ArcGIS 9
®
ArcGIS Survey Analyst Tutorial
Copyright © 2002–2008 ESRI
All rights reserved.
Printed in the United States of America.
The information contained in this document is the exclusive property of ESRI. This work is protected under United States copyright law and other
international copyright treaties and conventions. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or
mechanical, including photocopying and recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system, except as expressly permitted in writing by ESRI.
All requests should be sent to Attention: Contracts Manager, ESRI, 380 New York Street, Redlands, CA 92373-8100, USA.
The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice.
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Tim Hodson and Kristin Clark
U.S. GOVERNMENT RESTRICTED/LIMITED RIGHTS
Any software, documentation, and/or data delivered hereunder is subject to the terms of the License Agreement. In no event shall the U.S. Government
acquire greater than RESTRICTED/LIMITED RIGHTS. At a minimum, use, duplication, or disclosure by the U.S. Government is subject to restrictions
as set forth in FAR §52.227-14 Alternates I, II, and III (JUN 1987); FAR §52.227-19 (JUN 1987) and/or FAR §12.211/12.212 (Commercial Technical
Data/Computer Software); and DFARS §252.227-7015 (NOV 1995) (Technical Data) and/or DFARS §227.7202 (Computer Software), as applicable.
Contractor/Manufacturer is ESRI, 380 New York Street, Redlands, CA 92373-8100, USA.
ESRI, the ESRI globe logo, the ArcGIS logo, ArcView, ArcSDE, SDE, ArcEditor, ArcInfo, ArcCatalog, ArcMap, ArcGIS, GIS by ESRI, and www.esri.com
are trademarks, registered trademarks, or service marks of ESRI in the United States, the European community, or certain other jurisdictions.
The names of other companies and products herein are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective trademark owners.
attribution.pmd
1
05/18/2006, 3:30 PM
ArcGIS Survey Analyst Tutorial
IN THIS TUTORIAL
• Exercise 1: Organizing the tutorial
data
• Exercise 2: Exploring the survey
dataset
• Exercise 3: Working with survey
data
• Exercise 4: Creating COGO
computations
• Exercise 5: Updating computations and linked features
• Exercise 6: Exporting survey point
data
ArcGIS® Survey Analyst has the tools you need to enter survey data and
coordinate geometry (COGO) into survey datasets. You can import the data
you’ve collected from a total station or enter the tape measurements
recorded on a field sketch or a survey plan. Completing the exercises in this
chapter will provide you with the basic knowledge to use these capabilities.
Tutorial scenario
Your organization is building a geodatabase for Maricopa County, Arizona.
The geodatabase represents parcels and physical infrastructure. Your field
crew has performed a survey to relocate some parcel boundary monuments
and to fix the location of buildings for an existing subdivision. Coordinated
locations of section corners in the area were used as control for the field
survey. You will use a survey project in your geodatabase to import
measurement data for the boundary monuments that were found, and for
some corners of buildings on the site of the survey. You will use this
information to update the geometry of an existing subdivision block in your
geodatabase and add a new building based on tape measurements recorded
in the field.
You will use a second project to add values recorded on the original
subdivision plan. The survey points computed in this second project will be
exported for use by the field crew to locate any monuments that were not
found in the first field survey. You will use georeferenced images of the
original subdivision survey plans as a background for your work.
1
Ch02.pmd
1
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Introduction to the tutorial
To use this tutorial, you need to have the Survey Analyst
extension and ArcGIS installed. You also need to have the
tutorial data installed on a local or shared network drive on
your system. Ask your system administrator for the correct
path to the tutorial data if you do not find it at the default
installation path. The default installation path is
arcgis\ArcTutor\Survey_Analyst, on the drive where the
tutorial data is installed.
Details of the datasets that you will use in this tutorial are
described in the following tables.
Survey project
Description
Carmel Bay
Project for managing and entering
field-based survey data
Carmel Sub Plan
Project for managing and entering
plan-based survey data
Feature classes
Description
Parcels
Parcel polygons
ParcelLines
Parcel polylines
Buildings
Building polygons
Geodatabase
Description
T2SouthR5East_Sect
PLSS sections
Arizona
Database containing the data that you
will use and edit (located in Maricopa
County, Arizona)
T2SouthR5East_Qtr
PLSS quarter sections
T2SouthR5East_Cnrs
PLSS corners
T2SouthR5East_Lns
PLSS quarter-quarter section lines
T2SouthR5East_Polys
PLSS quarter-quarter sections
Images (TIFF)
Description
Book389Page27Sheet01
Final subdivision plan for Carmel Bay
at Ocotillo
Book389Page27Sheet02
Sheet 2 Extract
Sheet 2 Extract curve tables
Feature datasets
Description
MaricopaCountyParcels
Parcel data
MaricopaCountyInfra
Physical infrastructure data
MaricopaCountyPLSS
Public Land Survey System (PLSS)
data
Survey dataset
Description
Sheet2Tables
Arizona
Survey data
Survey folder
Description
Maricopa County
Folder representing all survey data in
the county
The tutorial scenario is fictitious, and the field survey data
has been simulated. The basic source data can be retrieved
online from the Bureau of Land Management’s Geographic
Coordinate Database (GCDB) and from the public record
of Maricopa County, as detailed below:
2
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
2
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Source
The Bureau of Land Management’s map server for the GCDB
(URL: http://www.geocommunicator.gov/lsi/)
Source
Maricopa County Recorder of Deeds online site
(URL: http://recorder.maricopa.gov/recorder.htm)
The datasets have been simplified by ESRI for the purposes
of the tasks in this tutorial; they are presented solely for
educational and training purposes. ESRI does not invite
reliance on this data for any other purpose, and the user of
this data should exercise their own professional judgment
when acting on its content.
This tutorial lets you explore the basic capabilities of
ArcGIS Survey Analyst. The complete tutorial will take you
two to three hours to complete. You can also complete the
exercises separately if that is more convenient for you.
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
3
3
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Exercise 1: Organizing the tutorial data
Before you can begin this tutorial, you must first find and
organize the tutorial data that you will need. Using
ArcCatalog, browse for and create a new folder connection
to your data:
1. Click the Start menu, point to Programs, point to ArcGIS,
and click ArcCatalog.
2. Navigate to the location of the tutorial data (the default
path is \arcgis\ArcTutor on the drive where ArcGIS is
installed).
3. Click the Survey_Analyst folder and drag it onto the toplevel node of the Catalog tree.
Your new folder connection is now listed in the Catalog
tree. Folder connections simplify the task of navigating
to your most frequently used datasets. You will now be
able to access all the data needed for this tutorial
through this new connection.
Enabling the Survey Analyst extension
Before continuing, you must enable Survey Analyst for use
in ArcCatalog.
1. Click Tools and click Extensions.
1
2. Check the Survey Analyst check box.
2
3
3. Click Close.
4
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
4
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Defining the display units
Different units are available for displaying lengths and
angles. You will define these for the units displayed in
ArcCatalog.
2
1. Click Tools and click Options.
5
4
3
6
1
2. Click the Survey Measurement Formats tab.
3. Click the Defined Formats drop-down arrow and click
Angle.
4. Click the Degree-Minute-Second option to select it.
5. Change the precision to 0. You will work in whole units
of seconds.
6. Click Set As Display Format.
7. Click the Defined Formats drop-down arrow and click
Length.
8. Click the second 0.000ft in the list for US Feet, and click
Set As Display Format.
9. Click OK.
You are now ready to start exploring the survey dataset and
working with your survey information. All of the survey
information will be displayed using the units you’ve
specified.
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
5
5
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Exercise 2: Exploring the survey dataset
Survey information is stored in the geodatabase in survey
datasets. A survey dataset is a comprehensive collection of
survey points, measurements, and computations. You define
a single survey dataset to provide survey-awareness for
each logical group of feature datasets and feature classes.
The survey dataset covers the extents of your management
area.
3. Click the Packages tab.
3
Viewing the survey dataset properties
1. In ArcCatalog, click the plus sign next to your new
folder connection. Click the plus sign next to the Survey
folder. Click the plus sign next to the Arizona
geodatabase.
2. Right-click the Arizona survey dataset and click
Properties.
2
The packages are the survey data types that can be
stored in the survey dataset. In this tutorial, you will be
importing and working with field survey data from total
positioning station (TPS) equipment, and you will also be
using and storing COGO.
Once packages are added, you cannot remove them
from the survey dataset.
The Survey Dataset Properties dialog box appears.
6
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
6
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
4. Click the Spatial Reference tab.
5. Click the Feature Classes tab.
4
5
This survey dataset has a geographic coordinate
system—North American Datum 1927. The latitude and
longitude extents of the survey dataset are represented
in decimal degrees and cover the state of Arizona.
Once defined, a dataset’s spatial reference cannot be
changed.
Now you will view the feature classes in the Arizona
geodatabase that are survey-aware and participate with
your survey dataset.
6
Survey-aware feature classes have enhanced
characteristics that enable the features they contain to
be synchronized with the locations of survey points.
All the feature classes in this geodatabase are surveyaware.
6. Click OK.
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
7
7
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Survey datasets can contain a large amount of survey
information from many different sources. Survey projects
are used to organize your survey data into logically
structured and manageable groups of measurements, survey
points, and computations. You always add new survey data
through survey projects.
The Survey Project Properties dialog box appears.
3
Viewing the survey project properties
1. In ArcCatalog, click the plus sign next to the Arizona
survey dataset. Click the plus sign next to the Maricopa
County survey folder.
2. Right-click the Carmel Bay survey project and click
Properties.
3. Click the Spatial Reference tab.
Each survey project can have its own projected
coordinate system.
2
8
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
8
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
4. Click the Point tab.
5. Click the COGO tab.
5
4
Different points from different projects may have the
same name. Since all points in the survey dataset are
shared between projects, they need to be uniquely
identified. Do this by assigning a string to each survey
project. Each point name is associated with this string,
which is called a prefix.
If needed, you can change this string. Survey Analyst
notifies you if this string is already in use by a different
project. Leave the string as C1 for this project.
The Scale Correction applies a scale factor to all
distances entered in COGO computations. The original
unscaled distance values are stored.
The Angle Correction value for the Ground to Grid
corrections applies a rotation of entered directions during
coordinate geometry computations. The original
unrotated direction measurement values are stored.
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
9
9
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
6. Click the TPS tab.
7. Click the Corrections tab.
7
6
8
Standard deviations are used to define the expected level
of precision in calibrated measuring devices.
The values on this tab are the default standard deviations
assigned in new computations that use measurements
from total station equipment. When working with
specific computations, you can either accept or change
these standard deviations.
If needed, on this property tab you can also change the
defaults used by projects.
You do not need to change the default standard
deviations for this project.
These correction methods are used in computations to
take into account the effects of meridian convergence,
meteorological conditions, and height above sea level on
the computed coordinates. The original measurement
values entered into the system are not altered by these
corrections.
You do not need to change or assign correction methods
for this project; only the Basic Sea Level Correction is
required.
8. Click OK.
10
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
10
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Previewing the data for survey projects
Next you will preview the data for the survey projects in
the survey dataset. Previewing the data provides a visual
representation of the survey measurements in the survey
dataset.
1. Click the Carmel Bay survey project.
2. Click the Preview tab to see the survey data for this
project.
1
2
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
11
11
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Importing from a data collector file
2. Click the drop-down arrow and click GSI Converter.
The information stored in the data collectors from field
equipment devices is added to survey projects using the
Import Survey Data Wizard.
2
You will use the Import Survey Data Wizard to browse for
a Geo Serial Interface (GSI) file and bring this data into
your survey dataset.
Using the Import Survey Data Wizard
1. Right-click the CarmelBay project and click Import
Survey Data.
1
3. Click the Browse button and navigate to the
CarmelBay.gsi file located in the Survey folder where
you installed the tutorial data.
Survey Analyst provides a set of converter types that
allows the data from these different formats to be
imported. You will import a GSI file format.
3
12
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
12
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
4. Click Next.
If the source data has coordinates, they may not be in
the same coordinate system as your project. In this case,
you can select the coordinate system of your source
data, and the importer will project it into the coordinate
system of your survey project.
The data in the the CarmelBay.gsi file is in the same
coordinate system as the CarmelBay project. You will
keep the default option.
5. Click Next.
A source file point naming convention can take
advantage of the prefix system of Survey Analyst to
uniquely identify control points that already exist in the
survey dataset. In these source files, the prefix of the
name is separated from the rest of the name by a single
character separator. In this panel, you can choose the
separator that is used in the import file. The coordinates
in the CarmelBay.gsi file do not depend on points in an
existing project, so you will accept the default and not
use a separator.
6. Type “.02” for standard deviation in x,y coordinates and
“.05” for standard deviation in elevation. These values
denote the expected precision of the measurements
based on the equipment and techniques used in the field.
7. Click Next.
6
5
The source file data can be connected with control point
locations. These points may be in the source file itself or
in an existing survey project. They are always identified
by a name.
7
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
13
13
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
You can choose to generate a log file that reports the
results of the import.
8. Choose a log file path and name and click Finish.
8
The additional measurements from the GSI file are now
stored in the survey dataset. These will be managed and
used in the Carmel Bay survey project.
14
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
14
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Exercise 3: Working with survey data
Survey layers let you symbolize and label survey points and
measurements on a map. A map document displaying the
Carmel Bay survey project has already been created. You
will add a new survey layer to this existing map of the area
and refine its properties for the Carmel Sub Plan project.
3. Navigate to the Arizona geodatabase where the Arizona
survey dataset is located.
4. Click the Arizona survey dataset and click Add.
First you must open the map document. You will do this
from ArcCatalog.
1. Double-click the Maricopa_1.mxd map document.
ArcMap starts and displays a map of the survey area.
4
The survey layer appears in the table of contents.
5. Click the Bookmarks menu and click Control Extent.
1
5
2. Click the Add Data button.
2
This bookmark displays the survey area at a larger scale.
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
15
15
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Enabling the Survey Analyst extension
Setting the survey layer properties
Before continuing, you must enable Survey Analyst for use
in ArcMap.
A survey layer provides flexibility in displaying survey
information in a way that is meaningful for your task. You’ll
change the properties for the new survey layer to best
represent the Carmel Sub Plan project.
1. Click Tools and click Extensions.
1. Right-click the Arizona survey layer and click
Properties.
1
1
2. Type “Carmel Bay Sub Plan” as the Layer Name on the
General tab.
2. Check the Survey Analyst check box.
2
2
3. Click the Close button.
A survey layer has a sublayer for each of the data types
supported by the survey dataset. You can control the
number of sublayers displayed in the survey layer. The total
station measurements are not needed for the Carmel Bay
Sub Plan survey project, so the sublayer that represents
these is not required. Therefore, you need to remove the
sublayer representing total station measurements.
16
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
16
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
3. Click the Sub-Layers tab and click TPS Measurements.
4. Click the Remove button.
7. Uncheck the Carmel Bay project and verify that the
Carmel Sub Plan project is checked.
8. Click OK on the Layer Properties dialog box.
Saving your map document
Now you will save the changes you have made to the map
document so that you do not need to repeat this section if
you choose to stop this tutorial and continue at a later time.
3
1. Click the Save button.
1
4
The survey layer can be used to display data from all the
projects of the survey dataset, or it can be used to display
data from a specific set of survey projects. You’ll ensure
that when other new projects are added to the survey
dataset, this survey layer will only display the Carmel Sub
Plan project.
5. Click the Survey Projects tab.
6. Click the plus sign next to the Maricopa County survey
folder.
5
Map displaying the survey information in the Arizona survey dataset.
7
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
17
17
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Working with the Survey Explorer
The previous section describes how you can visualize
measurements and survey points in the map. This important
map visualization is complemented by the equally important
functionality provided through the Survey Explorer. The
Survey Explorer is used to view and enter the numerical
values required for computing coordinates.
3. Click the Survey Editor toolbar’s title bar and drag it to
the top of the ArcMap application window. This will
dock the toolbar.
3
You can dock the Editor toolbar the same way.
Adding the required toolbars
Before you can use the Survey Explorer, you need to add
the Editor and Survey Editor toolbars to ArcMap.
1. Click View, point to Toolbars, and click Editor.
The Editor toolbar appears in ArcMap.
Setting the display units for length measurements
Since the measurements you are working with are in feet,
you will need to change the display units for the new
COGO computations that you will create.
1. Click the Tools menu and click Options.
2. Add the Survey Editor toolbar the same way.
1
2
1
18
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
18
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
2. Click the Survey Measurement Formats tab.
Setting the display units for angle measurements
3. Click the Defined Formats drop-down arrow and click
Length.
Next, you will repeat these steps to change the units for
angles.
1. Click the Defined Formats drop-down arrow and click
Angle.
2
2. Click the Degree-Minute-Second option to select it.
3. Change the precision to 0. You will work in whole units
of seconds.
4. Click Set As Display Format.
5. Click OK.
3
4. Click 0.00ft, type “2” for precision, click Set As Display
Format, then click OK.
1
3
2
4
4
All length measurements that appear while using the Survey
Explorer and Survey Analyst commands will be displayed to
two decimal places in units of feet.
5
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
19
19
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Setting the display units for direction
measurements
Repeat these steps to change the units for directions.
1. Click the Defined Formats drop-down arrow and click
Direction.
Listing points in the Survey Explorer
1. Click the List Survey Objects tool.
1
2. Click the N0–00–00E option.
3. Change the precision to 0.
4. Click Set as Display format.
2. Click and drag a box around all the survey points in the
current map extents.
5. Click OK.
2
The Survey Explorer opens, displaying a list containing
all the survey points in the map extents.
Next, you will resize the Survey Explorer so that you can
see more columns in the list.
20
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
20
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
3. Move the mouse pointer to the bottom-right corner of the
window. Click and drag the corner until the easting and
northing values are visible.
Finding stored computations with the Survey Explorer
1. Click the leftmost column of the row in the Survey
Explorer list that represents the point DU2135.
2. Right-click the row and click Go To Computations.
3. Check Input and Output to find computations that both
use or create coordinates for the selected survey point.
4. Click OK.
3
Note that certain survey points do not have easting and
northing values. These points resulted from the import of
the GSI file. This file has no coordinates; it contains
measurements between coordinated points stored in the
survey dataset.
1
2
3
The importer automatically computed provisional locations
for the newly measured points by using the raw
measurements in the file.
The two point sublayers for the Carmel Bay survey layer
are used to distinguish between the coordinated points and
the empty points, which still need to be computed.
4
The Survey Explorer displays a new list containing a
field traverse computation. This computation is a control
traverse that used DU2135 as a reference point for
orientation.
Next, you will view some of the details of this stored
computation.
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
21
21
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Navigating to the details of a stored computation
1. Click the leftmost column of the Survey Explorer list for
the Control 01 computation.
2. Right-click the row and click Go To Details.
3. Click the Setup tab.
The Setup tab displays all the instrument setups
processed in this traverse.
3
1
2
The Survey Explorer displays a detailed view of the field
traverse computation. The General tab displays
information that identifies the computation and its
allowable limits.
The General tab provides information to
identify the computation and its limits.
22
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
22
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Editing survey data
4. Click the Measurements tab.
Values for the measurements from the different setups
are displayed.
5
4
Computing coordinates and analyzing coordinate quality is
the most important feature of Survey Analyst.
In this exercise, you will define computations to calculate
coordinates for points, link a parcel block feature to points,
and update the feature’s location. To do this, you will add
your imported measurements to a new computation.
Starting an edit session and setting the editing
environment
Before you start defining computations, you need to start
editng and also set the Target project for your edits.
Adding an edit task
1. Click the Editor menu and click Start Editing.
1
5. Close the Survey Explorer.
You have now learned a little bit about using the Survey
Explorer by importing instrument setups and measurements.
In the next exercise, you will build on this by adding your
imported instrument setups and measurements to a new
computation.
If the Starting To Edit In A Different Coordinate System
dialog box appears, click Start Editing.
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
23
23
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Creating a new field traverse computation
Zooming to the Carmel Bay project area
To calculate coordinates for the measured points, two
traverse computations will be used. The first traverse has
already been defined; this is the computation you found in
the previous exercise. It was used to extend control into the
project area, and it created two new survey points: T1 and
T2.
1. Click the Bookmarks menu and click Survey Area.
You will now create a second field traverse computation to
calculate coordinates for control points T3–T7. Additional
measurements were also imported as part of the GSI file
and were used to calculate coordinates for building corners
and found parcel corner monuments in the project area.
1
Setting the target project
Before you start defining new computations, you must set
the project that will own the points, measurements, and
computations that will be stored.
The Survey Area bookmark changes the map display to
show the area of the second traverse.
1. Click the Project drop-down arrow and click
Arizona - Carmel Bay.
1
Map extents showing the area of the second
traverse
24
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
24
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Defining the second traverse and side-shots
6. Click the Setup tab.
1. Click the tool palette drop-down arrow, point to the TPS
Computations button, and click the Traverse button.
7. Snap to and click T02 on the map.
6
1
7
The Survey Explorer appears with pages for a new field
traverse.
2. Type “Control 02” for the traverse name. You will use
this name again later to find this computation.
3. Type “Traverse T02 to T01” for the comment.
4. Type “0.200” for Lateral Misclosure and “0.2” for
Lengthwise Misclosure.
8. Press Enter twice to accept the default name and Fixed
option.
5. Check Compute Tacheometry for every Traverse
Station.
9. Add the remaining traverse setups—shown as red
triangles on the map—working in a counterclockwise
direction and ending with T01.
9
2
3
4
5
9
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
25
25
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
10. Click T01 on the map and check Fixed.
Defining orientation and computing
You will now view the measurements and define the points
that were used for orientation during the field survey. You
will do this for each of the setups.
1. Click the Measurements tab.
Q
The final traverse setup will participate in this traverse
as a fixed closure point.
Each survey point can have many instrument setups. There
are two setups at the T1 and T2 points. The first setups at
these points were used for the initial control traverse—
Control 01. The second setups at each of these points were
imported during the import exercise; these are the setups
that must be processed in this traverse. This traverse is
presently using the first setups for T01 and T02. You will
now change these to the correct setups.
2. Click the Setup drop-down arrow and click T02 / 2.
3. Check 300420 in the orientation field.
4. Click the Adjustment method drop-down arrow and click
Compass.
1
2
3
11. Double-click the Setup field for T02, click the dropdown arrow, and click T02 / 2.
4
W
You will next ensure that the correct orientation points are
being used for the setup at T01.
5. Click the Setup drop-down arrow and click T01 / 2.
12. Double-click the Setup field for T01, click the dropdown arrow, and click T01 / 2.
5
26
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
26
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
6. Check 300400 in the orientation field.
Viewing the traverse misclosure information
If the computation results are within the limits you defined,
the computation is marked as valid. This is indicated by the
check mark in the lower-left portion of the computation
page.
6
7. Click the Compute button on the Survey Explorer
toolbar.
7
The computation has a
valid state.
Additional information concerning the traverse misclosure is
also available. You will now verify these results.
1. Click the Traverse Overview tab.
1
The details of the traverse misclosure are displayed.
Saving your edits
Coordinates for the second traverse have been computed,
including the locations for the building corners and found
monuments. The survey points have coordinates and are
labeled and displayed with a different symbol.
Now that you have successfully added the second
computation to the geodatabase, you can save your edits.
1. Click the Editor menu and click Save Edits.
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
27
27
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Editing features using survey points
Now that you have computed survey point locations for the
found monuments and building corners, you will associate
these coordinated locations with the features in the feature
layers. You will start with the subdivision block in the parcel
layer. First you will set the map to a bookmark of the area.
1. Click the Bookmarks menu and click Feature Linking.
1. Click the Link tool on the Survey Editor toolbar.
1
The Link tool will work together with the snapping
environment of the Editor.
2. Snap and click C1.p006, then click the parcel feature
vertex closest to this point.
2
1
Using the Link tool
You can link the vertices of features to survey points
without changing the location of features. The geometry of
the feature stores the link information of the associated
survey points. You will now make a link from a survey point
to a feature vertex for the subdivision block.
The symbol for the vertex of the feature is updated, and
a link-line is displayed between the survey point and the
feature vertex.
28
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
28
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Using the Link command
4. Click the Survey Editor drop-down arrow and click Link.
Instead of using the Link tool for each of the feature
vertices, you will link the remaining survey points using the
Link command. This command will search for survey points
to link within a defined distance of each feature vertex.
4
1. Click the Edit tool on the Editor toolbar.
1
2. Click the Go Back To Previous Extent button on the
Tools toolbar.
The dialog box for the Link command options appears.
Use a linking tolerance of 10 feet. This is the distance
that is used at each feature vertex when the command
searches for survey points to link.
5. Type 10 in the Linking Tolerance box.
6. Check Always link coincident feature vertices.
7. Click OK.
2
3. Select the subdivision block.
5
6
7
3
Now all of the survey points used to define the locations of
parcel corners have been linked to the subdivision block in
the parcel layer. The link-lines between the feature vertices
and survey points are displayed, and the symbols at the
feature vertices are udpated.
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
29
29
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Using the Update Feature Vertices command
Until now, you have made no changes to the locations of
features. You will now use the survey points and links to
change the location of the subdivision block.
The parcel block is updated so that the linked vertices
share the same locations as the survey points. In
addition, the locations of the unlinked vertices have been
transformed to provide a relative match with the
surveyed vertices.
1. Click Survey Editor and click Update Feature Vertices.
Turning off the survey layer
The symbols of the linked feature vertices are changed to
indicate that these vertices share locations with survey
points. You will now turn off the survey layer so you can
easily see how the symbols have changed.
1
1. Uncheck the Carmel Bay survey layer in the map’s table
of contents.
The Transformation Algorithm dialog box appears. You
can select the type of transformation applied to the
unlinked feature vertices when the geometry update is
applied.
1
2. Check Set feature vertex to the location of the survey
point.
3. Check Apply transformation algorithm.
4. Click the drop-down arrow on the Algorithm, click Affine
Transformation, then click OK.
2
3
4
30
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
30
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
The map displays only the features and the link symbols
for the vertices of the linked feature.
Saving your edits and your map document
Now that you have updated the parcel feature in your
geodatabase, you can save your edits.
1. Click Editor in the Editor toolbar and click Save Edits.
2. Click the Save button to save your map document.
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
31
31
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Exercise 4: Creating COGO computations
Your field crew was not able to measure all the building
corners directly from the total station equipment. To
completely define the geometry for buildings, a tape
measure was used in the field to measure between the
building corners. These values were recorded in a field
sketch. Based on the values from these field sketches, you
will now use COGO computations to add a new building to
the buildings layer.
First, you must return to the spatial bookmark for the new
building and turn on the Carmel Bay survey layer and the
Buildings layer.
Setting up a point naming increment
The names of survey points in this survey project start with
an alphanumeric character and also have a numeric value
at the end of the character string. The system can
automatically generate these survey point names and
increment the numeric value. You will now specify that the
new points entering the system will start from 101.
1. Click Survey Editor and click Options. The Surveying
Properties dialog box appears.
1. Click the Bookmarks menu and click Feature Linking.
2. Check the Carmel Bay survey layer and the Buildings
feature layer in the map’s table of contents.
1
2. Click the Points tab and type “100” for the Start Point.
2
2
2
3. Click OK on the Surveying Properties dialog box.
32
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
32
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Adding a building using COGO computations
Coordinate geometry computations can be used together
with the Editor’s edit tasks and target layer. You have the
option to add a sketch vertex for each new survey point
created. Instead of using this option, you will create the
survey points for the building and, as a second step, create
the new building feature. Next, you will turn off the option
to create an edit sketch.
1. Click the Project drop-down arrow and click Arizona Carmel Bay.
1
The Survey Explorer appears and shows the distance–
distance COGO computation.
2. Type “b005” as the first point, press Enter, type “19.78”
in the first distance field, and press Enter again.
3. Type “b006” as the second point name, press Enter, type
“14.93” in the second distance field, and press Enter.
1
Using the distance–distance intersection computation
2
3
The first COGO computation will be an intersection of
distances in order to define the coordinates of one of the
building corners.
1. Click the tool palette drop-down arrow, point to the
COGO Intersections button, and click the distance–
distance intersection button.
4
5
4. Press Enter, accepting the default Right solution. There
are two possible solutions when you are intersecting two
distances. When you look along a straight line from the
first point to the second point, the new point to compute
is on the right-hand side.
5. Press Enter to accept 101 as the name of the new
survey point.
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
33
33
5/2/2008, 2:57 PM
Using the deflection angle distance computation
Adding the final building corner
On the field sketch for the building, an assumption is made
that the building walls are orthogonal to each other. For
the next measured building corner, this assumption is used in
the deflection angle distance COGO computation.
You will now add a second distance-distance intersection
computation to add the final building corner.
1. Click the tool palette drop-down arrow, point to the
COGO Basic Computations button, and click the
Deflection-Angle-Distance button.
1. Click the tool palette drop-down arrow, point to the
COGO Intersections button, and click the DistanceDistance intersection button.
1
1
The Deflection-Angle-Distance computation is displayed
in the Survey Explorer.
2. Type “b006” as the from point and press Enter.
The first point of the new computation is, by default, the last
point that was computed.
2. Press Enter to accept point 102 as the first point, type
“26.71” as the first distance, and press Enter.
3. Click survey point 101 on the map to define the
reference direction.
3. Type “b004” as the second point name.
4. Type “270” as the deflection angle and press Enter.
5. Click the Solution drop-down arrow and click Left.
4. Type “43.04” as the second distance.
5. Type “23.520” as the distance and press Enter.
3
2
4
5
2
4
5
6. Press Enter to accept 103 as the new point name.
6. Press Enter to accept 102 as the new point name.
34
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
34
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Using the final closing distance as a check
The Existing Result Point message box appears:
The tape measurements made around the building perimeter
have been used to define its location. You will now add the
closing tape measurement distance to calculate a second
check coordinate.
1. Click the tool palette drop-down arrow, point to the
COGO Basic Computations button, and click the
Deflection Angle Distance button.
1
8
8. Click Yes to indicate that the calculated coordinate
should be added to the existing survey point.
This coordinate will be used in the next exercise as a check
on the other tape measurements around the building
perimeter, but first you will create the new building feature.
2. Type “b004” as the from point and press Enter.
Creating the building feature
3. Click the survey point called 103 on the map to define
the reference direction.
1. Click the Sketch tool on the Editor toolbar.
4. Type “270” as the deflection angle and press Enter.
2. Click the Task drop-down arrow and click Create New
Feature.
5. Type “11.12” as the distance and press Enter.
6. Type “b005” as the Result Point.
1
2
3. Click the Target drop-down arrow and click Buildings.
4
5
3
7. Press Enter to compute the new coordinate.
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
35
35
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
4. Snap to and click point b005.
5. Repeat step 4 in sequence for each of the following
points: 101, b006, 102, 103, b004.
6. Right-click the map. The Sketch context menu appears.
7. Click Finish Sketch in the Sketch context menu.
7
36
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
36
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Comparing coordinates of a survey point
New computations can use existing survey points as targets
for computed coordinates. In the previous exercise, you
selected the existing point b005 as a result point for a
COGO computation. This was based on a check
measurement that was used to compute a second
coordinate for b005.
The Survey Explorer displays a single row list showing
the survey point b005.
3. Click the row for b005 to select the point.
In this exercise, you will use this check measurement to
ensure that no mistake was made in the other tape
measurements. You will do this by viewing and comparing
the sets of coordinates computed for b005.
Navigating to survey point details
3
The survey point is highlighted on the map.
1. Click the Survey Object List tool in the Survey Editor
toolbar.
4. Right-click the first column in the selected row. The
Survey Explorer column context menu appears.
5. Click Go To Details.
1
2. Click and drag a box around point b005.
5
2
The Survey Explorer displays the detail page for b005.
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
37
37
5/2/2008, 2:40 PM
Comparing and averaging coordinates of a survey point
When two coordinates for a point are computed, their
average value is automatically determined and used as the
current coordinate for the point. You will use the final tape
measurement to b005 as a check measurement. This
measurement is not required to contribute to the average
coordinate for b005.
2. Double-click the Include in Mean column for the second
computed coordinate, click no, then press Enter.
The mean value is updated. The current coordinate is the
coordinate computed from the total station
measurement.
Saving your edits
You will now compare the coordinates computed for b005
and remove the second coordinate from the computed mean
for this survey point.
Now that you have added field survey measurements,
computations, survey points, and a new building feature to
your geodatabase, you can save your edits.
1. Click the Coordinate Manager tab.
1. Click the Editor menu in the Editor toolbar and click
Save Edits.
The difference in the coordinates is acceptable as a
check on the tape measurements around the building
perimeter. This indicates that no mistakes were made in
reading the tape measurements.
1
1
2
38
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
38
5/2/2008, 3:01 PM
Entering COGO from plan data
Changing the automated point management settings
When your organization does not have coordinates for the
parcel corners represented on a subdivision plan, using
COGO computations is one method to calculate them. You
will now use the dimensions available on Sheet 2 of the
Carmel Bay subdivision plan to get approximate coordinates
for a parcel monument. Since these computed coordinates
will be based on the survey points measured by your field
crew, they can be used to more easily find physical
evidence of this parcel corner, which could not be found
during the first field survey.
Computations can use the survey points created and owned
by other projects. When these survey points are used, a
copy of the coordinate is made for exclusive use in your
project. Since survey points may have many coordinates,
you need to define the coordinate that should be copied for
your project. You can automate the choice for this
coordinate. Since there are only two projects in the map,
the project that owns all existing points is Carmel Bay.
First you will need to go to the Project 2 Area bookmark.
You will now choose to always copy the current coordinate
of the owning project when using survey points from other
projects.
1. Click the Bookmarks menu and click Project 2 Area.
1. Click Survey Editor and click Options.
2
1
3
2. Check Survey Plat Images in the table of contents.
The Survey Editor Options dialog box appears.
2. Click the Points tab and click copy the current
coordinate of the owner survey project.
3. Click OK.
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
39
39
5/2/2008, 2:41 PM
Creating a station and offset computation
1. Click the Save button to save your map document.
2. Click the Project drop-down arrow and click
Arizona - Carmel Sub Plan.
5. Click the tool palette drop-down arrow, point to the
COGO Advanced Computations button and click the
Station and Offset button.
2
5
3. Click the Editor and click Snapping.
The Snapping Environment dialog box appears.
4. Uncheck Vertex for Parcels.
The Survey Explorer displays the new station offset
computation. You will use this computation to define a
point on line between points p006 and p005.
6. Click p006 on the map, then click p005.
4
6
40
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
40
5/2/2008, 2:41 PM
Saving your edits
7. Click the drop-down arrow for stationing type, click
Variable distances, and press Enter.
You have successfully added a plan-based COGO
computation to the geodatabase.
7
1. Click the Editor menu and click Save Edits.
8. Press Enter and type “90.79” for the distance value.
9. Press Enter twice to move to the Point field.
10. Type “101” for the point field and press Enter.
11. Press Enter twice, and in the Value field type “91.49”.
12. Check Proportion.
8
Q
W
E
A survey point is computed online between p006 and
p005. The difference between the computed closing
distance and entered distance is proportioned.
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
41
41
5/2/2008, 2:41 PM
Exercise 5: Updating computations and linked features
In the exercise ‘Working with survey data’, you learned
how to find stored computations. In this exercise you will
discover a different method to navigate to an existing
computation. You will find and make a change to the second
control traverse—Control 02. You have determined that the
measurement to the point 300420 is erroneous and should
be disabled.
Editing the Control 02 traverse
4. Click the Measurements tab.
5. Click the leftmost column of the row for the
measurement to 300420.
6. Right-click the row and click Disable Measurement.
5
1. Click the tool palette drop-down arrow, point to TPS
Computations, and click Traverse.
6
2. Type “Control 02” in the Computation Name box and
press Enter.
2
3. Click Yes to view the Control 02 traverse.
7. Click the Compute button on the Survey Explorer
toolbar.
7
3
42
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
42
5/2/2008, 2:41 PM
Updating the linked features
All the survey point locations are updated based on this
change in the computation. You will now update the linked
features to match this update in the survey points.
1. Click the Edit tool in the Editor toolbar.
4. Check Set feature vertex to the location of the survey
point, and check Apply transformation algorithm.
5. Click the Transformation drop-down arrow and click
Affine Transformation.
6. Click OK.
1
4
5
2. Select the linked features by dragging a box around the
building and parcel feature.
2
6
The feature locations are updated based on the
recomputed locations of the survey points.
3. Click the Survey menu in the Survey Editor toolbar and
click Update Feature Vertices.
Saving your edits
3
You have now updated your stored computations and the
geometry of linked features.
1. Click the Editor menu and click Save Edits.
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
43
43
5/2/2008, 2:41 PM
Exercise 6: Exporting survey point data
To support the work of your field crew, you need to be able
to supply coordinates for locating positions in the field. In
this exercise you will export the survey points that you
computed. These coordinates can be made available for
field work. For instance, they can be transferred onto a
PCMCIA card or data collector, or directly to the field
instrument.
2. Click the Name drop-down arrow and click Carmel Bay.
3. Click Next.
2
1. Right-click the Carmel Bay survey layer, point to Data,
and click Export Survey Data.
1
1
In the first page of the Data Exchange wizard, you will
choose the project from which you want to export
coordinates.
3
44
Ch02.pmd
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
44
5/2/2008, 2:41 PM
5. Click the drop-down arrow for Survey Data Converter
and click GSI Converter.
6. Click the Browse button, type “Export” in the File Name
box, then click Save.
5
The points will be exported based on the coordinates
system of Carmel Bay Sub Plan. The second option allows
you to export into a different coordinate system. Choosing
this option would project all the coordinates to your selected
spatial reference. For this export, this is not required.
9. Click Next.
10. Accept the default units and coordinate precision and
click Next.
11. Click Finish.
6
7. Click Next on the Export Survey Data Wizard dialog
box.
8. Click the option for the coordinates to remain in the
same spatial reference as the survey project from which
you are exporting data.
Q
8
ARCGIS SURVEY ANALYST TUTORIAL
Ch02.pmd
45
45
5/2/2008, 2:41 PM
Ch02.pmd
46
5/2/2008, 2:41 PM
Download PDF
Similar pages