Manual
Transducer
Model 2601
Analog Cabinet and Miking Simulator for E Guitars
Manual Transducer, Model 2601
Version 1.1 – 5/2007
Designer: Ralf Reichen, Jens Gronwald
This user's guide contains a description of the product. It in no way represents a guarantee of
particular characteristics or results of use. The information in this document has been carefully compiled and verified and, unless otherwise stated or agreed upon, correctly describes
the product at the time of packaging with this document.
Sound Performance Lab (SPL) continuously strives to improve its products and reserves the
right to modify the product described in this manual at any time without prior notice. This
document is the property of SPL and may not be copied or reproduced in any manner, in part
or fully, without prior authorization by SPL.
SPL electronics GmbH
Sohlweg 55
41372 Niederkruechten
Germany
Tel. +49 (0)2163 983 40
Fax +49 (0)2163 983 420
Email: info@soundperformancelab.com
www.soundperformancelab.com
CE Declaration of Conformity
Manufacturer: SPL electronics GmbH
Type of Equipment: Audio Signal Processor
Product: Transducer, Model 2601
Compliance Engineer: Wolfgang Neumann
Test Basis: EN50081-1:1992, EN50082-1:1992, EN60065:1993, EN61000-3-3:1995,
EN60065:2002, EN55013:2001, EN55020:2002, EN61000-3-2:2000, 73/23 EWG; 93/68 EWG.
We herewith declare, that the construction of the Transducer, Model 2601, is in compliance
with the standards and regulations mentioned above.
Notes on environmental protection
At the end of its operating life, this product must not be disposed of with regular
household waste but must be returned to a collection point for the recycling of
electrical and electronic equipment. The “wheelie bin“ symbol on the product,
user‘s manual and packaging indicates that. The materials can be re-used in
accordance with their markings. Through re-use, recycling of raw materials, or
other forms of recycling of old products, you are making an important contribution to the
protection of our environment. Your local administrative office can advise you of the responsible waste disposal point.
WEEE Registration: 973 349 88
© 2007 SPL electronics GmbH. All rights reserved. Names of other companies and their products are trademarks of their respective owners.
2
Transducer
Contents
Important Safety Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Hook Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Hook Up, Rack Mounting, Warnings, Symbols and Notes, Advices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Scope of Delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tonehunter and SPL, Tonehunter, SPL, Transducer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Advantages – an Overview, On Stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sound Setups, Complete – Not Approximated – Simulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Authentic Variety, Analog Construction – Analog Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6
6
7
8
8
REAR PANEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Power Connection, On and Off, Signal Connections, XLR, 1/4" Jacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Overview, Wiring Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Power Input, Warning: Connecting Guitar Amps, Speaker Thru . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Mic Level Output, Line Output 1, Line Output 2, Pre Simulator Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Power, Voltage, Ground Lift, Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
FRONT PANEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Control Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Signal LED, Speaker Action, Speaker Cabinet, Speaker Voicing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Miking Level, Microphone Selection, Microphone Distance, Output Gain, OVL LED . . . 15
Setup Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Recording: Setup 1, Live: Setup 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Live: Setup 3 and 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Live: Stereo Effect/Dry-Wet-Wet – Setup 5 and 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Live: Stereo-Effect/Dry-Wet-Wet, Stage and P. A. – Setup 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Leveling the Transducer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Clean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Crunch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Lead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Guarantee & Product Registration
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Copy Master Transducer Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Transducer
3
Important Safety Information
Please note and retain this information. Carefully read and follow all of the safety and operating instructions before you use the machine. Be doubly careful to note and follow the warnings and special safety notices.
Connections: Only use the connections as described. Other connections can lead to health
risks and equipment damage.
Water and Humidity: Do NOT use this machine anywhere near water (for example near a wash
basin or bath, in a damp cellar, near swimming pools, or the like). In such cases there is an
extremely high risk of fatal electrical shocks!
Insertion of Foreign Objects or Fluids: NEVER allow a foreign object through any of the
machine‘s chassis openings. You can easily come into contact with dangerous voltage or cause
a damaging short circuit. NEVER allow any fluids to be spilled or sprayed on the machine. Such
actions can lead to dangerous electrical shocks or fire!
Opening the Machine: Do NOT open the machine housing, as there is great risk you will
damage the machine, or – even after being disconnected – you may receive a dangerous electrical shock!
Electrical Power: Run this machine ONLY from sources which can provide proper power at the
prescribed rating. When in doubt about a source, contact your dealer or a professional electrician. To be sure you have isolated the machine, do so by disconnecting the power cord from
your wall connection. Be sure that the power cord plug is always accessible. When not using
the machine for a longer period, make sure to unplug it from your wall power socket.
Power Cord Protection: Make sure that your power cord is arranged to avoid being stepped
on or any kind of crimping and damage related to such event. Do not allow any equipment or
furniture to crimp this power cord.
Power Connection Overloads: Avoid any kind of overload in connections to wall sockets,
extension or splitter power cords. Always keep manufacturer warnings and instructions in
mind. Overloads create fire hazards and risk of dangerous shocks!
Lightning: Before thunderstorms or other severe weather, disconnect the machine from wall
power (but to avoid life threatening lightning strikes, not during a storm). Similarly, before
any severe weather, disconnect ALL the power connections of other machines and antenna
and phone/internet cables which may be interconnected so that no lightning damage or overload results from such secondary connections.
Air Circulation: Chassis openings offer ventilation and serve to protect the machine from
overheating. NEVER cover or otherwise close off these openings. NEVER place the machine
on a soft surface (carpet, sofa, etc.). Make sure to provide for a mounting space of 4-5 cm/2
inches when mounting the machine in racks or cabinets.
Repairs: Unplug the machine and immediately contact a qualified technician when you think
repairs are needed – or when moisture or foreign objects may accidentally have gotten in to
the housing, or in cases when the machine may have fallen and shows any sign of having been
damaged. This also applies to any situation in which the machine has not been subjected
to any of these unusual circumstances but still is not functioning normally or its performance is substantially altered.
In cases of damage to the power cord or its plug, first consider turning off the main circuit
breaker before unplugging the power cord.
Operate the controls and switches only as described in the manual. Incorrect adjustments
outside safe parameters can lead to damage and unnecessary repair costs. Never use the
switches or level controls to effect excessive or extreme changes.
Replacement/Substitute Parts: Be sure that any service technician uses original replacement
parts or those with identical specifications as the originals. Incorrectly substituted parts can
lead to fire, electrical shock, or other dangers, including further equipment damage.
Safety inspection: Be sure always to ask a service technician to conduct a thorough safety
check and ensure that the state of the repaired machine is in all respects up to factory standards.
Cleaning: In cleaning, do NOT use any solvents, as these can damage the chassis finish. Use
a clean, dry cloth (if necessary, with an acid-free cleaning oil). Disconnect the machine from
your power source before cleaning.
4
Transducer
Hook Up
Hook up
Be very careful to check that the rear chassis power selection switch is set to the correct
local line voltage position before using the unit (230 V position: 220-240 V, 115 V position:
110-120 V)! When in doubt about a source, contact your dealer or a professional electrician.
Before connecting any equipment make sure that any machine to be connected is turned off
(rear panel power switch). Follow all safety instructions on page 4.
Place the unit on a level and stable surface. The unit’s enclosure is EMC-safe and effectively
shielded against HF interference. Nonetheless, you should carefully consider where you place
the unit to avoid electrical disturbances. It should be positioned so that you can easily reach
it, but there are other considerations. Try not to place it near heat sources or in direct sunlight,
and avoid exposure to vibrations, dust, heat, cold or moisture. It should also be kept away
from transformers, motors, power amplifiers and digital processors. Always ensure sufficient
air circulation by keeping a distance of 4-5 cm/2 inches to other units and to the sides of the
unit.
Rack Mounting
Be sure that both above and below the machine you maintain a distance of 1U (44mm/
1.5-2 inches) in order to eliminate electromagnetic or high frequency interference from other
equipment. Moreover, this will ensure adequate air circulation to prevent overheating. Do
NOT locate other machines that produce excessive heat below the Transducer. The rear side
of the machine should be properly supported – especially when transport is involved.
WARNINGS
DO NOT PLACE THE MACHINE IN SUCH A WAY THAT IT MIGHT COME INTO CONTACT WITH OR SIT
ON ANY FLUIDS. AVOIDING SUCH CONTACT WILL AVOID HAZARDS FROM FIRE, DANGEROUS
ELECTRICAL SHOCK OR MACHINE DAMAGE. DO NOT OPEN THE MACHINE. THE LIGHTNING
SYMBOL WITHIN A TRIANGLE WARNS YOU ABOUT UNINSULATED HIGH VOLTAGE INSIDE THE
TRANSDUCER AND THE POTENTIAL FOR DANGEROUS ELECTRICAL SHOCKS – WHICH CAN ALSO
OCCUR EVEN AFTER THE MACHINE HAS BEEN DISCONNECTED FROM A POWER SOURCE.
SYMBOLS AND NOTES
ALSO IN THIS MANUAL A LIGHTNING SYMBOL WITHIN A TRIANGLE WARNS YOU ABOUT THE
POTENTIAL FOR DANGEROUS ELECTRICAL SHOCKS – WHICH CAN ALSO OCCUR EVEN AFTER
THE MACHINE HAS BEEN DISCONNECTED FROM A POWER SOURCE.
AN EXCLAMATION MARK (!) WITHIN A TRIANGLE IS INTENDED TO MAKE YOU AWARE OF
IMPORTANT OPERATIONAL ADVICE AND/OR WARNINGS THAT MUST BE FOLLOWED. BE
ESPECIALLY ATTENTIVE TO THESE AND ALWAYS FOLLOW THE ADVICE THEY GIVE.
The symbol of a lamp directs your attention to explanations of important functions or applications.
ATTENTION
Do not attempt any alterations to this machine without the approval or supervision of SPL
electronics GmbH. Doing so could nullify completely any and all of your warranty/guarantee
rights and claims to user support.
Transducer
5
Scope of Delivery
The scope of delivery comprises the Transducer, the power cable and the manual. Please keep
the original packaging. In case of a service procedure the original packaging ensures a safe
transport. It also serves as a safe packaging for your own transports if you do not use special
transportation cases.
Introduction
Tonehunter and SPL
The Transducer is a cooperative developmental effort between the guitar amp firm of
Tonehunter and SPL. It brings together many years of experience from the professional music
scene, combining specialized knowledge of electric guitarists and SPL‘s established international reputation in the research and development of analog studio electronics. This mutual
effort of these two firms has been the basis for new ideas such as the unique Transducer
concept, which has the potential to revolutionize the working life of both the electric guitarist
and the recording studio engineer.
Tonehunter
The firm Tonehunter has over 15 years of experience pursuing the goal of fulfilling the sonic
wishes of professional electric guitarists. This includes tube amplifiers, effects units, support
for live and studio sessions as well as custom set designs from instruments, cables and
effects machines to pickups, amps and speaker cabinets. The Tonehunter team is comprised
exclusively of musicians with extensive audio engineering backgrounds who, in contact with
their customers, are always at the forefront of new, no-compromise developments that fulfill
the highest user expectations.
SPL – Sound Performance Lab
SPL boasts over 20 years of experience in the development and production of analog and
digital audio processing equipment in the professional music, film, multimedia and broadcasting industries. Our products enjoy a first rank, worldwide reputation for innovation, user
friendliness and consistently superior performance.
To SPL’s technological milestones belong the first level-independent analog dynamic envelope shaping tool (the “Transient Designer”), the pioneering introduction in 1998 of the first
discrete 5.1 surround recording system (“Atmos 5.1“) and the development of the SPL SUPRA
OpAmps with an unprecedented operating voltage of 120 Volts. These SUPRA OpAmps form
the basis for SPL‘s Mastering Series for stereo and multi-channel applications and with their
performance set new benchmarks in audio signal processing that are clearly a step beyond all
existing analog or digital audio formats.
Transducer
The SPL Transducer is an analog cabinet and miking simulator for guitar amplifiers. In studio
and on stage the Transducer replaces the guitar speaker cabinet and microphone(s) so that
the time and resource-intensive microphone processing of this loud sonic source is no longer
necessary. In addition the Transducer offers much more sonic flexibility and variety than a
single mike and cabinet setup because it allows for varied speaker and mike simulations
while allowing to retain accustomed features of individual setups (such as the ability to vary
level-dependent loudspeaker characteristics and microphone distances).
Do you want to record a fully torqued tube amp in a hotel at night? You’ll stay: with headphones virtually inaudible to anyone else, soundwise with stunning authenticity, and with
the direct response of latency-free analog gear. The Transducer‘s purely analog design and
strictly selected components are the key to its extremely fast and complex sonic processing
– latency problems simply do not exist! It thereby gives the guitarist a direct response with an
authentic punch. The analog simulation is so lavishly designed and constructed that even the
most subtle guitar amp nuances are reproduced. With just a few adjustments the engineer
has at his or her disposal a first class guitar signal for either studio recording sessions or in a
live P. A. mix.
6
Transducer
Introduction
Advantages – an Overview
The Transducer supplants at least four loudspeaker cabinets, two high quality microphones,
their preamp, a good room ambiance, and at any time, the amplification may be cranked up.
Moreover, the entire Transducer usage is highly intuitive and requires no prior miking expertise.
• The Transducer offers a unique ability for the guitarist during production performance to
hear a true playback and then adjust his playback to the moment in the control room.
• Fully analog construction for the highest authenticity in sonic quality and outstanding
playability throught direct, latency-free response.
• Critical parts are carefully selected for exceptional sonic characteristics. In these days of
mass production, we still select our OP amps only after listening to them and rejecting
those lacking in our required exceptional sonic characteristics. This also applies to our top
flight foil condensers and individually built High-Z transformers from Lehle.
• The Transducer replaces all major cabinet and microphone types, thereby enormous
savings in cost and space in transport, on stage, or in the studio.
• Processing is independent from absolute volume levels, which means that no recording
room is necessary and ear-saving work is possible everywhere and at any time.
• Sonically much more flexible than a fixed cabinet/mike set in that all important loudspeaker
and cabinet types, as well as dynamic and condenser microphones can be simulated.
• Multiple guitar tracks can be “stacked” – the doubled layers become “phatter”. In the
process, there will not be any thinning effect from phase shifts as with digital simulation.
• 200-Watt Power Soak: The power amp‘s distortion may, as with cabinets, be integrated
into an authentically distorted sonic design. Please pay close attention to the warnings for
connecting guitar amps to the Transducer on page 11.
• Resulting recorded sounds are independent from room characteristics – what you hear is
what you get.
• Signals for live mixes are at recording quality level and free from crosstalk from other sound
sources.
• As on-stage recording loudspeakers are not needed any in-ear monitoring is done at safehearing levels as the cabinet must not be drowned out.
• Significantly less time spent and much more efficiency and convenience in equipment
setup, preparation, and working with sound variations.
• Working procedures and connections follow customary standards of amp and cabinet sets.
• Live application advantage: It is extremely easy to achieve a dry-wet-wet setup. The amp
signal passes via “Speaker Thru“, for a dry direct signal and the Transducer line out is
connected to the effects machine; FX left and right out provides a wet signal on stage.
• Live application advantage: two line outs with separate balancing drivers – the Transducer
provides for both FOH and stage routings.
On Stage
The Transducer’s “Speaker Thru“ option allows a cabinet to be connected without any loss
in signal quality. The stage sound comes as usual from the stack, while at the same time the
sound technician receives a top quality recording quality signal without miking – and without
crosstalk from any other sound source. If on the other hand very low sound levels are required
on stage, the Transducer can supplant the cabinet. The line or microphone signal of the
Transducer can then be routed via FOH mixer to either a stage monitor or in-ear system for the
guitarist.
Transducer
7
Introduction
Sound Setups
After cabling is complete, the sound setup functions primarily as one might expect: First,
guitar amp sound adjustments are prepared as though the cabinet were already connected.
However, instead of choosing a cabinet and experimenting with microphones and their positioning, adjustments need only be made with the Transducer controls. In such cases the
Transducer interfaces with the guitar amp just as an actual guitar cabinet and microphone:
When switching the Transducer to a smaller cabinet with a “crispy” speaker, one probably
also changes the amplifier settings.
During studio production the guitarist can try out different adjustments, and during playback, immediately hear these settings and their effects on the mix. The operation is based
on standard procedures, is completely intuitive and independent from room acoustics – what
you hear is what you get.
A Complete – Not Approximated – Simulation
An important aspect of signal processing with guitar sound distortion is the reproduction
of chords: The string sound should exhibit a fine resolution and homogeneous, musically
unified sound quality. From this emanates the deep, complex and unified sonic structure
typical of the best speaker and box assemblies. This aspect is also a prime consideration in
the Transducer‘s uniquely precise output: Through its new concept in signal processing you
experience a completely authentic sonic feel.
The Transducer circuitry also conveys the different time characteristics of guitar speaker low
and high frequencies. With reduced guitar signal levels, the Transducer nonetheless reproduces the full dynamic range of a guitar amp. Even attack-dependent loudspeaker compression characteristics are realistically reproduced. For guitarists there is his playing no change
in comparison to normal box setups.
Authentic Variety
The Transducer‘s flexible switching enables adjustments which allow the creation of complex
sound and attack characteristics of “classic” electric guitar cabinets and their speakers in all
frequency ranges. From the small, half open 1x12 inch cabinet with alnico speaker to British
4x12 inch Rock n‘ Roll cabinets, the Transducer has every sound covered. Even speaker distortion effects and recording levels may be simulated, including the desired loudness effect.
Analog Construction – Analog Function
In working with the Transducer, a guitar amp will be loaded as if with an actual cabinet so that
the interaction of both components will produce the same results. As the microphone type
and positioning are adjustable, the Transducer can supplant both cabinet and mike.
One Transducer output can also be used the same as if it were a microphone standing in front
of a guitarist‘s cabinet: It can be used with a microphone preamp. Just as it is worth the effort
to try out different mike preamps with mikes and cabinets, one may do the same with the
Transducer. Alternatively the Transducer also provides for a line signal output so that additional microphone amplification is no longer needed. An internal microphone preamplifier in
traditional SPL quality is used here for pristine sound results.
8
Transducer
Rear Panel
108&3
70-5"(&]'64&
Power Connection
7_)[
'VTFN"TMPX
Before you connect the Transducer to any local power source, be SURE to check that the rear
panel voltage switch is correctly set for your local area (115V position: 110-120V, 230 V position: 220-240V).
7_)[
'VTFN"TMPX
70-5"(&]'64&
Connect the included power chord to the rear Mains Input. Transformer, power chord and
case connection conform to VDE, UL and CSA requirements. Power fuse ratings are 200 mA
slow blow (230 volts) or 400 mA slow blow (115 volts).
."*/4*/165
."*/4*/165
On and Off
108&3
In switching on and off, you need not follow any particular sequence. Even when the amp
is running and the Transducer is shut off, the latter works as a passive resistance circuit.
Therefore the amp is not loaded more heavily by a switched off Transducer as it is in the case
of a connected cabinet.
108&3
108&3
Signal Connections
Before first connecting any other equipment – and in all other cases where you are connecting cables with or from other sources – you should be sure to shut the Transducer and all
machines to be connected off (rear panel power switch). Otherwise you risk to damage the
unit, connected gear or your ears.
XLR Connections
0VUQVU
CBMBODFE
The diagram shows how to wire the balanced XLR output connections if unbalanced connections are required.
For further information on the XLR connections (pin wiring) please refer to the descriptions of
the respective outputs on the following pages.
VOCBMBODFE
(/%
IPU
DPME
1/4" Jack Connections
The 1/4" Jack connections of Pre Simulator and Speaker Thru output as well as Power Input
are unbalanced.
The balanced TRS connector of Line Output 2 can be used both with balanced and unbalanced
(=mono Jack connection) wiring.
For further information on the Jack connections (pin wiring) please refer to the descriptions of
the respective inputs and outputs on the following pages.
Transducer
9
Rear Panel
Overview, Wiring Examples
10
Transducer
Rear Panel
Connections
108&3*/165
)JHI8BUU*OQVU
-PBE0OMZ
.BY8BUUT
Here you connect the guitar amp‘s loudspeaker output. Connector variant and pin configurations follow industry standards: Unbalanced 1/4” Jack connector with the signal at the tip and
ground at the sleeve.
5JQ
4MFFWF(/%
Power Input
IMPORTANT INFORMATION:
As with any typical amp and cabinet cabling, it is critical to observe loudspeaker cable of
a minimum 1.5 mm2 cross section. Guitar or line cables can lead to amplifier damage! We
recommend to use cables with a maximum length of 3 meters/10 feet for lossless signal
transmission.
)JHI8BUU*OQVU
-PBE0OMZ
.BY8BUUT
5JQ
4MFFWF(/%
108&3*/165
WARNING: Connecting Guitar Amps and the Transducer
Many guitar amps are not designed for sustained maximum level operation, and if run this
way, it can lead to overloads and power amp damage. At high levels, amps can produce high
frequency oscillations which can destroy output transformers. Moreover, this can cause
audible unwanted output transformer distortion. Such problems are not a result of Transducer
use, but reside within the guitar amp.
Even in situations where you might wish to push the guitar amp to its limit in conjunction
with the Transducer, you should always be sure to allow for ample power reserves to avoid
endangering the amp itself!
In the same way a guitar amp and box should never be run knobs full to the right, so should
you avoid running the Transducer this way. Therefore we strongly recommend that the guitar
amp should never be run at over 70% of its maximal signal level!
Look for the amp‘s “Sweet Spot” as you make adjustments to it. This is almost never in the
upper level output range. Where the amp‘s bass starts to sound “spongy” and somewhat
undifferentiated is the place where your master level control should be turned back.
The guitar amp output must be rated at 8 ohms! Only connect amplifiers rated at a 100 W
maximum to maintain a further 100 W reserve for signal peaks. A guitar amp may be used
ONLY within its normal operating parameters. The Transducer may be loaded up to 200 W.
But please note that a 100 W amp at higher volumes, eventually combined with further effects,
produces peaks far above 100 W. Therefore we strongly recommend connecting amps rated at
a maximum of 100 W.
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This output provides for a passthrough from guitar amp to speaker in order to allow for the
connection of an additional 4, 8 or 16-ohm cabinet. This setup makes it possible to have a
traditional amp and cabinet combination sound sent to the stage and at the same time, route
the Mic Level or Line Output for PA or recording.
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Speaker Thru
At Speaker Thru the amp signal appears with a -8dB lowering of the original signal level. The
guitar amp therefore can be driven into saturation also at moderate levels.
Connector variant and connections follow industry standards: Unbalanced 1/4" Jack connector
with the signal at the tip and ground at the sleeve.
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IMPORTANT INFORMATION:
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As with any typical amp and cabinet cabling, it is critical to observe loudspeaker cable of
a minimum 1.5mm2 cross section. Guitar or line cables can lead to amplifier damage! We
recommend to use cables with a maximum length of 3 meters/10 feet for lossless signal
transmission.
Transducer
11
Rear Panel
Connections
Mic Level Output
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The microphone level output is usable just like any mike out. The Miking Level control on
the Transducer front panel regulates the signal. The Output Gain control has no influence on
the Miking Level output. Just as with conventional cabinet miking, variations in microphone
preamp choices may of course be made to influence further the sonic result.
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Balanced XLR output, wiring: pin 1 = ground, pin 2 = hot (+), pin 3 = cold (-).
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Line Output 1
The front panel Output Gain control regulates the output signal, which appears at the Line
Output 1 connector.
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Balanced XLR output, line signal with +4dB.
Wiring: pin 1=ground, pin 2=hot (+), pin 3=cold (-).
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Line Output 2
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The front panel Output Gain control regulates the output signal, which appears at the Line
Output 2 connectors.
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Balanced XLR and 1/4” TRS connector, line signal with +4dB.
Wiring XLR: pin 1 = ground, pin 2 = hot (+), pin 3 = cold (-).
Wiring TRS: tip =hot (+), ring = cold (-), sleeve = ground.
The Line Output 2 phase switch provides for a reversal of this output‘s signal phase.
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IMPORTANT ADVICE
Use only one (either an XLR or 1/4" TRS) Line Output 2 connection at a time. Using both
output connections simultaneously can impair the signal through impedance mismatches
from the doubled load that can lead to such problems as high frequency damping.
However, Line Output 1 and 2 can be used simultaneously.
Pre Simulator Out
This output is independent from Speaker Simulation and thus independent from Transducer
adjustments. The signal at this Pre Simulator Out is that of the power-reduced amp signal (line
level). With this arrangement you can feed a separate amp and guitar box setup or effects
machines.
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Connector variant and connections correspond to industry standards: Unbalanced 1/4" Jack
connector with the signal at tip and ground at sleeve.
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Mic Level Output, Line Output 1, Line Output 2 (XLR or TRS connection) und Pre Simulator Out
may all be used simultaneously.
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12
Transducer
Rear Panel
Switches
Power
108&3
The rear panel Power switch activates the Transducer, confirmed by the lighted blue front
panel LED.
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Ground Lift
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The rear panel GND lift switch eliminates hum by separating the internal ground from the
unit’s housing ground. Hum can, for example, result when this unit’s housing has a common
ground connection with other machines that might have a different ground potential.
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Phase
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Applies to Line Output 2 only. This switch reverses the signal phase by 180° to prevent
frequency cancellations when another machine is connected.
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IMPORTANT ADVICE: Before you use the Transducer, make sure that this switch setting
reflects the correct local power line voltage (115V position: 110-120V, 230 V position: 220240V).
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The rear panel voltage selector switch serves to let the user switch to the local line voltage
standard.
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Phase reverse is applied for example to compensate for different phases from a cabinet
(connected via Speaker Thru) and a monitor in a live setup or to compensate for phase differences from two guitar amps in a studio setup.
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Transducer
13
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Front Panel
Overview
Control Elements
Controls, LEDs and Switches from left to right
4*(
Signal LED
The signal LED indicates the presence of a signal at the Transducer‘s input. It is activated at a
-20 dBu level.
WARNING
If an amplifier is connected and the Signal LED illuminates though a signal is not present or
too much noise from the amp is not the reason, the lighted LED can indicate a high frequency
resonance of the amp.
In this case turn down the master volume of the amp until the LED goes out. High frequency
resonances can overload and damage the guitar amp!
Such problems are not a result of Transducer use, but reside within the guitar amp.
41 &
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Speaker Action
4
This simulates speaker cone characteristics at different levels. With a moderately driven
guitar box (Speaker Action from 0%-35%), speakers ideally reproduce the signal clearly
without too many side effects. As levels increase, overtones are added by the overdriven
speaker, producing its characteristic “rasping” distortion effect. Speaker Action allows for
the simulation of this effect.
Speaker Actions is, as with Miking Level and Output Gain, a level control. Turning it to the left
allows only low levels to pass, just as with a cabinet driven at low levels. If a small Speaker
Action is wanted, it must be compensated for with a comparable increase in Miking Level – in
principle the same as you would need to do in working with a cabinet.
Please pay attention to the information under “Leveling the Transducer” on page 20.
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Speaker Cabinet
This switch toggles between an open and closed guitar cabinet characteristic.
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“Open” sounds definitely more open, brilliant and direct, as the signal contains more transients and produces less punch as with the “Closed” setting, wherein the sound has more
punch and with its added compression more closely creates the impression of the compressed
air in a closed box, though with less brilliance and detail.
Speaker Voicing
This offers the choice of sound and attack characteristics from either alnico speakers (Sparky)
or the British ceramic construction (Mellow). The “Sparky” setting produces a lively, more
responsive sound with additional overtones, while the “Mellow” setting sounds warmer and
softer.
Transducer
Controls, LEDs and Switches from left to right
Control Elements
Miking Level
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A microphone produces a different sound at lower sound levels than at higher ones. With the
Transducer‘s Miking Level one can simulate these differences. Increasing the Miking Level
effect produces a stronger compression level and a denser sound canvas. This builds an effect
of increasing loudness.
A lower miking level produces a more refined and at the same time, marked high frequency
production with reduced mids.
Please pay attention to the information under “Leveling the Transducer” on page 20.
Microphone Selection
This provides for selecting either condenser or dynamic microphone characteristics.
Depending upon the cabinet these microphone choices will affect the sound right from the
start, and clearly this will continue to contribute to the overall available guitar sound.
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A condenser microphone normally sounds more open and transparent, though less punchy
than a dynamic. It is also unforgiving, and, for example, can quickly single out weaknesses
in loudspeaker microphoning. A dynamic microphone has more punch, though it sounds
less clear than a condenser. It can be more forgiving and withstands higher sound pressure
levels.
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Microphone Distance
The sound dispersion characteristics of guitar speakers varies with microphone distance, with
slightly distanced microphoning adding more ambience. With Microphone Distance settings
it is possible to simulate these different sonic characteristics.
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The Close setting provides a more direct sound and tends to sit in the front of the mix. With
sharply defined corners and angles, full detailing and overtone rich, this sound is suited for
soloists. In contrast, the Ambient setting is ideal for a “wall of sound“ – and is sonically less
direct, softer, but with more push and punch.
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Output Gain
This controls the Line Output 1 and 2 output levels; the Mic Level Output is not influenced by
this control. Please pay attention to the Information under “Leveling the Transducer” on page
20.
This LED illuminates 3 dB before the internal microphone preamplifier stage is overloaded. In
this case, be sure to lower the Output Gain until the OVL LED goes out.
NOTE: The Mic Level Output is independent from the Output Gain control.
07-
Overload LED
Line Output 1 and Line Output 2 only. This LED illuminates 3 dB before the internal microphone
preamplifier stage is overloaded. In this case, be sure to lower the Output Gain until the OVL
LED goes out.
Transducer
15
Setup Examples
Recording, Live
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Setup 1
This is the simplest setup for recording situations. The guitar amp is connected normally to
the Transducer. In this case either the Transducer Mic Level Output can be routed to a microphone preamp or its Line Output can connect to an external line in. Both of these outputs may
be used simultaneously.
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Setup 2
This is the simplest setup for live applications and when it should be quiet on stage. Connect
the amp to the Transducer. The guitarist receives a monitoring signal (in-ear or through a
monitor box) from the Transducer Line Output through the live mixer.
The PA may also be fed from the mixer or a Transducer output (Line Output, or Mic Level
Output).
16
Transducer
Setup Examples
Live
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Setup 3
If an on-stage guitarist wishes to have his cabinet sound, the signal should be routed to his
box via the Transducer Speaker Thru. In this case the amp signal power is reduced by 8 dB
enroute to the box; here saturation (that is, power amp distortion) begins to occur at moderate
listening levels.
The two separate Transducer Line Outputs may be used simultaneously to feed both an FOH
mixer and monitor mixer.
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Setup 4
If the guitarist does not need the 8 dB Speaker Thru signal reduction, he may connect both
the guitar box and Transducer simultaneously with the guitar amp loudspeaker outputs
(assuming this is an amp option).
IMPORTANT ADVICE: In such cases the guitar amp impedance must be reduced by half. For
example: In connecting to the Transducer (8 ohms) and guitar box rated at 8 ohms, the guitar
amp must be set up at 4 ohms. The two separate Transducer Line Outputs may be used to
feed both an FOH mixer and monitor mixer simultaneously.
Transducer
17
Setup Examples
Live: Stereo Effect/Dry-Wet-Wet
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Setup 5
Stereo Effects Setup: Dry-Wet-Wet Setup with guitar box (Dry) and two stage monitors (Wet).
The dry guitar signal is routed from the Transducer Speaker Thru. Connect the Transducer
Line Output to an effects machine. The effects machine‘s wet outputs (Right/Left) are then
connected as needed to powered monitors. The guitarst gets a simple stereo effects (DryWet-Wet setup) signal on stage. The second Transducer Line Output may, for example, be
routed for P. A. use.
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Setup 6
Stereo Effects Setup: Dry-Wet-Wet setup for three powered monitors without cabinet.
The dry guitar signal derives from Line Ouput 1, which is routed to an active monitor. Connect
the Transducer Line Output 2 with an effects machine and route each of it‘s wet outputs (L/R)
to an active monitor. The guitarist gets a simple stereo effect Dry-Wet-Wet setup on stage.
18
Transducer
Setup Examples
Live: Stereo-Effekt/Dry -Wet-Wet, Stage and P. A.
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Setup 7
Stereo Effects Setup on stage and for P. A.: Dry-Wet-Wet setup with (Dry) cabinet and two
(Wet) stage monitors.
The dry guitar signal is routed via the Transducer‘s Speaker Thru. Connect the Transducer
Line Output 1 with an effects machine and each of it‘s wet outputs (L/R) to an active monitor.
The on-stage guitarist gets a simple stereo effects Dry-Wet-Wet setup. For the FOH mixer, the
two wet signals need only to be split for further routing. The FOH mixer receives a dry signal
from the Transducer Line Output 2.
Transducer
19
Leveling the Transducer
All three Transducer level controls influence output levels. Therefore it is important to understand their existing mutual effects and the overall results. These controls have been designed
purposefully with a percentage scaling, as one structured in dB is in fact not possible. The
input signal itself – coming from the guitar amp – is a power signal that is no longer measurable or depictable in dB. Thus a “0dB” input level is not definable, and thus other levels
may not be derived from it. Because this reference point is lacking, it is also impossible to
construct subsequent controls in dB scaling.
1. As an initial setting, move the Speaker Action, Miking Level and Output Gain controls to
50%.
2. In order to provide the following peripherals with proper levels, adjust the Outupt Gain*
control appropriately.
3. For desired adjustments to the Transducer sound you have available the four toggle switch
options provided by Speaker Action and Miking Level controls.
With a more limited Speaker Action a signal will sound cleaner and have more definition.
A higher Speaker Action offers stronger compression and more overtones which begin to
introduce light speaker cone distortion.
A limited Miking Level provides both more highs and refinement in overtones with somewhat reduced mids. As Miking Level is increased, the signal thickens. Mids and bass are
compressed and moved to the foreground.
4. You can adjust overall level controls that are effected by Speaker Action and Miking Level
with the Output Gain* control.
*: The Output Gain control functions only with the Line Outputs. If you are routing from the
Mic Level Output, use the control in your following mic preamp to adjust the overall level.
It is important to consider added power amp distortion, as it is the basis for the Transducer‘s
concept with its ability to process up to a 200 Watt, 8 ohm cabinet-amplified signal. Avoid too
much mental separation in what should be your integrated Transducer level control thinking,
as just with past situations that employed traditional guitar amp and cabinets, you must
consider the interaction with a guitar amp – and here especially in relation to the preamp
and master gain. This is really the only way you can achieve the effects you‘re looking for (in
particular, the distortion from pre and power amps).
Please pay attention to the instructions for connecting guitar amps to the Transducer on
page 11!
Presets
Setting Examples for Clean, Crunch and Lead Sounds
Just as you would choose a cabinet matching your amp you can use the settings of the
following presets. Our presets correspond to the respective amps and provide a first orientation for your individual settings.
Speaker Action and Miking Level controls determine both the basic sound and leveling; individual experimentation is always required here. The Transducer delivers a full bandwidth
signal from 20 Hz to 20 kHz, so we recommend to create the basic sound without further EQ
processing first. Once you have found your sound you can go ahead with any desired effects.
WARNING
If an amplifier is connected and the Signal LED illuminates though a signal is not present or
too much noise from the amp is not the reason, the lighted LED can indicate a high frequency
resonance of the amp.
In this case turn down the master volume of the amp until the LED goes out. High frequency
resonances can overload and damage the guitar amp!
Such problems are not a result of Transducer use, but reside within the guitar amp.
20
Transducer
Presets
Clean
Open Cabinet,
2 x 10" Alnico Speakers
Sixties Sound
Open Cabinet,
2 x 12" Ceramic Speakers
Sixties Sound
Closed Cabinet,
2 x 12" Ceramic Speakers,
American Modern Clean
Open Cabinet,
overloaded 1 x 12" Alnico Speaker,
Light Crunch
Closed Cabinet,
2 x 12" Alnico Speaker
Transducer
21
Presets
Crunch
4 x 12", Plexi “Greenback“
4 x 12", early “Vintage 30“
4 x 12", sparky “Greenback“
4 x 12", sparky “G 12 H“
1 x 12", “EV 12 L“
2 x 12", “Black Face“
22
Transducer
Presets
Lead
4 x 12" “Greenback“ Rock
4 x 12" “G 12 H“
“Vintage 30“
“Bluesbraker“
2 x 12" “Bulldog“
Sparky “EV“
Transducer
23
Specifications
Input
Speaker Input
Impedance
Max. Input Load
1/4" Jack connection
8 Ohms
100 W RMS, 200 W Peak
Outputs
Speaker Thru
1/4" Jack connection
Pre Simulation Out
Impedance
1/4" Jack connection
ca. 1 kOhm
Mic Level Output
Impedance unbalanced
Impedance balanced
Max. Output Level
Signal to Noise Ratio
XLR, electronically balanced
ca. 600 Ohms
ca. 1,2 kOhms
+6 dBu
-100 dBu (A weighted)
Line Output 1
Impedance unbalanced
Impedance balanced
Max. Output Level
Signal to Noise Ratio
XLR, electronically balanced
ca. 600 Ohms
ca. 1,2 kOhms
+21,5 dBu
-94 dBu (A weighted)
Line Output 2
Impedance unbalanced
Impedance balanced
Max. Output Level
Signal to Noise Ratio
XLR and 1/4" TRS connection, electronically balanced
ca. 600 Ohms
ca. 1,2 kOhms
+21,5 dBu
-94 dBu (A weighted)
Power Supply
Selectable Line Voltages
115 V AC, 60 Hz
230 V AC, 50 Hz
Power Consumption
5,2 VA
Fuses
110 – 120 V AC: 400 mA slow blow
220 – 240 V AC: 200 mA slow blow
Power Connector
Standard 3-prong IEC connector
Dimensions & Weight
24
Height x Width x Depth
88,2 mm x 482,6 mm x 270 mm
ca. 3,4" x 19" x 10,6"
Weight
4,8 kg/10,58 lbs
Transducer
Power Supply
The power supply was carefully engineered to provide clean and consistent current, an important prerequisite for excellent audio. Built around an overdimensioned toroidal transformer,
the power supply generates a minimal electromagnetic field with no hum or mechanical
noise.
All audio-related components are fed by two separate voltage regulators to minimize disturbance from other components.
."*/4*/165
An AC power cord is included for connection to the standard 3-prong IEC connector. The transformer, power cord and IEC connector are VDE, UL and CSA approved. The AC fuse is rated at
200 mA (230 V version) or 400 mA (115 V version).
."*/4*/165
Guarantee & Product Registration
All SPL products come with a two-year manufacturer’s guarantee against defects in material
or assembly from the date of purchase.
End users are supported in the two-year guarantee through their distributor or dealer. In such
cases, please contact your dealer for full guarantee conditions and service.
Direct SPL product support requires product registration. Please fill out the guarantee card
enclosed in the package legibly in printed letters and send it directly to SPL.
Or use the online registration form that may be reached at www.soundperformancelab.com
(international clients) or www.spl-usa.com (US clients).
Transducer
25
Block Diagram
26
Transducer
Engineer:
Track(s)/Group:
Date:
Guitar player:
Album/Gig:
Title:
Copy Master Transducer Settings
< Manual Transducer
28
Transducer
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