OpenCom 510 - Login to Sales Channel Support Pages

OpenCom 510
Mounting and Commissioning
User Guide
Welcome to DeTeWe
Thank you for choosing this DeTeWe
product. Our product meets the
strictest requirements with regard to
quality and design.
The following instructions will guide
you in the operation of your
OpenCom 510 software and answer
most of the questions that may
arise.
If you require further technical support or information about other DeTeWe products, please refer to our
website at
www.detewe.de.
It provides additional notes and tips
on the product.
We hope you enjoy using
OpenCom 510.
OpenCom 100 Product
Family
This manual describe the communication system OpenCom 510.
For other members of the product
family, the following manuals exist:
■
OpenCom 100:
Manual for OpenCom 105,
OpenCom 107, OpenCom 110
and OpenCom 120
■
OpenCom 130/150:
Manual for OpenCom 130 and
OpenCom 150
■
OpenCom 510:
Manual for OpenCom 510
(19" housing)
We hope you enjoy using the
OpenCom 510.
Contents
Features
5
Factory Settings
10
Telephony Functions
10
Authorisations
10
Internet Functions
13
Backplane
Uninterruptible Power Supply 30
Power Failure
15
Construction of the
OpenCom 510
15
Scope of Delivery
16
Declarations of Conformity
16
Installation
17
Notes on Safety
17
General Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Notes on the Mains Supply . . . . . . 17
Notes on EMC and Earthing . . . . . 18
Notes on Installing the
OpenCom 510. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Notes on Installing Terminals . . . . 19
31
Interfaces and Connectible Terminals
33
Overview
Preliminary
Information
28
33
S0 Ports
34
Termination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
External ISDN Ports (S0 External) . 36
Internal S0 Ports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Upn Ports
38
Terminals Connected to Upn Ports 38
Technical Information. . . . . . . . . . . 38
DECT Base Station Connection
Variants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
a/b Ports
40
Terminals Connected to a/b Ports 40
Technical Information. . . . . . . . . . . 42
PCM Port
43
Siting, Ambient Conditions
20
LAN Port
43
DSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Service PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Installation in a 19" Rack
21
COM Port
Installing Modules
22
Slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Notes on Disconnecting the
Mains Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Installing the Central Control
Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Installing Interface Cards. . . . . . . . 25
Installing a Power Supply Unit . . . 27
44
Accessories and Adapters
46
Upn Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
a/b Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Audio Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Approved Devices /
Approved Accessories . . . . . . . 48
Device Combinations . . . . . . . . . . . 49
1
Modules
52
Module Naming Conventions 53
Overview of Available Modules 54
MPS+1-AC
55
MC+1-3
57
MT+S2M1-1
60
MX+S01-8
63
MS+UPN1-8
65
MS+UPN2-8
66
MS+A1-8
68
Configuration
70
Brief Guide to Initial
Configuration
71
First Configuration via Serial Port . 71
System Requirements
72
Configuration under Windows 73
Connection on Serial Port (V.24) . . 73
Notes on Configuring the
Serial Port. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Connection by Network Card
(LAN) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Testing the Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Starting the Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Configuration for Linux and
MacOS
77
Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
MacOS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Configuring the OpenCom 510 79
Preparing the Configuration . . . . . 79
Starting the Web Console. . . . . . . . 79
Loading the Online Help. . . . . . . . . 81
Finishing the Configuration . . . . . . 82
Preconfiguration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
2
Remote Configuration . . . . . . . . . . .82
Codes for IP Configuration . . . . . . .83
Saving and Loading the
Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
Loading SW Updates . . . . . . . . . . . .84
Resetting the System Data . . . . . . .84
Generating Your Own MoH Files . .85
Configuration Examples
86
OpenCom 510 in Computer
Networks
86
Introduction to TCP/IP
87
OpenCom 510 in a Serverless
LAN
88
DNS Name Resolution . . . . . . . . . . .89
Internet Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89
RAS Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
OpenCom 510 in a LAN
with an IP-enabled Server
91
DNS Name Resolution . . . . . . . . . . .91
Internet Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
RAS Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
LAN-to-LAN Link
94
Useful Information on
Internet Access
95
Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95
Using the Web. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95
E-mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96
NAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96
PBX Networking
98
PBX Cascading
98
Functionality of PBX Cascading . . .98
Putting a Cascaded PBX into
Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Notes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
PBX Networking
102
Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Types of Point-to-Point
Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Technical Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Licensing Information
109
Team Functions
110
Introduction
110
Explanation of Keys. . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Team Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Examples of Use
112
Executive/Secretary Team . . . . . . 112
Three-member Team . . . . . . . . . . 113
Unified Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Toggle Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Call Queue
117
Multi-Company Variant
122
Configuring the Multi-Company
Variant
123
Activating the Multi-Company
Variant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Configuring and Managing
Companies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Assigning Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Assigning Trunk Groups . . . . . . . . 125
Allocating Routing Codes . . . . . . 125
Configuring the Company
Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Working with the Multi-Company
Variant
126
Company Telephone Book. . . . . . 126
Making Calls Between
Companies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Billing Charges per Company . . . 127
Introduction
117
Activation of Queues . . . . . . . . . . 118
Call Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Pickup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Hunt Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Configuring the PC
Software
128
Examples of Use
119
Attendant Terminal for an
Operator with Two System
Telephones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Group of Three Attendant
Terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Setting up TAPI
128
Setting up NET CAPI
130
Using the Systray Display
131
Browser for OpenCTI
132
Synchronising the PC Clock
133
Address Queries using LDAP 134
USB DECT Box on the
OpenCom 510
135
General Information . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Installation and Configuration . . 135
Technical Data for Operation on the
OpenCom 510. . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
3
Configuration Guide 137
Overview
138
PBX Ports
139
Easy Access
140
ISP Settings
141
RAS Settings
142
LAN-to-LAN Settings
143
E-mail Function
144
E-mail Access
145
Frequently Asked
Questions
4
146
General/Hardware
146
Telephony
147
DECT
149
LAN
150
Internet
151
Technical Data
153
Index
155
Features
The OpenCom 510 is a communications system for integrated voice and
data communication. The most significant feature of this communications system is its modular structure.
The OpenCom 510 is designed for installation in a 19" frame. The frame
itself can be installed in a 19" wallmounted enclosure or in a 19" floorstanding cabinet.
The system provides a number of
slots for the installation of modules.
In a fully configured system, the following modules will have been installed (and all slots will be occupied): 2 power supply units,
1 control module, 12 interface cards.
By combining different interface
cards, it is possible to create configurations suited to the user’s specific
communications requirements. If,
for example, a user requests DECTcapable Upn interfaces or additional
S0 or a/b interfaces, one or more interface cards can be integrated without having to exchange the entire
system.
Moreover, OpenCom 510 systems
can be cascaded, which allows you
to integrate a higher number of
modules, or networked in order to
meet growing communications requirements.
The OpenCom 510 can be integrated into system environments
Features
with structured cabling. All connections to a structured cabling patch
panel can be made with standard
patch cables.
The OpenCom 510 supports the following communications applications:
■
Telephony with system telephones, ISDN telephones and
analogue terminals, Internet/intranet data communication,
CTI applications, sub-system operation and system configuration using a standard web
browser
■
Additional software packages
for expanded telephony functions, e.g. the digital voicebox
and voice portal systems OpenVoice and OpenAttendant
■
The “Doorline” intercom system
Telephony
The OpenCom 510 communications
system is designed to be connected
to an ISDN basic access interface using the DSS1 protocol. Both multiterminal access (point-tomultipoint) and system access
(point-to-point) configurations are
supported. The system can be configured to run both types of access in
parallel. S0 and S2M interface cards
are available for connecting the sys-
5
tem to the telecommunications network. An S0 interface card provides
eight S0 ports (switchable to either
internal or external connections).
The S2M interface card provides one
ISDN S2M interface for connecting
the OpenCom 510 either to a primary multiplex interface or to a second PBX (ISDN point-to-point connection). For an overview of
interface cards, refer to Modules
starting on page 52.
The OpenCom 510 firmware is designed for a maximum of 600 users.
For information on system limitations, refer to Technical Data starting
on page 153.
The following can be connected to
the OpenCom 510:
■
Euro ISDN terminals
■
DeTeWe system telephones
■
OpenPhone 52 ISDN telephones
(to the Upn port)
■
DeTeWe RFP 21 base stations
■
DECT handsets (with RFP 21 connected to DECT-capable Upn port
of MS+UPN2-8 interface card)
■
analogue terminals
S0 interfaces must be operated with
Euro ISDN terminals in accordance
with the DSS1 protocol.
6
Upn ports are suitable for connecting
the OpenPhone range of DeTeWe
system telephones. Furthermore,
the DECT-capable Upn ports of the
MS+UPN2-8 interface card can be
used to connect RFP 21 base stations.
Analogue ports are suitable for connecting standard analogue terminals.
If your network provider supports
the CNIP (Calling Name Identification Presentation) feature, the
names of callers will be displayed in
addition to the numbers whenever
external calls are received. The
OpenCom 510 supports the display
of the name on system telephones.
However, if you have created an entry in the telephone book under the
number of the caller, this entry will
be displayed instead.
The OpenCom 510 can be integrated into an existing local area
network (LAN) and used as an Internet access router and mail client by
all workstations in the LAN.
The OpenCom 510 can be configured
and programmed by means of a web
browser (web console). This browser
needs to be installed on a PC which
is connected to the system.
The OpenCom 510 can be pre-configured at the service centre and remote-configured for service purposes.
Features
A COM port can be used to connect a
PC for the purpose of transferring
connection data.
You can use the “Doorline” intercom
system to connect the OpenCom 510
to a building’s wiring system, which
enables you to use door opener and
doorbell functions through the
OpenCom 510.
The OpenCom 510 enables you to
use third-party CTI (Computer Telephony Integration) applications.
This requires the installation of a
TAPI driver (provided on the system
CD-ROM) on a Windows PC. The
OpenCom 510 also features the integrated dialling wizard OpenCTI 50
with which users can call up and use
telephone functions through their
PCs without having to install a special TAPI driver.
Further Telephony Features
The OpenCom 510 can be used to
run digital voicebox and voice portal
systems. The configuration data and
the recorded speech files (messages
for, or left by, a caller) are stored on
the OpenCom 510 CompactFlash
card, which is installed on the
MC+1-3 central control module.
For further information, refer to the
“OpenVoice” and “OpenAttendant”
user guides.
You can optimize telephone communication with the help of team func-
Features
tions and the call-queueing function.
The “OpenCount” application, which
requires a separate licence, can be
used to record and save connection
data; these data can be analysed using a number of individually configurable filter criteria. For further information, refer to the web console
online help.
You can connect two OpenCom 510
systems (PBX cascading). Cascading
is a simple way of increasing the
number of terminals that can be
connected.
As your communication requirements grow, the OpenCom 510 can
be networked with other telecommunications systems. The
OpenCom 510 can then operate as a
sub-system or as a DECT server. It is
also possible to create a telecommunications system with several networked PBXs.
Internet Access
For the purpose of providing Internet access, PCs can be connected to
the OpenCom 510 by means of the
internal S0 ports, and an entire LAN
can be connected by means of the
Ethernet port. If Internet access is already available from an Internet
service provider, the OpenCom 510
can be configured accordingly. The
OpenCom 510 can also be used for IP
configuration if there is no IP-capable client network. An integrated
7
DHCP server and a DNS server will
take over IP address administration
and name resolution for the client
PCs.
The OpenCom 510 enables all connected PCs to access the Internet
using a common IP address; only the
common address will be visible outside the LAN. Network address translation (NAT) is used to change the IP
addresses of the local (client) PCs
into the IP address of the
OpenCom 510. This prevents direct
access to the LAN’s client PCs and
thus offers protection against attacks from the Internet. The
OpenCom 510 offers further protection of the LAN in the form of customisable filter lists (firewall function).
Note: Also observe the notes in
Useful Information on Internet Access
starting on page 95.
DECT Data Communication
PCs that are not connected to the
OpenCom 510 via the internal S0
ports or the Ethernet interface can
access the Internet if used in combination with a USB DECT Box or the
OpenPhone 25 DECT terminals. PCs
in these configurations can also
make full use of the Internet and email features of the OpenCom 510.
Data will then be transmitted via the
internal data interface of the
OpenPhone 25, which must be connected to the serial port of the PC by
8
means of the supplied adapter. The
Internet can be accessed directly via
the remote data transfer (i.e. dialup) network. The OpenPhone 25 will
establish a data connection with the
OpenCom 510 via the DECT air interface. The Internet connection itself
will be established either directly
through an ISDN B-channel or indirectly through the internal RAS interface of the OpenCom 510. Indirect RAS access is preferable as it
uses the routing function of the
OpenCom 510 and thus benefits
from the security features of shared
Internet access.
The optional USB DECT Box enables
a PC to establish a wireless (DECT)
ISDN data connection. The USB DECT
Box and the PC are connected by
means of the USB interface.
For detailed information on installing the required driver software and
on the various configuration options, refer to USB DECT Box on the
OpenCom 510 starting on page 135
and to the “OpenPhone 25” user
guide. For information on configuring the OpenPhone 25 data interface, please refer to the
OpenCom 510 online help.
E-Mail
The OpenCom 510 offers an integrated e-mail function that supports
the POP3, APOP or IMAP4 protocols
used to query an Internet service
provider for incoming mail. The
OpenCom 510 can be configured to
Features
enable every member of staff to
query mail accounts. The
OpenCom 510 fetches the incoming
e-mail headers (subjects) and senders from the mail server at set intervals and forwards them to the user’s
system terminal.
Further Network Features
You can enable staff to dial into the
LAN by means of RAS access.
In addition, you can configure a LANto-LAN link via ISDN. Two
OpenCom 510 systems can thus connect their LANs for on-demand dialin (from both sides).
A NET CAPI (driver software provided
on the system CD-ROM) enables PCs
without ISDN cards to use ISDN functions.
Features
9
Factory Settings
The OpenCom 510 is delivered with
the following basic settings and activated features. We recommend that
you configure the OpenCom 510 to
meet your specific requirements before putting it into operation (see
Configuration starting on page 70).
Tip: Notes on the functions listed
below can be found in the glossary
(provided as a PDF file on the system
CD-ROM).
Telephony Functions
■
The OpenCom 510 is pre-configured for use in Germany.
■
Analogue terminals: The dialling mode (pulse dialling or
DTMF) is detected automatically.
■
Incoming external calls are signalled at all corded terminals
connected to the system.
■
The system PIN, which is used
for remote-programmable call
forwarding, for example, is
“0000”.
Authorisations
10
Authorisations determine which
functions can be used at the
terminals connected to the
OpenCom 510. Authorisations are
configured for so-called user groups;
users and their terminals are allocated to these groups.
the OpenCom 510 and unrestricted
configuration rights. Users in the
“Guests” group cannot configure the
OpenCom 510 or make external
calls, and have only restricted use of
the terminal functions of the
OpenCom 510.
Two user groups are preset: “Administrators” and “Guests”. “Administrators” have access to all functions of
Note: When the OpenCom 510 is
first put into operation, all connected
terminals are in the “Administrators”
Telephony Functions
Factory Settings
group until a user logs on to the web
console. All terminals are then automatically allocated to the “Guests”
group. For further information on
configuring user groups and users, refer to the online help chapter “User
Manager”.
The following terminal functions are
preset for the “Administrators”
group:
■
External line access: International numbers can be called
from all configured telephones.
External lines must be seized by
entering a prefixed code.
■
Least cost routing (LCR) is not
active. As soon as LCR is configured, users can make calls using
selected call-by-call providers.
■
VIP call is activated.
■
Announcements to system terminals are possible.
■
Baby calls can be configured.
■
If a call key is configured for a
user on more than one terminal,
he can program this key for
more than one outgoing call, i.e.
he can use his various terminals
to make parallel calls from this
telephone number.
■
“Pickup” and “Pickup selective”
of calls from other telephones
Factory Settings
are activated. Pickup protection
is deactivated.
■
“Call removal” is deactivated.
■
“Callback on busy” can be activated.
■
If a user has configured more
than one terminal under the
same number, they can suppress
the signalling of calls at the parallel terminals.
■
“Call queue” is deactivated.
■
“Reaction: Connection will be
disconnected” is deactivated as
callers trying to reach a terminal
that cannot be reached or is
busy will hear a busy signal.
■
Call forwarding to internal or external numbers can be activated.
Call forwarding after a certain
period of time is set to 20 seconds. Door calls can be forwarded. Forwarded calls are simultaneously signalled at the
original terminal and at the forwarding destination. Call forwarding can be configured for
specific MSN groups, provided
that MSN groups have been configured. Users of the “Administrators” group can set call forwarding for other users, their
own terminals, however, are
protected against call forwarding configuration by others.
Authorisations
11
■
External calls can be transferred
to an external subscriber.
■
Three-party conferences can be
set up.
■
During a consultation call, the
waiting party hears music on
hold, provided a music-on-hold
file has been loaded into the system.
■
■
The presentation of the user’s
own phone number (MSN or system access number) on the display of the external party’s terminal is activated, but can be
suppressed.
■
The telephone lock can be activated. The terminal PIN is
“0000”.
■
Interception of malicious callers
is possible if this feature has
been ordered from the network
operator.
■
■
12
Call protection, call-waiting protection and intercom protection
are deactivated.
Speed dialling is possible, provided it has been configured in
the OpenCom 510 central telephone book.
The blacklist, the whitelist and a
call filter are not pre-configured
and thus not active. If these lists
are configured, they can be acti-
Authorisations
vated for the user groups. A special list with emergency telephone numbers is preset and
activated.
■
External and internal calls not
answered by a user are entered
in their call list.
■
The door opener can be operated from all terminals. Door
calls can be forwarded.
■
Keypad dialling is possible.
■
The user group is not authorised
to change the system’s time
groups.
■
Call forwarding for SMS calls in
the fixed-lines network is not activated.
■
Connection data analysis is deactivated.
■
The cost multiplier is set to
100%, i.e. the costs are not multiplied by any factor.
■
Call charges can be recorded, associated with booking numbers
and analysed.
■
Every user can change the configuration of the OpenCom 510.
■
Every user can create a personal
telephone book and edit entries
in the central telephone book.
Factory Settings
■
Every user can read out the
charges.
■
Every user can use the internal
OpenCount application for the
analysis of connection data.
■
Every user with a system terminal who has a workstation can
use OpenCTI 50 to make calls,
manage calls and messages, dial
numbers from both the central
and personal telephone books,
and use the OpenCTI 50 busy
display.
■
The multi-company variant is
not activated.
Internet Functions
Note: E-mail, ISP and RAS access
cannot be configured unless you have
activated the OpenCom 510 IP package licence in the web console’s Configurator in the SYS Configuration:
Licences menu (see also Information
Regarding the Licensing of the
OpenCom 510 IP Package on
page 14).
■
■
■
■
RAS access (with or without callback) can be configured for
every OpenCom 510 user, provided that RAS access is authorised.
More than one mail account
query can be configured for
every user.
Every user with a system terminal can be automatically notified
of the receipt of e-mail.
OpenCom 510 web console or
from a system terminal that has
been configured accordingly).
The following IP addresses are preset for network configuration:
■
Host name: host
■
IP address: 192.168.99.254
■
Network mask: 255.255.255.0
The following addresses are transmitted to the LAN’s client PCs using
DHCP or PPP:
■
Gateway address:
192.168.99.254
■
Domain name: domain
■
Domain name server:
192.168.99.254
Users can terminate Internet
connections (through the
Factory Settings
Internet Functions
13
■
PPP addresses: 192.168.100.0 to
192.168.100.10
■
DHCP addresses: 192.168.99.129
to 192.168.99.148
You can change the IP settings in the
Configurator. Consult the LAN’s network administrator if you wish to do
so.
Information Regarding the
Licensing of the OpenCom 510
IP Package
You will need to obtain an activation
key in order to configure and use the
IP package in your communications
system.
To generate the activation key, visit
the DeTeWe licence server (http://lizenz.detewe.de).
The activation key is generated on
the basis of the serial number of
your OpenCom 510 and the transaction record (TAD). The licensing confirmation accompanying your IP
package contains your personal TAD
and all the information you need to
carry out this procedure.
Write down or print out the generated activation key.
Then activate the IP package on the
web console in the Configurator in
the SYS Configuration: Licences
menu. Additional information can
be found in the online help.
14
Internet Functions
Factory Settings
Preliminary Information
Construction of the OpenCom 510
The OpenCom 510 is designed to be
used in 19" rack systems. It comprises the following:
■
■
A 19" mounting frame for the
modules. In a fully configured
system, the following modules
will have been installed (and all
slots will be occupied): 2 power
supply units, 1 control module,
12 interface cards. The interface
cards provide the system ports.
The 19" frame of the
OpenCom 510 is also referred to
as the 1-12 frame (signifying the
number of slots for interface
cards).
cards ordered by the customer must
be installed separately.
Please note: Interface cards may
be installed by qualified personnel
only!
For further information on installing
modules/cards, please refer to Installation in a 19" Rack starting on
page 21 and Installing Modules starting on page 22.
A backplane. The backplane provides the sockets for the control
module and the interface cards;
it supplies the modules/cards
with the required power and
system signals.
The OpenCom 510 comes fully assembled. By contrast with other systems, you will not need to assemble
the frame and backplane yourself.
A power supply unit and the central
control module are built into the
frame before delivery. Interface
Preliminary Information
Construction of the OpenCom 510
15
Scope of Delivery
of delivery only if the 1-12 frame
is the first frame ordered and
not being used to expand the
OpenCom 510.
The OpenCom 510 communications
system’s scope of delivery comprises
the following:
■
1 19" frame (1-12 frame) with
slots for 1 control module and
up to 2 power supply units and
12 interface cards
The basic configuration of a 19"
frame includes the following
components:
All other components (e.g. second power supply unit, interface
cards and accompanying cables) are included as per the customer’s order.
■
1 RS-232 to RJ45 adapter cable
(for the V.24 interfaces of the
MC+1-3 control module)
■
1 set of mounting brackets and
screws for installing the frame in
a 19" rack
■
1 set of dummy covers for covering unused slots
■
1 set of short user guides
■
1 CD
– 1 BPV+1-12 backplane
–1 MPS+1-AC power supply
unit
– 1 mains cable for connection
to the mains supply
– 1 MC+1-3 control module
– 1 CompactFlash Card; the
firmware is stored on this card.
This card is included in the scope
Declarations of Conformity
The communications systems of the
OpenCom 100 product family comply with the requirements of EU directive 99/5/EC.
The declarations of conformity can
be found on the Internet at
http://www.detewe.de.
16
Scope of Delivery
Preliminary Information
Installation
Notes on Safety
The CE symbol on the product confirms that it meets the requirements
of the technical guidelines on user
safety and electromagnetic compatibility valid at the time of approval.
General Instructions
Please note: This product may be
installed and serviced by qualified
personnel only. Opening the housing
and carrying out unauthorised repairs may damage the product and
will invalidate the warranty.
CAUTION!
Static charge can damage the
OpenCom 510. Before and during
work on the electrical components of the OpenCom 510, discharge any static electricity from
your body and the tools you are
using.
Notes on the Mains
Supply
DANGER! Hazardous voltages inside the device!
The MPS+1-AC power supply units
may not be opened as this may lead
to exposure to hazardous voltages!
Defective power supply units must
be sent to the manufacturer for repairs.
Always use the original packaging
when packing OpenCom 510 components for transport or storage.
Installation
The OpenCom 510 may be connected only to mains sockets with a
protective earth conductor.
Install the OpenCom 510 only near
easily accessible, wall-mounted
mains sockets.
Always use a dedicated circuit with
10-ampère protection to supply the
19" frame (1-12 frame).
If the OpenCom 510 is being powered by two MPS+1-AC power supply units, each of the two units must
be plugged into its own mains
Notes on Safety
17
socket. Do not use multiway mains
strips to connect more than one
OpenCom 510 power supply unit or
a OpenCom 510 and other devices to
the same mains supply.
The mains cables of the MPS+1-AC
power supply units must have ferrite
rings fitted. The mains cables are
factory-fitted with ferrite rings.
tion. This is normally the
OpenCom 510 housing.
Earthing and Potential
For the purpose of potential equalisation, all conductive parts of the
OpenCom 510 must be connected to
the protective earth conductor
(earth busbar of the building’s wiring system) by means of a solid or
stranded wire of at least 2,5 mm2
(yellow/green).
Mains cable with ferrite ring
Install an overvoltage protection device.
Notes on EMC and
Earthing
Please note: MOS modules:
Observe the regulations regarding
modules and packaging carrying the
MOS trademark!
Use earthing wrist straps connected
to the appropriate points on the
frame (see C in the illustration
OpenCom 510: 1-12 frame mounting
points on page 21).
The mains socket’s protective earth
conductor and the telephone earth
line must be connected to one reference point for potential equalisa-
18
Notes on Safety
Installation
ø 2,5 mm2
ø 2,5 mm2
OpenCom 510: Earthing arrangement
The metal screens of the subscriber
and trunk cables must be connected
to the circuit common in the distributor or the patch field. The protective earth conductor of the 230 V
mains cables is connected to the circuit common and the telephone
earth line.
All metal parts of the communications system are mechanically and
thus electrically coupled in order to
provide protection through the protective earth conductor and the telephone earth line.
Notes on Installing the
OpenCom 510
Do not allow any fluid to enter the
OpenCom 510 as this may cause
electric shocks or short circuits.
Do not install the OpenCom 510 during a thunderstorm. Do not connect
Installation
or disconnect any cables during a
thunderstorm.
The OpenCom 510 is designed for indoor use only. Route the cables in
such a way that they cannot be
stepped on or tripped over.
The OpenCom 510 must be securely
screwed into the frame when installation work on the system is interrupted or terminated. Unused slots
must be covered with dummy covers
(included in the scope of delivery).
Notes on Installing
Terminals
Only devices that supply safety extra-low voltage (SELV) may be connected to the OpenCom 510. Proper
use of standard terminals will satisfy
this requirement.
The analogue interfaces may only be
used to connect terminals that meet
Notes on Safety
19
the appropriate technical requirements. For details, refer to a/b Ports
starting on page 40.
Use a shielded Ethernet cable (STP
cable, Shielded Twisted Pair cable) to
connect the OpenCom 510 to a Local
Area Network (LAN).
Siting, Ambient Conditions
The ambient temperature for operating the OpenCom 510 must be between +5 °C and +40 °C.
To maintain a safe ambient temperature, install the OpenCom 510 in a
properly ventilated location, away
from sources of direct heat.
that the air intake temperature does
not exceed +40 °C.
The OpenCom 510 may also be connected to an IT system.
Do not site the OpenCom 510
■
in front of or above heat sources
such as radiators,
■
in direct sunlight,
■
behind curtains,
■
in small, unventilated, damp
rooms,
■
near flammable materials,
■
or near high-frequency devices
such as transmitter and radiotherapy or similar apparatus.
If the OpenCom 510 is to be installed
together with other electronic
equipment in a 19” cabinet, ensure
20
Siting, Ambient Conditions
Installation
Installation in a 19" Rack
1
2
C
C
B
A
OpenCom 510: 1-12 frame mounting points
The OpenCom 510 is designed to be
installed in 19" racks only.
The following mounting points for
installation in a 19" rack can be
found on the 1-12 frame:
Legend
A
Mounting bracket screw bolts for
front mounting (approx. 132 mm)
to the uprights of the 19" rack
B
Mounting bracket screw bolts for
mid-mounting (approx. 400 mm)
to the uprights of the 19" rack
C
Left and right screw points for
earthing wrist strap or circuit
common connection between
1-12 frame and 19" rack
Legend
1
Left mounting bracket
2
Right mounting bracket
Note: If the OpenCom 510 is to be
used as a wall-mounted instead of a
floor-standing system, it must be installed in a standard-type wallmounted enclosure using 19" mounting technology.
Installation
Installation in a 19" Rack
21
Installing Modules
A
0
B
C (1-6)
D (7-12)
OpenCom 510: 1-12 frame slots
Slots
The OpenCom 510 1-12 frame can
house up to:
■
2 power supply units
■
1 control module
■
12 interface cards (trunk or subscriber modules) split into
2 separate groups.
The following slots are provided for
installing these modules:
Legend
A
Slot for group 1 power supply unit
B
Slot for group 2 power supply unit
0
Slot for central control module
C
Slots for group 1 interface cards
(slots 1 - 6)
D
Slots for group 2 interface cards
(slots 7 - 12)
Each of the two groups (1 or 2, or C
and D, respectively, in the illustration) requires its own power supply
unit. Power for the control module is
always supplied by the group 1
power supply unit. The group 1
22
Installing Modules
Installation
power supply unit must therefore always be installed.
Modules can be installed either
when the entire system is configured
or as an upgrade at a later time.
Notes on Disconnecting
the Mains Supply
DANGER! Hazardous voltages inside the device!
The OpenCom 510 must be disconnected from the mains supply for
the following installation work:
■
Installation of the central control
module
■
Installation of a power supply
unit
If a 1-12 frame is being powered by
two power supply units, it is de-energised by unplugging both mains
cables.
DANGER! Always unplug the
mains cables of both power supply units when installing the central control module or a power
supply unit.
OpenCom 510 will still be operational! However, only the modules
supplied by the group 1 (A) power
supply unit, i.e. the central control
module and the interface cards in
slots 1 - 6, will be functional.
If you unplug the mains cable of the
group 1 (A) power supply unit, the
OpenCom 510 ceases to be operational. However, slots 7 - 12 (D) will
still be supplied with operating voltage. (Refer to the illustration
OpenCom 510: 1-12 frame slots on
page 22 to determine the location of
the modules specified in parentheses above.)
The LEDs of each module indicate
whether the respective module is
operational. For further information
on LED indicators, refer to Modules
starting on page 52.
Installing the Central
Control Module
The OpenCom 510 comes with the
central control module installed.
Should you need to exchange the
central control module, proceed as
follows:
1. Shut down the OpenCom 510. To
do so, first restart the system by
– entering the code procedure
If you unplug the mains cable of the
group 2 (B) power supply unit, the
Installation
H * 1 8 5 (system
PIN) # on a connected tele-
phone, or
Installing Modules
23
– clicking on Restart in the
SYS Configuration: Restart
menu in the Configurator.
2. Wait until the LEDs of the installed modules start flashing
red.
CAUTION!
Static charge can damage electronic devices. Observe the regulations regarding electrostatically sensitive components.
DANGER! Hazardous voltages inside the device!
3. Unplug all of the mains cables of
the OpenCom 510 to disconnect
the system from the mains supply.
The central control module must
not be installed if the
OpenCom 510 is switched on!
Refer to Notes on Disconnecting
the Mains Supply starting on
page 23.
4. Remove the screws with which
the central control module is secured in the 1-12 frame and pull
the module out.
5. Unpack the central control module.
6. Carefully push the central control module into slot 0 (see also
the illustration OpenCom 510: 112 frame slots on page 22). The
printing on the front of the module should be at the top.
Ensure that the backplane plug
of the central control module is
securely plugged into the socket
on the backplane.
7. Refit the screws to secure the
module in the 1-12 frame.
8. Plug the desired cables into the
corresponding RJ45 sockets on
the central control module. Refer to Modules starting on
page 52 for information on pin
assignment.
9. Switch the OpenCom 510 on
again. To do so, reconnect the
group 1 power supply unit (see
A in the illustration
OpenCom 510: 1-12 frame slots
on page 22) with the mains supply (if you are powering the
24
Installing Modules
Installation
OpenCom 510 with two power
supply units, reconnect the second unit as well).
The system will now start up and
all modules (interface cards) will
be re-initialised.
10. Observe the module LEDs during
start-up of the OpenCom 510.
Information on indicators can be
found in Modules starting on
page 52.
Note: The MAC address for the
OpenCom 510 is assigned by the central control module and cannot be
changed. If the central control module has to be exchanged, you may
need to change the IP settings. For
further information on MAC addresses, refer to the online help.
Explanatory Note on Shutting
Down the System
If the OpenCom 510 is disconnected
from the mains supply, its main
memory is deleted. The main memory stores the current configuration
data, which are regularly copied to
the CompactFlash memory card. Restarting the system causes it to copy
the current configuration data from
the main memory to the CompactFlash card, which ensures that the
most recent configuration is restored
when the system is started up.
Installation
Installing Interface Cards
Interface cards can be installed or
exchanged with the system powered
up (“hot-plugging”). Proceed as follows:
1. If you want to exchange an interface card, the slot for this card
needs to be deactivated first.
Open the PBX Configuration:
Ports: Slots page in the Configurator. In the table row listing
the card to be exchanged, click
on Stop. The system then deactivates the slot. Any connections
(telephone calls, data transfers)
established through this card
will be terminated.
2. Remove the screws with which
the interface card is secured in
the 1-12 frame and pull the card
out.
3. Unpack the interface card and
check whether it is the desired
type. The type designation is
printed on the front of the card.
Installing Modules
25
S0 2
S0 1
MX+S01-8
Detail: Printing on the front of an
“MX+S01-8” type interface card
6. Plug the desired cables into the
corresponding RJ45 sockets on
the interface card. Refer to Modules starting on page 52 for information on the pin assignment for each interface card.
7. Cover any unused slots with
dummy covers (included in the
scope of delivery).
The dummy covers must be securely screwed to the frame!
CAUTION!
8. If you have exchanged the interface card, you will need to reactivate the slot for this card.
Static charge can damage electronic devices. Observe the regulations regarding electrostatically sensitive components.
4. Carefully push the interface card
into the corresponding slot. The
printing on the front of the module should be at the top (see illustration in previous instruction).
Ensure that the backplane plug
of the interface card is securely
plugged into the socket on the
backplane.
5. Refit the screws to secure the interface card in the 1-12 frame.
26
Installing Modules
Open the PBX Configuration:
Ports: Slots page in the Configurator again. In the table row
listing the card that has been exchanged, click on Start.
9. Observe the LEDs on the card.
Information on indicators can be
found in the chapter Modules
starting on page 52.
Checking the Status of the
Interface Cards via the Web
Console
You can also check the status of the
interface cards via the Web console
of the OpenCom 510.
1. Open the PBX Configuration:
Ports: Slots page in the Configurator.
Installation
2. In the Status table row, check
whether a green tick is displayed
for the newly installed interface
card. The tick indicates that the
interface card is operational.
– clicking on Restart in the
SYS Configuration: Restart
menu in the Configurator.
2. Wait until the LEDs of the installed modules start flashing
red.
Installing a Power Supply
Unit
Depending on the number of installed modules (interface cards), either one or two power supplies are
required (see A and B in the illustration OpenCom 510: 1-12 frame slots
on page 22):
■
■
The power supply unit for
group 1 (A) must always be installed. It supplies the central
control module and the interface cards in slots 1 - 6.
The power supply unit for
group 2 (B) is required if interface cards are to be installed in
in slots 7 - 12.
If you want to deinstall the second
power supply unit or exchange a defective one, proceed as follows:
DANGER! Hazardous voltages inside the device!
3. Unplug all of the mains cables of
the OpenCom 510 to disconnect
the system from the mains supply.
Power supply units must not be
installed if the OpenCom 510 is
switched on! Refer to Notes on
Disconnecting the Mains Supply
starting on page 23.
4. Unpack the power supply unit.
CAUTION!
1. Shut down the OpenCom 510. To
do so, first restart the system by
– entering the code procedure
H * 1 8 5 (system
PIN) # on a connected telephone, or
Installation
Static charge can damage electronic devices. Observe the regulations regarding electrostatically sensitive components.
Installing Modules
27
5. Carefully push the power supply
unit into the corresponding slot
(see also the illustration
OpenCom 510: 1-12 frame slots
on page 22). Seen from the
front, the mains inlet socket
should be on the bottom right.
8. Switch the OpenCom 510 on. To
do so, reconnect the power supply unit with the mains supply (if
you are powering the
OpenCom 510 with two power
supply units, connect the second
unit as well).
The system will now start up and
all modules (interface cards) will
be re-initialised.
Ensure that the backplane plug
of the power supply unit is securely plugged into the socket
on the backplane.
6. Refit the screws to secure the
power supply in the 1-12 frame.
7. Install further interface cards if
required (see also Installing Interface Cards starting on
page 25).
9. Observe the module LEDs during
start-up of the OpenCom 510.
Information on indicators can be
found in the chapter Modules
starting on page 52.
Backplane
28
The BPV+1-12 backplane of the
OpenCom 510 supplies the modules
installed in the 1-12 frame with the
required power and system signals.
The backplane is also used to provide access to the PCM highway (for
transmitting utility data), the LAN
(for exchanging signalling data) and
to the system clock circuits.
■
The MPS+1-AC power supply
units and the MC+1-3 central
control module are each connected by means of a 96-pin
spring contact strip.
■
The interface modules are each
connected by means of a 48-pin
spring contact strip.
The backplane has vertically arranged sockets for the backplane
plugs of the modules:
The backplane also carries the system serial number (etched into the
backplane chip).
Should you need to exchange the
backplane, proceed as follows:
Backplane
Installation
DANGER! Hazardous voltages inside the device!
2. Deinstall all modules and power
supply units from the 1-12
frame (see Installing Modules
starting on page 22).
1. Unplug all of the mains cables of
the OpenCom 510 to disconnect
the system from the mains supply.
3. Remove the screws on the backplane (see arrows in the illustration OpenCom 510: Backplane
screws). Carefully remove the
backplane from the 1-12 frame,
pulling it out of the frame towards the front.
Refer to Notes on Disconnecting
the Mains Supply starting on
page 23.
OpenCom 510: Backplane screws
4. From the front, insert the new
backplane into the 1-12 frame.
Insert and tighten the screws to
secure the backplane in the 1-12
frame.
5. Reinstall the modules in the designated slots.
6. Cover any unused slots with
dummy covers (included in the
scope of delivery).
Installation
The dummy covers must be securely screwed to the frame!
7. Switch the OpenCom 510 on
again. To do so, reconnect the
power supply unit with the
mains supply (if you are powering the OpenCom 510 with two
power supply units, connect the
second unit as well).
8. Observe the module LEDs during
start-up of the OpenCom 510.
Information on indicators can be
Backplane
29
found Modules starting on
page 52.
If you were using software packages subject to licensing (e.g.
the internal voice mail program
OpenVoice) prior to exchanging
the backplane, this software
needs to be reactivated using
new activation keys. Contact
your dealer or DeTeWe distributor.
9. The new keys will be generated
using the backplane serial
number. You will be required to
state this serial number. You can
determine the serial number in
the System Info: Versions menu
in the Configurator.
10. Enter the new activation key in
the SYS Configuration: Licences
menu in the Configurator. This
will reactivate the software
packages.
The backplane serial number is
also used to encode the PARK of
a DECT system. If you are using a
DECT system with the
OpenCom 510, you will need to
re-enter the PARK.
11. You can determine the new
PARK in the System Info: Versions menu in the Configurator.
Uninterruptible Power Supply
If you are using uninterruptible
power supplies (UPS), you must provide a separate UPS either for the
power supply of each frame (cascaded PBXs, see PBX Cascading starting on page 98) or for the power
supply of both frames. If one UPS is
used for both frames, it must be
earthed separately.
An MPS+1-AC power supply unit has
a leakage current of < 0.5 mA.
A 900-watt UPS is entirely sufficient
to power the OpenCom 510 (this
also applies to cascaded systems).
The total leakage current must not
exceed 3.5 mA per mains socket. Use
the leakage current specified by the
UPS manufacturer as a reference.
30
Uninterruptible Power Supply
Installation
Power Failure
In the event of a power failure, the
system memory will retain all data
(program and user data) without
any changes.
The internal clock will continue to
run for 24 hours. If the power failure
lasts longer than 24 hours, the time
and date will be reset to the factory
setting when power is switched on
again, and updated (by means of a
signal from the exchange) after the
first external outgoing call.
With multi-terminal access configurations, the OpenCom 510 provides
an emergency service feature: In the
event of a power failure, the S01 interface will be switched to the S08
interface, enabling you to make calls
through a connected terminal.
The following is required to enable
emergency service:
■
An MX+S01-8 interface card
must be installed.
■
The power failure circuit of this
interface card must be activated.
To do so, set DIP switches S17 to
S20 to “ON”. The interface card is
delivered with the power failure
circuit deactivated (default: off).
■
Port S01 must be connected to
an NTBA (multi-terminal access)
and configured as an external
connection.
Installation
■
Port S08 must be configured as
an internal connection. An ISDN
telephone with emergency service capability must be connected
to this port.
Note: Emergency service is not possible with system access configurations.
Testing the Power Failure Circuit
You can test the configuration as follows:
1. Disconnect the OpenCom 510
from the mains supply (see instructions in Installing the Central Control Module starting on
page 23, steps 1 to 3).
2. Disconnect the NTBA from the
mains supply.
3. It should now be possible to
make external calls through the
ISDN telephone connected to
port S08.
Power Failure
31
2 1
2 1
ON
ON
S17/18 S19/20
MX+S01-8: Location of the DIP switches for the power failure circuit
32
Power Failure
Installation
Interfaces and Connectible
Terminals
Overview
The OpenCom 510 interfaces have
been implemented as RJ45 sockets
on the front of the interface cards
and the central control module. No
special proprietary cables are required. Patch panels can be con-
nected by means of standard patch
cables.
For technical information on the interfaces, refer to Modules starting on
page 52.
Overview: Interfaces and Interface Cards
Interface
Card
Properties
Page
S0
MX+S01-8
8 S0 interfaces for either external or internal connections
63
S2M
MT+S2M1-1
1 S2M interface for connecting to digital
networks (primary multiplex connections)
or for cascading two PBXs
60
Upn
MS+UPN1-8
8 Upn interfaces, not DECT-capable
65
Upn
MS+UPN2-8
8 Upn interfaces, not DECT-capable
66
a/b
MS+A1-8
8 a/b interfaces
68
PCM
MC+1-3
1 PCM port
(on central control module)
57
LAN
MC+1-3
1 Ethernet port (10/100 Mbits/s)
(on central control module)
57
COM / V.24
MC+1-3
2 V.24 ports
(on central control module)
57
The following terminals and systems
can be connected to the
OpenCom 510:
Interfaces and Connectible Terminals
Overview
33
Overview: Interfaces and Connectible Terminals
Interface
Terminals/Systems
Page
S0 (internal)
ISDN terminals (DSS1 protocol):
34
telephones, fax machines, base stations and handsets, ISDN
cards for PCs
Upn
Digital terminals (ISDN terminals, system telephones) and
DECT base stations
38
a/b
Analogue terminals:
telephones, G3 fax machines, (external or internal) modems, external music-on-hold devices, external voice mail
systems, external intercom systems
40
PCM
Connection of a second PBX (PBX cascading)
43
LAN
Connection to a LAN (local area network) or of a DSL
modem
43
COM / V.24
Connection of a PC (for transmitting connection data)
44
S0 Ports
All of the eight S0 interfaces on the
MX+S01-8 interface card are switchable, i.e. they can be used either for
external connections (ISDN basic access or a second PBX) or for internal
connections (ISDN terminals). It is
not possible to use these interfaces
simultaneously for both types of
connections.
Pin Assignment
+ + – –
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
S0 interface pin assignment
The following table explains the S0
interface pin assignment.
The S0 ports have been implemented as RJ45 sockets.
34
S0 Ports
Interfaces and Connectible Terminals
1
Not used
2
Not used
3
Send +
4
Receive +
5
Receive -
6
Send -
7
Not used
8
Not used
Termination
Each interface card has 16 DIP
switches (S1 to S16, two per S0 interface). The DIP switches activate the
required terminating resistors for
the S0 buses (100 ohms per S0 bus).
In the default setting, all terminating resistors are activated (Default:
on).
1 2
Assignment
ON
Pin Number
MX+S01-8: Location of DIP switches S1 to S16
Note: The following configuration
information applies to external as
well as internal S0 interfaces.
Bus Configuration: OpenCom 510
at the End of an S0 Bus
If a OpenCom 510 is connected at
the end of an S0 bus, the terminating
resistors of the relevant S0 interface
cards must be activated.
Interfaces and Connectible Terminals
In a typical configuration, the
OpenCom 510 will be connected to
the network termination for basic
access (NTBA) with an externally
switched S0 port; therefore, all terminating resistors of the interface
card are activated in the default setting.
S0 Ports
35
1 2
ON
OpenCom 510
nating resistors of the relevant S0 interface cards must be deactivated.
1. Remove the interface card by
following the instructions in Installing Interface Cards starting
on page 25.
TR
IAE
One end of the S0 bus is terminated
by the OpenCom 510; the terminating resistors must be activated (DIP
switches set to “on”).
IAE = ISDN socket (German: “ISDN
Anschluß Einheit”) or ISDN terminal.
TR = Terminating Resistor, the S0
termination. The TR must be at the
termination of the line. This can also
be done by an appropriately wired
IAE.
2. The DIP switches are protected
by a plastic foil. Use a pointed
tool such as a screwdriver to
slide the DIP switches down (see
arrow in the illustration
MX+S01-8: Terminating resistors
deactivated).
OpenCom 510
1 2
MX+S01-8: Terminating resistors activated
ON
IAE
TR
TR
IAE
1a
TR
1b
2a
TR
MX+S01-8: Terminating resistors deactivated
Termination on an ISDN socket
Both ends of the S0 bus are terminated by terminating resistors; the
terminating resistors must be deactivated (DIP switches set to “1 2”).
The illustration Termination on an
ISDN socket shows an IAE with integrated terminating resistors.
External ISDN Ports
(S0 External)
2b
Bus Configuration: OpenCom 510
in in the Middle of an S0 Bus
If a OpenCom 510 is connected in
the middle of an S0 bus, the termi-
36
IAE
S0 Ports
You can connect the OpenCom 510
to the NTBA or to a second
OpenCom 510 for PBX cascading.
Interfaces and Connectible Terminals
To connect the OpenCom 510 to the
NTBA, wire pins 3, 4, 5, 6 of the NTBA
and of the OpenCom 510 1:1.
To directly connect two
OpenCom 510 systems via the external S0 ports, connect the RJ45 sockets of the systems by means of a
crossed twisted-pair cable. The distance between the two PBXs must
not exceed 1000 metres (see also
PBX Networking starting on
page 102).
ISDN terminals can be connected to
internal S0 ports by means of a
crossed ISDN cable. For the pin assignment of crossed ISDN cables, refer to the illustration Wiring for direct
connection on page 37. If the terminal did not come with a suitable
ISDN cable, contact your dealer or
DeTeWe distributor.
The length of an internal S0 bus cable must not exceed 150 m. Each internal S0 bus has a power feed of approx. 3 W. The feed voltage is –42 V.
TK-Anlage 1, S 0 ext
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
TK-Anlage 2, S 0 ext
(RJ 45-Buchsen)
Wiring for direct connection
Internal S0 Ports
Up to eight ISDN terminals per bus
can be connected to the internal S0
ports by means of four-wire cables.
Three of these terminals can be supplied with power from the bus; any
additional terminals will require
their own power supply. The internal
S0 buses can be used for point-tomultipoint connections in accordance with the DSS1 protocol (Euro
ISDN).
Interfaces and Connectible Terminals
S0 Ports
37
Upn Ports
Terminals Connected to
Upn Ports
Upn ports can be used to connect
one of the following system terminal
types:
■
RFP 21 DECT base station
■
OpenPhone 61, OpenPhone 63
or OpenPhone 65 system telephone
■
OpenPhone 52 ISDN system terminal
The (corded) OpenPhone 63 and
OpenPhone 65 system telephones
can be cascaded by means of a Upn
adapter, which enables you to connect two OpenPhones to one Upn
port. For further information, refer
to the “OpenPhone 61, 63, 65” user
guide.
The RFP 21 DECT base station can be
used to connect the OpenPhone 21
and OpenPhone 25 DECT handsets.
The OpenPhone 25 has a V.24 interface for data transmissions and Internet access. Note that handsets
such as the OpenPhone 21 can also
be used in conjunction with base
stations operating with the GAP/CAP
standard.
Note on the MS+UPN2-8
Interface Card
Upn interfaces can only be used to
connect DECT base stations if the
MS+UPN2-8 has been installed in
the master system; if this card is in
the slave system, it is not possible to
connect any DECT base stations to
the card’s Upn interfaces.
Note on the MS+UPN1-8
Interface Card
The Upn interfaces of the
MS+UPN1-8 interface card cannot
be used to connect DECT base stations.
Technical Information
The Upn ports have been implemented as RJ45 sockets.
Each of the devices listed above can
be connected to the Upn interface by
means of a two-wire 1:1 cable. System terminals come with a suitable
cable for connection to the RJ45
socket of the interface.
A two-wire cable connected to a Upn
port can be up to 1000 m long, provided it is a 0.6 mm twisted-pair cable.
Each Upn port has a power feed of
approx. 3 W. The short-circuit-proof
feed voltage is –42 V.
38
Upn Ports
Interfaces and Connectible Terminals
DECT Base Station
Connection Variants
A DECT base station can be connected to either one or two Upn interfaces:
■
If the DECT base station is connected to one Upn interface, four
simultaneous calls or connections can be made through the
handsets.
Pin Assignment
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Upn interface pin assignment
The following table explains the Upn
interface pin assignment.
Pin Number
Assignment
1
Not used
If the DECT base station is connected to two Upn interfaces,
eight simultaneous calls or connections can be made through
the handsets.
2
Not used
3
Upn a *)
4
Upn a
5
Upn b
Please note that it is not possible to
establish more simultaneous external connections than there are external B channels.
6
Upn b *)
7
Not used
8
Not used
■
To connect a DECT base station to
two Upn interfaces, you can combine
two Upn ports on the MS+UPN2-8
interface card: Upn ports 1+2, 3+4,
5+6 or 7+8 (Upn port 2 is connected
to Upn port 1, Upn port 4 to Upn
port 3 etc.). Ports are combined by
setting the DIP switches on the card
accordingly. In this configuration,
the DECT base station must be connected to the first Upn port of the
pair by means of a 1:1 cable (system
telephone cable).
*) If the DIP switches are set accordingly, the conductors of the adjacent
Upn port will be connected here; use
only the first Upn port in this configuration.
Setting DIP Switches
1. Remove the interface card by
following the instructions in Installing Interface Cards starting
on page 25.
2. The DIP switches are protected
by a plastic foil. Use a pointed
tool such as a screwdriver to
slide the DIP switches to the
Interfaces and Connectible Terminals
Upn Ports
39
right (see arrow in the illustration Location of the DIP switches
on the MS+UPN2-8 interface card
on page 40).
ON
1 2
Location of the DIP switches on the MS+UPN2-8 interface card
a/b Ports
Terminals Connected to
a/b Ports
a/b ports can be used to connect analogue terminals, e.g. apparatus for
speech and data communications
using pulse or DTMF dialling, e.g.:
40
■
analogue telephones,
■
G3 fax machines,
■
(external or internal) analogue
modems,
■
external music-on-hold devices,
a/b Ports
■
external voice mail systems,
■
external intercom systems.
Please note: Observe the following notes on connecting analogue
terminals. Terminals that do not satisfy the technical requirements for
connection with the OpenCom 510
may cause damage to the communications system!
Analogue Telephones
If analogue telephones are to be
connected, we recommend devices
that support dual-tone multi-fre-
Interfaces and Connectible Terminals
quency (DTMF) dialling as it is not
possible to use the additional features of the OpenCom 510 with
pulse dialling telephones.
Modems
The maximum transmission rate for
analogue modems is 33.6 kbits/s
(V.34+).
Music on Hold
A suitable external device for music
on hold is the Genius 2000, manufactured by Speech Design. If you are
not using an external MoH device,
the OpenCom 510 offers an internal
MoH feature: You can change the
MoH melody in the SYS Configuration: Components menu of the Configurator. For further information,
refer to the online help.
Please note: For external music
on hold, use only devices with an input impedance of 600 ohms, floating
connection. An incorrect input impedance can cause irreparable damage to
the OpenCom 510!
Voice Mail
If you are using an external voice
mail system, it must be capable of
handling the number of digits used
for internal telephone numbers, e.g.
five digits if you have configured
five-digit internal numbers. We recommend the following Speech Design products: Memo 200/300/400
or Memo 200-A/300-A/400-A.
Interfaces and Connectible Terminals
The external voice mail system can
be connected to internal a/b ports as
well as to internal S0 ports. For both
port types the voice mail system can
activate the notification for system
terminals with the code procedures
* 6 8 resp. # 6 8 .
Intercom System (for a/b)
The intercom systems “DoorLine
T01/02” and “DoorLine T03/04” of
the german Telekom’s division
T-Com can be connected via the
“DoorLine M06” to any a/b port. The
“Doorline” module provides the actor for the door opener contact.
Observe the following for connection and use of the intercom system:
■
The intercom system and the
“Doorline” module should be set
to their factory settings.
■
In the PBX Configuration:
Ports: a/b: Change menu in the
Configurator, select Doorline
under Type.
■
The “Doorline” intercom system
has a number of bell keys to
which you can assign different
call numbers in the
PBX Configuration: Ports:
Doorline menu in the Configurator.
■
You can call the “Doorline” intercom system by entering the
code procedure * 1 0 2 .
a/b Ports
41
■
■
The “Doorline” actor can be operated only when the speech
channel is open at the same
time.
Pin Assignment
The “Doorline” intercom system
can be connected to any a/b
port. However, you can use only
one “Doorline” with the
OpenCom 510.
a/b interface pin assignment
For details on installing and configuring the “Doorline” intercom system, refer to the product user guide.
The intercom system should be installed by qualified personnel only
as sensor/actor contacts will need to
be connected for this procedure.
Technical Information
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
The following Table explains the a/b
interface pin assignment.
Pin Number
Assignment
1
Not used
2
Not used
3
Not used
4
Channel a
5
Channel b
6
Not used
7
Not used
8
Not used
The a/b ports have been implemented as RJ45 sockets. Each of the
devices listed above can be connected to the a/b interface by means
of a two-wire 1:1 cable.
A two-wire cable connected to an
a/b port can be up to 6500 m long,
provided it is a 0.6 mm twisted-pair
cable, or up to 3000 m if a 0.4 mm
twisted-pair cable is used.
The 50 Hz/40 V AC ringing voltage of
the eight interfaces is supplied by
the interface card.
42
a/b Ports
Interfaces and Connectible Terminals
PCM Port
The PCM port on the MC+1-3 central
control module is used to cascade
two PBXs.
Cascaded PBXs must be connected
by means of a twisted-pair cable
with RJ45 plugs. This cable transmits
voice data as well as administration
data between the PBXs.
All eight pins of the cable must be
wired 1:1. Connect the cable to the
PCM port of the MC+1-3 central control module of each of the two PBXs.
The shielded CAT-5 cable must not
be longer than 50 centimetres.
For further information, refer to PBX
Cascading starting on page 98.
LAN Port
The LAN port (Ethernet interface) on
the MC+1-3 central control module
allows the integration of the
OpenCom 510 into a company LAN
(Local Area Network) with the use of
a 10-Mbit hub or switch. In such a
configuration, the OpenCom 510
can, for example, act as an IP router
for establishing Internet connections.
The Ethernet interface supports
transmission rates of 10 Mbits/s and
100 Mbits/s in half duplex or full duplex mode. The transmission rate
and mode are selected automatically
(Auto Sensing function).
A LAN cable (twisted-pair in accordance with 10BaseT or 100BaseTX)
must not be longer than 100 m. Safe
operation with 100 Mbits/s requires
Interfaces and Connectible Terminals
the use of category 5 cables and
sockets. Use a shielded Ethernet
cable (STP cable, Shielded Twisted
Pair cable).
DSL
External DSL modems can be connected via the LAN port. This requires the use of an external switch
or hub which connects the output of
the DSL modem (NTBBA) to the LAN
port of the OpenCom 510. The router
will then convert the PPPoE protocol
to the TCP/IP protocol of the LAN.
The DSL modem is connected by
means of a crossed twisted-pair cable. Alternatively, you can use a
switchable port on the hub, which is
usually marked with an “X”.
PCM Port
43
OpenCom
TAE
DSL & Uk0
S0
DSL
Splitter
Net
TCP/IP &
PPPoE
DSL
Uk0
NTBA
S0
PC
Crosslinked twisted pair cable
PPPoE
DSL
Modem
TCP/IP
Hub
Net
Network connection of the OpenCom via ISDN and DSL
Service PC
The Ethernet interface can also be
used to connect a service PC using a
crossed Ethernet cable.
COM Port
The COM port (V.24-1 interface) on
the MC+1-3 central control module
can be used to connect a PC for the
purpose of transmitting connection
data. Connection data can be analysed in detail with the connection
data recording program OpenCount.
Please note: The COM port cable
must not be longer than 3 metres.
The V.24 interface uses a transmission rate of 19.2 kbits/s.
44
COM Port
Note: A special 10-pin cable is required for connecting apparatus to
the V.24-1 interface. Contact your DeTeWe distributor or local retailer if you
want to purchase one of these cables.
Pin Assignment
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
V.24 interface pin assignment
Interfaces and Connectible Terminals
The following Table explains the V.24
interface pin assignment.
Pin Number
Assignment
1
GND (EED)
2
Not used
3
DTR
4
CTS
5
TXD
6
RTS
7
RXD
8
DSR
9
DCD
10
Not used
Interfaces and Connectible Terminals
COM Port
45
Accessories and Adapters
The OpenPhone 63 and
OpenPhone 65 system telephones
have one or two slots on the rear for
various adapters and other accessories. Further information on installing and operating these add-ons can
be found in the “OpenPhone 61, 63,
65” user guide under “Add-ons (with
& without an Adapter)”.
In the following you will find technical details on the add-ons and a list
of compatible accessories.
Upn Adapter
The Upn adapter is an adapter with a
Upn port for connecting another
OpenPhone 61, 63, 65 system telephone and a socket for an extra
plug-in power supply.
Weight: 70 g
Dimensions: 73 x 60 x 30 mm
Power consumption: max. 195 mW
Cable length: max. 30 m
Please note: The Upn adapter
may be used only for connecting the
system terminals listed above. The
Upn extension cable must not exceed
30 m in length and must not be used
outdoors.
Note: An extra plug-in power supply is required to operate combinations of equipment with a power consumption that exceeds the power
output of the Upn ports.
a/b Adapter
You can use an a/b adapter to connect analogue terminals to the
OpenPhone 63 and OpenPhone 65
system telephones.
Connecting an a/b adapter will result in exceeding the feed performance of the Upn port, regardless of
the range. Therefore a plug-in power
supply must be additionally connected to the a/b adapter.
Note: Please use the plug-in power
supply with the product code
4505759. The plug-in power supply
for use in the UK has the product code
4510694.
Weight: 70g
Dimensions: 73 x 60 x 30 mm
Power consumption: max. 160 mW
Cable length: max. 3 m
Audio Adapter
The audio adapter is an adapter extension with four different ports for
external audio and signalling devices.
46
Accessories and Adapters
Weight: 70g
Dimensions: 73 x 60 x 30 mm
Power consumption: max. 260 mW
(with relay active).
Audio Adapter Pin Assignment
Port
Used for
Socket
Assignment
1
Ear cap,
second handset,
headset,
active speaker or microphone
RJ-10
(4-pin
Western
socket)
1: microphone -
2
2: speaker +
3: speaker 4: microphone +
Recording device; relay Stereo jack,
contact generates sig- 3.5 mm
nal for starting and
stopping recording.
1 (GND): recording
signal, relay contact 1
2 (peak): recording signal +
3 (ring): relay contact 1
3
Not used on
OpenCom 510
Round power
socket
(4 mm)
-
4
Door display
RJ-11 or
RJ-12
(6-pin
Western socket)
4, 5: relay contact 2
1, 2, 3, 6: NC
Electrical Data of Ports
Port
Connection Values
Microphone,
microphone of second handset,
headset microphone
Electret microphone
Typical sensitivity: 10 mV/Pa
Power feed: I < 300 µA at 1.5 V
Ear cap,
loudspeaker of second handset,
headset, headset loudspeaker
Typical impedance: 150 ± 30 ohms
Typical sensitivity: 94 dB/1 mW
(0 dB = 20 µPa)
Active speaker
Max. output voltage: 1 Vrms
at input impedance > 10 kohms
Accessories and Adapters
47
Electrical Data of Ports
Port
Connection Values
Recording device audio input
Typical input sensitivity: 0.24 mV
(microphone level)
Recording device start/stop
(relay contact 1)
Max. switching voltage: 50 VDC/29 V AC
Max. switching current: 1 ADC/0.7 A AC
Door display
(relay contact 2)
Max. switching voltage: 50 VDC/29 V AC
Max. switching current: 1 ADC/0.7 A AC
Approved Devices /
Approved Accessories
Please note: Only the following,
recommended accessories may be
connected to the audio adapter. The
cable to the door display must not be
run outdoors.
The following devices are recommended:
Type
Manufacturer, Product Designation
Headset:
GN-Netcom, Profile binaural (1869-00-03)
GN-Netcom, Profile 3-in-1 (1866-00-04)
48
Headset adapter cable:
GN Netcom, QD cable (quick coupling), smooth,
Mod 4 (8800-00-01)
Second handset
Siemens, L30351-F600-A366
Handset
DeTeWe, OpenPhone 60
Microphone:
Winfinity, 4511326 / H 282-18
Loudspeaker:
Siemens, L30460-X1278-X
Recording device:
No recommendation
Accessories and Adapters
Device Combinations
These symbols are used in the following tables:
You can use the following power values to calculate the power consumption of combined equipment:
●
This combination is possible.
❍ Reduced tone ringing, open listen-
ing and hands-free talking volume
possible.
■
Upn adapter: 195 mW
■
Audio adapter: 260 mW
■
a/b adapter: 160 mW
(must be combined with a plugin power supply!)
■
OpenPhone 61: 1,000 mW
■
OpenPhone 63: 1,025 mW
■
OpenPhone 65: 1,140 mW
■
Up to three add-on keypads:
330 mW
Configurations without
Plug-in Power Supply
(Range up to 500 m)
The following table shows examples
of equipment combinations for
which the maximum power consumption of 2.4 W is not exceeded.
Basic Unit: OpenPhone 63
Add-ons
Second Terminal
Power
Audio adapter Upn adapter
Up to 3 keypad
modules
–
–
–
–
1025 mW
●
–
–
–
1285 mW
–
●
–
OpenPhone 61
2220 mW
–
●
–
OpenPhone 63
without adapter
2245 mW
–
●
–
OpenPhone 65
without adapter or
keypad module
2360 mW
Accessories and Adapters
49
Basic Unit: OpenPhone 65
Add-ons
Second Terminal
Power
Audio adapter Upn adapter
Up to 3 keypad
modules
–
–
–
–
1140 mW
–
–
●
–
1470 mW
●
–
●
–
1730 mW
–
●
–
OpenPhone 61
2335 mW
–
●
–
OpenPhone 63
without adapter
2360 mW
–
❍
–
OpenPhone 65
without adapter or
keypad module
2475 mW
Configurations without
Plug-in Power Supply
(Range 500 to 1000 m)
The following table shows examples
of equipment combinations for
which the maximum power consumption of 2.2 W is not exceeded.
Basic Unit
OpenPhone 63
OpenPhone 65
50
Add-ons
Power
Audio adapter Upn adapter
Up to 3
keypad modules
●
–
–
1285 mW
–
–
●
1470 mW
●
–
●
1730 mW
Accessories and Adapters
Configurations with
Plug-in Power Supplies
The following table shows examples
of equipment combinations operating with additional power from a
plug-in power supply.
Basic Unit: OpenPhone 63
Add-ons:
Up to 3
keypad
modules
Second terminal
Audio
adapter
Upn adapter OpenPhone 61 OpenPhone 63
without
and plug-in
adapter
power
supply
●
OpenPhone 65
without
adapter and
with 1 keypad
module
●
●
●
●
●
Basic Unit: OpenPhone 65
Add-ons:
Up to 3
keypad
modules
Second terminal
Audio
adapter
Upn adapter OpenPhone 61 OpenPhone 63
without
and plug-in
adapter
power supply
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
OpenPhone 65
without
adapter and
with 1 keypad
module
●
●
●
●
●
●
Accessories and Adapters
51
Modules
This chapter provides detailed technical information on the modules
which can be installed in the
OpenCom 510. You will find information on their respective fields of application, along with technical and
operational information and notes
on indicators.
Please note: When installing
modules, always observe the Notes
on Safety starting on page 17!
The modules fulfil the following
tasks:
■
Power supply units (max. 2) provide the OpenCom 510 with
power.
■
A central control module controls
the entire system. This module
also houses the memory card
(CompactFlash) for storing data.
■
Interface cards are used to connect the OpenCom 510 to the
telecommunications network
(or to another communications
system) and to connect terminals.
A number of interface cards are
available for these tasks. Depending on the interface card’s
functions, it may also be referred
to as a trunk module or as a subscriber module.
For detailed information on installing modules, refer to the chapter Installing Modules starting on page 22.
52
Modules
Module Naming Conventions
The names of the modules indicate
the module type and functions:
Mx+y1-z
Abbr.
Meaning
M
Module
x
Indicates the module type as
follows:
C
Control
S
Subscriber
T
Trunk
X
Subscriber/Trunk
PS
Power Supply
+
Character used to divide the
product name
y
Indicates the interface type as
follows:
A
Analogue interface
UPN Upn interface
S0
S0 interface
S2M S2M interface
1
Module generation
-
Character used to divide the
product name
z
Number of interfaces
Modules
Module Naming Conventions
53
Overview of Available Modules
The following table provides an
overview of modules available for
the OpenCom 510:
Name
Description
Page
MPS+1-AC
Power supply with AC/DC converter
55
MC+1-3
Central control module with three interfaces
57
MT+S2M1-1
Trunk module with one S2M interface for connecting to digital 60
networks or for cascading two PBXs
MX+S01-8
Trunk or subscriber module with eight S0 interfaces for either 63
external (trunk) or internal (subscriber) connections
MS+UPN1-8
Subscriber module with eight Upn interfaces for connecting
digital terminals (ISDN terminals, system telephones); does
not support DECT base stations
65
MS+UPN2-8
Subscriber module with eight Upn interfaces for connecting
digital terminals (ISDN terminals, system telephones) and
DECT base stations
66
MS+A1-8
Subscriber module with eight a/b interfaces for connecting
analogue terminals
68
S0 1
MX+S01-8
S0 2
The name of the module and the interface type are printed on the front
of the modules. The following illustration shows the printing on the
MX+S01-8 interface card.
Detail: Printing on the front of an
MX+S01-8 interface card
54
Overview of Available Modules
Modules
MPS+1-AC
Field of Application
The MPS+1-AC power supply unit
supplies power to the first six slots
(1 to 6) of the OpenCom 510. The
MPS+1-AC converts the output voltages (220 V/110 V) output voltages
into a DC voltage (+3.3 V and –42 V).
If the remaining slots (7 to 12) are to
be used, a second MPS+1-AC power
supply unit will need to be installed.
Technical Data
The following data refer to the supply of power to the first six slots.
Input Voltage
Rated voltage
230 V via standard
IEC connector
Voltage range
95 V to 275 V
Rated current
2.0 A at 115 V
1.0 A at 230 V
0.9 A at 275 V
MPS+1-AC
Efficiency at rated > 80 %
load
+3.3 V Output Voltage
Rated voltage
+3.3 V
Voltage range
+3.2 V... +3.4 V
Rated current
10.0 A
Current limitation 12 A to 15 A
Short-circuit
Continuous shortcircuit protection
–42 V Output Voltage
Rated voltage
–42 V
Voltage range
–40 V... –44 V
MPS+1-AC: Front view
Modules
MPS+1-AC
55
–42 V Output Voltage
Rated current
4.0 A
In the event of a power failure, the
power supply unit will generate a
power failure signal.
Current limitation 4.4 A to 5.5 A
Short-circuit
Continuous shortcircuit protection
Indicators
There are two LEDs on the front of
the MPS+1-AC power supply unit.
The LEDs indicate the following:
■
Left: If the left LED is constantly
lit up green, the output voltage
is +3.3 V.
■
Right: If the right LED is constantly lit up green, the output
voltage is –42 V.
The LEDs only indicate that the voltage is present. They do not say anything about the voltage quality.
Operational Information
The MPS+1-AC power supply unit
will be ready for operation as soon as
it has been plugged into the designated slot (see Slots starting on
page 22).
The mains voltage of 230 V is drawn
through the standard IEC connector.
The output voltages are fed to the
BPV+1-12 backplane through the
96-pin spring contact strip (see
Backplane starting on page 28).
56
MPS+1-AC
Modules
MC+1-3
MC+1-3
These are standard external Ethernet
(1x) and V.24 (2x) interfaces as well
as internal PCMV, PCMH and CompactFlash slot interfaces.
V.24-2 V.24-1 Ethernet PCM
Technical Information
■
The MC+1-3 central control
module is powered by the
group 1 power supply unit.
■
The MC+1-3 central control
module has a plug-in card
(MSUB-MRAM) with 128 Mbytes
of main (random access) memory.
Please note: This plug-in card
must not be exchanged by service
personnel. In the event of a malfunction, the entire MC+1-3 central control module must be sent in for repair.
■
MC+1-3: Front view
Field of Application
The MC+1-3 module is the central
control module of the
OpenCom 510. It can be installed in
slot 0 only (at the left end in the 1-12
frame; see Slots starting on
page 22).
In addition to the control function,
the MC+1-3 central control module
provides a number of interfaces.
Modules
The MC+1-3 central control
module has a CompactFlash slot
(MSUB-MFL, PCMCIA interface)
for CompactFlash cards. The following data are stored on the
CompactFlash card: the
OpenCom 510 firmware, the system terminal software, the configuration data and all customer
data such as audio files for the
internal voice mail system.
Note: Only licensed cards may be
used. These are currently (May 2004)
special 256-Mbyte cards by SanDisc.
MC+1-3
57
for frame coding (PBX Cascading
starting on page 98).
Contact your DeTeWe distributor or
local retailer if you want to purchase
one of these cards.
■
■
■
■
In cascaded configurations, master and slave systems are connected via the PCM port (RJ45
socket).
■
The Ethernet port (10/100
Mbits/s) can be used to connect
the OpenCom 510 to the LAN.
■
The V.24-1 interface can be used
to connect additional apparatus,
e.g. a computer for analysing
call charges.
In cascaded OpenCom 510 configurations, the slave system requires an MC+1-3 central control module of its own.
In cascaded OpenCom 510 configurations, a CompactFlash card
must be installed in the master
system; it is not necessary to install one of these cards in the
slave system.
In cascaded configurations, the
central control modules use the
PCMV interface to exchange system signals. The PCMV interface
provides the system clock signals, access to the 16-Mbit/s
PCM highway, and a 2-Mbit/s
LAN.
For information on the V.24 interface pin assignment, refer to
COM Port starting on page 44.
Indicators
There are four LEDs on the front of
the MC+1-3 central control module.
MC+1-3
1
2
3
4
MC+1-3: LEDs
■
58
In cascaded configurations, the
S1 and S2 DIP switches are used
The LEDs indicate the following:
LED 1:
Flashing yellow
New software is being loaded onto an interface card
(the corresponding interface card’s indicator will be
constantly red).
LED 2:
Constantly green
The central control module is operational (flickering
is normal).
Flashing green/yellow
The system software (firmware) is starting up.
MC+1-3
Modules
Flashing yellow
The booter is reloading.
Constantly yellow
The system is booting.
Constantly red
System fault
LED 3:
–
Not used
LED 4:
Constantly green
An Ethernet connection has been established.
Operational Information
If you need to exchange the central
control module, shut down the system first! The OpenCom 510 must be
disconnected from the mains supply
(see Installing the Central Control
Module starting on page 23).
Do not pull the CompactFlash card
during operation as this may cause
data to be lost!
A MC+1-3 central control module installed in a master system provides
the following central resources:
■
3 three-party conferences
■
6 DTMF transmitters
■
10 DTMF receivers
■
1 Music On Hold
■
32 HDLC controllers for RAS, ISP
and DECT data.
If the MC+1-3 central control module is removed from a cascaded PBX,
the entire system will become inoperative.
Modules
MC+1-3
59
MT+S2M1-1
-42V
S2M
MT+S2M1-1
MT+S2M1-1: Front view
Field of Application
The MT+S2M1-1 interface card provides one ISDN S2M interface for connecting the OpenCom 510 either to a
primary rate access or to a second
PBX (ISDN point-to-point connection).
60
MT+S2M1-1
The MT+S2M1-1 interface card can
be installed in any of the slots (1 to
12) of the OpenCom 510 (see Slots
starting on page 22).
Technical Information
■
The MT+S2M1-1 interface card
can also be installed in a slave
system.
■
A maximum of four MT+S2M1-1
interface cards can be configured in the entire system.
■
No settings need to be made on
the MT+S2M1-1 interface card.
■
The MT+S2M1-1 interface card
runs on software acquired from
the system. After the card has
been installed it will automatically load the required software.
■
The maximum range is 300 m.
■
The short-circuit-proof feed
voltage is –42 V/7 W.
Modules
Assignment
1
IN a
2
IN b
3
Not used
4
OUT a
5
OUT b
6
Not used
7
Not used
8
Not used
MT+S2M1-1
1
2
3
4
S2M
Pin Number
Indicators
There are four LEDs on the front of
the MT+S2M1-1 interface card.
-42V
Pin Assignment
The following table shows the pin
assignment for the RJ45 connector
of the interface (labelled “S2M”; see
the illustration MT+S2M1-1: Front
view on page 60):
MT+S2M1-1: LEDs
The following table shows the pin
assignment for the RJ45 connector
of the power feed cable (labelled
“–42 V”; see the illustration
MT+S2M1-1: Front view on page 60):
Pin Number
Assignment
1
Not used
2
Not used
3
–42 V
4
0V
5
0V
6
–42 V
7
Not used
8
Not used
Modules
MT+S2M1-1
61
The LEDs indicate the following:
LED 1:
Constantly yellow
At least one connection established through the interface card is active.
LED 2:
Constantly green
The interface card is operational; the slot has been
activated (flickering is normal).
Flashing yellow
The interface card is ready, but the slot has not been
activated or the interface card has not been configured yet.
Constantly red
New software is being loaded onto the interface
card. If the LED lights up red for an extended period
of time, there may be a fault.
LED 3:
Constantly green
The interface card is providing the system clock signal (indicated only in the master system and only on
an interface card).
LED 4:
–
Not used
Operational Information
The MT+S2M1-1 interface card can
be exchanged during operation, i.e.
without powering down the system.
However, the slot must first be deactivated in the Configurator in the
web console (see Installing Interface
Cards starting on page 25).
If the MT+S2M1-1 interface card is
being used in the master system of a
cascaded configuration, it can provide the system clock signal. Unless
otherwise specified, the system automatically selects an S2M card as
the clock signal source. For further
information, refer to PBX Cascading
starting on page 98.
62
MT+S2M1-1
Modules
MX+S01-8
Field of Application
The MX+S01-8 interface card provides eight 8 S0 interfaces which can
be used for either external connections, i.e. to connect the
OpenCom 510 to a digital network
(PSTN, Public Switch Telephony Network), or internal connections, i.e. to
connect digital terminals (ISDN telephones, ISDN fax machines etc.) to
the OpenCom 510.
figured accordingly, external
calls can be made using an
emergency telephone.
For further information, refer to
Power Failure starting on
page 31.
■
The MX+S01-8 interface card can be
installed in any of the slots (1 to 12)
of the OpenCom 510 (see Slots starting on page 22).
For further information, refer to
S0 Ports starting on page 34.
■
Technical Information
■
The MX+S01-8 interface card
can also be installed in a slave
system.
■
DIP switches S1 to S16 can be
used to activate a 100-ohm terminal resistor (default: ON).
■
The power failure circuit can be
activated by means of DIP
switches S17 to S20 (default:
off). If activated, the system will
connect the first S0 interface
with the eighth S0 interface in
the event of a power failure; provided the system has been con-
Modules
If the MX+S01-8 interface card is
being used in the master system
of a cascaded configuration, it
can provide the system clock signal.
For further information, refer to
PBX Networking starting on
page 102.
■
For further information, refer to
Termination starting on page 35.
All eight S0 interfaces can be
configured either as subscriber
(internal) interfaces or as trunk
(external) interfaces.
The MX+S01-8 interface card
runs on software acquired from
the system. After the card has
been installed it will automatically load the required software.
Pin Assignment
For information on the S0 interface
pin assignment, refer to S0 Ports
starting on page 34.
MX+S01-8
63
Indicators
There are four LEDs on the front of
the MX+S01-8 interface card.
MX+S01-8
3
4
S0 2
S0 1
1
2
MX+S01-8: LEDs
The LEDs indicate the following:
LED 1:
Constantly yellow
At least one connection established through the interface card is active.
LED 2:
Constantly green
The interface card is operational; the slot has been
activated (flickering is normal).
Flashing yellow
The interface card is ready, but the slot has not been
activated or the interface card has not been configured yet.
Constantly red
New software is being loaded onto the interface
card. If the LED lights up red for an extended period
of time, there may be a fault.
LED 3:
Constantly green
The interface card is providing the system clock signal (indicated only in the master system and only on
an interface card).
LED 4:
Constantly yellow
The interface card is running a combination of subscriber and trunk connections, i.e. both internal and
external S0 interfaces have been configured.
Operational Information
The MX+S01-8 interface card can be
exchanged during operation, i.e.
without powering down the system.
However, the slot must first be deac-
64
MX+S01-8
tivated in the Configurator in the
web console (see Installing Interface
Cards starting on page 25).
Modules
All three protocol layers can be individually configured as master or
slave for each S0 interface.
The S0 interfaces can be configured
as DSS1-PP, DSS1-PMP or Q.SIG lines.
MS+UPN1-8
Field of Application
The MS+UPN1-8 interface card provides eight Upn interfaces for connecting system terminals; however,
it is not possible to connect DECT
base stations.
The MS+UPN1-8 interface card can
be installed in any of the slots (1 to
12) of the OpenCom 510 (see Slots
starting on page 22).
Pin Assignment
RJ45 Connector Pin Assignment for
the MS+UPN1-8 Interface
Pin Number
Assignment
1
Not used
2
Not used
3
Not used
4
Upn a
5
Upn b
6
Not used
7
Not used
8
Not used
Technical Information
■
The MS+UPN1-8 interface card
can also be installed in a slave
system.
No settings need to be made on
the MS+UPN1-8 interface card.
■
The MS+UPN1-8 interface card
runs on software acquired from
the system. After the card has
been installed it will automatically load the required software.
Indicators
There are four LEDs on the front of
the MS+UPN1-8 interface card.
MS+UPN1-8
1
2
3
4
UPN 2
UPN 1
■
MS+UPN1-8
Modules
MS+UPN1-8
65
The LEDs indicate the following:
LED 1:
Constantly yellow
At least one connection established through the interface card is active.
LED 2:
Constantly green
The interface card is operational; the slot has been
activated (flickering is normal).
Flashing yellow
The interface card is ready, but the slot has not been
activated or the interface card has not been configured yet.
Constantly red
New software is being loaded onto the interface
card. If the LED lights up red for an extended period
of time, there may be a fault.
LED 3:
–
Not used
LED 4:
–
Not used
Operational Information
The MS+UPN1-8 interface card can
be exchanged during operation, i.e.
without powering down the system.
However, the slot must first be deactivated in the Configurator in the
web console (see Installing Interface
Cards starting on page 25).
The short-circuit-proof feed voltage
is –42 V.
MS+UPN2-8
Field of Application
The MS+UPN2-8 interface card provides eight Upn interfaces for connecting system terminals and DECT
base stations.
The MS+UPN2-8 interface card can
be installed in any of the slots (1 to
12) of the OpenCom 510 (see Slots
starting on page 22).
66
MS+UPN2-8
Technical Information
■
The MS+UPN2-8 interface card
can also be installed in a slave
system.
■
A maximum of 48 RFPs (Radio
Fixed Parts, DECT base stations)
can be connected to the entire
system.
Modules
■
In order to connect RFPs, Upn
ports 1+2, 3+4, 5+6 or 7+8 can
be combined by setting the DIP
switches on the card accordingly.
For further information, refer to
Upn Ports starting on page 38.
The MS+UPN2-8 interface card
runs on software acquired from
the system. After the card has
been installed it will automatically load the required software.
Indicators
There are four LEDs on the front of
the MS+UPN2-8 interface card.
MS+UPN2-8
1
2
3
4
UPN 2
UPN 1
■
Pin Assignment
For information on the Upn interface
pin assignment, refer to Upn Ports
starting on page 38.
MS+UPN2-8
The LEDs indicate the following:
LED 1:
Constantly yellow
At least one connection established through the interface card is active.
LED 2:
Constantly green
The interface card is operational; the slot has been
activated (flickering is normal).
Flashing yellow
The interface card is ready, but the slot has not been
activated or the interface card has not been configured yet.
Constantly red
New software is being loaded onto the interface
card. If the LED lights up red for an extended period
of time, there may be a fault.
LED 3:
–
Not used
LED 4:
–
Not used
Modules
MS+UPN2-8
67
Operational Information
The MS+UPN2-8 interface card can
be exchanged during operation, i.e.
without powering down the system.
However, the slot must first be deactivated in the Configurator in the
web console (see Installing Interface
Cards starting on page 25).
DECT base stations can be connected
only if the interface card has been
installed in the master system of a
cascaded configuration.
MS+A1-8
Field of Application
The MS+A1-8 interface card provides eight analogue interfaces for
connecting analogue terminals.
■
The consultation feature can be
selected by means of a flash key
and/or earthing key.
■
The MS+A1-8 interface card
runs on software acquired from
the system. After the card has
been installed it will automatically load the required software.
■
No settings need to be made on
the MS+A1-8 interface card.
The MS+A1-8 interface card can be
installed in any of the slots (1 to 12)
of the OpenCom 510 (see Slots starting on page 22).
Technical Information
■
■
■
68
The MS+A1-8 interface card can
also be installed in a slave system.
The MS+A1-8 interface card
supports pulse dialling as well as
dual-tone multi-frequency
(DTMF) dialling. The central receivers of the MC+1-3 interface
card are used for DTMF recognition.
Pin Assignment
For information on the a/b interface
pin assignment, refer to a/b Ports
starting on page 40.
Indicators
There are four LEDs on the front of
the MS+A1-8 interface card.
Calling line identification presentation (CLIP) is supported.
MS+A1-8
Modules
MS+A1-8
3
4
a/b 2
a/b 1
1
2
MS+A1-8
The LEDs indicate the following:
LED 1:
Constantly yellow
At least one connection established through the interface card is active.
LED 2:
Constantly green
The interface card is operational; the slot has been
activated (flickering is normal).
Flashing yellow
The interface card is ready, but the slot has not been
activated or the interface card has not been configured yet.
Constantly red
New software is being loaded onto the interface
card. If the LED lights up red for an extended period
of time, there may be a fault.
LED 3:
–
Not used
LED 4:
–
Not used
Operational Information
The MS+A1-8 interface card can be
exchanged during operation, i.e.
without powering down the system.
However, the slot must first be deactivated in the Configurator in the
web console (see Installing Interface
Cards starting on page 25).
Modules
MS+A1-8
69
Configuration
Configuration and programming of
the OpenCom 510 is performed by
the Configurator, a special software
application integrated into the sys-
tem. The Configurator is operated
via the Web console, which can be
run on any PC connected to the
OpenCom 510.
The OpenCom 510 Web console
Using the Web console, you can:
■
70
perform the initial configuration of the OpenCom 510,
■
configure users of the
OpenCom 510 and authorise
them to use certain system services,
■
carry out further
system maintenance,
■
use PC-supported telephony
functions,
■
read out call charge information,
■
access the OpenCom 510 telephone book.
The Web console has an integrated
online help function that offers comprehensive information on configuration and maintenance of the
OpenCom 510 (see Loading the Online Help starting on page 81).
Note: In order to use all the new
system software functions, we recommend that you download the latest
software from our Web site at
http://www.detewe.com.
For the initial configuration you can
connect the PC to the OpenCom 510
Configuration
via the Ethernet port. A COM port
can also be used. The TCP/IP network
protocol is used to set up a connection via one of these ports. You can
then open the Web console of the
OpenCom 510 and call up the Configurator from there.
Note: This chapter describes initial
configuration of the OpenCom 510.
For day-to-day operation you can integrate the OpenCom 510 into a LAN
and start the Configurator from any
PC. For information on how to do this,
refer to the Configuration Examples
starting on page 86.
Brief Guide to Initial Configuration
Setting up a first connection is quite
simple with a standard Windows PC:
First Configuration via
Serial Port
1. Turn off the PC. Remove all connected network cables.
1. The serial port can also be used
as alternative access for the first
configuration.Additionally, you
require a crossed serial line
(“null modem”).Install the “occonfig” program from the system CD. To do this, you must log
on as an administrator under
Windows NT or Windows 2000/
XP.
2. Connect the PC network card to
the LAN port. Use a cross-wired
Ethernet cable to do this.
3. Restart the PC. If you manually
deactivated the automatic configuration of the network card
via DHCP, you must reactivate
this and again restart the computer.
4. Start the Web browser. In the
address field, enter
“http://192.168.99.254/”.
The login page of the Web console
will then open. For further details,
please refer to Configuring the
OpenCom 510 starting on page 79.
Configuration
2. Shut down the PC. Remove all
connected network leads. Connect the serial port of the PC to
the COM port of the
OpenCom 510.
3. Restart the PC. Set up an RAS
link with the icon configured on
the desktop under step 1. Enter
“Administrator” without a password as your user name.
Brief Guide to Initial Configuration
71
4. Start the Web browser. Enter
“http://192.168.99.254/” in the
address box.
You will see the log-on page of the
Web console. Continue reading under Configuring the OpenCom 510
starting on page 79.
System Requirements
Note: If no connection can be established by following the instructions in the Brief Guide to Initial Configuration starting on page 71, refer
to the more detailed explanations below.
■
IBM-compatible 200 MHz PC
In addition, the selected type of connection requires further system
components that you may have to
install on your PC. The driver software is normally supplied with the
hardware, and the appropriate version should be available for your operating system. You will find the system software on the installation CD
of your operating system.
■
32 MB RAM and 50 MB of free
hard disk space
For connection on the V.24 port
(COM port) you need:
■
Microsoft Windows 95/98,
Microsoft Windows 2000/XP or
Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 operating system
■
Hardware: one free serial port
(RS-232, V.24) and a serial cable
(SUBD9). System software: serial port driver and TCP/IP protocol software
■
Microsoft Internet Explorer version 4.0 or higher, or Netscape
Communicator version 4.5 or
higher
■
Driver software: RAS adapter
software for installation on the
service PC (is included on the
CD)
A normal TCP/IP-capable PC with a
Web browser is required for the initial configuration. The PC should at
least meet the following requirements:
Note: Microsoft Internet Explorer is
already installed in current versions
of the Microsoft Windows operating
72
system. If required, a Web browser
can be installed from the system CD
delivered with the OpenCom 510.
System Requirements
For connection by network card you
need:
Configuration
■
Hardware: network card with
10BaseT port and RJ-45 network
cable (crossover twisted pairs or
connection via a hub)
■
Software: network card driver
and TCP/IP protocol software
Configuration under Windows
Before beginning initial configuration, install the necessary hardware
and matching driver software on the
PC. Follow the installation instructions supplied with the hardware. In
many cases, the TCP/IP system software is installed together with the
driver software for the hardware.
When you have installed the driver
software, proceed as follows:
IP protocol is present. If necessary, install TCP/IP by clicking on
the “Add” button.
3. Select “TCP/IP” from the “Protocol/Microsoft” folder and confirm your entry with “OK”.
4. Then follow the installation instructions displayed.
Note: The following steps are not
necessary under Windows 2000/XP. If
possible, use a network card connection as network cards are easier to
configure and feature higher data
transfer rates. For more information
please read Connection by Network
Card (LAN) starting on page 75
Depending on the type of connection (network card or V.24) you select, note the following when installing the driver and system software.
1. Open “Network Settings” in the
Control Panel of your PC. To do
this, you select the item “Settings > Control Panel” from the
Start menu and double-click on
the “Network” icon. Under Windows NT, select the “Protocols”
tab.
The required components are normally ready installed together with
the operating system. In this case,
you can easily configure the connection to the OpenCom 510 by using
the program “occonfig”:
2. Check the list of installed components to see whether the TCP/
Configuration
Connection on Serial Port
(V.24)
Note: Under Windows NT or Windows 2000/XP you must log on as an
administrator.
Configuration under Windows
73
1. Insert the system CD supplied
along with the OpenCom 510.
The CD starts automatically if
your PC is configured accordingly. Otherwise select “Run” in
the Start menu. Use the
“Browse” button to find the
“cd_start.exe” program on the
CD. Confirm your entry with
“Open” and “OK”.
2. Select the “Software, installation
program for RAS network link”
option from the start mask. Click
on “OK” to install the modem
driver.
3. In the dialogue that follows, select a serial port and confirm this
with “OK”.
3. In the dialogue which follows,
enter the user name and password valid for the OpenCom 510
user account being used. For the
initial configuration, log on under the user name “Administrator” without giving a password.
Clear any entries in the “Domain” box and confirm this with
“OK”.
When the connection is established, all necessary IP address
parameters will be transmitted
by the OpenCom 510 using the
PPP protocol and automatically
set for the direct PC link.
After restarting your computer, you
will find an icon for the connection
to the OpenCom 510 on your desktop.
4. Once set-up of the connection is
confirmed, you can continue
with Testing the Setup starting
on page 76.
Note: If this procedure cannot be
completed properly, refer to the section entitled Notes on Configuring the
Serial Port on page 75.
Note: It is not possible to operate a
network card and a remote data
transfer connection for the same network address range simultaneously.
For this reason you must temporarily
deactivate the network card when
you want to establish a remote data
transfer connection. To do this, open
the “System” icon in the Control Panel
and deactivate the network card in
the “Devices” tab. If the PC is configured via DHCP, you can instead also
disconnect the PC from the LAN and
reboot it.
Establishing a Remote Data
Transfer Connection
1. Connect the serial port of the PC
to the OpenCom 510 COM port.
You will require a suitable connector cable.
74
2. Double-click on the OpenCom
desktop icon created with the
“occonfig” program.
Configuration under Windows
Configuration
Notes on Configuring the
Serial Port
Installing the RAS under
Windows NT 4.0
A serial port is automatically detected when the PC boots and the
corresponding system software is installed. The TCP/IP connection to the
OpenCom 510 is established by
means of additional system software: the RAS adapter software and
the serial port driver.
1. Open the Control Panel and double-click on the “Network” icon.
Tip: The serial port that you use is
operated with the parameters
57,600 baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit,
no parity and no hardware data flow
control.
Note: The RAS network is always
installed under Windows 2000/XP
and cannot be uninstalled. The following section is only relevant for users of old Windows versions.
Installing the RAS Network under
Windows 95 or Windows 98
2. Select the “Services” tab and
click on the “Add” button.
3. Select “Remote Access Service”
from the list and confirm with
“OK”.
4. To conclude installation of the
RAS, the RAS “Properties” dialogue is displayed. Select the
driver “OpenCom Modem” that
was created on the first start of
the program “occonfig” and confirm this with “OK”.
5. Confirm the configuration with
the “Continue” button and close
the network settings.
1. Open the Control Panel and double-click on the “Software” icon.
Note: If you have installed an operating system update earlier (Service
Pack), install this again after installation of the RAS.
2. Click on the “Windows Setup”
tab and double-click on the item
“Communications”.
Connection by Network
Card (LAN)
3. Tick the check box next to the
component “RAS Network” and
confirm your entry with “OK”.
First-time configuration of the
OpenCom 510 is also possible by a
network card, providing this is already installed on the PC, of course.
When the driver software for a network card is installed, the necessary
Configuration
Configuration under Windows
75
system software for the TCP/IP protocol is installed at the same time.
During this process you should activate the automatic assignment of IP
addresses by the DHCP protocol.
Note: For initial configuration, it
may be wise not to connect the
OpenCom 510 to an existing LAN in
order to eliminate conflicts with an
existing DHCP server.
If the PC has been operating in a network to date, you should activate the
automatic assignment of an IP address.
2. Restart your PC. During the system start, all necessary IP address parameters will be transmitted by OpenCom 510 via
DHCP and automatically set for
the network card.
1. To do this, you select “Settings >
Control Panel” in the Start
menu. Double-click on the “Network” icon. Under Windows NT
select the “Protocols” tab. Under Windows 2000/XP right click
on the “LAN Link” icon. Select
“Properties”.
2. Double-click on the item “TCP/IP
Protocol > Network card”. Activate the option “Obtain an IP address from a DHCP server” in the
“Properties” dialogue. Gateway
or DNS entries must be deactivated.
Note: Changes to the Gateway and
the DNS configuration are made by
DHCP.
Establishing a Network
Connection
1. Connect the PC network card to
the OpenCom 510 network port.
To do this, use either a crossover
twisted-pair network cable or
connect the OpenCom 510 via a
hub.
76
Configuration under Windows
Note: If the PC has been operating
under Windows NT in a network with
a Windows NT domain, you will not
be able to log on to the domain. So
log on to the PC domain as the local
user “Administrator”.
3. Continue reading under Testing
the Setup starting on page 76.
Testing the Setup
Subsequent to establishment, test
the TCP/IP connection between the
OpenCom 510 and the PC.
1. Select the item “Run” in the
Start menu. Enter the command
“ping host.domain” or
“ping 192.168.99.254” in the
“Open” box.
2. Confirm this with “OK”.
Tip: To find the IP address of the
Web console, enter * 1 8 2
on a connected system telephone.
Configuration
* 1 8 3 will also show you
the network mask.
You can test the correct IP configuration under Windows 95 and Windows 98. Select the item “Run” in
the Start menu. Enter the command
“winipcfg” in the “Open” box. Confirm this with “OK”. Select the network adapter used for connection to
the OpenCom 510. The IP addresses
assigned by the OpenCom 510 on establishment of the connection will
be displayed.
Under Windows NT4, 2000 and XP
you can check the IP configuration
by entering the commands “ipconfig
-all” or “route print” in the command
prompt. The command “arp -a” produces a list of assigned IP addresses
for LAN links.
Starting the Browser
Start the installed Web browser.
When you start the Microsoft Internet Explorer for the first time, the Internet access wizard will automatically appear. Select the option “Use
existing account” and confirm this
with “OK”.
If the PC has been operating in a network or used for Internet access, it is
possible that access may be configured indirect via a proxy server. Deactivate access via a proxy server
(“Direct connection”). To do this in
the Internet Explorer, open the Internet options in the menu “Tools > Internet Options”, then select the
“Connections” tab. In Netscape Communicator, you select the command
“Edit > Settings” and then select the
section “Extended > Proxies” under
“Category”.
Note: Reset your browser’s options
for the call-up of pages to their default settings specified on initial installation of the browser.
Configuration for Linux and MacOS
All modern operating systems support the TCP/IP protocol. You can
find detailed information on setting
up hardware and software for the
Windows operating systems under
Configuration under Windows starting on page 73. In this section there
are tips on integrating Linux and
MacOS operating systems.
Configuration
Linux
The Linux network configuration is
usually performed by the set-up program with which you install a Linux
distribution. After installation, you
will see a series of “How To's”. In
“Linux NET-3-HowTo” and “DHCP
Configuration for Linux and MacOS
77
Mini-HowTo” you will find instructions on TCP/IP configuration.
For the OpenCom 510 to configure
the TCP/IP settings of a Linux system
via DHCP, you must also install the
“dhclient” package and activate configuration via DHCP in the Linux network configuration. To access the
OpenCom 510 Configurator, you
should also install Netscape Communicator 4.5 (or higher).
MacOS
The TCP/IP protocol is already integrated in the new MacOS starting
with version 7.6. For the
OpenCom 510 to configure the TCP/
IP settings of a MacOS system via
DHCP, you must set the configuration method to “DHCP Server” in the
menu “Control Panels TCP/IP”.
To access the OpenCom 510 Configurator, you should also install Netscape Communicator 4.5 (or higher)
or Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.5 (or
higher).
78
Configuration for Linux and MacOS
Configuration
Configuring the OpenCom 510
Preparing the
Configuration
Before starting with the configuration, make sure you have the following documents at hand:
■
An overview of the ports
■
A list of the terminals to be connected
■
A list of the IPEIs, if you wish to
log on DECT terminals in the secure procedure
■
A list of the users to be set up
(staff entitled to use the services
of the OpenCom 510) with their
names, departments, and the internal call numbers you want to
allocate to them
■
For Internet access: the Internet
service provider access data.
Starting the Web Console
1. Start your Web browser. Enter
the OpenCom 510 IP address in
the “Address” box:
http://192.168.99.254/.
If the configuration PC gets its IP
address automatically from the
OpenCom 510 or if the
OpenCom 510 is entered as the
domain name server, you can
also start the Web console by
entering the DNS name. The
DNS name in the factory setting
is host.domain. You can change
this in the Configurator (NET
Configuration: Easy Access
menu).
2. The OpenCom 510 Web console
is started. First set the country in
which you are operating the
OpenCom 510, and in which language the Web console is to be
displayed.
Data not available for first-time configuration can be updated or corrected at a later date.
Note: Use the Configuration Guide
starting on page 137. This will assist
you in making the settings in the correct sequence.
Configuration
Configuring the OpenCom 510
79
OpenCom 510: log-on dialogue box
3. To commence configuration, you
must first log on. For the initial
configuration, enter your:
- user name: “Administrator”
- password: for the initial configuration, leave this box blank.
4. Confirm this by clicking on OK.
This puts all connected terminals into the “Guest” user group
with restricted user rights. In
this way you prevent international external calls from the terminals, for example, while you
are configuring the
100OpenCom 510 and the users.
80
Configuring the OpenCom 510
Configuration
OpenCom 510: dialogue box for initial access
5. The software opens a dialogue
for initial access. Determine an
administrator password and enter it in this dialogue.
Loading the Online Help
6. Confirm your input with Apply.
1. Go to the SYS Configuration:
Components menu. Select the
entry Online Help and click on
Browse.
7. Click on the Configurator button on the home page.
You will find notes on using the Configurator and in the online help.
Click on Help in the menu bar or
click on TOC to activate an overview
of help topics.
The online help can now be loaded
in the Configurator:
2. Look for one of the languagespecific ZIP files in the OLH directory of the set-up CD. Confirm
your choice by clicking on Open.
3. Then click on Load to transfer
the online help to the system.
Configuration
Configuring the OpenCom 510
81
Please note: After completion of
the loading operation, the system will
take a few minutes to analyse the
transferred file.
Note: You can downed the latest
version of the online help from
http://www.detewe.de/.
Finishing the
Configuration
1. When you have completed all
the settings in the Configurator,
you must save the configuration
(see also Saving and Loading the
Configuration on page 84).
2. Then select the Log-off command in the upper menu bar.
Preconfiguration
Configuration of the OpenCom 510
can be prepared at your DeTeWe
Customer Service Centre or by an authorised DeTeWe dealer. For this purpose, a OpenCom 510 installed here
is programmed with the customer
data (e.g. user data, call distribution
schemes, cord-bound terminals).
This data is stored and then loaded
into the OpenCom 510 at the customer’s site by a service technician.
This prepared configuration must be
completed at the customer’s site
(LAN configuration and DECT terminals).
82
Configuring the OpenCom 510
For configuration of the
OpenCom 510 Internet functions,
first ask the responsible system administrator for details of the customer’s LAN prerequisites.
Remote Configuration
The OpenCom 510 configuration can
also be altered or updated remotely
by a customer service centre or authorised dealer. This requires activation of internal RAS access in the
OpenCom 510 for the customer service centre/authorised dealer.
Note: If one or more MSNs are entered on the PBX Configuration: System: Remote service menu page in
the Configurator and the Status option is activated, remote configuration access is then activated when a
data call from one of the entered
MSNs is registered.
The customer service centre/authorised dealer can then log into the
OpenCom 510 as an administrator:
■
User name: “Administrator”
■
Password: administrator password
Note: If you do not wish to let the
customer service centre/authorised
dealer know the administrator password, you can define a temporary
password for remote configuration
with at least five digits.
Configuration
Use the following code digit procedure on a standard terminal or a system telephone to activate internal
remote maintenance access for the
service centre/authorised dealer:
Remote configuration on (log-on
with administrator password)
H*19*
Z (system PIN) #
Remote configuration on (log-on
with temporary password)
H * 1 9 * Z (system PIN)
* Z (temporary password) #
Remote configuration off
tion: Firmware menu in the Configurator).
For security reasons, settings in the
Configurator, Net Configuration
should only be edited on site to
avoid malfunctions or failures in the
customer’s LAN (e.g. due to IP address conflicts). Refer to the chapter
entitled Configuration Examples
starting on page 86, where interaction between the OpenCom 510 and
a LAN is explained.
Codes for IP
Configuration
H#19#
Activation is automatically cancelled 30 minutes after the last configuration activity.
Note: During remote configuration, the OpenCom 510 is blocked for
RAS access by any further users.
Please note: The system PIN is
preset to “0000” and it is absolutely
imperative that the system administrator changes it to prevent undesirable remote maintenance.
Using remote configuration, all
OpenCom 510 settings with the exception of the system PIN can be edited or updated. New software versions of the OpenCom 510 and the
software for the connected system
terminals and base stations can also
be installed (see the SYS Configura-
Configuration
The IP configuration of the
OpenCom 510 is performed on the
Web console in the Configurator, in
the NET Configuration: Easy Access
menu.
In the event that the IP configuration of the OpenCom 510 has to be
changed and access via the Web
console is not possible, you can also
use a code digit procedure to change
these basic settings. Entry can be
made from an analogue telephone,
an ISDN telephone and from system
telephones.
Ask your system administrator for
the OpenCom 510 system PIN. The
factory setting is “0000”.
Configuring the OpenCom 510
83
Set IP address
H * 1 8 2 Z (system PIN)
* Z (www) * Z (xxx) *
Z (yyy) * Z (zzz) #
Set NET mask
H * 1 8 3 Z (system PIN)
* Z (www) * Z (xxx) *
Z (yyy) * Z (zzz) #
Restart
H*185
Z (system PIN) #
Saving and Loading the
Configuration
Configurations are saved in a file archive and can be loaded to the
OpenCom 510 either locally from a
connected configuration PC, or by
remote configuration.
The following configuration and customer data can be saved and loaded
again:
■
Telephony and network parameters
■
User data
■
Telephone book entries
■
LCR tables
For further information, refer to the
online help documentation under
the topic SYS Configuration: Data
backup.
84
Configuring the OpenCom 510
Loading SW Updates
New versions of the system and terminal software can be loaded to the
system.
New software versions of the
OpenCom 510 are loaded from the
configuration PC, which accesses the
Configurator (see the SYS Configuration: Firmware menu). For information on connecting a configuration PC, see Brief Guide to Initial
Configuration on page 71.
The terminal software is part of the
OpenCom 510 software and is automatically loaded into the terminals
via the OpenCom 510 if the software
version in the terminal is different
from the terminal software stored in
the OpenCom 510.
Note: If you are operating an PBX
cascade, new system software is automatically transferred to the slave
system from the master system.
For further information, refer to the
online help documentation under
the item SYS Configuration:
Firmware.
Resetting the System
Data
You can restore the factory settings
of the OpenCom 510 in the Configurator.
Configuration
Please note: If this is done, all individual settings and the user data
are then lost. For this reason, you
should back up your configuration
regularly, the best time being after
every change. For details, refer to the
chapter entitled Saving and Loading
the Configuration starting on page 84
and to the Web console online help.
Proceed as follows:
1. In the Configurator, call up the
SYS Configuration: Restart
menu.
2. Click on Restart with Defaults.
3. Confirm this by pressing “OK”
when the query dialogue box
opens.
Generating Your Own
MoH Files
The OpenCom 510 comes with an internal MoH file for Music on Hold.
The OpenCom 510 product CD contains a number of MoH files with different volume levels, which you can
load at a later time as necessary.
own MoH file. This program is usually located in the Windows directory called “Multimedia”.
The MoH file must be coded with
8000 Hz, 8 bit mono in accordance
with CCITT, A-Law. This coding is required for the OpenCom 510 and can
be set in the “Sound Recorder” when
you save the file under Format
(CCITT, A-Law) and Attributes (8000
Hz, 8 bit mono).
Note: If you don't have the Sound
Recorder program or the appropriate
codec on your Windows operating
system, you should install these components from your Windows CD.
Load your MoH file in the Web console's Configurator, in the SYS Configuration: Components menu.
Note: When generating your own
MoH file, you may incur a fee for the
use of non-resident melodies (e.g. a
GEMA fee in Germany or MCPS fee in
the UK). The MoH files that come with
your OpenCom 510 can be used free
of charge.
The file format for non-resident Music on Hold is *.wav. You can also
save your own MoH in a *.wav file
and load it into the OpenCom 510.
If you have a Windows operating
system, you can use the “Sound Recorder” program to generate your
Configuration
Configuring the OpenCom 510
85
Configuration Examples
OpenCom 510 in Computer Networks
One of the outstanding features of
the OpenCom 510 is the integration
of telephony and computer networks. Connect the OpenCom 510
via a computer network (LAN) with
suitably configured workstations,
and you can use its network features
from these workstations. Using a
Web browser you can access:
■
the OpenCom 510 Configurator
■
call charge administration
■
the OpenCTI 50, with which telephone functions can be used on
a PC
■
the OpenCom 510 central telephone book and your personal
telephone book as well as to the
company telephone book (if the
multi-company variant is activated).
In addition, the OpenCom 510 can
be used as an Internet access server.
RAS access can also be implemented
using the OpenCom 510, which enables the integration of external staff
in the LAN.
In this chapter you will find several
examples of configurations showing
integration of the OpenCom 510 in a
LAN. Which example applies to your
situation depends on the size and
properties of the existing or planned
LAN infrastructure.
The following LAN prerequisites are
possible:
Server configuration in the LAN OpenCom 510 Functions
No IP server present
OpenCom 510 functions automatically as DHCP and
DNS server
IP server present
OpenCom 510 functions automatically as DHCP
client
DHCP server present
System Administrator must assign IP address and
DNS name for OpenCom 510
IP server present
No DHCP server present
86
Special case when integrating the OpenCom 510 in
a LAN; settings in the “NET Configuration: Easy
Access” menu must be coordinated with the responsible system administrator
OpenCom 510 in Computer Networks
Configuration Examples
Introduction to TCP/IP
In a single LAN it is possible to use
various protocols for the transmission of data. The connection between a workstation computer and
the OpenCom 510 runs via the TCP/
IP protocol used on the Internet.
TCP/IP can be used together with
other protocols (e.g. NetBEUI, AppleTalk or IPX/SPX) on the same network.
Every device participating in data
transmission using TCP/IP requires a
unique IP address. An IP address
consists of four groups of digits from
0 to 255, each separated by a full
stop. The supplementary protocols
DHCP and PPP automatically assign
IP addresses to devices. Class C networks normally use IP addresses in
which the first three numbers are
the same and the last number is
uniquely assigned to a specific device in the LAN. On the Internet,
unique addresses assigned by a special organisation created for this purpose are used. Within a LAN, you can
use addresses which are not unique
world-wide.
network mask, the connection is established via the default gateway. If
a device knows several data routes
to different intermediate stations,
one speaks of a router.
The domain name system (DNS) resolves a plain text DNS name into an
IP address. The DNS is a hierarchically structured database, distributed worldwide. A DNS server can
supply information on the names
and IP addresses for which it is responsible. For all other information,
a DNS server contacts other DNS
servers. For the establishment of
every connection from the workstation, it is possible to give either an IP
address, or a name that a DNS server
resolves into an IP address.
Note: For further explanations of
technical terms, refer to the Glossary
on the CD-ROM supplied.
TCP/IP enables the establishment of
connections via one or more intermediate stations. The decision
whether to connect directly or indirectly to the partner device depends
on the network mask. The network
mask for a class C network is
255.255.255.0. If the IP address of
the partner device does not fit the
Configuration Examples
Introduction to TCP/IP
87
OpenCom 510 in a Serverless LAN
In a peer-to-peer network, the workstations are connected to one another via network cables. In many
networks, the cables run in the form
of a star from a central hub. Such
networks do not require special
servers. This configuration example
is also valid for a LAN with a server
using a protocol other than TCP/IP
(e.g. AppleTalk or IPX/SPX).
ISP
(DNS)
OpenCom
(DHCP, RAS,
int. DNS, Internet)
S0
S0
Ext.
PC
PC 1
S0
Net
Net
PC 2
Hub
Net
The OpenCom 510 in a serverless LAN
In a serverless LAN, the
OpenCom 510 takes over the IP configuration of the connected workstations. All TCP/IP settings necessary
for the workstations are assigned by
the OpenCom 510 via DHCP (dynamic host configuration protocol).
In this operating mode, an IP address space reserved for such networks is used:
88
192.168.99.254
OpenCom 510 IP address
192.168.99.129 to 192.168.99.148
DHCP addresses: IP address space for workstations
192.168.100.0 to 192.168.100.10
PPP addresses: IP address space for RAS
dialling
255.255.255.0
Network mask (class C network)
192.168.99.254
DNS server IP address
192.168.99.254
Default gateway IP address
OpenCom 510 in a Serverless LAN
Configuration Examples
Install the TCP/IP network protocol
and a Web browser for every workstation which is to have access to the
OpenCom 510 network features.
For notes on installing network
cards, refer to Connection by Network
Card (LAN) on page 75.
workstations. When you want to see
a Web page, you simply type the URL
(uniform resource locator; Internet
address; “http://...”) in your browser.
In a serverless LAN, the
OpenCom 510 is configured as a DNS
server and default gateway. The
workstation therefore sends its Internet connection request to the
OpenCom 510.
DNS Name Resolution
In a serverless LAN, the internal DNS
name resolution is performed by the
OpenCom 510. If you type the string
“host.domain” into your browser, a
DNS request is sent to the
OpenCom 510 IP address. The
OpenCom 510 responds with the
correct IP address, so that the Configurator home page can be called
up.
In a peer-to-peer network (Windows
network), the workstations each
have a name which is displayed in
the network environment. These
NetBIOS names can differ from the
DNS names assigned to the workstations by the OpenCom 510. The
OpenCom 510 is not visible in the
network environment.
Internet Access
In almost all cases, the request will
contain a DNS name which is unknown in the internal network.
When you type a URL into your
browser, the OpenCom 510 receives
the request to find the corresponding IP address. If the name is unknown in the LAN, the request is forwarded to an ISP’s external DNS
server.
Note: Workstation PCs automatically add a domain name to URLs
without a dot. You specify this domain name in the Configurator. For
example, if you have configured
“firm.co.uk” as the domain name, an
access request for “www.firm.co.uk”
will be interpreted as a local DNS request which does not lead to the establishment of an Internet connection. For this reason, you should
choose a name which is not used in
the Internet as the domain name
(“firm-opencom.co.uk” for example).
If access to an ISP has been configured on the OpenCom 510, the
OpenCom 510 can be operated as an
Internet access server without any
additional configuration of the
Configuration Examples
OpenCom 510 in a Serverless LAN
89
RAS Access
You can establish a connection from
an external computer with an ISDN
card to the OpenCom 510. The necessary TCP/IP settings are transmitted by the OpenCom 510 on establishment of the connection. The
computer that has dialled in now
has access to all services in the LAN
capable of being used via TCP/IP. The
authorisation for RAS access is set up
in the Configurator via the User
Manager: User Groups menu.
In a serverless LAN, Windows uses
the NetBIOS protocol for accessing
files and printers via the network environment. NetBIOS can use NetBEUI, IPX/SPX or TCP/IP as the transport protocol. In the network
environment, you can only access
files and printers on workstations using TCP/IP for NetBIOS.
Note: In a serverless LAN, the workstations running decide independently which one is to keep the list of
names visible in the network environment. This process is triggered by
broadcasts, which can take some time
on a RAS connection. You can shorten
this period by activating the “Find >
Computer” function in the Start menu
and selecting the client computer.
90
OpenCom 510 in a Serverless LAN
Configuration Examples
OpenCom 510 in a LAN
with an IP-enabled Server
In a LAN with an IP-enabled server,
you should coordinate integration of
the OpenCom 510 with the responsible network administrator. You must
decide on the IP address space to be
used and which network services
(DHCP, DNS, RAS, Internet access)
the OpenCom 510 is to handle in the
LAN.
ISP
(DNS)
S0
OpenCom
S0
Ext.
PC
PC 1
S0
Net
Net
Server
(DHCP, RAS,
int. DNS,
Internet)
S0 int
S0
Net
PC 2
Hub
Net
The OpenCom 510 in a LAN with an
IP-enabled server
In many cases, an IP-enabled server
configures the TCP/IP settings via
DHCP for all workstations. On starting, the OpenCom 510 requests TCP/
IP settings via DHCP. If this request is
responded to, the OpenCom 510
uses the TCP/IP settings received.
You can then use a workstation to
access the OpenCom 510 Configurator under the IP address assigned by
the server.
In networks in which the TCP/IP settings are made manually, you have
to enter the corresponding TCP/IP
settings in the OpenCom 510 Configurator (NET Configuration: Easy
Access menu). Here the
OpenCom 510 acts as the DHCP
server. A workstation requesting the
TCP/IP settings via DHCP then receives the settings you made in the
Configurator.
DNS Name Resolution
In a LAN with an IP-enabled server,
the latter is also responsible for DNS
name resolution. If you want to start
the Configurator by entering a DNS
name, you must link this name on
the server with the IP address used
by the OpenCom 510. For further information, refer to the server documentation.
Note: To access the OpenCom 510
under the same IP address after a restart, you must specify this IP address
permanently on a DHCP server. On a
DHCP server it is possible to link the
MAC address of a network card with a
specific IP address. You will find details in the server documentation.
Configuration Examples OpenCom 510 in a LAN with an IP-enabled Server
91
Internet Access
You can also use the OpenCom 510
as an Internet access server in a LAN
with an IP-enabled server. To do this,
you must enter the OpenCom 510 IP
address on the server as the default
gateway. In addition, you must edit
the internal DNS server configuration so that the resolution of external DNS names is forwarded to the
OpenCom 510.
In this example, the Internet connection is established from a workstation via the server, which in turn requests Internet access from the
OpenCom 510.
There are two different ways of suitably configuring the internal DNS
server. You can enter the
OpenCom 510 IP address as a DNS
forwarder. If you require access to
extended DNS information, you can
also configure the DNS server for a
recursive DNS request without the
DNS forwarder. For further explanation, refer to the DNS server documentation.
92
ISP
(DNS)
OpenCom
(Internet)
S0
S0
Ext.
PC
PC 1
S0
Net
Net
Server
(DHCP, RAS,
int. DNS)
S0 int
S0
Net
PC 2
Hub
Net
The OpenCom 510 as a DNS server in a
LAN with an IP server
RAS Access
In a LAN with an IP-enabled server
you can also enable external computers to dial in via the
OpenCom 510. To do this, you should
coordinate with the network administrator the IP address space which
can be assigned to an external computer dialling in, and enter it in the
Configurator, NET Configuration:
Easy Access menu, under PPP Addresses.
The user account administered by
the OpenCom 510, with which dialling in is permitted, only allows the
establishment of direct and anonymous TCP/IP connections such as
HTTP, FTP or SMTP connections. If
you additionally want to allow file or
printer access in the network, you
must set up a suitable user account
on the addressed server for network
log-in. If you use the same log-in
name for the OpenCom 510 user ac-
OpenCom 510 in a LAN with an IP-enabled Server Configuration Examples
count and the same password for
the network log-in, you have to enter this combination only once when
dialling in.
ISP
(DNS)
OpenCom
(RAS, Internet)
S0
S0
Ext.
PC
PC 1
S0
Net
Server
(DHCP,
int. DNS)
Net
Net
PC 2
Hub
Net
RAS access by the OpenCom 510 in a
LAN with an IP server
Note: In a larger Windows network
with several segments, the lists of
computer names visible in the network environment can no longer be
established by broadcasts. In this case
you use a special WINS server whose
address the OpenCom 510 does not
make known to the workstation
when dialling in. For this reason, you
enter the address of a WINS server
manually in the network settings of
the workstation.
Configuration Examples OpenCom 510 in a LAN with an IP-enabled Server
93
LAN-to-LAN Link
You can use the OpenCom 510 to interlink two LANs via ISDN. To do this,
you configure two OpenCom 510
systems so that they can dial in to
each other. In order for this to work,
the two LANs must be configured for
different IP address ranges (subnetworks). For at least one of the
OpenCom 510 systems, change the
prescribed address range for the
LAN.
OpenCom
(IP=192.168.99.254,
Net=192.168.99.0)
Net
PC 1
Net
Hub
OpenCom
(IP=192.168.11.254,
Net=192.168.11.0)
S0
S0
PC 2
PC 1
Net
Net
Net
PC 2
Hub
Net
The OpenCom 510 in a LAN-to-LAN link
In the Configurator, NET Configuration: LAN-LAN menu you can configure the dial-in settings. The
OpenCom 510 will set up a connection whenever a TCP/IP data transfer
to the other LAN is requested.
As the IP address range, you can select one of the 256 class C subnetworks designed for local LANs.
Select a class C sub-network in the
range from 192.168.0.0 to
192.168.255.0.
Note that such a connection is only
set up when specific requests are
made. These can be for FTP file
transfers, e-mails or downloading
Web pages. Name resolution via
broadcasts is not possible. If you
wish to use the LAN-to-LAN link to
access files and printers in the Windows network, you need an IP-enabled server that administers the
name resolution for the Windows
network.
94
LAN-to-LAN Link
Configuration Examples
Useful Information on Internet Access
Costs
Using the Web
The OpenCom 510 uses a router
function to access the Internet,
which means that it automatically
establishes an Internet connection
when required and terminates the
connection after a certain period of
time if no data are being transmitted.
A Web browser not only enables you
to use the OpenCom 510 Configurator from every workstation but also
to obtain a wealth of information
from the Internet. Simply enter the
desired URL in the address field of
the browser. Access from a standalone PC via an online service differs
from Internet access via the
OpenCom 510 in the following respects:
Unfortunately, programs other than
those typically intended to access
the Internet (such as your browser or
your e-mail software) may send out
data packets which cause an Internet connection to be established,
even if these programs are not
strictly Internet-associated applications.
■
When you request a Web page,
dialling in results automatically.
There is no display of dialogues
with manual confirmation of dialling in or hanging up.
■
Requesting Web pages is not a
connection-orientated service.
When the Web page has been
loaded completely, the TCP/IP
connection is cleared. If you do
not request further Web pages,
the OpenCom 510 automatically
releases the connection to the
Internet after a certain, specifiable duration.
■
It is possible to call up Web
pages simultaneously from several workstations.
■
The OpenCom 510 can block access to certain Web pages by
means of filter lists.
Examples of such programs are the
MicrosoftTM XPTM operating system,
various multimedia programs such
as RealplayerTM and anti-virus applications that may establish an Internet connection for automatic updates (the so-called “phone home
function”).
It is therefore highly advisable to
limit ISP access by specifying the
maximum monthly connection time
under Connection time per month
(maximal) in the NET Configuration: Connections: ISP menu on the
web console.
Configuration Examples
Useful Information on Internet Access
95
E-mail
One of the most important services
in the Internet is e-mail. E-mails are
buffered in individual e-mail accounts on a mail server. Mail servers
are operated by ISPs for example.
With the OpenCom 510 you can set
up one or more e-mail accounts for
every user account configured on
the OpenCom 510. These e-mail accounts are then checked at regular
intervals.
If there are new e-mails in an e-mail
account, and the OpenCom 510 has
been configured for this function,
the user specified in the
OpenCom 510 user account is notified of the new e-mail on his system
terminal. System telephones from
the OpenPhone 6x and 2x product
range can also display information
such as the sender or the subject of
the e-mail.
single account with the Internet
service provider.
■
The IP addresses used in the LAN
are translated into IP addresses
valid worldwide. So you require
no such addresses for your LAN.
■
Only TCP/IP connections triggered from a workstation can be
established. Consequently, while
you can call up Web pages from
a workstation, you cannot install
a Web server visible in the Internet on a workstation.
Certain protocols cannot be used
when NAT is being used. This affects
protocols with the following properties:
■
TCP/IP addresses are transported in the useful load, e.g.
NetBIOS over TCP/IP.
■
The protocol requires an active,
inward-directed connection establishment, e.g. ICQ.
■
The protocol will function without TCP/UDP port numbers, e.g.
ICMP or IGMP.
NAT
Network address translation (NAT) is
activated on accessing the Internet
(ISP). You require this feature in order to translate internal IP addresses
to valid external IP addresses. This
has three important consequences
for Internet access:
■
96
Several workstations can share a
single Internet access. You do
not require a LAN access, only a
Useful Information on Internet Access
The OpenCom 510 NAT has suitable
processes for ensuring the functions
of many important protocols affected by these rules. These are the
protocols FTP (in “active” mode), CuSeeMe (“videoconferencing”), IRC
(“chat”), ICMP errors (“traceroute”)
and ICMP echo (“ping”).
Configuration Examples
Protocols which require inward-directed connection establishment
can be configured in the Net Configuration: Port Access menu. For further information, refer to the online
help of this menu.
Configuration Examples
Useful Information on Internet Access
97
PBX Networking
As requirements grow, the
OpenCom 510 can be operated together with other PBX installations.
If you merely need a larger number
of connections, it is easy to link a
second PBX (“PBX Cascading”). If you
want to operate the OpenCom 510
at several locations with different
PBXs, this is possible by PBX Networking.
PBX Cascading
You can combine two PBXs in order
to increase the number of terminals
that can be connected. A master PBX
and a slave PBX are connected to
one another by means of a cable.
The two PBXs essentially function
Master PBX
Slave PBX
OpenCom 120
OpenCom 105, OpenCom 110,
OpenCom 120
OpenCom 130
OpenCom 105, OpenCom 110,
OpenCom 120 or OpenCom 130
OpenCom 150
OpenCom 150
OpenCom 510
OpenCom 510
Note: The OpenCom 107 is not
equipped with a PCM port. For this
reason, PBX cascading is not possible
with this PBX.
For the PBX Cascading you will need
a license. The license agreement provides you with the necessary steps
to activate this function
98
like a single PBX with a higher
number of ports. The master PBX
controls the slave PBX. The following
PBXs from the product family can be
used for cascading:
PBX Cascading
Functionality of PBX
Cascading
Cascaded PBXs must be connected
by means of a twisted-pair lead with
RJ45 plugs. All eight pins of the lead
must be wired 1 to 1. Both voice and
administration data are transferred
via this lead. Connect the lead to the
PCM ports of the two MC+1-3 cen-
PBX Networking
tral control modules of the PBXs. The
shielded CAT-5 lead must not be
longer than 50 centimetres.
2. Set the DIP switches of both
modules as follows:
DIP Switch Settings
Note: Owing to the very short permissible lead length, the two PBXs
have to be stacked. It is not possible
to place them side by side.
PBX 1 (Master)
data lead (8 pins assigned, joined 1 to 1)
Frame as Master
Frame as Slave
S1: open
S1: closed (switch
(switch set to “1”) set to “ON”)
S2: open (switch
set to “2”)
S2: open (switch
set to “2”)
For the location of the DIP
switches (S1and S2), refer to the
illustration MC+1-3: Top view.
3. Re-install the central control
modules in the frames.
BPX 2 (Slave)
Cascaded PBX system
Putting a Cascaded PBX
into Operation
Proceed as follows to put a cascaded
PBX system into operation:
1. If you want to cascade two
OpenCom 510 PBXs, you will
need to set the frame number
using the DIP switches on the
central control module.
To access the DIP switches, remove both central control modules (master and slave systems);
proceed as described in Installing the Central Control Module
starting on page 23.
PBX Networking
PBX Cascading
99
ON
1 2
3
4
1
2
5
6
MC+1-3: Top view
100
4. Mount the slave system frame
above or below the master system. Connect a system telephone to the slave system for a
later performance check. Use
the Upn1 terminal of an existing
MS+UPN1-8 or MS+UPN2-8 interface card.
6. Switch off the master system if it
is operating. Disconnect the
module from the power supply
by pulling out the mains plug.
5. Back up the master system data.
For further information, refer to
the online help topic SYS Configuration: Data Backup. The
backup procedure also stores
the current configuration data to
the CompactFlash memory card.
8. Power on the two PBXs. The order in which you do this does
not matter.
PBX Cascading
7. Connect the two modules by
means of a suitable cable as described above.
In the PBX Configuration: Ports:
Slots dialogue of the master system’s Configurator, click on Slave.
Select the slave Type in the Slave:
Change dialogue.
PBX Networking
Please note: If you change the
type of slave system later on, the port
settings that have been made will be
deleted.
The master system then initialises the slave system. This may
involve transfer of firmware (operating software) from the master system to the slave system.
This can take a few minutes.
9. Configure the system telephone
connected to the slave system
for testing purposes in the Configurator. In the
PBX Configuration: Ports: Upn
dialogue, click on one of the additionally displayed entries of
the type Upn 1/m/n (1: slave
system, m: slot number, n: Upn
port number).
Note: Changes to the configuration while initialising the slave system
may trigger error reports referring to
the ongoing initialisation.
be used with appropriate telephones. All features of system
telephones on Upn ports are
available without restriction.
■
The S0 ports of the slave system
can also be used for trunk lines
or for PBX networking (see PBX
Networking starting on
page 102).
■
It is not possible to operate a
DECT base station on one of the
Upn ports of the slave system.
■
The ISDN-L1 reference clock signal is always transferred from
the master to the slave system
and must be acquired from an S0
port –or preferably an S2Mport– on the master system. The
master system therefore needs
to be connected to at least one
ISDN trunk line.
■
It is possible to operate an S2M
interface card of the type
MS+S2M1-1 in the slave system.
As the ISDN-L1reference clock
signal supplied by an SO interface card is not precise enough,
you will also need to operate an
S2M interface card in the master
system.
■
The slave system cannot be addressed directly through a LAN.
For configuration, always use
the Web console of the master
system.
You can see that the initialisation
has been completed from the display on the system telephone connected to the slave system.
Notes
Observe the following when operating a cascaded PBX system:
■
All Upn, S0 and a/b ports of the
slave system interface cards can
PBX Networking
PBX Cascading
101
■
A memory card installed in the
slave system cannot be used.
■
To operate the slave system
again normally, you must reset it
to its factory settings (refer to
Resetting the System Data starting on page 84 and DIP Switch
Settings on page 99).
PBX Networking
OpenCom 510 provides all the features necessary for PBX networking.
You need PBX networking in the following cases:
■
To operate the OpenCom 510 as
a subsidiary system on another
PBX. This will also allow you to
use the OpenCom 510 as a DECT
server, for example.
■
To network the OpenCom 510
with an OpenCom 1000. In this
way you can use the
OpenCom 510 as a PBX for a
branch office, for instance.
■
To network several
OpenCom 510s into a PBX system.
■
To use flexible configuration
possibilities of trunk lines for a
OpenCom 510.
All settings that affect the configuration of PBX networking can be found
in the Configurator menu
PBX Configuration: Trunks and in
102
PBX Networking
the PBX Configuration: System:
Settings dialogue under System
linking. Refer also refer to the corresponding help topics in the
OpenCom 510 online help.
Note: If you do not need the features of PBX networking, the simplified configuration is sufficient in most
cases. For this purpose, assign the
preconfigured trunk groups Multiterminal access or System access to
the ports. The preconfigured route
called External trunk now makes it
possible to seize an external line immediately or by first dialling the prefix “0”. You can rename the preconfigured bundle and the preconfigured
route if required, but you cannot delete them.
Connections
Networking two or more PBXs
means interconnecting them. The
OpenCom 510 allows you to use
both trunk lines and point-to-point
PBX Networking
connections on external S0 ports or
on the S2M port.
PBX
PBX
PBX
PBX
PBX
Trunk line
Point-to-point
connection
Example of a PBX network
Various line types and transmission
protocols can be used for point-topoint connections. The required network topology (distance, connection capacity) determines which
type of point-to-point connection is
most suitable.
Protocol: Q.SIG or DSS1
The Q.SIG protocol, designed for
ISDN point-to-point connections, is
the preferable choice as the transmission protocol; alternatively, the
DSS1 protocol, designed for ISDN
dial-up connections in the EuroISDN, can be used. Certain PBX networking features can only be used
with the Q.SIG protocol, however. In
particular, the identifier indicating
whether a call is internal or external
cannot be transmitted using DSS1.
Both protocols implement communication on several protocol layers:
■
L1: Layer 1 defines the physical
line properties and the electrical coding of signals.
PBX Networking
■
L2: Layer 2 enables communication via individual error-protected channels that are independent of each other.
■
L3: Layer 3 defines the administration of the individual channels and implements the features designed for ISDN.
Master/Slave
For an ISDN connection, it is possible
to determine which PBX is the protocol master and which the protocol
slave. This relationship can be determined for all three protocol layers independently of one another.
For each protocol layer, the PBX at
the other end always has to be suitably configured. If one PBX is the protocol master for a layer, the other
PBX must be the protocol slave for
this same layer. Normally all three
protocol layers are configured identically. In the case of a trunk line, the
network operator is the protocol
master for all three layers.
Note: In the case of an S2M line, it is
also possible to determine for each
useful channel which end can administer a channel (master = internally
seized or slave = externally seized).
On S0 lines this setting is determined
by “L3 master” for both B-channels.
L1 Clock
To enable PBXs in the ISDN network
to communicate with each other,
they must be “clock-aligned”. The L1
PBX Networking
103
protocol master sets the clock for
layer 1, and the L1 protocol slave
adopts (synchronises to) this clock.
When planning a PBX networking
scheme, you must make sure that
the L1 clock propagates from a master via a number of PBXs.
Network
operator M
S
PBX1
M
M
S
PBX 3
S
S
PBX 2
M
Trunk line
Point-to-point
connection
Example: propagation of the L1 clock
If more than one port with the setting L1 Type = “Slave” is configured
on an OpenCom 510 and the setting
L1 sync possible has been activated,
then one of the ports is automatically defined as the L1 clock source.
The OpenCom 510 will automatically
switch the clock source to another
port configured as an L1 clock source
(if a line fails, for example).
LED 3 (top right) of an interface card
will light up if one of the interfaces
on the card has been selected as a
clock source. If an S2M interface of
the type MS+S2M1-1 is installed, it
will be selected as the preferred
clock source.
Please note: Reciprocal or circular application of the L1 clock is not
allowed.
104
PBX Networking
Example: In the above case you
could reverse the L1 slave/master
setting for the connection between
PBX 1 and PBX 3. However, if you
then activate the setting
L1 sync possible for the port of PBX
1, this may cause parts of the PBX
network to stop functioning temporarily.
When applying the L1 clock of trunk
lines, you can assume that the public
network is “clock-aligned”. So, in the
above example, you can connect additional trunk lines to one of the
PBXs.
Types of Point-to-Point
Connection
There are different types of connection available for an ISDN point-topoint connection between two PBXs,
depending on the distance between
them.
Direct Connection
This type of point-to-point connection joins the two systems directly to
each other using a crossover
twisted-pair cable. An S0 connection
can be used for distances up to 1,000
metres, while an S2M connection can
span up to 250 meters. Normally one
PBX is the protocol master for all
three layers, and the other PBX is the
protocol slave for all three layers.
PBX Networking
PBX 1
L1 master
L2 master
L3 master
PBX 2
L1 slave
L2 slave
L3 slave
Direct connection
■
Use the RJ45 jacks on one of the
external S0 ports for an S0 connection between two
OpenCom 510s.
PBX 1, S 0 ext
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
PBX 2, S 0 ext
(RJ-45 socket)
Note: The active transmission system itself gets its L1 clock either from
the network operator or from a clock
generator connected by wire.
Connection via the Public
Network
Point-to-point connections via the
public network of a network operator can be used for bridging distances beyond 50 km. Due to the
long distance involved, for technical
reasons it is not possible to synchronise the L2 protocol. Consequently,
the public network is normally the
protocol master for protocol layers
L1 and L2. One PBX is therefore the
L3 master and the other PBX the L3
slave.
Wiring of a direct connection
Connection via an Active
Transmission System
For distances exceeding the range of
a direct connection, an active transmission system can increase the
range to up to 50 km. Normally the
L1 master is the transmission system
for the two connected PBXs. For the
protocol layers L2 and L3, one PBX is
normally the protocol master and
the other PBX is the protocol slave.
PBX 1
L1 slave
L2 master
L3 master
Transmission
System
L1 master
PBX 2
L1 slave
L2 slave
L3 slave
Connection by an active transmission
system
PBX Networking
PBX 1
L1 slave
L2 slave
L3 master
Public
network
L1 master
L2 master
PBX 2
L1 slave
L2 slave
L3 slave
Point-to-point connection via a public network
Configuration
The possible configurations described below can be set up in the
Web console using the PBX Configuration: Trunks menu.
Trunk groups
This is a group of lines of the same
type and direction. A line can only be
assigned to one trunk group.
PBX Networking
105
Network
operator
PBX 1
PBX 3
A
E
B
C
D
Bundle
Trunk line
PBX 2
Point-to-point
connection
Example of a PBX network with trunk
groups
In the above example, the following
trunk groups are configured for
PBX 1:
■
Two S0 lines in a multi-terminal
configuration to the network
operator which are assigned to
the “A” trunk group.
■
Two S0 point-to-point connections to PBX 2 which are assigned to the “C” trunk group.
■
One S0 point-to-point connection to PBX 3 which is assigned
to the “E” trunk group.
Note: A line or a trunk group cannot be seized directly. It is always performed indirectly via a route.
Routes
A route is a group of trunk groups
enabling a connection in one direction. If the first trunk group of a
route is fully utilized, the next trunk
group is seized (“trunk group overflow”). One trunk group can also be
used for different routes.
In the above example, a route set up
for PBX 1 allows a connection to
106
PBX Networking
PBX 2. Trunk groups “C,” “E” and “A”
are assigned to this route. If a user
connected to PBX 1 wants to reach a
party in PBX 2, lines will be seized in
the following order:
■
PBX 1 first searches for a free
channel in the “C” trunk group.
■
If all the lines in trunk group “C”
are busy, the system tries to set
up a connection via trunk group
“E”. PBX 3 switches the connection through, provided it is appropriately configured (refer to
Numbering starting on
page 107).
■
If it was not possible to set up an
indirect connection via PBX 3,
the system tries again via trunk
group “A”. The “prefix” necessary for this can be configured
with the route.
■
The user does not get a busy signal until the attempt to set up
an indirect connection via the
network operator has also failed.
Note: If an internal connection is
switched via a network operator, the
call is signalled using the external
number of the calling PBX.
For each route you can define a randomly selectable code digit for seizing the route. You can also configure
whether a user is authorised to seize
a particular route, whether LCR is to
be used for one of the trunk groups
PBX Networking
and the criteria (business or private
call, booking numbers) for evaluating call data.
PBX
100-199
b
a
Numbering
A user can seize a particular route by
pre-dialling a specific code digit.
With this “open numbering”, a user
must always dial this code digit and
then the telephone number in order
to reach a party in another PBX.
If none of the telephone numbers in
your PBX network occur twice, you
can also configure “closed numbering”, allowing the same telephone
number to be used for reaching each
user within the PBX network.
With closed numbering, the
OpenCom 510 determines which
route to seize from the telephone
number dialled. The information
needed for routing a call can be configured in a numbering table containing up to 100 entries. You use
this table to assign telephone numbers and/or ranges of telephone
numbers to a particular route.
A default entry in the numbering table makes it possible to seize a “default route” for all remaining unassigned numbers. In particular, this
simplifies configuration of the
OpenCom 510 as a subsidiary system: the only entry you assign to the
default entry is the route to the host
system
PBX Networking
c
4: b
D: c
PBX
400-499
d
PBX
200-299
h
g
PBX
500-599
D: a
e
3: e
5: h
D: d
f
PBX
300-399
k
5: k
D: f
i
3: i
D: g
D:Default
Route
Example of closed numbering tables
The automatic switching of call requests (i.e. routing) by means of
trunk group overflow or default
numbering can lead to “circular
switching”.
To avoid this, a “transit” counter is
incremented whenever a connection
is switched through on Q.SIG lines.
When the configured maximum
value is reached, further switching
stops.
Technical Details
A different PBX number must be set
for each OpenCom 510 in a PBX network. This setting can be found in
the Web console, in the menu
PBX Configuration: System under
the heading System linking. You can
also set the maximum value for the
transit counter there. This value depends on the topology of the PBX
network and should allow the system to have the maximum number
of further connections possible.
You can display the connection status of the lines at any time in the
Configurator menu System info:
PBX Networking
107
PBX: Trunks. You should check this
in particular after making changes
to a configuration to see whether all
the lines used for system networking
are operable.
Some of the features possible in
Q.SIG are not supported by
OpenCom 510 with all their options,
for example callback on busy within
the Q.SIG network. The call categories defined in Q.SIG (e.g. Emergency
Call, Operator, Normal) and the Q.SIG
name transmission feature (“user
names”) are fully supported.
The code digits to be used for seizing
a route with open numbering are
not transmitted to the destination
PBX and thus cannot be evaluated
by it. To reseize a route (for example
for a callback), you must set the appropriate digit prefixes in the trunk
group configuration for the routes to
be reseized.
Tip: If, for example, you are configuring a route which can be seized using routing code “5” and have selected one or more bundles for this
route, change the Prefix for dest.
call number at incoming internal
setting to “5” for this bundle in order
to enable the route to be reseized.
108
PBX Networking
PBX Networking
Licensing Information
A licence is required for certain additional OpenCom 510 program packages, for example for the internal
voice-mail system called OpenVoice.
The licensing confirmation for the
cascading contains all the information you need to carry out this procedure.
The following information is for customers who have already obtained
licences for an OpenCom 510 and
would like to cascade or network
their existing system with another
OpenCom 510.
Note: You will need the serial numbers of both infocom systems for
porting the activation keys. The serial numbers can be found in the
Web console's Configurator, in the
System Info: Versions menu.
PBX Networking
If you network two OpenCom 510
systems with each other, you
needn't generate any new activation
keys but can continue to use the corresponding functions on the existing
OpenCom 510. The “disadvantage”
of this alternative is that you have to
administer a separate configuration
on each OpenCom 510.
PBX Cascading
In the case of PBX cascading, the
master system administers the overall configuration.
If you have already installed activation keys on an existing
OpenCom 510, they have to be
ported to the master system
(OpenCom 510).
In this case, new activation keys for
the use of additional program packages must be generated on the
DeTeWe licence server
(http://lizenz.detewe.de).
PBX Networking
Licensing Information
109
Team Functions
Introduction
With the team functions you can
manage your telephone communication tasks by assigning lines with
separate call numbers to the keys of
different terminals. The terminal users, or team members, can thus pick
up one another’s calls or telephone
each other using the configured
keys.
Team functions can only be configured on the corded system telephones of the OpenPhone 6x product line because only these have the
required features.
Explanation of Keys
The team functions are programmed
on the call keys of the OpenPhone 6x
telephones. Depending on the terminal, different numbers of call keys
are available:
110
Introduction
Number of available call-keys
Telephone
Number of keys
OpenPhone 61
One key with a display, five keys without a display
OpenPhone 63
Three keys with a
display, five keys
without a display
OpenPhone 65
19 keys with a display: nine on the telephone itself and 10
on an add-on
Note: Only one function or call
number can be programmed for each
call key.
The following keys can be used:
■
Trunk key: Calls (for the programmed call number, e.g. 11)
are signalled to this key, and you
can make internal and external
calls via this number. A trunk key
can be programmed with a substitute function (with another
team member acting as the substitute). Calls for you are then
signalled to the terminal of another team member. A trunk key
also provides functions for man-
Team Functions
aging calls. For example, you can
configure call protection if you
do not want to be disturbed, or
call diversion to another telephone.
■
■
Team key: As with a trunk key, a
team key can be used to receive
or make calls. However, this key
cannot be used to change the
settings for managing calls; it is
not possible, for example, to
configure call diversion to another telephone. Calls made via
a team key are signalled to all
terminals with a trunk key that
has been programmed with the
same number. For example, the
team key with the number 11
calls all trunk keys with the
number 11.
Busy key: The purpose of a busy
key is to make the busy status of
other team members visible. An
incoming call for a busy team
member is signalled on the
other team member's busy key.
That team member can take this
call by pressing the busy key,
which seizes his own terminal's
trunk key. Calls taken via the
busy key are not entered in the
call list of the team member
who was originally called. In addition, it is possible to call the respective team member via his
busy key when his terminal is
idle. You set up a call to this
team member by pressing your
own trunk key.
Team Functions
■
Direct call key: Only outgoing
calls can be made with a direct
call key; they are signalled to all
terminals with the same number
programmed to a trunk key.
Calls via a direct call key are signalled to the destination terminal even if that terminal has
been programmed with a substitution function or call protection. If the destination terminal
has been configured for call diversion, the direct call is not diverted.
Which key is suitable for which
purpose?
■
Trunk keys can be assigned call
numbers for managing central
communication tasks, for example, customer support. If the call
numbers of the support department are assigned to trunk keys
on all of its terminals, then all
members of the support department can receive and manage
calls and use the substitute
function.
■
Team keys, for example, can be
used to create a project group
within a department. Calls from
customers of this group can then
be answered by any team member who is not busy. The team
members can call each other by
the team keys.
■
A busy key can be used to configure an attendant terminal
Introduction
111
showing the status of the individual users. The attendant terminal sees the status of the users and can put calls through by
simply pressing the key.
■
Direct call keys, for example,
can be configured at a terminal
in a conference room in order to
call the secretary.
Team Configuration
You can create teams and program
call keys in the Configurator of the
OpenCom 510 (PBX Configuration:
Groups and Ports: Upn menu).
Call key 1 is preset as a trunk key on
all system telephones. This setting
can be changed by the system administrator.
Examples of Use
Secretary
The following examples illustrate
the various uses of teams and team
functions.
For information on the display texts
and how to use the individual functions, refer to the chapter “Managing Calls in a Team” in the “OpenPhone 61, 63, 65” user guide.
Executive/Secretary
Team
In this example, the executive/secretary team comprises two members:
the executive and the secretary. The
secretary has one OpenPhone 63
system telephone, and the executive
has two, one of which is used as a
parallel telephone in a sofa suite.
112
Examples of Use
TrK 11: Secretary
TrK 10: Executive
11
10
DK 10: Executive
Executive
TrK 10: Executive
TrK 11: Secretary
TrK 12: Private
12
Executive´s Parallel
TrK 10: Executive
TrK 12: Private
Example: executive/secretary team
Line Seizure
The secretary can be reached on the
call number 11 (trunk key TrK 11:
secretary’s office).
The executive can be reached on the
call number 10 (trunk key TrK 10: executive’s office). He can also answer
calls from his parallel telephone. In
Team Functions
addition, a private line is configured
for both of the executive’s telephones (trunk key TrK 12: private).
Call numbers 11 and 10 are both
configured as a trunk key on the executive’s and the secretary’s terminal
respectively. Thus the executive and
the secretary can use either call
number (for answering as well as
making calls). Each can act as a substitute for the other.
The secretary’s terminal also has the
executive’s call number configured
as a direct call number (DK 10: executive’s office). The secretary can
therefore reach the executive and
put through calls even if the executive has programmed a substitute.
Line Busy Indication
If a line is busy, e.g. TrK 11 secretary’s
office, the other terminal will indicate this. The executive’s private calls
via TrK 12 are not indicated on the
secretary’s terminal since no appropriate trunk key is configured on the
latter’s telephone.
Call Signalling
In this configuration example, calls
to one’s own call number are signalled acoustically on the following
telephones:
■
Call number 11 on the secretary’s telephone
■
Call numbers 10 and 12 on the
executive’s telephone.
Team Functions
Calls for the other team member’s
call number are indicated by an optical signal on one’s own telephone
(flashing trunk key LED).
The parallel telephone will indicate
calls only by an optical signal.
Time-delayed acoustic signalling can
be configured for TrK 10 on the secretary’s telephone. If the executive,
for example, does not answer a call
within 10 seconds, the secretary’s
telephone will start to ring.
If the executive activates a substitute function with the secretary as
the substitute, calls for call number
10 will be indicated on the executive’s telephone by an optical signal
only, but signalled acoustically on
the secretary’s telephone. The secretary can also activate a substitute
function. Calls for call number 11 are
then signalled acoustically on the
executive’s telephone, and indicated
by an optical signal on the parallel
telephone and the secretary’s telephone.
Three-member Team
The three-member team described
here is an example of a team configuration within a project group, e.g.
export sales.
Each team member has one OpenPhone 63 system telephone with all
Examples of Use
113
call keys programmed as trunk and
team keys.
Miller
10
TrK 10: Miller
TK 11: Johnson
TK 12: Smith
Johnson
11
Line Busy Indication
If a line is busy, e.g. TrK 11 Johnson,
the team keys 11 on Miller’s and
Smith’s telephones will indicate this.
Trk 11: Johnson
TK 10: Miller
TK 12: Smith
Call Signalling
In this example, calls via the trunk
keys are signalled acoustically. Calls
via the team keys are indicated by a
visual signal (the team key LED
flashes).
Smith
12
TrK 12: Smith
Unified Team
TK 10: Miller
TK 11: Johnson
Example: three-member team
Line Seizure
Each team member’s call number,
e.g. call number 10 for Miller, is programmed as a trunk key on his telephone.
On the other telephones in the team,
this call number is programmed as a
team key (e.g. TK 10 on Johnson’s
and Smith’s telephones). The team
members can thus see which
number a call is for and can answer it
by pressing the appropriate team
key.
The team members can call each
other via the team keys. For example, Miller can call number 12 by
pressing TK 12; the call is then signalled to Smith’s telephone on
TrK 12.
114
Examples of Use
The unified team described here is
an example of a team configuration
within a department in which calls
are to be managed quickly (e.g. support department).
Each team member has one OpenPhone 63 system telephone with all
call keys programmed as trunk keys.
Miller
TrK 10: Support 1
TrK 11: Support 2
TrK 12: Support 3
10
Johnson
TrK 10: Support 1
11
12
TrK 11: Support 2
TrK 12: Support 3
Smith
TrK 10: Support 1
TrK 11: Support 2
TrK 12: Support 3
Example: unified team
Team Functions
Line Seizure
Call numbers 10, 11 and 12 are programmed as trunk keys on each
team member’s telephone (TrK 10
to TrK 12.
Each team member has one
OpenPhone 65 with all call keys programmed as trunk and team keys.
Miller
14:22
Mi.14.Feb.01
All team members can use these
numbers for answering as well as
making calls.
Tip: In this team configuration it is
useful to program one of the function keys on each telephone with the
“Hold” function. A call, e.g. for
TrK 11, can then be put on hold by
pressing the function key. If another
team member then presses trunk
key TrK 11 on his telephone, he can
accept the call. For further information on function keys, refer to the
“OpenPhone 61, 63, 65” user guide.
Line Busy Indication
If a line is busy, e.g. TrK 11 Johnson,
the trunk keys on the other team telephones will indicate this.
Call Signalling
In this example, calls via all trunk
keys are signalled acoustically.
Toggle Team
The toggle team described here illustrates how a large number of call
numbers can be managed efficiently
with the help of team functions.
Team Functions
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
TrK 10: Support 1
TrK 11: Support 2
TrK 12: Support 3
TrK 13: Support 4
TrK 14: Support 5
TrK 15: Hotline 1
TrK 16: Hotline 2
TK 20: Support 6
TK 25: Hotline 3
Johnson
14:22
Mi.14.Feb.01
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
TrK 20: Support 6
TrK 21: Support 7
TrK 22: Support 8
TrK 23: Support 9
TrK 24: Support 10
TrK 25: Hotline 3
TrK 26: Hotline 4
TK 10: Support 1
TK 15: Hotline 1
Example: toggle team
Line Seizure
Each team member is assigned
seven call numbers, each programmed as a trunk key (TrK 10 to
TrK 16 and TrK 20 to TrK 26). For each
member, these trunk keys are programmed either as support numbers
or hotline numbers.
The first support number and the
first hotline number of each team
member is programmed as a team
key on the other member’s tele-
Examples of Use
115
phone, e.g. TrK 10 and TrK 15 on
Miller’s telephone as TK 10 and TK 15
on Johnson’s telephone. The assumption here is that most calls will
go to the respective first call numbers, and team members can thus
help each other out by answering
one another’s calls.
On each telephone it is possible to
toggle between the calls on individual lines, e.g. TrK 10 and TrK 11, by
pressing the appropriate key (toggling).
Every call on a trunk key can be
transferred to any other party by
means of the R key. For more information, refer to the chapter entitled
“Consultation, Toggling, Transfer
and Conference” in the “OpenPhone
61, 63, 65” user guide.
Line Busy Indication
If a line is busy, e.g. TrK 10 on Miller’s
telephone, the appropriate team key
will indicate this, e.g. TK 10 on Johnson’s telephone.
Call Signalling
In this example, calls via trunk keys
are signalled acoustically. Calls via
team keys are indicated by a visual
signal (the team key LED flashes).
116
Examples of Use
Team Functions
Call Queue
Introduction
A queue can be activated for the telephone numbers of any type of telephone, i.e. for system, analogue,
ISDN and DECT telephones.
If a call number with a queue is busy,
calls to this number enter the queue.
A caller in the queue hears an idle
tone.
Calls which remain in the queue for
too long are cleared from the queue.
The caller then gets a busy tone. The
time until an external call is cleared
from a queue is defined by the network operator. In Germany this is
usually two minutes and in other European countries usually three minutes.
If more than one telephone number
(e.g. trunk or team keys) has been
configured for a telephone, separate
queues are used for each number.
On the OpenPhone 65 system telephone, additional calls are signalled
by a brief tone in the loudspeaker
and in the display. If calls are in the
queue, a number at the beginning of
the second line of the display on the
OpenPhone 65 indicates how full the
queue is. If more than one telephone
number with a queue is configured
Call Queue
on the telephone, the total number
of entries are displayed.
Calls in a queue are handled by the
OpenCom 510 in the following order
of priority: instant connection, sensor calls, automatic recalls, VIP calls,
then other internal and external
calls. Sensor calls thus have priority
over other calls, for example. Calls of
the same priority level are switched
in the order of their arrival.
The system administrator sets the
number of calls that can be placed in
a queue individually for each user
group. The value can lie between “0”
and “99”. The “0” value deactivates
the ”Call queue” function for a user
group. When the maximum number
of calls in the queue is reached, further callers hear a busy tone.
Only calls which have a “voice” service indicator are administered in a
queue.
Note: As calling fax machines often operate with the “voice” service
indicator (e.g. on analogue ports),
you should assign ports for fax machines on the OpenCom 510 to a user
group without a queue.
Introduction
117
Queues can be combined with the
“forwarding,” “pickup” and “hunt
group” functions, for example, in order to configure an attendant terminal for an operator.
Activation of Queues
Queues can be activated per user
group. The default factory setting
of queues for the preset groups “Administrators” and “Guests” is off.
When using queues, it often makes
sense to activate call waiting protection. For this purpose, “Call waiting
protection” authorisation must be
allocated to the user group, and call
waiting protection must be activated on the terminal.
You should configure a new user
group (e.g. “Operators”) and activate
the authorisations “Call queue”, “Call
waiting protection” and, if necessary, “Call forwarding”. If users belong to this group, a queue will be
activated automatically for all telephone numbers assigned to them.
Call Forwarding
Forwarded calls of the forwarding
type “Immediately” and “On busy”
have priority over queues. The
queue of the forwarding telephone
is not used for forwarding calls in
this manner.
118
Introduction
During the configuration of this type
of call forwarding, the contents of
the queue are not transferred to the
target terminal. If there are still calls
in the queue when the call forwarding function is activated, these calls
can only be accepted on the source
terminal.
If a call is to be forwarded “After delay”, it enters the queue. If the call
has not been answered before the
delay period expires, it will be forwarded to the target terminal and
can then be answered there.
Pickup
The functions “Pickup” (from a
pickup group) and “Pickup selective”
can be used together with queues.
A user who accepts a call using
“Pickup” or “Pickup selective” picks
up the next call from the queue.
Hunt Groups
Hunt groups of the “parallel” type
are usually used together with
queues, with the queues of each telephone in the group being synchronised to each other. When a call to
the number of the hunt group arrives, the call enters all parallel
queues. If a call from one of the
queues is answered, it is removed
from all other parallel queues.
Call Queue
Examples of Use
Attendant Terminal for an
Operator with Two
System Telephones
The operator switches all incoming
calls and can either work on the
OpenPhone 65 or the mobile terminal, the OpenPhone 25/27.
under User Manager: User
groups. Activate “Call queue”,
“Call waiting protection” and
“Call forwarding” for this group
and set the Dial out: External
option appropriately.
■
Create a user called “Operator 1”
under User Manager: User. Assign this user to the “Operators”
user group. Assign the telephone numbers of the
OpenPhone 65 trunk key and
the number of the mobile
OpenPhone 25/27 to this user.
■
Activate Call wait. prot.
(call waiting protection) on both
terminals in the Protection
menu.
■
Configure a function key on the
OpenPhone 65 which activates/
deactivates a “call forwarding
immediately” to the telephone
number of the mobile
OpenPhone 25/27 (in the menu
Call forwarding: Divert
phone: Immediately).
Configuration
■
Configure the system access or
access for multiple terminals under PBX Configuration: Ports:
S0.
■
Configure the OpenPhone 65
and the RFP 21/23 under PBX
Configuration: Ports: Upn.
■
Configure a trunk key for the
OpenPhone 65 under PBX Configuration: System telephones.
■
Configure the OpenPhone 25/27
under PBX Configuration:
Ports: DECT-PP and assign the
OpenPhone 25/27 its own telephone number. Check in the
OpenPhone 25/27.
■
Under PBX Configuration: Call
Distribution: Incoming route all
incoming calls to the number of
the OpenPhone 65 trunk key.
■
In the Configurator, create a
new group called “Operators”
Call Queue
Use
Incoming calls are routed to the
OpenPhone 65 manned by the operator, who then puts the calls
through. A queue is used so that callers do not get a busy signal. The display on the OpenPhone 65 indicates
Examples of Use
119
how many calls there are in the
queue.
If the operator wants to leave the
workstation and take along the attendant terminal, call forwarding to
the OpenPhone 25/27 is activated by
pressing a function key. Calls which
are in the OpenPhone 65 queue
must still be answered on this telephone. New calls are signalled on
the mobile OpenPhone 25/27 or enter its queue, allowing the
OpenPhone 25/27 to be used as a
mobile attendant terminal.
On returning to the workstation, the
operator deactivates call forwarding
by pressing a function key. Calls
which are already in the queue are
switched on the mobile
OpenPhone 25/27. New calls are signalled on the OpenPhone 65 or enter its queue.
Configuration
■
Configure the system access or
access for multiple terminals under PBX Configuration: Ports:
S0.
■
Configure the three
OpenPhone 65 telephones under PBX Configuration: Ports:
Upn.
■
Configure a trunk key with its
own telephone number for each
of the OpenPhone 65 telephones under PBX Configuration: System telephones.
■
Configure a hunt group of the
“parallel” type under PBX Configuration: Groups: Hunt
Group, and include the three telephone numbers of the trunk
keys in this hunt group.
■
Under PBX Configuration: Call
Distribution: Incoming route all
incoming calls to the number of
the hunt group.
■
In the Configurator, create a
new group called “Operators”
under User Manager: User
groups. Activate “Call queue”
and “Call waiting protection” for
this group.
■
In the User Manager, configure
a user for each of the three operators and assign these settings
to the user group called “Opera-
Group of Three Attendant
Terminals
The attendant terminals switch all
incoming calls. Incoming calls are
administered in queues. Depending
on the number of arriving calls, one
to three attendant terminals in this
group are manned. The attendant
terminals are each equipped with an
OpenPhone 65.
120
Examples of Use
Call Queue
tors”. Allocate each user the
telephone number of the trunk
key of their system telephone.
■
Activate Call wait. prot.
(call waiting protection) on all
three terminals in the
Protection menu.
■
Program a function key with the
function “Sign on/sign off from
hunt group” on the three system
telephones (in the menu
Calls: Hunt group).
Note: The last attendant terminal
remaining in the hunt group should
not sign off, so that incoming calls
can always be signalled to at least
one terminal.
Use
Incoming calls are signalled in parallel to all signed-on attendant terminals. If the attendant terminals are
busy, the incoming call joins the
queue on each of the terminals in
the hunt group. If one of the attendant terminals accepts a call from the
queue, the call is removed from the
queues of all the other attendant
terminals. The display on each attendant terminal (OpenPhone 65)
indicates how full the queue is.
If attendants leave the terminal,
they sign off from the hunt group by
means of a function key. In contrast
to Example 1, further calls do not
have to be processed after the signoff, as the calls are also registered in
the queues of the other signed-on
attendant terminals.
Call Queue
Examples of Use
121
Multi-Company Variant
Communications systems are frequently shared by several companies. These companies want to
jointly use the existing infrastructure
(e.g. the existing lines and features
of the system), while at the same
time they wish to organise and pay
for their communication completely
independently of one another.
■
Each available trunk group is
uniquely assigned to a company
so that incoming external calls
can be transferred to the correct
internal subscriber.
■
For each company, every route
can have its own code. For example, it is possible to activate
different routes with the code
“0” for different companies. This
enables separate charging for
outgoing external calls, for example.
■
An individual exchange (“operator”) can be set up for each company.
■
Each company can maintain the
communication data of its business partners in its own company telephone book.
■
The charges can be billed individually for each company.
This “multi-company variant” can be
implemented using the
OpenCom 510 within a shared office,
for example.
In the multi-company variant, the
companies are essentially completely independent of one another.
This allows them to have their own
trunk lines, which is useful for billing
purposes. The OpenCom 510 hardware and software are used equally
by all the companies, however. It is
possible to configure the
OpenCom 510 for each company and
define the extent to which the features of the system may be used.
In brief, the features of the multicompany variant are as follows:
122
■
Up to five companies can be
configured at the same time.
■
Every user of the OpenCom 510
is assigned to a company.
Multi-Company Variant
Configuring the Multi-Company Variant
The multi-company variant can be
commissioned and configured by
the system administrator of the
OpenCom 510 without any major effort. In the multi-company variant,
the communications system behaves in exactly the same way as the
single-company variant. This is particularly of interest to users who
want to expand their own system
and at the same time operate it in a
group.
The process in brief:
1. The feature must be activated
(see Activating the Multi-Company Variant starting on
page 123).
2. The required companies must be
set up (see Configuring and Managing Companies starting on
page 124).
3. The users of the OpenCom 510
are assigned to the individual
companies (see Assigning Users
starting on page 124).
4. In order that the OpenCom 510
can transfer incoming calls to
the corresponding company (or
its staff) correctly, the existing
trunk groups must be uniquely
assigned to the companies (see
Assigning Trunk Groups starting
on page 125).
Multi-Company Variant
5. In the case of outgoing external
calls, the lines via which the
members of a company can
make a call must be defined (see
Allocating Routing Codes starting
on page 125).
6. An exchange must be set up for
each company so that the
OpenCom 510 can correctly
process statuses in which a call
should be routed to the exchange (see Configuring the
Company Exchange starting on
page 125).
Activating the MultiCompany Variant
To be able to configure several companies in the OpenCom 510, the
“Multi-company variant”
(OpenCompany 45) program package must first be activated. This is
done in the Configurator on the
Web console in the
SYS Configuration: Licences menu.
The licence confirmation you received with the program package
contains all the information you require about how to proceed.
Only when this package has been activated are the fields required to
configure the multi-company variant available in the other menus of
the Web console, for example in the
User Manager: User groups menu
Configuring the Multi-Company Variant
123
or in the PBX Configuration:
Trunks menu.
■
The name of the default company can be changed, but the
default company itself cannot
be deleted.
Configuring and Managing
Companies
Assigning Users
Up to five companies can be configured in the OpenCom 510. By default, one company with the name
“Company 1” is predefined. All configuration settings, e.g. in the user
groups or in the trunk group configuration, apply to this predefined default company if not other company
has been selected.
Companies are set up and managed
in the PBX Configuration: Companies menu:
124
■
A new company is created in this
menu using the command New.
Each company can be given a
name up to 20 characters long.
This name is then displayed in all
configuration dialogue boxes in
which company-specific settings
can be defined.
■
In this menu a company can be
deleted again using the command Delete. If a company is
deleted which is still used at
other places (in the user groups,
for example), the respective
configuration is changed to the
default company.
Configuring the Multi-Company Variant
For each user you must define the
company to which they belong. This
assignment determines, for example, which company telephone book
the user has access to and which
company-specific configuration data
apply to them.
As the OpenCom 510 manages users
in groups, the assignment “user >
company” is also established this
way. The company to which each
user group belongs must be defined
for each group. A user group can
only belong to one company, i.e. not
to several. However, a company can
have several user groups. It is therefore possible, in the same way as in
the entire system, to allocate a range
of authorisation rights for the use
and configuration of features for
each company.
When setting up a new user group
(in the User Manager menu), you
will find that the default company is
predefined; another company can
be assigned as long as no other companies have been set up.
Multi-Company Variant
Assigning Trunk Groups
Allocating Routing Codes
Connections of the same type and in
the same direction are arranged in a
trunk group (e.g. S0 multi-terminal
connections). To be able to correctly
transfer incoming calls to the members of the configured companies
(the users) via the lines of a certain
trunk group of the OpenCom 510,
each of the available trunk groups
must be assigned to one of the companies. This is necessary to be able
to transfer incoming external calls to
the correct company exchange in
cases where the called internal subscriber cannot be reached (“Connection to Operator”), for example.
Routes are used for automatic and
selective seizure of trunk groups or
connections for external calls. It is
possible to seize a route by predialling a code.
The assignment of trunk groups to
companies is done in the
PBX Configuration: Trunks: Bundle
menu.
For outgoing external calls which users set up via the lines of their company’s trunk group, the assignment
of the trunk group to the company is
irrelevant: the charges are assigned
according to the “source” principle.
Charges are billed to the company to
which the user belongs who set up
the connection. The OpenCom 510
recognises this on the basis of the
assignment between user groups
and companies and on the basis of
the routing code with which a line of
the trunk group was seized. For
more information, please see the
following section.
Multi-Company Variant
In the PBX Configuration: Trunks:
Route menu, you can define which
company can seize each route. An individual code for the seizure is allocated per route for each company.
The OpenCom 510 ensures that during configuration no seizure code is
allocated twice (for two different
routes) for each company. If during
configuration of a route no code is
allocated for one of the configured
companies, the route concerned
cannot be seized by the members
(user groups) of this company.
Configuring the Company
Exchange
An internal telephone number must
be set up for each company which
represents the exchange, i.e. “the
operator”. The calls to specific extensions arriving at the exchange are
routed to this number, for example,
as are all external calls where the
called subscriber (a user who belongs to this company) cannot be
reached, as in the case of a timeout.
Configuring the Multi-Company Variant
125
A company exchange is set up in the
PBX Configuration: System: Operator menu. In this menu, you can
specify an internal telephone
number for each company and time
group which then represents the exchange for this company.
Working with the Multi-Company
Variant
All the features of the OpenCom 510
which the users may already be familiar with from the single-company
variant are available in the multicompany variant. These features can
be used to the same extent and can
be used in exactly the same way.
The following section describes the
features additionally available to the
users in the multi-company variant.
Company Telephone Book
An individual company telephone
book can be created for each company. In addition to this, “personal”
and “central” telephone books exist:
126
■
A personal telephone book is
available for each user.
■
The central telephone book can
be used across the companies by
all users of the OpenCom 510.
Working with the Multi-Company Variant
The company telephone book is a
central telephone book for the
whole company. It is only available
to the users/user groups who are assigned to this company. You can also
define whether the members of
each user group may edit the company telephone book or not.
The company telephone book is
treated exactly the same way on the
system terminals as the other types
of telephone books. This means that
the entries listed in the personal,
central and company telephone
books are displayed on the system
phones at the same time.
Users can also use the telephone
book of their company with the
OpenCTI 50 Web applications and
phone book, assuming they are authorised to use these applications.
In addition, it is also possible to assign a user group with the authorisation to edit foreign company tele-
Multi-Company Variant
phone books. This authorisation is
useful if members of this group - e.g.
the “Administrators” - service the
entire system. Foreign telephone
books can only be edited in the Configurator in the Phone Book menu.
The number of entries in a company
telephone book is unrestricted. The
OpenCom 510 can manage up to
2,000 entries in all telephone books
(in the central, personal and company telephone books).
Making Calls Between
Companies
All users of the OpenCom 510 can
make internal calls to one another,
irrespective of which company they
belong to. Calls between users from
the different companies are therefore not subject to any restrictions.
Billing Charges per
Company
In the Costs Web application you can
output the charges for each company.
Users who are authorised to use this
application can view the charges for
each company.
Multi-Company Variant
Working with the Multi-Company Variant
127
Configuring the PC Software
Further possibilities of use can be
implemented on a workstation PC
with the Windows operating system
by installing drivers and programs.
You can find the installation programs required for this on the system CD that comes with the
OpenCom 510.
Proceed as follows to install extra
software:
1. Log on under Windows NT or
Windows 2000/XP as the administrator.
If your PC is suitably configured,
the CD will start automatically.
Otherwise select “Run” from the
Start menu. Click on the
“Browse” button to look for the
program “cd_start.exe” on the
CD. Then confirm this with
“Open” and “OK”.
3. Choose the required option from
the start mask and follow the
program instructions.
Further instructions for various options that are available are given below.
2. Insert the system CD.
Setting up TAPI
With a TAPI (Telephony Application
Programming Interface) you can operate a CTI application (computer telephony integration). Here, the CTI
application uses the services of the
OpenCom 510 with the help of the
TAPI driver installed on a Windows
PC.
Requirements
You require an active IP network
connection between the PC and the
telephone system. Refer to the chapter entitled Configuration under Windows starting on page 73 if you have
128
Setting up TAPI
not yet established an IP network
connection. CTI functions can be
used only in conjunction with system telephones.
You must therefore have configured
at least one user for a system telephone. In addition, you require a
TAPI 2.1-compatible CTI application,
for example the Phone Dialer included in the Windows operating
system.
Configuring the PC Software
Installing the TAPI Driver
1. Call up the start mask from the
system CD (see Configuring the
PC Software on page 128).
2. Select “Software, TAPI Service
Provider” from the start mask
and follow the program instructions.
Configuring the TAPI Connection
Note: Under Windows NT or Windows 2000/XP you should log on as
the user for whom you want to configure the TAPI connection.
1. In the Start menu, select “Settings > Control Panel”. Doubleclick on the “Telephony” icon
(“Phone and Modem Options”
icon under Windows 2000/XP).
2. Change to the “Telephony Drivers” tab (“Advanced Options”
tab under Windows 2000/XP).
3. From the list of installed driver
software, select “OpenCom 100
Service Provider” and click on
“Configure”.
4. In the following dialogue you
will find a list with the configured connections for the user
who is currently logged on. Click
on “New”.
5. In the following dialogue you
provide information for the new
Configuring the PC Software
connection. In the “Connection
name” box you can enter a descriptive name for the connection. In the “CTI server” box you
must enter the DNS name or the
IP address of the OpenCom 510.
Using the “…” button you can
search for this in the LAN. In the
boxes “Username” and “Password” you enter the user data of
one of the users configured on
the OpenCom 510. This user
must be allocated a system telephone. Confirm your entry with
“OK”.
6. The new connection is now configured. Close the opened dialogues with “OK” and “Close”.
Testing the TAPI Function
1. In the Start menu, select “Programs > Accessories > Communication” and then start the program called “Phone Dialer”.
Under Windows XP the “Phone
Dialer” is started indirect by using the dialling function of the
“Address book” (can be found in
the start menu under
“Programs >Accessories”). A
manual start of the program file
“Dialer.exe” in the “C:\Program
files\Windows NT” folder is possible also.
2. In the “Tools” menu, select the
item “Connect using...” to select
the system telephone that is to
Setting up TAPI
129
use the CTI application. Under
Windows 2000/XP you select the
item “Options” from the “Edit”
menu. In the “Lines” tab you
then select the system telephone from the “Phone calls”
list.
3. Enter a telephone number in the
“Number” box and confirm with
“Dial.” Under Windows 2000/XP
you first click on the “Dial” icon
and in the subsequent dialogue
activate “Phone call”.
4. The number you entered is displayed on the selected system
telephone. Lift the receiver to
start dialling.
Note: If the “Phone Dialer” program is not installed, you will have to
install it. To do this, you open the
“Control Panel” and click on “Software”. In the “Windows Setup” tab
you activate the “Connections” component.
Setting up NET CAPI
With a CAPI driver (common application programming interface) Windows programs are able to access
services and functions of an ISDN
card. With a network-based CAPI,
the OpenCom 510 allows the use of
ISDN functions also by PCs in which
no ISDN card is integrated.
and any CAPI drivers on your PC must
be de-installed.
Requirements
You require an active IP network
connection between the PC and the
telephone system. Refer to the chapter Configuration under Windows
starting on page 73 if you have not
yet established an IP network connection.
2. Select “Software, NET CAPI
Driver” from the start mask and
follow the program instructions.
Installing the NET CAPI driver
1. Call up the start mask from the
system CD (see Configuring the
PC Software on page 128).
Configuring the NET CAPI Driver
The NET CAPI driver requires an extra
internal number so that the “virtual
ISDN card” on the OpenCom 510 can
be addressed:
Please note: Before installing the
CAPI driver for the OpenCom 510, any
existent ISDN card must be removed
130
Setting up NET CAPI
Configuring the PC Software
1. Go to the Configurator, NET
Configuration: Connections:
CAPI menu. Click on Change.
2. Activate the Status check box.
Enter at least one unassigned,
internal number in the boxes
under Parameters. Confirm your
entry with Assign.
3. Go to the Configurator, User
Manager: User menu. Select
one of the users shown. Enter
the number just assigned in one
of the boxes No. 1 to No. 10.
Confirm your entry with Apply.
4. If it is to be possible to call the
“virtual ISDN card” externally, or
if external calls are to be possible, the number must be included in call distribution (Con-
figurator, PBX Configuration:
Call Distribution menu).
5. After installing the NET CAPI
driver, you will find an extra icon
on the right side of the Windows
Start bar. Click on this icon with
the right mouse key. Select the
Log-on command from the
menu.
Note: In the subsequent dialogue
you must log on NET CAPI first with
the user (user name and password)
for which you configured the CAPI telephone number in the User Manager (see Step 3).
You will find further information on
the working of the NET CAPI driver
and CAPI application programs on
the system CD.
Using the Systray Display
You can configure a systray display
for the OpenCom 510 to appear in
the information area of the Start bar
of a workstation. This systray display
constantly shows you whether an
ISP, an RAS or a LAN-to-LAN connection is active. It is also possible to
display the current occupancy of the
trunk lines.
Configuring the PC Software
Requirements
To use the systray display, you must
first install TAPI; see Setting up TAPI
starting on page 128.
Please note: The systray display
requires a current version of TAPI. If
you are using TAPI from an earlier
version of the OpenCom 510, you
must first install the newer version
from the system CD.
Using the Systray Display
131
Installing the systray display
1. Call up the start mask of the system CD (see Configuring the PC
Software on page 128).
2. From the start mask, select
“Software, install systray”. Follow the program instructions.
3. Start the copied program by
“Start > Run” and the configuration dialogue is displayed. Select
one of the entries displayed under Existing PBXs. Enter your
user name and password in the
boxes under Log-on.
4. If you activate the Autostart
check box, you will see the
systray display even after restarting your PC.
5. Confirm the entries in the configuration dialogue with OK and
the systray display logs on for
the OpenCom 510.
6. Right-click on the
systray display in
the Start bar. Select
Configuration to call up the
configuration dialogue. Select
Network Connections or Trunk
Lines to produce a status dialogue.
Browser for OpenCTI
You can simplify the daily use of the
OpenCTI using the Web browser especially adapted for the
OpenCom 510. Each time the workstation is restarted, this browser program can automatically start and log
you in. This means the OpenCTI is always operational and can be accessed using the icon in the information area of the task bar.
Installing the browser for
OpenCTI
1. Call up the start mask from the
system CD (see Configuring the
PC Software on page 128).
2. From the start mask, select
“Software, Install browser for
OpenCTI”. Follow the program
instructions.
3. Follow the program instructions.
132
Browser for OpenCTI
Configuring the PC Software
After installing the browser, there is
a new menu entry in the Windows
start menu under Programs:
OpenCTI Browser.
gram. To view this, click the top left
corner of the program window on
the system menu icon or on the icon
in the information area of the task
bar. Select the Readme command.
Further information can be found in
the online help of the browser pro-
Synchronising the PC Clock
With the network service SNTP (simple network time protocol) it is possible to synchronise the internal
clock of a PC with the time of the
OpenCom 510.
Requirements
You must enter the time zone so that
the OpenCom 510 can calculate the
time of the internal clock back to the
GMT (Greenwich Mean Time) required for SNTP:
1. Go to the Configurator, SYS
Configuration: System menu.
Click on Change.
2. Under Internet time (SNTP), enter the Time zone for which the
time of the OpenCom 510 applies and whether summer time
is allowed for. Confirm this with
Assign.
Configuring SNTP
For various operating systems, you
can use one of the numerous SNTP
programs offered for downloading
Configuring the PC Software
on the Internet. Configure the
OpenCom 510 as an SNTP server for
such programs.
SNTP with Windows 2000
Here you configure the SNTP server
as follows:
1. Log on as the administrator.
Start the “Command Prompt”
under “Start > Programs > Accessories”.
2. Enter the command line “net
time /setsntp:192.168.99.254”.
Confirm with the enter key. This
command changes the setting
for the SNTP server address in
the system registry. Close the
command line.
3. Open the “Services” dialogue
under “Start > Settings > Control Panel > Administration”. Set
the autostart type of the “Windows Timer” service to “Automatic”. Start the service with
“Process > Start”. Every time the
Synchronising the PC Clock
133
service starts, the PC clock is
synchronised with the time of
the OpenCom 510.
Please note: In a Windows domain network, the PDC server (primary domain controller) should automatically assume the function of the
timer.
SNTP with Windows XP
Here you configure the SNTP server
by double-clicking on the time in the
Start bar. Enter the OpenCom 510 as
the “server” in the “Internet time”
tab.
Address Queries using LDAP
You can search the data of the central telephone book of the
OpenCom 510 from a workstation in
the LAN using LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol”). When configuring an LDAP-enabled program,
specify the IP address of the
OpenCom 510 as the address of the
LDAP server.
LDAP with Outlook Express
You can configure and operate the
LDAP directory service with Outlook
ExpressTM, a MicrosoftTM e-mail program, as follows:
1. Call up the Accounts command
in the Tools menu.
The Internet Accounts dialogue
box will then open.
2. Click on Add. Select the Directory Service command from the
pop-up menu.
134
Address Queries using LDAP
The Internet Connection Wizard dialogue box for Internet access will then open.
3. Under Internet directory
(LDAP) server, enter the address of the OpenCom 510. It is
not necessary to log in to the
LDAP server. Click twice on
Next. Then click on Finish.
4. Check the function. In the Edit
menu, call up the Find: People
command.
The Find: People dialogue box
will then open.
5. In the Look in list, select the entry with the OpenCom 510 address. Enter a user in the Name
input field, Administrator for example. Then click on Find now.
Configuring the PC Software
The list of entries found should
now display the address from
the central telephone book.
Note: Only users can be found for
whom an internal telephone number
has been configured.
USB DECT Box on the OpenCom 510
General Information
The USB DECT Box provides a PC with
a wireless ISDN data connection
(DECT). The Box is connected to the
PC via the USB interface and uses the
RFP 21/23 to create a connection to
the OpenCom 510 and its network,
to the telephone network and to the
Internet.
Note: Up-to-date information on
the USB DECT Box can be found at
http://www.detewe.de/.
Installation and
Configuration
1. Connect the RFP 21/23 to a free
Upn interface on the
OpenCom 510. Instructions on
how to do this can be found in
the section MS+UPN2-8 starting
on page 66.
2. Configure the RFP 21/23 in the
Configurator, using the PBX
Configuration: Ports: Upn
menu.
Configuring the PC Software
3. Install the software of the USB
DECT Box and then connect the
USB DECT Box to your PC. Further information on this can be
found in the corresponding
chapter of the “USB DECT Box”
manual (which is included with
the USB DECT Box).
4. Create a new DECT device of the
type USB DECT Box in the Configurator (menu PBX Configuration: Ports: DECT-PP) and assign a telephone number for the
data port.
5. Check the USB DECT Box in. Further information on how to do
this can be found in the corresponding chapter of the “USB
DECT Box” manual and in the
online help provided in the
OpenCom 510.
6. Assign a user to the telephone
numbers of the USB DECT Box in
the Configurator (menu User
Manager: User).
USB DECT Box on the OpenCom 510
135
Tip: We recommend that you create the Internet access indirectly via
the RAS access of the OpenCom 510.
If you wish to use the USB Box to dial
up an Internet provider directly, follow the instructions in the corresponding chapter of the “USB DECT
Box” manual. If you do this, you can
omit the remaining steps.
Please note: The direct dial-up
of an Internet provider offers no
safety mechanisms, whereas accessing the Internet via the OpenCom 510
protects your network/PC by means
of filter lists.
7. In the Configurator (menu User
Manager: User), assign the user
of the USB DECT Box to a user
group which is allowed to use
RAS access.
8. Configure the Internet access in
the OpenCom 510 Configurator
(menu NET Configuration: Connections: ISP). You can edit/create suitable filter lists for the Internet access in the NET
Configuration: Safe Access
menu.
Box” manual. Do not enter the
provider data, though. Instead,
use the internal number of the
RAS access and the user name
and password of the
OpenCom 510 user.
Detailed information can be found in
the Internet starting on page 151
section of the Frequently Asked Questions chapter. The information concerning the Internet functionality of
the OpenPhone 25/27 also applies to
the USB DECT Box.
Technical Data for
Operation on the
OpenCom 510
■
Data transmission with RAS
access / Internet access via the
OpenCom 510: Up to 64 kbit/s
gross
■
Data transmission with direct
dial-up of a provider: Up to 128
kbit/s gross
9. Configure the RAS access in the
NET Configuration: Connections: RAS menu.
10. Configure the communication
network. To do this, follow the
instructions in the corresponding chapter of the “USB DECT
136
USB DECT Box on the OpenCom 510
Configuring the PC Software
Configuration Guide
The Configuration Guide contains a
series of flowcharts that will help
you to plan the configuration of the
OpenCom 510 and guide you
through the necessary settings step
by step, focusing on the network settings. The individual charts are summarised below:
Note: Settings for mail and ISP and
RAS access are only possible by releasing the OpenCom 510 IP package on the Web console Configurator
in the SYS Configuration: Licences
menu.
■
Overview: This chart gives you
an overview of the initial configuration of the OpenCom 510.
■
Configuring PBX Ports: This
chart shows you the necessary
steps for configuring ports and
terminals.
■
Configuring Easy Access: This
chart guides you through TCP/IP
settings for the OpenCom 510.
■
Configuring ISP Settings: These
instructions support you in configuring the Internet access.
■
Configuring RAS Settings: This
chart guides you through the
configuration of the RAS settings.
Configuration Guide
■
Configuring LAN-to-LAN Settings: This chart guides you
through the configuration of the
LAN-to-LAN settings.
■
Configuring E-Mail: This diagram tells you how to create the
requirements needed for configuring the OpenCom 510 e-mail
access function.
■
Configuring E-Mail Access: This
overview provides instructions
on configuring the
OpenCom 510 e-mail access
server.
137
Overview
No
Ethernet network
(LAN) exists?
Yes
Yes
Cross-connected ethernet
cable available?
Connect the configuration PC to
the OpenCom 510 LAN port.
Enable DHCP.
Connect the OpenCom 510 and the
configuration PC to the network
Start the OpenCom 510 configuration
service via your Web browser.
No
Connect the configuration PC to
the OpenCom 510 COM port.
Generate the Dialup Networking
entry with “occonfig”.
Create the user groups and users.
Enter the OpenCom 510 address, for
example “http://192.168.99.254”.
Set the system data. Select the access type. Connect
the S0, U pn and analogue devices and configure them.
Configure the call distribution scheme.
User Manager
Configure the Least Cost Routing
function: zones, network providers
and holidays.
PBX Configuration
Configure OpenCom 510
Least Cost Routing function?
Yes
LCR Configuration
Yes
Enter the licence code for releasing
the IP package in the “System
Configuration: Licences” menu.
No
Configure OpenCom 510
network functions?
Easy Access Configuration
Dial in (RAS)?
Yes
RAS Configuration
Yes
LAN-LAN Configuration
Yes
ISP Configuration
Yes
E-Mail Configuration
No
Connection (LAN)?
No
No
Internet?
No
E-mail?
No
Save data
Finished
Flowchart: Overview
138
Overview
Configuration Guide
PBX Ports
Define the access type
Set the access type (multiterminal
access and/or system access).
Define the external
S0 interfaces
Set the external S0 interfaces and
enter the telephone numbers
assigned by your network provider.
Do you have ISDN terminals
that you wish to operate on
an S0 interface?
S0 terminals
Set the internal S0 interfaces
and enter the internal
telephone numbers.
Yes
Define the internal S0
interfaces
Yes
Configure the
Upn interfaces
Enter the Upn interfaces
and enter the internal
telephone numbers.
DECT terminals
Do you want to operate
DECT terminals on the
OpenCom 510?
No
Do you want to operate
system telephones or
DECT terminals?
Upn terminals
No
Do you want to operate
analogue terminals
(e.g. a fax machine)?
Analogue terminals
No
Yes
Configure the DECT
terminals
Check in the DECT terminals
and enter the internal
telephone numbers.
Yes
Configure the
a/b interfaces
Set the analogue interfaces
and enter the internal
telephone numbers.
Yes
Configure the sensor
Enter the internal telephone
numbers for the time
groups of the sensor.
Yes
Configure the COM
interface
No
Do you want to use a
sensor contact on the
OpenCom 510 (e.g. for
a door opener)?
Sensor
No
Do you want to run the
OpenCount program?
COM
Select the “connection
data” option.
No
Finished
Flowchart: Configuring the PBX Ports
Configuration Guide
PBX Ports
139
Easy Access
Do you have a computer network?
LAN
No
Finished
Yes
Host name
Assign a name to
the OpenCom 510.
DHCP
Yes
Do you have a DHCP
server in your network?
The OpenCom 510
takes the settings from
your DHCP server
No
Activate the OpenCom 510
DHCP server.
OpenCom 510
DHCP server
Enter the Ethernet-IP configuration for the OpenCom 510.
IP address
Network mask
Gateway address
Enter the address range of the client
computers in your network.
Do you have a DNS server
in your network?
DNS
No
Enter the address range
for the RAS accesses.
Client computers are informed of this
gateway address via DHCP as a gateway.
DHCP adresses
Domain name
Specify the IP address of the OpenCom 510
under “Domain Name Server”. This is
transferred as the DNS server to the client
computers via DHCP.
Ask your network administrator for the
address range for the RAS accesses. For
this purpose, your administrator must
reserve an IP address range for the RAS
accesses.
OpenCom 510 as
DNS server
Enter the domain name. This name is
transferred to the client computers as
the domain via DHCP.
Yes
Specify the IP address of
your internal DNS server
under “Domain Name
Server”. This is transferred
as the DNS server to the
client computers via DHCP.
Register internal DNS
PPP addresses
Finished
Flowchart: Configuring Easy Access
140
Easy Access
Configuration Guide
ISP Settings
Do you want to configure
a new Internet provider?
Your own ISP
“SYS Configuration: System:
Country” = “German”?
Enter your provider's
dial-in data.
No
Yes
T-Online
T-Online: Telephone number,
Access identification, T-Online
number, Co-user number
and Password
Configure T-Online in “NET:
Configuration: Connections: ISP:
Provider”. You will obtain the access
data when you register.
Domain Name Server
Mail input server and
mail output server
Specify a standard POP server
and a standard SMTP server.
Select one of the
default providers in
“NET Configuration:
Connections: ISP”.
Yes
Provider-New: Provider,
Telephone Number,
User Name and Password
Specify the IP address of
the DNS in the Internet.
Select a provider from
the list
No
Maximum idle time
Specify the maximum time of
inactivity after which the connection
to the ISP is cleared down.
Activate the status and
select the provider
DSL
(PPPoE)
Yes
No
Is your IP address
allocated by your
provider?
PPP
No
Configure the ISP in “NET:
Configuration: Connections: ISP”.
HDLC
Yes
IP address
Gateway
Network mask
Specify the gateway
for the Internet
connection.
Your own telephone
number
Maximum idle time
Filter list IN
No
No
Yes
Enter the IP address and network mask
you wish to obtain from your provider.
Max. connection time
per month
LAN
Yes
Yes
Dynamic
No
Specify the maximum
connection time for one month.
Specify the maximum time of inactivity after
which the connection to the ISP is cleared down.
Select the filter lists. Filter lists are created
in “NET Configuration: Safe Access”.
Filter list OUT
Finished
ISP cannot be configured.
Flowchart: Configuring the ISP Settings
Configuration Guide
ISP Settings
141
RAS Settings
Have you made the network
settings for the OpenCom 510?
Configure the RAS access of the
OpenCom 510.“NET Configuration:
Connections: RAS”
LAN
Yes
Status
Telephone number
Select from PAP,
CHAP and CLID.
Have you created users
with RAS access rights?
NET Configuration:
Easy Access
Configure the network settings
for the OpenCom 510.
Activate the RAS access.
Specify the telephone number for which
the RAS access should be configured.
Authorisation
Number of connections
Select the filter lists. Filter
lists are created in “NET
Configuration: Safe Access”
No
Specify how many simultaneous
connections are possible via this access.
Filter list IN
Filter list OUT
Users
Yes
No
User Manager: Users and
User Groups
Configure users that
have RAS access rights.
Add internal telephone
number to the incoming
call distribution scheme.
Finished
Flowchart: Configuring the RAS Settings
142
RAS Settings
Configuration Guide
LAN-to-LAN Settings
Have you made the network
settings for the OpenCom 510?
LAN
Yes
Configure the LAN-LAN
connection.“NET Configuration:
Connections: LAN-LAN”
Protocol
Telephone number local
IP address local
Network mask local
Yes
CLID
No
NET Configuration:
Easy Access
Configure the network settings
for the OpenCom 510.
Select between PPP and HDLC transparent.
Enter the internal telephone number.
Enter the local IP address.
Enter the local network mask.
Authorisation method of the local
LAN: CLID, PAP or CHAP?
No
User name local
Password local
Telephone number remote
IP address remote
Network mask remote
Yes
CLID
Specify the user name with which the
remote LAN can access a destination.
Specify the password with which the
remote LAN can access a destination.
Specify the telephone number of the remote LAN access.
Specify the IP address of the remote LAN.
Specify the network mask of the remote LAN.
Authorisation method of the remote
LAN: CLID, PAP or CHAP?
No
User name remote
Password remote
Specify the user name with which
the remote LAN can be accessed.
Specify the password with which
the remote LAN can be accessed.
Select the direction of the connection.
Direction of connection
Maximum connection
time per month
Maximum idle time
Specify the maximum number of minutes per month
the connection to the remote LAN can be set up for.
Set the maximum idle time after which a
connection to the remote LAN is cleared down.
Add internal telephone
number to the incoming call
distribution scheme.
Finished
Flowchart: Configuring the LAN-to-LAN Settings
Configuration Guide
LAN-to-LAN Settings
143
E-mail Function
Have you made the network
settings for the OpenCom 510?
LAN
No
Configure the network settings
for the OpenCom 510.
NET Configuration:
Easy Access
Yes
Do you want to use e-mail
from the Internet?
Internet
Yes
Configure your Internet access.
No
Has an internal e-mail server
been configured in your LAN?
LAN
NET Configuration:
Connection: ISP
No
No e-mail use
Yes
Do you want to be notified of
e-mails on your system telephones?
Notification
No
Finished
Yes
Have you stored the
users to be notified?
Users
Yes
Set the polling time periods.
No
Create the users and activate
e-mail notification. Also enter
the users' e-mail addresses.
User Manager:
Users, User Groups
and User Accounts
NET Configuration:
E-Mail Access
Finished
Flowchart: Configuring the E-mail Function
144
E-mail Function
Configuration Guide
E-mail Access
Do you have access to a mail server
in your network or in the Internet?
Mail server
No
Configure your network/
Internet access.
NET Configuration: Easy Access
or Configure ISP
Yes
Do you have created mail account polls
in the “User Manager: User accounts”?
User accounts
No
Set up user accounts in
the User Manager.
User Manager: User Accounts
Yes
Configuration of e-mail
access settings
Maximum number of e-mails
per user account
Specify the time intervals in which
the OpenCom 510 is to poll all mail
accounts from the standard POP server.
Specify the maximum no. of e-mails per
user account that should be temporarily
stored by the OpenCom 510.
Enquiry interval
Start and end times:
Monday to Friday 1st starting time
Monday to Friday 1st ending time
Monday to Friday 2nd starting time
Monday to Friday 2nd ending time
Saturday 1st starting time
Saturday 1st ending time
Saturday 2nd starting time
Saturday 2nd ending time
Define the time windows in which the
OpenCom 510 should check the mail accounts
for new messages in the time intervals that
have been set. You can define two time
windows for each working day (Monday to
Friday), and two each for Saturday and Sunday.
Sunday 1st starting time
Sunday 1st ending time
Sunday 2nd starting time
Sunday 2nd ending time
Finished
Flowchart: Configuring E-mail Access
Configuration Guide
E-mail Access
145
Frequently Asked Questions
This chapter provides tips and information on how to deal with any malfunctions or faults you may experience with the OpenCom 510.
Please note: Repairs to the
OpenCom 510 should only be carried
out by qualified personnel.
The following LEDs indicate that the
OpenCom 510 is ready for operation:
Activity LED
LAN LED
+3,3 V
LED
-42 V
LED
MPS+1-AC
MPS+1-AC
Position of LEDs on the OpenCom 510
General/Hardware
Question: The OpenCom 510 is
not functioning.
Make sure the mains plug is properly
connected.
Plug another device into the mains
socket to check whether there is any
voltage.
Question: The mains plug is connected, the mains socket is supplying output, but the OpenCom 510
still does not function.
DANGER! High voltage inside the device. To make the system dead, remove the power plug
from the socket!
146
General/Hardware
Is the +3,3V/-42V LED at the lit up? If
not, contact your service centre or an
authorised dealer. The AC adapter
plug of the OpenCom 510 may be
defective.
Question: After restarting the
OpenCom 510, nothing is indicated on the displays of any connected terminals.
It takes a short while for the
OpenCom 510 to start up. After the
restart, check whether the activity
LED flickers in a regularly interval.
This indicates that the OpenCom 510
has started up correctly and is ready
for operation. Further information
can be found in the chapter Modules
starting on page 52. If the
OpenCom 510 has not restarted
Frequently Asked Questions
properly, reset the OpenCom 510 to
its original factory setting (refer to
the chapter entitled Resetting the
System Data starting on page 84).
Telephony
Question: It is not possible to
make external calls.
Make sure the telephone has been
properly connected.
Check the connection between the
NTBA and the OpenCom 510.
Check also whether the appropriate
port has been configured correctly in
the Configurator (PBX Configuration: Ports menu).
In the Configurator, check whether
the external S0 ports are configured
correctly (PBX Configuration: S0
menu).
Question: The OpenCom 510 is
connected to an NTBA with a
multi-terminal configuration. Why
is it not possible to establish external connections?
With the original factory setting, an
additional external S0 port is set for
an NTBA in system configuration;
this additional port will be used first
to seize a trunk line.
Deactivate the corresponding S0
port in the Configurator (PBX Configuration: S0 menu).
Question: One of the telephones
is not functioning at all.
Frequently Asked Questions
Question: It is not possible to
make external calls with one of the
telephones.
Check whether a user is configured
for the telephone. Otherwise the
settings of the Guests user group are
valid for the telephone. To standard,
this user group has no external call
authorisation.
Make sure the user configured for
this telephone belongs to a user
group with external line access
(Configurator, User Manager: User
groups menu).
Check also whether the internal call
number of this telephone has been
configured for outgoing call distribution (Configurator, PBX Configuration: Call Distribution menu).
Telephony
147
Question: One of the features
(e.g. call diversion) on one of the
telephones cannot be used even
though the feature has been configured in the Configurator of the
OpenCom 510.
Make sure the user configured for
this telephone belongs to a user
group that has access to this feature
(Configurator, User Manager: User
and User groups menus). Some features cannot be used until the system PIN is changed.
Question: Nothing is indicated on
the display of one of the connected
ISDN telephones.
You have connected the ISDN telephone to an external S0 port (RJ-45
socket). These ports are intended for
connection to the NTBA only. Connect the telephone to an internal S0
port (pressure terminal).
Question: Calls can be made but
not received with one of the ISDN
telephones.
The internal call number that has
been configured for this ISDN telephone in the Configurator (PBX
Configuration: Ports: S0 menu)
must also be configured as an MSN
on the ISDN telephone itself. For further information, refer to the User
Guide of your ISDN telephone.
148
Telephony
Question: It is not possible to configure Call Distribution: Outgoing
for multi-terminal access.
You have configured multi-terminal
access and system access in parallel.
All outgoing calls are therefore established via system access, and outgoing call distribution can be configured for system access only
(Configurator, Call Distribution:
Outgoing menu).
A specific MSN can be seized for individual calls by means of a code
number procedure. For further information, refer to the “OpenCom 100,
Operation on Standard Terminals”user guide.
Question: Which reason may have
problems with receiving faxes
resp. sending faxes?
In frequent cases, the reason may be
found in a problem with the ISDN-L1
reference clock distribution. The L1
clock is delivered from the network
provider. An unclean L1 clock distribution and the introduced signalling
jitter is overheard by the human ear.
Nevertheless, data and fax transmissions may be disturbed by the jitter.
Please check, which ISDN lines will
deliver the L1 clock. One of the installed ISDN interface boards
(MX+S01-8 or MT+S2M1-1) should
show a steady green light with LED
3. Details can be found under L1
Clock starting on page 103.
Frequently Asked Questions
DECT
Question: The LED of the RFP 21/
23is flashing, but none of the DECT
devices is functioning.
Question: Another manufacturer’s DECT device is not functioning.
Make sure the terminal setting for
the corresponding Upn port is set to
RFP 21/23 (Configurator, PBX Configuration: Ports: Upn menu).
Check whether the DECT device supports the DECT GAP standard. In the
Configurator, also make sure GAP is
set for this DECT device (PBX Configuration: Ports: DECT-PP menu).
Question: The LED of the RFP 21/
23 is continuously lit up, but one of
the cordless DECT devices is indicating “No connection”.
Question: The startup procedure
of the RFP 21/23 take a long time?
What is the reason?
You have not configured a port for
this DECT device. Configure a port in
the Configurator and start the enrolment procedure (PBX Configuration: Ports: DECT-PP menu).
This behaviour may indicate a problem with the reference clock. Refer
also to Which reason may have problems with receiving faxes resp. sending faxes? starting on page 148.
Question: Is it possible to increase
the time for the enrolment procedure?
You must manually enter the IPEI of
the DECT device in the Configurator.
The enrolment time is then increased to one hour (PBX Configuration: Ports: DECT-PP menu).
Frequently Asked Questions
DECT
149
LAN
Question: It is not possible to establish a network connection with
the OpenCom 510.
Check whether the LEDs for the hub
and the PC’s network card are indicating a connection.
Check the LEDs for the LAN functions
of the OpenCom 510. The green LAN
LED at the top indicates whether the
network cable has been properly
connected.
To check whether there is a network
connection with your OpenCom 510,
enter the “ping IP address” command in “Run” in the Windows Start
menu (e.g. ping 192.168.99.254).
Question: How can I determine
the IP address of the
OpenCom 510?
To find out what the IP address is,
enter the code number
* 1 8 2 on one of the connected system telephones.
The code-number procedure
* 1 8 3 also displays the network mask.
Question: The network connection is functioning, but nothing is
displayed in the browser.
150
LAN
Enter the complete IP address of the
OpenCom 510 along with the protocol identifier, for example http://
192.168.99.254/.
Check whether the browser has
been configured for connection
through a proxy server. If so, deactivate the “Connect through proxy
server” setting.
Question: You have just configured the OpenCom 510 via the network. Why is it not possible now to
establish a remote data transfer
network connection?
The network card and the communication (remote data transfer)
adapter cannot be run with the
same routing setting. Deactivate the
network card before connecting via
the dial-up network.
Question: Our network has grown
over time, with several segments
connected by one central router.
How can PCs from all segments be
connected with the OpenCom 510?
In the Configurator, use the LAN
setting in ISP to specify the central
router as the default gateway. If necessary, deactivate any filter rules defined for the ISP (NET Configuration: Connections: ISP menu). If
several routers are configured for
your network in different segments,
Frequently Asked Questions
you can enter extra static routes in
the NET Configuration: Easy Access:
Routes menu.
Question: In our network the
OpenCom 510 dynamically issues
the IP addresses by DHCP. Can I
firmly assign the IP address for our
internal server PCs (mail, Web)?
You need a static address assignment for these PCs. Make the appropriate assignment entries in the
Configurator (NET Configuration:
DHCP menu). Activate “Dynamic and
static address”. If you fix a name for
these IP addresses in the NET Configuration: Easy Access: Hosts
menu, you can address the server
PCs quite easily by the DNS names.
Internet
Question: I cannot access our
company Web site.
Outside your system, your company
Web site is accessed at
“www.firm.com”, but in the Configurator you have entered “firm.com”
as the domain. Your company’s site
URL thus counts as an internal URL
and can only be accessed by entering the direct IP address. If required,
change the domain setting in the
NET Configuration: Easy Access
menu.
Question: Why do some Internet
services not work even though
they can be used when dialling in
directly via a modem?
Some Internet services require an
active connection coming from the
Internet. But the configured filter
rules prevent this. Plus, it is not possible to establish incoming Internet
Frequently Asked Questions
connections with the PCs directly
owing to the network address translation process.
Question: It is not possible
to access the Internet with the
OpenPhone 25/27.
The requirement for this is that the
set should be configured as Handset+data. The telephone number
used by the OpenPhone 25/27 to establish an Internet connection must
also be specified in the respective
user profile (Configurator, User
Manager: User menu).
With the OpenPhone 25/27, the Internet can be accessed either directly via the remote data transfer
network or indirectly via RAS access
on the OpenCom 510. For direct access you can directly dial any provider. Indirect access uses the routing function of the OpenCom 510,
Internet
151
accompanied by the configured security features, for example.
Directly via remote data transfer
network
If the Internet is accessed directly via
the remote data transfer network,
make sure that
■
the remote data transfer network is properly installed on
your PC and that the correct ISP
access data is configured,
■
the internal number used by the
OpenPhone 25/27 to establish
the data connection is configured for outgoing call distribution (Configurator, PBX Configuration: Call Distribution:
Outgoing menu).
For information on the installation of
software and on configuring Internet access, refer to the
“OpenPhone 25” user guide or to the
“OpenPhone 27” user guide.
Indirectly via RAS access
If the Internet is accessed indirectly
via RAS, the system administrator
should make sure that:
152
■
permission has been given for
Internet access via RAS (Configurator, Net Configuration: Safe
Access menu),
■
an internal number is configured
for RAS access (Configurator,
Net Configuration: Connections: RAS menu),
■
your user group has been
granted RAS access rights (Configurator, User Manager: User
Groups menu).
Internet
Frequently Asked Questions
Technical Data
Please observe the technical information regarding modules under
Modules starting on page 52.
Component
Page
1-12 frame of the OpenCom 510
– BPV+1-12 backplane system:
– Dimensions:
Supply voltages and system signals for up
to 2 power supply units, 1 central control
module and 12 interface cards
28
4.5 height units (1 U = 44.45 mm)
–
19" frame in accordance with DIN 41494
Part 5 for installation in a 19" cabinet
– Number of slots:
12
22
– Length of cable:
50 cm; 1:1 network cable connecting master and slave
98
– Number of channels:
236
–
Cascading of two 19" frames
Modules
– MPS+1-AC power supply unit (with AC/DC converter)
55
– MC+1-3 central control module
57
– MT+S2M1-1 trunk module
60
– MX+S01-8 subscriber or trunk module
63
– MS+UPN1-8 subscriber module
65
– MS+UPN2-8 subscriber module
66
– MS+A1-8 subscriber module
68
Technical Data
153
The following table provides an
overview of the configuration limits
for the OpenCom 510. These limits
result from the combination of different interface cards.
OpenCom 510: system configuration limits
maximum number of ports
…via module …
2 (1 x Ethernet, 1 x V.24)
MC+1-3
4 x S2M
MT+S2M1-1
24 x S0 (for internal or external use)
MX+S01-8
24 x Upn
MS+UPN1-8
24 x Upn
MS+UPN2-8
24 x a/b
MS+A1-8
System configuration limits in general
2
Frames
1
CompactFlash card
Note: The online help provides an
overview of the limits that should be
observed when configuring the
OpenCom 510.
154
Technical Data
Index
Numerics
1-12 frame 15, 21
19" frame 15, 21
A
a/b adapter 46
a/b ports 40
Accessories 48
Actor
See Intercom system 42
Adapter
Audio 46
Cables (RS-232 - RJ-45) 16
Upn 46
Add-on 49
Authorisations 10
B
Backplane 15
Exchanging 28
Basic setting 84
Bundles 105
Busy key 111
C
Call keys 110
Clock 133
Synchronising the PC (via
SNTP) 133
COM port 44
Configuration 70
Client 77
Configuration with Windows 73
Establishing a network
connection 76
Initial configuration 70
Index
Installing the remote data transfer
network under Windows 9x 75
Loading software updates 84
Network card setup 75
Preconfiguration 82
RAS service 75
Remote configuration 82
Resetting the system data 84
Saving and loading the
configuration 84
Serial port (V.24) 75
Starting the browser 77
System prerequisites 71
V.24 port 75
Configuration examples 86
Introduction to TCP/IP 87
OpenCom 100 in a LAN with an IPenabled server 91
OpenCom 100 in a serverless
LAN 88
RAS 90
Configuration guide
Easy Access 140
E-mail access 145
E-mail function 144
ISP settings 141
LAN-to-LAN settings 143
Overview 138
PBX ports 139
RAS settings 142
Configuring
Preparation 79
Starting the Web console 79
Control module 5, 15
Functional description 57
Installation 23
D
DECT 8, 149
DHCP 86
155
Direct call key 111
DNS 89, 91
DSL 43
DSS1 103
E
E-mail 8
F
Factory settings 10
FAQs 146
Features 5
Internet factory settings 13
Telephony factory settings 10
H
Hardware 146
I
Installation 15, 17
Control module 23
Installation in a 19" rack 21
Interfaces 25
Power supply units 27
Scope of delivery 16
Siting 20
Intercom system 41
Interface cards 5, 15
Installation 25
Interfaces
a/b 40
LAN 43
MS+A1-8 68
MS+UPN1-8 65
MS+UPN2-8 66
MX+S01-8 63
Overview 33
PCM 43, 98
S0 34, 37
S2M 60
156
Upn 38
V.24 6
Internet
Access 7
Factory settings 13
Internet access 95
Costs 95
E-mail 96
NAT 96
Web 95
ISDN-L1 clock 101
L
LAN port 43
LCR 106
LDAP 134
Linux 77
Log-in procedure 132
M
MacOS 77
MC+1-3 43, 98
see Control module 57
MPS+1-AC
see Power supply units 55
MS+A1-8 68
MS+S2M1-1 101, 104
MS+UPN1-8 65, 100
MS+UPN2-8 66, 100
MT+S2M1-1 60
Multi-terminal access 5, 102
Music on Hold 41
External devices 41
Generating own files 85
MX+S01-8 63
N
NET CAPI 130
NTBA 43, 147
Nummerierung 107
Index
O
S
Online help 81
OpenCTI 132
Outlook Express 134
S0 port 148
S0 ports 34
S0 ports, internal 37
S2M 103
Safety 17
Saving and loading the
configuration 84
Sensor
See Intercom system 42
Slots 22
SNTP 133
Software updates, loading 84
System access 5, 102
System data, resetting 84
Systray display 131
P
PBX cascade 84
PBX cascading 98
PBX networking 102
PBX number 107
PC status display 131
PCM port 43
Pin assignment
a/b interface 42
Audio adapter 47
IAE 36
MT+S2M1-1 61
S0 interfaces 34
Upn interface 39, 65
V.24 interface 44
Point-to-point connections 104
Ports
See Interfaces 33
Power failure 31
Power supply units 5, 15
Functional description 55
Installation 27
Q
Q.SIG 103
R
Remote configuration 82
Resetting system data 84
Routes 106
T
Team functions
Explanation of keys 110
Introduction 110
Team key 111
Telephony 147
Telephony factory settings 10
Terminals
Overview 33
Three-member team 113
Time
After a power failure 31
Time zone 133
Toggle team 115
Troubleshooting 146
Trunk key 110
U
Unified team 114
Upn ports 38
V
Voice Mail 41
Index
157
Notes
158
Index
Notes
Index
159
Notes
160
Index
In the UK:
DeTeWe Ltd
1 Frogmore Road, Hemel Hempstead,
Herts, HP3 9TG
WWW: http://www.detewe.co.uk/
Other countries:
DeTeWe AG & Co.
Zeughofstrasse 1, D-10997 Berlin,
Germany
WWW: http://www.detewe.de/
Subject to changes
As of 06.2004
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