoiding instrument weather due to clouds and fog.
Your scope may be clear between intense echoes; this clear area
does not necessarily mean you can fly between the storms and
maintain visual sighting of them.
Thunderstorms build and dissipate rapidly. Therefore, do not attempt
to plan a course between echoes using ground based radar. The best
use of ground radar information is to isolate general areas and
coverage of echoes. You must avoid individual storms from in-flight
observations either by visual sighting or by airborne radar. It is better
to avoid the whole thunderstorm area than to detour around individual
storms unless they are scattered.
Remember that while hail always gives a radar echo, it may fall
several miles from the nearest visible cloud and hazardous
turbulence may extend to as much as 20 miles from the echo edge.
Avoid intense or extreme level echoes by at least 20 miles; that is,
such echoes should be separated by at least 40 miles before you fly
October, 1990
10-31
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
between them. With weaker echoes you can reduce the distance by
which you avoid them.
Above all, remember this: never regard any thunderstorm lightly.
Even when radar observers report the echoes are of light intensity,
avoiding thunderstorms is the best policy. The following are some
do's and don'ts of thunderstorm avoidance:
1. Don't land or take off in the face of an approaching
thunderstorm. A sudden gust front of low level turbulence could
cause loss of control.
2. Don't attempt to fly under a thunderstorm even if you can see
through to the other side. Turbulence and wind shear under the
storm could be disastrous.
3. Don't fly without airborne radar into a cloud mass containing
scattered embedded thunderstorms. Embedded thunderstorms
usually can not be visually circumnavigated.
4. Don't trust visual appearance to be a reliable indicator of the
turbulence inside a thunderstorm.
5. Do avoid by at least 20 miles any thunderstorm identified as
severe or giving an intense radar echo. This is especially true
under the anvil of a large cumulonimbus.
6. Do circumnavigate the entire area if the area has 6/10 or
greater thunderstorm coverage.
7. Do remember that vivid and frequent lightning indicates the
probability of a severe thunderstorm.
8. Do regard as extremely hazardous any thunderstorm with tops
35,000 feet or higher, whether the top is visually sighted or
determined by radar.
October, 1990
10-32
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
If you cannot avoid penetrating a thunderstorm, the following are
some do's BEFORE entering the storm:
9. Tighten your safety belt, put on your shoulder harness, and
secure all loose objects,
10. Plan and hold your course to take you through the storm in
minimum time,
11. To avoid the most critical icing, establish a penetration altitude
below the freezing level or above the level of -15°C.
12. Verify that pitot heat is on and turn on carburetor heat or
engine anti-ice, Icing can be rapid at any altitude and cause
almost instantaneous power failure and/or loss of airspeed
indication.
MOUNTAIN FLYING
Pilots flying in mountainous areas should inform themselves of all
aspects of mountain flying, including the effects of topographic
features on weather conditions. Many good articles have been
published, and a synopsis of mountain flying operations is included in
the FAA Airman's Information Manual, Part 1.
Avoid flight at low altitudes over mountainous terrain, particularly near
the lee slopes. If the wind velocity near the level of the ridge is in
excess of 25 knots and approximately perpendicular to the ridge,
mountain wave conditions are likely over and near the lee slopes, If
the wind velocity at the level of the ridge exceeds 50 knots, a strong
mountain wave is probable with extreme up and down drafts and
severe turbulence, The worst turbulence will be encountered in and
below the rotor zone, which is usually 8 to 10 miles downwind from
the ridge. This zone is sometimes characterized by the presence of
"roll clouds" if sufficient moisture is present; altocumulus standing
lenticular clouds are also visible signs that a mountain wave exists,
but their presence is likewise dependent on moisture. Mountain wave
October, 1990
10-33
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
turbulence can, of course, occur in dry air and the absence of such
clouds should not be taken as assurance that mountain wave
turbulence will not be encountered. A mountain wave downdraft may
exceed the climb capability of your airplane. Avoid mountain wave
downdrafts.
VFR - LOW CEILINGS
If you are not instrument rated, do not attempt "VFR on Top" or
"Special VFR" flight or clearances. Being caught above a solid cloud
layer when an emergency descent is required (or at destination) is an
extremely hazardous position for the VFR pilot. Accepting a
clearance out of airport control zones with no minimum ceiling and
one mile visibility as permitted with "Special VFR" is a foolish practice
for the VFR pilot.
Avoid areas of low ceilings and restricted visibility unless you are
instrument rated and proficient and have an instrument equipped
airplane. Then proceed with caution and with planned alternates.
VFR AT NIGHT
When flying VFR at night, in addition to the altitude appropriate for
the direction of flight, pilots should maintain a safe minimum altitude
as dictated by terrain, obstacles such as TV towers, or communities
in the area flown. This is especially true in mountainous terrain,
where there is usually very little ground reference. Minimum
clearance is 2,000 feet above the highest obstacle en route. Do not
depend on your ability to see obstacles in time to miss them. Flight on
dark nights over sparsely populated country can be the same as IFR,
and must be avoided by inexperienced or non-IFR rated pilots.
October, 1990
10-34
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
VERTIGO - DISORIENTATION
Disorientation can occur in a variety of ways. During flight, inner ear
balancing mechanisms are subjected to varied forces not normally
experienced on the ground. This, combined with loss of outside visual
reference, can cause vertigo. False interpretations (illusions) result,
and may confuse the pilot's conception of the altitude and position of
his airplane.
Under VFR conditions, the visual sense, using the horizon as a
reference, can override the illusions. Under low visibility conditions
(night, fog, clouds, haze, etc.) the illusions predominate. Only through
awareness of these illusions, and proficiency in instrument flight
procedures, can an airplane be operated safely in a low visibility
environment.
Flying in fog, dense haze or dust, cloud banks, or very low visibility,
with strobe lights or rotating beacons turned on can contribute to
vertigo. They should be turned off in these conditions, particularly at
night.
All pilot's should check the weather and use good judgment in
planning flights. The VFR pilot should use extra caution in avoiding
low visibility conditions.
Motion sickness often precedes or accompanies disorientation and
may further jeopardize the flight.
Disorientation in low visibility conditions is not limited to VFR pilots.
Although IFR pilots are trained to look at their instruments to gain an
artificial visual reference as a replacement for the loss of a visual
horizon, they do not always do so. This can happen when the pilot's
physical condition will not permit him to concentrate on his
Instruments; when the pilot is not proficient in flying instrument
October, 1990
10-35
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
conditions in the airplane he is flying; or, when the pilot's work load of
flying by reference to his instruments is augmented by such factors
as turbulence. Even an instrument rated pilot encountering instrument
conditions, intentional or unintentional, should ask himself whether or
not he is sufficiently alert and proficient in the airplane he is flying, to
fly under low visibility conditions and the turbulence anticipated or
encountered.
If any doubt exists, the flight should not be made or it should be
discontinued as soon as possible.
The result of vertigo is loss of control of the airplane. If the loss of
control is sustained, it will result in an excessive speed accident.
Excessive speed accidents occur in one of two manners, either as an
inflight airframe separation or as a high speed ground impact; and
they are fatal accidents in either case. All airplanes are subject to this
form of accident.
For years, Beech Pilot's Operating Handbooks and FAA Approved
Flight Manuals have contained instructions that the landing gear
should be extended in any circumstance in which the pilot encounters
IFR conditions which approach the limits of his capability or his
ratings. Lowering the gear in IFR conditions or flight into heavy or
severe turbulence, tends to stabilize the aircraft, assists in
maintaining proper airspeed, and will substantially reduce the
possibility of reaching excessive airspeeds with catastrophic
consequences, even where loss of control is experienced.
Excessive speed accidents occur at airspeeds greatly in excess of
two operating limitations which are specified in the manuals:
Maximum maneuvering speed and the "red line" or "never exceed"
speed. Such speed limits are set to protect the structure of an
airplane. For example, flight controls are designed to be used to their
fullest extent only below the airplane's maximum maneuvering speed.
As a result, the control surfaces should never be suddenly or fully
deflected above maximum maneuvering speed. Turbulence
October, 1990
10-36
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
penetration should not be performed above that speed. The accidents
we are discussing here occur at airspeeds greatly in excess of these
limitations. No airplane should ever be flown beyond its FAA
approved operating limitations.
STALLS, SLOW FLIGHT AND TRAINING
The stall warning system must be kept operational at all times and
must not be deactivated by interruption of circuits, circuit breakers, or
fuses. Compliance with this requirement is especially important in all
high performance single engine airplanes during simulated engineout practice or stall demonstrations, because the stall speed is critical
in all low-speed operation of airplanes.
Training should be accomplished under the supervision of a qualified
instructor-pilot, with careful reference to the applicable sections of the
FAA Practical Test Standards and FAA Pilot Transition Courses for
Complex Single Engine and Light Twin Engine Airplanes (AC61-9). In
particular, observe carefully the warnings in the Practical Test
Standards.
SPINS
A major cause of fatal accidents in general aviation aircraft is a spin.
Stall demonstrations and practice are a means for a pilot to acquire
the skills to recognize when a stall is about to occur and to recover as
soon as the first signs of a stall are evident. If a stall does not occur
- A spin cannot occur.
It is important to remember however, that a stall can occur in any
flight attitude, at any airspeed, if controls are misused.
October, 1990
10-37
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
Unless your aircraft has been specifically certificated in the aerobatic
category and specifically tested for spin recovery characteristics, it is
placarded against intentional spins.
The pilot of an airplane placarded against intentional spins should
assume that the airplane may become uncontrollable in a spin, since
its performance characteristics beyond certain limits specified in the
FAA regulations may not have been tested and are unknown. This is
why aircraft are placarded against intentional spins, and this is why
stall avoidance is your protection against an inadvertent spin.
Pilots are taught that intentional spins are entered by deliberately
inducing a yawing moment with the controls as the aircraft is stalled.
Inadvertent spins result from the same combination - stall plus yaw.
That is why it is important to use coordinated controls and to recover
at the first indication of a stall when practicing stalls.
Always remember that extra alertness and pilot techniques are
required for slow flight maneuvers, including the practice or
demonstration of stalls. In addition to the foregoing mandatory
procedure, always:
Be certain that the center of gravity of the airplane is as far forward as
possible. Forward C.G. aids stall recovery, spin avoidance and spin
recovery. An aft C.G. can create a tendency for a spin to stabilize,
which delays recovery.
Whenever a student pilot will be required to practice slow flight, be
certain that the qualified instructor pilot has a full set of operable
controls available. FAA regulations prohibit flight instruction without
full dual controls.
Conduct any maneuvers which could possibly result in a spin at
altitudes in excess of five thousand (5,000) feet above ground level in
clear air only.
October, 1990
10-38
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
Remember that an airplane, at or near traffic pattern and approach
altitudes, cannot recover from a spin, or perhaps even a stall, before
impact with the ground. On final approach maintain at least the
airspeed shown in the flight manual.
Remember that if an airplane flown under instrument conditions is
permitted to stall or enter a spin, the pilot, without reference to the
horizon, is certain to become disoriented. He may be unable to
recognize a stall, spin entry, or the spin condition and he may be
unable to determine even the direction of the rotation.
Finally, never forget that stall avoidance is your best protection
against an inadvertent spin. MAINTAIN YOUR AIRSPEED.
In aircraft not certificated for aerobatics spins are prohibited. If a spin
is entered inadvertently:
Immediately move the control column full forward and simultaneously
apply full rudder opposite to the direction of the spin; continue to hold
this position until rotation stops and then neutralize all controls and
execute a smooth pullout. Ailerons should be neutral and the throttle
in idle position at all times during recovery.
DESCENT
In single engine piston-powered airplanes, supercharged or normally
aspirated, it is necessary to avoid prolonged descents with low
power, as this produces two problems: (1) excessively cool cylinder
head temperatures which cause premature engine wear, and (2)
excessively rich mixtures due to idle enrichment (and altitude) which
causes soot and lead deposits on the spark plugs (fouling). The
second of these is the more serious consideration; the engine may
not respond to the throttle when it is desired to discontinue the
descent. Both problems are amenable to one solution: maintain
adequate power to keep cylinder head temperature in the "green"
range during descent, and lean to best power mixture (that is,
progressively enrich the mixture from cruise only slightly as altitude
decreases). This procedure will lengthen the descent, of course, and
October, 1990
10-39
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
requires some advance planning. If it is necessary to make a
prolonged descent at or near idle, as in practicing forced landings, at
least avoid the problem of fouled spark plugs by frequently advancing
the throttle until the engine runs smoothly, and maintain an
appropriate mixture setting with altitude. (Refer to pre-landing check
list.)
VORTICES - WAKE TURBULENCE
Every airplane generates wakes of turbulence while in flight. Part of
this is from the propeller or jet engine, and part from the wing tip
vortices. The larger and heavier the airplane, the more pronounced
and turbulent the wakes will be. Wing tip vortices from large, heavy
airplanes are very severe at close range, degenerating with time,
wind and distance. These are rolling in nature, from each wing tip. In
tests, vortex velocities of 133 knots have been recorded.
Encountering the rolling effect of wing tip vortices within two minutes
after passage of large airplanes is most hazardous to light airplanes.
This roll effect can exceed the maximum counter-roll obtainable in a
light airplane. The turbulent areas may remain for as long as three
minutes or more, depending on wind conditions, and may extend
several miles behind the airplane. Plan to fly slightly above and to the
windward side of the other airplanes. Because of the wide variety of
conditions that can be encountered, there is no set rule to follow to
avoid wake turbulence in all situations. However, the Airman's
Information Manual, and to a greater extent Advisory Circular 90-23,
Aircraft Wake Turbulence, provide a thorough discussion of the
factors you should be aware of when wake turbulence may be
encountered.
October, 1990
10-40
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
TAKEOFF AND LANDING CONDITIONS
When taking off on runways covered with water or freezing slush, the
landing gear should remain extended for approximately ten seconds
longer than normal, allowing the wheels to spin and dissipate the
freezing moisture. The landing gear should then be cycled up, then
down, wait approximately five seconds and then retracted again.
Caution must be exercised to insure that the entire operation is
performed below Maximum Landing Gear Operating Airspeed.
Use caution when landing on runways that are covered by water or
slush which cause hydroplaning (aquaplaning), a phenomenon that
renders braking and steering ineffective because of the lack of
sufficient surface friction. Snow and ice covered runways are also
hazardous. The pilot should also be alert to the possibility of the
brakes freezing.
Use caution when taking off or landing during gusty wind conditions.
Also be aware of the special wind conditions caused by buildings or
other obstructions located near the runway.
MEDICAL FACTS FOR PILOTS
GENERAL
When the pilot enters the airplane, he becomes an integral part of the
man-machine system. He is just as essential to a successful flight as
the control surfaces. To ignore the pilot in preflight planning would be
as senseless as failing to inspect the integrity of the control surfaces
or any other vital part of the machine. The pilot has the responsibility
for determining his reliability prior to entering the airplane for flight.
When piloting an airplane, an individual should be free of conditions
which are harmful to attentiveness, ability to make correct decisions,
and rapid reaction time.
October, 1990
10-41
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
FATIGUE
Fatigue generally slows reaction time and causes errors due to
inattention. In addition to the most common cause of fatigue;
insufficient rest and loss of sleep, the pressures of business, financial
worries, and family problems can be important contributing factors. If
you are tired, don't fly.
HYPOXIA
Hypoxia, in simple terms, is a lack of sufficient oxygen to keep the
brain and other body tissues functioning properly. There is a wide
individual variation in susceptibility to hypoxia. In addition to
progressively insufficient oxygen at higher altitudes, anything
interfering with the blood's ability to carry oxygen can contribute to
hypoxia (anemias, carbon monoxide, and certain drugs). Also,
alcohol and various drugs decrease the brain's tolerance to hypoxia.
Your body has no built-in alarm system to let you know when you are
not getting enough oxygen. It is impossible to predict when or where
hypoxia will occur during a given flight, or how it will manifest itself.
Some of the common symptoms of hypoxia are increased breathing
rate, a light-headed or dizzy sensation, tingling or warm sensation,
sweating, reduced visual field, sleepiness, blue coloring of skin,
fingernails, and lips, and behavior changes. A particularly dangerous
feature of hypoxia is an increased sense of well-being, called
euphoria. It obscures a person's ability and desire to be critical of
himself, slows reaction time, and impairs thinking ability.
Consequently, an hypoxic individual commonly believes things are
getting progressively better while he nears total collapse.
October, 1990
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Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
The symptoms are slow but progressive, insidious in onset, and are
most marked at altitudes starting above ten thousand feet. Night
vision, however, can be impaired starting at an altitude of 5,000 feet.
Persons who have recently overindulged in alcohol, who are
moderate to heavy smokers, or who take certain drugs, may be more
susceptible to hypoxia. Susceptibility may also vary in the same
individual from day to day or even morning to evening. Use oxygen
on flights above 0,000 feet and at any time when symptoms appear.
Depending upon altitude, an hypoxic individual has a limited time to
make decisions and perform useful acts, even though he may remain
conscious for a longer period. The time of useful consciousness is
approximately 3-5 minutes at 25,000 feet of altitude and diminishes
markedly as altitude increases.
Should symptoms occur that cannot definitely be identified as either
hypoxia or hyperventilation, try three or four deep breaths of oxygen.
The symptoms should improve markedly if the condition was hypoxia
(recovery from hypoxia is rapid).
Pilots who fly to altitudes that require or may require the use of
supplemental oxygen should be thoroughly familiar with the operation
of the aircraft oxygen systems. A preflight inspection of the system
should be performed, including proper fit of the mask. The
passengers should be briefed on the proper use of their oxygen
system before flight.
Pilots who wear beards should be careful to ensure that their beard is
carefully trimmed so that it will not interfere with proper sealing of the
oxygen masks. If you wear a beard or moustache, test the fit of your
oxygen mask on the ground for proper sealing. Studies conducted by
October, 1990
10-43
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Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
the military and oxygen equipment manufacturers conclude that
oxygen masks do not seal over beards or heavy facial hair.
Federal Aviation Regulations related to the use of supplemental
oxygen by flight crew and passengers must be adhered to if flight to
higher altitudes is to be accomplished safely. Passengers with
significant circulatory or lung disease may need to use supplemental
oxygen at lower altitudes than specified by these regulations.
HYPERVENTILATION
Hyperventilation, or over-breathing, is a disturbance of respiration
that may occur in individuals as a result of emotional tension or
anxiety. Under conditions of emotional stress, fright, or pain,
breathing rate may increase, causing increased lung ventilation,
although the carbon dioxide output of the body cells does not
increase. As a result, carbon dioxide is "washed out" of the blood.
The most common symptoms of hyperventilation are: dizziness,
nausea, sleepiness, and finally, unconsciousness. If the symptoms
persist discontinue use of oxygen and consciously slow your
breathing rate until symptoms clear, and then resume normal
breathing rate. Normal breathing can be aided by talking aloud.
October, 1990
10-44
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
ALCOHOL
Common sense and scientific evidence dictate that you must not fly
as a crew member while under the influence of alcohol. Alcohol, even
in small amounts, produces, among other things, a dulling of critical
judgment; a decreased sense of responsibility; diminished skill
reactions and coordination; decreased speed and strength of
muscular reflexes (even after one ounce of alcohol); decreases in
efficiency of eye movements during reading (after one ounce of
alcohol); increased frequency of errors (after one ounce of alcohol);
constriction of visual fields; decreased ability to see under dim
illuminations; loss of efficiency of sense of touch; decrease of
memory and reasoning ability; increased susceptibility to fatigue and
decreased attention span; decreased relevance of response;
increased self confidence with increased insight into immediate
capabilities.
Tests have shown that pilots commit major errors of judgment and
procedure at blood alcohol levels substantially less than the minimum
legal levels of intoxication for most states. These tests further show a
continuation of impairment from alcohol up to as many as 14 hours
after consumption, with no appreciable diminution of impairment. The
body metabolizes ingested alcohol at a rate of about one-third of an
ounce per hour. Even after the body completely destroys a moderate
amount of alcohol, a pilot can still be severely impaired for many
hours by hangover. The effects of alcohol on the body are magnified
at altitudes, as 2 oz. of alcohol at 18,000 feet produce the same
adverse effects as 6 oz. at sea level.
Federal Aviation Regulations have been amended to reflect the
FAA's growing concern with the effects of alcohol impairment. FAR
91 states:
October, 1990
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Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
"(a) No person may act or attempt to act as a crewmember of a civil
aircraft:
1. Within 8 hours after the consumption of any alcoholic
beverage;
2. While under the influence of alcohol;
3. While using any drug that affects the person's faculties in any
way contrary to safety; or
4. While having .04 percent by weight or more alcohol in the
blood.
(b) Except in an emergency, no pilot of a civil aircraft may allow a
person who appears to be intoxicated or who demonstrates by
manner or physical indications that the individual is under the
influence of drugs (except a medical patient under proper care) to be
carried in that aircraft."
Because of the slow destruction of alcohol by the body, a pilot may
still be under influence eight hours after drinking a moderate amount
of alcohol. Therefore, an excellent rule is to allow at least 12 to 24
hours between "bottle and throttle," depending on the amount of
alcoholic beverage consumed.
DRUGS
Self-medication or taking medicine in any form when you are flying
can be extremely hazardous. Even simple home or over-the-counter
remedies and drugs such as aspirin, antihistamines, cold tablets,
cough mixtures, laxatives, tranquilizers, and appetite suppressors,
may seriously impair the judgment and coordination needed while
flying. The safest rule is to take no medicine before or while flying,
except after consultation with your Aviation Medical Examiner.
October, 1990
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Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
SCUBA DIVING
Flying shortly after any prolonged scuba diving could be dangerous.
Under the increased pressure of the water, excess nitrogen is
absorbed into your system. If sufficient time has not elapsed prior to
takeoff for your system to rid itself of this excess gas, you may
experience the bends at altitudes even under 10,000 feet, where
most light planes fly.
CARBON MONOXIDE AND NIGHT VISION
The presence of carbon monoxide results in hypoxia which will affect
night vision in the same manner and extent as hypoxia from high
altitudes. Even small levels of carbon monoxide have the same effect
as an altitude increase of 8,000 to 10,000 feet. Smoking several
cigarettes can result in a carbon monoxide saturation sufficient to
affect visual sensitivity equal to an increase of 8.000 feet altitude.
A FINAL WORD
Airplanes are truly remarkable machines. They enable us to shrink
distance and time. and to expand our business and personal horizons
in ways that, not too many years ago, were virtually inconceivable.
For many businesses, the general' aviation airplane has become the
indispensable tool of efficiency.
Advances in the mechanical reliability of the airplane we fly have
been equally impressive, as attested by the steadily declining
statistics of accidents attributed to mechanical causes, at a time when
the airframe, systems and power plants have grown infinitely more
complex. The explosion in capability of avionics systems is even
more remarkable. Radar, RNAV, LORAN, sophisticated autopilots
and other devices which, just a few years ago, were too large and
prohibitively expensive for general aviation size airplanes, are
becoming increasingly commonplace in even the smallest airplanes.
October, 1990
10-47
Section X
Safety information
Beechcraft
Single Engine (piston)
It is thus that this Safety Information is directed to the pilot, for it is in
the area of the skill and proficiency of you, the pilot, that the greatest
gains in safe flying are to be made over the years to come. Intimate
knowledge of your aircraft, its capabilities and its limitations, and
disciplined adherence to the procedures for your aircraft's operation,
will enable you to transform potential tragedy into an interesting
hangar story when - as it inevitably will - the abnormal situation is
presented.
Know your aircraft's limitations, and your own. Never exceed either.
Safe flying,
... BEECH AIRCRAFT CORPORATION
October, 1990
10-48
S-TEC CORPORATION
RT. 3 BLDG 946
WOLTERS INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX
MINERAL WELLS, TEXAS 76067
FAA APPROVED SUPPLEMENT
TO
PILOT’S OPERATING HANDBOOK AND/OR
FAA APPROVED AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL
FOR BEECH MODELS
35-33, 35-A33 AND 35-B33
S-TEC SYSTEM 50 TWO AXIS
AUTOMATIC FLIGHT CUIDANCE SYSTEM
(14 VOLT SYSTEM)
REG NO. N334Z
SER NO. CD -229
This Supplement must be attached to the applicable FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual,
Pilot’s Operating Handbook, or Pilot’s Operating Handbook and FAA approved Airplane Flight
Manual modified by the installation of S-TEC System 50. Autopilot Model ST – 187-50
installed in accordance with STC SA5215SW-D. the information contained herein
supplements the information of the basic POH and /or AFM; for limitations, Procedures and
Performance information not contained in this Supplement, consult the basic POH and / or
AFM.
SECTION I
GENERAL
This manual is to acquaint the pilot with the features and functions of the System 50 Two Axis
Autopilot and to provide operating instructions for the system when installed in the above
aircraft model(s). The aircraft must be operated within the limitations herein provided when
the autopilot is in use.
SECTION II
OPERATING LIMITATIONS
1.
2.
Autopilot operation prohibited above 200 MPH CAS (Autopilot Vnmo)
Autopilot must be OFF during take-off and landing
FAA/DAS APPROVED
P/N: 89254
DATE: 10-5-83
Page 1
S-Tec corporation
Mineral wells, TEXAS 76067
SECTION III
EMERGENCY OPERATING PROCEDURES
In the event of an autopilot malfunction, or any time the autopilot is not performing as
expected or commended, do not attempt to identify the system problem. Immediately regain
control of the aircraft by overpowering the autopilot as necessary and then disconnect the
autopilot. Do not reengage the autopilot until the problem has been identified and corrected.
1.
2.
Autopilot may be disconnected by
a. Depressing the “AP Disconnect” Switch on the left horn of the pilot’s control
wheel (if installed).
b. Depressing the “ON-OFF” Switch on the autopilot programmer unit.
c. Moving autopilot master switch of “OFF” position.
d. Pulling the autopilot circuit breaker.
Altitude loss during a malfunction and recovery.
a. The following altitude lasses and bank angles were recorded after a malfunction
with a 3-second recovery delay
Configuration
Bank Angle / Altitude Loss
Climb
55° / -20’
Cruise
55° / -220’
Descent
55° / -320’
b. The following altitude lasses and bank angles were recorded after a malfunction
with a 1-second recovery delay
Configuration
Bank Angle / Altitude Loss
Maneuvering
15° / -40’
Approach (coupled or
25° / -20’
uncoupled
The above values are the worst case for all the models covered by this document.
SECTION IV
NORMAL OPERATING PROCEDURES
4-1 SYSTEM DESCRIPTION
The System 50 is a pure rate autopilot which uses an inclined rate gyro in the Turn
Coordinator instrument as the primary roll and turn rate sensor and an accelerometer and an
absolute pressure transducer as pitch rate sensors. The turn coordinator includes an
autopilot pick-off, a gyro RPM detector and an instrument power monitor. Low electrical
power will cause the instrument “flag” to appear while low RPM will cause the autopilot to
disconnect. The autopilot includes an automatic pre-flight test feature that allows a visual
check of all the annunciator lamps and checks critical elements of the accelerometer system.
FAA/DAS APPROVED
P/N: 89254
DATE: 10-5-83
Page 2
S-Tec corporation
Mineral wells, TEXAS 76067
The test feature will not enable autopilot function unless the automatic test sequence is
satisfactorily completed.
When the pre-flight test is satisfactorily completed and when the rate gyro RPM is correct, the
green “RDY” light will illuminate indicating the autopilot is ready for the functional check and
operation. The autopilot cannot be engaged unless the “RDY” light is illuminated. When the
system is equipped with the optional 3” Air Driven Directional Gyro (D.G.) or a compass
system, directional information is provided to the autopilot by a heading bug in the instrument.
Pitch axis control is provided for the altitude hold function by use of the accelerometer and
pressure transducer. When the altitude hold mode is engaged an elevator trim sensor in the
pitch servo will detect the elevator trim condition. When elevator trim is necessary to reestablish a trimmed condition, trim indicator lights on the programmer unit will illuminate to
indicate the direction to trim to restore a trimmed condition.
The indicator and annunciator lamp brilliance is controlled through the aircraft instrument light
rheostat, except for the “trim” indicators which always illuminate at full intensity.
1.
Mode Programmer and Annunciator Unit – Provides mode switches and annunciation
for the system.
2.
Mode Annunciation Window – Displays mode in use
FAA/DAS APPROVED
P/N: 89254
DATE: 10-5-83
Page 3
S-Tec corporation
Mineral wells, TEXAS 76067
3.
Ready Light (RDY) – Green RDY lamp illuminates when autopilot is ready for
engagement
4.
ON-OFF Stabilizer Mode Switch – Momentary actuation engages roll system in
stabilizer (STB) Mode and allows use of the turn knob (Item 11) to command turn rate
desired. When the system is operating a momentary actuation will disengage the
system and cancel all annunciations.
5.
Altitude Mode Switch (ALT) – Momentary actuation will engage altitude hold mode or
disengage altitude mode if previously engaged. The function is also available by use
of an options control wheel mounted altitude engage / disengage switch, for added
convenience.
6.
Navigation Mode Switch (NAV) – Momentary activation will engage the VIR Tracking
Mode. This mode provides low system gain for comfortable cross country tracking.
7.
Approach Mode Switch (APR) – Momentary actuation will engage the VOR or
Localizer Tracking Mode. This mode provides a higher level of system gain for more
active tracking of VOR or Localizer front course signals.
8.
Reverse Approach Mode Switch (REV) – Momentary activation will engage the
reverse tracking mode for use when tracking a localizer back-course. This mode
provides the same system gain as the APR Mode with reverse needle sensing.
9.
Down TRIM Light (DN) – this light illuminates to indicate the need for nose down trim.
When both the UP and the DN lights are not lighted, the aircraft is in tri longitudinally.
10. UP Trim Light (UP) – this light illuminates to indicate the need for nose UP trim
11. Turn Knob and Heading Switch – The turn knob allows the selection of turn rates up
to standard rate (3° per second) either right or left. Turning the knob to the right or
left will cause a turn that is proportional to the displacement of the knob from the
center. For level flight the electronics provide a small dead zone of approximately
10° at the center indice. To actuate heading mode, momentarily depress the turn
knob. To return to STB mode form HDG, depress the turn knob. When the system is
operating in any radio mode and he system is equipped with a D.G., depressing the
turn knob will return the system to HDG Mode directly.
12. Autopilot Master ON-OFF Test Switch – Refer to Pre-flight Procedures for operating
details.
FAA/DAS APPROVED
P/N: 89254
DATE: 10-5-83
Page 4
S-Tec corporation
Mineral wells, TEXAS 76067
13. Optional remote AP disconnect switch and / or remote altitude hold engage –
disengage switch.
4.2 PRE-FLIGHT PROCEDURES
NOTE: During system functional checks the system must be
provided adequate DC voltage. (12 or 14 VDC minimum at
appropriate.)
MADATORY PRE-FLIGHT TEST
1.
AP Master Switch - Move TEST position
2.
a. Observe all lights and annunciators illuminate
b. Observe the following light sequence of the trim indicators/Sequence requires
9 seconds)
i. Initially both trim UP & DN lights are illuminated.
ii. Up light extinguishes and relights
iii. DN light the extinguishes and will remain off.
AP Master Switch – Move to ON position observe ready (RDY) light illuminates.
Autopilot can be engaged and disengaged repeatedly without repeating the test
sequence until electoral power is removed. Once power is interrupted the test must
be re-conducted to get a ready indication. If the ready light does not illuminate after
the test a failure to pass the test is indicated and the system will require service.
NOTE: ALTITUDE MODE CANNOT BE ENGAGEDUNLESS PWER IS ON FOR
MOR THAN 15 SECONDS.
SYSTEM FUNCTINOAL TEST
3.
4.
5.
6.
Depress ON-OFF Switch – STB Annunciator illuminates. Rotate turn knob left and
right, observe control wheel moves in corresponding direction. Center turn knob.
Set D.G. and place bug under lubber line (if installed) push turn knob to engage HDG
mode. Observe HDG annunciator. Move HDG bug left and right observe proper
control wheel motion.
Overpower Test – Grasp control wheel and overpower roll servo left and right.
Overpower action should be smooth with no noise or jerky feel. If unusual sounds or
excessive play is detected, have the servo installation inspected prior to flight.
Radio Check
FAA/DAS APPROVED
P/N: 89254
DATE: 10-5-83
Page 5
S-Tec corporation
Mineral wells, TEXAS 76067
7.
8.
9.
a. A Turn on NAV Radio, with valid NAV signal, engage NAV Mode and move
VOR OBS so that the VOR needle moves left and right – control wheel should
follow the direction of needle movement
b. Select REV Mode – the control wheel should rotate in opposite direction of the
NAV needle
c. Select APR Mode – the control wheel should again follow radio needle
movement and with more authority than produced by NAV Mode
Move control wheel to level flight position – Engage ALT Mode. Move control wheel
fore and aft to overpower pitch servo clutch. Overpower action should be smooth
with o noise or jerky feel. If unusual sounds or excessive play is detected, have the
servo installation inspected prior to flight..
Trim check – Manually apply back pressure to control wheel for 2 – 3 seconds.observe the DN trim light illuminates. Apply forward pressure to the control wheel for
2 – 3 seconds, observe the UP trim light illuminates. Move the control wheel to
center – observe both UP / DN lights extinguish.
Hold control wheel and depress ON-OFF Switch – note that roll and pitch servos
release. Move control wheel to confirm roll and pitch motions are free, with no
control restriction or binding. If the optional disconnect switch is installed it may be
used to effect the disconnect for this check.
4-3 IN-FLIGHT PROCEDURES.
NOTE:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
The required pre-flight test can be conducted in he air if
necessary. It should be noted, however, that when the
UP/DN lights are flashing the pitch servos will momentarily
engage and disengage. This alternate engage-disengage
sequence is part of the test function. Because of the
engage-disengage sequence the test should not be
conducted while maneuvering.
Check – RDY light on
Trim aircraft for existing flight condition.
Center turn-knob – depress ON-OFF Switch
Set turn knob to level or turning flight, as desired
Set HDG bug to desired heading (if installed) and depress turn knob to engage
heading mode, select headings as desired.
At desired altitude, depress ALT Mode Switch. Trim aircraft as necessary to
establish cruise condition – disengage ALT Mode to climb or descend.
VOR TRACKING AND VOR – LOC APPROACCH
FAA/DAS APPROVED
P/N: 89254
DATE: 10-5-83
Page 6
S-Tec corporation
Mineral wells, TEXAS 76067
1.
2.
3.
4.
Tune NAV receiver and select radial
Maneuver aircraft to selected radial (or localizer) within + / - 1 needle width and within
10° of course heading.
Engage NAV mode for VOR tracking
Engage APR Mode for VOR or LOC approach
To track the localizer front course outbound to the procedure turn area, maneuver to the
localizer center an, when on the outbound heading, select REV Mode. To track the localizer
back course inbound, maneuver to the localizer back course center and, when on the
inbound heading, select the REV Mode.
Approach Mode may be used to track VOR radials cross country, if desired. Use of APR
Mode for cross country tracking may result in some course scalloping if the VOR signal is
weak or otherwise “noisy”. In areas of poor signal quality NAV Mode may provide more
accurate tracking even with reduced gain..
SECTION V
OPERATIONAL DATA
Text of this Section not affected by installation of this equipment.
SECTION VI
REQUIRED OPERATING EQUIPMENT
Text of this Section not affected by installation of this equipment.
SECTION VII
WEIGHT AND BALLANCE
Text of this Section not affected by installation of this equipment.
APPROVED BY
S-TEC CORPORATION
DAS 5 SW
P/N 89254
DATE: 10-5-83
FAA/DAS APPROVED
P/N: 89254
DATE: 10-5-83
Page 7
United States of America
Department of Transportation – Federal Aviation Administration
Supplemental Type Certificate
This certificate issued to
Number
SA5215SW-D
S-TEC CORPORATION
Rt 4, Bldg. 946
Wolters Industrial Complex
Mineral Wells TX 76067
certifies that the change in the type design for the following products with the limitations and
conditions therefore as specified herein meets the airworthiness requirements of Part 3 of the
Civil Air Regulations.
Original Product – Type certificate Number
Make
Model
3A15
BEECH
35-33, 35-A33, 35-B33, 35C33A
E33, E33A, F33, F33C G33 AND F33A
Description of Type Design Change:
Installation of S-TEC 40/50 Single and Two Axis Automatic Flight Guidance Systems, Model ST187 40/50, according to Bulletin No. 287, dated 7-19-83 and Master Drawing List No. 92215, dated
7-19-83 and/or later FAA Approved revisions of the above data (14 volt system)
Limitations and Conditions
1.
2.
Eligible only on Beech Model F33A, S/N CE-315 and below
FAA Approved Supplement of Pilot’s Operating Handbook and/or FAA Approved Airplane
Flight Manual, P/N 89252, date 10-5-83 is required for Beech Models 35-33, 35-A33, and
35-B33 for S-TEC System 40 and/or later FAA Approved revisions of the above
supplement
(See Continuation Sheet, Page 2, a part of this STC)
This certificate and the supporting data which is he basis for approval shall remain in effect until
surrendered, suspended, revoked or a termination date is otherwise established by the
Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration.
Date of Application: 8-26-83
Date of Issuance:
10-5-83
Date reissued:
Date surrendered:
By direction of the Administrator
Harold W. Holdman
DAS Staff Coordinator, DAS 5 SW
Title
Any alteration of this certificate is punishable by a fine of not exceeding $1,000, or imprisonment not
exceeding 3 years or both
United States of America
Department of Transportation – Federal Aviation Administration
Supplemental Type Certificate
(Continuation Sheet)
Number
SA5215SW-D
Limitations and Conditions (cont’d)
3.
FAA Approved Supplement to Pilot’s Operating Handbook and/or FAA Approved Airplane
Flight Manual, P/N 89253, dated 10-5-83 is required for Beech Models 35-C33, 35-C33A,
E33, E33A, E33C, F33, F33A, S/N CE-315 and below, F33C and G33 for S-TEC System
40 and/or later FAA Approved revisions of the above supplement.
4.
FAA Approved Supplement to Pilot’s Operating Handbook and/or FAA Approved Airplane
Flight Manual, P/N 89254, dated 10-5-83 is required for Beech Models 35-33, 35-A33, 35B33, for S-TEC System 50 and/or later FAA Approved revisions of the above supplement
5.
FAA Approved Supplement to Pilot’s Operating Handbook and/or FAA Approved Airplane
Flight Manual, P/N 89255, dated 10-5-83 is required for Beech Models 35-C33, 35-C33A,
E33, E33A, E33C, F33, F33A, S/N CE-315 and below, F33C and G33 for S-TEC System
50 and/or later FAA Approved revisions of the above supplement.
6.
Compatibility of this modification with other previously approved modifications must be
determined by the installer.
Any alteration of this certificate is punishable by a fine of not exceeding $1,000, or imprisonment not
exceeding 3 years or both
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