Veritas™ System Recovery 16 User'

Veritas™ System Recovery
16 User's Guide
Linux Edition
Contents
Chapter 1
Introducing Veritas™ System Recovery for Linux
............................................................................................. 4
About Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition .................................. 4
Chapter 2
Installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux
Edition ............................................................................... 5
Before you install ........................................................................... 5
System requirements ................................................................ 5
Installing Fuse ......................................................................... 7
About supported file systems and removable media ....................... 8
When you delay licensing .......................................................... 9
About upgrading to Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition ............... 10
Installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition ............................ 10
Uninstalling Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition ......................... 11
Chapter 3
Backing up a Linux computer
........................................ 13
About backing up a Linux computer ..................................................
Viewing the details of the disk that you want to back up ........................
Performing an independent backup ..................................................
Scheduling a backup .....................................................................
Viewing the details of existing backup jobs ..................................
Recovery point type options ......................................................
Compression level options .......................................................
Encryption type options ...........................................................
Scheduling options for starting a new recovery point set (base
recovery point) .................................................................
Scheduling options for creating recovery points (incremental
recovery points) ...............................................................
Scheduling options for an independent recovery point ....................
Running an existing backup job .......................................................
13
14
14
15
17
17
18
18
19
20
21
21
Contents
Chapter 4
Restoring a Linux computer
........................................... 23
About recovering a Linux computer ..................................................
Starting a Linux-based computer using Veritas Recovery Disk ...............
Recovering a Linux computer .........................................................
About restoring to empty disk segments ......................................
Mounting and unmounting a recovery point for granular file and folder
recovery ...............................................................................
Chapter 5
23
23
25
27
27
Creating a Veritas Recovery Disk ................................. 31
About Veritas Recovery Disk ........................................................... 31
Creating a Veritas Recovery Disk for Linux ........................................ 31
Chapter 6
Features not supported in Veritas System
Recovery for Linux ...................................................... 34
Windows product features not supported in this release ....................... 34
Chapter 7
Troubleshooting Veritas System Recovery Linux
Edition ............................................................................. 36
About finding logs for troubleshooting ............................................... 36
About using the gatherLogs utility for troubleshooting ........................... 37
About troubleshooting cron services issues ........................................ 37
Appendix A
Veritas System Recovery for Linux Utilities ............... 38
createSRD .................................................................................. 39
symsr ......................................................................................... 41
mount.v2i .................................................................................... 51
3
Chapter
1
Introducing Veritas™
System Recovery for Linux
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition
About Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition
Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition lets you recover from system loss or
disasters in minutes, not hours, or days. It provides fast, easy to use system
restoration to help you meet your recovery time objectives. Veritas System Recovery
16 Linux Edition lets you capture recovery points of all the partitions and volumes
on a live Linux system. The recovery points can include partitions and volumes
containing the operating system (OS), applications, system settings, configurations,
files, and data.
When you experience a problem with your computer, you can restore a file system
partition or an entire drive. This recovery process returns your computer to a
previous, functional state with the operating system, applications, and data files
intact.
Using Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition you can do the following:
■
Perform backups (create recovery points) of partitions and volumes on your
Linux system.
■
Restore volumes and partitions using the recovery points you have created.
■
Create a Veritas Recovery Disk that you can use to recover your computer if it
does not start.
■
Mount recovery points so you can restore individual files and folders.
See “About backing up a Linux computer” on page 13.
Chapter
2
Installing Veritas System
Recovery 16 Linux Edition
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
Before you install
■
About upgrading to Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition
■
Installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition
■
Uninstalling Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition
Before you install
Installation procedures might vary depending on your work environment and the
type of Linux you use. This chapter focuses on installing Veritas System Recovery
16 Linux Edition from a download.
Before you install Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition, ensure that your
computer meets the system requirements. Review the Readme file for any known
issues.
See “System requirements” on page 5.
See “About supported file systems and removable media ” on page 8.
See “Installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition” on page 10.
System requirements
The following table lists the system requirements for Veritas System Recovery 16
Linux Edition to function properly.
Installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition
Before you install
Table 2-1
Minimum system requirements
Component
Minimum requirements
Operating system
You can find a list of compatible operating systems, platforms,
and applications at the following URL:
https://www.veritas.com/support/en_US/search-results.html?keyword=V-306-17*
Note: SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop and Red Hat
Enterprise Linux Desktop are not supported.
All standard kernel versions are supported for the Linux
distributions that are listed.
The binary drivers are already included for all standard
kernels that are supported for the listed Linux distributions.
For custom kernels (recompiled kernels), the installer builds
and installs the custom snap driver for the running custom
kernel during installation. The system must have the custom
kernel headers installed.
RAM
Available hard disk space
The following are the memory requirements for SUSE Linux,
Red Hat Linux, and the CentOS Linux:
■
SUSE Linux: 1 GB
■
Red Hat Linux: 1 GB
■
CentOS Linux: 1 GB
The Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition installation
requires 50 MB of free disk space. To install and use the
option for extracting and creating a Veritas Recovery Disk,
you should have at least 200 MB of disk space.
You should have sufficient hard disk space on a local hard
disk or network server for storing recovery points.
Be aware that the file sizes of resulting recovery points
depend on the amount of data that you intend to back up.
DVD-ROM drive
The drive can be any speed, but it must be capable of being
used as the startup drive from the BIOS.
6
Installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition
Before you install
Table 2-1
Minimum system requirements (continued)
Component
Minimum requirements
Software
Other required software:
■
■
The Granular File Recovery option (mount.v2i utility) uses
libfuse.
Currently, only Fuse 2.7.x is supported. Other versions
of Fuse are not supported, but may work.
createSRD uses the squashfs-tools package on RHEL
for creating RHEL Veritas Recovery Disks. You must
install the required squashfs-tools package on RHEL 5.x
and squashfs-tools and genisoimage packages on RHEL
6.x.
See “Installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition” on page 10.
See “About supported file systems and removable media ” on page 8.
Installing Fuse
The Fuse driver and libfuse must be installed before you use the Veritas System
Recovery 16 Linux Edition recovery point mount utility. On SUSE Linux and RHEL
6.x, the Fuse driver is installed by default, but, the Fuse library (libfuse) must be
installed. On Red Hat 5.x Linux, both, the Fuse driver and the Fuse library must be
installed.
You can install the Fuse driver and libfuse from the RPM repository. You can also
install Fuse from a downloaded .tar file.
To download and install the Fuse .tar file
1
Log on as root.
2
Download Fuse 2.7.x from http://fuse.sourceforge.net.
3
Extract the .tar.gz file.
4
Change the directory to the Fuse extracted folder.
5
Run the following commands in the order indicated.
./configure
make
make install
7
Installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition
Before you install
6
Check /etc/ld.so.conf using a text editor (for example, run vi /etc/ld.so.conf ).
Look for a line containing '/usr/local/lib'. If it is missing, you must add it.
7
Run ldconfig command
ldconfig
SUSE requires only the installation of the libfuse rpm libraries. Red Hat requires
both the libfuse rpm library and the fuse module.
See “Installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition” on page 10.
See “System requirements” on page 5.
About supported file systems and removable media
Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition supports the following file systems and
removable media:
Supported file systems
Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition supports the
following file systems:
■
ReiserFS version 3
■
EXT2
■
EXT3
■
EXT4
■
FAT16 with 2-GB limit
■
FAT32
■
XFS
Note: Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition only
supports the listed file systems. Other file systems such as
Btrfs, JFS, NSS, and Reiser4 are not supported.
8
Installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition
Before you install
Supported platforms
Removable media
Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition supports the
following new platforms:
■
RHEL 6.6
■
RHEL 6.7
■
RHEL 6.8
■
RHEL 7.0
■
RHEL 7.1
■
RHEL 7.2
■
RHEL 7.3
■
CentOS 6.6
■
CentOS 6.7
■
CentOS 6.8
■
CentOS 7.0
■
CentOS 7.1
■
CentOS 7.2
■
CentOS 7.3
■
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11 SP4
■
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12.0
■
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12.1
■
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12.2
Backing up is not supported to some types of removable
media in Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition. You
must save recovery points to a local mount point.
See “Before you install” on page 5.
See “Installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition” on page 10.
When you delay licensing
If you choose to delay installation of the license key, all features in Veritas System
Recovery 16 Linux Edition remain enabled during a 60-day trial period.
Veritas Recovery Disk (SRD), a component of Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux
Edition, is available with no trial period. However, you need a valid license key to
use the back up feature in Veritas Recovery Disk. If you have created the Veritas
Recovery Disk on a computer having licensed version of Veritas System Recovery
16 Linux Edition, the Veritas Recovery Disk is automatically licensed. In such cases,
you can perform cold backups using the Veritas Recovery Disk without the need
of adding a license key.
You can purchase a license key and activate the software at any time (even after
the trial period expires) without the need to reinstall. To activate Veritas System
9
Installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition
About upgrading to Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition
Recovery 16 Linux Edition before or after the trial period, you can use the following
command:
#symsr -addlicense <license key>
See “Installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition” on page 10.
See “Uninstalling Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition” on page 11.
About upgrading to Veritas System Recovery 16
Linux Edition
You can upgrade Symantec System Recovery 2011, 2013, or 2013 R2 Linux Edition
to Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition. When you upgrade, the installation
program automatically uninstalls the previous version of Veritas System Recovery
Linux Edition from your computer. However, all the configurations, policies, tasks,
and recovery points are preserved.
To upgrade to Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition, install 16 Edition on your
computer.
See “Installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition” on page 10.
Installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux
Edition
Before you begin, you should review the requirements and scenarios for installing
Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition.
Root privileges are required to install the Veritas_System_Recovery.bin.
To install Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition
1
Log on to your computer as the root user.
2
Copy the Veritas_System_Recovery.bin file from the download or the product
DVD to a folder on your Linux computer.
3
Make the Veritas_System_Recovery.bin file an executable by changing to the
directory where you copied it and entering the following command at the Linux
console:
chmod +x Veritas_System_Recovery.bin
10
Installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition
Uninstalling Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition
4
Start the installation process by entering the following command at the Linux
terminal:
./Veritas_System_Recovery.bin
Note: The command that you specified assumes that you are currently in the
same directory where the Veritas_System_Recovery.bin file is located. If that
is not the case, you must either change to that folder or specify the proper path
to it.
5
Page through the license agreement and accept it by entering a y or yes at
the prompt.
6
If you want to install the utility for creating a Veritas Recovery Disk, type a y
or yes at the install Veritas Recovery Disk creation utility prompt.
createSRD is a command line utility for creating a Veritas Recovery Disk CD.
A Veritas Recovery Disk CD is not included with Veritas System Recovery 16
Linux Edition. You must create the CD manually using the createSRD utility.
See “Creating a Veritas Recovery Disk for Linux” on page 31.
7
If you want to install the Granular File Recovery utility for mounting a recovery
point, type a y or yes at the install Granular File Recovery utility prompt.
Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition includes command line utilities for
mounting or unmounting a recovery point so you can restore individual files
and folders.
Note: If you choose not to install the utilities you can run the installation process
later. The installation program automatically detects that Veritas System Recovery
16 Linux Edition is installed and prompts you to install the utilities that are not
installed.
See “When you delay licensing” on page 9.
See “Uninstalling Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition” on page 11.
Uninstalling Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux
Edition
After installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition, you can uninstall it if
needed.
11
Installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition
Uninstalling Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition
To uninstall Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition
1
Log on to your computer as the root user.
2
Uninstall Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition by entering the following
command at the Linux terminal:
symsr-uninstall
Note: Reinstalling Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition prompts you to install
over a previous installation. Uninstalling the product is not required before reinstalling
it.
See “Installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition” on page 10.
12
Chapter
3
Backing up a Linux
computer
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About backing up a Linux computer
■
Viewing the details of the disk that you want to back up
■
Performing an independent backup
■
Scheduling a backup
■
Running an existing backup job
About backing up a Linux computer
When you perform a backup on a Linux computer, Veritas System Recovery 16
Linux Edition takes a snapshot of an entire partition or volume, capturing all
information that is stored on it for later retrieval. All of your files, folders, desktop
settings, programs, and your operating system are captured into a recovery point.
You can then use that recovery point to restore an individual partition or your entire
computer by restoring all volumes on the system individually.
In addition to backing up your computer after installing Veritas System Recovery
16 Linux Edition, you can also perform a backup by booting into Veritas Recovery
Disk. This type of backup is sometimes referred to as a cold backup or offline
backup. It lets you create recovery points of partitions and volumes without booting
to Linux from your hard drive.
The steps for performing a backup using Veritas Recovery Disk are the same as
performing a backup from within Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition.
See “About Veritas Recovery Disk” on page 31.
Backing up a Linux computer
Viewing the details of the disk that you want to back up
See “Performing an independent backup” on page 14.
See “Scheduling a backup” on page 15.
Viewing the details of the disk that you want to
back up
Before you perform or schedule backups of a disk, you can view the partitions, file
system types, and segments that are available on it.
To view the details of the disk that you want to back up
1
At the Linux server, log on as user root or a user with administrative privileges.
2
Enter the following command in a terminal window:
symsr -info disk
See “Performing an independent backup” on page 14.
Performing an independent backup
To perform a backup using Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition
1
At the Linux server, log on as user root or a user with administrative privileges.
2
Enter the following command in a terminal window:
symsr -b volume_name options -d destinationrecoverypoint_name
Replace volume_name with the name and path of the volume block device or
mount point.
Replace options with the options you want to use with the backup.
See Backup and Restore (symsr utility) on page 41. for a list of the options
available with the Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition command line
utility.
Replace destination with the location where the recovery point is created.
Replace recoverypoint_name with the name you want to assign to the recovery
point.
For example, if you want to create a recovery point named system_000.v2i of
the /dev/sda1 volume in the same directory where the command is executed
and using default options, you enter the following command:
symsr -b /dev/sda1 -d system_000.v2i
14
Backing up a Linux computer
Scheduling a backup
Note: Some characters have special meanings and should not be used in recovery
point file names and passwords. These characters include colons (:), back slashes
(\), question marks (?), ampersand (&), asterisk (*), and caret (^).
Note: When you back up volumes with unsupported file systems, SmartSector
copying is disabled (SmartSector backs up only those sectors on the volume that
contain data).
See “Viewing the details of the disk that you want to back up” on page 14.
See “Scheduling a backup” on page 15.
Scheduling a backup
Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition lets you schedule backups on a Linux
computer. It provides a command line interface that lets you set the backup options
and specify a schedule to run the backups.
While scheduling backups, you can choose to create the following types of recovery
points:
■
Independent recovery point
Creates a complete, independent backup of the specified volumes or
comma-separated multiple volumes.
■
Recovery point set
Creates a base recovery point and additional recovery points that contain the
incremental changes that are made to the specified volumes or comma-separated
multiple volumes
To schedule a backup using Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition
1
At the Linux server, log on as user root or a user with administrative privileges.
2
Enter the following command in a terminal window to start the schedule backup
wizard:
symsr -createjob
Note: To exit the wizard, type q, Q, or Quit at any prompt other than the Select
the source prompt or the Select destination prompt.
15
Backing up a Linux computer
Scheduling a backup
3
At the Select the source prompt, type the path of the volume block device or
the mount point that you want to back up.
You can provide multiple devices or mount points by using a comma (,)
separator.
4
At the Select destination prompt, type the location where you want to create
the recovery points.
5
At the Create machine specific folder prompt, type a y if you want to create
a computer-specific folder in the backup destination.
This option is useful if you use the same backup destination for multiple
computers. When you back up a computer, its recovery points are stored in
the folder specific to that computer.
6
At the Select recovery point type prompt, enter an appropriate option to
specify the type of recovery point you want to create.
See “Recovery point type options” on page 17.
7
At the Select compression level prompt, enter an appropriate option to set
a compression level for the recovery points.
See “Compression level options” on page 18.
8
At the Select encryption type prompt, enter an appropriate option to encrypt
recovery point data or protect recovery point data using a password.
See “Encryption type options” on page 18.
9
At the Backup schedule prompt, enter appropriate options to specify a
schedule to run the backups.
The backup schedule options vary depending on the recovery point type you
have selected.
See “Scheduling options for starting a new recovery point set (base recovery
point)” on page 19.
See “Scheduling options for creating recovery points (incremental recovery
points)” on page 20.
See “Scheduling options for an independent recovery point” on page 21.
10 At the Verify recovery point after creation prompt, type a y if you want to
test whether the recovery point is valid or corrupt after it is created.
16
Backing up a Linux computer
Scheduling a backup
11 Review the backup job summary and then at the Save Job prompt, type a y
to save the backup job.
12 At the Provide job name prompt, enter a name for the backup job.
After you save a backup job, it is available in the system. You can view the
details of the existing backups jobs if required.
See “Viewing the details of existing backup jobs” on page 17.
Viewing the details of existing backup jobs
You can see a list of existing backup jobs and their details.
To view the details of existing backup jobs
1
At the Linux server, log on as user root or a user with administrative privileges.
2
Enter the following command in a terminal window:
symsr -info job
See “Scheduling a backup” on page 15.
Recovery point type options
The following table describes the recovery point type options that you can select
while scheduling a backup.
See “Scheduling a backup” on page 15.
Table 3-1
Recovery point type options
Option
Description
Recovery point set (recommended)
Creates a recovery point set of the specified
volumes. This backup type requires less
storage and is faster that independent
recovery point because it contains only the
incremental changes that were made to your
computer since the previous recovery point
Note: You can have only one recovery point
set defined for each volume at any point of
time.
Independent recovery point
Creates a complete, independent backup of
the specified volumes. This backup type
typically requires more storage space than
the recovery point set, especially if you run
the backup multiple times.
17
Backing up a Linux computer
Scheduling a backup
Compression level options
The following table describes the compression levels that you can apply to the
recovery points.
See “Scheduling a backup” on page 15.
Table 3-2
Compression level options
Option
Description
None
Indicates that no compression is applied to
the recovery point. Use this option if storage
space is not an issue. However, if the backup
is saved to a busy network drive, high
compression may be faster than no
compression because there is less data to
write across the network.
Standard (recommended)
Uses low compression for a 40 percent
average data compression ratio on recovery
points.
This option is set by default.
Medium
Uses medium compression for a 45 percent
average data compression ratio on recovery
points.
High
Uses high compression for a 50 percent
average data compression ratio on recovery
points. This option is usually the slowest
method.
When a high compression recovery point is
created, CPU usage might be higher than
normal. Other processes on the computer
might also slow down.
Encryption type options
The following table describes the encryption type options that you can set for the
recovery points.
See “Scheduling a backup” on page 15.
18
Backing up a Linux computer
Scheduling a backup
Table 3-3
Encryption type options
Option
Description
No password and no encryption
Creates the recovery points without any
password protection or encryption. Use this
option only if you store your recovery points
in a location that is not shared with anyone.
Anyone who can access the recovery points
can restore from them or view their contents.
Password protected with AES Encryption Lets you set a password on the recovery point
when it is created. Passwords can include
standard characters. Passwords cannot
include extended characters, or symbols. Use
characters with an ASCII value of 128 or
lower. Only the users who know the password
can restore from or view the contents of the
recovery point.
Encrypts recovery point data to add another
level of protection to your recovery points.
Choose from the following encryption levels:
■
■
■
Standard 128-bit (8+ character
password)
Medium 192-bit (16+ character
password)
High 256-bit (32+ character password)
Scheduling options for starting a new recovery point set (base
recovery point)
The following table describes the scheduling options for starting a new recovery
point set.
See “Scheduling a backup” on page 15.
Table 3-4
Scheduling options for a new recovery point set
Option
Description
Weekly
Starts a new recovery point set at the defined
time and on the days of the week that you
specify.
19
Backing up a Linux computer
Scheduling a backup
Table 3-4
Scheduling options for a new recovery point set (continued)
Option
Description
Monthly
Starts a new recovery point set at the defined
time and on the day of the month that you
specify.
Quarterly
Starts a new recovery point set at the defined
time and on the first day of every quarter.
Yearly
Starts a new recovery point set at the defined
time and on the first day of every year.
Scheduling options for creating recovery points (incremental recovery
points)
The following table describes the scheduling options for creating recovery points.
See “Scheduling a backup” on page 15.
Table 3-5
Scheduling options for creating recovery points
Option
Description
Schedule
Lets you select the days and a start time for
when you want to create the recovery points.
Run more than once per day
Indicates that you want to create recovery
points more than once a day to protect the
data that you edit or change frequently.
Time between backups
Specifies the time that must occur between
two recovery points.
This option appears only if you have selected
to create recovery points more than once in
a day.
20
Backing up a Linux computer
Running an existing backup job
Table 3-5
Scheduling options for creating recovery points (continued)
Option
Description
Number of times
Specifies the number of times the backup
should run in a day. This option appears only
if you have selected to create recovery points
more than once in a day.
Ensure that you specify a number considering
the number of hours that you have specified
to occur between two backups. For example,
if you have specified a period of 10 hours to
occur between backups, you cannot run more
than three backups a day.
Scheduling options for an independent recovery point
The following table describes the scheduling options for creating an independent
recovery point.
See “Scheduling a backup” on page 15.
Table 3-6
Scheduling options for an independent recovery point
Option
Description
Weekly
Creates the recovery point at the defined time
and on the days of the week that you specify.
Monthly
Creates the recovery point at the defined time
and on the day of the month that you specify.
Quarterly
Creates the recovery point at the defined time
and on the first day of every quarter
Yearly
Creates the recovery point at the defined time
and on the first day of every year.
Run Only Once
Creates the recovery point one time on the
date and at the time that you specify.
Running an existing backup job
You can run an existing backup at any point of time. This option is useful in the
following situations:
21
Backing up a Linux computer
Running an existing backup job
■
You modify a large number of files and you want to back them up immediately
rather than waiting for the scheduled backup to run.
■
You want to back up your computer before you install a new application or before
you make any changes to the operating system.
To run an existing backup job
1
At the Linux server, log on as user root or a user with administrative privileges.
2
Enter the following command in a terminal window:
symsr -runjob <job id>
Replace <job id> with the ID of the backup job that you want to run.
You can view the details of existing backup jobs to find out the ID of the backup
job that you want to run.
See “Viewing the details of existing backup jobs” on page 17.
22
Chapter
4
Restoring a Linux
computer
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About recovering a Linux computer
■
Starting a Linux-based computer using Veritas Recovery Disk
■
Recovering a Linux computer
■
Mounting and unmounting a recovery point for granular file and folder recovery
About recovering a Linux computer
If Linux fails to start or does not run normally, you can recover your computer using
Veritas Recovery Disk and an available recovery point.
Note: If you can start Linux and the partition that you want to restore is not the
system partition, you can restore the partition from within Linux.
Veritas Recovery Disk lets you run a recovery environment that provides temporary
access to Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition recovery features.
See “Starting a Linux-based computer using Veritas Recovery Disk” on page 23.
Starting a Linux-based computer using Veritas
Recovery Disk
The Veritas Recovery Disk CD lets you start a computer that can no longer run the
Linux operating system. The Veritas Recovery Disk CD is not included with Veritas
Restoring a Linux computer
Starting a Linux-based computer using Veritas Recovery Disk
System Recovery 16 Linux Edition. You must create the Veritas Recovery Disk CD
using the createSRD utility after installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition.
See “Creating a Veritas Recovery Disk for Linux” on page 31.
When you start your computer using the Veritas Recovery Disk CD, the recovery
process follows the recovery environment process of the rescue disk that you used
to create Veritas Recovery Disk.
To start a Linux-based computer using Veritas Recovery Disk
1
If you store your recovery points on a USB device, attach the device now (for
example, an external hard drive).
Note: You should attach the device before you restart the computer. Otherwise,
the recovery environment might not detect it.
2
Insert the Veritas Recovery Disk CD that you created previously into the media
drive of the computer.
3
Restart the computer.
If you cannot start the computer from the CD, you might need to change the
startup and BIOS settings on your computer.
4
Boot your computer into the rescue environment.
To activate network into the rescue environment, do one of the following:
5
■
Activate your network from within the Red Hat or SUSE rescue environment.
■
Activate your network using the ifup command.
Check if correct version of Veritas System Recovery Linux Edition is installed
on your computer.
To check the version of Veritas System Recovery Linux Edition, open a terminal
window (command-line terminal) and enter the following command:
symsr -v
6
If correct version of Veritas System Recovery Linux Edition is installed on your
computer, proceed to restore your system.
See “Recovering a Linux computer” on page 25.
See “Mounting and unmounting a recovery point for granular file and folder recovery”
on page 27.
24
Restoring a Linux computer
Recovering a Linux computer
Recovering a Linux computer
You can restore your computer (all volumes and partitions on your computer) using
the recover feature of Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition. If you have a
recovery point for the partitions or volumes that you want to recover, you can fully
recover your computer or another hard drive back to the state it was in when the
recovery point was created.
Restoring a system volume might require booting to and performing the recovery
from the Veritas Recovery Disk.
Note: If you restore a volume or partition that LVM (Linux Volume Manager) or
software RAID managed, before you start the recovery process you must use
lvmtools or the RAID tools that are present on the recovery disk to set up LVM or
software RAID.
25
Restoring a Linux computer
Recovering a Linux computer
To recover a computer
1
If the computer won't boot, start it using Veritas Recovery Disk. If the computer
will boot, log on at a terminal window as user root or as a user with
administrative privileges .
See “Starting a Linux-based computer using Veritas Recovery Disk” on page 23.
2
If the recovery point is stored on a remote NFS or CIFS share, configure your
network settings and mount the remote NFS or CIFS share.
3
Enter the following command at the server console:
symsr -r recoverypoint_nameoptions -d destination
Replace recovery point_name with the name of the recovery point you want
to restore. Recovery points have a .v2i or .iv2i file name extension.
Replace options with the options you want to use with the restore.
Replace destination with the location where the recovery point is restored. The
destination must be a partition or a volume device.
For example, if you want to restore an independent recovery point named
system_000.v2i (the system partition) from the /tmp/path/to directory back to
its original location (/dev/sda1), you enter the following command:
symsr -r /tmp/path/to/system_000.v2i -d /dev/sda1 -active
Similarly, to restore an incremental recovery point named system_000_005.iv2i
from a recovery point set, you enter the following command:
symsr -r /tmp/path/to/system_000_005.iv2i -d /dev/sda1 -active
Note: The -active option is only used with Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux
Edition during a restoration of a system volume. Using the -active option allows
the system to boot from a restored volume. Also, in order for a system to boot
correctly from a restored system volume, you might be required to fix the Grub
boot loader using the grub-install tool. You might also need to update the
/etc/fstab.
See “About restoring to empty disk segments” on page 27.
See “Mounting and unmounting a recovery point for granular file and folder recovery”
on page 27.
26
Restoring a Linux computer
Mounting and unmounting a recovery point for granular file and folder recovery
About restoring to empty disk segments
Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition lets you restore to an MBR (Master Boot
Record) partition, GPT and LVM devices, Software RAID, or to free space on the
disk. If you restore to free disk space (an empty disk segment), an MBR partition
(on an MBR disk) or a GPT entry (on a GPT disk) is created regardless of the
partition type that the recovery point was created from
For example, suppose you have a 40 GB hard disk (/dev/sda) that is partitioned as
follows:
/dev/sda1=20GB
Free Space=20GB
To restore a recovery point named backup01.v2i to free space, you use the following
command:
symsr -r backup01.v2i -d /dev/sda -seg 1
Note: To find the empty segment number, you can use the following command:
symsr -info disk
After the recovery is complete, the disk has the following partitions with the restored
volume on the /dev/sda2 partition:
/dev/sda1
/dev/sda2
See “Mounting and unmounting a recovery point for granular file and folder recovery”
on page 27.
Mounting and unmounting a recovery point for
granular file and folder recovery
Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition creates partition or volume-level recovery
points. If you want to restore individual files, folders, and documents, you must first
mount the recovery point that includes those files and folders. The Granular File
Recovery utility is included with Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition and can
be used to mount recovery points. After mounting a recovery point using the Granular
File Recovery utility, you can restore individual files, folders, and documents.
While mounting a recovery point, you may experience the following error:
27
Restoring a Linux computer
Mounting and unmounting a recovery point for granular file and folder recovery
'mount.v2i: error while loading shared libraries: libfuse.so.2: cannot
open shared object file: No such file or directory'
In such cases, you should follow the FUSE installation steps before you attempt to
mount the recovery point again.
See “Installing Fuse” on page 7.
28
Restoring a Linux computer
Mounting and unmounting a recovery point for granular file and folder recovery
To mount a recovery point using the Granular File Recovery utility
1
Open a terminal window (command-line terminal) on the Linux server and log
on as a user with mount privileges.
2
Create an empty directory where you want the recovery point mounted.
3
Do one of the following:
To mount
a
recovery
point
Enter the following command in a Linux terminal window:
mount -t v2i sda1recoverypoint.v2i /mnt/image
Replace sda1recoverypoint.v2i with the name of the recovery point.
Replace /mnt/image with the path to the empty directory you created. The
recovery point is mounted here.
Note: If the recovery point is password protected, you must also use the
password option and specify the password. For example, if a password
was required for sda1recoverypoint.v2i, you would enter the following
command and replace password with the actual password for the recovery
point:
mount -t v2i sda1recoverypoint.v2i /mnt/image -o
password=password
System prompts for a password if you attempt to mount a
password-protected recovery point without specifying one.
To mount
an
incremental
recovery
point
Enter the following command in a Linux terminal window:
mount -t v2i sda1recoverypoint_nnn.iv2i /mnt/image
Replace sda1recoverypoint_nnn.v2i with the name of the incremental
recovery point. For example, if you want to mount the fifth incremental
recovery point, replace sda1recoverypoint_nnn.iv2i with
sda1recoverypoint_005.iv2i.
Replace /mnt/image with the path to the empty directory you created. The
recovery point is mounted here.
Note: If the recovery point is password protected, you must also use the
password option and specify the password. For example, if a password
was required for sda1recoverypoint_nnn.iv2i, you would enter the following
command and replace password with the actual password for the recovery
point:
mount -t v2i sda1recoverypoint_nnn.iv2i /mnt/image -o
password=password
System prompts for a password if you attempt to mount a
password-protected recovery point without specifying one.
29
Restoring a Linux computer
Mounting and unmounting a recovery point for granular file and folder recovery
To unmount a recovery point
1
Open a terminal window (command-line terminal) on the Linux server and log
on as a user with mount privileges.
2
Enter the following command in a Linux terminal window:
umount /mnt/image
Replace /mnt/image with the path to where the recovery point is mounted.
See “Recovering a Linux computer” on page 25.
30
Chapter
5
Creating a Veritas
Recovery Disk
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About Veritas Recovery Disk
■
Creating a Veritas Recovery Disk for Linux
About Veritas Recovery Disk
Veritas Recovery Disk lets you start a computer that can no longer run the Linux
operating system. You must create the Veritas Recovery Disk using the createSRD
utility after installing Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition. createSRD builds
a recovery environment based on the rescue environment of your Linux distribution.
In the recovery environment, you can access the recovery features of Veritas System
Recovery 16 Linux Edition.
The createSRD utility creates an ISO file which you can burn to a CD or DVD to
create a Veritas Recovery Disk. The createSRD utility does not include any CD or
DVD burning functionality.
See “Creating a Veritas Recovery Disk for Linux” on page 31.
Creating a Veritas Recovery Disk for Linux
To create a Veritas Recovery Disk for Linux you must have a Red Hat Enterprise
Linux (RHEL) boot CD/DVD or ISO or a SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES)
CD/DVD or ISO.
Creating a Veritas Recovery Disk
Creating a Veritas Recovery Disk for Linux
Note: The ISO must match the distribution and version of Linux that you currently
have installed and running.
To create a Veritas Recovery Disk for Linux CD using a Red Hat Enterprise
Linux boot CD/DVD iso file
1
Open a terminal window (command-line terminal) on the Linux server and log
on as a user with administrative privileges.
2
Enter the following command at the Linux server console:
createSRD --iso=/mnt/backup/rhel-5.2-server-i386-dvd.iso -d
/mnt/backup/customSRD.iso
Replace /mnt/backup/rhel-5.2-server-i386-dvd.iso with the path and name of
the source ISO file you use to create the Veritas Recovery Disk.
Replace /mnt/backup/customSRD.iso with the path and name of the Veritas
Recovery Disk ISO file that you want to create.
To create a Veritas Recovery Disk using a SUSE Linux Enterprise Server
CD/DVD in the drive
1
Open a terminal window (command-line terminal) on the Linux server and log
on as a user with administrative privileges.
2
Enter the following command at the Linux server console:
createSRD --iso=/media/SLES10SP_001/ -d /mnt/backup/customSRD.iso
Replace /media/SLES10SP_001/ with the path to where the CD is mounted.
Replace /mnt/backup/customSRD.iso with the path and name of the Veritas
Recovery Disk ISO file that you want to create.
To create a Veritas Recovery Disk using a SUSE Linux Enterprise Server
CD/DVD mounted in the /media directory
1
Open a terminal window (command-line terminal) on the Linux server and log
on as a user with administrative privileges.
2
Enter the following command at the Linux server console:
createSRD -i /media/SLES10 -d /mnt/backup/customSRD.iso
Replace /mnt/backup/customSRD.iso with the path and name of the Veritas
Recovery Disk ISO file that you want to create.
Note: You can also use RHEL 6.2 boot CD to create Veritas Recovery Disk for
Linux.
32
Creating a Veritas Recovery Disk
Creating a Veritas Recovery Disk for Linux
See “About Veritas Recovery Disk” on page 31.
33
Chapter
6
Features not supported in
Veritas System Recovery
for Linux
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
Windows product features not supported in this release
Windows product features not supported in this
release
This release of Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition includes the functionality
to back up and restore Linux computers, partitions, or volumes. Also included is
the functionality to create a Veritas Recovery Disk and mount recovery points.
Many features in the 16 for Windows are not included in Veritas System Recovery
16 Linux Edition. The following list identifies the features that 16 for Windows
supports, but are not included in Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition.
■
Backup and Restore of Windows system volumes from Linux.
■
Backing up to and restoring from CD and DVD.
■
Backing up to non-mounted network locations including ftp, sftp, and windows
shares--CIFS.
■
GUI management tool -- No GUI management tool is currently included with
Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition. All functions are performed using
command line utilities.
■
Offsite Copy.
Features not supported in Veritas System Recovery for Linux
Windows product features not supported in this release
■
Backing up individual files and folders.
■
Notification area icons and alerts.
■
Restore Anyware.
■
Virtualization support including physical to virtual conversion.
■
Veritas System Recovery 16 Management Solution for Convert to Virtual tasks.
■
Veritas System Recovery 16 Management Solution for remote recovery of drives
or one or more computers using LightsOut Restore.
■
Veritas System Recovery 16 Management Solution for deleting recovery points.
■
Converting to and restoring from vmdk.
35
Chapter
7
Troubleshooting Veritas
System Recovery Linux
Edition
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About finding logs for troubleshooting
■
About using the gatherLogs utility for troubleshooting
■
About troubleshooting cron services issues
About finding logs for troubleshooting
You can find the logs and alerts that can help you to diagnose and troubleshoot
issues in the following directory:
/var/log/symsr/
This directory contains the following:
■
Debug logs
■
Application logs
■
Install/Uninstall logs
■
Alerts
■
History
See “About using the gatherLogs utility for troubleshooting” on page 37.
See “About troubleshooting cron services issues” on page 37.
Troubleshooting Veritas System Recovery Linux Edition
About using the gatherLogs utility for troubleshooting
About using the gatherLogs utility for
troubleshooting
The gatherLogs utility is installed along with Veritas System Recovery Linux Edition.
You can use the gatherLogs utility to gather the system logs and product logs that
are required to diagnose and troubleshoot issues.
Use the following command to run the utility:
#gatherLogs
The utility gathers the system logs and product logs, and compiles them in a
compressed file that is created in the following location:
#/tmp/Veritas_System_Recovery_for_Linux_logs.<timestamp>.zip
See “About finding logs for troubleshooting” on page 36.
See “About troubleshooting cron services issues” on page 37.
About troubleshooting cron services issues
If the jobs do not run on the scheduled date and time, you must restart the cron
services.
On SUSE Linux, use one of the following commands to restart the cron services:
#service cron restart
or
#/etc/init.d/cron restart
On RHEL, use one of the following commands to restart the cron services:
#service crond restart
or
#/etc/init.d/crond restart
See “About finding logs for troubleshooting” on page 36.
See “About using the gatherLogs utility for troubleshooting” on page 37.
37
Appendix
Veritas System Recovery
for Linux Utilities
This appendix includes the following topics:
■
Create Veritas Recovery Disk (createSRD utility)
■
Backup and Restore (symsr utility)
■
Granular File Recovery (mount.v2i utility)
A
Veritas System Recovery for Linux Utilities
Create Veritas Recovery Disk (createSRD utility)
Create Veritas Recovery Disk (createSRD utility)
Create Veritas Recovery Disk (createSRD utility) – Create a Veritas
Recovery Disk
SYNOPSIS
createSRD [source]... [destination]
createSRD [source]... [install ISO type, disk type]... [destination]
DESCRIPTION
createSRD is a command line utility for creating a Veritas Recovery Disk (VRD).
Veritas Recovery Disk lets you start a computer that can no longer run the Linux
operating system. When you boot your computer using the Veritas Recovery Disk
CD, a scaled-down version of Linux runs a recovery environment. In the recovery
environment, you can access the recovery features of Veritas System Recovery.
OPTIONS
-h, --help
Show this help message and exit.
-i FILE or DIR, --iso=FILE or DIR
CD ISO file or directory where the CD is mounted. You use this ISO file or
directory to create a Veritas Recovery Disk.
-d FILE, --destination=FILE
The output ISO file that the script creates.
-m, --manual-modifications
Pause after all files are extracted to allow for manual modifications.
--temp-dir=DIR
Temporary directory that is used for creating the new ISO file. The default is
/tmp/<iso_name>.
-v --verbose
Print extra status messages to stdout.
EXAMPLES
createSRD uses POSIX-style options. This is different than the symsr utility, which
always uses a single '-' even if the option contains multiple characters. Single-letter
39
Veritas System Recovery for Linux Utilities
Create Veritas Recovery Disk (createSRD utility)
parameters may be specified as a group in POSIX tar -xvf, but cannot be in the
symsr utilities.
The following are usage examples for the createSRD utility.
createSRD --iso=/mnt/backup/rhel-5.2-server-i386-dvd.iso -d
/mnt/backup/customSRD.iso
Create an Veritas Recovery Disk from a Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) boot
CD/DVD iso.
createSRD --iso=/media/SLES10SP_001/ -d /mnt/backup/customSRD.iso
Create a Veritas Recovery Disk from a SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES)
CD/DVD in the drive.
createSRD -i /media/SLES10 -d srd.iso
Create a Veritas Recovery Disk from a SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES)
CD/DVD mounted in the /media/ directory.
SEE ALSO
Man page for Backup and Restore (symsr utility).
Man page for Granular File Recovery (mount.v2i utility).
40
Veritas System Recovery for Linux Utilities
Backup and Restore (symsr utility)
Backup and Restore (symsr utility)
Backup and Restore (symsr utility) – Back up or restore a computer.
SYNOPSIS
symsr [ACTION] [OPTION]...
DESCRIPTION
symsr is a command line utility for backing up and restoring a Linux computer or
for adding a product license key. The symsr utility captures a recovery point of the
entire live Linux system without affecting the productivity. This includes the operating
system, applications, system settings, configurations, and files. The recovery point
can be saved to various media or disk storage devices, including a SAN, a NAS,
and Direct Attached Storage. When systems fail, you can quickly restore them
without the need for manual, lengthy, and error-prone processes.
Using the symsr command line utility involves specifying an action and the options
that are associated with that action.
ACTIONS
The actions are a group of choices that are used with the symsr command line
utility. Only one action can be specified at a time when running symsr. Different
options exist for each action. The actions are listed below:
-addlicense <license key>
Adds a license key to Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition.
-b, -backup <device>
Performs a backup of the specified device and creates a recovery point at the
specified location.
-createjob
Lets you schedule a backup job for a specific device, comma-separated multiple
volumes, or mount points.
-info
Shows information about the existing backup jobs, or the partitions and file
system types that are available on the disk.
-r, -restore <recovery point>
Restores the specified recovery point to the specified location.
41
Veritas System Recovery for Linux Utilities
Backup and Restore (symsr utility)
Note: You cannot restore a recovery point to a destination that is smaller than
the size of the volume that was backed up.
-rmjob <job id>
Removes an existing backup job from the info job list.
-runjob <job id>
Runs an existing backup job immediately, irrespective of the backup job
schedule.
-vrp, -verify-recovery-point <recovery point>
Verifies the integrity of the specified recovery point.
Note: You cannot verify the integrity of the underlying file system in the recovery
point.
OPTIONS
-?, -help
Show the help message and exits.
-active, -set-active
Sets the restored partition on the destination server to active.
-cmp, -compress, -compression <level>
The compression level you want to apply to the recovery point. Valid
compression levels include None, Standard, Medium, and High. If you do not
specify a compression level, the default is Standard.
-d, -dest, -destination <file>
The file or folder where the recovery point is created, or the device where the
recovery point is to be restored. If you do not specify a destination, the default
is the current directory. A destination is required for performing a recovery.
-desc, -description <description>
Use this option to provide a description of the recovery point.
disk
Lists the partitions and file system types that are available on the disk.
Note: This option must be used with the -info action.
42
Veritas System Recovery for Linux Utilities
Backup and Restore (symsr utility)
-encryption, -use-aes-encryption <level>
Use this option to encrypt a recovery point. Encryption levels include high
(256-bit), medium (192-bit), and standard (128-bit).
Each encryption level requires a different length password. Password lengths
include at least 32 characters for high, at least 16 characters for medium, and
at least eight characters for standard.
The default is no encryption if no encryption level is specified.
-force-unmount
This option attempts to remove any mount points from the destination before
a restore. If this option is not specified, the restore fails and an error message
displays indicating that you should remove mount points and retry the restore.
-ignore-bad-sectors
This option lets you run a backup even if there are bad sectors on the hard
disk. Although most drives do not have bad sectors, the potential for problems
increases during the lifetime of the hard disk. If you have an older hard drive,
you should use this option.
job
Lists all the scheduled backup jobs and their status. The status of a backup
job is either active or in progress. Active status indicates that the scheduled
job is active for the given recovery point type. In progress status indicates that
the backup job is running on the device, after the backup job completes, the
status changes back to active.
Note: This option must be used with the -info action.
-mnt, -mount-point <path>
The mount point you want to add to the volume after it is restored (not
persistent). <path> must be a valid path.
-nombr, -do-not-restore-mbr
Do not restore the master boot record that is contained in the recovery point.
This option is used only with the Restore action.
-p, -pwd, -password <password>
Use this option to specify a password for the recovery point file when creating
a backup or to supply a password for a password-protected recovery point
when restoring.
-prefix, -file-prefix <string>
Lets you specify a prefix for the recovery point file name. The prefix is used
when the destination is not specified or is a directory.
43
Veritas System Recovery for Linux Utilities
Backup and Restore (symsr utility)
-raw, -raw-image
This option instructs Veritas System Recovery 16 Linux Edition to not use
SmartSector copy. Instead, the entire volume is captured even if there is no
data in some sectors of the volume.
-reboot, -reboot-on-success
Restart the computer when the restore is complete.
-seg, -segment <number>
You can specify an empty section of the disk to restore the recovery point to
(a zero-based index). The number must not be a negative number.
-span, -split, -span-size <number>
Use this option to divide the recovery point file into separate chunks. The
number is the chunk size in x 500 MB, and cannot be negative.
-v, -version
Provides the information about the product name, version, and the license
status.
-verify
Verify the recovery point after it is created or before it is restored.
OPTIONS FOR CREATE JOB ACTION
Usage: symsr -createjob
Note: The symsr -createjob action starts the schedule backup wizard. To exit
the wizard, type q, Q, or Quit at any prompt of the wizard other than the Select
Source prompt or the Select Destination prompt.
The following options are specific to the -createjob action.
Select Source
Lets you select the source that you want to back up. The source can be one
or more comma-separated devices or a mount point of a device.
Select Destination
Lets you select the location where you want to store the recovery points.
Create a computer specific folder
Creates a computer-specific folder in the backup destination location. By default,
this option is set to no [n].
44
Veritas System Recovery for Linux Utilities
Backup and Restore (symsr utility)
Select a recovery point type
Lets you select the type of backup you want to create. The available backup
types are independent backup and recovery point set. The default backup type
is recovery point set [1].
Select compression level
Lets you select a compression level for the recovery points.
The following compression levels are available:
[1] Standard - 40 percent average data compression ratio on recovery points.
[2] Medium - 45 percent average data compression ratio on recovery points.
[3] High - 50 percent average data compression ratio on recovery points.
[4] No compression for the recovery points.
By default, standard [1] compression level is used for the recovery points.
Select encryption type
Lets you set a password with or without encryption on the recovery point when
it is created.
The following encryption types are available:
[1] No password and no encryption
[2] Standard 128-bit (8+ character password)
[3] Medium 192-bit (16+ character password)
[4] High 256-bit (32+ character password)
By default, this option is set to no password and no encryption [2].
Note: If you select an encryption type that requires a password, you are
prompted to enter and confirm the password.
Start a new recovery point set
Lets you specify a schedule to run the base backup for a recovery point set.
The following scheduling options are available:
[1] Weekly
Runs the backup on the day of the week you specify. By default, the backup
is run on Sunday [SUNDAY].
[2] Monthly
45
Veritas System Recovery for Linux Utilities
Backup and Restore (symsr utility)
Runs the backup on the days of the month you specify. You can choose to run
the backup every day, on a specific day, or on the last of day of the month. By
default, the backup runs on the first day of the month [1].
[3] Quarterly
Runs the backup on the first day of every quarter. If you choose this option,
the backup runs on the first day of January, April, July, and October.
[4] Yearly
Runs the backup on the first day of January.
Note: The default schedule for running backups is Monthly [2].
Specify backup start time
Runs the backup at the time and on the days specified by you.
Note: Veritas System Recovery Linux Edition adjusts the time you specify a
backup to run to the nearest quarter of an hour. For example, if you schedule
a backup to run at 2:20 P.M., the time to run the backup is adjusted to 2:30
P.M.
The default schedule for running backups is Weekly [1].
Create recovery points
Lets you schedule a backup to create recovery points.
The following scheduling options are available:
Schedule recovery points
Lets you specify whether you want to create recovery points. By default, this
option is set to yes [y].
Recur every week
Runs the backup on the days of the week you specify. You can choose to run
the backup on one day or multiple days in a week. By default, the backup runs
on Sunday [SUNDAY]
Run more than once a day
Runs the backup more than once a day to protect the data that you change
frequently. By default, this option is set to no [n].
Time between backups
46
Veritas System Recovery for Linux Utilities
Backup and Restore (symsr utility)
Specifies the maximum time period that should occur between two backups.
This option appears only if you have selected to run backups more than once
a day.
Number of backups
Specifies the number of times the backup should run in a day. Ensure that you
specify a number considering the number of hours that you have specified to
occur between two backups. For example, if you have specified a period of 10
hours to occur between backups, you cannot run more than three backups a
day.
Specify independent recovery point schedule
Lets you schedule backups to create independent recovery points.
The following scheduling options are available:
[1] Weekly
Runs the backup on the day of the week you specify. By default, the backup
runs on Sunday [SUNDAY].
[2] Monthly
Runs the backup on the days of the month you specify. You can choose to run
the backup every day, on a specific day, or on the last of day of the month. By
default, the backup runs on the first day of the month [1].
[3] Quarterly
Runs the backup on the first day of every quarter. If you choose this option,
the backup runs on the first day of January, April, July, and October.
[4] Yearly
Runs the backup on the first day of January.
[5] Run only once
Runs the backup only once.
Note: The default schedule for running backups is Weekly [1].
Recur every week
Runs the backup on the days of the week you specify. You can choose to run
the backup on one or more days of the week. By default, the backup runs on
Sunday [SUNDAY].
Specify backup start time
Runs the backup at the time on the days that you specified.
47
Veritas System Recovery for Linux Utilities
Backup and Restore (symsr utility)
Note: Veritas System Recovery Linux Edition adjusts the time you specify a
backup to run to the nearest quarter of an hour. For example, if you schedule
a backup to run at 2:20 P.M., the time to run the backup is adjusted to 2:30
P.M.
Verify recovery point after creation
Verifies whether the recovery point is valid after it is created.
Save Job
Lets you save or cancel a backup job. By default, this option is set to yes [y].
Provide Job Name
Lets you specify a name for the backup job you want to save. You must enter
a job name. The job name cannot be blank and cannot contain only spaces.
EXAMPLES
The following are usage examples for the symsr command-line utility.
symsr -b /dev/sda1 -d sda1backup.v2i
Creates a recovery point named sda1backup.v2i for volume sda1 using default
options and storage. The recovery point is created in the same folder where
the command is run.
symsr -b /boot -d sda1backup.v2i
Creates a recovery point named sda1backup.v2i for the mount point /boot. The
recovery point is created in the same folder where the command is run.
symsr -b /dev/mapper/vg0-lv0 -d lvmbackup.v2i
Creates a recovery point of an LVM volume. The recovery point is created in
the same folder where the command is run.
symsr -b /dev/sda1 or ,
symsr -b /boot
Creates a recovery point of volume sda1 with the default file name. This creates
the recovery point in the current folder using the name volume_name_NNN.v2i.
symsr -b /dev/sda1 -d machinename_volumename or ,
symsr -b /boot -d
machinename_volumename
Creates a recovery point of volume sda1 with the supplied file name. This
creates the recovery point in the current folder using the name
machinename_volumename_NNN.v2i.
48
Veritas System Recovery for Linux Utilities
Backup and Restore (symsr utility)
symsr -b /dev/sda1 -create-machine-folder or ,
symsr -b /boot
-create-machine-folder
Creates a folder using the computer name and place the recovery point of
volume sda1 in that folder.
symsr -b /dev/sda1 -d /machine_subfolder/machinename_volumename
,
or
symsr -b /boot -d /machine_subfolder/machinename_volumename
Creates a recovery point of volume sda1 in the specified computer subfolder
with the specified file name. This creates the recovery point in the specified
computer subfolder using the name machinename_volumename_NNN.v2i.
symsr -b /boot -d /mnt/backup/sda1backup.v2i -ignore-bad-sector
Creates a recovery point that skips over the bad sectors on the hard disk.
symsr -b /boot -d /mnt/backup/sda1backup.v2i -p recoverypointpassword
Creates a recovery point with password protection.
symsr -b /boot -d /mnt/backup/sda1backup.v2i -cmp high
Creates a recovery point with high compression.
symsr -b /boot -d /mnt/backup/sda1backup.v2i -desc "This backup was
taken on July 25 2009 at 10:00AM"
Creates a recovery point with an embedded recovery point description.
symsr -b /boot -d /mnt/backup/sda1backup.v2i -span 2
Creates a recovery point that spans multiple files that are each 1000 MB. The
chunk size in x 500 MB.
symsr -b / -d /mnt/backup -use-aes-encryption high -password
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Creates a recovery point using AES-256 encryption. For high AES encryption,
the password length must be at least 32 characters.
symsr -info disk
Shows the partitions and file system types that are available on the disk.
symsr -info job
Shows a list of existing backup jobs and their details.
symsr -r system_000.v2i -d /dev/sda1
Restores the system partition back to its original location (/dev/sda1).
symsr -r system_000_005.iv2i -d /dev/sda1
Restores the fifth incremental recovery point of the system partition back to its
original location (/dev/sda1).
49
Veritas System Recovery for Linux Utilities
Backup and Restore (symsr utility)
symsr -r system_000.v2i -d /dev/sda -segment 0
Restores the system partition back to its original location (/dev/sda1) on a new
or empty disk.
symsr -r lvm2_000.v2i -d /dev/mapper/vg0-lv1
Restores an LVM device back to its original location (/dev/mapper/vg0-lvl).
symsr -rmjob job-1
Removes the backup job corresponding to the specified job ID.
symsr -runjob job-4
Runs the backup job corresponding to the specified job ID immediately,
irrespective of the backup schedule.
symsr -v
Shows the information about the product name, version, and the license status.
symsr -vrp system_000.v2i
Verifies the integrity of the recovery point.
symsr -vrp system_000_s01.v2i
Verifies the integrity of the spanned recovery point and the recovery point chain.
Note: Some characters have special meanings and should not be used in recovery
point file names and passwords. These characters include colons (:), back slashes
(\), question marks (?), ampersand (&), asterisk (*), and caret(^).
SEE ALSO
Man page for Create Veritas Recovery Disk (createSRD utility).
Man page for Granular File Recovery (mount.v2i utility).
50
Veritas System Recovery for Linux Utilities
Granular File Recovery (mount.v2i utility)
Granular File Recovery (mount.v2i utility)
Granular File Recovery (mount.v2i utility) – Mount a recovery point file
for restoring files and folders.
SYNOPSIS
mount -t v2i [recovery point]... [mount point]... [options]...
DESCRIPTION
mount.v2i mounts a recovery point. It is usually invoked indirectly by the mount(8)
command when using the -t v2i option. This command requires the FUSE driver
and the FUSE shared library (libfuse.so.2).
mount -t v2i is a command line utility for mounting a recovery point file on a Linux
computer so you can restore files and folders.
Using the mount -t v2i command line utility involves specifying the image file name,
the location where the recovery point will be mounted, and any desired options.
You must use the -o flag when specifying options.
Use umount command to unmount the.v2i file that is mounted using the mount -t
v2i command.
OPTION
password=<password>
If the recovery point is assigned a password, use this option to supply the
password when mounting or unmounting the file.
If a password is not supplied for the password-protected recovery point, it
prompts you for the password.
EXAMPLES
The following are usage examples for mounting a recovery point using mount -t v2i
and unmounting a recovery point using unmount.
mount -t v2i image.v2i /mnt/image
Mount a recovery point in the /mnt/image directory. Replace image.v2i with
the name of the recovery point.
51
Veritas System Recovery for Linux Utilities
Granular File Recovery (mount.v2i utility)
mount -t v2i image_nnn.iv2i /mnt/image
Mount an incremental recovery point in the /mnt/image directory. Replace
image_nnn.iv2i with the name of the incremental recovery point. For example,
if you want to mount the fifth incremental recovery point, replace image_nnn.iv2i
with image_005.iv2i.
mount -t v2i image.v2i /mnt/image -o password=password
Mount a password-protected recovery point in the /mnt/image directory. Replace
image.v2i with the name of the recovery point and password with the password.
umount /mnt/image
Unmount a recovery point in the /mnt/image directory.
SEE ALSO
Man page for Create Veritas Recovery Disk (createSRD utility).
Man page for Backup and Restore (symsr utility).
52
Download PDF
Similar pages