Windows Installer Editor Reference

Windows Installer Editor Reference
Windows Installer Editor
The software described in this book is furnished under a license agreement and may be used only in accordance with the terms of the
agreement.
Documentation version 8.0
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Windows Installer Editor Reference
2
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Windows Installer Editor Reference
3
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Windows Installer Editor Reference
4
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Windows Installer Editor Reference
5
Contents
Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Chapter 1: Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
About Windows Installer Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Product Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Installation Expert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About Page Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing Page Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Current Feature Drop-Down List. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Current Release Drop-Down List . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Task List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Filtering the Task List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finding Table Errors From the Task List. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding User-Defined Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Generating Shared Resource Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation Resources and Their Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Generating Package Contents Reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Downloading Redistributable Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Downloading Redistributables From the Wise Web Site . . . . . .
Downloading Redistributables From Other Vendors’ Web Sites .
Product Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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17
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32
Chapter 2: Setting Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
How you can set up Windows Installer Editor . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting General Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting .NET Assembly Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Advertising Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Digital Signature Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About ExpressBuild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting ExpressBuild Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How ExpressBuild Groups Work . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Requirements for Using ExpressBuild . . . . . . . . .
Setting Installation Expert Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Merge Module Directories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Activating Suppressed Prompts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Repository Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Source Control Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Wildcard Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating and Editing Installation Templates . . . . . . . . . . .
Component Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About Component Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting a Component Rule Set. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Component Rules to Align GUIDs in an Upgrade
Customizing Component Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding and Editing Component Rules . . . . . . . . .
Microsoft Best Practices Component Rule Set . . . . . . .
Windows Installer Editor Reference
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6
One File Per Component Rule Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Chapter 3: Working With Wise Installation Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Before You Create an Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
File Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Project Files and Database Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Target Platforms: 32-bit and 64-bit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Specify the Target Platform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What’s Different in a 64-bit Installation? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
32-bit Applications on 64-bit Computers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guidelines for Creating Platform-Specific Installations. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Multiple, Platform-Specific Installations from One Project File .
Defining the INSTALLDIR Property in a Mixed-Platform Installation.
Starting a New Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About Standard User Installations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating an Installation for Standard Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Device Driver Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Options for New Installations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Opening an Installation Package. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Comparing Windows Installer Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving an Installation as XML . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working With Installations in the Software Manager Database . . . . . . . . . .
Compiling An Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing and Running An Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing An Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running An Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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59
60
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62
63
63
65
66
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69
70
71
71
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77
77
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80
80
81
Chapter 4: Defining an Installation Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Project Summary Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Product Details Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Meta Data to the Software Manager Database . .
Incrementing the Product Version. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Default Installation Directory. . . . . . . . . . .
General Information Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Add/Remove Programs Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Features Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Strategies for Organizing Files Into Features . . . . . . . .
Adding a New Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring a Feature Using Its Drop-Down List . . . . . .
Configuring a Feature Using the Feature Details Dialog .
Using Conditions With Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding and Deleting Feature Conditions . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Binary Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Binary Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Refreshing Binary Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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. 83
. 83
. 86
. 87
. 88
. 89
. 90
. 91
. 92
. 94
. 95
. 96
100
101
102
103
103
Chapter 5: Assembling an Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Files or Web Files Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
When to Use the File-Related Installation Expert Pages .
Installation Directories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Files or Web Files Page Icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Files to an Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Merge Modules Instead of Files . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Files From the Wise Software Repository . . . . .
Windows Installer Editor Reference
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105
107
108
109
109
112
113
7
Adding Contents of Directories to the Installation . . . . . . . .
Adding .NET Assemblies to the Installation . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Assembly Dependencies are Added to an Installation. .
Assembly Dependencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About Dependency Scan Exclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About the Global Dependency Exclusion List . . . . . . . .
Editing Settings for Automatic Updating . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a File From the Destination Computer . . . . . . . .
Copying and Moving Files on the Destination Computer. . . .
Editing File Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing General File Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Permissions for Files and Directories . . . . . . . .
Editing Self-Registration Settings for Files . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Assembly Settings for Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Win32 Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing Shared File Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing XML Files During Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing DIFxApp Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Self-Registration Information is Captured . . . . . . . . . .
Using WiseComCapture.exe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resolving File Conflicts Within Windows Installer Editor. . . . . . .
Resolving Conflicts With Rules in Windows Installer Editor . .
Resolving Conflicts Individually in Windows Installer Editor .
Registry Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Registry Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing Registry Entries From the Destination Computer .
Importing and Exporting Registry Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring General Registry Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Permissions for Registry Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing Shared Registry Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Special Registry Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
INI Files Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating and Editing .INI Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shortcuts Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Shortcut to an Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing a Shortcut Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding an Environment Variable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding File Associations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Determining Extension Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Command Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting MIME Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Services Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Service to the Destination Computer . . . . . . . . . .
Controlling Services on the Destination Computer . . . . . . .
Adding an ODBC Item . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting ODBC Data Source Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting ODBC Driver Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting ODBC Translator Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding to the Windows Firewall Exception List . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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114
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Chapter 6: Your Installation on the Destination Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
About System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Setting a Requirement on the System Requirements Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Setting a System Requirement for Server Roles and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Windows Installer Editor Reference
8
Adding Roles and Services to the Server Roles and Services Dialog Box
Setting a Requirement by Creating a Launch Condition . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performing a System Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching For Files or Directories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching For Items in .INI Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching For a Registry Value. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching For a Previously-Installed Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Version-Specific Windows Installer Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About UAC Elevation of Windows Installer Installations . . . . . . . . . . . .
About UAC Elevation of an Entire Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Features for Installation Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 7: Organizing Your Installation Into Releases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
About Releases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a New Release. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Outputting a Multiple-Language Release . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing a Release . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing Properties for a Release . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing Summary Items for a Release . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining a Feature and Component Set for a Release . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharing Settings Between Releases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example: Creating an Evaluation Release . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Build Options for a Release . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About the Installation of an .MSI into an SVS Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About the Exclusion of Files on the Build Options Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About Maintenance of an .MSI Installed into an SVS Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Prerequisites to a Release . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Windows Installer or .NET Framework Runtime. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Prerequisite File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Runtime Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing the WiseScript That Creates the Installation .EXE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Web-Based Installations With WebDeploy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The WebDeploy Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tips for Creating an Efficient WebDeploy Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a WebDeploy Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Uploading a WebDeploy Installation to the Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up Media for Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Media Item. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Media Destination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Including Features and Components in Media Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharing Media Settings Between Releases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example: Spanning an Installation Across Media and Sharing Media Size Information.
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184
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Chapter 8: Advanced Installations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
About the Mobile Devices Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Process for Adding Mobile Device Support to an Installation
About Windows Mobile Installations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Windows Mobile Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About Palm OS Installations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Palm OS Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Administrator Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifying Search Locations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Options for an Administrative Installation . . . . . . . . . . .
About Command Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows Installer Editor Reference
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9
Creating a Command Line To Apply to an Installation . . . . . .
Applying UI Options to an Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applying Logging Options to an Installation . . . . . . . . . .
Applying an Advertising Option to an Installation . . . . . .
Applying a Repair Option to an Installation . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Public Properties in an Installation . . . . . . . . .
Applying Transforms to an Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applying or Removing Patches With a Command Line . . .
Command Line Options For WFWI.EXE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WFWI.EXE Command Line Option Example . . . . . . . . . .
Automating the Build Process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Digital Signature to an Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating an Installation for Microsoft SMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a .NET Installation When You Have the .NET Framework
Creating a .NET Installation Without the .NET Framework . . . . . .
About Web Installations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Features That Support Web Installations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Web Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Virtual Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a New Web Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Installation Options for a Web Installation . . . . . . . .
Setting Installation Options for a Child Virtual Directory . . . .
About the Web Site Details Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Web Settings From a File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring a Microsoft SQL Server During Installation . . . . . . . .
Tips for Using the SQL Server Scripts Page . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting SQL Connection Strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifying SQL Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifying Replacements in SQL Statements . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing .NET Framework Security Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MTS/COM+ Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding an MTS or COM+ Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 9: Translating an Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266
About the Languages Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Translated .MSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Language Transform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharing Language Settings Between Releases . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a Language from an Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining and Translating Into Additional Languages . . . . . . . . . . . .
About the New Language Wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining a New Language and Exporting All Text for Translation
Importing All Text Strings After Translation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing All Text Strings With the New Language Wizard . . . .
Translating Text Strings You Have Added or Changed . . . . . . . . . . .
Translating Text Strings by Exporting to a File . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exporting Selected Text Strings to a File . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing Selected Text Strings From a File . . . . . . . . . . .
Translating Text Directly Without Exporting It . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Translating Text on the Language Strings Dialog . . . . . . . .
Changing Text in Installation Expert and Setup Editor . . . . .
Resizing Dialog Controls After Translation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About the Language Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Default Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows Installer Editor Reference
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266
268
269
270
271
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273
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276
278
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279
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281
281
282
283
284
284
10
About the Default Release Language. . . . .
About the Language Strings Dialog . . . . . . . . .
Keeping Track of Changed Text Strings . . .
What Pre-Translated Languages Are Available?.
Language IDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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285
286
286
287
288
Chapter 10: Distributing an Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290
Package Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WiseUpdate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The WiseUpdate Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using WiseUpdate in an Installation . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the WiseUpdate Page . . . . . . . . . .
About the WiseUpdate Update File . . . . . . . . .
Customizing the WiseUpdate Dialog Boxes. . . .
Uploading WiseUpdate Files With an FTP Client
Testing WiseUpdate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Options for Running WiseUpdate Client . . . . . . . . .
WiseUpdate Tips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting WiseUpdate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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290
290
292
293
293
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296
297
297
298
299
300
Chapter 11: Upgrading Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
About Upgrading Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preparing for Software Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Archive the Shipping Version of the .MSI. . . . . . .
Determine the Form of the Update . . . . . . . . . . .
Determine the Product Code and Product Version .
Check the Installation With UpgradeSync . . . . . .
UpgradeSync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Patch Creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Upgrades. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating an Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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302
302
302
303
304
304
305
305
305
306
Chapter 12: Working With Source Paths. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308
About source paths. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Source Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding an Installation to Source Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Files to an Installation in Source Control. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking Files Into Source Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking Files Out from Source Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Getting Latest Version of Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing Files from Source Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Undoing the Check Out of Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Showing History of the Installation File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Showing the Differences Between Installation Files. . . . . . . . . . . .
Comparing the Current Installation to the Latest in Source Control.
About Path Variables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Turning Path Variable Substitution On and Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a User-Defined Path Variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Path Variable Based on an Environment Variable . . . . .
Creating a Path Variable Based on a Registry Value . . . . . . . . . . .
Source Paths in an Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Source Directories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Converting to Relative Source File Paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Converting to UNC-Based Source File Paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows Installer Editor Reference
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308
308
309
310
311
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312
313
313
313
314
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315
316
316
317
317
318
319
320
321
11
Changing the Source Directory Dynamically During Compile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321
Chapter 13: Merge Modules and Transforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323
About Merge Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Available Tabs and Pages in Merge Modules . . . . . . . .
Setting Merge Module Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Dependencies for a Merge Module . . . . . .
Setting Exclusions for a Merge Module . . . . . . . .
Creating a Merge Module As a New Installation . . . . .
Creating a Merge Module From Existing Components .
Creating a Configurable Merge Module . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Configuration Item Details . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifying Drop-Down List Values for Substitution
Specifying a Bitfield for Substitution . . . . . . . . . .
Specifying a Key for Substitution . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example: Configuring an Item for a Merge Module
About the Merge Modules Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Merge Module to an Installation . . . . . .
Editing Merge Module Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About Transforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Transform Based on an Existing .MSI . . . .
Setting Transform Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Universal Transform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applying a Transform to an Installation . . . . . . . . . . .
Multiple Instance Installations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Multiple Instances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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323
324
325
326
327
328
329
331
332
333
334
335
336
337
338
340
341
342
343
344
345
346
348
Chapter 14: Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349
About Windows Installer Editor tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ApplicationWatch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Convert SMS Installer or WiseScript Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Converting an SMS Installer or WiseScript Installation . . . . . . .
Import Visual Studio Projects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing an Installation From a Visual Studio Project . . . . . . .
Removing Dependencies from the Project Dependency Exclusion List
Manage Assembly Exclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MSI to WSI Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Converting an .MSI to a .WSI File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifying Merge Module Source Directories . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifying File Source Directories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Package Validation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing Files With Missing or Invalid Source Paths . . . . . . . . . . .
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349
350
350
351
352
353
355
355
356
356
357
358
360
361
Chapter 15: Setup Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 363
About Setup Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Product Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifying Summary Information . . .
Features Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning a Component to a Feature.
Modules Icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Advertising Icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Folder in Setup Editor . . .
Creating Duplicate File Entries . . . . .
Components Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows Installer Editor Reference
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363
365
366
367
368
369
370
371
371
372
12
Component Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding and Editing a Component . . .
Moving Items Between Components .
About the Key Path. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Isolating a .DLL With an .EXE. . . . . .
Adding Published Components . . . . .
Tables Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a New Table . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a New Row in a Table. . . . .
Editing Existing Tables . . . . . . . . . .
Searching for Table Data . . . . . . . . .
Finding Validation Errors . . . . . . . . .
Editing Binary Data in the Icon Table
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374
374
378
378
379
379
380
382
383
383
384
385
386
Chapter 16: Using Conditions and Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387
Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Where Can You Use Conditions? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Condition Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Examples of Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WiseFixConditions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Conditions With Condition Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking the Value of a Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking the Value of an Environment Variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking If and How a Feature or Component is Currently Installed . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking If and How a Feature or Component Will Be Installed by This Installation
Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Do You Use Properties? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a New Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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387
387
389
390
390
391
392
393
394
394
395
396
397
Chapter 17: Working With Dialogs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 399
About Dialogs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About the Wizard Dialogs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Dialogs Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Theme of Dialogs . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding and Editing Dialog Themes . . . . . . . . . .
Importing Text into License and Readme Dialogs
Changing the Order of Web Dialogs . . . . . . . . .
Using the Dialogs Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Controls to Dialogs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Dialog Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a New Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About Dialog Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types of Dialog Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Dialog Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Basic Control Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting an Event on a Control . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning Help to a Control . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning Conditions to a Control . . . . . . . .
Setting the Graphic for a Control . . . . . . . .
Setting the Items in a Control . . . . . . . . . .
Organizing and Aligning Controls on Dialogs . . .
Aligning Dialog Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Centering Dialog Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Making Dialog Controls the Same Size . . . .
Windows Installer Editor Reference
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399
400
402
403
404
405
406
406
408
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411
411
413
413
416
417
417
418
418
419
420
421
421
13
Spacing Dialog Controls Evenly . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Dialog Tab Order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About Billboards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Billboards to a Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Obtaining Logon Information From a Dialog. . . . . . . . . .
Adding the Logon Information Dialog . . . . . . . . . . .
About the SQL Connection Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding the SQL Connection Dialog to an Installation .
Editing Additional SQL Connection Dialogs . . . . . . . .
Adding the Custom Property Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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421
422
422
423
425
425
426
427
428
429
Chapter 18: Macro Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 431
About the Macro Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About Macro Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating, Editing, and Running a Macro.
Events That Can Trigger a Macro . . . . .
About the Macro Editor Window . . . . . . . . .
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431
431
432
433
434
Chapter 19: Debugger for Windows Installer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 436
About the Debugger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Debugger Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running the Debugger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Properties and Applying Transforms in the
Setting and Clearing Debugger Breakpoints . . . . .
Evaluating Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working With Temporary Tables and Columns . . .
Searching For Text in Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Debugger .
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436
436
437
438
438
439
439
439
Chapter 20: Using MSI Script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 440
About MSI Script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The MSI Script Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About Installation Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Custom Action Outside a Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Custom Action to Multiple Sequences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About Installation Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finding Text in MSI Script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types of Actions in MSI Script Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About the Standard and Custom Tabs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding and Editing Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Commenting Out Script Lines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calling WiseScripts with Custom Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Examples of WiseScripts You Run From an .MSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using a WiseScript to Parse a Path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using a WiseScript to Install a License File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Uninstalling Changes Made by a WiseScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting: When WiseScript Custom Actions Fail on Windows Vista or later
Guidelines for Using Custom Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guidelines for Custom Action Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guidelines for Custom Action Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guidelines for Nested Installation Custom Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guidelines for Calling VBScripts and JScripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guidelines for Calling .DLLs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Launching a Custom Action from a Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows Installer Editor Reference
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440
441
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458
14
Troubleshooting Custom Actions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 459
Chapter 21: Custom Action Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 460
About Custom Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Call Custom DLL From Destination . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Call Custom DLL From Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Call Custom DLL From Installed Files . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring .DLL Parameter Settings . . . . . . . . . . .
Call DLL From Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Call DLL From Installed Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Call JScript From Embedded Code . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Call JScript From Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Call JScript From Installed Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Call JScript From Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Call VBScript From Embedded Code . . . . . . . . . . . .
Call VBScript From Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Call VBScript From Installed Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Call VBScript From Property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Display Message. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Download File From Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
End Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Execute Program From Destination . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Execute Program From Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Execute Program From Installed Files . . . . . . . . . . .
Execute Program From Path. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
If Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install MSI From Destination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install MSI From Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install MSI From Relative Path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Launch Web Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Open Document From Installed Files. . . . . . . . . . . .
Pause Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Post Data to HTTP Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Run WiseScript From Destination . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Run WiseScript From Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Run WiseScript From Installed Files . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set Feature State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terminate Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Custom Action Location Tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Custom Action Location Tab for Merge Modules
Using the Custom Action Properties Tab . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Custom Action Description Tab. . . . . . . . . . . .
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461
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Chapter 22: Windows Installer and .NET Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 494
About Microsoft Windows Installer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Frequently Asked Questions About Microsoft Windows Installer
Working With Components and Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About GUIDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About Microsoft .NET Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Frequently Asked Questions About Microsoft .NET . . . . . . . . .
Requirements for Creating a .NET Installation . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows Installer Editor Reference
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15
Appendix A: Wise Custom Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 502
Appendix B: Wise Tables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508
Appendix C: Property Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 512
Build Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 512
INI File Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 516
Run Time Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 519
Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521
Windows Installer Editor Reference
16
Chapter 1
Introduction
This chapter includes the following topics:
z
About Windows Installer Editor on page 17
z
Starting the Software on page 17
z
The Product Interface on page 18
z
Using Installation Expert on page 19
z
Using the Task List on page 25
z
Installation Resources and Their Locations on page 28
z
Generating Package Contents Reports on page 29
z
Downloading Redistributable Files on page 30
z
Downloading Redistributable Files on page 30
z
Product Documentation on page 32
About Windows Installer Editor
Windows Installer Editor is an installation development tool for creating and editing
Windows® Installer (.MSI) installation packages. It is a complete and user-friendly front
end for generating Windows Installer database files, which are executed by the Windows
Installer engine.
With Windows Installer Editor, you can:
z
Create installations that are compliant with the Microsoft Windows 2000, XP, and
Vista logo program.
z
Edit and refine installations that you have converted from other formats.
z
Import development projects.
Microsoft® Windows® Installer is a Microsoft technology that provides a standard
installation engine that can be used for the installation of any 32-bit Windows
application. It resides on the destination computer and performs the installation of
applications. Windows Installer technology provides features that are not available in
traditional installation-building products (examples: self-healing and install-ondemand).
Windows Installer Editor is a tool in Wise Package Studio®.
Starting the Software
To start the software
1.
In Wise Package Studio, do one of the following:
Windows Installer Editor Reference
17
Introduction
2.
„
On the Projects tab, click the Run link to the right of the task or tool associated
with Windows Installer Editor. The installation associated with the current
project might be opened by default. This tool might open to a different view
based on command-line options defined in Process Templates Setup.
„
On the Tools tab, double-click Windows Installer Editor.
Select File menu > New.
The New Installation File dialog box appears.
3.
Complete the dialog box:
a.
In the Categories list, click Predefined Templates.
b.
In the Templates/Tools list, click the Windows Application icon.
The Windows Application icon lets you create a standard installation. You can
create other types of installations.
See Starting a New Installation on page 70 and Options for New Installations on
page 73.
c.
In the File type section, specify the type of file to create.
d.
In Target Platform, specify whether this installation is enabled for 32-bit, 64bit (x64), or 64-bit (Itanium) platforms. This sets the initial target platform for
the Default release.
e.
If the application has been written to be installed and run by standard users
without elevation, mark Create a Vista Standard User Installation. This
clears the Enable User Account Control (UAC) check box in Installation
Expert > Windows Installer Options page.
See Creating an Installation for Standard Users on page 71.
f.
Click OK.
The new installation opens.
The Product Interface
Windows Installer Editor has the following views, each of which provides you with a
different development environment.
Installation Expert
Installation Expert lets you create basic Windows Installer
installations and provides an easy-to-use, task-oriented user
interface to perform the most common installation tasks.
Each page of Installation Expert lets you configure a specific
aspect of your installation.
See Using Installation Expert on page 19.
Windows Installer Editor Reference
18
Introduction
MSI Script
MSI Script provides a powerful yet easy-to-use environment
for editing Windows Installer installation sequences. A
sequence is a set of actions that are performed during a
particular type of installation.
MSI Script is easy to work with even if you are not familiar
with the underlying Windows Installer technology. Just
double-click the custom action to add to your sequence or
start typing the action name, then fill out options for the
action. A new line based on the action and the options you
entered appears in the sequence at the location of the last
selected action. The resulting sequence is displayed in clear,
readable statements.
See About MSI Script on page 440
Setup Editor
Setup Editor is a powerful view of the installation, and using
its advanced features requires proficiency in the Windows
Installer development environment or in software
development. Setup Editor lets you create fully customized
interactive installations. Certain advanced tasks can be
performed only in Setup Editor.
See About Setup Editor on page 363.
To navigate between views, click the navigation tabs at the lower left of the main
window.
Additional Interfaces
z
The Tools menu contains powerful tools that perform specialized functions.
See About Windows Installer Editor tools on page 349.
z
The Compile, Test, Debug, and Run buttons let you test and compile the installation.
See Compiling An Installation on page 78, Testing and Running An Installation on
page 80, and About the Debugger on page 436.
Using Installation Expert
To access Installation Expert, click Installation Expert at the lower left of the Windows
Installer Editor main window.
Windows Installer Editor Reference
19
Introduction
Installation Expert window in Windows Installer Editor
Page Views
Page Area
Page Groups
Compile and Test
View Navigation
Page Views
Use the Page Views drop-down list to select a page view, which is a set of Installation
Expert page groups and pages.
See About Page Views on page 21 and Customizing Page Views on page 22.
Page Groups
When you select a page view, its pages are organized into page groups.
Click the group name to expand or collapse its pages. Click a page name to display that
page.
Page Area
When you click a page name in a page group, this area displays the page’s options. Each
page lets you define a specific aspect of the installation. (Examples: On the Files page,
you define what files are included in the installation. On the Registry page, you define
what registry keys and values are created on the destination computer.) Complete only
the pages that are pertinent to your particular installation, in any order. If required
information is missing, an error message appears during compile.
z
Use
on the toolbar to navigate from page to page, or click the page name in
the list of pages.
z
To display help for the current page, press F1.
z
To return a page to its last saved state, select Edit menu > Reset Page.
View Navigation
Click these tabs to change views.
Windows Installer Editor Reference
20
Introduction
Compiling and Testing
Compile, Test, Debug, and Run buttons test and compile the installation.
See also:
Using the Current Release Drop-Down List on page 24
Using the Current Feature Drop-Down List on page 23
About Page Views
A page view is a set of Installation Expert page groups and pages that you select from
the Page Views drop-down list. Select a page view to display only specific page groups
and pages.
Types of Page Views
z
Predefined page views that display the groups and pages most frequently used for a
particular type of installation. The All page view displays all page groups and pages.
The Merge Module page view appears for all merge modules. You cannot edit or
delete predefined page views.
z
Custom page views that you create to meet your specific needs.
See Customizing Page Views on page 22.
z
Page views that are created when you create an installation template. You cannot
delete these page views.
See Creating and Editing Installation Templates on page 48.
The page views are arranged alphabetically in the Page Views drop-down list with the
exception of the All page view, which is always first. The list also includes <New
View...> and <Customize Page Views...>, which are at the end of the list and are
used to create or customize page views.
Predefined Templates and Page Views
Most predefined installation templates have an associated page view. When you create a
new installation by using one of these templates, the page view that is associated with
that template becomes the default page view of the installation. When you open the
installation, this page view appears in the Page Views drop-down list.
You can select a different page view from the list at any time, except when you are
working in a merge module or universal transform. Merge module and universal
transform projects cannot use other page views, and their page views cannot be used
with other types of projects.
When you select a different page view, it changes the pages displayed in Installation
Expert but does not change the installation type. If you change the page view and save
the installation, this new page view displays the next time you open the installation,
unless you clear the Display the page view associated with a project when a
project is opened check box in Wise Options.
Custom Templates and Page Views
When you create a custom installation template, a page view is created with the same
name and is listed in the Page Views drop-down list.
See Creating and Editing Installation Templates on page 48.
Windows Installer Editor Reference
21
Introduction
When you use a template to create an installation, the default page view is the page
view that was displayed when the template was created. If the template’s default page
view is a custom page view, you can customize it.
See Customizing Page Views on page 22.
You can share page views that are associated with an installation template because the
page view is stored in the template, which is located in the share point directory.
Which Page View Appears?
z
The Display the page view associated with a project when a project is
opened check box in Wise Options determines what page view appears. If you clear
this check box, the page view in Installation Expert does not change when you open
a project regardless of its associated page view.
See Setting Installation Expert Options on page 42.
z
The All page view is used when you open an installation file that does not have an
associated page view. An .MSI does not have an associated page view.
See also:
Using Installation Expert on page 19
Customizing Page Views
You can create customized Installation Expert page views that display only the page
groups and pages that you use most often. You can customize the page view of custom
installation templates or create customized page views that are not associated with a
template. You cannot customize the predefined page views, but you can make a copy of
a predefined page view and then customize it.
When you customize a page view, you can specify how many page groups appear, what
the group names are, and what pages appear under each group.
Customized Page Views dialog box
Buttons to edit page groups
and pages are unavailable
when a predefined page
view is selected in Page
View Name.
These pages appear under
the group selected in Page
Groups.
The page groups appear on
the left side of Installation
Expert.
Windows Installer Editor Reference
22
Introduction
To create a page view
1.
From the Page Views drop-down list in Installation Expert, select <New View...>.
The Enter Name dialog box appears.
2.
Enter a name for the page view.
To create an access key for the name, type & (ampersand) before a letter in the
name. The page view access keys appear only in the page group’s right-click menu,
which you access from the context menu key (the key next to the right Ctrl key).
3.
Click OK.
On the Customized Page Views dialog box, the new page view is selected in Page
View Name, but it has no page groups or page names.
4.
To copy the page groups and pages of an existing page view:
a.
Click Copy View. The Copy View dialog box appears.
b.
Select the page view to copy and click OK.
The Merge Module and Universal Transform page views do not appear on the list
because they cannot be copied.
You can now customize the page view by changing its page groups and pages.
To customize a page view
1.
From the Page Views drop-down list in Installation Expert, select <Customize
Page Views...>.
The Customize Page Views dialog box appears.
2.
3.
Select the page view from Page View Name, and do any of the following:
„
To add a new page group, click the Page Groups Add button and enter a name.
„
To rename a page group, select the page group and click Rename.
„
To add a page to a page group, select the page group and click the Add button
to the right of Page Names. On the Select Pages to Add dialog box, select one
or more pages and click OK.
„
To delete a page group or a page name, select it and click its Delete button.
Click OK on the Customize Page Views dialog box.
To delete a page view, select it from Page View Name and click the top Delete button.
See also:
Using Installation Expert on page 19
Using the Current Feature Drop-Down List
The Current Feature drop-down list appears on pages in the Feature Details page
group. When it appears, you can set options on a per-feature or per-condition basis. You
add features and conditions on the Features page, then select a feature from Current
Feature before setting options on other pages.
Windows Installer Editor Reference
23
Introduction
Current Feature drop-down list
Example: Suppose you have three features, and each feature requires different registry
entries. On the Registry page, you select the first feature from Current Feature, create
its registry entries, select the second feature in the list, create its registry entries, and
so on.
During installation, files, registry entries, and other system changes are installed only if
the feature they belong to is installed.
The same applies to conditions; add files, registry entries, and other changes to a
condition, and during installation, those files and registry entries are installed only if the
condition is true and the feature is installed.
The All Features (Modify/Delete only) option in Current Feature displays
information for all features at once. (Example: On the Files page this option displays all
folders and files for all features.) Add and New buttons are unavailable while all features
are displayed; you must select a single feature to add items.
On some pages, Current Feature also contains numbers in parentheses, which
represents the number of that page’s items (files or registry keys) that are assigned to
each feature or condition.
See also:
Using the Current Release Drop-Down List on page 24
Using Installation Expert on page 19
Using the Current Release Drop-Down List
The Current Release drop-down list appears on pages in the Release Definition page
group. When it appears, you can set options on a per-release basis by selecting a
feature from Current Release and then setting options on that page.
Current Release drop-down list
A release is a special version of your application. Example: a 30-day evaluation release
for evaluators. Use Current Release to configure separate settings, media, and
language options for each release.
See also:
Windows Installer Editor Reference
24
Introduction
Using Installation Expert on page 19
Using the Current Feature Drop-Down List on page 23
Using the Task List
When Windows Installer Editor encounters installation issues that could cause problems,
it displays them in the Task List. You can manually display or hide the Task List from the
View menu.
The Task List gathers all installation issues into one place, and makes it easy to analyze
their causes. If the issue is caused by an error in a table, you can quickly jump from the
Task List to the row in the table that caused the error.
See Finding Table Errors From the Task List on page 27.
When you resolve the issue that corresponds to a task, the task is deleted the next time
you run the procedure that generated the task. Example: If a task was added to the
Task List because of a compile error and you resolve that error, the next time you
compile the installation that task is deleted.
How Tasks are Added to the Task List
z
Save or Compile
If errors occur when you save or compile an installation, the errors are displayed in
the Task List.
z
Package Validation
When you run Package Validation, validation issues appear on the View / Correct
dialog box. If you mark the Add to Task List check box on the View / Correct
dialog box, each issue becomes a task in the Task List when you click Finish. If
Package Validation encounters save or compile errors, the package validation
process ends and the errors are added to the Task List.
See About Package Validation in the Wise Package Studio Help.
z
Check Tables
When you check tables, the installation is searched for component and table errors
and results are placed in the Task List. To check tables, select Setup Editor > Tables
tab, right-click in the left pane and select Check Tables.
See Finding Validation Errors on page 385.
z
User-Defined
You can add user-defined tasks to the task list.
See Adding User-Defined Tasks on page 27.
Note
When you close an installation, all tasks, except user-defined tasks, are removed from
the Task List.
Task List Icons
The following icons help you quickly identify the types of tasks in the Task List:
Windows Installer Editor Reference
25
Introduction
An error that will cause incorrect behavior and must be fixed
Validation issues found by Package Validation
See About Package Validation in the Wise Package Studio Help.
A task you created
This icon also appears with a task that reminds you to add the
package meta data to the Software Manager database.
Operations you can perform in the Task List
z
Filter tasks by type.
See Filtering the Task List.
z
Find table errors.
See Finding Table Errors From the Task List on page 27.
z
Sort a Task List column by clicking its header.
z
Copy a task’s description by right-clicking its description.
z
Delete a task by right-clicking its description.
Filtering the Task List
To filter the task list
1.
Right-click in the Task List and select Show Tasks.
2.
Select a filter.
„
Save/Compile
Tasks that correspond to errors that are generated when you save or compile.
„
Validation
Tasks that correspond to issues that are generated during Package Validation.
„
Component
Tasks that correspond to component errors that are generated when you check
tables.
See Using the Task List on page 25.
„
Table
Tasks that correspond to table validation errors that are generated when you
check tables.
See Using the Task List on page 25.
„
User-Defined
Tasks that you have created.
When you set a filter, it is in effect until you change it. However, when you encounter
installation issues, the filter is reset to All so installation issues can be displayed.
Windows Installer Editor Reference
26
Introduction
Finding Table Errors From the Task List
If a task is associated with a table, you can access that table directly from the Task List,
which helps you discover the problem that caused the issue.
Example: If a source file for the installation was moved or deleted at its source, a
WiseSourcePath table error appears during compile. When you double-click this task,
the WiseSourcePath table appears in Setup Editor, and the row in the table that is the
cause of the problem is highlighted. Use the source path information in the row to
ascertain and resolve the problem.
Warning
Deleting, adding, or editing table data directly is not recommended unless you are an
experienced Windows Installer developer with a clear understanding of Windows
Installer database technology. Editing table data might cause unexpected, undesirable
behavior, including damage to the installation. We cannot provide technical support for
problems arising from table editing.
To find table errors from the Task List:
If the task has a table listed in the Table column, double-click the task. The table is
displayed in Setup Editor > Tables tab, and the row in the table associated with the task
is highlighted.
If you need more information, check the task’s description or press F1 to display the
help topic for the selected table in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
See also:
Tables Tab on page 380
Using the Task List on page 25
Adding User-Defined Tasks
You can add tasks to the Task List. Example: Add user-defined tasks to define work that
must be completed on the installation. Tasks you add to the Task List are saved with the
installation. You can only add user-defined tasks to a .WSI; you cannot add them to an
.MSI.
To add a user-defined task
1.
On the first line of the Task List, click Click here to add a new item twice and type
the task.
If Click here to add a new item does not appear in the Task List, save the
installation file and it will appear.
2.
Click anywhere outside the box that contains the new task.
The task is added to the Task List and appears in the Description column. Userdefined tasks do not use the Tables column.
See also:
Using the Task List on page 25
Windows Installer Editor Reference
27
Introduction
Generating Shared Resource Reports
The following shared resource reports provide a quick way to review the resources that
are shared by the current installation and other packages in the Software Manager
database.
z
Shared Files Report
Lists the files that are shared by the current installation and packages in the
Software Manager database. For each file, the report lists each application that uses
the file and shows detailed file information (examples: version, date/time, path, and
so on).
z
Shared Registry Report
Lists the registry keys that are shared by the current installation and packages in
the Software Manager database. For each registry key, the report lists each
application that uses the registry key and shows the key value.
The reports are displayed in HTML format. The .XSL templates used to format these
reports are in the Templates\Reports subdirectory of the share point directory. You can
customize the .XSL templates to supply branding information, to filter data, or to
transform the data to another format.
To generate a shared resource report
1.
Select Reports menu and select either Shared Files or Shared Registry.
The Welcome dialog box appears.
2.
In Data Source, specify the Software Manager database that contains the
resources you want to review. If the Software Manager database you want is not
listed, click Open to select it.
3.
From Group, select the group that contains the packages to compare this
installation to.
4.
Click Next.
The report is generated and displayed in the Shared Files Report or Shared Registry
Report dialog box.
You can save the or print the report from this dialog box. Saving to HTML is
available only on computers that contain MSXML.DLL, which is included in Internet
Explorer 5.x and higher.
5.
When you finish reviewing, saving, or printing the report, click Finish.
Installation Resources and Their Locations
Windows Installer Editor uses various resources to create installations. (Example:
installation templates, component rules, language files, and so on.) Most of these
resources are installed with this product. Others must be created and placed in the
appropriate directory before they can be used.
(Standard Edition.) These resources are in subdirectories of the Windows Installer Editor
installation directory.
(Professional Edition.) These resources are stored in subdirectories of the share point
directory. The share point directory also contains subdirectories that are specific to the
Wise Package Studio Workbench. For a description of those subdirectories, see Wise
Package Studio Directories in the Wise Package Studio Help.
Windows Installer Editor Reference
28
Introduction
You can specify alternate locations for storing resources.
See Setting Repository Preferences in the Wise Package Studio Help.
Directory
Contents
Custom Actions
Files that you create to use in custom actions, such as WiseScripts, VBScripts, .DLLs,
and so on, that you use in Windows Installer installations.
Languages
Language resource files that are used to change the language of installations.
Merge Modules
The default merge modules directory is Program Files\Common Files\Merge
Modules\Wise Solutions. This is the default target location for downloading merge
modules, and the default directory from which you select merge modules to add to an
installation.
Resources
Installation resources such as bitmap and icon files.
Templates
Macros and additional template files that are used by Package Distribution. Also
contains templates that are used to create a new installation.
Templates\Dialogs
The Wise Standard.MSI that provides information that is used by the New Dialog
Wizard to add a new dialog box to an installation.
Templates\Reports
Templates that are used to format the shared resources reports in Windows Installer
Editor. These reports are available only when you have a repository connection in
Wise Installation Studio.
Themes
Themes.ini, which stores information about themes you have added or customized.
Also contains subdirectories that store the images for each theme.
Validation
Predefined validation modules (.CUB files) that are used by Package Validation.
Generating Package Contents Reports
Package contents reports provide an overview of the contents of an installation file and
make it easy to provide this information to end users. The following reports are
available:
z
Package Contents Summary
Lists detailed information for every resource in an installation, including files,
registry keys, shortcuts, file associations, and merge modules. You can generate
this report for .WSI, .MSI, .WSM, and .MSM files.
z
Package Contents By Feature
Contains the same information as the Package Contents Summary report, but
arranges it by feature. You can generate this report for .WSI and .MSI files.
To generate a package contents report
1.
Select Reports menu > Package Contents and select either Summary or By Feature.
2.
The report is generated and opens in a dialog box.
Use a report’s table of contents to quickly access information about a specific type of
resource. You can print the report or save it as an HTML or XML file.
Windows Installer Editor Reference
29
Introduction
Downloading Redistributable Files
The Download Redistributables wizard, available from the Help menu, lets you obtain
merge modules, Windows Installer runtime installers, and .NET Framework runtime
installers. You need the Windows Installer runtimes if you decide to pre-install Windows
Installer with an installation. You need the .NET Framework if you are creating an
installation that contains .NET elements. Because of size and obsolescence
considerations, these files are distributed through the Internet.
This wizard appears any time Windows Installer Editor detects a dependency on other
merge modules or other redistributables. Example: If you run ApplicationWatch and it
adds a file that must be installed with a certain merge module, the Download
Redistributables wizard appears and prompts you to download the necessary merge
module. This wizard might also appear if you install runtimes with the installation, or if
you add files to the installation that are part of a merge module.
Download redistributable files from the following locations:
Wise Web Site
Select and download one or more redistributables from the
Wise Web site.
See Downloading Redistributables From the Wise Web Site
on page 30.
Other Vendors’ Web
Sites
Select and download a redistributable from a third-party
vendor’s Web site. Available redistributables are authored
by the respective vendor, and you need to contact the
vendor for information or help on these redistributables.
See Downloading Redistributables From Other Vendors’ Web
Sites on page 31.
If you need to go through a firewall or proxy server to get to the Internet, the Download
Redistributables wizard uses your browser’s proxy settings. To change your Internet
connection settings, refer to your browser’s documentation.
Downloading Redistributables From the Wise Web Site
You must be in an active Wise installation to follow this procedure.
To download redistributables from the Wise Web Site
1.
Select Help menu > Download Redistributables.
The Source Location dialog box appears.
2.
Mark Wise Web Site and click Next.
A Download Files dialog box appears while all available redistributable files are
retrieved. The Available Redistributable Files dialog box then appears.
3.
From Redistributable Type, select the type of redistributable to download.
4.
In the Modules Available or Versions Available list, mark one or more check
boxes for the redistributables to download.
5.
Click Next.
Windows Installer Editor Reference
30
Introduction
If you chose to download any merge modules, the Target Location dialog box
appears, where you specify merge modules’ download location; otherwise the
download starts and you can skip the next step. Runtimes are downloaded to
private directories where they are accessed as needed by Windows Installer Editor.
6.
From Target Location, select the directory to download the selected merge
modules to, then click Next.
The drop-down list shows all merge module directories specified in Wise Options.
See Setting Merge Module Directories on page 43.
The selected redistributables are downloaded from the Internet.
7.
Click Finish on the Download Files dialog box to finish the wizard.
The merge modules you selected are now in the directory you specified as the target
location. If any merge modules had dependencies on other merge modules, those
merge modules were also downloaded. Other runtimes are located in their required
directories.
See also:
Downloading Redistributable Files on page 30
Downloading Redistributables From Other Vendors’ Web Sites
You must be in an active Wise installation to follow this procedure. We have no control
over other vendor’s redistributable files. Check with the vendor for product support.
To download redistributables from other vendors’ Web sites
1.
Select Help menu > Download Redistributables.
The Source Location dialog box appears.
2.
Mark Other Vendors’ Web Sites and click Next.
When all available redistributables are retrieved, the Available Redistributable Files
dialog box appears.
3.
In the list box, select the redistributable to download and then click Download to
connect to the vendor’s Web site.
4.
Follow the links and prompts on the Web site to download the redistributable. Be
sure to download merge modules to a directory specified in Wise Options.
See Setting Merge Module Directories on page 43.
5.
When the download is complete, return to the Available Redistributable Files dialog
box and click Finish.
The merge modules and other runtimes you selected are now in the directory you
specified as the target location. If any merge modules had dependencies on other merge
modules, those merge modules were also downloaded.
See also:
Downloading Redistributable Files on page 30
Windows Installer Editor Reference
31
Introduction
Product Documentation
This documentation assumes that you are proficient in the use of the Windows operating
system. If you need help using the operating system, consult its user documentation.
Use the following sources of information to learn about this product.
Online Help
The online help contains detailed technical information and step-by-step instructions for
performing common tasks.
Access help in the following ways:
z
To display context-sensitive help for the active window or dialog box, press F1.
z
To select a help topic from a table of contents, index, or search, select Help menu >
Help Topics.
Reference Manual
All the material in the online help is also available in a .PDF-format reference manual,
which you can access by selecting Help menu > Reference Manual.
Getting Started Guide
The Getting Started Guide contains system requirements, installation instructions, and a
tutorial. You can access a .PDF version of the Getting Started Guide from the Windows
Start menu.
Windows Installer SDK Help
You can get technical details about Windows Installer from its own help system, which is
written by Microsoft for a developer audience. In Wise for Windows Installer, select Help
menu > Windows Installer SDK Help.
Version 4.5 of the Windows Installer SDK Help is provided. If you have obtained a later
version, links from the Wise product documentation to the Windows Installer SDK Help
might not work.
Release Notes
The product release notes cover new features, enhancements, bug fixes, and known
issues for the current version of this product. To access the release notes, select Release
Notes from the Symantec program group on the Windows Start menu.
Windows Installer Editor Reference
32
Chapter 2
Setting Up
This chapter includes the following topics:
z
How you can set up Windows Installer Editor on page 33
z
Setting Options on page 33
z
Creating and Editing Installation Templates on page 48
z
Component Rules on page 49
How you can set up Windows Installer Editor
Before you create and edit installations, set up Windows Installer Editor to reflect your
organization’s standards:
z
Set options that control the installations you create and determine the installation
resources you use.
See Setting Options on page 33.
z
Decide whether you need to customize the templates that installations are based
on.
See Creating and Editing Installation Templates on page 48.
z
Decide which rule set to use to help you manage the creation of components in
installations. You can edit the predefined rule sets or create new rule sets. If the
predefined rule sets do not meed your needs, you can duplicate them and modify
the copies as needed, or you can create new rule sets.
See Component Rules on page 49.
Setting Options
You can set options that control the installations you create and determine the
installation resources you use. Some of the options are global; they are set for all files
you open with Windows Installer Editor, including files you created previously. Other
options provide defaults for new files and do not affect existing files.
You set options on the Options dialog box, which you access by selecting Tools menu >
Options.
The Options dialog box contains the following tabs. See:
Setting General Options
Setting .NET Assembly Options on page 35
Setting Advertising Options on page 37
Setting Digital Signature Options on page 38
Setting ExpressBuild Options on page 40
Setting Installation Expert Options on page 42
Setting Merge Module Directories on page 43
Activating Suppressed Prompts on page 44
Windows Installer Editor Reference
33
Setting Up
Setting Source Control Options on page 46
Setting Wildcard Groups on page 47
Setting General Options
To set general options, select Tools menu > Options and click the General tab.
Automatic Options
z
Create backup copy during save
Mark this to create a new backup file every time you save. The backup file name
consists of the current file name plus a number. (Example: if the current file name is
Sample.wsi, the backups are named Sample1.wsi, Sample2.wsi, and so on.) Only
the file you are working on is backed up. (Example: if you open a .WSI and save it,
the corresponding .MSI is not backed up.) Use caution with this option if you are
working with large installation files; if you save often, your disk space will quickly
become depleted.
This can be set automatically from Wise Package Studio Preferences; use this check
box to override the Package Studio setting.
z
Add default remarks to installation sequences
Although most Wise project (.WSI) files have remarks that explain the actions in the
sequences, compiled .MSIs do not. Mark this to add remarks to the current .MSI and
all .MSIs that you open subsequently. Remarks are added to .WSIs only if no
remarks already exist.
z
Create XML copy during save
Mark this to update a copy of the installation in XML format every time you save. If
a copy does not exist, it is created. The copy has the same name as the installation
file with the extension .XML appended, and it is saved in the same directory.
(Example: If the current file name is Application.wsi, the XML copy is named
Application.wsi.xml.) This lets you check the XML version of the installation into a
source code control system and use text-based file comparison tools to find
changes.
See Saving an Installation as XML on page 77.
Compiler Options
The following options are default settings for all new compiles. Changing these settings
does not affect installations that have already been compiled.
z
Add custom actions for predefined folders in merge modules
This affects the merging of merge modules that place files in predefined directories,
such as \Windows, \System32, and so on. Mark this to have the merge emulate the
behavior of the Microsoft merge tool, mergemod.dll, which uses custom actions to
handle predefined directories. Clearing this check box can fix potential problems
with capitalization inconsistencies in the directory name.
Windows Installer Editor Reference
34
Setting Up
Note
Windows Installer Editor has its own code for merging a module into an .MSI, but
this check box causes your merge to follow the Microsoft conventions for merging.
Microsoft’s merging code adds a custom action to the installation for each
predefined directory referenced in each included merge module. The custom action
uses a Set Property action to set the predefined directory name, whereas the
Windows Installer Editor code sets the predefined directory name by adding an item
to the Directory table of the Windows Installer database.
z
Display error if merge modules conflict with main installation rows
Merge module errors occur if a merge module contains a row that has the same key
as a row in the main installation. Clear this to ignore such errors and let the merge
module row overwrite the row in the main installation.
z
Enable Quick Compile
Mark this to speed the compile process by compressing only previously
uncompressed or changed files. Quick Compile writes the .MSI table information. If
a file or media has changed, a full compile will occur instead. Quick Compile is for
project files only. You can also speed compile time by using ExpressBuild, a multiprocessor compile feature.
See About ExpressBuild on page 39.
Software Virtualization Options
z
Install into virtual layer from Run button
Mark this to install an installation into a virtual layer when you click the Run button.
This creates a new layer, installs the .MSI into the layer, and activates the layer.
After you test the installation, you can delete the layer to restore your computer to
its original state.
See Running An Installation on page 81.
Startup Options
z
Reload last project at startup
Mark this to open the last installation you worked on when you start Windows
Installer Editor.
See also:
Setting Options on page 33
Setting .NET Assembly Options
¾ Windows Installer 2.0 or later only.
You can specify whether you create standard Win32 or .NET installations, and customize
how Windows Installer Editor handles the .NET assemblies.
To set options:
Select Tools menu > Options and click the .NET Assemblies tab. Complete the tab.
Windows Installer Editor Reference
35
Setting Up
If the options on the .NET Assemblies tab are unavailable, install the .NET Framework
and run a manual repair of the Windows Installer Editor .MSI from Add/Remove
Programs.
COM Interop Options
z
z
Default Application Type
This determines the default setting for the Application Type field on the Product
Details page for new installations. Changing this field does not affect existing
installations.
„
Win 32 (non .NET)
Select this if you typically create standard Win32 installations without .NET
assemblies.
„
.NET Application
Select this if you typically create .NET installations with only .NET elements.
„
Mixed (.NET and Win32)
Select this if you typically create installations containing both Win32 and .NET
elements. When this option is selected, .NET assemblies you add to an
installation are registered so that they can be called as though they were COM
components. For information on COM interoperability, search for “Interoperating
with Unmanaged Code” in the MSDN Library (msdn.microsoft.com/library/).
Rescan COM interop registry keys on compile
Mark this to scan and update interop registry keys for .NET assemblies each time
you compile. This check box is available only if the .NET Framework is installed on
your computer.
Assembly Scanning Options
The scanning options are available only if the .NET Framework is installed on your
computer.
z
Scan Dependencies
Specify how dependency assemblies are added to an installation. You can add them
manually or have Windows Installer Editor scan the assembly manifest for
dependencies and add them automatically. Changing this option does not affect
assemblies that have already been added to installations.
„
Never scan dependencies
If you select this, you must add dependency assemblies to installations
manually on the Files or Web Files page.
„
Prompt to scan dependencies
When you add a .NET assembly to an installation, Windows Installer Editor
scans its manifest for dependencies and prompts you to select which ones to
add to the installation.
„
Always scan dependencies
When you add a .NET assembly to an installation, Windows Installer Editor
scans its manifest for dependencies and adds them to the installation.
z
Rescan assembly dependencies on compile
Mark this to scan for new assembly dependencies each time you compile.
z
Rescan assembly attributes on compile
Mark this to rescan and update assembly attributes each time you compile. This
check box is marked by default.
Windows Installer Editor Reference
36
Setting Up
Note
On .NET Framework versions earlier than 1.1, the scan does not occur when you add an
assembly from a UNC or mapped network drive (example: the share point directory). To
enable scanning of such assemblies, either upgrade to .NET Framework version 1.1 or
later, or change your .NET security so that the share point directory is fully trusted.
See also:
Setting Options on page 33
Setting Advertising Options
You can specify how to gather self-registration and advertising information for files you
add to an installation. Windows Installer considers some kinds of registry entries, such
as file extension definitions, to be advertising information.
See Platform Support of Advertisement in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
The Advertising options are default settings for all new components. Changing these
settings will not affect existing components.
To set options:
Select Tools menu > Options and click the Advertising tab. Complete the tab.
z
Advertising Setting
Select one of the “scan” options to have Windows Installer Editor inspect your
computer’s registry and the files in the installation and automatically add Windows
Installer advertising information for the files that you add to the installation.
The different scan options let you determine whether the advertising information is
added to the advertising tables (AppId, Class, Extension, Mime, ProgId, TypeLib,
Verb), to the registry, or both. The scan options also cause AppPath registry
information to be added to the installation automatically, although it is not related to
advertising. Only AppPath information at
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\App Paths\ is
added.
This registration method is preferred over self-registration because it does not
depend on the presence of other files on the destination computer, nor does it
depend on how well the .OCX or .DLL file adheres to self-registration conventions.
However, the .OCX or .DLL files must already be registered correctly on your
computer. If you prefer not to register installation files on your computer, you can
run the scan routine as a stand-alone utility on a different computer.
See Using WiseComCapture.exe on page 134.
„
Do not scan advertising information
Use self-registration for components that support it. Windows Installer Editor
will not scan files or the registry.
„
Scan advertising information into registry keys
Add advertising information to the installation as registry keys only; do not
create entries in advertising tables. This results in an installation that does not
support advertising through COM.
Windows Installer Editor Reference
37
Setting Up
„
Scan advertising information into advertising tables
Place registry entries that are considered to be advertising information into
advertising tables. Create registry entries for any information that cannot be
placed in the advertising tables. This results in an installation that supports
advertising.
„
Scan advertising into both advertising tables and registry
Place registry entries that are considered to be advertising information into
advertising tables and into registry keys. As a result, all advertising information
is included in the installation; none is lost.
Warning
When registry entries are created for any information that cannot be placed in the
advertising tables, the installation is more accurate because no information is lost.
However, this might cause an error or warning when you run the Application
Specification Logo test in Package Validation.
z
Automatically add self-registration
Mark this to add self-registration information to the installation whenever you add
an .OCX or .DLL file that supports self-registration. Typically, .OCX and .DLL files are
self-registered dynamically on the destination computer by calling self-registration
functions. If you mark this check box, Windows Installer registers your .OCX and
.DLL files. The .DLL or .OCX may require certain files to be installed already in order
to self-register properly.
Scanning the advertising information into the advertising tables is recommended
over self-registration.
z
Default to rescan advertising for new components
If the advertising information contained in your files might change during the
development process, mark this to scan the advertising information and update the
installation every time you compile. The scan options in the Advertising Setting
field above only read the advertising information that’s present in the file when you
first add it to the installation.
This field sets the default for new components; if you change it, existing
components are not affected. The Rescan advertising information during
compile check box on the Component Details dialog box can override this setting
for individual components.
See also:
Setting Options on page 33
Setting Digital Signature Options
You can add a digital signature to an installation on the Digital Signature page. You also
can add a digital signature to a patch in Patch Creation.
The Digital Signature options provide default settings for the Digital Signature page and
Patch Creation. These options apply to all future installation and patch files. They do not
affect existing files.
To set options:
Select Tools menu > Options and click the Digital Signature tab. Complete the tab.
Windows Installer Editor Reference
38
Setting Up
z
z
Signing with Public/Private Key Pair Files
„
Signcode.exe Location
Enter the path of the signcode.exe that performs the signing tasks.
„
Credentials File
Enter the path of the credentials file that contains your Digital ID.
„
Private Key File
Enter the path of the private key file (.PVK). If this key is lost or stolen, contact
your certificate authority immediately.
Signing with Personal Information Exchange Files
„
Signtool.exe Location
Enter the path of the signtool.exe that performs the signing tasks.
„
Personal Information Exchange (.pfx) File
Enter the path of your Personal Information Exchange file (.PFX).
See also:
Adding a Digital Signature to a Patch in the Wise Package Studio Help
Adding a Digital Signature to an Installation on page 240
Setting Options on page 33
About ExpressBuild
¾ Not available in Standard Edition.
Note
For multi-processor compile to occur using distributed computers, all source files of the
installation must be on a shared drive and must be specified in the installation with UNC
paths. (Example: \\SERVER\File.exe). In addition, when you open the installation file,
you must open it in such a way that it is referenced by a UNC path. Example: After you
select File > Open, browse to the installation underneath the My Network Places icon or
type the entire UNC path in the File Name field. These requirements do not apply to
using multiple processors within one computer.
With ExpressBuild™, you can use multiple processors to speed compile time for large
builds. Use multiple processors on the local computer, and use the main processor of
multiple distributed computers (called a build group). The processors on the local
computer can be physical or virtual processors. You can also set up your own computer
to provide processing power for another build computer.
ExpressBuild speeds compile time by distributing the time-consuming task of
compressing .CAB files among multiple processors. Therefore, the greatest time savings
are realized when you have multiple .CAB files. Specify .CAB file creation rules in
Installation Expert > Media page.
See:
Setting ExpressBuild Options
How ExpressBuild Groups Work on page 41
Requirements for Using ExpressBuild on page 41
Windows Installer Editor Reference
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Setting Up
Setting ExpressBuild Options
¾ Not available in Standard Edition.
If you turn ExpressBuild on, it is turned on globally; that is, it is in effect for all
installation files you open, regardless of when they were created.
Before you use ExpressBuild, verify that you meet the requirements for using
ExpressBuild options and review the reasons why multi-processor compile might not
work.
See Requirements for Using ExpressBuild on page 41.
To set options:
Select Tools menu > Options and click the ExpressBuild tab. Complete the tab.
You can mark any combination of the three check boxes below. After you mark either of
the first two check boxes, compiles will try to use multi-processor compile unless
prevented from doing so. If you mark Allow My Computer to Build for Others, your
computer is immediately available to assist in compiles being performed on other
computers.
z
Build Using Multiple Local Processors
Mark this to have multiple processors within this computer help process compiles.
The processors on this computer can be physical or virtual processors. You must
also enter the number of local processors in the field below. There are several
requirements for using this option.
„
z
Number of Local Processors
Enter the number of physical or virtual processors available on the current
computer.
Build Using Multiple Distributed Computers
Mark this to have more than one computer help process compiles. You must have
previously set up a build group to use this option. There are several requirements
for using this option.
„
Build Group Name
Enter the build group name.
See How ExpressBuild Groups Work on page 41.
„
z
Build Group Domain
Enter the NT domain name of the build group. All members of a single build
group must be in the same NT domain.
Allow My Computer to Build for Others
Mark this to have this computer be available to help process compiles that are
started on another build computer. Performance degrades while this computer helps
to process compiles. This causes WiseExpressBuild.exe to start immediately.
„
Build Group Name
Enter the group name of the build group that your computer will be a member
of. If another computer compiles using your build group name, then your
processor will be used to help compile.
See also:
About ExpressBuild on page 39
Windows Installer Editor Reference
40
Setting Up
Setting Options on page 33
How ExpressBuild Groups Work
¾ Not available in Standard Edition.
You can specify a build group of computers within the same NT domain or workgroup to
share processing of compiles. To specify a build group, first you select an arbitrary name
for the build group. Then, on those computers that will be part of a build group, you do
one of two things:
z
If Windows Installer Editor is not installed, then run WiseExpressBuild.exe, which is
located in the share point directory. The Wise ExpressBuild dialog box opens.
Specify the group name and whether the WiseExpressBuild.exe should open at
system startup. WiseExpressBuild.exe runs in the background and responds to and
manages compile requests from the build computer. You can open it and edit its
properties by double-clicking on its icon in the Windows taskbar.
z
If Windows Installer Editor is installed, open it on that computer. Select Tools menu
> Options, click the ExpressBuild tab, and mark the Allow My Computer to Build
for Others check box.
Then enter the group name of the build group your computer will build for. Do this
on each computer that will share processing as part of a single build group. When
you click OK on the Options dialog box, the WiseExpressBuild.exe immediately
begins running on your computer, with its icon showing in the system tray area of
your taskbar.
Note
Performance slowdowns will occur on computers in build groups when they are called
upon to help process compiles.
See also:
About ExpressBuild on page 39
Setting ExpressBuild Options on page 40
Requirements for Using ExpressBuild
Requirements for Using ExpressBuild
¾ Not available in Standard Edition.
z
In the following instances, because of .CAB formation issues, multi-processor
compile does not take place and normal compiling occurs:
„
If you select Uncompressed external files from the Compression Option
field on the Media page.
„
If you select One Cab in the Cab Options field on the Media page, or if the
.MSI contains only one .CAB for some other reason.
„
If you select any size other than zero in the Max Media Size field on the Media
page.
„
If you are in a merge module.
Windows Installer Editor Reference
41
Setting Up
z
Because each processor compresses .CAB files, using multiple processors is more
efficient if files are arranged into multiple, moderately-sized .CAB files. To achieve
this, select One Cab per feature or One Cab per component in the Cab Options
field on the Media page.
Additional requirements for using the option to Build Using Multiple
Distributed Computers:
z
All the installation source files must be shared so that all members of the build
group have network privileges to access them.
z
The paths to all installation source files must be in UNC notation. Change paths to
UNC notation using Tools menu > Convert Source Paths.
If any source files have paths to the local drive (Example: C:\MyFiles\File.jpg) then
multi-processor compile does not occur.
See Source Paths in an Installation on page 318.
z
The path to the installation file must be referenced in UNC notation. When you open
the installation file, open it in such a way that it is referenced by a UNC path.
Example: When opening a file, browse to the installation underneath the My
Network Places icon or type the entire UNC path in the File Name field. If you
browse under the My Computer icon, the path will not be referenced in UNC
notation.
See also:
About ExpressBuild on page 39
Setting ExpressBuild Options on page 40
How ExpressBuild Groups Work on page 41
Setting Installation Expert Options
You can set options that control the behavior of Installation Expert.
To set options:
To set options for Installation Expert, select Tools menu > Options and click the
Installation Expert tab.
Complete the tab.
z
View directories for all features on Files page
Mark this to display all directories on the Files page, regardless of what feature the
directory was created for.
Clear this to display only the directories that were created for the current feature
(the feature selected in the Current Feature drop-down list.) Example: If you
create a directory for FeatureA, and then use the Current Feature drop-down list
to go to FeatureB, you no longer see the directory you made for FeatureA.
This does not apply to the Web Files page.
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View registry keys for all features on Registry page
Mark this to display all registry keys on the Registry page, regardless of what
feature the registry key was created for. This displays a composite view of all
registry keys created for all features. If this check box is not marked, only keys
created for the currently selected feature (in the Current Feature drop-down list)
are displayed.
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Setting Up
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Show merge module components
Mark this to view the files and registry entries from merge modules in Installation
Expert. You can only view merge module components in an .MSI. By default, these
items are hidden.
z
Listbox Compatibility Mode
If your computer has certain video drivers, you might have problems selecting items
from list boxes within Windows Installer Editor. If items that you select from list
boxes are continually misinterpreted by Windows Installer Editor, mark this check
box to eliminate list box problems.
z
Expand all features on Features page
Display Feature title instead of name on Features page
Display hidden features on Features page
These check boxes determine how features are displayed on the Features page. You
can override these settings using the right-click menu on that page.
z
Display the page view associated with a project when a project is opened
Mark this to display an installation project’s default page view when the installation
opens. If you clear this check box, the page view in Installation Expert does not
change when you open a project regardless of its associated page view.
z
Use advanced drawing routines (restart required)
If a black box appears at the bottom of the Installation Expert page group list,
cutting off the last several pages in the list, mark this check box and restart your
computer to eliminate the problem.
z
Display Project Summary Page when a project is opened
Mark this to have the Project Summary page appear when an installation is opened.
See also:
Setting Options on page 33
Setting Merge Module Directories
You can set default directories for storing merge modules.
You can store merge modules on a local drive or a shared network drive. When you add
a merge module to an installation, you can select from the merge modules in the
directories you specify here. When you use the Download Redistributables wizard, you
can download merge modules to directories you specify here.
You can use merge modules that are in the Software Manager database, which helps
ensure that team members always access approved versions of merge modules. (Not
available in Standard Edition.)
To set options:
Select Tools menu > Options and click the Merge Modules tab.
You also can access these options when you add a merge module to an installation; click
the Directories button on the Select Merge Module dialog box.
See Adding a Merge Module to an Installation on page 338.
Complete the tab.
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Setting Up
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Default Merge Module Directory
Shows the path to the default merge module directory. All merge modules that are
in this directory—along with the merge modules that are in the directories shown in
the Directory list below—are listed on the Select Merge Module dialog box that
appears when you click the Add button at the right of the Merge Modules page.
To exclude the merge modules in the default directory from the list, mark Do not
show merge modules from the Default Merge Module Directory.
z
Read Merge Modules List From Software Manager Database
(Not available in Standard Edition.) Mark this to include merge modules from the
Software Manager database on the Select Merge Module dialog box that appears
when you click the Add button on the Merge Modules page.
z
Directory
Enter additional directories where merge modules are stored. Merge modules in
these directories are listed on the Select Merge Modules dialog box. Example: If you
save your organization’s user-created merge modules in the shared network
directory V:\Modules, and you add V:\Modules to the Directory list, the merge
modules in that directory will appear on the Select Merge Module dialog box.
To add a directory to the list, click Add, browse for the directory, and click OK. To
include subdirectories in the search, mark the check box in the Include Subdirs
column. The next time you click the Add button on the Merge Modules page,
modules in that directory appear on the Select Merge Module dialog box.
To delete a directory from the list, click the directory and click Delete. Merge
modules in that directory will no longer appear on the Select Merge Module dialog
box.
See also:
Setting Options on page 33
Activating Suppressed Prompts
Some of the prompts that appear in Windows Installer Editor contain a Don’t show this
message again check box that lets you suppress the prompt in the future.
To reactivate prompts that you previously suppressed
1.
Select Tools menu > Options and click the Prompts tab.
The dialog box lists the prompts you have suppressed and shows your last response
to each prompt. If you have not suppressed any Windows Installer Editor prompts,
nothing is listed.
2.
Select the prompt message line and click Activate.
The prompt is removed from the list. The next time you encounter a situation in
which that prompt applies, the prompt will appear.
See also:
Setting Options on page 33
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Setting Up
Setting Repository Options
Use the Repository tab on the Wise Options dialog box to:
z
(Client installations only.) Connect to a different Wise Software Repository (the
share point directory and any databases associated with it).
Changing the share point directory or a specific path does not copy resources to the
new location. Typically, you will specify a share point or path that is already in use.
z
Specify the directories that contain shared resources that are used to create and
edit Windows Installer installations. Typically, you will use the default locations, but
you can set individual share locations for specific resources.
See Installation Resources and Their Locations on page 28.
To connect to a different repository
(Client installations only.) You can connect to a different repository by specifying the
share point that is associated with it.
When you change the default share point, you are logged off and prompted to log on.
Because serial numbers and license assignments are stored in the Workbench database,
you must have a different license assignment in the Workbench database that you
change to.
1.
Select Tools menu > Options.
2.
On the Wise Options dialog box, click the Repository tab.
3.
Click Browse.
4.
On the Browse for Folder dialog box, browse to an existing share point directory and
click OK.
The Wise Software Repository that is associated with that share point becomes your
default.
To change a default resource location
The resource locations are used for Windows Installer installations only.
1.
Select Tools menu > Options.
2.
On the Wise Options dialog box, click the Repository tab.
3.
Click Advanced.
4.
On the Repository Advanced Settings dialog box that appears, double-click one of
the following items and browse to a new path.
You can use the variable [WiseSharePoint] to represent the share point directory in
the following paths. You also can use the predefined variables that appear on the
Path Variables page. However, you cannot use other user-defined path variables
because they are specific to a single installation and the following paths are global
options.
„
Windows Installer Editor Reference
Component Rules
Specify the location of ComponentRules.ini, which contains the rules that
govern how components are created in installations.
45
Setting Up
Warning
If you are sharing component rules, be careful when editing existing rule sets
because your changes will overwrite rule sets used by team members.
„
Custom Actions
Specify the location in which you will save files used in custom actions
(examples: WiseScripts, .DLL files, JScript files, and VBScript files) that can be
added to installations. This is the default location whenever you browse for a file
on a custom action dialog box.
„
Default Project Directory
Specify the default directory in which all new installations will be saved. The
default is the Projects subdirectory of the share point directory.
Note
Changes in this field do not take effect until you exit and restart the product.
„
Dialogs
Specify the location of the Wise Standard.MSI that contains information that the
New Dialog Wizard uses to add a new dialog box to an installation.
„
Languages
Specify the location of language resource files.
„
Resources
Specify the location of the bitmaps and icons that are used in installations.
„
Templates
Specify the location of installation templates and WfWI macros.
„
Themes
Specify the location of the themes that are used to customize installation dialog
boxes.
„
Validation Modules
Specify the location of the validation modules (.CUB files) and settings that are
used in Package Validation.
See also:
Setting Merge Module Directories on page 43
Setting Options on page 33
Setting Source Control Options
You can set options that enable source control functionality and set the levels of
interaction Windows Installer Editor has with your source code control system (SCCS).
See Using Source Control on page 308.
The Source Control options apply to the current installation and all future installations.
Changing these options does not affect existing installations.
To set options:
Select Tools menu > Options and click the Source Control tab. Complete the tab.
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Setting Up
Note
If the following options do not appear on the Source Control tab, you probably don’t
have a source code control system on your computer. It could also be that your SCCS is
unrecognized or that there are communications problems between the SCCS server and
your computer.
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Enable source control
Mark this to enable all source control functionality both in the current installation
and all future installations. When you mark this check box, the following three check
boxes are enabled, as well as the items in the Source Control menu. When source
control is enabled, you can add files to source control, check files in and out, get the
latest version of files, track history, and view differences.
z
Check out file when it is opened
If this is marked, then each time you open a file that has been previously checked
in, the file will be automatically checked out for you. If your source code control
system is not available, you can cancel attempts to connect and work on the local
copy of the file.
z
Check in file when it is closed
If this is marked, then each time you open a file that has been previously checked
out, the file will be automatically checked in for you.
z
Add new files to source control
If this is marked, then each time you create a new installation file and save it, you
will be prompted to add it to your source code control system.
Enabling the source control options above does not implement source control in the
installation. It merely enables you to add and remove files from the source code control
system, and to check them in and out. Use the options on the Source Control menu to
perform these tasks.
See also:
Setting Options on page 33
Setting Wildcard Groups
On the Wildcard Groups tab, you can create groups of wildcards so you don’t have to
type multiple wildcards repeatedly.
On the Files and Web Files pages in Installation Expert, you use the wildcard groups
when you add directory contents. Wildcard groups on the Wildcard Groups tab appear in
the Include Wildcards list on the Add Contents and Wildcard Details dialog boxes.
Select a wildcard group to add just a subset of the files in the directory whose contents
you are adding.
Several wildcard groups are predefined, which you can edit. If you delete them, they are
recreated when the application starts. Also, wildcards that you enter in any Include
Wildcards field are added to the list of wildcard groups.
To add a wildcard group so it appears in Include Wildcards
1.
Select Tools menu > Options and click the Wildcard Groups tab.
2.
On the Wildcard Groups tab, click Add.
The Wildcard Group Details dialog box appears.
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Setting Up
3.
Complete the dialog box and click OK:
„
Group Name
Enter a name to precede the wildcards in the Include Wildcards list. This is a
visual identifier to help you quickly find the wildcards in the list.
„
Wildcards
Enter semi-colon delimited wildcards. (Example: Enter *.EXE;*.DLL for all .EXE
and .DLL files. A ? represents any one character.)
Later, when you add contents or set automatic updating on the Files or Web Files page,
this wildcard group is available from the Include Wildcards list.
See also:
Setting Options on page 33
Creating and Editing Installation Templates
When you create a new installation or merge module, it gets its configuration from a
template file. Templates contain logical defaults and commonly used settings. Some
template files are predefined and appear when you create a new installation. You also
can create your own templates.
Example: If all your installations have the same system configuration requirements and
document file extensions, you can create a template with these changes preconfigured.
Warning
Editing predefined templates is not recommended, because they might be overwritten
during upgrades. Instead, save customized templates with different names, or make
copies of the predefined templates and edit the copies.
Template Location
Templates are in:
z
(Standard Edition.) The Templates subdirectory of the Windows Installer Editor
installation directory.
z
(Professional Edition.) The Templates subdirectory of the share point directory. This
lets multiple users access the same templates.
See Installation Resources and Their Locations on page 28.
To create a custom template
1.
Select File menu > New.
The New Installation File dialog box appears.
2.
Select a template file on which to base the new template and click OK. Only icons
that have a corresponding file in the Templates directory are templates; other icons
cannot be used to create or edit templates.
A new installation or merge module opens.
3.
Make all the changes that should appear in installations that will be created with this
template.
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Setting Up
4.
5.
To include a description that will appear on the New Installation File dialog box when
you click this template:
a.
Select Setup Editor > Product tab.
b.
Click the Summary icon.
c.
In the upper-right pane, double-click Comments.
d.
On the Summary Details dialog box that appears, enter a description of this
template in Value and click OK.
Save the file:
a.
Select File menu > Save As.
b.
Name the file and save it in the Templates directory as a .WSI, .MSI, .WSM, or
.MSM.
When you save the template, a page view is created with the same name and is
listed in the Page Views drop-down list. However, when you use the template to
create an installation, the default page view is the page view that was displayed
when the template was created. If the template’s default page view is a custom
page view, you can customize it.
See Customizing Page Views on page 22.
6.
To test the new template, select File menu > New.
The New Installation File dialog box appears and the file that you just created
appears in the Custom Templates category. If the New Installation File dialog box
does not contain the new template, verify that you saved it in the correct format
and location.
7.
Select the template you just created and click OK.
8.
Verify that the changes you made in the template are present in this new
installation.
Component Rules
You can select or create rules that help you manage the creation of components in an
installation. Using component rules eliminates the need to specify component
information for every individual resource you add to an installation and ensures that
components are created consistently across all installations. Component rules can also
help you align component GUIDs in an upgrade with component GUIDs in previous
versions of the installation.
When you first create an installation, you select a component rule set to manage
components you add to that installation. Then, whenever you add a resource, such as a
file, registry key, shortcut, or anything else that can be installed, components are
created for those resources in accordance with the rule set you selected. Example: You
can always create a new component for each new file added to the installation, or you
can group related resources, such as help files, into one component.
Two predefined rule sets are provided. You might find that they manage your
components satisfactorily and no customization is necessary. If the predefined rule sets
do not meed your needs, you can duplicate them and modify the copies as needed, or
you can create new rule sets to reflect your organization’s standards. For descriptions of
the predefined rule sets, see Microsoft Best Practices Component Rule Set on page 56
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Setting Up
and One File Per Component Rule Set on page 57. For instructions on creating new rule
sets, see Customizing Component Rules on page 53.
You can share component rules with others in your organization through a share point
directory. Sharing component rules ensures that you always use the most current set of
rules and that your installations always adhere to company standards for creating
components. To share component rules, in Workbench, select Edit menu > Preferences,
click the Repository tab, and click the Advanced button. Make sure a shared directory is
specified for the Component Rules path.
See Setting Repository Preferences in the Wise Package Studio Help.
See also:
About Component Rules on page 50
Selecting a Component Rule Set on page 51
Using Component Rules to Align GUIDs in an Upgrade on page 52
About Component Rules
A component rule set manages components that are added to installations.
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A rule set is a collection of rules.
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A rule consists of one or more conditions and one or more actions.
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A condition determines the criteria that a resource must meet in order for an action
to be performed. Example: If you select the condition Added resource is a Shortcut,
the action is only performed for shortcut resources.
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An action determines how a resource will be assigned to a component.
Rule sets are stored in an .INI file located in the share point directory. You can change
the location.
See Setting Repository Preferences in the Wise Package Studio Help.
Do not try to edit the .INI file other than through the Component Rules dialog boxes.
Warning
If you are sharing component rules, when you edit existing rule sets your changes will
overwrite rule sets used by other members of the team.
How Component Rules Are Applied
Component rules are applied in the order they appear from top to bottom in the list of
rules on the Customize Component Rules dialog box. When a rule has multiple
conditions, only resources that meet all the conditions have the rule applied to them.
Once an added resource matches the conditions in a rule, the action is applied and no
subsequent rules are evaluated for that resource. If you add a resource that does not
meet any of the conditions in the rule set, then the Microsoft Best Practices rule set is
used for that resource.
See also:
Component Rules on page 49
Microsoft Best Practices Component Rule Set on page 56
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Setting Up
Selecting a Component Rule Set
Use the Component Rule Selection dialog box to select a rule set and component naming
conventions for the current installation or to set the default rule options for all future
installations.
The component key values you enter on the Component Rule Selection dialog box can
be overridden by specific rules. Example: If you use a rule set that contains rules for
naming certain types of components, then only the components that do not meet the
conditions in the rule set will be named using the component key value options you
specify here.
To select a component rule set
1.
Select Component Rules menu > Select Rule Set.
The Component Rule Selection dialog box appears.
2.
From Rule Set Name, select the rule set to use for this installation.
3.
To make the specified rule set the default for all future installations, mark Make
this the default rule set for all Windows Installer files.
4.
In the Component Key Values section, select an option from the Default list to
determine the naming convention for new components. If the rule set you use
specifies the component naming under certain conditions, the naming convention
you specify here will be overridden when those conditions are met.
„
Set component key to a named Base
Select this to name new components with specified text plus an incremental
number. Selecting this option enables the Base field. Enter text to serve as a
base for the component name (example: Component). Component names will
be incremented from this base (example: Component1, Component2, and so
on).
„
Set component key to key of keypath or first resource
Select this to name components as follows:
„

If the resource is a file, registry key, or ODBC data source, give the
component the same name as the key of the keypath.

For any other type of resource, give the component the same name as the
key of the first resource in the component.
Set component key to table name of keypath or first resource
Select this to give new components the name of the table in which the keypath
or first resource resides. If multiple components are named for the same table,
an incremental number is added to the component name (example: File1, File2,
and so on).
5.
From Files, you can select a different naming convention for components that are
based on file resources. You can use the long file name of the keypath file, the short
file name of the keypath file, or the naming convention specified in the Default field
above.
6.
To make the options in the Component Key Values section the defaults for all
future installations, mark Make this the default key naming convention for all
installations.
7.
Click OK on the Component Rule Selection dialog box.
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Setting Up
All resources that you add to this installation from this time forward will be organized
into components according to the rule set and other conventions you specified.
See also:
Component Rules on page 49
Using Component Rules to Align GUIDs in an Upgrade
Component rules can help you align component GUIDs in an upgrade with component
GUIDs in previous versions of the installation. If GUIDS or key paths for the same
component don’t match between the new and old .MSI, the component could
inadvertently get deleted because Windows Installer does not recognize the components
as being the same. Aligning component GUIDs for matching components prevents
upgrades from deleting necessary files in the newer version.
If you are working on an upgrade installation, you specify the previous versions of the
installation on the Previous Installation Versions dialog box. Then, make sure you use a
component rule set that contains a rule for aligning component GUIDs with previous
versions. Example: The two predefined rule sets contain a rule in which, if the keypath
resource matches a resource in the previous .MSI list, the component layout of the
previous .MSI is matched and the component key is set to match the previous version.
All new resources you add to the upgrade installation will be checked against the
previous installations.
To ensure that all resources you add to an upgrade installation are aligned with previous
versions, specify the previous installation versions before adding any resources to the
installation. If you have already added resources to the installation, as is the case when
you use a copy of a previous .WSI as a starting point for creating an upgrade
installation, you must run UpgradeSync to align GUIDs for existing components.
To use component rules to align GUIDs in an upgrade
1.
Create or open the upgrade installation.
2.
If you have already added resources to the upgrade installation, run UpgradeSync
to align GUIDs for existing components.
See Using UpgradeSync in the Wise Package Studio Help.
3.
Select a rule set to use for this upgrade.
See Selecting a Component Rule Set on page 51.
Make sure the rule set you select contains a rule for aligning component GUIDs with
previous versions; this should be the first rule in the rule set.
For best results, use the same rule set, if any, that was used in the previous
versions. That way, component creation in the upgrade will be consistent with the
previous versions.
4.
Select Component Rules menu > Previous Versions.
The Previous Installation Versions dialog box appears.
5.
On the Previous Installation Versions dialog box, specify the previous versions of
this installation.
„
Windows Installer Editor Reference
To add a previous version .MSI to the list, click Add, click
.MSI, and click Open. The .MSI is added to the list.
to browse to the
52
Setting Up
„
6.
The previous versions will be checked in the order they appear in this list.
Click OK on the Previous Installation Versions dialog box.
All new resources you add to the upgrade installation will be checked against and
aligned with the previous installations you specified.
See also:
Component Rules on page 49
Customizing Component Rules
If the predefined component rule sets do not reflect your organization’s standards, you
can create a new rule set. The predefined rule sets, Microsoft Best Practices and One file
per component, are read-only and cannot be modified. However, you can copy a
predefined rule set and modify the copy.
When creating new rules, refer to Microsoft’s rules for creating components.
See Organizing Applications into Components and Changing the Component Code in the
Windows Installer SDK Help.
Warning
If you are sharing component rules, when you edit existing rule sets your changes will
overwrite rule sets used by other members of the team.
To add a new component rule set
1.
Select Component Rules menu > Customize.
The Component Rules Manager dialog box appears, listing the predefined rule sets
and custom rule sets you have created.
2.
Click New.
The Enter Rule Set Name dialog box appears.
3.
Enter a unique Rule Set Name to identify this rule set and click OK.
The new rule set name appears and is selected in the Component Rules Manager
dialog box.
4.
Click Modify.
The Customize Component Rules dialog box appears.
5.
On the Customize Component Rules dialog box, click Add to add the first rule for
this rule set.
This starts the Component Rule Wizard, which you step through to add the
conditions and actions that comprise the rule.
See Adding and Editing Component Rules on page 54.
6.
When you finish adding rules to the rule set, click OK on the Customize Component
Rules dialog box and then click OK on the Component Rules Manager dialog box.
The new rule set is added to the list of available rule sets. To use the new rule set for the
current installation or to make it the default for all future installations, you must select
it.
See Selecting a Component Rule Set on page 51.
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Setting Up
To customize an existing component rule set
1.
Select Component Rules menu > Customize.
The Component Rules Manager dialog box appears, listing the predefined rule sets
and any custom rule sets you have created.
2.
Click a rule set.
„
To copy the rule set, click Copy, type the new name on the Enter Rule Set Name
dialog box, and click OK.
„
To modify the rule set, click Modify. The Customize Component Rules dialog box
appears, where you can add, edit, and delete rules.
See Adding and Editing Component Rules on page 54.
Note
If you selected a predefined rule set, all the buttons on the Customize
Components Rules dialog box are unavailable because the predefined rule sets
are read-only. However, you can use this dialog box to view the rules in a
predefined rule set.
3.
„
To rename the rule set, click Rename, type the new name on the Enter Rule Set
Name dialog box, and click OK.
„
To delete the rule set, click the Delete button to the right of the rule set name.
Click OK on the Customize Component Rules dialog box.
See also:
Component Rules on page 49
Adding and Editing Component Rules
You can add component rules to a rule set, edit existing component rules, and delete
component rules.
The predefined rule sets, Microsoft Best Practices and One file per component, are readonly and cannot be modified.
Warning
If you are sharing component rules, when you edit existing rule sets your changes will
overwrite rule sets used by other members of the team.
To edit a component rule
1.
Select Component Rules menu > Customize.
The Component Rules Manager dialog box appears, listing the predefined rule sets
and any custom rule sets you have created.
2.
Click a rule set and click Modify.
The Customize Component Rules dialog box appears.
„
Windows Installer Editor Reference
To add a rule, click Add. This starts the Component Rule Wizard, which lets you
define component rules. For details, see the procedure below.
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Setting Up
„
3.
To edit a rule, click the rule in the rules list and click Details. This starts the
Component Rule Wizard, which you can step through to change the rule name
or change any of the conditions or actions. For details, see the procedure below.
When you finish, click OK on the Customize Component Rules dialog box.
The Component Rules Manager dialog box reappears.
4.
Click OK.
To add or edit a component rule
1.
On the Name page of the Component Rule Wizard, enter a name for the new rule
and click Next. If this is an existing rule, the name is already entered and you can
accept or change it.
The Conditions page appears.
2.
In the Which condition(s) do you want to check? list, mark the check box next
to each condition to check.
When there are no conditions for performing the action(s) in this rule, select the
condition Always perform associated action.
As you mark check boxes, the conditions appear in the Rule description list. If you
select a condition that is incompatible with a condition you have already selected,
the first condition you selected is removed from the list.
3.
If a condition contains underlined text, click the underlined text to open a Rule
Details dialog box. There you can select a value for the underlined text.
Example: If you selected the condition Added resource is a file with name any,
you would click the word any and enter a specific file name. Wildcards are allowed.
4.
When you have added all conditions that comprise the rule, click Next on the
Conditions page.
The Actions page appears.
5.
In the Which action(s) do you want to perform? list, mark the check box next
to the action or actions to perform.
The actions you mark appear in the Rule description list. If you select an action
that is incompatible with an action you have already selected, the first action you
selected is removed from the list.
6.
If an action contains underlined text, click the underlined text to open a Rule Details
dialog box. There you can specify a value for the underlined text.
Example: If you selected the action Set component key to Component, you
would click the word Component and enter specific text.
7.
When you have added all actions to the rule, click Finish on the Actions page.
The Customize Component Rules dialog box reappears. The rule is displayed in the
upper list box and its details are displayed in the Rule description list.
8.
You can continue to add and edit rules. When you finish, click OK on the Customize
Component Rules dialog box.
The new rules are added to the rule set and the Component Rules Manager dialog
box reappears.
9.
Click OK.
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Setting Up
See also:
Component Rules on page 49
Microsoft Best Practices Component Rule Set
When you use this predefined rule set, components are created using the Microsoft
component creation guidelines.
See Organizing Applications into Components and Changing the Component Code in the
Windows Installer SDK Help.
If an added resource does not meet the conditions in a rule, the next rule is evaluated
for that resource. If the resource does not meet the conditions in any of the rules, the
component is created according to the final rule.
z
Match components in previous versions of the .MSI
If the keypath resource matches a resource in the previous .MSI list, match the
component layout of the previous .MSI and set the component key to match the
previous version.
z
Add all executable files to their own components
If the added resource is a 32-bit executable file (.DLL, .OCX, or .EXE), create a new
component.
z
Add all .TLB files to their own components
If the added resource is a .TLB file, create a new component.
z
Group Matching .HLP and .CNT files together
If resource file names are the same and their file extensions are .HLP or .CNT, add
them to the same component. The .HLP will be the keypath file.
z
Group matching .CHM and .CHI files together
If resource file names are the same and their extensions are .CHM or .CHI, add
them to the same component. The .CHM will be the keypath file.
z
Put registry keys associated with files or components in matching
components
If the added resource is a registry key, and the registry value name or value refers
to a file or component, add the resource to an existing component that contains the
same type of resource.
z
Put Current User registry keys in their own component
If the added resource is a registry key under HKEY_CURRENT_USER, add the
resource to the component matching the conditions and set the component key
base to CurrentUser. The component key base will be incremented for each new
component matching this condition. Example: CurrentUser1, CurrentUser2, and so
on.
z
Put non-Current User registry keys in their own component
If the added resource is a registry key NOT under HKEY_CURRENT_USER, add the
resource to an existing component that contains the same type of resource.
z
Group all non-executable files to their own component
If the added resource is not a 32-bit executable file (.DLL, .OCX, or .EXE), add the
resource to an existing component that contains the same type of resource.
z
Name new non-advertised shortcuts by destination directory
If the added resource is a shortcut, add it to an existing component containing nonadvertised shortcuts in the same destination directory.
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Group non-keypath resources by resource type
If the added resource cannot be set to the keypath, that is, if it is not a file, registry
key, or ODBC data source, add the resource to an existing component that contains
the same type of resource.
z
Create new components for resources not matching other criteria
For all other resources that do not match the criteria above, create a new
component for the resource and set the component key to the table name of the
keypath or the first resource. If multiple components are named for the same table,
an incremental number is added to the component name. Example, File1, File2, and
so on.
See also:
Component Rules on page 49
One File Per Component Rule Set
When you use this predefined rule set, each file you add to the installation becomes its
own component.
If an added resource does not meet the conditions in a rule, the next rule is evaluated
for that resource. If the resource does not meet the conditions in any of the rules, the
component is created according to the final rule.
z
Match components in previous versions of the .MSI
If the keypath resource matches a resource in the previous .MSI list, match the
component layout of the previous .MSI and set the component key to match the
previous version.
z
Add all files to their own components
If the added resource is a file, create a new component.
z
Put registry keys associated with files or components in matching
components
If the added resource is a registry key, and the registry value name or value refers
to a file or component, add the resource to an existing component that contains the
same type of resource.
z
Put Current User registry keys in their own component
If the added resource is a registry key under HKEY_CURRENT_USER, add the
resource to the component matching the conditions and set the component key
base to CurrentUser. The component key base will be incremented for each new
component matching this condition. Example: CurrentUser1, CurrentUser2, and so
on.
z
Put non-Current user registry keys in their own component
If the added resource is a registry key NOT under HKEY_CURRENT_USER, add the
resource to an existing component that contains the same type of resource.
z
Name new non-advertised shortcuts by destination directory
If the added resource is a shortcut, add it to an existing component containing nonadvertised shortcuts in the same destination directory.
z
Group non-keypath resources by resource type
If the added resource cannot be set to the keypath, that is, if it is not a file, registry
key, or ODBC data source, add the resource to an existing component that contains
the same type of resource.
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z
Create new components for resources not matching other criteria
For all other resources that do not match the criteria above, create a new
component for the resource and set the component key to the table name of the
keypath or the first resource. If multiple components are named for the same table,
an incremental number is added to the component name. Example: File1, File2, and
so on.
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Chapter 3
Working With Wise Installation Files
This chapter includes the following topics:
z
Before You Create an Installation on page 59
z
File Types on page 60
z
Project Files and Database Files on page 61
z
Target Platforms: 32-bit and 64-bit on page 62
z
Starting a New Installation (page 70)
z
Options for New Installations on page 73
z
Opening an Installation Package on page 74
z
Comparing Windows Installer Files on page 75
z
Saving an Installation as XML on page 77
z
Working With Installations in the Software Manager Database on page 77
z
Compiling An Installation on page 78
z
Testing and Running An Installation on page 80
Before You Create an Installation
To avoid interruptions during installation development, gather the following information
before you begin creating an installation in Windows Installer Editor.
z
All the files to install on the destination computer. This includes program files, files
necessary for optional features, related .DLLs, drivers, and other support files.
z
Any third-party installations that the installation will provide. Example: Adobe
Acrobat Reader.
z
Which files and other system changes comprise which features. (In Windows
Installer, a feature is a distinct part of your application’s functionality. Examples: a
spell-checker, a thesaurus, or a collection of clip art.) If the installation will let end
users select optional components, you must organize files into features when you
create the installation.
z
A list of the changes that must be made to system information files (examples: .INI
files, the registry, and so on) for your application to run properly.
z
The application’s system requirements in as much detail as possible. Consider not
only memory and disk requirements, but also the minimum screen depth and
resolution, and the minimum required version of the operating system.
z
Any custom graphics, referred to as billboards, that should be displayed during
installation.
z
Any changes that should be made to the dialog boxes that will be displayed during
installation.
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See Using the Dialogs Page on page 402.
z
If applicable, a Readme file and a license agreement file.
File Types
In Windows Installer Editor, you can create and edit different types of Windows Installer
database files. You can work in the Windows Installer database file or in a project file
that contains instructions for compiling the Windows Installer database file.
See Project Files and Database Files on page 61.
Following are the types of Windows installer files.
Extension
Description
.MSI
Windows Installer database, which is a distributable installation. The .MSI extension is
associated with the Windows Installer executable, MSIExec.EXE. When an .MSI is
opened, Windows Installer executes it, thereby installing the application. You can open
and edit an .MSI in Windows Installer Editor. However, options that have to do with
creating an .MSI, such as those on the Releases, Release Settings, and Media pages,
are unavailable.
You can convert an .MSI to a project file (.WSI).
See MSI to WSI Conversion on page 356.
.WSI
Windows Installer project file, which describes an .MSI but does not store contents. It
is in the same format as an .MSI. You edit a .WSI in Windows Installer Editor and
compile it to the corresponding .MSI. The .WSI file is smaller than an .MSI and you can
set multiple options for the output of the .MSI.
.MSM
Windows Installer merge module, which is a pre-compiled library of components (files,
registry changes, and other system changes) that installs a discrete part of your
application. It cannot be run alone, but must be merged with an .MSI during the .MSI
compile.
See About Merge Modules on page 323.
.WSM
Windows Installer merge module project, which describes an .MSM, but does not store
merge module contents. You edit a .WSM in Windows Installer Editor and compile it to
the corresponding .MSM.
See About Merge Modules on page 323.
.MST
Windows Installer transform, which changes a Windows Installer package at run time
and must be applied from the command line. See About Transforms on page 341.
.MSP
Windows Installer patch, which updates an existing installed application. Patches
contain only the differences between the old and new versions of an application.
Create a patch with the Patch Creation tool, which creates an .MSP file that you
distribute to end users.
See Patch Creation in the Wise Package Studio Help.
.PCP
Windows Installer patch project, which describes and compiles to a Windows Installer
patch. A .PCP file is created from the Patch Creation tool.
See Patch Creation in the Wise Package Studio Help.
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Extension
Description
.EXE
You can compile an .EXE that encapsulates the .MSI or that calls an external .MSI.
Doing so gives you the option of pre-installing the Windows Installer runtime before
performing your own installation, which ensures that the installation will run.
See Setting Build Options for a Release on page 193 and Adding Prerequisites to a
Release on page 198.
Project Files and Database Files
Typically, the installation you distribute is an .MSI. Windows Installer operates on .MSIs,
which are a type of relational database that stores installation information and files in
tables.
See About Microsoft Windows Installer on page 494.
On the Build Options page (see Setting Build Options for a Release on page 193) or on
the Media page (see Setting Up Media for Distribution on page 210), you can specify to
output an installation in different ways:
z
As a single-file .MSI, which contains compressed installation files.
z
As an .MSI that has external compressed .CAB files.
z
As an .MSI that has external uncompressed files.
z
As an .EXE that contains the .MSI and installation files.
z
As an .EXE that runs an external .MSI.
If you to output an .EXE, you can then pre-install Windows Installer or other runtimes.
When you create an installation, you can work in a .WSI (project) file or an .MSI file.
The same applies to merge modules; you can work in a .WSM (project) file or an .MSM
file.
If you work in a .WSI or .WSM
(Wise project)
If you work in an .MSI or .MSM
(Windows Installer database)
How are installation
files and paths stored?
Externally. The project contains paths to
the installation files. During compile,
they are compiled into the resulting .MSI
or .EXE.
Inside the database file. Files are
refreshed from disk unless Don’t update
or recompress files when saving is
marked on the Product Details page.
Can you create
releases?
Yes. Use the Releases page and other
Release Definition pages.
No. Because you are already working in
the final output file, options for multiple
output files are unavailable, which includes
all Release Definition pages.
Compiling does what?
Reads the project information and
compiles a database file (.MSI or .MSM),
which contains installation files.
Refreshes files from disk unless Don’t
update or recompress files when
saving is marked on the Product Details
page.
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Can you switch from
working on one file
type to the other?
If you work in a .WSI or .WSM
(Wise project)
If you work in an .MSI or .MSM
(Windows Installer database)
You can switch from a project file to a
database file by compiling the project,
opening the resulting database file, and
continuing development in the database
file. However, an .MSI created by
compiling a .WSI does not contain file
paths; it contains only the files
themselves. Therefore, any files added
prior to the switch will not be refreshed
from disk because they have no file path.
Only those files you add after the switch
contain file paths and are refreshed from
disk.
Use MSI to WSI Conversion to convert an
.MSI to a .WSI. It extracts installation files
from an .MSI, saves them to disk at
locations you specify, and creates a .WSI
that points to those files.
See MSI to WSI Conversion on page 356.
Target Platforms: 32-bit and 64-bit
Windows Installer Editor supports the following types of installation packages:
z
32-bit installations that contain only 32-bit components
z
64-bit installations that contain only 64-bit components
z
64-bit installations that contain some 32-bit components
Windows Installer Editor supports both x64 (for AMD64 and Intel EM64T processors) and
64-bit Itanium platforms.
z
An Itanium installation will not run on an x64 platform, and vice versa.
z
A 64-bit installation will not run on a 32-bit platform.
z
A 32-bit installation will run on any 32-bit or 64-bit platform.
Developing 64-bit Installations on a 32-bit Computer
You can develop a 64-bit installation on a 32-bit computer, with these limitations:
z
On the Registry page, you cannot browse the 64-bit registry in the upper list boxes.
However, you can add 64-bit registry keys in the lower list boxes, and you can
import .REG files that contain 64-bit keys.
z
You cannot test, run, or debug a 64-bit installation on a 32-bit computer.
See:
How to Specify the Target Platform on page 63
What’s Different in a 64-bit Installation? on page 63
32-bit Applications on 64-bit Computers on page 65
Guidelines for Creating Platform-Specific Installations on page 66
Creating Multiple, Platform-Specific Installations from One Project File on page 67
Using 64-Bit Windows Installer Packages in the Windows Installer SDK Help
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How to Specify the Target Platform
The target platform is stored in the Template Summary property of the .MSI or .MSM
(merge module). For an installation to run, the platform in the Template Summary
property must match the platform of the destination computer.
The Template Summary property of the .MSI is set during compile based on the
release’s Target Platform setting. The initial target platform for the Default release is
set by the Target Platform option on the New Installation File dialog box.
If the release’s Target Platform
setting is
then the Template Summary property
value is
32-bit
Intel
64-bit (x64)
x64
64-bit (Itanium)
Intel64
Viewing the Template Summary Property
This setting is visible under Setup Editor > Product tab > Summary. Do not change the
target platform setting there.
When an installation project (.WSI) contains multiple releases that compile to 32-bit and
64-bit .MSIs, the Template Summary property reflects one platform or the other. The
correct Template Summary property is set in each .MSI during compile.
See Template Summary Property in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
Additional Target Platform Settings
z
Feature Details dialog box
To display this dialog box, double-click a feature in Installation Expert > Features
page.
At run time, the destination computer’s platform determines whether a feature is
available for installation. (Example: On a 64-bit destination computer, a feature that
is designated as 32-bit does not appear to the end user and is never installed.)
This setting is used primarily to organize components by feature in a 64-bit
installation that contains 32-bit components.
See Configuring a Feature Using the Feature Details Dialog on page 96.
z
Component Details dialog box
To display this dialog box, select Setup Editor > Components tab, right-click a
component, and select Details.
The 64-bit component check box designates a component as 64-bit. This is
marked when you add 64-bit .EXE and .DLL files or 64-bit registry keys. If this is not
marked, the component is registered as a 32-bit component.
What’s Different in a 64-bit Installation?
A 64-bit installation differs from a 32-bit installation in the following ways:
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General Information page
The minimum version of Windows Installer is set to 2.00 in the Installer Version field.
Do not override this setting in a 64-bit installation, because 64-bit installations are not
supported by Windows Installer versions earlier than 2.0.
Setup Editor > Product Tab > Summary icon
The Template Summary property is set to x64 or Intel64, which indicates the platform
that is supported by the installation.
Condition Builder
Condition Builder contains additional property values:
z
VersionNT64, which is set when the installation runs on a 64-bit platform.
z
Intel64, which is set when the installation runs on an Itanium platform.
z
Msix64, which is set when the installation runs on an x64 platform.
Files Page
Additional predefined directories appear in the lower-left list box: Program Files (x86)
and Windows\SysWOW64. These are for 32-bit components in a 64-bit installation.
See Installation Directories on page 108.
Setup Editor > Tables tab
The Directory table contains additional, 64-bit specific folders.
Registry page
z
The upper list boxes can display the 32-bit or 64-bit registry. The 64-bit registry is
visible only if your computer is running a 64-bit operating system.
z
The lower list boxes can display the 32-bit or 64-bit registry on any computer.
z
You can add registry keys and values to the 32-bit or 64-bit registry on any
computer.
See Registry Page on page 139.
Component Details dialog box
For a 64-bit component, the 64-bit component check box is marked and the
Condition field contains (VersionNT64).
See Adding and Editing a Component on page 374.
System Search page
The Read Registry Value dialog box, which you access from the System Search page,
contains a check box that lets you include 64-bit components in a registry value search.
See Searching For a Registry Value on page 174.
Prerequisites page
In a 64-bit installation, you can specify a prerequisite for the x64 or IA64 (Itanium)
edition of the .NET Framework. To download these runtimes, use the Wise Web Site
option of the Download Redistributables wizard.
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Custom actions
Windows Installer Editor does not contain 64-bit versions of custom actions, however:
z
When you create a custom action that calls a JScript or VBScript file, a check box
lets you indicate that the script needs to access 64-bit functionality and run in a 64bit process.
z
The following Call Custom DLL actions can call 64-bit .DLLs:
Call Custom DLL From Destination
Call Custom DLL From Installation
Call Custom DLL From Installed Files
Because .DLLs are processor-specific, the .DLL that you call must target the same
platform (32-bit, x64, or 64-bit Itanium) as the installation. In a mixed-target
project file (.WSI), condition each Call Custom .DLL custom action for the
appropriate platform.
32-bit Applications on 64-bit Computers
WOW64 (Windows On Windows 64) is an emulator that lets 32-bit applications run on
64-bit versions of Windows. To prevent file and registry collisions, it isolates 32-bit
applications from 64-bit applications by:
z
Redirecting 32-bit applications to the Program Files (x86) directory.
z
Redirecting system calls from 32-bit applications to the SysWOW64 directory.
z
Providing separate logical views of key portions of the registry, intercepting 32-bit
registry calls to each logical registry view, and mapping them to the corresponding
physical registry location. The reflection process is transparent to the application.
Therefore, a 32-bit application can access registry data as if it were running on 32bit Windows even if the data is stored in a different location on 64-bit Windows.
When an installation contains both 32-bit and 64-bit components, place files and
registry keys in the appropriate location for the platform they target.
Resource
Place 32-bit versions in
Place 64-bit versions in
Program files (default
directory)
Program Files (x86) directory
Program Files directory
Operating system components
and shared libraries
Windows\SysWOW64 directory
Windows\System32 directory
Registry keys
Do one of the following:
Do one of the following:
z
z
Place the keys in the 32bit registry view. They will
be installed in the
WOW6432Node (for hives
that have a WOW6432
node).
z
Place the keys in the 62-bit registry view.
z
Mark the component as 64-bit on the
Component Details dialog box.
Do not mark the
component as 64-bit.
Search for “Running 32-bit Applications” and “WOW64 Implementation Details” in the
MSDN Library (msdn.microsoft.com/library/).
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Guidelines for Creating Platform-Specific Installations
The following guidelines refer to creating installations in Windows Installer Editor. For
more general guidelines, see Using 64-Bit Windows Installer Packages in the Windows
Installer SDK Help.
32-bit Installations That Contain Only 32-bit Components
z
On the New Installation File dialog box, select 32-bit as the target platform. This
sets the initial target platform for the Default release.
z
Set the target platform for all features to 32-bit. A 64-bit feature in a 32-bit
installation will never be installed.
z
Add resources to the installation as usual. Do not add 64-bit components to a 32-bit
installation.
z
Set the target platform for all releases to 32-bit (this is the default).
64-bit Installations That Contain Only 64-bit Components
z
On the New Installation File dialog box, select one of the 64-bit options as the target
platform. This sets the initial target platform for the Default release.
z
Select the appropriate 64-bit target platform for all features.
z
Add resources to the installation as usual. When you add 64-bit .EXE and .DLL files
or 64-bit registry keys, they are designated as 64-bit components. (The 64-bit
component check box is marked on the Component Details dialog box.)
z
Select the appropriate 64-bit target platform for all releases.
z
AMD 64-bit computers require Windows Installer version 3.0 or later. If your
installation targets AMD 64-bit computers, include a system requirement to check
the destination computer’s Windows Installer version.
64-bit Installations That Contain Some 32-bit Components
z
Select the appropriate target platform for each feature, and add the correct type of
component to each one. Do not add a 64-bit component to a 32-bit feature, and
vice versa, because it will never be installed.
When you add 64-bit .EXE and .DLL files or 64-bit registry keys, they are designated
as 64-bit components. (The 64-bit component check box is marked on the
Component Details dialog box.) When you add 32-bit files or registry keys, the 64bit component check box is not marked.
z
Select the appropriate target platform for each release.
z
AMD 64-bit computers require Windows Installer version 3.0 or later. If your
installation targets AMD 64-bit computers, include a system requirement to check
the destination computer’s Windows Installer version.
You can create a single installation project (.WSI) that can produce 32-bit and 64-bit
installation files.
See Creating Multiple, Platform-Specific Installations from One Project File on page 67.
Platform-Specific Merge Modules
z
A 32-bit merge module can be merged into a 32-bit or 64-bit installation.
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z
A 64-bit merge module can be merged into a 64-bit installation. The processor type
(x64 or Intel64) of the merge module must match that of the installation.
See also:
How to Specify the Target Platform on page 63
Using 64-bit Merge Modules in the Windows Installer SDK Help
Creating Multiple, Platform-Specific Installations from One Project
File
You can create a single installation project (.WSI) that can produce 32-bit and 64-bit
installation files, or x64 and Itanium installation files.
Example:
You develop a graphics suite that consists of features for drawing, graphing, and page
layout. The application was originally developed as a 32-bit application, and you will
continue to support a 32-bit version, but you also will release a version that contains
some 64-bit components. To save development time, you want to maintain a single
installation project (.WSI) that can produce installation files for both platforms.
Your options are:
z
Organize the project by feature. Do this to let the end user choose from different
platform-specific features during installation. In a large installation, this method will
work better than organizing the project by component.
Note
If you add a 64-bit component to a 32-bit feature, it will never be installed. A 64-bit
component will be ignored during installation on a 32-bit computer, and a 32-bit
feature will not be installed on a 64-bit computer.
z
Organize the project by component. This method results in fewer features and
possibly less duplication. However, in a large installation, it might be less efficient to
have to assign a target platform to each component.
To organize a mixed-platform project by feature
1.
On the New Installation File dialog box, select x64 as the target platform.
2.
On the Features page, create separate features for the different target platforms.
Example:
This feature is used by both
versions.
3.
When you add files, registry keys, and other resources to the installation, be sure to
select the appropriate feature. Example: Add Chart32.exe to the Charting32
feature, and add Chart64.exe to the Charting64 feature.
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4.
In MSI Script, add a custom action to set the value of the INSTALLDIR property.
See Defining the INSTALLDIR Property in a Mixed-Platform Installation on page 69.
5.
On the Releases page, create a release for each target platform. Example:
Graphic32, Graphic64.
6.
On the Release Settings page, select the features to include in each release.
Example:
Select the 64-bit release
Select the features to be
installed on 64-bit platforms
7.
Compiling the project creates the following .MSIs:
„
Graphic32.msi, which runs installs only 32-bit components and runs on any
platform. Its Template Summary property is set to Intel, which represents a 32bit installation.
„
Graphic64.msi, which installs both 32-bit and 64-components and runs on x64
platforms only. Its Template Summary property is set to x64.
To organize a mixed-platform project by component
1.
On the Features page, create a single set of features and set their target platform to
All Processors. Example:
2.
When you add files, registry keys, and other resources to the installation, put both
32-bit and 64-bit items in a single feature. Example: Add both Chart32.exe and
Chart64.exe to the Charting feature.
3.
In MSI Script, add a custom action to set the value of the INSTALLDIR property.
See Defining the INSTALLDIR Property in a Mixed-Platform Installation on page 69.
4.
On the Releases page, create a release for each target platform. Example:
Graphic32, Graphic64.
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5.
On the Release Settings page, select the components to include in each release.
Example:
Select the 64-bit release.
Select the features to be
installed on 64-bit platforms.
Within each feature, select the
components to be installed on
64-bit platforms.
6.
Compiling the project creates the following .MSIs:
„
Graphic32.msi, which installs only 32-bit components and runs on any platform.
Its Template Summary property is set to Intel, which represents a 32-bit
installation.
„
Graphic64.msi, which installs both 32-bit and 64-components and runs on 64bit platforms only. Its Template Summary property is set to x64.
See also:
Configuring a Feature Using the Feature Details Dialog on page 96
Customizing a Release on page 188
Defining a Feature and Component Set for a Release on page 190
Defining the INSTALLDIR Property in a MixedPlatform Installation
The INSTALLDIR build property represents the main installation directory for the
application. By default, it is set to the first directory you create under the Program Files
folder on the Files page. A mixed platform project has two installation directories: one
under Program Files and another under Program Files (x86). However, the INSTALLDIR
property can have only one value. To see this, go to the Files page and view the
subdirectories of Program Files and Program Files (x86); only one will be designated as
the INSTALLDIR.
To define the second installation directory, add a custom action to set the default value
of INSTALLDIR based on the destination computer’s platform. Place the custom action at
the beginning of the installation initialization. You only need a custom action for the
undefined installation directory.
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Example: The installation directory is Program Files (x86)\QuickFacts. In MSI Script,
enter the following custom action:
If VersionNT64 then
Set Property INSTALLDIR to [ProgramFiles64Folder]\QuickFacts
End
If the destination computer’s target platform is 64-bit, then the default installation
directory is Program Files\QuickFacts. If it is 32-bit, then the original installation
directory is used.
See also:
Creating Multiple, Platform-Specific Installations from One Project File on page 67
About MSI Script on page 440
Custom Action Reference on page 460
Starting a New Installation
Follow the steps below to create a new standard Windows Installer installation.
You can create other types of installations.
See Options for New Installations on page 73.
To start a new installation
1.
In Wise Package Studio, do one of the following:
„
On the Projects tab, click the Run link to the right of the task or tool associated
with Windows Installer Editor. The installation associated with the current
project might be opened by default. This tool might open to a different view
based on command-line options defined in Process Templates Setup.
„
On the Tools tab, double-click Windows Installer Editor.
The New Installation File dialog box appears. If it does not appear, select File menu
> New.
2.
In the Categories list, click Predefined Templates.
3.
In the Templates/Tools list, click the Windows Application icon.
A Windows Application installation is a standard installation intended for a Windows
computer or server.
4.
In the File type section, specify the type of file to create:
„
Create an .MSI (Windows Installer database), which is a distributable
installation.
„
Create a .WSI (Windows Installer project), which contains instructions for
compiling an .MSI.
See Project Files and Database Files on page 61.
5.
Select a target platform: 32-bit, 64-bit (x64), or 64-bit (Itanium).
See How to Specify the Target Platform on page 63.
6.
If the application has been written to be installed and run by standard users without
elevation, mark Create a Vista Standard User Installation. This clears the
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Enable User Account Control (UAC) check box in Installation Expert > Windows
Installer Options page.
See Creating an Installation for Standard Users on page 71.
7.
Click OK. The new installation opens.
About Standard User Installations
¾ Windows Installer 4.0 or later only.
The User Account Control (UAC) that was introduced with Windows Vista provides a
temporary privilege-elevation model. A standard user installation is one in which the
UAC is disabled so that standard users can install it without elevation. The installation
cannot contain actions that access a protected area on the destination computer.
During development, a standard user installation behaves as follows:
z
z
Windows Installer Editor warns you when you make a change in the installation that
is incompatible with a standard user installation:
„
On the Files page, the default installation folder in the lower-left list box is
Windows\Profiles\Local Settings\Application Data instead of Program Files.
„
On the Files page, a warning message appears when you try to add a file to a
protected area.
„
On the Registry page, a warning message appears when you try to add a
registry key to a protected area.
The DisableUAP property is set, which hides the option to install for all users or the
current user on the installation’s User Information dialog box.
See Creating an Installation for Standard Users on page 71.
At run time, a standard user installation behaves as follows:
z
The Destination Folder dialog box does not appear because letting the end user
change to a directory that is not per-user would cause the installation to fail.
z
The User Account Control dialog box that prompts end users for administrator
credentials does not appear.
z
If the installation tries to access a protected area, it fails.
Installations that were created in a Wise product earlier than Wise Package Studio 7.0
SP1 or Wise Installation Studio 7.0 run as if User Account Control is enabled.
See also About UAC Elevation of Windows Installer Installations on page 178.
Creating an Installation for Standard Users
¾ Windows Installer 4.0 or later only.
A standard user installation is one in which the UAC is disabled so that standard users
can install it without elevation. The installation cannot contain actions that access a
protected area on the destination computer.
See About Standard User Installations on page 71.
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To create a standard user installation
1.
Do one of the following:
„
In Installation Expert > Windows Installer Options page, clear the Enable User
Account Control (UAC) check box.
See Setting Version-Specific Windows Installer Options on page 176.
„
2.
On the New Installation File dialog box, mark Create a Vista Standard User
Installation. This clears the Enable User Account Control (UAC) check box
in Installation Expert > Windows Installer Options page.
As you develop the installation, do not access or install to protected areas. Example:
the Program Files or Windows System directories, or the HKLM or HKCR sections of
the registry.
Creating a Device Driver Installation
You can create an installation that supports Microsoft Driver Install Frameworks (DIFx).
Microsoft created the Driver Install Frameworks to significantly improve the quality of
device driver installations. For information on DIFx, search for “DIFx” in the MSDN
Library (msdn.microsoft.com/library/).
The Microsoft DIFxApp merge module simplifies the process of creating installations that
install device drivers. This merge module adds custom actions to the installation that are
needed to install and uninstall the driver package using Driver Install Frameworks for
Applications (DIFxApp). After you add the merge module, you add the files that make up
the driver package and specify the DIFxApp options for installing the driver.
To create a device driver installation
1.
Use the Download Redistributables wizard to download the latest version of the
DIFxApp merge module from the Wise Web site, if you have not already done so.
See Downloading Redistributable Files on page 30.
Note
Early versions of this merge module might be named “Binaries.”
2.
Make sure the device driver you are installing meets the Microsoft DIFx driver
requirements.
3.
Do one of the following:
„
Start a new installation and select the Device Driver icon on the New
Installation File dialog box.
See Starting a New Installation on page 70.
„
4.
Open an existing installation.
On the Merge modules page, add the Microsoft DIFxApp merge module to the
installation.
See Adding a Merge Module to an Installation on page 338.
5.
On the Features page, add a feature for the installation’s driver package.
See a Adding a New Feature on page 94.
6.
On the Files page, do the following.
See Adding Files to an Installation on page 109.
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a.
Select the driver package feature.
b.
Create a unique directory for the driver package.
c.
Add the driver package’s .INF file to the directory you created.
d.
The driver package’s .INF file must be the first file added to this directory so
that it becomes the key path of the component.
e.
Add the other files that make up the driver package to the same directory that
contains the .INF file.
f.
In the lower-right list box, double-click the .INF file.
g.
The File Details dialog box appears.
h.
Click the Driver tab and edit the DIFxAPP options.
See Editing DIFxApp Options on page 132.
7.
To add additional driver packages repeat the preceding steps, except for adding the
DIFxApp merge module.
8.
Continue developing the installation.
Options for New Installations
When you create a new installation, the New Installation File dialog box appears and
provides options for starting an installation. Most of the options use a template to start a
specific kind of installation. If you have created custom templates, they appear as
additional options for new installations.
See Creating and Editing Installation Templates on page 48.
This section describes the options that are available.
Windows Application
Creates a standard installation with default settings.
See Starting a New Installation on page 70.
Device Driver
Creates an installation that installs a device driver. This template supports Microsoft
Driver Install Frameworks (DIFx). Use it with the DIFxApp merge module that adds
custom actions to the installation that are needed to install and uninstall the device
driver package using Driver Install Frameworks for Applications (DIFxApp).
See Creating a Device Driver Installation on page 72.
Web Application
Creates an installation intended to be run on Microsoft Internet Information Server
(IIS).
See About Web Installations on page 245.
Server Application
Creates an installation intended to be run on Microsoft IIS, with an additional dialog box
for recording logon information.
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See Obtaining Logon Information From a Dialog on page 425.
Windows Mobile
Opens the Windows Mobile wizard, which lets you add Windows Mobile .CAB files to a
desktop installation. The wizard is also accessible from the Mobile Devices page.
See Adding Windows Mobile Files on page 220.
Palm Application
Opens the Palm OS wizard, which lets you add Palm OS files to a desktop installation.
The wizard is also accessible from the Mobile Devices page.
See Adding Palm OS Files on page 223.
Transform
Lets you change any aspect of an installation by creating a transform based on changes
that you make to the installation.
See Creating a Transform Based on an Existing .MSI on page 342.
Universal Transform
Lets you create a universal transform containing limited changes that can be applied to
any .MSI.
See Creating a Universal Transform on page 344.
Merge Module
See Creating a Merge Module As a New Installation on page 328.
Import Tools
The following tools open an import wizard, where you select a development project file
to import. Target file information is extracted from the project file and added to the
installation.
See Import Visual Studio Projects on page 352.
z
Visual Basic
z
Visual C#
z
Visual J#
Opening an Installation Package
The Open dialog box might contain the following tabs that let you open different items:
z
File System tab: Opens a package from a directory on your computer.
z
Repository tab: Opens a package from the Wise Software Repository.
The Repository tab on the Open dialog box provides a centralized list of installation
packages and eliminates the need to navigate your file system to find an installation
file. When you select a package from the repository:
„
The package opens from its location in the repository.
Typically, this is the Scripts, Projects, or Available Packages directory.
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„
If the package status is Available, you are prompted to change the status to
Under Development.
Warning
Use caution when changing available packages, because they might have been
deployed to end users.
„
If you try to save the package, a prompt asks if you want to overwrite the file
that is in the repository.
„
If the package is checked into the Software Manager Revision Control, you
might see additional prompts when you try to edit or save it.
To open a package from a directory:
Click the File System tab on the Open dialog box and navigate to a package. This is the
same as the standard Windows Open dialog box.
To open a package from the Wise Software Repository
1.
Click the Repository tab on the Open dialog box.
Packages are displayed in the list box if they have a valid path to an installation file
(.MSI, .WSI, and so on). If a package’s path to its installation file is missing or
broken, or is not accessible by the current computer, that package is not listed. Also,
subscription packages are not listed.
2.
Database displays the current Software Manager database. To select a package
from a different database, click
.
The Select Data Source dialog box appears. This is a standard Windows ODBC
connection wizard, which lets you connect to a database through an ODBC data
source.
3.
4.
Specify criteria for filtering the packages that are displayed above:
„
Groups
This lists the groups defined in Software Manager.
„
Status
This lists the possible package statuses.
„
Package Type
This lists the available package types.
Select a package in the list and click Open.
If you change an installation that you opened from the repository, re-import it into the
Software Manager database. Otherwise, changes will not be reflected in the repository.
Comparing Windows Installer Files
Visual MSIDiff™ lets you compare the following types of files and see the differences in
Setup Editor > Tables tab: .MSI, .WSI, .MSP, .MSM, .WSM, or .MST files. You can
compare an .MSP file only with its base .MSI.
Note
Revision Control in Software Manager runs Visual MSIDiff to compare versions of a
package. (Not available in Standard Edition.)
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See Revision Control in the Software Manager Help.
Options for Comparing Files
z
Compare the current file to another file.
z
Compare any two files.
z
Compare a transform to its base .MSI, to see the items that the transform changes
in the .MSI.
To view differences between two Windows Installer files
1.
Open a file.
2.
Select Tools menu > Visual MSIDiff and then select an option.
„
Compare Current File to Another File
The Compare Windows Installer Files dialog box appears. Specify the file to
compare to the current file. To have the file you specify in Compare To treated
as the newer file in the comparison, mark the dialog box’s check box. To
compare an .MSP to an .MSI, the current file must be the .MSI. An .MSP is
always treated as the newer file. Click OK.
„
Compare Any Two Files
The Compare Windows Installer Files dialog box appears. Specify the files to
compare. The file you specify in the Base File field becomes the current file. To
compare an .MSP to an .MSI, the Base File must be the .MSI. To have the file
you specify in Compare To treated as the newer file in the comparison, mark
the dialog box’s check box. An .MSP is always treated as the newer file. Click
OK.
„
Compare Transform to Base .MSI
(Transform files only.) Automatically compares the .MST to its base .MSI.
You are taken to Setup Editor > Tables tab and the Visual MSIDiff Key dialog box
appears, which describes icons that indicate changes. Changes are shown in the
tables and rows where they occur.
3.
On the Visual MSIDiff Key dialog box, take note of the symbols and colors that
indicate changes and click OK.
If the Visual MSIDiff Key dialog box does not appear, you might have marked its Do
not show this dialog again check box. You can reactivate this prompt in Wise
Options.
4.
Scroll through tables on the Tables tab, looking for the symbols for changed tables.
Click on changed tables to view differences in rows, which are indicated by symbols
and colors.
As you work in the installation file, the symbols indicating changed items are
updated dynamically. The compare stays on until you end it.
5.
To end the compare, select Tools menu > Visual MSIDiff > End Current Compare.
This turns off compare symbols and closes the comparison file.
You can also start Windows Installer Editor in the Visual MSIDiff mode from a command
line.
See Command Line Options For WFWI.EXE on page 238.
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See also:
Tables Tab on page 380
Saving an Installation as XML
You can save a copy of an installation (.WSI, .MSI, WSM, or .MSM) in XML format. This
lets you check the XML version of the installation into a text-based source code control
system (SCCS), use text-based file comparison tools to find changes, or perform
analyses with XML reporting tools.
You can set a global option in Wise Options to create an XML copy every time you save
an installation file, or you can export to an XML file on an as-needed basis. Depending
on the size of the installation file, creating an XML copy can take several minutes.
You cannot open an XML-format file in Windows Installer Editor.
To create an XML file during saves
Use this method when you plan to check the XML file into an SCCS from Windows
Installer Editor. This ensures that the XML copy is always synchronized with the original
installation file.
1.
Select Tools menu > Options and click the General tab.
2.
Mark the Create XML copy during save check box.
This global option causes an XML copy to be created every time you save an installation
file. The copy has the same name as the installation file with the extension .XML
appended, and it is saved in the same directory. (Example: If the current file name is
Application.wsi, the XML copy is named Application.wsi.xml.)
To export an XML file as needed
Use this method when you do not have an integrated SCCS, or to compare the version of
the installation you’re working in to the version that you checked out of your SCCS.
1.
Select File menu > Export to XML.
2.
In the Save As dialog box that appears, specify a file name with the extension .XML
and click Save.
If you have not named the installation file yet, name and save the installation file on
the Save As dialog box. When the Save As dialog box reappears, specify the .XML
file.
The current installation is saved and exported to XML format.
Working With Installations in the Software Manager
Database
There are restrictions on editing and saving an installation that has been added to the
Software Manager database (either by adding its meta data or importing it).
When the package path matches a package in the database
If you open an installation file and the Software Manager database contains a package
with the same package path, the application and package names on the Product Details
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page are unavailable. This is because the installation is connected to the package in the
database. You can only edit these names on the Package Attributes dialog box in
Software Manager.
If you edit the installation’s meta data, the meta data in the database is updated when
you save the installation. If you change the installation, re-import it to the Software
Manager database to update its resources.
Opening a copy of a package in the database
If you open an installation file that is a copy of a package in the Software Manager
database, the application and package names are populated and enabled. Change one
or both of these names before saving the installation to avoid overwriting the package in
the database. Then, when you then save the installation, a new package and its meta
data are added to the Software Manager database.
Example: You want to create a patch for an installation that is in the Software Manager
database. You open a copy of the installation file to change it. Before you save the
installation, you change its package name on the Product Details page. When you save
the installation, a new package with the same application name, and its meta data, are
added to the database.
Duplicate package in Software Manager Database dialog box
If you open an installation file that is a copy of a package in the Software Manager
database, and you don’t change the application and package name on the Product
Details page, the Duplicate Package in Software Manager Database dialog box appears
when you try to save the installation. Select an option and click OK:
z
Create a New Package (recommended)
Mark this to create a new package in the Software Manager database. The Product
Details page opens so that you can change the application or package name before
saving the installation file.
z
Overwrite Existing Package
Mark this to overwrite the package in the Software Manager database. The meta
data of the package in the database is overwritten, and its resources are removed
from the database.
z
Work Disconnected
Mark this to keep the installation file disconnected from the Software Manager
database. When you save the installation, its meta data is not added to the
database.
To connect the installation file to the Software Manager database, change the
application or package name on the Product Details page and save the installation.
A new package and its meta data are added to the database.
Compiling An Installation
Compiling an installation compresses its files, builds .CABs if necessary, and creates the
installation .MSI. Depending on the .EXE option you select on the Build Options page,
compiling can also create an installation .EXE.
Multiple Releases
The number and type of files that are generated depend on the settings you select on
the Build Options and Media pages. If the installation contains multiple releases, all
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releases in the installation are compiled. To compile a specific release, go to the
Releases page, select one or more releases, and click the Compile button at the right of
the Releases page.
Speeding the Compile
If you are working in a .WSI or .WSM file, you can use either of the following methods to
speed the compile process:
z
Mark the Enable Quick Compile check box in Wise Options. Quick Compile
compresses only previously uncompressed or changed files. If a file or media entry
has changed, a full compile occurs instead.
See Setting General Options on page 34.
z
Use ExpressBuild, a multi-processor compile feature.
See About ExpressBuild on page 39.
To compile an installation
1.
Click Compile at the lower right of the main window.
2.
Select the type of compile from the button menu. (Not available in Standard
Edition.)
With Enterprise Management Server, Security Setup determines whether these
options appear.
z
Local Compile
The package is compiled locally.
If the installation contains files that have missing or invalid source paths, the
Welcome dialog box of the Remove Missing Files tool appears. This lets you remove
those files if they should not be in the installation.
See Removing Files With Missing or Invalid Source Paths on page 361.
z
Remote Compile
The package is compiled on the Wise Package Studio server and the operation is
managed by the Wise Task Manager. The package must be in the share point
directory, and its source files must have UNC or relative paths. Before the package
is compiled, it is saved and closed in Windows Installer Editor.
See Wise Task Manager in the Wise Package Studio Help.
Compile Results
If you are working in an .MSI or .MSM, compiling saves the file. If file paths are stored in
the .MSI, compiling first refreshes the files with the latest version. If files cannot be
read, or other errors occur, errors are listed in the Task List. Use the Task List to
determine the source of the errors.
See Using the Task List on page 25.
If you see messages that files are missing, you can suppress the file refresh by marking
the Don’t update or recompress files when saving check box on the Product Details
page.
If merge modules are missing, you can download them using Help menu > Download
Redistributables.
See also:
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Testing An Installation on page 80
Running An Installation on page 81
Running the Debugger on page 437
Testing and Running An Installation
To test an installation, you can:
z
Test the installation, which appears to run but does not install files or change the
system.
See Testing An Installation on page 80.
z
Debug the installation in an .MSI debugger, which lets you step through the
installation while viewing the property values and other table data. This actually
runs the installation, and lets you see exactly what it is doing at any time.
See Running the Debugger on page 437.
z
Run the installation on your computer, which installs files and changes the system.
See Running An Installation on page 81.
z
Run the installation and install it into a virtual layer. After you test the installation,
you can then delete the layer to restore your computer to its original state.
See Running An Installation on page 81.
Note
When working in a .WSI, you can set the installation to generate more than one
installation program by adding releases to the Releases page. If you test, debug, or run
an installation that contains multiple releases, you are prompted to select a release.
Testing An Installation
You run an installation in test mode, which does not install files or change the system.
This lets you run through the user interface and logic of an installation without making
changes.
To test an installation
1.
Click Test at the lower right of the main window.
2.
If you have added command lines to the Command Line page, a menu appears with
further options. The menu contains the names of all command lines you created.
You can test with a command line by selecting its name. To avoid having to select
from the button menu, press Ctrl+T to test with no command line.
3.
If you are working in a .WSI that contains multiple releases, you are prompted to
select one.
The installation is compiled and run in test mode.
Note
If you change the installation and then test it, but the change is not apparent, close the
installation. Reopen it and compile it, and then run it again.
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Testing a transform or merge module
You cannot test a transform or a merge module by itself. It can only be run in
conjunction with an .MSI. To run a transform or merge module, run the base .MSI from
the command line with the appropriate command-line options, which are documented in
the Windows Installer SDK Help.
See also:
Compiling An Installation on page 78
Running An Installation on page 81
Running the Debugger on page 437
Running An Installation
When you run an installation, you can either:
z
Install it on your computer.
This runs the installation as it would run on the destination computer and makes
changes to your computer.
z
Install it into a virtual layer.
This creates a new virtual layer, installs the .MSI into the layer, and activates the
layer. After you test the installation, you can delete the virtual layer to restore your
computer to its original state. (Not available in the Visual Studio integrated editor.)
To perform side-by-side testing of two versions of an application without them
interfering with each other, install one version into a virtual layer and the other version
on your computer.
To run an installation and install it on your computer
1.
Click Run at the lower right of the main window.
2.
Select the type of installation from the button menu:
„
Force Reinstall
Normally, if an application is installed and you try to install it again, Windows
Installer prompts you to remove it. This option uses command lines to bypass
the uninstall. Existing resources are replaced, and new resources are laid down.
(The command line msiexec.exe /FAMSUV [MSIFILENAME] is used.
See Command Line Options in the Windows Installer SDK Help.)
3.
„
Uninstall --> Install
If the application is already installed, this option first uninstalls it, then installs.
„
Run
Runs the installation normally. If the application is already installed, you are
prompted to uninstall it.
„
Other command lines
If you added command lines to the Command Line page, they also appear. To
avoid having to select from the button menu, press Ctrl+R to run with no
command line.
If you are working in a .WSI that contains multiple releases, you are prompted to
select one.
The installation is compiled and run.
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Note
If you change the installation and then run it, but the change is not apparent, close the
installation. Reopen it and compile it, and then run it again.
To run an installation and install it into a virtual layer
1.
On the Wise Options dialog box, mark the Install into virtual layer from Run
button option.
See Setting General Options on page 34.
2.
Click Run at the lower right of the main window.
3.
If you are working in a .WSI that contains multiple releases, you are prompted to
select one.
The application is installed into a new virtual layer and activated. You can test the
installation by viewing its installed files and running the application. If needed, you
can edit the contents of the layer in the Virtual Package Editor. You might add or
delete a file or registry key for testing purposes. You can then delete the layer to
restore your computer to its original state.
See About Installation Expert in the Virtual Package Editor Help.
To delete an installation installed into a virtual layer
Do one of the following:
z
Install another installation into a virtual layer.
This removes the layer that was previously created and creates a new one.
z
Close Windows Installer Editor.
z
Delete the virtual layer from the Symantec SVS applet.
The name of the virtual layer is WiseTemp_ProductName where ProductName is the
value of the ProductName property.
See About the Altiris SVS Applet in the Virtual Package Editor Help.
Running a transform or merge module
You cannot run a transform or a merge module by itself. It can only be run in
conjunction with an .MSI.
To run a transform or merge module, run the base .MSI from the command line with the
appropriate command-line options, which are documented in the Windows Installer SDK
Help.
See also:
Testing An Installation on page 80
Running the Debugger on page 437
Compiling An Installation on page 78
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Chapter 4
Defining an Installation Project
This chapter includes the following topics:
z
Project Summary Page on page 83
z
Product Details Page on page 83
z
General Information Page on page 89
z
Add/Remove Programs Page on page 90
z
Features Page on page 91
z
Managing Binary Resources on page 102
Project Summary Page
The Installation Expert > Project Summary page provides the following information
about the current installation project and quick access to areas of the installation:
z
Links to Installation Expert pages that have content in the current installation and,
where appropriate, the number of items defined on each page.
Examples: How many features are defined on the Features page, how many files
have been added to the Files page, and so on.
z
Links to the Package Contents reports.
z
Installation package meta data (read-only). You can edit the meta data.
See Product Details Page on page 83.
A check box in Wise Options determines whether the Project Summary page appears
when an installation is opened.
Product Details Page
Use the Product Details page to enter, edit, or view an installation’s meta data. Meta
data is displayed for .MSI, .WSI, and .MST files. In the Value column of the Package
Meta Data table, you can enter or edit meta data that is not read-only.
Note
The meta data that appears when you create a transform comes from the base .MSI. If
you change a transform’s meta data, it is set when the transform is applied.
Meta Data and the Software Manager Database
If you define meta data fields in Software Manager, they appear on the Product Details
page unless the Software Manager database cannot be found. You can edit these meta
data fields on the Product Details page or in Software Manager. In Software Manager,
you can also change the order in which the meta data fields appear on the Product
Details page.
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See Defining Custom Meta Data Fields in the Software Manager Help.
For an .MSI or .WSI, you can add the meta data that appears on the Product Details
page to the Software Manager database. This lets you add package information to the
Software Manager database early in the development or repackaging process. It also
eliminates the need to enter the meta data manually in Software Manager and ensures
that every package in the database has meta data that meets your corporate standards.
See Adding Meta Data to the Software Manager Database on page 86.
See How to Get Packages Into the Software Manager Database in the Software Manager
Help.
To set product details
Select Installation Expert > Product Details page and complete the page:
z
Application
Enter the name to use for this application in the Software Manager database. This
can be the same as the Product Name meta data field. This field appears in an
.MSI or .WSI only.
z
Package
Enter a unique name to identify this package in the Software Manager database.
Typically, you use the Application name plus specific version information.
(Example: If the Application name is Product, the Package name might be
Product 5.05.) This field appears in an .MSI or .WSI only.
z
Product Type
(Read-only.) This displays Windows Installer for installations and Transform for
transforms.
z
Product Name
Enter the name of the application, which by default is the name of the first directory
you create on the Files or Web Files page.
The end user sees this name during installation and in the Add/Remove Programs
dialog box.
z
Manufacturer
Enter the manufacturer or publisher of the application.
z
Version
Enter the version number of the application. Windows Installer uses this to identify
this application when subsequent patches or upgrades are applied. The version
should be in the format AA.BB.CCCC.DDDD, where AA is the major version, BB is
the minor version, CCCC is the build version, and DDDD is optional and ignored. It is
stored as a string data type.
See Incrementing the Product Version on page 87.
Warning
If you are releasing a newer version of your application but are not using an
upgrade or patch, it is very important to enter a new version on the Product Details
page. Not doing so can cause the installation to open in maintenance mode instead
of in normal installation mode. This can result in an installation that is a mixture of
old and new files, which can cause errors in your application. The only exception is if
the installation contains no new files, no deletion of files, and no other system
changes, which means that only the contents of files are changed.
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Default Directory
During installation, this directory is displayed to the end user on the Destination
Folder dialog box, and the end user can change the default location for the
application. (The Destination Folder dialog box is called the Single Feature
Destination dialog box in Windows Installer Editor.) This defaults to the first
directory you create on the Files or Web Files page. To change the default directory,
select its value, click the Change button, and select a new directory.
See Setting the Default Installation Directory on page 88.
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Package Path
(Read-only.) This displays the installation file’s location.
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Repository ID
(Read-only.) This displays the package’s unique identifier in the Wise Software
Repository, which Windows Installer Editor generates in the form of a GUID. This ID
is generated when you save or compile an installation after entering the application
and package names. It is also generated when you import a package in Software
Manager, if it does not already exist.
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Product Code
Every Windows Installer installation must have a unique product code, which is used
as the principal identification for the application. Windows Installer Editor generates
a product code in the form of a GUID, which ensures that no two applications ever
have the same product code. To change the product code:
„
Select its value and click the Change button.
„
On the dialog box that appears, click Yes to change the product code and the
upgrade code, or click No to change just the product code. If the installation is
an upgrade of an existing installation, then change the product code only.
See Upgrades on page 305.
Changing the product code also changes the package code. For information on
the product and package codes, see ProductCode Property, Package Codes, and
Product Codes in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
See About GUIDs on page 497.
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Application Type
Specify whether this is a standard Win32 or a .NET installation. This also determines
how Windows Installer Editor handles COM interoperability registry entries. This
defaults to the Default Application Type that is specified in Wise Options.
See Setting .NET Assembly Options on page 35.
The ability to create .NET installations is supported only by Windows Installer 2.0 or
later.
„
Win 32 (non .NET)
Select this if this is a standard Win32 installation without .NET assemblies.
„
.NET Application
Select this if this is a .NET installation with only .NET elements.
„
Mixed (.NET and Win32)
Select this if this installation contains both Win32 and .NET elements. When this
option is selected, the Generate COM interop registry keys for .NET
Assembly check box on the File Details dialog box > Self-registration tab is
marked by default for all .NET assemblies you add to this installation. The
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assemblies will be registered so that they can be called as though they were
COM elements.
When the .NET Application or Mixed option is selected, entries are created in the
MsiAssembly and MsiAssemblyName tables for each assembly you add to the
installation. The Global Assembly Cache directory also appears on the Files page.
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Installation Target
This value is for meta data purposes only. It does not change the installation.
„
Windows-based desktop/server PC
Mark this if the installation does not install a Web service to an IIS server. This
is the default except for Web and server applications.
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Windows-based IIS Web server
Mark this if the installation installs a Web application to an IIS server. This is the
default for Web and server applications.
Description
Describe the package.
This becomes part of the package meta data when the package is imported into the
Software Manager database.
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Don’t update or recompress files when saving
(.MSI files only.) Files are stored in .MSI files either with a hard-coded path to the
original, or without a path. For files with paths, Windows Installer Editor gets the
latest copy of the file from the specified path when you save or compile the .MSI.
Mark this to prevent Windows Installer Editor getting the latest copy of files that
have paths.
If you clear this check box, files that are set to be compressed are not recompressed when you save or compile.
Compression options are on the Media page.
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Increment version number on compile
Mark this to increment the third section of the version when the installation is
compiled. Examples:
3.0.3790 is incremented to 3.0.3791
2.5 is incremented to 2.5.0001
Adding Meta Data to the Software Manager Database
For an .MSI or .WSI, you can add to the Software Manager database the meta data that
appears on the Product Details page. This lets you add package information to the
Software Manager database early in the development or repackaging process. It also
eliminates the need to enter the meta data manually in Software Manager and ensures
that every package in the database has meta data that meets your corporate standards.
To add meta data to the Software Manager database
1.
Select Installation Expert > Product Details page.
2.
Enter the Application and Package names. These fields appear in an .MSI or .WSI
only.
See Product Details Page on page 83.
3.
Select File menu > Save to save the installation.
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If this is the first time you have saved the installation, the Save As dialog box
appears. Enter a name for the file and click Save.
4.
If a package with the same application and package name is already in the Software
Manager database, a warning message appears. Click OK and change either the
application or package name to create a new package in Software Manager.
When you save the installation, its meta data is added to the Software Manager
database and the Repository ID field is populated.
What happens when you add meta data to the Software Manager
database?
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The meta data appears in Software Manager on the Package pane and the Package
Attributes dialog box.
See About the Software Manager Window and Viewing and Editing Package
Attributes in the Software Manager Help.
This only adds the package’s meta data to the Software Manager database. It does
not import the package’s resources. The package’s resources are imported by the
Import Wizard in Software Manager.
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The package is assigned a status of New in Software Manager. You cannot change to
or from this status manually. A New package is changed to Under Development only
when you use the Import Wizard to import its resource information.
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The package is assigned a repository ID in the form of a GUID. If you make a copy
of the installation and change the copies application or package name, it is assigned
a new repository ID.
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The Application and Package fields on the Product Details page are unavailable.
You can edit them on the Package Attributes dialog box in Software Manager.
See Viewing and Editing Package Attributes in the Software Manager Help.
If you open an installation file that is a copy of the package in the Software Manager
database, the Application and Package fields are populated and enabled. Change
one or both of these fields before saving the installation to avoid overwriting the
package in the database.
See Working With Installations in the Software Manager Database on page 77.
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If you edit meta data on the Product Details page, the meta data in the Software
Manager database is updated when you save the installation. If you edit meta data
in Software Manager, your edits appear on the Product Details page the next time
you open the installation.
See How to Get Packages Into the Software Manager Database in the Software Manager
Help.
Incrementing the Product Version
Windows Installer uses the version number of the application to identify the product
when subsequent patches or upgrades are applied.
How do you set the version number?
The version number is stored in the Version field on the Product Details page. You can
update the version number by changing the field.
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See Product Details Page on page 83.
You can increment the version number automatically during compile by marking the
Increment version number on compile check box on the Product Details page.
When should you increment the version field?
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When you add or delete files from the installation.
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When you create, remove, or edit any other items besides files. Examples: services,
ODBC, runtimes, registry, and so on.
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If you plan to create a patch that updates earlier versions to this version.
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When you include upgrade entries on the Upgrades page of versions that this
installation will upgrade.
When can you leave the version field the same?
When you create an update that has all the same files as the original version, and only
the contents of files have changed.
Setting the Default Installation Directory
During installation, this directory is displayed to the end user on the Destination Folder
dialog box, and the end user can change the default location for the application. (The
Destination Folder dialog box is called the Single Feature Destination dialog box in
Windows Installer Editor.)
On the Product Details page, you can:
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Change the default installation directory.
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Reset the default directory for features that use this directory.
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Create a new directory as a child, or subdirectory, of an existing directory.
Note
When end users install your application, sometimes the installation directory defaults to
the C drive, and other times it defaults to another drive. This happens because Windows
Installer determines which drive has the most free space.
To set the default installation directory
1.
Select Installation Expert > Product Details page.
2.
Select the Default Directory value and click the Change button.
The Set Default Install Directory dialog box appears. The Default Directory dropdown list contains all the directories accessed by this installation, including
predefined Windows directories.
3.
From Default Directory, select a new default installation directory.
If the directory you want is not listed, add it in Installation Expert > Files page.
To create a new directory as a child of an existing directory, select a directory, click
the New Folder button and, in the Create New Folder dialog box, enter a name for
the new subdirectory.
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4.
Mark Change Feature configurable directories to have any features that
explicitly reference the default directory change when you select a new default
directory.
To see if a feature explicitly references a directory, double-click the feature name on
the Features page. If the Directory field does not contain <none>, then the
feature explicitly references a directory.
5.
Click OK.
General Information Page
Use the General Information page to set the summary information and the required
Windows Installer version for the installation file. End users can see the summary
information by right-clicking the compiled .MSI or .EXE in Windows Explorer and
selecting Properties.
Note
In Windows Vista and later, the file Properties dialog box does not contain summary
information.
For information on summary items, see Summary Property Descriptions in the Windows
Installer SDK Help.
Select Installation Expert > General Information and complete the page:
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Title
Enter the name of the application. This field often includes a version number.
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Subject
Enter a brief description of the application.
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Author
Enter the author or publisher of the application. This field often includes a copyright
notice.
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Keywords
Enter a list of keywords that the end user can use to search for this installation in
Windows Explorer.
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Installer Version
(Read-only.) This displays the minimum Windows Installer version required on the
destination computer to run this installation. This is not the version of the
application. If the destination computer has an earlier version of Windows Installer,
the installation fails.
To change this version, select Setup Editor > Product tab, click the Summary icon in
the left pane, and double-click Minimum Installer Version in the upper-right pane.
If this is a 64-bit installation, the minimum version of Windows Installer is set to
2.00 or later. Do not change this value in a 64-bit installation.
Microsoft Restrictions:
„
Windows Installer version 3.0 requires Windows 2000 SP 3 or later, Windows XP,
or Windows 2003.
„
Windows Installer version 4.0 requires Windows Vista or later.
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Comments
Enter comments about the application that this installation installs.
Add/Remove Programs Page
Windows operating systems have an Add/Remove Programs or Programs and Features
applet that let end users uninstall, change, or repair programs. Use the Add/Remove
Programs page to enter the information necessary to support these capabilities.
Select Installation Expert > Add/Remove Programs and complete the page:
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Do not display in Add/Remove Programs list
Mark this to exclude your application from Add/Remove Programs.
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Display in Add/Remove Programs list
Mark this to include your application in Add/Remove Programs and to set the
following:
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„
Display Icon
Specify an icon to appear next to the application name in Add/Remove
Programs. If you leave this blank, a generic icon is used. Click Browse to select
a file from the installation. If the file exists on disk, you also see an icon
selection dialog box where you select the icon.
„
Icon Number
Enter the icon resource ID (preceded by -) or the icon number for the specified
icon. Because a file can contain multiple icons, icons in a file are numbered,
starting from zero. This is pre-filled if you selected an icon from the icon
selection dialog box.
„
Hide modify button
Mark this to disable the Change button for your application in Add/Remove
Programs. This prevents end users from changing the installation.
„
Hide remove button
Mark this to disable the Remove button for your application in Add/Remove
Programs. End users will not be able to uninstall the application using Add/
Remove Programs.
Support Information Page
The following information appears under the Support Information link in Add/
Remove Programs.
„
Product Updates URL
Enter a URL where end users can get online support for the application.
„
Contact Person
Enter the name of a person or department that end users can contact if they
have questions. Examples: a support technician or the support department.
„
Phone Number
Enter the phone number for the contact person specified above.
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Help URL
Enter the path to a help file that will be installed on the destination computer.
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Comments
Enter any additional comments for the end user.
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Hide repair button
Mark this to disable the installation repair option under the Support Information
link in Add/Remove Programs.
Features Page
Use Installation Expert > Features page to create the structure of an installation by
defining:
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What features make up the application.
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How those features are presented to the end user during installation.
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What conditions must be true for portions of features to be installed.
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The target platform (32-bit, 64-bit, or both) for each feature.
See How to Specify the Target Platform on page 63.
Determine your application’s features and conditions before configuring other aspects of
the installation, because many of the pages in Installation Expert have a Current
Feature drop-down list that lets you set options on a per-feature and per-condition
basis.
See Working With Components and Features on page 496.
Note
WiseScript Package Editor and WiseScript Editor refer to features as “components.”
To see a tree structure that lists all components, merge modules, files, registry entries,
and other installation items associated with each feature, use Setup Editor > Features
tab.
To specify which features are installed by default if the end user selects a Complete,
Typical, or Custom installation type on the Installation Type dialog, use the Installation
Types page.
See Setting Features for Installation Types on page 181.
In an installation with multiple releases, you can deselect certain features for certain
releases on the Release Settings page.
See Defining a Feature and Component Set for a Release on page 190.
About the Complete feature
In a new installation, the Features page already contains a feature named Complete,
because every installation must contain at least one feature. You can rename the
Complete feature. You can delete it, but only after you create a second feature.
See Strategies for Organizing Files Into Features on page 92.
Working with the Features page
The tree structure on the Features page displays features and conditions, and their
hierarchical relationships.
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To add a new feature, click its parent feature and click the Add button at the right of
the page.
See Adding a New Feature on page 94.
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To configure installation options for a feature, click its icon (
option from its drop-down list.
) and select an
See Configuring a Feature Using Its Drop-Down List.
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To configure all items for a feature, click its name and click Details at the right of the
Features page.
See Configuring a Feature Using the Feature Details Dialog on page 96.
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To delete a feature or condition, click its name and click Delete at the right of the
page. When you delete a feature, all its child features and conditions are deleted
also.
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To rearrange features, click Move Up and Move Down at the right of the page. You
can move features within their current level only, in their current sibling group. You
cannot move features to their parent or child levels.
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To add a condition to a feature, click its name and click Add Condition at the right of
the page.
See Using Conditions With Features on page 100 and Adding and Deleting Feature
Conditions on page 101.
Use the right-click menu to:
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Expand or collapse a selected feature’s children.
z
Display hidden features.
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Display the features’ titles as they appear on the Select Feature dialog box during
installation rather than the features’ names, which are used by Windows Installer.
Any display option you select from the right-click menu overrides the corresponding
setting in Wise Options.
To see how features appear during installation
1.
In a sample installation file, add a second feature on the Features page.
2.
On the Files page, add a file to each feature. Select the feature from the Current
Feature drop-down list before adding the file.
3.
On the Dialogs page, clear the check box for Installation Type Dialog, and mark
the check box for Select Feature Dialog.
4.
Click Test in the lower-right of the main window.
The Select Feature dialog box in the installation reflects the options that you set on the
Features page.
Strategies for Organizing Files Into Features
It is important to create and organize features and define conditions in a logical way; not
doing so can result in non-functional versions of your application being installed.
Features in an installation appear in a tree structure, which lets you place features in
hierarchical relationships. You can add a feature at the same level as another feature
(sibling level) or as a child of another feature. Sibling features can be installed
independently of each other, while child features can be installed only if their parent
feature is installed.
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The core resources for an application should always be in a top-level feature. The core
feature should install a functioning version of your application; it should have no
dependencies on resources that are in optional features.
When Windows Installer repairs an installation due to corruption or deletion of a
resource, it repairs the entire feature. Example: If an advertised shortcut is part of the
top level feature, and that advertised shortcut gets deleted, the entire application is
reinstalled during the repair. Therefore, isolate advertised shortcuts and their .EXEs into
their own sub-features to avoid complete reinstallation and result in more efficient
repairs.
The following examples illustrate several strategies for organizing files into features.
Place dependent features below required core files
The features Internal_Text_Editor and Internal_Graphics_Editor, which are built into the
application, are dependent on the presence of the core application files, which are
assigned to the Core feature. Make them children of the Core feature to ensure that they
are never installed without the Core feature.
Dependent on Core feature
Place dependent features as siblings to core files, but require core files
The features Internal_Text_Editor and Internal_Graphics_Editor, which are built into the
application, are dependent on the presence of the core application files, which are
assigned to the Core feature. Because they are siblings of the Core feature, an end user
might install the text editor feature or the graphics editor feature without installing the
core feature, which would break the installation. To avoid this problem, make the Core
feature required; double-click it and mark the Required Feature check box on the
Feature Details dialog box. Required features cannot be turned off during installation.
The advantage to this strategy is that during installation, the end user sees the optional
features at the top level instead of buried in the tree structure.
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Place stand-alone features as siblings
The features External_Text_Editor and External_Graphics_Editor are stand-alone
applications, which can run independently of the core application. Therefore, you can
make them siblings of the Core feature. An end user can install the text editor or the
graphics editor without the core application.
Independent of Core feature
Use conditions with features
The Core feature has two conditions. VersionNT specifies that the operating system must
be later than Windows Me, and Version9x specifies that the operating system must be
Windows 95/98/Me. Because conditions appear in the Current Feature drop-down list,
which appears on most Installation Expert pages, you can associate the same kinds of
items with a condition that you can with a feature, including files, registry entries,
shortcuts, services, and so on. Any items that you associate with either condition are
installed only if the feature is installed and the condition is true.
Conditions
See also:
Features Page on page 91
Creating Multiple, Platform-Specific Installations from One Project File on page 67
Adding a New Feature
To add a new feature
1.
Do one of the following:
„
In Installation Expert > Features page, click the feature name under which the
new feature should appear. Then click Add at the right of the Features page.
To add the new feature at the top level, click Installation Features; to add the
new feature under a feature, click the feature’s name.
„
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In Setup Editor > Features tab, right-click the feature under which the new
feature should appear, and select New > Feature.
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To add the new feature at the top level, right-click the Features icon; to add the
new feature under a feature, right-click the feature’s name.
The Feature Details dialog box appears.
2.
Complete the dialog box.
See Configuring a Feature Using the Feature Details Dialog on page 96.
3.
Click OK on the Feature Details dialog box.
The new feature appears in the tree.
4.
The order in which features appear on the Features page determines the order of
the features on the Select Features dialog box that appears during installation. To
rearrange the order, select a feature name and click Move Up or Move Down at the
right of the Features page.
To edit a feature’s settings, double-click its name. To rename a feature, right-click its
name, select Rename, and enter a new name. To delete a feature and its child features,
right-click its name and select Delete.
See also:
Features Page on page 91
Strategies for Organizing Files Into Features on page 92
Configuring a Feature Using Its Drop-Down List
In Installation Expert > Features page, when you click the icon next to a feature name,
a drop-down list that contains options for installing the feature appears. The option you
set in this drop-down list determines the default state of the feature during installation.
The drop-down list provides a way to set common options quickly. The icon itself
provides a visual cue that indicating which options have been set.
The drop-down list options are a subset of the options that are available in the Feature
Details dialog box, which you access by clicking the Details button at the right of the
Features page.
Note
The first four options in the feature’s drop-down list set the default only; the end user
can change the default during installation. To prevent the end user from being able to
change the defaults you set here, you can turn off the Select Feature dialog box on the
Dialogs page, use the Feature Details dialog box to set features to be required, or set
features to be hidden from the end user.
To set options for a feature
Click the feature’s icon and select an option. You can select only one of the first four
options, but you can set the fifth option, Hidden from user, in combination with any of
the first four options.
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Will be installed on local hard drive
Make the feature default to being installed on the local hard drive. (This option
corresponds to setting Favor Local in the Attributes drop-down list on the Feature
Details dialog box.)
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Will be installed to run from source
Make the feature default to being run from source. (This option corresponds to
setting Favor Source in the Attributes drop-down list on the Feature Details
dialog box.)
If a feature is installed to run from source, it is available to the application and
visible to the end user, but is not actually installed on the local hard drive. When the
feature is invoked, your application must call Windows Installer functions, such as
MsiGetComponentPath, to locate and read the necessary files from the installation
source, which might be a CD-ROM or shared network directory. Example: Use this
option to specify a clip art library to run from the source. Then you must code your
application to try to read from the installation source when the end user tries to use
the clip art library.
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Feature will be installed when required
Make the feature default to being advertised. (This option corresponds to setting
Favor Advertising in the Advertising drop-down list on the Feature Details dialog
box.)
If a feature is advertised, it is available to the application and visible to the end user,
but is not actually installed on the hard drive. If the installation source, such as a
CD-ROM or shared network directory, is available to the destination computer, the
feature is installed when the end user invokes the feature. If the installation source
is not available, the end user is prompted for the installation source.
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Entire feature will be unavailable
Prevent the feature from appearing during installation and from being installed.
(This option corresponds to setting Never Install This Feature on the Level dropdown list on the Feature Details dialog box.)
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Hidden from user
Prevent the feature from appearing to the end user on the installation’s Select
Features dialog box. You can set this option in combination with any one of the other
options above. (This option corresponds to setting Hidden in the Display dropdown list on the Feature Details dialog box.)
See also:
Features Page on page 91
Configuring a Feature Using the Feature Details Dialog on page 96
Configuring a Feature Using the Feature Details Dialog
When you create a new feature or edit an existing feature, you can configure the feature
using the Feature Details dialog box. Access this dialog box from Installation Expert or
Setup Editor.
See Adding a New Feature on page 94.
For technical information on the fields on this dialog box, see Feature Table in the
Windows Installer SDK Help.
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Note
Some options on this dialog box set the default only; the end user can change the
default during installation. To prevent the end user from being able to change the
defaults you set, you can turn off the Select Feature dialog box on the Dialogs page, set
features to be required, or set features to be hidden.
To complete the dialog box
z
Name
Enter the name of the feature, which is used internally by Windows Installer. The
feature name is limited to 32 characters.
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Title
Enter text to identify the feature. This text appears on the Select Features dialog
box during installation.
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Parent
This list contains all features in the installation. To change the feature’s parent, and
therefore the feature tree, select from this list. This lets you change the feature tree
in Installation Expert or Setup Editor instead of editing tables.
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Target Platform
Specify the platform on which this feature should be installed.
Note
If you add a 64-bit component to a 32-bit feature, it will never be installed. A 64-bit
component will be ignored when installing on a 32-bit computer, and a 32-bit
feature will not be installed on a 64-bit computer.
„
All Processors
The feature appears for installation on any computer, regardless of the
platform.
„
32 Bit Processors
The feature appears for installation on 32-bit computers only.
„
64 Bit Processors
The feature appears for installation on 64-bit computers only.
„
x64 Only
The feature appears for installation on computers that support the x86
architecture (including AMD64 or EM64T).
„
Itanium Only
The feature appears for installation on computers that support the Itanium 64bit processor.
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Description
Enter a multi-line description of the feature. This appears if the end user selects a
feature on the Select Features dialog box during installation. This text must fit in the
Feature Description area of the Select Features dialog box.
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Level
If you are using the Installation Types page to determine which features to install for
a Typical or Complete installation, you can skip this field. If not, specify whether this
feature is installed for a Typical or Complete installation. The end user chooses
Typical, Complete, or Custom on the Installation Type dialog box (also called Select
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Installation Type). During a Custom installation, the end user can turn features on
or off individually.
Each installation has an installation level, stored in the property INSTALLLEVEL.
Each feature has its own installation level value, which is set by this field. If a
feature’s level is less than or equal to the installation’s INSTALLLEVEL property, then
the feature is installed. By default, INSTALLLEVEL is set to 3 for a Typical
installation, and to 1000 for a Complete installation.
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„
Normal
Set the feature’s level value to 3, which means that it gets installed by default
for either Typical or Complete.
„
Never install this feature
Set the feature’s level value to 0, which means that it won’t appear during
installation, and won’t be installed.
„
Always install this feature
Set the feature’s level value to 1, which means that it gets installed by default
for either Typical or Complete.
„
Custom
Set the feature’s installation level value yourself. Example: if you want a feature
to be installed for a Complete installation, but not for a Typical installation, set a
custom level value that’s greater than 3 and less than or equal to 1000. The
Custom Value field becomes available.
Custom Value
If Custom is selected in Level above, enter the level value for the feature in this
field. For details, read the description of Level, above.
Note
The end user’s action on the Installation Type dialog box determines the
INSTALLLEVEL property. To see how this works, go to Setup Editor > Dialogs tab
and click the Installation Type dialog in the list. Double-click the Typical/Complete/
Custom radio button, and you see that the end user’s choice in this radio group sets
the property InstallMode. If you then double-click Next on the Installation Type
dialog box and view the Events tab, you see that, based on the InstallMode value,
the installation property INSTALLLEVEL is set to either 3 or 1000.
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Display
Specify if and how the feature is displayed to the end user on the Select Feature
dialog box during installation.
„
Invisible
Do not display the feature.
„
Visible and Expanded
Display the feature and its children.
„
Visible and Collapsed
Display the feature but not its children.
To expand or collapse a selected feature’s children, display hidden features, or
display the features’ titles rather than the features’ names, use the right-click menu
on the Features page.
See Features Page on page 91.
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Attributes
Specify the default for the feature in the installation. The end user can change the
default.
„
Favor Local
The feature should be installed on the destination computer.
„
Favor Source
The feature should be run from the source CD or network directory. This means
the feature is available to the application, but is not installed on the local hard
drive. When the feature is invoked, your application must call Windows Installer
functions (example: MsiGetComponentPath) to locate and read the necessary
files from the installation source, which might be a CD or shared network
directory. A typical use of this option would be to specify a clip art library to run
from the source. Then you must code your application to try to read from the
installation source when the end user tries to use the clip art library.
„
Favor Parent
The feature should use the same attribute setting as its parent feature. If you
select this option, you must also set the installation to generate uncompressed
external files that can run from the source.
See Adding a Media Item on page 210.
z
Advertising
Specify the default setting for how this feature supports advertising. If a feature is
advertised, it is not installed, but it appears to be installed to the end user. Example:
The end user might see shortcuts or menu options for an advertised feature, or the
system might have certain entry points to the feature, such as a registered file
extension, that can perform installation-on-demand of an advertised feature.
„
None
By default, the feature is set to be installed, not advertised.
„
Favor Advertising
By default, the feature is set to be advertised.
„
Disallow Advertising
The feature is set to be installed, not advertised, and the end user cannot
change the default.
Note
Advertising is only supported on certain platforms. To suppress advertising on
unsupported platforms, mark Disable advertising if not supported by OS below.
See Platform Support of Advertisement in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
z
Directory
To let end users select the directory for this feature, select a directory from this list.
When the end user selects this feature on the Select Feature dialog box during
installation, the Browse button becomes enabled so that they can select a new
directory. Child features of this feature inherit the new directory selected by the end
user. If you leave the directory set to <none>, then the files for this feature are
installed in the directory structure specified on the Files page.
To ensure that two features always get installed to the same directory, select the
same option in Directory for both features.
If you let end users select directories for individual features, you must code your
application in such a way that it can locate the features wherever they might be
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placed by the end user. To do this, you can call Windows Installer functions, such as
MsiGetComponentPath.
Note
Only the files that are in the directory you select or in its child directories will be
installed in the new directory that the end user selects. Example: Suppose FeatureA
installs File1 in the Sample\FeatureA\ directory and File2 in the Windows directory.
During installation, the end user specifies Sample\A\ for the new directory. Only
File1, which was originally in the FeatureA\ directory, is actually installed in the A\
directory. File2 is still installed in the Windows directory.
z
Required Feature
Mark this if the feature is required for installation. During installation, end users
cannot deactivate installation of a required feature. If you select Never install this
feature in Level (above), it overrides this option.
z
Disable advertising if not supported by OS
Mark this to ignore any choices you made in the Advertising drop-down list if the
operating system on the destination computer does not support advertising. See
Platform Support of Advertisement in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
See also:
Configuring a Feature Using Its Drop-Down List on page 95
Using Conditions With Features
You can add conditions to features to specify different actions based on installation
properties, system configuration, end user choices, and so on. Both conditions and
features are listed in the Current Feature drop-down list, which appears on all
Installation Expert pages in the Feature Details page group. Just as you can specify
options on a per-feature basis, you can also specify options on a per-condition basis.
Options on these pages that you associate with a condition are installed only if the
condition is true and the feature is installed.
Example:
Suppose your core application files are stored in a feature named Application. If your
application is installed on Windows 95/98/Me, you want to also install Application9x.dll,
but if your application is installed on operating system later than Windows Me, you want
to install ApplicationNT.dll. You do not want to install both .DLLs, but instead want to
install one or the other based on the version of the operating system. To do this, you:
z
Add two conditions under the Web_Creator feature, Version9X (which specifies an
OS of Windows 95/98/Me) and VersionNT (which specifies an OS later than Windows
Me).
z
On the Files page, select the VersionNT condition from the Current Feature dropdown list, then add the ApplicationNT.dll file.
z
On the Files page, select the Version9X condition from the Current Feature dropdown list, then add the Application9x.dll file.
During installation, the files contained within the conditions are installed only if the
condition is true.
Version9X and VersionNT are properties that are set by Windows Installer. See
VersionNT Property and Version9X Property in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
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See also:
WiseFixConditions on page 390
Features Page on page 91
Adding and Deleting Feature Conditions on page 101
Adding and Deleting Feature Conditions
To add a new condition to a feature
1.
Select Installation Expert > Features page.
2.
Click a feature name.
3.
Click Add Condition at the right of the Features page.
The Feature Condition dialog box appears.
4.
Click Build, and create your condition on the Condition Builder dialog box.
The Condition Builder dialog box lets you construct a conditional expression and
check its syntax.
See Creating Conditions With Condition Builder on page 391.
Note
If you add a component condition that checks the installed state of a component or
feature, add the merge module CondFix.msm to the installation. This merge module
fixes a Windows Installer limitation.
See WiseFixConditions on page 390.
5.
Click OK on the Feature Condition dialog box.
The condition appears in the Current Feature drop-down list. If you want to make file
changes or other system changes on the destination computer only if this condition is
true, you first select this condition from the Current Feature drop-down list.
To delete a condition
1.
Select Installation Expert > Features page
2.
Select a condition.
3.
Click Delete at the right of the Features page.
You are prompted to choose what to do with the components that are associated
with the condition. Conditions can contain files, registry entries, and so on, all of
which make up components. When you delete a condition, one of two things can
happen:
„
You can delete all the components that have been added to the condition.
„
You can move all the components associated with the condition to the
condition’s parent feature. If you choose to move the components, they are
placed under the parent feature, and are installed unconditionally.
See also:
Features Page on page 91
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Managing Binary Resources
Use Installation Expert > Resources page to add and update binary resources, and to
change the names or source files for existing binary entries. It provides an easy way to
edit and update peripheral files. (Examples: graphics you might have added for an
installation dialog box or .DLLs you might call with a custom action.) Any changes you
make here are reflected in the Binary table that you can access in Setup Editor > Tables
tab.
The Resources page also lets you link binary data to its source files, by marking binary
resources to be refreshed. As a result, the binary data is updated during compile with
any modification that might have been made to the source file.
Note
The Resources page might contain entries you did not add, such as images, icons, and
Wise .DLL files. The images and icons appear on wizard dialog boxes during installation.
If you are using the default installation wizard, do not delete these resource entries;
otherwise you might encounter errors during compile. The Wise .DLL files support
advanced functionality that you add to an installation (example: custom actions).
Removing or refreshing these files can result in advanced functionality ceasing to work
correctly.
Columns on the Resources page
Name
Name of the row in the Binary table
File Name
Path to the source file that contains the binary data
<Unspecified> in this column indicates that the source file is not
known. (Example: This is the case when an installation includes
a third-party .MSI.) Unspecified entries are stored in the .MSI
and cannot be updated during compile.
Last Modified
Size
Refresh
Creation or modification date of the file that contains the binary
data and its size
Updates the binary data during compile, to reflect any changes
made in the source file
See Refreshing Binary Resources on page 103.
Working with the Resources page
z
To change binary resource properties for a selected resource, click Details at the
right of the page.
See Adding Binary Resources on page 103.
z
To add binary resources to an installation, click Add at the right of the page.
See Adding Binary Resources on page 103.
z
To delete a selected binary resource from the installation, click Delete at the right of
the page.
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z
To edit a selected source file, click Edit at the right of the page. The file opens in an
appropriate application or you are prompted to select an application. Make the
changes and save the file.
z
To copy binary data into a new source file, click Save As at the right of the page. You
might do this to extract a file stored in an .MSI (with an <Unspecified> file name) to
your disk.
Note
If you have saved a resource with an unspecified source file to a new file, don’t save
the installation until you verify that you selected the appropriate file extension. To
do this, select the resource on the Resources page and click the Edit button at the
right of the page. The file should open in an appropriate application. If it doesn’t,
select Edit menu > Reset Page and save the resource again, using a different
extension.
Adding Binary Resources
When you use the Resources page to add binary resources to an installation, Windows
Installer Editor adds the appropriate rows to the Binary table.
Select Installation Expert > Resources page, click Add at the right of the page, and
complete the Resource Details dialog box:
z
Name
Enter a descriptive name for the data you’re adding. This name appears on the
Resources page and in the Binary table. If you leave this blank, the name of the
source file is used instead.
z
File Name
Specify the file that contains the binary data.
z
Create/update link to refresh data when file changes
Mark this to update the data during compile with any modification you might have
made to the source file. This also marks the check box in the Refresh column on the
Resources page.
See Refreshing Binary Resources on page 103.
This check box is unavailable if you have selected a resource with an unspecified file
name.
Note
You can create or remove this link later, by marking or clearing the check box in the
Refresh column on the Resources page.
See also:
Managing Binary Resources on page 102
Refreshing Binary Resources
When you mark a binary resource to be refreshed, you create a link between the binary
data in the installation and its source file. As a result, each time you compile, the binary
data is updated with any changes you might have made to the source file. In a project
file (.WSI), the source file for a binary resource marked to be refreshed stays outside
the project file, and therefore does not increase the size of the .WSI.
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To have a binary resource refreshed
Do one of the following:
z
Mark the corresponding check box in the Refresh column on the Resources page.
z
Mark the Create/update link to refresh data when file changes check box on
the Resource Details dialog box.
You can only refresh binary resources with known source files. If you try to mark the
Refresh check box for a resource whose source file is shown as unspecified, you are
prompted to export the data to a new source file.
To resolve compile errors for binary resources that appear in red
If a binary resource marked to be refreshed appears in red, with question marks in the
Last Modified and Size columns, the name or the location of its source file has changed.
To compile without binary file errors, do one of the following:
z
Use the Resource Details dialog box to update the path for the source file.
z
Clear the Refresh check box and use the existing entry for the resource in the Binary
table.
If an error message appears when you try to clear the Refresh check box, it means
that the Binary table does not have an entry for this resource. Example: This can
happen if you’re working with a .WSI and the source file was changed while the
project file was closed. In this case, you must use the Resource Details dialog box
and set a source file for the binary resource, if you don’t want to delete it.
See:
Adding Binary Resources on page 103
Managing Binary Resources on page 102
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Chapter 5
Assembling an Installation
This chapter includes the following topics:
z
Files or Web Files Page on page 105
z
Resolving File Conflicts Within Windows Installer Editor on page 135
z
Registry Page on page 139
z
INI Files Page on page 148
z
Shortcuts Page on page 150
z
Adding an Environment Variable on page 153
z
Adding File Associations on page 154
z
Services Page on page 157
z
Adding an ODBC Item on page 160
z
Adding to the Windows Firewall Exception List on page 162
Files or Web Files Page
On the Files or Web Files page, you specify the directories and files to be installed on the
destination computer. You also can specify operations to remove, copy, or move files on
the destination computer during the installation.
On the Web Files page, you also can add Web sites, virtual directories, and Web folders,
and set their options. The Web Files page displays items to be installed to a Microsoft
Internet Information Services Web server, while the Files page displays all items to be
installed. For a summary of differences between the two pages, as well as links to Webrelated functionality, see About Web Installations on page 245.
See also:
When to Use the File-Related Installation Expert Pages on page 107
You can detect and resolve conflicts between a package that is still in the authoring
phase and those that have already been deployed, without importing the package into
the Software Manager database. If you do this as you add files to an installation, you
can identify conflicts at an earlier stage in the repackaging process.
See Resolving File Conflicts Within Windows Installer Editor on page 135.
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Files page in Windows Installer Editor
Current Feature
drop-down list
Directories
available to your
computer
Files in the
directory selected
on the left
Directories to
be installed on
the destination
computer
Files or
operations to be
installed on the
destination
computer
The Windows directory represents the system directory
of the destination computer. Structure you add to the
Web Files page is installed under the Web server root.
Working With the Files or Web Files Page
z
If the installation has multiple features, specify the feature you are configuring by
selecting it from the Current Feature drop-down list.
z
In the lower-left list box, use the right-click menu to expand or collapse folders, to
hide or show empty folders, and to rename folders.
z
Drag directories or files to the page from Windows Explorer.
z
Drag directories or files from the upper list boxes to the lower list boxes.
z
Use the following buttons:
„
Add Contents
Add an entire directory and its contents to the installation, filter the directory
using wildcards, and link the directory so that the installation’s contents change
dynamically as the directory’s contents change.
See Adding Contents of Directories to the Installation on page 114.
„
Add File
Add files to the directory that is selected in the lower-left list box.
See Adding Files to an Installation on page 109.
„
New
Create directories to be installed on the destination computer.
You also can create directories in Setup Editor.
See Creating a Folder in Setup Editor on page 371.
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„
Delete (lower left)
Remove a directory from the installation. This does not delete it from the
destination computer.
„
Details (lower left)
On the Files page, use this to set NTSF permissions.
On the Web Files page, use this to set all IIS-related details about the item, as
well as Web-based security.
„
Wildcards
Update settings of a directory in the installation.
See Editing Settings for Automatic Updating on page 119.
„
Operation
Add operations to the installation. See:
Removing a File From the Destination Computer on page 121
Copying and Moving Files on the Destination Computer on page 122
„
Delete (lower right)
Remove a file or operation from the installation.
„
Details (lower right)
View details on the installation’s files or operations, including attributes, name
and source, permissions, self-registration, and assembly options. See:
Editing File Details on page 123.
Removing a File From the Destination Computer on page 121.
Copying and Moving Files on the Destination Computer on page 122
To learn about the Web-specific functionality of the Web Files page, see About Web
Installations on page 245.
See also:
Installation Directories on page 108
Files or Web Files Page Icons on page 109
Adding Merge Modules Instead of Files on page 112
Adding Files From the Wise Software Repository on page 113
Adding .NET Assemblies to the Installation on page 115
How Self-Registration Information is Captured on page 133
When to Use the File-Related Installation Expert Pages
You can add files to an installation on the Files page and the Web Files page. The
following table describes when you should use each of these pages.
Page
When to use it
Files
z
To add files to any installation
See Files or Web Files Page on page 105.
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Page
When to use it
Web Files
z
To create Web folders, virtual directories, and Web
sites, and add files to them
z
To add files to a Web installation
See About Web Installations on page 245.
Installation Directories
A new installation contains several predefined directories. They appear in the lower-left
list box of the Files page, and in the left pane of the Components and Features tabs in
Setup Editor.
Program Files
Represents the Program Files directory on the destination
computer.
Windows
Represents the system directory (regardless of its actual
name) on the destination computer. Some standard
directories are already created under Windows, such as
System32 and Fonts. To create a subdirectory of the system
directory, create it under the Windows directory.
(64-bit installations only.) The Windows directory has an
additional subdirectory, SysWOW64, which stores 32-bit
applications and components.
Program Files (x86)
(64-bit installations only.) A 64-bit system has two
directories for program files: Program Files, in which 64-bit
applications and components are installed; and Program
Files (x86), in which 32-bit applications and components are
installed.
See 32-bit Applications on 64-bit Computers on page 65.
Global Assembly
Cache
(.NET installation only.) This is used for assemblies that will
be shared by many applications on the destination
computer. It appears only if you select either .NET
Application or Mixed (.NET and Win32) as the
application type on the Product Details page.
wwwroot
Represents the root of the Web server on the destination
computer, which is typically C:\InetPub\wwwroot\
See About Web Installations on page 245.
Default directory
If you specify the default directory on the Product Details
page, it appears on the Files page followed by
[INSTALLDIR]. This makes it easy to identify the installation
directory. To enable or disable this option, select Show
InstallDir from the right-click menu.
You can add new directories on the Files page, the Web Files page, the Components tab,
and the Features tab.
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If the directory structure on your computer changes while you are assembling an
installation, change the source directories in the installation, or convert them to relative
or UNC-based source paths.
See About source paths on page 308.
See also:
Files or Web Files Page on page 105
Files or Web Files Page Icons on page 109
Files or Web Files Page Icons
The following icons appear in the lower-right list box on the Files or Web Files page to
help you quickly identify different types of files on the destination computer.
Installation file
Duplicate installation file
Installation file with permissions set
File to be removed from the destination computer
File to be moved on the destination computer
New location of file to be moved on the destination computer
File to be copied on the destination computer
New location of file to be copied on the destination computer
Web site
These cannot be deleted or renamed from the Files page. Use the Web Files
page instead.
Virtual directory
These cannot be deleted or renamed from the Files page. Use the Web Files
page instead.
See also:
Files or Web Files Page on page 105
Installation Directories on page 108
Adding Files to an Installation
If you add the same file to multiple locations, it is considered a duplicate file entry.
See Creating Duplicate File Entries on page 371.
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When you add files to a package that has already been distributed to the share point
directory and imported, you are prompted to add the new files to the share point
directory. If you do so, the .QUE file for that package is reset and you must re-import
the package in Software Manager. If you have already detected conflicts for that
package, you must also redo the conflict detection process.
To add files from Installation Expert
1.
Select Installation Expert > Files or Web Files page.
2.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you add
must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All Features
is selected.)
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer only if the
feature is installed.
Items that you add to a condition are installed only if the feature is installed and the
condition is true.
3.
If the directory where the file is to be added is not listed in the lower-left list box:
a.
Select the directory under which the new directory should be created.
b.
Click New, enter a directory name, and click OK.
The directory you specify will be created on the destination computer if it does not
exist.
Note
When you add a directory, you might not see it when you select another feature
from Current Feature. To display directories for all features, mark the View
directories for all features on Files page check box in Wise Options.
4.
In the lower-left list box, select the directory to which the file will be added.
5.
In the upper list boxes, navigate to a file and double-click it or drag it to the lowerright list box. You can select multiple files.
If you try to add files to the Destination Computer icon or the Program Files
directory, you are prompted to first create a folder to hold the files.
The file is added to the selected directory and appears in the lower-right list box.
Other dialog boxes might appear.
See Additional dialog boxes on page 111.
To add files from the Features tab in Setup Editor
1.
On the Features tab, expand a feature and then expand its Combined folder.
2.
Expand the Files icon.
If the Files icon does not appear, right-click and select Hide Empty Folders/Items.
3.
To add a new directory, right-click a directory and select New > folder.
4.
To add a file, right-click a directory and select New > File.
The Add Files to Installation dialog box appears.
5.
Specify one or more files and click Open.
The file is added to the selected folder and appears in the upper-right pane.
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Other dialog boxes might appear.
See Additional dialog boxes on page 111.
To add files from the Components tab in Setup Editor
1.
On the Components tab, expand a component.
2.
Right-click the Files icon and select New > File.
If the Files icon does not appear, right-click and select Hide Empty Folders/Items.
The Add Files to Installation dialog box appears.
3.
Specify one or more files and click Open.
The file is added to the component’s installation directory and appears in the upper-right
pane.
Other dialog boxes might appear.
See Additional dialog boxes on page 111.
Additional dialog boxes
z
If you add a .NET assembly, and if Scan Dependencies in Wise Options is set to
Prompt to scan dependencies, then Windows Installer Editor:
„
Scans the assembly manifest for dependencies.
„
Displays the Assembly Dependencies dialog box, which prompts you to select
the dependencies to add to the installation.
See Assembly Dependencies on page 117.
z
If a file that is part of a merge module is added, the Files in Merge Modules dialog
box appears. It prompts you to add the merge module and, if necessary, download
it.
See Adding Merge Modules Instead of Files on page 112.
z
If a file that is used by a package in the Wise Software Repository is added, the Files
in Repository dialog box appears and prompts you to add a version of the file that is
in the repository.
See Adding Files From the Wise Software Repository on page 113.
z
A File Details dialog box appears if you:
„
Double-click a file.
„
Select multiple files and click Details (Files or Web Files page).
„
Right-click and select Details (Components and Features tabs).
See Editing File Details on page 123.
See also:
Files or Web Files Page on page 105
Installation Directories on page 108
Files or Web Files Page Icons on page 109
Adding Contents of Directories to the Installation on page 114
Adding .NET Assemblies to the Installation on page 115
Editing Settings for Automatic Updating on page 119
Removing a File From the Destination Computer on page 121
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Copying and Moving Files on the Destination Computer on page 122
Adding Merge Modules Instead of Files
The Files in Merge Modules dialog box appears when a file that is part of a merge
module is added to an installation. Typically, it appears when you:
z
Add a file to the Files or Web Files page.
z
Run tools that add files to an installation. (Example: ApplicationWatch,
SetupCapture.)
The Files in Merge Modules dialog box lets you add the merge module that contains the
file instead of adding the file.
Example:
The file olepro32.dll is part of a merge module named oleaut32.msm (Microsoft OLE
2.40). Because the file olepro32.dll is meant to function as part of a more
comprehensive merge module, it is better to add the merge module instead of the
individual file.
The merge module might contain other files, registry keys, and dependencies on other
merge modules. If it contains dependencies, the dependent merge modules are added
also. Other files and registry keys that are in the merge module are removed from the
installation to avoid duplication.
To add the merge module that contains the file
Mark the check boxes of merge modules to add. To see what dependent merge modules
will be added, expand the folders. Then click OK.
If the merge modules or their dependencies are not found, the Download
Redistributables wizard opens with the appropriate merge modules selected. When you
finish the download, the merge modules are added to the installation.
To add the file instead of the merge module
Clear the check boxes of all merge modules and click OK. Dependency merge modules
are not added if you clear the parent merge module’s check box.
To hide this dialog box in the future
From Show this Dialog, select one of the following:
z
Hide; Replace files with merge modules matching version
Avoid seeing this dialog box in the future and always replace files with the
corresponding merge modules. This turns the dialog box off for all instances in
which it would normally appear.
z
Hide; Don’t automatically add merge modules
Avoid seeing this dialog box in the future and never replace files with the
corresponding merge modules. This turns the dialog box off for all instances in
which it would normally appear.
To make the dialog box appear again, click the Prompts tab in Wise Options and activate
the dialog box.
See also:
Downloading Redistributable Files on page 30
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Files or Web Files Page on page 105
Adding Files to an Installation on page 109
Adding Contents of Directories to the Installation on page 114
Adding Files From the Wise Software Repository
¾ Not available in Standard Edition.
The Files in Repository dialog box appears when a file that is used by a package in the
Wise Software Repository is added to an installation. Typically, it appears when you:
z
Add a file to the Files or Web Files page.
z
Run tools that add files to an installation. (Example: ApplicationWatch,
SetupCapture.)
The Files in Repository dialog box lets you add the version of the file that is in the
repository, which ensures that you use the correct versions of file resources in
applications you develop.
Example: An approved version of the file Sample.dll is stored in the Wise Software
Repository and is used by several packages in the Software Manager database. When
you add Sample.dll to an installation, you can select the version in the repository as the
source for the file.
When you capture a large application with many files, the repository check can slow
SetupCapture considerably. Therefore, you can disable this feature in SetupCapture.
Clear the Enable checking of files against Wise Software Repository check box in
the General Settings of SetupCapture Configuration.
To add a file from the Wise Software Repository
1.
2.
Do one of the following to display the Files in Repository dialog box:
„
Add files to an installation so that the dialog box appears automatically.
„
In Windows Installer Editor, select Tools > Check Repository Files.
Mark the check boxes of files to add and click OK.
The file’s source path is set to the same location as the version in the Wise Software
Repository. You can see the source path on the File Details dialog box > General tab.
To hide this dialog box in the future
From Show this Dialog, select Hide. This turns the dialog box off for all instances in
which it would normally appear.
To make the dialog box appear again, click the Prompts tab in Wise Options and activate
the dialog box.
See also:
Viewing Shared File Resources on page 130
Files or Web Files Page on page 105
Adding Files to an Installation on page 109
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Adding Contents of Directories to the Installation
You can add the entire contents of a directory to an installation or use wildcard filters to
add only specified files in the directory. You also can link a directory that you add to the
installation so that it is dynamically updated when the source directory changes.
To add contents of directories to the installation
1.
Select Installation Expert > Files or Web Files page.
2.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you add
must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All Features
is selected.)
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer only if the
feature is installed.
Items that you add to a condition are installed only if the feature is installed and the
condition is true.
3.
In the upper-left list box, select a directory whose contents you want to add.
4.
In the lower-left list box, select a directory where you want to add the contents.
5.
Click Add Contents.
The Add Contents dialog box appears.
6.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Dest. Directory
Enter the name of the installation directory that will hold the contents of the
directory you’re adding. If you don’t enter a directory name, the contents are
added to the directory that’s selected in the lower-list box.
„
Include Wildcards, Exclude Wildcards
To add or exclude files based on specific criteria, enter a semicolon-delimited list
of wildcards. Wildcards apply only at the moment you click OK on this dialog
box unless you also mark the Update installation check box below. (Example:
Enter *.EXE for all EXE files. A ? represents any one character.) If you leave the
wildcard fields blank, all files in the directory are added.
Groups of wildcards appear in Include Wildcards, which you can edit.
See Setting Wildcard Groups on page 47.
„
Include Subdirectories
Mark this to add all the subdirectories within the directory you’re adding. The
wildcard settings and update installation settings apply to the subdirectories
also.
„
Update installation as files are added or removed from source directory
Mark this to dynamically update the installation when the contents of the
directory you’re adding change on your computer. Otherwise, the wildcards
apply only at the moment you add the directory.
Note
If you link a directory using this check box and if files originally added by the
wildcard are now missing, a Wildcard Deleted Files dialog box appears when you
save the installation. Click No to leave temporarily missing files in the
installation.
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If you mark this check box, each time you save the installation, it is
synchronized with the current contents of the directory. If you specified
wildcards, the installation is synchronized based on the wildcard criteria. If you
included subdirectories, those directories are updated also. If you don’t mark
this check box, you can turn automatic updating on later by using the Wildcard
Details dialog box.
See Editing Settings for Automatic Updating on page 119.
7.
Click OK.
The contents of the directory in the upper-left list box are added to the directory you
selected in the lower-left list box or to the directory you specified in the Dest.
Directory field. If you marked the Update installation as selected files are
added or removed from source directory check box, the linked folder displays
with a small magnifying glass (
).
Note
When you add a directory, you might not see it when you select another feature
from Current Feature. To display directories for all features, mark the View
directories for all features on Files page check box in Wise Options.
See also:
Files or Web Files Page on page 105
Installation Directories on page 108
Adding Files to an Installation on page 109
Adding .NET Assemblies to the Installation
Note
The ability to create .NET installations is supported only by Windows Installer 2.0 or
later.
When you create a .NET installation, you can use the Files or Web Files page to add .NET
assemblies. When you add a file that is a .NET assembly to an installation, the
MsiAssembly and MsiAssemblyName tables are updated.
If the .NET Framework is installed on your computer, the following tasks are performed
automatically when you add a .NET assembly. If the .NET Framework is not installed,
you must perform these tasks manually.
See Creating a .NET Installation Without the .NET Framework on page 243.
z
Files contained in a multifile assembly are added when the main assembly file
(containing the manifest) is added.
z
Depending on the Scan Dependencies option in Wise Options, you either enter
assembly dependencies manually, or they are scanned and added automatically, or
they are scanned and you are prompted to add them.
See Assembly Dependencies on page 117.
z
Assembly attributes are added to the Assembly tab of the File Details dialog box.
z
In a mixed installation (.NET and Win32), registry keys are added to register .NET
assemblies so that they can be called as though they were COM components.
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You can install assemblies into the Global Assembly Cache, the WinSxS directory, or a
private directory. Each of these directories is used in a different way:
Global Assembly Cache
Assemblies that will be shared by many applications on the destination computer should
be installed into the Global Assembly Cache directory. Assemblies installed into the
Global Assembly Cache must be strongly named. A strong name consists of an
assembly’s identity—its simple text name, version number, and culture information (if
provided)—strengthened by a public key and a digital signature generated over the
assembly. The Global Assembly Cache directory appears only if .NET Application or
Mixed (.NET and Win32) is selected as the application type on the Product Details
page. See Installation of Assemblies to the Global Assembly Cache in the Windows
Installer SDK Help.
WinSxS
To enable side-by-side sharing of a Win32 assembly, install it into the WinSxS directory,
which is under the Windows directory on Windows XP or later. Assemblies installed into
WinSxS must be strongly named. On Windows XP or later, shared assemblies are
installed as side-by-side assemblies. See Side-by-Side Assemblies in the Windows
Installer SDK Help.
Private directory
If an assembly is private, used by only one application, install it into any installation
directory, provided its path contains a maximum of 256 characters. See Private
Assemblies in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
See also:
Installation Directories on page 108
How Assembly Dependencies are Added to an Installation
When you add a .NET assembly to an installation, and the assembly has dependencies
on other files, you can add the dependency files to the installation in the following ways:
z
You can add the dependency files manually.
z
Windows Installer Editor can scan the assembly’s manifest and add the dependency
files.
z
Windows Installer Editor can scan the assembly’s manifest and prompt you to add
the dependency files.
The scan feature is controlled by the following settings:
z
In Wise Options > .NET Assemblies tab, use the Scan Dependencies drop-down
list.
z
In the Import Visual Basic, C#, or J# tool, on the Select Configuration dialog box,
use the Automatically add Assembly Dependencies without prompting check
box.
You can exclude dependencies from the assembly scan for a specific installation or for all
installations.
See About Dependency Scan Exclusions on page 117.
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Note
On .NET Framework versions earlier than 1.1, the scan does not occur when you add an
assembly from a UNC or mapped network drive (example: the share point directory). To
enable scanning of such assemblies, either upgrade to .NET Framework version 1.1 or
later, or change your .NET security so that the directory is fully trusted.
Assembly Dependencies
When you add a .NET assembly to an installation, Windows Installer Editor can scan the
assembly’s manifest for dependencies and prompt you to add the dependency files to
the installation.
If the scan finds dependencies, the Assembly Dependencies dialog box lists
dependencies for all the assemblies you added. In the Assembly Dependencies dialog
box, you can check the checkbox next to a dependency name to add the dependency to
the installation. If you uncheck the check box, the dependency is added to the project
dependency exclusion list and is skipped by future scans of the current installation.
You can remove dependencies from the project dependency exclusion list.
See Removing Dependencies from the Project Dependency Exclusion List on page 355.
See also:
How Assembly Dependencies are Added to an Installation on page 116
About Dependency Scan Exclusions
When you add a .NET assembly to an installation, Windows Installer Editor can scan the
assembly’s manifest for dependencies and either add the dependencies to the
installation or prompt you to select the dependencies to add.
You can use the following exclusion lists to exclude dependencies from assembly scans:
Project dependency
exclusion list
A project dependency exclusion list is maintained for every
.NET installation project. A dependency is added to the list
when you choose not to include the dependency during an
assembly scan.
Use this exclusion list to exclude specific dependencies from
a single installation.
You can remove dependencies from the project dependency
exclusion list.
See Removing Dependencies from the Project Dependency
Exclusion List on page 355.
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Global dependency
exclusion list
By default, certain dependencies are excluded from
assembly scans in all .NET installations. These global
dependency exclusions are hard-coded.
You can create an XML file that overrides the hard-coded
dependency exclusions with exclusions that you define.
Use this exclusion list to exclude specific dependencies, or
dependencies that match a wildcard, from all installations.
For example, dependency files that are part of the .NET
Framework.
See About the Global Dependency Exclusion List on
page 118.
Assembly dependencies that are in an exclusion list are never added to an installation,
even if the .NET assembly is rescanned, or if you add a new assembly that has the same
dependency.
About the Global Dependency Exclusion List
By default, certain dependencies are excluded from assembly scans in all .NET
installations. These global dependency exclusions are hard-coded.
You can create an XML file that overrides the hard-coded dependency exclusions with
exclusions that you define. Name the file dotnetexclude.xml and place it in one of the
following locations:
z
The Windows Installer Editor subdirectory of this product’s installation directory on
the local computer
z
The top level of the share point directory
If you have multiple exclusion lists, they are used in the following order:
z
If dotnetexclude.xml is on the local computer, it is used instead of the hard-coded
list.
z
If dotnetexclude.xml is on the share point directory, it becomes the primary
exclusion list, which overrides any local exclusion lists and the hard-coded list.
Use the following syntax in the XML file:
<<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Exclusions>
<Assembly name="regular expression" />
</Exclusions>
The regular expression represents a wildcard in regular expression syntax. For
information on regular expression syntax, search for “Regular Expression Syntax” in the
MSDN Library (msdn.microsoft.com/library/).
The dotnetexclude.xml file overrides all the hard-coded exclusions. To retain the hardcoded exclusions, add them to the XML file. The following list of default exclusions is
provided in the proper XML syntax. You can add your own exclusions to this list.
<<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Exclusions>
<Assembly name="^Microsoft.VisualBasic$" />
<Assembly name="^Microsoft.VisualBasic.Vsa$" />
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<Assembly name="^Microsoft.Vsa$" />
<Assembly name="^Microsoft_VsaVb$" />
<Assembly name="^Microsoft.Vsa.Vb.CodeDOMProcessor$" />
<Assembly name="^Microsoft.VisualC$" />
<Assembly name="^Accessibility$" />
<Assembly name="^cscompmgd$" />
<Assembly name="^CustomMarshalers$" />
<Assembly name="^IEExecRemote$" />
<Assembly name="^IEHost$" />
<Assembly name="^IIEHost$" />
<Assembly name="^ISymWrapper$" />
<Assembly name="^Microsoft.JScript$" />
<Assembly name="^mscorcfg$" />
<Assembly name="^Regcode$" />
<Assembly name="^mscorlib$" />
<Assembly name="^system\." />
<Assembly name="^system$" />
</Exclusions>
See also:
About Dependency Scan Exclusions on page 117
Editing Settings for Automatic Updating
On the Files or Web Files page, if you link a source directory to a directory in the
installation, the files in the installation are updated when the contents of the source
directory change.
To edit the settings for automatic updating of a directory
1.
Select Installation Expert > Files or Web Files page.
2.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you add
must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All Features
is selected.)
3.
Click the directory name in the lower-left list box and click Wildcards at the lower
left of the Files or Web Files page.
The Wildcard Details dialog box appears. If the directory is currently linked to
directories on your computer, those directories appear in the Source Directory list.
4.
To link the contents of a source directory to this installation directory, click Add,
select a directory from your computer, and click OK.
Whenever the contents of directories in the Source Directory list change, the
installation directory is updated, based on the wildcard settings. Example: Suppose
you link the directory C:\Directory and enter *.exe in Include Wildcards. Later
you add Editor.exe to C:\Directory and remove Paint.exe from C:\Directory. This
installation is updated so that it contains Editor.exe and does not contain Paint.exe.
If you also added Paint.dll to the source directory, it is not added to the installation
directory because it does not match the wildcard criteria.
5.
To turn off automatic updating for this installation directory, select each directory in
the Source Directory list and click Delete.
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6.
To configure a particular source directory, select it in the Source Directory list and
complete the Wildcard Details dialog box:
„
Include Wildcards, Exclude Wildcards
To include or exclude files based on specific criteria, enter a semicolon-delimited
list of wildcards. (Example: Enter *.EXE for all EXE files or *.DLL for .DLL files.)
If you leave the wildcard fields blank, all files in the directory are added. Groups
of wildcards appear in Include Wildcards.
To edit groups, use the Wildcards tab in Options.
See Setting Wildcard Groups on page 47.
„
Include Subdirectories
Mark this to add all the subdirectories within the directory you’re adding. The
wildcard settings and update installation settings apply to the subdirectories
also.
„
Change existing components’ attributes
When files are added because of changes in the source directory, new
components are created to hold them. Mark this to reset the attributes of any
pre-existing components to the settings that are specified on this dialog box. If
you do not mark this check box, the files currently in the source directory do not
have the component attributes you set below.
„
Run location
Specify whether new components are installed on the local hard drive (Run
Locally), not installed on the local hard drive (Run From Source), or either.
Change this option only if you plan to integrate Windows Installer function calls
into your application to determine the installed location.
„
Always increment shared DLL count
Mark this to always increment the count of applications using .DLLs in this
component when it is installed, even if the file is not already installed. Normally,
Windows Installer only increments the shared DLL count on a file if the file is
installed and has an existing shared DLL count.
If a component is installed to the Global Assembly Cache, you cannot increment
the shared DLL count.
„
Leave installed on uninstall
Mark this to leave the component installed when its parent feature is
uninstalled.
„
Check condition during reinstall
Mark this to check conditions attached to the component when the application is
reinstalled. If this is not marked, the conditions are checked only during the
original installation.
„
Never overwrite if key path exists
Mark this to prevent the installation of this component if the file, registry entry,
or ODBC data source specified as the key path is already present.
7.
Click OK.
8.
If a change in the wildcards causes files to be deleted, the Wildcard Deleted Files
dialog box appears. Click Yes to remove the listed files from the installation.
The files in the installation directory are updated immediately according to the changes
you made on the Wildcard Details dialog box.
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See also:
Files or Web Files Page on page 105
Files or Web Files Page Icons on page 109
Installation Directories on page 108
Adding Files to an Installation on page 109
Adding Contents of Directories to the Installation on page 114
Removing a File From the Destination Computer
You can add an operation to remove one or more files from the destination computer
during installation. This operation affects files that are already on the destination
computer, not files that are part of the installation.
You can use this operation to remove unneeded files on the destination computer to
keep it in a cleaner state. You also can use it to work around Windows Installer version
rules. Example: If the latest release of an installation uses an older version of a .DLL
than was used in the previous release, the version rules will not allow you to install the
older .DLL. If the installation first removes the newer .DLL from the destination
computer, then the version rules will not prevent the installation of the older .DLL.
Warning
Be very careful when removing files from the destination computer. Do not remove files
unless you are sure that they are not used by another application.
To remove a file from the destination computer
1.
Do one of the following:
„
Select Installation Expert > Files or Web Files page.
a. From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you
add must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All
Features is selected.)
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer
only if the feature is installed. Items that you add to a condition are installed
only if the feature is installed and the condition is true.
b. Click Operation below the lower-right list box and select Remove File.
„
In Setup Editor, on the Components or Features tab, right-click a component or
feature and select New > Remove File.
The Remove File Details dialog box appears.
2.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Directory
Specify the directory on the destination computer where the file is located or
create a new subdirectory. To create a new subdirectory, select a directory and
click New Folder.
„
File Name
Specify the name of the file to be removed. You can use wildcards to select
multiple files or you can mark All Files to select all files in the selected
directory.
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„
3.
Remove During
Specify when the file should be removed: during install, uninstall, or both install
and uninstall.
Click OK.
The operation to remove a file from the destination computer appears, preceded by
On the Files or Web Files page, the entry’s Type column contains “Remove.”
.
To edit it, double-click its name. To delete it, use the right-click menu.
See also:
Files or Web Files Page on page 105
Installation Directories on page 108
Files or Web Files Page Icons on page 109
Adding Files to an Installation on page 109
Copying and Moving Files on the Destination Computer
You can add an operation to copy or move a file on the destination computer during
installation. This operation affects files that are already on the destination computer, not
files that are part of the installation.
You might copy or move files on the destination computer to reorganize the location of
the installation files in a new release. Example: Your application installed graphic files to
C:\Program Files\Application\Graphics, but your latest release installs them to C:\My
Documents\Application. You can add an operation to copy or move the existing graphic
files from the old directory to the new directory.
Warning
Be very careful when moving files on the destination computer. Do not move files unless
you are sure that they are not used by another application.
To copy and move files on the destination computer
1.
Do one of the following:
„
Select Installation Expert > Files or Web Files page.
a. From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you
add must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All
Features is selected.)
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer
only if the feature is installed. Items that you add to a condition are installed
only if the feature is installed and the condition is true.
b. Click Operation below the lower-right list box and select Copy File or Move
File.
„
In Setup Editor, on the Components or Features tab, right-click a component or
feature, select New, and select Copy File or Move File.
The Copy File Details or Move File Details dialog box appears.
2.
Complete the dialog box:
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„
Source Directory
Specify the directory on the destination computer where the file is located or
create a new subdirectory. To create a new subdirectory, select a directory and
click New Folder.
„
Source File Name
Specify the name of the file to be copied or moved. You can use wildcards to
select multiple files or you can mark All Files to select all files in the selected
directory.
„
Dest. Directory
Specify the directory on the destination computer to copy or move the file to or
create a new subdirectory. To create a new subdirectory, select a directory and
click New Folder.
To rename files on the destination computer, make the source and destination
directory the same.
„
Dest. File Name
To change the name of a file when it is copied or moved, specify the new name.
To leave the file name unchanged when it is copied or moved, leave this field
blank. This also works when you use wildcards in the Source File Name field to
select multiple files.
3.
Click OK.
The operation to copy or move a file on the destination computer appears, preceded by
the copy icon (
) or move icon (
). On the Files or Web Files page, the entry’s Type
column contains “Copy to” or “Move to” followed by the directory to which the file will be
copied or moved.
To edit it, double-click its name. To delete it, use the right-click menu.
See also:
Files or Web Files Page on page 105
Files or Web Files Page Icons on page 109
Installation Directories on page 108
Adding Files to an Installation on page 109
Editing File Details
When you add a file to an installation, it inherits the attributes of the original file. If you
edit the attributes of a file in an installation, the file reflects your edits when it is
installed on the destination computer.
Note
When you add an operation to remove, move, or copy a file on the destination computer,
an entry for that operation appears on the Files or Web Files page in the lower-right list
box. Because the entry is an operation to be performed on a file on the destination
computer, you cannot edit its attributes. However, you can edit the details of the
operation.
To edit attributes for a single file
On the Files or Web Files page, double-click a file in the lower-right list box.
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The File Details dialog box appears. It contains several tabs. See:
Editing General File Details on page 124
Setting Permissions for Files and Directories on page 126
Editing Self-Registration Settings for Files on page 127
Editing Assembly Settings for Files on page 127
Viewing Shared File Resources on page 130
Editing XML Files During Installation on page 131
To edit attributes for multiple files
1.
On the Files or Web Files page, select multiple files in the lower-right list box.
2.
Click Details at the lower right of the page.
The Multiple Files dialog box appears. Only a subset of the editing options are
available.See Editing General File Details on page 124 and Setting Permissions for Files
and Directories.
Note
If you add a file to an installation, then add it again to a different directory, the second
instance is added as a duplicate file. If you double-click the second file, the Duplicate
File Details dialog box appears instead of the File Details dialog box. (See also Creating
Duplicate File Entries on page 371.) With .NET assemblies, if you add the same file to
the application directory and the Global Assembly Cache, a duplicate file is not created
because they are treated as separate components.
See also:
Files or Web Files Page on page 105
Adding Files to an Installation on page 109
Editing General File Details
To edit general file details
1.
Do one of the following:
„
In Installation Expert: On the Files or Web Files page, select one or more files
and click Details.
„
In Setup Editor: On the Components or Features tab, select one or more files
and select Details from the right-click menu.
The File Details or Multiple Files dialog box appears.
2.
Click the General tab.
3.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Long Filename
(File Details dialog box only.) The name of the file as displayed on computers
running Windows 95 and later.
„
Short Filename
(File Details dialog box only.) The 8.3 file name as displayed in DOS or under
older versions of Windows. Specify the short name your application will look for
if it is installed on a shared network directory that doesn’t support long file
names.
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„
Source Pathname
The full path of the file on your computer. If this is blank, or if it is just a file
name with no path, you might be working in an .MSI, which encapsulates the
file itself.
„
Font Name
(File Details dialog box only.) The name of the font contained in the file, if it is a
font file.
„
Read Only
Make the file read-only on the destination computer.
„
Hidden
Make the file hidden on the destination computer.
„
System
Designate this file as a system file on the destination computer.
„
Vital
Mark this if this file must be installed correctly for the installation to succeed. If
the file cannot be installed for any reason, the installation fails.
„
Add to Hash Table
(Not available for multiple files.)
If this is an unversioned file, mark this to create an entry for this file in the
MsiFileHash table. Windows Installer version 2.0 or later uses file hashing to
detect and eliminate unnecessary file copying during reinstalls and repairs. It
does this by comparing a file hash stored in the MsiFileHash table to a hash of
an existing file on the destination computer. See MsiFileHash Table in the
Windows Installer SDK Help.
„
File has Valid Checksum
Many executable files (examples: .EXE, .OCX, .DLL, etc.) store a checksum that
can be checked against actual file contents to ensure the file is not corrupted.
Mark this to have file contents verified during reinstall or repair. If the
verification fails, the file is assumed to be corrupted and is replaced. For files
that contain checksum information, this check box is marked automatically
when you add the file to the installation.
„
Self-Register OCX/DLL
(Multiple Files dialog box only.) Many files support self-registration (examples:
many .OCXs and some .DLLs). Mark this to self-register these files during the
installation with an unordered registration method.
„
Duplicate Files
This appears only if this file was added to the installation more than once. The
duplicates are listed here for informational purposes only.
You can view and edit duplicate file entries on the Components and Features
tabs in Setup Editor.
See Creating Duplicate File Entries on page 371.
4.
Click OK.
Note
With .NET assemblies, if you add the same file to the application directory and the
Global Assembly Cache, a duplicate file is not created because they are treated as
separate components.
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Setting Permissions for Files and Directories
You can set NTFS (NT file system) permissions for a single file or folder or for multiple
files. The permissions you set are applied to the domain and user you specify, so you
can set different permissions for the same file or folder for different users. Set
permissions only if you know your users and their domains.
When you set permissions for a file, the file appears preceded by
.
Note
The Permissions tab does not set Web-based security. To set Web-based security, go to
Installation Expert > Web Files page, select the directory or virtual directory, and click
the Details button. The Directory Security tab lets you set options for Microsoft Internet
Information Server. See IIS documentation for details on options.
To set NTFS file or directory security
1.
Do one of the following:
„
In Installation Expert: On the Files or Web Files page, select a folder, file, or set
of files and click the corresponding Details button. (On the Web Files page, you
can set permissions for files but not for folders.)
„
In Setup Editor: On the Components or Features tab, right-click a folder, file, or
set of files and select Details.
A dialog box appears with a Permissions tab. If you selected multiple files that have
different permissions, you are prompted to reset the permissions to a common set
when you click the Permissions tab. If you do not reset the permissions, the
Permissions tab is unavailable.
2.
On the Permissions tab, click Add.
The Lock Permissions Details dialog box appears.
a.
Enter the Domain.
b.
Enter or select a User name.
c.
Click OK.
The domain and user names appear in the upper list box, and the list of permissions
is enabled.
3.
To set permissions, mark the check boxes.
You can add multiple users.
Warning
If you set permissions for a folder that is written to by this installation, be sure that the
user installing this application has privileges to write to the folder.
Example: Suppose you give write privileges to ASPNET_USER for Program
Files\SampleFolder, which later in this installation has files written to it. If the current
user profile running this installation is ADMINISTRATOR, then the installation will fail to
write to SampleFolder, because only ASPNET_USER has write permissions to
SampleFolder. ASPNET_USER is automatically set.
See Run Time Properties on page 519.
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Editing Self-Registration Settings for Files
Many files support self-registration (examples: many .OCXs and some .DLLs). You can
edit these files so that they self-register during installation.
To edit self-registration settings for files
1.
Do one of the following:
„
In Installation Expert: On the Files or Web Files page, double-click a file.
„
In Setup Editor: On the Components or Features tab, double-click a file.
The File Details dialog box appears.
2.
Click the Self-registration tab.
3.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Registration Method

Do not register

Unordered (normal Windows Installer behavior)
Select this if the file does not require that other files in the installation be
registered first for it to self-register properly.

Use order specified below
(Not available in a merge module.)
Select this if this file requires that other files in the installation be registered
first for it to self-register properly. This enables the Registration Order
field.
„
Registration Order
This section lists files you selected for self-registration with the Use order
specified below method. Arrange files in the order in which they need to selfregister. You can only move the file for which you are viewing details.
„
Generate COM interop registry keys for .NET Assembly
If this installation contains both .NET and COM elements, mark this to register
.NET assemblies so that they can be called as though they were COM elements.
This check box is enabled only if you have the .NET Framework installed on your
computer, and if the file you are viewing is an assembly that was written to
allow COM interop. When the Application Type on the Product Details page is
Mixed (.NET and Win32), this check box is marked by default.
4.
Click OK.
Editing Assembly Settings for Files
Use the Assembly tab on the File Details dialog box to enter and edit information about
.NET and Win32 assemblies. Windows Installer Editor uses this information to register
the assembly files.
z
For a .NET assembly, use the Assembly tab to enter the assembly attributes. If the
.NET Framework is installed on your computer, this information is filled in from the
assembly manifest and you should not have to change it. Also use the Assembly tab
to specify whether to display the .NET assembly as a reference in Visual Studio .NET
on the destination computer.
z
For a Win32 assembly, use the Assembly tab to create and edit a manifest.
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See Creating a Win32 Assembly on page 129.
To edit assembly settings for files
1.
Do one of the following:
„
In Installation Expert: On the Files page, double-click a file.
„
In Setup Editor: On the Components or Features tab, double-click a file.
The File Details dialog box appears.
2.
Click the Assembly tab.
The Assembly tab only appears for files that are keypaths to their components.
3.
Complete the dialog box. If .NET is installed on this computer, some of these
options may be preconfigured. If you don’t have .NET, enable options below by
selecting .NET in Assembly Type.
„
Assembly Type
Specify whether this file is a .NET assembly, a Win32 assembly, or neither.
„
Manifest
.NET and Win32 assemblies require a manifest. Select the file that contains the
manifest for this assembly. For .NET assemblies, this often is the same as the
file you are editing, because most manifests are embedded in the assembly file
or in one of the files in a multifile assembly. For Win32 files, the manifest is
often an external file with the same name plus “.manifest”. (Example: The
manifest for My.exe would be named My.exe.manifest.)
See Creating a Win32 Assembly on page 129.
„
Assembly Attributes
This displays the assembly’s culture, name, publicKeyToken, and version
attributes.
If this information has not been pre-filled, click Add to enter it. Enter the Name
and Value for each of the assembly’s attributes.
For information on obtaining assembly attributes, see Creating a .NET
Installation Without the .NET Framework on page 243.
4.
„
Show reference in Visual Studio .NET
Mark this to add a registry key that displays this assembly as a reference in
Visual Studio on the destination computer. (Visual Studio .NET 2002 or later
only.) This lets you pull the assembly into a Visual Studio project without having
to browse for it.
„
Execute Install method on this assembly
A .NET assembly can contain an install object that performs additional
installation functions unique to the assembly. Mark this to execute this
assembly’s install object after the file is installed.
„
Generate native-code version during installation
Mark this to run the Native Image Generator (ngen.exe) on the assembly after
it is installed. The Native Image Generator precompiles portions of the assembly
and caches it on the target computer so assemblies load and execute faster. For
details, search for “Native Image Generator” in the MSDN Library
(msdn.microsoft.com/library/).
Click OK.
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See also:
Editing File Details on page 123
Creating a Win32 Assembly
Your can use Win32 assemblies to isolate applications on destination computers running
under Windows XP or later. Isolating an application .EXE means its dependent, shared
.DLL and .OCX files are placed in the application directory or in the WinSxS directory
rather than in a non-side-by-side location. This ensures that your application always
uses the version of .DLL or .OCX with which it was installed. It prevents overwriting of
previous versions of the .DLL or .OCX and ensures that other applications do not
overwrite your version of shared files.
You isolate a Win32 assembly by means of a manifest file, which describes the assembly
and any resources it depends on. Options for adding a Win32 assembly and its manifest
to an installation are:
z
Create a manifest for a Win32 assembly outside Windows Installer Editor, then add
the assembly and its manifest to the installation as you would any other files. On
the Assembly tab of the File Details dialog box, mark it as a Win32 assembly and
specify the manifest file.
z
Use the procedure below to create a Win32 assembly and manifest on the Manifest
File Details dialog box. This populates the MsiAssembly and MsiAssemblyName
tables.
Warning
Isolation does not work on all applications. Applications must be written according to
Microsoft programming guidelines to work with operating system isolation methods.
(Example: If an application hard-codes paths to support files, isolation might not work.)
For details, see the following topics in the Windows Installer SDK Help: Isolated
Components, Installation of Win32 Assemblies, Side-by-Side Assemblies. Also, search
for “assembly manifest” and “isolated applications” in the MSDN Library
(msdn.microsoft.com).
To create a Win32 assembly and manifest
1.
Add the application file and its dependent files to the installation.
2.
In Installation Expert > Files or Web Files page, double-click the application file in
the lower-right list box.
The File Details dialog box appears.
3.
Click the Assembly tab.
4.
From Assembly Type, select Win32.
Attributes are read from the file and displayed in the Assembly Attributes list, and
a manifest file name is entered in Manifest.
5.
To add dependencies to the manifest file, click Edit.
The Manifest File Details dialog box appears.
6.
Click Add, then select an option:
„
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Installed File
Adds a dependency to a file that is in the installation. On the Select File dialog
box that appears, select the dependency file and click OK. The dependency file
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Assembling an Installation
is added to the installation as a side-by-side assembly. It is marked as a Win32
assembly and a manifest is created for it.
„
External Manifest
Adds the attributes of an external manifest file as a dependency. Specify a
manifest file and click OK. The manifest you specify and the file it points to must
be present on the destination computer or in the installation. They must also be
located in the application’s directory structure or the WinSxS directory. See
Private Assemblies in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
7.
To add more dependencies, repeat the preceding step.
8.
Mark Use XP Common Controls to add a dependency on the Common Controls
Version 6.0, which gives the Win32 assembly .EXE the look and feel of Windows XP.
For details, search for “Windows XP visual style” in the MSDN Library
(msdn.microsoft.com).
9.
Click OK, then click OK on the File Details dialog box.
The manifest file is created in XML format and added to the installation with the same
name as the dependent file plus “.manifest”. (Example: The manifest for My.exe would
be named My.exe.manifest.) The manifest is also added to your computer with the
extension .XML. (Example: If you add C:\Program Files\My.exe and make it a Win32
assembly, the file C:\Program Files\My.exe.xml is created.)
See also:
Editing File Details on page 123
Editing Assembly Settings for Files on page 127
Viewing Shared File Resources
The Shared Resources tab on the File Details dialog box displays all packages in the
Software Manager database that use a specific file, even if they install the file to a
different location. This lets you:
z
Determine the correct version of the file to use in your application by checking
whether the file is used by packages that have already been deployed.
z
Resolve potential file conflicts during the development cycle. When the file in the
current installation conflicts with a file in the Software Manager database, you can
replace the current file with the correct version from the repository.
You also can view shared file resources in a report format.
See Generating Shared Resource Reports on page 28.
To view shared file resources
1.
Do one of the following:
„
In Installation Expert: On the Files or Web Files page, double-click a file.
„
In Setup Editor: On the Components or Features tab, double-click a file.
The File Details dialog box appears.
2.
Click the Shared Resources tab.
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A white exclamation point to the left of the package indicates that the current file is
already in the Software Manager database and it does not conflict with the file used
by that package.
A red exclamation point to the left of the package indicates that the current file
conflicts with the file used by that package. Examples: The files have a different
version, date/time, or size; the files are installed to the same directory, but
component GUIDs do not match.
To select a different file
1.
On the Shared Resources tab of the File Details dialog box, select the package that
contains the version of the file you want to use.
2.
Click Use Instead.
This button is unavailable when: the package you selected above is the one that is
currently open; there is no conflict; or the source file listed in the Wise Software
Repository cannot be found (example: the file has been deleted).
3.
Click OK.
The current file is replaced with the version of the file in the Software Manager
database. If a conflict existed, the exclamation point to the left of the package
changes from red to white.
See also:
Editing File Details on page 123
Editing XML Files During Installation
When you add an XML file, such as Web.config, to the Files or Web Files page, and then
get details for the XML file, the Dynamic Content tab appears, which shows the file’s
contents.
The purpose of the Dynamic Content tab is to let you modify the XML file by inserting
system-specific information such as local directory paths and user names. Because this
information is different for each server, you use Windows Installer properties to specify
dynamic items.
Note
If you add an XML file, but the Dynamic Content tab does not appear in the file’s details
dialog box, the file was not recognized as a well-formed XML file. Check the file for
irregularities and verify it adheres to XML and Microsoft authoring standards.
To set values to be replaced in an XML file at run time
1.
In Installation Expert > Files or Web Files page, add a valid XML file.
2.
Double-click the XML file and select the Dynamic Content tab.
The contents of the XML file appear in the list box.
3.
Mark Enable Dynamic Content.
The Edit button becomes enabled for editable lines only after you mark Enable
Dynamic Content.
4.
Select a line and click the Edit button.
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Not all lines are editable, only lines that have name-value attributes. (Example:
<compilation defaultLanguage=”c#” />.) The Attribute Editor dialog box appears.
5.
6.
To edit an XML attribute:
a.
Select the attribute in the top list box.
b.
In Dynamic Value, type a new value to replace the current value at run time.
You can enter bracketed Windows Installer property names. You must have
added a mechanism elsewhere in the installation to populate the property.
(Example: Use the Custom Property dialog; see Adding the Custom Property
Dialog on page 429. Or use properties defined in Run Time Properties on
page 519.)
c.
Alternatively, you can select a property name from Property and click the
Insert into Dynamic Value button.
Click OK on the Attribute Editor dialog box when finished.
At run time, the attribute is replaced with the dynamic value you specified. Windows
Installer properties are resolved to their value.
See also:
Editing File Details on page 123
Editing DIFxApp Options
When an installation contains a device driver that meets Microsoft Driver Install
Frameworks (DIFx) driver requirements, you can use Microsoft’s Driver Install
Frameworks for Applications (DIFxApp) to install the driver.
See Creating a Device Driver Installation on page 72.
You edit the DIFxApp options on the Driver tab of the File Details dialog box. This tab
appears only if all of the following are true:
z
The DIFxApp merge module has been added to the installation.
Note
Early versions of this merge module might be named “Binaries.”
z
You selected an .INF file on the Files page.
z
The .INF file is the key path of the component.
To edit DIFxApp options
1.
Double-click the device driver’s .INF file on the Files page or on the Components or
Features tab in Setup Editor.
The File Details dialog box appears.
2.
Click the Driver tab.
3.
Complete the dialog box:
„
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Use DIFxApp to install this driver file
When you mark this check box, the other options become enabled. They are all
marked by default.
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Assembling an Installation
4.
„
Retain better-matching PnP function drivers
Mark this to retain the device’s Plug and Play function driver if it is a better
match for the device than the driver in the installation. If you clear this check
box, the installation’s plug and play function driver is always installed.
„
Prompt for missing device
Mark this to prompt the end user to connect a device to the computer if the
device matches this driver and is disconnected.
„
Create entry under Add/Remove Programs
Mark this to make this driver package removable through Add/Remove
Programs.
„
Driver Installation Order
This list box displays the .INF file you selected on the Files page and every other
.INF file in the installation that uses DIFxApp for its installation. Use the Move
Up and Move Down buttons to move the .INF file you selected on the Files page.
Click OK.
How Self-Registration Information is Captured
When you add a .DLL or .OCX file containing COM self-registration information to an
installation, its registration information is scanned and the appropriate registry keys are
added to the installation. This system of registration is more robust than letting the file
self-register at installation time because it does not depend on the presence of other
files on the destination computer or on how well the .OCX or .DLL file adheres to selfregistration conventions.
How self-registration information is scanned
z
When a file is added to an installation, its type libraries are scanned for registration
information and the appropriate registry keys are added to the installation. You can
set options in Wise Options to rescan and update the installation each time you
compile. Additional options determine whether the advertising information is added
to the advertising tables (AppId, Class, Extension, Mime, ProgId, TypeLib, Verb), to
the registry, or both.
See Setting General Options on page 34.
z
A more powerful scanning method captures information not available in the type
library, such as extensions, keys in hives other than HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT, and
keys in sections other than CLSID, Interface, Mime, Typelib, or ProgIds. To use this
method, do one of the following:
„
On the Component Details dialog box, mark Self-register the key path file
before compile. Each time you compile, files in the component are reregistered, the registration information is rescanned, and any new information
is added to the installation.
See Adding and Editing a Component on page 374.
„
Use the WiseComCapture.exe utility to extract a file’s registration information to
a .REG file, from which you can import registry keys into the installation. Use
this method to avoid registering the files on your computer.
See Using WiseComCapture.exe.
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Using WiseComCapture.exe
before you can scan a file’s self-registration information and add it to an installation, the
file must be registered on your computer. If you prefer not to register files on your
computer, you can run the scan routine as a stand-alone utility on a different computer.
This utility, WiseComCapture.exe, is in the Windows Installer Editor installation
directory. It extracts the registration information to a .REG file, from which you can
import registry keys into the installation.
To scan a file’s self-registration information and add it to an
installation
1.
Copy or install the files to self-register onto a computer other than your build
computer.
2.
Copy WiseComCapture.exe to a location you can access from the other computer.
3.
Run WiseComCapture.exe from the command line, using the following syntax:
WiseComCapture.exe /r /u Input_COM_Full_pathname Output_REG_pathname
where:
„
/r self-registers the files before extracting the registry information.
„
/u self-unregisters the files after the extraction is finished.
„
Input_COM_Full_pathname is the path to the file or files that should be selfregistered.
„
Output_REG_pathname is the path and file name of the .REG file to which the
registry information will be extracted. This file must be accessible to anyone
who will be working on the installation.
The files are registered and the registry information is extracted to the .REG file you
specified.
4.
On the build computer, do one of the following to import the .REG file:
„
On the Registry page, import the .REG file you created. This method imports
the information once but does not update it if the file’s registration information
changes.
See Importing and Exporting Registry Entries on page 144.
„
In Setup Editor > Components tab, display the Component Details dialog box
for the component containing the file. In Import .REG File, specify the .REG
file you created. Mark Extract advertising information from registry file.
See Adding and Editing a Component on page 374.
If you rerun WiseComCapture.exe whenever the file’s registration information
changes, its registry information will be imported from the .REG file.
See also:
How Self-Registration Information is Captured on page 133
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Resolving File Conflicts Within Windows Installer
Editor
¾ Not available in Standard Edition.
You can detect and resolve conflicts between a package that is still in the authoring
phase and those that have already been deployed, without importing the package into
the Software Manager database. The best time to do this is as you add files to an
installation. This lets you:
z
Streamline repackaging by identifying conflicts earlier in the process.
z
Maintain your Software Manager database as a pristine image of packages that have
already been deployed in the production environment.
Example:
Suppose you are working on an update to Application A, which is scheduled for a future
release. You import Application A into the Software Manager database to resolve
conflicts. Another member of your team is working on Application B, which uses older
versions of some of the files in Application A. When you import Application B into the
Software Manager database, these files conflicts are found and resolved by pulling in the
newer versions from Application A. You release Application B with files from Application
A that have not been released. You can avoid this situation by resolving conflicts without
importing into the Software Manager database.
How Windows Installer Editor detects conflicts
Windows Installer Editor compares the files each application installs and records files
that conflict. Resolving a conflict involves looking at each file that is installed by more
than one package and selecting which version to install on the destination computer.
You also can change the location of conflicting files so that each package can use its
version of the file. When you resolve conflicts from Windows Installer Editor, all conflicts
are resolved in the current installation only; the Software Manager database is never
changed.
Options for resolving conflicts
z
Resolve Conflicts with Rules
Uses ConflictManager’s conflict resolution rules to resolve conflicts automatically.
See Resolving Conflicts With Rules in Windows Installer Editor.
z
Resolve Conflicts
Runs the Resolve wizard, which lets you review and resolve file conflicts one at a
time.
See Resolving Conflicts Individually in Windows Installer Editor on page 136.
Resolving Conflicts With Rules in Windows Installer Editor
¾ Not available in Standard Edition.
Using conflict resolution rules is the fastest way to resolve conflicts. The rules do the
conflict analysis and resolve the conflicts automatically. This saves time, reduces errors,
and provides consistency in conflict resolution.
See Conflict Resolution Rules in the ConflictManager Help.
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To resolve conflicts with rules in Windows Installer Editor
1.
Select Tools menu > Resolve Conflicts with Rules.
The Resolve with Rules dialog box appears.
2.
From Datasource, select the Software Manager database containing the
applications to use for conflict resolution.
If the database is not listed, click Open. The Select Data Source dialog box appears.
This is a standard Windows ODBC connection wizard, which lets you connect to a
database through an ODBC data source.
3.
From Group, select the group that contains the packages to compare this
installation to.
4.
From Rule Set Name, select the rule set to use.
5.
Click OK.
The Resolving Conflicts dialog box appears, and conflicts are resolved. If there are
few conflicts to resolve, the dialog box appears briefly.
When the resolution is finished, you should see the changes in the installation. Example:
If a file was moved to a private directory, that directory should appear on the Files page.
Rules that would change an application in the Software Manager database are ignored,
because resolving conflicts from Windows Installer Editor affects the current installation
only. As a result, some conflicts might not get resolved. Use the Resolve wizard to
resolve any remaining conflicts.
See Resolving Conflicts Individually in Windows Installer Editor on page 136.
See also:
Resolving File Conflicts Within Windows Installer Editor on page 135
Resolving Conflicts Individually in Windows Installer Editor
¾ Not available in Standard Edition.
Use the Resolve wizard to resolve file conflicts without using resolution rules, or to
resolve conflicts that cannot be resolved automatically with rules.
When you resolve conflicts from Windows Installer Editor, all conflicts are resolved in the
current installation only; the Software Manager database is never changed.
To resolve individual conflicts in Windows Installer Editor
1.
Select Tools menu > Resolve Conflicts.
The Welcome page appears.
2.
From Datasource, select the Software Manager database containing the
applications to use for conflict resolution.
If the database is not listed, click Open. The Select Data Source dialog box appears.
This is a standard Windows ODBC connection wizard, which lets you connect to a
database through an ODBC data source.
3.
From Group, select the group that contains the packages to compare this
installation to.
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4.
From Isolation method, select an option. Selecting an isolation method activates
the Move button on the File Conflicts and File Conflicts in Registry pages.
„
Do not move files
Do not allow file isolation.
„
Isolated Components
Isolate files using Windows Installer isolated components. The isolation is
managed by the operating system. This method works with Windows Installer
packages only.
„
Application Paths.
Moves files out of the System directory and into a private directory. This
method works for Windows Installer and WiseScript packages, and is supported
by all Windows operating systems.
By default, the files are placed in the application directory. To place files in a
different directory, in Application Path Settings, specify a subdirectory of the
application directory or the full path to a different directory. You can use
variables in the path.
5.
Click Next.
Depending on the number of packages in the Software Manager database and the
speed of your computer, conflict detection can take several minutes.
When conflict detection is complete, the File Conflicts page appears. The upper list
box contains files in the selected package that have conflicts and are not listed in
the registry. You usually can move such files without causing problems. The lower
list box contains the conflicting files in other packages.
6.
In the upper list box, select one or more files and take one of the following actions.
See Guidelines for Resolving File Conflicts in the ConflictManager Help.
When you resolve a conflict, the exclamation point to the left of the file name
changes from red to white.
„
To move the selected file to a private directory and change the file path in the
package, click Move. This button is not available if you selected the Do not
move files isolation method.
Note
In most cases, when you move a non-executable file, such as a help file, to an
isolated or private directory, the application still uses the version in the shared
directory. The advantage of using isolation is that the different versions of the
file are saved in the isolated directories and will not be overwritten by other
packages. You can add a shortcut to the application to point to the appropriate
file location.
„
To use the most recent version of the file for the active package, click Latest. If
one file has a newer version but another has a newer date/time, the Latest File
Selection dialog box appears, where you specify whether to use the file with the
newest modified date or the highest internal version number.
„
To change the file’s component, click Fix Comp.

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If file is a KeyPath to a component in one package but not in another, the file
becomes a KeyPath to its own component.
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Assembling an Installation

If the file has extra non-advertising resources, they are moved to a new
component.

If the file’s shared .DLL counter is not set, it is set.
If the component has more than one of these issues, a Fix Options dialog box
appears, where you can select which actions to take.
„
7.
To apply a file in the lower list box to the current installation, select a file in
each list and click Copy Up. The file remains in its current location but will be
used to install the installation in the upper list box.
Click Next on the File Conflicts page.
The File Conflicts in Registry page appears. The upper list box contains files in the
selected package that have conflicts and are listed in the registry. The lower list box
contains the conflicting files in other packages.
8.
In the upper list box, select one or more files and take one of the following actions.
See Guidelines for Resolving File Conflicts in the ConflictManager Help.
When you resolve a conflict, the exclamation point to the left of the file name
changes from red to white.
„
To move the selected file to a private directory and change the file path in the
package, click Move. This button is not available if you selected the Do not
move files isolation method.
Warning
When conflicting files are listed in the registry, moving them to a private
application directory can cause problems. ConflictManager updates the registry
when a file is moved to a private application directory. This can cause other
packages to follow the moved file and result in a further conflict.
9.
„
To use the most recent version of the file for the active package, click Latest. If
one file has a newer version but another has a newer date/time, the Latest File
Selection dialog box appears, where you select whether to use the file with the
newest modified date or the highest internal version number.
„
To apply a file in the lower list box to the current installation, select a file in
each list and click Copy Up. The file remains in its current location but will be
used to install the package in the upper list box.
„
To open a separate dialog box listing the registry keys that contain the path to
the selected file, click Reg Details.
When you have resolved all file conflicts, click Finish on the File Conflicts in Registry
page.
The Resolve wizard makes the changes you specified and closes.
The resulting changes should appear in the installation. Example: If a file was moved to
a private directory, that directory should appear on the Files page.
See also:
Resolving File Conflicts Within Windows Installer Editor on page 135
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Registry Page
Use the Registry page to specify the registry entries to be installed, removed, or edited
on the destination computer. You can either add registry entries manually or import a
registry file (.REG). If you import a Visual Basic .VBR file, it will import the registry
settings, but will not automatically set up for the installation of either a remote
automation or DCOM™ server. You also can export to a registry file.
When you import a registry entry that points to a standard directory, such as Win32 or
Program Files, Windows Installer Editor replaces the path to the directory with formatted
text in brackets. As a result, the registry entry automatically points to the correct
directory, no matter where it is located. Example: References to C:\Program Files\ are
replaced with [ProgramFilesFolder].
In addition, if the registry key points to a file in the installation, it is replaced by
[#filekey]. Example: If you have C:\Program Files\MyApp\MyApp.exe in your
installation, and you add a registry key that refers to that file, its value becomes
[#myapp.exe], assuming myapp.exe is the key to the file in the File table. See
Formatted in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
Registry page in a 32-bit installation
Registry keys
on your
computer.
Registry keys to
be created on
the destination
computer.
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Registry values
in the key
selected on the
left.
Registry values
to be installed
on the
destination
computer.
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Assembling an Installation
Registry page in a 64-bit installation
On a 64-bit
computer, the
64-bit registry
is visible here.
The button
menu lets you
add keys to the
32-bit or 64-bit
registry.
The button
menu lets you
add values to
the 32-bit or
64-bit
registry.
Working with the Registry page
z
If the installation has multiple features, specify the feature you are configuring by
selecting it from the Current Feature drop-down list.
z
Use the right-click menu to expand or collapse directories, to hide or show empty
directories, and to view the 32-bit or 64-bit registry. The upper panes can display
the 32-bit or 64-bit registry, but the 64-bit registry is visible only when your
computer is running a 64-bit operating system. The lower panes can display the 64bit view on any computer, but only in projects with 64-bit features or releases.
z
Drag and drop keys and values on the Registry page, or use the following buttons:
„
Add Keys
Copy a registry key, including all its subkeys and values, from your computer to
the installation.
In a 64-bit installation, this button contains a menu that lets you specify
whether to add the key to the 32-bit or 64-bit registry.
„
Add Values
Copy values from your computer to the installation.
In a 64-bit installation, this button contains a menu that lets you specify
whether to add the value to the 32-bit or 64-bit registry.
„
Add
Create a new key or import a registry file into the installation.
„
Delete Key, Delete Value
Remove a registry key or value from the installation.
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„
Details
Edit registry key settings.
See also:
Adding Registry Keys on page 141
Removing Registry Entries From the Destination Computer on page 142
Importing and Exporting Registry Entries on page 144
Configuring General Registry Settings on page 145
Setting Permissions for Registry Keys on page 147
Viewing Shared Registry Resources on page 147
Special Registry Keys on page 148
Adding Registry Keys
Use Installation Expert or Setup Editor to add registry keys and values to any registry
folder or subfolder. You also can change settings for selected registry keys and rename
or delete files and folders. However, you cannot rename or delete a root folder.
In Installation Expert, the Registry page displays only the registry keys for the feature in
the Current Feature drop-down list. To display registry keys for all features, mark
View registry keys for all features on Registry page in Wise Options.
In Setup Editor, the Registry icon displays the registry keys and values that are included
in the selected feature or component.
To add an empty registry key
1.
Select Installation Expert > Registry page.
2.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you add
must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All Features
is selected.)
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer only if the
feature is installed.
Items that you add to a condition are installed only if the feature is installed and the
condition is true.
3.
In a 64-bit installation, right-click in the lower-left list box and select 32-bit View or
64-bit View.
4.
In the lower-left list box, select the location for the key.
5.
Click Add and select Key.
The Registry Details dialog box appears.
6.
From Operation, select Create empty key.
7.
In Key, click at the end of the existing text, and add a backslash and the name of
the new key.
Example: Append \Preferences to the end of the existing key name.
8.
Click OK.
To add a registry value in Installation Expert
1.
Select Installation Expert > Registry page.
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2.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you add
must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All Features
is selected.)
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer only if the
feature is installed.
Items that you add to a condition are installed only if the feature is installed and the
condition is true.
3.
In a 64-bit installation, right-click in the lower-left list box and select 32-bit View or
64-bit View.
4.
In the lower-left list box, select the key to contain the value you’re adding.
5.
Click Add and select Key.
The Registry Details dialog box appears.
6.
Complete the dialog box and click OK.
See Configuring General Registry Settings on page 145.
To add a registry value in Setup Editor
1.
Do one of the following in Setup Editor:
„
On the Features tab, expand a feature and then expand its Combined folder.
If the Combined folder does not appear, right-click and select Hide Empty
Folders/Items.
„
On the Components tab, expand a component.
When an installation contains both 32-bit and 64-bit components, place registry
keys in the appropriate location for the platform they target.
2.
Expand the Registry icon.
3.
To add a new folder, right-click a folder and select New > Folder. Rename the new
folder.
4.
Right-click a folder and select New > Registry Key.
The Registry Details dialog box appears.
5.
Complete the dialog box and click OK.
See Configuring General Registry Settings on page 145.
The registry value is added to the selected feature or component and appears in the
lower-right list box. To edit it, double-click its name. To delete it, use the right-click
menu.
Removing Registry Entries From the Destination Computer
You can specify registry keys and values to be removed from the destination computer
during installation. This operation affects registry entries that are already on the
destination computer, not registry entries that are part of the installation.
In Installation Expert, the Registry page displays only the registry keys for the feature in
the Current Feature drop-down list. To display registry keys for all features, mark
View registry keys for all features on Registry page in Wise Options.
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Warning
Be very careful when removing registry entries from the destination computer. Do not
remove registry entries unless you are sure that they are not used by another
application.
To add a remove registry operation in Installation Expert
1.
Select Installation Expert > Registry page.
2.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you add
must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All Features
is selected.)
3.
Add the registry key and value to the installation.
See Adding Registry Keys on page 141.
4.
In a 64-bit installation, right-click in the lower-left list box and select 32-bit View or
64-bit View.
5.
In the lower-left list box, select the key that contains the value to remove.
6.
In the lower-right list box, double-click the value to remove.
The Registry Details dialog box appears.
7.
From Operation, select Remove value during install.
8.
Click OK.
A red exclamation point appears over the icon of the registry value you selected to
indicate that this value will be removed during installation.
To add a remove registry operation in Setup Editor
1.
Do one of the following in Setup Editor:
„
On the Features tab, expand a feature and then expand its Combined folder.
If the Combined folder does not appear, right-click and select Hide Empty
Folders/Items.
„
On the Components tab, expand a component.
2.
Expand the Remove Registry icon.
3.
Right-click a folder and select New > Remove Registry.
The Remove Registry Details dialog box appears.
4.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Root
The top-level key from which the key will be removed. Example:
HKEY_CURRENT_USER.
„
Key
The name of the key to remove. To create an entire key path, separate key
names with backslashes (\). Example: NewDocument\Protocol\StdFileEditing.
„
Value Name
The value to remove. You can enter a formatted text string. For information
about formatted text strings, see Formatted and Registry Table in the Windows
Installer SDK Help.
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5.
Click OK.
The remove registry operation appears in the upper-right pane. To edit it, double-click
its name. To delete it, use the right-click menu.
To remove multiple registry keys from the destination computer
1.
Select Installation Expert > Registry page.
2.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you add
must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All Features
is selected.)
3.
Add the registry keys and values to the installation.
See Adding Registry Keys on page 141.
4.
In the lower-left list box, right-click the key that contains the subkeys and values to
remove, and select Remove all subkeys and values on install.
A red exclamation point appears over the folder icon of the registry key you selected to
indicate that all the subkeys and values of this registry key will be removed during
installation.
Importing and Exporting Registry Entries
You can import registry files (.REG) into an installation. You also can export registry key
settings from an installation to a .REG file. RegEdit 4.0 and 5.0 formats are supported
for importing; RegEdit 4.0 formats are supported for exporting.
To import a registry file
1.
Do one of the following:
„
Select Installation Expert > Registry page.
a. From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item
you add must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item
when All Features is selected.)
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer
only if the feature is installed. Items that you add to a condition are installed
only if the feature is installed and the condition is true.
b. In a 64-bit installation, right-click in the lower-left list box and select 32-bit
View or 64-bit View.
c. Click Add at the lower left of the Registry page and select Import.
„
2.
In Setup Editor, on the Components or Features tab, right-click the Registry
icon or a registry folder and select Import from .REG File.
On the dialog box that appears, specify a .REG file and click Open.
The contents of the selected registry file, along with all corresponding folders, are placed
in the appropriate root folder.
To export to a registry file
1.
Do one of the following:
„
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Select Installation Expert > Registry page.
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In the lower-left list box, right-click the key to export, and select Export to .REG
File. To export all keys that you have designated for the destination computer,
right-click the Destination Computer icon.
„
In Setup Editor, on the Components or Features tab, right-click the Registry
icon or a registry folder and select Export to .REG File.
The Export to .REG File dialog box appears.
2.
In File Name, specify the path of the registry file you are creating.
3.
In Export As, select the version of RegEdit that the registry file should be
compatible with.
4.
„
Registration File (*.REG)
Export to a Unicode file format.
„
Win9x/NT 4 Registration File (*.REG)
Export to a flat text file format.
Click OK.
The .REG file is saved in the location you specified. If the registry key you exported had
a property name surrounded by brackets, and that property is defined in the Property
table in the Windows Installer database, then the bracketed property name is replaced
with the local computer value of the property in the exported .REG file.
Configuring General Registry Settings
Use the Registry Details dialog box to set or edit the general registry key settings.
To configure general registry settings
1.
Do one of the following:
„
In Installation Expert > Registry page, click Add > Key at the lower left of the
page.
„
Double-click a registry value on the Registry page in Installation Expert or on
the Components or Features tab in SetUp Editor.
The Registry Details dialog box appears.
2.
Complete the dialog box:
„
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Operation
Specify what operation will be applied to the key and its associated value.

Create/update key and value
If the value exists, it is updated. If the key or value does not exist, it is
created.

Create empty key
An empty key is created. It is populated with a +.

Remove subkeys for uninstall
During uninstall, all subkeys of this key are removed.

Create empty key and remove subkeys for uninstall
During uninstall, all subkeys of this key and all named values of the key
itself are removed.
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
„
Remove value during install
This value is removed from the registry key. On the Registry page, a red
exclamation point appears over the icon of the registry value you selected.
This option appears only when you access the Registry Details dialog box
from the Registry page.
Root
This is enabled only when you access the Registry Details dialog box from the
Add button on the Registry page.
The top-level key in which the new key will be added. (Example:
HKEY_CURRENT_USER.)
„
Key
This is enabled only when you access the Registry Details dialog box from the
Add button on the Registry page.
Enter the name of the new key. Create an entire key path by separating key
names with backslashes. (Example: Entering
NewDocument\Protocol\StdFileEditing creates the StdFileEditing key inside the
Protocol key, which is created inside the NewDocument key.) Any keys in the
path that do not exist are created.
„
Value Name
Enter the name of a new named value. You can enter a formatted text string.
For information about formatted text strings, see Formatted and Registry Table
in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
„
Data Value
Enter the data for the value. You can enter a formatted text string. (Example:
To return the directory that contains MyApp.exe, enter a value of
[$component], where component is MyApp.exe; to return the directory and the
file name, enter a value of [#MyApp.exe].) For information about formatted
text strings, see Formatted and Registry Table in the Windows Installer SDK
Help.
„
Data Type
Select the type of data contained in the named value.
The associated Windows API data types are in parentheses below.

String
(REG_SZ) Identifies the value as an expandable string. To include a
property, enclose the property name in square brackets.

Unexpanded string
(REG_EXPAND_SZ) Identifies the value as a string that contains
unexpanded references to environment variables that are expanded when
the value is retrieved. Enclose the environment variables in single percent
signs. For example, %PATH%.
If you do not want the variable to be expanded, enclose it in double percent
signs. For example, %%WIN%%. This allows Windows system variables to
be embedded.

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Double word
(REG_DWORD) Identifies the value as a 32-bit number in decimal notation.
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
3.
Binary / Hex
(REG_BINARY) Identifies the value as a binary in hexadecimal notation. Do
not use spaces, commas, or other characters to separate the bytes.
Example: AD30C0A94020A8FC4C0008.
Click OK.
Setting Permissions for Registry Keys
Use the Registry Key Permissions dialog box to set permissions to protect your
application’s registries against accidental deletion or changes.
See Configuring General Registry Settings on page 145.
The permissions you set are applied to the domain and user you specify, so you can set
different permissions for the same registry key for different users. Set permissions only
if you know your users and their domains. Example: If you are a system administrator
and want to set permissions for registry keys in an .MSI as appropriate for your
network.
To add permissions for a domain and user
1.
Do one of the following:
„
In Installation Expert: On the Registry page, right-click a registry key and select
Permissions.
„
In Setup Editor: On the Components or Features tab, right-click a registry key
and select Permissions.
The Registry Key Permissions dialog box appears.
2.
Click Add.
The Lock Permissions Details dialog box appears.
a.
Enter the Domain.
b.
Enter or select a User name.
c.
Click OK.
The domain and user names appear in the upper list box, and the list of permissions
is enabled.
3.
To set permissions, mark the check boxes.
You can add multiple users.
Viewing Shared Registry Resources
The Shared Resources tab on the Registry Details dialog box displays all packages in the
Software Manager database that use a specific registry key and value. This lets you
ensure that the registry keys that are set by your current application will not conflict
with keys set by other packages.
You also can view shared registry resources in a report format.
See Generating Shared Resource Reports on page 28.
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To view shared registry resources
1.
Double-click a registry value on the Registry page in Installation Expert or on the
Components or Features tab in Setup Editor.
The Registry Details dialog box appears.
2.
Click the Shared Resources tab.
See also:
Registry Page on page 139
Special Registry Keys
In addition to the standard top-level registry keys, a special registry key named
HKEY_USER_SELECTABLE is provided. Depending on the operating system, during
installation an end user can install an application for the current user only or for all the
users of the computer. Registry changes under this key are made to either
HKEY_CURRENT_USER or HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, based on the end user’s choice
during installation.
Windows Installer itself also provides registry keys with special functionality. (Example:
You can install a key named AlwaysInstallElevated to force Windows Installer
installations to always install with elevated privileges.) For a list of these special keys,
see User Policies and Machine Policies in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
INI Files Page
Use the INI Files page to:
z
Update the contents of an existing .INI file, such as System.ini.
z
Create an .INI file and write installation properties to it.
You cannot use this page to delete part or all of an .INI file.
The left list box on this page represents the directory tree of the destination computer,
and the right list box contains .INI entries you add to the installation. Use the right-click
menu to expand or collapse folders and to hide or show empty folders.
Note
To see the same directory structure that exists on the Files page, mark the View
directories for all features on Files page check box in Wise Options.
Tips for creating and editing .INI files
z
After you create an .INI file, you cannot edit its name. You must delete the .INI
entry and create a new one.
z
When you edit an existing .INI file, new .INI file settings are merged into the
existing settings. If you enter a section name that already exists, its new parameter
assignment lines are added to the existing section. If a section and its variable
already exist, the variable’s value is overwritten.
z
You can use formatted text strings to resolve special substrings in the Section,
Key, or Value fields in the INI File table, entering the formatted text directly on the
INI File Details dialog box. You also can edit the IniFile table in Setup Editor. For
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information on formatted text strings, see Formatted in the Windows Installer SDK
Help.
See Editing Existing Tables on page 383.
Creating and Editing .INI Files
Note
When you change an .INI file and then view its contents, the lines within the changed
section might not be in the same order as before the change. This is not a problem
because the entries in an .INI file are not order dependent.
To create and edit an .INI file from Installation Expert
1.
Select INI Files page.
2.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you add
must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All Features
is selected.)
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer only if the
feature is installed.
Items that you add to a condition are installed only if the feature is installed and the
condition is true.
3.
To create a new folder for the INI file, click New Folder, enter a folder name, and
click OK.
4.
In the left pane, select a folder and click New File.
The INI File Details dialog box appears.
5.
Complete the dialog box; see below.
6.
Click OK.
The INI File entry appears in the right list box. To edit it, double-click its name. To
delete it, use the right-click menu.
To create and edit an .INI file from Setup Editor
1.
On the Components or Features tab, expand a component or feature.
2.
To create a new folder for the INI file, right-click the INI Files icon or one of its
subfolders and select New > Folder. Rename the folder.
3.
Right-click a folder and select New > INI File.
Note
Add the .INI file immediately after creating the folder, because if you create the
folder, but fail to put an .INI file entry inside it, the folder is deleted from the
installation the next time you save it.
The INI File Details dialog box appears.
4.
Complete the dialog box; see below.
5.
Click OK.
The INI File entry is added to the selected feature or component and appears in the
upper-right pane. To edit it, double-click its name. To delete it, use the right-click menu.
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To complete the INI File Details dialog box
z
INI Filename
Enter a name for the new .INI file, or click Import to import an existing .INI file. This
file will be created on the destination computer, if it does not already exist. If it
exists, the .INI contents you enter will be used to edit the existing .INI file.
Note
Because Windows Installer does not support writing comments to .INI files,
comments are removed from .INI files you import.
z
INI Settings
Enter the information to add or change in the .INI file. The
text must be in the correct syntax. Section names must be in brackets and contents
must be in the form variable=value. Example:
[SECTIONNAME]
Color=Red
You can enter Windows Installer property names (surrounded by brackets) for both
the variable and value. Example: To set a variable named MyAppLocation to the
installation directory and add it to the APPLICATIONPATH section, enter:
[APPLICATIONPATH]
MyAppLocation=[PRIMARYFOLDER]
Shortcuts Page
The Shortcuts page lets you add, edit, and delete shortcuts for files in the installation,
and add icons for shortcuts you will install. You also can create a shortcut for a file on
the destination computer that’s not in the installation.
Shortcuts for files that have associated shortcuts are created automatically if you select
one of the scan advertising options from the Advertising Setting drop-down list in
Wise Options.
Adding a Shortcut to an Installation
To add a shortcut
1.
Do one of the following:
„
Select Installation Expert > Shortcuts page.
a. From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you
add must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All
Features is selected.)
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer
only if the feature is installed. Items that you add to a condition are installed
only if the feature is installed and the condition is true.
b. Click Add at the right of the Shortcuts page.
„
In Setup Editor, on the Components or Features tab, right-click a component or
feature and select New > Shortcut.
The Shortcut Type dialog box appears.
2.
Complete the dialog box:
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„
File in the installation
Mark this to have the shortcut open a file in the installation.
„
Advertised
This is marked by default, which means this shortcut appears on the destination
computer regardless of whether its target is installed or advertised. When the
end user opens an advertised shortcut, installation of the target .EXE file is
started. If you clear this check box, the shortcut appears only if its target is
installed, but not if its target is advertised.
Note
If you designate a shortcut as advertised, and the shortcut’s target is deleted,
selecting that shortcut performs self-repair. Self-repair is not performed for
non-advertised shortcuts.
„
Command Line
Mark this to have the shortcut execute a command-line statement. Use this
option to open a file that’s not part of the installation, but only if you’re sure the
file exists on the destination computer.

Command Line
Enter the entire command-line statement, including arguments and other
command-line options. Enclose the statement in quotation marks if it
contains spaces.
See Editing a Shortcut Configuration on page 152.

3.
Shortcut Name
Enter a name for the shortcut.
Click Next.
If you created a shortcut for a file in the installation, the Shortcut File Selection
dialog box appears.
4.
Select the installation file to create a shortcut for and click Next.
Note
Files added under the Duplicate Files icon in the Features or Components tabs of
Setup Editor do not appear because you cannot add shortcuts for duplicate files.
The Shortcut Destination Directory dialog box appears.
5.
Specify a directory to contain the shortcut.
The predefined directories on this dialog box represent standard system directories
on the destination computer, regardless of their actual names. The most common
location for application shortcuts is the Start menu’s Programs directory, which is
selected by default. To put the shortcut in a new directory, click New Folder to create
it.
6.
Click Finish.
The Shortcut Details dialog box appears, where you can specify further details for
the shortcut. When the end user installs your application, this shortcut will appear in
the location you specified.
See Editing a Shortcut Configuration on page 152.
The shortcut appears. To edit it, double-click its name. To delete it, use the right-click
menu.
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Editing a Shortcut Configuration
To edit a shortcut configuration
1.
Do one of the following:
„
Select Installation Expert > Shortcuts page.
a. From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you
add must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All
Features is selected.)
b. Double-click the shortcut.
„
In Setup Editor, on the Components or Features tab, expand the component or
feature that contains the shortcut. Click the Shortcuts icon and double-click the
shortcut in the upper-right pane.
If the Shortcuts icon does not appear, right-click and select Hide Empty Folders/
Items.
The Shortcut Details dialog box appears.
2.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Name
The name of the shortcut. If the name is longer than 8.3 characters, the short
(8.3) file name appears first, followed by a pipe character (|) and the long
(Windows 95) file name.
„
Target File
(Read-only.) This contains the file name of the target of this file. You specified
this file when you created this shortcut. To create a shortcut to a different file,
delete this shortcut entry and create a new one. If you created a command-line
shortcut, this field is replaced by the Command Line field.
„
Command Line
This appears only if you created a command-line shortcut. It contains the
command-line statement.
„
Dest. Directory
This lists all predefined directories and directories that you have created. Select
the location for the shortcut on the destination computer, or click New Folder to
create a new directory.
„
Arguments
Enter command-line arguments to append to the command-line statement that
is executed to start the target of this shortcut. You can enter property names
surrounded by brackets to specify standard directories. (Example: To specify a
file named Notes.txt in the Windows directory, enter
[WindowsFolder]Notes.txt.) For a list of predefined directories, see System
Folder Properties in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
„
Description
Enter a one-line description of the shortcut, which appears when an end user
right-clicks on a shortcut file in Windows Explorer and selects Properties.
„
Working Directory
Select the directory that should be current when the target of this shortcut is
started.
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„
Show Window
Select whether the target file opens in a normal, minimized, or maximized
window.
„
Advertised
Mark this to have the shortcut appear on the destination computer regardless of
whether its target is installed or advertised. When the end user opens an
advertised shortcut, installation of the target .EXE file is started. If you clear
this check box, the shortcut appears only if its target is installed, but not if its
target is advertised. You can select a new feature or icon only if this check box
is marked.
„
Feature
To associate this feature with a different shortcut, select the feature. Because
non-advertised shortcuts cannot be associated with a feature, this field is
enabled for advertised shortcuts only.
3.
To select a new icon, click New Icon and specify the icon.
4.
Click OK.
Adding an Environment Variable
You can add, edit, and delete environment variables and values to be set by the
operating system on the destination computer. You can add environment variables from
Installation Expert or Setup Editor.
To add an environment variable
1.
Do one of the following:
„
Select Installation Expert > Environment Variables page.
a. From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you
add must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All
Features is selected.)
b. Click Add at the right of the page.
„
In Setup Editor, on the Components or Features tab, right-click a component or
feature and select New > Environment Variable.
The Environment Variable Details dialog box appears.
2.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Name
Enter a name for the environment variable.
„
Value
Enter a value for the environment variable.
Note
To read the value of an existing environment variable into a property, use the
Set Property type of custom action to read it into a property. Enter
[%ENVIRONMENT_VARIABLE_NAME] in the Property Value field on the Details
tab of the Set Property dialog box while making the action (brackets required).
„
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Operation
Specify how to handle the variable during installation and uninstallation.
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3.
„
Replacement
Specify how to handle an existing value for the variable.
„
Windows NT based system environment variable
Mark this if this is a NT based system environment variable.
Click OK.
The environment variable is added. To edit it, double-click its name. To delete it, use the
right-click menu.
Adding File Associations
Use the File Associations page to associate file extensions with executables to determine
which application to start when the end user double-clicks a file with a certain extension.
You can associate file extensions with any executable file in an installation. File
associations are a type of advertising and are stored in the registry.
To add a file association
1.
Do one of the following:
„
Select Installation Expert > File Associations page.
a. From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you
add must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All
Features is selected.)
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer
only if the feature is installed. Items that you add to a condition are installed
only if the feature is installed and the condition is true.
b. Click Add at the right of the page and select New.
„
In Setup Editor, on the Components or Features tab, right-click a component or
feature and select New > File Association.
The File Association Details dialog box appears.
2.
On the Extension Details tab, select the executable to use for the extension, type an
extension, and enter the program ID for the executable.
See Determining Extension Settings on page 155.
3.
(Optional.) On the Command Verbs tab, click Add, and on the Verb Details dialog
box that appears, set the actions that will be available when the end user rightclicks an executable with this extension in Windows Explorer.
See Adding Command Verbs on page 156.
4.
(Optional.) On the MIME Types tab, mark Show All and mark check boxes to select
the MIME types to associate with this extension.
See Selecting MIME Types on page 156.
5.
Click OK.
The file association appears. To edit it, double-click its name. To delete it, use the rightclick menu.
In Setup Editor, a new branch of folders is created under the Advertising icon to show
the application folder, the Extensions folder, and the ProgId folder.
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To import a file association
1.
Select Installation Expert > File Associations page.
2.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you add
must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All Features
is selected.)
3.
Click Add at the right of the File Associations page and select Import.
The Import File Association dialog box appears.
4.
Click Browse to select the executable to use for the extension. You can only select
executables that you have already added to the installation.
5.
From Extension, select the extension to use. This list shows all available extensions
on your computer.
6.
Click OK.
All relevant information for the extension you select is imported into the Extension
Details, Command Verbs, and MIME Types tabs. To edit those tabs, double-click the file
association name.
See also:
Advertising Icon on page 370
Determining Extension Settings
Use the Extension Details tab to determine file association settings.
To determine file association settings
1.
Click the Extension Details tab on the File Associations Details dialog box.
See Adding File Associations on page 154.
2.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Executable File
Specify the executable to use for the extension. You can only select an
executable that is in the installation.
„
Extension
Enter an extension. Do not include the period.
„
ProgID
Enter or select the program ID for the executable. This list contains the ProgIDs
defined in this installation and the ProgIDs detected for the executable you
specified above.
„
Description
Enter the type of file. The end user sees this description on the Properties dialog
box for files of this type.
„
Icon
Click Change Icon and specify an icon. This icon will be displayed on files of this
type on the destination computer.
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Note
The Description and Icon fields are associated with the ProgID, not the extension.
If no ProgID is specified, those fields are unavailable.
3.
Click OK.
Adding Command Verbs
Use the Command Verbs tab to determine which actions are available when the end user
right-clicks a file with your file association in Windows Explorer. The actions appear in
the end user’s right-click menu in the same order that you set here.
To add a command verb
1.
Click the Command Verbs tab on the File Associations Details dialog box.
See Adding File Associations on page 154.
2.
Click Add to add a new action or double-click an action.
The Verb Details dialog box appears.
3.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Verb
Enter or select the action to be performed when the end user selects the
corresponding command from the right-click menu.
„
Command
Enter the command as it should appear on the right-click menu.
This entry is added to the text strings on the Languages page and can be
localized.
See About the Languages Page on page 266.
„
4.
Argument
Enter command-line options that will be passed to the executable file when the
action is performed. The default (%1) is a Windows variable that holds the path
of the file that was opened.
Click OK.
Selecting MIME Types
Use the MIME Types tab to select the MIME types to associate with your extension.
To select MIME types
1.
Click the MIME Types tab on the File Associations Details dialog box.
See Adding File Associations on page 154.
2.
Complete the dialog box:
„
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Show All
Mark this to display all available MIME types on your computer. To associate a
MIME type with an extension, click its check box. If you are an experienced
Windows Installer developer, you can add MIME types using the MIME table in
Setup Editor.
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„
3.
Show Associated
Mark this to display the MIME types currently associated with the selected file
extension. To disassociate a MIME type, clear its check box.
Click OK.
Services Page
Use the Services page to define applications to be installed as a service. You also can
start, stop, and delete services that are installed on the destination computer. For
information on coding an application to run as a service, consult Microsoft developer
documentation.
Application files that can be installed as a service are: .EXE, .VXD, .SYS, or .386.
Adding a Service to the Destination Computer
You can add a service to an installation from Installation Expert or Setup Editor.
After you add a service, you can set options to start, stop, and delete services on the
destination computer.
See Controlling Services on the Destination Computer.
To add a service
1.
Select Installation Expert > Files page.
2.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you add
must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All Features
is selected.)
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer only if the
feature is installed.
Items that you add to a condition are installed only if the feature is installed and the
condition is true.
3.
Add the file that runs the service. Application files that can be installed as a service
are: .EXE, .VXD, .SYS, or .386.
4.
Do one of the following:
„
Select Installation Expert > Services page.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition.
Click Add at the right of the page and select Create Service.
„
On the Features or Components tab in Setup Editor, right-click a feature or
component and select New > Service.
The Select File dialog box appears, which displays only the files that are associated
with the currently-selected feature. The left list box displays the directory structure
of the installation, and the right list box displays files in the selected directory.
5.
Select a file in the right list box and click OK.
The Create Service Details dialog box appears.
6.
Complete the dialog box:
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The options you set on the Create Service Details dialog box are dependent on how
you coded your service. Some of the options correspond to options in the Services
application. For details, see ServiceInstall Table in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
„
Service Name
Enter the name of the service. This name is used internally by the service to
register itself properly in the registry, so this value must match the internal
name of the service that’s stored within the application file. You can see the
internal name in Windows Task Manager or the SCList Windows utility.
„
Display Name
The name that appears in the Services application.
„
Description
Enter a description for the service. This appears only in the Windows Services
application.
„
Executable
Displays the file you selected on the Select File dialog box, which runs the
service.
„
Arguments
Enter any arguments to be passed to the service on the command line at
startup.
„
Login Username, Password
Enter the Windows account information for the account the service is to run
under. Example: .\Username or Domain\Username.
„
Load Order Group
Enter the group that this service will be a part of. Groups are loaded
alphabetically at startup.
„
Dependencies
Enter the names of any other services that must be running before this service
can start.
„
Error Control
Specify what happens if an error is reported while starting the service.

Ignore Error
Logs the error in an error log and continues.

Normal Error
Displays a message to the end user and logs the error in an error log.

Critical Error
Restarts the system and sets it to the last known good menu.
„
Service that runs in its own process
Mark this if the service runs as its own process.
„
Service that shares a process with others
Mark this if the service runs as a shared process, such as a kernel driver or file
system driver.
„
Automatic
Mark this to have the service always start when the destination computer is
started.
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7.
„
Manual
Mark this to have the service enabled but not automatically started. If this
option is marked, the end user can start the process manually using the
Services control panel or Services application.
„
Service interacts with desktop
Mark this to have the service display UI (examples: an application window, an
item on the taskbar, and so on) to the end user while it is running.
Click OK.
The service appears. To edit it, double-click its name. To delete it, use the right-click
menu.
Controlling Services on the Destination Computer
You can start, stop, and delete services that are in the installation or services that are
already installed on the destination computer.
See Adding a Service to the Destination Computer on page 157.
To control a service
1.
Do one of the following:
„
Select Installation Expert > Services page.
a. From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you
add must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All
Features is selected.)
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer
only if the feature is installed. Items that you add to a condition are installed
only if the feature is installed and the condition is true.
b. Click Add at the right of the page and select Service Control.
„
On the Features or Components tab in Setup Editor, right-click a feature or
component and select New > Service Control.
The Service Control Details dialog box appears.
2.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Service Name
Select a service contained in the currently-selected feature, or enter the name
of a service you expect to be installed on the destination computer. This name is
used internally by the service to register itself properly in the registry, so this
value must match the internal name of the service that’s stored within the
application file.
„
Arguments
Enter any arguments to be passed to the service on the command line at
startup.
„
Install Action
Mark the actions to perform on the service when your application is installed.
„
Uninstall Action
Mark the actions to perform on the service when your application is uninstalled.
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„
3.
Wait for service action to complete before continuing
Mark this if the installation should wait until the actions specified above finish
before continuing with installation.
Click OK.
The service control item appears. To edit it, double-click its name. To delete it, use the
right-click menu.
Note
To both stop and delete a service, do not mark both the Stop Service and Delete
Service check boxes in the same control service action; instead, create two control
service actions. On the first control service action, mark Stop Service and Wait for
service action to complete before continuing. On the second control service action,
mark Delete Service. This ensures that the service is completely stopped before the
installation tries to remove it.
Adding an ODBC Item
You can use Installation Expert or Setup Editor to define the ODBC (Open Data Base
Connectivity) data sources, drivers, and translators to include in an installation. For
information about ODBC, consult technical documentation provided by Microsoft.
To add an ODBC item
1.
Do one of the following:
„
Select Installation Expert > ODBC page.
a. From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you
add must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All
Features is selected.)
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer
only if the feature is installed. Items that you add to a condition are installed
only if the feature is installed and the condition is true.
b. Click Add at the right of the ODBC page and select Driver, Data Source, or
Translator.
„
On the Features or Components tab, right-click a feature or component, select
New, and select ODBC Source, ODBC Driver, or ODBC Translator.
The corresponding dialog box appears.
2.
Complete the dialog box and click OK. For details, see:
„
Setting ODBC Data Source Details on page 161
„
Setting ODBC Driver Details on page 161
„
Setting ODBC Translator Details on page 162.
The ODBC entry appears. To edit it, double-click its name. To delete it, use the rightclick menu.
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Setting ODBC Data Source Details
To set ODBC data source details
1.
Access the ODBC Data Source Details dialog box.
See Adding an ODBC Item on page 160.
2.
3.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Data Source Name
Enter a name for the data source, or click Import to import data source
information from a saved data source file. If you click Import, the Select Data
Source dialog box appears, which displays a list of ODBC data sources that are
currently registered on your computer.
„
Driver
Enter the driver name that will be used to access this data source. If you don’t
know the exact spelling of the driver name, click Import to import the data
source.
„
Register Per Machine, Register Per User
Mark Register Per Machine to give all users on the destination computer
access to the data source, or mark Register Per User to give only the user
who installs the application access to the data source.
„
Source Attributes
Enter attributes for the data source, one per line, in keyword=value format.
Press Ctrl+Enter to move to the next line.
Click OK.
Setting ODBC Driver Details
To set ODBC driver details
1.
Access the ODBC Driver Details dialog box.
See Adding an ODBC Item on page 160.
2.
3.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Driver Name
Enter a name for the driver, or click Import to import driver information from a
saved driver file. If you click Import, the Select ODBC Driver dialog box
appears, which displays a list of ODBC drivers that are currently installed on
your computer.
„
Driver .DLL
Specify the path to the .DLL used for this driver.
„
Setup .DLL
Specify the path to the .DLL used to configure this driver.
„
Driver Attributes
Enter attributes for the driver, one per line, in keyword=value format. Press
Ctrl+Enter to move to the next line.
Click OK.
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Setting ODBC Translator Details
To set ODBC translator details
1.
Access the ODBC Translator Details dialog box.
See Adding an ODBC Item on page 160.
2.
3.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Description
Enter a description of the translator, or click Import to import an existing
translator. If you click Import, the Select ODBC Driver dialog box appears, which
displays a list of ODBC translators that are currently installed on your computer.
„
Translator File
Specify the file that contains the translator.
„
Setup File
Specify the file that contains configuration data for the selected translator.
Click OK.
Adding to the Windows Firewall Exception List
The Windows Firewall that is included with Windows XP SP2, Windows Server 2003 SP1,
and later, controls which applications and ports on the destination computer can accept
incoming traffic from the Internet or a network. When Windows Firewall detects
incoming traffic, it blocks the connection and prompts the end user to block or allow the
connection. If the end user allows the connection, the application or port is added to the
Windows Firewall exception list, so that future connections to that application or port are
not blocked.
On the Firewall Exceptions page, you can specify application files and ports to be added
to the Windows Firewall exception list during installation. This adds custom actions to
the installation, which add the exceptions to the Windows Firewall exception list. When
your application is installed, it can accept incoming traffic and open required ports on
the destination computer without end user intervention. This is useful for games and
other similar applications.
If your installation contains an exception that is already in the Windows Firewall
exception list on the destination computer, it will not overwrite that existing exception.
Also, only exceptions that are installed with your application are removed when your
application is uninstalled.
Example: Your installation installs a multi-player network game, which requires multiple
users to communicate with each other over the Internet. On computers that use
Windows Firewall, end users are prompted the first time another player tries to
communicate with them. If you add the port that the game uses to the Windows Firewall
exception list, then the game communication can occur without prompting the end
users.
Operating system notes
The ability to add Windows Firewall exceptions to an installation is not restricted by the
operating system that is running on your build computer. The operating system on the
destination computer determines whether the exceptions are implemented.
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z
When the destination computer is running Windows XP SP2, Windows Server 2003
SP1, or later, the exceptions are added to the Windows Firewall exceptions list.
z
When the destination computer is running an operating system that does not have
Windows Firewall, the installation runs normally and the Windows Firewall
exceptions are ignored.
To add to the Windows Firewall exception list
1.
Select Installation Expert > Firewall Exceptions page.
2.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you add
must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All Features
is selected.)
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer only if the
feature is installed.
Items that you add to a condition are installed only if the feature is installed and the
condition is true.
3.
Click Add at the right of the Firewall Exceptions page.
The Exception Type dialog box appears.
4.
5.
Specify the type of exception to add:
„
Application file. Do this to allow traffic to this specific file through any port. Go
to step 5.
„
Port. Do this to allow traffic from any application through this specific port. Go
to step 6.
To add an application file:
a.
On the Exception Type dialog box, mark Application and click Next.
The Application Selection dialog box appears and displays files in the installation
with the following extensions: .EXE, .COM, or .ICD.
b.
Select a file. A file can appear in the exception list only once.
The Friendly Name defaults to the file name. You can edit this information.
c.
6.
Click Finish.
To add a port:
a.
On the Exception Type dialog box, mark Port.
b.
In Friendly Name, enter a descriptive name for the port.
c.
In Port Number, enter the number of the port to open.
d.
Mark TCP or UDP to specify the communications protocol.
A combination of port number and protocol type can appear in the exception list
only once.
e.
Click Finish.
The exception appears. To edit it, double-click its name. To delete it, use the right-click
menu.
When you edit an application exception, you can only change the Friendly Name. When
you edit a port exception, you can change the Friendly Name, the Port Number, and
the protocol type.
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When a file that is specified in an exception is deleted from the installation, the
exception entry and the associated custom actions are removed also.
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Chapter 6
Your Installation on the Destination Computer
This chapter includes the following topics:
z
About System Requirements on page 165
z
Performing a System Search on page 169
z
Setting Version-Specific Windows Installer Options on page 176
z
Setting Features for Installation Types on page 181
About System Requirements
You can define system requirements for an installation in two different areas of Windows
Installer Editor:
z
System Requirements page
You can use a point-and-click interface to specify minimum system requirements for
the installation. When you specify a requirement, you also type a warning message
that the end user sees if their computer does not meet the specified requirements.
You can specify version requirements for the operating system, Internet Explorer,
Windows Installer Runtime, SQL Sever, .NET Framework, and IIS. You can also
specify requirements for screen attributes. For installations on computers running
Windows Server 2008 or later server operating system, you can specify
requirements for server roles and services.
See Setting a Requirement on the System Requirements Page on page 165.
See Setting a System Requirement for Server Roles and Services on page 167.
z
Launch Conditions icon
This is in Setup Editor > Product tab. It lets you build complex conditions using
Windows Installer run-time properties that test aspects of the destination computer.
See Setting a Requirement by Creating a Launch Condition on page 169.
Setting a Requirement on the System Requirements Page
This procedure applies to all system requirements that you set on the System
Requirements page except the Installed Server Roles (Server 2008) system
requirement. Notes on specific system requirements follow the procedure.
See Setting a System Requirement for Server Roles and Services on page 167.
To set a requirement on the System Requirements page
1.
Select Installation Expert > System Requirements page.
2.
Double-click a requirement.
The Minimum System Requirements dialog box appears.
3.
From the drop-down list at the top of the dialog box, select a requirement.
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Requirements that begin with “All” or “Do not check” indicate that this requirement
is not checked. Any requirement you select includes not only the requirement but
also any greater value. Example: Selecting a Windows version of Windows XP lets
an installation run on any computer with Windows XP or any later versions of the
same operating system.
4.
In Message Text, enter the error message that appears if the destination computer
doesn’t meet the system requirement. It should communicate to the user why the
installation cannot run.
5.
Click OK.
Windows Version
The requirements you set for the Windows version apply only if the destination
computer is running one of the following operating systems:
Windows 95
Window 98
Windows Me
If the destination computer is running a version of Windows NT, the minimum system
requirements specified under the Windows NT Version item are checked instead.
Windows NT Version
The requirements you set for the Windows NT version apply only if the destination
computer is running one of the following operating systems:
Windows
Windows
Windows
Windows
Windows
Windows
2000
XP
Server 2003
Vista
Server 2008
7
If the destination computer is running Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me, the
minimum system requirements specified under the Windows Version item are checked
instead.
Screen Resolution
The minimum required screen resolution.
Screen Colors
The minimum required screen depth. 24 Million Colors corresponds to True Color in
the Display Control Panel.
Internet Explorer Version
The minimum required version of Microsoft Internet Explorer.
Windows Installer Runtime Version
The installation will fail if the destination computer lacks the required version of
Windows Installer.
To prevent this, you can use the Prerequisites page to set the installation to pre-install a
later version of Windows Installer.
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See Adding Prerequisites to a Release on page 198.
SQL Server Version
Use this option to check for the presence of SQL Server. By default, this value is not
checked.
This option is useful if you have set up this installation to configure a Microsoft SQL
Server on the SQL Server Scripts page.
See Configuring a Microsoft SQL Server During Installation on page 257.
.NET Framework Version
This verifies the version of the Microsoft .NET Framework.
IIS Version
Use this option to check for the presence of a Microsoft Internet Information Services
(IIS) server. By default, this value is not checked.
This option is useful if you have set up this installation to configure a Microsoft Internet
Information Services (IIS) server.
See About Web Installations on page 245.
If you set an IIS Version, then an additional list of requirements appears, which are
settings available in IIS 4.0 and later. These requirements match those that are in
Internet Services Manager under the Web Service Extensions folder icon. You can
double-click any of these requirements to check its state as set on the destination IIS
Web server. You can specify the order in which these launch conditions are evaluated in
the WiseLaunchCondition table.
See Wise Tables on page 508.
See also:
Importing .NET Framework Security Settings on page 261
About Microsoft .NET Technology on page 497
Requirements for Creating a .NET Installation on page 501
Setting a System Requirement for Server Roles and Services
For installations on computers that run the Windows Server 2008 or later server
operating system, you can specify system requirements for server roles and services. If
an application requires specific server roles or services, the installation can check to see
if they are installed. If these server roles or services are not installed, the application is
not installed and the end user receives an error message. The error message explains
why the installation could not run.
By default, when you set requirements for server roles and services, you can only select
from a subset of the server roles and services. If you want to check for additional server
roles and services, you must first add them.
See Adding Roles and Services to the Server Roles and Services Dialog Box on
page 168.
To set a system requirement for server roles and services
1.
Select Installation Expert > System Requirements page.
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2.
Double-click Server Roles and Services (Server 2008).
The Server Roles and Services dialog box appears.
3.
In the list of roles and services, check the server roles and services that must be
installed to install the application.
4.
Type the error message that appears if the destination computer does not meet this
system requirement.
This message should communicate to the user why the installation cannot run.
5.
Click OK.
See also:
Setting a Requirement on the System Requirements Page
Adding Roles and Services to the Server Roles and Services Dialog
Box
The Server Roles and Services dialog box appears when you double-click Server Roles
and Services (Server 2008) on the System Requirements page. This dialog box lists only
a subset of the server roles and services that an installation can check for on a Windows
Server 2008 computer.
To check for additional server roles or services, you must first add them to the roles.txt
file. After you add them to the roles.txt file, they appear on the Server Roles and
Services dialog box.
When you add a role or service to the roles.txt file, you must enter the value of the ID
property for the server role or service. These values are listed in the ID properties table
in the Win32_ServerFeature Class article in Microsoft’s MSDN Library. This table has a
column for the value and another column for the description of the value.
To add server roles and services to the Server Roles and Services
dialog box
1.
Access the roles.txt file and remove its Read-only attribute.
By default, the file is in the Program files\Symantec\Wise Package Studio\Windows
Installer Editor directory.
2.
Open the roles.txt file.
3.
Below the last entry, type SVFT_ followed by the value for the server role or service.
You get the value from the Win32_ServerFeature Class article in Microsoft’s MSDN
Library.
4.
After the value for the server role or service, press the Tab key and type the value’s
description.
You can enter any description, but we recommend using Microsoft’s description.
This description appears on the Server Roles and Services dialog box in alphabetical
order.
5.
Repeat the preceding two steps to add additional server roles or services.
6.
Save the Roles.txt file.
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The next time you open the Server Roles and Services dialog box, the options you
added to the roles.txt file appear in the list of server roles and services.
Setting a Requirement by Creating a Launch Condition
You can use launch conditions to check system requirements on the destination
computer. (Example: The value of properties or environment variables.) Windows
Installer defines several properties at run time that are useful for defining conditions.
See Hardware Properties and Operating System Properties in the Windows Installer SDK
Help.
To set basic requirements, use the System Requirements page.
See Setting a Requirement on the System Requirements Page on page 165.
To create new launch conditions and edit existing ones, use the Launch Conditions icon
in Setup Editor > Product tab.
To create a new launch condition
1.
In Setup Editor > Product tab, right-click the Launch Condition icon and select New
> Launch Condition.
The Launch Condition Details dialog box appears.
2.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Condition
Enter the new condition or click Build to create a condition in Condition Builder.
See Creating Conditions With Condition Builder on page 391.
„
3.
Message Text
Enter the error message that appears if the destination computer doesn’t meet
the condition. It should communicate to the end user why the installation
cannot run.
Click OK.
The new condition appears in the list in the upper-right pane.
Note
If the launch condition depends on a system search, move the AppSearch action so that
it precedes the LaunchCondtions action in the User Interface sequence. For silent
installations, also move the AppSearch action in the Execute Immediate sequence.
See About Installation Sequences on page 444.
To edit or delete an existing launch condition
In Setup Editor > Product tab, select the Launch Condition icon to display current launch
conditions in the upper-right pane.
z
To edit a launch condition, double-click it.
z
To delete a launch condition, select it and press Delete.
Performing a System Search
Use the System Search page to search the destination computer:
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z
To find a previous version of your application that wasn’t installed using Windows
Installer technology.
z
To find any files, directories, .INI files, registry entries, or components of a previous
version of your application. You can specify the items to search for and then code
the installation so the new version is placed in the same location as the previous
one, rather than in a default location.
z
To look for a specific third-party application. Example: You might want to include a
feature in your application that is only installed if a certain application is already
installed on the destination computer.
At run time, the installation searches for the items that are specified on the System
Search page and places the results in properties you specify. There is no order to the
search, therefore you can’t make one entry depend on another.
See:
Searching
Searching
Searching
Searching
For
For
For
For
Files or Directories on page 170
Items in .INI Files on page 172
a Registry Value on page 174
a Previously-Installed Component on page 175
For information on searching for previous versions, see Searching for Existing
Applications, Files, Registry Entries, or .ini File Entries in the Windows Installer SDK
Help.
You can get the product code GUID of the previous installation by filling in the Action
Property field on the Upgrade dialog box.
See Creating an Upgrade on page 306.
Searching For Files or Directories
On the System Search page, you can set up a search for a file or directory on the
destination computer. To find a directory, you must search for a specific file contained
inside the directory. When you search for a file, Windows Installer stops searching as
soon as it finds the first file or directory that matches your specification. Therefore, it is
important that you specify unique file or directory attributes for your search. You can
specify to return either the full file path or just the directory that contains the file.
To search for a file or directory
1.
Select Installation Expert > System Search page.
2.
Click Add at the right of the page and select File or Directory.
The Search for File dialog box appears.
3.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Property
Specify a property name. It will hold the result of the search, which is a file
name or directory path. If you’ve already defined a new public property (all
uppercase) in the Properties icon on the Product tab, then you can select it from
the list; otherwise enter a new property name (all uppercase). If you enter a
new property name, and the search fails to find a match, the property value will
be null and will be false if used in a condition.
„
Operation
Select the type of entry for the property:
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
Search all fixed drives for a file
Searches all permanent attached drives for the file. You determine how
many levels down the search is performed by entering a search depth. This
operation returns the entire path to the file. Example: C:\Program
Files\Application\Application.exe.

Search for file: return full file name
Searches a specific directory for a file, and returns a full path. (Example:
C:\Program Files\Application\Application.exe.) If you select this option,
Search Directory becomes enabled.

Search for file: return containing directory only
Searches a specific folder for a file, and returns the path to the file without
the file name. (Example: C:\Program Files\Application\.) If you select this
option, Search Directory becomes enabled.
„
Search Directory
This is not available when you search all fixed drives for a file. Although you can
enter a specific path here, it is best to enter one of the predefined folder
properties that are listed in the Directory table of the Tables tab in Setup Editor.
Example: Entering [Windows] searches the default Windows directory,
regardless of its name or location.
„
Search Depth
Enter how many directories below the search directory to search. The default,
0, searches only the top level of the directory specified in Search Directory. If
you are searching all fixed drives for a file, then 0 searches the root directories
only. Enter 1 to search both the top level and the top level’s child directories, 2
to search two levels of child directories, and so on.
„
File Name
Enter the name of the file.
„
Details
Click to specify more details about the file.
The Search File Details dialog box appears.
4.
If you clicked Details, complete the dialog box:
Because the file search stops with the first match, enter as much detail as possible
to ensure that the installation finds the correct file.
„
File Name
Enter the name of the installed file. This is the only required search criteria.
„
Min. Version
(Optional.) The file’s binary version resource must be equal to or greater than
this number. Leave both version fields blank to ignore the file version.
„
Max. Version
(Optional.) The file’s binary version resource must be equal to or less than this
number. Leave both version fields blank to ignore the file version.
Note
When using the version fields, make sure you consider the binary version
resource and not the string version resource. The Windows Properties dialog
box for files displays only the string version, which can be different from the
binary version. Only the first three segments of a four-segment version string
are considered. Example: For 1.0.2.3, only 1.0.2 is considered.
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„
Min. Size
The file’s size must be equal or greater than this number. Leave the default
value of 0 to ignore the file size.
„
Max. Size
The file’s size must be equal or less than this number. Leave the default value of
0 to ignore the file size.
„
Languages
(Optional.) To search for a file with a particular language ID, enter the language
ID. To enter multiple languages, separate the language IDs with commas.
5.
Click OK on the Search File Details dialog box.
6.
Click OK on the Search for File dialog box.
To test the search, add a text box on one of the dialog boxes in the installation. In the
text box’s Control Text field, enter the property name (surrounded by brackets) that
you assigned to this search. (Example: [MY_PROPERTY].) This causes the value of the
property to be displayed on the dialog box. When you run the installation, the property
you specified will hold the results of the search. If it is empty, the search failed.
Searching For Items in .INI Files
On the System Search page, you can set up a search for an item in an .INI file on the
destination computer. You can either search for a generic value, or do a special search
that’s tailored specifically for a file path or directory path.
Note
When you use the System Search page to search for an .INI file, you can only search for
.INI files that are inside the Windows or the Winnt directory. Windows Installer does not
find .INI files that are located in other directories, even subdirectories within the
Windows directory.
.INI file terminology
z
An .INI file consists of sections with the following syntax:
[DirectoriesAndFiles]
SrcDir=E:\Application\
SrcFiles=E:\Application\Application.exe, E:\Sample\Sample.dll
z
In the section above, DirectoriesAndFiles is an INI Section Name and SrcDir is an
INI Item Name.
z
Item Field refers to the number of the item in a comma-delimited list. Example:
The Item Field for E:\Sample\Sample.dll in the section above is 2 because it is the
second item in the list.
To add an .INI file to the search list
1.
Select Installation Expert > System Search page.
2.
Click Add at the right of the page and select INI File.
The Read INI File dialog box appears.
3.
Complete the dialog box:
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„
Property
Specify a property name. It will hold the result of the search, which is a file
name, directory path, or other value, depending on the operation performed by
the search. If you’ve already defined a new public property (all uppercase) in
the Properties icon on the Product tab, then you can select it from the list;
otherwise enter a new property name (all uppercase). If you enter a new
property name, and the search fails to find a match, the property value will be
null and will be false if used in a condition.
„
Operation
Select the type of entry for the property:

Read directory name from INI file
Use this only if the .INI information you are searching for is a directory path.
A search of this type returns the entire directory path. Example:
E:\Application\.
If you use this operation on .INI information that’s in the form of a file path,
or any other form, then this type of search fails. The search also fails if there
is more than one value listed for the item, separated by commas.

Read file pathname from INI file
Use this only if the .INI information you are searching for is a file path.
Example: E:\Application\Application.exe. However, the file name itself is
dropped from the search result. A search of this type returns the directory
path only, minus the file name. Example: E:\Application\.
If you use this operation on .INI information that’s in the form of a directory
path, or any other form, then this type of search fails. The search also fails if
there is more than one value listed for the item, separated by commas.

Read raw value from INI file
Use this to find any type of .INI information. This type of search has the
added benefit of letting you specify the Item Field, which determines which
value in a comma-delimited list of values to retrieve. Example: If you set the
Item Field to 2 and search this item:
Colors=red,blue,green
“blue” is returned because it is the second field in the item.

4.
INI File Name
Enter the name of the .INI file. (Not case-sensitive.)
„
INI Section Name
Enter the section name that contains the item you’re searching for. Although
section names are enclosed in brackets, don’t include the brackets. (Not casesensitive.)
„
INI Item Name
Enter the name of the item that contains the value you’re searching for. (Not
case-sensitive.)
„
Item Field
This is enabled if you select Read raw value from INI file in the Operation
field. If the item you’re searching for contains several values, separated by
commas, enter the number of the value’s position in the list of values or enter 0
to get all values.
Click OK.
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To test the search, add a text box on one of the dialog boxes in the installation. In the
text box’s Control Text field, enter the property name (surrounded by brackets) that
you assigned to this search. (Example: [MY_PROPERTY].) This causes the value of the
property to be displayed on the dialog box. When you run the installation, the property
you specified will hold the results of the search. If it is empty, the search failed.
Searching For a Registry Value
On the System Search page, you can set up a search for a registry value on the
destination computer. You can either search for a generic value, or do a special search
that’s tailored specifically for a file path or directory path.
To search for a registry value
1.
Select Installation Expert > System Search page.
2.
Click Add at the right of the page and select Registry.
The Read Registry Value dialog box appears.
3.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Property
Specify a property name. It will hold the result of the search, which is a file
name, directory path, or other value, depending on the operation performed by
the search. If you’ve already defined a new public property (all uppercase) in
the Properties icon on the Product tab, then you can select it from the list;
otherwise enter a new property name (all uppercase). If you enter a new
property name, and the search fails to find a match, the property value will be
null and will be false if used in a condition.
„
Operation
Select the type of entry for the property:

Read directory name from registry
Use this only if the registry information you are searching for is a directory
path. A search of this type returns the entire directory path. Example:
E:\Application\.
If you use this operation on registry information that’s not in the form of a
file path, the search fails.

Read file pathname from registry
Use this only if the registry information you are searching for is a file path,
such as E:\Application\Application.exe. However, the file name itself is
dropped from the search result. A search of this type returns the directory
path only, minus the file name. Example: E:\Application\.
If you use this operation on registry information that’s not in the form of a
directory path, the search fails.

Read raw value from registry
Use this to find any type of registry information.
„
Root
Select the root folder that contains the registry value to search for.
„
Key
Enter an entire key path, separating key names with backslashes. Example:
Software\Application\Common.
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4.
„
Value Name
Enter the name of the registry value. To find the default registry value, leave
this blank.
„
Search 64-bit portion of the registry
(64-bit installations only.) Mark this to find registry keys that are designated as
64-bit components.
Click OK.
To test the search, add a text box on one of the dialog boxes in the installation. In the
text box’s Control Text field, enter the property name (surrounded by brackets) that
you assigned to this search. (Example: [MY_PROPERTY].) This causes the value of the
property to be displayed on the dialog box. When you run the installation, the property
you specified will hold the results of the search. If it is empty, the search failed.
Searching For a Previously-Installed Component
On the System Search page, you can set up a search for a component that was
previously installed on the destination computer. The search looks for the component’s
GUID in the registry to determine whether the component is installed.
You might use this search to find the installation directory of a component installed by a
different Windows Installer installation.
Example: Suppose you want to find the installation directory of version 1.0 of your
Sample1 application. You could use a file search to find the file, Sample1.exe, but it
might take a long time to search all drives. Instead, you could search for the component
ID of the component that contained Sample1.exe in the original installation. This type of
search is much faster.
To perform a component search, you must know the component’s ID. To obtain this ID,
you must have access to the .WSI file of the previous installation. You can find the
component’s GUID on the Component Details dialog box.
See Adding and Editing a Component on page 374.)
To add a component to your search list
1.
Select Installation Expert > System Search page.
2.
Click Add at the right of the page and select Component.
The Read Component Settings dialog box appears.
3.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Property
Specify a property. It will hold the result of the search, which is a file name,
directory path, or other value, depending on the operation performed by the
search. If you’ve already defined a new public property (all uppercase) in the
Properties icon on the Product tab, then you can select it from the list;
otherwise enter a new property name (all uppercase). If you enter a new
property name, and the search fails to find a match, the property value will be
null and will be false if used in a condition.
„
Operation
Select the type of entry for the property:
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„

Read directory name from component keypath
Select this operation if the component you are searching for contains only an
empty directory (a Create Directory item) and has an empty key path. This
operation returns a directory path. (Example: C:\Program
Files\Application\.) If the keypath for this component is a file, ODBC item, or
registry item, this operation fails.

Read file pathname from component keypath
Select this operation only if the component you are searching for has a file
for a key path. In this case, it returns the directory path. Example:
C:\Program Files\Application\.
Component ID
Enter the GUID for the component.
See Adding and Editing a Component on page 374 and About GUIDs on
page 497.
4.
Click OK.
To test the search, add a text box on one of the dialog boxes in the installation. In the
text box’s Control Text field, enter the property name (surrounded by brackets) that
you assigned to this search. (Example: [MY_PROPERTY].) This causes the value of the
property to be displayed on the dialog box. When you run the installation, the property
you specified will hold the results of the search. If it is empty, the search failed.
Setting Version-Specific Windows Installer Options
¾ Windows Installer 4.0 or later only.
Use the Windows Installer Options page to set options for installations that will run on
Windows Installer 4.0 or later. The features that these options enable were introduced
with Windows Vista. These options are ignored when you run the installation on earlier
operating systems.
UAC Compatibility Settings
The User Account Control (UAC) that was introduced with Windows Vista provides a
temporary privilege-elevation model. The settings in this section let you determine the
elevation level of an installation.
See About UAC Elevation of Windows Installer Installations on page 178.
z
No elevation required
This option disables UAC. Check this check box only if the installation does not
access a protected area on the destination computer.
When User Account Control is disabled:
„
The DisableUAP property is set, which hides the option to install for all users or
the current user on the installation’s User Information dialog box.
„
The entire installation runs without elevation.
„
If the installation tries to access a protected area, it fails.
See About Standard User Installations on page 71.
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z
Elevate Deferred Execution sequence only
This is the preferred option for most installations. Typically, actions that require
elevation should be in the Execute Deferred sequence.
At run time, when the installation reaches the Deferred Execution sequence, the
user is prompted for administrator credentials.
z
Elevate entire installation
Elevate the entire installation when it contains actions that require elevation but are
outside the Execute Deferred sequence.
See About UAC Elevation of an Entire Installation on page 180.
Restart Manager
Installations and updates often require computer restarts when files that are being
updated are in use by a running application or service. In Windows Vista or later, Restart
Manager can detect processes that have files in use and stop and restart them without
requiring a restart of the computer. Applications that are written to take advantage of
Restart Manager can be restarted and restored to the same state and with the same
data as before the restart.
To enable Restart Manager for this installation, mark the following options:
z
Use Restart Manager
When this installation is run, use Restart Manager to shut down and restart
applications and services that have files in use.
The use of Restart Manager determines which dialog box appears if the installation
tries to update files that are being used:
z
„
If Restart Manager is enabled, the Windows Vista Files in Use dialog box
(MsiRMFilesInUse) appears.
„
If Restart Manager is disabled, the Files in Use dialog box (used in earlier
versions of Windows) appears.
Restart registered applications that were shut down by Restart Manager
When applications are shut down, only applications that are registered with Restart
Manager for a restart are restarted. Applications that are not registered are not
restarted even if this check box is checked.
The following options determine which applications are shut down:
„
Attempt to shut down all affected applications
Restart Manager attempts to shut down all affected applications. If an
application is written to ignore the shutdown request, it is not shut down.
„
Shut down all affected applications
Restart Manager forces a shut down of all affected applications, including those
that are written to ignore the shutdown request.
„
Shut down only if all affected applications are registered for a restart
If at least one affected application is unregistered, then the attempt to shut
down all applications, registered or not, fails and a restart is required at the end
of the installation.
Log file options
If you include logging options, then when the installation is run on Windows Vista or
later, the installation’s Exit dialog box contains an option to view the log file.
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To set logging options for installations that will run under Windows Installer 4.0 or later,
mark the appropriate check boxes:
z
! - Flush each line to the log
z
a - Start up of actions
Logs actions as they are started.
z
c - Initial UI parameters
Logs the initial user interface parameters.
z
e - All error messages
z
i - Status messages
z
m - Out-of-memory or fatal exit information
z
o - Out-of-disk-space messages
z
p - Terminal properties
z
r - Action-specific records
z
u - User requests
z
v - Verbose output
Logs more detailed information about each event or error.
z
w - Non-fatal warnings
z
x - Extra debugging information (Windows Server 2003 only)
You also can set these options from a command line.
See Applying Logging Options to an Installation on page 233.
About UAC Elevation of Windows Installer Installations
¾ Windows Installer 4.0 or later only.
In pre-Vista versions of Windows, users frequently logged on as administrators, leaving
their computers vulnerable to security breaches. The User Account Control (UAC) that
was introduced with Windows Vista provides a temporary privilege-elevation model. A
user who needs to run an administrative application can elevate their permissions by
providing approval for that application.
Installation actions that write to a protected area on the destination computer require
elevation. When UAC is enabled and the installation tries to access a protected area, the
user is prompted as follows:
z
A user who is logged on with administrator credentials is prompted to confirm that
they want to continue.
z
A user who is logged on with standard user credentials is prompted to enter a
password for an administrator account for the installation to continue.
Installations that were created in a Wise product earlier than Wise Package Studio 7.0
SP1 or Wise Installation Studio 7.0 run as if UAC is enabled.
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Options for elevating Windows Installer installations
Option
Description
Elevate the Deferred
Execution sequence
In a typical MSI, only the Deferred Execution sequence should contain actions
that write to a protected area on the destination computer. The installation runs
in standard user mode until it enters the Execute Deferred sequence. Then a UAC
prompt appears and the Execute Deferred sequence runs in administrator mode.
The prompt appears even if the installation runs silently. This option is the
default for most installations.
Set this option on the Windows Installer Options page, under the UAC
Compatibility Settings section.
See Setting Version-Specific Windows Installer Options on page 176.
If custom actions do not run or if the installation fails for other elevation-related
reasons, consider another elevation method.
Elevate the entire MSI
You can elevate an entire Windows Installer installation. At run time, a UAC
prompt appears only when the installation begins. The remainder of the
installation runs in an elevated mode.
Set this option on the Windows Installer Options page, under the UAC
Compatibility Settings section.
See Setting Version-Specific Windows Installer Options on page 176.
Elevate the entire MSI in the following situations:
z
When the installation contains custom actions that access protected areas
and are located outside of the Execute Deferred sequence. Typically, such
custom actions check launch conditions or obtain data to populate
installation dialog boxes.
z
When you cannot or prefer not to wrap the MSI in an EXE.
See About UAC Elevation of an Entire Installation on page 180.
Wrap the MSI in a WiseScript
EXE
To elevate an entire Windows Installer installation, you can wrap the MSI in a
WiseScript EXE that sets the run level with a manifest file. At run time, a UAC
prompt appears only when the EXE begins. The MSI runs in an elevated mode.
You can wrap the MSI in an EXE in Installation Expert on the Build Options page.
Select one of the options that create an EXE.
See Setting Build Options for a Release on page 193.
Wrap the MSI in an EXE in the following situations:
z
When you need to add runtime or prerequisite files to the installation for preinstallation on the destination computer.
z
When the installation contains custom actions that access protected areas
and are located outside of the Execute Deferred sequence. Typically, such
custom actions check launch conditions or obtain data to populate
installation dialog boxes.
When the installation runs in maintenance mode, the MSI runs outside the EXE
wrapper. Therefore, a UAC prompt appears when the MSI runs.
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Option
Description
Create a standard user
installation with no elevation
If an application is written to be installed and run by standard users without
elevation, you can bypass UAC elevation issues. The installation cannot contain
actions that access a protected area on the destination computer. If the
installation tries to access a protected area, it fails.
See Creating an Installation for Standard Users on page 71.
See also:
Setting Version-Specific Windows Installer Options on page 176
Guidelines for Custom Action Location on page 454
About UAC Elevation of an Entire Installation
¾ Windows Installer 4.0 or later only.
To avoid elevation-related failures, you can elevate an entire installation. At run time, a
UAC prompt appears only when the installation first begins. The remainder of the
installation runs in an elevated mode.
Use this method of elevation when an installation’s User Interface sequence contains the
following types of custom actions:
z
Actions that access a restricted area to check launch conditions or obtain data to
populate installation dialog boxes.
z
Actions that perform an IIS check. These actions usually appear in a Web or server
installation.
z
Actions that access user information or other restricted information. These actions
usually appear in a server installation.
The option to elevate the entire MSI is on the Windows Installer Options page, under the
UAC Compatibility Settings section.
See Setting Version-Specific Windows Installer Options on page 176.
When you elevate an entire MSI, the custom action WiseElevateCheck is added to the
User Interface sequence. Do not remove this custom action from the installation.
Note
When you create a Web installation or a server installation, Wise IIS-related custom
actions are added to the Execute Immediate sequence. These actions are coded to run
in an elevated mode. Any other custom actions in the Execute Immediate sequence that
access restricted areas are not elevated. Move them to the Execute Deferred sequence.
The elevated MSI runs as follows:
z
A single UAC prompt appears when the MSI begins. No other prompts appear.
z
During the User Interface sequence, the WiseElevateCheck action determines
whether the installation is running with elevated privileges and elevates it if
necessary.
z
If the installation is set to create an installation log, two logs might be created. One
log contains little information. The other log appears to contain entries for two
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installations. If you specified a name for the log file, only one log is created but it
might appear to contain entries for two installations. This is normal.
When the installation runs in maintenance mode, the installation is not elevated and a
UAC prompt appears before the Execute Deferred sequence begins. If the installation
contains the Wise IIS-related custom actions in the Execute Immediate sequence, a
prompt appears before that sequence as well.
You also can elevate an MSI by wrapping it in a WiseScript EXE that sets the run level
with a manifest file.
See About UAC Elevation of Windows Installer Installations on page 178.
See also Guidelines for Custom Action Location on page 454.
Setting Features for Installation Types
Use the Installation Types page to determine which features are installed when the end
user selects Complete, Typical, or Custom on the Installation Type dialog box. To display
the Installation Type dialog box to the end user during installation, you must mark its
check box on the Dialogs page.
Example: Suppose your application contains three features. You could set the following
defaults for the Installation Type dialog box:
Installation Type
Features Installed by Default
Typical
Core
Complete
Core
Tutorial
Samples
Because the Installation Types page simply sets the defaults, the end user can still
override these choices during installation by clicking Custom in the Installation Type
dialog box, and then turning features on or off on the Select Feature dialog box. To
display the Select Feature dialog box to the end user during installation, mark its check
box on the Dialogs page.
On the Installation Types page, the upper-left list box shows the default installation
types: Typical, Complete, and Custom, which correspond to the radio buttons that are
presented to the end user on the Installation Type dialog box during installation. The
right list box shows the features in the installation. You can collapse or expand the
features and their child features using the right-click menu.
For each installation type, you can set the following:
z
Quick access key
To change the underlined letter for the access key, double-click an installation type
name to make it editable, then change the position of the & (ampersand). The letter
that follows the & becomes underlined on the Select Installation Type dialog box.
z
Whether it is selected by default
To set an installation type radio button to be selected by default, select the
installation type name in the upper-left list and click Default Installation Type.
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z
Description text
This text appears next to the radio button on the Installation Type dialog box. To
change the text for a specific installation type, select the installation type name in
the upper-left list and change the text in the Description text box.
z
Default features
To set which features are turned on by default during installation, select an
installation type name in the upper-left list and mark the check boxes of the
features in the list on the right.
Warning
If you are using the Installation Types page to manage the Installation Type dialog box,
do not edit the Installation Type dialog box. Doing so causes the Installation Types page
not to work properly.
The following examples illustrate how the selections you make on the Installation Types
page appear to the end user.
Select Installation Type dialog box
Selected by
default
Description
text
Access key
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Select Features dialog box
Default
features
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Chapter 7
Organizing Your Installation Into Releases
This chapter includes the following topics:
z
About Releases on page 184
z
Customizing a Release on page 188
z
Setting Build Options for a Release on page 193
z
Adding Prerequisites to a Release on page 198
z
Creating Web-Based Installations With WebDeploy on page 204
z
Setting Up Media for Distribution on page 210
About Releases
Note
You can only create releases in a project file (.WSI). In any other file, the pages in the
Release Definition page group are fully or partially unavailable. An exception is the
Languages page.
See About the Languages Page on page 266.
You can create an installation that generates different installations for different releases
of your application. You do this by creating and customizing releases within the
installation. You can create releases that install different features, have different
properties, have different output formats, and support different platforms.
The Releases page lets you define multiple releases for an installation, edit releases, and
delete releases you have created. If you haven’t created additional releases for the
installation, the Releases page lists only one release: Default.
Example 1:
You want to have a standard and an evaluation edition for your application, and you
want to release both editions on CD and as Internet downloads. To accomplish this,
create four releases:
z
Standard edition on CD-ROM
z
Standard edition for the Internet
z
Evaluation edition on CD-ROM
z
Evaluation edition for the Internet
Example 2:
You want to create a single installation project (.WSI) that can produce installation files
for 32-bit, x64, and 64-bit Itanium platforms. To accomplish this, create three releases
and set the appropriate target platform for each one:
z
32-bit edition
z
x64 edition
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z
Itanium edition
See Creating Multiple, Platform-Specific Installations from One Project File on page 67.
Multiple Releases From a Workbench Process
The predefined Workbench process, Repackage for Windows Installer, works with a
single .MSI that has the default project file name. If you create multiple releases for a
package, you should either customize the process for that project to perform tasks on all
.MSIs that are compiled, or write a macro to change the names of the additional .MSIs
to the default file name.
Working With the Releases Page
Use the following buttons:
z
Details
Edit a release.
z
Add
Add a new release.
See Creating a New Release.
z
Delete
Delete a release. At least one release is required; if the installation only has one
release, you cannot delete it.
z
Compile
Compile a specific release without compiling the entire installation. Select one or
more releases and click the Compile button at the right of the Releases page.
The Compile button at the bottom of the main window compiles the entire
installation.
See Compiling An Installation on page 78.
You can edit various aspects of each release on the other pages in the Release Definition
page group.
Creating a New Release
Note
This page is fully enabled in a .WSI only. In an .MSI or .MST, you cannot add or delete.
To create a new release
1.
Select Installation Expert > Releases page.
2.
Click Add.
The Release Details dialog box appears.
3.
Enter the following:
„
Release Name
Enter a unique name that describes the release. Example: Standard_CD-ROM or
Standard_Internet. This name appears on the Releases page.
„
.MSI File Name
Name the installation file for this release. Each release is saved as a separate
.MSI. If you leave this blank, the release name defaults to the name of the .WSI
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with the extension .MSI. When an installation has multiple releases, this can
cause a compile error, because no two releases can have the same name.

To save the .MSI in a subdirectory of the installation project’s location,
precede the file name with a \ and the subdirectory path. Example:
\My_Directory\Sample.msi

To populate the file name or subdirectory with the value of one or more
properties, enter one or more property names surrounded by brackets.
Example: [ProductName].msi
You can use one or more specific parts of a property’s value if its segments
are period delimited. This is most useful for adding all or part of the product
version number to the file name. The syntax is:
[property_name.%segment_number%segment_number]
You can add characters between the segments, except for periods,
numerals, or the % symbol.
Examples: If the value of ProductVersion is 1.05.07.25, the following .MSI
names result.
.MSI File Name Entry
Compiled .MSI Name
Application_[ProductVersion.%4].msi
Application_25.msi
Application_[ProductVersion.%1_%2].msi
Application_1_05.msi
„
Description
Enter information to distinguish this release from others. Examples: Evaluation,
Optimized for Internet Distribution. This description appears on the Releases
page.
„
Installation Theme
Select the theme for the installation dialog boxes for this release. The theme
controls the overall look of the dialog boxes by setting their top or side images
and the fonts of the dialog box text. You can use different themes for different
releases. Example: Use a different theme for an evaluation release to clearly
distinguish it from your standard release.
See Changing the Theme of Dialogs on page 403.
The theme of the Default release on the Releases page corresponds to the
Default Theme on the Dialogs page. Changing the theme on one page changes
it on the other. Renaming or deleting the Default release breaks this
relationship.
„
Compression Type
Select the amount of compression. This depends on the media you use to
distribute the release. Examples: For an Internet release, use maximum
compression for a faster download, but for a release on a CD, use no
compression. Higher compression slows the compile.
„
Release Type
Select Terminal Server Enabled if this release is intended to be installed in a
Microsoft Terminal Services or Citrix environment. This sets the installation to
be installed per-machine and prevents keypaths for components from being
assigned to per-user resources. This option might cause keypaths to be empty,
and might cause a one-time repair. Environment variables are duplicated,
creating a per-user set and a per-machine set, one of which is installed
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depending on the value of ALLUSERS. Also see ALLUSERS Property in the
Windows Installer SDK Help.
„
Target Platform
Select the target platform for this release. This determines the Template
Summary property of the compiled .MSI. The initial default is set by the Target
Platform option on the New Installation File dialog box.
If the installation previously contained only 32-bit releases, designating a
feature or release as 64-bit enables the 64-bit areas of the Files and Registry
pages as well as other 64-bit-related areas of the interface.
„
Build this release during compile
Mark this to have this release compiled when you click Compile at the bottom of
the main window.
This corresponds to the check box in the Build column on the Releases page.
Marking or clearing one check box affects the other check box.
4.
To add or edit media settings, click Edit Media. The Media Details dialog box
appears. The Edit Media button and the Media section appear only when you first
add a new release.
See Setting Up Media for Distribution on page 210.
5.
Click OK.
The release is added to the list on the Releases page. To edit a release, double-click its
name. The other pages in the Release Definition page group let you further customize
each release.
See also:
How to Specify the Target Platform on page 63
Outputting a Multiple-Language Release
Note
This page is fully enabled in a .WSI only. In an .MSI or .MST, you cannot add or delete.
Normally, when you compile an installation containing multiple languages, a separate
.MSI or .MST is created for each language. However, you can create a single installation
that contains multiple languages, and either automatically installs in the destination
computer’s language or prompts the end user to select a language. To create a multiple
language installation, you must create a release that compiles to an .EXE file.
To output a multiple-language release
1.
On the Releases page, create a release to contain the multiple languages.
See Creating a New Release on page 185.
2.
On the Build Options page:
„
Current Release
Select the release that you just created
„
.EXE Options
Select one of the following:
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
Single-file .EXE
When you select this, you must create a language transform for each
additional language.
See Creating a Language Transform on page 269.
During compile, the transforms are packaged inside the .EXE along with the
.MSI.

.EXE that launches external .MSI
When you select this, you can use language transforms or you can create a
separate .MSI for each language. During compile, settings for the .EXE are
stored in a separate .INI file.
See INI File Properties on page 516.
„
Include all languages in installation .EXE
Mark this to embed all the languages that are marked on the Languages page in
the output .EXE.
„
Always prompt for installation language
Mark this to prompt the end user to select a language.
Clear this to have the resulting installation verify if one of the languages in the
installation is on the destination computer. If so, the installation proceeds in the
destination computer’s language. If not, the end user is prompted to select a
language.
3.
On the Languages page, select the languages you want to include in this release.
See Creating a Translated .MSI on page 268.
4.
Save and compile the installation.
When the end user runs the installation .EXE, the installation either proceeds in the
destination computer’s language or prompts the end user to select a language. If you
created a single-file .EXE, the .MSI runs with the appropriate transform. If you created
an .EXE that launches an external .MSI, the appropriate language .MSI runs.
Customizing a Release
When you create a new release, it has the same properties, summary items, and
features list as the Default release. The Release Settings page lets you customize a
particular release by:
z
Overriding the properties and summary items. These are set for the entire
installation in Setup Editor > Product tab.
z
Selecting the features to include in the release. Features are set for the entire
installation in Installation Expert > Features page.
The tree structure on the Release Settings page displays features and their
hierarchical relationships. Use the right-click menu to collapse or expand all features
or child features of selected parents only.
z
Selecting the components to include in the release.
Expand the feature tree structure on the Release Settings page to display the
components in each feature.
You can share settings between releases, so you can efficiently create releases that
share all or most settings.
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Example:
Customize a release as an evaluation in which:
z
The application doesn’t allow the end user to save files.
z
The product’s name indicates it is an evaluation.
z
The product’s summary informs the end user that this evaluation release doesn’t
allow saving files.
Note
This page is enabled in a .WSI only.
Customizing Properties for a Release
Note
This page is enabled in a .WSI only.
You can use the Release Settings page to override the value of an existing property or
add a new property for a specific release. Example: Change the ProductName property
to reflect that a particular release is an evaluation version rather than a full version.
The property override does not affect property values in other languages in the
installation. Example: If a property has a value of 0 in the Default language and a value
of 5 in German, and you change the value to 12 on the Release Settings page, the value
of the property in the German .MSI will be 5.
Each release contains the properties listed under the Properties icon in Setup Editor >
Product tab. Only those properties that you change or add for a specific release appear
under the Properties icon on the Release Settings page. Properties that you add for a
specific release do not appear in Setup Editor. Deleting a property from the Release
Settings page removes the override for the specific release.
To customize properties for a release
1.
Select Installation Expert > Release Settings page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
In the list box, click the Properties icon.
4.
Click Add at the right of the Release Settings page. The Property Settings Override
dialog box appears.
5.
From Name, select an existing property or enter a name to create a new property.
6.
In Value, enter an initial value for the property. During execution, the installation
might change this value.
7.
Click OK.
The property appears in the list box. To edit it, double-click its name.
Customizing Summary Items for a Release
Note
This page is enabled in a .WSI only.
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You can use the Release Settings page to override the value of an existing summary
item or edit customized summary items. Example: Change the Comment Summary item
to reflect that a particular release is an evaluation version rather than a full version.
End users can see the summary information by right-clicking the compiled .MSI or .EXE
in Windows Explorer and selecting Properties.
Note
In Windows Vista and later, the file Properties dialog box does not contain summary
information.
For information on summary items, see Summary Property Descriptions in the Windows
Installer SDK Help.
Each release contains the summary items listed under the Summary icon in Setup Editor
> Product tab. Only those summary items you change for a specific release appear
under the Summary icon on the Release Settings page. You cannot create new summary
items. Deleting a summary item from the Release Settings page removes the override
for the specific release.
To customize summary items
1.
Select Installation Expert > Release Settings page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
In the list box, click the Summary icon.
4.
Click Add at the right of the Release Settings page. The Summary Settings Override
dialog box appears.
5.
From Name, select a summary item.
6.
In Value, enter a new value or text for the summary item.
7.
Click OK.
The summary item appears in the list box. To edit it, double-click its name.
See also:
Specifying Summary Information on page 366
Defining a Feature and Component Set for a Release
Note
This page is enabled in a .WSI only.
The Release Settings page lists all features in an installation. You can:
z
Select the features to include in a particular release. Example: Turn off a SpellCheck
or a SaveAs feature for a evaluation release.
z
Select the components to include in a release. Example: In a platform-specific
release, select only the components that target that platform.
To define features and components for a release
1.
Select Installation Expert > Release Settings page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
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3.
If necessary, expand the Features icon in the list box.
4.
To include a feature in this release, mark its check box. To exclude a feature, clear
its check box.
5.
To select which components to include in this release:
a.
Click the feature name to display the feature’s components in the lower pane.
b.
Mark the check boxes of components to include. All check boxes are marked by
default.
See also:
Creating Multiple, Platform-Specific Installations from One Project File on page 67
Sharing Settings Between Releases
Note
This page is enabled in a .WSI only.
You can share settings from a release with other releases in the installation. After you
initially share settings, the settings for the releases are linked. This means that any
change you make to the release settings for any of the linked releases is applied to all
other linked releases. At any time, you can break the link.
To share settings between releases:
1.
Select Installation Expert > Release Settings page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release to copy settings to.
3.
Click Share at the right of the Release Settings page. The Share Release dialog box
appears.
4.
From Copy/Share Settings From, select the release that contains the settings to
copy.
5.
Click OK.
The settings of the release in Copy/Share Settings From immediately replace the
settings of the release in Current Release. Any change you make to the release
settings of either of the linked releases is applied to the other release, until you break
the link.
To break a link between releases
1.
Select Installation Expert > Release Settings page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
Click Share at the right of the Release Settings page. The Share Release dialog box
appears.
4.
From Copy/Share Settings From, select <None>.
5.
Click OK.
The link between the selected release and other releases is broken. The current settings
of the releases are not changed, but changing settings for one release no longer affects
the settings of the other release.
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Example: Creating an Evaluation Release
This example describes how you could define an evaluation release for an application. In
this example:
z
The release is named Sample Evaluation.
z
The application’s summary dialog box indicates that this is an evaluation release.
z
Potential customers can use the evaluation version indefinitely, but they can’t save
any files.
Assumptions
z
On the Features page, you have added a SaveAs feature with the appropriate
resources for the default release.
z
The SaveAs feature includes resources that let end users save files.
z
On the Releases page, you have created a release named Evaluation.
To create a sample evaluation release
1.
Select Installation Expert > Release Settings page.
2.
From Current Release, select Evaluation.
3.
Click the Properties icon.
4.
Click Add at the right of the Release Settings page. The Property Settings Override
dialog box appears.
5.
From Name, select ProductName.
6.
In Value, enter Sample Evaluation.
7.
Click OK.
8.
Click the Summary icon.
9.
Click Add at the right of the Release Settings page. The Summary Settings Override
dialog box appears.
10. From Name, select Comments.
11. In Value, enter:
This is an evaluation version; it does not allow you to save files.
12. Click OK.
13. If necessary, expand the Features icon in the list box.
14. Clear the SaveAs feature’s check box.
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Setting Build Options for a Release
Note
This page is fully enabled in a .WSI only. In an .MSI or .MST, you cannot add or delete.
On the Build Options page, you can customize a release by selecting the format of
output files and language options.
If the format of the output file is an .EXE, you can select an option to install the .MSI
into an SVS layer. When you select this option, you can also specify end user data files
to exclude from the SVS layer.
See About the Installation of an .MSI into an SVS Layer on page 195 and About the
Exclusion of Files on the Build Options Page on page 196.
To set build options
1.
Select Installation Expert > Build Options page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
Complete the build options listed below.
Build options
z
Use short file names for files uncompressed outside of the install
Mark this to abbreviate file names to 8.3 format names. This is useful if you will
distribute your installation on CDs with the 8.3 format.
z
.EXE Options
This determines what kind of files are output when you compile this release. If you
create an .EXE, you can install Windows Installer and .NET Framework runtimes and
run prerequisite files on the destination computer before the main installation. In a
64-bit installation, the .EXE will always be 32-bit.
For WebDeploy to be enabled, you must select one of the WebDeploy options.
„
Do not create an .EXE file
Create only the .MSI file. The installation will work only on computers that have
Windows Installer installed. Selecting this disables the remaining options on the
Build Options page.
„
Single-file .EXE (only valid for files inside .MSI)
Place the .MSI file inside an .EXE file.
This is the preferred option if you plan to send an installation by email or place
it on a Web page.
„
.EXE that launches external .MSI
Create an .EXE with the same name as the .MSI file. Settings for the .EXE are
stored in a separate .INI file. The .EXE itself is small, because it doesn’t contain
any runtimes or the .MSI file. This is the preferred option if you place the
installation on a CD, because the .MSI does not need to be extracted to the hard
drive.
See INI File Properties on page 516.
„
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WebDeploy .EXE
Create an .EXE that is optimized for direct downloading from the Internet. The
installation will compile to an .EXE that contains the download information, and
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an .MSI file that might or might not be embedded in the .EXE. This sets the
Create a downloadable .EXE option on the WebDeploy page, and vice versa.
„
WebDeploy .EXE and .INI
Change the download information dynamically, perhaps as a result of end user
input. The installation will compile to an .EXE, an external .MSI, and an external
.INI file that contains the download information. This sets the Create an .EXE
and .INI option on the WebDeploy page, and vice versa.
Warning
If you change the .EXE options after you edit the WiseScript on the Prerequisite
Pages, you will lose all the changes you made to the script.
z
Password
Enter a password. The user who installs the application is prompted to enter the
password to start the installation. This password is the same for all users. You can
protect only single-file .EXEs with a password.
z
Prompt to remove previous version before installing
Mark this to have the installation check for previous versions of the same application
and prompt the end user to uninstall the previous version before proceeding with
the new installation. This option is disabled when the Install the .MSI into an SVS
layer option is selected.
For this to work, the previous version must have been installed using Windows
Installer technology. If not, then use the System Search page to search for a
previous version.
Note
For best results, use the Upgrades page rather than this option to deal with previous
versions of your application.
Do not mark this check box if you are using the Upgrades page or patches to update
an application.
z
Include all languages in installation .EXE
Mark this to embed all the languages that are marked on the Languages page in the
output .EXE.
See Outputting a Multiple-Language Release on page 187.
z
Always prompt for installation language
Mark this to cause a multi-language installation to prompt the end user for the
language at run time.
Clear this to have the resulting installation verify if one of the languages in the
installation is on the destination computer. If so, the installation proceeds in the
destination computer’s language. If not, the end user is prompted to select a
language.
z
Install the .MSI into an SVS layer
Mark this to install the .MSI into an SVS layer if the SVS driver (Software
Virtualization Agent) is installed on the destination computer. When you select this
option, the other SVS options on the page are enabled.
z
Install normally if the SVS driver is not present
Mark this option to install the .MSI normally if the SVS driver (Software
Virtualization Agent) is not installed on the computer. If you clear this option and
the SVS driver is not present, then the installation fails.
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z
Exclude all file extensions from the Extension table
Mark this to exclude user data files from the SVS layer for all file extensions that
appear in the Extension table. You add file extensions to the Extension table on the
File Associations page.
See Adding File Associations on page 154 and About the Exclusion of Files on the
Build Options Page on page 196.
z
Exclude the following extensions
Specify file extensions for user data files that you want to exclude from the SVS
layer. Separate extensions with a comma. You can enter extensions with or without
the preceding period.
z
Exclude all files in the following directories
Use this option to exclude specific directories from an SVS layer. Any user data file
that is saved in these directories is excluded from the SVS layer. When you specify
a directory, you can also exclude its subdirectories. To exclude a directory, click
Add and select the directory from the Directory drop-down list. The Directory
drop-down list displays all built-in Windows Installer directories and any directories
that you added on the Files page. To exclude subdirectories, mark Exclude all
subdirectories under this directory. Directories that you exclude appear in the
list pane on the Build Options page.
See also:
Adding Prerequisites to a Release on page 198
Creating a WebDeploy Installation on page 207
About the Installation of an .MSI into an SVS Layer
You can create an .MSI installation that is installed into an SVS layer. You can then take
advantage of the benefits of both an .MSI and an SVS layer. When you install an .MSI
into an SVS layer, you eliminate the possibility of conflicts with other applications,
including another version of the same application, and avoid changes to the base
Windows installation. You also make it possible for an end user to quickly restore the
application to its original state by resetting the layer from Add/Remove Programs.
Before you create an installation that installs an .MSI into an SVS layer, you should be
familiar with the following:
z
.EXE wrapper
To create an installation that installs an .MSI into an SVS layer, you must first select
an option to create an .EXE on the Build Options page. After you select an .EXE
option, the Install the .MSI into an SVS layer option becomes enabled on this
page. After you select the option to install the .MSI into an SVS layer and compile
the .MSI, an .EXE file is created that has the same name as the .MSI file. This .EXE
file contains the logic that is needed to install the .MSI into an SVS layer.
See Setting Build Options for a Release on page 193
z
WiseScript project file (.WSE)
When you select the option on the Build Options page to install the .MSI into an SVS
layer, a WiseScript project file (.WSE) is created, which when compiled creates the
.EXE wrapper. You can edit this .WSE file from the Prerequisites page.
See Editing the WiseScript That Creates the Installation .EXE on page 202.
In addition to the logic needed to install the .MSI into an SVS layer, the WiseScript
file contains installation error messages and the installation’s maintenance mode
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dialogs. The maintenance mode dialog boxes appear when the end user clicks the
application’s Change/Remove button in Add/Remove Programs.
See About Maintenance of an .MSI Installed into an SVS Layer on page 197.
Note
Only English is supported for any dialogs that are controlled by this WiseScript file.
z
Exclusions
When you install an .MSI into an SVS layer, you should also specify on the Build
Options page the end user data files that should be excluded from the SVS layer.
You exclude files so that end users data files are not lost when the application is
reset from Add/Remove Programs.
See About the Exclusion of Files on the Build Options Page on page 196.
z
Execution of .EXE wrapper
When an end user runs the default WiseScript .EXE wrapper that is generated when
the .MSI is compiled, the .EXE wrapper does the following on their computer:
„
Determines whether the Virtual Software Package (VSP) is already installed. If a
VSP with the same GUID is already installed, a message informs the end user
and the installation ends.
„
Installs any other prerequisites that are specified on the Prerequisites page.
These prerequisites are not installed into an SVS layer.
„
Determines whether a compatible version of the SVS Driver (Software
Virtualization Agent) is installed.
„
If a compatible version of the SVS Driver is not found one of the following
happens:
„

If you selected the option to install the .MSI normally on the Build Options
page, the .EXE wrapper installs the .MSI normally and not into an SVS layer.

If you did not select the option to install the .MSI normally, the installation
ends.
Creates an SVS layer for the .MSI and installs the .MSI into the layer.
The .MSI installation runs normally. This includes the installation dialog boxes
that appear to the end user. The product code of the .MSI is used for the layer
ID.
„
Activates the virtual software layer.
The virtualized application then looks and behaves like any other application to
the end user.
See also:
About Virtual Software Packages in the Virtual Package Editor Help
About the Exclusion of Files on the Build Options Page
On the Build Options page, if you select Install the .MSI into an SVS layer, options to
exclude file extensions or directories become enabled. Use these options to exclude end
user data files from the SVS layer. You exclude files so that end users data files are not
saved in the SVS layer but are saved to the base file system. End user data files that are
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excluded from the layer are not lost when the application is reset from Add/Remove
Programs.
See About Maintenance of an .MSI Installed into an SVS Layer on page 197.
Warning
If an .MSI is installed into an SVS layer, any files that are generated by the application
and saved locally are lost when the layer is reset unless those files were excluded on the
Build Options page.
The Build Options page contains options that let you use any of the following to exclude
user data files from an SVS layer:
z
Files extensions that are listed on the Files Association page. These extensions
appear in the Extension table on the Tables tab.
z
File extensions that you specify.
z
File directories that you select. You can select any of the pre-built Windows Installer
directories or any directories that you added to your installation. When you select a
directory, you can also select to exclude its subdirectories.
Also see:
Tables Tab on page 380
Adding File Associations on page 154
About Maintenance of an .MSI Installed into an SVS Layer
When an .MSI is installed into an SVS layer, an end user can use Add/Remove Programs
to perform maintenance on the application.
Note
Only English is supported for the maintenance mode dialogs.
The end user can perform the following operations from Add/Remove Programs:
z
Remove
This option deletes the SVS layer along with the application.
z
Repair
This option runs Windows Installer repair. This reinstalls missing or corrupt files,
registry keys, and shortcuts. Preferences stored in the registry may be reset to
default values.
z
Advanced
This option lets the end user access the following options:
„
Modify
This option displays the Select Feature dialog box and lets the end user change
the application features that are installed.
„
Reset
This option resets the SVS layer and returns the application to its original state.
Any customization that the end user made to the application is lost.
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Warning
If an .MSI is installed into an SVS layer, any files that are generated by the
application and saved locally are lost when the layer is reset unless those files were
excluded on the Build Options page.
See About the Exclusion of Files on the Build Options Page on page 196.
Adding Prerequisites to a Release
On the Prerequisites page, you add runtime or prerequisite files to the installation for
pre-installation on the destination computer. You can:
z
Select the Windows Installer and .NET Framework runtimes to add.
Note
SVS Driver runtime options appear if you open a Windows Installer package that
was created with Wise Installation Studio that included these options.
z
Add prerequisite files to run before the main installation. Prerequisite files are
usually .EXE or .MSI files, but there is no restriction on their type.
z
Add runtimes to run before the main installation. They are added as an include
script to the WiseScript that creates the installation .EXE.
Note
The options on the Prerequisites page are unavailable if Do not create an .EXE file is
selected from .EXE Options on the Build Options page.
See Setting Build Options for a Release on page 193.
To add prerequisites to a release
1.
Select Installation Expert > Prerequisites page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
Select the Windows Installer and .NET Framework runtime versions to pre-install.
See Adding a Windows Installer or .NET Framework Runtime on page 198.
4.
If necessary, add prerequisite files.
See Adding a Prerequisite File on page 200.
5.
If necessary, add runtime files.
See Adding a Runtime Prerequisite on page 201.
For each prerequisite file and runtime file that you add in the lower pane, script is added
to the WiseScript that creates the installation’s .EXE. You can edit this script to enhance
the functionality of the prerequisites.
See Editing the WiseScript That Creates the Installation .EXE on page 202.
Adding a Windows Installer or .NET Framework Runtime
On the Prerequisites page, you can select the Windows Installer and .NET Framework
runtimes to add to the installation for pre-installation on the destination computer.
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If you specify a runtime that is not on your computer, the Download Redistributables
wizard appears during compile. Use the Wise Web Site option to download that runtime,
which should be pre-selected.
See Downloading Redistributable Files on page 30.
Note
The options on the Prerequisites page are unavailable if Do not create an .EXE file is
selected from .EXE Options on the Build Options page.
See Setting Build Options for a Release on page 193.
To add a Windows Installer or .NET Framework runtime
1.
Select Installation Expert > Prerequisites page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
Select the Windows Installer runtime version to pre-install.
„
You can select a Windows Installer runtime for Windows 2000/XP/2003 and
Windows Vista/2008. This adds a file to the installation that pre-installs the
selected version of Windows Installer if it is not on the destination computer.
Because Windows Installer 4.0 is unique to Vista and is installed with Vista, it is
not included in the lists. A Windows Installer runtime version 4.5 does not work
with Windows 2000.
„
If you know that the operating system is not used on any destination
computers, select None.
„
Select Latest to add the latest runtime that you have downloaded and that
works with that operating system.
Example: If the latest runtime that you have downloaded is 3.0 and you select
Latest (2000/XP/2003), then 3.0 is added to the installation. If later you
download the Windows Installer 4.5 for XP/Server 2003 (32 bit) runtime, then
this 4.5 runtime would be added to the installation.
4.
(Optional) Mark the Delay Windows Installer runtime reboot until after
product installation option.
This option delays the restart to the end of the installation and minimizes restarts
for the end user.
This is enabled only if one of the Windows Installer Runtime Version fields is set
to 2.0 or later. Normally, installing the Windows Installer runtime requires a restart
at that point in the installation.
5.
Select the .NET Framework runtime version to pre-install.
6.
(Optional) Mark the Show Microsoft .NET End-User License Agreement option.
This is enabled if you selected an option to install the .NET Framework runtime.
Mark this to display the end-user license agreement (EULA) to the end user during
installation, or clear it to suppress the EULA.
7.
If necessary, add prerequisite files.
See Adding a Prerequisite File on page 200.
8.
If necessary, add runtime files.
See Adding a Runtime Prerequisite on page 201.
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Adding a Prerequisite File
On the Prerequisites page, you can add prerequisite files to run before the main
installation. Prerequisite files are usually .EXE or .MSI files, but there is no restriction on
their type.
Note
The options on the Prerequisites page are unavailable if Do not create an .EXE file is
selected from .EXE Options on the Build Options page.
See Setting Build Options for a Release on page 193.
To add a prerequisite file
1.
Select Installation Expert > Prerequisites page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
To run the prerequisite files before checking the launch conditions of the .MSI
installation, mark Don’t check the launch conditions of the .MSI installation
until after running the prerequisites.
By default, the .MSI launch conditions are checked after the installation of any
runtimes that you select on the Prerequisites page and before any prerequisite files
run. With this option you can delay checking the .MSI launch conditions until after
the prerequisite files run. Use this option when the .MSI launch conditions will fail if
the prerequisite files have not been run.
4.
To add a prerequisite file, click Add at the right of the page and select Prerequisite.
The Prerequisite Details dialog box appears.
Note
If you compile an installation into an .EXE that launches an external .MSI, three files
are generated: an .EXE, an .MSI, and an .INI. If you add prerequisite files to the
installation, a subdirectory that is named after your installation file is also created.
When you distribute the installation, you must include this subdirectory along with
the three files that are generated or the installation will not run.
5.
Complete the dialog box:
„
File Path
Specify the prerequisite file to be run before the main installation.
„
Command Line
Specify the command-line options to apply to the prerequisite file at run time.
„
If the prerequisite’s launch conditions fail, stop the .MSI installation
Mark this to stop the main installation if the prerequisite file fails to run because
of its launch conditions.
„
Add Launch Conditions
Click this to add launch conditions to the prerequisite file.
The Prerequisite Launch Conditions dialog box appears. You can add launch
conditions for the destination computer’s operating system, display settings,
and NT administrator rights. The prerequisite file runs only if all conditions are
true. Conditions you add appear in the Condition section. If your prerequisite
file is an .MSI, you cannot add launch conditions, but you can view its launch
conditions on the Prerequisite Launch Conditions dialog box.
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6.

To add a launch condition, select an option from both drop-down lists and
click Add. Repeat to add additional launch conditions.

To delete a launch condition, select it in the Condition section and click
Delete.

Click OK to save the launch conditions.
Click OK on the Prerequisite Details dialog box.
The prerequisite file is added to the Prerequisites page. To edit or delete it, use the
right-click menu.
7.
If necessary, add a Windows Installer, .NET Framework, or runtime. See:
Adding a Windows Installer or .NET Framework Runtime on page 198
Adding a Runtime Prerequisite on page 201
8.
If a prerequisite file or runtime requires a restart, you might need to edit the
WiseScript to make the restart run smoothly. We recommend adding two Pause
actions for 1000 milliseconds after a prerequisite or runtime that requires a restart.
This works better than one Pause action for 2000 milliseconds. Adding the Pause
actions prevents the WiseScript from trying to start the next prerequisite or runtime
while the computer is shutting down.
9.
During installation, any runtimes you selected at the top of the Prerequisites page
run first, and then the prerequisite files and runtimes run in the order that they are
listed. To rearrange the order, select an item in the lower pane and click Move Up or
Move Down at the right of the page.
For each prerequisite file and runtime that you add in the lower pane, script is added to
the WiseScript that creates the installation’s .EXE. You can edit this script to enhance
the functionality of the prerequisites.
See Editing the WiseScript That Creates the Installation .EXE on page 202.
If the build options for this installation are set to create an .EXE that launches an
external .MSI, then when this installation is compiled, the prerequisite .EXE is copied to
a subdirectory of the installation’s project directory, named Msi_Name\FILEPATH1.
Adding a Runtime Prerequisite
If you need to distribute a runtime with an application, you can use the Prerequisites
page to add the runtime to run before the main installation. A runtime is added as an
include script to the WiseScript that creates the installation .EXE. Unlike prerequisite
files, you do not set command-line options or launch conditions for a runtime because
any options are built into the runtime.
A runtime is always included in the installation .EXE, even if .EXE that launches
external .MSI is selected on the Build Options page.
Before you can add a runtime to an installation, you must add the runtime files to your
computer. To download many of the runtimes, select Help menu > Download
Redistributables and mark Other Vendors’ Web Sites. If a runtime is not available
from Download Redistributables, you must download it directly from the vendor’s Web
site.
Note
The options on the Prerequisites page are unavailable if Do not create an .EXE file is
selected from .EXE Options on the Build Options page.
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See Setting Build Options for a Release on page 193.
To add a runtime to an installation
1.
Select Installation Expert > Prerequisites page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
Click Add at the right of the page and select Runtime.
The Runtime Details dialog box appears.
4.
To add a runtime, mark its check box.
For many runtimes, an additional dialog box appears where you specify settings for
the runtime.
5.
If a runtime-specific dialog box appears, complete it and click OK.
6.
Click OK on the Runtime Details dialog box.
The runtime is added to the Prerequisites page. To edit or delete it, use the rightclick menu.
7.
If necessary, add a Windows Installer or .NET Framework runtime, or a prerequisite
file. See:
Adding a Windows Installer or .NET Framework Runtime on page 198
Adding a Prerequisite File on page 200
8.
If a prerequisite file or runtime requires a restart, you might need to edit the
WiseScript to make the restart run smoothly. We recommend adding two Pause
actions for 1000 milliseconds after a prerequisite or runtime that requires a restart.
This works better than one Pause action for 2000 milliseconds. Adding the Pause
actions prevents the WiseScript from trying to start the next prerequisite or runtime
while the computer is shutting down.
9.
During installation, any runtimes you selected at the top of the Prerequisites page
run first, and then the prerequisite files and runtimes run in the order that they are
listed. To rearrange the order, select an item in the lower pane and click Move Up or
Move Down at the right of the page.
For each prerequisite file and runtime that you add in the lower pane, script is added to
the WiseScript that creates the installation’s .EXE. You can edit this script to enhance
the functionality of the prerequisites.
See Editing the WiseScript That Creates the Installation .EXE on page 202.
Editing the WiseScript That Creates the Installation .EXE
If you select an option on the Build Options page to create an .EXE, a WiseScript project
file (.WSE) is generated, which is used to compile the .EXE. After you add prerequisite
files or runtimes to an installation on the Prerequisites page, you can edit this WiseScript
to enhance the functionality of the prerequisites.
You can also edit this WiseScript if you select Install the .MSI into an SVS layer on
the Build Options page. In this case, you might edit this WiseScript to change the .MSI
command line by changing the MSICMDLINE variable or to set the value of properties.
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Warning
Make sure the .EXE options on the Build Options page are set correctly before you edit
the WiseScript. If you change the .EXE options after you edit the WiseScript, you will
lose all the changes you made to the script.
To edit the WiseScript
1.
Select Installation Expert > Prerequisites page.
2.
Add prerequisites as needed.
See Adding Prerequisites to a Release on page 198.
After you edit the WiseScript, you cannot add or edit prerequisite files and runtimes
on the Prerequisites page. You also cannot edit any of the Install the .MSI into an
SVS layer options on the Build Options page. To enable these options, click Reset
Script at the right of the page.
3.
Click Edit Script at the right of the page.
The Edit Script button is available only after you do one of the following:
„
Add prerequisite files or runtimes on the Prerequisites page.
„
Select Install the .MSI into an SVS layer on the Build Options page.
See Setting Build Options for a Release on page 193.
If you have not previously edited the script, a warning message appears. Click Yes.
The installation is saved and compiled and the WiseScript that creates the
installation’s .EXE opens in WiseScript Editor.
The name of the WiseScript file for the default release is the installation name with
the extension .WSE. The WiseScript files for additional releases are named for the
release.
Warning
Don’t change the name of the WiseScript file. It must have this name to create an
.EXE that includes your edits.
4.
Edit the WiseScript as needed and save it.
The next time you compile the installation, an .EXE is generated using the
WiseScript file that you edited.
5.
Thoroughly test the WiseScript to make sure it executes as expected.
To reset the WiseScript
1.
Click Reset Script at the right of the page.
This button is enabled only if you have used the Edit Script button.
A warning message appears.
2.
Click Yes.
The changes you made to the WiseScript are deleted, and the ability to add and edit
prerequisite files on the Prerequisites page is enabled.
See also:
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About Script Editor in the WiseScript Editor Help
Creating Web-Based Installations With WebDeploy
¾ Windows Installer version.
For best results with WebDeploy, the destination computer should have Windows
Installer 2.0 or later.
Note
This page is enabled in a .WSI only.
WebDeploy™ lets you create Web-based installations that minimize bandwidth
requirements by downloading only the files needed for the installation.
Examples:
z
If you set the installation to pre-install the Windows Installer runtime, and the
destination computer already has that runtime installed, then the runtime file is not
downloaded.
z
If the installation contains multiple features, only the features that the end user
selects during installation are downloaded and installed.
Without WebDeploy, you could create a single-file .EXE, upload it to an FTP server, and
let your end users download it by clicking on its link. The disadvantage of this is that a
single-file .EXE can be very large. The entire installation, including Windows Installer
runtimes, is downloaded whether or not it is needed on the destination computer. The
resulting download can take a long time and tie up bandwidth.
Note
You cannot use WebDeploy to run patches (.MSP) or transforms (.MST). To distribute
updates with WebDeploy, format the installation as an upgrade using the Upgrades
page.
For information on using WebDeploy with WiseUpdate, see WiseUpdate Tips on
page 299.
You can use WebDeploy in several ways, depending on how you set the WebDeploy
options:
Create an .EXE that contains the .MSI
Windows Installer and .NET runtimes, and prerequisite files, if any, are external to the
.EXE. When an end user runs the .EXE from the Web, it runs the .MSI from the Web. The
runtime and prerequisite files are downloaded only if they are needed on the destination
computer.
See The WebDeploy Process on page 205.
Prerequisite and runtime files that you add on the Prerequisites page are always
included in the .EXE.
This is the best method to use when distributing installations over the Internet because,
if a self-repair is needed, the .MSI is cached locally and no further downloads are ever
required.
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Create an .EXE that runs an external .MSI
Windows Installer and .NET runtimes, and prerequisite files, if any, are external to the
.EXE. The resulting .EXE is very small. When an end user runs the .EXE, it connects to
the Web location of the .MSI and runs the .MSI. The runtime and prerequisite files are
downloaded only if they are needed on the destination computer.
Prerequisite and runtime files that you add on the Prerequisites page are always
included in the .EXE.
This method is best used over a corporate intranet. Because the .MSI is run directly
from the Web, if a self-repair or install-on-demand is needed, the end user must have
immediate access to the original Web location of the .MSI.
Create an .EXE that runs an external .MSI, and an external .INI that
contains download and installation information
Use this method to change the download information dynamically, perhaps as a result of
end user input. You compile to an .EXE and .INI and then distribute the .EXE on a CD or
other media along with an Autoplay program.
Example:
You want to let the end user select from multiple download sites. You write an Autoplay
program that presents download site options to the end user. When the end user selects
a site, the Autoplay program copies the .EXE and .INI to a temporary directory, then
edits the .INI file, adding the URL of the selected download site. The Autoplay program
then runs the .EXE, which connects to the appropriate Web site based on the updated
information in the .INI file, and runs the .MSI file it finds there.
See also:
Tips for Creating an Efficient WebDeploy Installation on page 206
Creating a WebDeploy Installation on page 207
Uploading a WebDeploy Installation to the Web on page 208
The WebDeploy Process
The following diagram shows how the WebDeploy™ process works when you distribute
an .EXE with an embedded .MSI over the Internet.
Phase 1:
Your Computer
Your Web Server
Upload files through FTP
When you develop the installation, you:
Compile the installation to an .EXE that contains the .MSI
Configure WebDeploy by specifying the location of installation files on the Web
server
z Upload the installation files to the Web server
z Notify end users of the Web link to the .EXE
z
z
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Phase 2:
Destination Computer
(HTTP Protocol)
Your Web Server:
z Contains the .EXE and
other pieces of the
installation ready for
download
The end user:
z Runs the installation .EXE from your Web server
Phase 3:
Destination Computer
(HTTP Protocol)
Your Web Server:
z Contains the .EXE and
other pieces of the
installation ready for
download
When the end user runs the .EXE, it:
Runs the .MSI
Runs an installation wizard
Determines which pieces of the application are needed
Installs the appropriate pieces of the application
z
z
z
z
See also:
Creating Web-Based Installations With WebDeploy
Tips for Creating an Efficient WebDeploy Installation
¾ Windows Installer version.
For best results with WebDeploy, the destination computer should have Windows
Installer 2.0 or later.
z
For more efficient downloading, organize the installation into components. Only the
components that are needed for the installation are downloaded.
See Working With Components and Features on page 496.
z
Make the installation download more efficiently. On the Installation Expert > Media
page, display the Media Details dialog box and select One Cab per component in
the Cab Options field.
See Adding a Media Item on page 210.
z
It is a good idea to digitally sign installations that you plan to deploy over the Web.
To add an authenticode digital signature to your installation files, use the Digital
Signature page. This requires Windows Installer 2.0 or later.
See Adding a Digital Signature to an Installation on page 240.
See also:
Creating Web-Based Installations With WebDeploy
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Creating a WebDeploy Installation
¾ Windows Installer version.
For best results with WebDeploy, the destination computer should have Windows
Installer 2.0 or later.
Note
This page is enabled in a .WSI only.
The WebDeploy™ page lets you enable an installation for distribution through the Web.
You do this by setting options for compiling the installation and for connecting to the
Web server that will contain the installation files.
For suggestions on how to set WebDeploy options to meet your requirements, see
Creating Web-Based Installations With WebDeploy on page 204. Also see Tips for
Creating an Efficient WebDeploy Installation on page 206.
Note
To avoid web connection errors when you use WebDeploy with IIS 6.0 or later, you must
add a MIME type for “*” (asterisk) to allow the WebDeploy download files (such as .000,
.001, .002).
To create a WebDeploy installation
1.
Select Installation Expert > WebDeploy page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
Mark Create a Web-based installation. This enables the remaining options on the
page.
4.
From .EXE Options, specify how the installation is created. This is linked to the
.EXE Options field on the Build Options page.
„
Create a downloadable .EXE
Create an .EXE that is optimized for direct downloading from the Internet. The
installation will compile to an .EXE that contains the download information, and
an .MSI file that might or might not be embedded in the .EXE. This sets the
WebDeploy .EXE option on the Build Options page, and vice versa.
„
Create an .EXE and .INI
Change the download information dynamically, perhaps as a result of end user
input. The installation will compile to an .EXE, an external .MSI, and an external
.INI file that contains the download information. This sets the WebDeploy .EXE
and .INI option on the Build Options page, and vice versa.)
See INI File Properties on page 516.
5.
In the following fields, specify the URL to which you will upload various installation
files. This information is included in the installation and determines where the
installation looks for files to download. You must specify the full URL address, path,
and file name. Include a user name and password if your Web server requires them.
Use the format:
http://user_name:password@www.address.com/file_name.msi
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Click the Edit button next to each field to display a URL Settings dialog box, which
lets you enter the elements of the file location separately and then builds the full
path from your entries.
Note
If you select the Create .EXE and .INI option, the password is stored in the .INI
file. If you are concerned about the password being visible, select the Create a
downloadable .EXE option instead, which stores the password in the .EXE.
„
.MSI Download URL
Enter the Web server address that points to the .MSI. This must match the
name of the .MSI you upload later. To embed the .MSI in the .EXE, leave this
field blank.
„
2000/XP Download URL
To make the Windows Installer runtime installation for Windows 2000/XP
available for pre-installation, enter the address of the runtime installation file.
The runtime installation file is typically named:
Windows 2000/XP: InstMsi3.exe
Leave these fields blank to embed the Windows Installer runtime .EXE in the
WebDeploy .EXE if the Prerequisites page is set to pre-install the Windows
Installer runtime.
„
.NET Runtime URL / .NET Update URL
Getting the latest version of the .NET Framework runtime requires installing two
files, the original installation and a patch installation. In .NET Runtime URL,
enter the address that points to the .NET Framework runtime file
(dotnetfx.exe). In .NET Update URL, enter the address that points to the .NET
Framework upgrade file.
Leave these fields blank to embed the .NET .EXE in the WebDeploy .EXE if the
Prerequisites page is set to pre-install the .NET Framework runtime.
Note
Be sure that the location you upload to does not violate the license agreement for the
distribution of Microsoft runtime files.
See also:
Creating Web-Based Installations With WebDeploy on page 204
Uploading a WebDeploy Installation to the Web on page 208
Uploading a WebDeploy Installation to the Web
¾ Windows Installer version.
For best results with WebDeploy, the destination computer should have Windows
Installer 2.0 or later.
Note
This page is enabled in a .WSI only.
To upload the files in a WebDeploy installation, you can use any FTP client.
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To upload a WebDeploy installation
1.
Verify that directories exist on the Web server at the URL addresses you specified in
the Download URL fields on the WebDeploy page.
2.
Using an FTP client, upload the installation files:
„
If you are distributing a single-feature .MSI over the Internet, the installation
should be compiled to an .EXE that contains the .MSI. Create a Web page
containing a link to the .EXE file, then upload the .EXE to the location of that
Web page.
Example:
Upload Sample1.exe to http://www.Sample1.com/installs
„
If you are distributing a multi-feature, install-on-demand application over a
corporate intranet, the installation should be compiled to an .EXE that runs an
external .MSI. Create a Web page containing a link to the .EXE file, then upload
the .EXE to the location of that Web page. Then upload the .MSI and any
external .CAB files to the URL address you specified in the .MSI Download
URL field on the WebDeploy page.
Example:
UploadSample2.exe to http://www.Sample2.com/installations
UploadSample2.msi to http://www.Sample2.com/downloads
„
If you are distributing the installation through an Autoplay program, the
installation should be compiled to an .EXE that runs an external .INI and .MSI.
Save the Autoplay program and the .EXE and .INI files to a CD or other
distribution media. Then upload the .MSI and any external .CAB files to the URL
address you specified in the .MSI Download URL field on the WebDeploy
page.
Example:
Upload Sample3.msi to http://www.Sample3.com/downloads
3.
If the installation will pre-install any Windows Installer or .NET runtimes, use an FTP
client to upload the following files:
„
If you specified a 2000/XP Download URL on the WebDeploy page, upload
the file InstMsi3.exe to that Web address.
„
If you specified a .NET Runtime URL on the WebDeploy page, upload the .NET
Framework file dotnetfx.exe to that Web address. Likewise, if you specified a
.NET Update URL, upload the .NET Framework update file to that Web
address.
If you do not have a copy of the appropriate runtime file, use the Download
Redistributables wizard.
See Downloading Redistributable Files on page 30.
Note
Be sure that the location you upload to does not violate the license agreement for
the distribution of Microsoft runtime files.
4.
Distribute the installation media or notify your end users of the Web link to the
.EXE.
See also:
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Creating Web-Based Installations With WebDeploy on page 204
Creating a WebDeploy Installation on page 207
Setting Up Media for Distribution
Note
This page is fully enabled in a .WSI only. In an .MSI or .MST, you cannot add or delete.
The Media page lets you prepare an installation for distribution. Here, you specify
compression, the media’s size, holding directories, and how features and components
are organized on the media. You set media options per release.
If the installation spans more than one media, you can determine which files are placed
on which disk, or you can have it done for you.
To prepare an installation for distribution, perform these tasks:
z
Add media items to apply different compression options to different files in
components or features.
See Adding a Media Item on page 210.
During compile, the media items are placed in the destination directories in the
order in which they’re listed on the Media page. To rearrange the order, select a
media item and click Move Up or Move Down at the right of the Media page, or drag
the media item to a new position. The .MSI file is an exception. It is always placed in
the first destination directory, no matter where it appears in the list.
z
Add destination directories. Destination directories are holding places for the
installation. They represent the disks, CDs, or server you use for distributing your
application.
See Adding a Media Destination on page 212.
z
Compile the installation.
z
Copy the contents from the destination directories onto the media you will use for
distribution.
Note
At least one media item is required. If the Media page contains only one item, you
cannot delete it.
Adding a Media Item
Note
This page is fully enabled in a .WSI only. In an .MSI or .MST, you cannot add or delete.
You can add media items to apply different compression options to different files in
components or features.
Example:
Leave a Readme file and a tutorial uncompressed, compress application files inside the
.MSI file, and compress graphic files into external .CAB files. In this case, you would add
these media items:
z
Uncompressed Readme
z
Uncompressed Tutorial
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z
Compressed application files
z
Compressed graphic files
To add a media item
1.
Select Installation Expert > Media page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
Click Add at the right of the Media page. The Media Details dialog box appears.
4.
In Media Name, describe the media item you’re setting up. Examples: Compressed
Application Files or Uncompressed Tutorial. This name appears on the Media page.
The media name must be unique within a release.
5.
In Compression Option, specify how to compress the installation files. This is
unavailable if Single-file .EXE is selected on the Build Options page.
„
Compress files inside .MSI
Wrap all files inside the .MSI, including .CAB files if you select a .CAB option
below.
„
Compress files into external Cab files
Compress all files into one or more .CAB files outside the .MSI file. CAB files are
like .ZIP files; they contain one or more compressed files.
When you select one of the above compression options, you must select one of the
Cab Options below.
„
Uncompressed external files
Leave all files uncompressed and outside the .MSI file. If you configured part of
the application to run from the source media, you must use this option.
See the description of the Will be installed to run from source icon in
Configuring a Feature Using Its Drop-Down List on page 95.
If you select this option, you also might want to use short file names for
uncompressed files outside the installation.
See the description of Use short file names for files uncompressed outside
of the install in Creating a New Release on page 185.
6.
In Cab Options, determine the makeup of your .CAB files. To minimize file size, use
fewer .CAB files; to minimize installation time, use more .CAB files. This is
unavailable if you select Uncompressed external files from Compression
Option above, or if you are working in an .MSI.
„
Quickest (new files and modules get cab file)
Any new files that you add to the installation, including merge modules, get
their own .CAB files. This is selected by default in an .MSI.
„
One Cab (including modules)
Create one large .CAB file for all files and merge modules in the installation.
This option saves some file space by eliminating overlap in .CAB files, but
installation is slower than installing from multiple .CAB files.
„
One Cab per feature
Every feature in the installation gets its own .CAB file. This option is most
efficient on a CD or similar media, where file size is not an issue.
„
One Cab per component
Every component in the installation gets its own .CAB file.
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This option is best for WebDeploy installations, where only required components
are downloaded.
The remaining options on the Media page are enabled in a .WSI only.
7.
In the Custom Media Settings area, specify settings that are related to the size of
your media.
Share media destination/size info with previous media entry
Gives a media item the same size and destination settings as its predecessor’s,
therefore, mark this for the second and subsequent media items only. Example:
This makes it easier to create a CD where some files are compressed and others
are not. You can create one or more media items with different compression
options but have them all placed on the same CD.
„
You can also use this option to have one distribution medium (example: a CD)
filled up before starting to place media items on a second or third distribution
medium.
See Example: Spanning an Installation Across Media and Sharing Media Size
Information on page 215.
„
Max Media Size
Enter the size of the distribution media as a whole number and select the
appropriate unit (KB or MB) from the drop-down list. To indicate unlimited size,
enter 0.
„
Cluster Size
Select the bytes per sector of the distribution media.
Recommendations for common distribution media:
8.
Media
Max Media Size
Cluster Size
CD-ROM
550 MB
2048 Bytes
ZIP disk
100 MB or 250 MB
2048 Bytes
Floppy disk
1440 KB
512 Bytes
In the Media Destinations section, enter the directory where the installation is
stored before you copy it to the distribution media. Enter one destination for each
distribution medium.
See Adding a Media Destination on page 212.
9.
In the Include Features/Components section, select the features and
components to include in this media item.
See Including Features and Components in Media Items on page 213.
10. Click OK.
The media item appears on the Media page, in the Media Name column. To edit it,
double-click its name.
Adding a Media Destination
Note
These settings are enabled in a .WSI only.
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A media destination is a holding directory for the installation. It has the same capacity
as indicated in the Max Media Size field in the Media Details dialog box. During
compile, all files for your installation are placed in one or more destination directories,
and you copy them from there to your distribution media. Enter one destination for each
distribution media. If you don’t create media destinations, that is, destination
directories, the files are copied to the directory where the .WSI file is located.
Example: If your installation is so large that it needs two CDs, enter two destination
directories. Files are copied to the first destination directory in the list, until the directory
is filled to the maximum media size. Then, the application starts copying files to the
second destination directory.
Note
The .MSI file is always placed in the first directory in the list.
To specify a destination directory
1.
Select Installation Expert > Media page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
Double-click a media item. The Media Details dialog box appears.
4.
In the Media Destinations section, click Add. The Media Destination Details dialog
box appears.
5.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Destination Directory
Specify the holding directory in which the installation files are stored before
they’re placed on the selected media.
If you specify a maximum media size on the Media Details dialog box and do not
specify destination directories, installation files are placed in folders with
generic names (Disk1, Disk2, and so on) in the directory that contains the
project file.
„
Volume Label
This entry appears in the Label field when you right-click the icon for a volume
in Windows Explorer and select Properties.
It is very important to change volume labels for your disks or CDs to match this
value. Failing to do so will prevent the installation from working properly.
„
6.
Disk Name
Enter the disk name that should appear when the installation prompts the end
user to insert another disk or CD. Example: Disk2. This only pertains to
installations that require multiple distribution media.
Click OK.
During compile, the installation is broken up into the directories you specify. Then, you
must copy the contents of each directory to a disk or CD that has the same name that’s
in the Volume Label field.
Including Features and Components in Media Items
Note
These settings are enabled in a .WSI only.
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You can specify the features and components to include in each media item.
By default, All Features/Components are selected to be included. Use this setting in
any of the following instances:
z
The installation has only one media item.
z
You want to include every remaining feature and component that is not included in a
previous media item.
z
It doesn’t matter which files are on which medium.
In any other case, use the Include Items for Media dialog box to select the features and
components to include in the current media item. During compile, an error message
notifies you if you have failed to include a feature that has files added to it.
Examples:
z
Suppose you want to have an uncompressed Readme file on your distribution
media. In this case, you could create a media item called Uncompressed Readme.
Then, from the list of components to include, you would select the Readme file’s
component for inclusion in this media item.
z
Suppose the installation includes a graphic feature with sample images, and you
want to compress these images into an external .CAB file. In this case, you could
create a media item called Compressed graphic files. Then, from the list of features,
you would select the graphic feature for inclusion in this media item.
To include features and components in a media item
1.
Select Installation Expert > Media page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
Double-click a media item. The Media Details dialog box appears.
4.
In the Include Features/Components section, click Add. The Include Items for
Media dialog box appears.
5.
From the drop-down list, specify whether to include components or features.
6.
In the list box, select one or more features or components and click OK.
The features or components you selected appear in the Include Features/
Components section on the Media Details dialog box. To exclude a feature or
component, select it and click Delete. If you delete all selected features and
components, the default setting of All Features/Components returns.
Sharing Media Settings Between Releases
Note
This page is fully enabled in a .WSI only. In an .MSI or .MST, you cannot add or delete.
You can share media settings from a release with other releases in the installation. After
you initially share settings, the settings for the releases are linked. This means that any
change you make to the media settings for any of the linked releases is applied to all
other linked releases. At any time, you can break the link.
To share media settings between releases
1.
Select Installation Expert > Media page.
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2.
From Current Release, select a release to copy settings to.
3.
Click Share at the right of the Media page. The Share Release dialog box appears.
4.
From Copy/Share Media Settings From, select the release that contains the
settings to copy.
5.
Click OK.
The settings of the release in Copy/Share Media Settings From immediately replace
the settings of the release in Current Release. Any change you make to the media of
either of the linked releases is applied to the other release, until you break the link.
To break a link between releases
1.
Select Installation Expert > Media page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
Click Share at the right of the Media page. The Share Release dialog box appears.
4.
From Copy/Share Media Settings From, select <None>.
5.
Click OK.
The link between the selected release and other releases is broken. The current settings
of the releases are not changed, but changing settings for one release no longer affects
the settings of other release.
Example: Spanning an Installation Across Media and Sharing Media
Size Information
You can span an installation across CDs and use the Share media destinations/size
info with previous media entry option. Assume the following:
z
The files for your application use 1.5 GB of uncompressed disk space.
z
You want to distribute the application on two CDs.
z
For each of the two CDs, you can safely assume a maximum size of 550 MB, which
means that you need to compress some, but not all of your files.
z
Your application includes some features that are always installed on the destination
computer. These are the files you compress.
z
The application also includes some features that the end user can either install or
run from the CD-ROM. These are the files you don’t compress.
This scenario means that you need to create two media items:
z
One media item for those features and components that are always installed,
compressed into one big .CAB file.
z
A second media item for those files that can be run from the CD and that you
therefore don’t compress.
To create media items with shared size information
The following steps are for the first media item.
1.
Select Installation Expert > Media page.
2.
Click Add at the right of the Media page. The Media Details dialog box appears.
3.
Complete the dialog box.
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„
Media Name
Enter a name for the first media item. Example: Compressed Files.
„
Compression Option
Select Compress files into external Cab files.
„
Cab Options
Select One Cab (including modules).
„
Max Media Size
Enter 550 MB.
„
Cluster Size
Select 2048 Bytes.
4.
In the Media Destinations section, click Add. The Media Destination Details dialog
box appears.
5.
Make the following entries for the first CD:
„
Destination Directory
C:\My Installation\CD 1
This assumes that you have a directory named My Installation on your C drive.
„
Volume Label
CD One
It is very important to change volume labels for your disks or CDs to match this
value. Failing to do so will prevent the installation from working properly.
„
Disk Name
CD 1
6.
Click OK.
7.
In the Media Destinations section, click Add again. The Media Destination Details
dialog box appears.
8.
Make the following entries for the second CD:
9.
„
Destination Directory
C:\My Installation\CD 2
„
Volume Label
CD Two
„
Disk Name
CD 2
Click OK.
10. In the Include Features/Components list, click Add and select the features and
components to compress.
11. Click OK.
The next steps are for the second media item.
12. On the Media page, click Add. The Media Details dialog box appears.
13. Complete the dialog box.
„
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Media Name
Enter a name for the second media item. Example: Uncompressed Files.
216
Organizing Your Installation Into Releases
„
Compression Option
Select Uncompressed external files.
„
Share media destination/size info with previous media entry.
Mark this check box.
„
Include Features/Components section
Click Add and select the features and components to leave uncompressed.
14. Click OK.
After compile, the destination directory CD 1 contains the .CAB file and as many
uncompressed files as can fit on the CD. All remaining uncompressed files are in the
directory CD 2.
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Chapter 8
Advanced Installations
This chapter includes the following topics:
z
About the Mobile Devices Page on page 218
z
Setting Administrator Options on page 225
z
Specifying Search Locations on page 227
z
Setting Options for an Administrative Installation on page 228
z
About Command Lines on page 229
z
Adding a Digital Signature to an Installation on page 240
z
Creating an Installation for Microsoft SMS on page 241
z
Creating a .NET Installation When You Have the .NET Framework on page 242
z
Creating a .NET Installation Without the .NET Framework on page 243
z
About Web Installations on page 245
z
Configuring a Microsoft SQL Server During Installation on page 257
z
Importing .NET Framework Security Settings on page 261
z
MTS/COM+ Page on page 263
About the Mobile Devices Page
Note
To see the Mobile Devices page, select one of these views from the Page Views dropdown list in Installation Expert: All, Palm Application, or Windows Mobile
Application.
Use the Mobile Devices page to configure a Windows Installer installation to install files
that support a mobile device application.
This lets you install the main application to a desktop computer and simultaneously
install support for any mobile device that the user has. The ability to install to multiple
platforms at once, including Windows, simplifies the installation process for you and the
end user.
The Mobile Devices page supports the following platforms:
z
Microsoft® Windows Mobile™ platform for Pocket PC and Smartphone
z
Palm OS
If the installation supports the Pocket PC 2002 platform, you also can install the .NET
Compact Framework, a version of .NET designed for mobile devices. If you don’t have
the .NET Compact Framework runtime, and you include it in the installation, the
Download Redistributables wizard appears during compile and prompts you to download
it.
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About the Mobile Device Package Editor tool
Mobile Device Package Editor is a separate installation development tool that lets you
create an .INF file and compile it to one or more .CAB files that install a mobile device
application. It supports the Microsoft® Windows Mobile™ platform for Pocket PC and
Smartphone devices.
See About Mobile Device Package Editor in the Mobile Devices Package Editor Help.
See also:
Process for Adding Mobile Device Support to an Installation on page 219
About Windows Mobile Installations on page 219
About Palm OS Installations on page 222
Process for Adding Mobile Device Support to an Installation
You can configure a Windows Installer installation to install files that support a mobile
device application.
1.
Obtain the mobile device installation file or files.
„
For Windows Mobile applications, the installation consists of one or more .CAB
files. Obtain the .CAB files from a vendor or other source, or use the Mobile
Device Package Editor to create them.
„
For Palm OS applications, the installation consists of one or more files in any of
these formats: .PDB, .PRC, or .PQA.
2.
In Windows Installer Editor, go to Installation Expert > Mobile Devices page and add
the mobile device installation files.
3.
Finish assembling the Windows Installer installation. Any resources that you add to
the installation, other than those on the Mobile Devices page, are installed on the
desktop computer, not the mobile device.
4.
If you added one or more Palm OS files, and you selected the option to install to the
Palm user folder, then verify that the installation contains the Installation Type and
Palm User Information dialog boxes.
5.
Compile the installation. The mobile device installation files are included in the
compiled .MSI or .EXE. If you added Windows Mobile .CAB files, an .INI file that
describes the .CABs is created and included in the compiled .MSI or .EXE.
See also:
About the Mobile Devices Page on page 218
About Mobile Device Package Editor in the Mobile Devices Package Editor Help
About Windows Mobile Installations
The Microsoft® Windows Mobile™ platform supports Pocket PC and Smartphone
devices. A Windows Mobile device installation consists of a single, self-extracting .CAB
file and an optional Setup.dll file. The .CAB file contains all the resources (files, registry
keys, and shortcuts) that comprise the application. The Setup.dll file provides functions
for performing certain operations during the installation and removal of your application.
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Mobile device .CAB files are generated by the CabWiz program from an information file
(.INF). The .INF is a text file that specifies directories, files, settings, and configurations
that are used to install a mobile device application.
(Pocket PC applications only.) A single .INF file can contain information to produce
multiple .CAB files. Example: An application supports the Windows Mobile and Pocket PC
2002 platforms, but several of the application files are platform-dependent. When you
create the installation, you assign the files to the device that supports that platform.
When you compile, the Windows Mobile-specific files are placed in the Windows Mobile
.CAB file, and the Pocket PC 2002-specific files are placed in the Pocket PC 2002 .CAB
file.
A mobile device application can be installed in the following ways:
z
The .CAB file and an .INI file that describes the .CAB are included in an installation
that runs on the desktop computer. The desktop computer contains Application
Manager (CeAppMgr.exe), which is installed with ActiveSync. Application Manager
installs the mobile device application on the device.
z
The end user copies the .CAB file to the mobile device and opens it. The .CAB file
extracts its contents to the directories that were specified in the .INF file.
Uninstall of the mobile device application is controlled by the mobile device and
ActiveSync. Uninstalling the mobile device installation from the desktop computer does
not affect the application that is installed on the mobile device.
To add Windows Mobile .CAB files to a desktop installation, use Installation Expert >
Mobile Devices page.
See Adding Windows Mobile Files.
See also:
About the Mobile Devices Page on page 218
Process for Adding Mobile Device Support to an Installation on page 219
Adding Windows Mobile Files
To add Windows Mobile .CAB files to a desktop installation, use the Windows Mobile
wizard.
To access the wizard:
Do one of the following:
z
Select Installation Expert > Mobile Devices. Do this to add the mobile device
installation to an existing installation.
a.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you
add must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All
Features is selected.)
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer only if
the feature is installed.
b.
Click Add at the right of the page and select Windows Mobile.
If the Mobile Devices page is not visible, select All or Windows Mobile
Application from the Page Views drop-down list in Installation Expert.
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z
On the New Installation File dialog box, select the Windows Mobile template from
the Predefined Templates category. Do this to add the mobile device installation to a
new installation.
The Application Information dialog box appears.
To step through the wizard
1.
Complete the Application Information dialog box and click Next:
„
Application Name
Enter the name of the application you are installing. This appears in the list of
applications on the Mobile Devices page. It also appears in the desktop
computer’s mobile device software (the Add/Remove Programs dialog box,
which is accessible from the Microsoft ActiveSync window).
„
Description
This appears in the desktop computer’s mobile device software.
The CAB Files dialog box appears.
2.
Complete the dialog box and click Next:
a.
Click Add, select one or more files, and click Open.
b.
Mark the following options if applicable:

Include the .NET Compact Framework
(Pocket PC 2002 or later only). Mark this to include the .NET Compact
Framework runtime in the installation. This causes Application Manager to
install the .NET Compact Framework on the device before it installs the
mobile device application.
If the .NET Compact Framework runtime is not in the Stub subdirectory of
the Windows Installer Editor installation directory, the Download
Redistributables wizard appears during compile and prompts you to
download it.

c.
.NET Compact Framework Runtime Version
Select a version of the .NET Compact Framework.
Click Next.
The Desktop Computer dialog box appears.
3.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Desktop Directory
Specify the directory on the desktop computer in which to store the .CAB and
.INI files that are necessary for installation to the mobile device. Typically, this
would be in the Program Files directory. These files are run from the Add/
Remove Programs option in ActiveSync.
„
Install on the mobile device following the desktop installation
If you mark this and the mobile device is connected during the desktop
installation, then the end user is prompted to perform the mobile device
installation immediately following the desktop installation.
If installation onto the mobile device will not take place immediately following the
desktop installation, then use the following fields to create a shortcut on the desktop
computer. This shortcut starts installation onto the mobile device by calling the
Application Manager.
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4.
„
Shortcut Name
Enter a name for the shortcut on the mobile device.
„
Shortcut Directory
Select a directory on the desktop computer in which to place the shortcut.
Typically, this is the Windows Start menu.
„
Icon File
To use a custom icon, enter the path to the .ICO, .EXE, or .DLL file that contains
the icon.
„
Icon Index
Enter the resource number of the icon (in the .ICO, .EXE, or .DLL file specified
above) to use from the icon file above. This icon appears in the Shortcut
Directory you selected above.
Click Finish.
To edit the mobile device entry, select it and click Details.
After you create a mobile device entry, you might notice changes throughout Installation
Expert, such as files added on the Files page, a shortcut on the Shortcuts page, and new
custom actions added to MSI Script. Do not change or delete these items because doing
so will cause the mobile device installation to fail.
See also:
About the Mobile Devices Page on page 218
About Windows Mobile Installations on page 219
Process for Adding Mobile Device Support to an Installation on page 219
About Palm OS Installations
A Palm OS® application consists of a file in one of the following formats:
z
.PDB (Palm database), which stores data for an application.
z
.PQA (Palm query application), which is a .PDB that contains world-wide web
content.
z
.PRC (Palm resource), which contains resources.
To install a Palm OS application, the end user installs or downloads its file to the desktop
computer, runs the Palm Desktop software to specify the new application, and performs
a HotSync operation to install the application on the mobile device.
To add Palm OS files to a desktop installation, use Installation Expert > Mobile Devices
page. You can specify where the Palm OS files are installed.
See Adding Palm OS Files on page 223.
Installing to the Add-on folder
When the end user runs the Palm Desktop software to specify a new application to
install, the contents of the Palm\Add-on folder are displayed first. This lets the end user
install the Palm application manually, and gives all Palm users of the desktop computer
access to the application.
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Installing to the Palm User folder
Palm applications that are in the Palm user folder (Palm\User) are installed on that end
user’s device whenever a HotSync operation is performed. The end user does not have
to specify the application in the Palm Desktop.
When multiple Palm users use the desktop computer, the end user who runs the
Windows Installer installation can specify which Palm users should be able to access the
new Palm application.
To install to the Palm user folder:
1.
2.
When you create the Windows installer installation:
a.
Mark the Install File to Palm User Folder During Installation check box on
the Palm File Details dialog box.
b.
Add the Installation Type and Palm User Information dialog boxes to the
installation.
During installation, the end user:
a.
Selects Custom on the Install Type dialog box. This causes the Palm User
Information dialog box to appear.
b.
Selects users on the Palm User Information dialog box, which lists all Palm users
on the desktop computer.
The Palm files are installed in the directories for the specified users. If the steps above
are not followed, the files are installed for all Palm users.
Installations that were created in a product earlier than Wise for Windows Installer 5.0
or Windows Installer Editor 4.5 might not contain the Palm User Information dialog box.
You can add this dialog box.
See Creating a New Dialog on page 410.
Uninstalling
Uninstall of the mobile device application is controlled by the Palm device. Uninstalling
the application from the desktop computer does not affect the application that is
installed on the mobile device.
For information about Palm OS applications, search for “developer documentation” at
www.palmos.com.
See also:
About the Mobile Devices Page on page 218
Process for Adding Mobile Device Support to an Installation on page 219
Adding Palm OS Files
To add Palm OS files to a desktop installation, use the Palm OS wizard.
To access the wizard
Do one of the following:
z
Select Installation Expert > Mobile Devices. Do this to add the mobile device
installation to an existing installation.
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„
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you
add must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All
Features is selected.)
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer only if
the feature is installed.
„
Click Add at the right of the page and select Palm OS.
If the Mobile Devices page is not visible, select All or Palm Application from the
Page Views drop-down list in Installation Expert.
z
On the New Installation File dialog box, select the Palm Application template from
the Predefined Templates category. Do this to add the mobile device installation to a
new installation.
The Application Information dialog box appears.
To step through the wizard
1.
Complete the Application Information dialog box and click Next:
„
Application Name
Enter the name of the application you are installing. This appears in the list of
applications on the Mobile Devices page.
„
Desktop Directory
Specify a directory on the desktop computer in which to store the files that will
be added to the Palm device. Typically, this is a subdirectory of the Program
Files directory. If you select one of the folder options on the Palm File Details
dialog box, the files are copied to the Palm-specific directories. The files in this
directory are uninstalled when the .MSI is uninstalled from the desktop
computer.
The Palm OS Files dialog box appears.
2.
Click Add, specify a file, and complete the Palm File Details dialog box:
„
File Name
Specify the name for the file when it is installed onto the Palm device.
„
Source Pathname
This specifies the source path for the file you added.
„
Install File to Palm “Add-on” Folder During Installation
Copy the file to the Palm\Add-on folder. When the end user runs the Palm
Desktop software to specify a new application to install, the contents of the
Palm\Add-on folder are displayed first. This lets the end user install the Palm
application manually, and gives all Palm users of the desktop computer access
to the application.
„
Install File to Palm User Folder During Installation
Copy the file to the Palm user folder (Palm\user) for each user that is selected
on the Palm User Information dialog box, which appears during installation on
the desktop computer. Palm applications that are in the Palm user folder are
installed to the device whenever a HotSync is performed on the Palm device.
See Installing to the Palm User folder on page 223.
Note
Files that are installed in the Add-on folder or Palm user folders are not uninstalled
when the desktop application is uninstalled.
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3.
Click OK. To add more files, repeat the preceding step.
4.
Click Finish on the Palm OS Files dialog box.
To edit the mobile device entry, select it and click Details.
See also:
About the Mobile Devices Page on page 218
About Palm OS Installations on page 222
Process for Adding Mobile Device Support to an Installation on page 219
Setting Administrator Options
Use the Administrator Options page to specify installation and reinstallation options. The
options on this page actually set Windows Installer properties under the Properties icon
in Setup Editor > Product tab.
Select Installation Expert > Administrator Options and complete the page:
z
Install for Profile
Select the profile for installing the application. This controls where some items are
stored (examples: shortcuts, desktop items, and HKEY_USERS registry entries). It
can also affect uninstall and repair. Example: If an application is installed under an
administrator account, regular users cannot uninstall or repair the application.
z
„
Per-user installation
The application is installed under the profile of the end user who installs it. If
another user logs in, shortcuts and other personalized information are not
available and the application may not run.
„
Per-machine installation
The application is installed under the All Users profile and is available to any end
user. When you select this option, the configuration information, such as Start
menu shortcuts, is stored in the All Users location. The user who installs the
application must have administrator privileges.
„
Determined by user access
The application is installed according to the privileges of the end user who
installs it. If an administrator installs the application, it is installed for all users.
If a regular user installs the application, it is installed only for that user.
Reboot Option
Specify how restarts are handled at installation completion:
„
Reboot if required
Restarts if necessary. Example: If the installation needs to replace an in-use
file.
„
Always reboot
A message prompts the end user to restart at the end of the installation. If
there is no user interface, the system restarts itself. See Do not display
reboot prompts below.
„
Never reboot
The end user is not prompted to restart even if a restart is needed to replace inuse files. Use this if you are installing several packages at the same time and
plan to restart after the final installation.
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z
Do not display reboot prompts
Mark this to restart without end user interaction. This does not perform a restart,
but suppresses the prompt if a restart occurs.
z
Rollback Option
Specify how the installation should handle rollbacks. A rollback is the process of
returning the computer to its original state in the event that an installation in
progress is canceled. A rollback requires the installation to back up existing files
instead of just replacing or deleting them and therefore takes more disk space.
„
Prompt user to continue without rollback if out of disk space
If the destination computer has insufficient disk space for the copies of replaced
and deleted files, the end user is asked whether to continue without a rollback.
„
Disable rollback without prompting only if out of disk space
The installation continues without a rollback if the destination computer has
insufficient disk space for a rollback.
„
Fail if out of disk space
The installation is canceled if the destination computer has insufficient disk
space for a rollback. A message informs the end user of the failed installation.
„
Rollback if possible with no prompting
This is the default behavior for rollbacks, which is to roll back if possible without
prompting the user.
„
Disable rollback
The installation does not create a rollback script and does not support rolling
back a canceled installation.
z
Create advertised shortcuts as regular shortcuts
Mark this to have the installation generate regular shortcuts rather than shortcuts
supporting installation-on-demand and advertisement. This disables self-repair on
shortcuts, which can prevent problems with application repairs occurring when the
shortcut is moved or deleted.
z
Reinstallation Options
Reinstallation occurs if Windows Installer determines that an application needs to be
repaired. Specify the reinstallation options:
„
File Replacement
Specify how the installation handles reinstallation of a file.
„
Reinstall all per-user based registry keys
Mark this to reinstall registry keys the installation places in the
HKEY_CURRENT_USER or HKEY_USERS directory on the destination computer.
„
Reinstall all shortcuts
Mark this to reinstall all shortcuts and re-cache all icons. This also overwrites
existing shortcuts and icons.
„
Re-cache local copy of installation
By default, the installation is stored on the destination computer, without the
actual installation files. Mark this to run the installation, when a reinstallation
occurs, from the original source instead of the cached copy on the local
computer. Then, the installation on the source media is copied to the local
computer.
See also:
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Advanced Installations
Setting Options for an Administrative Installation on page 228
Specifying Search Locations on page 227
Specifying Search Locations
Use the Search Locations page to specify paths to search for installation files during a
reinstall or repair. Adding new source locations on the Search Locations page replaces
the default location. This feature is intended for system administrators who want to
dynamically replace the default search location for self-repair, reinstall, and installationon-demand.
By default, if an application needs to be repaired or reinstalled, Windows Installer
searches the original source path (stored in the property [SOURCEDIR]), which is the
original location from which the application was installed. For a mobile end user, the
original source path might not be a good choice for reinstalls and repairs because the
user might be at a different location when the reinstall or repair is started.
Example: You have a department of mobile end users who travel around the world with
their notebook computers. Jim installed Norton AntiVirus from the Applications server
while at his home base of Chicago, Illinois. But while Jim is in Amsterdam, you release
an update to the Norton installation that neutralizes a new virus. It is more efficient for
Jim to be able to reinstall from the Amsterdam Applications server.
To solve this problem, you could:
z
Use your network logon script to always set an environment variable with the
nearest Applications server name.
z
Complete the Search Locations page, but instead of hard coding a server name,
specify the environment variable that points to a local server.
In addition to using an environment variable to specify a search location, you can use
Windows Installer properties, URLs, mapped drive letters, and UNC formatted paths.
Search locations are searched in the order they are listed, and the first found instance is
used.
To specify a search location
1.
Select Installation Expert > Search Locations page.
2.
Click Add.
The Search Location Details dialog box appears.
3.
Enter an alternate location that this application should search for the installation
package if a repair or reinstall is necessary. You can use the following formats:
„
To specify a property, you must set the property to contain an appropriate
server location. Example: [APPS_SERVER]\Apps.
„
To specify an environment variable, you must set the environment variable to
contain an appropriate server location. Example: %CLOSEST_SERVER%\Apps.
„
To specify a URL, enter the URL. Example:
http:\\intranet.mycompany.com\Apps.
„
To specify a mapped drive letter, enter the drive letter and path. Example:
X:\Apps
„
To specify a UNC formatted path, enter the location in UNC notation. Example:
\\APPS_SERVER_AMSTERDAM\Apps.
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Advanced Installations
4.
Click OK.
To include the original source directory
If you add directories to the Search Locations page, the installation's original source
directory is replaced, but you can add it to your search locations.
1.
Add [SOURCEDIR] to the Search Locations page.
2.
Select MSI Script > Execute Immediate tab and click the Standard tab.
3.
Add ResolveSource, a standard Windows Installer action, to the Execute Immediate
sequence immediately after the CostInitialize action.
4.
Find the action named Set Property WiseModifySourceList and move it below the
ResolveSource action.
To avoid performing this for each new installation, add these modifications to a
template.
See Creating and Editing Installation Templates on page 48.
See also:
Setting Options for an Administrative Installation on page 228
Setting Administrator Options on page 225
Setting Options for an Administrative Installation
Use the Administrative Install page to specify the property values to be set during an
installation from an administrative image. Properties that you set on this page are only
in effect during installation from an administrative image. If an end user runs this
installation directly, not from an administrative image, then this page has no effect. For
information on administrative installations, see Administrative Installation in the
Windows Installer SDK Help.
Development computer. Use Package Distribution to perform an
administrative installation to a shared network server.
Administrative Installation. Properties defined under the Properties
icon in Setup Editor > Product tab are stored in the .MSI and applied
during installation.
Shared network server. Server stores the administrative image.
Regular Installation. Properties set on Administrative Install page are
applied during installation. These values override properties defined in
the .MSI.
End user computer. User, logon script, or other mechanism starts
installation by running the administrative installation on the server.
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Advanced Installations
To set a property for the administrative image
1.
Select Installation Expert > Administrative Install.
2.
In Default Installation Folder, specify the directory on the destination computer
where the installation should be copied.
During installation from the administrative image, this is the default destination
directory on the Destination Folder dialog box. You cannot enter bracketed property
names in this field.
3.
Click Add.
The Property Settings Override dialog box appears.
4.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Name
Select an existing property or enter a property name. You can create your own
unique property, or enter a Windows Installer property name. Do not surround
the property name with brackets. Properties can either be public (uppercase) or
private (mixed case).
For descriptions of properties in this installation, see Build Properties on
page 512. For a complete list of Windows Installer Properties, see Property
Reference in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
„
5.
Value
Enter the value for the property. You cannot enter properties because they will
not be resolved into their values.
Click OK.
See also:
Setting Administrator Options on page 225
Specifying Search Locations on page 227
About Command Lines
Command lines change the behavior of an .EXE for different work environments and
user requirements. You can work with two sets of command lines for installations:
Command lines that you can apply
to installations at run time
Command lines that you can apply to
Windows Installer Editor for
compiling
Call MSIExec.EXE.
Call WFWI.EXE.
Are applied to Windows Installer
installations or patches at run time.
Are applied to Windows Installer Editor at
run time to compile an installation.
Options let you specify UI, logging,
advertising, and repair options. They
also let you edit public properties,
apply transforms, and apply or remove
patches.
Options let you control logging and UI, and
set default values for properties in the
compiled installation.
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Advanced Installations
Command lines that you can apply
to installations at run time
Command lines that you can apply to
Windows Installer Editor for
compiling
Are documented fully in Command Line
Options and Standard Installer
Command Line Options in the Windows
Installer SDK Help.
Are documented in Wise product
documentation.
Can be built automatically with the
Command Line page.
z
See Command Line Options For WFWI.EXE
on page 238.
Must be built manually.
See Creating a Command Line To
Apply to an Installation on
page 230.
Can be built manually.
z
See Command-Line Options in the
Windows Installer SDK Help.
See also:
WFWI.EXE Command Line Option Example on page 239
Automating the Build Process on page 240
Creating a Command Line To Apply to an Installation
¾ Not available in a transform.
Command lines cannot be applied to a transform.
Use the Command Line page in Installation Expert to create syntactically correct
command lines to apply to an installation at run time. These are applied to MSIExec.EXE
on the destination computer. Command lines that you create appear in a popup menu
for the Test and Run buttons so you can test them.
To create a command line to apply to an installation
1.
Select Installation Expert > Command Line page.
2.
Click Add.
The Command Line Details dialog box appears.
Note
Although you can enter a command line in the Command Line field, we
recommend that you use the options provided in this utility for an optimal, errorfree installation.
3.
Click the General tab and complete the dialog box:
„
Name
Enter the name of the command line.
„
Shortcut File
Specify the full path of the shortcut file (.LNK) you are creating to execute the
command line. The default location is the Temp directory.
You also can create a batch file by changing the file extension to .BAT.
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Advanced Installations
„
4.
Install Mode
Select an install mode:

Install
Installs or configures the installation package. Select this option to remove
patches.

Advertised
Advertises the installation on the destination computer.

Repair
Repairs an application that is installed on the destination computer.

Network Install
Extracts the files in the installation package to a network location.

Uninstall
Uninstalls the installation package.

Update
Updates the installation package by applying patches.
Depending on the install mode you select, additional tabs appear on the Command
Line Details dialog box. Following are the tabs that appear and how you can use
them to modify the command line:
„
UI Options
Make the installation run in silent mode and set the user interface level.
See Applying UI Options to an Installation on page 232.
„
Logging
Generate a log when the installation is run and select logging options.
See Applying Logging Options to an Installation on page 233.
„
Advertising
Advertise applications and apply a transform to the advertised package.
See Applying an Advertising Option to an Installation on page 234.
„
Repair
Repair installed files.
See Applying a Repair Option to an Installation on page 235.
„
Properties
Change the value of public properties.
See Changing Public Properties in an Installation on page 236.
„
Transforms
Apply transforms to the installation package using the TRANSFORMS property.
See Applying Transforms to an Installation on page 237.
„
Patches
Add or remove patches using the PATCH and MSIPATCHREMOVE properties.
See Applying or Removing Patches With a Command Line on page 237.
5.
After you modify the command line, click OK.
The command line is added to the Command Line page. To edit it, double-click its name.
To delete it, select it and click Delete.
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Advanced Installations
See also:
About Command Lines on page 229
Applying UI Options to an Installation
¾ Not available in a transform.
Command lines cannot be applied to a transform.
You can use a command line to set the UI options, which determine how much the end
user interacts with the installation. See User Interface Levels in the Windows Installer
SDK Help. You can set UI options for all versions of Windows Installer or for Windows
Installer 3.0 only.
To apply UI options to an installation
1.
On the Command Line Details dialog box, click the UI Options tab.
See Creating a Command Line To Apply to an Installation on page 230.
2.
To enable the UI Options check boxes, mark Set User Interface level.
3.
By default, qn - No UI is marked in the All Windows Installer versions section.
To set options for all versions of Windows Installer, mark the appropriate options in
this section.
„
qn - No UI
Displays no user interface during the installation.
„
qb - Basic UI
Displays built-in modeless dialog boxes that show progress messages during
the installation.
Note
Modal dialog boxes require user input whereas modeless dialog boxes don’t.
„
qr - Reduced UI
Displays authored modeless dialog and built-in modal error-message boxes
during the installation.
„
qf - Full UI
Displays both modal and modeless dialog boxes that have been authored into
the internal user interface, and built-in modal error-message boxes during the
installation.
„
qn+ - No UI
Displays no user interface, except for a modal dialog box at the end of the
installation.
„
qb+ - Basic UI
Displays built-in modeless dialog boxes that show progress messages during
the installation and a modal dialog box at the end of the installation.
„
qb- - Basic UI
Displays built-in modeless dialog boxes that show progress messages and no
modal dialog boxes during the installation.
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Advanced Installations
4.
If you mark the qb, qb+, or qb- option, then the Hide the Cancel Button check
box is enabled. Check this to add the ! switch to the command line, which removes
the Cancel button from the installation dialog boxes.
5.
To set options for Windows Installer 3.0 only, mark one of the following options in
the Windows Installer 3.0 only section. This overrides any options you mark in
the All Windows Installer versions section. (These options are enabled only if
Windows Installer 3.0 or later is installed on your computer.)
6.
7.
„
Quiet - No UI
Displays no user interface during the installation.
„
Passive - display a progress bar but no other prompts or messages
If you mark Quiet or Passive in the Windows Installer 3.0 only section, you can
also control how Windows Installer handles restarts.
„
Default (Restart if required)
Restarts the computer when necessary with no prompts or warnings to the user.
„
No restart
Never restarts the computer after the installation.
„
Force restart
Always restarts the computer after the installation.
„
Prompt restart
(Passive only.) Displays a message that a restart is required to complete the
installation and asks the user if they want to restart the computer now.
Click OK.
See also:
Creating a Command Line To Apply to an Installation on page 230
Applying Logging Options to an Installation
¾ Not available in a transform.
Command lines cannot be applied to a transform.
You can use a command line to set logging options that determine what activities are
logged during the installation. For information on logging options, see Logging in the
Windows Installer SDK Help. You can set logging options for all versions of Windows
Installer or for Windows Installer 3.0 and later.
In Windows Installer 4.0 and later, you can set logging options in the installation instead
of with a command line.
See Setting Version-Specific Windows Installer Options on page 176.
To apply logging options to an installation
1.
Click the Logging tab on the Command Line Details dialog box.
See Creating a Command Line To Apply to an Installation on page 230.
2.
To enable the Logging Options check boxes, mark Create Log File.
This enables the field to its right, which displays the default location for a log file
created during installation. The default location is the Temp directory.
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Advanced Installations
3.
To change the location of the log file, specify a new path.
4.
To set logging options for all versions of Windows Installer, mark the appropriate
check boxes in the All Windows Installer versions section:
5.
„
* - Wildcard, log all information
Logs all information, but does not use verbose output. This is marked by
default. When this check box is marked, the first four options in this section are
enabled. Clear this check box to enable all the other options in this section.
„
v - Verbose output
Logs more detailed information about each event or error.
„
+ - Append to existing file
Appends the log to an existing log file.
„
! - Flush each line to the log
„
i - Status messages
„
w - Non-fatal warnings
„
a - Start up of actions
Logs actions as they are started.
„
r - Action-specific records
„
u - User requests
„
c - Initial UI parameters
Logs the initial user interface parameters.
„
m - Out-of-memory or fatal exit information
„
o - Out-of-disk-space messages
„
p - Terminal properties
„
e - All error messages
To set logging options for Windows Installer 3.0 or later, mark log - log all
information in the Windows Installer 3.0 or later section. This overrides any
options you mark in the All Windows Installer versions section.
Note
This option is enabled only if Windows Installer 3.0 or later is installed on your
computer. It will work on the destination computer only if it has Windows Installer
3.0 or later installed.
6.
Click OK.
See also:
Creating a Command Line To Apply to an Installation on page 230
Applying an Advertising Option to an Installation
¾ Not available in a transform.
Command lines cannot be applied to a transform.
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Advanced Installations
Windows Installer can advertise the availability of an application to end users and to
other applications without actually installing the application. If an application is
advertised, only the interfaces required for installing the application are presented to the
end user or other applications, saving time and disk space. End users install the
application by activating the advertised interface.
You can use a command line to set advertising options that determine who sees the
advertised application and whether a transform is applied to it. For information on
advertising options, see Advertisement in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
To apply advertising options to an installation
1.
Click the Advertising tab on the Command Line Details dialog box.
See Creating a Command Line To Apply to an Installation on page 230.
Note
The Advertising tab appears only when Install Mode on the General tab of the
Command Line Details dialog box is set to Advertised.
2.
Complete the dialog box:
„
m - Advertise to all users of machine
„
u - Advertise to the current user
„
t - Applies transform to advertised package
Add a transform to the advertised installation.
In the field below the check box, specify the transform file to include in the
installation.
3.
Click OK.
See also:
Creating a Command Line To Apply to an Installation on page 230
Applying a Repair Option to an Installation
¾ Not available in a transform.
Command lines cannot be applied to a transform.
You can use a command line to set a repair option for an installation that determines the
files that are reinstalled during a repair. You also can specify whether files are rewritten,
overwritten, or run from the source. For information on repair options, see
REINSTALLMODE Property in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
To apply repair options to an installation
1.
Click the Repair tab on the Command Line Details dialog box.
See Creating a Command Line To Apply to an Installation on page 230.
Note
The Repair tab appears only when Install Mode on the General tab of the
Command Line Details dialog box is set to Repair.
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Advanced Installations
2.
3.
Complete the dialog box:
„
p - Reinstall only if file is missing
„
o - Reinstall if file is missing or if an older version is installed
„
e - Reinstall if file is missing or an equal or older version is installed
„
d - Reinstall if file is missing or a different version is installed.
„
c - Reinstall if file is missing or the stored checksum doesn’t match the
calculated value
„
a - Force all files to be reinstalled
„
u - Rewrite all required user specific registry entries
„
m - Rewrite all required machine specific registry entries
„
s - Overwrite all existing shortcuts
„
v- Run from source and re-cache the local package
Click OK.
See also:
Creating a Command Line To Apply to an Installation on page 230
Changing Public Properties in an Installation
¾ Not available in a transform.
Command lines cannot be applied to a transform.
For information on public properties, see Public Properties in the Windows Installer SDK
Help.
To change public properties in an installation
1.
Click the Properties tab on the Command Line Details dialog box.
See Creating a Command Line To Apply to an Installation on page 230.
Note
The Properties tab appears only when Install Mode on the General tab of the
Command Line Details dialog box is set to Install or Network Install.
2.
Select a property in the left pane and click Add to copy it to the right pane.
3.
In the right pane, enter the value for the property.
4.
Click OK.
See also:
Creating a Command Line To Apply to an Installation on page 230
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Advanced Installations
Applying Transforms to an Installation
¾ Not available in a transform.
Command lines cannot be applied to a transform.
For information on transforms, see TRANSFORMS Property in the Windows Installer SDK
Help.
To apply transforms to an installation
1.
Click the Transform tab on the Command Line Details dialog box.
See Creating a Command Line To Apply to an Installation on page 230.
Note
The Transforms tab appears only when Install Mode on the General tab of the
Command Line Details dialog box is set to Install.
2.
Click Add and specify the transform file (.MST).
The full path appears in Transform List.
3.
Repeat the preceding step to specify additional transforms.
4.
Because Windows Installer applies transforms in the order specified, adjust the
order of the transforms as needed.
5.
Click OK.
See also:
Creating a Command Line To Apply to an Installation on page 230
Applying or Removing Patches With a Command
Line
¾ Not available in a transform.
Command lines cannot be applied to a transform.
You can use a command line to update an installation by applying or removing patches.
For information on patches, see PATCH Property and MSIPATCHREMOVE Property in the
Windows Installer SDK Help.
Prior to Windows Installer 3.0, you could only remove a patch by uninstalling the entire
application. Beginning with Windows Installer 3.0, you can remove a single patch or a
set of patches in any order without uninstalling the application. See Removing Patches
and Uninstallable Patches in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
To apply or remove patches with a command line
1.
On the General tab, select one of the following from Install Mode.
See Creating a Command Line To Apply to an Installation on page 230.
„
Windows Installer Editor Reference
Install
Use this option to remove or apply patches. You can apply patches to an
installed package or to the package being installed by the command line
237
Advanced Installations
„
Update
Use this option to update installed applications.
2.
Click the Patches tab on the Command Line Details dialog box.
3.
Mark whether to add or remove patches. The option to remove patches is enabled
only if Windows Installer 3.0 or later is installed on your computer.
4.
Click Add and specify a patch file (.MSP).
The full path appears in the Patch List.
5.
Repeat the preceding step to specify additional patches. (Windows Installer 3.0 or
later only.)
6.
Windows Installer applies patches in the order listed. To rearrange the order, click
Move Up or Move Down. If you used patch sequencing with Windows Installer 3.0
when you created the patches, that sequencing would override the order you specify
here.
7.
Click OK.
See also:
Creating a Command Line To Apply to an Installation on page 230
Command Line Options For WFWI.EXE
You can invoke Windows Installer Editor (WfWI.exe) with command-line options and
pass it the name of your project file (.WSI or .WSM) as a parameter. WFWI.exe
command lines let you compile an installation or merge module, while setting options
that have to do with the compile. You can also set the default value of Windows Installer
properties within the installation.
Use the following syntax:
“path\WFWI.EXE” “path\project file” /option
You can also start Windows Installer Editor (WfWI.exe) in the Visual MSIDiff mode using
the following command line:
WFWI.EXE base_file compare_file
See Comparing Windows Installer Files on page 75.
Do not confuse this list of command-line options with the command-line options that you
can apply at run time to an .MSI through the executable msiexec.exe. For a list of those
command-line options, see Command Line Options in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
Command-line options
Description
/c
Compile only and exit
This option compiles a .WSI to an .MSI, or
a .WSM to an .MSM. This option must be
the first one in the command-line
statement.
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Advanced Installations
Command-line options
Description
/c=“release_name”
Compile only the specified release from an
installation containing multiple releases
/p name=value
Set property values
The property name and value must
immediately follow the /p. You can use as
many property name and value switches as
you like in a command line. Do not enter
any spaces in the name=value
construction, unless they are enclosed in
double quotes.
/o path
Specifies the compiled output file
You cannot specify a relative path; specify
an absolute path. The path must
immediately follow the /o.
/F
Has the same effect as clearing the Don’t
update or recompress files when
saving check box on the products Details
page
See Product Details Page on page 83.
/s
Compile silently
If you don’t include this, error or
informational messages might appear that
require user intervention.
/l log_file_name
Creates an additional compile log file in
addition to compile.log, which is created
automatically
WFWI.EXE Command Line Option Example
The following example shows how to compile an installation from the command line.
“path\WFWI.EXE” C:\Installers\MyApp.wsi /c /s /p CURRENT_FILES="E:\Test
Development" /o C:\MyAppInstaller.msi
The preceding command line does the following:
z
Invokes the executable
z
Specifies the .WSI to compile (C:\Installers\MyApp.wsi)
z
Sets it to compile (/c)
z
Sets all error messages to be suppressed (/s)
z
Sets the property CURRENT_FILES (/p CURRENT_FILES="E:\Test Development")
z
Sets the output location (/o C:\MyAppInstaller.msi)
If you set multiple properties, separate the property value pairs with spaces. Enclose the
values with double quotes.
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Advanced Installations
Automating the Build Process
You can use the WFWI.exe command-line options in conjunction with other processes to
create an automated build process.
Enter the following command-line statement into a batch file or any other program that
has the ability to run command-line statements, such as Scheduled Tasks in Control
Panel:
“path\WFWI.EXE” “path\project file” /c /o “path\output file” /s
where:
z
“path\WfWI.exe” is the path to the Wise executable
z
“path\project file” is the path to the installation (.WSI) or merge module (.WSM)
project file to compile
z
“path\output file” is the location of the compiled installation (.MSI) or merge module
(.MSM)
Adding a Digital Signature to an Installation
Use the Digital Signature page to add an Authenticode digital signature to an installation
file so its integrity and authenticity can be verified.
Digital signature methods
The file signing tool that is used to digitally sign a file depends on the type of your digital
certificate:
z
Public/private key pair files
This method requires a credentials file (.SPC or .CER) and a private key file (.PVK).
This method is supported by the signcode.exe tool. For details, search for
“Signcode” in the MSDN Library (msdn.microsoft.com/library/).
z
Personal Information Exchange file
This method requires a Personal Information Exchange file (.PFX), which is a
container file for the public/private key information. This method is supported by the
signtool.exe tool. For details, search for “Signtool” in the MSDN Library
(msdn.microsoft.com/library/).
Requirements
z
You must have a valid code signing certificate, which you can obtain from a
commercial certificate authority such as Verisign. For a list of certificate authorities,
search for “Microsoft Root Certificate Program Members” in the MSDN Library
(msdn.microsoft.com/library/).
z
You must have the signtool.exe or signcode.exe tool on your computer.
z
Signtool.exe requires the CAPICOM 2.0 redistributable to be installed and registered
on your computer. CAPICOM provides services for digitally signing applications, and
is available from the Microsoft Web site.
z
The location of signtool.exe or signcode.exe must be specified on the Digital
Signature tab in Wise Options, or they must be available on the system path.
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Advanced Installations
To add a digital signature
Select Installation Expert > Digital Signature page, mark Add a digital signature, and
complete the page:
z
Web URL
Enter your organization’s Web site address.
z
Descriptive Name
Enter the name of your application. This name is embedded in your Authenticode
certificate to let end users verify the name of the application they are installing.
z
TimeStamp URL
Specify the URL you use for your timestamping service. Timestamping lets end
users distinguish between a certificate that has expired but was valid when it was
used to sign the installation, and a certificate that was used to sign an installation
while it was expired. The timestamping service must be available on your computer
to build the installation but does not need to be available to the end user running
the installation.
z
Certificate options
„
Signtool.exe with Personal Information Exchange file
Mark this to use signtool.exe and then specify the Personal Information
Exchange file (.PFX) to use. This option requires a password.
You will be prompted for the password during compile.
„
Signcode.exe with public/private key pair files
Mark this to use signcode.exe and then specify the credentials file (.SPC or
.CER) that contains your Digital ID, and your private key file (.PVK).
z
Digital Signature for
Specify which output files should be digitally signed. If you select a type of output
file that is not selected on the Build Options page, this drop-down list is ignored.
Example: If you specify Do not create an .EXE file in .EXE Options on the Build
Options page, and in this drop-down list you select Installation .EXE only, no
digitally signed installation is created, because the installation doesn’t create an
.EXE file.
Note
The ability to add a digital signature to .MSI and external .CAB files is supported by
Windows Installer 2.0 or later only.
See also:
Setting Digital Signature Options on page 38
Creating an Installation for Microsoft SMS
If an installation will be run in a Microsoft Systems Management Server (SMS)
environment, you can have the installation create a status .MIF file in the Windows
directory to describe the application. In order to use an installation in an SMS
environment, you must also create a package definition file (.PDF or .SMS), which
contains information about the installation. You can create the package definition file
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Advanced Installations
manually, or configure the installation to create it when compiled. For information about
SMS, visit the Microsoft Developer Network (msdn.microsoft.com).
The Microsoft SMS page specifies the information for the .MIF file and package definition
file. Alternatively, you can apply the /m command-line option to msiexec.exe to create a
status.mif file. See Command Line Options in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
To have the installation create a status .MIF file and a package definition file, mark
Create Status MIF and complete the page.
z
Install MIF Filename
Enter the name of the application being installed. Example: sample.mif.
z
Uninstall MIF Filename
Enter the name of the application being uninstalled. Example: uninstall_sample.mif.
z
Serial Number
Enter the serial number of the application being installed.
z
Package Definition File
To create a package definition file when the installation is compiled, mark one of the
following check boxes. Verify that the installation’s name, version, and manufacturer
are entered on the Product Details page, because that information is included in the
package definition file.
„
Create .PDF File (SMS 1.2 or earlier)
Mark this to create a package definition file of file type .PDF. In Version, enter
the SMS version.
„
Create .SMS File (SMS 2.0 or later)
Mark this to create a package definition file of file type .SMS. In Version, enter
the SMS version.
You can also import an existing Microsoft SMS installation.
See Legacy Setup Conversion in the Wise Package Studio Help.
Creating a .NET Installation When You Have the
.NET Framework
¾ Windows Installer 2.0 or later only.
The .NET Framework helps automate the process of building a .NET installation by
extracting most of the assembly details from the assembly manifests and adding them
to the installation.
To create a .NET installation when you have the .NET Framework
1.
Select Installation Expert > Product Details page.
2.
In the Application Type field, select either .NET Application or Mixed (.NET and
Win32).
This designates the installation as .NET and determines how Windows Installer
Editor handles COM interop registry entries.
See Product Details Page on page 83.
3.
Add assemblies and their dependency files to the installation, using the Files page.
See Adding .NET Assemblies to the Installation on page 115.
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Windows Installer Editor finds all multifile assemblies and adds them automatically.
Depending on the Scan Dependencies option in Wise Options, dependency
assemblies might be added automatically, or you might be prompted to add them. If
the option to Never scan dependencies is selected, you must add the
dependencies.
4.
If the destination computer does not contain the .NET Framework, add support for
the .NET Framework to the installation. On the Prerequisites page, select the
desired release and then select the runtime from .NET Framework Runtime
Version.
The Windows Vista and later operating systems already include the .NET
Framework.
See Adding Prerequisites to a Release on page 198.
5.
Finish building the installation as usual, then compile and distribute it.
See also:
About Microsoft .NET Technology on page 497
Requirements for Creating a .NET Installation on page 501
Frequently Asked Questions About Microsoft Windows Installer on page 495
Creating a .NET Installation Without the .NET Framework on page 243
Setting a Requirement on the System Requirements Page on page 165 (for information
on setting the required .NET Framework version)
Creating a .NET Installation Without the .NET
Framework
¾ Windows Installer 2.0 or later only.
You can build an installation for a .NET application even if you do not have the .NET
Framework installed on your computer. Perhaps your company’s development computers
have the .NET Framework, but the computer you use to build installations does not. If
you do not have the .NET Framework, you must do manually what the .NET Framework
normally does automatically.
To create a .NET installation without the .NET Framework
1.
Select Installation Expert > Product Details page.
2.
In Application Type, select either .NET Application or Mixed (.NET and
Win32).
This designates the installation as .NET and determines how Windows Installer
Editor handles COM interop registry entries.
See Product Details Page on page 83.
3.
Add assemblies to the installation, using the Files or Web Files page.
Be sure to add all files in multifile assemblies.
See Adding .NET Assemblies to the Installation on page 115.
4.
Add attributes and dependencies for each assembly.
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a.
Use a computer that has the .NET Framework installed and has the assemblies.
This typically is a development computer.
b.
For each assembly, run the ildasm tool from the Visual Studio .NET command
prompt. When you run ildasm, you select an assembly and the program displays
the assembly’s attributes. Write down the assembly’s culture, name,
publicKeyToken, and version, as well as any dependencies.
c.
On the Files or Web Files page, add the dependency assemblies to the same
directory as the assembly that has the dependencies. Repeat for each assembly.
d.
In the lower right pane of the Files or Web Files page, double-click an assembly
to display the File Details dialog box. Click the Assembly tab. Click Add to add
the Name and Value of the assembly’s culture, name, publicKeyToken, and
version. Repeat for each assembly.
See Editing Assembly Settings for Files on page 127.
5.
If the installation contains both .NET and Win32 components, register the .NET
components for COM interop.
a.
Use a computer that has the .NET Framework installed and has the assemblies.
This typically is a development computer.
b.
For each .NET assembly, run the Assembly Registration tool (regasm) from the
Visual Studio .NET command prompt. Run regasm with the argument /regfile
and specify a file name.
Example: regasm AssemblyFileName /regfile:RegFileName.reg.
This command generates a .REG file containing the registry entries you need to
allow the .NET assembly to be called as a COM component. Search for
“Assembly Registration Tool (Regasm.exe)” in the MSDN Library
(msdn.microsoft.com/library/).
c.
On the Registry page, import the .REG file you created for each assembly.
See Adding Registry Keys on page 141.
6.
If the destination computer does not contain the .NET Framework, add support for
the .NET Framework to the installation. On the Prerequisites page, select the
desired release and then select the runtime from .NET Framework Runtime
Version.
The Windows Vista and later operating systems already include the .NET
Framework.
See Adding Prerequisites to a Release on page 198.
7.
Finish building the installation as usual, then compile and distribute it.
See also:
About Microsoft .NET Technology on page 497
Requirements for Creating a .NET Installation on page 501
Frequently Asked Questions About Microsoft Windows Installer on page 495
Creating a .NET Installation When You Have the .NET Framework on page 242
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About Web Installations
You can create an installation that installs Web resources to a Microsoft Internet
Information Server (IIS) by using the Web Files page in Installation Expert.
To learn about file-related functionality on the Web Files page, see Files or Web Files
Page on page 105 and its subtopics.
To learn about Web-related functionality, see:
Features That Support Web Installations on page 246
Creating a Web Site on page 247
Creating a Virtual Directory on page 249
Creating a New Web Folder on page 251
Setting Installation Options for a Web Installation on page 252
Setting Installation Options for a Child Virtual Directory on page 253
About the Web Site Details Dialog on page 255
Installing Web Settings From a File on page 256
Note
If you cannot see the Web Files page in the list of pages in Installation Expert, select
Web Application or All from the Page Views drop-down list in the upper-left corner.
Differences between the Files page and Web Files page
Files page
Web Files page
You can create directories and add files
to them
You can create Web folders, virtual
directories, and Web sites, and add files
to them
You can set NTFS-based (NT file system)
permissions on directories
You can set Web-based security on
directories
It shows all directories and files that will
be installed, including Web items
It shows only directories and files that
will be accessible through an IIS Web
server
It shows Web sites under the physical
directory where they will be installed
It shows Web sites in the hierarchy as
they will appear in IIS Internet Services
Manager
It contains the wwwroot directory, which
represents the physical InetPub\wwwroot
directory on the destination computer
It does not contain wwwroot, but you can
map a virtual directory to a physical
directory that you created under
wwwroot on the Files page
You cannot delete a physical directory
that is mapped to a virtual directory or
Web site
You can delete a virtual directory or Web
site, and a message asks if you want to
delete the corresponding mapped
physical directory and files
You can delete a non-Web directory
You cannot delete a non-Web directory,
except in the instance described above
See also:
When to Use the File-Related Installation Expert Pages on page 107
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Features That Support Web Installations
In addition to the Web Files page, the following features throughout the product
specifically support Web application installations:
Dynamic editing of XML
files
The Dynamic Content tab appears for valid XML files,
such as Web.config, that you add to the installation. Use
it to edit the attributes in an XML file by substituting the
value of Windows Installer properties at run time.
Gather the values of properties using the Custom
Property dialog below.
See Editing XML Files During Installation on page 131.
Custom Property dialog
The Custom Property dialog provides an easy way to let
the end user specify values for Windows Installer
properties. You can use these properties to populate an
XML file, as described above.
See Adding the Custom Property Dialog on page 429.
SQL Connection dialog
Let the end user select a SQL Server name and security
credentials to generate a valid SQL Server connection
string. The connection string can then be used
elsewhere, such as in a Web.config file or on the SQL
Server Scripts page.
See About the SQL Connection Dialog on page 426.
ASPNET properties
The default ASP .NET users that are set by .NET
installations are put into Windows Installer properties:
ASPNET_USER, ASPNET1.0_USER, and
ASPNET1.1_USER. An ASP account that is created by
2.0 or later versions of .NET populate the
ASPNET_USER property. You can use these for setting
directory security.
See Run Time Properties on page 519.
Directory security
You can set NTFS directory security, which enhances
Web site security.
See Setting Permissions for Files and Directories on
page 126.
Wildcard groupings
To make it easier to quickly add all files of specific
types, such as all Web file types, you can set up
Wildcard groups in Wise Options. Then, when you add
the contents of a directory on the Files or Web Files
page, you can choose a wildcard group to filter on.
See Setting Wildcard Groups on page 47.
Check for IIS version
Windows Installer Editor Reference
On the System Requirements page, you can require a
specific version of Microsoft Internet Information Server
(IIS). Once you set an IIS version, a list of Web
extensions appears, and you can check whether they
are enabled. However, the Web extensions are only
valid on destination computers with IIS 6.0 later.
246
Advanced Installations
Instance transforms
You can install more than one instance of a Web
application to multiple virtual directories using instance
transforms.
See Multiple Instance Installations on page 346.
See also:
About Web Installations on page 245
Creating a Web Site
New Web sites that you add to an installation appear under the Program Files directory
by default.
Prior to Windows Vista, Microsoft Internet Information Server (IIS) supported the
creation of new Web sites only on server operating systems, which excluded Windows
2000 Professional and Windows XP. For workstation operating systems that do not
support the creation of a Web site, you can let end users create a virtual directory
instead of a Web site. When you set the installation options for a Web installation, you
can select an option to install it as a virtual directory.
See Setting Installation Options for a Web Installation on page 252.
To create a Web site
1.
Select Installation Expert > Web Files page.
If you don’t see the Web Files page, select All from the Page Views drop-down list.
2.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you add
must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All Features
is selected.)
3.
If the Web installation requires a Web server restart, mark Restart IIS service
during installation. This check box does not appear when All Features is selected
above.
4.
In the lower-left list box, select a parent node.
5.
Click New and select New Web Site.
The New Web Site dialog box appears.
6.
7.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Description
Enter a description for the directory, which serves as an identifying name in
Internet Information Services.
„
Local Path
Specify the physical directory to which the Web site is mapped. You can browse
to any directory that has already been added to the installation. Example:
Change this to a directory under wwwroot to have this item reside under
wwwroot.
Click OK.
The site appears in the lower-left list box.
8.
Select the new site and click Details.
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The details dialog box appears with several tabs.
9.
Click the Installation Settings tab and complete the tab:
„
Override Existing Settings
If an installation with the same name as this one is already on the destination
computer, specify whether to retain existing settings (None) or override
existing settings (All).
„
Support IIS 7.0 (Vista and later)
This option enables IIS 7.0, which is available only with Vista and later. If you
create a new installation, this check box is checked by default. If you open an
installation created with a previous version of Windows Installer Editor, it is not
checked. When this option is checked, a web.config file is added to the
installation although it is not saved until you save or compile the installation.
The web.config file contains the settings that you select on the Details dialog
box. This web.config file is required for the support of virtual directory creation
in IIS 7.0 and later.
10. Click the Web Site UI tab. Use this tab to specify the installation options that will be
available to the end user at run time.
See Setting Installation Options for a Web Installation on page 252.
11. Complete the remaining tabs on the details dialog box. These tabs correspond to
options on the properties dialog box in IIS, version 5.0. Use them to specify which
options are user-configurable at run time. Use the IIS help for information about
these tabs.
See About the Web Site Details Dialog on page 255.
12. Click OK on the details dialog box.
Note
Clicking OK on the details dialog box regenerates the Web dialog boxes in the
installation.
To delete a Web site
z
On the Web Files page, in the lower-left list box, select a Web site and click Delete.
At the prompt that appears:
„
Click Yes to delete the corresponding physical directory and files.
„
Click No to clear the Web Folder settings but leave the folders and files in the
installation and the lower-left pane.
If the Delete button is unavailable, it means you have selected a normal folder
instead of a Web site. To delete a normal folder from the installation, use the Files
page.
On the Files page, you cannot delete a physical directory that is linked to a Web site.
To change a Web site to a virtual directory
z
On the Web Files page, in the lower-left list box, right-click a Web site and select
Change to Virtual Directory.
Any Web dialog boxes in this installation are regenerated.
Settings on the details dialog box that do not apply to virtual directories are unavailable.
However, if you change this back to a Web site, those settings are retained.
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See Setting Installation Options for a Web Installation on page 252 and About the Web
Site Details Dialog on page 255.
See also:
About Web Installations on page 245
Creating a Virtual Directory
This section covers creating a virtual directory, converting an existing installation
directory to a virtual directory, adding a directory from your computer as a virtual
directory, and deleting a virtual directory.
A virtual directory is considered top-level if it is directly under Destination Computer,
and is considered a child if it is under a Web site.
To create a virtual directory
1.
Select Installation Expert > Web Files page.
If you don’t see the Web Files page, select All from the Page Views drop-down list.
2.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you add
must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All Features
is selected.)
3.
If the Web installation requires a Web server restart, mark Restart IIS service
during installation. This check box does not appear when All Features is selected
above.
4.
In the lower-left list box, select a parent node.
5.
Click New and select New Virtual Directory.
The New Virtual Directory dialog box appears.
6.
7.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Alias
Enter an alias for the directory. This typically appears in the URL to this Web
resource.
„
Local Path
Specify the physical directory to which the alias is mapped. You can browse to
any directory that has already been added to the installation and create an
additional directory (optional) by typing its name in this field.
Click OK.
The virtual directory appears in the lower-left list box.
8.
Select the new virtual directory and click Details.
The details dialog box appears with several tabs. For a top-level virtual directory,
the Web Site, Web Site UI, and Home Directory tabs appear. For a child virtual
directory, the Virtual Directory and Virtual Directory UI tabs appear. The remaining
tabs are the same for both types of virtual directory.
9.
Click the Installation Settings tab and complete the tab:
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„
Override Existing Settings
If an installation with the same name as this one is already on the destination
computer, specify whether to retain existing settings (None) or override
existing settings (All).
„
Remove on Uninstall
(Top-level virtual directories only.) Mark this to have this virtual directory
removed (unregistered) from IIS during uninstall. This does not uninstall the
physical directory and files—the normal uninstall mechanism handles that.
„
Support IIS 7.0 (Vista and later)
This option enables IIS 7.0, which is available only with Vista and later. If you
create a new installation, this check box is marked by default. If you open an
installation created with a previous version of Windows Installer Editor, it is not
checked. When this option is checked, a web.config file is added to the
installation although it is not saved until you save or compile the installation.
The web.config file contains the settings that you select on the Details dialog
box. This web.config file is required for the support of virtual directory creation
in IIS 7.0 and later.
10. To specify the installation options that will be available to the end user at run time,
do one of the following:
„
If this is a top-level virtual directory, click the Web Site UI tab.
See Setting Installation Options for a Web Installation on page 252.
„
If this is a child virtual directory, click the Virtual Directory UI tab.
See Setting Installation Options for a Child Virtual Directory on page 253.
11. Complete the remaining tabs on the details dialog box. These tabs correspond to
options on the properties dialog box in IIS, version 5.0. Use them to specify which
options are user-configurable at run time. Use the IIS help for information about
these tabs.
See About the Web Site Details Dialog on page 255.
12. Click OK on the details dialog box.
Note
Clicking OK on the details dialog box regenerates the Web dialog boxes in the
installation.
To add a directory from your computer as a virtual directory
1.
On the Web Files page, manually create a virtual directory with the name of the
directory on your computer.
2.
In the upper-left list box, navigate to and select the directory on your computer.
3.
Click Add Contents.
The Add Contents dialog box appears.
4.
In Dest. Directory, clear the name and then click OK.
The contents are added into the virtual directory. If you don’t first clear the Dest.
Directory field, then the directory is added as a Web folder.
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To map an existing physical directory to a virtual directory
Use this procedure if you have already created a directory on the Files page or a Web
folder on the Web Files page, and you now want to map that directory to a virtual
directory.
1.
On the Web Files page, in the lower-left list box, select a parent node.
2.
Click New and select New Virtual Directory.
The New Virtual Directory dialog box appears.
3.
4.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Alias
Enter an alias for the directory. This appears in the URL to this Web resource.
„
Local Path
Browse to the existing directory to be mapped to a virtual directory.
Click OK.
To delete a virtual directory
z
On the Web Files page, in the lower-left list box, select a virtual directory and click
Delete.
A message asks if you want to delete the corresponding physical directory and files.
On the Files page, you cannot delete a physical directory that is linked to a virtual
directory.
To change a virtual directory to a Web site
z
On the Web Files page, in the lower-left list box, right-click a top-level virtual
directory and select Change to Web Site. (You cannot change a child virtual
directory.)
Any Web dialog boxes in this installation are regenerated.
Settings on the details dialog box that do not apply to Web sites are unavailable.
However, if you change this back to a virtual directory, those settings are retained.
See Setting Installation Options for a Web Installation on page 252 and About the Web
Site Details Dialog on page 255.
See also:
About Web Installations on page 245
Creating a New Web Folder
To create a new Web folder
1.
Select Installation Expert > Web Files page.
If you don’t see the Web Files page, select All from the Page Views drop-down list.
2.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you add
must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All Features
is selected.)
3.
In the lower-left list box, select a Web site or virtual directory.
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4.
Click New and select New Web Folder.
5.
Enter a name for the directory and click OK.
6.
Select the new directory and click Details.
The details dialog box appears with several tabs.
7.
Complete the tabs on the details dialog box. These tabs correspond to options on
the properties dialog box in IIS, version 5.0.
For information on these tabs, see the IIS help. Also see About the Web Site Details
Dialog on page 255.
See also:
About Web Installations on page 245
Setting Installation Options for a Web Installation
An important part of setting up a Web installation is specifying the installation options
that will be available to the end user at run time. To do so, use the Web Site UI tab,
which appears on the details dialog box for Web sites and top-level virtual directories. If
the virtual directory is under a Web site, then see Setting Installation Options for a Child
Virtual Directory on page 253.
You set options for each Web site or virtual directory you have added on the Web Files
page. Setting installation options adds Web (IIS) dialog boxes to the installation. If you
omit the procedure below, no Web dialog boxes appear to the end user, and the
installation tries to apply the defaults for all items.
Warning
Do not edit the Web (IIS) dialog boxes, except to change their order (as a group) in the
installation sequence. Editing the Web dialog boxes might cause unexpected,
undesirable behavior, including damage to the installation. Also, any operation within
this product that affects the installation’s user interface will regenerate the Web dialog
boxes, therefore, any changes you make to them will be lost.
To set installation options
1.
Select Installation Expert > Web Files page.
2.
In the lower-left list box, select a Web site or a top-level virtual directory and click
Details. If you don’t see the item you want, make sure you have the correct feature
selected in Current Feature.
The details dialog box appears.
3.
Click the Web Site UI tab.
4.
To display installation dialog boxes to the end user at run time, mark Display RunTime UI. This adds Web dialog boxes to the installation.
If this is a top-level virtual directory, no other options are available. Skip the
remaining steps and click OK.
If this is a Web site, the remaining options on the tab are enabled when you mark
this check box.
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Note
If the current installation was built in an older version of Windows Installer Editor,
you are prompted to first convert the dialog boxes on the Dialogs page. Converting
resets navigation and conditions, so if you customized the dialog boxes, back up this
installation before converting.
5.
6.
Complete the User Installation Options section:
„
New Web Site
Mark this to let end users install Web resources to a new Web site. However,
even if you mark this, this will not be an available option if the operating system
of the destination computer does not support the creation of new Web sites.
Workstation operating systems prior to Vista do not support the creation of a
new Web site.
„
Existing Web Site
Mark this to let end users install Web resources to an existing Web site. They
will see a list of existing Web sites to choose from.
„
Virtual Directory
Mark this to let end users install Web resources to a virtual directory. If you
select only this option, then this Web site will be installed as a virtual directory.
„
Install as Virtual Directory on Workstation
This applies only if the New Web Site option above is marked, and the
installation is installed to an operating system whose IIS version does not
support creation of a new Web site. This option ensures that end users can
install to a virtual directory even if you did not mark it above. Otherwise, the
installation will fail because it is trying to force a Web site to be created when
the IIS version disallows it.
Complete the New Web Site Prompts section.
These options are enabled if you mark New Web Site above. Mark the items that
the end user should be able to configure during installation. These items correspond
to options on the properties dialog box in IIS.
See About the Web Site Details Dialog on page 255.
7.
Click OK.
Note
Clicking OK on the details dialog box regenerates the Web dialog boxes in the
installation.
See also:
About Web Installations on page 245
Setting Installation Options for a Child Virtual Directory
An important part of setting up a Web installation is specifying the installation options
that will be available to the end user at run time. To do so, use the Virtual Directory UI
tab, which appears on the details dialog box for child virtual directories. If the virtual
directory is directly under Destination Computer, then see Setting Installation Options
for a Web Installation on page 252.
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You set options for each Web site or virtual directory you added on the Web Files page.
Setting installation options adds Web (IIS) dialog boxes to the installation. If you omit
the procedure below, no Web dialog boxes appear to the end user, and the installation
tries to apply the defaults for all items.
Warning
Do not edit the Web (IIS) dialog boxes, except to change their order (as a group) in the
installation sequence. Editing the Web dialog boxes might cause unexpected,
undesirable behavior, including damage to the installation. Also, any operation within
this product that affects the installation’s user interface will regenerate the Web dialog
boxes, therefore, any changes you make to them will be lost.
To set installation options
1.
Select Installation Expert > Web Files page.
2.
In the lower-left list box, select a child virtual directory and click Details. If you don’t
see the item you want, make sure you have the correct feature selected in Current
Feature.
The details dialog box appears.
3.
Click the Virtual Directory UI tab.
4.
To display installation dialog boxes to the end user at run time, mark Display RunTime UI. This adds Web dialog boxes to the installation. When you mark this check
box, the remaining options on the tab are enabled.
Note
If the UI is unavailable for the parent Web site, then Web dialog boxes are not
generated for this child virtual directory.
Note
If the current installation was built in an older version of Windows Installer Editor,
you are prompted to first convert the dialog boxes on the Dialogs page. Converting
resets navigation and conditions, so if you have customized the dialog boxes, back
up this installation before converting.
5.
Complete the tab:
„
„
6.
Web Resources Location:

New Virtual Directory
Mark this to let end users install Web resources in the named virtual
directory to a new virtual directory.

Existing Virtual Directory
Mark this to let end users choose to install Web resources to an existing
virtual directory. They will see a list of existing virtual directories to choose
from.
Let End Users Rename Virtual Directory at Run Time
Mark this to let end users enter a new name and parent directory for the virtual
directory, other than the name you set by default on the Web Files page.
Click OK.
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Note
Clicking OK on the details dialog box regenerates the Web dialog boxes in the
installation.
See also:
About Web Installations on page 245
About the Web Site Details Dialog
If you select a directory, virtual directory, or Web site on the Web Dialogs page and click
Details, a multi-tabbed Details dialog box appears. Most tabs on this dialog box
correspond to those in Internet Services Manager in Microsoft Internet Information
Server (IIS), version 5.0. For information on these tabs, see the IIS help.
Tabs that do not appear in IIS
Installation Settings
Lets you override existing settings when installing over an
existing Web site or virtual directory
See Creating a Web Site on page 247 or Creating a Virtual
Directory on page 249.
Web Site UI
(Web sites and top-level virtual directories) Lets you specify
the installation options that will be available to the end user
at run time
See Setting Installation Options for a Web Installation on
page 252.
Virtual Directory UI
(Child virtual directories only) Lets you specify the
installation options that will be available to the end user at
run time
See Setting Installation Options for a Child Virtual Directory
on page 253.
ASP.NET
Lets you specify the version of ASP.NET to register with IIS
When the installation installs the Web site, it registers that
version of ASP.NET with IIS for the Web site. It will register
the highest available version of ASP.NET that matches the
selected version. (Example: If you select version 2.0 and
there are two versions of 2.0, it will register the highest
version.) To specify a specific version, select User
Specified from the drop-down list and enter the version. To
pre-install the .NET Framework if it is not installed, use the
Prerequisites page.
See Adding Prerequisites to a Release on page 198.
Options in Windows Installer Editor that are different from IIS
z
On the Web Site tab, you can specify only one identity for a Web site (consisting of
an IP address, port, and host header), whereas in IIS you can specify multiple
identities.
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z
The Web Site tab lacks the Connections and Logging sections.
z
The Home Directory and Virtual Directory tabs lack the options to specify where the
content should come from.
z
The Directory Security tab lacks the IIS options for IP address and domain name
restrictions and Secure communications. The navigation of this tab is also different
from IIS.
z
The HTTP Headers tab lacks the ability to edit content ratings.
How options are set on the Web server
When you install a Web site or virtual directory that already exists, you can control
whether settings are changed on the Web server. Use the Override Existing Settings
drop-down list on the Web site Details dialog box > Installation Settings tab.
See also:
About Web Installations on page 245
Installing Web Settings From a File
You can let the end user run your Web installation on multiple computers and set the
same settings on each one without having to step through the Web dialog boxes.
Example: An end user, who operates a Web farm, wants to run your installation with the
same Web site settings on 12 computers.
This is accomplished by a Web settings XML file that is generated by the end user from a
special command line. The end user can edit this XML file to set the Web installation
options they want. When the end user runs the installation with another special
command line, the Web installation settings are obtained from the XML file.
The XML file can be created and used during the initial installation only. Using the
command lines during a reinstall or uninstall does not work. Instead, the .MSI runs as it
normally would for the reinstall or uninstall.
About the Web settings XML file
z
The XML file is generated for a specific operating system type. If the end user
creates the XML file on a server-class computer, those settings cannot be installed
on a workstation, and vice versa.
z
The XML file is generated for a specific .MSI and should only be used with that .MSI.
z
The XML file is generated for a specific version of Windows Installer Editor and can
only be used with that version.
z
The XML file contains the default Web site settings that you set in the installation.
z
If the installation contains a Web site, the XML file cannot be generated on a
workstation that runs on an operating system earlier than Windows Vista.
z
End users should limit their editing to the sections in the XML file that are
commented. These generally are settings that appear in the Web dialog boxes, that
is, settings that appear on the Installation Settings, Web Site UI, and Virtual
Directory tabs on the Web site details dialog box. Editing non-commented settings
can cause the installation to fail or cause IIS to be configured improperly. We cannot
provide technical support for such problems.
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To install Web settings from a file
This procedure is performed by end users. If you will let your end users use this feature,
you must provide them with this information.
1.
Run the installation with the following command line:
msiexec.exe /i "PathToMsi.msi" WISE_CONFIG_OUTPUT_PATH="PathToWebSettingsFile.xml"
where PathToMsi.msi is the full path to the installation and
PathToWebSettingsFile.xml is the full path to where the XML should be created.
The default Web site settings are written to the XML file that is specified in the
command line. The installation itself is not performed and a Setup Canceled dialog
box appears.
2.
Edit the XML file to set the desired options and then save the changes.
Follow the guidelines at the beginning of the XML file. Only edit settings that are
commented.
3.
On the destination computer, run the installation with the following command line:
msiexec.exe /i "PathToMsi.msi" WISE_CONFIG_INPUT_PATH="PathToWebSettingsFile.xml"
where PathToMsi.msi is the full path to the installation and
PathToWebSettingsFile.xml is the full path to the edited XML file.
The installation uses information in the XML file to configure the Web settings. Web
dialog boxes do not appear during installation.
Configuring a Microsoft SQL Server During
Installation
Use the SQL Server Scripts page to create or configure Microsoft SQL Server databases.
You might use this page if the application you are installing is a database application and
depends on certain database content and configuration. This page eliminates the need
to require end users to configure databases manually.
On this page, you specify a connection string and SQL statements, which are executed
during installation. Therefore, you have the ability to do any configuration that is
possible with SQL statements.
You can generate SQL statements in the following ways:
z
Type or paste SQL statements.
z
Import SQL statements from a file.
z
Specify a database to recreate, and the necessary SQL statements are generated
automatically.
To configure an installation to run a SQL script
1.
Select Installation Expert > SQL Server Scripts page.
See Tips for Using the SQL Server Scripts Page on page 258.
2.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you add
must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All Features
is selected.)
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Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer only if the
feature is installed. Items that you add to a condition are installed only if the feature
is installed and the condition is true.
3.
Click Add at the right side of the page.
The SQL Script Details dialog box appears.
4.
Click the Connection tab and specify a name for the SQL script and a connection
string that connects to the database the installation modifies.
See Setting SQL Connection Strings on page 259.
5.
Click the Statements tab and specify SQL statements to be executed on the
destination computer.
See Specifying SQL Statements on page 259.
6.
Click the Replacement tab and specify text strings to be found and replaced within
the SQL statements at install time.
See Specifying Replacements in SQL Statements on page 261.
7.
Click OK on the SQL Script Details dialog box.
The script is added to the list on the SQL Server Scripts page.
8.
The SQL scripts are executed in the order they appear on the SQL Server Scripts
page. To rearrange the order, select a statement name and click Move Up or Move
Down.
For information on setting the required SQL Server version, see Setting a Requirement
on the System Requirements Page on page 165.
Tips for Using the SQL Server Scripts Page
z
Add the SQL Connection dialog box to an installation to create a valid connection
string for a SQL Server located anywhere on the network of the destination
computer.
See About the SQL Connection Dialog on page 426.
z
Uninstall won’t roll back the changes performed by the SQL statements.
z
Databases are connected to and configured through the ODBC driver on the
destination computer.
z
The SQL scripts you specify are saved to a file with the same name as the script
name you specify, with the extension .SQL The file is added to the installation. This
file appears on the Files page under a Temp directory. During installation, this file is
installed, its statements are executed, and then it is deleted. Do not remove this file
from the installation.
z
The SQL Server Scripts page does not provide error checking for valid SQL syntax or
debugging for failed statements. Make sure the SQL code you enter is well-tested
before deployment. If errors occur during installation, the end user will see SQL
error messages.
Note
These tips assume familiarity with SQL Server statement syntax and debugging.
Technical Support does not provide assistance with debugging SQL statements.
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See also:
Configuring a Microsoft SQL Server During Installation on page 257
Setting SQL Connection Strings
To set SQL connection strings
1.
Click the Connection tab on the SQL Script Details dialog box.
See Configuring a Microsoft SQL Server During Installation on page 257.
2.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Name
A name for the SQL script is generated and displayed here. You can accept the
default or enter a more descriptive name. If you later change this field, the
script file is not renamed.
A file with this name and the extension .SQL is added to the installation.
„
Connection String
Enter a connection string that connects to a specific Microsoft SQL Server and
database. The default connection string works for most locally installed SQL
Server databases.
If you use the SQL Connection dialog box in this installation, enter the Windows
Installer property WISE_SQL_CONN_STR enclosed in brackets. This property is
populated with a valid connection string when the end user completes the SQL
Connection dialog box and clicks Next.
See About the SQL Connection Dialog on page 426.
If your application connects to more than one SQL Server during installation,
add a SQL Connection dialog box for each additional server, edit the additional
dialog boxes, and use a different property for each connection string.
See Editing Additional SQL Connection Dialogs on page 428.
The database you specify here must be accessible through ODBC on the
destination computer. If you have a database registered in ODBC on your own
computer, you can click Browse to select it, and the connection string is
generated. For this to work, the destination computer must have access to the
same database.
3.
Click OK.
See also:
Tips for Using the SQL Server Scripts Page on page 258
Specifying SQL Statements
To specify SQL statements
1.
Click the Statements tab on the SQL Script Details dialog box.
See Configuring a Microsoft SQL Server During Installation on page 257.
2.
To import a file containing SQL statements, click Import SQL File and specify a .SQL
or .TXT file that contains SQL statements.
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The statements appear on the Statements tab, where you can edit them. If you
later change the file on disk, you must re-import the file to include the changes in
the installation.
3.
To generate statements that recreate a database, click Recreate Database.
The Recreate Database dialog box appears.
4.
5.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Connection String
Specify a connection string to the Microsoft SQL Server and database. It must
be accessible to your computer. If it is registered as an ODBC data source on
your computer, click Browse to select it, and the connection string is generated.
„
Database Name
Enter a name for the database to be created on the destination computer.
„
Import Data Rows
Mark this to populate the database’s tables with all its current data. This is
unavailable until you mark the Import Tables check box below.
„
Import Views
Mark this to import the defined views of the database.
„
Import Procedures
Mark this to import the defined procedures of the database.
„
Import Tables
Mark this to import blank tables from the database. This does not import the
data (mark Import Data Rows to import data). You can import all tables, only
certain tables, or all tables except certain tables. For the last two options, enter
a list of table names delimited by commas.
„
Refresh when installation is compiled
Mark this to have the SQL statements regenerated from the actual database
when you compile this installation. This causes the compile to take longer. Do
not edit the SQL statements on the Statements tab, because they will be
overwritten during compile.
„
Remove this database first
Mark this to delete this database, if it already exists on the SQL Server, before
execution of the SQL statements. If this check box is cleared, and the database
already exists, then any overlapping tables are overwritten on the destination
computer, new tables are added, and non-overlapping tables are left as-is. This
results in a composite database that is mixture of new and old.
Click OK.
Note
Error checking or debugging is not available for statements that you type or import.
Make sure the SQL code you enter is well-tested before deployment. If errors occur
during installation, the end user will see SQL error messages.
See also:
Tips for Using the SQL Server Scripts Page on page 258
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Specifying Replacements in SQL Statements
You can specify text strings to be found and replaced within the SQL statements during
installation.
To specify replacements in SQL statements
1.
Click the Replacement tab on the SQL Script Details dialog box.
See Configuring a Microsoft SQL Server During Installation on page 257.
2.
Click Add.
The Add Replacement dialog box appears.
3.
4.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Text to Find
Enter regular text or formatted text, such as a bracketed property name. If you
enter formatted text, it is resolved before the find and replace takes place.
Example: If you enter [INSTALLDIR], the find and replace searches for the
value of INSTALLDIR.
„
Replace With
Enter regular text or formatted text, or select a current Windows Installer
property from the drop-down list. If you enter formatted text, items are
replaced with the value of the formatted text. This is useful for creating dynamic
installations. Example: Suppose you are creating a new database on the server.
Place an edit field on a dialog box asking for the new database name. The
answer is stored in a property, which you could then use in this field, replacing
the current database name.
Click OK.
Note
Keep in mind that any matching string is replaced, so only replace strings you know to
be unique. Example: If you replace “Red” with “Blue,” a “PreparedStatement” object in a
SQL statement becomes “PrepaBlueStatement” and breaks the code.
See also:
Tips for Using the SQL Server Scripts Page on page 258
Importing .NET Framework Security Settings
Use the .NET Framework Security page to import .NET Framework security settings from
your computer into an installation for a .NET application that you are deploying using
no-touch deployment. No-touch deployment lets system administrators deploy .NET
desktop applications through a remote Web server without altering the end user’s
registry or shared system components. Search for “No-Touch Deployment in the .NET
Framework” in the MSDN Library (msdn.microsoft.com/library/).
When an end user downloads your .NET application using no-touch deployment, they
need specific security settings to be able to run the application. You import these
security settings from your computer into the installation. When the application is
downloaded, the settings you imported into the installation change the client’s security
settings and enable the application to run.
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To be able to import security settings using the .NET Framework Security page, you
must have the .NET Framework installed on your computer. You create and configure
.NET Framework security settings using the Microsoft .NET Framework Configuration
tool, which is in Administrative Tools in your computer’s Control Panel. The .NET
Framework security settings consist of a hierarchy of code groups. When you import
.NET Framework Security settings, you import one or more of these code groups.
.NET Framework Security page
Properties and
values of the
code group last
selected in the
upper-left pane.
Code groups on
your computer.
Properties and
values of the
code group last
selected in the
lower-left pane.
Code groups you
have imported
from your
computer into
the installation.
To import .NET Framework security settings
1.
Select Installation Expert > .NET Framework Security page.
2.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you add
must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All Features
is selected.)
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer only if the
feature is installed. Items that you add to a condition are installed only if the feature
is installed and the condition is true.
3.
In the upper-left list box, navigate to and select the code group that contains the
security settings.
4.
Click Add Code Group to add the code group to the installation.
The code group appears in bold type in the lower-left pane. If you import a child
code group, any parent code groups also appear but are not in bold type. These
parent code groups contain no security settings, but maintain the correct
hierarchical structure for the code groups.
To delete a .NET Framework security code group from the installation, select it in the
lower-left list box and click Delete. If the code group has parent code groups that are
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not in bold type, they do not need to be deleted. They are removed when you exit the
.NET Framework Security page.
See also:
About Microsoft .NET Technology on page 497
MTS/COM+ Page
Use the MTS/COM+ page to add MTS or COM+ application packages to an installation.
The MTS/COM+ page is intended for software developers who know the computer
names of the servers that contain MTS or COM+ server applications.
Both MTS (Microsoft Transaction Server) and COM+ are steps in the evolution of the
Component Object Model (COM) technology. MTS, which was developed first, is a
transaction processing system for developing, deploying, and managing server
applications. MTS runs on Windows NT Server 4.0 or later.
COM+, the next generation of COM technology, is shipped with and requires the
Microsoft Windows operating system. It provides a standard that lets any two
components communicate with each other regardless of what computer each is running
on, the operating systems that are running, and the language in which the components
are written. All computers can communicate through COM if they have support for
DCOM (Distributed Component Object Model) installed.
MTS or COM+ packages generally consist of server software and client software. When
you add an MTS or COM+ package to an installation, you must designate it as either a
server installation or a client installation. You cannot add both the server and client
installation for a given MTS or COM+ application to the same feature. If you need to
install both the server and client of the same application, either create two .MSI files, or
put the server installation in one feature, and the client installation in another feature. If
the MTS or COM+ application contains roles, those roles are not installed on destination
computers.
See also:
Adding an MTS or COM+ Application on page 263
Adding an MTS or COM+ Application
To add an MTS or COM+ application
1.
Make sure that you have either MTS or COM+ on your computer, and that the MTS
or COM+ server application is installed and configured on your computer exactly as
it should be configured on the destination computer.
Note
(Optional) You can add the files that make up the MTS/COM+ application on the
Files page. This lets you place the files in any directory structure. Otherwise, the
files are placed in the Program Files\{GUID}\ directory. If you add the files yourself,
you must mark the Use Existing Source Paths check box later in this procedure.
2.
Select Installation Expert > MTS/COM+ page.
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3.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you add
must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All Features
is selected.)
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer only if the
feature is installed. Items that you add to a condition are installed only if the feature
is installed and the condition is true.
4.
Click Add at the right of the MTS/COM+ page.
The MTS/COM+ Application Details dialog box appears.
5.
6.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Application Name
Specify the MTS/COM+ application. You can only select from currently installed
applications.
„
GUID
(Read-only.) This contains the GUID of the MTS/COM+ application that you
select.
„
Installation Type
Select the installation type:

Client
Installs the client portion of the MTS/COM+ application. This installation type
requires a remote server name. In Remote Server Name, enter the name
of the computer on the network that will contain the MTS/COM+ server
application the client will connect to. If you design the installation so that the
server name is placed into a property dynamically during the installation
wizard dialog boxes, you can enter that property name here, surrounded by
brackets.

Server
Installs the server portion of the MTS/COM+ application.
„
Refresh/Update Application on Compile
Mark this to refresh the MTS/COM+ application from your computer's
Component Services control panel each time you compile the installation. If you
clear this check box, the MTS/COM+ application information is copied
immediately to this installation and is not refreshed during compile. Example:
You might use this option if you need to transfer the installation to a computer
that does not have the same MTS/COM+ application installed. If it is set to
refresh and the MTS/COM+ application is not found, an error occurs during
compile.
„
Use Existing Source Paths
Use this option to prevent the MTS/COM+ files from being added to the default
location on the Files page. This lets you place the files on the Files page in the
directory you choose. You must add the files that make up the MTS/COM+
application to the Files page before marking this check box. Otherwise, you will
get an error during compile.
Click OK.
The information you entered above is stored in the WiseComPlusApp and
WiseComPlusComponent tables in the Windows Installer database.
See also:
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MTS/COM+ Page on page 263
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Chapter 9
Translating an Installation
This chapter includes the following topics:
z
About the Languages Page on page 266
z
Defining and Translating Into Additional Languages on page 272
z
Translating Text Strings You Have Added or Changed on page 278
z
Resizing Dialog Controls After Translation on page 283
z
About the Language Menu on page 284
z
About the Language Strings Dialog on page 286
z
Keeping Track of Changed Text Strings on page 286
z
What Pre-Translated Languages Are Available? on page 287
z
Language IDs on page 288
About the Languages Page
You can translate the default dialog boxes in an installation into any language. Windows
Installer Editor contains 25 pre-translated languages in addition to English. You can add
any language that is not already pre-translated.
The Languages page displays pre-translated languages. Pre-translated languages
contain translations for all default text in the installation’s user interface elements.
Examples: error messages; disk prompts; text and controls on dialog boxes;
descriptions or names for launch conditions, features, or shortcuts; property values, file
names, and directory names.
Use the Languages page to:
Translate an installation into one or
more languages
This translates the default text in the
installation’s user interface elements. It does
not translate your application or any user
interface elements that you customize in the
installation.
See Creating a Translated .MSI on page 268.
Define a new language
Do this when the language you need is not one
of the pre-translated languages.
See Defining and Translating Into Additional
Languages on page 272.
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Export text strings to a file that
you can send to a translator
Do this when you define a new language, or
when you add or change any user interface
elements in an installation.
See Exporting Selected Text Strings to a File on
page 279.
Import translated text strings from
a file to the installation
See Importing All Text Strings After Translation
on page 275 and Importing All Text Strings
With the New Language Wizard on page 276.
Translate customized user
interface elements
See Translating Text Strings You Have Added
or Changed on page 278.
Keep track of changed, exported,
and imported strings
See Keeping Track of Changed Text Strings on
page 286.
Columns on the Languages page
The Languages page has two columns:
z
The Language Name column lists all available languages. To translate an
installation, you mark the check box for one or more languages. This adds
translated strings for that language to the installation. Translated installations are
generated during compile.
z
When you mark the check box for a language, the Text Translated column displays
Yes to indicate that the installation contains a translation for that language. All
languages that show Yes in this column are listed on the Language menu.
Options for compiling a translated installation
z
Compile to a separate .MSI file for the default language plus each language that is
marked on the Languages page.
See Creating a Translated .MSI on page 268.
z
Compile to a language transform (.MST). The compile creates an .MSI for the
default language and a separate .MST for each language that is marked on the
Languages page. At installation, the appropriate .MST must be applied to the .MSI
to change the installation language.
See Creating a Language Transform on page 269.
When translations are not compiled
When you mark a language check box, then clear it, the translation remains in the
installation but no .MSI or .MST is created in that language during compile. This lets you
omit a language from the compile without losing any translated text strings. This is
especially important when you have added custom translated text.
Additional translation options
You can create a multiple-language installation that installs in the destination computer’s
language or prompts the end user to select a language.
See Outputting a Multiple-Language Release on page 187.
A Share option makes it easy to translate several releases into the same language or set
of languages, with the same language settings.
See Sharing Language Settings Between Releases on page 270.
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Note
The Languages page is unavailable for transforms. Edit languages in the base .MSI.
Creating a Translated .MSI
You can translate an installation to another language and have it compile to one or more
.MSI files. A separate .MSI is created for the default language plus each language that is
marked on the Languages page.
z
You can compile all languages into one installation file.
See Outputting a Multiple-Language Release on page 187.
z
If you have customized any of the user interface elements of this installation, you
must translate the changed text before translating the installation.
See Translating Text Strings You Have Added or Changed on page 278.
z
If the language you need is not listed on the Languages page, you must define a
new language and translate its text strings.
See Defining and Translating Into Additional Languages on page 272.
Note
If the installation contains Web resources, adding or changing a language regenerates
the Web dialog boxes in the installation.
To create a translated .MSI
1.
Select Installation Expert > Languages page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
Mark the check box next to each language to translate this installation to.
Some .MSI files might not have languages listed on the Languages page. In that
case, you must use the .WSI that compiled the .MSI.
Note
If this installation was created in a previous version of Windows Installer Editor, but
you did not update the path variables when you first opened the installation in the
newer version, you will receive an error when you mark a language check box. To fix
this, close the installation, reopen it, and click Yes in the prompt that asks you to
update variables.
The remaining steps are optional.
4.
Double-click the marked language.
The Language Details dialog box appears.
5.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Destination File
Specify the full path for the translated .MSI; be sure to include the .MSI file
extension.
If you leave this field blank, this language is always compiled to an .MSI whose
name is created by adding an underscore and the language name to the
installation file name. Example: If you mark the check box for German and the
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installation file is named Sample, a file named Sample_German.msi is created
during compile.
If you specify an .MST file instead of an .MSI, this language is compiled to a
language transform.
See Creating a Language Transform on page 269.
„
Codepage, Language ID
Leave the defaults in these fields. You typically only change these fields when
you define a new language.
„
Default release language
(.WSI files only.) Mark this to use this language as the default language for this
release. During compile, the default release language overrides the Default
language on the Language menu.
Note
Only one language per release can be the default release language. An error
message lets you know if you mark this check box for a second language.
See About the Default Release Language on page 285.
6.
Click OK.
7.
If needed, complete the Language Details dialog box for any other languages that
are marked.
Default text strings for the selected release are translated into the selected languages.
You can share these language settings with other releases in this installation.
See Sharing Language Settings Between Releases on page 270.
Creating a Language Transform
You can create one or more language transforms that change the language in the dialog
boxes that appear during installation. The compile creates an .MSI for the default
language and a separate .MST for each language that is marked on the Languages page.
During installation, the appropriate .MST must be applied to the .MSI to change the
installation language.
See Applying a Transform to an Installation on page 345.
z
If you have customized any of the user interface elements of this installation, you
must translate the changed text before translating the installation.
See Translating Text Strings You Have Added or Changed on page 278.
z
If the language you need is not listed on the Languages page, you must define a
new language and translate its text strings.
See Defining and Translating Into Additional Languages on page 272.
Note
If the installation contains Web resources, adding or changing a language regenerates
the Web dialog boxes in the installation.
To create a language transform
1.
Select Installation Expert > Languages page.
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2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
Mark the check box next to each language to create a language transform for.
Some .MSI files might not have languages listed on the Languages page. In that
case, you must use the .WSI that compiled the .MSI.
4.
Double-click the marked language.
The Language Details dialog box appears.
5.
In Destination File, specify the full path for the translated .MST; be sure to include
the .MST file extension.
If you specify an .MSI file instead of an .MST, this language is compiled to an
installation database.
See Creating a Translated .MSI on page 268.
6.
Leave the defaults in Codepage and Language ID. You typically change these
fields only when you define a new language. The Default release language check
box is unavailable when you specify an .MST as the destination file.
7.
Click OK.
8.
If needed, complete the Language Details dialog box for any other languages you
marked.
Default text strings for the selected release are translated into the selected languages.
You can share these language settings with other releases in this installation.
See Sharing Language Settings Between Releases on page 270.
Sharing Language Settings Between Releases
You can translate several releases into the same language or languages, with the same
settings you define in the Language Details dialog box. To do this, you share language
settings between releases.
After you initially share language settings, the settings for the releases are linked. This
means that any change you make to the language settings for any of the linked releases
is applied to all other linked releases. At any time, you can break the link. Breaking the
link does not change the current settings for the releases.
To share settings between releases
1.
Translate the installation to another language.
See Creating a Translated .MSI on page 268.
2.
Select Installation Expert > Languages page.
3.
From Current Release, select the release to copy settings to.
4.
Click Share at the right of the page. The Share Release dialog box appears.
5.
From Copy/Share Languages From, select the release that contains the settings
to copy.
6.
Click OK.
The settings of the release in Copy/Share Languages From immediately replace the
settings of the release in Current Release. Any change you make to the language
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settings of either of the linked releases is also applied to the other release, until you
break the link.
To break a link between releases
1.
Select Installation Expert > Languages page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
Click Share at the right of the page. The Share Release dialog box appears.
4.
From Copy/Share Languages From, select <None>.
5.
Click OK.
The link between the selected release and other releases is broken. The current settings
of the releases are not changed, but changing settings for one release no longer affects
the settings of the other release.
Removing a Language from an Installation
You can disable a language in an installation. This means the installation still contains
the translated strings for the disabled language but the installation is not compiled to
that language.
You also can delete a language entirely from an installation. This means the language is
removed from the Languages page and its translated strings are deleted from the
installation. This is not recommended if you have added or changed text strings in a
language, because the customized strings are lost.
Note
If the installation contains Web resources, adding or changing a language regenerates
the Web dialog boxes in the installation.
To disable a language in an installation
1.
Select Installation Expert > Languages page and clear the check box next to the
language to disable.
The translated text strings for that language remain in the installation, but the
installation is not translated to that language during compile. To compile the installation
to that language again, simply mark its check box. In this way you can easily turn a
language off and on.
To delete a language entirely from an installation
1.
Select Installation Expert > Languages page, click a language, and click Delete at
the right of the page.
The language is removed from the Languages page in the installation. Text strings for
the deleted language are deleted from the installation, unless that language is selected
in another release. The language will still be available in other installations if it is one of
the pre-translated languages or if you added it to the installation template.
Warning
When you delete a language this way, all custom translated text strings in that language
are lost.
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To restore a language that was deleted
If you use the Delete button on the Languages page to delete a language and its text
strings from an installation, you can later restore that language to the installation if you
have a file containing translated text strings for that language.
Add the language to the Languages page and import translated text strings.
See Importing All Text Strings With the New Language Wizard on page 276.
z
To restore one of the pre-translated languages, select the appropriate resource file
from the Languages subdirectory. To restore a language that you added and had
translated, specify the resource or text file containing the translated text strings.
The location of the Languages subdirectory varies.
See Installation Resources and Their Locations on page 28.
The language is restored to the Languages page.
Note
This process does not restore any custom translated text.
Defining and Translating Into Additional Languages
If the language you need is not one of the 25 pre-translated languages, you can add it to
the Languages page and add translated text for that language. Then you can translate
installations into the new language.
Example:
Suppose you want to translate an installation into Swiss French. However, that language
is not one of the pre-translated languages. You can add Swiss French to the Languages
page and add Swiss French text strings to the installation. Then, you can compile an
installation that displays Swiss French on all dialog boxes and error messages.
The new language and its translated strings are added to the current installation only. To
make the new language available for future installations, add it to an installation
template instead of to a specific installation.
See Creating and Editing Installation Templates on page 48.
Process for defining and translating into a new language
1.
If you plan to customize or add new elements to the user interface of the
installation, do so first. That way, the customized strings will be included when you
export text strings for translation.
2.
Add the new language to the list on the Languages page by defining language
settings, then export the text strings in the installation to a resource or text file.
See Defining a New Language and Exporting All Text for Translation on page 274.
3.
Have the text strings translated to the new language. The translator should
translate the strings in place in the same file, to ensure the returned file is
formatted identically.
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Warning
If you export the strings to a text file, make sure that the first two fields in the text
file are not translated. These are the table and key names for the text strings and
must remain intact.
4.
Import the translated resource or text file.
See Importing All Text Strings After Translation on page 275.
Now you can compile the installation to the new language.
See Creating a Translated .MSI on page 268 and Creating a Language Transform on
page 269.
After the initial translation, whenever you add or change text strings, you must have
them translated if you want them in the new language.
See Translating Text Strings You Have Added or Changed on page 278.
About the New Language Wizard
Use the New Language wizard to:
z
Define a new language on the Languages page.
z
Export text strings to a file that you can send to a translator.
z
Import translated text strings from a file to the installation.
To use the New Language wizard
1.
Select Installation Expert > Languages page.
2.
Click Add at the right of the page.
The Specify Language Details page appears.
3.
Complete the page. The information you need to enter depends on what you plan to
do; for details, see the topics listed in the next step. Then click Next.
The Export/Import Text Strings for Language page appears.
4.
Mark one of the following options:
„
Export
Export all text strings to a file for translation into this new language. This is the
option most typically used.
See Defining a New Language and Exporting All Text for Translation on
page 274.
„
Import
Import a file containing translated text strings for this language. Do this if you
already have translated text strings for this language.
See Importing All Text Strings With the New Language Wizard on page 276.
„
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None
Add a new language with text strings in the default language. Do this when you
want to add a new language to the Languages page now and translate the
strings later.
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5.
If you select None, click Finish to add the language to the Languages page and exit
the wizard. If you select Export or Import, click Next. Additional pages appear; for
details, see the topics listed in the preceding step.
Defining a New Language and Exporting All Text for Translation
If the language you need is not one of the 25 pre-translated languages, you can define
the new language on the Languages page, then export strings from the installation.
Later, you have the strings translated and import the translated strings.
To define a new language and export all text for translation
1.
Select Installation Expert > Languages page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
Click Add at the right of the page.
The New Language wizard appears with the Specify Language Details page.
4.
Complete the page:
„
Language Name
Enter a name for the new language.
„
Destination File
(Optional.) Specify the full path for the translated installation file. You can
create an .MSI or a transform (.MST).
If you leave this field blank, this language is always compiled to an .MSI whose
name is created by adding an underscore and the language name to the
installation file name. Example: If the new language is named NewLanguage,
and the installation file is named Sample, the translated installation is compiled
to Sample_NewLanguage.msi.
„
Codepage
A code page ensures that the correct character set is used for the language you
are adding. In most cases, it is best to specify 0, which is a language-neutral
code page. If the language you are adding uses a multi-byte character set, then
select the appropriate code page from the drop-down list. See Setting the Code
Page of a Database in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
„
Language ID
Specify only one language ID for the language you are adding. Windows
Installer supports only one language in this field.
Language IDs are standardized.
See Language IDs on page 288.
„
Default release language
(.WSI files only.) Mark this to use this language as the default language for this
release. During compile, the default release language overrides the Default
language on the Language menu.
Note
Only one language per release can be the default release language. An error
message lets you know if you mark this check box for a second language.
See About the Default Release Language on page 285.
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5.
Click Next.
The Export/Import Text Strings for Language page appears.
6.
If you have not had the strings translated, mark Export and click Next.
The Export Default Strings page appears.
7.
Complete the page:
„
8.
Export As
Select a file type for the text strings:

Resource File
Exports the strings to a Visual C++ style resource file; this includes an .H
(header) file. With a resource editor, you or the translator can resize dialog
boxes appropriately for each language.

Text File
Exports the strings to a standard text file, in which they are separated by
tabs.
„
File Name
Specify the full path for the file to export text strings to.
„
Export File and Directory Names
Mark this to include the installation’s file and directory names in the export file.
Click Finish.
The text strings are exported to the file you specified, which you can send to a
translator. When you receive the translated file from the translator, you import the text
strings into the installation.
See Importing All Text Strings After Translation.
Importing All Text Strings After Translation
Typically, while adding a new language to the Languages page, you export the text
strings from the installation to a file and send them to a translator. After the text strings
for the new language are translated, you must import them into the installation. In this
procedure, you use the Language Strings dialog box to import translated text strings.
This procedure assumes that you have added the new language to the Languages page,
defined its settings, and exported text strings.
See Defining a New Language and Exporting All Text for Translation on page 274.
If you have not defined language settings for the new language, you can use the New
Language wizard to define the language settings and import the text strings at the same
time.
See Importing All Text Strings With the New Language Wizard on page 276.
Note
In .TXT files, if tab characters for one or more text strings are added or deleted during
translation, the text strings cannot be imported. To determine whether there are any
text strings that are not imported and therefore not translated, go to the Language
Strings dialog box and compare the entries in the Changed and Exported columns. They
should match.
See Keeping Track of Changed Text Strings on page 286.
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To import all text strings using the Language Strings dialog box
1.
Select Installation Expert > Languages page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
Click Strings at the right of the page.
The Language Strings dialog box appears.
4.
From Language, select the language for which you will replace all text strings.
5.
At the bottom left of the Language Strings dialog box, click Import.
The Import Language Strings dialog box appears.
6.
In Translated Strings File, specify the name of the file that contains the
translated text strings for the new language.
7.
Make sure the Do not compare with current strings option is marked. You only
need to compare strings when you import strings you add or change after you have
imported all strings.
8.
Click OK.
The translated text strings are imported into the installation and you can translate the
installation to the new language.
See Creating a Translated .MSI on page 268 and Creating a Language Transform on
page 269.
Importing All Text Strings With the New Language Wizard
You can use the New Language wizard to import text strings at the same time you define
a new language on the Languages page. Do this only when you already have a file
containing translated text strings for the language you are adding. Example: If you
added the language Swiss French to a previous installation, and now you want to use it
in a new installation, you can use the New Language wizard to import Swiss French
translations to the new installation.
Note
A better way to make a new language available for multiple installations is to add it to an
installation template instead of to a specific installation.
See Creating and Editing Installation Templates on page 48.
You might also use this process to restore a language that you deleted from the
Languages page. You must have access to the original file that contains the translated
text strings. This process does not restore any custom translated text.
Typically, you do not have a translated text file at the time you define a new language.
Instead, you use the New Language wizard to define a new language and export text
strings to a file, you have the file translated, and you import the translated strings at a
later time.
See Defining and Translating Into Additional Languages on page 272.
To import all text strings with the New Language wizard
1.
Select Installation Expert > Languages page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
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3.
Click Add at the right of the page.
The New Language wizard appears with the Specify Language Details page.
4.
Complete the page:
„
Language Name
Enter a name for the new language.
„
Destination File
(Optional.) Specify the full path for the translated installation file. You can
create an .MSI or a transform (.MST).
If you leave this field blank, this language is always compiled to an .MSI whose
name is created by adding an underscore and the language name to the
installation file name. Example: If the new language is named NewLanguage,
and the installation file is named Sample, the translated installation is compiled
to Sample_NewLanguage.msi.
„
Codepage
A code page ensures that the correct character set is used for the language you
are adding. In most cases, it is best to specify 0, which is a language-neutral
code page. If the language you are adding uses a multi-byte character set, then
select the appropriate code page from the drop-down list. See Setting the Code
Page of a Database in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
„
Language ID
Specify only one language ID for the language you are adding. Windows
Installer supports only one language in this field.
Language IDs are standardized.
See Language IDs on page 288 or visit msdn.microsoft.com.
„
Default release language
(.WSI files only.) Mark this to use this language as the default language for this
release. During compile, the default release language overrides the Default
language on the Language menu.
Note
Only one language per release can be the default release language. An error
message lets you know if you mark this check box for a second language.
See About the Default Release Language on page 285.
5.
Click Next.
The Export/Import Text Strings page appears.
6.
Mark Import and click Next.
The Import Translated Text Strings page appears.
7.
In Translated Strings File, specify the file containing the translated strings.
8.
Click Finish.
The translated text strings are imported into the installation and you can translate the
installation to the new language.
See Creating a Translated .MSI on page 268 and Creating a Language Transform on
page 269.
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Translating Text Strings You Have Added or
Changed
When you add or change any user interface elements in an installation, you must
translate those changes if you want them to appear in another language. Examples:
error messages; disk prompts; text and controls on dialog boxes; descriptions or names
for launch conditions, features, or shortcuts; property values, file names, and directory
names.
You have several options for finding out which strings need to be translated and getting
the translated text into the installation:
z
If you change multiple strings and need to send them to a translator, export only the
changed strings to a file. Send the file to a translator, then import the translated
strings back into the installation.
See Translating Text Strings by Exporting to a File on page 278.
z
If you make just a few small changes and you know the translations, you can edit
the text directly.
See Translating Text Directly Without Exporting It on page 281.
z
If you are adding an entire new language, you can export all text strings in the
installation, have them translated, and then import the translated strings to the
installation.
See Defining and Translating Into Additional Languages on page 272.
The translated text might require more space than the default language. (Example:
Most languages require more space than English.) Therefore, you might need to resize
dialog box controls to accommodate text expansion.
See Resizing Dialog Controls After Translation on page 283.
Note
dialog box controls are shared across all languages, which means that a control you add
to one language is added to all other languages as well. Similarly, a control you delete in
one language is deleted in all other languages. However, you can add conditions to show
or hide certain controls in certain languages.
See Conditions for controls on dialog boxes on page 388. Also see UserLanguageID
Property in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
Translating Text Strings by Exporting to a File
When you add or change any user interface elements in an installation, you must
translate those changes if you want them to appear in another language. To do so, you
export the new or changed text strings to a file, have them translated, then import the
translated strings back into the installation.
See Exporting Selected Text Strings to a File on page 279 and Importing Selected Text
Strings From a File on page 280.
Example:
Suppose an installation is in English and Spanish. You decide to add a new dialog box to
the installation wizard. You add the dialog box in the default language (in this case,
English). That way, the dialog box is added to all languages in the installation (English
and Spanish). However, because the Spanish text for the new dialog box does not exist,
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the new dialog box displays in English, even in the Spanish version of the installation.
You must export all the text on the new dialog box to a file, have it translated to
Spanish, and then import the Spanish version of the text back into the installation.
z
If you are translating the entire installation to a new language, you can export,
translate, and import all text strings in the installation.
See Defining and Translating Into Additional Languages on page 272.
z
If you make just a few small changes and you know the translations, you can edit
the text directly.
See Changing Text in Installation Expert and Setup Editor on page 282.
z
You can use the Language Strings dialog box on the Languages page to keep track
of changed and exported text strings.
See Keeping Track of Changed Text Strings on page 286.
Exporting Selected Text Strings to a File
Export selected text strings when you add or change text strings in an installation that is
translated to another language. Example: When you add a custom dialog box, you must
translate the text in that dialog box to all other languages used in the installation.
To export selected text strings
1.
Select Installation Expert > Languages page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
Click Strings at the right of the page.
The Language Strings dialog box appears.
4.
From Language, select the language to export text strings for. The drop-down list
shows those languages that have translated text strings in this installation; they are
indicated by a Yes in the Text Translated column on the Languages page.
5.
On the Language Strings dialog box, click Export.
The Export Language Strings dialog box appears.
6.
From Export As, select a file type for the text strings:
„
Resource File
Exports the dialog boxes and strings to a Visual C++ style resource file; this
includes an .H (header) file. With a resource editor, you or the translator can
resize dialog boxes appropriately for each language.
„
Text File
Exports the strings to a standard text file, in which fields are separated by tabs.
Warning
Make sure that the first two fields in the text file are not translated. These are the
table and key names for the text strings and must remain intact.
7.
In File Name, specify the full path for the file to export text strings to.
8.
From Export Options, select which strings to export:
„
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New or changed strings since last export
Export strings that were added or changed since you last exported text strings
for translation.
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9.
„
New or changed strings in installation
Export all strings that were added or changed in this installation.
„
All strings in current language
Export all the text strings in the language you selected from the Language
drop-down list.
„
All strings in default language
Export the text strings in the default language for the .WSI. This is either the
Default language on the Language menu or the default release language
defined on the Language Details dialog box.
To include the installation’s file and directory names in the export file, mark Export
File and Directory Names.
10. Click OK.
The text strings are exported to the file you specified, which you can send to a
translator. When you receive the translated file from the translator, you import the text
strings into the installation.
See Importing Selected Text Strings From a File.
Importing Selected Text Strings From a File
When you add or change text strings in an installation that is translated to another
language, you must export the changed text strings and have them translated.
See Exporting Selected Text Strings to a File on page 279.
When you receive translated text strings from the translator, you import them into the
installation so that those text strings appear in the correct language in the compiled
installation.
To import selected text strings
1.
Select Installation Expert > Languages page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
Click Strings at the right of the page.
The Language Strings dialog box appears.
4.
From Language, select the language to import text strings for.
5.
In the Language Strings dialog box, click Import.
The Import Language Strings dialog box appears.
6.
In Translated Strings File, specify the name of the file that contains the
translated text strings.
7.
If additional text changes might have been made since the text strings were
exported, you can compare the strings in the installation to the strings in the
original export file. If the strings don’t match, the corresponding translated strings
are not imported. To enable the compare:
8.
a.
Mark Compare current strings with original strings.
b.
In Original Strings File, specify the name of the file you exported for
translation.
Click OK.
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The translated text strings are inserted into the installation.
If you chose to compare the text strings during the import, an error message informs
you when one or more text strings in the installation have been changed since the
export. In that case, the translated strings that correspond to the changed strings are
not imported. You should re-export the changed text strings for additional translation.
Note
In .TXT files, if tab characters for one or more text strings are added or deleted during
translation, the text strings cannot be imported. To find out if there are any text strings
that are not imported and therefore not translated, go to the Language Strings dialog
box and compare the entries in the Changed and Exported columns. They should match.
See Keeping Track of Changed Text Strings on page 286.
Translating Text Directly Without Exporting It
Typically, you export all text strings, file names, and directory names to a file to have
them translated. Then you import the translations back into the installation. However, in
some instances you might need to translate a small amount of text, such as a single
dialog box control or a single file name. Rather than going through the process of
exporting and importing changed text strings, you can make these changes yourself for
each language.
Example:
Suppose you have translated an installation to German. Then you add a Cancel button to
an existing dialog box. You already know the German translation for “Cancel” because
other dialog boxes contain a Cancel button. In this case, you don’t need to export,
translate, and import the changed string; you can change the text for the new Cancel
button.
You have the following options for translating changed text:
z
Translate specific text in the Language Strings dialog box. This lets you see at a
glance the translation status of text strings in the installation.
See Translating Text on the Language Strings Dialog.
z
Change specific text in Installation Expert and Setup Editor.
See Changing Text in Installation Expert and Setup Editor on page 282.
Both of the above procedures assume that you already have the translation for the
changed text.
z
If you are adding an entire new language, you can export, translate, and import all
text strings in the installation.
See Defining and Translating Into Additional Languages on page 272.
z
If you change several strings and need to put them in a file for the translator, you
can export, translate, and import only the strings you changed.
See Translating Text Strings by Exporting to a File on page 278.
Translating Text on the Language Strings Dialog
In the Language Strings dialog box, you can change translated text for any of the
selected languages. Do this when you have only a small amount of text to be changed
and you know the translation for that text.
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If you need to translate larger amounts of text, export the text strings to a file.
See Translating Text Strings by Exporting to a File on page 278.
To translate a small amount of text
1.
Select Installation Expert > Languages page.
2.
From Current Release, select a release.
3.
Click Strings at the right of the page.
The Language Strings dialog box appears.
4.
From Language, select a language. The Language Strings dialog box shows the
text strings for that language.
5.
In the Translated Text column, click the text to change and press Enter.
6.
Enter new text or change the existing text.
7.
Press Enter.
You can observe the change in the corresponding table in the Tables tab in Setup Editor.
Similarly, you can change text in the Tables tab or the Dialogs tab, then observe the
change here in the Language Strings dialog box.
See Changing Text in Installation Expert and Setup Editor.
Changing Text in Installation Expert and Setup
Editor
You can change translated text for any of the selected languages in certain areas of
Installation Expert and Setup Editor. Do this when you have only a small amount of text
to be changed and you know the translation for that text.
If you need to translate larger amounts of text, export the text strings to a file.
See Translating Text Strings by Exporting to a File on page 278.
To change translated text
1.
From the Language menu, select a language.
2.
Go to the table, dialog box, or Installation Expert page that contains the text string,
file name, or directory name to edit.
3.
Change the text. Note that the text is changed only for the language you selected
from the Language menu.
You can observe the change in the Language Strings dialog box. Similarly, you can
change translated text in the Language Strings dialog box, then observe the change in
Installation Expert or Setup Editor.
See Translating Text on the Language Strings Dialog on page 281.
Tables and columns that contain text strings you can translate
You can edit the strings in Setup Editor > Tables tab, in other Setup Editor tabs, or in
Installation Expert.
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Table
Columns you can translate and edit
ActionText
Description, Template
BBControl
Text
ComboBox
Text
Control
Text, Help
Dialog
Title
Directory
DefaultDir
DuplicateFile
DestName
Error
Message
Feature
Title, Description
File
FileName
LaunchCondition
Description
ListBox
Text
ListView
Text
Media
DiskPrompt
Property
Value
RadioButton
Text, Help
Shortcut
Name, Description
UIText
Text
WiseReleaseMediaDest
DiskPrompt
Resizing Dialog Controls After Translation
Because some languages require more space than others, you might need to resize
dialog box controls (examples: buttons and text boxes) to accommodate text expansion.
To resize dialog box controls
1.
From the Language menu, select a language.
To resize dialog box controls across all languages, select the Default language.
2.
Select Setup Editor > Dialogs tab.
3.
Click the dialog box to change.
4.
Select a dialog box control and resize it.
See Types of Dialog Controls on page 411.
Note
dialog box controls are shared across all languages, which means that a control you add
to one language is added to all other languages as well. Similarly, a control you delete in
one language is deleted in all other languages. However, you can add conditions to show
or hide certain controls in certain languages.
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See Conditions for controls on dialog boxes on page 388. Also see UserLanguageID
Property in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
About the Language Menu
The Language menu lists all languages that have text translated in the installation. Use
the Language menu to display translatable items in another language. Examples: error
messages; disk prompts; text and controls on dialog boxes; descriptions or names for
launch conditions, features, or shortcuts; property values, file names, and directory
names.
Example:
Suppose you have translated an installation to German, and you want to resize buttons
and text boxes on a dialog box to accommodate the longer German text. In Setup Editor,
click the Dialogs tab and display a dialog box. Its text is in the default language. Now
select Language menu > German. The dialog box is displayed in German, and you can
resize dialog box controls as needed.
When you add or change text in the installation’s user interface elements, make sure
Language menu > Default is selected. That way, the items are added or changed for all
languages. If you change the user interface while a different language is selected, the
change is made for that language only.
The Language menu does not affect the basic information in the installation, such as
files added or dialog boxes selected. This means you cannot add files or select dialog
boxes for a certain language in this manner. Any file you add in Installation Expert or
any dialog box you select in the Dialogs tab in one language is added and selected for all
languages in the overall installation. To add files or select dialog boxes for a certain
language only, use features and the Release Settings page.
See Customizing a Release on page 188.
The default language is initially English, however, you can change it. You also can
override the default language for a specific release by designating a default release
language.
See Changing the Default Language on page 284 and About the Default Release
Language on page 285.
Changing the Default Language
The Default language that appears on the Language menu is initially English and is the
same for all new installations. During compile, an .MSI is always created for the default
language regardless of how many other languages are marked on the Languages page.
When you translate an installation into one or more language transforms, the base .MSI
is always compiled in the default language. The exception is when you define a default
release language.
See About the Default Release Language on page 285.
You can change the default language for new installations by creating a new installation
template. Although templates must be in .MSI format, you must start with a .WSI
because you cannot specify the default language in an .MSI.
To create a template with a different default language
1.
Select File menu > New.
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The New Installation File dialog box appears.
2.
In the Categories list, click Predefined Templates.
3.
In the Templates/Tools list, click the Windows Application icon.
4.
Mark Create .WSI or .WSM project file that can be compiled into an .MSI or
.MSM and click OK.
5.
Select Installation Expert > Languages page and mark the check box next to the
language that should be the default.
6.
Double-click the language name to display the Language Details dialog box.
7.
Mark Default release language and click OK.
8.
Click Compile.
9.
In the Save As dialog box that appears,
a.
Navigate to the Templates subdirectory and enter a file name. The location of
the Templates subdirectory varies.
See Installation Resources and Their Locations on page 28.
b.
From Save as Type, select Installer Projects (*.wsi).
c.
Click Save.
The .WSI is saved and then is compiled to an .MSI. Only .MSIs appear in the New
Installation File dialog box as templates.
To test the new template:
1.
Select File menu > New.
The New Installation File dialog box appears and the file you just created appears in
the Custom Templates category. If the New Installation File dialog box does not
contain the new template, check to make sure you saved the installation as an .MSI
in the Templates directory.
2.
Select the template you just created and click OK.
3.
Check that the default language has been changed:
„
The Default language should be the only one listed on the Language menu.
„
In Installation Expert > Dialogs page, display any dialog box. The dialog box
should appear in the new default language rather than in English.
You can use this template to create installations in which the default language is the one
you selected.
About the Default Release Language
The default release language is defined for a specific installation. It overrides the Default
language on the Language menu during compile.
Example: Suppose you’re creating an installation named Sample and you only want to
create one .MSI, in German. Mark the Default release language check box on the
Language Details dialog box for German. When you compile, Sample.msi will be in
German. If you don’t mark the check box, the compile will create two files: Sample.msi,
which is in the default language, and Sample_German.msi.
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You can also use the default release language to change the language of a base .MSI,
against which you will apply other language transforms. Example: Suppose you create
an installation named Sample2. On the Languages page, you mark the check box for
German and, on the Language Details dialog box for German, you mark the Default
release language check box. Then, back on the Languages page, you mark the check
box for Spanish. On the Language Details dialog box for Spanish, you enter
Sample2_Spanish.mst as the Destination File. When you compile, the following files
result: Sample2.msi, which is in German, and Sample2_Spanish.mst, which is a Spanish
language transform.
The Default release language check box is on the Language Details dialog box and
the Specify Language Details page of the New Language wizard. It appears in .WSI files
only.
Note
Only one language per release can be the default release language.
About the Language Strings Dialog
The Language Strings dialog box, which appears when you click the Strings button at
the right of the Installation Expert > Languages page, displays all translated and default
text strings side by side. Use the Language Strings dialog box to translate strings and
keep track of changed text strings.
Columns on the Language Strings dialog box
Translated text
Lists all text strings in the selected language
Default Text
Lists all text strings in the default language
Table
Indicates the table in the database that contains the string
Key
Shows the key to the table
Column
Indicates which column of the table is translated
Changed
Yes indicates that a text string has been added or changed
See Keeping Track of Changed Text Strings on page 286.
Exported
Yes indicates that a text string has been exported
See Keeping Track of Changed Text Strings.
See also:
Exporting Selected Text Strings to a File on page 279
Importing All Text Strings After Translation on page 275
Importing Selected Text Strings From a File on page 280
Translating Text on the Language Strings Dialog on page 281
Keeping Track of Changed Text Strings
Two columns in the Language Strings dialog box help you keep track of changed,
exported, and imported strings: the Changed column and the Exported column. Both
columns should contain No when you are ready to compile a translated installation.
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When you do this
the Changed
column contains
and the Exported
column contains
Add or change a text string
Yes
No
Export strings
Yes
Yes
Import strings
No
No
The same stages apply when you add or change files or directories, if you export file and
directory names for translation. If you do not export file and directory names, then the
entry in the Changed column remains Yes.
If the Changed column still reads Yes after you have imported text strings, one of two
things happened:
z
Formatting for the corresponding text string in the resource or text file was
changed. (Example: This can happen if a tab in a text file was deleted or moved.)
Try to reformat the resource or text file and then import it again.
z
When you imported, you chose to compare current strings with original strings, and
you have made changes to the strings in the interim. In this case, export changed
text strings again. Translate the strings that have changed, then import them.
What Pre-Translated Languages Are Available?
Pre-translated text strings let you instantly translate an installation into the following
languages:
Chinese (PRC)
Chinese (Taiwan)
Czech
Danish
Dutch (Netherlands)
Finnish
French
French (Canadian)
German
Greek
Hindi
Hungarian
Indonesian
Italian
Japanese
Korean
Norwegian
Polish
Portuguese
Portuguese (Brazil)
Romanian
Russian
Spanish
Spanish (Basque)
Spanish (Catalan)
Swedish
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Thai
Turkish
If the language you need is not listed here, you can send the installation text strings to
a translator and then add the new language and the translated strings to the Languages
page.
See Defining and Translating Into Additional Languages on page 272.
The default language for all installations is English, unless you change it.
See Changing the Default Language on page 284.
Language IDs
Windows Installer uses language IDs to determine whether the destination computer
supports the language that is used for the installation dialog boxes. Example: If you
create an installation with the language ID for Greek, that installation only runs on a
computer with Greek fonts.
Language IDs and Locale Codes for Common Languages
For additional language codes, search for “locale ID chart” in the MSDN Library
(msdn.microsoft.com/library).
Language
Sublanguage
Language ID
(decimal
notation)
ANSI
codepage
Languageneutral
0
Process or
User Default
Language
1024
Czech
1029
1250
Danish
Danish
1030
1252
Dutch
Belgian (Flemish)
2067
1252
Dutch
Dutch (Standard)
1043
1252
English
American
1033
1252
English
Australian
3081
1252
English
British
2057
1252
English
Canadian
4105
1252
English
Ireland
6153
1252
English
New Zealand
5129
1252
Finnish
Finnish
1035
1252
French
Belgian
2060
1252
French
Canadian
3084
1252
French
French (Standard)
1036
1252
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Language
Sublanguage
Language ID
(decimal
notation)
ANSI
codepage
French
Swiss
4108
1252
German
Austrian
3079
1252
German
German (Standard)
1031
1252
German
Swiss
2055
1252
Greek
1032
1253
Hindi
1081
0
Hungarian
1038
1250
Icelandic
Icelandic
1039
1252
Italian
Italian (Standard)
1040
1252
Italian
Swiss
2064
1252
Norwegian
Norwegian (Bokmal)
1044
1252
Norwegian
Norwegian (Nynorsk)
2068
1252
1045
1250
Polish
Portuguese
Portuguese (Brazilian)
1046
1252
Portuguese
Portuguese (Standard)
2070
1252
Romanian
1048
1250
Russian
1049
1251
Slovak
1051
1250
Spanish
Mexican
2058
1252
Spanish
Spain (Modern Sort)
3082
1252
Spanish
Spain (Standard/Traditional
Sort)
1034
1252
Swedish
Swedish
1053
1252
Thai
1054
874
Turkish
1055
1254
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Chapter 10
Distributing an Installation
This chapter includes the following topics:
z
Package Distribution on page 290
z
WiseUpdate on page 290
Package Distribution
When you complete and compile an installation, you can use Package Distribution to
share or deploy it by:
z
Copying a Package to the Share Point Directory
z
Copying a Package to a Network Directory
z
Copying a Compiled Installation to an FTP Server
z
Performing an Administrative Installation of a Windows Installer Package.
z
Moving a Package into Microsoft Active Directory
For details, see these topics in the Wise Package Studio Help.
WiseUpdate
WiseUpdate® offers an easy method for updating your application on your end users’
computers, ensuring that end users are always working with the most current version of
your application. Based on settings you specify on the WiseUpdate page, WiseUpdate
installs a small client application (WiseUpdt.exe) along with your application. You can
place a shortcut to this application in the end user’s Startup group so that it checks for
updates when the destination computer is started or an end user logs on to Windows.
WiseUpdate Client checks for newer versions of your application at the Web location you
specified. If it finds a new installation, it downloads and runs it.
WiseUpdate, by itself, does not deploy the current version of your application; it simply
adds a Web-based update mechanism to your end users’ computers. The first time you
configure WiseUpdate, you enable that version to check for later versions over the
Internet. Once WiseUpdate is integrated into your application, it simplifies the upgrade
process for you and your end users for future updates to your application.
See Configuring the WiseUpdate Page on page 293.
When WiseUpdate runs on the destination computer, the end user can change proxy
server information or the check interval by clicking the Advanced button on the first
page of the wizard.
You can customize the wizard dialog boxes that appear during WiseUpdate.
See Customizing the WiseUpdate Dialog Boxes on page 296.
See also:
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The WiseUpdate Process on page 292
Using WiseUpdate in an Installation on page 293
Options for Running WiseUpdate Client on page 298
WiseUpdate Tips on page 299
Troubleshooting WiseUpdate on page 300
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The WiseUpdate Process
Phase 1:
Your Computer
When you first use WiseUpdate, you:
1. Develop the installation
2. Configure WiseUpdate and
specify:
„ Location of updates on the
Web server
„ Current version of the
application
(FTP)
3. Upload to the Web server:
„ WiseUpdate update file
„ Installation files and Readme
Phase 2:
Your Web Server (FTP/HTTP):
z Contains the WiseUpdate
update file that stores:
„ The current version number
„ URLs to the installation files
z Contains the installation files
and Readme
Destination Computer
The end user:
1. Obtains your application through normal distribution channels
2. Installs your application:
„ WiseUpdate Client is copied to the application directory
„ A shortcut to WiseUpdate client is placed on the destination computer
Phase 3:
Your Computer
When you update your application to
a new version, you:
1. Develop an upgrade or patch
2. Configure WiseUpdate and
specify:
„ Same Web location as the
original
„ New version of the application
Phase 4:
(FTP)
3. Upload to the Web server:
„ WiseUpdate update file
„ Installation files and Readme
Destination Computer
Your Web Server (FTP/HTTP):
z Contains the WiseUpdate
update file that stores:
„ The new version number
„ URLs to the new installation
files
z Contains the new installation
files and Readme
Your Web Server (FTP/HTTP)
(HTTP)
When WiseUpdate Client is run on the destination computer, it:
z Runs an upgrade wizard
z Reads the WiseUpdate update file on the Web server
z Determines that a new version exists
z Displays the Readme
z Downloads and runs new installation files
z Updates the local version
See also:
WiseUpdate
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Using WiseUpdate in an Installation
To use WiseUpdate® effectively, you must use it in two or more successive versions of
your application. Using it in one version of your application only enables that version to
check for later versions over the Internet.
Note
To avoid web connection errors when you use WiseUpdate with IIS 6.0 or later, you must
add a MIME type to the IIS server for each type of file that you let users download from
the Internet.
Process for using WiseUpdate effectively
1.
Select Installation Expert > WiseUpdate page.
2.
Mark Include WiseUpdate Client.
This causes WiseUpdate Client, a small executable file (WiseUpdt.exe), to be
included in the installation and installed on the destination computer in the main
application directory along with your application.
3.
Configure the WiseUpdate page.
See Configuring the WiseUpdate Page on page 293.
4.
When the installation is tested and ready for distribution, upload the installation
files, the Readme file, and the update file to a Web server.
See Uploading WiseUpdate Files With an FTP Client on page 297.
Warning
If you do not upload the files before deploying your application to end users, an
error occurs when they check for upgrades.
5.
Test the WiseUpdate process.
See Testing WiseUpdate on page 297.
6.
Distribute your application using your usual method. Examples: CD or WebDeploy.
7.
The next time you update your application, do the following:
a.
Format it as an upgrade or a patch.
b.
Update the Version field on the Product Details page, otherwise the
maintenance mode will be entered.
c.
Upload the updated installation files to the Web server.
After you upload the updated application, end users who have WiseUpdate will be
prompted to update their application over the Internet.
See also:
WiseUpdate
Configuring the WiseUpdate Page
Completing the WiseUpdate page causes the WiseUpdate Client to be installed in the
application directory on the destination computer along with your application. Most of
the fields on this page specify information to be embedded inside WiseUpdate Client.
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This information tells the client when, how, and where to check the Web location for new
versions.
The first time you configure WiseUpdate, you enable that version to check for later
versions over the Internet. To enable the Internet updating capability, you must use
WiseUpdate for each successive version of your application.
To configure the WiseUpdate page
1.
Select Installation Expert > WiseUpdate page.
2.
Mark Include WiseUpdate Client.
3.
Complete the page:
„
Host Address
Enter the Web server address where you plan to store updated installation files.
(Example: www.company.com.) You can also enter the server’s IP address.
Note
The Web location you select should be accessible through both the FTP and the
HTTP protocols—you typically use FTP to transfer files to it, and end users use
HTTP (WiseUpdate Client) to read and download files from it.
See WiseUpdate Tips on page 299.
„
Host Username
If necessary, enter the user name that’s required to connect to the host
address. Typically, Web servers don’t require user names and passwords. This is
used for basic HTTP authentication.
„
Host Password
If necessary, enter the password that’s required to connect to the host address.
Enter this only if the Host Username is entered above.
„
Host Directory
Enter the directory on the Web server where you plan to store updated
installation files, including the WiseUpdate update file. To put the files in the
root directory of the host, leave this blank.
If you are working in an update, the directory must be the same as in the
original version of the installation.
„
Update Filename
Enter a name for the WiseUpdate update file and use the extension .INI.
(Example: WiseUpdate.ini.) This file is created during compile. In subsequent
versions of this installation, the file name must be the same as in the original
version of the installation.
See About the WiseUpdate Update File on page 295.
„
Product Version
Enter the current version of the installation. This version is stored with your
application on the destination computer and is compared to the version stored
in the update file on the Web server.
„
Check Interval (days)
Enter the frequency at which to remind the end user to check for updates. This
works in conjunction with the Add client to StartUp group check box below.
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If you place the WiseUpdate shortcut in the StartUp group on the destination
computer, WiseUpdate Client runs when the destination computer is started or
the end user logs on to Windows. If the check interval has been reached,
WiseUpdate Client runs normally, prompting the end user to check for updates.
If the check interval has not been reached, WiseUpdate Client runs silently and
quits.
„
Alternate Web Page
Enter a URL to direct the end user to if WiseUpdate Client cannot check for
updates or download the installation files. You might direct the end user to a
Web page that contains technical support information, upgrade information, or
a discussion of possible problems.
„
Start Menu Icon
This is enabled when you mark the Add client to StartUp group check box
below. Enter a name for a shortcut to be created in the Startup group of the
destination computer’s Windows Start menu. This name cannot contain special
characters such as /, :, *, or ?.
„
Add client to StartUp group
Mark this to have the installation add a shortcut for WiseUpdate Client to the
Startup group of the Windows Start menu on the destination computer. Then,
when the destination computer is started or the end user logs on to Windows,
the shortcut runs WiseUpdate Client according to the Check Interval (days)
setting described above.
If you do not mark this check box, then WiseUpdate Client will never run on the
end user’s computer unless you code your application to run it.
„
Only display UI if there is an update to install
Mark this to run the update check silently and prompt the user only when an
update is available. If you leave this blank, the end user is prompted every time
an update check occurs.
„
Keep a log of WiseUpdate checks
Mark this to create a log of all update attempts on the destination computer.
The log file is created in the application’s installation directory, using the name
that you specify in Log Filename.
See also:
Using WiseUpdate in an Installation on page 293
Options for Running WiseUpdate Client on page 298
Customizing the WiseUpdate Dialog Boxes on page 296
About the WiseUpdate Update File
On the WiseUpdate page, you enter a name for the WiseUpdate update file, which is
created during compile. Later, the update file is uploaded to a Web server. When
WiseUpdate Client runs on the destination computer, it reads the update file to
determine if a new version exists, and if so, where to find the new version and its
Readme.
The update file is in .INI format and contains information you enter on the WiseUpdate
page. It is formatted as follows:
[WiseUpdate]
Version=2.0
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Size=1095391
Install=http://www.company.com/updates/Application.exe
ReadMe=http://www.company.com/updates/Readme.rtf
where:
z
Version is the version of installation that is available on the server.
z
Size is the size of the installation in bytes.
z
Install is the URL to the installation.
z
ReadMe is the URL to the installation’s Readme file. If there is no Readme file, the
Readme line is omitted.
See also:
Using WiseUpdate in an Installation on page 293
Customizing the WiseUpdate Dialog Boxes
You can customize the dialog boxes that appear during a WiseUpdate. You might want to
customize the dialog boxes for the following reasons:
z
To add your organization’s logo to the dialog boxes.
z
To change some of the text on the dialog boxes.
z
To change the text on the dialog boxes in another language.
When you add WiseUpdate support to an installation, the merge module
WiseUpdate.msm is added to the installation on the Merge Modules page. That merge
module contains a WiseScript named WiseUpdt.exe, which contains the WiseUpdate
dialog boxes.
To customize the WiseUpdate dialog boxes
1.
In Windows Explorer, go to the following directory:
Program Files\Symantec\Wise Package Studio\Windows Installer Editor\WiseUpdt
2.
Right-click WiseUpdt.wse, select Properties, uncheck Read-only, and click OK.
3.
In WiseScript Editor or WiseScript Package Editor, open WiseUpdt.wse.
4.
(WiseScript Package Editor only) To edit text in a language other than English, add
support for that language. When you are on the Languages page, be sure to check
Copy Default.
See Processes for Adding Language Support in the WiseScript Package Editor or
WiseScript Editor documentation.
5.
To edit text in English or to make other changes, edit the dialog boxes as needed.
See Editing Dialog Boxes in the WiseScript Package Editor or WiseScript Editor
documentation.
6.
Compile the WiseScript to an .EXE and place it in the same directory as the .WSE.
You must use the default name, WiseUpdt.wse, and overwrite the existing file.
7.
In Windows Installer Editor, open WiseUpdt.msm from the following directory:
Program Files\Symantec\Wise Package Studio\Windows Installer Editor\WiseUpdt
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If the prompt about the Windows Installer SDK merge module naming convention
appears, click No.
8.
In Installation Expert, on the Files page, delete WiseUpt.exe from the INSTALLDIR
directory and add the one that you just edited.
9.
Compile WiseUpdt.msm.
10. In Windows Installer Editor, open your WiseUpdate installation project (WSI).
11. In Installation Expert, on the Merge Modules page, delete the WiseUpdate merge
module and then add the one that you just edited.
12. Compile your WiseUpdate installation.
Uploading WiseUpdate Files With an FTP Client
Use an FTP client to upload the following items to the Host Address and Host
Directory you specified on the WiseUpdate page:
z
The compiled installation file or files.
z
An optional Readme file.
z
The WiseUpdate update file, which specifies the current version of the application,
the URL to the installation files, and the URL to the Readme.
See About the WiseUpdate Update File on page 295.
You can place the installation files and Readme at any Web location, provided their URLs
are recorded correctly in the WiseUpdate update file.
When you enter the URLs in the FTP client, make sure they match the case of the actual
path on the Web server. Some HTTP servers are case-sensitive and display errors if the
case does not match exactly.
See also:
Using WiseUpdate in an Installation on page 293.
Testing WiseUpdate
After you configure the WiseUpdate page and upload files to the FTP server, you should
test the WiseUpdate process.
To test how WiseUpdate works when an update is not needed
In this test, the end user’s version of your application matches the version on the Web
server.
1.
Install the first version of your application on a testing computer (not your
development computer).
2.
On the testing computer, open your application’s installation directory and doubleclick the file WiseUpdt.exe. Normally, this file is run automatically at prescribed
intervals at startup, but for testing purposes, you run the .EXE directly.
WiseUpdate Client opens, customized with your application’s name.
3.
Click Next.
WiseUpdate Client uses the HTTP connection information that you specified on the
WiseUpdate page to read the WiseUpdate update file on the Web server. If you are
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running the same version of your application as that on the server, a message
notifies you that you are running the latest version.
4.
Close the WiseUpdate Client window.
5.
If this test is not successful, try to determine the problem.
See WiseUpdate Tips on page 299 and Troubleshooting WiseUpdate on page 300.
6.
If this test is successful, follow the next procedure to test what happens when the
version of your application on the Web server is later than the end user’s version.
To test how WiseUpdate works when an update is needed
1.
2.
To make the application on the server appear to be a later version:
a.
On your development computer, on the WiseUpdate page, enter a later product
version. (Example: If the original version was 1.0.0, enter 1.0.2.)
b.
Compile the installation to create a new update file.
c.
Upload the new update file to the Web server.
On the testing computer, open your application’s installation directory and doubleclick the file WiseUpdt.exe. Then click Next.
Because the version on the Web server is now later than the version on the testing
computer, WiseUpdate Client displays the Readme file and then displays an option to
download and run the installation.
3.
You can download and run the installation, but installation will fail unless the version
on the server is an upgrade or patch that updates the currently installed version. In
a real-life scenario, when you put updates on the server, they must be configured as
upgrades or patches.
4.
To restore the correct version information to the server, repeat step 1, except enter
the original product version.
5.
If this test is not successful, try to determine the problem.
See WiseUpdate Tips on page 299 and Troubleshooting WiseUpdate on page 300.
6.
If you see the Web page you entered in the Alternate Web Page field on the
WiseUpdate page, then there was a problem connecting to the host through HTTP,
or the necessary files were not found on the host.
See also:
Using WiseUpdate in an Installation on page 293
Options for Running WiseUpdate Client
Options on the WiseUpdate page determine how WiseUpdate Client (WiseUpdt.exe) is
run on the destination computer.
Run from a shortcut on the destination computer
z
On the WiseUpdate page, mark the Add client to Startup group check box and
enter a value in the Check Interval (days) field.
z
The installation adds a shortcut for WiseUpdate Client to the Startup group of the
Windows Start menu on the destination computer.
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z
When the destination computer is started or the end user logs on to Windows,
WiseUpdate Client silently checks the time elapsed since it last ran. If the number of
days elapsed is greater than the check interval value, WiseUpdate Client prompts
the end user to check for updates.
Run from your application
z
On the WiseUpdate page, clear the Add client to Startup group check box.
Entering a value in the Check Interval (days) field is optional.
z
Code your application to open the file WiseUpdt.exe from the application directory,
in either of the following ways:
„
Run WiseUpdate Client when the application is run.
To use the check interval value from the WiseUpdate page, run WiseUpdate
Client with the /c command-line option. Then WiseUpdate Client silently checks
the time elapsed since it last ran. If the number of days elapsed is greater than
the check interval value, WiseUpdate Client prompts the end user to check for
updates.
„
Add a menu command in your application to run WiseUpdate Client.
Run silently
You can use this option with either of the options above.
z
On the WiseUpdate page, mark the Only display UI if there is an update to
install check box.
z
On the destination computer, WiseUpdate Client silently checks the time elapsed
since it last ran. If the appropriate amount of time has elapsed, WiseUpdate Client
silently checks for updates. If an update is available, WiseUpdate prompts the end
user to download the update.
See also:
WiseUpdate
WiseUpdate Tips
Can WiseUpdate be used with WebDeploy?
Yes. Make sure that update installations you release are formatted as upgrades (use the
Upgrades page). You cannot use WebDeploy to run patch files (.MSP).
WebDeploy embeds connection information into the .EXE of the .MSI/.EXE pair, so that
the .EXE can run the .MSI from a location on the Web. WiseUpdate provides for regular
checking for updates that are performed by the application on the destination computer.
If you plan to put all compiled files in the same location on the Web, then specify the
same directory on both the WebDeploy and WiseUpdate pages.
Because the .EXE of an .MSI/.EXE pair might contain optional runtimes (examples:
Windows Installer or .NET runtimes), WiseUpdate always tries to open the .EXE, not the
.MSI. Follow these guidelines:
z
The .EXE of the .MSI/.EXE pair must be located somewhere on the Web and must be
accessible to WiseUpdate users. It cannot be distributed through email or other
mechanisms.
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z
On the WiseUpdate page, the connection information you enter must point to the
location of the WiseUpdate update file on the Web server.
See Creating Web-Based Installations With WebDeploy on page 204.
Does WiseUpdate work if the Web location of the WiseUpdate update
file changes?
No. Once you start using WiseUpdate, all subsequent versions of the WiseUpdate update
file must be located in the same directory as the original. This is because the
WiseUpdate Client that’s already on end users’ computers only knows to look at the Web
location you set when you originally configured it. Therefore, when you configure the
WiseUpdate page for subsequent versions of the same application, make sure that the
Host fields and the Update Filename field are the same as in the original version of
the installation.
Why are there two different fields that accept the product version?
During the WiseUpdate process, you encounter two different fields that require a
product version. How are these fields related?
z
The Version field on the Product Details page sets the version for the application,
and is used by Windows Installer to determine whether updates and patches are
valid upgrades for the installed version.
z
The Product Version field on the WiseUpdate page sets the version in the registry
of the destination computer, which WiseUpdate Client checks against the update file
on the FTP server. It also sets the version that is stored in the WiseUpdate update
file.
Typically, both fields should have the same version number, but you can change the
versions to force upgrades.
See also:
WiseUpdate
Troubleshooting WiseUpdate
Troubleshooting WiseUpdate
If you encounter problems with WiseUpdate during testing or after deploying your
application, check the following suggestions.
z
Use an FTP client to observe what files are the on the Web server and where they
are located. Open the WiseUpdate update file that is located on the Web server and
see if the referenced paths are valid.
z
WiseUpdate Client uses HTTP to connect to the Web server specified on the
WiseUpdate page. You typically use the FTP protocol to upload the installation .EXE,
an optional Readme file, and a WiseUpdate update file. Both operations access the
same location on the same server. Therefore, both protocols must have access to
the directory, and the host must be able to process both HTTP and FTP requests.
Also, the Host Directory, the Host Username, and the Host Password might be
different for using the FTP protocol than for using the HTTP protocol. This is because
the Web server and the FTP server might have different alias and user information,
but point to the same directory.
z
Updates for Windows Installer installations must be in the form of an upgrade or
patch. If the end user has version 1.0.0 of your application installed, and you make
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some changes to it and upload it with a new version number, the WiseUpdate
upgrade will fail unless you configured the updated package as an upgrade (using
the Upgrades page) or a patch (using Patch Creation).
z
If end users cannot view the Readme file in WiseUpdate Client, make sure the
Readme file does not have embedded graphics, which are not supported.
See also:
WiseUpdate Tips
WiseUpdate
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Chapter 11
Upgrading Applications
This chapter includes the following topics:
z
About Upgrading Applications on page 302
z
Preparing for Software Updates on page 302
z
UpgradeSync on page 305
z
Patch Creation on page 305
z
Upgrades on page 305
About Upgrading Applications
Windows Installer provides two main methods for upgrading installations: patching and
upgrading. You can also have the end user upgrade by uninstalling and then reinstalling,
although this method is not recommended.
You can create upgrades for installations using the Upgrades page. Patching and the
UpgradeSync tool are covered in the Wise Package Studio Help.
For information on upgrading, see the following topics in the Windows Installer SDK
Help.
Patching and Upgrades
Preparing an Application for Future Major Upgrades
Small Updates
Minor Upgrades
Major Upgrades
UpgradeCode Property
Patching
Changing the Product Code
Preparing for Software Updates
Preparing for updates starts when you ship the first version of your application. Use the
following steps to prepare for a software update:
1.
Archive the Shipping Version of the .MSI on page 302.
2.
Determine the Form of the Update on page 303.
3.
Determine the Product Code and Product Version on page 304.
4.
Check the Installation With UpgradeSync on page 304.
Archive the Shipping Version of the .MSI
This is the first step in preparing for an update.
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Planning for the next software update should start when you ship the first version of
your application. To create an update, you must have access to previous versions of the
installation. Always archive the shipping installation in a place that is accessible. Even if
you compile and ship the installation as an .EXE, archive the .MSI, which is created
alongside the .EXE. If the installation included .CABs or other files, archive those also.
Determine the Form of the Update
This is the second step in preparing for an update.
An update can be a patch, an upgrade, or a reinstall. You can create both a patch and an
upgrade of the same installation. If you do not create a patch or an upgrade, your
update is a reinstall by default. You can also use command-line options to cause an
upgrade to completely or partially reinstall.
About patches
z
Can only update an existing application.
z
Can update multiple previous versions to the current version.
z
Can only update an application originally installed with Windows Installer
technology.
z
Are small, containing only the changes between the original and updated
applications.
z
Are created with Patch Creation, available in Wise Package Studio.
See Patch Creation in the Wise Package Studio Help.
z
Allow little flexibility in customizing an update. Example: You cannot change feature
states, leave certain features installed, or perform custom actions based on the
version of the installed application.
About upgrades
z
Used when you make major changes to an installation.
z
Update an existing application or install the entire application.
z
Are at least as large as a stand-alone installation.
z
Can update multiple versions of an installed application.
z
After installing the new version, check for components of the previous version that
are no longer needed and remove them.
z
Allow flexibility in customizing an update. Example: You can run custom actions and
specify features to leave on the destination computer based on what version is
already installed.
z
Are created on the Upgrades page.
See Upgrades on page 305.
About reinstalls
z
Are required by default if you don’t provide for another method of updating, such as
a patch or upgrade. Reinstalls are forced by the operating system if the version and
the product code are the same.
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z
If the product code is changed, then the updated application can be installed
alongside the original application, or can inadvertently be installed over the original
application.
z
Are not recommended for updating an application.
z
Should only be used to update if one of the following is true:
„
The update is so small that only the contents of a few files changed. No new
files or registry keys were added, and none were removed.
„
The update is so large that you want the old and new versions to be able to
coexist on the same computer.
If you make changes to the installation (Example: adding or removing files), you must
change the product version. If you do not change the product version and the end user
tries to reinstall, it can result in a mix of old and new files. If the product version is
incremented, the installation displays a message stating that the application is already
installed and installation cannot continue. The end user must uninstall the application
and run the installation to install the new version. To avoid this, use patches or
upgrades.
Determine the Product Code and Product Version
This is the third step in preparing for an update.
Before deploying an updated installation, you must determine whether you need to
change the product code and the product version. Windows Installer uses the product
code and product version to determine how to handle an upgrade. Also, your
organization’s support department might need to differentiate updates based on product
version.
You change the product code and product version on the Product Details page. For
information on when to change them, see:
Incrementing the Product Version on page 87
Patching and Upgrades in the Windows Installer SDK Help
Changing the Product Code in the Windows Installer SDK Help
Warning
If you are releasing a newer version of your application but are not using an upgrade or
patch, it is very important to enter a new version on the Product Details page. Not doing
so can cause the installation to open in maintenance mode instead of in normal
installation mode. This can result in an installation that is a mixture of old and new files,
which can cause errors in your application. The only exception is if the installation
contains no new files, no deletion of files, and no other system changes, which means
that only the contents of files are changed.
Check the Installation With UpgradeSync
This is the fourth step in preparing for an update.
UpgradeSync changes the current installation in preparation for creating either a patch
or upgrade. UpgradeSync compares the current installation to the previous version of
the installation and prepares the current installation for a patch or upgrade.
UpgradeSync is a tool in Wise Package Studio.
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See UpgradeSync.
UpgradeSync
Using UpgradeSync is one of the steps in preparing software for updates.
See Preparing for Software Updates on page 302.
UpgradeSync compares the current package with the previous version of the package,
and does the following to prepare the current package for a patch or upgrade:
z
Changes the PackageCode, ProductCode, and ProductVersion properties if
necessary.
z
Aligns component GUIDs. If GUIDs or key paths for the same component don’t
match between the new and old .MSI, the component could inadvertently get
deleted because Windows Installer does not recognize the components as being the
same. Aligning component GUIDs for matching components prevents upgrades from
deleting necessary files in the newer version.
z
Detects errors that could cause problems with a patch or upgrade and, if possible,
fixes them.
See Using UpgradeSync in the Wise Package Studio Help.
Patch Creation
Use Patch Creation to create a Windows Installer patch file (.MSP) that updates installed
versions of a Windows Installer-based application. A patch file can update one or several
previous versions. Unlike full installations, a patch installation contains only the
information necessary to update an installed version of the application.
See the following topics in the Wise Package Studio Help:
Creating a Patch File
Specifying Previous Versions for Patches
Advanced Upgrade Version Details
Adding a Digital Signature to a Patch
Specifying the Patch Sequence
Specifying Advanced Patch Settings
Specifying Patch Removal Settings
Upgrades
Use the Upgrades page to create an installation that upgrades previous versions of an
application. During an upgrade, the installation searches the destination computer for
applications that can be upgraded, and upon detection, retrieves its version information
from the registry. The installation uses this information along with the criteria on the
Upgrades page to determine whether the installed application should be upgraded. Then
the installation silently uninstalls the previous version and installs the new version.
Note
Upgrading is only supported in Windows Installer runtime v1.1 or later.
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What you need to create an upgrade
z
The previous version or versions, which you are upgrading, must have been
installed using Windows Installer.
z
You need access to the .MSI of each version you are upgrading.
z
If you do not have access to the .MSI files, you must have the upgrade code and
version information from the .MSI files. The upgrade code is stored in the
UpgradeCode property, which is in the Properties icon in Setup Editor > Product tab.
The version is located on the Product Details page.
z
The product code of this installation should be different from the product codes of
the installations you will upgrade.
What is the upgrade code?
The upgrade code is a property that is set when you create a new installation. It should
be the same for a related set of applications. When the end user runs an installation on
the destination computer, Windows Installer searches for applications with the same
upgrade code.
The upgrade code is the only information required for creating an upgrade. If no other
upgrade specifications are entered, it is used as the sole factor for determining whether
the upgrade takes place. You can see the upgrade code under the Properties icon in
Setup Editor > Product tab. It is in GUID format.
Creating an Upgrade
To create an upgrade
1.
Select Installation Expert > Upgrades page.
2.
Click Add at the right of the page and specify the .MSI or .WSI for the previous
version of the application.
If you see a warning to update the current installation’s product code, click Yes.
The Upgrade Details dialog box appears.
3.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Upgrade Code
If you specified an .MSI or .WSI to upgrade, this is filled in with that .MSI’s
upgrade code. If you did not specify an .MSI, you must enter the upgrade code
of the installation you want to upgrade.
See What is the upgrade code? on page 306.
„
Minimum Version
Enter the minimum version that should be upgraded by this installation. The
version you enter here is not upgraded unless you mark the Include minimum
version in range check box.
„
Include minimum version in range
Mark this to include the minimum version as a valid upgrade. If you clear this,
only versions greater than the minimum version are upgraded.
„
Maximum Version
Enter the maximum version that should be upgraded by this installation. The
version you enter here is not upgraded unless you mark the Include
maximum version in range check box.
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„
Include maximum version in range
Mark this to include the maximum version as a valid upgrade. If you clear this,
only versions below the maximum version are upgraded.
„
Languages
This determines if an application should be upgraded based on its language.
Enter a semicolon-delimited list of languages that should be upgraded by this
installation. If this is left blank, all languages are included. Example: To upgrade
only the American English version, enter 1033.
See Language IDs on page 288.
„
Exclude languages in list
Mark this to reverse the function of the Languages field, causing this
installation to upgrade only the versions not listed in the Languages field.
Example: To upgrade every version except the American English version, enter
1033 in the Languages field and mark this check box.
„
Features to remove
If this is left blank, the upgrade removes all existing features from the installed
application, and then installs the features specified in the new installation. To
prevent the removal of a feature or features, you specify the features to
remove. Then the upgrade removes only the features you specify and leaves
any other features. The list of features should be comma-delimited. The feature
names must exactly match those in the previous version.
Example: Suppose Application 1.0 contains Feature1, Feature2, and Feature3.
Application 2.0 contains Feature1, Feature2, and Feature4; Feature3 has been
dropped. When you upgrade 1.0 users, you enter Feature1, Feature2 in
Features to remove. When the upgrade occurs, Windows Installer first
removes Feature1 and Feature2 from the existing installation, then installs
Feature1, Feature2, and Feature4. Therefore, users of 1.0 still have Feature3.
4.
„
Action Property
Specify a property to run a particular custom action based on which product
version is already installed. During installation, if an application with the same
upgrade code is found on the destination computer, its product code is placed
into this property. You can set conditions on custom actions so that they
execute based on the contents of this property. If you choose to create a new
property, enter its name in all uppercase letters, and add it to the list of
restricted public properties, which is stored in the SecureCustomProperties
property. Only restricted public properties appear in this list.
„
Continue installation after a remove failure
Mark this to continue the installation, even if it is unable to remove one or more
features of the installed application.
„
Migrate feature states
Mark this to retain the feature states of the installed application during the
upgrade. Example: If the end user chose not to install a feature, such as a spell
checker, in the initial installation, the upgrade will not install it either.
„
Do not uninstall previous version
Mark this to keep the previous version of the application on the destination
computer when the upgrade is installed. This lets the end user have two
versions of the application installed.
Click OK.
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Chapter 12
Working With Source Paths
This chapter includes the following topics:
z
Using Source Control on page 308
z
About Path Variables on page 315
z
Source Paths in an Installation on page 318
About source paths
You might find that you need to work with source paths during installation development.
Project files (.WSI) reference files you add to the installation by their source path. Each
time you compile, the files are copied from the source path to the .MSI.
You can use Package Distribution in Workbench to distribute an installation to the share
point directory so that it can be imported into the Software Manager database. When
you distribute to the share point, all the installation’s source files are copied to the share
point and the source paths for those files are updated in the installation.
See Copying a Package to the Share Point Directory in the Wise Package Studio Help.
Using Source Control
Source code control is the control, tracking, and recording of all changes made to a set
of source code files. Various commercial and open-source software applications, such as
Microsoft Visual SourceSafe, act as source code control systems (SCCS). All SCCS
applications have similar functionality: tracking who is working on what file; allowing for
retrieval of previous versions, backing out of changes, adding and removing files from
the SCCS; and recording the history of files. They might also provide functionality for
viewing the differences between versions of files.
Windows Installer Editor integrates with leading SCCS applications to let you perform
source control tasks on an installation. Windows Installer Editor determines the SCCS
that you are using and calls APIs that interact with it. The API functions display dialog
boxes and functionality directly from your SCCS. On the Source Control tab in Wise
Options, you enable source code control and set the global level of interaction between
your SCCS and Windows Installer Editor.
See Setting Source Control Options on page 46.
Whereas source control manages source files, the Software Manager Revision Control
protects and tracks changes to packages. You cannot use both the Software Manager
Revision Control and a third-party source control product for Wise Package Studio
projects. You must choose one or the other.
See Choosing to Use Revision Control in the Software Manager Help.
To use source control, you must:
z
Have an SCCS installed on your computer, have a valid account, and you might need
permissions to create new directories and add files. Because Windows Installer
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Editor works though your existing user account, the permissions you experience in
Windows Installer Editor are the same as those you already have set in your SCCS.
z
Enable the Source Control menu by marking the Enable source control check box
in Wise Options. If you do not have an SCCS installed on your system, the Source
Control menu is hidden and the Source Control tab in Wise Options displays an
informational message.
z
Choose to use source control, rather than the Software Manager Revision Control, in
the Wise Repository Manager. See Choosing a Revision Control System in the Wise
Package Studio Getting Started Guide.
Note
If your installation is already located in your source control system, you can connect to
the existing installation. Do a Get of all the installation files to your hard drive, then
follow the procedure in Adding an Installation to Source Control on page 309.
How XML Files Integrate With Source Code Control
To ensure that the XML copy is always synchronized with the original installation file, be
sure to mark the Create XML copy during save check box in Wise Options.
If an XML copy of an installation is in the same directory as the installation file:
z
Source control tasks that you perform on the current installation file are also
performed on its XML copy. This ensures that both versions remain synchronized.
(The XML copy does not appear on the SCCS dialog boxes.)
z
When you show history, the XML file is used instead of the installation file.
z
When you compare differences, the XML file is used instead of the installation file.
See Saving an Installation as XML on page 77.
See also:
Adding Files to an Installation in Source Control on page 310
Checking Files Into Source Control on page 311
Checking Files Out from Source Control on page 312
Getting Latest Version of Files on page 312
Removing Files from Source Control on page 313
Undoing the Check Out of Files on page 313
Showing History of the Installation File on page 313
Showing the Differences Between Installation Files on page 314
Comparing the Current Installation to the Latest in Source Control on page 314
Adding an Installation to Source Control
To use source control, you must have a source code control system (SCCS) installed on
your computer.
See Using Source Control on page 308.
To add an installation to source control
1.
If the commands in the Source Control menu are unavailable, do the following:
a.
Select Tools menu > Options > Source Control tab.
b.
Mark Enable source control. This enables the Source Control menu.
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c.
2.
Click OK to exit Wise Options.
Select Source Control menu > Add.
Dialog boxes from your SCCS appear, in which you connect to your SCCS and select
the location where this installation should be stored. To get further help on any of
these options, see the help system for your SCCS. If this installation is already located
in your SCCS, you can connect to it by selecting its current location when prompted.
After the SCCS-related dialog boxes appear, the Add to Source Control dialog box
appears. This dialog box contains the files that you add to the installation and
resource files from the Windows Installer Editor directory that are part of every new
installation.
Note
If you are working in a .WSI, only the .WSI can be added to source control; there is
no way to add the corresponding compiled .MSI. The .WSI or .MSI you are working
in does not appear on the Add to Source Control dialog box because it is added
automatically. Only files that are currently part of the installation appear. If you later
add more files, repeat this process to add those files to the SCCS.
3.
On the Add to Source Control dialog box, mark the check boxes of the files to add to
source control and click OK. Comments, which are stored as an attribute of the file
in the SCCS, are optional. If necessary, scroll to the right to view the Type and File
Path columns.
The Copy Files to New Location dialog box appears if any files are not in the
directory tree of the installation file. Because all files that you add to source control
must be in the same directory tree as the installation file, this dialog box prompts
you to move the files to a new directory under the installation file directory.
4.
Mark the check boxes of the files to copy to the same directory tree as the
installation file. To change the new location, click Change Dir and select another
directory within the same directory tree.
The New Location column indicates the directory to which files will be copied. (Scroll
right to see the New Location column.) If you later edit a file, you must edit the file
that is copied to the new location, because that is the file that is compiled into the
installation.
Note
To avoid moving files, cancel this operation, remove this project from source control,
and move the installation file into the same directory tree as its source files.
5.
Click OK.
After the installation is added to your SCCS, use the options in the Source Control menu
to coordinate file transactions between your computer and the SCCS. Whenever you add
files to the installation, repeat the process above to add them to your SCCS.
See also:
Adding Files to an Installation in Source Control on page 310
Adding Files to an Installation in Source Control
When you add files to an installation, you must also add them to your source code
control system (SCCS), even if you previously added the installation to source control.
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Example: Suppose you add an installation to source control, along with source files A.dll,
B.txt, and C.jpg. Later, you add the file D.gif to the installation. To get D.gif into source
control follow the procedure below.
To add files to an installation in source control
1.
Select Source Control menu > Add.
The Add to Source Control dialog box appears. This dialog box shows files in the
installation that have not yet been added to source control.
2.
On the Add to Source Control dialog box, mark the check boxes of the files to add to
source control and click OK. Comments, which are stored as an attribute of the file
in the SCCS, are optional. If necessary, scroll to the right to view the Type and File
Path columns.
The Copy Files to New Location dialog box appears if any files are not in the
directory tree of the installation file. Because all files that you add to source control
must be in the same directory tree as the installation file, this dialog box prompts
you to move the files to a new directory under the installation file directory.
3.
Mark the check boxes of the files to copy to the same directory tree as the
installation file. To change the new location, click Change Dir and select another
directory within the same directory tree.
The New Location column indicates the directory to which files will be copied. (Scroll
right to see the New Location column.) If you later edit a file, you must edit the file
that is copied to the new location, because that is the file that is compiled into the
installation.
Note
To avoid moving files, cancel this operation, remove this project from source control,
and move the installation file into the same directory tree as its source files.
4.
Click OK.
After the installation is added to your SCCS, use the options in the Source Control menu
to coordinate file transactions between your computer and the SCCS. Whenever you add
files to the installation, repeat the process above to add them to your SCCS.
See also:
Using Source Control on page 308
Adding an Installation to Source Control on page 309
Checking Files Into Source Control
You can use this feature only if you’ve added the current installation to your source code
control system (SCCS).
If you check a file in, then try to work on it, you are prompted to save it with a new
name because the file is locked for changes unless it is checked out first.
To check files into source control
1.
Select Source Control menu > Check In.
The Check In dialog box appears, listing all files that have previously been checked
out.
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Note
When you add an installation to source control, the installation file (.WSI or .MSI) is
added and is also checked out, so it might appear in this dialog box even if you
previously did not check it out.
2.
Mark the check boxes of the files to check into source control and click OK.
Comments, which are stored as an attribute of the file in the SCCS, are optional.
See also:
Using Source Control on page 308
Adding an Installation to Source Control on page 309
Checking Files Out from Source Control
You can use this feature only if you’ve added the current installation to your source code
control system (SCCS).
If you check a file in, then try to work on it, you are prompted to save it with a new
name because the file is locked for changes unless it is checked out first.
To check files out from source control
1.
Select Source Control menu > Check Out.
The Check Out dialog box appears, listing all files that have previously been checked
in.
Note
When you add an installation to source control, all files except the installation file
(.WSI or .MSI) are checked in, so they might appear in this dialog box even if you
previously did not check them in.
2.
Mark the check boxes of the files to check out from source control and click OK.
Comments, which are stored as an attribute of the file in the SCCS, are optional.
See also:
Using Source Control on page 308
Adding an Installation to Source Control on page 309
Getting Latest Version of Files
You can use this feature only if you’ve added the current installation to your source code
control system (SCCS).
To get the latest version of a file
1.
Select Source Control menu > Get Latest Version.
The Get Latest Version dialog box appears, listing all files in the installation.
2.
Mark the check boxes of the files to get from source control and click OK. You cannot
select a new location to copy files you get; they replace the existing files at the
check in/check out location.
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See also:
Using Source Control on page 308
Adding an Installation to Source Control on page 309
Removing Files from Source Control
You can use this feature only if you’ve added the current installation to your source code
control system (SCCS).
To remove files from source control
1.
Select Source Control menu > Remove.
The Remove dialog box appears, listing all files in the installation.
2.
Mark the check boxes of the files to remove from source control and click OK.
Comments, which are stored as an attribute of the file in the SCCS, are optional.
See also:
Using Source Control on page 308
Adding an Installation to Source Control on page 309
Undoing the Check Out of Files
You can use this feature only if you’ve added the current installation to your source code
control system (SCCS).
To undo check out
1.
Select Source Control menu > Undo Check Out.
The Undo Check Out dialog box appears, listing all files that have been checked out.
Note
When you add a installation to source control, the installation file (.WSI or .MSI) is
added and is also checked out, so it might appear in this dialog box even if you
previously did not check it out.
2.
Mark the check boxes of the files for which to undo check out. This backs out your
changes to the file, and checks the file back into source control.
See also:
Using Source Control on page 308
Adding an Installation to Source Control on page 309
Showing History of the Installation File
You can use this feature only if you’ve added the current installation to your source code
control system (SCCS).
You can view the history of an installation in terms of its check in/check out activity in
the SCCS. You can only view the history of the installation file (.WSI or .MSI), not the
other source files associated with the installation. If an XML copy of the installation
exists, the Show History command displays the history of the XML file instead of the
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installation file. To view the history of files other than the installation file, use your SCCS
directly.
To view the history of the installation file, select Source Control menu > Show History.
Dialog boxes from your SCCS appear. For information on these dialog boxes, consult the
documentation for your SCCS. In Microsoft Visual SourceSafe, the History Options dialog
box appears, followed by the History of ProjectFileName.wsi dialog box.
See also:
Using Source Control on page 308
Adding an Installation to Source Control on page 309
Showing the Differences Between Installation Files
You can use this feature only if you’ve added the current installation to your source code
control system (SCCS).
SCCS applications commonly have functionality to let you see the differences between
the installation located on your local computer and the installation in the SCCS.
To access this feature from Windows Installer Editor, select Source Control menu >
Show Differences. Dialog boxes from your SCCS appear. For help using these dialog
boxes to show differences, consult the documentation for your SCCS.
Note
If you are using Microsoft Visual SourceSafe, the Difference Options dialog box appears.
You might need to select the SourceSafe folder and the Windows folder to compare in
the Compare and To fields. Then click the Project button for differences.
To perform a compare using Visual MSIDiff instead, use the Compare to Latest menu
command. It performs a table-by-table, row-by-row comparison of the current
installation file to the installation file in your SCCS.
See Comparing the Current Installation to the Latest in Source Control.
See also:
Using Source Control on page 308
Adding an Installation to Source Control on page 309
Comparing the Current Installation to the Latest in Source Control
You can use this feature only if you’ve added the current installation to your source code
control system (SCCS).
You can perform a table-by-table, row-by-row comparison of the database tables that
make up an installation file (.MSI or .WSI). The current installation file is compared to
the latest installation file that is checked into your SCCS.
To compare the current installation to the latest in source control
1.
Select Source Control menu > Compare to Latest.
You are taken to Setup Editor > Tables tab and the Visual MSIDiff Key dialog box
appears, which describes icons that indicate changes. Changes are shown in the
tables and rows where they occur.
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2.
On the Visual MSIDiff Key dialog box, take note of the symbols and colors that
indicate changes and click OK.
If the Visual MSIDiff Key dialog box does not appear, you might have clicked its Do
not show this dialog again check box. You can reactivate this dialog box on the
Prompts tab in Wise Options.
3.
On the Tables tab, scroll through tables, looking for the symbols for changed tables.
Click changed tables to view differences in rows, which are indicated by symbols and
colors.
As you work in the installation file, the symbols indicating changed items are
updated dynamically.
4.
To turn the compare off, which closes the comparison file and returns to the current
file, select Tools menu > Visual MSIDiff > End Current Compare. Closing the file also
ends the compare.
Another command in the Source Control menu, Show Differences, lets you use the
compare technology offered by your SCCS.
See Showing the Differences Between Installation Files on page 314.
See also:
Using Source Control on page 308
Adding an Installation to Source Control on page 309
About Path Variables
When you add a file to an installation, its source path is stored. During compile, the
source path information is used to find the file and compile it into the .MSI or .EXE. The
Path Variables page lets you define variables to replace commonly-used source paths.
However, it has no effect on files that are already part of the installation. For these files,
see Source Paths in an Installation on page 318. If you add a file, and its source path
matches one of the paths defined on the Path Variables page, the variable that
represents the path is stored instead of the hard-coded path.
Example: Suppose the source files for your test build are in C:\Application\Test, and the
source files for your production build are in C:\Application\Production. You could create
a user-defined path variable named Application_Files and set it to C:\Application\Test. If
you then add the test build source files, their source path would contain the variable
name. You could then change this path variable to C:\Application\Production for your
production build.
Note
Do not create more than one variable that refers to the same path, because only one of
them is used when you add files.
Predefined Path Variables
Commonly used paths, particularly system-related paths, are predefined on the Path
Variables page. By default, they are enabled, which means all files you add from
common folders contain path variables as part of the source path. You cannot modify
predefined path variables, but you can turn substitution off.
See Turning Path Variable Substitution On and Off on page 316.
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Use to Replace Substrings
You can also use path variables to replace any matching substring in a path. Example: If
files are in C:\Development\Application\Version1.0, you could create a path variable
named Version and set it to Version 1.0. Each time an instance of “Version 1.0” was
found in a path, it would be replaced with [Version].
Options for Creating a Path Variable
z
Creating a User-Defined Path Variable on page 316.
z
Creating a Path Variable Based on an Environment Variable on page 317.
z
Creating a Path Variable Based on a Registry Value on page 317.
Turning Path Variable Substitution On and Off
The Path Variables page lets you define variables to replace commonly-used source
paths. Once these variables are defined, you can turn them on and off.
To turn path variable substitution on and off
1.
Select Installation Expert > Path Variables page.
2.
Mark or clear the check box in the Replace column.
Turning substitution off does not remove the path variable from paths for files added
previously; it only affects paths for files added subsequently.
See also:
About Path Variables on page 315
Creating a User-Defined Path Variable
You can create a user-defined path variable that is set to a directory on your computer.
To create a user-defined path variable
1.
Select Installation Expert > Path Variables page.
2.
Click Add at the right of the page and select User-Defined Path Variable.
The User-Defined Path Variable Details dialog box appears.
3.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Variable Name
Enter any name, but do not use special characters or spaces. Because this is not
a Windows Installer property, you do not need to follow Windows Installer
property naming conventions. This variable is inserted into the paths of files
that are pulled from the directory that appears in Current Value.
„
Current Value
(Read-only) This displays what you enter in Defined Value.
„
Defined Value
Specify the directory to replace with a variable. When you add a file from this
directory, the variable name replaces the path.
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„
4.
Replace When Matched
Mark this to activate this path variable. If this is cleared, this path variable has
no effect on files you add to the installation.
Click OK.
See also:
About Path Variables on page 315
Creating a Path Variable Based on an Environment Variable
You can create a path variable that is set to the value of an environment variable.
To create a path variable based on an environment variable
1.
Select Installation Expert > Path Variables page.
2.
Click Add at the right of the page and select Environment Path Variable.
The Environment Variable Path Variable Details dialog box appears.
3.
4.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Variable Name
Enter any name, but do not use special characters or spaces. Because this is not
a Windows Installer property, you do not need to follow Windows Installer
property naming conventions. This variable is inserted into the paths of files
that are pulled from the directory that appears in Current Value.
„
Current Value
(Read-only) This displays the current value of the environment variable you
select below.
„
Env. Variable
This list contains the environment variables that are currently defined on your
computer. Select an environment variable that contains a directory path.
„
Replace When Matched
Mark this to activate this path variable. If this is cleared, this path variable has
no effect on files you add to the installation.
Click OK.
See also:
About Path Variables on page 315
Creating a Path Variable Based on a Registry Value
You can create a path variable that is set to a registry value.
When a registry path value is displayed on the Path Variables page, a double slash
precedes the value name. This is normal. (You might have to scroll to the right to see
this value in the Defined Value column.)
To create a path variable based on a registry value
1.
Select Installation Expert > Path Variables page.
2.
Click Add at the right of the page and select Registry Path Variable.
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The Registry Path Variable Details dialog box appears.
3.
4.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Variable Name
Enter any name, but do not use special characters or spaces. Because this is not
a Windows Installer property, you do not need to follow Windows Installer
property naming conventions. This variable is inserted into the paths of files
that are pulled from the directory that appears in Current Value.
„
Current Value
(Read-only.) This shows the current data of the registry value specified below.
„
Reg. Key
Specify the complete key name of the registry value that contains a directory
path. The registry browser that appears shows only key names (folder icons).
You specify the value in Reg. Value below.
„
Reg. Value
Select the value to pull a directory name from. This list shows the values
contained in the key you selected above.
„
Replace When Matched
Mark this to activate this path variable. If this is cleared, this path variable has
no effect on files you add to the installation.
Click OK.
See also:
About Path Variables on page 315
Source Paths in an Installation
Paths to files in an installation can break if you:
z
Move files that are part of the installation to a new directory on your computer or
network.
z
Move the installation file itself from your computer to another computer.
z
Use relative paths and then move the installation file.
z
Rename a directory.
An installation can also contain broken paths if it was created with SetupCapture.
Sometimes, SetupCapture captures references to temporary files that are deleted after
the installation is finished.
If paths are broken, then during compile, error messages appear in the Task List
concerning the files that could not be opened. Rather than adding the files again, you
can specify new source directories for these files. If files with broken paths should not be
in the installation, you can use the Remove Missing Files tool to remove them.
See Removing Files With Missing or Invalid Source Paths on page 361.
The Convert Source Paths dialog box lets you change the directories that contain an
installation’s files. You can also change all the directories to either relative or UNC
(Uniform Naming Convention) paths. If you change directories to relative paths, then
the installation can be opened on any computer that has the same relative directory
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structure. If you change the directories to UNC paths, you can leave the source files on a
server but open the installation from any computer on the local network.
Whether the path to a file is stored depends on what kind of file you’re working in. When
you add a file to an .WSI or .MSI, the path to the file is stored, and each time you
compile, the file is recompressed into the resulting .MSI. However, if you open an .MSI
that was compiled from a .WSI, it does not store paths to the files because the files are
encapsulated inside the .MSI. You cannot change the source paths of files encapsulated
inside an .MSI.
To see a file’s path, go to the Files or Web Files page and double-click a file in the lowerright list box. The File Details dialog box appears, which displays the path for the file in
the Source Pathname field. If this field only displays a file name or is blank, then you
are working in an .MSI that was compiled from a .WSI. If files do not have paths, you
can either double-click on each file and define a path, or convert the .MSI to a .WSI by
using MSI to WSI Conversion.
See also:
Changing Source Directories on page 319
Converting to Relative Source File Paths on page 320
Converting to UNC-Based Source File Paths on page 321
Changing the Source Directory Dynamically During Compile on page 321
Changing Source Directories
When you change source directories, you can specify a new path for a selected directory
or for multiple directories.
To change source directories
1.
Select Tools menu > Convert Source Paths.
The Convert Source Paths dialog box appears with a list of all the directories that are
referenced in the installation.
2.
Select a directory from the list.
To change multiple directories, select a high-level directory so that you can change
all of its subdirectories.
3.
Click Change Selected Path.
The Change Selected Path dialog box appears.
4.
5.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Change to
Specify the new path.
„
Change Sub-Directories
Mark this to change the subdirectories of the current directory.
Click OK.
The Change Source Directories to column displays the new path. If you marked
Change Sub-Directories, all directories that start with the same name as the one
you changed are renamed.
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Example: If you change C:\Program Files\Application\Manual to C:\Program
Files\Application\Online Manuals, all the directories that begin with C:\Program
Files\Application\Manuals are changed.
6.
To make additional changes, repeat the preceding steps.
7.
To set the path type for files that you add to the installation later, make a selection
from Path Type on the Convert Source Paths dialog box.
You can set paths to absolute, relative, or UNC-based.
8.
Click OK.
All parts of the installation that reference these directories are updated.
See also:
Source Paths in an Installation on page 318
Converting to Relative Source File Paths
You can convert the paths of source files to relative paths. You might do this to keep all
your source files in a central version and source control system. (Example: Microsoft
Visual SourceSafe. In Microsoft Visual SourceSafe, if you copy the installation files to a
different directory each time you do a Get, you can use this feature to ensure that the
paths are always valid, even though the directory structure changes.)
A relative path uses .\ in the path to indicate the current directory, and it uses ..\ to
indicate one directory up. All paths are relative to where the .WSI or .MSI file is located.
Example: If the path to the .WSI is C:\Development\Application.wsi, and you add the
file C:\Program Files\Application.ini, the relative path of Application.ini is ..\Program
Files\Application.ini.
To convert to relative source file paths
1.
Select Tools menu > Convert Source Paths.
The Convert Source Paths dialog box appears.
2.
Click Change All Paths to Relative.
The Change Source Directories to column displays the new paths.
A one-time conversion of the paths in the installation is performed. To change the
directories back to absolute paths, select high-level directories and change the
paths.
See Changing Source Directories on page 319.
Paths to files that are not on the same drive as the installation file are not
converted, because they cannot be written as relative paths. Predefined paths, such
as [ProgramFiles], cannot be changed to relative paths.
3.
To convert all directories you add to the installation later to relative paths, select
Relative Paths from Path Type.
4.
Click OK.
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Converting to UNC-Based Source File Paths
You can convert the mapped drive paths of source files to UNC-based (Uniform Naming
Convention) paths. This helps prevent compile errors when installation source files are
on a central file server.
Example: If you add files to an installation from your Y drive, which is mapped to a file
server, paths of files you add to the installation start with Y:\. If a co-worker opens and
compiles the installation on another computer that doesn’t have its Y drive mapped to
the same file server, the compile fails because the installation cannot find the source
files on the Y drive. However, if you first convert all network paths to UNC paths, coworkers on the same network can open and compile the installation without
encountering errors. Instead of a path such as Y:\Application.ini, a file has a fully
qualified path such as \\Server\Development\Application\Application.ini.
To convert to UNC-based source file paths
1.
Select Tools menu > Convert Source Paths.
The Convert Source Paths dialog box appears.
2.
Click Change All Paths to UNC.
This button is only available if at least one of the paths in the installation is from a
mapped network drive.
The Change Source Directories to column displays the new paths. Only the source
paths that are from mapped drives are changed to UNC.
3.
To convert all directories you add subsequently to UNC paths, select UNC Paths
from Path Type.
4.
Click OK.
A one-time conversion of all the network paths in the installation is performed. Paths to
files that are on local drives are not converted. However, if the local drive is shared, it is
converted to the shared drive name.
See also:
Source Paths in an Installation on page 318
Changing the Source Directory Dynamically During Compile
You can define a source directory as a property, so you can easily reassign the location
of source files when you compile a .WSI or .MSI. Use this feature if you:
z
Frequently change the location of source files.
z
Frequently move the installation to other computers.
z
Need to point to a different source directory each time you compile.
Use the procedures below to change the source directory dynamically during compile.
To create a property to hold the source directory value
1.
Select Setup Editor > Product tab and click the Properties icon in the left pane.
2.
In the right pane, select New > Property from the right-click menu.
The Property Details dialog box appears.
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3.
Complete the dialog box and click OK:
„
Name
Enter a new property name.
„
Value
Enter the directory path that currently contains the source files.
Example: Enter SourceFiles in the Name field and enter C:\Development in the
Value field. The directory path you enter here can be changed by commandline options during compile.
To point source directories to the value of the property
1.
Select Tools menu > Convert Source Paths.
The Convert Source Paths dialog box appears.
2.
Select the source directory to change dynamically.
3.
Click Change Selected Path.
The Change Selected Path dialog box appears.
4.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Change to
Enter the name of the property, surrounded by square brackets. The property
name is case-sensitive. Example: [SourceFiles].
You can add other directories to the end of the property name to create other
locations. Example:
[SourceFiles]Libraries\Visual Basic
[SourceFiles]Libraries\C++
„
5.
Change Sub-Directories
Mark this to change the subdirectories of the current directory.
Click OK.
The Change Source Directories to column displays the property name in brackets.
6.
Click OK.
To change the source directory by compiling from the command line
1.
Select Windows Start menu > Run.
The Run window appears.
2.
Enter the following:
„
The path of the WfWI.exe program.
„
The path to the .WSI or .MSI to be compiled.
„
The command-line options to compile and set the property value.
Example: "C:\Program Files\Windows Installer Editor\WfWI.exe"
C:\Installers\Application.wsi /c /p SourceFiles="E:\Development\"
See About Command Lines on page 229 and Source Paths in an Installation on
page 318.
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Chapter 13
Merge Modules and Transforms
This chapter includes the following topics:
z
About Merge Modules on page 323
z
Available Tabs and Pages in Merge Modules on page 324
z
Creating a Merge Module As a New Installation on page 328
z
Creating a Merge Module From Existing Components on page 329
z
Creating a Configurable Merge Module on page 331
z
About the Merge Modules Page on page 337
z
Adding a Merge Module to an Installation on page 338
z
About Transforms on page 341
z
Creating a Transform Based on an Existing .MSI on page 342
z
Creating a Universal Transform on page 344
z
Applying a Transform to an Installation on page 345
z
Multiple Instance Installations on page 346
About Merge Modules
A merge module is a special kind of Windows Installer database that contains the
components needed to install a discrete software bundle. A merge module cannot be
installed alone, but must be merged into a standard Windows Installer installation
during compile of the installation. Typically, a merge module or a collection of merge
modules related by dependencies installs an application or portion of an application at
run time. The purpose of merge modules is to let you add self-contained software
modules to multiple installations. See Merge Modules in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
Example: Suppose you have five applications that require a specifically configured
version of the Visual Basic runtime. You could create a merge module that installs and
configures the Visual Basic runtime. Then you add the merge module to each installation
that requires that particular Visual Basic runtime. This saves you from having to add the
necessary files, registry entries, and other components to every installation individually.
It also saves time if you update the merge module; instead of updating the five
installations for all applications, you update only the merge module, then recompile the
five installations.
When deploying software through a merge module, keep update considerations in mind.
Example: If you deploy MSDE through a merge module, end users cannot use
Microsoft’s MSDE security patches to update that installation of MSDE. Microsoft patches
only operate on software packages installed by .MSI. You would have to incorporate the
MSDE patch changes in an update to your own application and distribute it to your end
users. This could cause security and timing issues for your end users.
You can obtain merge modules from several sources:
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z
Merge modules that you create.
See Adding a Merge Module to an Installation on page 338.
z
Predefined merge modules that install commonly-used software packages. You can
download these from the Wise Web site or from other vendors’ Web sites.
See Downloading Redistributable Files on page 30.
z
Configurable merge modules that you create.
See Creating a Configurable Merge Module on page 331.
Note
When you view MSI Script in a merge module, you’ll notice that you cannot select an
installation mode, that there are no actions in the right pane, and that there are no
sequence tabs at the bottom. This is because any custom action you add to a merge
module does not contain its own sequence tables and must be merged into the
CustomAction table and the sequence tables of the main installation.
See All Custom Actions on page 442 and Using the Custom Action Location Tab for
Merge Modules on page 489.
Configurable merge modules
Configurable merge modules contain certain values that the installation author can
configure to specify how the module behaves in an installation. Example: A configurable
merge module might let you set attributes on components, enable or disable isolated
components, specify a bitmap for a dialog box, or specify how a custom action is run.
When you add a configurable merge module to an installation, an additional dialog box
appears, on which you specify values for the configurable items. You also can create
configurable merge modules.
Configurable merge modules are supported only by Windows Installer 2.0 or later.
See Configurable Merge Modules in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
See also:
Available Tabs and Pages in Merge Modules on page 324
Creating a Merge Module As a New Installation on page 328
Creating a Merge Module From Existing Components on page 329
About the Merge Modules Page on page 337
Editing Merge Module Details on page 340
Available Tabs and Pages in Merge Modules
When you work in a merge module, you have access to a limited set of pages in
Installation Expert. Some of these pages are unique to merge modules.
You cannot add features to a merge module, therefore, the Features tab does not appear
in Setup Editor when you are in a merge module. Instead, the Module tab appears,
which contains information similar to that found on the Features tab. It lets you
manipulate the components, files, registry entries, and other items in the merge
module. Items you add to the merge module are listed under this tab.
See Items you can add on the Features tab on page 367.
The panes on the Module tab show only the items you have added, unless you select to
show empty folders and items from the right-click menu. The upper-right pane shows
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the contents of the item selected in the left pane. For an expanded view of a selected
item, double-click the item in the right pane.
See also:
Setting Merge Module Details on page 325
Setting Dependencies for a Merge Module on page 326
Setting Exclusions for a Merge Module on page 327
Creating a Merge Module As a New Installation on page 328
Creating a Merge Module From Existing Components on page 329
Creating a Configurable Merge Module on page 331
Setting Merge Module Details
¾ Available in merge module files (.WSM, .MSM) only.
Use the Module Details page to specify the name, version, language, and type of a
merge module. Windows Installer uses this information to identify the merge module.
To set merge module details
1.
Select Installation Expert > Module Details page.
If there is no Module Details page, you are not in a merge module file.
2.
Complete the page:
„
Module Name
Enter a name that Windows Installer and Windows Installer Editor can use
internally to identify the merge module.
„
Version
Enter the version of the module. Windows Installer and Windows Installer Editor
use this number to check versions of dependency and exclusion merge
modules. You can use the format xxxxx.xxxxx.xxxxx.xxxxx, where x is a digit.
See Version in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
„
Language
Enter the language ID for the merge module. English is 1033. Language neutral
(meaning the merge module works with all languages) is 0.
See Language IDs on page 288.
„
Module Type
Select the module type. This defaults to the Default Application Type that is
specified in Wise Options.
See Setting .NET Assembly Options on page 35.
Note
The ability to create .NET installations is supported only by Windows Installer
2.0 or later.
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
Win 32 (non .NET)
A standard Win32 merge module without .NET assemblies.

.NET Application
A .NET merge module with only .NET elements.
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Merge Modules and Transforms

Mixed (.NET and Win32)
A merge module that contains both Win32 and .NET elements. When this
option is selected, the Generate COM interop registry keys for .NET
Assembly check box on the Self-registration tab of the File Details dialog
box is marked by default for all .NET assemblies you add to this merge
module. The assemblies will be registered so that they can be called as
though they were COM elements.
When the .NET Application or Mixed option is selected, entries are created in
the MsiAssembly and MsiAssemblyName tables for each assembly you add to
the merge module. Also, the Global Assembly Cache appears on the Files page.
See also:
Available Tabs and Pages in Merge Modules on page 324
Setting Dependencies for a Merge Module
¾ Available in merge module files (.WSM, .MSM) only.
The Dependencies page lets you add, edit, and remove the dependencies for a merge
module.
A dependency is a merge module that is required for the current merge module to work.
Dependencies can have their own dependencies, which means that the module you
designate as a dependency could itself have a dependency on another module, and so
on. Use dependencies to compartmentalize different components of software. When you
compile an installation that contains a merge module that has a dependency, both the
original merge module and all its dependencies are merged into the installation.
Example:
Suppose you have a merge module that consists of a library of database drivers, but for
those drivers to work, MDAC must also be installed. You designate the MDAC merge
module as a dependency to the database driver module. Then, whenever you add the
database driver module to an installation, Windows Installer Editor tries to add the
dependency merge module, MDAC.
Windows Installer Editor looks for dependency merge modules in the default merge
module directory specified in Wise Options, and also looks at the list of previously added
merge modules. If Windows Installer Editor does not find the dependent module in
either of these places, it prompts you to add the dependency merge module yourself.
To add a dependency to a merge module
1.
Select Installation Expert > Dependencies page.
If there is no Dependencies page, you are not in a merge module file.
2.
Click Add at the right of the Dependencies page and specify one or more merge
modules.
If you select one merge module, the Dependency Module Details dialog box
appears.
If you select multiple merge modules, they’re listed on the Dependencies page.
Double-click a module name to open the Dependency Module Details dialog box for
a specific merge module.
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Fields are populated with information extracted from the merge module.
3.
4.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Module ID
To specify a different merge module, click Browse.
„
Language ID
To specify a different language for the dependent merge module, change
Language ID. (Example: Do this if the merge module you selected includes a
complete language group but you want your merge module to be dependent on
only one language in this group.) To ignore any language considerations, enter
0.
„
Version
To ignore any version considerations for the merge module upon which the new
merge module will be dependent, leave Version blank.
Click OK.
The merge module is added to the Dependencies page.
Note
The information on the Dependency Module Details dialog box fills the
ModuleDependency table, which you can see in Setup Editor > Tables tab. See
ModuleDependency Table in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
See also:
Available Tabs and Pages in Merge Modules on page 324
Setting Exclusions for a Merge Module
¾ Available in merge module files (.WSM, .MSM) only.
The Exclusions page lets you add, edit, and remove the exclusions for a merge module.
Exclusions are a way of preventing two incompatible merge modules from being merged
into the same installation. You can set merge modules to be exclusions of each other.
Example: Suppose you have two versions of the same merge module: version 1.0 and
version 1.1. These two merge modules should never be installed together, so you make
each an exclusion of the other.
Completing the Exclusions page enters the exclusion information in the ModuleExclusion
table in the Windows Installer database and triggers compile and verification error
messages if both merge modules are included in the same installation.
To add an exclusion to a merge module
1.
Select Installation Expert > Exclusions page.
If there is no Exclusions page, you are not in a merge module file.
2.
Click Add at the right of the Exclusions page and specify one or more merge
modules to exclude from the current merge module.
If you select one merge module, the Exclusion Module Details dialog box appears.
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If you select multiple merge modules, they’re listed on the Exclusions page. Doubleclick a module name to open the Exclusion Module Details dialog box for a specific
merge module.
Fields are filled in with information extracted from the merge module.
3.
4.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Module ID
To specify a different merge module, click Browse.
„
Language ID
To specify a different language for the merge module to be excluded, change
the number in Language ID. (Example: Do this if the merge module you
selected includes a complete language group but you want to exclude one
language in this group only.) To ignore any language considerations, enter 0.
„
Min Version and Max Version
To exclude multiple versions of the same merge module, edit the Min Version
and Max Version fields to reflect the versions to exclude. If you leave these
fields blank, all versions of the merge module are excluded.
Click OK.
The merge module is added to the Exclusions page.
Note
The information on the Exclusion Module Details dialog box fills the ModuleExclusion
table, which you can see in Setup Editor > Tables tab. See ModuleExclusion Table in
the Windows Installer SDK Help.
See also:
Available Tabs and Pages in Merge Modules on page 324
Creating a Merge Module As a New Installation
You can create a merge module in much the same way that you create a new
installation.
To start a new merge module
1.
Select File menu > New.
The New Installation File dialog box opens.
2.
From the Categories list, select Other Templates.
3.
From the Template/Tools list, select the Merge Module icon.
4.
Select a file type and a target platform, and click OK.
For information on file types, see File Types on page 60.
The Target Platform section on the New Installation File dialog box appears only if
Select platform in New Installation File dialog is selected in Wise Options.
See How to Specify the Target Platform on page 63.
A new merge module opens. In Installation Expert, four page groups appear,
showing the pages that apply to merge modules.
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See To assemble the merge module.
To assemble the merge module
1.
Assemble the merge module by adding files, registry entries and so on using the
pages under the Details page group. Because merge modules cannot have multiple
features, you don’t select a feature on these pages.
Note
The Files page includes an extra folder named Application. By default, files that you
add to this folder are copied to the default installation directory of the installation
into which the merge module is merged. Example: If you merge the merge module
into an installation that installs files to C:\Program Files\Product, all files you add to
the Application folder will also be installed to C:\Program Files\Product.
2.
If you’re creating a configurable merge module, specify which items can be modified
when the module is merged into an installation.
See Creating a Configurable Merge Module on page 331.
3.
Select the dependencies and exclusions for this merge module.
Dependencies are other merge modules that must be included with this merge
module, and exclusions are other merge modules that cannot be included with this
merge module.
See Setting Dependencies for a Merge Module on page 326 and Setting Exclusions
for a Merge Module on page 327.
4.
Configure the summary information for the merge module.
See General Information Page on page 89.
5.
Configure the Module Details page, which contains the merge module name,
language, and version.
See Setting Merge Module Details on page 325.
After you create the merge module, you can add it to a standard installation.
See Adding a Merge Module to an Installation on page 338.
See also:
About Merge Modules on page 323
Creating a Merge Module From Existing Components on page 329
Available Tabs and Pages in Merge Modules on page 324
Creating a Merge Module From Existing Components
You can create a merge module by moving components from a feature in an existing
installation file or merge module into a new merge module.
Note
All the components you plan to move to the new merge module must be in the same
feature. If they are not, create a feature temporarily and add the components to it in
Setup Editor > Features tab.
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To create a merge module from existing components
1.
Open the installation file or merge module to move components from.
2.
Select Tools menu > Move Components to Merge Module.
You can also select Setup Editor > Features tab (in an installation) or Setup Editor >
Modules tab (in a merge module), right-click the feature containing the components
to move, and select Move Components to Merge Module.
The Merge Module Information dialog box appears.
3.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Merge Module Path
Specify a full path for the new merge module.
„
Module Name
Enter a name that Windows Installer and Windows Installer Editor can use
internally to identify the merge module.
„
Version
Enter the version of the module. Windows Installer and Windows Installer Editor
use this number to check versions of dependency and exclusion merge
modules. You can use the format xxxxx.xxxxx.xxxxx.xxxxx, where x is a digit.
See Version in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
„
Language
Enter the language ID for the merge module. English is 1033. Language neutral
(meaning the merge module works with all languages) is 0.
See Language IDs on page 288.
4.
Click Next.
The Merge Module Components dialog box appears.
5.
From Export from Feature, select the feature that contains the components to
move.
If you are moving components from a merge module, there are no features.
6.
Mark the check boxes of the components to move into the new merge module.
7.
Click Finish.
The components you select are removed from this installation, compiled into the new
merge module, and re-inserted in the form of a merge module. The new merge module
is also available to other installations.
See also:
Setting Merge Module Details on page 325
Setting Dependencies for a Merge Module on page 326
Setting Exclusions for a Merge Module on page 327
About Merge Modules on page 323
Available Tabs and Pages in Merge Modules on page 324
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Creating a Configurable Merge Module
¾ Available in merge module files (.WSM, .MSM) only.
To create a configurable merge module, you add configuration items to a standard
merge module. On the Substitutions page, you specify the:
z
Substitution item, which is the field that can be configured.
z
Configuration item, which determines how a field can be configured.
This creates a substitution value, which consists of one or more values specified by
configuration items. When a configurable merge module is added to an installation, the
installation author can specify values for the substitution item based on the
configuration item settings.
See Adding a Merge Module to an Installation on page 338.
Configurable merge modules are supported only by Windows Installer 2.0 or later.
For information on creating a standard merge module, see Creating a Merge Module As a
New Installation on page 328.
To add a configuration item to a merge module
1.
Select Installation Expert > Substitutions page.
If there is no Substitutions page, you are not in a merge module file.
2.
Click Add at the right of the page.
The Module Substitution dialog box appears.
3.
From Table, select the table that contains the item to be configured when the
merge module is added to an installation.
4.
In the table, click a table cell to select the substitution item.
5.
Click Add and select from the button menu:
„
Configurable Item
Select to add a configuration item to the selected substitution item.
See Setting Configuration Item Details on page 332.
„
6.
Constant
Select to add a constant value in combination with configurable items. Example:
After adding a configuration item, select this option to add a pipe character (|)
before adding another configuration item.
Click OK.
The value you defined for the configurable item appears in the Value field, and the
item appears in the Configuration Items list box.
7.
To add more values for the item, repeat the preceding two steps.
If you add multiple values, multiple rows appear in the list box and the values are
concatenated to create the entire substitution value.
See Example: Configuring an Item for a Merge Module on page 336.
8.
Click OK.
The new configuration item is listed on the Substitutions page.
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See also:
Specifying Drop-Down List Values for Substitution on page 333
Specifying a Bitfield for Substitution on page 334
Specifying a Key for Substitution on page 335
Setting Configuration Item Details
To set configuration item details
1.
Access the Configuration Item Details dialog box from the Module Substitution
dialog box.
See Creating a Configurable Merge Module on page 331.
2.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Name
Enter a name to represent the item in the Configuration Items list box on the
Module Substitution dialog box.
„
Display Name
Enter the name that should appear on the Merge Module Configuration dialog
box when the merge module is added to an installation.
„
Description
Describe what can be modified.
„
Type
Select the type of configurable data that is appropriate for the item you allow to
be substituted.

Arbitrary Text
The installation author can enter any text to replace the default value.
Example: Use this when you allow a file name to be modified.
See Example: Configuring an Item for a Merge Module on page 336.

Formatted Text
The installation author can enter any text in Windows Installer formatted
text format to replace the default value. Example: Use this when you allow a
registry value to be modified.

RTF Text
The installation author can enter any text in rich text format to replace the
default value. Example: Use this when you allow a different license
agreement to be selected.

Text Drop-down List
The installation author can select from a drop-down list to replace the
default value. This list displays only the name you gave the value, not the
actual value. This is useful when the values are not self-explanatory.
(Example: Use this option to make a property configurable. Possible choices
for the installation author could be to let all end users or only selected end
users install this particular file.)
Additional fields appear when you select this option.
See Specifying Drop-Down List Values for Substitution on page 333.
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
Windows Installer Identifier
The installation author can enter text in the format of a Windows Installer
identifier to replace the default value. This text can contain ASCII
characters, digits, underscores, or periods, and must begin with either a
letter or an underscore. Example: Use this to allow a key to be changed or
entered into any table.
For information on the format types like the ones listed above, see Text Format
Types in the Windows Installer SDK Help.

Bitfield (Drop-down List)
The installation author can select from a drop-down list to replace the
default value. This list displays only the name you gave the value, not the
actual value. This is useful when you provide values that are not selfexplanatory. Use the bitfield type only on columns that are bit flags.
(Example: In the Files table, the Attribute column contains bit flags
representing the file attributes. Therefore, you can use the bitfield type to
make a file’s attributes configurable. Possible choices for the installation
author could be for the file to be read-only; read-only and hidden; or readonly, hidden, and vital.)
Additional fields appear when you select this option.
See Specifying a Bitfield for Substitution on page 334 and Bitfield Format
Types in the Windows Installer SDK Help.

Integer
The installation author can enter any integer to replace the default value.
Example: Use this to make the size of a control or a dialog box configurable.
See Integer Format Types in the Windows Installer SDK Help.

Key Into a Table
The installation author can select a key into a table from a drop-down list to
replace the default value. (Example: Use this to let the installation author
change the directory for a component when adding a merge module to an
installation.)
Additional fields appear when you select this option.
See Specifying a Key for Substitution on page 335 and Key Format Types in
the Windows Installer SDK Help.
3.
„
Non-nullable
Mark this if a value is required for this configuration item.
„
Default Value
Enter the value that should appear on the Merge Module dialog box when the
configurable merge module is added to an installation. This is the value that can
be changed.
Click OK.
Specifying Drop-Down List Values for Substitution
When you add a configuration item to a configurable merge module as a text drop-down
list, you must specify values and the text that describes them. When adding the merge
module to an installation, the installation author selects from a list that displays the
descriptive text. See Text Format Types in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
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To specify drop-down list values for substitution
1.
Access the Configuration Item Details dialog box from the Module Substitution
dialog box.
See Creating a Configurable Merge Module on page 331.
2.
Complete the Configuration Item Details dialog box.
See Setting Configuration Item Details on page 332.
3.
From Type, select Text Drop-down List.
4.
Click Add.
The Drop-down List Value dialog box appears.
5.
6.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Name
Enter text to describe the substitution value. The installation author sees this
value in the Value drop-down list on the Merge Module Configuration dialog
box.
„
Value
Enter the value to be substituted for the current value of the configuration item.
Click OK.
The Configuration Item Details dialog box lists the text and value you defined.
7.
Repeat the preceding three steps to add additional values.
8.
Click OK.
The Module Substitution dialog box appears.
The values you defined for the configurable item appear in the Value field, and the
items appear in the Configuration Items list box.
9.
Click OK.
Specifying a Bitfield for Substitution
When you add a configuration item to a configurable merge module as a bitfield dropdown list, you must specify values and the text that describes them. When adding the
merge module to an installation, the installation author selects from a list that shows the
descriptive text. See Bitfield Format Types in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
To specify a bitfield for substitution
1.
Access the Configuration Item Details dialog box from the Module Substitution
dialog box.
See Creating a Configurable Merge Module on page 331.
2.
Complete the Configuration Item Details dialog box.
See Setting Configuration Item Details on page 332.
3.
From Type, select Bitfield (Drop-down List).
4.
In Bitmask, enter the decimal value of the bit flag to set. To set multiple bit flags,
enter the sum of their decimal values.
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Example: Suppose you want to let the installation author set the attributes of a file
to system and vital. The decimal value of the system attribute is 4. The decimal
value of the vital attribute is 512. You would add these values and enter a bitmask
of 516.
5.
Click Add.
The Drop-down List Value dialog box appears.
6.
7.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Name
Enter text to describe the substitution value. The installation author sees this
value in the Value drop-down list on the Merge Module Configuration dialog
box.
„
Value
Enter the value to be substituted for the current value of the configuration item.
Click OK.
The Configuration Item Details dialog box lists the text and value you defined.
8.
Repeat the preceding three steps to add additional values.
9.
Click OK.
The Module Substitution dialog box appears.
The values you defined for the configurable item appear in the Value field, and the
items appear in the Configuration Items list box.
10. Click OK.
Specifying a Key for Substitution
When you add a configuration item to a configurable merge module as a key into a
table, you must specify a table for the key to make configurable. When adding the
merge module to an installation, the installation author selects from a list that appears.
For information on this format type, see Key Format Types in the Windows Installer SDK
Help.
To specify a key for substitution
1.
Access the Configuration Item Details dialog box from the Module Substitution
dialog box.
See Creating a Configurable Merge Module on page 331.
2.
Complete the Configuration Item Details dialog box.
See Setting Configuration Item Details on page 332.
3.
From Type, select Key Into a Table.
4.
Mark Delete Unreferenced Rows to have the row that is referenced by the default
value merged if the installation author selects the default value when adding the
merge module to an installation.
Example: Suppose the merge module includes a dialog box with a graphic. You
select Binary (Bitmap) from Key Table and set the Default Value to the bitmap in
the merge module. If the installation author selects a different bitmap when adding
the merge module to an installation, then the default bitmap is no longer
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referenced. If Delete Unreferenced Rows is marked, the default bitmap is not
merged into the installation.
5.
From Key Table, select the type of table to make available for selection for this key.
6.
Click OK.
The Module Substitution dialog box appears.
The values you defined for the configurable item appear in the Value field, and the
items appear in the Configuration Item list box.
7.
Click OK.
Example: Configuring an Item for a Merge Module
Suppose your merge module includes a file named ReleaseNotes. Here is how you can
let installation authors select a long or a short file name when they merge the module
into an installation.
To configure an item for a merge module
1.
Select Installation Expert > Substitutions page.
2.
Click Add at the right of the page.
The Module Substitution dialog box appears.
3.
From Table, select File.
4.
In the FileName column, click the cell that contains the ReleaseNotes file name. It
should look something like this:
RELEAS~1.TXT|ReleaseNotes.txt
5.
Click Add and select Configurable Item.
The Configuration Item Details dialog box appears.
6.
7.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Name
Enter “short name.”
„
Display Name
Enter “Short file name.”
„
Description
Enter “Choose whether to use a short or a long file name for this file.”
„
Type
Select Arbitrary Text.
„
Default Value
Enter “RELEAS~1.TXT.”
Click OK.
On the Module Substitution dialog box, your configuration item appears as
short_name in the Configuration Items list box.
8.
Click Add and select Constant.
The Substitution Constant dialog box appears.
9.
In Constant Substitution Value, enter the pipe character (|) and click OK.
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On the Module Substitution dialog box, the pipe character (|) appears in the
Configuration Items list box, below short_name.
10. Click Add and select Configurable Item.
The Configuration Item Details dialog box appears.
11. Enter the following:
„
Name
Enter “long name.”
„
Display Name
Enter “Long file name.”
„
Description
Enter “Choose whether to use a short or a long file name for this file.”
„
Type
Select Arbitrary Text.
„
Default Value
Enter “ReleaseNotes.txt.”
12. Click OK.
On the Module Substitution dialog box, long_name appears in the Configuration
Items list box, below the pipe character. Value shows the substitution options for
the file name: [=short_name]|[=long_name].
13. When you add this merge module to an installation, the configuration items will
appear in the order they are listed here. To rearrange the items click move up and
move down.
When you add this configurable merge module to an installation, the Merge Module
Configuration dialog box displays the following:
z
In the list box at the top: Short file name and Long file name.
z
Description: Choose whether to use a short or a long file name for this file.
z
Text Value: either RELEAS~1.TXT or ReleaseNotes.txt, depending on the selection in
the list box. This value can be modified.
See also:
Creating a Configurable Merge Module on page 331
About the Merge Modules Page
The Merge Modules page lets you add merge modules to an installation, edit settings for
merge modules that you already added, and remove merge modules from an
installation.
See:
Adding a Merge Module to an Installation on page 338
Editing Merge Module Details on page 340
About Merge Modules on page 323
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Adding a Merge Module to an Installation
Use the Merge Modules page to add merge modules to an installation. By default, merge
modules are not installed with Windows Installer Editor. However, you can create merge
modules or use the Download Redistributables wizard to obtain third-party merge
modules.
See Downloading Redistributable Files on page 30.
When deploying software through a merge module, keep update considerations in mind.
Example: If you deploy MSDE through a merge module, end users cannot use
Microsoft’s MSDE security patches to update that installation of MSDE. Microsoft patches
only operate on software packages installed by Microsoft .MSIs. You would have to
incorporate the MSDE patch changes in an update to your own application and distribute
it to your end users. This could cause security and timing issues for your end users.
To add a merge module
1.
Select Installation Expert > Merge Modules page.
2.
From Current Feature, select a feature or condition. (Because any item you add
must be assigned to a specific feature, you cannot add an item when All Features
is selected.)
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer only if the
feature is installed. Items that you add to a condition are installed only if the feature
is installed and the condition is true.
3.
Click Add at the right of the Merge Modules page.
The Select Merge Module dialog box appears and lists available merge modules in
the directories specified in Wise Options.
See Setting Merge Module Directories on page 43.
(Professional Edition.) The Select Merge Module dialog box can also include merge
modules that are in the Software Manager database. You must have access to the
Software Manager database and the Read Merge Modules List From Software
Manager Database check box must be marked in Wise Options.
4.
If the merge module you want is not in the list, do one of the following:
„
To add directories to search for merge modules, click Directories and the Merge
Modules tab from Wise Options appears. Click Add to add the directory that
contains the merge module. The merge modules in this directory are added to
the list of available merge modules.
See Setting Merge Module Directories on page 43.
„
Click Download to add merge modules from the Wise Web site, other vendors’
Web sites. If you download the merge modules to a directory that is specified in
Wise Options, they are added to the list of available merge modules.
See Downloading Redistributable Files on page 30.
5.
Select one or more merge modules from the list by marking the corresponding
check boxes.
6.
Click Next.
The Merge Module File Directory dialog box appears.
7.
To change the destination for a merge module, select one or more merge modules
and click Change.
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The Select Merge Module Destination Directory dialog box appears.
8.
Select a directory and click OK.
Select the destination directory for files in the merge module that are not installed
to a predefined directory. If there are no files in the merge module’s Application
directory and you want to leave this blank, select <none>.
9.
If the installation contains only one feature and the merge module is not
configurable, the Merge Module File Directory dialog box contains a Finish button.
Click Finish to complete this process.
10. If the installation contains multiple features, the Merge Module File Directory dialog
box contains a Next button. Click Next to continue.
The Merge Module Features dialog box appears.
11. To add this merge module to other features besides the one you selected in the
Current Feature drop-down list, select them in the list box. You can select multiple
features.
If multiple features in the installation depend on this merge module, you should add
it to all of them. Only one copy of the merge module is installed on the destination
computer regardless of how many features include it.
12. If none of the merge modules you’re adding is configurable, the Merge Module
Features dialog box contains a Finish button. Click Finish to complete the process.
13. If any of the merge modules you’re adding is configurable, the Merge Module
Features dialog box contains a Next button. Click Next to continue. The Merge
Module Configuration dialog box appears.
14. In the list box, select the name of the item to configure. If the Value drop-down list
appears, select a value. If a text field appears, its label indicates the type of data
you can enter.
See Editing Merge Module Details on page 340.
15. If you’re adding more than one configurable merge module, a Next button appears
at the bottom of the dialog box. Click Next and repeat the preceding step.
The Next button changes to a Finish button when the Merge Module Configuration
dialog box shows the last configurable merge module to be added.
16. Click Finish.
The merge modules are added to this installation. If any of the merge modules contain
dependencies, Windows Installer Editor tries to add them by looking in the default
merge module directory.
See Setting Dependencies for a Merge Module on page 326.
If a dependency merge module cannot be found, you are prompted to download it.
During compile, the merge modules are merged into the installation, so that the
resulting .MSI contains both the changes defined in the standard installation as well as
the changes defined in the merge modules. If your compile fails because of merge
module errors, the errors appear in the Task List.
To remove a merge module from an installation, select the merge module on the Merge
Modules page and click Delete. If the module is included with more than one feature, it
is only removed from the installation when you remove it from all features.
See also:
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About the Merge Modules Page on page 337
Editing Merge Module Details
To edit merge module details
1.
Select Installation Expert > Merge Modules page.
2.
From Current Feature, select the feature or condition that contains the merge
module to edit.
3.
Double-click a merge module.
The Merge Module Details dialog box appears. It has one tab if you double-clicked a
standard merge module and two tabs for a configurable merge module.
4.
Click the Settings tab and change the dialog box’s settings as needed:
„
Module Source Path
To get the same merge module (with the same GUID) from a different location,
enter a full path to the merge module.
„
Destination Directory
Select the destination directory for files in the merge module that are not
installed to a predefined directory. If there are no files in the merge module’s
Application directory and you want to leave this blank, select <none>.
„
Feature
If the installation contains multiple features, a list of features appears. To add
this merge module to other features, mark their check boxes.
If multiple features in the installation depend on this merge module, you should
add it to all of them. Only one copy of the merge module is installed on the
destination computer regardless of how many features include it.
5.
If the merge module is configurable, the Merge Module Details dialog box has a
Configuration tab. To change configuration values:
„
Click the configuration tab.
„
In the list box, select the name of the item to configure.
„
If the Value drop-down list appears, select a value. It will be either a bitfield
value, a table, or text. If a text field appears its label indicates the type of data
you can enter:

Text Value
Enter any text.

Formatted Text Value
Enter any text in Windows Installer formatted text format.

RTF Value
Enter any text in rich text format.

Windows Installer Identifier Value
Enter text in the format of a Windows Installer identifier, which may contain
ASCII characters, digits, underscores, or periods, and must begin with either
a letter or an underscore.
For information on the format types listed above, see Text Format Types in the
Windows Installer SDK Help.
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
Integer Value
Enter any integer. See Integer Format Types in the Windows Installer SDK
Help.
For general information on configurable item types, see Semantic Types in the Windows
Installer SDK Help or see Creating a Configurable Merge Module on page 331.
Note
During compile, if the installation contains a merge module that cannot be located on
your system, you are prompted to download the merge module. This can happen if the
installation was created on a different computer or if you have moved your merge
modules directory.
See also:
Adding a Merge Module to an Installation on page 338
About Transforms
A transform is a special kind of Windows Installer file (.MST) that customizes a Windows
Installer installation. You use it to change the installation in some way for a specific
group of end users. When you create a new transform, you must specify a standard
installation database (.MSI) on which to base the transform. Typically, a transform works
only with a specific installation. However, a universal transform can be applied to any
installation.
Transforms must be run from the command line.
See Applying a Transform to an Installation on page 345.
Because it would be unwieldy to install all options for all groups of end users, you can
create one base .MSI, along with several transforms, each of which modifies the .MSI
database at installation to customize it for different groups.
Example: Suppose you are a system administrator who’s deploying a new version of
workgroup software. You can use transforms to customize the installation for the needs
of different departments. In each transform, you make changes to customize an
installation for a particular department. Then during installation, you make sure that the
appropriate transform is applied for each department.
You can create the following types of transforms:
z
A transform based on changes that you make to an existing installation. This lets
you change any aspect of an installation.
See Creating a Transform Based on an Existing .MSI.
z
A universal transform containing limited changes that can be applied to any .MSI.
See Creating a Universal Transform on page 344.
z
A language transform that lets you change the language on the dialog boxes that
appear during installation.
See Creating a Language Transform on page 269.
z
A transform that lets you change the way the installation runs. Use InstallTailor to
run the installation and record the installation options you select. Example: Turn off
a specific dialog box or set certain features to be on by default.
See Creating a Transform with InstallTailor in the Wise Package Studio Help.
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z
A transform that captures first use settings. First use settings are the changes made
by an .MSI-based application the first time it is started on a computer after being
installed. Create this type of transform with SetupCapture.
See Using SetupCapture to Capture First Use Settings in the Wise Package Studio
Help.
Note
The Languages pages is unavailable for transforms. Edit languages in the base .MSI.
See also:
TRANSFORMS Property in the Windows Installer SDK Help
Setting Transform Details on page 343
Creating a Transform Based on an Existing .MSI
You can change any aspect of an installation by creating a transform based on changes
that you make to the installation. When you select a standard installation file, a
temporary copy of that installation file opens in Windows Installer Editor, where you
make the changes for the transform. This is the most flexible way to create a transform.
Example: Suppose you want a transform that changes the application name, changes
what registry entries are installed, and changes what system requirements are
necessary to run the installation. Because these changes affect multiple areas of the
product, you use this method to create the transform.
To create a transform based on an existing .MSI
1.
Select File menu > New. The New Installation File dialog box appears.
„
From the Categories list, select Other Templates.
„
In the Templates/Tools list, select the Transform icon, then click OK.
The Open File dialog box appears.
2.
Specify the .MSI on which this transform should be based.
The transform opens with the exact settings of the installation on which it is based.
3.
Make changes to the installation, such as adding files, or changing any other
settings.
Note
If you add files when editing a transform, a .CAB file is created along with the
transform. When you apply the transform, make sure the .CAB file, the original
.MSI, and the .MST are all in the same directory.
4.
Save the transform, using the .mst extension.
The Transform Details dialog box appears.
5.
Complete the Transform Details dialog box and click OK.
See Setting Transform Details on page 343.
The transform appears in the location you specified.
See also:
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Applying a Transform to an Installation on page 345
Setting Transform Details
The Transform Details dialog box, which appears when you save a transform file,
contains options that flag error conditions of a transform. You set the error conditions to
ignore. It also contains validation options. Normally, if the error conditions exist, errors
are generated when the transform is applied to the standard installation.
In most cases, if you create the transform using Windows Installer Editor, you can leave
the defaults on the Transform Details dialog box. See MsiCreateTransformSummaryInfo
in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
z
Base database
(Read-only) This is the .MSI on which this transform is based. If this transform is
applied to a database other than the one specified here, an error is generated
during installation.
z
Suppress Transform Application Errors
The following check boxes let you suppress certain errors if the transform tries to
perform certain operations on the base database. In most cases, you can leave the
default settings in this section.
z
„
Add existing row
Suppress errors from occurring if the transform tries to add a row that already
exists in the base .MSI.
„
Delete missing row
Suppress errors from occurring if the transform tries to remove a row that
doesn’t exist in the base .MSI.
„
Add existing table
Suppress errors from occurring if the transform tries to add a table that already
exists in the base .MSI. This is marked by default when you create a transform.
„
Delete missing table
Suppress errors from occurring if the transform tries to delete a table that
doesn’t exist in the base .MSI. This is marked by default when you create a
transform.
„
Update missing row
Suppress errors from occurring if the transform tries to update a row that
doesn’t exist in the base .MSI.
„
Code page mismatch
Suppress errors from occurring if the code page (language) setting of the
transform does not match that of the base .MSI.
Validation
The following check boxes and fields let you require certain conditions to be true for
the transform to be applied to the base .MSI.
„
Match Language
Mark this if the language of the transform must match the language of the base
.MSI.
„
Match Product
Mark this if the product code of the transform must match the product code of
the base .MSI.
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„
Match Upgrade Code
Mark this if the upgrade code of the transform must match the upgrade code of
the base .MSI.
„
Version Matching
The version of the installation (set on the Product Details page) is in the form
AA.BB.CCCC.DDDD, where AA represents the major version, BB represents the
minor version, CCCC represents the update version, and DDDD represents the
build version. Select an item in the list to have the version of the transform
checked against the version of the base .MSI. If the versions do not match, an
error is generated during installation.
„
Version Relationship
If you chose to check versions, specify what version relationship must be true in
order not to generate an error.
Creating a Universal Transform
Normally, a transform is based on a specific .MSI and can change that base .MSI only.
However, in some circumstances you might want to apply the same change to multiple
.MSIs. (Example: to add a registry key that holds the company name.) To do so without
creating multiple transforms, you can create a universal transform containing limited
changes that can be applied to any .MSI.
A universal transform is based on schema.msi (a blank installation database) instead of
a specific .MSI. You do not create or assign features in a universal transform. Instead,
everything you add to a universal transform is added to a top-level, hidden feature.
You cannot make complex changes to installations with a universal transform (example:
adding files). Therefore, only a limited set of Installation Expert pages are available in a
universal transform. However, if you import the universal transform to the Software
Manager database, distribute it to the share point directory, and then open it in Windows
Installer Editor from the repository, then all the Installation Expert pages appear. This
happens because, when you apply the transform to an .MSI or a blank database during
the import, the copy in the repository is no longer a “universal” transform.
GUIDs added to item names
When you add the following items to a universal transform, a GUID is appended to the
item name:
Path variables
Resources
Environment variables
Registry entries
Properties
Shortcuts
You can see these GUIDs in the MSI tables. You cannot remove the GUIDs from the
names.
To create a universal transform
1.
Select File menu > New. The New Installation File dialog box appears.
a.
From the Categories list, select Other Templates.
b.
In the Templates/Tools list, select the Universal Transform icon and then
click OK.
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A new installation opens.
2.
Complete the Installation Expert pages or otherwise edit the transform as needed.
The following Installation Expert pages are available:
General Information Page
Path Variables page (see About Path Variables on page 315)
Resources page (see Managing Binary Resources on page 102)
Registry Page
INI Files Page
Shortcuts Page
Environment Variables page (see Adding an Environment Variable on page 153)
System Search page (see Performing a System Search on page 169)
3.
Save the transform, using the .mst extension.
The transform appears in the location you specified.
See also:
Applying a Transform to an Installation on page 345
About Transforms
Applying a Transform to an Installation
A transform must be applied to a base .MSI during installation using a command-line
option; it cannot be applied beforehand.
On the command line, type the following:
msiexec /i Application.msi TRANSFORMS=TransformName.mst
where Application.msi is the name of the .MSI, and TransformName.mst is the name of
the transform.
Because it is not practical to have end users type a line on the command line to run a
transform, we suggest you use one the following methods to run the transform:
z
Write a batch file that runs the .MSI along with the appropriate transform.
z
Use the shortcut that was created with the transform. If you used InstallTailor to
create a transform, a shortcut with the same name as the transform is created
along with the transform file. This shortcut’s target is set to run the base .MSI and
apply the transform.
z
Output the installation as an .EXE that launches an .MSI, which lets you send
command-line options to the .MSI. Do this on the Build Options page. See the
example below.
Example: Applying a transform with an .EXE
In this example, you output the installation as an .EXE that launches an .MSI and applies
the transform.
1.
Select Installation Expert > Releases page.
2.
Create a new release.
See Creating a New Release on page 185.
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3.
Select the Build Options page, select the new release from the Current Release
drop-down list, and select .EXE that launches external .MSI from the .EXE
Options drop-down list.
4.
Compile the installation, which creates an .EXE, an .MSI, and an .INI file.
5.
Open the .INI file, and add the following line:
CmdLine=TRANSFORMS="TransformName.mst" /i
where TransformName.mst is the name of the transform.
When you double-click the .EXE file, it reads the .INI file of the same name. (Example:
Application.EXE reads Application.INI.) When it runs the installation, it applies the
command-line option specified in the CmdLine property and the transform is applied.
These command-line options are passed to msiexec.exe, the Windows Installer
executable.
If you have multiple transforms, you can make multiple releases, and manually edit the
.INI file for each release.
Multiple Instance Installations
Note
Multiple instance installations are supported only by the versions of Windows Installer
released with Windows XP SP1 (2.0.2600.1106), Windows Server 2003 (2.0.3790.0), or
later.
Windows Installer permits one instance of a product code to be installed per machine
and one instance to be installed per user. To install multiple instances of a product
without creating a separate installation for each instance, you can create instance
transforms to change the product code for each instance. An instance transform changes
the product code of an installation or patch and can isolate its data so that multiple
instances of the application can be installed.
Example: A Web server administrator can install multiple instances of a web site
template on the same server to different virtual directories.
Guidelines
z
Code the application so that it can locate resources based on the instance identifier.
To create the instance identifier, you define an instance property in the base
installation and have the instance transform set the property value.
z
Create a base installation. For each instance to be installed, create an instance
transform. The base installation may install its own instance.
z
Each instance must have a unique product code and an instance identifier.
z
To isolate resources for each instance, install them into a location that depends on
the instance identifier.
For additional guidelines, see Authoring Multiple Instances with Instance Transforms in
the Windows Installer SDK Help.
Creating an instance transform
1.
Open the base installation or patch for which you are creating an instance
transform.
2.
Select Installation Expert > Instance Transforms page.
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3.
In Instance Property, enter a property that will be replaced by a unique value in
this instance of the installation.
4.
Product Name is pre-filled with the product name from the Product Details page. If
you change it here, it is changed on the Product Details page.
5.
Click Add at the right of the page.
The Instance Transform Details dialog box appears.
6.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Instance Property Value
The base product name is incremented by 1 for each new instance transform.
You can change this but the value must be unique. This value will replace the
instance property and serve as the instance identifier.
„
Product Code
Windows Installer Editor generates a product code in the form of a GUID, which
ensures that no two applications ever have the same product code. To change
the product code, click Generate; typing or editing a GUID does not generate a
valid GUID.
„
Product Name
The base product name is incremented by 1 for each new instance transform.
You can change this but the name must be unique. The end user sees this name
during installation and in the Add/Remove Programs dialog box.
„
File Name
The base product name is incremented by 1 for each new instance transform.
You can change this but the name must be unique. This becomes the name of
the transforms that is created. The transform is saved in the same directory as
the base installation file.
„
Change install directory to Instance Property Value?
Mark this to change the value of the directory property INSTALLDIR to the value
in the Instance Property Value field above. INSTALLDIR is the main
installation directory for the application (example: Program Files\Application).
This helps you isolate files for each instance.
Example: Suppose you want to install test, beta, evaluation, and production
versions of your application on the same destination computer. To do this, code
your application to look for these instances. Add files to the installation. On the
Instance Transforms page, add instances for each version of your application
and define an instance property value for each (examples: 1, 2, 3, 4). Mark the
Change install directory to Instance Property Value check box for each
instance. When each instance transform is applied to the installation, files are
installed into INSTALLDIR, but the value of INSTALLDIR changes based on the
instance property value. (Examples: Program Files\Application1, Program
Files\Application2, and so on.) If you did not mark the Change install
directory to Instance Property Value check box, then files for each instance
would be installed on top of each other in the same directory as for the base
installation.
7.
Click OK.
The instance transform is added to the list on the Instance Transforms page. To edit an
instance transform, double-click its name. The actual transform files (.MST) are created
during compile.
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See also:
Installing Multiple Instances on page 348
Installing Multiple Instances
Note
Multiple instance installations are supported only by the versions of Windows Installer
released with Windows XP SP1 (2.0.2600.1106), Windows Server 2003 (2.0.3790.0), or
later.
Like other types of transforms, an instance transform must be applied to a base .MSI or
patch during installation using a command-line option; it cannot be applied beforehand.
On the command line, type the following:
msiexec /i Application.msi TRANSFORMS=Instance.mst MSINEWINSTANCE=1 /qb
where Application.msi is the name of the .MSI, and Instance.mst is the name of the
transform.
For additional examples, see Installing Multiple Instances with Instance Transforms in
the Windows Installer SDK Help.
See also:
Multiple Instance Installations on page 346
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Chapter 14
Tools
This chapter includes the following topics:
z
About Windows Installer Editor tools on page 349
z
ApplicationWatch on page 350
z
Convert SMS Installer or WiseScript Installation on page 350
z
Import Visual Studio Projects on page 352
z
Manage Assembly Exclusions on page 355
z
MSI to WSI Conversion on page 356
z
Package Validation on page 360
z
Removing Files With Missing or Invalid Source Paths on page 361
About Windows Installer Editor tools
Windows Installer Editor contains the following tools that perform specialized functions.
You can start a tool in several ways (some options are available for specific tools only).
z
By selecting its name from the Tools menu.
z
By clicking its icon on the Tools toolbar. To display the Tools toolbar, select View
menu > Tools.
z
By clicking its icon on the New Installation File dialog box, which puts the results
from the tool into a new installation file.
z
By running it from the Wise Package Studio Workbench.
Windows Installer Editor Tools
z
ApplicationWatch
See ApplicationWatch in the Wise Package Studio Help.
z
Check Repository Files
See Adding Files From the Wise Software Repository on page 113. (Not available in
Standard Edition)
z
Convert SMS Installer or WiseScript Installation
See Convert SMS Installer or WiseScript Installation on page 350.
z
Convert Source Paths
See About source paths on page 308.
z
Import Visual Studio Projects
z
Move Components to Merge Module
See Creating a Merge Module From Existing Components on page 329.
z
MSI to WSI Conversion
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Package Distribution
Copy a compiled installation to an FTP server, to a local area network, or to
removable media. You can also perform an administrative installation to a shared
network directory. In the Standard Edition, you also can distribute an installation to
the share point directory.
See Package Distribution in the Wise Package Studio Help.
z
Package Validation
See About Package Validation in the Wise Package Studio Help.
z
Patch Creation
See Patch Creation in the Wise Package Studio Help.
z
Remove Missing Files.
See Removing Files With Missing or Invalid Source Paths on page 361.
z
Resolve Conflicts
See Resolving Conflicts Individually in Windows Installer Editor on page 136.
z
Resolve Conflicts with Rules
See Resolving Conflicts With Rules in Windows Installer Editor on page 135.
z
Software Manager
Provides the interface for working with packages in the Software Manager database.
See About Software Manager in the Software Manager Help.
z
UpgradeSync
See UpgradeSync in the Wise Package Studio Help.
z
Visual MSIDiff™
See Comparing Windows Installer Files on page 75.
ApplicationWatch
ApplicationWatch™ monitors your computer as you execute an application or run an
installation and determines which .DLL, .OCX, and .EXE files were accessed. It then adds
these files to a new installation. You can use this tool for informational purposes or to
facilitate the creation of a new installation.
See Creating a Package with ApplicationWatch in the Wise Package Studio Help.
Convert SMS Installer or WiseScript Installation
Use the Convert SMS Installer or WiseScript Installation tool to convert the following
types of setup programs into Windows Installer packages:
z
Microsoft SMS (.IPF or .EXE)
z
WiseScript (.WSE or .EXE)
See Converting an SMS Installer or WiseScript Installation on page 351.
Conversion Guidelines
Following are guidelines for using Convert SMS Installer or WiseScript Installation:
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z
You cannot convert all .EXEs—only those that were created with Microsoft SMS or a
WiseScript-based product.
z
If you do not have the original installation project file, you can convert the compiled
.EXE instead, because it contains an embedded copy of the script.
z
Because script installations are based on a different technology than Windows
Installer, not all elements of the script are converted to Windows Installer format.
„
Only the installation of files, registry changes, and other system changes are
converted.
„
Custom dialog boxes, custom logic, and other settings are not converted.
z
All the files that are available to the original installation must be available to the
converted Windows Installer package at the same locations.
z
Components are converted to features, and Execute Program script actions are
converted to Execute Program custom actions.
z
Some script actions can cause problems with the conversion process.
z
To edit an .IPF file without converting it to a Windows Installer package, open it in
WiseScript Editor or WiseScript Package Editor. The WiseScript tools natively
support Microsoft SMS files.
Converting an SMS Installer or WiseScript Installation
When you convert an SMS or WiseScript installation, its contents are added to the
Windows Installer installation that is currently open.
To convert an SMS Installer or WiseScript installation
1.
Before you convert a script, open it and delete all Display Billboard, Display Graphic,
and Add Icon script actions.
2.
In Windows Installer Editor, open a new or existing installation.
3.
Select Tools menu > Convert WiseScript Installation or SMS Installer. (In Visual
Studio: Project menu > Convert WiseScript Installation or SMS Installer.)
The Welcome page appears.
4.
Complete the page:
„
Installation Script
Specify the full path of the .IPF or .EXE to convert.
„
Extract Directory
If you specified an .EXE file above, specify a directory in which to hold the
extracted files and click Next.
Files must be extracted from the .EXE before the conversion can begin. This
becomes the source directory for the new package.
5.
Click Next to start the conversion.
The .IPF or .EXE is converted to Windows Installer format.
When the conversion is finished, the Conversion Complete page appears. It shows
the results of the conversion and lists any errors or problems that might have
occurred. (Example: An error occurs when files that were referenced by the source
installation cannot be found.)
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6.
To obtain a record of any conversion errors, click Save Errors or Print Errors.
7.
Click Finish.
More errors might appear at this point, which have to do with saving in Windows
Installer format.
If a file that is part of a merge module is added, the Files in Merge Modules dialog
box appears. It prompts you to add the merge module and, if necessary, download
it.
See Adding Merge Modules Instead of Files on page 112.
8.
Open the resulting package in Windows Installer Editor to view the converted file
and to resolve reported problems.
Pages in Installation Expert, such as the Files page, are populated based on the
contents of the source installation. If you converted an .IPF, files are referenced
from their original locations. If you converted an .EXE, files from the converted
installation are stored in and referenced from the extract directory that you
specified above.
See also:
Convert SMS Installer or WiseScript Installation on page 350
Import Visual Studio Projects
The Import Visual Basic, Visual C#, or Visual J# tools let you import a Visual Basic, C#,
or J# project file into an installation file. You specify information about the project, and
the tool extracts information, such as source file paths, and integrates it into a new or
existing installation.
See Importing an Installation From a Visual Studio Project on page 353.
z
These tools only support projects of these types:
Microsoft Visual Basic 5
Microsoft Visual Basic 6
Microsoft Visual Basic .NET, version 2003 or earlier
Microsoft C#, version 2003 or earlier
Microsoft J#, version 2003 or earlier
z
These types of files are supported: .VBP, .VBPROJ, .CSPROJ, .VJSPROJ, or .SLN.
z
When you import a solution, any project types other than those listed above are
skipped. If your VB, C#, or J# projects depend on files that are in projects that are
skipped, the installation might not work.
z
For Visual Basic projects, the Visual Basic Import tool only supports file types of the
Standard EXE project type.
z
For Visual Basic .NET, C#, or J# projects, if a project file has dependencies on other
projects, you cannot import just the project file. You must import the entire solution
that contains the project and its dependencies.
z
There is no link between a project or solution and the installation you create for the
project or solution. If your solution or project is updated with new files, you must
make those changes in the installation manually.
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z
These tools are not designed to set up a remote automation or a DCOM™ server
automatically.
Importing an Installation From a Visual Studio Project
Use the following procedure to create a Windows Installer package from a Visual Basic,
Visual C#, or Visual J# project, version 2003 or earlier.
See Import Visual Studio Projects on page 352.
To import from a Visual Studio project
1.
Do one of the following:
„
Select File menu > New. On the New Installation File dialog box, select Import
Tools from the Categories list, and in the Templates/Tools list, double-click
the type of project to import. This creates an installation that contains only the
information from the imported installation.
„
Select Tools menu > Import Tools and select the type of project to import. This
adds the imported installation’s information to the current installation file.
The Project or Solution File dialog box appears.
2.
In Project or Solution File, specify the path to the project or solution file and click
Next.
„
(Visual Basic .NET, C#, or J# projects.) The Select Configuration dialog box
appears. This displays the configurations that are in the solution or project,
which correspond to build configurations in your Microsoft development
environment.
a. Select the configuration to import.
b. To be prompted at the end of this wizard to select which assembly
dependencies get added to which feature, clear Automatically add
Assembly Dependencies without prompting. Otherwise dependencies
are added silently.
„
(Visual Basic 5 or 6 project.) The Select Visual Basic Directory dialog box
appears.
Specify the directory on your computer where Visual Basic 5 or 6 is installed.
This directory contains the support files that must be included in the installation
because they are needed by the Visual Basic program.
3.
Click Next on the Select Configuration or Select Visual Basic Directory dialog box.
The Scanning Project Files page appears. During or after the scan, additional
prompts and pages might appear:
„
If the project is out of date or missing, a prompt appears. You can try to rebuild
the project from this tool, or open the development environment and rebuild
the project from there.
„
If the project has a reference to another project, an error message appears and
the import ends. Restart the import and select the solution file (.SLN) that
contains both projects.
„
If dependency files (.DEP) for Win32 target files are missing, the Dependency
Files Not Found page appears. Dependency files list referenced files. This page
usually does not apply to .NET projects, which use assembly manifests instead
of dependency files, unless the .NET project depends on a COM .DLL that has a
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dependency. If the dependency files cannot be read, then the files they refer to
cannot be added to the installation you are creating.
If any files on the Dependency Files Not Found page are crucial to this
installation:
a. Cancel the import.
b. Locate the files and move them to the System or System32 directory.
c. Restart the import.
4.
Click Next.
If target files were not found during the scan, the Files Not Found page appears.
Files might be missing if the configuration of the solution that you selected has not
been built. Missing files will cause compile errors in the installation that results from
this import process.
Otherwise, the Installation Files page appears.
5.
If the Files Not Found page appears:
a.
Select a file and click Browse to locate missing files.
b.
Click Next.
The Installation Files page appears.
6.
The Installation Files page lists the files that were detected during the scan and will
be added to the installation.
7.
To add or remove files in the installation, click Add or Delete and then click Next.
The Application Installation Information page appears.
8.
9.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Name
Enter a name for the installation. This overwrites the Name field on the Product
Details page. If you don’t want to overwrite the current installation name, leave
this blank.
„
Installation Directory
Enter the default installation directory where files from this import should be
placed. All added files are placed in this directory in Installation Expert > Files
page.
Click Finish.
10. Additional dialog boxes might appear:
„
(Visual Basic .NET, C#, or J# projects.) If you cleared the Automatically add
Assembly Dependencies without prompting check box, the Assembly
Dependencies dialog box appears. It prompts you to select which dependencies
to add to the installation.
See Assembly Dependencies on page 117.
„
If a file that is part of a merge module is added, the Files in Merge Modules
dialog box appears. It prompts you to add the merge module and, if necessary,
download it.
See Adding Merge Modules Instead of Files on page 112.
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„
If a file that is used by a package in the Wise Software Repository is added, the
Files in Repository dialog box appears and prompts you to add a version of the
file that is in the repository.
See Adding Files From the Wise Software Repository on page 113.
The project is integrated into an installation file, which contains all the information it
needs to install the project. Options are pre-filled on the Files and Product Details pages.
As with any installation, you should compile and test the installation thoroughly to
ensure it operates correctly.
Removing Dependencies from the Project
Dependency Exclusion List
When you add a .NET assembly to an installation, Windows Installer Editor can scan the
assembly’s manifest for dependencies and prompt you to add the dependency files to
the installation.
When you choose not to add a dependency, it is added to the project dependency
exclusion list for that installation. The exclusion list is stored in the WiseMediaOptions
table.
Assembly dependencies that are in the exclusion list are never added to the installation,
even if the .NET assembly is rescanned, or if you add a new assembly that has the same
dependency. Use the Manage Assembly Exclusions tool to remove dependencies from
the exclusion list so that they can appear in future assembly scans.
To remove dependencies from the project dependency exclusion list
1.
Open the installation.
2.
On the Tools menu, click Manage Assembly Exclusions. (In Visual Studio: Project
menu > Manage Assembly Exclusions.)
3.
In the Manage Assembly Exclusions dialog box, uncheck the check box for each
dependency to remove from the exclusion list.
4.
Click OK.
See also:
How Assembly Dependencies are Added to an Installation on page 116
About Dependency Scan Exclusions on page 117
Manage Assembly Exclusions
A project dependency exclusion list is maintained for every .NET installation project. A
dependency is added to the list when you choose not to include the dependency during
an assembly scan.
See About Dependency Scan Exclusions on page 117.
When you run the Manage Assembly Exclusions tool, the Manage Assembly Exclusions
dialog box lists all the dependencies that are in the exclusion list for the current
installation. You can uncheck the check box next to a dependency to remove it from the
exclusion list so that it can appear in future assembly scans.
See Removing Dependencies from the Project Dependency Exclusion List on page 355.
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MSI to WSI Conversion
Use MSI to WSI Conversion to convert existing .MSI files to Windows Installer project
files (.WSI). An .MSI is a distributable installation. Because an .MSI typically
encapsulates all the files in the installation, it is larger and takes longer to save. A
project file (.WSI) compiles to an .MSI. Instead of compressed files, a .WSI contains
paths to source files. A .WSI file is smaller and you can set multiple options for the
output of the .MSI. For information on the differences between project files and
installation database files, see Project Files and Database Files on page 61.
If you have an installation .MSI, you can open and edit it in Windows Installer Editor.
However, to take advantage of some Windows Installer Editor features, you can convert
the .MSI to a project file.
See:
Converting an .MSI to a .WSI File on page 356
Specifying Merge Module Source Directories on page 357
Specifying File Source Directories on page 358
Converting an .MSI to a .WSI File
By default, MSI to WSI Conversion extracts files and merge modules from an .MSI to a
directory you select. It then creates a project file (.WSI) that references those files and
merge modules. The project file, in turn, can be edited in Windows Installer Editor, and
then compiled to a new .MSI file. Alternately, instead of extracting files from the .MSI
and creating the new .WSI to point to them, you can redefine source paths so they point
to source files already on your computer. In this case, the files from the .MSI are not
extracted, but are substituted by files on your computer.
A .WSI file records the files and merge modules that should be compiled into the .MSI by
storing source paths. (To see the source path for a file in the installation, display its File
Details dialog box.) When you open a .WSI and compile, Windows Installer Editor reads
the source paths, and then compiles them into the .MSI.
Running MSI to WSI Conversion involves redefining source paths, either by extracting
files and merge modules from the .MSI itself, or by redefining the source paths to point
to files and merge modules that already exist on your computer.
To convert an .MSI to a .WSI
1.
Open an .MSI.
If a message appears asking you to convert this Windows Installer database to a
Wise project file, click Yes. Otherwise, select Tools menu > MSI to WSI Conversion.
The Welcome page appears.
2.
In New Source Directory, specify the directory to which all files and merge
modules in the .MSI will be extracted. In the converted .WSI file, all source paths
will point to the files and merge modules located in this directory. You can override
this directory for individual files and merge modules later in this wizard.
If the .MSI contains any merge modules, the Merge Module Sources page appears;
otherwise, the File Sources page appears.
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3.
On the Merge Module Sources page, you can change the default for extracting
merge modules, which is to extract them from the .MSI into the default source
directory you specified on the Welcome page. To accept the default, click Next.
You can change the default.
See Specifying Merge Module Source Directories on page 357.
4.
On the File Sources page, you can change the default for extracting files, which is to
extract them from the .MSI into the default source directory you specified on the
Welcome page. To accept the default, click Next.
You can change the default.
See Specifying File Source Directories on page 358.
The Create WSI File page appears.
5.
In New .WSI File, specify the path of the new .WSI to create. Do not select a
directory that already contains an .MSI of the same name, because when you
compile this .WSI file, it overwrites any .MSI of the same name that resides in the
same directory.
6.
Click Finish.
If any source files or associated .CAB files are not in the location specified in the
.MSI, they are listed on the Files Not Found page and source paths are not created
for those files. You must find them and add them to the new .WSI.
The new .WSI is created at the location you specified, the current .MSI is closed,
and the new .WSI is opened. Compile and test this installation thoroughly before
deploying.
Specifying Merge Module Source Directories
During MSI to WSI Conversion, merge modules are extracted from the .MSI to the
default source directory specified on the Welcome page. The source files are pulled from
the source directory when the .WSI is compiled. On the Merge Module Sources page,
you can override the default source directory for specific merge modules.
See MSI to WSI Conversion on page 356.
You can override the default source directory in the following ways:
z
Change Source Directory
Extract merge modules to a directory other than the default directory.
z
Replace With Local File
Select merge modules on your computer to replace the merge modules in the .MSI.
The merge modules you select on your computer must have identical GUIDs as
those you are replacing.
z
Search Module Directories
Search for merge modules by GUID in all the merge module directories defined in
Wise Options.
z
Reset to Default
After changing the source path through any of the above methods, you can reset a
merge module to its default, which is to extract to the default source directory.
To change the directory to which merge modules will be extracted
1.
On the Merge Module Sources page, select one or more merge modules.
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2.
Click Change Path and select Change Source Directory.
The Select Directory dialog box appears.
3.
Select a directory and click OK. The merge modules you selected will be extracted to
this directory instead of the default source directory.
4.
Complete the .MSI to .WSI Conversion wizard.
To replace merge modules with merge modules on your computer by
specifying the merge module location
1.
On the Merge Module Sources page, select one or more merge modules to replace.
2.
Click Change Path and select Replace With Local File.
If multiple merge modules are selected, the Select Directory dialog box appears. If
one merge module is selected, the Choose Replacement Merge Module dialog box
appears.
3.
Select either a directory or a specific merge module:
„
On the Select Directory dialog box, select the directory that contains
replacement merge modules for all the merge modules you have selected and
click OK. Merge modules are matched by GUID, a unique identifier attached to
Windows Installer files, rather than by name. If the search is unsuccessful, a
dialog box lists the merge modules that were not found.
„
On the Choose Replacement Merge Module dialog box, specify the merge
module to replace the selected merge module. You must specify a merge
module whose GUID matches the GUID of the original merge module; otherwise
an error occurs.
The Source column on the Merge Module Sources page changes to Local to indicate
that a local merge module will be used instead of the merge module in the .MSI.
4.
Complete the MSI to WSI Conversion wizard.
To replace merge modules with merge modules on your computer by
searching
1.
On the Merge Module Sources page, select one or more merge modules to replace.
2.
Click Change Path and select Search Module Directories.
A search of module directories is performed. Merge Module directories are defined in
Wise Options.
Merge Modules are matched by GUID, a unique identifier attached to Windows
Installer files, rather than by name. The first found instance is used. The Source
column changes to Local to indicate that local merge modules will be used instead of
merge modules from the .MSI. If the search is unsuccessful, a dialog box lists the
merge modules that were not found.
3.
Complete the MSI to WSI Conversion wizard.
Specifying File Source Directories
During MSI to WSI Conversion, files are extracted from the .MSI to the default source
directory specified on the Welcome page. The source files are pulled from the source
directory when the .WSI is compiled. On the File Sources page, you can override the
default source directory for specific files.
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See MSI to WSI Conversion on page 356.
You can override the default source directory in the following ways:
z
Change Source Directory
Extract files to a directory other than the default directory.
z
Replace With Local File
Select files on your computer to replace the files in the .MSI. This option lets you
search your computer for matching files.
z
Reset to Default
After changing the source path through any of the above methods, you can reset a
file to its default, which is to extract to the default source directory.
To change the directory to which files will be extracted
1.
On the File Sources page, select one or more files.
2.
Click Change Path and select Change Source Directory.
The Select Directory dialog box appears.
3.
Select a directory and click OK. The selected files will be extracted to this directory
instead of the default source directory.
4.
Complete the MSI to WSI Conversion wizard.
To replace one file with a file on your computer
1.
On the File Sources page, select a file to replace.
2.
Click Change Path and select Replace With Local File.
The Choose Replacement File dialog box appears.
3.
Specify a file to replace the selected file. The Source column on the File Sources
page changes to Local to indicate that a local file will be used instead of the file in
the .MSI.
4.
Complete the MSI to WSI Conversion wizard.
To replace multiple files with local files by searching
1.
On the File Sources page, select multiple files to replace.
2.
Click Change Path and select Replace With Local File.
The Replace With Local Files dialog box appears.
3.
Select an option from Search Options and click OK.
„
Selected Directory Only
Search only the current directory for the selected files.
„
Selected Directory and Sub-Directories
Search the current directory and all its subdirectories for the selected files.
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Note
For the following two options, the Destination Path column is appended to whatever
directory you select. Example: Suppose you are repackaging Application.msi, and
you have it installed in C:\Program Files\Application, you would select the C drive,
then select Selected Directory Contains Destination Directory Structure and
click OK. If you selected the Application directory itself, it would result in searching
C:\Program Files\Application\Program Files\Application because the Destination
Path column on the File Sources page is appended to the end of the directory you
select.
„
Selected Directory Contains Destination Directory Structure
Select this if a directory on your computer or network contains the application’s
files in a directory structure that mimics the directory structure in which they
will be installed. You might have this directory if you have the application
installed, or you might just have a directory that contains the same directory
structure as that of the installed application.
Using this option, the Duplicate Files Details dialog box might appear if the
installation you are converting contains instances of duplicate files. An
installation can contain multiple copies of a file and the copies can be set to
install to the same directory. Example: Suppose the installation Application.msi
contains both a Windows NT version and a Windows 98 version of the file
pshop.dll. Only one file gets installed, depending on the operating system the
installation runs on. In an installation with duplicate files, MSI to WSI
Conversion cannot change the paths to point to your local computer, because
your local computer only contains one copy of the file. For these files, either
leave them set to the default, which will extract all copies of the file from the
.MSI, or individually replace them with the appropriate files from your
computer.
„
Selected Directory Contains Administrative Install
Select this if a directory on your computer or network contains an
administrative installation. Select the same directory you selected as the root
directory for the administrative installation. An administrative installation
mimics the directory structure of the installed application and allows for
network installations. Unlike a normal installation, an administrative installation
has a copy of every file that the installation contains. This option pulls files from
the directory structure created by an administrative installation.
Files are matched by name. The first found instance is used. The Source column on
the File Sources page changes to Local to indicate that local files will be used instead
of files from the .MSI. If the search is unsuccessful, a dialog box lists the files.
Package Validation
Package Validation checks a Windows Installer package for errors based on rules in one
or more validation modules. It validates installation files (.MSI and .WSI), merge
modules (.MSM and .WSM), and transforms (.MST).
See the following topics in the Wise Package Studio Help:
z
Validating Installation Packages
z
About Customizing Validation Modules
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z
Adding a Validation Module to Package Validation
z
Adding a Rule That Calls a Custom Action
z
Adding a Validation Rule Set
Removing Files With Missing or Invalid Source
Paths
When you compile an installation that contains files with missing or broken source
paths, the compile fails. The Remove Missing Files tool reduces compile errors by
searching an installation for such files and letting you remove those files from the
installation. If you decide to leave a file in the installation, you can fix its source path.
Paths to files in an installation can break if you:
z
Move files that are part of the installation to a new directory on your computer or
network.
z
Move the installation file itself from your computer to another computer.
z
Use relative paths and then move the installation file.
z
Rename a directory.
An installation can also contain broken paths if it was created with SetupCapture.
Sometimes, SetupCapture captures references to temporary files that are deleted after
the installation is finished.
To remove files with missing or broken source paths
1.
Access the Remove Missing Files tool in either of the following ways:
„
Perform a local compile of an installation that contains files with missing or
broken source paths.
„
Select Tools menu > Remove Missing Files.
The Welcome page appears.
2.
Click Next.
The installation is searched and the Results page appears.
3.
Select the files to remove from the installation and click Next.
The Removing Files page appears.
4.
If you ran this tool from the Tools menu, the Compile This Installation check box
appears when the removal process finishes. Clear the check box to continue without
compiling.
5.
Click Finish.
If you marked the Compile This Installation check box, or if you ran this tool from
within the compile process, the installation is compiled.
6.
If you compiled the installation but you did not remove all the files with missing or
broken source paths, the Welcome page reappears. Do one of the following:
„
Step through the pages and remove the remaining files.
„
Click Cancel on the Welcome page, fix the source paths, and recompile.
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To fix source paths
If a file in the installation has a missing or broken source path, but the file should remain
in the installation, you must fix its source path before you can compile successfully. Do
either of the following:
z
z
Select Installation Expert > Files page.
a.
In the lower-left list box, navigate to the directory that contains the file.
b.
In the lower-right list box, double-click the file to display the File Details dialog
box.
c.
On the General tab, enter the correct path in Source Pathname.
Use the Convert Source Paths tool.
See Source Paths in an Installation on page 318.
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Chapter 15
Setup Editor
This chapter includes the following topics:
z
About Setup Editor on page 363
z
Product Tab on page 365
z
Features Tab on page 367
z
Components Tab on page 372
z
Tables Tab on page 380
About Setup Editor
Setup Editor provides an in-depth view of all changes that you make to an installation.
You can make those changes in Setup Editor or Installation Expert. However, there are
certain advanced tasks that you can perform in Setup Editor only:
z
Edit the text on installation dialog boxes.
z
Create components and assign them to features.
z
Build complex conditions that must be met for installation to occur.
z
Select dialog boxes to appear during maintenance installations (uninstalls).
z
Edit the raw table data of the Windows Installer database.
Note
This documentation does not discuss Windows Installer tables, functions, or properties.
Before you edit raw table data, read the Windows Installer SDK help for that table. On
the Tables tab, click a table and press F1.
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Setup Editor window in Windows Installer Editor
The upper-right
pane displays
contents of the
item selected in
the left pane.
Double-click
items to edit
them.
The left pane lists
items for the selected
tab. Expand folders
to see their contents
in the upper-right
pane. To show or
hide empty items,
right-click and select
Hide Empty Folders/
Items.
The lower-right pane contains context-sensitive help. To hide the help, select
View menu and clear Help Pane.
Note
Check the right-click menu frequently when you are working in Setup Editor. It provides
access to most of the tasks that you can accomplish in Setup Editor.
Setup Editor tabs
Product
Set and edit the summary information to be stored with the
installation file, properties that are used during compile, and
launch conditions that determine whether the installation can
run on the destination computer.
See Product Tab on page 365.
Features
Add, edit, and delete features. Assign components to features;
add and remove components to and from features; and arrange
the features of the installation.
See Features Tab on page 367.
Dialogs
Select and customize dialog boxes the installation uses.
See Using the Dialogs Tab on page 406.
Tables
Edit tables in the .MSI database. You can access most of the
data in these tables through Installation Expert pages or other
tabs of Setup Editor. Deleting, adding, or editing table data
directly is not recommended unless you are an experienced
Windows Installer developer with a clear understanding of
Windows Installer database technology.
See Tables Tab on page 380.
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Components
Add, edit, and delete individual components of the installation.
Each component is one action the installation performs.
Example: installing a file, changing the registry, and so on.
See Components Tab on page 372.
Module
This tab appears only when you are in a merge module file. Add,
edit, and delete the components, files, registry entries, and
other installation modifications contained in the merge module.
See Available Tabs and Pages in Merge Modules on page 324.
Product Tab
On the Product tab in Setup Editor, you set and edit the following information for an
installation:
Summary
Use the Summary icon to set the value of a summary item. End
users can see the summary information by right-clicking the
compiled .MSI or .EXE in Windows Explorer and selecting
Properties.
See Specifying Summary Information on page 366.
Properties
Use the Properties icon to add, edit, and delete properties in an
installation. Properties are variables that are initialized by the
installation and are used by Windows Installer. The property
values can change during run time. Some of the properties that
appear are required Windows Installer properties, so use caution
in editing or deleting them.
See:
Properties on page 395
Creating a New Property on page 397
Properties in the Windows Installer SDK Help
Launch Conditions
Use the Launch Conditions icon to create new launch conditions
and edit existing launch conditions. Launch conditions are
system requirements that must be met on the destination
computer for the installation to proceed.
See Setting a Requirement by Creating a Launch Condition on
page 169.
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Specifying Summary Information
Use the Summary icon in Setup Editor to set the value of a summary item. End users
can see the summary information by right-clicking the compiled .MSI or .EXE in
Windows Explorer and selecting Properties.
Note
In Windows Vista and later, the file Properties dialog box does not contain summary
information.
For information on summary items, see Summary Property Descriptions in the Windows
Installer SDK Help.
You can use the Release Settings page to override the value of an existing summary
item or edit customized summary items.
See Customizing Summary Items for a Release on page 189.
To view all available summary items, click the Summary icon in the left pane on the
Product tab. A list of summary items appears in the upper-right pane, and you can edit
an item by changing its value. You cannot create or delete summary items, because they
are defined by Windows Installer.
The following summary items are named differently in the Windows Installer SDK Help:
Name in Setup Editor
Name in Windows Installer SDK
Source Type
Word Count
Minimum Installer Version
Page Count
Package Code
Revision Number
Template Summary
Template
The Template Summary determines the target platform of the compiled .MSI.
See How to Specify the Target Platform on page 63.
To set the value of a summary item
1.
In Setup Editor > Product tab, click the Summary icon.
2.
In the upper-right pane, double-click a summary item. The Summary Details dialog
box appears.
In a transform, some summary items are not editable because they keep the value
of the base .MSI.
3.
In Value, enter a new value.
4.
Click OK.
You also can edit several of the summary items in Installation Expert > General
Information page.
See General Information Page on page 89.
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Features Tab
The Features tab lets you manipulate an installation’s features and all corresponding
items. It displays a tree structure that lists all components, merge modules, files,
registry entries, and other installation items associated with each feature.
See Working With Components and Features on page 496.
Features you add in Installation Expert are displayed on this tab. However, the features’
conditions are not displayed in Setup Editor.
By default, the Features tab displays only items that are in the installation. Example: If
the installation contains a file, a Files icon appears. If you have not added any items to
the installation, only the Features and Complete icons appear. (Complete is the default
feature that is included in new installations.)
Working with the features tree
z
To display all empty items, right-click in the left pane and select Hide Empty Folders/
Items.
z
To display a feature’s contents, click the feature in the left pane. The contents
appear in the upper-right pane.
z
To display all items in a feature, click the feature’s Combined icon. All items appear
in the upper-right pane.
z
To display all items in a feature grouped by type, expand the feature’s Combined
icon and click the type icon.
z
To expand or collapse a selected feature’s children, use the right-click menu.
z
To customize how items appear in the features tree, right-click in the left pane and
select Customize View. In the Customize View dialog box that appears, mark the
check boxes of the items to display, and rearrange items by clicking Move Up or
Move Down.
z
To quickly organize the items on the Features tab:
„
Drag a feature to a new parent feature.
„
Drag components from one feature to another.
Adding an item to a feature
Do either of the following in Setup Editor > Features tab:
z
Right-click the feature name. Select New and the item to add.
z
Expand the feature and expand the Combined folder. If necessary, show empty
folders. Right-click the icon for a particular item and select New.
If an icon does not appear, right-click and use the Customize View dialog box to
show the icon.
Items you can add on the Features tab
Most of these items can also be added in Installation Expert.
Feature
See Adding a New Feature on page 94.
Component assignment
See Assigning a Component to a Feature on page 368.
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Folder
See Creating a Folder in Setup Editor on page 371
Duplicate file entry
See Creating Duplicate File Entries on page 371
Environment variable
See Adding an Environment Variable on page 153.
File association
See Advertising Icon on page 370.
See Adding File Associations on page 154.
File
See Adding Files to an Installation on page 109.
INI file
See Creating and Editing .INI Files on page 149.
ODBC source, driver, or
translator
See Adding an ODBC Item on page 160.
Registry key
See Adding Registry Keys on page 141.
Service control
See Controlling Services on the Destination Computer
on page 159.
Service
See Adding a Service to the Destination Computer on
page 157.
Shortcut
See Adding a Shortcut to an Installation on page 150.
Remove Registry operation
See Removing Registry Entries From the Destination
Computer on page 142.
Remove Files operation
See Removing a File From the Destination Computer on
page 121.
Move Files operation
See Copying and Moving Files on the Destination
Computer on page 122.
Copy Files operation
See Copying and Moving Files on the Destination
Computer on page 122.
You also can view merge modules that are included in specific features.
See Modules Icon on page 369.
Assigning a Component to a Feature
The Components icon in Setup Editor lets you:
z
Assign components to features
z
Remove (unassign) components from features
z
Move components between features
z
Add new components and edit the details of existing ones
See Adding and Editing a Component on page 374.
When a component is assigned to a feature, the component is installed on the
destination computer only if the feature is installed.
The Components icon on the Features tab shows items in each component. To access
installation items organized by component, use the Components tab.
See Components Tab on page 372.
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To assign a component to a feature
1.
In Setup Editor > Features tab, right-click a feature and select New > Component
Assignment.
The Assign Components to Feature dialog box appears. The dialog box lists all
components in the installation, except those already assigned to the currently
selected feature.
2.
Select one or more components to add to the feature.
3.
Click OK.
You can add the same component to more than one feature; the component is in the
installation only once. Example: If your application includes a grammar check feature
and a spell check feature that both depend on the same file, you might want to assign
that file’s component to both features. That way the file is available even if only one of
the features is installed on the destination computer.
To unassign a component
1.
In Setup Editor > Features tab, expand the folder for the feature that contains the
component to unassign.
2.
Click the Components icon. All components for the feature appear in the upper-right
pane.
3.
In the upper-right pane, right-click a component and select Unassign.
Components that are not assigned to any feature are not installed on the destination
computer.
To move a component to a different feature
1.
In Setup Editor > Features tab, expand the folder for the feature that contains the
component to move.
2.
Click the Components icon. All components for the feature appear in the upper-right
pane.
3.
In the upper-right pane, click a component and drag it to a different feature in the
left pane.
The component is moved to the new feature.
See also:
Features Tab on page 367
Modules Icon
The Modules icon in Setup Editor displays merge modules included in specific features.
However, you cannot add merge modules here. To add or edit merge modules in an
installation, use Installation Expert > Merge Modules page.
See Adding a Merge Module to an Installation on page 338 and Editing Merge Module
Details on page 340.
To view merge modules in a feature
1.
In Setup Editor > Features tab, expand a feature.
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2.
Click the Modules icon.
The merge modules in the selected feature appear in the upper-right pane.
If the Advertising icon does not appear, right-click and select Hide Empty Folders/
Items.
See also:
About Merge Modules on page 323
Features Tab on page 367
Advertising Icon
The Advertising icon in Setup Editor contains information that Windows Installer uses
when publishing and assigning applications to the destination computer. The Advertising
icon:
z
Shows the entry points that are installed if you are using advertising to make
applications available to end users.
z
Lets you edit and create new file associations.
See Adding File Associations on page 154.
Note
The Advertising icon might contain other advertising items besides file extensions
but you can add extensions only.
z
Lets you view and edit AppID and ProgID information.
Advertisement, which is a way to deploy applications in large organizations, is available
with Windows Installer, but only for supported platforms.
See Advertisement and Platform Support of Advertising in the Windows Installer SDK
Help.
To view or edit AppID or ProgID information
1.
In Setup Editor, on the Components or Features tab, expand the Advertising icon
under a feature or component and select the AppID or ProgID folder.
If the Advertising icon does not appear, right-click and select Hide Empty Folders/
Items.
2.
In the upper-right pane, double-click an AppID or ProgID.
The AppID or ProgID dialog box appears, which displays information from the AppID
or ProgID table.
3.
You can edit the entries in the Value column. See AppID Table or ProgID Table in the
Windows Installer SDK Help.
Warning
Editing table data directly is not recommended unless you are an experienced Windows
Installer developer with a clear understanding of Windows Installer database technology.
See also:
Features Tab on page 367
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Creating a Folder in Setup Editor
The Create Folder icon in Setup Editor lets you add a new empty directory under an
existing directory.
You also can create directories on the Files or Web Files pages in Installation Expert,
where you can also use wildcards to add files to directories automatically.
See Editing Settings for Automatic Updating on page 119.
To create a new folder
1.
In Setup Editor, on the Components or Features tab, right-click a component or
feature and select New > Create Folder.
The Create Folder Details dialog box appears.
2.
From Directory, select a parent directory.
3.
At the end of the existing path, type \ (backslash) followed by the name of the new
directory. Example: To create a folder named Sample in the Program Files directory,
the Directory field should contain Program Files\Sample.
4.
Click OK.
The Create Folder entry appears in the upper-right pane.
5.
You can add permissions to the new folder.
See Setting Permissions for Files and Directories on page 126.
See also:
Installation Directories on page 108
Features Tab on page 367
Creating Duplicate File Entries
Duplicate files are files that must be copied to more than one location during installation.
According to Windows Installer rules, you cannot install the same file multiple times. The
Duplicate File icon in Setup Editor lets you:
z
Place the same file in different directories.
z
Place a file in the same directory with a different name.
See DuplicateFile Table in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
You can create a duplicate file entry only for files that are already in the installation.
Note
Duplicate files are not created for .NET assemblies added to both the application
directory and the Global Assembly Cache. Instead, they are treated as separate
components.
To add a duplicate file entry
1.
In Setup Editor, on the Components or Features tab, right-click a component or
feature and select New > Duplicate File.
2.
The Duplicate File Details dialog box appears.
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3.
4.
Specify the following:
„
Existing File
Specify the path for the file to be duplicated.
„
Dest. Directory
Specify the directory on the destination computer in which the duplicate file
should be installed. To add a subdirectory to the directory you selected, click
New Folder and enter a folder name.
„
Long File Name
Enter a name for the duplicate file.
„
Short File Name
(Optional.) Enter a short file name in 8.3 format to accommodate systems that
don’t support long file names.
Click OK.
The duplicate file entry appears in the upper-right pane.
If you added the duplicate file to a different feature and a different directory than the
original file, then a new component is created for the duplicate file.
You cannot have two components install the same file to the same destination directory.
If the file is already set to be installed to the same directory by a component assigned to
another feature, you are prompted to create a component assignment to the current
feature. If you do this, then any future changes to the component will affect all features
to which it is assigned.
To edit a duplicate file entry, double-click its name. To delete it, right-click its name and
select Delete.
See also:
Features Tab on page 367
Components Tab
The Components tab lets you manipulate an installation’s components. It displays a tree
structure that lists all files, registry entries, and other installation items contained in
each component. It also indicates any component errors.
Installation Expert automatically creates the appropriate components for each item you
add and organizes them according to a component rule set you select. Example: You can
always create a new component for each new file added to the installation, or you can
group related resources, such as help files, into one component.
See Component Rules on page 49.
By default, the Components tab displays only items that are in the installation. Example:
If the installation contains a file, a Files icon appears. If you have not added any items to
the installation, only the Components icon appears.
Working with the components tree
z
To display all empty items, right-click in the left pane and select Hide Empty Folders/
Items.
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z
To display a component’s contents, click the component in the left pane. The
contents appear in the upper-right pane. You also can expand the component so
that its contents appear in the components tree.
z
To expand or collapse a selected component’s children, use the right-click menu.
z
To customize the icons that appear in the components tree, right-click in the left
pane and select Customize View. In the Customize View dialog box that appears,
mark the check boxes of the items to display, and rearrange items by clicking Move
Up or Move Down.
z
To quickly organize the items on the Components tab:
„
Drag an item from the upper-right pane to a different component on the left
pane.
„
In the left pane, drag an entire component item group from one component to
another.
Adding an item to a component
Do either of the following in Setup Editor > Components tab:
z
Right-click the component name. Select New and the item to add.
z
Expand the component. If necessary, show empty folders. Right-click the icon for a
particular item and select New.
If an icon does not appear, right-click and use the Customize View dialog box to
show the icon.
Items you can add on the Components tab
Most of these items can also be added in Installation Expert.
Component
See Adding and Editing a Component on page 374.
Folder
See Creating a Folder in Setup Editor on page 371.
Duplicate file entry
See Creating Duplicate File Entries on page 371.
Environment variable
See Adding an Environment Variable on page 153.
File association
See Advertising Icon on page 370.
See Adding File Associations on page 154.
File
See Adding Files to an Installation on page 109.
INI file
See Creating and Editing .INI Files on page 149.
Isolated component
See Isolating a .DLL With an .EXE on page 379.
ODBC source, driver, or
translator
See Adding an ODBC Item on page 160.
Published component
See Adding Published Components on page 379.
Registry key
See Adding Registry Keys on page 141.
Service control
See Controlling Services on the Destination Computer
on page 159.
Service
See Adding a Service to the Destination Computer on
page 157.
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Shortcut
See Adding a Shortcut to an Installation on page 150.
Remove Registry operation
See Removing Registry Entries From the Destination
Computer on page 142.
Remove Files operation
See Removing a File From the Destination Computer on
page 121.
Move Files operation
See Copying and Moving Files on the Destination
Computer on page 122.
Copy Files operation
See Copying and Moving Files on the Destination
Computer on page 122.
See also:
Component Errors on page 374
Moving Items Between Components on page 378
About the Key Path on page 378
Component Errors
As you work on the Components tab, Setup Editor continually monitors components for
common errors. When it detects an error, it changes the color of the component’s icon to
red.
To view a component error message
1.
In Setup Editor > Components tab, right-click the red component icon and select
Show Errors.
Typical causes of component errors
z
The component has an empty key path but contains files, registry entries, or ODBC
data sources.
z
The component has more than one executable (.EXE, .DLL, .OCX).
z
The same file is assigned to multiple components.
z
A shortcut is assigned to the component, but the key path for the shortcut is not a
file.
z
Registry keys are created in HKEY_CURRENT_USER, but the key path is not for a
registry key in HKEY_CURRENT_USER.
See also:
Components Tab on page 372
Adding and Editing a Component
Warning
To work with items on the Components tab, you should be proficient in the Windows
Installer development environment. See Windows Installer Components in the Windows
Installer SDK Help.
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Setup Editor
Installation Expert automatically creates the appropriate components for each item you
add to an installation. However, you can add and edit components yourself in Setup
Editor > Components tab.
z
To edit a component, double-click its name.
z
To edit multiple components, first select the Components icon in the upper-left
pane. In the upper-right pane, select components, right-click, and select Details. On
the Multi-Component Details dialog box, you can edit a subset of the fields found in
the Component Details dialog box.
z
To delete or rename a component, use the right-click menu.
To add a new component
1.
In Setup Editor > Components tab, right-click and select New > Component.
The Component Details dialog box appears.
2.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Component
Enter a name for the new component. Components generated by Installation
Expert have automatically generated names that usually reflect the first file
added to a particular directory.
„
Directory
Enter the directory on the destination computer where the files in this
component will be installed. To create a new folder, click New.
„
GUID
(Optional.) To replace the automatically-generated GUID (globally unique
identifier) for this component with a new one, click Generate.
„
Condition
Enter the condition required to install this component. To always have the
component installed, leave this blank. To enter a condition that must evaluate to
true before the component can be installed, click Build. The Condition Builder
appears.
See Creating Conditions With Condition Builder on page 391.
For some conditions, you might need to add a special merge module that
addresses a limitation of Windows Installer.
See Using Conditions With Features on page 100.
When you add a 64-bit component to the installation, the 64-bit component
check box below is marked automatically and the condition (VersionNT64) is
added to this field. This must be the first condition in the condition string. If you
add conditions, add them after the (VersionNT64) and enclose them in
parentheses. Example:
(VersionNT64) AND (TEST = 1)
As long as the 64-bit check box is marked, you cannot delete the
(VersionNT64) condition. This ensures that the component is installed only on a
64-bit platform.
„
Windows Installer Editor Reference
Run Location
Select the location from which the component should run:
375
Setup Editor
„
„

Run Locally
The component is installed and runs from the destination computer’s hard
drive. This setting overrides the corresponding feature’s attribute.

Run from Source
The component runs from the media or the server that contains the
installation. This setting overrides the corresponding feature’s attribute.

Run from Source or Locally
The component takes on the feature’s attribute.
Key Path Type
Select the type of item Windows Installer should use as a key path:

File Key Path
Use a file as the component’s key path.

Registry Key Path
Use a registry entry as the component’s key path.

ODBC Data Source Key Path
Use an ODBC data source as the component’s key path.
Key Path
Select the item Windows Installer should use as a key path. The drop-down list
shows files, registry entries, or ODBC data sources that are included in the
component, depending on your selection in the Key Path Type field.
See About the Key Path on page 378.
„
Always increment shared .DLL count
Mark this to increment the count of applications using .DLLs in this component
when installing it, even if the component is already installed. If a component is
installed to the Global Assembly Cache, you cannot increment the reference
count.
„
Leave installed on uninstall
Mark this to leave the component installed when its feature is uninstalled.
„
Check condition during reinstall (Transitive)
Mark this to check the condition not only on the original installation but also
when the component is re-installed.
„
Never overwrite if key path exists
Mark this to prevent the component from being installed if the item specified as
the key path already exists.
„
64-bit component
When this is marked, it designates the component as 64-bit. The target
directory and the component must both be either 32-bit or 64-bit. If one is 32bit and the other is 64-bit, a warning message appears, giving you the option to
change the target directory to match the component. Example: If this check
box is marked and the Directory is Program Files (x86), you are prompted to
change this target directory to its 64-bit counterpart, Program Files.
This is marked automatically for 64-bit .EXE or .DLL files and 64-bit registry
keys that you add to the installation.
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Setup Editor
„
Disable registry reflection
„
Uninstall on supercedence
Mark this to prevent leaving an orphan component of a patch package on a
computer when the patch package is superceded by another. If you mark this
option, Windows Installer 4.5 or later unregisters and uninstalls this component
when a superceding patch package is installed. If you don’t mark this option
and the component is not used, it might be left behind.
„
Shared
Mark this to share this component with any other installed package that has the
same component. If the package
„
Self-register key path file before compile
Mark this so that, each time you compile, the file referenced in the Key Path
field is re-registered, the registration information is rescanned, and any new
information is added to the installation.
If you clear this check box, then the file is not self-registered; instead,
registration information is scanned from its type library and added to the
installation. Registering the file enables its advertising information to be drawn
into the installation—if the file is not registered, then this advertising
information might not be present on the current computer, which means it
cannot be automatically added.
See How Self-Registration Information is Captured on page 133.
„
Rescan advertising information during compile
Mark this to gather advertising information from the registry for the file
referenced in the Key Path field each time you compile the installation. This
overrides the Default to rescan advertising for new components check box
in Wise Options for this component.
„
Import REG File
Specify a .REG file that contains registry information about the key path file.
This information is read into the component each time you compile.
Example: If the programmer who creates the key file for this component is not
the author of the installation, the programmer can place all required information
into a .REG file and give this file to the installation author for inclusion into the
component. You can use WiseComCapture.exe to create this .REG file.
See Using WiseComCapture.exe on page 134.
„
3.
Extract advertising information from registry file
Mark this to take information from the .REG file and places it into the
advertising tables instead of the registry tables if possible.
Click OK on the Component Details dialog box.
If the installation has only one feature, the component is added to that feature. If
the installation has more than one feature, the Select Feature(s) to Assign
Component to dialog box appears.
4.
Mark one or more check boxes for the features to assign the new component to and
click OK.
The component appears in the upper-right pane.
See also:
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Setup Editor
Components Tab on page 372
Moving Items Between Components
Warning
To work with items on the Components tab, you should be proficient in the Windows
Installer development environment. See Windows Installer Components in the Windows
Installer SDK Help.
On the Components tab, you can move items from one component to another. The
procedure below works for all types of items, and also warns you when a key path must
be changed. For files and registry entries, you can drag between components, but you
are not warned if a key path is changed.
To move items between components
1.
In Setup Editor > Components tab, navigate to an item so that it appears in the
upper-right pane.
2.
In the upper-right pane, select one or more items, right-click, and select Move.
Note
If an item you select is the component’s key path, a message informs you that the
item will become the destination component’s key path, even if that component
already has a key path. To reset the destination component’s key path, click Yes. To
cancel the move, click No. You can reset key paths manually by right-clicking an
item and selecting Set as Key.
The Move to a Different Component dialog box appears.
3.
Click the component to move the selected item to.
4.
Click OK.
If the component icon is colored red after you move an item to it, the change you made
causes an error. Right-click the component and select Show Errors to see a description
of the problem.
See also:
Components Tab on page 372
About the Key Path
To determine whether a specific component is installed, Windows Installer looks for the
component’s key path rather than looking for every item in the component. If it finds the
item that is specified as the key path, it assumes that all other items that make up the
corresponding component, and therefore, the component, are installed. Some items
require a key path (example: advertised shortcut).
Setup Editor indicates key paths by placing a yellow key icon over the item’s icon.
To set an item as key path
z
In Setup Editor > Components tab, right-click the item and select Set as Key.
OR
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Setup Editor
z
Select the item as key path on the Component Details dialog box.
See Adding and Editing a Component on page 374.
See also:
Components Tab on page 372
Isolating a .DLL With an .EXE
To prevent .DLL conflicts, you can associate a .DLL file in the installation with a specific
.EXE file in the installation. Then Windows Installer automatically associates the .DLL
with the .EXE, even if the destination computer already has a .DLL with the same name
installed. See Isolated Components in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
Add the .DLL to the System32 directory, as you normally would, and then create an
isolated component that moves the .DLL to your application’s directory.
Note
Before you isolate a .DLL with an executable, make sure that you have added all files to
the installation, especially .EXE and .DLL files.
To isolate a .DLL with an .EXE
1.
In Setup Editor > Components tab, right-click a .DLL and select New > Isolated
Component.
The Isolated Component Details dialog box appears, where you select a file for
isolation from the feature that contains the component.
„
If the key path for the current component is not an .EXE, the drop-down list
shows all .EXEs in the containing feature that are key paths of .DLL files.
„
If the key path for the current component is an .EXE, the drop-down list shows
all files from the containing feature that are key paths other than the current
component.
2.
From Associated File, select the .EXE to assign to this .DLL.
3.
Click OK.
The isolated component entry appears in the upper-right pane. To edit it, double-click its
name. To delete it, right-click its name and select Delete.
See also:
Components Tab on page 372
Adding Published Components
Published components let applications written specifically for Windows Installer refer to
one or more components by a single identifier. Example: Do this to add the same
published component to each component in a feature. At run time, the installation only
needs to check for one published component to determine if the feature is installed. See
PublishComponent Table and Qualified Components in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
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Setup Editor
To add published components
1.
In Setup Editor > Components tab, right-click a component and select New >
Published Component.
2.
The Publish Component Details dialog box appears.
3.
Complete the dialog box:
4.
„
Publish GUID
(Optional.) To replace the automatically-generated GUID (globally unique
identifier) for this component with a new one, click Generate.
„
Feature
Select the feature to have published.
„
Component
Select the component to have published.
„
Qualifier
Enter a text string to distinguish multiple forms of the same component.
„
Application Data
Enter a text string that describes the qualified component, that is, the
combination of component and qualifier. This string can be displayed to the end
user.
Click OK.
The published component entry appears in the upper-right pane. To edit it, double-click
its name. To delete it, right-click its name and select Delete.
See also:
Components Tab on page 372
Tables Tab
The Tables tab lists every table in the Windows Installer database. Most of this data is
accessible in Installation Expert or in the other tabs of Setup Editor. The Tables tab lets
you edit existing table data, add new data, add new tables, and delete tables.
In addition to standard Windows Installer tables, the Tables tab also lists Wise tables.
See Wise Tables on page 508.
Reasons to edit tables directly
z
To use the few features, such as ReserveCost, that are not available anywhere but
on the Tables tab.
z
To add a table to store data that is non-Windows Installer standard.
Example: If you create a custom action that stores data, you must create a new
table in which to store it. Or you might write a .DLL that reads the new table and
performs certain actions.
z
To edit the data created in Installation Expert or on the other tabs of Setup Editor.
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Setup Editor
Warning
Deleting, adding, or editing table data directly is not recommended unless you are an
experienced Windows Installer developer with a clear understanding of Windows
Installer database technology. Editing table data might cause unexpected, undesirable
behavior, including damage to the installation. We cannot provide technical support for
problems arising from table editing.
Tables tab in Setup Editor
Key field.
Table headings.
Column
information
List of tables in
the Windows
Installer
database.
Table contents.
Working with tables
By default, the left pane of the Tables tab lists all the tables in the Windows Installer
database, even those that don’t contain data.
z
To hide empty tables, right-click in the left pane and select Show Empty Tables. To
redisplay the empty tables, right-click and select Show Empty Tables again.
z
To display a table’s contents, click its name in the left pane. The table’s contents
appear in the upper-right pane, arranged in columns by field. The column width and
sort order are retained when you leave the Tables tab.
The top heading row of the table displays field names. Key fields are indicated by a
key symbol. By convention, database columns that are external keys take the name
of the primary key column with an added underscore character. Example: An
external key to the File column of the File table is always named File_.
z
An optional, second heading row shows the field’s data type, string length if
applicable, and whether the field can be null. To display or hide the second heading
row, right-click the table and select Column Info.
z
Initially, tables are not sorted. To sort a table, click the heading for the column to
sort.
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Setup Editor
z
You can select rows in tables, then copy and paste them into any program that
supports SYLK format, such as Excel. You also can paste the rows into a text editor,
where they appear as comma-delimited text.
See:
Creating a New Table on page 382
Creating a New Row in a Table on page 383
Editing Existing Tables on page 383
Searching for Table Data on page 384
Finding Validation Errors on page 385
Editing Binary Data in the Icon Table on page 386
Creating a New Table
Warning
Deleting, adding, or editing table data directly is not recommended unless you are an
experienced Windows Installer developer with a clear understanding of Windows
Installer database technology. Editing table data might cause unexpected, undesirable
behavior, including damage to the installation. We cannot provide technical support for
problems arising from table editing.
To create a new table
1.
In Setup Editor > Tables tab, right-click and select Create Table.
The Create Table dialog box appears.
2.
In Table Name, enter the name of the new table.
3.
Click Add to add a field.
The Field Definition dialog box appears.
4.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Field Name
Enter the name of the field.
„
Data Type
Specify whether this field is a long integer, short integer, or string.
„
String Length
If this field is a string, enter the length of the string in this field. The default is
255 characters; a length of 0 indicates no length limit.
„
Nullable
Mark this to indicate that this field can be null.
„
Primary Key
Mark this to indicate that this field is a primary key in this table. A table can
have more than one primary field.
„
Localizable
Mark this to indicate that this field should be translatable. If you distribute this
installation in another language, the data in this field will be translated.
„
Value Range Min/Value Range Max
Enter minimum and maximum allowed values for an integer field. These fields
are available only when the data type is a long or short integer.
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Setup Editor
„
Value Set
Enter a list of acceptable values for this field, separated by semicolons.
„
Key Table
Select the table to which this column is linked. Example: The SelfReg table has
a column File_ that is linked to the File table.
„
Key Column
Select the column in the linked table. Example: The SelfReg table File_ column
is linked to the File column in the File table.
„
Category
Select the type of information stored in this column.
„
Description
Enter a short text description of the information stored in this column.
5.
Click OK on the Field Definition dialog box.
6.
Continue to add fields as needed.
7.
On the Create Table dialog box, click OK to add the table.
See also:
Tables Tab on page 380
Creating a New Row in a Table on page 383
Creating a New Row in a Table
Warning
When you add a row to a table this way, additional rows are not added to related tables.
Be sure you understand relational databases and Windows Installer database technology
before adding rows.
To create a new row in a table
1.
In Setup Editor > Tables, in the left pane, select a table.
2.
In the upper-right pane, right-click the row above which the new row should appear
and select New Row.
A message appears.
3.
Click OK. A new row is added to the table.
4.
Click in each field to select it for entry. (If you click away from the row, you might
have to triple-click to access a field.)
Editing Existing Tables
On the Tables tab, you can directly edit any data in the Windows Installer database. You
also can delete rows from tables and delete tables.
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Setup Editor
Warning
Deleting, adding, or editing table data directly is not recommended unless you are an
experienced Windows Installer developer with a clear understanding of Windows
Installer database technology. Editing table data might cause unexpected, undesirable
behavior, including damage to the installation. We cannot provide technical support for
problems arising from table editing.
To edit table data
1.
In Setup Editor > Tables tab, in the left pane, select a table.
2.
In the upper-right pane, do one of the following:
3.
„
Click the field to change and press Enter or F2.
„
If a field is already active, press Tab to move from left to right or Shift+Tab to
move from right to left within the table.
Type new data or change the existing data.
Some table columns have drop-down lists that you can use for editing. Example: The
drop-down list for the Feature_Parent column in the Feature table lets you select a new
parent for the current feature. Drop-down lists for columns that contain formatted data
type show the properties from the Property table. You can either select from the list or
enter a new property.
To delete a row from a table
In Setup Editor > Tables tab, in the upper-right pane, right-click a row and select Delete.
To delete a table:
1.
In Setup Editor > Tables tab, in the left pane, right-click a table and select Delete
Table.
2.
Click Yes on the warning dialog box that appears.
If you later add an item that requires the deleted table, Windows Installer Editor
automatically recreates the table.
Searching for Table Data
On the Tables tab, you can search for and replace strings. Search the entire database, a
single table, or a single column.
Example: The product name changes and you need to find and replace it everywhere it
occurs.
Find and Replace commands are in the Edit menu.
See also:
Finding Validation Errors on page 385
Finding Text in MSI Script on page 444
Assigning a Component to a Feature on page 368
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Setup Editor
Finding Validation Errors
On the Tables tab, you can search for tables that contain errors and you can search for
individual validation errors. These are quick ways to search for validation errors while
you are working on a package.
A validation error occurs when the data in a field does not comply with the requirements
assigned to the field. Examples: null fields in columns that are not nullable, foreign key
mismatches, and strings that are too long for the field.
Alternatively, when a project is complete and all changes are saved, you can run the
Package Validation tool to check the entire package against a set of rules, such as the
Windows Installer SDK Internal Consistency rules.
To find tables that contain errors
In Setup Editor > Tables tab, right-click the left pane and select Check Tables.
The installation is searched for tables that contain errors. Any table that contains an
error is shown in red in the left pane and the error becomes a task in the Task List.
You can use the Task List to review the errors (see Using the Task List on page 25) or
you can click a red table name and use the Find Error menu item to find the row that
contains the error. See the following procedure.
To find individual validation errors in a database
1.
In Setup Editor > Tables tab, right-click and select Find Error.
The Find dialog box appears.
2.
In the Direction section, mark either Up or Down to specify the search direction.
3.
Click Find Next.
If the database contains one or more validation errors, the first one is highlighted in
red in the upper-right pane.
4.
To find the next error, click Find Next again.
To find validation errors in a package
z
Select Tools menu > Package Validation.
Package Validation appears.
See About Package Validation in the Wise Package Studio Help.
When validation is complete, the View / Correct dialog box appears. It lists
validation issues that represent areas where the package might not comply with the
specifications in the validation modules you selected. The icon to the left of each
issue indicates the issue type. When you close Package Validation, validation errors
that were not corrected are added to the Task List.
See also:
Tables Tab on page 380
Searching for Table Data on page 384
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Setup Editor
Editing Binary Data in the Icon Table
On the Tables tab, you can edit binary data in the Icon table. Most items in this table are
graphics (example: shortcut icons). You can export binary files for editing and then
import them back into the installation. Exported binary files are formatted as Windows
bitmaps.
The Binary table also contains binary data. To edit binary data in the Binary table, use
the Resources page.
See Managing Binary Resources on page 102.
Warning
Deleting, adding, or editing table data directly is not recommended unless you are an
experienced Windows Installer developer with a clear understanding of Windows
Installer database technology. Editing table data might cause unexpected, undesirable
behavior, including damage to the installation. We cannot provide technical support for
problems arising from table editing.
To edit binary data
1.
In Setup Editor > Tables tab, click the Icon table.
The table’s data appears in the upper-right pane. You can change the data in the
Name fields as you would in any other table.
2.
In the Data column, click a binary field (displayed as {binary data}) and press F2 or
Enter.
The Edit Binary Data dialog box appears.
3.
4.
5.
In the Action section, mark an option:
„
Read binary data from file
Import binary data from an external file.
„
Write binary data to file
Export binary data to an external file so it can be edited.
In File Name, do one of the following:
„
If you are reading from an external file, specify the full path of a file to read.
„
If you are writing to a file, enter the full path of the file. By default, this file is
exported to the directory where the Windows Installer database file is stored. To
export to a different directory, specify a full path, such as C:\TEMP\FILENAME.
Click OK.
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Chapter 16
Using Conditions and Properties
This chapter includes the following topics:
z
Conditions on page 387
z
Properties on page 395
Conditions
Conditions are like expressions: they evaluate to a true or false value. You associate
conditions with different elements of an installation such as features, components,
actions, dialog boxes, and dialog box controls to determine whether something happens
or not. Based on whether the condition is true or not, you can determine whether to:
z
Allow the installation to continue
z
Install certain features and components
z
Display certain dialog boxes or dialog box controls
z
Execute custom actions you add in MSI Script
When you create a new installation, conditions are already created throughout the
installation where appropriate.
You often use properties inside conditions. Properties are named values that are any of
the following:
z
Predefined in Windows Installer Editor.
z
Defined by Windows Installer, by you in the installation file, or by the end user
during installation.
z
Based on the system configuration of the destination computer.
See Properties on page 395.
See also:
Where Can You Use Conditions? on page 387
Condition Guidelines on page 389
Examples of Conditions on page 390
WiseFixConditions on page 390
Creating Conditions With Condition Builder on page 391
Where Can You Use Conditions?
Conditions on the Features page
You can add conditions on the Features page. These conditions appear in the Current
Feature drop-down list that appears at the top of pages in the Feature Details page
group. Using the Current Feature drop-down list, you can add system changes to a
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Using Conditions and Properties
condition or feature. These changes can include adding files, registry entries, services,
and ODBC.
Items that you add to a feature are installed on the destination computer only if the
feature is installed. Items that you add to a condition are installed only if the feature is
installed and the condition is true.
See Using Conditions With Features on page 100.
Conditions for actions
You can set conditions on the actions in MSI Script by using If Statements. MSI Script
contains standard Windows Installer actions, dialog boxes, and custom actions. In
general, you should not set or change conditions for standard actions, but you’ll
probably set conditions for any custom actions or dialog boxes you create.
See About MSI Script on page 440 and Guidelines for Custom Action Conditions on
page 455.
Launch conditions
Launch conditions are system requirements that must be met for the installation to
proceed. You set launch conditions in the Launch Conditions icon in Setup Editor >
Product tab. When you set system requirements on the System Requirements page,
they are added to the Launch Conditions icon.
Example of a possible launch condition:
ScreenX >= 800 AND ScreenY >= 600
This condition specifies that the screen resolution must be 800 x 600 in order for the
installation to proceed.
ScreenX and ScreenY are Windows Installer properties that are set according to the
screen resolution on the destination computer. See ScreenX Property and ScreenY
Property in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
Conditions for controls on dialog boxes
In Setup Editor > Dialogs tab, you can use conditions with dialog box controls. Controls
are the items that appear on dialog boxes, such as text boxes, radio buttons and check
boxes. Because many conditions are already set on the default installation dialog boxes,
you can use those for examples of how you might use conditions in dialog boxes. View
them in Setup Editor > Dialogs tab.
z
Conditions that set the state of controls
You can create a condition that sets a control to be enabled, disabled, shown,
hidden, or set as the default control.
Example: If you double-click the Next button on the License dialog in Setup Editor >
Dialogs tab, then on the Conditions tab on the Properties dialog box you see three
conditions attached to the Next button. These conditions determine the state of the
Next button. They are all based on the value of a property named Accept. The
Accept property is set to “Yes” when the end user clicks the I accept the license
agreement radio button. As soon as Accept equals “Yes”, the Next button becomes
enabled and set to the default control. (To see how the Accept property is set,
double-click the radio buttons on the License dialog, then view the Items tab on the
Properties dialog box.)
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z
Conditions attached to control events
You can attach an event to a control. The event can have an associated condition.
You might attach events to Next buttons that specify what event happens if the Next
button is clicked.
Example: Click the Installation Type dialog in Setup Editor > Dialogs tab. Doubleclick the Next button and click the Events tab on the Properties dialog box.
Depending on what the property InstallMode is set to, different dialog boxes appear,
as specified in the NewDialog events. If the end user selects the Custom radio
button, InstallMode is set to Custom, and the Select Feature dialog appears. If the
end user does not select the Custom radio button, the Start Installation dialog
appears. The value of the InstallMode property is determined by the end user’s radio
button choice.
Conditions attached to components
You can attach conditions to components in Setup Editor > Components tab. (You can
also add them to components on the Features tab.) If you attach a condition to a
component, the component is installed only if the condition is true. To add or change a
condition attached to a component, right-click a component icon and select Details. Use
the Condition field on the Component Details dialog box that appears to add or change
a condition.
If you add conditions to the Features page, and add items to the conditions using the
Current Feature drop-down list at the top of Installation Expert pages, then some of
the components on the Components tab will have conditions set.
Note
If you add a component condition that checks the installed state of a component or
feature, add the merge module CondFix.msm to the installation. This merge module
fixes a Windows Installer limitation.
See WiseFixConditions on page 390.
Condition Guidelines
Before creating conditions, become familiar with the following Windows Installer
guidelines for creating conditions.
z
z
You can use the following types of values inside a condition:
„
The name of the property. This is case-sensitive. You do not need to enclose the
property name in square brackets. See Using Properties in Conditional
Statements in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
„
Any integer between -32,767 and 32,767. You cannot use floating point values.
„
String literal. Enclose text in quotation marks. Properties that have not been set
evaluate to an empty string “” (null).
„
Environment variable. Precede the variable name with a percent symbol (%).
If a property is set, it evaluates to true in a Boolean expression.
Example: If the installation runs on a destination computer whose operating system
is later than ME, the property VersionNT is set to the version number of the
operating system. However, if you want to set a condition to check for these
operating systems, you can enter the condition as VersionNT. If VersionNT is set to
anything at all, even 0, the condition evaluates to true.
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z
When adding conditions to the Launch Conditions icon, you can add conditions that
check properties or environment variables, but you cannot add conditions that check
the installed state of a component or feature.
z
You might need to include the merge module CondFix.msm, that fixes certain
Windows Installer limitations related to component conditions.
See WiseFixConditions on page 390.
Property names and values, by default, are case-sensitive. To make them caseinsensitive, precede the operator with ~= instead of =.
z
Example: If you enter the condition REMOVE=ALL but the value of the REMOVE
property is currently “All” (with upper- and lowercase), the condition is false. To
write the condition so that it is case-insensitive, type the condition as follows:
REMOVE~=”All”
z
Environment variable names are not case-sensitive.
z
Non-existent property values are treated as empty strings and evaluate to false.
z
Operators and precedence are the same as in the BASIC and SQL languages, but
you can override precedence with parentheses.
z
Arithmetic operators and floating point numeric values are not supported.
For details, see Conditional Statement Syntax in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
Examples of Conditions
You can build conditions using property names, environment variables, and feature and
component states. Conditions can contain both Windows Installer properties and
properties that you create. A complete list of Windows Installer properties is available in
Property Reference in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
Condition
The condition is true if
SystemLanguageID=1033
The installation is running on a computer whose
language is set to English.
REMOVE~=”ALL”
The product is being uninstalled. The ~ makes the
condition case-insensitive.
NOT Installed
The product is being installed for the first time.
CHECKBOX_IS_MARKED
You make a check box and associate the property
CHECKBOX_IS_MARKED with it, and during
installation, the end user marks the check box.
VersionNT
The installation is running on Windows 2000 or
later.
VersionNT AND NOT Installed
The installation is running on Windows 2000 or
later, and the application is not yet installed.
WiseFixConditions
Windows Installer Editor contains a special merge module, WiseFixConditions
(CondFix.msm), that fixes certain Windows Installer limitations:
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Add CondFix.msm to an installation if you add a component condition that checks the
installed state of a component or feature.
The Windows Installer Editor installation places CondFix.msm in the default merge
modules directory, or you can download it with the Download Redistributables wizard.
This merge module appears on the Select Merge Module dialog box when you add a
merge module on the Merge Modules page. If you don’t see it, you have marked the Do
not show merge modules from the Default Merge Module Directory check box in
Wise Options.
See Setting Merge Module Directories on page 43.
See also:
Downloading Redistributable Files on page 30
Using Conditions With Features on page 100
Creating Conditions With Condition Builder
Use the Condition Builder to build conditions that test the installed state of components
and features and the value of properties and environment variables. You can access the
Condition Builder from different areas of Windows Installer Editor.
See Where Can You Use Conditions? on page 387.
Condition Builder dialog box
Scrolling text
box. Enter or
build conditions
here.
Click to check the
syntax of
conditional
statements.
Operator
buttons
Mark Ignore Case
to make conditions
case-insensitive.
This inserts a ~
when you click a
comparative
operator button.
Lists
Operator buttons
Most of the operator buttons in the middle of the dialog box, starting with the = button,
are described in Conditional Statement Syntax in the Windows Installer SDK Help. They
include logical, comparative, string, and bitwise operators.
z
Use the ~ button before an operator to make the condition case-insensitive.
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Use the () buttons to enclose parts of the condition, which changes the order of
precedence.
z
Use the " button to enclose literal text.
Lists
z
Fields
Select the kind of item the condition checks. You can check the installed state for
features and components, and you can check the value of properties and
environment variables.
z
Values
If you selected Environment Variable or Property in the Fields list, double-click the
name of an environment variable or a property to insert it into a condition.
See Checking the Value of a Property on page 392 or Checking the Value of an
Environment Variable on page 393.
Note
The following two lists let you check the current or future installed state of a feature
or component.
See Checking If and How a Feature or Component is Currently Installed on page 394
and Checking If and How a Feature or Component Will Be Installed by This
Installation on page 394.
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State
Use this list only to check the installed state of a component or feature. Action
refers to what occurs during installation, and Installed refers to the current state of
the destination computer.
z
Install/Action state
Use this list only to check the installed state of a component or feature. Absent
means the feature or component is not installed, Advertised means it is
advertised, Local means it is installed on the local hard drive, and Source means it
is installed to run from the installation source.
See also:
Condition Guidelines on page 389
Examples of Conditions on page 390
Checking the Value of a Property
To check whether a property evaluates to true
You do not need to use the Condition Builder. Enter the name of the property in the
Condition field, wherever it appears. Example: To create a condition that checks
whether a Windows NT operating system is running, you enter the condition, VersionNT,
which evaluates to true when VersionNT is set.
For examples of where the Conditions field appears, see Where Can You Use
Conditions? on page 387.
To check whether the property equals a certain value
1.
Open the Condition Builder.
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See Creating Conditions With Condition Builder on page 391.
2.
In the Fields list, click the Property folder.
The Values list displays a list of properties and directories that are initialized by this
installation. More properties appear than in other lists of properties, such as the
Properties icon in Setup Editor > Product tab. It includes Windows Installer
properties that are set at run time based on system configuration, such as ScreenX
and ScreenY. For information on Windows Installer properties, see Property
Reference in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
3.
In the Values list, double-click the name of the property.
If the property you want does not appear in this list, enter the property name in the
condition list box at the top of the Condition Builder dialog box.
4.
Click the = button.
An equals sign is inserted in the condition list box.
5.
Click in the condition list box after the equals sign and enter a value.
6.
Click OK.
Checking the Value of an Environment Variable
Environment variables are system or end user variables that are set by the operating
system running on the destination computer. They contain values specific to that
computer.
Note
This procedure lets you check the value of an environment variable. To read the value of
an environment variable into a property, use the Set Property type of custom action.
Enter [%ENVIRONMENT_VARIABLE_NAME] in the Property Value field on the Custom
Action Target dialog box while creating the action (brackets required).
To check the value of an environment variable
1.
Open the Condition Builder.
See Creating Conditions With Condition Builder on page 391.
2.
In the Fields list, click the Environment Variable folder.
The Values list displays the environment variables that currently exist on your
computer. If the environment variable you want is not in the list, enter its name in
the condition list box at the top of the Condition Builder dialog box. For information
on available environment variables, consult Microsoft Windows developer
documentation.
3.
In the Values list, double-click the name of the environment variable.
4.
Click the = button.
5.
Click in the condition list box after the equals sign and enter a value.
6.
Click OK.
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Checking If and How a Feature or Component is
Currently Installed
A feature or component might be installed to run locally, from the source, or advertised,
which are all options you can set when installing a component or feature.
Note
You cannot add this type of condition to the Launch Conditions icon in Setup Editor >
Product tab. Also, when you add this type of condition, add the merge module
CondFix.msm to the installation. This merge module fixes a Windows Installer limitation.
See WiseFixConditions on page 390.
To check if and how a feature or component is currently installed
1.
Open the Condition Builder.
See Creating Conditions With Condition Builder on page 391.
2.
In the Fields list, click the Feature or Component folder.
3.
In the Values list, click the name of the feature or component.
4.
In the State list, double-click Installed.
5.
Click the = button.
6.
In the Install/Action state list, double-click one of the following to check the
current installation state of the feature or condition:
„
Absent
Not installed.
„
Advertised
Installed in an advertised state.
„
Local
Installed locally.
„
Source
Installed to run from installation source.
When you finish, a condition appears in the condition list box. Based on the choices
you make, the appropriate Windows Installer codes are inserted. Example:
!Complete = 3
7.
Click OK.
Checking If and How a Feature or Component Will
Be Installed by This Installation
A feature or component might be installed to run locally, from the source, or advertised,
which are all options you can set when installing a component or feature.
Note
You cannot add this type of condition to the Launch Conditions icon in Setup Editor >
Product tab. Also, when you add this type of condition, add the merge module
CondFix.msm to the installation. This merge module fixes a Windows Installer limitation.
See WiseFixConditions on page 390.
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To check if and how a feature or component will be installed by this
installation
1.
Open the Condition Builder.
See Creating Conditions With Condition Builder on page 391.
2.
In the Fields list, click the Feature or Component folder.
3.
In the Values list, click the name of the feature or component.
4.
In the State list, double-click Action.
5.
Click the = button.
6.
In the Install/Action state list, double-click one of the following to check the
action state of the feature or condition:
„
Absent
Will not be installed by this installation.
„
Advertised
Will be installed in an advertised state.
„
Local
Will be installed locally by this installation.
„
Source
Will be installed to run from installation source by this installation.
When you finish, a condition appears in the condition list box. Based on the choices
you make, the appropriate Windows Installer codes are inserted. Example:
&Complete = 3
7.
Click OK.
Properties
Properties are variables that are used by Windows Installer during installation. You often
use properties inside conditions. You can hard-code the value of a property, but you can
also make properties more flexible by manipulating them at run time based on user
input, system configuration, or other situations.
Properties are set by the following methods and in the following order:
Included in the
installation database
Some properties are included in all installations you create
in Windows Installer Editor. These include required Windows
Installer properties, properties that are used on the
installation dialog boxes, predefined Wise properties, and
the directories listed in the Directory table on the Tables tab
in Setup Editor. You can see these properties by clicking the
Properties icon in Setup Editor > Product tab.
See Build Properties on page 512.
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Created by you in the
installation database
You can create properties in the Properties icon in Setup
Editor > Product tab. Also, some dialog boxes that contain a
property drop-down list also contain a New button with
which you can create a new property.
See Creating a New Property on page 397.
Set on the command
line
Properties can be set on the command line.
Set by Windows
Installer at run time
Some properties are set by Windows Installer according to
the configuration of the destination computer.
See Command Line Options For WFWI.EXE on page 238.
See Property Reference in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
Set by end user input
You can author the user interface so that end user input sets
property values. Example: You can associate a property
name with a dialog box control. The results of the end user’s
action on the dialog box control are put into the property.
Because each method of setting properties can be overridden by the methods that come
after it, property values might change during installation. You can see the value of
properties during installation in the Properties pane of Debugger for Windows Installer,
which appears when you click the Debug button.
Properties that are authored into the installation database’s Property table, which
appear in the Properties icon in Setup Editor > Product tab, represent initial values of
properties. Changing the Properties table after installation begins has no effect on the
values of properties that are stored in memory.
During installation, properties can be changed only by actions that are running in
immediate execution mode. User interface actions are in immediate execution mode,
and you can set your custom actions to run in immediate execution mode.
See also:
How Do You Use Properties? on page 396
Creating a New Property on page 397
Property Reference on page 512
How Do You Use Properties?
You can use properties in the following ways:
To interact with the user
You can attach properties to controls on dialog boxes, which puts the results of the
control into the property. Then, use the property in a condition.
Example: In Setup Editor > Dialogs tab, the Installation Type dialog has a set of radio
buttons. The radio buttons are associated with a property named InstallMode, and based
on the value of InstallMode, the Next button displays a different dialog box. Double-click
the radio buttons and the Next button, to view their Properties dialog boxes.
See About Dialog Controls on page 411.
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In conditions
You can use properties inside conditions. You do not need to enclose the property name
in brackets. Conditions determine whether something happens or not.
As formatted text on dialog boxes
To display the value of a property or write the value of a property to a file, you must
enclose the property name in square brackets. Example: [Property].
Example: In Setup Editor > Dialogs tab, right-click a dialog box name, and select
Details. The Dialog Details dialog box appears with [ProductName] [_WiseDialogSuffix]
in the Dialog Title.
To display a bracket, you must enclose it in square brackets. Example: [[].
To change the way the installation is run
You can set properties that change the way Windows Installer runs.
Example: To force or suppress a restart at the end of installation, you could create a Set
Property custom action that sets the Windows Installer property named REBOOT.
Creating a New Property
Note
Before you create a new property, search the Windows Installer SDK Help to make sure
the property name is not already used by Windows Installer. See Property Reference in
the Windows Installer SDK Help.
To create a new property
1.
In Setup Editor > Product tab, right-click the Properties icon and select New >
Property.
The Property Details dialog box appears.
2.
Complete the dialog box:
„
Name
Enter a name for the property. Properties can contain only letters, numbers,
underscores, and periods and must begin with a letter or underscore.
A public property name consists of all uppercase letters. The value of public
properties can be passed from the UI Sequence to the Execute Sequence. In
most cases, barring security issues, you should designate properties as public
properties. (See Public Properties in the Windows Installer SDK Help.) A private
property name includes lowercase letters. (See Private Properties in the
Windows Installer SDK Help.)
„
Value
Enter an initial value for the property.
According to Windows Installer guidelines, you should always enter an initial
value. However, in some cases you might not want to. Example: If the property
is associated with a check box, and you want the check box to appear
unchecked initially.
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Note
You cannot enter other properties to set the value of a new property because
text you enter is interpreted literally. This is not true for some specific Windows
Installer properties, such as DiskPrompt and PrimaryFolder.
To set a property to the value or values of other properties, use the Set Property
custom action.
See Set Property on page 487.
3.
„
Hidden property
Mark this to designate this property as hidden. This Windows Installer 2.0
feature prevents the property’s value from being written to the installation log
file. Use this for properties that contain information, such as serial numbers or
passwords, that you don’t want end users to see.
„
Add to the list of restricted public properties
Mark this to designate this property as a restricted public property. Do this if the
installation is to be performed on locked-down Windows computers and you
want the ability to change and pass its value from the UI Sequence to the
Execute Sequence. (See Restricted Public Properties in the Windows Installer
SDK Help.) This is unavailable if you entered any lowercase letters in the name.
Click OK.
The property is added to the list of properties initialized by this installation.
You can also create a new property from any dialog box in the product that has a
Property drop-down list with a New button next to it.
To edit a property, double-click its name under the Properties icon in Setup Editor >
Product tab.
Warning
You can edit and delete properties, but many of the properties you see in the Properties
icon are Windows Installer properties. You should be proficient in the Windows Installer
development environment before you edit or delete Windows Installer properties. If you
change the name of a property, make sure you update any dialog box controls or
conditions that reference the property name.
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Chapter 17
Working With Dialogs
This chapter includes the following topics:
z
About Dialogs on page 399
z
Using the Dialogs Page on page 402
z
Using the Dialogs Tab on page 406
z
Editing Dialog Details on page 408
z
Creating a New Dialog on page 410
z
About Dialog Controls on page 411
z
About Billboards on page 422
z
Obtaining Logon Information From a Dialog on page 425
z
About the SQL Connection Dialog on page 426
z
Adding the Custom Property Dialog on page 429
About Dialogs
You can select, edit, and rearrange dialog boxes that appear to the end user during
installation. This lets you determine the level of control the end user has over the
installation. You also can select the theme that controls the overall look of the
installation dialog boxes.
For most installations, the Dialogs page provides all the options that are needed for
selecting and editing dialog boxes. The Dialogs tab in Setup Editor contains advanced
tools for editing the appearance as well as the behavior and logic of installation dialog
boxes.
You can access dialog boxes from the following places:
z
Dialogs page
(Installation Expert) The dialog boxes on the Dialogs page are those in the Welcome
Dialog Wizard, which appear to the end user during a normal installation. Turn the
dialog box boxes on or off, rearrange them, view conditions, and select the dialog
box theme. Click the Dialog Editor button to display a dialog box on the Dialogs tab.
z
Dialogs tab
(Setup Editor) Edit any dialog boxes in the installation and create new dialog boxes.
z
Display Dialog actions
(MSI Script) View dialog box sequences as they are ordered in the installation
sequences, as well as the conditions under which the dialog boxes display. The
conditions are within If statements surrounding the Display Dialog actions. One
Display Dialog action represents an entire dialog box sequence. Example:
Welcome_Dialog in MSI Script represents the entire Welcome Dialog Wizard, as
shown on the Dialogs tab. In MSI Script, if you double-click the script line for
Welcome_Dialog, the first dialog box of the Welcome Dialog Wizard displays on the
Dialogs tab.
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The Dialogs tab shows all dialog boxes that are part of an .MSI. Any of these dialog
boxes can appear in different situations:
Install Dialogs
The Install Dialogs appear during a normal installation, if no command-line options are
used to run an advertisement, administrative, or silent installation.
Maintenance Dialogs
The Maintenance Dialogs appear when the installation is run in maintenance mode, that
is, when it is run after the application is installed. Maintenance mode lets the end user
change, repair, or uninstall the application.
Admin Dialogs
The Admin Dialogs appear during an administration installation. An administrative
installation copies a source image of the application to a network, for later installation by
end users.
To run an administrative installation, use the command-line option /a.
See About Installation Modes on page 441.
See also:
About Installation Sequences on page 444
Types of Actions in MSI Script Sequences on page 445
About the Wizard Dialogs on page 400
Using the Dialogs Page on page 402
Using the Dialogs Tab on page 406
About the Wizard Dialogs
Some dialog boxes in the Welcome Dialog Wizard are probably familiar to you, because
they appear in almost all installations. Others only appear in certain situations:
z
If you add them with the New Dialog Wizard.
See Creating a New Dialog on page 410.
z
If you add certain features to your installation, corresponding dialog boxes are
added.
Example: IIS dialog boxes are added if you add Web resources to the Web Files
page.
z
If you create an installation based on a certain template that has special dialog
boxes. (Example: The Server Application template contains the SQL Connection
dialog.) You select the installation template in the New Installation File dialog box.
Dialog boxes that can appear in installations
Welcome dialog
License dialog
Windows Installer Editor Reference
See Importing Text into License and Readme Dialogs on
page 405.
400
Working With Dialogs
Readme dialog
See Importing Text into License and Readme Dialogs on
page 405.
User Information dialog
Lets end users enter their name, company, and product
ID, and indicate whether the software should be
installed for all users or only for the current user. The
Product ID field does not appear to the end user if the
ProductID property (select Product tab > Properties
icon) is set to none.
See ProductID Property and PIDTemplate Property in
the Windows Installer SDK Help.
Single Feature Destination
dialog
Sets the installation directory.
Installation Type dialog
Lets the end user select a typical, complete, or custom
installation, which you define on Installation Expert >
Installation Types page.
Select Feature dialog
Lets the end user select which features to install and
how to install them.
Palm User Information
dialog
If you add Palm OS files on the Mobile Devices page,
and if the desktop computer has multiple Palm users,
this dialog box appears and lets the end user specify
which Palm users should be able to access the new Palm
application.
For additional criteria for displaying this dialog box, see
Installing to the Palm User folder on page 223.
SQL Connection dialog
Appears in installations that are started from the Server
Application template in the New Installation File dialog
box. It lets end users select a SQL Server name and
security credentials, and puts the resulting connection
string into a property. You can use this connection string
on Installation Expert > SQL Server Scripts page.
See Adding the SQL Connection Dialog to an Installation
on page 427.
IIS dialogs
Several dialog boxes that begin with “IIS” are added if
you install Web files.
See About Web Installations on page 245.
Warning
Do not edit the Web (IIS) dialog boxes, except to
change their order (as a group) in the installation
sequence. Editing the Web dialog boxes might cause
unexpected, undesirable behavior, including damage to
the installation. Also, any operation within this product
that affects the installation’s user interface will
regenerate the Web dialog boxes, therefore, any
changes you make to them will be lost.
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Logon Information dialog
Appears in installations that are started from the Server
Application template in the New Installation File dialog
box. You can add it to any installation by using the New
Dialog Wizard.
See Adding the Logon Information Dialog on page 425.
Custom Property dialog
Lets end users set the values of Windows Installer
Properties. You can only add this dialog box through the
New Dialog Wizard, where you set the properties that
appear during installation.
See Adding the Custom Property Dialog on page 429.
See also:
Using the Dialogs Page on page 402
Using the Dialogs Tab on page 406
About Dialogs on page 399
Using the Dialogs Page
Use Installation Expert > Dialogs page to view, activate, and rearrange installation
dialog boxes that are part of the Welcome Dialog Wizard. The dialog boxes that you
activate determine the level of control the end user has over the installation.
Warning
Do not edit the Web (IIS) dialog boxes, except to change their order (as a group) in the
installation sequence. Editing the Web dialog boxes might cause unexpected,
undesirable behavior, including damage to the installation. Also, any operation within
this product that affects the installation’s user interface will regenerate the Web dialog
boxes, therefore, any changes you make to them will be lost.
The Dialogs page looks different based on the version of the Wise product that the
current installation was created in. If the installation was created in Wise for Windows
Installer 6.0 or later, or Windows Installer Editor 5.5 or later, or any version of Wise MSI
Editor, it has more options, which are documented below. If the installation was created
in earlier versions, it has fewer options and contains a Convert button.
Using the Convert button
The Convert button converts the button navigation to a more flexible and robust system,
which facilitates changing the order of dialog boxes. However, converting may cause
problems with legacy installations if you have extensively customized the dialog boxes
and their settings. Make a backup of the installation before converting if such
customization exists. Click Convert and the dialog boxes are instantly converted to the
new system with no undo. At that point, new options appear on the Dialogs page.
To activate a dialog box
Mark the check box next to the dialog box’s name.
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Warning
If this installation contains Web resources, then the list of dialog boxes might include
Web (IIS) dialog boxes. Only enable or disable the Web dialog boxes as a group.
Enabling individual Web dialog boxes can prevent the installation from working properly.
To view a dialog box
Click the dialog box name in the Dialogs list.
To edit dialog box details and attributes
Select the dialog box and click Details.
See Editing Dialog Details on page 408.
To change the order of dialog boxes during installation
Use the Move Up and Move Down buttons.
Warning
If this installation contains Web resources, then the list of dialog boxes might include
Web (IIS) dialog boxes. The Web dialog boxes must always remain in their original
order, so they should only be moved as a group. See Changing the Order of Web Dialogs
on page 406.
To add a dialog box
Click the Add button and complete the wizard.
See Creating a New Dialog on page 410.
To turn off all installation dialog boxes
Do one of the following:
z
Use a silent installation.
See User Interface Levels in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
z
In Setup Editor > Dialogs tab, clear the check box next to Welcome Dialog
Wizard.
About changing conditions
On the Dialogs page, you see the conditions attached to each dialog box. You can
change these conditions by double-clicking the dialog box name and editing the
Conditions field, but this is not recommended. Most of the Windows Installer properties
referenced in conditions are documented in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
Changing the Theme of Dialogs
The theme controls the overall look of installation dialog boxes by setting their top or
side images and the fonts of the dialog box text. You can choose from predefined
themes or themes that you have created.
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Warning
Changing themes might delete dialog box customizations in installations that were
created in previous versions of this Wise product. To preserve dialog box customizations,
leave None selected in Default Theme.
To change the dialog box theme
1.
Select Installation Expert > Dialogs page.
2.
From Default Theme, select a new theme.
„
The None option appears in Default Theme for installations created in
previous versions of this Wise product. If the installation you previously created
has dialog box customizations that you do not want to lose, leave the Default
Theme set to None.
„
Select No Graphics to omit top or side images from dialog boxes. Use this
option to minimize the size of an installation that is always run silently.
The dialog box in the Preview pane displays the new theme.
Applying Themes to Releases
You can apply different themes to different releases. The theme of the Default release
on the Releases page corresponds to the Default Theme on the Dialogs page. Changing
the theme on one page changes it on the other. Renaming or deleting the Default
release breaks this relationship.
See Creating a New Release on page 185.
Adding and Editing Dialog Themes
The theme controls the overall look of installation dialog boxes by setting their top or
side images and the fonts of the dialog box text. You can edit themes and create
customized dialog box themes.
If an installation was imported or converted from a non-Wise product, the ability to edit
the themes is limited and varies depending on the product.
To add or edit a dialog box theme
1.
Select Installation Expert > Dialogs page.
2.
Click Edit Themes.
The Edit Themes dialog box appears.
3.
4.
Specify a theme:
„
To edit an existing theme, click the theme name in the list on the left.
„
To create a new theme, click New and enter the theme’s name in Name.
„
To create a new theme based on an existing theme, click a theme in the list,
click Copy, and enter the new theme’s name in Name.
To add images to a new theme or to change an existing theme’s images, click
Browse to the right of Top Image Preview or Side Image Preview and select a
new image file.
The image you select appears in the preview pane.
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When you create a new theme, the images you specify are copied to a new
subdirectory in the Themes directory. The location of the Themes subdirectory
varies.
See Installation Resources and Their Locations on page 28.
Theme images you create must be in .BMP format. To quickly create theme images,
copy and edit a set of predefined images. These images are in the subdirectories of
the Themes directory.
5.
To remove an image from a theme, click the Remove button to the right of the
image.
6.
To edit a theme’s fonts, click the Set Font button to the right of the font to change
and select a new font from the Font dialog box. Select a font that will be on the
destination computer. If the font you select is not on the destination computer, the
font is set to a recognized system font.
The selected font appears on the Edit Themes dialog box next to the Set Font
button.
„
The Title Font settings control the font for the title of all dialog boxes that have
a top image. (Example: the title “License Agreement” on the License dialog.)
The Title Font settings do not control the font for the title of the Welcome
dialog or any other dialog boxes that have a side image.
„
The Main Font settings control the font for the rest of the text on the dialog
boxes. You cannot edit the font of individual sections of a dialog box from the
Edit Themes dialog box.
„
If you create a new theme and do not set the fonts for that theme, it uses the
default font settings in the Properties table.
„
To edit the font of the Welcome dialog box title or of any individual sections of
dialog box text, use Setup Editor > Dialogs tab.
See Basic Control Settings on page 413.
If you change one or more themes on the Edit Themes dialog box, and then click OK, all
the changes are saved, but if you click Cancel, all the changes are canceled.
Importing Text into License and Readme Dialogs
You can import an .RTF or .TXT file to appear on the License and Readme dialog boxes.
After you import the text, you can edit it in its dialog box.
To import text into License and Readme dialog boxes
1.
Select Installation Expert > Dialogs page.
2.
Select the dialog box in the Dialogs list.
3.
Click Import Text and select an .RTF or .TXT file.
This button is available only when you select the License or Readme dialog boxes.
The text is imported into the dialog box but any embedded graphics are removed.
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Note
If you encounter error messages or formatting problems when you import the file, open
it in Wordpad, save it as .RTF, and re-import it. Some computers cannot import files with
formats other than .RTF. Also, only the standard .RTF settings are supported for the
License and Readme dialog boxes.
Changing the Order of Web Dialogs
If this installation contains Web resources, then it might contain Web (IIS) dialog boxes.
These dialog boxes must always remain in their original order, so they should only be
moved as a group.
To change the order of Web dialog boxes
1.
Select Installation Expert > Dialogs page.
2.
Click Web Dialogs.
The Web Dialog Sequence dialog box appears.
If the Web Dialogs button does not appear, either this installation does not contain
Web resources, or the user interface has been disabled for those Web resources.
3.
In the list of dialog boxes, WEB DIALOGS represents the entire group of Web-related
dialog boxes, which must be moved as a group. Use the Move Up and Move Down
buttons to move the group of Web dialog boxes.
Warning
Do not edit the Web (IIS) dialog boxes, except to change their order (as a group) in the
installation sequence. Editing the Web dialog boxes might cause unexpected,
undesirable behavior, including damage to the installation. Also, any operation within
this product that affects the installation’s user interface will regenerate the Web dialog
boxes, therefore, any changes you make to them will be lost.
See also:
About Web Installations on page 245
Using the Dialogs Tab
Use Setup Editor > Dialogs tab to select, edit, rearrange, and create the dialog boxes
that will appear in an installation. It shows the complete list of dialog boxes and provides
more options for working with dialog boxes than are available in Installation Expert >
Dialogs page.
The Dialogs tab contains a Layout menu, a right-click menu, and a toolbar that let you
add new controls to dialog boxes, edit existing controls, and organize dialog box
content.
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To expand or collapse a selected dialog set’s children, use the right-click menu.
z
If the toolbar is not visible, select View menu > Controls.
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Warning
Do not edit the Web (IIS) dialog boxes, except to change their order (as a group) in the
installation sequence. Editing the Web dialog boxes might cause unexpected,
undesirable behavior, including damage to the installation. Also, any operation within
this product that affects the installation’s user interface will regenerate the Web dialog
boxes, therefore, any changes you make to them will be lost.
To activate dialog boxes for an installation
Mark the check box next to the dialog’s name. This works consistently for wizard dialog
boxes that appear under a wizard set, such as the Welcome Dialog Wizard. It does not
work for some required dialog boxes, such as the User Exit and Fatal Error dialog boxes,
which can appear whether you mark their check boxes or not. If you turn off the Cancel
dialog boxes that appear as children of wizard dialog boxes, the Cancel button that calls
the Cancel dialog box becomes unavailable in the wizard dialog box.
Warning
If this installation contains Web resources, then it might contain Web (IIS) dialog boxes.
Only enable or disable the Web dialog boxes as a group. Enabling individual Web dialog
boxes can prevent the installation from working properly.
To edit dialog box details and attributes
Right-click the dialog box name in the left pane and select Details.
See Editing Dialog Details on page 408.
Warning
If you are using the Installation Types page to manage the Installation Types dialog box,
you cannot change any details on the Installation Types dialog box. Doing so causes the
Installation Types page not to work properly.
To change the order of dialog boxes during installation
Right-click the dialog box name in the left pane and select. Move Up or Move Down
Warning
If this installation contains Web resources, then it might contain Web (IIS) dialog boxes.
The Web dialog boxes must always remain in their original order, so they should only be
moved as a group.
See Changing the Order of Web Dialogs on page 406.
To add a dialog box to the installation
1.
In the left pane, right-click where the new dialog box should appear, and select New
> Dialog.
2.
Complete the wizard.
See Creating a New Dialog on page 410.
To turn off all installation dialog boxes
Do one of the following:
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Use a silent installation.
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See User Interface Levels in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
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In Setup Editor > Dialogs tab, clear the check box next to Welcome Dialog
Wizard.
Adding Controls to Dialogs
Add controls to dialog boxes on the Dialogs tab in Setup Editor.
Because of limitations with Windows Installer, do not place dialog box controls on top of
graphics. Although you can place objects on top of one another, controls that are placed
on top of graphics often do not appear at run time.
Warning
Do not edit the Web (IIS) dialog boxes, except to change their order (as a group) in the
installation sequence. Editing the Web dialog boxes might cause unexpected,
undesirable behavior, including damage to the installation. Also, any operation within
this product that affects the installation’s user interface will regenerate the Web dialog
boxes, therefore, any changes you make to them will be lost.
To add controls to dialog boxes
1.
In Setup Editor > Dialogs tab, select a dialog box in the left pane.
The dialog box appears in the right pane.
2.
Select Layout menu > Add, and then select the type of control to insert. If the
controls in the Add menu are unavailable, click the dialog box to make it active, and
try adding the control again.
Depending on the type of control you select, a Properties dialog box appears so you
can configure the control’s properties, position, and attributes. For information on
each tab of the Properties dialog box, see:
Basic Control Settings on page 413
Setting an Event on a Control on page 416
Assigning Help to a Control on page 417
Assigning Conditions to a Control on page 417
Setting the Graphic for a Control on page 418
Setting the Items in a Control on page 418
3.
Click OK to add the control to the dialog box.
4.
Use other commands on the Layout menu to help organize and arrange the new
controls.
When you perform an operation on multiple controls at once (example: aligning
controls), the last control you select is the master control, which the other selected
controls will conform to. The master control is surrounded with solid handles instead of
hollow handles.
Editing Dialog Details
You can edit the general details of any installation dialog box from:
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Setup Editor > Dialogs tab: Right-click the name of a dialog box in the left pane,
and select Details.
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Installation Expert > Dialogs page: Select the dialog box and click the Details
button.
The Dialog Details dialog box appears.
Warning
If you are using the Installation Types page to manage the Installation Types dialog box,
do not change any details on the Installation Type dialog box. Doing so causes the
Installation Types page not to work properly.
Warning
Do not edit the Web (IIS) dialog boxes, except to change their order (as a group) in the
installation sequence. Editing the Web dialog boxes might cause unexpected,
undesirable behavior, including damage to the installation. Also, any operation within
this product that affects the installation’s user interface will regenerate the Web dialog
boxes, therefore, any changes you make to them will be lost.
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Dialog Title
Enter the title of the dialog box. You can include an installation property in the title
by enclosing it in square brackets. Example: [ProductName] inserts the name of the
product at run time.
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X and Y Centering
Enter X and Y values from 1 to 100 to indicate where on the screen the dialog box
should be centered. Values of 50 in both fields mean that the dialog box should be
exactly centered on the screen. If the Y Centering value is set to 33, the center of
the dialog box will be 1/3 of the way from the top of the screen.
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Visible
Mark this to make the dialog box visible.
z
Minimize Button
Mark this to add a minimize button.
z
Track Disk Space
Mark this to have the dialog box periodically call Windows Installer to update any
disk space fields on the dialog box.
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Error Dialog
Mark this if the dialog box is an error dialog box. The property named ErrorDialog
determines which specific dialog box is called if errors occur during installation. The
dialog box must contain a text control named ErrorText to receive the contents of
the error message. An installation can contain only one error dialog box.
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Modal
Mark this if the dialog box should be modal, which means the dialog box is the front
window of the installation until the end user clicks OK or Cancel. The end user
cannot access other windows or dialog boxes of the installation until the modal
dialog box is dismissed.
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Keep Modeless
Mark this if non-modal dialog boxes that are displayed when this dialog box appears
should remain on the screen.
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Use Custom Palette
Mark this to use a custom color palette on displays with 256 colors or less. This
usually makes the dialog box look better, provided only one dialog box is on the
screen at a time.
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Note
If you get details for the Custom Property dialog box, an Edit button appears on the
Dialog Details dialog box. This lets you change the Windows Installer properties for the
Custom Property dialog box.
Creating a New Dialog
The New Dialog Wizard guides you through the process of adding a new dialog box to an
installation.
To create a new dialog box
1.
Start the New Dialog Wizard:
„
Select Setup Editor > Dialogs tab. In the left pane, right-click where the new
dialog box should appear, and select New > Dialog.
OR
„
Select Installation Expert > Dialogs page > Add button.
The Select Dialog Type page appears.
Note
The dialog box templates that appear are in Wise Standard.msi, which is stored in
\Templates\Dialogs. To make additional dialog boxes available in each new
installation, open Wise Standard.msi and add the dialog boxes to the All Dialogs
branch on the Dialogs tab.
The location of the Templates subdirectory varies.
See Installation Resources and Their Locations on page 28.
2.
Select the type of dialog box and click Next.
The Dialog Properties page appears.
3.
Edit any values by clicking the item in the Type column and then clicking Edit.
This page lets you change any properties the new dialog box inherits from the
template. Example: Each dialog box must have a unique name. The wizard assigns
a unique name to the new dialog box by appending a number to the template’s
name, but you might want a more descriptive name.
4.
When you finish editing values, click Next.
If you added the Custom Property dialog box, the Select Custom Properties page
appears, where you can select properties that can be set by the end user during
installation.
See Adding the Custom Property Dialog on page 429.
The Select Installation Placement page appears, which differs slightly based on what
version of Windows Installer Editor the current installation was created in.
Read about the Convert button in Using the Dialogs Page on page 402.
5.
Specify where in the sequence the new dialog box should appear.
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If Move Up and Move Down buttons appear, use them to move the new dialog
box within the list.
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„
6.
If they do not appear, then you must select a dialog box in both the After and
Before columns. The new dialog box will appear after the dialog box you select
in After, and before the dialog box you select in Before.
Click Finish to add the new dialog box to the dialog box list.
Now you can add and edit controls on the dialog box.
See:
Adding Controls to Dialogs on page 408
Editing Dialog Details on page 408
Organizing and Aligning Controls on Dialogs on page 419
About Dialog Controls
Installation dialog boxes contain standard controls, which you can add and edit. Most
controls are configured by completing their Properties dialog box.
See Editing Dialog Controls on page 413.
dialog box controls often have an associated property. The result from the dialog box
control is put into the property. To have a dialog box control be deselected by default,
associate the control with a property whose value is not defined (null).
Example:
Suppose you create a check box, and you want the check box to be initially cleared. In
the Properties dialog box for the check box, click the New button next to the Property
field, create a new property named CHECKBOX1, and leave its value blank. Although this
results in error messages during compile (which you can safely ignore), it ensures that
the check box is initially cleared when initially cleared when it appears to the end user.
(Delete the property from the Properties icon on the Product tab to eliminate error
messages.) To test whether the end user marked the check box, you use a condition
that consists of the property’s name, that is, CHECKBOX1. If the check box was not
marked, the value of the property remains null, and therefore CHECKBOX1 is false. If
the check box was marked, its value is now non-null, and therefore CHECKBOX1 is true.
Types of Dialog Controls
Billboard
A static field that defines the area of the dialog box where a
sequence of text and images is displayed during installation
Billboards require special setup.
See About Billboards on page 422.
Bitmap
A static image field for displaying graphics
Button
A clickable button
Check box
A single check box for on/off, true/false settings
Combobox
A combination edit field and drop-down list control that lets
the end user select a predefined value or enter a value
Directory Combobox
Displays a combination directory list and path edit field to
let the end user specify a directory
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Directory Listbox
Displays the folders below the main part of the current path
This is intended to be used with the path edit control.
Edit Field
A single line input field
Group Box
A boundary box drawn around related controls
Icon
A static image control for displaying icons
Line
A separator line drawn between groups of controls
Listbox.
Displays a single column of values without icons
The end user can select one value from the list.
Listview
Displays a single column of values with an icon next to each
The end user can select one value from the list.
Masked Edit Field
A text edit field with a mask that creates a template for end
user data entry, specifying default values for some positions
and specifying the proper type of character (numeric or
alpha) for others
You can enter certain characters in the Control Text field of
the Masked Edit control to constrain which characters can be
used at each character position of the control.
See MaskedEdit Control in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
Path Edit
A single line input field that accepts only a valid path
This is intended to be used in conjunction with the directory
list box or directory combobox controls.
Progress Bar
A control that displays the progress of an installation or
other operation
Radio Button
A group of mutually exclusive options with a separate radio
button for each option
Scrollable Text
A multi-line text entry field
Selection Tree
Displays the feature selection tree
Text
Static text field for displaying messages
The end user cannot change text in this type of field. You
can enter a property name surrounded by brackets in this
type of control to display a property’s current value.
Volume Cost Listbox
A static text control that shows information about the disk
space requirements of different volumes (referred to as
“cost” in Windows Installer terminology) for the currently
selected features
Volume Combobox
Lets the end user select a volume for installation
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Editing Dialog Controls
Warning
Do not edit the Web (IIS) dialog boxes, except to change their order (as a group) in the
installation sequence. Editing the Web dialog boxes might cause unexpected,
undesirable behavior, including damage to the installation. Also, any operation within
this product that affects the installation’s user interface will regenerate the Web dialog
boxes, therefore, any changes you make to them will be lost.
To edit dialog box controls
1.
In Setup Editor > Dialogs tab, select a dialog box in the left pane.
The dialog box appears in the right pane.
2.
Double-click a control.
A multi-tabbed Properties dialog box appears. The tabs that appear vary depending
on the type of control. See:
Basic Control Settings on page 413
Setting an Event on a Control on page 416
Assigning Help to a Control on page 417
Assigning Conditions to a Control on page 417
Setting the Graphic for a Control on page 418
Setting the Items in a Control on page 418
To see the results of these settings, compile and run the installation.
Basic Control Settings
The Control tab, which appears on the Properties dialog box for dialog controls,
determines the appearance and basic behavior of controls.
See Editing Dialog Controls.
The settings available on this tab vary depending on the type of control.
z
Property
The name of the property associated with this control. The property determines the
initial state of the control, and holds the result from the control after end user input.
This property can determine the initial state of the control. Example: If a check box
is associated with a property whose value is not defined (null), the check box is
initially cleared when it appears to the end user. After the end user has interacted
with a control by marking it, entering text into it, or selecting an option, the result of
the user input is stored in this property.
You can create a new property.
See Creating a New Property on page 397.
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Control Text
The text in the control. For bitmap and icon controls, this stores the key in the
binary table in which the bitmap or icon is stored. Click Import to import text from
an existing text file (.TXT or .RTF).
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Note
If you encounter error messages or formatting problems when you import the file,
open it in Wordpad, save it as .RTF, and re-import it. Some computers cannot import
files with formats other than .RTF.
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Max Characters
(This replaces the Control Text field for an edit field control.) Enter the maximum
number of characters the end user can enter.
z
Default
Mark this to activate this control when the user presses Enter while on this dialog
box. Example: If you mark this check box for an OK button on a dialog box, then
when the user presses Enter, the event associated with the OK button is activated.
z
Cancel
Mark this to activate this control when the user presses Esc while on this dialog box.
Example: If you mark this check box for a Cancel button on a dialog box, then when
the user presses Esc, the event associated with the Cancel button is activated.
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Font Property
(Not available for a scrollable text control.) Select the property that defines a font.
In most cases, select _WiseDialogFontDefault to match the default text of other
text on dialog boxes. To define a new font style, add a new row to the TextStyle
table in Setup Editor > Tables tab. Then create a new property, and enter the new
text style’s name, surrounded by curly brackets, as the property value.
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Control Font
You can click Set Font and select a font for the control. The Font Property field, if
set, overrides this field.
z
X Position, Y Position
The location of the control within the dialog box. The upper-left corner is
represented by X,Y values of 0,0. You also can drag the control to position it on the
dialog box.
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Width, Height
The size of the control in installation units, which are equal to 1/12 the height of the
system font on the destination computer.
General Attributes
z
Visible
Makes the control visible.
z
Sunken
Makes the control beveled to appear pushed into the dialog box.
z
Right Aligned Text
Right-aligns text in the control.
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Enabled
Enables the control, that is, display it in a state the end user recognizes as clickable.
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Indirect
If you mark this, the information for the control is not stored directly in the property
for the control. Instead, the value of the control’s property is used as the real
property name to store the information in.
Example: Suppose a dialog box has three radio buttons and a check box. The radio
buttons set the property RADIO to FIRST, SECOND, or THIRD. The check box also
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uses the property RADIO but has the Indirect check box marked. The property
FIRST, SECOND, or THIRD is set to the check box state based on the setting of the
radio button.
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Scrollbar on left side
On a scrolling field control, places the scrollbar on the left instead of the right.
(Usually used with the Right-To-Left Reading check box below.)
z
Integer
Restricts end users to entering only integers in this control.
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Right-To-Left Reading
Indicates that the text in this control is in a language that is read right to left.
z
Has Border
Displays a group box frame around the radio buttons in a radio button control.
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Check Value
If the end user marks the control, the value of the property in the Property field is
set to this value.
Control Attributes
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Transparent
Makes the background of the control transparent.
z
Format Size
Tries to format displayed text as a number representing a count of bytes. The
control’s text must be set to a number in units of 512 bytes. KB, MB, or GB is added
to the end of the text depending on how large the number is.
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No Prefix
Displays any & (ampersand) characters in the control’s text. Otherwise, &
characters do not appear and cause the next character to be underscored.
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Users Language
Makes the text control use fonts created in the end user's default UI codepage. If
this is cleared, the fonts are created in the database’s codepage.
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No Word Wrap
Text is not wrapped to fit the control area. Instead, it is clipped at the right edge of
the control.
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Multiline
Lets an edit field control accept multiple lines of text. If this is cleared, it accepts
only a single line.
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Image Handle
Obtains the image from a handle rather than from the Binary table.
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Icon Control
Replaces the control’s text with an icon. The control’s text is used as a key to the
Binary table to point to the icon data.
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Pushbutton
(Check Boxes and radio button groups only.) Draws the control as if it were a
pushbutton, although its behavior is not changed.
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Fixed Size
Prevents the image associated with the control from being scaled to fit the control
size. Instead, the image is cropped or centered in the control.
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Password
Makes an edit control display asterisks instead of the characters that the end user
types. This is typical of controls that require entry of a password.
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Bitmap
Replaces the control’s text with a bitmap. The control’s text is used as a key to the
Binary table to point to the bitmap data.
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Icon Size
Determines how icons are displayed in the control. Select a size, or select First
Icon to set scaling according to the first icon.
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Sorted
By default, the items in the control are sorted alphabetically before they are
displayed. Mark this to sort the items in the order they appear on the Items tab of
the Properties dialog box.
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Droplist
Makes the control display a drop-down list rather than a multi-line selection list.
z
Removable Volumes, CD-ROM Volumes, Fixed Volume, RAM Disk Volumes,
Remote Volumes, Floppy Volume
Mark the check boxes to determine which types of volumes are listed in the control.
z
Windows 95 Style
Displays the control using a Windows 95 appearance.
z
Elevation Shield
Adds the Windows Vista shield icon (User Account Control elevation icon) to a
pushbutton control.
Setting an Event on a Control
The Events tab, which appears on the Properties dialog box for dialog box controls,
determines the events that the control can send and receive.
See Editing Dialog Controls on page 413.
Use events to control the display of other dialog boxes, and to control the way Windows
Installer displays dialog boxes. When an event is generated (either by a dialog box
control or by Windows Installer) it is published. The published event is sent to Windows
Installer and to all dialog box controls that have subscribed to it.
Publish events
The top section of the Events tab lists the events published by the control.
z
To add a new published event, click Add.
z
To edit a selected event, click Details.
z
To remove a selected event from this control, click Delete.
z
To rearrange the order in which the events are sent, click Move Up or Move Down.
When you click Add or Details, the Publish Event Details dialog box appears, where you
set the following options:
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Event
Select the event to be published. See the following in the Windows Installer SDK
Help:
ControlEvent Overview for general information on control events.
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Control Events for details on each control event.
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Argument
Enter the argument for the event. If no value is passed for that argument, the event
is ignored. See Control Events in the Windows Installer SDK Help; click an event
name to see valid arguments.
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Condition
If you enter a condition for the event, the event occurs only if the condition is true.
If there is no condition, the event always occurs.
See Conditions on page 387.
Subscribe to events
The bottom section of the Events tab lists the events accepted by the control.
z
To add a new subscribed event, click Add.
z
To edit a selected event, click Details.
z
To remove a selected event from this control, click Delete.
When you click Add or Details, the Subscribe Event Details dialog box appears, where
you set the following options:
z
Event
Select the event to be subscribed to. See the following in the Windows Installer SDK
Help:
ControlEvent Overview for general information on control events
Control Events for details on each control event
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Attributes
Select an attribute that should be set for the control when the subscribing control
receives the ControlEvent. For information on valid attributes, see Control Attributes
in the Windows Installer SDK Help.
Assigning Help to a Control
The Help tab, which appears on the Properties dialog box for dialog box controls, lets
you set tooltip help for the control.
See Editing Dialog Controls on page 413.
Note
The Help tab is not available for radio button controls. Instead, enter tooltip help for
radio button controls in the Help Text field on the Radio Button Details dialog box,
which you access from the Items tab.
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Tooltip
A short phrase that appears when the end user points to the control and pauses.
This is also used by screen reading programs.
Assigning Conditions to a Control
The Conditions tab, which appears on the Properties dialog box for dialog box controls,
lets you set conditions for a control. The conditions let you assign specific attributes to a
control. Conditions determine whether the control is the default control, and whether it
is disabled, enabled, hidden, or visible. You can add multiple conditions to a control.
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To add a new condition, click Add.
z
To edit a selected condition, click Details.
z
To remove a selected condition from this control, click Delete.
When you click Add or Details, the Control Condition Details dialog box appears, where
you set the following options:
z
Action
The action to take when the condition is true.
z
Condition
If you enter a condition for the event, the event occurs only if the condition is true.
If there is no condition, the event always occurs.
See Conditions on page 387.
Setting the Graphic for a Control
The Graphic tab, which appears on the Properties dialog box for graphical dialog box
controls, lets you specify a graphic file for the control. It determines the image displayed
in the control. Not all controls can display graphics.
See Editing Dialog Controls on page 413.
z
Graphic Name
The drop-down list displays graphics stored in the Binary table. Select a graphic or
click Set to import a new graphic. Graphics must be in .BMP format.
z
Information
Displays information about the graphic, including the number of colors in its palette,
its width and height, and its size.
z
Preview
Displays the image. If necessary, the image is scaled down to fit in the preview
area.
Setting the Items in a Control
The Items tab, which appears on the Properties dialog box for list box controls,
comboboxes, listview controls, and radio button controls, determines the items that are
listed in the control. It also lets you determine the tab order of the items, and set the
vertical position (which determines the order of the items on the dialog box).
See Editing Dialog Controls on page 413.
All controls that share the same property name also share the same list of items.
Example: Suppose you make a radio button control, associate the property ITEM_LIST
with it, and add three items to it. Then on another dialog box, you make a listview
control and associate ITEM_LIST with it. If you view the Items tab for the listview
control, it contains the same items as for the radio button.
z
To add a new item, click Add.
z
To edit a selected item, click Details.
z
To remove a selected item from this control, click Delete.
z
To rearrange the order in which the items are displayed, click Move Up or Move
Down. To change the order in which the items appear on the dialog box, double-click
each item and set its Y coordinate.
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When you click Add or Details, a details dialog box appears, where you can specify the
text that appears in the control.
The settings available on this tab vary depending on the type of control.
z
Text
The text of the button or list item.
z
Value
The value returned to the control’s property when the item is selected.
z
Help Text
A short phrase that appears when the end user points to the control and pauses.
z
Icon Name
Select an icon from the list or click Set and select an icon file on your hard drive.
The icon you set appears next to this item in the list control. This option does not
appear for all types of controls.
z
Font Property
Select the property that defines a font. In most cases, select
_WiseDialogFontDefault to match the default text of other text on dialog boxes.
To define a new font style, add a new row to the TextStyle table in Setup Editor >
Tables tab. Then create a new property, and enter the new text style’s name,
surrounded by curly brackets, as the property value.
z
Control Font
You can click Set Font and select a font for the control. The Font Property field, if
set, overrides this field.
z
X Position, Y Position
The location of the item within the control. The upper-left corner is represented by
X,Y values of 0,0. To rearrange items within the control (example: to reorder the
items for radio buttons), change the Y position.
z
Width, Height
The size of the control in installation units, which are equal to 1/12 the height of the
system font on the destination computer.
Organizing and Aligning Controls on Dialogs
You can align, center, and evenly space controls on installation dialog boxes. You also
can constrain controls so they are the same size and set the tab order. You perform
these functions using commands on the Layout or right-click menu.
When you perform an operation on multiple controls at once (example: aligning
controls), the last control you select is the master control, which the other selected
controls will conform to. The master control is surrounded with solid handles instead of
hollow handles.
Warning
Do not edit the Web (IIS) dialog boxes, except to change their order (as a group) in the
installation sequence. Editing the Web dialog boxes might cause unexpected,
undesirable behavior, including damage to the installation. Also, any operation within
this product that affects the installation’s user interface will regenerate the Web dialog
boxes, therefore, any changes you make to them will be lost.
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Overlapping graphics and controls
When dialog box controls are layered on top of a graphic or other control, the tab order
determines the layer order. During compile, any item that is not included in the tab
order is layered over items that are included in the tab order, causing certain controls to
be hidden at run time. This layering can change from compile to compile. This is a
Windows Installer limitation.
To prevent unexpected control layering, set the dialog box’s tab order to include any
graphic or control that is overlapped by another control. The higher the item is in the tab
order, the closer to the top layer it will be.
See Setting Dialog Tab Order on page 422.
Example: On the sample dialog box shown below, the image covers most of the dialog
box, and is overlapped by text and check box controls. Because the graphic and static
text controls are not included in the tab order, they might be layered over the check box
control at run time.
Incorrect tab order on a dialog box
Graphic and static text controls are not
included in the tab order
Aligning Dialog Controls
You can align controls on a dialog box in relation to each other.
To align dialog box controls
1.
In Setup Editor > Dialogs tab, select a dialog box in the left pane.
2.
In the right pane, select two or more controls.
The last control you select is the master control that the other controls will be
aligned with.
3.
Select Layout menu > Align > Lefts/Rights/Tops/Bottoms, depending on which edge
of the controls should align.
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All selected controls are aligned with the master control.
Centering Dialog Controls
You can center controls on a dialog box in relation to the dialog box boundaries.
To center dialog box controls
1.
In Setup Editor > Dialogs tab, select a dialog box in the left pane.
2.
In the right pane, select two or more controls.
3.
Select Layout menu > Center in Form > and then select one of the following.
„
Vertically. Center within the top and bottom edges of the dialog box.
„
Horizontally. Center within the left and right edges of the dialog box.
All selected controls are centered on the dialog box.
Making Dialog Controls the Same Size
You can make multiple controls on a dialog box the same size.
To make dialog box controls the same size
1.
In Setup Editor > Dialogs tab, select a dialog box in the left pane.
2.
In the right pane, select two or more controls.
The last control you select is the master control that the other controls will be sized
to.
3.
Select Layout menu > Make Same Size and then select one of the following.
„
Width.
„
Height.
„
Both.
All selected controls are sized to the master control.
Spacing Dialog Controls Evenly
You can space controls on dialog boxes evenly between the leftmost and rightmost
controls (for horizontal spacing) or the topmost and bottommost controls (for vertical
spacing.)
To space dialog box controls evenly
1.
In Setup Editor > Dialogs tab, select a dialog box in the left pane.
2.
In the right pane, select two or more controls.
3.
Select Layout menu and then select one of the following.
„
Horizontal Spacing > Make Equal. Space items left to right.
„
Vertical Spacing > Make Equal. Space items up and down.
All selected controls are spaced evenly on the dialog box.
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Setting Dialog Tab Order
You can determine the tab order of controls on dialog boxes.
To prevent unexpected control layering, set the dialog box’s tab order to include any
graphic or control that is overlapped by another control. The higher the item is in the tab
order, the closer to the top layer it will be.
See Overlapping graphics and controls on page 420.
To set the dialog box tab order
1.
In Setup Editor > Dialogs tab, select a dialog box in the left pane.
2.
Click anywhere on the dialog box to set focus.
3.
Select Layout menu > Set Tab Order.
This is unavailable unless you set the focus on the dialog box first.
A black box appears for each control. The numbers on the boxes indicate the tab
order.
4.
To set the new tab order for the dialog box, click the controls in order. Each control
turns blue as its new tab order is assigned.
If the first several items have the correct tab order, and you want to begin
renumbering the tab order at a later number, hold down the Ctrl key and click the
control after which you want to renumber. Example: If controls 1 through 7 have the
correct tab order, and you want to start renumbering from 8, press Ctrl and click
control 7. Then continue setting tab order starting from control 8.
About Billboards
Billboards consist of a series of text and images that are dynamically displayed on a
dialog box during installation. Typically, billboards highlight features of the program
being installed, promote related products, or encourage product registration.
A billboard is associated with an action, and is displayed while that action is performed
during installation. A billboard consists of:
The billboard
The billboard defines the area of the dialog box where a
sequence of text and images is displayed. The billboard
is like a screen on which bitmaps, icons, or text controls
are projected.
The billboard control
The billboard control is associated with a feature and
an installation action. It also defines how many
bitmaps, icons or text controls are displayed, and in
what order. You create one billboard control for each
bitmap, icon, or text control.
Bitmap/Icon/Text control
Bitmap, icon, or text controls are associated with a
billboard control, and you place them inside the
billboard area.
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Where to use billboards
Billboards typically are used on the Progress dialog under the Install Dialogs, and are
associated with the InstallFiles action. You can add billboards to other dialog boxes, if:
z
The dialog box is displayed to the end user while the installation is performing an
action.
z
You associate the billboard with an action that takes some time to perform. If the
action is completed in a fraction of a second, the end user will not see the billboard.
A billboard typically consists of several bitmaps, icons or text controls. If you want to
display only one control, add it to the dialog box directly instead of within a billboard.
Windows Installer does not support the display of billboards outside installation dialog
boxes.
Adding Billboards to a Dialog
In the following steps, bitmaps, icons, and text controls are referred to as content items.
To add billboards to a dialog box
1.
Select Setup Editor > Dialogs tab.
2.
In the left pane, select the Progress dialog under Install Dialogs.
By default, the Progress dialog contains a billboard, which is represented by a small
outline in the lower left of the dialog box. Content items you add will be bounded by
this outline.
3.
Click the small outline and resize and move it to accommodate the content items
you plan to add. You can adjust it later.
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Note
Although a default billboard area is already created, you also can create your own.
Right-click the dialog box and select Add > Billboard. On the Properties dialog box
that appears, click the Events tab. Make sure the Subscribe to Event list contains an
entry where Event is set to SetProgress and Attribute is set to Progress.
4.
Create one or more billboard controls:
a.
Right-click the dialog box and select Billboards > New.
The Billboard Details dialog box appears.
b.
Complete the dialog box:

Name
Enter a descriptive name for this control.

Feature
Select a feature from the list. This control’s content item only appears during
installation if this feature is installed.

Action
Select an action from the list. We strongly recommended that you leave the
default, InstallFiles, because usually only this action takes time to complete.
The control’s content items are displayed while this action is performed
during installation.

Display After
If this is the first control, select <display first>. Otherwise, select the
control that this one should appear after.
c.
Click OK.
d.
Repeat this step to add as many controls as you have content items.
The controls you create do not appear on the dialog box. You can only see their
content items, which you add in the next step.
5.
Add content items to each billboard control:
„
Right-click the dialog box and select Billboards > BillboardControlName, where
BillboardControlName is the name of the control. This makes the control active.
„
Right-click the dialog box, select Billboards > Add Control, and select Bitmap,
Icon, or Text.
A properties dialog box appears. The tabs that appear vary depending on the
type of control.
„
For bitmaps or icons, click the Graphic tab and select a graphic or click Set to
import a new graphic. Graphics must be in .BMP format.
See Setting the Graphic for a Control on page 418.
For text controls, enter text in the Control Text field.
See Basic Control Settings on page 413.
„
You can add multiple content items to each control.
„
Make sure each content item is within the outline that represents the billboard
area.
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If you add large content items, you can resize the Progress dialog box itself to
accommodate them. Also, you might need to resize bitmap items for them to
display correctly.
6.
To preview the billboard, select each billboard in order from the Billboard submenu
of the right-click menu.
7.
To see the billboard work, compile and run the installation.
Note
Billboards do not appear when you test the installation. This is because files are not
installed during a test, so the InstallFiles event is never triggered. To view the billboards,
you must run the installation.
See Running An Installation on page 81.
To edit an existing billboard
Always select the billboard control name first by right-clicking and selecting Billboards >
BillboardControlName, where BillboardControlName is the name of the billboard control.
This makes the control active, which means that any editing you do is applied to that
billboard.
Obtaining Logon Information From a Dialog
Often, server software must be configured after installation to run under a particular
user with certain permissions. To help with this process, you can add the Logon
Information dialog box to an installation. The Logon Information dialog box is fully
customizable, which lets you communicate its purpose to the user.
Use the Logon Information dialog box to:
z
Let the end user create a new NT user account during installation, if the end user
has the privileges to do so.
z
Let the end user specify an existing NT user account during installation.
z
Populate the properties MYUSERNAME and MYPASSWORD with the logon
information specified by the user.
Although this dialog box captures the logon information, it does not use it in any way or
apply it to your executables or services. You must do that yourself by using the
properties elsewhere in the installation.
Example: To have a service run under the specified user account, you can enter the
property names MYUSERNAME and MYPASSWORD, enclosed in brackets, in the Service
Details dialog box (Installation Expert > Services page).
See also:
Adding the Logon Information Dialog on page 425
Adding the Logon Information Dialog
The Server Application template (Server Application.msi) contains the Logon
Information dialog box by default. For all other installations, you can add the Logon
Information dialog box by using the New Dialog Wizard in Setup Editor > Dialogs tab.
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To create a new installation that contains the Logon Information
dialog box
1.
Select File menu > New.
2.
In the Categories list, select Predefined Templates.
3.
In the Templates/Tools list, select Server Application and click OK.
4.
In Setup Editor > Dialogs tab, select the Logon Information dialog and edit the
dialog box text as needed to communicate its purpose to the end user who installs
your application.
To add the Logon Information dialog box to any installation
1.
In Setup Editor > Dialogs tab, expand the Install Dialogs tree, then expand the
Welcome Dialog Wizard tree.
2.
Right-click on a dialog box under the Welcome Dialog Wizard and select New >
Dialog.
3.
On the Select Dialog Type dialog box, select Logon Information and click Next.
4.
Step through the wizard to create a new dialog box.
See Creating a New Dialog on page 410.
5.
Edit the dialog box text as needed to communicate the purpose of the user account
to the end user who installs your application.
Guidelines for using the Logon Information dialog box
z
Make sure you customize the text on the Logon Information dialog box to
communicate the logon information’s purpose to the end user.
z
If the end user chooses to create a new user, the end user must have user creation
privileges on the server or domain.
z
If the end user creates a user with this dialog box, then cancels the installation, the
created user still exists and is not deleted.
z
During installation, the end user cannot progress through the installation until a
valid NT account is entered on this dialog box. There is no mechanism for the end
user to skip this part of the installation.
z
Do not use this dialog box to capture logon information to be used in a SQL Server
connection string on the SQL Server Scripts page; the Microsoft SQL Server logon
mechanism prevents this from working.
See also:
Adding a Service to the Destination Computer on page 157
About Web Installations on page 245
Obtaining Logon Information From a Dialog on page 425
About the SQL Connection Dialog
Add the SQL Connection dialog box to an installation to:
z
Let the end user select a SQL Server name and security credentials to generate a
valid SQL Server connection string.
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z
Populate the WISE_SQL_CONN_STR property with the valid connection string.
When the end user completes the SQL Connection dialog box and clicks Next, the
installation creates and tests the connection string. If the connection string is not valid,
an error message appears.
Note
The SQL Connection dialog box only validates the connection string; it cannot verify that
the user has permission to execute all SQL statements in a SQL script.
SQL Connection dialog box requirements
z
Use the WISE_SQL_CONN_STR property for the connection string in Installation
Expert > SQL Server Scripts page.
See Configuring a Microsoft SQL Server During Installation on page 257.
z
The ODBC SQL Server driver must be on the destination computer for this dialog
box to work. Use the Prerequisites page to pre-install MDAC, which includes the
ODBC SQL Server driver.
See Adding Prerequisites to a Release on page 198.
z
The Browse button appears on the SQL Connection dialog box only if SQL Client
Tools (osql.exe) is installed on the destination computer. When the end user clicks
the Browse button, a drop-down list appears with the SQL Servers on their network.
If the Browse button does not appear, the end user must enter the SQL Server
name.
z
This dialog box requires no modification to output a valid connection string to the
property WISE_SQL_CONN_STR. However, if your application connects to more than
one SQL Server during installation, add a SQL Connection dialog box for each
additional server, edit the additional dialog boxes, and use a different property for
each connection string.
See Editing Additional SQL Connection Dialogs on page 428.
See also:
Adding the SQL Connection Dialog to an Installation on page 427
Adding the SQL Connection Dialog to an Installation
The Web Application and Server Application templates contain the SQL Connection
dialog box. For all other installations, you can add the SQL Connection dialog box.
To create a new installation that contains the SQL Connection dialog
box
1.
Select File menu > New.
2.
In the Categories list, select Predefined Templates.
3.
In the Templates/Tools list, select Server Application or Web Application and
click OK.
4.
In Setup Editor > Dialogs tab, select SQL Connection Dialog and edit the dialog box
text as needed to communicate its purpose to the end user who installs your
application.
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To add the SQL Connection dialog box to any installation
1.
Select Installation Expert > Dialogs page.
2.
Click Add.
The Select Dialog Type dialog box appears.
3.
Select SQL Connection Dialog and click Next.
4.
Step through the wizard to create a new dialog box.
See Creating a New Dialog on page 410.
5.
Edit the dialog box text as needed to communicate its purpose to the end user who
installs your application.
See also:
About the SQL Connection Dialog on page 426
Editing Additional SQL Connection Dialogs
In most cases, an application connects to only one SQL Server during installation.
However, if your application connects to more than one SQL Server during installation,
add a SQL Connection dialog box for each additional server and edit the additional dialog
boxes as follows:
To add and edit SQL Connection dialog boxes
1.
Start the New Dialog Wizard to add an additional SQL Connection dialog box.
See Adding the SQL Connection Dialog to an Installation on page 427.
2.
On the Dialog Properties dialog box of the New Dialog Wizard, edit the dialog box’s
default control properties.
Example: Edit the dialog box’s control properties as follows:
From:
To:
WiseSqlServerName
WiseSqlServerName1
WiseSqlAuth
WiseSqlAuth1
WiseSqlUser
WiseSqlUser1
WiseSqlPass
WiseSqlPass1
3.
Finish the New Dialog Wizard.
4.
In Setup Editor > Dialogs tab, select SQL Connection Dialog1 in the left pane.
5.
In the right pane, edit the Argument of the [WiseSqlParam] event for the Browse
and Next buttons using the new control properties and a new property for the
connection string.
See Setting an Event on a Control on page 416.
Example: Edit the Argument of the [WiseSqlParam] event for the Browse and Next
buttons as follows:
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From:
To:
WiseSqlServerName|WiseSqlAuth|WiseSqlUser|WiseSq
lPass|WISE_SQL_CONN_STR
WiseSqlServerName1|WiseSqlAuth1|WiseSqlUser1|Wis
eSqlPass1|WISE_SQL_CONN_STR1
6.
Use the new property for the connection string in the SQL script that executes the
connection with the additional SQL Server.
See Setting SQL Connection Strings on page 259.
Example: Use the WISE_SQL_CONN_STR1 property for the connection string.
See also:
About the SQL Connection Dialog on page 426
Adding the Custom Property Dialog
The Custom Property dialog box lets you specify Windows Installer properties that can
be set by the end user during installation. You might use this if there are environmentdependent values that you cannot predict, which must be provided by the end user, such
as user names and passwords. You can use this dialog box to gather property values to
replace in an XML file.
See Editing XML Files During Installation on page 131.
This dialog box does not appear in any installation by default, and must be added
through the New Dialog Wizard.
Warning
Do not add more than one Custom Property dialog box to a single installation; only one
per installation is supported. If an installation contains multiple Custom Property dialog
boxes, then multiple, identical dialog boxes appear to the end user at run time.
To add the Custom Property dialog box
1.
Select Installation Expert > Dialogs page.
2.
Click Add.
The New Dialog Wizard appears.
See Creating a New Dialog on page 410.
3.
On the Select Dialog Type page, select Custom Property Dialog and click Next.
4.
Leave the defaults on the Dialog Properties page and click Next.
The Select Custom Properties page appears, where you can either choose existing
Windows Installer properties or create new properties.
5.
Complete the page:
„
Existing Properties
To add an existing property, select it from this list and click Add. To create a new
property, select <New Property> from this list, and define the new property.
See Creating a New Property on page 397.
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6.
„
End User-Configurable Properties
This list, which you build with the Add button, contains the properties that will
be editable by the end user in the Custom Property dialog box during
installation.
„
Property Description
For each property you added in End User-Configurable Properties, select the
property name and add a description here to help the end user understand how
to set the property. This is limited to about 275 characters, because of the size
of the field that appears on the Custom Property dialog box.
„
Display property value as asterisks during installation
To mask the property value during installation, select the property name in End
User-Configurable Properties and mark this check box. If the end user sets
this value during installation, their entry is masked, and they must enter the
property value a second time to verify the entry. This also omits the property
value from the installation log. Use this feature when the property value
includes sensitive information (example: a password).
Finish the New Dialog Wizard.
The Custom Property dialog box now appears in the list of dialog boxes on the Dialogs
page. When you run this installation, the Custom Property dialog box appears.
To edit the properties on the Custom Property dialog box
1.
Select Installation Expert > Dialogs page.
2.
In the list of dialog boxes, select Custom Property Dialog.
3.
Click Details.
4.
On the Dialog Details dialog box, click the Edit button.
The Edit Custom Properties dialog box appears, where you can change the properties.
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Chapter 18
Macro Editor
This chapter includes the following topics:
z
About the Macro Editor on page 431
z
About Macro Files on page 431
z
About the Macro Editor Window on page 434
About the Macro Editor
The Macro Editor provides access to Wise Automation, which programmatically controls
Windows Installer Editor. Use Wise Automation to perform tasks that occur regularly and
require multiple steps in the user interface. Example: You can write Wise Automation in
the Macro Editor to automate daily builds. To view the Wise Automation Reference, open
WiseAutomation.chm, which is in the Technical Documentation subdirectory of this
product’s installation directory.
Warning
You should be familiar with macros and comfortable with Visual Basic to use this feature.
For information on Visual Basic, visit msdn.microsoft.com/vbasic/.
Note
You can use Wise Automation with Visual Studio or other scripting environments.
About Macro Files
Use the Macro Editor to create and edit macro files. The default macro file in the
Templates folder (Macros.wbs) contains sample macros. These samples are commented
out, which means that you can view the script in the Macro Editor but you can’t run the
macros unless you uncomment the script. You can add macros to Macros.wbs, and edit
and delete its macros.
Each new file you start in Windows Installer Editor has Macros.wbs attached. When you
open the Macro dialog box, you can attach a different macro file.
You can create the following types of macros:
z
Event macros that run when you fire the corresponding event.
z
Macros that you run manually.
If your .WBS files include event macros,