Oracle Application Server Installation Guide for Microsoft Windows

Oracle® Application Server
Installation Guide
10g Release 3 (10.1.3) for Microsoft Windows (64-Bit) on Intel
Itanium
B28162-02
May 2006
Oracle Application Server Installation Guide, 10g Release 3 (10.1.3) for Microsoft Windows (64-Bit) on Intel
Itanium
B28162-02
Copyright © 2006, Oracle. All rights reserved.
Primary Author:
Brintha Bennet
Contributing Author:
Divya Shankar
Contributor: Sriram Nagaraj Rao, Arun Kuzhimattathil, Shashidhara Varamballi, Ranjan Dutta,
Madhusudhana Srinivasamurthy, Sonal Pandey, Suresh Sasidharan, Janelle Simmons, Prashanth Joshi,
Reema Khosla
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Contents
Preface ................................................................................................................................................................. ix
Intended Audience......................................................................................................................................
Documentation Accessibility .....................................................................................................................
Related Documents .....................................................................................................................................
Conventions .................................................................................................................................................
1
Product and Installation Overview
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.3.1
1.3.2
1.3.3
1.3.4
2
ix
ix
x
x
Product Overview....................................................................................................................... 1-1
Basic and Advanced Installation .............................................................................................. 1-1
Recommended Topologies ........................................................................................................ 1-2
Installing an Integrated Web Server and OC4J Middle Tier ......................................... 1-4
Installing Multiple Integrated Web Server and OC4J Middle Tiers............................. 1-5
Installing a Web Server Middle Tier and OC4J Middle Tier on Separate Hosts ........ 1-9
Installing a Web Server Middle Tier and Multiple OC4J Middle Tiers ................... 1-10
Requirements
Using OracleMetaLink to Obtain the Latest Oracle Application Server Hardware and
Software Requirements ................................................................................................... 2-1
2.2
System Requirements ................................................................................................................. 2-2
2.3
Windows System Files (wsf.exe) .............................................................................................. 2-4
2.4
Ports .............................................................................................................................................. 2-5
2.4.1
About Ephemeral Ports....................................................................................................... 2-5
2.4.2
Checking If a Port Is in Use ................................................................................................ 2-7
2.4.3
Using Default Port Numbers ............................................................................................. 2-7
2.4.4
Using Custom Port Numbers (the "Static Ports" Feature) ............................................. 2-8
2.4.4.1
Format of the staticports.ini File................................................................................. 2-8
2.4.4.2
Error Conditions that Will Cause the Installer to Use Default Ports Instead of
Specified Ports ................................................................................................... 2-9
2.4.4.3
Ports for Oracle HTTP Server .................................................................................. 2-10
2.5
Operating System User ........................................................................................................... 2-10
2.6
Environment Variables ........................................................................................................... 2-11
2.6.1
How to Set Environment Variables................................................................................ 2-11
2.6.2
ORACLE_HOME and ORACLE_SID ............................................................................ 2-11
2.6.3
PATH .................................................................................................................................. 2-11
2.6.4
TNS_ADMIN..................................................................................................................... 2-11
2.1
iii
2.6.5
2.7
2.7.1
2.7.2
2.7.3
2.7.4
2.7.5
2.7.6
2.7.6.1
2.7.6.2
2.7.6.3
2.7.6.4
2.7.7
2.7.8
2.7.9
2.8
3
Things You Should Know Before Starting the Installation
3.1
3.1.1
3.1.2
3.1.3
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.6.1
3.6.2
3.6.3
3.6.4
3.6.5
3.7
4
What Components Are Installed? ............................................................................................
Basic Installation Steps ...............................................................................................................
Before You Begin..................................................................................................................
Installation Steps..................................................................................................................
What Should I Do Next? ............................................................................................................
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-2
4-4
Advanced Installation
5.1
5.2
iv
Oracle Home Directory .............................................................................................................. 3-1
Naming Your Oracle Home ............................................................................................... 3-1
Installing in an Existing Oracle Home.............................................................................. 3-1
Installing in a Non-Empty Oracle Home ......................................................................... 3-1
Installing Additional Languages .............................................................................................. 3-2
Oracle Application Server Instances and Instance Names ................................................... 3-2
The oc4jadmin User and Restrictions on its Password.......................................................... 3-3
Where Does the Installer Write Files?...................................................................................... 3-4
Obtaining Software from Oracle E-Delivery........................................................................... 3-5
Finding and Downloading the Oracle Application Server 10g Release 3 (10.1.3) E-Pack.
.................................................................................................................................... 3-5
Finding Required and Optional Downloads ................................................................... 3-5
Disk Space Requirements ................................................................................................... 3-5
Software Requirements for Unzipping Files ................................................................... 3-5
Extracting Software from the Zip Files............................................................................. 3-6
Starting the Oracle Universal Installer..................................................................................... 3-6
Basic Installation
4.1
4.2
4.2.1
4.2.2
4.3
5
TEMP .................................................................................................................................. 2-12
Network Topics ........................................................................................................................ 2-12
Installing on DHCP Computers ..................................................................................... 2-12
Installing on Multihomed (Multi-IP) Computers ........................................................ 2-13
Installing on Computers with Multiple Aliases ........................................................... 2-14
Installing on Non-Networked Computers.................................................................... 2-14
Installing on Static IP Computers that You Want to Disconnect from the Network Later
.................................................................................................................................. 2-15
Installing a Loopback Adapter ....................................................................................... 2-15
Checking If a Loopback Adapter Is Installed on Your Computer ..................... 2-16
Installing a Loopback Adapter on Windows 2003 ............................................... 2-16
Checking the Hostname ........................................................................................... 2-18
Removing a Loopback Adapter on Windows 2003 .............................................. 2-18
Copying CD-ROMs or DVD-ROM to Hard Drive, and Installing from the Hard Drive..
.................................................................................................................................. 2-18
Installing from a Remote CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Drive........................................... 2-20
Installing on Remote Computers Through Remote Control Software ..................... 2-22
Prerequisite Checks Performed by the Installer .................................................................. 2-23
What Components Are Installed? ............................................................................................ 5-1
Advanced Installation Steps...................................................................................................... 5-2
5.2.1
5.2.2
5.2.3
5.2.4
5.2.5
5.3
5.3.1
5.3.2
5.3.3
5.3.4
5.3.5
5.3.6
5.3.7
5.3.8
5.3.9
5.3.10
5.3.11
5.3.12
5.3.13
5.4
5.5
6
Before You Begin.................................................................................................................. 5-2
Installing J2EE Server and Process Management............................................................ 5-2
Installing Web Server and Process Management............................................................ 5-3
Installing Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process Management.................. 5-4
Installing Oracle TopLink................................................................................................... 5-5
Installation Screens ..................................................................................................................... 5-6
Oracle Application Server 10g 10.1.3.0.0 Installation Screen......................................... 5-7
Select Installation Type Screen .......................................................................................... 5-8
Specify Port Configuration Options Screen ..................................................................... 5-8
Administration Instance Settings ...................................................................................... 5-9
Administration Settings Screen ...................................................................................... 5-10
Specify Instance Name Screen ........................................................................................ 5-12
Cluster Topology Configuration Screen - J2EE Server and Process Management Install
Type ....................................................................................................................... 5-12
Cluster Topology Configuration Screen: Web Server and Process Management Install
Type ....................................................................................................................... 5-14
Cluster Topology Configuration Screen: Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and
Process Management Install Type .......................................................................... 5-15
Summary Screen ............................................................................................................... 5-17
Install Screen...................................................................................................................... 5-17
Configuration Assistants Screen..................................................................................... 5-18
End of Installation Screen ................................................................................................ 5-20
Troubleshooting Information................................................................................................. 5-20
What Should I Do Next? ......................................................................................................... 5-21
Installing in High Availability Environments
6.1
Overview of High Availability Configurations...................................................................... 6-1
6.1.1
Active-Active Topologies: OracleAS Clusters ................................................................. 6-1
6.1.2
Active-Passive Topologies: OracleAS Cold Failover Clusters ...................................... 6-2
6.1.3
OracleAS Disaster Recovery .............................................................................................. 6-3
6.1.4
Summary of Differences ..................................................................................................... 6-3
6.2
Creating the Active-Active Topology ...................................................................................... 6-4
6.2.1
Active-Active Topologies: Introduction ........................................................................... 6-4
6.2.2
OracleAS Clusters in Active-Active Topologies ............................................................. 6-5
6.2.3
Properties of Oracle Application Server Instances in Active-Active Topologies....... 6-6
6.2.4
Installation Steps for Active-Active Topologies.............................................................. 6-6
6.2.5
Supporting Procedures for Creating the Active-Active Topology............................ 6-11
6.2.5.1
Setting up Clusters with the Discovery Server Method ...................................... 6-11
6.2.5.2
Setting up Multicast Replication ............................................................................. 6-12
6.2.5.3
Setting up Peer-to-Peer Replication ........................................................................ 6-12
6.2.5.4
Setting up Replication to a Database ...................................................................... 6-14
6.2.5.5
Setting the Replication Policy .................................................................................. 6-14
6.2.5.6
Specifying the Number of Nodes to Replicate To ................................................ 6-16
6.3
Creating the Active-Passive Topology.................................................................................. 6-16
6.3.1
Active-Passive Topologies: Introduction ...................................................................... 6-16
6.3.2
Overview of Installation Steps for OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster......................... 6-18
6.3.3
Preinstallation Steps for OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster .......................................... 6-19
v
6.3.3.1
Ensure that the Event Log Service Is Running ...................................................... 6-19
6.3.3.2
Get a Virtual Address for the Cluster..................................................................... 6-19
6.3.3.3
Verify that Microsoft Cluster Server (MSCS) Is Installed on Both Nodes......... 6-20
6.3.3.4
Determine the Name of the Cluster ........................................................................ 6-20
6.3.3.5
Determine a Domain User to Administer Oracle Fail Safe ................................. 6-20
6.3.3.6
Install Oracle Fail Safe on the Local Storage of Each Node................................. 6-20
6.3.3.7
Create a Group in Oracle Fail Safe .......................................................................... 6-22
6.3.3.8
Set up staticports.ini File .......................................................................................... 6-27
6.3.4
OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster: Details of Installation Steps ................................... 6-27
6.3.5
Postinstallation Steps: Make OPMN Highly Available .............................................. 6-29
6.4
Creating an OracleAS Disaster Recovery Configuration ................................................... 6-35
6.4.1
OracleAS Disaster Recovery: Introduction ................................................................... 6-35
6.4.2
Setting up the OracleAS Disaster Recovery Environment ......................................... 6-37
6.4.2.1
Ensure Nodes Are Identical at the Operating System Level............................... 6-37
6.4.2.2
Set Up staticports.ini File.......................................................................................... 6-37
6.4.2.3
Set Up Identical Hostnames on Both Production and Standby Sites................. 6-38
6.4.2.4
If You Want to Use OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster on the Production Site
(OracleAS 10.1.2.n.n only) ............................................................................... 6-42
6.4.3
Installing Oracle Application Server in an OracleAS Disaster Recovery Environment....
.................................................................................................................................. 6-43
6.4.3.1
Installing the OracleAS Infrastructure (OracleAS Release 10.1.2.n.n Only) .... 6-44
6.4.3.2
Installing Middle Tiers (OracleAS Release 10.1.3 and 10.1.2.n.n) ...................... 6-44
6.4.4
Installing the OracleAS 10g (10.1.3) Standalone Install of OracleAS Guard into Oracle
Homes .................................................................................................................... 6-45
6.4.5
Patching OracleAS Guard Release 10.1.2.n.n with Release 10.1.3.0.0 ....................... 6-45
6.4.6
What to Read Next?.......................................................................................................... 6-46
7
Postinstallation Tasks
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8
A
7-1
7-2
7-3
7-3
7-3
7-3
7-3
7-3
Silent and Non-Interactive Installation
A.1
A.2
A.3
A.4
A.4.1
A.4.2
A.4.3
A.4.4
A.4.4.1
vi
Deploying Oracle Business Rules Rule Author ......................................................................
State of Oracle Application Server Instances After Installation...........................................
Passwords for Oracle Application Server Components........................................................
Configuring OracleAS Clusters ................................................................................................
Backup and Recovery .................................................................................................................
SSL.................................................................................................................................................
Regional and Language Option Settings and the NLS_LANG Parameter.........................
What to Do Next .........................................................................................................................
Silent Installation........................................................................................................................
Non-Interactive Installation .....................................................................................................
Preinstallation.............................................................................................................................
Create the Response File ...........................................................................................................
Creating Response Files from Templates ........................................................................
Creating Response Files by Using the Record Mode in the Installer ..........................
Variables to Modify in the Response Files ......................................................................
Example Response Files.....................................................................................................
Example Response File for Standalone J2EE Server and Process Management
A-1
A-1
A-2
A-2
A-2
A-2
A-3
A-3
A-4
Example Response File for Web Server and Process Management ..................... A-5
Example Response File for Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process
Management ......................................................................................................A-6
A.4.4.4
Example Response File for Oracle TopLink ............................................................ A-7
A.5
Start the Installation................................................................................................................... A-8
A.6
Postinstallation ........................................................................................................................... A-8
A.7
Security Tips for Silent and Non-Interactive Installations................................................... A-8
A.8
Deinstallation.............................................................................................................................. A-8
A.4.4.2
A.4.4.3
B
Default Port Numbers
B.1
B.2
B.3
C
Deinstallation and Reinstallation
C.1
C.2
C.3
C.4
D
Deinstallation Procedure: Overview.......................................................................................
Deinstalling Procedure..............................................................................................................
Deinstalling All Oracle Products Manually ...........................................................................
Reinstallation ..............................................................................................................................
C-1
C-2
C-2
C-3
Configuration Assistants
D.1
D.1.1
D.1.2
D.2
E
Method of Assigning Default Port Numbers......................................................................... B-1
Default Port Numbers ............................................................................................................... B-1
Ports to Open in Firewalls ........................................................................................................ B-2
Troubleshooting Configuration Assistants ............................................................................
General Tips.........................................................................................................................
Configuration Assistant Result Codes.............................................................................
Description of Oracle Application Server Configuration Assistants .................................
D-1
D-1
D-2
D-2
Troubleshooting
E.1
E.2
E.3
E.3.1
E.3.2
E.3.3
E.3.4
E.3.5
E.3.6
E.4
Log Files ...................................................................................................................................... E-1
General Troubleshooting Tips ................................................................................................. E-1
Installation Problems and Solutions ....................................................................................... E-2
Location of Log Files .......................................................................................................... E-2
Installer Does Not Appear................................................................................................. E-2
Unable to Clean Up a Failed Installation ........................................................................ E-3
User Interface Does Not Display in the Desired Language, or Does Not Display
Properly ...................................................................................................................E-3
Unable to Run Oracle Application Server On-Network as Well as Off-Network .... E-3
Configuration Assistant Failures - General .................................................................... E-3
Need More Help?....................................................................................................................... E-4
Index
vii
viii
Preface
The Oracle Application Server Installation Guide covers requirements, new features in the
Oracle Universal Installer, Oracle Application Server concepts that affect installation,
installation procedures, and troubleshooting tips. In addition, this guide also provides
some sample topologies for installing and running Oracle Application Server.
Intended Audience
This guide is intended for users who are comfortable running some system
administration operations, such as creating users and groups and adding users to
groups.
Documentation Accessibility
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accessible, with good usability, to the disabled community. To that end, our
documentation includes features that make information available to users of assistive
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support, call 800.446.2398.
ix
Related Documents
For additional information, see the following manuals:
■
Oracle Application Server Administrator’s Guide
■
Oracle Application Server Concepts
■
Oracle Application Server High Availability Guide
Conventions
The following text conventions are used in this document:
x
Convention
Meaning
boldface
Boldface type indicates graphical user interface elements associated
with an action, or terms defined in text or the glossary.
italic
Italic type indicates book titles, emphasis, or placeholder variables for
which you supply particular values.
monospace
Monospace type indicates commands within a paragraph, URLs, code
in examples, text that appears on the screen, or text that you enter.
1
Product and Installation Overview
This chapter describes what is contained in Oracle Application Server and
recommended topologies. It contains the following sections:
■
Section 1.1, "Product Overview"
■
Section 1.2, "Basic and Advanced Installation"
■
Section 1.3, "Recommended Topologies"
1.1 Product Overview
Oracle Application Server is made up of a middle tier and OracleAS Infrastructure.
You deploy and run your applications on the middle tiers. The infrastructure provides
services that are used by middle tiers. These services can be shared by one or more
middle tiers.
Oracle Application Server 10g Release 3 (10.1.3) provides a complete Java 2, Enterprise
Edition (J2EE) 1.4-compliant environment. Specifically, this release provides a new
version of Oracle Containers for J2EE (OC4J). OC4J provides all the containers, APIs,
and services mandated by the J2EE specification. This release is designed for
administrators who are using OC4J to deploy and manage J2EE applications.
In addition to OC4J, this release also includes new releases of Oracle HTTP Server,
Oracle Process Manager and Notification Server (OPMN), and Oracle Enterprise
Manager 10g Application Server Control Console.
You can integrate Oracle Application Server 10g Release 3 (10.1.3) with an existing
Oracle Application Server environment that includes 10g Release 2 (10.1.2) OracleAS
Infrastructure, 10g Release 2 (10.1.2) Oracle HTTP Server, or 10g Release 2 (10.1.2)
OracleAS Web Cache components.
See Also: Oracle Application Server Upgrade and Compatibility Guide
for more information about which specific versions are compatible
with 10g Release 3 (10.1.3)
1.2 Basic and Advanced Installation
Table 1–1 summarizes the groups of services available with each installation type.
Product and Installation Overview
1-1
Recommended Topologies
Table 1–1
Oracle Application Server 10g Release 3 (10.1.3) Install Types
Install Mode
Available Installation Types
Basic
■
Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server, and Process Management
Advanced
■
J2EE Server and Process Management
This option installs OC4J, the main runtime component of the Oracle Application
Server. It also installs Application Server Control Console for management and
deployment operations and OPMN for process control.
■
Web Server and Process Management
This option installs Oracle HTTP Server with SSL Support for deploying
applications. It also installs OPMN for process control.
■
Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server, and Process Management
This option installs both OC4J and Oracle HTTP Server and their associated
components. It also installs Application Server Control Console for management
and deployment operations and OPMN for process control.
■
Oracle TopLink
This option installs TopLink Foundation Library and Oracle TopLink Workbench
for use by J2EE applications.
See Also: Oracle TopLink documentation for further information
about the Oracle TopLink advanced installation option
The basic (one-click) installation prompts you with questions on the initial installation
screen, and then it proceeds to install the product without any further user interaction.
The default values for all the components are used.
The advanced installation provides you with a great degree of customization and
flexibility, which enables installation of additional languages, port configuration
options, and cluster configuration.
Table 1–2 summarizes the differences in the customization options between basic and
advanced installation.
Table 1–2
Basic and Advanced Installation Features
Action or Option
Basic
Advanced
Specify an Oracle Home
Yes
Yes
Specify an instance name and oc4jadmin password
Yes
Yes
Select additional languages
No
Yes
Specify automatic or manual port configuration
No
Yes
Configure Application Server Control
No
Yes
Specify default OC4J instance name
No
Yes
Configure instance to be part of a cluster
No
Yes
Configuration assistants
Yes
Yes
1.3 Recommended Topologies
Table 1–3 provides a road map of where to find information about the supported 10g
Release 3 (10.1.3) topologies.
1-2 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Recommended Topologies
Table 1–3
Basic and Advanced Installation Features
Topology
See This Documentation
for Details
10.1.3 Middle-Tier Topologies
A middle tier containing an integrated OC4J instance with Oracle
HTTP Server in one Oracle home
Section 1.3.1, "Installing an
Integrated Web Server and
OC4J Middle Tier"
Two middle tiers containing an integrated OC4J instance with Oracle
HTTP Server in two separate Oracle homes. You establish an
OracleAS Clusters configuration for these middle tiers and designate
one of the OC4J instances as the Administration OC4J instance for
running the Application Server Control Console. You then manage
both OC4J instances from this instance of Application Server Control
Console.
Section 1.3.2, "Installing
Multiple Integrated Web
Server and OC4J Middle
Tiers"
Two middle tiers, one containing Oracle HTTP Server and the second
containing an OC4J instance
Section 1.3.3, "Installing a
Web Server Middle Tier and
OC4J Middle Tier on
Separate Hosts"
Three middle tiers, one containing Oracle HTTP Server and two
containing OC4J instances. You establish an OracleAS Clusters
configuration for the OC4J instances and designate one of the OC4J
instances as the Administration OC4J instance for running the
Application Server Control Console. You then manage both OC4J
instances from this instance of Application Server Control Console.
Section 1.3.4, "Installing a
Web Server Middle Tier and
Multiple OC4J Middle Tiers"
"myJ2EE," in the Oracle
An enterprise data center for J2EE applications that use Oracle
Application Server Enterprise
Application Server Java Authentication and Authorization Service
(JAAS) Provider LDAP for user authentication. This topology contains Deployment Guide
four middle tiers, two containing Oracle HTTP Servers and two
containing OC4J instances. In this configuration, Application Server
Control Console is available on its own OC4J Web site. A firewall
separates the Oracle HTTP Servers from the OC4J instances.
High-Availability Topologies
An OracleAS Clusters configuration in which two or more middle-tier Section 6.2, "Creating the
instances serve the same content. A load balancer distributes requests Active-Active Topology"
equally among the active instances.
An Oracle Application Server Cold Failover Clusters configuration in
which two or more middle-tier instances serve the same content, but
only instance is active at any one time.
Section 6.3, "Creating the
Active-Passive Topology"
An OracleAS Disaster Recovery configuration in which a standby site
mirrors a production site. During normal operation, the production
site handles all the requests. If the production site goes down, the
standby site takes over and handles all the requests.
Section 6.4, "Creating an
OracleAS Disaster Recovery
Configuration"
10.1.3 Middle Tiers with Existing 10.1.2 Environments
10.1.2 Oracle HTTP Server: Two middle tiers, one containing 10g
Release 2 (10.1.2) Oracle HTTP Server and OracleAS Web Cache
components and the second containing a 10g Release 3 (10.1.3) OC4J
instance. Oracle HTTP Server and OracleAS Web Cache are installed
as a part of a J2EE and Web Cache middle-tier installation.
"Configuring Oracle
Application Server 10.1.2
with Oracle Application
Server 10.1.3" in the Oracle
Application Server
Administrator’s Guide
Product and Installation Overview
1-3
Recommended Topologies
Table 1–3 (Cont.) Basic and Advanced Installation Features
Topology
See This Documentation
for Details
10.1.2 OracleAS Infrastructure: A 10g Release 3 (10.1.3) middle-tier
instance using a 10g Release 2 (10.1.2) Oracle Identity Management.
This topology also supports associating a 10g Release 3 (10.1.3)
middle-tier instance with a new 10g Release 2 (10.1.2) Oracle Identity
Management for the following scenarios:
"Configuring Instances to
Use a 10.1.2 Oracle Identity
Management" in the Oracle
Application Server
Administrator’s Guide
■
Moving to a new host
■
Creating a failover environment
■
Moving applications from a test environment to a new
production environment
"Moving 10.1.2 Identity
Management to a New Host"
in the Oracle Application
Server Administrator’s Guide
"Changing from a Test to a
Production Environment" in
the Oracle Application Server
Administrator’s Guide
10.1.2 OracleAS Web Cache Instance: A single 10g Release 2 (10.1.2)
OracleAS Web Cache acting as a reverse proxy for a 10g Release 2
(10.1.3) middle-tier. The middle tier contains an integrated OC4J
instance with Oracle HTTP Server.
"Configuring 10.1.2 OracleAS
Web Cache as a Reverse
Proxy" in the Oracle
Application Server
Administrator’s Guide
10.1.2 OracleAS Web Cache Cluster: Two or more 10g Release 2
(10.1.2) OracleAS Web Cache servers configured as a cluster to reverse
proxy a 10g Release 2 (10.1.3) middle-tier. The middle tier contains an
integrated OC4J instance with Oracle HTTP Server.
"Configuring 10.1.2 OracleAS
Web Cache as a Reverse
Proxy" in the Oracle
Application Server
Administrator’s Guide
The remainder of this section addresses the recommended topologies for installing
Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J instances. It contains the following topics:
■
Section 1.3.1, "Installing an Integrated Web Server and OC4J Middle Tier"
■
Section 1.3.2, "Installing Multiple Integrated Web Server and OC4J Middle Tiers"
■
■
Section 1.3.3, "Installing a Web Server Middle Tier and OC4J Middle Tier on
Separate Hosts"
Section 1.3.4, "Installing a Web Server Middle Tier and Multiple OC4J Middle
Tiers"
1.3.1 Installing an Integrated Web Server and OC4J Middle Tier
The Basic Installation Mode combines an Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J middle-tier
instance in the same Oracle home, as depicted in Figure 1–1. This topology enables
you to use OPMN to manage a standalone OC4J instance.
1-4 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Recommended Topologies
Figure 1–1 Integrated Web Server and OC4J Middle Tier
10.1.3 Middle Tier
OPMN
Client
Oracle HTTP
Server
HTTP Listen:
7777
OC4J
Default-web-site
ajp: 12501
Requirements
The requirements are the same as those listed in Chapter 2, "Requirements".
Installation Sequence
Perform a basic installation, as described in Section 4.2.2, "Installation Steps".
1.3.2 Installing Multiple Integrated Web Server and OC4J Middle Tiers
This topology builds upon the example in the previous section, Section 1.3.1. It adds
an additional combined Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J middle-tier instance, as shown
in Figure 1–2. When you install this cluster topology, you install two middle-tier
instances in two different Oracle homes. During installation of the two instances, you
cluster the instances using dynamic node discovery. You designate one of the OC4J
instances as the Administration OC4J instance for running the Application Server
Control Console. You manage both OC4J instances from this instance of Application
Server Control Console. This topology provides a highly available environment for
testing and production purposes.
Product and Installation Overview
1-5
Recommended Topologies
Figure 1–2 Cluster with Integrated Web Server and OC4J Middle Tiers
Client
Dynamic Discovery
Cluster
10.1.3 Middle Tier
10.1.3 Middle Tier
OPMN
OPMN
Oracle HTTP
Server
HTTP Listen:
7777
Oracle HTTP
Server
HTTP Listen:
7777
OC4J (home)
Default-web-site
ajp: 12501
OC4J (home)
Default-web-site
ajp: 12502
Requirements
The requirements are the same as those listed in Chapter 2, "Requirements".
Installation Sequence
To install this topology:
1.
For the first middle tier, install an Administration OC4J instance.
Perform an Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process Management
advanced installation, as described in Section 5.2.4, "Installing Integrated Web
Server, J2EE Server and Process Management". During the installation procedure,
follow the prompts, ensuring you perform the following:
■
■
In the Administration Instance Settings page, select Configure this as an
Administration OC4J Instance.
In the Administration Settings page, enter a password for the oc4jadmin
account in the Administrator Account Password fields. Enter a name for the
default OC4J instance, such as home, in the OC4J Instance Name field.
Make a note of the OC4J instance name and the password you enter here; you
will need them later.
■
In the Cluster Topology Configuration screen, select Configure this instance
to be part of an Oracle Application Server cluster topology and specify a
cluster discovery address for the cluster. The multicast address you enter must
be within the valid address range, which is 224.0.0.1 to
239.255.255.255.
Make a note of the address and port that you enter on this page; you will need
them later.
1-6 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Recommended Topologies
2.
For the second middle tier, perform an Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and
Process Management advanced installation, as described in Section 5.2.4,
"Installing Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process Management".
During the installation procedure, follow the prompts, ensuring you perform the
following:
■
■
In the Administration Instance Settings page, deselect Configure this as an
Administration OC4J Instance.
In the Administration Settings page, enter a password for the oc4jadmin
account in the Administrator Account Password fields. Enter a name for the
OC4J instance, such as home, in the OC4J Instance Name field.
If you want this OC4J instance to be part of the same group, specify the same
name for the OC4J that you specified in Step 1 of this procedure. Similarly,
enter the same password for the Administrator Account Password that you
entered in Step 1 of this procedure.
Assigning multiple OC4J instances the same instance name during installation
forms a group, making it easy to deploy applications to more than one OC4J
instance at time. You can simultaneously execute specific configuration
operations on all OC4J instances in a group.
In order to use a group, each OC4J instance in a group must also have the
same oc4jadmin password. If they do not, then you will have to reset the
password after the installation.
■
In the Cluster Topology Configuration screen, select Configure this instance
to be part of an Oracle Application Server cluster topology and specify the
same cluster discovery address as you specified in Step 1 of this procedure.
See Also:
■
■
"Configuring Multiple OC4J Middle Tiers in a Cluster," in the
Oracle Application Server Administrator’s Guide for further
information about configuring this topology
"How Groups Are Formed" in the Oracle Application Server
Administrator’s Guide for more information about groups
For larger application deployments spanning three or more nodes, consider your
performance and security needs. One strategy is to install and dedicate one node to
exclusively run Application Server Control Console and install the other nodes to
support applications. To install for this strategy:
1.
For the first middle tier, install an Administration OC4J instance.
Perform an Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process Management
advanced installation, as described in Section 5.2.4, "Installing Integrated Web
Server, J2EE Server and Process Management".
During the installation procedure, follow the prompts, ensuring you perform the
following:
■
■
In the Administration Instance Settings page, select Configure this as an
Administration OC4J Instance.
In the Administration Settings page, enter a password for the oc4jadmin
account in the Administrator Account Password fields. Enter a unique name
for this OC4J instance, such as AdminOC4J, in the OC4J Instance Name field.
Product and Installation Overview
1-7
Recommended Topologies
■
In the Cluster Topology Configuration screen, select Configure this instance
to be part of an Oracle Application Server cluster topology and specify a
cluster discovery address for the cluster. The multicast address you enter must
be within the valid address range, which is 224.0.0.1 to
239.255.255.255.
Make a note of the address and port that you enter on this page; you will need
them later.
2.
For the second middle tier, perform an Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and
Process Management advanced installation, as described in Section 5.2.4,
"Installing Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process Management".
During the installation procedure, follow the prompts, ensuring you perform the
following:
■
■
In the Administration Instance Settings page, deselect Configure this as an
Administration OC4J Instance.
In the Administration Settings page, enter a password for the oc4jadmin
account in the Administrator Account Password fields. Enter a name for the
default OC4J instance, such as home, in the OC4J Instance Name field that is
different than the one you specified in Step 1 of this procedure.
Make a note of the OC4J instance name and the password you enter here; you
will need them later.
■
3.
In the Cluster Topology Configuration screen, select Configure this instance
to be part of an Oracle Application Server cluster topology and specify the
same cluster discovery address as you specified in Step 1 of this procedure.
For the additional middle tiers, perform an Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and
Process Management advanced installation, as described in Section 5.2.4,
"Installing Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process Management".
During the installation procedure, follow the prompts, ensuring you perform the
following:
■
■
In the Administration Instance Settings page, deselect Configure this as an
Administration OC4J Instance.
In the Administration Settings page, enter the same password for the
oc4jadmin account in the Administrator Account Password field and
instance name in the OC4J Instance Name fields as you specified in Step 2 of
this procedure.
Assigning multiple OC4J instances the same instance name during installation
forms a group, making it easy to deploy applications to more than one OC4J
instance at time. You can simultaneously execute specific configuration
operations on all OC4J instances in a group.
In order to use a group, each OC4J instance in a group must also have the
same oc4jadmin password. If they do not, then you will have to reset the
password after the installation.
■
In the Cluster Topology Configuration screen, select Configure this instance
to be part of an Oracle Application Server cluster topology and specify the
same cluster discovery address as you specified in Step 1 of this procedure.
1-8 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Recommended Topologies
1.3.3 Installing a Web Server Middle Tier and OC4J Middle Tier on Separate Hosts
Figure 1–3 shows a topology in which you install Oracle HTTP Server on one
computer, and install the OC4J instance on another computer. Then, you cluster the
instances using dynamic node discovery. This topology enables Oracle HTTP Server to
route requests to OC4J, and OC4J to dynamically notify Oracle HTTP Server of new
application bindings when an application is deployed.
Figure 1–3 Cluster with a Web Server Middle Tier and OC4J Middle Tier on Separate
Hosts
Dynamic Discovery Cluster
10.1.3 Middle Tier
OPMN
Client
Oracle HTTP
Server
HTTP Listen: 7777
10.1.3 Middle Tier
OPMN
OC4J (home)
Default-web-site
ajp: 12501
Requirements
The requirements are the same as those listed in Chapter 2, "Requirements".
Installation Sequence
To install this topology:
1.
For the first middle tier, perform a Web Server and Process Management advanced
installation, as described in Section 5.2.3, "Installing Web Server and Process
Management".
During the installation procedure, follow the prompts. In the Cluster Topology
Configuration screen, select Configure this HTTP Server instance to be part of an
Oracle Application Server cluster topology and specify a cluster discovery
address for the cluster.
2.
For the second middle tier, perform a J2EE Server and Process Management
advanced installation, as described in Section 5.2.2, "Installing J2EE Server and
Process Management".
During the installation procedure, follow the prompts, ensuring you perform the
following:
Product and Installation Overview
1-9
Recommended Topologies
■
■
■
In the Administration Instance Settings page, select Configure this as an
Administration OC4J Instance.
In the Administration Settings page, enter a name for the OC4J instance, such
as home, in the OC4J Instance Name field.
In the Cluster Topology Configuration screen, select Configure this OC4J
Server instance to be part of an Oracle Application Server cluster topology
and specify the same cluster discovery address as you specified in Step 1 of
this procedure.
See Also: "Configuring a Web Server and J2EE on Separate Hosts,"
in the Oracle Application Server Administrator’s Guide for further
information about configuring this topology
1.3.4 Installing a Web Server Middle Tier and Multiple OC4J Middle Tiers
This topology builds upon the example in the previous section, Section 1.3.3. It adds
an additional OC4J middle-tier instance, as shown in Figure 1–4. When you install this
cluster topology, you install Oracle HTTP Server on one computer, install OC4J
instances on two separate computers, and specify cluster settings. You designate one
of the OC4J instances as the Administration OC4J instance for running the Application
Server Control Console. You manage both OC4J instances from this instance of
Application Server Control Console. This topology provides a highly available
environment for testing and production purposes.
This topology also supports using a firewall to separate Oracle HTTP Server from the
OC4J instances, as shown in Figure 1–5.
Figure 1–4 Cluster with a Web Server Middle Tier and Multiple OC4J Middle Tiers
Dynamic Discovery Cluster
10.1.3 Middle Tier
OPMN
Client
Oracle HTTP
Server
HTTP Listen: 7777
10.1.3 Middle Tier
10.1.3 Middle Tier
OPMN
OPMN
OC4J (home)
OC4J (home)
Default-web-site
ajp: 12501
Default-web-site
ajp: 12502
1-10 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Recommended Topologies
Figure 1–5 Cluster with a Web Server Middle Tier and Multiple OC4J Middle Tiers
Separated by a Firewall
Dynamic Discovery Cluster
10.1.3 Middle Tier
OPMN
Client
Oracle HTTP
Server
HTTP Listen:
7777
Firewall
10.1.3 Middle Tier
10.1.3 Middle Tier
OPMN
OPMN
OC4J (home)
Default-web-site
ajp: 12501
OC4J (home)
Default-web-site
ajp: 12502
Requirements
The requirements are the same as those listed in Chapter 2, "Requirements".
Installation Sequence
To install this topology:
1.
For the Oracle HTTP Server middle tier, perform a Web Server and Process
Management advanced installation, as described in Section 5.2.3, "Installing Web
Server and Process Management".
During the installation procedure, follow the prompts. In the Cluster Topology
Configuration screen, select Configure this HTTP Server instance to be part of an
Oracle Application Server cluster topology and specify a cluster discovery
address for the cluster. The multicast address you enter must be within the valid
address range, which is 224.0.0.1 to 239.255.255.255.
Make a note of the address and port that you enter on this page; you will need
them later.
2.
For the first OC4J middle tier, install an Administration OC4J instance.
Perform a J2EE Server and Process Management advanced installation, as
described in Section 5.2.2, "Installing J2EE Server and Process Management".
During the installation procedure, follow the prompts, ensuring you perform the
following:
■
In the Administration Instance Settings page, select Configure this as an
Administration OC4J Instance.
Product and Installation Overview
1-11
Recommended Topologies
■
In the Administration Settings page, enter a name for the default OC4J
instance, such as home, in the OC4J Instance Name field.
Make a note of the OC4J instance name and the password you enter here; you
will need them later
■
3.
In the Cluster Topology Configuration screen, select Configure this OC4J
instance to be part of an Oracle Application Server cluster topology and
specify the same cluster discovery address as you specified in Step 1 of this
procedure.
For the second OC4J middle tier, perform a J2EE Server and Process Management
advanced installation, as described in Section 5.2.2, "Installing J2EE Server and
Process Management".
During the installation procedure, follow the prompts, ensuring you perform the
following:
■
■
■
In the Administration Instance Settings page, deselect Configure this as an
Administration OC4J Instance.
In the Administration Settings page, enter the same OC4J instance name in the
OC4J Instance Name field as you specified in Step 2 of this procedure.
In the Administration Settings page, enter a password for the oc4jadmin
account in the Administrator Account Password fields. Enter a name for the
OC4J instance, such as home, in the OC4J Instance Name field.
If you want this OC4J instance to be part of the same group, specify the same
name for the OC4J that you specified in Step 2 of this procedure. Similarly,
enter the same password for the Administrator Account Password that you
entered in Step 2 of this procedure.
Assigning multiple OC4J instances the same instance name during installation
forms a group, making it easy to deploy applications to more than one OC4J
instance at time. You can simultaneously execute specific configuration
operations on all OC4J instances in a group.
In order to use a group, each OC4J instance in a group must also have the
same oc4jadmin password. If they do not, then you will have to reset the
password after the installation.
■
In the Cluster Topology Configuration screen, select Configure this OC4J
instance to be part of an Oracle Application Server cluster topology, specify
the same cluster discovery address as you specified in Step 2 of this procedure.
See Also:
■
■
■
"Configuring Multiple OC4J Middle Tiers in a Cluster," in the
Oracle Application Server Administrator’s Guide for further
information about configuring this topology
"How Groups Are Formed" in the Oracle Application Server
Administrator’s Guide for more information about creating groups
"myJ2EE" in the Oracle Application Server Enterprise Deployment
Guide for further information about using a firewall in this
topology
For larger application deployments spanning three or more nodes, consider your
performance and security needs. One strategy is to install and dedicate one node to
1-12 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Recommended Topologies
exclusively run Application Server Control Console and install the other nodes to
support applications. To install for this strategy:
1.
For the Oracle HTTP Server middle tier, perform a Web Server and Process
Management advanced installation, as described in Section 5.2.3, "Installing Web
Server and Process Management".
During the installation procedure, follow the prompts. In the Cluster Topology
Configuration screen, deselect Configure this HTTP Server instance to be part of
an Oracle Application Server cluster topology and specify a cluster discovery
address for the cluster. The multicast address you enter must be within the valid
address range, which is 224.0.0.1 to 239.255.255.255.
Make a note of the address and port that you enter on this page; you will need
them later.
2.
For the first OC4J middle tier, install an Administration OC4J instance.
Perform a J2EE Server and Process Management advanced installation, as
described in Section 5.2.2, "Installing J2EE Server and Process Management".
During the installation procedure, follow the prompts, ensuring you perform the
following:
■
■
■
In the Administration Instance Settings page, select Configure this as an
Administration OC4J Instance.
In the Administration Settings page, enter a password for the oc4jadmin
account in the Administrator Account Password fields. Enter a unique name
for this OC4J instance, such as AdminOC4J, in the OC4J Instance Name field.
In the Cluster Topology Configuration screen, select Configure this OC4J
instance to be part of an Oracle Application Server cluster topology and
specify the same cluster discovery address as you specified in Step 1 of this
procedure.
See Also: "Publishing Application Server Control Console to a
Separate Web Site" in the Oracle Application Server Administrator’s Guide
for instructions on making Application Server Control Console
accessible on a separate Web site
3.
For the second OC4J middle tier, perform a J2EE Server and Process Management
advanced installation, as described in Section 5.2.2, "Installing J2EE Server and
Process Management".
During the installation procedure, follow the prompts, ensuring you perform the
following:
■
■
In the Administration Instance Settings page, deselect Configure this as an
Administration OC4J Instance.
In the Administration Settings page, enter a password for the oc4jadmin
account in the Administrator Account Password fields. Enter a name for the
default OC4J instance, such as home, in the OC4J Instance Name field that is
different than the one you specified in Step 2 of this procedure.
Make a note of the OC4J instance name and the password you enter here; you
will need them later.
■
In the Cluster Topology Configuration screen, select Configure this OC4J
instance to be part of an Oracle Application Server cluster topology, specify
the same cluster discovery address as you specified in Step 1 of this procedure.
Product and Installation Overview
1-13
Recommended Topologies
4.
For the additional OC4J middle tiers, perform a J2EE Server and Process
Management advanced installation, as described in Section 5.2.2, "Installing J2EE
Server and Process Management".
During the installation procedure, follow the prompts, ensuring you perform the
following:
■
■
In the Administration Instance Settings page, deselect Configure this as an
Administration OC4J Instance.
In the Administration Settings page, enter the same password for the
oc4jadmin account in the Administrator Account Password field and
instance name in the OC4J Instance Name fields as you specified in Step 3 of
this procedure.
Assigning multiple OC4J instances the same instance name during installation
forms a group, making it easy to deploy applications to more than one OC4J
instance at time. You can simultaneously execute specific configuration
operations on all OC4J instances in a group.
In order to use a group, each OC4J instance in a group must also have the
same oc4jadmin password. If they do not, then you will have to reset the
password after the installation.
■
In the Cluster Topology Configuration screen, select Configure this OC4J
instance to be part of an Oracle Application Server cluster topology, specify
the same cluster discovery address as you specified in Step 1 of this procedure.
1-14 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
2
Requirements
Before installing Oracle Application Server, ensure that your computer meets the
requirements described in this chapter.
Table 2–1
Sections in This Chapter
Section
Highlights
Section 2.1, "Using OracleMetaLink to Obtain
the Latest Oracle Application Server
Hardware and Software Requirements"
Describes how to find the most current requirements for Oracle
Application Server 10g Release 3 (10.1.3).
Section 2.2, "System Requirements"
Lists requirements such as supported processor speed, memory,
disk space, and swap space.
Section 2.3, "Windows System Files (wsf.exe)"
Describes how to run wsf.exe to update Windows system files.
Applicable only if the installer prompts you to do so.
Section 2.4, "Ports"
Describes how to configure components to use ports other than
the default ports.
Section 2.5, "Operating System User"
Describes why you should create an operating system user to
install Oracle Application Server.
Section 2.6, "Environment Variables"
Describes how to set or unset environment variables required for
installation.
Section 2.7, "Network Topics"
Describes network issues such as installing Oracle Application
Server on a remote computer, using a remote CD-ROM/DVD
drive, or installing from a hard disk.
Section 2.8, "Prerequisite Checks Performed
by the Installer"
Lists the items checked by the installer, such as length of the
Oracle home name and whether or not the Oracle home directory
already contains another Oracle product.
2.1 Using OracleMetaLink to Obtain the Latest Oracle Application Server
Hardware and Software Requirements
The Oracle Application Server 10g (10.1.3) hardware and software requirements
included in this guide were accurate at the time this manual was released to
manufacturing. For the most up-to-date information about hardware and software
requirements, refer to OracleMetaLink:
https://metalink.oracle.com/
After logging into OracleMetaLink, click Certify. From the resulting Web page, you can
view the latest certifications by product, platform, and product availability.
Requirements 2-1
System Requirements
2.2 System Requirements
Table 2–2 lists the system requirements for running Oracle Application Server. The
installer checks many of these requirements at the start of the installation process and
warns you if any of them is not met. To save time, you can manually check only the
ones that are not checked by the installer. Refer to Table 2–2 to see which requirements
are not checked by the installer.
You can also run the system checks performed by the installer without doing an
installation, by running the setup.exe command as shown. The setup.exe
command is on the Oracle Application Server CD-ROM (Disk 1) or DVD-ROM (in the
application_server directory).
CD-ROM (assumes E: is the CD-ROM Drive):
E:\> setup.exe -executeSysPrereqs
DVD-ROM (assumes E: is the CD-ROM Drive):
E:\> cd application_server
E:\application_server> setup.exe -executeSysPrereqs
The results are displayed on the screen as well as written to a log file. For more
information on the types of checks performed, see Section 2.8, "Prerequisite Checks
Performed by the Installer".
Table 2–2
System Requirements
Item
Requirement
Operating system
Microsoft Windows Server 2003 (64-bit) with Service Pack 1 or above
Checked by Installer: Yes
Note: Oracle Application Server can be installed on Windows operating systems that
include Terminal Services. However, Oracle Application Server cannot be installed or
controlled by the Terminal Services remote client.
Network
You can install Oracle Application Server on a computer that is connected to a network, or
on a "standalone" computer (not connected to the network).
If you are installing Oracle Application Server on a standalone computer, you can connect
the computer to a network after installation. You have to perform some configuration tasks
when you connect it to the network.
Refer to Oracle Application Server Administrator’s Guide for details.
Checked by Installer: No
IP
You can install Oracle Application Server on a computer that uses static IP or DHCP-based
IP.
Note:
■
■
If you are installing on DHCP computers, see Section 2.7.1, "Installing on DHCP
Computers" for additional requirements.
If you are installing on static IP computers and you want to be able to run Oracle
Application Server on or off the network, see Section 2.7.5, "Installing on Static IP
Computers that You Want to Disconnect from the Network Later" for additional
requirements.
Checked by Installer: No
Hostname
Ensure that your hostnames are not longer than 255 characters.
Checked by Installer: No
2-2 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
System Requirements
Table 2–2 (Cont.) System Requirements
Item
Requirement
Processor Speed
300 MHz or faster
To determine the processor speed, run the following command:
prompt> cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep MHz
cpu MHz
: 2992.553
Checked by Installer: Yes
Memory
512 MB
Note:
■
■
■
The installer checks the amount of memory on your computer and will warn you if
your computer does not meet the minimum memory requirements.
This is the minimum value that is enough to install and run Oracle Application Server.
For most production sites, you should configure at least 1 GB of physical memory. For
sites with substantial traffic, increasing the amount of memory further may improve
performance. For Java applications, you should either increase the maximum heap
allocated to the OC4J processes or configure additional OC4J processes to utilize this
memory. See the Oracle Application Server Performance Guide for details.
To determine the optimal amount of memory for your installation, the best practice is to
load test your site. Resource requirements can vary substantially for different
applications and different usage patterns. In addition, some operating system utilities
for monitoring memory can overstate memory usage, partially due to the
representation of shared memory. The preferred method for determining memory
requirements is to monitor the improvement in performance resulting from the
addition of physical memory in your load test. Refer to your platform vendor
documentation for information on how to configure memory and processor resources
for testing purposes.
Checked by Installer: Yes
File system type
NTFS is recommended over FAT32 or FAT file system types because NTFS includes security
features such as enforcing permission restrictions on files.
Checked by Installer: No
Disk space
■
J2EE Server and Process Management: 614 MB
■
Web Server and Process Management: 525 MB
■
Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process Management: 645 MB
■
Oracle TopLink: 205 MB
Checked by Installer: No
Space in TEMP
directory
55 MB to run the installer, but you need 150 MB to install Oracle Application Server.
If the TEMP directory does not have enough free space, you can specify a different directory
by setting the TEMP environment variable. See Section 2.6.5, "TEMP" for details.
Checked by Installer: Yes
Requirements 2-3
Windows System Files (wsf.exe)
Table 2–2 (Cont.) System Requirements
Item
Requirement
Total Pagefile size
(Virtual Memory)
512 MB of virtual memory
If you plan to use OracleAS Clusters, Oracle recommends a minimum of 1 GB.
In a production environment, Oracle recommends a minimum of 1 GB.
To view and change the total pagefile size (virtual memory):
Windows 2003:
1.
Display the System control panel.
On Windows 2003, select Start > Control Panel > System.
2.
Select the Advanced tab.
3.
Click Settings in the Performance section.
4.
Select the Advanced tab.
5.
Click Change to review and change the virtual memory setting.
Checked by Installer: Yes
Monitor
256 color display
Checked by Installer: Yes
Supported browsers
Oracle Enterprise Manager 10g is supported on the following browsers:
■
Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 SP2 (supported on Microsoft Windows only)
■
Netscape 7.2
■
Mozilla 1.7. You can download Mozilla from http://www.mozilla.org.
■
Firefox 1.0.4. You can download Firefox from http://www.mozilla.org.
■
Safari 1.2, 2.0 (on Apple Macintosh computers)
For the most current list of supported browsers, check the OracleMetaLink site
(https://metalink.oracle.com).
Checked by Installer: No. However, if you access Oracle Enterprise Manager 10g using a
non-supported browser, you will get a warning message.
2.3 Windows System Files (wsf.exe)
Note: Perform this procedure only if prompted by the installer.
Oracle Application Server requires minimum versions of some system files in the
Windows system directory (typically C:\Windows\system32 or
C:\Winnt\system32). When you run the installer for Oracle Application Server, the
installer checks the Windows system files on your computer. If it finds old versions of
these files, and the files are in use by other processes, then it prompts you to exit the
installer and run wsf.exe to install the latest Windows system files. (If it finds old
versions of the files, but the files are not in use by other processes, then it just replaces
the files and you do not have to run wsf.exe.)
You can find wsf.exe in the same directory as the installer.
To run wsf.exe, which you need to do only if prompted by the installer, perform
these steps:
1.
Start wsf.exe, which starts up Oracle Universal Installer to install the Windows
system files.
CD-ROM (assumes E: is the CD-ROM drive):
2-4 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Ports
E:\> wsf.exe
DVD-ROM (assumes E: is the DVD-ROM drive):
E:\> cd application_server
E:\> wsf.exe
2.
Table 2–3
Follow the screens in the installer:
Screens for Installing Windows System Files
Screen
Action
1.
Welcome
Click Next.
2.
Specify File Locations
Destination Name: Enter a name for the Oracle home for wsf.
Destination Path: Enter any full path. The installer installs the files in the proper
system directories, regardless of the value you enter in this field.
Click Next.
3.
Warning: System Reboot
Required
If you see this screen, the installer will reboot your computer automatically at the
end of this installation to complete the Windows system files installation. Save and
close applications (other than this installer) that you have running on your
computer.
Click Next.
4.
Summary
Click Next to start installing the Windows system files.
5.
End of Installation
Click Exit to exit the installer.
3.
If the installer displayed the "Warning: System Reboot Required" screen during
installation, the installer now reboots your computer. If not, please reboot your
computer before continuing.
2.4 Ports
Many Oracle Application Server components, such as Oracle HTTP Server, use ports.
You can have the installer assign default port numbers, or use port numbers that you
specify.
■
Section 2.4.1, "About Ephemeral Ports"
■
Section 2.4.2, "Checking If a Port Is in Use"
■
Section 2.4.3, "Using Default Port Numbers"
■
Section 2.4.4, "Using Custom Port Numbers (the "Static Ports" Feature)"
2.4.1 About Ephemeral Ports
An ephemeral port is a port number that an operating system can temporarily assign
to a service or process. Some services or processes have conventionally assigned
permanent port numbers. In other cases, an ephemeral port number is assigned
temporarily (for the duration of the request and its completion) from a range of
assigned port numbers.
Ephemeral Port Range
The ephemeral port range on Microsoft Windows is ports 1024 through 5000, inclusive.
Requirements 2-5
Ports
Only the upper end of this range is adjustable in Windows. In most other operating
systems, the ephemeral range by default is much larger, and the lower and upper
bounds of the range are adjustable.
One Application Server process, Oracle HTTP Server SSL, uses ports in the ephemeral
port range. This process cannot start up if the port that it needs is already in use by
clients.
Problem: Components Cannot Start Up Because of Conflicts with Ephemeral
Ports
On rare occasions, Oracle Application Server processes are unable to start up because
required ports are not available. Processes may fail to start up or report that they are
unable to "bind" to ports. The behavior may be transient in that if you try to restart the
affected process later, it does start successfully.
The cause of this problem is that by default, Oracle Application Server uses a number
of ports that fall into the range of "ephemeral" ports. Ephemeral ports are usually used
on the client ends of client/server TCP/IP connections. Because client processes
usually are unconcerned with which port value is used on the client side of the
connection, all TCP/IP implementations allow clients to defer to the operating system
the choice of which port value to use for the client side. The operating system selects a
port from the "ephemeral" port range for each client connection of this type.
On the other hand, server processes (for example, Oracle Application Server processes)
cannot use ephemeral ports. They must use fixed port values so that clients can always
connect to the same server port to communicate with the server.
Port conflicts with ephemeral ports arise when an Oracle Application Server process is
configured to use a port in the ephemeral port range. The Oracle Application Server
process tries to start up, but discovers that the port that it needs is already in use by a
client process (the client received the ephemeral port assignment from the operating
system). This client can be any process on the computer capable of communicating via
TCP/IP. The Oracle Application Server process fails to start up when the port that it
needs is unavailable.
This problem occurs relatively more frequently on Microsoft Windows than on other
operating systems because by default Windows uses a small range of ports for
ephemeral client connections.
How to Avoid Conflicts with Ephemeral Ports
To avoid conflicts with ephemeral ports, you have these options:
■
Install Oracle Application Server using staticports.ini so that Oracle Application
Server components do not use ports within the ephemeral range. In the
staticports.ini file, use port numbers below 1024 or above 5000.
See Section 2.4.4, "Using Custom Port Numbers (the "Static Ports" Feature)" for
details.
■
■
If you have already installed Oracle Application Server, you can reconfigure the
components to use ports below 1024 or above 5000. See the Oracle Application
Server Administrator’s Guide to learn how to change the current ports used by
Application Server processes.
(This option can be done postinstallation.) Modify the ephemeral port range on
your computer. Use this option only if you cannot use any of the alternatives
above. This option is the least preferred because it makes changes to the Windows
registry, and it affects all products that you run on your computer.
2-6 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Ports
This option moves the ephemeral port range to a new location. Before making the
change, you must verify that none of the products you are using (Oracle or
non-Oracle) on your computer use non-ephemeral ports within the ephemeral
port range. If any products do so, you must relocate them to the new
ReservedPorts range (see below), above the new ephemeral range, or below port
1024.
To implement this option, perform these steps:
–
Raise the upper bound of the ephemeral port range to expand the size of the
range.
Set the MaxUserPort value in the registry to at least 13000, but no higher than
65534. MaxUserPort is the upper bound of the ephemeral port range.
For steps, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 196271:
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;[LN];196
271.
–
Reserve a portion of the newly expanded ephemeral port range for use by
Oracle Application Server.
Set the ReservedPorts value in the registry so that ports 1024 through 8000 are
reserved for Oracle Application Server. The reserved range incorporates the
range of ports normally used by Oracle Application Server.
For steps, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 812873:
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;[LN];812
873.
–
Restart your computer for the changes to take effect.
After performing the steps, you end up with the following: ports from 1024
through 8000 are reserved for Oracle Application Server, and ports 8001 through
13000 are the new ephemeral port range (assuming you set the MaxUserPort to
13000). The reserved range incorporates the range of ports normally used by
Oracle Application Server, and the ephemeral range has the same size as the
original.
2.4.2 Checking If a Port Is in Use
To check if a port is being used, you can run the netstat command as follows:
C:\> netstat -an | find "portnum"
Note that you need double-quotes around the port number.
2.4.3 Using Default Port Numbers
If you want to use the default port numbers for components, you do not have to do
anything. See Appendix B, "Default Port Numbers" for a list of the default port
numbers and ranges. Make sure that at least one port is available in the port range for
each component. If the installer is unable to find a free port in the range, the
installation will fail.
Note the following points:
■
The installer assigns the default ports to components only if the ports are not in
use by other applications. If the default port is in use, the installer tries other ports
in the port number range for the component. For example, the default non-SSL
Requirements 2-7
Ports
port for Oracle HTTP Server is port 80. If this port is in use by another application,
the installer assigns a port in the 7777 - 7877 range.
■
The installer no longer checks the services file to determine if a port is in use. In
earlier releases, the installer would not assign a port number if the port number is
listed in the file.
The services file is located in the
C:\%SystemRoot%\system32\drivers\etc directory, where %SystemRoot%
is windows on Windows 2003.
2.4.4 Using Custom Port Numbers (the "Static Ports" Feature)
To instruct the installer to assign custom port numbers for components:
1.
Create a file containing the component names and port numbers. Section 2.4.4.1,
"Format of the staticports.ini File" describes the file format. This file is typically
called the staticports.ini file, but you can name it anything you want.
2.
In the installer, on the Specify Port Configuration Options screen, select Manual
and enter the full path to the staticports.ini file.
If you do not specify the full path to the file, the installer will not be able to find
the file. The installer will then assign default ports for all the components, and it
will do this without displaying any warning.
2.4.4.1 Format of the staticports.ini File
The staticports.ini file has the following format. Replace port_num with the port
number that you want to use for the component.
Oracle
Oracle
Oracle
Oracle
Oracle
HTTP Server port = port_num
HTTP Server SSL port = port_num
Notification Server Request port = port_num
Notification Server Local port = port_num
Notification Server Remote port = port_num
The easiest way to create the file is to use the staticports.ini file on the CD-ROM
(Disk 1) or DVD as a template:
1.
Copy the staticports.ini file from the CD-ROM or DVD to your hard disk.
Table 2–4
Location of the staticports.ini File on CD-ROM and DVD-ROM
Media
Location of staticports.ini File
CD-ROM
Disk 1: E:\stage\Response\staticports.ini
DVD
E:\application_server\stage\Response\staticports.ini
2.
Edit the local copy (the file on the hard disk) to include the desired port numbers.
You do not need to specify port numbers for all components in the
staticports.ini file. If a component is not listed in the file, the installer uses
the default port number for that component.
The following example sets the Oracle HTTP Server ports and some Oracle
Process Manager and Notification Server ports. For components not specified, the
installer will assign the default port numbers.
Oracle HTTP Server port = 2000
Oracle HTTP Server SSL port = 2001
Oracle Notification Server Request port = 2002
2-8 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Ports
Oracle Notification Server Local port = 2003
When installation is complete, you can run the following commands to see the
assigned ports:
C:\> ORACLE_HOME\opmn\bin\opmnctl startall
C:\> ORACLE_HOME\opmn\bin\opmnctl status -l
Notes on Choosing Port Numbers:
■
■
Port numbers cannot be greater than 65535.
If you plan to set port numbers for Oracle HTTP Server, be sure
you read Section 2.4.4.3, "Ports for Oracle HTTP Server".
The installer verifies that the ports specified in the file are available by checking
memory. This means that it can only detect ports that are being used by running
processes. It does not look in configuration files to determine which ports an
application is using.
If the installer detects that a specified port is not available, it displays an alert. The
installer will not assign a port that is not available. To fix this:
1.
Edit the staticports.ini file to specify a different port, or shut down the
application that is using the port.
2.
Click Retry. The installer re-reads the staticports.ini file and verifies the
entries in the file again.
2.4.4.2 Error Conditions that Will Cause the Installer to Use Default Ports Instead
of Specified Ports
Check your staticports.ini file carefully because a mistake can cause the installer
to use default ports without displaying any warning. Here are some things that you
should check:
■
■
■
■
■
If you specify the same port for more than one component, the installer will use
the specified port for the first component, but for the other components, it will use
the components’ default ports. The installer does not warn you if you have
specified the same port for multiple components.
If you specify different ports for one component on multiple lines, the installer
assigns the default port for the component. The installer does not warn you if you
have specified different ports for one component.
If you specify the same port for one component on multiple lines, the installer
assigns the default port for the component. The installer does not warn you if you
have specified the same port on multiple lines.
If you have syntax errors in the staticports.ini file (for example, if you
omitted the = character for a line), the installer ignores the line. For the
components specified on such lines, the installer assigns the default ports. The
installer does not display a warning for lines with syntax errors.
If you misspell a component name, the installer assigns the default port for the
component. Names of components in the file are case sensitive. The installer does
not display a warning for lines with unrecognized names.
Requirements 2-9
Operating System User
■
■
If you specify a non-numeric value for the port number, the installer ignores the
line and assigns the default port number for the component. It does this without
displaying any warning.
If you specify a relative path to the staticports.ini file (for example,
".\staticports.ini" or just "staticports.ini"), the installer will not find
the file. The installer continues without displaying a warning and it will assign
default ports to all components. You must specify a full path to the
staticports.ini file.
2.4.4.3 Ports for Oracle HTTP Server
Be sure you understand the following when setting ports for this component.
In the httpd.conf file for Oracle HTTP Server, the Port and the Listen directives
specify the ports used by Oracle HTTP Server (Figure 2–1). You must set both
directives to use the same port number.
To set these ports, use the "Oracle HTTP Server port" and "Oracle HTTP Server Listen
port" lines in the staticports.ini file. For example:
Oracle HTTP Server port = 8080
Oracle HTTP Server Listen port = 8080
To set the SSL version of these ports, use the following lines. As in the non-SSL
version, the port numbers must be the same.
Oracle HTTP Server SSL port = 443
Oracle HTTP Server Listen (SSL) port = 443
Figure 2–1 Configuring Oracle HTTP Server
Uses this directive
in the httpd.conf file
Line in staticports.ini
to set the value for the
directive
Port
Oracle HTTP Server port
Listen
Oracle HTTP Server Listen port
Oracle HTTP Server
Note: You must specify the same port number for both directives.
2.5 Operating System User
The operating system user performing the installation must belong to the
Administrators group.
Note: The user must be listed directly in the Administrators group.
The user cannot belong to the Administrators group indirectly (for
example, by being a member of a group that is part of the
Administrators group).
Perform the following steps to check if you belong to the Administrators group:
2-10 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Environment Variables
1.
Display the Computer Management dialog.
On Windows 2003: Right-click the local computer icon on the desktop and select
Manage.
2.
On the left side, expand Local Users and Groups, and select Users.
3.
On the right side, right-click the user and select Properties. This displays the
Properties dialog.
4.
In the Properties dialog, select the Member Of tab.
If you are not a member of the Administrators group, get an administrator to add you
to the group or log in as a user who is a member of the Administrators group.
2.6 Environment Variables
The operating system user who will be installing Oracle Application Server needs to
set (or unset) the following environment variables.
Table 2–5 summarizes whether you set or unset an environment variable.
Table 2–5
Environment Variable Summary
Environment variable
Set or Unset
ORACLE_HOME and
ORACLE_SID
Must not be set.
PATH
Must not be longer than 1023 characters.
TEMP
Optional. If unset, defaults to C:\temp.
TNS_ADMIN
Must not be set.
2.6.1 How to Set Environment Variables
This section describes how to set environment variables in Windows:
1.
To display the System control panel select Start > Control Panel > System.
2.
Select the Advanced tab.
3.
Click Environment Variables.
4.
To change the value of a variable, select the variable and click Edit.
2.6.2 ORACLE_HOME and ORACLE_SID
These environment variables must not be set.
2.6.3 PATH
The PATH environment variable cannot be longer than 1023 characters. Otherwise, the
installation may fail.
2.6.4 TNS_ADMIN
Ensure that the TNS_ADMIN environment variable is not set when you run the
installer. If set, it can cause errors during installation.
Requirements 2-11
Network Topics
2.6.5 TEMP
During installation, the installer needs to write temporary files to a "temporary"
directory. By default, the "temporary" directory is C:\temp.
If you want the installer to use a directory other than C:\temp, set the TEMP
environment variable to the full path of an alternate directory. This directory must
meet the requirements listed in Table 2–2.
If you do not set this environment variable, and the default directory does not have
enough space, then the installer displays an error message that says the environment
variable is not set. You can either set the environment variable to point to a different
directory or free up enough space in the default directory. In either case, you have to
restart the installation.
2.7 Network Topics
Typically, the computer on which you want to install Oracle Application Server is
connected to the network, has local storage to contain the Oracle Application Server
installation, has a display monitor, and has a CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive.
This section describes how to install Oracle Application Server on computers that do
not meet the typical scenario. It covers the following cases:
■
Section 2.7.1, "Installing on DHCP Computers"
■
Section 2.7.2, "Installing on Multihomed (Multi-IP) Computers"
■
Section 2.7.3, "Installing on Computers with Multiple Aliases"
■
Section 2.7.4, "Installing on Non-Networked Computers"
■
■
■
■
■
Section 2.7.5, "Installing on Static IP Computers that You Want to Disconnect from
the Network Later"
Section 2.7.6, "Installing a Loopback Adapter"
Section 2.7.7, "Copying CD-ROMs or DVD-ROM to Hard Drive, and Installing
from the Hard Drive"
Section 2.7.8, "Installing from a Remote CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Drive"
Section 2.7.9, "Installing on Remote Computers Through Remote Control
Software"
2.7.1 Installing on DHCP Computers
Note this limitation when running Oracle Application Server on DHCP computers:
Oracle Application Server instances on DHCP computers cannot communicate with
other instances running on other computers. For example, you cannot have OracleAS
Infrastructure on one computer and a middle tier on another computer if any one of
those computers uses DHCP. All the instances that need to communicate with each
other need to run on the same computer. There are no limitations on clients: clients
from other computers can access the instances running on the DHCP computer, as
long as the client computer can resolve the DHCP computer on the network.
Before installing Oracle Application Server on a DHCP computer, perform these steps:
1.
Install a loopback adapter on the DHCP computer.
2-12 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Network Topics
When you install a loopback adapter, the loopback adapter assigns a local IP for
your computer. Having a loopback adapter and a local IP address means that you
do not have to run the chgiphost script after installation each time the IP
address changes (due to DHCP).
Which Is the Primary Network Adapter?
Windows considers loopback adapters as a type of network adapter. After
installing a loopback adapter on your computer, you have at least two network
adapters on your computer: your network adapter and the loopback adapter.
You want Windows to use the loopback adapter as the primary adapter. The
primary adapter is determined by the order in which you installed the adapters:
■
On Windows 2000, the primary adapter is the last adapter installed. You can
just install the loopback adapter. However, if you install additional network
adapters after you install the loopback adapter, you need to deinstall the
loopback adapter and reinstall it.
To install a loopback adapter on the different Windows platforms, see
Section 2.7.6, "Installing a Loopback Adapter".
2.
Ping each computer where you plan to install Oracle Application Server.
■
Ping the computer from itself, using only the hostname and using the fully
qualified name.
For example, if you installed a loopback adapter on a computer called
mycomputer, check the following:
prompt> ping mycomputer
Reply from 10.10.10.10
prompt> ping mycomputer.mydomain.com
Reply from 10.10.10.10
Ping itself using just the hostname.
Returns loopback adapter IP.
Ping using a fully qualified name.
Returns loopback adapter IP.
Note: When you ping a computer from itself, the ping command
should return the IP of the loopback adapter. It should not return the
network IP of the computer.
■
Ping the computer from other computers on the network, using only the
hostname and using the fully qualified name.
In this case, the ping command returns the network IP of the computer.
prompt> ping mycomputer
Reply from 139.185.140.166
prompt> ping mycomputer.mydomain.com
Reply from 139.185.140.166
Ping using
Returns
Ping using
Returns
the hostname.
network IP.
a fully qualified name.
network IP.
If ping fails, then consult your network administrator.
2.7.2 Installing on Multihomed (Multi-IP) Computers
You can install Oracle Application Server on a multihomed computer. A multihomed
computer is associated with multiple IP addresses. This is typically achieved by
having multiple network cards on the computer. Each IP address is associated with a
hostname; additionally, you can set up aliases for the hostname. By default, Oracle
Universal Installer uses the ORACLE_HOSTNAME environment variable setting to find
the hostname. If ORACLE_HOSTNAME is not set and you are installing on a computer
Requirements 2-13
Network Topics
that has multiple network cards, Oracle Universal Installer determines the hostname
by using the first name in the hosts file (typically located in DRIVE_
LETTER:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc).
Clients must be able to access the computer using this hostname (or using aliases for
this hostname). To check, ping the hostname from the client computers using the short
name (hostname only) and the full name (hostname and domain name). Both must
work.
For information on setting environment variables, see Section 2.6.1, "How to Set
Environment Variables".
2.7.3 Installing on Computers with Multiple Aliases
A computer with multiple aliases is registered with the naming service under a single
IP but with multiple aliases. The naming service resolves any of those aliases to the
same computer. Before installing Oracle Application Server on such a computer, set
the ORACLE_HOSTNAME environment variable to the computer whose hostname you
want to use.
For information on setting environment variables, see Section 2.6.1, "How to Set
Environment Variables".
2.7.4 Installing on Non-Networked Computers
You can install Oracle Application Server on a non-networked computer, such as a
laptop. Because a non-networked computer has no access to other computers, you
have to install all the components that you need on the computer.
Note that to install Oracle Application Server on a non-networked computer, the
computer must have networking capabilities. Non-networked means that the
computer is not connected to a network.
If you want to install Oracle Application Server on a non-networked computer, and
you never want to connect the computer to a network after installation, ever, then you
can just go ahead and install Oracle Application Server on your non-networked
computer.
However, if you plan to connect the computer to a network after installation, perform
these steps before you install Oracle Application Server on the non-networked
computer.
1.
Install a loopback adapter on the computer. See Section 2.7.6, "Installing a
Loopback Adapter".
The loopback adapter and local IP address simulate a networked computer. If you
connect the computer to the network, Oracle Application Server still uses the local
IP and hostname.
2.
Ping the computer from itself, using only the hostname and using the fully
qualified name.
For example, if you installed a loopback adapter on a computer called
mycomputer, check the following:
prompt> ping mycomputer
Reply from 10.10.10.10
prompt> ping mycomputer.mydomain.com
Reply from 10.10.10.10
2-14 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Ping itself using just the hostname.
Returns loopback adapter IP.
Ping using a fully qualified name.
Returns loopback adapter IP.
Network Topics
Note: When you ping a computer from itself, the ping command
should return the IP of the loopback adapter.
If ping fails, then you need to talk with your network administrator.
Connecting the Computer to the Network After Installation
If you connect the computer to a network after installation, your Oracle Application
Server instance on your computer can work with other instances on the network.
Recall that you must have installed a loopback adapter on your computer. Your
computer can use a static IP or DHCP, depending on the network to which you are
connected.
See the Oracle Application Server Administrator’s Guide for details.
2.7.5 Installing on Static IP Computers that You Want to Disconnect from the Network
Later
If you plan to install Oracle Application Server on a networked computer with static IP
and you want to be able to run Oracle Application Server when you disconnect the
computer from the network, you need to do the following steps before installing
Oracle Application Server:
1.
Install a loopback adapter on your computer. See Section 2.7.6, "Installing a
Loopback Adapter" for details.
Without a loopback adapter, Oracle Application Server cannot function correctly
when you disconnect the computer from the network because the static IP is no
longer available.
2.
Make sure the loopback adapter is the primary network adapter. See "Which Is the
Primary Network Adapter?" on page 2-13. To check, ping the computer from itself
using (1) the hostname only and (2) the fully qualified name.
For example, if you installed a loopback adapter on a computer called
mycomputer, you can run these commands:
prompt> ping mycomputer
Reply from 10.10.10.10
prompt> ping mycomputer.mydomain.com
Reply from 10.10.10.10
Ping itself using just the hostname.
Returns loopback adapter IP.
Ping using a fully qualified name.
Returns loopback adapter IP.
When you ping a computer from itself, the ping command should return the IP of
the loopback adapter. It should not return the network IP of the computer.
These steps are required regardless of whether the computer is using static IP or
DHCP. If this is a DHCP computer, you already know you need a loopback adapter;
see Section 2.7.1, "Installing on DHCP Computers".
When you disconnect the computer from the network, the computer has no access to
any network resources. Make sure you have all the instances (for example, OracleAS
Infrastructure and middle tier) you need on your computer.
2.7.6 Installing a Loopback Adapter
A loopback adapter is required in any of these scenarios:
■
you are installing on a DHCP computer (see Section 2.7.1, "Installing on DHCP
Computers"), or
Requirements 2-15
Network Topics
■
■
■
you are installing on a non-networked computer and plan to connect the computer
to a network after installation (see Section 2.7.4, "Installing on Non-Networked
Computers"), or
you are installing on a computer with multiple aliases (see Section 2.7.3, "Installing
on Computers with Multiple Aliases"), or
you are installing on a networked computer (with static IP or DHCP), but you
want to be able to run Oracle Application Server when you take the computer off
the network.
The procedure for installing a loopback adapter depends on the version of Windows:
■
Section 2.7.6.1, "Checking If a Loopback Adapter Is Installed on Your Computer"
■
Section 2.7.6.2, "Installing a Loopback Adapter on Windows 2003"
■
Section 2.7.6.3, "Checking the Hostname"
■
Section 2.7.6.4, "Removing a Loopback Adapter on Windows 2003"
2.7.6.1 Checking If a Loopback Adapter Is Installed on Your Computer
To check if a loopback adapter is installed on your computer, run the "ipconfig
/all" command:
prompt> ipconfig /all
If there is a loopback adapter installed, you would see a section that lists the values for
the loopback adapter. For example:
Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection 2:
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft Loopback Adapter
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 02-00-4C-4F-4F-50
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration IP Address. . . : 169.254.25.129
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.0.0
2.7.6.2 Installing a Loopback Adapter on Windows 2003
To install a loopback adapter on Windows 2003:
1.
Open the Windows Control Panel.
Windows 2003: Select Start > Control Panel > System.
2.
Double-click Add Hardware to start the Add Hardware wizard.
3.
In the Welcome window, click Next.
4.
In the Is the hardware connected? window, select Yes, I have already connected
the hardware, and click Next.
5.
In the The following hardware is already installed on your computer window, in
the list of installed hardware, select Add a new hardware device, and click Next.
6.
In the The wizard can help you install other hardware window, select Install the
hardware that I manually select from a list, and click Next.
7.
In the From the list of hardware types, select the type of hardware you are
installing window, select Network adapters, and click Next.
8.
In the Select Network Adapter window, make the following selections:
2-16 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Network Topics
9.
■
Manufacturer: select Microsoft.
■
Network Adapter: select Microsoft Loopback Adapter.
Click Next.
10. In the The wizard is ready to install your hardware window, click Next.
11. In the Completing the Add Hardware Wizard window, click Finish.
12. If you are using Windows 2003, restart your computer.
13. Right-click My Network Places on the desktop and choose Properties. This
displays the Network Connections Control Panel.
14. Right-click the connection that was just created. This is usually named "Local Area
Connection 2". Choose Properties.
15. On the General tab, select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and click Properties.
16. In the Properties dialog box, click Use the following IP address and do the
following:
a.
IP Address: Enter a non-routable IP for the loopback adapter. Oracle
recommends the following non-routable addresses:
–
192.168.x.x (x is any value between 1 and 255)
–
10.10.10.10
b.
Subnet mask: Enter 255.255.255.0.
c.
Record the values you entered, which you will need later in this procedure.
d.
Leave all other fields empty.
e.
Click OK.
17. Click OK in the Local Area Connection 2 Properties dialog.
18. Close Network Connections.
19. Restart the computer.
20. Add a line to the C:\winnt\system32\drivers\etc\hosts file with the
following format, right after the localhost line:
IP_address
hostname.domainname
hostname
where:
■
IP_address is the non-routable IP address you entered in step 14.
■
hostname is the name of the computer.
■
domainname is the name of the domain.
For example:
10.10.10.10
mycomputer.mydomain.com
mycomputer
21. Check the network configuration:
a.
Open System in the Control Panel, and select the Computer Name tab. In Full
computer name, make sure you see the host name and the domain name, for
example, sales.us.mycompany.com.
b.
Click Change. In Computer name, you should see the host name, and in Full
computer name, you should see the host name and domain name. Using the
Requirements 2-17
Network Topics
previous example, the host name would be sales and the domain name
would be us.mycompany.com.
c.
Click More. In Primary DNS suffix of this computer, you should see the
domain name, for example, us.mycompany.com.
2.7.6.3 Checking the Hostname
If your DHCP server also assigns the hostname for your computer (in addition to
assigning an IP address), the installer might use this hostname instead of the hostname
you defined locally.
To ensure that the installer uses the local hostname, you have two options:
■
Option 1: Start up the installer with the OUI_HOSTNAME parameter. This
parameter specifies the hostname that you want to use.
E:\> setup.exe OUI_HOSTNAME=myhostname.mydomain.com
■
Option 2: Before running the installer, add a line to the
C:\winnt\system32\drivers\etc\hosts file with the following format:
IP_address
hostname.domainname
hostname
This line should come after the localhost line in the file.
Replace IP_address with the loopback adapter's IP address. This should be a
non-routable IP address.
Replace hostname and domainname with the appropriate values.
Example:
10.10.10.10
mycomputer.mydomain.com
mycomputer
If you have already installed Oracle Application Server, you can change the hostname
after installation using the change IP/hostname procedures documented in the Oracle
Application Server Administrator’s Guide.
2.7.6.4 Removing a Loopback Adapter on Windows 2003
To remove a loopback adapter on Windows 2003:
1.
Display the System control panel.
Windows 2003: Select Start > Control Panel > System.
2.
In the Hardware tab, click Device Manager.
3.
In the Device Manager windows, expand Network adapters. You should see
Microsoft Loopback Adapter.
4.
Right-click Microsoft Loopback Adapter and select Uninstall.
5.
Click OK.
2.7.7 Copying CD-ROMs or DVD-ROM to Hard Drive, and Installing from the Hard Drive
Instead of installing from the Oracle Application Server CD-ROMs or DVD-ROM, you
can copy the contents of the CD-ROMs or DVD-ROM to a hard drive and install from
there. This might be easier if you plan to install many instances of Oracle Application
Server on your network, or if the computers where you want to install Oracle
Application Server do not have CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drives.
2-18 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Network Topics
(You can install from remote CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drives; see Section 2.7.8,
"Installing from a Remote CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Drive".)
When you install from the hard drive, the installer does not prompt you to swap
CD-ROMs. It can find all the files if they are in the proper locations (see Figure 2–2).
Accessing the Hard Drive from Other Computers
If you want to install Oracle Application Server on remote computers from the hard
drive where you copied the contents of the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM, you have to do
the following steps:
1.
On the local computer, share the hard drive.
2.
On the computers where you want to install Oracle Application Server, map to the
shared hard drive.
3.
Run the installer from the remote computers where you want to install Oracle
Application Server.
Note that you have to use the drive letter for the mapped drive to access the
installer (for example, H:\appserver10_1_2\setup.exe).
You cannot use the universal naming convention (UNC) syntax
(\\hostname\sharename) to access the installer.
Space Requirement
Ensure that the hard drive contains enough space to hold the contents of the
CD-ROMs or the application_server directory on the DVD-ROM. Each CD-ROM
contains approximately 650 MB. This means that if you are copying three CD-ROMs,
you need approximately 1.9 GB of disk space.
On the DVD-ROM, the application_server directory is approximately 1.6 GB.
This space is in addition to the space required for installing Oracle Application Server
(listed in Table 2–2).
To Copy the CD-ROMs:
1. Create a directory structure on your hard drive as shown in Figure 2–2.
You need to create a parent directory (called OracleAS_10g in the example, but
you can name it anything you like), and, under the parent directory, create
subdirectories called Disk1, Disk2, and so on. The names of the subdirectories
must be DiskN, where N is the CD-ROM number.
Figure 2–2 Directory Structure for Copying CD-ROMs to Disk
OracleAS_10g
Disk1
Disk2
Disk3
Contents
of Disk1
Contents
of Disk2
Contents
of Disk3
2.
Copy the contents of each CD-ROM into the corresponding directory.
You can copy the files using Windows Explorer or the command line. If you are
using the command line, you can use the xcopy command.
Requirements 2-19
Network Topics
The following example assumes E: is the CD-ROM drive, and C:\OracleAS_
10g\DiskN are the directories that you want to copy the CD-ROMs to.
E:\> xcopy /e /i E:\1013disk1
E:\> xcopy /e /i E:\1013disk2
... Repeat for each CD-ROM.
C:\OracleAS_10g\Disk1
C:\OracleAS_10g\Disk2
To run the installer from the copied files, invoke the setup.exe executable from the
Disk1 directory. Run it from the computer that will be running Oracle Application
Server.
C:\> cd OracleAS_10g\Disk1
C:\OracleAS_10g\Disk1> setup.exe
To Copy the application_server Directory from the DVD-ROM
You can copy the application_server directory using Windows Explorer or the
command line. If you are using the command line, here are the steps:
1.
(optional) Create a directory to contain the application_server directory.
2.
Copy the application_server directory from the DVD-ROM to your hard
disk.
The example assumes E: is the DVD-ROM drive, and C:\application_server
is the destination directory:
E:\> xcopy /e /i
E:\application_server
C:\application_server
To run the installer from the copied files, invoke the executable from the computer
that will be running Oracle Application Server:
C:\> cd application_server
C:\application_server> setup.exe
2.7.8 Installing from a Remote CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Drive
If the computer where you want to install Oracle Application Server does not have a
CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive, you can perform the installation from a remote
CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive. Check that you have performed these steps:
On the Remote Computer, Share the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Drive
The remote CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive that you want to use must allow shared
access. To set this up, perform these steps on the remote computer (which has the
CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive):
1.
Log in to the remote computer as an Administrator user.
2.
Start up Windows Explorer.
3.
Right-click the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive letter and choose Sharing and
Security (Windows 2003.
4.
In the Sharing tab (Figure 2–3):
Select Share this folder.
Share name: Give it a share name such as cdrom or dvd. You will use this name
when you map the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive on the local computer. See step d
on page 2-21.
2-20 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Network Topics
Click Permissions. You need at least "read" permission for the user who will be
accessing it to install Oracle Application Server.
Click OK when done.
Figure 2–3 Sharing a CD-ROM Drive
5.
CD-ROM: Insert Oracle Application Server Disk 1 into the CD-ROM drive.
DVD-ROM: Insert the Oracle Application Server DVD-ROM into the DVD-ROM
drive.
On the Local Computer, Map the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Drive
Perform these steps on the local computer to map the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive
and to run the installer:
1.
Map the remote CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive.
a.
Start up Windows Explorer on the local computer.
b.
Select Tools > Map Network Drive. This displays the Map Network Drive
dialog.
c.
Select a drive letter to use for the remote CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive.
d.
In Folder, enter the location of the remote CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive using
the following format:
\\remote_hostname\share_name
Replace remote_hostname with the name of the remote computer with the
CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive.
Replace share_name with the share name that you entered in step 4 on
page 2-20.
Example: \\computer2\cdrom
e.
If you need to connect to the remote computer as a different user:
Click different user name, and enter the username.
Requirements 2-21
Network Topics
f.
2.
Click Finish.
Run the installer from the mapped CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive.
When the installer prompts you to switch CD-ROMs, eject the CD-ROM and insert
the requested CD-ROM.
Note: The installer must be running when you are switching
CD-ROMs. Do not exit the installer when switching CD-ROMs. If
you exit the installer, it is unable to continue from where it left off.
In addition, the partial installation that it created is not usable, and
may need to be removed manually.
2.7.9 Installing on Remote Computers Through Remote Control Software
If you want to install and run Oracle Application Server on a remote computer (that is,
the remote computer has the hard drive and will run Oracle Application Server
components), but you do not have physical access to the computer, you can still
perform the installation on the remote computer if it is running remote control
software such as VNC or Symantec pcAnywhere. You also need the remote control
software running on your local computer.
You can install Oracle Application Server on the remote computer in one of two ways:
■
■
If you have copied the contents of the Oracle Application Server CD-ROM or
DVD-ROM to a hard drive, you can install from the hard drive.
You can insert the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM into a drive on your local computer,
and install from the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM.
Installing from a Hard Drive
If you have copied the contents of the Oracle Application Server CD-ROM or
DVD-ROM to a hard drive, you can install from the hard drive.
The steps that you have to do are:
1.
Make sure that the remote control software is installed and running on the remote
and local computers.
2.
Share the hard drive that contains the Oracle Application Server CD-ROM or
DVD-ROM.
3.
On the remote computer, map a drive letter to the shared hard drive. You would
use the remote control software to do this on the remote computer.
4.
Through the remote control software, run the installer on the remote computer.
You access the installer from the shared hard drive.
Installing from a Remote CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Drive
You can insert the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM into a drive on your local computer, and
install from the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM. This is similar to the scenario described in
Section 2.7.8, "Installing from a Remote CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Drive".
The steps that you have to do are:
1.
Make sure that the remote control software is installed and running on the remote
and local computers.
2.
On the local computer, share the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive.
2-22 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Prerequisite Checks Performed by the Installer
On the remote computer, map a drive letter to the shared CD-ROM or DVD-ROM
drive. You would use the remote control software to do this on the remote
computer.
These steps are described in Section 2.7.8, "Installing from a Remote CD-ROM or
DVD-ROM Drive".
3.
Through the remote control software, run the installer on the remote computer.
You access the installer from the shared CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive.
2.8 Prerequisite Checks Performed by the Installer
Table 2–6 lists the checks performed by the installer:
Table 2–6
Prerequisite Checks Performed by the Installer
Item
Description
Processor
See Table 2–2 for recommended values.
Memory
See Table 2–2 for recommended values.
Swap space
See Table 2–2 for recommended values.
TMP space
See Table 2–2 for recommended values.
Instance name
The installer checks that the computer on which you are installing Oracle
Application Server does not already have an instance of the same name.
Oracle home directory name
The installer checks that the Oracle home directory name does not contain any
spaces.
Path to Oracle home directory The installer checks that the path to the Oracle home directory is not longer than
127 characters.
Oracle home directory
contents
The installer checks that the Oracle home directory does not contain any files that
might interfere with the installation.
Oracle home directory
You should install Oracle Application Server in a new directory. Here are some
examples of installations that are not allowed:
■
■
Oracle Application Server into an Oracle Management Service Oracle home
■
Oracle Application Server into an Oracle Collaboration Suite Oracle home
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Static port conflicts
Oracle Application Server into an 8.0, 8i, 9.0.1, 9.2, or 10g database Oracle
home
Oracle Application Server into an Oracle HTTP Server standalone Oracle
home
Oracle Application Server into an OracleAS Web Cache standalone Oracle
home
Oracle Application Server into an Oracle9i Developer Suite 9.0.2 or Oracle
Developer Suite 10g Release 2 (10.1.2) Oracle home
Oracle Application Server into an Oracle Containers for J2EE standalone
Oracle home
Oracle Application Server into an Oracle9iAS 1.0.2.2 Oracle home
Oracle Application Server into an infrastructure 9.0.2, 9.0.4, or 10g Release 2
(10.1.2) Oracle home
Oracle Application Server into an Oracle9iAS 9.0.2, 9.0.3, 9.0.4, or 10g Release
2 (10.1.2) middle tier Oracle home
Oracle Application Server into an Oracle home installed from the Oracle
Business Intelligence 10g (10.1.2.0.2) CD-ROM.
The installer checks the ports listed in the staticports.ini file, if specified. See
Section 2.4, "Ports".
Requirements 2-23
Prerequisite Checks Performed by the Installer
Table 2–6 (Cont.) Prerequisite Checks Performed by the Installer
Item
Description
Monitor
The installer checks that the monitor is configured to display at least 256 colors.
Display permission
The installer checks that the user has permissions to display on the monitor
specified by the DISPLAY environment variable.
DISPLAY environment
variable
The installer checks that the DISPLAY environment variable is set.
TNS_ADMIN environment
variable
The TNS_ADMIN environment variable must not be set.
Cluster file system
The installer checks that you are not installing Oracle Application Server in a
cluster file system (CFS).
There must not be a tnsnames.ora file in the /etc or /var/opt/oracle
directories.
2-24 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
3
Things You Should Know Before Starting the
Installation
Contents:
■
Section 3.1, "Oracle Home Directory"
■
Section 3.2, "Installing Additional Languages"
■
Section 3.3, "Oracle Application Server Instances and Instance Names"
■
Section 3.4, "The oc4jadmin User and Restrictions on its Password"
■
Section 3.5, "Where Does the Installer Write Files?"
■
Section 3.6, "Obtaining Software from Oracle E-Delivery"
■
Section 3.7, "Starting the Oracle Universal Installer"
3.1 Oracle Home Directory
The directory in which you install Oracle Application Server is called the Oracle home.
During installation, you specify the full path to this directory.
For example, you can install Oracle Containers for J2EE in C:\oracle\OraHome_
oc4j.
3.1.1 Naming Your Oracle Home
Each Oracle home directory is automatically given a name. The Oracle home name is
oracleasx, where x is a number that depends on how many Oracle Application
Server installations are on the system.
For example, if you are performing your first installation of Oracle Application Server
on this system, then your Oracle home is named oracleas1.
3.1.2 Installing in an Existing Oracle Home
Generally, you cannot install Oracle Application Server in an existing Oracle home. See
"Oracle home directory" on page 2-23 for a list of combinations that are not allowed.
3.1.3 Installing in a Non-Empty Oracle Home
You cannot install Oracle Application Server in a directory that already contains some
files, except for the cases mentioned in Section 3.1.2, "Installing in an Existing Oracle
Home". For example, if you cancel an installation, or if an installation failed, you have
Things You Should Know Before Starting the Installation
3-1
Installing Additional Languages
to clean up the directory before you can reinstall Oracle Application Server in it. Also,
the installer cannot "repair" an installation.
3.2 Installing Additional Languages
By default, the installer installs Oracle Application Server with text in English and in
the operating system language. If you need additional languages, click the Product
Languages button in the "Select Installation Type" screen.
When you select additional languages to install, the installer installs text in the
selected languages. It also installs fonts required to display the languages.
For some components, languages are installed only if you select them during
installation. In this case, if you access the application in a language that is not
available, it will fall back on the server locale language.
For other components, available languages are installed regardless of what you select
during installation. In this case, however, fonts are installed only for the languages that
are explicitly selected. When you access the application, it uses text in your language
because the language was installed. However, if you do not have the appropriate fonts
to render the text, the text appears as square boxes. This usually applies to the Chinese,
Japanese, and Korean languages.
You can install fonts after installation. See Section E.3.4, "User Interface Does Not
Display in the Desired Language, or Does Not Display Properly".
Note that you cannot install additional languages after installation. You must install
all languages that you need during installation. If you run Oracle Application Server
in an environment that uses a language that you did not install, the user interface can
display text in that language and/or in English, or it can display square boxes (caused
by missing fonts) instead of text.
3.3 Oracle Application Server Instances and Instance Names
When you install the middle tier, what you get is an Oracle Application Server
instance. The installer prompts you to provide a name for the Oracle Application
Server instance you are installing. For example, you can name an instance "J2EE". This
name can be different from the Oracle home name.
You cannot change this name after installation.
Oracle Application Server appends the hostname and domain name to the given
instance name to form a complete instance name. For example, if you are installing an
instance on a computer named c1, and you name the instance Oc4j1, then the full
name of the instance is Oc4j1.c1.mydomain.com, assuming the domain name is
mydomain.com.
Valid Characters in Instance Names
Instance names can consist only of the alphanumeric characters (A-Z, a-z, 0-9) and the
_ (underscore) character.
There is no maximum length restriction for instance names.
Restrictions on Oracle Application Server Instance Names
Do not use the hostname of the computer when naming Oracle Application Server
instances.
3-2 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
The oc4jadmin User and Restrictions on its Password
If you are planning to place the Oracle Application Server instance in an OracleAS
Cluster, the instance name must not contain the following:
■
hostname or IP address of any computer in the OracleAS Cluster
■
Oracle home of any Oracle Application Server installation in the OracleAS Cluster
How Oracle Application Server Uses Instance Names
Instance names are important because Oracle Application Server uses them to
uniquely identify instances. This means that if you install multiple Oracle Application
Server instances on the same computer, you must give them different names.
When you administer Oracle Application Server using Oracle Enterprise Manager 10g
Application Server Control (or Application Server Control for short), the instance
name appears on the screens. You can click the instance name to see details about the
instance, such as the components that are installed in that instance, if the components
are running or stopped, and the log files for the components. The Application Server
Control is a browser-based administration tool for Oracle Application Server. See the
Oracle Application Server Administrator’s Guide for details about this administration tool.
The Oracle home name is used in the following ways:
■
OPMN runs as a Windows service. When naming this service, the installer inserts
the Oracle home name in the service name using the following format:
Oracle-<InstanceName>ProcessManager
For example: if you use the instance name "Oc4j", the process management service
will be called Oracle-Oc4jProcessManager.
■
The instance name also appears in menu items in the Start menu for starting and
stopping components in the associated instance:
■
■
Start > Programs > Oracle - instanceName > Oracle Process Manager > Start
Oracle Process Manager
Start > Programs > Oracle - instanceName > Oracle Process Manager > Stop
Oracle Process Manager
3.4 The oc4jadmin User and Restrictions on its Password
If you select one of the following installation types, the installer prompts you to
specify the password for the oc4jadmin user:
■
Basic Installation
■
Advanced Installation: J2EE Server and Process Management
■
Advanced Installation: Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process
Management
The oc4jadmin user is the administrative user for Oracle Application Server
instances. To manage Oracle Application Server instances using Application Server
Control, you log in as oc4jadmin.
On a computer, you can install multiple Oracle Application Server instances, each with
its own unique instance name, but the name of the administrative user is oc4jadmin
for all instances. The password for the oc4jadmin user can be different for each
instance.
Things You Should Know Before Starting the Installation
3-3
Where Does the Installer Write Files?
Password for the oc4jadmin User
The password for the oc4jadmin user has these restrictions:
■
The minimum length is 5 characters.
■
The maximum length is 30 characters.
■
At least one of the characters must be a number.
■
■
■
Passwords can contain only alphanumeric characters from your database character
set, the underscore (_), the dollar sign ($), and the number sign (#).
Passwords must begin with an alphabetic character. Passwords cannot begin with
a number, the underscore (_), the dollar sign ($), or the number sign (#).
Passwords cannot be Oracle reserved words. The Oracle Database SQL Reference
lists the reserved words. You can find this guide on Oracle Technology Network
(http://www.oracle.com/technology/documentation). Or you can just
avoid using words that sound like they might be reserved words.
Note: When entering your password, check that the state of the Caps
Lock key is what you want it to be. Passwords are case-sensitive.
You must remember the password because you need to enter it to perform the
following task:
■
When you log on to Application Server Control to manage Oracle Application
Server, you log on as the oc4jadmin user.
If you forget the password, you can reset it. See the Oracle Application Server
Administrator’s Guide for details.
Note: If you intend to register your installation with Oracle Internet
Directory after you finish installing, the password for the oc4jadmin
user must conform to Oracle Internet Directory’s password policy.
Check with your Oracle Internet Directory administrator to verify the
password policy.
3.5 Where Does the Installer Write Files?
The installer writes files to the following directories:
Table 3–1
Directories Where the Installer Writes Files
Directory
Description
Oracle home directory
This directory contains Oracle Application Server files. You
specify this directory when you install Oracle Application Server.
Inventory directory
When you install the first Oracle product on a computer, you
specify this directory, which the installer uses to keep track of
which Oracle products are installed on the computer. In
subsequent installations, the installer uses the same inventory
directory.
Inventory directory
The installer uses the inventory directory to keep track of which
Oracle products are installed on the computer. The inventory
directory is created when you install the first Oracle product on
the computer. In subsequent installations, the installer uses the
same inventory directory.
(system_
drive:\Program
Files\Oracle\Invento
ry)
3-4 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Obtaining Software from Oracle E-Delivery
Table 3–1 (Cont.) Directories Where the Installer Writes Files
Directory
Description
/tmp directory
The installer writes files needed only during installation to a
"temporary" directory. By default, the "temporary" directory is
/tmp. To specify a different directory, set the TMP and TMPDIR
environment variables. See Section 2.6.5, "TEMP" for details.
Additionally, the installer also creates entries in the Windows registry.
3.6 Obtaining Software from Oracle E-Delivery
You can obtain Oracle products from Oracle E-Delivery at
http://edelivery.oracle.com/. Oracle products are distributed as "E-Packs".
An E-Pack is an electronic version of the software that is also available to Oracle
Customers on CD-ROM or DVD-ROM.
3.6.1 Finding and Downloading the Oracle Application Server 10g Release 3 (10.1.3)
E-Pack
Refer to the CD/Media Pack description or the list of products that you purchased on
your Oracle Ordering Document. Then, view the License List to help you decide which
Product Pack you need to select in order to search for the appropriate E-Pack(s) to
download. Prior to downloading, verify that the product you are looking for is in the
License and Options section of the E-Pack README. Oracle recommends that you
print the README for reference.
3.6.2 Finding Required and Optional Downloads
Refer to the README link that is on each E-Pack Download page. In addition to
listing the licensable products and options contained in the pack, the README lists
downloadable files that are required to run each product and which downloadable
files are optional. Oracle recommends that you print the README for reference.
3.6.3 Disk Space Requirements
In addition to having the required disk space necessary to install and run your Oracle
software, you'll need to have sufficient disk space to download all the required
software files and have enough disk space to extract them.
After extracting the software from the Zip files, you can burn them onto CD-ROM and
install from them, or install from your computer's hard drive.
3.6.4 Software Requirements for Unzipping Files
All Oracle E-Delivery files have been archived using Info-ZIP's highly portable Zip
utility. After downloading one or more of the archives, you will need the UnZip utility
or the WinZip utility to extract the files.You must unzip the archive on the platform for
which it was intended. For example, if you download the file for the Solaris Operating
System (SPARC) version of Oracle Application Server, you must unzip the file on a
Solaris Operating System (SPARC) computer. If you unzip the file on a Windows
computer, and then move the stage area to a Solaris Operating System (SPARC)
machine, the stage area files will be corrupted because Windows will not preserve the
case sensitivity or the permission bits of UNIX file names.
Things You Should Know Before Starting the Installation
3-5
Starting the Oracle Universal Installer
3.6.5 Extracting Software from the Zip Files
Verify that the file size of your downloaded file matches the file size displayed on
E-Delivery. Unzip each Zip file to its own temporary directory. For example, create a
directory structure called oraAS10g on your hard drive:
c:\oraAS10g
Then create a new directory for each Zip file you downloaded:
c:\oraAS10g\Disk1
c:\oraAS10g\Disk2
etc.
If you plan burn the files on a CD-ROM, create a separate CD-ROM from the contents
of each directory. Do not burn a CD-ROM containing the Zip file itself; you need the
unzipped contents of the Zip files to do the installation. When you burn the files to
CD-ROM, the contents of each disc must be at the root of the CD image.
To install from CD-ROM or from your hard drive, see Section 3.7, "Starting the Oracle
Universal Installer".
3.7 Starting the Oracle Universal Installer
1.
Log in to the computer as a user who is a member of the Windows Administrators
group.
2.
Insert the disk.
CD-ROM users: Insert Oracle Application Server Disk 1 into the CD-ROM drive.
DVD-ROM users: Insert the Oracle Application Server DVD-ROM into the
DVD-ROM drive.
3.
If your computer supports the auto run feature, the installer launches
automatically.
If your computer does not support the auto run feature, you have to start up the
installer manually:
CD-ROM users: Double-click setup.exe.
DVD-ROM users: Double-click setup.exe in the application_server
directory.
This launches Oracle Universal Installer, through which you install Oracle Application
Server.
3-6 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
4
Basic Installation
This chapter describes how to perform a basic installation of Oracle Application
Server. The following topics are covered:
■
Section 4.1, "What Components Are Installed?"
■
Section 4.2, "Basic Installation Steps"
■
Section 4.3, "What Should I Do Next?"
4.1 What Components Are Installed?
During the Basic Installation, you must install all of the components. If you do not
want to install all the components, see Chapter 5, "Advanced Installation".
The following components are installed during the Basic Installation:
■
Oracle HTTP Server
This is the Web server component of Oracle Application Server.
■
Oracle Containers for J2EE
This component provides a complete Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) environment
for developing Java applications.
■
Oracle Enterprise Manager 10g Application Server Control
This component is used for Web-based management of Oracle Application Server.
■
Oracle Process Manager and Notification Server
4.2 Basic Installation Steps
This section describes the procedure for the basic installation of Oracle Application
Server. It contains the following topics:
■
Section 4.2.1, "Before You Begin"
■
Section 4.2.2, "Installation Steps"
4.2.1 Before You Begin
Before you begin installing Oracle Application Server, ensure that you have read both
Chapter 2, "Requirements" and Chapter 3, "Things You Should Know Before Starting
the Installation". These chapters contain important information with which you must
be familiar before you begin the installation so you can avoid potential problems
during the installation.
Basic Installation 4-1
Basic Installation Steps
4.2.2 Installation Steps
To install Oracle Application Server with a basic installation, perform the following
steps:
1.
Start Oracle Universal Installer.
For more information, refer to Section 3.7, "Starting the Oracle Universal Installer".
2.
Oracle Application Server 10g 10.1.3.0.0 Installation Screen
Installation Directory: Enter the directory where you want install Oracle
Application Server.
Select Basic Installation Mode.
Installation Type: You cannot change the installation type in a basic installation.
Instance Name: The instance name identifies this Oracle Application Server
instance. If you have more than one Oracle Application Server instance on the
same host, the instances must have unique names.
Administration Username: The administration username for Oracle Application
Server instances is set to oc4jadmin and cannot be changed. To manage Oracle
Application Server instances using Oracle Enterprise Manager 10g, log in as the
oc4jadmin user.
Administration Password and Confirm Password: Enter the password for the
oc4jadmin user.
Click Install.
Figure 4–1 Oracle Application Server 10g 10.1.3.0.0 Installation Screen
3.
Oracle Universal Installer: Install Screen
This screen shows the progress of installation.
4-2 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Basic Installation Steps
Figure 4–2 Oracle Universal Installer: Install Screen
4.
Oracle Universal Installer: Configuration Assistants Screen
This screen shows the progress of the configuration assistants.
Figure 4–3 Oracle Universal Installer: Configuration Assistants Screen
5.
Oracle Universal Installer: End of Installation Screen
This screen tells you whether or not your installation was successful, and provides
a link to the product release notes.
Basic Installation 4-3
What Should I Do Next?
Figure 4–4 Oracle Universal Installer: End of Installation Screen
4.3 What Should I Do Next?
After the installation is complete, you should:
■
■
Refer to Chapter 7 for instructions and information about postinstallation tasks
you should perform.
Refer to the Oracle Application Server Administrator’s Guide for information about
how to configure, administer, and manage Oracle Application Server after it has
been successfully installed.
4-4 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
5
Advanced Installation
This chapter describes how to perform an advanced installation of Oracle Application
Server. The following topics are covered:
■
Section 5.1, "What Components Are Installed?"
■
Section 5.2, "Advanced Installation Steps"
■
Section 5.3, "Installation Screens"
■
Section 5.4, "Troubleshooting Information"
■
Section 5.5, "What Should I Do Next?"
5.1 What Components Are Installed?
During the Advanced Installation, you have four installation choices: J2EE Server and
Process Management, Web Server and Process Management, Integrated Web Server,
J2EE Server and Process Management, and Oracle TopLink.
The following components are installed in a J2EE Server and Process Management
installation:
■
Oracle Containers for J2EE
This component provides a complete Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) environment
for developing Java applications.
■
Oracle Enterprise Manager 10g Application Server Control
This component is used for Web-based management of Oracle Application Server.
■
Oracle Process Manager and Notification Server
The following components are installed in a Web Server and Process Management
installation:
■
Oracle HTTP Server
This is the Web server component of Oracle Application Server.
■
Oracle Process Manager and Notification Server
An Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process Management installation contains
the components from both the J2EE Server and Process Management and Web Server
and Process Management installations.
In an Oracle TopLink installation, only Oracle TopLink Foundation Library is installed.
Advanced Installation 5-1
Advanced Installation Steps
5.2 Advanced Installation Steps
This section describes the procedure for the advanced installation of Oracle
Application Server. It contains the following topics:
■
Section 5.2.1, "Before You Begin"
■
Section 5.2.2, "Installing J2EE Server and Process Management"
■
Section 5.2.3, "Installing Web Server and Process Management"
■
■
Section 5.2.4, "Installing Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process
Management"
Section 5.2.5, "Installing Oracle TopLink"
5.2.1 Before You Begin
Before you begin installing Oracle Application Server, ensure that you have read both
Chapter 2, "Requirements" and Chapter 3, "Things You Should Know Before Starting
the Installation". These chapters contain important information with which you must
be familiar before you begin the installation so you can avoid potential problems
during the installation.
5.2.2 Installing J2EE Server and Process Management
Table 5–1 provides a brief summary of the steps necessary to install J2EE Server and
Process Management with an advanced installation.
Table 5–1
1.
Steps for Installing J2EE Server and Process Management
Screen
Action
--
Start Oracle Universal Installer.
For more information, refer to Section 3.7, "Starting the Oracle Universal Installer".
2.
Oracle Application
Server 10g 10.1.3.0.0
Installation
Specify the Oracle Home in the Installation Directory field.
Select Advanced Installation Mode.
Click Next.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.1, "Oracle Application Server 10g
10.1.3.0.0 Installation Screen".
3.
Select Installation Type
Select J2EE Server and Process Management.
Click Next.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.2, "Select Installation Type Screen".
4.
Specify Port
Configuration Options
Select whether you want to configure ports automatically or manually by
specifying the location of a port configuration file.
Click Next.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.3, "Specify Port Configuration Options
Screen".
5.
Administration Instance
Settings
Select Configure this as an Administration OC4J instance if you would like to run
Application Server Control on this instance.
Click Next.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.4, "Administration Instance Settings".
5-2 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Advanced Installation Steps
Table 5–1 (Cont.) Steps for Installing J2EE Server and Process Management
6.
Screen
Action
Administration Settings
Specify the Oracle Application Server instance name and oc4jadmin password.
Specify the default Oracle Containers for J2EE instance name.
Click Next.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.5, "Administration Settings Screen".
7.
Cluster Topology
Configuration
Select if you would like to configure this instance to be part of an Oracle
Application Server cluster topology.
If you select Configure this OC4J instance to be part of an Oracle Application
Server cluster topology, specify the IP Address and Port, and select Access this
OC4J Instance from a separate Oracle HTTP Server if you want the default web
site to run in AJP protocol mode.
Click Next.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.7, "Cluster Topology Configuration
Screen - J2EE Server and Process Management Install Type".
8.
Summary
Verify that the installation parameters shown on the screen are correct.
Click Install.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.10, "Summary Screen".
9.
Install
None. This screen shows the progress of the installation.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.11, "Install Screen".
10. Configuration Assistants
None, unless you want to stop the installation of a particular configuration
assistant.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.12, "Configuration Assistants Screen".
11. End of Installation
None. This screen tells you whether or not your installation was successful, and
provides a link to the product release notes.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.13, "End of Installation Screen".
5.2.3 Installing Web Server and Process Management
Table 5–2 provides a brief summary of the steps necessary to install Web Server and
Process Management with an advanced installation.
Table 5–2
1.
Steps for Installing Web Server and Process Management
Screen
Action
--
Start Oracle Universal Installer.
For more information, refer to Section 3.7, "Starting the Oracle Universal Installer".
2.
Oracle Application
Server 10g 10.1.3.0.0
Installation
Specify the Oracle Home in the Installation Directory field.
Select Advanced Installation Mode.
Click Next.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.1, "Oracle Application Server 10g
10.1.3.0.0 Installation Screen".
3.
Select Installation Type
Select Web Server and Process Management.
Click Next.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.2, "Select Installation Type Screen".
Advanced Installation 5-3
Advanced Installation Steps
Table 5–2 (Cont.) Steps for Installing Web Server and Process Management
4.
Screen
Action
Specify Port
Configuration Options
Select whether you want to configure ports automatically or manually by
specifying the location of a port configuration file.
Click Next.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.3, "Specify Port Configuration Options
Screen".
5.
Specify Instance Name
Specify the Oracle Application Server instance name.
Click Next.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.6, "Specify Instance Name Screen".
6.
Cluster Topology
Configuration
Select if you would like to configure this instance to be part of an Oracle
Application Server cluster topology.
If you select Configure this HTTP Server instance to be part of an Oracle
Application Server cluster, specify the IP Address and Port.
Click Next.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.8, "Cluster Topology Configuration
Screen: Web Server and Process Management Install Type".
7.
Summary
Verify that the installation parameters shown on the screen are correct.
Click Install.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.10, "Summary Screen".
8.
Install
None. This screen shows the progress of the installation.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.11, "Install Screen".
9.
Configuration Assistants
None, unless you want to stop the installation of a particular configuration
assistant.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.12, "Configuration Assistants Screen".
10. End of Installation
None. This screen tells you whether or not your installation was successful, and
provides a link to the product release notes.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.13, "End of Installation Screen".
5.2.4 Installing Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process Management
Table 5–3 provides a brief summary of the steps necessary to install Integrated Web
Server, J2EE Server and Process Management with an advanced installation.
Table 5–3
1.
Steps for Installing Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process Management
Screen
Action
--
Start Oracle Universal Installer.
For more information, refer to Section 3.7, "Starting the Oracle Universal Installer".
2.
Oracle Application
Server 10g 10.1.3.0.0
Installation
Specify the Oracle Home in the Installation Directory field.
Select Advanced Installation Mode.
Click Next.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.1, "Oracle Application Server 10g
10.1.3.0.0 Installation Screen".
3.
Select Installation Type
Select Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process Management.
Click Next.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.2, "Select Installation Type Screen".
5-4 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Advanced Installation Steps
Table 5–3 (Cont.) Steps for Installing Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process Management
4.
Screen
Action
Specify Port
Configuration Options
Select whether you want to configure ports automatically or manually by
specifying the location of a port configuration file.
Click Next.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.3, "Specify Port Configuration Options
Screen".
5.
Administration Instance
Settings
Select Configure this as an Administration OC4J instance if you would like to run
Application Server Control on this instance.
Click Next.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.4, "Administration Instance Settings".
6.
Administration Settings
Specify the Oracle Application Server instance name and oc4jadmin password.
Specify the default Oracle Containers for J2EE instance name.
Click Next.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.5, "Administration Settings Screen".
7.
Cluster Topology
Configuration
Select if you would like to configure this instance to be part of an Oracle
Application Server cluster topology.
If you select Configure this instance to be part of an Oracle Application Server
cluster topology, specify the IP Address and Port.
Click Next.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.9, "Cluster Topology Configuration
Screen: Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process Management Install Type".
8.
Summary
Verify that the installation parameters shown on the screen are correct.
Click Install.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.10, "Summary Screen".
9.
Install
None. This screen shows the progress of the installation.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.11, "Install Screen".
10 Configuration Assistants
None, unless you want to stop the installation of a particular configuration
assistant.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.12, "Configuration Assistants Screen".
11. End of Installation
None. This screen tells you whether or not your installation was successful, and
provides a link to the product release notes.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.13, "End of Installation Screen".
5.2.5 Installing Oracle TopLink
Table 5–4 provides a brief summary of the steps necessary to install Oracle TopLink
with an advanced installation.
Advanced Installation 5-5
Installation Screens
Table 5–4
1.
Steps for Installing Oracle TopLink
Screen
Action
--
Start Oracle Universal Installer.
For more information, refer to Section 3.7, "Starting the Oracle Universal Installer".
2.
Oracle Application
Server 10g 10.1.3.0.0
Installation
Specify the Oracle Home in the Installation Directory field.
Select Advanced Installation Mode.
Click Next.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.1, "Oracle Application Server 10g
10.1.3.0.0 Installation Screen".
3.
Select Installation Type
Select Oracle TopLink.
Click Next.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.2, "Select Installation Type Screen".
4.
Summary
Verify that the installation parameters shown on the screen are correct.
Click Install.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.10, "Summary Screen".
5.
Install
None. This screen shows the progress of the installation.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.11, "Install Screen".
6.
End of Installation
None. This screen tells you whether or not your installation was successful, and
provides a link to the product release notes.
For more information, refer to Section 5.3.13, "End of Installation Screen".
5.3 Installation Screens
This section describes the various Oracle Universal Installer (OUI) installation screens
for Oracle Application Server 10g Release 3 (10.1.3). It contains the following sections:
■
Section 5.3.1, "Oracle Application Server 10g 10.1.3.0.0 Installation Screen"
■
Section 5.3.2, "Select Installation Type Screen"
■
Section 5.3.3, "Specify Port Configuration Options Screen"
■
Section 5.3.4, "Administration Instance Settings"
■
Section 5.3.5, "Administration Settings Screen"
■
Section 5.3.6, "Specify Instance Name Screen"
■
■
■
Section 5.3.7, "Cluster Topology Configuration Screen - J2EE Server and Process
Management Install Type"
Section 5.3.8, "Cluster Topology Configuration Screen: Web Server and Process
Management Install Type"
Section 5.3.9, "Cluster Topology Configuration Screen: Integrated Web Server, J2EE
Server and Process Management Install Type"
■
Section 5.3.10, "Summary Screen"
■
Section 5.3.11, "Install Screen"
■
Section 5.3.12, "Configuration Assistants Screen"
■
Section 5.3.13, "End of Installation Screen"
5-6 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Installation Screens
5.3.1 Oracle Application Server 10g 10.1.3.0.0 Installation Screen
This is the first screen in the installation process. You need to specify the installation
directory (or Oracle home) and whether you want to perform a basic or advanced
installation.
Figure 5–1 Oracle Application Server 10g 10.1.3.0.0 Installation Screen
Installation Directory
Specify the full path of the installation directory or Oracle home. This is the directory
where you want to install the software. For more information about the Oracle home,
refer to Section 3.1, "Oracle Home Directory".
Select Basic or Advanced Installation Mode
In this chapter you are performing an advanced installation of Oracle Application
Server, so select Advanced Installation Mode and click Next.
If you want to perform a basic installation, see Chapter 4, "Basic Installation".
After you click the Next button, the following warning appears:
Figure 5–2 Warning Screen
Click Yes to continue with the advanced installation.
Advanced Installation 5-7
Installation Screens
5.3.2 Select Installation Type Screen
Select the product you want to install, then click Next.
Figure 5–3 Oracle Universal Installer: Select Installation Type Screen
To learn what components are installed with the different installation types, see
Section 5.1, "What Components Are Installed?".
5.3.3 Specify Port Configuration Options Screen
Select the method in which you want to configure ports.
5-8 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Installation Screens
Figure 5–4 Oracle Universal Installer: Specify Port Configuration Options Screen
Click Automatic if you want to use all default port numbers. Refer to Appendix B for a
list of all the default port numbers and ranges.
Click Manual if you want to customize your port numbers. You must supply the full
path and file name to an existing port configuration file containing the port numbers
you want to use for each component. Typically, this port configuration file is called
staticports.ini, although any name is valid as long as the format of the file is
correct. Refer to Section 2.4.4, "Using Custom Port Numbers (the "Static Ports"
Feature)" for more information about the staticports.ini file that is shipped with the
product.
5.3.4 Administration Instance Settings
Select whether you would like to run Application Server Control on this instance.
Advanced Installation 5-9
Installation Screens
Figure 5–5 Oracle Universal Installer: Administration Instance Settings Screen
Configure this as an Administration OC4J instance
Select this option if you want to run Application Server Control on this system to
provide management capabilities.
If you are using a single instance topology, you should select this option to be able to
manage the instance.
If you are using a cluster topology, you should select this option if you want this
instance to administer the cluster using Application Server Control. In a cluster
topology, only one instance should be configured as an Administration OC4J instance.
Note that the Administration OC4J instance for the cluster does not have to be the first
installed node.
If you do not select Configure this as an Administration OC4J instance, then
Application Server Control will be configured to not run on this system. This
Application Server instance will need to be managed by Application Server Control
running on another OC4J instance within the cluster topology. You can configure the
Application Server Control to run on this instance following installation if required.
See "Enabling Remote Management by Setting Administrator Credentials" in the
Oracle Application Server Administrator’s Guide for details.
5.3.5 Administration Settings Screen
Specify the Oracle Application Server instance name, oc4jadmin password, and the
OC4J instance name.
5-10 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Installation Screens
Figure 5–6 Oracle Universal Installer: Administration Settings Screen
AS Instance Name
The AS Instance Name uniquely identifies this Oracle Application Server instance.
For more information about instance names, see Section 3.3, "Oracle Application
Server Instances and Instance Names".
Default OC4J Instance Administrator Account Username
The administrative username for Oracle Application Server instances is set to
oc4jadmin and cannot be changed. To manage Oracle Application Server instances
using Enterprise Manager, log in as the oc4jadmin user.
For more information about the oc4jadmin user, see Section 3.4, "The oc4jadmin User
and Restrictions on its Password".
Administrator Account Password and Confirm Administrator Account Password
On a host, you can install multiple Oracle Application Server instances, each with its
own unique instance name, but the name of the administrative user is oc4jadmin for
all instances. You can specify a different password for the oc4jadmin user for each
instance.
For more information about the oc4jadmin password, see Section 3.4, "The oc4jadmin
User and Restrictions on its Password".
OC4J Instance Name
The OC4J instance name identifies the default OC4J instance created by the installer.
OC4J instance names can consist only of the alphanumeric characters (A-Z, a-z, 0-9)
and the underscore character (_).
There is no maximum length for an OC4J instance name.
Advanced Installation 5-11
Installation Screens
5.3.6 Specify Instance Name Screen
This screen only appears if you select the Web Server and Process Management
option on the Select Installation Type screen shown in Figure 5–7.
Figure 5–7 Oracle Universal Installer: Specify Instance Name Screen
Instance Name
Specify the Oracle Application Server instance name. The instance name uniquely
identifies this Oracle Application Server instance.
For more information about instance names, see Section 3.3, "Oracle Application
Server Instances and Instance Names".
5.3.7 Cluster Topology Configuration Screen - J2EE Server and Process Management
Install Type
Select whether you would like to configure this instance to be part of an Oracle
Application Server cluster topology.
5-12 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Installation Screens
Figure 5–8 Oracle Universal Installer: Cluster Topology Configuration (J2EE)
Configure this OC4J instance to be part of an Oracle Application Server cluster
topology
Select this option if you would like to configure this instance to be part of an Oracle
Application Server cluster topology. You may also configure the cluster topology
following installation. See Section 7.4, "Configuring OracleAS Clusters" for details.
Specify the Oracle Application Server cluster discovery address
Specify the IP Address and the Port for the multicast address shared by all the nodes
in the cluster.
Note:
■
■
■
When installing the first instance of the cluster, you only need to
provide the discovery address. You do not need to perform any
additional steps before installing the first instance of the cluster.
All nodes within the topology must be configured to use the same
multicast address and port.
The multicast address must be within the valid address range,
which is 224.0.0.1 to 239.255.255.255.
If you are adding an instance to an existing cluster and do not know the multicast
address, find the <discover> element in the opmn.xml file on an Oracle Application
Server instance in the topology. The <discover> element should appear like this:
<notification-server>
<topology>
<discover list="*225.0.0.20:8001"/>
</topology>
...
</notification-server>
Advanced Installation 5-13
Installation Screens
In this example, the IP address is 225.0.0.20 and the port is 8001.
Access this OC4J Instance from a separate Oracle HTTP Server
Select this option if you want the OC4J instance to accept requests from an Oracle
HTTP Server instance. If you select this option, then the OC4J instance will be
configured so that its default web site is running in AJP protocol mode and accepts
requests from mod_oc4j running in Oracle HTTP Server.
If you do not select this option, the OC4J instance will listen for requests from browser
clients using its own HTTP listener. The OC4J instance will be configured so that its
default web site is running in HTTP protocol mode and can be directly accessed from
browser clients.
You can change how this OC4J instance is accessed following installation. See
"Configuring Multicast Discovery with opmnctl" in the Oracle Containers for J2EE
Configuration and Administration Guide.
5.3.8 Cluster Topology Configuration Screen: Web Server and Process Management
Install Type
Select whether you would like to configure this instance to be part of an Oracle
Application Server cluster topology.
Figure 5–9 Oracle Universal Installer: Cluster Topology Configuration (Web Server)
Configure this Oracle HTTP Server instance to be part of an Oracle Application
Server cluster
Select this option if you would like to configure this instance to be part of an Oracle
Application Server cluster. You may also configure the cluster following installation.
See Section 7.4, "Configuring OracleAS Clusters" for details.
5-14 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Installation Screens
Specify the Oracle Application Server cluster discovery address
Specify the IP Address and the Port for the multicast address shared by all the nodes
in the cluster.
Note:
■
■
■
When installing the first instance of the cluster, you only need to
provide the discovery address. You do not need to perform any
additional steps before installing the first instance of the cluster.
All nodes within the topology must be configured to use the same
multicast address and port.
The multicast address must be within the valid address range,
which is 224.0.0.1 to 239.255.255.255.
If you are adding an instance to an existing cluster and do not know the multicast
address, find the <discover> element in the opmn.xml file on an Oracle Application
Server instance in the topology. The <discover> element should appear like this:
<notification-server>
<topology>
<discover list="*225.0.0.20:8001"/>
</topology>
...
</notification-server>
In this example, the IP address is 225.0.0.20 and the port is 8001.
5.3.9 Cluster Topology Configuration Screen: Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and
Process Management Install Type
Select whether you would like to configure this instance to be part of an Oracle
Application Server cluster topology.
Advanced Installation 5-15
Installation Screens
Figure 5–10 Oracle Universal Installer: Cluster Topology Configuration (Integrated)
Configure this instance to be part of an Oracle Application Server cluster
topology
Select this option if you would like to configure this instance to be part of an Oracle
Application Server cluster topology. You may also configure the cluster topology
following installation. See Section 7.4, "Configuring OracleAS Clusters" for details.
Specify the Oracle Application Server cluster discovery address
Specify the IP Address and the Port for the multicast address shared by all the nodes
in the cluster.
Note:
■
■
■
When installing the first instance of the cluster, you only need to
provide the discovery address. You do not need to perform any
additional steps before installing the first instance of the cluster.
All nodes within the topology must be configured to use the same
multicast address and port.
The multicast address must be within the valid address range,
which is 224.0.0.1 to 239.255.255.255.
If you are adding an instance to an existing cluster and do not know the multicast
address, find the <discover> element in the opmn.xml file on an Oracle Application
Server instance in the topology. The <discover> element should appear like this:
<notification-server>
<topology>
<discover list="*225.0.0.20:8001"/>
</topology>
...
</notification-server>
5-16 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Installation Screens
In this example, the IP address is 225.0.0.20 and the port is 8001.
5.3.10 Summary Screen
Check and verify that the installation parameters shown in this window are correct.
Figure 5–11 Oracle Universal Installer: Summary Screen
Click Install to begin the installation.
5.3.11 Install Screen
This screen shows the progress of the installation.
Advanced Installation 5-17
Installation Screens
Figure 5–12 Oracle Universal Installer: Install Screen
Click Stop Installation if you want to abort the installation. You will be asked to verify
that you want to stop the installation.
This screen also provides the location of the install log, in case you want to view the
contents of the log.
5.3.12 Configuration Assistants Screen
This screen shows the name, status, and tool type for tools recommended to be run
before completing the installation.
5-18 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Installation Screens
Figure 5–13 Oracle Universal Installer: Configuration Assistants Screen
A tool may have one of the following states, as shown in the status column:
■
Succeeded: The tool ran successfully.
■
Failed: The tool ran, but failed.
■
Pending: The tool is waiting to run.
■
Cancelled: The tool was cancelled by the user (by clicking Stop).
■
In Progress: The tool is currently running.
■
Skipped: A configuration assistant running before this tool was cancelled or
failed. Tools that follow a failed or cancelled tool are skipped.
When you select a tool, its details are shown in the Details box. Details are displayed
as the tool is running. If you want to stop a configuration assistant while it is running,
click Stop.
If all tools succeed on the first try, OUI automatically proceeds to the next page.
Otherwise, OUI remains on the Configuration Assistants page until all tools are
successful. You can then click Next to proceed.
If one or more tools fail, OUI does not proceed to the next page. Instead, you can read
the details of failed tools, fix the problems, and try running the configuration assistant
again. You should also consult the installation document for the product being
installed for instructions on what to do if a tool fails. For all failed or skipped tools,
OUI generates a list of the tool names and the commands used to run them; you can
copy/paste this information directly into a shell script or batch file to run these tools
after installation is complete.
By default, the check box in the Retry column will be checked for all tools that failed or
were skipped. To retry all checked configuration assistants, click Retry.
To continue without fixing the problem, click Next.
Advanced Installation 5-19
Troubleshooting Information
Note: The installation is considered successful even if all
configuration assistants failed, irrespective of their type
(Recommended or Optional). However, failing to successfully run all
recommended tools results in an improperly configured product that
may not function.
5.3.13 End of Installation Screen
This screen tells you whether or not your Oracle Application Server installation was
successful and displays some important information that you must remember about
the products you have installed. For example, it might contain information about the
URLs for particular Web applications. Write down this information so that you can
remember it.
This information can also be found in the ORACLE_HOME\install\readme.txt file.
Figure 5–14 Oracle Universal Installer: End of Installation
To view release notes for the products you have installed, click Release Information or
see the documentation page on OTN
(http://www.oracle.com/technology/documentation).
Click Exit to exit the Oracle Universal Installer.
5.4 Troubleshooting Information
If you encounter any problems with the installation, configuration assistants, or
product in general, refer to Appendix E, "Troubleshooting" for common problems and
solutions.
5-20 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
What Should I Do Next?
5.5 What Should I Do Next?
After the installation is complete, you should:
■
■
Refer to Chapter 7 for instructions and information about postinstallation tasks
you should perform.
Refer to the Oracle Application Server Administrator’s Guide for information about
how to configure, administer, and manage Oracle Application Server after it has
been successfully installed.
Advanced Installation 5-21
What Should I Do Next?
5-22 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
6
Installing in High Availability Environments
This chapter provides an overview of the high availability configurations supported
by Oracle Application Server and instructions for installation.
Contents of this chapter:
■
Section 6.1, "Overview of High Availability Configurations"
■
Section 6.2, "Creating the Active-Active Topology"
■
Section 6.3, "Creating the Active-Passive Topology"
■
Section 6.4, "Creating an OracleAS Disaster Recovery Configuration"
6.1 Overview of High Availability Configurations
This chapter provides only a brief overview of the high availability configurations in
Oracle Application Server. For a complete description of the configurations, see the
Oracle Application Server High Availability Guide.
Oracle Application Server supports the following types of high availability
configurations at installation time. Note that there are multiple variants of each type.
■
Section 6.1.1, "Active-Active Topologies: OracleAS Clusters"
■
Section 6.1.2, "Active-Passive Topologies: OracleAS Cold Failover Clusters"
■
Section 6.1.3, "OracleAS Disaster Recovery"
For a quick summary of the high availability configurations, see Section 6.1.4,
"Summary of Differences".
6.1.1 Active-Active Topologies: OracleAS Clusters
Oracle Application Server provides an active-active redundant model for all its
components with OracleAS Clusters. In an OracleAS Clusters configuration, two or
more Oracle Application Server instances are configured to serve the same workload.
These instances can run on the same machine or on different machines.
The instances are front-ended by an external load balancer, which directs requests to
any of the active instances. Instead of an external load balancer, you can also run a
software load balancer to distribute the requests. In production environment, however,
a hardware load balancer is recommended.
Common properties of an OracleAS Clusters configuration include:
■
Similar instance configuration
Installing in High Availability Environments
6-1
Overview of High Availability Configurations
The instances need to serve the same workload or applications. Some
configuration properties should have similar values across instances so that the
instances can deliver the same reply to the same request. Other configuration
properties may be instance-specific, such as local host name information.
If you make a configuration change to one instance, you should also make the
same change to the other instances in the active-active topology. The "Configuring
and Managing Clusters" chapter in the Oracle Containers for J2EE Configuration and
Administration Guide lists the files that contain properties that should be replicated.
■
Independent operation
If one Oracle Application Server instance in an active-active topology fails, the
other instances in the cluster continue to serve requests. The load balancer directs
requests only to instances that are alive.
Advantages of an OracleAS Clusters configuration include:
■
Increased availability
An active-active topology is a redundant configuration. Loss of one instance can
be tolerated because other instances can continue to serve the same requests.
■
Increased scalability and performance
Multiple identically-configured instances provide the capability to share a
workload among different machines and processes. You can scale the topology by
adding new instances as the number of requests increase.
For instructions on creating the OracleAS Clusters configuration, see Section 6.2,
"Creating the Active-Active Topology".
6.1.2 Active-Passive Topologies: OracleAS Cold Failover Clusters
Oracle Application Server provides an active-passive model for all its components in
OracleAS Cold Failover Clusters. In an OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster topology, two
Oracle Application Server instances are configured to serve the same application
workload but only one is active at any particular time. The passive instance runs (that
is, becomes active) only when the active instance fails. These instances run on nodes
that are in a hardware cluster.
Common properties of an OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster topology include:
■
Hardware cluster
In an OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster topology, you run Oracle Application Server
on machines that are in a hardware cluster, with vendor clusterware running on
the machines.
■
Shared storage
You install the Oracle home for the Oracle Application Server instance on storage
shared by the machines in the hardware cluster.
The active node in the OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster topology mounts the
shared storage so that it has access to the Oracle home. If it fails, the passive
instance mounts the shared storage and accesses the same Oracle home.
■
Virtual hostname
The virtual hostname gives clients a single system view of the Oracle Application
Server middle tier. Clients use the virtual hostname to access the Oracle
Application Server middle tier.
6-2 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Overview of High Availability Configurations
The virtual hostname is associated with a virtual IP. This name-IP entry must be
added to the DNS that the site uses. For example, if the two physical hostnames of
the hardware cluster are node1.mycompany.com and node2.mycompany.com,
the single view of this cluster can be provided by the virtual hostname
apps.mycompany.com. In the DNS, apps maps to a virtual IP address that floats
between node1 and node2 via a hardware cluster. Clients access Oracle
Application Server using apps.mycompany.com; they do not know which
physical node is active and actually servicing a particular request.
You can specify the virtual hostname during installation. See Section 6.3, "Creating
the Active-Passive Topology".
■
Failover procedure
An active-passive configuration also includes a set of scripts and procedures to
detect failure of the active instance and fail over to the passive instance while
minimizing downtime.
Advantages of an OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster topology include:
■
Increased availability
If the active instance fails for any reason or must be taken offline, an identically
configured passive instance is prepared to take over at any time.
■
Reduced operating costs
In an active-passive topology only one set of processes is up and serving requests.
Managing the active instance is generally easier than managing an array of active
instances.
■
Application independence
Some applications may not be suited to an active-active topology. This may
include applications that rely heavily on application state or on information stored
locally. An active-passive topology has only one instance serving requests at any
particular time.
For instructions on creating the OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster configuration, see
Section 6.3, "Creating the Active-Passive Topology".
6.1.3 OracleAS Disaster Recovery
OracleAS Disaster Recovery configurations have the following characteristics:
■
■
A production site and a standby site that mirrors the production site. Typically,
these sites are located some distance from each other to guard against site failures
such as floods, fires, or earthquakes. During normal operation, the production site
handles all the requests. If the production site goes down, the standby site takes
over and handles all the requests.
Each site has all the hardware and software to run. It contains nodes for running
Oracle Application Server instances, load balancers, and DNS servers.
For installation details, see Section 6.4, "Creating an OracleAS Disaster Recovery
Configuration".
6.1.4 Summary of Differences
Table 6–1 summarizes the differences among the high availability configurations.
Installing in High Availability Environments
6-3
Creating the Active-Active Topology
Table 6–1
Differences Among the High Availability Configurations
OracleAS Cold
Failover Cluster
OracleAS Clusters
OracleAS Disaster
Recovery
Node configuration
Active-Passive
Active-Active
Active-Passive
Hardware cluster
Yes
No
Optional (hardware cluster
required only if you installed
the OracleAS Infrastructure
in an OracleAS Cold Failover
Cluster configuration)
Virtual hostname
Yes
No
Yes
Load balancer
No
Yes
No
Shared storage
Yes
No
No
6.2 Creating the Active-Active Topology
This section describes how to install Oracle Application Server in an active-active
topology with OracleAS Clusters. OracleAS Clusters is one of the high availability
environments supported by Oracle Application Server.
Contents of this section:
■
Section 6.2.1, "Active-Active Topologies: Introduction"
■
Section 6.2.2, "OracleAS Clusters in Active-Active Topologies"
■
Section 6.2.3, "Properties of Oracle Application Server Instances in Active-Active
Topologies"
■
Section 6.2.4, "Installation Steps for Active-Active Topologies"
■
Section 6.2.5, "Supporting Procedures for Creating the Active-Active Topology"
6.2.1 Active-Active Topologies: Introduction
An active-active topology consists of redundant middle-tier instances that deliver
greater scalability and availability than a single instance. Active-active topologies
remove the single point of failure that a single instance poses. While a single Oracle
Application Server instance leverages the resources of a single host, a cluster of
middle-tier instances spans multiple hosts, distributing application execution over a
greater number of CPUs. A single Oracle Application Server instance is vulnerable to
the failure of its host and operating system, but an active-active topology continues to
function despite the loss of an operating system or a host, hiding any such failure from
clients.
In active-active topologies, all the instances are active at the same time. This is
different from active-passive topologies, where only one instance is active at any time.
The nodes in the active-active topologies are not in a hardware cluster.
Load Balancer Requirements
Active-active topologies use a load balancer to direct requests to one of the Oracle
Application Server instances in the topology. In other words, the Oracle Application
Server instances are fronted by the load balancer.
You configure the load balancer with virtual server names for HTTP and HTTPS
traffic. Clients use the virtual server names in their requests. The load balancer directs
requests to an available Oracle Application Server instance.
6-4 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating the Active-Active Topology
See the Oracle Application Server High Availability Guide for a list of features that your
load balancer should have.
Figures of Active-Active Topologies
The following figures show two active-active topologies. The difference in the
topologies is whether you install Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J in the same Oracle
home or in separate Oracle homes.
Figure 6–1 shows an active-active topology with Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J in the
same Oracle home. Figure 6–2 shows an active-active topology with Oracle HTTP
Server and OC4J in separate Oracle homes.
Figure 6–1 Active-Active Topology with Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J in the Same Oracle Home
Load
Balancer
Node 1
Node 2
OHS
OC4J
OHS
OC4J
Variation: You can use Oracle Identity Management
from 10.1.2 with this topology.
Figure 6–2 Active-Active Topology with Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J in Separate Oracle Homes
Load
Balancer
Node 1
Node 2
OHS
OHS
Node 3
Node 4
OC4J
OC4J
Variation:
· You can use Oracle Identity Management
from 10.1.2 with this topology.
· You can use Oracle HTTP Server from
10.1.2 with this topology.
6.2.2 OracleAS Clusters in Active-Active Topologies
All the Oracle Application Server instances in an active-active topology belong to the
same cluster. Oracle HTTP Server forwards application requests only to OC4J
instances that belong to the same cluster.
You can cluster instances with OPMN using one of the following ways:
■
All the instances use the same multicast IP address and port.
■
All the instances are chained to the same discovery server.
■
Each instance specifies all other instances in the opmn.xml configuration file.
Installing in High Availability Environments
6-5
Creating the Active-Active Topology
■
If the instances run on nodes that are on different subnets, you have to designate a
node to be the gateway server, which bridges the instances on the different
subnets.
Clustering with OPMN also enables you to use the @cluster parameter in some
opmnctl commands. Commands that use the @cluster parameter apply to all
instances in the cluster. For example, you can use the @cluster parameter to start all
components in all instances in the cluster.
OC4J instances in a cluster have the following features:
■
■
■
■
OC4J instances have cluster-wide properties as well as instance-specific properties.
Cluster-wide properties are properties whose values are identical for all OC4J
instances in the cluster. Instance-specific properties are properties that have
different values for each OC4J instance. For a list of cluster-wide properties, see
the "Configuring and Managing Clusters" chapter in the Oracle Containers for J2EE
Configuration and Administration Guide.
If you modify a cluster-wide property in one OC4J instance, make sure that you
propagate the change to all other OC4J instances in the cluster.
When you deploy an application to an OC4J instance, you also need to deploy it
on all other OC4J instances in the cluster.
The number of OC4J processes is an instance-specific property: it can be different
for each OC4J instance. This must be configured for each Oracle Application
Server instance in the cluster. The OC4J process configuration provides flexibility
to tune according to the specific hardware capabilities of the host. By default, each
OC4J instance is instantiated with a single OC4J process.
For details, see the "Configuring and Managing Clusters" chapter in the Oracle
Containers for J2EE Configuration and Administration Guide.
6.2.3 Properties of Oracle Application Server Instances in Active-Active Topologies
Because the load balancer can send a request to any Oracle Application Server instance
in the topology, you need to ensure that the instances are configured in the same
manner so that clients get the same response regardless of which instance handles the
request. This includes the following:
■
■
■
Deploy the same applications on each OC4J instance in the topology.
Ensure that you replicate state and stateful session bean information across OC4J
instances so that in the event that an OC4J instance fails, another OC4J instance
contains the state information and can continue the session.
Ensure that configuration properties for all the OC4J instances in the topology are
identical. These configuration properties are listed in chapter 8, "Configuring and
Managing Clusters", in section "Replicating Changes Across a Cluster", in the
Oracle Containers for J2EE Configuration and Administration Guide.
6.2.4 Installation Steps for Active-Active Topologies
To create the topology shown in Figure 6–1 or Figure 6–2, you perform the following
steps:
Step 1: Configure the Load Balancer with Virtual Server Names
Step 2: Install Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J and Cluster the Instances using OPMN
Step 3: Cluster the OC4J Components to Create an Application Cluster
6-6 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating the Active-Active Topology
The following sections describe the steps in detail.
Step 1 Configure the Load Balancer with Virtual Server Names
Refer to your load balancer documentation for configuration steps. On your load
balancer, you need to configure a virtual server name and port for HTTP traffic, and
another virtual server name and port for HTTPS traffic. The port numbers for the
virtual server names should match the port numbers at which Oracle HTTP Server is
listening. Clients will use the virtual server names and ports to access Oracle
Application Server instances.
Step 2 Install Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J and Cluster the Instances using
OPMN
You can install Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J in the same Oracle home (see
Figure 6–1), or in different Oracle homes (see Figure 6–2).
For Oracle Application Server instances that you want to group in the same
active-active topology, you need to place them in the same cluster. This enables
communication between the Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J instances, and simplifies
the management of Oracle Application Server instances. OracleAS Clusters enable you
to use the @cluster parameter for the opmnctl command to manage all the
instances in the cluster.
You can create clusters using one of the following methods:
■
Dynamic Discovery Method
In this method, each ONS node within the same subnet announces its presence
with a multicast message. The cluster topology map for each node is automatically
updated as nodes are added or removed, enabling the cluster to be self-managing.
If you use this method, you should specify the multicast address and port on the
Cluster Topology Configuration screen in the installer.
■
Discovery Server Method
In this method, specific nodes within a cluster are configured to serve as
"discovery servers", which maintain the topology map for the cluster; the
remaining nodes then connect with one another via this server.
If you use this method, you can define a cluster for OPMN by specifying the
names of the Oracle Application Server instances explicitly in the opmn.xml file of
each instance by following the steps in Section 6.2.5.1, "Setting up Clusters with
the Discovery Server Method" after installation.
■
Gateway Method
This configuration is used to connect topologies separated by firewalls or on
different subnets using specified "gateway" nodes.
If you use this method, see the section "Configuring Cross-Topology Gateways" in
the Oracle Containers for J2EE Configuration and Administration Guide for
configuration details.
You can perform either an integrated installation or a distributed installation.
■
For Integrated Installations (Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J in the Same Oracle
Home)
You install Oracle Application Server on the local storage of each node in the
active-active topology.
Installing in High Availability Environments
6-7
Creating the Active-Active Topology
Perform an advanced installation by following the steps in Section 5.2.4, "Installing
Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process Management" so that both Oracle
HTTP Server and OC4J will run from the same Oracle home.
During the installation procedure, follow the prompts, ensuring you perform the
following:
■
■
On the Administration Instance Settings screen:
–
If you want this node to administer the cluster using Application Server
Control, select Configure this as an Administration OC4J instance. In a
cluster topology, only one instance should be configured as an
Administration OC4J instance. Note that the Administration OC4J
instance for the cluster does not have to be the first installed node.
–
If you do not want this node to administer the cluster, deselect Configure
this as an Administration OC4J instance.
If you are using the dynamic discovery method to cluster the Oracle
Application Server instances for OPMN, perform the following:
On the Cluster Topology Configuration screen, select Configure this instance
to be part of an Oracle Application Server cluster topology. Specify the IP
Address and Port for the multicast address shared by all the nodes in the
cluster.
Note that the multicast address must be between 224.0.0.1 and 239.255.255.255.
If you are installing on the first node in the cluster, you may choose any IP
address and port, as long as it falls in the multicast address range.
Note the following:
■
■
■
■
■
■
Set the Oracle home to be on the local storage of each node.
Ensure that the same component uses the same port number in each Oracle
Application Server instance in the cluster. For example, ensure that Oracle
HTTP Server is listening at the same port number for all instances in the
cluster.
To simplify administering the instances, use the same Oracle home path and
the same instance name for each node.
If you are using the discovery server method to cluster the Oracle Application
Server instances for OPMN, be sure to perform the steps in Section 6.2.5.1,
"Setting up Clusters with the Discovery Server Method" after installation.
If you are using the gateway method to cluster the Oracle Application Server
instances for OPMN, see the section "Configuring Cross-Topology Gateways"
in the Oracle Containers for J2EE Configuration and Administration Guide for
configuration details.
For Distributed Installations (Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J in Different Oracle
Homes)
You install Oracle Application Server on the local storage of each node in the
active-active topology.
For the nodes where you want to run Oracle HTTP Server, follow the steps in
Section 5.2.3, "Installing Web Server and Process Management". For the nodes
where you want to run OC4J, follow the steps in Section 5.2.2, "Installing J2EE
Server and Process Management".
During installation, select the following options:
6-8 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating the Active-Active Topology
■
■
On the Administration Instance Settings screen:
–
If you want this node to administer the cluster using Application Server
Control, select Configure this as an Administration OC4J instance. In a
cluster topology, only one instance should be configured as an
Administration OC4J instance. Note that the Administration OC4J
instance for the cluster does not have to be the first installed node.
–
If you do not want this node to administer the cluster, deselect Configure
this as an Administration OC4J instance.
If you are using the dynamic discovery method to cluster the Oracle
Application Server instances for OPMN, perform the following:
–
If you are installing Oracle HTTP Server, select Configure this HTTP
Server instance to be part of an Oracle Application Server cluster on the
"Cluster Topology Configuration" screen. Specify the IP Address and Port
for the multicast address shared by all the nodes in the cluster.
–
If you are installing OC4J, select Configure this OC4J instance to be part
of an Oracle Application Server cluster topology on the "Cluster
Topology Configuration" screen. Specify the IP Address and Port for the
multicast address shared by all the nodes in the cluster and select Access
this OC4J Instance from a separate Oracle HTTP Server.
Note that the multicast address must be between 224.0.0.1 and 239.255.255.255.
If you are installing on the first node in the cluster, you may choose any IP
address and port, as long as it falls in the multicast address range.
Note the following:
■
■
■
■
■
Set the Oracle home to be on the local storage of each node.
Ensure that the same component uses the same port number in each Oracle
Application Server instance in the cluster. For example, ensure that Oracle
HTTP Server is listening at the same port number for all instances in the
cluster.
To simplify administering the instances, use the same Oracle home path and
the same instance name for each node.
If you are using the discovery server method to cluster the Oracle Application
Server instances for OPMN, be sure to perform the steps in Section 6.2.5.1,
"Setting up Clusters with the Discovery Server Method" after installation.
If you are using the gateway method to cluster the Oracle Application Server
instances for OPMN, see the section "Configuring Cross-Topology Gateways"
in the Oracle Containers for J2EE Configuration and Administration Guide for
configuration details.
Step 3 Cluster the OC4J Components to Create an Application Cluster
You can also cluster the OC4J components within the Oracle Application Server
instances. This type of cluster is called Application Cluster.
Application Clusters provides the following features:
■
■
■
Replication of objects and data contained in an HTTP session or a stateful session
Enterprise JavaBean
In-memory replication using multicast or peer-to-peer communication, or
persistence of state to a database
Load-balancing of incoming requests across OC4J instances
Installing in High Availability Environments
6-9
Creating the Active-Active Topology
■
Transparent failover across applications within the cluster
Application Clusters Defined at the Global Level or Application Level
You can define properties of an application cluster at the global level or at the
application level. Properties defined at the global level apply to all applications, but
you can override specific properties by defining them at the application level.
To define properties at the global level, you define them in the ORACLE_
HOME\j2ee\home\config\application.xml file, which is the configuration file
for the global default application.
To define properties at the application level, you define them in the application’s
orion-application.xml file. When you deploy the application, the file is located
in the ORACLE_HOME\j2ee\home\application-deployments\<app-name>/
directory.
Procedure
To create an application cluster at either the global or application level, you perform
these steps:
1.
Add an empty <distributable/> tag to the web.xml file for all Web modules
that are part of an application configured for clustering.
2.
Specify the mechanism for replicating state and session information between
Oracle Application Server instances. You choose one of the following replication
mechanisms:
Table 6–2
Application Cluster Replication Mechanisms
Replication Mechanism
Description
Multicast
OC4J instances use a multicast address and port to
replicate information between themselves.
See Section 6.2.5.2, "Setting up Multicast Replication" for
details.
Peer-to-peer
Oracle Application Server supports two types of
peer-to-peer replication: dynamic and static.
■
■
In dynamic peer-to-peer replication, OC4J discovers
other OC4J instances through OPMN. You do not have
to list the names of the instances in a configuration
file.
In static peer-to-peer replication, you list the names of
the instances that you want to be involved in the
replication.
See Section 6.2.5.3, "Setting up Peer-to-Peer Replication" for
details.
Replication to database
State and session information are saved to the database
that you specify. The database must be defined in the
data-sources.xml file.
See Section 6.2.5.4, "Setting up Replication to a Database"
for details.
3.
Specify how often and which data are replicated. See Section 6.2.5.5, "Setting the
Replication Policy" for details.
4.
Specify the number of nodes to replicate the data to. See Section 6.2.5.6,
"Specifying the Number of Nodes to Replicate To" for details.
6-10 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating the Active-Active Topology
For details, see the "Application Clustering in OC4J" chapter in the Oracle Containers for
J2EE Configuration and Administration Guide.
6.2.5 Supporting Procedures for Creating the Active-Active Topology
This section describes some common procedures that you may need to perform to
maintain the active-active topology:
■
Section 6.2.5.1, "Setting up Clusters with the Discovery Server Method"
■
Section 6.2.5.2, "Setting up Multicast Replication"
■
Section 6.2.5.3, "Setting up Peer-to-Peer Replication"
■
Section 6.2.5.4, "Setting up Replication to a Database"
■
Section 6.2.5.5, "Setting the Replication Policy"
■
Section 6.2.5.6, "Specifying the Number of Nodes to Replicate To"
6.2.5.1 Setting up Clusters with the Discovery Server Method
If you do not want to use the multicast method, you can define a cluster by specifying
the names of the nodes running the Oracle Application Server instances in the
opmn.xml file of each instance.
Example: if you want to cluster four instances (inst1.node1.mycompany.com,
inst2.node2.mycompany.com, inst3.node3.mycompany.com,
inst4.node4.mycompany.com), you would perform these steps:
1.
Designate at least one of the instances to serve as the "discovery server". The
discovery server maintains the topology for the cluster.
This example assumes that inst1.node1.mycompany.com and
inst2.node2.mycompany.com will be the discovery servers for the cluster.
In distributed installations (Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J on different Oracle
homes), any instance, whether running Oracle HTTP Server or OC4J, can serve as
the discovery server.
2.
In the opmn.xml file for all instances in the cluster, specify the nodes that are
running the discovery servers (node1.mycompany.com and
node2.mycompany.com in the example).
In the example, the opmn.xml file is changed to include the following lines:
<notification-server>
<topology>
<discover
list="node1.mycompany.com:6201,node2.mycompany.com:6201"/>
</topology>
...
</notification-server>
The 6201 specifies the port number at which the notification server is listening.
You can find this value in the opmn.xml file of that instance.
If you have more than one discovery server, you separate them with the comma
character.
3.
On all the instances, run "opmnctl reload" to force OPMN to read the updated
opmn.xml file.
> ORACLE_HOME\opmn\bin\opmnctl reload
Installing in High Availability Environments 6-11
Creating the Active-Active Topology
6.2.5.2 Setting up Multicast Replication
Multicast replication is the default replication type. To set up an application to use
multicast replication, you can just add the empty <cluster/> tag to the application’s
orion-application.xml file or to the global ORACLE_
HOME\j2ee\home\config\application.xml file. For example:
<orion-application ... >
...
<cluster/>
</orion-application>
You need to add the <cluster/> tag on all nodes where the application is deployed.
By default, multicast replication uses multicast address 230.230.0.1 and port 45566. If
you want to change these values, you specify the desired values in the ip and port
attributes of the multicast element. For example, the following snippet shows the
ip and port attributes set to customized values:
<orion-application ... >
...
<cluster allow-colocation="false">
<replication-policy trigger="onShutdown" scope="allAttributes"/>
<protocol>
<multicast ip="225.130.0.0" port="45577" bind-addr="226.83.24.10"/>
</protocol>
</cluster>
</orion-application>
The multicast address must be between 224.0.0.1 and 239.255.255.255.
Description of other tags and attributes used in the snippet above:
■
■
■
allow-colocation: specifies whether or not application state is replicated to
other Oracle Application Server instances running on the same host. The default is
true.
trigger and scope: see Section 6.2.5.5, "Setting the Replication Policy".
bind-addr: specifies the IP of the network interface card (NIC) to bind to. This is
useful if the host machine has multiple NICs, each with its own IP address.
6.2.5.3 Setting up Peer-to-Peer Replication
Oracle Application Server supports two types of peer-to-peer replication: dynamic and
static.
■
■
In dynamic peer-to-peer replication, OC4J discovers other OC4J instances through
OPMN. You do not have to list the names of the instances in a configuration file.
In static peer-to-peer replication, you list the names of the instances that you want
to be involved in the replication.
Dynamic Peer-to-Peer Replication
To specify dynamic peer-to-peer replication, you include an empty
<opmn-discovery/> tag in the application’s orion-application.xml file or in
the global ORACLE_HOME\j2ee\home\config\application.xml file
<orion-application ... >
...
<cluster allow-colocation="false">
<replication-policy trigger="onShutdown" scope="allAttributes"/>
<protocol>
6-12 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating the Active-Active Topology
<peer>
<opmn-discovery/>
</peer>
</protocol>
</cluster>
</orion-application>
You defined how OPMN discovers instances in a cluster in step 2, "Install Oracle
HTTP Server and OC4J and Cluster the Instances using OPMN" on page 6-7.
Static Peer-to-Peer Replication
To specify static peer-to-peer replication, you list the names of the hosts in the <node>
element in the application’s orion-application.xml file or in the global ORACLE_
HOME\j2ee\home\config\application.xml file. For each node, you specify
another node in the active-active topology such that all the nodes in the topology are
connected in the chain. For example, if you have three Oracle Application Server
instances in your topology, node 1 can specify node 2, node 2 can specify node 3, and
node 3 can specify node 1.
Example:
On node 1, the <node> tag specifies node 2:
<orion-application ... >
...
<cluster allow-colocation="false">
<replication-policy trigger="onShutdown" scope="allAttributes"/>
<protocol>
<peer start-port="7900" range="10" timeout="6000">
<node host="node2.mycompany.com" port="7900"/>
</peer>
</protocol>
</cluster>
</orion-application>
On node 2, the <node> tag specifies node 3:
<orion-application ... >
...
<cluster allow-colocation="false">
<replication-policy trigger="onShutdown" scope="allAttributes"/>
<protocol>
<peer start-port="7900" range="10" timeout="6000">
<node host="node3.mycompany.com" port="7900"/>
</peer>
</protocol>
</cluster>
</orion-application>
On node 3, the <node> tag specifies node 1:
<orion-application ... >
...
<cluster allow-colocation="false">
<replication-policy trigger="onShutdown" scope="allAttributes"/>
<protocol>
<peer start-port="7900" range="10" timeout="6000">
<node host="node1.mycompany.com" port="7900"/>
</peer>
</protocol>
</cluster>
Installing in High Availability Environments 6-13
Creating the Active-Active Topology
</orion-application>
Another way of doing this is to have all the nodes specify the same node. In a
three-node example, you could also have nodes 1 and 2 specify node 3, and node 3 can
specify either node 1 or node 2.
Description of the tags and attributes used in the example above:
■
■
■
■
■
start-port: specifies the first port on the local node that Oracle Application
Server tries to bind to for peer communication. If this port is already in use, Oracle
Application Server increments the port number until it finds an available port. The
default is 7800.
timeout: specifies the length of time in milliseconds to wait for a response from
the specified peer node. The default is 3000 milliseconds.
host: specifies the name of the peer node.
port: specifies the port to use on the specified host (in the host attribute) for peer
communication. The default is 7800.
range: specifies the number of times to increment the port specified on the port
(not start-port) attribute. The default is 5.
Note the following:
■
In static peer-to-peer replication, the application’s orion-application.xml file
is different for each instance. When you deploy your application, you have to
make sure that you update the orion-application.xml accordingly.
6.2.5.4 Setting up Replication to a Database
In this replication mechanism, the replicated data is saved to a database. You specify
the database in the <database> tag in the application’s orion-application.xml
file or in the global ORACLE_HOME\j2ee\home\config\application.xml file.
For example:
<orion-application ... >
...
<cluster allow-colocation="false">
<replication-policy trigger="onShutdown" scope="allAttributes"/>
<protocol>
<database data-source="jdbc/MyOracleDS"/>
</protocol>
</cluster>
</orion-application>
The value for the data-source attribute must match the data source’s jndi-name as
specified in the data-sources.xml file. See the Oracle Containers for J2EE Services
Guide for details on creating and using data sources.
6.2.5.5 Setting the Replication Policy
Attributes in the <replication-policy> tag enable you to specify which data is to
be replicated and how frequently the data is replicated.
The trigger attribute
The trigger attribute specifies when replication occurs. Table 6–3 describes
supported values for this attribute:
6-14 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating the Active-Active Topology
Table 6–3
Values for the trigger Attribute
Value
HttpSession
Stateful Session Bean
onSetAttribute
Replicate each change made to Not applicable.
an HTTP session attribute at
the time the value is modified.
From a programmatic
standpoint, replication occurs
each time setAttribute() is
called on the HttpSession
object.
This option can be resource
intensive in cases where the
session is being extensively
modified.
onRequestEnd
(default)
Queue all changes made to
HTTP session attributes, then
replicate all changes just before
the HTTP response is sent.
Replicate the current state of the
bean after each EJB method call. The
state is replicated frequently, but
offers higher reliance.
onShutdown
Replicate the current state of
the HTTP session whenever the
JVM is terminated gracefully,
such as with Control-C. State is
not replicated if the host is
terminated unexpectedly, as in
the case of a system crash.
Replicate the current state of the
bean whenever the JVM is
terminated gracefully. State is not
replicated if the host is terminated
unexpectedly, as in case of a system
crash.
Because session state was not
previously replicated, all
session data is sent across the
network at once upon JVM
termination, which can impact
network performance. This
option can also significantly
increase the amount of time
needed for the JVM to shut
down.
Because bean state was not
previously replicated, all state data
is sent across the network at once
upon JVM termination, which can
impact network performance. This
option may also significantly
increase the amount of time needed
for the JVM to shut down.
The scope attribute
The scope attribute specifies which data is replicated. Table 6–4 describes supported
values for the attribute:
Table 6–4
Values for the scope Attribute
Value
HttpSession
Stateful Session Bean
modifiedAttributes
Replicate only the modified HTTP
session attributes.
Not applicable.
This is the default replication
setting for HttpSession.
allAttributes
Replicate all attribute values set on Replicate all member
the HTTP session.
variable values set on the
stateful session bean.
This is the default replication
setting for stateful session
beans.
Installing in High Availability Environments 6-15
Creating the Active-Passive Topology
6.2.5.6 Specifying the Number of Nodes to Replicate To
To specify the number of nodes to replicate to, use the write-quota attribute of the
<cluster> tag. For example, the following snippet specifies that the replicated data
is replicated to two other nodes.
<orion-application ... >
...
<cluster allow-colocation="false" write-quota="2">
<replication-policy trigger="onShutdown" scope="allAttributes"/>
<protocol>
<peer>
<opmn-discovery/>
</peer>
</protocol>
</cluster>
</orion-application>
The default is 1.
Recommendations: For a two-node active-active topology, set write-quota to 1, so
that the data is replicated to the other node.
For topologies with three or more nodes, set write-quota to at least 2 to ensure that
the data is replicated to at least two other nodes.
To replicate data to all nodes in the topology, set write-quota to the total number of
nodes in the topology. It is possible to write back to the same node if there is another
instance running on that node.
The write-quota attribute is not used if you are replicating to database.
6.3 Creating the Active-Passive Topology
This section describes how to install Oracle Application Server in an active-passive
topology with OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster. OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster is one
of the high availability environments supported by Oracle Application Server.
Contents of this section:
■
Section 6.3.1, "Active-Passive Topologies: Introduction"
■
Section 6.3.2, "Overview of Installation Steps for OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster"
■
Section 6.3.3, "Preinstallation Steps for OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster"
■
Section 6.3.4, "OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster: Details of Installation Steps"
6.3.1 Active-Passive Topologies: Introduction
An active-passive topology consists of the following:
■
Two nodes in a hardware cluster
■
A virtual hostname and IP address
■
A shared storage, to be shared between the two nodes
You install the Oracle home on the shared storage. During runtime in an active-passive
topology, only one node is active. The other node is passive. The active node mounts
the shared storage so that it can access the files and runs all the processes and handles
all the requests. Clients access the active node through the virtual hostname. Clients
do not need to know the physical hostnames of the nodes in the topology.
6-16 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating the Active-Passive Topology
If the active node fails for any reason, a failover event occurs and the passive node
takes over and becomes the active node. It mounts the shared storage and runs all the
processes and handles all the requests. The virtual hostname and IP now point to the
passive node. Clients, because they access the nodes using the virtual hostname, do
not know that it is the passive node that is servicing their requests.
The nodes need to be in hardware cluster to enable failover.
Note: Installing the Oracle home on the local storage of each node in
the OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster topology is not supported. You
have to install it on the shared storage.
Vendor Clusterware
The two nodes in an active-passive topology are in a hardware cluster, which typically
includes some vendor clusterware. For a list of certified clusterware, visit the Oracle
Technology Network website (http://www.oracle.com/technology).
If you are running on Windows, you need the following products for the cluster:
■
Oracle Fail Safe
■
Microsoft Cluster Server
These products must be installed on both nodes (active and passive) in the topology.
Figures of Active-Passive Topologies
Figure 6–3 shows a diagram of an active-passive topology with the Oracle Application
Server Oracle home installed on the shared storage. The Oracle home contains both
Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J. Figure 6–4 shows a distributed active-passive topology,
where Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J are installed on different Oracle home.
Figure 6–3 Active-Passive Topology with Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J in the Same Oracle Home
Virtual Hostname:
oc4j_mydomain.com
Virtual IP: 123.45.67.89
HTTP(S)
On Failover
Hardware Cluster
Cluster Node 1
(Active)
Cluster Node 2
(Passive)
OHS
OC4J
OHS
OC4J
Vendor Clusterware
Vendor Clusterware
InterConnect
Variation:
You can use Oracle
Identity Management
from 10.1.2 with
this topology
On Windows platforms you
need Microsoft Cluster
Server and Oracle
Fail Safe.
On Failover
ORACLE_HOME for OHS and OC4J
Shared
Storage
Installing in High Availability Environments 6-17
Creating the Active-Passive Topology
Figure 6–4 Active-Passive Topology with Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J in Separate Oracle Homes
Virtual Hostname:
ohs.mydomain.com
Virtual IP: 123.45.67.89
HTTP(S)
On Failover
Hardware Cluster
Cluster Node 1
(Active)
Cluster Node 2
(Passive)
OHS
OHS
Vendor Clusterware
Vendor Clusterware
InterConnect
Variations:
· You can use Oracle Identity
Management from 10.1.2
with this topology.
· You can use Oracle HTTP
Server from 10.1.2 with
this topology.
On Windows platforms, you
need Microsoft Cluster Server
and Oracle Fail Safe.
On Failover
ORACLE_HOME for OHS
Shared
Storage
Virtual Hostname:
oc4j.mydomain.com
Virtual IP: 123.45.67.89
HTTP(S)
On Failover
Hardware Cluster
Cluster Node 1
(Active)
Cluster Node 2
(Passive)
OC4J
OC4J
Vendor Clusterware
Vendor Clusterware
InterConnect
On Windows platforms, you
need Microsoft Cluster Server
and Oracle Fail Safe.
On Failover
ORACLE_HOME for OC4J
Shared
Storage
6.3.2 Overview of Installation Steps for OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster
Follow the steps in Table 6–5 to create the OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster
configuration. If you are installing Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J in the same Oracle
Home (Figure 6–3), perform the steps on the hardware cluster. If you are installing
Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J in separate Oracle Homes (Figure 6–4), perform each
step on both hardware clusters.
6-18 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating the Active-Passive Topology
Table 6–5
1.
Overview of Installation Steps for OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster
Step
Description
Perform Preinstallation Steps
Preinstallation tasks, described in Section 6.3.3 include:
■
■
■
■
■
■
Section 6.3.3.1, "Ensure that the Event Log Service Is
Running"
Section 6.3.3.2, "Get a Virtual Address for the Cluster"
Section 6.3.3.3, "Verify that Microsoft Cluster Server
(MSCS) Is Installed on Both Nodes"
Section 6.3.3.4, "Determine the Name of the Cluster"
Section 6.3.3.5, "Determine a Domain User to Administer
Oracle Fail Safe"
Section 6.3.3.6, "Install Oracle Fail Safe on the Local
Storage of Each Node"
■
Section 6.3.3.7, "Create a Group in Oracle Fail Safe"
■
Section 6.3.3.8, "Set up staticports.ini File"
2.
Install Oracle Application Server on the
Shared Disk
In this step, you run the installer from either node of the
hardware cluster to install Oracle HTTP Server and OPMN on
the shared disk.
3.
(optional) Configure the Oracle Application
Server Instance for SSL
If you want the Oracle Application Server instance to use SSL,
enable SSL in the Oracle Application Server installation.
4.
(optional) Create a File System on the Shared
Disk for OracleAS JMS File-Based Persistence
If you are using OracleAS JMS, create a file system on the
shared disk.
6.3.3 Preinstallation Steps for OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster
Before installing Oracle Application Server in an OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster,
perform these procedures:
■
Section 6.3.3.1, "Ensure that the Event Log Service Is Running"
■
Section 6.3.3.2, "Get a Virtual Address for the Cluster"
■
Section 6.3.3.3, "Verify that Microsoft Cluster Server (MSCS) Is Installed on Both
Nodes"
■
Section 6.3.3.4, "Determine the Name of the Cluster"
■
Section 6.3.3.5, "Determine a Domain User to Administer Oracle Fail Safe"
■
Section 6.3.3.6, "Install Oracle Fail Safe on the Local Storage of Each Node"
■
Section 6.3.3.7, "Create a Group in Oracle Fail Safe"
■
Section 6.3.3.8, "Set up staticports.ini File"
6.3.3.1 Ensure that the Event Log Service Is Running
The "Event Log" service must be running on both nodes in the cluster. You can check it
in the Services dialog. To access the Services dialog:
■
Windows 2003: Select Start > Administrative Tools > Services.
6.3.3.2 Get a Virtual Address for the Cluster
You need a virtual address to associate with the cluster. A virtual address consists of a
virtual hostname and an IP address. Clients access the OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster
using the virtual hostname. The virtual address is in addition to each node’s own
Installing in High Availability Environments 6-19
Creating the Active-Passive Topology
hostname and IP address. Figure 6–3 shows a virtual address for the two nodes in the
cluster.
To get a virtual address, consult your network administrator. Virtual hostnames and IP
addresses are any valid hostname and IP address in the context of the subnet
containing the cluster.
Note: You map the virtual hostname and virtual IP address only to
the active node. Do not map the virtual hostname and IP address to
both active and passive nodes at the same time. When you fail over,
only then map the virtual hostname and IP address to the passive
node, which is now the active node.
6.3.3.3 Verify that Microsoft Cluster Server (MSCS) Is Installed on Both Nodes
To verify that MSCS is installed on a computer, check that you can launch the Cluster
Administrator from the Start menu:
Windows 2003: Select Start > Administrative Tools > Cluster Administrator.
Note that the "Cluster IP Address" and "Cluster Name" used by MSCS are different
from the virtual hostname and virtual IP created in the previous step.
6.3.3.4 Determine the Name of the Cluster
You can use the Cluster Administrator to find out the name of your cluster.
6.3.3.5 Determine a Domain User to Administer Oracle Fail Safe
You need a domain user to own the "OracleMSCSServices" service, which gets
installed when you install Oracle Fail Safe.
Requirements for this user:
■
This user must be defined at the domain level (as opposed to a user defined
locally) because you need to specify the same user on both nodes during
installation.
■
Make sure that you do not have a local user with the same name on either node.
■
This user must have Administrator privileges on both nodes in the cluster.
■
This user must also belong to the DBA group.
During Oracle Fail Safe installation, you specify the domain and the user using the
domainname\username format.
6.3.3.6 Install Oracle Fail Safe on the Local Storage of Each Node
You need to install Oracle Fail Safe on the local storage of both nodes. For example,
Figure 6–3 shows Oracle Fail Safe installed on both nodes.
Oracle Fail Safe is shipped with Oracle Application Server. It is available on the Oracle
Fail Safe CD-ROM.
Overview of Steps to Install Oracle Fail Safe on Both Nodes
The sequence of steps for installing Oracle Fail Safe on each node is:
1.
Before you start installing Oracle Fail Safe, you need to know the domain and user
who will own the "OracleMSCSServices" service. This service gets installed when
6-20 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating the Active-Passive Topology
you install Oracle Fail Safe. See Section 6.3.3.5, "Determine a Domain User to
Administer Oracle Fail Safe" for details on this user.
2.
Install Oracle Fail Safe on node 1. See details in the next section, "Steps for
Installing Oracle Fail Safe" on page 6-21.
3.
Restart node 1.
4.
Install Oracle Fail Safe on node 2.
5.
Restart node 2.
6.
Verify the cluster using Oracle Fail Safe Manager.
Steps for Installing Oracle Fail Safe
This section describes the screens for installing Oracle Fail Safe. For a full description
of the screens, refer to the Oracle Fail Safe Installation Guide.
1.
Insert the Oracle Fail Safe CD-ROM and double-click setup.exe to start up the
installer.
2.
Welcome screen: click Next.
3.
Specify File Locations screen:
Name: Enter the name for this Oracle home. Example: ofs.
Path (in the Destination section): Enter the full path where you want to install
Oracle Fail Safe. You must install Oracle Fail Safe on the local storage. Example:
C:\oracle\OFS.
Note: You should use the same name and path for the Oracle Fail
Safe installations on both nodes.
Click Next.
4.
Select Installation Type screen: Select Typical, and click Next.
This installs the following components:
■
Oracle Fail Safe Manager
■
Oracle Services for MSCS
5.
Reboot Needed After Installation screen: This screen reminds you that you need to
restart your computer after installation. Click Next.
6.
Summary screen: Click Install.
7.
Oracle Services for MSCS Account/Password screen:
Domain\Username: Enter the domain name and the username under which you
want to run the OracleMSCSServices service.
Password and Confirm Password: Specify and confirm the password for the user.
Click OK.
8.
Configuration Assistants screen: This screen shows the progress as the
configuration assistants run.
9.
End of Installation: Click Exit.
Installing in High Availability Environments 6-21
Creating the Active-Passive Topology
Verify the Cluster
After installing Oracle Fail Safe, verify the cluster using Oracle Fail Safe Manager.
1.
Start Oracle Fail Safe Manager from the Start menu:
Start > Programs > Oracle - OracleHomeName > Oracle Fail Safe Manager
OracleHomeName refers to the name that you gave to the Oracle home where you
installed Oracle Fail Safe.
2.
Enter the cluster name in Cluster Alias in the Add Cluster to Tree dialog
(Figure 6–5). You defined the cluster name using Cluster Administrator. Click OK.
Figure 6–5 Oracle Fail Safe Manager: Add Cluster to Tree dialog
3.
In the left frame, select the cluster. This causes Oracle Fail Safe Manager to display
the Welcome dialog (Figure 6–6). In the figure, "FSWIN-CLU1" is the cluster name.
Click Verify Cluster.
You might see some warnings related to Oracle software. These warnings are
expected because you have not installed any products in the cluster yet. However,
if you see any system warnings, you should investigate them.
Figure 6–6 Oracle Fail Safe Manager: Welcome / Verify Cluster dialog
6.3.3.7 Create a Group in Oracle Fail Safe
A group in Oracle Fail Safe is a logical collection of resources that will fail over to the
standby node as a unit. Before you install Oracle Application Server in an OracleAS
Cold Failover Cluster, you need to create a group using Oracle Fail Safe Manager, and
add these resources to the group:
Table 6–6
Resources to Add to the Group Before Installing Oracle Application Server
To add this resource to a group:
Use This Tool
IP of virtual host
Oracle Fail Safe Manager
Virtual hostname
Oracle Fail Safe Manager
Shared disk
Cluster Administrator
6-22 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating the Active-Passive Topology
Follow these steps to create and set up a group. This procedure creates a group with
default attributes (for things such as failover and failback policies). You can change
these attributes later if necessary. For details, see the Oracle Application Server High
Availability Guide and the Oracle Fail Safe documentation.
1.
Start up Oracle Fail Safe Manager from the Start menu:
Start > Programs > Oracle - OracleHomeName > Oracle Fail Safe Manager
OracleHomeName refers to the name that you gave to the Oracle home directory
where you installed Oracle Fail Safe.
2.
Expand the cluster on the left side.
3.
Right-click Groups, and select Create from the pop-up menu. This starts up the
Create Group wizard.
4.
Follow the screens in the Create Group wizard to create a group called "OracleAS".
a.
General, Step 1, screen: Enter the group name for the Oracle Application
Server resources and click Next. This guide calls the group "OracleAS".
Figure 6–7 Oracle Fail Safe Manager: Create Group Wizard, General Screen
b.
Failback Policies, Step 2, screen: Select Prevent Failback and click Next.
Figure 6–8
c.
Oracle Fail Safe Manager: Create Group Wizard, Failback Policies Screen
Finish Creating the Group screen: Review the information and click OK.
Installing in High Availability Environments 6-23
Creating the Active-Passive Topology
Figure 6–9
Screen
d.
Oracle Fail Safe Manager: Create Group Wizard, Finish Creating the Group
Add Virtual Address screen: Click Yes.
Figure 6–10 Oracle Fail Safe Manager: Create Group Wizard, Add Virtual Address Screen
e.
Add Resource to Group - Virtual Address screen:
Select Show networks accessible by clients.
Network: Select the name associated with the primary network interface card
on the node. By default, it is "Local Area Connection".
Host Name: Enter the virtual hostname. Example: vhost.
IP Address: Enter the IP of the virtual hostname. Example: 138.2.229.77.
Click Next.
Figure 6–11 Oracle Fail Safe Manager: Create Group Wizard, Add Resource to Group Virtual Address Screen
f.
Finish Adding the Virtual Address to the Group screen: Review the
information and click OK.
6-24 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating the Active-Passive Topology
Figure 6–12 Oracle Fail Safe Manager: Create Group Wizard, Finish Adding the Virtual
Address to the Group Screen
5.
Verify that you can see the group that you just created in Oracle Fail Safe Manager
(Figure 6–13) and that the group has these two resources in it:
■
IP address of the virtual host
■
Virtual hostname (shown as Network Name)
Figure 6–13 Oracle Fail Safe Manager Showing the Resources in the New Group
6.
Using Cluster Administrator, move the shared disk where you will be installing
Oracle Application Server into the group that you just created in Oracle Fail Safe
Manager.
a.
Start up Cluster Administrator from the Start menu:
Windows 2003: Start > Administrative Tools > Cluster Administrator
b.
On the left side, select the disk group that contains the shared disk. In
Figure 6–14, Disk I is the shared disk.
Note the "OracleAS" group on the left side. This is the group that you created
in Oracle Fail Safe Manager.
Installing in High Availability Environments 6-25
Creating the Active-Passive Topology
Figure 6–14 Cluster Administrator Showing the Shared Disk
c.
Drag and drop the shared disk (Disk I in the example) from the right side to
the "OracleAS" group on the left side. If the Cluster Administrator prompts
you to confirm (Figure 6–15), click Yes.
Figure 6–15 Cluster Administrator: Move Resources Confirmation Dialog
7.
In Oracle Fail Safe Manager, check that the group now includes the shared disk.
Figure 6–16 Oracle Fail Safe Manager After Adding the Shared Disk to the Group
6-26 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating the Active-Passive Topology
6.3.3.8 Set up staticports.ini File
Set up a staticports.ini file to use when installing the middle tiers. See Section 2.4.4,
"Using Custom Port Numbers (the "Static Ports" Feature)" for details on creating the
staticports.ini file.
Note: The ports must be different from those used for other Oracle
Homes on the same node. To check the ports assigned to components
in any Oracle Home, run the following commands:
C:\> ORACLE_HOME/opmn/bin/opmnctl startall
C:\> ORACLE_HOME/opmn/bin/opmnctl status -l
6.3.4 OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster: Details of Installation Steps
This section lists the steps for installing OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster.
If you are installing Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J in separate Oracle Homes, you
need to perform each of these steps on both clusters.
Step 1 Perform Preinstallation Steps
Perform the preinstallation steps listed in Section 6.3.3, "Preinstallation Steps for
OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster".
Step 2 Install Oracle Application Server on the Shared Disk
To install Oracle Application Server on the shared disk of the hardware cluster,
perform the following steps:
1.
Install Oracle Application Server on the shared disk of the hardware cluster from
node 1.
■
For OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster with Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J in
the Same Oracle Home
Follow the steps in Section 5.2.4, "Installing Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server
and Process Management". During installation, perform the following actions:
■
–
On the "Specify Port Configuration Options" screen, specify the
staticports.ini file you created in Section 6.3.3.8, "Set up staticports.ini
File".
–
On the "Administration Instance Settings" screen, select Configure this as
an Administration OC4J instance if you want to configure Application
Server Control for administering the OC4J instance. Otherwise, deselect
this option.
For OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster with Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J in
Separate Oracle Homes
If you are installing on the hardware cluster where you want to run Oracle
HTTP Server, follow the steps in Section 5.2.3, "Installing Web Server and
Process Management". During installation, perform the following actions:
–
On the "Specify Port Configuration Options" screen, specify the
staticports.ini file you created in Section 6.3.3.8, "Set up staticports.ini
File".
–
If you want to route all requests to OC4J through the Oracle HTTP Server,
select Configure this HTTP Server instance to be part of an Oracle
Installing in High Availability Environments 6-27
Creating the Active-Passive Topology
Application Server cluster on the "Cluster Topology Configuration"
screen. Specify the IP Address and Port for the multicast address shared
by all the nodes in the cluster.
–
If you do not want to route all requests to OC4J through the Oracle HTTP
Server, deselect Configure this HTTP Server instance to be part of an
Oracle Application Server cluster on the "Cluster Topology
Configuration" screen.
If you are installing on the hardware cluster where you want to run OC4J,
follow the steps in Section 5.2.2, "Installing J2EE Server and Process
Management". During installation, perform the following actions:
2.
–
On the "Specify Port Configuration Options" screen, specify the
staticports.ini file you created in Section 6.3.3.8, "Set up staticports.ini
File".
–
On the "Administration Instance Settings" screen, select Configure this as
an Administration OC4J instance if you want to configure Application
Server Control for administering the OC4J instance. Otherwise, deselect
this option.
–
If you want to route all requests to OC4J through the Oracle HTTP Server,
select Configure this OC4J instance to be part of an Oracle Application
Server cluster topology on the "Cluster Topology Configuration" screen.
Specify the IP Address and Port for the multicast address shared by all the
nodes in the cluster. Select Access this OC4J Instance from a separate
Oracle HTTP Server.
–
If you do not want to route all requests to OC4J through the Oracle HTTP
Server, deselect Configure this OC4J instance to be part of an Oracle
Application Server cluster topology on the "Cluster Topology
Configuration" screen.
Stop the Oracle Application Server Services on node 1, and set their startup type to
manual.
a.
Display the Services window.
Windows 2003: Select Start > Administrative Tools > Services.
b.
Stop this service.
Oracle-<InstanceName>ProcessManager
To stop a service, right-click the service and select Stop from the pop-up
menu.
c.
Set the start type of the service listed above to manual.
Right-click the service, and select Properties.
Select Manual from the "Startup Type" section, and click OK.
3.
Remove the ORACLE_HOME directory.
4.
Fail over the Cluster group created in the preinstallation to node 2.
■
Use Oracle Fail Safe to move the group that you created in Oracle Fail Safe.
■
Start up Oracle Fail Safe Manager.
■
Right-click the group and select "Move to a different node".
6-28 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating the Active-Passive Topology
5.
Install Oracle HTTP Server and OC4J on the shared disk of the hardware cluster
from node 2 using the installation steps in step 1. Make sure that you use the same
values as you did in the earlier install.
Step 3 (optional) Configure the Oracle Application Server Instance for SSL
If you want the Oracle Application Server instance to use SSL, follow the steps in the
Oracle Application Server Administrator’s Guide.
Step 4 (optional) Create a File System on the Shared Disk for OracleAS JMS
File-Based Persistence
If you are using OracleAS JMS with file-based persistence, create a file system on the
shared disk for the OracleAS JMS queues. Add this shared disk to the Oracle Fail Safe
group using the Cluster Administrator. You can do this by performing steps 6 and 7 in
Section 6.3.3.7, "Create a Group in Oracle Fail Safe".
Step 5 Make OPMN Highly Available
Add OPMN as a resource to the group that you created in Oracle Fail Safe. See
Section 6.3.5, "Postinstallation Steps: Make OPMN Highly Available" for details.
6.3.5 Postinstallation Steps: Make OPMN Highly Available
To make OPMN highly available, add it to the Oracle Fail Safe group that you created
in Section 6.3.3.7, "Create a Group in Oracle Fail Safe". OPMN corresponds to the
Oracle-<InstanceName>ProcessManager service.
1.
Start up Oracle Fail Safe Manager from the Start menu.
Start > Programs > Oracle - OracleHomeName > Oracle Fail Safe Manager
OracleHomeName refers to the name that you gave to the Oracle home directory
where you installed Oracle Fail Safe.
2.
On the left side, expand Groups, right-click the group that you created in
Section 6.3.3.7, "Create a Group in Oracle Fail Safe", and select Add Resource to
Group. This starts up the Add Resource to Group wizard.
Installing in High Availability Environments 6-29
Creating the Active-Passive Topology
Figure 6–17 Oracle Fail Safe Manager: Add Resource to Group
3.
Perform these steps in the Add Resource to Group wizard:
a.
Resource, Step 1
Select Generic Service, verify that the group is correct, and click Next.
Figure 6–18 Add Resource to Group Wizard (Adding OPMN), Resource, Step 1 Screen
b.
Generic Service Identity, Step 2
Select Oracle-<InstanceName>ProcessManager from Display Name,
and click Next.
6-30 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating the Active-Passive Topology
Figure 6–19 Add Resource to Group Wizard (Adding OPMN), Generic Service Identity,
Step 2 Screen
c.
Generic Service Account, Step 3
There are no startup parameters for OPMN. Click Next.
Figure 6–20 Add Resource to Group Wizard (Adding OPMN), Generic Service Account,
Step 3 Screen
d.
Generic Service Disks, Step 4
There should not be anything under Selected Disks. Click Next.
Installing in High Availability Environments 6-31
Creating the Active-Passive Topology
Figure 6–21 Add Resource to Group Wizard (Adding OPMN), Generic Service Disks,
Step 4 Screen
e.
Generic Service Dependencies, Step 5
Move the Network Name to the Resource Dependencies column. Click Next.
Figure 6–22 Add Resource to Group Wizard (Adding OPMN), Generic Service
Dependencies, Step 5 Screen
f.
Generic Service Registry, Step 6: Click Finish.
6-32 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating the Active-Passive Topology
Figure 6–23 Add Resource to Group Wizard (Adding OPMN), Generic Service Registry,
Step 6 Screen
g.
Finish Adding the Generic Service to the Group
Verify the information and click OK. In particular, check that both nodes in the
cluster are listed under Possible Owner Nodes.
Figure 6–24 Add Resource to Group Wizard (Adding OPMN), Finish Adding the Generic
Service to the Group Screen
h.
Confirm Add Generic Service to Group screen: Click Yes.
Figure 6–25 Add Resource to Group Wizard (Adding OPMN), Confirm Add Generic
Service to Group Screen
Installing in High Availability Environments 6-33
Creating the Active-Passive Topology
Oracle Fail Safe Manager now configures the Process Manager service so that
both nodes in the cluster can run it. When it is done, it displays a screen
similar to Figure 6–26. Click OK in the success dialog.
Figure 6–26 Add Resource to Group Wizard (Adding OPMN), Final Screen
i.
In the Oracle Fail Safe Manager, you should see the Process Manager service
listed under the group.
6-34 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating an OracleAS Disaster Recovery Configuration
Figure 6–27 Oracle Fail Safe Manager With the Process Manager Service Added to the
Group
6.4 Creating an OracleAS Disaster Recovery Configuration
This section describes how to install Oracle Application Server in OracleAS Disaster
Recovery configurations. OracleAS Disaster Recovery is one of the high availability
environments supported by Oracle Application Server.
Contents of this section:
■
Section 6.4.1, "OracleAS Disaster Recovery: Introduction"
■
Section 6.4.2, "Setting up the OracleAS Disaster Recovery Environment"
■
■
Section 6.4.3, "Installing Oracle Application Server in an OracleAS Disaster
Recovery Environment"
Section 6.4.4, "Installing the OracleAS 10g (10.1.3) Standalone Install of OracleAS
Guard into Oracle Homes"
■
Section 6.4.5, "Patching OracleAS Guard Release 10.1.2.n.n with Release 10.1.3.0.0"
■
Section 6.4.6, "What to Read Next?"
6.4.1 OracleAS Disaster Recovery: Introduction
Use the OracleAS Disaster Recovery environment when you want to have two
physically separate sites in your environment. One site is the production site, and the
other site is the standby site. The production site is active, while the standby site is
passive; the standby site becomes active when the production site goes down.
OracleAS Disaster Recovery supports a number of basic topologies for the
configuration of the Infrastructure and middle tier on production and standby sites.
OracleAS Disaster Recovery supports these basic topologies:
Installing in High Availability Environments 6-35
Creating an OracleAS Disaster Recovery Configuration
■
■
■
■
■
■
Symmetrical topologies -- strict mirror of the production site with collocated
Oracle Identity Management and OracleAS Metadata Repository Infrastructure
Asymmetrical topologies -- simple asymmetric standby topology with collocated
Oracle Identity Management and OracleAS Metadata Repository Infrastructure
Separate OracleAS Metadata Repository for OracleAS Portal with collocated
Oracle Identity Management and OracleAS Metadata Repository Infrastructure
(the Departmental Topology)
Distributed Application OracleAS metadata Repositories with Non collocated
Oracle Identity Management and OracleAS Metadata Repository Infrastructure
Redundant Multiple OracleAS 10.1.3 Home J2EE Topology
Redundant Single OracleAS 10.1.3 Home J2EE Topology Integrated with an
Existing Oracle Identity Management 10.1.2.0.2 Topology
In a symmetric topology, each node in the standby site corresponds to a node in the
production site. This includes the nodes running both OracleAS Infrastructure and
middle tiers. In an asymmetric topology, the number of instances required on the
standby site are fewer than the number on the production site and the number of
instances required on the standby site must be the minimum set of instances required
to run your site in the event of a switchover or failover operation. The last two
supported topologies are particularly important in OracleAS Release 10.1.3.0.0. See the
Oracle Application Server High Availability Guide for a detailed description of these
topologies.
As a small variation to this environment, you can set up the OracleAS Infrastructure
on the production site in an OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster environment. See
Section 6.4.2.4, "If You Want to Use OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster on the Production
Site (OracleAS 10.1.2.n.n only)" for details.
For these supported topologies, OracleAS Guard will be installed in every Oracle
home on every system that is part of your production and standby topology
configured for the OracleAS Disaster Recovery solution.
OracleAS Guard can be installed as a standalone install kit located on OracleAS
Companion CD #2. See Section 6.4.4, "Installing the OracleAS 10g (10.1.3) Standalone
Install of OracleAS Guard into Oracle Homes" for more information about when this
standalone kit should be installed.
Figure 6–28 shows an example symmetric OracleAS Disaster Recovery environment.
Each site has two nodes running middle tiers and a node running OracleAS
Infrastructure.
Data Synchronization
For OracleAS Disaster Recovery to work, data between the production and standby
sites must be synchronized so that failover can happen very quickly. Configuration
changes done at the production site must be synchronized with the standby site.
You need to synchronize two types of data. The synchronization method depends on
the type of data:
■
■
Use Oracle Data Guard to synchronize data in the OracleAS Metadata Repository
databases on the production and standby sites. You can configure Oracle Data
Guard to perform the synchronization.
Use the backup and recovery scripts to synchronize data outside of the database
(such as data stored in configuration files).
6-36 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating an OracleAS Disaster Recovery Configuration
See the Oracle Application Server High Availability Guide for details on how to use Oracle
Data Guard and the backup and recovery scripts.
Figure 6–28 OracleAS Disaster Recovery Environment
Standby Site
Production Site
External hostname: prodmid1
IP: 138.1.2.333
External hostname: standbymid1
IP: 213.2.2.330
Internal hostname: asmid1
Internal hostname: asmid1
External hostname: prodmid2
IP: 138.1.2.444
Middle Tier
Middle Tier
External hostname: standbymid2
IP: 213.2.2.331
Internal hostname: asmid2
Internal hostname: asmid2
Middle Tier
Middle Tier
OracleAS Infrastructure
OracleAS Metadata Repository
OracleAS Infrastructure
Oracle Data
Guard
Hostname: prodinfra
Alias:
asinfra
IP:
138.1.2.111
OracleAS Metadata Repository
Hostname: standbyinfra
Alias:
asinfra
IP:
213.2.2.110
6.4.2 Setting up the OracleAS Disaster Recovery Environment
Before you can install Oracle Application Server in an OracleAS Disaster Recovery
environment, you have to perform these steps:
■
Section 6.4.2.1, "Ensure Nodes Are Identical at the Operating System Level"
■
Section 6.4.2.2, "Set Up staticports.ini File"
■
■
Section 6.4.2.3, "Set Up Identical Hostnames on Both Production and Standby
Sites"
Section 6.4.2.4, "If You Want to Use OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster on the
Production Site (OracleAS 10.1.2.n.n only)"
6.4.2.1 Ensure Nodes Are Identical at the Operating System Level
Ensure that the nodes are identical with respect to the following items:
■
The nodes are running the same version of the operating system.
■
The nodes have the same operating system patches and packages.
■
You can install Oracle Application Server in the same directory path on all nodes.
6.4.2.2 Set Up staticports.ini File
The same component must use the same port number on the production and standby
sites. For example, if Oracle HTTP Server is using port 80 on the production site, it
must also use port 80 on the standby site. To ensure this is the case, create a
staticports.ini file for use during installation. This file enables you to specify
Installing in High Availability Environments 6-37
Creating an OracleAS Disaster Recovery Configuration
port numbers for each component. See Section 2.4.4, "Using Custom Port Numbers
(the "Static Ports" Feature)" for details.
6.4.2.3 Set Up Identical Hostnames on Both Production and Standby Sites
The names of the corresponding nodes on the production and standby sites must be
identical, so that when you synchronize data between the sites, you do not have to edit
the data to fix the hostnames.
For the Infrastructure Nodes
For the node running the infrastructure, set up a virtual name. To do this, specify an
alias for the node in the C:\Windows\system32\drivers\etc\hosts file.
For example, on the infrastructure node on the production site, the following line in
the hosts file sets the alias to asinfra:
138.1.2.111
prodinfra
asinfra
On the standby site, the following line sets the node’s alias to asinfra.
213.2.2.110
standbyinfra
asinfra
When you install OracleAS Infrastructure on the production and standby sites, you
specify this alias (asinfra) in the Specify Virtual Hostname screen. The configuration
data will then contain this alias for the infrastructure nodes.
For the Middle-Tier Nodes
For the nodes running the middle tiers, you cannot set up aliases like you did for the
infrastructure nodes because the installer does not display the Specify Virtual
Hostname screen for middle-tier installations. When installing middle tiers, the
installer determines the hostname automatically by calling the gethostname() function.
You want to be sure that for each middle-tier node on the production site, the
corresponding node on the standby site returns the same hostname.
To do this, set up a local, or internal, hostname, which could be different from the
public, or external, hostname. You can change the names of the nodes on the standby
site to match the names of the corresponding nodes on the production site, or you can
change the names of the nodes on both production and standby sites to be the same.
This depends on other applications that you might be running on the nodes, and
whether changing the node name will affect those applications.
1.
On the nodes whose local names you want to change, set the _CLUSTER_
NETWORK_NAME_ environment variable to specify the new local fully qualified
name (for example, asmid1.oracle.com).
Note: You must set the _CLUSTER_NETWORK_NAME_ environment
variable as a "user" environment variable, not as a "system"
environment variable.
2.
Enable the other nodes in the OracleAS Disaster Recovery environment to be able
to resolve the node using the new local hostname. You can do this in one of two
ways:
Method 1: Set up separate internal DNS servers for the production and standby
sites. This configuration allows nodes on each site (production or standby) to
resolve hostnames within the site. Above the internal DNS servers are the
corporate, or external, DNS servers. The internal DNS servers forward
6-38 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating an OracleAS Disaster Recovery Configuration
non-authoritative requests to the external DNS servers. The external DNS servers
do not know about the existence of the internal DNS servers. See Figure 6–29.
Figure 6–29 Method 1: Using DNS Servers
External DNS Server
External DNS Server
Internal DNS Server
for the Standby Site
Internal DNS Server
for the Production Site
asinfra
asmid1
External DNS Server
asinfra
asmid2
Production Site
asmid1
asmid2
Standby Site
Method 1 Details
a.
Make sure the external DNS names are defined in the external DNS zone.
Example:
prodmid1.us.oracle.com
prodmid2.us.oracle.com
prodinf.us.oracle.com
standbymid1.us.oracle.com
standbymid2.us.oracle.com
standbyinf.us.oracle.com
b.
IN
IN
IN
IN
IN
IN
A
A
A
A
A
A
138.1.2.333
138.1.2.444
138.1.2.111
213.2.2.330
213.2.2.331
213.2.2.110
At the production site, create a new zone at the production site using a
domain name different from your external domain name. To do this, populate
the zone data files with entries for each node in the OracleAS Disaster
Recovery environment.
For the infrastructure node, use the virtual name or alias.
For the middle-tier nodes, use the node name (the value in the _CLUSTER_
NETWORK_NAME_ environment variable).
The following example uses "asha" as the domain name for the new zone.
asmid1.asha
asmid2.asha
asinfra.asha
IN
IN
IN
A
A
A
138.1.2.333
138.1.2.444
138.1.2.111
Do the same for the standby site. Use the same domain name that you used for
the production site.
asmid1.asha
asmid1.asha
asinfra.asha
c.
IN
IN
IN
A
A
A
213.2.2.330
213.2.2.331
213.2.2.110
For each node on the production site, configure the DNS resolver to point to
the internal DNS servers instead of the external DNS server.
Installing in High Availability Environments 6-39
Creating an OracleAS Disaster Recovery Configuration
Table 6–7
Configure the DNS Resolver to Point to Internal DNS Servers
Microsoft Windows 2003
1.
Display the Local Area Connection Status dialog.
In Windows 2003, select Start > Control Panel > Network Connections > Local Area
Connection.
2.
Click Properties to display the Local Area Connection Properties dialog.
3.
With the General tab selected, select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) from the list box and click
Properties. This displays the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties dialog.
4.
Replace the existing name server IP address with the IP address of the internal DNS server
for the production site.
5.
Click Advanced. This displays the Advanced TCP/IP Settings dialog.
6.
Select the DNS tab, and update the DNS server addresses.
Do the same for the nodes on the standby site, but use the IP address of the
internal DNS server for the standby site.
d.
Create a separate entry for Oracle Data Guard in the internal DNS servers.
This entry is used by Oracle Data Guard to ship redo data to the database on
the standby site.
In the next example, the "remote_infra" entry points to the infrastructure node
on the standby site. This name is used by the TNS entries on both the
production and standby sites so that if a switchover occurs, the entry does not
have to be changed.
Figure 6–30 Entry for Oracle Data Guard in the Internal DNS Servers
Production Site
Standby Site
asinfra = 138.1.2.111
asinfra = 213.2.2.110
remote_infra = 213.2.2.110
remote_infra = 138.1.2.111
On the production site, the DNS entries look like this:
asmid1.asha
asmid2.asha
asinfra.asha
remote_infra.asha
IN
IN
IN
IN
A
A
A
A
138.1.2.333
138.1.2.444
138.1.2.111
213.2.2.110
On the standby site, the DNS entries look like this:
asmid1.asha
asmid2.asha
asinfra.asha
remote_infra.asha
IN
IN
IN
IN
A
A
A
A
213.2.2.330
213.2.2.331
213.2.2.110
138.1.2.111
Method 2: Edit the C:\Windows\system32\drivers\etc\hosts file on each
node on both sites. This method does not involve configuring DNS servers, but
you have to maintain the hosts file on each node in the OracleAS Disaster
Recovery environment. For example, if an IP address changes, you have to update
the files on all the nodes, and restart the nodes.
Method 2 Details
6-40 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating an OracleAS Disaster Recovery Configuration
On each node on the production site, include these lines in the
C:\Windows\system32\drivers\etc\hosts file. The IP addresses resolve to
nodes on the production site.
Note: In the hosts file, be sure that the line that identifies the
current node comes immediately after the localhost definition (the
line with the 127.0.0.1 address).
127.0.0.1
138.1.2.333
138.1.2.444
138.1.2.111
a.
localhost
asmid1.oracle.com
asmid2.oracle.com
asinfra.oracle.com
asmid1
asmid2
asinfra
On each node on the standby site, include these lines in the hosts file. The IP
addresses resolve to nodes on the standby site.
Note: In the hosts file, be sure that the line that identifies the
current node comes immediately after the localhost definition (the
line with the 127.0.0.1 address).
127.0.0.1
213.2.2.330
213.2.2.331
213.2.2.110
b.
localhost
asmid1.oracle.com
asmid2.oracle.com
asinfra.oracle.com
asmid1
asmid2
asinfra
Set the order of hostname resolution so that the node resolves hostnames by
reading the hosts file first. If the hosts file does not contain an entry for the
desired hostname, then the node will resolve the hostname through DNS.
You can do this by adding the entries to the hosts file, then running the
"nbtstat -R" command to purge cached information and reload the name
table. See your system administrator for details.
Verifying that the Nodes Resolve the Hostnames Correctly
After making the changes and restarting the nodes, check that the nodes resolve the
hostnames properly by running the following commands:
■
On the middle-tier nodes on both sites, run the hostname command. This should
return the internal hostname. For example, the command should return "asmid1"
if you run it on prodmid1 and standbymid1.
C:\> hostname
asmid1
■
On each node, ping the other nodes in the environment using the internal
hostname as well as the external hostname. The command should be successful.
For example, from the first midtier node, prodmid1, run the following commands:
C:> ping prodinfra
ping the production infrastructure node
Pinging prodinfra [138.1.2.111] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 138.1.2.111: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
C:> ping asinfra
ping the production infrastructure node
Pinging prodinfra [138.1.2.111] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 138.1.2.111: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Installing in High Availability Environments 6-41
Creating an OracleAS Disaster Recovery Configuration
C:> ping asmid2
ping the second production midtier node
Pinging asmid2 [138.1.2.444] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 138.1.2.444: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
C:> ping prodmid2
ping the second production midtier node
Pinging asmid2 [138.1.2.444] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 138.1.2.444: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
C:> ping standbymid1
ping the first standby midtier node
Pinging asmid2 [213.2.2.330] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 213.2.2.330: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
6.4.2.4 If You Want to Use OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster on the Production Site
(OracleAS 10.1.2.n.n only)
Note: You must perform this installation in an OracleAS Release
10.1.2.n.n environment, where n.n represents 0.0 or higher. This
information is presented here for informative purposes only.
On the production site of a OracleAS Disaster Recovery system, you can set up the
OracleAS Infrastructure to run in a OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster configuration. In
this case, you have two nodes in a hardware cluster, and you install the OracleAS
Infrastructure on a shared disk. See Chapter 11, "Installing in High Availability
Environments: OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster" in the Oracle Application Server
Installation Guide 10g Release 2 (10.1.2) Documentation set for details.
Figure 6–31 Infrastructure in an OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster Configuration
Production Site
Standby Site
OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster
(unchanged)
prodinfra = 138.1.2.111
prodinfra2 = 138.1.2.112
Virtual hostname: asinfra
Virtual IP address: 138.1.2.120
Nodes running middle tiers (unchanged)
To set up OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster in this environment, use the virtual IP
address (instead of the physical IP address) for asinfra.asha on the production site. The
following example assumes 138.1.2.120 is the virtual IP address.
asmid1.asha
asmid2.asha
asinfra.asha
IN
IN
IN
A
A
A
6-42 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
138.1.2.333
138.1.2.444
138.1.2.120
this is a virtual IP address
Creating an OracleAS Disaster Recovery Configuration
remote_infra.asha
IN
A
213.2.2.110
On the standby site, you still use the physical IP address for asinfra.asha, but the
remote_infra.asha uses the virtual IP address.
asmid1.asha
asmid2.asha
asinfra.asha
remote_infra.asha
IN
IN
IN
IN
A
A
A
A
213.2.2.330
213.2.2.331
213.2.2.110
138.1.2.120
physical IP address
virtual IP address
Need to Create the Password File in Oracle Fail Safe
When you are setting up OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster in an OracleAS Disaster
Recovery environment, you need to create the password file when you are adding the
OracleAS Metadata Repository to the Oracle Fail Safe group; that is, add a Resource
Type of Oracle Database.
See Section 11.12.2, "Make OracleAS Metadata Repository Highly Available" in the
Oracle Application Server Installation Guide 10g Release 2 (10.1.2) Documentation set.
In step 3c, select Yes, create the password file.
In User Name, enter SYS.
In Password and Confirm Password, enter and confirm the password that you want
to set for the SYS user.
6.4.3 Installing Oracle Application Server in an OracleAS Disaster Recovery
Environment
For OracleAS Release 10.1.3.0.0, you can only install middle tiers on the production
and standby sites.
Install Oracle Application Server as follows:
Note: For all of the installations, be sure to use staticports.ini to
specify port numbers for the components. See Section 6.4.2.2, "Set
Up staticports.ini File".
Install Middle Tiers (OracleAS Release 10.1.3 only)
1. Install middle tiers on the production site.
2.
Install middle tiers on the standby site.
Install OracleAS Infrastructure and Middle Tiers (Release 10.1.2.n.n only)
Note: You must perform this installation in an OracleAS Release
10.1.2.n.n environment, where n.n represents 0.0 or higher. This
information is presented here for informative purposes only.
1.
Install OracleAS Infrastructure on the production site.
2.
Install OracleAS Infrastructure on the standby site.
3.
Start the OracleAS Infrastructure in each site before installing the middle tiers for
that site.
Installing in High Availability Environments 6-43
Creating an OracleAS Disaster Recovery Configuration
4.
Install middle tiers on the production site.
5.
Install middle tiers on the standby site.
6.4.3.1 Installing the OracleAS Infrastructure (OracleAS Release 10.1.2.n.n Only)
Note: You must perform this installation in an OracleAS Release
10.1.2.n.n environment, where n.n represents 0.0 or higher. This
information is presented here for informative purposes only.
In an OracleAS Release 10.1.2.0.0 environment, you must install the Oracle Identity
Management and the OracleAS Metadata Repository components of OracleAS
Infrastructure on the same node. You cannot distribute the components over multiple
nodes. In an OracleAS Release 10.1.2.0.2 environment, you can distribute the
components over multiple nodes.
The installation steps are similar to that for OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster. See
Section 11.3, "Installing an OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster (Infrastructure)
Configuration" in the Oracle Application Server Installation Guide 10g Release 2 (10.1.2)
Documentation set for the screen sequence.
Note the following points:
■
■
Select Configuration Options screen: be sure you select High Availability and
Replication. See Table 11–7, step 2.
In the Specify Virtual Hostname screen, enter the fully qualified local hostname
as the virtual address (for example, asinfra.oracle.com). See Table 11–7, step 6.
6.4.3.2 Installing Middle Tiers (OracleAS Release 10.1.3 and 10.1.2.n.n)
Depending on your configuration, you can install OracleAS 10.1.3 middle tiers or
OracleAS 10.1.2.n.n middle tiers, where n.n represents 0.0 or higher.
OracleAS Release 10.1.3
On OracleAS release 10.1.3, you can install any type of middle tier that you like:
For installing J2EE Server and Process Management, see Section 5.2.2, "Installing J2EE
Server and Process Management".
For installing Web Server and Process Management, see Section 5.2.3, "Installing Web
Server and Process Management".
For installing Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server, and Process Management, see
Section 5.2.4, "Installing Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process Management".
OracleAS Release 10.1.2.n.n
Note: You must perform this installation in an OracleAS Release
10.1.2.n.n environment, where n.n represents 0.0 or higher. This
information is presented here for informative purposes only.
On OracleAS Release 10.1.2.n.n, you can install any type of middle tier that you like:
For installing J2EE and Web Cache, see Section 7.9 "Installing J2EE and Web Cache in a
Database-Based Farm Repository and with Oracle Identity Management Access" in the
Oracle Application Server Installation Guide for 10g Release 2 (10.1.2).
6-44 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Creating an OracleAS Disaster Recovery Configuration
For installing Portal and Wireless or Business Intelligence and Forms, see Section 7.13,
"Installing Portal and Wireless or Business Intelligence and Forms".
Note the following points on OracleAS 10.1.2.n.n:
■
When the installer prompts you to register with Oracle Internet Directory, and
asks you for the Oracle Internet Directory hostname, enter the alias of the node
running OracleAS Infrastructure (for example, asinfra.oracle.com).
6.4.4 Installing the OracleAS 10g (10.1.3) Standalone Install of OracleAS Guard into
Oracle Homes
OracleAS 10g (10.1.3) standalone install of OracleAS Guard is located on Companion
CD Disk 2. This standalone install of OracleAS Guard can be installed in the following
environments:
■
■
■
■
In its own home in the case when you are cloning an instance or topology to a new
standby system (see the section on standby site cloning in Oracle Application Server
High Availability Guide for more information).
Oracle database server home for an OracleAS Metadata Repository configuration
created using OracleAS Metadata Repository Creation Assistant.
OracleAS Disaster Recovery full site upgrade from OracleAS 10g (9.0.4) to
OracleAS 10g (10.1.3) (see the chapter on OracleAS Disaster Recovery site upgrade
procedure in Oracle Application Server High Availability Guide for more information).
OracleAS Guard patch upgrade from OracleAS 10g (10.1.2.0.0) to OracleAS 10g
(10.1.2.0.2) (see Section 6.4.5, "Patching OracleAS Guard Release 10.1.2.n.n with
Release 10.1.3.0.0" for more information).
If this is an upgrade installation of OracleAS Guard, make a copy of your dsa.conf
configuration file to save your current settings for your OracleAS Guard environment.
After running the OracleAS 10g (10.1.3) standalone install kit of OracleAS Guard, you
can restore your saved dsa.conf configuration file with your settings to continue
using the same settings for the upgraded OracleAS Guard environment.
To run the OracleAS 10g (10.1.3) standalone install kit of OracleAS Guard, run the kit
in the following directory path:
On Windows systems:
\Disk2\asg\install\setup.exe
Choose the type of install that you want. Choose Typical for most installations. Choose
Custom or Reinstall for upgrading from an older release of OracleAS Guard to the
current release.
Enter the oc4jadmin account password to continue the installation.
6.4.5 Patching OracleAS Guard Release 10.1.2.n.n with Release 10.1.3.0.0
If you already have an OracleAS Disaster Recovery environment set up using
OracleAS Guard Release 10.1.2.n.n (where n.n represents 0.0 or higher, you can patch
OracleAS Guard in your environment to take advantage of new features and support
for the topologies described in Section 6.4.1, "OracleAS Disaster Recovery:
Introduction". To patch your OracleAS Disaster Recovery environment, follow these
basic steps:
1.
Stop the OracleAS Guard server in all OracleAS 10.1.2.n.n Oracle homes on both
production and standby sites using the following opmnctl command:
Installing in High Availability Environments 6-45
Creating an OracleAS Disaster Recovery Configuration
On Windows systems:
<ORACLE_HOME>\opmn\bin\opmnctl stopall
2.
Install the OracleAS 10g (10.1.3.0.0) standalone install of OracleAS Guard into each
Oracle home on the production and standby sites.
If multiple Oracle homes exist on the same system, ensure that different ports are
configured for each of the OracleAS Guard servers in this configuration file.
Because this is an upgrade installation of OracleAS Guard, make a copy of your
dsa.conf configuration file to save your current settings for your OracleAS
Guard environment. After running the OracleAS 10g (10.1.3.0.0) standalone install
kit of OracleAS Guard, you can restore your saved dsa.conf configuration file
with your settings to continue using the same settings for the upgraded OracleAS
Guard environment.
On Windows systems:
<ORACLE_HOME>\dsa\dsa.conf
3.
Start the OracleAS Guard server in all OracleAS 10.1.3.0.0 Oracle homes on both
production and standby sites using the following opmnctl command:
On Windows systems:
<ORACLE_HOME>\opmn\bin\opmnctl startall
<ORACLE_HOME>\opmn\bin\opmnctl startproc ias-component=DSA
6.4.6 What to Read Next?
For information on how to manage your OracleAS Disaster Recovery environment,
such as setting up Oracle Data Guard and configuring the OracleAS Metadata
Repository database, see the Oracle Application Server High Availability Guide.
6-46 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
7
Postinstallation Tasks
Contents:
■
Section 7.1, "Deploying Oracle Business Rules Rule Author"
■
Section 7.2, "State of Oracle Application Server Instances After Installation"
■
Section 7.3, "Passwords for Oracle Application Server Components"
■
Section 7.4, "Configuring OracleAS Clusters"
■
Section 7.5, "Backup and Recovery"
■
Section 7.6, "SSL"
■
■
Section 7.7, "Regional and Language Option Settings and the NLS_LANG
Parameter"
Section 7.8, "What to Do Next"
7.1 Deploying Oracle Business Rules Rule Author
After installing Oracle Application Server, you need to perform some additional steps
to use Oracle Business Rules Rule Author and its associated online help.
The steps are as follows:
1.
Access the Oracle Enterprise Manager 10g Application Server Control Console
using the following URL:
http://hostname:http_port_number/em
In the Groups section of the page, click home in the Name column.
2.
Select the Applications tab.
3.
To deploy Oracle Business Rules Rule Author, perform the following steps:
a.
Click Deploy. This opens the Deploy: Select Archive page.
b.
Select one of the following options:
–
Archive already present on server where Application Server Control is
running.
If you select this option, fill in the Location on Server field with ORACLE_
HOME\rules\webapps\ruleauthor.ear, replacing ORACLE_HOME
with the directory containing the Oracle Application Server installation.
–
Archive is present on local host. Upload archive to the server where
Application Server Control is running.
Postinstallation Tasks
7-1
State of Oracle Application Server Instances After Installation
If you select this option, click Browse to locate the ruleauthor.ear file
on your machine. The file is located at ORACLE_
HOME\rules\webapps\ruleauthor.ear, where ORACLE_HOME is the
directory containing the Oracle Application Server installation.
4.
c.
Click Next. This opens the Deploy: Application Attributes page.
d.
Enter the name of the application as ruleauthor.
e.
Click Next. This opens the Deploy: Deployment Settings page.
f.
Click Deploy. This will display server messages during deployment.
g.
Click Return.
To deploy the online help for Oracle Business Rules Rule Author, perform the
following steps:
a.
Click Deploy. This opens the Deploy: Select Archive page.
b.
Select one of the following options:
–
Archive already present on server where Application Server Control is
running.
If you select this option, fill in the Location on Server field with ORACLE_
HOME\rules\webapps\rulehelp.ear, replacing ORACLE_HOME with
the directory containing the Oracle Application Server installation.
–
Archive is present on local host. Upload archive to the server where
Application Server Control is running.
If you select this option, click Browse to locate the rulehelp.ear file on
your machine. The file is located at ORACLE_
HOME\rules\webapps\rulehelp.ear, where ORACLE_HOME is the
directory containing the Oracle Application Server installation.
c.
Click Next. This opens the Deploy: Application Attributes page.
d.
Enter the name of the application as rulehelp.
e.
Click Next. This opens the Deploy: Deployment Settings page.
f.
Click Deploy. This will display server messages during deployment.
7.2 State of Oracle Application Server Instances After Installation
After installation, the components that you have configured are started up.
You can view the Welcome page and the Application Server Control page in a browser.
The URLs for these pages are shown in the last screen of the installer. You can view the
contents of the last screen in the file ORACLE_HOME\install\readme.txt.
Some of the Oracle Application Server components run as Windows services. You can
see them in the Services dialog. To display the Services dialog:
Windows 2003: Select Start > Administrative Tools > Services.
You can use scripts or you can use the Oracle Enterprise Manager 10g Application
Server Control to start and stop Oracle Application Server instances. See the Oracle
Application Server Administrator’s Guide for details.
7-2 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
What to Do Next
7.3 Passwords for Oracle Application Server Components
By default, all passwords for Oracle Application Server components are set to be the
same as the Oracle Application Server instance password. For security reasons, you
should change the passwords of the various components to have different values.
See the Oracle Application Server Administrator’s Guide and the component guides in the
Oracle Application Server Documentation Library for details on how to alter the
passwords for the components you have installed.
7.4 Configuring OracleAS Clusters
If you did not configure OracleAS Clusters during installation, you can use Oracle
Process Manager and Notification Server (OPMN) commands to do so following
installation. See "Configuring Cluster Topologies" in the Oracle Application Server
Administrator’s Guide for details.
7.5 Backup and Recovery
After installation would be a good time to start backing up the files, and to set up your
backup and recovery strategy. See the Oracle Application Server Administrator’s Guide for
details.
7.6 SSL
By default, most components are not configured for SSL. To enable SSL, see the SSL
section in the Oracle Application Server Administrator’s Guide.
7.7 Regional and Language Option Settings and the NLS_LANG
Parameter
Make sure the language setting of your account is consistent with the system default
language. Based on the language setting, the NLS_LANG parameter is automatically
defined in the Windows registry.
After installation, do not change the system default language. Otherwise, the NLS_
LANG parameter and the language setting will be inconsistent.
7.8 What to Do Next
After installing Oracle Application Server, you should read the Oracle Application
Server Administrator’s Guide. Specifically, you should read the "Getting Started After
Installing Oracle Application Server" chapter.
You should also perform a complete Oracle Application Server environment backup
after installing Oracle Application Server. This enables you to restore a working
environment in case something goes wrong. For details on how to perform a complete
Oracle Application Server environment backup, see the Oracle Application Server
Administrator’s Guide.
You should also perform a complete Oracle Application Server environment backup
after each successful patchset upgrade and after each successful configuration change.
Postinstallation Tasks
7-3
What to Do Next
7-4 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
A
Silent and Non-Interactive Installation
This appendix describes how to install Oracle Application Server in silent mode. This
appendix contains the following topics:
■
Section A.1, "Silent Installation"
■
Section A.2, "Non-Interactive Installation"
■
Section A.3, "Preinstallation"
■
Section A.4, "Create the Response File"
■
Section A.5, "Start the Installation"
■
Section A.6, "Postinstallation"
■
Section A.7, "Security Tips for Silent and Non-Interactive Installations"
■
Section A.8, "Deinstallation"
A.1 Silent Installation
Silent installation eliminates the need to monitor the Oracle Application Server
installation because there is no graphical output and no input by the user.
Silent installation of Oracle Application Server is accomplished by supplying the
Oracle Universal Installer with a response file and specifying the -silent flag on the
command line. The response file is a text file containing variables and parameter
values which provide answers to the installer prompts.
If this is a first time installation of Oracle Application Server, you must create the
registry keys before starting. Registry key creation is described in Section A.3,
"Preinstallation".
Use silent installation of Oracle Application Server when there are similar installations
on more than one computer. Additionally, use silent install when performing the
Oracle Application Server installation from a remote location using the command line.
A.2 Non-Interactive Installation
Non-interactive installations also use a response file to automate the Oracle
Application Server installation. In non-interactive installations, there is graphical
output and users may enter input.
Non-interactive installation of Oracle Application Server is also accomplished by
supplying the Oracle Universal Installer with a response file but without specifying
the -silent flag on the command line. The response file is a text file containing
variables and parameter values which provide answers to the installer prompts. If you
Silent and Non-Interactive Installation
A-1
Preinstallation
have not provided responses to all of the installer prompts, you need to enter
information during the installation.
If this is a first time installation of Oracle Application Server, you must create the
registry keys before starting. Registry key creation is described in Section A.3,
"Preinstallation".
Use non-interactive installation of Oracle Application Server when there are specific
screens you want to observe during installation.
A.3 Preinstallation
If you have not installed Oracle Application Server on your computer, then you need
to create the following Registry key and value:
■
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Oracle\inst_loc = Inventory_
Directory
The Inventory_Directory is the full path to your installer files. For example:
C:\Program Files\Oracle\Inventory
A.4 Create the Response File
Before doing a silent or non-interactive installation, you must provide information
specific to your installation in a response file. The installer will fail if you attempt an
installation using a response file that is not configured correctly. Response files are text
files that you can create or edit in a text editor.
A.4.1 Creating Response Files from Templates
Templates for response files are available in the stage\Response directory on Disk 1
of the Oracle Application Server CD-ROM. Response file templates are available for
the following installation types:
Table A–1
Response File Templates in the stage/Response Directory
Installation Type
Filename
Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process
Management
oracle.as.j2ee.top.allProducts.rsp
J2EE Server and Process Management
oracle.as.j2ee.top.core.rsp
Web Server and Process Management
oracle.as.j2ee.top.httpServer.rsp
Oracle TopLink
oracle.as.j2ee.top.toplink.rsp
See the template files for descriptions of the parameters in the file.
Note: For Boolean parameters, specify either "true" or "false".
A.4.2 Creating Response Files by Using the Record Mode in the Installer
You can run the installer in record mode to save your inputs to a file that you can use
later as a response file. This feature is useful if you need to perform the same
installation on different computers.
To run the installer in record mode:
A-2 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Create the Response File
1.
Start up the installer with the -record and -destinationFile parameters.
E:\> setup.exe -record -destinationFile newResponseFile
Replace newResponseFile with the full path to the response file that you want the
installer to create. Example: C:\myJ2EEResponse.rsp.
2.
Enter your values in the installer screens. The installer will write these values to
the file specified in the -destinationFile parameter.
When you click the Install button, the installer automatically writes all your
values to the specified file. At this point, you can complete the installation on this
computer, or you can exit without performing the installation.
Secure information, such as passwords, is not written to the file, so you must modify
the response file before you can use it. To set the password, modify the sl_
adminDialogReturn parameter. See the generated response file for a description of
the parameter.
A.4.3 Variables to Modify in the Response Files
For all installation types, modify the following variables:
FROM_LOCATION
ORACLE_HOME
For the J2EE Server and Process Management install type, modify the following
variables:
szl_PortListSelect
sl_DlgClusterInfoReturn
sl_AdminInstanceSettingsSelections
b_autoPortDetect
sl_adminDialogReturn
For the Web Server and Process Management install type, modify the following
variables:
szl_PortListSelect
szl_InstanceInformation
sl_DlgClusterInfoWebReturn
b_autoPortDetect
For the Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process Management install type,
modify the following variables:
szl_PortListSelect
sl_DlgClusterInfoWebReturn
sl_AdminInstanceSettingsSelections
b_autoPortDetect
sl_adminDialogReturn
A.4.4 Example Response Files
The following sections shows example response files for the following Oracle
Application Server installation types:
■
■
Section A.4.4.1, "Example Response File for Standalone J2EE Server and Process
Management"
Section A.4.4.2, "Example Response File for Web Server and Process Management"
Silent and Non-Interactive Installation
A-3
Create the Response File
■
■
Section A.4.4.3, "Example Response File for Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server
and Process Management"
Section A.4.4.4, "Example Response File for Oracle TopLink"
Note: Be sure that you read the description of each parameter=value in
the provided sample files, and edit value accordingly for your
environment.
A.4.4.1 Example Response File for Standalone J2EE Server and Process
Management
The following shows an example of a response file for a silent installation of
standalone instance of J2EE Server and Process Management as described in
Section 5.2.2, "Installing J2EE Server and Process Management".
RESPONSEFILE_VERSION=2.2.1.0.0
FROM_LOCATION=""E:\Disk1\stage\products.xml
FROM_LOCATION_CD_LABEL="LABEL1"
NEXT_SESSION_RESPONSE=<Value Unspecified>
ORACLE_HOME=""C:\oracle\oracle_home
ORACLE_HOME_NAME="OHOME1"
TOPLEVEL_COMPONENT={"oracle.as.j2ee.top","10.1.3.0.0"}
DEINSTALL_LIST={"oracle.as.j2ee.top","10.1.3.0.0"}
SHOW_SPLASH_SCREEN=true
SHOW_WELCOME_PAGE=false
SHOW_COMPONENT_LOCATIONS_PAGE=false
SHOW_CUSTOM_TREE_PAGE=false
SHOW_SUMMARY_PAGE=true
SHOW_INSTALL_PROGRESS_PAGE=true
SHOW_REQUIRED_CONFIG_TOOL_PAGE=true
SHOW_CONFIG_TOOL_PAGE=true
SHOW_XML_PREREQ_PAGE=true
SHOW_RELEASE_NOTES=true
SHOW_END_OF_INSTALL_MSGS=true
SHOW_ROOTSH_CONFIRMATION=true
SHOW_END_SESSION_PAGE=true
SHOW_EXIT_CONFIRMATION=true
NEXT_SESSION=true
NEXT_SESSION_ON_FAIL=true
SHOW_DEINSTALL_CONFIRMATION=true
SHOW_DEINSTALL_PROGRESS=true
ACCEPT_LICENSE_AGREEMENT=true
RESTART_SYSTEM=<Value Unspecified>
CLUSTER_NODES=<Value Unspecified>
OUI_HOSTNAME=<Value Unspecified>
REMOVE_HOMES=<Value Unspecified>
COMPONENT_LANGUAGES={"en"}
INSTALL_TYPE="core"
szl_PortListSelect={"YES",""C:\oracle\mystaticports.ini}
szl_InstanceInformation=<Value Unspecified>
sl_DlgClusterInfoWebReturn=<Value Unspecified>
sl_DlgClusterInfoReturn={"YES","NO","225.0.0.20","8001"}
sl_AdminInstanceSettingsSelections={"true"}
s_asInstanceName=<Value Unspecified>
s_adminPassword=<Value Unspecified>
b_useLocalInstance=<Value Unspecified>
b_autoPortDetect=false
sl_adminDialogReturn={"appserver","oc4jadmin","welcome1","welcome1","OHOME1",""}
A-4 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Create the Response File
nValidationInstanceInfo=<Value Unspecified>
n_DlgClusterInfoWebValidate=<Value Unspecified>
nValidationPortListSelect=<Value Unspecified>
n_DlgClusterInfoValidate=<Value Unspecified>
n_validateAdminDialogInfo=<Value Unspecified>
A.4.4.2 Example Response File for Web Server and Process Management
The following shows an example of a response file for a silent installation of Web
Server and Process Management as described in Section 5.2.3, "Installing Web Server
and Process Management".
RESPONSEFILE_VERSION=2.2.1.0.0
FROM_LOCATION="E:\Disk1\stage\products.xml"
FROM_LOCATION_CD_LABEL="LABEL1"
NEXT_SESSION_RESPONSE=<Value Unspecified>
ORACLE_HOME="C:\oracle\oracle_home"
ORACLE_HOME_NAME="OHOME1"
TOPLEVEL_COMPONENT={"oracle.as.j2ee.top","10.1.3.0.0"}
DEINSTALL_LIST={"oracle.as.j2ee.top","10.1.3.0.0"}
SHOW_SPLASH_SCREEN=true
SHOW_WELCOME_PAGE=false
SHOW_COMPONENT_LOCATIONS_PAGE=false
SHOW_CUSTOM_TREE_PAGE=false
SHOW_SUMMARY_PAGE=true
SHOW_INSTALL_PROGRESS_PAGE=true
SHOW_REQUIRED_CONFIG_TOOL_PAGE=true
SHOW_CONFIG_TOOL_PAGE=true
SHOW_XML_PREREQ_PAGE=true
SHOW_RELEASE_NOTES=true
SHOW_END_OF_INSTALL_MSGS=true
SHOW_ROOTSH_CONFIRMATION=true
SHOW_END_SESSION_PAGE=true
SHOW_EXIT_CONFIRMATION=true
NEXT_SESSION=true
NEXT_SESSION_ON_FAIL=true
SHOW_DEINSTALL_CONFIRMATION=true
SHOW_DEINSTALL_PROGRESS=true
ACCEPT_LICENSE_AGREEMENT=true
RESTART_SYSTEM=<Value Unspecified>
CLUSTER_NODES=<Value Unspecified>
OUI_HOSTNAME=<Value Unspecified>
REMOVE_HOMES=<Value Unspecified>
COMPONENT_LANGUAGES={"en"}
INSTALL_TYPE="httpServer"
szl_PortListSelect={"YES","C:\oracle\mystaticports.ini"}
szl_InstanceInformation={"appserver"}
sl_DlgClusterInfoWebReturn={"NO","",""}
sl_DlgClusterInfoReturn=<Value Unspecified>
sl_AdminInstanceSettingsSelections=<Value Unspecified>
s_asInstanceName=<Value Unspecified>
s_adminPassword=<Value Unspecified>
b_useLocalInstance=<Value Unspecified>
b_autoPortDetect=false
sl_adminDialogReturn=<Value Unspecified>
nValidationInstanceInfo=<Value Unspecified>
n_DlgClusterInfoWebValidate=<Value Unspecified>
nValidationPortListSelect=<Value Unspecified>
n_DlgClusterInfoValidate=<Value Unspecified>
n_validateAdminDialogInfo=<Value Unspecified>
Silent and Non-Interactive Installation
A-5
Create the Response File
s_group=<Value Unspecified>
OPTIONAL_CONFIG_TOOLS=<Value Unspecified>
A.4.4.3 Example Response File for Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process
Management
The following shows an example of a response file for a silent installation of
Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process Management as described in
Section 5.2.4, "Installing Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process Management".
RESPONSEFILE_VERSION=2.2.1.0.0
UNIX_GROUP_NAME=<Value Unspecified>
FROM_LOCATION="E:\Disk1\stage\products.xml"
FROM_LOCATION_CD_LABEL="LABEL1"
NEXT_SESSION_RESPONSE=<Value Unspecified>
ORACLE_HOME="C:\oracle\oracle_home"
ORACLE_HOME_NAME="OHOME1"
TOPLEVEL_COMPONENT={"oracle.as.j2ee.top","10.1.3.0.0"}
DEINSTALL_LIST={"oracle.as.j2ee.top","10.1.3.0.0"}
SHOW_SPLASH_SCREEN=true
SHOW_WELCOME_PAGE=false
SHOW_COMPONENT_LOCATIONS_PAGE=false
SHOW_CUSTOM_TREE_PAGE=false
SHOW_SUMMARY_PAGE=true
SHOW_INSTALL_PROGRESS_PAGE=true
SHOW_REQUIRED_CONFIG_TOOL_PAGE=true
SHOW_CONFIG_TOOL_PAGE=true
SHOW_XML_PREREQ_PAGE=true
SHOW_RELEASE_NOTES=true
SHOW_END_OF_INSTALL_MSGS=true
SHOW_ROOTSH_CONFIRMATION=true
SHOW_END_SESSION_PAGE=true
SHOW_EXIT_CONFIRMATION=true
NEXT_SESSION=true
NEXT_SESSION_ON_FAIL=true
SHOW_DEINSTALL_CONFIRMATION=true
SHOW_DEINSTALL_PROGRESS=true
ACCEPT_LICENSE_AGREEMENT=true
RESTART_SYSTEM=<Value Unspecified>
CLUSTER_NODES=<Value Unspecified>
OUI_HOSTNAME=<Value Unspecified>
REMOVE_HOMES=<Value Unspecified>
COMPONENT_LANGUAGES={"en"}
INSTALL_TYPE="allProducts"
szl_PortListSelect={"YES","C:\oracle\mystaticports.ini"}
szl_InstanceInformation=<Value Unspecified>
sl_DlgClusterInfoWebReturn={"YES","225.0.0.20","8001"}
sl_DlgClusterInfoReturn=<Value Unspecified>
sl_AdminInstanceSettingsSelections={"false"}
s_asInstanceName=<Value Unspecified>
s_adminPassword=<Value Unspecified>
b_useLocalInstance=<Value Unspecified>
b_autoPortDetect=false
sl_adminDialogReturn={"appserver","oc4jadmin","welcome1","welcome1","OHOME1",""}
nValidationInstanceInfo=<Value Unspecified>
n_DlgClusterInfoWebValidate=<Value Unspecified>
nValidationPortListSelect=<Value Unspecified>
n_DlgClusterInfoValidate=<Value Unspecified>
n_validateAdminDialogInfo=<Value Unspecified>
A-6 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Create the Response File
s_group=<Value Unspecified>
OPTIONAL_CONFIG_TOOLS=<Value Unspecified>
A.4.4.4 Example Response File for Oracle TopLink
The following shows an example of a response file for a silent installation of Oracle
TopLink as described in Section 5.2.5, "Installing Oracle TopLink".
RESPONSEFILE_VERSION=2.2.1.0.0
UNIX_GROUP_NAME=<Value Unspecified>
FROM_LOCATION="E:\Disk1\stage\products.xml"
FROM_LOCATION_CD_LABEL="LABEL1"
NEXT_SESSION_RESPONSE=<Value Unspecified>
ORACLE_HOME="C:\oracle\oracle_home"
ORACLE_HOME_NAME="OHOME1"
TOPLEVEL_COMPONENT={"oracle.as.j2ee.top","10.1.3.0.0"}
DEINSTALL_LIST={"oracle.as.j2ee.top","10.1.3.0.0"}
SHOW_SPLASH_SCREEN=true
SHOW_WELCOME_PAGE=false
SHOW_COMPONENT_LOCATIONS_PAGE=false
SHOW_CUSTOM_TREE_PAGE=false
SHOW_SUMMARY_PAGE=true
SHOW_INSTALL_PROGRESS_PAGE=true
SHOW_REQUIRED_CONFIG_TOOL_PAGE=true
SHOW_CONFIG_TOOL_PAGE=true
SHOW_XML_PREREQ_PAGE=true
SHOW_RELEASE_NOTES=true
SHOW_END_OF_INSTALL_MSGS=true
SHOW_ROOTSH_CONFIRMATION=true
SHOW_END_SESSION_PAGE=true
SHOW_EXIT_CONFIRMATION=true
NEXT_SESSION=true
NEXT_SESSION_ON_FAIL=true
SHOW_DEINSTALL_CONFIRMATION=true
SHOW_DEINSTALL_PROGRESS=true
ACCEPT_LICENSE_AGREEMENT=true
RESTART_SYSTEM=<Value Unspecified>
CLUSTER_NODES=<Value Unspecified>
OUI_HOSTNAME=<Value Unspecified>
REMOVE_HOMES=<Value Unspecified>
COMPONENT_LANGUAGES={"en"}
INSTALL_TYPE="toplink"
szl_PortListSelect=<Value Unspecified>
szl_InstanceInformation=<Value Unspecified>
sl_DlgClusterInfoWebReturn=<Value Unspecified>
sl_DlgClusterInfoReturn=<Value Unspecified>
sl_AdminInstanceSettingsSelections=<Value Unspecified>
s_asInstanceName=<Value Unspecified>
s_adminPassword=<Value Unspecified>
b_useLocalInstance=<Value Unspecified>
b_autoPortDetect=<Value Unspecified>
sl_adminDialogReturn=<Value Unspecified>
nValidationInstanceInfo=<Value Unspecified>
n_DlgClusterInfoWebValidate=<Value Unspecified>
nValidationPortListSelect=<Value Unspecified>
n_DlgClusterInfoValidate=<Value Unspecified>
n_validateAdminDialogInfo=<Value Unspecified>
Silent and Non-Interactive Installation
A-7
Start the Installation
A.5 Start the Installation
To make the installer use the response file, specify the location of the response file that
you want to use as a parameter when starting the installer.
To perform a non-interactive installation:
E:\> setup.exe -responseFile absolute_path_and_filename
To perform a silent installation, use the -silent parameter:
E:\> setup.exe -silent -responseFile absolute_path_and_filename
A.6 Postinstallation
The success or failure of the non-interactive and silent installations is logged in the
installActions<time_stamp>.log file. Additionally, the silent installation
creates the silentInstall<time_stamp>.log file. The log files are created in the
C:\Program Files\Oracle\Inventory\Logs directory.
The silentInstall<time_stamp>.log file contains the following line if the
installation was successful:
The installation of OracleAS <Installation Type> was successful.
The installActions<time_stamp>.log file contains specific information for each
Oracle Application Server installation type.
A.7 Security Tips for Silent and Non-Interactive Installations
One of the pieces of information in the response file is the installation password. The
password information is in clear text.
To minimize security issues regarding the password in the response file, follow these
guidelines:
■
■
Set the permissions on the response files so that they are readable only by the
operating system user who will be performing the silent or non-interactive
installation.
If possible, remove the response files from the system after the silent or
non-interactive installation is completed.
A.8 Deinstallation
You can perform a silent deinstallation of Oracle Application Server by supplying a
silent deinstallation parameter to the response file you used for installation.
Modify the following parameter in your installation response file:
REMOVE_HOMES={"<ORACLE_HOME to be removed>"}
For example:
REMOVE_HOME="C:\oracle\ora_j2ee"
A-8 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Deinstallation
Note: You still need to follow the clean up steps described in
Appendix C, "Deinstallation and Reinstallation". The silent
deinstallation command only replaces the step where you run the
installer interactively to deinstall the instance.
To perform a silent deinstallation, use the -deinstall parameter when entering the
command:
E:\> setup.exe -silent -deinstall -responseFile absolute_path_and_filename
Silent and Non-Interactive Installation
A-9
Deinstallation
A-10 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
B
Default Port Numbers
By default, the installer assigns port numbers to components from a set of default port
numbers. This appendix contains a list of these port numbers.
If you want to use a different set of port numbers, you have to create a file called
staticports.ini, in which you list the port numbers that you want to use. See
Section 2.4.4, "Using Custom Port Numbers (the "Static Ports" Feature)" for details.
This appendix contains the following topics:
■
Section B.1, "Method of Assigning Default Port Numbers"
■
Section B.2, "Default Port Numbers"
■
Section B.3, "Ports to Open in Firewalls"
B.1 Method of Assigning Default Port Numbers
The installer assigns default port numbers to each component using the following
method:
1.
The installer checks if the default port number is in use. If it is not in use, the
installer assigns it to the component.
2.
If the default port number is already in use by an Oracle product or by any
running application, the installer tries the lowest number in the port number
range. It keeps trying the port numbers in the range until it finds one that is
available.
B.2 Default Port Numbers
Table B–1 lists the default port numbers for components. The last column, Name in
staticports.ini, specifies the component name as it appears in the staticports.ini
file, which enables you to override the default port numbers. See Section 2.4.4, "Using
Custom Port Numbers (the "Static Ports" Feature)" for details.
Default Port Numbers B-1
Ports to Open in Firewalls
Table B–1
Default Port Numbers and Ranges (Grouped by Component)
Default Port
Port Number
Range
Oracle Notification Server Request Port
6003
6003 - 6099
Oracle Notification
Server Request port
Oracle Notification Server Local Port
6100
6100 - 6199
Oracle Notification
Server Local port
Oracle Notification Server Remote Port
6200
6200 - 6299
Oracle Notification
Server Remote port
OC4J AJP
12501
12501 - 12600
Not settable through
staticports.ini
OC4J RMI
12401
12401 - 12500
Not settable through
staticports.ini
JMS
12601
12601 - 12700
Not settable through
staticports.ini
IIOP
13301
13301 - 13400
Not settable through
staticports.ini
IIOPS1
13401
13401 - 13500
Not settable through
staticports.ini
IIOPS2
13501
13501 -13600
Not settable through
staticports.ini
Listen Port
7777
7777 - 7877
Not settable through
staticports.ini
Listen (SSL) Port
4443
4443
Not settable through
staticports.ini
SSL Port
4443
443, 4443
Oracle HTTP Server SSL
port
Java Object Cache
7000
7000 - 7099
Not settable through
staticports.ini
Port Tunneling
7501
7501 - 7599
Not settable through
staticports.ini
Oracle HTTP Server Diagnostic port
7200
7200 - 7299
Not settable through
staticports.ini
Component
Name in staticports.ini
Oracle Process Manager and Notification Server
(OPMN)
Oracle Application Server Containers for J2EE
(OC4J)
Oracle HTTP Server
B.3 Ports to Open in Firewalls
If you plan to install Oracle Application Server behind firewalls, you need to open
certain ports in the firewall during installation (and also during runtime).
For a 10g Release 3 (10.1.3) middle-tier instance, you need access to Oracle Notification
Server and AJP ports. You need to open the following ports used by these components
in the firewall:
■
OPMN Oracle Notification Server remote port
■
OC4J AJP port
B-2 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
C
Deinstallation and Reinstallation
This appendix guides you through the deinstallation and reinstallation process for
Oracle Application Server.
■
Section C.1, "Deinstallation Procedure: Overview"
■
Section C.2, "Deinstalling Procedure"
■
Section C.3, "Deinstalling All Oracle Products Manually"
■
Section C.4, "Reinstallation"
C.1 Deinstallation Procedure: Overview
Follow these high-level steps to deinstall Oracle Application Server (the details are
provided in later sections):
1.
Run the deinstaller.
2.
Clean up any remaining files.
Items to Remove or Clean Up
To deinstall Oracle Application Server instances, you have to clean up the items listed
in Table C–1. The procedures are described later in this appendix.
Table C–1
Items to Deinstall
Item to Clean Up
Tool to Use
Files from the Oracle home directory
Installer
If the installer does not remove all the files, you can remove
the remaining files using the rm command.
Entries for the deleted instance in the Inventory
directory
Installer
Instance name from Farm page
Installer
Entries for the deleted instance in the Windows
registry
Installer
The installer does not remove all the Oracle registry entries.
If you need to delete all Oracle registry entries, see
Section C.3, "Deinstalling All Oracle Products Manually".
Note: You can remove the entries only if the computer is not
running other Oracle Application Server instances or other
Oracle products, because the procedure described in the
section removes entries for all Oracle products.
The installer does not permit custom deinstallation of individual components.
Deinstallation and Reinstallation C-1
Deinstalling Procedure
C.2 Deinstalling Procedure
1.
Log in as the operating system user who installed the instance you want to
deinstall.
2.
Stop all processes associated with the instance you want to deinstall.
See the Oracle Application Server Administrator’s Guide for details on how to stop the
processes.
3.
Start the installer.
Select Start > Programs > Oracle - InstanceName > Deinstall.
4.
Follow these steps in the installer.
a.
Click OK to start the deinstaller.
b.
Press Enter to exit the deinstaller when the deinstallation is complete.
5.
Restart your computer to stop any remaining processes associated with the
deinstallation.
6.
Delete any remaining files in the deleted instance’s Oracle home directory.
C:\> del %ORACLE_HOME%
C.3 Deinstalling All Oracle Products Manually
The following procedure removes all Oracle products from your computer.
Caution: These instructions remove all Oracle components,
services, and registry entries from your computer. Exercise extreme
care when removing registry entries. Removing incorrect entries
can cause your computer to stop working.
1.
Delete Registry keys.
a.
Select Start > Run, type in regedit, and click OK. This displays the Registry
Editor.
b.
Delete the following folders from the Registry. To delete a folder, select it and
select Edit > Delete from the menu.
In some of the entries below, InstanceName indicates the name of the Oracle
Application Server instance, which you entered in the Oracle Application
Server 10g 10.1.3.0.0 Installation screen.
*
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE \SOFTWARE\ORACLE
*
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\
Services\Oracle-InstanceNameProcessManager
*
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet
X\Services\Oracle-InstanceNameProcessManager
X is a number, for example, 001.
*
c.
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\ORACLE
Exit the Registry Editor.
C-2 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Reinstallation
2.
Edit/delete environment variables.
To display environment variables:
■
Right-click My Computer (on Windows 2003, the icon is labeled with the
name of your computer) on the desktop and select Properties. Select the
Advanced tab, then click Environment Variables
Modify the Path system variable to remove all references to any previous Oracle
home paths:
Highlight the Path system variable. Click the Edit button and modify the path in
the Variable Value field.
For example, the following shows an Oracle-modified Path system variable:
C:\OraHome\jdk\jre\bin\classic;C:\OraHome\jdk\jre\bin;C:\OraHome\bin;
C:\OraHome\jlib;C:\OraHome\jre\1.1.8\bin;C:\WINNT\system32;C:\WINNT;
C:\WINNT\System32\Wbem
The following shows the Path system variable after removal of the Oracle home
references:
C:\WINNT\system32;C:\WINNT;C:\WINNT\System32\Wbem
3.
Click OK
4.
Remove Oracle program folders.
ClickStart > All Programs (Windows 2003). Remove Oracle folders by
right-clicking on the folder and selecting Delete.
5.
Delete the Oracle user.
a.
Right-click My Computer (on Windows 2003, the icon is labeled with the
name of your computer) and select Manage.
b.
Expand Local Users and Groups.
c.
Select Users.
d.
Delete the user that installed Oracle products.
e.
Double click My Computer on your desktop. Inspect the Documents and
Settings directory on your hard drive and delete any Oracle user entries.
6.
Restart your computer.
7.
Remove remaining Oracle home directories from your hard drive.
For example:
C:\Oracle\*, C:\Program Files\Oracle\*
8.
Restart your computer.
C.4 Reinstallation
The installer does not allow reinstallation of an Oracle Application Server instance in a
directory that already contains an Oracle Application Server instance. To reinstall
Oracle Application Server in the same directory, you have to deinstall and then install
it.
Deinstallation and Reinstallation C-3
Reinstallation
C-4 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
D
Configuration Assistants
This appendix lists the configuration assistants and the location of their log files.
■
Section D.1, "Troubleshooting Configuration Assistants"
■
Section D.2, "Description of Oracle Application Server Configuration Assistants"
D.1 Troubleshooting Configuration Assistants
Contents:
■
Section D.1.1, "General Tips"
■
Section D.1.2, "Configuration Assistant Result Codes"
D.1.1 General Tips
If a configuration assistant fails, try the following steps to correct the problem:
1.
Review the installation log files listed in Section E.1, "Log Files".
2.
Review the log files for the failed configuration assistant. Configuration assistant
log files are listed in Section D.2, "Description of Oracle Application Server
Configuration Assistants". Try to fix the issue that caused the error.
3.
If the failed configuration assistant has any dependencies, then run the
dependencies again. You must do this even if the dependency completed
successfully.
4.
If an optional configuration assistant fails, and it does not have any dependencies,
run the remaining configuration assistants. Uncheck the cancelled optional
configuration assistant, highlight and check the next listed configuration assistant,
and click Retry.
5.
If configuration assistant failure occurs when running configuration assistant
execution commands on the command line, then re-run the configuration assistant
execution command again.
You can use the generated script file named configtoolcmds.pl located in the
ORACLE_HOME\bin directory to execute the failed configuration assistant again.
The configtoolcmds.pl script is generated after you exit the installer. During
silent or non-interactive installation, the configtoolcmds.pl script is generated
immediately after configuration assistant failure.
6.
If you see a "Fatal Error. Reinstall" message, find the cause of the problem by
analyzing the log files. You cannot recover from a fatal error by correcting the
problem and continuing. You must remove the current installation and reinstall
Oracle Application Server. The following tasks describe the recovery procedure:
Configuration Assistants D-1
Description of Oracle Application Server Configuration Assistants
a.
Deinstall the failed installation using the procedure described in Appendix C,
"Deinstallation and Reinstallation".
b.
Correct the cause of the fatal error.
c.
Reinstall Oracle Application Server.
D.1.2 Configuration Assistant Result Codes
If a configuration assistant fails, the bottom half of the installation screen displays the
error message, and the configuration assistant writes its result code (Table D–1) to the
following log file:
C:\Program Files\Oracle\Inventory\logs\installActionstimestamp.log
Table D–1
Result Codes for Configuration Assistants
Result Code
Description
0
Configuration assistant succeeded
1
Configuration assistant failed
-1
Configuration assistant cancelled
D.2 Description of Oracle Application Server Configuration Assistants
Table D–2 lists the Oracle Application Server configuration assistants in alphabetical
order. Different installations use different configuration assistants depending on
installation type and configuration options you selected.
Table D–2
Oracle Application Server Configuration Assistants
Configuration
Assistant
Description
Log File Location
ADF
Configuration
Assistant
Integrates Oracle Application Development
Framework Runtime Libraries with Oracle
Enterprise Manager 10g Application Server Control.
ORACLE_HOME\cfgtoollogs\configtool
stimestamp.log
C:\Program
Files\Oracle\Inventory\logs\instal
lActionstimestamp.log
OPMN
Configuration
Assistant
Starts OPMN and OPMN-managed processes.
ORACLE_HOME\cfgtoollogs\configtool
stimestamp.log
ORACLE_HOME\cfgtoollogs\ipm.log
ORACLE_HOME\cfgtoollogs\ons.log
D-2 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
E
Troubleshooting
This appendix describes solutions to common problems that you might encounter
when installing Oracle Application Server. It contains the following sections:
■
Section E.1, "Log Files"
■
Section E.2, "General Troubleshooting Tips"
■
Section E.3, "Installation Problems and Solutions"
■
Section E.4, "Need More Help?"
E.1 Log Files
The installer writes the following log files:
■
inventory_location\logs\installActionstimestamp.log
■
inventory_location\logs\oraInstalltimestamp.err
■
inventory_location\logs\oraInstalltimestamp.out
The default inventory_location is:
C:\Program Files\Oracle\Inventory
E.2 General Troubleshooting Tips
If you encounter an error during installation:
■
■
■
■
Read the Oracle Application Server Release Notes for the latest updates. The release
notes are available with the platform-specific documentation. The most current
version of the release notes is available on Oracle Technology Network
(http://www.oracle.com/technology/documentation).
Verify that your computer meets the requirements specified in Chapter 2,
"Requirements".
If you entered incorrect information on one of the installation screens, return to
that screen by clicking Back until you see the screen.
If a configuration assistant failed, check the log file for that configuration assistant.
Section D.2, "Description of Oracle Application Server Configuration Assistants"
lists the configuration assistants and the location of their log files. If you do not see
log files from some configuration assistants in the ORACLE_HOME\cfgtoollogs
directory, exit the installer. This causes the installer to copy the log files to that
directory.
Troubleshooting E-1
Installation Problems and Solutions
■
If an error occurred while the installer is copying or linking files:
1.
Note the error and review the installation log files.
2.
Remove the failed installation by following the steps in Appendix C,
"Deinstallation and Reinstallation".
3.
Correct the issue that caused the error.
4.
Restart the installation.
E.3 Installation Problems and Solutions
This section describes common installation problems and solutions:
■
Section E.3.1, "Location of Log Files"
■
Section E.3.2, "Installer Does Not Appear"
■
Section E.3.3, "Unable to Clean Up a Failed Installation"
■
■
■
Section E.3.4, "User Interface Does Not Display in the Desired Language, or Does
Not Display Properly"
Section E.3.5, "Unable to Run Oracle Application Server On-Network as Well as
Off-Network"
Section E.3.6, "Configuration Assistant Failures - General"
E.3.1 Location of Log Files
There are two sets of log files:
■
The installer writes the following log files:
–
inventory_location\logs\installActionstimestamp.log
–
inventory_location\logs\oraInstalltimestamp.err
–
inventory_location\logs\oraInstalltimestamp.out
The default inventory_location is:
C:\Program Files\Oracle\Inventory
■
The configuration assistants write log files in the ORACLE_HOME\cfgtoollogs
directory.
Note that if you want to access the log files created by the configuration assistants,
you need to exit the installer first. The log files are inaccessible if the installer is
still in use.
E.3.2 Installer Does Not Appear
Problem
The installer does not appear when you run setup.exe.
Solution
If you are installing Oracle Application Server on a computer that is already running
Oracle Database 10g, then you have to start up the installer with the following option:
E:\> setup.exe -J-Dsun.java2d.noddraw=true -Dsun.awt.nopixfmt=true
E-2 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Installation Problems and Solutions
E.3.3 Unable to Clean Up a Failed Installation
If your installation was not successful, you have to deinstall it first before you can
install Oracle Application Server again. Refer to Appendix C, "Deinstallation and
Reinstallation" for instructions.
E.3.4 User Interface Does Not Display in the Desired Language, or Does Not Display
Properly
Problem
Messages do not appear in the desired language, or messages are not displayed
correctly
Solution
Currently Oracle Application Server does not support adding or removing languages
after installation.
If you are serving non-English content, be sure you add all the languages that you
need during installation. To add languages during installation, click the Product
Languages button in the "Select Installation Type" screen. To see which languages are
installed by default, see Section 3.2, "Installing Additional Languages".
If you are serving non-English content and forgot to click the Product Languages in
the installation, the user interface might not display properly because the required
fonts were not installed. You can fix this by contacting Customer Service for the
requirement fonts.
E.3.5 Unable to Run Oracle Application Server On-Network as Well as Off-Network
Problem
You installed Oracle Application Server when the computer was connected to the
network, and now you want to run it off-network
Solution
If you want to run Oracle Application Server on-network as well as off-network, you
need to install a loopback adapter. On computers with static IP address, when you go
off-network, your Ethernet adapter will be down (ipconfig shows cable
disconnected) and ipconfig cannot resolve that IP.
For details on loopback adapters, see Section 2.7.6, "Installing a Loopback Adapter".
E.3.6 Configuration Assistant Failures - General
This section describes general tips for troubleshooting configuration assistant failures.
See the next sections for specific configuration assistant failures. See also Appendix D,
"Configuration Assistants".
Problem
Configuration assistant failed
Solution
Configuration assistants fail from a variety of causes. Some things you can check are:
Troubleshooting E-3
Need More Help?
■
Check the log files for the failed configuration assistant to determine the problem.
The log files are located in the ORACLE_HOME\cfgtoollogs directory.
Fix the problem indicated in the log file, and click Retry to rerun the failed
configuration assistant.
If the configuration assistant fails while running configuration assistant execution
commands on the command line, then run the configuration assistant execution
command again.
You can use the generated script file named configtoolcmds.pl located in the
ORACLE_HOME\bin directory to run the failed configuration assistant again. The
configtoolcmds.pl script is generated after you exit the installer. During silent or
non-interactive installation, the configtoolcmds.pl script is generated
immediately after configuration assistant failure.
E.4 Need More Help?
If this appendix does not solve the problem you encountered, try these other sources:
■
■
Oracle Application Server Release Notes, available on the Oracle Technology Network
(http://www.oracle.com/technology/documentation)
OracleMetaLink (https://metalink.oracle.com)
If you do not find a solution for your problem, open a service request.
E-4 Oracle Application Server Installation Guide
Index
Numerics
browser requirement,
256 color requirement, 2-4
C
A
active-active topology
creating, 6-4
installation, 6-6
introduction, 6-4
supporting procedures, 6-11
active-passive topology
creating, 6-16
installation details, 6-27
installation overview, 6-18
introduction, 6-16
OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster, 6-2
postinstallation steps, 6-29
preinstallation steps, 6-19
adapters
loopback, 2-13
network, 2-13
adding shared disk to group in Oracle Fail Safe, 6-25
adding virtual address to group in Oracle Fail
Safe, 6-24
additional languages, 3-2
Administrators group, 2-10
advanced installation, 5-1
installation steps, 5-2
installed components, 5-1
Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process
Management, 5-4
J2EE Server and Process Management, 5-2
Oracle TopLink, 5-5
Web Server and Process Management, 5-3
aliases
installing on computers with aliases, 2-14
B
backup and recovery
in OracleAS Disaster Recovery environment,
postinstallation, 7-3
basic installation, 4-1
installation steps, 4-2
installed components, 4-1
2-4
6-36
CD-ROM
copying to hard drive, 2-18
cluster name (for OracleAS Cold Failover
Cluster), 6-20
cluster topologies
installing a Web server middle tier and multiple
OC4J middle tiers on separate hosts, 1-10
installing a Web server middle tier and OC4J
middle tier on separate hosts, 1-9
installing multiple integrated Web server and
OC4J middle tiers, 1-5
cluster, verifying (OracleAS Cold Failover
Cluster), 6-22
_CLUSTER_NETWORK_NAME_ environment
variable, 6-38, 6-39
components
default port numbers, B-1
how to assign custom port numbers, 2-8
configuration assistants, D-1
dependencies, D-1
descriptions of, D-2
error codes, D-2
fatal errors, D-1
troubleshooting, D-1
copying CD-ROM/DVD to hard drive, 2-18
CPU requirements, 2-3
custom ports
see static ports
D
default port numbers, 2-7, B-1
deinstallation, C-1
overview, C-1
removing all Oracle products, C-2
silent mode, A-8
deinstallation procedure, C-2
deploying Oracle Business Rules Rule Author, 7-1
DHCP
installing on DHCP computers, 2-12
disk space requirements, 2-3
DNS server for name resolution (OracleAS Disaster
Index-1
Recovery), 6-38
DVD
copying to hard drive, 2-18
E
environment variables, 2-11
_CLUSTER_NETWORK_NAME_, 6-38, 6-39
ORACLE_HOME, 2-11
ORACLE_SID, 2-11
PATH, 2-11
setting, 2-11
TEMP, 2-12
TNS_ADMIN, 2-11
ephemeral ports, 2-5
error codes from configuration assistants, D-2
Event Log service (for OracleAS Cold Failover
Cluster), 6-19
F
fatal errors, D-1
file system type requirement, 2-3
firewalls
and ports, B-2
font problems, E-3
G
groups (Oracle Fail Safe)
adding shared disk to groups, 6-25
adding virtual address to groups, 6-24
creating, 6-22
H
high availability environments, 6-1
active-active topology, 6-4
active-passive topology, 6-16
OracleAS Clusters, 6-4
OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster, 6-16
overview, 6-1
summary of differences, 6-3
hostname requirement, 2-2
hostnames
installing on computers with multiple
aliases, 2-14
hosts file for name resolution (OracleAS Disaster
Recovery), 6-40
httpd.conf file, 2-10
J2EE Server and Process Management, 5-2
Oracle TopLink, 5-5
Web Server and Process Management, 5-3
installation steps
advanced installation, 5-2
basic installation, 4-2
installation types, 1-2
installer
see Oracle Universal Installer
installing additional languages, 3-2
installing from hard drive, 2-18
installing Oracle Fail Safe, 6-20
instance names, 3-2
how they are used, 3-3
restrictions, 3-2
valid characters, 3-2
Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process
Management
installation, 5-4
inventory directory, 3-4
IP
installing on a computer with multiple IP
addresses, 2-13
requirements, 2-2
J
J2EE Server and Process Management
installation, 5-2
L
languages, installing additional, 3-2
log files, E-1
from non-interactive installations, A-8
location of, E-2
loopback adapters, 2-13
installing, 2-15
removing (Windows 2000, Windows 2003,
Windows XP), 2-18
M
memory requirements, 2-3
middle tiers
installing in OracleAS Disaster Recovery, 6-44
monitor requirement, 2-4
MSCS
for OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster, 6-20
multihomed computers, installing on, 2-13
I
N
installActions.log, A-8
installation
advanced
see advanced installation
basic
see basic installation
Integrated Web Server, J2EE Server and Process
Management, 5-4
name resolution (OracleAS Disaster Recovery), 6-38
using DNS servers, 6-38
using hosts file, 6-40
names of instances
see instance names
nbtstat command, 6-41
network adapter, primary, 2-13
network requirements, 2-2
Index-2
network topics, 2-12
installing from hard drive, 2-18
installing from remote CD-ROM/DVD
drive, 2-20
installing on computers with aliases, 2-14
installing on DHCP computers, 2-12
installing on multihomed computers, 2-13
installing on off-network computers, 2-14
remote installations, 2-22
NLS_LANG parameter, 7-3
non-interactive installations, A-1
deinstalling, A-8
log files, A-8
postinstallation steps, A-8
preinstallation steps, A-2
security tips, A-8
non-networked computers, installing on, 2-14
O
oc4jadmin user, 3-3
password for, 3-3
off-network computers, installing on, 2-14
off-network problems, E-3
operating system groups
Administrators group, 2-10
operating system users, 2-10
Administrators group, 2-10
operating system version, 2-2
Oracle Business Rules Rule Author
deploying, 7-1
Oracle Data Guard (for OracleAS Disaster
Recovery), 6-36, 6-40
Oracle E-Delivery, 3-5
Oracle Enterprise Manager Application Server
Control
URL, 7-2
Oracle Fail Safe
adding shared disk to group, 6-25
adding virtual address to group, 6-24
creating groups, 6-22
installing, 6-20
OracleMSCSServices service, 6-20
user requirements, 6-20
verifying cluster, 6-22
Oracle home
directory, 3-1
installing in a non-empty, 3-1
installing in an existing, 3-1
naming, 3-1
Oracle HTTP Server
configuring static ports, 2-10
Oracle MetaLink
using to obtain updates to 10.1.3.0.0, 2-1
Oracle TopLink
installation, 5-5
Oracle Universal Installer
does not appear, E-2
log files, E-1
prerequisite checks, 2-23
starting, 3-6
where it writes files, 3-4
ORACLE_HOME environment variable, 2-11
ORACLE_SID environment variable, 2-11
OracleAS Clusters
see active-active topology
OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster
advantages, 6-3
cluster name, 6-20
domain user requirements, 6-20
Event Log service, 6-19
in OracleAS Disaster Recovery environment, 6-42
MSCS, 6-20
preinstallation steps, 6-19
see active-passive topology
verifying cluster, 6-22
virtual address, 6-19
OracleAS Disaster Recovery
data synchronization, 6-36
installation steps, 6-43
installing middle tiers, 6-44
installing OracleAS Infrastructure, 6-44
name resolution, 6-38
Oracle Data Guard, 6-40
setting up, 6-37
setting up identical hostnames, 6-38
staticports.ini file, 6-37
with OracleAS Cold Failover Cluster, 6-42
OracleAS Infrastructure
installing in OracleAS Disaster Recovery, 6-44
OracleMSCSServices service (Oracle Fail Safe), 6-20
P
pagefile size (virtual memory) requirement, 2-4
passwords
for oc4jadmin user, 3-3
PATH environment variable, 2-11
pcAnywhere, 2-22
ports, 2-5
checking if a port is in use, 2-7
ephemeral, 2-5
list of default port numbers, B-1
static ports, 2-8
to open in firewalls, B-2
using default port numbers, 2-7
postinstallation steps, 7-1
for silent or non-interactive installations, A-8
preinstallation steps
for silent and non-interactive installations, A-2
prerequisite checks, 2-23
primary network adapter, 2-13
processor, 2-3
Product Languages button, 3-2
R
RAM requirements, 2-3
record mode in the installer, A-2
remote control software, 2-22
remote installations, 2-20, 2-22
Index-3
requirements
browser, 2-4
disk space, 2-3
environment variables, 2-11
file system type, 2-3
for computers that you want to disconnect from
network later, 2-15
for DHCP computers, 2-12
for multi-alias computers, 2-14
for multihomed computers, 2-13
for non-networked computers, 2-14
hostname, 2-2
IP, 2-2
memory, 2-3
monitor, 2-4
network, 2-2
operating system version, 2-2
pagefile size (virtual memory), 2-4
processor, 2-3
space in TEMP directory, 2-3
response files, A-1
creating, A-2
creating using the record mode, A-2
examples, A-3
specifying on command-line, A-8
templates, A-2
variables to modify, A-3
runInstaller command
-executeSysPrereqs parameter, 2-2
S
security tips for silent and non-interactive
installations, A-8
Services dialog, displaying, 7-2
setup.exe command
on CD-ROM, 3-6
on DVD-ROM, 3-6
shared disk, adding to group (Oracle Fail Safe), 6-25
shared storage, 6-2
silent installations, A-1
deinstalling, A-8
postinstallation steps, A-8
preinstallation steps, A-2
security tips, A-8
silentInstall.log, A-8
SSL
postinstallation configuration, 7-3
starting Oracle Universal Installer, 3-6
static ports, 2-8
for Oracle HTTP Server, 2-10
not working, 2-9
staticports.ini file, 2-8
creating, 2-8
format, 2-8
in OracleAS Disaster Recovery, 6-37
system requirements, 2-2
T
TEMP directory,
Index-4
2-12
space required, 2-3
TEMP environment variable, 2-12
/tmp directory, 3-5
TNS_ADMIN environment variable, 2-11
topologies
10.1.3 middle tiers, 1-3
high availability, 1-3
integrated Web server and OC4J middle
tier, 1-4
multiple integrated Web server and OC4J
middle tiers, 1-5
Web server middle tier and multiple OC4J
middle tiers on separate hosts, 1-10
Web server middle tier and OC4J middle tier on
separate hosts, 1-9
with 10.1.2 Oracle HTTP Server, 1-3
with 10.1.2 OracleAS Web Cache, 1-4
with 10.1.2 OracleAS Web Cache cluster, 1-4
with 9.0.4 or 10.1.2 OracleAS
Infrastructure, 1-4
supported, 1-2 to 1-14
trigger attribute (for replication-policy), 6-14
troubleshooting, E-1
configuration assistants, D-1
general tips, E-1
U
user interface problems, E-3
user requirements for OracleAS Cold Failover
Cluster, 6-20
users (operating system)
see operating system users
V
verifying cluster (OracleAS Cold Failover
Cluster), 6-22
virtual address for OracleAS Cold Failover
Cluster, 6-19
virtual address, adding to group (Oracle Fail
Safe), 6-24
virtual IP, 6-3
virtual memory (pagefile size) requirement, 2-4
VNC, 2-22
W
Web Server and Process Management
installation, 5-3
Welcome page, URL for, 7-2
Windows registry
removing all Oracle products, C-2
Windows system files (wsf.exe), 2-4
write-quota attribute (in cluster tag), 6-16
wsf.exe, 2-4
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