Nikon
NIKONOS-V
INSTRUCTION MANUAL
CE:
r.
) NOMENCLATURE- - - - - - - - CD Film advance lever
Shutter speed/mode index @
@ Shutter speed scale
® Shutter speed/mode
® Frame counter
Accessory shoe
selector dial
Viewfinder
®
Neckstrap eyelets @
®
Distance scale
®
Lens focusing knob ®
Lens
@ Lens aperture knob
® Aperture
2
®
index
Distance scale index
®
Aperture scale @
@ ASAIISO film speed index
Viewfinder eyepiece window
®
@ Film rewind knob
@ Fi lm rewind crank
® ASAIISO
film speed dial
® ASAII SO
film speed scale
Fil m advance sprockets @
Film
spool
®
Fi lm guide rails @
Camera back releasel
® lock mark
Pressure plate locking catch @l
Camera back releasel
i@ lock latch
Camera back @
®
Film rewind fork
Fi lm
Flash sync socket cover @
Battery chamber cl ip @
Tripod socket @
3
./'
/ CONTENTS- - - - - - - - - - - NOMENCLATURE ... . . . . . .... . ....... . .. . . 2-3
FOREWORD . ....... . ... . ................ . .. . 6
PREPARATION . .. ..... . .... . ......... . .. . 7 -11
Examining and lubricating the O-rings .... 8
The O -rings and their seal ing method . .. 10
TIPS ON CAMERA CARE . . . .. . . . ........ 12-13
BASIC OPERATIONS .................. . . 14-29
CONTROLS IN DETAIL. ..... . ........... 30-49
Shutter Speed /Mode Selector Dial . . ... . . 30
A (Auto) .... . . . .. . .. . ... ... . . .... . ...... 30
Manual (1/30 to 1/1000sec.) . .... . .. . . .. 31
M90 (1/90sec.) . . . ...... . ... . . . .. . ... ... 31
B (Bulb) . . .. .. . .... . . . ... . . . ..... . ..... . . 31
R (Rewind) .. ... . . . . . .... . . . ............ . 31
Aperture Setting ... ..... . . ............. . 32
TTL Metering System ... .. . . ..... . ... .... 33
Viewfinder ...... . ..... . ... . .... . . . . . . . . 34
Shooting in the Aperture-Priority
Automatic Exposure Mode . ... . . .... . . . 35
Shutter-priority automatic exposure
photography . . .. . . . ... . . . ....... .. ... . 36
Shooting in the Manual Exposure Mode. 37
How to select the f/stop and
shutter speed . .. ... ... .. . ..... . .. . . . . . . 39
Shutter speed /aperture combinations
that give the same exposure . .... ... . . . 39
4
EV range of the camera . ... .. . . .. . ... . . 39
Shutter Release Lock Lever .... . . . . . .. . .. 40
Shutter Release Button .... ... .. . . . . . . ... 40
ASA/ISO Film Speed Dial . ....... . . . ..... 41
-Frame Counter .... . . . . ... . .. . ... .. .. . . . 42
Film Advance Lever . ...... . . . . .. . . . . . . . 43
Exposure compensation . . ........ . 43-44
Depth of field ...... . ..... . ....... . .. . .. . 45
Camera Back Lock System ............ .. 47
Pressure Plate ...... . .... . ..... . ........ 48
Anatomica l Grip . . . . ... . ............... . 48
Tripod Socket ......... .. . . . ............ . 49
FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY . .... . . .......... 50-57
Flash Socket ............... . . .. . . ....... 52
Accessory Shoe .... . .. ... .. ...... . . . ... 53
Viewfinder Ready-Light .. .. ....... . ..... 53
Camera meter, shu tter speed,
and ready-light .... . ..... . .. . .. ... . .... 54
Nikonos-V/Speedlight
combination chart . .......... . . . . . . . . . . 55
Daylight fill-in flash shooting ..... . . .... . . 56
EV chart .. . . . ... . .. ......... . .... . ..... 57
TIPS ON UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHY .. 58 - 64
Water's magnifying effects . .. . .. . . . .. ... 58
Lens focal length and picture angle . . .. . 58
Focusing ..... .. .......... . . . ...... . ... . 59
Water's effects on colors .. .... . . . . ...... 60
Color absorption underwater ' " .. ... ... 60
Shooting distance and
subject contrast ...... . ... . ..... .. . .... 61
Shooting with sunlight . . .... , , .. . . . , . , . .. 61
Camera positioning ..... , .... , , . . .. ... . 62
Best depth of water for AE shooting ... ... 62
Film choice . ... . .. . ... . ... .... .. . . . ..... 63
Wh en to use a speed light .. . . .. . ........ 63
Underwater photography and
speedlig ht guide numbers ......... .... 63
Flash shooting tips ........ . . , . . . .. , .... . 64
ACCESSORIES . . ....................... 65-76
Nikonos Speedlights SB-103
and SB-102 ..... . . .... ... ... .. ... . 65-66
V-Type Sync Cord . .. .. . . . . ..... _. . .. . . . .,66
VI-A-Type Sync Cord SC-10 . . . .. . . . .. . . .. 66
Nikonos Interchangeable Lenses . . . ... . , 67
Rela ti onship between picture angle and
foca l length . . . . . . . . . , , . . . . .... , . ... . .. 67
UW-Nikkor 15mm f/ 2.BN,
UW-Nikkor 20mm f/2B,
and UW-Nikkor 2Bmm f/35 ... .. . . . . 68-69
W-Nikkor 35mm f/2 .5 (Standard). . . .... .. 70
Nikkor BOmm 1/4 ....... . . . . . . .. .. . . , , ... 71
LW-Nikkor 2Bmm f/2 .B .... .. .... , .. . .. . . . 72
Nikonos Close-up Outfit ... . ...... , . ..... 73
Accessory Viewfinders , .......... , . ..... 74
Optical Viewfinder DF-11 ... . , _. . ... . . ... 74
.optical Viewfi nder DF-12 . . .... . , . ... .. .. 74
Optica l Viewfinder for
the UW-Nikkor 2Bmm f/3. 5 . ... . . . .. . . . .. 74
Optical Viewfinder DHO ... . .. . , . .. .. . . 74
Plastic Frame Finder for
the UW-Ni kkor 2Bmm f/3.5 ....... . . ..... 74
Plastic Frame Finder for the W-Nikkor
35mm f/2.5 and the Nikkor BOmm f/4 ... 74
Lens Hood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 75
Plastic Lens Protector . . .. . . . ... . . .. . . . .. 75
Rubber Lens Hood .... . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . 75
Lens Cases.... . ... .. . .. . . . _. .. . . . . . .. .. 76
Camera Case . . .. . . ... .. . .. , ..... . . . . .. 76
Speed light Case SS-101 .. . . .. , .. .. .. . . .. 76
Close-up Outfit Case . . ..... . . . ... .. . . .. 76
O-rings and lubricant .. . .... . . , . . . . . . ... 76
TIPS ON BATTERY USE . . .. . . , , , , . . ... . . . . . . .. 77
SPECIFICATIONS .. . . . ........ ... .. . . . .. 78 - 79
5
FOREWORD---------The Nikonos-V is the world's only 3Smm underwater
camera capable of going to a depth of SOm (160 feet)
and withstanding pressure of 6kg/cm' (8Slb/in')
without a special underwater housing. Because of its
ruggedness, you can use the Nikonos in situations
where regular cameras would dare not go. Carry it to
the beach, use it on your boat, even take it mountain
climbing or go skiing.
The Nikonos-V's automatic aperture-priority and
manual exposure controls make picture-taking both
above and below water easier than ever. For extra
precision, shutter speeds are quartz-controlled in the
manual mode. The Nikonos-V also makes flash photography easier than ever. Combine it with the SB-103
or SB-102 for both underwater and on-land photography and enjoy the benefits of automatic TTL flash
exposure control. Other Nikon accessories allow TTL
multiple flash photography.
Six interchangeable lenses from super-wideang le to
medium telephoto are also available: the UW-Nikkor
1Smm f/2.8N, UW-Nikkor 20mm f/2.8, UW-Nikkor
28mm f/3.S-all for underwater use only ; the WNikkor 3Smm f/2.S and Nikkor 80mm f /4, for both
underwater and on-land use; and the water-resistant
LW-Nikkor 28mm f/2.8 , for on-land use only.
The Nikonos-V has a large, high-eyepoint viewfinder
that lets you see the entire field of view from up to
40mm away while wearing a diver 's mask or goggles.
6
A new camera back lock system eliminates the possibility of the camera back opening accidently. And a
large shutter release button and film advance lever
allow you to operate the Nikonos-V in the same
manner as a regular 3Smm camera.
Even though this camera is very easy to use, you
should still familiarize yourself with the prepa ratory
steps and basic operations explained in the first two
sections of this manual. For more detailed information, refer to "CONTROLS IN DETAIL" and " TIPS ON
UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHY." A few minutes
wisely invested now will payoff later in years of
rewarding photographic experiences.
PREPARATlON----------STOP! READ THIS NOTICE BEFORE USING YOUR NIKONOS·V CAMERA.
THE O·RING SEALS MUST BE EXAMINED AND LUBRICATED BEFORE USE
TO AVOID DAMAGING THE CAMERA.
This Nikonos-V uses O-rings to seal and waterproof
the junct ions between parts _ Your Nikonos-V should
not be considered waterproof until you have examined
the four user-serviceable O-rings (one each for the
camera back@ , lens®, flash sync socket, and battery
clip@). They must be in perfect , undamaged condition
and properly lubricated prior to each use. Read the
following instructions thoroughly to familiarize yourself with the maintenance of the O-rings.
Because the outer surface of your Nikonos-V has
been specially treated to make it waterproof, it must
be protected from impact. If it becomes damaged ,
send it to a qualified technician for service before the
next use.
Your Nikonos-V is watertight only when in properly
serviced condition , when all O-ring seals are in perfect
condition, and when all components are properly
assembled and closed.
Pay special attention to the instructions for installing
the O-rings because it is the O-rings which make your
Nikonos-V watertight. For the O-rings to perform
properly, they must be in perfect condition (with no
cuts, tears , or other impe rfections) and properly
lubricated. If they are not, they will not perform pro-
perly and may allow water to enter your camera. To
prevent the accidental use of a defective O-ring ,
always discard old rings.
The channels into which the O-rings fit must be free of
any foreign matter and in their original , smoothly
finished condition. If they are not, the O-rings will not
seat properly and may allow water to enter your
camera. If any channel in your Nikonos-V becomes
damaged, send the camera to' a qualified technician
for service before the next use.
Your Nikonos-V contains a series of O-rings. Some
are factory installed and cannot be serviced by you.
Once each year, send your camera to a qualified
technician so these O-rings can be serviced. Do not
attempt to disassemble the camera and service these
O-rings yourself.
Four of the O-rings in your Nikonos-V can be serviced
by you. These must be examined at the end of each
dive day and , if possible, after each dive.
7
- PREPARATION-confinued--------Examining and lubricating the O-rings
1. To remove the O-rings , except the one around the
camera back, grasp the ring between your thumb
and forefinger. Pinch your fingers together as you
slide them in the direction of the arrow to create
slack in the O-ring. Then grasp the portion with
your other hand and pull the ring off (see Fig. 1).
To remove the O-ring around the camera back, use
the edge of a credit card or dive card or some
other thin, blunt, instrument. Never use a knife or
other sharp-edged instrument. Insert the card
under the ring and pull up to lift the O-ring out (see
Fig. 2). Do not scratch the O-ring in the process.
2. Visually examine each O-ring for imperfections. If
any O-ring is damaged (by tears, cuts, or other
imperfections), discard it immediately. If any O-ring
has dirt , sand, hair, or foreign matter on it, rinse the
O-ring in fresh water to remove it.
3. When lubricating the various parts of your camera,
use only the special non-water-soluble non-silicon
lubricant supplied with the camera_ Never use
other lubricants (such as Vaseline) which are watersoluble.
4. To lubricate the O-rings, smear at small amount of
the special non-silicon lubricant on your finge rtips
and then gently run each O-ring between them.
Never use a brush or similar object to apply the
lubricant; small hairs may fall into the channel and
8
allow water to enter the camera. While lubricating
each O-ring, examine it with your finge rtips for
imperfections. If an O-ring is properly lubricated, it
will glisten-and will not have "gobs" of lubricant on
it. To ensure the longest possible camera life, apply
lubricant whenever necessary. Lubricantion protects
the O-rings from excessive wear; it also makes the
camera back easy to open and the lens or other
parts easy to attach.
5. Visually examine the channels into which the
O-rings fit to determine that each is clean and
smooth. If any channel is dirty, clean it with a nonlint material. Coat each channel with a thin film of
lubricant while being careful not to apply too much.
6. Reseat all four O-rings with your fingertips by
inserting one side of the ring into the channel and
holding it in position while rolling the other side of
the ring in to place (see Fig. 3). To insert the O-ring
into the channel in the camera back, place the ring
over the groove and then press it down into place.
Check to see that the O-ring is not twisted and that
each of its edges is properly seated (see Fig . 4)
7. Check the surfaces which are opposite the O-rings
to determine that each is clean, smooth, and free of
foreign matter. Clean and lubricate the surfaces in
the same manner as the channels.
Fig. 1
Fig.2
Fig.3
Fig.4
9
PREPARATlON- continued - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ; ,
8. When closing or reattaching the parts with O-rings,
be sure that each O-ring seats properly and
securely. All four O-rings must be properly aligned
and not "pinched. "
The preceding instructions must be performed on
each user-serviceable O-ring prior to each dive day
and, if possible, prior to each dive. By following these
procedures and all other procedures in this instruction manual, you will be able to enjoy using your
Nikonos-V fo r many years
Reminder: An extra set of O-rings (one each for the
camera back , lens, flash sync socket , and battery
clip) and a tube of lubricant are supplied with the
camera. Additional O-rings and lubricant are available
from authorized Nikon dealers and service centers.
The O-rings and their sealing method
The method used by the O-rings to seal and waterproof the camera is shown in the fol lowing illustrations.
When a low level of pressure exists (for instance, just
under -the water's surface), each O-ring seals Its
groove by its own elastic force (see Chart A) When
the pressure increases (at greater depths), the
O-ring's shape is alte red and its seal ing ability is
increased to withstand the greater pressure. The
pressure changes the ring from its original "0" shape
(when looking at a cross-sectional view) to a "D"
shape (see Chart B).
ChartA
o Slight compression
10
Chart B
O-rings
fH~~g~
NIKONOS
C -ring Grease
O-ring lubricant
11
TIPS ON CAMERA C A R E - - - - - - - 1. After using the camera underwater, rinse it in
fresh water with the camera back closed
and the lens mounted. When the camerailens
assembly gets dirty, rinse it thoroughly in fresh
water. Immediately after using it in salt water,
rinse it thoroughly in fresh water to remove any
residue. Otherwise, corrosion may occur in
minute places like screw holes or the junctions
of parts. To prevent this, soak the camera/lens
assembly overnight in a basin of fresh water and
move the external parts (for instance, the film
advance lever CD, shutter speed/mode selector
dial ®, ASAilSO film speed dial @), and so on),
then rinse it vigorously in running water. Finally,
dry the camerailens assembly with a soft clothnever by heating- before removing the lens
from the camera. Be sure to wipe away any
drops of water that may have seeped in past the
O-ring. All underwater Nikonos accessories
should be handled in this way
2. Never attempt to change lenses, open the
camera , or load/unload film underwater.
3. After shooting in the water (especially, in salt
water or dirty water), wipe any drops of water on
the camera body before removing the film cartridge. If any drops of water fall into the camera
12
when the camera back is opened, immediately
wipe them off.
4. Do not submerge the camera in water with the
flash -socket cover removed. And when using
the Nikonos Speedlight, make sure the sync
cord and sensor cord plugs are securely
attached before entering the water.
5. Should the lens or camera body accidentally fall
. into salt water during loading (or at any other
time when the interior is exposed), rinse it immediately in fresh water and take the unit to any
authorized Nikon dealer or service center as
soon as possible.
6. If this camera is frequently used underwater
(especially in salt water or dirty water), make it
a rule to take it to a Nikon service center on a
regular basis for an inspection of the camera's
O-rings. Doing so will increase the camera's
performance and life span.
7. Do not attempt to rotate the focusing or aperture
knobs beyond their limits of travel; forcing these
knobs will damage the lens mechanism.
8. The LW-Nikkor 28mm f/2.8 is water-resistant,
not waterproof, and cannot be submerged in
water.
9. Store th e camera and lens away from high
temperatures, high humidity, naphthalene, and
camphor. If the camera will not be used for
more than two weeks, remove the battery or
batteries. Do not leave the battery or batteries
in the battery chamber for a long time or the
contacts may become contaminated. It is a
good Idea to periodically clean the battery or
batteries and the contacts in the battery chamber with a soft cloth. If a battery leaks into the
battery chamber, remove the battery or batteries
at once and clean the chamber.
10. Check the camera thoroughly before using it
each time.
11 . Do not touch the shutter curtains.
12. Clean metallic parts with a blower brush or soft
dry cloth.
13. Clean glass surfaces, such as the lens or the
finder eyepiece @, with a blower brush; avoid
using lens tissue if possible. To remove dirt,
smudges, or fingerprints , gently wipe the surface with soft cotton moistened with a small
amount of absolute alcohol, using a spiral motion
from center to periphery.
14. In a humid environment, store the camera in a
vinyl bag with a desiccant to keep away dust,
moisture, and salt.
15. Because the frame counter window is made of
plastic, do not wipe it with an alcohol-moistened
cloth.
13
BASIC OPERATIONS---------
1
Remove the baHery
• clip @.
Turn the camera upside down and
use a coin to twist the lid counterclockwise to unscrew it.
Note: The small numbers in the circles
identify parts of the camera as listed in
the NOMENCLATURE section.
Install the baHery
2 • or
batteries.
Wipe the battery terminals clean
and insert either one 3V lithium
battery (CR-1/3N type), two 1.55 V
silver-oxide batteries (SR-44 type),
or two 1.5 V alkaline-manganese
batteries (LR-44 type) into the battery clip, making sure each "+"
sign is up.
- See " TIPS ON BATTERY USE" on page
77 for more information.
14
3
Replace the battery
• clip.
Slip the battery clip back into the
camera body and screw it clockwise tightly into place.
To replace the clip, gently push it
into the battery chamber then
screw it into place.
Check O-ring: Before replacing
the clip, check the O-ring around it
by following the directions in
"PREPARATION" on page 7.
4
Mount the lens @.
• With the silver lens focusing
knob @ positioned vertically in
front of the viewfinder ® (when
mounting the LW-Nikkor lens , hold
the silver mounting ring with the
red dot facing up), push the iens
firmly into the camera's bayonet
mount. Turn the lens 90° clockwise
until the lens positioning pins @
click and lock into position in the
lens positioning slots @. Now the
camera/lens assembly is completely watertight.
Mounting the lens upside down will
not affect its operation but may make
it easier to read the aperture and distance scales from above the camera.
Do not, however, mount the LW-Nikkor
lens in this manner.
olt will be easier to mount the lens if
you push the lens alternately up and
down into the camera 's bayonet
mount.
o
Check the Q·ring : Before mounting the lens, check the O-ring
around it by following the directions in "PREPARATION" on page 7.
To remove: Pull the lens slightly
out from the body and turn it 90°
counterclockwise so the lens posi tioning pins are out of the lens
pOSitioning slots. Then , with the
silver lens focusing knob positioned vertically (in the case of
the LW-N ikkor, with the red dot on
the mounting ring facing up), remove the lens from the camera
body.
o
Be sure the a·ring does not get
scratched while the lens is being
removed.
15
-BASIC OPERATIONS-confinued-------
5
Unlock and open
• the camera back @.
While depressing the orange
camera back release/lock button
@, lift up the camera back release/
lock latch@), turn it in the direction
of the arrow on the camera body
(counterclockwise), and align the
red camera back release /lock
mark @Don the latch with the white
camera back release index ® on
the camera body.
16
up the film
6 • Lift
pressure plate ®
and install the film
cartridge.
Swing the film pressure plate away
from the camera body. While holding the film pressure plate up, slip
the cartridge into the film cartridge
chamber so the top of the cartridge engages the rewind fork ®J
and the film leader points toward
the takeup spool ®. Then push in
the bottom of the cartridge until it
is fully seated in the chamber.
Insert the film
7• leader
in the takeup
- The film pressure plate is attached to
the camera body to protect the shutter
curtains from water and other foreign
matter when the camera back is open.
Because the pressure plate is springloaded, it will automatically return to
its original position when you remove
your finger.
- Any 35mm film cartridge (J135 type)
available on the market can be used.
- Avoid loading film in direct sunlight. If
there is no shade available, turn your
back to the sun and use your own
shadow to shield the camera.
spool ® .
Pull the leader across the camera
and insert it into one of the slots in
the film takeup spool.
Cartridge
Film perforations
Light trap
Film leader
17
- BASIC OPERATIONS-confinued- - - - - - -
8 • Engage
the film's
perforations with
9
the sprocket teeth.
Move the shutter release lock
lever ®out of the "L" position.
Advance the takeup spool slightly
with your finger to engage the
film 's perforations with the teeth
of the takeup spool and the
sprockets@.
18
Unlock the shutter
• release button ® .
Advance the film
10 • with
the film
advance lever CD.
Pullout the film advance lever and
advance the film with it until the
perforations on both film edges
are securely engaged with the
sprocket teeth .
11 • film
Confirm that the
is properly
12 • Return
the film
pressure plate to
loaded.
its original position.
Confirm that the perforations on
both film edges are securely engaged with the sprocket teeth, that
the film is located properly between both film guide rails @ , and
that there is no film slack.
Let the film pressure plate swing
gently back into its original position
and lock under the pressure plate
locking catch ®J.
the film pressure plate is placed in
its original position before the film
perforations and the sprocket teeth
are properly engaged, the film pres·
sure plate may become dislocated or
the film may not advance properly.
If the film is improperly located between the film guide rails, the film may
not advance properly.
o lf
19
-BASIC OPERATIONS-confinued-------
Fold down the
13. ~1:~~~~~~o;~Ck. 14 • camera
back
Before closing the camera back,
make sure the red mark on the
camera back release/lock latch is
aligned with the white camera
back release index on the camera
body. Then firmly press the camera
back against the camera body
(the camera back release/lock
latch will move clockwise).
Turn the camera back release/lock
latch clockwise until its red mark
clicks into position opposite the
red camera back lock index @i .
The camera back is now locked.
20
release/lock latch.
Fold the latch down until it is flush
with the camera body.
Check the O·ring: Before closing
the camera back, check the O-ring
around it by following the direc tions in "PREPARATION " on page 7.
- When closing the camera back, make
sure it locks shut. Also make sure the
lens positioning pins @ lock securely
into the lens positioning slots @ . The
lens positioning pins may disengage
from the lens positioning slots from
pressure caused by closing the camera
back. If this occurs, remount the lens
securely into position.
15
Take up the film
• slack.
Fold out the film rewind crank ®.
Rotate the fi lm rewind knob in the
direction of the arrow on the knob
(clockwise) as you lift up. Then,
with the knob in the raised position,
rotate it in the same direction until
you feel a slight tension.
- If you cannot pull up the film rewind
knob, turn it clockwise slightly.
- Do not push the film rewind knob
down until you have completed Step
17.
16
Set the shutter
• speed/mode
selector dial ® to "A" (for
automatic exposure
operation ).
For rapid film loading, align the "A"
on the shutter speed/mode selector dial ® with the shutter speed/
mode index before making blank
exposures. Until the frame counter
reaches "1," the shutter wi ll be
automatically released at approximately 1/1500sec.
• Until the frame counter reaches "1,"
the shutter will also be automatically
released at approximately 1/1500sec
when the shutter speed/mode selector
dial is set from 1/30sec. to 1/IOOOsec.
• 'n addition to the aperture-priority
automatic exposure system, the
Nikonos-V is also equipped with a
manual exposure
system.
See
"MANUAL EXPOSURE " on page 37
for more information.
• When the older-type UW-Nikkor 15mm
f/2.8 lens is used, the Nikonos-V's
TTL exposure meter does not operate.
21
- BASIC OPERATIONS-confinued- - - - - - _
17• exposures
Make blank
until
the frame counter ®
shows frame "i."
Continue to depress the shutter
release button and wind th e film
advance lever until the frame
counter shows " 1." Wh ile making
these blank exposures, watch the
rewind knob to see that it rotates.
This indicates that the film has
been loaded correctly and is being
advanced.
If the film rewind knob does not
rotate , the film is improperly loaded
and must be loaded again.
22
18
0 00 not begin shooting until the frame
counter shows frame "1." The viewfinder LED indicator(s) does not operate before the frame counter shows
frame "1."
Push the rewind
• knob back down.
Fold the crank back in . Then rotate
the knob slightly in the opposite
direction of the arrow on the knob
(counterclockwise) while pushing
down. The knob will return to its
original position.
o Be
sure to push the rewind knob back
down after completing the blank exposures, especially before you actually
dive into the water. Otherwise, water
may enter the camera body.
19• Set
the ASAflSO
film speed.
Lift up the fi lm speed dial @, rotate
it in either direction until the ASAI
ISO film speed is opposite the
white ASA/ ISO film speed index
@ , then make sure the dial is fu lly
seated at the desired position. This
programs the camera's exposure
meter so that it may provide a
proper exposure for the speed of
the film in use.
• The film speed is printed on the film
carton and the cartridge itself.
20. ~~n:~'{.~:~ress
release button halfway.
The shutter release button activates the exposure meter when
gently depressed halfway.
ASA/ISO film speed scale
25
50
• • • • •
32 40
64
•
80
100
•
200
400
800
1600
• • • • • •••••••
500 ~
250 i
1000 i
125 *
160
320
640
1250
23
~ BASIC
21 •
OPERATIONS-confinued- - - - - - -
Check battery
power.
Be sure to check battery power
before shooting.
Point the lens at a brightly lit area,
look through the viewfinder eyepiece@), and check to see that the
viewfinder LED indicator( s) lights
up or blinks. It is not possible to
check battery power when the
shutter speed/mode selector dial
is set at M90 (1 /90 sec.) or B
(Bulb) because the exposure meter
does not operate when the shutter
speed/mode selector dial is at
either of these settings, even if the
shutter release button is depressed
24
halfway.
If battery power is sufficient, the
meter wi ll stay on for 16sec. after
you remove your finger from the
button. The meter automatically
turns off after 16 sec .
If the viewfinder LED indicator(s)
does not appear, reload the battery
(or batteries) properly or replace
it (them) with a fresh one(s).
o Battery power
cannot be checked until
the frame counter reaches" 1. "
o lf the viewfinder LEO indicator(s) turns
off immediately after you remove your
finger from the shutter release button
or before 16sec. have elapsed, the
battery (or batteries) is (a re) almost
exhausted and must be replaced with
a fresh one(s).
the lens
22 • Set
aperture.
Turn the black lens aperture knob
@) until the desired flnumber is
opposite the index mark on the
front of the lens.
The pincer-type depth-of-field indicators ®, coupled with the focusing knob, open and close to show
the range of distances which will
be in focus in the final photograph.
Refe r to the example photos on
page 46 for more information.
When shooting for the first time,
use the following guide to select
the aperture.
• When the aperture is changed, the
shutter speed selected by the camera
and the depth of field change accordingly. Both affect the look of your
photographs.
In underwater photography, aperture
selection varies depending upon the
shooting situation. For more informa tion, see page 39 or 45. Do not attempt
to rotate the lens aperture knob beyond its limits of travel; forcing it will
damage the lens mechanism.
Estimate or measure the camerato-subject distance *. Turn the
silver lens focusing knob until the
estimated camera-to-subject distance in meters or feet is lined up
with the index on the front of the
lens . The depth-of-field indicators
will indicate how close an estimate
of the camera-to-subject distance
you wi ll need to obtain an in -focus
picture .
* See page 59 for more information .
• Do not attempt to rotate the lens
focusing knob beyond its limits of
travel, forcing it will damage the lens
mechanism.
• To measure the exact distance between the subject and film plane, use
the film plane indicator (-e-) on the
camera.
25
-BASIC OPERATIONS-confinued-------
3
24
Many blurred shots are caused by
improperly holding the camera.
The best way to prevent camera
blur is to hold the camera steady.
Basic shooting posture: As you
look through the viewfinder, use
your left hand to cradle the
camera, wrapping your fingers
around the lens and propping your
elbow against your body fo r support. Use your right hand 's index
finger to depress the shutter
release button , and use your
thumb to wind the film advance
lever. Wrap the other fingers of
26
the subject
25 • inFrame
the viewfinder.
Hold the camera
• steady.
your right hand around the camera
body. You can adapt this basic
posture to both horizontal- and
vertical-format shooting.
Other factors can contribute to
camera blur, especially when
shooting underwater, so experiment until you find the camera
holding method that works best
for you (practicing by holding the
camera in front of a mirror is
useful). When actually shooting, it
is also advisable to lean on or
against a strong, stable object (for
instance, a wall or large rock).
The frame lines built into the viewfinder show the fie ld of view of the
normal 35mm lens. For proper
framing, place your subject within
the outlined area. When shooting
subjects at distances as close as
O.8m (2.75ft), use the parallax
correction marks for framing .
Inside the viewfinder
1. Frame lines showing the field of
view for the norma l 35mm lens
2. Parallax correction marks
3. LED shutter speed indicators
26
27
Take the picture.
• Look through the viewfinder and depress the shutter
release button halfway. The shutter
speed, determined by the subject's
brightness, is indicated by the
viewfinder LED. If any LED shutter
speed indicator between 1000 and
30 lights, gently depress the shutter release button completely.
If either the LED overexposure or
underexposure warning arrow
lights, adjust the lens aperture
knob to turn it off. If the warning
arrow remains lighted, after the
lens aperture knob is adjusted, the
shutter speed is beyond the meter
coupling range and you cannot
obtain the correct exposure. See
page 35 for more information.
Inside the viewfinder
1. Actual field of view with parallaxcorrected shooting
2. LED overexposure warning
arrow
3. LED underexposure/camera
shake warning arrow
4. LED thunderbolt mark
(flash ready-light)
Advance the film.
• Stroke the film advance
lever to transport the film to the
next frame and prepare the
camera for the next shot.
27
-BASIC OPERATIONS-confinued- - - - - --
28 • speed/mode
Set the shutter
29• rewind
Lift up the film
knob.
selector dial to "R."
Lift up the film rewind knob and
rotate it in the direction of the
arrow on the knob (clockwise) to
secure it in the raised position.
After the last exposure has been
made, the film advance lever will
not advance further and the frame
counter will indicate that all frames
have been exposed. You must then
rewind the exposed film back into
its cartridge. To do this, first turn
the shutter speed dial to "R"
(Rewind) to disengage the film
sprocket drive.
The shutter is automatically locked
when the dial set to "R."
28
30
Rewind the film.
• Fold out the film rewind
crank and rotate it in the direction
of the arrow on the knob (clockwise) to rewind the film.
When you feel the tension lessen,
cont inue winding one or two more
turns so the film leader rewinds
completely into the cartridge.
· 00 not open the camera back until
you have completely rewound the film
into its cartridge. Otherwise, light may
reach the film and ruin your photos.
· 00 not attempt to rewind film underwater.
31
thebshtU tter
32 • reLOICk
ease U ton.
Remove the film
• cartridge.
Do not remove the film cartridge in
direct sunlight.
Open the camera back by following the directions in Step 5 (the
frame counter will automatically
return to "S") and remove the film
cartridge. Then close and lock the
camera by following the directions
in Step 13.
• Do not store the removed film cartridge in a brightly lit area.
• Take the film in for development as
soon as possible.
• After shooting underwater, thoroughly
wipe off any water around the camera
back with a soft cloth before opening
the camera back.
Also wipe off the junctions of the
Q-rings and their grooves with a soft
cloth.
When loading or removing film, wipe
up any water that seeps into the
camera body or it may corrode the
body.
Return the shutter speed/mode
selector dial to the "A" pOSition to
prepare the camera for the next
roll of film. Finally, move the shutter
release button lock lever to the" L"
position to prevent the shutter
release button from being depressed and inadvertently draining
battery power.
29
CONTROLS IN D E T A I L - - - - - - - - B(Bulb)
A (Auto)
Shutter Speed I Mode Selector
Diol ®
The Nikonos-V offers aperture-priority automatic
mode operation and manual control of all shutter
speeds from 1/30 to 1/1000sec., including the M90
(1/90secl, B (Bulb), and R (Rewind) sett ings. All
shutter speeds from 1/30 to 1/1000sec., excluding
M90 (1I90sec.) and B (Bulb), are electronically controlled. To set the desired shooting mode or shutter
speed, rotate the shutter speed/mode selector dial
until the desired setting click-stops opposite the
shutter speed/mode index. The shutter speed/mode
selector dial has the following settings : R (Rewind),
B (Bulb), M90 (1/90secl, A (Auto), and six shutter
speeds from 1/1000 to 1I30sec. Intermediate settings
cannot be used.
30
A (Auto)
Used for aperture-priority automatic mode shooting.
Manually set the f/stop first; then the camera's microcomputer selects the matching shutter speed step lessly between 1/30 and 1/1000sec., depending on
the scene brightness and the film speed in use. Until
the frame counter reaches frame" 1," the shutter will
be automatically released at approximately 1/1500sec.
regardless of the scene brightness and the film speed
in use. After the frame counter reaches frame "1,"
the camera automatically returns to normal A mode
operation.
Manual (1/30 to 1/1000 sec.)
B (Bulb)
Used for full manual control of both f/stop and shutter
speed. All six shutter speeds indicated on the dial are
available with timing accuracy assured by a Quartz
oscillator. Each number shown on the scale IS reciprocal, i.e , 1000 means 1/1000 second, 125 means
1/125 second , etc. A one-step change will either
halve or double the exposure ; e.g., a shutter speed
of 1/125sec. lets in twice as much light as 1/250sec.
and half as much light as 1/60sec.
At this mechanical setting , the shutter remains open
for as long as you depress the shutter release button.
Cannot be used for TTL auto flash photography
R(Rewind)
This setting disengages the film sprocket drive to
permit film rewinding. At this setting , the shutter
release button cannot be operated.
Note: When the shutter speed/mode selector dial is set at
either M90 or B, the exposure meter does not work nor do the
LED viewfinder indicators light. When the dial is set at R, the
shutter is automatically locked.
M90 (1/90sec.)
At this setting, the shutter is mechanically released at
1/90sec. Use this setting when the battery (or
batteries) is weak , exhausted or not loaded in the
camera. M90 setting can also be used for flash photography. It cannot , however, be used for TTL auto flash
photography.
31
- CONTROLS IN DETAIL- continued- - - - - ~
Aperture Seffing
The aperture controls th e amount of light passing
through the lens. When moving from one flstop to the
next , the amount of light is either halved or doubled.
For example, to halve the amount of light, rotate the
lens aperture knob (in the case of the LW-Nikkor,
rotate the aperture ring) until the aperture index is
opposite the next smaller aperture (indicated by a
numerically larger f-number on the aperture scale).
To double the amount of light through the lens, rotate
the lens aperture knob until the aperture index is
opposite the next larger aperture (the next smaller
f-number).
Because the Nikkor lenses for the Nikonos-V do not
have click-stops at each f-number, any setting can be
used. (The LW-Nikkor does have click-stops between
f-numbers , but intermediate settings can still be
32
used.) As the aperture is opened and closed , the
pincer-type depth-of-field indicators open and close
to show the distance range which will be in focus in
the final photograph . See page 39 for more information .
TTL Metering System
The Nikonos-V uses a (through-the-Iens) TTL centerweighted stopped-down metering system which
measures the light passing through the lens to determine the correct exposure.
When the shutter re lease button is depressed halfway,
activating the exposure meter, the camera's microcomputer automatically selects the shutter speed
that corresponds to the aperture set, ASAIISO film
speed in use, and scene brightness, and causes the
appropriate viewfinder LED indicators to light .
The camera places special emphasis on the brightness at the center of the viewfinder, although the
meter measures the brightness of the entire scene.
Correct exposure is assured when the main subject
is placed in this central area.
Ie printed circuil
board
SPD
Ligh t path
Shutter curtain
Metering reflector
33
- CONTROLS IN DETAIL-continued- - - - - -
Viewfinder ®
The high-eyepoint viewfinder al lows you to place your
eye up to 40mm away from the eyepiece, so that the
enti re field of view can be seen while wearing a diver 's
mask , goggles, or safety glasses. The built-in frame
lines indicate the area of coverage for the normal
35mm lens; the parallax correct ion marks should be
used to frame the subject when shooting at the
closest focusing distance of O.8m (2.75ft). (In the
illustration above, the parallex-corrected shooting
area is indicated by red lines.) At the bottom of the
viewfinder, there are LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes)
which indicate the shutter speeds and warn of possible
over- or underexposure. In addition, a flash ready-light
in the form of a red lightining bolt mark is built in.
34
• The frame lines indicate 85% (when the focusing scale is
set to infinity) of the area which will be reproduced on the
film. So the actual area will be wider than the scene through
the viewfinder
• When using the LWNikkor 28mm fI2.8, the field of view is
the sa me as the full area Inside the viewfinder When shooting at the closest fOCUSing distance of G.5m !15ft!, the
picture coverage is from the top of the uppermost frame
lines down.
Shooting in the Aperture-Priority
Automalic Exposure Mode
To use the aperture-priority automatic exposure mode ,
perform the following procedures:
1. Set the shutter speed/mode selector dial to "A"
(Auto)
2. Tu rn the lens aperture knob (in the case of the LWNikkor, turn its aperture ring) to the desired aperture setting. Intermediate aperture settings can be
used.
3. Estimate or measure the camera-to-subject distance *. Then turn the lens focusing knob (in the
case of the LW-Nikkor, turn its focusing ring) until
the distance scale index is opposite the desired
setting.
* See page 59 for more information.
4. Look through the viewfinder and compose the subject within the frame lines.
5. Unlock the shutter release button and gently depress the shutter release button halfway. If anyone
of the viewfinder shutter speed LED indicators
between 1/30 and 1/1000sec. lights (indicating the
shutter speed selected by the came ra's microcomputer), depress the shutter release button
completely to release the shutter. If two shutter
speed LED indicators light at the same time , it
means the camera's microcomputer has selected
an intermediate shutter speed. If the LED over exposure warning arrow ( ... ) blinks, the exposure is
beyond the high end of the meter's range (the sub -
35
-CONTROLS IN DETAIL- continued - - - - -Overexposure warning
Underexposure warning
Shutter-priority automatic exposure
photography
ject is too bright). Therefore, set the lens to its
smallest available aperture (the largest f-nu mber).
If, after that, the arrow is still blinking, either use
a neutral density fi lter or change to a film with a
lower ASA/ ISO film speed.
If the LED underexposure warning arrow ( ~ ) blinks ,
the exposure is beyond the low end of the meter's
range (th e subject is too dark). Therefore, set the
lens to its largest available aperture (the smallest
f-number). If, after this, the arrow is still blinking,
use a Nikon Speedlight or change to a film with a
higher ASA/ISO film speed. (For Speedlight information , see page 50.)
36
The Nikonos-Vallows you to select a particu lar shutter
speed to achieve a specific photographic effect when
shooting in the A mode. To photograph moving subjects, you can select a fast shutter speed to freeze
the action and produce sharp out lines, or you can
select a slow shutter speed to pan the action and
produce an intentional blur. To operate the Nikonos -V
in this manner, gently depress the shutter release
button halfway. Then, while watching the viewfinder
LED indicators, turn the lens aperture knob (in the
case of the LW-Nikkor, turn its aperture ring) until the
LED that indicates the desired shutter speed lights.
Shutter speed
set on dial
Correct
shutter speed
Shooting in the Manual Exposure Mode
The following procedures apply when you want to:
• Select your own aperture and shutter speed.
• Use an exposure other than what the viewfinder
LEOs indicate.
• Use the "B" (Bulb) setting.
• Use a Nikon Speedlight other than the 8B-103,
SB-102 or 8B-101.
• Use the" M90" (1/90 sec.) setting.
1. Estimate or measure the camera-to-subject distance'.
2. Unlock the shutter release button.
3. Set the shutter speed/mode selector dial and the
aperture index to the desired shutter speed and
f/stop, respectively.
4. Look through th e viewfinder, compose the scene,
and gently depress the shutter release button half* See page 59 for more information.
way to activate the meter. The viewfinder LED
indicator which corresponds to the shutter speed
you selected will light. If, at the same time, one or
two other shutter speed LEOs blink, the camera's
microcomputer has determined that a different
shutter speed is needed to obtain the correct exposure with the existing scene brightness and
aperture.
To obtain the co rrect exposure , rotate either the
lens aperture knob (in the case of the LWNikkor,
rotate its aperture ring) or the shutter speed/mode
selector dial until only one shutter speed LED
remains lighted.
If the LED overexposure warning arrow ( .... ) blinks,
either turn the shutter speed/mode selector dial to
a faster shutter speed or set the lens to a smaller
37
-CONTROLS IN
DETAIL-continued -----~
Overexposure warn ing
aperture (a larger I-number). II the arrow continues
to blink even when the shutter speed/mode selector
dial is set to "1000" (1/1000sec.) and the lens is
set to its smallest aperture (the largest I-number),
either use a neutral density lilter or change to a
lilm with a lower ASAIISO Ii 1m speed.
II the LED underexposure warning arrow ( ~ ) blinks,
either turn the shutter speed/mode selector dial to
a slower shutter speed or set the lens to a larger
aperture (a smaller I-number). II the arrow continues to blink even when the shutter speed/mode
selector dial is set to "30" (1/30sec.) and the lens
is set to its largest aperture (the smallest I-number),
either use a Nikon Speedlight or change to a lilm
with a higher ASAIISO lilm speed. (For Speedlight
inlormation , see page 50).
38
Underexposure warning
olf two shutter speed LED indicators light at the same time,
it means an intermediate shutter speed will provide the
correct exposure. Therefore, turn the lens aperture knob (in
the case of the LWNikkor, turn its aperture ring) slightly until
only one LED remains lighted.
o When the shutter speed/mode selector dial is set at either
M90 or B, the exposure meter does not work nor do the LED
viewfinder indicators light. When the dial is set at R, the
shutter is automatically locked.
o To create a special photographic effect through an intentional over- or underexposure, set either the lens aperture
knob (in the case of the LW-Nikkor, set its aperture ring) or
the shutter speed/mode selector dial so that at least two
non-adjacent LED indicators are lighted.
How to select the f/stop and
shutter speed
Exposure is determined by the combination of shutter
speed and aperture . As the numbers on eith-er the
aperture scale or shutter speed/mode selector dial
increase by one increment, the amount of light striking the film is reduced by approximately one hal f. For
example, the amount of light at 1/250sec. is one half
that at 1/125sec., but the amount of light at 1/60sec.
is twice that at 1/125sec. Likewise, the amount of
light at f/16 is one half that at f/1 1, but the amount of
light at f/8 is twice that at f/11. Brighter scenes require
either faster speeds or smaller apertures or a combination of both which wi ll give the same amount of
exposure; darker scenes require the reverse.
For example, if you obtain the correct exposure with
the combination of 1/125sec. and f/11, you will also
obtain the correct exposure with the combination of
1/60sec. and f/16, and with 1/250sec. and f/8.
For more in formation about depth of field , see page
EV Range of the Camera
EV is the abbreviation for Exposure Value. With
ASAIISO 100 film and an f/2.8 lens, the exposure
value range of the Nikonos -V is between EV 8 and
EV 19 (1/30sec. at f/2.8 to 1/1000sec. at f/22). These
shutter speed/aperture combinations are not affected
by ASA/ ISO fi lm speed. That is, the Nikonos-V's
shutter speed/aperture comb inations are always
1/30sec. at 2.8 to 1/1000sec. at fl22 at any film
speed from ASA/ ISO 25 to 1600.
45.
Shutter speed/aperture combinations that give
the same exposure
Shutter speed (sec.) 1/1000
Aperture (f/number)
39
-CONTROLS IN DETAIL-continued- - - - - -
Shutter Release Lock Lever ®
Shutter Release Button @
This convenient lever prevents fi lm wastage and
inadvertent battery drain caused by accidentaly depressing the sh utter release button when the camera
is not in use. When storing or carrying the camera,
lock the shutter re lease button by sliding the lever to
the "L" position. To unlock the shutter re lease button ,
slide the lock lever off the" L" position .
Located at the top of the anatomical grip, the large
shutter release button on the Nikonos-V provides convenient operation either above or below the water.
When gently depressed halfway, this button activates
the exposure meter. After you remove your finger
from the button , the meter stays for approximately
16sec. and then automatically turns itself off to conserve battery power. Because the shutter release
button activates the viewfinder LEDs when the shutter
speed/mode index is opposite any setting except
M90 (1/90sec), B (Bulb), or R (Rewind), the shutter
release button can be used as a battery check. At
M90 (1I90sec.), B (Bulb), and R (Rewind), and until
the frame counter reaches" 1," the viewfinder LEDs
do not appear. Remember that the shutter release
button should be depressed gently, not rapid ly, to
40
ASA/ISO Film Speed Dial ®
re lease the shutter. Also avoid shaking or moving the
camera when releasing the shutter.
• When you release the shutter at "A" in a very da rk place or
with the front lens cap on, the shutter curta in may remain
open. If this happens, turn the shutter speed/mode selector
dial to another setting to close the shutter
• The shutter will not be released when the film has not been
advanced, when the shutter release button is locked, nor
when the shutter speed/mode selector dial is set at "R."
Providing ASA/ISO sett ings from 25 to 1600, the film
speed dial is set by lifting up the knurled ring and
rotating it until the desired speed is opposite the wh ite
index. Wh en the ring is released, it locks into place.
The dial can be rotated even underwater without
water getting inside the ca mera .
The wh ite dots between the numbers on the dial represent intermediate film speed settings. (See the
adjacent chart at page 23.) .
• Setting the correct ASA/ ISO film speed value is essentia l to
the proper operation of the camera , since the ASA/ ISO film
speed in use is one of the three pieces of information (the
other two being the shutter speed in use and the scene
brightness) used by the camera 's microcomputer to determine the correct exposure.
41
·-CONTROLS IN DETAIL-continued------
Frame Counter ®
To accommodate all commercially available film
cartridges, the Nikonos ·V frame counter goes up to
36. The "S" appears automatically as soon as the
camera back is opened and signifies the "START"
position. There are two dots between "S" and" 1" to
indicate blank exposures. After" 1," even numbers
are listed and odd numbers are indicated by dots in
between. The most frequent ly used numbers- 12,
20, 24, and 36-are in red. The frame counter will
advance one stop with each complete stroke of the
film advance lever, regard less of whethe r or not there
is film in the camera. The frame counter will not
advance after it reaches 36, but the film can be
wound and the shutter can be cocked.
42
• 00 not begin shooting until the frame counter reaches frame
"1."
• When the shutter speed/mode index is opposite any setting
except M90 !1/90sec.J, a (aulb), or R (Rewind), the shutter
will be automatically released at approximately 1/1500sec.
until the frame counter reaches frame "1," regardless of
the scene brightness and the film speed in use.
• After the frame counter reaches frame "1 , " the camera
automatically returns to the mode you have selected.
Film Advance Lever CD
Exposure Compensation
The film advance lever on the Nikonos-V operates in
the same manner as that of a regular 35mm camera.
To cock the shutter and advance the film to the next
frame , stroke the lever countercjockwise until it stops.
When you remove your finger, the lever will automatically return. The lever is ratcheted , so it may be
operated in one continuous stroke or a series of
shorter ones. In addition, the lever is hinged for compact storage in the rest position. The angle of throw
is 144°,
When the overal l scene is unusually light or dark in
tone or there is a substantial difference in contrast
between the main subject and the background (for
example, backlit subjects or snowscapes), the
camera 's meter may be fooled into giving the incorrect exposure. In these cases, exposure compensation-via the ASAIISO film speed dial-is required to
obtain the correct exposure. To do this, intent ionally
reset the ASAIISO film speed dial.
o lf the lever becomes increasingly difficult to stroke when
winding several frames, the film is improperly advancing.
Do not force the lever further; instead, rewind the film and
load it again.
o When all available frames have been exposed, the lever will
stop advancing. Do not force the lever further; instead,
rewind the film.
43
- CONTROLS IN DETAIL-continued- - - - - Exposure Compensation in the A mode: To make
an exposure compensation with the ASA/ ISO film
speed scale , determine the film speed that corresponds to the desired exposure compensation va lue
by using the following chart.
For example, to make a + 1 exposure compensation
when using ASA/ ISO 100 film, reset the ASA/ ISO film
speed scale to ASA/ ISO 50.
~
+ 2 -1% - IX + 1
o
+!6 0
-l> -% -I - Il> -1% - 2
-
-
-
25
32
40
50
-
25
32
40
50
64
80
100 125 160 200 250
64
80
100 125 160 200 250 320 400
32
64
+~
64
80
100 125
100
25
32
40
50
200
50
64
80
100 125 16 0 200 250 320 400 500 e40 800
400
100 125 160 200 250 32 0 400 500 640 800 1000 1250 1600
1000
250 320 400 500 640 800 1000 1250 1600
Exposure compensation value
f) Film speed in use
Exposure Compensation in the manual mode
(1/30sec. to 1/1000sec.): To make an exposure
compensation, set either the lens aperture knob (in
the case of the LW-N ikkor, set its aperture ring) or the
shutter speed/mode selector dial so that at least two
non-adjacent LED indicators are lighted (one LED
indicates the shutter speed you select, one indicates
the shutter speed the camera 's microcomputer se -
44
lects). Another method is to move close to the subject
(or position it in the center of the viewfinder) and obtain an exposure reading; then set the controls accord ingly and step back (or change the position of the
subject in- the viewfinder). When you release the
shutter, the result with be a properly exposed photograph.
This technique can also be used to create intentional overand underexposures in normal lighting. The proper amount
of exposure compensation can be determined through trial
and error
o Be sure to return the ASAIISO film speed dial to the correct setting after you have finished your exposure como
pensation.
olt is difficult to use exposure compensation when shooting
underwater in harsh lighting conditions. An alternative is to
"bracket" your shots: take one shot at the indicated correct
exposure, and one each at the next largest and smallest
flstops (or next fastest and slowest shutter speeds).
o Generally speaking, a + 2 exposure compensation is required when shooting subjects against snowscapes and
similar situations, but that value will not always provide the
correct exposure. For best results, use an 18 % reflectance
gray card (available at most camera stores) for precise
exposure metering rather than using the ASAIISO film speed
dial. TTL exposure meters are calibrated to provide the
correct exposure when an 18% reflectance gray card is
used. If you do not have a gray card, hold the palm of one
hand at least a foot in front of the lens in the same light as
your main subject and let the camera meter your hand for
the correct exposure.
Depth Of Field
When you shoot at a certain aperture and focusing
distance, you will find that not only the main subject
but also objects within a certain range in front and
behind it will be sharp in the final photograph . This
"in-focus zone" is known as depth of field. Objects
beyond this range become increasingly out of focus.
Because the Nikonos-V features aperture-priority
automatic exposure, you can control depth of field by
varying the f/stop. When the zone of sharpness is
la rge, depth of field is "deep"; when it is small, depth
of field is "shallow."
For any individual lens:
- The smaller the aperture (the larger the f-number),
the deeper the depth of field; the larger the aperture
(the smaller the f-number), the shallower the depth
offield.
- Depth of field becomes deeper the farther the subject is from the lens; the depth of field becomes
shallower the closer the subject is to the lens.
- Depth of field behind the main subject is deeper
than in front of it.
Between lenses of different focal lengths: longer
focal length lenses have shallower depth of field at
each f/stop; shorter foca l length lenses have deeper
depth of fie ld at each f/stop.
As you open and close the aperture, the pincer-type
depth-of-field indicators open and close to show the
distance range which will be in focus in the final
photograph. (In the case of the LW-Nikkor, depth of
field is indicated by pairs of colored depth-of-field
index lines on the aperture scale.)
For example, with the star)dard W-Nikkor 35mm f/2.5
lens, when the lens focusing knob is set at 3 m and
the lens aperture knob at f/16, the indicators show
that all objects between 1.5m and infinity (00) will be
in focus in the final photograph.
• To minimize any errors you may have made when measuring
or estimating the subject distance or focusing, use the
smallest aperture (the largest f-number) possible. Alternately, move farther from the subject or use a lens with
shorter focal length.
45
- CONTROLS IN DETAIL-continued- - - - - Different Depths Of Field
fl2.5-Shallow depth of field
46
fl22-Deep depth of field
Camera Back Lock System
This newly designed system allows quick and easy
film loading in the normal 35mm camera way.
To allow the camera back to be opened or closed in
a minimum amount of time, a quick-release camera
back release/lock latch ® is employed . It can be
opened after turning it 90° in the direction of the arrow
on the camera body while depressing the orange
camera back release/lock button @, thereby aligning
the red camera release/lock mark ® on the latch wit h
the white camera back release index ® on the camera
body. Before closing the camera back, align the red
mark with the white index, then firmly press the
camera back against the body and turn the latch until
its red mark clicks into position opposite the red
index@.
Naturally, you should never attempt to load or unload
the camera underwater or in situations where water
might get inside the camera.
47
- CONTROLS IN DETAIL-continued- - - - - -
Pressure Plate ®
Anatomical Grip IJ)
Instead of being attached to the -camera back, the
Nikonos-V's pressure plate is attached to the inside
of the camera and is hinged. This style pressure plate
uses a safety catch to keep the film flat, and to protect
the shutter curtains from accidental splashes or
foreign matter when the camera back is open.
By placing your right forefinger on the shutter release
button with the thumb behind the film advance lever,
your other fingers naturally wrap around the anatomical grip. With this comfortable and secure hold,
you can change rapidly from horizontal- to vertical format shooting.
One of the biggest causes of blurred pictures is
camera shake. When you release the shutter, support
the camera with both hands and depress the shutter
release button gently, not rapidly. Underwater, weightlessness makes it even more difficult to hold the
camera steady, so concentrate on steadiness even
when using fast shutter speeds.
48
Tripod Socket @
A standard tripod socket is located in the camera's
baseplate for attachment of the brackets for the
Nikonos Underwater Speedlights S8-103, S8-102 and
S8 -101. A regular tripod can also be used for shooting
on land at slow shutter speeds or when making time
exposures.
49
FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY-------Ie printed circu it board
Metering reflector
Shutter curtain
Light path
50
SPD
Except at shallow depths, a speedlight is a must when
shooting underwater because it restores the subject 's
natural colors. A speed light is also convenient as a
main light source at night and in dim light as well as
a supplemental light source to fill in shadows in
daylight.
A number of different speedlights can be used with
the Nikonos-V, including the new dedicated speedlight,
the SB-103 or SB-102, and the SB-101-both of which
can be used both on land and underwater. When
shooting on land, you can also use Speedlights SB-19,
SB-18, SB-16B, SB-15, and SB-E.
To simplify flash photography even further, the
Nikonos-V features fully automatic through-the-Iens
(TTL) flash exposure control. While the shutter is
open, a silicon photodiode (SPO) at the bottom of the
shutter box reads the light as it reflects off the film ;
when the film has received enough light for correct
exposure, the flash unit turns off. TTL flash exposure
control is operable with the SB-103 or SB-102, which
connects directly to the camera, and the SB-18, SB16B and SB-15, which connect to the camera through
a sync cord. The Nikonos -V can also be used with a
va riety of Nikon TTL Multiple Flash photographic
accessories. Before shooting, check that the aperture
setting is adequate for the flash-lo-subject distance
and the guide number of the speedl ighl in use.
The Nikonos-V, which has only an X-contact, synchronizes with speedlights when the shutter speed set is
1/90sec. or slower. (Shutter speed sync ranges are
shown in the following chart.)
When connecting a special electronic flash unit with a provision for time lag, set the shutter speed at 1/60sec. or slower
depending upon the time lag.
o Connecting other manufacturers' flash units may damage
the Nikonos-V's IC circuitry. Also, units with a high-voltage
sync circuit may adversely affect shutter speed precision.
o
1/1000 1/500 1/250
_
. Synchronized
_
: Cannot be used
51
-FLASH PHOTOGRAPHy-confinued- - - - - -
Flash Socket
The flash socket is located in the came ra 's baseplate
just below the anatomical grip. Use a coin to unscrew
the flash socket cover@. Like the battery chamber
cover, it has an O-ring to make it watert ight. Once the
cover is removed, electrical connection between the
camera and the Nikonos Speedlight SB-103, SB-102
or 8B-101 can be made with the coiled sync cord.
Since the Nikonos -V's flash socket provides X-sync
only, flash units using flashbulbs cannot be used. An
opt ional sync cord allows other Nikon speedlights to
be used with the Nikonos-V on land.
52
.After each underwater shooting session, examine the
flash socket cover's O-ring and apply lubrication if
necessary_ See " PREPARATION" on page 7 for more
information_
• Whenever a sync cord is not being used, be sure the
flash socket cover is screwed tightly into place; if water
seeps past, it will be almost impossible to remove_ If
water does enter the flash socket, contact an authorized
Nikon dealer or service center immediately or corrosion
may damage the electrical contacts and circuitry_
Accessory Shoe @
Viewfinder Ready-Light
8uilt into the top of the viewfinder, the Nikonos-V 's
accessory shoe accepts the following accessories:
1. Four optical viewfinders: OF-II for UW-N ikkor
15mm f/2.S N ; OF-12 for the UW-N ikkor 20mm
f/2.S (and for UW- Nikkor 2Smm f/3.5 via mounting
mask) ; OF- l0 fo r Nikkor SOmm f/4; and "Optic al
Viewfinder for UW-N ikkor 2Smm f/3.5 " (also for WNikkor 35mm f/2.5 via mounting mask).
2. Two plastic frame finders-one for the UW-Nikkor
2Smm fl3.5, the other for both W-Nikkor 35mm
fl2.5 and Nikkor SOmm f/4.
3. Sensor Un it SU-l0l for Nikonos Speedlight S8- 102
and S8-101 or on-land use with dedicated directmounting Nikon Speedlights.
The Nikonos-V's thunderbolt-shaped ready-light is
located in the lower righthand corner of the viewfinder
next to the LEO underexposure warning arrow.
When the S8-103 or S8-102 Speedlight is being used
and both the speedlight and the camera 's exposure
meter are turned on , the ready-light lights whe'l the
speedlight has recycled and goes out when the shutter
is released . Th is enables you to keep your eye to the
viewfinder at al l ti mes. As a warning, the ready-light
blinks when the flash output is insufficient, the
camera's ASAIISO fi lm speed dial is misset, or the
shutter speed/mode selector dial is set to M90
(1/90sec.) or 8 (8u lb) for TTL flash operation.
53
- FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY-continued- - - - - Camera meter, shutter speed ,
and ready-light
.
The relationship between the recycling of the flash
unit, the camera's shu tter speed , and the ready-light
(if the flash unit provides a ready-light indication) is
shown below.
· If the shutter speed/mode selector dial is set at "A" or at any
shutter speed setting from 1/1000 to 1/125sec., the shutter
speed automatically switches to 1/90sec. when the speedlight is turned on, regardless of whether or not it has recycled.
When the shutter speed/m ode selector dial is set at 1/60 or
1I30sec., the shutter will be released at the speed selected.
Shutter speed/mode
selector dial
• The Nikonos-V's automatic TTL flash exposure control is not
operable when the shutter speed/mode selector dial is set at
M90 (1/90secJ or B (Bulb).
· If the ready-light does not light after a shot, check the battery
power in the following manner.
1. If the flash unit's ready-light does not light, the flash unit's
batteries are exhausted and must be replaced with a fresh
set.
2. If the camera's meter is on and the flash unit's ready-light
lights but the viewfinder ready-light does not light or blink,
the camera's battery (or batteries) is (are) exhausted and
must be replaced with a fresh one (or set).
~:~:tro;u~,~pe~
A (Auto)*
lights
1/90 sec .
doesn 't light
-
1/1000 to 1/125 sec.
lig hts
1/90 sec.
doesn 't light
-
1/60 to 1/30 sec.
lights
as set
doesn' t light
--+
--+
lights
M90 or B
-
as set
• Select and set a useable aperture; aperture-priority automatic exposure is not operable when using a speedlight. However,
the shutter speed you selected and shutter speed selected by the came ra 's microcomputer light are indicated by the viewfinder LEOs in the same manner as when shooting using aperture-priority automatic exposure.
54
Nikonos-V/Speedlight Combination Chart
Situation
Underwater
(also usable on land)
On land
I
Speed light
Connection
I
Ioperates
Ready·light I
Flash output
control
SB-103
Direct
Yes
TTL/manual
SB-102
Direct
Yes
TTL/autolmanual
SB-101
Direct
Yes
Autolmanual
SB-17/SB-16A/SB-12
Via V-Type Sync Cord + AS-6
Yes
Autolmanual *
SB-18/SB-16B/SB-15
Vi a V-Type Sync Cord
Yes
TTL/autolmanual *
SB-19ISB-E
Via V-Type Sync Cord
Ye s
Auto
Vi a V-Type Sync Cord + SC-13 w ith SU-2
Ye s
Au tol manual
Via V-Type Sync Cord + SC-23
Yes
TTL/manual *
SB- 11I SB-14
* Except with the 58-12, TTL multiple flash photograph)! is possible with the optional TTL Multi-Flash Sync Cord SC-19 and/or
SC-IS. For TTL multiple flash photography, 58-17 and S8 -16A should be used as slave flash units. For details, see instruction
manual of accessories for TTL multiple flash photography.
• When connecting a Nikon speedlight to the Nikonos- V with the Nikonos IV-A 's Flash Unit Adapter and the SC-IO Sync Cord for
use on land, reset the shutter speed/mode selector dial to 1160, 1/30 or M90 (//90sec.!.
55
-FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY-confinued-----Daylight fill-in flash shooting
When shooting in daylight , a backlit subject may come
out almost as a silhouette if the background is correctly exposed . If, on the other hand , exposure compensation is made to correct ly expose the subject ,
the background may be washed out. To fil l in the
shadows and balance the illumination levels of the
subject and the background in daylight shooting , use
the 8B-103 or 8B-102 8peedlight.
When the speedlight is turned on, the shutter speed
automatically switches to 1/90sec. Point the camera
at the main subject and gently depress the shutter
release button halfway to activate the camera 's exposure meter. When the meter is on and the flash has
recycled , the viewf inder ready-l ight will light and one
of the shutter speed LED indicators will blink. To
obtain the correct exposure, adjust the aperture to
numerical ly larger f-numbers until both the 1/125sec.
and 1/60sec. shutter speed LEOs begin blinking , or
until either the 1/60sec. or 1/30sec. LED indicator
blinks. Check that the viewfinder ready-light is lighted ,
then depress the shutter release button completely.
56
For best results , follow this procedure whenever any
of the shutter speed LEOs from "125" to " 1000" blinks
during-daylight fill-in flash shooting unless you intentiona lly want to over- or underexpose a shot.
For more information , refer to the speedlight instruction manual.
EVChart
At ASAIISO 100, the exposure range of the Nikonos-V
is from EV 8 (1/30sec . at f/2.8) to EV 19 (1I1000sec.
at f/22) . The ranges at various film speeds are shown
in the chart. For example, the range at ASA/ISO 100
is in pink, the range at ASA/ISO 25 is indicated by
blue lines, and the range at ASA/ISO 400 is indicated
by black lines. The exposure value (EV) is a number
representing the various combinations of apertures
and shutter speeds that will provide the same exposure. For instance, EV 10 represents 1/30sec . at f/5 .6,
but it can also mean 1/60sec. at f/4 or 1/125sec. at
f/2.8.
ASAIISO
EV
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
I I I I
'"
A' /
. /V
/
/
/" V
/
/
~
/"" /" V
/
/
/
/"" /"" ",
/
/
V /"~
. /JIII'
"
V
. / /" /"" /" . / /" V
/
/
f/ number
........
........
100
--.....
--.....
200
400
800
~
........
~
1600
--.....
-------..... -------..... -------..... -----........ ........
-----........ -------..... --..... -----........ -----........
~
/
/
/
/" /" /" /
/"" /" V /" /" /" /"
2. 8 4/5 (
50
~
~
V
//
25
........
-----........ -----........ -----........
~
~
~
~
~
~
--.....
........
Time
........
........
~
--.....
........
~
------
8/ 1 ( 1 ( 22'
I
I
I
I ASA /ISO 400
ASA /I SO 25
ASA /ISO 100
U","bl e"~
range on Auto .
(sec.)
1/1000
1/ 500
1/250
1/ 125
1/60
1/ 30
1/ 15
1/8
1/ 4
1/2
1
2
57
TIPS ON UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHY-------,
The results you will obtain when shoot ing underwater
depend upon the transparency of the water, the
shooting depth , whether or not objects are floating
near your subject , the condition of the light, and
several other factors. To take good underwater
photos, you must have a basic knowledge of underwater photography.
Lens focal length and picture angle
Focal length (mm)
-
Water's magnifying effects
15
20
28
35
80
~
74°
62°
30°20'
Lig ht is refracted in water, so underwater objects
seem approximately 25% larger and closer than they
actually are. As a result , the picture angle of the lens
in use becomes smaller. For example, the picture
angle of a 35mm lens underwater is almost the same
as th at of a 50mm lens on land.
4
Illustrations, underwater photos, and editorial
supervision supplied by Akira Tateishi , Marine Art
Center, Co., Ltd.
58
1
2
3
4
5
6
Size of object as it appears underwater (4/3U
Actual size of object (U
Actual or measured distance (j)
Distance set on lens (3/41)
Your eye
Underwater mask
94°
78°
59°
46'30'
22' 45'
Focusing
The distance scales on the interchangeable lenses
for the Nikonos-V are correct for on-land use. When
using these lenses underwater, therefore, you mtlst
set the distance scale to 3/4 of the actual or measured
camera-to-subject distance. For example, if the actual
or measured camera-to-subject dis tance is 1.33 m
(4.3ft), the distance scale should be set at 1 m (3.3ft).
If you estimate the distance underwater, though, you
won't have any problems; the water has the same
magnifying effect on the IE IS as it does on your eyes.
So just set the lens at the estimated distance.
When shooting underwater, you will probably find it
more convenient to keep the lens set at a specific
distance and reposition yourself at that distance from
the subject than to set the distance for each subject.
When taking photos of fish, set the lens to a specific
distance and then release the shutter when the fish
swims to that distance.
For best results underwater, shoot with a wide-angle
lens; its deeper depth of field will let you take sharper
photos.
<·;J>c>t
~
/I I
Wait for the subject to move to the prefocused distance_
Move to the prefocused distance_
59
-TIPS ON UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHY-confinued-,
Water's effects on colors
The farther you descend from the water 's surface,
the more the selective filtration and light absorption
of the water reduce visibi lity. Red is the first color to
be absorbed, orange and yellow follow close behind
(refer to the chart)
At 10m (33ft), everything takes on a blue -green cast .
In addition , depending upon the turbu lence of the
water, vis ibility may be reduced even further by silt
and microscopic particles of plankton in suspension.
Therefore, below approx imately 5m (16ft), use a
speedlight to give the subject additional illumination
and to restore natural colors, especial ly those in the
red portion of the spectrum. For more information
about flash shoot ing, see pag e 50.
1. Red absorption increases at greater depths. Subject looks bluish even at short distances.
2. Red absorption decreases at shallower depths and
at smaller distances.
3. Subject looks in creasingly bluish at greater dis tances, even at shallow depths.
Color Absorption Underwater
30
n~
~ <-~ ~
_
60
= color is absorbed
Shooting distance and subject contrast
Shooting with sunlight
The greater the camera-to -subject distance underwater, the less the subject contrast. Small particles of
plan~ton or dirt that float in the water decreas.e the
subject contrast to such a degree that, even under
ideal conditions, it is next to impossible to take a sharp
photo when the camera-to-subject distance is more
than 5m (16ft). For best results, get as close to the
subject as possible and use the widest angle lens you
have. Be careful, too, when using a speedlight that
you aren't so far from the subject that sufficient light
cannot reach it.
Good underwater photography requires good lighting,
such as sunlight. But the amount of sunlight that
enters the water depends upon the position of the sun.
The maximum amount of light enters the water when
the sun is directly overhead. If the angle between the
sun and the water's surface is at least 45°, though,
more than 90% of the sun's light enters the water.
(The chart below shows the relationship of the angle
between the sun and water and the amount of sunlight
that enters the water.) For best results, pick a calm,
sunny day and dive between the hours of 10:00a.m.
and 2: 00 p.m If there are 'waves and swells, or if the
waves break against rocks nearby and foam, less
sunlight will enter the water.
(%)
Amount of
100
incoming light 80
..".-
I---
I
60
I
40
II
J
o
20
D·
IS ' 3D ' 45 ' 60 ' 75 ' 90 '
Angle of the sun
61
~TIPS
ON UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHY-confinued-
Camera positioning
For normal shooting , hold the camera horizontally
for subject lighting with good contrast (il lustration #4).
Whenever possible , avoid shooting stra ight down on
the subject (i llustration #1); the sunlight will be behind
the camera , resu lting in flat , low-contrast light ing.
As it is on land , backlighting is possible underwater.
For partially backlit subjects with medium-contrast
lighting, hold the camera at an angle toward the
water's surface (i llustration #2). For dramatic backlit
scenes in which objects appear as silhouettes, point
the camera directly toward the water's surface
(illustration #3). If more detail in the silhouetted subject is desired, make an exposure compensation by
resetting the ASA/ ISO film speed dial to a lower
number (th is can be done underwater), by switching
to the manual mode, or by using a speedlight. For
example, with ASAIISO 400 fi lm , reset the dial to
ASA/ ISO 200 for a one-stop exposure inc rease or
reset the dial to ASA/ ISO 100 for a two-stop increase .
After taking the shot, do not forget to reset the
dial to its original position.
Best depth of water for
AEshooting
If the water is ve ry transparent , you can use the
Nikonos-V in the A mode down to 20m (656ft), but
most pictures will come out bluish because of the
light absorption of the water. Diving deeper wi ll not
ensure better photographs ; most subjects underwater
are no more than 10m (33ft) below the water's surface. For results, dive in shallow areas and do not
attempt to take pictures below a depth of 4 to 5m
(13 to 16ft). If you want to shoot below th is depth , use
a speedlight to restore the subject's natural colors
o
#2
~
~
Surface of ~ Camera
the water
~r .
y
0
#3
+
0
.
Subject
~
~
62
0
sunl iQht
#1
~
~.
0
#4
~
~<
/'\
....
~
Film choice
Using film with a speed of ASAIISO 400 or higher will
allow you to use faster shutter speeds, thereby minimizing the effects of camera movement as much as
possible.
When to use a speedlight
1) To restore natural colors to the subject
When shooting color fi lm without a speedlight, your
photos will come out bluish because of the selective
filtration and light absorption of water. Using a speedlight wil l allow you to capture the subject in all its
splendor.
2) To add illumination to the subject
When shooting a subject that is partially in darkness
(such as the inside of an underwater cave or a face
behind a diver's mask), use a speedlight to provide
more illumination.
Underwater photography and speedlight
guide numbers
Because of the light absorption of water, the guide
number of a speed light is lower underwater than it is
on land. Also, because the transpa rency of the water
varies from situation to situation, it is difficult to
calculate the aperture setting from the guide number.
As a rule of thumb, use the following formula to calculate the aperture from the guide number when using
a speedlight in fairly transparent water.
(1/2 to 1/3)Guide Number
Flash-to-subject Distance
f/stop
Poor vis ibil ity may reduce the maximum shooting
distance and guide number even further. For best
results, take the first shot at the recommended exposure, then take two additional shots with the lens at
the next two numerically smaller f-numbers.
To compensate for light loss in the A mode, use the
Sensor Unit SU-101 when using the SB-101 in the
automatic mode. Even though the maximum shooting
distance will be cut in half, you will still obtain the
correct exposure. When shooting manually, divide the
speedlight guide number by two. In the TTL mode, the
SB-103 or SB-102 automatically provides the correct
flash exposure.
63
- TIPS ON UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHY-confinuedFlash shooting tips
To prevent light from being scattered by suspended
particles and then being reflected directly back into
the lens, position the flash head as far away from the
lens as possible. If necessary, remove the flash from
its bracket and hold it off to the side and slightly above
the subject. If sand is kicked up from the seabed (see
Photo 1), wait until it settles before shooting (see
Photo 2). Finally, remember that water absorbs the
light from the speedlight , too.
Normal shooting
with speedlight
Floating part icles f)
of dirt or plankton
Off-camera
shooting
~. ""
. "
64
..
~~
~
Photo 2
ACCESSORIES----------Nikonos 5peedlight 58-103
A compact version of the field-proven SB-102, this
new direct-mounting unit has automatic through -thelens (TTL) flash exposure control (with the Nikenos -V)
as well as manual. Thanks to TTL automat ic flash
output control, the range of useable apertures widens
to make photography easier than ever.
Area of coverage is that of a 28mm lens; with the
Wide-Flash Adapter SW-103 (provided), area of
coverage increases to that of a 15 mm lens.
The SB-103 also features TTL multiple flash capability
through the optional Double Flash Bracket and
Double Sync Cord. Use two SB-103s or one SB-103
and one SB-102 and broaden your underwater photography capabilities
The SB -1 03 couples with the Nikonos-V 's viewfinder
ready-light to indicate when the flash has charged
and to warn if the camera's settings are outside the
flash coupling range.
In addition, when the camera 's shutter speed/mode
selector. dial is set at any setting except " M90"
(1/90sec.l, B (Bulb), or R (Rewind), the shutter speed
automatically switches to 1/90sec. when the speedlight is turned on. (See the chart on page 54 for more
information.)
65
-ACCESSORIES-confinued---.- - - - Nikonos SB-102
This powerful (GN 32) and versatile speedlight offers
TTL (with the Nikonos-V), Auto (useable with the optional Sensor Unit SU -1 01) and manual flash controls.
Like the SB -103, area of coverage is that of a 28mm
lens ; with the Wide-Flash Adapter SW-102 (provided),
area of coverage increases to that of a 15mm lens.
Viewfinder indicators and shutter synchronization
speed are the same as the SB-103. (See the chart on
page 54 for more information.)
The SB-102 has mul tiple flash capab ility (wi th or
without cord), through the built-in slave sensor or the
optional Double Flash Bracket and Double Sync Cord ,
and also features a target-light for close-up shooting.
The target -light, positioned in the center of the flash
head , shoots a beam of light at the subject to help you
aim the flash head at the subject.
V-Type Sync Cord
One end of the cord connects to the camera 's flash
socket; the other has a hot shoe which attaches to the
camera's accessory shoe. Thus , any electronic flash
unit with a standard ISO-type mounting foot , such as
Nikon Speedlights SB-18, SB-16B or SB-15, can be
used with the Nikonos-V for on-land flash photography.
By using TTL Remote Cord SC-23 in conjunction with
a V-Type Sync Cord, a bracket-mounting type flash
unit such as Nikon Speedlight SB-14 or SB-11 can be
66
used. TTL automatic flash exposure control is possi ble with these flash units, as is TTL multiple flash
photography.
l'l-A-Type Sync Cord SC-10
One end of this cord connects to the camera via the
flash unit adapter for the Nikonos IV-A; the other end
has a hot shoe wh ich attaches to the accessory shoe.
Thus, any electronic flash unit with a standard ISOtype mounting foot, such as Nikon Speedlights SB-18,
SB-16B, and SB-15, can be used with the Nikonos -V
for on-land flash photography. However, automatic
TTL and TTL multiple flash photography are not
possible.
Nikonos Interchangeable Lenses
Relationship between picture angle and focal length
35mm
80mm
67
- ACCESSORIES-confinued--------UW-Nikkor 15mm f/2.8N ,
UW-Nikkor 20mm f/2.8, and
UW-Nikkor 28mm f/3.5
Designed exclusively for underwater use, these
UW-Nikkor lenses can be used to a depth of 50mm
(160ft). The optics are corrected exclusively for
underwater aberrations and provide excellent underwater photographs. Also , Nikon Integrated Coating
(N IC) is applied to internal air-to-glass surfaces to
minimize ghost images and flare. For each lens, an
optional optical viewfinder is available for quick determination of field of view.
Lens construction : 9 elements in 7 groups
Picture angle :
78 0 (underwater)
Distance scale :
Graduated in meters and feet from 0.4 m
(1.3 It) to infinity (00 )
Aperture scale :
f/2.8 to f/22
Attachment size : 67mm (p 0.75mm)
Dimensions:
Approx. 70 mm dia. x 74 mm long
(overall)
Approx.350g
Weight:
Main Specifications
UW-Nikkor 28mm f13.5
UW·Nikkor 15mm 112.8N
Lens construction: 12 elements in 9 groups (including
watertight front cover glass)
Picture angle:
94 0 (underwater)
Distance scale:
Graduated in meters and feet from
0.3m (1 It) to infinity (00) with
secondary scales from 0.22 to 0.25m
(0.7 to 0.9ft)
Aperture scale:
fl2.8 to fl22
Attachment size:
87mm (p 0.75mm)
Dimensions:
Approx. 93mm dia x 90.6mm long
(overall)
Weight:
Approx.665g
=
68
UW·Nikkor 20mm 112.8
=
Lens construction : 6 elements in 5 groups
Picture angle:
59 0 (underwate r)
Distance scale:
Graduated in meters and fee t from 0.6m
(2ft) to infinity (00)
Aperture scale:
fl3.5 to f 122
Attachment size : 58 mm (p 0.75 mm)
Dimensions :
Approx. 62 mm dia. x 43.8 mm long
(overall)
Weight :
Approx.175g
=
UW-N ikkor 15mm fl 2.8N mounted on
ikonos-V with Optical Viewfinder DF-1 1
UW-N ikkor 20mm fl2 .8 mounted on
Nikonos -V with Optical Viewfinder DF- 12
UW-N ikkor 28mm fl 3.5
69
-ACCESSORIES-confinued--------W-Nikkor 35mm fl2.5 (Standard)
This, the standard lens for the Nikonos-V, can be used
both on land and underwater to a depth of 50m
(160ft)
NIC is applied to internal air-to-glass surfaces to
minimize ghost images and flare and ensure highresolution images. The optical elem ents are sealed
with a watertight front element and the lens barrel
features a special spring-loaded mount to ensure
proper alignment of the lens and camera body regardless of the water pressure. The threaded lens
front accepts a variety of accessories.
Main Specifications
Lens construction: 7 elements in 5 groups
(including watertight front
cove r glass)
43 ° 30' (underwater) and
Picture angle:
62° (on land)
Graduated in meters and feet
Distance scale:
from 0.8m (275ft) to infin ity (00)
f/2.5 to f/22
Aperture scale :
Attachment size: 58mm (p = 075mm)
Approx . 62mm dia. x
Dimensions:
39.5mm long (overall)
Approx. 160g
Weight:
70
Nikkor 80mm f/4
Designed for maximum performance both on land and
underwater, this medium telephoto lens can go to a
depth of 50m (160ft)
NIC is applied to internal ai r-to-glass SLfrfaces to
min imize ghost images and flare and produce highresolution images.
In addition, a plastic frame finder (for underwater use)
and optical viewfinder DF-10 (for on-land use) are
available to let you quickly determine the precise field
of view.
Main Specifications
Lens construction: 5 elements in 5 groups
(including watert ight front
cover glass)
Picture angle:
22°45' (underwater) and
30°20' (on land)
Graduated in meters and feet
Distance scale:
from 1 m (35ft) to infinity (00)
f/4 to f/22
Aperture scale:
Attachment size : 58mm (P =0.75mm)
Approx . 62mm dia . x
Dimensions :
66mm long (overall)
Weight:
Approx . 275g
71
~ACCESSORIES-continued--------­
LW-Nikkor 28mm f/2.8
Designed exclusively for use on land, this lens is
water-resistant, not waterproof, and cannot be submerged in water. Useful for regular snapshots and
landscapes, this lens is ideal for shooting under harsh
conditions, such as in rain or snow, or while skiing ,
mountain climbing, boating, etc.
All aberrations are well corrected, so pictures are
sharp and have high contrast , even at full aperture.
The convenient 52 mm attachment size allows you to
use a large variety of filters and other accessories
designed for Nikkor and Nikon Series E lenses. And
like those lenses, the LW-Nikkor is easy to operate.
Main Specifications
Lens construction : 5 elements in 5 groups
Picture angle:
74 0 (on land)
Distance scale:
Graduated in meters and feet
from 0.5m (1 .5ft) to infinity (00)
f/2.8 to f/22
Aperture scale:
Attachment size: 52mm (p = 075mm)
Approx. 68.5mm dia. x
Dimensions:
57mm long (overall)
Approx . 240g
Weight :
72
Nikonos Close-Up Outfit
Because of the incredible variety of aquatic life , half
the fun of underwater photography is in taking closeups. To simplify the process, use the Nikonos CloseUp Outfit. It consists of a single close-up attachment
lens, three fie ld frames , and a frame support bracket.
The close-up lens screws into the front of either the
2Bmm, 35mm, or BOmm lens (not the UW-Nikkor
15mm f/2.B or the LW-Nikkor 2Bmm 112.B) to magnify
the image. The three field frames indicate the area of
coverage for each of the three interchangeable
lenses , while the frame support bracket holds the
frames at exactly the right distance from the camera
for perfect focus. Just frame your subject within the
field frame and take a perfect close-up.
This outfit can also be used with the Nikonos IV-A
and III.
73
-ACCESSORIES-confinued--------Accessory Viewfinders
Accessory viewfinders are available for certain
Nikonos lenses to help you determine the field of view
rapidly.
Plastic frame finders let you frame moving subjects
quickly and accurately while your eye is removed
from the viewfinder.
Optical Viewfinder DF·11: For exclusive use with the
UW·Nikkor 15mm fl2.8N.
Optical Viewfinder DF·12: Designed for use with the
UW·Nikkor 20mm f /2.8. Can also be used with UW·
Nikkor 28mm f/3.5 lens via the supplied mounting
mask.
Optical Viewfinder for UW·Nikkor 28mm f/3.5:
Designed for use with the UW·Nikkor 28mm f/3.5.
Can also be used with the W·N ikko r 35 mm f/2.5 lens
via the supplied mounting mask .
Optical Viewfinder DF·10: For exclusive use on land
with Nikkor 80mm f/4. Distance scale ring for parallax
correction is provided .
Plastic Frame Finder for UW·Nikkor 28mm f/3.5:
For exclusive use with the UW·N ikkor 28 mm f/3.5.
Mou nts on the Nikonos accessory shoe.
74
Plastic Frame Finder for the W·Nikkor 35mm f/2.5
and the Nikkor 80mm fl4: For exclusive use under·
water with the W·Nikkor 35mm fl2.5 and the Nikkor
80mm f/4. Mounts on the Nikonos accessory shoe.
Nikon offers a full range of accessories for both underwater and on land picture-taking with the NikonosV
In addition to the lenses, flash units, optical viewfinde rs
(glass and plastic) , and close-up outfit already mentioned, the following accessories are available:
Lens Hood (also serves as a filter holder)
This combination lens hood/filter adapter for the
W-Nikkor 35 mm f/2.5 and the Nikkor 80 mm f/4 lenses
prevents stray light from entering the lens and protects the lens from damage.
The hood screws into the front of the lens; standard
52mm filters screw directly into the front of the hood.
Plastic Lens Protector
A special plastic lens protector is available for mounting on the front of the UW-Nikkor 28mm f/3.5 ,
W-Nikkor 35mm f/2.5, and Nikkor 80mm f/4 lenses.
The resiliency of this unit effectively protects the lens
against damage from bumps against solid underwater
objects.
Rubber Lens Hood
This unit is a combination lens protector and lens
hood for the W-Nikkor 35mm f12.5 lens. It slides over
the front of the lens and, protects it underwater.
75
-ACCESSORIES-confinued--------Lens Cases
Three types of leatherette lens cases are available
for the Nikonos-V's lenses. The Lens Case CL-51
accepts the Nikkor SOmm 114 lens ; the Lens Case
CL-50A accepts either the UW-Nikkor 2Smm f/ 3.5 or
the W-Nikkor 35mm f/2.5 lens. For the LW-Nikkor
2Smm f/2.S, both the Lens Case CL-30S and the
Flexible Lens Pouch No. 61 are available.
Camera Case
This special soft camera case of nylon and leatherette
accepts the Nikonos-V and either the UW-Nikkor
2Smm f/3.5 or the W-Nikkor 35mm f/2.5 lens with its
front lens cap.
5peedlight Case 55-101
This stylish tote bag has three cushioned compartments for the camera and all parts of the S8-103,
S8-102 or S8-101
Close-Up Outfit Case
All items in the Nikonos Close-Up Outfit, including the
field frames, fit into special contoured compartments
in this rectangular zippered case.
O-rings and Lubricant
Additional O-rings and lubricant are available to allow
you to maintain the camera in perfect condition.
76
TIPS ON BATTERY U S E - - - - - - - • Keep batteries away from infants and small children.
In case a battery is accidentally swallowed, call a
doctor immediately as the material inside the
batteries may be fatal.
• Battery power falls off in extremely cold temperatures and this may cause the camera to cease to
operate. In this situation, use new batteries and
protect the camera body from the cold. Note that
battery power wil l be recovered as soon as the
temperature becomes normal.
• When not using the camera for a long period of
time, take the batteries out and store them in a cool
(below 20°C), dry place. Should the batteries be
left in the battery chamber for a long period of time,
insufficient contact may occur due to battery contamination . Thus, it is good practice to periodically
clean the batteries and the contact section in the
battery chamber with a soft cloth. If the battery
chamber is stained by a leaking battery, remove
the batteries at once and clean the chamber.
• Never mix new and old batteries or batteries of
different makes.
• Always check battery power before every shooting
session. It is a good idea to have spare batteries on
hand during a lengthy shooting assignment.
• In normal use, a battery's lifespan is about one
year. The battery packed with this camera, however, is for test purposes only so its lifespan may
be shorter than usual.
• Never disassemble batteries or dispose of them
by burning.
77
SPECIFICATIONS----------
Type of camera: Electronical ly controlled 35mm
amphibious focal plane shutter camera
Construction: Body made of die-cast.aluminum
alloy and reinforced plastic; all joints sealed by
O-ring gaskets to ensure absolute watertightness;
camera able to withstand pressures up to 6kg/cm2
(85Ib/in 2) at a depth of 50m (160 ft)
Useable film: Standard 35mm cartridge-type film
Picture format : 24mmx36mm (standard 35mm
film format)
Lens mount: Nikonos bayonet mount
Lenses: W-Nikkor 35mm f/2.5 standard; four
additional lenses from super-wideangle to medium
telephoto available
Viewfinder: Inverted Galilean type Albada finder
built into camera for use with standard 35mm lens ;
bright frame lines show approx. 85 % fie ld of view
at infinity (00); 0.55X magnification; diopter 0.9; high
eyepoint allows viewing with eye 40mm away from
fi nder ; parallax correction marks provided ; accessory
optical viewf inders or frame finders available for
various lenses
Viewfinder display: LED shutter speed indications ;
LED over- and underexposure wa rning arrows;
thunderbolt -shaped ready-light
Shutter: Electronically controlled vertical-travel
metal focal-plane type
78
Shutter speeds: A (AUTO): Electronically controlled
step less speeds from 1/30 to 1/1000sec. ,
M (MANUAL): Quartz-control led speeds from 1/30
to 1/ 1000sec.; M90 (MECHANICAL) Mechanica l
spe-ed of 1/90sec .; B (BU LB): Mechanical setting
for long exposures ; R (REWIND): Setting used when
rewinding film
Shutter release: Button at top of anatomical grip;
initial pressure on button switches on meter, meter
remains on for 16sec. after finger is removed ;
shutter release lock incorporated
Exposure control: Two exposure control modes:
A (automatic aperture-priority) and M (manual)
modes provided ; M90 (mechanical 1/90sec.) and
B (Bulb) also provided
Exposure metering: Through-the-Iens (TTL)
stopped-down metering via two silicon photo diodes
(SPD) with center-weighted metering pattern; one
SPD used for TTL flash exposure control with
SB-103, SB-102 , and others
Metering range: EV 8 to EV 19 at ASA/ ISO 100 with
112.8 lens (trom 1/30sec. at f/2.8 to 1/1000sec. at
f/22)
Film speed range: ASAIISO 25 to 1600
Accessory shoe: Provided; built into top of
viewfinder
Flash synchronization : X-sync only via flash socket
in camera's base; synchronizes at 1/90sec. or
slower; with Nikonos 8peedlights 88-103, 88-102
and 88-101 , shutter speed automatically switches to
1/90sec. when shutter speed/ mode seiBctor dial is at
"A" or at 1/125 or higher in manual mode ; at 1/60sec.
or slower on manual, shutter fires at speed set
Flash ready-light: Thunderbolt-shaped LED in viewfinder lights when 88- 103, 88 -102, 88-101 , and
others have recycled ; blinks to warn of insuffic ient
light output, improper shutter speed/mode selector
dial setting, and film speed setting beyond the
useable range of A8AII80 25 to 400 for TTL flash
operation
Film advance lever: Wound in single stroke or
series of strokes; 144 0 winding angle; hinged for
compact storage; when shutter speed/mode selector
dial is at "A," shutter releases at approx. 1/1500sec.
unti l film frame counter reaches frame " 1" for fast
film loading
Frame counter: Additive type; advances one frame
with each complete stroke of fi lm advance lever
whether film is loaded or not ; resets when camera
back is opened
Film rewind: Manual via film rewind crank after
shutter speed/mode selector dial is set to "R"
Rewind) ; shutter release button is automatically
o cked
Camera back: Hinged type with camera back
locking pin; opened and locked via camera back
lock/release latch and camera back release button
Pressure plate: Hinged type, attached to camera
body; locking catch provided
Tripod socket : Located at base plate of camera
body; standard 1/4 inch (J I8)
Batteries: One 3V lith ium battery (CR 1/3 type),
two 1.55V silver-oxide batteries (8R-44 type) or
one 1.5 V alkaline-manganese battery (LR-44 type )
Battery check: Possible when shutter speed/mode
selector dial is at any sett ing except M90, 8 , or R,
and frame counter is at or beyond" 1" ; viewfinder
LED lights to indicate proper battery installation and
sufficient battery power when shutter release button
is depressed; if battery power is exhausted, shutter
can be released at 1/1500sec.
Dimensions: Approx. 146mm(W)x99mm(H)x
58mm(D) (without lens)
Weight: Approx. 700g (without lel1s)
Subject to change without notice.
79
No reproduction in any form of this manua l, in
whole or in pa rt (except for brief quotation in critical
articles or revi ews), may be made without written
authorisation from NIKON CORPORATION.
Nikon
NIKON CORPORATION
FUJI BLDG , 2-3, MARUNOUCHI 3-CHOME, CHIYODA-KU, TO KYO 100, JAPAN
PHONE: 81 -3-3214-5311 TELEX: NIKON J22601 FAX : 81-3-3201-5856
Printed in Japan 9&386-C12 (8215)
®
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