Dell Lifecycle Controller v2.40.40.40 User'

Dell Lifecycle Controller GUI
v2.40.40.40 User's Guide
Notes, cautions, and warnings
NOTE: A NOTE indicates important information that helps you make better use of your product.
CAUTION: A CAUTION indicates either potential damage to hardware or loss of data and tells you how to avoid the
problem.
WARNING: A WARNING indicates a potential for property damage, personal injury, or death.
© 2016 Dell Inc. All rights reserved. This product is protected by U.S. and international copyright and intellectual property laws. Dell and the Dell
logo are trademarks of Dell Inc. in the United States and/or other jurisdictions. All other marks and names mentioned herein may be trademarks of
their respective companies.
2016 - 10
Rev. A00
Contents
1 Introduction..................................................................................................................... 7
Why use Lifecycle Controller?............................................................................................................................................ 7
Benefits of using iDRAC with Lifecycle Controller.............................................................................................................. 7
What's new in this release?................................................................................................................................................ 8
Key features....................................................................................................................................................................... 8
Feature matrix.............................................................................................................................................................. 9
Licensable features in Lifecycle Controller........................................................................................................................ 10
Viewing iDRAC license information.................................................................................................................................... 11
Other documents you may need........................................................................................................................................11
Social Media Reference.............................................................................................................................................. 12
Accessing documents from Dell support site.................................................................................................................... 12
Contacting Dell................................................................................................................................................................. 12
2 Using Lifecycle Controller..............................................................................................14
Starting Lifecycle Controller..............................................................................................................................................14
Start messages during POST, causes, and resolutions................................................................................................14
Enabling Lifecycle Controller.......................................................................................................................................15
Disabling Lifecycle Controller...................................................................................................................................... 15
Canceling Lifecycle Controller actions.........................................................................................................................15
Using Lifecycle Controller for the first time.......................................................................................................................16
Setting up Lifecycle Controller using Initial Setup Wizard............................................................................................16
Setting up Lifecycle Controller from the home page...................................................................................................18
Lifecycle Controller features............................................................................................................................................. 19
3 Operating system deployment....................................................................................... 21
Installing an operating system........................................................................................................................................... 21
Using the optional RAID configuration..............................................................................................................................22
Configuring RAID using the operating system deployment wizard....................................................................................23
Unattended installation.....................................................................................................................................................23
UEFI Secure Boot.............................................................................................................................................................23
Driver access....................................................................................................................................................................24
Installing an operating system on iSCSI LUN and FCoE LUN............................................................................................24
Post reboot scenarios...................................................................................................................................................... 24
4 Monitor......................................................................................................................... 26
Hardware inventory view and export............................................................................................................................... 26
About view and export current inventory.........................................................................................................................26
About view and export factory-shipped inventory........................................................................................................... 26
Viewing hardware inventory — current or factory shipped..............................................................................................26
Exporting hardware inventory — current or factory shipped........................................................................................... 27
Exporting hardware inventory to a USB drive............................................................................................................ 28
Exporting hardware inventory to a network share......................................................................................................28
3
Viewing or exporting hardware inventory after part replacement.................................................................................... 29
Viewing or exporting current inventory after resetting Lifecycle Controller..................................................................... 29
Lifecycle Controller log.....................................................................................................................................................29
Viewing Lifecycle Log history..................................................................................................................................... 30
Exporting Lifecycle Log...............................................................................................................................................31
Adding a work note to the Lifecycle Log.................................................................................................................... 32
5 Firmware update........................................................................................................... 33
Firmware update methods............................................................................................................................................... 34
Version compatibility........................................................................................................................................................ 35
Updating firmware........................................................................................................................................................... 35
Selecting the type of update and update source........................................................................................................36
Using single component DUPs................................................................................................................................... 40
Selecting and applying updates.................................................................................................................................. 40
Firmware rollback............................................................................................................................................................. 40
Rolling back to previous firmware versions................................................................................................................. 41
6 Configure...................................................................................................................... 42
System control panel access options................................................................................................................................42
Controlling access to the front panel..........................................................................................................................42
Configuring iDRAC........................................................................................................................................................... 43
Configuring system time and date....................................................................................................................................43
Configuring vFlash SD card.............................................................................................................................................. 43
Enabling or disabling a vFlash SD card........................................................................................................................44
Initializing a vFlash SD card........................................................................................................................................ 44
Configuring RAID..............................................................................................................................................................44
Foreign configuration found....................................................................................................................................... 45
Viewing current RAID configuration........................................................................................................................... 45
Selecting RAID levels..................................................................................................................................................46
Selecting physical disks.............................................................................................................................................. 46
Setting virtual disk attributes......................................................................................................................................47
Viewing summary....................................................................................................................................................... 48
Configuring RAID using software RAID.............................................................................................................................48
Creating a secure virtual disk on a RAID controller........................................................................................................... 49
Key encryption................................................................................................................................................................. 50
Applying the local key on a RAID controller................................................................................................................ 50
Local key encryption mode...............................................................................................................................................50
Encrypting unsecure virtual disks................................................................................................................................51
Rekey controller with new local key............................................................................................................................ 51
Removing encryption and deleting data...................................................................................................................... 51
Breaking mirrored drives.................................................................................................................................................. 52
System setup — Advanced Hardware Configuration.......................................................................................................52
Modifying device settings.......................................................................................................................................... 55
Collect system inventory on restart................................................................................................................................. 55
Updating server inventory information.......................................................................................................................55
Configuring local FTP server............................................................................................................................................ 55
4
FTP authentication.................................................................................................................................................... 55
Requirements for a local FTP server.......................................................................................................................... 56
Copying repository to a local FTP server from the Dell Server Updates DVD.............................................................56
Using Dell Repository Manager to create the repository and copy it to a local FTP server........................................ 56
Accessing updates on a local FTP server................................................................................................................... 56
Configuring a local USB drive........................................................................................................................................... 57
Copying repository to a local USB drive from the Dell Server Updates DVD.............................................................. 57
Using Dell Repository Manager to create the repository and copy to a USB drive..................................................... 57
Configuring NFS and CIFS servers................................................................................................................................... 57
Configuring NFS servers............................................................................................................................................ 57
Configuring CIFS servers............................................................................................................................................57
Conditions while configuring HTTP server....................................................................................................................... 58
7 Maintain........................................................................................................................ 59
Platform restore...............................................................................................................................................................59
About server profile backup image............................................................................................................................. 59
Supported components..............................................................................................................................................60
Backup server profile........................................................................................................................................................ 61
Backing up the server profile...................................................................................................................................... 61
System or feature behavior during backup..................................................................................................................61
Export server profile.........................................................................................................................................................62
Exporting server profile to USB drive or network share............................................................................................. 62
Import server profile.........................................................................................................................................................62
Importing server profile from a vFlash SD card, network share, or USB drive............................................................ 63
Importing server profile after system board replacement...........................................................................................65
Import server license........................................................................................................................................................66
Importing server license from a network share or USB drive......................................................................................66
Part replacement configuration........................................................................................................................................ 67
Applying firmware and configuration updates to replaced parts................................................................................. 67
Supported devices..................................................................................................................................................... 68
Repurpose or retire system.............................................................................................................................................. 68
Deleting server information........................................................................................................................................ 68
Hardware diagnostics.......................................................................................................................................................69
Performing hardware diagnostics...............................................................................................................................69
SupportAssist Collection.................................................................................................................................................. 69
Exporting the SupportAssist Collection...................................................................................................................... 70
8 Easy-to-use system component names......................................................................... 72
9 Using the system setup and boot manager....................................................................75
Choosing the system boot mode......................................................................................................................................75
Entering System Setup.....................................................................................................................................................76
Responding to error messages................................................................................................................................... 76
Using the system setup navigation keys.....................................................................................................................76
System Setup options...................................................................................................................................................... 76
System Setup Main screen.........................................................................................................................................77
5
System BIOS screen...................................................................................................................................................77
System information screen......................................................................................................................................... 77
Memory Settings screen............................................................................................................................................ 78
Processor settings screen.......................................................................................................................................... 78
SATA Settings Screen................................................................................................................................................80
Boot Settings screen..................................................................................................................................................80
Integrated devices screen........................................................................................................................................... 81
Serial communications screen..................................................................................................................................... 81
System Profile Settings screen.................................................................................................................................. 82
System security screen.............................................................................................................................................. 83
Miscellaneous settings............................................................................................................................................... 84
System and setup password features.............................................................................................................................. 84
Assigning a system and/or setup password............................................................................................................... 84
Deleting or changing an existing system and/or setup password...............................................................................85
Using your system password to secure your system..................................................................................................86
Operating with a setup password enabled..................................................................................................................86
Entering the UEFI boot manager......................................................................................................................................86
Using the boot manager navigation keys.................................................................................................................... 87
Boot Manager screen................................................................................................................................................. 87
UEFI Boot menu......................................................................................................................................................... 87
Embedded systems management.................................................................................................................................... 88
iDRAC settings utility........................................................................................................................................................88
Entering the iDRAC settings utility............................................................................................................................. 88
10 Troubleshooting and frequently asked questions......................................................... 89
Error messages................................................................................................................................................................ 89
Frequently asked questions..............................................................................................................................................89
6
1
Introduction
Dell Lifecycle Controller provides advanced embedded systems management to perform systems management tasks such as
deploy, configure, update, maintain, and diagnose using a graphical user interface (GUI). It is delivered as part of integrated Dell
Remote Access Controller (iDRAC) out-of-band solution and embedded Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) applications in
the latest Dell servers. iDRAC works with the UEFI firmware to access and manage every aspect of the hardware, including
component and subsystem management that is beyond the traditional Baseboard Management Controller (BMC) capabilities.
NOTE: The UEFI environment provides the local console interface and the infrastructure for locally managed system
components.
Lifecycle Controller has the following components:
•
GUI:
– Is an embedded configuration utility that resides on an embedded flash memory card.
– Is similar to the BIOS utility that is started during the boot sequence, and can function in a pre-operating system
environment.
– Enables server and storage management tasks from an embedded environment throughout the life cycle of the server.
•
Remote Services (WS-Man) simplify end-to-end server life cycle management using the one-to-many method. It interfaces for
remote deployment integrated with Dell OpenManage Essentials and partner consoles. For more information about remote
services features, see Dell Lifecycle Controller Remote Services Quick Start Guide at dell.com/support/home.
Why use Lifecycle Controller?
The iDRAC with Lifecycle Controller technology in the server’s embedded management allows you to perform useful tasks such as
configuring BIOS and hardware settings, deploying operating systems, changing RAID settings, and saving hardware profiles.
Together, iDRAC and Lifecycle Controller provide a robust set of management functions that can be used throughout the entire
server lifecycle.
Dell Lifecycle Controller simplifies server lifecycle management — from provisioning, deployment, patching and updating to servicing
and user customization — both locally and remotely. Lifecycle Controller includes managed and persistent storage that embeds
systems management features and Operating System device drivers directly on the server. This eliminates the media-based system
management tools and utilities traditionally needed for systems management.
Benefits of using iDRAC with Lifecycle Controller
The benefits include:
•
Increased availability — Early notification of potential or actual failures that help prevent a server failure or reduce recovery time
after failure.
•
Improved productivity and lower Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) — Extending the reach of administrators to larger number of
distant servers can make the IT staff more productive while driving down operational costs such as travel.
•
Secure environment — By providing secure access to remote servers, administrators can perform critical management
functions while maintaining server and network security.
•
Enhanced embedded management — Lifecycle Controller provides deployment and simplified serviceability through the LC GUI
for local deployment, Remote Services (wsman) interfaces for remote deployment integrated with Dell OpenManage Essentials
and partner consoles, and Redfish UI.
7
For more information on iDRAC, see the Integrated Dell Remote Access Controller User’s Guide at dell.com/support/home. For
more information on wsman, see the Dell Lifecycle Controller GUI User’s Guide at delltechcenter.com/lc.
What's new in this release?
The updates supported in this release are:
•
Added support for the Windows 2016 and the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.8 operating systems.
•
Added support to export and import of Server Configuration Profiles using Redfish interface.
•
Added support for M4 GPU and M40 24GB GPU for PowerEdge C4130 and R730 servers.
•
Added support for enhanced Lifecycle Controller logging.
•
Added support for Emulex and Qlogic FC cards on PowerEdge R830 Platform.
•
Added support for Dual HBA330 on R730xd
•
Added support for x520 10Gbe dual port SFP+Mezz for PowerEdge C6320.
•
Added support for SATADOM flash memory module.
•
Added support for 2400 W Power Supply to PowerEdge FX2 Chassis.
•
Added support for 1100 W PSU on PowerEdge R830 platform.
•
Added support for 1100 W Mix Mode PSU (380 vdc).
•
Added firmware update support for the following PSUs:
– Flextronics 1600 W PSU
– PSU 1100 W -48v DC support on DSS 2500
– PSU 550 W HVDC PSU support on DSS 1500/1510
– 1100 W 240V DC and 220 V AC
– 13G Lite-On 750 W PSU
– 13G Lite-On 1100 W PSU
Key features
The key features of Lifecycle Controller are:
•
Provisioning — Entire preoperating system configuration from a unified interface.
•
Deploying — Simplified operating system installation with the embedded drivers on Lifecycle Controller. Unattended installation
mode is available for Microsoft Windows and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 operating systems.
•
Download drivers for operating system installation from downloads.dell.com.
•
Patching or updating — Operating system agnostic, and reduced maintenance downtime with direct access to updates from
downloads.dell.com. It simplifies firmware updates by maintaining a working version for rollback.
•
Servicing — Continuous availability of diagnostics without depending on a hard-disk drive. Ability to flash firmware automatically,
while replacing components such as a Dell PowerEdge storage controller, NIC, and power supply unit. Support for VLAN in
network configuration.
•
System erase — Deletes the server and storage-related data on selected components of a server. You can delete information
on BIOS, Lifecycle Controller data (LC logs, configuration database and rollback firmware versions), iDRAC settings, and storage
components on the server.
NOTE: You cannot delete the iDRAC license file.
•
Security — Support local key encryption.
•
Enhanced Security — Support for TLS 1.2, 1.1, and 1.0. To enhance security, default setting is TLS 1.1 and higher.
•
Restoring the server — Back up the server profile (including RAID configuration) and restore the server to a previously known
state. Importing a server license, firmware rollback, and restoring system configuration in case of system board replacement.
•
Hardware inventory — Provides information about the current and factory system configuration.
•
Lifecycle Controller logs for troubleshooting.
8
Feature matrix
The following table lists the Lifecycle Controller features supported on the 12th and 13th generation Dell PowerEdge servers.
Table 1. Feature Matrix
Features supported
Dell PowerEdge 12th generation servers
Dell PowerEdge 13th generation servers
Firmware update
Operating system
deployment
Device configuration
Diagnostics
Server profile backup and
export
Server profile import
Part replacement
Local updates
Driver packs
Hardware inventory
Remote services (through
WS-Man)
Unattended operating
system installation —
Microsoft Windows
Unattended operating
system installation — Red
Hat Enterprise Linux 7
Deploying an operating
system using UEFI Secure
Boot
Enhanced repurpose or
retire server
9
Dell PowerEdge 12th generation servers
Features supported
Dell PowerEdge 13th generation servers
NOTE: Specific
component selection
is not supported on
the Dell's 12th
generation of
PowerEdge servers.
For more
information on this
feature, see
Repurpose or retire
system.
NOTE: The following features are supported on the 12th generation PowerEdge servers only if iDRAC and Lifecycle
Controller versions are 2.10.10.10 or later:
•
Unattended operating system installation — Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7
•
Enhanced repurpose or retire server
Licensable features in Lifecycle Controller
Lifecycle Controller features are available based on the type of license (Basic Management with IPMI, iDRAC Express, iDRAC
Express for Blades, or iDRAC Enterprise) that you purchase. Only licensed features are available in the Lifecycle Controller GUI. For
more information about managing licenses, see the Integrated Dell Remote Access Controller User's Guide at dell.com/support/
home. The following table lists the Lifecycle Controller features available based on the license purchased.
Table 2. Licensable Features in Lifecycle Controller
Feature
Base Management with
IPMI
iDRAC Express (Rack
and Tower Servers)
iDRAC Express (Blade
Servers)
iDRAC Enterprise
Firmware Update
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Operating system
deployment
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Device configuration Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Diagnostics
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Server profile
backup and export
—
—
—
Yes
Server profile import Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Part replacement
—
Yes
Yes
Yes
Local updates
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Driver packs
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Hardware inventory
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Remote services
(through WS-MAN)
—
Yes
Yes
Yes
SupportAssist
Collection
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Repurpose or retire
system
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
10
Viewing iDRAC license information
After you open the Lifecycle Controller GUI page, you can view details about the iDRAC installed on a server. To view the iDRAC
license information:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
On any page of Lifecycle Controller, click About in the upper-right corner.
3.
On the About page, click License Information.
The following information is displayed on the iDRAC License Report page:
Table 3. : License Information
Device ID
Indicates the Service Tag of the server on which iDRAC is installed.
License
•
•
•
•
•
Entitlement ID — Indicates a unique ID provided by the manufacturer.
Status — Indicates the status of the installed license.
Description — Indicates the license details.
License Type — Indicates the type of license of the device. For example, Evaluation, Evaluation
Extension, or Perpetual.
Expiration — Indicates the date and time at which the license expires.
Other documents you may need
In addition to this guide, you can access the following guides available at dell.com/support/home.
•
The Lifecycle Controller Online Help provides detailed information about the fields available on the GUI and the descriptions for
the same. To view the online help information, click Help in the upper-right corner of all Lifecycle Controller pages, or press
<F1>.
•
The Lifecycle Controller Release Notes is available from within the product. To read through the Release Notes within Lifecycle
Controller, click About in the upper-right corner, and then click View Release Notes. A web version is also given to provide lastminute updates to the system or documentation or advanced technical reference material intended for experienced users or
technicians.
•
The Dell iDRAC Licensing White paper at Dell TechCenter. This document provides an overview of iDRAC digital licensing and
how it is different from iDRAC available in the Dell PowerEdge servers. It also provides an understanding on iDRAC Express and
Enterprise value offerings.
•
The Dell Lifecycle Controller Remote Services For Dell PowerEdge Servers Quick Start Guide provides information about using
remote services.
•
The Systems Management Overview Guide provides brief information about the various Dell software available to perform
systems management tasks.
•
The Integrated Dell Remote Access Controller (iDRAC) User’s Guide provides information about configuring and using an iDRAC
for rack, tower, and blade servers to remotely manage and monitor your system and its shared resources through a network.
•
The Dell Repository Manager User Guide provides information about creating customized bundles and repositories comprised of
Dell Update Packages (DUPs) for systems running supported Microsoft Windows operating systems.
•
The "Lifecycle Controller Supported Dell Systems and Operating Systems" section in the Dell Systems Software Support Matrix
provides the list of Dell systems and operating systems that you can deploy on target systems.
•
The Dell PowerEdge RAID Controller (PERC) 9 User's Guide provides specification and configuration-related information about
the PERC 9 controllers.
•
The Glossary provides information about the terms used in this document.
•
The Dell OpenManage Server Update Utility User's Guide provides information about using the DVD-based application for
identifying and applying updates to the system.
The following system documents are available to provide more information:
•
The safety instructions that came with your system provide important safety and regulatory information. For additional
regulatory information, see the Regulatory Compliance home page at dell.com/regulatory_compliance. Warranty information
may be included within this document or as a separate document.
11
•
The Rack Installation Instructions included with your rack solution describe how to install your system into a rack.
•
The Getting Started Guide provides an overview of system features, setting up your system, and technical specifications.
•
The Owner’s Manual provides information about system features and describes how to troubleshoot the system and install or
replace system components.
•
Lifecycle Controller Web Services Interface Guide–Windows and Linux.
Social Media Reference
To know more about the product, best practices, and information about Dell solutions and services, you can access the social media
platforms such as Dell TechCenter and YouTube. You can access blogs, forums, white papers, how-to videos, and so on from the
Lifecycle Controller wiki page at www.delltechcenter.com/lc.
For Lifecycle Controller documents and other related firmware documents, see Dell TechCenter.
Accessing documents from Dell support site
You can access the required documents in one of the following ways:
•
Using the following links:
– For all Enterprise Systems Management documents — Dell.com/SoftwareSecurityManuals
– For OpenManage documents — Dell.com/OpenManageManuals
– For Remote Enterprise Systems Management documents — Dell.com/esmmanuals
– For iDRAC and Lifecycle Controller documents — Dell.com/idracmanuals
– For OpenManage Connections Enterprise Systems Management documents — Dell.com/
OMConnectionsEnterpriseSystemsManagement
– For Serviceability Tools documents — Dell.com/ServiceabilityTools
– For Client Command Suite Systems Management documents — Dell.com/DellClientCommandSuiteManuals
•
From the Dell Support site:
a.
Go to Dell.com/Support/Home.
b.
Under Select a product section, click Software & Security.
c.
In the Software & Security group box, click the required link from the following:
– Enterprise Systems Management
– Remote Enterprise Systems Management
– Serviceability Tools
– Dell Client Command Suite
– Connections Client Systems Management
d.
•
To view a document, click the required product version.
Using search engines:
– Type the name and version of the document in the search box.
Contacting Dell
NOTE: If you do not have an active Internet connection, you can find contact information on your purchase invoice,
packing slip, bill, or Dell product catalog.
Dell provides several online and telephone-based support and service options. Availability varies by country and product, and some
services may not be available in your area. To contact Dell for sales, technical support, or customer service issues:
1.
Go to Dell.com/support.
2.
Select your support category.
3.
Verify your country or region in the Choose a Country/Region drop-down list at the bottom of the page.
12
4.
Select the appropriate service or support link based on your need.
13
2
Using Lifecycle Controller
This section provides information about starting, enabling, and disabling Lifecycle Controller. Before using Lifecycle Controller, make
sure that the network and iDRAC are configured. For more information, see the Integrated Dell Remote Access Controller User’s
Guide at dell.com/esmmanuals.
Starting Lifecycle Controller
To start Lifecycle Controller, restart the system and press <F10> during POST to select Lifecycle Controller from the list displayed.
When Lifecycle Controller is started for the first time, it displays the Settings wizard that allows you to configure the preferred
language and network settings.
NOTE: If the system does not start Lifecycle Controller, see Start messages during POST, causes and resolutions.
Related links
Setting up Lifecycle Controller using Initial Setup Wizard
Start messages during POST, causes, and resolutions
The table lists the messages that appear during system startup, and their appropriate cause and resolution.
Table 4. Start messages during POST, cause, and resolution
Message
Cause
Lifecycle Controller disabled
•
Resolution
Wait for a minute after resetting iDRAC to
The system is turned on or restarted
while iDRAC is initializing. This occurs if: restart the system, so that iDRAC initializes.
– The system is turned on
immediately after AC power is
connected to the system.
– The system is restarted immediately
after resetting iDRAC.
– A backup server profile operation or
restore server profile operation is in
progress.
Lifecycle Controller update required
•
Lifecycle Controller is manually disabled
Press <F2> during POST, select System
Setup → iDRAC Settings → Lifecycle
Controller → Enable.
•
The embedded device that has a
backup of the product may contain
corrupted data.
Ungracefully exits Lifecycle Controller
for three consecutive times if one of
the following conditions occur:
Enable Lifecycle Controller. For more
information, see Enabling Lifecycle
Controller.
•
– 3 consecutive unsuccessful
attempts to enter Lifecycle
Controller GUI.
– 3 consecutive unsuccessful
attempts to complete inventory
collection.
14
Message
Cause
Resolution
– 3 consecutive unsuccessful
attempts to perform tasks in
Automated Task applications.
Lifecycle Controller not available
Another process is using iDRAC.
Wait for 30 minutes for the current process
to complete, restart the system, and then
retry. You can use the iDRAC GUI to check
the job queue and the status.
Related links
Disabling Lifecycle Controller
Enabling Lifecycle Controller
To enable access to Lifecycle Controller during system startup:
1.
Press <F2> during POST.
The System Setup Main Menu page is displayed.
2.
Select iDRAC Settings.
3.
Select Lifecycle Controller.
4.
Under Lifecycle Controller, select Enabled.
5.
On the System Setup Main Menu page, select Finish to save the settings.
6.
Select Yes to restart the system.
The iDRAC Settings page is displayed.
Disabling Lifecycle Controller
To disable access to Lifecycle Controller at system startup:
1.
Press <F2> during POST.
The System Setup Main Menu page is displayed.
2.
Select iDRAC Settings.
The iDRAC Settings page is displayed.
3.
Select Lifecycle Controller.
4.
Under Lifecycle Controller, select Disabled.
5.
On the System Setup Main Menu page, select Finish to save the settings.
6.
Select Yes to restart the system.
Canceling Lifecycle Controller actions
If Lifecycle Controller causes the system to restart twice, cancel the Lifecycle Controller actions. However, if Lifecycle Controller
causes the system to restart the third time, the message Lifecycle Controller update required is displayed, you must
enable Lifecycle Controller. For more information on enabling Lifecycle Controller, see Enabling Lifecycle Controller.
CAUTION: This action cancels all tasks that are being performed by Lifecycle Controller. It is recommended that you
cancel the Lifecycle Controller actions only when absolutely necessary.
1.
Press <F2> during POST.
The System Setup Main Menu page is displayed.
2.
In the System Setup Main Menu page, select iDRAC Settings.
The iDRAC Settings page is displayed.
3.
Select Lifecycle Controller.
15
4.
Under Cancel Lifecycle Controller Actions, select Yes.
5.
On the System Setup Main Menu page, select Finish to save the settings.
6.
Select Yes to restart the system.
Using Lifecycle Controller for the first time
After you start Lifecycle Controller for the first time, by default the Initial Setup Wizard page is launched. Use this wizard to set up
the Language ,Keyboard Type, Network Settings, and iDRAC Network and Credentials.
Related links
Setting up Lifecycle Controller using Initial Setup Wizard
Updating firmware
Setting up Lifecycle Controller using Initial Setup Wizard
Use the Initial Setup Wizard to select the language and default keyboard settings, configure network settings, iDRAC network and
credential configuration, and view the summary of the settings.
Specifying language and keyboard type
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
On the left pane, click Settings.
3.
On the Settings pane, click Language and Keyboard. Use the up-and down-arrow keys to select options.
•
4.
From the Language drop-down menu, select the language.
• From the Keyboard Type drop-down menu, select the keyboard type.
Click Next to save the new settings.
Viewing Product Overview
Use this page to see the overview of Lifecycle Controller and iDRAC. Click Next to continue.
NOTE: For more information about the product, scan the QR code provided on this page by using a supported QR reader
or scanner and navigate to www.delltechcenter.com/idrac
The Lifecycle Controller Network Settings page is displayed.
Configuring Lifecycle Controller Network Settings
Use this page to configure network settings for a NIC.
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
On the left pane, click Settings.
3.
On the Settings pane, click Network Settings.
4.
From the NIC Card drop-down menu, select the NIC port that you want to configure.
NOTE: You can use only one NIC at a time to communicate with the network.
5.
From the IPV4 Network Settings→ IP Address Source drop-down menu, select one of the following options:
•
No Configuration — indicates that the NIC must not be configured.
•
DHCP — indicates that the NIC must be configured using an IP address from a DHCP server. If DHCP is selected, a DHCP
IP address is displayed on the Network Settings page.
•
6.
16
Static IP — indicates that the NIC must be configured using a static IP. Type the IP Address Properties — IP Address,
Subnet Mask, Default Gateway, and DNS Address. If you do not have this information, contact your network
administrator.
From the IPV6 Network Settings→ IP Address Source drop-down menu, select one of the following options:
•
No Configuration — indicates that the NIC must not be configured.
•
DHCPv6 — indicates that the NIC must be configured using an IP address from a DHCPv6 server. If DHCPv6 is selected,
a DHCPv6 IP address is displayed on the Network Settings page.
NOTE: While configuring DHCP server with IPv6, the configuration fails if you disable forwarding or advertising
options.
•
7.
Static IP — indicates that the NIC must be configured using a static IP. Type the IP Address Properties — IP Address,
Subnet Mask, Default Gateway, and DNS Address. If you do not have this information, contact your network
administrator.
Click Enabled and type the VLAN ID and Priority under Lifecycle Controller VLAN Settings to configure the VLAN settings of
a NIC.
You cannot configure the VLAN settlings of the following NICs:
8.
•
Emulex SeaHawk-2 (FH) PCIe Adapter
•
Emulex SeaHawk-2 (LP) PCIe Adapter
•
Emulex Vindicator-2 rNDC
•
Emulex Sea Stallion-2 Mezzanine Card
•
Emulex Pave Low-2 bNDC
•
Emulex SeaHawk-2 (FH) NIC Only PCIe Adapter
•
Emulex SeaHawk-2 (LP) NIC Only PCIe Adapter
•
Emulex Vindicator-2 NIC Only rNDC
•
Emulex Sea Stallion-2 NIC Only Mezzanine Card
• Emulex Pave Low-2 NIC Only bNDC
Click Next.
NOTE: If Lifecycle Controller settings are not correctly configured, an error message is displayed.
NOTE: If you are unable to connect to a network, verify the settings. For information about correct network
settings, contact your network administrator.
Configuring iDRAC Network and Credentials
Use this page to configure remote access parameters for iDRAC.
1.
From the IP Address Source menu, select one of the following options:
•
Static — indicates that the network must be configured by using a static IP. Type the IP Address Properties such as IP
Address, Subnet Mask, Default Gateway, DNS Address Source, and DNS Address. If you do not have this information,
contact your network administrator.
•
2.
3.
DHCP — Indicates that the network must be configured by using an IP address from a DHCP server. If DHCP is selected, a
DHCP IP address is displayed on the Network Settings page.
Enter the following credentials:
•
Account Username— The user name to access iDRAC network
•
Password— The password to access iDRAC network
• Confirm Password— The password to access iDRAC network
Click Next
Recommended characters in user names and passwords
This section provides details about the recommended characters while creating and using user names and passwords.
Use the following characters while creating user names and passwords:
NOTE: For recommended characters while accessing network shares, see Table 7. Recommended characters while
accessing network shares.
Table 5. Recommended characters for user names
Characters
Length
0-9
A-Z
a-z
1-16
17
Characters
Length
-!#$%&()*/;?@[\]^_`{|}~+<=>
Table 6. Recommended characters for passwords
Characters
Length
0-9
A-Z
a-z
'-!"#$%&()*,./:;?@[\]^_`{|}~+<=>
1-20
NOTE: You may be able to create user names and passwords that include other characters. However, to ensure
compatibility with all interfaces, Dell recommends using only the characters listed here.
NOTE: To improve security, it is recommended to use complex passwords that have 8 or more characters and include
lower-case alphabets, upper-case alphabets, numbers, and special characters. It is also recommended to regularly
change the passwords, if possible.
Table 7. Recommended characters while accessing network shares
Characters
Length
0-9
A-Z
a-z
-*/:?@\_|
User name: 1-16
Password: 1-20
Viewing summary of network settings
This page provides a summary of the Lifecycle Controller and iDRAC IP configurations. Verify the configurations and click Finish to
save the settings and exit from the Settings wizard.
Accessing help
Each Lifecycle Controller page has a help associated with it. Press <F1> or click Help (in the upper-right corner) to view the help
information about the features available on a page.
Viewing release notes
1.
To view the release notes, click About on any page of Lifecycle Controller.
NOTE: The About option is not available from the help pages.
2.
Click View Release Notes.
Setting up Lifecycle Controller from the home page
If you miss to make any changes in the Initial Setup Wizard, or if you want to make any configuration changes later, restart the
server, press F10 to launch Lifecycle Controller, and select Settings from the home page.
Specifying language and keyboard type
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
On the left pane, click Settings.
3.
On the Settings pane, click Language and Keyboard. Use the up-and down-arrow keys to select options.
•
4.
18
From the Language drop-down menu, select the language.
• From the Keyboard Type drop-down menu, select the keyboard type.
Click Next to save the new settings.
Configuring Lifecycle Controller Network Settings
Use this page to configure network settings for a NIC.
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
On the left pane, click Settings.
3.
On the Settings pane, click Network Settings.
4.
From the NIC Card drop-down menu, select the NIC port that you want to configure.
NOTE: You can use only one NIC at a time to communicate with the network.
5.
From the IPV4 Network Settings→ IP Address Source drop-down menu, select one of the following options:
•
No Configuration — indicates that the NIC must not be configured.
•
DHCP — indicates that the NIC must be configured using an IP address from a DHCP server. If DHCP is selected, a DHCP
IP address is displayed on the Network Settings page.
•
6.
Static IP — indicates that the NIC must be configured using a static IP. Type the IP Address Properties — IP Address,
Subnet Mask, Default Gateway, and DNS Address. If you do not have this information, contact your network
administrator.
From the IPV6 Network Settings→ IP Address Source drop-down menu, select one of the following options:
•
No Configuration — indicates that the NIC must not be configured.
•
DHCPv6 — indicates that the NIC must be configured using an IP address from a DHCPv6 server. If DHCPv6 is selected,
a DHCPv6 IP address is displayed on the Network Settings page.
NOTE: While configuring DHCP server with IPv6, the configuration fails if you disable forwarding or advertising
options.
•
7.
Static IP — indicates that the NIC must be configured using a static IP. Type the IP Address Properties — IP Address,
Subnet Mask, Default Gateway, and DNS Address. If you do not have this information, contact your network
administrator.
Click Enabled and type the VLAN ID and Priority under Lifecycle Controller VLAN Settings to configure the VLAN settings of
a NIC.
You cannot configure the VLAN settlings of the following NICs:
8.
•
Emulex SeaHawk-2 (FH) PCIe Adapter
•
Emulex SeaHawk-2 (LP) PCIe Adapter
•
Emulex Vindicator-2 rNDC
•
Emulex Sea Stallion-2 Mezzanine Card
•
Emulex Pave Low-2 bNDC
•
Emulex SeaHawk-2 (FH) NIC Only PCIe Adapter
•
Emulex SeaHawk-2 (LP) NIC Only PCIe Adapter
•
Emulex Vindicator-2 NIC Only rNDC
•
Emulex Sea Stallion-2 NIC Only Mezzanine Card
• Emulex Pave Low-2 NIC Only bNDC
Click Next.
NOTE: If Lifecycle Controller settings are not correctly configured, an error message is displayed.
NOTE: If you are unable to connect to a network, verify the settings. For information about correct network
settings, contact your network administrator.
Lifecycle Controller features
This section provides a brief description about the Lifecycle Controller features and helps you understand how to use the Lifecycle
Controller wizards most effectively. Each feature is a wizard in Lifecycle Controller, which supports the following features:
•
Home — Navigate back to the Home page.
19
•
Lifecycle Log — View and export the Lifecycle Controller log, and add a work note to the log.
•
Firmware Update — Apply updates or perform firmware rollback for the system components, and view the firmware version
available on a server.
•
Hardware Configuration — Configure system devices, view, export hardware inventory of a system, and repurpose or retire
system.
•
OS Deployment — Install an operating system in manual mode or unattended mode by using an 'answer' file.
•
Platform Restore — Backup, export, and restore system profile. Import iDRAC license from Lifecycle Controller GUI.
•
Hardware Diagnostics — Perform diagnostics to validate the memory, I/O devices, CPU, physical disks, and other peripherals.
•
Settings — Specify the language, keyboard layout, and network settings while using Lifecycle Controller.
•
System Setup — Configure settings for devices or components such as iDRAC, BIOS, RAID, and NIC.
Related links
Lifecycle Controller log
Firmware update
Firmware rollback
Hardware inventory view and export
Configure
Operating system deployment
Platform restore
Hardware diagnostics
Setting up Lifecycle Controller using Initial Setup Wizard
Using the system setup and boot manager
Import server license
Viewing iDRAC license information
Restoring server profile after system board replacement
20
3
Operating system deployment
The OS Deployment feature allows you to deploy standard and custom operating systems on the managed system. You can also
configure RAID before installing the operating system if it is not already configured.
Lifecycle Controller allows deploying the operating system using the following options:
•
Manual installation
•
Unattended installation. For more information on unattended installation, see Unattended installation.
•
UEFI Secure Boot. For more information on UEFI Secure Boot, see UEFI Secure Boot.
NOTE: Driver packs are available for the deployment of Windows and Linux operating systems supported by Lifecycle
Controller. Before deploying these operating systems, make sure that Lifecycle Controller is updated with the latest
driver packs. You can download the latest drivers pack from dell.com/support.
Installing an operating system
Before installing an operating system, make sure that the following prerequisites are met:
•
Optical DVD drive, or a virtual media (ISO image) is connected virtually to a server.
•
Software RAID or PowerEdge RAID controller is installed with the latest firmware, and at least two hard-disk drives are available
for creating the virtual disk. For information about the supported controllers and related firmware, see the operating system
documentation.
NOTE: You can install the operating system on media such as Dual SD or PCIe SSD. However, RAID configuration is
not supported on these media.
•
For installing an operating system in an unattended mode, make sure that you copy the required configuration file
(autounattend.xml for Windows and ks.cfg for RHEL 7) to a USB or network share.
NOTE: PERC S110 and S130 controllers support only SATA disk drives for which a minimum of two hard-disk drives are
required.
To install an operating system:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click OS Deployment.
3.
In the right pane, click Deploy OS and select one of the following:
•
Configure RAID First — Click to configure a RAID connected to the server. For information about configuring a RAID, see
Using the optional RAID configuration.
NOTE: Configuring RAID is optional if an already-connected virtual disk is present.
•
4.
Go Directly to OS Deployment — Click to launch the operating system deployment wizard and start installing an operating
system.
On the Select an Operating System page, select the following and click Next:
•
Boot Mode — Choose either UEFI or BIOS boot mode depending on the boot configuration of the system for OS
installation.
•
Secure Boot — Allows you to enable or disable the Secure Boot option. Click Enabled to secure the boot process by
checking if the drivers are signed with an acceptable digital signature. This option is available only for the UEFI boot mode.
For more information on Secure Boot, see UEFI Secure Boot.
21
NOTE: The Secure Boot option is available only if the Load Legacy Video Option ROM setting is set to disabled.
To disable the Load Legacy Video Option ROM setting, click System Setup → System BIOS Settings →
Miscellaneous Settings → Load Legacy Video Option ROM → Disabled.
•
Secure Boot Policy — Displays the current setting of the boot policy in the BIOS.
NOTE: You can change the Secure Boot Policy setting only in BIOS.
NOTE: The Secure Boot option is available on the 13th generation of PowerEdge servers, only if the BIOS of the
system supports the feature. The Secure Boot option is not available on the 12th generation of PowerEdge
servers.
•
5.
Available Operating Systems — Displays the list of operating systems depending on the boot mode selected. Select the
operating system to install on the server. The drivers packs for deploying the Windows and Linux operating systems
supported by Lifecycle Controller are available and extracted to a local repository (OEMDRV). These driver packs contain
the drivers required for installing an operating system.
NOTE: If you select VMware ESXi, Citrix XenServer, or select the Any Other Operating System option, make
sure that you have prepared the necessary drivers for your system. Drivers for VMware ESXi and Citrix
XenServer are not included in the driver packs. See dell.com/support for more information on operating system
installation images and drivers for these operating systems.
On the Select Installation Mode page, select any one of the following:
•
Unattended Install
•
Manual Install
NOTE: The Unattended Install option is enabled only if the operating system is compatible for an unattended
installation. If the operating system is not compatible, the option is grayed out. For more information on unattended
install mode, see Unattended Installation.
NOTE: A detailed procedure for installing an operating system using the unattended installation mode is provided in
the Unattended Installation of Operating Systems from Lifecycle Controller on Dell PowerEdge Servers white paper
at delltechcenter.com/lc.
6.
7.
On the Select Installation Mode page, select or enter the appropriate data to import the operating system configuration file
and then click Next. For more information about the fields available on the Select Installation Mode page, see the online help
by clicking Help in the upper-right corner of the Lifecycle Controller GUI.
On the Insert OS Media page, insert the appropriate operating system media and click Next.
Lifecycle Controller validates the media and displays an error message if the verification process is not successful. The
verification may be unsuccessful if:
8.
•
An incorrect operating system media is inserted.
•
An operating system media is damaged or corrupted.
• The optical drive in the system cannot read the media.
On the Reboot the System page, the summary of selections is displayed. Verify the selections and click Finish.
The system reboots and starts the operating system installation. For more information on the post-reboot scenarios, see Post
Reboot Scenarios.
Related links
UEFI Secure Boot
Unattended installation
Post reboot scenarios
Using the optional RAID configuration
Using the optional RAID configuration
When you install an operating system, you can:
•
Deploy the operating system without configuring RAID.
•
Configure the hard-disk drives using the optional RAID configuration wizard and deploy the operating system.
22
Alternatively, you can configure RAID through the RAID configuration page from the Hardware Configuration → Configuration
Wizards → RAID Configuration.
Configuring RAID using the operating system deployment wizard
To configure RAID using the OS Deployment page:
NOTE: If the system has a RAID controller, you can configure a virtual disk as the boot device. Create boot virtual disk
only from disk drives populated across 0–3 of the system. For slot information, see the system Owner’s Manual at
dell.com/support/home.
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click OS Deployment.
3.
On the OS Deployment page, click Deploy OS.
4.
On the Deploy OS page, click Configure RAID First, and then click Next.
The storage controllers available for configuration are displayed in the RAID Configuration page.
NOTE: Make sure that the selected controller is not in a non-RAID mode.
5.
Select a storage controller.
The RAID configuration options are displayed.
6.
Follow the instruction on the screen, complete the RAID setting tasks, and then click Finish.
The RAID configuration is applied to the virtual disks, and the Select an Operating System page is displayed. You can proceed
with installing the operating system. For information on installing the operating system, see Installing An Operating System.
Unattended installation
An unattended installation is a scripted operating system installation process that allows you to install an operating system using the
configuration file with minimal intervention. A scripted configuration file that contains the desired operating system setting
information is required for this option. The Unattended Install option is available only if the operating system that you have selected
for installation is compatible for an unattended installation. To deploy an operating system using the unattended mode, see Installing
An Operating System.
You can also see the Unattended Installation of Operating Systems from Lifecycle Controller on Dell PowerEdge Servers white
paper at Dell TechCenter.
NOTE: The unattended installation feature is supported only for Microsoft Windows and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7
operating systems. If you select an operating system other than Windows or Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, the Unattended
Install option is grayed out.
Related links
Installing an operating system
Using the optional RAID configuration
UEFI Secure Boot
The UEFI Secure Boot is a technology that secures the boot process by verifying if the drivers and operating system loaders are
signed by the key that is authorized by the firmware. When enabled, Secure Boot makes sure that:
•
BIOS boot option is disabled.
•
Only UEFI-based operating systems are supported for operating system deployment in all management applications.
•
Only authenticated EFI images and operating system loaders are started from UEFI firmware.
You can enable or disable the Secure Boot attribute locally or remotely using Dell management applications. Lifecycle Controller
supports deploying an operating system with the Secure Boot option only in the UEFI boot mode.
23
There are two BIOS attributes that are associated with Secure Boot:
•
Secure Boot — Displays if the Secure Boot is enabled or disabled.
•
Secure Boot Policy — Allows you to specify the policy or digital signature that BIOS uses to authenticate. The policy can be
classified as:
– Standard — BIOS uses the default set of certificates to validate the drivers and operating system loaders during the boot
process.
– Custom — BIOS uses the specific set of certificates that you can import or delete from the standard certificates to validate
the drivers and operating system loaders during the boot process.
NOTE: The Secure Boot Policy is read-only in Lifecycle Controller. You can change this setting only in the BIOS. To
enter BIOS system setup, press <F2> during POST.
NOTE: The Secure Boot feature is supported on the Dell 12th generation PowerEdge servers, only if BIOS on the system
supports this feature. To deploy an operating system using the Secure boot option, see Installing An Operating System.
NOTE: For more information on UEFI, go to uefi.org.
Related links
Installing an operating system
Using the optional RAID configuration
Driver access
Lifecycle Controller provides a local repository for drivers that are required for installing the operating system. Based on the
operating system you want to install, the OS Deployment wizard extracts these drivers and copies them to a temporary directory
(OEMDRV) on the managed system. These files are deleted after 18 hours or when you:
•
Refresh the AC power cycle, which resets the iDRAC.
•
Press <F2> select iDRAC Settings or Lifecycle Controller to cancel the Lifecycle Controller actions.
NOTE: Before installing an operating system, make sure that Lifecycle Controller is updated with the latest driver packs.
You can download the latest Lifecycle Controller drivers at dell.com/support.
Installing an operating system on iSCSI LUN and FCoE LUN
You can install an operating system on an iSCSI LUN and FCoE LUN by using the System Setup page. A detailed procedure for
installing is provided in the Deploying Operating System on iSCSI & FCoE LUN white paper at delltechcenter.com/lc.
Post reboot scenarios
The following table lists the post reboot scenarios, its user actions, and impact.
Table 8. Post reboot scenarios
Scenario
User Action and Impact
During POST, the system prompts you to press a key
to boot to the operating system installation media.
Press any key to begin the operating system installation; else, the system
boots to the hard-disk drive and not the operating system installation
media.
Operating system installation is interrupted and the
system restarts before the installation is completed.
The system prompts you to press a key to boot from the operating
system installation media.
Cancel operating system installation.
Press <F10>.
NOTE: If you press <F10> during the installation process or a
restart, the drivers provided by the operating system deployment
wizard are removed.
24
Scenario
User Action and Impact
During the 18-hour period when drivers are extracted
to a temporary location after the operating system is
installed, you cannot update the component firmware
using a DUP. If you attempt a DUP through the
operating system during this time period, the DUP
displays a message that another session is active.
Lifecycle Controller does not allow DUP after the operating system
installation. However, if you disconnect the power supply to the managed
system, the OEMDRV directory is erased.
Related links
Installing an operating system
Using the optional RAID configuration
25
4
Monitor
Using Lifecycle Controller, you can monitor the hardware inventory and events of a server throughout its life cycle.
Hardware inventory view and export
Lifecycle Controller provides the following wizards to manage the system inventory:
•
View Current Inventory
•
Export Current Inventory
•
View Factory Shipped Inventory
•
Export Factory Shipped Inventory
•
Collect System Inventory on Restart
About view and export current inventory
You can view information about the currently installed hardware components that are internal to the system chassis and the
configuration for each component. All the currently installed hardware components such as fans, PCI devices, NICs, DIMMs, PSU,
and their properties and values are displayed. You can export this information to a compressed XML file and then to a USB drive or
network share. The XML file is saved in the following format: HardwareInventory_<servicetag>_<timestamp>.xml.
For more information about the easy-to-use names of the hardware components, see Easy-To-Use System Component Names.
NOTE: Incorrect inventory data is displayed or exported after performing a system erase. For viewing the correct
inventory data, see Viewing and Exporting Current Inventory After Resetting Lifecycle Controller.
Related links
Viewing hardware inventory — current or factory shipped
Exporting hardware inventory — current or factory shipped
Viewing or exporting hardware inventory after part replacement
About view and export factory-shipped inventory
You can view information about the factory-installed hardware components and their configuration. You can export this information
in an XML format to a USB drive or a network share. The XML file is saved in this format:
FactoryShippedHWInventory_<servicetag>.xml.
For more information about the easy-to-use names of the hardware components, see Easy-to-use System Component Names.
NOTE: View and export factory-shipped inventory feature is grayed out if the Repurpose or Retire System option is
selected, which permanently deletes the factory-shipped inventory.
Related links
Viewing hardware inventory — current or factory shipped
Exporting hardware inventory — current or factory shipped
Viewing hardware inventory — current or factory shipped
NOTE: For factory-shipped inventory, the status of few parameters for the installed components is displayed as
Unknown.
26
To view the currently installed or factory-installed hardware components and their configuration details:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Hardware Configuration.
3.
In the right pane, click Hardware Inventory.
4.
To view the current- or factory-shipped inventory, click View Current Inventory or View Factory Shipped Inventory
respectively.
A list of hardware components are displayed on the View Current Hardware Inventory page.
NOTE: Lifecycle Controller does not provide the driver version for the RAID controller. To view the driver version,
use iDRAC, OpenManage Server Administrator Storage Service, or any other third-party storage management
application.
5.
Select from the Filter by Hardware Component drop-down menu to filter the components. The Fully Qualified Device
Descriptor (FQDD) property of a component is also listed along with other properties of a hardware component.
NOTE: You can also filter data by a FQDD property of the hardware component. By default, the FQDD Device
Description property value is displayed for every hardware component listed.
Related links
About view and export current inventory
About view and export factory-shipped inventory
Exporting hardware inventory — current or factory shipped
Before exporting the currently installed or factory-installed hardware components and their configuration, make sure that the
following prerequisites are met:
•
If you use the network share (shared folder), configure the Network Settings. For more information, see Configuring Network
Settings For A NIC.
•
If you are storing the exported file on a USB drive, make sure that a USB drive is connected to the managed system.
To export the current or factory-shipped hardware inventory:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Hardware Configuration.
3.
In the right pane, click Hardware Inventory.
4.
Click Export Current Inventory or Export Factory Shipped Hardware Inventory.
5.
If you are exporting the inventory to a local USB drive, select USB Drive. If you are exporting the file to a shared folder on a
network, select Network Share.
For more information, see Exporting Hardware Inventory To A USB Drive or Exporting Hardware Inventory To A Network
Share.
To verify that using Lifecycle Controller, you can connect to the IP address, click Test Network Connection. Using Lifecycle
Controller you can ping the Gateway IP, DNS server IP, and the host IP.
NOTE: If the domain name is not resolved in the DNS, then you cannot use Lifecycle Controller to ping the domain
name and view the IP address. Make sure that the DNS issue is resolved, and then retry.
6.
Click Finish to export the inventory.
The HardwareInventory _<servicetag>_<timestamp>.xml or FactoryShippedHWInventory_<servicetag>.xml file is copied
to the specified location. For the current inventory, the time stamp is in the format yyyy-mm-ddthh:mm:ss, where ‘t’ indicates
time.
NOTE: For factory-shipped inventory, the status of few parameters for the installed components is displayed as
Unknown.
27
Related links
About view and export current inventory
About view and export factory-shipped inventory
Exporting hardware inventory to a USB drive
Exporting hardware inventory to a network share
Exporting hardware inventory to a USB drive
To export hardware-related inventory to a USB drive:
1.
From the Select Device drop-down menu, select a USB drive.
2.
In the File Path box, type a valid directory or subdirectory path on the device. For example, 2015\Nov. If the path is not
provided, the file is stored in the root location of the device.
NOTE: Lifecycle Controller allows 256 characters in a path that includes the file name and file extension. For
example, if 56 characters are used for file name and extension, only 200 characters can be used for the path.
Lifecycle Controller does not support these characters -:, *,?,”,<,>,|,#,%,^, and SPACE.
Exporting hardware inventory to a network share
To export to a network share, select CIFS or NFS and type the required details.
Related links
CIFS
NFS
CIFS
For CIFS, type the following details:
•
Share Name — Type the server IP or host name followed by the root of the network share. Examples: \
\192.168.0.120\sharename or \\hostname\sharename.
•
Domain and User Name — Type the domain and user name required to log on to the network share. If there is no domain, type
the user name.
•
Password — Type the correct password.
•
File Path — Type the sub-directories, if any. For example, 2015\Nov.
NOTE: The following characters are supported for user name and password:
– Digits (0–9)
– Alphabets (a-z, A-Z)
– Hyphen (-)
NOTE: Lifecycle Controller allows 256 characters in a path that includes the file name and file extension. For
example, if 56 characters are used for file name and extension, only 200 characters can be used for the path.
Lifecycle Controller does not support these characters -:, *,?,”,<,>,|,#,%,^, and SPACE.
NFS
For NFS, type the following details:
•
Share Name — Type the server IP or hostname followed by the root of the network share. Examples: \
\192.168.0.120\sharename or \\hostname\sharename
•
File Path — Type the subdirectories path, if any. For example, 2015\Nov.
The examples provided for Share Name and File Path are in the correct format even though it does not follow the mount behavior
for NFS shares.
NOTE: Lifecycle Controller allows 256 characters in a path that includes the file name and file extension. For example, if
56 characters are used for file name and extension, only 200 characters can be used for the path. Lifecycle Controller
does not support these characters -:, *,?,”,<,>,|,#,%,^, and SPACE.
28
Viewing or exporting hardware inventory after part replacement
To view or export the hardware inventory after part replacement:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Hardware Configuration.
3.
In the right pane, click Hardware Inventory.
4.
Click View Current Inventory.
Lifecycle Controller displays the old hardware inventory.
5.
Restart the server and relaunch Lifecycle Controller.
6.
On the Hardware Inventory page, click View Current Hardware Inventory to view the latest inventory, or click Export
Current Inventory to export the latest inventory to an external location.
NOTE: For more information about the part replacement feature, see the Part Replacement in Lifecycle Controller
white paper at delltechcenter.com/lc.
Related links
About view and export current inventory
Viewing or exporting current inventory after resetting Lifecycle
Controller
NOTE: The system automatically turns off after you select the Repurpose or Retire System option.
To view or export the current hardware inventory data after resetting Lifecycle Controller:
1.
Turn on the system and wait for a few minutes for iDRAC to start functioning.
2.
Press <F10> during POST to start Lifecycle Controller and the system inventory is collected as Collect System Inventory On
Restart (CSIOR) is enabled by default.
3.
After Lifecycle Controller starts, click Hardware Configuration → View Current Hardware Inventory or Export Current
Hardware Inventory to view or export current hardware inventory respectively. If the following message is displayed, click No,
reboot the system, and then retry.
Hardware change is detected on the system. The current hardware inventory does not
contain the latest updates as the hardware inventory update is in progress. To view or
export the latest hardware inventory, relaunch Lifecycle Controller and retry. Do you
want to continue with the old current hardware inventory information?
Related links
Viewing hardware inventory — current or factory shipped
Exporting hardware inventory — current or factory shipped
Lifecycle Controller log
Lifecycle Controller Log provides a record of past activities on a managed system. Using the Lifecycle Log wizard, you can view
and export life cycle log, and add a work note to a log history. The log contains the following:
•
Firmware update history based on device, version, and date and time.
•
Events based on category, severity, and date and time.
•
User comments history based on date and time.
NOTE: On PowerEdge FM120x4 servers, the Lifecycle Log may display CPU not detected after the system profile is
changed.
29
NOTE: If you initiate configuration jobs using RACADM CLI or iDRAC web interface, the Lifecycle log displays
information about the user, interface used, and the IP address of the system from which you initiate the job.
Related links
Viewing Lifecycle Log history
Exporting Lifecycle Log
Adding a work note to the Lifecycle Log
Viewing Lifecycle Log history
Use the Lifecycle Log feature to view:
•
System event logs
•
History of firmware updates
NOTE: The details of the configuration changes are not displayed.
•
User work notes
You can use the filtering and sorting options to view the Lifecycle Log.
NOTE: As the system events are generated by various systems management tools, you may not view the events in log
immediately after they were logged.
To view the Lifecycle Log history and use the filtering options:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Lifecycle Log.
3.
In the right pane, click View Lifecycle Log History.
The following details are displayed:
•
No. — The serial number of the event.
•
Category — The category to which the events belong. The available categories are:
– All — Events related to all categories are listed.
– System Health — Events related to the installed hardware such as fan, PSUs, NIC/LOM/CNA link, BIOS errors, and so
on.
– Storage — Events related to the external or internal storage components such as storage controller, enclosure, HDDs,
and software RAID.
– Configuration — Events related to the hardware and software changes such as addition or removal of hardware in the
system, configuration changes made using Lifecycle Controller or system management tools.
– Audit — Events related to a user login, intrusion, licenses, and so on.
– Updates — Events related to updates or rollback of firmware and drivers.
– Work Notes — Events logged by you.
NOTE: These options are available in the Filter by Category drop-down menu. Select the category to filter
the data depending on the category option selected.
•
Severity
– Critical — Indicates the events that are business-critical.
– Informational — Indicates the events that are generated only for information purpose.
•
Message ID — Each event is represented with a unique Message ID. For example, SWC0001.
•
Description — A brief description about the event. For example, Dell OS Drivers Pack, v.6.4.0.14, X14
was detected.
NOTE: If you initiate configuration jobs using RACADM CLI or iDRAC web interface, the Lifecycle log description
displays the information about the user, interface used, and the IP address of the system from which you initiate
the job.
•
30
Date and Time — Indicates the date and time when an event occurred.
Exporting Lifecycle Log
Use the Export Lifecycle Log feature to export the Lifecycle Log information to a compressed file (.gz format) that has log files in
an .xml file. You can save the XML file in a USB drive or on a network share. For more information about the schema, see
en.community.dell.com/techcenter/extras/m/white_papers/20270305. Before exporting the Lifecycle Log, make sure that the
following prerequisites are met:
•
To export the file to a USB drive, make sure that a USB drive is connected to the managed server.
•
To export the file to a network share (shared folder), set the correct network settings. For more information, see Configuring
Network Settings For A NIC.
NOTE: As the system events are generated by various systems management tools, you may not view the events in
log immediately after they were logged.
NOTE: The log data is exported to a compressed file (.gz format) only if iDRAC version 1.50.50 or later is installed.
Else, the data is exported as an .xml file.
To export the Lifecycle Log:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Lifecycle Log.
3.
In the right pane, click Export Lifecycle Log.
4.
Select either USB Drive or Network Share.
For more information, see Exporting Lifecycle Log To A USB Drive or Exporting Lifecycle Log To A Network Share.
When you select Network Share, to verify connection, click Test Network Connection. Lifecycle Controller pings the Gateway
IP, DNS server IP, and host IP.
NOTE: Lifecycle Controller cannot ping the domain name and cannot display the IP address if the DNS is not able to
resolve the domain name. Make sure that the issue with DNS is resolved and retry.
5.
Click Finish.
The Lifecycle Log is exported to the specified location.
Related links
Exporting hardware inventory to a USB drive
Exporting hardware inventory to a network share
Exporting Lifecycle Log to a USB drive
To export the Lifecycle Log to a USB drive:
1.
From the Select Device drop-down menu, select a USB drive.
2.
In the File path box, type a valid directory or subdirectory path on the device. If the path is not provided, the file is stored in the
root location of the device.
For example, 2014\Nov.
NOTE: Lifecycle Controller allows 256 characters in a path that includes the file name and file extension. For example, if
56 characters are used for file name and extension, only 200 characters can be used for the path. Lifecycle Controller
does not support these characters -:, *,?,",<,>,|,#,%,^, and SPACE.
Exporting Lifecycle Log to a network share
To export to a network share, select CIFS or NFS and type the required details.
CIFS
For CIFS, type the following details:
•
Share Name — Type the server IP or host name followed by the root of the network share. Examples: \
\192.168.0.120\sharename or \\hostname\sharename.
•
Domain and User Name — Type the domain and user name required to log on to the network share. If there is no domain, type
the user name.
•
Password — Type the correct password.
31
•
File Path — Type the sub-directories, if any. For example, 2015\Nov.
NOTE: The following characters are supported for user name and password:
– Digits (0–9)
– Alphabets (a-z, A-Z)
– Hyphen (-)
NOTE: Lifecycle Controller allows 256 characters in a path that includes the file name and file extension. For
example, if 56 characters are used for file name and extension, only 200 characters can be used for the path.
Lifecycle Controller does not support these characters -:, *,?,”,<,>,|,#,%,^, and SPACE.
NFS
For NFS, type the following details:
•
Share Name — Type the server IP or hostname followed by the root of the network share. Examples: \
\192.168.0.120\sharename or \\hostname\sharename
•
File Path — Type the subdirectories path, if any. For example, 2015\Nov.
The examples provided for Share Name and File Path are in the correct format even though it does not follow the mount behavior
for NFS shares.
NOTE: Lifecycle Controller allows 256 characters in a path that includes the file name and file extension. For example, if
56 characters are used for file name and extension, only 200 characters can be used for the path. Lifecycle Controller
does not support these characters -:, *,?,”,<,>,|,#,%,^, and SPACE.
Adding a work note to the Lifecycle Log
You can add a work note to the Lifecycle Log to record comments for your reference. You can enter comments such as scheduled
downtime or changes made by administrators who work in different shifts for later reference.
NOTE: You can type a maximum of 50 characters in the Lifecycle Log field. The special characters such as <, >, &, and
% are not supported.
To add a work note:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Lifecycle Log.
3.
In the right pane, click Add a work note to Lifecycle Log.
4.
In the Enter a work note field, enter the comments and click OK.
32
5
Firmware update
Using Lifecycle Controller, the system can be updated using the repositories accessible through FTP or on a locally attached USB
drive, DVD, or network share. Use the Firmware Update page to:
•
View the current version of the installed applications and firmware.
•
View a list of available updates.
•
Select the required updates, downloads (automatic), and then apply the updates to the following components listed in the table.
NOTE: When you update the firmware on a BCM57xx and 57xxx adapters, you will notice that the cards are displayed as
QLogic. This is due to the acquisition of Broadcom NetXtreme II by QLogic.
The following table lists the components that support the Firmware Update feature.
NOTE: When multiple firmware updates are applied through out-of-band methods or using the Lifecycle Controller GUI,
the updates are ordered in the most efficient possible manner to reduce unnecessary restarting of a system.
Table 9. Firmware Update — Supported Components
Component Name
Firmware Rollback
Out-of-band — System In-band — System
Supported? (Yes or No) Restart Required?
Restart Required?
Lifecycle Controller
GUI — Restart
Required?
Diagnostics
No
No
No
No
OS Driver Pack
No
No
No
No
BIOS
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
RAID Controller
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Backplanes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Enclosures
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
NIC
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
iDRAC
Yes
No
*No
Yes
Power Supply Unit
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
CPLD
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
FC Cards
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
HHHL NVMe adapter
(13th generation
PowerEdge servers only)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
NVMe PCIe SSD drives
(13th generation
PowerEdge servers only)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
CMC (on PowerEdge
FX2 servers)
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
OS Collector
No
No
No
No
* Indicates that though a system restart is not required, iDRAC must be restarted to apply the updates. iDRAC communication and
monitoring will temporarily be interrupted.
33
Related links
Firmware update methods
Version compatibility
Updating firmware
Firmware update methods
The following table lists the various locations or media and methods to perform the updates:
NOTE: If the FTP server or network share is used for updates, configure the network card using the Settings wizard
before accessing the updates.
Table 10. Firmware Update Methods
Location
Methods
Media
Methods
Location
FTP
•
•
Non-proxy (Internal or Service Provider)
Proxy (Internal or Service Provider)
Local Drive
•
•
Dell Server Update Utility DVD
USB Drive
•
•
Virtual Console (Mapped on Client)
Attached Locally
•
•
HTTP
Network Share
– CIFS
– NFS
NOTE: If you select a local drive for updates, you will not get an option to browse the device you have selected. You
must know the name or path of the filename before selecting the local drive.
The following table lists the supported interfaces, image-file types, and whether Lifecycle Controller must be in enabled state for the
firmware to be updated:
Table 11. Image file types and dependencies
.D7 Image
iDRAC DUP
Interface
Supported
Requires LC
enabled
Supported
Requires LC enabled
BMCFW64.exe utility
Yes
No
No
N/A
Racadm FWUpdate
(old)
Yes
No
No
N/A
Racadm Update (new)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
iDRAC UI
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
WSMAN
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
In-band OS DUP
No
N/A
Yes
No
34
Version compatibility
The version compatibility feature enables you to update the component firmware versions that are compatible with system
components. In case of compatibility issues, Lifecycle Controller displays upgrade or downgrade error messages during the update.
Updating firmware
You can update to the latest version of Lifecycle Controller using the Firmware Update wizard. It is recommended that you run the
Firmware Update wizard regularly to access the latest updates. You can update the component firmware by either using update
repositories or individual DUPs (single component DUP).
NOTE: The firmware for iDRAC and Lifecycle Controller is combined in a single package.
NOTE: Make sure that the file name for the single component DUPs does not have any blank space.
NOTE: If Collect System Inventory On Restart (CSIOR) is disabled while performing an update, Lifecycle Controller
automatically updates the system inventory.
NOTE: Both 32–bit and 64–bit DUPs and catalog are supported. If both the 32-bit and 64-bit DUPs are available in a
catalog, the 64-bit DUP is preferred for the firmware update. 32-bit DUP is used for firmware update only when 64-bit
DUP is not available in a catalog.
NOTE: When you check for updates, all compatible versions are listed.Before you install the update, ensure that you
select the latest available version and also ensure that it is newer than the version currently installed.If you want to
control the version that iDRAC detects, create a custom repository using Dell Repository Manager (DRM) and configure
iDRAC to use that repository to check for updates.
On PowerEdge FX2 servers, you can update the Chassis Management Controller (CMC) firmware using Lifecycle Controller. You
can update CMC only if the Server Mode is set to Monitor and Configure in CMC and Communication Permissions is set to CMC
firmware update in iDRAC.
To enable these settings,
1.
On the CMC GUI, click Setup → Server Mode → Monitor and Configure
2.
On the iDRAC GUI, click iDRAC Settings → Communication Permission → CMC firmware update
To update the firmware:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Firmware Update.
3.
In the right pane, click Launch Firmware Update.
4.
Select any one of these update repositories: FTP Server, Local Drive (CD, DVD, or USB), or Network Share (CIFS, NFS, or
HTTP), and click Next.
The Enter Access Details page is displayed.
NOTE: If you select FTP Server, you can verify the connection by clicking Test Network Connection. If the domain
name is provided, then the server IP address and the domain name is displayed. If proxy IP is provided, then the
proxy IP along with the server IP is displayed.
NOTE: If you select Network Share (CIFS, NFS, or HTTP), you can verify the connection by clicking Test Network
Connection. By default, Lifecycle Controller pings the host and proxy IP.
5.
Type or select the appropriate data.
6.
Click Next.
The Select Updates page is displayed with the catalog file, catalog version, and component names for which the updates are
available.
7.
Select the components that require an update, and then click Apply.
The update process is initiated and the firmware update is completed. After restart, the system is ready to use.
35
NOTE: The system does not restart if operating system driver packs, OS collector tool, or hardware diagnostics are
updated.
NOTE: When applying more than one update, the system may restart between updates. In this case, Lifecycle
Controller restarts the server and automatically continues the update process.
NOTE: iDRAC resets while updating iDRAC. If the iDRAC firmware update is interrupted for any reason, wait for up
to 30 minutes before you attempt another firmware update.
NOTE: After the CPLD firmware is updated on the modular servers, on the View Current Versions page, under
Firmware Update, the firmware update date is displayed as 2000-01-01, regardless of the actual update date. The
updated date and time are displayed based on the time zone that is configured on the server.
NOTE: On a Dell PowerEdge server, if you use Lifecycle Controller to update the Intel Network Card firmware from
version 15.0.xx to 16.5.xx or vice versa, reboot the server to view the updated firmware.
NOTE: If you update the Intel Network Card firmware from version 14.5.x to 16.5.xx or vice versa on a Dell
PowerEdge server by using Lifecycle Controller, the Firmware Rollback page may display the firmware version as
15.0.xx instead of 14.5.x . However, the Firmware Rollback page displays the version 14.5.x if you update the
firmware by using the Intel Network firmware DUPs on the OS.
Related links
Firmware update
Firmware update methods
Version compatibility
Selecting the type of update and update source
Selecting and applying updates
Updating or rolling back devices that affect Trusted Platform Module settings
Selecting the type of update and update source
To perform the updates, you can download single component DUPs or repository (Catalog.xml) using the Firmware Update wizard
to one of the following:
NOTE: The Catalog.xml file contains the individual server bundles. Each bundle consists of all the DUP information (md5
security key, date and time, path, Release ID, version, and so on).
•
FTP server — Dell FTP Server, Local FTP, or FTP server using a proxy server.
NOTE: Make sure that the repository (catalog file) and DUPs are copied to the root folder of the source
•
Local Drive — Use a USB drive, Dell Server Updates DVD, or Lifecycle Controller OS Driver Packs DVD
•
Network Share (CIFS, NFS, and HTTP)
Related links
Comparing firmware versions
Using single component DUPs
Using a local drive
Using a FTP server
Using a network share
Updating or rolling back devices that affect Trusted Platform Module settings
Using a local drive
Lifecycle Controller allows you to perform firmware updates using locally available DVDs or USB drives, or virtual media. This
flexibility improves the efficiency of the update process when there is a high network traffic. After selecting the update repository,
Lifecycle Controller automatically detects any necessary updates, and performs those updates on components you specifically
select.
To access the repository on the local drive, create a repository on a DVD or USB drive and attach it to the server locally or using a
virtual media.
36
Using a DVD
Use either the Server Update Utility (SUU) DVDs or custom DVDs (SUU ISO downloaded from dell.com/support and written to a
DVD) to perform the firmware updates. The available DVDs are:
•
OpenManage SUU DVD to update all the server components such as Lifecycle Controller, Dell Diagnostics, BIOS, RAID
controller, NIC, iDRAC, and Power Supply Unit.
•
Lifecycle Controller OS Driver Packs DVD (Windows only) to update the operating system driver packs.
To access the updates from a DVD:
1.
Insert the appropriate DVD in the locally attached CD/DVD drive. Alternatively, insert the appropriate DVD in the client and use
the Virtual Media feature to access the attached CD/DVD drive. For more information, see the Integrated Dell Remote Access
Controller (iDRAC) User’s Guide at dell.com/esmmanuals.
2.
From the Local Drive drop-down menu, select the drive that contains the updated DVD.
3.
In the File Path or Update package path field, enter the location or subdirectory where the catalog is available.
NOTE: If the catalog file is located in the root folder, do not enter the file name in the File Path or Update package
path field. However, if the catalog file is located in a subdirectory, enter the subdirectory name.
NOTE: If the catalog file or DUP is downloaded from ftp.dell.com, do not copy them to a subdirectory.
NOTE: Lifecycle Controller allows 256 characters in a path that includes the file name and file extension. For
example, if 56 characters are used for file name and extension, only 200 characters can be used for the path.
Lifecycle Controller does not support these characters -:, *,?,”,<,>,|,#,%,^, and SPACE.
Using a USB drive
You can download the repository from the SUU DVD or from an FTP location to a USB drive, and then access the updates from this
drive.
Before downloading the repository to the USB drive, make sure that the following prerequisites are met:
•
The updates are downloaded using the Dell Repository Manager and the repository is created on a USB drive.
NOTE: To download the complete repository, make sure that the USB drive has 8 GB free space.
•
Connect the USB drive to the system.
To update using a USB drive:
1.
Insert a USB drive to the managed system. Alternatively, you can insert the USB drive to the client system and use the Virtual
Media feature to access the USB drive. For more information about this feature, see the Integrated Dell Remote Access
Controller (iDRAC) User’s Guide at dell.com/esmmanuals.
2.
From the Select Device drop-down menu, select the USB drive that contains the updates (DUP or repository).
3.
In the File Path or Update package path field, type the location or subdirectory where the catalog file is available.
NOTE: If the catalog file is located in a root folder, do not enter the file name in the File Path or Update package
path field. However, if the catalog file is located in a subdirectory, enter the subdirectory name.
NOTE: If the catalog file or DUP is downloaded from ftp.dell.com, do not copy them to a subdirectory.
NOTE: Lifecycle Controller allows 256 characters in a path that includes the file name and file extension. For
example, if 56 characters are used for file name and extension, only 200 characters can be used for the path.
Lifecycle Controller does not support these characters -:, *,?,”,<,>,|,#,%,^, and SPACE.
Using a FTP server
Lifecycle Controller provides options to update a server using the latest firmware available on the Dell FTP server or internal FTP
server. To use the Dell FTP, local FTP, or service provider's FTP server that is configured as proxy or non-proxy, use the following
options:
•
Using Non-Proxy FTP Server
•
Using Proxy FTP Server
37
Related links
Accessing updates on a local FTP server
Configuring a local USB drive
Using a non-proxy FTP server
Lifecycle Controller can access the latest firmware from ftp.dell.com. It downloads the DUPs from this location to perform
firmware update.
Before performing an update using a non-proxy FTP server, make sure that the following prerequisites are met:
•
The network settings are configured (Settings → Network Settings).
•
The updates are downloaded using Dell Repository Manager, and the repository is created on an internal FTP server.
To update the system using the Dell FTP server, internal FTP server, or service provider’s FTP server:
•
Dell FTP Server — In the Address field, enter only ftp.dell.com.
•
Internal FTP server or service provider’s FTP server — Enter the following details:
– User Name — The user name to access the FTP location.
– Password — The password to access the FTP location.
– File Path or Update package path — Name of the DUP location or subdirectory where the catalog is available.
This step is optional for operating system driver source.
NOTE: If the catalog file is located in the root folder, do not enter the file name in the File Path or Update
package path field. However, if the catalog file is located in a subdirectory, enter the subdirectory name.
NOTE: If the catalog file or DUP is downloaded from ftp.dell.com, do not copy them to a subdirectory.
NOTE: Lifecycle Controller allows 256 characters in a path that includes the file name and file extension. For
example, if 56 characters are used for file name and extension, only 200 characters can be used for the path.
Lifecycle Controller does not support these characters -:, *,?,”,<,>,|,#,%,^, and SPACE.
Using a proxy FTP server
Using Lifecycle Controller, you can update the firmware by using ftp.dell.com, or by using an internal FTP server or service
provider’s FTP server, when you are connected to the Internet through a proxy server.
Before performing an update using a proxy FTP server, make sure that the following prerequisites are met:
•
The network settings are configured (Settings → Network Settings).
•
The updates are downloaded using the Dell Repository Manager, and the repository is created on an internal FTP server.
•
The proxy server supports either HTTP or SOCKS4 protocols.
•
Information related to proxy server such as IP address or host name of the proxy server, login credentials, and the port number
are readily available.
NOTE: Lifecycle Controller does not support CCproxy. It supports only Squid proxy.
To update the system using the Dell FTP server or an internal FTP server, or service provider’s FTP server in a proxy environment:
•
Dell FTP Server — In the Address field, enter ftp.dell.com, and under the Proxy Settings section, enter the proxy server
information.
•
Internal FTP server or service provider’s FTP server — Enter the following details:
– User Name — The user name to access the FTP location.
– Password — The password to access the FTP location.
– File Path or Update package path — Name of the DUP location or subdirectory where the catalog is stored.
NOTE: If the catalog file is located in the root folder, do not enter the file name in the File Path or Update
package path field. However, if the catalog file is located in a subdirectory, enter the subdirectory name (for
example, subdirectory).
NOTE: If the catalog file or DUP is downloaded from ftp.dell.com, do not copy them to a subdirectory.
38
NOTE: Lifecycle Controller allows 256 characters in a path that includes the file name and file extension. For
example, if 56 characters are used for file name and extension, only 200 characters can be used for the path.
Lifecycle Controller does not support these characters -:, *,?,”,<,>,|,#,%,^, and SPACE.
•
Enable Settings — Select this option to enter the following details:
– Server — The host name of the proxy server.
– Port — The port number of the proxy server.
– User Name — The user name required to access the proxy server.
– Password — The password required to access the proxy server.
– Type — The type of proxy server. Lifecycle Controller supports HTTP and SOCKS 4 proxy server types.
Using a network share
To use a shared folder over a network, select Network Share (CIFS, NFS, or HTTP) and enter the details provided in the following
table:
CIFS
For CIFS, type the following details:
•
Share Name — Path to the repository or the shared folder where the DUPs are stored. For example,
\\192.168.20.26\sharename or \\servername\sharename
•
Domain and User Name — Type the correct domain and user name required to log on to the network share. For example, loginname@myDomain, and if there is no domain, type only the login name. For example, login-name.
•
Password — Password to access the share.
•
File Path or Update package path — Name of the DUP location or subdirectory, where the catalog is stored.
NFS
For NFS, type the following details:
•
Share Name — Path to the repository or the shared folder where the DUPs are stored. For example,
\\192.168.20.26\sharename or \\servername\sharename
•
File Path or Update package path — Name of the DUP location or subdirectory, where the catalog is stored.
NOTE: If the catalog file is located in the root folder, do not enter the filename in the File Path or Update package path
field. However, if the catalog file is located in a subdirectory, enter the subdirectory name.
NOTE: If the catalog file and DUP are downloaded from ftp.dell.com, do not copy them to a subdirectory.
NOTE: Lifecycle Controller allows 256 characters in a path that includes the file name and file extension. For example, if
56 characters are used for file name and extension, only 200 characters can be used for the path. Lifecycle Controller
does not support these characters -:, *,?,”,<,>,|,#,%,^, and SPACE.
HTTP
For HTTP, type the following details:
•
Share Name — Path to the shared folder where the DUPs or repository is located. For example,
\\192.168.20.26\sharename or \\servername\sharename
•
File Path or Update package path — Name of the DUP location or subdirectory, where the catalog is stored.
NOTE: There is no option to browse to the folder. To access the file, type the complete URL of the HTTP web server.
•
Enable Settings — Select this option to enter the following details:
– Server: The host name of the proxy server.
– Port: The port number of the proxy server.
– User Name: The user name required to access the proxy server.
– Password: The password required to access the proxy server.
– Type: The type of proxy server. Lifecycle Controller supports HTTP, SOCKS 4, and SOCKS 5 proxy server types.
NOTE: HTTP, SOCKS 4, and SOCKS 5 (for IPv6) proxy server types are supported in this release. HTTPS is not
supported in LC-UI.
39
Using single component DUPs
To use single component Dell Update Packages (DUP), download the Dell Update Package (only .exe) from the Dell FTP site
(ftp.dell.com), or copy from the Server Update Utility DVD, or from dell.com/support to a local hard disk drive or network share.
NOTE: Make sure that the file name for the single component DUPs does not have any blank space.
NOTE: Both 32–bit and 64–bit DUPs are supported.
NOTE: If you execute multiple jobs for various components and iDRAC DUP is one of the jobs, ensure that iDRAC job is
the last job in the queue. Ensure that all other jobs are either in SCHEDULED or COMPLETED state before you execute
the iDRAC job.
In the File Path or Update package path field, enter the name of the DUP (for example, APP_WIN_RYYYZZZ.EXE) or if the DUP is
present in a subdirectory, enter both the subdirectory name and name of the DUP (for example, subdirectory
\APP_WIN_RYYYZZZ.EXE).
NOTE: Lifecycle Controller allows 256 characters in a path that includes the file name and file extension. For example, if
56 characters are used for file name and extension, only 200 characters can be used for the path. Lifecycle Controller
does not support these characters -:, *,?,”,<,>,|,#,%,^, and SPACE.
Selecting and applying updates
1.
To select and apply the updates, from the Available System Updates table, select the check box corresponding to the
component that has the firmware you want to update. After you select the catalog ID details, of the firmware selected are
displayed in the following format:
Release Date: YYYY-MM-DD
Source: USB Drive or CD or DVD (<device type>): \<firmware file name in .exe format>.
By default, Lifecycle Controller selects the components for which the current updates are available.
2.
Click Apply. The system may restart after the update process is complete. When applying more than one update, the system
may restart between the updates and launch back to Lifecycle Controller, and continue with the other selected updates.
NOTE: The system does not restart after updating the operating system driver pack and hardware diagnostics.
NOTE: While using Lifecycle Controller to update the power supply unit (PSU) firmware, the system turns off after the
first task. It takes a couple of minutes to update the PSU firmware, and then automatically turns on the server.
Firmware rollback
Lifecycle Controller allows you to roll back to a previously installed version of component firmware such as BIOS, iDRAC with
Lifecycle Controller, RAID Controller, NIC, Enclosure, Backplane, Fibre Channel cards, and Power Supply Unit (PSU). Use this
feature if you have a problem with the current version, and want to revert to the previously‑installed version.
On the Dell 13th generation PowerEdge servers that have a single iDRAC and Lifecycle Controller firmware, rolling back the iDRAC
firmware also rolls back the Lifecycle Controller firmware. However, on a 12th generation PowerEdge servers with firmware version
2.xx.xx.xx, if you want to roll back Lifecycle Controller firmware to a previous version such as 1.x.x, you must first roll back iDRAC to
the previous version and then roll back Lifecycle Controller. It is not possible to roll back Lifecycle Controller to a previous version if
iDRAC firmware version is 2.xx.xx.xx.
•
Dell Diagnostics, operating system driver packs, CPLD, and operating system collector tool cannot be rolled back to earlier
versions.
•
The earlier version is available only if the component firmware is updated at least once to a different version.
•
Except for iDRAC firmware, the earlier version of the firmware is not displayed if the current version and the earlier version are
the same.
•
Every time a firmware image is updated, the earlier version of the firmware image is backed up.
•
Every time a rollback operation is performed, the previously installed firmware becomes the current version. However, for
iDRAC, the previously installed version becomes the current version and the current version is stored as the previous version.
40
•
The earlier version of the firmware is available only if any of the following tools are used to update the firmware: Lifecycle
Controller Firmware Update feature, Lifecycle Controller-Remote Services, or the Dell Update Package (DUP) from operating
system.
NOTE: You cannot roll back to firmware version 1.x.x or earlier on a 13th generation PowerEdge server.
Related links
Rolling back to previous firmware versions
Rolling back to previous firmware versions
You can roll back to earlier versions of a firmware using the Firmware Rollback wizard.
NOTE: If you update any firmware only once, the rollback feature provides the option to revert to the factory-installed
component firmware image. If you update the firmware more than once, the factory‑installed images are overwritten and
you cannot revert to them.
To roll back a firmware:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Firmware Update.
3.
In the right pane, click Launch Firmware Rollback.
The Firmware Rollback page displays a list of components for which roll back is available and the later versions are selected by
default.
4.
Select the required rollback image and click Apply.
After the update process is complete, the system may restart. When applying more than one update, the system may restart
between updates and launch back to Lifecycle Controller and continue updating.
Related links
Firmware rollback
Comparing firmware versions
Updating or rolling back devices that affect Trusted Platform Module settings
Comparing firmware versions
To compare the version of the update or rollback with the version currently installed on the system, compare the versions in the
Current and Available fields:
•
Component — Displays the name of the components. Select the check box corresponding to the component that you want to
update.
•
Current — Displays the component version currently installed on the system.
•
Available — Displays the version of the available firmware.
Updating or rolling back devices that affect Trusted Platform Module settings
Enabling Trusted Platform Module (TPM) with pre-boot measurement enables the BitLocker protection on the system. When
BitLocker protection is enabled, updating or rolling back the components such as RAID controller, NIC, and BIOS require that a
recovery password is entered or a USB drive that contains a recovery key is inserted during the next system restart. For information
on how to set TPM settings, see the BIOS User Guide available at dell.com/support/home.
When Lifecycle Controller detects that TPM security is set to On with Pre-boot Measurements, a message indicates that certain
updates require the recovery password or USB drive with the recovery key. The message also indicates components that affect the
BitLocker.
You can choose not to update or roll back those components by navigating to the Select Updates page, and then clearing the
options for the appropriate components.
41
6
Configure
Lifecycle Controller provides various system configuration wizards. Use the configuration wizards to configure system devices. The
Configuration Wizards has:
•
System Configuration Wizards — This wizard includes LCD Panel Security, iDRAC Settings, System Date and Time
Configuration, and vFlash SD card Configuration.
•
Storage Configuration Wizards — This wizard includes RAID Configuration, Key Encryption, and Break Mirror.
Related links
Controlling access to the front panel
Configuring iDRAC
Configuring system time and date
Configuring vFlash SD card
Configuring RAID
Configuring RAID using software RAID
Creating a secure virtual disk on a RAID controller
Applying the local key on a RAID controller
Breaking mirrored drives
System control panel access options
Lifecycle Controller front panel security configuration enables an administrator to restrict access to system control panel interface.
The options available are:
•
View and Modify — You can obtain information and make changes using the system control panel interface.
•
View Only — You can move through the data screens to obtain information using the system control panel interface.
•
Disable — You do not have access to information or control, other than the information displayed by the management
controller, and you cannot specify actions.
Controlling access to the front panel
To control access to the front panel:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
From the Lifecycle Controller Home page, select Hardware Configuration.
3.
In the right pane, select Configuration Wizards.
4.
On the System Configuration Wizards page, click LCD Panel Security.
5.
Set System Control Panel Access to one of the following options:
6.
42
•
View and Modify
•
View Only
• Disable
Click Finish to apply the changes.
Configuring iDRAC
To configure iDRAC parameters applicable to the system, such as LAN, common IP settings, IPv4, IPv6, Virtual Media, and LAN user
configuration use the iDRAC Settings wizard.
NOTE: You can also use the System Setup utility during startup for configuring iDRAC. For more information about the
System Setup utility, see Using The System Setup Program And Boot Manager.
To configure and manage the iDRAC parameters:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane of Home page, click Hardware Configuration.
3.
In the right pane, click Configuration Wizards.
4.
On the System Configuration Wizards page, click iDRAC Settings, and then click the following options to configure the
different iDRAC parameters.
For more information about configuring iDRAC settings, see the Integrated Dell Remote Access Controller (iDRAC) User’s
Guide at dell.com/esmmanuals.
NOTE: Click System Summary to view the parameters and their values.
5.
• Network
• OS to iDRAC Pass Through
• Alerts
• System Event Log
• Virtual Media
• vFlash Media
• Thermal
• System Location
• Front Panel Security
• User Configuration
• Smart Card
• Lifecycle Controller
• Remote Enablement
• Reset iDRAC Configuration to defaults
Click Back after setting the parameters for each option to return to the main menu.
6.
Click Finish to apply the changes.
Configuring system time and date
To set the time and date for the managed system:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
From the Lifecycle Controller Home page, select Hardware Configuration.
3.
In the right pane, select Configuration Wizards.
4.
Under System Configuration Wizards, click System Time and Date Configuration.
The default system time and system date displayed in Lifecycle Controller is the date and time reported by the system BIOS.
5.
Modify the System Time and System Date (HH:MM:SS AM or PM), as required.
6.
Click Finish to apply the changes.
Configuring vFlash SD card
Use the licensed feature to enable or disable the vFlash SD card, check the health and properties, and initialize the vFlash SD card.
Lifecycle Controller support vFlash SD cards of sizes 1 GB, 2 GB, 8 GB, 16 GB, and 32 GB.
43
NOTE: The options under vFlash SD card are grayed-out if there is no SD card inserted in the slot.
NOTE: If FIPS is enabled, you cannot perform any actions associated with the vFlash SD card, such as configuring the
vFlash SD card, exporting or backing up server profile to the vFlash, or importing server profile using vFlash.
See the Integrated Dell Remote Access Controller (iDRAC) User’s Guide available at dell.com/support/home for more information
on vFlash SD card and the installation procedure.
Use the vFlash SD card configuration feature to:
•
Enable or disable vFlash SD card.
•
Determine the vFlash SD card properties:
– Name—Displays the name of the vFlash SD card.
– Health—Displays health states such as OK, Warning, and Critical.
– Size—Indicates the total size of the vFlash SD card.
– Available Space—Indicates the available size on the vFlash SD card to create a partition.
– Write Protected—Indicates if the write-protect latch on the vFlash SD card is set to on or off position.
•
Initialize vFlash — Deletes all the existing partitions on the vFlash SD card.
Enabling or disabling a vFlash SD card
NOTE: Make sure to set the write-protect latch on the vFlash SD card to the off position.
If set to Enabled, the vFlash SD card appears in the BIOS boot order, allowing you to boot from the vFlash SD card. If set to
Disabled, virtual flash is not accessible.
To enable or disable a vFlash SD card:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Hardware Configuration.
3.
In the right pane, click Configuration Wizards.
4.
Under System Configuration Wizards, click vFlash SD Card Configuration.
5.
From the vFlash SD card drop-down menu, select Enabled or Disabled.
6.
Click Finish to apply the changes.
The vFlash SD Card page is displayed.
Initializing a vFlash SD card
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Hardware Configuration.
3.
In the right pane, click Configuration Wizards.
4.
On the System Configuration Wizards page, click vFlash SD Card Configuration.
The vFlash SD Card page is displayed.
5.
Click Initialize vFlash to delete all the data present in the vFlash SD card.
NOTE: The Initialize vFlash option is not available after you disable the vFlash SD card.
Configuring RAID
If your system has one or more supported PERC RAID controllers with PERC 8 firmware or later, or software RAID controllers, use
the RAID Configuration wizard to configure a virtual disk as the boot device.
NOTE: Create boot virtual disk only from disk drive populated across slots 0–3 of the system. For slot information, see
the server Owner’s Manual at dell.com/poweredgemanuals.
NOTE: If there are any internal storage controller cards on the system, all other external cards cannot be configured.
The external cards can be configured only if there are no internal cards.
44
To configure RAID:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Hardware Configuration.
3.
In the right pane, click Configuration Wizards.
4.
Under Storage Configuration Wizards, click RAID Configuration to launch the wizard.
The View Current RAID Configuration and Select Controller page is displayed.
5.
Select the controller and click Next.
The Select RAID Level page is displayed.
6.
Select the RAID level and click Next.
The Select Physical Disks page is displayed.
7.
Select the physical disk's properties and click Next.
The Virtual Disk Attributes page is displayed.
8.
Select the virtual disk parameters and click Next.
The Summary page is displayed.
9.
To apply the RAID configuration, click Finish.
Related links
Viewing current RAID configuration
Selecting a RAID controller
Foreign configuration found
Selecting RAID levels
Selecting physical disks
Setting virtual disk attributes
Viewing summary
Foreign configuration found
The Foreign Configuration Found page is displayed only if a foreign configuration physical disk drive resides on the selected RAID
controller or any uninitialized physical disk drives present on the system.
A foreign configuration is a set of physical disk drives containing a RAID configuration that is introduced to the system, but is not
managed by the RAID controller to which it is attached. You may have a foreign configuration if physical disk drives have been
moved from one RAID controller to another RAID controller.
NOTE: Import Foreign Configuration is supported from System Setup → Advanced Hardware Configuration → Device
Settings.
You have two options: Ignore Foreign Configuration and Clear Foreign Configuration.
•
If the foreign configuration contains data that you require, click Ignore Foreign Configuration. If you click this option, the disk
drive space containing the foreign configuration is not available for use in a new virtual drive.
•
To delete all data on the physical disk drives containing the foreign configuration, click Clear Foreign Configuration. This option
deletes the hard-disk drive space containing the foreign configuration and makes it available for use in a new virtual drive.
After selecting one of the above options, click Next.
Viewing current RAID configuration
The View Current RAID Configuration and Select Controller page displays the attributes of any virtual disks already configured on
the supported RAID controllers attached to the system. You have two options:
•
Accept the existing virtual disks without changing. To select this option, click Back. If you have to install the operating system
on an existing virtual disk, make sure that the virtual disk size and RAID level are correct.
•
Use the RAID configuration wizard to delete all the existing virtual disks and create a single new virtual disk to be used as the
new boot device. To select this option, click Next.
45
NOTE: RAID 0 does not provide data redundancy and hot spare. Other RAID levels provide data redundancy and
enable you to reconstruct data in the event of a disk-drive failure.
NOTE: You can create only one virtual disk using Lifecycle Controller. To create multiple virtual disks, use Option
ROM. To access Option ROM, press <Ctrl> <R> during boot or POST.
Selecting a RAID controller
The View Current RAID Configuration and Select Controller page displays all supported RAID controllers attached to the system.
Select the RAID controller on which you want to create the virtual disk, and then click Next.
Selecting RAID levels
Select a RAID Level for the virtual disk:
•
RAID 0 — Stripes data across the physical disks. RAID 0 does not maintain redundant data. When a physical disk fails in a RAID
0 virtual disk, there is no method for rebuilding the data. RAID 0 offers good read and write performance with zero data
redundancy.
•
RAID 1 — Mirrors or duplicates data from one physical disk to another. If a physical disk fails, data can be rebuilt using the data
from the other side of the mirror. RAID 1 offers good read performance and average write performance with good data
redundancy.
•
RAID 5 — Stripes data across the physical disks, and uses parity information to maintain redundant data. If a physical disk fails,
the data can be rebuilt using the parity information. RAID 5 offers good read performance and slower write performance with
good data redundancy.
•
RAID 6 — Stripes data across the physical disks, and uses two sets of parity information for additional data redundancy. If one
or two physical disks fail, the data can be rebuilt using the parity information. RAID 6 offers good data redundancy and read
performance but slower write performance.
•
RAID 10 — Combines mirrored physical disks with data striping. If a physical disk fails, data can be rebuilt using the mirrored
data. RAID 10 offers good read and write performance with good data redundancy.
•
RAID 50 — A dual-level array that uses multiple RAID 5 sets in a single array. A single physical disk failure can occur in each of
the RAID 5 without any loss of data on the entire array. Although the RAID 50 has increased write performance, its performance
decreases, data or program access gets slower, and transfer speeds on the array are affected when a physical disk fails and
reconstruction takes place.
•
RAID 60 — Combines the straight block level striping of RAID 0 with the distributed double parity of RAID 6. The system must
have at least eight physical disks to use RAID 60. Failures while a single physical disk is rebuilding in one RAID 60 set do not lead
to data loss. RAID 60 has improved fault tolerance because more than two physical disks on either span must fail for data loss to
occur.
NOTE: Depending on the type of controllers, some RAID levels are not supported.
Minimum disk requirement for different RAID levels
Table 12. RAID level and number of disks
RAID Level
Minimum Number of Disks
0
1*
1
2
5
3
6
4
10
4
50
6
60
8
* For PERC S110 and S130 RAID controllers, a minimum of two hard-disk drives are required.
Selecting physical disks
Use the Select Physical Disks screen to select the physical disks to be used for the virtual drive and select the physical disk driverelated properties.
46
The number of physical disks required for the virtual disk varies depending on the RAID level. The minimum and maximum numbers
of physical disks required for the RAID level are displayed on the screen.
•
Protocol — Select the protocol for the disk pool: Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) or Serial ATA (SATA). SAS drives are used for
high performance, while SATA drives provide a more cost-effective solution. A disk pool is a logical grouping of physical disk
drives on which one or more virtual drives can be created. The protocol is the type of technology used to implement RAID.
•
Media Type — Select the media type for the disk pool: Hard Disk Drives (HDD) or Solid State Disks (SSD). HDDs use
traditional rotational magnetic media for data storage and SSDs implement flash memory for data storage.
•
Disk Boot Size — Select one of the following disk block sizes:
– 512 — indicates that the 512 bytes block size hard drives (HDD) are selected.
– 4K — indicates that the 4K block size hard disk drives (HDD) are selected. 4K block HDDs allows the faster data transfer
with fewer commands.
•
T10 Protection Information (T10 PI) Capability— It is known as DIF (Data Integrity Fields) and the supporting HDDs are
referred to DIF drives. The T10 enabled HDDs validates and stores the data integrity fields for each blocks. It performs this
action when you write the data on the disk and return these values on a read request. When you read or write the data from the
HDD, the data is checked for the errors. Select one of the following types of T10 protection information capabilities :
– All — indicates that both the T10 PI capable and non-capable HDDs are selected.
– T10 PI Capable — indicates that only T10 PI capable HDDs are selected.
– Non-T10 Capable — indicates that only non-T10 capable HDDs are selected.
NOTE: PERC 9 with version 9.3.2 and above doesn’t support T10 PI capabilities.
•
Encryption Capability — Select Yes to enable encryption capability.
•
Select Span Length — Select the span length. The span length value refers to the number of physical disk drives included in
each span. Span length applies only to RAID 10, RAID 50, and RAID 60. The Select Span Length drop‑down list is active only if
you have selected RAID 10, RAID 50, or RAID 60.
•
Drives remaining for current span — Displays the number of physical disk-drives remaining in the current span based on the
span length value selected.
•
Select the physical disk-drives using the check boxes at the bottom of the screen. The physical disk-drive selection must meet
the requirements of the RAID level and span length. To select all the physical disk-drives, click Select All. After you select the
option, the option changes to Deselect.
Setting virtual disk attributes
Use this page to specify the values for the following virtual drive attributes:
•
Size — Specify the size of the virtual drive.
•
Stripe Element Size — Select the stripe element size. The stripe element size is the amount of drive space a stripe consumes
on each physical-disk drive in the stripe. The Stripe Element Size list may contain more options than initially displayed on the
screen. Use the up arrow and down arrow keys to view all available options.
•
Read Policy — Select the read policy:
– Read Ahead — The controller reads sequential sectors of the virtual drives when seeking data. The Read Ahead policy may
improve system performance if the data is written to sequential sectors of the virtual drives.
– No Read Ahead — The controller does not use the Read Ahead policy. The No Read Ahead policy may improve system
performance, if the data is random and not written to sequential sectors.
– Adaptive Read Ahead — The controller initiates the Read Ahead policy only if the most-recently-read requests accessed
sequential sectors of the disk drive. If the most-recently-read requests access random sectors of the disk drive, then the
controller uses the No Read Ahead policy.
•
Write Policy — Select the write policy.
– Write Through — The controller sends a write-request-completion signal only after the data is written to the disk drive. The
Write Through policy provides better data security than the Write Back policy, because the system assumes that the data is
available only after it has been written to the disk drive.
– Write Back — The controller sends a write-request completion signal as soon as the data is in the controller cache, but has
not yet been written to the disk drive. The Write Back policy may provide faster 'write' performance, but it provides less data
security, because a system failure can prevent the data from being written to the disk drive.
47
– Force Write Back — The write cache is enabled regardless of whether the controller has an operational battery. If the
controller does not have an operational battery, data loss may occur in the event of a power failure.
•
Disk Cache Policy— Select the write policy.
– Enabled — The controller enables physical disk cache setting while creating virtual disks.
– Disabled —The controller disables physical disk cache setting while creating virtual disks.
•
Assign a Hot Spare Disk if available — Select this option to assign a hot spare to the virtual drive. A hot spare is an unused
backup physical disk drive that is used to rebuild data from a redundant virtual drive. A hot spare can be used only with a
redundant RAID level. Hot spares also have physical disk-drive size requirements. The hot spare must be as large as or bigger
than the smallest physical disk-drive included in the virtual drive. If the RAID level and physical disk-drive availability do not meet
these requirements, a hot spare is not assigned.
NOTE: Assign a hot spare only from disk drives populated across slots 0–3 of the system. For slot information, see
the Dell PowerEdge Owner's manual at dell.com/poweredgemanuals.
•
Hot Spare Disk — Select a disk that is used as a hot spare. Only one dedicated hot spare is supported in Lifecycle Controller.
•
Secure Virtual Disk — Select to secure the virtual drive using the controller’s security key.
NOTE: The secure virtual drive is created only if the controller security key is created and the selected disks are
Self-Encrypting Drives (SEDs).
Viewing summary
The Summary page displays the virtual disk attributes based on selections.
CAUTION: Clicking Finish deletes all existing virtual drives except any foreign configurations that you specified. All data
residing on the virtual drives is lost.
To return to a previous page to review or change selections, click Back. To close the wizard without making changes, click Cancel.
Click Finish to create a virtual drive with the displayed attributes.
Configuring RAID using software RAID
For the PERC S110 and S130 controllers, make sure to change the SATA settings in the system BIOS to RAID Mode. To change this
setting using the BIOS, the latest BIOS version must be installed. For more information about the BIOS versions for different
systems, see the Lifecycle Controller Release Notes at dell.com/support/home.
NOTE: For more information about RAID configuration, see the Creating RAID using Lifecycle Controller white paper at
delltechcenter.com/lc.
NOTE: If you have an older BIOS, you can configure RAID only through Option ROM.
Use this feature to configure RAID, if a PERC S110 or S130 controller is enabled on the system. If you select the software RAID
option, you cannot create partial virtual disk through Lifecycle Controller interface and it displays the physical disk-drives as NonRAID disks or RAID-ready disks.
•
Non-RAID disk — A single disk-drive without any RAID properties. Needs initialization to apply RAID levels.
•
RAID-ready disk — The disk drive is initialized and a RAID level can be applied.
NOTE: From Lifecycle Controller UI, you can deploy only Windows server operating system using software RAID
controller.
To configure software RAID:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Hardware Configuration.
3.
In the right pane, click Configuration Wizards.
4.
Under Storage Configuration Wizards, click RAID Configuration to launch the wizard.
The View Current RAID Configuration and Select Controller page is displayed.
5.
Select the controller and click Next.
If the non-RAID disk drives are attached to the selected controller, select the non-RAID physical disk-drives, and then click
Next to initialize them. Else, the Select RAID Level page is displayed.
48
NOTE: During initialization, all the data on the non-RAID disk drives are deleted.
6.
Select the RAID level and click Next.
The Select Physical Disks page is displayed.
7.
Select the physical disk properties and click Next.
8.
Select the virtual disk parameters and click Next.
The Virtual Disk Attributes page is displayed.
The Summary page is displayed.
9.
To apply the RAID configuration, click Finish.
Related links
Selecting a RAID controller
Foreign configuration found
Selecting RAID levels
Selecting physical disks
Setting virtual disk attributes
Viewing summary
Creating a secure virtual disk on a RAID controller
Make sure that the controller is encrypted with a local key. For more information on encrypting with a local key, see Key Encryption.
To create a secure virtual disk on a RAID controller:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Hardware Configuration.
3.
In the right pane, click Configuration Wizards.
4.
Under Storage Configuration Wizards, click RAID Configuration to launch the wizard.
The View Current RAID Configuration and Select Controller page is displayed along with the information on whether the
displayed virtual disk is secure.
5.
Select a security capable controller and click Next.
If the non-RAID disks are attached to the selected controller, select the non-RAID physical disk-drives, and then click Next to
initialize them. Else, the Select RAID Level page is displayed.
NOTE: During initialization, all the data on the non-RAID disk drives are deleted.
6.
Select the RAID level and click Next.
The Select Physical Disks page is displayed.
NOTE: Create boot virtual disks only from disk drives populated across slots 0–3 of the system. For slot
information, see the system Owner’s Manual.
7.
From the Encryption Capability drop-down menu, select Self-encryption.
The self-encryption disks (SEDs) are displayed.
8.
Select the SEDs and specify the properties, and then click Next.
The Virtual Disk Attributes page is displayed.
9.
Select the virtual disk parameters, select the Secure Virtual Disk option, and click Next.
The Summary page is displayed.
10. To apply the RAID configuration, click Finish.
49
Related links
Selecting a RAID controller
Foreign configuration found
Selecting RAID levels
Selecting physical disks
Setting virtual disk attributes
Viewing summary
Applying the local key on a RAID controller
Key encryption
Use the Key Encryption feature to:
•
Apply local encryption for PERC H710, H710P, H730, H730P, H810, and H830 RAID controllers.
•
Delete the local encryption key.
•
Encrypt the existing unsecure virtual drives.
•
To change an existing encryption key to another one.
NOTE: For more information about the key encryption feature, see the Key Encryption in Lifecycle Controller white
paper at delltechcenter.com/lc.
Applying the local key on a RAID controller
Before applying the local key on a RAID controller, make sure that the controller is security-capable.
To apply the local key on a RAID controller:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Hardware Configuration.
3.
In the right pane, click Configuration Wizards.
4.
Under Storage Configuration wizards, click Key Encryption.
5.
Select the controller to apply a local key and click Next.
6.
Click Set up local key encryption and click Next.
NOTE: Some controller options are disabled if they do not support encryption.
7.
Enter the Encryption Key Identifier that is associated with the entered passphrase.
The Encryption Key Identifier is a passphrase hint; you must enter the passphrase when Lifecycle Controller prompts this hint.
8.
In the New Passphrase field, enter a passphrase.
NOTE: The controller uses the passphrase to encrypt the disk drive data. A valid passphrase contains 8–32
characters. It must include a combination of uppercase and lowercase letters, numbers, and symbols without
spaces.
9.
In the Confirm Passphrase field, re-enter the passphrase, and then click Finish.
Local key encryption mode
You can perform the following tasks while the controller is in the Local Key Encryption mode:
NOTE: For more information on the specification and configuration-related information for the PERC H710, H710P,
H810, and PERC 9 controllers, see the PERC H710, H710P, and H810 Technical Guidebooks.
•
Encrypt unsecure virtual disks — Enable data encryption on all the security-capable, unsecure virtual drives.
NOTE: This option is available if there are secure-capable virtual disks connected to a security-capable controller.
•
50
Rekey controller and encrypted disks with a new key — Replace the existing local key with a new key.
•
Remove encryption and delete data — Delete the encryption key on the controller and all the secure virtual drives along with its
data. After deletion, controller state changes to No encryption mode.
Related links
Encrypting unsecure virtual disks
Rekey controller with new local key
Removing encryption and deleting data
Encrypting unsecure virtual disks
Make sure that the following prerequisites are met:
•
Selected controller is security-capable.
•
Security-capable virtual drives must be attached to the controller.
•
Controller must be in the local-key-encryption mode.
To encrypt the unsecure virtual drives:
NOTE: All virtual drives created on the same physical disk-drives are automatically encrypted when any one of the virtual
drives is encrypted.
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Hardware Configuration.
3.
In the right pane, click Configuration Wizards.
4.
On the Storage Configuration wizards page, click Key Encryption.
5.
Select the controller that is encrypted and click Next.
NOTE: The encryption mode (Local Key Encryption) applied to the selected controller does not change.
6.
Select Encrypt unsecure virtual disks and click Next.
7.
To enable encryption, select unsecure virtual drives and click Finish.
Related links
Local key encryption mode
Rekey controller with new local key
To rekey the controller with a new local key:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Hardware Configuration.
3.
In the right pane, click Configuration Wizards.
4.
On the Storage Configuration wizards page, click Key Encryption.
5.
On the Select Controller Select the controller to which the local key is applied and click Next.
6.
In the Existing Passphrase field, enter the existing passphrase associated with the displayed Encryption Key Identifier.
7.
In the New Encryption Key Identifier field, enter the new identifier. The Encryption Key Identifier is a passphrase hint; you
must enter the passphrase when Lifecycle Controller prompts this hint.
8.
In the New Passphrase field, enter the passphrase that is associated with the new encryption key identifier.
Related links
Local key encryption mode
Removing encryption and deleting data
To remove the encryption and delete the data on the virtual disks:
51
CAUTION: The existing encryption, virtual drives, and all the data are permanently deleted.
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Hardware Configuration.
3.
In the right pane, click Configuration Wizards and click Key Encryption.
4.
Select the controller on which you must remove the key that was applied and click Next.
5.
In the right pane, select Remove encryption and delete data and click Next.
6.
Select Delete encryption key and all secure virtual disks and click Finish.
Related links
Local key encryption mode
Breaking mirrored drives
To split the mirrored array of RAID-1 virtual drives:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Hardware Configuration.
3.
In the right pane, click Configuration Wizards.
4.
Under Storage Configuration wizards, click Break Mirror.
The Break Mirror page is displayed with the mirrored virtual drives.
5.
Select the related controller and click Finish.
NOTE: The Break Mirror feature does not support software RAID controllers.
NOTE: For more information about the break mirror feature, see the Performing a Break-Mirror Operation Using
Lifecycle Controller white paper at delltechcenter.com/lc.
The system automatically turns off even if one mirrored array is successfully delinked.
System setup — Advanced Hardware Configuration
The Lifecycle Controller Advanced Hardware Configuration wizards allow you to configure BIOS, iDRAC, and certain devices such
as NIC, and RAID controllers through Human Interface Infrastructure (HII). HII is a UEFI-standard method for viewing and setting a
device's configuration. You can utilize a single utility to configure multiple devices that may have different pre-boot configuration
utilities. The utilities also provide localized versions of devices such as the BIOS setup.
Based on the system configuration, other device types may also appear under Advanced Hardware Configuration if they support
the HII configuration standard.
NOTE: When you update the firmware on a BCM57xx and 57xxx adapters, you will notice that the cards are displayed as
QLogic. This is due to the acquisition of Broadcom NetXtreme II by QLogic.
The Advanced Hardware Configuration wizard allows you to configure the following:
NOTE: You can also use System Setup utility during startup to configure the following devices. For more information
about the System Setup utility, see Using The System Setup Program And Boot Manager.
•
System BIOS Settings
•
iDRAC Device Settings
•
NICs
You can configure only one NIC at a time. The supported NIC cards are as follows:
– BCM5708 TOE plus iSCSI Offload NIC
– BCM5709C Dual Port NIC without iSCSI Offload
– BCM5709C Dual Port Rack Mezzanine Card
– BCM5709S Dual Port SERDES Mezzanine Card for Blade Systems
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– BCM57710 10GBase-T Single Port NIC
– BCM57710 10GBase-T Dual Port Rack Mezzanine Card
– BCM57710 Dual Port KX4 Blade Mezzanine Card
– BCM57711 Dual Port KX4 Noble MC
– BCM95708C PCI-E NIC
– BCM95709C 10/100/1000BASET Quad Port NIC
– BCM95709 iSCSI Offload Dual Port NIC
– BCM957711 10G SFP+ Dual Port NIC
– Broadcom 57810S DP 10G SFP+ Adapter (Full Height)
– Broadcom 57810S DP 10G SFP+ Adapter (Low Profile)
– Broadcom 57800S DP 10G BASE-T Adapter (Full Height)
– Broadcom 57800S DP 10G BASE-T Adapter (Low Profile)
– Broadcom 5720 DP 1G Adapter (Full Height)
– Broadcom 5720 DP 1G Adapter (Low Profile)
– Broadcom 5719 QP 1G Adapter (Full Height)
– Broadcom 5719 QP 1G Adapter (Low Profile)
– Broadcom 57800S QP rNDC (10G BASE-T + 1G BASE-T)
– Broadcom 57800S QP rNDC (10G SFP+ + 1G BASE-T)
– Broadcom 5720 QP rNDC 1G BASE-T
– Broadcom 57810S DP bNDC KR
– Broadcom 5719 QP 1G Mezz
– Broadcom 57810S DP 10G KR Mezz
– Intel(R) Ethernet Converged Network Adapter X710 (Dual Port)
– Intel(R) Ethernet Converged Network Adapter X710 (Quad Port)
– Intel(R) Ethernet 10G 4P X710/I350 rNDC
– Intel(R) Ethernet 10G 4P X710-k bNDC
– Intel(R) Ethernet 10G 4P X710 SFP+ rNDC
– Intel i540 DP 10G BASE-T Adapter (Full Height)
– Intel i540 DP 10G BASE-T Adapter (Low Profile)
– Intel DP 10GBASE SFP+ (Full Height)
– Intel DP 10GBASE SFP+ (Low Profile)
– Intel i350 DP 1G Adapter (Full Height)
– Intel i350 DP 1G Adapter (Low Profile)
– Intel i350 QP 1G Adapter (Full Height)
– Intel i350 QP 1G Adapter (Low Profile)
– Intel i540 QP rNDC (10G BASE-T + 1G BASE-T)
– Intel i350 QP rNDC 1G BASE-T
– Intel i520 DP bNDC KR
– Intel DP 10Gb KR Mezz
– Intel DP 10Gb KR Mezz
– Intel I350 QP 1G Mezz
– ConnectX-3 Dual Port 10 GbE KR Blade Mezzanine Card
– ConnectX-3 Dual Port 10 GbE DA/SFP+ Network Adapter
– ConnectX-3 Dual Port 40 GbE QSFP+ Network Adapter
– ConnectX-4 Lx Dual Port 25 GbE DA/SFP rNDC
– Fibre Channel cards:
* QLogic 57810S Dual 10GE PCIe Standup Base-T CNA
53
* QLogic 57810S Dual 10GE PCIe Standup SFP+/DA CNA
* QLogic 57810S-k Dual Port 10Gb bMezz KR CNA
* QLogic 57840S-K Quad Port 10Gb bNDC KR CNA
* QLogic 57840S Quad Port 10GB rNDC SFP+/DA
* QLogic Gigabit Network Adapter
* QLogic Gigabit Network Adapter (PowerVault)
* QLogic QLE2660 Single Port FC16 HBA
* QLogic QLE2660 Single Port FC16 HBA (LP)
* QLogic QLE2662 Dual Port FC16 HBA
* QLogic QLE2662 Dual Port FC16 HBA (LP)
* QLogic QME2662 Dual Port FC16 HBA Mezzanine
* QLogic QLE2560 FC8 Single Channel HBA
* QLogic QLE2562 FC8 Dual Channel HBA
* QLogic FC8 Embedded Mezz Card QME2572
* Emulex LPe16000 Single Port FC16 HBA
* Emulex LPe16000 Single Port FC16 HBA (LP)
* Emulex LPe16002 Dual Port FC16 HBA
* Emulex LPe16002 Dual Port FC16 HBA (LP)
* Emulex LPm16002 Dual Port FC16 HBA Mezzanine
RAID
•
H310 Adapter
•
H310 Mini Monolithic
•
H310 Mini Blades
•
H310 Embedded
•
H330 Adapter
•
H330 Mini Monolithic
•
H330 Mini and Mono
•
H330 Mini Blades
•
H330 Embedded
•
H710 Adapter
•
H710 Mini Blades
•
H710 Mini Monolithic
•
H710P Adapter
•
H710P Mini Blades
•
H710P Mini Monolithic
•
H810 Adapter
•
H830 Adapter
•
H730P Adapter
•
PERC S110
•
PERC S130
Integrated Broadcom NICs are controlled by both BIOS and the settings stored on the device itself. As a result, the Boot Protocol
field in the HII of integrated NICs has no effect; this setting is instead controlled by the BIOS on the Integrated Devices screen.
To set integrated NICs to an iSCSI or PXE boot mode, select System BIOS Settings, and then select Integrated Devices. In the list
for each embedded NIC, select the appropriate value:
•
54
Enabled for no boot capability.
•
Enabled with PXE to use the NIC for PXE boot.
•
Enabled with iSCSI to use the NIC to boot from an iSCSI target.
Modifying device settings
To modify device settings using the Advanced Hardware Configuration:
NOTE: You can also modify the device settings by using the System Setup utility during startup. For more information
about the System Setup utility, see Using The System Setup Program And Boot Manager.
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, select System Setup.
3.
In the right pane, click Advanced Hardware Configuration.
4.
Select the device you want to configure.
Based on the configuration setting changes, the following message may be displayed:
One or more of the settings requires a reboot to be saved and activated. Do you want to
reboot now?
5.
Select No to continue making additional configuration changes or select Yes to save the changes and exit the wizard.
All changes are applied during the next system restart.
Collect system inventory on restart
When you enable the Collect System Inventory On Restart (CSIOR) property, hardware inventory and part configuration
information is discovered and compared with previous system inventory information on every system restart.
NOTE: By default, the CSIOR property is enabled.
Updating server inventory information
To enable collecting system inventory on restart:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Hardware Configuration.
3.
In the right pane, select Hardware Inventory.
4.
Click Collect System Inventory on Restart.
5.
Under Collect System Inventory on Restart, click Enabled, and then click Finish.
The system inventory is updated after the next restart.
Configuring local FTP server
If your organization’s users are on a private network that does not have access to external sites, specifically ftp.dell.com, you can
provide firmware updates from a locally-configured FTP server. The users in your organization can access updates or drivers for
their Dell server from the local FTP server instead of ftp.dell.com. A local FTP server is not required for users, who have access to
ftp.dell.com through a proxy server. Check ftp.dell.com frequently to make sure your local FTP server has the most recent
updates.
FTP authentication
Although you must provide the user name and password for the FTP server, Lifecycle Controller supports anonymous login to the
FTP server using the FTP server address to download the catalog information. If you use a firewall, you should configure it to allow
outgoing FTP traffic on port 21. The firewall must be configured to accept incoming FTP response traffic.
55
Requirements for a local FTP server
The following requirements apply when configuring a local FTP server.
•
The local FTP server must use the default port (21).
•
You must use the Settings wizard to configure the network card on your system before accessing updates from the local FTP
server.
Copying repository to a local FTP server from the Dell Server Updates DVD
To copy the repository:
1.
Download the Dell Server Updates ISO image to your system from dell.com/support.
2.
Copy the repository folder of the DVD to the root directory of the local FTP server.
3.
Use this local FTP server for firmware update.
Using Dell Repository Manager to create the repository and copy it to a local FTP server
To create and copy the repository:
1.
Copy the repository created using the Dell Repository Manager to the root directory of the local FTP server.
NOTE: For information about creating a repository for your system, see the Dell Repository Manager User’s Guide
at dell.com/support/home.
2.
Use this local FTP server for firmware update.
Accessing updates on a local FTP server
You must know the IP address of the local FTP server to specify the online repository when using the OS Deployment and
Firmware Update features.
If you are accessing the local FTP server through a proxy server, you require the following information about the proxy server:
•
The host name or IP address of the proxy server
•
The port number of the proxy server
•
The user name to access the proxy server
•
The password to access the proxy server
•
The type of proxy server
•
To download drivers using a proxy server to access an FTP server, you must specify:
– Address — The IP address of the local FTP server or ftp.dell.com
– User Name — The user name to access the FTP location.
– Password — The password to access this FTP location.
– Proxy Server — The server host name or the IP address of the proxy server.
– Proxy Port — The port number of the proxy server.
– Proxy Type — The type of proxy server. HTTP and SOCKS 4 proxy server types are supported by Lifecycle Controller.
– Proxy User Name — The user name required to access the proxy server.
– Proxy Password — The password required to access the proxy server.
The following characters are supported for User Name and Password:
•
Digits (0–9)
•
Alphabets (a-z, A-Z)
•
Hyphen (-)
56
Configuring a local USB drive
If you are using a private network that does not have access to external sites such as ftp.dell.com, you can provide updates from a
locally‑configured USB drive.
The USB drive used as a repository must have at least 8 GB free space.
NOTE: A USB drive is not required for users, who have access to ftp.dell.com through a proxy server.
For the latest updates, download the most recent Dell Server Updates ISO images for your system from dell.com/support.
NOTE: Lifecycle Controller supports internal SATA optical drives, USB drives, and Virtual Media devices. If the
installation media is corrupt or not readable, then Lifecycle Controller may be unable to detect the presence of a media.
In this case, an error message is displayed stating that no media is available.
Copying repository to a local USB drive from the Dell Server Updates DVD
To copy a repository:
1.
Download the latest Dell Server Updates ISO image file from dell.com/support.
2.
Copy the repository folder of the DVD to the root directory of the USB drive.
3.
Use this USB drive for firmware update.
Using Dell Repository Manager to create the repository and copy to a USB drive
To create and copy the repository:
1.
Copy the repository created using the Dell Repository Manager to the root directory of the USB drive.
2.
Use this USB drive for firmware update.
NOTE: For information on creating a repository for your system, see the Dell Repository Manager User’s Guide at
dell.com/support/home.
Configuring NFS and CIFS servers
If you are using a private network that does not have access to external sites such as ftp.dell.com, you can provide updates from a
locally‑configured NFS and CIFS servers.
Configuring NFS servers
To configure an NFS server, perform the following tasks:
1.
Open the /etc/exports configuration file and add an NFS entry.
For example:
[root@localhost ~]# cat /etc/exports
/nfs_share *(rw,fsid=0,insecure,sync,no_root_squash,no_subtree_check)
2.
Save the configuration file and restart the NFS service.
Configuring CIFS servers
To configure an CIFS server, perform the following tasks:
1.
Right-click the folder that you want to configure as CIFS share and select Properties → Sharing.
2.
Click the Advanced Sharing tab and select Share this folder.
3.
Click the Permissions tab.
4.
Click Add to add names of the users for whom you want to provide access to the CIFS share.
5.
Type the names and click OK.
57
6.
In the Permissions section under Allow column, select Full Control.
Now the selected folder is shared over network and it can be accessed over CIFS protocol by using the
\\<ip address>\share_name folder path.
NOTE: Lifecycle Controller does not support CIFS message signing feature. Therefore, you must disable the Digitally
sign communications (always) option.
Disabling the Digitally sign communications option
To disable the Digitally sign communications (always) option, perform the following tasks:
1.
Open Control Panel and select Administrative Tools.
2.
Click Local Security Policy.
3.
On the left navigation pane, expand the Local Policies option and select Security Options.
4.
Double-click the Microsoft network server: Digitally sign communications (always) option.
5.
Select Disabled and click OK.
Conditions while configuring HTTP server
While configuring the HTTP servers, ensure that:
•
The HTTP server is configured to the default port (80). The Lifecycle Controller web interface accesses the web server using
the default port. If the web server is configured to a port other than the default, Lifecycle Controller will not be able to access
the web server.
•
The Apache web server is set as the default web server. Using other web servers may result in unexpected behavior or errors.
58
7
Maintain
Using Lifecycle Controller, you can maintain the health of a system throughout its life cycle using the features such as Part
Replacement Configuration and Platform Restore.
Platform restore
Lifecycle Controller allows you to create a copy (image file) of the server's profile on the vFlash SD card installed on the server. The
server profile backed up on a vFlash SD card contains the server component configuration and firmware installed on various
components on the server where the card is installed. The backup image file does not contain any operating system or hard-disk
drive data. For more information about the supported components, see Supported Components. For better security, Lifecycle
Controller allows you to remove the vFlash SD card and keep it in a safe location, or you can copy the server profile (backup image)
that is stored on the vFlash SD card to any USB drive or an external network share. Therefore, whenever the firmware is corrupted,
configuration changes are incorrect, or the system board is replaced, you can use the backup image to restore the server to its
previously stored profile. The following features are available to maintain a server:
•
Backup Server Profile — Allows you to create the server profile on a vFlash SD card that is installed on the server. Lifecycle
Controller can create the server profile only on the vFlash SD card.
•
Export Server Profile — Allows you to export the server profile that is stored on the vFlash SD card to a USB drive or a
network share (CIFS or NFS).
•
Import Server Profile — Allows you to restore the backup image from the vFlash SD card, USB drive, or a network share (CIFS
or NFS).
•
Import Server License — Allows you to import an iDRAC license from a network share or a USB drive.
NOTE: This feature is licensed. You must acquire the required license to enable this feature. For more information about
acquiring and using the licenses, see the Integrated Dell Remote Access Controller (iDRAC) User’s Guide at dell.com/
esmmanuals.
About server profile backup image
The server profile backup image file contains:
•
Readable
– System identification information such as model number and Service Tag. For example, R720 and 1P3HRBS.
– Date and time the backup was last taken.
– Currently installed hardware inventory information.
– Firmware for each component.
•
Encrypted
– Component configuration information.
– User name and password for RAID controller and BIOS.
– Component certificates.
– Licenses.
– Signature to validate that the backup file is not tampered and generated by Lifecycle Controller.
The server profile backup image file does not contain:
•
Operating system or any data stored on hard-disk drives or virtual drives.
59
•
vFlash SD card partition information.
•
Lifecycle log.
•
Dell diagnostics.
•
Dell OS Driver Pack.
•
A Local Key Management (LKM) passphrase, if the LKM–based storage encryption is enabled. However, you must provide the
LKM passphrase after performing the restore operation.
Security
The contents of the backup image file cannot be accessed with any application, even if it is generated without a passphrase.
However, if the backup image file is created using a passphrase, Lifecycle Controller uses the passphrase to encrypt the backup
image file with 128-bit encryption.
Size
Based on the server configuration, the size of a backup image file can be a maximum of 384 MB.
Performance
•
Back up — The time taken to collect the required information and store the backup image file on a vFlash SD card is 45 minutes
(maximum).
•
Restore — The time taken to restore a server using a backup image file depends on the number of components installed on the
server. Most of the server components such as BIOS, NIC, RAID, and other host bus adapters require multiple system restarts in
order to restore the server to its previous configuration. Each restart may take 1–15 minutes (for maximum system hardware
configurations). This restart time is in addition to the time taken for accessing the backup image file, which depends on where it
is stored (vFlash SD card, USB drive, or network share).
Supported components
The following table lists the server components that are supported by Lifecycle Controller while performing a backup or restore
operation.
Table 13. Supported Components
Component
Firmware
Configuration
Security Information*
BIOS
Yes
Yes
Yes
RAID Controller
Yes
Yes
NA
NIC
Yes
Yes
NA
iDRAC
Yes
Yes
Yes
OS Driver Pack
NA
NA
NA
Dell Diagnostics
NA
NA
NA
Lifecycle Controller
Yes
NA
NA
Backplane
NA
NA
NA
CPLD
NA
NA
NA
Power Supply Unit
Yes
NA
NA
FC HBA
Yes
Yes
NA
Enclosure
NA
NA
NA
NVMe PCIe SSD drives
NA
NA
NA
OS Collector
NA
NA
NA
HHHL NVMe Adapter
NA
NA
NA
* The security information refers to the user credentials that are used to access the components.
60
Backup server profile
Use this licensed feature to perform the following and store the backup image files in a vFlash SD card:
•
Back up the following:
– Hardware and firmware inventory such as BIOS, NDCs, Lifecycle Controller supported add-in NIC cards, and Storage
Controllers (RAID level, virtual disk, and controller attributes)
– System information
– Lifecycle Controller firmware images, data and configuration, and iDRAC firmware and configuration
•
Optionally, secure the backup image file with a passphrase.
Related links
System or feature behavior during backup
Backing up the server profile
Backing up the server profile
Before you back up the server profile, make sure that the following prerequisites are met:
•
A software license for Dell PowerEdge servers is installed on the server. For more information about managing licenses using the
iDRAC web interface, go to Overview → Server → Licenses, and see the iDRAC Online Help.
•
The server has a valid Service Tag (seven characters).
•
vFlash SD card is installed, initialized, and enabled.
•
vFlash SD card has a minimum free space of 384 MB.
To back up the server profile:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, select Platform Restore.
3.
In the right pane, select Backup Server Profile.
4.
To generate the backup file without entering the passphrase, click Finish.
Alternatively, to generate an encrypted backup file using a passphrase, enter the passphrase and click Finish. In the absence of
a passphrase, Lifecycle Controller encrypts the backup image file with a default passphrase (internally generated).
5.
In the Backup File Passphrase field, enter a passphrase. For example, Rt@#12tv.
NOTE: A valid passphrase contains 8–32 characters. It must include a combination of uppercase and lowercase
letters, numbers, symbols, and must not have white spaces. The passphrase is optional and if used for backup, it
must be used during restore.
6.
In the Confirm Passphrase field, re-enter the passphrase and click Finish.
The system restarts and Lifecycle Controller is disabled. You cannot access Lifecycle Controller until the backup process is
complete. A success message is displayed when you start Lifecycle Controller after backup is complete.
NOTE: You can check the Lifecycle logs in the iDRAC web interface for backup server profile status. To view the log
in Lifecycle Controller after the backup is completed, click Lifecycle Log → View Lifecycle Log History.
NOTE: If FIPS is enabled, you cannot perform any actions associated with the vFlash SD card, such as exporting or
backing up server profile to the vFlash or importing server profile using vFlash.
System or feature behavior during backup
•
Lifecycle Controller is disabled.
•
A partition with a label name SRVCNF is automatically created on the vFlash SD card to store the backup image file. If a partition
with the label name SRVCNF exists, it is overwritten.
•
Takes up to 45 minutes depending on the server configuration.
61
•
Takes a backup of all configuration information.
•
Does not back up diagnostics and driver pack information.
•
Backup fails if an AC power cycle is performed.
Export server profile
Use this licensed feature to export the backup image file stored in the vFlash SD card to a USB drive or a network share.
Related links
System or feature behavior during export
Exporting server profile to USB drive or network share
Exporting server profile to USB drive or network share
Before exporting the server profile, make sure that the following pre-requisites are met:
•
A software license for the Dell PowerEdge servers is installed on the server. For more information about managing licenses using
the iDRAC web interface, go to Overview → Server → Licenses, and see iDRAC Online Help.
•
vFlash SD card is installed in the system and must contain the backup image file.
•
USB drive has a minimum free space of 384 MB.
•
Network share is accessible and has a minimum free space of 384 MB.
•
Use the same vFlash SD card that was used during backup.
NOTE: If FIPS is enabled, you cannot perform any actions associated with the vFlash SD card, such as exporting or
backing up server profile to the vFlash, or importing server profile using vFlash.
To export the server profile to a USB drive or a network share:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, select Platform Restore.
3.
In the right pane, select Export Server Profile.
4.
Select either USB Drive or Network Share, enter the details, and then click Finish.
NOTE: You can also use a USB drive that is attached to the client system while operating remotely. To use the USB
drive remotely, use the Virtual Media feature. For more information, see the Integrated Dell Remote Access
Controller (iDRAC) User’s Guide at dell.com/esmmanuals.
The Backup_<service_tag>_<time_stamp>.img file is exported to the specified location.
Related links
Exporting hardware inventory to a USB drive
Exporting hardware inventory to a network share
System or feature behavior during export
•
Exporting the server profile may take up to five minutes based on the server configuration.
•
Lifecycle Controller exports the backup image file in the Backup _<service_tag>_<time_stamp>.img format. The <service_tag>
is copied from the backup image file name. The <time_stamp> is the time when the backup was initiated.
•
After a successful export, the event is logged in the Lifecycle Log.
Import server profile
Use the Import Server Profile feature to apply a backup to the system from which it was taken previously, and restore the system
hardware and firmware configuration according to the information stored in the backup image file. For more information about the
supported components, see Supported Components. The operation restores the backup information to all the system components
that are located in the same physical location (for example, in the same slot) when the backup was performed. If you install
components such as a RAID controller, NIC, CNA, FC HBA, and hard-disk drive in a slot that is different from the slot they were
installed before backup, the restore operation fails on such components. The failures are logged in the Lifecycle Log.
62
You can cancel a restore job using the iDRAC Settings utility by pressing <F2> during POST, and then clicking Yes under Cancel
Lifecycle Controller Actions or resetting iDRAC. This operation initiates the recovery process and restores the system to a
previously known state. The recovery process may take more than five minutes based on system configuration. To check if the
recovery process is complete, view the Lifecycle logs in the iDRAC web interface.
Related links
Importing server profile from a vFlash SD card, network share, or USB drive
Importing server profile after system board replacement
Importing server profile using a vFlash SD card
Importing server profile from a network share
Importing server profile from a USB drive
Importing server profile from a vFlash SD card, network share, or USB drive
Before importing the server profile, make sure that the following prerequisites are met:
•
The Service Tag of the server is same as when the backup was taken.
•
If you are restoring from a vFlash SD card, the vFlash SD card must be installed and must contain the backup image in a folder
labeled SRVCNF. This image must be from the same server that you are trying to restore.
NOTE: If FIPS is enabled, you cannot perform any actions associated with the vFlash SD card, such as exporting or
backing up server profile to the vFlash, or importing server profile using vFlash.
•
If you are restoring from a network share, make sure that the network share where the backup image file is stored is accessible.
You can import the server profile from a vFlash SD card, Network Share, or a USB drive.
Related links
System or feature behavior during import
Importing server profile using a vFlash SD card
Importing server profile from a network share
Importing server profile from a USB drive
Post-import scenario
Import server profile
Importing server profile using a vFlash SD card
To import from a vFlash SD card:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, select Platform Restore.
3.
In the right pane, select Import Server Profile.
4.
Select vFlash Secure Digital (SD) Card and click Next.
5.
Select either Preserve or Delete.
•
6.
Preserve — Preserves the RAID level, virtual drive, and controller attributes.
• Delete — Deletes the RAID level, virtual drive, and controller attributes.
If you have secured the backup image file with a passphrase, enter the passphrase (entered during backup) in the Backup File
Passphrase field, and then click Finish.
Related links
System or feature behavior during import
Import server profile
Importing server profile after system board replacement
Importing server profile from a network share
To import from a network share:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, select Platform Restore.
3.
In the right pane, select Import Server Profile.
63
4.
Click Local Drive (USB) or Network Share and click Next.
5.
Click Network Share.
6.
Select CIFS or NFS, enter the backup file name along with the directory, subdirectory path, and then click Next.
7.
Select either Preserve or Delete.
•
8.
Preserve configuration — Preserves the RAID level, virtual disk, and controller attributes.
• Delete configuration — Deletes the RAID level, virtual disk, and controller attributes.
If you have secured the backup image file with a passphrase, enter the passphrase (entered during backup) in the Backup File
Passphrase field, and then click Finish.
Related links
System or feature behavior during import
Import server profile
Importing server profile after system board replacement
Importing server profile from a USB drive
To import from a USB drive:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, select Platform Restore.
3.
In the right pane, select Import Server Profile.
4.
Select Local Drive (USB) or Network Share and click Next.
5.
Select USB Drive.
6.
From the Select Device drop-down menu, select the attached USB drive.
7.
In the File Path field, enter the directory or subdirectory path, where the backup image file is stored on the selected device and
click Next.
8.
Select either Preserve or Delete.
•
9.
Preserve — Preserves the RAID level, virtual disk, and controller attributes.
• Delete — Deletes the RAID level, virtual disk, and controller attributes.
If you have secured the backup image file with a passphrase, enter the passphrase (entered during backup) in the Backup File
Passphrase field, and then click Finish.
Related links
System or feature behavior during import
Import server profile
Importing server profile after system board replacement
System or feature behavior during import
•
Lifecycle Controller is not available during restore, and is enabled after the import operation is complete.
•
Restores everything that was backed up, including Lifecycle Controller content.
•
Import may take up to 45 minutes depending on the server configuration.
•
Diagnostics or driver pack information is not restored.
•
If multiple restarts occur during tasks executed in Lifecycle Controller, it is because there was an issue while trying to set the
device configuration, which attempts to perform the task again. Check the Lifecycle Logs for information on the failed device.
•
Import operation for a card fails if the slot in which it was installed earlier has changed.
•
The import operation restores only Perpetual license. The Evaluation license is restored only if it has not expired.
Post-import scenario
The managed-system performs the following operations:
1.
The system if turned on, automatically turns off. If the system boots to an operating system, it attempts to perform a graceful
shutdown. If it is not able to perform a graceful shutdown, it performs a forced shutdown after 15 minutes.
2.
System turns on and boots to System Services to execute tasks to perform firmware restore for supported devices (BIOS,
storage controllers, and Add-in NIC cards).
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3.
System reboots and goes to System Services to execute tasks for firmware validation, configuration restore for supported
devices (BIOS, storage controllers, and Add-in NIC cards) and the final verification of all tasks executed.
4.
System turns off and performs iDRAC configuration and firmware restore. After completion, iDRAC resets and takes up to 10
minutes before the system turns on.
5.
System turns on and the restore process is complete. Check the Lifecycle Logs for the restore process entries.
Related links
Importing server profile from a vFlash SD card, network share, or USB drive
Importing server profile after system board replacement
Before importing the server profile after replacing the system board, make sure that the following prerequisites are met:
•
A backup image of the server with the old system board is present.
•
If you are restoring from a vFlash SD card, it must be installed, and contain the backup image in a folder labeled SRVCNF. This
image must be from the same server that you are trying to restore.
•
If you are restoring from a network share, make sure that the network share where the backup image file is stored is accessible.
After replacing the system board, import the server profile from a vFlash SD card, network share, or a USB device.
•
See Post-Import Scenario.
•
The Service Tag is restored on the new system board from the backup file.
NOTE: Lifecycle Controller prompts you with a dialog box to retrieve the Service Tag and restore the server profile, if
you have replaced a system board and have not entered the Service Tag on the replaced system board.
Related links
Import server profile
Importing server profile using a vFlash SD card
Importing server profile from a network share
Importing server profile from a USB drive
Restoring server profile after system board replacement
When you launch Lifecycle Controller after replacing the system board, a message is displayed prompting you to either retrieve the
Service Tag and the server profile using any of the following:
•
vFlash SD card
•
Easy Restore
To restore the server profile using vFlash SD card:
1.
Press <F10> during POST to launch Lifecycle Controller.
2.
Click Yes on Do you want to restore the service tag? dialog box.
3.
On the Restore Service Tag dialog box:
•
To import a server profile that is stored on a vFlash SD card, click Import Server Profile. For more information about
importing a server profile, see Import Server Profile.
NOTE: To import a server profile, you must have an Enterprise license and administrator-level rights.
•
To manually enter a Service Tag, click Manually configure service tag. On the Service Tag Settings page, type the
Service Tag, and then click OK.
To restore the server profile using Easy Restore:
NOTE: Easy Restore is available only on 13th generation PowerEdge servers that have the Easy Restore flash
memory. Easy Restore is not available on PowerEdge R930.
After you replace the motherboard on your server, Easy Restore allows you to automatically restore the following data:
•
System Service Tag
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•
Licenses data
•
UEFI Diagnostics application
•
System configuration settings—BIOS, iDRAC, and NIC
Easy Restore uses the Easy Restore flash memory to back up the data. When you replace the motherboard and power on the
system, the BIOS queries the iDRAC and prompts you to restore the backed-up data. The first BIOS screen prompts you to
restore the Service Tag, licenses, and UEFI diagnostic application. The second BIOS screen prompts you to restore system
configuration settings. If you choose not to restore data on the first BIOS screen and if you do not set the Service Tag by
another method, the first BIOS screen is displayed again. The second BIOS screen is displayed only once.
NOTE:
•
System configurations settings are backed-up only when CSIOR is enabled. Ensure that Lifecycle Controller and
CSIOR are enabled.
•
System Erase does not clear the data from the Easy Restore flash memory.
•
Easy Restore does not back up other data such as firmware images, vFlash data, or add-in cards data.
Import server license
Use the Import Server License feature to import an iDRAC license from the Lifecycle Controller GUI. The scenarios in which you
may want to import a license are when you set up a new server shipped from the factory, while upgrading an Express license to an
Enterprise license, and so on. You can import the license that is stored on a USB drive or on the network share such as CIFS or NFS.
You can perform the following operations only if you have an evaluation license of Lifecycle Controller:
•
Back up a server profile
•
Export a server profile
•
Configure a vFlash SD card
NOTE: You can import license on PowerEdge 12th generation and later servers. For more information about importing
server license, see the Importing iDRAC License Using Lifecycle Controller white paper at delltechcenter.com/lc.
Importing server license from a network share or USB drive
Before importing a server license, make sure that the following prerequisites are met:
•
The number of licenses already installed on the server must not be more than 16.
•
The license being imported is not expired.
•
The license being imported is not of perpetual type, which has a unique identifier or Service Tag associated with another server.
•
The license being imported is a proper compressed file and not corrupted file.
•
The license being imported must not be already installed on the same server.
•
If importing a leased license, that date of import must be a date after the lease date is activated.
Importing an iDRAC license from a network share
To import a server license from a network share:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Platform Restore.
3.
In the right pane, click Import Server License.
4.
On the Import Server License page, click Network Share.
5.
Click Yes, if the following message appears: Network is not configured. Do you want to configure now?.
For more information about setting up a network connection, see Configuring Network Settings NIC Card. You can test the
connection of a network by clicking Test Network Connection.
6.
If the network is configured, click CIFS or NFS, select or type the appropriate data in the field, and then click Next.
The license is imported, installed, and the following message is displayed:
License successfully Imported.
66
Importing an iDRAC license from a USB drive
To import a server license from a USB drive:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Platform Restore.
3.
In the right pane, click Import Server License.
4.
On the Import Server License page, click USB Drive.
NOTE: If a USB Drive is not connected, the following message is displayed:
Insert Media
5.
From the Select Device drop-down menu, select the attached USB drive.
6.
In the File Path field, enter the directory or subdirectory path, where the backup image file is stored on the selected device and
click Finish.
The license is imported, installed, and the following message is displayed:
License successfully Imported.
Part replacement configuration
Use the Part Replacement feature to automatically update a new part to the firmware version or the configuration of the replaced
part, or both. The update occurs automatically when you reboot your system after replacing the part. It is activated through a
license, and can be disabled remotely using Lifecycle Controller-Remote Services, or through the Lifecycle Controller.
NOTE: Part replacement does not support RAID operations such as resetting configuration, recreating VDs, setting
controller key, or changing controller mode.
On PowerEdge FD332 servers, part replacement is not supported if a single PERC is replaced with a dual PERC or vice versa.
Applying firmware and configuration updates to replaced parts
Before configuring replaced parts, make sure that the following prerequisites are met:
•
Click the Collect System Inventory On Restart option, so that Lifecycle Controller automatically invokes Part Firmware
Update and Part Configuration Update when the system is started.
NOTE: If Collect System Inventory On Restart is disabled, the cache of system inventory information may become
stale if new components are added without manually entering Lifecycle Controller after turning the system on. In
manual mode, press <F10> after the part replacement during a system restart.
•
Make sure that the Disabled option under Part Firmware Update and Part Configuration Update are cleared.
•
The replaced card or part must belong to the same family as the previous component.
•
If the current adapter on the system is NPAR enabled and is replaced with a new adapter, after the host server is turned on,
press <F2> and select System Setup → Device Settings and make sure that the NPAR is enabled. NPAR must be enabled on
the new adapter before using the Part Replacement feature.
To apply part firmware and configuration to replaced parts:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Platform Restore.
3.
In the right pane, click Part Replacement.
The Part Replacement Configuration page is displayed.
4.
From the part firmware update drop-down menu, select one of the following:
•
Disabled — Firmware update on replaced parts is not performed.
•
Allow version upgrade only — Firmware update on replaced parts is performed only if the firmware version of the new
part is earlier than the existing part.
•
Match firmware of replaced part — Firmware on the new part is updated to the version of the original part.
NOTE: Match firmware of replaced part is the default setting.
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5.
From the part configuration update drop-down menu, select one of the following:
•
Disabled — The feature is disabled and the current configuration is not applied if a part is replaced.
•
Apply always — The feature is enabled and the current configuration is applied if a part is replaced.
NOTE: Apply always is the default setting.
•
Apply only if firmware match — The feature is enabled and the current configuration is applied only if the current
firmware matches with the firmware of a replaced part.
Supported devices
You can update the part firmware and configuration for the following devices:
•
Fibre Channel cards
•
NICs
•
PERC series 7, 8, and 9
•
SAS series 7 and 8
•
Power Supply Unit (PSU)
NOTE: PSUs support only firmware update and not part replacement.
Repurpose or retire system
You can erase selective system information by using the Lifecycle Controller Repurpose or Retire System option. This feature
permanently deletes server and storage-related data on selected components of a server before you repurpose or retire a server.
The selected components are then returned to their default state.
NOTE: The Repurpose or Retire System option resets the state of the inventory collection to Enabled, and then
permanently deletes the iDRAC and BIOS configuration information, factory-shipped inventory, configurations, Lifecycle
Log information (historical data and work notes), backup image file, non-volatile (NV) cache, vFlash card, operating
system driver packs, and diagnostics. During this operation, it deletes the hardware and software inventory data related
to the system. However, they are recreated during the next restart of the server. It also deletes the firmware and
previous versions, which will not be available for firmware rollback
NOTE:
•
The Repurpose or Retire System feature is supported on the 12th generation PowerEdge servers with iDRAC and
Lifecycle Controller version 2.10.10.10 or later. You can use this feature on selective components. Whereas, on the 12th
generation of PowerEdge servers with iDRAC and Lifecycle Controller version 2.05.05.05 or earlier, this feature is
supported only on the entire system and not selective components.
•
The Repurpose or Retire System feature does not allow deletion of iDRAC-related license information.
•
PERC NV cache and vFlash card are displayed only if PERC and vFlash cards are available on the server.
Use this feature to delete any sensitive data and configuration-related information when you need to:
•
Retire a managed system.
•
Reuse a managed system for a different application.
Deleting server information
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Hardware Configuration, and then click Repurpose or Retire System.
3.
On the Select Components page, select the features and components to delete from Server Features and Storage
Components.
4.
Click Next.
A summary of the features and components selected for deletion is displayed.
5.
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Read the information on the Summary page and click Finish.
6.
The host server will turn off when the operation is completed, iDRAC will reset.
When the iDRAC is backed up, you must manually turn on the host server. If you select BIOS component for System Erase, a flag is
set to reset the BIOS to default during POST and the server turns off again.
Hardware diagnostics
It is recommended that you run diagnostics using the Hardware Diagnostics utility, as part of a regular maintenance plan to validate
whether or not the system and the attached hardware are functioning properly. As the diagnostics utility has a physical (as opposed
to logical) view of the attached hardware, it can identify hardware problems that the operating system and other online tools cannot
identify. You can use the hardware diagnostics utility to validate the memory, I/O devices, CPU, physical disk drives, and other
peripherals.
Performing hardware diagnostics
To perform hardware diagnostics:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane of Lifecycle Controller, click Hardware Diagnostics.
3.
In the right pane, click Run Hardware Diagnostics.
The diagnostics utility is launched.
4.
Follow the instructions on the screen.
When the tests are complete, results of the diagnostics tests are displayed on the screen. To resolve the problems reported in
the test results, search dell.com/support.
NOTE: To close the Hardware Diagnostics page, restart the system, and press <F10> during POST to start Lifecycle
Controller.
SupportAssist Collection
If you have to work with Dell technical support on an issue with a server but the security policies restrict direct Internet connection,
you can provide technical support with necessary data to facilitate successful troubleshooting of the problem without having to
install any software or download tools from Dell and without having access to the Internet from the server operating system or
Lifecycle Controller. You can send the report from an alternate system and make sure that the data collected from your server is
not viewable by unauthorized individuals while sending it to technical support.
You can generate a health report of the server and using Lifecycle Controller, you can export the report to a location on the
management station (local) or to a shared network location such as Common Internet File System (CIFS) or Network File Share
(NFS). You can then share this report directly with technical support.
NOTE: SupportAssist Collection feature is supported on the 12th generation PowerEdge servers with iDRAC and
Lifecycle Controller version 2.10.10.10 or later.
Lifecycle Controller allows you to collect data from the following options:
•
Hardware
•
Software controller logs
•
OS and Software application data
NOTE: OS and Software application data is enabled only if this data is already collected and cached using the OS
collector tool on iDRAC. Lifecycle Controller displays this option along with the time stamp of data collection. You
can select this option to retrieve the cached data available on the server. For more information on collecting OS and
Software application data using the OS collector tool in iDRAC, see the Integrated Dell Remote Access Controller
(iDRAC) User’s Guide at dell.com/esmmanuals.
SupportAssist Collection is exported in the standard ZIP format. The report contains information that is similar to the information
available in the DSET report such as:
69
•
Hardware and inventory for all components
•
System, Lifecycle Controller, and component attributes
•
BIOS boot order information
•
Installed and available component firmware versions
•
vFlash SD card partition information
•
Fresh Air and component statistics (for applicable servers)
•
Operating system and application information
•
Active Lifecycle Controller logs (archived entries are not included)
•
Component hardware logs
•
Trace logs
•
Storage controller logs
After Lifecycle Controller exports the SupportAssist Collection file, you can delete information that you do not want to share with
technical support. Each time the data is collected, an event is recorded in the Lifecycle Controller Log. The event includes
information such as the interface used, the date and time of export, and iDRAC user name.
Exporting the SupportAssist Collection
Before exporting a report, make sure that:
•
Collect System Inventory On Reboot (CSIOR) is enabled.
•
You have login and server control rights.
To export a SupportAssist Collection:
1.
Start Lifecycle Controller. For more information, see Starting Lifecycle Controller.
2.
In the left pane, click Hardware Diagnostics, and then click Export SupportAssist Collection.
3.
On the Terms and Conditions page, read the conditions and select the I agree to allow Technical Support to use tech
support report data option.
4.
Click Next.
Lifecycle Controller checks the availability of hardware, operating system and application data, and RAID controller logs, and
then displays the options listed in step 5. If the operating system and application data, or RAID controller logs are unavailable,
the relevant options are grayed out. The duration to collect the selected data is displayed next to the options listed in step 5.
5.
On the Select Report Data page, select the options for which you want to create a SupportAssist Collection:
•
Hardware — Collects data pertaining to the server and component inventory, firmware installed on the server,
configuration information, and hardware logs.
•
RAID Controller Logs — Contains information about the storage logs.
•
Operating System and Application Data — Contains information about the operating system and application. The OS and
application data may contain sensitive and personal information. You can choose to exclude this data while collecting the
information.
6.
NOTE: OS and Software application data is enabled only if this data is already collected and cached using the
OS collector tool on iDRAC. Lifecycle Controller only retrieves the cached data. For more information on
collecting OS and Software application data using the OS collector tool in iDRAC, see the Integrated Dell
Remote Access Controller (iDRAC) User’s Guide at dell.com/esmmanuals.
Click Next.
7.
On the Select Export Settings page, type or select the required information and click Next.
For information about the fields on this page, see the Online Help by clicking Help in the upper-right corner of the Lifecycle
Controller application.
70
8.
On the Summary page, verify your selections and click Finish.
71
8
Easy-to-use system component names
The following is the list of most commonly used Fully Qualified Device Descriptors (FQDD) used in all the interfaces including GUI,
Redfish, WSMAN, and RACADM.
•
ALL
•
iDRAC
•
System
•
LifecycleController
•
EventFilters
•
BIOS
•
NIC
•
FC
•
RAID
The following table lists the FQDD of the system components and the equivalent easy-to-use names.
Table 14. Easy-to-use Names of System Components
FQDD of System Component Name
Easy-to-use Name
RAID.Integrated.1-1
Integrated RAID Controller 1
RAID.Slot.1-1
RAID Controller in Slot 1
NIC.Mezzanine.1B-1
NIC in Mezzanine
NIC.Mezzanine.1C-1
NIC.Mezzanine.1C-2
NIC.Mezzanine.3C-2
NonRAID.Integrated.1-1
Integrated Storage Controller 1
NonRAID.Slot.1-1
Storage Controller in Slot 1
NonRAID.Mezzanine.2C-1
Storage Controller in Mezzanine 1 (Fabric C)
NIC.Embedded.1
NIC.Embedded.2
Embedded NIC 1
Embedded NIC 2
NIC.Embedded.1-1
Embedded NIC 1 Port 1
NIC.Embedded.1-1-1
Embedded NIC 1 Port 1 Partition 1
NIC.Slot.1-1
NIC.Slot.1-2
NIC in Slot 1 Port 1
NIC in Slot 1 Port 2
Video.Embedded.1-1
Embedded Video Controller
HostBridge.Embedded.1-1
Embedded Host Bridge 1
ISABridge.Embedded.1-1
Embedded ISA Bridge 2
P2PBridge.Embedded.1-1
Embedded P2P Bridge 3
P2PBridge.Mezzanine.2B-1
Embedded Host Bridge in Mezzanine 1 (Fabric B)
USBUHCI.Embedded.1-1
Embedded USB UHCI 1
USBOHCI.Embedded.1-1
Embedded USB OHCI 1
72
FQDD of System Component Name
Easy-to-use Name
USBEHCI.Embedded.1-1
Embedded USB EHCI 1
Disk.SATAEmbedded.A-1
Disk on Embedded SATA Port A
Optical.SATAEmbedded.B-1
Optical Drive on Embedded SATA Port B
TBU.SATAExternal.C-1
Tape Back-up on External SATA Port C
Disk.USBFront.1-1
Disk connected to front USB 1
Floppy.USBBack.2-1
Floppy-drive connected to back USB 2
Optical.USBFront.1-1
Optical drive connected to front USB 1
Disk.USBInternal.1
Disk connected to Internal USB 1
Optical.iDRACVirtual.1-1
Virtually connected optical drive
Floppy.iDRACVirtual.1-1
Virtually connected floppy drive
Disk.iDRACVirtual frsy.1-1
Virtually connected disk
Floppy.vFlash.<string>
vFlash SD Card Partition 2
Disk.vFlash.<string>
vFlash SD Card Partition 3
iDRAC.Embedded.1-1
iDRAC
System.Embedded.1-1
System
HardDisk.List.1-1
Hard Drive C:
BIOS.Embedded.1-1
System BIOS
BIOS.Setup.1-1
System BIOS Setup
PSU.Slot.1
Power Supply 1
Fan.Embedded.1
Fan 1
System.Chassis.1
Blade Chassis
LCD.Chassis.1
LCD
Fan.Slot. 1
Fan.Slot. 2
Fan.Slot. 3
Fan.Slot. 4
Fan.Slot. 5
Fan.Slot. 6
Fan.Slot. 7
Fan.Slot. 8
Fan.Slot. 9
Fan 1
Fan 2
Fan 3
Fan 4
Fan 5
Fan 6
Fan 7
Fan 8
Fan 9
MC.Chassis.1
MC.Chassis.2
Chassis Management Controller 1
Chassis Management Controller 2
KVM.Chassis.1
KVM
IOM.Slot.1
IOM.Slot.2
IOM.Slot.3
IOM.Slot.4
IOM.Slot.5
IOM.Slot.6
IO Module 1
IO Module 2
IO Module 3
IO Module 4
IO Module 5
IO Module 6
PSU.Slot.1
PSU.Slot.2
PSU.Slot.3
PSU.Slot.4
Power Supply 1
Power Supply 2
Power Supply 3
Power Supply 4
73
FQDD of System Component Name
Easy-to-use Name
PSU.Slot.5
PSU.Slot.6
Power Supply 5
Power Supply 6
CPU.Socket.1
CPU 1
System.Modular.2
Blade 2
DIMM.Socket.A1
DIMM A1
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9
Using the system setup and boot manager
System Setup enables you to manage your system hardware and specify BIOS-level options.
The following keystrokes provide access to system features during startup:
Table 15. System setup keystrokes
Keystroke
Description
<F2>
Opens the System Setup page.
<F10>
Opens and starts Lifecycle Controller, which supports systems management features such as
operating system deployment, hardware diagnostics, firmware updates, and platform configuration,
using a GUI. The feature set available in Lifecycle Controller is determined by the iDRAC license
installed.
<F11>
Opens the BIOS Boot Manager or the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) Boot Manager,
depending on the boot configuration of the system.
<F12>
Starts Preboot Execution Environment (PXE) boot.
From System Setup, you can:
•
Change the NVRAM settings after you add or remove hardware
•
View the system hardware configuration
•
Enable or disable integrated devices
•
Set performance and power management thresholds
•
Manage system security
You can access System Setup using the:
•
Standard graphical browser, which is enabled by default
•
Text browser, which is enabled using Console Redirection
To enable Console Redirection, in System Setup, select System BIOS → Serial Communication screen → Serial
Communication, select On with Console Redirection.
NOTE: By default, help text for the selected field is displayed in the graphical browser. To view the help text in the text
browser, press <F1>.
Choosing the system boot mode
Support site link
System Setup enables you to specify one of the following boot modes for installing your operating system:
•
BIOS boot mode (the default) is the standard BIOS-level boot interface.
•
BIOS boot mode (the default) is the standard BIOS-level boot interface.
NOTE: Dell Storage NAS supports only BIOS mode. You must not change the boot mode to UEFI because the system
does not boot.
•
Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) (the default) boot mode is an enhanced 64-bit boot interface. If you have
configured your system to boot to UEFI mode, it replaces the system BIOS.
75
NOTE: The system supports only BIOS boot mode.
1.
From the System Setup Main Menu, click Boot Settings, and select Boot Mode.
2.
Select the UEFI boot mode you want the system to boot into.
CAUTION: Switching the boot mode may prevent the system from booting if the operating system is not installed in
the same boot mode.
3.
After the system boots in the specified boot mode, proceed to install your operating system from that mode.
NOTE: Operating systems must be UEFI-compatible to be installed from the UEFI boot mode. DOS and 32-bit operating
systems do not support UEFI and can only be installed from the BIOS boot mode.
NOTE: For the latest information about supported operating systems, go to Dell.com/ossupport.
Entering System Setup
1.
Turn on, or restart your system.
2.
Press F2 immediately after you see the following message:
F2 = System Setup
If your operating system begins to load before you press F2, wait for the system to finish booting, and then restart your system
and try again.
Responding to error messages
If an error message is displayed while the system is booting, make a note of the message. For more information, see System Error
Messages.
NOTE: After installing a memory upgrade, it is normal for your system to display a message the first time you start your
system.
Using the system setup navigation keys
Table 16. Using the system setup navigation keys
Keys
Action
Up arrow
Moves to the previous field.
Down arrow
Moves to the next field.
<Enter>
Allows you to type in a value in the selected field (if applicable) or follow the link in the field.
Spacebar
Expands or collapses a drop-down menu, if applicable.
<Tab>
Moves to the next focus area.
NOTE: For the standard graphics browser only.
<Esc>
Moves to the previous page till you view the main screen. Pressing <Esc> in the main screen displays a
message that prompts you to save any unsaved changes and restarts the system.
<F1>
Displays the System Setup help file.
NOTE: For most of the options, any changes that you make are recorded but do not take effect
until you restart the system.
System Setup options
76
System Setup Main screen
NOTE: Press <Alt><F> to reset the BIOS or UEFI settings to their default settings.
Menu item
Description
System BIOS
This option is used to view and configure BIOS settings.
iDRAC Settings
This option is used to view and configure iDRAC settings.
Device Settings
This option is used to view and configure device settings.
System BIOS screen
NOTE: The options for System Setup change based on the system configuration.
NOTE: System Setup defaults are listed under their respective options in the following sections, where applicable.
Menu Item
Description
System Information Displays information about the system such as the system model name, BIOS version, Service Tag, and so
on.
Memory Settings
Displays information and options related to installed memory.
Processor Settings
Displays information and options related to the processor such as speed, cache size, and so on.
SATA Settings
Displays options to enable or disable the integrated SATA controller and ports.
NOTE: The SATA setting is not available on the PowerEdge R720xd server.
Boot Settings
Displays options to specify the boot mode (BIOS or UEFI). Enables you to modify UEFI and BIOS boot
settings.
Integrated Devices
Displays options to enable or disable integrated device controllers and ports, and to specify related features
and options.
Serial
Communication
Displays options to enable or disable the serial ports and specify related features and options.
System Profile
Settings
Displays options to change the processor power management settings, memory frequency, and so on.
System Security
Displays options to configure the system security settings like, system password, setup password, TPM
security, and so on. It also enables or disables support for local BIOS update, the power and NMI buttons on
the system.
Miscellaneous
Settings
Displays options to change the system date, time, and so on.
System information screen
You can use the System Information screen to view system properties such as Service Tag, system model name, and the BIOS
version.
To view the System Information screen, click System Setup Main Menu → System BIOS → System Information.
The System Information screen details are explained as follows:
Menu Item
Description
System Model Name Displays the system model name.
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Menu Item
Description
System BIOS
Version
Displays the BIOS version installed on the system.
System Service Tag
Displays the system Service Tag.
System
Manufacturer
Displays the name of the system manufacturer.
System
Displays the contact information of the system manufacturer.
Manufacturer
Contact Information
Memory Settings screen
Menu Item
Description
System Memory
Size
Displays the amount of memory installed in the system.
System Memory
Type
Displays the type of memory installed in the system.
System Memory
Speed
Displays the system memory speed.
System Memory
Voltage
Displays the system memory voltage.
Video Memory
Displays the amount of video memory.
System Memory
Testing
Specifies whether system memory tests are run during system boot. Options are Enabled and Disabled. By
default, the System Memory Testing option is set to Disabled.
Memory Operating
Mode
Specifies the memory operating mode. The options available are Optimizer Mode, Advanced ECC Mode,
Mirror Mode, Spare Mode, Spare with Advanced ECC Mode, and Dell Fault Resilient Mode. By default,
the Memory Operating Mode option is set to Optimizer Mode.
NOTE: The Memory Operating Mode can have different defaults and available options based on
the memory configuration of your system.
NOTE: The Dell Fault Resilient Mode establishes an area of memory that is fault resilient. This
mode can be used by an operating system that supports the feature to load critical applications or
enables the operating system kernel to maximize system availability.
Node Interleaving
If this field is Enabled, memory interleaving is supported if a symmetric memory configuration is installed. If
Disabled, the system supports Non-Uniform Memory architecture (NUMA) (asymmetric) memory
configurations. By default, Node Interleaving option is set to Disabled.
Serial Debug Output By default, it is set to disabled.
Processor settings screen
NOTE: Depending on the platform, some attributes may or may not be displayed.
Menu Item
Description
Logical Processor
Allows you to enable or disable logical processors and display the number of logical processors. If the
Logical Processor option is set to Enabled, the BIOS displays all the logical processors. If this option is set
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Menu Item
Description
to Disabled, the BIOS only displays one logical processor per core. By default, the Logical Processor option
is set to Enabled.
QPI Speed
Allows you to set the QuickPath Interconnect (QPI) data rate settings. By default, the QPI Speed option is
set to Maximum data rate.
NOTE: QPI Speed displays only when both the processors are installed.
Alternate RTID
(Requestor
Transaction ID)
Setting
Allows you to allocate more RTIDs to the remote socket, increasing cache performance between the
sockets or work in normal mode for NUMA. By default, the Alternate RTID (Requestor Transaction ID)
Setting is set to Disabled.
Virtualization
Technology
Allows you to enable or disable the additional hardware capabilities provided for virtualization. By default, the
Virtualization Technology option is set to Enabled.
Adjacent Cache Line Allows you to optimize the system for applications that require high utilization of sequential memory access.
Prefetch
By default, the Adjacent Cache Line Prefetch option is set to Enabled. You can disable this option for
applications that require high utilization of random memory access.
Hardware
Prefetcher
Allows you to enable or disable the hardware prefetcher. By default, the Hardware Prefetcher option is set
to Enabled.
DCU Streamer
Prefetcher
Allows you to enable or disable the Data Cache Unit (DCU) streamer prefetcher. By default, the DCU
Streamer Prefetcher option is set to Enabled.
DCU IP Prefetcher
Allows you to enable or disable the Data Cache Unit (DCU) IP prefetcher. By default, the DCU IP
Prefetcher option is set to Enabled.
Execute Disable
Allows you enable or disable execute disable memory protection technology. By default, the Execute
Disable option is set to Enabled.
Logical Processor
Idling
Allows you to enable or disable the OS capability to put logical processors in the idling state in order to
reduce power consumption. By default, the option is set to Disabled.
Number of Cores
per Processor
Allows you to control the number of enabled cores in each processor. By default, the Number of Cores per
Processor option is set to All.
Processor 64-bit
Support
Specifies if the processor(s) support 64-bit extensions.
Processor Core
Speed
Displays the maximum core frequency of the processor.
Processor Bus
Speed
Displays the bus speed of the processors.
Processor 1
NOTE: The processor bus speed option displays only when both the processors are installed.
NOTE: The following settings are displayed for each processor installed in the system.
Family-ModelStepping
Displays the family, model and stepping of the processor as defined by Intel.
Brand
Displays the brand name reported by the processor.
Level 2 Cache
Displays the total L2 cache.
Level 3 Cache
Displays the total L3 cache.
Number of Cores
Displays the number of cores per processor.
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Menu Item
Description
Dell Controlled
Turbo
Allows you to control turbo engagement. This feature is also referred to as Dell Processor Acceleration
Technology (DPAT).
NOTE: Depending on the platform, some attributes may or may not be displayed.
SATA Settings Screen
Menu Item
Description
Embedded SATA
Allows the embedded SATA to be set to Off, ATA, AHCI, or RAID mode. By default, Embedded SATA is set
to AHCI Mode.
Port A
Auto enables BIOS support for the device attached to SATA port A. By default, Port A is set to Auto.
Port B
Auto enables BIOS support for the device attached to SATA port B. By default, Port B is set to Auto.
Port C
Auto enables BIOS support for the device attached to SATA port C. By default, Port C is set to Auto.
Port D
Auto enables BIOS support for the device attached to SATA port D. By default, Port D is set to Auto.
Port E
Auto enables BIOS support for the device attached to SATA port E. By default, Port E is set to Auto.
Port F
Auto enables BIOS support for the device attached to SATA port F. By default, Port F is set to Auto.
NOTE: Ports A, B, C, and D are used for the backplane drives, port E for the optical drive (CD/DVD), and port F for the
tape drive.
Boot Settings screen
Menu item
Description
Boot Mode
Allows you to set the boot mode of the system.
CAUTION: Switching the boot mode may prevent the system from booting if the operating system
is not installed in the same boot mode.
If the operating system supports UEFI, you can set this option to UEFI. Setting this field to BIOS allows
compatibility with non-UEFI operating systems. By default, the Boot Mode option is set to BIOS.
NOTE: Setting this field to UEFI disables BIOS Boot Settings menu. Setting this field to BIOS
disables the UEFI Boot Settings menu.
Boot Sequence
Retry
Allows you to enable or disable the boot sequence retry feature. If this field is enabled and the system fails
to boot, the system reattempts the boot sequence after 30 seconds. By default, the Boot Sequence Retry
option is set to Disabled.
BIOS Boot Settings
Allows you to enable or disable BIOS Boot options.
NOTE: This option is enabled only if the boot mode is BIOS.
UEFI Boot Settings
Allows you to enable or disable UEFI Boot options. The Boot options include IPv4 PXE and IPv6 PXE. By
default, the UEFI PXE boot protocol is set to IPv4.
NOTE: This option is enabled only if the boot mode is UEFI.
One-Time Boot
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Allows you to enable or disable a one-time boot from a selected device.
Integrated devices screen
Menu Item
Description
Integrated RAID
Controller
Allows you to enable or disable the integrated RAID controller. By default, the Integrated RAID Controller
option is set to Enabled.
User Accessible USB Allows you enable or disable the user accessible USB ports. Selecting Only Back Ports On disables the
Ports
front USB ports and selecting All Ports Off disables both front and back USB ports. By default, the User
Accessible USB Ports option is set to All Ports On.
Internal USB Port
Allows you to enable or disable the internal USB port. By default, the Internal USB Port option is set to On.
Internal SD Card
Port
Enables or disables the system’s internal SD card port. By default, the Internal SD Card Port option is set
to On.
NOTE: This option is displayed only if IDSDM is installed on the system board.
Internal SD Card
Redundancy
If set to Mirror mode, data is written on both SD cards. If any one of the SD card fails, data is written to the
active SD card. Data from this card is copied to the replacement SD card at the next boot. By default,
Internal SD Card Redundancy option is set to Mirror.
NOTE: This option is displayed only if IDSDM is installed on the system board.
Integrated Network
Card 1
Allows you to enable or disable the integrated network card 1. By default, the Integrated Network Card 1
option is set to Enabled.
OS Watchdog Timer Allows you to enable or disable the OS watchdog timer. When this field is enabled, the operating system
initializes the timer and the OS watchdog timer helps in recovering the operating system. By default, the OS
Watchdog Timer option is set to Disabled.
Embedded Video
Controller
Allows you to enable or disable the Embedded Video Controller. By default, the embedded video controller
is set to Enabled.
SR-IOV Global
Enable
Allows you to enable or disable the BIOS configuration of Single Root I/O Virtualization (SR-IOV) devices.
By default, the SR-IOV Global Enable option is set to Disabled.
Memory Mapped
I/O above 4GB
Allows you to enable support for PCIe devices that require large amounts of memory. By default, the option
is set to Enabled.
Slot Disablement
Allows you to enable or disable available PCIe slots on your system. The Slot Disablement feature controls
the configuration of PCIe cards installed in the specified slot.
CAUTION: Slot disablement must be used only when the installed peripheral card is preventing
booting into the Operating System or causing delays in system startup. If the slot is disabled, both
the Option ROM and UEFI driver are disabled.
Serial communications screen
Menu Item
Description
Serial
Communication
Allows you to select serial communication devices (Serial Device 1 and Serial Device 2) in the BIOS. BIOS
console redirection can also be enabled and the port address can be specified. By default, Serial
Communication option is set to On without Console Redirection.
Serial Port Address
Allows you to set the port address for serial devices. By default, the Serial Port Address option is set to
Serial Device 1=COM2, Serial Device 2=COM1.
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Menu Item
Description
NOTE: Only Serial Device 2 can be used for Serial Over LAN (SOL). To use console redirection by
SOL, configure the same port address for console redirection and the serial device.
External Serial
Connector
Allows you to associate the external serial connector to serial device 1, serial device 2, or remote access
device. By default, the External Serial Connector option is set to Serial Device1.
NOTE: Only Serial Device 2 can be used for SOL. To use console redirection by SOL, configure
the same port address for console redirection and the serial device.
Failsafe Baud Rate
Displays the failsafe baud rate for console redirection. The BIOS attempts to determine the baud rate
automatically. This failsafe baud rate is used only if the attempt fails and the value must not be changed. By
default, the Failsafe Baud Rate option is set to 11520.
Remote Terminal
Type
Allows you to set the remote console terminal type. By default, the Remote Terminal Type option is set to
VT 100/VT 220.
Redirection After
Boot
Allows you to enable or disable to the BIOS console redirection when the operating system is loaded. By
default, the Redirection After Boot option is set to Enabled.
System Profile Settings screen
You can use the System Profile Settings screen to enable specific system performance settings such as power management.
To view the System Profile Settings screen, click System Setup Main Menu → System BIOS → System Profile Settings.
The System Profile Settings screen details are explained as follows:
Option
Description
System Profile
Sets the system profile. If you set the System Profile option to a mode other than Custom, the BIOS
automatically sets the rest of the options. You can only change the rest of the options if the mode is set to
Custom. This option is set to Performance Per Watt Optimized (DAPC) by default. DAPC is Dell Active
Power Controller.Performance Per Watt (OS).
NOTE: All the parameters on the system profile setting screen available only when the System
Profile option is set to Custom.
CPU Power
Management
Sets the CPU power management. This option is set to System DBPM (DAPC)OS DBPM by default.
DBPM is Demand-Based Power Management.
Memory Frequency Sets the speed of the system memory. You can select Maximum Performance, Maximum Reliability, or a
specific speed.
Turbo Boost
Enables or disables the processor to operate in turbo boost mode. This option is set to Enabled by default.
C States
Enables or disables the processor to operate in all available power states. This option is set to Enabled by
default.
Monitor/Mwait
Enables the Monitor/Mwait instructions in the processor. This option is set to Enabled for all system
profiles, except Custom by default.
NOTE: This option can be disabled only if the C States option in the Custom mode is set to
disabled.
NOTE: When C States is set to Enabled in the Custom mode, changing the Monitor/Mwait setting
does not impact the system power or performance.
Memory Patrol
Scrub
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Sets the memory patrol scrub frequency. This option is set to Standard by default.
Option
Description
Memory Refresh
Rate
Sets the memory refresh rate to either 1x or 2x. This option is set to 1x by default.
Memory Operating
Voltage
Sets the DIMM voltage selection. When set to Auto, the system automatically sets the system voltage to
the optimal setting based on the DIMM capacity and the number of DIMMs installed. By default, the
Memory Operating Voltage option is set to Auto.
Collaborative CPU
Performance
Control
Enables or disables the CPU power management. When set to Enabled, the CPU power management is
controlled by the OS DBPM and the System DBPM (DAPC). This option is set to Disabled by default.
System security screen
Menu Item
Description
Intel AES-NI
Improves the speed of applications by performing encryption and decryption using the Advanced Encryption
Standard Instruction Set and is set to Enabled by default.
System Password
Allows you to set the system password. This option is set to Enabled by default and is read-only if the
password jumper is not installed in the system.
Setup Password
Allows you to set the setup password. This option is read-only if the password jumper is not installed in the
system.
Password Status
Allows you to lock the system password. By default, the Password Status option is set to Unlocked.
TPM Security
Allows you to control the reporting mode of the Trusted Platform Module (TPM). By default, the TPM
Security option is set to Off. You can only modify the TPM Status, TPM Activation , and Intel TXT fields if
the TPM Status field is set to either On with Pre-boot Measurements or On without Pre-boot
Measurements.
TPM Activation
Allows you to change the operational state of the TPM. By default, the TPM Activation option is set to No
Change.
TPM Status
Displays the TPM status.
TPM Clear
CAUTION: Clearing the TPM results in the loss of all keys in the TPM. The loss of TPM keys may
affect booting to the operating system.
Allows you to clear all the contents of the TPM. By default, the TPM Clear option is set to No.
Intel TXT
Allows you to enable or disable Intel Trusted Execution Technology (TXT). To enable Intel TXT,
Virtualization Technology must be enabled and TPM Security must be Enabled with Pre-boot
measurements. By default, the Intel TXT option is set to Off.
BIOS Update
Control
Allows you to update the BIOS using either DOS or UEFI shell-based flash utilities. For environments that do
not require local BIOS updates, it is recommended to set this option to Disabled. By default, the BIOS
Update Control option is set to Unlocked.
NOTE: BIOS updates using the Dell Update Package are not affected by this option.
Power Button
Allows you to enable or disable the power button on the front of the system. By default, the Power Button
option is set to Enabled.
NMI Button
Allows you to enable or disable the NMI button on the front of the system. By default, the NMI Button
option is set to Disabled.
AC Power Recovery Allows you to set how the system reacts after AC power is restored to the system. By default, the AC
Power Recovery option is set to Last.
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Menu Item
Description
NOTE: Set the AC Power Recovery option to On or Last to enable or disable the AC Power
Recovery Delay option.
AC Power Recovery Allows you to set how the system supports staggering of power up after AC power is restored to the
Delay
system. By default, the AC Power Recovery Delay option is set to Immediate.
NOTE: Set the AC Power Recovery Delay option to User to enable or disable the User Defined
Delay option.
User Defined Delay
(60s to 240s)
Allows you to set the User Defined Delay when the User Defined option for AC Power Recovery Delay is
selected.
Miscellaneous settings
Menu Item
Description
System Time
Allows you to set the time on the system.
System Date
Allows you to set the date on the system.
Asset Tag
Displays the asset tag and allows you to modify it for security and tracking purposes.
Keyboard NumLock
Allows you to set whether the system boots with the NumLock enabled or disabled. By default the
Keyboard NumLock is set to On.
NOTE: This option does not apply to 84-key keyboards.
Report Keyboard
Errors
Allows you to set whether keyboard-related error messages are reported during system boot. By default,
the Report Keyboard Errors option is set to Report.
F1/F2 Prompt on
Error
Allows you to enable or disable the F1/F2 prompt on error. By default, F1/F2 Prompt on Error is set to
Enabled.
In-System
Characterization
This option enables or disables In-System Characterization. By default, In-System Characterization is set
to Enabled.
System and setup password features
You can create a system password and a setup password to secure your system. To enable creation of the system and setup
password, the password jumper must be set to enabled. For more information on the password jumper settings, see System Board
Jumper Settings.
System password
This is the password that you must enter before you can boot your system.
Setup password
This is the password that you must enter to access and make changes to the BIOS or UEFI settings of your
system.
CAUTION: Avoid leaving your system running and unattended. Enabling the password feature provides a basic level of
security for the data on your system.
NOTE: Your system is shipped with the system and setup password feature disabled.
Assigning a system and/or setup password
The password jumper enables or disables the System Password and Setup Password features. For more information on the
password jumper settings, see System board jumper settings. .
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NOTE:
You can assign a new System Password or Setup Password or change an existing System Password or Setup Password only when
the password jumper setting is enabled and Password Status is set to Unlocked. If the Password Status is set to Locked, you
cannot change the System Password or Setup Password.
If the password jumper setting is disabled, the existing System Password and Setup Password is deleted and you need not provide
the system password to boot the system.
1.
To enter System Setup, press F2 immediately after a power-on or reboot.
2.
In the System Setup Main Menu, select System BIOS and press Enter.
3.
In the System BIOS screen, select System Security and press Enter.
4.
In the System Security screen, verify that Password Status is Unlocked.
5.
Select System Password, enter your system password, and press Enter or Tab.
Use the following guidelines to assign the system password:
•
A password can have up to 32 characters.
•
The password can contain the numbers 0 through 9.
•
Only the following special characters are allowed: space, (”), (+), (,), (-), (.), (/), (;), ([), (\), (]), (`).
A message prompts you to re-enter the system password.
6.
Re-enter the system password and click OK.
7.
Select Setup Password, enter your system password and press Enter or Tab.
A message prompts you to re-enter the setup password.
8.
Re-enter the setup password click OK.
9.
Press Esc to return to the System BIOS screen. Press Esc again, and a message prompts you to save the changes.
NOTE: Password protection does not take effect until the system reboots.
Deleting or changing an existing system and/or setup password
Ensure that the Password jumper is set to enabled and the Password Status is Unlocked before attempting to delete or change
the existing System and/or Setup password. You cannot delete or change an existing System or Setup password if the Password
Status is Locked.
To delete or change the existing System and/or Setup password:
1.
To enter System Setup, press <F2> immediately after a power-on or restart.
2.
In the System Setup Main Menu, select System BIOS and press <Enter>.
The System BIOS screen is displayed.
3.
In the System BIOS Screen, select System Security and press <Enter>.
The System Security screen is displayed.
4.
In the System Security screen, verify that Password Status is Unlocked.
5.
Select System Password, alter or delete the existing system password and press <Enter> or <Tab>.
6.
Select Setup Password, alter or delete the existing setup password and press <Enter> or <Tab>.
NOTE: If you change the System and/or Setup password a message prompts you to re-enter the new password. If
you delete the System and/or Setup password, a message prompts you to confirm the deletion.
7.
Press <Esc> to return to the System BIOS screen. Press <Esc> again, and a message prompts you to save the changes.
NOTE: You can disable password security while logging on to the system. To disable the password security, turn on or
reboot your system, type your password and press <Ctrl><Enter>.
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Using your system password to secure your system
Support site link
If you have assigned a setup password, the system accepts your setup password as an alternate system password.
1.
Turn on or reboot your system.
2.
Type the system password and press Enter.
When Password Status is set to Locked, type the system password and press Enter when prompted at reboot.
NOTE: If an incorrect system password is typed, the system displays a message and prompts you to reenter your
password. You have three attempts to type the correct password. After the third unsuccessful attempt, the system
displays an error message that the system has stopped functioning and must be turned off. Even after you turn off and
restart the system, the error message is displayed until the correct password is entered.
Operating with a setup password enabled
If Setup Password is set to Enabled, type the correct setup password before modifying the system setup options.
If you do not type the correct password in three attempts, the system displays the following message:
Invalid Password! Number of unsuccessful password attempts: <x> System Halted! Must power
down.
Password Invalid. Number of unsuccessful password attempts: <x> Maximum number of password
attempts exceeded.System halted.
Even after you turn off and restart the system, the error message is displayed until the correct password is typed. The following
options are exceptions:
•
If System Password is not set to Enabled and is not locked through the Password Status option, you can assign a system
password. For more information, see the System Security Settings screen section.
•
You cannot disable or change an existing system password.
NOTE: You can use the password status option with the setup password option to protect the system password from
unauthorized changes.
Entering the UEFI boot manager
NOTE: Operating systems must be 64-bit UEFI-compatible (for example, Microsoft Windows Server 2008 x64 version)
to be installed from the UEFI boot mode. DOS and 32-bit operating systems can only be installed from the BIOS boot
mode.
The Boot Manager enables you to:
•
Add, delete, and arrange boot options.
•
Access System Setup and BIOS-level boot options without restarting.
To enter the Boot Manager:
1.
Turn on or restart your system.
2.
Press <F11> after you see the following message:
<F11> = UEFI Boot Manager
If your operating system begins to load before you press <F11>, allow the system to finish booting, and then restart your
system and try again.
NOTE: On 13th generation PowerEdge servers, F11 allows you to access the Boot menu depending on the boot
mode setting. If boot mode is set to UEFI, you can access only the UEFI boot mode and you cannot access the BIOS
boot mode anymore.
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Using the boot manager navigation keys
Key
Description
Up arrow
Moves to the previous field.
Down arrow
Moves to the next field.
<Enter>
Allows you to type in a value in the selected field (if applicable) or follow the link in the field.
Spacebar
Expands or collapses a drop-down list, if applicable.
<Tab>
Moves to the next focus area.
NOTE: For the standard graphics browser only.
<Esc>
Moves to the previous page till you view the main screen. Pressing <Esc> in the main screen exits the Boot
Manager and proceeds with system boot.
<F1>
Displays the System Setup help file.
NOTE: For most of the options, any changes that you make are recorded but do not take effect until you restart the
system.
Boot Manager screen
Menu Item
Description
Continue Normal
Boot
The system attempts to boot to devices starting with the first item in the boot order. If the boot attempt
fails, the system continues with the next item in the boot order until the boot is successful or no more boot
options are found.
BIOS Boot Menu
Displays the list of available BIOS boot options (marked with asterisks). Select the boot option you wish to
use and press <Enter>.
UEFI Boot Menu
Displays the list of available UEFI boot options (marked with asterisks). Select the boot option you wish to
use and press <Enter>. The UEFI Boot Menu enables you to Add Boot Option, Delete Boot Option, or
Boot From File.
Driver Health Menu
Displays a list of the drivers installed on the system and their health status.
Launch System
Setup
Enables you to access the System Setup.
System Utilities
Enables you to access the BIOS Update File Explorer, run the Dell Diagnostics program, and reboot the
system.
UEFI Boot menu
Menu Item
Description
Select UEFI Boot
Option
Displays the list of available UEFI boot options (marked with asterisks), select the boot option you wish to
use and press <Enter>.
Add Boot Option
Adds a new boot option.
Delete Boot Option
Deletes an existing boot option.
Boot From File
Sets a one-time boot option not included in the boot option list.
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Embedded systems management
The Dell Lifecycle Controller provides advanced embedded systems management throughout the system’s lifecycle. The Dell
Lifecycle Controller can be started during the boot sequence and can function independently of the operating system.
NOTE: Certain platform configurations may not support the full set of features provided by the Dell Lifecycle Controller.
For more information about setting up the Dell Lifecycle Controller, configuring hardware and firmware, and deploying the operating
system, see the Dell Lifecycle Controller documentation at Dell.com/idracmanuals.
iDRAC settings utility
The iDRAC Settings utility is an interface to set up and configure the iDRAC parameters using UEFI. You can enable or disable
various iDRAC parameters using the iDRAC Settings Utility.
NOTE: Accessing some of the features on the iDRAC Settings Utility requires the iDRAC Enterprise License upgrade.
For more information on using iDRAC, see the Integrated Dell Remote Access Controller (iDRAC8) and iDRAC7 User’s Guide at
dell.com/esmmanuals.
Entering the iDRAC settings utility
1.
Turn on or restart the managed system.
2.
Press <F2> during POST.
3.
In the System Setup Main Menu page, click iDRAC Settings.
The iDRAC Settings screen is displayed.
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10
Troubleshooting and frequently asked questions
This section describes the error messages commonly generated by Lifecycle Controller and provides suggestions for resolving the
issues. This section also lists the questions that are frequently asked by Lifecycle Controller users.
Error messages
Each error message that is generated from Lifecycle Controller has a Message ID, Message Description, and Recommended
Response Action in a single dialog box. If you want to view the detailed description about a message, see the Dell Event Message
Reference Guide at dell.com/support/home.
Frequently asked questions
1.
When Lifecycle Controller downloads updates where are the files stored?
The files are stored in a volatile memory, on the main system board. This memory is not removable and is not accessible
through the operating system.
2.
Is a virtual media device or vFlash SD card required to store data for updates?
No. The files are stored in memory on the main system board.
3.
What is virtual media?
Virtual media is remote media such as CDs, DVDs, and USB disk drives that a server identifies as local media.
4.
What should I do if an update fails?
If an update fails, Lifecycle Controller restarts, and then attempts all the pending updates that are selected. After the final
restart, the system opens the Lifecycle Controller Home page. Launch Firmware Update again, select the updates that failed,
and then click Apply.
NOTE: If the iDRAC firmware update is interrupted, you may have to wait up to 30 minutes before attempting
another iDRAC firmware update.
5.
What is vFlash SD card?
vFlash SD card is a formatted SD (Secure Digital) card that plugs into iDRAC Enterprise. vFlash SD card can be formatted and
enabled through iDRAC to make it accessible as a USB drive for data storage. Virtual flash is a partition on vFlash SD card to
which you can remotely write an ISO file. For more information, see the Integrated Dell Remote Access Controller (iDRAC)
User’s Guide at dell.com/esmmanuals.
6.
Can I add my own drivers to use for operating system installation?
No, you cannot add your own drivers for operating system installation. For more information on updating the drivers that are
used for operating system installation, see Updating Platform.
7.
Can I update the drivers used by an already-installed operating system through Lifecycle Controller?
No, Lifecycle Controller only provides drivers that are required for operating system installation. To update the drivers used by
an installed operating system, see your operating system’s Help documentation.
8.
Can I add my own drivers and firmware for updating Lifecycle Controller to a local USB drive?
No, only drivers and firmware downloaded from the Dell Server Updates DVD are supported. For more information, see
Configuring Local USB Drive.
9.
Can I delete Lifecycle Controller?
No.
10.
Can I use a virtual media for the operating system media source during installation?
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Yes. For more information about iDRAC, see the Integrated Dell Remote Access Controller (iDRAC) User’s Guide at dell.com/
esmmanuals.
11.
Can I use a virtual USB drive to update the repository?
Yes. For more information on using a virtual USB drive to update the repository, see the Integrated Dell Remote Access
Controller (iDRAC) User’s Guide at dell.com/esmmanuals.
12.
What is UEFI? With which version of UEFI does Lifecycle Controller comply?
Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) is a specification that defines a model for the interface between the operating
systems and firmware on a server. The interface consists of data tables that contain platform-related information, along with
boot and runtime calls available to the operating system and operating system loaders. This interface provides a standard
environment for booting an operating system and running preboot applications. Lifecycle Controller complies with the UEFI
version 2.3. For more information, go to uefi.org.
13.
Within Hardware Configuration, what is the difference between the Configuration Wizards and Advanced Configuration?
Lifecycle Controller offers two methods to configure hardware: Configuration Wizards and Advanced Configuration.
Configuration Wizards guide you through a sequence of tasks to configure your system devices. The Configuration Wizards
include iDRAC, RAID, System Date/Time, and Physical Security. For more information, see Configuring System and Advanced
Hardware Configuration.
Advanced Configuration allows you to configure Human Interface Infrastructure (HII) –enabled devices (for example, NICs and
BIOS). For more information Advanced Hardware Configuration.
14.
Does Lifecycle Controller support rollback of BIOS and firmware?
Yes. For more information, see Firmware Rollback.
15.
Which devices support system updates?
Currently, Lifecycle Controller supports updates to the BIOS, iDRAC firmware, power supply firmware, and certain RAID and
NIC controller firmware. For more information, see Updating Firmware.
16.
What should I do if my system stops responding while using Lifecycle Controller?If your system stops responding while
using Lifecycle Controller, a black screen with red text is displayed. To resolve this problem, try restarting your system and
enabling Lifecycle Controller. If the issue persists, contact your service provider. For more information about recovering
Lifecycle Controller from the Lifecycle Controller Update Required mode, see the Recovery from Lifecycle Controller Update
Required white paper available at delltechcenter.com/lc.
17.
How do I find out the currently installed version details of the Lifecycle Controller product?
Click About on the top right corner of the Lifecycle Controller home page.
18.
What should I do if I have an issue with mouse cursor synchronization when I access Lifecycle Controller through the
iDRAC Virtual Console?
Make sure that the Single Cursor option under Tools menu is selected on the iDRAC Virtual Console client. For more
information, see the Integrated Dell Remote Access Controller (iDRAC) User’s Guide at dell.com/esmmanuals.
19.
Why should the CSIOR be enabled?
The Collect System Inventory On Restart (CSIOR) option must be enabled so that Lifecycle Controller can automatically
collect the details of the hardware and software available on the system, update the database, and invoke part firmware
update and hardware configuration at system startup. If you do not enable CSIOR, you must boot into LC UI and exit to sync
and update software or hardware inventory.
20. Why are some features not accessible in Lifecycle Controller?
The features such as Lifecycle Log, Hardware Inventory (View and Export), Part Replacement, and vFlash SD card
configuration depend on the latest iDRAC firmware. Make sure that the latest iDRAC firmware with Enterprise license is
installed.
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