Windows Vista Just the Steps for Dummies (ISBN

Windows Vista
Just the Steps
™
™
FOR
DUMmIES
‰
by Nancy Muir
Windows Vista
Just the Steps
™
™
FOR
DUMmIES
‰
by Nancy Muir
Windows Vista™ Just the Steps™ For Dummies®
Published by
Wiley Publishing, Inc.
111 River Street
Hoboken, NJ 07030-5774
www.wiley.com
Copyright © 2007 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana
Published by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana
Published simultaneously in Canada
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Library of Congress Control Number: 2006936744
ISBN: 978-0-471-78685-6
Manufactured in the United States of America
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
1B/QX/RS/QW/IN
About the Author
Nancy Muir has written over 50 books on topics ranging from desktop applications to online safety and
distance learning. She has also contributed articles to
several national magazines on topics such as distance
learning and home design. Prior to her freelance career,
Nancy worked in the software and book publishing
industries and has taught technical writing at the
university level. She holds a certificate in distance
learning design.
Dedication
To my wonderful husband, Earl, for his neverending
support and love. And to his folks, Nettie and Dick,
for putting up with my hectic schedule during their
summer visit with grace and humor.
Author’s Acknowledgments
The author would like to thank the folks at Wiley for
their continued faith in her work, and specifically
Kyle Looper and Blair Pottenger, the acquisitions
and project editors on this book, respectively.
Their support and encouragement made working on
a tight schedule with a very new version of Windows
bearable!
Publisher’s Acknowledgments
We’re proud of this book; please send us your comments through our online registration form located at www.dummies.com/register/.
Some of the people who helped bring this book to market include the following:
Acquisitions, Editorial, and Media Development
Composition Services
Project Editor: Blair J. Pottenger
Project Coordinator: Jennifer Theriot
Acquisitions Editor: Kyle Looper
Layout and Graphics: Denny Hager, Heather Ryan,
Ronald Terry, Erin Zeltner
Senior Copy Editor: Teresa Artman
Technical Editor: Lee Musick
Editorial Manager: Kevin Kirschner
Media Development Specialists: Angela Denny, Kate Jenkins,
Steven Kudirka, Kit Malone
Media Development Manager: Laura VanWinkle
Editorial Assistant: Amanda Foxworth
Sr. Editorial Assistant: Cherie Case
Cartoons: Rich Tennant (www.the5thwave.com)
Publishing and Editorial for Technology Dummies
Richard Swadley, Vice President and Executive Group Publisher
Andy Cummings, Vice President and Publisher
Mary Bednarek, Executive Acquisitions Director
Mary C. Corder, Editorial Director
Publishing for Consumer Dummies
Diane Graves Steele, Vice President and Publisher
Joyce Pepple, Acquisitions Director
Composition Services
Gerry Fahey, Vice President of Production Services
Debbie Stailey, Director of Composition Services
Proofreaders: Linda Seifert, Charles Spencer
Brian H. Walls
Indexer: Lynnzee Elze
Contents at a Glance
Introduction............................................1
Part I: Working in Windows Vista ............3
Chapter 1: Exploring the Windows Vista Desktop........................5
Chapter 2: Controlling Applications with Windows Vista.........15
Chapter 3: Working with Files and Folders .................................23
Chapter 4: Using Built-In Windows Applications.......................35
Chapter 5: Using the Windows Sidebar and Gadgets.................43
Part II: Getting on the Internet ..............55
Chapter 6: Accessing the Internet.................................................57
Chapter 7: Browsing the Web with Internet Explorer.................67
Chapter 8: Exchanging E-Mail with Windows Mail....................83
Chapter 9: Working Remotely ......................................................99
Part III: Setting Up Hardware
and Networks .....................................107
Chapter 10: Setting Up New Hardware......................................109
Chapter 11: Setting Up a Network..............................................119
Part IV: Customizing the
Windows Desktop ................................127
Chapter 12: Setting Up Your Display ........................................129
Chapter 13: Customizing Windows Ease of Access ..................137
Part V: Using Security and
Maintenance Features .........................147
Chapter 14: Setting Passwords and File Access .........................149
Chapter 15: Protecting Windows ...............................................157
Chapter 16: Maintaining Windows ...........................................165
Part VI: Fixing Common Problems.........173
Chapter 17: Troubleshooting Hardware Problems...................175
Chapter 18: Troubleshooting Software Problems.....................183
Chapter 19: Getting Help ...........................................................189
Part VII: Fun and Games .....................197
Chapter 20: Playing Games in Windows Vista..........................199
Chapter 21: Playing Music in Windows Vista............................207
Chapter 22: Working with Photos in Photo Gallery.................217
Index..................................................225
I
’m guessing you have a healthy dislike of computer books. You don’t
want to wade through a long tome on Windows Vista. Rather, you just
want to get in, find out how to do something, and get out. You’re not alone.
I was itching to write a book where I could get right to the details of how to
do things — and move on. None of that telling you what I’m going to tell
you, saying my piece, and then reviewing for you what I just said. That’s why
I was delighted to tackle a Just the Steps For Dummies book on Windows
Vista.
➟
Introduction
Conventions used
in this book
About This Book
➟ When you have to type something in a text
Windows Vista is a very robust piece of software, with about as much functionality as Einstein on a good day. If you own a Windows Vista computer
(and I assume you do, or you should rush back to the bookstore for a
refund, pronto!) you likely spend a lot of time everyday in the Windows
Vista environment. Knowing how to harness the power of this operating system is what this book is all about. As the title suggests, I give you just the
steps you need to do many of the most common Windows Vista tasks. This
book is all about getting productive right away.
➟ For menu commands, I use the ➪ symbol to
Why You Need This Book
You can’t wait weeks to master Windows Vista. It’s where all your software
lives as well as how you get to your e-mail and documents. You have to figure out Windows Vista quickly. You might need to poke around Windows
Vista and do work while learning. When you hit a bump in the road, you
need a quick answer to get you moving again. This book is full of quick,
clear steps that keep your learning in high gear.
box, I put it in bold type.
separate menu items. For example, choose
Tools➪Internet Options. The ➪ symbol is just
my way of saying “Choose Internet Options
from the Tools menu.”
➟ Points of interest in some figures are circled.
The text tells you what to look for, and the circle makes it easy to find.
This icon points out insights or
helpful suggestions related to
tasks in the step list.
Windows Vista Just the Steps For Dummies
How This Book Is Organized
Part V: Using Security and Maintenance Features
This book is conveniently divided into several handy parts.
Windows Vista provides lots of ways to keep your information safe, from passwords to protect your files to tools to
prevent viruses and spyware from attacking your system.
There are also several features that help keep your system up
to date and trouble-free.
Part I: Working in Windows Vista
Here’s where you get the basics of opening and closing software applications, working with files and folders to manage
the documents you create, and using built-in Windows
applications like the Calculator and WordPad.
Part II: Getting on the Internet
The whole world is online, and you can’t be left behind.
Here’s where I show you how to connect, how to browse,
ways for using the Internet to stay in touch when you’re on
the road, and how to do e-mail.
Part III: Setting Up Hardware and Networks
In addition to software, Windows helps you work with hardware and connections between computers. You might have
to make a little effort to set up new hardware or a home network. This part is where I show you how to do that.
Part IV: Customizing the Windows Desktop
You want Windows Vista to function in a way that matches
your style, right? This is the part where I cover customizing
the look of Windows Vista, customizing its behavior, and
making it user friendly for those with access challenges.
➟
2
Part VI: Fixing Common Problems
Yes, I admit it, even Windows Vista can have problems.
Luckily, it also has tools to get you out of trouble. In this
part, I explain how to deal with hardware and software
problems as well as how to get help when you need it.
Part VII: Fun and Games
Finally, you’ve earned some fun. Go to these chapters to discover a world of games, music, and photos just waiting for
you in Windows Vista.
Get Ready To . . .
Whether you need to open a piece of software and get working, check your e-mail, or get online, just browse this book,
pick a task, and jump in. Windows Vista can be your best
friend if you know how to use it, and the tasks covered in
this book will make you a Windows Vista master in no time.
Part I
Working in Windows
Vista
Chapter 1: Exploring the Windows Vista Desktop . . . .5
Log On and Off Windows Vista................................6
Work with the Start Menu .........................................7
Work with the Quick Launch Bar .............................8
Set the Date and Time ...............................................9
Arrange Icons on the Desktop.................................10
Create a Desktop Shortcut .......................................11
Empty the Recycle Bin .............................................12
Shut Down Your Computer ....................................13
Chapter 2: Controlling Applications
with Windows Vista . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Launch an Application ............................................16
Resize Application Windows...................................17
Switch between Running Applications...................17
Move Information between Applications ..............18
Start an Application Automatically ........................19
Close an Application ...............................................21
Set Program Defaults...............................................22
Uninstall an Application.........................................22
Chapter 3: Working with Files and Folders . . . . . . . .23
Access Recently Used Items
from the Start Menu..............................................24
Locate Files and Folders in Your Computer...........25
Locate Files and Folders in Windows Explorer......26
Search for a File .......................................................27
Move a File or Folder...............................................28
Rename a File or Folder ..........................................29
Create a Shortcut to a File or Folder ......................29
Print a File ................................................................30
Delete a File or Folder..............................................31
Create a Compressed File or Folder .......................32
Add a File to Your Favorites List .............................33
Chapter 4: Using Built-In Windows Applications . . . .35
Create a Formatted Document in WordPad ..........36
Edit a Picture in Paint..............................................37
View a Digital Image in the
Windows Photo Gallery........................................38
Enter Contacts in Windows Contacts.....................40
Clip with the Windows Snipping Tool ...................41
Track Your Time in Windows Calendar .................42
Chapter 5: Using the Windows
Sidebar and Gadgets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Set Up the Windows Sidebar ..................................44
Add Gadgets to the Sidebar ....................................45
Make a Note with Notes .........................................46
Display a Continuous Slide Show ..........................47
Use the Windows Calculator ..................................48
Play with Puzzles .....................................................49
Convert Currency.....................................................50
Add a Feed to the Windows Sidebar.......................51
Get the Latest Stock Quotes ....................................52
Monitor Your CPU...................................................53
Exploring the
Windows Vista
Desktop
J
ust as your desk is the central area from which you do all kinds of work,
the Windows Vista desktop is a command center for organizing your
computer work. Here you find the Start menu, which you use to access
information about your computer, files, folders, and applications. You’ll also
find a taskbar that offers settings, such as your computer’s date and time,
as well as shortcuts to your most frequently accessed programs or files.
In this chapter, you explore the desktop, which appears when you log on
to Windows Vista. Along the way, you discover the Recycle Bin, the Quick
Launch bar (this might sound like a salad bar at a fast-food restaurant, but
it’s actually the area of the Windows Vista taskbar that lets you open frequently used programs), and how to shut down your computer when you’re
done for the day.
Here, then, are the procedures that you can use to take advantage of the
desktop features of Windows Vista.
➟
Chapter
Get ready to . . .
1
➟ Log On and Off Windows Vista ....................6
➟ Work with the Start Menu ............................7
➟ Work with the Quick Launch Bar ..................8
➟ Set the Date and Time..................................9
➟ Arrange Icons on the Desktop ....................10
➟ Create a Desktop Shortcut..........................11
➟ Empty the Recycle Bin................................12
➟ Shut Down Your Computer ........................13
Chapter 1: Exploring the Windows Vista Desktop
Log On and Off Windows Vista
1. Turn on your computer to begin the Windows Vista
start-up sequence.
2. In the resulting Windows Vista Welcome screen, enter
your password and click the arrow button (or click
Switch User and choose another user to log on as).
Windows Vista verifies your password and displays
the Windows Vista desktop, as shown in Figure 1-1.
(Note: If you haven’t set up the password protection
feature or more than one user, you’re taken directly to
the Windows Vista desktop. For more on adding and
changing passwords, see Chapter 12.)
3. To log off the current user account, first save any open
documents, close any open applications, and then
choose Start. Then click the arrow next to the Lock button and choose Log Off. Windows Vista logs off and displays a list of users. To log on again, click a user icon.
To create another user, choose Start➪Control Panel➪User Accounts
and Family Safety➪Add or Remove User Accounts. Then click Create
a New Account. Follow instructions to enter a name for the account and
set a password for it, if you like.
To log on as another user as described in Step 3, you have to enable
Fast User Switching in the User Account settings.
➟
6
Figure 1-1: The Windows Vista desktop
After you set up more than one user, before you get to the password
screen, you have to click the icon for the user you wish to log on as.
Work with the Start Menu
Work with the Start Menu
1. Press the Windows key on your keyboard or click the
Start button on the desktop to display the Start menu
(see Figure 1-2).
2. From the Start menu, you can do any of the following:
• Click All Programs to display a list of all programs on
your computer. You can click any program in the list
to open it.
• Click any category on the right of the Start menu to
display a Windows Explorer window with related
folders and files (see Figure 1-3).
• Click either frequently used programs at the top left
of the Start menu or recently used programs just
below them.
Figure 1-2: The Start menu
• Click the Power button icon to close all programs
and turn off Windows, or click the Lock icon to lock
your computer.
• Click the arrow next to the Lock button to display a
menu of choices for shutting down or restarting your
computer, logging off, or for logging in as a different
user.
3. When you move your cursor away from the Start menu,
it disappears.
Open the Start menu and right-click in a blank area, and click
Properties to display the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog
box, where you can customize the Start menu behavior. If you
would rather use the look and feel of the Start menu in older versions of Windows, select Classic Start Menu in the Taskbar and Start
Menu Properties dialog box and then click OK.
Figure 1-3: A Windows Explorer window
➟
7
Chapter 1: Exploring the Windows Vista Desktop
Work with the Quick Launch Bar
1. Locate the Quick Launch bar on the taskbar just to the
right of the Start button; if it’s not visible, right-click the
taskbar and choose Toolbars➪Quick Launch from the
shortcut menu (see Figure 1-4). By default, it includes
the Show Desktop and Switch between Windows icons.
2. To place any application on the Quick Launch bar, as
shown in Figure 1-5, right-click that application in the
Start menu or on the Desktop and then choose Add to
Quick Launch. You can also click and drag it to the
Quick Launch bar. (If you want help creating a desktop
shortcut, see the task, “Create a Desktop Shortcut,” later
in this chapter.)
If you have more programs in this area than can be shown on the
taskbar, click the arrows to the right of the Quick Launch bar; a
shortcut menu of programs appears. However, don’t create too
much clutter on your Quick Launch bar, which can make it unwieldy.
Logical candidates to place here are your Internet browser, your
e-mail program, and programs that you use every day, such as a
word processor or calendar program.
Figure 1-4: The Toolbars menu
When the Quick Launch bar is displayed, the Show Desktop button
is available. When you click this button, all open applications are
reduced to taskbar icons. It’s a quick way to clean your desktop —
or hide what you’re up to!
➟
8
Figure 1-5: Add icons to the Quick Launch bar
Set the Date and Time
Set the Date and Time
1. Press the Windows key on your keyboard to display the
taskbar if it isn’t visible.
2. Right-click the Date/Time display on the far right of the
taskbar and then choose Adjust Date/Time from the
shortcut menu that appears.
3. Click the Change Date and Time (see Figure 1-6) button
and in the Date and Time Settings dialog box click
another date on the calendar. Enter a new time in the
Time box to change the time. Click OK.
4. To change the time zone, from the Date and Time
Properties dialog box click the Change Time Zone button. Choose another time zone from the Time Zone list
and click OK.
Figure 1-6: The Date and Time Properties dialog box
5. Click OK to apply the new settings and close the dia-
log box.
If you don’t want your computer to adjust for Daylight Saving Time,
click Change Time Zone and click the Automatically Adjust Clock for
Daylight Saving Time checkbox to turn this feature off.
Another option for displaying the time or date is to add the Clock or
Calendar gadgets to the Windows Sidebar. You can also drag gadgets
right onto your desktop if you prefer not to leave the Sidebar displayed. See Chapter 5 for more about using the Sidebar and Gadgets.
➟
9
Chapter 1: Exploring the Windows Vista Desktop
Arrange Icons on the Desktop
1. Right-click the desktop and choose View in the resulting
shortcut menu; be sure that Auto Arrange isn’t selected,
as shown in Figure 1-7. (If it is selected, deselect it
before proceeding to the next step.)
2. Right-click the Windows Vista desktop. In the resulting
Figure 1-7: The Desktop shortcut menu,
View submenu
shortcut menu, choose Sort By and then click the criteria for sorting your desktop shortcuts (see Figure 1-8).
3. You can also click any icon and drag it to another loca-
tion on the desktop — for example, to separate it from
other desktop icons so you can find it easily.
If you’ve rearranged your desktop by moving items hither, thither,
and yon and you want your icons in orderly rows along the left side
of your desktop, snap them into place with the Auto Arrange feature.
Right-click the desktop and then choose View➪Auto Arrange.
Want to quickly hide all your desktop open windows? Say the boss
is headed your way, and all you have there is games? Click the
Show Desktop icon on the Quick Launch bar. Poof! They’re all gone,
and your job is secure. Just click items on the taskbar to display
each window again.
➟
10
Figure 1-8: The Desktop shortcut menu,
Sort By submenu
Create a Desktop Shortcut
Create a Desktop Shortcut
1. Choose Start➪All Programs and locate the program on
the list of programs that appears.
2. Right-click an item, Freecell for example, and choose
Send To➪Desktop (Create Shortcut) (see Figure 1-9).
3. The shortcut appears on the desktop (see Figure 1-10).
Double-click the icon to open the application.
Occasionally, Windows Vista offers to delete desktop icons that you
haven’t used in a long time. Let it. The desktop should be reserved
for frequently used programs, files, and folders. You can always recreate shortcuts easily if you need them again.
To clean up your desktop manually, right-click the desktop and
choose Personalize. Click Change Desktop Icons in the Tasks list on
the left. In the Desktop Icons setting dialog box that appears, click
the Restore Default button, which returns to the original desktop
shortcuts set up on your computer.
Figure 1-9: The Send To shortcut menu
You can create a shortcut for a brand new item by right-clicking the
desktop, choosing New, and then choosing an item to place there,
such as a text document, bitmap image, or contact. Then doubleclick the shortcut that appears and begin working on the file in the
associated application.
Figure 1-10: A new shortcut on the desktop
➟
11
Chapter 1: Exploring the Windows Vista Desktop
Empty the Recycle Bin
1. Right-click the Recycle Bin icon on the Windows Vista
desktop and choose Empty Recycle Bin from the menu
that appears (see Figure 1-11).
2. In the confirmation dialog box that appears (see Fig-
ure 1-12), click Yes. A progress dialog box appears
indicating the contents are being deleted. Remember
that after you empty the Recycle Bin, all files in it are
unavailable to you.
Up until the moment you permanently delete items by performing
the preceding steps, you can retrieve items in the Recycle Bin by
right-clicking the desktop icon and choosing Open. Select the item
you want to retrieve and then click the Restore This Item link near
the top of the Recycle Bin window.
Figure 1-11: The Recycle Bin shortcut menu
You can modify the Recycle Bin properties by right-clicking it and
choosing Properties. In the dialog box that appears, you can change
the maximum size for the Recycle bin, and where it should be
stored on your hard drive. You can also deselect the option of having a confirmation dialog box appear when you delete Recycle Bin
contents.
➟
12
Figure 1-12: Confirming the Empty Recycle Bin command.
Shut Down Your Computer
Shut Down Your Computer
1. Choose Start and then click the arrow to the right of the
Lock button.
2. In the resulting shortcut menu shown in Figure 1-13,
choose Shut Down to shut the computer down completely; if you want to reboot (turn off and turn back on)
your computer, choose Restart.
If you’re going away for a while but don’t want to have to go
through the whole booting up sequence complete with Windows
Vista music when you return, you don’t have to turn off your computer. Just click the Hibernate button instead (in Step 2) to put your
computer into a kind of sleeping state where the screen goes black
and the fan shuts down. When you get back, just click your mouse
button or press Enter, or in some cases (especially on some laptops)
press the Power button; your computer springs to life, and whatever
programs and documents you had open are still open.
Figure 1-13: The menu used to turn off or restart your computer
If your computer freezes up for some reason, you can turn it off in a
couple of ways. Press Ctrl+Alt+Delete twice in a row, or press the
power button on your CPU and hold it until the computer shuts down.
Don’t simply turn off your computer at the power source unless you
have to because of a computer crash. Windows Vista might not start
up properly the next time you turn it on if you don’t follow the
proper shutdown procedure.
➟
13
Chapter 1: Exploring the Windows Vista Desktop
➟
14
Controlling
Applications with
Windows Vista
Y
ou might think of Windows Vista as a set of useful accessories, such
as games, a calculator, and a paint program for playing around with
images, but Windows Vista is first and foremost an operating system.
Windows Vista’s main purpose is to enable you to run and manage other
software applications, from programs that manage your finances to the latest
3-D computer action game. By using the best methods for accessing and
running software with Windows Vista, you save time; setting up Windows
Vista in the way that works best for you can make your life easier.
In this chapter, you explore several simple and very handy techniques for
launching and moving between applications. You go through step-by-step
procedures ranging from opening an application to resizing application windows to removing programs when you no longer need them.
This is where you explore all the procedures that you can use to launch,
move among, and close down applications in Windows Vista.
➟
Chapter
Get ready to . . .
2
➟ Launch an Application ................................16
➟ Resize Application Windows........................17
➟ Switch between Running Applications..........17
➟ Move Information between Applications......18
➟ Start an Application Automatically ..............19
➟ Close an Application ..................................20
➟ Set Program Defaults ................................21
➟ Uninstall an Application..............................22
Chapter 2: Controlling Applications with Windows Vista
Launch an Application
1. Launch an application by using any of the following
four methods:
• Choose Start➪All Programs. Locate the program
name on the All Programs list that appears and click
it. Clicking an item with a folder icon displays a list
of programs within it; just click the program on that
sublist to open it (as shown in Figure 2-1).
• Double-click a program shortcut icon on the desktop
(see Figure 2-2).
• The taskbar should display by default; if doesn’t,
press the Windows key (on your keyboard) to display
it, and then click an icon on the Quick Launch bar
(as shown in Figure 2-2), just to the right of the
Start button. Note that the Quick Launch bar is not
displayed by default. See the Chapter 1 for more
about this.
Figure 2-1: The All Programs menu
• If you used the program recently and saved a document, choose Recent Items from the Start menu. Then
click a document created in that program from the list
that displays. (See Chapter 3 for information about
displaying recently used files on the Start menu.)
2. When the application opens, if it’s a game, play it; if it’s
a spreadsheet, enter numbers into it; if it’s your e-mail
program, start deleting junk mail. . . . You get the idea.
Not every program that’s installed on your computer appears as a
desktop shortcut or Quick Launch bar icon. To add a program to the
Quick Launch bar or to add a desktop shortcut, see Chapter 1.
➟
16
Figure 2-2: Desktop shortcuts and the taskbar showing the Quick Launch bar
Switch between Running Applications
Resize Application Windows
1. With an application open and maximized, click the
Restore Down button (the icon showing two overlapping windows) in the top-right corner of the program
window. The window reduces in size (see Figure 2-3).
2. To enlarge a window that has been restored down to
again fill the screen, click the Maximize button. (Note:
This button is in the same location as the Restore Down
button; this button toggles to one or the other, depending on whether you have the screen reduced in size or
maximized. A ScreenTip identifies the button when you
pass your mouse over it.)
Switch between Running
Applications
Figure 2-3: A minimized Microsoft Paint window
1. Open two or more programs. The last program that you
open is the active program.
2. Press Alt+Tab to move from one open application win-
dow to another.
3. Press and hold Alt+Tab to open a small box, as shown
in Figure 2-4, revealing all opened programs.
4. Release the Tab key but keep Alt pressed down. Press
Tab to cycle through the icons representing open
programs.
5. Release the Alt key, and Windows Vista switches to
whichever program is selected. To switch back to the last
program that was active, simply press Alt+Tab, and that
program becomes the active program once again.
Figure 2-4: The list of active programs
➟
17
Chapter 2: Controlling Applications with Windows Vista
Move Information between
Applications
1. Open two applications. If their windows are maximized,
click the Restore Down buttons in the upper-right corners to reduce their sizes.
2. Click any corner on each program window and drag to
change the size further until you can see both programs
on the Windows desktop at once (see Figure 2-5).
3. Click and hold their title bars to drag the windows
around your desktop, or right-click the taskbar and
choose Cascade Windows, Show Windows Stacked, or
Show Windows Side by Side to automatically arrange
the windows on the desktop.
4. Select the information that you want to move (for
example text, numbers, or a graphical object) and drag
it to the other application document (see Figure 2-6).
Figure 2-5: Arranging windows
5. Release your mouse, and the information is copied to
the destination window.
You can also use simple cut-and-paste or copy-and-paste operations
to take information from one application and move it or place a copy
of it into a document in another application. In addition, some applications have Export or Send To commands to send the contents of a
document to another application. For example, Microsoft Word has a
Send To➪Microsoft Office PowerPoint command to quickly send a
Word document to be the basis of a PowerPoint presentation outline.
➟
18
Remember, this won’t work between every type of application. For
example, you can’t click and drag an open picture in Paint into the
Windows Calendar. It will most dependably work when dragging
text or objects from one Office 2007 program to another. In other
cases, using the cut-and-paste method might be your best bet.
Figure 2-6: Dragging a selection between windows
Start an Application Automatically
Start an Application Automatically
1. Using Windows Explorer (right-click Start and then click
Explore), locate and open the folder where the application you want to start when you start Windows Vista is
located. Click to select it (see Figure 2-7).
2. Drag the item to the Startup folder in the Folders list
on the left (under Windows, Start Menu, Programs in
the list).
3. Double-click the Startup folder; you see the program
listed (see Figure 2-8).
4. When you finish moving programs into the Startup
folder, click the Close button in the upper-right corner.
The programs you moved will now open every time
Windows Vista is started.
If you place too many programs in Startup, it might take a minute
or two before you can get to work because you have to wait for programs to load. Don’t overfill your Startup folder: Use it just for the
programs you need most often.
Figure 2-7: Dragging a program to the Startup folder
You can remove an application from the Startup folder by rightclicking it and choosing Delete.
Figure 2-8: The Startup folder contents
➟
19
Chapter 2: Controlling Applications with Windows Vista
Close an Application
1. With an application open, first save any open documents
and then close them by using one of these methods:
• Click the Close button in the upper-right corner of
the window.
• Click Alt+F4 to close most open windows.
• Choose File➪Exit (see Figure 2-9).
2. The application closes. If there is a document open that
you haven’t saved, you see a dialog box asking whether
you want to save the document (see Figure 2-10). Click
Yes or No, depending on whether you want to save your
changes.
To save a document before closing an application, choose File➪
Save and use settings in the Save dialog box (that appears) to
name the file and also specify which folder to save it to.
Figure 2-9: Choosing the Exit command
Note that choosing File➪Exit closes all open documents in an application. Choose File➪Close to close only the currently active document
and keep the application and any other documents open.
You don’t have to close an application to open or switch to another.
To switch between open applications, press Alt+Tab and use the
arrow keys to move to the application (or document if multiple documents are open in an application) in which you want to work.
➟
20
Figure 2-10: Saving changes to open documents
Set Program Defaults
Set Program Defaults
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Programs.
2. In the resulting Programs window, as shown in Fig-
ure 2-11, click the Set Your Default Programs link in the
Default Programs section to see specifics about the programs that are set as defaults.
3. If a User Account Control window appears, click
Continue to allow changes.
4. Select an item in the list of Programs (see Figure 2-12)
and click Set This Program as Default.
5. Click OK to save your settings.
If you want to view what each setting does, or further customize the
Custom options, click a program and then click Choose Defaults for
This Program to specify file extensions and protocols for the program.
Figure 2-11: The Programs window
Figure 2-12: The Set Your Default Programs window
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21
Chapter 2: Controlling Applications with Windows Vista
Uninstall an Application
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Uninstall a Program
(under the Programs category).
2. In the resulting window, as shown in Figure 2-13, click a
program and then click the Uninstall/Change button.
Although some programs will display their own uninstall screen, in most cases, a confirmation dialog box
appears (see Figure 2-14).
3. If you’re sure that you want to remove the program,
click Yes in the confirmation dialog box. A dialog box
shows the progress of the procedure; it disappears when
the program has been uninstalled.
4. Click the Close button to close the Uninstall or Change
a Program window.
With some programs that include multiple applications, such as
Microsoft Office, you might want to remove only one program, not
the whole shooting match. For example, you might decide that you
have no earthly use for Access but can’t let a day go by without
using Excel and Word — so why not free up some hard drive space
and send Access packing? If you want to modify a program in this
way, click the Change button in Step 2 of this task rather than the
Uninstall button. The dialog box that appears allows you to select
the programs that you want to install or uninstall or might open the
original installation screen from your software program.
Warning: If you click the Change or Remove button, some programs will simply be removed with no further input from you. Be
really sure that you don’t need a program before you remove it, or
that you have the original software on disk/c so you can reinstall it
should you need it again.
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22
Figure 2-13: The Uninstall a Program window
Figure 2-14: The removal confirmation dialog box
If you used an earlier version of Windows, you note that the Add a
Program command is gone. Because all software created today allows
you to put a CD/DVD into your drive and then follow onscreen directions
to install the program, Microsoft must have decided that its own Add a
Program feature was obsolete!
Working with Files
and Folders
J
➟
Chapter
oin me for a moment in the office of yesterday. Notice all the metal filing cabinets and manila file folders holding paper rather than the sleek
computer workstations and wireless Internet connections we use today.
Fast forward: You still organize the work you do every day in files and folders,
but today, the metal and cardboard have been dropped in favor of electronic
bits and bytes. Files are the individual documents that you save from within
applications, such as Word and Excel, and you use folders and subfolders
to organize several files into groups or categories, such as by project or by
customer.
In this chapter, you find out how to organize and work with files and folders,
including
➟
Finding your way around files and folders: This includes tasks such
as locating and opening files and folders.
➟
Manipulating files and folders: These tasks cover moving, renaming,
deleting, and printing a file.
➟
Compressing a file: This squeezes a file’s contents to make larger files
more manageable.
Get ready to . . .
3
➟ Launch a Recently Used Item ....................24
➟ Locate Files and Folders
in Your Computer......................................25
➟ Locate Files and Folders
in Windows Explorer ..................................26
➟ Search for a File ........................................27
➟ Move a File or Folder ................................28
➟ Rename a File or Folder ............................29
➟ Create a Shortcut to a File or Folder ..........29
➟ Print a File ................................................30
➟ Delete a File or Folder ..............................31
➟ Create a Compressed File or Folder ............32
➟ Add a File to Your Favorites List ................33
Chapter 3: Working with Files and Folders
Access Recently Used Items
from the Start Menu
1. Open the Start menu and right-click any blank area.
From the resulting shortcut menu, choose Properties.
2. In the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box
that appears, click the Start Menu tab (if that tab isn’t
already displayed).
3. Make sure that the Store and Display a List of Recently
Opened Files check box is selected (see Figure 3-1) and
then click OK.
4. Choose Start➪Recent Items, and then choose a file from
the resulting submenu (see Figure 3-2) to open it.
If a file in the Recent Items list can be opened with more than one
application — for example, a graphics file that you might open
with Paint or in the Windows Picture and Fax Viewer — you can
right-click the file and use the Open With command to control which
application is used to open the file.
Figure 3-1: The Taskbar and Start Menu Properties
dialog box
There’s another way to look for documents you’ve worked with
recently. Recently used programs will be listed in the main Start
menu. If you open one there will typically be a list of recently used
files at the bottom of the application’s File or similar menu.
➟
24
Figure 3-2: The Recent Items list accessed from the Start menu
Locate Files and Folders in Your Computer
Locate Files and Folders
in Your Computer
1. Choose Start➪Computer.
2. In the resulting Computer window (see Figure 3-3)
double-click an item, such as a floppy drive, a CD-ROM
drive, or your computer hard drive, to open it.
3. If the file or folder that you want is stored within
another folder (see Figure 3-4 for an example of the
resulting window), double-click the folder or a series
of folders until you locate it.
4. When you find the file you want, double-click it to
open it.
Note the buttons on the top of the window in Figure 3-4. Use the
commands in this area to perform common file and folder tasks,
such as organizing, viewing, or opening files; or burning a file to a
CD/DVD.
Figure 3-3: The Computer window
Depending on how you choose to display files and folders, you might
see text listings as in Figure 3-4, icons, or even thumbnail representations of file contents.
Figure 3-4: The window for a hard drive
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25
Chapter 3: Working with Files and Folders
Locate Files and Folders
in Windows Explorer
1. Right-click the Start menu and choose Explore.
2. In the resulting Windows Explorer window, as shown in
Figure 3-5, double-click a folder in the Name field to
open the folder.
3. The folder’s contents are displayed. If necessary, open a
series of folders in this manner until you locate the file
you want.
4. When you find the file you want, double-click it to
open it.
To see different perspectives and information about files in
Windows Explorer, click the arrow on the Views button (it looks like
series of columns) and choose one of the following menu options:
Extra Large, Large, Medium, or Small Icons for graphical displays;
Details to show details such as Date Modified and Size, and Tiles to
show the file/folder name, type, and size. If you are working with
a folder containing graphics files, the graphics automatically display
as thumbnails unless you choose Details.
There are some shortcuts to commonly used folders in the Start
menu, including Documents, Pictures, and Music. Click one of these
and Windows Explorer opens that particular window.
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26
Figure 3-5: The Windows Explorer window
Search for a File
Search for a File
1. Choose Start➪Search.
2. In the resulting Search Results window, enter a search
term in the Search field (see Figure 3-6).
3. Click the arrow for the In field and choose locations to
search.
4. Click the type of item for which you want to search
along the top of the window (for example Picture,
Music, Document, or E-mail). Click the Search Tools
button and choose Search Options to modify search
parameters. The search begins, and results are displayed
(see Figure 3-7).
5. Click any of the column headings (Name, Date Modified,
and so on) to sort your results by that item.
Figure 3-6: The Search window
6. Click Views to cycle through the options of various size
icons or text listings, or click the arrow on this field to
choose your preferred view from a list.
7. When you locate the file you want, you can double-click
it to open it.
Search Folders are a new feature in Windows Vista. To save the
results of a search, you can click the Save Search button. In the
Save As dialog box that appears, provide a filename and type, set
the location to save it to, and then click Save. The search results are
saved as a search folder on your computer in your user name folder.
Try using the new feature Instant Search, which provides a search
box right on the Start menu. Just click Start, and type a search term
in the box labeled Start Search. Click either the Search the Internet
or See All Results link that appears. The Search window appears,
and you can use the procedures in this task to refine or get results
of your search.
Figure 3-7: The Search Results window
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27
Chapter 3: Working with Files and Folders
Move a File or Folder
1. Right-click the Start menu button and choose Explore.
2. In the resulting Windows Explorer window (see
Figure 3-8), double-click a folder or series of folders
to locate the file that you want to move.
3. Take one of the following actions:
• Click and drag the file to another folder in the Folders
pane on the left side of the window. If you right-click
and drag, you are offered the options of moving or
copying the item when you place it via a shortcut
menu that appears.
• Right-click the file and choose Send To. Then choose
from the options shown in the submenu that appears
(as shown in Figure 3-9).
Figure 3-8: The Windows Explorer window
4. Click the Close button in the upper-right corner of the
Windows Explorer window to close it.
If you change your mind about moving an item using the rightclick-and-drag method, you can click Cancel on the shortcut menu
that appears.
If you want to create a copy of a file or folder in another location on
your computer, right-click the item and choose Copy. Use Windows
Explorer to navigate to the location where you want to place a copy,
right-click and choose Paste or press Ctrl+V.
➟
28
Figure 3-9: The Send To submenu
Create a Shortcut to a File or Folder
Rename a File or Folder
1. Locate the file that you want to rename by using Windows
Explorer. (Right-click Start and choose Explore.)
2. Right-click the file and choose Rename (see Figure 3-10).
3. The filename is now available for editing. Type a new
name, and then click anywhere outside the filename to
save the new name.
You can’t rename a file to have the same name as another file
located in the same folder. To give a file the same name as another,
cut it from its current location, paste it into another folder, and then
follow the procedure in this task. Or, open the file and save it to a
new location with the same name, which creates a copy. Be careful,
though: Two files with the same name can cause confusion when
you search for files. If at all possible, use unique filenames.
Figure 3-10: A filename available for editing
Create a Shortcut to a File or Folder
1. Locate the file or folder by using Windows Explorer.
(Right-click Start and choose Explore.)
2. In the resulting Windows Explorer window (see
Figure 3-11), right-click the file or folder that you want
to create a shortcut for and then choose Create Shortcut.
3. A shortcut named File or Folder Name Shortcut appears
at the bottom of the open folder. Click the shortcut and
drag it to the desktop.
To open the file in its originating application or a folder in Windows
Explorer, simply double-click the desktop shortcut icon.
Instead of creating a shortcut and dragging it to the desktop, you
can right-click a file or folder and choose Sent To➪Desktop (Create
Shortcut) to accomplish the same thing.
Figure 3-11: The Windows Explorer window displaying a shortcut menu
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29
Chapter 3: Working with Files and Folders
Print a File
1. Open the file with the application in which it was
created.
2. Choose File➪Print.
3. In the resulting Print dialog box (see Figure 3-12), select
what to print; these options might vary but generally
include the following
• All prints all pages in the document.
• Current Page prints whatever page your cursor is
active in at the moment.
• Pages prints a page range or series of pages you enter
in that field. For example, enter 3-11 to print pages 3
through 11; or enter 3, 7, 9-11 to print pages 3, 7, and
9 through 11.
• Selection prints any text or objects that you have
selected within the file when you choose the Print
command.
4. In the Number of Copies field, click the up or down
arrow to set the number of copies to make; if you want
multiple copies collated, select the Collate check box.
5. Click OK to proceed with printing.
Here’s another method for printing: locate the file by using Windows
Explorer (right-click Start and choose Explore). Right-click the file and
choose Print from the shortcut menu that appears. The file prints with
your default printer settings.
➟
30
Figure 3-12: The Print dialog box
Different applications might offer different options in the Print dialog box.
For example, PowerPoint offers several options for what to print, including slides, handouts, or the presentation outline, and Outlook allows you
to print e-mails in table or in memo style.
Delete a File or Folder
Delete a File or Folder
1. Locate the file or folder by using Windows Explorer.
(Right-click Start and choose Explore.)
2. In the resulting Windows Explorer window, right-click the
file or folder that you want to delete (see Figure 3-13)
and then choose Delete.
3. In the resulting dialog box (see Figure 3-14), click Yes to
delete the file.
When you delete a file or folder in Windows Vista, it’s not really
gone. It’s removed to the Recycle Bin. Windows Vista periodically
purges older files from this folder, but you might still be able to
retrieve recently deleted files and folders from it. To try to restore
a deleted file or folder, double-click the Recycle Bin icon on the
desktop. Right-click the file or folder and choose Restore. Windows
Vista restores the file to wherever it was when you deleted it.
Figure 3-13: The Windows Explorer window displaying a shortcut menu
Instead of right-clicking and choosing Delete from the menu that
appears in Step 2 above, you can click the Delete key on your
keyboard.
Figure 3-14: The Delete File dialog box
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31
Chapter 3: Working with Files and Folders
Create a Compressed File or Folder
1. Locate the files or folders that you want to compress by
using Windows Explorer. (Right-click Start and choose
Explore.)
2. In the resulting Windows Explorer window, you can do
the following (as shown in Figure 3-15):
• Select a series of files or folders: Click a file or folder,
press and hold Shift to select a series of items listed
consecutively in the folder, and click the final item.
• Select nonconsecutive items: Press the Ctrl key and
click each item you want to include.
3. Right-click the selected items. In the resulting shortcut
menu (see Figure 3-16), choose Send To➪Compressed
(Zipped) Folder. A new compressed folder appears.
The folder icon is named after the last file you selected
in the series and the name of the folder is left open for
you to edit.
Figure 3-15: A series of selected files and folders
Following Step 3 in this task, to rename the compressed file just type
a new name and then click outside of the file name area. To rename
the file at a later time, see the task “Rename a File or Folder, “ earlier in this chapter.
➟
32
Figure 3-16: The Send To submenu
Add a File to Your Favorties List
Add a File to Your Favorites List
1. Locate the files or folders that you want to make a
Favorite by using Windows Explorer. (Right-click Start
and choose Explore).
2. In the resulting Windows Explorer window, click a file
or folder and drag it to the Favorites folder in the
Folders list on the left (see Figure 3-17).
3. To see a list of your Favorites, choose Start➪Favorites.
4. In the resulting submenu (see Figure 3-18), click an
item to open it.
If the Favorites item doesn’t display on your Start menu, right-click
the Start menu and choose Properties. On the Start Menu tab with
Start Menu selected, click the Customize button. Make sure that
Favorites Menu is selected, and then click OK twice to save the setting.
Figure 3-17: The Favorites menu in Windows Explorer
Figure 3-18: The Favorites submenu on the Windows Start menu
➟
33
Chapter 3: Working with Files and Folders
➟
34
Using Built-In
Windows Applications
➟
Chapter
W
indows Vista isn’t just a traffic cop for your computer’s hardware and
other software programs; it has its own set of neat tools that you can
use to get things done. What sorts of things? Well, by using various Windows
Accessories (that is, built-in software programs) you can do everything from
writing down great thoughts to working with beautiful pictures. Here’s what
the Windows built-in applications help you do:
➟
➟
➟
Work with words. WordPad provides a virtual pad for jotting down
ideas, making notes, creating small documents, or entering programming
code. WordPad isn’t as robust as some mainstream word processors,
but it’s just write (pun intended) for simple documents with a few
formatting bells and whistles.
Play with images. Windows makes you an artist because you can view
and edit graphics files in Paint and view digital images (you know,
the photos you took at little Ricky’s birthday party?) in the Windows
Photo Gallery. The new Snipping Tool is a way to grab little clippings
of either words or images, annotate them, and then add them to a
variety of documents.
Manage contacts and your schedule. Windows Contacts is an electronic version of that little alphabetical book you keep by your phone;
it’s a great place to store contact information. Windows Calendar provides an easy-to-use scheduling tool in which you can enter tasks and
share task information with others.
Get ready to . . .
4
➟ Create a Formatted Document
in WordPad................................................36
➟ Edit a Picture in Paint ................................37
➟ View a Digital Image in the
Windows Photo Gallery ..............................38
➟ Enter Contacts in Windows Contacts ............40
➟ Clip with the Windows Snipping Tool ..........41
➟ Track Your Time in Windows Calendar ........42
Chapter 4: Using Built-In Windows Applications
Create a Formatted Document
in WordPad
1. Choose Start➪All Programs➪Accessories➪WordPad to
open the WordPad window, as shown in Figure 4-1.
2. Enter text in the blank document. (Note: Press Enter to
create blank lines between paragraphs.)
3. Click and drag to select the text; then choose Format➪
Font.
4. In the resulting Font dialog box, as shown in Figure 4-2,
adjust the settings for Font, Font Style, or Size. You can
apply strikeout or underline effects by selecting those
check boxes. You can also modify the font color and
even apply a script from a language that uses an alphabet different than English, such as Arabic. Click OK to
apply the settings.
Figure 4-1: The Windows WordPad window
5. Click various other tools, such as the alignment buttons or
the Bullets button on the toolbar, to format selected text.
6. Choose Insert➪Object to insert an object.
7. In the Object dialog box that appears, select the Create
New option, click an object type, and then click OK.
Modify the inserted object however you want (moving
it, resizing it, and so on).
8. When your document is complete, choose File➪Save.
In the Save As dialog box, enter a name in the File Name
text box, select a file location from the Address Bar
drop-down list, and then click Save.
➟
36
E-mailing a copy of your WordPad document is simplicity itself. Just
choose File➪Send, and an e-mail form appears from your default
e-mail program with the file already attached. Just enter a recipient and a message and click Send. It’s on its way!
Figure 4-2: The WordPad Font dialog box
Edit a Picture in Paint
Edit a Picture in Paint
1. Choose Start➪All Programs➪Accessories➪Paint.
2. In the resulting Paint window, choose File➪Open. Locate
a picture file that you want to edit (see Figure 4-3), select
it, and click Open. There’s a pretty picture of flowers
shown in the Paint window in Figure 4-4.
You can also get an image from a camera or scanner by using the
File➪From Scanner or Camera command.
3. Now you can edit the picture in any number of ways:
• Edit colors. Choose a color from the color palette at
the top of the Paint window and use various tools
(such as Airbrush, Brush, Fill with Color, and the
Pick Color dropper) to apply color to the image or
selected drawn objects, such as rectangles. Clicking
on a color selects a foreground color; right-clicking a
color selects a background color.
Figure 4-3: The Open dialog box
• Select areas. Select the Free-Form Select and Select
tools, and then click and drag on the image to select
portions of the picture. You can then crop out these
elements by choosing Edit➪Cut.
• Add text. Select the Text tool, and then click and drag
the image to create a text box in which you can enter
and format text.
• Draw objects. Select the Rectangle, Rounded
Rectangle, Polygon, or Ellipse tool, and then click
and drag the image to draw objects.
• Modify the image. Use the commands on the Image
menu to change the colors and stretch out, flip
around, or change the size of the image.
4. Choose File➪Save to save your masterpiece, File➪Print
to print it, or File➪Send to send it by e-mail.
Figure 4-4: A picture opened in Paint
➟
37
Chapter 4: Using Built-In Windows Applications
View a Digital Image in the
Windows Photo Gallery
1. Choose Start➪All Programs➪Windows Photo Gallery.
2. In the resulting Windows Photo Gallery window, as
shown in Figure 4-5, you can use the tools at the
bottom (see Figure 4-6) to do any of the following:
• The Next and Previous icons move to a previous or
following image in the same folder.
• The Display Size icon in the shape of a magnifying
glass displays a slider you can click and drag to
change the size of the image thumbnails.
• The Delete button deletes the selected image.
• The Rotate Clockwise and Rotate Counterclockwise
icons spin the image 90 degrees at a time.
• The center Play Slide Show button with a slide image
on it displays the images in your Picture folder in a
continuous slide show.
Figure 4-5: The Windows Photo Gallery
Figure 4-6: The tools you can use to manipulate images
3. Click any of the items on the left to choose which
images to display (such as those taken in a certain year
or saved in a certain folder).
Did you upload a photo from your camera but you don’t remember
what you called it? If you want to find a photo you imported to the
Photo Gallery from a camera or scanner in the recent past, click the
Recently Imported folder in the picture list on the left.
➟
38
For more on the Windows Photo Gallery, see Chapter 22.
View a Digital Image in the Windows Photo Gallery
4. Some of the buttons at the top of the window
(see Figure 4-7) are listed here; see Chapter 22 for a
description of all the menus and features of Windows
Photo Gallery.
Figure 4-7: Use these buttons and drop down menus to work with your photos in a
variety of ways.
• File displays commands for working with the file,
such as Delete and Rename.
• Fix displays the selected image with image manipulation tools.
• Info displays information about the image, such as
the date created and size.
• Print is the button to click to print the selected image.
• Create allows you to create a DVD, movie, or data
disc using the image.
• E-mail opens a dialog box to specify the image to be
attached to an e-mail using your default mail program.
• Open allows you to open the image in another program, such as Paint, which you can use to edit the
image.
5. When you finish viewing and working with images,
Figure 4-8: Close the Windows Photo Gallery
click the Close button in the top right corner to close
the Photo Gallery (see Figure 4-8).
If you make a change to a photo in the gallery using the Fix feature, Windows saves a copy of the original photo in case you want
to restore it. By default the original photo is never ever deleted, but
you can change that to save space. Choose File➪Option, and in the
Windows Photo Gallery Options dialog box, select a different setting
in the Move Originals to Recycle Bin after drop-down list, such as
one month or six months.
➟
39
Chapter 4: Using Built-In Windows Applications
Enter Contacts in Windows Contacts
1. Choose Start➪All Programs➪Windows Contacts.
2. In the resulting Windows Contacts window, as shown in
Figure 4-9, right-click and choose New➪Contact.
3. In the Properties dialog box shown in Figure 4-10, enter
information in various fields, clicking other various tabs
to add more details. For some fields, such as E-mail, you
must enter information and then click the Add button
to add it to a list.
4. After you finish entering information, click OK.
The IDs tab of the Contacts Properties dialog box allows you to associate digital IDs with e-mail addresses. A digital ID proves your
identity to recipients of your e-mail, and you can use them to encrypt
your message as well
➟
40
Figure 4-9: Windows Contacts
Figure 4-10: Entering new contact information
Clip with the Windows Snipping Tool
Clip with the Windows Snipping Tool
1. Choose Start➪All Programs➪Accessories➪Snipping Tool.
2. In the Snipping Tool window that appears (see
Figure 4-11), click the down-arrow on the New button
and choose a snip mode from the drop-down list:
Figure 4-11: The Snipping Tool window
• Free Form Snip lets you draw any old kind of line
you like, such as a triangle, to define what you want
to snip.
• Rectangular Snip does what it says: When you click
and drag over a region, it forms a rectangular snip.
• Window Snip allows you to select an active window
to snip.
• Full-Screen Snip takes the entire enchilada, capturing
the whole screen in the wink of an eye.
3. If you chose Free Form or Rectangular in Step 2, click
and drag on the desktop or in a document to form an
area to snip. If you chose Windows, click on the window you want to snip. If you chose Full-Screen, the snip
happens automatically.
4. In the mark-up window that appears (see Figure 4-12),
use the Pen, Highlighter, and Eraser tools to mark up
the image.
Figure 4-12: The mark-up window with a captured snip
5. Click the Save Snip button that looks like a computer
disk to display the Save As dialog box, where you can
enter a filename, specify the location to save the file to,
and then click Save.
➟
41
Chapter 4: Using Built-In Windows Applications
Track Your Time in
Windows Calendar
1. Choose Start➪All Programs➪Windows Calendar.
2. In the Windows Calendar window shown in Figure 4-13,
click the New Task or the New Appointment button.
3. In the Details pane shown in Figure 4-14, enter informa-
tion about the task or appointment, including whether
Windows Calendar should remind you about the item.
4. Click anywhere outside of the New Task/New
Appointment pane. The item appears in your daily
calendar.
5. Click the View button to cycle through the views, or
click the down-arrow on the View button to choose a
view, such as Month or Week.
Figure 4-13: The Windows Calendar window
If you want to share your calendar, you can choose Share➪Publish
and enter a URL for the location where you want to publish your
calendar online. You can even make a setting so that any changes
to the calendar are automatically published online.
You can import a calendar you create in another program, such as
Outlook by choosing File➪Import. In the resulting Import dialog
box, enter the name of the file, and choose whether to create a new
calendar, or integrate the calendar entries into another calendar.
➟
42
Figure 4-14: The New Task pane
Using the Windows
Sidebar and Gadgets
➟
Chapter
W
indows Vista has a new desktop feature called the Windows Sidebar.
The Sidebar contains tools, called gadgets, displayed as icons along
the right side of your screen by default (although you can make settings to
display it on the left). From the Windows Sidebar, you can quickly access
various handy features to write down great thoughts, calculate numbers, feed
online data direct to your desktop, and more. Here’s what you can do with
the Windows gadgets:
➟
Work with words and images. Notes is like an onscreen sticky notepad,
where you can jot reminders or ideas on the fly. Slide Show is a continuous slide show of the photos in your Pictures folder.
➟
Manipulate numbers. The Windows Calculator doesn’t fit in the palm
of your hand, but it does offer a little onscreen calculator that you can
use to push numbers around. Punch numbers in by using your mouse
or keyboard instead of your finger, and you can handle even complex
calculations with ease.
➟
Play with puzzles. Two neat little puzzles, Number Puzzle and Picture
Puzzle, allow you to play games that are so tiny, even your boss won’t
notice you’re not actually working.
➟
Work with online data. The Feed Watcher and Feed Viewer allow you
to grab data from online RSS feeds (a format used for syndication of
news and other content), such as the latest news or other useful information. Stocks and Currency Conversion provide up-to-the-minute
data on stocks and currency values.
➟
Plus a couple more gadgets. If you want to see how long it takes you
to complete one of the puzzle gadgets (or do anything else), use the
Timer gadget! The CPU Meter provides up-to-date information about
your computer processor speed and available memory.
Get ready to . . .
5
➟ Set Up the Windows Sidebar ......................44
➟ Add Gadgets to the Sidebar........................45
➟ Make a Note with Notes ............................46
➟ Display a Continuous Slide Show ................47
➟ Use the Windows Calculator........................48
➟ Play with Puzzles ......................................49
➟ Convert Currency ......................................50
➟ Add a Feed to the Windows Sidebar............51
➟ Get the Latest Stock Quotes........................52
➟ Monitor Your CPU ......................................53
Chapter 5: Using the Windows Sidebar and Gadgets
Set Up the Windows Sidebar
1. Right-click the Windows Sidebar icon on the Windows
taskbar and choose Properties to open the Windows
Sidebar Properties dialog box shown in Figure 5-1.
2. Select the Sidebar Is Always on Top of Other Windows
check box. If you like, you can also enable Start Sidebar
When Windows Starts to ensure that the Sidebar always
displays when you start your computer.
3. Click OK and then click the Close button to close the
Control Panel window. The Sidebar appears, as shown
in Figure 5-2.
If you’re left handed, or have some other propensity for things on
the left, you can choose to have the Sidebar displayed on the left
side of the screen by selecting the Left radio button in the Windows
Sidebar Properties dialog box.
Figure 5-1: Setting up Sidebar to appear on
your desktop
Once you’ve made your sidebar settings, the quickest way to display them in the future is to click the Windows Sidebar icon on the
Windows taskbar
➟
44
Figure 5-2: The Windows Sidebar displaying gadgets
Add Gadgets to the Sidebar
Add Gadgets to the Sidebar
1. With the Sidebar displayed, click the Gadgets symbol
(a plus sign) at the top of the Sidebar.
2. In the resulting Add Gadgets dialog box (see Figure 5-3),
double-click a gadget (or click and drag it to the Sidebar).
If you want to view additional gadgets, click the arrows
on the Page # of # item in the top left corner of the
dialog box.
3. Click the Close button to close the dialog box.
Gadgets included in Windows Vista may change; if any gadgets discussed in this chapter don’t appear, click the Get More Gadgets
Online link to find and install them.
Figure 5-3: The Add Gadgets dialog box
You can detach gadgets from the Sidebar and place them on the
desktop. If you then close the Sidebar, you can still work with those
desktop gadgets. To move a gadget, just click the Move button (the
bottom of the three buttons to the right of any gadget) and drag
the gadget where you want it.
If you add more gadgets than can be shown in the single Sidebar,
use the Previous and Next arrows at the top of the Sidebar to move
from one set of gadgets to the next.
➟
45
Chapter 5: Using the Windows Sidebar and Gadgets
Make a Note with Notes
1. Add the Notes gadget to the Sidebar (see the preceding
task) and click it.
2. Type whatever note you wish (see Figure 5-4), and then
do any of the following:
• Save: Click the Add button (the plus symbol on
the note) to save the note and move on to the next
blank note.
Figure 5-4: Text entered
on Notes
• Navigate: Click the Back arrow to move back to the
first note — or when you’ve entered more than one
note, click the Forward arrow to move to the next note.
• Delete: Click the Delete button to delete a note.
3. To change the font or color of your Notes text, click the
Settings button (the little wrench in the set of tools to
the right of any gadget).
4. In the resulting Notes window (see Figure 5-5), use the
Font and Font Size fields to modify the font. Click the
arrows beneath the Notes preview to choose a different
Notes background. Click OK when you’re done.
5. Click OK to save the settings.
You can right-click the Notes gadget and use a shortcut menu to
undo, cut, copy, paste, delete, or select all the displayed note text.
You can also use shortcut key combinations for many of these, such
as Ctrl+X for Cut.
➟
46
If you want two or more sets of Notes for different topics or types of
notes, just add Notes to the Sidebar a second time (see the preceding
task). Each set of Notes added can be a different color, so you can
easily keep track of which Notes pad holds which type of information.
Figure 5-5: The Notes dialog box
Display a Continuous Slide Show
Display a Continuous Slide Show
1. Add the Slide Show gadget to the Sidebar (see the earlier
task, “Add Gadgets to the Sidebar”) and click it.
2. Use the tools along the bottom of the slide show (see
Figure 5-6) to do the following:
Figure 5-6: The Slide
Show toolbar
• Click the View button to display the current slide in
the Photo Gallery Viewer.
• Click Pause to stop the slide show at the current slide.
• Click Previous to go to the previous slide.
• Click Next to go to the next slide.
3. Click the Settings button. In the resulting Slide Show
dialog box (see Figure 5-7), change the picture folders
to include in the slide show, or modify the number of
seconds to display each slide or a transition effect to use
between slides.
Figure 5-7: The Slide Show dialog box
4. Click OK to close the dialog box.
When you click the View button to display the current slide in Photo
Gallery Viewer, you can use tools to modify the image, print it, e-mail
it, or even create a movie. See Chapter 22 for more about using
Photo Gallery Viewer.
➟
47
Chapter 5: Using the Windows Sidebar and Gadgets
Use the Windows Calculator
1. Add the Calculator gadget (see Figure 5-8) to the Sidebar.
(See the earlier task, “Add Gadgets to the Sidebar.”) You
can enter numbers and symbols in a few different ways.
• Type numbers and symbols on your keyboard. They
appear in the entry box of the calculator. Press Enter
to perform the calculation.
• Click numbers or symbols on the calculator display
and then click the = button to perform the calculation. You can also use your keyboard to enter numbers
and operands.
You can right-click gadgets and choose the Detach from Sidebar
command from the shortcut menu to move a gadget to the desktop,
rather than using the click-and-drag method. This shortcut menu also
allows you to modify the opacity of a gadget so that when you move
your mouse off it, it fades to the degree that you set the opacity.
➟
48
Figure 5-8: The
Calculator gadget
Play with Puzzles
Play with Puzzles
1. Add the Picture Puzzle gadget to the Sidebar. (See the
earlier task, “Add Gadgets to the Sidebar.”)
2. Click either of the tools along the top of the puzzle
(see Figure 5-9) to do the following:
• Show Picture displays the picture you’re trying to
create.
Figure 5-9: The
Picture Puzzle
gadget
• Solve rearranges the pieces into the picture. After you
have clicked Solve, you can click this button again
(it’s then labelled Shuffle) to rearrange the pieces.
3. To play the game, click any piece adjacent to a blank
square. It moves into the blank space. Keep clicking and
moving pieces until you get the numbers arranged in
sequence from 1 to 15 (Number Puzzle) or the picture
pieces arranged to form a picture (Picture Puzzle).
4. Click the Settings button to the right of the puzzle to
display its settings dialog box (see Figure 5-10).
5. Click the Previous or Next button to scroll through
Figure 5-10: The Picture Puzzle
dialog box.
available pictures for the puzzle.
6. When you find the picture you want, click OK to close
the dialog box.
➟
49
Chapter 5: Using the Windows Sidebar and Gadgets
Convert Currency
1. Add the Currency Conversion gadget to the Sidebar.
(See the earlier task, “Add Gadgets to the Sidebar.”)
2. Connect to the Internet to access the latest currency rates
(as shown in Figure 5-11) and do any of the following.
• Enter the number of dollars; the number of equivalent euros is displayed.
Figure 5-11: The Currency Conversion
gadget connected to the Internet
• Click the arrow to the right of either currency and
choose another currency to convert from or to (see
Figure 5-12).
To view the online source for the latest currency conversion rates,
click and drag the Currency gadget to the desktop and click the
Data Providers link. The MSN Money page opens. Click the Banking
tab and then click the Currency Exchange Rates link to view current
rates.
If you detach the Currency Converter from the Sidebar an Add tool
appears. Click this to select another currency to display. With this
feature you can compare multiple currencies at the same time.
➟
50
Figure 5-12: Choosing a different
currency to convert.
Add a Feed to the Windows Sidebar
Add a Feed to the Windows Sidebar
1. Add the Feed Headlines gadget to the Sidebar and click
View Headlines. (See the earlier task, “Add Gadgets to
the Sidebar.”)
2. Double-click a feed to display it in your browser (see
Figure 5-13).
3. At the Web site that appears you can view blog entries,
submit an entry, or subscribe to additional feeds.
4. Click the Settings button. In the resulting Feed Viewer
dialog box (see Figure 5-14), select the default feed and
the number of recent headlines to show.
5. Click OK to close the dialog box.
Use the Next and Previous arrows that appear at the bottom of the
Feed Headlines gadget when you move your mouse over it to scroll
through available feeds.
Figure 5-13: The Feed Viewer showing the IEBlog
For more information about RSS feeds, click the What are Feeds?
link in the Feed Headlines settings dialog box.
Figure 5-14: The Feed Viewer dialog box
➟
51
Chapter 5: Using the Windows Sidebar and Gadgets
Get the Latest Stock Quotes
1. Add the Stocks gadget to the Sidebar. (See the earlier
task, “Add Gadgets to the Sidebar.”) Click and drag it
to the desktop where you can view more information.
2. Connect to the Internet; stock prices and stock exchange
data are displayed (see Figure 5-15).
Figure 5-15: The Stock gadget on the
desktop displaying stocks
3. Click the Search for a Stock button (a plus sign in the
bottom-right corner) and enter a stock symbol. Click
the Search button and the price is displayed (as shown
in Figure 5-16).
4. Click on a stock exchange to display detailed information
about it in your browser.
5. Click the Close button to close your browser.
Click the Show Stock Graph icon (a squiggly line symbol in the
bottom-right corner of the Stocks gadget) to view a graph of activity for the day.
Figure 5-16: The Stocks dialog box
➟
52
Monitor Your CPU
Monitor Your CPU
1. Add the CPU Meter gadget (see Figure 5-17) to
the Sidebar. (See the earlier task, “Add Gadgets
to the Sidebar.”)
2. Use the readouts to monitor the following:
• CPU Usage monitors how hard your CPU is working
to process various programs and processes running
on your computer.
• Random Access Memory (RAM) monitors the percent
of your computer memory that is being used.
Figure 5-17: The CPU Meter
gadget
If you want more detail about your computer memory usage, use
the Start menu to display the Control Panel and choose System and
Maintenance. The System links allow you to monitor the processor speed
and the amount of RAM available.
That’s about all there is to CPU Meter! You can’t make any settings
for it. It’s just a little reminder that helps you keep track of your
computer’s performance. If memory is almost at 100%, consider
freeing some space. If the CPU is at a higher percentage, odds are
you’ve got lots of programs running which could be slowing down
your computer’s performance; consider shutting some down!
➟
53
Chapter 5: Using the Windows Sidebar and Gadgets
➟
54
Part II
Getting on the Internet
Chapter 6: Accessing the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
Chapter 8: Exchanging E-Mail with Windows Mail . . .83
Set Up a New ISP Internet Connection..................58
Share an Internet Connection on a Network.........59
Configure a TCP/IP Connection.............................60
Set Up an Always-On Connection ..........................61
Repair a Connection................................................62
Set Up a Connection to the Network
at Your Workplace .................................................63
Designate Your Default Connection.......................64
Remove an Internet Connection.............................65
Open Windows Mail and Receive Messages ..........84
Manage an E-Mail Account .....................................85
Create and Send E-Mail...........................................86
Send an Attachment ................................................88
Read a Message ........................................................89
Reply to a Message...................................................90
Forward E-Mail.........................................................90
Create and Add a Signature .....................................91
Format E-Mail Messages ..........................................92
Add Stationery .........................................................93
Add Contacts to the Address Book .........................94
Customize the Windows Mail Layout ....................95
Create Message Folders............................................96
Organize Messages in Folders .................................97
Create Mail Rules.....................................................98
Chapter 7: Browsing the Web
with Internet Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67
Navigate the Web.....................................................68
Search the Web.........................................................69
Find Content on a Web Page ..................................70
Set Up a Home Page ................................................71
Add a Web Site to Favorites.....................................72
Organize Favorites ...................................................73
Work with Tabs ........................................................74
View Your Browsing History ...................................75
Customize the Internet Explorer Toolbar ..............76
Download Files ........................................................77
Change Privacy Settings ..........................................78
Enable the Content Advisor....................................79
View RSS Feeds.........................................................80
Print a Web Page ......................................................81
Chapter 9: Working Remotely . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Create a Power Plan for a Laptop .........................100
Create a Custom Power Plan .................................101
Connect to a Wireless Network.............................101
Send a Fax from Your Computer ..........................102
Set Up Long Distance Dialing
away from Home .................................................103
Set Up a Calling Card ............................................104
Make a Dialup Connection by Using
an Infrared-Enabled Cellular Phone ..................105
Accessing the
Internet
➟
Chapter
T
he Internet has become as integral to computing as a cellphone is to a
teenager. It’s how people communicate, transfer files, share images and
music, shop for goods and services, and research everything from aardvarks
to zebras.
6
Getting connected to the Internet isn’t hard. Most Internet service providers
(ISPs) provide software to set up your connection automatically. But you can
connect in a few different ways, and you’ll encounter a few different technologies. You might also need to tinker around with some settings to get
things working just the way you want them to.
Get ready to . . .
In this chapter, you find out how to make and manage Internet connections,
including
➟ Configure a TCP/IP Connection ..................60
➟ Set Up an Always-On Connection ................61
➟ Repair a Connection ..................................62
➟ Set Up a Connection to the Network
➟
Setting up your connection: The New Connection Wizard helps you
with this process. Then you can designate your default connection so
that you log on to the Internet using the method that you prefer.
➟
Modifying settings: Whether you use a TCP/IP or an always-on
connection (such as cable or DSL), you discover the ins and outs
of configuring them here as well as how to share your Internet connection with someone else.
➟
Using your Internet connection to connect to a network: If you’re
like many people, you might need to tap into your workplace network
from a remote location. It’s easy to do, and I tell you how.
➟ Set Up a New ISP Internet Connection ........58
➟ Share an Internet Connection
on a Network ............................................59
at Your Workplace ....................................63
➟ Designate Your Default Connection ............64
➟ Remove an Internet Connection..................65
Chapter 6: Accessing the Internet
Set Up a New ISP Internet
Connection
1. Choose Start➪Network.
2. In the resulting window, click Network and Sharing
Center.
3. In the resulting Network and Sharing Center window
(see Figure 6-1), click the Set Up a Connection or
Network link.
4. In the Choose a Connection Option dialog box, accept
the default option Connect to the Internet by clicking
Next.
5. In the resulting dialog box, click your connection.
(These steps follow the selection of Broadband.) If you
have a current connection, a window appears asking
whether you want to use a current connection. Click
Next to accept the default option of creating a new
connection.
Figure 6-1: The Network and Sharing Center window
6. In the resulting dialog box, as shown in Figure 6-2,
enter your user name, password, and connection name
(if you want to assign one) and then click Connect.
Windows Vista automatically detects the connection,
and the Network and Sharing Center appears with your
connection listed.
In many cases, if you have a disc from your ISP, you don’t need to
follow the preceding steps. Just pop that CD into your CD-ROM
drive, and in no time, a window appears that gives you instructions
for setting up your account.
➟
58
Figure 6-2: The New Connection Wizard
Share an Internet Connection on a Network
Share an Internet Connection
on a Network
1. Choose Start➪Network.
2. In the resulting window, click the Network and Sharing
Center link.
3. In the resulting Network and Sharing Center window
(refer to Figure 6-1), click the Manage Network
Connections link.
4. In the resulting window (see Figure 6-3), right-click a
connection and then choose Properties.
5. In the Connection Properties dialog box, click the
Sharing tab (see Figure 6-4).
6. Select the Allow Other Network Users to Connect through
This Computer’s Internet Connection check box.
Figure 6-3: The Network Connections window
7. If you want to dial this connection automatically when
another computer on your network tries to access it,
select the Establish a Dial-up Connection Whenever
a Computer on My Network Attempts to Access the
Internet check box.
8. If you want other people on your network to control the
shared Internet connection by enabling or disabling it,
select the Allow Other Network Users to Control or
Disable the Shared Internet Connection check box.
9. Click OK, and then close the Network Connections win-
dow to save the shared connection settings.
Users on your network also have to make some settings to use your
shared connection. They have to configure settings for an Internet
communications standard called TCP/IP (Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol) on their local area connections so that
they get an IP connection automatically.
Figure 6-4: Selected options in the Connection
Properties dialog box
➟
59
Chapter 6: Accessing the Internet
Configure a TCP/IP Connection
1. Choose Start➪Network.
2. In the resulting window, click the Network and Sharing
Center link.
3. In the resulting Network and Sharing Center window
(refer to Figure 6-1), click the Manage Network
Connections link.
4. In the resulting window, right-click a connection and
then choose Properties.
5. In the Connection Properties dialog box, click the
Networking tab (see Figure 6-5).
6. On the Networking tab, in the This Connection Uses
the Following Items area, select the Internet Protocol
Version (TCP/IP) option and then click the Properties
button. Be sure that the latest version of the TCP/IP
is selected, even if earlier versions are also available
and selected.
Figure 6-5: The Connection Properties dialog box,
Networking tab
7. In the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties dialog box
that appears (as shown in Figure 6-6), allow addresses
to be assigned automatically. Select the Obtain an IP
Address Automatically option and then click OK twice.
➟
60
Although you can enter addresses manually in the Internet Protocol
(TCP/IP) Properties dialog box, I recommend letting them be
assigned automatically. That way, if your setup changes, you don’t
have to go back and manually modify addresses. This also saves
you the hassle of having to manually configure certain settings,
such as the Domain Name Service, which implements the Domain
Name System (DNS). Don’t want to worry about such techie things?
Me, neither. That’s why I just let addresses be assigned automatically.
Figure 6-6: The Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties
dialog box
Set Up an Always-On Connection
Set Up an Always-On Connection
1. Choose Start➪Network.
2. In the resulting window, click the Network and Sharing
Center link.
3. In the resulting window, click Set Up a Connection or
Network.
4. In the resulting dialog box, as shown in Figure 6-7, click
Next to set up a connection to the Internet. If you have
any existing connections at this point, you might be
asked whether you want to choose an existing connection
or set up a new one. Click Next to set up a new one.
5. In the resulting dialog box (see Figure 6-8), select the
Broadband option. In the resulting dialog box, enter
your user and password information and a connection
name if you wish, and then click Connect.
Figure 6-7: The New Connection Wizard
6. In the following dialog boxes, the wizard notifies you
that Windows Vista will detect your connection and
make settings for you. When you reach the final wizard
dialog box, click Finish to complete the process.
You might not have to do any of the preceding steps to set up an
always-on connection. If your provider doesn’t require a user name
and password to be entered, simply connect your broadband or
cable modem and then restart your computer. Windows Vista should
automatically detect the connection.
Figure 6-8: Choosing your connection.
➟
61
Chapter 6: Accessing the Internet
Repair a Connection
1. Choose Start➪Network.
2. In the resulting window, click the Network and Sharing
Center link.
3. In the resulting window, click the Manage Network
Connections link.
4. In the Network Connections window, right-click the con-
nection and then click the Diagnose button.
5. A diagnostic runs and displays a window with suggestions
about how to repair your connection (see Figure 6-9).
Click a suggestion to perform the action, and then click
the Close button to close the dialog box (for example,
resetting the network adapter). If the suggestion is an
action you must perform, such as plugging in a cable,
do so.
Sometimes diagnosing a connection doesn’t do the trick. In that case,
it’s best to delete the connection and just create it again by clicking
the Create a New Connection link in the Network Connections window
and entering the correct settings.
➟
62
Figure 6-9: The Windows Network Diagnostics window
You may have recently made or changed a setting that caused your network connection to fail. If that could be the case, you might consider running a System Restore to an earlier point in time. A System Restore will
take you back to a time before you changed your settings, but it doesn’t
delete any programs or documents. See Chapter 18 for more about using
the System Restore feature.
Set Up a Connection to the Network at Your Workplace
Set Up a Connection to the Network
at Your Workplace
1. Choose Start➪Network.
2. In the resulting window, click the Network and Sharing
Center button.
3. In the resulting window, click Set Up a Connection or
Network link. In the Choose a Connection Option window that appears, click Connect to a Workplace and
then click Next.
4. In the How Do You Want to Connect? dialog box, as
shown in Figure 6-10, click Use My Internet Connection
(VPN) (assuming you are connecting over the Internet
and not through a phone line).
Figure 6-10: The Network Connection Type dialog box
5. In the next two dialog boxes, enter an address for the
connection (see Figure 6-11), and then complete one of
two tasks:
• For a dial-up connection, enter a phone number
(see Figure 6-11).
• For a VPN connection, select whether to automatically
dial the initial connection.
6. When you reach the final wizard dialog box, click Finish
to complete the wizard.
Figure 6-11: The Type the Telephone Number to Connect To dialog box
➟
63
Chapter 6: Accessing the Internet
Designate Your Default Connection
1. Choose Start➪Network.
2. In the resulting window, click the Network and Sharing
Center link.
3. In the resulting window (see Figure 6-12), click the
Manage Network Connections link.
4. In the Network Connections window (see Figure 6-13),
right-click the connection you want as default and then
choose Set as Default Connection. The number (1)
appears in parentheses by the connection name.
Your computer uses the default connection anytime you click a link
to an online location or open your browser. However, you can still
manually open any connection by opening the Network Connections
window, right-clicking any connection, and choosing Connect.
Figure 6-12: The Network and Sharing Center window
Why would you need to change a connection? If you travel with a
laptop computer you may want to change your default connection
from your home network to a wireless connection provided at an
airport or hotel, for example. Or, you may use one connection at
home and one at the office.
➟
64
Figure 6-13: The Network Connections window
Remove an Internet Connection
Remove an Internet Connection
1. Choose Start➪Network.
2. In the resulting window, click the Network and Sharing
Center link.
3. In the resulting window (see Figure 6-14), click the
Manage Network Connections link.
4. In the Network Connections window (see Figure 6-15),
right-click the connection and then click Delete.
The connection name is removed from the Network
Connections list.
Even if you no longer need a connection, as long as you don’t click
on it, there’s no harm leaving it in your connections list. However,
somebody else using your computer may be unsure as to which connection to activate, and your Network Connections window will be
more cluttered if you don’t get rid of old connections.
Figure 6-14: The Network and Sharing Center window
Figure 6-15: The Network Connections window
➟
65
Chapter 6: Accessing the Internet
➟
66
Browsing the Web
with Internet Explorer
➟
Chapter
T
o drive around the Internet superhighway, you need a good vehicle.
A browser is a program that you can use to get around the Internet,
and Internet Explorer (IE) is one of the best.
IE is built into Windows Vista because it’s made by Microsoft, so the
Microsoft folks can put it anywhere they like. This is good news for you
because by using IE you can
➟
Navigate all around the Web. Use the IE navigation features to jump
from one site to another, go back to places you’ve been (via the
Favorites and History features), and search for new places to visit.
➟
Download files to your computer or print. When you find what you
want online, such as a graphic image or free software program, you
might want to save it to your computer for future use. Do you need
a hard copy of what you’ve found? Just use the Print feature of IE.
➟
Protect yourself. The Internet is a bit dangerous — a place where
some people try to get at your private information and make nefarious
use of it. IE provides privacy settings and special features to control
the use of cookies (small files that folks who run Web sites insert on
your hard drive to help them track your online activities). You can use
the Content Advisor to limit the online locations that your computer
can visit.
Get ready to . . .
7
➟ Navigate the Web ......................................68
➟ Search the Web..........................................69
➟ Find Content on a Web Page ......................70
➟ Set Up a Home Page..................................71
➟ Add a Web Site to Favorites........................72
➟ Organize Favorites ....................................73
➟ Work with Tabs ..........................................74
➟ View Your Browsing History........................75
➟ Customize the Internet Explorer Toolbar ....76
➟ Download Files ..........................................77
➟ Change Privacy Settings ............................78
➟ Enable the Content Advisor ........................79
➟ View RSS Feeds..........................................80
➟ Print a Web Page ......................................81
Chapter 7: Browsing the Web with Internet Explorer
Navigate the Web
1. Open IE by clicking the Internet Explorer icon on the
Quick Launch portion of the Windows Vista taskbar.
2. Enter a Web site address in the Address bar as shown in
Figure 7-1 (www.pubstudio.com is my company’s
Web site) and then press Enter.
3. On the resulting Web site, click a link, display another
page on the site, or enter another address to proceed to
another page.
A link can be an icon or text. A text link is identifiable by colored
text, usually blue or purple. After you click a link, it usually changes
color to show that it’s been followed.
4. Click the Back button to move back to the first page that
you visited. Click the Forward button to go forward to
the second page that you visited.
Figure 7-1: My Web site home page
5. Click the down-pointing arrow at the far right of the
Address bar to display a list of sites that you visited
recently, as shown in Figure 7-2. Click a site in this list
to go there.
The Refresh and Stop buttons on the right end of the Address bar are
useful for navigating sites. Clicking the Refresh button redisplays the
current page. This is especially useful if a page updates information
frequently, such as on a stock market site. You can also use the Refresh
button if a page doesn’t load correctly; it might load correctly when
refreshed. Clicking the Stop button stops a page that’s loading. So, if
you made a mistake entering the address, or if the page is taking
longer than you’d like to load, click the Stop button to halt the process.
➟
68
You can use the Pop-Up Blocker to stop annoying pop-up ads as you
browse. Click the Tools menu button and choose Pop-up Blocker➪
Turn On Pop-up Blocker to activate this feature. You can also use
the Pop-up Blocker Settings command on this same menu to specify sites on which you want to allow pop-ups.
Figure 7-2: Recently visited sites
Search the Web
Search the Web
1. Open IE and click in the Live Search pane on the toolbar.
2. Enter a search term in the text box and then click Search.
3. In the resulting Windows Live list of links (see Figure 7-3),
click a link to go that Web page. If you don’t see the link
that you need, click and drag the scrollbar to view more
results.
4. Click a tab along the top of the search results to see
different types of results: for example, news stories or
images related to your search term.
5. Click the Options link at the top of the Search window
to change Live Search settings.
6. In the resulting Search Settings dialog box, as shown in
Figure 7-4, select options such as the following, and
then click Save to apply the new settings:
Figure 7-3: Search results displayed in Windows Live
• SafeSearch: These options let you set filtering of
search results at three levels: Strict, which filters out
most inappropriate content; Moderate, which filters
out only certain types of content; and Off, which
turns off filtering for searches.
• Results: Select one of these options to determine
whether results are opened in the current browser
window or whether Windows Live opens a new
browser window.
Knowing how search engines work can save you time. For example,
if you search by entering golden retriever, you typically get sites
that contain both words or either word. If you put a plus sign between
these two keywords (golden+retriever), you get only sites that contain both words.
Figure 7-4: The Search Settings dialog box
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69
Chapter 7: Browsing the Web with Internet Explorer
Find Content on a Web Page
1. With IE open and the Web page that you want to search
displayed, click the arrow on the Search box and choose
Find on This Page.
Figure 7-5: The Find dialog box
2. In the resulting Find dialog box, as shown in Figure 7-5,
enter the word that you want to search for. Use the following options to narrow your results:
• Match Whole Word Only: Select this option if you
want to find only the whole word (for example, if
you enter elect and want to find only elect and not
electron or electronics).
• Match Case: Select this option if you want to match
the case (for example, if you enter Catholic and want
to find only the always-capitalized religion and not
the adjective catholic).
3. Click the Next button. The first instance of the word is
highlighted on the page (see Figure 7-6). If you want to
find another instance, click the Next button again. Click
the Previous button to move back to the last match.
4. When you’re done searching, click the Close button in
the Find dialog box.
Many Web sites, such as www.Amazon.com, have a
Search This Site feature that allows you to search not only the displayed Web page but all Web pages on a Web site. Look for a
Search text box and make sure that it searches the site — and not
the entire Internet.
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70
Figure 7-6: A found word highlighted on a Web page
Set Up a Home Page
Set Up a Home Page
1. Open IE and choose Tools➪Internet Options.
2. In the resulting Internet Options dialog box, on the
General tab, enter a Web site address to use as your
home page, as shown in Figure 7-7. Note that you can
enter several home pages that will appear on different
tabs every time you open IE, as shown in Figure 7-8.
Alternatively, click one of the following preset option
buttons, as shown in Figure 7-7:
• Use Current: Sets whatever page is currently displayed
in the browser window as your home page.
• Use Default: This setting sends you to the MSN
Web page.
• Use Blank: If you’re a minimalist, this setting is for
you. No Web page displays; you just see a blank area.
Figure 7-7: The Internet Options dialog box
3. Click OK.
4. Click the Home Page icon to go to your home page.
If you want to have more than one home page, you can create multiple home page tabs that will display when you click the Home button. Click the arrow on the Home button and choose Add or Change
Home Page. In the Add or Change Home Page dialog box that
appears, click the Add this page to your home page tabs radio button, and then click Yes. Display other sites and repeat this procedure
for all the home page tabs you want.
To remove a home page you have set up, click the arrow on the Home
Page button and choose Remove and then choose a particular home
page, or choose Remove All from the sub menu that appears.
Figure 7-8: Two home page tabs
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Chapter 7: Browsing the Web with Internet Explorer
Add a Web Site to Favorites
1. Open IE, enter the URL of a Web site that you want to
add to your Favorites list, and then click Go (the button
with blue arrows on it to the right of the Address bar.
2. Click the Add to Favorites button and then choose Add
to Favorites.
Figure 7-9: The Favorites Center dialog box
3. In the resulting Favorites Center dialog box, as shown
in Figure 7-9, modify the name of the Favorite listing
to something easily recognizable. If you wish, choose
another folder or create a folder to store the Favorite in.
4. Click Add to add the site.
5. Click the Favorites Center button and then click the name
of the site from the list that’s displayed (see Figure 7-10)
to go to that site.
Regularly cleaning out your Favorites list is a good idea — after
all, do you really need the sites that you used to plan last year’s
vacation? With the Favorites Center displayed, right-click any item
and then choose Delete or Rename to modify the favorite listing.
You can keep the Favorites Center as a side pane in Internet
Explorer by displaying it and then clicking the Pin the Favorites
Center button (it has a left-facing green arrow on it and is located
to the right of the History button).
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72
Figure 7-10: Favorites Web sites displayed in the Favorites pane
Organize Favorites
Organize Favorites
1. With Internet Explorer open, click the Add to Favorites
button and then choose Organize Favorites.
2. In the resulting Organize Favorites dialog box (see
Figure 7-11), click the New Folder, Move, Rename, or
Delete buttons to organize your favorites.
3. When you finish organizing your Favorites, click Close.
These steps provide a handy way to manage several sites or folders, but you can also organize favorite sites one by one by using the
Favorites pane. (You display the Favorites pane by clicking the
Favorites button.) Right-click any favorite site listed in the pane and
choose a command: Create New Folder, Delete, Rename, or Sort by
Name, for example.
If you create new folders in the above steps, then you will have to
manually transfer files into those folders. To do this just display the
Favorites Center and click and drag files listed there on top of folders.
Figure 7-11: Organize Favorites dialog box
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73
Chapter 7: Browsing the Web with Internet Explorer
Work with Tabs
1. With Internet Explorer open, click New Tab (the small-
est tab on the far right of the tabs).
2. A new tab appears, which displays some information
about tabs (see Figure 7-12). Enter a URL in the Address
bar. The URL opens in that tab. You can then click other
tabs to switch among sites.
3. Click the Quicktabs button (it consists of four little
squares on the far left of the tabs) to display a thumbnail
of all open tabs (see Figure 7-13), or click the Tab List
button (the arrow to the right of the Quicktabs button)
to display a text list of tabs.
4. Close an active tab by clicking the Close button on the
right.
A tab is a sort of window you can use to view any number of sites.
You don’t have to create a new tab to go to another site. Having the
ability to keep a few tabs open at a time means you can more quickly
switch between two or more sites without navigating back and forth
either with the Previous or Next buttons or by entering URLs. You can
also create more than one Home Page tab that can appear every time
you open IE. See the task “Set Up a Home Page” for more about this.
Figure 7-12: A newly created tab
You can also press Ctrl+T to open a new tab in Internet Explorer.
Also, if you want to keep one tab open and close all others, right-click
the tab you want to keep open and choose Close Other Tabs.
➟
74
Figure 7-13: Quicktabs displaying thumbnails of all open tabs
View Your Browsing History
View Your Browsing History
1. Click the Favorites Center button and then click History
to display the History pane (see Figure 7-14).
2. Click the down-arrow on the History button (see
Figure 7-15) and select a sort method:
• By Date: Sort favorites by date visited.
• By Site: Sort alphabetically by site name.
• By Most Visited: Sort with the sites visited most on
top and those visited least at the bottom of the list.
• By Order Visited Today: Sort by the order in which
you visited sites today.
3. In the History pane, you can click a site to go to it.
The History pane closes.
Figure 7-14: The History pane
You can also choose the arrow on the right of the Address bar to display sites you’ve visited.
Choose Search History on the History menu to display a search box
you can use to search for sites you’ve visited.
Figure 7-15: The History sort menu
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75
Chapter 7: Browsing the Web with Internet Explorer
Customize the Internet
Explorer Toolbar
1. Open IE.
2. Click Tools➪Toolbars➪Customize. The Customize
Toolbar dialog box (as shown in Figure 7-16) appears.
3. Click a tool on the left and then click the Add button to
Figure 7-16: The Customize Toolbar dialog box
add it to the toolbar.
4. Click a tool on the right and then click the Remove but-
ton to remove it from the toolbar.
5. When you’re finished, click Close to save your new
toolbar settings. The new tools appear (see Figure 7-17);
click the double-arrow button on the right of the toolbar to display any tools that IE can’t fit onscreen.
You can use the Move Up and Move Down buttons in the Customize
Toolbar dialog box to rearrange the order in which tools appear on
the toolbar. To reset the toolbar to defaults, click the Reset button
in that same dialog box.
If you want to add some space between tools on the toolbar so
they’re easier to see, click the Separator item in the Available Toolbar
Buttons list and add it before or after a tool button.
Figure 7-17: Display any additional tools by clicking the button on the right of the
toolbar
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76
Download Files
Download Files
1. Open a Web site that contains downloadable files.
Typically Web sites offer a Download button or link
that initiates a file download.
2. Click the appropriate link to proceed. Windows Vista
might display a dialog box asking your permission to
proceed with the download; click Yes.
3. In the resulting File Download dialog box, as shown in
Figure 7-18: The File Download dialog box
Figure 7-18, choose either option:
• Click Run to download to a temporary folder.
You can run an installation program for software,
for example. However, beware: If you run a program
directly from the Internet, you could be introducing
dangerous viruses to your system. You might want
to set up an antivirus program to scan files before
downloading them.
If a particular file will take a long time to download (the Windows Vista
beta version took me over 20 hours!) you may have to babysit it. If your
computer goes into standby it could pause the download. If your computer automatically downloads updates it may cause your computer to
restart automatically as well, cancelling or halting your download. Check
in periodically to keep things moving along.
• Click Save to save the file to your hard drive. In the
Save As dialog box, select the folder on your computer
or removable storage media (a CD-ROM, for example)
where you want to save the file. If you’re downloading
software, you need to locate the downloaded file and
click it to run the installation.
If you’re worried that a particular file might be unsafe to download
(for example, if it’s from an unknown source and, being an executable file type, could contain a virus), click Cancel in the File
Download dialog box.
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77
Chapter 7: Browsing the Web with Internet Explorer
Change Privacy Settings
1. With IE open, choose Tools➪Internet Options and click
the Privacy tab, as shown in Figure 7-19.
2. Click the slider and drag it up or down to make different
levels of security settings.
3. Read the choices and select a setting that suits you.
4. Click the Sites button to specify sites to always or never
allow the use of cookies. In the resulting Per Site Privacy
Actions dialog box (as shown in Figure 7-20), enter a
site in the Address of Website box and click either Block
or Allow.
5. Click OK twice to save your new settings.
The default setting, Medium, is probably a good bet for most people. To restore the default setting, click the Default button in the
Internet Options dialog box Privacy tab or use the slider to move
back to Medium.
Figure 7-19: The Privacy tab of the Internet Options
dialog box
You can also use pop-up blocker settings on the Privacy tab to specify which pop-up windows to allow or block. Just click the Settings
button, enter a Web site name, and then click Add to allow pop-ups.
➟
78
Figure 7-20: The Per Site Privacy Actions dialog box
Enable the Content Advisor
Enable the Content Advisor
1. With IE open, choose Tools➪Internet Options.
2. In the resulting Internet Options dialog box, click the
Content tab to display it.
3. Click the Enable button. (Note: If there is no Enable but-
ton but Disable and Settings buttons instead, Content
Advisor is already enabled. Click the Settings button to
see the options and make changes if you wish.)
4. On the Ratings tab of the Content Advisor dialog box
(see Figure 7-21), click one of the categories (such as
Depiction of Drug Use) and then move the slider to use
one of three site screening settings: None, Limited, or
Unrestricted.
5. Repeat Step 4 for each of the categories.
Figure 7-21: The Ratings tab of the Content Advisor
dialog box
6. Click the Approved Sites tab (see Figure 7-22) and enter
the name of a specific site that you want to control
access to. Then click Always or Never.
• Always allows users to view the site, even if it’s
included in the Content Advisor screening level
you’ve set.
• Never means that nobody can visit the site even if it’s
acceptable to Content Advisor.
7. When you finish making your settings, click OK twice to
save them.
If you want to view sites that you don’t want others to see, you can
do that, too. On the General tab of the Content Advisor dialog box,
make sure that the Supervisor Can Type a Password to Allow
Viewers to View Restricted Content check box is selected, and then
click Create Password. In the dialog box that appears, enter the
password, confirm it, and then enter a hint and click OK. Now if
you’re logged on as the system administrator, you can get to any
restricted site by using this password.
Figure 7-22: The Approved Sites tab of the Content
Advisor
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79
Chapter 7: Browsing the Web with Internet Explorer
View RSS Feeds
1. Click the Favorites Center button; then click the Feeds
button to display a list of recently displayed RSS Feeds
(see Figure 7-23).
2. Click a Feed to display it (see Figure 7-24).
3. You can also click the View Feeds on This Page button
on the toolbar to view any active feeds listed on the currently displayed page.
The View Feeds on This Page button is grayed out when there are
no RSS feeds on the current page, and it turns Red when feeds are
present.
Though Internet Explorer has an RSS feed reader built in, you can
explore other feed readers. Just type “RSS feeds” into Internet
Explorer’s Search box to find more information and listings of readers and RSS feed sites.
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80
Figure 7-23: The RSS Feeds pane
Figure 7-24: An RSS Feed site
Print a Web Page
Print a Web Page
1. If a Web page includes a link or button to print or dis-
play a print version of a page, click that and follow the
instructions.
2. If the page doesn’t include a link for printing, click the
Print button on the IE toolbar.
3. In the resulting Print dialog box, decide how much of the
document you want to print and then select one of the
options in the Page Range area, as shown in Figure 7-25.
Note that choosing Current Page or entering page numbers in the
Pages text box of the Print dialog box doesn’t mean much when printing a Web page — the whole document might print because Web
pages aren’t divided into pages as word processing documents are.
Figure 7-25: The Print dialog box
4. Click the up arrow in the Number of Copies text box to
print multiple copies. If you want multiple copies collated, select the Collate check box.
5. When you adjust all settings you need, click Print.
➟
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Chapter 7: Browsing the Web with Internet Explorer
➟
82
Exchanging E-Mail
with Windows Mail
➟
Chapter
O
nce upon a time, people chatted around the water cooler or over
lunch, but that’s all changed now. Now the place to spend your time
communicating is online.
Although instant messaging from your cell phone is all the rage, e-mail is
still the cornerstone of online communication. You’ve probably sent an
e-mail (unless you were brought up by wolves in the forest), but you might
not be familiar with the ins and outs of using Windows Mail, the e-mail program from Microsoft that’s built into Windows Vista.
To make your e-mailing life easy, this chapter takes a look at these tasks:
➟
Receive, send, and forward messages. Deal with the ins and outs of
receiving and sending e-mail. Use the formatting tools that Windows
Mail provides to make your messages more attractive and readable.
➟
Add information into the Address Book. You can quickly and easily
manage your contacts as well as organize the messages you save in
e-mail folders.
➟
Set up the layout of all Windows Mail features. Use the Folder bar
and Layout features to create the most efficient workspace.
➟
Manage your e-mail account. Set up an e-mail account, and then
create, modify, and add rules for your account to operate by.
Get ready to . . .
8
➟ Open and Receive Windows Mail ................84
➟ Manage an E-Mail Account ........................85
➟ Create and Send E-Mail..............................86
➟ Send an Attachment ..................................88
➟ Read a Message ........................................89
➟ Reply to and Forward E-Mail ......................90
➟ Create and Add a Signature ......................91
➟ Format E-Mail Messages ............................92
➟ Add Stationery ..........................................93
➟ Add Contacts to the Address Book ..............94
➟ Customize the Windows Mail Layout ..........95
➟ Create Message Folders..............................96
➟ Organize Messages in Folders ....................97
➟ Create Mail Rules ......................................98
Chapter 8: Exchanging E-Mail with Windows Mail
Open Windows Mail and
Receive Messages
1. Choose Start➪All Programs➪Windows Mail.
2. In the Windows Mail window, press Ctrl+M to send and
receive all messages.
3. Click the Inbox item in the Folders list to view mes-
sages. New messages sport a small closed envelope icon;
those with attachments have a paper clip icon as well
(see Figure 8-1).
To organize messages in the Inbox, click any of the headings at the
top, such as From (to sort the messages alphabetically by sender),
Received (to sort by the date they were received), and so on.
If your mail doesn’t come through it’s probably because your e-mail
provider’s servers are experiencing technical problems. Just wait a
little while and try to retrieve your mail again. If you still can’t get
mail (and you know you should have received some by now) contact your e-mail provider to find out what the problem is and when
it will be fixed.
Note that if an e-mail has a little exclamation point to the left of it
in your Inbox somebody has flagged it as urgent. It’s usually best
to check out those e-mails first!
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84
Figure 8-1: The Windows Mail Inbox
Manage an E-Mail Account
Manage an E-Mail Account
1. In the Windows Mail main window, choose Tools➪
Accounts.
2. In the resulting Internet Accounts dialog box, as shown
in Figure 8-2, do any of the following:
• To remove an account, click the Remove button on
any of the tabs. A confirming message appears.
To delete the account, click Yes.
• Select an account and click the Set as Default button
to make it the account that Windows connects you to
when you go online. In the case of the mail server,
the default is the one used to send any message.
3. To set up a new account, click Add.
Figure 8-2: The Internet Accounts dialog box
4. In the resulting Internet Connection Wizard (see
Figure 8-3), choose an account type: E-mail, Newsgroup,
or Directory Service for online search services used by
the Contacts feature to search for people.
5. Click Next. In the following screen, follow the set-up
instructions.
Following the Internet Connection Wizard often requires that you
provide certain information about your Internet service provider
(ISP), such as its mail server or connection method. Keep this information handy!
6. When you finish setting up accounts, click the Close
button to close the Internet Accounts dialog box.
Figure 8-3: The first screen of the wizard used to add an account
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85
Chapter 8: Exchanging E-Mail with Windows Mail
Create and Send E-Mail
1. Choose Start➪All Programs➪Windows Mail.
2. Click the Create Mail button on the Windows Mail tool-
bar to create a new blank e-mail form (see Figure 8-4).
3. Type the e-mail address of the recipient in the To field
text box and an address in the Cc field text box to send
a copy of the message.
4. Click in the Subject field text box and type a concise yet
descriptive subject.
5. Click in the message window and type your message
(see Figure 8-5).
Figure 8-4: A new, blank e-mail form with addresses entered
Don’t press Enter at the end of a line. Windows Mail has an automatic
text wrap feature that does this for you. Also, keep e-mail etiquette
in mind as you type. For example, don’t type in ALL CAPITAL LETTERS.
This is called shouting, which is considered rude.
Do be polite even if you’re really, really angry. Your message could
be forwarded to just about anybody, just about anywhere, and you
don’t want to get a reputation as a hothead. Do be concise. If you
have lots to say, consider sending a letter by snail-mail or overnight
delivery. Most people tire of reading text onscreen after a short while.
Figure 8-5: A message typed and ready to go
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86
Create and Send E-Mail
6. When you finish typing your message, spell-check it
(unless you’re the regional state spelling champ).
Click the Spelling button; possibly misspelled words
get highlighted, and the Spelling dialog box appears
(see Figure 8-6). At this point, you have some choices:
• Click the Ignore button to ignore this instance of the
misspelling.
• Click the Ignore All button to ignore all instances.
• Choose a suggested alternate spelling and click the
Change button to change that instance; or, click
the Change All button to change all instances
of the word.
• Click the Add button to add the current spelling of
the word to the Spelling feature dictionary so it’s
never questioned again.
Figure 8-6: The Spelling dialog box
Remember that when creating an e-mail, you can address it to a stored
address by using the Address Book feature. Click the To button, and your
Address Book appears. You can then select a contact from there.
Windows Mail also allows you to just begin to type a stored contact in an
address field (To or Cc), and it fills in likely options while you type. When
it fills in the correct name, just press Enter to select it.
7. Click the Close button to close the Spelling Checker.
Click the Send button. The message is on its way!
If the message is really urgent, you might also click the Priority button to add a bright red exclamation mark to the message header to
alert the recipient. Click twice again to return the priority to Low.
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Chapter 8: Exchanging E-Mail with Windows Mail
Send an Attachment
1. Create a new e-mail message, address it, and enter a
subject.
2.
Click the Attach File to Message button.
3. In Open dialog box that appears (see Figure 8-7), locate
the file that you want and then click Open.
4. With the name of the attached file now in the Attach
field text box (see Figure 8-8), type a message (or not —
after all, a picture is worth a thousand words).
5. Click the Send button to send.
If you want to send somebody your own contact information, create a business card in your Address Book and attach it to an e-mail.
This is saved in vCard format, and the recipient can then import it
into his or her Address Book. Just create yourself as a contact. Then,
in the Address Book window, right-click the contact and choose Send
Contact (vCard). A blank e-mail opens with the card attached.
Figure 8-7: The Open dialog box
Some e-mail programs limit the time that the program attempts to
get mail from your server. If you sometimes get a message that your
connection timed out, choose Tools➪Accounts, select your e-mail
account, and then click Properties. On the Advanced tab, move the
Server Timeout slider a bit to the right to allow for a longer time
period before timing out.
Figure 8-8: The Attach field showing an attached file
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88
Read a Message
Read a Message
1. Click an e-mail message in your Inbox or double-click it
to open it in a separate window. Unread messages sport
an icon of an unopened envelope to the left of the message subject.
2. Use the scrollbars in the message window to scroll
down through the message and read it (see Figure 8-9).
3. If the message has an attachment, it shows a paper clip
symbol when the message is closed in your Inbox;
attachments are listed in the Attach box in the open
message. To open an attachment, double-click it.
4. In the Mail Attachment dialog box (see Figure 8-10),
Figure 8-9: A newly received e-mail message
click the Open button. The attachment opens in whatever program is associated with it (such as the Windows
Fax and Picture Viewer for a graphics file) or the program it was created in (such as Word for Windows).
If you’d rather save an attachment to a storage disk or your hard
drive, right-click the attachment name in the Attach field and
choose Save As. In the Save As dialog box that appears, choose a
location and provide a name for the file; then click Save.
Figure 8-10: The Mail Attachment dialog box
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Chapter 8: Exchanging E-Mail with Windows Mail
Reply to a Message
1. Open the message you want to reply to, and then
select one of the following reply options, as shown
in Figure 8-11:
• Reply: Send the reply to only the author.
• Reply All: Send a reply to the author as well as everyone who received the original message.
2. In the resulting e-mail form (see Figure 8-12), enter any
additional recipient(s) in the To and/or Cc text boxes
and type your message in the message window area.
3. Click the Send button to send the reply.
Figure 8-11: Reply to the sender or all recipients
If you don’t want to include the original message in your reply,
choose Tools➪Options and click the Send tab. Clear the Include
Message in Reply check box, and then click OK.
Forward E-Mail
1. Open the e-mail message that you want to forward.
2. Click the Forward button on the toolbar.
3. In the message that appears with Fw added to the begin-
ning of the subject line, enter a new recipient(s) in the
To and Cc fields, and then enter any message that you
want to include in the message window area, as shown
in the example in Figure 8-12.
4. Click Send to forward the message.
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90
Figure 8-12: A message ready to be sent
Create and Add a Signature
Create and Add a Signature
1. Choose Tools➪Options to open the Options dialog box.
Click the Signatures tab (see Figure 8-13).
2. Click the New button to create a new signature and then
enter your Signatures text.
3. Select the Add Signatures to All Outgoing Messages
check box and make sure that the signature is selected
as the default. (Note: Select the Don’t Add Signatures to
Replies and Forwards check box if you want to add your
signature only occasionally.)
4. Click OK to save the signature. To manually add a signa-
ture to an open e-mail message with the message open,
choose Insert➪Signature and select a signature from the
list that appears to insert it (see Figure 8-14).
If you have different e-mail accounts and want to assign a different
signature to each one, go to the Signatures tab of the Options dialog box. There, select a signature in the Signatures list box, click the
Advanced button, and then select an account to associate it with.
Figure 8-13: The Options dialog box, Signatures tab
Remember that if you attach your signature to every outgoing
e-mail including e-mail replies, whoever you communicate with will
get the information provided there. Consider issues of identity theft
before you provide your address, phone number, and other personal information to all and sundry.
Figure 8-14: Manually inserting a signature in an e-mail
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Chapter 8: Exchanging E-Mail with Windows Mail
Format E-Mail Messages
1. Create a new e-mail message or open a message and
click Reply or Forward.
2. Select the text that you want to format (see Figure 8-15).
3. Use any of the following options to make changes to
the font. (See the toolbar containing these tools in
Figure 8-16 and a message with various formats applied.)
• Font drop-down list: Choose an option from the
drop-down list to apply it to the text.
• Font Size drop-down list: Change the font size here.
• Paragraph Style button: Apply a preset style, such as
Heading 1 or Address.
Figure 8-15: Text selected for formatting
• Bold, Italic, or Underline buttons: Apply styles to
selected text.
• Font Color button: Display a color palette and click
a color to apply it to selected text.
• Formatting Numbers or Formatting Bullets buttons:
Apply numbering order to lists or precede each item
with a round bullet.
• Increase Indentation or Decrease Indentation button:
Indent that paragraph to the right or move (decrease)
it to the left.
• Align Left, Center, Align Right, or Justify buttons:
Adjust the alignment.
• Insert Horizontal Line button: Add a line to your
message.
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92
Figure 8-16: A variety of formats applied to an e-mail message
Add Stationery
Add Stationery
1. Click the arrow on the Create Mail button in the
Windows Mail main window and select a stationery
option listed in the menu that appears, or choose the
Select Stationery command to get more choices.
2. In the Select Stationery dialog box that appears
(see Figure 8-17), select a stationery from the list.
3. Click OK to apply the stationery to the new message.
4. With a new, reply, or forwarded message open, you can
apply stationery using either of these methods:
• Choose Format➪Apply Stationery, and then click a
stationery to apply (see Figure 8-18).
Figure 8-17: The Select Stationery dialog box
• Choose More Stationery to access the Select
Stationery dialog box.
You can also insert a picture in an e-mail. With the e-mail form
open, choose Insert➪Picture. Locate a picture in the Picture window
that appears and click Open. The picture fills the background of the
e-mail message area.
Figure 8-18: Stationery applied to an e-mail message
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Chapter 8: Exchanging E-Mail with Windows Mail
Add Contacts to the Address Book
1. In the Windows Mail main window, click the Contacts
button to open the Contacts window.
2. To create a new contact in the resulting Contacts win-
dow, as shown in Figure 8-19, right-click on a name
and choose New➪Contact. (Note: New Contact Group
can be used to create a group of people from existing
contacts, such as your car pool members.)
3. In the resulting Properties dialog box, as shown in
Figure 8-20, go to the following options tabs to enter
contact information:
• Name and E-mail tab: Enter the person’s name and
e-mail address. (This is the only information you
must enter to create a contact.)
• Home tab: Enter the person’s home and Web site
addresses as well as phone, fax, and cellphone
numbers.
Figure 8-19: The Contacts window
• Work tab: Enter information about the company that
the person works for as well as his job title and pager
number. You can even add a map to help you find
his office.
• Family tab: Enter the person’s family members’ names,
as well as his or her gender, birthday, and anniversary.
• Notes tab: Enter any notes you like to in the form on
this tab.
• IDs tab: Ensure secure communications. Digital IDs
are certificates that you can use to verify the identity
of the person with whom you’re communicating.
4. Click OK to save your new contact information, and
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94
then close the Contacts window.
Figure 8-20: The Properties dialog box (Add text)
Customize the Windows Mail Layout
Customize the Windows Mail Layout
1. Choose View➪Layout to open the Window Layout
Properties dialog box.
2. Select various check boxes in the Basic section, as shown
in Figure 8-21, to select items to display in separate panes
(see Figure 8-22), including
• Folder List: A pane containing a list of all folders.
• Folder Bar: A bar near the top of the screen that
includes a drop-down list of folders.
• Toolbar: The bar containing tools you use to create
and work with messages, such as Create, Reply,
Forward, and Print.
• Status Bar: The bar across the bottom of screen that
lists the number of messages in all your folders and
the number of unread messages.
Figure 8-21: The Layout Properties dialog box
• Views Bar: A bar under the toolbar containing a
drop-down menu with three commands: Hide Read
Messages, Hide Read or Ignored Messages, and Show
All Messages.
• Search Bar: The bar that allows you to search your
mail for keywords or other criteria.
3. Select various options in the Preview Pane section to
preview a message selected in the Inbox, Outbox, Drafts,
Sent Items, or Deleted Items folders.
4. Click OK to apply and save all your layout settings.
Figure 8-22: Various elements displayed in Windows Mail
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Chapter 8: Exchanging E-Mail with Windows Mail
Create Message Folders
1. Choose View➪Layout to open the Window Layout
Properties dialog box.
2. Select check boxes to display the Folders list and Folder
bar and then click OK.
3. In the Folders list, click any folder to display its contents
(see Figure 8-23).
4. Choose File➪Folder➪New.
5. In the resulting Create Folder dialog box (see Figure 8-24),
select the folder that you want the new folder to be created in and then enter a new folder name.
6. Click OK.
Typically, you select the Local Folders item in Step 5 so that the new
folder is at the same level as the Inbox, Outbox, and so on.
Alternatively, you could select the Inbox item to place the new folder
within the Inbox folder.
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96
Figure 8-23: The Folders list in the Windows Mail Folder bar
Figure 8-24: The Create Folder dialog box
Organize Messages in Folders
Organize Messages in Folders
1. In the Folders list, click an arrow symbol to the left of
any folder to display its contents (see Figure 8-25).
2. To place a message in a folder, you can do one of these
actions:
• With a folder (such as the Inbox) displayed, click
a message and then drag it into a folder in the
Folders list.
• With an e-mail message open, choose File➪Move to
Folder or Copy to Folder. In the dialog box that
appears (see Figure 8-26), select the appropriate
folder and click OK.
• Right-click a message in a displayed folder and choose
Move to Folder or Copy to Folder. In the dialog box
that appears, select the appropriate folder and then
click OK.
Figure 8-25: The Folders list, which you find in the Windows Mail Folder Bar
3. To delete a message, display the folder it’s saved to,
select it, and then click the Delete button or press
Delete (on your keyboard).
If you try to delete a message from your Deleted Items folder, a
message appears asking whether you really want to delete this message permanently. That’s because when you delete a message from
another folder, it’s really not deleted; instead, it’s simply placed in
the Deleted Items folder. To send it into oblivion, you have to delete
it from the Deleted Items folder, confirming your deletion so that
Windows Mail is really convinced that you mean what you say.
Figure 8-26: The Move dialog box
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Chapter 8: Exchanging E-Mail with Windows Mail
Create Mail Rules
1. Choose Tools➪Message Rules➪Mail.
2. In the resulting New Mail Rule dialog box (see
Figure 8-27), select the check box to set a Condition
for the rule. For example, if you want all messages that
contain the word Sale in the subject line to be moved
to a Junk Mail folder, select the Where the Subject Line
Contains Specific Words option.
3. Select the Select the Actions for Your Rule check boxes
to choose rule actions. In the example in Step 2, for
instance, you would select the Move It to the Specified
Folder option.
4. In the Rule Description area, click a link (the colored text).
To continue the example shown in Figure 8-27, you click
the phrase Contains Specific Words. Fill in the specific
information for the rule in the dialog box that appears
(see Figure 8-28 for an example). For the second item in
this example, click the word specified and select a folder
for matching messages to be moved to.
Figure 8-27: The New Mail Rule dialog box with rule information selected
5. Click OK to save the description and return to the New
Mail Rule dialog box. Fill in the Name of the Rule text box
with a name that you can recognize, and then click OK.
After you create a rule, open the Message Rules dialog box (choose
Tools➪Message Rules➪Mail) and then click the Modify button in
the Message dialog box to make changes to the rule, or click the
Remove button to delete it.
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98
Here are some rules that people find handy to create: Place messages
marked as priority in a Priority folder, or put messages with attachments in an Attachments folder. When you’re on vacation, choose to
have all messages forwarded to somebody else, such as an assistant;
or, if a message is from a certain person, mark it with a color. Note:
If you use the autoforward feature, you have to leave your computer
on and also leave Windows Mail open while you’re away.
Figure 8-28: Specifying rule details
Working Remotely
W
e live in a hurry-up-and-go society. Gone are the days when you
could sit back during your flight from Des Moines to Chicago and
take a snooze. These days, people do as much work in the air and on the
road as in cubicles and offices.
➟
Chapter
Windows Vista hasn’t left the road warrior behind: It offers several features
that help keep you in touch and help you connect your Windows computer
to mobile devices, such as a personal digital assistant (PDA) or cellphone.
The Windows Vista remote control features include
➟
Power management tools called Power Plans for laptops to make sure
that you don’t run out of juice at an all-important moment.
➟
The ability to connect to a wireless network, such as the kind you find
in airports, restaurants, and hotels.
➟
A feature that lets you send documents on your computer over a
phone line to a fax machine.
➟
Features to let your modem dial from a remote location by setting up
a different originating location than your home or office, and even
dial by using a calling card for long distance calls.
Get ready to . . .
9
➟ Create a Power Plan for a Laptop ............100
➟ Create a Custom Power Plan ....................101
➟ Connect to a Wireless Network ................101
➟ Send a Fax from Your Computer ..............102
➟ Set Up Long Distance Dialing
away from Home ....................................103
➟ Set Up a Calling Card ..............................104
➟ Make a Dialup Connection by Using an
Infrared-Enabled Cellular Phone ..............105
Chapter 9: Working Remotely
Create a Power Plan for a Laptop
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪System and Maintenance,
and then click the Power Options link.
2. In the Select a Power Plan window, as shown in
Figure 9-1, select a scheme. Power Saver is a good
option for a laptop computer.
3. To change settings, click the Change Plan Settings link
under any Power Plan. In the window that displays (see
Figure 9-2), click the arrow and choose another setting
for the length of time of inactivity before the display
shuts off to save power.
4. Click the Save Changes button to save the settings and
then click the Close button to close the Control Panel.
In the window for changing plan settings, you can click the Change
Advanced Power Settings link to modify such settings as requiring a
password to wake up your computer, when to turn off your hard
disk, or when to automatically go into hibernation mode.
Figure 9-1: The Select a Power Plan window
There are trade-offs to make in power plan settings. For example,
if you have your computer go into hibernation after a very short
time, it may help you save battery power, but, depending on your
settings, you may have to log into Windows again each time you
revive it. See Chaper 14 for information about how to modify user
accounts and password settings to make getting back to work as
quick as possible.
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100
Figure 9-2: Changing power plan settings
Connect to a Wireless Network
Create a Custom Power Plan
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel, and then click the Power
Options link.
2. In the Power Options window, click the Create a Power
Plan link.
3. In the Create a Power Plan window (see Figure 9-3),
select the plan that is close to what you want to create,
enter the name for your plan in the Plan Name field,
and then click Next.
4. In the Edit Plan Settings window that appears, click the
arrow to display a drop-down list of timings for turning
off the display and then choose one.
5. Click the Create button to add the plan to your list of
Power Plans.
Figure 9-3: The Create a Power Plan window
If you create a plan, there are no Energy Savings or Performance
ratings next to it in the plan list. Also, if you make changes to an
existing plan, those ratings don’t change. If somebody else will use
the computer, either let him know about this or reset the plans to
default to avoid confusion. (In the Change Plan Settings window,
select Restore Default Settings for this Plan.)
Connect to a Wireless Network
1. With the Windows Vista taskbar displayed, right-click
the Network icon on the taskbar.
2. Click Connect to a Network. The Connect to a Network
window appears (see Figure 9-4).
3. Click a network to select it and then click Connect.
Windows Vista checks the connection and connects you.
Figure 9-4: The Connect to a Network window
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Chapter 9: Working Remotely
Send a Fax from Your Computer
1. Be sure that you connected your computer to a phone
line, and then choose Start➪All Programs➪Windows
Fax and Scan.
2. In the Windows Fax and Scan window that appears (see
Figure 9-5), click the New Fax button. If you haven’t set
up the Fax feature, the Fax Setup Wizard appears. Click
Connect to a Fax Modem and then follow instructions
to set up the connection.
3. When you finish the setup wizard, a new fax cover page
form (see Figure 9-6) is displayed.
4. Enter the recipient’s information (this must be a contact
you have saved with a fax number) and subject, as well
as any message you want to include. Click Insert to add
a file or pages from a scanner in your message.
Figure 9-5: The Windows Fax and Scan window
5. Click Send to send the fax.
These days there are several alternatives to faxing. If you have a
scanner you can scan images into your computer and then send
them as attachments to e-mail, which is covered in Chapter 8. You
can also use a document reader program such as Adobe to save a
document as a PDF file. Anybody who has Adobe, which is free, can
open that file and view the document without having to have the
originating software available to them. If the person you’re trying
to communicate with can’t receive a fax, consider these two options.
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102
Figure 9-6: A fax form
Set Up Long Distance Dialing away from Home
Set Up Long Distance Dialing
away from Home
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel, click the Hardware and
Sound link, and then click the Phone and Modem
Options link.
2. Click New. In the New Location dialog box, as shown in
Figure 9-7, click the arrow on the Country/Region dropdown list and choose a location.
3. Enter your area code and any other information you need
to access a carrier or reach an outside line; then click OK.
4. In the Phone and Modem Options dialog box that
appears (see Figure 9-8), click OK to save your settings.
If you’re in a remote location, say at the North Pole, and need to
use a different telephony provider in a certain location, you can
click the Advanced tab of the Phone and Modem Options dialog box
to choose an option or add another carrier. For example, people
often use a TAPI (Telephony Application Programming Interface)
provider for setting up an application to access a server’s voice service to handle multicast conferencing. (If you don’t know what multicast conferencing is, you’ll probably never need this setting.)
Figure 9-7: The New Location dialog box
Keep in mind that most ISPs can provide you with a local access
number so you don’t have to dial long distance to access your
Internet account. It’s a good idea to look this number up on your
ISP’s Web site before you travel so you don’t have spend money
connecting remotely just to get the local number!
Figure 9-8: The Phone and Modem Options dialog box
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Chapter 9: Working Remotely
Set Up a Calling Card
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel, click the Hardware and
Sound link, and then click the Phone and Modem
Options link.
2. In the Phone and Modem Options dialog box (shown
in Figure 9-9), select an option from the Location list
box, and then click the Edit button.
3. In the Edit Location dialog box that appears, click the
Calling Card tab (as shown in Figure 9-10).
4. Select an option from the Card Types list box.
5. Enter the calling card number in the Account Number
text box and then enter the PIN in the Personal ID
Number text box.
6. Click OK to save the settings.
Figure 9-9: The Phone and Modem Options dialog box
If you have a calling card that isn’t listed in the Card Types list box
on the Calling Card tab, leave the default setting of None, and then
click the New button to enter information about your specific calling card.
If you have a problem when your modem dials a number, you
might need to specify a rule for accessing an outline line. On the
General tab of the Edit Location dialog box, make an entry in the
To Access An Outline Line for Local (or Long Distance) Calls box to
fix this problem.
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104
Figure 9-10: The Edit Location dialog box, Calling Card tab
Make a Dialup Connection by Using an Infrared-Enabled Cellular Phone
Make a Dialup Connection by Using
an Infrared-Enabled Cellular Phone
1. If necessary, check with your phone manufacturer or
documentation to make sure that your cellphone’s
infrared feature is turned on.
2. Line up the infrared transceiver on your phone and the
transceiver on your computer within a few feet of each
other.
3. Choose Start➪Network.
4. In the Network window, click the Network and Sharing
Center link.
5. In the Network and Sharing Center window (as shown
in Figure 9-11), click the Set Up a Connection or
Network link.
Figure 9-11: The Network and Sharing Center window
6. In the Choose a Connection Option window, as shown
in Figure 9-12, click any of the four connection types,
depending on what kind of connection you want to set up.
7. Continue with the various wizard settings. When you
finish the wizard, you should be able to connect to this
location by using your cellular phone, as long as your
phone and computer are aligned properly.
If you’re not sure whether your computer or laptop supports infrared
connections, look for a small, dark red window on the computer or
laptop case (that’s the infrared transceiver; it looks like a similar
window on your TV remote control), or check your device documentation. You can also go to the Device Manager through the Control
Panel and look under Infrared Devices to see whether any are listed.
For more about the specifics of using your cell phone with a wireless
network connection, check your phone manufacturer’s user manual.
➟
Figure 9-12: The Choose a Connection Option window of the New Connection Wizard
105
Chapter 9: Working Remotely
➟
106
Part III
Setting Up Hardware and
Networks
Chapter 10: Setting Up New Hardware . . . . . . . . . .109
Install a Printer .......................................................110
Set a Default Printer...............................................112
Configure a USB Device ........................................113
Set Up a Modem ....................................................114
Set Up a New Monitor...........................................115
Upgrade a Graphics Card ......................................116
Set Up a Sound Card .............................................117
Use Disk Management to Extend a Partition .......118
Chapter 11: Setting Up a Network . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Install a PCI Network Adapter ..............................120
Connect a Wired Ethernet Network .....................122
Configure a Wireless Network by Using
the Network Setup Wizard .................................123
Change a Computer’s Network Name .................124
Join a Workgroup ..................................................125
View Workgroup Computers ................................126
Setting Up New
Hardware
P
eripherals, graphics cards, modems, SCSI (pronounced skuz-zee, if you
please) — just what the heck is all this stuff?
Collectively, these items belong to the category of computer hardware.
Your CPU and monitor are hardware. So are the cards slotted into your
CPU that provide memory to run software and the mechanisms for playing
sounds and videos. Printers are hardware, as is anything else that plugs into
your computer.
Installing a new piece of hardware used to be a great occasion for groaning
and moaning. Nothing was compatible, everything installed differently, and
Windows itself didn’t have much in the way of popular drivers (software that
runs various pieces of hardware) ready and waiting. That all changed with a
technology called Plug and Play, which automates the installation process
and some standardizing of connections through Universal Serial Bus (USB)
ports. Windows Vista now comes with a full framework of drivers for hardware devices, and whatever it doesn’t have is usually easy to download from
any hardware manufacturer’s Web site. In this chapter, you find out how
you can
➟
Install and set up common peripherals. Peripherals include a monitor, printer, and modem.
➟
Install and set up cards that slot into your CPU; partition your
hard drive. Add sound and video; also, add hard drive partitions to
optimize memory.
➟
Chapter
10
Get ready to . . .
➟ Install a Printer........................................110
➟ Set a Default Printer ................................112
➟ Configure a USB Device ..........................113
➟ Set Up a Modem......................................114
➟ Set Up a New Monitor..............................115
➟ Upgrade a Graphics Card ........................116
➟ Set Up a Sound Card................................117
➟ Use Disk Management to
Extend a Partition....................................118
Chapter 10: Setting Up New Hardware
Install a Printer
1. Read the instructions that came with the printer. Some
printers require that you install software before connecting them, but others can be connected right away.
2. Turn on your computer and then follow the option that
fits your needs:
• If your printer is a Plug and Play device, connect it;
Windows Vista installs what it needs automatically.
• Insert the disk/c that came with the device and follow
the onscreen instructions.
Figure 10-1: The Add Printer Wizard
• Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Printer (under the
Hardware and Sound category); in the window that
appears, click Add A Printer. If this is the option that
you’re following, proceed to the next step in this list.
3. If you choose the third option in Step 2, in the Add
Printer Wizard, click the Add a Local Printer option
(see Figure 10-1).
4. In the resulting wizard window (the Choose a Printer
Port dialog box, as shown in Figure 10-2), click the
down arrow on the Use an existing port field and select
a port, or just use the recommended port setting that
Windows selects for you. Click Next.
Figure 10-2: The Select a Printer Port dialog box
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110
Install a Printer
5. In the next wizard window (Install the Printer Driver
dialog box; see Figure 10-3), choose a manufacturer
and then choose a printer. You then have two options:
• If you have the manufacturer’s disc, insert it in the
appropriate CD drive now and click the Have Disk
button. Click Next.
• If you don’t have the manufacturer’s disc, click the
Windows Update button to see a list of printer
drivers that you can download from Microsoft’s Web
site. Click Next.
6. In the resulting Type a Printer Name dialog box
(see Figure 10-4), enter a printer name. If you don’t
want this to be your default printer, clear the Make
This My Default Printer option. Click Next.
Figure 10-3: The Install the Printer Driver dialog box
7. In the resulting dialog box, click Finish to complete the
Add Printer Wizard.
If your computer is on a network, you get an additional dialog box
in the wizard right after you name the printer. Select the Do Not
Share This Printer option to stop others from using the printer, or
you can select the Share Name option and enter a printer name to
share the printer on your network. This means that others can see
and select this printer to print to.
Figure 10-4: The Type a Printer Name dialog box
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Chapter 10: Setting Up New Hardware
Set a Default Printer
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Printer (under the
Hardware and Sound category).
2. In the resulting Printers window (as shown in
Figure 10-5), the current default printer is indicated
by a check mark.
3. Right-click any printer that isn’t set as the default and
choose Set as Default Printer from the shortcut menu,
as shown in Figure 10-6.
4. Click the Close button in the Printers window to save
the new settings.
To modify printing properties (for example, whether the printer
prints in draft or high-quality mode, or whether it uses color or only
black and white), right-click a printer in the Printers window (refer
to Figure 10-6) and choose Printing Preferences. This same dialog
box is available from most common Windows-based software programs, such as Microsoft Word or Excel, by clicking the Properties
button in the Print dialog box.
Figure 10-5: The Printers window
If you right click the printer that is already set as the default you’ll
find that the Set as Default Printer command will not be available
on the shortcut menu mentioned in Step 3.
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112
Figure 10-6: The shortcut menu to change a default printer
Configure a USB Device
Configure a USB Device
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Hardware and Sound➪
Device Manager.
2. In the resulting Device Manager dialog box, click the plus
sign to the left of the Universal Serial Bus Controllers
item. Right-click an item and choose Enable to enable it
or Disable to disable it.
3. Right-click an item and choose Properties (see
Figure 10-7), and then click the Drivers tab.
4. Click the Driver tab, as shown in Figure 10-8. Click the
buttons on the Driver sheet to manage the driver; you
can view details about it, upgrade it to a newer version,
or uninstall it.
5. Click OK to save your USB device settings.
Figure 10-7: The General tab
If a USB device isn’t working properly, click the Resources tab of the
USB Device Properties dialog box. This includes a list of any conflicting devices that could be causing problems. Also, check the Help
and Support Center for Windows (Start➪Help and Support) to
locate troubleshooting help.
Figure 10-8: The Driver tab
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Chapter 10: Setting Up New Hardware
Set Up a Modem
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Hardware and Sound➪
Device Manager.
2. In the resulting Device Manager window, click the plus
sign to the left of the Modems to display installed
modem devices (see Figure 10-9). Right-click a modem
and choose Properties from the shortcut menu.
3. In the resulting Properties dialog box, click the Modem
tab, as shown in Figure 10-10. You can adjust the following settings on this tab sheet:
• Speaker Volume: Adjust the speaker volume or turn it
off by using the Speaker Volume slider to control the
dialing sound you hear when the modem operates.
• Maximum Port Speed: Adjust this setting by selecting
a speed from the drop-down list. This setting determines the speed at which programs can send data to
the modem. This is usually set at the correct number
when you install the modem.
Figure 10-9: The Device Manager window
• Dial Control: Make sure that this check box is
selected so your dialing attempts pay off.
4. Click the Driver tab.
You might want to adjust modem speed if you’re using a device that
can support higher speeds than your installed modem. A Windows
CE device is one example of this.
5. On the resulting Driver tab sheet (refer to Figure 10-8),
➟
click the buttons on the Driver sheet to manage the
driver; you can view details about it, upgrade to a newer
version, enable or disable it, or uninstall it.
6. Click OK to save your settings.
114
Figure 10-10: The Modem Properties dialog box
Set Up a New Monitor
Set Up a New Monitor
1. Place the CD that came with your monitor in your
CD-ROM drive and choose Start➪Control Panel➪
Hardware and Sound➪Device Manager.
2. In the resulting Device Manager window, click the plus
sign to the left of Monitors to display installed monitors
(see Figure 10-11). Right-click the new monitor and
choose Scan for Hardware Changes from the shortcut
menu.
3. If your monitor driver is up to date, you see a message
that scanning is in progress, which disappears when the
scan is complete. If your monitor driver isn’t up to date,
the Hardware Update Wizard appears. Follow the wizard screens to install the monitor drivers.
Figure 10-11: Monitors displayed in the Device Manager
4. When the wizard is complete, if everything seems to be
working fine, you can close the Device Manager window.
If you have problems with the monitor, open the Device Manager
window, right-click the monitor, and then choose Properties. On the
Driver tab, make sure the device shows a Disable button (meaning
it’s currently enabled). If things still aren’t working right, check out
Windows Help and Support for troubleshooting advice.
You can make adjustments to your monitor display by using the
Appearance and Personalization category of the Control Panel or the
Display Item in Windows Classic View of Control Panel options. For more
about making Display option settings, take a gander at Chapter 12.
Many manufacturers’ device drivers are already stored in Windows.
When you install a device by using the Hardware Update Wizard,
you might find that you can simply browse the manufacturers’
device drivers rather than download them or select them from a CD.
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Chapter 10: Setting Up New Hardware
Upgrade a Graphics Card
1. Turn off your computer. (Note: This step is very impor-
tant; you have to open your CPU for this procedure, and
you’re in danger of severe electrical shock if you leave
your computer on while you play around inside it.)
2. Refer to your computer manual to determine how
to open the CPU, how your computer is configured,
where graphics cards can be inserted, and which kinds
of graphics cards to use.
3. Plug the graphics card into the appropriate slot, close
your computer, and replace any screws that you took
out when opening the computer.
4. Turn on the computer; Windows Vista detects the new
card and installs appropriate drivers.
Figure 10-12: The Device Manager window
5. View the information about the installed graphics
device by choosing Start➪Control Panel➪Hardware
and Sound➪Device Manager.
6. Click the plus sign next to Display Adapters (see
Figure 10-12), right-click the graphics card that you
installed, and then choose Properties. You see system
settings for this card (see Figure 10-13). The Device
Status tells you whether it’s working properly.
Note that your particular hardware might have its own idiosyncrasies,
and new technologies come along that change the way newer computers are configured, so be sure to read your computer users’
manual before dealing with any hardware upgrade.
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116
Warning: Be careful about poking metal implements (such as
screwdrivers) into the insides of the CPU because you could set off
an electrical unpleasantry. Place your computer on a nonconductive
surface (such as a rubber mat) before opening it up. Don’t wear an
aluminum foil suit for this sort of procedure, and never leave your
computer plugged in or turned on while opening it.
Figure 10-13: Assessing the status of your new
graphics card
Set Up a Sound Card
Set Up a Sound Card
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Hardware and Sound,
and then click the Device Manager link.
2. In the resulting Device Manager window (see
Figure 10-14), click the plus sign icon to the left
of Sound, Video, and Game Controllers.
3. Right-click the sound card listed there and choose
Properties.
4. In the resulting Audio Controller Properties dialog box
shown in Figure 10-15, on the Driver tab, make sure the
fourth button down says Disable (meaning the device is
currently enabled). If it says Enable, click on it.
5. If you want to make changes to the driver, click the
Update Driver button.
Figure 10-14: The Device Manager window
6. When you’re done making settings, click OK.
Read your users’ manual before doing this procedure. Some sound
cards are built into the motherboard, but others require that you
take some steps to disable the old card before installing the new.
If you’re having trouble getting sound, remember the basics: You
have to have speakers connected to your computer, and the volume
setting on your computer can’t be muted. If you neglect to properly
set either of these two vital requirements, don’t be ashamed —
just about everyone has done it, myself included!
Figure 10-15: The Audio Controller Properties dialog box,
General tab
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Chapter 10: Setting Up New Hardware
Use Disk Management
to Extend a Partition
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪System and Maintenance➪
Administrative Tools.
2. In the resulting Administrative Tools windows, double-
click Computer Management.
3. In the resulting Computer Management window (as
shown in Figure 10-16), click Disk Management in the
list on the left (the Disk Management window shown
in Figure 10-17 appears), right-click a basic disk in the
top center pane (this is usually your hard drive) that
isn’t allocated, and then choose Extend Volume from
the shortcut menu that appears.
4. Follow the steps in the New Simple Volume Wizard to
Figure 10-16: The Computer Management window
create the new partition.
An extended partition adds to your drive space by borrowing some
from an adjoining partition, and makes your system utilize memory more efficiently. But just so you know, you have to be logged
on as a system administrator to complete the steps listed here.
You can also shrink a drive, which frees up some space for you to
create a new partition at the end of a volume. The Shrink Volume
command is located on the shortcut menu that appears when you
right-click a disk in the Disk Management window.
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118
Figure 10-17: The Disk Management window
Setting Up a Network
➟
Chapter
S
etting up a network among two or more computers can make your life
much easier because after you set up a network, you can use this connection to share files, folders, printers, and access to the Internet with other users.
The most common way to connect a network is to use a wired Ethernet
connection, involving cables and equipment, referred to as a hub or switch.
To determine whether your computer is Ethernet-ready, check the back of
your PC: You should see what looks like a very large phone connector jack.
This is the Ethernet connector.
After you connect the necessary cables and equipment, most newer computers already have network drivers installed, so Windows Vista is capable of
recognizing the connection. With simple-to-use wizards, little input on your
part is required to set up a network.
You can also set up a connection through a wireless access point (which you
set up according to the instructions that come with the wireless router) and
an adapter that you either install in your CPU in the form of a PCI adapter
or plug into your PC by using a USB (Universal Serial Bus) port or a PC
Card adapter.
To set up a network, you explore the following tasks:
➟
Installing a network adapter if one is not built into your computer,
and configuring a network by using the Network Setup Wizard.
➟
Setting up a wireless access point and configuring a wireless network
by using the Wireless Network Setup Wizard.
➟
Making various settings to a network connection, including changing a
networked computer’s name so the one you gave it when you bought it
(Hot Mama, Road Warrior, or whatever) isn’t the one that shows on
the network.
➟
Creating and viewing workgroups on a network.
Get ready to . . .
11
➟ Install a PCI Network Adapter ..................120
➟ Connect a Wired Ethernet Network ..........122
➟ Configure a Wireless Network by Using
the Network Setup Wizard ......................123
➟ Change a Computer’s Network Name........124
➟ Join a Workgroup ....................................125
➟ View Workgroup Computers ....................126
Chapter 11: Setting Up a Network
Install a PCI Network Adapter
1. After purchasing the PCI adapter, turn off your desktop
computer and disconnect all power and other cables
from it.
2. Open the PC chassis (see Figure 11-1). Check your
user’s manual for this procedure, which usually involves
removing a few screws and popping the cover off your
tower.
3. Touch a metal object (not the computer) to get rid of any
static discharge before you reach inside the computer.
4. Locate an empty slot for the PCI adapter and if neces-
sary remove the protective cover from it. Again, check
your manual for the exact location in your system.
5. Remove the adapter from its packaging. Handling it by
its edges, line it up with the slot and insert it firmly but
gently.
6. Make sure you don’t disconnect any wires or leave loose
screws inside the PC chassis; then replace the computer
cover and reinsert the screws.
Leave the parts that you’re going to insert in your computer in their
packaging until you need them. If they sit around on your desktop
or elsewhere, they could pick up static discharge, which could be
harmful to your computer.
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120
Figure 11-1: Opening your
CPU case
Install a PCI Network Adapter
7. Plug in the computer and turn it on. Your computer
should sense the new adapter when it starts up and display the Installing Device Driver pop-up above your
taskbar (see Figure 11-2).
8. Windows Vista might automatically set up the hardware.
If Windows Vista can’t find a driver for the adapter, you
might have to provide it.
9. When the process is complete, a pop-up appears stating
that your hardware driver is installed and ready to use
(see Figure 11-3).
If Windows Vista cannot find the driver, use the diskette or CD that
came with the adapter — or you can usually download the driver
from your hardware manufacturer’s Web site for free. Use the
Browse button to navigate to the location where you downloaded
the driver, and then proceed with the wizard.
Figure 11-2: The Installing Device Driver pop-up
Figure 11-3: Confirmation that your device driver was installed
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Chapter 11: Setting Up a Network
Connect a Wired Ethernet Network
1. Obtain a Cat 5 or Cat 5e Ethernet cable for every com-
puter you will connect to the network (see Figure 11-4).
2. Purchase a hub or switch with enough ports for each
computer you want to connect (see Figure 11-5).
3. Turn off all computers as well as the switch/hub. Plug
one end of the Ethernet cable into the switch or hub
and the other end into the network adapter that you
installed in your PC. See the first task in this chapter
for help with this.
4. Repeat Step 3 for each computer you want to include in
the network.
5. Turn on the switch or hub and then turn on the com-
puters. Use the following task to run the Network Setup
Wizard and set up the network.
Figure 11-4: The Ethernet connector
Switches make for a speedier network although they cost a little more
than a hub. However, in most cases, it’s better to invest a few dollars
more for the extra performance of a switch. If you want to get very
sophisticated — for example, like on a company network — you
could use a router, which helps you track various people on the network and the places they are going on the network.
Cat 5 is a kind of cable used for data transfer. If your home is wired
for high-speed access, you may have Cat 5 cable in your walls. You
can find the kind of Cat 5 cable referred to in this task at your local
computer or office supply store with connectors for plugging into
your comptuer and hub.
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122
Figure 11-5: A switch with ports
Configure a Wireless Network by Using the Network Setup Wizard
Configure a Wireless Network by
Using the Network Setup Wizard
When you purchase a wireless access point, it includes instructions for
setting it up. This typically involves plugging it into a power source, plugging in Ethernet cables to your main computer and possibly a DSL (digital subscriber line) or other high-speed modem, and then turning it on.
1. Turn on each PC that you have attached to the network.
2. On the PC that will share its Internet connection, log on
to the Internet.
3. On the Internet-connection PC, choose Start➪Network
and then click the Network and Sharing Center button.
4. In the resulting Network and Sharing Center window,
click the Set Up a Connection or Network link.
5. In the resulting Choose a Connection Option window
(see Figure 11-6), choose the Set Up a Wireless Network
option and then click Next. The next window describes
what the wizard will do; click Next.
6. A progress windows displays (see Figure 11-7) while
Windows Vista detects your hardware settings. There are
a few options at this point:
Figure 11-6: The Choose a Connection Option window
• Windows Vista detects your hardware and configures
it automatically; you are done.
• Windows Vista detects your hardware but requires
you to configure it manually. In this case, select the
Configure This Device Manually option and complete the required information to finish the setup.
• If you have a Flash drive connected via a USB port,
connect the drive and click the Create Wireless
Network Settings and Save to a USB Flash Drive.
Enter a name for your network on the following
screen and then follow the directions, which involve
disconnecting the Flash drive and plugging it into a
wireless access point. You can then use the drive to
configure each computer on the network as directed.
7. On the final wizard screen that appears, click Finish.
Figure 11-7: Choosing how to set up your network
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123
Chapter 11: Setting Up a Network
Change a Computer’s Network Name
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪System and Maintenance
and then click the System link.
2. In the resulting System dialog box, as shown in
Figure 11-8, click the Change Settings link.
3. On the Computer Name tab of the resulting System
Properties dialog box, as shown in Figure 11-9, replace
the current name with a name in the Computer
Description text box and then click OK to save the
new name.
4. Click the Close button to close the Control Panel.
Two computers on the same network cannot have the same name.
Therefore, you may want to modify computer names before you
start setting up your network so they are unique. Making the computer name descriptive is useful: Simple names such as John’s
Computer and Basement PC help everybody on the network know
which is which.
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124
Figure 11-8: The System window of the Control Panel
Figure 11-9: The System Properties dialog box,
Computer Name tab
Join a Workgroup
Join a Workgroup
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪System and Maintenance
and then click the System link.
2. In the resulting System dialog box, click the Change
Settings link.
3. On the Computer Name tab of the resulting System
Properties dialog box, shown in Figure 11-10, click the
Change button.
4. The Computer Name/Domain Changes dialog box
appears (see Figure 11-11). In the Workgroup field, enter
or edit the name for your workgroup with no spaces
between letters.
5. Click OK to close the dialog box, and then click OK
again to close the System Properties dialog box. If
prompted, restart Windows Vista.
Figure 11-10: The System Properties dialog box,
Computer Name tab
A workgroup is essentially a set of computers on a network. On a
large network, breaking computers down into these groups so they
can easily work with each other makes sense. In a smaller home
network, you will probably just create one workgroup to allow all
your computers to easily access each other.
One task that becomes easier when you are part of a workgroup is
sharing files. If you locate a file or folder on your computer and
right-click it, you can choose to share it on the network. When you
do, only people in your workgroup will be able to access this shared
file or folder.
Figure 11-11: The Computer Name/
Domain Changes dialog box
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125
Chapter 11: Setting Up a Network
View Workgroup Computers
1. Choose Start➪Network.
2. In the resulting window, click the Network and Sharing
Center button. In the Network and Sharing Center window, click the View Computers and Devices link.
3. In the resulting window, click the arrow on the Views
button, as shown in Figure 11-12, and choose Details.
The Workgroup column lists the names of all network
workgroups.
4. Click the Close button to close the window.
When you view a workgroup, you can double-click one to see a listing of all the devices, scheduled tasks, and shared files and folders
available to the group.
If you don’t see a computer you expected to see on your network,
double-check to see if you entered the workgroup name correctly in
the preceding task of Joining a Workgroup. Workgroups can have
no spaces, and all computers in the workgroup have to have exactly
the same workgroup name—no typos!
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126
Figure 11-12: The Details view of your available computers
Part IV
Customizing the
Windows Desktop
Chapter 12: Setting Up Your Display . . . . . . . . . . . .129
Set Your Screen’s Resolution .................................130
Change the Desktop Background .........................131
Choose a Desktop Theme .....................................132
Set Up a Screen Saver ............................................133
Change the Windows Vista Color Scheme ..........134
Arrange Icons on the Desktop ..............................135
Chapter 13: Customizing Windows Ease of Access . . .137
Optimize the Visual Display.................................138
Replace Sounds with Visual Cues.........................139
Set Up Speech Recognition ...................................140
Modify How Your Keyboard Works .....................142
Use the Onscreen Keyboard Feature ....................143
Change Mouse Behavior .......................................144
Change the Cursor.................................................145
Setting Up Your
Display
Y
ou chose your designer Day Planner, glow-in-the-dark gel pens, and
solid maple inbox for your real-world desktop, right? Why shouldn’t the
Windows Vista desktop give you the same flexibility to make things look the
way you like? After all, this is the main work area of Windows Vista, a space
that you traverse many, many times in a typical workday. Take it from somebody who spends many hours in front of a computer: Customizing your
desktop pays off in increased productivity as well as decreased eyestrain.
To customize your desktop, you can do the following:
➟
Change how the desktop looks. Set up Windows Vista to display
images and colors. You can also use screen saver settings to switch
from everyday work stuff to a pretty animation when you’ve stopped
working for a time. You can modify your screen resolution setting,
which controls how sharp and detailed a picture your screen displays.
➟
Rearrange icons. Your desktop isn’t just a pretty picture. Placed on the
background are icons that represent shortcuts to the programs and
files that you work with every day. Organizing these icons logically
can help you be more efficient.
➟
Chapter
Get ready to . . .
12
➟ Set Your Screen’s Resolution ....................130
➟ Change the Desktop Background..............131
➟ Choose a Desktop Theme ........................132
➟ Set Up a Screen Saver..............................133
➟ Change the Windows Vista Color Scheme ....134
➟ Arrange Icons on the Desktop ..................135
Chapter 12: Setting Up Your Display
Set Your Screen’s Resolution
1. Right-click the desktop to display a shortcut menu and
then choose Personalize.
2. In the resulting Personalization window, click the
Display Settings link.
3. In the Display Settings dialog box that appears (as
shown in Figure 12-1), move the Resolution slider to
a higher or lower resolution. You can also choose how
many colors your computer uses for display by making
a choice in the Colors drop-down list.
4. Click OK to accept the new screen resolution.
Higher resolutions, such as 1400 x 1250, produce smaller, crisper
images. Lower resolutions, such as 800 x 600, produce larger, somewhat jagged images. The upside of higher resolution is that more
fits on your screen; the downside is that words and graphics can be
hard to see.
The Colors setting of the Display Properties dialog box offers two
settings. The lower color quality is 16-bit; the highest is 32-bit.
Essentially, the higher the bits, the more color definition you get.
Remember that you can also use your View settings in most software
programs to get a larger or smaller view of your documents without
having to change your screen’s resolution.
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130
Figure 12-1: The Display Settings dialog box
Change the Desktop Background
Change the Desktop Background
1. Right-click the desktop and choose Personalize from the
shortcut menu.
2. In the resulting Personalization window, click the
Desktop Background link to display the Desktop
Background dialog box, as shown in Figure 12-2.
3. Select a category of desktop background options from
the Background list box (see Figure 12-3) and then click
the image preview you want to use. The background is
previewed on your desktop.
4. From the positioning options at the bottom, select one
of the following options:
• Fit to Screen: This option stretches one copy of the
image to fill the screen, covering any background
color completely.
Figure 12-2: The Desktop Background dialog box
• Tile: This choice displays multiple copies of the image
filling the desktop. The number of images depends
on the size and resolution of the original graphic.
• Center: Quite logically, this option centers the image
on a colored background so that you can see a border
of color around its edges.
5. Click OK to apply the settings and close the dialog box.
If you apply a desktop theme (see more about this in the next
task), you overwrite whatever desktop settings you’ve made in this
task. If you apply a desktop theme and then go back and make
desktop settings, you replace the theme’s settings. However, making changes is easy and keeps your desktop interesting, so play
around with themes and desktop backgrounds all you like!
Figure 12-3: Available categories of backgrounds
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131
Chapter 12: Setting Up Your Display
Choose a Desktop Theme
1. Right-click the desktop and choose Personalize. The
Personalization window opens. Click the Theme link.
2. In the resulting Theme Settings dialog box, as shown in
Figure 12-4, select a theme from the Theme drop-down
list. Your options include the following:
• Windows Vista offers up a beautiful lake and mountains against a blue sky. The color scheme that this
theme uses for various onscreen elements, such as window title bars, relies heavily on grays, blues, and reds.
• Windows Classic sports a plain blue background
with silvery-blue and gray colors for screen elements.
• My Current Theme uses whatever settings you have
and saves them with that name.
• Browse takes you to the Program Files folder of
Windows, where you can look for any files with the
.theme extension. It’s not that Windows Vista comes
with a lot of these waiting in this folder for you to use
them, but if you buy and install Microsoft Plus! which
provides you with lots of extra graphic goodies, the
new themes are stored here by default. If you find one
you like, select, and click the Open button.
3. Click OK to apply the selected theme.
Themes save sets of elements that include menu appearance, background colors or patterns, screen savers, and even mouse cursors and
sounds. If you modify any of these individually — for example, by
changing the screen saver to another one — that change overrides
the setting in the theme you last applied.
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132
Figure 12-4: The Theme Settings dialog box
You can save custom themes. Simply apply a theme, make any changes
to it you like using the various Appearance and Personalization settings
options, and then in the Theme Settings dialog box, click Save As. In the
resulting dialog box give your new theme a name and click Save. It will
now appear on the Theme list.
Set Up a Screen Saver
Set Up a Screen Saver
1. Right-click the desktop and choose Personalize. In the
resulting Personalization window, click the Screen Saver
link to display the Screen Saver Settings dialog box, as
shown in Figure 12-5.
2. From the Screen Saver drop-down list, choose a screen
saver.
3. Use the arrows in the Wait xx Minutes text box to set the
number of inactivity minutes that Windows Vista waits
before displaying the screen saver.
4. Click the Preview button (see Figure 12-6) to take a
peek at your screen saver of choice. When you’re happy
with your settings, click OK.
Figure 12-5: The Screen Saver Settings dialog box
Screen savers used to be required to keep your monitor from burning out because an image was held on your screen for too long.
Newer monitors don’t require this, but people are attached to their
screen savers, so the feature persists. Screen savers are also useful
for hiding what’s on your screen from curious passersby if you happen to wander away from your desk for a while. If you want no
screen saver to appear, choose None from the Screen Saver list in
the Screen Saver Settings dialog box.
Some screen savers allow you to modify their settings: for example,
how fast they display or how many lines they draw onscreen. To
customize this, click the Settings button when in the Screen Saver
Settings dialog box.
Figure 12-6: The Photos screen saver preview
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133
Chapter 12: Setting Up Your Display
Change the Windows Vista
Color Scheme
1. Right-click the desktop and choose Personalize.
2. In the resulting Personalization window, click the
Window Color and Appearance link to display
the Window Color and Appearance dialog box,
as shown in Figure 12-7.
3. Click a color scheme and make settings for transparency
and color intensity.
4. To customize the selected preset color scheme, click the
Open Classic Appearance Properties for More Color
Options link, and in the Appearance settings dialog box
that appears, click Advanced.
5. In the resulting Advanced Appearance dialog box, as
Figure 12-7: The Appearance Settings dialog box
shown in Figure 12-8, click a screen element in the Item
drop down list and then make settings for size, color,
font, or effects such as bold and repeat this for each
item you want to change.
6. Click OK to close the Advanced Appearance dialog box
and apply all changes.
If you want to set specific colors in the Advanced Appearance dialog box and you know the Red/Green/Blue value for those colors,
in the Color drop down lists click Other and enter specific values for
Red, Green, and Blue. Click OK to save the changes.
Some colors are easier on the eyes than others. For example, green
is more restful to look at than orange. Choose a color scheme that
is pleasant to look at and easy on the eyes!
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134
Figure 12-8: The Advanced Appearance dialog box
Arrange Icons on the Desktop
Arrange Icons on the Desktop
1. Modify the icons displayed on your desktop by using
any of these methods:
• Right-click the Windows desktop. In the resulting
shortcut menu (as shown in Figure 12-9), choose
Sort By, and then choose one of four criteria: Name,
Size, File Extension, or Date Modified.
Figure 12-9: The desktop shortcut menu
• Click any icon on the desktop and drag it to a new
location.
• Right-click the Windows desktop, choose View, and
then make sure that Auto Arrange isn’t selected. (If it
is selected, deselect it.) Now you can click any icon
and drag it to another location on the desktop.
2. To automatically add certain folders to your desktop,
right-click the desktop and choose Personalize. In the
resulting Personalization window, click the Change
Desktop Icons link in the Task pane.
3. In the resulting Desktop Icon Settings dialog box, as
shown in Figure 12-10, select any of the Desktop
Icons check boxes to automatically display shortcuts
for items such as Internet Explorer, the Computer, or
the Recycle Bin.
Figure 12-10: The Desktop Icon Settings dialog box
4. Click OK to save the settings and click Close to close the
Personalization window.
To change an icon used for the preset folders that you set up in the
Desktop Icon Settings dialog box, select an icon preview and click
the Change Icon button. In the Change Icon dialog box that appears,
click another icon, and then click OK twice. However, be careful
when using this feature: If somebody who uses your computer isn’t
aware of the changed icons, he could start clicking the wrong icon
and potentially not only waste time but possibly run a program that
you don’t want him to run. If you make changes and decide to go
back to Microsoft’s original idea of a good icon for programs, click
the Restore Default button in the Desktop Icon Settings dialog box.
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135
Chapter 12: Setting Up Your Display
➟
136
Customizing Windows
Ease of Access
➟
Chapter
P
eople aren’t born with good manners. Everyone has to be taught to
help other people and share toys, for example. Similarly, sometimes
Windows has to be taught how to behave. For example, it doesn’t know right
off the bat that somebody using it has a vision challenge that requires special
help, or that a user prefers a certain mouse cursor, or that you have difficulty
using your keyboard.
Somebody taught you manners, but Windows depends on you to make settings that customize its behavior. This is good news for you because the
ability to customize Windows Vista gives you a lot of flexibility in how you
interact with it.
Here’s what you can do to customize Windows Vista:
➟
Control features that help visually challenged users to work with a
computer, such as setting a higher contrast or using a Narrator to read
the onscreen text aloud.
➟
Work with the Speech Recognition feature that allows you to input
data into a document using speech rather than a keyboard or mouse.
➟
Modify the mouse functionality for left-handed use, change the cursor
to sport a certain look, or make viewing the cursor as it moves around
your screen easier.
➟
Work with keyboard settings that make input easier for those who are
challenged by physical conditions, such as carpal tunnel syndrome or
arthritis.
Get ready to . . .
13
➟ Optimize the Visual Display......................138
➟ Replace Sounds with Visual Cues ..............139
➟ Set Up Speech Recognition ......................140
➟ Modify How Your Keyboard Works ..........142
➟ Use the Onscreen Keyboard Feature ........143
➟ Change Mouse Behavior ..........................144
➟ Change the Cursor ..................................145
Chapter 13: Customizing Windows Ease of Access
Optimize the Visual Display
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel.
2. In the Control Panel window, click the Optimize Visual
Display link under the Ease of Access tools.
3. In the resulting Optimize Visual Display dialog box
(as shown in Figure 13-1), select the check boxes for
features you want to use:
• High Contrast: Make settings for using greater contrast on screen elements.
• Make Things on the Screen Larger: If you click Turn
on Magnifier (see Figure 13-2), you have two cursors
onscreen. One cursor appears in the Magnifier window where everything is shown enlarged, and one
appears in whatever is showing on your computer
(for example, your desktop or an open application).
You can maneuver either cursor to work in your document. (They’re both active, so it does take some
getting used to.)
Figure 13-1: Magnifying your text
• Make Things On Screen Easier to See: Here’s where
you make settings that adjust onscreen contrast to
make things easier to see, enlarge the size of the
blinking mouse cursor, and get rid of distracting animations and backgrounds.
4. When you finish making settings, click Save to
apply them.
➟
138
Figure 13-2: The Magnifier effect on your screen
Replace Sounds with Visual Cues
Replace Sounds with Visual Cues
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Ease of Access and then
click the Replace Sounds with Visual Cues link.
2. In the resulting Sounds dialog box (see Figure 13-3),
make any of the following settings:
• Turn on Visual Notifications so that Windows Vista
will play sounds along with a display of visual cues.
• Chose a setting for visual warnings. These warnings
essentially flash a portion of your screen to alert you
to an event.
• To control text captions for any spoken words, select
Turn on Text Captions for Spoken Dialog (when
available). Note: This isn’t always available with every
application you use.
Figure 13-3: The Sounds dialog box
3. To save the new settings, click Save.
Visual cues are useful if you are hard of hearing and don’t always
pick up system sounds alerting you to error messages or a device
disconnect. After the setting is turned on, it is active until you go
back to the Sounds dialog box and turn it off.
This may seem obvious, but if you are hard of hearing you may
want to simply increase the volume for your speakers. You can do
this by using the volume adjustment in a program such as Windows
Media Player (see Chapter 21), or modifying your system volume
by choosing Hardware and Sound in the Control Panel and then
clicking the Adjust System Volume link.
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Chapter 13: Customizing Windows Ease of Access
Set Up Speech Recognition
1. Attach a desktop microphone or headset to your com-
puter and choose Start➪Control Panel➪Ease of Access➪
Start Speech Recognition.
2. The Set Up Speech Recognition message appears; click
Next to continue. (Note: If you’ve used Speech
Recognition before, this message will not appear.)
3. In the resulting Welcome to Speech Recognition dialog
box (as shown in Figure 13-4), select the type of microphone that you’re using and then click Next. The next
screen tells you how to place and use the microphone
for optimum results. Click Next.
Figure 13-4: The initial Set Up Speech Recognition dialog box
4. In the following window (see Figure 13-5), read the
sample sentence aloud. When you’re done, click Next.
During the Speech Recognition setup procedure you are given the
option of printing out commonly used commands. It’s a good idea
to do this, as speech commands aren’t always second nature!
Figure 13-5: The dialog box where you establish your
microphone connection by reading a sentence aloud
➟
140
Set Up Speech Recognition
5. In the resulting dialog box, choose whether to enable or
disable document view. Document view allows Windows
Vista to review your documents and e-mail to help it recognize your speech patterns. Click Next.
Figure 13-6: The Speech Recognition
Control Panel
6. In the resulting dialog box, if you wish to view and/or
print a list of speech recognition commands, click the
View Reference Sheet button, and then click the Close
button to close that window. Click Next to proceed.
7. In the resulting dialog box, either click Run Speech
Recognition at Startup to disable this feature or leave
the default setting. Click Next. The final dialog box
informs you that you can now control the computer
by voice, and offers you a Start Tutorial button to help
you practice voice commands. Click that button, or
click Cancel to skip the tutorial and leave the Speech
Recognition set up.
To stop Speech Recognition, click the Close button on the Control Panel.
To start the Speech Recognition feature again, choose Start➪Control
Panel➪Ease of Access➪Speech Recognition and then click the Start
Speech Recognition link. To learn more about Speech Recognition commands, click the Take Speech Tutorials link in the Ease of Access window.
8. The Speech Recognition control panel appears (see
Figure 13-6). Say, “Start listening” to activate the feature
and begin using spoken commands to work with your
computer.
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Chapter 13: Customizing Windows Ease of Access
Modify How Your Keyboard Works
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Ease of Access and then
click the Change How Your Keyboard Works link.
2. In the resulting Keyboard dialog box (see Figure 13-7),
make any of these settings:
• Turn on Mouse Keys to control your mouse by keyboard commands. If you turn on this setting, click
the Set Up Mouse Keys link to specify settings for this
feature.
• Select the Turn on Sticky Keys feature to set up keystroke combinations to be pressed one at a time,
rather than in combination.
• You can set up Windows Vista to play a sound when
you press Caps Lock, Num Lock, or Scroll Lock
(which I do all the time by mistake!).
• If you sometimes press a key very lightly or press it so
hard it activates twice, you can use the Turn on Filter
Keys setting to adjust repeat rates to adjust for that.
Use the Set Up Filter Keys link to fine-tune settings if
you make this choice.
• To have Windows Vista highlight keyboard shortcuts
and access keys with an underline wherever these
shortcuts appear, click that setting.
3. To save the new settings, click Save.
You can click the Learn about Additional Assistive Technologies
Online link to go the Microsoft Web site and discover add-on and
third-party programs that might help you if you have a visual,
hearing, or input-related disability.
➟
142
Figure 13-7: The Keyboard dialog box
Keyboards all have their own unique feel. If your keyboard isn’t responsive and you have a keyboard-challenging condition, you might also try
different keyboards to see if one works better for you than another.
Use the Onscreen Keyboard Feature
Use the Onscreen Keyboard Feature
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Ease of Access and then
click the Ease of Access Center link.
2. In the resulting Change Ease of Access Center dialog box
(see Figure 13-8), select the Start On-Screen Keyboard
check box. The On-Screen Keyboard appears.
3. Open a document in any application where you can
enter text, and then click the keys on the onscreen keyboard to make entries.
To use keystroke combinations (such as Ctrl+Z), click first key (in this
case, Ctrl), and then click the second key (Z). You don’t have to hold
down the first key as you do with a regular keyboard.
4. To change settings, such as how you select keys (Typing
Mode) or the font used to label keys (Font), choose
Settings and then choose one of the four options shown
in Figure 13-9.
Figure 13-8: The Change Ease of Access window
5. Click the Close button to stop using the onscreen
keyboard.
You can set up the Hover typing mode to activate a key after you
hover your mouse over it for a predefined period of time (x number
of seconds). If you have arthritis or some other condition that makes
clicking your mouse difficult, this option can help you enter text.
Choose Settings➪Typing Mode➪Hover to Select to activate the
Hover mode.
Figure 13-9: The On-Screen Keyboard Settings menu
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Chapter 13: Customizing Windows Ease of Access
Change Mouse Behavior
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Ease of Access and
then click the Change How Your Mouse Works link.
The Make the Mouse Easier to Use dialog box opens
(see Figure 13-10).
2. To use the numeric keypad to move your mouse cursor
on your screen, choose the Turn on Mouse Keys setting.
If you turn this feature on, click Set Up Mouse Keys to
fine-tune its behavior.
3. Select the Activate a Window by Hovering Over It
with The Mouse check box to enable this (pretty
self-explanatory!) feature.
4. Click Save to save the new settings.
You can click the Mouse Settings link in the Mouse Properties dialog
box; then, on the Buttons tab, use the Switch Primary and Secondary
Buttons feature to make the right mouse button handle all the usual
left button functions, such as clicking and dragging, and the left
button handle the typical right-hand functions, such as displaying
shortcut menus. This helps left-handed people use the mouse more
easily.
If you want to modify the behavior of the mouse pointer, in the
Mouse Properties dialog box, click the Pointer Options tab to set the
pointer speed (how quickly you can drag the mouse pointer around
your screen), to activate the Snap To feature that automatically
moves the mouse cursor to the default choice in a dialog box, or to
modify the little trails that appear when you drag the pointer.
➟
144
If you have difficulty seeing the cursor on-screen experiment with
the Windows Vista color scheme to see if another setting makes your
cursor stand out better against the background. See Chapter 12 for
information on setting up the color scheme for your computer.
Figure 13-10: The Make the Mouse Easier to Use dialog box
Change the Cursor
Change the Cursor
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Ease of Access➪Change
How Your Mouse Works.
2. Click any mouse pointer sample to select it (see
Figure 13-11).
3. Click Apply to use the new pointer setting and then
click Save to close the Mouse dialog box.
Be careful not to change the cursor to another standard cursor (for
example, changing the Normal Select cursor to the Busy hourglass
cursor). This could prove slightly confusing for you and completely
baffling to anybody else who works on your computer. If you make
a choice and decide it was a mistake, click the Use Default button
on Pointer tab in the Mouse Properties dialog box to return a
selected cursor to its default choice.
Figure 13-11: The Make the Mouse Easier to Use dialog box
To change other cursors, for example the cursor that appears
when you click and drag objects, click the Mouse Settings link,
Pointers tab.
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Chapter 13: Customizing Windows Ease of Access
➟
146
Part V
Using Security and
Maintenance Features
Chapter 14: Setting Passwords and File Access . . . .149
Change the Windows Password............................150
Allow Access to the Public Folder .........................151
Set Up Shared Folders ...........................................152
Set File Attributes...................................................153
Create a New User Account ..................................154
Switch User Accounts ............................................155
Set Up Parental Controls ......................................156
Chapter 15: Protecting Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157
Set Up Trusted and Restricted Web Sites..............158
Enable the Windows Firewall ...............................159
Set Up Windows Defender
to Run Automatically ..........................................160
Use Windows Defender to Monitor Programs ....161
Run a Windows Defender Scan ............................162
Run Windows Update ...........................................163
Chapter 16: Maintaining Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
Back Up Files to a Writable CD or DVD ..............166
Defragment a Hard Drive......................................167
Free Disk Space ......................................................168
Delete Temporary Internet Files
by Using Internet Explorer .................................169
Delete Cookies by Using Internet Explorer..........170
Schedule Maintenance Tasks .................................171
Setting Passwords
and File Access
A
fter working with Windows and the software that it supports for a
while, you’ll find that you build a treasure trove of information and
documents. Microsoft provides features in Windows that help to keep your
computer private, whether at work or home, as well as to protect your valuable files. These features include the following:
➟
With passwords assigned (password-protection), you can keep people
from accessing your computer when you’re not around.
➟
Shared and public folder features allow you to share information with
others on a network or to keep others out of folders, if you prefer.
You can also use the shared folders feature to share folders with
multiple users of a standalone computer.
➟
Use settings to protect individual files by making them read-only —
that is, allowing people to read what’s in them but not make and save
changes — or hidden from others entirely.
➟
Set up user accounts so that different users on a single computer
access their own settings. Also, use parental controls so folks with
more experience can guide those who are younger as they explore
what the computer and Internet have to offer.
➟
Chapter
14
Get ready to . . .
➟ Change the Windows Password ................150
➟ Allow Access to the Public Folder ..............151
➟ Set Up Shared Folders..............................152
➟ Set File Attributes ....................................153
➟ Create a New User Account ......................154
➟ Switch User Accounts................................155
➟ Set Up Parental Controls ..........................156
Chapter 14: Setting Passwords and File Access
Change the Windows Password
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel, and then click User
Accounts and Family Safety.
2. In the resulting window shown in Figure 14-1, click the
Change Your Windows Password link. Then, if you have
more than one user account, click Manage Another
Account and click the account to add the password to.
Click the Create a Password for Your Account link.
3. In the Create a Password for Your Account screen, as
shown in Figure 14-2, enter a password, confirm it, and
add a password hint.
4. Click the Change Password button.
5. You return to the Make Changes to Your User Account
window. If you wish to remove your password at some
point, you can click the Remove Your Password link here.
Figure 14-1: The User Accounts and Family Safety window
6. Click the Close button to close the User Accounts
window.
If you forget your password, Windows shows the hint you entered
to help you remember it, but remember that anybody who uses
your computer can see the hint when it’s displayed. So, if lots of
people know that you drive a Ford and your hint is “My car model,”
your password protection is about as effective as a thin raincoat in
a hurricane.
After you create a password, you can go to the User Accounts window and change it at any time by clicking Change Your Password.
You can also change the name on your user account by typing
Change Your Name.
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150
Figure 14-2: The Create a Password for Your Account screen
Allow Access to the Public Folder
Allow Access to the Public Folder
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel and then click the Set
Up File Sharing link under the Network and Internet
category.
2. In the resulting Network and Sharing dialog box (see
Figure 14-3), click the arrow on the Public Sharing item
and select your preferred setting for the Public Folder.
You can allow access with the ability to make changes,
allow access without the ability to make changes, or
not allow access.
3. Click Apply to save the setting and then click the Close
button to close the Control Panel.
The Public folder is found using the path C:\Users\
Public. This is a handy way to share files when you have protected your private folders.
Figure 14-3: The Network and Sharing dialog box
In the Network and Sharing Center dialog box, click the Show Me
All the Files and Folders I Am Sharing link to review the accesses
you have set up.
Even if you allow access to a printer through printer sharing, you
may need to install that printer’s drivers in each computer that
accesses it. See Chapter 10 for more about setting up printers.
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Chapter 14: Setting Passwords and File Access
Set Up Shared Folders
1. Locate the folder that you want to share by using
Windows Explorer. (Choose Start➪All Programs➪
Accessories➪Windows Explorer.)
2. Right-click the folder that you want to allow others to
access and then choose Share.
3. In the resulting File Sharing dialog box, as shown in
Figure 14-4, click the arrow in the box to select users to
share with, and then click Add. To create a new user,
choose Create a New User from the drop-down list that
appears.
4. Click Share. A dialog box appears. Click Yes to share the
file. A confirmation dialog box appears indicating that
the file is shared and allowing you to e-mail a link to
it to the people to whom you have granted access (see
Figure 14-5).
Figure 14-4: The File Sharing dialog box
5. Click Done to complete the file sharing process.
To find out more about using Windows Explorer to locate and work
with files, see Chapter 2.
You can choose to share individual files by following the procedure
outlined here, but if you change your mind you can also remove
permissions. To change the permissions for sharing a file with a particular user, display the File Sharing dialog box, click the name of a
user, and choose Remove from the menu that appears.
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152
Figure 14-5: Confirmation of sharing with a link to e-mail users about their permissions
Set File Attributes
Set File Attributes
1. Locate the file that you want to modify by using
Windows Explorer. (Choose Start➪All Programs➪
Accessories➪Windows Explorer.)
2. Right-click the file and choose Properties.
3. In the resulting Filename Properties dialog box, as
shown in Figure 14-6, click the General tab.
4. Select the Read-Only or Hidden check boxes.
5. Click OK to accept the new settings.
If you want to see the files that you’ve marked as hidden, go to the
file or folder location (for example, in the My Documents folder or
by using Windows Explorer) and choose Organize➪Folder and
Search Options. Click the View tab to display it, select the Show
Hidden Files and Folders radio button in the Advanced Settings, and
then click OK. Be aware that this reveals all hidden folders, not just
those for a particular folder.
Figure 14-6: The Filename Properties
dialog box
One other item you can change settings for in the Properties dialog
box is what program you open the file with. In the Opens With area
of the dialog box click the Change button and choose the most
appropriate program. This is handy for items such as graphics files
where you may have a preferred graphics viewing program you
like to use.
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Chapter 14: Setting Passwords and File Access
Create a New User Account
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel.
2. In the resulting window, click the Add or Remove User
Accounts link under User Accounts and Family Safety.
3. In the resulting Manage Accounts dialog box, as shown
in Figure 14-7, click Create a New Account.
4. In the next dialog box, as shown in Figure 14-8, enter
an account name, and then select the type of account
you want to create:
• Administrator, who can do things like create and
change accounts and install programs.
• Standard user, who can’t do the tasks an administrator can.
5. Click the Create Account button and then close the
Figure 14-7: Creating a new user account
Control Panel.
After you create an account, you can make changes to it, such as
assigning a password or changing the account type, by doubleclicking it in the Manage Accounts window you reached in Step 4 (in
the preceding step list) and following the links listed there.
Figure 14-8: Choosing the account type
➟
154
Switch User Accounts
Switch User Accounts
1. Click Start and then click the arrow on the side of the
Lock button (see Figure 14-9).
2. Choose Switch User. In the resulting window, click on
the user you want to log in as.
3. If the user account is password-protected, a box appears
for you to enter the password. Type the password and
then click the arrow button to log in.
4. Windows Vista logs you in with the specified user’s
settings.
If you don’t like the picture associated with your user account, you
can change it. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Add or Remove User
Accounts and then click the account you want to change. In the resulting window, click Change the Picture and choose another picture or
browse to see more picture choices.
Figure 14-9: Switching users
If you forget your password and try to switch users without entering one, Windows Vista shows your password hint, which you can
create when you assign a password to help you remember it.
You can set up several user accounts for your computer, which helps
you save and access specific user settings and provide privacy for
each user’s files with passwords. To find out about setting up user
accounts and changing their settings, see Chapter 14.
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Chapter 14: Setting Passwords and File Access
Set Up Parental Controls
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Set Up Parental Controls
For Any User under the User Accounts and Family Safety
category. In the resulting Parental Controls window (see
Figure 14-10), click the user for whom you wish to
apply Parental Controls.
2. In the resulting User Controls dialog box (see
Figure 14-11), make any of the following settings:
• Select the On, Enforce Current Settings check box to
turn Parental Controls on.
• Select the On, Collect Information about Computer
Usage check box to receive reports about this user’s
computer activities.
• Click the Windows Vista Web Filter link to access a
form that allows you to specify what type of Web
content this user should be allowed to access.
Figure 14-10: The Parental Controls window
• Click any of the Settings (Time Limits, Games, Allow
and Block Specific Programs, and Activity Reports) to
further control how much time can be spent online
and what kinds of activities the user can engage in.
3. Click OK and then click the Close button to close the
Parental Controls window. The settings take effect the
next time the user logs in. If the user is currently logged
in, the settings will not take place until he logs off and
then logs on again or you restart the computer.
➟
156
Figure 14-11: The User Controls dialog box
Protecting Windows
A
➟
➟
Chapter
fter working with Windows for a while as well as the software that it
supports, you build a treasure trove of information and documents.
Microsoft provides security features within Windows that help to keep your
information private, whether at work or home, and also keep you in safe territory when you’re online. You can do the following:
Set up Internet Explorer zones. Designate Trusted Web sites (from
which you feel perfectly safe downloading files) and Restricted sites
(which are likely to contain things that you wouldn’t download to
your worst enemy’s computer).
➟
Make sure protections are up to date. By enabling a firewall to keep
your computer safe from outsiders and also keeping Windows up to
date, you can avoid several kinds of attacks on your data.
➟
Work with Windows Defender. New in Windows Vista is Windows
Defender, which is a built-in solution for protecting you against spyware (typically software downloaded to your computer that causes
those nasty pop-ups to appear).
Get ready to . . .
15
➟ Set Up Trusted and Restricted Web Sites....158
➟ Enable the Windows Firewall ....................159
➟ Set Up Windows Defender
to Run Automatically................................160
➟ Use Windows Defender
to Monitor Programs................................161
➟ Run a Windows Defender Scan ................162
➟ Run Windows Update ..............................163
Chapter 15: Protecting Windows
Set Up Trusted and Restricted
Web Sites
1. Double-click the Internet Explorer icon on the Windows
desktop or Quick Launch bar to start your browser.
2. Choose Tools➪Internet Options.
3. In the Internet Options dialog box (see Figure 15-1),
click the Security tab.
4. Click the Trusted Sites icon and then click the Sites button.
5. In the resulting Trusted Sites dialog box, enter a URL in
the Add This Web Site to the Zone text box for a Web
site you want to allow your computer to access.
6. Click Add to add the site to the list of Web sites, as
shown in Figure 15-2.
7. Repeat Steps 3–6 to add more sites.
8. When you’re done, click Close and then click OK to
Figure 15-1: The Internet Options dialog box,
Security tab
close the dialog boxes.
9. Repeat Steps 1–8, clicking the Restricted Sites icon rather
than Trusted Sites in Step 4 to designate sites that you
don’t want your computer to access.
If the Require Server Verification (https:) for All Sites In This Zone
check box is selected in the Trusted Sites dialog box, any Trusted site
you add must use the https prefix, which indicates that the
site has a secure connection.
➟
158
You can establish a Privacy setting on the Privacy tab of the Internet
Options dialog box to control which sites are allowed to download
cookies to your computer. Cookies are tiny files that a site uses to track
your online activity and recognize you when you return to the source
site. Trusted sites are ones that you allow to download cookies to your
computer even though the privacy setting you have made might not
allow many other sites to do so. Restricted sites can never download
cookies to your computer, no matter what your privacy setting is.
Figure 15-2: The Trusted Sites dialog box
Enable the Windows Firewall
Enable the Windows Firewall
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Check This Computer’s
Security Status.
2. In the Windows Security Center window that appears
(see Figure 15-3), check that the Windows Firewall is
marked as On. If it isn’t, click the Windows Firewall
link in the left pane of the window and then click the
Change Settings link in the resulting dialog box.
3. In the resulting Windows Firewall window (see
Figure 15-4), select the On radio button and then
click OK.
4. Click the Close button to close Windows Security Center
and the Control Panel.
A firewall is a program that protects your computer from the outside world. This is generally a good thing, unless you use a Virtual
Private Network (VPN). Using a firewall with a VPN results in you
being unable to share files and use some other VPN features.
Figure 15-3: The Windows Security Center window
Antivirus and security software programs may offer their own firewall protection and may display a message asking if you want to
switch. Check their features against Windows and then decide, but
usually most firewall features are comparable. The important thing
is to have one activated.
Figure 15-4: The Windows Firewall dialog box
➟
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Chapter 15: Protecting Windows
Set Up Windows Defender
to Run Automatically
1. Choose Start➪All Programs➪Windows Defender.
2. In the resulting Windows Defender window, choose
Tools➪Options. In the Options dialog box that appears
(see Figure 15-5), select the Automatically Scan My
Computer check box if it’s not already selected, and
then choose the frequency, time of day, and type of
scan from the drop-down lists.
3. To ensure that your scan uses the latest definitions for
malware (a kind of spyware with malicious intent),
select the Check for Updated Definitions Before
Scanning check box.
4. Scroll down to the bottom of the Options dialog box
(see Figure 15-6) and make sure that the Use Windows
Defender check box is enabled (checked) to activate the
program.
Figure 15-5: The Windows Defender dialog box
5. Click Save to save your settings.
If you want to exclude certain files or locations from the regular
scans, you can use the Advanced Options in the Windows Defender
dialog box. Click the Add button and browse for the location or file
you want to exclude.
➟
160
Figure 15-6: Turn on Windows Defender in the Administrator Options
Use Windows Defender to Monitor Programs
Use Windows Defender
to Monitor Programs
1. Choose Start➪All Programs➪Windows Defender.
2. In the resulting Windows Defender window, choose
Tools➪Software Explorer (see Figure 15-7). In the
Software Explorer window that appears, click the
Category button and choose a category of software
to display.
3. Click any program you’d like to monitor. Detailed infor-
mation about that program appears (see Figure 15-8).
4. Your options might vary, depending on the category of
software you select. For example, for Currently Running
Programs, if you want to stop a process in progress, click
End Process. If you want to display the Task Manager
window to manage specific software tasks, click Task
Manager. For Startup Programs, you can use the buttons
displayed to remove a program from the startup programs, disable or enable a program, and so on.
Figure 15-7: The Windows Defender window
5. When you finish working with Software Explorer, click
the Close button.
You can use the information about programs available in Software
Explorer to verify program information, such as its publisher, version, when it was installed, and whether it shipped with your operating system. These details might help you verify whether a piece
of software on your system is legitimate or one that you’d rather
not run.
Figure 15-8: Software Explorer
➟
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Chapter 15: Protecting Windows
Run a Windows Defender Scan
1. Choose Start➪All Programs➪Windows Defender.
2. In the resulting Windows Defender window, click the
down-arrow on the Scan button (see Figure 15-9). In
the resulting menu, choose one of three options:
• Quick Scan: This runs a scan of the likeliest spots on
your computer where spyware might lurk. In many
cases, this quicker scanning process finds most, if not
all, problems and is good choice for a daily automatic scan.
• Full Scan: This scan checks every single file and
folder on your computer and gives any currently running programs the once-over. However, be aware that
a Full Scan can cause your computer to run a little
more slowly while it runs.
Figure 15-9: The Scan menu in the Windows Defender window
• Custom Scan: This scan allows you to customize
where to scan. This is helpful if you suspect that a
particular drive or folder is harboring a problem.
3. If you choose Quick Scan or Full Scan, the scan begins
immediately. If you choose Custom Scan, you can click
the Select button in the Select Scan Options dialog box
that appears (see Figure 15-10). Then, in the Select
Drives and Folders to Scan dialog box, select drives,
files, and folders to scan. Click OK. Back in the Select
Scan Options dialog box, click Scan Now.
➟
162
The History button in Windows Defender gives you a review of the
activities and actions taken by Windows Defender. In that window
you can also view your settings for Microsoft SpyNet. By default
you have joined with a basic membership that reports actions to
remove spyware. An advanced membership alerts you when new
threats are detected. Allowing reports on spyware activity can help
Microsoft prevent or stop such threats, however, if you don’t want
to report issues with your computer and spyware to Microsoft, you
can choose not to join Microsoft SpyNet.
Figure 15-10: The Select Scan Options dialog box
Run Windows Update
Run Windows Update
1. Choose Start➪All Programs➪Windows Update.
2. In the Windows Update window, click Check for
Updates. Windows thinks about this for a while, so feel
free to page through a magazine for a minute or two.
3. In the resulting window, as shown in Figure 15-11, click
the View Available Updates link.
4. In the following window, which shows the available
updates (see Figure 15-12), you can click to select
updates that you want to install. Then click the Install
button.
5. A window appears showing the progress of your instal-
lation. When the installation is complete, you might
get a message telling you that it’s a good idea to restart
your computer to complete the installation. Click
Restart Now.
Figure 15-11: The Windows Update window
You can set up Windows Update to run at the same time every day.
Click the Change Settings link in the Windows Update window and
choose the frequency (such as every day) and time of day to check
for and install updates.
Windows Ultimate Extras which is mentioned in the Windows Update
window is a program that provides you with programs, services,
and content for the Windows Vista Ultimate version of the program.
Other versions of Windows Vista cannot sign up for this program.
Figure 15-12: Selecting which updates to install
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Chapter 15: Protecting Windows
➟
164
Maintaining Windows
T
Windows Vista handles lots and lots of files. To keep your computer
and Windows in tip-top shape, you need to organize files in logical ways,
perform maintenance activities, prepare for disaster — and know how to
recover from it.
The tasks in this chapter fall into three different categories:
➟
Backing up your files: Backing up files is a good computing practice,
guaranteeing that you have a copy of all your work in case of a crash.
You have to use a writable CD or DVD disc to back up files to it.
➟
Performing basic maintenance: These tasks are the equivalent of a
janitorial service. To keep your system in shape, you can defragment
your hard drive (take little fragments of files and consolidate them for
efficiency) or free up space on the drive. These two tasks troubleshoot
files on your hard drive to make sure that you get the best performance
from your computer.
➟
➟
Chapter
his chapter covers tasks akin to changing the oil in your car: Maintenance
might not be a barrel of laughs, but it keeps your car (or in this case,
your computer) running, so it has to be done. These are the types of tasks
that help you organize, maintain, and protect your computer system.
Clearing up clutter: You can delete cookies and temporary files placed
on your computer during online sessions to stop them from cluttering
your hard drive. You can also schedule routine maintenance tasks to
happen automatically so you don’t take a chance that you forget to
perform them.
16
Get ready to . . .
➟ Back Up Files to a Writable CD or DVD ......166
➟ Defragment a Hard Drive ........................167
➟ Free Disk Space ......................................168
➟ Delete Temporary Internet Files
by Using Internet Explorer ......................169
➟ Delete Cookies by Using
Internet Explorer ....................................170
➟ Schedule Maintenance Tasks ....................171
Chapter 16: Maintaining Windows
Back Up Files to a Writable
CD or DVD
1. Place a blank writable CD R/RW (read/writable) or
DVD R/RW in your CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive and
then choose Start➪Documents.
2. In the resulting Documents window (see Figure 16-1),
select all the files that you want to copy to disc.
3. Right-click the files that you want and then choose
Send To➪Name of your writable CD-R/RW-ROM or
DVD-ROM drive.
4. In the Burn a Disc dialog box that appears, enter a disc
title and choose whether you wish to change the file
format selection. Click Next.
5. In the window that appears (see Figure 16-2), click
Figure 16-1: Files selected for backup in the Documents window
Burn to Disc. When the files have been copied, click the
Close button to close the CD-R/RW-ROM or DVD-ROM
window.
If you want to back up the entire contents of a folder, such as the
Document folder, you can just click the Documents folder itself in
Step 2.
You can also back up to a network or another drive by using the
Back Up Your Computer link in the Control Panel. Using Windows
Backup, you can make settings to regularly back up to a local disk
or CD R/RW/DVD drive, or to a network. Backing up to a CD/DVD
is a little different from burning a disc in that after you back up your
files, only changes are saved each subsequent time a backup is run.
➟
166
Figure 16-2: Files waiting to be copied to a writable CD
Defragment a Hard Drive
Defragment a Hard Drive
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪System and Maintenance
and then click Defragment Your Hard Drive in the
Administrative Tools.
2. In the resulting Disk Defragmenter window (see
Figure 16-3), to the left of the Defragment Now button
is a note about whether your system requires defragmenting. If it does, click Defragment Now. A message
appears (see Figure 16-4) that Windows is defragmenting your drive and that it may take up to a few hours to
complete.
Figure 16-3: The Disk Defragmenter in action
3. When the defragmenting process is complete, the
Disk Defragmenter window shows that your drive no
longer requires defragmenting. Click Close to close the
window.
Warning: Disk defragmenting could take a while. If you have
energy-saving features active (such as a screen saver), they could
cause the defragmenter to stop and start all over again. Try running
your defrag overnight while you’re happily dreaming of much more
interesting things. You can also set up the procedure to run automatically at a preset period of time, such as once every two weeks
by using the Run Automatically setting in the Disk Defragmenter
window.
Figure 16-4: The Disk Defragmenter window
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Chapter 16: Maintaining Windows
Free Disk Space
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪System and Maintenance
and then click Free Up Disk Space in the Administrative
Tools.
2. In the dialog box that appears (see Figure 16-5), click
the icon next to the kind of files you want to clean up.
If you choose All Files on This Computer, go to Step 3.
If you choose My Files Only, choose the drives you want
to scan from the Disk Cleanup: Drive Selection dialog
box that appears.
Figure 16-5: Choose your Disk Cleanup option
3. The resulting dialog box shown in Figure 16-6 tells you
that Disk Cleanup calculated how much space can be
cleared on your hard drive and displays the suggested
files to delete in a list (those to be deleted have a check
mark). If you want to select additional files in the list to
delete, click to place a check mark next to them.
4. After you select all the files to delete, click OK. The
selected files are deleted.
Click the View Files button in the Disk Cleanup dialog box to see more
details about the files that Windows proposes to delete, including
the size of the files and when they were created or last accessed.
If you can’t free up enough disk space for your needs you might
consider running Error Checking to locate bad sectors on your hard
drive, covered in Chapter 17 or even replacing your hard drive with
one that has more capacity.
➟
168
Figure 16-6: The Disk Cleanup dialog box
Delete Temporary Internet Files by Using Internet Explorer
Delete Temporary Internet Files
by Using Internet Explorer
1. Open Internet Explorer.
2. Choose Tools➪Internet Options.
3. On the General tab of the resulting Internet Options
dialog box (see Figure 16-7), click the Delete button in
the Browsing History section.
4. In the resulting Delete Browsing History dialog box, as
shown in Figure 16-8, click the Delete Files button
in the Temporary Internet Files section.
5. A confirmation message asks whether you want to delete
the files. Click Yes. Click Close and then click OK to
close the open dialog boxes.
Temporary Internet files can be deleted when you run Disk Cleanup
(see that task earlier in this chapter), but the process that I describe
here allows you to delete them without having to make choices
about deleting other files on your system.
Figure 16-7: The Internet Options dialog box
Windows Vista offers a new feature for rating and improving your
computer’s performance. From the System and Maintenance category in the Control Panel, click the Check Your Computer’s Windows
Experience Index Base Score. In the resulting dialog box click the
Refresh Now button to get a rating of your processor speed, memory operations, and more.
Figure 16-8: The Delete Browsing History dialog box
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169
Chapter 16: Maintaining Windows
Delete Cookies by Using
Internet Explorer
1. Open Internet Explorer.
2. Choose Tools➪Internet Options.
3. On the General tab of the resulting Internet Options
dialog box (see Figure 16-9), click the Delete button in
the Browsing History section.
4. In the resulting dialog box, as shown in Figure 16-10,
click the Delete Cookies button in the Cookies section.
5. A confirmation message asks whether you want to
delete the files. Click Yes. Click Close and then click
OK to close the open dialog boxes.
There are pros and cons to allowing cookies to be saved on your
computer. Cookies embed information about you and your Internet
browsing habits on your computer which Web sites can use to predict your buying interests. That information can be used to push
annoying pop-up windows at you, or simply suggest products you
might be interested in buying when you revisit a favorite online
store. If you don’t want to have cookies saved to your computer
change privacy a higher setting (see Chapter 7 for more about this).
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170
Figure 16-9: The Internet Options dialog box
Figure 16-10: The Delete Browsing History dialog box
Schedule Maintenance Tasks
Schedule Maintenance Tasks
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪System and Maintenance
and then click Schedule Tasks in the Administrative
Tools.
2. In the resulting Task Scheduler dialog box, as shown in
Figure 16-11, choose Action➪Create Task.
3. In the resulting Create Task dialog box, enter a task
name and description. Choose when to run the task
(only when you are logged on, or whether you’re logged
in or not).
4. Click the Triggers tab and then click New. In the New
Trigger dialog box, choose a criteria in the Begin the
Task drop-down list and use the Settings to specify how
often to perform the task as well as when and at what
time of day to begin. Click OK.
Figure 16-11: The Task Scheduler dialog box
5. Click the Actions tab and then click New. In the New
Action dialog box, choose the action that will occur
from the Action drop-down list. These include starting
a program, sending an e-mail, or displaying a message.
Depending on what you choose here, different action
dialog boxes appear. For example, if you want to send
an e-mail, you get an e-mail form to fill in.
6. If you want to set conditions in addition to those that
trigger the action that control whether it should occur,
click the Conditions tab and enter them.
7. In the resulting dialog box, select a start time and start
date by clicking the arrows in each field. Then click Next.
8. Click the Settings tab and make settings that control
how the task runs.
9. After you complete all settings, click OK to save the task.
Figure 16-12: The Create Task dialog box
If you like a more wizard-like interface for building a new task, you can
choose the Create Basic Task item from the Action menu. This walks you
through the most basic and minimal settings you can make to create a
new task.
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Chapter 16: Maintaining Windows
➟
172
Part VI
Fixing Common Problems
Chapter 17: Troubleshooting Hardware Problems . . .175
Check for Printer Compatibility...........................176
Run Error Checking to Detect Bad Sectors
on a Hard Drive ..................................................177
Perform Modem Diagnostics ................................179
Use the Hardware Troubleshooter .......................180
Update a Driver......................................................181
Revert to a Previous Version of a Driver...............182
Chapter 18: Troubleshooting Software Problems . . .183
Shut Down a Nonresponsive Application ...........184
Start Windows in Safe Mode.................................185
Create a System Restore Point ..............................186
Restore the Windows System ................................187
Reformat a Drive....................................................188
Chapter 19: Getting Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .189
Explore the Help Table of Contents .....................190
Search for Help ......................................................191
Post a Question in Windows Communities ........192
Access Windows Online Help...............................193
Connect to Remote Assistance..............................194
Change Help and Support Center
Display Options ..................................................195
Contact Microsoft Customer Support ..................196
Troubleshooting
Hardware Problems
➟
Chapter
C
omputer hardware, like your CPU and printer, is cool. Hardware is the
gadgetry that hums and beeps and looks neat on your desktop. But when
hardware goes wrong, you might be tempted to throw it out the window.
Don’t do that — think of all the money you spent on it. Instead, use Windows
to isolate and troubleshoot the problem.
Windows Vista has several features that help you diagnose and treat the
sickest hardware, including
➟
A method of checking whether your printer model is compatible with
Windows Vista.
➟
A Disk Cleanup feature that checks your hard drive for problems that
could be causing poor performance, such as bad sectors on the drive
or bits of stray data that could simply be thrown away — and then
freeing space and helping your system to perform better.
➟
Modem diagnostics that query your modem to be sure that it’s connected, configured, and performing properly.
➟
A Hardware Troubleshooter feature in the Windows Help and Support
Center that offers advice to help you fix a variety of hardware problems.
➟
The ability to quickly and easily update hardware drivers that might
help your hardware perform optimally or revert to a previous driver
if a newer version is causing problems.
Get ready to . . .
17
➟ Check for Printer Compatibility ................176
➟ Run Error Checking to Detect Bad
Sectors on a Hard Drive ..........................177
➟ Perform Modem Diagnostics ....................178
➟ Use the Hardware Troubleshooter ............179
➟ Update a Driver ......................................180
➟ Revert to a Previous Version of a Driver....181
Chapter 17: Troubleshooting Hardware Problems
Check for Printer Compatibility
1. Open Internet Explorer and go to http://
testedproducts.windowsmarketplace.com.
2. In the window that appears (see Figure 17-1), click
Printers in the hardware category list.
3. In the resulting Printers page (see Figure 17-2), locate
your printer in one of three ways:
• Click a category of printer and find your printer in
the resulting list.
• Click the manufacturer company for your printer and
locate your printer in the resulting list.
• Use the alphabetical listing of printers. (Note that
there are 436 pages of these listings, so click the
Sort By field and page links at the top to get to your
model name.)
Figure 17-1: The Windows Tested Products page
4. When you locate your model of printer, click it to see
detailed information about what versions of Windows
it is compatible with.
Beyond being compatible with Windows Vista, here are some
sneaky printer problems to look for: The printer isn’t connected to
the computer; the printer isn’t plugged in; the printer driver is out
of date; the printer doesn’t have an ink cartridge in it; the printer
isn’t set up as the current printer (so you’re printing to some other
printer or trying to print to a printer that’s no longer connected to
your computer); or the printer lid is open.
➟
176
You can also find a link to the Windows Tested Products List Web site
through the Troubleshooting section of Help and Support, in the
Hardware and Drivers section.
Figure 17-2: The Printers page
Run Error Checking to Detect Bad Sectors on a Hard Drive
Run Error Checking to Detect
Bad Sectors on a Hard Drive
1. Choose Start➪Computer.
2. Right-click the drive you want to repair and then choose
Properties.
3. In the resulting Properties dialog box, click the Tools tab
to display it (see Figure 17-3). Then click the Check
Now button.
4. In the resulting Check Disk dialog box (see Figure 17-4),
choose the option you want to use:
• Automatically Fix File System Errors: You have to
close all files in order to run this option.
• Scan For and Attempt Recovery of Bad Sectors: If
you select this option, it also automatically fixes any
errors found, so you don’t need to select the first
option as well.
Figure 17-3: The Properties dialog box, Tools tab
5. Click Start.
If there are unrecoverable sectors that can’t be fixed by using this
utility, they will be flagged so that Windows doesn’t attempt to access
them anymore.
Figure 17-4: The Check Disk dialog box
➟
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Chapter 17: Troubleshooting Hardware Problems
Perform Modem Diagnostics
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Hardware and Sound and
then click Device Manager.
2. In the resulting window, click the plus sign next to
Modems to display installed modems. Right-click a
modem and choose Properties from the shortcut menu.
3. On the Diagnostics tab of the resulting Modem Properties
dialog box (see Figure 17-5), click Query Modem.
4. What appears at this point differs depending on whether
the modem is experiencing a problem. If the modem is
working properly, the response reads Success (see
Figure 17-6 for an example). You can select the Append
to Log check box to add this information to your log,
and then share the log with a technical support person
to get help with your modem problem.
Figure 17-5: The Modem Properties dialog box,
Diagnostics tab
5. Click OK and then click the Close button on the Device
Manager window.
6. Find the problem and click the Close button in the
upper-right corner of the Troubleshooter to close it.
You should also check the Resource tab of the Modem Properties
dialog box, which lists any other devices on your system that might
be in conflict with your modem and therefore cause problems.
Disable those devices and try your modem again.
If the modem isn’t working properly, try the troubleshooting feature
of the Help and Support window to try to pinpoint the problem.
➟
178
Figure 17-6: The results of a modem query
Use the Hardware Troubleshooter
Use the Hardware Troubleshooter
1. Choose Start➪Help and Support➪Troubleshooting.
2. In the resulting Troubleshooting in Windows window,
scroll down the Hardware and Drivers section, and click
the Troubleshoot Driver Problems link (see Figure 17-7).
3. Follow the instructions that relate to your problem.
(Figure 17-8 shows things to try if your device used to
work but now doesn’t, as an example.)
4. After you solve the problem, click the Close button to
close the Troubleshooting window. If you don’t find a
solution, consider using the Remote Assistance feature
to get one-on-one help (see Chapter 19 for more about
this feature).
Figure 17-7: The Troubleshooting window
You might also find help with hardware drivers by going to the
Device Manager (Start➪Control Panel➪Hardware and Sound➪
Device Manager) and right-clicking a device. Choose Properties and
then display the Driver tab to update or test a driver.
The In This Article listing of links helps you pinpoint the information
you want to find in the Troubleshooter feature. The Get Help from
Other People link may also lead you to resources who can help with
your troubleshooting tasks.
Figure 17-8: Troubleshooting advice
➟
179
Chapter 17: Troubleshooting Hardware Problems
Update a Driver
1. Choose Start➪Help and Support.
2. In the resulting Help and Support window click Table
of Contents, then click Hardware, Devices, and Drivers,
and finally click Driver Software. In the Driver Software
window, click Repair or Update a Driver.
3. In the resulting Repair or Update a Driver window
(see Figure 17-9), click the To Update Driver Software
Using Windows Update link, click the Click to Open
Windows Update link, and follow the instructions
(see Figure 17-10).
4. When you finish updating the driver, click the Close but-
ton to close the Windows Help and Support window.
In some cases, you have to reboot your computer to give Windows
a chance to load the new driver. Choose Start➪Turn Off Computer.
In the resulting Turn Off Computer dialog box, click the Restart button to reboot your system. The driver should now, by the magic of
the Windows Plug and Play feature that automatically detects new
hardware, be working.
Figure 17-9: The Repair or Update a Driver window
If you don’t find the updated driver using the Windows Vista procedure
outlined above, consider going directly to the hardware manufacturer’s Web site and downloading the latest driver.
➟
180
Figure 17-10: The Windows Update window
Revert to a Previous Version of a Driver
Revert to a Previous
Version of a Driver
1. Disconnect the device that’s associated with the driver
that’s causing trouble.
2. Turn off the device.
3. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Hardware and Sound and
click the Update Device Drivers link in the Device
Manager category.
4. In the resulting Device Manager window, click the arrow
to the left of a category of device to display the devices,
and then right-click on the device you want to rollback
and choose Properties.
Figure 17-11: The Repair or Update a
Driver window
5. In the resulting Properties window (see Figure 17-11),
click the Driver tab and then click the Roll Back Driver
button.
There’s another option for updating a driver. On the Driver tab of
the device Properties dialog box, click the Uninstall button to
remove the driver. You can then install a new one from a disc or by
downloading it over the Internet.
➟
181
Chapter 17: Troubleshooting Hardware Problems
➟
182
Troubleshooting
Software Problems
A
ll the wonderful hardware that you’ve spent your hard-earned money
on doesn’t mean a thing if the software driving it goes flooey. If any
programs cause your system to crash (meaning it freezes up so there’s less
action on your screen than on a loser’s prom night), you can try a variety of
tasks to fix it. In this chapter, you find out how to recover when the following
problems occur:
➟
When a program crashes, you can simply shut down that program by
using the Windows Task Manager. This utility keeps track of all the
programs and processes that are running on your computer.
➟
If you’ve got problems and Windows isn’t responding, sometimes it
helps to restart in Safe Mode, which requires only basic files and drivers. Restarting in Safe Mode often allows you to troubleshoot what’s
going on, and you can restart Windows in its regular mode after the
problem is solved.
➟
Use the System Restore feature to first create a system restore point
(a point in time when your settings and programs all seem to be
humming along just fine) and then restore Windows to that point
when trouble hits.
➟
If all else fails, you might have to reformat an entire drive. This wipes
all information from the drive. If it’s the hard drive that you reformat,
you have to start again by reloading the operating system and all your
software.
➟
Sometimes you just have to run older programs on Windows Vista.
To avoid compatibility issues that could crash your system, try running the Program Compatibility Wizard to test your program first.
➟
Chapter
18
Get ready to . . .
➟ Shut Down a Nonresponsive Application ....184
➟ Start Windows in Safe Mode ....................185
➟ Create a System Restore Point..................186
➟ Restore the Windows System ....................187
➟ Reformat a Drive ....................................188
Chapter 18: Troubleshooting Software Problems
Shut Down a Nonresponsive
Application
1. Press Ctrl+Alt+Del.
2. In the Windows screen that appears, click Start Task
Manager.
3. In the resulting Windows Task Manager dialog box
(see Figure 18-1), select the application that you were
in when your system stopped responding.
4. Click the End Task button.
5. In the resulting dialog box, the Windows Task Manager
tells you that the application isn’t responding and asks
whether you want to shut it down now. Click Yes.
If pressing Ctrl+Alt+Del doesn’t bring up the Task Manager, you’re
in bigger trouble than you thought. You might need to press and
hold your computer power button to shut down. Note that some
applications use an AutoSave feature that keeps an interim version
of the document that you were working in — you might be able to
save some of your work by opening that last-saved version. Other
programs don’t have such a safety net, and you simply lose whatever changes you made to your document since the last time you
saved it. The moral? Save, and save often.
You may see a dialog box appear when an application shuts down
that asks if you want to report the problem to Microsoft. In the past
if you said yes, information went to Microsoft and that’s the last you
heard of it. In Windows Vista you actually get a message back with
suggestions on how to solve the problem. This message appears in
a little window on your screen.
➟
184
Figure 18-1: The Windows Task Manager
Start Windows in Safe Mode
Start Windows in Safe Mode
1. Remove any CDs or DVDs from your computer.
2. Choose Start, click the arrow on the right of the Lock
button, and then choose Restart to reboot your system
(see Figure 18-2).
3. When the computer starts to reboot (the screen goes
black), begin pressing F8.
4. If you have more than one operating system, you might
see the Windows Advanced Options menu. Use the
up- and down-arrow keys to select the Windows Vista
operating system. Or, type the number of that choice,
press Enter, and then continue to press F8.
5. In the resulting plain-vanilla text-based screen, press the
up- or down-arrow key to select the Safe Mode option
from the list and then press Enter.
Figure 18-2: The Turn Off Computer dialog box
6. Log in to your computer with administrator privileges;
a Safe Mode screen appears (see Figure 18-3). Use the
tools in the Control Panel and the Help and Support
system to figure out your problem, make changes, and
then restart. When you restart again (repeat Step 2), let
your computer start in the standard Windows Vista mode.
When you reboot and press F8 as in Step 2, you’re in the old textbased world that users of the DOS operating system will remember.
It’s scary out there! Your mouse doesn’t work a lick, and no fun
sounds or cool graphics exist to sooth you. In fact, DOS is the reason the whole For Dummies series started because everybody felt
like a dummy using it, me included. Just use your arrow keys to get
around and press Enter to make selections. You’re back in Windowsland soon . . .
Figure 18-3: Windows Vista running in Safe Mode
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185
Chapter 18: Troubleshooting Software Problems
Create a System Restore Point
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Backup Your Computer
(under System and Maintenance).
2. In the Backup and Restore Center window, click Create
a Restore Point or Change Settings under Tasks. The
User Account Control might display a dialog box asking
for your permission to continue; if so, click Continue.
3. On the System Protection tab of the System Properties
dialog box that appears (see Figure 18-4), click Create.
4. In the resulting Create a Restore Point dialog box (see
Figure 18-5), enter a description; this description is helpful
if you create multiple restore points and want to identify
the correct one. The current date is usually your best bet.
Figure 18-4: The System Properties dialog
box, System Protection tab
5. Click the Create button, and the system restore point is
created and is available to you when you run a System
Restore. (See the following task for more about this.)
6. In the dialog box that appears telling you the restore
point was created successfully, click OK and then click
OK again to close the Control Panel.
Every once in a while, when you install some software, make some
new settings in Windows, and things seem to be running just fine,
create a system restore point. It’s good computer practice, just like
backing up your files, only you’re backing up your settings. Once a
month or once every couple months works for most people, but if you
frequently make changes, create a system restore point more often.
➟
186
A more drastic option to System Restore is to run the system recovery
disc that probably came with your computer or that you created using
discs you provided. However, system recovery essentially puts your
computer right back to the configuration it had when it was carried out
of the factory. That means you lose any software you’ve installed and
documents you’ve created since you began to use it. A good argument
for creating system restore points on a regular basis, don’t you think?
Figure 18-5: The Create a Restore Point dialog box
Restore the Windows System
Restore the Windows System
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Back Up Your Computer
(under System and Maintenance).
2. In the Backup and Restore Center window, click Repair
Windows Using System Restore in the Tasks list.
3. In the resulting System Restore dialog box (see
Figure 18-6), click Next. In the next window that
appears, as shown in Figure 18-7, click Finish to confirm the system restore point.
4. A dialog box confirms that you want to run System
Restore. Click Yes.
Figure 18-6: The System Restore dialog box
5. The system goes through a shutdown and restart
sequence, and then displays a dialog box that informs
you that the System Restore has occurred.
6. Click OK to close it.
System Restore doesn’t get rid of files that you’ve saved, so you
don’t lose your Ph.D. dissertation. System Restore simply reverts to
Windows settings as of the restore point. This can help if you or
some piece of installed software made a setting that is causing some
conflict in your system that makes your computer sluggish or prone
to crashes.
System Restore doesn’t always solve the problem. You very best bet
is to be sure you create a set of backup discs for your computer when
you buy it. If you didn’t do that, and you can’t get things running
right again, contact your computer manufacturer. They may be able
to send you a set of recovery discs, though they may charge a small
fee. These discs restore your computer to its state when it left the
factory, and in this case you lose applications you installed and documents you created, but you get your computer running again.
Figure 18-7: Confirming the restore point to use
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187
Chapter 18: Troubleshooting Software Problems
Reformat a Drive
1. Assuming your system is still functional enough to let
you do so, back up everything you can find (documents,
photos, graphics, saved e-mails, updates, drivers, and so
on; don’t worry about software programs because you’ll
have to reinstall those, anyway) and close all applications.
2. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪System and
Maintenance➪Administrative Tools.
3. In the Administrative Tools window (see Figure 18-8),
double-click the Computer Management link.
4. In the resulting Computer Management window, click
the Disk Management link on the left. In the resulting
window (see Figure 18-9), right-click the drive or partition that you want to reformat, and then choose Format
from the shortcut menu that appears.
Figure 18-8: The Administrative Tools window
5. In the resulting dialog box, select the options you want
(file system and size) and then click OK.
The two file systems types that you can choose from are NTFS and
FAT32. NTFS, which stands for NT File System, is the default. This
format supports long filenames, and various storage, security, and
recovery features of Windows NT. FAT32 is an older system used by
the now antiquated MS-DOS to organize files. You are probably better off leaving NTFS as your file system choice.
Note that you have to be logged on as the head honcho — the system administrator — to perform these steps. And it’s worth repeating: Reformatting a drive wipes everything off it, so be sure that’s
what you want to do before you do it.
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188
I can’t stress this strongly enough: Before you reformat a drive, you
should back up everything you can, including drivers or updates to
software that you’ve sat through tedious minutes (or hours) to
download from the Web. You don’t want to have to spend all that
download time all over again to get yourself up to speed.
Figure 18-9: The Computer Management window
Getting Help
W
ith so many Windows Vista features, you’re bound to run into something that doesn’t work right or isn’t easy to figure out (or that this
book doesn’t cover). That’s when you need to call on the resources that
Microsoft provides to help you out.
Through the Help and Support Center, you can get help in various ways,
including the following:
➟
➟
➟
Access information that’s stored in the Help system database. Drill
down from one topic to another or by using a powerful search mechanism. There’s even a troubleshooting feature that helps you pin down
your problem.
Get help from your fellow Windows users. Tap into information
exchanged by users in Windows Communities or by using a little feature called Remote Assistance, which allows you to let another user take
over your computer from a distance (via the Internet) and figure out
your problem for you.
Bite the bullet and pay for it. Microsoft offers some help for free
(for example, help for installing its software that you paid good
money for), but some help comes for a price. When you can’t find
help anywhere else, you might want to consider forking over a few
hard-earned bucks for this option.
➟
Chapter
19
Get ready to . . .
➟ Explore the Help Table of Contents ..........190
➟ Search for Help........................................191
➟ Post a Question in Windows
Communities............................................192
➟ Access Windows Online Help ....................193
➟ Connect to Remote Assistance ..................194
➟ Change Help and Support
Center Display Options ............................195
➟ Contact Microsoft Customer Support..........196
Chapter 19: Getting Help
Explore the Help Table of Contents
1. Choose Start➪Help and Support to open Windows Help
and Support, as shown in Figure 19-1. Note: If your
copy of Windows came built into your computer, some
computer manufacturers (such as Hewlett-Packard), customize this center to add information that’s specific to
your computer system.
2. Click the Table of Contents link to display a list of top-
ics. Click any of the topics to see a list of subtopics.
Eventually, you get down to the deepest level of detailed
subtopics that have question mark icons next to them,
as shown in Figure 19-2.
3. Click a subtopic to read its contents. Some subtopics
contain blue links that lead to related topics. Links with
a green arrow next to them perform an action when
clicked, such as opening a dialog box so you can complete a task.
Figure 19-1: The Microsoft Help and Support window
4. Click any words in green to view a definition of those
terms. When you finish reading a help topic, click the
Close button to close the Help and Support window.
You can click the Print icon in the set of tools at the top right of the
Help and Support window to print any displayed topic. You can also
click the Restore Down button in the title bar to minimize the window and keep it available while you work in your computer.
It helps you to get the most up-to-date help information if you are
connected to the Internet when you open Help and Support. If you
are not connected you can still browse the database of help information installed with Windows Vista, but you will see a message in
the help window telling you you are not connected.
➟
190
Figure 19-2: Detailed level help subtopics
Search for Help
Search for Help
1. Open the Help and Support Window.
2. Enter a search term in the Search box and then click the
Search Help button. Search results, such as those shown
in Figure 19-3, appear.
3. Explore the results by clicking various links in the
Search Results. These links offer a few different types
of results:
• Clicking a link with a right-pointing triangle displays
steps or additional information.
• Clicking a link with a green arrow next to it performs
an action, such as opening a dialog box.
• Clicking a See Also link at the bottom of the search
results takes you to a help topic.
Figure 19-3: The result of a search for the keyword joystick
• In some search results, an article is displayed with an
index of topics titled In This Article (see Figure 19-4).
4. If you have no luck, enter a different search term in the
Search text box and start again.
If you don’t find what you need with Search, consider clicking the
Browse Help button in the top right of the Help and Support window
(it sports a little blue icon in the shape of a book) to display a list
of major topics. Those topics may also give you some ideas for good
search terms to continue your search.
Figure 19-4: An article displayed from a search
➟
191
Chapter 19: Getting Help
Post a Question in Windows
Communities
1. Open the Help and Support Center. Then, in the Ask
Someone section of the main help page, click the
Windows Communities link.
2. In the Microsoft Windows Vista Newsgroups page that
opens in your browser (see Figure 19-5), enter a keyword
in the Search For field. Then, from the In drop-down
list, choose which newsgroup to search in.
3. In the resulting Search Results page, click to display a
list of all replies under it. Click an item to display it in
the lower pane (see Figure 19-6).
4. Perform any of the following actions to participate in
the newsgroup. (Note: You have to click Sign In and
enter your Microsoft Passport information to participate
in the discussion.)
Figure 19-5: The Windows Vista Newsgroup page
• Update your profile. Click the Edit My Profile button to enter your display name and any other information you want to appear about you when you post
a message.
• Post a new message. Choose New➪Question, select
the discussion group to participate in, and then enter
the Subject and Message in their respective text boxes.
Click to accept the terms of use, and then click Post
to post your question.
• Reply to a message in a discussion. With the list of
postings and replies displayed, click the Reply button,
fill in the message, and then click Post.
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192
You can also use the Search feature to search for keywords or
phrases in discussions. Enter a word or phrase in the Search text
box, select a discussion to search in the In drop-down list, and then
click Go. Relevant messages are displayed; click one to read it.
Figure 19-6: A newsgroup discussion page
Access Windows Online Help
Access Windows Online Help
1. Open the Help and Support Center and then click the
Windows Online Help icon.
2. In the window that appears (see Figure 19-7), you can
use links and icons to access the following features:
• Click a Find Answers icon to find support in categories such as Hardware and Drivers, Printing, and
Networking (see Figure 19-8).
• Use the links in the Expert Advice section to read
articles and frequently asked questions about common help topics.
• Click the Get Answers from Other Windows users
link to access Windows Vista Newsgroups. (See the
preceding task for information about posting messages in these online communities.)
Figure 19-7: The Windows Vista Online Help page
3. Click the Close button to close the online help window
in your browser, and then click the Close button to
close Windows Help and Support.
To set up Help and Support to always Get Online Help, click the
arrow on the Online Help button in the bottom-right corner of the
Help and Support window, choose Settings, and be sure the check
box labelled Include Windows Online Help and Support When You
Search for Help is selected.
Figure 19-8: The Printing category of online help topics
➟
193
Chapter 19: Getting Help
Connect to Remote Assistance
1. First enable Remote Assistance by choosing Start➪
Control Panel➪System and Maintenance➪System➪
Remote Settings. On the Remote tab, select the Allow
Remote Assistance Connections to this Computer check
box, and then click OK.
2. Open the Help and Support Center. Click the Windows
Remote Assistance link in the Ask Someone area of the
Help and Support Center.
3. On the Windows Remote Assistance page, as shown in
Figure 19-9, click the Invite Someone You Trust to Help
You link. On the page that appears, you can notify
somebody that you want help.
4. You can use Windows Messenger or e-mail to invite
Figure 19-9: The Windows Remote Assistance page
somebody to help you. For these steps, click Use E-mail
to Send an Invitation.
5. Enter and retype a password and click Next. Your default
e-mail program opens with an invitation message prepared. Fill in an e-mail address and, if you like, a personal
message at the end of the automatically generated invitation. (For example, you might want to provide the
password you assigned here.) Click Send.
6. In the resulting Windows Remote Assistance window, as
shown in Figure 19-10, when an incoming connection is
made, use the tools here to adjust settings, chat, send a
file, or pause, cancel, or stop sharing.
7. When you’re finished, click the Close button to close
the Windows Remote Assistance window.
➟
194
Figure 19-10: Tools to control a Remote Assistance session
Setting a time limit to not more than a few hours is a good idea. After
all, you don’t want somebody trying to log on to your computer unexpectedly two weeks from now when you’ve already solved the problem
some other way.
Remember that it’s up to you to let the recipient know the password — it
isn’t included in your e-mail unless you add it. Although using a password
used to be optional in Windows XP, it’s mandatory in Windows Vista, and
the password you use must be at least six characters long.
Change Help and Support Center Display Options
Change Help and Support
Center Display Options
1. Open the Help and Support Center.
2. Choose Options➪Text Size and then choose one of the
text size options: Largest, Larger, Medium (the default),
Smaller, or Smallest (see Figure 19-11).
3. Your new settings take effect immediately; click the
Close button or navigate to another area of the Help
and Support Center.
If you don’t like the colors in your Help and Support screen you can
change them by choosing a different color scheme in the Control
Panel, Appearance and Personalization settings.
Don’t forget that you can reduce the size of the display by clicking
the Restore Down button in the upper-right corner of the window.
This is especially useful with the Help window so you can display it
side by side with an application or Control Panel window where
you’re trying to troubleshoot the described help topic.
Figure 19-11: The Help and Support Center Options menu
➟
195
Chapter 19: Getting Help
Contact Microsoft Customer Support
1. Go to the Help and Support window and click the Ask
button in the upper-right corner. On the page that
appears, as shown in Figure 19-12, click Windows
Communities to post a question online.
2. Click the Microsoft Customer Support link for help with
so-called “non-technical” issues, such as subscriptions,
events, or training. The Contact Us Web page shown in
Figure 19-13 appears.
Typically, you can call support for two free help sessions or unlimited
installation support by submitting a request via e-mail support or
calling 866-234-6020. You can get paid phone support for $35 per
request by calling 800-936-5700, or advanced support for $245 by
calling 800-936-4900. Advanced support is for what Microsoft refers
to as mission critical issues, dealing with software deployment across
an enterprise or larger network issues.
Figure 19-12: The Microsoft Customer Support link
There is also a live chat support feature through customer support.
This is sometimes the quickest way to get somebody’s attention, and
you get the same two free support calls and unlimited installation
support. If your product wasn’t purchased as a separate package but
through a licensing sale or bundled on a new computer, you have to
follow specific instructions on the Customer Support Web page to get
product support.
➟
196
Figure 19-13: A variety of customer support options on the Contact Us Web page
Part VII
Fun and Games
Chapter 20: Playing Games in Windows Vista . . . . .199
Play Solitaire ..........................................................200
Play FreeCell...........................................................201
Play Spider Solitaire...............................................202
Play Minesweeper ..................................................203
Play Purble Place ...................................................204
Play Hearts .............................................................205
Add a USB Joystick to Your Computer.................206
Chapter 21: Playing Music in Windows Vista . . . . .207
Set Up Speakers .....................................................208
Adjust Volume........................................................209
Create a Playlist ......................................................210
Burn Music to a CD/DVD ......................................211
Rip Music from a CD/DVD ...................................212
Play Music ..............................................................213
Set Up Your Default Online Stores .......................214
Sync to a Portable Device ......................................215
Chapter 22: Working with Photos in Photo Gallery . . .217
View a Digital Image in the
Windows Photo Gallery ......................................218
Add a Tag to a Photo .............................................219
Organize Photos by Date ......................................220
Play a Slide Show ...................................................221
E-Mail a Photo .......................................................222
Fix a Photo .............................................................223
Burn a Photo to a CD or DVD .............................224
Playing Games in
Windows Vista
A
ll work and no play is just wrong no matter how you look at it.
So, Microsoft has built plenty of games into Windows Vista to keep
you amused.
Many computer games are essentially virtual versions of games that you
already know, such as Solitaire and Chess. But Windows Vista has added
some interesting treats to the mix — several that depend to a great extent
on some neat onscreen animation.
Altogether, you can access nine games through Windows, and this chapter
gives you a sampling of the best of them. Here’s what you can expect:
➟
➟
Traditional card games, such as Solitaire and Hearts.
➟
A game that’s great for small children — Purble Place — where the
object is to place features on a cartoon character’s face that match up.
Games of dexterity, such as Minesweeper, where the goal is to be the
fastest, smartest clicker in the West.
This chapter also covers setting up a gaming joystick as well as selecting a
game rating system that allows you to pick and choose the games you want
your family to play.
➟
Chapter
20
Get ready to . . .
➟ Play Solitaire ..........................................200
➟ Play FreeCell ..........................................201
➟ Play Spider Solitaire ................................202
➟ Play Minesweeper....................................203
➟ Play Purble Place ....................................204
➟ Play Hearts..............................................205
➟ Add a USB Joystick to Your Computer ......206
Chapter 20: Playing Games in Windows Vista
Play Solitaire
1. Choose Start➪Games. In the resulting Games window,
(see Figure 20-1), double-click Solitaire.
2. In the resulting Solitaire window, click a card (see
Figure 20-2) and then click a card in another deck that
you want to move it on top of. The first card you click
moves.
3. When playing the game, you have the following options:
• If no moves are available, click the stack of cards in
the upper-left corner to deal another round of cards.
• If you move the last card from one of the six laid-out
stacks, leaving only face-down cards, click the facedown cards to flip one up. You can also move a King
onto any empty stack.
Figure 20-1: The Games window
• When you reach the end of the stack of cards in the
upper-left corner, click them again to redeal the cards
that you didn’t use the first time.
• You can play a card in one of two places: either
building a stack from King to Ace on the bottom row,
alternating suits; or starting from Ace in any of the
top four slots, placing cards from Ace to King in a
single suit.
• When you complete a set of cards (Ace to King), click
the top card and then click one of the four blank
deck spots at the top-right of the window. If you
complete all four sets, you win.
4. To deal a new game, choose Game➪New Game. Unlike
life, it’s easy to start over with Solitaire!
5. To close Solitaire, click the Close button.
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200
Figure 20-2: The Solitaire game window
Play FreeCell
Play FreeCell
1. Choose Start➪Games; in the Games window, double-
click FreeCell.
2. In the resulting FreeCell window, as shown in Figure 20-3,
a game is ready to play. If you want a fresh game, you
can always choose Game➪New Game; a new game is
dealt and ready to play.
The goal is to move all the cards, grouped by the four suits, to the
home cells (the four cells in the upper-right corner) stacked in order
from Ace at the bottom to King at the top. The trick here is that you
get four free cells (the four cells in the upper-left corner) where you
can manually move a card out of the way to free up a move. You
can also use those four slots to allow you to move up to four cards
in a stack at once. (For example, if you want to move a Jack, 10, 9,
and 8 all together onto a Queen.) You can move only as many cards
as there are free cells available plus one. Free spaces in the rows of
card stacks also act as free cells. You win when you have four stacks
of cards for each of the four suits placed on the home cells.
Figure 20-3: A new FreeCell game
3. Click a card; to move it, click a free cell or another card
at the bottom of a column. Figure 20-4 shows a game
where two free cells are already occupied.
If you move a card to a free cell, you can move it back to the bottom of a column, but only on a card one higher in an alternate
color. You could move a 3 of hearts to a 4 of spades, for example.
You stack the cards in the columns in alternating colors, but the
cards in the home cells end up in order and all in one suit.
If you get hooked on this game, try going to www.
freecell.com, a Web site devoted to FreeCell. Here
you can engage in live games with other players, read more about
the rules and strategies, and even buy FreeCell merchandise. Don’t
say I didn’t warn you about the possibility of addiction.
Figure 20-4: Occupied cells
➟
201
Chapter 20: Playing Games in Windows Vista
Play Spider Solitaire
1. Choose Start➪Games; in the Games window, double-click
Spider Solitaire. A window appears where you can click
the level of difficulty you prefer.
2. In the resulting window, click a card and click another
card or drag it to the bottom of another stack or to an
empty stack so that you match the same suit in each
stack, moving in descending order from King to Ace
(see Figure 20-5).
3. Move a card to automatically turn over a new card in
the stack.
4. After you complete a set of cards in a suit, those cards
are moved off the game area. The goal is to remove all
the cards in the fewest moves. You can
• Deal a new set of cards. Choose Game➪New Game
or click the stack of cards in the bottom-right corner
to deal a new set of cards. (Note: You have to have a
card on each of the ten stacks before you can deal
new ones.)
Figure 20-5: The Spider Solitaire game window
• Save your game. Choose Game➪Exit and then click
Save in the Exit Game dialog box to save your game.
• Change the options. Choose Game➪Options (see
Figure 20-6) and select a new difficulty level. Other
options mainly affect how or whether you save games
and open them to continue, and whether the variously annoying or angelic sounds play when you
click a card, deal a card, or fold a stack (assuming
your computer system is set up with a sound card
and speakers).
5. When you finish playing, click the Close button and either
➟
202
click Save or Don’t Save in the Exit Game dialog box.
Figure 20-6: The Spider Options dialog box
Stuck for a move? Try choosing Game➪Hint. Various combinations of
cards are highlighted in sequence to suggest a likely next step in the
game. If you’re not stuck but just bored with the appearance of the
game, choose Game➪Change Appearance and select another desktop
and background style.
Play Minesweeper
Play Minesweeper
1. Choose Start➪Games; in the Games window, double-
click Minesweeper. A window appears where you can
click the level of difficulty you prefer.
2. The Minesweeper game board opens (see Figure 20-7).
Click a square on the board, and a timer starts counting
the seconds of your game.
• If you click a square and a number appears, the
number tells you how many mines are within the
eight squares surrounding that square; if it remains
blank, there are no mines within the eight squares
surrounding it.
Figure 20-7: A new Minesweeper game
• If you click a square and a bomb appears, all the hidden bombs are exposed (see Figure 20-8), and the
game is over.
• Right-click a square once to place a flag on it marking
it as a mine. Right-click a square twice to place a
question mark on it if you think it might contain
a bomb to warn yourself to stay away for now.
3. To begin a new game, choose Game➪New Game. In the
New Game dialog box, click Quit and Start a New Game.
If you want to play a game with the same settings as the
previous one, click Restart This Game.
4. You can set several game options through the Game menu:
• To change the expertise required, choose Game➪
Options and then choose Beginner, Intermediate, or
Advanced.
• To change the color of the playing board choose
Game➪Change Appearance.
• If you want to see how many games you’ve won, your
longest winning or losing streak and more, choose
Game➪Statistics.
5. To end the game, click the Close button.
Figure 20-8: You lose!
If you want a bigger game board (more squares, more bombs, more fun)
choose Game➪Options and then click Custom and specify the number
of squares across, down, and the number of bombs hidden within them.
➟
203
Chapter 20: Playing Games in Windows Vista
Play Purble Place
1. Choose Start➪Games; double-click Purble Place.
Purble Place is actually made up of three games: Comfy Cakes,
Purble Shop, and Purble Pairs. All are aimed at younger children to
help them learn to match things, and all offer easy to follow popup instructions.
2. In the resulting Purble Place window (see Figure 20-9),
click one of three items to begin a game:
• The schoolhouse opens Purble Pairs, where you click
two squares at a time, trying to find pairs of items.
• The bakery displays Comfy Cakes, where you assemble a cake to match the picture.
• The Purble Shop contains a little character for whom
you have to select eyes, nose, and mouth that match.
Figure 20-9: The Purble Place main menu
3. In the game window (Figure 20-10 shows Comfy Cakes),
follow the onscreen instructions to make selections.
In Comfy Cakes, for example, click a cake shape and
then click the large green arrow button on the screen to
move the cake to the next station. Choose icing and decorations that match the picture of the cake on the TV.
4. To return to the main menu, choose Game➪Main Menu.
To exit the game entirely, click the Close button.
There’s a shortcut in each game window to get back to the main menu.
Click the little building icons (shop, school, and home) that are surrounded by a green arrow.
➟
204
Figure 20-10: The Comfy Cakes game
Play Hearts
Play Hearts
1. Choose Start➪Games and double-click Hearts. If you’ve
never played before, you’ll see a Microsoft Hearts
Network dialog box; enter your name and click OK.
2. In the resulting Hearts window, as shown in Figure 20-11,
your hand is displayed while others are hidden. Begin
play by clicking three cards to pass to your opponent,
and then clicking the Pass Left button.
3. Each player moving clockwise around the window plays
a card of the same suit by clicking it. The one who plays
the highest card of the suit in play wins the trick. (A trick
is the cards you collect when you play the highest card
of the suit.)
4. Choose Game➪Options to change the settings shown in
Figure 20-12. You can rename the other three players,
play sounds, show tips, or specify how to save a game.
Figure 20-11: The Hearts window with three cards ready to be passed
5. To end the game, choose Game➪Exit or click the Close
button.
Check out the menus in the Games window for organizing and customizing the various games that Windows Vista makes available
and to set Parental Controls.
Figure 20-12: The Hearts Options dialog box
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205
Chapter 20: Playing Games in Windows Vista
Add a USB Joystick
to Your Computer
1. To connect a USB joystick or other type of game con-
troller, simply plug it into a USB port on your computer.
Connect to a game port by plugging the device into the
port you want to use on your computer. Windows Vista
should recognize it and install it automatically.
2. If your device isn’t recognized automatically, continue
with the following steps.
3. Choose Start➪Games➪Tools➪Input Devices.
Figure 20-13: The Game Controllers dialog box
4. In the resulting Game Controllers dialog box, as shown in
Figure 20-13, click Add.
5. In the resulting list of controllers (see Figure 20-14), click
the one that you plugged in and then click OK twice.
If your device controller isn’t listed in the Game Controller dialog box,
insert the installation disk/c that came with it and follow directions
to install it. If you don’t have an installation disk/c, either the device
manual or the manufacturer’s Web site might indicate that there’s
a compatible driver that’s already installed with Windows that you
could use, so follow Step 5 to select that driver. Alternatively, you
can click the Custom button, make selections there, and let Windows
select a likely driver. One final option: The manufacturer might offer
a downloadable version of the driver on its Web site.
➟
206
Figure 20-14: The list of available game controllers
Playing Music in
Windows Vista
➟
Chapter
W
ho doesn’t love music? It sets our toes tapping and puts a song in our
hearts. It’s the perfect accompaniment to spice up the drudgery of
working on a computer for hours on end, so wouldn’t it be great if you could
play music right at your desk without having to take up valuable desktop
space with a CD player or even an iPod?
Good news: You might not realize it, but your Windows Vista computer is a
lean, mean, music machine. With a sound card installed and speakers
attached, it’s a hi-tech desktop boombox that can play sound files and
CD/DVDs. Using Windows media programs, you can create playlists and
even burn music tracks to a CD/DVD or sync to your portable device to
download music to it.
The ins and outs of music on your computer, which you discover in this
chapter, include
➟
Getting your computer ready for listening by setting up your speakers
and adjusting the volume.
➟
➟
➟
Downloading music from the Internet or a CD/DVD and playing it.
Managing your music by creating playlists of tracks you download.
Burning tracks to CD/DVD or syncing to download music to portable
devices so you and your music can hit the road.
Get ready to . . .
21
➟ Set Up Speakers ......................................208
➟ Adjust Volume..........................................209
➟ Create a Playlist ......................................210
➟ Burn Music to a CD/DVD..........................211
➟ Rip Music from a CD/DVD........................212
➟ Play Music ..............................................213
➟ Set Up Your Default Online Stores ............214
➟ Sync to a Portable Device ........................215
Chapter 21: Playing Music in Windows Vista
Set Up Speakers
1. Attach speakers to your computer by plugging them into
the appropriate connection (often labeled with a little
megaphone or speaker symbol) on your CPU, laptop,
or monitor.
2. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Hardware and Sound;
then click the Manage Audio Devices link (under
Sound).
3. In the resulting Audio Devices dialog box (see Figure
21-1), double-click the Speakers item.
4. In the resulting Speakers dialog box, click the Levels tab,
as shown in Figure 21-2, and then use the Speakers slider
to adjust the speaker volume. Note: If there is a small red
x on the speaker button, click it to activate the speakers.
Figure 21-1: The Audio Devices dialog box
5. Click the Balance button. In the resulting Balance dialog
box, use the L(eft) and R(ight) sliders to adjust the balance of sounds between the two speakers.
6. Click OK three times to close all the open dialog boxes
and save the new settings.
You can test your speakers. On the Advanced tab of the Speakers
dialog box, choose your speaker configuration and then click the
Test button. This tests first one speaker and then the other to help
you pinpoint whether one of your speakers is having problems or
whether you should adjust the balance between the speakers for
better sound.
Figure 21-2: The Speakers dialog box
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208
Adjust Volume
Adjust Volume
1. Choose Start➪Control Panel➪Hardware and Sound.
2. Click the Adjust System Volume link under Sound to dis-
play the Volume dialog box (as shown in Figure 21-3).
3. Make any of the following settings:
• Move the Device volume slider to adjust the main
system volume up and down.
• For sounds played by Windows, adjust the volume by
moving the Applications slider.
• To mute either main or application volume, click the
speaker icon beneath either slider so that a red symbol appears.
4. Click the Close button twice.
Figure 21-3: The Volume dialog box
Today many keyboards include volume controls and a mute button to
control sounds from your computer. Some even include buttons to play,
pause, and stop audio playback. Having these buttons and other controls at your fingertips can be worth a little extra in the price of your
keyboard.
Here’s a handy shortcut for quickly adjusting the volume of your
default sound device. Click the Volume button (which looks like a
little gray speaker) in the System Tray. To adjust the volume, use the
slider on the Volume pop-up that appears, or select the Mute check
box to turn off sounds temporarily.
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Chapter 21: Playing Music in Windows Vista
Create a Playlist
1. Choose Start➪All Programs➪Windows Media Player.
2. Click the Library tab and then click Create Playlist at the
left under the Playlists item. The Create Playlist label
disappears, and a text box opens in its place; enter a
playlist title there and then click outside it. A blank
playlist appears in the List pane on the right.
3. Click a library in the left pane of the Media Library, and
the library contents appear (see Figure 21-4). Click an
item and then drag it to the new playlist. Repeat this
step to locate additional titles to add to the playlist.
4. When you finish adding titles, click Save Playlist. To play
a playlist, click it in the Library pane and then click the
Play button.
5. You can manage the list by right-clicking it and choosing
Figure 21-4: Building a playlist in the List pane
Edit in List Pane. Click the arrow next to the playlist
title and use the drop-down menu commands (see
Figure 21-5) to do tasks, such as
• Choose Sort to sort the playlist by title, artists, release
date, and so on.
• Choose Shuffle List Now to randomly reorganize the
titles to play in a different order.
• Choose Rename Playlist to give it a different name.
• Choose Skipped Items to indicate how to deal with
tracks you have skipped.
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210
You can also right-click a playlist in the Library pane and choose
Play to play it or choose Delete to delete the list, though the original tracks that make up the list still exist.
Figure 21-5: The menu for editing a
playlist
Burn Music to a CD/DVD
Burn Music to a CD/DVD
1. Insert a blank CD or DVD suitable for storing audio
files in your computer CD/DVD-RW drive.
2. Open the Windows Media Player, click the Library or
Burn button, and then click one more albums or
playlists to play and drag them to the Burn pane
(see Figure 21-6).
3. Click Start Burn. Windows Media Player begins to burn
the items to the disc. The Status column for the first
song title reads Writing to Disc and changes to
Complete when the track is copied.
4. When the burn is complete, your disc is ejected
(although you can change this option by choosing
Burn➪Eject Disc After Burning to deselect it).
If you swap music online through various music-sharing services and
then copy them to CD/DVD and pass them around to your friends,
always do a virus check on the files before handing them off. Also,
be sure you have the legal right to download and swap music with
others.
Figure 21-6: Music displayed in the Burn pane waiting to be copied
Note that DVDs come in different types, including DVD+, DVD- and
DVD+/-. You must be sure your DVD drive is compatible with the
disc type you are using or you cannot burn the DVD successfully.
Check the packaging for the format before you buy!
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Chapter 21: Playing Music in Windows Vista
Rip Music from a CD/DVD
1. Insert an audio CD/DVD in your computer’s CD/DVD-RW
drive.
2. Open the Windows Media Player, click the Library tab,
and then click an album or playlist to open it.
3. Click the Rip tab. The titles on the currently open item
are automatically ripped (copied) to the open library.
If there is a track you don’t want to copy, mark its check
box in the Rip window (see Figure 21-7).
4. When the rip is complete, the titles appear in the
playlist in the Library window.
You can click the arrow on the Rip tab button to view a menu of
options. By using this, you can modify when a rip occurs (when in
the Rip tab, never, or always), the format and bit rate, and whether
to eject the CD/DVD after ripping.
Windows Media Player offers a few different formats for ripping.
For example, Windows Media Audio offers you a smaller file size and
good audio quality. Windows Media Audio Lossless provides better
quality at the cost of a larger file size. Other choices include MP3 and
WAV. To change this setting click the arrow under the Rip button and
choose Format and click on an option in the menu that appears.
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212
Figure 21-7: A playlist displayed in the List pane
Play Music
Play Music
1. Choose Start➪All Programs➪Accessories➪Windows
Media Player.
2. Click the Library tab to display the library shown in
Figure 21-8. Click an album or playlist to open it; the
titles of the songs are displayed in the right pane.
3. Use the buttons on the bottom of the Player window
(as shown in Figure 21-9) to do the following:
• Click a track, and then click the Play button to play it.
• Click the Stop button to stop playback.
• Click the Next or Previous button to move to the next
or previous track in an album or playlist.
• Use the Mute and Volume controls to pump the
sound up or down without having to modify the
Windows volume settings.
Tired of the order in which your tracks play? You can use the Turn
Shuffle On button on the far left of the playback controls to have
Windows Media Player move around the tracks on your album randomly. Click this button again to turn the shuffle feature off.
Figure 21-8: A selected album or playlist
Figure 21-9: The playback tools
To jump to another track, rather than using the Next and Previous
buttons you can click a track in the track list in the Media Player
window. This can be much quicker if you want to jump several
tracks ahead or behind of the currently playing track.
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Chapter 21: Playing Music in Windows Vista
Set Up Your Default Online Stores
1. Choose Start➪All Programs➪Accessories➪Windows
Media Player.
2. Choose Online Stores➪>Browse All Online Stores. Note:
If you’ve set up a default online store, the Online Stores
button displays that store’s name.
3. In the resulting window displaying a choice of online
stores (see Figure 21-10), click a category in the list on
the left and then click a store. A message appears confirming that you want to go to this store. Click Yes.
This store is now your default store in this category,
and its name is displayed on the Online Stores button.
4. In the resulting store Web site, follow that site’s proce-
dure to browse or make purchases.
5. When you finish shopping, click any of the tabs in
Media Player to close the online store and return to
using Media Player.
If you’ve set up a store in more than one category, whichever store
you visited last is displayed on the Online Stores button. To easily
switch to another store, click the arrow on the Online Stores button
and choose Add Current Service to Menu. Now you can quickly go
to that store by choosing it from the menu.
To display a media guide that covers movies, music, radio stations,
and even cartoons, click the arrow on the Online Stores button and
choose Media Guide. This takes you to www.windows
media.com, with news, links, free skins, device reviews,
and more.
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Figure 21-10: A variety of stores to choose from
Sync to a Portable Device
Sync to a Portable Device
1. Open Windows Media Player and connect your device
to your computer.
2. A Sync List pane appears on the right. Click and drag
items in your library you want to sync to your device
into the Sync pane (see Figure 21-11).
3. Click Start Sync. The Sync status shows in Media Player.
When it’s done, all items will show as Synchronized to
Device (see Figure 21-12).
To sync to another connected device, just click the Next Device link
in the Sync pane, build your sync list by clicking and dragging items
to the pane, and click Start Sync again.
If you have trouble syncing to your device, be sure to check the
device user manual. With new types of devices coming out all the
time, some may be configured differently and need to be set up to
work with your computer and Windows Vista.
Figure 21-11: The Sync List pane
Figure 21-12: Windows Media Player in the process of syncing to a device
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Chapter 21: Playing Music in Windows Vista
➟
216
Working with Photos
in Photo Gallery
A
picture is worth a thousand words, and that’s probably why everybody
is in on the digital image craze. Most people today have access to a digital camera (even if only on their cellphones) and have started manipulating
and swapping photos like crazy, both online and off.
Although Chapter 4 gives you a quick peek at how to view images in the
Photo Gallery, there’s much more to this feature of Windows Vista than that.
In this chapter, you discover how to
➟
➟
➟
View your photos and run a slide show of them.
➟
Fix a photo by adjusting its exposure or color, or cropping it to focus
on the part of the image you like best.
Work with tags to help you organize and search through photos.
E-mail a photo to others or burn photos to a CD or DVD to pass
around to your friends.
➟
Chapter
22
Get ready to . . .
➟ View a Digital Image in the
Windows Photo Gallery ............................218
➟ Add a Tag to a Photo ..............................219
➟ Organize Photos by Date ........................220
➟ Play a Slide Show ....................................221
➟ E-Mail a Photo ........................................222
➟ Fix a Photo..............................................223
➟ Burn a Photo to a CD or DVD ..................224
Chapter 22: Working with Photos in Photo Gallery
View a Digital Image in the
Windows Photo Gallery
1. Choose Start➪All Programs➪Windows Photo Gallery.
2. In the resulting Windows Photo Gallery window, as
shown in Figure 22-1, click any of the items in the
Navigation pane on the left to choose which images to
display (such as those taken in a certain year or saved in
a certain folder).
3. Double-click an image to display it. Then you can use the
tools at the bottom of the window (see Figure 22-2) to
do any of the following:
• The Next and Previous icons move to a previous or
following image in the same folder.
Figure 22-1: The Windows Photo Gallery
• The Display Size icon displays a slider you can click
and drag to change the size of the image thumbnails.
• The Delete button deletes the selected image.
• The Rotate Clockwise and Rotate Counterclockwise
icons spin the image 90 degrees at a time.
4. When you finish viewing images, click the Close button
in the top-right corner to close the Photo Gallery.
If you add additional photos to the Photo Gallery, click the arrow on
the Choose a Thumbnail View (to the left of the Search box) and
choose Refresh. All photos will be reshuffled into applicable categories.
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218
Figure 22-2: The tools you can use to manipulate images
Add a Tag to a Photo
Add a Tag to a Photo
1. To create a new tag, click the Create a New Tag item
in the Navigation pane. The box opens for editing.
Type a tag name and then click anywhere outside it.
2. Click a file to select it.
3. Click the Info button. All tags associated with the
photo appear on the right of the gallery window
(see Figure 22-3).
4. Click Add Tags, begin to type a tag name, and choose it
from the drop-down list that appears (see Figure 22-4).
Press Enter to add the tag, which then appears in the list
of tags associated with that photo.
5. To see all photos associated with a certain tag, click the
tag in the Tags list in the Navigation pane.
Figure 22-3: Information about a photo’s associated tags
To delete a tag, right-click the tag in the Navigation pane and choose
Delete. To rename a tag, right-click it and choose Rename.
To see a list of all photos in the Photo Gallery organized by tags, click
the Tags item in Navigation pane. Categories appear in the Photo
Gallery window with a note of the total items with that associated tag.
Figure 22-4: Adding a tag to a photo
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Chapter 22: Working with Photos in Photo Gallery
Organize Photos by Date
1. Click a month or date in the Date Taken section of
Navigation pane. Photos taken in that timeframe are
displayed (see Figure 22-5).
2. Right-click a photo and choose Properties.
3. On the Details tab of the Properties dialog box that
appears (see Figure 22-6), click the Date Taken field and
adjust the date by typing a new one, or click the calendar
icon and choose a new date from the pop-up calendar.
4. Click OK. The photo is now in the newly selected date’s
folder.
Another way to organize photos is to rate them by whatever criteria
you want. When you assign a rating to your photos, you can then
view them by using the Ratings category in the list on the left. To add
a rating to a photo, select it and then click the Info button. Click the
chosen star for the rating number; that is, if you want to rate a photo
a 3, click the third star from the left.
Figure 22-5: The contents of a Date Taken folder
You can also change other properties of a photo or video in the
Properties dialog box. For example, you can change the title, subject, rating, author, date acquired, and copyright. If you’re serious
about your photography, you can even add information about camera make, model, lenses, and aperture settings here.
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220
Figure 22-6: The Properties dialog box
Play a Slide Show
Play a Slide Show
1. With the Photo Gallery open, click the set of slides
you’d like to use for the slide show from the
Navigation pane.
2. Click the Play Slide Show button, as shown in Figure
22-7. The slide show begins to play.
3. Slides proceed at a preset speed. You can change
this speed by right-clicking your screen and choosing Slide Show Speed Slow, Medium, or Fast (see
Figure 22-8).
4. To move more quickly to the next or previous slide,
press the right- or left-arrow key on your keyboard.
5. To pause the show, right-click and choose Pause.
6. To end the show, press Esc on your keyboard.
Figure 22-7: Choosing the slides to include in your show
If you want to create a custom show, you can create a new tag,
assign it to the photos you want to be in the show, and then choose
that tag in the Navigation pane before running the show. See the
earlier task, “Add a Tag to a Photo,” for more about how to do this.
Figure 22-8: The shortcut menu for controlling a show in progress
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221
Chapter 22: Working with Photos in Photo Gallery
E-Mail a Photo
1. With the Photo Gallery open and the item you want
to e-mail selected, click the E-mail button.
2. In the Attach Files dialog box that appears (see
Figure 22-9), change the photo size by clicking the
Picture Size drop-down arrow and choosing another
size from the list.
Figure 22-9: The Attach Files dialog box
3. Click Attach. An e-mail form from your default e-mail
application appears with your photo attached (see
Figure 22-10).
4. Fill out the e-mail form with an addressee, subject, and
message (if you wish), and then click Send.
Choose smaller size photos to attach to an e-mail because graphic
files can be rather big. You might encounter problems sending larger
files, or others might have trouble receiving them. Using a smaller
size is especially important if you are sending multiple images. Note
that although you can send a video file as an e-mail attachment, you
can’t resize it; video files make photo files look tiny by comparison,
so it’s probably better to send one at a time, if at all.
You can also open an e-mail form first. Then, with the Photo Gallery
open, click and drag a photo to your e-mail. This method attaches
the original file size to the message.
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222
Figure 22-10: An e-mail message with an image attached
Fix a Photo
Fix a Photo
1. With the Photo Gallery open, display a photo by locating
it with the Navigation pane; then click the thumbnail to
select it.
2. Click the Fix button. The Fix window appears, as shown in
Figure 22-11. Click Auto Adjust to let Photo Gallery fix the
photo, or use any of these tools (click the tool name once
to display options and click it again to close that tool):
• Click Adjust Exposure and use the sliders to adjust
brightness and contrast.
• Click Adjust Color and use the sliders (see
Figure 22-12) to adjust temperature, tint, and
saturation.
• Click Crop Picture and use the handles on the rectangle that appears to enlarge or shrink the area on
the photo to be cropped, or click the rectangle and
drag it around your picture to crop to another location on it. Click the Apply button to apply the cropping. When you click the Apply button, it applies and
saves the change.
Figure 22-11: The Fix window
• If your picture contains a face with red, glowing eyes,
click the Fix Red Eye tool and then click and drag
around the eye you want to fix in your image to
adjust it.
3. You can use the navigation tools at the bottom to zoom
in or out, fit the image to the window, move to the next
image, undo or redo actions, or delete the picture. When
you’re finished, click the Back to Gallery button.
The Undo feature in this window allows you to pick the action you
want to undo, unlike many Undo features that force you to undo all
the actions leading back to the action you want to undo. Click the
arrow on the Undo item under the tools, rather than on the set of
buttons along the bottom, to use this feature.
Figure 22-12: The Adjust Color tools
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223
Chapter 22: Working with Photos in Photo Gallery
Burn a Photo to a CD or DVD
1. Insert a writable CD or DVD disc into your disc drive.
2. With the Photo Gallery open, display a photo by locating
it with the Navigation pane and then clicking the thumbnail to select it. To select additional images, hold Ctrl
while clicking additional images.
3. Click the Burn button and then choose Data Disc.
4. In the resulting Burn a Disc dialog box (see Figure 22-13),
enter a disc title and click then Next to accept the
Mastered format, which is readable on most computers.
Figure 22-13: The Burn a Disc dialog box
5. In the Windows Explorer window that appears for your
disc drive (see Figure 22-14), click the Burn to Disc button to proceed.
6. The Burn a Disc window appears. If you wish, modify
the disc title or adjust the recording speed and then
click Next. A progress bar appears.
7. When the files have been burned to the disc, a confirm-
ing dialog box appears, and your disc drawer opens.
Click Finish to complete the process and close the
wizard.
In the confirmation dialog box that appears in Step 6, you can select
the Yes, Burn These Files to Another Disc check box if you want to
make another copy of the same files.
Figure 22-14: Images ready to be burned to a disc
➟
224
➟
Index
•A•
accessibility. See Ease of Access features
accounts. See user accounts
Address Book, 94
Administrative Tools window, 118, 188
Administrator accounts, 154
Appearance Settings dialog box, 134
applications. See also software; Windows Vista
arranging windows, 18
AutoSave feature, 184
built-in
Calendar, 35, 42
Contacts, 35, 40
Paint, 35, 37
Photo Gallery, 35, 38–39
Snipping Tool, 35, 41
WordPad, 35, 36
closing, 20
hiding open windows, 10
launching, 16
moving information between, 18
opening files with different, 24
overview, 15
removing, 22
resizing windows, 17, 18
saving changes, 20
setting defaults, 21
starting automatically, 19
switching between running, 17
attachments, e-mail, 88, 89
audio. See sound; music
Audio Description feature, 138
Audio Devices dialog box, 208
Auto Adjust tool, 223
Auto Arrange feature, 10
AutoSave feature, 184
•B•
backgrounds, desktop, 131
backing up
before reformatting drives, 183, 188
files to CD/DVD, 165, 166
system files/settings, 186–187
browsers. See Internet Explorer
business vCards, 88
•C•
Calculator gadget, 43, 48
Calendar program, 35, 42
calling card options, 104
Windows Vista Just the Steps For Dummies
➟
226
CD/DVD
backing up files to, 165, 166
burning music to, 211
burning photos to, 224
ripping music from, 212
cell phone infrared connections, 105
color
adjusting in photos, 223
desktop quality options, 130
desktop schemes, 134
compatibility issues, 176, 183
compressing files, 32
Computer Management window, 118, 188
Computer Name/Domain Changes dialog box, 125
Computer window, 25
computers. See also hardware; mobile computing;
networks
faxing from, 102
locking, 7
maintenance tasks
backing up files to CD/DVD, 165, 166
defragmenting hard drives, 165, 167
deleting cookies, 165, 170
deleting temporary Internet files, 165, 169
freeing up disk space, 168
overview, 165
scheduling, 171
monitoring CPU and memory usage, 53
opening up cases, 116, 120
rebooting, 13, 180, 185
shutting down, 13, 180
contacts, 35, 40, 94
Content Advisor dialog box, 79
cookies, 158, 165, 170
CPU cases, opening, 116, 120
CPU Meter gadget, 43, 53
cropping pictures, 223
Ctrl+Alt+Del shortcut, 13, 184
Currency Conversion gadget, 43, 50
cursor options, 144, 145
•D•
date and time settings, 9
defragmenting hard drives, 165, 167
desktop. See also Ease of Access features; Windows
Sidebar
customizing
backgrounds, 131
color quality, 130
color schemes, 134
desktop icons, 135
overview, 129
screen resolution, 130
screen savers, 133
themes, 131–132
logging on and off, 6
moving gadgets to, 45, 48
overview, 5
Quick Launch bar, 8, 16
Recycle Bin, 12, 31
shortcuts on, 10, 11, 135
Start menu, 7
taskbar, 8, 16
device drivers. See software
Device Manager, 113–117, 179
disability access. See Ease of Access features
discs, system recovery, 186, 187
Disk Management window, 118
disks, hard. See hardware
Documents window, 166
DOS operating system, 185
drivers. See software
Index
•E•
e-mailing. See also Windows Mail
photos, 222
WordPad documents, 36
Ease of Access features
Audio Description, 138
Change How Keyboard Works, 142
Change How Mouse Works, 144–145
cursor/pointer options, 144, 145
learning about additional, 142
Magnifier, 138
Narrator, 138
On-Screen Keyboard, 143
Optimize Visual Display, 138
overview, 137
Replace Sounds with Visual Cues, 139
Speech Recognition, 139–140
Edit Location dialog box, 104
Ethernet networks, 119, 122
extending disk volumes, 118
•F•
Favorites lists, 33, 72–73
faxing from computers, 102
Feed Viewer/Watcher gadgets, 43, 51
file system options, 188
files and folders. See also pictures
accessing recently opened, 24
adding to Favorites, 33
backing up to CD/DVD, 165, 166
backing up using restore points, 186–187
choosing programs to open, 24, 153
compressing, 32
creating shortcuts to, 29
creating WordPad documents, 36
deleting, 31
downloading from Internet, 77
e-mail folders, 96, 97
locating, 25, 26, 27
moving, 28
overview, 23
PDF files, 102
printing, 30
protecting access
by hiding, 153
marking as read-only, 149, 153
overview, 149
to public folders, 151
when sharing, 152
renaming, 29
Find dialog box, 70
finding. See searches
firewalls, 159
Flash drives, 123
Free Up Disk Space tool, 168
FreeCell game, 201
•G•
gadgets. See Windows Sidebar
game controllers, 206
games
FreeCell, 201
Hearts, 205
Minesweeper, 203
overview, 199
Purble Place, 204
Solitaire, 200
Spider Solitaire, 202
graphics card upgrades, 116
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Windows Vista Just the Steps For Dummies
•H•
hardware. See also computers; troubleshooting
game controllers, 206
graphics cards, 116
hard disks
checking for errors, 177
cleaning up, 168
defragmenting, 165, 167
extending volumes, 118
reformatting, 183, 188
modems, 114, 178
monitors, 115
overview, 109
printers
checking compatibility, 176
installing, 110–111
setting default printers, 112
sharing, 151
sound cards, 117
USB devices, 113
hardware drivers. See software
Hearts game, 205
Help and Support Center
changing display options, 195
Customer Support, 196
Get Help from Other People, 179
getting help in newsgroups, 192
In This Article, 179
Internet connections and, 190
Online Help, 193
opening, 190
overview, 113, 189
printing help topics, 190, 193
➟
228
Remote Assistance, 189
Repair or Update a Driver, 180, 181
searches in, 191, 192, 193
Table of Contents, 190
Troubleshooting window, 179
hibernation mode, 13, 100
hiding files, 153
hiding open windows, 10
History lists, 75, 162
hubs, 119, 122
•I•
images. See pictures; Windows Photo Gallery
infrared connections using cell phones, 105
Instant Search feature, 27
Internet Accounts dialog box, 85
Internet connections. See also mobile computing
always-on connections, 61
changing, 64
default connections, 64
overview, 57
removing, 65
repairing, 62
setting up new, 58
sharing on networks, 59
TCP/IP settings, 59, 60
at workplace, 63
Internet Explorer. See also protecting Windows
adding sites to Favorites, 72
blocking pop-ups, 68, 78
Content Advisor settings, 79
customizing toolbar, 76
defined, 67
Index
downloading files, 77
home page options, 71
links, 68
navigation tools, 68
organizing Favorites, 73
printing Web pages, 81
privacy settings, 78
searches, 69, 70, 75
security zones, 157, 158
switching between sites, 74
viewing browsing history, 75
viewing RSS feeds, 80
working with tabs, 74
Internet Options dialog box
Content tab, 79
General tab, 71, 169–170
Privacy tab, 78, 158
Security tab, 158
Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties dialog box, 60
•J•
joystick installation, 206
•K•
keyboard shortcuts. See shortcut keys
keyboards, 142–143
•L•
laptops. See mobile computing
locking computers, 7
logging on and off, 6
•M•
Magnifier feature, 138
maintenance tasks. See computers
malware, 160
media. See music
memory usage monitoring, 54
Microphone Setup Wizard, 140
Microsoft Customer Support, 196
Microsoft Plus!, 132
Microsoft SpyNet, 162
Minesweeper game, 203
mobile computing. See also computers; Internet
connections
calling card options, 104
cell phone infrared connections, 105
long distance dialing, 103
overview, 99
power plan options, 100–101
sending faxes, 102
wireless connections, 101
modems, 114, 178
monitor setup, 115
mouse options, 144–145
music. See also sound
adjusting volume, 209
burning to CD/DVD, 211
creating playlists, 210
getting Media Guide, 214
from online stores, 214
overview, 207
playing, 213
ripping from CD/DVD, 212
setting up speakers, 208
syncing to portable devices, 215
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Windows Vista Just the Steps For Dummies
•N•
Narrator feature, 138
Network Connections window, 59, 64–65
Network Diagnostics window, 62
Network File and Printer Sharing dialog box, 151
Network and Sharing Center window, 58, 64–65, 105
networks. See also computers
changing computer names, 124
Ethernet connections, 122
hubs, routers, switches, 122
installing PCI adapters, 120–121
overview, 119
sharing files, 125
wireless connections, 123
workgroups, 125, 126
notebook computers. See mobile computing
Notes gadget, 43, 46
Number Puzzle gadget, 43, 49
•O•
Optimize Visual Display feature, 138
•P•
➟
230
Paint program, 35, 37
parental controls, 156
passwords. See protecting Windows
PCI adapters, 120–121
PCs. See computers
Picture Puzzle gadget, 43, 49
pictures. See also files and folders; Windows Photo
Gallery
capturing selections, 41
changing in user accounts, 155
editing in Paint, 37
Plug and Play technology, 109
pointer options, 144, 145
pop-up blocking, 68, 78
Power Plan options, 100–101
printers. See also hardware
checking compatibility, 176
installing, 110–111
setting default printers, 112
sharing, 151
troubleshooting, 176
printing
files, 30
setting preferences, 112
Web pages, 81
programs. See applications; software
protecting file access. See also files and folders
hiding files, 153
marking as read-only, 149, 153
overview, 149
public folder access, 151
when sharing, 152
protecting Windows. See also Internet Explorer
controlling cookies, 158
with firewalls, 159
monitoring software, 161
overview, 157
with passwords
overview, 149
in Remote Assistance, 189
for user accounts, 150
running Windows Update, 163
setting up Trusted/Restricted sites, 157, 158
from spyware, 157, 160, 162
with Windows Defender, 157, 160–162
The Publishing Studio Web site, 68
Purble Place game, 204
Puzzle gadgets, 43, 49
Index
•Q•
Quick Launch bar, 8, 16
•R•
read-only files, 149, 153
rebooting computers, 13, 180, 185
recently imported photos, 38
recently opened files, 24
recently visited Web sites, 68
recovery discs, system, 186, 187
Recycle Bin, 12, 31
Red Eye tool, 223
remote control features. See mobile computing
Replace Sounds with Visual Cues feature, 139
resolution, screen, 129, 130
restarting computers, 13, 180, 185
Restore Down button, 17, 195
restoring Recycle Bin items, 12, 31
restoring systems. See System Restore
Restricted Web sites, 157, 158
routers, 122
RSS feeds, 43, 51, 80
•S•
Safe Mode, 183, 185
screen resolution, 129, 130
screen savers, 133
ScreenTips, 17
searches
for files/folders, 25, 26, 27
finding drivers, 121
in Internet Explorer, 69, 70, 75
in newsgroups, 193
SafeSearch options, 69
saving results, 27
security. See protecting file access; protecting Windows
server timeout options, mail, 88
sharing. See also networks
calendars, 42
files, 125, 152
Internet connections, 59
printers, 151
public folders, 151
shortcut keys
closing open windows, 20
opening Internet Explorer tabs, 74
starting Task Manager, 184
switching between open applications, 17
turning off computers, 13
shortcuts on desktop, 10, 11
shortcuts to files/folders, 29
shutting down computers, 13, 180, 185
shutting down nonresponsive software, 183, 184
Sidebar. See Windows Sidebar
Slide Show gadget, 43, 47
slide shows in Photo Gallery, 221
Snap To feature, 144
Snipping Tool, 35, 41
software. See also applications; troubleshooting
drivers
defined, 109
finding, 121
for game controllers, 206
installing, 121
managing, 113, 114
rolling back, 181
updating, 180
monitoring, 161
Software Explorer, 161
Solitaire game, 200
➟
231
Windows Vista Just the Steps For Dummies
sound. See also music
adjusting volume, 139, 209
Narrator feature, 138
replacing with visual cues, 139
sound card setup, 117
speaker setup, 208
Speech Recognition feature, 139–140
spell checking e-mail, 87
Spider Solitaire game, 202
spyware, 157, 160, 162
Start menu
customizing, 7
defined, 7
Favorites, 33
Instant Search box, 27
Recent Items, 24
Startup folder, 19
Stocks gadget, 43, 52
switches, 119, 122
System Properties dialog box, 124, 125, 186
system recovery discs, 186, 187
System Restore
creating restore points, 183, 186
defined, 62
troubleshooting hardware, 181
troubleshooting software, 183, 187
•T•
➟
232
tabs, Internet Explorer, 74
tags, photo, 219
Task Manager, 184
Task Scheduler, 171
taskbar, 8, 16
Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box, 24
TCP/IP settings, 59, 60
Temporary Internet Files, 165, 169
themes, desktop, 131–132
time and date settings, 9
Timer gadget, 43, 53
troubleshooting
hardware
disk volumes, 177
getting help with, 179
modems, 178
overview, 175
portable device syncing, 215
printers, 176
using System Restore, 181
USB devices, 113
Internet connections, 62
software
compatibility issues, 183
drivers, 179–181
overview, 183
by reformatting drives, 183, 188
in Safe Mode, 183, 185
shutting down nonresponsive, 183, 184
using System Restore, 183, 186–187
Trusted Web sites, 157, 158
turning off computer, 13, 180, 185
•U•
Uninstall a Program window, 22
Update, Windows, 163
upgrading graphics cards, 116
USB device setup, 113
USB joystick installation, 206
user accounts
changing names, 150
changing pictures, 155
changing type, 154
creating, 6, 154
setting parental controls, 156
setting passwords, 150
switching, 155
Index
•V•
vCard business cards, 88
volume, adjusting speaker, 139, 209
volumes, extending disk, 118
•W•
Web browsers. See Internet Explorer
Web site addresses
FreeCell, 201
The Publishing Studio, 68
Windows Marketplace, 176
Windows Media Guide, 214
Window Layout Properties dialog box, 95
Windows Accessories, 35
Windows Calendar, 35, 42
Windows Classic Theme, 132
Windows Contacts, 35, 40
Windows Defender, 157, 160–162
Windows Explorer
Favorites menu, 33
locating files/folders in, 26
opening, 7
shortcut menus, 29, 31
Views options, 26
Windows Firewall, 159
Windows Help. See Help and Support Center
Windows Mail. See also e-mailing
adding contacts to Address Book, 94
attachments, 88, 89
etiquette, 86
Inbox, 84
layout options, 95
managing accounts, 85
message folders, 96, 97
message rules, 98
messages
addressing, 87
creating, 86
deleting, 97
formatting text, 92
forwarding, 90
organizing, 84, 97
reading, 89
receiving, 84
replying to, 90
spell-checking, 87
overview, 83
priority options, 87
on Quick Launch bar, 8
sending contact information, 88
server timeout options, 88
signature options, 91
stationery options, 93
Windows maintenance. See computers
Windows Media Player. See music
Windows Network Diagnostics window, 62
Windows Photo Gallery. See also pictures
adding tags to photos, 219
adjusting color/exposure, 223
burning photos to CD/DVD, 224
changing photo properties, 220
cropping pictures, 223
defined, 38–39, 218
e-mailing photos, 222
fixing red-eye, 223
navigation tools, 223
organizing photos, 220
overview, 35, 217
playing slide shows, 47, 221
rating photos, 220
Recently Imported folder, 38
saving original photos, 39
Undo feature, 223
➟
233
Windows Vista Just the Steps For Dummies
Windows Remote Assistance, 189
Windows security. See protecting Windows
Windows Sidebar. See also desktop
defined, 43
display options, 44
gadgets
adding to Sidebar, 45
Calculator, 48
CPU Meter, 53
Currency Conversion, 50
defined, 43
Feed Viewer, 51
Feed Watcher, 51
getting more, 53
moving to desktop, 45, 48
Notes, 46
Number Puzzle, 49
opacity settings, 48
Picture Puzzle, 49
Slide Show, 47
Stocks, 52
Timer, 53
Windows Task Manager, 184
➟
234
Windows Update, 163, 180
Windows Vista. See also applications; desktop; Ease of
Access features
creating user accounts, 6
customizing
cursor, 145
keyboard, 142
mouse, 144
on-screen keyboard, 143
sounds, 139
visual display, 138
defined, 15
Instant Search feature, 27
overview, 1
performance rating feature, 169
Search Folders feature, 27
Web Filter feature, 156
Windows Vista Theme, 132
Windows Vista Ultimate Extras, 163
wireless networks, 101, 105, 123
WordPad, 35, 36
workgroups, 125, 126
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