ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and

ZP3 Fire Control Panel
Installation, Commissioning,
and Maintenance Manual
P/N 503-1160ZE-I-12 • REV 12.0 • ISS 13SEP11
© 2011 UTC Fire & Security. All rights reserved.
The ZP3 name and logo are trademarks of UTC Fire & Security.
Other trade names used in this document may be trademarks or
registered trademarks of the manufacturers or vendors of the
respective products.
UTC Fire & Security South Africa (Pty) Ltd., 555 Voortrekker Road,
Maitland, Cape Town 7405, PO 181 Maitland, South Africa
Authorized EU manufacturing representative:
UTC Fire & Security B.V.
Kelvinstraat 7, 6003 DH Weert, Netherlands
This document applies to ZP3 version 3.12
!
%
!
Products marked with this symbol
cannot be disposed of as unsorted municipal waste in the European
Union. For proper recycling, return this product to your local supplier
upon the purchase of equivalent new equipment, or dispose of it at
designated collection points. For more information see:
www.recyclethis.info.
#
#
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$
"
"
Hereby, UTC Fire & Security
declares that this device is in compliance with the essential
requirements and other relevant provisions of Directive 1999/5/EC.
&
!
This product contains a battery that
cannot be disposed of as unsorted municipal waste in the European
Union. See the product documentation for specific battery
information. The battery is marked with this symbol, which may
include lettering to indicate cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), or mercury
(Hg). For proper recycling, return the battery to your supplier or to a
designated collection point. For more information see:
www.recyclethis.info.
#
#
$
$
$
For contact information, see www.utcfireandsecurity.com.
Important information iii
Introduction 2
Specifications 3
Panel overview 10
Optional modules 19
Quick start 34
Unpacking or packing 36
Overview of installation 39
Preparatory work 41
Installation information 42
Terminal layout 50
Power supply 50
Battery connection 54
Power supply and battery calculations 56
Z-Loop 58
Common outputs 60
Auxiliary boards 63
Introduction 70
Setup menu 70
System specification 90
Cause and effect functions 93
System address list 97
EN 54 Setup requirements 101
Introduction 106
Verification 106
System tests 108
Introduction 112
Peer-to-peer 3 (P2P3) protocol 112
Panel filters set, store and send capability 114
New network filters 114
Language loading 116
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
i
Introduction 118
System cabling 120
Z-Address lines 121
Serial communication lines 128
DC control lines 130
Overview 132
Routine maintenance 132
Maintenance menu 135
Interpretation of analogue readings 143
Corrective maintenance 150
ii
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
This manual is intended for use by the personnel who install and commission the
ZP3 Fire Control Panel, and has been prepared in accordance with ZP3
operating software version 3.12.
Advisory messages alert you to conditions or practices that can cause unwanted
results. The advisory messages used in this document are shown and described
below.
Warning messages advise you of hazards that could result in injury
or loss of life. They tell you which actions to take or to avoid in order to prevent
the injury or loss of life.
Caution messages advise you of possible equipment damage. They tell
you which actions to take or to avoid in order to prevent the damage.
Note messages advise you of the possible loss of time or effort. They
describe how to avoid the loss. Notes are also used to point out important
information that you should read.
Trained service personnel must carry out procedures in this manual.
The ZP3 panel is powered from a 230 VAC primary supply and from a 24 VDC
battery backup supply.
The power supply forms part of the main board assembly. This
assembly consists of a circuit board (incorporating the power supply), mounted
on a metal chassis, with the power supply covered by a metal enclosure. The
enclosure must not be opened, and non-authorized persons must never remove
the circuit board from the chassis. Very high voltage potentials exist on the circuit
board, and disassembling any part of the power supply could be dangerous to
field personnel.
Connection to the 230 VAC primary supply (+10%, í15%), must comply with
National wiring regulations. The wiring must be permanently connected to the
building wiring through a 10 A, 3-core cable, and a double pole 10 A isolation
switch.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
iii
The primary supply must be wired to the correct terminals as follows:
•
Live = Brown
•
Neutral = Blue
•
Earth = Green/Yellow
The earth wire MUST be connected for each installation.
•
The incoming mains fuse only breaks the live connection.
•
Dangerous potential remains on the incoming terminals even when the fuse is
removed.
•
Dangerous potentials can also exist at other locations on the PCB even with
mains and battery disconnected.
•
The backup batteries, although at only 24 VDC, carry enough charge to be
dangerous.
•
When connecting batteries, or when working in the vicinity of the battery
terminals, take care not to accidentally cause a short circuit. In particular
burns to the user
metallic tools or metallic watchstraps can also inflict
as well as cause a short circuit.
'
(
)
(
*
(
The backup batteries contain substances that are potentially hazardous
to your health and to the environment.
iv
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
This product is CPD approved. Certification details are shown in the table below.
+
,
Certification
Certification body
1134
Certificate number
1134-CPD-089
EN 54
EN 54-2: 1997+A1: 2006
EN 54-4: 1997+A1: 2002+A2: 2006
Manufacturer
UTC Fire & Security South Africa (Pty) Ltd., 555 Voortrekker Road,
Maitland, Cape Town 7405, PO 181 Maitland, South Africa
Authorized EU manufacturing representative:
UTC Fire & Security B.V.
Kelvinstraat 7, 6003 DH Weert, Netherlands
Year of manufacture
The year and day of manufacture, in the format YYDDD, is
included in the first five digits of your product serial number,
(located on the product identification label).
These control panels have been designed in accordance with European EN 54-2,
and EN 54-4 standards. In addition, they comply with the following EN 54-2
optional requirements, see Table 1 below.
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7.8
Output to fire alarm devices (output to C)
7.9.1
Output to fire alarm routing equipment (output to E)
7.11
Delays to outputs
7.12.2
Dependencies on more than one alarm signal (type B)
7.13
Alarm counter
8.3
Fault signals from points
8.4
8.4 Total loss of the power supply
8.9
8.9 Output to fault warning routing equipment (output to J)
9.5
9.5 Disablement of addressable points
10.
Test conditions
10.1
General requirements
10.2
Indication of the test condition
10.3
Indication of zones in the test state
11
Standardized input/output interface
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
v
Table 2 below lists and defines the abbreviations and acronyms used in this
manual.
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DC
Direct current
GND
Ground
LCD
Liquid crystal display
LED
Light emitting diode
mA
Milliampere
PF
Microfarads
MICC
Mineral-insulated copper-clad
PC
Personal computer
RX
Receive
SAB
Sounder alarm base
SW
Switch
TX
Transmit
V
Volts
Table 3 lists the documents, or parts thereof, that are referenced from this
manual:
3
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ZP3 Fire Control Panel User Guide
503-1160ZE-U-12
ZP3 Fire Alarm System Maintenance Logbook
503-1842ZE-1-02
ZP3AB-NET1 Network Board Installation Sheet
501-0485ZE-1-01
ZP3AB-SCB-D Serial Display Unit Interface Installation Sheet
501-0482ZE-1-01
Planner User Guide
503-1436ZE-U-06
European Standard EN 54 (Parts 2 and 4)
British Standards BS 5839 (Part 1: 1988)
vi
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 1
Installation overview
This chapter provides the specifications for your control panel, with an overview
of the panel display and controls, construction and other panel information.
Introduction 2
Specifications 3
Dimensions 9
Panel overview 10
Display and controls 10
Panel construction 10
Built-in communication port 16
Optional modules 19
Communication boards 19
Remote display unit 25
Accessory plate 25
Modem 28
Printer 31
Quick start 34
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
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Chapter 1: Installation overview
The ZP3 fire control panel (see Figure 1) is a state-of-the-art analogue
addressable panel that complies with EN 54 parts 2 and 4. It is a compact
microprocessor controlled unit, of modular design. Hardware and software
modules enable you to configure virtually any system requirement. The panel
uses nonvolatile flash memory, and can be programmed on site, either directly
via the keypad, or by means of a notebook computer.
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ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 1: Installation overview
Refer to Table 4 below for detailed specifications for the ZP3 Fire Control Panel.
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Fire alarm panel
Complies with European Standard EN 54-2
Power supply
Complies with European Standard EN 54-4
Electromagnetic
CE Marked. Complies with European Directive 89/336/EEC.
Complies with standards BS EN 50081, BS EN 50082, and IEC
950
IP rating
IP30: For indoor use only
7
Loop protocol
ZP addressable loop protocol
Isolators
Up to 16 per loop (advisable to use 11)
ZP3 four-loop panel
ZP3 two-loop panel
ZP3 one-loop panel
+
8
-
Devices-508
Loop devices, such as sensors,
sounders, interfaces
Zones-128
128 digital display, 50 built-in
zone LEDs
Outputs-768
Located on the I/O Bus (local
and/or remote)
Devices-254
Loop devices, such as sensors,
sounders, interfaces
Zones-128
128 digital display, 50 built-in
zone LEDs
Outputs-768
Located on the I/O Bus (local
and/or remote)
Devices-127
Loop devices, such as sensors,
sounders, interfaces
Zones-128
128 digital display, 50 built-in
zone LEDs
Outputs-768
Located on the I/O Bus (local
and/or remote)
Mains voltage
230 VAC +10%, í15%
Mains frequency
50 Hz (r15%)
Mains current (maximum)
1A
Power
130 W
CIE input voltage
21.0 to 27.6 VDC
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
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Chapter 1: Installation overview
3
9
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Output voltage (mains on)
24 VDC nominal
See note 1
Output voltage (mains off)
18.0 to 27.6 VDC
See note 1
Battery charging voltage
27.6 VDC
at 20qC temperature
compensated
Maximum ripple (at full load)
500 mV peak
2
Total continuous
2.6 A at 21 VDC
See note 2
Total continuous
3.0 A at 24 VDC
See note 2
Total peak
5.5 A at 24 VDC
See note 2
Panel operation (quiescent)
0.4 A
See note 3
Panel operation (fire)
0.6 A
See note 3
Battery charging (JP6 IN,
default)
1.4 A
Battery charging (JP6 OUT)
1.0 A
Available to user (continuous
non fire alarm)
1.2 A
See note 4
Available to user (continuous in 2.5 A
fire alarm)
See note 5
:
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High voltage alarm
28.5 VDC
First battery low-voltage
22.3 VDC
notification: battery low warning
local
Second battery low-voltage
21.0 VDC
notification: low/no battery local
;
Type
12 V (2X)
Sealed lead-acid as per “Power
supply and battery calculations”
on page 56
Make and model
—
Kung Long WP26-12
BS129N
Battery SLA type
26 A/H
Maximum size that can be
fitted into a type-A cabinet
6 VDC
Time and date retention
Panel (quiescent at 24 VDC)
450 mA
Load of panel only, excluding
any external devices
Panel (alarm at 24 VDC)
500 mA
Load of panel only, excluding
any external devices
Per Loop (quiescent at 24
VDC)
150 mA
Fully loaded loop, with 127 ZP
devices, not in alarm
Lithium battery CR2325
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8
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ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 1: Installation overview
Per Loop (alarm at 24 VDC)
300 mA
Panel total (alarm at 24 VDC)
+
8
-
9
Maximum available per loop,
for driving all devices
Dependent upon external
devices when in alarm
-
Primary supply
24 to 28 VDC (amps
dependant on system load)
Optional. Supplied from an
external charger
Output (mains OFF)
24 VDC
15 to 27.6 VDC depending
upon state of battery and load
Total output
Amps
Dependent on external charger
capacity
User available output
Amps
Dependent on external charger
Secondary supply/battery
24 VDC
Capacity dependent upon
external charger
Part number
71900
Version 2.0 or higher
Firmware
-
Flash memory
Configuration programming
-
Flash memory
Liquid crystal text display
160 characters
Backlit 4-line text display
LED indicators
87
High-efficiency LEDs for status
indication
Z-Port 1
Planner (RS-232)
Built-in RS-232 for loading
configuration from Planner
(without control lines)
Z-Port 2
ZP-Net (RS-485)
Optional RS-485 port for
connecting to ZP-NET
Serial control bus
SCB-Bus (RS-485)
Optional port for remote display
and control panels
Z-Port 1a
RS-232
Optional port for BMS, pager,
or other connection (with
modem control lines)
Common sounders
EN 54-2
Four common sounder circuits
Coincidence alarm
EN 54-2
Coincidence within zone
Remote manned centre (fire)
EN 54-2
For connection to fire alarm
RMC routing equipment
Remote manned centre (Fault)
EN 54-2
For connection to fault alarm
RMC routing equipment
Zone walk test
EN 54-2
One-man test of a zone, other
zones remain working
Control outputs
EN 54-2
Up to 768 programmable
control outputs
:
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:
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ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
5
Chapter 1: Installation overview
Output delays
EN 54-2
Delays can be programmed to
any output
Alarm counter
EN 54-2
Level 2 access alarm counter
records all alarms
Delay on sounder silence
Prevents silencing alarms
before they are heard
Alarm verification
Verifies alarms from a sensor
before displaying “Fire”
Sensor sensitivity
Four levels of sensitivity per
sensor
Input - output configuration
Sophisticated I/O mapping
functions
Automatic sensor test
Tests complete operation of
sensors
-
Help
Button
Displays operator instructions
on-screen
View fire alarm
Button
Displays the Fire Alarms by
Zone screen
View fault alarm
Button
Displays the Fault Alarms by
Zone screen
View disabled zones/devices
Button
Displays the Disabled Devices
by Zone screen
View other
Button
Displays the Other Events by
Category screen
View points/devices
Button
Displays alarms by individual
device
Accept
Button
Silences the built-in panel
buzzer during an alarm
Reset
Button
Resets the system to normal
after an alarm
Silence alarms
Button
Silences all field sounders that
are active
Sound alarms
Button
Activates all (or selected) field
sounders
Restore disabled alarms/RMC
Button
Restores sounders or RMC
alarms that are disabled
Scroll events (more)
Button
Manually scrolls the list of
alarms on LCD screen
Controls ON/OFF
Key switch
Enables or disables front panel
controls
Operator menu/keypad
Keypad
For operator, maintenance, and
setup menus
6
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 1: Installation overview
<
Fire (common)
LED (dual)
Red
Fault (common)
LED (dual)
Yellow
Disabled (common)
LED (dual)
Yellow
Other (common)
LED (dual)
Yellow
Alarms silenced
LED
Yellow
Sound alarms key pressed
LED
Yellow
Night mode (optional)
LED
Green
Day mode (optional)
LED
Yellow
More alarms
LED
Yellow
Sounders active
LED
Red
Remote centre alarm active
LED
Red
Control output active
LED
Red
System fault
LED
Yellow
Zone fault
LED
Yellow
Sounder fault
LED
Yellow
Remote centre alarm fault
LED
Yellow
Control output fault
LED
Yellow
Zone disabled
LED
Yellow
Point disabled
LED
Yellow
Sounders disabled
LED
Yellow
Remote centre alarm disabled
LED
Yellow
Control output disabled
LED
Yellow
Zone prealarm
LED
Yellow
Point prealarm
LED
Yellow
System test mode
LED
Yellow
LED
Green
Sounder circuits
(common/programmable)
2
Monitored sounder circuits,
programmable as one o/p “1 + 2”
Sounder circuits
(common/programmable)
2
Monitored sounder circuits,
programmable as one o/p “3 + 4”
Fire (common)
1
Voltage-free relay contacts,
common to all fire alarms
Fault (common)
1
Voltage-free relay contacts,
common to fault alarms
Remote manned centre (fire)
1
Monitored voltage output to
RMC transmitter for fire
Remote manned centre (fault)
1
Monitored voltage output to
RMC transmitter for fault
Power on
:
8
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
7
Chapter 1: Installation overview
:
8
-
Relay outputs
Up to 896
Transistor open-collector O/P
Up to 896
Sounder-circuit outputs
Up to 896
Monitored Inputs
Up to 896
2
-
A total of 896 (768 freely
programmable) inputs or
outputs can be connected to
each ZP3 panel. These inputs
and outputs can be a mixture of
any of the standard device
types shown
24-character panel-mounted
Built-in
Plain-paper printer with menuselectable programme
[1] This is the output voltage available to provide power to auxiliary boards, such as sounder
output boards. It must not be used to power devices not related to the fire system. With the mains
on it is regulated at 24 to 29 VDC, and with the mains off it provides battery voltage, which is
approximately 3 V lower than the battery voltage when a full load (4 A) is connected. As a safety
feature, line device analogue information is ignored by the panel at very low input voltages.
Battery voltages from 19 to 21 V (and lower depending on the current being drawn) cause the
panel to display the message “Fire detection inactive”.
[2] This is the total power supply capability, used for all panel and user operations. The peak
current is only available for short periods of time, not exceeding 30 minutes.
[3] Maximum current used internally by the panel, excluding detectors and external devices.
[4] After deducting panel operation and battery charging requirements, the current remaining is
available for use by external devices such as detectors, accessory boards and sounders. This is
the maximum current available while the system is in a non fire alarm condition.
[5] In a fire alarm condition, the battery charging is disconnected. Therefore, in a fire condition,
additional current is available for external fire alarm devices only, such as sounders.
8
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 1: Installation overview
See Figure 2 for the dimensions of the ZP3 fire alarm panel. The basic panel is
designed for surface mounting, and flush-mounting kits are available. The
dimensions below apply to the basic panel. For details of optional mounting
hardware, see the appropriate data sheets.
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ZP3 FIRE ALARM SYSTEM
HELP
LOCAL ZONES
MORE
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
VIEW
POINTS
ACCEPT
RESET
FIRE
FAULT
DISABLED
OTHER
SILENCE
ALARMS
MUTE
BUZZER
POWER ON
NIGHT
ACTIVE
FAULT DISABLED DELAYED PRE-ALM
ENABLE
TEST
CONTROL
SYSTEM
DAY
ZONE
MORE TIME
POINT
SOUND
ALARMS
RESTORE
DISABLED
ALARMS
SOUNDERS
ON
OFF
REMOTE ALARM
CONTROL OUTPUTS
540 mm
1
ABC
2
DEF
3
GHI
F1
4
JKL
5
MNO
6
PQR
F2
7
STU
8
VWX
9
YZ
0
[ ]
ZITON
ZP3 Fire Alarm Panel
410 mm
137 mm
Weight without batteries
10 kg
Weight with batteries
20 kg
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
9
Chapter 1: Installation overview
The fascia of the ZP3 fire panel has the necessary indicator lamps, text display
screen, controls, menu keyboard, and printer to provide the operator with the
status of the system at all times. It also has a reporting system for alarms, faults,
and other events. Figure 3 shows the main features of the front panel.
5
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2
3
4
ZP3 FIRE ALARM SYSTEM
1
5
HELP
LOCAL ZONES
MORE
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
VIEW
POINTS
ACCEPT
6
RESET
FIRE
FAULT
DISABLED
SILENCE
ALARMS
OTHER
MUTE
BUZZER
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
POWER ON
NIGHT
SYSTEM
DAY
ZONE
MORE TIME
POINT
ACTIVE
FAULT
DISABLED DELAYED PRE-ALM
TEST
7
ENABLE
RESTORE
DISABLED
ALARMS
CONTROL
ON
SOUNDERS
OFF
REMOTE ALARM
49
SOUND
ALARMS
CONTROL OUTPUTS
50
8
12
9
1
ABC
2
DEF
3
GHI
F1
4
JKL
5
MNO
6
PQR
F2
7
STU
8
VWX
9
YZ
0
[ ]
11
1.
2.
3.
4.
Zone fire indicators
Help button
Views points button
LCD text display
ESC
10
5.
6.
7.
8.
Scroll buttons
Sounder control keys
Alarm view buttons
Access control
9.
10.
11.
12.
Status indicators
Keypad
Printer
Day/night module
The display of information is designed to comply with the requirements of
EN 54-2. In addition to alarms and events being reported on the text screen, they
are also indicated on zone lamps where applicable. Operation of controls is
structured by access level, with four levels being provided. The printer is an
optional item.
The ZP3 fire control panel (see Figure 4) is of modular design so that it can be
configured for any required application. It consists of a basic panel, which is fully
functional, and available in three models, one-loop, two-loop, and four-loop. The
basic panel operates as a complete system without any extras.
10
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 1: Installation overview
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Figure 4 shows the basic fire panel. The elements shown provide all required
functions, and form the core of the ZP3 panel. No optional I/O modules or printer
are shown in this illustration. Three communication boards are fitted.
Figure 5 shows the internal features of the basic ZP3 panel with additional detail.
All components are carried on two main modules; the internal chassis holds the
main board and processor board, and the door assembly holds the display board,
the zone board, the keyboard, and the Zport 1 connection.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
11
Chapter 1: Installation overview
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6
8
5
7
4
1
1.
2.
3.
4.
Door assembly
Main chassis
Batteries
Field wiring entry
2
3
5.
6.
7.
8.
Main terminals
Mains 230 VAC connections
Mains fuse
Mains filter
The panel is divided into three main modules, namely the chassis, the door
assembly, and the cabinet. The basic electrical installation can be carried out
using the cabinet only, which has the required conduit entry points at the top and
back. Optional hardware is available for different installation requirements.
Figure 6 shows all the main features of the ZP3 panel main chassis assembly.
This unit comprises the line drivers, the I/O circuitry, the control circuits, the
power supply, and the plug-in central processing unit (CPU).
12
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 1: Installation overview
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1
2
3
4
6
5
8
7
10
9
11
38
37
14
12
15
13
16
17
18
36
35
34
33
32
31
30
29
19
20
21
23
22
28
27
26
25
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
Earth monitoring enabled
Battery for time/date
Chassis
Field terminals
LED 6 RMC alarm activated
LED 10 RMC fault activated
LED 12 common fire
LED 11 common fault
LED 13 sounder 1+2 activated
LED 36 sounder 3+4 activated
LED 1 battery charging
LED 5 RMC alarm overload
LED 9 RMC fault overload
Monitored sounder 4
Monitored sounder 3
Aux/supply out
RMC fault alarm
Battery/external 24V
Monitored sounder 1
24
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
Monitored sounder 2
Main 24 VDC power 6.3 A
5 VDC power 0.5 A
Charge rate selector
Power supply unit
CPU board
LED 4 mains on
LED 2 RDU +ve
LED 7 RS-232 +ve
LED 8 RS-232 íve
LED 14 +5V_S
LED 15 +5V
LED 37 24V
LED 20 sounder fault
LED 19 loop fault
LED 18 earth fault
LED 21 ADC failure
To auxiliary boards
To display PCB
The main chassis is removed from the panel by removing the four securing
screws.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
13
Chapter 1: Installation overview
Once removed, the main chassis should not be dismantled, as very
high voltage exists below the circuit board, and can be present even when mains
is off, or the unit is removed from power. There are no field-serviceable parts in
the assembly.
Figure 7 shows all the main features of the ZP3 panel Door Assembly. This unit
comprises the panel display and control electronics as well as the keyboard, a
serial connection for data loading, and the printer (if fitted).
5
=
!
,
&
-
2
1
3
4
5
1. Display board
2. Zone board
3. Optional printer
4 Earth straps
5. Commissioning board
1. Remove the two screws securing the hinges.
2. Remove the four nuts securing the earth straps, which connect from door to
box.
3. Carefully unplug cables connecting the door boards to the main chassis.
Do not dismantle the door boards. There are no field-serviceable parts in
the assembly.
14
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Brown
Green
2
1
RS-232
Commissioning Keyswitch
Board
Optional
printer
Black
Red
Purple
White
Grey
CPU
Battery
Blue
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Battery
IEC mains
plug
Connector
Red
Grey
Keypad
Pink
Controls off
keyswitch
Temperature
sensor
2
8
1
-
Main Board
Red
Grey
Black
J2
JP24
JP7
Zone Board
Mains
filter
TB5/25
<
TB24
!
6
>
TB2
TB26
Black
Mains
terminal
Green
Red
Auxiliary mounting plate
J1
Display Board
JP1
Ribbon cable connection
Ribbon cable connection
Neutral
Earth
Live
5
COM
N/O
SCRN
TX
RX
Auxiliary boards
Chapter 1: Installation overview
15
Chapter 1: Installation overview
5
!
&
5
1
3
2
6
4
8
7
9
10
13
12
11
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Earth straps
Chassis earthing nuts
Earth connection to detector loop screens
Building earth
Filter earth
Panel enclosure earthing stud
Earth path to chassis
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Earth in cable to PSU
Earth path to power supply cover
Accessory plate earthing screw to chassis
Earth path to accessory plate
Contact clips
Commissioning board
The built-in RS-232 port is used to connect the ZP3 panel to an external
computer for the purpose of uploading or downloading the panel’s configuration
16
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 1: Installation overview
program. Configuration programming is normally done on a PC using Planner
programme) and then loaded into the panel at the site
(the
via a portable PC. This port can also be used to upgrade the ZP3 panel software
to a new version.
?
@
A
B
B
(
*
C
D
*
E
F
B
G
D
H
'
The preferred baud rate settings when using Planner to configure a ZP3
panel are shown in Table 5 below.
&
-
!
;
6
+
4
Baud rate
Data bits
Parity
Stop bits
Receive
38400
8
Even
1
Send
9600
8
Even
1
Alternatively you can set Z-Port 1 to ZCP3 to allow control directly from Planner.
The protocol is RS-232, with a three-wire connection as shown in Figure 10. This
port shares internal lines with Z-Port 1a, and consequently the D-plug connection
to the ZP3AB-RS232 board must be physically disconnected before using the
built-in port.
5
!
:
4
#
0
"
&
"
-
-
0
Cable connections
(Ziton RS-232 Type A Cable)
1
6
5
9
ZP3 Panel
(9-pin)
9-pin D
connector
2
Computer
(9-pin) (25-pin)
RX
3
TX
5
GND
TX
3
RX
2
3
GND
5
7
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
1
5
9-pin D
connector
2
6
9
1
13
14
25
25-pin D
connector
17
Chapter 1: Installation overview
RS-232 is officially specified as having a maximum cable length of 10 metres,
which is more than adequate for ZP3/PC configuration functions. The connecting
cable must be screened, and must be made-up as per Figure 10. Alternatively, a
standard null modem cable can be used.
The RS-232 built-in serial port (Zport1) must be configured in the software, and
must be set to match the communications parameters of the PC and program
being used.
Access the communications parameters menu using the following menu path:
Setup > System Configuration > Peripheral Comms > Comms Parameters
The following screen is displayed.
5
!
+
To change a setting, move the bracket to the selected item, and press Enter.
The parameters are dependent on the program used. For Planner, set the
parameters as follows.
&
-
!
6
$
+
0
Z-PORT
Enter Z-port number 1
Protocol
Enter the required protocol as follows:
0 = disable the port
11 = for use with Ziton Planner
18 = ZCP2-3 protocol
Setup
Enter the following setup data:
Baud rate = 38400
Data bits = 8
Parity = None
Stop bits = 1
18
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 1: Installation overview
The standard ZP3 fire panel has one built-in communication port, Z-Port 1, used
for programming. Additional ports are available as options for other functions,
such as connecting into a Ziton ZP-NET network, connecting to graphics display
computers, as well as to remote display units and remote control units. These
ports are installed as shown in Figure 12. Modules are connected to plug-in
sockets, and secured to posts with three M4 screws.
5
!
&
"
1
3
4
2
<
,
:
-
1.
Z-Port 1
Standard
Connects to notebook computer for programming
of the ZP3 panel using the Planner configuration
program.
2.
Z-Port 1a
Optional
Serial communication board ZP3AB-RS232 for
connecting to third party systems, such as building
management systems, graphics systems, and
automatic pager systems.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
19
Chapter 1: Installation overview
<
,
:
-
3.
Z-Port 2
Optional
Serial board ZP3AB-NET-RS485 for connecting to
a Ziton ZP-NET peer-to-peer network comprising
several ZP3 panels, Maestro graphics computers,
and global display panels.
4.
Serial control
board
Optional
Serial board ZP3AB-SCB-D for connecting to one
or more remote display panels, remote control
panels with inputs and outputs (sounders, control
outputs, etc), and remote mimic indicator panels.
The ZP3AB-RS232 Serial Communications Board (see Figure 13) is used to
connect a ZP3 panel to an external device, such as a desktop printer, a graphics
display system, a building management system, modem, or a paging system.
The hardware protocol is a RS-232, being a screened five-wire connection. The
RS-232 board is defined in the menus as Port1a, and different software protocols
can be selected to match the connected PC application. Communication
parameters can be set in the Setup menu.
5
4
!
6
+
4
3
;
0
:
4
"
:
-
;
6
+
"
0
Cable connections
(Ziton RS232 Type A Cable)
Computer
(9-pin) (25-pin)
ZP3 Panel
(9-pin)
1
6
5
9
9-pin D
connector
2
RX
TX
3
2
3
TX
RX
2
3
4
DTR
CTS
8
5
5
GND
GND
5
7
6
DSR
RTS
7
4
7
RTS
8
CTS
1
6
5
9-pin D
connector
9
1
13
14
25
25-pin D
connector
Z-Port 1a
ZP3AB-RS232 board
RS-232 is officially specified as a maximum cable length of 10 metres. However,
if slower baud rates are used, then it is possible to operate it at up to 50 metres.
Cable must be screened, with at least five conductors, and must be made up as
shown in Figure 13.
20
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 1: Installation overview
To be functional, the optional RS-232 serial port (Z-port 1a) must be configured
in software, and must be set to match the communications parameters of the PC
and program being used. Access the communications parameters menu using
the following menu path:
Setup > System Configuration > Peripheral Comms > Comms Parameters
The following screen is displayed.
5
!
+
/
To change a setting, move the bracket to the selected item, and then press
Enter.
The parameters are dependent on the programme used. The following options
are available.
&
-
=
!
6
0
+
Z-PORT
Enter Z-port number 1
Protocol
Enter the required protocol as follows:
0 = disable the port
1 = ZCP2 protocol, multiple-telegram, full handshaking
2 = ZCP2 protocol, single telegram, single direction TX only, no
handshaking
7 = ZCP2 protocol, single telegram, full handshaking
11 = ZCP3 for use with Ziton Planner
18 = ZCP2-3 protocol, multiple-telegram, full handshaking
(configurable). For use with Ziton Planner, Maestro & Building
Management systems
Setup
Enter the required setup data from the following options:
Baud rate = 57600, 38400, 33600, 28800, 19200, 14400, 9600, 4800,
2400, 1200, 600, 300
Data bits = 5, 6, 7, 8
Parity = Even, Odd, None
Stop bits = 1, 2
The ZP3AB-NET1 Network Board is used to connect a number of ZP3 panels
into a peer-to-peer network. The hardware protocol is a multidrop RS-485
screened, two-wire connection. Although the ZP3AB-NET1 board is capable of
dual routing operation, ZP3 software does not support this feature, and the board
must be used as a single-channel device. In a network of ZP3 panels, one of the
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
21
Chapter 1: Installation overview
panels must have the fail-safe links connected by connecting the jumpers as
shown in Figure 15. All other panels must have their jumpers removed. For long
cable runs wiring should be terminated (using LK10) at each end of the cable
run, in addition to the LK8 and LK9 jumpers. In any case no more than two
terminating links (LK10) must be inserted.
5
!
6
+
4
3
;
.
.
0
8
;
6
+
0
"
(+)
Connect to terminals of
(–)
the ZP3 AB-NET card
in previous ZP3 panels (Screen)
(+)
Connect to terminals of
(–)
the ZP3 AB-NET card in
(Screen) next ZP3 panels
Channel 2 (unused)
Channel 1
LK8
LK10
LK9
Not used
Do not terminate
RS-485 fail-safe jumpers (LK8 and
LK9) (These jumpers must be
installed on
in a
network. All other panels must have
the jumpers removed.)
I
J
K
L
I
J
M
N
O
J
M
Single/dual selector
(Always set as dual. Connect
jumper to left pair of pins.)
K
Z-Port 2
ZP3AB-NET1
Network Interface Board
RS-485 operates through up to 2,000 metres of screened, twisted-pair cable.
Wiring can be daisy-chained point-to-point, or can be T-tapped or spurred for
short distances i.e. less than 10 m. The total length of cable in the network
should not exceed 2,000 metres. If the network distances are greater than 2,000
metres, use RS-485 booster units, or fibre-optic cable. For more information refer
to the
(P/N 501-0485ZE-1-01).
P
?
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
U
(
Y
H
D
*
Z
S
D
A
*
G
[
B
'
Y
A
@
@
A
Y
F
D
B
\
]
(
(
Y
The cable is specified in detail in Appendix A “ZP wiring guide” on page 117, but
as a guideline it should be data quality cable with a conductor size of 0.5 mm².
To be functional, the optional ZP3AB-NET1 Network Board (Z-Port 2) must be
configured in software. Access the communications parameters menu using the
following menu path:
Setup > System Configuration > Peripheral Comms > Comms Parameters
The following screen is displayed.
22
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 1: Installation overview
5
!
+
$
To change a setting, move the bracket to the selected item, and then press
Enter.
The parameters are dependent on the program used. The following options are
available.
&
-
>
!
6
0
+
"
Z-PORT
Enter Z-port number 2
Protocol
Enter the required protocol as follows:
0 = Used for stand-alone panels (not networked)
9 = Peer-to-Peer networking
10 = Peer-to-Peer V2
17 = Peer-to-Peer V3
Setup
Enter the following setup data:
Baud rate = 19200
Data bits = 8
Parity = Even
Stop bits = 1
The ZP3AB-SCB-D Serial Control Bus Driver Board is used to connect a number
of remote display units (RDUs) and remote control units (RCUs) to a ZP3 fire
panel. The hardware protocol is a multidrop RS-485 screened, two-wire
connection. The wiring is connected from the ZP3AB-SCB-D board in the ZP3
panel to the SCB connections in the RDU and RCU panels. The wiring must be
terminated at the ZP3 panel by connecting the jumpers as shown in Figure 17.
All other panels must not be terminated, i.e. their jumpers must be removed.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
23
Chapter 1: Installation overview
5
=
!
6
+
4
3
:
;
,
;
0
:
-
-
;
,
;
0
Do
_
^
c
connect screen
to RDU terminal
1
Screen
Do
_
^
c
connect screen
to RDU terminal
2
Do
_
^
c
connect screen
to RDU terminal
RS485 line terminations. (Terminate
as shown on the ZP3 panel
Do
terminate on RDU or RCU units.)
^
_
^
_
`
a
32
b
c
Remote Display Units (RDUs)
Remote Control Units (RCUs)
ZP3AB-SCB-D
Serial Control Bus
Driver Board
SCB
The RDU screen must
be connected on the ZP3AB-SCB1 Serial
Control Bus Driver Board in the ZPR Panel. The screen must
be connected
at the RDU.
D
B
@
d
B
D
Y
RS-485 operates through up to 2,000 metres of screened, twisted-pair cable.
Wiring can be daisy-chained point-to-point, or can be T-tapped or spurred. The
total length of cable in the network should not exceed 2,000 metres. If the
network distances are greater than 2,000 metres, use RS-485 booster units, or
fibre-optic cable. For more information refer to the
(P/N 501-0482ZE-1-01).
P
?
Q
R
S
T
\
e
S
T
f
\
(
*
F
A
@
f
F
'
g
@
A
d
h
B
F
Y
[
B
Y
(
*
C
A
i
(
[
B
'
Y
A
@
@
A
Y
F
D
B
\
]
(
(
Y
The cable is specified in detail inAppendix A “ZP wiring guide” on page 117, but
as a guideline it should be data quality cable with a conductor size of 0.5 mm².
24
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 1: Installation overview
The ZP3 panel can operate 63 remote display units. The address range for the
RDU is 1 to 63, which allows for up to 63 address options. The RDU is wired to
the panel via the ZP3AB-SCB1 SCB driver board.
Usage: Fit the ZP3AB-SCB1 board to the ZP3 panel using the interface marked
“RDU interface”. Accept devices on the panel. The SCB software stream for the
71910 EN panel is SW72401. Once the SCB driver board has been accepted the
user can view the SCB driver software under Operator > Reports to display.
Configure the SCB online, this defines the number of RDUs that can be
connected to the panel.
Navigate to the following menu:
Setup > System Configuration > Peripheral Comms > RDU/SCBR Online
The address of an RDU may not be higher than the number of RDUs configured
to be to online. If this value is set to 32 then RDUs can be connected with
addresses ranging from one to 32. This number defines the valid RDU address
numbers and not the amount of RDUs connected. All RDUs that have addresses
higher than the number entered for RDUs online will not have control abilities.
If this number is set to 63, the address at the RDU can be set to any address
from 1 through 63. If this number is set to 1, only address 1 can be set on the
RDU unit.
When an RDU is configured as being online, it mimics the panel and also sends
control information back to the panel. To disable the RDU control, remove the
controls enabled jumper fitted to the RDU board. The RDU software stream for
the 71910 EN panel is SW72201. Once the RDU has been accepted the user
can view the RDU software under Operator > Reports to Display. If there are ten
RDUs accepted then this menu will have ten entries for RDUs.
Usage: The number selected on the address switch depends on the number of
RDUs defined online. As stated above, the number entered to define the amount
of RDUs online defines the maximum address number. Address switches 1, 2, 3,
4, 5, and 6 set the address in the standard address switch format as used on the
detectors, e.g. switches 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 set to ON represent an RDU address of
62.
An accessory plate can be installed for the purpose of mounting optional auxiliary
boards. The accessory plate mounts onto the main chassis, as shown in
Figure 18.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
25
Chapter 1: Installation overview
5
>
!
3
-
1
2
3
4
1. Chassis located under clips
2. Connect ribbon cable to SSB2
3. Accessory plate
4. Thumb screw
A ribbon cable is fitted to the accessory plate. Connecting the ribbon cable to the
socket as shown in Figure 18 automatically connects all auxiliary boards to the
ZP3 main board. The accessory plate enables easy access to the main board
after installation.
The basic panel incorporates a standard range of inputs and outputs. If additional
inputs or outputs are required, a range of optional modules is available that fit
into the panel. The auxiliary I/O boards mount onto the auxiliary chassis as
shown in Figure 19.
26
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 1: Installation overview
5
!
9
-
&
1
2
3
1. Position A
2. Position B
3. Position C
The maximum number of auxiliary boards that can be fitted into a ZP3 panel is
three. This can be all of one type, or a mix of types. This provides from 24 to 72
outputs within the ZP3 cabinet. If additional auxiliary boards are required, these
Various size cabinets are
must be mounted in a separate
available, and each ZP3 panel can support up to 896 outputs, of which 768 are
freely programmable.
*
(
j
D
Y
(
i
D
B
Y
*
D
@
i
A
k
F
B
(
Y
l
The following I/O auxiliary boards are available:
•
ZP3AB-MIP8 Input Board (8-way). See “ZP3AB-MIP8 Input Board” on page
66
•
ZP3AB-RL8 Relay Board (8-way), See “ZP3AB-RL8 Relay Board” on page 63
•
ZP3AB-MA8 Monitored Output Board (8-way). See “ZP3AB-MA8 Monitored
Output Board” on page 64
•
ZP3AB-OP24 Transistor Output Board (24-way). See “ZP3AB-OP24
Transistor Output Board” on page 65
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
27
Chapter 1: Installation overview
The Digi One 1A Modem as shown in Figure 20 allows remote dial-in access to
the ZP3 panel for diagnostic purposes.
The Modem communicates to the ZP3 panel via the serial port connector JP3 on
the ZPAB-RS232 board located on the ZP3 panel. Legacy modems were
additionally controlled via a Modem Control Board connected on the panel’s SSB
(serial synchronous bus). See Table 9 below for modem specifications.
5
!
"
&
-
6
+
4
3
;
!
,
#
4
0
m
-
Description
Remote diagnostics modem
Mounting
On the ZP3 accessory plate
Wiring
Via connecting lead to the ZPAB-RS232 board
Power requirements
Connector
Voltage
Two-contact barrel connector
+9 to +30 VDC
-
Ambient temperature
0 to 55°C
Relative humidity
5 to 90% noncondensing
Altitude
0 to 3,658 m
EN 60529 rating
IP00
Dimensions (W × L × H)
83 × 133 × 19 mm
Weight
227g
28
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 1: Installation overview
To prevent electric shock, do not remove the cover of this module
while the unit is powered up. There are no user-serviceable parts inside. Only an
approved maintenance authority may perform servicing work.
Do not overtighten the panel clamp screws. Failure to comply will
damage the unit.
Make sure the associated washers are positioned directly beneath each
screw head.
1. See Figure 21 on page 30. Fit the Modem mounting bracket (item 3) onto the
four accessory plate stand-offs (item 2) and secure using the four M4 screws
(item 5) supplied, with associated washers (item 6) positioned directly
beneath each screw head.
2. See Figure 22 on page 30. Position the Modem on the mounting bracket so
that the Modem catch is positioned in the upper tab of the mounting bracket.
3. Push the lower corner of the Modem in the direction of the arrow so it locks
into position on the mounting bracket.
4. See Figure 23 on page 31. Fit the accessory plate (if necessary) to the ZP3
panel.
5. Connect the 9-way RS-232 cable from the modem connector to connector
JP3 on the ZPAB-RS232 board located on the ZP3 panel.
6. Connect the telephone line to the RJ11 socket on the modem.
7. Connect +24 VDC supply from the modem power supply connector to the
+24V and 0V connections on the Supply Output connector located on the ZP3
panel main board.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
29
Chapter 1: Installation overview
5
!
"
<
-
-
&
2
1
3
4
5
6
1. Accessory plate
2. Standoffs
3. Modem mounting bracket
5
!
"
<
-
-
4. Bracket channel
5. M4 screws (4X)
6. Washers (4X)
"
Mounting
slot
Modem
Upper
tab
Mounting
bracket
Lower
tab
Catch
30
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 1: Installation overview
5
4
!
<
-
-
-
"
Power supply
connector
RJ11 socket
:
4
0
RS-232 cable
Accessory plate
"
8
&
-
"
Supply output
ZPAB-RS232 board
Modem
An optional ZP3-PR2 dot-matrix printer kit can be fitted to the door of a ZP3
control panel. The printer kit consists of an ABLE printer, a Ziton Printer PCB and
the necessary mounting hardware to fit to the ZP3 panel.
The printer (see Figure 24) can be used to give a hard copy of panel alarms, fault
events, panel operations, and report requests. The response to alarms, faults,
and panel operations can be individually enabled or disabled in the panel
software. See Table 10 on page 32 for printer specifications.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
31
Chapter 1: Installation overview
5
!
"
&
-
+
4
+
+
0
!
6
/
+
"
#
Description
Printer Kit
Model number
ZP3-PR2
Part number
172201
Character set
IBM 224 Character set (ASCII Characters 32 to 255)
Character format
When connected to the panel: ASCII 24 characters
Power supply
Voltage
Current (standby)
Current (printing)
24 VDC
23 mA
180 mA
Printer consumables
Ink ribbon cartridge
Paper roll
ZP-PRC, P/N 24201. Life is 0.5 million characters
ZP-PRR, P/N 23701 or equivalent. Width: 57.5 ± 0.5 mm.
Thickness: 0.07 mm. Outer diameter < 40 mm
Dimensions (W × H × D)
130 × 66 × 103 mm
Weight
404 g including full-length paper roll
EN 60529 Rating
IP00
Figure 25 on page 33 illustrates the key installation elements for the printer.
Detailed steps for installation follow the figure.
32
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 1: Installation overview
5
!
"
+
-
-
Maestro communications
port PCB
Panel door
Printer
Earth wire
Mounting
screws
Mounting
bracket
Printer PCB
Ribbon cable
from printer to
display board
Display board
1. Ensure that the ZP3 panel is powered down.
2. Remove the plastic knockout on the panel door.
3. Ensure that the orange and black cable is disconnected from the printer and
separate the printer from its bracket by removing the mounting screws.
4. Fit the printer flush with the panel door.
5. Install the mounting bracket as shown in the illustration. Line up the outer
holes on the mounting bracket with the threaded holes on the back of the
panel printer.
6. Ensure that the earth connections are made as shown in Figure 25 above.
Do not overtighten the panel clamp screws. Failure to comply will
damage the unit.
7. Secure the mounting bracket to the panel printer using the screws provided.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
33
Chapter 1: Installation overview
8. Connect the external circuit board (attached to the mounting bracket) to the
printer using the orange and black cable.
9. Connect the display board and the printer board to the printer using the ribbon
cable provided, as shown in Figure 25 on page 33.
10. Connect 24 VDC power to the printer using the black and red ZP3 power
lead.
11. Power up the panel and configure the printer on the ZP3 panel.
Once installed the printer must be configured to operate as required. It can be
programmed to print or suppress different types of messages (e.g. print fire
alarms message, suppress disabled messages, etc.). This programming is done
in the ZP3 panel Setup menu. See “System Configuration > Printer” on page 85
for details.
Here are a few guidelines to help set up the panel as rapidly as possible.
The panel fascia contains a complete set of status LEDs which give the current
status of the ZP3 panel. Under normal operating conditions, all of these LEDs
should be off, and the buzzer should be silent. Only the green Power On LED
should be illuminated.
When testing a panel, always ensure that the Z-loops are correctly terminated into-out as per the wiring drawing, and that all monitored outputs (sounders,
monitored inputs, etc,) are terminated with the correct end-of-line resistor.
Make sure that at least one sensor or device is connected when testing a panel
otherwise a fault condition occurs.
Always power up with sensors or devices attached to the Z-loops. Remember
that the ZP3 panel does not automatically accept sensors or devices added (or
removed) afterwards, and a fault condition results. To accept the addition or
removal of sensors and devices, go to the menu Setup > Points > Accept Points,
and run the accept routine. This causes the panel to accept the sensors and
devices currently attached.
The commissioning key switch, which is located on the inside of the front door,
and
. The commission position enables
has two positions,
you to access the panel setup menus via the keyboard. With the key switch in the
commission position, the System Test LED on the fascia flashes.
B
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D
B
The internal buzzer operates to announce any events that occur. It provides the
required output level to be heard in all situations, with the door closed, and meets
EN 54-2 requirements for this.
34
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 2
Installing the ZP3 fire
control panel
This chapter gives an overview of unpacking or repacking your control panel,
presents assembly and storage instructions, covers installation details, and sets
forth the established “good practices” that you should follow.
Unpacking or packing 36
Removing the door and chassis assembly 37
Storing the door assembly 38
Storing the main chassis 38
Overview of installation 39
Preparatory work 41
Installation information 42
Cable entry 42
Wiring 43
Surface mounting 44
Flush mounting 45
Backup batteries 46
Good practices 47
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
35
Chapter 2: Installing the ZP3 fire control panel
The ZP3 panel is shipped with the panel fully assembled. As only the panel
backbox is normally mounted during the installation, the design anticipates that
you will remove the door assembly and main chassis before the cabinet is sent to
the site for electrical installation.
Extra cartons are included with the original packaging to allow repacking the door
assembly and chassis. These can then be stored until they are needed for
commissioning.
The panel packaging is shown in Figure 26.
5
!
"
-
$
Door Carton
Panel Tray
Open into carton
A
Open into carton
B
Retain cover
C
Panel Cover Pad
Inner Spacer
Side Buffer
ZP3 Panel
Back Buffer
Front Buffer
Shipping Carton
Retain carton
36
D
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 2: Installing the ZP3 fire control panel
Refer to Figure 27 below. Once the panel is unpacked, the door and chassis can
be removed as described below.
1. Disconnect the four earth straps attached to the door (item 1).
2. Disconnect the wire and quick release connector (item 2) from the main
board.
3. Cut the cable ties and free the cables.
4. Disconnect the SSB ribbon cable (item 3) from the main board.
5. Remove the two screws (item 4) and remove the door.
6. Disconnect power supply plug (item 5).
7. Remove the four nuts (item 6) and remove the chassis.
5
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4
3
6 2
1
1
5
1. Earth strap
2. Wire * quick release connector
3. SSB ribbon cable
4. Securing screw
5. Power supply plug
6. Securing nut
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
37
Chapter 2: Installing the ZP3 fire control panel
The door assembly can be stored in the packing carton provided until it is
required. Repack as shown in Figure 28, making sure that the door hinges are
placed in the cut-out provided.
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&
-
"
Panel cover pad
C
Panel tray
A
ZP3 door assembly
Door carton
B
See Figure 29 below. The main chassis assembly can be stored in the packing
carton provided until it is required. Repackage the chassis by wrapping it in a
protective wrap (such as bubble wrap), and then placing it in the main panel
carton.
5
!
"
:
Chassis
Carton
38
D
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 2: Installing the ZP3 fire control panel
Installation of the ZP3 panel must meet the requirements of the authority having
jurisdiction. The panel incorporates the system operating controls and displays,
and should consequently be located in an accessible position, in close proximity
to the persons who are expected to operate the system, and respond to any
alarms.
The panel can be surface mounted or flush-recess mounted, with appropriate
hardware. Electrical conduit entry is from the top or from behind, and various
options are available. The simplest installation is when the panel is used as a
230 VAC model, with built-in batteries. The use of external power supplies or
batteries can change the installation criteria.
In some installations, the fascia of the panel is mounted in a security console,
usually located in a manned control room. In this case the panel can be located
in a plant room, and a remote display unit installed into the console. A fullfunction remote display unit provides all the display, control, and menu access as
the main panel, and is connected by a single twisted-pair, screened cable.
The panel must always be installed in its original cabinet, as supplied by Ziton.
Never operate the panel without its door or fascia.
Do not dismantle the chassis and components, and then remount them into
another metal enclosure.
Do not change or extend internal ribbon cables, and do not run ribbon cables
outside of the ZP3 cabinet.
Failure to comply with the above cautions voids the guarantee and any product
approvals. It also makes the panel susceptible to EMC and other electrical noise.
The ZP3 panel complies with the requirements of the European CE-Mark for
immunity to and emission of electrical interference. This compliance is subject to
the panel being operated in its original enclosure, and installed and earthed
correctly in accordance with this manual.
The first step when installing a ZP3 panel is to remove the main chassis, and
remove the door assembly, leaving the bare backbox for installation. This
procedure is described under “Preparatory work” on page 41.
The box can then be prepared for mounting. Knock out the required conduit
holes, either on top or at the rear of the cabinet. Drill any additional holes, or
larger holes, as required. Note that cable entry can only be brought into the panel
into the top section as shown in the drawings later in this topic.
Optional hardware in the form of various mounting kits is available to provide
additional space for systems with a large amount of wiring. These are shown in
abridged form in this section, and full details can be obtained from the data
sheets and application manuals available for these kits.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
39
Chapter 2: Installing the ZP3 fire control panel
The ZP3 fire panel is designed for mounting in an indoor location with a
temperature range of í5°C to +40°C, a relative humidity of 95% noncondensing,
and an environment that is dry and free of condensation. The environmental
rating is IP30.
The wiring connection to the extinguishant cylinder actuator is a low
impedance circuit, which can draw up to 1 A during actuation. Make sure that
wiring to the actuator is of sufficient capacity to avoid a voltage loss due to wiring
resistance.
Do not drill, file, or carry out any metalwork on the cabinet with any of
the circuit boards installed in the cabinet. Metal filings will enter the circuit and
may cause severe damage.
40
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 2: Installing the ZP3 fire control panel
Figure 30 shows the basic steps to mounting a ZP3 fire panel on the wall.
5
4
!
-
8
-
-
#
1
Remove chassis and door assembly
2
Bare backbox
3
Knockout or drill holes
4
Mount panel and connect
conduits or cable glands
5
Thoroughly clean interior of panel
6
Fit chassis and door assembly
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
41
Chapter 2: Installing the ZP3 fire control panel
Cable entry and wiring locations for the ZP3 panel are restricted to specific areas
as shown in Figure 31.
5
4
!
&
-
-
1
4
1. Knockout conduits
2. Mains cable area
3
2
3. Low voltage cable area
4. Electronics chassis
It is very important to follow the above rules carefully. This ensures that cables
are properly separated from the electronic circuit boards. It also prevents
physical damage to components and removes noise interference.
42
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 2: Installing the ZP3 fire control panel
Refer to Figure 32 below. Wiring must be connected to terminals in a neat and
orderly manner. All screens must be connected, and terminals must be
adequately tight and secure. The panel must be properly earthed as shown in
Figure 32. To prevent cross-cable interference, different types of wiring must be
separated as indicated below.
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1. Data cabling separated from other cables
2. Z-loops & low voltage control cabling
separated from high voltage cables
3. Mains cabling separate from low voltage
wiring
4. Earth
5. Serial Control Board (SCB)
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
43
Chapter 2: Installing the ZP3 fire control panel
Figure 33 below illustrates the main requirements for surface mounting of the
ZP3 panel.
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Ceiling
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ZP3 panel
ZP3 FIRE ALARM SYSTEM
LOCAL ZONES
ZITON FIRE SYSTEM
Mon 01/01/1998 12:00
1720 mm
ZITON
Floor
475 mm
540 mm
410 mm
Use appropriate mounting screws such as plastic rawl plugs, expansion anchors,
etc., depending on the type of wall. Use M4 screws at least 20 mm long. The
mounting system must be able to support a minimum weight of 20 kg, which is
the total weight of the panel (with batteries).
44
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 2: Installing the ZP3 fire control panel
The ZP3 panel protrudes by only 10 mm when flush mounted. Two types of flush
mounting kits are available, as shown and described in Figure 34 below. Both
use the same collar, and look the same when installed. Flush mounting options
are shown in Table 11 below.
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Flush mounting collar,
without backbox
In this variation, the panel backbox is fitted into the wall cavity, with
careful alignment. It is then conduited and wired. The flushing collar is
then fitted to aesthetically complete the installation.
Flush mounting collar,
with backbox
In this variation, a special flushing backbox is fitted into the wall cavity,
and all conduit and cables are brought into this box, and terminated on
terminals. This box therefore forms both a recessed tray and terminal
box. The ZP3 panel and flushing collar are then fitted into the recessed
tray. The advantage of this system is that the wall cavity recessed box
can be roughly installed, and out of alignment. The system allows the
panel and collar to be perfectly aligned after installation.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
45
Chapter 2: Installing the ZP3 fire control panel
1. Make sure the backup batteries are correct as specified under “Batteries” in
Table 4 on page 3.
2. Position a backup battery in the left mounting position in the chassis as
shown in Figure 35 below.
3. Locate the battery mounting bracket (packed separately in bubble wrap in the
main shipping carton).
4. Hook the curved end of the securing hook on the battery mounting bracket
into the hook locator on the hook mounting plate located on the chassis (see
Figure 35 below).
5. Taking care that the securing hook is in position, install the second backup
battery in the right mounting position in the chassis.
6. Secure the batteries to the chassis with the mounting bracket using the wing
nut supplied (see Figure 36 on page 47).
7. Connect the backup batteries as described under “Battery connection” on
page 54.
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46
Battery
mounting
position (right)
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 2: Installing the ZP3 fire control panel
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Battery mounting
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Applying good practices during your installation ensures that the ZP3 system
operates reliably and is trouble-free. These are simple actions that assist with
commissioning and also provide stable long-term operation.
The panel must be connected to a secure earth point. Door earth straps and
internal earth must be connected. Take extra precautions for lightning areas.
All cable screens must be connected to the terminals provided. Do not cut off
screen tails or leave screens floating.
Inside the panel, physically separate mains wiring, Z-loop wiring, and serial data
wiring. The flexible plastic separator that isolates mains from low voltage wiring,
must be positioned correctly. Externally, these cable groups should be run in
separate conduits. See Appendix A “ZP wiring guide” on page 117 for more
details.
Make sure that all connections are secure and tight, with a minimum of exposed
copper cable to prevent possible shorting to adjacent terminals.
When removing and replacing the chassis and door assemblies, handle them
with extreme care. These are high-precision electronic assemblies, and
susceptible to damage if handled roughly.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
47
Chapter 2: Installing the ZP3 fire control panel
Before fitting electronic assemblies, make sure that the cabinet is clean and free
from metal filings, oil, or moisture, all of which can damage electronic circuits.
Installing the wiring neatly and professionally to make commissioning and
maintenance simpler and quicker.
48
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 3
Field wiring
This chapter gives an overview of the terminal layout and provides information on
the power supply, battery, wiring, and outputs. It also discusses the compatible
auxiliary boards.
Terminal layout 50
Power supply 50
Mains supply 50
Connecting the mains power supply 51
Auxiliary 24 VDC supply 51
External power for accessory boards 52
Battery connection 54
Connection overview 55
Power supply and battery calculations 56
Power supply load calculation 57
Battery calculation 57
Z-Loop 58
Z-Loop wiring 58
Loop isolators 59
Z-Loop parameters 59
Common outputs 60
Common sounder outputs 60
Common fire / fault outputs 61
Remote manned centre outputs 62
Auxiliary boards 63
ZP3AB-RL8 Relay Board 63
ZP3AB-MA8 Monitored Output Board 64
ZP3AB-OP24 Transistor Output Board 65
ZP3AB-MIP8 Input Board 66
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
49
Chapter 3: Field wiring
Terminal layout and locations are shown in Figure 37. Detailed connections for
each function are shown on the following pages.
INTERNAL
CONNECTIONS
SOUNDER 1
SC
+24V
+24V
+24V SUPPLY OUTPUT
0V
0V
0V
SOUNDER 2
SC
+
_
SOUNDER 3
|
SC
+
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q
SOUNDER 4

SC
+
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‰
FIRE
OUT
z
+
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ƒ
RMC FLT
ƒ
FAULT
z
SC
x
LOOP 1
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INTERNAL
CONNECTIONS
+
_
SUPPLY
FAULT (IN)
BATTERY
FAULT (IN)
EARTH
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RMC ALM
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PSU MONITOR
n
F6
F3
F5
SSB1
F1
F2
SSB2
F10
F8
F7
F9
All terminals accept wiring sizes from 0.5 mm² to 2.5 mm².
Wiring size and type must be as specified in Appendix A “ZP wiring guide” on
page 117.
Refer to Figure 38 on page 51. A terminal block (item 2) is located at the top right
hand side of the fire panel for connecting the mains supply. The terminal block
incorporates a fuse holder (item 1) in the live leg of the supply. A mains filter
50
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 3: Field wiring
(item 3) is located next to the mains terminal block, which in turn is wired to the
power supply unit.
The front door of the panel is electrically connected to mains earth via earth
straps.
When connecting the mains supply to the panel, make sure that the incoming
power is from a clean source that has a solid earth connection. Connecting the
panel to a secure earth is very important.
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Mains filter
Internal connections
5.
6.
7.
8.
Live
Earth
Neutral
230 VAC
Make sure that the mains supply wiring is correctly connected. The wiring should
be as short as possible within the panel and should be kept away from Z-loop
wiring, data cables, and other low voltage wiring.
Mains power should be sourced directly from a separate circuit breaker in the
building electrical supply distribution board. This circuit should be clearly marked,
have a bipolar disconnect device, and only be used for fire detection equipment
See Figure 39 on page 52. The 24 VDC output (“Supply Output” terminal, TB2 on
the main board) is for use by auxiliary equipment, such as programmable relay
boards, sounder driver boards, etc. It can also be used to provide power to
devices such as remote display units, and similar peripheral devices.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
51
Chapter 3: Field wiring
The current drawn from the auxiliary supply is a function of the system
engineering. It depends upon the load that has been allocated to the control
panel for devices such as loop sounders, common sounders, and control relays.
The output is fused at 5 A (Fuse F1).
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SUPPLY OUTPUT
+24V +24V +24V 0V
0V
0V
5
6
TB2
1
2
3
4
F6
F3
F5
F1
F2
F8
F1
F7
F10
F9
F9
Where the load required for optional accessory boards exceeds the capacity of
the ZP3 power supply, it is possible to power these boards from a separate
external 24 VDC power supply as shown in Figure 40. This external supply must
meet the following criteria:
•
Output voltage must be in the range 22 to 28 VDC
•
Output ripple must be a maximum of 200 mV (peak-to-peak)
•
Output ripple with full load must be a maximum of 500 mV peak
•
Supply must comply with the requirements of European Standard EN 54-4
•
Output capacity must be adequate for the required load, even with batteries
disconnected
•
Supply must incorporate standby batteries, sized to provide the required
operating period
•
Output must be suitably fused
•
For reporting faults to the ZP3 fire panel, two voltage-free changeover
contacts must be provided, one signalling a mains failure, the other signalling
a battery fault
Do not connect the 0-volts (negative supply) of the external power
supply and the 0-volts (negative supply) of the fire panel. The two power supply
systems must remain floating with respect to each other.
52
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 3: Field wiring
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Power supply
230 VAC
Auxiliary board
External 24 VDC
power supply
24 VDC
230 VAC supply
When using an external power supply unit, the failure of the mains supply, or the
failure of the batteries, charging system, or fuse, can be reported to the ZP3 fire
panel as shown below. The power supply unit must incorporate two sets of
voltage-free contacts, one which changes over on mains failure, the other which
changes over on battery fault (disconnected battery, low or high voltage, etc.),
charger failure, or fuse failure. These contacts must be connected to the ZP3
main board terminals as shown in Figure 41 on page 54. When the contact
changes state, the fault is reported to the ZP3 panel, which indicates the
appropriate visual and audible alarm, as well as signalling to the remote manned
centre.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
53
Chapter 3: Field wiring
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12 VDC
12 VDC
External power supply
Voltage free contact
that closes on
mains failure
Voltage free contact
that closes on
battery failure
Input to indicate
external PSU
mains failure
Input to indicate
external PSU
battery failure
EARTH
SUPPLY BATTERY
FAULT
FAULT
+
- +
-
24 VDC supply
to fire panel
ZP3 main board
-
+
PCRX SG PCTX
1 2 3 4 5
PRINTER
SUPPLY
1 2 3
1 2 3 4
This section describes how to connect the batteries to the power supply (see
Figure 42). Make sure that you comply with the “General warnings and
precautions” on page iii and the recommendations provided under “Good
practices” on page 47.
54
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 3: Field wiring
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9
10
1.
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4.
5.
6.
Battery connector socket
Plug
Red
Black
Grey
Grey
7.
8.
9.
10.
Battery connector lead
Connector
Black
230 VAC Types of cables:
(a) spade lugs
(b) screw lugs
11. Red
Refer to Figure 42 above.
•
The batteries must be housed in their proper place.
•
The batteries must be connected using only the leads provided. These leads
incorporate a temperature-sensing element, used to provide temperature
compensated charging.
•
The connector lead connects to the main board with a plug and socket.
Battery positive is RED (item 3), battery negative is BLACK (item 4), and the
control leads are GREY (items 5 and 6).
•
Two final connector leads are provided: one for batteries with plug-in type
connectors, the other for batteries with screw connectors. Use the appropriate
lead for your batteries.
•
The batteries must be connected in series with a jumper as shown in
Figure 42.
•
Take care not to invert the battery connection polarity. If this happens, replace
fuse F1 (6.3 A, slow-blow, 250 V, size 20 mm × 5 mm).
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
55
Chapter 3: Field wiring
Two power supply calculations must be done when designing a ZP3 system:
1. The capacity must be calculated when running on mains power to ensure that
it will be able to supply the system load, even when the batteries are
disconnected or discharged.
2. Calculate the capacity when running on batteries.
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0.0400
ZP3AB-Net1 Network card
0.0700
0.0700
ZP3AB-RS232 Comms card
0.0650
0.0650
ZP3AB-PR1 Printer
0.0370
0.1900
ZP3AB-RL8 Relay board
0.0350
0.1300
ZP3AB-MA8 Sounder board
0.0400
0.2200
ZP3AB-OP24 Output board
0.0010
0.0500
ZP3AB-MIP8 Input board
0.0400
0.0600
ZP700 sensors (all types)
0.0005
0.0006
ZP700 Loop I/O units (all)
0.0005
0.0006
ZP700 Call points (all types)
0.0005
0.0006
ZP755 Loop sounder
0.0005
0.0025
ZP570 Conventional i/f
0.1000
0.1000
ZP471 Radio loop interface
0.0400
0.0400
ZP472 Radio loop interface
0.0400
0.1000
ZP3-ECU Extinguishing
control units
0.0800
0.2000
Conventional detectors
(all types)
0.0001
0.0000
Alarm bells
0.0000
0.0500
Electronic sounders
0.0000
0.0250
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Total standby
(C3 × C5)
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Total alarm
(C4 × C5)
Other
Alarms
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ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 3: Field wiring
Use the information provided in Table 12 to calculate the power supply and battery load
capacities. Record the results as shown in Table 13.
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Quiescent Amperes
L1
1.2 A
Fire alarm Amperes
L2
2.5 A
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Insert the calculated quiescent load into L1, and the calculated fire alarm load into L2.
Check Pass if the calculated load is below the PSU capacity, otherwise check Fail.
Should the ZP3 PSU not be able to supply the system load, then either the system
design must be modified, or a separate, external power supply must be used for part of
the load.
If the system must operate in the quiescent state for 24 hours and with a full
alarm load for half an hour, calculate the battery size as follows (see Table 14
below).
Multiply the quiescent load plus the basic panel load by 1.05 (this adds 5%) to
obtain the possible extra load resulting from the panel being in a fault, disabled,
or other non-fire condition. Multiply this figure by 24 to obtain the ampere-hours
(Ah) needed for 24-hour operation. Insert the result into C1.
Multiply the Fire Alarm Load plus the basic panel load by 0.5, and insert the
result into C2.
Add C1 and C2, and insert the result into C3.
Add 25% to C3 to calculate the battery over-rating requirement. This allows for
the normal deterioration in battery performance over the batteries' lifetime.
Select the nearest size battery available, rounding upwards. Remember that the
largest battery that can be accommodated in the ZP3 enclosure is 30 Ah.
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Standby Ah
(Quiescent load + 0.3 Amps) × 24 × 1.05
C1
Fire alarm Ah
(Fire alarm load + 0.5 Amps) × 0.5
C2
Total Ah
C1 + C2
C3
Battery capacity over-rating (25%) C3 × 1.25
C4
Nearest size battery
C5
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
57
Chapter 3: Field wiring
See Figure 43 below. The addressable Z-Loop can be wired as a Class A return
loop, or as Class B single direction wiring, with spurs. Loop length can be up to
3,000 metres, depending upon the type, quantity and location of devices
attached. For more information see “Z-Loop parameters” on page 59.
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Class B single direction Loop
Class B wiring terminate
at panel as shown
Unused loops
to be terminated
as shown
+
OUT
-
LOOP 1
SC
+
IN
-
LOOP 2
SC
+
-
SC
+
LOOP 3
-
SC
+
-
SC
+
LOOP 4
-
SC
+
-
SC
+
-
SC
TB11
TB12
TB13
TB14
1 2 3 4 5 6
1 2 3 4 5 6
1 2 3 4 5 6
1 2 3 4 5 6
Class A return loop
F6
F3
F5
F1
F2
F10
F8
F7
F9
When wired in Class B single direction format, then the loop terminals must be
connected (+) in to (+) out and (í) in to (í) out.
The loop is monitored for open and short circuit. Unused loops must be
terminated (+) in to (+) out and (í) in to (í) out.
58
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 3: Field wiring
For information on loop isolators, see “Line isolators” on page 123 in Appendix A
of this manual.
The Z-loop connects the ZP analogue addressable devices to the fire control
panel. It is a two-wire loop that supplies power to the connected devices, and
carries communication between each device and the panel. Loops must be wired
in correctly sized cable, and must be continuously screened.
Refer to Table 15 below. Cables must be shielded and shields must be
continuous i.e. connected through at each device. For Class A return loop wiring,
both ends of the shield must be connected to their earth terminals at the panel.
For Class B single-direction wiring, the screen must be connected to its earth
terminal at the panel end, and left disconnected at the far end.
Shielded cable may be two-core or multiple-core. If multiple-core cables are
used, only Z-loop wiring or the fire system DC wiring must be run inside the same
screen. Third-party cabling, for example public address and intercom systems,
must not be run inside the same screen.
Z-loops should, where possible, be separated from high-voltage cabling. They
must not run adjacent to high-voltage cable for any substantial distance.
Separation should be at least 100 mm.
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The ZP line loop screen
connection must be kept as
short as possible to ensure the
best results for noise
immunity, which is a CE
requirement.
The adjacent illustration shows
two screen connections.
Option B (the preferred
method), has a shorter screen
connection even though this
results in longer plus and
minus terminal wires.
SCREEN
Option A
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
SCREEN
Option B
59
Chapter 3: Field wiring
Alternative screen connection
Outer cover
For optimum connection, if
thick, mineral-insulated cabling
is being used, we recommend
using EMC glands as an
alternative method for the
screen connection.
Strip away the outer covering
of the cable to expose the
metal sheath. Connect the
metal sheath directly to the
ZP3 panel box via the EMC
conductive gland.
EMC gland
SCREEN
SCREEN
EMC gland
connecting
metal sheath
and panel box
Cable sizing depends upon the length of the Z-loop, and the number and type of
devices connected. Input devices, such as fire sensors, call points, and interface
units, use very little current, and allow the maximum loop length. Adding looppowered output devices (for example, sounders) to the loop requires heavier
cable and reduces the allowable loop length. See Appendix A “ZP wiring guide”
on page 117 for more details.
See Figure 44 on page 61. The ZP3 Fire Control Panel has four built-in sounder
outputs, arranged in two pairs. These outputs provide 24 VDC for driving
sounders. They can be programmed to activate on a fire alarm from any zone or
device, or as required.
The outputs are wired in two-wire Class B single direction format. They must be
daisy-chained from point-to-point, without T-taps or spurs. They operate on a
reverse polarity basis, and are monitored for open circuit and short circuit faults.
Circuits must be terminated with a 2.2 kȍ, 1 W end-of-line resistor at the last
sounder on the circuit.
60
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 3: Field wiring
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Output potential
24 VDC
Wire as per sounder circuit 1
2k2
2k2
NonAlarm Alarm
2k2
Sounder
-
+
+
-
2k2
EOL
Polarising
diode
SOUNDER 4
SC
SOUNDER 3
+
-
+
1
2 3 4 5 6
-
SC
SOUNDER 2
-
1
2 3 4 5 6
TB5
SC
SOUNDER 1
+
+
-
SC
TB4
F3
F6
F3
F5
F1
F2
F10
F2
F8
F8
F7
F7
F9
Note: The terminal markings on the panel board show the
terminal potential (positive/negative) in the alarm condition
Sounders connected to the circuits must be polarized, i.e. fitted with diodes so
that they operate with power in one polarity direction, and not in the reverse
direction.
The sounder lines are fused at 1 A each, and sounders 1, 2, 3, and 4 are fused
by F8, F7, F3, and F2 respectively.
See Figure 45 on page 62. The common fire and common fault relay outputs
provide voltage-free contacts, which can be set to be either normally open (NO,
closing on alarm), or normally closed (NC, opening on alarm). The NO or NC
settings are done in software in the Setup menu.
The common fire relay changes state on any fire alarm, and the common fault
relay changes state on any fault alarm. Relays restore when the panel is reset.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
61
Chapter 3: Field wiring
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FIRE
TB6
1 2 3 4
F6
F3
F5
F1
F2
F10
F8
F7
F9
Contacts can be set to be
normally closed or normally open
via software setup
The relay contacts are rated for a maximum current of 1 A, and a maximum
voltage of 24 VDC or 100 VAC.
See Figure 46 on page 63. The remote manned centre (RMC) alarm output
sends a fire alarm signal to RMC-routing equipment upon receipt of any fire
alarm. This transmits an alarm to a remote manned centre such as a fire brigade
or a manned control room.
The remote manned centre (RMC) fault output sends a fault alarm signal to
RMC-routing equipment upon occurrence of any panel or system fault. This
transmits a fault signal to a remote manned centre such as a fire brigade, or a
manned control room.
62
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 3: Field wiring
¤
¥
¦
§
¨
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ª
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¹
©
¯
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µ
©
¯
³
°
°
©
º
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©
°
µ
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§
µ
¶
§
µ
·
RMC routing equipment
Fire Alarm
Fire Alarm
to remote
manned
centre
1K8 to
3K0 ȍ
Both field connections
are mounted
Normally de-energised,
energises into alarm
Fault Alarm
Fault Alarm
to remote
manned
centre
1K8 to
3K0 ȍ
RMC ALM
SC
+
+
RMC FLT
SC
Screened cable
optional
Normally energised,
de-energises into alarm
F3
3
F6
F1
F2
4 5 6
F8
F10
1 2
F5
F5
TB9
F7
F9
The RMC outputs are designed to drive relays in the fire alarm routing
equipment. These relays must have a coil resistance of 1.8 to 3.0 kȍ.
The fire alarm circuit is monitored for open and short circuit faults at the fire
panel. A fire alarm causes the current to increase and activate the routing
equipment.
The fault alarm circuit is monitored for open and short circuit faults at the
receiving equipment end. The fault alarm output is normally ON, and deenergises upon receipt of a fault signal.
If these outputs are not used they should be terminated with a resistor of 2.2 kȍ.
See Figure 47 on page 64. The ZP3AB-RL8 Relay Board is a programmable
relay board with eight separate relays. Each relay has a single changeover
contact which changes state when activated. Relays are each allocated an
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
63
Chapter 3: Field wiring
address, and programmed to operate from selected inputs using the I/O-mapping
function built into the panel.
The ZP3AB-RL8 board connects to the ZP3 panel control bus. If allocated to the
User Bus section, up to 768 addresses are available. These outputs are freely
programmable. If allocated to the System Bus section, a further 256 addresses
are available, which have preprogrammed functions.
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§
¨
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½
¾
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Á
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(-)
Device
being
switched
Protected
flyback diode,
1N5819 [2]
(+)
RELAY 1
RELAY 2
RELAY 3
RELAY 4
RELAY 5
RELAY 6
RELAY 7
RELAY 8
Power in
7
8
0V
1
ON
ON
2
3
4
5
6
24V
Board
address
switch [3]
24 VDC supply (22 to 29 VDC)
Supplied from ZP3 panel auxiliary output supply.
— or —
Supplied from separate 24 VDC power supply unit. [1]
[1] If externally supplied, do not common the power supplies, i.e. do not connect the 0V of the
internal and external power supplies together.
[2] If outputs are used to switch inductive loads, they should be protected with a flyback diode.
[3] Each board is fitted with an eight-segment DIP switch. This switch is set to an address
between 000 and 127. This board address determines the address of each output, and is
specified in “System address list” on page 97.
See Figure 48 on page 65. The ZP3AB-MA8 Monitored Output Board is a
programmable output board with eight separate outputs, designed to drive fire
alarm sounder or control outputs. Outputs monitor the circuit field wiring for open
circuit and short circuit faults, and report to the panel should a fault occur. The
outputs operate on a reverse polarity basis, being set to one polarity for normal
and reversing polarity for alarm. Outputs must be polarized with a polarizing
diode (these are often internally fitted on sounders). The outputs are wired in
two-wire Class B single direction format. They must be daisy-chained from pointto-point, without spurs. Circuits must be terminated with a 2.2 kȍ end-of-line
resistor at the last device on the circuit.
64
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 3: Field wiring
Each output is allocated a unique address, and programmed to operate from
selected inputs using the I/O-mapping function built into the panel. The
ZP3AB-MA8 board connects to the ZP3 panel control bus. If allocated to the
User Bus section, up to 768 addresses are available. These outputs are freely
programmable. If allocated to the System Bus section, a further 256 addresses
are available, which have preprogrammed functions.
¤
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¦
§
¨
©
ª
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¬
½
¾
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À
Á
Â
Æ
À
Ä
Æ
®
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µ
®
¨
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º
Ç
§
µ
¶
§
µ
Á
®
³
¨
º
+ -
Earth 0V 24V
O/P 1
(same as per output 1)
O/P 2
O/P 3
O/P 4
O/P 5
O/P 6
O/P 7
O/P 8
7
8
Internally
connected
Screen (unused)
EOL
resistor
Supplied from ZP3 panel auxiliary output
supply.
— or —
Supplied from separate 24 VDC power
supply unit. [1]
ON
1
24 VDC supply (22 to 29 VDC)
ON
2
3
4
5
6
Power in
Board
address
switch [2]
Output Fuses
[1] If externally supplied, do not common the power supplies, i.e. do not connect the 0V of the
internal and external power supplies together.
[2] Each board is fitted with a DIP switch, which is set to an address between 000 and 127. This
determines the address of each output, as specified in “System address list” on page 97.
Each output provides 24 VDC in alarm, and can drive a maximum circuit load of
1 A. If outputs are used to switch inductive loads, they should be protected with a
flyback diode.
The load is provided from the 24 VDC supply connected to the power input
terminals. If connected to the ZP3 panel auxiliary power supply terminals, the
load is supplied from the built-in ZP3 power supply. If connected to an external
24 VDC power supply, the external supply supplies the load.
See Figure 49 on page 66. The ZP3AB-OP24 Transistor Output Board is a
programmable output board with 24 separate outputs, designed to drive lowpower functions, such as LEDs or control relays. This board is suitable for driving
remote mimic panels. The outputs are open-collector transistor outputs, which
switch negative (0 volts) when activated. Connect the opposite side of the output
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
65
Chapter 3: Field wiring
load (LED, etc.) to a common positive (+24 volts) from the same power supply
source as the board.
Each output is allocated a unique address, and programmed to operate from
selected inputs using the I/O-mapping function built into the panel. The
ZP3AB-OP24 board connects to the ZP3 panel control bus. If allocated to the
User Bus section, up to 768 addresses are available. These outputs are freely
programmable. If allocated to the System Bus section, a further 256 addresses
are available, which have preprogrammed functions.
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§
¨
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ª
È
¬
½
¾
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À
Á
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Ç
¾
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ª
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°
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µ
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24V+
Optional flyback
diode, 1N5819 [2]
1
2
3
4
5
6 7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
Power in
7
8
0V
1
ON
Power
out
ON
2
3
4
5
6
24 VDC
Board
address
switch [3]
24V common
Earth
24 VDC supply (22 to 29 VDC)
Supplied from ZP3 panel auxiliary output supply.
— or —
Supplied from separate 24 VDC power supply unit. [1]
[1] If externally supplied, do not common the power supplies, i.e. do not connect the 0V of the
internal and external power supplies together.
[2] Each output can drive a maximum circuit load of 50 mA. If outputs are used to switch
inductive loads, they should be protected with a flyback diode.
[3] Each board is fitted with a DIP switch, which is set to an address between 000 and 127. This
determines the address of each output, as specified in “System address list” on page 97.
The load is provided from the 24 VDC supply connected to the power input
terminals. If connected to the ZP3 panel auxiliary power supply terminals, the
load is supplied from the built-in ZP3 power supply. If connected to an external
24 VDC power supply, the external supply supplies the load.
See Figure 50 on page 67. The ZP3AB-MIP8 Input Board is a programmable
input board with eight separate inputs. It is designed for connection to normally
open, voltage-free contacts (key switches, relays, etc), the closing of which
provides an input signal to the panel. This signal can be programmed to operate
control outputs or sounders, disable zones or devices, change sensor
66
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 3: Field wiring
sensitivities, or carry out other functions. The activation of these inputs is not
displayed as an alarm by the panel, but rather treated as a
control function.
The input circuit field wiring is monitored for open circuit faults.
Ë
Ì
Í
Î
Ï
Ð
Each input is allocated a unique address, and programmed to operate selected
outputs or functions using the I/O-mapping function built into the panel. The
ZP3AB-MIP8 board connects to the ZP3 panel control bus. If allocated to the
User Bus section, up to 768 addresses are available. These outputs are freely
programmable. It does not operate on the preprogrammed System Bus section.
¤
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§
¨
©
«
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¬
½
¾
¿
À
Á
Â
Æ
Ò
¾
Ä
Ò
°
¶
§
µ
Á
®
³
¨
º
+ -
Screen (unused)
EOL
resistor
NO contact
(closes to activate)
(same as per input 1)
Internally
connected
Earth 24V 0V
I/P 1
I/P 2
I/P 3
I/P 4
I/P 5
I/P 6
I/P 7
I/P 8
7
8
Power in
2
1
ON
ON
Supplied from ZP3 panel
auxiliary output supply.
— or —
Supplied from separate 24 VDC
power supply unit. [1]
3
4
5
6
24 VDC supply (22 to 29 VDC)
Board
address
switch [2]
[1] If externally supplied, do not common the power supplies, i.e. do not connect the 0V of the
internal and external power supplies together.
[2] Each board is fitted with a DIP switch, which is set to an address between 32 and 127. This
determines the address of each input, as specified in “User bus addresses” on page 100.
The inputs are wired in two-wire Class B single direction format. If connected to
more than one contact, they must be daisy-chained from point-to-point, without
spurs. Circuits must be terminated with a 2.2 kȍ, 0.5 W end-of-line resistor at the
end of the circuit.
The board can be connected to the ZP3 panel auxiliary power supply terminals,
or to an external 24 VDC power supply.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
67
Chapter 3: Field wiring
68
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 4
Software programming
This chapter provides information on programming, including the menu
operation, structure, and functionality.
Introduction 70
Setup menu 70
Menu operation 70
Menu structure 74
Menu functions 77
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
69
Chapter 4: Software programming
The ZP3 fire control panel is a modular system with a powerful software
programming capability. The system requirements are built from standard
hardware modules, and the functional requirements are software programmed
into the panel. The software programming system allows for programming that
meets the needs of virtually any required application.
The configuration can be programmed on a PC computer using the Planner
programme, and then loaded into the panel. It can also be programmed directly
into the panel via the fascia keyboard. Programming on a PC is the
recommended method because it also allows you to produce a hardcopy of the
system programming for record purposes.
The following key items or features can be programmed into the panel:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Access control facilities
Panel identification
Stand-alone system or ZP-NET multiple panel system
Fire and non-fire functions
Sensor allocation to zones
Individual sensor and device location messages
Zone identification or location messages
Input to output mapping
Device type and address
Alarm verification feature
Sensor sensitivity
Sensor with attached sounder
Loop sounders
Panel sounders
Sensor self-test
Loop isolators
Delay on silencing sounders
Printer and printer options
•
Time stamping of event on-screen
The panel programming functions are accessed via the Setup menu, using the
panel keypad. Menu functions are displayed on the LCD screen.
70
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 4: Software programming
The keypad is illustrated in Figure 51 and described in Table 16 below.
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1
ABC
2
DEF
3
GHI
F1
4
JKL
5
MNO
6
PQR
F2
7
STU
8
VWX
9
YZ
0
[ ]
Ê
³
Á
Õ
§
´
µ
µ
©
®
Ó
¸
¬
Ô
°
Å
¶
³
º
Õ
§
µ
µ
®
°
·
Ö
1
ABC
ESC
F1
©
ESC
F2
³
¯
©
×
©
·
»
¨
¥
¶
µ
¥
®
°
Numeric buttons
Used to enter number sequences
Menu
Displays the Main Menu
Enter
Used to confirm data entry and save data
Escape or Esc
Exits a function and returns to the previous
level
Home
Exits all menus and returns to the system home
screen
Function buttons
Used within certain menus
Navigation buttons
Used to move up, down, left, or right
The Main Menu is the entry point to all of the user operator accessible software
functions, including the Setup menu. The Setup menu holds all the system
configuration options.
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1. Press the Menu button on the keypad.
The Main Menu is displayed, as shown below.
2. Choose Setup Menu to display the Setup menu.
To do this, press the 3 button on the keypad The system prompts you to enter
the access code.
3. Enter the setup (level 3) access code, and then press Enter.
The Setup menu is displayed, as shown below.
The menu name is displayed on the top line, and the menu items are shown with
numbers alongside. Menu items are selected by pressing the numeric keypad
button that matches the item number. Selecting a menu item may cause another
menu to appear or may carry out a particular function. The operator may be
prompted to enter the required information via the keypad.
Any menu can be cancelled and the previous menu presented by pressing the
Esc button. Esc is used to cancel or abort the current activity and return to the
previous activity.
Exit the menu system completely by pressing the Home button. This returns the
panel to its normal operation display. To prevent a system from being
inadvertently left in a menu, a timeout is built into the menu system. The timeout
counter starts from the last button press. In menu selection, the timeout is
approximately 45 seconds; if a software function has been started and not
completed, then it is 12 minutes.
The normal operation display consists of either the Home screen showing either
a title message plus the time and date (if the panel is in quiescent condition) OR
an alarm condition.
Some of the menus are used to set up the configuration of devices or functions.
Figure 52 shows some example displays, using the communications port setting
parameters.
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1. Access the following menu: Setup > System Configuration > Peripheral
Comms > Comms Parameters.
2. Select the required port to configure as follows:
Press the Up or Down Arrow button to move the selection brackets to Z-Port.
Press the Left or Right Arrow button to select the required Z-port (i.e. 1 or 2).
3. Select the required communications protocol as follows:
Press the Up or Down Arrow button to move the selection brackets to
Protocol.
Press Enter. A list of available protocols is displayed.
Select the required protocol using the Up or Down Arrows, and then press
Enter.
4. Select the required communications protocol parameters as follows:
Press the Up or Down Arrows to select Setup.
Press Enter. A list of available parameters is presented.
Press the Left or Right Arrows to select each parameter, and then press
Enter.
Press the Up or Down Arrows to select the required value, and then press
Enter.
Select Done after setting the required parameters, and then press Enter.
5. When you have finished, press Esc to save the programming.
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The following chart shows the menu structure of the Setup menu. A greater-than
sign beside an option indicates that there are more submenus or options
available than those shown.
Zoning
Viewing
Allocation and Messages
Fire Coincidence Detection
Edit
Zone Allocation
Zone Messages
Fire Coincidence Detection
Clear
Single Zone
All Zones
Single Zone Message
All Zone Messages
I/O Mapping
I/O Map View
I/O Map Edit
I/O Map Clear
Global Reactivation
Points
Individual Settings
View
Sensitivity and AVF
Sensitivity - Point
Sensitivity - Point Range
AVF - Point
AVF - Point Range
Zones
Messages
Sounder
Detector Test
Point Type
AGV Allocation
Edit
Sensitivity and AVF
Sensitivity - Point
AVF (Fire) - Point
Messages
Edit
Display
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Clear Single
Clear All
Zones
Sounder
Detector Test
Point Type
AGV Allocation
Global Settings
View
Sensitivity
AVF
Sounder Alarm Base
Detector Test
Edit
Sensitivity
AVF (Fire)
AVF (Fault)
Sounder Alarm Base
Detector Test
Accept Points
Sounders
View SAB
Edit SAB
View Mapped Sounders
Edit Mapped Sounders
Paradigm
View
Point Profile
Edit
Point Profile
Clear
Point Profile
System Configuration
Panel Options
Panel Mode >
Panel Number
Day/Night Times
Day Delay Override
Panel Standard
Control Key Levels
Sound Alarms
Silence Alarms
Accept
Reset
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Restore Disabled Alarms
Peripheral Comms
Comms Parameters >
RDU/SCBR Online
Peer To Peer Options
Peer Define
Relays
Fire Relay
Fault Relay
RMC Alarm Relay
Sounder Relays
Printer
Printer Type
Printer Options
Silence Delay
Isolators
AGV
Time Update
Event Time Display
Flash LED Healthy Det
Zone LED Link
Time Set Level
Control Keyswitch Level
Planner
Send Map
Receive Map
Title Message Edit
Watchdog Counters
Level 4 Ops
Security Codes
Clear Codes
Edit / View
Print
Panel Hardware
Erase Program
Software Upgrade
Local Programming
Debug Comms Message
Clear Alarm Counters
Language Select
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Buildings are divided into logical areas known as zones, in order to readily
identify each location. The ZP3 fire panel displays fire and fault events by zone.
Fire alarm input devices, such as sensors and call points, are assigned to a
zone.
The menu path is: Setup > Zoning. The available options are described in
Table 17.
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Viewing
View the devices assigned to a zone, with their type and the zone
message. Enter the zone number. The address of the first point in the
zone is displayed, together with the total number of devices assigned to
the zone. Scroll to view other device addresses. It is also possible to
view zones set for fire coincidence detection.
Edit
Assign devices to a zone, and create or edit the zone message.
Zone allocation. Enter the zone number, use the numeric keys or the
scroll feature to select points to be assigned to the zone. Use the F1 key
to remove a point from within a zone.
Zone messages. Enter the zone number, and use the keypad to enter
the zone message.
Fire coincidence detection. Enter the zone number.
Clear
Clear (delete) zone programming. Options are; single zone clearing; all
zone clearing; single zone message clear; all zone messages clear. A
level 3 code is required before the information is deleted.
The Title Message Edit menu lets you set the home screen title message, which
is displayed on the LCD screen when the system is in normal mode, i.e. when no
alarms are active.
The menu path is: Setup > Title Message.
The ZP3 panel processors are continually monitored. If a processor fails, it is
restarted automatically, and a watchdog counter is incremented.
The menu path is: Setup > Watchdog Counters.
The watchdog counters can be viewed in this menu. Use the F1 key to clear
counters.
Input-output mapping interlinks inputs to outputs creating a
schedule. Up to 1,000 outputs can be controlled, with 2,000 inputs. Inputs and
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Chapter 4: Software programming
outputs can be assigned a range of attributes to create the required functions.
Each input can be linked to several outputs, with different attributes for each.
The menu path is: Setup > I-O Mapping. The available options are described in
Table 18.
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I/O Map View
View I/O mapping. Enter the output address to view and press Enter.
The display shows the output address, its attributes, and its
identification message. It also shows the total number of outputs
mapped. Using the scroll feature displays the linked inputs and their
attributes.
I/O Map Edit
Add new I/O map entries or edit existing entries. Proceed as follows:
Enter the output address, and press Enter. The output is shown, with
default attributes that can be changed. Use F2 to create (or edit) an
output identification message. Choose Done when complete.
The display switches to the input screen, and allows inputs to be
assigned. Each input address entered is presented with default
attributes that can be changed. Select Done when complete, and the
next input is presented.
Press Esc to select the next output address after all inputs are assigned.
Press Home to exit the menu, and save the I/O mapping once complete.
Note: The addresses of Control Nodes can be mapped as inputs only.
The Control nodes are addressed as group 26; address range 0 to 255.
I/O Map Clear
Clear (delete) all I/O mapping entries. A level 3 code is required before
the I/O map can be deleted.
Global Reactivate
This option is used to globally set the reactivation rules for outputs that
have been defined as silencing. It also defines their behaviour after they
have been silenced, when a second alarm is received. Two options are
available:
Own I/Ps. This means that if the output is silenced, it only reactivates if
a second alarm is received from an input that is mapped to it.
Any Fire. This means that if the output is silenced, it reactivates from
any second alarm, regardless of the source.
The View menu lets the operator view the configurations of individual points
connected to the Z-loops.
The menu path is: Setup > Points > Individual Settings > View. The available
options are described in Table 19.
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View the sensitivity to which a sensor is set. The following options are
available after accessing this menu.
Sensitivity point. Sensitivity settings for an individual point. Enter the
point address. The device type, zone, and sensitivity settings are
displayed. Use the scroll feature to view the next or previous point.
Sensitivity point range. Sensitivity settings viewed on a group basis by
zone and device type. Enter the zone range (or all), and the device
types (or all) and then use the scroll feature to view.
AVF point. Alarm verification settings for an individual point. Enter the
point address. The device type, zone, and AVF setting are displayed.
Use the scroll feature to view the next or previous point.
AVF point range. Alarm verification settings viewed on a group basis by
zone and device type. Enter the zone range (or all) and device type (or
all) and then use the scroll feature to view.
Zones
View the point addresses of all devices allocated to a zone. Enter the
zone number to be viewed. The zone number and first point address in
that zone are displayed. Use the scroll feature to view the next or
previous address in that zone.
Messages
View the identification message assigned to each point address. Enter
the point address. The message is displayed. Use the scroll feature to
view the next or previous point address.
Sounder
View which sensors are fitted with sounder bases. The address of the
first sensor with sounder base is displayed together with the total
number of sensor-sounder base points. Use the scroll feature to view
the list.
Detector Test
View which sensors have their self-test feature enabled. Enter the point
address for the point to be viewed. Use the scroll feature to view the
next or previous point.
Point Type
View the type of device at each address. Enter the point address. The
device type is displayed. Use the scroll feature to view the next or
previous address.
AGV Allocation
View which sensors are allocated into each alarm group. See the Points
> Individual Settings > Edit section for more details on AGV.
This Individual Settings > Edit menu lets the operator configure devices
connected to the Z-loops.
The menu path is: Points > Individual Settings > Edit. The available menu options
are described in Table 20.
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There are four sensitivity levels for each point. This option lets you set
the sensitivity of devices using the following options.
Sensitivity point. Enter the point address. The current sensitivity is
displayed, and can be changed. Scroll to select the next point address.
AVF (Fire) point. With alarm verification enabled, smoke must be
present for a period before the sensor gives an alarm. Enter the point
address. The setting (AVF on or off) is displayed, which can be
changed. Scroll to select the next point address.
Note: The AVF setting for a fault condition is global, not individual.
Zones
Allocate Z-loop devices to a zone, or remove devices from a zone. Enter
the zone number. The first point address, and the number of devices in
the zone are displayed. Scroll to view the other point addresses in the
zone. To add a new device to the zone, enter a new point address. To
delete an existing device, display its point address and press F1.
Messages
Create or edit identification messages for each point address. In the edit
mode, the panel keyboard is used. Messages can be up to 40
characters in length. Options are provided to delete messages.
Sounder
Create a list of sensors that are fitted with sounder bases (SAB). A
scrolling, current list is shown. To add a new sensor, enter the point
address. To delete a sounder base entry, press F1.
Detector Test
Enable or disable the self-test function of each sensor. Enter the point
address. The screen indicates whether the self-test is on or off. To edit a
new sensor, enter the address or scroll.
Point Type
Allows the device type at the point address to be defined e.g. heat
sensor, optical smoke sensor, call point, etc. This is an optional field as
the panel normally learns the device type automatically.
AGV Allocation
This allows the point addresses which physically exist between loop
isolators to be defined. This is an optional field as the panel normally
learns the addresses automatically.
The Global Settings > View menu provides a view of the attributes of point
addresses on a zonal basis. Enter a range of zones, for example 1-1, 3-5, or All.
The menu path is: Points > Global Settings > View.
Scroll through the point addresses. The options available for each address are
described in Table 21.
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Sensor sensitivity
View sensitivity settings of devices
AVF (Alarm Verification Function)
Enabled or disabled
Sounder base
Present or not
Detector self-test
Enabled or disabled
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The Global Settings > Editing menu provides the ability to simultaneously
programme a set of attributes for a group of point addresses as follows.
The menu path is: Points > Global Settings > Editing.
After programming globally with this menu, individual devices that need different
attributes can be changed using the Points menu. Scroll through the point
addresses. The editing options available for each address are described in
Table 22.
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Sensor sensitivity
High, medium, standard, low
Fire AVF (Alarm Verification Function)
Enabled or disabled
Fault AVF (Alarm Verification Function)
Enabled or disabled (Note: Global only)
Sounder base
Present or not
Detector self-test
Enabled or disabled
Selecting the Accept Points menu instructs the panel to carry out a self-learning
process, to accept all current devices attached to the Z-loops, or peripheral
boards, as the current system configuration. The panel displays the message
“Accepting points” and counts down toward zero. On completion, the panel
displays “Calibrating”. If a device was not accepted, it is shown as “unaccepted”.
The menu path is: Setup > Points > Accept Points.
The Sounders menu provides the tools for setting up system sounders. Loop
devices and panel outputs that operate sounders must be defined as such to the
panel to ensure that they behave correctly.
The menu path is: Setup > Sounders or Setup > Pnts > INDN. The available
sounder setup options are described in Table 23.
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View SAB
View which Z-loop sensors have been defined as having a sounder
base (SAB). The point address of the first sensor is displayed, plus the
total number of sounder bases. Scroll to view the list.
Edit SAB
Define which sensors have a sounder base. Add or delete a point
address.
View Mapped
Sounders
View of all outputs (Z-loop and panel outputs), which have been defined
as sounders in the I/O mapping tables. Scroll to view the list.
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Edit Mapped Sounders Define which outputs are sounders. The point address of the first
sounder is displayed, plus the total number sounders in the list. Scroll to
view the list. Addresses can de added to or deleted from the list.
The Paradigm menu is used to set the properties of Paradigm sensors. These
properties define the performance characteristics of each sensor, and are
selected according to the location of the sensor and the type of response
required from a fire, as well as the sensors resistance to false alarms. See the
section on sensor setup options for details on how to choose appropriate settings
for each sensor.
The menu path is: Setup > Paradigm. The paradigm sensor setup options are
described in Table 24.
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View > Point Profile
View the profile assigned to each Paradigm sensor. The point address
of the first Paradigm sensor is displayed, together with its profile code.
Scroll to view the list.
Edit > Point Profile
Allocate a profile to each Paradigm sensor. Enter a point address, and a
configuration menu appears. Two different profiles can be assigned to
each Paradigm sensor, one for day operation, and one for night
operation.
Clear > Point Profile
Restores a Paradigm point address to the default Paradigm profile.
The Panel Options menu path is: Setup > System Configuration > Panel Options.
The Panel Options section sets the following global panel functions (see
Table 25).
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Panel Mode
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Define whether the panel is to operate in standard or day/night mode. In
standard mode, all functions remain the same regardless of the time of
day. In day/night mode, functions and alarms operate differently during
day and night hours.
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Panel Number
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Each fire panel must be given a unique number 001 to 255 that is
embedded in the four-segment, IP-style address AAA-BBB-CCC-DDD,
where:
A = domain address
B = site address
C = host address
D = panel number
The domain address, site address and host address are fixed for a
particular site, i.e. for all panels in a Planner project.
The menu displays the following information:
Enter local panel number: When entering the Panel Number menu the
cursor defaults to the local panel number field. The IP address is
entered in the same style as the date, with digits added continuously
from left to right.
Address: The four-segment, IP-style panel address currently allocated is
displayed in this field.
New: The panel number selected in “Enter local panel number” is
displayed.
Note: When enter is pressed to save the data, if any of the three-digit
fields exceeds 255, an error message is displayed in the bottom right of
the menu. The error message is cleared once a value less than or equal
to 255 is entered. Press Esc to cancel any changes.
Day/Night Times
Day/Night panels change to night mode each evening at a preset time.
This menu sets the changeover times for each day of the week.
D/delay Override
Allows call points to be excluded from the “Day delay” alarm delay
period.
Panel Standard
Allows panel to be configured to a specific standard:
EN 54, 1997 (Classic/UK)
EN 54, 2005 (Sweden etc.)
CP10, Singapore
The Control Key Levels menu path is: Setup > System Configuration > Control
Key Levels. The Control Key Levels menu sets the access levels for the following
functions (see Table 26).
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Sound Alarms
Defines the required access level for the Sound Alarms control key (i.e.
the Sound Alarms button).
Silence Alarms
Defines the required access level for the Silence Alarms control key.
Accept
Defines the required access level for the Accept/Silence Buzzer control
key.
Reset
Defines the required access level for the Reset control key.
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Restore Disabled
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Defines the required access level for the Restore Disabled Alarms
control key.
Note: Level 1 allows open access, while level 2 or higher enforces restricted access. Restricted
access requires a password before the control key operates. The panel’s control key switch must
be in the ON position in both cases. See also the “Control Key Switch” option in Table 30 on page
86.
The Peripheral Comms menu is used to set the peripheral communications
functions of the panel. It allows for the setup of the communications parameters
for networked panels, and for the SCB-bus connected to remote display units
and remote control units).
The menu path is: Setup > System Configuration > Peripheral Comms. See
Table 27 for available options.
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Comms
Defines the port number, communication protocol, baud rate, number of
bits, parity, and stop bits.
RDU/SCBR Online
Specifies the quantity of RDUs (remote display units) and RCUs (remote
control units) connected to the panel via SCB-bus. The maximum is 63.
Comms Hardware
Communication hardware settings for handshake and timeouts. Precise
usage of timeouts varies according to the selected protocol. Timeouts
should be left at their default settings unless additional interface
equipment with special requirements is used. Timeouts for interruption
of communications:
(a) acknowledgement (b) offline/inter-packet (c) inter-character
The range for this setting is 000 to 255.
Note: When a level 4 user accesses this menu, the timeouts can be
individually edited. If a level 3 user accesses this menu, the user can
use the Timeout defaults option, but cannot edit the individual timeout
settings.
Press F2 to default the selected port’s timeouts as follows:
•
Timeout 1 = 4 seconds (on all Z-ports)
•
Timeout 2 = 67 minutes (scaled x 4 internally, making 268 seconds)
(on all Z-ports)
•
Timeout 3 = 50 milliseconds (on all Z-ports).
Hardware handshaking lines RTS, DSR, CTS, and DTR may be
enabled or disabled as a group. The four handshake lines default to
“disabled”.
Peer Options
84
In networks, each panel must mark as
the address numbers of all
the other panels that it must communicate with. Each panel must also
define the type of information and control functions to send to the other
panels in the network.
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Peer Define
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Defines the properties of all network panels, e.g. number of loops,
zones, and communication ports.
The Relays menu allows for the setup of the standard built-in relays.
The menu path is: Setup > System Configuration > Relays. The following options
are available (see Table 28).
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Fire Relay
The common fire relay can be set to normally de-energised (open
contact, closing on alarm) or normally energised (closed contact, open
on alarm). The latter state is described as “inverted” in the menu.
Fault Relay
The common fault relay can be set to normally energised (open contact,
closing on alarm) or normally de-energised (closed contact, open on
alarm). The latter state is described as “inverted” in the menu.
RMC Alarm
The remote manned centre output is connected to RMC-routing
equipment. It should be set to restore only after a reset.
Sounder Relays
The sounder outputs (four outputs, controlled from two addresses) can
be set to operate as common, from any alarm, or as programmable. If
they are set to programmable, then they must be linked to activating
inputs in the I/O-menu.
The Printer menu allows for the setup of the optional in-panel printer.
The menu path is: Setup > System Configuration > Printer. The following options
are available (see Table 29).
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Printer Type
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Allows the type of printer to be defined. Current types are:
1. NONE = no printer attached
2. Able-24/25 = panel printer
3. Able-24+IN) = panel printer
4. Serial desktop = external printer, 80 column
Printer Options
Defines the information to be printed, categories are:
1. Fire Alarm
2. Fault
3. Panel Operation
4. O/P Activation
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Chapter 4: Software programming
The Various System Configuration section describes the options available in the
submenus.
The menu path is: Setup > System Configuration > [Option]. The following
options are available (see Table 30).
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Silence Delay
Allows the SILENCE ALARMS key to be delayed to prevent the alarm
sounders from being silenced (turned off) too soon, before being heard.
Enter the required silence delay time required in seconds.
Isolators
Define the quantity of isolators installed per Z-loop, range 0 to 16.
AGV (Alarm Group
Verification)
Specifies whether the Alarm Group Verification (AGV) function is
enabled or disabled. Two modes are provided:
Address group check - When enabled, the panel verifies that the correct
device addresses exist between loop isolators
Partial short check - When enabled, checks for partial short circuits and
data corruption, isolating the cause with the loop isolators
Time Update
When this menu is [ENABLED], setting the time and date in a panel,
which is part of a network of panels, causes the time and date of all the
panels in the network to be updated.
Event Time Disp
Enabling this function causes the time of each alarm to be displayed on
the LCD display. This reduces the number of characters visible for the
zone message by 6. See also “Zone identification messages” on page
91.
Flash Healthy LED
With this function enabled, the LEDs on sensors and line devices flash
once every 20 seconds to indicate that the device is present and
healthy. When a device is in alarm, the LED flashes once every 2
seconds. With this function disabled, the LEDs remain off when the
device is normal.
Zone LED Link
The zone LEDs can be set to be automatically linked to the system
zones, or to be programmed to different zones with I/O-mapping. This
menu defines whether the zone LEDs are zone-linked or programmable.
Time Set Level
This function enables either free access to the time setting commands,
or limits access to level 2.
Control Key Switch
This function causes the RDUs Controls Enable/Disable key switch to
be linked to the level 2 access code, allowing it to be used for level 2
access from RDUs, which do not have keypads with which to enter a
passcode.
Note: For this to operate, the RDUs Controls key switch must be wired
into the required “Reserved terminal” of its display board in place of the
“Controls Off” terminal.
Most of the programming of a ZP3 system is done by means of software. This
can be done directly via the panel menus, or it can be done offline on a PC, using
the Planner program, and later loaded into the panel by means of a serial data
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Chapter 4: Software programming
connection. After being loaded into the panel, minor modifications can be made
to the programming, directly via the panel menus. In this case, it is possible to
load the programming from the panel back to the PC, for saving to disk, and
printed report and record keeping.
The menu path is: Setup > Planner. Menu options available are as follows (see
Table 31).
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Send Map
This function is used to send the programmed data that exists in a ZP3
panel to an external PC.
Receive Map
This function is used to receive programmed data from a PC.
The preferred baud rate settings when using Planner to configure a ZP3
panel are shown in Table 32 below.
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Baud rate
Data bits
Parity
Stop bits
Receive
38400
8
Even
1
Send
9600
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1
Alternatively you can set Z-Port 1 to “ZCP3” to allow control directly from
Planner.
These are high level operations for use by a senior administrator of the fire
system, to alter options or settings that cannot be changed by installation,
maintenance, or operation personnel.
The menu path is: Setup > Level 4 Operations. The following options are
available (see Table 33).
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
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Chapter 4: Software programming
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Security Codes
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Defines panel access codes as follows:
1. Operator
2. Maintenance
3. Setup
4. Level 4
In addition, the access system allows you to enter up to 20 (optional)
operator names. Each name can have a different four-digit numeric
access code, and can have an access level from 1 through 4.
Clear: This menu lets you delete all the access codes. The existing
level 4 code is required for deletion and a new level 4 code is required.
Edit/View: This menu allows for viewing, adding, and deleting codes.
The first operator, code, and access level is displayed. Scroll to display
other entries. Displayed entries can be deleted. To add an entry, scroll
to the end of the list and enter the required details.
Print: This option generates a printed record of all existing operator
names, codes, and levels.
Local Programming
Defines the programming method, as follows:
Local programming enabled = The panel can be programmed directly
from the keypad (with level 3 access), or by loading a project from a PC.
Local programming disabled = The panel cannot be programmed via the
keypad, it can only be programmed by loading a project created on an
external PC.
Erase Program
Deletes all user programming and restores all configuration settings to
the factory defaults.
Software Upgrade
Lets you load new operating software into the panel from a PC.
Loading new software does not lose or affect configuration
programming.
Debug Comms
View data received on Z-Port 1 and 2 or other diagnostic information on
other virtual ports.
Panel Hardware
Defines the hardware configuration, i.e. loops, zones, and power
options.
Clr Alrm Counters
Resets the alarm counters to zero.
Language
The ZP3 panel has facilities for two languages, English and one extra
language. This menu defines the default language that the panel uses.
An alternative foreign language can be loaded (for software version 3.02
and higher). This option was not available on version 3.00. Note that the
appropriate version language file must be used.
Refer also to the ZP3 language loading procedure, which may be found
in the
(P/N 503-1436ZE-U-05)
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ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 5
System configuration
This chapter provides configuration information for your control panel, and
includes information on EN 54 requirements.
System specification 90
General information 90
Input-output mapping 90
Panel identification 90
Menu access codes 90
Control key access levels 91
Local programming 91
Networking 91
Zone allocation 91
Zone identification messages 91
Point information 91
Device identification message 91
Detector self-test 92
Sounder bases 92
Loop sounders 92
Panel sounders 92
Z-loop isolators 93
Common relays 93
Printer 93
Alarm time display 93
Silence delay 93
Cause and effect functions 93
Input-output mapping 93
Output parameters 94
Input parameters 95
Point address structure 95
System address list 97
System bus addresses 97
User bus addresses 100
EN 54 Setup requirements 101
Summary 101
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Chapter 5: System configuration
To set up the system configuration, it is necessary to prepare a detailed system
specification. This specification will also be used in the future maintenance of the
system. The specification should contain the information described in this topic.
A system schematic should be prepared, showing all the panels, and auxiliary
boards and modules, in the system. The schematic should show the Z-loops,
with the devices and loop isolators.
A list of all sensors and devices must be prepared, with device types, location
details, and point addresses. Drawings should be available showing loop wiring
runs, with the positions and point address of each device, and the positions of
each loop isolator. A schedule of loops, with the loop length, wiring size, and
number and type of devices on each loop should be produced.
Input-output mapping is software defined rules that allow the linking of inputs to
outputs creating a
schedule. This is described in more detail in
the topic “Cause and effect functions” on page 93.
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Each panel must be assigned a unique number between 1 and 255. A title
message, which displays on the panel LCD in the normal condition, is optional. If
specified, it can be up to 40 characters in length, and defaults to “Fire Alarm
System”.
The panel uses access codes (passwords) to control user access to the menus.
There are four access levels, but only three are restricted and require the use of
access codes. A four-digit numeric access code must be specified for each of the
three restricted access levels:
•
•
•
Level 2 = Maintenance
Level 3 = Setup
Level 4 = Level 4 (or administration)
Level 1, Operator, is not restricted and does not require the user to enter an
access code.
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Chapter 5: System configuration
A facility is provided to prevent unauthorised operation of control keys (buttons)
on the panel fascia. Each of the four main control keys Accept, Reset, SilenceAlarms, and Sound-Alarms, can be individually assigned an access level. If
unassigned, these controls operate at level 1, which is uncontrolled.
The panel can be configured to allow or prohibit l
from the
fascia keypad. If local programming is not allowed, then the panel can only be
programmed by downloading a configuration project created on an external PC.
This can provide a higher level of security to prevent unauthorized on-site
changes to the configuration.
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Panels must be defined as stand-alone or part of a network.
All input devices on a loop must be assigned to a zone. This includes sensors,
call points, and interface units. Output devices such as sounders and line relays
can be zoned optionally, as required. Zones must be specified and numbered,
and the point addresses belonging to each zone must be defined.
Each zone requires an identification message. The message displayed on the
Points screen can be up to 29 characters in length (on networked panels due to
the panel numbers field) or 33 on stand-alone panels. If the feature that displays
the time of each alarm on-screen is enabled, then the visible space for the zone
message is reduced by 6 characters. It is not necessary to include the zone
number in the message, as this is displayed automatically. All 40 characters are
logged on the printer.
The address of each point to be used in the system must be defined, together
with the type of device at each point address.
Each device in the system has an identification message, which is tagged to the
point address of the device. For Z-loop devices this message can be up to 40
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
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Chapter 5: System configuration
characters in length. For panel outputs, the message can be 10 characters in
length.
ZP700 series sensors have a self-test capability that is used by the panel to
automatically test them every 24 hours. This test is optional, and can be specified
on a device-by-device basis. Certain devices on the loop (for example,
conventional detectors connected via interface units), do not have a self-test
facility, and would have this function disabled. The default setting is OFF.
A sensor can be connected to a sounder alarm base (SAB), providing the ability
to provide an audible alarm at each sensor. The point address of each sensor
fitted with a sounder base must be specified, and whether the sounder is
powered from the Z-loop, or powered externally. This is dependent upon the
number of base sounders, the required sound output (in decibels), and the size
and length of loop cabling. Refer to the relevant base sounder application
documentation for more information.
Sounders can be connected directly to the Z-loop, and assigned their own point
address. The point address of each loop device that is a sounder must be
specified in order for it to behave correctly. In addition, you must specify whether
the sounder is powered from the Z-loop, or powered externally. This is
dependent upon the number of sounders, the required sound output (in decibels),
and the size and length of loop cabling. Refer to the relevant loop sounder
application documentation for more information.
Panel sounders are attached to the panel in two ways:
•
Standard built-in sounder outputs, a quantity of four, paired on two addresses
•
Optional sounder outputs, quantity dependent upon the number of boards
installed
Sounders can be connected directly to panel outputs, or to remote panel outputs.
All sounders can be programmed to operate on a common alarm, or to be
individually configurable by means of I/O-mapping. All sounder outputs have their
own panel point address. The point address of each panel output connected to a
sounder must be specified as a sounder output, in order for it to behave correctly.
Panel sounders are usually powered from the panel power supply, but can also
be powered by an external power supply. This is dependent upon the number of
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Chapter 5: System configuration
sounders, the required sound output (in decibels), and whether the sounders are
connected to the panel, or to a remotely located RCU-panel.
The number of Z-loops and the number of loop-isolators on each loop must be
specified. In addition the location of each isolator must be shown either on the
schematics, or on the layout drawings. Up to 16 loop isolators (limited to 11 to
comply with EN 54 specification) can be installed on a loop. The panel includes
two built-in isolator relays, giving a total of 12 isolated sections of cable.
The normal state for common fire and fault relays must be defined. The defaults
are; fire relay (normally de-energised) and fault relay (normally energised).
Specify whether a panel printer is to be fitted, and specify the type of events that
must be printed. Events are categorized into fire alarms, fault alarms, panel
operations, and outputs activated.
Specify whether the time of each alarm must be displayed on-screen or not. This
information is always printed on the printout.
A delay can be programmed for the Silence Alarms button in order to prevent the
system sounders being silenced (turned off) too soon in the event of a fire alarm.
The time can be set between 0 and 600 seconds.
Input-output mapping refers to software-defined rules that allow the linking of
inputs to outputs creating a
schedule. Up to 2,000 input triggers
may be configured to link with up to 896 outputs. This allows multiple input
conditions to be defined for each output.
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The full details of every input-output map link must be specified. An address must
be specified for each output and each input. The options to be configured for a
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
93
Chapter 5: System configuration
mapping link are discussed below under the headings “Output parameters” and
“Input parameters”.
The output mode defines whether the output is silencing, non-silencing, dynamic,
or pulsed. Pressing the Silence Alarms button on the panel turns off the silencing
outputs. Non-silencing outputs turn off when the panel is reset. If the output
mode is set to dynamic then the output ignores the silence or reset keys, and
follows the input trigger, i.e. it switches off when the input is deactivated. A
pulsed response activates the output for a single programmable period
(selectable in seconds up to 2 hours, 11 minutes, and 15 seconds) after
activation.
The mode also indicates whether the output is triggered by any one of its inputs
(single-knock), or whether it requires two input triggers (double-knock).
Output reactivation mode applies to silencing outputs only. This allows an output
that has been silenced (from a previous alarm) to be reactivated by two options;
either from any new fire alarm in the system (labelled as “Any”), or only by a new
alarm from input devices that are already linked to it in the I/O map (labelled as
“Own”).
When an output is triggered, it can be given an elapsed time delay of 0 to 600
seconds until it activates. This interval is called the output delay.
Each output can be individually defined to be normally off (de-energised in the
non-alarm condition, energising on alarm) or normally on (energised in the nonalarm condition, de-energising on alarm). The default setting is “Normally Off”.
Each output that is defined to operate sounders should be specified as such.
Note that outputs declared as sounders are always configured as silencing, and
this setting takes precedence over the I/O-mapping setting. These are intended
for extinguishing and ventilation control, etc. Outputs defined to operate as
control outputs should be defined as such.
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The input can be set to operate its linked output at these rates: steady, flash fast,
flash slow, or disable. The “disable” value is used when an input address is used
to disable one or more outputs; for example, when a key switch is used to disable
outputs for routine maintenance. Note that panel outputs can be set to fast or
slow intermittent operation, whereas Z-loop devices have only one flash rate. On
multi-tone sounders, these correspond to different tones.
The device type of the input can be defined as a general device, line device, or a
gas control unit. The type setting determines what trigger events are available to
activate an output.
Each input can be set to trigger the output on certain types of event, defined by
its type. Sensors can activate outputs from fire, fault, prealarm, service, or
disabled alarms.
Input-output mapping a software-defined rule that defines a set of input triggers
that activate an output. One or more inputs may be linked to an output. Each
input and output has an address that must be specified when setting an I/O
mapping link. Each address consists of three elements as follows.
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Panel number - three digits (for inputs only)
Group or loop number - two digits
Point address - three digits
The ZP3 panel incorporates one control bus with 1,024 addresses that can be
either inputs or outputs. Refer to the “System address list” on page 97 for details.
These addresses are divided into two groups, system bus and user bus, as
shown in the following table.
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System Bus (Group 09)
000 to 255
Controls panel functions, including zones,
common LEDs, and control keys. Can be used
for external mimic functions. These outputs are
preprogrammed.
User Bus (Group 10)
000 to 767
Freely programmable.
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Chapter 5: System configuration
The system bus range of addresses is preprogrammed by default to carry out
certain functions, for example, to illuminate zone LEDs. Alternatively, addresses
9.001 to 9.128 can be configured to be freely programmable. Where connected
outputs are set to addresses in the system bus range, then these outputs
automatically mimic the behaviour of the preprogrammed functions. For example,
an output board set to the same address as the zone LEDs automatically mimics
these LEDs, without any panel programming being required.
The user bus range of addresses is freely programmable. Any output connected
to the system with an address in the user bus range must be programmed using
the I/O-mapping function before it will operate.
The ZP3 auxiliary boards can be set to assume any address in the system bus
(group 9) or user bus (group 10) address range. Auxiliary boards have 8, 16, or
24 points, which are addressed sequentially from a base address. The base
address is determined by the DIP switch settings on each board. Refer to the
information in the topic “System address list” on page 97.
DIP switch settings between 0 and 31 set the addresses within the system bus
(group 09) range (Switch 8 = ON).
DIP switch settings between 32 and 127 set the addresses within the user bus
(group 10) range (Switch 8 = OFF).
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Chapter 5: System configuration
The following tables show the system bus (group 09) addresses for each
auxiliary board DIP switch setting. These are preprogrammed, and cannot be
changed from the specified functions. Outputs can be linked to these addresses
to automatically mimic their functions.
Accessory board DIP switch 8 must be set to ON to link to the system bus.
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001
002
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Zone 0 Fire LED
001
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024
Zone 24 Fire LED
Zone 1 Fire LED
025
Zone 25 Fire LED
002
Zone 2 Fire LED
026
Zone 26 Fire LED
003
Zone 3 Fire LED
027
Zone 27 Fire LED
004
Zone 4 Fire LED
028
Zone 28 Fire LED
005
Zone 5 Fire LED
029
Zone 29 Fire LED
006
Zone 6 Fire LED
030
Zone 30 Fire LED
007
Zone 7 Fire LED
031
Zone 31 Fire LED
008
Zone 8 Fire LED
032
Zone 32 Fire LED
009
Zone 9 Fire LED
033
Zone 33 Fire LED
010
Zone 10 Fire LED
034
Zone 34 Fire LED
011
Zone 11 Fire LED
035
Zone 35 Fire LED
012
Zone 12 Fire LED
036
Zone 36 Fire LED
013
Zone 13 Fire LED
037
Zone 37 Fire LED
014
Zone 14 Fire LED
038
Zone 38 Fire LED
015
Zone 15 Fire LED
039
Zone 39 Fire LED
016
Zone 16 Fire LED
040
Zone 40 Fire LED
017
Zone 17 Fire LED
041
Zone 41 Fire LED
018
Zone 18 Fire LED
042
Zone 42 Fire LED
019
Zone 19 Fire LED
043
Zone 43 Fire LED
020
Zone 20 Fire LED
044
Zone 44 Fire LED
021
Zone 21 Fire LED
045
Zone 45 Fire LED
022
Zone 22 Fire LED
046
Zone 46 Fire LED
023
Zone 23 Fire LED
047
Zone 47 Fire LED
004
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Chapter 5: System configuration
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048
Zone 48 Fire LED
049
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080
Zone 80 Fire LED
Zone 49 Fire LED
081
Zone 81 Fire LED
050
Zone 50 Fire LED
082
Zone 82 Fire LED
051
Zone 51 Fire LED
083
Zone 83 Fire LED
052
Zone 52 Fire LED
084
Zone 84 Fire LED
053
Zone 53 Fire LED
085
Zone 85 Fire LED
054
Zone 54 Fire LED
086
Zone 86 Fire LED
055
Zone 55 Fire LED
087
Zone 87 Fire LED
056
Zone 56 Fire LED
088
Zone 88 Fire LED
057
Zone 57 Fire LED
089
Zone 89 Fire LED
058
Zone 58 Fire LED
090
Zone 90 Fire LED
059
Zone 59 Fire LED
091
Zone 91 Fire LED
060
Zone 60 Fire LED
092
Zone 92 Fire LED
061
Zone 61 Fire LED
093
Zone 93 Fire LED
062
Zone 62 Fire LED
094
Zone 94 Fire LED
063
Zone 63 Fire LED
095
Zone 95 Fire LED
064
Zone 64 Fire LED
096
Zone 96 Fire LED
065
Zone 65 Fire LED
097
Zone 97 Fire LED
066
Zone 66 Fire LED
098
Zone 98 Fire LED
067
Zone 67 Fire LED
099
Zone 99 Fire LED
068
Zone 68 Fire LED
100
Zone 100 Fire LED
069
Zone 69 Fire LED
101
Zone 101 Fire LED
070
Zone 70 Fire LED
102
Zone 102 Fire LED
071
Zone 71 Fire LED
103
Zone 103 Fire LED
072
Zone 72 Fire LED
104
Zone 104 Fire LED
073
Zone 73 Fire LED
105
Zone 105 Fire LED
074
Zone 74 Fire LED
106
Zone 106 Fire LED
075
Zone 75 Fire LED
107
Zone 107 Fire LED
076
Zone 76 Fire LED
108
Zone 108 Fire LED
077
Zone 77 Fire LED
109
Zone 109 Fire LED
078
Zone 78 Fire LED
110
Zone 110 Fire LED
079
Zone 79 Fire LED
111
Zone 111 Fire LED
011
012
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ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 5: System configuration
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Zone 112 Fire LED
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Points Disabled LED
Zone 113 Fire LED
145
Info LED
114
Zone 114 Fire LED
146
Alarms Delayed LED
115
Zone 115 Fire LED
147
Rem/Alarm Delayed LED
116
Zone 116 Fire LED
148
GC Function Delayed LED
117
Zone 117 Fire LED
149
Day Mode LED
118
Zone 118 Fire LED
150
Test Condition LED
119
Zone 119 Fire LED
151
Point Alarm LED
120
Zone 120 Fire LED
152
System On LED
121
Zone 121 Fire LED
153
LCD Backlight On
122
Zone 122 Fire LED
154
Reserved-for future use
123
Zone 123 Fire LED
155
Reserved-for future use
124
Zone 124 Fire LED
156
Reserved-for future use
125
Zone 125 Fire LED
157
Reserved-for future use
126
Zone 126 Fire LED
158
Buzzer Output
127
Zone 127 Fire LED
159
Info #2 LED
128
Zone 128 Fire LED
160
Common Disable #2 LED
129
Common Fire LED
161
Common Fault #2 LED
130
Common Fire LED #2
162
Night Mode LED
131
Sounders Active LED
163
Alarm Silenced LED
132
Remote Alarm Active LED
164
More Up LED
133
Control O/P Active LED
165
More Down LED
134
Common Fault LED
166
Zone Prealarm
135
Alarm(Sounder) Fault LED
167
Zone Fault
136
Remote Alarm Fault LED
168
More Time
137
Control O/P Fault LED
169
Points Fault
138
System Fault LED
170
Double Knock
139
Common Disable LED
171
Security (door switches?)
140
Alarm Disable LED
172
Common Fire LEDs
141
Rem. Alarm Disabled LED
173
Fire Alarm Relays 1+2
142
Control O/P Disabled LED
174
Silence Alarm Key
143
Zone Disabled LED
175
Sound Alarm Key
019
020
021
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
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Chapter 5: System configuration
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022
176
Reset Panel Key
177
Sound Alarms LED
178
Fire Alarm Relays 2+3
179
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023
184
Mains supply fault
185
Disable All Sounders
023
186
Reserved for future use
Accept alarms key
to
to
180
More time key
031
255
181
Restore disabled alarms
key
182
Modem power control
183
Toggle Day/Night
The ZP3 auxiliary boards can assume any address in the user bus (group 10)
address range. Each auxiliary board represents a range of point addresses;
8-way, 16-way, or 24-way. The address range is defined by the board address,
which is set with a DIP switch on each board. The board address defines the first
8-point addresses on the board. For boards with more than 8-ways, each
subsequent group of 8-ways automatically assumes the next board address after
the DIP switch setting. Therefore, a 24-way board would use 3 board addresses,
the first being set on the DIP switch, the other two board addresses following-on
by assumption.
Accessory board DIP switch 8 must be set to OFF to link to the user bus.
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000-007
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192-199
80
384-391
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576-583
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200-207
81
392-399
105
584-591
34
016-023
58
208-215
82
400-407
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592-599
35
024-031
59
216-223
83
408-415
107
600-607
36
032-039
60
224-231
84
416-423
108
608-615
37
040-047
61
232-239
85
424-31
109
616-623
38
048-055
62
240-247
86
432-439
110
624-631
39
056-063
63
248-255
87
440-447
111
632-639
40
064-071
64
256-263
88
448-455
112
640-647
41
072-079
65
264-271
89
456-463
113
648-655
42
080-087
66
272-279
90
464-471
114
656-663
43
088-095
67
280-287
91
472-479
115
664-671
44
096-103
68
288-295
92
480-477
116
672-679
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ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 5: System configuration
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104-111
69
296-303
93
478-495
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680-687
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112-119
70
304-311
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496-503
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688-695
47
120-127
71
312-319
95
504-511
119
696-703
48
128-135
72
320-327
96
512-519
120
704-711
49
136-143
73
328-335
97
520-527
121
712-719
50
144-151
74
336-343
98
528-535
122
720-727
51
152-159
75
344-351
99
536-543
123
728-735
52
160-167
76
352-359
100
544-551
124
736-743
53
168-175
77
360-367
101
552-559
125
744-751
54
176-183
78
368-375
102
560-567
126
752-759
55
184-191
79
376-383
103
568-575
127
760-767
The setup requirements to conform to EN 54 are provided below. All paragraph
numbers refer to EN 54 part 2 of 1997 unless otherwise specified.
1. Para 7.1.4 and 8.1.3: AVF shall be switched off for all points.
2. Para 7.3.1: Under menu Setup > System Configuration > Zone LED Link,
zone LEDs shall be linked to the appropriate zones.
3. In menu Setup > System Configuration > Control Key Switch Level:
Para 7.4.1: The Accept key shall be set up to level 1 or 2
Para 7.6.1: The Reset key shall be set up to level 2
Para 7.8(a): The Silence Alarms key shall be set up to level 2
Para 7.8(b): The Sound Alarms key shall be set up to access level 2
4. Para 7.8: If accessory board ZP3AB-MA8 outputs are required to serve the
function of “output to fire alarm devices (item C)” then they must be defined
as sounder outputs when mapping. Standard outputs and use of nonmonitored output boards shall not be used to comply with EN 54 item C
requirements.
5. Para 7.10: If accessory board ZP3AB-MA8 outputs are required to serve the
function of “control to fire protection equipment” then they must be defined as
control outputs when mapping. The programming must not include delays to
output when the output is used to serve the function of “control to fire
protection equipment”. Standard outputs and use of non-monitored
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
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Chapter 5: System configuration
input/output boards shall not be used to comply with EN 54 item G
requirements.
6. Para 7.11(a): Under menu Setup > System Configuration > Relays > Sounder
Relays, the sounder relays must be defined as programmable. The relays
must then be mapped as outputs (addresses 09-173 and 09-178) using the
I/O mapping function. They must defined as sounder outputs, silencing with
no delay.
A suitable input would be the common fire LED at address 09-129.
7. Para 7.11(c): The day delay and more time extension shall be set to a
maximum of 10 minutes as it automatically affects the delay to RMC alarm
output.
8. Para 7.11(c): The I/O mapping to common sounder outputs (addresses
09-173 and 09-178) shall be set to a maximum delay of 10 minutes (including
day delay and more time extension if operating in day mode).
9. Para 7.11(d): Under menu Setup > System Configuration > Panel Options >
Day Delay Override set up so that call points do override the day delay.
10. Para 7.12: To meet coincidence detection requirements either:
(a) Use the coincidence function in the Setup > Zoning menu to inhibit the
indication of fire alarm condition (the first alarm in shows as a prealarm)
— or —
(b) Facilitate the option to inhibit fire alarm devices and fire protection
equipment by mapping each appropriate output as double knock from the
zone
11. Para 8.2.4(c): Earth fault monitoring shall be enabled (by inserting link J1 on
the main control board).
12. Para 8.2.5/6: The auxiliary 24 V power supply output shall not be used to
drive unmonitored equipment i.e. equipment which will not automatically notify
a fault to the control panel should loss of power occur. Line units such as
ZP752-2 are monitored.
13. Para 12.4.4: All internal components of the panel enclosure shall be left inside
the enclosure to ensure EMC compatibility. The panel shall remain locked
with key removed during operation.
14. Para 12.5.2 and CEA GEI 1-052 Para 5.2.3: Under menu Setup > System
Config > AGV, the AGV should be defined as enabled for partial short circuit
check.
15. Para 12.5.2: Loops must be wired in Class A return loop configuration.
16. Para 12.5.2: Isolators should be placed on the loop such that no more than 32
detectors or call points may be isolated in the event of an open or short circuit
on the loop. (It is recommended that no more than 32 points are included in a
zone).
17. Para 12.6: The controls key switch should be left on.
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Chapter 5: System configuration
18. Para 12.10.2: The panel audible sounder shall be operated at full volume and
not suppressed.
19. EN 54-2 annexure A: The commissioning key should be off.
20. Heat sensor elements required to conform to EN 54 Part 5 Grade 1 must be
set up to sensitivity 2.
21. To meet the requirements of EN 54-2 either as a sounder output (type C) or
an output to fire protection equipment (type G) the output must be monitored
and hence a monitored output accessory board should be used as opposed
to a relay output accessory board or line device.
22. The ZP3 panel approved to EN 54 was tested using the internal power
supply. Although option is provided to supply power from an external power
supply this should not be used if compliance with EN 54 is essential.
23. The ZP3 panel approved to EN 54 was tested using 11 isolators in a ZP
address loop. Although option is provided to software select up to 16
isolators, a maximum of 11 should be used if compliance with EN 54 is
essential.
24. The loop wiring must be shielded with the screens being effectively earthed.
25. Para 5.3.1 b): Charge rate jumper JP6 must be linked to meet the
requirements of EN 54 if the battery capacity exceeds 17Ah. See “Power
supply and battery calculations” on page 56 for more details.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
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Chapter 5: System configuration
104
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 6
System commissioning
This chapter provides commissioning instructions for your control panel.
Introduction 106
Verification 106
Verify system design 106
Verify equipment installation 106
Verify wiring 107
Remove the clock battery protective tab 107
Verify system programming 107
System tests 108
Panel check 108
Z-loop wiring check 109
Z-loop wiring parameters 109
Z-loop functional tests 110
Data wiring RS-485 110
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
105
Chapter 6: System commissioning
After the ZP3 fire control panel and the other system elements have been
installed, the system must be commissioned. The purpose of commissioning is to
make sure that the system operates correctly. The following areas must be
checked:
•
The system has been correctly designed
•
All equipment has been properly installed
•
The software functions have been correctly programmed
•
Sensors are appropriate for their environment
•
All sensors function correctly
•
All outputs operate correctly
•
Cause and effect linkages are correct
•
The complete system is functioning correctly
The following elements must be verified as correct. Some of these items can be
checked using the printout from the Ziton Planner programming software. Others
items require on-site checking, testing and measurement. The commissioning
process must cover the following items.
Verify that the system design satisfies the requirements of the system
specification (usually produced by the project consulting engineer, or similar
person). Check that that the correct types of sensors are fitted into each area,
and that equipment complies with the specification.
Where a system is required to comply with the design criteria of a National
Standard (such as BS 5839-1,
), then verify that the installation does comply with these requirements.
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Check and verify that all the items of equipment (sensors, call points, fire panels,
etc.) are installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions and
recommendations.
106
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 6: System commissioning
•
Check that the installation of the wiring complies with the requirements of
Appendix A “ZP wiring guide” on page 117 and that it has been sized
correctly. Particularly check that all Z-loops are screened, and that the
screens are continuous, and earthed at the panel.
•
Make sure there are no sections of floating screens. Also verify that proper
separation has been maintained from high-voltage mains cabling.
•
Check that data cabling (RS-232 and RS-485) is screened, continuous, and
earthed, and separated from mains and Z-loop wiring.
Make sure that the plastic protective tab installed between the metal securing clip
and the lithium clock batteries on the main board is removed to enable the clock
(see Figure 54 below).
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Plastic protective tab
The software configuration can be verified by checking the system configuration
printout from the Planner programme. If the system was not programmed using
Planner, then a printout of the zoning and I/O-mapping functions can be obtained
from the panel. The following must be checked and verified:
•
Access control levels are correctly set
•
System configuration (global settings) have been set in the Setup menu
•
AGV function has been enabled if this feature is required
•
Panel number is correctly set
•
Panel has been defined as a stand-alone or ZP-NET panel
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
107
Chapter 6: System commissioning
•
Panel has been defined as standard operation or day/night operation
•
Zoning has been correctly allocated to sensors
•
If zoning has been unlinked from the fascia LEDs, then zones must be I/Omapped to LEDs
•
Sensor and device location messages are correct
•
Zone identification or location messages are correct
•
Input-output mapping is correct
•
Paradigm sensors have been programmed with the correct profiles
•
Standard sensors have been correctly set for sensitivity and AVF
•
Sensors with attached sounder are tagged as such
•
All sounders in the system are tagged as such
•
Control outputs are all tagged as such
•
Sensor self-test feature has been programmed
•
Correct quantity of loop isolators has been set
•
Correct delay on silencing of sounders has been set, if required
•
Printer options have been set
•
Event on-screen time-stamping has been set, if required
After confirming that the system has been correctly installed and programmed,
perform the following tests to confirm that the equipment is functioning correctly:
1. Disconnect the loops from the panel.
2. Jumper the in and out terminals of each loop, and connect three sensors (or
other line devices) to each loop.
3. Address these devices at any desired addresses; do not duplicate addresses.
4. Make sure the addresses are zoned.
5. Carry out the following checks:
a) Check that the first analogue value (the Reference Value, V1) of each ZP
device is within the range 208 to 216 counts in the maintenance/reports to
screen/point analogues menu. If any of the devices are out of this range, then
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ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 6: System commissioning
replace the panel main board. For ZX, ZR or EX devices, check for the
appropriate levels as shown in Table 37 below.
b) Put one device on each loop into alarm (activate call points, or use smoke
or test smoke on a sensor). Make sure the panel reports an alarm and that
the zone is reported on the LCD display (and the correct zone and status
LEDs turn on).
c) Create a fault on one device on each loop (disconnect a call point, or
unplug a sensor base). Make sure the panel reports a fault and that the zone
is reported on the LCD display (and the correct status LED turns on).
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227
ZR (wireless)
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135
163
ZX (paradigm)
4
135
163
EX (intrinsically safe)
6
68
100
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1. Disconnect the loops from the panel.
2. Bridge out any line isolators (if fitted).
3. Measure the resistance of the complete loop (the combined resistance of both
the positive and negative legs), using a multimeter, as follows:
If the system is wired as a Class A return loop, measuring the resistance is a
simple matter. At the panel, measure the resistance of the positive leg from
[+out] to [+in], and record. Multiply by two to get resistance of the total cable
and check that they are within the required parameters as described under
“Z-loop wiring parameters” below.
If the system is wired as a Class B return loop, measure as follows. If the loop
has T-taps, identify the longest leg (measured from the panel to the last
device). At the last device connect the positive leg to the negative leg. At the
panel, measure the resistance from the positive leg [+out] to the negative leg
[íout], and record.
These must be as specified in Appendix A “ZP wiring guide” on page 117.
As a guideline only:
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
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Chapter 6: System commissioning
•
For a loop with sensors, call points, and interface units only, the total loop
resistance must not exceed 75 ȍ (i.e. 37.5 ȍ for the positive leg and 37.5 ȍ
for the negative leg), and the maximum cable length must not exceed
3,000 m.
•
For a loop with loop-powered sounders, wiring parameters depend upon the
number of sounders connected. Assuming 100 sounders, the total loop
resistance must not exceed 12 ȍ, and the maximum cable length must not
exceed 1,500 m.
1. Connect all the loops to the panel.
2. Power up the panel, and allow the panel to go through the self-diagnostics,
device acceptance, and automatic calibration routines.
3. Access the Setup > Points > Accept Points menu, and manually accept all
devices online.
4. Carry out the following checks:
a) Identify the device addresses on each loop that are (1) the closest to the
panel, (2) the furthest from the panel (i.e. near the end of the Z-loop), and (3)
about halfway along the Z-loop.
b) In the Maintenance > Reports to Screen > Point Analogues menu, check
that the first analogue value (the Reference Value, V1) of each ZP device is
within the range 208 to 216 counts, and within 5 counts of each other. For ZX,
ZR, or EX devices, check for the appropriate levels as shown in Table 37 on
page 109.
If the Reference Value is substantially reducing between the beginning and
the end of the Z-loop, this is an indication that the wiring is out of
specification, resulting in signal loss. Incorrectly sized wiring, a loop that is too
long, loose connections, or similar faults could cause this. If this is the case,
the fault must be found and rectified.
Check that RS-485 data cabling connecting panels together meets the requirements of
Appendix A “ZP wiring guide” on page 117. As a guideline, this must be high-quality,
screened data cable, with a maximum of 2,000 metres of cable connected in any one
network. The cable terminating jumpers on the communications boards must be set
correctly. See the appropriate equipment data sheets.
110
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 7
Peer-to-peer 3 protocol
This chapter provides information on the protocol features of your control panel.
Introduction 112
New data structure 112
Compatibility with Maestro and Planner 112
Peer-to-peer 3 (P2P3) protocol 112
Overview 112
Compatibility with older versions of panel software 112
P2P3 New features 113
Panel filters set, store and send capability 114
New network filters 114
Filter description 114
Use of network communications filters 115
Language loading 116
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
111
Chapter 7: Peer-to-peer 3 protocol
This chapter covers the new features and enhancements of software 71910
Version 3.04 (EN 54 ZP3 Fire Panel), which was released on 01 August 2003.
Panel Software 3.04 makes use of a new data structure. This new structure
relates to device messages and zone messages.
Use Planner version 3.0.0.59 or higher to ensure that the structure is correct.
Previous Planner projects or saved files are converted automatically to the
correct structure when opened with Planner 3.0.0.59 or higher.
The most notable new feature is the Peer-to-Peer 3 Protocol (P2P3), which
allows up to 255 network nodes on a single multidrop RS-485 communication
link. Although this capability is apparent, a network of 100 nodes is deemed the
maximum, as this is the maximum extent to which the system has been tested.
Since version 3.00, the protocol has been reworked to deliver multiple
commands and events in a single data packet. This results in larger packets and
quicker overall performance when the system gets busy. Version 3.00 and 3.04
panels will therefore not communicate correctly with each other.
During upgrade, we recommend that the version 3.04 panels have their network
communications disabled. This can be done either by physically disconnecting
them or splitting them into subnetworks of new and old or by using the new Panel
Comms Disable feature described on the next page.
Keep the network communications disabled until all the old version 3.00 software
has been replaced.
Sound and silence command and status report handling has been improved to
minimize an older event from being reported after a newer command.
The status block fetched by Maestro now includes a “panel comms disabled”
status (block 15).
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Sending empty blocks in place of those that only contain zeros as data has
further optimized this status mechanism, so less data is sent when loops, zones,
or outputs are normal.
Note that Maestro version 3.0 or higher is required to communicate correctly with
the new panel software.
•
Panel communications enable or disable function
•
Interpanel support for remote diagnostics across the network
•
Panel standards
The Panel Comms Enable/Disable option enables or disables P2P3
communications to panels on the network temporarily, without altering their filters
etc. When edited on one panel, it replicates to all panels that are configured to be
online via setup, so that they all agree on who is expected to be online.
The option is accessed on the panel using a new menu: Maintenance > More >
Panel Comms Enable/Disable, or by Planner, or on Maestro.
This feature can be used when maintenance is being done on a panel, and can
replace the need to have large numbers of point disables from that panel being
reported on the rest of the system, without needing to edit a large number of
communications filter entries.
If any panels are registered as disabled, the Other LED illuminates and the
operator can view the list of panels disabled by viewing the other info.
Planner can be connected directly to one panel via its RS-232 port and then
access any other panel indirectly via the network. The operator can perform all
functions listed below with the exception of Code Load and Language Load.
•
Maintenance Flash Load (includes all disables: point, zone, and panel
communications)
•
Configuration Flash Load (includes all setup options)
•
Message Flash Load (includes the custom text for points and zones)
•
Analogue View
•
Remote Reset/Silence/Accept commands
•
Code Load (Direct/Local panel only)
•
Event Archives View
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Chapter 7: Peer-to-peer 3 protocol
•
LED status View
•
Language Load (Direct/Local panel only)
When the configuration is loaded, the disables must also be loaded, to
keep them tracking one another. However the disables may be changed without
changing the configuration, as long as the configuration’s integrity is ensured.
These new features are only available when using Planner version 3.0 or higher.
The panels now have a utility that allows the Network filters of all of the panels in
the network to be set up and then transferred to any or all of the panels in the
network via Maestro.
The “fetch disables control” filter is used to indicate the other nodes in the system
to which the Fetch Disables command may be sent. This is used to control the
Disables LED on the front of the ZP3 Panel. The LED only illuminates on the
local panel if the local panel has any disabled or delayed elements or if any
remote panels to which the Fetch Disables command may be sent have any
disabled elements. If this filter is off to a remote panel then any disabled
elements on that panel are not displayed on the local panel.
The “disable events” filter specifies the remote panels to which the event
telegrams arising out of a change of disable status on the local panel should be
sent. This filter should only be turned on if the remote panel has a specific need
to use this information other than for display purposes, for example if a remote
I/O-mapped operation has to be triggered by a specific zone or device
disablement on the local panel. Display only purposes are provided for with the
fetch disables control.
It is not a requirement to send disable events to Maestro (with P2P-3
protocol) since all disablements are sent in the general status message.
The general status events filter is used to identify the Maestro nodes in a
network. Panel nodes do not use the general status block data, but all panel
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ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Chapter 7: Peer-to-peer 3 protocol
nodes generate the message. Setting the general status event flag for each
Maestro node permits the remote panels to always send the status messages to
all of the Maestros at the same time.
Since the disable events no longer need to be sent for display only needs, each
panel volunteers the general status message to all the Maestros whenever a
change of disable status occurs on the panel. A 20-second delay period from the
last change of disable status is used to allow multiple disable changes to be done
prior to the status message being sent out.
The delay is cumulative, i.e. a 20-second period of no changes is required
before the status job is sent. Sending a status request message from Maestro,
which is processed immediately by the target panel, if it is not currently busy with
a status job, can shorten this period.
We recommend that the available communications filters be used to minimize the
network communications data traffic of commands as well as events to those that
are necessary. This is done to optimize the use of the bandwidth and buffer
sizes, which are limited by physical constraints. The panel has a display buffer of
a total of 484 events, including points, zones, and system status. On versions
prior to R3.11, once this buffer is full, information is no longer passed to Maestro
and panel events that are inter-panel I/O-mapped are not sent. However, on later
versions this restriction is removed by the use of an additional rotating
communications buffer. In the case of viewing disables some of the buffer space
may be occupied by other events that occurred since the last reset, including
reset status events from remote panels, if they were configured to send them.
In particular the disabled/enabled status of points and zones is now passed to
Maestro primarily by general status data blocks (controlled by the general status
filter). They no longer depend on the disabled event telegrams, which bypasses
the restriction in event buffer size and contents.
The panel automatically sends the general status data block to Maestro
20 seconds after a single change in its disablements, (or once 20 seconds after
the last of a series of disablements). Maestro also requests it automatically on
startup, after a reset, during a fascia view, or manually on request by the
operator by selecting Refresh, or Current Status (from Maestro Comms or
Maestro panel controls right-click).
Selecting Key 4, in the Keys options, can toggle the fetch disables command
filter setting. This filter enables/disables the Fetch Disables command to the
individual remote panels when the View Disables button is pressed on the local
(receiving) panel. At the same time, it also allows (or disallows) the Common
Disable LED to reflect the disables of the same remote panels.
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Chapter 7: Peer-to-peer 3 protocol
The communications test message is also enabled or disabled using this filter.
Panels use this to request the disable status of remote panels at startup. It must
be enabled to a Maestro station.
The disabled event filter (which existed in earlier versions) may be set separately
at the sender panel (as before) to allow or prevent volunteering disabled events
to remote panels or Maestro. The disabled events filter should be set
to send
to Maestro, but only to panels if they require it.
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If a panel is undergoing commissioning or configuration changes and has large
numbers of disables, either the “disables” commands and disabled events are
disallowed, or the whole panel is ignored using the Panel Comms Enable/Disable
feature.
The “general status events” filter setting works similarly by pressing Key 4 in
Event options. This should be used for enabling a status data message from a
panel to a Maestro, and disabling it to all remote panels, which do not require it.
An alternative foreign language may be loaded on version 3.02 (or later) panels.
This was not available on version 3.00 panels.
The appropriate version language file must be used.
Refer also to the ZP3 Language Loading procedure, which may be found in the
(P/N 503-1436ZE-U-05).
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ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Appendix A
ZP wiring guide
This chapter includes information on the wiring arrangement of your control
panel.
Introduction 118
General 118
Panel power supply connections 118
System cabling 120
Overview 120
Circuit types 120
Circuit schematic 120
Z-Address lines 121
Function 121
Features 122
Wiring styles 122
Line isolators 123
Shielding 124
Unshielded cable 127
Loop length 127
Serial communication lines 128
General 128
RS-232 ports 128
RS-485 ports 129
DC control lines 130
General 130
DC cable type 130
DC cable size 130
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
117
Appendix A: ZP wiring guide
The ZP system uses an extremely flexible wiring arrangement. It is designed to
provide simple, low-cost wiring for new buildings. It can, in many cases, also use
existing wiring where a fire detection system is being upgraded. A key feature of
ZP the system is the ability to mix looped wiring and spurs on the same circuit. A
further advantage is that future extensions or changes to a system are easily
carried out, without in any way affecting the existing system or its wiring.
To make sure that systems function correctly, it is important that correct
wiring techniques are used. The wiring is an integral part of the complete system,
and use of unsuitable cable, or defective installation methods can cause the
system to malfunction.
This appendix provides specifications and guidelines for cable selection and
installation. Follow these practices to make sure that your ZP fire detection
system functions correctly and reliably at all times.
All wiring must be installed in compliance with local codes, and in accordance
with the requirements of the local authority having jurisdiction.
Where line powered output devices are used, adequate provision must be
allowed for in the system cabling to cater for the increased line current drawn.
In addition to the requirements specified in this appendix, all wiring should be
installed in compliance with Section 17 (paragraphs 17.1 - 17.15) and Section 24
(paragraphs 24.1 - 24.5) of British Standards BS 5839: Part 1: 1988.
Effective functioning of the system is dependant on the correct connection of the
panel power connections and must be wired as described under “Power supply”
on page 50 of this manual.
The panel must be connected to a source of power that is both clean
and reliable. The power source should not be shared by electrical equipment that
causes electrical noise or spikes. If the quality of the power feeding the panel is
suspect and electrical noise is present, assistance should be sought from Ziton
regarding earth and surge protection.
The panels, power supplies, and cables making up the fire detection system
should be connected to earth at one point only. This earth point must always be
at the panel. The only exception to this is when MICC cable is used. In this case
the cable shield may be connected at other points in the building.
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ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Appendix A: ZP wiring guide
The panel is typically located in a building, which allows only limited earth
options. The following are the preferred rules that should be followed if possible.
Normally the panel is connected to the nearest external earth point. This external
earth point may vary in quality, from a high quality instrumentation earth to the
earth used by the electrical network. This external earth point is in turn connected
to the main building earth system.
The earth connection should preferably meet the following criteria:
•
It should be a clean earth, preferably not shared with other electrical devices.
High-energy equipment should be connected to an earth point that is as close
as possible to true earth.
•
Wiring codes normally require it to be bonded to the main building earth for
safety reasons.
•
The resistance to true earth should be as low as possible.
See Figure 55 for a typical panel earth connection.
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Power supply
Panel
ZP loop
Common earth point at panel
Wire from panel to earth point
6. External earth point
7. Existing wire from earth point to main
building earth
8. Main building earth
9. High energy equipment
The wire from the panel to the external earth point should be at least 4 mm²
cable and be securely connected at both ends to ensure a good mechanical and
electrical connection. Use crimped lugs where possible.
If any loop device makes use of separate external power i.e. is not powered from
the ZP loop, then the earth connections must follow the guidelines below:
•
The ZP loop shield must be connected to panel earth at the panel.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
119
Appendix A: ZP wiring guide
•
AC supply earth and panel earth must be connected if not the same.
•
If the loop device is powered from an external power supply at the panel, the
external power supply negative must be connected to panel earth. For a
frequent surge environment, the loop device chassis must be connected to
the main building earth. This may require a separate earth wire to be run to
the panel.
The ZP system consists of a number of devices that are connected together by
cables. Examples of these devices are control panels, repeater panels, fire and
smoke sensors, audible sounders, relays, computers, etc. Different circuits
control various functions, and these circuits have differing cable requirements.
Four different types of circuit are used to interconnect the equipment into a
system. These are described below, and illustrated on the next page.
A full description of the wiring requirements for each type is detailed on following
pages.
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Z-Address lines
Fire sensors, line relays, isolators, call
points, addressable sounders, other line
devices
See “Z-Address lines” on
page 121
Serial communication
lines
Panel-to-panel networks, connections to
repeater panels and to computers and
building management systems, other
devices, e.g. printers
See “Serial
communication lines” on
page 128
DC control lines
Sounders, control relays, door magnets,
etc.
See “DC control lines”
on page 130
Figure 56 shows a typical single-panel system, and Figure 57 shows a typical
multiple-panel networked system.
120
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Appendix A: ZP wiring guide
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Data wiring-RS-485
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2. Communication wiring, RS-485
Z-Address lines connect the Ziton addressable field devices to the panel. Field
devices include fire and smoke sensors, line relays, addressable sounders,
extinguishing control units, manual call points, interface units, and line isolators.
Each Z-Address line is a two-wire circuit, which provides both power and data
communication to the ZP fire and smoke sensors, call points, and addressable
input and output interface units.
Some devices, such as the extinguishing control unit, require a separate power
supply circuit, whereas others, such as the ZP754 loop sounder, may be either
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
121
Appendix A: ZP wiring guide
externally powered or powered from the Z-Address line. Each line connects to
127 ZP addressable line devices.
Key features of the Z-Address Line are:
•
Cabling can be installed in any configuration that suits the building. This
includes loop circuits, tees, spurs, or combinations of styles.
•
Cabling can be shielded, for new buildings, or unshielded for retrofitting
systems to existing buildings (see “Rules for using shielded cable” on page
125 and “Rules for using unshielded cable” on page 127 for more details if
required.
•
Up to 3,000 metres of two-core cable can be used per loop, depending upon
cable size and provided that no line-powered output devices are connected.
Refer to “Loop length” on page 127 for more details about maximum
permissible loop lengths.
The ZP system can mix looped wiring and spurs on the same addressable circuit.
This provides maximum flexibility and lowest cost during installation. Figure 58,
Figure 59, and Figure 60 show examples of different wiring styles, together with
an outline of the benefits of each.
See Figure 58. Return loop wiring provides protection against open circuits, short
circuits (using line isolators), and earth leakage.
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1
2
3
1. Control Unit
2. Loop
3. Detectors
See Figure 59. Return loop wiring with spurs provides protection against open
circuits, short circuits (using line isolators), and earth leakage.
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ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Appendix A: ZP wiring guide
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4
2
1. Control Unit
2. Detectors
3
3. Loop
4. Spur
See Figure 60. Single direction wiring with spurs provides protection against
open circuits and earth leakage.
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2
1. Control Unit
2. Detectors
3. Spur
Line isolators are devices installed on the Z-Address line to monitor for short
circuits on the field wiring. These devices keep up to 93% of the line operational
in the event of a short circuit. Line isolation can only be utilised when Style A
wiring is used. They must be installed in accordance with the requirements of
BS 5839 Part 1.
See Figure 61 for a schematic of line isolator usage. Isolators are installed on the
loop at intervals. A short circuit on the loop wiring causes the isolators on each
side of the short to disconnect the damaged section of cable. This removes the
short from the loop, allowing the remainder of the loop to function normally.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
123
Appendix A: ZP wiring guide
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1
2
3
1. Control Unit
2. Detectors
3. Isolators
1. Isolators should be located on the Z-Address loop either at the beginning and
end of each zone, or at regular intervals.
2. To comply with BS 5839 Part 1, no more than 1 zone, or 20 detectors or call
points, must be grouped between two isolators. Other standards allow up to
32 devices between isolators.
3. A maximum of 16 isolators can be used on each Z-Address loop.
4. The total loop cable resistance must not exceed 75 ȍ (37.5 ȍ for each
positive and negative leg).
5. The maximum cable resistance between any two isolators, or from the panel
to the first isolator, is 18 ȍ for both cores (9 ȍ for each positive and negative
leg).
6. The Z-Address loop is pulsed at nominal 20 Vp-p. When loops are installed in
accordance with this wiring guide, then the maximum volt-drop across the
loop is 4 V. This ensures that isolators always receive a supply of at least
16 V.
Shielded cable provides the greatest protection against external interference, as
well as protecting other equipment from interference generated by the fire
detection system.
Shielded cable must be used where possible.
Shielded cable must be earthed at the panel at both ends and must never
be left with the shield floating.
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ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Appendix A: ZP wiring guide
1. Shielding includes cable with copper screens, Mylar covered, or Pyrotenax
cable (MICC).
2. Shielded cable may be two-core or multiple-core.
3. Only Z-Address lines may be run inside a screen, in order to qualify as
shielded.
4. Where four-core shielded cables are used, two cores can be used for the
Z-Address Line, and the other two cores used for either ZP approved
sounders, or ZP system DC control circuits.
5. Where multiple-core cable is used, it must only be used for the ZP fire
detection system devices, attached to the same control panel. Third party
cabling should not be run inside the same shield as the fire detection cable.
Examples are public address and intercom systems. Third party cabling
includes connections between ZP interface units and relays, etc. of other
systems.
6. The shielding must be connected through at each sensor, line device, or
connection, and must be continuous through the complete length of cable.
The connection must be by means of a terminal.
7. Z-Address line must be separated from high voltage cables by at least
300-mm as per BS 5839 Part 1.
8. Continuity of conduit, Pyrotenax, or shielding must be as per BS specification
BS 5839 Part 1 (paragraph 24.5), and the
(BS 7671).
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9. Insulated screened cable must be isolated from building earth except for
connection at the panel.
For Pyrotenax cable (MICC), which can pick up coincidental earths at junction
boxes, the building system must have an effective earth bond between the parts
of a building or buildings where the system is to be installed. The building earth
bond must be sufficient to prevent the fire system from acting as an earth strap
between the different parts of a building or buildings.
Figure 62 and Figure 63 show the correct methods for using shielded cable.
The cable shield must be continuous, and must be connected through at
detectors, or devices, or at connections. Some detectors have provision for the
shield connection, but in those without, a connector should be used to join the
shield.
•
Shields must be connected with a screw connector at each termination.
•
Earth continuity must be checked.
•
The addressable line outgoing and return loop must both be earthed.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
125
Appendix A: ZP wiring guide
For MICC cable, earth must be continuous at each connection or junction, in
accordance with BS specification BS 5839 Part 1 (paragraph 24.5), and the
(BS 7671).
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126
2. Shield connected through
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Appendix A: ZP wiring guide
Unshielded cable should only be used where it is impractical to use shielded
cable. An example would be the upgrading of an existing system to a ZP system,
where the cabling is already in place.
When the Z-Address line is used with unshielded cable, the panel should be set
to AVF mode. In this mode, some of the functional responses are deliberately
slowed, in order to maintain data integrity in an electrically noisy environment.
Electrical noise, generated by third party pulsing systems, can transfer into
Z-Address lines if the third-party cables are adjacent to the fire alarm cables.
In some cases, the use of unshielded cable can cause spurious responses.
Under no circumstances must an unconnected screen be left floating
on a cable. If screened cables are used they must be terminated as described
under “Shielding” on page 124.
1. Z-Address lines may be run in steel or plastic conduit or trunking, or fixed to
walls or supports without conduit.
2. Third party or mains power cabling may not be run adjacent to the Z-Address
line or in the same conduit or trunking.
3. The cores of multiple-core cable may be used for several Z-Address lines
from the same panel, as well as ZP approved sounders, and ZP systems DC
control lines.
4. Where multiple-core cable is used, it must only be used for the ZP fire
detection system devices. Third party cabling should not be run inside the
same outer insulation as the fire detection cable. Examples are public
address and intercom systems. Third party cabling includes connections
between ZP interface units and relays, etc. of other systems.
5. Noise generated by an unshielded Z-Address line may cause interference on
third-party systems, such as intercoms.
6. Unshielded Z-Address lines must be separated from high voltage cables by at
least 300 mm, as per BS 5839 Part 1.
7. Unshielded Z-Address lines must be separated from all other cables by at
least 50 mm.
The Z-Address line operates with a two-core loop length of up to 3,000 m when
no high-power devices are used on the line. High-powered devices, e.g. looppowered sounders, draw more current and engineering calculation is required for
specific line configurations to make sure that the line resistance through various
sections of the line does not cause the line drive voltage at the end of the line to
drop from 20 V to below the specified detector minimum of 16 V. For current
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
127
Appendix A: ZP wiring guide
draws and minimum line voltages see the applicable datasheets. Refer to Ziton if
further assistance is required.
The Z-Address line must meet two criteria; resistance and capacitance. The
maximum permissible resistance of a loop is 75 ȍ. This is the combined
resistance of both conductors. The total capacitance of a line should not exceed
0.7 µF with either leg shorted to earth.
Table 38 below gives the conductor sizes required for different loop lengths,
which meet the above criteria when using normal copper screened cable and no
loop powered sounders. Lengths for high capacitance cables should be reduced
accordingly.
Refer to Table 38 below.
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[2] For two-core cabling
Serial communication lines are data lines used to convey digital communication
between control panels and other devices, as well as between control panels in
multiple-panel network systems. Other devices include devices such as graphics
computers, remote display units, mimic panels, printers, accessory panels, and
so on.
Two types of serial communication ports are used on ZP panels, i.e. RS-232 and
RS-485.
RS-232 ports are used for connection to graphics computers, building
management systems and Ziton accessories, and for interfacing to building
128
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Appendix A: ZP wiring guide
management systems. Each port usually connects to only one piece of
equipment.
1. Cable requires nine conductors plus a shield. The cable is terminated at each
end to a D connector, either 9-pin or 25-pin depending upon the equipment.
2. The shield must be insulated, and earthed only at the point shown on the
system installation drawing.
3. No cables or conductors for other services must be run inside the same
shielding.
4. RS-232 cabling is normally specified for a maximum length of 10 m.
5. RS-232 cabling can be used at up to 100 m cable length, at a slower
communication baud rate. This does not affect the performance of the
system.
RS-485 ports are used for connections between ZP panels and ZP equipment.
For example, between networking panels in a multiple-panel system, from a
panel to a remote display unit, to an intelligent mimic panel, etc. RS-485 is
sometimes used to connect to computers.
A single circuit may interconnect several pieces of equipment.
1. Cable requires two conductors plus a shield. The cable is terminated at each
end to a 9-pin D connector, or onto terminals, depending upon the equipment.
2. The shield must be insulated, and connected only at the points shown on the
system installation drawing. If the shield is not insulated, and could be
earthed, then a three-conductor cable is required. The third wire serves the
function of the screen.
3. Only cable specifically manufactured for RS-485 should be used. This is an
ultra-low capacitance cable with capacitance of 0.04 µf/1000 m.
4. The conductor size, when using shielded cable with a capacitance of
0.04 µf/1000 metres, should be as follows:
0.25 mm² - up to 1,000 m
0.50 mm² - 1,000 to 2,000 m
5. No cables or conductors for other services must be run inside the same
shielding.
6. The maximum communication distance for RS-485 cabling is 2,000 m. If
greater distances are required, please contact Ziton.
7. Where wiring connects to several panels or devices, it must be daisy-chained
from point to point (not connected in a star pattern).
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
129
Appendix A: ZP wiring guide
ZP systems operate on 24 VDC. The majority of field wiring consists of power
supply wiring, for devices that require 24 V, or switched, low voltage DC circuits.
These are used for functions such as audible alarm sounders, mimic panels,
magnetic door holders, CO2, water mist or Halon extinguishing systems, and
control of building systems such as evacuation systems, air conditioning,
dampers, and lifts and elevators.
Wiring specifications depend entirely on the current consumption of the devices
connected, the number of devices on the same line, and the distance of each
device from the control unit.
Any type of cable may be used for DC control circuits. Normally, PVC insulated,
single-core or multiple-core cable is used. It is not necessary to shield these
cables.
See Table 39. Conductor diameters of 0.5 mm² to 2.5 mm² may be used. Cables
should be sized so that a maximum volt drop of 1.0 V occurs at the furthest
device when the circuit is operated at maximum power consumption.
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1.5
750
375
150
75
35
2.5
1250
625
250
125
60
[1] Length of two-core cable giving a 1 V drop
130
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Appendix B
ZP3 system maintenance
This chapter includes information on the fire alarm system and battery
maintenance.
Overview 132
Record keeping 132
System specification 132
Routine maintenance 132
Quarterly maintenance 132
Annual maintenance 134
Maintenance menu 135
Introduction 135
Menu access 135
Maintenance 137
Menu structure 138
Menu functions 139
Interpretation of analogue readings 143
Introduction 143
Reference group 143
Device type readings 144
Reference (low) 146
Device status reading 147
Extinguishing control unit 149
Corrective maintenance 150
Removing and replacing the clock batteries 150
Fuses and indicators 151
Removing and replacing the backup batteries 152
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
131
Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
Two types of maintenance are performed on a ZP3 system:
•
Routine maintenance
•
Corrective maintenance
Routine maintenance must be performed at the prescribed times in order to help
the system operate to its optimum effect. The quarterly and annual services are
designed to check that the system is functioning to its installation specifications,
and must be carried out by an authorized Ziton maintenance company.
The panel operator or the company in-house maintenance staff typically carry out
(P/N 503a daily and weekly check. See the
1160ZE-U-12) if required.
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Only trained personnel can perform corrective maintenance in order to bring the
system back into service after a particular fault.
A record of all alarms, events, checks, tests, and repairs must be entered in a
logbook (see P/N 503-1842ZE-1-02), which is typically maintained by the panel
operator.
Make sure that there is a record available showing how the fire system has been
configured. This is a system specification that should describe in detail all
aspects of the system. The system specification is essential for the system to be
tested and checked during servicing. This document is the blueprint of how the
system has been configured and how it should behave. When changes are made
to the system, the specification should be updated.
Quarterly maintenance is performed every three months. Refer to Table 40 for
the quarterly checks that must be carried out on the ZP3 system.
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Log book analysis
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Prepare for testing by reading through the log book. Any
corrective action that has not yet been taken should be noted
and carried out during the service.
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
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2.
Service and
preservice check
Use the panel menu to take a print out of all the sensors that
are in a service or preservice condition, which indicates that
they are contaminated. Exchange these points with replacement
units, set to the same address. Dirty sensors can be sent to
Ziton for cleaning.
3.
Analogue values
check
Use the panel menu to generate printer reports of device
analogue values. Compare these values to the permitted values
for each point. Replace faulty devices or repair wiring.
4.
Configuration check
Connect Planner to the panel and print out a complete system
configuration from the panel software. Compare this to the
system specification and verify that the system zoning, inputoutput mapping, and other settings have not been changed.
5
Disabled devices
check
Check if the common Disable LED on the front of the panel is
illuminated. If so, use the menu to identify the disabled devices
and investigate the reason. Any faults should be rectified, and
any disabled devices should then be enabled.
6.
Test the alarms
Test one sensor or call point in each zone. Activate each point
in turn, checking that the sounders operate and that the panel
reacts correctly.
Check that signals to auxiliary systems such as the fire station,
air conditioning, building management systems, graphics
displays, or remote indicators function correctly.
7.
Fault test
Remove one sensor in the system and check that the panel
correctly reports the event. Accept the fault, replace the sensor
and reset the panel.
8.
Panel controls test
Check that all control functions and the Accept and Reset
buttons are operating correctly.
9.
Printer test
Make sure that the printer (if fitted) is printing all events
generated during the service.
10.
Monitor earth
leakage
If the earth leakage monitoring feature on the ZP3 system is
enabled, test the earth leakage by applying a short between the
positive leg of the Z-loop and earth. Make sure that the panel
indicates an earth leakage fault. Repeat test using the negative
leg of the Z-loop.
11.
Connection checks
Make sure that all terminal screws are tight and cables inside
the panel are secure. Check that all printed circuit boards
(PCBs) appear to be in good condition, are free of dust and are
securely mounted in the panel.
12.
Battery replacement
check
Make sure that the backup batteries installed are sufficient to
meet the system specifications. If not then replace them with
suitable ones as described under “Removing and replacing the
backup batteries” on page 152.
Check whether the battery replacement date will still be valid
before the next service. If not, then replace the batteries as
described under “Removing and replacing the backup batteries”
on page 152. The age of the battery should be marked on it with
a label, or may be recorded in the log book. SLA batteries
should be replaced at least every four years, or more frequently
in high temperature environments (refer to the manufacturer’s
documentation if necessary).
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Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
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Battery operation
check
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Check that the battery is healthy. One method is to conduct an
“all sounders on” operational test with the mains off and the
system running on batteries. This tests the batteries under a full
load. The battery voltage should be monitored during this test
and should not fall below 24 V.
Remove one battery terminal and verify that the system reports
a battery fault. Replace the terminal, ensure that it is tight, and
reset the panel.
Clean the battery with a damp cloth and lightly lubricate any
exposed terminals with petroleum jelly if necessary.
14.
Time and date set
Set the correct time and date on the panel, if necessary.
15.
Completion of
service
Restore the system to normal condition, enable any disabled
devices, reconnect any disconnected devices, reconnect all
external systems that were disconnected for the testing, and
make sure that the system is left in 100% working condition.
Advise all staff and the remote manned centre that testing is
complete, and that any alarm now received must be treated as
real.
Refer to Table 41 for the annual checks that must be carried out on the ZP3
system.
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1.
Quarterly checks
Make sure the quarterly checks have been performed (see
Table 40 on page 132)
2.
Input-output
configuration test
Using a fairly large representative sample, verify by testing that
the input-output mapping operates as programmed. Activate an
input, such as a sensor, call point, or interface unit, and verify
that the correct outputs operate. Also check that the outputs
function correctly, for example, that they pulse, or operate
continuously, that any delays operate correctly, etc.
3.
Building changes
check
Visually inspect that the internal structural layout of the building,
including inter-office partitioning, has not changed from the
system specification to such an extent that it may affect the
efficient operation of the fire alarm system.
4.
Clock batteries
check
Check whether the lithium clock batteries will still be valid before
the next service. If not, then replace the batteries as described
under “Removing and replacing the clock batteries” on page
150. The age of the battery should be marked on it with a label,
or may be recorded in the log book. SLA batteries should be
replaced at least every four years, or more frequently in high
temperature environments (refer to manufacturer’s
documentation if necessary).
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Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
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Completion of
service
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Restore the system to normal condition, enable any disabled
devices, reconnect any disconnected devices, reconnect all
external systems that were disconnected for the testing, and
ensure that the system is left in 100% working condition. Advise
all staff and the remote manned centre that testing is complete,
and that any alarm now received must be treated as real.
The panel has built-in software functions for providing maintenance diagnostics
and support. These functions are accessed via the Maintenance menu, using the
panel keypad. Menu functions are displayed on the LCD screen.
Access to the menus is via the panel keypad (see Figure 64). Each button on the
keypad is described in Table 42 on page 136.
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Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
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F2
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Numeric buttons
Used to enter number sequences
Menu
Displays the Main Menu
Enter
Used to confirm data entry and save data
Escape or Esc
Exits a function and returns to the previous
level
Home
Exits all menus and returns to the system home
screen
Function buttons
Used within certain menus
Navigation buttons
Used to move up, down, left, or right
ESC
F1
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
The Main Menu is the entry point to all of the maintenance related software
functions, including the Maintenance menu.
1. Press the Menu button on the keypad.
The Main Menu is displayed as shown below.
2. Choose the Maintenance option to display the Maintenance menu.
To do this, press the 2 button on the keypad. The system prompts you to
enter the access code.
3. Enter the maintenance (level 2) access code, and then press Enter.
The Maintenance menu is displayed, as shown below.
The menu name is displayed on the top line, and the menu items are shown with
numbers alongside. Menu items are selected by pressing the numeric keypad
button that matches the item number. Selecting a menu item may cause another
menu to appear or may carry out a particular function. The operator may be
prompted to enter the required information via the keypad.
Any menu can be cancelled and the previous menu presented by pressing the
Esc button. Esc is used to cancel or abort the current activity and return to the
previous activity.
Exit the menu system completely by pressing the Home button This returns the
panel to its normal operation display.
To prevent a system from being inadvertently left in a menu, a timeout is built into
the menu system. The timeout counter starts from the last button press. In menu
selection, the timeout is approximately 45 seconds. If a software function was
started (but was not completed) the timeout is 12 minutes.
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Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
The Maintenance menu structure is displayed as a menu tree in the following list.
Edit Disabled
Point
Zone
Extinguish Systems
Sounders
Outputs
Remote Alarm
View Disabled
Point
Zone
Extinguish Systems
Sounders
Outputs
Remote Alarm
Enable All
All Points
All Outputs
All Point and Outputs
Reports to Display
Point Analogues
Checksums
Zoning
I/O Mapping
Service Reports
Pre-service Reports
Reports to Printer
I/O Map
Points Analogues
Service Reports
Zoning
Checksums
Stop Printer
Calibrate
Test
Detector Test
Walk Test
Flash Faulty Point LED
Comms Enable/Disable
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Menu path
Maintenance > Edit Disabled
Purpose
This menu groups the functions relating to enabling and disabling
points, zones, and outputs.
Point
Enable or disable a point, accept the default point address displayed or
enter the address of the point to be edited. The point address and
current state are displayed. Use the scroll feature to display the next or
previous point to be edited.
Zone
Enable or disable a zone, accept the default zone number displayed or
enter the zone number to be edited. The zone number and status is
displayed. Where the points in a zone are not all set to any one status,
the status is shown as “Various settings”. Use the scroll feature to
display the number of points in the zone and the totals of enabled or
disabled points within the zone.
Extinguish Sys
Enable or disable extinguishing control units. Only valid ECU addresses
are displayed. Use the scroll feature to select the ECU to edit.
Sounders
Enable or disable a sounder output. Only outputs and points declared as
sounders are displayed. Use the scroll feature to select the sounder to
edit.
Note: Compliance with EN 54-2 requires that
sounders are enabled
or disabled together. From Software version 3.11 onwards, this is
achieved by pressing the Restore Disabled Alarms button, which now
toggles between Disable All Sounders and Enable All Sounders, as
indicated by the Sounders Disabled LED.
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Outputs
Enable or disable an I/O-mapped output, accept the default output
address displayed or enter the address of the output to be edited. The
output address and status are displayed. Use the scroll feature to
display the output to be edited.
Remote Alarm
Enable or disable the remote alarm relay (fire brigade) switched outputs.
Both the alarm and fault outputs can be edited in this menu.
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Menu path
Maintenance > View Disabled
Purpose
This menu is used to view points, zones, or outputs that have been
disabled. An Extinguish System submenu is also provided to limit the
points viewed to extinguishing control units. Once a submenu is chosen,
the first disablement in the category is displayed. Use the scroll feature
to view the next or previous disablement.
Points
Display all points that are set to disabled.
Zones
Display zones that are set to disabled. The zone number of the first
disabled zone and the number of points within the zone are displayed.
Extinguish sys
Display extinguishing control units (ECUs) set to disabled.
Sounders
Display sounders that are set to disabled.
Outputs
Display I/O-mapping outputs set to disabled. The address of the first
disabled output is displayed. Use the scroll feature to view the next or
previous disabled output.
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Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
Remote alarm
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Display the enabled/disabled status of the remote alarm relay (fire
brigade) switched outputs. Both the alarm and fault outputs can be
viewed in this menu.
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Menu path
Maintenance > Edit or View Disabled (Points, Zones)
Purpose
This menu lets you temporarily disable an address in half hour intervals.
This allows multiple zones and line input devices to be disabled but not
panel or panel bus outputs. After the period expires, the address
enables again automatically. The menu allows the user to select Auto
Enable, after a disablement period configurable from 30 minutes to 12
hours.
Points
To auto enable any point select Edit Disabled from the Maintenance
menu. Select the point to be auto enabled and select Auto, using the
arrows to scroll up or down to set the required time period. Use the
scroll feature to display the next or previous point to be disabled. Use
the Enter key to confirm the selection.
Zones
To auto enable zones select Edit Disabled from the Maintenance menu.
Select the zones to be auto enabled and select Auto, using the arrows
to scroll up or down to set the required time period. Use the Enter key to
confirm the selection.
Note: The disabled status can be overridden by:
•
A local enable event from the local panel
•
A remote enable event from a remote panel via the peer to peer
network
•
A change over from day to night mode may extend the disabled
period to coincide with the Disable by Night setting.
In the case of dual-sensor detectors, both smoke and heat elements are
disabled.
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Menu path
Maintenance > Enable All
Purpose
This menu provides a quick method to enable points and outputs or
both. The menu options available are: Enable all…
Points
Enable all system Z-loop devices. This includes sensors, call points,
devices, zones, and loop or base sounders.
Outputs
Enable all panel outputs. This includes all extinguishing control units,
panel sounder outputs, and the remote manned centre output.
Points and Outputs
Enable all Z-loop devices and panel outputs, i.e. this is the same as
selecting both options above.
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Menu path
Maintenance > Reports to Display
Purpose
This menu provides a selection of reports to view on the display. Report
messages can be manually or automatically scrolled. The reports that
can be viewed are listed below with a brief description of each report.
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Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
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Point Analogues
A real time display is shown per point of analogue values. Point ID,
sensitivity, threshold, and condition are also displayed. Use the scroll
feature to view the next or previous point analogues.
Checksums
Two numeric values are displayed, a calculated and a stored value. If
the values are not equal, data corruption has occurred.
Zoning
Generate a report showing which points are allocated to a zone. The
zone number and the first point allocated to the zone is displayed. Use
the scroll feature to display the next or previous point allocated to the
zone.
I/O Mapping
Display a report of all the programmed outputs with their respective
programmed configuration details and associated input triggers. Use the
scroll keys to view the next or previous outputs and left or right arrow
keys to view associated inputs.
Service
Generate a report of all sensors that require servicing. A service
condition indicates that the sensor should be cleaned or replaced as
soon as possible. Use the scroll feature to display the next or previous
point. The point displayed may be limited to a date range.
Pre-service
Generate a report of all sensors that are in a preservice condition. A
sensor in a preservice condition does not need immediate attention.
Preservice reports allow forward planning by the installer. Use the scroll
feature to display the next or previous point. The points displayed can
be limited to a date range.
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Menu path
Maintenance > Reports to Printer
I/O map
Generate a printout of all I/O-mapping entries.
Points analogue
Generate a snapshot of all points analogues at the time of the print
report initialisation. Enter an address range of points to print or accept
the default value (all).
Service reports
Generate a report of all sensors that require servicing or are in a
preservice condition. A service condition indicates that the sensor
should be cleaned or replaced as soon as possible. A sensor in a
preservice condition does not need immediate attention, but serves as a
warning that the sensor will reach a service condition in the future.
Zoning
Generate a printout of which points are allocated to a zone. The printout
shows the zone number and the points assigned within it.
Checksums
Two numeric values are printed, a calculated value and a stored value.
If the two values are not equal, then code corruption has occurred.
Stop printer
Cancel any print operation in progress.
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Menu path
Maintenance > Calibrate Detectors
Purpose
The panel automatically calibrates every sensor every 24 hours, at
midnight.
This menu lets you manually recalibrate the sensors. When initiated a
message “Calibrating…” is displayed on the LCD screen while
calibration takes place. This takes about one minute to complete.
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Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
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Menu path
Maintenance > Test
Purpose
This menu allows you to configure automatic and manual test modes to
provide simple one-man testing of a complete system.
Detector test
Sensors can be individually or globally configured to self-test every 24
hours. This test is done at midnight, and a report is generated if any
sensors fail the test.
The self-test routine can be manually initiated from within this menu for
an immediate real time test. The display indicates the number of
detectors tested and passed. A fault event is generated if failure occurs.
If a printer is fitted, a report is automatically printed.
Walk test
The walk test procedure is executed on a zonal basis. A zone is placed
in walk test mode, and the sensors/devices within the zone are manually
tested. The outputs and alarms for the selected zone are automatically
disabled. At the end of the test, the display shows the number of
devices in the zone, the number triggered and passed, and the number
not triggered and failed. The respective zone LED on the fire panel is lit.
A printed report is also produced. If an alarm occurs in a different zone,
the panel cancels the test, and initiates a real alarm.
Flash faulty LED
Enabling this function flashes the LED on a point that reports a fault.
This assists with visually finding and identification of the device that
reports a fault.
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Menu path
Maintenance > Comms Enable/Disable
Purpose
This menu lets you temporarily enable or disable PP3 communications
to panels on the network, without altering their filters etc. When edited
on one panel it replicates to all panels that are configured to be online
via setup, so that they all agree on who is expected to be online.
When Comms Enable/Disable is selected, the following menu is displayed (see
Figure 65). The panel number, which defaults to 001, can be entered using the
panel keypad.
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As the panel number is entered, the panel status changes accordingly. The panel
status can either be Enabled, Disabled, Offline, or Invalid. An invalid panel
number results in an invalid condition, which is indicated by a blank in the panel
status field.
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Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
The panel number is entered from right to left. Illegal panel values may occur as
the panel number is being entered, which is why an invalid condition is displayed
as blank (to prevent confusion).
When the panel number is entered, the menu text changes from “Enter-Save” to
“Home-Save” thereby making the Enter button functionality redundant. Pressing
the F1 button toggles the panel status of the selected panel.
If the Esc button is pressed, all changes made in this menu will be lost. Pressing
the Home button saves all changes.
The panel reads six analogue values from each device, each time it polls that
device. Each value is a whole number that can range from 0 to 255. These
values can be interpreted in order to provide a comprehensive analysis of each
device and the system as a whole.
The six readings are listed below in the order in which they are read and
conventionally displayed:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Reading 1
Reading 2
Reading 3
Reading 4
Reading 5
Reading 6
Reference group
Polling group
Device type
Reference (low)
Device status (analogue reading)
Device specific
The following sections give the meanings of each analogue reading. Reading 6 is
only relevant for certain specialized devices, and is usually zero.
The reference group reading identifies the device reference group type. This
value is used for the following:
•
Decide if a device is online (connected) or offline (disconnected).
•
Determine the health of a device and how well the device or the line driver
board is calibrated.
•
Identify the device as an intrinsically safe (EX), ZR, ZP or ZX device.
The values are interpreted as follows (as for Table 37 on page 109):
•
0–39: A value in this range indicates to the panel that there is no device at the
polled address. It is offline.
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Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
•
70–100: Values in this range indicate an intrinsically safe (EX) device. The
norm for intrinsically safe devices is 84, which indicates best calibration.
•
135–163: The norm for ZR and ZX devices is 152.
•
197–226: Values in this range indicate a healthy non-intrinsically safe device
(ZP). The norm for devices is 213, which indicates best calibration. If a device
falls outside the range 205 to 218 then it should be recalibrated.
Values falling outside the above ranges indicate a very poorly calibrated or
unhealthy device. The panel treats all such devices as invalid. If occurring on
multiple devices, a wiring fault may be suspected.
Readings two (polling group) and three (device type) together with reading one
(reference group) identify the type of the device. The device types indicated by
combinations of the three readings are provided in Table 52 below.
The Code column gives a three-digit identifier for the device, each digit derived
from the values of the device type readings. Some intrinsically safe devices may
have the same code as standard devices but are distinguished by their reference
group reading (reading 1).
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ZP710-2
Analogue ionization sensor
212
197-226 (213)
228-255 (245)
197-226 (213)
ZP720-2
Analogue heat sensor
213
197-226 (213)
228-255 (245)
165-194 (180)
ZP720-3
Analogue heat sensor
217
197-226 (213)
228-255 (245)
039-068 (054)
ZP725-2
Analogue heat sensor,
with rate of rise element
214
197-226 (213)
228-255 (245)
133-162 (152)
ZP730-2
Analogue optical sensor
215
197-226 (213)
228-255 (245)
102-131 (118)
ZP732-2
Analogue duet sensor
(optical/heat)
216
197-226 (213)
228-255 (245)
070-100 (084)
ZP5-IF8-22
Eight-way interface fire
call point board
222
197-226 (213)
197-226 (213)
197-226 (213)
ZP5-IF8-23
Eight-way interface fire
sprinkler board
223
197-226 (213)
197-226 (213)
165-194 (180)
ZP740-2-23
Analogue interface fire
sprinkler
223
197-226 (213)
197-226 (213)
165-194 (180)
ZP5-IF8-24
Eight-way interface fire
general purpose board
224
197-226 (213)
197-226 (213)
133-162 (152)
ZP740-2-24
Analogue interface fire
general purpose
224
197-226 (213)
197-226 (213)
133-162 (152)
ZP745
Interface unit
224
197-226 (213)
197-226 (213)
133-162 (152)
A45E
Interface unit
224
197-226 (213)
197-226 (213)
133-162 (152)
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ZP740ST
Analogue interface for
high sensitive smoke
detector (stratos)
233
197-226 (213)
165-194 (180)
165-194 (180)
ZLS1APIC
Analogue interface for
high sensitive smoke
detector (stratos)
233
197-226 (213)
165-194 (180)
165-194 (180)
ZP755
Loop sounder (all
variants)
241
197-226 (213)
133-162 (152)
228-255 (245)
ZP750-2
Line relay
242
197-226 (213)
133-162 (152)
197-226 (213)
A50E
Line relay
242
197-226 (213)
133-162 (152)
197-226 (213)
A51E
High voltage line relay
242
197-226 (213)
133-162 (152)
197-226 (213)
ZP752-2
Dual line sounder unit
245
197-226 (213)
133-162 (152)
102-131 (118)
ZP753-2
Addressable LED
indicator
246
197-226 (213)
133-162 (152)
070-100 (084)
ZP754*-2
Addressable line sounder 247
197-226 (213)
133-162 (152)
039-068 (054)
ZP755
Loop sounder (ZP754
mode)
247
197-226 (213)
133-162 (152)
039-068 (054)
ZP5-IF8-52
Eight-way interface fire
non-fire/auxiliary board
252
197-226 (213)
102-131 (118)
197-226 (213)
ZP740-2-52
Analogue interface nonfire/auxiliary
252
197-226 (213)
102-131 (118)
197-226 (213)
ZP5-IF8-53
Eight-way interface fire
non-alarm/control board
253
197-226 (213)
102-131 (118)
165-194 (180)
ZP740-2-53
Analogue interface nonalarm/control
253
197-226 (213)
102-131 (118)
165-194 (180)
ZP5-IF8-54
Eight-way interface fire
non-alarm/control board
254
197-226 (213)
102-131 (118)
133-162 (152)
ZP740-2-54
Analogue interface nonalarm/control
254
197-226 (213)
102-131 (118)
133-162 (152)
ZP5-IF8-62
Eight-way interface fire
security latching board
262
197-226 (213)
070-100 (084)
197-226 (213)
ZP740-2-62
Analogue interface
security latching
262
197-226 (213)
070-100 (084)
197-226 (213)
ZP5-IF8-64
Eight-way interface fire
security non-latching
board
264
197-226 (213)
070-100 (084)
133-162 (152)
ZP740-2-64
Analogue interface
security non-latching
264
197-226 (213)
070-100 (084)
133-162 (152)
ZX832-2
Analogue duet sensor
(paradigm) optical/heat
416
133-162 (152)
228-255 (245)
070-100 (084)
ZR420
Radio heat detector
423
133-162 (152)
197-226 (213)
165-194 (180)
ZR485
Radio call-point
424
133-162 (152)
197-226 (213)
133-162 (152)
ZR430
Radio optic detector
425
133-162 (152)
197-226 (213)
102-131 (118)
Radio aux.
Radio auxiliary interface
426
133-162 (152)
197-226 (213)
070-100 (084)
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
145
Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
$
1
(
>
>
!
>
#
Radio
sounder
Radio I/O unit (includes
sounders)
427
133-162 (152)
197-226 (213)
039-068 (054)
Radio I/O
group
Radio I/O group
(including sounder
groups)
437
133-162 (152)
165-194 (180)
039-068 (054)
ZP710Ex-1
Intrinsically safe analogue 655
ionization sensor
070-100 (084)
102-131 (118)
102-131 (118)
ZP720Ex-1
Intrinsically safe analogue 656
heat sensor (change to
ZP720Ex-1) FT
070-100 (084)
102-131 (118)
070-100 (084)
ZP785-2
Call point
222
197-226 (213)
197-226 (213)
197-226 (213)
ZP785-3
Call point- 3 second
response
222
197-226 (213)
197-226 (213)
197-226 (213)
ZP786Ex-1
Intrinsically safe analogue 665
call point (break-glass)
070-100 (084)
070-100 (084)
102-131 (118)
ZP740Ex-1
Intrinsically safe analogue 666
interface unit (fire)
070-100 (084)
070-100 (084)
070-100 (084)
ZP740Ex-1
Intrinsically safe analogue 667
interface unit (non-fire)
070-100 (084)
070-100 (084)
039-068 (054)
ZP3-ECU
Extinguishing control unit
- address 1
244
197-226 (213)
133-162 (152)
133-162 (152)
ZP3-ECU
Extinguishing control unit
- address 2
242
197-226 (213)
133-162 (152)
197-226 (213)
ZP5-570-2
Analogue interface for
conventional sensor line
232
197-226 (213)
165-194 (180)
197-226 (213)
A70E
(emulated)
Analogue interface for
conventional sensor line
232
197-226 (213)
165-194 (180)
197-226 (213)
ZP5-574
Four-way conventional
interface
235
197-226 (213)
165-194 (180)
102-131 (118)
ZP7BMR
Analogue interface fire
general purpose
224
197-226 (213)
192-226 (213)
133-162 (152)
ZP7BM2000
Analogue interface fire
general purpose
224
197-226 (213)
192-226 (213)
133-162 (152)
The reference (low) reading is used to determine that the line on which the
device is connected is healthy and is not subject to residual or unwanted signals.
For effective operation of the line this value must be below 10. A reading of zero
is quite usual.
If the low reference reading ever rises above 38 then the panel treats the device
generating the reading as invalid.
146
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
The device status reading is sometimes also referred to simply as the analogue
reading. It is a precise indicator of how strongly the device is sensing the
environmental factors (e.g. heat or smoke) it is designed to detect. For some
devices the analogue reading may indicate some other measure such as the
status of a switch.
The panel interprets the reading according to the device type. The panel uses
sophisticated algorithms based on these readings and their change over time to
determine the true conditions in the area covered by the device. Viewing a
snapshot of the analogue readings cannot provide information with the same
degree of accuracy; nevertheless values can be interpreted, as in the following
tables, in order to help assess the status of a device.
The resting values of the analogues when devices are in normal conditions are
provided in Table 53. The resting value is referred to as the idle value and can
take on any values in the ranges given below, usually this is near the midpoint of
the range.
&
$
"
#
C
B
!
#
$
5
ZP710-2
20–108
20–108
20–108
20–108
ZP720-2
25–123
25–143
25–186
25–186
ZP725-2
25–123
25–151
25–174
25–194
ZP730-2
20–108
20–108
20–108
20–108
ZP732-2 optic
20–108
20–108
20–108
20–108
ZP732-2 heat
25–163
25–163
25–179
25–179
ZP720-3
25–123
25–163
25–179
25–179
ZP740-2
59–137
59–137
59–137
59–137
ZP745
59–137
59–137
59–137
59–137
ZP770-2
59–137
59–137
59–137
59–137
ZP740ST
39–104
39–104
39–104
39–104
ZP755
40–110
40–110
40–110
40–110
ZP750-2
59–140
59–140
59–140
59–140
ZP752-2
40–140
40–140
40–140
40–140
ZP753-2
40–110
40–110
40–110
40–110
ZP754*-2
40–110
40–110
40–110
40–110
ZP5-IF8
59–137
59–137
59–137
59–137
ZX832-2 optic
20–100
20–100
20–100
20–100
ZX832–2 heat
25–164
25–164
25–179
25–179
ZR420
85
85
85
85
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
147
Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
$
C
!
#
$
5
ZR430
85
85
85
85
Radio Sounder
85
85
85
85
ZP710Ex-1
10–54
10–54
10–54
10–54
ZP720Ex-1
12–71
12–71
12–93
12–100
ZP785-3
59–137
59–137
59–137
59–137
ZP786Ex-1
29–58
29–58
29–58
29–58
ZP740Ex-1
29–58
29–58
29–58
29–58
ZP5-570-2
59–137
59–137
59–137
59–137
ZP5-574
59–137
59–137
59–137
59–137
In Table 54 below, the analogue values that indicate an alarm state are shown
for various devices. For some devices other value ranges are used to indicate
such conditions as fault, service, preservice and prealarm.
&
1
"
)
5
(
C
8
B
)
)
)
$
'
8
$
$
'
8
$
'
8
$
'
ZP710-2
N+68
168
N+81
180
N+94
190
N+105
200
ZP720-2
145
N/A
a(144)
N/A
a(187)
N/A
188
N/A
ZP720-3
165
N/A
a(164)
N/A
a(180)
N/A
181
N/A
ZP725-2
125
N/A
153
N/A
176
N/A
196
N/A
ZP730-2
N+77
158
N+90
176
N+102
186
N+110
205
ZP732-2 optic
element
N+77
158
N+90
176
N+102
186
N+110
205
ZP732-2 heat
element
165
N/A
a(164)
N/A
a(180)
N/A
181
N/A
ZP720-3
165
N/A
a(164)
N/A
a(180)
N/A
181
N/A
ZP5-IF8
138
187
138
187
138
187
138
187
ZP740-2
138
187
138
187
138
187
138
187
ZP745
138
187
138
187
138
187
138
187
ZP770-2
138
187
138
187
138
187
138
187
ZP740ST
150
255
150
255
150
255
150
255
ZP755
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
ZP750-2
141
141
141
141
141
141
141
141
ZP752-2
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
ZP753-2
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
ZP754-2
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
ZX832-2 optic
element
a(N+49)9 255
a(N+60)
255
a(N+80)
255
a(N+105) 255
148
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
1
)
(
C
8
)
)
$
'
8
$
$
'
8
$
'
8
$
'
ZX832-2 heat
element
a(165)
N/A
a(164)
N/A
a(180)
N/A
a(181)
N/A
ZR420
181
181
181
181
181
181
181
181
ZR430
181
181
181
181
181
181
181
181
Radio sounder
181
181
181
181
181
181
181
181
ZP710Ex-1
N+34
255
N+40
255
N+47
255
N+52
255
ZP720Ex-1
73
N/A
73
N/A
95
N/A
102
N/A
ZP785-2
138
187
138
187
138
187
138
187
ZP785-3
138
187
138
187
138
187
138
187
ZP786Ex-1
59
98
59
98
59
98
59
98
ZP740Ex-1
59
98
59
98
59
98
59
98
ZP5-570-2
138
187
138
187
138
187
138
187
ZP5-574
138
187
138
187
138
187
138
187
a = algorithm
Note: When the calculated N+ values fall outside of the minimum/maximum levels, the
minimum/maximum levels take precedence. N is the nominal idle value read on a daily basis. N
value adjustment is limited to 10 counts maximum, this avoids sensitivity shift in a smouldering
fire situation.
The extinguishing control unit in particular makes extensive use of readings 5
and 6 to indicate status. These analogues are shown in Table 55 for reading 5
and Table 56 for reading 6.
&
1
"
:
'
B
8
Normal idle value
39–65
Manual when door locked
68–100
Loss of signal
< 39
General panel fault
103–132
Power supply fault
> 163
Relay operated
141–163
&
1
"
:
'
B
8
.
)
.
Fault, low idle
< 39
Auto released
39–65
Manual released
68–100
)
0
0
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
149
Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
1
8
System locked-off (released)
103–132
Auto non-released
141–163
System locked-off (non-released)
166–195
Manual (non-released)
> 198
)
Lithium clock batteries on the main board ensure that the system date and time
stay current despite power outages. These must be replaced before they reach
their end-of-life date.
The lithium clock batteries contain substances that are potentially
hazardous to your health and to the environment.
1. Open the front door of the ZP3 panel.
2. Locate the lithium clock batteries on the main board (see Figure 66).
3. Remove the batteries by sliding them out from under the securing pin.
4. Install two new lithium batteries into the space provided making sure that the
positive sides of the batteries are facing towards the front of the panel.
5. Dispose of the old batteries as required by local ordinances or regulations. Do
dispose of the batteries in unsorted municipal waste.
Ï
ÿ
ñ
Ð
>
)
7
"
Lithium
batteries
Securing
pin
150
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
Figure 67 shows the fuses and indicators used primarily for fault finding on the
power supply. A list of fuses and indicators is provided in the accompanying
legend.
Fuses must only be replaced with the value and type shown. Use of an incorrect
fuse can affect safety and reliability.
ÿ
=
ÿ
6
7
8
1
22
2
3
4
5
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
8
*
8
9
10
1
(
>
>
7
1.
LED 1
Battery charging
-
25.4 × 6.3 mm
2.
Fuse F6
Auxiliary 24 VDC supply
S2000mAL250V
20 × 5 mm 250V, 2.0A slow-blow
3.
Fuse F1
Battery fuse
S6300mAL250V
20 × 5 mm 250V, 6.3A slow-blow
4.
Fuse F8
Monitor sound
F1AL250V
20 × 5 mm 250V, 1.0A fast-blow
5.
Fuse F7
Monitor sound
F1AL250V
20 × 5 mm 250V, 1.0A fast-blow
6.
Fuse F5
RMC FLT alarm
F1AL250V
20 × 5 mm 250V, 1.0A fast-blow
7.
Fuse F2
Monitor sounders
F1AL250V
20 × 5 mm 250V, 1.0A fast-blow
8.
Fuse F3
Monitor sounders
F1AL250V
20 × 5 mm 250V, 1.0A fast-blow
9.
Fuse F9
PSU 24 VDC supply
S4000mAL250V
20 × 5 mm 250V, 4.0A slow-blow
10.
Fuse F10 PSU 5 VDC logic
(internal)
S500mAL250V
20 × 5 mm 250V, 500mA slowblow
11.
LED 21
Default = Off
-
Green: On = ADC failure
12.
LED 18
Default = Off
-
Green: On = Earth fault
13.
LED 19
Default = Off
-
Green: On = Loop fault
14.
LED 20
Default = Off
-
Green: On = Sounder fault
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
151
Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
8
*
8
1
(
>
>
7
15.
LED 37
Internal supply 24 VDC
-
Green: On = supply on, Off =
supply faulty
16.
LED 15
Internal supply for CPU
(5 VDC)
-
Green: On = supply on, Off =
supply faulty
17.
LED 14
Internal supply for logic
(5 VDC)
-
Green: On = supply on, Off =
supply faulty
18.
LED 8
Internal supply for
RS-232 (12 VDC íve)
-
Green: On = supply on, Off =
supply faulty
19.
LED 7
Internal supply for
RS-232 (12 VDC +ve)
-
Green: On = supply on, Off =
supply faulty
20.
LED 2
Internal supply for
ZP3AB-SCB-D control
bus driver
-
Green: On = supply on, Off =
supply faulty
21.
LED 4
Mains 230 VAC supply
-
Green: On = supply on, Off =
supply faulty
22.
Fuse FM
Mains fuse
F5AL250VAC
BS1362
The backup batteries may need to be replaced for a number of reasons, for
example, end-of-life, insufficient capacity, etc.
•
The backup batteries, although only 24 VDC, carry enough charge to be
dangerous.
•
When connecting batteries, or when working in the vicinity of the battery
terminals, take care not to accidentally cause a short circuit. In particular
metallic tools or metallic watchstraps can also inflict
burns to the user
as well as cause a short circuit.
Ë
Î
D
Î
ó
Î
The backup batteries contain substances that are potentially hazardous
to your health and to the environment.
1. Disconnect the connections from the positive and negative terminals on the
backup batteries.
2. Loosen and remove the wing nut from the batteries securing bracket (see
Figure 68 on page 153).
3. Remove the bracket securing the backup batteries to the chassis.
4. Remove the backup batteries.
5. Install new backup batteries as described under “Backup batteries” on page
46.
152
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
6. Dispose of the battery as required by local ordinances or regulations. Do
dispose of the batteries in unsorted municipal waste.
ÿ
>
)
"
7
(
"
Wing nut
Ï
ñ
Ð
Battery
mounting
bracket
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
153
Appendix B: ZP3 system maintenance
154
ZP3 Fire Control Panel Installation, Commissioning, and Maintenance Manual
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