IBM ServeRAID
User’s Reference
IBM ServeRAID
User’s Reference
Note: Before using this information and the product it supports, be sure to read the general information in
Appendix D, “Warranty information” on page 259 and Appendix E, “Notices” on page 271.
Eighth Edition (July 2004)
© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2004. All rights reserved.
US Government Users Restricted Rights – Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule
Contract with IBM Corp.
Safety
Before installing this product, read the Safety Information.
Antes de instalar este produto, leia as Informações de Segurança.
Pred instalací tohoto produktu si prectete prírucku bezpecnostních instrukcí.
Læs sikkerhedsforskrifterne, før du installerer dette produkt.
Lees voordat u dit product installeert eerst de veiligheidsvoorschriften.
Ennen kuin asennat tämän tuotteen, lue turvaohjeet kohdasta Safety Information.
Avant d'installer ce produit, lisez les consignes de sécurité.
Vor der Installation dieses Produkts die Sicherheitshinweise lesen.
Prima di installare questo prodotto, leggere le Informazioni sulla Sicurezza.
Les sikkerhetsinformasjonen (Safety Information) før du installerer dette produktet.
Antes de instalar este produto, leia as Informações sobre Segurança.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
iii
Antes de instalar este producto, lea la información de seguridad.
Läs säkerhetsinformationen innan du installerar den här produkten.
iv
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Statement 1:
DANGER
Electrical current from power, telephone, and communication cables is
hazardous.
To avoid a shock hazard:
• Do not connect or disconnect any cables or perform installation,
maintenance, or reconfiguration of this product during an electrical
storm.
• Connect all power cords to a properly wired and grounded electrical
outlet.
• Connect to properly wired outlets any equipment that will be attached
to this product.
• When possible, use one hand only to connect or disconnect signal
cables.
• Never turn on any equipment when there is evidence of fire, water, or
structural damage.
• Disconnect the attached power cords, telecommunications systems,
networks, and modems before you open the device covers, unless
instructed otherwise in the installation and configuration procedures.
• Connect and disconnect cables as described in the following table
when installing, moving, or opening covers on this product or
attached devices.
To Connect:
To Disconnect:
1.
Turn everything OFF.
1.
Turn everything OFF.
2.
First, attach all cables to devices.
2.
First, remove power cords from outlet.
3.
Attach signal cables to connectors.
3.
Remove signal cables from connectors.
4.
Attach power cords to outlet.
4.
Remove all cables from devices.
5.
Turn device ON.
Safety
v
Statement 2:
CAUTION:
When replacing the lithium battery, use only IBM Part Number 33F8354 or an
equivalent type battery recommended by the manufacturer. If your system has a
module containing a lithium battery, replace it only with the same module type
made by the same manufacturer. The battery contains lithium and can explode
if not properly used, handled, or disposed of.
Do not:
•
Throw or immerse into water
•
Heat to more than 100°C (212°F)
•
Repair or disassemble
Dispose of the battery as required by local ordinances or regulations.
Statement 5:
CAUTION:
The power control button on the device and the power switch on the power
supply do not turn off the electrical current supplied to the device. The device
also might have more than one power cord. To remove all electrical current
from the device, ensure that all power cords are disconnected from the power
source.
2
1
WARNING: Handling the cord on this product or cords associated with accessories
sold with this product will expose you to lead, a chemical known to the State of
California to cause cancer, and birth defects or other reproductive harm. Wash
hands after handling.
ADVERTENCIA: El contacto con el cable de este producto o con cables de
accesorios que se venden junto con este producto, pueden exponerle al plomo, un
elemento químico que en el estado de California de los Estados Unidos está
considerado como un causante de cancer y de defectos congénitos, además de otros
riesgos reproductivos. Lávese las manos después de usar el producto.
vi
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Contents
Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii
Preface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
How this book is organized . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
Notices and statements used in this book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvi
Working inside the server with the power on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Handling static-sensitive devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
IBM ServeRAID Support CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii
ROM Update wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii
Device drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii
IPSSEND and IPSMON command-line programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii
AACCLI command-line program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii
Diskette images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
ServeRAID files needed to install Microsoft Cluster Server (MSCS) . . . . . . . . . xix
ServeRAID publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
IBM ServeRAID Applications CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx
ServeRAID Manager program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx
Supported operating systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx
Part 1. Installation and configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Chapter 1. Product information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Option package contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Controller features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Connector locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
ServeRAID-4H controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
ServeRAID-4Mx controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
ServeRAID-4Lx controller. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
ServeRAID-5i controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
ServeRAID-6M controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
ServeRAID-6i/6i+ controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
ServeRAID-7k Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
ServeRAID-7t controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Chapter 2. Installing and cabling a ServeRAID controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using a ServeRAID controller in a server with Active PCI features . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Windows NT 4.0 with Active PCI features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Windows 2000 with Active PCI features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Windows Server 2003 with Active PCI features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using NetWare with Active PCI features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the ServeRAID-4 controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting external devices to a ServeRAID-4 controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the ServeRAID-5i controller. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preparing for installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the ServeRAID-6M controller. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting external devices to a ServeRAID-6M controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the ServeRAID-6i/6i+ controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preparing for installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
15
15
16
16
16
16
17
20
21
21
22
24
26
27
27
28
vii
Installing the ServeRAID-7k controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replacing the Battery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the ServeRAID-7t controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preparing for installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
30
30
31
32
32
32
Chapter 3. RAID technology overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stripe-unit size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting a RAID level and tuning performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supported RAID levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID level-0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID level-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID level-1 Enhanced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID level-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID level-5 Enhanced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID level-5E Enhanced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID level-x0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Drive-state descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physical-drive-state descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Logical-drive-state descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
35
35
36
36
37
38
39
40
42
43
45
47
47
47
Chapter 4. Configuring ServeRAID controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Obtaining ServeRAID updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating BIOS and firmware code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the ServeRAID controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using ServeRAID Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fine-tuning your configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing your configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Getting assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
49
49
49
50
50
58
59
60
Chapter 5. Installing ServeRAID device drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Chapter 6. Configuring two ServeRAID controllers in a failover environment .
Hardware requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation guidelines and restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preparing the active controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the active controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the active controller. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting the active controller to the enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring ServeRAID arrays and logical drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preparing the passive controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the passive controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the passive controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting the passive controller to the enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Completing the failover environment installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the device driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Verifying the configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
viii
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
65
65
66
67
67
67
69
69
75
75
76
77
77
77
78
Part 2. Utility programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Chapter 7. Using the ServeRAID Mini-Configuration program. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing the Mini-Configuration program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing the controller status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing the configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the advanced configuration functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
81
81
82
82
83
Chapter 8. Using the ARC utility (Serial ATA controllers only). . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Array Configuration Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing arrays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating arrays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Initializing disk drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rescanning disk drives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using SATASelect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the disk utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing the event log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
85
85
85
87
89
89
89
91
91
Chapter 9. Installing and using the IPSSEND command-line program . . . . . . . 93
Installing the IPSSEND command-line program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Installing IPSSEND for Windows or OS/2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Installing IPSSEND for NetWare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Installing IPSSEND for Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Installing IPSSEND for OpenServer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Installing IPSSEND for UnixWare. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Starting the IPSSEND command-line program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Starting IPSSEND from Windows, NetWare, OS/2, Linux, OpenServer, or
UnixWare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Starting IPSSEND from DOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Using the IPSSEND command-line program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
FlashCopy function (for Windows only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Server roll-out functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Error-recovery functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Problem-isolation and debug functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
RAID configuration functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Chapter 10. Installing and using the IPSMON command-line program
(NetWare only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Installing the IPSMON command-line program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Using the IPSMON command-line program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Chapter 11. Installing and using the AACCLI command-line program . . . . . .
Installing the AACCLI command-line program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing AACCLI for Windows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing AACCLI for NetWare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing AACCLI for Linux. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing AACCLI for OpenServer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing AACCLI for UnixWare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the AACCLI command-line program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting AACCLI from Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting AACCLI from the Windows command prompt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting AACCLI from NetWare, Linux, OpenServer, or UnixWare . . . . . . . . . .
Using the AACCLI command-line program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using AACCLI in batch mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Opening and closing a controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using AACCLI with command files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
121
121
121
121
122
122
123
124
124
124
124
125
125
126
126
Contents
ix
General control functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Container (array) functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controller functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disk functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Task functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enclosure functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Backup and restore functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
127
127
129
130
130
131
131
Chapter 12. Installing and starting the ServeRAID Manager program . . . . . .
Installing the ServeRAID Manager program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing ServeRAID Manager in Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows
Server 2003, Windows NT 4.0, or Windows 98 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing ServeRAID Manager in NetWare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing ServeRAID Manager in Red Hat Linux, SuSE Linux, Turbolinux,
or SCO UnitedLinux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing ServeRAID Manager in OS/2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing ServeRAID Manager in OpenServer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing ServeRAID Manager in UnixWare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the ServeRAID Manager program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the ServeRAID Manager program in Windows XP, Windows 2000,
Windows Server 2003, Windows NT 4.0, or Windows 98 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the ServeRAID Manager program in NetWare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the ServeRAID Manager program in OS/2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the ServeRAID Manager program in OpenServer, UnixWare,
and Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
133
133
134
135
135
136
137
137
139
139
139
140
140
Part 3. Installing the IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Chapter 13. Introduction to the IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution . . . . . . . . . . 143
x
Chapter 14. Preparing to install or change a cluster solution . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terms and definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ServeRAID considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controller considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Array or logical drive considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
147
147
148
148
148
148
Chapter 15. Configuring ServeRAID controllers for clustering . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the controller for Microsoft Cluster Server using Windows 2003,
Windows 2000, or Windows NT 4.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring a controller for clustering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring ServeRAID arrays and logical drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
151
151
152
154
Chapter 16. Monitoring and updating an IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution . .
Checking the ownership of a physical drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding logical drives to a cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Validating a cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing merge-group numbers and other cluster information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
159
159
160
161
162
Chapter 17. Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software on Windows NT 4.0 . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the ServeRAID Manager program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating additional ServeRAID disk resources on a Windows NT 4.0
ServeRAID cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
163
163
163
164
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
166
Deleting and re-creating a ServeRAID logical drive resource . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Uninstalling MSCS on ServeRAID servers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating ServeRAID software in an MSCS cluster environment . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding an additional ServeRAID controller to an existing Windows NT 4.0
Cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software on Windows 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the ServeRAID Manager program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating additional ServeRAID disk resources on a Windows 2000
ServeRAID cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting and re-creating a ServeRAID logical drive resource . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Upgrading the IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution from Microsoft Windows NT
4.0 to Windows 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Uninstalling MSCS on ServeRAID servers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding an additional ServeRAID controller to an existing Windows 2000
Cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software on Windows Server 2003 . . . . . .
Installing the ServeRAID Manager program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating additional ServeRAID disk resources on a Windows Server 2003
Cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting and Recreating a ServeRAID logical drive resource . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Upgrading the IBM ServeRAID cluster Solution from Microsoft Windows 2000
to Windows Server 2003 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Un-configuring Cluster Service on a Windows Server 2003
ServeRAID cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
167
168
169
170
173
173
173
177
178
178
179
180
183
183
183
186
187
187
188
Part 4. Maintenance and troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Chapter 18. Obtaining ServeRAID updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Downloadable files from the World Wide Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Updating the ServeRAID BIOS, firmware, and software code for clustering . . . . . 193
Chapter 19. Upgrading a ServeRAID controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Updating device drivers, BIOS and firmware code, and utility programs . . . . . . . . 196
Replacing the old controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Chapter 20. Solving ServeRAID problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM ServeRAID Support CD warning message while starting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ServeRAID controller messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ServeRAID startup (POST) messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ISPR register codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BCS and ECS register codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recovering from problems starting the ServeRAID Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recovering from an incomplete format of a physical drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rebuilding a defunct drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recovering from defunct drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rebuilding a hot-swap drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Restoring a logical drive configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recovering from multiple physical drive failures (Windows only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Capturing the ServeRAID logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Isolating and removing the failed physical drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking the hardware connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting defunct drives to the online state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing the critical logical drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
199
199
199
204
205
206
209
211
211
212
212
213
214
215
215
216
216
216
Contents
xi
Finishing the procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Locating the startup device (SCO OpenServer only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Solving problems in a failover environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recovering from a failure in a failover environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recovering from a failed physical drive in a RAID level-5E or level-5EE
environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recovering from a power failure during a failover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting an IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recovering from a failed ServeRAID server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recovering from a failed ServeRAID controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recovering from a failover in a Microsoft Cluster Server server . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recovering from a failed physical drive in a RAID level-5E or level-5EE
environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting ServeRAID subsystems in a cluster environment . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 21. Getting help and technical assistance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Before you call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Getting help and information from the World Wide Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Software service and support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware service and support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
217
217
219
219
219
221
221
222
222
223
225
226
226
231
231
231
231
232
232
Part 5. Appendixes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
xii
Appendix A. Creating ServeRAID diskettes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diskette images for ServeRAID SCSI controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diskette images for ServeRAID SATA controllers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating diskettes on Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating diskettes on IBM OS/2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating diskettes on Linux or UNIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
235
235
236
237
237
238
Appendix B. Array Configuration Utility for MS-DOS for SATA . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interactive versus Script mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running the ACU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Interactive mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating an array with ACU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing arrays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting arrays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the scripting features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Playback mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Record mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Script file syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error handling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Playback and record notes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Invoking the ACU and using a script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
239
239
239
239
240
241
243
243
244
246
247
252
253
253
Appendix C. Configuring ServeRAID SNMP support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NetWare setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Linux setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCO and Unixware setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
255
255
256
257
257
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Appendix D. Warranty information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Warranty period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Problem determination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Warranty service and support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
International Warranty Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Purchasing additional services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Statement of Limited Warranty Z125-4753-06 8/2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Part 1 - General Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Part 2 - Country-unique Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
259
259
260
260
261
261
262
262
264
Appendix E. Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edition notice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Important notes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Product recycling and disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electronic emission notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Industry Canada Class A emission compliance statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Australia and New Zealand Class A statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
United Kingdom telecommunications safety requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
European Union EMC Directive conformance statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Taiwanese Class A warning statement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chinese Class A warning statement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Japanese Voluntary Control Council for Interference (VCCI) statement . . . . . .
271
271
272
273
273
274
274
274
274
274
274
275
275
275
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283
Contents
xiii
xiv
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Preface
This book provides information for configuring an IBM® ServeRAID™ controller,
installing device drivers, and installing and using the ServeRAID utility programs and
the IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution.
Note: The IBM ServeRAID product can be either a controller on an adapter or a
controller on the system board of your server, such as a SCSI controller with
integrated RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disk) capabilities.
To install device drivers and utility programs for other planar RAID controllers,
see the installation guide and CDs provided with your server for instructions.
How this book is organized
Chapter 1, “Product information” on page 3 contains introductory information and
specifications for the IBM ServeRAID-4H, ServeRAID-4Mx, ServeRAID-4Lx,
ServeRAID-5i, ServeRAID-6M, ServeRAID-6i/6i+, ServeRAID-7k, and ServeRAID-7t
controllers.
Chapter 2, “Installing and cabling a ServeRAID controller” on page 15 explains how to
install and cable the ServeRAID-4, ServeRAID-5i, ServeRAID-6M, ServeRAID-6i, and
ServeRAID-7t controllers.
Chapter 3, “RAID technology overview” on page 35 contains general information
about RAID technology.
Chapter 4, “Configuring ServeRAID controllers” on page 49 explains the ServeRAID
configuration process. You can refer to the information when configuring one or more
devices attached to a ServeRAID controller.
Chapter 5, “Installing ServeRAID device drivers” on page 63 contains information
about installing and updating the ServeRAID device drivers.
Chapter 6, “Configuring two ServeRAID controllers in a failover environment” on page
65 contains instructions for configuring two ServeRAID controllers in a failover
environment. These instructions are for Microsoft® Windows NT® 4.0 and Microsoft
Windows® 2000 only.
Chapter 7, “Using the ServeRAID Mini-Configuration program” on page 81, Chapter 8,
“Using the ARC utility (Serial ATA controllers only)” on page 85, Chapter 9, “Installing
and using the IPSSEND command-line program” on page 93, Chapter 10, “Installing
and using the IPSMON command-line program (NetWare only)” on page 117, and
Chapter 11, “Installing and using the AACCLI command-line program” on page 121
contain instructions for installing, starting, and using the Mini-Configuration, ARC,
IPSSEND, IPSMON, and AACCLI programs. You can use these operating-systemspecific programs to maintain and monitor your ServeRAID subsystem.
Chapter 12, “Installing and starting the ServeRAID Manager program” on page 133
contains instructions for installing and starting the ServeRAID Manager program. You
can use this program to maintain and monitor your ServeRAID subsystem.
Chapter 13, “Introduction to the IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution” on page 143 and
Chapter 14, “Preparing to install or change a cluster solution” on page 147 provide
general information about the IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution, including terms,
definitions, and considerations.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
xv
Chapter 15, “Configuring ServeRAID controllers for clustering” on page 151 explains
the procedure for configuring ServeRAID controllers for clustering when using
Microsoft Cluster Server (MSCS).
Chapter 17, “Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software” on page 163 provides
the procedure for installing Microsoft Cluster Server on Windows 2003, Windows
2000, and Windows NT 4.0.
Chapter 16, “Monitoring and updating an IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution” on page
159 contains information for monitoring and updating an IBM ServeRAID Cluster
Solution.
Chapter 18, “Obtaining ServeRAID updates” on page 193 provides information for
obtaining IBM ServeRAID and IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution updates from the
World Wide Web.
Chapter 19, “Upgrading a ServeRAID controller” on page 195 contains instructions for
upgrading your ServeRAID controller.
Chapter 20, “Solving ServeRAID problems” on page 199 describes the ServeRAID
POST error codes and startup messages. This chapter also includes some basic
information about rebuilding a defunct drive and troubleshooting failover and cluster
problems.
Chapter 21, “Getting help and technical assistance” on page 231 provides information
about accessing the IBM World Wide Web sites to obtain future code and information
updates for the ServeRAID controller.
Appendix A, “Creating ServeRAID diskettes” on page 235 contains instructions for
creating device driver installation diskettes, which contain device drivers and the
command-line utility programs.
Appendix B. “Array Configuration Utility for MS-DOS for SATA” on page 239 describes
how to use the ACU to configure ServeRAID SATA controllers from MS-DOS.
Appendix C, “Configuring ServeRAID SNMP support” on page 255 contains
instructions for installing and configuring the ServeRAID Manager SNMP software.
Appendix D, “Warranty information” on page 259 contains warranty information.
Appendix E, “Notices” on page 271 contains product notices and trademarks.
Notices and statements used in this book
The caution and danger statements that appear in this book are also in the
multilingual Safety Information Book, which is on the IBM Documentation CD. Each
statement is numbered for reference to the corresponding statement in the Safety
Information Book.
The following types of notices and statements are used in this book:
xvi
•
Note: These notices provide important tips, guidance, or advice.
•
Important: These notices provide information or advice that might help you avoid
inconvenient or problem situations.
•
Attention: These notices indicate possible damage to programs, devices, or data.
An attention notice is placed just before the instruction or situation in which
damage could occur.
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
•
Caution: These statements indicate situations that can be potentially hazardous
to you. A caution statement is placed just before the description of a potentially
hazardous procedure step or situation.
•
Danger: These statements indicate situations that can be potentially lethal or
extremely hazardous to you. A danger statement is placed just before the
description of a potentially lethal or extremely hazardous procedure step or
situation.
Working inside the server with the power on
Your server supports hot-plug, hot-add, and hot-swap devices and is designed to
operate safely while turned on with the cover removed. Follow these guidelines when
you work inside a server that is turned on:
•
Avoid loose-fitting clothing on your forearms. Button long-sleeved shirts before
working inside the server; do not wear cuff links while you are working inside the
server.
•
Do not allow your necktie or scarf to hang inside the server.
•
Remove jewelry, such as bracelets, necklaces, rings, and loose-fitting wrist
watches.
•
Remove items from your shirt pocket (such as pens or pencils) that could fall into
the server as you lean over it.
•
Avoid dropping any metallic objects, such as paper clips, hair pins, or screws, into
the server.
Handling static-sensitive devices
Attention: Static electricity can damage electronic devices, including your server.
To avoid damage, keep static-sensitive devices in their static-protective packages
until you are ready to install them.
To reduce the possibility of damage from electrostatic discharge, observe the
following precautions:
•
Limit your movement. Movement can cause static electricity to build up around
you.
•
Handle the device carefully, holding it by its edges or its frame.
•
Do not touch solder joints, pins, or exposed circuitry.
•
Do not leave the device where others can handle and damage it.
•
While the device is still in its static-protective package, touch it to an unpainted
metal part of the server for at least 2 seconds. This drains static electricity from
the package and from your body.
•
Remove the device from its package and install it directly into the server without
setting down the device. If it is necessary to set down the device, place it back into
its static-protective package. Do not place the device on your server cover or on a
metal surface.
•
Take additional care when handling devices during cold weather. Heating reduces
indoor humidity and increases static electricity.
Preface
xvii
IBM ServeRAID Support CD
The IBM ServeRAID Support CD contains the following:
•
ServeRAID ROM Update wizard
•
Device drivers
•
IPSSEND command-line program
•
IPSMON command-line program
•
AACCLI command-line program
•
ACU/DOS SATA command-line program
•
Diskette images
•
ServeRAID files needed to install Microsoft Cluster Server (MSCS)
•
ServeRAID publications and readme text files
ROM Update wizard
The ROM (read-only memory) Update wizard is a program designed to automatically
identify and scan each ServeRAID controller installed in your server. If the BIOS and
firmware code need updating, the wizard will give you the opportunity to do so.
Device drivers
The device drivers are located in the following directories on the IBM ServeRAID
Support CD:
e:/operatingsystem/scsi/DRIVER
e:/operatingsystem/sata/DRIVER
where e is the CD-ROM drive and operatingsystem is the specific operating system
used in the ServeRAID installation.
The device drivers are also provided on operating-system-specific diskette images.
IPSSEND and IPSMON command-line programs
Use these programs to configure and manage your ServeRAID SCSI controllers on
the supported operating systems. These programs are available on both the IBM
ServeRAID Support CD and the operating-system-specific IBM ServeRAID Support
diskettes.
AACCLI command-line program
Use these programs to configure and manage your ServeRAID-7t SATA controllers
on the supported operating systems. These programs are available on the IBM
ServeRAID Support CD.
xviii
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Diskette images
Device driver diskette images are available in the /DISKETTE/SCSI directory and the
/DISKETTE/SATA directory on the IBM ServeRAID Support CD.
For a complete list of diskette images and instructions for creating the diskettes, see
Appendix A, “Creating ServeRAID diskettes” on page 235.
ServeRAID files needed to install Microsoft Cluster Server (MSCS)
Note: The IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution requires Microsoft Windows 2003,
Microsoft Windows 2000, or Windows NT 4.0.
These files are available in the following directory on the IBM ServeRAID Support CD:
e:/operatingsystem/scsi/CLUSTER
where e is the CD-ROM drive and operatingsystem is the specific operating system
used in the ServeRAID installation.
ServeRAID publications
The following books are available in Portable Document Format (PDF) on the IBM
ServeRAID Support CD in the BOOKS directory:
•
IBM ServeRAID User’s Reference (SRAID.PDF)
•
IBM ServeRAID Device Driver Installation Instructions (DEVDRV.PDF)
•
IBM Installation Guide: ServeRAID-4 Ultra160, ServeRAID-5i Ultra320,
ServeRAID-6M Ultra320, ServeRAID-6i/6i+ Ultra320 SCSI, ServeRAID-7k
Ultra320 SCSI, and ServeRAID-7t SATA Controllers (INSTALL.PDF)
Note: Use Adobe Acrobat Reader to view these files. The IBM ServeRAID Support
CD contains the Acrobat Readers for Microsoft Windows, IBM OS/2®, and
Linux® in the BOOKS/READERS directory.
If you are installing the IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution, you might need to refer to
the IBM Shared Disk Clustering Hardware Reference. This book provides general
information about planning and configuring a shared-disk cluster using IBM server
products. It contains illustrations, descriptions, and parts listings for various highavailability, shared-disk cluster examples.
Note: You can obtain this publication from the IBM Support Web site. See
“Downloadable files from the World Wide Web” on page 193 for additional
information.
In addition, the following IBM Redbooks™might be of interest:
•
Implementing Netfinity Disk Subsystems: ServeRAID SCSI, Fibre Channel, and
SSA
•
Tuning Netfinity Servers for Performance: Getting the most out of Windows 2000
and Windows NT 4.0
•
Netfinity Director: Integration and Tools
•
Netfinity Clustering Planning Guide
You can download these books from the IBM Web site at
http://www.ibm.com/redbooks/.
Preface
xix
IBM ServeRAID Applications CD
The IBM ServeRAID Applications CD contains the ServeRAID Manager program.
ServeRAID Manager program
Use this program to configure arrays and logical drives on ServeRAID controllers.
ServeRAID Manager operates in two ways: in startable-CD mode and as an installed
program. In startable-CD mode, you can configure your ServeRAID adapter before
you install an operating system.
This program is available in the following directory on the IBM ServeRAID
Applications CD:
e:/operatingsystem/MANAGER
where e is the CD-ROM drive and operatingsystem is the specific operating system
used in the ServeRAID installation.
Supported operating systems
The following operating systems are supported with ServeRAID-4, ServeRAID-5i,
ServeRAID-6M, ServeRAID-6i/6i+, ServeRAID-7k, and ServeRAID-7t controllers:
xx
•
IBM OS/2 WARP® Server for e-business (ServeRAID-4, ServeRAID-5i,
ServeRAID-6M, ServeRAID-6i/6i+ controllers only)
•
Microsoft Windows 2000 Server and Advanced Server
•
Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional (ServeRAID-6i/6i+, ServeRAID-5i, and
ServeRAID-4Lx controllers only)
•
Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition, Enterprise Edition, and Web
Edition
•
Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0 and Enterprise Edition 4.0
•
Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 Workstation (ServeRAID-6i/6i+, ServeRAID-5i, and
ServeRAID-4Lx controllers only)
•
Microsoft Windows XP Professional (ServeRAID-7t, ServeRAID-6M, ServeRAID6i/6i+, ServeRAID-5i, and ServeRAID-4Lx controllers only)
•
Novell NetWare (versions 5.1, 6.0, and 6.5)
•
Red Hat Linux version 9.0
•
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2.1 and 3 AS/ES/WS for Intel and AMD 32-bit kernels
•
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 AS/ES/WS for AMD and Intel EM64T 64-bit kernels
•
Red Hat Enterprise Linux As 2.1 and AS 3 for Itanium 64-bit kernels (ServeRAID4Mx and ServeRAID-6M controllers only)
•
SuSE Linux Professional 8.2, 9.0, and 9.1 for Intel and AMD kernels
•
SuSE Linux Professional 9.1 for AMD64 and Intel EM64T 64-bit kernels
•
SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 8
•
SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 8 for AMD64
•
SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 8 for Itanium 64-bit kernels (ServeRAID-4Mx and
ServeRAID-6M controllers only)
•
SuSE Desktop version 1.0
•
TurboLinux Professional 7
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
•
TurboLinux Enterprise Server 8
•
SCO OpenServer 5.0.7
•
SCO UnixWare version 7.1.4
Note: The IBM ServeRAID Support CD includes device drivers for old versions of
most supported operating systems. These drivers are provided for backward
compatibility only. To use the latest drivers, always upgrade to a supported
version of your operating system before installing the ServeRAID software. For
a complete list of device drivers provided for backward compatibility, see the
IBM ServeRAID Device Driver Installation Instructions (DEVDRV.PDF),
located in the BOOKS directory on the IBM ServeRAID Support CD.
Preface
xxi
xxii
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Part 1. Installation and configuration
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
1
2
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 1. Product information
This book provides information needed to install and configure the following
ServeRAID controllers:
•
IBM ServeRAID-4H Ultra160 SCSI controller (Part Number 37L6889)
•
IBM ServeRAID-4Mx Ultra160 SCSI controller (Part Number 06P5736)
•
IBM ServeRAID-4Lx Ultra160 SCSI controller (Part Number 06P5740)
•
IBM ServeRAID-5i Ultra320 SCSI controller (Part Number 25P3492)
•
IBM ServeRAID-6M Ultra320 SCSI controller (Part Number 32P0033)
•
IBM ServeRAID-6i/6i+ Ultra320 SCSI controller (Part Number 13N2190)
•
IBM ServeRAID-7k Ultra320 SCSI controller (Part Number 71P8642)
•
IBM ServeRAID-7t SATA Controller (Part Number 71P8648)
These high-performance, redundant array of independent disk (RAID) controllers are
ideally suited for data-storage environments that require superior performance,
flexibility, and reliable data storage. (See “Controller features” for more information.)
Controllers that come on the system board of your server are referred to as integrated
RAID controllers.
Option package contents
In addition to this book, the ServeRAID option package contains:
•
IBM ServeRAID Support CD
See “IBM ServeRAID Support CD” on page xviii for more detailed information.
•
IBM ServeRAID Applications CD
See “IBM ServeRAID Applications CD” on page xx for more detailed information.
•
One of the following controllers:
— IBM ServeRAID-4H Ultra160 SCSI controller
— IBM ServeRAID-4Mx Ultra160 SCSI controller
— IBM ServeRAID-4Lx Ultra160 SCSI controller
— IBM ServeRAID-5i Ultra320 SCSI controller
— IBM ServeRAID-6M Ultra320 SCSI controller
— IBM ServeRAID-6i/6i+ Ultra320 SCSI controller
— IBM ServeRAID-7k Ultra320 SCSI controller
— IBM ServeRAID-7t SATA controller
Attention: Do not open the static-protective package containing the controller
until you are instructed to do so.
Contact your place of purchase if any items are missing or damaged.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
3
Controller features
The standard features of the ServeRAID controllers are as follows.
Notes:
1. See Chapter 3, “RAID technology overview” on page 35 for additional information
about arrays, logical drives, and RAID levels.
2. The number of arrays and logical drives varies according to the firmware level and
stripe-unit size.
4
Feature
ServeRAID7t
ServeRAID7k
ServeRAID6i/6i+
ServeRAID6M
Logical devices (max.)
24
8
8
8
Battery-backup cache
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Cache memory
64 MB
64 MB, 128
MB, 256 MB
128 MB
128 MB, 256
MB
Hard disk drives (max.)
4
30
30
30
Logical drives (max.)
24
8
8
8
Microprocessor
Intel 80302,
100MHz
Intel 80321,
600 MHz
Intel 80321,
400 MHz
Intel 80321,
600 MHz
Channels/Ports
4 Serial ATA
2 SCSI
0
2 SCSI
Transfer speed (max.)
1.5 Gb per
sec
320 MB per
sec.
320 MB per
sec.
320 MB per
sec.
Supported RAID levels
0, 1, 5, 10,
simple
volume
0, 1,
1- Enhanced
(1E), 5, 5EEnhanced
(5EE), 10, 50
0, 1,
1- Enhanced
(1E), 5, 5EEnhanced
(5EE), 00, 10,
1E0, 50
0, 1,
1- Enhanced
(1E), 5, 5EEnhanced
(5EE), 00, 10,
1E0, 50
System PCI data bus
64 bit at 66
MHz
n/a
64 bit at 66 to
133 MHz
64 bit at 66 to
133 MHz
Feature
ServeRAID5i
ServeRAID4H
ServeRAID4Mx
ServeRAID4Lx
Logical devices (max.)
8
8
8
8
Battery-backup cache
Yes
Yes
Yes
N/A
Cache memory
128 MB
128 MB
64 MB
32 MB
Hard disk drives (max.)
30
60
30
15
Logical drives (max.)
8
8
8
8
Microprocessor
Intel 80303,
100 MHz
IBM PowerPC
750, 266 MHz
Intel 80303,
100 MHz
Intel 80303,
100 MHz
SCSI channels
0
4
2
1
SCSI transfer speed
(max.)
320 MB per
sec.
160 MB per
sec.
160 MB per
sec.
160 MB per
sec.
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Feature
ServeRAID5i
ServeRAID4H
ServeRAID4Mx
ServeRAID4Lx
Supported RAID levels
0, 1,
1-Enhanced
(1E),
5, 00, 10,
1E0, 50
0, 1,
1-Enhanced
(1E), 5,
5-Enhanced
(5E), 00, 10,
1E0, 50
0, 1,
1-Enhanced
(1E), 5, 5Enhanced
(5E), 5EEnhanced
(5EE), 00,
10, 1E0, 50
0, 1,
1-Enhanced
(1E), 5, 5Enhanced
(5E), 5EEnhanced
(5EE), 00,
10, 1E0, 50
System PCI data bus
64 bit at 66
MHz
64 bit at 33
MHz
64 bit at 33 to 64 bit at 33 to
66 MHz
66 MHz
The ServeRAID controllers support the following features of ServeRAID software and
utility programs.
ServeRAID
features
ServeRAID-7t
ServeRAID-7k
ServeRAID6i/6i+
ServeRAID-6M
ServeRAID
ROM Update
wizard
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
ServeRAID
Manager
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
BIOS
Configuration
program
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Command-Line
Tool
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
IPSSEND
FlashCopy™
function
(Windows
Server 2003,
Windows XP
Professional,
Windows 2000,
and Windows
NT only)
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
IPSMON
(NetWare only)
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Copy Back
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Clustering
(Windows 2003,
Windows 2000,
and Windows
NT only)
No
No
No
Yes
Failover
(Windows 2000
and Windows
NT only)
No
No
No
Yes
(Windows 2000
only)
Chapter 1. Product information
5
ServeRAID
features
ServeRAID-5i
ServeRAID-4H
ServeRAID-4Mx ServeRAID-4Lx
ServeRAID
ROM Update
wizard
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
ServeRAID
Manager
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
BIOS
Configuration
program
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Command-Line
Tool
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
IPSSEND
FlashCopy™
function
(Windows
Server 2003,
Windows XP
Professional,
Windows 2000,
and Windows
NT only)
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
IPSMON
(NetWare only)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Copy Back
No
No
No
No
Clustering
(Windows 2003,
Windows 2000,
and Windows
NT only)
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Failover
(Windows 2000
and Windows
NT only)
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Connector locations
This section provides illustrations of the SCSI channel connectors and cable
connectors for the ServeRAID-4H, ServeRAID-4Mx, ServeRAID-4Lx, ServeRAID-5i,
ServeRAID-6M, ServeRAID-6i/6i+, ServeRAID-7k, and ServeRAID-7t controllers.
The light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on the controllers indicate activity on the SCSI
channels and provide diagnostic information for trained service technicians.
ServeRAID-4H controller
The ServeRAID-4H controller has four independent SCSI channels: channel 1,
channel 2, channel 3, and channel 4. Each of these SCSI channels supports up to 15
physical devices.
Note: In the event of a power outage or failure, the battery-backup cache protects the
data stored in the ServeRAID cache memory when using the write-back setting
of the write-cache mode.
6
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Internal Channel 2
Internal Channel 1
Battery for Backup Cache
External Channel 1
External Channel 2
External Channel 3
External Channel 4
Figure 1. ServeRAID-4H controller
You can attach internal SCSI devices to the internal channel 1 and channel 2
connectors. You can attach external SCSI devices to the external channel 1, channel
2, channel 3, and channel 4 connectors. You cannot attach internal and external SCSI
devices to both the internal and external connectors on the same channel. For
example, you cannot attach devices to both external channel 1 and internal channel 1.
The ServeRAID-4 controllers do not support configurations that use both the internal
and external connectors on the same channel concurrently.
Note: The ServeRAID-4H controller uses the module (part number 37L6903)
containing a lithium battery.
Statement 2:
CAUTION:
When replacing the lithium battery, use only IBM Part Number 37L6903 or an
equivalent type battery recommended by the manufacturer. If your system has a
module containing a lithium battery, replace it only with the same module type
made by the same manufacturer. The battery contains lithium and can explode
if not properly used, handled, or disposed of.
Do not:
•
Throw or immerse into water
•
Heat to more than 100°C (212°F)
•
Repair or disassemble
Dispose of the battery as required by local ordinances or regulations.
Chapter 1. Product information
7
ServeRAID-4Mx controller
The ServeRAID-4Mx controller has two independent SCSI channels: channel 1 and
channel 2. Each of these SCSI channels supports up to 15 physical devices.
Note: In a power outage, the battery-backup cache protects data stored in the
ServeRAID cache memory using the write-back setting of write-cache mode.
Internal Channel 1
Internal Channel 2
External Channel 2
Battery for Backup Cache
External Channel 1
Figure 2. ServeRAID-4Mx controller
You can attach internal SCSI devices to the internal channel 1 and channel 2
connectors. You can attach external SCSI devices to the external channel 1 and
channel 2 connectors. You cannot attach internal and external SCSI devices to both
the internal and external connectors on the same channel. For example, you cannot
attach devices to both external channel 1 and internal channel 1. The ServeRAID-4
controllers do not support configurations that use both the internal and external
connectors on the same channel concurrently.
Note: The ServeRAID-4Mx controller uses the module (part number 37L6903)
containing a lithium battery.
Statement 2:
CAUTION:
When replacing the lithium battery, use only IBM Part Number 37L6903 or an
equivalent type battery recommended by the manufacturer. If your system has a
module containing a lithium battery, replace it only with the same module type
made by the same manufacturer. The battery contains lithium and can explode
if not properly used, handled, or disposed of.
Do not:
•
Throw or immerse into water
•
Heat to more than 100°C (212°F)
•
Repair or disassemble
Dispose of the battery as required by local ordinances or regulations.
8
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
ServeRAID-4Lx controller
The ServeRAID-4Lx controller has one independent SCSI channel: channel 1. This
SCSI channel supports up to 15 physical devices.
Internal Channel 1
External Channel 1
Figure 3. ServeRAID-4Lx controller
You can attach internal SCSI devices to the internal channel 1 connector. You can
attach external SCSI devices to the external channel 1 connector. You cannot attach
internal and external SCSI devices to both the internal and external connectors on the
same channel. For example, you cannot attach devices to both external channel 1
and internal channel 1. The ServeRAID-4 controllers do not support configurations
that use both the internal and external connectors on the same channel concurrently.
Chapter 1. Product information
9
ServeRAID-5i controller
The ServeRAID-5i controller has no independent SCSI channels. It must be used with
an IBM xSeries server that contains an integrated RAID controller. It comes with both
a 2-U and 3-U I/O bracket; the 3-U bracket is mounted on the controller.
Note: In the event of a power outage or failure, the battery-backup cache protects the
data stored in the ServeRAID cache memory when using the write-back setting
of the write-cache mode.
Battery for Backup Cache
2-U/3-U I/O
Bracket
Figure 4. ServeRAID-5i controller
Note: The ServeRAID-5i controller uses the module (part number 25P3482)
containing a lithium battery.
Statement 2:
CAUTION:
When replacing the lithium battery, use only IBM Part Number 25P3482 or an
equivalent type battery recommended by the manufacturer. If your system has a
module containing a lithium battery, replace it only with the same module type
made by the same manufacturer. The battery contains lithium and can explode
if not properly used, handled, or disposed of.
Do not:
•
Throw or immerse into water
•
Heat to more than 100°C (212°F)
•
Repair or disassemble
Dispose of the battery as required by local ordinances or regulations.
10
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
ServeRAID-6M controller
The ServeRAID-6M controller has two independent SCSI channels: channel 1 and
channel 2. Each of these SCSI channels supports up to 15 physical devices.
Note: In the event of a power outage or failure, the battery-backup cache protects the
data stored in the ServeRAID cache memory when the write-back setting of
the write-cache mode is used.
Battery for backup cache
Internal channel 1
Internal channel 2
External channel 1
External channel 2
Figure 5. ServeRAID-6M controller
Note: The ServeRAID-6M controller includes a lithium battery module (part number
02R0986).
You can attach internal SCSI devices to the internal channel 1 and channel 2
connectors. You can attach external SCSI devices to the external channel 1 and
channel 2 connectors. You cannot attach internal and external SCSI devices to both
the internal and external connectors on the same channel. For example, you cannot
attach devices to both external channel 1 and internal channel 1. The ServeRAID-6M
controllers do not support configurations that use both the internal and external
connectors on the same channel concurrently.
Statement 2:
CAUTION:
When replacing the lithium battery, use only IBM Part Number 02R0986 or an
equivalent type battery recommended by the manufacturer. If your system has a
module containing a lithium battery, replace it only with the same module type
made by the same manufacturer. The battery contains lithium and can explode
if not properly used, handled, or disposed of.
Do not:
•
Throw or immerse into water
•
Heat to more than 100°C (212°F)
•
Repair or disassemble
Dispose of the battery as required by local ordinances or regulations.
Chapter 1. Product information
11
ServeRAID-6i/6i+ controller
The ServeRAID-6i/6i+ controller has no independent SCSI channels. It must be used
with an IBM xSeries server that contains an integrated RAID controller. It comes with
both a 2-U and 3-U I/O bracket; the 3-U bracket is mounted on the controller.
Note: In the event of a power outage or failure, the battery-backup cache protects the
data stored in the ServeRAID cache memory when using the write-back setting
of the write-cache mode.
Battery for Backup Cache
Figure 6. ServeRAID-6i controller
Note: The ServeRAID-6i/6i+ controller uses the module (part number 71P8628)
containing a lithium battery.
Statement 2:
CAUTION:
When replacing the lithium battery, use only IBM Part Number 71P8628 or an
equivalent type battery recommended by the manufacturer. If your system has a
module containing a lithium battery, replace it only with the same module type
made by the same manufacturer. The battery contains lithium and can explode
if not properly used, handled, or disposed of.
Do not:
•
Throw or immerse into water
•
Heat to more than 100°C (212°F)
•
Repair or disassemble
Dispose of the battery as required by local ordinances or regulations.
12
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
ServeRAID-7k Controller
The ServeRAID-7k controller is a device with a 256 DIMM and battery-backed cache
that connects directly to specific IBM planar designs to provide full RAID capabilities.
VA R TA M i c r o b a t t e r y G m b H
Assembled in Indonesia for
PoLiFlex Battery Pack
CAUTION: Do Not Dissassemble.
Do Not Short Circuit. Do Not
B u r n o r E x p o s e t o H i g h Te m p e r a t u r e
(60 C/ 140° F)
U s e D e s i g n a t e d C h a r g e r O n l y.
Figure 7. ServeRAID-7K controller
ServeRAID-7t controller
The ServeRAID-7t controller has four Serial ATA (SATA) ports. You can connect up to
four Serial ATA hard drives to the on-board connectors. A 3-U bracket is mounted on
the controller.
Serial ATA
Figure 8. ServeRAID-7t controller
Chapter 1. Product information
13
14
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 2. Installing and cabling a ServeRAID controller
This chapter provides installation and cabling instructions for the IBM ServeRAID
controllers. Before you install a ServeRAID controller in your server, review and follow
the instructions in “Safety” on page iii, “Working inside the server with the power on”
on page xvii, and “Handling static-sensitive devices” on page xvii.
You can install a maximum of 16 ServeRAID controllers in a server.
Important: When you install multiple ServeRAID controllers in a server that has
peripheral component interconnect (PCI) slot enabled for high scan (boot) priority,
ensure that the ServeRAID adapter controlling the startup (boot) drive is installed in a
PCI slot that is scanned before the PCI slots that contain the other ServeRAID
adapters. See the documentation that comes with the server for detailed information
about the PCI-slot scan order.
Using a ServeRAID controller in a server with Active PCI features
Note: The ServeRAID-7t, ServeRAID-7k, ServeRAID-6i/6i+ and ServeRAID-5i
controllers do not support Active PCI features. The ServeRAID-6M controller
does not support Active PCI features under the Windows operating system.
Some IBM servers support Active PCI (also called hot-plug PCI) features. The
following table summarizes which operating systems support specific Active PCI
functions.
Feature
Windows NT 4.0 Windows 2000 Windows
Server 2003
NetWare 5.x NetWare 6.x
Hot-add
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Hotremove
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Hotreplace
Yes
No
No
No
No
You can use the Active PCI features to install, remove, or replace PCI controllers
without turning off the server.
•
Use the hot-add feature to add a controller to a running server, thus expanding its
capacity.
•
Use the hot-remove feature to remove a controller from a running server.
•
Use the hot-replace feature to replace a controller with an identical controller while
the server is running.
Note: When you use the hot-replace feature, some parameters (such as rebuild
rate) are not restored. If you have previously saved the controller
configuration, refer to it for information.
Attention: Do not attempt a hot-replace operation on a server running the Windows
2000, Windows Server 2003, or Novell NetWare operating system by hot-removing a
failed controller and then hot-adding a new controller. Loss of data can occur. If a
controller fails on these operating systems, you must shut down the server to replace
the controller.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
15
Using Windows NT 4.0 with Active PCI features
To use Active PCI with Windows NT 4.0 and a ServeRAID controller, you must install
the following software components in this order:
1. Desktop Management Interface (DMI) Service provider. A free version is included
on the IBM ServeRAID Support CD in the following directory:
e:\WINNT\DMISP\setup.exe
where e is the CD-ROM drive.
Note: This version is sufficient for most users’ needs, but a Year 2000 ready
version is available at http://www.enablers.com/.
2. IBM Hot Plug for Windows NT 4.0 Package, version 4.2 or later. This package is
available from the IBM Support Web site. See “Downloadable files from the World
Wide Web” on page 193 for additional information.
Note: Be sure to read the instructions and restrictions for this software program.
3. ServeRAID Active PCI DMI component. This is an optional component that you
can install during the ServeRAID Manager installation.
To perform a hot-replace operation, start the IBM ServeRAID Hot Replace wizard.
You can start this program from within either the IBM Hot Plug for Windows NT 4.0
program or the ServeRAID Manager program. You can use the ServeRAID Manager
program to start the wizard either on the server with the failed controller or across the
network from a remote installation of the ServeRAID Manager.
Note: It is useful to start the IBM ServeRAID Hot Replace wizard from a remote
installation when the server with the failed controller does not have a monitor.
Using Windows 2000 with Active PCI features
To use Active PCI with Windows 2000, you must install the IBM Active PCI Software
for Windows 2000. This software is available from the IBM Support Web site. See
“Downloadable files from the World Wide Web” on page 193 for additional information.
Note: Be sure to read the instructions and restrictions for this software program.
Using Windows Server 2003 with Active PCI features
To use Active PCI with Windows Server 2003, you must install the IBM Active PCI
Software for Windows Server 2003. This software is available from the IBM Support
Web site. See “Downloadable files from the World Wide Web” on page 193 for
additional information.
Note: Be sure to read the instructions and restrictions for this software program.
Using NetWare with Active PCI features
To use Active PCI with NetWare, you must install the IBM PCI Hot-Plug Controller
Driver for NetWare. This software is available from the IBM Support Web site. See
“Downloadable files from the World Wide Web” on page 193 for additional information.
Note: Be sure to read the instructions and restrictions for this software program.
16
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Installing the ServeRAID-4 controller
During the installation, you might need a small, flat-blade screwdriver and the
documentation that comes with your server.
Complete the following steps to install the ServeRAID-4 controller:
1. Review “Safety” on page iii and the Safety Information Book provided with your
server. Also, review “Handling static-sensitive devices” on page xvii.
Note: Some IBM servers support Active PCI features, which enable you to install
or remove PCI controllers without turning off the server. If your server
model provides Active PCI support and you are using Windows 2000,
Windows NT 4.0, Windows Server 2003, Netware 5.x, or NetWare 6.x, you
do not need to turn off your server to install this controller. This operation is
referred to as a hot-add operation. Before performing this operation,
complete the following tasks:
•
Review the information provided with your server to determine
whether your model supports these features. After you verify that your
server supports Active PCI features, verify that the selected PCI slot
also supports these features. Although certain servers support Active
PCI features, some of the PCI slots might not support these features.
Therefore, if you install a ServeRAID controller in a PCI slot that does
not support Active PCI features, you cannot perform a hot-add
operation in that slot.
•
Review the documentation provided with your operating system for
information concerning using these features.
•
See “Using a ServeRAID controller in a server with Active PCI
features” on page 15.
•
If you intend to perform a hot-add operation, you must first install the
required software components for using your operating system with
Active PCI. Follow the instructions in the appropriate section of this
book:
— “Using Windows NT 4.0 with Active PCI features” on page 16
— “Using Windows 2000 with Active PCI features” on page 16
— “Using Windows Server 2003 with Active PCI features” on page 16
— “Using NetWare with Active PCI features” on page 16
2. If your server model does not support Active PCI, turn off the server and
disconnect all power cords and cables from the server.
Statement 5:
CAUTION:
The power control button on the device and the power switch on the power
supply do not turn off the electrical current supplied to the device. The
device also might have more than one power cord. To remove all electrical
current from the device, ensure that all power cords are disconnected from
the power source.
2
1
Chapter 2. Installing and cabling a ServeRAID controller
17
3. Remove the server cover and locate an empty PCI expansion slot for the
controller. Choose a slot that is farthest from other installed components, such as
the microprocessor. If necessary, see your server documentation for more
detailed information about the expansion slots.
Note: Some server models require that you install the ServeRAID controller in a
specific PCI slot. See the documentation that came with your server for
more information.
4. Remove the expansion-slot cover, if applicable.
5. Touch the static-protective package containing the controller to an unpainted
metal part of the server for at least 2 seconds. This discharges any static
electricity from the package and your body.
6. Holding the controller by the edges, remove it from the static-protective package.
Do not touch any exposed components on the controller.
7. Insert the controller into the PCI expansion slot. Press the controller firmly into the
slot so that it is fully seated.
Figure 9. Inserting a ServeRAID-4H controller into the PCI expansion slot
8. Secure the controller by either tightening the expansion-slot screw on the top of
the controller or closing the latch, depending on your server.
9. Connect the SCSI cables to the controller. If you intend to attach external devices
only, go to step 13 on page 19. Otherwise, go to step 10.
18
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
10. Connect one end of a 68-pin standard cable (separately purchased or already in
your server) to the internal channel connector on the ServeRAID controller.
Note: See “Connector locations” on page 6 for the channel connector locations.
Figure 10. Connecting a ServeRAID-4H controller internal channel connector
11. Connect the other end of the SCSI cable to the SCSI backplane or to a SCSI
device in the server. (See your server documentation or the system label inside
the server cover for the location of the SCSI connector on the backplane.)
12. If you have physical drives to install, install them now. See your server
documentation for drive installation instructions.
13. Install the server cover.
14. If you disconnected the cables and power cords in step 2 on page 17, reconnect
the cables and cords. See your server documentation if you need detailed
instructions.
15. If you want to attach an external SCSI device to the ServeRAID controller, go to
“Connecting external devices to a ServeRAID-4 controller”. Otherwise, go to
Chapter 4, “Configuring ServeRAID controllers” on page 49.
Chapter 2. Installing and cabling a ServeRAID controller
19
Connecting external devices to a ServeRAID-4 controller
Note: You cannot attach SCSI devices to both the internal and external connectors
on the same channel. For example, you cannot attach devices to both external
channel 1 and internal channel 1. The ServeRAID-4 controllers do not support
configurations that use both the internal and external connectors on the same
channel concurrently.
Complete the following steps to attach SCSI devices to an external channel connector
on the ServeRAID-4 controller:
1. Connect one end of a 68-pin, very-high-density connector interface (VHDCI) SCSI
cable to an external channel connector on the ServeRAID controller.
Note: See “Connector locations” on page 6 for the channel connector locations.
Figure 11. Connecting a ServeRAID-4H controller external channel connector
2. Connect the other end of the SCSI cable to the external SCSI device.
3. Go to “Updating BIOS and firmware code” on page 49.
20
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Installing the ServeRAID-5i controller
Attention: If you plan to install a ServeRAID-5i controller into a server that contains
data, back up the data first. When the ServeRAID-5i controller is installed, you will
lose access to any data or applications on physical drives connected to the integrated
RAID controller.
Preparing for installation
Before you begin the installation procedure, see the documentation that comes with
your server. You need to determine:
•
The PCI expansion slot into which you will install the controller
•
Whether you need to install the low-profile 2-U bracket
The IBM ServeRAID-5i Ultra320 SCSI controller has a 3-U bracket. If your server
requires a low-profile 2-U bracket, you must use the following instructions to install the
2-U bracket.
Attention: Failure to follow these instructions might damage the ServeRAID-5i
controller.
Complete the following steps to install the 2-U bracket. You will need a small, flatblade screwdriver.
1.
Holding the controller by the edges, remove it from the static-protective package.
2. Set the controller battery-side down on a nonconductive, static-protected surface.
Do not place the controller on your server cover or on a metal table.
3. Using a small, flat-blade screwdriver, remove the screw from the battery pack.
4. To remove the battery, gently press the tab up and lift the battery away from the
controller.
Tab
Alignment pin
Battery
5. Remove the two bracket screws. Set them aside.
Chapter 2. Installing and cabling a ServeRAID controller
21
6. Remove the 3-U bracket.
7. Align the two screw holes in the 2-U bracket with the two screw holes on the
controller. Using the two screws that you removed in step 5, secure the bracket to
the controller. The screws enter the screw holes on the battery side of the
controller and then go through the bracket screw holes.
Attention: Follow steps 8 and 9. Failure to do so might damage the controller.
8. Carefully reposition the battery pack on the controller. Be sure that the alignment
pin and the two tabs are properly aligned.
Tabs
Alignment pin
Battery
9. Press gently on the center of the battery pack to snap the battery pack into place.
Be sure to apply pressure evenly with both hands and to hold the controller as
shown in the figure below. Also, make sure that the tab is properly latched on the
controller.
10. Using the screw that you removed in step 3 on page 21, secure the battery to the
controller.
Installation procedure
During the installation, you might need a small, flat-blade screwdriver and the
documentation that comes with your server.
Complete the following steps to install the ServeRAID-5i controller:
1. Review “Safety” on page iii and the Safety Information Book provided with your
server. Also, review “Handling static-sensitive devices” on page xvii.
2. Turn off the server and disconnect all power cords and cables from the server.
Statement 5:
CAUTION:
The power control button on the device and the power switch on the power
supply do not turn off the electrical current supplied to the device. The
device also might have more than one power cord. To remove all electrical
22
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
current from the device, ensure that all power cords are disconnected from
the power source.
2
1
3. Remove the server cover and locate the PCI expansion slot.
Notes:
a. The ServeRAID-5i controller must be installed in an extended PCI expansion
slot. If you have not already done so, see the documentation that comes with
your server to determine the correct PCI expansion slot for the ServeRAID-5i
controller.
b.
If another controller is already installed in the extended PCI expansion slot
designed for the ServeRAID-5i controller, you must remove the controller
before installing the ServeRAID-5i controller.
4. Remove the expansion-slot cover, if applicable.
5. Touch the static-protective package containing the controller to an unpainted
metal part of the server for at least 2 seconds. This discharges any static
electricity from the package and your body.
6. Holding the controller by the edges, remove it from the static-protective package.
Do not touch any exposed components on the controller.
7. Insert the controller into the PCI expansion slot. Press the controller firmly into the
slot so that it is fully seated.
Figure 12. Inserting a ServeRAID-5i controller into the PCI expansion slot
8. Secure the controller by either tightening the expansion-slot screw on the top of
the controller or closing the latch, depending on your server.
Chapter 2. Installing and cabling a ServeRAID controller
23
9. If you have physical drives to install, install them now. See your server
documentation for drive installation instructions.
10. Install the server cover.
11. Reconnect the cables and cords. See your server documentation if you need
detailed instructions.
12. Go to “Updating BIOS and firmware code” on page 49.
Installing the ServeRAID-6M controller
During the installation, you might need a small, flat-blade screwdriver and the
documentation that comes with your server.
Complete the following steps to install the ServeRAID-6M Ultra320 SCSI controller:
1. Review “Safety” on page iii and the Safety Information Book provided with your
server. Also, review “Handling static-sensitive devices” on page xvii.
2. Turn off the server and disconnect all power cords and cables from the server.
Statement 5:
CAUTION:
The power control button on the device and the power switch on the power
supply do not turn off the electrical current supplied to the device. The
device also might have more than one power cord. To remove all electrical
current from the device, ensure that all power cords are disconnected from
the power source.
2
1
3. Remove the server cover and locate an empty PCI expansion slot for the
controller. Choose a slot that is farthest from other installed components, such as
the microprocessor. If necessary, see your server documentation for more
detailed information about the expansion slots.
Note: Some server models require that you install the ServeRAID controller in a
specific PCI slot. See the documentation that comes with your server for
more information.
4. Remove the expansion-slot cover, if applicable.
5. Touch the static-protective package containing the controller to an unpainted
metal part of the server for at least 2 seconds. This discharges any static
electricity from the package and your body.
6. Holding the controller by the edges, remove it from the static-protective package.
Do not touch any exposed components on the controller.
24
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
7. Insert the controller into the PCI expansion slot. Press the controller firmly into the
slot so that it is fully seated.
Figure 13. Inserting a ServeRAID-6M controller into the PCI expansion slot
8. Secure the controller by either tightening the expansion-slot screw on the top of
the controller or closing the latch, depending on your server.
9. Connect the SCSI cables to the controller. If you intend to attach external devices
only, go to step 13 on page 26. Otherwise, go to step 10.
10. Connect one end of a 68-pin standard cable (separately purchased or already in
your server) to the internal channel connector on the ServeRAID controller.
Note: See “Connector locations” on page 6 for the channel connector locations.
Figure 14. Connecting a ServeRAID-6M controller internal channel connector
Chapter 2. Installing and cabling a ServeRAID controller
25
11. Connect the other end of the SCSI cable to the SCSI backplane or to a SCSI
device in the server. (See your server documentation or the system label inside
the server cover for the location of the SCSI connector on the backplane.)
12. If you have physical drives to install, install them now. See your server
documentation for drive installation instructions.
13. Install the server cover.
14. Reconnect the cables and cords. See your server documentation if you need
detailed instructions.
15. If you want to attach an external SCSI device to the ServeRAID controller, go to
“Connecting external devices to a ServeRAID-6M controller”. Otherwise, go to
Chapter , “Configuring the ServeRAID controller” on page 50.
Connecting external devices to a ServeRAID-6M controller
Note: You cannot attach SCSI devices to both the internal and external connectors
on the same channel. For example, you cannot attach devices to both external
channel 1 and internal channel 1. The ServeRAID-6M controllers do not
support configurations that use both the internal and external connectors on
the same channel concurrently.
Complete the following steps to attach SCSI devices to an external channel connector
on the ServeRAID-6M controller:
1. Connect one end of a 68-pin very-high-density connector interface (VHDCI) SCSI
cable to an external channel connector on the ServeRAID controller.
Note: See “Connector locations” on page 6 for the channel connector locations.
Figure 15. Connecting a ServeRAID-6M controller external channel connector
2. Connect the other end of the SCSI cable to the external SCSI device.
3. Go to “Updating BIOS and firmware code” on page 49.
26
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Installing the ServeRAID-6i/6i+ controller
Attention: If you plan to install a ServeRAID-6i/6i+ controller in a server that
contains data, back up the data first. When the ServeRAID-6i/6i+ controller is
installed, you will lose access to any data or applications on physical drives connected
to the integrated RAID controller.
If you are upgrading from a ServeRAID-5i controller to a ServeRAID-6i/6i+ controller,
review “Replacing the old controller” on page 196.
Review “Handling static-sensitive devices” on page xvii.
Preparing for installation
Before you begin the installation procedure, see the documentation that comes with
your server. You need to determine:
•
The PCI expansion slot into which you will install the controller
•
Whether you need to install the low-profile 2-U bracket
The IBM ServeRAID-6i/6i+ Ultra320 SCSI controller has a 3-U bracket. If your server
requires a low-profile 2-U bracket, you must use the following instructions to install the
2-U bracket.
Attention: Failure to follow these instructions might damage the ServeRAID-6i/6i+
controller.
Complete the following steps to install the 2-U bracket. You will need a small, Phillips
or flat-head screwdriver.
1. Holding the controller by the edges, remove it from the static-protective package.
Do not touch any exposed components on the controller.
2. Set the controller battery-side down on a nonconductive, static-protected surface.
Do not place the controller on your server cover or on a metal table.
3. Using a small, Phillips or flat-head screwdriver, remove the two bracket screws.
Set them aside.
4. Remove the 3-U bracket.
5. Align the two screw holes in the 2-U bracket with the two screw holes on the
controller. Using the two screws that you removed in step 3, secure the bracket to
the controller.
6. Return the controller to the static-protective package.
Chapter 2. Installing and cabling a ServeRAID controller
27
Installation procedure
During the installation, you might need a small, flat-blade screwdriver and the
documentation that comes with your server.
Complete the following steps to install the ServeRAID-6i controller:
1. Review “Safety” on page iii and the Safety Information Book provided with your
server.
2. Turn off the server and disconnect all power cords and cables from the server.
Statement 5:
CAUTION:
The power control button on the device and the power switch on the power
supply do not turn off the electrical current supplied to the device. The
device also might have more than one power cord. To remove all electrical
current from the device, ensure that all power cords are disconnected from
the power source.
2
1
3. Remove the server cover and locate the PCI expansion slot.
Notes:
a. The ServeRAID-6i/6i+ controller must be installed in an extended PCI
expansion slot. If you have not already done so, see the documentation that
comes with your server to determine the correct PCI expansion slot for the
ServeRAID-6i/6i+ controller.
b.
If another controller is already installed in the extended PCI expansion slot
designed for the ServeRAID-6i/6i+ controller, you must remove the controller
before installing the ServeRAID-6i/6i+ controller.
4. Remove the expansion-slot cover, if applicable.
5. Touch the static-protective package containing the controller to an unpainted
metal part of the server for at least 2 seconds. This discharges any static
electricity from the package and your body.
6. Holding the controller by the edges, remove it from the static-protective package.
Do not touch any exposed components on the controller.
7. Plug the battery cable into its power source on the controller card. See Figure
16.“Inserting a ServeRAID-6i/6i+ controller into the PCI expansion slot” on page
29.
28
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
8. Insert the controller into the PCI expansion slot. Press the controller firmly into the
slot so that it is fully seated.
Figure 16. Inserting a ServeRAID-6i/6i+ controller into the PCI expansion slot
9. Secure the controller by either tightening the expansion-slot screw on the top of
the controller or closing the latch, depending on your server.
10. If you have physical drives to install, install them now. See your server
documentation for drive installation instructions.
11. Install the server cover.
12. Reconnect the cables and cords. See your server documentation if you need
detailed instructions.
13. Go to “Updating BIOS and firmware code” on page 49.
Chapter 2. Installing and cabling a ServeRAID controller
29
Installing the ServeRAID-7k controller
The ServeRAID-7k controller connects directly to a 168-pin memory slot on the
motherboard.
Installation procedure
To install the ServeRAID-7k controller:
1. Review “Safety” on page iii and the Safety Information Book provided with your
server.
2. Turn off the server and disconnect all power cords and cables from the server.
Statement 5:
CAUTION:
The power control button on the device and the power switch on the power
supply do not turn off the electrical current supplied to the device. The
device also might have more than one power cord. To remove all electrical
current from the device, ensure that all power cords are disconnected from
the power source.
2
1
3. To prepare the server for the ServeRAID-7k installation, do the following:
a. If you are installing the ServeRAID-7k in an x236 Series Server, remove the
server cover and locate the memory slot on the motherboard.
b.
If you are installing the ServeRAID-7k in an x346 Series Server:
•
Remove the server cover.
•
Pull up the handle on the middle enclosure cover and pull out to
remove the enclosure cover and riser card.
4. Touch the static-protective package containing the controller to an unpainted
metal part of the server for at least 2 seconds. This discharges any static
electricity from the package and your body.
5. Holding the controller by the edges, remove it from the static-protective package.
Do not touch any exposed components on the controller.
6. The battery will arrive already connected to the controller card. However, the
battery will not be connected to its power source. Plug the battery cable into the
connector on the ServeRAID-7k card. See Figure 17.“Installing a ServeRAID-7k
controller” on page 31.
30
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Press to remove battery
Plug battery cable into connector
PoLiFlex Battery Pack
CAUTION: Do Not Dissassemble.
Do Not Short Circuit. Do Not
B u r n o r E x p o s e t o H i g h Te m p e r a t u r e
(60 C/ 140° F)
U s e D e s i g n a t e d C h a r g e r O n l y.
Assembled in Indonesia for
VA R TA M i c r o b a t t e r y G m b H
Insert into 168-pin memory slot
Figure 17. Installing a ServeRAID-7k controller
7. Insert the controller into the memory slot. Press the controller firmly into the slot so
that it is fully seated.
a. If inserting the ServeRAID-7k controller into an xSeries 236 server, insert at a
90° angle.
b.
If inserting the ServeRAID-7k controller into an xSeries 346 server, insert at a
45° angle.
8. On the xSeries 346 server, reinsert the riser car and replace the enclosure cover.
On both servers, replace the outer cover.
9. Reconnect the cables and cords. See your server documentation if you need
detailed instructions.
10. Go to “Updating BIOS and firmware code” on page 49.
Replacing the Battery
To replace the battery on the ServeRAID-7k:
1. Access the controller card (follow Step 1 through Step 3 of the “Installation
procedure” on page 30).
2. Remove the card from the memory slot.
3. Disconnect the battery power cable, and press the buttons on each side of the
battery (see Figure 17.“Installing a ServeRAID-7k controller” on page 31) to
remove the battery.
4. Attach the new battery and reconnect the power cable.
5. Follow Step 7 through Step 9 of the “Installation procedure” on page 30.
Chapter 2. Installing and cabling a ServeRAID controller
31
Installing the ServeRAID-7t controller
This section provides installation and cabling instructions for the ServeRAID-7t SATA
controller. When you complete the installation and are ready to connect Serial ATA
devices to the controller, keep in mind that:
•
The interface cable ends are identical; you do not need to worry about which end
to attach to the controller and which end to the drive.
•
All interface connectors are keyed so that you can insert them in only one
direction.
Preparing for installation
Before you begin the installation procedure, you need to determine the PCI expansion
slot into which you will install the controller.
Installation procedure
Complete the following steps to install the ServeRAID-7t controller:
1. Review “Safety” on page iii and the Safety Information Book provided with your
server.
2. Turn off the server and disconnect all power cords and cables from the server.
Statement 5:
CAUTION:
The power control button on the device and the power switch on the power
supply do not turn off the electrical current supplied to the device. The
device also might have more than one power cord. To remove all electrical
current from the device, ensure that all power cords are disconnected from
the power source.
2
1
3. Remove the server cover and locate the PCI expansion slot.
4. Remove the expansion-slot cover, if applicable.
5. Touch the static-protective package containing the controller to an unpainted
metal part of the server for at least 2 seconds. This discharges any static
electricity from the package and your body.
6. Holding the controller by the edges, remove it from the static-protective package.
Do not touch any exposed components on the controller.
7. Insert the controller into the PCI expansion slot. Press the controller firmly into the
slot so that it is fully seated.
32
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Port 3
Port 2
Port 1
Port 0
Figure 18. Installing a ServeRAID-7t controller
8. Secure the controller by either tightening the expansion-slot screw on the top of
the controller or closing the latch, depending on your server.
9. If you have physical drives to install, install them now. Use the cables supplied
with your kit to connect your controller to the Serial ATA hard drives.
The cable connectors are all identical, so it does not matter which end you
connect to your controller or hard drive. Also, the connectors are keyed to fit the
connector in only one direction. Do not try to force a cable connector onto the
controller or a drive. If the connector does not slide on easily, try reversing it.
10. Install the server cover.
11. Reconnect the cables and cords. See your server documentation if you need
detailed instructions.
12. Go to “Updating BIOS and firmware code” on page 49.
Chapter 2. Installing and cabling a ServeRAID controller
33
34
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 3. RAID technology overview
Redundant array of independent disks (RAID) is the technology of grouping several
physical drives in a computer into an array that you can define as one or more logical
drives. Each logical drive appears to the operating system as a single drive. This
grouping technique greatly enhances logical-drive capacity and performance beyond
the physical limitations of a single physical drive.
When you group multiple physical drives into a logical drive, the ServeRAID controller
can transfer data in parallel from the multiple drives in the array. This parallel transfer
yields data-transfer rates that are many times higher than with nonarrayed drives. This
increased speed makes the system better able to meet the throughput (the amount of
data processed in a given amount of time) or productivity needs of the multiple-user
network environment.
The ability to respond to multiple data requests provides not only an increase in
throughput, but also a decrease in response time. The combination of parallel
transfers and simultaneous responses to multiple requests enables disk arrays to
provide a high level of performance in network environments.
Note: If you already understand these concepts, go to Chapter 4, “Configuring
ServeRAID controllers” on page 49.
Stripe-unit size
With RAID technology, data is striped across an array of physical drives. This datadistribution scheme complements the way the operating system requests data.
The granularity at which data is stored on one drive of the array before subsequent
data is stored on the next drive of the array is called the stripe-unit size.
You can set the stripe-unit size to 8 KB, 16 KB, 32 KB, or 64 KB. You can maximize
the performance of your ServeRAID controller by setting the stripe-unit size to a value
that is close to the size of the system I/O requests. For example, performance in
transaction-based environments, which typically involve large blocks of data, might be
optimal when the stripe-unit size is set to 32 KB or 64 KB. However, performance in
file and print environments, which typically involve multiple small blocks of data, might
be optimal when the stripe-unit size is set to 8 KB or 16 KB.
The collection of stripe units, from the first drive of the array to the last drive of the
array, is called a stripe.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
35
Selecting a RAID level and tuning performance
Disk arrays are used to improve performance and reliability. The amount of
improvement depends on the application programs that you run on the server and the
RAID levels that you assign to the logical drives.
Each RAID level provides different levels of fault-tolerance (data redundancy),
utilization of physical drive capacity, and read and write performance. In addition, the
RAID levels differ in regard to the minimum and maximum number of physical drives
that are supported.
When selecting a RAID level for your system, consider the following factors.
RAID level
Data
redundancy
Physical drive
capacity
utilization
Read
performance
Write
performance
Built-in
spare
drive
Min.
number
of drives
Max.
number
of drives
RAID level-0
No
100%
Superior
Superior
No
1
16
RAID level-1
Yes
50%
Very high
Very high
No
2
2
RAID level-1E
Yes
50%
Very high
Very high
No
3
16
RAID level-5
Yes
67% to 94%
Superior
High
No
3
16
RAID level-5E
Yes
50% to 88%
Superior
High
Yes
4
16
RAID level-5EE
Yes
50% to 88%
Superior
High
Yes
4
16
RAID level-00
No
100%
Superior
Superior
No
2
60
RAID level-10
Yes
50%
Very high
Very high
No
4
16
RAID level-1E0
Yes
50%
Very high
Very high
No
6
60
RAID level-50
Yes
67% to 94%
Superior
High
No
6
60
Physical drive utilization, read performance, and write performance depend on the
number of drives in the array. Generally, the more drives in the array, the better the
performance.
Supported RAID levels
The ServeRAID controllers support RAID level-0, level-1, level-1E, level-5, level-5E,
level-00, level-10, level-1E0, level-50, and level-5EE. For a list of RAID levels
supported by each controller, see “Controller features” on page 4.
The ServeRAID-7t SATA controller supports the following additional RAID levels:
•
Simple Volume — a single disk drive or segment; not redundant.
•
Spanned Volume — two or more disk drives or segments with the same or
different capacity, connected end-to-end. A spanned volume offers no
redundancy or performance advantage over a single drive.
•
RAID Volume — two or more logical drives with the same RAID level, connected
end-to-end. The logical drives may have the same or different capacity and are
not striped together; they may be redundant, depending on the RAID level.
Note: The integrated LSI RAID controller supports RAID level-1 only.
36
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
RAID level-0
RAID level-0 stripes the data across all the drives in the array. This offers substantial
speed enhancement but provides no data redundancy. RAID level-0 provides the
largest storage capacity of the RAID levels that are offered, because no room is taken
for redundant data or data-parity storage.
RAID level-0 requires a minimum of one drive and, depending upon the level of
firmware and the stripe-unit size, supports a maximum of 8 or 16 drives.
The following illustration shows an example of a RAID level-0 logical drive.
Start with two physical drives.
Create an array using the two physical drives.
Then create a logical drive within that array.
The data is striped across the drives, creating blocks.
Notice that the data is striped across all the drives in
the array, but no redundant data is stored.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
A physical drive failure within the array results in loss of data in the logical drive
assigned RAID level-0, but only in that logical drive. Logical drives assigned RAID
level-1, level-1E, level-5, level-5E, or level-5EE in the same array do not lose data.
Note: If you have an array that contains only one physical drive, you can assign only
RAID level-0 to the logical drive in that array.
When you replace a failed drive, the ServeRAID controller can rebuild all the RAID
level-1, level-1E, level-5, level-5E, and level-5EE logical drives automatically onto the
Chapter 3. RAID technology overview
37
replacement physical drive. However, any data stored in a failed RAID level-0 logical
drive is lost.
Although the risk of data loss is present, you might want to assign RAID level-0 to a
logical drive to take advantage of the speed this RAID level offers. You can use this
logical drive to store data that you back up each day and can re-create easily. You
also might want to use a RAID level-0 logical drive when you require maximum
capacity.
RAID level-0 offers the following advantages and disadvantages.
Advantages
Disadvantages
•
Substantial speed enhancement
•
Maximum utilization of physical drive
storage capacity, because no room is
taken for redundant data or data-parity
storage
No data redundancy, resulting in data loss in
the event that a physical drive fails
RAID level-1
RAID level-1 uses data mirroring. Two physical drives are combined into an array, and
data is striped across the array. The first half of a stripe is the original data; the second
half of a stripe is a mirror (that is, a copy) of the data, but it is written to the other drive
in the RAID level-1 array.
RAID level-1 provides data redundancy and high levels of performance, but the
storage capacity is diminished. Because the data is mirrored, the capacity of the
logical drive when assigned RAID level-1 is 50% of the array capacity.
RAID level-1 requires two physical drives.
The following illustration shows an example of a RAID level-1 logical drive.
Start with two physical drives.
Create an array using the two physical drives.
Then create a logical drive within that array.
38
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
The data is striped across the drives, creating blocks.
Notice that the data on the drive on the right is a copy
of the data on the drive on the left.
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
With RAID level-1, if one of the physical drives fails, the ServeRAID controller
switches read and write requests to the remaining functional drive in the RAID level-1
array.
RAID level-1 offers the following advantages and disadvantages.
Advantages
Disadvantages
•
100% data redundancy
•
High performance
Allows only 50% of the physical drive storage
capacity to be used
RAID level-1 Enhanced
RAID level-1 Enhanced (RAID level-1E) combines mirroring and data striping. This
RAID level stripes data and copies of the data across all of the drives in the array. As
with the standard RAID level-1, the data is mirrored, and the capacity of the logical
drive is 50% of the array capacity.
RAID level-1E has a similar profile to RAID level-1; it provides data redundancy and
high levels of performance, but the storage capacity is diminished. However, RAID
level-1E allows a larger number of physical drives to be used.
RAID level-1E requires a minimum of three drives and, depending upon the level of
firmware and the stripe-unit size, supports a maximum of 8 or 16 drives.
The following illustration is an example of a RAID level-1E logical drive.
Start with three physical drives.
Create an array using the physical drives.
Chapter 3. RAID technology overview
39
Then create a logical drive within that array.
The data is striped across the drives, creating
blocks.
Notice that the stripe labeled ∗ is the data
stripe and the stripe labeled ∗∗ is the copy of
the preceding data stripe. Also, notice that
each block on the mirror stripe is shifted one
drive.
*
**
1
2
3
3
1
2
*
4
5
6
**
6
4
5
With RAID level-1E, if one of the physical drives fails, the ServeRAID controller
switches read and write requests to the remaining functional drives in the RAID level1E array.
RAID level-1E offers the following advantages and disadvantages:
Advantages
Disadvantages
•
100% data redundancy
•
High performance
Allows only 50% of the physical drive storage
capacity to be used
RAID level-5
RAID level-5 stripes data and parity across all drives in the array.
RAID level-5 offers both data protection and increased throughput. When you assign
RAID level-5 to an array, the capacity of the array is reduced by the capacity of one
drive (for data-parity storage). RAID level-5 gives you higher capacity than RAID level1, but RAID level-1 offers better performance.
RAID level-5 requires a minimum of three drives and, depending upon the level of
firmware and the stripe-unit size, supports a maximum of 8 or 16 drives.
The following illustration is an example of a RAID level-5 logical drive.
Start with four physical drives.
40
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Create an array using three of the
physical drives, leaving the fourth as
a hot-spare drive.
Then create a logical drive within that
array.
The data is striped across the drives,
creating blocks.
Notice that the storage of the data
parity (denoted by ∗) also is striped,
and it shifts from drive to drive.
1
2
5
*
6
4
*
7
*
3
*
8
A parity block (∗) contains a
representation of the data from the
other blocks in the same stripe. For
example, the parity block in the first
stripe contains data representation of
blocks 1 and 2.
If a physical drive fails in the array,
the data from the failed physical drive
is reconstructed onto the hot-spare
drive.
*
3
5
2
1
4
*
6
*
8
*
7
RAID level-5 offers the following advantages and disadvantages.
Advantages
Disadvantages
•
100% data protection
•
Offers more physical drive storage
capacity than RAID level-1 or level-1E
Lower performance than RAID level-1 and
level-1E
Chapter 3. RAID technology overview
41
RAID level-5 Enhanced
RAID level-5 Enhanced (RAID level-5E) is the same as RAID level-5 with a built-in
spare drive. Like RAID level-5, this RAID level stripes data and parity across all of the
drives in the array.
RAID level-5E offers both data protection and increased throughput. When an array is
assigned RAID level-5E, the capacity of the logical drive is reduced by the capacity of
two physical drives in the array (one for parity and one for the spare).
Reading from and writing to four physical drives is more efficient than reading from
and writing to three physical drives and an idle hot spare. Therefore, RAID level-5E
provides a higher level of performance than RAID level-5.
The spare drive is actually part of the RAID level-5E array, as shown in the following
example. With such a configuration, you cannot share the spare drive with other
arrays. If you want a spare drive for any other array, you must have another spare
drive for those arrays.
RAID level-5E requires a minimum of four drives and, depending upon the level of
firmware and the stripe-unit size, supports a maximum of 8 or 16 drives. RAID level5E is also firmware-specific.
Note: For RAID level-5E, you can have only one logical drive in an array. When
using RAID level-5E, you can have a maximum of seven logical drives on the
controller.
The following illustration is an example of a RAID level-5E logical drive.
Start with four physical drives.
Create an array using all four physical
drives.
Then create a logical drive (labeled as
1) within the array.
Notice that the distributed spare drive
is the free space (labeled as 2) shown
below the logical drive.
The data is striped across the drives,
creating blocks in the logical drive.
The storage of the data parity
(denoted by ∗) is striped, and it shifts
from drive to drive as it does in RAID
level-5.
Notice that the spare drive is not
striped.
42
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
1
2
*
4
7
1
*
8
2
5
*
3
6
9
If a physical drive fails in the array,
the data from the failed drive is
reconstructed. The array undergoes
compression, and the distributed
spare drive becomes part of the array.
The logical drive remains RAID level5E.
*
3
5
*
9
1
*
6
7
2
4
*
8
*
When you replace the failed drive, the
data for the logical drive
decompresses and returns to the
original striping scheme.
If you use a RAID level-5E logical drive in a failover or cluster configuration, the RAID
level-5E logical drive will not failover while undergoing compression or
decompression.
RAID level-5E offers the following advantages and disadvantages.
Advantages
Disadvantages
•
100% data protection
•
•
Offers more physical drive storage
capacity than RAID level-1 or level-1E
Lower performance than RAID level-1
and level-1E
•
Supports only one logical drive per array
Higher performance than RAID level-5
•
Cannot share a hot-spare drive with other
arrays
•
RAID level-5E Enhanced
RAID level-5E Enhanced (RAID level-5EE) is the same as RAID level-5E, but with a
more efficient distributed spare drive and faster rebuild times. Like RAID level-5E, this
RAID level stripes data and parity across all of the drives in the array.
RAID level-5EE offers both data protection and increased throughput. When an array
is assigned RAID level-5EE, the capacity of the logical drive is reduced by the
capacity of two physical drives in the array (one for parity and one for the spare).
The spare drive is actually part of the RAID level-5EE array. However, unlike RAID
level-5E, which uses contiguous free space for the spare, a RAID level-5EE spare is
interleaved with the parity blocks, as shown in the following example. This enables
data to be reconstructed more quickly if a physical drive in the array fails. With such a
configuration, you cannot share the spare drive with other arrays. If you want a spare
drive for any other array, you must have another spare drive for those arrays.
RAID level-5EE requires a minimum of four drives and, depending upon the level of
firmware and the stripe-unit size, supports a maximum of 8 or 16 drives. RAID level5EE is also firmware-specific.
Note: For RAID level-5EE, you can have only one logical drive in an array.
Chapter 3. RAID technology overview
43
The following illustration is an example of a RAID level-5EE logical drive.
Start with four physical drives.
Create an array using all four physical
drives.
Then create a logical drive within the
array.
The data is striped across the drives,
creating blocks in the logical drive.
The storage of the data parity
(denoted by ∗) is striped, and it shifts
from drive to drive as it does in RAID
level-5E.
The spare drive (denoted by S) is
interleaved with the parity blocks, and
it also shifts from drive to drive.
If a physical drive fails in the array,
the data from the failed drive is
reconstructed. The array undergoes
compaction, and the distributed spare
drive becomes part of the array. The
logical drive remains RAID level-5EE.
When you replace the failed drive, the
data for the logical drive undergoes
expansion and returns to the original
striping scheme.
44
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
RAID level-5EE offers the following advantages and disadvantages.
Advantages
Disadvantages
•
100% data protection
•
•
Offers more physical drive storage
capacity than RAID level-1 or level-1E
Lower performance than RAID level-1
and level-1E
•
Supports only one logical drive per array
•
Higher performance than RAID level-5
•
•
Faster rebuild than RAID level-5E
Cannot share a hot-spare drive with other
arrays
•
Not supported on all ServeRAID
controllers
RAID level-x0
RAID level-x0 refers to RAID level-00, level-10, level-1E0, and level-50. RAID level-x0
uses an array of arrays, or a spanned array. The operating system uses the spanned
array logical drive in the same way as a regular array logical drive.
RAID level-x0 allows more physical drives in an array. The benefits of using RAID
level-x0 are larger logical drives, increased performance, and increased reliability.
RAID level-0, level-1E, level-5, level-5E, and level-5EE cannot use more than 16
physical drives in an array; however, RAID level-1E0 and level-50 support 60 drives.
RAID level-x0 requires a minimum of two drives and supports a maximum of 60
drives.
The following illustration is an example of a RAID level-10 logical drive.
Start with six physical drives.
Create three arrays (labeled
A, B, and C), each array
using two physical drives.
Then create a spanned array
(labeled as ∗) that spans the
three arrays.
A
C
B
A
*B
C
Chapter 3. RAID technology overview
45
A sub-logical drive is created
within each array (A, B, and
C). Then, the data is striped
across the physical drives in
the array, creating blocks.
Notice that, in each array, the
data on the drive on the right
is a copy of the data on the
drive on the left. This is
because the sub-logical
drives (A, B, and C) are RAID
level-1 in a RAID level-10
implementation (see the
following table).
Then, create a logical drive
within the spanned array (∗).
The data is striped across
this logical drive, creating
blocks (1-12). Notice that
none of these blocks are
redundant. This is because
the logical drive is RAID
level-0 in a RAID level-x0
implementation (see the
following table).
*B
A
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
*B
A
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
C
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1 12
4 43
7 56
10 87
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
2 12
5 43
8 56
11 87
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
C
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
3 12
6 43
9 56
12 87
RAID level
Sub-logical drive
Spanned array logical drive
00
RAID level-0
RAID level-0
10
RAID level-1
RAID level-0
1E0
RAID level-1E
RAID level-0
50
RAID level-5
RAID level-0
With RAID level-10, level-1E0, and level-50, if one of the physical drives fails in a sublogical drive, the ServeRAID controller switches read and write requests to the
remaining functional drives in the sub-logical drive. With RAID level-00, a physical
drive failure within the sub-logical drive results in loss of data.
RAID level-x0 offers the following advantages and disadvantages.
46
Advantages
Disadvantages
•
Supports up to 60 physical drives
•
•
100% data redundancy (except for RAID
level-00)
Not supported by all ServeRAID
controllers
•
No data redundancy for RAID level-00
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Drive-state descriptions
This section provides descriptions of the physical and logical drive states. ServeRAID
publications frequently refer to these states.
Physical-drive-state descriptions
The following table provides descriptions of the valid physical drive states.
Drive state
Meaning
Defunct
A physical drive in the online, hot-spare, or rebuild state has become defunct. It does not respond
to commands, which means that the ServeRAID controller cannot communicate properly with the
drive.
If a physical drive has become defunct, see “Rebuilding a defunct drive” on page 211.
Hot spare
A hot-spare drive is a physical drive that is defined for automatic use when a similar drive fails.
Online
The drive is online. It is functioning properly and is part of an array.
Rebuilding
The drive is being rebuilt.
For more information on rebuilding a drive, see “Rebuilding a defunct drive” on page 211.
Ready
The ServeRAID controller recognizes a ready drive as being available for definition.
Standby hot spare
A standby hot spare is a hot-spare drive that the ServeRAID controller has spun down. If an online
drive becomes defunct and no suitable hot-spare drive is available, a standby hot-spare drive of
the appropriate size automatically spins up and enters the rebuild state.
Logical-drive-state descriptions
The following table provides descriptions of the valid logical drive states.
Drive state
Meaning
Blocked
The blocked state is reserved for RAID level-0 logical drives that are part of the same array as one
or more of the following drive types:
•
•
•
A RAID level-1 logical drive
A RAID level-1E logical drive
A RAID level-5 logical drive
If a physical drive in such an array fails, the RAID level-0 logical drives enter the offline state, while
the other logical drives enter the critical state.
After you replace the failed physical drive, a rebuild operation starts and reconstructs the data
stored in any RAID level-1, level-1E, or level-5 logical drives; at the same time, the RAID level-0
logical drives enter the blocked state. RAID level-0 logical drives cannot be rebuilt, because they
do not contain redundant data.
After the rebuild operation is completed, you can unblock the RAID level-0 logical drives and
access them once again. However, the logical drive might contain damaged data. You must recreate, reinstall, or restore the data from the most recent backup disk or tape to the RAID level-0
logical drive.
Critical migrating
A logical drive in the critical state that is undergoing a logical-drive migration (LDM).
Critical system
The ServeRAID controller uses this reserved state during a logical-drive migration when the logical
drive is in the critical state.
Chapter 3. RAID technology overview
47
Drive state
Meaning
Critical
A RAID level-1, level-1E, level-5, level-5E, or level-5EE logical drive that contains a defunct
physical drive is in the critical state. A critical logical drive is accessible, despite a physical drive
failure.
Attention: If the state of the logical drive is critical, see “Rebuilding a defunct drive” on page 211.
Migrating
The logical drive is undergoing a logical-drive migration; that is, a change in RAID levels, a change
in logical-drive size, an increase in free space, a RAID level-5E compression or decompression, or
a RAID level-5EE compaction or expansion.
Offline
The logical drive is offline and not accessible. This state occurs when one of the following is true:
•
One or more physical drives in a RAID level-0 logical drive are defunct.
•
Two or more physical drives in a RAID level-1, level-1E, or level-5 logical drive are defunct.
•
Three or more drives in a RAID level-5E or level-5EE logical drive are defunct.
If any of these is true, see “Rebuilding a defunct drive” on page 211.
Okay
The logical drive is working properly. It is in a good, functional state.
System
The ServeRAID controller uses this reserved state during logical-drive migration.
48
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 4. Configuring ServeRAID controllers
This chapter provides information about obtaining ServeRAID updates, updating
ServeRAID BIOS and firmware code, and configuring ServeRAID controllers.
Obtaining ServeRAID updates
IBM periodically makes updated versions of the ServeRAID software available from
the IBM Support page on the World Wide Web.
Complete the following steps to locate files:
1. Go to http://www.ibm.com/pc/support/.
2. In the Search field at the top of the page, type ServeRAID; then, press Enter.
Note: If you download ServeRAID software, you must download and install all
ServeRAID software at the same time. This will ensure that all levels of the
software are compatible. The ServeRAID software includes:
•
•
•
•
BIOS and firmware code
Device drivers
ServeRAID Manager program
Command-line programs
If you do not have access to the World Wide Web, contact your place of purchase,
your IBM reseller, or your IBM marketing representative for replacement CDs.
Updating BIOS and firmware code
You must have the latest BIOS and firmware code installed on your server if either of
the following conditions applies:
•
If you plan to install the ServeRAID controller in a 64-bit server
•
Before configuring the ServeRAID controller
Important: You cannot move the ServeRAID controller from a 32-bit server to a 64-bit
server without updating the levels of BIOS and firmware code to level 6.00 or later.
Complete the following steps to update the levels of BIOS and firmware code:
1. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the server CD-ROM drive, and turn on
the server.
The IBM ServeRAID ROM Update wizard automatically starts. The ROM (readonly memory) update wizard is a program that updates the BIOS and firmware
code on ServeRAID controllers. The wizard automatically identifies and scans
each ServeRAID controller.
If the BIOS and firmware code require updating, a report screen opens with the
following information:
•
•
•
•
•
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
Controller types found.
Controller slot number, if known.
Firmware version.
BIOS version.
Update status. If a controller has outdated BIOS or firmware code, the ROM
Update wizard marks the controller as a candidate for update.
49
The IBM ServeRAID ROM Update wizard asks if you want to update. You decide
whether to update, but you must update all or none of the controllers in your
server; you cannot selectively update.
2. If you want to update your ServeRAID controllers, click Update. If the wizard
detects an error, an error message appears and you are prompted to insert a
diskette into your diskette drive. The wizard saves details about the error to a file
on the diskette.
If you do not want to update your ServeRAID controllers, click Cancel.
3. When all updates are completed, scroll through the Features window. This
window reports the changes that the IBM ServeRAID ROM Update wizard applied
to your ServeRAID controllers.
4. Leave the IBM ServeRAID Support CD in the CD-ROM drive; shut down and
restart the server.
Configuring the ServeRAID controller
This section provides information about starting and using the ServeRAID Manager
program to configure your ServeRAID controllers, view the ServeRAID configurations
and associated devices, change controller settings, monitor your controllers, and
more.
The information in this section focuses on using the ServeRAID Manager program in
startable-CD mode to configure your ServeRAID SCSI controllers or to change
specific settings.
Note: For information on configuring your ServeRAID-7t SATA controller controller,
see the ServeRAID Manager on-line help.
If you are configuring a planar RAID controller, see the instructions in the Installation
Guide provided with your server.
Important:
If you intend to use your ServeRAID controllers in a Microsoft Windows failover or clustering
environment, continue with one of the following sections:
•
For failover, go to Chapter 6, “Configuring two ServeRAID controllers in a failover
environment” on page 65.
•
For clustering, go to Part 3, “Installing the IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution” on page 141.
Using ServeRAID Manager
The ServeRAID Manager program operates in two ways:
•
Startable-CD mode
•
As an installed software program
When you run the ServeRAID Manager program from the startable IBM ServeRAID
Support CD, you are using startable-CD mode. Startable-CD mode lets you to
configure your controller before you install your operating system. After you have
configured the controller and installed the operating system, you also can use
startable-CD mode to change specific controller settings. For additional information,
see “Viewing your configuration” on page 59.
50
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
To run the ServeRAID Manager program in startable-CD mode, turn on the server;
then, insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD (or the CD that contains the ServeRAID
Manager program that came with your server) into the CD-ROM drive.
If the ServeRAID Manager program detects unconfigured controllers and ready
drives, the program automatically starts the Configuration wizard, and a window
similar to the one shown in Figure 19 opens.
Figure 19. “Configuration wizard” window
You can use the Configuration wizard to create arrays and logical drives for each
ServeRAID controller. The Configuration wizard provides two configuration options:
Express and Custom. Express configuration automatically configures your ServeRAID
controller, and you can use Custom configuration to configure your controller
manually. If you want to use RAID level-1E, RAID-level-5E, RAID-level-5EE, or RAID
level-x0, you must use Custom configuration. For more information about RAID levels,
see Chapter 3, “RAID technology overview” on page 35.
Using Express configuration: Express configuration automatically
configures your ServeRAID controller. This feature:
•
Creates arrays by grouping together same-sized physical drives.
•
Creates one logical drive per array.
•
Assigns a RAID level based on the number of physical drives in an array:
— An array with a single physical drive is assigned RAID level-0.
— An array with two physical drives is assigned RAID level-1.
— An array with three or more physical drives is assigned RAID level-5.
•
Designates a hot-spare drive for the controller. If one or more arrays has four or
more physical drives, the largest-sized drive from those arrays is designated the
hot-spare drive.
Chapter 4. Configuring ServeRAID controllers
51
Complete the following steps to use Express configuration:
1. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the ServeRAID controller that you want to
configure.
2. From the toolbar, click
(Create).
3. Click Express configuration.
4. Click Next. The “Configuration summary” window opens.
5. Review the information that is displayed in the “Configuration summary” window.
To change the configuration, click Modify arrays or Modify logical drives.
Figure 20. “Configuration summary” window (Express Configuration)
Note: Some operating systems have size limitations for logical drives. Before
you save the configuration, verify that the size of the logical drive is
appropriate for your operating system.
6. Click Apply; then, click Yes when asked if you want to apply the new
configuration. The configuration is saved in the ServeRAID controller and in the
physical drives.
7. If you have multiple controllers, complete the following steps:
a. Click the ServeRAID controller that you want to configure.
(Create).
b.
From the toolbar, click
c.
Repeat step 3 through step 7 for each controller.
8. When you have completed configuring your controllers, you can change certain
controller settings. See “Fine-tuning your configuration” on page 58 for more
information. If you do not want to change any settings, exit from the ServeRAID
Manager program, and remove the CD from the CD-ROM drive.
52
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
9. Restart the server.
10. Continue with Chapter 5, “Installing ServeRAID device drivers” on page 63.
Note: If you are configuring your startup (boot) ServeRAID controller, you must
install the device driver while installing the operating system.
Using Custom configuration: Select Custom configuration to configure your
controller manually. Complete the following steps to use Custom configuration:
1. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the ServeRAID controller that you want to
configure.
2. From the toolbar, click
(Create).
3. Click Custom configuration.
4. Click Next. The “Create arrays” window opens. If you want to create spanned
arrays, go to step 2 of “Creating spanned arrays:” on page 56.
Figure 21. “Create arrays” window
5. Click the appropriate tab in the right pane; then, from the list of ready drives,
select the drives that you want to move to the array.
6. Click
(Add selected drives) to add the drives to the array. You can click
(Add all drives) to move all ready drives to an array.
7. Repeat steps 5 and 6 for each additional array or hot-spare drive that you want to
configure.
8. After you select the ready drives for your arrays and hot-spare drive, click Next.
The “Create logical drives” window opens.
Chapter 4. Configuring ServeRAID controllers
53
Figure 22. “Create logical drives” window
9. Click the appropriate Array tab.
10. Select a RAID level from the drop-down list. (For more information, see
“Supported RAID levels” on page 36.)
Notes:
a. RAID level-5E and RAID level-5EE allow only one logical drive per array.
b.
If you are configuring a spanned array, you can set the RAID level only for the
first logical drive you create.
11. If you do not want to use the maximum size for the logical drive, type the size in
the Data (MB) field.
Notes:
a. For ServeRAID series 3, 4, 5, and 6 controllers, you can define up to eight
logical drives per controller. There are two exceptions:
•
If an array contains a logical drive assigned RAID level-5E or RAID level5EE
•
If you want to use the logical-drive migration feature
In these cases, one logical drive slot must be left free; therefore, you cannot
define more than seven logical drives.
b.
Some operating systems have size limitations for logical drives. Before you
save the configuration, verify that the size of the logical drive is appropriate for
your operating system.
c.
A logical drive cannot exceed 2048 GB; the minimum size is 5 MB.
d. Typically, the first logical drive defined on the first ServeRAID controller found
by system BIOS during startup will be your startup (boot) drive.
12. If you have free space available and want to create additional logical drives, click
Define new logical drive.
54
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Figure 23. “Adding another logical drive” window
13. Repeat steps 10 through 12 on page 54 for each logical drive that you want to
define in this array.
14. Repeat step 9 on page 54 through step 13 for each additional array that you want
to configure.
15. Click Next. The “Configuration summary” window opens.
Chapter 4. Configuring ServeRAID controllers
55
Figure 24. “Configuration summary” window (Custom Configuration)
16. Review the information that is displayed in the “Configuration summary” window.
To change the configuration, click Back.
17. Click Apply; then, click Yes when asked if you want to apply the new
configuration. The configuration is saved in the ServeRAID controller and in the
physical drives.
18. If you have multiple controllers, complete the following steps:
a. Click the ServeRAID controller that you want to configure.
(Create).
b.
From the toolbar, click
c.
Repeat steps 3 on page 53 through 18b for each controller.
19. When you have completed configuring your controllers, you can change certain
controller settings. See “Fine-tuning your configuration” on page 58 for more
information. If you do not want to change any settings, exit from the ServeRAID
Manager program, and remove the CD from the CD-ROM drive.
20. Restart the server.
21. Continue with Chapter 5, “Installing ServeRAID device drivers” on page 63.
Note: If you are configuring your startup (boot) ServeRAID controller, you must
install the device driver while installing the operating system.
Creating spanned arrays: If you want to assign RAID level-x0 to an array, you must
create a spanned array. For more information about spanned arrays, see “RAID levelx0” on page 45.
Notes:
1. Spanned arrays are supported only by ServeRAID-4, ServeRAID-5i,
ServeRAID-6M, and ServeRAID-6i/6i+ controllers.
2. A logical drive cannot exceed 2048 GB; the minimum size is 5 MB.
56
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Complete the following steps to create one or more spanned arrays:
1. If you have not completed steps 1 to 4 in “Using Custom configuration:” on page
53, do so now.
2. Create identical arrays by completing the following steps:
a. Click the Array tab in the right panel; then, from the list of ready drives, select
the drives you want to move to the array.
b.
Click
c.
Repeat steps 2a and 2b for each additional array that you want to configure.
(Add selected drives) to add the drives to the array.
Note: To create a spanned array, the arrays to be spanned must be identical
(that is, they must have the same number of physical drives).
d. Select the
(span arrays) check box; then, click Next. The
“Create spanned arrays” window opens.
Figure 25. “Create spanned arrays” window
3. Create spanned arrays by completing the following steps:
a. In the list of arrays, click the arrays that you want to add to your spanned
array.
b.
Click
You can click
c.
(Add selected arrays) to add the arrays to the spanned array.
(Add all arrays) to move all arrays to the spanned array.
To create additional spanned arrays, click the New spanned array tab in the
right pane; then, repeat steps 3a and 3b.
4. Click Next; the “Create logical drives” window opens. Continue with step 9 of
“Using Custom configuration:” on page 53.
Chapter 4. Configuring ServeRAID controllers
57
Fine-tuning your configuration
Before you store data on the controller, you will need to determine the correct stripeunit size for your configuration and set the write-cache mode, if necessary.
Changing the stripe-unit size: The new controller stripe-unit size is set at the
factory to 8 KB. If you need to change this setting, you must change the stripe-unit
size before you store data in the logical drives. After you store data in the logical
drives, you cannot change the stripe-unit size without destroying the data.
Complete the following steps to change the stripe-unit size:
1. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the new controller to select it.
2. Click Actions ➔ Change stripe-unit size.
3. Select the new stripe-unit size for your installation.
Note: Consider your server application environment when you select the
controller stripe-unit size setting.
Environment
Stripe-unit size
Groupware (such as Lotus® Notes® or Exchange)
16 KB
Transaction processing database
16 KB
Decision support database
16 KB
Thin client environments
8 KB
File server (Windows 2000, Windows NT 4.0, Windows Server 2003,
Novell NetWare)
16 KB
File server (other)
8 KB
Web server
8 KB
Other
8 KB
Setting the write-cache mode: Set the write-cache mode according to the
planned use of each logical drive. For logical drives where read and write performance
is important and data can be recovered, set the write-cache mode to write-back. For
logical drives where read and write performance is less important but data integrity is
a high priority, set the write-cache mode to write-through. If your controller has
battery-backed cache, the possibility of data loss in write-back mode is eliminated.
Notes:
1. If communication with the controller is lost during a read or write operation that
involves a logical drive in write-back mode, you might lose some of the data,
unless your controller has battery-backed cache.
2. If you plan to use the logical drive as the installation drive for the Novell NetWare
5.x operating system, you must set the write-cache mode to write-through.
To change the write-cache mode on a logical drive, complete the following steps:
1. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the logical drive.
2. Click Actions ➔ Change write-cache mode to write through (or Change writecache mode to write back).
58
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Viewing your configuration
You can use ServeRAID Manager to view information about RAID controllers and the
RAID subsystem (such as arrays, logical drives, hot-spare drives, and physical
drives).
To view information, expand the ServeRAID Manager tree; then, click the relevant
tree object. Detailed information about the selected device appears in the right pane.
Figure 26. ServeRAID Manager window
To display available actions for an item, click the item in the ServeRAID Manager tree
and click Actions.
Chapter 4. Configuring ServeRAID controllers
59
Getting assistance
For more information about ServeRAID Manager, see the on-line help system. To
start the help system, either click
(Information about this window) on the
toolbar or select an item from the Help menu.
Figure 27. ServeRAID Manager help menu
The help system (ServeRAID Assist) will open within the ServeRAID Manager
interface.
To learn more about the ServeRAID Manager objects and the actions that apply to
them, select an object, either in the tree or in the Physical and Logical device views;
then, click Actions ➔ Hints and tips. ServeRAID Manager Assist will start, and
information about the object will be displayed.
60
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Figure 28. Hints and tips feature
Chapter 4. Configuring ServeRAID controllers
61
62
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 5. Installing ServeRAID device drivers
The ServeRAID device drivers are provided on the IBM ServeRAID Support CD. The
IBM ServeRAID Device Driver Installation Instructions (DEVDRV.PDF), located in the
BOOKS directory on the support CD, provides detailed instructions for installing the
device drivers on the following operating systems:
•
IBM OS/2 WARP® Server for e-business (ServeRAID-4, ServeRAID-5i,
ServeRAID-6M, ServeRAID-6i/6i+ controllers only)
•
Microsoft Windows 2000 Server and Advanced Server
•
Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional (ServeRAID-6i/6i+, ServeRAID-5i, and
ServeRAID-4Lx controllers only)
•
Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition, Enterprise Edition, and Web
Edition
•
Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0 and Enterprise Edition 4.0
•
Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 Workstation (ServeRAID-6i/6i+, ServeRAID-5i, and
ServeRAID-4Lx controllers only)
•
Microsoft Windows XP Professional (ServeRAID-7t, ServeRAID-6M,
ServeRAID-6i/6i+, ServeRAID-5i, and ServeRAID-4Lx controllers only)
•
Novell NetWare (versions 5.1, 6.0, and 6.5)
•
Red Hat Linux version 9.0
•
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2.1 and 3 AS/ES/WS for Intel and AMD 32-bit kernels
•
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 AS/ES/WS for AMD and Intel EM64T 64-bit kernels
•
Red Hat Enterprise Linux As 2.1 and AS 3 for Itanium 64-bit kernels
(ServeRAID-4Mx and ServeRAID-6M controllers only)
•
SuSE Linux Professional 8.2, 9.0, and 9.1 for Intel and AMD kernels
•
SuSE Linux Professional 9.1 for AMD64 and Intel EM64T 64-bit kernels
•
SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 8
•
SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 8 for AMD64
•
SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 8 for Itanium 64-bit kernels (ServeRAID-4Mx and
ServeRAID-6M controllers only)
•
SuSE Desktop version 1.0
•
TurboLinux Professional 7
•
TurboLinux Enterprise Server 8
•
SCO OpenServer 5.0.7
•
SCO UnixWare version 7.1.4
Note: The IBM ServeRAID Support CD includes device drivers for old versions of
most supported operating systems. These drivers are provided for backward
compatibility only. To use the latest drivers, always upgrade to a supported
version of your operating system before installing the ServeRAID software. For
a complete list of device drivers provided for backward compatibility, see the
IBM ServeRAID Device Driver Installation Instructions.
If you are configuring your startup (boot) ServeRAID controller, you must install the
device driver while installing the operating system.
If you are installing files for a RAID controller that comes as a standard feature on your
IBM server system board, use the installation instructions and CDs provided with your
server.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
63
64
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 6. Configuring two ServeRAID controllers in a failover
environment
You can configure two ServeRAID controllers in a failover environment when using
the Microsoft Windows 2000 or Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 operating system. This
ServeRAID release includes an optional ServeRAID device driver that provides fault
tolerance. With fault tolerance, you can pair two controllers and connect them to the
same enclosure to ensure access to the physical drives, even after one controller
fails.
Notes:
1. The ServeRAID-6M controller supports failover under Windows 2000 only.
2. The Microsoft Windows Server 2003 operating system does not support the
failover function.
Important:
1. When you are adding a failover pair to an existing setup, verify that the failover
device driver is properly installed before you configure the failover pair. The
ServeRAID device drivers are provided on the IBM ServeRAID Support CD. For
instructions, see the IBM ServeRAID Device Driver Installation Instructions
(DEVDRV.PDF), located in the BOOKS directory on the IBM ServeRAID Support
CD. For a list of the supported operating systems, see Chapter 5, “Installing
ServeRAID device drivers” on page 63.
2. If you are using the Windows NT operating system in a failover environment, do
not remove logical drives from your failover configuration. If a logical drive fails
and must be removed, you must fix the failure and recreate the same logical drive.
Hardware requirements
Important:
To implement fault tolerance, you must use only matched pairs of controllers. The controllers
must be identical, including stripe-unit size and the level of BIOS and firmware code.
You can use the following pairs to provide fault tolerance:
•
•
•
•
Two ServeRAID-6M
Two ServeRAID-4Mx
Two ServeRAID-4Lx
Two ServeRAID-4H
Note: If your system has a built-in ServeRAID controller on the system board, you
cannot use the built-in controller in the failover pair.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
65
To use fault-tolerant technology with ServeRAID controllers, you must use one of the
following enclosures:
•
IBM Netfinity® EXP15 Storage Enclosure
•
IBM Netfinity EXP200 Storage Enclosure
•
IBM Netfinity EXP300 Storage Enclosure
•
IBM Netfinity EXP400 Storage Enclosure
Note: There can only be 13 physical drives in an EXP300 or EXP400 enclosure
when used in a failover setup. The drive that has a SCSI ID of 6 must be
removed from the enclosure.
Installation guidelines and restrictions
Important:
If the following guidelines and restrictions are not met, failover is disabled for the controller
pair, and an error explaining the problem is logged in the system event log.
To achieve fault tolerance with ServeRAID controllers, you must adhere to the
following guidelines:
•
You must configure the controllers as an active-passive pair, where all logical
drives are defined on only the active controller.
•
The stripe-unit size and level of BIOS and firmware code must be the same on
both controllers.
•
All physical drives must be configured in arrays. A failover pair must not contain
any physical drives in the ready state.
•
You must set the write-cache mode of all logical drives on the active controller to
write through.
Note: If your ServeRAID controller has a battery-backup cache, it is disabled
when you create a failover pair. The write-cache mode is automatically
changed from write back to write through.
•
All logical drives must have unique shared merge-group numbers.
•
When you use multiple failover pairs in a system, each set of controllers must
have unique controller and partner names.
•
All on-board ServeRAID controllers must be enabled, even if the controller is not
used.
The following restrictions apply:
•
Hot-spare drives are not supported in a failover environment.
•
RAID level-x0 and RAID level 5x are not supported in a failover environment.
•
You cannot hot-add a controller and then configure it as part of a failover pair.
•
A failover pair and a ServeRAID adapter defined as a Microsoft Cluster Server
(MSCS) resource cannot coexist in the same server.
•
A logical drive cannot failover if it is:
— A logical drive that is undergoing a rebuild operation
— A logical drive currently undergoing logical-drive migration (LDM) operations
66
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Preparing the active controller
This section covers the following steps:
Step 1. Installing the ServeRAID controller that you will designate as the active
controller.
Step 2. Configuring the active controller for failover.
Step 3. Connecting the active controller to the enclosure; then, starting the server with
the IBM ServeRAID Support CD in the CD-ROM drive.
Step 4. Configuring arrays and logical drives.
Installing the active controller
If you have not yet installed the ServeRAID controller that you will designate as the
active controller, do so now. For instructions, see the IBM Installation Guide that came
with the controller.
Important:
Do not install the controller that you will designate as the passive controller until instructed to
do so.
Configuring the active controller
Complete the following steps to configure the active controller:
1. Turn on the server.
Note: The cables to the drive enclosure must not be attached when you start the
server.
2. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive. The ServeRAID
Manager program starts.
3. If the ServeRAID Manager program starts the Configuration wizard, a window
similar to the one in the following illustration opens. Click Cancel to exit the
Configuration wizard; then, in the confirmation window, click Yes.
Chapter 6. Configuring two ServeRAID controllers in a failover environment
67
Figure 29. Configuration wizard
4. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the ServeRAID controller that you want to
configure as the active controller.
Attention:
Restore the ServeRAID controller to factory-default settings only once, when the controller is
first installed. This process removes all configuration information from non-volatile randomaccess memory (NVRAM), including the SCSI initiator IDs, the controller and partner names,
and the array information.
This point is especially important if the Windows system startup drive is attached to the IBM
ServeRAID controller. If this process occurs after the startup-drive array has been created,
the array information will be removed, and the system will no longer start in Windows.
If you already have logical drives defined on the controller that you want to keep, go to step 7.
Steps 5 and 6 will cause loss of data by deleting all the logical drives that have already been
defined.
5. If you have logical drives defined on the controller that you want to keep, go to
step 7. Otherwise, click Actions ➔ Restore to factory-default settings.
6. If a confirmation window opens, click Yes. When the operation is complete, a
message appears at the bottom of the window indicating that the ServeRAID
Manager has successfully restored the configuration to the factory-default
settings.
7. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the ServeRAID controller that you want to
configure as the active controller.
8. Click Actions ➔ Clustering actions ➔ Configure for clustering. The
“Configure controller x for clustering” window opens, where x is the controller
68
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
number that you selected in step 7. This example shows the “Configure controller
1 for clustering” window.
.9
.wodniw
Figure 30. “Configure controller 1 for clustering” window
10. Provide the following information:
Controller name
Type a name to identify the active controller, for example, Controller A.
Partner name
Type a name that you will use to identify the passive controller, for
example, Controller B.
Initiator IDs
The system presets these SCSI initiator IDs to 7. Set each ID to 6 for
shared channels. (The ServeRAID Manager program does not permit you
to select numbers other than 6 and 7.)
Notes:
a. The controller name and partner name are case sensitive.
b.
If your configuration will contain multiple ServeRAID controller pairs, each
controller name must be unique.
11. Click OK.
12. Shut down the server.
Connecting the active controller to the enclosure
Complete the following steps to connect the active controller to the enclosure:
1. Connect the enclosure to the active ServeRAID controller.
Notes:
a. Both the active and passive controller must be connected to the same
enclosure.
b.
The enclosure bus cables must be connected to the same channel on each
controller. For example, the enclosure bus #1 cable is connected to channel 1
on the active controller, and the enclosure bus #2 cable is connected to
channel 1 on the passive controller.
2. Restart the server with the IBM ServeRAID Support CD in the CD-ROM drive.
Configuring ServeRAID arrays and logical drives
Complete the following steps to configure arrays and logical drives on the active
controller:
1. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the ServeRAID controller that you want to
configure as the active controller.
2. On the toolbar, click
(Create). The Configuration wizard opens.
Chapter 6. Configuring two ServeRAID controllers in a failover environment
69
Figure 31. Configuration wizard
3. Click Custom configuration.
4. Click Next. The “Create arrays” window opens. If you want to create spanned
arrays, go to step 2 of “Creating spanned arrays:” on page 74.
70
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Figure 32. “Create arrays” window
5. Click the appropriate Array tab in the right panel; then, from the ready drives list,
select the drives that you want to move to the array.
(Add selected drives) to add the drives to the array. You can click
6. Click
(Add all drives) to move all ready drives to an array.
7. Repeat steps 5 and 6 for each additional array that you want to configure.
Notes:
a. You must use all the ready drives when creating your arrays (that is, all ready
drives in the ServeRAID Manager tree must be online).
b.
Hot-spare drives are not supported in a failover environment. The exception is
the built-in hot-spare that is part of a RAID level-5E or RAID level-5EE logical
drive.
8. After you select the ready drives for your arrays, click Next. The “Create logical
drives” window opens.
Chapter 6. Configuring two ServeRAID controllers in a failover environment
71
Figure 33. “Create logical drives” window
9. Click the appropriate Array tab.
10. Select a RAID level from the drop-down list. (For more information, see Chapter 3,
“RAID technology overview” on page 35.)
Notes:
a. Create only one logical drive for each array.
b.
A logical drive cannot exceed 2048 GB; the minimum size is 5 MB.
c.
Typically, the first logical drive defined on the first ServeRAID controller found
by system BIOS during startup will be your startup (boot) drive.
Attention: Before assigning a logical drive RAID level-5E or RAID level-5EE, consider the
following. If a physical drive fails during a post-failover resynchronization, the logical drive will
enter the blocked state. Data might be lost or damaged.
11. Repeat steps 9 and 10 for each additional array that you want to configure.
12. Click Next. The “Configuration summary” window opens.
72
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Figure 34. "Configuration summary" window
13. Review the information that is displayed in the “Configuration summary” window.
To change the configuration, click Back.
14. Click Apply; then, click Yes when asked if you want to apply the new
configuration. The configuration is saved in the ServeRAID controller and on the
physical drives.
15. Now, you must assign merge-group numbers to the shared logical drives. In the
ServeRAID Manager tree, click the active controller (that is, the ServeRAID
controller that contains the logical drives).
16. Click Actions ➔ Clustering actions ➔ Configure for clustering. The
“Configure controller x for clustering” window opens, where x is the controller
number that you selected in step 15. This example shows the “Configure
controller 1 for clustering” window.
Figure 35.“noc7gm3Configure
d
controller 1 for clustering” window
Chapter 6. Configuring two ServeRAID controllers in a failover environment
73
17. Select the Shared check boxes for all the logical drives.
Note: All the logical drives must be shared. Non-shared drives are not supported
in the failover environment.
18. Do not change the merge-group number from the default provided.
19. Record the controller name, partner name, and merge-group numbers; store them
in a safe place. You will need this information to recover the configuration if the
ServeRAID controller fails.
Note: You can save this information to a file by using the ServeRAID Manager
program:
a. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the server.
b.
Click Actions ➔ Save printable configuration.
20. Click OK.
21. To exit the ServeRAID Manager program, click File ➔ Exit.
Creating spanned arrays: If you want to assign RAID level-x0 to an array, you
must create a spanned array. For more information about spanned arrays, see
Chapter 3, “RAID technology overview” on page 35.
1. If you have not completed steps 2 through 4 in “Configuring ServeRAID arrays
and logical drives” on page 69, do so now.
2. Create identical arrays by completing the following steps:
a. Click the Array tab in the right panel; then, from the list of ready drives, select
the drives that you want to move to the array.
b.
Click
c.
Repeat steps 2a and 2b for each additional array that you want to configure.
(Add selected drives) to add the drives to the array.
Note: To create a spanned array, the arrays to be spanned must be identical
(that is, they must have the same number of physical drives).
d. Select the
(span arrays) check box; then, click Next. The
“Create spanned arrays” window opens.
74
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Figure 36. “Create spanned arrays” window
3. Create spanned arrays by completing the following steps:
a. In the list of arrays, click the arrays that you want to add to your spanned
array.
b.
Click
(Add selected arrays) to add the arrays to the spanned array.
You can click
c.
(Add all arrays) to move all arrays to the spanned array.
To create additional spanned arrays, click the New spanned array tab in the
right pane; then, repeat steps 3a and 3b.
4. Click Next; the “Create logical drives” window opens. Continue with step 9 of
“Configuring ServeRAID arrays and logical drives” on page 69.
Preparing the passive controller
This section covers the following steps:
Step 1. Installing the ServeRAID controller that you will designate as the passive
controller.
Step 2. Configuring the passive controller for failover.
Step 3. Connecting the passive controller to the enclosure; then, starting the server.
Installing the passive controller
Install the ServeRAID controller that you will designate as the passive controller. For
instructions, see the IBM Installation Guide that came with the controller.
Chapter 6. Configuring two ServeRAID controllers in a failover environment
75
Configuring the passive controller
Complete the following steps to configure the passive controller for failover:
1. Start the server.
Note: The cables to the drive enclosures must not be attached to the passive
controller when you start the server.
2. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive. The ServeRAID
Manager program starts.
3. If the ServeRAID Manager program starts the Configuration wizard, a window
similar to the one in the following illustration opens. Click Cancel to exit the
Configuration wizard; then, in the confirmation window, click Yes.
Figure 37. Configuration wizard
4. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the ServeRAID controller that you want to
configure as the passive controller.
5. Click Actions ➔ Clustering actions ➔ Configure for clustering. The
“Configure controller x for clustering” window opens, where x is the controller
number that you selected in step 4. This example shows the “Configure controller
2 for clustering” window.
Figure 38.“noc7gm3Configure
d
controller 2 for clustering” window
76
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
6. Provide the following information:
Controller name
Type the name of the passive controller. This will be the same name as
you typed in step 10 on page 69, for example, Controller B.
Partner name
Type name of the active controller. This will be the same name as you
typed in step 10 on page 69, for example, Controller A.
Initiator IDs
The system presets these SCSI initiator IDs to 7. When configuring the
passive controller, do not change these values. (The ServeRAID
Manager program does not permit you to select numbers other than 6 and
7.)
Notes:
a. The controller name and partner name are case sensitive.
b.
If your configuration will contain multiple ServeRAID controller pairs, each
controller name must be unique.
7. Click OK.
8. Shut down the server.
Connecting the passive controller to the enclosure
Complete the following steps to connect the passive controller to the enclosure:
1. Connect the enclosure to the passive ServeRAID controller.
Notes:
a. Both the active and passive controller must be connected to the same
enclosure.
b.
The enclosure bus cables must be connected to the same channel on each
controller. For example, the enclosure bus #1 cable is connected to channel 1
on the active controller, and the enclosure bus #2 cable is connected to
channel 1 on the passive controller.
2. Restart the server.
Completing the failover environment installation
Installing the device driver
Complete the following steps to finish the failover configuration:
1. If this is an existing system and if you have not already done so, install the faulttolerant device driver located on the IBM ServeRAID Failover Support for
Windows NT and Windows 2000 diskette. For instructions, see the IBM
ServeRAID Device Driver Installation Instructions on the IBM ServeRAID Support
CD.
2. If this is a new system, install your Windows operating system by using the
specific device driver that was designed for your operating system. After you
install your operating system, upgrade it to the fault-tolerant device driver that is
located on the IBM ServeRAID Failover Support for Windows NT and Windows
2000 diskette. For instructions, see the IBM ServeRAID Device Driver Installation
Instructions on the IBM ServeRAID Support CD.
Note: During the installation, the fault-tolerant functionality of the failover pair is
disabled. This functionality is enabled after the fault-tolerant device driver is
installed.
Chapter 6. Configuring two ServeRAID controllers in a failover environment
77
Verifying the configuration
To verify that the failover-pair configuration is correct, install and start the ServeRAID
Manager program on the Windows 2000 or Windows NT 4.0 server. For more
information, see Chapter 12, “Installing and starting the ServeRAID Manager
program” on page 133. If your failover pair is correctly configured, the ServeRAID
Manager tree will designate the controllers as active and passive.
For troubleshooting in a failover environment, see “Solving problems in a failover
environment” on page 219.
78
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Part 2. Utility programs
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
79
80
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 7. Using the ServeRAID Mini-Configuration program
This chapter provides the information needed to start and use the ServeRAID MiniConfiguration program.
The ServeRAID Mini-Configuration program provides a quick way to display the
current settings for a ServeRAID controller. You also can use this program to perform
a limited set of the configuration functions without using the IBM ServeRAID Support
CD.
Note: For information about configuring BIOS settings for ServeRAID SATA
controllers, see Chapter 8, “Using the ARC utility (Serial ATA controllers only)”
on page 85.
Accessing the Mini-Configuration program
Complete the following steps to access the Mini-Configuration program:
1. Turn on the server. If the server already is running, shut down the operating
system; then, restart the server.
2. When the following message appears, promptly press Ctrl+I:
Press Ctrl+I to access the Mini-Configuration Program
3. If your server contains more than one ServeRAID controller, a selection screen
appears. To continue, complete the following steps:
a. Use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to select a controller.
b. Press Enter.
If your server contains only one ServeRAID controller, or after you select a
ServeRAID controller, the main menu appears.
The following choices are available from the main menu:
•
View Controller Status shows the current status of the ServeRAID
controller. (See “Viewing the controller status” for more information.)
•
View Configuration shows the current configuration information for the
ServeRAID controller. (See “Viewing the configuration” on page 82 for more
information.)
•
Advanced Functions is used to restore the controller to the factory-default
settings, import configuration from drives, configure BIOS settings, and view
the controller and PCI information. (See “Using the advanced configuration
functions” on page 83 for more information.)
4. Use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to highlight your choice; then, press
Enter.
5. Follow the instructions that appear on the screen.
6. Click Exit. If your server contains more than one ServeRAID controller, the
controller selection screen appears. Otherwise, the Mini-Configuration program
closes.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
81
Viewing the controller status
When you select View Controller Status from the main menu, the following
information appears on the screen:
•
All physical drives and their states
•
Unattend shows the current state of the unattended mode.
— When this option is set to Off and a startup error occurs, the system stops at
the recovery option screen and waits for you to choose the recovery method.
— When this option is set to On and a startup error occurs, the system stops at
the recovery option screen and waits 30 seconds for you to respond. Then,
the BIOS automatically selects an appropriate option and continues the
system startup process.
•
ReadAhead shows the current state of the read-ahead cache mode.
•
CompMode shows the current state of BIOS-compatibility mapping. Off indicates
8 GB (Extended); On indicates 2 GB (Limited).
•
Clustered shows the current state for clustering.
•
BBC shows the cache size of the battery-backup cache, if it is installed (8 = 8 MB,
32 = 32 MB, 64 = 64 MB, 128 = 128 MB, 256 = 256 MB) or No if there is no
battery-backup cache installed.
•
Boot Blk shows the version number of the startable microcode (or firmware)
loaded for the ServeRAID controller.
•
Code Blk shows the current version number of the microcode (or firmware)
loaded for the ServeRAID controller.
•
Rebuild Rate shows the current speed setting for rebuilds: High, Medium, or Low.
•
Number of Defunct drives shows the current number of defunct physical drives.
•
Number of Offline drives shows the current number of offline logical drives.
•
Number of Critical drives shows the current number of critical logical drives.
•
Config Updates shows the number of times that the configuration has been
changed since it was initialized. When you initialize the configuration, the Config
Updates resets to 0.
•
Bad Stripe, Locked Stripe, or Blocked Drive identifies the logical drives that are
affected.
— Bad Stripe Drives indicates logical drives that have inaccessible areas.
— Locked Stripe Drives is a reserved field.
— Blocked Drives indicates the logical drives that are blocked. You must
unblock a blocked drive before you can use it. See “Logical-drive-state
descriptions” on page 47 for more information.
Viewing the configuration
You can select View Configuration from the main menu to display the number, size,
RAID level, state, stripe-unit size, write-cache mode, read-ahead cache mode, and
creation date for each logical drive.
82
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Using the advanced configuration functions
You can select the Advanced Functions to restore the controller configuration to
factory-default settings, copy the configuration to the controller from the connected
physical drives, configure BIOS settings, and view the controller and PCI information.
When you select the Advanced Functions from the main menu, the following choices
are displayed.
Attention: Be careful when making selections from this menu. If you change the
configuration, you might lose data.
•
Restore to Factory Default Settings restores all parameters in the configuration
to the factory-default settings. When you reset the configuration, any data or
programs stored on the logical drives attached to the selected ServeRAID
controller will become inaccessible.
This choice deletes the existing configuration information; that is, it deletes all
logical drives defined for the controller and sets all functional physical drives
attached to the controller to the ready state.
•
Copy the Configuration from Drives to Controller reads the most common
configuration from the drives in the server and copies it to the ServeRAID
controller.
•
Configure BIOS Settings is used to modify the following BIOS settings for the
ServeRAID controller:
— BIOS support for INT13 extensions: INT13 extensions allow use and full
partitioning of disks greater than 7.8GB. INT13h is the BIOS interface that
provides both floppy and fixed disk functions to DOS. The ServeRAID BIOS is
not the only code segment that provides INT13h functions. Other PC devices
such as diskette drives, IDE-type fixed disks, and any devices controlled by
non-ServeRAID PCI adapters, also use INT13h. The ServeRAID BIOS adds
its interrupt service routine to the chain of INT13h routines by replacing the
INT13h vector with its own. When a call to INT13h occurs, the ServeRAID
BIOS must determine whether to handle the request or to pass it to another
routine on the chain.
The default is YES: Support floppy and fixed disk functions to DOS; allow
ServeRAID PCI adapter to add its interrupt to chain of INT13 Routines; and
support 64-bit disk addressing (disk sizes beyond 8GBs).
Set to NO if: disk sizes are less 8GB and/or the system BIOS only supports
INT13 interface (not with extensions).
— BIOS support for reading partition tables: When you attach a CD-ROM
drive to the ServeRAID controller and set the startable CD-ROM feature to
YES, the ServeRAID controller will attempt to start a CD that has a startup
partition, if no other controller in the system is currently using INT13
extensions. Only one controller in the system can support the INT13
extensions.
The default is YES: Allow startable partition table to be read.
— Bypass read/verify operations: Set to NO if absolute data reliability is
preferred (default). Set to YES if performance is preferred over absolute data
reliability.
— BIOS compatibility mapping: For completeness, and to assist those
working with older hardware. Normally, for drives over 8.4GB, you should set
the value to EXTENDED. The default is LIMITED.
Note: If you are installing OS/2 5.0, you must set the BIOS compatability
mapping to EXTENDED or the installation will fail.
Chapter 7. Using the ServeRAID Mini-Configuration program
83
Today, drives over 8.4GB are generally accessed by setting the BIOS to
dynamically autodetect their size at start time, and then using logical block
addressing. Most of the issues that PC users once had to deal with in
tweaking BIOS translation modes are no longer necessary for modern drives
over 8.4GB because these drives are no longer addressed using cylinder,
head, and sector numbers.
— Selected Adapter Queue Depth (No. of commands): Used to select the
number of outstanding commands allowed by the controller at one time. Set to
64 commands (default) for normal, everyday use. Set to 96 commands if you
want enhanced performance with the controller write-back cache disabled
and you have a large number of disk drives attached to the controller.
— Override temporary write through: Used if the controller is new and the
battery is dead or not charged to functional capacity or for performance
analysis. While the cache battery is charging (if installed), write back logical
drives will switch to write through to reduce dependency on cache.
The default is NO to switch to write through mode while battery is charging, so
data is written to drives before commiting back to operating system. Use this
setting to avoid data loss should power be lost while the cache battery is not
charged to functional capacity. Set to YES to keep write back mode even
while the battery is charging.
— Load BIOS default settings: Forces all BIOS settings to their default values.
— Save BIOSsettings: Saves BIOS settings between power up/down and
restrart sequences.
84
•
View Controller and PCI Information shows the ServeRAID controller hardware
and PCI register information.
•
Esc is used to exit from the current menu to the previous menu.
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 8. Using the ARC utility (Serial ATA controllers only)
This chapter provides the information needed to start and use the Adaptec RAID
Configuration (ARC) utility.
The ARC utility is an embedded BIOS utility that you can use to configure your
ServeRAID Serial ATA controllers, such as the ServeRAID-7t SATA controllers. It
includes:
•
Array Configuration Utility (ACU)—Used to create, configure, and manage
arrays. Also used to initialize and rescan drives.
•
SATASelect—Used to change device and controller settings,
•
Disk Utilities—Used to format or verify media.
To run the ARC utility, press Ctrl+A when prompted by the following message during
system startup:
Press <Ctrl><A> for Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility
The ARC menu appears, presenting the following options:
•
Array Configuration Utility
•
SATASelect Utility
•
Disk Utilities
To select an option from this menu, or from any of the menus within ARC, browse with
the arrow keys and then press Enter. In some cases, selecting an option displays
another menu. To return to the previous menu at any time, press Esc.
The following sections discuss each of these menu options.
Using the Array Configuration Utility
The Array Configuration Utility (ACU) enables you to manage, create, and delete
arrays from the controller’s BIOS. You can also initialize and rescan drives.
You can use the ACU to create a startable array for the system. We recommend that
you configure the system to start from an array instead of a single disk to take
advantage of the redundancy and performance features of arrays. For details, see
“Making an array startable” on page 86.
Managing arrays
Use the Manage Arrays option to view array properties and members, make an array
the boot array, manage failover assignments, and delete arrays. The following
sections describe these operations in greater detail.
Viewing array properties To view the properties of an existing array:
1. At the BIOS prompt, press Ctrl+A.
2. From the ARC menu, select Array Configuration Utility.
3. From the ACU menu, select Manage Arrays.
4. From the List of Arrays dialog box, select the array you want to view information
on and then press Enter.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
85
Single Level Arrays Only—For RAID levels 0, 1, and 5, the Array Properties
dialog box shows detailed information on the array physical disks.
Dual-Level Arrays—For RAID 10s, to view detailed information on the array
physical disks, highlight the displayed member and then press Enter to display
the second level. Press Enter again to display the physical disks associated with
the array.
Note: A failed drive is displayed in a different text color.
5. Press Esc to return to the previous menu.
Making an array startable You can make an array startable so that the
system starts from the array instead of from a stand-alone (single) disk. To make an
array startable:
1. At the BIOS prompt, press Ctrl+A.
2. From the ARC menu, select Array Configuration Utility.
3. From the ACU menu, select Manage Arrays.
4. Select the array you want to make startable and then press Ctrl+B. This changes
the selected array’s number to 00, making it the controller’s boot array.
5. Restart the system.
Notes:
•
If the controller is not a boot device, you can disable its runtime BIOS, see page
90. When the BIOS is disabled, it does not occupy any of the expansion ROM
region of the system’s memory map. In a system with several expansion ROMs,
disabling the BIOS may be helpful.
•
You cannot make a non-00 array startable while the array is in a build/verify or
reconfiguration process.
•
The controller always uses the lowest numbered array as its startable array. If you
delete Array 00 for any reason, the next lowest numbered array becomes the
startable array. Use the Ctrl+B option to mark the correct array as the startable
array (by making it Array 00).
•
If you want to boot from a stand-alone (single) disk drive, first create a volume on
that disk.
•
The system BIOS provides additional tools to modify the boot order. For more
information, refer to your system documentation.
Deleting arrays To delete an existing array:
CAUTION:
Back up the data on an array before you delete it. When you delete the array,
you loose all your data on the array. You cannot restore deleted arrays.
1. At the BIOS prompt, press Ctrl+A.
2. From the ARC menu, select Array Configuration Utility.
3. From the ACU menu, select Manage Arrays.
4. Select the array you wish to delete and then press Delete.
5. In the Array Properties dialog box, press Delete again and then press Enter. The
following message is displayed:
Warning!! Deleting will erase all data from the array.
Do you still want to continue? (Yes/No):
6. Select Yes to delete the array or No to return to the previous menu. At the
7. Press Esc to return to the previous menu.
86
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Managing hot spare drive assignments To assign a hot spare drive to an
array:
1. Select Manage Arrays from the Main menu.
2. From the List of Arrays dialog box, select the array to which you want to assign a
hot spare, and then press Ctrl+S. The Hotspare Management for Array dialog box
is displayed, which shows the drives that can be assigned as hot spare drives.
3. Select a drive and then press Insert to assign the drive as a hot spare. The
specified drive is displayed in the Assigned Hotspares drives list.
4. Press Enter to save the hot spare drive assignment. the following message is
displayed:
Have you finished managing Hotspare drives?
5. Press Y (for yes) to return to the Main menu.
To remove an assigned hot spare drive from an array:
1. Select Manage Arrays from the Main menu.
2. From the List of Arrays dialog box, select the array from which you want to
remove the assigned hot spare drive and press Ctrl+S. The Hotspare
Management for Array dialog box is displayed, which shows a list of drives that
can be assigned as hot spare drives and a list of drives that are assigned as hot
spare drives.
3. From the Assigned Hotspares drives list, select the drive to be removed and then
press Delete. The specified drive is displayed in the Select Hotspares drives list.
4. Press Enter to save the removed hot spare drive assignment. The following
message is displayed:
Have you finished managing Hotspare drives?
5. Press Y (for yes) to return to the Main menu.
Creating arrays
Before creating arrays, make sure the disks for the array are connected and installed
in your system (or enclosure). Note that any disks with MS-DOS partitions, disks with
no usable space, or disks that are uninitialized appear dimmed and cannot be used for
creating a new array. For information on how to initialize a disk drive, see page 89.
To create an array:
1. Shut down and restart the system.
2. At the BIOS prompt, press Ctrl+A.
3. From the ARC menu, select Array Configuration Utility.
4. From the ACU menu, select Create Array.
5. Browse with the arrow keys to select a channel.
6. Select the disks for the new array and then press Insert. ACU displays the largest
usable space available for each disk. You can use available space from multiple
disks for the new array.
To deselect any disk, highlight the disk and then press Delete.
Note: The ACU cannot reliably find disks or enclosures that were powered up
after system power-up. Therefore, power up enclosures prior to powering
up the host.
7. Press Enter when all disks for the new array are selected. The Array Properties
menu is displayed.
Chapter 8. Using the ARC utility (Serial ATA controllers only)
87
After you install a controller in a system and start it for the first time, the BIOS
announces the configuration it has detected. This configuration may not match your
system’s configuration.
CAUTION:
If you do not take any action within 30 seconds, the system automatically
accepts the configuration. If the configuration does not match your system,
reject it or enter the ARC utility. Otherwise, the array configuration may be
erased.
If necessary, enter the ARC utility. Upon entering ARC, accept the configuration that
ARC reports, and then modify the configuration to suit your needs.
Assigning array properties The ACU can be used to assign array properties
only prior to array creation. (After the array is created, you need to use the ServeRAID
Manager program.)
To assign properties to the new array:
1. In the Array Properties menu, select an array type and then press Enter. The
display shows only the array types available for the number of drives selected.
The maximum number of drives allowed and minimum number of drives required
depends on the RAID level, as described in the table below.
RAID Level
Maximum Drives
Minimum Drives
Simple volume
4
1
RAID 0
4
2
RAID 1
2
2
RAID 5
4
3
RAID 10
4
4
2. Type in an optional label for the array and then press Enter.
3. Enter the desired array size. The maximum array size available based on the
segments you selected is displayed automatically. If you want to designate a
different array size, type the desired array size and select MB (megabytes), GB
(gigabytes), or TB (terabytes) from the drop-down list. If the available space from
the selected segments is greater than the size you specify, the remaining space is
available for use in other arrays.
4. Select the desired stripe size. The allowable stripe sizes are 16, 32, and 64 KB
(the default). The default stripe size provides the best overall performance in most
network environments.
5. Specify whether you want to enable read caching for the array.When Enabled (the
default), caching is enabled, providing maximum performance. When Disabled,
caching is disabled.
Caching should usually be enabled to optimize performance, unless your data is
highly sensitive, or unless your application performs completely random reads,
which is unlikely.
6. Specify whether you want to enable write caching for the array.
Note: If write caching is Enabled, there is a potential for data loss or corruption
during a power failure.
7. When you are finished, select Done.
88
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Initializing disk drives
If an installed disk does not appear in the disk selection list for creating a new array or
if it appears grayed out, you need to initialize it before you can use it as part of an
array.
CAUTION:
Initializing a disk overwrites the partition table on the disk and makes any data
on the disk inaccessible. If the drive is used in an array, you may not be able to
use the array again. Do not initialize a disk that is part of a boot array. The boot
array is the lowest numbered array (normally 00) in the List of Arrays dialog
box. (See “Viewing array properties” on page 85 for information on determining
which disks are associated with a particular array.)
To initialize drives:
1. At the BIOS prompt, press Ctrl+A.
2. From the ARC menu, select Array Configuration Utility.
3. Select Initialize Drives.
4. Browse with the arrow keys to select a channel.
5. Browse with the arrow keys to highlight the disk you wish to initialize and then
press Insert.
6. Repeat step 5 until all the drives to be initialized are selected.
7. Press Enter.
8. Read the warning message, ensure that you have selected the correct disk drives
to initialize, and then press Y to continue.
Rescanning disk drives
To rescan the drives connected to the controller:
1. At the BIOS prompt, press Ctrl+A.
2. From the ARC menu, select Array Configuration Utility.
3. Select Rescan Drives.
Using SATASelect
SATASelect allows you to change device and controller settings without opening the
computer cabinet or handling the card. With this utility, you can modify the Channel
Interface Definitions and Device Configuration Options.
To access SATASelect:
1. When you turn on or restart your system, press Ctrl+A to access the ARC utility
when you see the following message:
Press <Ctrl><A> for Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility
2. If multiple controllers are installed, select the controller you want to configure and
then press Enter.
3. From the ARC menu, select SATASelect Utility.
The SATA Configuration and Controller Configuration menu options are
displayed.
To select a SATASelect menu option, browse with the arrow keys to the option
and then press Enter. In some cases, selecting an option displays another menu.
You can return to the previous menu at any time by pressing Esc.
Chapter 8. Using the ARC utility (Serial ATA controllers only)
89
To restore the original SATASelect default values, press F6 from the SATA
Configuration or the Contoller Configuration menu.
SATA Configuration Options:
— Write Cache (Default: Enabled)—When Enabled, write cache is enabled,
providing maximum performance.
Note: When Enabled, there is a potential for data loss or corruption during a
power failure.
— DMA (Default: Enabled)—When Enabled, Direct Memory Access (DMA)
mode is used for the drive, providing maximum performance.
— SMART (Default: Enabled)—Controls the predictive failure feature of the disk
drive. When Enabled and the drive supports Self-Monitoring, Analysis and
Reporting Technology (SMART) configuration, the SMART status of the drive
(Healthy or Failed) is displayed along with the physical drive display during
POST. Messages are logged to the ServeRAID Manager log file when they
occur. When Event Broadcasting is enabled for your operating system,
SMART events are also sent to destinations according to your system’s
particular configuration (for example, system log file, Event Viewer, pop ups,
email, etc.) When Disabled, or when the drive does not support SMART, the
SMART status is not displayed.
— Allow Read Ahead (Default: Enabled)—When Enabled, the drive’s read
ahead cache algorithm is used, providing maximum performance under most
circumstances.
Controller Configuration Options:
— Drives Write Cache (Default: Drive's Default)—When Enabled, write cache is
enabled, providing maximum drive performance. When Disabled, no write
cache is used on the drive. By default, the drive’s setting is used.
Note: When Enabled, there is a slight possibility (less than with controller
cache) of data loss or corruption during a power failure.
— Runtime BIOS (Default: Enabled)—When Enabled, the BIOS allows the
controller to act as a startable device. Disabling the BIOS allows another
suitable controller to act as the start device.
— Automatic Failover (Default: Enabled)—When Enabled, the controller
automatically rebuilds an array when the failed drive is replaced. When
disabled, the array must be rebuilt manually.
— Array Background Consistency Check (Default: Disabled)—When
Enabled, the controller continuously performs a verification on a redundant
array to check data integrity. In the case of RAID 1 or 10, consistency checks
assure that the data between like blocks match. In the case of a RAID 5,
consistency checks assure that data in the stripe and the calculated parity for
the stripe match. Consistency checking processes reduce performance. For a
RAID 5, the performance reduction is significant.
— Array-based BBS Support (Default: Disabled)—When Enabled in systems
that support BBS, the controller presents attached startable devices up to the
host system's BIOS for boot device selection. This is relevant for logical
arrays.
Note: The BBS (BIOS Boot Specification) enables the BIOS to identify all
Initial Program Load devices (devices with the ability to load and
execute an OS; for example, floppy drives, hard drives, CD-ROM
drives, etc.) in the system, prioritize them in the order you select, and
sequentially go through each device to allow booting.
— Physical Drives Display during POST (Default: Disabled)—When Enabled,
attached physical devices are displayed during system POST. Displaying the
devices adds a few seconds to the overall POST time.
90
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
4. To exit SATASelect, press Esc until a message prompts you to exit. (If you
changed any host adapter settings, you are prompted to save the changes before
you exit.) Select Yes to exit and restart the system. Any changes you made take
effect after the system boots.
Using the disk utilities
The disk utilities enable you to low-level format or verify the media of your Serial ATA
hard disks. To access the disk utilities:
1. Turn on your computer and then press Ctrl+A when prompted to access the ARC
utility.
2. If multiple controllers are installed, select the controller you want to configure and
then press Enter.
3. From the ARC menu, select Disk Utilities.
4. Select the desired disk and then press Enter.
You are offered the following options:
— Format Disk—Simulates a format of the hard drive by removing the file
system and writing zeros to the entire disk. Serial ATA drives are formatted at
the factory and do not need to be formatted again.
CAUTION:
Formatting destroys all data on the drive. Be sure to back up your data
before performing this operation.
— Verify Disk Media—Scans the media of a disk drive for defects. Any errors
found are corrected.
Viewing the event log
The BIOS-based event log stores all firmware events (configuration changes, array
creation, boot activity, and so on).
The event log has a fixed size. Once full, old events are flushed as new events are
stored. Also, the log is volatile; therefore, it is cleared after each system restart.
To access the event log:
1. When you turn on or restart your system, press Ctrl+A to access the ARC when
prompted by the following message:
Press <Ctrl><A> for Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility
2. If multiple controllers are installed, select the controller you want to configure and
then press Enter.
3. From the ARC menu, press Ctrl+P.
The Controller Service Menu appears.
4. Select Controller Log Information and then press Enter. The current log is
displayed.
Chapter 8. Using the ARC utility (Serial ATA controllers only)
91
92
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 9. Installing and using the IPSSEND command-line
program
This chapter provides the information needed to install, start, and use the IPSSEND
command-line program.
IPSSEND is an advanced command-line program that you can use to configure and
manage your ServeRAID SCSI controllers. This utility program is provided on the IBM
ServeRAID Support diskettes and the IBM ServeRAID Support CD.
Installing the IPSSEND command-line program
This section describes how to install the IPSSEND command-line program. For a
complete list of supported operating systems, see “Supported operating systems” on
page xx.
Note: To run IPSSEND on DOS, you must start IPSSEND from the IBM ServeRAID
Support for DOS diskette. This diskette contains the advanced SCSI
programming interface (ASPI) device driver.
Installing IPSSEND for Windows or OS/2
You can install this program for Windows or OS/2 using either the IBM ServeRAID
Support CD or the appropriate IBM ServeRAID Support diskette.
Installing IPSSEND for Windows or OS/2 from
CD: Complete the following steps to install IPSSEND for Windows or OS/2 using the
IBM ServeRAID Support CD:
1. Start the server.
2. After the operating system starts, insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the
CD-ROM drive. If the CD starts automatically, exit the installation program.
3. Create an IPSADM directory on your hard disk. From the operating-system
command prompt, type the following command and press Enter:
md c:\ipsadm
where c is the drive letter where the operating system is installed.
4. Copy IPSSEND to your hard disk. Type one of the following commands and press
Enter:
For Windows 2000
and Windows XP
Professional
copy e:\windows\win2k_xp\scsi\cmdline\ipssend.exe c:\ipsadm
For Windows Server
2003
copy e:\windows\win2003\scsi\cmdline\ipssend.exe c:\ipsadm
For Windows NT 4.0
copy e:\windows\winnt\scsi\cmdline\ipssend.exe c:\ipsadm
For OS/2
copy e:\os2\cmdline\ipssend.exe c:\ipsadm
where e is the drive letter of the CD-ROM drive that contains the IBM ServeRAID
Support CD and c is the drive letter where the operating system is installed.
5. Remove the CD from the CD-ROM drive.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
93
Installing IPSSEND for Windows or OS/2 from
diskette: Complete the following steps to install IPSSEND for Windows or OS/2
using the IBM ServeRAID Support diskette:
1. Start the server.
2. After the operating system starts, insert the appropriate IBM ServeRAID Support
diskette into the diskette drive.
3. Create an IPSADM directory on your hard disk. From the operating-system
command prompt, type the following command and press Enter:
md c:\ipsadm
where c is the drive letter where the operating system is installed.
4. Copy IPSSEND to your hard disk. Type one of the following commands and press
Enter:
For Windows 2000
and Windows XP
Professional
copy a:\win2k_xp\scsi\cmdline\ipssend.exe c:\ipsadm
For Windows Server
2003
copy a:\win2003\scsi\cmdline\ipssend.exe c:\ipsadm
For Windows NT 4.0
copy a:\winnt\scsi\cmdline\ipssend.exe c:\ipsadm
For OS/2
copy a:\ipssend.exe c:\ipsadm
where a is the drive letter of the diskette drive that contains the appropriate IBM
ServeRAID Support diskette, and c is the drive letter where the operating system
is installed.
5. Remove the IBM ServeRAID Support diskette from the diskette drive.
Installing IPSSEND for NetWare
You can install this program for NetWare using either the IBM ServeRAID Support CD
or the IBM ServeRAID Support for NetWare diskette.
Installing IPSSEND for NetWare from CD: Complete the following steps
to install IPSSEND for NetWare using the IBM ServeRAID Support CD:
1. Start the server.
2. Exit to the console screen. From the console prompt, mount the CD-ROM drive.
Type the following command and press Enter:
Load Cdrom
3. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive.
4. If you are installing IPSSEND for NetWare 5.x or 6.0, from the console prompt,
type the following commands and press Enter. Continue to Step 6.
Netbasic
Shell
5. If you are installing IPSSEND for NetWare 6.5, from the console prompt, type the
following commands and press Enter:
nsninit
nsnshell
94
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
6. Copy IPSSEND to your hard disk. Type the following command and press Enter:
copy serveraid:\netware\scsi\cmdline\ipssend.nlm C:\nwserver\
where nwserver is the directory where NetWare is installed.
7. Remove the IBM ServeRAID Support CD from the CD-ROM drive.
8. From the DOS prompt, ensure that you are in the c:\nwserver directory; then, type
the following command and press Enter to restart NetWare:
server
Installing IPSSEND for NetWare from diskette: Complete the following
steps to install IPSSEND for NetWare using the IBM ServeRAID Support for NetWare
diskette:
1. Start the server.
2. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support for NetWare diskette into the diskette drive.
3. Copy IPSSEND to your hard disk. From the console prompt, type the following
command and press Enter:
copy a:\ipssend.nlm c:\nwserver
where a is the drive letter of diskette drive that contains the IBM ServeRAID
Support for NetWare diskette, c is the drive letter where NetWare is installed, and
nwserver is the directory where NetWare is installed.
4. Remove the IBM ServeRAID Support for NetWare diskette from the diskette drive.
5. From the DOS prompt, ensure that you are in the c:\nwserver directory; then, type
the following command and press Enter to restart NetWare:
server
Installing IPSSEND for NetWare without
restarting the system: Complete the following steps to install IPSSEND for
NetWare without having to shut down your system:
1. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive.
2. From the X Server - Graphical Console, copy ipssend.nlm to the System directory:
copy e:\Serveraod_v7_10:\netware\scsi\cmdline\ipssend.nlm c:\Sys:\System\
where e is the drive letter of CD-ROM drive and c is the drive letter where
NetWare is installed.
3. Remove the IBM ServeRAID Support CD from the Cd-ROM drive.
Installing IPSSEND for Linux
You can install this program for Red Hat Linux, SuSE Linux, Turbolinux, or
UnitedLinux using either the IBM ServeRAID Support CD or the appropriate IBM
ServeRAID Support diskette.
Note: For IPSSEND to work properly under Linux, the following conditions must
apply:
•
You must have SCSI Generic support compiled into your kernel. See the
Linux Kernel-HOWTO for more information on configuring and recompiling
your kernel.
•
You must have permission to access the SCSI Generic device files in /dev.
Chapter 9. Installing and using the IPSSEND command-line program
95
Installing IPSSEND for Linux from CD: Complete the following steps to
install IPSSEND for Linux using the IBM ServeRAID Support CD:
1. Start the server.
2. After the operating system starts, insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the
CD-ROM drive.
3. If your CD-ROM drive automounts, go to step 4. Otherwise, mount the CD-ROM
drive. From the console, type the following command and press Enter:
mount -r -t iso9660 /dev/cdromdevicefile /mountpoint
where cdromdevicefile is the specific device file for the CD-ROM block device,
and mountpoint is the specific mount point of the Linux system.
4. Copy IPSSEND to your hard disk. Type the following command and press Enter:
cp /mountpoint/linux_dir/scsi/cmdline/ipssend /usr/bin
where mountpoint is the mount point of the Linux system, and linux_dir is linux or
linux_amd64.
5. Change the access permissions. Type the following command and press Enter:
chmod 700 /usr/bin/ipssend
6. Unmount the CD-ROM drive. Type the following command and press Enter:
umount /mountpoint
where mountpoint is the specific mount point of the Linux system.
7. Remove the CD from the CD-ROM drive.
Installing IPSSEND for Linux from diskette: Complete the following
steps to install IPSSEND using the IBM ServeRAID Support diskette for your Linux
operating system:
1. Start the server.
2. After the operating system starts, insert the appropriate IBM ServeRAID Support
diskette into the diskette drive.
3. Mount the diskette drive. From the console, type the following command and
press Enter:
mount -t msdos /dev/diskettedevicefile /mountpoint
where diskettedevicefile is the specific device file for the diskette drive block
device, and mountpoint is the specific mount point of the Linux system.
4. Copy IPSSEND to your hard disk. Type the following command and press Enter:
cp /mountpoint/ipssend /usr/bin/ipssend
where mountpoint is the specific mount point of the Linux system.
5. Unmount the diskette drive. Type the following command and press Enter:
umount /mountpoint
where mountpoint is the specific mount point of the Linux system.
6. Remove the IBM ServeRAID Support diskette from the diskette drive.
96
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Installing IPSSEND for OpenServer
You can install this program for OpenServer using either the IBM ServeRAID Support
CD or the IBM ServeRAID Support for SCO OpenServer diskette.
Installing IPSSEND for OpenServer from CD:Complete the following
steps to install IPSSEND for OpenServer using the IBM ServeRAID Support CD:
1. Start the server.
2. After the operating system starts, insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the
CD-ROM drive.
3. Mount the CD-ROM drive. From the console, type the following command and
press Enter:
mount -f ISO9660 -o ro,lower /dev/cd0 /mnt
where /dev/cd0 is the specific device file for the CD-ROM block device. If you
have more than one CD-ROM drive, you must replace /dev/cd0 with the specific
name of the CD-ROM drive you want to use.
Note: If you currently have another device mounted on /mnt, you must create a
new directory and substitute its name for /mnt in these instructions.
4. Copy IPSSEND to your hard disk. Type the following command and press Enter:
cp /mnt/openserv/scsi/cmdline/ipssend /usr/bin
5. Change the access permissions. Type the following command and press Enter:
chmod 700 /usr/bin/ipssend
6. Unmount the CD-ROM drive. Type the following command and press Enter:
umount /mnt
7. Remove the CD from the CD-ROM drive.
Installing IPSSEND for OpenServer from
diskette: Complete the following steps to install IPSSEND for OpenServer using
the IBM ServeRAID Support for SCO OpenServer diskette:
1. Start the server.
2. After the operating system starts, insert the IBM ServeRAID Support for SCO
OpenServer diskette into the diskette drive.
3. Mount the diskette drive. From the console, type the following command and
press Enter:
mount -f S51K /dev/fd0 /mnt
where /dev/fd0 is the specific device file for the diskette drive block device. If you
have more than one diskette drive, you must replace /dev/cd0 with the specific
name of the diskette drive you want to use.
Note: If you currently have another device mounted on /mnt, you must create a
new directory and substitute its name for /mnt in these instructions.
4. Copy IPSSEND to your hard disk. Type the following command and press Enter:
cp /mnt/ipssend /usr/bin/ipssend
5. Unmount the diskette drive. Type the following command and press Enter:
umount /mnt
where /mnt is the directory that you mounted in step 3.
6. Remove the diskette from the diskette drive.
7. Change the access permissions. Type the following command and press Enter:
chmod 700 /usr/bin/ipssend
Chapter 9. Installing and using the IPSSEND command-line program
97
Installing IPSSEND for UnixWare
You can install this program for UnixWare using either the IBM ServeRAID Support
CD or the IBM ServeRAID Support for SCO UnixWare and Open UNIX diskette.
Installing IPSSEND for UnixWare from CD: Complete the following steps
to install IPSSEND for UnixWare using the IBM ServeRAID Support CD:
1. Start the server.
2. After the operating system starts, insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the
CD-ROM drive.
3. Mount the CD-ROM drive. From the console, type the following command and
press Enter:
mount -F cdfs -r /dev/cdrom/cdromdevicefile /mnt
where cdromdevicefile is the specific device file for the CD-ROM block device.
Look in the /dev/cdrom directory to determine what cdromdevicefile is on your
server, for example, c0b0t010.
Note: If you currently have another device mounted on /mnt, you must create a
new directory and substitute its name for /mnt in these instructions.
4. Copy IPSSEND to your hard disk. Type the following command and press Enter:
cp /mnt/unixware/scsi/cmdline/ipssend /usr/bin
5. Change the access permissions. Type the following command and press Enter:
chmod 700 /usr/bin/ipssend
6. Unmount the CD-ROM drive. Type the following command and press Enter:
umount /mnt
7. Remove the CD from the CD-ROM drive.
Installing IPSSEND for UnixWare from
diskette: Complete the following steps to install IPSSEND for UnixWare using the
IBM ServeRAID Support for SCO UnixWare and Open UNIX diskette:
1. Start the server.
2. After the operating system starts, insert the IBM ServeRAID Support for SCO
UnixWare and Open UNIX diskette into the diskette drive.
3. Mount the diskette drive. From the console, type the following command:
mount -F s5 /dev/fd0 /mnt
If you have more than one diskette drive, you might need to replace /dev/fd0 with
the specific name of the diskette drive that you want to use.
Note: If you currently have another device mounted on /mnt, you must create a
new directory and substitute its name for /mnt in these instructions.
4. Copy IPSSEND to your hard disk. Type the following command and press Enter:
cp /mnt/ipssend /usr/bin/ipssend
5. Unmount the diskette drive. Type the following command and press Enter:
umount /mnt
where mnt is the directory that you mounted in step 3.
6. Remove the diskette from the diskette drive.
7. Change the access permissions. Type the following command and press Enter:
chmod 700 /usr/bin/ipssend
98
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Starting the IPSSEND command-line program
You can run IPSSEND either from your operating system or by using the startable
(bootable) IBM ServeRAID Support for DOS diskette. When you run IPSSEND without
parameters, a list of available functions and their specific parameters is displayed. For
a description of the available functions and their parameters, see “Using the IPSSEND
command-line program”.
Starting IPSSEND from Windows, NetWare, OS/2, Linux, OpenServer, or
UnixWare
To start and run IPSSEND without parameters, type one of the following commands
and press Enter:
For Windows and OS/2
c:\ipsadm\ipssend
For NetWare
load ipssend
For Linux, OpenServer, and
UnixWare
/usr/bin/ipssend
where c is the drive letter of the drive where the operating system is installed.
Starting IPSSEND from DOS
Complete the following steps to start IPSSEND:
1. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support for DOS diskette into the diskette drive.
2. Restart the server.
3. Type the following command and press Enter to see a list of IPSSEND
parameters:
ipssend
Using the IPSSEND command-line program
The IPSSEND command-line program provides a quick way to complete the following
actions:
•
Create backup copies of data (see “FlashCopy function (for Windows only)” on
page 100)
•
Copy ServeRAID controller configurations from one server to another (see
“Server roll-out functions” on page 106)
•
Recover from a failed physical drive and rebuild an affected logical drive (see
“Error-recovery functions” on page 107)
•
Isolate problems and determine their causes (see “Problem-isolation and debug
functions” on page 109)
•
Create logical drives; display or modify a limited set of configuration settings (see
“RAID configuration functions” on page 112)
Note: If you do not have the IPSSEND program installed, see “Installing the
IPSSEND command-line program” on page 93.
The syntax conventions are as follows:
•
Commands are shown in uppercase letters.
•
Variables are shown in italics and explained immediately afterward.
•
Optional commands or variables are enclosed in brackets.
Chapter 9. Installing and using the IPSSEND command-line program
99
•
Where you must type one of several commands, the values are separated by
slashes.
•
Default values are underlined.
•
Repeatable parameters are enclosed in braces, and the maximum number of
repetitions is specified.
FlashCopy function (for Windows only)
Note: The ServeRAID-5i controller does not support the FlashCopy function.
The FlashCopy function creates a quick backup copy of data. It sets up a link between
the source and target partitions; then, it creates a snapshot-like backup of the source
data on the target partition. Any changes made to the source drive after you issue the
command are not reflected on the target drive; the target drive is instantly available for
access. You can use the backup copy of data for such tasks as tape backup, drive
cloning, and multiserver rollout.
There are two primary FlashCopy functions: backup and nobackup. The FlashCopy
backup function copies the entire contents of the source partitions to the target
partitions so that entire logical drives can be moved from one server to another. The
FlashCopy nobackup function creates a temporary snapshot copy of a partition for
tape drive backup and reference purposes. The FlashCopy nobackup function is less
I/O-intensive than the FlashCopy backup function.
Important: By design, a FlashCopy backup or nobackup operation changes the
target-volume names so that they match the source-volume names. If you prefer, you
can rename the target volumes after the FlashCopy operation is completed. This is
especially important when the Window Distributed File System (DFS™) is being used,
because not renaming the volumes might cause conflicts with DFS.
Other FlashCopy functions include:
•
•
•
•
100
delete: You can use this function to delete an array.
import: After a FlashCopy backup function is completed, you can use this
function to move a logical drive to another server.
map: You can use this function to determine the partition numbers and whether
they are available for the FlashCopy backup or nobackup processes.
stop all: You can use this function to break the links between the source and
target partitions.
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Important:
Before using FlashCopy, consider the following requirements:
•
You can perform a FlashCopy backup operation on only one controller at a time.
•
The source and target partitions must be on the same controller.
•
You can have up to four FlashCopy links active at one time.
•
There is no limit on source and target partition size. However, the size of the target
partition must be equal to or larger than that of the source partition. For optimal space
usage, the target partition should be the same size as the source partition.
•
The source and target partitions must have the same file-system type, allocation-unit
size, and compression setting.
•
The source and target drives must be part of the same type of array. That is, either both
drives are part of a spanned array, or both drives are part of a nonspanned array.
•
If the source and target drives are part of a spanned array, the following conditions must
apply:
— Each array must have the same number of sub-arrays.
— Each logical drive on the spanned array can have only one partition.
•
Normal I/O functions can be performed on the source partition while the FlashCopy
operation is in progress.
•
If you are performing a FlashCopy backup, do not write to the target partition until the
FlashCopy backup process is complete. If you are performing a FlashCopy nobackup, do
not write to the target partition at all.
•
You can use the noprompt option to run some FlashCopy functions without receiving any
interactive prompts.
Chapter 9. Installing and using the IPSSEND command-line program
101
The following information explains the FlashCopy functions in more detail.
Function
What it does
Command
flashcopy
backup
This function creates a snapshot of the data
contained on the source partitions and
writes it to the corresponding target
partitions. The link between each source
partition and target partition exists until all
the data is copied; then, the operation is
complete and the link is automatically
broken. At this point, the source partitions
are ready for immediate use, and each
target partition contains a valid copy of the
source partition data that existed at the
exact time you issued the FlashCopy
backup command. The physical drives
containing the target partitions can be
removed and used with another ServeRAID
controller.
IPSSEND FLASHCOPY controller BACKUP {source
target} [POLL] [FORCE] [NOPROMPT]
where:
•
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
source is the source partition number, and target is
the target partition number. The maximum number of
repetitions of {source target} is four.
POLL is an optional parameter that displays the
progress of the backup function.
FORCE is an optional parameter that creates a
FlashCopy of a source partition that is the boot
partition and either contains open files or a memory
paging file.
Note:
•
Using the FORCE option will not guarantee
file consistency between the source and
target partitions.
NOPROMPT is an optional parameter that overrides
the user prompt.
Notes:
1.
Only one FlashCopy backup process (involving up to
four source and target partitions) can be active on a
controller at a time. If a FlashCopy backup process is
in progress, you cannot issue another FlashCopy
backup or FlashCopy nobackup command until the
previous FlashCopy backup process is completed.
2.
You must initiate multiple FlashCopy links at the same
time. If you want to initiate four FlashCopy links, you
must initiate the links on the same command. For
example:
IPSSEND FLASHCOPY BACKUP 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
You cannot initiate the four links across multiple
commands, such as:
IPSSEND FLASHCOPY BACKUP 1 2 3 4
IPSSEND FLASHCOPY BACKUP 5 6 7 8
flashcopy
delete
This function deletes an array. You can use
the ServeRAID Manager program to identify
the array that you want to delete. This
program can make the LEDs flash for the
physical drives that belong to the specific
array.
Note:
The FlashCopy delete function is
not available in a cluster
configuration.
Important: If your target logical drive is
configured with write-back cache enabled,
wait 10 minutes after the FlashCopy backup
is completed before issuing a FlashCopy
delete command. This ensures that all data
has been moved from the controller cache
to the logical drive.
102
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
IPSSEND FLASHCOPY controller DELETE arrayID
[NOPROMPT]
where:
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
arrayID is one of the following values:
— For a nonspanned array: (A–H)
— For a spanned array: (1–8)
NOPROMPT is an optional parameter that overrides
the user prompt.
Function
What it does
Command
flashcopy
import
Use this function to merge logical-drive
information from physical drives when they
are added to an existing server
configuration.
IPSSEND FLASHCOPY controller IMPORT ALL/n
Notes:
1.
The stripe-unit size of the logical drives
being imported must be the same as
the stripe-unit size of the logical drives
on the new controller.
2.
The number of physical drives you add
must be equal to the number of
physical drives that were in the logical
drive defined originally.
3.
The physical drives must be added
while the server is on.
4.
When a logical drive is imported, all
partitions from that logical drive are
also imported automatically. You
cannot import a single partition
selectively.
5.
You must manually assign drive letters
after the import is completed.
6.
The FlashCopy import function is not
available in a cluster configuration.
where:
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
ALL specifies that all logical drives are to be imported
n is the logical drive number (1–8) for the specific
drive you want to import
Chapter 9. Installing and using the IPSSEND command-line program
103
Function
What it does
Command
flashcopy
map
This function lists the following information
for each operating-system partition:
IPSSEND FLASHCOPY controller MAP
•
•
•
•
where:
Partition number, letter, and size
Logical drive number
Array letter
Whether the partition is available for
FlashCopy
Run the FlashCopy map command before
starting a FlashCopy backup or FlashCopy
nobackup procedure.
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16).
If a partition is not available for FlashCopy, the report
contains one of the following explanatory notes:
Note 1 This is either an active FlashCopy link or
unavailable due to active FlashCopy links. See
the table below for details. Use the stop function
to break these links. After the link is broken, you
can reissue the FlashCopy backup or FlashCopy
nobackup functions.
Note 2 One or more of the following is true for this
partition:
•
•
•
•
•
•
The partition is the boot partition.
The partition does not have a Microsoft
Windows NT File System (NTFS) or file
allocation table (FAT) file system.
The partition does not have a drive letter
assigned.
There is more than one partition defined on
this logical drive in the spanned array.
The partition has open files.
The partition has a memory-paging file.
You can override these requirements by using
the force option. See the FlashCopy backup and
FlashCopy nobackup functions for more details.
Note 3 One or more of the following is true for this
partition:
•
•
•
The partition is in the blocked state.
The partition is not in the okay or critical
state.
The partition is currently synchronizing,
rebuilding, or migrating.
Note 4 FlashCopy can support up to four active links
only.
Note 5 There is no partition defined on this logical drive.
104
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Function
What it does
Command
flashcopy
nobackup
This function creates a snapshot of the data
contained on the source partitions;
however, it does not back up the entire
contents of the source partitions to the
target partitions. The snapshot exists only
while there is a link between the source and
target partitions. The link between the
source and target partitions exists until you
issue the FlashCopy stop all command.
After you issue the FlashCopy stop all
command, the target partition is no longer
accessible. Compared to the FlashCopy
backup command, the FlashCopy nobackup
command requires less internal ServeRAID
processing and disk access; it has a smaller
impact on performance.
IPSSEND FLASHCOPY controller NOBACKUP {source
target} [FORCE] [NOPROMPT]
where:
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
source is the source partition number, and target is
the target partition number. The maximum number of
repetitions of {source target} is four.
FORCE is an optional parameter that creates a
FlashCopy of a source partition that is the boot
partition and either contains open files or a memory
paging file.
Note:
•
Using the FORCE option will not guarantee
file consistency between the source and
target partitions.
NOPROMPT is an optional parameter that overrides
the user prompt.
Notes:
1.
Only one FlashCopy nobackup link (involving up to
four source and target partitions) can exist on a
ServeRAID controller. If a FlashCopy nobackup
function is invoked, you cannot issue another
FlashCopy nobackup or FlashCopy backup command
until existing nobackup links are broken.
2.
You must initiate multiple FlashCopy links at the same
time. For example, if you want to initiate four
FlashCopy links, you must initiate the links on the
same command:
IPSSEND FLASHCOPY NOBACKUP 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
You cannot initiate the four links across multiple
commands, such as:
IPSSEND FLASHCOPY NOBACKUP 1 2 3 4
IPSSEND FLASHCOPY NOBACKUP 5 6 7 8
flashcopy
stop all
This function breaks all open links between
the source and target partitions. After you
issue the FlashCopy stop all command, the
target partition contents are no longer
accessible and you must reformat your
target partitions. This includes stopping in
the middle of a FlashCopy backup
operation. Data is valid during the
FlashCopy backup and after the FlashCopy
backup is completed, but not after a
FlashCopy stop is issued during a
FlashCopy backup procedure.
Note:
IPSSEND FLASHCOPY controller STOPALL
[NOPROMPT]
where:
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
NOPROMPT is an optional parameter that overrides
the user-prompt.
After a FlashCopy stop all
command is executed, the
ServeRAID Manager program will
display an event indicating that the
FlashCopy has failed. This is
normal.
Chapter 9. Installing and using the IPSSEND command-line program
105
Server roll-out functions
The following table describes the IPSSEND server roll-out functions.
Function
What it does
Command and supported operating systems
autosync
This function synchronizes a new logical
drive. This computes and writes the parity
data, verifying that the data redundancy for
the logical drive is correct. Because this
function runs in the background, you can use
the logical drive immediately.
IPSSEND AUTOSYC controller logicaldrive [NOPROMPT]
Note:
where:
•
•
•
Use this function only on RAID level5, 5E, or 5EE logical drives.
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
logicaldrive is the logical drive number (1–8)
NOPROMPT is an optional parameter that overrides
the user prompt
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
backup
This function saves information concerning a
controller configuration to a diskette or to a
physical drive. The information includes:
•
•
•
BIOS settings
Array and logical drive definitions
Cluster parameters
Note:
The ServeRAID controller
configuration must be valid.
IPSSEND BACKUP controller filename [NOPROMPT]
where:
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
filename is the path and file name where the
configuration is to be written
NOPROMPT is an optional parameter that overrides
the user prompt
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
copyld
This function copies the content of one
logical drive (the source) to another logical
drive (the target).
IPSSEND COPYLD controller source target [NOPROMPT]
Note:
•
•
•
•
The size of the target logical drive
must be greater than or equal to the
size of the source logical drive.
where:
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
source is the source logical drive number
target is the target logical drive number
NOPROMPT is an optional parameter that overrides
the user prompt
Supported operating system: DOS
init
This function initializes the first 0.5 MB of a
logical drive. This process erases the
partition tables; you will lose access to data
on the logical drive.
Note:
merge
(Linux only) Restart your server to
clear the previous partition tables
from memory.
This function migrates a set of logical drives
from one ServeRAID controller to another.
This function is used in High Availability (HA)
to allow server redundancy without the
performance loss of a mirrored server.
IPSSEND INIT controller logicaldrive [NOPROMPT]
where:
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
logicaldrive is the logical drive number (1–8)
NOPROMPT is an optional parameter that overrides
the user prompt
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
IPSSEND MERGE controller Merge ID [OWN/PARTNER]
where:
•
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
Merge ID is the identifier on the logical drive to merge
(1 to 254)
OWN merges a node’s own logical drives
PARTNER merges a partner’s logical drives
Supported operating system: Windows
106
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Function
What it does
Command and supported operating systems
restore
This function loads a configuration from a file
stored on a diskette or on a hard disk. This
operation overwrites the existing
configuration information and BIOS settings
stored on a ServeRAID controller.
IPSSEND RESTORE controller filename [NOPROMPT]
where:
•
•
•
Note:
The configuration must be a valid
configuration file created using the
IPSSEND backup function.
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
filename is the path and file name where the
configuration is to be written
NOPROMPT is an optional parameter that overrides
the user prompt
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
synch
This function synchronizes the parity
information on redundant logical drives. If the
parity information is inconsistent, IPSSEND
repairs it automatically.
IPSSEND SYNCH controller logical drive
where:
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
logical drive is the logical drive number (1 to 8)
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
unmerge
This function clears a set of logical drives
from a ServeRAID controller configuration.
This function is used in High Availability (HA)
to allow server redundancy without the
performance loss of a mirrored server.
IPSSEND UNMERGE controller Merge ID
[OWN/PARTNER]
where:
•
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
Merge ID is the identifier on the logical drive to
unmerge (1 to 254)
OWN unmerges a node’s own logical drives
PARTNER unmerges a partner’s logical drives
Supported operating system: Windows
Error-recovery functions
The following table describes the IPSSEND error-recovery functions.
Function
What it does
Command and supported operating systems
getstatus
This function displays information about the
most recent rebuild, synchronization,
logical-drive migration,
compaction/expansion, or FlashCopy. The
information includes the type of operation,
status, logical drive number, logical drive
size, and percentage of the operation
completed.
IPSSEND GETSTATUS controller
where:
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
Chapter 9. Installing and using the IPSSEND command-line program
107
Function
What it does
Command and supported operating systems
rebuild
This function rebuilds a defunct physical
drive. You can use this function for arrays
that contain one or more logical drives in
the critical state.
IPSSEND REBUILD controller dch dsid nch nsid
where:
•
•
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
dch is the channel number for the defunct drive (1–4)
dsid is the SCSI ID for the defunct drive (0–15)
nch is the channel number for the new drive (1–4)
nsid is the SCSI ID for the new drive (0–15)
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
setstate
This function changes the state of a
physical drive.
IPSSEND SETSTATE controller channel sid newstate
where:
Attention: Be very careful when using
this function. For example, you might lose
data if you change a physical drive from the
defunct state to the online state without first
performing a rebuild operation. Also do not
use this function to modify the configuration
of a cluster. Always configure clusters with
the ServeRAID Manager.
•
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
channel is the channel number for the drive (1–4)
sid is the SCSI ID for the drive (0–15)
newstate is the new state for the drive. Valid states
are:
— EMP for Empty
— RDY for Ready
— HSP for Hot spare
— SHS for Standby hot spare
— DDD for Defunct disk drive
— DHS for Defunct hot spare
— RBL for Rebuild
— SBY for Standby
— ONL for Online
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
unblock
This function provides access to a blocked
RAID level-0 logical drive.
IPSSEND UNBLOCK controller logicaldrive
where:
Important: The logical drive might contain
damaged data. You must recreate or
restore the data.
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
logicaldrive is the logical drive number (1–8)
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
108
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Problem-isolation and debug functions
The following table describes the IPSSEND problem-isolation and debug functions.
Function
What it does
Command and supported operating systems
eraseevent
This function clears all entries in the
designated event logs. (See getevent for
descriptions of the ServeRAID controller
device event, soft event, and hard event
logs).
IPSSEND ERASEEVENT controller
DEVICE//SOFT/HARD/ALL
where:
•
•
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
DEVICE is the device event log
SOFT is the ServeRAID controller soft event log
HARD is the ServeRAID controller hard event log
ALL is the ServeRAID controller device event, soft
event, and hard event logs
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
format
This function performs a low-level format of
a physical drive, erasing all data.
IPSSEND FORMAT controller channel sid
where:
Attention: After issuing the format
command, do not stop the formatting
process. If you stop the process, the
physical drive will not respond to anything
except the format function. To recover the
drive, see “Recovering from an incomplete
format of a physical drive” on page 211.
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
channel is the channel number for the device (1– 4)
sid is the SCSI ID for the device (0–15)
Supported operating system: DOS
Chapter 9. Installing and using the IPSSEND command-line program
109
Function
What it does
Command and supported operating systems
getbst
This function displays the bad stripe
information for a controller, including the
number of bad stripes per logical drive.
IPSSEND GETBST controller
A bad stripe table entry is created when the
ServeRAID controller and/or components
within the subsystem are operating under
conditions that normal error recovery
cannot compensate for. The cause could be
a hardware problem, improper
procedure/usage of the controller or host
system, or an environmental issue. The
information stored within a bad stripe is
considered inconsistent and not made
available to the operating system.
A typical failure that results in a bad stripe
table entry occurs when two or more stripe
units (physical disks) fail to complete a read
or write within the same redundant stripe
(all physical disks within the logical
drive/array). A single stripe unit failure is
correctable and recoverable but two or
more failures within the same redundant
RAID stripe are not. Each bad stripe table
entry becomes a part of the ServeRAID
configuration.
The most common reason for a bad stripe
table entry is operating a server for an
extended period of time while a logical drive
is in the critical state.
Other factors that can result in a bad stripe
table entry include:
•
•
•
•
Operating a server for an extended
period of time with unmatched versions
of ServeRAID software, including
BIOS/firmware/drivers/utilities
Poorly seated SCSI bus components,
including the ServeRAID controller,
cables, drives, and repeater options
Powering a server off improperly or
unexpected power off conditions
Hard system hang conditions
To minimize the risk of bad stripes:
•
•
•
•
110
Ensure that the disk subsystem is
monitored for disk failures by installing
software that provides alert automation
Ensure that a Hot Spare or Standby Hot
Spare is installed in the system
Ensure that the hard disk drive firmware
is current (see http://www3.ibm.com/pc/support/site.wss/MIGR4GSU4F.html)
Ensure that all hard disks are replaced
according to IBM procedures and
guidelines
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
where:
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
Function
What it does
Command and supported operating systems
getevent
This function displays the contents of the
designated event logs.
IPSSEND GETEVENT controller
DEVICE/DDD/SOFT/HARD/ALL
where:
•
•
•
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
DEVICE is the device event log
DDD is the defunct drive log
SOFT is the ServeRAID controller soft event log
HARD is the ServeRAID controller hard event log
ALL is the ServeRAID controller device event, defunct
drive, soft event, and hard event logs
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
getversion
identify
This function lists the versions of BIOS,
cluster DLL, device driver, and firmware for
every ServeRAID controller in the server.
IPSSEND GETVERSION
This function flashes the LEDs on a
designated physical or logical drive. To stop
the LEDs from flashing, press any key.
IPSSEND IDENTIFY controller
PHYSICALDRIVE/LOGICALDRIVE options
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
where:
•
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
PHYSICALDRIVE is the designated physical drive
LOGICALDRIVE is the designated logical drive
options is one of the following values:
— If PHYSICAL DRIVE, the channel ID and SCSI ID
— If LOGICALDRIVE, the logical drive number (1-8)
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
Chapter 9. Installing and using the IPSSEND command-line program
111
RAID configuration functions
The following table describes the IPSSEND RAID configuration functions.
Function
What it does
Command and supported operating systems
create
This function creates logical drives on
either an existing or a new array. To define
a new array, you must type the channel
and SCSI ID of the physical drives.
IPSSEND CREATE controller LOGICALDRIVE
NEWARRAY/ARRAYID size raidlevel {channel sid}
[NOPROMPT]
Note:
You cannot create RAID level-x0
logical drives with this function.
After the logical drive is created, a quick
initialization is done. The quick initialization
process initializes the first 1024 sectors of
the logical drive.
If you assign the logical drive RAID level-5,
RAID level-5E, or RAID level-5EE and the
ServeRAID controller supports autosynchronization, the logical drive
automatically synchronizes in the
background. If the controller does not
support the auto-synchronization feature,
you can use the IPSSEND synch function
to synchronize the RAID level-5, RAID
level-5E, or RAID level-5EE logical drives.
After synchronization, the logical drives
are available for storing data.
where:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
NEWARRAY indicates that you are creating a new
array and logical drive
ARRAYID is the Array ID (A–H) of the existing array
on which you want to create a logical drive
size is one of the following values:
— The size in MB of the logical drive
— MAX indicates that you want to use all available
space in the array.
raidlevel is the RAID level for the logical drive (0, 1,
1E, 5, 5E, or 5EE)
If NEWARRAY, channel is the channel number for the
device (1– 4), and sid is the SCSI ID for the device (0–
15). The maximum number of repetitions of {channel
sid} is 16.
NOPROMPT is an optional parameter that overrides
the user prompt.
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
Attention: Do not use this function to
modify the configuration of a cluster.
Always configure clusters with the
ServeRAID Manager.
delete
This function deletes an array. You will
lose all the data contained in logical drives
defined in the array.
IPSSEND DELETE controller ARRAY arrayID
Note:
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
•
arrayID is the array identifier (A-H) of an existing array
You cannot delete spanned arrays
(RAID level-x0 logical drives) with
this function.
where
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
devinfo
This function lists the state and size of a
physical drive.
IPSSEND DEVINFO controller channel sid
where:
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
channel is the channel number for the device (1– 4)
sid is the SCSI ID for the device (0–15)
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
drivever
This function lists the vendor ID, firmware
IPSSEND DRIVEVER controller channel sid
version, and serial number of a designated
physical drive. IPPSEND retrieves this
where:
information directly from the physical drive. •
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
•
channel is the channel number for the device (1– 4)
•
sid is the SCSI ID for the device (0–15)
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
112
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Function
What it does
Command and supported operating systems
getconfig
This function lists information about a
controller, logical drive, or physical drive.
This information can include (but is not
limited to) the following items:
IPSSEND GETCONFIG controller AD/LD/PD/AL
•
•
•
•
•
•
hsrebuild
Controller type
Controller FRU, including serial
number and part number
BIOS, boot block, device driver, and
firmware versions
Logical drive status, RAID level, and
size
Physical drive type, SCSI ID,
presence of PFA
Physical drive state
This function enables the hot-swap rebuild
feature.
where:
•
•
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
AD specifies the controller information.
LD specifies the logical drive information.
PD specifies the physical device information.
AL specifies all information.
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
IPSSEND HSREBUILD controller ON
where:
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
readahead
This function enables, disables, or sets the
read-ahead cache mode to “Adaptive.”
IPSSEND READAHEAD controller ON/OFF/ADAPTIVE
where:
•
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
ON enables the read-ahead cache mode
OFF disables the read-ahead cache mode
ADAPTIVE indicates that the controller will determine
the best mode to use at any given time.
Supported operating system: DOS
scandrives
This function scans all SCSI channel on a
controller for the following types of drives:
IPSSEND SCANDRIVES controller
•
•
where:
Physical drives that have been added
Ready drives that have been removed
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
Chapter 9. Installing and using the IPSSEND command-line program
113
Function
What it does
Command and supported operating systems
set
The IPSSEND SET function allows you to:
To change the LDCACHE setting, use the following
command: IPSSEND SET controller LDCACHE
LogicalDrive WRITEBACK/WRITETHROUGH NAME
[NOPROMPT]
•
•
•
•
Change the LDCACHE write policy of
a controller.
Change the name of a controller in a
cluster.
Set the rebuild rate for defunct drives.
Enable and disable copy back — a
method of restoring a logical drive’s
original configuration after replacing a
failed drive in an array.
The copy back mode setting affects future
copy back operations only. If copy back is
in progress it completes before the new
setting takes effect.
Note:
Copy back is supported on the
ServeRAID-6M and ServeRAID6i/6i+ controllers only.
Attention: If you issue the IPSSEND
SET command during an LDM or a rebuild
operation, the command will abort and fail
with an error message.
where:
•
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
LogicalDrive is the logical drive number (1 to 8).
Options: Use WRITEBACK or WRITETHROUGH to
change the LDCACHE write policy of a controller to
either WRITEBACK or WRITETHROUGH.
NOPROMPT is an optional parameter that overrides
the user prompt.
Supported operating system for LDCACHE option: DOS
To change a clustering setting, use the following
command: IPSSEND SET controller NAME NewHostID
where:
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
NewHostID is the identifier of the new system host
Supported operating systems for NAME option: Windows,
NetWare, OS/2, Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS.
To change the rebuild rate for defunct drives, use the
following command: IPSSEND SET REBUILDRATE rate
where:
•
rate is LOW, MED, or HIGH
Supported operating system for REBUILDRATE option:
DOS
To change the copy back mode setting, use the following
command: IPSSEND SET controller COPYBACK mode
where:
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
mode is ON or OFF
Supported operating systems for COPYBACK option:
Windows, NetWare, OS/2, Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare,
and DOS.
114
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Function
What it does
Command and supported operating systems
setbios
The IPSSEND SETBIOS CNTRLI option of
this function enables you to control the
display of logical drives from the
ServeRAID BIOS Mini Configuration Utility
banner. You can also use the IPSSEND
SETBIOS CNTRLI option to enable or
disable the ServeRAID BIOS Mini
Configuration Utility program.
IPSSEND SETBIOS CNTRLI [OFF/ON/HIDE]
where:
•
•
•
OFF disables the CNTRL-I BIOS Mini Configuration
selection during system startup so that the ServeRAID
BIOS Mini Configuration Utility program cannot be
selected.
ON enables the CNTRL-I BIOS Mini Configuration
selection during system startup
HIDE hides the CNTRL-I BIOS Mini Configuration
selection during system startup. If you press Ctrl+I
after the ServeRAID banner is displayed, the
ServeRAID BIOS Mini Configuration Utility program is
started.
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
setconfig
This function modifies the controller
configuration. You can either restore the
controller to the factory-default settings, or
you can copy the configuration from
physical drives attached to a controller.
IPSSEND SETCONFIG controller
DEFAULT/IMPORTDRIVE [NOPROMPT]
where:
•
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
DEFAULT restores the controller to the factory-default
settings. All logical drives that are currently defined
will be deleted.
IMPORTDRIVE copies the configuration from the
drives attached to the controller. To import from a
specific physical drive, type the channel number and
the SCSI ID; otherwise, the controller selects the drive
from which to import the configuration. This option is
useful when you are replacing a controller and
reestablishing the original configuration on the new
controller.
NOPROMPT is an optional parameter that overrides
the user prompt.
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
unattended
This function enables or disables
unattended mode. This controller setting
determines how the BIOS handles failures
during system startup.
IPSSEND UNATTENDED controller ON/OFF
where:
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
ON enables the feature
OFF disables the feature
Supported operating systems: Windows, NetWare, OS/2,
Linux, OpenServer, UnixWare, and DOS
Chapter 9. Installing and using the IPSSEND command-line program
115
116
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 10. Installing and using the IPSMON command-line
program (NetWare only)
This chapter provides the information about installing, starting, and using the IPSMON
command-line program.
You can use the IPSMON program to monitor a ServeRAID controller for defunct
drives, Predictive Failure Analysis® (PFA) warnings, rebuild operations, FlashCopy
operations, synchronizations, logical-drive migrations, RAID level-5E compressions,
and RAID level-5EE compactions. Whenever activities occur, this program can log a
message to the screen, to a file, or to both the screen and a file.
You can use the IPSMON program with Novell NetWare 5.x only.
Installing the IPSMON command-line program
You can install this program for NetWare using the IBM ServeRAID Support CD only.
Complete the following steps to install the IPSMON program for NetWare:
1. Start the server.
2. From the console prompt, mount the CD-ROM drive. Type the following command
and press Enter:
Load Cdrom
3. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive.
4. From the console prompt, type the following commands and press Enter:
Netbasic
Shell
5. Copy IPSMON to your hard disk. Type the following command and press Enter:
copy serveraid:\netware\scsi\cmdline\ipsmon.nlm C:\nwserver\
where nwserver is the directory where NetWare is installed.
6. Remove the IBM ServeRAID Support CD from the CD-ROM drive.
7. From the DOS prompt, ensure that you are in the c:\nwserver directory; then, type
the following command and press Enter to restart NetWare:
server
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
117
Using the IPSMON command-line program
Complete the following steps to run the IPSMON program:
1. From the console, type the following command:
load ipsmon
2. Press Enter.
When you start IPSMON, it immediately begins polling all ServeRAID controllers for
specific conditions. If a condition is found, this program logs a message to the screen,
to a file, or to both the screen and a file.
Note: IPSMON continuously polls the ServeRAID controllers until you type unload
ipsmon at the system console.
Command: ipsmon options
where options is one of the following optional parameters:
•
•
•
-F:filename to specify the name of the file in which to record messages. The
default file name is IPSMON.LOG.
-S to display messages on the standard output (usually the screen).
-? to obtain a current list of valid parameters.
Note: If you start this program without any command-line parameters, the IPSMON
program will log the messages to the IPSMON.LOG file, and the messages will
not be displayed on the screen.
During operation, IPSMON logs various messages. Each message contains an alert
code and a location specifier.
•
The alert code begins with the message type and number:
— INF (information) followed by the message number
— WRN (warning) followed by the message number
— CRT (critical) followed by the message number
•
The location specifier comes after the alert code:
— A followed by the controller number
— C followed by the channel number (if required)
— SID followed by the SCSI ID (if required)
For example, a message of CRTxxx:A2C3SID04 signifies that a Critical condition
(CRTxxx) was found on Controller 2 (A2), Channel 3 (C3), SCSI ID 4 (SID04).
The IPSMON program can log the following messages, based on the condition being
monitored and errors detected.
Information Messages:
<Date and Time> INF000:A1C-SID-<Date and Time> INF001:A1C-SID-<Date and Time> INF002:A1C-SID-<Date and Time> INF003:A1C-SID-<Date and Time> INF004:A1C-SID-<Date and Time> INF005:A1C-SID-<Date and Time> INF006:A1C-SID--
(no errors detected)
(rebuild started)
(rebuild completed)
(synchronization started)
(synchronization completed)
(migration started)
(migration completed)
Warning Messages:
<Date and Time> WRN001:A2C3SID12 (PFA error detected)
118
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Critical Messages:
<Date and Time> CRT001:A3C2SID04 (dead drive detected)
<Date and Time> CRT002:A1C-SID-- (controller is not responding to
commands)
Chapter 10. Installing and using the IPSMON command-line program (NetWare only)
119
120
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 11. Installing and using the AACCLI command-line
program
This chapter provides the information needed to install, start, and use the AACCLI
command-line program.
AACCLI is an advanced command-line program that you can use to configure and
manage your ServeRAID-7t SATA controllers. This utility program is provided on the
IBM ServeRAID Support CD.
Installing the AACCLI command-line program
This section describes how to install the AACCLI command-line program using the
IBM ServeRAID Support CD. For a complete list of supported operating systems, see
“IBM ServeRAID Applications CD” on page xx.
Installing AACCLI for Windows
Complete the following steps to install AACCLI for Windows using the IBM ServeRAID
Support CD:
1. Start the server.
2. After the operating system starts, insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the
CD-ROM drive. If the CD starts automatically, click Browse CD; otherwise, open
your file system browser.
3. In the e:\windows\winversion\sata\cmdline\dll directory, double-click setup.exe,
where e is the drive letter of the CD-ROM drive and winversion is win2k_xp,
win2003, or winnt. Follow the instructions on the screen to install the program.
4. After the first installation wizard finishes, go to the
e:\windows\winversion\sata\cmdline directory (up one directory level from step 3).
Double-click setup.exe. Follow the instructions on the screen to install the
program.
5. Remove the CD from the CD-ROM drive.
6. Restart the server.
Installing AACCLI for NetWare
Complete the following steps to install AACCLI for NetWare using the IBM ServeRAID
Support CD:
1. Start the server.
2. Exit to console screen. From the console prompt, mount the CD-ROM drive. Type
the following command and press Enter:
Load Cdrom
3. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive.
4. If you are installing AACCLI for NetWare 5.x or 6.0, from the console prompt, type
the following commands and press Enter. Continue to Step 6.
Netbasic
Shell
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
121
5. If you are installing AACCLI for NetWare 6.5, from the console prompt, type the
following commands and press Enter:
nsninit
nsnshell
6. Copy AACCLI to your hard disk. Type the following command and press Enter:
copy serveraid:\netware\sata\cmdline\aaccli.nlm C:\nwserver\
where nwserver is the directory where NetWare is installed.
7. Remove the IBM ServeRAID Support CD from the CD-ROM drive.
8. From the DOS prompt, ensure that you are in the c:\nwserver directory; then, type
the following command and press Enter to restart NetWare:
server
Installing AACCLI for Linux
Complete the following steps to install AACCLI for Red Hat Linux, SuSE Linux,
Turbolinux, or UnitedLinux using the IBM ServeRAID Support CD:
1. Start the server.
2. After the operating system starts, insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the
CD-ROM drive.
3. If your CD-ROM drive automounts, go to step 4. Otherwise, mount the CD-ROM
drive. From the console, type the following command and press Enter:
mount -r -t iso9660 /dev/cdromdevicefile /mountpoint
where cdromdevicefile is the specific device file for the CD-ROM block device,
and mountpoint is the specific mount point on the Linux system.
4. Copy AACCLI to your hard disk. Type the following command and press Enter:
cp /mountpoint/linux_dir/sata/cmdline/aacapps-4.1-0.i386.rpm .
where mountpoint is the mount point of the Linux system, and linux_dir is linux or
linux_x86_64.
5. Install AACCLI in the /usr/sbin directory of your Linux system. Type the following
command and press Enter:
rpm -i aacapps-4.1-0.i386.rpm
6. Unmount the CD-ROM drive. Type the following command and press Enter:
umount /mountpoint
where mountpoint is the mount point on the Linux system.
7. Remove the CD from the CD-ROM drive.
Installing AACCLI for OpenServer
Complete the following steps to install AACCLI for OpenServer using the IBM
ServeRAID Support CD:
1. Start the server.
2. After the operating system starts, insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the
CD-ROM drive.
122
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
3. Mount the CD-ROM drive. From the console, type the following command and
press Enter:
mount -f ISO9660 -o ro,lower /dev/cd0 /mnt
where /dev/cd0 is the specific device file for the CD-ROM block device. If you
have more than one CD-ROM drive, you must replace /dev/cd0 with the specific
name of the CD-ROM drive you want to use.
Note: If you currently have another device mounted on /mnt, you must create a
new directory and substitute its name for /mnt in these instructions.
4. Copy the AACCLI tar file to your hard disk. Type the following command and
press Enter:
cp /mnt/openserv/sata/cmdline/aacapps.tar.Z .
5. Uncompress the tar file. Type the following command and press Enter:
uncompress aacapps.tar.Z
6. Extract the contents of the tar file. Type the following command and press Enter:
tar -xef aacapps.tar
7. Unmount the CD-ROM drive. Type the following command and press Enter:
umount /mnt
8. Remove the CD from the CD-ROM drive.
Installing AACCLI for UnixWare
Complete the following steps to install AACCLI for UnixWare or Open Unix using the
IBM ServeRAID Support CD:
1. Start the server.
2. After the operating system starts, insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the
CD-ROM drive.
3. Mount the CD-ROM drive. From the console, type the following command and
press Enter:
mount -F cdfs -r /dev/cdrom/cdromdevicefile /mnt
where cdromdevicefile is the specific device file for the CD-ROM block device.
Look in the /dev/cdrom directory to determine what cdromdevicefile is on your
server, for example, c0b0t010.
Note: If you currently have another device mounted on /mnt, you must create a
new directory and substitute its name for /mnt in these instructions.
4. Copy the AACCLI tar file to your hard disk. Type the following command and
press Enter:
cp /mnt/unixware/sata/cmdline/aacapps.tar.Z .
5. Uncompress the tar file. Type the following command and press Enter:
uncompress aacapps.tar.Z
6. Extract the contents of the tar file. Type the following command and press Enter:
tar -xef aacapps.tar
7. Unmount the CD-ROM drive. Type the following command and press Enter:
umount /mnt
8. Remove the CD from the CD-ROM drive.
Chapter 11. Installing and using the AACCLI command-line program
123
Starting the AACCLI command-line program
This section describes how to start the AACCLI command-line program on the
supported operating systems. For a description of the available functions and their
parameters, see “Using the AACCLI command-line program” on page 125.
Starting AACCLI from Windows
To start the command-line program from Windows, click Start in the lower-left corner
of the screen; then, click Programs ➔ Adaptec SCSI RAID ➔ CLI. A window similar
to the following opens.
Figure 39. AACCLI command-line program
Starting AACCLI from the Windows command prompt
To start the command-line program from the Windows command prompt, go to the
installation directory; then, type afacli.
Note: On the Windows operating system, the executable name is afacli.exe.
Starting AACCLI from NetWare, Linux, OpenServer, or UnixWare
To start the command-line program on NetWare, Linux, OpenServer, or UnixWare,
type one of the following commands and press Enter:
For NetWare
load aaccli
For Linux
/usr/sbin/aaccli
For OpenServer and
UnixWare
<install_dir>/aaccli
where install_dir is the directory where aaccli is installed.
124
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Using the AACCLI command-line program
The AACCLI command-line program provides a quick way to configure and manage
your ServeRAID-7t SATA controllers. It allows you to:
•
Create and delete arrays
•
Display or modify configuration settings for arrays, disks, and enclosures
•
Manage tasks
•
Isolate problems and determine their causes
The syntax conventions are as follows:
•
Commands are shown in uppercase letters.
•
Variables are shown in italics and explained immediately afterward.
•
Optional commands or variables are enclosed in brackets.
•
Repeatable parameters end with an ellipsis (...).
Note: The AACCLI command descriptions show how to perform the same or similar
action with IPSSEND. For details about IPSSEND commands, see Chapter 9,
“Installing and using the IPSSEND command-line program” on page 93.
Important:
The AACCLI command-line program was originally developed for SCSI RAID controllers.
For Serial ATA controllers, the software has been adapted by mapping ports 0 through 3
to the following SCSI IDs:
Bus
Bus
Bus
Bus
0,
0,
0,
0,
ID
ID
ID
ID
0,
1,
2,
3,
Lun
Lun
Lun
Lun
0
0
0
0
In general, SCSI IDs will be populated from Bus 0, ID 0 upwards (always LUN 0).
Using AACCLI in batch mode
By default, AACCLI is interactive. When you start AACCLI, you type commands at the
CLI> command prompt. To issue a series of commands from the operating system
command prompt, separate each command with a semicolon and end the command
line with the AACCLI exit command, for example:
aaccli controller list; exit
Note: In Unix, you may need to replace the semicolon with a colon to prevent the
operating system from interpreting the line as a shell command.
Chapter 11. Installing and using the AACCLI command-line program
125
Opening and closing a controller
To prepare a controller to receive AACCLI commands, you first need to open the
controller. You may open only one controller at a time.
To open controller AAC0 and prepare it to receive more commands, type:
CLI> open AAC0
The prompt changes to reflect the open controller, as shown in the next example.
When you finish working with the controller, close it by typing:
AAC0> close
Using AACCLI with command files
In its simplest form, a command file is a text file that contains valid AACCLI
commands. To execute a command file, type the at sign (@) followed by the file name
that contains the AACCLI commands. For example, in interactive mode, type:
AAC0>@commandscript.txt
You can also execute a command file from the operating system prompt. The
following command writes the command output to a file:
aaccli @commandscript.txt >output.afa 2>&1
The following command file:
open AAC0
controller details
close AAC0
exit
1. Opens controller AAC0 by invoking the open command.
2. Invokes the controller details command to obtain information about the controller.
3. Closes controller AAC0 by invoking the close command.
4. Exits the AACCLI command processor.
Note: All command files must end with the exit command to prevent the system
from hanging.
126
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
General control functions
The following table describes the AACCLI general control functions.
Function
What it does
Command
close
This function closes the currently opened
controller.
AACCLI CLOSE
exit
This function closes the currently opened
controller and exits the AACCLI program.
AACCLI EXIT
help
This function displays a list of all AACCLI
commands or a specific command.
AACCLI HELP [/FULL] [command]
where:
•
•
open
This function opens a controller for access.
The controller must opened before you can
use any other command.
/FULL displays the full command syntax, including
switches and parameters
command displays help for the specified command
AACCLI OPEN [/READONLY=boolean] [/DOMAIN=string]
string
where:
•
•
•
/READONLY—If TRUE, opens the controller for readonly access. The default is FALSE. If you open a
controller for read-only access, you can use only
commands that do not change the configuration.
/DOMAIN (Windows only)—If not specified, AACCLI
assumes the local domain.
string is the name of the controller to open.
Container (array) functions
The following table describes the AACCLI functions used to display, create, and
manage arrays and logical drives.
Function
What it does
IPSSEND
Equivalent
Command
container
create
mirror
This function creates a
RAID level 1 array.
IPSSEND
CREATE
AACCLI CONTAINER CREATE MIRROR [/WAIT
=boolean] [/IO_DELAY=integer] container device_ID
where:
•
•
•
•
/WAIT—If FALSE (the default), the operation is
performed in the background. If TRUE, the operation
is performed immediately; the command prompt
returns when the operation is complete.
/IO_DELAY—Number of milliseconds between each
I/O used for RAID 1 creation.
container is the ID of the array on which to create a
RAID 1 mirror.
device_ID is the ID of the device used for mirroring
the volume specified in the container parameter.
Chapter 11. Installing and using the AACCLI command-line program
127
Function
What it does
IPSSEND
Equivalent
container
create
mmirror
This function creates a
RAID Level-10 array.
IPSSEND
CREATE
Command
AACCLI CONTAINER CREATE MMIRROR
[/IO_DELAY=integer] [/WAIT=boolean] container
device_ID [device_ID..]
where:
•
•
•
•
container
This function creates a
create stripe RAID Level-0 array.
IPSSEND
CREATE
/WAIT—If FALSE (the default), the operation is
performed in the background. If TRUE, the operation
is performed immediately; the command prompt
returns when the operation is complete.
/IO_DELAY—Number of milliseconds between each
I/O used for RAID 10 creation.
container is the ID of the RAID Level 1 array.
device_ID is the ID of the device used to create the
RAID Level-10 array.
AACCLI CONTAINER CREATE STRIPE
[/CACHE=boolean] [/STRIPE_SIZE=integer]
[/LABEL=string] free_space [device_ID...]
where:
•
•
•
•
•
container
delete
This function deletes an
array.
IPSSEND
DELETE
/CACHE—If TRUE, enables caching. If FALSE,
disables caching.
/STRIPE_SIZE—Stripe size. The default is 64KB.
/LABEL—Volume label for the RAID Level-0 array.
free_space is the device ID of the device with free
space.
device_ID is one or more devices.
AACCLI CONTAINER DELETE [/ALWAYS=boolean]
[/UNCONDITIONAL=boolean] container
where:
•
•
•
container
list
This function lists
information about all arrays
on the controller.
IPSSEND
GETCONFIG
/ALWAYS—If TRUE, deletes the array even if it has
data. (Cannot override open files.)
/UNCONDITIONAL—If TRUE, deletes the array even
if it has a file system. (Overrides open files.)
container is the ID of the device to delete.
AACCLI CONTAINER LIST [/ALL=boolean]
[/FULL=boolean] container
where:
•
•
•
container
promote
container
remove
failover
This function creates a
multi-level volume from a
RAID Level-0 array or a
single volume.
IPSSEND
CREATE
This function removes one
or more failover disks.
IPSSEND
SETSTATE
/ALL—If TRUE, lists all containers on the controller.
/FULL—If TRUE, produces a verbose listing.
container is the ID of the array.
AACCLI CONTAINER PROMOTE container
where:
•
container is the ID of the array to promote to a multilevel volume.
AACCLI CONTAINER REMOVE FAILOVER container
device_ID [device_ID...]
where:
•
•
128
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
container is the ID of the array with the failover disk to
be removed.
device_ID is the ID of one or more devices to remove
as failover disks.
Function
What it does
container
set failover
This function assigns an
automatic failover disk to
an array.
IPSSEND
Equivalent
Command
IPSSEND
SETSTATE
AACCLI CONTAINER SET FAILOVER container
device_ID [device_ID...]
where:
•
•
container
show
failover
This function displays the
failover disks assigned to
an array.
IPSSEND
GETCONFIG
container is the ID of the array to which the failover
disk(s) are assigned.
device_ID is the ID of one or more devices to assign
as failover disks.
AACCLI CONTAINER SHOW FAILOVER [container]
where:
•
container is the ID of the array with failover disks.
Controller functions
The following table describes the AACCLI functions used to display controller status.
IPSSEND
Equivalent
Function
What it does
Command
controller
details
This function displays
information about the open
controller and software.
IPSSEND
GETCONFIG
AACCLI CONTROLLER DETAILS
controller
list
This function lists all
controllers or displays
information about the
currently opened
controller.
IPSSEND
GETCONFIG
AACCLI CONTROLLER LIST [/DOMAIN=string] [string]
where:
•
•
/DOMAIN (Windows only)—If not specified, AACCLI
assumes the local domain.
string is the host name of the machine to which the
controllers are connected.
controller
show
automatic_
failover
This function displays the
automatic failover status
(enabled or disabled) for
the controller.
IPSSEND
GETCONFIG
AACCLI CONTROLLER SHOW
AUTOMATIC_FAILOVER
controller
show
channels
This function displays all of
the channels on the
controller, including the
following information for
each channel: channel
type, host ID, and targets.
IPSSEND
GETCONFIG
AACCLI CONTROLLER SHOW CHANNELS
controller
show
container_
verify
This function displays the
status of the container
verify status.
IPSSEND
GETCONFIG
AACCLI CONTROLLER SHOW CONTAINER_VERIFY
Chapter 11. Installing and using the AACCLI command-line program
129
Disk functions
The following table describes the AACCLI functions used to manage disks connected
to a RAID controller.
Function
What it does
IPSSEND
Equivalent
Command
disk list
This function lists the disks
on a controller.
IPSSEND
GETCONFIG
AACCLI DISK LIST [/ALL=boolean] [/FULL=boolean]
[device_ID]
where:
•
•
•
/ALL—If TRUE, lists all disks on the controller.
/FULL—If TRUE, lists detailed information about all
devices. The default is FALSE.
device_ID is the ID of the device to list information
about.
disk show
partition
This function displays a list
of partitions on the disks
attached to the opened
controller.
IPSSEND
GETCONFIG
AACCLI DISK SHOW PARTITION
disk show
smart
This function displays SelfMonitoring, Analysis and
Reporting Technology
(SMART) configuration
information for one or all
disks.
IPSSEND
GETCONFIG
AACCLI DISK SHOW SMART [/ALL=boolean]
[/FULL=boolean] [/VIEW_CHANGEABLE=boolean]
device_ID
where:
•
•
•
•
disk show
space
This function shows disk
space usage information.
IPSSEND
GETCONFIG
/ALL—If TRUE, lists SMART partitions for all disks.
/FULL—If TRUE, lists detailed information about all
devices. The default is FALSE.
/VIEW_CHANGEABLE—If TRUE, lists configuration
information that can be changed on a SMART disk.
device_ID is the ID of the device to list information
about.
AACCLI DISK SHOW SPACE [/ALL=boolean] [device_ID]
where:
•
•
/ALL—If TRUE, lists all space usage information.
device_ID is the ID of the device to list information
about.
Task functions
The following table describes the AACCLI functions used to display and manage
tasks.
Function
What it does
task list
This function lists all
running tasks on the
controller.
IPSSEND
Equivalent
IPSSEND
GETSTATUS
Command
AACCLI TASK LIST [/ALL=boolean] [integer]
where:
•
•
task stop
This function stops one or
all running tasks on the
controller.
IPSSEND
DELETE
AACCLI TASK STOP [/ALL=boolean] [integer]
where:
•
•
130
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
/ALL—If TRUE, lists all information about running
tasks.
integer is the task ID.
/ALL—If TRUE, stops all suspended tasks..
integer is the task ID.
Enclosure functions
The following table describes the AACCLI functions used to obtain information about
enclosure management devices that support the SAF-TE specification. These
commands are available only if you are using an enclosure.
Function
What it does
enclosure
list
This function lists
components for one or all
enclosure devices.
IPSSEND
Equivalent
Command
IPSSEND
GETCONFIG
AACCLI ENCLOSURE LIST [/ALL=boolean]
[/FULL=boolean] [enclosure]
where:
•
•
•
enclosure
show fan
This function displays the
status of one or more fans.
IPSSEND
GETCONFIG
/ALL— If TRUE, lists all enclosures on the system.
/FULL— If TRUE, lists detailed information about
enclosure components.
enclosure is the ID of the enclosure management
device.
AACCLI ENCLOSURE SHOW FAN [enclosure] [fan]
where:
•
•
enclosure
show power
This function displays the
status of one or more
power supplies
IPSSEND
GETCONFIG
enclosure is the ID of the enclosure management
device.
fan is the unit number of the fan.
AACCLI ENCLOSURE SHOW POWER [enclosure]
[powersupply]
where:
•
•
enclosure
show slot
This function displays the
status of one or more
device slots on an
enclosure.
IPSSEND
GETCONFIG
AACCLI ENCLOSURE SHOW SLOT [enclosure] [slot]
where:
•
•
enclosure
show
temperature
This function displays the
temperature status for one
or more enclosures.
enclosure is the ID of the enclosure management
device.
powersupply is the unit number of the power supply.
IPSSEND
GETCONFIG
enclosure is the ID of the enclosure management
device.
slot is the unit number of the device slot.
AACCLI ENCLOSURE SHOW TEMPERATURE
[enclosure] [sensor]
where:
•
•
enclosure is the ID of the enclosure management
device.
sensor is the unit number of the temperature sensor.
Backup and restore functions
AACCLI does not support the equivalent of IPSSEND BACKUP or IPSSEND
RESTORE.
Chapter 11. Installing and using the AACCLI command-line program
131
132
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 12. Installing and starting the ServeRAID Manager
program
After installing the operating system and device drivers on your server, you can install
the ServeRAID Manager program. The ServeRAID Manager program provides a
graphical interface that you can use while your server is running to complete the
following tasks:
•
Monitor ServeRAID configuration changes
•
Perform configuration functions, including create an array, delete an array, create
a logical drive, change the RAID level, dynamically increase the logical drive size,
rebuild an array, configure ServeRAID controllers for failover, and configure a
cluster
Note: ServeRAID Manager does not support all of these functions for the planar
RAID controller that is a standard feature in some IBM xSeries servers.
For information about using the ServeRAID Manager program, see the ServeRAID
Manager online help or Chapter 4, “Configuring ServeRAID controllers” on page 49.
Installing the ServeRAID Manager program
This section provides instructions for installing the ServeRAID Manager program.
When using:
Go to:
Windows XP
“Installing ServeRAID Manager in Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows
Server 2003, Windows NT 4.0, or Windows 98” on page 134.
Windows 2000
“Installing ServeRAID Manager in Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows
Server 2003, Windows NT 4.0, or Windows 98” on page 134.
Windows
Server 2003
“Installing ServeRAID Manager in Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows
Server 2003, Windows NT 4.0, or Windows 98” on page 134.
Windows NT 4.0
“Installing ServeRAID Manager in Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows
Server 2003, Windows NT 4.0, or Windows 98” on page 134.
Windows 98
“Installing ServeRAID Manager in Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows
Server 2003, Windows NT 4.0, or Windows 98” on page 134.
NetWare
“Installing ServeRAID Manager in NetWare” on page 135.
Linux
“Installing ServeRAID Manager in Red Hat Linux, SuSE Linux, Turbolinux,
or SCO UnitedLinux” on page 135.
OS/2
“Installing ServeRAID Manager in OS/2” on page 136.
OpenServer
“Installing ServeRAID Manager in OpenServer” on page 137.
UnixWare
“Installing ServeRAID Manager in UnixWare” on page 137.
If you are installing ServeRAID Manager on an IBM xSeries server that contains a
planar RAID controller, see the documentation provided with your server for a list of
supported operating systems.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
133
Installing ServeRAID Manager in Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows
Server 2003, Windows NT 4.0, or Windows 98
Notes:
1. When installed on Windows XP Professional, Windows 2000, Windows NT 4.0, or
Windows Server 2003, this version of the ServeRAID Manager program supports
up to 16 ServeRAID controllers.
2. When installed on Windows 98, the ServeRAID Manager program works only as a
console. You can use the console to connect to remote servers that contain
ServeRAID controllers. Servers installed with Windows 98 as the operating
system do not support ServeRAID controllers.
3. If a previous version of the ServeRAID Manager program is installed on your
server, you must remove that version before upgrading to the new version. All
customization files (such as the Managed tree system nodes and the Notification
list) are saved and used in the upgrade. To remove the ServeRAID Manager
program from the Windows operating system on your server, use the
Add/Remove Programs wizard.
Complete the following steps to install the ServeRAID Manager program on Windows
XP, Windows 2000, Windows NT 4.0, Windows Server 2003, or Windows 98:
1. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Applications CD into the CD-ROM drive.
2. When the installation program starts, follow the instructions on the screen to
install the program.
Note: If you are installing ServeRAID Manager on an IBM server that supports
Active PCI under Windows NT 4.0, the installation program installs the
ServeRAID Active PCI DMI component automatically. This feature also
requires that you install the DMI Service provider and the IBM Hot Plug for
Windows NT 4.0 Package, version 4.2 or later. For more information, see
“Using a ServeRAID controller in a server with Active PCI features” on
page 15.
Windows unattended installation: Use the following procedure to perform
an unattended (“silent”) installation under the Windows operating system. An
unattended installation uses a setup file (setup.iss) to complete the installation without
messages or user interaction.
1. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Applications CD into the CD-ROM drive.
2. Exit to DOS; then, type the following at the command prompt and press Enter:
e:\windows\manager\setup -r
where e is the drive letter of the CD-ROM drive.
3. Follow the instructions on the screen to install the ServeRAID Manager program.
4. Click Start ➔ Control Panel ➔ Add/Remove Programs; then, uninstall the
ServeRAID Manager. Windows writes the setup information to the setup.iss file in
the Windows installation directory.
5. Copy the setup.iss file to the ServeRAID Manager installation directory, for
example:
copy c:\WINNT\setup.iss “c:\Program Files\IBM\ServeRAID Manager”
6. Install the ServeRAID Manager using the setup.iss file. Type the following at the
command prompt and press Enter:
e:\windows\manager\setup -s /f1”c:\install_dir\setup.iss”
where e is the drive letter of the CD-ROM drive and install_dir is the ServeRAID
Manager installation directory.
134
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
After a minute or two the silent install should be complete and the ServeRAID
Manager icons should be accessible.
Installing ServeRAID Manager in NetWare
Note: The NetWare version of the ServeRAID Manager program supports up to 16
ServeRAID controllers.
Important:
Before you install the ServeRAID Manager program, complete the following tasks:
•
Install the latest Support Pack before installing the Java™ Virtual Machine (JVM) for
Novell NetWare. You can download the latest Support Pack from the Novell Web site at
http://www.novell.com/download/.
•
Check that your JVM for Novell NetWare is version 1.3 or later. Versions older than 1.3
are not compatible with the ServeRAID Manager program. To check your JVM version,
load Java and type the following command at the NetWare command prompt:
JAVA -VERSION
You can download the latest JVM for Novell NetWare from the Novell web site at
http://www.novell.com/download/.
Complete the following steps to install the ServeRAID Manager program on Novell
NetWare:
1. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Applications CD into the CD-ROM drive.
2. If you are installing ServeRAID Manager from NetWare 5.1 or 6.5, from the
command-line prompt, type the following command and press Enter:
load cdrom
If you are installing ServeRAID Manager from NetWare 6.0 with Service Pack 3,
type the following command and press Enter:
load cd9660.nss
3. From the command-line prompt, type the following command and press Enter:
serveraid:\netware\manager\install
The installation program starts.
4. Follow the instructions on the screen to install ServeRAID Manager.
Installing ServeRAID Manager in Red Hat Linux, SuSE Linux, Turbolinux,
or SCO UnitedLinux
Notes:
1. The ServeRAID Manager program comes with the IBM Java Runtime
Environment (JRE).
2. If the ServeRAID Manager program has previously been installed on your server,
you must remove that version before upgrading. All customization files (such as
Managed system tree nodes and the Notification list) are saved and used in the
upgrade. To remove the ServeRAID Manager program from Linux, type the
following command:
rpm --erase RaidMan
3. When installed on Linux, this version of the ServeRAID Manager program
supports up to 12 ServeRAID controllers.
Chapter 12. Installing and starting the ServeRAID Manager program
135
Complete the following steps to install the ServeRAID Manager program on Red Hat
Linux, SuSE Linux, Turbolinux, or SCO UnitedLinux:
1. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive.
2. If your CD-ROM drive automounts, type the following command and go to step 6
on page 136. Otherwise, go to step 3.
rpm --install /mnt/cdrom/linux_dir/manager/RaidMan-v.rr.i386.rpm
where linux_dir is linux or linux_x86_64, v is the ServeRAID version number, and
rr is the ServeRAID release number.
3. If your CD-ROM drive does not automount, type the following command and press
Enter:
mount -r -t iso9660 /dev/cdromdevicefile /mountpoint
where cdromdevicefile is the specific device file for the CD-ROM block device,
and mountpoint is the point where you want to mount the CD filesystem.
4. Type the following command and press Enter:
rpm --install /mountpoint/linux_dir/manager/RaidMan-v.rr.i386.rpm
where mountpoint is the mount point used in step 3, linux_dir is the linux directory
used in step 3, v is the ServeRAID version number, and rr is the ServeRAID
release number.
5. When the installation is complete, type the following command:
umount /mountpoint
where mountpoint is the mount point used in step 3.
6. Press Enter. You can now remove the CD from the CD-ROM drive.
Installing ServeRAID Manager in OS/2
Note: When installed in OS/2, this version of the ServeRAID Manager program
supports up to 12 ServeRAID controllers.
Complete the following steps to install the ServeRAID Manager program on OS/2:
1. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Applications CD into the CD-ROM drive.
2. Open an OS/2 command window.
3. Type the following command and press Enter:
e:
where e is the CD-ROM drive letter.
4. Type the following command and press Enter:
cd \os2\manager
5. Type the following command and press Enter:
install
6. The installation program starts. Follow the instructions on the screen. On the final
installation panel, specify the location where you want to install the ServeRAID
Manager program.
136
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Installing ServeRAID Manager in OpenServer
Notes:
1. When installed in OpenServer, this version of the ServeRAID Manager program
supports up to 12 ServeRAID controllers.
2. To install or remove the ServeRAID Manager package, you must have root
privileges.
3. If ServeRAID Manager is installed on your system, you must remove the old
version before upgrading. All customization files (such as Managed system tree
nodes and the Notification list) are saved and used in the upgrade. To remove the
ServeRAID Manager program from OpenServer, type the following command:
pkgrm RaidMan
Complete the following steps to install the ServeRAID Manager program in
OpenServer.
Note: The ServeRAID Manager program requires that you install either the Java
Development Kit (JDK) for SCO operating systems or the Java Runtime
Environment (JRE) for SCO operating systems, version 1.3.1. You can
download the JDK and JRE from the Caldera Web site at
http://www.caldera.com/download/.
1. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Applications CD into the CD-ROM drive.
2. Type the following command and press Enter:
mount -r -f HS,lower /dev/cd0 /mnt
3. Type the following command and press Enter:
cd /mnt/openserv/manager
4. Type the following command and press Enter:
sh ./mgr_inst
5. When the installation is complete, type the following command and press Enter:
cd /
6. Unmount the CD-ROM drive. Type the following command and press Enter:
umount /mnt
You can now remove the CD from the CD-ROM drive.
Installing ServeRAID Manager in UnixWare
Notes:
1. The ServeRAID Manager program requires that you install either the JDK for SCO
operating systems, versions 1.1.7b or 1.1.3u, or the JRE for SCO UNIX operating
systems, version 1.3.0. You can download the JDK and JRE from the SCO Web
site at http://www.caldera.com/download/.
2. To install or remove the ServeRAID Manager package, you must have root
privileges.
3. If the ServeRAID Manager program has previously been installed on your server,
you must remove that version before upgrading. All customization files (such as
Managed system tree nodes and the Notification list) are saved and used in the
upgrade. To remove the ServeRAID Manager program from UnixWare, type the
following command:
pkgrm RaidMan
4. When installed in UnixWare, the current version of the ServeRAID Manager
program supports up to 12 ServeRAID controllers.
Chapter 12. Installing and starting the ServeRAID Manager program
137
Complete the following steps to install the ServeRAID Manager program for
UnixWare:
1. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Applications CD into the CD-ROM drive.
2. Type the following command and press Enter:
mount -r -F cdfs /dev/cdrom/cdromdevicefile /mnt
where cdromdevicefile is the specific device file for the CD-ROM block device.
Look in the /dev/cdrom directory to determine what cdromdevicefile is on your
server, for example, c0b0t010.
3. Type the following command and press Enter:
cd /mnt/unixware/manager
4. Type the following command and press Enter:
./mgr_inst
5. When the installation is complete, type the following command and press Enter:
cd /
6. Unmount the CD-ROM drive. Type the following command and press Enter:
umount /mnt
You can now remove the CD from the CD-ROM drive.
138
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Starting the ServeRAID Manager program
After you have configured your ServeRAID controller, installed the device drivers,
installed the operating system, and installed the ServeRAID Manager program on
your server, you can administer and monitor your ServeRAID controllers, as well as
modify the ServeRAID controller configuration.
Starting the ServeRAID Manager program in Windows XP, Windows
2000, Windows Server 2003, Windows NT 4.0, or Windows 98
To start the ServeRAID Manager program in Windows 2000, Windows NT, Windows
98, or Windows Server 2003, click Start ➔ Programs ➔ ServeRAID Manager ➔
ServeRAID Manager. The ServeRAID Manager program opens, and a window
similar to the one in the following illustration appears.
Figure 40. ServeRAID Manager window
Starting the ServeRAID Manager program in NetWare
To start the ServeRAID Manager program in NetWare:
1. From the NetWare console, type the following command and press Enter:
LOAD RAIDMAN
2. The ServeRAID Manager program opens, and a window similar to the one shown
in Figure 40 appears.
Chapter 12. Installing and starting the ServeRAID Manager program
139
Starting the ServeRAID Manager program in OS/2
To start the ServeRAID Manager program from the OS/2 desktop, double-click the
ServeRAID Manager icon.
Complete the following steps to start the ServeRAID Manager program from an OS/2
command line:
1. Change to the directory where you installed the ServeRAID Manager program.
Type the following command and press Enter:
cd \RaidMan
2. Type the following command and press Enter:
RaidMan
The ServeRAID Manager program opens, and a window similar to the one shown
in Figure 40 appears.
Starting the ServeRAID Manager program in OpenServer, UnixWare, and
Linux
Complete the following steps to start the ServeRAID Manager program in
OpenServer, UnixWare, or Linux:
Note: Ensure that you have superuser privileges before starting these procedures.
1. To change to the directory where you installed the ServeRAID Manager program,
type one of the following commands:
For OpenServer
cd /opt/RaidMan
For UnixWare
cd /opt/RaidMan
For Linux
cd /usr/RaidMan
2. Press Enter.
3. Type the following command and press Enter:
sh RaidMan.sh
4. The ServeRAID Manager program opens, and a window similar to the one shown
in Figure 40 on page 139 appears.
Note: (UnixWare only) When installed on UnixWare, the ServeRAID Manager
program might list the installed ServeRAID controllers in a different order than
the ServeRAID Manager program in startable-CD mode. To identify a specific
controller, refer to its physical slot number.
140
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Part 3. Installing the IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
141
142
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 13. Introduction to the IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution
A cluster is a group of independent computer systems that work together as a single
logical system. A client interacts with a cluster as though it is a single server. In other
words, a cluster is a group of computers linked together in such a way that they share
and manage a set of resources that can support a number of users at the same time.
This high-availability clustering solution is based on a two-server cluster, where both
servers can access the same storage devices, but only one server at a time controls
the storage devices shared by both servers. If one of the two running servers fails, the
remaining server automatically assumes control of the shared resources managed by
the failed server while still controlling its own resources at the same time. Then, the
failed server can be repaired offline without the loss of time or work efficiency,
because the shared data and applications earlier managed by the failed server are
still online to the clients.
When the failed server is operational again, it can be placed back into the cluster; the
resources are reallocated between the two servers and the cluster resumes normal
operation.
A controller is a device that coordinates and controls the operation of one or more
input and output devices, such as workstations, and synchronizes the operation of
such devices with the operation of a system as a whole.
The IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution, as discussed in this book, uses one of the
following controllers:
•
•
•
•
IBM ServeRAID-4H Ultra160 SCSI controller
IBM ServeRAID-4Mx Ultra160 SCSI controller
IBM ServeRAID-4Lx Ultra160 SCSI controller
IBM ServeRAID-6M Ultra320 SCSI controller
The IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution also uses IBM expansion enclosures, such as:
•
•
•
•
IBM Netfinity EXP15 Rack Storage Enclosure
IBM Netfinity EXP200 Rack Storage Enclosure
IBM Netfinity EXP300 Rack Storage Enclosure
IBM Netfinity EXP400 Rack Storage Enclosure
Note: There can be only 13 physical drives in an EXP300 or EXP400 enclosure
when used in a cluster setup. The drive that has a SCSI ID of 6 must be
removed from the enclosure.
You can install the IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution by using one of the following
software applications:
•
•
Microsoft Cluster Server, which is part of Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition
Microsoft Cluster Server, which is part of Windows 2000 Advanced Server Edition
The following figures show an example of a simple high-availability clustering solution.
The first figure shows a high-level view of a cluster; the second figure shows a more
detailed view of a cluster.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
143
Clients
Public Network
Crossover
Cable
(Heartbeat)
SCSI Bus
Server A
Server B
Expansion Enclosure
Figure 41. A high-level view of a cluster
Public Network
Server B
Server A
CD-ROM
Drive
233
MHz
233
MHz
6
4
3
RAID - 1
Array A
Integrated
Ethernet
Controller
SCSI IDs
SCSI IDs
Channel 2
6
4
3
Channel 1
RAID - 1
Array A
Channel 2
Crossover Cable (Heartbeat)
EtherJet
ServeRAID
EtherJet
Channel 1
CD-ROM
Drive
ServeRAID
Integrated
Ethernet
Controller
P
B B B HS
See Note A
See Note B
__
Repeater
0 1
2 3 4 5
P
Arrays
C C C HS
__
8 9 10 1112 13
SCSI IDs
Repeater
3518 Enclosure
Power Cord
UPS
UPS
UPS
Expansion
Server A
Server B
Unit
Power Cord
021km3d
Figure 42. A detailed view of a cluster
Note A: Server A
•
•
Shared Channel 1 - SCSI ID 6
Non-shared Channel 2 - SCSI ID 7
Note B: Server B
•
•
144
Shared Channel 1 - SCSI ID 7
Non-shared Channel 2 - SCSI ID 7
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
The solution you use for your installation depends on your specific requirements. For
more information about requirements and types of installations, see the IBM Shared
Disk Clustering Hardware Reference. You can obtain this publication from the IBM
Support Web site. See Chapter 18, “Obtaining ServeRAID updates” on page 193 for
additional information.
Chapter 13. Introduction to the IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution
145
146
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 14. Preparing to install or change a cluster solution
Note: If you are going to upgrade an existing high-availability cluster solution and are
already familiar with the concepts of a cluster, go to “Updating the ServeRAID
BIOS, firmware, and software code for clustering” on page 193. If you are
setting up a high-availability cluster solution for the first time, continue reading
this section.
Before you begin installing and setting up a high-availability cluster solution,
familiarize yourself with the following terms and definitions, as well as some
considerations concerning the ServeRAID controller.
Terms and definitions
The following terms are used in this section. For a detailed explanation of these terms,
see the Server Cluster Glossary in the Windows Platform Software Developers Kit.
Failover is the process of relocating the cluster resources from a failed server to the
remaining server. The resource-monitor program responsible for the resource detects
the failure. If a resource failure occurs, the resource-monitor program notifies the
Cluster Service, which triggers the actions that are defined in the failover policy for
that resource. A failover can occur automatically, such as when an application or a
server fails, or it can occur manually, such as when a system administrator moves all
applications onto one server and then shuts down the other server for scheduled
maintenance. Failover generally includes three tasks:
•
•
•
Failure detection
Resource relocation
Application restart
Failback is a special case of failover. It is the process of moving back some or all
groups of resources to the preferred owner after a failover has occurred. The
preferred owner is the server in the cluster on which you prefer each group of
resources to run. If the preferred owner fails, its resources are transferred to the other
server. When the preferred owner is repaired and comes back online and allow
failback is enabled in the Microsoft Cluster Administration program, the resources are
automatically transferred back to that server.
Resource Group is a set of dependent resources that you can group together. Some
cluster resources cannot go online unless other cluster services are running. These
services are resource dependencies. When one resource is listed as a dependency
for another resource, the two resources must be placed in the same group. If all
resources are ultimately dependent on one resource (for example, one physical disk
resource), all resources must be in the same group. Therefore, all resources in a
cluster might need to be in the same group.
Furthermore, any cluster operation performed on a group is performed on all
resources that are in that group. For example, if a resource must be moved from
Server A to Server B, all resources that are in the same group as the resource will be
moved also.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
147
ServeRAID considerations
It is important to understand the following ServeRAID considerations before you set
up your high-availability cluster solution.
Hardware considerations
•
You must cable the SCSI channels in a controller pair so that the controllers share
the same channels.
•
You must connect all disks that will be shared to the shared channels. This
includes hot-spare drives, as well as data drives.
•
Each shared physical drive must be part of a logical drive or defined as a hot
spare to one or the other servers. You must remove all other physical drives from
the shared disk enclosure to ensure proper operation.
•
Do not connect nondisk devices, such as CD-ROM or tape drives, to shared
channels. These devices will be accessible to both servers, and conflicts might
arise.
Controller considerations
•
Controller pair is a term that refers to two controllers, one in each system, that are
connected to each other through the same SCSI bus.
•
Each ServeRAID controller must have a different SCSI initiator ID assigned to the
shared channels. For example, set one server, Server A, to ID 6, and set the other
server, Server B, to ID 7. The setup instructions describe this in more detail.
•
You must set the stripe-unit size of each ServeRAID controller in a pair to the
same value (8 KB, 16 KB, 32 KB, or 64 KB).
•
Each ServeRAID controller must have a unique controller name assigned.
•
Do not change the controller name on both ServeRAID controllers in a pair at the
same time. Doing so can cause problems and might require that you restart the
server.
•
You cannot share hot-spare drives between controllers in a cluster pairing. If you
want hot-spare protection, each ServeRAID controller must have a hot-spare
drive defined. You must connect hot-spare drives only to shared channels. Both
servers must be able to access their uniquely-defined hot-spare drives in case a
failover occurs after a hot-spare drive replaces a failed shared drive.
•
Physical drives that are configured by one controller in the pair must appear as
ready drives to the other controller in the pair. Be sure to verify this criterion when
you add drives. Restart both servers, or scan for new devices using the
ServeRAID Manager program on both servers, to make sure the added physical
drives appear as ready drives on both servers before creating logical drives.
Array or logical drive considerations
148
•
Create only one logical drive for each array.
•
Every logical drive that is shared by the two servers must have its write-cache
mode set to write through; this will help ensure that data integrity is maintained.
For logical drives that are not shared between the two servers, set the write-cache
mode to write back; this will improve performance.
•
You must assign merge-group numbers in the range 1–8 to each logical drive that
will be shared. Merge-group numbers must be unique for each shared logical
drive in the cluster. You must assign merge-group numbers 206 or 207 to the nonshared logical drives.
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
•
If you are starting (booting) the operating system from a shared controller, define
the first logical drive as the startup drive and assign a merge-group number for a
non-shared drive, for example, 206 for Server A.
•
Logical-drive migration (LDM) is not supported on the quorum drive. The quorum
drive must be a RAID level-1 logical drive, and any LDM operation will change this
drive from a RAID level-1 logical drive to a different RAID level drive.
•
The total number of logical drives per controller must be eight or less before or
after a failover. If you exceed this number, a failover will not be completed.
•
The following logical drives will not failover:
— Logical drives currently undergoing logical-drive migration (LDM) operations
— RAID level-5E logical drives undergoing compression or decompression
— RAID level-5, level-5E, or level-5EE logical drives in a critical state
•
Because ServeRAID controllers do not permit the failover of critical RAID level-5,
level-5E, or level-5EE logical drives, do not use RAID level-5, level-5E, or level5EE for the quorum drive. You must configure the quorum drive as a RAID level-1
logical drive.
Note: Define hot-spare drives in your array to minimize the time that logical
drives remain in a critical state.
•
If a failover occurs while a critical RAID level-1, level-1E, level-10 or level-1E0
logical drive is rebuilding to a spare disk, the rebuild operation automatically
restarts.
•
The cluster support software will initiate a synchronization of all RAID level logical
drives except for the following types of drives:
— RAID level-0 logical drives
— Any critical or offline logical drives.
If a drive fails before this synchronization is complete, logical drive access is
blocked and is no longer accessible.
•
When a logical drive spans multiple SCSI channels and a failure within the drive
subsystem occurs that is unique to a channel (for example, a disconnected cable),
the entire physical array will be identified as failed even though access from the
surviving server can occur. Therefore, if you have small arrays, consider not
spanning multiple channels.
Chapter 14. Preparing to install or change a cluster solution
149
150
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 15. Configuring ServeRAID controllers for clustering
Before configuring the ServeRAID controllers, you must first update the BIOS and
firmware code. For more information, see “Updating the ServeRAID BIOS, firmware,
and software code for clustering” on page 193.
Configuring the controller for Microsoft Cluster Server using Windows
2003, Windows 2000, or Windows NT 4.0
If you are configuring ServeRAID controllers for Microsoft Cluster Server on Windows
2003, Windows 2000, or Windows NT 4.0, complete the following steps:
1. If necessary, perform any operating-system shutdown procedure on both servers
that you are going to use in the cluster.
2. Turn off both servers.
3. Verify that no enclosures are attached to any shared controller in either server.
4. Follow the procedure “Configuring a controller for clustering” on page 152 for each
shared controller in Server A, and then return to this step.
5. Turn off Server A; then, connect any shared external drive enclosures to Server A
only.
6. Turn on Server A with the IBM ServeRAID Support CD still in the CD-ROM drive.
7. Continue with the procedure “Configuring ServeRAID arrays and logical drives” on
page 154 for Server A, and then return to this step.
8. (Optional) Before you configure Server B for complicated clusters, use View
shared drives to identify online drives as reserved in Server B.
a. From Server A, right-click the controller and select View shared drives.
b.
Select the Enable view shared drives check box.
c.
Set the channel and SCSI ID for the drives that are identified as online on
Server A and ready on Server B.
Drives used in the cluster will be displayed as reserved on Server B.
9. Follow the procedure “Configuring a controller for clustering” on page 152 for each
shared controller in Server B, and then return to this step.
10. Remove the IBM ServeRAID Support CD from the CD-ROM drives of both
servers.
11. Restart Server A; then, restart Server B.
12. If you are installing the IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution using Microsoft Cluster
Server on Windows 2003, go to “Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software
on Windows Server 2003” on page 183.
If you are installing the IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution using Microsoft Cluster
Server on Windows 2000, go to “Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software
on Windows 2000” on page 173.
If you are installing the IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution using Microsoft Cluster
Server on Windows NT 4.0, go to “Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software
on Windows NT 4.0” on page 163.
Note: After you have completed installing the IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution, use
the Validate cluster action in the ServeRAID Manager program to verify the
cluster configuration. See “Validating a cluster” on page 161 for more
information.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
151
Configuring a controller for clustering
Complete the following steps to configure a controller for clustering.
Note: For complete information on using the ServeRAID Manager program, see the
ServeRAID Manager online help.
1. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive; then, turn on the
server. The ServeRAID Manager program starts.
2. If the ServeRAID Manager program detects unconfigured ServeRAID controllers
and ready drives, the program automatically starts the Configuration wizard, and a
window similar to the one in the following illustration opens. To exit the
Configuration wizard, click Cancel; then, in the confirmation window, click Yes.
Figure 43. Configuration wizard
3. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the ServeRAID controller that you want to
configure.
Attention:
Restore the ServeRAID controller to factory-default settings only once, when the controller is
first installed. This process removes all configuration information from NVRAM, including the
SCSI initiator IDs, the controller and partner names, and the array information.
This point is especially important if the Windows 2003, Windows 2000, or Windows NT 4.0
system startup drive is attached to the IBM ServeRAID controller. If this process occurs after
the startup drive array has been created, the array information will be removed, and the
system will no longer start in Windows 2003, Windows 2000, or Windows NT 4.0.
If you already have logical drives defined that you want to keep, go to step 6. Steps 4 and 5
will cause loss of data by deleting all logical drives already defined.
152
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
4. Click Actions ➔ Restore to factory-default settings.
5. If a confirmation window opens, click Yes. When the operation is complete, a
message appears at the bottom of the window indicating that ServeRAID
Manager has successfully restored the configuration to the factory-default
settings.
6. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the ServeRAID controller that you are
configuring.
7. Click Actions ➔ Clustering actions ➔ Configure for clustering. The
“Configure controller x for clustering” window opens, where x is the controller
number that you selected in step 6. This example shows the “Configure controller
1 for clustering” window.
Figure 44. “Configure for clustering” window
8. Provide the following information.
Controller name
Type a name to identify the first controller, for example, Server A.
Partner name
Type a name that you will use to identify the second controller, for
example, Server B.
Initiator IDs
The system presets these SCSI initiator IDs to 7. For Server A, set each
ID to 6 for shared channels. For Server B, ensure that each SCSI initiator
ID is set to 7 for shared channels. (The ServeRAID Manager program
does not permit you to select numbers other than 6 and 7.)
Notes:
a. The controller name and partner name are case sensitive.
b.
If your configuration will contain multiple ServeRAID controller pairs, each
controller name must be unique.
9. Click OK. The controller is now configured for clustering.
Chapter 15. Configuring ServeRAID controllers for clustering
153
Configuring ServeRAID arrays and logical drives
Important:
•
Define all shared logical drives on Server A.
•
When defining shared logical drives, create only one logical drive for each array.
•
Each controller must have its own hot-spare or standby hot-spare drive defined. This
means that you must not define the same hot-spare or standby hot-spare drive on both
controllers in the pair.
•
Define hot-spare and standby hot-spare drives only on a shared channel.
Complete the following steps to configure arrays and logical drives:
1. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the ServeRAID controller that you want to
configure.
2. On the toolbar, click
(Create). The Configuration wizard opens.
3. Click Custom configuration.
4. Click Next. The “Create arrays” window opens.
Figure 45. “Create arrays” window
5. Click the appropriate Array tab in the right panel; then, from the ready drives list,
select the drives that you want to move to the array.
154
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
6. Click
(Add selected drives) to add the drives to the array. You can click
(Add all drives) to move all ready drives to an array.
Notes:
a. Unless you define a drive as a hot-spare drive, you must use all the ready
drives when creating your arrays (that is, all ready drives in the tree must be
online).
b.
Hot-spare drives are not shared between controllers in a cluster pairing. If you
want hot-spare protection, each ServeRAID controller must have a hot-spare
drive defined.
c.
You must connect hot-spare drives only to shared channels. Both servers
must be able to access their uniquely-defined hot-spare drives in case a
failover occurs after a hot-spare drive replaces a failed shared drive.
d. You must create at least one logical drive to store the quorum resource
information. This logical drive (the quorum drive) must be assigned RAID
level-1.
e. For improved reliability, do not create arrays that span channels.
7. After you select the ready drives for your arrays, click Next. The “Create logical
drives” window opens.
Figure 46. “Create logical drives” window
8. Click the appropriate Array tab.
Chapter 15. Configuring ServeRAID controllers for clustering
155
9. Select a RAID level from the drop-down list. (For more information, see
“Supported RAID levels” on page 36.)
Notes:
a. If you have four or more ready drives in an array, use RAID level-5E or level5EE.
b.
Only one logical drive can be defined for each array.
c.
A logical drive cannot exceed 2048 GB; the minimum size is nMB, where n is
the number of drives in the array.
10. Click Next. The “Configuration summary” window opens.
Figure 47. “Configuration summary” window
11. Review the information that is displayed in the Configuration summary window.
Click Apply; then, click Yes when asked if you want to apply the new
configuration. The configuration is saved in the ServeRAID controller and on the
physical drives.
12. Click Return to the ServeRAID Manager to continue working with your
ServeRAID configuration. After creating the arrays and logical drives, you must
assign merge-group numbers to the shared logical drives.
Note: A merge-group number uniquely identifies each shared logical drive, even
when the logical drive moves between servers.
13. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the ServeRAID controller that contains the
logical drives.
Notes:
a. Valid merge-group numbers for non-shared logical drives are 206 and 207.
For example, set all non-shared drives on Server A to merge-group number
206 and all non-shared drives on Server B to merge-group number 207.
156
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
b.
The merge-group number must be unique for each logical drive that is shared
by the controller pair. For example, if you have a logical drive with a mergegroup number 1 on Server A, you cannot assign the same group number to a
logical drive on Server B. Valid merge-group numbers for shared logical
drives are from 1 to 8.
14. Click Actions ➔ Clustering actions ➔ Configure for clustering. The
“Configure controller x for clustering” window opens, where x is the controller
number that you selected in step 13. This example shows the “Configure
controller 1 for clustering” window.
Figure 48. “Configure for clustering” window
15. Select the Shared check boxes for all of the shared logical drives.
16. Do not change the merge-group number from the default that is provided.
17. Record the controller name, partner name, and merge-group numbers, and store
them in a safe place. You will need this information to recover the configuration if
the ServeRAID controller fails.
Note: You can save this information to a diskette file by using the ServeRAID
Manager program:
a. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the server.
b.
Insert a diskette into the floppy drive.
c.
Click Actions ➔ Save printable configuration.
18. Click OK.
Chapter 15. Configuring ServeRAID controllers for clustering
157
158
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 16. Monitoring and updating an IBM ServeRAID Cluster
Solution
You can use the ServeRAID Manager program to check the ownership of a physical
drive on another server or to add or remove a logical drive in the cluster. The
ServeRAID Manager program supports three features for cluster functions:
•
•
•
View shared drives
Validate cluster
Configure for clustering
Note: Make sure that you installed the ServeRAID Manager program on your server.
For instructions, see “Installing the ServeRAID Manager program” on page
133.
Checking the ownership of a physical drive
A physical drive that is owned (and configured) on Server B will appear in the ready or
defunct state on Server A. Complete the following steps to determine whether a ready
drive is owned by the other server:
1. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the controller that contains the ready drives.
A window similar to the one in the following illustration opens.
Figure 49. ServeRAID Manager window
2. Click Actions ➔ Clustering actions ➔ View shared drives. The “View shared
drives” window opens.
3. Click Enable view shared drives.
4. Select the SCSI channel and SCSI ID of a physical drive on a shared channel.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
159
5. Click OK. Physical drives that are available for use are labeled Ready in the tree.
If the physical drive is not available for use (that is, it is owned by the other
server), the drive is labeled Reserved in the tree.
Important:
Hot-spare drives owned by the other server are not labeled Reserved. Be sure you do not
inadvertently use a hot-spare drive in both servers.
Adding logical drives to a cluster
Complete the following steps to add logical drives to a cluster:
1. Install the hard disk drives in the server or shared expansion enclosure. For
installation information, see the documentation that is included with the hard disk
drive and the server.
Important:
Physical drives that are configured by one controller in the pair must appear as ready drives
to the other controller in the pair. Be sure to verify this status when you add drives after the
servers are started. Before creating logical drives, restart both servers, or scan for new drives
using the ServeRAID Manager program on both servers, to make sure the added physical
drives appear as ready drives on both servers. For more information, see “ServeRAID
considerations” on page 148.
2. Using the ServeRAID Manager program, configure the physical drives for the
ServeRAID controller. For instructions, see Chapter 4, “Configuring ServeRAID
controllers” on page 49.
Note: If the drives will be shared, define only one logical drive per array.
3. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the controller for the cluster.
4. Click Actions ➔ Clustering actions ➔ Configure for clustering. A window
similar to the one in the following illustration opens.
Figure 50. “NOC7GM3DConfigure for clustering” window
5. Click Shared or Non-shared for the logical drive you have just defined.
6. Select the merge-group number that you want to use for the logical drive you just
defined.
7. Click OK.
160
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
8. If you are using Windows NT 4.0, continue with “Creating additional ServeRAID
disk resources on a Windows NT 4.0 ServeRAID cluster” on page 166.
If you are using Windows 2000, continue with “Creating additional ServeRAID
disk resources on a Windows 2000 ServeRAID cluster” on page 177.
If you are using Windows 2003, continue with “Creating additional ServeRAID
disk resources on a Windows Server 2003 cluster” on page 186.
Validating a cluster
Use the Validate cluster feature to determine whether your cluster is configured
correctly.
Note: You must have the ServeRAID Manager program installed and running on all
servers in the cluster for this feature to work. You must run the Validate Cluster
feature from one of two nodes in the cluster; you cannot run it remotely.
Complete the following steps to validate a cluster:
1. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click a server in the cluster.
2. Click Actions ➔ ServeRAID Actions ➔ Validate cluster. A window similar to the
one in the following illustration opens.
Figure 51. “ServeRAID cluster validation” window
The server you selected in step 1 is listed in the Node A field.
Note: You cannot change the Node A system in the “ServeRAID cluster
validation” window. To select a different system, click Cancel to return to
the ServeRAID Manager tree.
3. From the Node B menu, select your second server.
Note: The Node B drop-down menu only contains the names of servers that are
remotely connected to the local machine. The Node B system defaults to
the first system in the tree other than the Node A system. If there are no
remote systems in the tree, click Cancel to return to the tree and add a
remote system. You can also type the Node B name.
Chapter 16. Monitoring and updating an IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution
161
4. Click Start. The ServeRAID Manager program scans both systems to verify the
ServeRAID cluster configuration. The progress indicator reports the progress of
the validation.
5. If you want to stop the validation before it is completed, click Cancel. Otherwise, if
the ServeRAID Manager program finds problems with the ServeRAID cluster
configuration, it reports the problems in the Problems found message field. If
there are no problems with the ServeRAID cluster configuration, the message
field reports only the cluster pairings found.
6. To view the problem report events in an easy-to-read window, double-click an
event in the Problems found message field.
7. To save the contents of the Problems found message field, click Save. A “Save
as” window opens. Specify the file name for the message field log and click OK.
8. Click Done to exit the “ServeRAID cluster validation” window. If the ServeRAID
cluster configuration has problems, fix the problems; then, use Validate cluster
again.
Viewing merge-group numbers and other cluster information
Complete the following steps to view the merge-group numbers and other cluster
information:
1. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the controller that you are using for the
cluster.
2. Click Actions ➔ Clustering actions ➔ Configure for clustering. A window
similar to the one in the following illustration opens.
Figure 52. “Configure controller for clustering” window
Note: In this case, you can view this information only. You cannot change the
information.
162
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 17. Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software
Important:
Before beginning the procedure:
•
Read “ServeRAID considerations” on page 148, which contains important information
about setting up valid cluster configurations.
•
Read “Configuring the controller for Microsoft Cluster Server using Windows 2003,
Windows 2000, or Windows NT 4.0” on page 151 for information on configuring Server A
and Server B for the high-availability cluster solution.
After configuring the ServeRAID controller, defining logical drives, and setting up
merge-group numbers, you can install Microsoft Cluster Server (MSCS) on Windows
NT 4.0, Windows 2000, or Windows 2003. Go to one of the following sections:
•
“Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software on Windows NT 4.0”
•
“Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software on Windows 2000” on page 173.
•
“Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software on Windows Server 2003” on
page 183.
Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software on Windows NT 4.0
Important:
Before beginning the procedure, ensure that you are using the IBM ServeRAID Support for
Windows NT 4.0 diskette during the installation of the Microsoft Windows NT Server
Enterprise Edition.
Installing the ServeRAID Manager program
Note: To run ServeRAID Manager as an installed program, you must install both the
ServeRAID device driver and the appropriate device driver for your server
video controller.
Before installing MSCS, you must install the ServeRAID Manager program:
1. If the server is not running, turn on the server.
2. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Applications CD into the CD-ROM drive of Server A.
The ServeRAID Manager setup program starts.
3. Click Next.
4. Click Yes to the Software License Agreement.
5. When prompted to install Windows Service, click Yes; then, click Next.
6. Select the Destination Folder; then, click Next.
7. After setup completes copying the files, click Finish.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
163
Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server
Complete the following steps to install the Microsoft Cluster Server:
1. If you do not have Microsoft Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition installed
already, install it with Service Pack 3 (or later) on both servers. Do not install the
Microsoft Cluster Server software. When prompted, deselect the option to install
MSCS; it will be installed later in this procedure.
Note: The Microsoft Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition CD contains Service
Pack 3.
For information on installing Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition, see the
documentation that is included with it. When you are finished, return to this step
and continue with this procedure.
2. Use the ServeRAID Manager program to scan for new drives on both servers.
Right-click on the controller, and click Scan for new or removed ready drives.
3. On Server A, run the IPSHAHTO.EXE utility program from the IBM ServeRAID
Cluster Solution for Windows NT, Windows 2000 , and Windows 2003 diskette or
the IBM ServeRAID Support CD. At a Windows NT command line, type one of the
following commands:
If installing from CD
e:\windows\winnt\scsi\cluster\support\ipshahto
If installing from diskette
a:\drivers\nt\cluster\support\ipshahto
where a is the diskette drive letter and e is the CD-ROM drive letter.
Running the IPSHAHTO utility program makes all the shared logical drives
available for access by Server A.
4. Using the Windows NT Disk Administrator, format all shared logical drives as
NTFS (NT File System), assign volume labels, and specify drive letters for each.
Important:
Before creating the ServeRAID logical cluster resource, you must assign a permanent (sticky)
drive letter to the shared logical drive on both servers. The two servers must have the same
drive letters on each shared drive. If you do not assign permanent drive letters, Windows NT
might assign different drive letters on each server. Assigning a permanent drive letter ensures
that Windows NT assigns the same drive letter to the partition on both servers.
Notes:
a. It is helpful if the volume label contains the drive letter you assigned to the
drive, such as DRIVE E.
b.
If you want to use the disk in a cluster, create only one partition on the disk.
Make the partition the full size of the disk and format the partition to NTFS.
5. On Server B, run the IPSHAHTO.EXE utility program to make all shared logical
drives available for access by Server B.
6. On Server B, use the Windows NT Disk Administrator to assign the same drive
letters that you assigned to each drive on Server A.
Note: Use the volume label as a guide to make sure you assign the same letters
on Server B as you assigned on Server A.
7. On Server A, run the IPSHAHTO.EXE utility program again, so that Server A
regains control of all shared logical drives.
164
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
8. On Server A, install the Microsoft Cluster Server (MSCS) software.
Note: The directory name and path where the MSCS software is installed must
be the same on both servers.
Complete the following steps to start the installation.
Important:
You must use the localquorum option when installing the Microsoft Cluster Server (MSCS)
software with ServeRAID controllers.
a. Insert the Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition Component CD into the CDROM drive on Server A.
b.
At the command line, type the following command and press Enter:
e:\MSCS\CLUSTER\I386\SETUP /localquorum
where e is the CD-ROM drive letter.
Note: You must type the parameter localquorum in lowercase.
c.
Install the Microsoft Cluster Server software. Follow the instructions in the
documentation included with the MSCS software.
Server A will restart when the installation is completed.
9. On Server B, make it join the cluster by doing the following.
Note: The directory name and path where the MSCS software is installed must
be the same on both servers.
a. Insert the Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition Component CD into the CDROM drive on Server B. Type the following command (from either a command
line or Add/Remove Programs in the Control panel) and press Enter:
e:\MSCS\CLUSTER\I386\SETUP
where e is the CD-ROM drive letter.
b.
Install the Microsoft Cluster Server software. Follow the instructions in the
documentation included with the MSCS software.
Server B will restart when the installation is completed.
10. Install the IBM ServeRAID Windows NT Cluster Solution program by completing
the following steps:
a. On Server A, run the utility SETUP.EXE program from the IBM ServeRAID
Cluster Solution for Windows NT, Windows 2000 , and Windows 2003 diskette
or IBM ServeRAID Support CD and follow the instructions that appear on the
screen. At a Windows NT command line, type one of the following commands
and press Enter:
If installing from CD
e:\windows\winnt\scsi\cluster\setup
If installing from diskette
a:\drivers\nt\cluster\setup
where a is the diskette drive letter and e is the CD-ROM drive letter.
b.
When the setup is completed on Server A, run the utility SETUP.EXE program
on Server B.
After the utility program has been installed on both servers, all shared
ServeRAID groups and disk resources will be automatically created by the
IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution setup program and then brought online.
Server A is the current owner of these groups.
Chapter 17. Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software
165
11. Move the quorum resource from localquorum to a ServeRAID disk resource by
completing the following steps:
a. On Server A, run the Microsoft Cluster Administrator program and open a
connection to the cluster you just created.
b.
Verify that the same server (for example, Server A) owns the ServeRAID disk
resources and the localquorum resource and that the quorum resource is
moved to a RAID level-1 logical drive.
Note: Set the quorum resources on a RAID level-1 logical drive. Do not set
the quorum resources on a RAID level-5, level-5E, or level-5EE logical
drive.
c.
Right-click the cluster name to open the cluster.
d. Select Properties; then, click the Quorum tab.
e. In the Quorum Resource field, select a ServeRAID shared disk.
f.
Click OK.
g. Delete the Local Quorum Resource and the Local Quorum Group.
See the Microsoft Cluster Solution Administrator's Guide for more information.
12. Install the latest Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack on both cluster server nodes.
Note: If you installed a Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack previously, you must
reinstall it now.
You now can move the shared disk resources manually using the Microsoft Cluster
Administrator program or automatically during failover.
See Microsoft Knowledge Base Article Q258750, “Recommended Private ’Heartbeat’
Configuration on a Cluster Server,” for additional configuration information.
Creating additional ServeRAID disk resources on a Windows NT 4.0
ServeRAID cluster
You can use a ServeRAID logical disk that has not already been designated as a
cluster resource, or you can create a new array and logical disk on Server A, using the
ServeRAID Manager program. For more information about creating new arrays and
logical drives, see Chapter 4, “Configuring ServeRAID controllers” on page 49.
Note: Be sure to assign a unique shared merge-group number to the new shared
logical drive.
Important:
Before creating the ServeRAID logical cluster resource, you must assign a permanent (sticky)
drive letter to the shared logical drive on both servers. The two servers must have the same
drive letters on each shared drive. If you do not assign permanent drive letters, Windows NT
might assign different drive letters on each server. Assigning a permanent drive letter ensures
that Windows NT assigns the same drive letter to the partition on both servers.
1. On Server A, complete the following steps:
a. Click Start in the lower-left corner of the screen; then, click Programs ➔
Tools ➔ Administrative Tools ➔Disk Administrator. The Disk
Administrator window opens.
b.
Click the partition that you want to assign a permanent drive letter.
c.
Click Tools ➔ Assign Drive Letter. The “Assign drive letter” window opens.
d. In the Assign drive letter menu, click the drive letter for the partition.
166
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
e. Click OK. Windows NT permanently assigns the selected drive letter to that
partition, even if you add new partitions or rearrange your controllers.
f.
To exit the Disk Administrator, click Partition ➔ Exit.
2. On Server B, complete the following steps:
a. Using the ServeRAID Manager program, scan for new or removed ready
drives.
b.
Run the IPSHAHTO.EXE utility program to move the newly defined logical
drive to this server.
c.
Using the Windows NT Disk Administrator program, assign the same
permanent (sticky) drive letter as in step 1.
Complete the following steps on the cluster server that currently owns the shared
logical drive. The cluster server that owns the logical drives is the server on which you
last ran the IPSHAHTO.EXE utility program.
1. On the server owning the newly created logical drive, run the Cluster
Administration program and open a connection to the installed cluster.
2. To create the ServeRAID disk resource in an existing group, ensure that the
cluster server that owns the shared logical drive is the owner of that group. If the
cluster server is not the owner of the group, use Move Group to make this cluster
server the owner of the group where you will create the ServeRAID disk resource.
Then, create the ServeRAID disk resource.
3. Bring the new ServeRAID disk group online. If you create a new ServeRAID
group, the cluster server that owns the shared logical drive will be the owner of
this group by default.
4. Create a ServeRAID disk resource as part of the new group.
5. Bring the ServeRAID disk group online.
Deleting and re-creating a ServeRAID logical drive resource
This section describes how to delete and re-create a ServeRAID logical drive
resource without deleting a ServeRAID logical drive.
1. If the resource or resource group is not currently owned by the cluster server from
which you will delete the group, move the resource or resource group to that
cluster server.
Note: The cluster service must be running on both systems.
2. To delete the resource, run the Microsoft Cluster Administration program from the
cluster server that currently owns the resource or resource group.
Note: You can also run the Microsoft Cluster Administration program from a
remote administration system.
3. Use the normal MSCS procedure for deleting a resource or a group. For
instructions, see the documentation that is included with the MSCS package.
4. After deleting the ServeRAID resource using Cluster Administrator, delete the
corresponding ServeRAID logical drive from both nodes using ServeRAID
Manager.
5. Shut down and reboot both cluster nodes.
IMPORTANT!You must first reboot the cluster node that owns the resources and
then reboot the other node.
Note: Restarting one cluster server will not shut down the entire cluster.
6. If the group that will own the resource you are creating is not currently owned by
the cluster server on which you want to create the resource, move the group to the
cluster server.
Chapter 17. Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software
167
7. To create the resource, run the Microsoft Cluster Administration program from the
cluster server that currently owns the resource group.
8. Create a new ServeRAID logical disk. For instructions, see “Creating additional
ServeRAID disk resources on a Windows NT 4.0 ServeRAID cluster” on page
166.
Uninstalling MSCS on ServeRAID servers
Note: Do not use the uninstallation procedure if you are upgrading MSCS on
ServeRAID servers. To upgrade MSCS on ServeRAID servers, follow the
instructions in “Updating ServeRAID software in an MSCS cluster
environment” on page 169.
To uninstall MSCS on ServeRAID servers, you must complete the following steps on
all servers in your cluster:
1. Select one of the cluster servers from which to uninstall MSCS.
2. Click Start ➔ Settings ➔ Control Panel. The Windows NT Control Panel window
opens.
3. Double-click Services. The Services window opens.
4. Select Cluster Service from the list of services; then, click Stop.
5. Click Close to exit the Services window. For more information, see the
documentation that is included with the cluster services.
6. In the Windows NT control panel, double-click Add/Remove Programs.
7. Select Microsoft Cluster Server from the list of installed components; then, click
Add/Remove.
Note: Ignore the warnings regarding the removal of IBM ServeRAID Logical
Disks.
8. Follow the on-screen prompts by clicking OK or Yes.
9. After the uninstallation of MSCS is complete, restart the server when prompted.
10. After the server has restarted, click Start ➔ Settings ➔ Control Panel.
11. Double-click Add/Remove Programs.
12. Select IBM ServeRAID Windows NT Cluster Solution from the list of installed
components; then, click Add/Remove.
13. Repeat step 1 through step 12 for the other servers in the cluster.
168
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Updating ServeRAID software in an MSCS cluster environment
If you are upgrading your ServeRAID software after downloading it from the IBM
Support Web site, perform this procedure. If you are installing your software using the
IBM ServeRAID Applications CD or IBM ServeRAID Support CD, see Chapter 4,
“Configuring ServeRAID controllers” on page 49 for instructions.
Important:
This upgrade procedure enables the cluster to remain online at all times. To upgrade the
cluster, complete the following steps on one server at a time. When all steps are completed for
Server A and both servers are reported in the Microsoft Cluster Administrator program as
“Up” and all resources are online, repeat the steps for Server B.
Step 1: Ensure cluster availability: Move all cluster resources from Server
A to Server B; ensure that the cluster resources are online.
Step 2: Upgrading the IBM ServeRAID Windows
NT device driver: Complete the following steps to upgrade the IBM ServeRAID
Windows NT device driver on a server in the cluster:
1. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive.
2. Click Start in the lower-left corner of the screen; then, click Settings ➔ Control
Panel. The Windows NT Control Panel window opens.
3. Double-click SCSI-Adapters.
4. Click the Drivers tab.
5. Click Add.
6. Click Have Disk.
7. For the path, type the following command:
e:\windows\winnt\scsi\driver
where e is the CD-ROM drive.
8. Click OK.
9. When the IBM ServeRAID controller is highlighted, click OK.
10. Shut down and restart the server from the CD.
Step 3: Upgrading the IBM ServeRAID BIOS and
firmware code: Complete the following steps to upgrade the IBM ServeRAID
BIOS and firmware on a server in the cluster:
1. If you have not already done so, start the server with the IBM ServeRAID Support
CD.
2. When prompted, click Update to flash the BIOS code and firmware code. If no
update is required, the ServeRAID Manager program starts.
3. When the update is complete, click Finish and remove the CD from the CD-ROM
drive. This will automatically restart (reboot) the server.
4. Allow the server to rejoin the cluster. When the server is reported in the Microsoft
Cluster Administrator program as “Up” and all resources are online, the upgrade
for this server is complete.
Chapter 17. Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software
169
Step 4: Upgrading the IBM ServeRAID Manager
program: Before you upgrade the ServeRAID Manager program, remove the
existing version of the ServeRAID Manager program from your server. Then, insert the
IBM ServeRAID Applications CD into the CD-ROM drive. The installation program
starts automatically.
Step 5: Upgrading the IBM ServeRAID Microsoft
Windows NT Cluster Solution: Run the utility SETUP.EXE program from the
IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution for Windows NT, Windows 2000 , and Windows 2003
diskette or IBM ServeRAID Support CD, and follow the instructions that appear on the
screen. At a Windows NT command line, type one of the following commands:
If installing from CD
e:\windows\winnt\scsi\cluster\setup
If installing from diskette
a:\drivers\nt\cluster\setup
where a is the diskette drive letter and e is the CD-ROM drive letter.
Step 6: Upgrading the software for Server B: Complete the following
steps to upgrade the software for Server B:
1. Move all cluster resources to Server A; ensure that the cluster resources are
online.
2. For Server B, repeat “Step 2: Upgrading the IBM ServeRAID Windows NT device
driver:” on page 169 through “Step 5: Upgrading the IBM ServeRAID Microsoft
Windows NT Cluster Solution:” on page 170.
Adding an additional ServeRAID controller to an existing Windows NT
4.0 Cluster
Complete the following steps to add ServeRAID controllers to an existing Microsoft
Cluster Server on Microsoft Windows NT 4.0:
1. Move all cluster resources to Server B.
2. On Server A, complete the following steps:
a. Click Start, highlight Settings, and then click Control Panel.
b.
Double-click Devices.
c.
In the list of devices, click Cluster Disk, and then click Startup.
d. Change the setting to Manual, click OK, and then click Yes.
e. Close the Devices window.
f.
In the Control Panel window, double-click Services.
g. In the list of services, click Cluster Server, and then click Startup.
h. Change the setting to Manual, click OK, and then click Yes.
i.
Close the Services window, and then close the Control Panel window.
3. On Server A, stop the cluster service.
4. Shut down Server A.
5. Install the new ServeRAID adapter in Server A.
6. Follow the instructions in “Configuring a controller for clustering” on page 152 for
the new shared controller on the ServeRAID adapter; then, return to this step.
7. Follow the instructions in “Configuring ServeRAID arrays and logical drives” on
page 154 to configure and share logical drives on this controller.
170
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
8. Restart Server A.
Important: Before creating the ServeRAID logical cluster resource, you must
assign a permanent (sticky) drive letter to the shared logical drive on both servers.
The two servers must have the same drive letters on each shared drive. If you do
not assign permanent drive letters, Windows NT might assign different drive
letters on each server. Assigning a permanent drive letter ensures that Windows
NT assigns the same drive letter to the partition on both servers.
9. On Server A, complete the following steps:
a. Click Start in the lower-left corner of the screen; then, click Programs ➔
Tools ➔ Administrative Tools ➔ Disk Administrator. The Disk
Administrator window opens.
b.
Click the partition to which you want to assign a permanent drive letter.
c.
Click Tools ➔ Assign Drive Letter. The Assign drive letter window opens.
d. In the Assign drive letter menu, click the drive letter for the partition.
e. Click OK. Windows NT permanently assigns the selected drive letter to that
partition, even if you add new partitions or rearrange your controllers.
f.
Click Partition ➔ Exit to exit the Disk Administrator.
10. On Server A, complete the following steps:
a. Click Start, highlight Settings, and then click Control Panel.
b.
Double-click Devices.
c.
In the list of devices, click Cluster Disk, and then click Startup.
d. Change the setting to Automatic, click OK, and then click Yes.
e. Close the Devices window.
f.
In the Control Panel window, double-click Services.
g. In the list of services, click Cluster Server, and then click Startup.
h. Change the setting to Automatic, click OK, and then click Yes.
i.
Close the Services window, and then close the Control Panel window.
11. Restart Server A.
12. On Server A, use the Cluster Administrator tool to move all resources from Server
B to Server A.
13. On Server B, complete the following steps:
a. Click Start, highlight Settings, and then click Control Panel.
b.
Double-click Devices.
c.
In the list of devices, click Cluster Disk, and then click Startup.
d. Change the setting to Manual, click OK, and then click Yes.
e. Close the Devices window.
f.
In the Control Panel window, double-click Services.
g. In the list of services, click Cluster Server, and then click Startup.
h. Change the setting to Manual, click OK, and then click Yes.
i.
Close the Services window, and then close the Control Panel window.
14. On Server B, stop the cluster service.
15. Shut down Server B.
16. Install a new ServeRAID adapter in Server B.
Chapter 17. Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software
171
17. Follow the instructions in “Configuring a controller for clustering” on page 152 for
the new shared controller on the ServeRAID adapter; then, return to this step.
18. Follow the instructions in “Configuring ServeRAID arrays and logical drives” on
page 154 to configure and share logical drives on this controller.
19. Restart Server B.
20. On Server B, complete the following steps:
a. Using the ServeRAID Manager program, scan for new or removed ready
drives.
b.
Run the IPSHAHTO.EXE program to move the newly defined logical drive to
Server B, by typing the following instruction at the command-line prompt:
E:\windows\winnt\scsi\cluster\support\ipshahto.exe
c.
Using the Windows NT Disk Administrator program, assign the same
permanent (sticky) drive letter as in step 9.
21. On Server B, complete the following steps:
a. Click Start, highlight Settings, and then click Control Panel.
b.
Double-click Devices.
c.
In the list of devices, click Cluster Disk, and then click Startup.
d. Change the setting to Automatic, click OK, and then click Yes.
e. Close the Devices window.
f.
In the Control Panel window, double-click Services.
g. In the list of services, click Cluster Server, and then click Startup.
h. Change the setting to Automatic, click OK, and then click Yes.
i.
Close the Services window, and then close the Control Panel window.
22. Restart Server B.
172
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software on Windows 2000
Important:
Before beginning the procedure, consider the following requirements:
•
Ensure that you use the IBM ServeRAID Support for Windows 2000 Server diskette
during the installation of Windows 2000 Advanced Server Edition or Windows 2000
Datacenter Server Edition.
Note:
This does not apply if your server only contains ServeRAID-4H controllers.
•
To create a ServeRAID cluster, you must install the Windows 2000 operating system on
an NTFS partition, and any shared cluster disks must be formatted as NTFS.
•
While installing Windows 2000, do not install Microsoft Cluster Server. You will install
MSCS later.
•
To install the ServeRAID device driver, see “Installing device drivers after installing
Windows 2000” in the IBM ServeRAID Device Driver Installation Instructions on the IBM
ServeRAID Support CD.
Note:
This only applies if your server contains a ServeRAID-4H controller.
Installing the ServeRAID Manager program
Complete the following steps to install the ServeRAID Manager program.
Note: To run ServeRAID Manager as an installed program, you must install both the
ServeRAID device driver and the applicable device driver for your server video
controller.
1. If the server is not running, turn on the server.
2. Log on to Windows 2000.
3. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Applications CD into the CD-ROM drive of Server A.
The ServeRAID Manager setup program starts.
4. Click Next.
5. Click Yes to the Software License Agreement.
6. Select the Destination Folder; then, click Next.
7. After setup completes copying the files, click Finish.
Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server
Important: If you are installing the cluster service on a domain controller, you must
install any Windows service packs first. If you reinstall the service pack after installing
the Microsoft Cluster Server, you will lose the active directory information.
To install the Microsoft Cluster Server, complete the following steps:
1. Use the ServeRAID Manager program to scan for new drives on all ServeRAID
controllers.
2. On Server A, run the IPSHAHTO.EXE utility program from the IBM ServeRAID
Windows NT Cluster Solutions Diskette or the IBM ServeRAID Support CD.
Chapter 17. Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software
173
3. At a Windows 2000 command line, type one of the following commands:
If installing from CD
e:\windows\win2k_xp\scsi\cluster\support\ipshahto
If installing from diskette
a:\drivers\nt\cluster\support\ipshahto
where a is the diskette drive letter and e is the CD-ROM drive letter.
Running the program makes all the shared logical drives available for access by
Server A.
4. Right-click My Computer on the desktop; then, click Manage. The Computer
Management window opens.
5. In the left pane, click to expand the Storage icon; then, click Disk Management.
The Disk Signature and Upgrade wizard window opens.
6. To assign disk signatures for the shared disks, click Next.
7. Set shared logical drives to Basic Disk. Click Cancel in the Upgrade Disks pane
of the window.
8. Format all shared logical drives to NTFS (NT File System), assign volume labels,
and specify drive letters for each.
Important:
Before creating the ServeRAID logical cluster resource, you must assign a permanent (sticky)
drive letter to the shared logical drive on both servers. The two servers must have the same
drive letters on each shared drive. If you do not assign permanent drive letters, Windows 2000
might assign different drive letters on each server. Assigning a permanent drive letter ensures
that Windows 2000 assigns the same drive letter to the partition on both servers.
Notes:
a. It is helpful if the volume label contains the drive letter you assigned to the
drive, such as DRIVE E.
b.
If you want to use the disk in a cluster, create only one partition on the disk.
Make the partition the full size of the disk and format the partition to NTFS.
c.
Make sure that all shared logical drives are the type Basic Disk. If they are
marked Dynamic Disk, change them to Basic Disk by completing the following
steps:
1) Right-click the Disk icon at the bottom of the Disk Management window
(see Figure 53).
2) Click Revert to Basic Disk.
174
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Figure 53. Changing a shared logical drive to Basic Disk
9. On Server B, use the ServeRAID Manager program to scan for new drives on all
ServeRAID controllers.
10. On Server B, run the same IPSHAHTO.EXE utility program to make all shared
logical drives available for access by Server B.
Note: If all logical drives are not working properly, there was a problem bringing
drives over from the other server. To diagnose the problem, use the log
files or the ServeRAID Manager to determine if the drives are critical or
offline.
11. Using the Windows 2000 Disk Management Snap-in Computer Management
program, scan for new drives and assign them the same drive letters that you
assigned to each drive on Server A.
Notes:
a. Use the disk volume label as a guide to make sure you assign the same drive
letters on Server B as you assigned on Server A.
b.
You might need to press the F5 key multiple times to update the displayed
information. Wait until all logical drive letters appear before attempting to
change the property of any drives.
c.
If the Disk Signature wizard prompts you to write signatures on drives, the
drives have not been correctly recognized. Complete the following steps:
1) On Server A, run the IPSHAHTO.EXE utility program.
2) After Server A has successfully brought over all drives, run the
IPSHAHTO.EXE utility program on Server B.
3) Repeat step 11.
12. Run the IPSHAHTO.EXE utility program from Server A again, so that control of all
shared logical drives returns to Server A.
Chapter 17. Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software
175
13. Using the Windows 2000 Disk Management Snap-in Computer Management
program on Server A, verify that the shared logical drives display with the correct
size, volume label, and drive letter.
Note: The drive letters for the shared disks must be the same on each server in
the cluster.
14. Ensure that both servers are turned on.
Note: If you have a two-node cluster that has a private network consisting of the
two servers directly connected to each other using an Ethernet cross-over
cable, make sure that both servers are turned on before you proceed.
Failure to have both servers turned on will cause Windows 2000 to mark
the network adapter as failed, and you will not be able to select it as the
private network interface during cluster setup.
15. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive.
16. Type the following command and press Enter:
e:\windows\win2k_xp\scsi\cluster\setup
where e is the CD-ROM drive letter. The SETUP.EXE program copies some files
and launches the Windows Component wizard.
17. In the Windows Component wizard, select the check box to install the Cluster
Service component; then, click Next.
18. When prompted, insert the CD labeled Windows 2000 Advanced Server CD-ROM
into the CD-ROM drive; then, click OK. The Microsoft Cluster Server
Configuration wizard opens.
Note: To configure the Microsoft Cluster Server, follow the instructions in the
Microsoft Cluster Server documentation.
After you install and configure the cluster, the IBM ServeRAID Cluster
Configuration wizard opens and applies ServeRAID-specific configurations to the
cluster.
19. When prompted, select a shared ServeRAID logical drive on which to set the
quorum resources.
Note: Set the quorum resources on a RAID level-1 logical drive. Do not set the
quorum resources on a RAID level-5, level-5E, or level-5EE logical drive.
20. Install the latest Windows 2000 Service Pack on Server A.
21. Repeat step 14 through step 18 for Server B.
22. Install the latest Windows 2000 Service Pack on Server B. The cluster installation
is now complete, and the cluster is ready for use.
See Microsoft Knowledge Base Article Q258750, “Recommended Private ’Heartbeat’
Configuration on a Cluster Server,” for additional configuration information.
176
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Creating additional ServeRAID disk resources on a Windows 2000
ServeRAID cluster
You can use a ServeRAID logical drive that has not already been designated as a
cluster resource, or you can create a new array and logical drive on Server A, using
the ServeRAID Manager program. For more information about creating new arrays
and logical drives, see Chapter 4, “Configuring ServeRAID controllers” on page 49.
Note: Be sure to assign a unique shared merge-group number to the new shared
logical drive.
Important:
Before creating the ServeRAID logical cluster resource, you must assign a permanent (sticky)
drive letter to the shared logical drive on both servers. The two servers must have the same
drive letters on each shared drive. If you do not assign permanent drive letters, Windows 2000
might assign different drive letters on each server. Assigning a permanent drive letter ensures
that Windows 2000 assigns the same drive letter to the partition on both servers.
Complete the following steps to create additional ServeRAID disk resources:
1. On Server A, complete the following steps:
a. Right-click My Computer; then, click Manage. The Computer Management
window opens.
b.
Double-click Storage.
c.
Click Disk Management. The Write Signature and Upgrade Disk wizard
opens.
d. Right-click Disk Management ➔ Rescan Disks.
e. On each of the new disks, complete the following tasks:
1) Right-click a new disk; then, click Write Signature. The Write Signature
wizard opens. Follow and complete the wizard.
2) Make sure that all shared logical drives are the type Basic Disk. If they are
marked Dynamic Disk, change them to Basic Disk by completing the
following steps:
a) Right-click the Disk icon at the bottom of the Disk Management
window.
b) Click Revert to Basic Disk.
3) Create one partition on the disk (the full size of the disk), assign a drive
letter, and format the partition to NTFS.
Note: To help recognize the drive on the cluster partner server, assign a
descriptive volume label that includes the drive letter.
2. On Server B, complete the following steps:
a. Using the ServeRAID Manager program, scan for new or removed ready
drives on all ServeRAID controllers.
b.
To move the newly defined logical drive to Server B, start the IPSHAHTO.EXE
program by typing:
a:\drivers\nt\cluster\support\ipshahto
where a is the diskette drive letter.
c.
Using the Windows 2000 Disk Management Snap-in Computer Management
program, assign the same drive letters that you assigned to the new drives on
Server A.
Note: Use the disk volume label as a guide to make sure you assign the
same drive letters on Server B as you assigned on Server A.
Chapter 17. Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software
177
d. To create a new ServeRAID disk resource and group for each newly defined
logical drive on Server B, start the MSCSCFG.EXE program by typing:
%systemroot%\cluster\mscscfg.exe
where%systemroot% is expanded by the operating system to the root
directory of the operating system on the server.
Deleting and re-creating a ServeRAID logical drive resource
This section describes how to delete and re-create a ServeRAID logical drive
resource without deleting a ServeRAID logical drive.
1. To delete the resource, run the Microsoft Cluster Administration program from the
cluster server that currently owns the ServeRAID resource or resource group.
Notes:
a. The cluster service must be running on both servers.
b.
You can also run the Microsoft Cluster Administration program from a remote
administration system.
2. Use the normal MSCS procedure for deleting a resource or a group. For
instructions, see the documentation that is included with the MSCS package.
3. After deleting the ServeRAID resource using Cluster Administrator, delete the
corresponding ServeRAID logical drive from both nodes using ServeRAID
Manager.
4. Shut down and reboot both cluster nodes.
IMPORTANT!You must first reboot the cluster node that owns the resources and
then reboot the other node.
Note: Restarting one cluster server will not shut down the entire cluster.
5. To create the new ServeRAID logical drive, see “Creating additional ServeRAID
disk resources on a Windows 2000 ServeRAID cluster” on page 177.
6. To create the new ServeRAID disk resource and group for the ServeRAID logical
drive, start the MSCSCFG.EXE program by typing:
%systemroot%\cluster\mscscfg.exe
where%systemroot% is expanded by the operating system to the root directory of
the operating system on the server.
Upgrading the IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution from Microsoft Windows
NT 4.0 to Windows 2000
Complete the following steps to upgrade from Windows NT 4.0 with Service Pack 5 (or
later) to Windows 2000 Advanced Server.
Note: Before upgrading from Windows NT Enterprise Edition, make sure you have
updated Windows NT 4.0 Enterprise Edition with the latest Service Pack on
both Server A and Server B.
1. On the server that you want to upgrade, click Start ➔ Programs ➔
Administrative Tools ➔ Cluster Administrator.
2. Move all cluster resources and groups to the other cluster node (that is, the server
that is not running the Cluster Administrator program).
3. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive; then, type the
following command and press Enter:
e:\windows\win2k_xp\scsi\cluster\setup.exe
where e is the CD-ROM drive.
4. When the following prompt appears, click Yes:
178
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
A previous installation of “IBM ServeRAID NT Cluster Solution” has been
found. Do you want to upgrade?
5. When the following prompt appears, click Yes:
You are currently running Windows NT 4.0. Is this upgrade to “IBM
ServeRAID NT Cluster Solution” being done as procedure to upgrade cluster
to run Windows 2000?
6. The IBM ServeRAID Windows NT Solution Setup program copies the necessary
Windows 2000 files; then, it prompts you to upgrade the server to Windows 2000.
Note: After you complete this step, you can no longer use this server as a
Windows cluster node.
7. Insert the Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server CD into the CD-ROM drive.
8. Run the Windows 2000 Advanced Server Setup program to upgrade this node to
Windows 2000. After successfully upgrading the server, it joins the cluster.
Note: If your cluster installation includes ServeRAID-4M, ServeRAID-4Mx,
ServeRAID-4L, ServeRAID-4Lx, or ServeRAID-6M controllers, you must
manually install the ServeRAID device driver. To do so, complete the
following steps:
a. When Windows 2000 restarts the first time, the Windows 2000 Setup
window opens.
b.
Press F6 promptly. You have only a few seconds to press this key.
c.
Select the IBM ServeRAID 4M/4Mx/4L/4Lx/5i/6M (Windows 2000)
device driver.
For additional information about installing ServeRAID device drivers, see
the IBM ServeRAID Device Driver Installation Instructions (DEVDRV.PDF)
on the IBM ServeRAID Support CD.
9. Repeat step 1 through step 8 for the other server in the cluster.
Uninstalling MSCS on ServeRAID servers
Complete the following steps to uninstall MSCS from a ServeRAID server using
Windows 2000 Advanced Server:
1. On the server you want to remove from the cluster, click Start ➔ Programs ➔
Administrative Tools ➔ Cluster Administrator.
2. Move all cluster resources and groups to the other cluster server (that is, the
server that is not running the Cluster Administrator program).
3. In the tree view, click the server from which you want to remove MSCS.
4. Using the right-mouse button, click Stop Cluster Service; then, click Evict Node.
5. Click Start ➔ Settings ➔ Control Panel. The Control Panel window opens.
6. Double-click Add/Remove Programs. The Add/Remove Programs window
opens.
7. In the left pane, click Add/Remove Windows Components. The Windows
Components wizard opens.
8. Deselect Cluster Service in the Components list; then, click Next.
9. After the Microsoft Cluster Server is uninstalled, the Windows Component wizard
prompts you to restart the server.
10. After the server restarts, click Start ➔ Settings ➔ Control Panel. The Control
Panel window opens.
11. Double-click Add/Remove Programs. The Add/Remove Programs window
opens.
Chapter 17. Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software
179
12. Select IBM ServeRAID NT Cluster Solution from the list of installed components.
13. To uninstall the IBM ServeRAID Windows NT Cluster Solution, click
Change/Remove.
If you uninstall clustering on Windows 2000, you might not be able to access the
ServeRAID logical drives shared by the two nodes of the cluster. If this occurs,
perform one of the following steps:
•
Delete the logical drives and restart the server.
•
Set the logical drives to non-shared by changing the merge-group numbers. Use
the ServeRAID Manager program in startable-CD mode to make this change.
Note: If you use the installed version of the ServeRAID Manager program to
delete and recreate the logical drives that have the same merge-group
number, you will not be able to access the logical drives. You must delete
the logical drives, restart the server, and re-create the logical drives.
Adding an additional ServeRAID controller to an existing Windows 2000
Cluster
Complete the following steps to add ServeRAID controllers to an existing Microsoft
Cluster Server on Microsoft Windows 2000:
1. Move all cluster resources to Server B.
2. On Server A, complete the following steps:
a. Click Start, highlight Programs, highlight Administrative Tools, and then
click Computer Management.
b.
In the left pane, click Device Manager.
c.
From the View menu, click Show Hidden Devices.
d. In the right pane, under Non-Plug and Play Drivers, double-click Clusdisk.
e. Click the Driver tab.
f.
In the Type box, click Disabled, and then click OK.
g. In the left pane, click the plus sign (+) next to Services and Applications to
expand the branch.
h. Under Services and Applications, click Services.
i.
In the right pane, double-click the Cluster service.
j.
In the Startup type box, click Disabled, and then click OK.
k.
Close the Computer Management tool.
3. On Server A, stop the cluster service.
4. Shut down Server A.
5. Install the new ServeRAID adapter in Server A.
6. Follow the instructions in “Configuring a controller for clustering” on page 152 for
the new shared controller on the ServeRAID adapter; then, return to this step.
7. Follow the instructions in “Configuring ServeRAID arrays and logical drives” on
page 154 to configure and share logical drives on this controller.
8. Restart Server A.
Important: Before creating the ServeRAID logical cluster resource, you must
assign a permanent (sticky) drive letter to the shared logical drive on both servers.
The two servers must have the same drive letters on each shared drive. If you do
not assign permanent drive letters, Windows NT might assign different drive
180
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
letters on each server. Assigning a permanent drive letter ensures that Windows
NT assigns the same drive letter to the partition on both servers.
9. On Server A, complete the following steps:
a. Right-click My Computer; then, click Manage. The Computer Management
window opens.
b.
Double-click Storage.
c.
Click Disk Management. The Write Signature and Upgrade Disk wizard
opens.
d. Right-click Disk Management ➔ Rescan Disks.
e. On each of the new disks, complete the following tasks:
1) Right-click a new disk; then, click Write Signature. The Write Signature
wizard opens. Follow and complete the wizard.
2) Make sure that all shared logical drives are the type Basic Disk. If they are
marked Dynamic Disk, change them to Basic Disk by completing the
following steps:
a) Right-click the Disk icon at the bottom of the Disk Management
window.
b) Click Revert to Basic Disk.
3) Create one partition on the disk (the full size of the disk), assign a drive
letter, and format the partition to NTFS.
Note: To help recognize the drive on the cluster partner server, assign a
descriptive volume label that includes the drive letter.
10. On Server A, complete the following steps:
a. Click Start, highlight Programs, highlight Administrative Tools, and then
click Computer Management.
b.
In the left pane, click Device Manager.
c.
From the View menu, click Show Hidden Devices.
d. In the right pane, under Non-Plug and Play Drivers, double-click Cluster
Disk.
e. Click the Driver tab.
f.
In the Type box, click System, and then click OK.
g. In the left pane, click the plus sign (+) next to Services and Applications to
expand the branch.
h. Under Services and Applications, click Services.
i.
In the right pane, double-click the Cluster service.
j.
In the Startup type box, click Automatic, and then click OK.
k.
Close the Computer Management tool.
11. Restart Server A.
12. On Server A, use the Cluster Administrator tool to move all resources from Server
B to Server A.
13. On Server B, complete the following steps:
a. Click Start, highlight Programs, highlight Administrative Tools, and then
click Computer Management.
b.
In the left pane, click Device Manager.
c.
From the View menu, click Show Hidden Devices.
Chapter 17. Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software
181
d. In the right pane, under Non-Plug and Play Drivers, double-click Clusdisk.
e. Click the Driver tab.
f.
In the Type box, click Disabled, and then click OK.
g. In the left pane, click the plus sign (+) next to Services and Applications to
expand the branch.
h. Under Services and Applications, click Services.
i.
In the right pane, double-click the Cluster service.
j.
In the Startup type box, click Disabled, and then click OK.
k.
Close the Computer Management tool.
14. On Server B, stop the cluster service.
15. Shut down Server B.
16. Install a new ServeRAID adapter in Server B.
17. Follow the instructions in “Configuring a controller for clustering” on page 152 for
the new shared controller on the ServeRAID adapter, then return to this step.
18. Restart Server B.
19. On Server B, complete the following steps:
a. Using the ServeRAID Manager program, scan for new or removed ready
drives on all ServeRAID controllers.
b.
Run the IPSHAHTO.EXE program to move the newly defined logical drive to
Server B, by typing the following instruction at the command-line prompt:
E:\windows\win2k_xp\scsi\cluster\support\ipshahto.exe
c.
Using the Windows 2000 Disk Administrator Snap-in Computer Management
program, assign the same drive letters that you assigned to the new drives on
Server A.
Note: Use the disk volume label as a guide to make sure you assign the
same drive letters on Server B as you assigned on Server A.
20. On Server B, complete the following steps:
a. Click Start, highlight Programs, highlight Administrative Tools, and then
click Computer Management.
b.
In the left pane, click Device Manager.
c.
From the View menu, click Show Hidden Devices.
d. In the right pane, under Non-Plug and Play Drivers, double-click Cluster
Disk.
e. Click the Driver tab.
f.
In the Type box, click System, and then click OK.
g. In the left pane, click the plus sign (+) next to Services and Applications to
expand the branch.
h. Under Services and Applications, click Services.
i.
In the right pane, double-click the Cluster service.
j.
In the Startup type box, click Automatic, and then click OK.
k.
Close the Computer Management tool.
21. Restart Server B.
182
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software on Windows Server 2003
Important:
Before beginning the procedure, consider the following requirements:
•
Ensure that you use the IBM ServeRAID Support for Windows 2003 Server diskette
during the installation of Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition.
•
To create a ServeRAID cluster, you must install the Windows Server 2003 operating
system on an NTFS partition, and any shared cluster disks must be formatted as NTFS.
•
To install the ServeRAID device driver, see “Installing device drivers after installing
Windows Server 2003” in the IBM ServeRAID Device Driver Installation Instructions on
the IBM ServeRAID Support CD.
•
For more information about configuring the ServeRAID controller for clustering, refer to
Chapter 16, Configuring a Controller for Clustering.
Installing the ServeRAID Manager program
Note: To run ServeRAID Manager as an installed program, you must install both the
ServeRAID device driver and the applicable device driver for your server video
controller.
Before installing MSCS, you must install the ServeRAID Manager program:
1. If the server is not running, turn on the server.
2. Log on to Windows Server 2003.
3. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Applications CD into the CD-ROM drive of Server A.
The ServeRAID Manager Setup program starts.
4. Click Next.
5. Click Yes to accept the Software License Agreement.
6. When prompted to install Windows Service, click Yes; then, click Next.
7. Select the Destination Folder; then, click Next.
8. After setup completes copying the files, click Finish.
9. Repeat steps 1 through 8 to install the ServeRAID Manager program on server B.
Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server
To install the Microsoft Cluster Server, complete the following steps:
1. Shutdown Server B.
2. On Server A, use the ServeRAID Manager program to scan for new drives on all
ServeRAID controllers.
3. On Server A, run the IPSHAHTO.EXE utility program from the IBM ServeRAID
Support CD. At a Windows Server 2003 command line, enter the following
command:
e:\win2003\cluster\support\ipshahto.exe
where e is the CD-ROM drive.
The utility makes all shared logical drives available for access by Server A.
4. Using the right-mouse button, click My Computer on the desktop; then, click
Manage. In the left pane of the Computer Management window, double-click the
Storage icon; then, click Disk Management to launch Windows Server 2003 Disk
Management Snap-in Computer Management program.
Chapter 17. Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software
183
Note: The Disk Signature and Upgrade wizard window should not open.
5. Format all ServeRAID shared logical drives to NTFS (NT File System), assign
volume labels, and specify drive letters for each.
Notes:
a. Before creating the ServeRAID logical cluster resource, assign a permanent
(sticky) drive letter to the shared logical drive on both servers. The two servers
must have the same drive letters on each shared drive. If you do not assign
permanent drive letters, Windows Server 2003 might assign different drive
letters on each server. Assigning a permanent drive letter ensures that
Windows Server 2003 assigns the same drive letter to the partition on both
servers.
b.
IBM recommends that you set the volume label to reflect the drive letter you
assigned to the drive, such as DRIVE E.
c.
If you want to use the disk in a cluster, create only one partition on the disk;
make the partition the full size of the disk and format the partition to NTFS.
d. Verify that all shared logical drives are marked Basic Disk. If they are marked
Dynamic Disk, change them to Basic Disk by completing the following steps:
1) Right-click the Disk icon at the bottom of the Disk Management window
(see Figure 46: Changing a Shared Logical Disk to a Basic Disk in the
section Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server Software on Windows
2000.
2) Click Revert to Basic Disk.
6. Reboot Server A.
7. Ensure that the newly formatted logical drives are seen correctly through the
Windows Server 2003 Disk Management utility.
8. Shut down Server A.
9. Boot Server B to Windows Server 2003.
10. On Server B, use the ServeRAID Manager program to scan for new drives on all
ServeRAID controllers.
11. Run the IPSHAHTO.EXE utility again to make all shared logical drives available
for access by Server B.
Note: All logical drives should be displayed as okay. Otherwise, there was a
problem bringing drives over from the other server. To diagnose the
problem, use the log files or the ServeRAID Manager to determine if the
drives are critical or offline.
12. Using the Windows Server 2003 Disk Management Snap-in Computer
Management program, assign the same drive letters that you assigned to each
shared ServeRAID logical drive on Server A.
Notes:
a. Use the disk volume label as a guide to make sure you assign the same drive
letters on Server B as assigned on Server A.
b.
You might need to press the F5 key multiple times to update the displayed
information. Wait until all logical drive letters appear before attempting to
change the property of any drives.
13. Reboot Server B.
14. Ensure that the newly formatted shared ServeRAID logical drives are seen
correctly through the Windows Server 2003 Disk Management utility.
15. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive of Server B.
16. At a Windows Server 2003 command line, enter the following command:
184
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
e:\win2003\cluster\setup.exe.
where e is the CD-ROM drive.
The SETUP.EXE program starts.
17. When prompted, select Create a new cluster. This launches Windows Create
Cluster Wizard.
Note: To configure the Microsoft Cluster Server, follow the instructions in the
Microsoft Cluster Server documentation.
18. After you install and configure the cluster, the IBM ServeRAID Cluster
Configuration wizard opens and applies ServeRAID-specific configurations to the
cluster. When prompted (only on the first server), select a shared ServeRAID
logical drive on which to set the quorum resource.
Note: Set the quorum resources on a RAID level-1 logical drive. Do not set the
quorum resources on a RAID level-5, level-5E, or level-5EE logical drive.
19. Boot Server A to Windows Server 2003.
20. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive of Server A.
21. At a Windows Server 2003 command line, enter the following command:
e:\win2003\cluster\setup.exe
where e is the CD-ROM drive.
22. The SETUP.EXE program. When prompted, select the Join an existing cluster
option. This launches the Microsoft “Add Nodes to Cluster” wizard.
Note: To configure the Microsoft Cluster Server, follow the instructions in the
Microsoft Cluster Server documentation. After you install and configure
thecluster, the IBM ServeRAID Cluster Configuration wizard opens and
applies ServeRAID-specific configurations to the cluster.
23. Complete the wizard to add the node to the cluster.
24. The cluster installation is now complete, and the cluster is ready to use.
Important:
Refer to Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 258750, “Recommended Private ‘Heartbeat’
Configuration on a Cluster Server.”
Chapter 17. Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software
185
Creating additional ServeRAID disk resources on a Windows
Server 2003 cluster
You can use a ServeRAID logical disk that has not already been designated as a
cluster resource, or you can create a new array and logical disk on Server A, using the
ServeRAID Manager program.
For more information about creating new arrays and logical drives, see Chapter
15. “Configuring ServeRAID controllers for clustering” on page 151.
Note: Be sure to assign a unique shared merge-group number to the new shared
logical drive.
Important:
Before creating the ServeRAID logical cluster resource, you must assign a permanent (sticky)
drive letter to the shared logical drive on both servers. The two servers must have the same
drive letters on each shared drive. If you do not assign permanent drive letters, Windows
Server 2003 might assign different drive letters on each server. Assigning a permanent drive
letter ensures that Windows Server 2003 assigns the same drive letter to the partition on both
servers.
Complete the following steps to create additional ServeRAID disk resources:
1. On Server A, do the following:
a. Using the right-mouse button, click My Computer on the desktop; then, click
Manage. In the left pane of the Computer Management window, double-click
the Storage icon; then, click Disk Management to launch the Windows
Server 2003 Disk Management Snap-in Computer Management program.
b.
Right-click Disk Management -> Rescan Disks.
c.
On each of the new disks, complete the following tasks:
Note: Press Cancel to ignore the Disk Signature Not Found error message.
Refer to Microsoft Knowledge Base article #293289.
2. Make sure that all shared logical drives are the type Basic Disk. If they are marked
Dynamic Disk, change them to Basic Disk by doing the following:
a. Right-click the Disk icon at the bottom of the Disk Management window.
b.
Click Revert to Basic Disk.
3. Create one partition on the disk (the full size of the disk), assign a drive letter, and
format the partition to NTFS.
Note: To help recognize the drive on the cluster partner server, assign a
descriptive volume label that includes the drive letter.
4. Reboot Server A.
5. On Server B, do the following:
a. Use the ServeRAID Manager program to scan for new drives on all
ServeRAID controllers.
b.
To move the newly defined logical drive to Server B, start the IPSHAHTO.EXE
program by typing:
%systemroot%\cluster\ipshahto.exe
where %systemroot% is expanded by the operating system to the root
directory of the operating system on Server B.
186
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
c.
Using the Windows Server 2003 Disk Management Snap-in Computer
Management program, assign the same drive letters that you assigned to the
new drives on Server A.
Note: Use the disk volume label as a guide to make sure you assign the
same drive letters on Server B as you assigned on Server A.
d. To create a new ServeRAID disk resource and group for each newly defined
logical drive on Server B, start the MSCSCFG.EXE program by typing:
%systemroot%\cluster\mscscfg.exe
where %systemroot% is expanded by the operating system to the root
directory of the operating system on Server B.
Deleting and Recreating a ServeRAID logical drive resource
This section describes how to delete and recreate a ServeRAID logical drive resource
without deleting a ServeRAID logical drive.
1. To delete the resource, run the Microsoft Cluster Administration program from the
cluster server that currently owns the ServeRAID resource or resource group.
Notes:
a. The cluster service must be running on both servers.
b.
You can also run the Microsoft Cluster Administration program from a remote
administration system.
2. Use the normal MSCS procedure for deleting a resource or a group. For
instructions, see the documentation that is included with the MSCS package.
3. After deleting the ServeRAID logical drive resource, delete the corresponding
ServeRAID logical drive from both nodes using ServeRAID Manager.
4. shut down and restart both cluster nodes.
IMPORTANT!You must first reboot the cluster node that owns the resources and
then reboot the other node.
Note: Restarting one cluster server will not shut down the entire cluster.
5. To create the new ServeRAID logical drive, see “Creating additional ServeRAID
disk resources on a Windows Server 2003 cluster” on page 186.
6. To create the new ServeRAID disk resource and group for the ServeRAID logical
drive, start the MSCSCFG.EXE program by typing:
%systemroot%\cluster\mscscfg.exe
where %systemroot% is expanded by the operating system to the root directory of
the operating system on Server B.
Upgrading the IBM ServeRAID cluster solution from Microsoft Windows
2000 to Windows Server 2003
Notes:
•
Before upgrading from Windows 2000, make sure you have updated Windows
2000 with the latest Service Pack on both Server A and Server B.
•
Evaluate all OEM drivers and applications installed on your Windows 2000 server
and insure that the software can gracefully handle an upgrade to Windows Server
2003.
•
Refer to Microsoft Knowledge Base article 812877 and verify that the Cluster
Service Account is a member of the Local Administrators Group on both cluster
nodes.
Chapter 17. Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software
187
Complete the following steps to upgrade from Windows 2000 with Service Pack 4 (or
later) to Windows Server 2003.
1. On the server that you want to upgrade, start Cluster Administer by clicking Start >
Programs > Administrative Tools > Cluster Administrator.
2. Move all cluster resources and groups to the other cluster node (that is, the server
that is not running the Cluster Administrator program).
3. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive; then, enter the
following command:
e:\winsrv\cluster\setup.exe
where e is the CD-ROM drive.
4. When prompted:
A previous installation of IBM ServeRAID NT Cluster Solution has been found. Do you want to
upgrade?
click Yes.
5. When prompted:
You are currently running Windows 2000. Is this upgrade to IBM ServeRAID NT Cluster
Solution being done as procedure to upgrade cluster to run Windows Server 2003?
click Yes.
6. The IBM ServeRAID Windows NT Solution Setup program copies the necessary
Windows 2003 files; then, it prompts you to upgrade the server to Windows Server
2003.
Note: After you complete this step, you can no longer use this server as a
Windows cluster node.
7. Run the Windows Server 2003 Setup program to upgrade this node to Windows
2003. After successfully upgrading the server, it joins the cluster.
Note: You must manually install the ServeRAID device driver for Windows Server
2003. For additional information about installing ServeRAID device drivers,
see IBM ServeRAID Device Driver Installation Instructions (DEVDRV.PDF)
on the IBM ServeRAID Support CD.
8. After the server has successfully been upgraded and has rejoined the cluster,
repeat Step 1 through Step 7 for the other server in the cluster.
Un-configuring Cluster Service on a Windows Server 2003
ServeRAID cluster
The files for the cluster service are installed, by default, on computers that run
Windows Server 2003. You cannot remove the cluster service, but you can rest the
service to an un-configured state by doing the following on the two cluster nodes:
1. Start the Cluster Administer by clicking Start -> Programs -> Administrative
Tools -> Cluster Administrator.
2. Right-click this computer’s name in the left pane, and then click Stop the Cluster
Service.
3. If the cluster presently has two nodes, then right-click this computer’s name in the
left pane, and then click Evict Node.
4. Close Cluster Administrator program window.
5. Click Start -> Settings > Control Panel. The Control Panel window opens.
6. Double-click Add/Remove Programs. The Add/Remove Programs window
opens.
188
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
7. Select IBM ServeRAID NT Cluster Solution from the list of installed
components. To uninstall the IBM ServeRAID Windows NT Cluster Solution, click
Change/Remove.
After the cluster is unconfigured on Windows Server 2003, you might not be able to
access the shared ServeRAID logical drives by the two nodes of the cluster. If this
occurs, do one of the following:
•
Delete the logical drives and restart the server.
•
Set the logical drives to non-shared by changing the merge-group numbers. Use
the ServeRAID Manager program in startable-CD mode to make this change.
Note: If you use the installed version of the ServeRAID Manager program to delete
and recreate the logical drives that have the same merge-group number, you
will not be able to access the logical drives. You must delete the logical drives,
restart the server, and re-create the logical drives. Doing so returns the cluster
to its original unconfigured state. You can re-add it later to the same, or
different, cluster.
Chapter 17. Installing the Microsoft Cluster Server software
189
190
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Part 4. Maintenance and troubleshooting
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
191
192
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 18. Obtaining ServeRAID updates
IBM periodically makes updated versions of the ServeRAID software available from
the IBM Support page on the World Wide Web.
Note: If you download ServeRAID software, you must download and install all
ServeRAID software at the same time. This will ensure that all levels of the
software are compatible. The ServeRAID software includes:
•
•
•
•
BIOS and firmware code
Device drivers
ServeRAID Manager program
Command-line programs
If you do not have access to the World Wide Web, contact your place of
purchase, your IBM reseller, or your IBM marketing representative for
replacement CDs.
Downloadable files from the World Wide Web
You can download files for the IBM ServeRAID products from the IBM Support Web
site.
Complete the following steps to locate files:
1. Go to http://www.ibm.com/pc/support/.
2. In the Search field at the top of the page, type ServeRAID; then, press Enter.
Updating the ServeRAID BIOS, firmware, and software code for
clustering
Use the following CD and diskettes:
•
IBM ServeRAID Support CD
•
•
IBM ServeRAID Applications CD
The appropriate IBM ServeRAID Support diskette for your Windows operating
system
The IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution for Windows NT, Windows 2000 , and
Windows 2003 diskette
•
Ensure that the ServeRAID controllers have the latest IBM ServeRAID software
installed.
Ensure that you are using a version of the ServeRAID software that has been certified
by Microsoft for Windows 2003, Windows 2000, and Windows NT 4.0 compatibility, as
noted on the IBM Support Web site.
Note: If you are using Windows 2000, check the Windows 2000 Hardware
Compatibility List (HCL) included on the Windows 2000 Advanced Server CD
or the IBM ServerProven® List on the IBM Support Web site to determine if
your server devices are supported by the Windows 2000 operating system. If
not, contact the device manufacturer to receive a device driver for Windows
2000.
For additional details about clustering and updating the code for clustering, go to the
Web site listed in “Downloadable files from the World Wide Web”, and follow the
instructions that are provided on this site.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
193
194
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 19. Upgrading a ServeRAID controller
This section contains instructions for upgrading a ServeRAID controller. The following
table displays possible upgrade scenarios.
Existing
controller
Upgrade to
ServeRAID-II
Upgrade to
ServeRAID-3
Upgrade to
Upgrade to
ServeRAID-4 ServeRAID-5i
Upgrade to
Upgrade to
ServeRAID-6M ServeRAID-6i
ServeRAID-II
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
ServeRAID-3
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
ServeRAID-4
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
ServeRAID-5i
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
ServeRAID-6M
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
ServeRAID-6i
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
ServeRAID-7k
No
No
No
No
No
No
ServeRAID-7t
No
No
No
No
No
No
Backward compatibility is not supported. In addition, you must usually upgrade to a
controller with the same or greater number of channels; upgrading to a controller with
fewer number of channels is possible only if the new controller contains as many or
more channels than those actually used on the original controller.
Note: You cannot upgrade a ServeRAID SCSI controller (series II, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7) to a
ServeRAID SATA controller (ServeRAID-7t).
You must select a ServeRAID controller that meets the conditions outlined above.
After updating the device driver, BIOS and firmware code, and utility programs, you
can replace the older controller with the new controller and copy the configuration
from the physical drives.
Notes:
1. When upgrading an existing system, you must update the device driver before
flashing the controller with the new BIOS and firmware code.
2. This procedure assumes that you are replacing an existing ServeRAID controller
in a fully functioning system.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
195
Updating device drivers, BIOS and firmware code, and utility programs
Complete the following steps to upgrade the device driver, BIOS and firmware code,
and utility programs:
1. Install the device driver for the new ServeRAID controller. For more information,
see the IBM ServeRAID Device Driver Installation Instructions (DEVDRV.PDF) on
the IBM ServeRAID Support CD.
Note: If the old controller is running the Microsoft Windows operating system and
you are replacing the controller with a different ServeRAID model, you
must insert the new controller into an open ServeRAID-compatible PCI slot
before you install the device driver. After you install the device driver for
the new controller, power-down the server and remove the new controller
from the PCI slot; complete steps 2–5 below; then, follow the instructions
in “Replacing the old controller” on page 196 to complete the upgrade. If
you see messages from the BIOS or operating system during the
procedure, disregard the messages and continue until the installation is
complete.
2. Update the BIOS and firmware code for your existing ServeRAID controller, using
the IBM ServeRAID Support CD that came with the new controller. For more
information, see “Updating BIOS and firmware code” on page 49.
3. If the IPSSEND command-line program is installed on the server, upgrade to the
latest version. For more information, see “Installing the IPSSEND command-line
program” on page 93.
4. Upgrade or install the ServeRAID Manager program. For more information, see
“Installing the ServeRAID Manager program” on page 133.
5. Ensure that the server is functioning properly before continuing with “Replacing
the old controller”.
Replacing the old controller
Complete the following steps to replace the old controller:
1. Shut down the server.
2. Make note of which SCSI cables were attached to specific channels.
3. Remove any cables from the old controller; remove the controller.
4. (Upgrading from ServeRAID-5i to ServeRAID-6i/6i+ Only) When you remove the
ServeRAID-5i controller from the PCI slot the BIOS disables the on-board SCSI
controller. You must re-enable the on-board SCSI controller before you insert the
ServeRAID-6i/6i+ controller into the slot. Follow these steps:
a. Restart the server.
b.
Press F1 to start the BIOS configuration program.
c.
In the BIOS configuration program, enable the on-board SCSI controller.
(Refer to your BIOS documentation for details on this procedure.)
d. Save the changes and exit.
e. Shut down the server.
5. Insert the new controller into a PCI slot. If possible, use the PCI slot in which the
old controller was inserted.
6. Attach the SCSI cables to the new controller.
Note: If the new controller has the same number of channels as the old
controller, attach storage devices to the same channels used before.
196
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
7. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the server CD-ROM drive, and turn on
the server. The IBM ServeRAID ROM Update wizard automatically starts.
If necessary, update the BIOS and firmware code for the new controller. Leave
the IBM ServeRAID Support CD in the CD-ROM drive; shut down and restart the
server.
8. After the ServeRAID Manager program starts, click the new controller in the left
pane.
9. Click Actions ➔ Restore to factory-default settings.
Note: Copy back is disabled by default when you upgrade from a previous
release of the ServeRAID software. For more information about copy back,
refer to “Restoring a logical drive configuration” on page 213.
10. Click Actions ➔ Copy configuration from drives.
11. Shut down the server, and remove the IBM ServeRAID Support CD from the
CD-ROM drive.
12. Restart the server.
Chapter 19. Upgrading a ServeRAID controller
197
198
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 20. Solving ServeRAID problems
This section describes the ServeRAID text and numeric messages that might be
displayed during startup. This section also includes some basic information about
rebuilding a defunct drive.
IBM ServeRAID Support CD warning message while starting
If you start a server with the IBM ServeRAID Support CD in the CD-ROM drive, the
following warning message might be displayed:
You passed an undefined mode number.
Press <RETURN> to see video modes available,
<SPACE> to continue or wait 30 secs
Press the Spacebar to continue starting the IBM ServeRAID Support CD. The
following message appears, and the CD starts:
Uncompressing Linux... Ok, booting the kernel.
ServeRAID controller messages
This section lists the ServeRAID messages that might appear during system startup.
The ServeRAID controllers provide a device event log that collects statistics on the
number and types of events that occur on a selected physical drive. After correcting a
problem with the disk array, clear the log so that you can identify any subsequent
errors quickly. For information about clearing the event log, see “eraseevent” in
“Problem-isolation and debug functions” on page 109.
All physical drives contain unique identifiers, such as the drive serial number and
manufacturer. During configuration, the ServeRAID controller stores this information.
The following table lists the messages associated with the ServeRAID subsystem
listed in alphabetical order.
Note: In the the following table, information about the BIOS utility applies to
ServeRAID SCSI controllers only. For information about using the BIOS
configuration program for the ServeRAID-7t SATA controller, refer to Chapter
8, “Using the ARC utility (Serial ATA controllers only)” on page 85.
Message
Explanation
Action
A new drive
was installed.
When the ServeRAID controller
detects a new drive that is not part of
the current configuration, the following
message appears:
This is an information message. No action is required.
x new Ready drives found
where x is the number of ready drives
found.
Auto rearrange.
Auto rearrange is enabled or disabled.
This is an information message. No action is required.
Battery-backup
cache not
responding.
BIOS code detected a bad or failed
battery-backup cache.
Press F9 to remove the battery-backup cache from the
configuration, or press F10 to exit without change.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
199
Message
Explanation
Action
Battery-backup
cache
replacement.
The ServeRAID controller detects that
the battery-backup cache is defective.
If the battery-backup cache must be replaced, contact your
IBM service representative.
Press F8 if you replaced the battery-backup cache, or press
F10 if you have not replaced the battery-backup cache.
Configured
drives are
missing.
When the ServeRAID controller
detects that a previously configured
drive is missing, the following message
appears:
Press one of the following keys:
F2
Detailed description. Press this key for a detailed
description of the problem.
F4
Retry. Press this key after correcting a problem.
For example, press F4 after you turn on the
external storage enclosure that contains the
physical drive.
F5
Change the configuration and set the drives to
defunct. Press this key to accept the new state that
the ServeRAID controller will assign to the drive.
For example, the ServeRAID controller will assign
the drive a state of defunct or empty.
x Online drive(s) not responding
or found at new location(s)
where x is the number of drives not
responding.
After you press F2, a more detailed
message appears:
You also can press F5 when you must remove a
drive. RAID level-1 and RAID level-5 logical drives
are present, and performance in a degraded mode
is acceptable. The ServeRAID controller will
assign the drive a state of defunct, but the server
can complete startup. However, the array will
remain in the critical state and the potential for
data loss will exist until you replace and rebuild the
defunct drive. To prevent the loss of data, replace
and rebuild the defunct drive in a timely manner.
Online Drive on Channel x SCSI
ID y is not responding.
where x is the channel ID and y is the
SCSI ID.
Note: A physical drive in the defunct state does
not necessarily mean that you need to
replace the drive. Before you replace the
drive, ensure that:
1.
All cables are connected properly to
the backplane and to the physical
drive. Also, ensure that all cables
inside the server are connected
properly.
2.
The hot-swap drive trays are seated
properly in the drive bay.
3.
If multiple drives fail in separate
arrays (one physical drive per array),
replace each of the defunct physical
drives. If multiple physical drives fail at
the same time within the same array,
contact your IBM service
representative. See “Rebuilding a
defunct drive” on page 211 for more
information.
After you complete these steps, if the physical
drive does not function properly, replace the drive.
F10
200
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Continue starting without changing the
configuration. Press this key to continue without
change to the configuration.
Message
Explanation
Action
Configured
drives are not in
the configured
location.
When the ServeRAID controller
detects that a previously configured
drive is present but the drive is in a
new location, the following message
appears:
Press one of the following keys:
F2
Detailed description. Press this key for a detailed
description of the problem.
F4
Retry. Press this key after correcting a problem.
For example, press F4 after you move the physical
drive to its previously assigned location.
F5
Change the configuration and set the drive to
defunct. Press this key to accept the new state that
the ServeRAID controller will assign to the drive.
For example, the ServeRAID controller will assign
the drive a state of defunct or empty.
x Online drive has been rearranged
where x is the number of drives that
have been rearranged.
Note: A physical drive in the defunct state does
not necessarily mean that you need to
replace the drive. Before you replace the
drive, ensure that:
After pressing F2, a more detailed
message appears:
Online Drive on Channel w SCSI
ID x moved to Channel y SCSI
ID z
where w and y are the channel
numbers, and x and z are the SCSI
IDs.
1.
All cables are connected properly to
the backplane and to the physical
drive. Also, ensure that all cables
inside the server are connected
properly.
2.
The hot-swap drive trays are seated
properly in the drive bay.
3.
If multiple drives fail in separate
arrays (one physical drive per array),
replace each of the defunct physical
drives. If multiple physical drives fail at
the same time within the same array,
contact your IBM service
representative. See “Rebuilding a
defunct drive” on page 211 for more
information.
After you complete these steps, if the physical
drive does not function properly, replace the drive.
F6
Change the configuration and accept the
rearrangement. Press this key to change the
configuration to match the current drive location.
You might remove the hot-swap drives from the
server for security or maintenance reasons. If you
replace the drives but install them in different drive
bays, you can press F6 to accept the new
locations, and the ServeRAID controller will update
the configuration.
F10
Controller is not
responding to
commands. No
logical drives
are installed.
The ServeRAID controller is not
operational.
Error: Cannot
The ServeRAID controller was unable
disable this
to prevent an extra copy of its BIOS
controller BIOS. code from being stored on the server.
This condition occurs when the server
contains multiple ServeRAID
controllers.
Continue startup without changing the
configuration. Press this key to continue without
change to the configuration.
Contact your IBM service representative.
Contact your IBM service representative.
Chapter 20. Solving ServeRAID problems
201
Message
Explanation
Action
Installation
stopped.
The server cannot access the
ServeRAID controller.
This is a follow-on message to a preceding message.
Follow the Action instructions for the preceding message to
resolve the problem.
New controller
installed in a
configured
server or drives
are imported.
When the ServeRAID controller
detects that the identifiers of the drives
do not match the controller
configuration information, the following
message appears:
Press one of the following keys:
F2
Detailed description. Press this key for a detailed
description of the problem.
F4
Retry. Press this key after correcting the problem.
For example, press F4 after you move the physical
drive to its previously assigned location, or after
you install the original physical drives back in the
server.
F5
Change the configuration and set the drive to
defunct. Press this key to accept the new state that
the ServeRAID controller will assign to the drive.
For example, the ServeRAID controller will assign
the drive a state of defunct or empty.
x Online drive(s) found with
incorrect configuration
where x is the number of drives found
with incorrect configuration.
After you press F2, a more detailed
message appears:
Configuration mismatch Channel
x with Host ID y
where x is the channel number and y is
the Host ID.
Note: A physical drive in the defunct state does
not necessarily mean that you need to
replace the drive. Before you replace the
drive, ensure that:
1.
All cables are connected properly to
the backplane or system board and to
the physical drive. Also, ensure that
all cables inside the server are
connected properly.
2.
The hot-swap drive trays are seated
properly in the drive bay.
3.
If multiple drives fail in separate
arrays (one physical drive per array),
replace each of the defunct physical
drives. If multiple physical drives fail at
the same time within the same array,
contact your IBM service
representative. See “Rebuilding a
defunct drive” on page 211 for more
information.
After you complete these steps, if the physical
drive does not function properly, replace the drive.
202
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Message
Explanation
New controller
installed in a
configured
server or drives
are imported
(Continued).
Action
F7
Import configuration information from drive. Press
this key to restart the server. Press this key to
import the configuration information from the drive
and to update the configuration information for the
ServeRAID controller. This choice is useful when
you replace the ServeRAID controller in an
existing ServeRAID subsystem.
You also might press F7 if you replace a whole set
of drives with drives that were configured in
another server with a ServeRAID controller.
Note: When you install drives in a server that
has no logical drives defined, the F7
choice will not appear. The ServeRAID
controller does not contain any logical
drives in its factory configuration.
Therefore, F7 will not appear. In this case,
complete the following steps:
1.
Recoverable
configuration
error.
Unrecoverable
configuration
error.
The configuration data stored in nonvolatile random-access memory
(NVRAM) does not match the
configuration data stored in the
electrically erasable programmable
read-only memory (EEPROM).
The configuration data stored in
NVRAM does not match the
configuration data stored in the
EEPROM.
Restart the server and press Ctrl+I to
start the Mini-Configuration program.
(See Chapter 7, “Using the
ServeRAID Mini-Configuration
program” on page 81 for more
information.)
2.
Select Advanced Functions.
3.
Select Copy the Configuration from
Drives to the Controller and follow
the instructions on the screen.
1.
Press Ctrl+I to access the ServeRAID MiniConfiguration menu. (See Chapter 7, “Using the
ServeRAID Mini-Configuration program” on page 81 for
more information.)
2.
Select Advanced Functions from the main menu.
3.
Select Copy the Configuration from Drives to the
Controller. (See “Using the advanced configuration
functions” on page 83 for more information.)
1.
Press Ctrl+I to access the ServeRAID MiniConfiguration menu. (See Chapter 7, “Using the
ServeRAID Mini-Configuration program” on page 81 for
more information.)
2.
Select Advanced Functions from the main menu.
Attention: Restoring to factory-default settings sets
all online drives in an array to ready. You must import
the configuration from the drives or diskette. Otherwise,
you must create a new array and logical drives. When
you create new logical drives, they are automatically
initialized. All data is lost and you must reinstall the
operating system and data.
3.
WARNING: n
logical drives
are critical; n
logical drives
are offline.
One or more physical drives have
failed.
Select Restore to the Factory-Default Settings. (See
“Using the advanced configuration functions” on page
83 for more information.)
Replace the defunct drives as soon as possible to prevent
data loss.
Chapter 20. Solving ServeRAID problems
203
Message
Explanation
Action
Your server has
an error due to
a Blocked
Logical Drive.
One or more logical drives are blocked.
A blocked logical drive cannot be
accessed. See “Logical-drive-state
descriptions” on page 47 and
“Rebuilding a defunct drive” on page
211 for more information.
Press F4 to unblock the logical drive, or press F5 to
continue without unblocking.
Unsupported
mix of disk and
tape.
A tape drive connected to the SCSI
controller channel is also used for disk
drives. This configuration is not
supported.
Remove the tape drive from the SCSI channel. Then, install
the tape drive on another channel.
ServeRAID startup (POST) messages
During power-on self-test (POST), the ServeRAID controller compares the stored
configuration information to the configuration that is actually present. If a discrepancy
exists, one or more status messages appear after POST is completed, but before the
operating system starts.
IBM ServeRAID BIOS
Copyright IBM Corp. 1995, 2001
BIOS Version: 4.10.05
Controller 1 Slot 4, Logical Drive=1, Firmware=4.00.20, Status=Fail
2 Drives(s) not responding or found at new location(s)
Press: F2 - Detailed information
F4 - Retry
F5 - Change the configuration and set drive(s) defunct
F10 - Continue booting without changing the configuration
When you press F2 for detailed information, the following register information appears
on the screen.
Detailed information
---------------------------------------------------------------------Online Drive on Channel 2 SCSI ID 0 is not responding
Online Drive on Channel 2 SCSI ID 1 is not responding
---------------------------------------------------------------------Controller Status Codes: ISPR = EF10 BCS = 07 ECS = 08
Press PgUp = Page Up
PgDn = Page Down
Esc = Exit panel
The controller status codes include the interrupt status port register (ISPR) code, the
basic configuration status (BCS) register code, and the extended configuration status
(ECS) register code.
If no errors occur during POST, the following register information is displayed: ISPR =
EF10, BCS = 0F or 09, and ECS = 00
204
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
If an error occurs, see “ISPR register codes” for the ISPR error codes and “BCS and
ECS register codes” on page 206.
Notes:
1. When the ServeRAID controller requires your input, a list of function keys will
appear below the message.
2. Where the Action information tells you to start the IBM ServeRAID configuration
program, insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive; then,
restart the server. The Action column also provides general information about the
message.
3. Where sid or ch appears in these messages, sid is the SCSI ID for the device,
and ch is the channel to which the device is attached.
4. Where m or n appears in these messages, a number will appear in the actual
message.
ISPR register codes
Code
Explanation
Action
1xxx to
7xxx
The POST detected an internal error.
Contact your IBM service representative.
2601 to
260B
The POST detected an error with the ServeRAID
subsystem.
Contact your IBM service representative.
2610
The POST detected an error with the ServeRAID
controller hardware.
Contact your IBM service representative.
2620
The POST detected that a ServeRAID configuration
or hard disk error occurred.
Start the IBM ServeRAID Support CD and view the
existing device and configuration information for
your ServeRAID subsystem. If you cannot locate
and correct the configuration problem or the failing
device, or if the problem persists, contact your IBM
service representative.
3E20H
The POST detected that the ServeRAID-5i controller
is in the wrong PCI expansion slot.
Install the ServeRAID-5i controller in the correct PCI
expansion slot. See the documentation that came
with your server for more information.
3E21H
The POST detected that the ServeRAID-5i controller
or ServeRAID-6i controller did not find the integrated
SCSI controller.
Make sure the ServeRAID-6i controller is in the
correct PCI expansion slot. See the documentation
that came with your server for more information.
Otherwise, contact your IBM service representative.
3E2xH
The POST detected an error with the integrated
SCSI controller: either the wrong controller was
found or some other SCSI controller error occurred.
Contact your IBM service representative.
8xxx to
Bxxx
The POST detected an error with the SCSI interface. Verify that the SCSI cables are correctly connected
and the SCSI termination is set properly for each
installed SCSI device.
If you cannot locate and correct the SCSI problem,
or if the problem persists, contact your IBM service
representative.
Chapter 20. Solving ServeRAID problems
205
BCS and ECS register codes
Notes:
1. When the ServeRAID controller requires your input, a list of function keys will be
displayed below the message.
2. Where the Action information tells you to start the IBM ServeRAID configuration
program, insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive; then,
restart the server. The Action column also provides general information about the
message.
BCS
ECS
Explanation
Action
Code
not in
table
Code
not in
table
The ServeRAID controller is not functioning
properly.
Contact your IBM service representative.
00
01
Invalid flash configuration.
00
02
Invalid NVRAM configuration.
Start the IBM ServeRAID Support CD and follow the
instructions that appear on the screen.
00
03
Invalid flash and NVRAM configuration.
If no instructions appear or if the problem persists,
contact your IBM service representative.
01
08
No configuration was found in drives, or the
online/rebuild drives are not responding.
To correct the problem:
1.
01
18
No configuration was found in drives, or the
online/rebuild and hot spare/standby hotspare drives are not responding.
If the controller is connected to an enclosure,
verify that the enclosure is on. If the enclosure
is off, turn on the power and press F4 to retry.
2.
No configuration was found in drives, or the
online/rebuild and ready/standby drives are
not responding.
Verify that all the physical drives are present. If
any drives are missing, replace the drives and
press F4 to retry.
3.
Verify that all the physical drives are connected
to the controller correctly. If any drives are
unconnected, connect the drives and press F4
to retry.
4.
If all the physical drives are present and
connected correctly, one or more of the drives
might be defective. Identify and replace the
defective drives; then, press F5 to accept the
changes.
If you have intentionally switched physical
drives that are connected to this controller,
press F7 to import the configuration from the
drives and account for the drive rearrangement.
01
28
01
38
No configuration was found in drives, or the
online/rebuild, hot spare/standby hot-spare,
and ready/standby drives are not responding.
01
48
No configuration was found in drives, or the
online/rebuild drives are not responding and
unidentified drives were found.
01
58
No configuration was found in drives, or the
online/rebuild and hot spare/standby hotspare drives are not responding and
unidentified drives were found.
5.
No configuration was found in drives, or the
online/rebuild and ready/standby drives are
not responding and unidentified drives were
found.
To exit without making changes, press F10.
01
01
206
68
78
No configuration was found in drives, or the
online/rebuild, hot spare/standby hot-spare,
and ready/standby drives are not responding
and unidentified drives were found.
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
BCS
ECS
Explanation
Action
03
88
A drive was imported from another server and
it has a valid configuration, and the
online/rebuild drives are not responding.
To correct the problem:
03
03
98
A8
1.
A drive was imported from another server and
it has a valid configuration, and the
online/rebuild and hot spare/standby hotspare drives are not responding.
A drive was imported from another server and
it has a valid configuration, and the
online/rebuild and ready/standby drives are
not responding.
To keep the previous configuration in the
controller, replace the physical drives that were
switched and press F4 to retry.
Attention: Completing step 2 might result in a
loss of the original configuration and data on
the drives.
2.
To accept the new configuration from the
physical drives, press F7.
3.
If all the physical drives are present and
connected correctly, one or more of the drives
might be defective. Identify and replace the
defective drives; then, press F5 to accept the
changes.
03
B8
A drive was imported from another server and
it has a valid configuration, and the
online/rebuild, hot spare/standby hot-spare,
and ready/standby drives are not responding.
03
C8
A drive was imported from another server and
it has a valid configuration, and the
online/rebuild drives are not responding and
unidentified drives were found.
03
D8
A drive was imported from another server and
it has a valid configuration, and the
online/rebuild and hot spare/standby hotspare drives are not responding and
unidentified drives were found.
03
E8
A drive was imported from another server and
it has a valid configuration, and the
online/rebuild and ready/standby drives are
not responding and unidentified drives were
found.
03
F8
A drive was imported from another server and
it has a valid configuration, and the
online/rebuild, hot spare/standby hot-spare,
and ready/standby drives are not responding
and unidentified drives were found.
07
00
The specified drive is not responding.
To correct the problem:
The specified drives are not responding.
1.
If the specified physical drive or drives are in an
external enclosure, verify that the enclosure is
turned on. If the enclosure is turned off, turn on
the power and press F4 to retry.
2.
Download and install the latest version of IBM
ServeRAID software. See Chapter 18,
“Obtaining ServeRAID updates” on page 193
for more information.
3.
Replace the failed physical drive or drives.
07
08
To exit without making changes, press F10.
Chapter 20. Solving ServeRAID problems
207
BCS
ECS
Explanation
Action
07
0C
Online/rebuild drives are not responding, and
a drive was found at the incorrect SCSI ID.
To correct the problem:
07
1C
Online/rebuild and hot spare/standby hotspare drives are not responding, and a drive
was found at the incorrect SCSI ID.
07
2C
Online/rebuild and ready/standby drives are
not responding, and a drive was found at the
incorrect SCSI ID.
07
3C
Online/rebuild, ready/standby, and hot
spare/standby hot-spare drives are not
responding, and a drive was found at the
incorrect SCSI ID.
07
07
4C
5C
Online/rebuild drives are not responding, and
a drive was found at the incorrect SCSI ID,
and unidentified drives were found.
Online/rebuild and hot spare/standby hotspare drives are not responding, a drive was
found at the incorrect SCSI ID, and
unidentified drives were found.
07
6C
Online/rebuild and ready/standby drives are
not responding, a drive was found at the
incorrect SCSI ID, and unidentified drives
were found.
07
7C
Online/rebuild, ready/standby, and hot
spare/standby hot-spare drives are not
responding, a drive was found at the incorrect
SCSI ID, and unidentified drives were found.
07
18
Online/rebuild and hot spare/standby hotspare drives are not responding.
07
28
Online/rebuild and ready/standby drives are
not responding.
07
38
Online/rebuild, ready/standby, and hot
spare/standby hot-spare drives are not
responding.
07
48
Online/rebuild drives are not responding, and
unidentified drives were found.
07
58
Online/rebuild and hot spare/standby hotspare drives are not responding, and
unidentified drives were found.
07
68
Online/rebuild and ready/standby drives are
not responding, and unidentified drives were
found.
07
78
Online/rebuild, ready/standby, and hot
spare/standby hot-spare drives are not
responding, and unidentified drives were
found.
09
00
No error occurred.
208
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
1.
To keep the previous configuration in the
controller, replace the physical drives and cable
connections that were switched or moved; then,
press F4 to retry.
Note:
Pressing F4 might not correct the
problem. If you do not return the drives
and cables to the previous
configuration, the message might
return.
2.
If all the physical drives are present and
connected correctly, one or more of the drives
might be defective. Identify and replace the
defective drives; then, press F5 to accept the
changes.
3.
To modify the configuration and accept the
rearrangement of the physical drives, press F6.
To exit without making changes, press F10.
To correct the problem:
1.
To keep the previous configuration in the
controller, replace the physical drives and cable
connections that were switched or moved; then,
press F4 to retry.
2.
If all the physical drives are present and
connected correctly, one or more of the drives
might be defective. Identify and replace the
defective drives; then, press F5 to accept the
changes.
To exit without making changes, press F10.
No action is required. Press F10 to exit without
making any changes.
BCS
ECS
Explanation
Action
09
10
Hot spare/standby hot-spare drives are not
responding.
To correct the problem:
09
20
Ready/standby drives are not responding.
09
30
Hot spare/standby hot-spare and
ready/standby drives are not responding.
1.
To keep the previous configuration in the
controller, replace the physical drives and cable
connections that were switched or moved; then,
press F4 to retry.
2.
If all the physical drives are present and
connected correctly, one or more of the drives
might be defective. Identify and replace the
defective drives; then, press F5 to accept the
changes.
To exit without making changes, press F10.
0F
00
No error occurred.
No action is required. Press F10 to exit without
making any changes.
0F
10
Hot spare/standby hot-spare drives are not
responding.
To correct the problem:
0F
20
Ready/standby drives are not responding.
0F
30
Hot spare/standby hot-spare and
ready/standby drives are not responding.
1.
To keep the previous configuration in the
controller, replace the physical drives and cable
connections that were switched or moved; then,
press F4 to retry.
2.
If all the physical drives are present and
connected correctly, one or more of the drives
might be defective. Identify and replace the
defective drives; then, press F5 to accept the
changes.
To exit without making changes, press F10.
1x
xx
(where
x is any
value)
(where
x is any
value)
Unsupported mix of disk and tape.
A tape drive connected to the SCSI controller
channel is also used for disk drives. This
configuration is not supported.
To correct the problem, remove the tape drive from
the SCSI channel. Then, install the tape drive on
another channel.
Recovering from problems starting the ServeRAID Manager
Problem
Explanation
Action
The ServeRAID Manager program
hangs on the splash screen.
You might be using an old
version of the ServeRAID
device driver.
Upgrade the ServeRAID device driver to the
latest version. For more information, see the
IBM ServeRAID Device Driver Installation
Instructions (DEVDRV.PDF) on the IBM
ServeRAID Support CD in the BOOKS
directory.
When starting the ServeRAID Manager
in NetWare, the following error
message is displayed:
The ServeRAID Manager
program was not installed
to the root directory of the
SYS volume.
Reinstall the ServeRAID Manager. If the
installation is completed properly, there will be
a directory called RAIDMAN under the root
directory of the SYS volume.
Unable to find load file RAIDMAN
Chapter 20. Solving ServeRAID problems
209
Problem
Explanation
Action
When starting the ServeRAID Manager
in NetWare, the following error
message is displayed:
You are using an old
version of the Java Virtual
Machine (JVM) for Novell
NetWare.
Download and install the latest JVM from the
Novell Web site:
http://developer.novell.com/ndk/download.htm
-autounload is an invalid parameter
When starting the ServeRAID Manager
in NetWare, the following error
message is displayed:
The Java Virtual Machine
Download and install the latest JVM from the
(JVM) for Novell NetWare is Novell Web site:
not installed on your server.
http://developer.novell.com/ndk/download.htm
ERROR: Unable to find Java
The ServeRAID Manager program fails
to start, and the following error
message is displayed:
Your TCP/IP hosts file is
not configured for the local
server hostname.
Configure your TCP/IP hosts file for the local
server hostname.
1.
For Linux or UNIX systems, open the
/etc/hosts file. For Windows systems, open
the c:\winnt\system32\drivers\etc\hosts
file. For Netware systems, open the
SYS:etc\hosts file. For OS\2 systems,
open the c:\MPTN\etc\hosts file.
2.
If TCP/IP networking is configured,
complete the following steps:
Can't find class
com.ibm.sysmgt.raidmgr.mgtGUI.
Launch
a.
If the hostname of the server is
identified on the line starting with
127.0.0.1, remove the hostname from
this line.
b.
On a new line, type the IP address of
the server.
c.
Press the Tab key to the second
column and type the fully qualified
hostname.
d.
Press the Tab key to the third column
and type the nickname for the server.
Note:
The following is an example of
a completed line:
1.1.1.1 matrix.localdomain
matrix
where 1.1.1.1 is the IP
address of the server and
matrix is the hostname of the
server.
3.
If TCP/IP networking is not configured,
type the server name in the third column of
the line that starts with 127.0.0.1.
Note:
The following is an example of a
completed line:
127.0.0.1 localhost matrix
where matrix is the server name.
4.
210
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Restart the server for these changes to
take effect.
Recovering from an incomplete format of a physical drive
During formatting of a physical drive, if the format process is stopped by a system
reset, system shutdown, power outage, or by some other means, the physical drive
becomes inoperable.
Complete the following steps to enable the physical drive to communicate with the
ServeRAID controller again:
1. Note the channel of the ServeRAID controller to which the physical drive is
connected.
2. Note the SCSI ID of the physical drive.
3. Use the ipssend format function to restart the format of the physical drive. The
syntax is: ipssend format controller channel sid
where:
•
•
•
controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–16)
channel is the channel number for the device (1–4)
sid is the SCSI ID for the device (0–15)
After the format process is complete, the ServeRAID controller will be able to
recognize the drive again.
Rebuilding a defunct drive
A physical drive is marked defunct when there is a loss of communication between the
controller and the physical drive. This can be caused by any of the following
conditions:
•
An improperly connected cable, physical drive, or controller
•
Loss of power to a drive
•
An improperly assembled SCSI channel in an unsupported configuration
•
A defective cable, backplane, physical drive, or controller
•
Connecting unsupported SCSI devices (such as tape drives or CD-ROM drives)
to the same SCSI channel used for an array
In each case, after the communication problem is resolved, a rebuild operation is
required to reconstruct the data for the device in its disk array. The ServeRAID
controllers can reconstruct RAID level-1, level-1E, level-5, level-5E, level-5EE, level10, level-1E0, and level-50 logical drives. They cannot, however, reconstruct data
stored in RAID level-0 or level-00 logical drives because RAID level-0 and level-00 are
not redundant. If an array contains only RAID level-0 or level-00 logical drives, the
logical drives in the array are marked offline, and the logical drives contain damaged
data. You cannot rebuild the logical drives. You must correct the cause of the failure
or replace the physical drives; then, you must restore your data.
To prevent data-integrity problems, the ServeRAID controllers set the RAID level-0
logical drives in the affected array to blocked during the rebuild operation for RAID
level-1, level-1E, or level-5. After the rebuild operation is completed, you can unblock
Chapter 20. Solving ServeRAID problems
211
the RAID level-0 logical drives and access them again. Remember, however, that the
RAID level-0 logical drives contain damaged data.
Note: For logical drives in an IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution, note the following
information:
•
Shared logical drives can have only one logical drive for each array;
therefore, blocking a RAID level-0 logical drive during a rebuild operation
does not apply to shared logical drives.
•
Non-shared logical drives can have more than one logical drive for each
array; therefore, blocking a RAID level-0 logical drive during a rebuild
operation does apply to non-shared logical drives.
Recovering from defunct drives
If the defunct drives are not part of an array, contact your IBM service representative.
If a physical drive fails in an array or multiple physical drives fail in separate arrays
(one physical drive per array), complete the following steps:
1. Replace each defunct physical drive. The ServeRAID controller starts the rebuild
operation when it detects the removal and reinsertion of a drive that is part of an
array.
Note: (For a configuration that contains a hot-spare drive) If you replace a failed
physical drive, it is not necessary to position the new physical drive on the
same SCSI channel and SCSI ID as the original hot-spare drive. The
replacement physical drive is automatically incorporated into the
configuration as a hot-spare drive. Here is an example of how this works:
a. The original configuration consists of a RAID level-5 logical drive
composed of three physical drives. The physical drives are connected
to SCSI channel 1; they are assigned SCSI IDs 0, 1, and 2. SCSI ID 3
is a hot-spare drive.
b.
The physical drive at Channel 1, SCSI ID 2, fails; the logical drive
enters the critical state.
c.
The hot-spare drive at Channel 1, SCSI ID 3, is rebuilt into the array.
d. You remove the failed physical drive at Channel 1, SCSI ID 2, and
replace it with a new physical drive. The new physical drive at Channel
1, SCSI ID 2, is automatically assigned to be a hot-spare drive.
2. If a rebuild operation is in progress, wait until the rebuild is complete. Otherwise,
go to step 3.
Note: If you are replacing multiple defunct drives, you must wait for each rebuild
operation to complete before starting subsequent rebuild operations.
3. Verify the cables, physical drives, and controllers are installed properly.
4. Attempt to rebuild the defunct physical drive by performing a hot-swap rebuild.
See “Rebuilding a hot-swap drive” for instructions.
5. If the hot-swap rebuild fails, contact your IBM service representative.
Rebuilding a hot-swap drive
A hot-swap rebuild refers to a rebuild operation that is started by the ServeRAID
controller when it detects that a drive that is part of an array and in the defunct state
has been removed and reinserted on the SCSI cable or backplane. The reinsertion of
the physical drive, whether it is the same drive or a new drive, will trigger the
ServeRAID controller to start the rebuild operation. During the rebuild operation, the
drive being rebuilt is in the rebuild state, and the logical drive remains critical until the
rebuild operation has been successfully completed.
212
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
On IBM servers, when a hot-spare drive is available, the rebuild operation begins
automatically without the need to replace the failed drive. If more than one drive fails
within the same array, no rebuild takes place. If multiple drives fail in separate arrays
(one physical drive per array), the controller initiates a rebuild operation for the logical
drives within the array containing the first failed physical drive. This rebuild operation
is performed on the first hot-spare drive of sufficient size to become a valid member of
the array.
Complete the following steps to start a hot-swap rebuild:
1. Without removing the drive completely, gently remove the physical drive from the
server, using the handle of the hot-swap tray. If necessary, see the documentation
that comes with your server for information about removing a physical drive.
Attention
When power is removed from a hot-swap drive, the drive immediately parks the heads, locks
the actuator in the “landing zone,” and begins spinning down. However, the spinning down of
the disk might require up to 20 seconds after power is removed. Do not move the drive while
it is spinning down. Moving the drive while it is spinning down might damage the drive.
2. Wait 20 seconds to allow the physical drive to completely stop spinning.
3. If you are certain there is nothing wrong with the physical drive you removed,
gently reinstall the drive into the server. Make sure the drive is completely
installed in the backplane connector.
Otherwise, replace the physical drive with a new drive that is the same size (or
larger) and continue with the rebuild operation.
Notes:
a. If multiple drives fail in separate arrays (one physical drive per array), replace
each defunct physical drive. If multiple physical drives fail at the same time
within the same array, contact your IBM service representative.
b.
Although it is possible to rebuild a defunct physical drive to an online physical
drive that is defective, avoid doing so.
Restoring a logical drive configuration
If copy back is enabled on your system, the ServeRAID software restores a logical
drive to its original configuration after you replace a failed drive in an array. The copy
back operation restores the data to its previous location, before the logical drive was
rebuilt from its spare.
To enable or disable copy back, use the ServeRAID Manager or IPSSEND. By
default, copy back starts automatically when the ServeRAID controller detects that a
failed drive in an array is replaced.
Note: When you upgrade the ServeRAID software from a previous release, copy
back is disabled by default.
For more information, see the SeveRAID Manager online help; also see Chapter 9,
“Installing and using the IPSSEND command-line program” on page 93.
Chapter 20. Solving ServeRAID problems
213
Recovering from multiple physical drive failures (Windows only)
Important:
•
There is no guarantee that this procedure will recover data.
•
This procedure requires a ServeRAID-3, ServeRAID-4, ServeRAID-5, or ServeRAID-6
controller with BIOS and firmware at version 4.x or later installed prior to the physical
drive failures.
•
Repeat this procedure for each array that contains multiple physical drives marked
defunct.
The ServeRAID controller is designed to tolerate a single physical drive failure in an
array. Although there is no guarantee that intact data can be recovered after a multiple
physical drive failure in an array, the following procedure offers the possibility of a
successful recovery in the event that multiple physical drives are marked defunct
within the same array.
You will need the following items:
•
An IBM ServeRAID Support CD.
•
A diskette containing the IPSSEND command-line program. This can be either
downloaded from the IBM Web site or created using the IBM ServeRAID Support
CD.
•
A version of DUMPLOG and CLEARLOG appropriate for your operating system.
You can download both programs from the IBM Support Web site at
http://www.ibm.com/pc/support.
Notes:
1. If you have downloaded a newer version of the IBM ServeRAID Support CD, do
not upgrade the BIOS and firmware until you have completed this procedure.
2. The following procedures rely upon logging functions introduced in version 4.0 of
the IBM ServeRAID Support CD. The ServeRAID controller must have had BIOS
and firmware version 4.x or later installed prior to the multiple physical drive
failure.
This procedure involves the following steps:
1. Capturing the ServeRAID logs
2. Isolating and removing the failed physical drive
3. Checking the hardware connections
4. Setting defunct drives to the online state
5. Accessing the critical logical drives
6. Finishing the procedure
214
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Capturing the ServeRAID logs
Complete the following steps to capture the ServeRAID logs:
1. Run DUMPLOG.BAT to capture the ServeRAID logs. Use one of the following
procedures:
•
If the operating system is located on the failed logical drive, complete the
following steps:
a. Copy the DUMPLOG.BAT and CLEARLOG.BAT files to the root of the
ServeRAID diskette.
b.
Start the server from the ServeRAID command-line diskette.
c.
At the prompt, type the following command:
DUMPLOG filename controller
where filename is the name of the text file where you want to save the log
and controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1-12).
•
If the operating system is accessible, complete the following tasks:
a. Copy or extract the DUMPLOG utility appropriate for your operating
system to a local directory or folder.
b.
Run the DUMPLOG command appropriate for the operating system and
save the output to a text file.
2. Send the logs to your IBM service representative for root-cause analysis. The logs
provide the best evidence for determining the cause of the failure.
Isolating and removing the failed physical drive
To use ServeRAID Manager to determine the order in which drives were marked
defunct, complete the following steps:
1. Start ServeRAID Manager in startable-CD mode using the IBM ServeRAID
Support CD.
2. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, right-click Local system.
3. Click Save printable configuration and event logs; then, press Enter. A window
opens, listing the name and location of the log file.
4. Click OK.
5. Open the log file in a text editor. The ServeRAID defunct drive event log lists all
physical drives marked defunct; the most recent failure is shown at the bottom of
the list.
6. Review the list to determine which physical drive failed first. If you cannot
determine which drive failed first, go to step 7 on page 216 of “Accessing the
critical logical drives."
Notes:
a. The ServeRAID defunct drive event log might contain entries from earlier
incidents of defunct drives. Review the list of defunct drives carefully, and use
the date and time stamps to identify the first drives associated with this
incident.
b.
In certain circumstances, the ServeRAID defunct drive event log does not list
the drives in the exact order that the drives failed. For example, when an array
spans multiple ServeRAID channels, the ServeRAID controller issues parallel
I/O requests to devices on each channel. In the event of a catastrophic failure,
physical drives might be marked defunct at the same time.
Chapter 20. Solving ServeRAID problems
215
7. Remove the first physical drive marked defunct from the backplane or disconnect
the SCSI cable from the drive.
8. Exit ServeRAID Manager; then, shut down the server.
Checking the hardware connections
While the server is turned off, complete the following tasks:
1. Reseat the ServeRAID controllers.
2. Reseat the cables and the disks against the backplanes.
3. Reseat the power cables to the backplane and SCSI backplane repeater options,
if they are present.
As you are reseating the components, visually inspect each piece for bent pins, nicks,
crimps, pinches, or other signs of damage. Take extra time to ensure that each
component snaps or clicks into place properly.
Setting defunct drives to the online state
Complete the following steps to set the defunct drives to the online state:
1. Start the server.
2. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive.
3. Use ServeRAID Manager to delete all hot-spare and standby-hot-spare drives.
This will prevent a rebuild operation from starting.
4. Set each defunct physical drive in the failed array to the online state. The failed
logical drives should change to a critical state. If there are problems bringing
physical drives online, or if a physical drive initially goes online and then fails to a
defunct state soon after, see “Troubleshooting” on page 217. The logical drives
must be in a critical state before you proceed.
Accessing the critical logical drives
Complete the following steps to attempt to access the critical logical drives:
1. If you are still in ServeRAID Manager, exit and restart the server.
2. Attempt to start the operating system. If you are prompted to perform any filesystem integrity tests, skip the tests.
3. If the operating system starts, check the controller log files for information about
each logical drive to determine whether the bad stripe table has incremented on a
logical drive. If there are one or more bad stripes, data is lost or damaged.
4. Run a read-only, file-system integrity check on each logical drive.
5. Using application-specific tools, run more intensive integrity tests on each logical
drive.
6. If all logical drives pass the tests, you can assume that the data is good. Go to
“Finishing the procedure”. Otherwise, weigh the results of the file-integrity tests
and determine how best to proceed. Your options include the following actions:
•
Use a recent backup to restore damaged files.
•
Use a recent backup to restore damaged files; schedule a planned outage to
rebuild the data at a later date.
•
Restore or rebuild the data.
7. Restore or rebuild the missing data on each critical logical drive if any of the
following problems persists:
•
216
The critical logical drive remains inaccessible.
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
•
Data errors are found on the critical logical drives.
•
The operating system continuously fails to start properly.
•
Partition information on the critical logical drives is unknown.
Finishing the procedure
Complete the following steps:
1. Initiate a backup of the data.
2. After the backup is completed, replace the physical drive that was removed in
step 7 on page 216. The new physical drive must be equal to or greater in size
than the original drive. An auto-rebuild operation will start.
3. If necessary, redefine the hot-spare drives.
4. Using DUMPLOG, capture another set of ServeRAID logs.
5. Clear the ServeRAID logs using the following CLEARLOG.BAT command
available on the DUMPLOG Web site:
CLEARLOG controller
where controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1-12).
6. If a case was opened with your IBM service representative for this problem,
complete steps 7 through 9; otherwise, you have completed the recovery process.
7. Using DUMPLOG, capture the ServeRAID logs after two to three days of normal
activity.
8. E-mail the ServeRAID logs to your IBM service representative.
9. If IBM determines that the ServeRAID controller and SCSI bus activities are not
operating properly, your IBM service representative will provide an action plan.
Follow the action plan, and repeat steps 7 and 8 until the system is running
normally.
Troubleshooting
If you continue to experience problems, review the following information. It might help
you identify the configuration or hardware problem.
Poor signal quality across the SCSI bus: The most common cause of
multiple physical drive failures is poor signal quality across the SCSI bus. As the SCSI
protocol tries to recover, the overhead increases. As the system becomes busier and
demand for data increases, the corrective actions of the SCSI protocol increase, and
the SCSI bus moves toward saturation. This overhead will eventually limit the normal
device communication bandwidth. If left unchecked, one or more SCSI physical drives
might not respond to the ServeRAID controller in a timely way, which will result in the
ServeRAID controller marking the physical drives defunct.
Poor signal quality problems can be caused by any of the following conditions:
•
Improper installation of the ServeRAID controller in a PCI slot
•
Poor cable connections
•
Poor seating of hot-swap drives against the SCSI backplane
•
Improper installation or seating of backplane repeaters
•
Improper SCSI bus termination
Chapter 20. Solving ServeRAID problems
217
Isolating hardware problems: You can use the following techniques to
isolate most hardware problems:
•
Check error codes within the ServeRAID Manager when a physical drive fails to
respond to a command. Research these codes in the Hardware Maintenance
Manual and Troubleshooting Guide for your server.
•
In non-hot swap systems, make sure the physical drives are properly attached to
the cable connectors. Start with the connector closest to the SCSI terminator and
work your way forward to the connector closest to the controller. Examine each
SCSI device and ensure that it has the proper jumper settings.
•
While the server is turned off, reseat the ServeRAID controller in its PCI slot and
all cables and disk devices on the SCSI bus.
•
Examine the cables for bent or missing pins, nicks, crimps, pinches, or overstretching.
•
Temporarily attach the physical drives to an integrated SCSI controller, if
available. Start the BIOS. As the BIOS POST runs, review the status of the
physical drives and the negotiated data rates. Determine if it is correct.
From the BIOS, choose an option which will list all the devices attached to the
controller. Select one of the physical drives and initiate a media test. This will test
the device and the entire SCSI bus. If you see errors on the integrated SCSI
controller, try to determine if it is the physical drive or the cable by initiating a
media test on other physical drives. Test both online and defunct physical drives
to determine if the test results are consistent with the drive states on the
ServeRAID controller. You can also move hot-swap physical drives to a different
position on the backplane and retest to see if the results change.
If the problem persists, swap out the SCSI cable and run a media test again on
the physical drives. If the physical drives pass the test, the previous cable is bad.
This is a valuable technique for isolating a failing component in the SCSI path.
Note: Depending on the rate at which it negotiates data with low-voltage
differential (LVD) SCSI devices, an integrated controller might produce
different results than the ServeRAID controller.
•
Use the system diagnostics to test the ServeRAID subsystem. Press F2 to start
diagnostics. If the subsystem fails the test, disconnect the physical drives from the
ServeRAID controller; then, reset the controller to the factory-default settings. Run
the diagnostic tests again. If the subsystem passes the diagnostics test, then
attach the disks to the ServeRAID controller, one channel at a time, and run the
tests again to isolate the channel of the failing component. If the controller
continues to fail diagnostic tests, call your IBM service representative for further
assistance.
Note: Be sure to use the most recent diagnostic tests available for the server.
•
218
Disconnect the first physical drive marked defunct from the cable or backplane.
Restore the ServeRAID controller to the factory-default setting. Attempt to import
the RAID configuration from the physical drives. Depending on how the failure
occurred, this technique might have mixed results. There is a reasonable chance
that all physical drives will return to an online state, except for the physical drive
that is disconnected.
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
•
Move the ServeRAID controller into a different PCI slot or PCI bus and retest.
Notes:
1. When attaching an LVD ServeRAID controller to storage enclosures, set the
data rate for the channel to the data rate supported by the enclosure.
2. Mixing LVD SCSI devices with single-ended SCSI devices on the same SCSI
bus will switch all devices on the channel to single-ended mode and data
rates.
•
Open a case with your IBM service representative. Submit all ServeRAID logs
captured on the system for interpretation to isolate a failing component.
Locating the startup device (SCO OpenServer only)
After installing a ServeRAID controller, SCO OpenServer might fail to find the startup
(boot) device.
This problem occurs when your server locates a startup device before coming to the
ServeRAID controller on which OpenServer is installed. To solve this problem, consult
the documentation that came with your server to determine the PCI slot scan order;
then, specify the startup device.
Complete the following steps to specify the startup device:
1. Restart the server.
2. From the prompt, type the following command and press Enter:
boot: defbootstr Sdsk=ips(x,0,0,0)
where x is the number of startup devices installed before the ServeRAID controller
on which OpenServer is installed.
Solving problems in a failover environment
Use these procedures to recover from problems in a failover environment. If you still
have problems after following these procedures, contact your IBM service
representative for further information. Also, you can find hints and tips to help you
solve problems on the IBM Support Web site. See “Downloadable files from the World
Wide Web” on page 193 for additional information.
Recovering from a failure in a failover environment
In a failover environment, when the ServeRAID device driver is unable to send a
command to the active controller and the active controller does not respond to a reset
command, the device driver attempts to failover to the passive controller.
Note: Loose cables or defective physical drives will not cause a failover to occur.
Replacing a controller of a failover pair in a nonhot-plug PCI slot:
Important: Before you replace the failed controller, verify that you have the latest
device drivers and BIOS and firmware code installed in your server. Follow the
instructions in Chapter 19, “Upgrading a ServeRAID controller” on page 195.
Chapter 20. Solving ServeRAID problems
219
If a failed controller is not in a hot-plug PCI slot, complete the following steps:
1. Shut down the server.
2. Replace the failed controller.
Note: Do not attach the SCSI cables to the new controller.
3. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive; then, turn on the
server. The ServeRAID Manager program starts.
4. Select the controller that you just inserted, and click Actions ➔ Restore to
factory-default settings.
5. If a confirmation window opens, click Yes. When the operation is complete, a
message appears at the bottom of the window indicating that the ServeRAID
Manager has successfully restored the configuration to the factory-default
settings.
6. Set the stripe-unit size of the new ServeRAID controller to match the stripe-unit
size of the ServeRAID controller that you replaced (see “Stripe-unit size” on page
35).
7. Click Actions ➔ Clustering actions ➔ Configure for clustering. The
“Configure controller for clustering” window opens.
Figure 54.“noc7gm3Configure
d
controller for clustering” window
8. Type the controller name, partner name, and SCSI initiator IDs that you used for
the controller you are replacing.
9. Click OK.
10. Shut down the server.
Important:
When connecting the cables, you must connect the same channel connectors on both
ServeRAID controllers to the enclosure. For example, if you connect the cable from Channel
1 on the first ServeRAID controller to the enclosure, you must connect the cable from Channel
1 on the second ServeRAID controller to the enclosure.
11. Connect the enclosure to the new ServeRAID controller.
12. Remove the IBM ServeRAID Support CD from the CD-ROM drive; then, turn on
the server.
13. Start the ServeRAID Manager program that is installed on the server; then,
confirm that the ServeRAID controllers are correctly configured for failover (see
“Verifying the configuration” on page 78).
220
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Replacing a controller of a failover pair in a hotplug PCI slot: If the failed controller is in a hot-plug slot, see the documentation
that comes with the server for instructions for replacing the controller.
Note: The hot-replace feature is only supported on the Windows NT operating
system. If a different operating system is installed on your server, see
“Replacing a controller of a failover pair in a non-hot-plug PCI slot:” on page
219.
Use the following software to replace the controller. Follow the on-screen directions:
•
IBM Netfinity PCI Hot Plug for Windows NT 4.0 Package, version 4.1 or later
•
(For the ServeRAID-4M, ServeRAID-4Mx, ServeRAID-4L, and ServeRAID-4Lx
controllers only) IBM PCI Hot Plug Adapter Update, version 1.0, for the IBM
Netfinity PCI Hot Plug for Windows NT 4.0
•
IBM ServeRAID Manager program
•
IBM ServeRAID Hot Replace wizard
Recovering from a failed physical drive in a RAID level-5E or level-5EE
environment
If a RAID level-5E logical drive undergoes compression or a RAID level-5EE logical
drive undergoes compaction as the result of a failed physical drive, the failed drive will
be marked defunct hot spare (DHS). Replace the defunct physical drive or remove the
defunct drive from the enclosure as soon as possible. If a DHS drive is present, the
RAID level-5E or level-5EE logical drive might not failover.
Recovering from a power failure during a failover
If a power failure occurs during a failover, the two controllers in the active-passive pair
might have the following problems:
•
•
Some logical drives are configured on one controller and some logical drives are
configured on the other controller.
A logical drive does not appear on either controller.
Complete the following steps to recover from a power failure:
1. Run ipssend merge for every merge-group number configured on the active
controller.
Note: If ipssend merge fails, run ipssend merge partner for every merge-group
number configured on the active controller.
2. Run ipssend unmerge for every merge-group number configured on the passive
controller.
3. Shut down and restart the server. Windows 2000 and Windows NT 4.0 pairs the
controllers again.
Chapter 20. Solving ServeRAID problems
221
Troubleshooting an IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution
There is the possibility that one of the servers, one of the ServeRAID controllers, or
one of the hard disk drives in a cluster might fail. This section presents procedures
you can take to recover from these potential problems. If you still have problems after
following these procedures, contact your IBM service representative for further
information. Also, you can find hints and tips to help you solve problems on the IBM
Support Web site. See “Downloadable files from the World Wide Web” on page 193
for additional information.
Recovering from a failed ServeRAID server
When replacing a failed server in a high-availability configuration, you might not need
to replace the ServeRAID controller. However, if you replace your ServeRAID
controller, you must reconfigure the controller after installing your new server.
Important:
The following procedure requires specific configuration settings for the ServeRAID controller.
If the server and controller that are being replaced are functional, you can obtain these
settings from the controller. However, if the controller or the server is not functional, you will
need a record of the settings, such as one created when the controller was previously
configured. If you are replacing your ServeRAID controller at the same time as your server,
you must have correct configuration information to complete this procedure.
Complete the following steps to recover from a failed server:
1. Shut down the failed server.
2. Remove all local physical drives from the failed server.
As you remove your physical drives, be sure to note the bay in which each drive
was installed. If you are replacing your failed server with an identical server, you
can reinstall the drives in an identical configuration and get your server up and
running quickly.
3. If the ServeRAID controller is functional, remove it from the failed server. As you
remove the controller from the failed server, be sure to note the following:
•
•
Which SCSI cables are connected to the SCSI channel connectors on the
controller
Which PCI slot has the controller installed
4. Install all the local physical drives into the new server, using the location
information you recorded in step 2.
For information about how to install a physical drive, see the documentation that
comes with your server. If you are replacing the failed server with an identical
server, install each physical drive in the same bay as the bay from which it was
removed in the failed server.
5. If the ServeRAID controller in the failed server is not functional, or if you are not
sure, continue with “Recovering from a failed ServeRAID controller”. Otherwise,
complete the following steps with the functional ServeRAID controller:
a. Install the controller in the new server.
b. Reinstall the cables as they were in the failed server.
c. Start the server.
222
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Recovering from a failed ServeRAID controller
You must have the following configuration information to configure your new
ServeRAID controller:
•
•
•
•
SCSI initiator IDs
The SCSI initiator IDs for a non-shared SCSI channel are set to 7. For shared
SCSI channels, the SCSI initiator IDs must be 7 or 6; they must be different from
the SCSI initiator IDs for the corresponding SCSI channels of the cluster partner
controller. Therefore, if you can obtain the SCSI initiator IDs for the corresponding
cluster partner system, you know the correct SCSI initiator IDs for this system. For
example, if the cluster partner system-shared SCSI initiator IDs were set to 7, the
controller you are replacing would need to have its SCSI initiator IDs set to 6 for
the shared channels.
Controller and partner name
You can also determine the names for the controller being replaced by reading
the settings from the cluster partner system.
Stripe-unit size
The stripe-unit size must be the same on both controllers in a high-availability
cluster.
Unattended mode setting
This setting is configured automatically as Enabled when a controller is set up for
clustering.
If the ServeRAID controller you are replacing is functional, you can obtain the above
configuration information by starting your server with the IBM ServeRAID Support CD
in the CD-ROM drive and using the ServeRAID Manager program.
Note: The configuration information is also available in the printable configuration file
you might have saved when configuring the ServeRAID controllers for
clustering.
If the ServeRAID controller is not functional, you will need to refer to a record of the
settings that was made when the controller was previously configured. If you do not
have a record of the configuration information, see “Obtaining the current
configuration information:” for information that might help you to assign the proper
values.
Obtaining the current configuration
information: To obtain the SCSI initiator IDs, controller name, partner name, and
stripe-unit size from the corresponding cluster partner controller, complete the
following steps:
1. Click Start ➔ ServeRAID Manager.
or
Start the cluster partner system with the IBM ServeRAID Support CD in the CDROM drive. The ServeRAID Manager program starts.
2. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the cluster partner controller.
Chapter 20. Solving ServeRAID problems
223
3. Click Actions ➔ Clustering actions ➔ Configure for clustering. The
“Configure controller for clustering” window opens.
Figure 55. “Configure controller for clustering” window
4. Note the settings in the fields.
5. To determine stripe-unit size, refer to the information displayed in the right pane of
ServeRAID Manager.
Replacing a ServeRAID controller: Complete the following steps to replace
a failed ServeRAID controller in your high-availability configuration:
1. Shut down the server.
2. Note which SCSI cables are connected to which SCSI channel connectors on the
controller.
3. Note which PCI slot has the controller installed.
4. Remove the failed ServeRAID controller.
For instructions on how to remove and install the ServeRAID controller, see the
installation guide that came with your ServeRAID controller.
5. Install the new ServeRAID controller. Be sure to install the controller in the same
PCI slot from which you removed the failed ServeRAID controller.
Important:
•
•
Do not reconnect the SCSI channel cables to the controller at this time.
You must ensure that you have the same level of ServeRAID BIOS and firmware on both
controllers in the cluster.
The software is available on the IBM Support Web site. See Chapter 18, “Obtaining
ServeRAID updates” on page 193 for additional information.
6. Start the system with the IBM ServeRAID Support CD in the CD-ROM drive. The
ServeRAID Manager program starts.
7. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the new controller.
8. Click Actions ➔ Restore to factory-default settings. The ServeRAID Manager
program initializes the controller configuration.
224
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
9. With the new controller still selected in the tree, click Actions ➔ Clustering
actions ➔ Configure for clustering. The “Configure controller for clustering”
window opens.
Figure 56. “Configure controller for clustering” window
10. Using the settings that were assigned to the previous ServeRAID controller (that
is, the controller you are replacing), complete each of the following fields:
•
•
•
SCSI initiator IDs
Controller name
Partner name
11. Click OK. The new controller stripe-unit size setting defaults to 8 KB. If you need
to change this setting to match the partner controller, go to step 12. Otherwise, go
to step 15.
12. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the new controller.
13. Click Actions ➔ Change stripe-unit size.
14. Click the new stripe-unit size for your installation.
15. Shut down and turn off the server.
16. Reconnect the SCSI channel cables to the controller.
Note: Be sure to connect the cables to the correct SCSI channels as noted in
step 2 on page 224.
17. If the ServeRAID controller being replaced is attached to the server startup disk
array or other non-shared disk arrays, start the system with the IBM ServeRAID
Support CD in the CD-ROM drive. The ServeRAID Manager program starts.
If the ServeRAID controller being replaced is not attached to any of these items,
go to step 21.
18. In the ServeRAID Manager tree, click the new controller.
19. Click Actions ➔ Copy configuration from drives.
20. Click the merge-group number for the non-shared logical drives (that is, 206 or
207).
Note: The last number in the merge-group number is the shared SCSI initiator
ID. That is, if the merge-group number is 206, the SCSI initiator ID is 6.
21. Remove the IBM ServeRAID Support CD from the CD-ROM drive.
22. Restart your server.
Note: If the controller you replaced is the startup controller, the system will now
start the operating system properly.
Recovering from a failover in a Microsoft Cluster Server server
After a failover occurs in a Microsoft Cluster Server server, the red drive lights in
external expansion enclosures might turn on for physical drives that are online. There
is no hardware problem; the lights turn off within an hour.
Chapter 20. Solving ServeRAID problems
225
Recovering from a failed physical drive in a RAID level-5E or level-5EE
environment
If a RAID level-5E logical drive undergoes compression or a RAID level-5EE logical
drive undergoes compaction as the result of a failed physical drive, the failed drive will
be marked defunct hot spare (DHS). Replace the defunct physical drive or remove the
defunct drive from the enclosure as soon as possible. If a DHS drive is present, the
RAID level-5E or level-5EE logical drive might not failover.
Troubleshooting ServeRAID subsystems in a cluster environment
Following is a series of common problems and solutions that can help you
troubleshoot your IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution.
Problem
Action
The ServeRAID Manager program shows
physical drives in defunct state.
1.
Enable the View shared drives feature in the ServeRAID
Manager program. Doing so will display a drive as reserved,
instead of defunct, in the following situations:
•
•
A drive has been moved.
A drive has failed-over to the other server in the cluster.
Notes:
2.
226
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
a.
It is normal for drives in the above situations to be displayed
as defunct if you have not enabled the View shared drives
feature. In this case, the drives shown in the defunct state are
not really defective.
b.
Even though you have enabled the View shared drives
feature, you will continue to see DDD entries in the Windows
system log. This is normal behavior.
Check RAID level-1, level-5E, and level-5EE arrays to make sure
they are not in critical state. If they are in critical state, replace the
failed drive and perform a rebuild operation.
Problem
Action
ServeRAID shared logical drives do not
failover properly.
1.
Ensure that the resource type of each ServeRAID controller
shared disk resource is IBM ServeRAID logical disk.
If the resource type is shown as “physical drive,” the localquorum
option was not specified properly when MSCS under Windows
was installed.
To correct this problem, you must reinstall the high-availability
cluster solution using Microsoft Windows.
RAID level-5 logical drives cannot be
accessed by the operating system after a
failover.
2.
Ensure that shared SCSI buses on the ServeRAID controller pair
are connected in the same way that corresponding SCSI channels
are connected. For example, SCSI channel 1 on the controller in
the first cluster server is connected to enclosure 1 and SCSI
channel 1 on the controller in the second cluster server is
connected to enclosure 1; channel 2 on the first server controller is
connected to enclosure 2 and channel 2 on the second server
controller is connected to enclosure 2, and so forth.
3.
Ensure that the physical SCSI drives that contain shared logical
drives are all connected to shared SCSI channels.
4.
Ensure that there are no more than eight shared logical drives
defined per pair of ServeRAID controllers.
5.
Make sure each shared logical drive has a unique merge-group
number assigned. Shared merge-group numbers must be in the
range 1–8.
6.
Make sure each ServeRAID controller has been assigned a
unique controller name and that each ServeRAID controller has its
partner name assigned properly to correspond to the ServeRAID
controller in the other cluster server that is attached to the shared
SCSI buses.
7.
Check for loose shared SCSI bus cables.
8.
Ensure that the physical drives that are expected to be moved or
to failover show up in a ready or reserved state on the server that
is attempting to take control of these drives.
Use the ServeRAID Manager program to check the state of the logical
drive to ensure that it is not blocked. Using this program, select the
logical drive and look for Blocked state Yes. If the logical drive is
blocked, make sure all physical drives that are part of the logical drive
are in the online state. If all physical drives are not in the online state, a
drive might have failed during one of the following situations:
•
•
A failover
A resynchronization process after a failover
Data integrity cannot be guaranteed in this case and the logical drive
has been blocked to prevent the possibility of incorrect data being read
from the logical drive.
Unblock, reinitialize, and synchronize the logical drive and restore the
data from a backup source. Depending on the type of data contained
on the logical drive and the availability of a recent backup copy, you
can take one of the following actions:
•
•
Unblock the drive and continue normal operation.
Replace and rebuild one or more defunct drives.
However, if you do not reinitialize, synchronize, and restore the drive,
be aware that some data could be lost or damaged.
Chapter 20. Solving ServeRAID problems
227
Problem
Action
If one of the cluster servers fails and the
surviving server takes over the cluster
resources, occasionally one or more of the IP
address resources will stay in the online
pending state for several minutes after they
are moved over to the surviving server. After
this, the resource will go to the failed state,
and the following error message will be
displayed in the surviving server system log
(as viewed with the Event viewer).
Complete the following steps:
1.
Right-click the IP resource in the Cluster Administrator.
2.
From the General page, click Properties.
3.
Select Run this resource in a separate Resource Monitor
check box. A message appears stating that the resource must be
restarted for the change to take effect.
Note:
Placing IPSHA disk resources into their own Resource Monitor
can decrease failover time.
For example, the Windows Event Log
Message:
Date:
Time:
User:
Computer:
???
???
N/A
???
Event ID:
Source:
Type:
Category:
1069
ClusSvc
Error
(4)
Description:
Cluster resource 'ip address resource
name' failed
After one of the cluster servers has been shut
down normally and the surviving server takes
over the cluster resources, occasionally one or
more of the IBM ServeRAID logical drive
resources will stay in the online-pending state
for several minutes, after they are moved over
to the surviving server (when viewed with the
Cluster Administrator). After this, the resource
will go to the Failed state and the following
error message will be displayed in the
surviving server system log (as viewed with
the Event viewer).
No action is necessary to bring the resource online after the failover.
MSCS will bring this resource online on the surviving server within
approximately 4 minutes.
For example, the Windows Event Log
Message:
Date:
Time:
User:
Computer:
???
???
N/A
???
Event ID:
Source:
Type:
Category:
1069
ClusSvc
Error
(4)
Description:
Cluster resource 'IBM ServeRAID Logical
Disk name' failed.
If a previous version of IBM ServeRAID
Cluster Solution has been uninstalled, a
message is incorrectly displayed prompting
you to perform an upgrade when you attempt
to reinstall the ServeRAID Windows Cluster
Solution.
228
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
You must delete the C3E76E53-F841-11D0-BFA1-08005AB8ED05
registry key. Complete the following steps to delete the registry key:
1.
From the Start menu, click Run.
2.
Type: REGEDIT and click OK. The Registry Editor window opens.
3.
Select HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\CLSID and delete C3E76E53F841-11D0-BFA1-08005AB8ED05.
4.
Reinstall the ServeRAID Windows Cluster Solution. For
instructions, see Chapter 15, “Configuring ServeRAID controllers
for clustering” on page 151.
Problem
Action
Array identifiers and logical drive numbers
might change during a failover condition.
By design, the array identifiers and logical drive numbers might change
during a failover condition. Consistency between the merge-group
numbers and Windows or Windows 2000 permanent (sticky) drive
letters is maintained, while the ordering process during a failover
condition is controlled by the Microsoft Cluster Server software and the
available array identifiers on the surviving server.
Chapter 20. Solving ServeRAID problems
229
230
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Chapter 21. Getting help and technical assistance
If you need help, service, or technical assistance or just want more information about
IBM products, you will find a wide variety of sources available from IBM to assist you.
This chapter contains information about where to go for additional information about
IBM and IBM products, what to do if you experience a problem with your xSeries or
IntelliStation® system, and whom to call for service, if it is necessary.
Before you call
Before you call, make sure that you have taken these steps to try to solve the problem
yourself:
•
Check all cables to make sure that they are connected.
•
Check the power switches to make sure that the system is turned on.
•
Use the troubleshooting information in your system documentation, and use the
diagnostic tools that come with your system.
•
Go to the IBM Support Web site at http://www.ibm.com/pc/support/ to check for
technical information, hints, tips, and new device drivers.
•
Use an IBM discussion forum on the IBM Web site to ask questions.
You can solve many problems without outside assistance by following the
troubleshooting procedures that IBM provides in the online help or in the publications
that are provided with your system and software. The information that comes with your
system also describes the diagnostic tests that you can perform. Most xSeries and
IntelliStation systems, operating systems, and programs come with information that
contains troubleshooting procedures and explanations of error messages and error
codes. If you suspect a software problem, see the information for the operating
system or program.
Using the documentation
Information about your IBM xSeries or IntelliStation system and preinstalled software,
if any, is available in the documentation that comes with your system. That
documentation includes printed books, online books, README files, and help files.
See the troubleshooting information in your system documentation for instructions for
using the diagnostic programs. The troubleshooting information or the diagnostic
programs might tell you that you need additional or updated device drivers or other
software. IBM maintains pages on the World Wide Web where you can get the latest
technical information and download device drivers and updates. To access these
pages, go to http://www.ibm.com/pc/support/ and follow the instructions. Also, you can
order publications through the IBM Publications Ordering System at
http://www.elink.ibmlink.ibm.com/public/applications/publications/cgibin/pbi.cgi.
Getting help and information from the World Wide Web
On the World Wide Web, the IBM Web site has up-to-date information about IBM
xSeries and IntelliStation products, services, and support. The address for IBM
xSeries information is http://www.ibm.com/eserver/xseries/. The address for IBM
IntelliStation information is http://www.ibm.com/pc/intellistation/.
You can find service information for your IBM products, including supported options,
at http://www.ibm.com/pc/support/. If you click Profile from the support page, you can
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
231
create a customized support page. The support page has many sources of
information and ways for you to solve problems, including:
•
Diagnosing problems, using the IBM Online Assistant
•
Downloading the latest device drivers and updates for your products
•
Viewing Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
•
Viewing hints and tips to help you solve problems
•
Participating in IBM discussion forums
•
Setting up e-mail notification of technical updates about your products
Software service and support
Through IBM Support Line, you can get telephone assistance, for a fee, with usage,
configuration, and software problems with xSeries servers, IntelliStation workstations,
and appliances. For information about which products are supported by Support Line
in your country or region, go to http://www.ibm.com/services/sl/products/.
For more information about Support Line and other IBM services, go to
http://www.ibm.com/services/, or go to http://www.ibm.com/planetwide/ for support
telephone numbers.
Hardware service and support
You can receive hardware service through IBM Integrated Technology Services or
through your IBM reseller, if your reseller is authorized by IBM to provide warranty
service. Go to http://www.ibm.com/planetwide/ for support telephone numbers.
In the U.S. and Canada, hardware service and support is available 24 hours a day, 7
days a week. In the U.K., these services are available Monday through Friday, from 9
a.m. to 6 p.m.
232
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Part 5. Appendixes
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
233
234
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Appendix A. Creating ServeRAID diskettes
Use the instructions in this appendix to create installation diskettes for ServeRAID
SCSI and SATA controllers.
Diskette images for ServeRAID SCSI controllers
Images for the following diskettes are in the \DISKETTE\SCSI directory of the IBM
ServeRAID Support CD. Each of the operating-system specific diskettes contains
device drivers and the IPSSEND utility. The IPSMON utility is available only on the
IBM ServeRAID Support CD.
Note: IBM ServeRAID support for Itanium (64-bit) servers is available only on the
IBM ServeRAID Support CD for Itanium, Version 6.11. For more information,
see http://www-306.ibm.com/pc/support/site.wss/MIGR-495PES.html.
Diskette image
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
Diskette
biosfw1.img
IBM BIOS and Firmware Update (1 of 5) for the ServeRAID-6M
controller
biosfw2.img
IBM BIOS and Firmware Update (2 of 5) for the ServeRAID-4H,
ServeRAID-II, ServeRAID on-board, and the ServeRAID controllers
biosfw3.img
IBM BIOS and Firmware Update (3 of 5) for the ServeRAID-4M,
ServeRAID-4Mx, ServeRAID-4L, ServeRAID-4Lx, ServeRAID-3H,
ServeRAID-3HB, and ServeRAID-3L controllers
biosfw4.img
IBM BIOS and Firmware Update (4 of 5) for the ServeRAID-5i and
ServeRAID-6M controllers
biosfw5.img
IBM BIOS and Firmware Update (5 of 5) for the ServeRAID-6i/6i+
controllers
clusnt.img
IBM ServeRAID Cluster Solution for Windows NT, Windows 2000,
and Windows 2003
dos.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for DOS
failover.img
IBM ServeRAID Failover Support for Windows NT and Windows
2000
netware.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for Novell NetWare
openserv.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for SCO OpenServer
os2.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for OS/2
redhat9.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for Red Hat Linux 9.0
rhel_i686.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS2.1 and
AS/ES/WS3 for Intel 32-bit kernel versions
rhel_amd32.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS2.1 and
AS/ES/WS3 for AMD 32-bit kernel versions
rhel_x86_64.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS/ES/WS3
for AMD 64-bit kernel versions and Intel EM64T 64-bit kernel
versions
redhat64.img*
IBM ServeRAID Support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS 2.1 and
AS 3 for Intel Itanium 64-bit kernel versions
sles8_amd64.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for SuSE Linux Enterprise Server for
AMD64
sles8_amd64_sp3.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for SuSE Linux Enterprise Server for
AMD64 with Service Pack 3
235
Diskette image
Diskette
suse82.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for SuSE Linux Professional 8.2 for Intel
and AMD kernel versions
suse90.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for SuSE Linux Professional 9.0 for Intel
and AMD kernel versions
suse91.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for SuSE Linux Professional 9.1 for Intel
and AMD kernel versions
suse91_x86_64.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for SuSE Linux Professional 9.1 for Intel
EM64T and AMD64-bit kernel versions
suse_desktop.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for SuSE Linux Desktop 1.0 for Intel and
AMD kernel versions
turbo.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for Turbolinux
ul.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for UnitedLinux (SCO UnitedLinux, SuSE
Linux Enterprise Server, Turbolinux Enterprise Server)
ul_sp3.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for UnitedLinux with Service Pack 3 (SCO
UnitedLinux, SuSE Linux Enterprise Server, Turbolinux Enterprise
Server)
ul64.img1
IBM ServeRAID Support for UnitedLinux for Itanium 64-bit versions
unixware.img
2
IBM ServeRAID Support for SCO UnixWare
win2003.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for Windows Server 2003
win2k_xp.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for Microsoft Windows XP Professional,
Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional, Microsoft Windows 2000
Advanced Server, and Microsoft Windows 2000 Server
1ServeRAID Support CD for 64-bit operating systems only.
2ServeRAID Support CD for 32-bit and 64-bit operating systems.
Diskette images for ServeRAID SATA controllers
Images for the following diskettes are in the \DISKETTE\SATA directory of the IBM
ServeRAID Support CD. Use these images to install the ServeRAID-7t SATA
controller on the supported operating systems.
Diskette image
236
Diskette
aacfw1.img
IBM BIOS and Firmware Update (1 of 2) for the ServeRAID-7t
controller
aacfw2.img
IBM BIOS and Firmware Update (2 of 2) for the ServeRAID-7t
controller
aac-linux-athlon-as.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS2.1
for AMD 32-bit kernel versions
aac-linux-i686-as.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS2.1
for Intel 32-bit kernel versions
aac-linux-i686-rhel3.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS3 for
Intel 32-bit kernel versions
aac-linux-athlon-rhel3.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS3 for
AMD 32-bit kernel versions
aac-linux-x86_64-rhel3.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux
AS/ES/WS3 for AMD 64-bit and EM64T 64-bit kernel versions
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Diskette image
Diskette
aac-linux-sl8x+ul.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for SuSE Linux Professional 8.2,
SuSE Linux Desktop 1.0, and United Linux 1.0
aac-linux-sl9x.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for SuSE Linux Professional 9.0
aac-linux-ul1-sp2a.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for United Linux 1.0 with Service
Pack 2a
aac-linux-ul1-sp3.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for United Linux 1.0 with Service
Pack 3
aac-netware.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for Novell NetWare
aac-win2003.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for Windows Server 2003
aac-win2k_xp.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for Microsoft Windows XP
Professional, Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional, Microsoft
Windows 2000 Advanced Server, and Microsoft Windows
2000 Server
aac-winnt.img
IBM ServeRAID Support for Microsoft Windows NT 4.0
Creating diskettes on Windows
Complete the following steps to create a diskette:
1. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive.
2. Insert a blank diskette into the diskette drive.
3. Open a DOS window.
4. At the command prompt, type the following and press Enter:
e:\diskette\tools\dsk4w32 e:\diskette\diskettetype\disketteimage a:
where
•
e is the drive letter for the CD-ROM drive.
•
diskettetype is scsi or sata depending on the driver type.
•
disketteimage is the name of the diskette image.
•
a is the drive letter for the diskette drive.
5. Remove the CD from the CD-ROM drive.
6. Remove the diskette from the diskette drive and label the diskette appropriately.
Creating diskettes on IBM OS/2
Complete the following steps to create a diskette:
1. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive.
2. Insert a blank diskette into the diskette drive.
3. At the OS/2 command prompt, type the following command and Press Enter:
e:\diskette\tools\dsk4wrp e:\diskette\scsi\disketteimage a:
where
•
e is the drive letter for the CD-ROM drive.
•
disketteimage is the name of the diskette image.
•
a is the drive letter for the diskette drive.
4. Remove the IBM ServeRAID Support CD from the CD-ROM drive.
Appendix A. Creating ServeRAID diskettes
237
5. Remove the diskette from the diskette drive and label the diskette appropriately.
Creating diskettes on Linux or UNIX
Complete the following steps to create a diskette:
1. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive.
2. Insert a blank diskette into the diskette drive.
3. At a command prompt, mount the CD-ROM drive by typing one of the following
commands:
For Linux
mount -t iso9660 /dev/cdromdevicefile /mountpoint
For OpenServer
mount -r -f ISO9660 /dev/cdromdevicefile /mountpoint
For UnixWare
mount -f cdfs /dev/cdromdevicefile /mountpoint
where cdromdevicefile is the specific device file for the CD-ROM block device,
and mountpoint is the mount point of the CD-ROM drive.
4. Press Enter.
5. At the command prompt, type the following:
dd if=/mountpoint/diskette/diskettetype/disketteimage of=/dev/diskettedevicefile
bs=32k
where
•
mountpoint is the mountpoint of the CD-ROM drive.
•
diskettetype is scsi or sata, depending on the driver type.
•
disketteimage is the name of the diskette image.
•
diskettedevicefile is the specific device file for the diskette block device.
6. Press Enter.
7. Unmount the CD-ROM drive. Type the following command and press Enter:
umount /mountpoint
where mountpoint is the moint point used in step 3 on page 238.
8. Remove the CD from the CD-ROM drive.
9. Remove the diskette from the diskette drive and label the diskette appropriately.
238
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Appendix B. Array Configuration Utility for MS-DOS for SATA
The Array Configuration Utility (ACU) is an application used to configure ServeRAID
Serial ATA controllers, such as the ServeRAID-7t, from the controller’s BIOS or MSDOS. This guide describes the functionality of ACU for MS-DOS only. See Chapter
8. “Using the ARC utility (Serial ATA controllers only)” on page 85 for information
about using ACU from within a controller’s BIOS.
Interactive versus Script mode
When used in MS-DOS mode (also known as interactive mode), the ACU offers the
same interface and features as the BIOS-based version (array creation, display, and
deletion, as well as device initialization). See “Using Interactive mode” on page 239
for details.
In addition, the ACU for MS-DOS offers a special command-line interface that enables
you to create arrays based on parameters specified in a plain-text script file. You can
record a controller’s current array and port configuration in a plain-text script file,
allowing you to easily restore your configuration or create a configuration based on a
script template. See “Using the scripting features” on page 243 for details.
Running the ACU
The ACU for MS-DOS diskette image (acu.img) is in the /diskette/sata directory on
the IBM ServeRAID Support CD.
To run the ACU for MS-DOS:
1. Create a bootable MS-DOS floppy disk using the ACU for MS-DOS image file
(acu.img). For details on creating the diskette, see the IBM ServeRAID Device
Driver Installation Instructions.
2. Insert the floppy into your diskette drive.
3. Restart your system.
If you issue the command ACU without any command-line switches, the ACU displays
its main window and waits for your menu selection (interactive mode). If you include
any command-line switches with the ACU command, ACU processes your command
with no further interaction (command-line or script mode).
The remainder of this guide explains how to use the ACU in both interactive and script
modes.
Using Interactive mode
When you issue the ACU command at the MS-DOS prompt without any command-line
switches, the ACU displays its main window and waits for your menu selection. To
select an ACU menu option, use the ↑ and ↓ keys, and press Enter. In some cases,
selecting an option displays another menu. Press Tab to navigate between the fields
within a dialog box. You can return to the previous menu at any time by pressing Esc.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
239
Creating an array with ACU
Before creating arrays, make sure the disks to be used as members of the array are
connected and installed.
Notes:
•
Disks with MS-DOS partitions, disks with no usable space, or disks that are
uninitialized appear dimmed and cannot be used for creating a new array.
•
If necessary, restart your system to ensure that it detects all connected drives.
•
If you need to initialize a device, see page 242.
•
To create an array, select the drive or drives to be used in the array and then
assign the desired properties to the array.
Selecting segments for new arrays To select one or more segments to
assign as members of the new array:
1. Use the arrow keys to select create array.
2. Use the arrow keys to select the drives to assign to the new array and press
Insert.
3. The ACU displays the largest usable space available for each drive. You can use
some or all of the available space from multiple drives to create the new array.
4. To deselect a drive, highlight the drive and press Delete.
Note: Drives containing MS-DOS partitions, drives with no available space, or
uninitialized drives appear dimmed and cannot be selected when creating
a new array.
5. Press Enter when you have selected all segments for the new array. The ACU
displays the Array Properties menu.
Assigning array properties To assign properties to the new array:
1. From the Array Properties menu, select an array type and press Enter. The
display shows only the array types available for the number of drives selected.
2. The controller supports four drives. The maximum number of drives allowed and
minimum number of drives required depends on the RAID level, as described in
the table below.
Number of Drives
Array Type
Maximum Supported
Minimum Required
Simple Volume (JBOD)
4
1
RAID 0
4
2
RAID 1
2
2
RAID 5
4
3
RAID 10
4
4
3. Type in an optional label for the array and press Enter.
4. Enter the desired array size. The maximum array size available based on the
segments you selected is displayed automatically. If you want to designate a
different array size, type the desired array size and select MB (megabytes), GB
(gigabytes), or TB (terabytes) from the drop-down list. If the available space from
the selected segments is greater than the size specified, the remaining space is
available for use in other arrays.
5. Select the desired stripe size. The allowable stripe sizes are:
• For RAID 0, 1 , and 5 only—16, 32, and 64 MB (the default).
• For RAID 10 only—32 and 64 MB (the default).
240
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
6. The default stripe size gives the best overall performance in most network
environments.
7. Specify whether you want to enable read and write caching for the array.When
Enabled (the default), caching is enabled, providing maximum performance.
When Disabled, caching is disabled.
CAUTION:
When caching is Enabled, there is a potential for data loss or corruption
during a power failure.
8. Caching should usually be enabled to optimize performance, unless your data is
highly sensitive, or unless your application performs completely random reads,
which is unlikely.
9. When you are finished, press Done.
Managing arrays
The Manage Arrays option enables you to perform the following functions:
•
“Viewing array properties”
•
“Assigning hot spares”
•
“Removing hot spare drives”
•
“Initializing a hard drive”
•
“Making an array bootable”
•
“Deleting arrays”
These operations are described in greater detail in the sections that follow.
Viewing array properties To view the properties of an existing array:
1. Select Manage Arrays from the Main menu.
2. From the List of Arrays dialog box, select the array you want to view information
on and press Enter.
3. The Array Properties dialog box is displayed. View the information as follows:
• RAID0, 1, 5—The physical disks associated with the array are displayed here,
except in the case of a RAID 10 array.
• RAID 10 Only—Highlight the displayed member and press Enter to display
the second level. Press Enter again to display the physical disks associated
with the array.
Note: The label of a failed drive is displayed in a different color.
4. Press Esc to return to the previous menu.
Assigning hot spares To assign a hot spare to an array:
1. Select Manage Arrays from the Main menu.
2. On the List of Arrays dialog box, select the array you want to assign a spare drive
to, and press Ctrl+s.
3. The Hotspare Management for Array dialog box is displayed; it shows which
drives that can be assigned as spare drives.
4. Select a drive and press the Insert key to assign the drive as a spare.
5. The specified drive is displayed in the Assigned Hotspares Drives list.
6. Press Enter to save the spare drive assignment. The following prompt is
displayed:
Have you finished managing Hotspare drives?
7. Press Y (for yes) to return to the Main menu.
Appendix B. Array Configuration Utility for MS-DOS for SATA
241
Removing hot spare drives To remove an assigned spare drive from an
array:
1. Select Manage Arrays from the Main menu.
2. From the List of Arrays dialog box, select the array you want to remove the
assigned spare drive from and type Ctrl+S.
3. The Hotspare Management for Array dialog box is displayed; it shows which
drives can be assigned as spare drives and a list of drives that are already
assigned as spare drives.
4. From the Assigned Hotspares drives list, select the drive to be removed and
then press Delete to remove the drive as a spare.
5. The specified drive is displayed in the Select Hotspares Drives list.
6. Press Enter to save the removed spare drive assignment. The following prompt is
displayed:
Have you finished managing Hotspare drives?
7. Press Y (for yes) to return to the Main menu.
Initializing a hard drive You must initialize a drive before you can use it as part
of an array. You can tell a drive is not available (and must be initialized) if it is not listed
in the disk selection list or if it is listed but grayed out.
CAUTION:
Initializing a disk deletes all data on the disk. (Actually, it overwrites the
partition table on the disk and makes all the previous data on the disk
inaccessible.) If the drive is a member of an existing array, you might not be able
to use that array again. Do not initialize a disk that is part of a boot array
(numbered 00 in the List of Arrays dialog box). See “Viewing array properties”
on page 241 for information on determining which disks are associated with a
particular array.
To initialize a drive:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Select Initialize Drives from the Main menu.
Select the disks you want to initialize and press Insert.
Press Enter.
Read the warning message and ensure that you have selected the correct devices
to initialize. Press Y to continue.
Making an array bootable You can make an array bootable so the system
boots from the array instead of from a stand-alone (single) device.
To make an array bootable:
1. Select Manage Arrays from the Main menu.
2. Select the array you want to make bootable and press Ctrl+B. This changes the
selected array’s number to 00, making it the controller’s boot array.
3. Restart the system.
Notes:
242
•
You cannot make a non-00 array bootable if the array is in a build/verify or
reconfiguration process.
•
The controller always uses the lowest numbered array as its bootable array. If you
delete Array 00 for any reason, the next higher numbered array becomes the boot
array. Mark the correct array as the bootable array by making it Array 00.
•
If the controller is not a boot device, you can disable its runtime BIOS to conserve
ROM.
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Deleting arrays
CAUTION:
Back up the data on an array before you delete it. All data on the array is lost
when you delete the array, and you cannot restore a deleted array.
To delete an existing array:
1. Select Manage Arrays from the Main menu.
2. Select the array you want to delete and press Delete.
3. From the Array Properties dialog box, press Delete again and then press Enter.
The following message is displayed:
Warning!! Deleting will erase all data from the array.
Do you still want to continue? (Yes/No):
4. Press Yes to delete the array or No to return to the previous menu. In the Array
Properties dialog box, press Delete again and press Enter.
5. Press Esc to return to the previous menu.
Using the scripting features
To use the ACU scripting features, issue the command ACU with one of the following
required switches:
•
/P—Playback mode. This mode configures array settings from a specified script
file.
•
/R—Record mode. This mode saves a controller’s array configuration in a
specified script file for later playback.
On the ACU command line, you can also specify the name of a log file to record the
status of the playback or record operation. The ACU records in the log any errors or
warnings encountered.
When running in playback or record mode, ACU stores the status of the playback or
record operation in the MS-DOS variable ERRORLEVEL on exit, allowing it to be used
within an MS-DOS batch file. See “Error handling” on page 252 for more information
on error handling.
Appendix B. Array Configuration Utility for MS-DOS for SATA
243
The table below lists the required and optional ACU command-line switches.
Switch
Description
/P <file>
Playback mode switch—In this mode, the ACU reads the contents of the
specified script file and creates arrays based on the properties defined in the
script.
The <file> is the name of the script file. It can include a drive, directory, and
filename and extension, but only the filename is required. If no drive or
directory is specified, defaults are used. The file extension is optional.
Note: The ACU exits with an error if you do not include either the /P or the /R
switch (but not both).
/R <file>
Record mode switch—In this mode, the ACU scans the controller’s current
array and port configuration and creates the specified script file based on the
configuration.
The <file> is the name of the script file. It can include a drive, directory, and
filename and extension, but only the filename and extension (.MLC) are
required. If no drive or directory is specified, defaults are used.
Note: The ACU exits with an error if you do not include either the /P or the /R
switch (but not both).
/L <file>
Optional log filename switch—If you include this switch, the ACU records
its activity and any errors it encounters in the log file. If you do not include this
switch, the ACU displays any status and errors on the screen.
The <file> is a standard MS-DOS file, which can include a drive, directory,
filename and extension. Only the filename and extension (.LOG) are required.
If no drive or directory is specified, defaults are used.
/C <number>
Optional controller number switch—In systems with more than one
controller, this switch specifies which controller to change.
The <number> is a controller number. Controller numbers start with zero. The
default is Controller 0.
Note: The number assigned to a particular controller is dependent on the
controller’s physical PCI slot and the order in which your system scans its PCI
slots.
/DC <number>
Delete array switch—Delele the specified array.
The <number> is an array number.
/S
Silent mode switch—Suppresses screen output.
/ALL
Run across all controllers switch
/LIST
List all conrollers switch
Playback mode
Playback mode enables you to create one or more arrays based on the properties
defined in a script file. It also enables you to configure certain properties for each
channel on the controller.
244
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
When you create an array, you can specify any of the array properties listed in the
table below.
Note: In the following table, “Channel” is always 0; “LUN” is always 0; and “ID” always
means “port”.
Property
Type
Description
Supported array types are:
•
Volume
•
RAID 0
•
RAID 1
•
RAID 5
•
RAID 10
Size
Size of the array to be created. Size can be specified in megabyte (MB),
gigabyte (GB), or terabyte (TB) units, or Maximum to specify the maximum
size based on the given type and disks.
Label
Alphanumeric string uniquely identifying the array.
StripeSize
Size (in MB) of contiguous data distributed across a striped array
(RAID 0, RAID 5, or RAID 10).
Cache settings
You can specify the following cache values:
•
ReadCache—Yes (enable), or No (disable)
•
WriteCache—Yes (enable), or No (disable)
Drives
Disk drives to use in creating the array. Drives are identified by their
channel number, ID number, and LUN.
HotspareDrives
Disk drives to assign as spare drives for this array. Drives are identified
by their channel number, ID number, and LUN.
In addition, there are other array properties that enable you to control the various array
settings during creation. See “Array definition block properties” on page 248 for the
complete list of array properties.
Initializing drives By default, when you use playback mode to create arrays, the
ACU initializes only those drives specified by the Drives property keyword in the script
file. It performs this initialization step before creating any new arrays. For example,
consider a script file that defines the following new arrays:
•
RAID 1 with drives=0:0:0, 0:1:0
•
RAID 5 with drives=0:1:0, 0:2:0, 0:3:0
As a result of executing this script file, the ACU initializes all drives comprising the two
arrays before creating any arrays. Any other drives connected to the controller are not
affected.
Initializing a drive automatically deletes any existing arrays with that drive as their
member. For example, if you specify drive 0:0:0 in an array’s Drives property and that
drive happens to be part of a RAID 0 (stripe) array, the ACU deletes the stripe array
when it initializes the drive. Note that existing arrays with drive members that are not
specified in any Drives property within the script are not affected.
In some cases, you might want the ACU to initialize all drives connected to the
controller, even those that are not specified in a script’s Drives property. This ensures
that all drives are initialized and any existing arrays are deleted before any new arrays
are created. You can specify InitializeAll=Yes within any array definition to instruct
the ACU to perform this task. Unlike most array properties, the InitializeAll=Yes
property is a global ACU setting and does not apply only to the array whose definition
Appendix B. Array Configuration Utility for MS-DOS for SATA
245
it appears in. Thus, you need only specify InitializeAll=Yes once within any array
definition to produce the desired action.
Because the ACU reads the entire script file before creating any arrays, the position of
the InitializeAll=Yes property within the script is not significant. Continuing the
previous example, if InitializeAll=Yes is specified in the second RAID 5’s definition,
the ACU initializes all drives before creating the first RAID 0.
Note: If a build/verify is in progress when an array is deleted, it is automatically
terminated.
See “InitializeAll” on page 250 for details on the syntax of the InitializeAll property.
Record mode
Record mode writes an existing controller’s array configuration to a specified script
file, enabling you to create the same configuration by running the ACU in playback
mode with the resulting script. In addition, record mode lists certain controller
properties that can be set in playback mode.
Because the ACU supports only a subset of array types available through the CLI and
the GUI, it cannot record all the possible array configurations. If the ACU encounters
an array that it cannot create it displays a warning (and records the warning in its log
file, if that switch is used) and does not record any properties for that array in its script
file.
The script file is limited to one controller and its associated array configuration files.
Although you can have multiple controllers on a single system, you cannot record all of
the controllers and their associated array configurations in one file. To record multiple
controllers, use the ACU record mode once for each individual controller. Your result
will be multiple files on the same disk with one file corresponding to each controller.
Recording basic controller information The ACU writes basic information
about the controller to the script file header. For example, if you type ACU /R test.mlc,
the contents of test.mlc might include the following:
Controller=0,1:5:0
Controller Name=Adaptec 2410SA
Subsystem ID=0x290
Firmware Version=V4.1-0[7224]
Total Ports=4
Port 0 = 0:1:0 Maxtor 74.534GB 74.502GB
Port 1 = 0:3:0 Maxtor 74.534GB 74.502GB
where:
•
The Controller= line shows the controller number, bus number, device ID
number, and LUN number (always 0 for SATA).
•
Subsystem ID is the unique “SSVID” required by Microsoft and other vendors to
differentiate the product model. The SSVID is used to indentify the controller's
model number during Windows installation and in the Device Manager.
•
Total Ports is the total number of devices that can be attached to the controller.
•
The Port #= line shows the size of drive in gigabytes (GB). The first number is the
total drive capacity; the second number is the actual capacity after subtracting the
space reserved for the RAID signature (metadata).
Determining build/verify/clear status When using playback mode to create
an array, you can specify whether to wait for an array’s initial build/verify or clear to
246
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
complete or to continue while the build/verify or clear proceeds in the background. If
you instruct the ACU to continue (Wait=No), you need to be able to check the status of
a background build/verify or clear task and determine when it is complete.
The ACU provides a way to do this. When you use record mode to record a controller’s
configuration and you specify a log file (/L switch), the ACU writes build/verify and
clear status information about each array in the configuration to the log file. An
application or batch file can then parse the resulting log file to determine whether an
array’s build/verify or clear is complete, in progress (a percentage of the task
completed), or failed.
The following example shows a log file of a recorded configuration consisting of three
arrays:
Reading array information ...Passed
Scanning for Drives ...Passed
Reading cache values...Passed
Array #0 Status : OK
Array #1 Status : BUILD/VERIFY 30%
Array #2 Status : BUILD/VERIFY/CLEAR FAILED
Each status line consists of the prefix:
Array#<n> Status :
where <n> is the array ID, followed by the status. The possible status values are as
follows:
•
OK
Indicates a nonredundant array (no build required) or a redundant array whose
build task completed successfully.
•
BUILD/VERIFY <n>%
CLEAR <n>%
Indicates a build/verify (or clear) is currently in progress, where <n> is the
percentage of the operation that is complete. The percentage is an integer
between 0 and 99, inclusive.
•
BUILD/VERIFY/CLEAR FAILED
Indicates a build/verify or clear that did not complete due to a data error or other
unexpected problem.
When a build/verify task runs on a multilevel array, the build/verify occurs on the child
arrays and not on the parent array. Consequently, the parent task always indicates
0 percent and the child task indicates 0 percent to 100 percent. When a clear task
runs on a multilevel array, the clearing occurs on the parent array and not on the child
arrays. Consequently, the parent task indicates 0 percent to 100 percent and the child
tasks always indicates 0 percent.
Build/verify operations on RAID 10 arrays For a RAID 10 array, the status
message indicates the percent of the build/verify completed for the parent and child
tasks. The status updates to OK when the tasks are complete. A sample RAID 10 build
status is as follows:
Array #1 Status : BUILD/VERIFY = 30%
Script file syntax
An ACU script file consists of the following:
•
Array definition block—Specifies the properties of an array, such as type, size,
and cache settings. The block begins with the keyword Array and ends with the
keyword End.
Appendix B. Array Configuration Utility for MS-DOS for SATA
247
Each array property consists of a property keyword and assigned value, separated by
an equal sign (=). Each property must be on its own line in the script. The order of
properties within a block (other than the starting Array keyword, and the ending End
keyword) is not significant.
Some array properties, such as Type, are required; others are optional. The table
below lists and describes array definition block properties, indicates which properties
are optional, and provides the default value used when that property is not specified.
All keywords can be written in any combination of upper- or lowercase characters.
Script lines can include any number of spaces and tabs both within keywords, or when
separating keywords and their values. Blank lines are ignored.
The pound character (#) indicates the start of a comment. The ACU ignores all
characters on a line that begins with a pound sign. You can use comments following
array property assignments or on their own lines. See “Invoking the ACU and using a
script” on page 253 for a sample script that includes comments.
Array definition block properties The table below lists the properties that
can be specified within an array definition block. The table lists each property’s
keyword, whether it is required, and its default value (if any). Note that the keywords
are arranged so the required keywords are listed first.
Keyword
248
Required?
Default Value
Array
Yes
None
Indicates the start of an array definition
block. See page 249 for details.
Drives
Yes
None
Specifies the devices used in creating
the array. See page 249 for details.
Type
Yes
None
Indicates the type of array to create. See
page 249 for details.
End
Yes
None
Indicates the end of an array definition
block. See page 249 for details.
HotspareDrives
No
None
Specifies the hot spare drives to assign
to the array. See page 249 for details.
InitializeAll
No
No
Indicates whether to initialize all the
drives connected to the controller. See
page 250 for details.
Method
No
Build/Verify
Indicates which method (build/verify,
clear, or quick init) to use when creating
a RAID 1, 5, or 10 array. See page 250
for details.
ReadCache
No
Yes
Indicates whether read caching is
enabled for this array. See page 251 for
details.
Size
No
Maximum
Specifies the size of the array. See page
251 for details.
StripeSize
No
32
Specifies the size of contiguous I/O, in
bytes. See page 251 for details.
Wait
No
Yes
Indicates whether the ACU should wait
for the new array’s build/verify or clear to
complete before continuing. See page
251 for details.
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Description
Required?
Default Value
WaitForBuild
No
Yes
Provided for backward compatibility only.
See page 251 for details.
WriteCache
No
Yes
Indicates whether write caching is
enabled for this array. See page 251 for
details.
Keyword
Description
The following sections describe each of these keywords in detail.
Array Array is a required keyword, indicating the start of an array definition block. It
accepts an optional array label value.
Examples
Array
Array=MyData
Drives Drives is a required keyword, specifying the devices to use in creating the
array. There is no default value.
A drive is identified by its channel number, ID (target), and LUN, separated by colons.
For example, 0:0:0 or 0:1:0. Separate multiple drive identifiers with commas.
CAUTION:
Any drive specified within the script file is initialized, which destroys any data
on that drive. If a drive is specified in more than one array definition block in a
script, it is initialized only once.
Examples
Drives=0:0:0
Drives=0:0:0,0:1:0,0:2:0
Type Type is a required keyword, indicating the array type. There is no default value.
Note: For information about the maximum number of drives supported and minimum
number of drives required, see page 240.
The Type keyword values are:
•
Volume
•
RAID0
•
RAID1
•
RAID5
•
RAID10
Examples
Type=Volume
Type=RAID1
End End is a required keyword, indicating the end of an array definition block.
Example
End
HotspareDrives HotspareDrives is an optional keyword, specifying the spare drives
to assign to the array. Spare drives are specified in the same way as the Drives
property. If HotspareDrives is not specified, no spare drives are assigned to the array.
Appendix B. Array Configuration Utility for MS-DOS for SATA
249
Notes
•
When assigning spare drives to a RAID 10 array, the ACU assigns all the drives in
the list to all the arrays within the multilevel array.
•
ACU only creates dedicated hot spares. If the same drive is assigned to protect
multiple arrays, only the last array that drive is assigned to is protected.
•
The ACU makes no checks to ensure that the amount of available space on the
specified spare drives is sufficient to serve as failover for the given array.
Example
HotspareDrives=0:0:0,0:1:0
InitializeAll InitializeAll is an optional keyword, indicating that all the drives
connected to the controller should be initialized and any existing arrays deleted before
creating a new array. This property applies to all drives on the controller. The default is
InitializeAll=No.
Possible values are as follows:
•
Yes—Initialize all drives.
•
No—Do not initialize all drives; only those drives specified with the Drives
property keyword are initialized.
The InitializeAll keyword is both global and position-independent within a script
file. If InitializeAll=Yes appears in any array definition block within the file, all drives
connected to the controller are initialized and any existing arrays are deleted before
any new arrays are created.
If there is no InitializeAll=Yes property specified anywhere in the script, the ACU
initializes only those drives specified with the Drives property keyword. See
“Initializing a hard drive” on page 242 for more details.
Note that it is not necessary to specify InitializeAll=Yes in more than one array
definition block. If both InitializeAll=Yes and InitializeAll=No are specified within
a script file, regardless of their position within the file, InitializeAll=Yes is the
overriding value.
Examples
InitializeAll=Yes
InitializeAll=No
Method Method is an optional keyword, indicating which method to use when
creating a RAID 5 array. Possible values are:
•
Build (the default)—Build/verify the array.
•
Clear—Clear the array.
•
Quick Init - Make the array available immediately
Overall, the Build method takes longer than Clear, but it enables you to begin using
the array immediately. Although faster, Clear must complete before you can begin
using the array. Quick Init makes the array available immediately, but for RAID 5
write performance is impacted until a Verify with Fix is run on the array.
Note: The Method property applies only to redundant arrays (RAID 1, 5, and 10).
Examples
Method=Build
WaitForClear=No
250
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
ReadCache The ReadCache keyword indicates whether the array uses read caching.
Possible values are:
•
Yes (the default)—Enable read caching.
•
No—Disable read caching.
The default is Yes.
Example
ReadCache=Yes
Size The Size keyword specifies the size of the array. Specify the size as an integer
or a decimal number, followed by the unit keyword MB (megabytes), GB (gigabytes),
or TB (terabytes). A unit keyword is required with a numeric size value. If no unit
keyword is specified, the ACU exits with an error.
Specify Maximum (the default) to create an array using the maximum available space,
based on the array type and drives selected.
Examples
Size=2.5GB
Size=300MB
Size=Maximum
StripeSize
Note: This keyword supports only RAID 0, RAID 5, and RAID 10 arrays.
The StripeSize keyword specifies the size of contiguous I/O (in MB) written to each
member of a striped array before switching to the next member.
The possible values for StripeSize are 16, 32, and 64 (kilobytes). The default is 64.
Example
StripeSize=64
Wait The Wait keyword indicates whether the ACU should wait for the new array’s
build/verify or clear to complete before continuing.
The Wait property is optional; if not specified, the ACU waits for the array’s build/verify
or clear to complete before continuing. Specify Wait=No to allow the ACU to continue
while the build/verify or clear completes in the background.
Array build/verifies and clears any tasks executed entirely on the controller and do not
depend on the ACU or any other host application to complete. If the controller is
powered off before the build/verify or clear completes and is then restarted, the
build/verify or clear task resumes without any user intervention.
Example
Wait=Yes
Wait=No
WaitForBuild The WaitForBuild keyword is provided for backward compatibility
only. Use the Wait keyword instead. The WaitForBuild keyword is still recognized and
can be used interchangeably with the Wait keyword.
WriteCache The WriteCache keyword indicates whether write caching is used for
this array if write caching is supported for the system. Possible values are as follows:
Appendix B. Array Configuration Utility for MS-DOS for SATA
251
•
Yes (the default)—Enable the write cache.
•
No—Disable the write cache.
Note: Setting an array’s WriteCache property to Yes might result in data loss or
corruption during a power failure.
The default is Yes.
Examples
WriteCache=Yes
WriteCache=Always
Error handling
Because the ACU scripting feature is designed to run without user interaction, the
ACU handles errors during record and playback by simply exiting immediately
whenever an error is detected.
Whenever the ACU encounters an error during record or playback—for example, an
unrecognized keyword in a script file—it reports the error and exits. If a log file is
opened, the ACU writes the error message to the log file. Otherwise, it displays the
message on the screen.
Upon exit, the ACU returns its exit status in the DOS environment variable ERRORLEVEL.
When the ACU is run within a DOS batch file, that batch file can examine the ACU’s
exit status using the DOS command IF ERRORLEVEL n. The batch file can use this
command to test the ACU success or failure status. The batch file can test for a
specific error using a series of If ERRORLEVEL n commands.
The table below lists the possible error codes returned by the ACU.
Code
Description
0
ACU ran without changes—The ACU exited with no errors (success) and no
report is required.
1
No controller found—The ACU did not detect any controllers in the system.
2
Syntax or logical error in the script file—The ACU encountered an invalid
command or keyword in the specified script file.
252
3
Unable to open file—The ACU was unable to open the specified script or log file.
4
Error in the command line parameters—You passed an invalid command-line
switch to the ACU. (See “Using the scripting features” on page 243 for the list of
valid command switches.)
5
Unable to read system configuration—The ACU was unable to get the
configuration information from the specified controller.
6
No drives detected—The ACU did not detect any devices attached to the
selected controller.
7
Specified drive not found in system—The device you specified does not exist
on the selected controller.
8
Specified array size too small—You specified an array size that is smaller than
the minimum size allowed for this array.
9
Specified array size too big—You specified an array size that is larger than the
maximum size allowed for this array.
10
Number of drives do not match the array type—The number of drives you
selected is invalid for the type of array specified.
11
Unable to initialize drive—The ACU was unable to initialize one or more
devices.
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Code
Description
12
Error occurred while creating array—The ACU encountered an error creating
an array.
13
Too many spare drives assigned—You attempted to assign more than the
maximum number of spare drives allowed for the specified array.
14
Insufficient memory to run the application—There is not enough memory to
run the ACU.
15
Incorrect controller number—The controller number you specified is invalid or
out-of-range.
16
Controller not responding—The controller has stopped responding to the ACU.
17
Build/Verify/Clear failed—The build/verify or clear running on one or more arrays
has failed.
100
You ran ACU and made changes—The ACU exited with no errors (success) and
you must restart the computer.
Playback and record notes
When using ACU in playback or record mode, note the following:
•
When recording an array, the ACU does not create a Wait keyword within an
array’s definition block in a script file.
When playing back any script file generated from the ACU record option, the ACU
uses the default setting Wait=Yes when creating an array unless you first edit the
script file and include a Wait=No line in the array’s definition block.
•
When recording a RAID 10, the ACU cannot map spare drives assigned to the
individual mirror sets to the HotspareDrives list in the resultant script file. The
script file syntax allows only a single list of spare drives to be assigned to any
given array.
In this case, the ACU creates the HotspareDrives list using all the drives assigned
to the lower-level mirror set arrays within the RAID 10. When playing back this
script, the ACU assigns all the drives in the HotspareDrives list to all the mirror set
arrays making up the RAID 10. However, this might not exactly match the original
spare drive assignments to the mirror set arrays.
Invoking the ACU and using a script
The following MS-DOS command invokes the ACU and creates arrays on controller 1
based on the array properties defined in the script file A:\RAID.ACU. It also saves a log
of the operation in the log file C:\RAID.LOG.
A:\> ACU /P A:\RAID.ACU /L C:\RAID.LOG /C1
The following sample script file is a sample RAID.ACU script as referred to in the
previous ACU command. This script creates the following arrays—a 500 MB, singledisk volume and a 2-GB, two-drive RAID 1 with a hot spare.
# Script to create volume, mirror, and RAID 5 arrays
# Create a 500MB volume labeled ‘MySystem’
Array=MySystem
Type=Volume
Size=500MB
Drives=0:0:0
End
# Create a 2GB mirror labeled ‘MyMirror’
Array=MyMirror
Type=RAID1
Size=2GB
Appendix B. Array Configuration Utility for MS-DOS for SATA
253
# Use drives 1 and 2
Drives=0:1:0,0:2:0
# Disable write cache
WriteCache=No
# Assign 1 spare drive
HotspareDrives=0:3:0
End
The following sample script file creates a maximum-size three-drive RAID 5.
# Create a maximum size RAID 5 labeled ‘MyData’
Array=MyData
Type=RAID5
Size=Maximum
# Use the maximum stripe size
StripeSize=64
# Clear the array (don’t build/verify it)
Method=Clear
# Don’t wait for clear to complete
Wait=No
# Use drives 0, 1, 2
Drives=0:0:0, 0:1:0, 0:2:0
End
254
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Appendix C. Configuring ServeRAID SNMP support
This appendix describes how to configure SNMP support for the ServeRAID software.
The ServeRAID Manager supports SNMP “gets” and “traps” through the use of an
SNMP sub-agent.
Windows setup
Use the following procedure to install and configure ServeRAID SNMP support for
Microsoft Windows:
Note: Be sure your Windows installation includes SNMP support! By default,
Windows 2000, Windows NT, and Windows XP do not install SNMP.
1. Run the ServeRAID Manager installation program; see “Installing the ServeRAID
Manager program” on page 133.
2. When the “Install SNMP Support” window opens, select Yes, install SNMP
support.
3. Follow the instructions on screen to complete the ServeRAID Manager
installation.
4. Restart your computer.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
255
5. Start the Windows Computer Management tool; then, Select Services from the
tree.
6. Double-click the SNMP service. The SNMP Service Properties window opens.
7. Click the Traps note tab; then, enter the IP address of each machine on which
you want to enable traps.
8. Click OK.
9. Start the SNMP service.
NetWare setup
Use the following procedure to install ServeRAID SNMP support for Novell NetWare:
1. At the command prompt, type the following and press Enter:
load AUS-SNMP.NLM
Refer to your Novell NetWare documentation for information on configuring traps.
256
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Linux setup
For the Linux operating system, the ServeRAID SNMP agent is a sub-agent that
interfaces with the UCD-SNMP agentx architecture. UCD-SNMP is a third-party
package for Linux; for information, documentation, and downloads, see www.netsnmp.org.
Use the following procedure to configure ServeRAID SNMP support for Linux:
1. Install the ServeRAID Manager program; see “Installing the ServeRAID Manager
program” on page 133.
2. Configure the UCD-SNMP master agent to be used with agentx.
3. Start the ServeRAID SNMP sub-agent: From the ServeRAID Manager installation
directory on the Linux machine, run the aus-snmpd executable.
Refer to your Linux documentation for information on configuring UCD-SNMP, agentx,
and setting up traps.
SCO and Unixware setup
For the SCO and Unixware operating system, the ServeRAID SNMP agent is an
SMUX sub-agent that interfaces with the Unix SMUX architecture.
Use the following procedure to configure ServeRAID SNMP support for SCO and
Unixware:
1. Install the ServeRAID Manager program; see “Installing the ServeRAID Manager
program” on page 133.
2. Configure the SMUX master agent.
3. Start the ServeRAID SNMP sub-agent: From the ServeRAID Manager installation
directory on the SCO or Unixware machine, run the aussnmpd executable.
Refer to your SCO or Unixware documentation for information on configuring the
SMUX master agent and setting up traps.
Appendix C. Configuring ServeRAID SNMP support
257
258
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Appendix D. Warranty information
This section contains information about your warranty period and the service and
support that are provided by your warranty.
Warranty period
The warranty period varies by machine type and country or region.
Contact your place of purchase for warranty service information. Some IBM Machines
are eligible for on-site warranty service depending on the country or region where
service is performed.
Prior to on-site warranty service, you are required to go through problem
determination with an IBM service specialist call center technician.
This paragraph applies only to products with a warranty period of 3 years on parts and
1 year on labor. A warranty period of 3 years on parts and 1 year on labor means that
IBM will provide warranty service without charge for:
1. parts and labor during the first year of the warranty period
2. parts only, on an exchange basis, in the second and third years of the warranty
period. IBM will charge you for any labor it provides in performance of the repair or
replacement.
The IBM Machine Warranties Web site at
http://www.ibm.com/servers/support/machine_warranties/ contains a worldwide
overview of the IBM Statement of Limited Warranty for IBM Machines, a glossary of
terms used in the Statement of Limited Warranty, Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ),
and links to Product Support Web pages. The IBM Statement of Limited Warranty is
available from this Web site in 29 languages in Portable Document Format (PDF).
Machine
•
IBM ServeRAID-4H Ultra160 SCSI Controller
•
IBM ServeRAID-4Mx Ultra160 SCSI Controller
•
IBM ServeRAID-4Lx Ultra160 SCSI Controller
•
IBM ServeRAID-5i Ultra320 SCSI Controller
•
IBM ServeRAID-6M Ultra320 SCSI Controller
•
IBM ServeRAID-6i/6i+ Ultra320 SCSI Controller
•
IBM ServeRAID-7k Ultra320 SCSI Controller
•
IBM ServeRAID-7t SATA Controller
Country or region
Warranty period
Service delivery method
Worldwide
3 years
Customer carry-in or mailin
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
259
Problem determination
Prior to on-site warranty service, you are required to go through problem
determination with an IBM service specialist call center technician. The service
specialist will run diagnostic tests on the hardware and check the software.
Running diagnostics: The IBM service specialist will help you determine
whether your equipment is functioning as specified. It might be necessary to isolate
the failing xSeries, Netfinity, or IntelliStation system; IBM component; or both from any
active production environment to run diagnostics and perform defect-isolation
programs. You are responsible for making the system, IBM component, or both
available for running diagnostics and defect-isolation programs.
Checking software: The IBM service specialist will help you ensure that the
correct BIOS code, firmware, device drivers, and other supporting IBM software are
installed and correctly configured. It might be necessary to manually gather
information about the relevant software levels or run IBM-approved utility programs to
gather this information. It might be necessary to isolate the failing system from any
active production environment to gather this information. You are responsible, with
assistance from the service specialist, for gathering this information. The IBM
Statement of Limited Warranty does not include on-site assistance with this activity.
Warranty service and support
With the original purchase of an IBM xSeries or IntelliStation system, you have access
to extensive service and support. During the IBM Machine warranty period, you may
call IBM or your reseller for problem-determination assistance under the terms of the
IBM Statement of Limited Warranty.
The following services are available during the warranty period:
•
Problem determination - Trained personnel are available to assist you with
determining if you have a hardware problem and deciding what action is
necessary to fix the problem.
•
IBM hardware repair - If the problem is determined to be caused by IBM
hardware under warranty, trained service personnel are available to provide the
applicable level of service, either on-site or at an IBM service center as
determined by IBM.
•
Engineering Change management - Occasionally, there might be changes that
are required after a product has been shipped from IBM. In those instances, IBM
will make Engineering Changes (ECs) available that apply to your hardware.
•
Customer replaceable units (CRUs) - Some parts of IBM xSeries and
IntelliStation systems are designated as customer replaceable units. IBM ships
CRUs to you for replacement by you. CRUs include keyboards, monitors,
memory, diskette drives, hard disk drives, and mice (this list is not inclusive of all
CRUs).
The following items are not covered under warranty service:
•
Replacement or use of non-IBM parts. All IBM parts contain a 7-character
identification in the format IBM FRU XXXXXXX.
•
Identification of software problem sources.
•
Installation of customer replaceable units (CRUs).
•
Installation and configuration of BIOS code, firmware, or device drivers that are
designated as customer installable.
See the IBM Statement of Limited Warranty for a full explanation of IBM warranty
terms. Be sure to retain your proof of purchase to obtain warranty service.
260
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Please have the following information ready when you call:
•
The machine type and model of your IBM hardware product (if available)
•
Serial numbers of your IBM hardware products
•
A description of the problem
•
The exact wording of any error messages
•
Hardware and software configuration information
International Warranty Service
If you travel with your xSeries or IntelliStation system or relocate it to a country or
region where your system is sold and serviced by IBM or IBM resellers authorized to
perform warranty service, International Warranty Service (IWS) is available during the
warranty period. Eligible IBM systems are identified by their four-digit machine types.
You can obtain IWS through the service delivery method (such as depot, carry-in, or
on-site) provided in the servicing country or region. Service methods and procedures
vary by country or region, and some service or parts might not be available in all
countries and regions. Service centers in certain countries or regions might not be
able to service all models of a particular machine type. In addition, some countries or
regions might have fees and restrictions that apply at the time of service.
To determine whether your system is eligible for IWS, go to
http://www.ibm.com/pc/support/ and click Warranty lookup.
Purchasing additional services
During and after the warranty period, you can purchase additional services, such as
support for IBM and non-IBM hardware, operating systems, and application programs;
network setup and configuration; upgraded or extended hardware repair services; and
custom installations. Service availability and service name might vary by country or
region.
For more information about these services, contact your IBM marketing
representative.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
261
IBM Statement of Limited Warranty Z125-4753-06 8/2000
Part 1 - General Terms
This Statement of Limited Warranty includes Part 1 - General Terms and Part 2 Country-unique Terms. The terms of Part 2 replace or modify those of Part 1. The
warranties provided by IBM in this Statement of Limited Warranty apply only to
Machines you purchase for your use, and not for resale, from IBM or your reseller.
The term “Machine” means an IBM machine, its features, conversions, upgrades,
elements, or accessories, or any combination of them. The term “Machine” does not
include any software programs, whether pre-loaded with the Machine, installed
subsequently or otherwise. Unless IBM specifies otherwise, the following warranties
apply only in the country where you acquire the Machine. Nothing in this Statement of
Limited Warranty affects any statutory rights of consumers that cannot be waived or
limited by contract. If you have any questions, contact IBM or your reseller.
The IBM Warranty for Machines: IBM warrants that each Machine 1) is free from
defects in materials and workmanship and 2) conforms to IBM's Official Published
Specifications (“Specifications”). The warranty period for a Machine is a specified,
fixed period commencing on its Date of Installation. The date on your sales receipt is
the Date of Installation unless IBM or your reseller informs you otherwise.
If a Machine does not function as warranted during the warranty period, and IBM or
your reseller are unable to either 1) make it do so or 2) replace it with one that is at
least functionally equivalent, you may return it to your place of purchase and your
money will be refunded.
Extent of Warranty: The warranty does not cover the repair or exchange of a
Machine resulting from misuse, accident, modification, unsuitable physical or
operating environment, improper maintenance by you, or failure caused by a product
for which IBM is not responsible. The warranty is voided by removal or alteration of
Machine or parts identification labels.
THESE WARRANTIES ARE YOUR EXCLUSIVE WARRANTIES AND REPLACE
ALL OTHER WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED,
INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OR
CONDITIONS OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE. THESE WARRANTIES GIVE YOU SPECIFIC LEGAL RIGHTS AND
YOU MAY ALSO HAVE OTHER RIGHTS WHICH VARY FROM JURISDICTION TO
JURISDICTION. SOME JURISDICTIONS DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR
LIMITATION OF EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, SO THE ABOVE
EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU. IN THAT EVENT, SUCH
WARRANTIES ARE LIMITED IN DURATION TO THE WARRANTY PERIOD. NO
WARRANTIES APPLY AFTER THAT PERIOD.
Items Not Covered by Warranty: IBM does not warrant uninterrupted or error-free
operation of a Machine. Any technical or other support provided for a Machine under
warranty, such as assistance via telephone with “how-to” questions and those
regarding Machine set-up and installation, will be provided WITHOUT WARRANTIES
OF ANY KIND.
Warranty Service: To obtain warranty service for a Machine, contact IBM or your
reseller. If you do not register your Machine with IBM, you may be required to present
proof of purchase.
During the warranty period, IBM or your reseller, if approved by IBM to provide
warranty service, provides without charge certain types of repair and exchange
service to keep Machines in, or restore them to, conformance with their Specifications.
262
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
IBM or your reseller will inform you of the available types of service for a Machine
based on its country of installation. At its discretion, IBM or your reseller will 1) either
repair or exchange the failing Machine and 2) provide the service either at your
location or a service center. IBM or your reseller will also manage and install selected
engineering changes that apply to the Machine.
Some parts of IBM Machines are designated as Customer Replaceable Units (called
“CRUs”), e.g., keyboards, memory, or hard disk drives. IBM ships CRUs to you for
replacement by you. You must return all defective CRUs to IBM within 30 days of your
receipt of the replacement CRU. You are responsible for downloading designated
Machine Code and Licensed Internal Code updates from an IBM Internet Web site or
from other electronic media, and following the instructions that IBM provides.
When warranty service involves the exchange of a Machine or part, the item IBM or
your reseller replaces becomes its property and the replacement becomes yours. You
represent that all removed items are genuine and unaltered. The replacement may not
be new, but will be in good working order and at least functionally equivalent to the
item replaced. The replacement assumes the warranty service status of the replaced
item. Many features, conversions, or upgrades involve the removal of parts and their
return to IBM. A part that replaces a removed part will assume the warranty service
status of the removed part.
Before IBM or your reseller exchanges a Machine or part, you agree to remove all
features, parts, options, alterations, and attachments not under warranty service.
You also agree to
1. ensure that the Machine is free of any legal obligations or restrictions that prevent
its exchange;
2. obtain authorization from the owner to have IBM or your reseller service a
Machine that you do not own; and
3. where applicable, before service is provided:
a. follow the problem determination, problem analysis, and service request
procedures that IBM or your reseller provides;
b. secure all programs, data, and funds contained in a Machine;
c. provide IBM or your reseller with sufficient, free, and safe access to your
facilities to permit them to fulfill their obligations; and
d. inform IBM or your reseller of changes in a Machine's location.
IBM is responsible for loss of, or damage to, your Machine while it is 1) in IBM's
possession or 2) in transit in those cases where IBM is responsible for the
transportation charges.
Neither IBM nor your reseller is responsible for any of your confidential, proprietary or
personal information contained in a Machine which you return to IBM or your reseller
for any reason. You should remove all such information from the Machine prior to its
return.
Limitation of Liability: Circumstances may arise where, because of a default on
IBM's part or other liability, you are entitled to recover damages from IBM. In each
such instance, regardless of the basis on which you are entitled to claim damages
from IBM (including fundamental breach, negligence, misrepresentation, or other
contract or tort claim), except for any liability that cannot be waived or limited by
applicable laws, IBM is liable for no more than
1. damages for bodily injury (including death) and damage to real property and
tangible personal property; and
2. the amount of any other actual direct damages, up to the charges (if recurring, 12
months' charges apply) for the Machine that is subject of the claim. For purposes
Appendix D. Warranty information
263
of this item, the term “Machine” includes Machine Code and Licensed Internal
Code.
This limit also applies to IBM's suppliers and your reseller. It is the maximum for
which IBM, its suppliers, and your reseller are collectively responsible.
UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES IS IBM LIABLE FOR ANY OF THE FOLLOWING:
1) THIRD-PARTY CLAIMS AGAINST YOU FOR DAMAGES (OTHER THAN THOSE
UNDER THE FIRST ITEM LISTED ABOVE); 2) LOSS OF, OR DAMAGE TO, YOUR
RECORDS OR DATA; OR 3) SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR INDIRECT DAMAGES
OR FOR ANY ECONOMIC CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, LOST PROFITS OR
LOST SAVINGS, EVEN IF IBM, ITS SUPPLIERS OR YOUR RESELLER IS
INFORMED OF THEIR POSSIBILITY. SOME JURISDICTIONS DO NOT ALLOW
THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION OR EXCLUSION MAY NOT APPLY TO
YOU.
Governing Law: Both you and IBM consent to the application of the laws of the
country in which you acquired the Machine to govern, interpret, and enforce all of your
and IBM’s rights, duties, and obligations arising from, or relating in any manner to, the
subject matter of this Agreement, without regard to conflict of law principles.
Part 2 - Country-unique Terms
AMERICAS
BRAZIL
Governing Law: The following is added after the first sentence:
Any litigation arising from this Agreement will be settled exclusively by the court of Rio
de Janeiro.
NORTH AMERICA
Warranty Service: The following is added to this Section:
To obtain warranty service from IBM in Canada or the United States, call 1-800-IBMSERV (426-7378).
CANADA
Governing Law: The following replaces “laws of the country in which you acquired
the Machine” in the first sentence:
laws in the Province of Ontario.
UNITED STATES
Governing Law: The following replaces “laws of the country in which you acquired
the Machine” in the first sentence:
laws of the State of New York.
ASIA PACIFIC
AUSTRALIA
The IBM Warranty for Machines: The following paragraph is added to this Section:
The warranties specified in this Section are in addition to any rights you may have
under the Trade Practices Act 1974 or other similar legislation and are only limited to
the extent permitted by the applicable legislation.
264
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Limitation of Liability: The following is added to this Section:
Where IBM is in breach of a condition or warranty implied by the Trade Practices Act
1974 or other similar legislation, IBM's liability is limited to the repair or replacement of
the goods or the supply of equivalent goods. Where that condition or warranty relates
to right to sell, quiet possession or clear title, or the goods are of a kind ordinarily
acquired for personal, domestic or household use or consumption, then none of the
limitations in this paragraph apply.
Governing Law: The following replaces “laws of the country in which you acquired
the Machine” in the first sentence:
laws of the State or Territory.
CAMBODIA, LAOS, AND VIETNAM
Governing Law: The following replaces “laws of the country in which you acquired
the Machine” in the first sentence:
laws of the State of New York.
The following is added to this Section:
Disputes and differences arising out of or in connection with this Agreement shall be
finally settled by arbitration which shall be held in Singapore in accordance with the
rules of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC). The arbitrator or arbitrators
designated in conformity with those rules shall have the power to rule on their own
competence and on the validity of the Agreement to submit to arbitration. The
arbitration award shall be final and binding for the parties without appeal and the
arbitral award shall be in writing and set forth the findings of fact and the conclusions
of law.
All proceedings shall be conducted, including all documents presented in such
proceedings, in the English language. The number of arbitrators shall be three, with
each side to the dispute being entitled to appoint one arbitrator.
The two arbitrators appointed by the parties shall appoint a third arbitrator before
proceeding upon the reference. The third arbitrator shall act as chairman of the
proceedings. Vacancies in the post of chairman shall be filled by the president of the
ICC. Other vacancies shall be filled by the respective nominating party. Proceedings
shall continue from the stage they were at when the vacancy occurred.
If one of the parties refuses or otherwise fails to appoint an arbitrator within 30 days of
the date the other party appoints its, the first appointed arbitrator shall be the sole
arbitrator, provided that the arbitrator was validly and properly appointed.
The English language version of this Agreement prevails over any other language
version.
HONG KONG AND MACAU
Governing Law: The following replaces “laws of the country in which you acquired
the Machine” in the first sentence:
laws of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.
INDIA
Limitation of Liability: The following replaces items 1 and 2 of this Section:
1. liability for bodily injury (including death) or damage to real property and tangible
personal property will be limited to that caused by IBM's negligence;
2. as to any other actual damage arising in any situation involving nonperformance
by IBM pursuant to, or in any way related to the subject of this Statement of
Appendix D. Warranty information
265
Limited Warranty, IBM's liability will be limited to the charge paid by you for the
individual Machine that is the subject of the claim.
JAPAN
Governing Law: The following sentence is added to this Section:
Any doubts concerning this Agreement will be initially resolved between us in good
faith and in accordance with the principle of mutual trust.
NEW ZEALAND
The IBM Warranty for Machines: The following paragraph is added to this Section:
The warranties specified in this Section are in addition to any rights you may have
under the Consumer Guarantees Act 1993 or other legislation which cannot be
excluded or limited. The Consumer Guarantees Act 1993 will not apply in respect of
any goods which IBM provides, if you require the goods for the purposes of a
business as defined in that Act.
Limitation of Liability: The following is added to this Section:
Where Machines are not acquired for the purposes of a business as defined in the
Consumer Guarantees Act 1993, the limitations in this Section are subject to the
limitations in that Act.
PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA (PRC)
Governing Law: The following replaces this Section:
Both you and IBM consent to the application of the laws of the State of New York
(except when local law requires otherwise) to govern, interpret, and enforce all your
and IBM’s rights, duties, and obligations arising from, or relating in any manner to, the
subject matter of this Agreement, without regard to conflict of law principles.
Any disputes arising from or in connection with this Agreement will first be resolved by
friendly negotiations, failing which either of us has the right to submit the dispute to the
China International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission in Beijing, the PRC,
for arbitration in accordance with its arbitration rules in force at the time. The
arbitration tribunal will consist of three arbitrators. The language to be used therein will
be English and Chinese. An arbitral award will be final and binding on all the parties,
and will be enforceable under the Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of
Foreign Arbitral Awards (1958).
The arbitration fee will be borne by the losing party unless otherwise determined by
the arbitral award.
During the course of arbitration, this Agreement will continue to be performed except
for the part which the parties are disputing and which is undergoing arbitration.
EUROPE, MIDDLE EAST, AFRICA (EMEA)
THE FOLLOWING TERMS APPLY TO ALL EMEA COUNTRIES:
The terms of this Statement of Limited Warranty apply to Machines purchased from
IBM or an IBM reseller.
Warranty Service: If you purchase an IBM Machine in Austria, Belgium, Denmark,
Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania,
Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United
Kingdom, you may obtain warranty service for that Machine in any of those countries
from either (1) an IBM reseller approved to perform warranty service or (2) from IBM. If
you purchase an IBM Personal Computer Machine in Albania, Armenia, Belarus,
266
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Georgia, Hungary,
Kazakhstan, Kirghizia, Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, Former Yugoslav Republic of
Macedonia (FYROM), Moldova, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovak Republic, Slovenia,
or Ukraine, you may obtain warranty service for that Machine in any of those countries
from either (1) an IBM reseller approved to perform warranty service or (2) from IBM.
If you purchase an IBM Machine in a Middle Eastern or African country, you may
obtain warranty service for that Machine from the IBM entity within the country of
purchase, if that IBM entity provides warranty service in that country, or from an IBM
reseller, approved by IBM to perform warranty service on that Machine in that country.
Warranty service in Africa is available within 50 kilometers of an IBM authorized
service provider. You are responsible for transportation costs for Machines located
outside 50 kilometers of an IBM authorized service provider.
Governing Law: The applicable laws that govern, interpret and enforce rights, duties,
and obligations of each of us arising from, or relating in any manner to, the subject
matter of this Statement, without regard to conflict of laws principles, as well as
Country-unique terms and competent court for this Statement are those of the country
in which the warranty service is being provided, except that in 1) Albania, BosniaHerzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Hungary, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia,
Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan,
Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan, the
laws of Austria apply; 2) Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, the laws of Finland apply; 3)
Algeria, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic,
Chad, Congo, Djibouti, Democratic Republic of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, France,
Gabon, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Ivory Coast, Lebanon, Mali, Mauritania,
Morocco, Niger, Senegal, Togo, and Tunisia, this Agreement will be construed and
the legal relations between the parties will be determined in accordance with the
French laws and all disputes arising out of this Agreement or related to its violation or
execution, including summary proceedings, will be settled exclusively by the
Commercial Court of Paris; 4) Angola, Bahrain, Botswana, Burundi, Egypt, Eritrea,
Ethiopia, Ghana, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Liberia, Malawi, Malta, Mozambique,
Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Rwanda, Sao Tome, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone,
Somalia, Tanzania, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, West
Bank/Gaza, Yemen, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, this Agreement will be governed by
English Law and disputes relating to it will be submitted to the exclusive jurisdiction of
the English courts; and 5) in Greece, Israel, Italy, Portugal, and Spain any legal claim
arising out of this Statement will be brought before, and finally settled by, the
competent court of Athens, Tel Aviv, Milan, Lisbon, and Madrid, respectively.
THE FOLLOWING TERMS APPLY TO THE COUNTRY SPECIFIED:
AUSTRIA AND GERMANY
The IBM Warranty for Machines: The following replaces the first sentence of the first
paragraph of this Section:
The warranty for an IBM Machine covers the functionality of the Machine for its normal
use and the Machine's conformity to its Specifications.
The following paragraphs are added to this Section:
The minimum warranty period for Machines is six months. In case IBM or your reseller
is unable to repair an IBM Machine, you can alternatively ask for a partial refund as far
as justified by the reduced value of the unrepaired Machine or ask for a cancellation of
the respective agreement for such Machine and get your money refunded.
Extent of Warranty: The second paragraph does not apply.
Appendix D. Warranty information
267
Warranty Service: The following is added to this Section:
During the warranty period, transportation for delivery of the failing Machine to IBM will
be at IBM's expense.
Limitation of Liability: The following paragraph is added to this Section:
The limitations and exclusions specified in the Statement of Limited Warranty will not
apply to damages caused by IBM with fraud or gross negligence and for express
warranty.
The following sentence is added to the end of item 2:
IBM’s liability under this item is limited to the violation of essential contractual terms in
cases of ordinary negligence.
EGYPT
Limitation of Liability: The following replaces item 2 in this Section:
as to any other actual direct damages, IBM's liability will be limited to the total amount
you paid for the Machine that is the subject of the claim. For purposes of this item, the
term “Machine” includes Machine Code and Licensed Internal Code.
Applicability of suppliers and resellers (unchanged).
FRANCE
Limitation of Liability: The following replaces the second sentence of the first
paragraph of this Section:
In such instances, regardless of the basis on which you are entitled to claim damages
from IBM, IBM is liable for no more than: (items 1 and 2 unchanged).
IRELAND
Extent of Warranty: The following is added to this Section:
Except as expressly provided in these terms and conditions, all statutory conditions,
including all warranties implied, but without prejudice to the generality of the foregoing
all warranties implied by the Sale of Goods Act 1893 or the Sale of Goods and Supply
of Services Act 1980 are hereby excluded.
Limitation of Liability: The following replaces items one and two of the first
paragraph of this Section:
1. death or personal injury or physical damage to your real property solely caused by
IBM's negligence; and
2. the amount of any other actual direct damages, up to 125 percent of the charges (if
recurring, the 12 months' charges apply) for the Machine that is the subject of the
claim or which otherwise gives rise to the claim.
Applicability of suppliers and resellers (unchanged).
The following paragraph is added at the end of this Section:
IBM's entire liability and your sole remedy, whether in contract or in tort, in respect of
any default shall be limited to damages.
ITALY
Limitation of Liability: The following replaces the second sentence in the first
paragraph:
In each such instance unless otherwise provided by mandatory law, IBM is liable for
no more than:
1. (unchanged)
2. as to any other actual damage arising in all situations involving nonperformance by
268
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
IBM pursuant to, or in any way related to the subject matter of this Statement of
Warranty, IBM's liability, will be limited to the total amount you paid for the Machine
that is the subject of the claim.
Applicability of suppliers and resellers (unchanged).
The following replaces the third paragraph of this Section:
Unless otherwise provided by mandatory law, IBM and your reseller are not liable for
any of the following: (items 1 and 2 unchanged) 3) indirect damages, even if IBM or
your reseller is informed of their possibility.
SOUTH AFRICA, NAMIBIA, BOTSWANA, LESOTHO AND SWAZILAND
Limitation of Liability: The following is added to this Section:
IBM's entire liability to you for actual damages arising in all situations involving
nonperformance by IBM in respect of the subject matter of this Statement of Warranty
will be limited to the charge paid by you for the individual Machine that is the subject of
your claim from IBM.
UNITED KINGDOM
Limitation of Liability: The following replaces items 1 and 2 of the first paragraph of
this Section:
1. death or personal injury or physical damage to your real property solely caused by
IBM's negligence;
2. the amount of any other actual direct damages or loss, up to 125 percent of the
charges (if recurring, the 12 months' charges apply) for the Machine that is the
subject of the claim or which otherwise gives rise to the claim;
The following item is added to this paragraph:
3. breach of IBM's obligations implied by Section 12 of the Sale of Goods Act 1979 or
Section 2 of the Supply of Goods and Services Act 1982.
Applicability of suppliers and resellers (unchanged).
The following is added to the end of this Section:
IBM's entire liability and your sole remedy, whether in contract or in tort, in respect of
any default shall be limited to damages.
Appendix D. Warranty information
269
270
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Appendix E. Notices
This information was developed for products and services offered in the U.S.A.
IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in
other countries. Consult your local IBM representative for information on the products
and services currently available in your area. Any reference to an IBM product,
program, or service is not intended to state or imply that only that IBM product,
program, or service may be used. Any functionally equivalent product, program, or
service that does not infringe any IBM intellectual property right may be used instead.
However, it is the user’s responsibility to evaluate and verify the operation of any nonIBM product, program, or service.
IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter
described in this document. The furnishing of this document does not give you any
license to these patents. You can send license inquiries, in writing, to:
IBM Director of Licensing
IBM Corporation
North Castle Drive
Armonk, NY 10504-1785
U.S.A.
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION PROVIDES THIS
PUBLICATION “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS
OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES
OF NON-INFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimer of express or implied warranties in
certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply to you.
This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors.
Changes are periodically made to the information herein; these changes will be
incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may make improvements and/or
changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication at any
time without notice.
Any references in this information to non-IBM Web sites are provided for convenience
only and do not in any manner serve as an endorsement of those Web sites. The
materials at those Web sites are not part of the materials for this IBM product, and use
of those Web sites is at your own risk.
IBM may use or distribute any of the information you supply in any way it believes
appropriate without incurring any obligation to you.
Edition notice
© COPYRIGHT INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION, 2004.
All rights reserved.
Note to U.S. Government Users Restricted Rights — Use, duplication or disclosure
restricted by GSA ADP Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
271
Trademarks
The following terms are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation in
the United States, other countries, or both:
Active Memory
Predictive Failure
Analysis
Active PCI
PS/2
Active PCI-X
ServeRAID
Alert on LAN
ServerGuide
C2T Interconnect
ServerProven
Chipkill
TechConnect
EtherJet
Tivoli
e-business logo
Tivoli Enterprise
Eserver
Update Connector
FlashCopy
Wake on LAN
IBM
XA-32
IntelliStation
XA-64
Light Path Diagnostics
X-Architecture
NetBAY
XceL4
Netfinity
XpandOnDemand
NetView
xSeries
OS/2 WARP
Lotus, Lotus Notes, SmartSuite, and Domino are trademarks of Lotus Development
Corporation and/or IBM Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both.
ActionMedia, LANDesk, MMX, Pentium, and ProShare are trademarks of Intel
Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both.
Adaptec and HostRAID are trademarks or registered trademarks of Adaptec, Inc.
Microsoft, Windows, and Windows NT are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the
United States, other countries, or both.
UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other
countries.
Java and all Java-based trademarks and logos are trademarks or registered
trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the United States, other countries, or both.
Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.
Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of
others.
272
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Important notes
Processor speeds indicate the internal clock speed of the microprocessor; other
factors also affect application performance.
CD-ROM drive speeds list the variable read rate. Actual speeds vary and are often
less than the maximum possible.
When referring to processor storage, real and virtual storage, or channel volume, KB
stands for approximately 1000 bytes, MB stands for approximately 1 000 000 bytes,
and GB stands for approximately 1 000 000 000 bytes.
When referring to hard disk drive capacity or communications volume, MB stands for
1000000 bytes, and GB stands for 1000 000 000 bytes. Total user-accessible
capacity may vary depending on operating environments.
Maximum internal hard disk drive capacities assume the replacement of any standard
hard disk drives and population of all hard disk drive bays with the largest currently
supported drives available from IBM.
Maximum memory may require replacement of the standard memory with an optional
memory module.
IBM makes no representation or warranties regarding non-IBM products and services
that are ServerProven, including but not limited to the implied warranties of
merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. These products are offered and
warranted solely by third parties.
IBM makes no representations or warranties with respect to non-IBM products.
Support (if any) for the non-IBM products is provided by the third party, not IBM.
Some software may differ from its retail version (if available), and may not include
user manuals or all program functionality.
Product recycling and disposal
This unit contains materials such as circuit boards, cables, electromagnetic
compatibility gaskets, and connectors which may contain lead and copper/beryllium
alloys that require special handling and disposal at end of life. Before this unit is
disposed of, these materials must be removed and recycled or discarded according to
applicable regulations. IBM offers product-return programs in several countries. For
country-specific instructions, refer to the following Web site:
http://www.ibm.com/ibm/environment/products/prp.shtml.
This product may contain a sealed lead acid, nickel cadmium, nickel metal
hydride, lithium, or lithium ion battery. Consult your user manual or service
manual for specific battery information. The battery must be recycled or
disposed of properly. Recycling facilities may not be available in your area. For
information on disposal of batteries, contact your local waste disposal facility.
In the United States, IBM has established a collection process for reuse, recycling, or
proper disposal of used IBM sealed lead acid, nickel cadmium, nickel metal hydride,
and battery packs from IBM equipment. For information on proper disposal of these
batteries, contact IBM at 1-800-426-4333. Have the IBM part number listed on the
battery available prior to your call.
Appendix E. Notices
273
Electronic emission notices
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) statement
Note: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class
A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to
provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is
operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can
radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the
instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications.
Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful
interference, in which case the user will be required to correct the interference at his
own expense.
Properly shielded and grounded cables and connectors must be used in order to meet
FCC emission limits. IBM is not responsible for any radio or television interference
caused by using other than recommended cables and connectors or by using other
than recommended cables and connectors or by unauthorized changes or
modifications to this equipment. Unauthorized changes or modifications could void the
user's authority to operate the equipment.
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the
following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and (2)
this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may
cause undesired operation.
Industry Canada Class A emission compliance statement
This Class A digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.
Avis de conformité à la réglementation d'Industrie Canada
Cet appareil numérique de la classe A est conforme à la norme NMB-003 du Canada.
Australia and New Zealand Class A statement
Attention: This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment this product may
cause radio interference in which case the user may be required to take adequate
measures.
United Kingdom telecommunications safety requirement
Notice to Customers
This apparatus is approved under approval number NS/G/1234/J/100003 for indirect
connection to public telecommunication systems in the United Kingdom.
European Union EMC Directive conformance statement
This product is in conformity with the protection requirements of EU Council Directive
89/336/EEC on the approximation of the laws of the Member States relating to
electromagnetic compatibility. IBM cannot accept responsibility for any failure to
satisfy the protection requirements resulting from a nonrecommended modification of
the product, including the fitting of non-IBM option cards.
This product has been tested and found to comply with the limits for Class A
Information Technology Equipment according to CISPR 22/European Standard EN
274
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
55022. The limits for Class A equipment were derived for commercial and industrial
environments to provide reasonable protection against interference with licensed
communication equipment.
Attention: This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment this product may
cause radio interference in which case the user may be required to take adequate
measures.
Taiwanese Class A warning statement
Chinese Class A warning statement
Japanese Voluntary Control Council for Interference (VCCI) statement
Appendix E. Notices
275
276
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Glossary
A
array. Two or more physical drives combined for
increased capacity, speed, or fault tolerance. Once
created, an array is configured as one or more logical
drives. The operating system in the server recognizes a
logical drive as a single drive.
auto-synchronization. Synchronization on RAID level-5,
level-5E, and level-50 drives that is automatically initiated
when logical drives are created. This type of
synchronization works in the background.
B
battery-backup cache. Buffer storage that protects data
during write-back operations; in the event of a power
failure, it preserves the data in the controller cache.
BIOS-compatibility mapping. A ServeRAID controller
setting with two options: Limited and Extended. The
default option is Extended.
BIOS-compatibility mapping—Extended. An option of
BIOS compatibility mapping. When the BIOS
compatibility mapping is set to Extended, the ServeRAID
BIOS is aware that the operating system supports 8 GB
or smaller physical drives.
BIOS-compatibility mapping—Limited. An option of
BIOS compatibility mapping. When the BIOS
compatibility mapping is set to Limited, the ServeRAID
BIOS is aware that the operating system supports 2 GB
or smaller physical drives. This enables the user to
migrate data from older PCI or Micro Channel® adapters.
block. A data unit created when data is striped across
physical drives.
blocked. A logical-drive state in which the data in a RAID
level-0 logical drive might be damaged and will need to
be restored. After an array fails and a rebuild operation is
initiated, the ServeRAID controller sets RAID level-0
logical drives to the blocked state. RAID-5 arrays can
also be blocked due to an error on a logical driver during
I/O operations.
compression. The process by which a RAID level-5E
logical drive utilizes the distributed spare drive in the
event of a physical drive failure. After the data is
reconstructed, the original array undergoes compression
and the distributed spare drive becomes part of the new
array.
controller. A device that coordinates and controls the
operation of one or more input/output devices, such as
workstations, and synchronizes the operation of such
devices with the operation of the system as a whole.
controller names. In a cluster or failover pair, the
unique names that identify the members of the pair to one
another.
copy back. A method of restoring a logical drive’s
original configuration after replacing a failed drive in an
array.
critical. The state of a RAID level-1, level-1E, level-5,
level-5E, level-5EE, level-10, level-1E0, or level-50
logical drive that contains a defunct drive.
D
data mirroring. A technique that creates a single logical
drive from two physical drives. All data written to the
logical drive is written to both physical drives, creating a
pair of physical drives containing exactly the same data.
data scrubbing. A feature that provides automatic,
continuous synchronization during system use. This
features works in the background, and ensures that the
redundant data and/or parity is correct.
data striping. A technique that divides a logical drive into
data blocks, called stripes, which are then distributed
over the physical drives. The layout is such that a
sequential read of data on the logical drive results in
parallel reads to each of the physical drives, resulting in
improved performance.
decompression. The process by which a compressed
array returns to its original striping scheme, after a failed
drive is replaced in a RAID level-5E logical drive. Contrast
with compression.
C
defunct. A physical-drive state in which the ServeRAID
controller cannot communicate properly with the drive.
cluster. In ServeRAID technology, two independent
computer systems organized into a network for the
purpose of sharing resources and communicating with
each other. A cluster provides fault-tolerance at the
server level.
distributed spare drive. In RAID level-5E and level5EE, the logical drive designated as a spare drive.
Because this spare drive is spread over several physical
drives, it is described as distributed.
compaction. The process by which a RAID level-5EE
logical drive utilizes the distributed spare drive in the
event of a physical drive failure. After the data is
reconstructed, the original array undergoes compaction,
and the distributed spare drive becomes part of the new
array. The logical drive remains RAID level-5EE.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
E
enclosure. A storage expansion unit, such as the
Netfinity EXP300 and EXP400 that contains supported
SCSI disk drives.
277
expansion. The process by which a compacted array
returns to its original striping scheme, after a failed drive
is replaced in a RAID level-5EE logical drive. Contrast
with compaction.
F
fault tolerance. The ability of a computer system to
operate correctly even though one or more of its
component parts are malfunctioning.
firmware. Proprietary code that is usually delivered as
microcode as part of an operating system. Firmware is
more efficient than software loaded from an alterable
medium and more adaptable to change than pure
hardware circuitry. An example of firmware is the Basic
Input/Output System (BIOS) in read-only memory (ROM)
on a PC system board.
H
logical drive. A grouping of physical drives that the
operating system recognizes as a single drive.
logical-drive migration. To add or remove physical
drives from an existing array, to change RAID levels,
change logical-drive size, or effect an increase in free
space.
M
merge-group number. In a clustering configuration, the
numbers that identify each logical drive. Non-shared
logical drives are assigned merge-group numbers of
either 206 or 207; shared logical drives need unique
merge-group numbers, so that they can be identified
even if they move to the other server.
merge-group state. In a clustering environment, whether
or not a logical drive is shared.
hot add. To add and configure a new ServeRAID
controller while the server is operational.
hot-spare drive. A physical drive that is defined for
automatic use when a similar drive fails.
hot-pluggable. Pertaining to a system in which
components can be added while the system is running.
hot-swappable. Pertaining to a component that can be
removed or replaced while the system is running.
hot-swap rebuild. An operation that is started by the
ServeRAID controller when it detects that a physical drive
that is part of an array and in the defunct state has been
removed and replaced on a SCSI cable or backplane.
I
migrating. The state of a logical drive undergoing a
logical-drive migration.
mirror role. The role assigned to the two physical drives
that an integrated RAID controller uses to create a RAID
level-1 logical drive. When the logical drive is created,
data is copied from the primary physical drive to the
secondary physical drive. Any data on the secondary
drive is destroyed.
N
Notification Manager. A tool used to notify remote
systems of events, problems, and configuration changes
occurring on a local system.
O
integrated RAID controller. An integrated SCSI
controller with RAID capabilities, such as the LSI 1020
and LSI 1030. These integrated RAID controllers are
standard features on some IBM xSeries servers; they can
be used to create a RAID level-1 logical drive from two
physical drives. A third physical drive can be used as a
hot-spare drive.
initialize logical drive. In the ServeRAID utilities, to
erase the first 1024 sectors on a drive, preventing access
to any data previously stored on the drive.
initiator identifiers. The SCSI initiator IDs assigned to a
cluster or failover pair.
IPSSEND command-line program. An advanced
command-line program that can be used to manage your
ServeRAID controllers. It can be used to configure your
controller, isolate and debug problems, recover from
errors, and to copy controller configurations from one
server to another.
278
L
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
offline. A logical-drive state in which the logical drive is
inaccessible.
okay. A logical-drive state in which the logical drive is
functional.
online. A physical-drive state in which the physical drive
is functioning properly and is part of an array.
P
partner name. In a cluster or failover pair, one of the two
controller names entered during configuration.
parity. A characteristic of the data stored on a RAID
level-5, level-5E, level-5EE, or level-50 logical drive that
can be used, in conjunction with the data on the
remaining drives, to recreate data on a failed physical
drive.
parity block. In a RAID level-5, level-5E, level-5EE, or
level-50 logical drive, a data unit that contains a
representation of the data from other blocks in the same
stripe.
physical drive. A hard disk drive.
POST. Power-on self-test. During POST, the ServeRAID
controller compares the stored configuration information
to the configuration that is actually present. If a
discrepancy exists, one or more status messages appear
after the POST completes but before the operating
system loads.
Q
quorum drive. In the Microsoft Clustering Solution, a
logical drive that stores the quorum resource information.
R
rack enclosure. See enclosure.
RAID. A technology of grouping several physical drives in
a computer into an array that you can define as one or
more logical drives. Each logical drive appears to the
operating system as a single drive. This grouping
technique greatly enhances logical-drive capacity and
performance beyond the physical limitations of a single
physical drive.
RAID level-0. A RAID level that uses data striping to
distribute data evenly across physical drives. While it
enables full utilization of physical drive capacity and
performance acceleration, RAID level-0 provides neither
fault tolerance nor redundancy.
RAID level-1. A RAID level that uses data mirroring to
distribute data across two physical drives. It provides data
redundancy and performance acceleration, although the
usable physical drive space is reduced by 50 percent.
RAID level-1E. A RAID level that uses both data striping
and data mirroring to distribute data across three or more
physical drives. Data is striped across each disk in the
array; the first set of stripes are the data stripes, and the
second sets of stripes are mirror copies of the first stripe,
shifted one drive. It provides data redundancy and
performance acceleration, although the usable physical
drive space is reduced by 50 percent.
RAID level-5. A RAID level that uses data striping and
block interweaving to distribute data across three or more
physical drives. It provides full data protection and
performance acceleration, although only 67-94% of
physical drive storage capacity can be used.
RAID level-5E. A RAID level that uses data striping and
block interweaving to distribute data across four or more
physical drives. It uses some space on each physical
drive as a distributed hot-spare. It provides full data
protection and performance acceleration, although only
50-88% of physical drive storage capacity can be used.
RAID level-5EE. A RAID level that uses data striping and
block interweaving to more efficiently distribute data
across four or more physical drives. Like RAID level-5E, it
uses some space on each physical drive as a distributed
hot-spare. However, RAID level-5EE offers a more
efficient distributed spare drive and faster rebuild times.
The spare drive is actually part of the RAID level-5EE
array. A RAID level-5EE spare drive is interleaved with
the parity blocks. This enables data to be reconstructed
more quickly if a physical drive in the array fails. RAID
level-5EE provides full data protection and performance
acceleration, although only 50-88% of physical drive
storage capacity can be used.
RAID level-x0. RAID level-00, level-10, level-1E0, and
level-50. These RAID levels use spanned arrays (arrays
of arrays) to enable the use of up to 60 physical drives.
RAID level-00 provides no data redundancy but provides
performance acceleration and enables 100% of the
physical drive storage capacity to be used. RAID level-10,
level-1E0, and level-50 provide full data protection,
performance acceleration, and greater reliability,
although only 50-94% of physical drive storage capacity
can be used.
read-ahead cache mode. A ServeRAID controller
setting that determines whether the ServeRAID controller
transfers data from disk to its local cache in increments
equal to the stripe-unit size or the system I/O requests.
The options are enabled, disabled, and adaptive; the
default option is adaptive.
read-ahead cache mode—Adaptive. The default-value
of the read-ahead cache mode. When the read-ahead
cache mode is set to adaptive, the ServeRAID controller
continually reevaluates whether to set the read-ahead
cache mode to enabled or disabled.
read-ahead cache mode—Disabled. An option of the
read-ahead cache mode. When the read-ahead cache
mode is disabled, the ServeRAID controller transfers data
from the logical drive to its local cache in increments
equal to the system I/O request size. This optimizes
performance when the workload is random or the system
I/O requests are smaller than the stripe-unit size.
read-ahead cache mode—Enabled. An option of the
read-ahead cache mode. When the read-ahead cache
mode is enabled, the ServeRAID controller transfers data
from the logical drive to its local cache in increments
equal to the stripe-unit size. This optimizes performance
when workloads are steady and sequential.
ready. A physical-drive state in which the drive is
available for definition.
rebuild. An operation to reconstruct data after the
problem that caused a physical drive to become defunct
has been resolved.
rebuilding. The state of a physical drive undergoing a
rebuild operation.
rebuild rate. The speed (high, medium, or low) at which
a rebuild operation will occur.
Glossary
279
redundant array of independent disks (RAID). See
RAID.
restore to factory-default settings. An action that
restores all parameters in the controller to the factorydefault settings. If logical drives are defined, the data
stored on them will be lost.
S
standby hot spare. A hot-spare physical drive that the
ServeRAID controller has spun down. If an online drive
becomes defunct and no suitable hot-spare drive is
available, a standby drive of the appropriate size
automatically spins up and enters the rebuild state.
stripe-unit size. The granularity at which data is stored
on one drive of the array before subsequent data is
stored on the next drive of the array. The performance of
a ServeRAID controller is maximized if the stripe-unit size
is close to the size of the system input/output requests.
SATA. See Serial ATA.
SCSI. See small computer system interface.
SCSI ID. A unique ID assigned to each SCSI device
connected to a SCSI controller. This ID enables the
controller to identify the device and ensure that different
devices on the same SCSI channel do not transfer data
simultaneously.
SCSI initiator ID. In a failover or clustering environment,
the ID assigned to a SCSI controller. Each ServeRAID
controller and its partner must have different SCSI
initiator IDS; one must be 6 and the other 7.
SCSI transfer speed. The speed at which data can be
transferred between a physical drive and the ServeRAID
controller.
Serial ATA. A successor to ATA that transfers data
across a serial interface instead of a parallel one. ATA
stands for AT Bus Attachment, the standard parallel
interface to IDE hard disks typically used in desktop
computers and some entry-level servers.
ServeRAID Manager. A program used to configure
ServeRAID controllers, view the ServeRAID
configuration, create arrays and logical drives, delete
arrays, dynamically increase the logical-drive size,
change RAID levels, and more.
ServeRAID Mini-Configuration program. A program
that allows the user to display the ServeRAID controller
settings, and to perform a limited set of configuration
functions without using the IBM ServeRAID Support CD.
ServeRAID ROM Update wizard. A program that
updates the BIOS and firmware codes on ServeRAID
controllers.
shared drives. The physical drives controlled by a
cluster or failover pair.
small computer system interface. A standard hardware
interface that enables a variety of peripheral devices to
communicate with one another.
spanned array. An array of arrays. Used in RAID level00, level-10, level-1E0, and level-50 to permit the use of
larger numbers of physical drives. The spanned array
contains arrays, each of which contains a sub-logical
drive, which can be RAID level-0, level-1, level-1E, or
level-5. The RAID-level for the logical drive contained
within the spanned array is 0.
280
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
stripes. The collection of stripe units, from the first to last
drive of the array.
sub-logical drive. In a RAID level-x0 configuration, a
logical drive contained within each array of the spanned
array. A sub-logical drive can be RAID level-0, level-1,
level-1E, or level-5.
synchronization. The process of recalculating and
rewriting either redundant data (RAID level-1, level-1E,
level-10, and level-1E0 logical drives) or parity data
(RAID level-5, level-5E, level-5EE, and level-50 logical
drives).
T
throughput. The speed at which data can be moved
from one place to another, usually expressed in MB per
second.
U
unattended mode. A ServeRAID controller setting that
determines how the BIOS handles failures during system
startup. The options are enabled and disabled; the
default value is disabled.
unattended mode—Disabled. An option of the
unattended mode. When the unattended mode is
disabled and the BIOS detects a failure, the system stops
at the recovery option screen and waits for the user to
respond.
unattended mode—Enabled. An option of the
unattended mode. When the unattended mode is enabled
and the BIOS detects a failure, the system waits for 30
seconds for the user to respond to the recovery option
screen. Then, the BIOS automatically selects an
appropriate option and continues the system startup
process. Unattended mode must be enabled in a
clustering environment.
W
write-cache mode. A ServeRAID controller setting that
determines whether the controller writes data to the
physical drive before or after sending a confirmation to
the operating system. The settings are write back and
write through.
write-cache mode—write back. A setting of the writecache mode. When the write-cache mode is set to write
back and the operating system sends data to the
controller, the controller sends a confirmation back to the
operating system before actually writing the data to a
storage device. This increases performance, but, if a
battery-backup cache is not used, increases the risk of
data loss in the event of a power failure.
write-cache mode—write through. A setting of the
write-cache mode. When the write-cache mode is set to
write through and the operating system sends data to the
controller, the controller writes the data to a storage
device before sending a confirmation to the operating
system. This mode decreases performance, but does not
risk data loss.
Glossary
281
282
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
Index
A
Active PCI
features 15
Hot replace operation and data loss 15
NetWare 16
Windows 2000 16
Windows NT 4.0 16
Windows Server 2003 16
Windows Server 2003 64-Bit Edition 16
ACU 239
/C switch 244
/L switch 244
/P switch 244
/R switch 244
creating arrays 240
deleting arrays 243
interactive mode
overview 239
managing arrays 241
playback mode
initializing drives 245
record mode
switch 244
script mode 243
overview 239
playback mode 244–246
record mode 246–254
scripting 243
user notes 253
ACU. See Array Configuration Utility
adapter, see controller xv
Array Configuration Utility
using to manage arrays 85
array configuration utility for MS-DOS 239
array definition block 247
Array keyword 249
Drives keyword 249
End keyword 249
HotspareDrives keyword 249
InitializeAll keyword 250
Method keyword 250
properties 248
ReadCache keyword 251
Size keyword 251
Type keyword 249
Wait keyword 251
WaitForBuild keyword 251
WriteCache keyword 251
Array Properties dialog box 241
deleting arrays 86, 243
Array Properties menu 240
Array property, array definition block 249
Arrays
creating bootable arrays 86
arrays
bootable 242
booting from 86
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004
multilevel, and build/verify tasks 247
properties 240
Drives 245
HotspareDrives 245
Label 245
ReadCache 245
Size 245
Type 245
WriteCache 245
size 88, 240
stripe size 88, 240
viewing properties 241
Assigned Hotspares drives list 87, 241
removing drives 87, 242
assigning array properties in interactive mode 240
assigning hot spare drives to an array 87, 241
autosync (IPSSEND) 106
B
backup (IPSSEND) 106
BIOS, updating xviii, 49
blocked logical drive 47
Bootable arrays
creating 86
bootable arrays 242
booting
from an array 86
build/verify tasks
determining status 246
on multilevel arrays 247
C
Caching
read 88, 241
write 88
Caldera OpenLinux
IPSSEND, installing 95
IPSSEND, starting 99, 124
ServeRAID Manager, installing 136
ServeRAID Manager, starting 140
CD, IBM ServeRAID Support xviii
Class A electronic emission notice 274
clear status 246
cluster environment
array and logical drive considerations 148
configuring arrays and logical drives 154
configuring controllers for MSCS 151
controller considerations 148
controller names 148
detailed view (illustration) 144
failback, definition 147
failed controller, recovering from 223
failed server 222
failover, definition 147
hardware considerations 148
283
high-level view (illustration) 144
hot-spare drives 148
logical drives, adding 160
merge-group numbers 148
assigning 156
viewing 162
physical drive, checking ownership of 159
problems 222
quorum drive 155
replacing a controller 224
restoring to factory-default settings 152
saving configuration information 157
SCSI initiator IDs 148
ServeRAID Manager, installing 163
troubleshooting 226
updating ServeRAID software 193
validating a cluster 161
verifying the cluster configuration 151
cluster, definition 143
comments, in script files 248
Containers
creating with CCU 87
deleting 86
managing with CCU 85
controller
connector locations 6
considerations 148
device drivers and startup (boot) controller 53, 56
device event log 199
failover environment 65
features 4
installing and cabling 15
LEDs 6
maximum number of 15
restoring to factory-default settings 68
ServeRAID-4H
battery-backup cache 6, 10
connecting external devices 20, 26
connector locations 6
hot-add operation 17
installing 17
ServeRAID-4Lx
connecting external devices 20, 26
connector locations 9
hot-add operation 17
installing 17
ServeRAID-4Mx
battery-backup cache 8
connecting external devices 20, 26
connector locations 8
hot-add operation 17
installing 17
ServeRAID-5i
brackets 10
installing 22
PCI expansion slot 23
ServeRAID-6i
brackets 12
connector locations 12
installing 28, 30
PCI expansion slot 27, 28
ServeRAID-6M
284
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
battery-backup cache 11
connector locations 11
installing 24
ServeRAID-7k
features 13
installing 30
replacing the battery 31
ServeRAID-7t
features 13
installing 32
preparing 32
troubleshooting 199
upgrading 195
controller number, specifying 244
Controller SCSI Bus ID 90
copy back 114, 213, 277
copyId (IPSSEND) 106
create (IPSSEND) 112
critical logical drive 48
critical migrating logical drive 47
critical system logical drive 47
D
data striping 35
defunct drive 114
defunct physical drive 47
delete (IPSSEND) 112
deleting arrays 243
deselecting drives 240
device drivers xviii
installing 63
startup (boot) controller 53, 56, 63
Disk Size Advisory 85
Disks
initializing 89
size advisory 85
disks
initializing drives 242
drives
deselecting 240
initializing 245
Drives property
array definition block 249
initializing drives 245
overview 245
drivever (IPSSEND) 112
E
electronic emission Class A notice 274
End property
array definition block 249
eraseevent (IPSSEND) 109
error codes 205
error handling
list of codes 252
script mode 252
ERRORLEVEL variable 252
F
failover
active-passive pair 66
arrays and logical drives, configuring 69
configuring controllers 65
failure, recovering from 219
guidelines and restrictions 66
hardware requirements 65
merge-group numbers, assigning 73
power failure, recovering from 221
spanned arrays, creating 74
failover drive assignments 87
FCC Class A notice 274
firmware, updating xviii, 49
FlashCopy
backup 102
delete 102
description 100
import 103
map 104
nobackup 105
stop all 105
format (IPSSEND) 109
Format disk 91
G
getconfig (IPSSEND) 113
getevent (IPSSEND) 111
getstatus (IPSSEND) 107
getversion (IPSSEND) 111
H
hot-spare drive 47
hot-spare drive, creating 53
hot-swap physical drive, rebuilding 212
Hotspare Management for Array dialog box 87, 241,
242
HotspareDrives keyword
array definition block 249
HotspareDrives property 245
hsrebuild (IPSSEND) 113
I
identify (IPSSEND) 111
init (IPSSEND) 106
initialize
disk drives
interactive mode 242
script mode 245
Initialize Drives option 242
InitializeAll property
array definition block 250
description 245
initializing disk drives 242
Initializing Disks 89
integrated SCSI controller with RAID capabilities
configuring 50
definition 278
losing access to data and programs 21, 27
ServeRAID Manager 133
ServeRAID-5i controller, use with 10
ServeRAID-6i controller, use with 12
supported operating systems 133
supported RAID levels 36
interactive mode 239
IPSMON 117
installing 117
log file 118
messages 118
starting 118
IPSSEND xviii
commands
autosync 106
backup 106
copyId 106
create 112
delete 112
drivever 112
eraseevent 109
format 109
getbst 110
getconfig 113
getevent 111
getstatus 107
getversion 111
hsrebuild 113
identify 111
init 106
merge 106
readahead 113
rebuild 108
restore 107
scandrives 113
set 114
setbios 115
setconfig 115
setstate 108
synch 107
unattended 115
unblock 108
unmerge 107
FlashCopy 100
backup 102
delete 102
import 103
map 104
nobackup 105
stop all 105
starting 99
starting from DOS 99
Index
285
L
N
Label property 245
List of Arrays dialog box 241
assigning hot spares 87, 241
removing hot spare drives 87, 242
log files
sample 247
switch 244
logical drive
blocked state 47
critical migrating state 47
critical state 48
critical system state 47
description of states 47
migrating state 48
offline state 48
okay state 48
size limitations 52, 54, 56
system state 48
NetWare
IPSMON, installing 117
IPSMON, starting 118
IPSSEND, installing 94
IPSSEND, starting 99, 124
ServeRAID Manager, installing 135
ServeRAID Manager, starting 139
notes, important 273
notices
electronic emission 274
FCC, Class A 274
used in this book xvi
M
Manage Arrays dialog box
assigning and removing hot spare drives 87, 241
removing hot spare drives 87, 242
Manage Arrays option 85, 241
deleting arrays 243
making an array bootable 242
merge (IPSSEND) 106
messages
POST 204
startup 199
Method property,array definition block 250
Microsoft Cluster Server
logical drives, deleting 167, 178
uninstalling 168
updating software 169
Windows 2000
arrays and logical drives, creating 177
installing 173
ServeRAID Manager, installing 173
uninstalling 179
Windows NT
arrays and logical drives, adding 166
installing 164
migrating logical drive 48
Mini-configuration program 81
Advanced Functions 81, 83
Configure BIOS Settings 83
Copy the Configuration from Drives to Controller
83
Restore to Factory Default Settings 83
View Configuration 81, 82
View Controller and PCI Information 84
View Controller Status 81, 82
Monitoring 90
286
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
O
offline logical drive 48
okay logical drive 48
online physical drive 47
Open UNIX
IPSSEND, installing 98, 123
IPSSEND, starting 99, 124
ServeRAID Manager, installing 138
ServeRAID Manager, starting 140
OpenLinux
IPSSEND, installing 95
IPSSEND, starting 99, 124
ServeRAID Manager, installing 136
ServeRAID Manager, starting 140
OpenServer
IPSSEND, installing 97
IPSSEND, starting 99, 124
ServeRAID Manager, installing 137
ServeRAID Manager, starting 140
OS/2
IPSSEND, installing 93, 121
IPSSEND, starting 99, 124
ServeRAID Manager, installing 136
ServeRAID Manager, starting 140
P
performance tuning
selecting a RAID level 36
stripe-unit size 35
physical drive
defunct state 47
descriptions of states 47
hot-spare state 47
online state 47
ready state 47
rebuilding a defunct drive 211
rebuilding state 47
recovering from defunct drives 212
recovering from incomplete formatting 211
standby hot-spare state 47
playback mode 243
build/verify status 246
clear status 246
initializing drives 245
switch 244
user notes 253
POST messages 204
problems
error codes 205
properties
array 240
viewing 241
array definition block 248
Drives 245
HotspareDrives 245
InitializeAll 245
Label 245
ReadCache 245
Size 245
StripeSize 251
Type 245
WriteCache 245
publications xix
Q
quorum drive 155
R
physical drive failure 44
supported number of drives 43
level-x0
advantages and disadvantages 46
illustration 45
physical drive failure 46
supported number of drives 45
performance tuning 36
Read caching 88, 241
readahead (IPSSEND) 113
ReadCache property
array definition block 251
description 245
ready physical drive 47
rebuild
physical drive 47
rebuild (IPSSEND) 108
record mode 243
script file syntax 247
user notes 253
Red Hat Linux
IPSSEND, installing 95
IPSSEND, starting 99, 124
ServeRAID Manager, installing 136
ServeRAID Manager, starting 140
Redbooks xix
removeng hot spare drives from an array 242
removing hot spare drives from an array 87
removing hot spares 242
restore (IPSSEND) 107
S
RAID
definition 35
level-0
advantages and disadvantages 38
illustration 37
physical drive failure 37
supported number of drives 37
level-1
advantages and disadvantages 39
illustration 38
physical drive failure 39
supported number of drives 38
level-1E
advantages and disadvantages 40
illustration 39
physical drive failure 40
supported number of drives 39
level-5
advantages and disadvantages 41
illustration 40
physical drive failure 41
supported number of drives 40
level-5E
advantages and disadvantages 43
illustration 42
physical drive failure 43
supported number of drives 42
level-5EE
advantages and disadvantages 45
illustration 44
scandrives (IPSSEND) 113
script files
syntax 247
comments in 248
script mode 239, 243
error handling 252
SCSI
channel interface definition 90
configuration utility 90
device configuration 91
SCSI Bus Interface Definition 90
SCSI Device Configuration 90
SCSI Disk Utilities 91
Select Hotspares drives list 87, 242
Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology.
See S.M.A.R.T. configurations
ServeRAID Cluster Solution xix
ServeRAID Manager xx
Configuration wizard 51
Custom configuration 53
Express configuration 51
installing 133
online help 60, 133
overview 50
problems starting 209
startable-CD mode 50
starting 139
ServeRAID ROM Update wizard xviii
Index
287
ServeRAID software
downloading 49, 193
features 5
IPSMON 117
IPSSEND command-line program 93, 121
Mini-configuration program 81
updates 49
updating 193
version levels 49
set (IPSSEND) 114
setbios (IPSSEND) 115
setconfig (IPSSEND) 115
setstate (IPSSEND) 108
Size property
array definition block 251
description 245
spanned array
creating 53, 56
illustration 45
standby hot-spare drive 47
static-sensitive devices, handling xvii
status, of build/verify or clear 247
stripe size 88, 240
stripe, definition 35
stripe-unit size
changing 58
default value 58
definition 35
performance tuning 35
StripeSize property 251
SuSE Linux
IPSSEND, installing 95
IPSSEND, starting 99, 124
ServeRAID Manager, installing 136
ServeRAID Manager, starting 140
synch (IPSSEND) 107
syntax of script files 247
system logical drive 48
T
throughput 35
trademarks 272
troubleshooting 199
Turbolinux
IPSSEND, installing 95
IPSSEND, starting 99, 124
ServeRAID Manager, installing 136
ServeRAID Manager, starting 140
Type property
array definition block 249
description 245
288
IBM ServeRAID: User’s Reference
U
unattended (IPSSEND) 115
unattended installation 134
unblock (IPSSEND) 108
United States electronic emission Class A notice 274
United States FCC Class A notice 274
UnixWare
IPSSEND, installing 98, 123
IPSSEND, starting 99, 124
ServeRAID Manager, installing 138
ServeRAID Manager, starting 140
unmerge (IPSSEND) 107
V
Verify disk media 91
viewing online publications xix
W
Wait property, array definition block 251
WaitForBuild property, array definition block 251
Web sites
Caldera 137
IBM Support 193
Novell NetWare 135
SCO 137
Windows
IPSSEND, installing 93, 121
IPSSEND, starting 99, 124
ServeRAID Manager, installing 134
ServeRAID Manager, starting 139
working inside server with power on xvii
Write caching 88
WriteCache property
array definition block 251
description 245
®
Part Number:
25R3678
Printed in Singapore
(1P) P/N:
25R3678
Download PDF
Similar pages