Harris LTE MBC-200 - Harris Corporation

User’s Manual
14221-6200-2010
Mar/14
Harris® LTE MBC-200
MULTI-BAND MOBILE ROUTER
14221-6200-2010
MANUAL REVISION HISTORY
REV.
-
DATE
Mar/14
REASON FOR CHANGE
Initial release.
Harris Corporation, Public Safety and Professional Communications (PSPC) Business continually evaluates its technical publications for
completeness, technical accuracy, and organization. You can assist in this process by submitting your comments and suggestions to the
following:
Harris Corporation
fax your comments to: 1-434-455-6851
PSPC Business
or
Technical Publications
e-mail us at: PSPC_TechPubs@harris.com
221 Jefferson Ridge Parkway
Lynchburg, VA 24501
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
This product was developed using GEOTRANS, a product of the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency and U.S. Army Engineering
Research and Development Center. Use of this software does not indicate endorsement or approval of the product by the Secretary of
Defense or the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency.
This device made under license under one or more of the following US patents: 4,590,473; 4,636,791; 5,148,482; 5,185,796; 5,271,017;
5,377,229; 4,716,407; 4,972,460; 5,502,767; 5,146,697; 5,164,986; 5,185,795.
The Advanced Multi-Band Excitation implementation 2 (AMBE+2) voice coding Technology embodied in this product is protected by
intellectual property rights including patent rights, copyrights and trade secrets of Digital Voice Systems, Inc. This voice coding
Technology is licensed solely for use within this Communications Equipment. The user of this Technology is explicitly prohibited from
attempting to extract, remove, decompile, reverse engineer, or disassemble the Object Code, or in any other way convert the Object Code
into a human-readable form. U.S. Patent Nos. #5,870,405, #5,826,222, #5,754,974, #5,701,390, #5,715,365, #5,649,050, #5,630,011,
#5,581,656, #5,517,511, #5,491,772, #5,247,579, #5,226,084 and #5,195,166.
CREDITS
Harris, assuredcommunications, Unity, VIDA, EDACS, NetworkFirst, and OpenSky are registered trademarks of Harris Corporation.
Bluetooth is a registered trademark of Bluetooth SIG, Inc.
Motorola is a registered trademark of Motorola, Inc.
AMBE is a registered trademark and IMBE, AMBE+, and AMBE+2 are trademarks of Digital Voice Systems, Inc.
All brand and product names are trademarks, registered trademarks, or service marks of their respective holders.
NOTICE!
The material contained herein is subject to U.S. export approval. No export or re-export is permitted without written approval from the U.S.
Government. Rated: EAR99; in accordance with U.S. Dept. of Commerce regulations 15CFR774, Export Administration Regulations.
Information and descriptions contained herein are the property of Harris Corporation. Such information and descriptions may not be copied
or reproduced by any means, or disseminated or distributed without the express prior written permission of Harris Corporation, PSPC
Business, 221 Jefferson Ridge Parkway, Lynchburg, VA 24501.
Repairs to this equipment should be made only by an authorized service technician or facility designated by the supplier. Any repairs,
alterations or substitutions of recommended parts made by the user to this equipment not approved by the manufacturer could void the
user's authority to operate the equipment in addition to the manufacturer's warranty.
This product conforms to the European Union WEEE Directive 2002/96/EC. Do not dispose of this product in a public
landfill. Take it to a recycling center at the end of its life.
This manual is published by Harris Corporation without any warranty. Improvements and changes to this manual necessitated by typographical errors,
inaccuracies of current information, or improvements to programs and/or equipment, may be made by Harris Corporation at any time and without notice.
Such changes will be incorporated into new editions of this manual. No part of this manual may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means,
electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording, for any purpose, without the express written permission of Harris Corporation.
Copyright © 2014 Harris Corporation.
2
14221-6200-2010
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section ...................................................................................................................................................... Page
1. SAFETY INFORMATION ............................................................................................................. 7
1.1
SYMBOL CONVENTIONS .................................................................................................. 7
1.2
ROUTER USE ....................................................................................................................... 7
1.3
INTERFERENCE ISSUES .................................................................................................... 8
1.4
MOBILE APPLICATION SAFETY ..................................................................................... 8
1.5
UL LISTED MODELS ONLY .............................................................................................. 8
2. PRODUCT OVERVIEW ................................................................................................................ 9
2.1
MODULE IDENTIFICATION .............................................................................................. 9
2.2
FEATURES AND BENEFITS OF THE MBC-200 MULTI-NETWORK ROUTER ........ 10
2.3
GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS .......................................................................................... 10
2.4
MECHANICAL SPECIFICATIONS .................................................................................. 12
2.5
ORDERING INFORMATION ............................................................................................ 13
2.6
EXTERNAL CONNECTORS ............................................................................................. 13
2.7
LEDS .................................................................................................................................... 15
2.8
NORMAL POWER-UP SEQUENCE ................................................................................. 16
2.9
ANTENNA .......................................................................................................................... 16
3. GETTING STARTED ................................................................................................................... 17
3.1
PACKAGE CONTENTS ..................................................................................................... 17
3.2
POWER SUPPLY CONNECTION ..................................................................................... 17
3.3
DEVICE CONNECTIONS .................................................................................................. 17
3.4
LAN CONFIGURATION .................................................................................................... 18
3.5
LOG-IN ................................................................................................................................ 19
3.6
LTE CONNECTION ........................................................................................................... 20
4. ANTENNA PACKAGE SELECTION: RULES AND GUIDELINES ..................................... 22
4.1
CO-LOCATION RULES ..................................................................................................... 22
4.1.1
Co-Located Transmitters .................................................................................... 23
4.2
LTE MIMO CONSIDERATIONS....................................................................................... 23
4.3
ANTENNA SELECTION AND SPACING CONSIDERATIONS .................................... 24
4.4
RADIO MODULES AND FREQUENCY BANDS ............................................................ 24
4.5
ANTENNA SUGGESTIONS .............................................................................................. 25
4.5.1
MBC-200 with Two LTE Cards and a WiFi Module......................................... 25
4.5.2
MBC-200 with One LTE Card and a WiFi Module ........................................... 25
4.5.3
Harris Antenna Part Number Reference ............................................................. 26
5. MBC-200 WEB INTERFACE ...................................................................................................... 27
5.1
UNIT STATUS .................................................................................................................... 27
5.1.1
System Information ............................................................................................ 28
5.1.2
Interface Information.......................................................................................... 28
5.2
GENERAL SETTINGS ....................................................................................................... 29
5.2.1
Unit ID ............................................................................................................... 29
5.2.2
Unit Password .................................................................................................... 30
5.2.3
Dynamic DNS .................................................................................................... 30
5.3
ETH0, ETH1, ETH2 (ETHERNET 0, 1, AND 2)................................................................ 31
5.3.1
Status .................................................................................................................. 32
5.3.2
IP Settings .......................................................................................................... 34
5.3.3
Statistics ............................................................................................................. 36
5.4
WIFI (ACCESS POINT)...................................................................................................... 37
5.4.1
Status .................................................................................................................. 37
5.4.2
Wireless Settings ................................................................................................ 38
3
14221-6200-2010
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section ...................................................................................................................................................... Page
5.4.3
IP Settings .......................................................................................................... 40
5.4.4
Statistics ............................................................................................................. 41
5.5
WIFI (CLIENT) ................................................................................................................... 42
5.5.1
Status .................................................................................................................. 42
5.5.2
Wireless Settings ................................................................................................ 44
5.5.3
IP Settings .......................................................................................................... 46
5.5.4
Site Survey ......................................................................................................... 46
5.5.5
Connection Manager .......................................................................................... 47
5.5.6
Statistics ............................................................................................................. 48
5.6
WWAN0/WWAN1 .............................................................................................................. 49
5.6.1
Status .................................................................................................................. 49
5.6.2
Carrier Settings ................................................................................................... 51
5.6.3
IP Settings .......................................................................................................... 53
5.6.4
Connection Manager .......................................................................................... 54
5.6.5
Statistics ............................................................................................................. 56
5.7
SERIAL ................................................................................................................................ 56
5.7.1
Status .................................................................................................................. 56
5.7.2
Serial Settings ..................................................................................................... 57
5.7.3
IP Settings .......................................................................................................... 59
5.7.4
Statistics ............................................................................................................. 60
5.8
ROUTER SETTINGS .......................................................................................................... 60
5.8.1
Interface Priority ................................................................................................ 60
5.8.2
Application Routing ........................................................................................... 61
5.8.3
Port Forwarding.................................................................................................. 62
5.8.4
MAC Filtering .................................................................................................... 64
5.8.5
IP Filtering.......................................................................................................... 65
5.8.6
Static Routing ..................................................................................................... 68
5.8.7
Routing Table ..................................................................................................... 69
5.9
SECURITY .......................................................................................................................... 70
5.9.1
IPSec................................................................................................................... 70
5.9.2
HTTPS ................................................................................................................ 73
5.9.3
Radius ................................................................................................................. 74
5.9.4
Security Policy ................................................................................................... 75
5.10 MONITOR & CONTROL ................................................................................................... 75
5.10.1
Status .................................................................................................................. 76
5.10.2
SNMP ................................................................................................................. 77
5.10.3
NMEA ................................................................................................................ 79
5.10.4
Power Management ............................................................................................ 79
Monitoring .......................................................................................................... 80
5.10.5
5.10.6
I/O Control ......................................................................................................... 82
5.11 GPS ...................................................................................................................................... 83
5.11.1
Status .................................................................................................................. 83
5.11.2
AAVL Settings ................................................................................................... 84
5.12 MAINTENANCE ................................................................................................................ 88
5.12.1
Status .................................................................................................................. 88
5.12.2
Firmware ............................................................................................................ 88
5.12.3
WWAN Firmware .............................................................................................. 89
5.12.4
Hardware ............................................................................................................ 90
4
14221-6200-2010
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section ...................................................................................................................................................... Page
5.12.5
Unit Configuration ............................................................................................. 91
5.12.6
System Log......................................................................................................... 92
5.12.7
USB Log............................................................................................................. 92
6. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE ....................................................................................................... 94
APPENDIX A – ABBREVIATIONS AND DEFINITIONS .............................................................. 95
APPENDIX B – MECHANICAL SPECIFICATIONS ...................................................................... 97
APPENDIX C – UL INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS & NON-INCENDIVE FIELD
WIRING .................................................................................................................. 101
APPENDIX D – FIRMWARE UPGRADES..................................................................................... 102
APPENDIX E – WIFI CONCURRENT CONFIGURATION: ACCESS POINT AND
CLIENT ................................................................................................................... 109
APPENDIX F – USING IPSEC TO CREATE IP PERSISTENCE............................................... 112
APPENDIX G – WARRANTY .......................................................................................................... 117
LIST OF FIGURES
Page
Figure 2-1: MBC-200 Mechanical Drawing .............................................................................. 12
Figure 2-2: Side Tapped Mounting Hole Location Detail - Typical Both Sides ....................... 13
Figure 2-3: Tapped Mounting Hole Location Detail - Top Only............................................... 13
Figure 2-4: Front Panel Connections ......................................................................................... 13
Figure 2-5: Rear Panel Connections .......................................................................................... 14
Figure 3-1: SIM card installation in MBC-200 .......................................................................... 17
Figure 3-2: Device connections for MBC-200 .......................................................................... 18
Figure 3-3: LAN Configuration Settings in Windows XP ......................................................... 19
Figure 3-4: Web Server Authentication Window ...................................................................... 20
Figure 3-5: Enable WWAN0 Interface and use Provider #1 for LTE connection ..................... 20
Figure 3-6: WWAN0 Status Tab Showing LTE Link Connected .............................................. 21
Figure 5-1: Web interface Displaying Unit Status Page ............................................................ 27
Figure 5-2: MBC-200 Web Interface Unit Status Page ............................................................. 28
Figure 5-3: General Settings – Unit ID ...................................................................................... 29
Figure 5-4: General Settings – Unit Password ........................................................................... 30
Figure 5-5: General Settings – Dynamic DNS........................................................................... 30
Figure 5-6: ETH0/ETH1/ETH2 – Status (Configured as LAN) ................................................ 32
Figure 5-7: ETH0/ETH1/ETH2 – Status (Configured as WAN) ............................................... 32
Figure 5-8: ETH0/ETH1/ETH2 – IP Settings (Configured as LAN)......................................... 34
Figure 5-9: ETH0/ETH1/ETH2 – IP Settings (Configured as WAN) ....................................... 35
Figure 5-10: ETH0/ETH1/ETH2 – Statistics ............................................................................. 36
Figure 5-11: WiFi (Access Point) – Status ................................................................................ 37
Figure 5-12: WiFi (Access Point) – Wireless Settings .............................................................. 38
Figure 5-13: WiFi (Access Point) – IP Settings ......................................................................... 40
Figure 5-14: WiFi (Access Point) – Statistics ............................................................................ 41
Figure 5-15: WiFi (Client) – Status ........................................................................................... 42
Figure 5-16: WiFi (Client) – Wireless Settings ......................................................................... 44
Figure 5-17: WiFi (Client) – IP Settings .................................................................................... 46
Figure 5-18: WiFi (Client) - Site Survey ................................................................................... 47
Figure 5-19: WiFi Client – Connection Manager ...................................................................... 47
5
14221-6200-2010
LIST OF FIGURES
Page
Figure 5-20: WiFi (Client) – Statistics ....................................................................................... 49
Figure 5-21: WWAN0/WWAN1 – Status ................................................................................. 49
Figure 5-22: WWAN0 /WWAN1 – Carrier Settings ................................................................. 52
Figure 5-23: WWAN0/WWAN1 – IP Settings .......................................................................... 53
Figure 5-24: WWAN0/WWAN1 – Connection Manager.......................................................... 54
Figure 5-25: WWAN0/WWAN1 – Statistics ............................................................................. 56
Figure 5-26: Serial – Status ........................................................................................................ 56
Figure 5-27: Serial – Serial Settings .......................................................................................... 57
Figure 5-28: Serial – IP Settings ................................................................................................ 59
Figure 5-29: Serial – Statistics ................................................................................................... 60
Figure 5-30: Router Settings – Interface Priority ....................................................................... 60
Figure 5-31: Router Settings – Application Routing ................................................................. 61
Figure 5-32: Router Settings – Port Forwarding ........................................................................ 62
Figure 5-33: Router Settings – MAC Filtering .......................................................................... 64
Figure 5-34: Router Settings – IP Filtering ................................................................................ 65
Figure 5-35: Router Settings – Static Routing ........................................................................... 68
Figure 5-36: Router Settings – Routing Table ........................................................................... 69
Figure 5-37: Security – IPSec .................................................................................................... 70
Figure 5-38: Security – HTTPS ................................................................................................. 73
Figure 5-39: Security – RADIUS............................................................................................... 74
Figure 5-40: Security – Security Policy ..................................................................................... 75
Figure 5-41: Monitor & Control – Status................................................................................... 76
Figure 5-42: Monitor & Control – SNMP ................................................................................. 77
Figure 5-43: Monitor & Control – NMEA................................................................................. 79
Figure 5-44: Monitor & Control – Power Management ............................................................ 79
Figure 5-45: Monitor & Control – Monitoring .......................................................................... 81
Figure 5-46: Monitor & Control – I/O Control .......................................................................... 82
Figure 5-47: GPS – Status.......................................................................................................... 83
Figure 5-48: GPS – AAVL Settings .......................................................................................... 85
Figure 5-49: Maintenance – Status ............................................................................................ 88
Figure 5-50: Maintenance – Firmware....................................................................................... 88
Figure 5-51: Maintenance – WWAN Firmware ........................................................................ 89
Figure 5-52: Maintenance – Hardware ...................................................................................... 90
Figure 5-53: Maintenance – Unit Configuration ........................................................................ 91
Figure 5-54: Maintenance – System Log ................................................................................... 92
Figure 5-55: Maintenance – USB Log ....................................................................................... 93
LIST OF TABLES
Page
Table 2-1: Option Numbers ....................................................................................................... 13
Table 2-2: Front Panel Connectors (Top Row – Left to Right) ................................................. 14
Table 2-3: Rear Panel Connections ............................................................................................ 15
Table 3-1: DC Power Cable Pin-Out ......................................................................................... 17
Table 5-1: Possible States of MBC-200 Interfaces .................................................................... 29
Table 5-2: GPS LED Color and GPS Status .............................................................................. 84
6
14221-6200-2010
1.
SAFETY INFORMATION
1.1
SYMBOL CONVENTIONS
The following conventions are used to alert the user to general safety precautions that must be observed
during all phases of operation, service, and repair of this product. Failure to comply with these
precautions or with specific warnings elsewhere violates safety standards of design, manufacture, and
intended use of the product. Harris assumes no liability for the customer's failure to comply with these
standards.
WARNING
CAUTION
The WARNING symbol calls attention to a procedure, practice, or the like, which, if not
correctly performed or adhered to, could result in personal injury. Do not proceed
beyond a WARNING symbol until the conditions identified are fully understood or met.
The CAUTION symbol calls attention to an operating procedure, practice, or the like, which, if
not performed correctly or adhered to, could result in a risk of danger, damage to the equipment,
or severely degrade the equipment performance.
The NOTE symbol calls attention to supplemental information, which may improve system
performance or clarify a process or procedure.
NOTE
The ESD symbol calls attention to procedures, practices, or the like, which could expose
equipment to the effects of Electro-Static Discharge. Proper precautions must be taken to
prevent ESD when handling circuit modules.
The electrical hazard symbol is a WARNING indicating there may be an electrical shock
hazard present.
1.2
ROUTER USE
The MBC-200 is a multi-band LTE router that is designed and intended primarily for use in mobile
applications. In addition to LTE, the MBC-200 also supports WiFi and wired Ethernet connectivity.
Please keep the LTE antennae at a safe distance from your head and body while the router is in use.
7
14221-6200-2010
***IMPORTANT***
Maintain a distance of at least 20 cm (8 inches) between the transmitter antenna and any person
while in use. This router is designed for use in applications that observe the 20 cm separation
distance.
CAUTION
1.3
INTERFERENCE ISSUES
Avoid possible radio frequency (RF) interference by following these guidelines:
1.4
1.5
•
The use of cellular telephones or devices in aircraft is illegal. Use in aircraft may endanger operation
and disrupt the cellular network. Failure to observe this restriction may result in suspension or denial
of LTE services to the offender, legal action, or both.
•
Do not operate in the vicinity of gasoline or diesel fuel pumps unless use has been approved or
authorized. Do not operate in fuel depots, chemical plants, or blasting areas unless use has been
approved and authorized.
•
Do not operate in locations where medical equipment that the device could interfere with may be in
use. Use care if operating in the vicinity of protected personal medical devices, i.e., hearing aids and
pacemakers.
•
Operation in the presence of other electronic equipment may cause interference if equipment is
incorrectly protected. Follow recommendations for installation from equipment manufacturers.
MOBILE APPLICATION SAFETY
•
Do not change parameters or perform other maintenance of the MBC-200 while driving.
•
Road safety is crucial. Observe National Regulations for cellular telephones and devices in vehicles.
•
Avoid potential interference with vehicle electronics by correctly installing the MBC-200. Leveraging
the FCC Modular approval of the LTE and WiFi module requires professional installation to avoid
antenna correlation.
UL LISTED MODELS ONLY
When operating at elevated temperature extremes, the surface may exceed +70 Celsius. For user
safety, the MBC-200 should be installed in a restricted access location.
CAUTION
EXPLOSION HAZARD, do not connect while circuit is live unless area is known to be
non- hazardous.
WARNING
For more information see APPENDIX C - UL Installation Instructions and Non-Incendive Field Wiring.
8
14221-6200-2010
2.
PRODUCT OVERVIEW
The MBC-200 offers a single, flexible platform to address a variety of wireless communications needs
with over-the-air configuration and system monitoring for optimal connectivity. This ready-to-deploy
broadband router enables wireless data connectivity over public and private LTE cellular networks at 4G
speeds based on 3GPP Standard E-UTRA Release 8 technologies.
The MBC-200 provides broadband connectivity over LTE Public Safety Band 14 for private
infrastructure, as well as over the commercial 700 MHz Band 13 or 17 (with 3G EV-DO/HSPA fallback
modes) for public use. Three Ethernet ports support LAN configurations that provide for the unique
requirements of third-party VPN middleware providers.
An IEEE 802.11 b/g/n WiFi interface access point and client operations support connectivity to IP
applications in a variety of different connection scenarios. Dual USB 2.0 host interfaces are provided to
support Serial IP communication (using the supported USB to RS-232 Converter cable accessory) and
writing event log files to a USB flash drive. Anticipated future uses include connection of other optional
USB peripherals such as ZigBee or Bluetooth® adapters.
The MBC-200 includes an easy to use web-based management and configuration interface, and
comprehensive remote management facilities. LTE/WiFi/Ethernet rule-based and application port-based
switching enables IP control such as segregating traffic specific to designated bearer networks and
choosing the WAN fallback order. This feature makes the MBC-200 a powerful and unique enabler of
interoperable network technologies.
The MBC-200 includes an IP router that facilitates traffic routing between all of the concurrently
operating networks. The integrated router simplifies installation cabling requirements by requiring only a
single cable connection with onboard computing equipment, and offloading routing processor burdens
and setup complexities.
2.1
MODULE IDENTIFICATION
The module identification label can be found on the bottom of your MBC-200 device. This label contains
the product part number, the serial number, FCC and IC IDs, as well as carrier specific information that
will be required when activating your data account. The following is a sample portrayal of the
identification label; identifiers and their placement will vary depending on model and installed options,
and actual bar-coded numbers on each unit will differ.
9
14221-6200-2010
2.2
2.3
FEATURES AND BENEFITS OF THE MBC-200 MULTI-NETWORK
ROUTER
•
Band 13 or 17 for public infrastructure.
•
Support for Band 14 LTE for private infrastructure.
•
Supports dual LTE modules for mixing public and private bands.
•
Superior RF performance with MIMO capabilities, Secure IPSec VPN connectivity, HTTPS,
RADIUS, Autonomous WAAS enabled GPS with local and host reporting, and Dynamic or Static
WAN IP.
•
Inbound and Outbound Ethernet Routing.
•
DHCP Server, Inbound port mapping/translation (Port Forwarding), and Firewall configuration for
increased network security.
•
Diversity antenna port/auxiliary port for increased receive sensitivity for dual LTE modules.
•
Local or remote configuration using HTML web server.
•
Inbound IP termination with Static IP, Persistent Domain Names with Dynamic DNS.
•
Ethernet and WiFi ports support LAN and WAN operation.
•
Dual SIM card slots to support multiple carrier contracts.
•
USB and digital/analog I/O for external devices.
•
Housed in a rugged metal chassis, the MBC-200 meets MIL-STD-810F certification (for dry heat and
cold storage and operation, cold start, humidity, random vibration, and mechanical shock) and IEC
61000-4-2 (2009) for electrostatic discharges.
GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS
Product specifications are subject to change without notice.
NOTE
GENERAL
10
Input Voltage
10 to 30 VDC
Power Consumption
Single LTE Module and GPS
Rx: 5.5 W (no WiFi); 7.7 W with WiFi
Tx: 9.1 W (no WiFi); 13.0 W with WiFi
LTE Diversity Support
DL MIMO, UL SISO
Security
3GPP Rel 8 security sublayer, IPSec VPN, HTTPS, and RADIUS
Carrier Approvals
Verizon Wireless, VTEL, PTCRB certified for AT&T
Certifications
FCC Part 15 Subpart B Class A, IC ICES-003, FCC Rule Part 27, 90 (B13, B14),
MIL-STD 810F (dry heat and cold storage and operation, cold start, humidity, random
vibration, and mechanical shock), IEC 61000-4-2 (2009) electrostatic discharges
Dual LTE Modules and GPS
Rx: 5.8 W (no WiFi); 10 W with WiFi
Tx: 14 W (no WiFi); 16.9 W with WiFi
14221-6200-2010
Connectors/Interface
Antenna connectors and LED indicators vary with device model (installed options)
Device Management
SNMP, embedded HTTP server for setup and help
LED Indicators
POWER, STATUS, ETH0, ETH1, ETH2, GPS, WWAN0, WWAN1 (with dual radio option), WiFi
Power
4-pin locking, ignition sense and alarm inputs
Console/Setup
3-wire serial connection in USB Mini-B form factor
Ethernet
(3) 10/100 Mbps RJ-45, auto MDIX, Auto-negotiation
USB
(2) Type A female
I/O
2 digital I/O, 2 analog inputs,
2 outputs (relay driven contact closures)
Antenna
(3) SMA-RP (802.11 b/g/n WiFi), (2) SMA (LTE) WWAN0 (single or dual radio),
(2) SMA (LTE) WWAN1 (dual radio option only), (1) SMA (GPS)
Mechanical/Environmental
Dimensions
1.9 in. (4,8 cm) height × 6.0 in (15,3 cm) width × 5.5 in. (14 cm) depth
Weight
2.5 lb. (1.13 kg)
Temperature Range
-22° to +158° F (-30° to +70° C)
Humidity
5% to 95% non-condensing
LTE Bands
Supported bands vary with device model.
Band 14
700 MHz “Public Safety” Block DL MIMO, UL SISO
Band 13
700 MHz DL MIMO, UL SISO
Band 17
700 MHz DL MIMO, UL SISO
CDMA Bands
Supported bands vary with device model.
EVDO Rev A (IS-856-A)
800 MHz Cellular/1900 MHz PCS
Downlink 3.1 Mbps; Uplink 1.8 Mbps
1xEVDO Rev 0 (IS-856)
800 MHz Cellular/1900 MHz PCS
Downlink 2.4 Mbps; Uplink 153.6 kbps
1xRTT (IS-2000)
GSM Bands
UMTS/HSPA
EDGE/GPRS
800 MHz Cellular/1900 MHz PCS
Downlink 153.6 kbps; Uplink 153.6 kbps
Supported bands vary with device model.
850/900, 1800/1900, 2100 MHz
Downlink 7.2 Mbps, Uplink 2.0 Mbps
Quad-band 850/900, 1800/1900 MHz
Downlink 236 kbps, Uplink 236 kbps
11
14221-6200-2010
WiFi Technology/Bands
IEEE 802.11 b/g/n
32 bit mPCI type lllA high power/performance WiFi
WPA-PSK (TKIP encryption), WPA2-PSK (CCMP encryption), 64 bit/128 bit WEP
encryption, WPA Enterprise and WPA2-Enterprise
Security
Data Rates
802.11b: up to 11 Mbps
802.11g: up to 54 Mbps
802.11n: up to 144 Mbps
2.4
MECHANICAL SPECIFICATIONS
The following table and figure show overall dimensions of the chassis of the MBC-200. Dimensioned
drawings of the chassis with mounting options (bracket, mounting plate, or DIN rail mount) are provided
in APPENDIX B. The drawings and associated data may be used for layout reference, but it is advised
that a physical comparison be made to the unit and bracket before laying out and drilling any holes.
DIMENSION
INCHES
CENTIMETERS
Height
1.90
4.83
Width
6.00
15.2
Depth
(Overall)
5.50
14.0
Depth
(Chassis only)
5.28
13.4
Figure 2-1: MBC-200 Mechanical Drawing
12
14221-6200-2010
Figure 2-2: Side Tapped Mounting Hole
Location Detail - Typical Both Sides
#8-32 UNC – 2B thread × 0.30 in. (0.76 cm)
depth 2 holes for mounting both sides (4 holes
total).
Figure 2-3: Tapped Mounting Hole Location
Detail - Top Only
#6-32 UNC – 2B thread × 0.12 in. (0.30 cm) depth 4
holes for mounting (top surface only).
2.5
ORDERING INFORMATION
Refer to the following tables for options and part numbers required for ordering MBC-200 routers:
Table 2-1: Option Numbers
OPTION NUMBER
2.6
DESCRIPTION
BB-B1300W
Mobile Router B13, WIFI
BB-B1314W
Mobile Router B13/B14, WIFI
BB-B1700W
Mobile Router B17, WIFI
BB-B1714W
Mobile Router B17/B14, WIFI
BB-B1400W
Mobile Router B14, WIFI
BB-200DO
Mobile Router Management Software
BB-B14UG
B14 Upgrade Kit
EXTERNAL CONNECTORS
This section describes the external connectors for the MBC-200.
Figure 2-4: Front Panel Connections
13
14221-6200-2010
Table 2-2: Front Panel Connectors (Top Row – Left to Right)
PANEL LABEL
CONNECTION
DESCRIPTION
WWAN0 M
SMA
B13/B17 LTE Rx/Tx primary antenna connector
WWAN0
SMA
B13/B17 LTE diversity connector
WWAN1 M
SMA
B14 LTE Rx/Tx primary antenna connector
WWAN1
SMA
B14 LTE diversity connector
WiFi M
RP-SMA
Primary WiFi Tx/Rx antenna connector
WiFi
(center connector)
RP-SMA
2× MIMO Tx/Rx antenna connector
(Used for WiFi 802.11b/g.)
WiFi
(farthest to right)
RP-SMA
3× MIMO Tx/Rx antenna connector
(Used for Wifi 802.11n.)
GPS
SMA
Power
4-pin locking
Power, ignition sense, and alarm input
USB
USB A
2 USB Host connectors (for future use)
ETH0
RJ-45
Ethernet 10/100 Mbps
ETH1
RJ-45
Ethernet 10/100 Mbps
ETH2
RJ-45
Ethernet 10/100 Mbps
GPS Receive antenna
Figure 2-5: Rear Panel Connections
14
14221-6200-2010
Table 2-3: Rear Panel Connections
2.7
PANEL LABEL
CONNECTION
DESCRIPTION
I/O
10-position
terminal socket
2 digital inputs/outputs, 2 analog inputs, 2 outputs (processor-controlled
internal relays)
Console
USB Mini-B
Mini-USB device port used for debug only
Setup
Push button
Push-button Reset / Force Factory Settings
Status
LED
SIM/SVC (left)
SIM card slot
WWAN0
USB Mini-B
SIM SVC (right)
SIM card slot
WWAN1
USB Mini-B
Bicolor Status LED
Slot and tray for mini SIM card for module in WAN slot 0
Service port, direct connection to WWAN0 module
Slot and tray for mini SIM card for module in WAN slot 1
Service port, direct connection to WWAN1 module
LEDS
INDICATOR
OFF
SOLID
GREEN
FLASHING
GREEN
SOLID AMBER
FLASHING
AMBER
SOLID RED
FLASHING
RED
Firmware boot
sequence /
Power-down
timer
activated 1
Power supply
fault
–
PWR
No power
Running
–
Hardware
power-up
sequence
STAT
No power
Status: Normal
–
Status: Warning
Status: Factory
Defaults
Status: Fault
–
GPS
–
Position Fix
Acquired
1 PPS Activity
Failed to
Acquire
Satellites
Acquiring
Satellites
Fault
–
WiFi 2
(Client)
I/F Disabled
Connected
Rx/Tx
Activity
–
–
Fault
–
WiFi2
(AP)
I/F Disabled
Ready
Rx/Tx
Activity
–
–
Fault
–
WWAN0/
WWAN1
I/F Disabled,
Idle, or
Bypassed
Connected
Rx/Tx
Activity
Failed to
Connect
Connecting
Fault
–
ETH Link/Act
No link
Link OK
Activity
–
–
–
–
1
The “Power-Down Timer Activated” is a transient condition that exists when the “ignition” input is OFF and the “power-management shutdown when ignition is off” feature is activated. It means that the unit is about to shut down and this will occur when the timer has
expired.
2
WiFi Client has priority over the WiFi AP function. This implies that WiFi Client has ownership of the LED when it is enabled. WiFi AP
has ownership of the LED only if the WiFi Client is disabled.
15
14221-6200-2010
INDICATOR
OFF
SOLID
GREEN
FLASHING
GREEN
SOLID AMBER
FLASHING
AMBER
SOLID RED
FLASHING
RED
ETH Speed
10 Mbps
–
–
100 Mbps
–
–
–
2.8
NORMAL POWER-UP SEQUENCE
STEP ACTION
LED ACTIVITY
1
Apply power to the unit.
N/A
2
Internal 5 V power supply turns on.
Power LED on front panel illuminates red for approximately 1
second.
3
Internal 1.8 V and 3.3 V power supply Every indicator, (except Ethernet jack indicators), illuminates amber for
turn on.
approximately 400 milliseconds.
4
Hardware initialization.
Every indicator turns off, except Power, which remains amber.
5
Bootstrap program runs.
Power LED blinks amber.
6
Application starts.
Power LED illuminates solid green.
7
Application runs normally.
Power LED remains solid green. Status LED on back panel illuminates
solid green.
2.9
ANTENNA
LTE antenna connections are SMA female connectors and must be used with antenna with SMA male
connectors.
When using a direct mount or rubber duck antenna, choose the antenna specific to your band
requirements. Mounting options and cable lengths are user’s choice and application specific. Each
WWAN interface supports a primary and diversity antenna connector.
Connect an active 3 V - 5.5 V GPS antenna, with an average gain greater than -5 dBi, if using the GPS
functionality.
MBC-200 routers are available with WiFi, using RP-SMA connectors. Connect the WiFi antenna to the
RP-SMA connectors labeled for WiFi. This device is factory configured with default settings and is ready
to be customized via the internal HTML interface that can be accessed using a web browser through an
Ethernet connection.
16
14221-6200-2010
3.
GETTING STARTED
3.1
PACKAGE CONTENTS
MBC-200 Router
Power Cable
Mounting Bracket or Plate (depending on fixed/portable or mobile model) and hardware
Quick-Start Guide (14221-6200-1020)
3.2
POWER SUPPLY CONNECTION
The MBC-200 is shipped with a DC power cable used to connect the device to a DC source. The cable
includes a fuse holder. Insert the fuse in the power cable fuse holder prior to powering on the unit. The
cable connections are listed below:
Table 3-1: DC Power Cable Pin-Out
PIN
WIRE
COLOR
DESCRIPTION
NOTES
1
Red
VIN
DC input power lead, 13.8 V nominal (10 V to 30 V range).
2
Black
Ground
Connect to power supply ground.
3
White
Ignition Sense
Standard ignition-on signal. Maximum voltage above which ignition_sense
will be detected as ignition asserted = 9.0 V;
If IGN Sense is not used, then this line must be connected to V IN.
4
3.3
Yellow
External Alarm Input
External alarm input (active low); can be left floating if not used.
DEVICE CONNECTIONS
Important: Before you begin configuring the MBC-200, you will need an LTE contract with a carrier
and an active SIM or UICC card for each carrier/LTE module installed in the MBC-200.
1. Unscrew two screws to remove the cover plate covering the WWAN slots and insert the SIM/UICC
card into the WWAN slot(s) as shown. Insert the first SIM into the WWAN0 slot. If you are using a
dual card solution, install the second SIM/UICC card into the WWAN1 slot. (Retain the cover plate
and attaching screws to reattach the cover plate after setup is complete.)
Figure 3-1: SIM card installation in MBC-200
2. Connect the antennas to the appropriate SMA connectors on the front of the MBC-200 router as
shown in the following figure, matching the antennas for the WWAN0 module with WWAN0
connectors, and antennas for the WWAN1 with WWAN1 connectors if applicable. For each antenna
17
14221-6200-2010
pair, connect the main Rx/Tx antenna to the connector labeled M, and MIMO/Diversity to the
secondary (unmarked) connector of the pair.
Figure 3-2: Device connections for MBC-200
3. Connect a GPS antenna to the SMA connector labeled GPS and connect WiFi antenna to the RPSMA connectors: one for the Main (WiFi M) and one or more (as equipped) for WiFi
MIMO/Diversity (unlabeled).
4. Connect an Ethernet cable into the ETH1 port (center Ethernet connector) of the MBC-200 and plug
the other end into the Ethernet port of your PC.
5. Connect the Power Cable between the router’s PWR port and an acceptable DC power source (10-30
VDC). The DC power cable shipped with the MBC-200 to connect the unit to DC power includes a
fuse holder. Insert the fuse in the power cable fuse holder before powering the unit. Cable
connections are listed in Table 3-1.
After power is applied, the MBC-200 Power LED will illuminate solid red for 1 second, then turn
solid amber for 5-6 seconds, blink amber for 6 seconds, and then turn solid green.
3.4
LAN CONFIGURATION
The MBC-200 contains a DHCP server which will automatically assign an IP address to your PC;
however, in some cases the user may need to change the network settings on their PC to accept the IP
address from the MBC-200. Before powering on the unit, confirm that your PC’s Ethernet port is set up to
receive an IP address from an external DHCP server, confirm it is not set to a static address. The process
required to do this differs depending on the version of Windows®.
For Windows XP users, select Start  Control Panel  Network Connections. Right-click Local
Area Connection and select Properties to open the configuration dialog box for Local Area Connection.
Select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click Properties to open the TCP/IP configuration window. On
the General tab, select Obtain an IP address automatically and Obtain DNS server address
automatically. Click OK to complete TCP/IP configuration.
18
14221-6200-2010
Figure 3-3: LAN Configuration Settings in Windows XP
3.5
LOG-IN
Start your Web browser and enter 192.168.1.50 in the address bar. A Web Server Authentication window
appears.
The Ethernet cable between the MBC-200 and your PC must be connected to ETH1 for this IP
address to work.
NOTE
19
14221-6200-2010
Figure 3-4: Web Server Authentication Window
Enter the User Name: admin and the Password: password and click OK to log into the router’s Home
Page. Information about the Unit Status is displayed on the Home Page.
3.6
LTE CONNECTION
Before you begin configuring the MBC-200, you will need an LTE account and an active
SIM or UICC card for each carrier/LTE module installed in the MBC-200.
NOTE
The MBC-200 Web interface is divided in two sections. In the left pane is the main navigation menu. On
the right is the content area for the selected page. Initially, information about the Unit Status is displayed.
From the main navigation menu on the left, select WWAN0 to navigate to the WWAN0 page. The Status
tab for WWAN0 is displayed. Select the Carrier Settings tab.
Figure 3-5: Enable WWAN0 Interface and use Provider #1 for LTE connection
If the interface is not already enabled, in the Configuration section click Enabled and in the same section,
click Save to enable the WWAN0 interface.
In the Provider #1 section, if Provider #1 is not already enabled click Enabled and in the same section,
click Save to enable Provider #1.
Leave APN, User, and Password blank unless you have received specific values from your carrier. For
most cases, Authentication should remain set as Any.
20
14221-6200-2010
It may take several minutes to establish the connection after it has been enabled for the first time. Verify
the connection is active by clicking the Status tab. See Figure 3-6.
Figure 3-6: WWAN0 Status Tab Showing LTE Link Connected
21
14221-6200-2010
4.
ANTENNA PACKAGE SELECTION: RULES AND
GUIDELINES
This section provides guidelines on selecting antenna packages for use with the Harris MBC-200 Mobile
Router.
NOTE
The MBC-200 requires professional installation by personnel proficient with the
intricacies of RF system deployment. The following antenna suggestions must be
viewed as starting points to be discussed with your selected radio installation service.
4.1 CO-LOCATION RULES
To ensure maximum flexibility in combining various radio bands and technologies inside the MBC-200,
the FCC Modular Approval approach has been adopted. Therefore, the MBC-200 itself has been FCC
certified as an “unintentional radiator” under FCC 47 CFR 15, Subpart B rules.
This certification method allows Harris to leverage the individual (or Modular) approval obtained by the
manufacturer of each radio module (802.11 cards, LTE cards, etc.) that can be mixed and matched inside
the MBC-200, without having to submit each MBC-200 + radio(s) combination offered to individual FCC
testing. The economies in time and money thus realized allow Harris to quickly adapt to market demands,
which in turn extends to Customers and Solution Providers being able to rapidly and cost effectively
benefit from these advances.
Under the FCC Modular Approval rules (covered by FCC 47 CFR 15.212), each radio module
manufacturer must provide a comprehensive list of requirements to be followed by Host equipment (e.g.,
MBC-200) vendors and end-users. By following the requirements specified by each applicable radio
module vendor (available for public view on the FCC website), the MBC-200 can leverage any
combination of LTE, WiFi, etc., radio cards.
Although the vast majority of the Modular Approval requirements attached to the radio modules used in
the MBC-200 do not impact antennas, a rule named “transmitter co-location” introduces some antenna
selection constraints. Related to the side-effects created when two transmitter antennas operate very close
to each other, this rule does apply to the MBC-200 radio modules.
In the various radios’ modular approval letters, co-location is typically defined as having two transmitter
antennas located less than 20 cm apart from each other, where both antennas can be active at the same
time.
This implies that a single antenna package cannot, for example, have a cable connected to the TX
connector of an LTE card and another cable connected to the TX connector of a WiFi card.
This rule is respected when a single card supporting true MIMO operation (example: WiFi 3x3 MIMO) is
connected to a single antenna package since the 3 transmitting elements of the single WiFi card have been
certified together and are covered by the same Modular Approval.
NOTE
22
To ensure compliance with Modular Approval co-location rules, do not attach TX
connectors from different radio adapters (ex: WWAN0 and WiFi; WWAN0 and
WWAN1) to the same antenna housing.
14221-6200-2010
4.1.1 Co-Located Transmitters
In order for a multi-radio product to use integrated all-in-one antennas (e.g.: 3 WiFi, 4 LTE, GPS inside
the same package), the product (such as the MBC-200) and the antenna(s) must be FCC certified as a
system, to be sold as-is.
This FCC certification path is much more involved (and much costlier) than the "unintentional radiator"
certification that relies on the individual module's approvals. Furthermore, the complete system (e.g.:
MBC-200 + antennas) must be fully recertified any time there is a change (new LTE module, new
antennas, etc.).
Finally, as these all-in-one antennas favor low package count over diversity performance, the preferred
approach is to use separate antenna packages for each radio.
4.2 LTE MIMO CONSIDERATIONS
MIMO stands for Multiple-Input Multiple-Output, meaning that MIMO systems use more than one
transmit antenna (TX) to send a signal on the same frequency to more than one receive antenna (RX).
MIMO technology is a standard feature of next-generation LTE networks, and it is a major piece of
LTE’s promise to significantly boost data rates and overall system capacity.
While traditional cellular networks generally provide the best service under line-of-sight conditions,
MIMO thrives under rich scattering conditions where signals bounce around the environment. This
phenomenon is called “multipath.” Under multipath conditions, signals from different TX points take
multiple paths to reach the user equipment (e.g., MBC-200) at different times.
In current LTE deployments such as those used by carriers enabled on the MBC-200, only the downlink
path supports MIMO (dubbed DL-MIMO); in the uplink path (MBC-200  Base Station) a single
antenna per LTE card is used to transmit data. Most LTE carriers do however support a form of uplink
MIMO called MU-MIMO (Multi-User MIMO) where a base station can schedule two independent radios
(e.g., two MBC-200 routers) to transmit at the same time (but with each MBC-200 still transmitting on a
single antenna).
In order to leverage the benefits of DL-MIMO, both connectors of a given LTE card must be attached to a
suitable antenna element. Although using a single antenna connector will still work, the Base Station will
not be able to allocate the full bandwidth it can dedicate to each MBC-200. Furthermore, the advantage
multipath represents in MIMO becomes a disadvantage when using a single antenna connector per LTE
card, as the physics principles involved will affect the quality of the received signals, causing further
throughput degradation (especially when the MBC-200 is moving at vehicular speeds).
23
14221-6200-2010
To ensure optimal performance of the MBC-200 on LTE and 802.11n radios, make
sure that each antenna connector is used and is connected to an appropriately selected
antenna element.
NOTE
4.3 ANTENNA SELECTION AND SPACING CONSIDERATIONS
Harris recommends that the MBC-200 be deployed by professional radio installers. This will ensure not
only the proper positioning of each MBC-200 antenna, but that the location of other antennas that may be
present on the asset equipped with the MBC-200 is taken into consideration.
Take the following into consideration prior to the installation, to provide an initial assessment on the real
estate required, number of antennas, etc.
4.4
NOTE
Don’t combine the cables from a single antenna package to both the RX and TX
connectors of the same MBC-200 radio card, unless this antenna has been designed
for, and tested to comply with, the diversity requirements for operation in this fashion.
NOTE
When using the MBC-200 with more than one radio (ex: B13 + B14 + WiFi), make
sure to observe a minimum of 20 cm of separation between antenna packages that have
cable(s) linked to an MBC-200 TX connector.
RADIO MODULES AND FREQUENCY BANDS
The following table presents the different frequency bands of operation for the radio modules that can be
used in the MBC-200:
MODULE
B13 LTE
B13 LTE
B13 LTE
MODE
4G
LTE
3G
CDMA
3G
CDMA
FREQ BAND
DL
FMIN
DL
FMAX
UL
FMIN
UL
FMAX
ANTENNAS
COMMENTS
LTE B13
746
756
777
787
1 RX/TX, 1 RX div
(1)
Verizon, LTE
869
894
824
849
1 RX/TX, 1 RX div
1930
1990
1850
1910
1 RX/TX, 1 RX div
Band 5
(Cellular)
PCS 1900
MHz
B14 LTE
4G
LTE
LTE B14
758
768
788
798
1 RX/TX, 1 RX div
(1)
FirstNet
GPS
GPS
GPS L1
1565
1585
n/a
n/a
1 RX
GPS L1
WiFi b/g/n
802.11
2.4 GHz ISM
2412
2462
2412
2462
3x3 MIMO
802.11 MIMO
module
WiFi b/g/n
802.11
5 GHz
5475
5825
5475
5825
3x3 MIMO
MIMO module
Notes:
(1) LTE (3GPP Rel 8-10) is DL-MIMO, UL-SISO.
24
Verizon, 3G
fallback
Verizon, 3G
fallback
14221-6200-2010
4.5
ANTENNA SUGGESTIONS
4.5.1
MBC-200 with Two LTE Cards and a WiFi Module
A
B
M
M
M
WWAN0
C
M
WWAN1
802.11
GPS
ANTENNAS
HARRIS PART NUMBER
HARRIS PART NUMBER
Antenna
Package
Magmount
Thread Mount
A
BB-AN7S
BB-AN7R
B
BB-AN7U
BB-AN7T
C
BB-AN7M
BB-AN7M
Notes:
Main of WWAN0 goes to package A, diversity of WWAN0 goes to package B.
Main of WWAN1 goes to package B, diversity of WWAN1 goes to package A.
4.5.2
MBC-200 with One LTE Card and a WiFi Module
(A) When lower antenna package count is preferred over optimal diversity performance
B
A
M
M
WWAN0
M
WWAN1
802.11
GPS
25
14221-6200-2010
ANTENNAS
HARRIS PART NUMBERS
HARRIS PART NUMBERS
Antenna Package
Magmount
Thread Mount
A
BB-AN7S
BB-AN7R
B
BB-AN7M
BB-AN7N
4.5.3
Harris Antenna Part Number Reference
PART NUMBER
26
DESCRIPTION
BB-AN7L
ANTENNA, MAG MNT, WHT 3X MIMO WIFI/WLAN
BB-AN7M
ANTENNA, MAG MNT, BLK 3X MIMO WIFI/WLAN
BB-AN7N
ANTENNA, SURFC MNT, WHT 3X MIMO WIFI/WLAN
BB-AN7P
ANTENNA, SURFC MNT, BLK 3X MIMO WIFI/WLAN
BB-AN7R
ANTENNA, CBL SURFC MNT, WHT LTE/GPS3 COMBO
BB-AN7S
ANTENNA, CBL MAG MNT, BLK LTE/GPS3 COMBO
BB-AN7T
ANTENNA, CBL MAG MNT, WHT LTE/GPS3 COMBO
BB-AN7U
ANTENNA, CBL MAG MNT, BLK LTE/LTE2 COMBO
14221-6200-2010
5.
MBC-200 WEB INTERFACE
The MBC-200 Web interface is divided into two sections. In the left pane is the main navigation menu.
On the right is the content area for each page. The navigation menu for your MBC-200 may contain fewer
sections than shown here, depending on which options are installed in your unit.
Figure 5-1: Web interface Displaying Unit Status Page
NOTE
5.1
If the computer you are using has previously been used to set up an MBC-200, you may need to
delete the browser history (specifically, temporary Internet files) for some pages of the web
interface to display correctly.
UNIT STATUS
The Unit Status is the first page displayed when navigating to the MBC-200 Web interface and is the
home page. Select Unit Status from the main navigation menu (or click Home) to return to this page.
From this page you can view unit identification, system status, and interface information.
27
14221-6200-2010
Figure 5-2: MBC-200 Web Interface Unit Status Page
5.1.1
System Information
Unit ID
This is the user-defined name given to the unit for ease of reference and is used by various services.
Local Time
Displays the current date and time (UTC) as received from the GPS receiver.
System Up Time
Displays the duration the system has been up in hours, minutes, and seconds.
Software Version
Displays the current system firmware version loaded.
Default Route
Displays the name of the WAN interface used as the default route. This value can change dynamically,
based on the available WANs and WAN failover rules specified.
5.1.2
Interface Information
Interface
Name of the interface.
State
Displays the current state of the interface. Possible states are listed in Table 5-1.
IP Address and Subnet Mask
Displays the IP address and subnet mask of the interface.
The MBC-200 acts as a router between each of its interfaces, ETH0, ETH1, ETH2, WiFi, WWAN0, and
WWAN1 (when installed and active); not as a switch or hub. Each of these interfaces, when enabled,
must have a unique IP address that (with the subnet mask) specifies a subnet that is separate (nonoverlapping) from subnets specified for any of the other MBC-200 interfaces.
28
14221-6200-2010
IP Address
Displays the IP address assigned to this interface.
Subnet Mask
Displays the subnet mask of this interface.
MAC Address
Media Access Control Address: every interface (i.e., LAN or WAN) has a unique hardware serial number
or MAC address to identify each Network Device from all others. Note that the optional WiFi client and
Access Point interfaces are provided by the same hardware module and therefore share the same MAC
address.
Table 5-1: Possible States of MBC-200 Interfaces
ETH (LAN)
ETH (WAN)
WiFi AP
WiFi Client
WWAN
Serial
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Down
Inactive
Inactive
Inactive
Inactive
Disconnected
Disabled
No Cable
No Cable
Configuring IP
Scanning
Connecting
Listening
Configuring IP
Acquiring IP
Connecting
Acquiring IP
Connected
No Cable
Connecting
Connecting
Connected
Connecting
Connecting
Connected
Connected
Connected
Connected
5.2
GENERAL SETTINGS
The General Settings page allows customization of basic settings of the MBC-200. Select General
Settings from the main navigation menu to navigate to the General Settings page. The General Settings
page contains three tabs: Unit ID, Unit Password, and Dynamic DNS.
5.2.1
Unit ID
Figure 5-3: General Settings – Unit ID
ID
This identifier serves to distinguish this unit from other units in the network. This identifier also serves as
the TAIP identifier used for GPS reporting and serves as the ‘syslocation’ for the SNMP facility.
29
14221-6200-2010
5.2.2
Unit Password
Figure 5-4: General Settings – Unit Password
Current Unit Password
The current unit password must be entered here to enable changing the unit password.
New Unit Password
Enter new password here. Password may include special characters and must be between 8-15 characters
long.
Confirm New Unit Password
Re-enter the new password. This password controls access to the MBC-200 HTML web interface via a
local Ethernet connection and via Remote login (see Section 5.9). Some functions such as SNMP will
require an additional password.
5.2.3
Dynamic DNS
Figure 5-5: General Settings – Dynamic DNS
Dynamic DNS is a system that allows the domain name data of a computer with a varying (dynamic) IP
addresses held in a name server to be updated in real time in order to make it possible to establish
30
14221-6200-2010
connections to that machine without the need to track the actual IP addresses at all times. A number of
providers offer Dynamic DNS services (DDNS), free or for a charge.
The MBC-200 allows publishing a distinct IP address or mnemonic name association for each of its
WAN interfaces, as well as for the WAN interface used as the default route. Example: car54 (for the
default route), car54_wifi, car54_LTEB14, car54_VZW.
5.2.3.1
Configuration
Dynamic DNS
Select Enabled to allow the MBC-200 to provide the selected service dynamic IP address information.
Select Disabled to stop any IP information from being sent to the selected service.
Client
Select the Dynamic DNS client to use. No-IP is the default DNS service.
5.2.3.2
Server Settings
Server Address
The internet address to communicate the Dynamic DNS information. Default is dynupdate.no-ip.com.
User Name
The user name used when setting up the account. This is used to login to the Dynamic DNS service.
Password
The password associated with the account.
Update Interval
Sets the interval, in minutes (0 to 65,535), after which the router will update the Dynamic DNS server of
its carrier assigned IP address. Each update is considered a data call by the LTE provider and could
deplete low usage data plan minutes. Setting the duration too long could lead to periods of lost
connectivity when the device’s IP address changes.
5.2.3.3
Client Settings
The Clear button on each entry can be used to remove that particular DDNS configuration. Click Save
for changes to take effect.
Enable
The IP address updates are only supplied to the service if this radio button is set.
Host Configuration
The unique device name to register with the DDNS service.
WAN Interface
The WAN interface whose IP address will be published for this DDNS registration.
5.3
ETH0, ETH1, ETH2 (ETHERNET 0, 1, AND 2)
The same instructions apply to settings for all Ethernet interfaces. Each Ethernet interface can be
configured as a LAN or a generic WAN. Select the interface, ETH0, ETH1, or ETH2, as applicable, from
the main navigation menu to navigate to the page for the interface.
31
14221-6200-2010
NOTE
5.3.1
When assigning IP addresses, each interface, ETH0, ETH1, and ETH2 (and WiFi, WWAN0,
and WWAN1, when active) must have a unique IP address that (with the subnet mask)
specifies it is on a subnet that is separate (non-overlapping) from subnets specified for any of
the other MBC-200 interfaces.
Status
Figure 5-6 is an example of ETH configured as a LAN:
Figure 5-6: ETH0/ETH1/ETH2 – Status (Configured as LAN)
Figure 5-7 is an example of ETH configured as a WAN:
Figure 5-7: ETH0/ETH1/ETH2 – Status (Configured as WAN)
5.3.1.1
Status
Interface Status
See Table 5-1 for possible states of MBC-200 interfaces in Unit Status.
Interface Up Time
Number of days, hours, minutes, and seconds that the interface has been up (connected state).
32
14221-6200-2010
5.3.1.2
IP
IP Address
IP address assigned to this interface.
NOTE
When assigning IP addresses, each interface, ETH0, ETH1, and ETH2 (and WiFi, WWAN0,
and WWAN1, when active) must have a unique IP address that (with the subnet mask) specifies
it is on a subnet that is separate (non-overlapping) from subnets specified for any of the other
MBC-200 interfaces.
Subnet Mask
The subnet mask assigned to this interface.
MTU
The Maximum Transmit Unit, the maximum packet size allowed to be transmitted.
The following only apply when the interface is configured as a WAN.
Gateway
IP address of the WAN gateway. This is used for routing packets to remote networks.
DNS Server 1, DNS Server 2
IP address of the (1) preferred and (2) alternate DNS server.
Lease Time
If the interface is set up to request an IP address from a DHCP server, this is the lease duration.
Lease Expires In
If the interface is set up to request an IP address from a DHCP server, this is the time remaining in the
current lease.
5.3.1.3
Link
Cable Status
Connected or disconnected.
33
14221-6200-2010
5.3.2
IP Settings
Figure 5-8 is an example of ETH configured as a LAN:
Figure 5-8: ETH0/ETH1/ETH2 – IP Settings (Configured as LAN)
34
14221-6200-2010
Figure 5-9 is an example of ETH configured as a WAN:
Figure 5-9: ETH0/ETH1/ETH2 – IP Settings (Configured as WAN)
5.3.2.1
Mode of Operation
Type
Select LAN if this Ethernet port is connecting to a local area network. Select WAN if the MBC-200 is
connecting to a wide area network through an external router or gateway.
5.3.2.2
IP Configuration
IP Address/Subnet Mask
Sets the IP Address and Subnet Mask for the Ethernet interface.
NOTE
When assigning IP addresses, each interface, ETH0, ETH1, and ETH2, (and WiFi, WWAN0,
and WWAN1, when active) must have a unique IP address that (with the subnet mask)
specifies it is on a subnet that is separate (non-overlapping) from subnets specified for any of
the other MBC-200 interfaces.
Mode
Select Dynamic or Static. If you select Dynamic, the rest of the entries on this page are shaded out.
IP Address
Static address for this interface. It must be on the same subnet as the gateway.
Subnet Mask
Assigned by the gateway.
35
14221-6200-2010
Gateway
IP address of the Gateway (DHCP host). If not known, this can be left as all zeros.
DNS Server 1, DNS Server 2
IP address of the DNS server for this unit. If not known, this can be left as all zeros.
MTU
Maximum Transmission Unit, maximum packet size allowed to be transmitted. Should be left as default
value of 1500 in most cases.
5.3.2.3
DHCP Server Configuration
DHCP Server
When enabled, the DHCP server will assign an IP addresses to each device connected to the Ethernet
port. IP addresses assigned will be in the defined range (see below) and on the same subnet as the MBC200.
Dynamic Leases (Start IP Address/End IP Address)
External LAN devices connected to the MBC-200 will be assigned IP address in this range when DHCP
is enabled. This range of IP addresses must be on the same subnet as MBC-200 (the range must be
compatible with the IP address and network mask set for the Ethernet interface).
5.3.2.4
NAT Configuration
NAT
Enable or Disable NAT (Network Address Translation).
5.3.3
Statistics
The statistics page lists the total number of packets and bytes transmitted and received since the time the
units status was listed as connected. These numbers reset to 0 when the Ethernet interface disconnects.
Figure 5-10: ETH0/ETH1/ETH2 – Statistics
36
14221-6200-2010
5.4
WIFI (ACCESS POINT)
Select WiFi (Access Point) from the main navigation menu to navigate to the WiFi (Access Point) page,
which contains tabs for status and configuration of the WiFi Access Point interface.
NOTE
5.4.1
When configuring the MBC-200 as both a WiFi Client and WiFi Access Point
simultaneously, both the Access Point and the Client use the same radio. Therefore once the
radio channel is set for the Access Point, the Client must use the same channel. The client will
only look for external Access Points with the same WiFi radio channel that is selected for its
own internal Access Point. The client will not scan for Access Points using any other
channels. For more information about using the MBC-200 WiFi interface in concurrent or
non-concurrent modes, see APPENDIX E - WiFi Concurrent Configuration as Access Point
and Client.
Status
Figure 5-11: WiFi (Access Point) – Status
5.4.1.1
Status
Interface Status
See Table 5-1 for the possible states of MBC-200 interfaces in Unit Status.
Interface Up Time
Number of days, hours, minutes, and seconds that the interface has been up (connected state).
5.4.1.2
IP
IP Address
IP address assigned to this interface.
Subnet Mask
The subnet mask assigned to this interface.
5.4.1.3
Link
WiFi Status
When status is listed as N/A, the interface is disabled; when status is listed as Ready, the interface is
ready to accept clients.
37
14221-6200-2010
5.4.2
Wireless Settings
Figure 5-12: WiFi (Access Point) – Wireless Settings
5.4.2.1
Configuration
Interface
Selecting Enabled will enable the Wireless interface. Selecting Disabled will disable it.
5.4.2.2
Wireless Configuration
SSID
The SSID is the name of the wireless local network. Devices connecting to the MBC-200 WiFi access
will identify the Access Point by this SSID.
Channel
Select the WiFi channel the module will transmit on. If there are other WiFi devices in the area the MBC200 should be set to a different channel than the other access points.
NOTE
38
If you are configuring the MBC-200 WiFi interface as both a client and an Access Point,
because they both use the same WiFi radio, the client will be restricted to the channel you
select for Access Point mode, and therefore will only connect to other Access Points that use
this channel, and will not scan for Access Points using any other channels.
14221-6200-2010
Mode
Select WiFi mode of operation: 801.11 b/g/n.
Authentication
Select authentication method. Options are Shared; WPA-PSK, WPA2-PSK, WPA-Enterprise and WPA2Enterprise. WPA2-PSK or WPA2-Enterprise is recommended if security is required.
Encryption
Select the encryption method. Options are None, WEP, TKIP, or CCMP. Depending on the authentication
method selected, some options will not be available here.
WEP Key Length
Available only if the WEP option is selected for encryption. Choose 64 or 128 bit key.
WEP Key Type
Available only if the WEP option is selected for encryption.
WEP Key Index
Available only if the WEP option is selected for encryption. Enter the encryption key.
Passphrase / Key
Passphrase/Key, a sequence of words or other text required for clients to connect to this wireless access
point.
5.4.2.3
RADIUS Configuration Server #1 and Server #2
IP
The IP address of the RADIUS server.
Port
The port number of the server.
Secret
Sets the shared Secret to use with the server.
Confirm Secret
Re-type the server shared Secret to confirm.
39
14221-6200-2010
5.4.3
IP Settings
Figure 5-13: WiFi (Access Point) – IP Settings
5.4.3.1
IP Configuration
IP Address/Subnet Mask
Sets the IP Address and Subnet Mask for the WiFi interface.
NOTE
When assigning IP addresses, each interface, ETH0, ETH1, ETH2,and WiFi (and WWAN0
and WWAN1, when active) must have a unique IP address that (with the subnet mask)
specifies it is on a subnet that is separate (non-overlapping) from subnets specified for any of
the other MBC-200 interfaces.
MTU
Maximum Transmission Unit, maximum packet size allowed to be transmitted. Should be left as default
value of 1500 in most cases.
40
14221-6200-2010
5.4.3.2
DHCP Server
DHCP Server
When enabled, the DHCP server will assign an IP addresses to each device connected to the Ethernet
port. IP addresses assigned will be in the defined range (see below) and on the same subnet as the MBC200.
Dynamic Leases (Start IP Address/End IP Address)
External LAN devices connected to the MBC-200 will be assigned IP address in this range when DHCP
is enabled. This range of IP addresses must be on the same subnet as MBC-200 (the range must be
compatible with the IP address and network mask set for the WiFi interface).
Static Leases
Allows you to assign and lease IP addresses to devices on your network, based on the specific MAC
address of each.
5.4.3.3
Other
Lease Duration
Length of time in seconds that leases will last for IP addresses assigned.
Domain Name Suffix
If not known, this can be blank.
DNS Server 1, DNS Server 2
IP address of the DNS server for this unit. If not known, this can be left as all zeros.
5.4.4
Statistics
The statistics page lists the total number of packets and bytes transmitted and received since the time the
units status was listed as connected. These numbers reset to 0 when the interface disconnects.
Figure 5-14: WiFi (Access Point) – Statistics
41
14221-6200-2010
5.5
WIFI (CLIENT)
Select WiFi (Client) from the main navigation menu to access the WiFi (Client) page which contains tabs
for status and configuration of the WiFi Client interface.
NOTE
5.5.1
When configuring the MBC-200 as both a WiFi Client and WiFi Access Point
simultaneously, both the Access Point and the Client use the same radio. Therefore once the
radio channel is set for the Access Point, the Client must use the same channel. The client will
only look for external Access Points with the same WiFi radio channel that is selected for its
own internal Access Point. The client will not scan for Access Points using any other
channels. For more information about using the MBC-200 WiFi interface in concurrent or
non-concurrent modes, see APPENDIX E - WiFi Concurrent Configuration as Access Point
and Client.
Status
Figure 5-15: WiFi (Client) – Status
5.5.1.1
Status
Interface Status
See Table 5-1 for the possible states of the MBC-200 interfaces in Unit Status.
Interface Up Time
Number of days, hours, minutes, and seconds that the interface has been up (connected state).
42
14221-6200-2010
5.5.1.2
IP
IP Address
IP address assigned to this interface.
Subnet Mask
The subnet mask assigned to this interface.
Gateway
IP address of the WAN gateway.
DNS Server 1, DNS Server 2
IP address of the (1) preferred and (2) alternate DNS server.
MTU
Maximum Transmission Unit, maximum packet size allowed to be transmitted.
Lease Time
If the interface is set up to request an IP address from a DHCP server, this is the lease duration.
Lease Expires in
If the interface is set up to request an IP address from a DHCP server, this is the time remaining in the
current lease.
5.5.1.3
Link
WiFi Status
See Table 5-1 for the possible states of the MBC-200 interfaces in Unit Status.
BSSID
Refers to the MAC address of the Access Point (AP).
SSID
Public name of the wireless network. All wireless devices on a WLAN must have the same SSID in order
to communicate with each other.
Authentication
Security mode as set by the WiFi access point (WPA, WPA2, etc.).
Encryption
Data encryption method as set by the WiFi access point.
Channel
Transmit and receive channel (defined by the 802.11 specification). Set by the access point.
Signal Quality
Indicator of the quality of the RF signal.
RSSI
Received Signal Strength indication. An indication of the power level of the signal being received by the
wireless interface.
43
14221-6200-2010
Bit Rate
Measurement of over-the-air throughput. This will be affected by the type of access point (b, g, or n) and
the number of WiFi antennas (1, 2, or 3) installed on the MBC-200 router.
Click Refresh to update the page to show the most current information.
5.5.2
Wireless Settings
This page allows you to enter settings to allow the WiFi client to connect to access points automatically.
The parameters entered on this page are the same as in the WiFi Access Point section, except when
operating in the client mode the parameters must match those entered on the access point for the WiFi
client to connect successfully.
As you add completed information for each access point, the access point will be listed in the Access
Point Table at the bottom of the page.
Figure 5-16: WiFi (Client) – Wireless Settings
5.5.2.1
Configuration
Click Add as you complete information for each access point. The access point will be added to the list in
the Access Point Table at the bottom of the tab. To remove an access point from the list, highlight it in the
table and select “delete entry” to the right.
Interface
Select Enabled to enable the wireless client interface. Select Disabled to disable it.
44
14221-6200-2010
5.5.2.2
Add Access Point
No. (1-10)
A number to assign to the access point.
SSID
The SSID of the access point.
Authentication
Select authentication method. Options are Shared; WPA-PSK, WPA2-PSK, WPA-Enterprise, and WPA2Enterprise. WPA2-PSK or WPA2-Enterprise is recommended if security is required.
Encryption
Select the encryption method. Options are None, WEP, TKIP, or CCMP. Depending on the authentication
method selected, some options will not be available here.
WEP Key Length
Available only if the WEP option is selected for encryption. Choose 64 or 128 bit key.
WEP Key Type
Available only if the WEP option is selected for encryption.
WEP Key Index
Available only if the WEP option is selected for encryption.
Passphrase/Key
Key or passphrase, a sequence of words or other text required to connect to the wireless access point.
User
User name used for RADIUS authentication; used in WPA-Enterprise and WPA2-Enterprise.
Password
Password used for RADIUS authentication; used in WPA-Enterprise and WPA2-Enterprise.
45
14221-6200-2010
5.5.3
IP Settings
Figure 5-17: WiFi (Client) – IP Settings
5.5.3.1
IP Configuration
Mode
Select Dynamic or Static. (If you select Dynamic IP, other entries on this section will be dimmed and
automatically determined by the DHCP host at connection.)
IP Address
Static address for this interface. It must be on the same subnet as the gateway.
Subnet Mask
Will be assigned by the gateway.
MTU
The Maximum Transmit Unit size. Should be left as the default value of 1500 bytes in most cases.
Gateway
IP address of the Gateway (DHCP host). If not known this can be left as all zeros.
DNS Server 1, DNS Server 2
IP address of the DNS server for this unit. If not known, this can be left as all zeros.
5.5.3.2
NAT Configuration
NAT
Enable or Disable NAT (Network Address Translation).
5.5.4
Site Survey
The Site Survey scans for available WiFi networks and returns the BSSID, SSID, WiFi Channel,
Authentication method, Encryption, and Signal Quality of available WiFi networks.
46
14221-6200-2010
A site survey is performed once each time the Site Survey tab is accessed.
NOTE
CAUTION
Performing a site survey takes the WiFi radio out of its current channel of operation and will
therefore disrupt any ongoing active Access Point and Client session, and may result in data
loss.
Figure 5-18: WiFi (Client) - Site Survey
5.5.5
Connection Manager
The Connection Manager tab allows you to configure the MBC-200 router to set criteria that determine
whether a reliable connection exists or the link is down. This feature can also be used to only generate
pings on an interface if no traffic is sent via this interface. This can be useful to maintain an active
connection.
Figure 5-19: WiFi Client – Connection Manager
47
14221-6200-2010
5.5.5.1
Active Disconnection Probe
Enable
Check this box to detect link connection status based on pings to a specified IP address or the WAN’s
Gateway.
Ping Interval
Interval between each ping if no packets have been received.
Ping this WAN’s Gateway
Check this box to ping the WAN’s Gateway rather than a specific IP address.
Ping this IP Address
Enter the IP address that pings will be sent to, to detect the link state.
Force link down
Specify the number of pings, if which are unsuccessful, the link will be declared down. If disabled, the
interface will never be forced down if pings fail.
5.5.5.2
Received Packet Disconnection Probe
Enable
Check this box to enable link detection based on whether packets are received.
Force link down after
Enter the number of seconds after which, if no packets have been received, the link will be declared
down.
5.5.5.3
RSSI-Based Disconnection Probe
Enable
Check this box to determine the status of the link based on whether the RSSI drops below a minimum
threshold for a specified duration.
Min RSSI Threshold
Enter the minimum RSSI.
Force link down after
Enter the number of seconds for which, if RSSI drops below the specified threshold, the link will be
determined to be down.
5.5.6
Statistics
The statistics page lists the total number of packets and bytes transmitted and received since the time the
units status was listed as connected. These numbers reset to 0 when the interface disconnects.
48
14221-6200-2010
Figure 5-20: WiFi (Client) – Statistics
5.6
WWAN0/WWAN1
As a true multi-bearer router, the MBC-200 can be equipped with two distinct LTE modules, each capable
of being operational at the same time. From the main navigation menu, select the desired interface,
WWAN0 or WWAN1, as applicable, to navigate to the page for the interface.
5.6.1
Status
Click Refresh to update the page to show the most current information.
Figure 5-21: WWAN0/WWAN1 – Status
49
14221-6200-2010
5.6.1.1
Status
Interface Status
See Table 5-1 for the possible states of the MBC-200 interfaces in Unit Status.
Interface Up Time
Number of days, hours, minutes, and seconds that the interface has been up (connected state).
5.6.1.2
IP
IP Address
WWAN IP address of the MBC-200. This is assigned by the carrier.
Subnet Mask
The subnet mask assigned by the carrier. This value will be dictated by the IP address assigned.
NOTE
Each of the MBC-200 interfaces, ETH0, ETH1, ETH2, WiFi, and WWAN0 (and WWAN1,
when active) must have a unique IP address that (with the subnet mask) specifies it is on a
subnet that is separate (non-overlapping) from subnets specified for any of the other MBC200 interfaces. IP addresses and subnet masks for the MBC-200 WWAN interfaces are
normally determined and set by the network provider or carrier and specify a different subnet
class than typically specified for the ETH and WiFi interfaces, and therefore are not likely to
incur any overlapping subnet issues.
Gateway
IP address of the WAN gateway. This is used for routing packets to remote networks
DNS Server 1, DNS Server 2
IP address of the (1) preferred and (2) alternate DNS server.
MTU
The Maximum Transmission Unit size, maximum packet size allowed to be transmitted.
5.6.1.3
Link
Status
See Table 5-1 for the possible states of the MBC-200 interfaces in Unit Status.
RSSI
Indication of the signal strength of the carrier network.
RSRQ
Reference Signal Received Quality.
Operating Mode
The RF technology currently active. Example: LTE, UMTS, or CDMA.
Carrier
Wireless network provider.
50
14221-6200-2010
APN
The Access Point Name currently being used.
5.6.1.4
Modem
Model
The manufacturer and model of the LTE module used by this WWAN interface.
Hardware Version
Hardware version of the LTE module used by the WWAN interface. Note: This is different from the
hardware version of the MBC-200 itself.
Firmware Version
Firmware version of the LTE module used by the WWAN interface. Note: This is different than the
firmware version of the MBC-200 itself.
IMEI
International Mobile Electronic Identifier. Depending on the carrier and technology used, this may be
required for the carrier when activating the data contract. In some cases this will be blank.
5.6.1.5
Identifications
SIM Status
Shows the status of the SIM card associated with the LTE module, if any. Should be READY.
IMSI
International Mobile Subscriber Identity, as read from the SIM. This is the user’s network subscription.
ICCID
Integrated Circuit Card Identity, as read from the SIM. This is the SIM’s serial number.
MDN
Mobile Directory Number. This is essentially the phone number for the device assigned for SMS-capable
devices.
5.6.2
Carrier Settings
For each WWAN interface, up to four LTE providers can be specified. MBC-200 will attempt to connect
to each in succession when the interface is enabled.
51
14221-6200-2010
Figure 5-22: WWAN0 /WWAN1 – Carrier Settings
5.6.2.1
Configuration
Interface
Selecting Enabled enables the Wireless interface. Selecting Disabled disables it.
5.6.2.2
Provider #1, Provider #2, Provider #3, Provider #4
Use
•
Enabled - the MBC-200 will attempt connection using the provider information entered in the section.
•
Disabled - the MBC-200 will not attempt connection using information entered in the section.
If more than one provider is enabled, connection attempts are made with each until one succeeds or all
have been tried. Connection attempts then continue with the first. Normally, only one network service
provider should be enabled.
Name
Assign a name to easily identify this account.
Mode
Mode of operation of the LTE module. Valid mode selections are based on the LTE module type.
Typically automatic, LTE with 3G fallback, or 3G only. For B13, for example, LTE, LTE+CDMA, or
CDMA may be possible selections. It is recommended to set this to Automatic.
APN
Access Point Name provided by the carrier. Leave this blank unless a special-user (example: static IP
address) SIM is provided by the carrier.
User
Username to provide when connecting. Leave this field blank unless one is specified by the carrier.
52
14221-6200-2010
Password
Password to provide when connecting. Leave this field blank unless one is specified by the carrier.
Authentication
Authentication method used by the carrier. Possible selections are PAP, CHAP, or Any. If your carrier
specifies a setting select the applicable authentication method; otherwise, leave this field set for Any.
5.6.3
IP Settings
Parameter definitions on this page are the same as in the IP Settings tab for the ETH0, ETH1, and ETH2
pages, except these parameters are specified by the WWAN network provider or carrier.
Figure 5-23: WWAN0/WWAN1 – IP Settings
5.6.3.1
IP Configuration
Mode
Select Dynamic or Static. (If you select Dynamic IP, other entries on this section will be dimmed and
automatically determined by the carrier’s DHCP host at connection.)
IP Address
IP address assigned to this interface.
Subnet Mask
The subnet mask assigned to this interface.
Gateway
IP address of the WAN gateway. If not known, this may be left as all zeros.
DNS Server 1, DNS Server 2
IP address of the (1) preferred and (2) alternate DNS server. If not known, these may be left as all zeros.
53
14221-6200-2010
MTU
Maximum Transmission Unit, maximum packet size allowed to be transmitted. Should be left as default
value of 1500 in most cases.
5.6.3.2
NAT Configuration
NAT
Enable or Disable NAT (Network Address Translation).
5.6.4
Connection Manager
The Connection Manager tab allows you to configure the MBC-200 router to set criteria that determine
whether a reliable connection exists or the link is down. This feature can also be used to only generate
pings on an interface if no traffic is sent via this interface. This can be useful to maintain an active
connection.
Figure 5-24: WWAN0/WWAN1 – Connection Manager
5.6.4.1
Active Disconnection Probe
Enable
Check this box to detect link connection status based on pings to a specified IP address or the WAN’s
Gateway.
Ping Interval
Interval between each ping if no packets have been received.
Ping this WAN’s Gateway
Check this box to ping the WAN’s Gateway rather than a specific IP address.
Ping this IP Address
Enter the IP address that pings will be sent to, to detect the link state.
54
14221-6200-2010
Force link down
Specify the number of pings, if which are unsuccessful, the link will be declared down. If disabled, the
interface will never be forced down if pings fail.
5.6.4.2
Received Packet Disconnection Probe
Enable
Check this box to enable link detection based on whether packets are received.
Force link down after
Enter the number of seconds after which, if no packets have been received, the link will be declared
down.
5.6.4.3
RSSI-Based Disconnection Probe
Enable
Check this box to determine the status of the link based on whether RSSI drops below a minimum
threshold for a specified duration.
Min RSSI Threshold
Enter the minimum RSSI.
Force link down after
Enter the number of seconds for which, if RSSI drops below the specified threshold, the link will be
determined to be down.
5.6.4.4
LTE Monitor
Enable
Check this box to enable the LTE Monitor.
Force LTE switch after
Enter the number of minutes between attempts to switch to LTE.
Quiet time required
Enter the number of seconds for which no traffic on the WWAN interface will cause an attempt to switch
to LTE.
55
14221-6200-2010
5.6.5
Statistics
The statistics page lists the total number of packets and bytes transmitted and received since the time the
units status was listed as connected. These numbers reset to 0 when the interface disconnects.
Figure 5-25: WWAN0/WWAN1 – Statistics
5.7
SERIAL
The Serial page contains tabs for making configuration settings for an external USB to RS-232 converter
cable accessory approved for use with the MBC-200. Select Serial from the main navigation menu to
navigate to this page.
5.7.1
Status
Figure 5-26: Serial – Status
5.7.1.1
Status
Interface Status
See Table 5-1 for possible states of MBC-200 interfaces in Unit Status.
Interface Up Time
Number of days, hours, minutes, and seconds that the interface has been up (connected state).
Automatically resets to zero on disconnect.
56
14221-6200-2010
5.7.1.2
IP
Mode
Displays the IP protocol used to transport serial data over a network: UDP, TCP, or all.
Local IP Endpoint
Address of the local IP endpoint.
Remote IP Endpoint
Address of the remote IP endpoint.
5.7.1.3
Serial
Adapter
The type of USB to Serial adapter detected on the USB port.
Port Settings
Serial port communication parameters: baud rate, data bits, parity, and stop bits.
Flow Control
Flow control settings for the Serial port.
5.7.2
Serial Settings
Figure 5-27: Serial – Serial Settings
Baud Rate
Sets the serial port baud rate. Supported values are 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, or 115200.
Data Bits, Parity, and Stop Bits
Sets these parameters, which must be specified for serial communication:
•
Data Bits: Supported values are 5, 6, 7, or 8.
•
Parity: Supported values are even, odd, none, or mark.
•
Stop Bits: Supported values are 1 or 2.
Flow Control
Supported values for Flow Control are Hardware Control or None.
57
14221-6200-2010
•
Hardware - The RTS and CTS lines are used when hardware flow control is enabled in both the
MBC-200 and the remote device. MBC-200 puts RTS in a mark condition to tell the remote device
that it is ready and able to receive data. If MBC-200 is not able to receive data (typically because its
receive buffer is almost full), it will put RTS in the space condition as a signal to the remote device to
stop sending data. When MBC-200 is ready to receive more data (that is, after data has been removed
from its receive buffer), it will place RTS back in the mark condition. The complement of the RTS
wire is CTS, which stands for Clear-To-Send. The remote device puts CTS in a mark condition to tell
MBC-200 that it is ready to receive the data. Likewise, if the remote device is unable to receive data,
it will place CTS in the space condition. Together, these two lines make up what is called RTS/CTS
or hardware flow control. MBC-200 supports this type of flow control.
•
None - The RTS line is always in a mark condition (always on) and the CTS line is ignored by the
MBC-200.
Software flow control (XON/XOFF) is not available on the MBC-200.
NOTE
DSR and DTR handshake
DTR stands for Data Terminal Ready. DSR (Data Set Ready) is the companion to DTR in the same way
that CTS is to RTS. Some serial devices use DTR and DSR as signals to simply confirm that a device is
connected and is turned on. MBC-200 can set DTR to the mark state (i.e., ON) when the serial port is
opened and leaves it in that state until the port is closed. Conversely, the MBC-200 can monitor the DSR
line to assess the presence and readiness of the remote device.
•
DSR Input: Supported values are Ignored or Connect to remote when on.
If set to Ignored, no action is performed by the MBC-200. If set to Connect to remote when on:
•
In TCP client mode, the MBC-200 will attempt to connect to the remote.
•
In TCP server, it starts the service and waits for remote connection.
•
In UDP, it starts the service, opens the socket, and is ready for data transfer.
•
DTR Output: Supported values are Always off, Always On, or On when connected to remote.
If set to Always off, MBC-200 puts the line in space condition (that is, off) and leaves it there. If set
to Always on, MBC-200 puts the line in mark condition (that is, on) and leaves it there.
If set to On when connected to remote:
 In TCP client or server mode, the MBC-200 sets the line to mark when connected to a remote.
 In UDP mode, the state is always connected and therefore the line is always set to mark.
Inter-Character Timeout
Indicates when a packet received from the serial port is to be considered complete. When the time
between two successive characters is greater than this value, the packet is considered complete and sent to
the remote. Supported values are 100 ms, 200 ms, 300ms, 400 ms, or 500 ms.
58
14221-6200-2010
NOTE
5.7.3
Packets received from the serial port are also limited in size to 255 bytes (by the Linux
kernel). This means that a packet received from the serial port is considered complete and is
immediately sent to the remote as soon as 255 consecutive bytes are received from the serial
port. This may have an impact of time-sensitive protocols that make use of packets larger than
255 bytes.
IP Settings
Figure 5-28: Serial – IP Settings
Mode
Sets the mode for Serial IP communication. Supported modes are UDP, TCP Server, or TCP Client.
Incoming Friendly IP Address
IP address from which packets received. This feature can be disabled by entering 0.0.0.0.
Local Port
The port number assigned to the serial IP port on which communications will take place.
Remote Host IP Address
The IP address of the remote UDP mode serial endpoint.
Remote Host Port
The port of the remote UDP mode serial endpoint.
TCP Server Inactivity Timeout
Amount of time (in seconds) to wait when no data is sent or received over the TCP session before closing
it.
TCP Server Hard Timeout
Amount of time (in seconds) to wait after a TCP session is established before closing it.
59
14221-6200-2010
TCP Client Keep Alive, TCP Client Keep Alive Probes, TCP Client Keep Alive Intvl
The TCP Client keep-alive parameters are used to detect idle TCP client sessions and to close them after
they are inactive for the specified length of time.
Log Disabled/Enabled
When logging is enabled, the file /var/log/serialpad.log will be created inside the unit. It will contain
debugging information about activities related to the serial port. The log is lost when the MBC-200 is
powered down.
5.7.4
Statistics
The statistics page lists the total number of packets and bytes transmitted and received since the time the
units status was listed as connected. These numbers reset to 0 when the serial interface disconnects.
Figure 5-29: Serial – Statistics
5.8
ROUTER SETTINGS
The Router Settings page contains tabs for making configuration settings for interface priority and for
routing, forwarding, and filtering. Select Router Settings from the main navigation menu to navigate to
this page.
5.8.1
Interface Priority
The MBC-200 allows failover of the default route to WAN interfaces in a specific order. This group of
settings allows ranking each WAN interface in order of preferred usage for the default route. The default
route will always be set to the highest-priority connected WAN interface. This assignment changes as
WAN interfaces connect or disconnect from the associated bearer network.
Figure 5-30: Router Settings – Interface Priority
60
14221-6200-2010
Priority Number 1, … Priority Number 7
Prioritize interfaces in order from 1 (highest priority) to 7 (lowest priority) for which the network will
reroute in the event of failover of the preferred interface.
5.8.2
Application Routing
The MBC-200 allows rule-based application traffic forwarding to specific WAN interfaces. Up to 20
rules can be specified, in each case specifying where ingress traffic (traffic entering MBC-200 from a
LAN interface) should be forwarded. Up to 3 egress WAN interfaces can be specified. The traffic meeting
the ingress classification rule will be forwarded to the highest priority connected WAN interface. This
allows specifying fallback WAN interfaces for different types of traffic.
Ingress classification rules can be specified based on the physical ingress interface, IP protocol, and IP
port number.
Figure 5-31: Router Settings – Application Routing
61
14221-6200-2010
5.8.3
NOTE
Port Forwarding
Exercise caution when configuring these router settings. Mistakes in setting up Port
Forwarding are common. If it appears that data is not passing through the router normally,
and if UDP testing fails, double-check the list of Port Forwarding rules.
Figure 5-32: Router Settings – Port Forwarding
5.8.3.1
DMZ Support for WWAN
DMZ
Enable or disable DMZ support for the WWAN.
Friendly IP Address
Optionally restricts DMZ access to only the specified WAN IP address.
If set to 0.0.0.0, the DMZ is open to all incoming WAN IP addresses.
CAUTION
Destination IP address
The WAN IP address, which has all ports exposed except ports defined in the Port Forwarding
configuration.
62
14221-6200-2010
5.8.3.2
Add Rule
As you complete entry of each rule, click Add to save it.
No.
Number assigned to each rule. This number may be any number from 1 to 20, inclusive, that has not been
assigned to another rule.
Protocol
The data protocol of the rule: TCP, UDP, or both.
Source IP Address
Specifies a WAN IP address that is allowed to access the router.
If set to 0.0.0.0, this allows all WAN IP addresses access to the router.
CAUTION
Public Port Number Range
Sets the external port number range for incoming requests.
Port Forwarding rules take precedence over the services specified in Security » IPSec or
RADIUS.
NOTE
Private IP Address
Sets the LAN address of a device connected to one of the MBC-200’s LAN interfaces. Inbound requests
will be forwarded to this IP address.
Private Port Number Range
Sets the LAN port number range used when forwarding to the destination IP address.
5.8.3.3
Rule Table
Rules that have been created appear in the rule table at the bottom of the tab.
63
14221-6200-2010
5.8.4
MAC Filtering
MAC filtering, when enabled, allows up to ten devices with unique MAC addresses to access the network
and blocks any other MAC addresses not in the list.
Figure 5-33: Router Settings – MAC Filtering
5.8.4.1
MAC Filtering
MAC Filtering
Select Enable to enable MAC filtering or select Disable to not use it.
5.8.4.2
MAC Filters
Click Save or Cancel to implement or cancel changes.
Enable
Check box to enable a MAC filter.
Allowed MAC Address
Enter the MAC address for a device to be allowed on the network.
LAN Interface
Select which ingress interface the associated MAC address is allowed to use.
Clear
Shortcut to remove a MAC address.
64
14221-6200-2010
5.8.5
IP Filtering
The IP Filtering tab is used to configure IP filters.
Figure 5-34: Router Settings – IP Filtering
Up to 20 IP filters can be defined. Each IP filter is identified by a unique number (from 1 to 20). An IP
packet goes through the filtering logic when IP filtering is enabled and:
•
The IP packet is received on one of the interface and is destined to the MBC-200.
OR
•
The IP packet is sent by the MBC-200.
OR
•
The IP packet is forwarded by the MBC-200.
The filtering logic is the following:
if exists (filter [1]) AND match (packet, filter [1]) then apply (action [1])
else if exists (filter [2]) AND match (packet, filter [2]) then apply (action [2])
else if exists (filter [3]) AND match (packet, filter [3]) then apply (action [3])
65
14221-6200-2010
...
else if exists (filter [20]) AND match (packet, filter [20]) then apply (action [20])
else process packet normally.
Where:
exists (filter [n])  The user-defined filter number n
match (packet, filter [n])  The IP packet matches filter number n
apply (action [n])  The action identified in filter number n
5.8.5.1
IP Filters
IP Filtering
•
Enable - IP filtering is enabled. Any custom IP filters entered by the user will be taken into account
when processing IP packets. The predefined IP filters will also be taken into account.
•
Disable - IP filtering is disabled.
5.8.5.2
Predefined Filters
Drop Remote Pings
Set this to Disabled if you do not want the MBC-200 to respond to pings from the WAN. This can reduce
your data usage and improve security, but will make connectivity testing more difficult.
Drop Remote IP Fragments
In some cases large packets sent by a remote IP endpoint will be broken and sent as fragments via the
MBC-200 to a local endpoint. Enable this to drop those packets. In most cases, this should be left disabled
to ensure reliable end-to-end communication.
Drop Invalid Packets
Select Enabled to have the MBC-200 drop any incoming packets that have been determined to be invalid.
Clamp TCP MSS to PMTU
Select Enabled to set the TCP Maximum Segment Size (MSS) to a good value based on the Path
Maximum Transmission Unit (PMTU).
5.8.5.3
Add Custom IP Filter
Click Add as you complete information for each IP filter. The IP filter will be added to the list in the
Custom IP Filter Table at the bottom of the tab. To remove an IP filter from the list, click Clear next to it
in the table.
No. (1-20)
A number to assign to the custom IP filter. This number may be any number from 1 to 20, inclusive, that
has not been assigned to another custom IP filter.
Source IP Address
If Any is selected, any source IP address will satisfy this filter.
A specific host IP address can also be specified, or a range of IP addresses via a bitmask (the box
following the /).
66
14221-6200-2010
If the Exclude box is checked, it means that in order for a packet to match this filter, it must not have the
specified source IP address (or not be in the specified range of IP addresses).
Destination IP Address
If Any is selected, any destination IP address will satisfy this filter.
A specific IP address can also be specified, or a range of IP addresses via a bitmask (the box following
the /).
If the Exclude box is checked, it means that in order for a packet to match this filter, it must not have the
specified source IP address (or not be in the specified range of IP addresses).
Protocol
Any: Any protocol number.
ICMP: The ICMP protocol (1).
TCP: The TCP protocol (6).
UDP: The UDP protocol (17).
Other: Any other IP protocol.
If the Exclude box is checked, it means that in order for the packet to match this filter, it must not have
the specified protocol number.
Source Port
Any: Any source port number.
Specific: Select a specific source port number. Range: Select a range of source port numbers.
If the Exclude box is checked, it means that in order for the packet to match this filter, it must not have
the specified source port number (or not be in the specified range of source port numbers).
Destination Port
Any: Any destination port number.
Specific: Select a specific destination port number. Range: Select a range of destination port numbers.
If the Exclude box is checked, it means that in order for the packet to match this filter, it must not have
the specified destination port number (or not be in the specified range of destination port numbers).
Direction
The direction of the path taken by the IP packet inside the MBC-200 router.
Any: Any direction.
An ingress interface sets which interface a packet must arrive on to match the filter, and/or egress sets
which interface the packet must be forwarded on. A specific ingress (packet entering the MBC-200) and
egress (packet leaving the MBC-200) can also be specified.
If the Exclude box is checked, it means that in order for the packet to match this filter, it must not be
processed in the specified direction.
Action
Keep – If IP filtering is enabled and an IP packet matches all criteria in the IP filter, keep the IP packet
(continue normal processing of the IP packet).
Drop – If IP filtering is enabled and an IP packet matches all criteria in the IP filter, drop the IP packet.
67
14221-6200-2010
5.8.6
Static Routing
Static Routing refers to a manual method of setting up routing between networks. Select the Static
Routing tab to add static routes to the Static Route Table. Static routes may be defined using the Static
Routing fields and appear in the table at the bottom of the tab.
Figure 5-35: Router Settings – Static Routing
5.8.6.1
Add Static Route
Click Add to add each configured route to the Static Route Table.
No. (1-20)
A number to assign to the static route. This number may be any number from 1 to 20, inclusive, that has
not been assigned to another static route.
Description
Description of the static route in the Static Route table.
IP Address
IP address of the destination network.
Subnet Mask
Subnet mask of the destination network.
Gateway IP Address
IP address of the local gateway.
Metric
Enter a number from 1 to 65535. The lower the metric value, the higher the route priority.
68
14221-6200-2010
5.8.7
Routing Table
Figure 5-36: Router Settings – Routing Table
Flags
FLAG
MEANING
U
Route is up.
H
Target is host.
G
Use gateway.
R
Reinstate route for dynamic routing.
D
Dynamically installed by daemon or redirect.
M
Modified from routing daemon or redirect.
A
Installed by addrconf.
C
Cache entry
!
Reject route.
Metric
The “distance” to the target (usually counted in hops).
Ref
Number of references to this route.
Use
Count of lookups for the route.
Iface
The interface to which the route is bound.
69
14221-6200-2010
5.9
SECURITY
Select security from the main navigation menu to navigate to security settings page containing settings for
IPSec, HTTPS, RADIUS, and Security Policy for the MBC-200 router.
5.9.1
IPSec
IPSec facilitates configuration of secured communication tunnels. The various tunnel configurations will
be displayed in the Tunnel Table at the bottom of the page. All tunnels are created using the ESP
(Encapsulating Security Payload) protocol. MBC-200 supports IPSEC IKE V1 and IKE V2. For IKE V2
tunnels, MOBIKE can also be enabled.
Figure 5-37: Security – IPSec
70
14221-6200-2010
5.9.1.1
General Settings
IPSec Enable
Selecting Enable launches the IPSec process and starts all enabled tunnels. Selecting Disable stops all
tunnels and shuts down the IPSec process. Note that all enabled tunnels are launched automatically when
the unit connects to the LTE carrier.
NAT Traversal
This setting applies only to IKE V1 tunnels. Determines how packets are addressed. Selecting Enable
allows packets coming from Local Subnet addresses through the NAT firewall unchanged. This may be
sufficient when traffic only travels from Local Subnet to Remote Subnet.
NOTE
Packets generated by MBC-200 LTE services appear to originate from one of the MBC-200’s
WAN addresses and cannot be sent via subnet-to-subnet tunnels. Use a WAN-to-subnet
tunnel for this (see “Local Subnet” below). NAT changes the source address to match the IP
Address of an outgoing interface used by the tunnel. NAT Traversal enables the NAT-T
protocol which can support traffic beyond just the Local and Remote Subnets.
5.9.1.2
Tunnel Configuration
Tunnel ID
Tunnel number - starts from 1 and increments for each new tunnel. To update an existing tunnel, use its
corresponding number from the tunnel table. To add a new tunnel, create a new tunnel number.
Note that most of the following items must match the configuration of the remote VPN host for successful
tunnel setup. Please refer to the remote host’s configuration.
IKE Mode
Internet Key Exchange Mode Configuration - select version 1 or version 2.
MOBIKE
Mobility and multihoming extension to Internet Key Exchange (IKEv2). MOBIKE allows the IP
addresses associated with IKEv2 and tunnel mode IPSec Security Associations to change.
Label
This is a label to identify a tunnel (use alphanumeric characters only).
Remote IP Address
The IP address of the remote endpoint of the tunnel.
Remote Subnets
Choose None if encrypted packets are only destined for the Remote IP Address.
Use an IP address or mask if encrypted packets are also destined for the specified network that is beyond
the Remote IP Address.
IMPORTANT: The Remote Subnet and Local Subnet addresses must not overlap!
Local Interface
The Local interface to which this tunnel applies. The MBC-200 allows setting up specific tunnels per
interface. This specifies the physical interface (typically a WAN interface) that will be used as the “left”
IPSec endpoint. Selecting the value of Any-WAN will result in selecting the interface currently pointed to
by the default route.
71
14221-6200-2010
Local IP From Peer
Enable or disable local IP from Peer.
Local Subnet
Choose None if only packets generated by MBC-200 router services will be sent through the tunnel.
Choose one of the MBC-200 interfaces (typically a LAN interface) to include that specific local subnet.
Use an IP address or mask if a network beyond the local LAN will be sending packets through the tunnel.
IMPORTANT: The Remote subnet and Local subnet addresses must not overlap!
Phase 1 Encryption
Use AES-128, AES-256, or 3DES encryption.
Phase 1 Authentication
Use MDS or SHA1 hashing.
Phase 1 DH Group
Negotiate (Auto) or use 768 (Group 1), 1024 (Group 2), 1536 (Group 5), or 2048 (Group 14) bit keys.
Phase 1 Key Lifetime
How long the keying channel of a connection should last before being renegotiated.
Phase 2 Encryption
Use AES-128, AES-256, or 3DES encryption.
Phase 2 Authentication
Use MD5 or SHA1 hashing.
Phase 2 Lifetime
How long a particular instance of a connection should last, from successful negotiation to expiry.
Pre-shared Key
Predetermined key known to both the local unit and the remote side prior to establishing the tunnel.
Perfect Forward Secrecy
Enable Perfect Forward Secrecy for the session keys.
Data Compression
Enable data compression for the tunnel.
Dead Peer Detection Delay
Amount of idle time (no packets received from tunnel) before sending a remote peer probe packet.
Dead Peer Detection Timeout
Remote peer probe response timer.
Dead Peer Detection Action
Action to be taken when a remote peer probe timeout value is reached.
As you complete entry of the above fields for each tunnel to be created, click Add to save the new tunnel
item and add it to the Tunnel Table.
72
14221-6200-2010
5.9.1.3
Tunnel Table
Enable
Check Ena. to enable a tunnel. This tunnel state is saved across resets of the MBC-200.
View
Click View to open a page showing the log of the tunnel’s negotiation activity.
Delete
Click Del to delete a tunnel.
5.9.2
HTTPS
Figure 5-38: Security – HTTPS
5.9.2.1
HTTPS Secure
HTTPS
Click Enabled to enable HTTPS; click Disabled to disable. If HTTPS is enabled, HTTP is disabled; if
HTTPS is disabled, HTTP is enabled.
5.9.2.2
Security Certificate
Validity Period (Start and End) displays information about the security certificate and start and end of the
period for which it will be valid. Click Regenerate Certificate to regenerate security certificate
credentials.
73
14221-6200-2010
5.9.3
Radius
Figure 5-39: Security – RADIUS
5.9.3.1
RADIUS for Web Access
RADIUS Authentication
Click Enable to enable RADIUS authentication; click Disable to disable it. The state of RADIUS
authentication is saved across resets of the MBC-200.
Timeout
Specify how many seconds to wait before a retry.
Retries
Specify how many times to retry authenticating with the server before giving up.
5.9.3.2
RADIUS Configuration Server #1, #2
Click Save to keep the currently-displayed value for each parameter. Once you have clicked Save,
Cancel cannot be used to return to previous settings. Click Cancel to abort changes and redisplay the lastsaved parameters for this page.
IP
The IP address of the RADIUS server.
Port
The port of the server.
Secret
Sets the secret to use with the RADIUS server.
Confirm Secret
Re-type the Server Secret to confirm the correct spelling.
74
14221-6200-2010
5.9.4
Security Policy
Security policy allows enabling or disabling remote (over-the-air, OTA) configuration of the MBC-200
router via HTTP, HTTPS, SNMP, and Telnet. When a protocol is enabled, you may specify the port on
which that protocol will be used.
When you have finished making configuration changes in this tab, click Save to save and apply the new
settings or click Cancel to clear changes.
Figure 5-40: Security – Security Policy
HTTP, Port
Enable or disable Hypertext Transfer Protocol. A well-known port for HTTP is port 80.
HTTPS, Port
Enable or disable HTTP Secure. A well-known port for HTTPS is port 443.
SNMP, Port
Enable or disable Simple Network Management Protocol. A well-known port for SNMP is port 161.
Telnet, Port
Enable or disable Telnet. A well-known port for Telnet is port 23.
5.10 MONITOR & CONTROL
Select Monitor & Control from the main navigation menu to navigate to the Monitor & Control page.
The MBC-200 embeds a few discrete analog and digital I/Os, some of which can be utilized to obtain
local measurements of voltage or control using relays or discrete digital outputs. Some I/Os are
monitoring on board physical elements such as temperature, supply voltage, etc.
These values are available using the SNMP protocol or through the Web pages.
75
14221-6200-2010
5.10.1 Status
Figure 5-41: Monitor & Control – Status
5.10.1.1 Device Status
Input Voltage
Displays current power supply voltage applied to the unit, in Volts with precision of ±8%.
Unit Temperature
Displays temperature inside the MBC-200 enclosure in degrees Celsius. Precision is approximately ±2°C
(±4°F).
Ignition
Indicates the current state of the Ignition signal.
External Alarm
Indicates the current state of the External Alarm register. When Active, it indicates that an Alarm event
was registered and not cleared yet. An external alarm can only be cleared by SNMP or by rebooting the
unit.
5.10.1.2 Input Status
Analog Input
Displays the measured input voltage, in Volts, with a precision of ±8%.
Digital Input
By convention, the digital inputs are said to be ¨high¨ when the input voltage is above a threshold value of
VIH volts. Conversely, it is said to be ¨low¨ when the input voltage is below a threshold value of VIL volts.
Those are defined as LVTTL (3.3 V) levels.
For reference:
VIL = 0.8 V maximum
76
14221-6200-2010
VIH = 2.0 V minimum
5.10.1.3 Output Status
Relay Output
Displays the current status of the relay output. Closed means the relay coil is energized and contacts are
closed.
Digital Output
Displays the current status of the digital output. Low means that the open collector transistor is on and the
output is shorted to GND. Conversely, when deactivated, the transistor stops conducting and the collector
is pulled high through the internal 18.2 K pull-up resistor.
5.10.2 SNMP
The Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is used in network management systems to monitor
network - attached devices for conditions that warrant administrative attention. SNMP version v2c and v3
are supported with the exception of INFORM.
Figure 5-42: Monitor & Control – SNMP
77
14221-6200-2010
5.10.2.1 Configuration
SNMP
Selecting Enable allows the SNMP functionality. Selecting Disable shuts off SNMP functionality.
Version
With SNMP Enabled, select the corresponding version that matches the SNMP Manager.
5.10.2.2 SNMP v2c
Read-only Community Name
The community string used for accessing the read-only Management Information Bases (MIBs).
Read-write Community Name
The community string used for accessing all Management Information Bases (MIBs) including writable
objects.
5.10.2.3 SNMP v3
Access
Access modes can be “Read Only” or “Read & Write.”
User Name
The user name for secure access to the Management Information Bases (MIBs) observing v3 standard.
Authentication
Selecting the authentication method for accessing the Management Information Bases (MIBs).
Authentication Password
The corresponding user password for accessing the Management Information Bases (MIBs) including
writable objects.
Privacy
Selecting the encryption method when communicating data.
Privacy Password
Selecting the encryption key (password) when communicating data.
5.10.2.4 SNMP Traps
Traps
Selecting Enable allows the active trap events to be reported to the defined server(s). Selecting Disable
deactivates events reporting. Up to four destinations can be specified.
Community Name
The community name is tagged into traps packets. The recipient can then filters traps for different
communities.
Server Address
IP address of server to which the trap events will be sent to.
78
14221-6200-2010
Server Port
The corresponding server port to which the trap events will be sent to (default 162).
5.10.2.5 MIB files
Click the link to download the information bases (MIBs).
5.10.3 NMEA
Status reports can be sent via NMEA-based protocol. The MBC-200 I/O subsystem operates according to
a manager/agent model. The PC-hosted manager sends requests to the MBC-200 I/O agent, which
performs the required actions. The MBC-200 agent reports alarms to the PC-hosted manager.
Figure 5-43: Monitor & Control – NMEA
NMEA
Click Enable to enable NMEA; click Disable to disable it. This setting is saved across resets.
Unit IP address
Select the unit interface IP address that will be sent to the manager as the source address.
Manager IP address/Manager port address
The IP address and port of the remote manager.
Manager connection type
The connection protocol to communicate with the remote manager.
5.10.4 Power Management
The MBC-200 is designed to stay ON even if the ignition is turned off. The MBC-200 can be configured
to automatically shut down 1, 5, 30, or 60 minutes after ignition has been turned off, or when the supply
voltage drops below a certain level (sometimes called “battery charge guard” feature).
Figure 5-44: Monitor & Control – Power Management
79
14221-6200-2010
Shutdown Method
Disabled by default. Select “Power off” to enable power management. If disabled, the MBC-200 will
continue to run indefinitely even without the ignition on.
After Ignition Line Off
Select between the following time intervals: 1, 5, 30 or 60 minutes. The Debounce time serves to avoid
false detection and can be configured to values between 100 ms up to 3.2 seconds. This means that the
Ignition must be stable for at least this amount of time for it to be recognized as OFF.
When Voltage Drops Below
Enter desired voltage. Enter "0" to disable (and give precedence to time delay configured under "After
ignition time off").
5.10.5 Monitoring
The MBC-200 monitors some I/O and can report events when certain criteria are met. For example, a
report can be generated when the temperature goes above some threshold value. These events can then
optionally be reported through SNMP and NMEA independently. When NMEA is enabled, the user can
define specific messages indicating normal and abnormal conditions. SNMP reports, on the other hand,
are based on a mechanism with traps and defined in the SNMP protocol and the MIB structures.
80
14221-6200-2010
Figure 5-45: Monitor & Control – Monitoring
81
14221-6200-2010
5.10.6 I/O Control
Figure 5-46: Monitor & Control – I/O Control
5.10.6.1 Relay Output Select
Select the initial state of the relays; i.e., the state when the system boots up. Note that the “Closed” state is
delayed from power-up up to when the firmware has completed its boot process – this is approximately
30-40 seconds.
5.10.6.2 Digital I/O Select
The Digital I/Os are configurable as input or output signals. The following picture presents a simplified
model of the circuitry:
When in Output Mode, the Output State signal serves to control the Open Collector transistor output.
When in Input Mode the Input Sense signal is fed into the MBC-200 and reported.
As inputs:
Use LVTTL (3.3 V) levels.
As outputs:
Use as an open collector with 100 ohm limiting resistor.
Maximum Sink Current = 50 mA for VCE_sat ≤ 0.3 V. Maximum VCE = 30 V DC.
82
14221-6200-2010
5.10.6.3 Relay Output Control
This sets the state of the Relay output. Closed means the relay coil is energized and the contacts are
closed.
5.10.6.4 Digital Output Control
These controls are only available when the Digital I/O Select is set to Output. Clicking on “High” means
that the open collector transistor is set to conduction (saturation). The transistor can then sink up to 50
mA. Conversely, when it is deactivated, the transistor stops conducting and the collector is left floating
through the internal 18.2 kΩ pull-up resistor.
5.11 GPS
The MBC-200 Mobile Broadband Router contains a standalone, high-accuracy, high-report-rate (12
satellites with WAAS and Differential Correction, 1 report per second) GPS receiver.
Select GPS from the main navigation menu to navigate to the GPS page.
5.11.1 Status
Figure 5-47: GPS – Status
Condition
Indicates the quality of received GPS reports.
•
No Fix/Invalid - The GPS receiver has not yet acquired enough satellites to provide an accurate
position, or the previous Estimated Position is over 3 minutes old.
•
Standard GPS Fix - GPS position is reported using no additional correction information.
•
Differential GPS Fix - Differential GPS corrects various inaccuracies in the GPS system to yield
measurements accurate to a couple of meters when the mobile is moving and even better when
stationary.
•
Estimated/Last Known Position - Satellite reception has degraded to the point where only an
Estimated position or the Last Known Position can be reported.
Number of Satellites
Indicates the number of satellite signals being received and used to calculate position.
UTC
The current time according to Universal Coordinated Time in hh:mm:ss, using a 24-hour clock format.
Position
The current position in Latitude (North-South) and Longitude (East-West). Positions are reported in
degrees and decimal minutes. For example, a Longitude of 73 degrees, 39 minutes and 45 seconds West
appears as: 73 39.7555W.
83
14221-6200-2010
Altitude
The current height above Mean Sea Level in meters.
True Course
Shows the current GPS-generated true course in degrees.
Ground Speed
Shows travel speed (in Km/h).
The GPS LED on the front panel also provides the status of the receiver.
Table 5-2: GPS LED Color and GPS Status
GPS LED COLOR
MEANING
Amber
Position lost, reporting last known position.
Green
Valid positions being reported.
Red
Fault.
Flashing Amber
Acquiring Satellites.
5.11.2 AAVL Settings
The Autonomous Automatic Vehicle Location (AAVL) feature adds the ability for MBC-200 routers to
transmit position reports either to a host connected to the local Ethernet port or to a remote host over the
wireless network. AAVL allows the system designer to specify the maximum distance or the time interval
between remote position reports.
84
14221-6200-2010
Figure 5-48: GPS – AAVL Settings
Position reports can be transmitted in a number of possible formats. When the format is disabled or the
Address or Port fields are blank, no report is sent.
FORMAT
DEFINITION
EXAMPLE
TAIP, No ID
Trimble ASCII Interface >RPV73511+4549542-0736643100035822;*7F<
Protocol (TAIP), No ID
TAIP, With ID
Trimble ASCII Interface >RPV56655+4549542-0736643300000002;ID=ADAM12;*5E<
Protocol (TAIP), With
ID
NMEA, GGA
NMEA GGA (Global
Positioning System Fix
Data)
$GPGGA,202742.0,4529.7240,N,7339.8585,W,2,9,0.9,28,M,,,,*3
E
85
14221-6200-2010
FORMAT
DEFINITION
EXAMPLE
NMEA, GLL
NMEA GLL (Geographic $GPGLL,4529.7241,N,7339.8584,W,202645.0,A,D*7C
Latitude & Longitude)
NMEA, RMC
NMEA RMC
(Recommended
Minimum data)
$GPRMC,153716.00,A,4529.72428,N,07339.86082,W,0.007,,18
0108,,,A*69
NMEA, VTG
NMEA VTG (Vector
Track and speed over
Ground)
$GPVTG,,T,,M,0.004,N,0.008,K,A*2F
GPS “sentences” are collected the from embedded GPS receiver in the MBC-200 router. These sentences
are provided into the above formats and are available to both local and remote delivery services. Two
TCP ports are available for clients to connect to and receive reports at the local or remote reporting rate.
Each report from the TCP ports is terminated with carriage-return/linefeed characters (CRLF). Up to two
local UDP Hosts and three remote UDP Hosts may be specified. Reports are sent as a datagram with no
terminating CRLF.
5.11.2.1 Autonomous Automatic Vehicle Location Settings
Differential Correction
Differential Correction allows WAAS correction information to be used to improve accuracy of the GPS
position reports.
NOTE
WAAS correction applies to North America only. The WAAS satellites currently in service
are 48 (Galaxy 15) and 51 (Anik F1R). The previous WAAS satellites 35 and 47 were taken
out of service on 2007/07/30. WAAS improves the tracking accuracy of the GPS navigation
system to approximately 10 feet.
5.11.2.2 Local Delivery
The MBC-200 router will produce a report each second and send it to any connected TCP clients and to
the specified UDP hosts. IMPORTANT: Local reports should only be delivered to addresses reachable
through the local LAN or WiFi ports. Sending reports once per second or faster over the LTE network
could result in a congested network and/or extremely large network usage charges.
TCP Server Format
Reports in the specified format (see the table above) are available to local clients that connect to TCP port
6257 of the MBC-200 router.
UDP Host (1,2) Format
Reports in the specified format (see the table above) are sent to the specified IP address and port. NOTE:
Different reports can be directed to the same UDP Host address and port.
UDP Host (1,2) Address
IP address of the UDP Host in dotted decimal format.
UDP Host (1,2) Port
IP Port of the UDP Host (1024-65535).
86
14221-6200-2010
5.11.2.3 Remote Delivery
The MBC-200 router can be configured to report after a certain time or distance.
Report every () seconds
Trigger the sending of a new remote report if the time since the last remote report exceeds the specified
number of seconds.
Report every () meters
Trigger the sending of a new remote report if the distance since the last remote report exceeds the
specified distance (in meters).
But no less than () seconds between reports
To prevent a fast-moving vehicle from reporting too frequently, a lower limit on the time between reports
can be specified.
TCP Server Format
Reports in the specified format (see the table above) are available to remote clients that connect to TCP
port 6258 of the MBC-200 router.
UDP Host (1,2,3) Format
Reports in the specified format (see the table above) are sent to the specified IP address and port. NOTE:
Different reports can be directed to the same UDP Host address and port.
UDP Host (1,2,3) Address
IP address of the UDP Host in dotted decimal format.
UDP Host (1,2,3) Port
IP Port of the UDP Host (1024-65535).
5.11.2.4 Store and Forward Settings
The MBC-200 router can be configured to store position reports when a connection is unavailable (for
example, out of network coverage range) and then forward the stored reports when connection is
reestablished.
Store and Forward
Enable or disable the Store and forward feature of the MBC-200.
Store when
Specify when GPS information is stored if, for example, a WWAN is out of coverage range.
Deliver messages every
Sets the time duration between consecutive messages. This can be set from one fifth of a second (0.2 s) to
ten seconds. Setting messages to be sent too often is not recommended.
Max reports to store
Sets the maximum number of reports to store. Only the most recent reports, up to the number of reports
specified, are stored. Older reports are discarded as new reports are created. This can be set from 3 to
1800. Setting the number to save too many reports is not recommended.
87
14221-6200-2010
5.12 MAINTENANCE
This section provides information you should have when contacting Harris Customer Service. In addition,
it allows you to update the firmware when updates become available, and, if directed to, to modify
fundamental hardware configuration parameters.
Select Maintenance from the main navigation menu to navigate to the Maintenance page.
5.12.1 Status
Figure 5-49: Maintenance – Status
Firmware
This is the complete identifier of the firmware currently running in the MBC-200.
Catalog Number
The catalog number indicates which optional modules are installed in the MBC-200.
Serial Number
The serial number of the MBC-200 router. The serial number is also printed on the label affixed to the
bottom of the MBC-200 enclosure.
5.12.2 Firmware
Figure 5-50: Maintenance – Firmware
5.12.2.1 Installed Firmware
This is the complete identifier of the firmware currently running in the MBC-200.
88
14221-6200-2010
5.12.2.2 Components
This is a complete list of component elements of the MBC-200 firmware. This provides useful
information for support technicians when contacting technical support.
5.12.2.3 Upgrade
When newer versions of MBC-200 firmware become available, the user can download the firmware from
the Harris Premier web site and manually update the unit by uploading a package to the unit.
Detailed information and procedures for performing manual firmware upgrades is provided in
APPENDIX D - Firmware Upgrades.
NOTE
The unit remains fully operational for the duration of the upload phase. However, the unit
automatically reboots once the upload completes, thus taking the MBC-200 out of service for
approximately 1 minute. Unless otherwise stated, the user is not expected to take any special
precautions.
It is important to have a stable power source and ensure that power to the MBC-200 is not
interrupted during a firmware upgrade.
CAUTION
5.12.3 WWAN Firmware
Figure 5-51: Maintenance – WWAN Firmware
5.12.3.1 WWAN0 Installed Firmware
Displays the model and firmware version of the LTE module installed in the WWAN0 position in the
MBC-200.
5.12.3.2 WWAN1 Installed Firmware
Displays the model and firmware version of the LTE module installed in the WWAN1 position in the
MBC-200.
89
14221-6200-2010
5.12.3.3 Upgrade WWANx Firmware
When newer versions of cell module firmware that are supported by Harris and the cell provider become
available, the user can download the firmware from the Harris Premier web site, and manually update the
LTE module by uploading the new firmware package to it. Detailed information and procedures for
performing manual firmware upgrades is provided in APPENDIX D - Firmware Upgrades.
NOTE
The WWAN interface will be temporarily disabled for the duration of the upgrade, which
may require up to 15 minutes. Unless otherwise stated, the user is not expected to take any
special precautions.
It is important to have a stable power source and ensure that power to the MBC-200 is not
interrupted during a firmware upgrade.
CAUTION
5.12.4 Hardware
Figure 5-52: Maintenance – Hardware
5.12.4.1 Hardware Information
This presents the unique serial numbers and other tracking information about components installed in the
MBC-200.
5.12.4.2 Catalog Number
The catalog number is an encoded description of the installed optional modules in the MBC-200. Users
should not make changes to any of these settings unless directed to do so by Harris personnel if assistance
is required to change the hardware configuration (for example, to change the LTE module to support
another carrier, etc.).
90
14221-6200-2010
5.12.5 Unit Configuration
The Unit Configuration tab allows you to save parameters (settings in the MBC-200 Web interface) of the
MBC-200 to a file. Conversely, if you have saved settings from the MBC-200 to a file, you can import
these previously-saved configuration settings to the MBC-200.
CAUTION
At the time of this writing, use of Internet Explorer 7, Internet Explorer 9, and Internet
Explorer 10 browsers are not recommended for backup (“Save As” as explained in Unit
Parameters below) or for importing unit parameters (“Browse…” as explained in Import Unit
Parameters below).
Figure 5-53: Maintenance – Unit Configuration
5.12.5.1 Parameters
Unit Parameters
Right-click the link and provide a destination location for the file to be downloaded. Download the file to
have a backup of the current configuration settings for your MBC-200.
Import Unit Parameters
Enter the path and filename for the previously-saved MBC-200 Configuration file, or use the Browse
button and navigate to it, and click Apply to import configuration parameters. Click Cancel to clear the
field and not import parameters.
NOTE
After importing some parameters, some services will be restarted and can cause the WWAN
interfaces to be restarted, causing a communication outage. This can take up to 30 seconds to
be restored.
91
14221-6200-2010
5.12.6 System Log
The System Log tab provides a way to capture the current status log of the device. Log information is
useful when contacting Harris’ Technical Assistance Center to resolve operational problems. Logs can be
downloaded as text files by clicking on the “download” links.
Figure 5-54: Maintenance – System Log
5.12.6.1 Syslog
Syslog displays system logs that are stored in the log buffers. These logs are cleared at every system boot.
A Grep function is provided to display only the log entries that contain text specified in the Grep search
field.
5.12.6.2 Flight Recorder
Flight Recorder is reserved for those logs that are very critical and which should be available even after a
system reboot. They are non-volatile.
5.12.7 USB Log
The USB Log tab provides a way to save log information to a USB flash drive. Log information is useful
when contacting Harris’ Technical Assistance Center to resolve operational problems.
92
14221-6200-2010
Figure 5-55: Maintenance – USB Log
5.12.7.1 USB log
Logs
Enable or disable writing log information to a USB flash drive. Logging is then automatically activated or
deactivated with the insertion or removal of USB flash drive to or from either of the two USB A ports in
the front panel of the MBC-200 router.
Events
Select the type of information to be written to the USB flash drive.
•
GPS – Periodically write GPS status to the log.
•
Interface – Write all changes in interface states.
•
WWAN – Periodically write WWAN interface status information.
•
Router – Write all changes to the default route.
Control
Always click Eject USB Flash Drive and wait a few moments before removing the USB device from the
front panel. This is recommended to properly stop the USB interface. Failure to stop the USB interface
before disconnecting could cause file corruption on the USB device and cause data loss or make the USB
device unusable.
93
14221-6200-2010
6.
TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
The Technical Assistance Center's (TAC) resources are available to help with overall system operation,
maintenance, upgrades and product support. TAC is the point of contact when answers are needed to
technical questions.
Product specialists, with detailed knowledge of product operation, maintenance and repair provide
technical support via a toll-free (in North America) telephone number. Support is also available through
mail, fax and e-mail.
For more information about technical assistance services, contact your sales representative, or contact the
Technical Assistance Center directly at:
94
North America:
1-800-528-7711
International:
1-434-385-2400
Fax:
1-434-455-6712
E-mail:
PSPC_tac@harris.com
14221-6200-2010
APPENDIX A – ABBREVIATIONS AND DEFINITIONS
AAVL: Autonomous Automatic Vehicle
Location
ADC: Analog to Digital Converter
APN: Access Point Name
BSSID: Basic Service Set Identification
CDMA: Code Division Multiple Access
CSD: Circuit-Switched Data
CSMA: Carrier Sense Multiple Access
CTS: Clear To Send
DCD: Data Carrier Detect
DCE: Data Communication Equipment
DHCP: Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
DTE: Data Terminal Equipment
DNS: Domain Name System or Domain Name
Service
ECIO: (Also Ec/IO) A ratio expressed in
decibels referenced to a milliwatt (dBm), of
received energy on the carrier (Ec) to
interference or noise (IO).
kbps: Kilobits per Second
LAN: Local Area Network
LED: Light-Emitting Diode
LTE: 3GPP Long Term Evolution
Mbps: Megabits per Second
MDN: Mobile Directory Number
ME: Mobile Equipment
MEI: Mobile Equipment Identity
MEID: Mobile Equipment Identifier
MHz: Megahertz
MIMO: Multiple Input and Multiple Output
MS: Mobile Station
MSGPS: Multi-Satellite Global Positioning
System
NTP: Network Time Protocol
OMA-DM: Open Mobile Alliance Device
Management
OTA: Over The Air
EDGE: Enhanced Data rates for Global
Evolution
PAD: Packet Assembler and Disassembler
ESN: Electronic Serial Number
PDP: Packet Data Protocol
EV-DO or EVDO: Evolution Data Optimized
PIN: Personal Identification Number
FCC: Federal Communications Commission
(U.S.)
PPP: Point-to-Point Protocol
GPRS: General Packet Radio Service
GPS: Global Positioning System
GSM: Global System for Mobile
communications
HSPA: High Speed Packet Access
PCS: Personal Communications Service
PPTP: Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol
PRL: Preferred Roaming List
RADIUS: Remote Authentication Dial In User
Service
RF: Radio Frequency
HSDPA: High-Speed Downlink Packet Access
RP-SMA: Reverse Polarity Sub-Miniature
version A (connector)
HSUPA: High-Speed Uplink Packet Access
RSSI: Received Signal Strength Indication
IC: Industry Canada
Rx: Receive
ICCID: Integrated Circuit Card Identifier
SIM: Subscriber Identity Module
IMEI: International Mobile Equipment Identity
SMA: Sub-Miniature version A (connector)
IMSI: International Mobile Subscriber Identity
95
14221-6200-2010
SMS: Short Message Service
SSID: Service Set Identifier
TAIP: Trimble ASCII Interface Protocol
TCP/IP: Transmission Control Protocol/Internet
Protocol
Tx: Transmit
UDP: User Datagram Protocol
UTMS: Universal Mobile Telecommunications
System
VDC: Voltage, Direct Current
VPN: Virtual Private Network
Wi-Fi or WiFi: Wireless Fidelity
96
14221-6200-2010
APPENDIX B – MECHANICAL SPECIFICATIONS
The following tables and figures show overall dimensions of the chassis and mounting bracket options for
the MBC-200 router. Mounting brackets allow the MBC-200 to be secured to any surface that can be
drilled for this purpose. The drawings may be used for layout reference, but it is advised that a physical
comparison be made to the unit and bracket before laying out and drilling mounting holes.
DIMENSION
INCHES
CENTIMETERS
Height
1.90
4,83
Width
6.00
15,2
Depth
5.50
14,0
Depth
(Chassis only)
5.28
13,4
Figure B-1: MBC-200 Overall Dimensions
Figure B-2: Side Tapped Mounting Hole Location
Detail - Typical Both Sides
#8-32 UNC – 2B thread × 0.30 in. (0,76 cm) depth 2
holes for mounting both sides (4 holes total).
Figure B-3: Tapped Mounting Hole Location Detail
- Top Only
#6-32 UNC – 2B thread × 0.12 in. (0,30 cm) depth 4
holes for mounting (top surface only).
97
14221-6200-2010
DIMENSION
INCHES
CENTIMETERS
Height
1.91
4,88
Width
6.00
15,2
Depth
7.250
18,42
Figure B-4: MBC-200 with Fixed Mounting Plate Overall Dimensions
Figure B-5: Fixed Mounting Plate Hole Location Detail*
*0.176 in. (0,447 cm) – 4 thru holes for securing mounting plate to a surface suitable for mounting.
98
14221-6200-2010
DIMENSION
INCHES
CENTIMETERS
Height
2.20
5,92
Width
6.00
15,2
Depth
5.50
14, 0
Depth
(Chassis only)
5.28
13,4
DIN rail mount attaches to top of unit as shown.
Figure B-6: MBC-200 with DIN Rail Mount Overall Dimensions
DIMENSION
INCHES
CENTIMETERS
Height
2.34
5,93
Width
6.88
17,5
Depth
5.50
14,0
Depth
(Chassis only)
4.28
10,9
Depth
(Bracket only)
2.50
6,35
Figure B-7: Mobile Mounting Bracket Slot Dimension Detail
99
14221-6200-2010
Figure B-8: Mobile Mounting Bracket Slot Dimension Detail
Figure B-9: MBC-200 with Mobile Mounting Bracket for Above Surface Mounting
100
14221-6200-2010
APPENDIX C – UL INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
& NON-INCENDIVE FIELD WIRING
UL acceptance requires the following installation instructions.
1. This equipment is suitable for use in Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D or non-hazardous
locations only.
EXPLOSION HAZARD — Do not disconnect equipment unless power has been removed
or the area is known to be non-hazardous.
WARNING
EXPLOSION HAZARD — Substitution of components may impair suitability for Class I,
Division
WARNING
2. The unit is to be powered with a Listed Class 2 or LPS power supply rated at 9 to 28 VDC or equivalent.
3. Device must be installed in an end-use enclosure.
4. All wiring routed outside the housing, except for the antenna, must be installed in grounded conduit,
following acceptable wiring methods based on installation location and electrical code.
5. The USB and SIM connectors are for temporary connection only during maintenance and setup of the
device. Do not use, connect, or disconnect unless the area is known to be non-hazardous. Connection or
disconnection in an explosive atmosphere could result in an explosion.
6. Do not operate reset switch unless area is known to be non-hazardous.
Figure C-1: MBC-200 Non-Incendive Field Wiring
Installation must be in accordance with the National Electric Code (NFPA 70, Article 504) and
ANSI/ISA-RF 12.6. (When the MBC-200 is located in a non-hazardous location, the maximum voltage is
±30 V and maximum current is 1 A.)
101
14221-6200-2010
APPENDIX D– FIRMWARE UPGRADES
Upgrading firmware in the MBC-200 and LTE modules is a two-part process (or three-part, if two LTE
modules are installed and both require firmware upgrades) requiring moderate technical know-how and
skill. Harris provides detailed instructions to guide you through the process of upgrading the MBC-200
router and LTE module firmware. Completing this requires downloading the firmware upgrade files to a
PC. In order to gain access to the upgrades via the PSPC Info Center (available only during the 2 year
warranty period), send an email to the Harris Technical Assistance Center (TAC) at
PSPC_TAC@harris.com with the following required information: Company Name, Sales Order number,
First and Last name, along with the email address of the user that will be downloading the software. Once
TAC has received the required information, you will receive an email with instructions on how to login to
the PSPC Info Center and how to download the upgrade.
Firmware upgrades become available occasionally. When upgrading firmware it is important to remember
there are two (or three) distinct components involved, each requiring its own version of firmware that is
completely different from the firmware required for the other component or components.
•
The MBC-200 itself requires firmware for which upgrades may become available occasionally.
Firmware for the MBC-200 is different and distinct from the firmware in the LTE modules.
•
Each LTE module in the MBC-200 requires firmware for which upgrades may become available
independently of upgrades for the MBC-200 firmware. LTE module upgrades vary and are specific to
the LTE module manufacturer, model number, and LTE network provider.
When obtaining a firmware upgrade, it is important to know and keep in mind which component the
upgrade is for: the MBC-200, the WWAN0 LTE module, or WWAN1 LTE module. Attempting to
perform a firmware upgrade for a component using a firmware upgrade file intended for a different
component can cause the component (and the MBC-200 router) to become inoperable. Firmware is made
available using the Harris Premier site. Monthly bulletins from the Premier site will keep the customer
updated about FW changes.
•
LTE modules in the MBC-200 should be upgraded to the most current version supported by Harris
and made available from LTE provider’s and/or Harris’ website to ensure compatibility and optimal
performance on the LTE network.
•
MBC-200 routers should be upgraded to the most recent router firmware compatible with the latest
LTE module firmware to take advantage of the most recent improvements and enhancements.
Firmware upgrades may be performed OTA (Over-The-Air), using the optional device management client
application, or through a network connection to the MBC-200. However, this section describes the
firmware upgrade of both the MBC-200 and LTE modules using a network connection to the MBC-200.
The following figure shows a simplified illustration of a typical network setup for firmware upgrades.
Figure D-1: MBC-200 Connected by Ethernet Cable for Firmware Upgrade
102
14221-6200-2010
D.1
PROCEDURE TO UPGRADE MBC-200 FIRMWARE
NOTE
The unit remains fully operational for the duration of the upload phase. However, the unit
automatically reboots once the upload completes, thus taking the MBC-200 out of service
during approximately one to two minutes. Unless otherwise stated, the user is not expected to
take any special precautions.
It is important to have a stable power source and ensure that power to the MBC-200 is not
interrupted during a firmware upgrade.
CAUTION
1. Connect a PC running Windows XP or Windows 7 to the MBC-200 as shown in Figure D-1 for direct
cable connection firmware upgrade.
a. For direct cable connection firmware upgrade, connect the Ethernet cable from the PC to the
Ethernet jack labeled ETH1 (center of the three Ethernet jacks).
b. Connect the 12 V DC power supply to the Power connector of the MBC-200 router. Connect the
12 V DC power supply to 110 V AC power.
2. On the PC, open a web browser and enter the IP address of the MBC-200 router in the address bar.
When the PC is connected to the Ethernet jack labeled ETH1, the default IP address is 192.168.1. 50.
In the Windows task bar you may need to refresh (click repair) the network connection for the
Ethernet port if you connected the cable after booting the PC or MBC-200.
3. A Web Server Authentication window appears as shown in Figure 3-4. (This may take up to 90
seconds after power is applied to the MBC-200.) For the default User Name and Password, see page
20. Click OK to log on.
4. Select Maintenance from the main navigation menu to navigate to the Maintenance page and then
select the Firmware tab.
Figure D-2: Maintenance – Firmware Upgrade Upload File
103
14221-6200-2010
5. Click Browse (or Choose File in some browsers - the button near the bottom of the Firmware tab) in
the Upgrade section and navigate to the firmware upgrade package file (which will have a file name
format similar to: HARRIS_MBC-200-[number]-V[version.number]-R[release.number].pak) and
then click Open to select the file. Click Apply to upload and apply the firmware upgrade package to
the MBC-200 router.
6. The MBC-200 router displays the message “Uploading new firmware. Please wait…” as it uploads
the firmware upgrade, which may take up to six minutes to finish. When it has finished uploading the
upgrade package, the MBC-200 displays a message that says “Successfully installed the new
firmware,” followed by the file name and file size of the package file. The MBC-200 will display this
message for approximately 90 seconds while a timer counts down the seconds at the bottom of the
window and then reboot automatically.
7. Wait for the MBC-200 to reboot, then wait a full minute after it has rebooted, and then access the
MBC-200 Web interface again as in steps 2 and 3, earlier in these instructions.
8. Select Maintenance from the main navigation menu to navigate to the Maintenance page. Select
either the Status or Firmware tab.
In either tab, verify that the firmware/package now displays the current version with the new
firmware version number. This number will be in the form PROD V[version.number]R[release.number], with the new version and release numbers, as in the .PAK file name.
Figure D-3: Firmware/Package Version Number and Release Number
All of the MBC-200 configuration settings are preserved through the firmware upgrade and the MBC-200
should return to functioning the same as it was before the upgrade (only better and with more versatility).
D.2
PROCEDURE TO UPGRADE B13/B17 LTE MODULE FIRMWARE IN
MBC-200
NOTE
The WWAN interface you are upgrading will be temporarily disabled for the duration of the
upgrade, which may require up to 15 minutes. Unless otherwise stated, the user is not expected
to take any special precautions.
It is important to have a stable power source and ensure that power to the MBC-200 is not
interrupted during a firmware upgrade.
CAUTION
1. Connect a PC running Windows XP or Windows 7 to the MBC-200 as shown in Figure D-1 for direct
cable connection firmware upgrade.
a. For direct cable connection firmware upgrade, connect the Ethernet cable from the PC to the
Ethernet jack labeled ETH1 (center of the three Ethernet jacks).
b. Connect the 12 V DC power supply to the Power connector of the MBC-200 router. Connect the
12 V DC power supply to 110 V AC power.
104
14221-6200-2010
2. On the PC, open a web browser and enter the IP address of the MBC-200 router in the address bar.
When the PC is connected to the Ethernet jack labeled ETH1, the default IP address is 192.168.1.50.
In the Windows task bar, you may need to refresh (click repair) the network connection for the
Ethernet port if you connected the cable after booting the PC or MBC-200.
3. A Web Server Authentication window appears as shown in Figure 3-4. (This may take up to 90
seconds after power is applied to the MBC-200.) For the default User Name and Password, see page
20. Click OK to log on.
4. Select Maintenance from the main navigation menu to navigate to the Maintenance page and then
select the WWAN Firmware tab.
CAUTION
Follow the instructions given below only to upgrade B13/B17 LTE modules. These shall have
model number starting with “Sierra MCXXXX”. To upgrade B14 LTE module, follow
instructions outlined in D.3 PROCEDURE TO UPGRADE B14 LTE MODULE
FIRMWARE IN MBC-200.
Figure D-4: Maintenance – WWAN Firmware Upgrade Upload File
5. Click Browse (or Choose File in some browsers — the button near the bottom of the WWAN
Firmware tab) in the Upgrade WWANx Firmware section and navigate to the firmware upgrade
package file. (Firmware upgrade package file names may vary by module manufacturer and model
and by cell provider.) Click Open to select the file and then click Apply to upload and apply the
firmware upgrade package.
6. The MBC-200 router displays the message “Uploading new firmware. Please wait…” as it uploads
the firmware upgrade, which may take up to fifteen minutes to finish. When it has finished uploading
the upgrade package, the MBC-200 displays a message that says “Successfully installed the new
firmware,” followed by the file name and file size of the package file.
7. Navigate to the WWAN Firmware tab of the Maintenance page or Status tab of applicable WWAN
page(s) as explained in the following steps to see the updated version number(s) for LTE module
firmware.
105
14221-6200-2010
8. Select Maintenance from the main navigation menu to navigate to the Maintenance page. Select the
WWAN Firmware tab. The WWAN Firmware tab shows the Model number and Firmware Version
for each installed cell module.
Figure D-5: WWAN0 Cell Module Model and Firmware Version
9. Select the WWAN page (WWAN0 or WWAN1, as applicable) from the main navigation menu and
select the Status tab.
The Status tab for each WWAN page also shows the Model number and Firmware Version.
Figure D-6: WWAN0 Cell Module Model and Firmware Version
Figure D-7: WWAN1 Cell Module Model and Firmware Version (if a Second Cell Module is Present)
All of the MBC-200 configuration settings are preserved through the firmware upgrade and the MBC200 should return to functioning the same as it was before the upgrade (only better and with more
versatility).
10. In the Carrier Settings tab, verify that the Interface is Enabled and verify that at least one provider is
Enabled.
Figure D-8: WWAN0 settings preserved through upgrade.
106
14221-6200-2010
D.3
PROCEDURE TO UPGRADE B14 LTE MODULE FIRMWARE IN MBC200
NOTE
The WWAN interface you are upgrading will be temporarily disabled for the duration of the
upgrade, which may require up to 15 minutes. Unless otherwise stated, the user is not expected
to take any special precautions.
It is important to have a stable power source and ensure that power to the MBC-200 is not
interrupted during a firmware upgrade.
CAUTION
CAUTION
Follow the instructions given below only to upgrade B14 LTE modules. These shall have model
number starting with “ALTAIR-SEMICONDUCTOR ALT3100”. To upgrade B13/B17 LTE
modules, follow instructions outlined in D.2 PROCEDURE TO UPGRADE B13/B17 LTE
MODULE FIRMWARE IN MBC-200.
You must have Administrator privileges to install an upgrade package!
NOTE
1. Download the LTE-UE Monitor Utility installation package from PSPC Info Center. In order to gain
access to the upgrades via the PSPC Info Center (available only during the 2 year warranty period),
send an email to the Harris Technical Assistance Center (TAC) at PSPC_TAC@harris.com with the
following required information: Company Name, Sales Order number, First and Last name, along
with the email address of the user that will be downloading the software. Once TAC has received the
required information, you will receive an email with instructions on how to login to the PSPC Info
Center and how to download the upgrade.
Refer to LTE-UE Monitor Utility’s user manual (14221-6200-2000) for installation instructions
(Refer Chapter 3 Installation).
2. Unscrew the two screws to remove the black plate covering SIM/SVC slots to expose the mini-USB
connectors and SIM slots as shown below.
Figure D-9: WWAN1 mini-USB connector used for upgrading B14 LTE module’s firmware.
3. Connect a PC running Windows XP or Windows 7 to the WWAN1’s mini-USB slot of the MBC-200
using a mini-USB cable.
107
14221-6200-2010
4. Launch the Harris LTE-UE monitor by navigating through the start menu of the PC in the following
way:
Start→All Programs→Harris Coporation→Harris LTE-UE→Harris LTE-UE Monitor
5. Navigate to the Firmware Upgrade option of the Harris LTE-UE monitor.
6. The Firmware Upgrade option allows you to manually upgrade the firmware installed in the UE.
Upon selection, the application prompts you to choose a firmware package to use in the upgrade. The
open file dialog defaults to the directory structure loaded as part of the install specification of the
automatic firmware file location. However, the file must only satisfy the condition that it is a properly
formatted Harris firmware file (*.hbin).
7. Once the file is selected, the firmware download begins. The monitor displays the download status via
a progress bar.
108
14221-6200-2010
APPENDIX E – WIFI CONCURRENT
CONFIGURATION: ACCESS POINT AND CLIENT
The WiFi interface of the MBC-200 router can be enabled in Access Point mode and Client mode at the
same time.
E.1
WIFI CONCURRENT MODE
The most important limitation you must be aware of when working with the MBC-200 router in
concurrent WiFi Access Point mode and Client mode is that the WiFi component of the MBC-200 has
only one radio.
In Concurrent WiFi mode (both Client and Access Point active), the MBC-200 WiFi Client can only
connect to external access points using the same channel that the internal Access Point is configured to
use.
Figure E-1: Concurrent WiFi Mode
In concurrent mode, the channel used by the WiFi access point of the MBC-200 router must be the same
as the channel used by the external WiFi access points. The WiFi client automatically scans for access
points every 60 seconds instead of every 5 seconds to reduce interference with the MBC-200's WiFi
access point.
109
14221-6200-2010
E.2
WIFI NON-CONCURRENT MODE – CLIENT MODE
If only the WiFi Client of the MBC-200 router is enabled, there is no restriction on the channel selection
for the external WiFi access points.
In Non-Concurrent mode (Client mode only), the WiFi client may use any valid channel as necessary to
connect to an access point.
Figure E-2: Non-Concurrent Mode (Client Mode Only)
In non-concurrent Client mode only, the channel used by the external WiFi access point can be set to any
valid channel.
110
14221-6200-2010
E.3
WIFI NON-CONCURRENT MODE – ACCESS POINT MODE
If only the WiFi Access Point of the MBC-200 router is enabled, the external WiFi access points have no
importance and may be set to any valid channel.
In Non-Concurrent mode (Access Point mode only), the MBC-200 router can use any valid channel
independent of any external access points.
Figure E-3: Non-Concurrent Mode (Access Point Mode Only)
In non-concurrent (Access Point mode only), the channel used by external WiFi access points do not
matter as long as there is no interference and they can be set to any valid channel.
111
14221-6200-2010
APPENDIX F – USING IPSEC TO CREATE
IP PERSISTENCE
This application note describes how the MBC-200 and connected devices can be easily accessed from a
remote application using IPSec tunnels. This method allows for continuous communication even though
the WAN IP address changes when a MBC-200’s WAN interface becomes unavailable and the MBC-200
uses an alternate method to access the Internet.
F.1
PROBLEM WITH MULTIPLE WANS
The MBC-200 mobile broadband router supports many methods for accessing the Internet. These include
either of two LTE modules, a WiFi module, or potentially any of three Ethernet ports which may be
connected to yet another wireless device such as a narrowband IP radio. The MBC-200 can be
programmed to automatically detect which of these interfaces is available at any given time and will
choose the highest priority interface for sending traffic.
Figure F-1: Router Settings – Interface Priority
Traffic originating from within the MBC-200 or traffic originating from devices connected directly to the
MBC-200 will automatically be routed out through the active WAN interface and will easily reach its
required destination. However, when the user wants to actively poll or remotely access the MBC-200 and
connected devices, the changing MBC-200 WAN interface can pose a problem. As the MBC-200
switches between one interface and the next, the IP address used to access the MBC-200 remotely
changes as well. In addition, LTE networks will assign the WWAN interface a dynamic IP address,
meaning that the IP address used for remote access will be different each time the unit connects to the
LTE network.
To solve this particular problem, the MBC-200 allows secure tunnels to be configured and automatically
created between the MBC-200 and a host server at the user’s office or corporate location. This tunnel is
automatically reestablished by the MBC-200 every time the MBC-200 changes its outgoing interface or
whenever there is an interruption in the WAN service. As a result, applications residing behind either end
of this secure tunnel can continue to have direct access to each other without needing to know which
interface the MBC-200 is currently using to access the Internet or what IP address is currently assigned to
the MBC-200’s WAN interface.
F.2
IPSEC TUNNEL
IPSec utilizes the client-server model, where the IPSec client (MBC-200) will initiate an encrypted tunnel
to the IPSec server using a pre-established security key. The tunnel creates a virtual private network
112
14221-6200-2010
(VPN) linking the networks attached to either endpoint. Once the tunnel is created, data can flow in either
direction.
The IPSec protocol encapsulates and encrypts the entire packet destined for the remote network. The
packet will have a new IP header, allowing the packet to be forwarded over the public network from the
IPSec client to the IPSec server or vice versa. At the receiving end, the IPSec header will be stripped from
the packet. The packet will be decrypted and then forwarded into the local area network as if both remote
networks were connected directly.
Imagine a scenario where the user programs the MBC-200’s interface priority as shown in Figure 5-30 in
Section 5.8.
Priority #1: WiFi Client
Priority #2: WWAN0 – Wireless Wide Area Network 0
Priority #3: WWAN1 – Wireless Wide Area Network 1
In the diagram below, the MBC-200 powers up, connects to both LTE networks. Since WiFi is not
available and WWAN0 is the highest priority available interface, the IPSec tunnel is established between
the MBC-200 and the IPSec server using WWAN0.
Figure F-2: MBC-200 using WWAN0 as the Default Interface
If by chance the WWAN0 network becomes unavailable at some later time, the MBC-200 will switch to
the backup LTE network, which in this scenario is WWAN1. The IPSec tunnel will be reestablished
through the MBC-200’s WWAN1 interface, and communications between the remote networks will
continue as they had initially.
Figure F-3: MBC-200 using WWAN1 as the Default Interface
Suppose later in the day the user arrives at a satellite office in another town. The MBC-200 can be
programmed to connect to the local WiFi hotspot, allowing all traffic to be routed through the WiFi
access point and avoiding LTE data usage fees. In this example, the MBC-200 switches from its default
WAN interface to WiFi. The IPSec tunnel is reestablished using WiFi, allowing communications to
continue between the remote networks.
113
14221-6200-2010
Figure F-4: MBC-200 using WiFi Client as Default Interface
In all three of the scenarios depicted in the three previous figures, devices or applications running on the
MBC-200’s ETH0 network or the corporate network can access one another through the IPSec tunnel. To
those applications, it appears as if the two networks are connected directly together with a single router.
Figure F-5: Simplified Network Topology after IPSec Tunnels are established
IPSec with Multiple MBC-200s
Additionally, many IPSec clients (for example, additional MBC-200 routers) can connect to a single
IPSec server. This allows an entire network of MBC-200 routers to be easily accessed by a host
application residing on the corporate network.
114
14221-6200-2010
Figure F-6: Multiple MBC-200 Routers with IPSec Tunnels
The IPSec tunnels create the effect of simplifying the network shown above. Since traffic is routed
through the IPSec tunnels automatically, devices located in the end networks view the network as if all
the networks were connected through a single router.
115
14221-6200-2010
Figure F-7: Simplified Network Topology after IPSec Tunnels are Established
When setting up a system as described above, the user must be careful to select an IP addressing scheme
so that the IP addressing range of one linked network does not overlap the IP address range of another
linked network. Each network must have a unique IP address range.
F.3
ADVANTAGES OF USING IPSEC
Using IPSec with the MBC-200 router provides several key advantages.
116
•
Eliminates the need to have static IP addresses associated with MBC-200 LTE accounts. After an
IPSec tunnel is established, devices from either the corporate network or the remote network can
initiate communications.
•
One or many devices can be connected to an MBC-200 router. Each device will have complete access
to and from the corporate network without complicated routing or port-forwarding rules.
•
IP Persistence: An application running on the corporate network can reach any MBC-200 router or
remote device connected to the MBC-200 LAN using its private IP address regardless of which WAN
interface is currently active on the MBC-200.
•
IPSec provides enhanced security, protecting critical data as it travels through public networks.
14221-6200-2010
APPENDIX G – WARRANTY
Please register this product within 10 days of purchase. Registration validates the warranty coverage, and enables Harris to contact
you in case of any safety notifications issued for this product.
Registration can be made on-line at http://pspc.harris.com/Service/CustomerService.aspx
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
Harris Corporation, a Delaware Corporation, through its RF Communications Division (hereinafter "Seller") warrants to the
original purchaser for use (hereinafter "Buyer") that Equipment manufactured by or for the Seller shall be free from defects in
material and workmanship, and shall conform to its published specifications. With respect to all non-Seller Equipment, Seller
gives no warranty, and only the warranty, if any, given by the manufacturer shall apply. Rechargeable batteries are excluded
from this warranty but are warranted under a separate Rechargeable Battery Warranty (ECR-7048).
Seller’s obligations set forth in Paragraph C below shall apply only to failures to meet the above warranties occurring within the
following periods of time from date of sale to the Buyer and are conditioned on Buyer’s giving written notice to Seller within thirty
(30) days of such occurrence:
1. for fuses and non-rechargeable batteries, operable on arrival only.
2. for parts and accessories (except as noted in B.1 and B.5), ninety (90) days.
3. for mobile and portable radios (“Subscriber Units”), twenty-four (24) months.
4. for Unity® model Subscriber Units, thirty-six (36) months.
5. for Six-Bay battery Chargers (12082-0314-xx and CH-104570-xxx), one (1) year.
6. for all other equipment of Seller’s manufacture, one (1) year.
If any Equipment fails to meet the foregoing warranties, Seller shall correct the failure at its option (i) by repairing any defective or
damaged part or parts thereof, (ii) by making available at Seller’s factory any necessary repaired or replacement parts, or (iii) by
replacing the failed Equipment with equivalent new or refurbished Equipment. Any repaired or replacement part furnished
hereunder shall be warranted for the remainder of the warranty period of the Equipment in which it is installed. Where such
failure cannot be corrected by Seller’s reasonable efforts, the parties will negotiate an equitable adjustment in price. Labor to
perform warranty service will be provided at no charge during the warranty period only for the Equipment covered under
Paragraph B.3, B.4 and B.5. To be eligible for no-charge labor, service must be performed at Seller’s factory, by an Authorized
Service Center (ASC) or other Servicer approved for these purposes either at its place of business during normal business hours,
for mobile or personal equipment, or at the Buyer’s location, for fixed location equipment. Service on fixed location equipment
more than thirty (30) miles (48 km) from the Service Center or other approved Servicer’s place of business will include a charge
for transportation.
Seller’s obligations under Paragraph C shall not apply to any Equipment, or part thereof, which (i) has been modified or otherwise
altered other than pursuant to Seller’s written instructions or written approval or, (ii) is normally consumed in operation or, (iii) has
a normal life inherently shorter than the warranty periods specified in Paragraph B, or (iv) is not properly stored, installed, used,
maintained or repaired, or, (v) has been subjected to any other kind of misuse or detrimental exposure, or has been involved in
an accident.
The preceding paragraphs set forth the exclusive remedies for claims based upon defects in or nonconformity of the Equipment,
whether the claim is in contract, warranty, tort (including negligence), strict liability or otherwise, and however instituted. Upon the
expiration of the warranty period, all such liability shall terminate. The foregoing warranties are exclusive and in lieu of all other
warranties, whether oral, written, expressed, implied or statutory. NO IMPLIED OR STATUTORY WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSE SHALL APPLY. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE SELLER BE
LIABLE FOR ANY INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR EXEMPLARY DAMAGES.
This warranty applies only within the United States.
Harris Corporation
RF Communications Division
221 Jefferson Ridge Parkway
Lynchburg, VA 24501
1-800-368-3277
Harris Corporation
RF Communications Division
1680 University Avenue
Rochester, NY 14610
1-585-244-5830
ECR-7047U
117
Public Safety and Professional Communications | www.pspc.harris.com
221 Jefferson Ridge Parkway | Lynchburg, VA USA 24501 | 1-800-528-7711
Download PDF
Similar pages