Redbooks Paper
Carla Sadtler
WebSphere Web Services Information
Roadmap
Web services has emerged as the most promising development to address cross-enterprise,
cross-platform, and cross-vendor business integration issues. Web services is a family of
emerging technologies that enable easy interoperability of programmed information
technology (IT) services and integration of applications into a company’s broader business
processes. Web services technology enables companies to describe available services and
provide access to those services over standard Web protocols and communications
boundaries.
There has been a vast amount of information published about Web services. This IBM®
Redpaper will help you find your way through some of the more recent information published
by IBM. It also covers some external material, such as technology standard Web sites.
Quick start for architects:
 Web services Conceptual Architecture
 CBDI Web Services Roadmap - Guiding the Transition to Web Service and SOA
Quick start for WebSphere® Application Server developers:
 Web services Conceptual Architecture
 WebSphere Version 5.1, Application Developer 5.1.1 Web Services Handbook,
SG24-6891-01
Quick start for WebSphere Business Integration developers:
 Web services Conceptual Architecture
 Using Web Services for Business Integration, SG24-6583
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004. All rights reserved.
ibm.com/redbooks
1
General information
 CBDI Web Services Roadmap - Guiding the Transition to Web Service and SOA
http://roadmap.cbdiforum.com
The Web Services Roadmap provides practical guidance to assist organizations in
introducing Web services and service-oriented architecture into their enterprises. The
topics include planning and managing the transition, as well as guidance on infrastructure,
architecture, process changes, project profile changes, and vendor strategies.
 IBM developerWorks® WebSphere Web services zone
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/websphere/zones/webservices/
This Web site acts as a portal into technical information regarding Web services and IBM
products. It includes up-to-date information about relevant articles, education, downloads,
and support information.
 The IBM Web services home page
http://www.ibm.com/software/solutions/webservices/
This Web page provides a portal into information regarding Web services and IBM
products. The information here is likely to be more marketing-oriented than that found on
the developerWorks site, but it has many useful links to demos, educational events, and
articles.
 Web Services Education Overview
The WTTE team has created a document to help those who need more Web Services
skills figure out how to get what they need.
This new document describes three different roles associated with designing, creating,
and maintaining Web services. It also includes an overview of the various technologies
and skills needed to perform these roles, along with a list of resources available to help
you acquire these skills. The document is intended for all audiences, both internal and
external. Be sure to take advantage of this offering, and share it with your colleagues and
customers!
http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/websphere/library/techarticles/wtte/webserviceseducati
on.html
Concepts, technology and specifications
 Web services Conceptual Architecture
http://www-306.ibm.com/software/solutions/webservices/pdf/WSCA.pdf
White paper, published May, 2001
The Web services Conceptual Architecture white paper describes the IBM approach to
Web services in terms of components, interactions, standards, and infrastructure. This
white paper first defines the essential characteristics of Web services and the artifacts,
roles, operations, and life cycle of the Web services model. The paper next discusses the
Web services stack and its relevant standards (SOAP, WSDL, UDDI, and so on) in depth.
The paper then summarizes the extensions required for this basic Web services
architecture to be viable for e-business applications. Among the extensions discussed are
security, quality of service, and management, as well as support for context,
conversations, activities, intermediaries, and portals. Finally, the paper examines the role
of Web services in the context of business processes and work flows.
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WebSphere Web Services Information Roadmap
The architecture presented in this document includes high-level descriptions of the
components and functions required for Web services, as well as requirements for tooling
and middleware that will implement these components and functions.
 WebSphere Version 5.1, Application Developer 5.1.1 Web Services Handbook,
SG24-6891-01
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246891.html
Redbook, published February, 2004
In this book, you will find a comprehensive description of the underlying concepts and
technologies for the use of Web services. It includes chapters that describe Web services,
SOAP, WSDL, JAX-RPC, JSR-109, UDDI, WSIF, WSIL, workflows and business
processes, and Web services security.
The book is based on WebSphere Application Server Version 5.1 and WebSphere Studio
Application Developer Version 5.1.1.
 IBM alphaWorks® Web services emerging technologies page
alphaWorks provides a unique opportunity for developers around the world to experience
the latest innovations from IBM. These emerging alpha code technologies are available for
download at the earliest stages of development - before they are licensed or integrated
into products - allowing users to evaluate and influence IBM research and development. In
addition, early adopters have access to a virtual collaborative community to learn more
about the uses of a particular technology and opportunities for commercial use of
alphaWorks’ technologies.
This Web page is an index into the Web services-related articles and downloads hosted
on alphaWorks.
http://www.alphaworks.ibm.com/webservices
 Web services interoperability (WS-I)
WS-I is an organization designed to promote Web service interoperability across
platforms, operating systems, and programming languages. Its Web site contains
resources such as an overview of Web services interoperability, usage scenarios, and
specifications. The WS-I Web site can be found at:
http://www.ws-i.org/
 SOAP specification
The Simple Object Access Protocol or Service-Oriented Architecture Protocol (SOAP) is a
network, transport, and programming language-neutral protocol that allows a client to call
a remote service. The message format is Extensible Markup Language (XML). You can
find more information about SOAP on the Web at:
http://www.w3.org/TR/SOAP
 WSDL specification
Web Service Description Language (WSDL) is an XML-based interface and
implementation description language. The service provider uses a WSDL document to
specify the operations that a Web Service provides, as well as the parameters and data
types of these operations. A WSDL document also contains the service access
information. For more information about WSDL, see:
http://www.w3.org/TR/wsdl
 UDDI specification
Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration (UDDI) is both a client-side API and a
SOAP-based server implementation. It can be used to store and retrieve information from
WebSphere Web Services Information Roadmap
3
service providers and Web services. For more information about UDDI, see the following
Web site:
http://uddi.org/specification.html
 Java™ APIs for XML based RPC (JAX-RPC/JSR 101)
JAX-RPC is a Java API that facilitates distributed computing in a Web services
environment. JAX-RPC-based Java applications can easily communicate with non-Java
based technologies in the RPC style fashion. JSR 101 formalizes the procedure for
invoking Web services in an RPC-like manner and lays down the requirements of
JAX-RPC 1.0.
– The complete JSR 101 specification is at:
http://www.jcp.org/en/jsr/detail?id=101
These are some informative articles on the IBM developerWorks Web site:
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-jsrart/
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-jaxrpc1
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/xml/library/x-tipjaxrpc/
 Web Services for J2EE specification (JSR 109)
JSR 109 is an architecture that standardizes the deployment of Web services in J2EE to
create portable and interoperable services across different server platforms. It extends
JSR 101 for J2EE, enabling EJB-based Web services and J2EE clients.
The best source for more information is the Web Services for J2EE specification, JSR
109, which can be downloaded from:
http://www-124.ibm.com/developerworks/downloads/index.php?group_id=116
There is also a foundation article that helps you to understand the JSR 109:
Build interoperable Web services with JSR-109:
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-jsrart/
 Web service invocation framework (WSIF)
WSIF is a flexible way to invoke Web services. The developer is no longer restricted to
developing services for particular transport protocols or service environments. WSIF
comes as a Java API that supports either the use of generated stubs or provides the
stub-less and completely dynamic invocation of Web services, where the binding can be
selected and updated at runtime.
Furthermore, WSIF allows late binding, where a new provider and description are made
available at runtime. The existing client can then utilize the new implementation.
The developerWorks Web site provides updated information about many activities
concerning Web services, including WSIF. In particular, the following articles provide more
detailed information:
–
Applying the Web Services Invocation Framework:
http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/ws-appwsif.html
–
Web Service Invocation Sans SOAP:
http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-wsif
–
Web Service Invocation Sans SOAP2:
http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-wsif2
In addition to these articles:
– The home page of the WSIF open-source project on Apache is located at:
http://ws.apache.org/wsif/
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WebSphere Web Services Information Roadmap
– The xml-axis-wsif code can be browsed at:
http://cvs.apache.org/viewcvs.cgi/xml-axis-wsif
– The IBM contribution on WSIF from October 2001 can be found at:
http://www.alphaworks.ibm.com/tech/wsif
 Web services inspection language (WSIL or WS-Inspection) 1.0.
A complement to UDDI, WS-Inspection is another service discovery mechanism that
addresses a different subset of requirements using a distributed usage model.
The WS-Inspection specification is designed around an XML-based model for building an
aggregation of references to existing Web service descriptions. WS-Inspection 1.0
provides a notation serving these purposes. The WS-Inspection specification is a joint
effort by IBM and Microsoft®.
The best source for more information is the Web services inspection language
(WS-Inspection) 1.0 specification at:
http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-wsilspec.html
 WS-Security
WS-Security defines the basic mechanisms for providing secure messaging. It defines a
standard set of SOAP extensions or message headers. It also defines a means of adding
security tokens to a message and leveraging XML Encryption and XML Digital Signatures
to provide confidentiality and integrity on a message.
WS-Security provides a foundation layer for secure Web services. It lays the groundwork
for higher-level facilities (such as federation, policy, and trust) that allow companies to
securely build relationships with partners, suppliers, and customers. The specification has
been submitted to the OASIS group for ongoing development. The originally published
version of WS-Security is available from:
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-security/
The latest draft version of the specification from OASIS is available from:
http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/documents.php?wg_abbrev=wss
The Web Services Security Addendum (August 2002):
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-secureadd.html
Web Services Security: SOAP Message Security Working (May 2003):
http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/download.php/2314/WSS-SOAPMessageSecurity-13-050103
-merged.pdf
 WS-Trust
Web Services Trust (WS-Trust) was published in December 2002 by IBM, Microsoft,
VeriSign, and RSA Security. This specification uses the basic mechanisms of WS-Security
and defines additional primitives and extensions for security token exchange. This allows
a standard (vendor-neutral) means of issuing and disseminating security tokens across
trust domains. This specification is available from:
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-trust/
 Web Services Policy (WS-Policy)
Within the space of policy, there are several specifications. The Web Services Policy
Framework defines a general-purpose model and corresponding syntax to describe and
communicate Web services policies. This allows service consumers to discover the
information they need to know to access services from a service provider. This
specification is available from:
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-polfram/
WebSphere Web Services Information Roadmap
5
The Web Services Policy Attachments specification provides a general-purpose
mechanism for associating policy assertions with subjects (services). It provides two
approaches for making assertions:
–
Policy assertions defined as part of the definition of the subject
–
Policy assertions defined independently of, and associated through, an external
binding to the subject
This specification is available from:
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-polatt/
The goal of Web Services Policy Assertions is to provide basic assertions needed to
enable Web services applications. This document specifies a set of common message
policy assertions that can be specified within a policy. This specification is available from:
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-polas/
The Web Services Security Policy Language defines a model and syntax to describe and
communicate security policy assertions within the larger policy framework. It covers
assertions for security tokens, data integrity, confidentiality, visibility, security headers, and
the age of a message. This specification is available from:
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-secpol/
 WS-Secure conversation
The Web Services Secure Conversation Language is built on top of the WS-Security and
WS-Policy models to provide secure communication between services. This specification
defines mechanisms for establishing and sharing security contexts and deriving keys from
security contexts to enable a secure conversation. This specification is available from:
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-secon/
 WS-Federation
WS-Federation is the latest in the family of Web Services Security specifications. It was
published on 8 July 2003. This specification spells out how companies with different
security solutions and trust domains can successfully interoperate. The three
specifications that make up WS-Federation are available for download from the IBM
developerWorks Web site at:
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-fed/
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-fedact/
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-fedpass/
Developing Web services
 WebSphere Version 5.1, Application Developer 5.1.1 Web Services Handbook,
SG24-6891-01
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246891.html
Redbook, published February 6, 2004
Part 2 of this book tells how to develop Web services using WebSphere Studio Application
Developer and how to deploy them on WebSphere Application Server Network
Deployment. It also tells how to develop Web services using WebSphere Studio
Application Developer Integration Edition and how to deploy them on WebSphere
Application Server Enterprise.
The book is based on WebSphere Application Server Version 5.1 and WebSphere Studio
Application Developer Version 5.1.1.
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WebSphere Web Services Information Roadmap
 WebSphere Version 5 Application Development Handbook, SG24-6993-00
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246993.html
Redbook, published December 14, 2003
This book discusses the process of developing applications using WebSphere Studio
Application Developer. It includes a chapter devoted to developing and testing Web
services and Web service clients. It discusses the features of WebSphere Studio
Application Developer that support Web services development. It outlines the methods of
development (top-down versus bottom-up). It also illustrates how to use WebSphere
Studio to create a Web service from a JavaBean and then how to create a Web service
client to connect to the Web service.
This book is based on WebSphere Application Server Version 5.0.2 and WebSphere
Studio Application Developer Version 5.1. For requirements, analysis, and design,
Rational® XDE™ on WebSphere Studio Application Developer Version 5.0 was used.

WebSphere Studio Application Developer Version 5 Programming Guide, SG24-6957-00
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246957.html
Redbook, published July 17, 2003
Where the WebSphere Version 5 Application Development Handbook is focused on the
development process from design phase through to the testing phase, this book is
focused on the programming aspects. Though much of the material dealing with Web
services is similar, this book contains more detail on using WebSphere Studio to create
Web services and Web services clients.
This book is based on Version 5 of WebSphere Studio Application Developer and
WebSphere Application Server.
 WebSphere Application Server - Express V5.0.2 Developer Handbook,
SG24-6555-01
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246555.html
Redbook, published September 22, 2003
This book, based on WebSphere Studio Site Developer, is directed toward the
WebSphere Application Server - Express development audience. It discusses building
Web services clients with WebSphere Studio Site Developer.
This book is based on WebSphere Application Server - Express V5.0.2, which includes
WebSphere Studio Site Developer V5.1.
 Legacy Modernization with WebSphere Studio Enterprise Developer, SG24-6806-00
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246806.html
Redbook, published December 20, 2002
This book includes a discussion on creating Web services using WebSphere Studio
Enterprise Developer. It includes a sample of accessing an EGL program as a Web
service. In the sample, WebSphere Studio Enterprise Developer is used to create a Struts
action class that calls an EGL program wrapper to execute an EGL program. A Web
service is then created from a Java bean, in this case, the Struts class.
In this way, the EGL program becomes a callable function that can be used from any Web
service client.
This book is based on WebSphere Studio Enterprise Developer Version 5 Early
Availability Release and WebSphere Application Server Version 5
 Exploring WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition 5.0,
SG24-6200-00
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246200.html
WebSphere Web Services Information Roadmap
7
Redbook, published August 8, 2003
This redbook tells how to develop business process-based applications to be deployed
using the Process Choreographer component of WebSphere Application Server
Enterprise. In this book you will find an example of building a process flow that integrates
a Java class, EJB session beans, and the Amazon.com Web service.
This book is based on WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
Version 5.0.1 and WebSphere Studio Application Server Enterprise Version 5.0.
 The XML Files: Development of XML/XSL Applications Using WebSphere Studio
Version 5, SG24-6586-00
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246586.html
Redbook, published December 02, 2002,
DAD Extension (DADX) is an XML technology for rapidly creating Web services that
access relational databases such as DB2® UDB. When combined with the DB2 XML
Extender, DADX supports mapping relational data into complex XML documents and
storing XML documents in the database.
This book discusses the use of XML in applications and includes a section on using XML
with Web services. The sample used illustrates the process of creating a Web service
based on a DADX document.
This book is based on Version 5 of IBM WebSphere Studio Application Developer.
Working with the Web Services Gateway
 WebSphere Version 5.1, Application Developer 5.1.1 Web Services Handbook,
SG24-6891-01
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246891.html
Redbook, published February 6, 2004
This book includes information about implementing the Web Services Gateway included
with the WebSphere Application Server Network Deployment product.
 A B2B Solution using WebSphere Business Integration V4.1 and WebSphere
Business Connection V1, SG24-6916
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246916.html
Redbook, published August 11, 2003
Part 5 of this book describes a B2B scenario that allows communication between a
business and its trading partners using the Web Services Gateway included with
WebSphere Business Connection V1. It discusses the development strategies, steps, and
service life cycle.
This book is based on Version 4, Release 1 of WebSphere Business Integration and V1 of
WebSphere Business Connection.
 Patterns: Broker interactions for Intra- and Inter-enterprise, SG24-6075
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246075.html
This book includes a scenario that describes how to use the Web Services Gateway
provided with WebSphere Application Server Enterprise to route Web services traffic. It
includes information about using filters to make routing decisions within the gateway.
This book is based on WebSphere Application Server Enterprise V5 and WebSphere
Business Integration Message Broker V5.
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WebSphere Web Services Information Roadmap
Web services security
 Web Services Security roadmap
Published by IBM and Microsoft in April of 2002
This roadmap describes a modular set of Web services specifications that allow
customers to build secure Web services according to their individual needs. Several of
these specifications have since been published and are described in this section. You can
download the roadmap from the Web at:
http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/ws-secmap
 Federated Identity Management and Secure Web Services, REDP-3678-00
Redpaper, published August 11, 2003
This IBM Redpaper discusses the IBM® Tivoli® software strategy and roadmap for a
consistent, unified, and evolutionary approach to securing cross-enterprise e-business
solutions. Built on open security standards, with tight integration to Web middleware (Java
2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE) and Microsoft .NET), Tivoli security solutions allow
you to increase the reach of your business through applications. They build on existing
Web security investments that can quickly evolve to take advantage of Web services and
federation standards. This paper describes the business problems that are solved by Web
services and Federated Identity Management. It also describes how Tivoli software from
IBM helps solve these problems.
 Enterprise Business Portals II with IBM Tivoli Access Manager, SG24-6885-00
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246885.html
Redbook, published March 26, 2003
IBM Tivoli Access Manager for e-business provides highly-available, centralized
authentication and authorization services. It provides simple, secure access to critical
information and thus enhances communications with customers, business partners, and
others. This book includes a chapter on protecting a Web Services environment using
Tivoli Access Manager.
This book is based on Tivoli Access Manager 4.1, WebSphere Portal 4.1.4, mySAP
Workplace 2.11, and SAP Enterprise Portal V5.0.
 WebSphere Version 5.1, Application Developer 5.1.1 Web Services Handbook,
SG24-6891-01
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246891.html
Redbook, published February 6, 2004
Part 1 of this book provides a comprehensive description of the underlying concepts and
technologies for the use of Web services.
Part 2 of this book tells how to develop Web services using WebSphere Studio Application
Developer and how to deploy them on WebSphere Application Server Network
Deployment. It also tells how to develop Web services using WebSphere Studio
Application Developer Integration Edition and how to deploy them on WebSphere
Application Server Enterprise. You will also find information about how to make a Web
service secure using authentication, digital signature, and encryption.
The book is based on WebSphere Application Server Version 5.1 and WebSphere Studio
Application Developer Version 5.1.1.
WebSphere Web Services Information Roadmap
9
Building solutions using Web services
 Using Web Services for Business Integration, SG24-6583
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246583.html
Redbook (Draft)
This book describes the use of Web services in integration scenarios based on the
message flow technology in WebSphere Business Integration Message Broker,
collaborations in WebSphere InterChange Server, and the Process Choreographer flow
engine in WebSphere Application Server Enterprise.
The book demonstrates how these products can call Web services and also describes
how integration solutions implemented in these products can be exposed as Web
services. It also discusses the use of the WebSphere Business Integration Adapters
based on Web services technologies.
 B2B Solutions Using WebSphere Business Connection, SG24-6197-00
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246197.html
Redbook, published July 18, 2003
WebSphere Business Connection focuses specifically on extended enterprise
collaboration. It provides elements for B2B integration, including the Web Services
Gateway, Trading Partner Interchange (TPI) server, WebSphere Data Interchange (WDI)
server, and many IBM CrossWorlds® connectors and collaborations specifically designed
for business-to-business connectivity, collaboration, and integration.
Setup and configuration information for the Web Services Gateway is included in this
book, along with sample scenarios that illustrate how a collaboration in CrossWorlds can
interact with the Web Services Gateway to invoke a Web service, how a Web service
implemented by a CrossWorlds collaboration can be invoked, and how a collaboration can
invoke a .NET Web service.
This book is based on Version 1, Release 1, of WebSphere Business Connection.
 Patterns: Self-Service Application Solutions Using WebSphere V5.0, SG24-6591-00
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246591.html
Redbook, published May 13, 2003
The Patterns for e-business are a group of proven, reusable assets that can be used to
increase the speed of developing and deploying Web applications. This IBM® Redbook
focuses on the Self-Service::Stand-Alone Single Channel application pattern for
facilitating user access to business sites and the Self-Service::Directly Integrated Single
Channel application pattern for including one or more point-to-point connections with
back-end applications.
The scenario used in this book illustrates how to integrate Web applications with the
enterprise tier using Web services, J2EE Connectors, and JMS.
This book is based on WebSphere Application Server V5.0. The following are companion
books that expand on this topic specifically for implementation on the iSeries™ and
z/Series platforms:
– Patterns: Self-Service Application Solutions Using WebSphere V5.0 for iSeries,
REDP-3670-00, Redpaper, published October 23, 2003, based on Version 5.0 of IBM
WebSphere Application Server for iSeries
– Patterns: Self-Service Application Solutions Using WebSphere for z/OS V5,
SG24-7092-00, Redbook, published December 22, 2003, based on WebSphere
Application Server for z/OS® V5
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WebSphere Web Services Information Roadmap
 WebSphere MQ Solutions in a Microsoft .NET Environment, SG24-7012-00
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg247012.html
Redbook, published January 7, 2004
This book demonstrates the use of WebSphere MQ in a .NET environment as a reliable
transport mechanism for the invocation of .NET applications and as a middleware product
used in the implementation of Web services. It introduces two mechanisms for
programming WebSphere MQ in a Microsoft .NET environment. These are WebSphere
MQ classes for Microsoft .NET and WebSphere MQ Transport for SOAP for interfacing to
Web Services. The scenarios include using WebSphere MQ classes for Microsoft .NET
(.NET application to .NET application and .NET application to J2EE application) and using
WebSphere MQ Transport for SOAP (.NET application to .NET Web service and .NET
application to J2EE Web service).
This book is based on WebSphere MQ V5.3, Microsoft Visual Studio .NET Professional
2003 with Microsoft Development Environment 2003 Version 7.1.3088 and Microsoft .NET
Framework 1.1 Version 1.1.4322; Internet Information Services (IIS) Version 5;
WebSphere MQ Transport for SOAP, February 2003; and WebSphere MQ classes for
.NET (amqmdnet.dll Version Resource 1.0.0.3).
 Patterns: Direct Connections for Intra- and Inter-enterprise, SG24-6933-00
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246933.html
Redbook, published October 21, 2003
This book takes you through the process of designing and building applications for
integrating business applications. Part 1 focuses on the Patterns for e-business and the
Application Integration and Extended Enterprise patterns. Part 2 discusses the technology
options available, including Web services.
Part 3 describes building Application Integration solutions and includes the following Web
services topics:
–
–
–
–
Using RPC style Web services
Using document style Web services
Using Web Services Gateway
Using the Web Services Gateway with J2EE Connectors
Part 4 describes extending Application Integration solutions to external partners and
includes a discussion on using inter-enterprise Web services.
This book is based on WebSphere Application Server V5.0.2, and IBM WebSphere Studio
Application Developer V5.1.
 A B2B Solution using WebSphere Business Integration V4.1 and WebSphere
Business Connection V1, SG24-6916
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246916.html
Redbook, published August 11, 2003
Part 5 of this book describes a B2B scenario that allows communication between a
business and its trading partners using the Web Services Gateway. It discusses the
development strategies, steps, and service life cycle.
This book is based on Version 4, Release 1 of WebSphere Business Integration.
 Patterns: Custom Designs for Domino® & WebSphere Integration, SG24-6903-00
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246903.html
Redbook published April 7, 2003
This book contains information about Domino and Web services, including Domino as a
Web service provider and as a Web service consumer. The discussion includes a scenario
WebSphere Web Services Information Roadmap
11
that shows how to provide a Web service, hosted in WebSphere Application Server, that
encapsulates Domino-specific functionality. The Web service aggregates information from
back-end sources, including Domino. This is a hybrid pattern using Self-Service,
Collaboration, Application Integration.
This book is based on IBM Lotus® Domino Server 6.0.1 and IBM WebSphere Application
Server V5.0.
 Using Informix® Dynamic Server with WebSphere, SG24-6948-00
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246948.html
Redbook, published June 27, 2003
This book discusses using Informix Dynamic Server as a Web services provider and as a
Web services consumer.
This book is based on Informix Dynamic Server Version 9.4, WebSphere Application
Server Version 5, and WebSphere Studio Application Developer Version 5.
 WebSphere Business Components Composer Implementation, SG24-6911-00
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246911.html
Redbook, published May 21, 2003
WebSphere Business Components Composer supports Web Services in two different
ways. It allows access to Web Services located remotely and allows the operations to be
generated and deployed as Web Services.
This book contains information about using WebSphere Business Components Composer
and its tools to build, deploy, and run a Web Service facade JavaBean for an existing
WebSphere Business Components Composer sample operation. It then explains how to
use Microsoft .NET to access the facade.
The example in this book is taken from the tutorial Developing WebSphere Business
Component Composer-based Web Services and Microsoft .NET Clients. This tutorial is
available at:
http://www7b.software.ibm.com/wsdd/library/tutorials
This book is based on Version 4, Release 2 of WebSphere Business Components
Composer and WebSphere Studio Application Developer V4.0.3.
 Patterns: Broker interactions for Intra- and Inter-enterprise, SG24-6075
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246075.html
Redbook, published February, 2004
This book takes you through the process of designing and building applications for
integrating business applications. Part 1 focuses on the Patterns for e-business and the
Application Integration and Extended Enterprise patterns. Part 2 discusses the technology
options available, including Web services.
Part 3 describes building Application Integration solutions for implementing a router and
broker functionality. The first scenario describes how to use the Web Services Gateway
provided with WebSphere Application Server Enterprise to route Web services traffic. It
includes information about using filters to make routing decisions within the gateway. The
second scenario uses WebSphere Business Integration Message Broker to perform more
complex broker functionality. It includes information about invoking a message flow as a
Web service, as well as invoking a Web service from a message flow.
This book is based on WebSphere Application Server Enterprise V5 and WebSphere
Business Integration Message Broker V5.
12
WebSphere Web Services Information Roadmap
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COPYRIGHT LICENSE:
This information contains sample application programs in source language, which illustrates programming
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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004. All rights reserved.
13
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14
WebSphere Web Services Information Roadmap
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