29% katana arf assembly manual

29% KATANA ARF
ASSEMBLY MANUAL
Required but not included
4 channel radio and supporting equipment
Engine 3.2-4.2 c.i. (50-60 c.c.)
Fuel Tank 24 ounce
Spinner 3 ½”
Hardware
Aircraft Specifications:
Wing Span
84”
Wing Area
1270 Sq. in.
Length
75”
Weight
16 to 18 pounds
Accessories and hardware packages available through Aeroworks
Congratulations! You have just become the owner of one of the highest quality airplanes in the industry.
Aeroworks uses only hand selected balsa wood and the highest quality light ply and hardwood available.
All fiberglass parts are hand crafted and inspected for imperfections. We have designed the 29% Katana
to be lightweight, yet strong enough to handle the aerobatic forces expected from a high performance
airplane.
Thank you for purchasing the 29% Katana ARF. We wish you great success in both the assembly and
flying of your fully aerobatic airplane. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to call.
Aeroworks:
Phone: (303) 366-4205
Fax: (303) 366-4203
Or write to:
Aeroworks
401 Laredo Unit “D”
Aurora, Co. 80011
Visit the Web: www.aero-works.net
Or E-mail us: Info@aero-works.net
Before starting the assembly process of your new 29% Katana ARF, Please read through the assembly
manual carefully, and inspect all parts and any hardware for imperfections or damage.
It is important to notify Aeroworks of any damage or problems with the model immediately. If you wish
to return this aircraft for any reason a 15% restock fee will be charged to the customer. In addition the
customer is responsible for all return shipping cost and all prior-shipping costs will not be refunded.
Aeroworks cannot insure the skill of the modeler in the construction or use of this aircraft. Therefore, will
not be accountable for any property damage, bodily injury or death caused by this aircraft.
The purchaser also accepts all responsibility of any and all structural or
mechanical failures.
1
EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS
AILERONS: (2) Servo’s: 70 Ounce minimum, two per wing. You may select to use only one servo per
wing panel. If you do, you will need to place it in the servo slot toward the root end of the wing and you
must use a 130-ounce minimum servo. Digital metal-geared servos are highly recommended. If you
select the two-servo option, digital and metal-geared servos are not required.
ELEVATORS: (2) Servo’s: 70 Ounce minimum one per stab. Digital and metal-geared servos are
not required. However are recommended. Especially if you plan on doing 3-D style maneuvers.
RUDDER: (1) Servo: 100 ounce or higher recommended. Push-pull system located in rear of fuselage,
or a pull-pull system in radio compartment. A digital metal-geared servo is not required, but highly
recommended. If you select to use a pull-pull system, it is recommended that you use a high torque servo
130-ounce minimum. The decision of using a push-pull system versus a pull-pull system will depend on
aircraft balance. Try to use the rudder servo to help achieve the correct C.G. location. Most 50 cc engines
will require you to use the pull-pull method for proper aircraft balance.
THROTTLE: (1) Servo: A high torque servo is not necessary, 48-ounce minimum. However, a
reliable and fast servo is recommended.
RECEIVER BATTERY: We recommend you use a 1700 MA 6 volt pack.
SWITCHES AND WIRING: It is important to use heavy gage wire (22 gauge) for all switches,
batteries, and extensions.
FUEL TANK AND LINE: Use a 24 oz. fuel tank with large diameter size fuel line. Gas will cause
fuel lines to swell and come off brass fuel tubing. Be certain to always tie down your fuel lines with clips
or wire. It is also recommended to solder a barb onto the brass tubing for extra security.
RECEIVER: The use of a PCM receiver is recommended.
TIGHTENING AND RE-SHRINKING THE COVERING
Open your kit slowly and take care not to damage any parts of the kit. Remove all parts from their plastic
protective covers for inspection.
Before doing any assembly or installation of any decals it is very important to re-shrink or re-tighten the
already applied Ultracote covering. Due to the shipping process, heat and humidity changes from different
climates, the covering may become lose and wrinkle in the sun. If you take the time to re-tighten the
covering, you will be rewarded with a long lasting beautifully covered model.
Using you’re covering iron or heat gun with a soft sock, gently apply pressure and rub in the covering. If
any bubbles occur, your iron may be to hot, reduce heat and work slowly. If bubbles persist, using a small
pin, punch holes in the bubble to relieve trapped air and reheat. We do not recommend using a heat gun
on any of the foam surfaces. Too much heat on one area may cause the foam to melt underneath the
wood.
After you have tightened up the covering, it is time to start the assembly of your Katana.
2
FUSELAGE ASSEMBLY
With a sharp Xacto knife remove covering from wing and stab tube holes. Remove covering from stab
and wing anti-rotation holes. Remove covering from aileron servo wire access slot in fuse and rudder
servo cut outs in the rear of the fuselage (If you are putting the rudder servo in the tail). If you are using a
lightweight engine you may select to install the rudder servo in the radio compartment using a pull-pull
system. It is recommended you check your C.G. prior to installing the rudder servo. Most 50 cc engines
will require the use of a pull-pull system.
WING ASSEMBLY
1) Locate the pre cut hinge slots in the wing and aileron. The model comes with CA style hinges pre
installed, but not glued into the control surfaces. If you wish to use the CA hinges we recommend
adding additional hinges to each surface and use thin CA when gluing in hinges. We have used the
CA type hinges with no problems. However, we highly encourage the builder to use the nylon pinned
style hinge, such as the Dubro ¼ scale hinge. You will have to enlarge the hinge slot to accommodate
the nylon hinge. Check surfaces for alignment and glue hinges into the control surfaces. We
recommend using slow set epoxy or hinge glue. Be certain to give yourself plenty of aileron throw.
Recommended throw is 35 degrees minimum up and down. We also recommend using Ultracote to
seal all control surfaces. (Stronger after market CA hinges available through Aeroworks.)
2) Locate servo location on bottom side of wings and remove covering. Attach servo extension leads to
your servo. Tie the pre-installed nylon string to your servo and pull the servo wire through the wing.
Install servo into wings. It is important to secure the servo connectors with tape, wire or after market
clip to be certain the leads do not disconnect.
3) Locate hardwood blocks pre installed in the ailerons. Drill and tap the control horn locations for an
8/32 bolt. Install the control horns so your linkage will be 90 degrees to the servo arm. We
recommend using the Nelson Hobby control horn assembly #RCL70 available through Aeroworks.
Do not counter sink bolt heads. The hard point is a plywood plate. If you counter sink head
you may drill through plate.
CONTROL
HORN
Drill and tap
for 8-32 bolt
3
4) When setting up the servo linkage, we recommend using 4-40 rod with a silver solder clevis. It is
very important to have all control linkages 90 degrees to the control surface and servo arm. If more
throw is required then the silver solder clevis will allow, we recommend using a Dubro swivel ball
link at the servo arm for more movement.
SILVER SOLDER
CLEVIS
SERVO ARM AND CONTROL HORN AT 90 DEGREE
5) It is best to have the linkage as far in on the servo arm as possible and as far away from the control
surface as possible. If you are setting up the plane for 3D style flying. We recommend using larger
after market servo arms. It is important not to be closer then 3/4” from the control surface with your
control horn. If you get to close to the control surface you may develop flutter. Special note:
Remember to center all servos prior to connecting linkages to servo. This will eliminate any binding
when the radio is turned on.
6) Locate the hardwood dowel for the wing retainer bolt, located on the bottom of each wing. Pre drill a
1/8” hole into the center of the dowel for the wing retainer bolt.
7) Slide aluminum tube through fuse and center in the fuse. Secure tube in fuse so tube cannot move. A
hose clamp works well for this. Slide one wing panel onto tube and push tight against the fuse.
8) Make sure tube is still centered in fuse.
9) Drill and tap aluminum tube and dowel for 6-32 bolt.
Wing
retainer
dowel
location
10) Slide on second wing panel and repeat process. Make sure wings are tight against fuse.
11) Leaving the aluminum tube in one wing panel, with wing retainer bolt secured, at all times, will
enable you to always find the tapped hole for the bolt.
4
STAB AND ELEVATOR ASSEMBLY
1) Locate the pre cut hinge slots in the stab and elevator. The model comes with CA style hinges pre
installed, but not glued into the control surfaces. If you wish to use the CA hinges we recommend
adding hinges to each surface and use thin CA when gluing in hinges. We have used the CA type
hinges with no problems, however we highly encourage the builder to use the nylon pinned style
hinge, such as the Klett ¼ scale. Check surfaces for alignment and glue hinges into the control
surfaces. We recommend using slow set epoxy or hinge glue. Be certain to give yourself plenty of
elevator throw. Recommended throw is 45 degrees minimum up and down. We recommend sealing
all surfaces with Ultracote.
Seal all hinge gaps
with Ultracote
covering
CA
hinges
2) Locate servo location on bottom side of stabs and remove covering. (One per stab) It will be
necessary for you to install the servo stand offs included with the kit. This will prevent the servo from
bottoming out in the stab. You will have to trim away some of the excess sheeting to accommodate
the stand offs. Place the servo in the slot to determine the location of the stand off. Once you have the
proper position, epoxy the stand offs into position. Using the preinstalled nylon servo wire attachment
string, pull servo leads through stab. You want to have the male end of the servo extension hanging
out the stab and the female end hanging out from the fuse. This will enable you to remove the stabs
easily when necessary. It works best to run one elevator servo extension into the elevator port of the
receiver and the other into an Aux port of the receiver designated by your radio manufacture. If you
do not have a radio capable of splitting the elevators into two different channels, it is possible to use a
“Y” reverser and plug both servos into the elevator port in the receiver. Install servo into stabs. It is
important to secure the servo connectors with tape, wire or after market clip to be certain the leads do
not disconnect.
It may be necessary
to trim balsa sheeting
to accommodate
servo stand offs
Glue stab support blocks
in place. Make sure that
servo fits in slot
5
3) Locate hardwood blocks pre installed in the elevators. Drill and tap block for control horn locations
for a 8/32 bolt. Install the control horns so your linkage will be 90 degrees to the servo arm. We
recommend using the Nelson control horn assembly #RCL70. DO NOT counter sink bolt head.
Use flush mount bolt
4) When setting up the servo linkage we recommend using 4-40 rod with a silver solder clevis. It is very
important to have all control linkages 90 degrees to the control surface and servo arm. If more throw
is required then the silver solder clevis will allow, we recommend using a Dubro swivel ball link at
the servo arm for more movement.
5) It is best to have the linkage as far in on the servo arm as possible and as far away from the control
surface as possible. If you are setting up the plane for 3D style flying. We recommend using larger
after market servo arms. It is important not to be closer then 3/4” from the control surface with your
control horn. If you get to close to the control surface you may develop flutter. Special note:
Remember to center all servos prior to connecting linkages to servo. This will eliminate any binding
when the radio is turned on.
6) Slide aluminum tube through fuse and center tube in fuse. Secure one end of tube in fuse so tube
cannot move. Slide one stab panel onto tube and push tight against fuse.
Retainer dowel
location is close
to tip end of
aluminum tube
MEASURE
EQUAL
DISTANCE
TAP FOR
4-40
BOLT
7) Locate the hardwood retainer dowel for the 4-40 stab retainer bolt, located on the bottom side of each
stab. Drill pilot hole through hardwood dowel and into aluminum tube. Then, drill and tap retainer
dowel, aluminum tube and dowel inside tube for 4-40 bolt. Secure stab to tube with 4-40 bolt, then
slide other stab onto tube and repeat retainer bolt installation. Be certain both stabs are tight against
fuse.
8) Leaving the aluminum tube in one stab panel, with stab retainer bolt secured, at all times will enable
you to always find the tapped hole for the bolt.
6
ENGINE BOX ASSEMBLY
1) Cut 1/8” ply engine box sides to correct length to accommodate your engine size (Be sure to cut
from front of engine box sides) An easy way to determine the correct length of box sides is to slide
the cowl just past Former F1 approximately 1/8”. Measure from front of former F1 to front of the
cowl. Now measure the length of your engine. Subtract the engine length from your first
measurement. This should be the required length for your engine box sides. It is always a good idea
to cut the engine box sides slightly shorter then needed, approximately ½”. This will allow you to
make adjustments by adding spacers between firewall and engine. Adding a spacer will also allow
for the rear cylinder to be spaced away from the firewall to allow for better cooling. *Be certain to
check sides, one is longer then the other, this will give you the correct amount of right thrust.
Measure from F1 to end of cowl to get correct box length
2) Slide engine box sides through former F1, slide notch of engine box sides into former F2. Square
sides to former F1. Using epoxy, glue sides to F1, F2 and fuse floor.
Hole in
firewall to
accommodate
rear intake
style engine.
3) Epoxy plywood firewall to the inside of the engine box sides and flush with the bottom of sides.
4) Cut 1/8” lite-ply engine box floor to correct length. The floor should rest on bottom of sides and
firewall and butt up next to former F1.
5) Epoxy engine box floor to the bottom of sides, firewall, and front of former F1. Be certain to square
all parts to former F1.
6) Use 3/8” balsa tri-stock reinforcement at all glue joints. Behind firewall reinforce glue joint with 3/8”
spruce tri stock.
7
FIN AND RUDDER ASSEMBLY
1) Locate the hardwood block pre installed in the rudder for the control horn. Drill and tap for 8-32 all
thread. Install all thread into rudder and secure with flat washer and nut on each side. You should
have approximately 1” of bolt on each side of the rudder for the mounting of the control horns. Use
thread lock to secure.
Pictures are
of different
model but
procedure is
the same
2) Trail fit fin to fuse. Remove fin. Apply epoxy to all surfaces to be glued. Slide fin into the fuse.
Use tape to hold in place while assembly dries.
Remove
covering
from glue
areas
Pictures are
of different
model but
procedure is
the same
Epoxy fin
to fuselage
3) Locate pre cut hinge locations and glue hinges into fin and rudder as you did with the elevator.
LANDING GEAR
1) Drill or tap axle hole in gear to fit your axle. We recommend 5/32” dia. Axle. Note: This step may
already be done.
2) Install axles using thread lock or lock nut.
3) Draw a centerline, front to back, down both aluminum landing gear and ply mounting plate.
4) Align center marks.
2”
5) With gear centered on center line and 2” back from Former F1, drill four equally spaced holes
through gear and mounting plate, two front and two back, to accommodate 10-32 bolts Note:
Aluminum gear may come pre-drilled, if so, use aluminum gear as a template. Use 10/32 bolts and
blind nuts to attach gear to mounting block. Special note: Use thread lock on all Gear bolts.
8
TAIL WHEEL
1) Locate tail wheel steering hard point towards bottom of rudder. Drill a hole big enough for 4-40 rod
to slide through.
2) Slide rod through rudder center rod and epoxy in place. Attach strip aileron horns to ends of rods.
Make sure rod sticks out 1” on each side.
3) Use springs to attach tail wheel to strip aileron horns
4) You may also mount rudder servo in the tail and use the 4-40 rudder push rod for tail wheel steering.
To do this, use one strip aileron horn and a 4-40 pushrod with a solder on clevis as shown.
Strip aileron horn
Epoxy in place
CANOPY/HATCH INSTALLATION
1) For your convenience, your canopy has been pre cut and trim painted to fit the hatch cover.
2) Trial fit canopy to hatch cover. Do all painting/prep work, dash panels and pilot installation prior to
gluing canopy. Note: We recommend you remove the covering from the cockpit floor location. We
use an automotive trunk spatter spray paint (Grey) and paint the floor location to complete a finished
look.
3) Glue canopy to hatch cover. We recommend using canopy glue.
ENGINE / COWL INSTALLATION
It is first recommended to install engine per manufactures recommendations.
Engine thrust line is 1 ¾” down from top of fuse box sides. 2 degrees of right thrust and 0 degrees of
down thrust. It will be necessary to offset the engine to the left (pilot view) 3/8” to compensate for right
thrust. This will allow the center of the engine to exit at the center of the cowl.
9
Firewall
Centerline
Measure Engine
thrust line 1 1/4”
down from top of
box sides
Offset center
of engine 3/8”
to compensate
for right thrust
1) Fit cowl to fuse cutting out where needed to accommodate engine. Remember to fit cowl over fuse
1/8”.
2) When fitting cowl to fuse. Use a 3 ½” spinner to ensure proper alignment with spinner plate of cowl.
3) When satisfied with fit drill two 1/8” holes through each side of cowl and into cowl mount blocks.
Approximately ¼” from rear of cowl. Note: The cowl mount blocks are not shown in the picture.
To help achieve proper C.G., mount engine as far forward as possible.
4) Use 4-40 bolts and blind nuts to attach cowl to fuse. NOTE: We recommend using metal/rubber
washer to secure bolt.
Metal
washer
with
rubber
backing
7) Engine thrust line is 1 ¾” down from top of fuse box sides and 3/8” to the left (pilot view) of a
vertical centerline.
Engine shown is a Desert Aircraft 50cc
CANISTER MUFFLER INSTALLATION
(OPTIONAL)
10
Note: If you are not going to install canister mufflers, do not cut the covering from the bottom of the
airplane. You must still attach bottom hatch cover with 4 4-40 bolts and blind nuts, but you do not need
to do anything else.
Instructions below show typical 100cc engine canister installation. The 50cc engine installation and
pipe installation will be similar. Except with the 50cc, you will only have one canister muffler.
1) Cut covering from air exit hole behind the bottom hatch.
2) Install exhaust headers and make sure that they are aligned in the center of the tunnel.
3) Remove headers and attach to pipes, slide into tunnel.
4) Remount headers to engine and check for alignment.
5) Install canister mounts through hatch opening. (Canister muffler mounts are supplied through engine
manufacture and do not come with airplane.)
6) Attach pipe mounts with 3 4-40 bolts and blind nuts to former 2.
7) Install hatch with 4 4-40 bolts and blind nuts.
Silicone spacer
Canister muffler
attachments are
left up to the
builder
4-40 Bolt
1/4" Lite-ply
Remove
covering from
air exit hole
behind hatch
Leave air inlet
hole open to
allow airflow
Make sure pipes are
centered in fuse and
are straight
Silicone
couplers attach
headers to pipes
11
INSTALLING WHEEL PANTS
1) Make a notch in the wheel pant and lite-ply mounting plate with a Dremel drum sander. Make the
notch deep enough to let the wheel pant slide over the axle to the desired height.
2) Align the wheel pant to the gear and with 1/8” drill bit, drill two equally spaced holes through gear
and wheel pant. Mount wheel pants to gear with 4/40 bolts and blind nuts.
CONTROL SURFACE THROW
1) Elevator
Low rate
High rate
3-D rate
10 degrees up and down
20 degrees up and down
45 degrees up and down
2) Rudder
Low rate
High rate
3-D rate
30% deflection left and right
60% deflection left and right
Full deflection left and right
3) Aileron
Low rate
High rate
3-D rate
18 degrees up 18 degrees down
24 degrees up 24 degrees down
35 degrees up 35 degrees down
The throws given are to be considered only a starting point. Adjust the throws to accommodate your style
of flying.
CENTER OF GRAVITY
BALANCING (C.G.) 4 ¼” BACK FROM THE LEADING EDGE OF THE WING AT THE
WING TIP.
1) Balance the Katana with fuel tank empty otherwise ready to fly.
2) With the wings, stabs and the hatch cover on the plane. Using your fingers pick up the model by the
wing tips. At the proper C.G. location which is 4 ¼” back from the leading edge of the wing tip, the
model should balance at this point. This is a starting point for the C.G. and can be adjusted forward or
aft depending on your flying style.
12
C.G.
4 1/4” back form
leading edge of wing tip
FLYING
We believe the Katana will be one of the finest flying airplanes you will ever fly. The Katana has no bad habits and
very slow speed stall characteristics.
Inverted flight is nearly hands off and knife-edge flight takes little or no mixing to remain straight and true.
Remember the Katana is a large aircraft and picks up speed quickly when coming out of split S type maneuvers or
when needing straight downward. (Always throttle back).
If you have followed the assembly manual instructions and have balance your Katana properly, you will be
rewarded with a highly aerobatic, stable and predictable flying airplane.
13
Secure battery with
hooks and rubber
bands
Always
protect wires
Optional rudder
servo location if
you wish to use a
pull-pull system.
Typical radio and tank installation
Shown with a DA 50 mounted and stock stand-offs
Strip aileron horn
Elevator servo installation
Attaching spring for tail
wheel if using a pull-pull
Tail wheel installation if
rudder servo is in tail
Tank installation
Tank is sitting on
high-density foam
with nylon ties to
hold to floor
14
Available From Aeroworks
ACCESSORIES FOR YOUR 29% KATANA
AEROWORKS REALISTIC PILOTS AVAIALBLE
Available in: Red, Yellow, Blue or Black Shirt color in Head Set version.
DASH PANELS AVAILABLE
WING BAGS AVAILABLE
WING BAG
STAB BAGS AVAILABLE
STAB BAG
HARDWARE PACKAGE AVAILABLE
29% Katana
HARDWARE PACKAGE
PACKING LIST
FUSELAGE
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
2
4
2
2
2
2
1
4
4
4
4/40 x ½ SOCKET HEAD CAP
#4 FLAT WASHER
4/40 BLIND NUTS
10/32 X ¾ SOCKET HEAD CAP
10/32 BLIND NUTS
#10 FLAT WASHER
4/40 X ½ SOCKET HEAD CAP
4/40 BLIND NUTS
#4 FLAT WASHER
5/32 AXLE SHAFTS
5/32 WHEEL COLLARS
3” DIAMETER WHEELS
4/40 x ¾” SOCKET HEAD CAP
#4 FLAT WASHER
4/40 BLIND NUTS
OHIO SUPERSTAR (medium)
4/40 x ½ SOCKET HEAD CAP
#4 FLAT WASHER
4/40 BLIND NUTS
DU571
DU 323
DU 135
DU 580
DU 584
DU 586
DU 571
DU 135
DU 323
DU 248
DU140
DU 300L
MFG279
DU 323
DU 135
DU571
DU 323
DU 135
COWL MOUNT
COWL MOUNT
COWL MOUNT
LANDING GEAR
LANDING GEAR
LANDING GEAR
WHEEL PANTS
WHEEL PANTS
WHEEL PANTS
MAIN WHEELS
MAIN WHEELS
MAIN WHEELS
HATCH COVER
HATCH COVER
HATCH COVER
TAILWHEEL
BOTTOM HATCH
BOTTOM HATCH
BOTTOM HATCH
WINGS
4
4
2
12
2
2
2
4/40 THREADED RODS
4/40 KWICK LINKS
NELSON CONTROL HORN
HINGES
6/32 X 1 ½ SOCKET HEAD CAP
#6 FLAT WASHER
6/32 BLIND NUT
DU 144
DU 305
RCL 70
DU 257
DU 317
DU 327
DU 136
AILERON PUSHRODS
AILERON PUSHRODS
AILERONS
AILERONS
WING RETAINER
WING RETAINER
WING RETAINER
TAIL GROUP
2
2
2
15
2
2
2
1
2
4-40 THREADED RODS
KWICK LINKS (solder)
NELSON CONTROL HORN
HINGES
NELSON CONTROL HORN
4-40 x 3/4 “ SOCKET HEAD CAP
#4 FLAT WASHER
DUBRO PULL-PULL SYSTEM
STRIP AILERON HORN
DU 144
DU 305
RCL 70
DU 257
RCL 70
DU 572
DU 323
DU 518
DU 103
16
ELEVATORS
ELEVATORS
ELEVATORS
ELEVATORS, RUDDER
RUDDER
STAB RETAINER
STAB RETAINER
RUDDER
TAILWHEEL
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