compressor installation and operation manual

COMPRESSOR
INSTALLATION
AND
OPERATION
MANUAL
for
Ambient Air Compressors
Air Boosters
Gas Compressors
OIL FREE AIR & GAS COMPRESSORS
THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
CONTENTS
Warranty.............................................................................................................................................................................4
Compressor Nameplates....................................................................................................................................................4
General Information............................................................................................................................................................5
Safety.................................................................................................................................................................................6
Introduction to Oil Free Ambient Air Compressors.............................................................................................................7
Introduction to Air Boosters and Gas Compressors...........................................................................................................8
Section 1 - Compressor Installation...................................................................................................................................9
Receipt of Compressor...............................................................................................................................................9
Location.......................................................................................................................................................................9
Foundation..................................................................................................................................................................9
Inlet Piping and Inlet Filtration.....................................................................................................................................10
Discharge Piping.........................................................................................................................................................11
Receivers (Ambient Air Compressors)........................................................................................................................11
Receivers (Air Boosters and Gas Compressors)........................................................................................................11
Compressor Cooling - Air Cooling...............................................................................................................................12
Compressor Cooling - Water Cooling..........................................................................................................................12
Compressor Control Panel..........................................................................................................................................13
Unloader Controls.......................................................................................................................................................13
Safety Devices............................................................................................................................................................15
Plumbing of Air Booster and Gas Compressor Packings............................................................................................16
Section 2 - Compressor Startup.........................................................................................................................................22
Installation Checklist...................................................................................................................................................22
Inspection After Extended Storage..............................................................................................................................23
Compressor Speed.....................................................................................................................................................23
Crankcase Lubrication................................................................................................................................................23
Oil Pressure Regulation..............................................................................................................................................24
V-Belt Tension and Alignment Settings........................................................................................................................24
Control Panels.............................................................................................................................................................26
Pre-Startup Checklist..................................................................................................................................................29
Initial Startup and Operation (Ambient Air Compressors)...........................................................................................29
Initial Startup and Operation (Air Boosters and Gas Compressors)...........................................................................30
Daily Startup Checklist................................................................................................................................................31
Section 3 - Maintenance and Troubleshooting...................................................................................................................32
Maintenance Schedule (Ambient Air Compressors)...................................................................................................32
Maintenance Schedule (Air Boosters and Gas Compressors)....................................................................................32
Troubleshooting...........................................................................................................................................................33
Section 4 - Compressor Servicing......................................................................................................................................36
Torque Valves..............................................................................................................................................................36
Tool List for Servicing..................................................................................................................................................36
Clearances and Tolerances . ......................................................................................................................................36
Compressor Disassembly...........................................................................................................................................38
Compressor Assembly................................................................................................................................................41
Appendix 1 - Tool List.........................................................................................................................................................45
Appendix 2 - Compressor Storage.....................................................................................................................................46
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
WARRANTY - GENERAL
Hycomp warrants that its compressors will be free from defects in material and workmanship for a period of twelve
(12) months from the date of purchase.
Hycomp compressors which fail within the 12 month period due to defects in material or workmanship, will be repaired
or replaced at Hycomp’s discretion provided the Purchaser meets all of the applicable requirements of the warranty
and none of the limitations apply.
Any parts subject to wear or abuse are not covered by this limited warranty. These may include, but are not limited
to, mechanical seals, bearings, piston rings, valves, packings, and other parts showing signs of abuse.
This limited warranty is void if any product or accessory has been serviced or altered by anyone not authorized by
Hycomp.
Additional warranty limitations apply. Please see complete warranty policy for details.
See complete warranty policy for details
(available from the factory)
NOTICE TO HYCOMP CUSTOMERS
Hycomp recommends you order service and replacement parts according to the model number and serial number
found on the nameplate of your compressor. Do not order parts from the general descriptions in this manual.
Ordering directly from Hycomp or a registered vendor will minimize the possibility of receiving incorrect parts for
your compressor.
COMPRESSOR NAMEPLATES
Each Hycomp model has a nameplate attached to the
crosshead guide cylinder, usually on the oil-pump end.
The information on this nameplate should be available
when ordering parts for the compressor or requesting
assistance with troubleshooting, maintenance,
installation or operation.
Before contacting Hycomp, note who you purchased
the compressor from, who installed it, installation date,
the purchase date, and model number. This will help
Hycomp identify your compressor and any special parts
and materials that may have been used. Fill in the
information from the new compressor into the spaces
provided in the sample nameplate below.
Installed By ________________________________
Installation Date_____________________________
Purchased Date_____________________________
Purchased From ____________________________
Date of Startup______________________________
Model #___________________________________
Serial #____________________________________
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
GENERAL INFORMATION
This manual covers the following types of
compressors:
Ambient Air Compressors - these are compressors
whose inlet source is the ambient air surrounding the
compressor.
Air Boosters - these are compressors that compress
air that is taken from a source other than the ambient
air. Generally the inlet air source is at an elevated
pressure, but vacuum applications can also be
accomplished. The inlet air is usually taken from
customer’s existing plant air system.
Gas Compressors - These are compressors pumping
any gas other than air. Including the following
compressors listed by block.
Ensure that you know what type of compressor you
have before using this manual. If the instructions for
the different types of compressors differ, this will be
noted in the manual.
NOTICE: Hycomp compressors must only be installed
in systems which have been designed by qualified
personnel. The system MUST conform to all applicable
federal, state, local and national standards.
This manual is intended to assist qualified technical
personnel in the installation, operation and maintenance
of Hycomp compressors, and should be kept with the
compressor at all times.
Hycomp compressors shall only be serviced and
maintained by qualified personnel. Routine inspection
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
and maintenance is highly recommended.
‘A’ Block:
AN6, AN4A, AN3A, 2AD4A
WN4A, AN3.4A
‘B’ Block:
AN12, 2AN8, 2AN7B, 2AN3B
‘C’ Block:
AN20, AN26, WN26, 2AN17, 2WN15, 2AN11C, 2AN10C,
2AN13C, AN10C, AN6C,
2AN3C
‘D’ Block:
AN44, WN44, 2AN26, 2AN35,
AN20D, 2AN35, 2WN35, 2WN5D, 2WN9D, AN12D, AN17D, AN35D,
2AN10D, 2AN15D
‘E’ Block:
WN72, 2AN61, 2AN76,
2WN61, WN14E, AN20E,
2WN13E, 2WN17E, 2WN22E,
2AN22E, 2WN38F, 2WN66F
‘F’ Block:
AN154, AN44F, WN28F, WN98,
WN154, 2WN34F, 2AN28F, 2AN66F,
2AN137, 2WN150F, 2AN22F, 2WN38F,
2WN66F, 2WN137F, 2WN49F
‘G’ Block:
2AN40, 2WN40
‘H’ Block:
2WN76, WN90, 2AN76
‘V’ Block:3AN44V, 3AN11V, 3WN35V, 3AN35V,
4WN27V
Differences between compressors
will be noted in the text.
SAFETY
Hycomp insures, from the beginning, that safety is
designed into every compressor. A compressor is a
precision high speed mechanical piece of equipment.
They require caution in operation to minimize hazard to
one’s self and property. The following is a list of safety
precautions that should always be observed:
1. Do not try to service any part of the compressor or
accessory while the unit is operating.
2. The main power disconnect switch must be turned
off; lockout/tagout the switch before performing any
work or maintenance on the unit, per OSHA Regulation
1910.147.
3. Relieve the system of all pressure before attempting
to service any part of the unit, per OSHA Regulation
1910.147.
4. The unit must not be operated with any of its safety
guards, shields, or screens removed.
5. Do not remove any warning signs or the
manufacturer’s nameplate.
6. Frequently check pressure relief valves for proper
operation.
7. Any changes to the compressor operating
parameters should only be made with the approval
of Hycomp. Contact the factory should a change be
necessary.
Hycomp oil free air boosters and industrial gas
compressors can be used for boosting air and a
variety of common industrial gases. Depending upon
the model of the compressor and the style of the
gas packing, intake pressures may range up to 300
psig, while discharge pressures may vary up to 1000
psig. Pressures above 1000 psig are possible with
customized units.
Most Hycomp compressors are sized for specific
applications; therefore, it is essential to contact the
factory before changing running conditions of the
compressor.
ALL INDUSTRIAL GASES WILL PROVE FATAL
TO PERSONNEL EXPOSED. Some gases are
immediately toxic or corrosive, and may cause short
term or long term damage, or death, to personnel
that are exposed to the gas. Only air is capable
of supporting life. Gases that are generally inert
to humans (Nitrogen, Helium, Argon, etc.), will not
sustain life if personnel are exposed to a pure gaseous
atmosphere.
Because there is NO SAFE GAS OTHER THAN AIR,
it is imperative that all exposure to industrial gases be
closely monitored and regulated. Federal mandate
requires specific procedures must be established for
any company that deals with industrial gases. This
includes, but may not be limited to, gas containment
policy, protection required for personnel working
with the gas, availability of MSDS’s, specific training,
emergency spill and/or contact procedures, etc.
Always check if there are EPA or OSHA standards
that may apply.
Ensure all materials used in the compressor and
associated plumbing, including coolers, separators,
filters, receivers, regulators, piping, etc. are compatible
with the gas being compressed. If unsure, contact the
manufacturer of the equipment.
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
INTRODUCTION TO
OIL FREE AMBIENT AIR COMPRESSORS
Hycomp oil free ambient air compressors (compressors
taking their inlet from the air around you) are unique
in the industry due to their small size, extended lower
end life, and open crosshead design. The crankcase is
pressure oil lubricated, providing extended bearing life
in the main, connecting rod and wrist pin bearings. The
open crosshead allows any oil vapors that may escape
from the crankcase to be vented to atmosphere,
thereby preventing their entrainment in the compressed
gas stream.
Hycomp oil free compressors are designed for heavy,
industrial duty service. Slower compressor speeds
prevent heat buildup, increase valve efficiency, and
increase overall life expectancy of wearing parts.
Hycomp’s crosshead design places the side thrust
UNLOADER
TOWER
COMPRESSION
CYLINDER
OIL-SCRAPERS
CROSSHEAD
CYLINDER
developed by the connecting rod onto the oil lubricated
crosshead piston/cylinder. By removing this side
thrust from the compression piston, the piston rings
provide an extended life expectancy, in comparison to
permanently sealed ball bearing, ‘oil-less’ designs.
Hycomp air compressor cylinders and cylinder heads
are single piece iron castings. This significantly
decreases warpage problems associated with
aluminum cylinders/heads. Additionally, iron is
inherently vibration dampening.
All Hycomp air compressors are tested at the factory
to ensure they meet contractual requirements. When
properly installed, the air compressor should be ready
and able to provide the reliable service Hycomp
customers have come to trust and appreciate.
CYLINDER HEAD
COMPRESSION
PISTON
PISTON ROD
CROSSHEAD
PISTON
CONNECTING
ROD
FLYWHEEL
OIL FILTER
OIL PUMP
CRANKCASE
Figure 1: Cutaway of an Ambient Air Compressor
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
INTRODUCTION TO
AIR BOOSTERS AND GAS COMPRESSORS
Hycomp oil free air boosters (compressors taking
their inlet from an air source at an elevated pressure)
and gas compressors are unique in the industry due
to their small size, open crosshead, and gas packing
design. The open crosshead allows any oil vapors
that may escape from the crankcase to be vented to
atmosphere, thereby preventing their entrainment in
the compressed gas stream. Hycomp’s innovative use
of the incoming gas stream to help cool gas packings
provides extended performance benefits and service
life.
These compressors draw inlet gas from a source that is
already at elevated pressure and “boost” it to an even
higher pressure. Because these compressors do not
draw from atmosphere they require special attention
to inlet gas conditions and cleanliness.
Hycomp’s gas packing design prevents leakage of
gas vapors to the open atmosphere. Hycomp utilizes
UNLOADER
TOWER
COMPRESSION
CYLINDER
GAS PACKINGS
OIL-SCRAPERS
CROSSHEAD
CYLINDER
self adjusting, segmented packings to seal against
the piston rod, and safely contain the gas. This gas
can then be vented to a safe location, or a variety of
purging, venting or padding options may be used to
control the gas leakage. With this system, Hycomp
compressors can pressurize flammable and toxic
gases.
Hycomp compressors & boosters are specialized and
engineered specifically for each application, making
them different from other types of compressors offered
in the market. They are available in single, two and
three stage models with air or water cooling.
All Hycomp boosters & compressors are tested at the
factory to ensure they meet contractual requirements.
When properly installed, the booster compressor
should be ready and able to provide the reliable
service that Hycomp customers have come to trust
and appreciate.
CYLINDER HEAD
COMPRESSION
PISTON
DISTANCE PIECE
(PLENUM CHAMBER)
PISTON ROD
CROSSHEAD
PISTON
CONNECTING
ROD
FLYWHEEL
OIL FILTER
OIL PUMP
CRANKCASE
Figure 2: Cutaway of an Air Booster & Gas Compressor
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
SECTION 1
COMPRESSOR INSTALLATION
RECEIPT OF COMPRESSOR
If installation is required in an area exposed to rain
or snow, a building or overhead protection should be
provided. If the compressor is liquid cooled, suitable
freeze protection must be provided for both the coolant
and the machine.
If concealed damage is discovered at a later date, the
carrier typically must be notified within 15 days of initial
receipt of the compressor. Check with your local carrier
for rules and regulations regarding damaged items. DO
NOT attempt to correct damages to compressor units
until a representative of the carrier has inspected the
damage, or the carrier agrees to pay damages.
FOUNDATION
Immediately upon receipt of the compressor, inspect
the unit and associated components for damage that
may have occurred during shipment. If any damage
is found, demand an inspection from the carrier. Ask
the carrier how to file a claim for shipping damages.
Shipping damage is not covered by Hycomp.
Upon receipt of the compressor, read the compressor
nameplate to confirm the model ordered. Read
the motor nameplate to ensure that the electrical
requirements do not exceed existing conditions.
Hycomp requires that all personnel in charge of
installation, maintenance, or service of a Hycomp
compressor read the manual in its entirety.
LOCATION
Locate the compressor in a dry, well ventilated and well
lit area that accommodates inspection and maintenance
access. Provide an unobstructed machine boundary of
at least 18” with adequate air flow and service space
around the compressor. Rotating machinery should
always display appropriate restrictive warnings and
cautions to minimize risk of injury to personnel.
Rotating machinery can be a source of noise, which
may require abatement or personnel exposure limits.
Understand your service environment and prepare
accordingly. Noise from a typical Hycomp compressor
will often exceeds 80 dBA @ 3ft.
Installation in locations exposed to ambient subfreezing
temperatures is not recommended. Exposure to direct
sunlight, rain, wind, dust, snow, moisture, and other
adverse environmental elements is not recommended
and will reduce service life and increase maintenance
requirements. If it is necessary to install the unit out of
doors, provide a rain cover or a completely enclosed
shed to prevent corrosion.
If it is necessary to install the unit in a location that
will experience operating temperatures below 32°F,
a properly sized crankcase heater must be installed.
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
Permanent installations require the compressor be
secured to a concrete foundation pad. The foundation
should rest on solid bedrock or compacted earth or
gravel, but not a combination of the two. The pad
should be composed of 4,000 psi cured concrete
reinforced with ASTM A615 #4 billet steel re-bar cross
laced on 16” centers located 3” above the base. The
amount of concrete used to form the pad should exceed
the weight of the compressor by 3 to 5 times. SAE Gr.
5 “J” bolting of appropriate length and size should be
used in the pad to provide baseplate mounting. Use of
a template to support and position the bolting +/– 1/16”
while setting concrete is recommended. Securing
bolting to existing foundations with drilled holes and
adhesives is not recommended unless expert advice
is available. Expert advice is also recommended for
installation of other forms of mechanical anchors. See
Figure 3 for additional details.
Epoxy based grouting is required to firmly seat
and attach the compressor skid to the concrete
foundation. ITW Philadelphia Resins brand “Chockfast
Red” grout is recommended. Sealing of grouts and
concrete is recommended to prevent contamination
by oil and moisture. Newly poured concrete must be
fully hydrated prior to grouting. The concrete slab
should be chipped to remove all latent and 50% of
the aggregate exposed to provide a rough bonding
surface for the epoxy. Dowels should be installed on
new exposed concrete to prevent edge lifting. The
2” Min.
All Sides
8” Min
Hex Nut
Washer
Compressor
Baseplate
Concrete Foundation with
Reinforcements Should
Be Used on All Models
“J” Bolts, Located
Per Compressor
Installation Diagram
Figure 3: Foundation Requirements
concrete foundation should be dry and free of oil before
pouring grout. Sleeve all foundation bolts to prevent
adhesion and allow bolt stretch. Steel baseplates
should be sanded and cleaned to provide adequate
adhesion surface.
Steel fabricated foundations must be adequately
engineered to support the weight and vibration of the
compressor.
INLET PIPING & INLET FILTRATION
Compressor life can be substantially increased by
providing clean, dry, cool gas to the compressor
inlet.
Ambient Air Compressors – In most cases,
the standard air filter furnished from the factory is
sufficiently large to meet normal operating conditions
when periodically serviced. Where the compressor
inlet is to be piped to the outside, a hood or shroud
must be installed to prevent rain from entering the filter
or pipe. In severe environmental conditions, it may
be necessary to consider a non-standard inlet filter.
Contact the factory for assistance in this case.
Large runs of intake piping require an increase in piping
size to maintain compressor efficiency; pipe size should
be increased one size for each 10 feet of intake pipe
and each 90° bend.
Air Boosters & Gas Compressors – The inlet piping
may be at a pressure above atmospheric, and must
be rated for the working pressure of the inlet gas, and
protected with a properly sized safety valve set at 20
to 30 PSI above the maximum operating pressure but
below the maximum allowable working pressure of
the pipe.
An inlet filter must be placed in-line with the inlet, to
ensure clean gas (or air) to the booster. The filter
should be a 1.0 micron or better, coalescing type,
sufficiently sized for twice the full flow of the booster
with minimal pressure drop. Inlet filters should be
installed on the upstream side of an inlet receiver to
prevent pulsation damage. The inlet receiver and
piping must be cleaned of any foreign residue before
compressor startup. Unless otherwise indicated, air
boosters and gas compressors do NOT come with an
inlet gas filter. Damage to the machine will occur if
contamination is drawn into the booster compressor
and will void the warranty!
Hycomp air boosters and gas compressors require
an inlet receiver to be installed just upstream of the
Discharge Receiver
Inlet Receiver
Inlet Filter
(required on all
applications)
Hycomp Booster
Compressor
Aftercooler
Discharge
Check Valve
(required on all
applications)
Figure 4: Basic System Configuration of an Air Booster or Gas Compressor
10
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
booster compressor. See RECEIVERS (Air Boosters
& Gas Compressors) for additional sizing details. See
Figure 4 for additional details.
Compressors are not designed to pump any liquids.
Liquids are non-compressible and even the slightest
amount of liquid can cause high-impact stresses
resulting in serious damage to the compressor. The
use of a liquid trap in the suction line is required where
the presence of entrained liquids in the suction gas is
a possibility.
Flex Connectors
Rigid Pipe
Support
Rigid Pipe
Support
DISCHARGE PIPING
Recommended practice is to have a compressor
aftercooler, discharge safety valve, discharge check
valve, and an air receiver. To prevent undesirable
pressure drops in piping, pipe size should be
increased one size for each 100 feet of run. Sweat
type copper fittings, when compatible with the gas
being compressed, will give much less pressure loss
than the equivalent size steel pipe. All horizontal pipe
runs should be sloped away from the compressor at
about one quarter inch per foot. All low points in the
piping system should have a drain leg to catch any
accumulation of condensation in the piping.
It is extremely important that a properly sized safety
valve, set at 10% or 20 to 30 PSI above the maximum
operating pressure but below the maximum allowable
working pressure of the system components, be
placed at the discharge receiver and upstream of the
aftercooler. Never place a line valve in the discharge
piping between the compressor discharge and the
safety valve.
A discharge check valve must be placed between
the aftercooler and the discharge receiver. This is
especially important on booster compressors, as
high pressure gas (or air) may leak back through the
compresor to the suction side of the system, causing
dangerously high pressures in the suction side
receivers, piping, etc.
On initial start-up of the compressor, bubble test all
piping connections for leaks with a soap-water solution.
All piping must be leak free.
Flexible expansion joints must be placed within 36
inches of the compressor to help compensate for
expansion/contraction of the pipes, as well as isolate
the vibration of the compressor from the rigid piping.
All piping must be adequately supported to ensure no
piping loads are placed upon the compressor (see
Figure 5). Failure to do so may cause a dangerous
break in the rigid pipe caused by vibration in the
piping.
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
Figure 5: Piping Connections
All piping must be compatible with the gas being
compresssed, and must be rated above the working
pressure of the system.
RECEIVERS
Ambient Air Compressors - In general, larger
receivers give better service from a compressor.
Ideally, the receiver should be large enough so that
the compressor will run long enough to reach normal
operating temperatures before shutting down. Table
1 is offered as a guideline for sizing the air tank for
an air compressor: The following formulas may also
be applied, where Start-Stop Operation is defined as
any operation with more than six (6) starts/stops per
hour:
LOAD / UNLOAD OPERATION:
Tank size (gal) = Compressor CFM*1.5
START-STOP OPERATION:
Tank size (gal) = Compressor CFM*3.0
Air Boosters and Gas Compressors - Reciprocating
compressors create pressure pulsation of both the
inlet and discharge gas streams. To minimize the
effects of pulsation phenomena Hycomp air boosters
and gas compressors operate best with both an
upstream pulsation tank (sometimes called a buffer
or inlet receiver tank) and a discharge receiver tank.
Compressor
Horsepower
1-3
5-15
20-50
Receiver size
Gallons / HP
20-40
15-20
8-12
Table 1: Receiver Sizing for Ambient Air
Compressors
11
Discharge receiver tanks must be separated from
the compressor with a check valve to prevent
high pressure gas from flowing back into the
compressor and suction side when shut down.
Consult your local supplier for check valve application
advice.
Receivers should be sized as follows:
MINIMUM INLET RECEIVER SIZE:
Tank size (gal) = Compressor SCFM
MINIMUM DISCHARGE RECEIVER SIZE:
Tank size (gal) = 2 X Compressor SCFM
For example, a 97 scfm air booster compressor would
require a minimum 120 gallon inlet receiver, and a
minimum 200 gallon discharge receiver. Whether for
inlet or discharge, a larger receiver is always better.
COMPRESSOR COOLING
Air Cooling - The Hycomp air cooled compressor
relies on convection air current to dissipate heat from
the compression cylinder and head. Normal operating
temperatures must not exceed 340°F. Installation in
a shaded or cool indoor area with air movement is
preferred. Installation in direct sunlight can result in
higher than normal operating temperatures and should
be avoided. For continuously operating compressors,
a fan directed to move air across the cylinder and head
can be used to lower operating temperatures, decrease
maintenance, and increase compressor life. Keep
the cylinder and head clean and free from dust and
debris to help maximize heat dissipation. Air cooled
intercoolers and aftercoolers are generally located in
close proximity to the flywheel, which is designed to
move air in the direction of the compressor crankcase.
The cooler fins must also be kept clean. Check the
fasteners securing the cooler mounts, as they are often
subject to loosening due to vibration.
Water Cooling - The Hycomp water cooled compressor
relies on circulating liquid coolant (water or other)
through the cylinder, head and heat exchangers to
dissipate heat. Coolant piping must be secure and
connected to and from the compressor components
with braided steel flex hose to isolate piping from
vibration.
Water quality should be maintained by a minimum 40
mesh strainer on the inlet to the compressor. Water
velocity should not exceed 15 ft/s. Additional water
quality guidelines are outlined in Table 2.
Water flow should be opposite to the direction of
gas flow, and must be throttled to obtain a maximum
12
Appearance
Smell
Bacteria
Content of Impurities
Dissolved Solids
pH
Total Hardness
Sulfides
Sulfur Dioxide
Chlorites
Free Chlorine
Nitrate
Nitrite
Ammonium
Clear
No Smell
Must be
Bacteriologically Safe
Free of Sediments/
Particles
<150 ppm
7 - 8.5
<100 ppm CaCO3
<1 ppm
<50 ppm
<5 ppm
<0.5 ppm
<100 ppm
None
<2 ppm
Table 2: Water Quality Guidelines
discharge water temperature of 125°F to 150°F. It is
important the discharge water temperature be maintained at least 25°F above the maximum inlet air or
gas temperature. If the discharge water is allowed to
cool much below 25°F above inlet gas temperature,
condensation may form in the cylinder and head,
leading to possible corrosion problems downstream.
Generally, a good approximation of cooling water requirements is 1 GPM of 70°F water per 5 HP (i.e. a 20
HP compressor should require approximately 4 GPM
of cooling water). This gives an approximate 20°F rise
in the water temperature through the compressor.
A visual flow indicating device is highly recommended
at one or more locations on the coolant inlet and/or
discharge lines. Check discharge coolant piping
backpressure. Excessive backpressure will result in
the compressor overheating. Compressors exposed
to sub-freezing temperatures must be protected from
damage caused by coolant freezing.
Hycomp recommends the use of the following valves
and devices to regulate cooling water:
Solenoid Shutoff Valve – Solenoid actuated valves
control the flow of water through the compressor
system, preventing flow at start-up, during shutdown,
or between compressor cycle times.
Thermoregulating Valve – Modulating valves regulate
the flow of water to the compressor to maintain a desired
exiting water temperature. They open automatically
when temperature increases at the sensing bulb. No
external power source is required to actuate the valve.
The sensing bulb should be placed in the discharge
water stream, while the main valve body should be
placed in front of the compressor.
Visual Flow Indicator – Flow indicators display to
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
the operator when there is water flow through the
compressor. On large scale water tower systems,
backpressures within the system can prevent water
flow through the compressor, causing overheating and/
or freezing problems. A well monitored flow indicator
can assure the user that water is flowing properly
through the system.
allows the compressor to load and unload based upon
discharge and suction pressures, as well as allowing
the compressor to start and stop unloaded. Even if the
unit does not include a control system from the factory,
many Hycomp compressors have unloader devices
installed. A piping and instrument diagram (P&ID) is
generally including with every Hycomp compressor
system, showing unloader installation
COMPRESSOR CONTROL PANEL
SUCTION VALVE UNLOADING
Suction valve unloaders utilize unloading towers
attached to the compressor cylinder head, and a
three way valve to supply air pressure to the unloader
towers to actuate them. The tower forces the suction
valve open, allowing the compressor to unload. The
three-way valve supplies gas pressure to the unloader
towers, or dumps that pressure out of the unloader
towers.
Your Hycomp compressor may be provided with a
factory installed compressor control panel. Optional
accessories specific to the control application
requirements may also be included. A Hycomp
compressor control system electrical schematic is
included, if applicable, as well as a basic piping and
instrument diagram (P&ID) for reference by installation
and operations personnel. Instructions specific to each
unique configuration of control system is provided with
the compressor. Components generally common to
many forms of compressor control schemes require
installation as follows:
Control Panel Enclosure – The enclosure must be of
appropriate NEMA rating for the application. Observe
all enclosure warnings when dealing with the enclosure
and its contents. Follow proper UL, NEMA, and NEC
codes when penetrating or installing the enclosure.
Motor Starter – The motor starter must have
appropriate electrical service brought to it by a qualified
electrician. Hycomp control panels list the electrical
service required on a sticker near the starter.
Gas Pressure Transducers – Generally located in
the control panel, these are used to provide control
feedback to maintain pressure setpoints. Gas pressure
sensing lines of appropriate pressure rating must be
plumbed to the transducer from an appropriate point
of origin. Use minimum 3/8” tubing. The transducers
must be plumbed to a NON-PULSING source to
prevent false readings. Ideally, the point of origin
will be the inlet and discharge receivers. It is NOT
ACCEPTABLE to plumb these transducers to the
compressor inlet and discharge piping, as the gas in
this piping pulses.
Unloader Device – The Hycomp control system
generally includes an unloader device to allow loading
and unloading of the compressor system. See the next
section for unloader methods and proper installation
of the device.
UNLOADER CONTROLS
Hycomp compressors are often supplied with an
unloading device of some type. This unloading device
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
Unloader Tower – Provided on all pressure lubricated
Hycomp model ambient air compressors and provided
on some air booster and gas compressors. If the
unit unloads via Suction Valve Unloading, this item is
included. Located on the inlet valve covers, the tower
provides the mechanical motion (pneumatically driven
via a diaphragm) to physically open the inlet valve(s).
One, two, or four towers are employed depending
upon the model of compressor. This tower must be
supplied with gas pressure to operate the suction valve
unloaders. The unloader gas pressure must exceed
the inlet pressure by a minimum of 30 psig in order for
the unloader mechanism to operate effectively. If the
unit comes with an unloading valve of some type, the
plumbing from the valve to the towers is done at the
factory. If no unloading valve device is present, use a
minimum of 1/4” tube of appropriate pressure rating, to
supply unloading gas/air to the unloader towers.
Three-Way Unloader Control Solenoid Valve
– Provided on air boosters and gas compressors with
suction valve unloading (see Figure 6). The three way
unloader control solenoid receives an electrical signal
from a pressure switch to engage or release (load
or unload the compressor). The valve is designed
so that if electrical power is lost or the solenoid fails,
the valve will unload the compressor. There are
three gas ports on the unloader valve, as well as an
electrical connection. Port # 1 is the vent port. Port
# 2 is connected to the Unloader Towers or 3-Way
Check Valve. Port #3 is connected to the unloader
pressure source. If the port configuration is different
than that listed above, it will be noted on the Piping
and Instrumentation Diagram.
If the unloader gas is air or a non-contaminating gas,
the solenoid can vent (Port #1) the gas to atmosphere.
If the unloading gas is a contaminating gas that cannot
be vented to atmosphere, then the solenoid must vent
13
To Unloader
Pressure
Source
#3
#2
#1
Vent (to Atmosphere
or Compressor Inlet)
Port #3 - to Unloader
Pressure Source
Unloader
Tower
Port #2 to Towers
Inlet Shutoff
Solenoid Valve,
wired and plumbed
to compressor,
requiring plumbing
to inlet gas piping
Port #1 - to vent
Figure 7: Inlet Shutoff Solenoid Valve
Unloading
Figure 6: Three Way Unloader Solenoid
Valve Plumbing
this gas to the booster compressor suction line, or a
safe location. If this valve is part of a factory assembled
controls system, this port will be pre-plumbed or tagged
with piping instructions.
Port # 2 must be plumbed to the unloader towers. If
included as part of a Hycomp controls package, the
unloader valve (Port #2) is already plumbed.
Port #3 must be connected to the gas source that
provides pressure for unloading. Use a minimum 3/8”
line to connect this port to the pressure source. If part
of a Hycomp controls package, this port may already be
plumbed to a ‘Tee’ connected to the discharge pressure
sensor, so only one line needs to be brought back to
the unloader valve/pressure switch.
The Three-Way Unloading Solenoid Valve requires
an electrical signal (check the side of the solenoid for
the voltage requirement - usually either 120 VAC or
24 VDC) to operate. When power is applied to the
solenoid, it will cause the compressor to load. When
power is removed from the solenoid, it will cause the
14
Actuated Inlet Ball Valve. This valve is wired and plumbed
to the compressor inlet, but still requires plumbing to gas
inlet piping, and a pneumatic pressure source.
Figure 8: Actuated Inlet Ball Valve
Unloading
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
compressor to unload.
INLET SHUTOFF VALVE UNLOADING - This
unloading method utilizes an actuated valve to close
off inlet flow to the compressor, thereby preventing
the compressor from loading. The actuated valve is
either a direct acting electrical solenoid valve, or an
actuated ball valve that uses a three way solenoid valve
to pneumatically operate a ball valve.
Solenoid Valve - A direct acting inlet solenoid shutoff
valve requires very simple wiring/plumbing (see
Figure 7). The valve is a Normally Closed type valve
(compressor is unloaded), that requires an electrical
signal to open (compressor is loaded). Check the side
of the solenoid for the voltage requirement - usually
either 120 VAC or 24 VDC. The Inlet Solenoid is
plumbed between the inlet gas piping and the inlet
to the compressor. The inlet solenoid is specially
sized for the pulsing flow requirements of a booster
compressor.
Actuated Ball Valve - The actuated ball valve type of
inlet shutoff valve requires both an electrical signal to
operate, as well as a pneumatic pressure source of
50-150 psig, unless otherwise indicated on the valve
(see Figure 8). Check the solenoid for the voltage
requirement - usually either 120 VAC or 24 VDC. The
Water Flow
Control Valve
port requiring a pressure source will be labeled as such.
Use a minimum of 3/8” tubing of appropriate pressure
rating to connect to the pressure source. All other ports
will be connected. The valve is set to close (unload
the compressor) when there is no power or unloader
pressure present. When the valve is energized and
has a pneumatic pressure source, the valve will open,
thereby loading the compressor. The actuated valve
is specially sized for the pulsing flow requirements of
a booster compressor.
SAFETY DEVICES
The following devices may be included with your
Hycomp compressor system (see Figure 9). However,
if they are not included, it is required that they be
installed and properly adjusted, prior to operation of
the compressor. Lack of these safety devices will
void the compressor warranty. In addition, damage
to equipment & personnel may occur if these devices
are not properly installed. Additional safety devices
not listed here may be necessary to properly protect
equipment and personnel.
Temperature Sensor – Excessive discharge
temperatures will cause premature failure of compressor
components and will void any factory warranty. All
Pressure
Safety Valves
Discharge Temperature
Sensor
Aftercooler
Flexible
Connection
Water Flow
Control Solenoid
Low Oil Pressure Sensor
Figure 9: Gas Compressors with Multiple Safety Devices
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
15
Gas
Packing
Case
Vent/Purge Connection Port
(must be plumbed at installation
for ‘G’ & ‘H’ series boosters)
Crossover pipe
included from factory
Figure 10: Gas Packing Plumbing Requirements for ‘G’ and ‘H’ Series Gas Compressors
compressors must have a temperature shutdown
device placed as near to the compressor discharge
as possible. The device should be set to shutdown
the compressor just above its maximum normal
operating temperature. Elevated temperatures may
be a result from wear and the first signs of valve and
ring failure. Temperature shutdown devices can be
used as a detection method to help prevent unexpected
compressor failures. Discharge temperature fault
setting must NEVER exceed 340° F.
Low Oil Pressure Sensor – While oil pressure loss in
the crankcase is a rare event, it can result in extensive
and costly damage to the compressor. A low oil
pressure sensor set to shut down the compressor at
3-5 PSIG below proper pressure may be installed at
the oil pump to shutdown the compressor in case of
lubrication failure. A 5-10 second delay timer should
be used to lock out the fault at start-up.
Pressure Safety Valve – Pressure safety relief valves
prevent dangerous over-pressurization by relieving
system pressure when compressed air/gas reaches the
maximum operating pressure of the system. Failure to
provide properly sized pressure relief valves can cause
property damage, personal injury, or death. Pressure
safety valves are preset by the manufacturer and the
settings should not be changed by anyone other than
16
the manufacturer or an authorized service facility.
Any line leading to or from a compressor that can be
blocked by a valve or other device, whether during
normal operation or during a failed operation, MUST
be equipped with a safety relief device. The safety
valve must be of a material compatible with the gas
being compressed, and must be able to handle a flow
in excess of the maximum flow of the compressor.
For toxic or flammable gases, the relief valve must
have a plumbed outlet that is piped to a safe release
area (outdoors, flare stack, etc), per local or federal
codes.
PLUMBING OF AIR BOOSTER AND
GAS COMPRESSOR PACKINGS
Hycomp gas compressors utilize piston rod gas
packings to maintain a pressure on the backside of
the compression piston, creating a fully reversing
piston rod load, as well as sealing the gas within the
booster itself.
Hycomp piston rod packings are bidirectional, but must
be properly arranged for specific applications. The
packing set is pinned together to prevent rotation of
individual packings, thereby preventing leakage and
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
excessive wear. The packings include a leaf type
spring that must be on the side of the packing towards
the higher pressure. For elevated inlet pressure
applications, the spring must be above the packing.
For vacuum type applications, the spring must be
below the packing.
More packings generally means tighter gas control. A
vent/purge port between the packings can be used to
add additional gas leakage control.
Three main styles of rod-packing arrangements
are used on Hycomp oil-free air boosters and gas
compressors: the ‘B’ series, used for air and noncontaminant gas boosting; the ‘G’ series, used to
boost most other industrial gases; and the ‘H’ series,
used with gases that require the highest degree of
containment.
To operate effectively, the packing cases must be
properly plumbed (see Figure 10). If your booster
compressor is of the ‘B’ configuration, you do not
need to add any additional plumbing. If your booster
compressor is of the ‘G’ or ‘H’ configuration, you must
add additional piping to vent or purge any gas leakage.
This piping will not be installed from the factory.
The gas vent/purge ports are 1/8” NPT. Hycomp
suggests the use of minimum 1/4” tubing to vent or
purge the ports. Use proper tubing practices for vent/
purge line installations.
Venting - If it is safe to vent the gas to atmosphere, run
a vent line to allow gas to escape to the atmosphere.
Review all federal, local and fire codes to ensure
that venting is a safe option. For instance, venting
nitrogen to the local atmosphere can be dangerous
in small enclosed areas as asphyxiation can occur.
Contact local OSHA representatives for assistance in
determining safety requirements for different gases.
Purging - It may be necessary to purge the packings
with an inert gas like nitrogen. Purging requires a loop,
whereby the purge gas, at pressure, can be routed to
a safe location for disposal of the mix of purge and
process gases.
Padding - A pad gas like nitrogen can be used to
pressurize the packings at a pressure higher than
the suction pressure of the booster compressor. Any
leakage of the pad gas will enter the process gas
stream contaminating the gas stream. However, the
pad gas will prevent the process gas from leaking to
atmosphere. This is often done in situations where
very tight gas control is required. As the pad gas may
leak to local atmosphere, precautions must be taken
to ensure it will not endanger personnel, property, or
equipment. Contact local OSHA representatives for
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
assistance in determining safety requirements for
different gases.
‘B’ SERIES BOOSTERS - The ‘B’ series booster
compressor is designed to compress air or
nonhazardous/non-contaminating gases, as follows
(see Figure 11):
B201 - Two pairs of tangent-tangent segmented
packings per rod, set for suction pressures above
ambient and below 100 psig.
B301 - Three pairs of tangent-tangent segmented
packings per rod, for inlet pressures of 100 psig to
165 psig.
B202 - Two pairs of tangent-tangent segmented
packings per rod, set for suction pressures at or below
ambient.
B302 - Three pairs of tangent-tangent segmented
packings per rod, set for suction pressures at or below
ambient, with tighter leakage control than the B202
arrangement.
Additional ‘B’ style packing arrangements can be
engineered for specialty applications. If your ‘B’ style
compressor does not match to the four listed above,
contact the factory for assistance.
The ‘B’ series of gas packings does not allow for a
vent or purge option. Therefore, there is no protection
if gas escapes past the packings -the gas releases
into the open crosshead piece, and will escape to the
surrounding atmosphere. This may be acceptable for
gases other than air, depending upon the location of the
compressor (indoor/outdoor), how well the compressor
is ventilated with fresh air, and the gas itself. Contact
your local OSHA representative and fire marshall for
assistance in determining safety requirements for all
gases.
Remember: There is no safe gas
other than air!
‘G’ SERIES BOOSTERS - The ‘G’ series booster
compressor is designed to compress standard
industrial gases and allows for venting or purging of
the packings. This gives a much greater degree of
leakage control. In the ‘G’ series, there are two sets
of gas packings, the upper and the lower. The upper
set is used to control the blow-by past the piston
rings. Ideally, little or no gas should escape past
these packings. What gas does leak by the upper set
of packings is trapped in a vented area by the lower
set of packings. The vented area must be piped to
an appropriate location outside for safe release to
atmosphere or it may be purged by an inert gas like dry
nitrogen with the outlet purge mix piped to a suitable
location (i.e. a low pressure flare). An inert gas purge
17
B201 Series:
No. of Packings per Rod:
Pressure Side:
Vents:
Maximum Inlet Pressure:
Minimum Inlet Pressure:
2
Top
Plugged
99 psig
1 psig
B301 Series:
No. of Packings per Rod:3
Pressure Side:
Top
Vents:
Plugged
Maximum Inlet Pressure:
165 psig
Minimum Inlet Pressure:
1 psig
B202 Series:
No. of Packings per Rod:
Pressure Side:
Vents:
Maximum Inlet Pressure:
Minimum Inlet Pressure:
2
Bottom
Plugged
≤ atmospheric
8 psia
B302 Series:
No. of Packings per Rod:3
Pressure Side:
Bottom
Vents:
Plugged
Maximum Inlet Pressure:
≤ atmospheric
Minimum Inlet Pressure:
8 psia
Figure 11: Gas Packing Arrangements for ‘B’ Series Air Boosters and Gas Compressors
18
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
must be at a pressure below the suction pressure and
above local ambient pressure. If the purge gas cannot
meet these pressure requirements, or if it is necessary
to pad the packing at a pressure higher than the inlet
pressure, the packing arrangement must be reversed.
Contact the factory if assistance is required. Three or
more pairs of tangent-tangent segmented packings are
used per rod, as follows (see Figure 12):
chamber (vacuum or high pressure padding) can also
be handled in standard configuration.
For special applications, additional configurations are
available. Contact factory for further configuration
details.
G211/G221 - Three/four packings per rod, with a
purge/vent chamber between the top sets and the
bottom-most set, configured for suction pressures
above ambient. G221 provides more leakage control
than G211.
G321 - Five sets of packings per rod may be used to
increase leakage control, with a purge/vent chamber
between the top three packings and the bottom two
packings. Configured for suction pressures above
ambient. Provides tighter leakage control than G211/
G221 configurations.
G212/G222 - Three/four packings per rod, with a
purge/vent chamber between the top sets and the
bottom-most set, configured for suction pressures
at or below ambient. G222 provides more leakage
control than G212.
G322 - Five sets of packings per rod may be used to
increase leakage control, with a purge/vent chamber
between the top three packings and the bottom two
packings. Configured for suction pressures at or
below ambient. Provides tighter leakage control than
G212/G222 configurations.
FACTORY ASSISTANCE
It cannot be stressed enough that any installation
questions should be referred to the factory. Proper
installation of the compressor will add years to
the life of the compressor and system. Improper
installation can cause future problems that are
expensive and difficult to solve without completely
reinstalling the compressor and may void the
warranty. Call the factory for assistance.
Vacuum applications may plumb the vent/purge line
to the discharge or second stage inlet. Additional ‘G’
style packing arrangements can be engineered for
specialty applications. If your ‘G’ style compressor
does not match to one of those listed above, contact
the factory for assistance.
‘H’ SERIES BOOSTERS - The ‘H’ series compressor is
designed to compress difficult to contain or extremely
toxic or hazardous, industrial gases. Two distinct
isolation chambers provide the maximum leakage
control available. Two pairs of tangent-tangent
packings per rod provide the first isolation of the
process gas. A second plenum chamber is added,
through which purge gas may be run. Three pairs of
tangent-tangent segmented packings per rod with a
purge chamber between the top two and the bottommost packings are located in the bottom of the lower
plenum chamber. This combination of ‘B’ and ‘H’ series
options provides the standard H2211 configuration.
Additional quantities of packings may be added for
tighter control. Application where the suction pressure
is lower than the pressure in the upper vent/purge
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
19
G211 Series:
No. of Packings:
Pressure Side:
Vent Pressure: Maximum Inlet Pressure:
Minimum Inlet Pressure:
2 Upper
1 Lower
Top
≥ Atmospheric
< Suction
99 psig
10 psig
1/8” NPT Vent ports must be plumbed to safe
vent location, purged, or padded.
G221 Series:
No. of Packings:
Pressure Side:
Vent Pressure: Maximum Inlet Pressure:
Minimum Inlet Pressure:
Note:
2 Upper
2 Lower
Top
≥ Atmospheric
< Suction
99 psig
10 psig
Tighter gas control
1/8” NPT Vent ports must be plumbed to safe
vent location, purged, or padded.
G321 Series:
No. of Packings:3 Upper
2 Lower
Pressure Side:
Top
Vent Pressure: ≥ Atmospheric
< Suction
Maximum Inlet Pressure:
165 psig
Minimum Inlet Pressure:
10 psig
Note:
Tightest gas control
1/8” NPT Vent ports must be plumbed to safe
vent location, purged, or padded.
Figure 12: Gas Packing Arrangements for ‘G’ Series Gas Compressors
20
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
G212 Series:
No. of Packings:
Pressure Side:
Vent Pressure: Maximum Inlet Pressure:
Minimum Inlet Pressure:
2 Upper
1 Lower
Bottom
≥ Atmospheric
> Suction
10 psig
0 psig
1/8” NPT Vent ports must be plumbed to safe
vent location, purged, or padded.
G222 Series:
No. of Packings:
Pressure Side:
Vent Pressure: Maximum Inlet Pressure:
Minimum Inlet Pressure:
Note:
2 Upper
2 Lower
Bottom
≥ Atmospheric
> Suction
10 psig
0 psig
Tighter gas control
1/8” NPT Vent ports must be plumbed to safe
vent location, purged, or padded.
G322 Series:
No. of Packings:3 Upper
2 Lower
Pressure Side:
Bottom
Vent Pressure: ≥ Atmospheric
> Suction
Maximum Inlet Pressure:
10 psig
Minimum Inlet Pressure:
0 psig
Note:
Tightest gas control
1/8” NPT Vent ports must be plumbed to safe
vent location, purged, or padded.
Figure 12: Gas Packing Arrangements for ‘G’ Series Gas Compressors (Continued)
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
21
SECTION 2
COMPRESSOR STARTUP
INSTALLATION CHECKLIST - REVIEW BEFORE CONTINUING
q Verify that the actual operating conditions will
match expected conditions.
q Reciprocating
compressors
installed
at
permanent locations must be mounted on a
reinforced concrete foundation (6 bag / 4000
psi mix) weighing at least twice the weight of
the bare compressor. Fill a permanent mounted
baseplate/skid with epoxy grout.
q Allow for 18” of clearance for air circulation and
service access around the compressor.
q Outdoor compressor installations must be
protected from the effects of the environment with
a suitable enclosure or overhead protection.
q A power disconnect for the machine must be
installed as per NEC & local code.
q Check the compressor oil level.
q Lockout/tagout the compressor control panel and
tighten all electrical connections within the control
panel (if provided) before startup. Connections
can come loose during shipping leading to
intermittent faults.
q Bump the compressor and check for proper
rotation (Clockwise viewed from oil pump end).
q Use flexible braided metal hose connections of
proper pressure and temperature rating, to the
compressor and system inlet and discharge ports.
Do not use rubber hose.
q Ensure Gas Packing cases are properly plumbed
to vent/pad/purge locations.
q All Air Booster and Gas Compressors must have
an inlet receiver sized per Hycomp installation
manual. Ensure that inlet and discharge receiver
tanks are secured and bolted down.
receiver inlet to protect the booster from system
contamination. Filter should be 1 micron or better,
sized for minimal pressure drop.
q Ambient Air Compressors must have an inlet filter
installed.
q Ensure properly sized pressure safety valves are
protecting the inlet and discharge piping systems
and are placed between the compressor and any
isolation ball valve, per ASME Code.
q A properly sized check valve must be located in
the discharge line, after the aftercooler.
q Protect personnel from high temperature piping/
tubing by insulating, warning, and/or restricting
access to the machine boundary.
q Instrument lines to control sensors, unloader
controls, etc., must be 3/8” tubing and drawn
from a receiver, not from the compressor inlet/
discharge piping.
q Install an oil seep drain line and container to route
and contain drainage from the crosshead cylinder.
A hose barb is provided for this purpose.
q Double nut, Nyloc nut, or Loctite foundation
bolting. Check all bolting after the first few hours
and days of operation for tightness.
q Compressors are shipped with ISO 68 / SAE
30 weight oil. Refer to installation manual to
ensure this is appropriate for your environmental
conditions.
q Check your system for leaks and fix as required.
Remove all pressure from system and isolate and
drain before attempting fixes.
q Complete the Hycomp Warranty Registration
Card and return it to Hycomp. Call 24/7 with
questions.
q Air Booster and Gas compressors must have
a properly sized filter installed at the suction
22
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
INSPECTION AFTER EXTENDED
STORAGE
If the compressor has been out of service for an
extended length of time, verify that the cylinder bores
and valve pockets are free of rust and other debris.
Inspect the crosshead bores for signs of rust.
Drain the oil from the crankcase and remove the
inspection cover plate. Inspect inside the crankcase
for signs of rust or contamination. Clean and/or
replace parts if they exhibit signs of corrosion. Refill
the crankcase with the proper weight and amount of
oil. Squirt oil onto all bearing areas and ensure all
bearings have fresh oil.
Squirt oil onto the piston rod oil scrapers by removing
the oil scraper cover. Apply enough oil to ensure that
the crosshead cylinder bores receive oil. Remove the
oil scraper case if necessary to ensure oil is applied to
the crosshead bores.
Rotate the unit manually to ensure everything rotates
smoothly and no interference or friction can be felt.
COMPRESSOR SPEED
Ambient
Temperature
Oil Viscosity
0 to 32°F (-18 to 0°C)
32 to 80°F (0 to 27°C)
Above 80°F (>27°C)
SAE 10W / ISO 32
SAE 20W / ISO 46
SAE 30W / ISO 68
Table 3: Oil Viscosity
level gauge located on the oil pump side of the ‘F’ block.
Do not flush the crankcase with solvents, as this will
dilute the oil. All pressure oil lubricated compressors
come standard with a spin-on oil filter. This filter must
be replaced at the same time the oil is changed.
When an alternate oil is required, Hycomp can also
supply HYLUBE, a single viscosity non-detergent R&O
compressor oil, available in several standard viscosities
for different ambient conditions. In this situation, the
oil filter and oil change requirement is 2,000 hours of
run time or 6 months, whichever occurs first.
Oils come in several viscosities suitable for different
operating conditions. See Table 3 for SAE oil
viscosity recommendations and Table 4 for crankcase
capacities.
The lubrication systems of Hycomp model compressors
are designed to operate at speeds of 400 RPM and
above. Do not operate below 400 RPM without
consulting factory.
At ambient temperatures below 0°F (-18°C), a
crankcase heater must be installed. Hycomp
recommends a 70°F (21°C) thermostat setpoint, with
SAE30/ISO68 oil.
Hycomp compressors should not be run at speeds
above 700 RPM without consulting factory. While
these compressors have been operated at speeds in
excess of 700 RPM, reduced volumetric efficiencies
and shortened valve and piston ring life result. Hycomp
recommends keeping compressor speed below the
maximum recommended for optimum service life and
warranty compliance.
NOTE: DO NOT MIX SYNTHETIC OIL WITH
TRADITIONAL COMPRESSOR OIL.
CRANKCASE LUBRICATION
Hycomp compressors ship with HYSYN SAE 30/ISO
68 synthetic compressor oil in the crankcase, unless
otherwise requested. All Hycomp compressor models
have fully pressurized crankcase lubrication system
fed by a gerotor type constant pressure oil pump,
with the exception of the ‘A’ block compressors which
are splash lubricated. With the HySyn, oil change
requirements are every 8,000 hours of run time or
12 months, whichever occurs first. In any case, oil
should be changed whenever the oil becomes visibly
contaminated. Check oil level weekly on continuous
run units. Oil level should be maintained between the
two marks on the oil dip stick located on the side of
the running gear or a small air bubble on top of the oil
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
Suitable oils for use in Hycomp compressors
include:
HYSYN synthetic compressor oil (8000 hr)
No direct replacements available
HYLUBE compressor oil (2000 hr)
Conoco Multipurpose R&O
Exxon/Mobil Rarus 427
Chevron Machine Oil R&O
Shell Turbo Oils T
Block
Quarts
A
B
C
D, G
E, H
F
V
7/8
1-1/2
2
6
7
10
10
Table 4: Oil Capacity by Block
23
‘F’ Blocks Built Prior to 2009 - Oil pressure regulation
on ‘F’ block models built prior to 1/1/09 is factory
set. Adjustment on ‘F’ blocks built prior to 2009 is
accomplished by removing the oil pump and changing
the number of valve discs under the oil pressure
relief spring. Adding more valve discs will increase
pressure, while removing valve discs will decrease
pressure. Each valve disc changes the oil pressure
by approximately 2.5 PSIG.
‘F’ Blocks Made After 1/1/09 - The oil pressure can
be changed using the adjusting screw, see Figure 13.
Set the oil pressure to 45 - 50 PSIG with compressor
at normal operating temperature.
V-BELT TENSION AND ALIGNMENT
SETTINGS
Oil Pressure
Adjusting
Screw
Improper pulley alignment and belt tension will cause
motor overload, excessive vibration, and premature
belt and bearing failure. The belt must be routinely
inspected for cracks, burns, frays, or any unusual wear
and replaced if necessary. Routinely check the motor
sheave and compressor flywheel for oil, grease, or
burrs. Clean or replace when necessary. Make sure
all mountings are securely fastened. The drive belt
grooves of the sheave and flywheel must line up with
each other. The motor drive shaft must be parallel
to the compressor crankshaft. Hycomp recommends
banded belts rather than multiple individual belts.
‘F’ Block- as of 1/1/09
Figure 13: Oil Pump - ‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’, ‘E’, ‘F’,
‘G’, ‘H’, and ‘V’ Blocks (Including ‘F’ Blocks
as of 1/1/09)
OIL PRESSURE REGULATION
Oil pressure regulation on ‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’, ‘E’, ‘F’, ‘G’,
‘H’ (including ‘F’ blocks as of 1/1/09) and ‘V’ blocks
is accomplished by an adjustable, spring loaded
valve located in the bearing carrier on the end of
the compressor opposite the flywheel. Pressure
is controlled by an adjusting screw and lock nut.
Adjustment must be made while the compressor is
running.
For ‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’, ‘E’, ‘G’ and ‘H’ Blocks - Increase
in pressure is accomplished by a clockwise rotation
of the adjusting screw. Set the oil pressure to 1822 PSIG with the compressor at normal operating
temperature.
24
Angular Misalignment - The motor shaft and
Compressor crankshaft are not parallel. This is typically
due to an alignment error at motor or motor adjusting
base. Correct alignment by shifting the motor to bring
the motor shaft parallel with the crankshaft. (See
Figure 15.)
Parallel Misalignment - The sheave is not properly
located on the motor shaft. This is typically caused
by improper location of the motor drive sheave on
the motor shaft. Loosen and reposition sheave until
properly aligned with flywheel. (See Figure 14.)
Figure 14: Misalignment
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
Figure 16: V-Belt Deflection Measurement
Figure 15: Alignment Evaluation
Sheave Wobbling on Shaft - Sheave or bushing not
installed on motor shaft correctly.
Note: Sheave alignment can be checked by using
several methods. Alignment on v-belt drives
should be less than 1/2˚ or 1/10” per foot of center
to center distance.
Straight Edge Method - This method can be used to
align the motor sheave and compressor flywheel.
1. Confirm that the compressor, motor and motor mount
are squared up with the skid face and all mounting
bolts are secure.
2. Install bushing and sheave on the motor shaft.
3. Place the belt(s) on the motor sheave and
compressor flywheel and temporarily tighten belt by
adjusting the motor base mount. Note: Banded v-belts
may need to be installed at the same time as the motor
sheave for ease of assembly.
4. Place a straight edge across the face of the
compressor flywheel, spanning the motor sheave. An
angular misalignment will be observed as an angle
between the straight edge and the face of the motor
sheave. A parallel misalignment will be observed as an
offset between the center line of a belt on the flywheel
and motor sheave. Resolve angular misalignment
prior to making corrections in parallel misalignment,
as angular corrections require repositioning of the
motor.
Alignment Evaluation - (See Figure 15.)
Angular Alignment: Place a straight edge across the
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
compressor flywheel with the loose end of the straight
edge not in contact with the motor sheave. Observe
alignment of the face of the motor sheave with the line
of the straight edge. Adjustment of the motor and/or
mounting base will be required to correct angular
alignment.
Parallel Alignment - Place a straight edge across
the compressor flywheel with the loose end of the
straight edge not in contact with the motor sheave.
Place a straight edge across the compressor flywheel
with the loose end of the straight edge not in contact
with the motor sheave. Measure from straight edge to
a marked reference point on the belt at the flywheel.
Rotate belt to shift the marked reference point at the
motor sheave. Adjust sheave on motor shaft to obtain
equal measurements.
The belt can now be tightened via the motor base,
refer to specific v-belt manufacturer tension ratings. An
example of deflection force tensioning follows:
Measure span length (t). See Figure 16.
Use an appropriate sized v-belt tension gauge, on
the scale reading “Deflection Inches”, set the O-ring
to show a deflection of 1/64” per inch of span length
(t). For example a span length of 32” will require a
deflection of 32/64” or 1/2”. (See Figure 17.)
Small O-Ring
Plunger with
Deflection Force
Scale (lbs)
Body with Deflection
Scale (in)
Large
O-Ring
Figure 17: V-Belt Tension Gauge
25
V-Belt
Cross
Section
2B
3B
Figure 18: Tension Gauge Example
At the center of the span (t), apply force using the
tension tester perpendicular to the span. For banded
belts, place a piece of steel or angle iron across the
band width and deflect the entire width of the band
evenly.
Use the straight edge placed across the sheave and
flywheel above the belt to establish a reference line.
Deflect the belt until the bottom edge of the lower o-ring
is at the correct deflection distance. Find the deflection
force on the upper scale of the tension tester. The
sliding rubber O-ring will move up the scale as the
tester is compressed. See Figure 18.
Compare the deflection force with the range of forces
recommended. See Table 5. If less than minimum the
belt should be tightened. Note: There normally will be
a rapid drop in tension during the run in period and the
belt must be inspected periodically to ensure the belt
tension is within the specified range.
For example if you have a 4B belt with a motor sheave
of 5.4” diameter and a span of 32”, you would deflect
the belt 32/64” (1/2”) from the reference line. At
that amount of deflection the force applied should
be 36.4 lbs. max. With new belts, start near the
maximum deflection force value and check the tension
periodically during the first 24 to 48 hours of service
duty. You must adjust to run in the range of 24.8 lbs.
to 36.4 lbs. See Table 5.
Care should be taken during tension adjustments to
assure that the alignment is maintained.
Upon completion of alignment and tension adjustment,
all mounting hardware should be re-checked for proper
tightness.
26
4B
4C
Small
Sheave
Diameter
Range (in.)
Recommended
Deflection Force (lbs.)
MIN.
MAX.
4.6
10.2
14.8
5.0 - 5.2
11.6
17
5.4 - 5.6
12.4
18.2
6.0 - 6.8
14.2
20
7.4 - 9.4
16.2
24
4.6
15.3
22.2
5.0 - 5.2
17.4
25.5
5.4 - 5.6
18.6
27.3
6.0 - 6.8
21.3
30
7.4 - 9.4
24.3
36
4.6
20.4
29.6
5.0 - 5.2
23.2
34
5.4 - 5.6
24.8
36.4
6.0 - 6.8
28.4
40
7.4 - 9.4
32.4
48
7.0
36.4
52
7.5
38.8
56
8.0 - 8.5
44
64
9.0 - 10.5
48
72
11.0 - 16.0
56
84
Table 5: Typical V-Belt Deflection Forces
CONTROL PANELS
Most Hycomp packages are supplied with a proprietary
control panel; this panel contains the electric and
electronic components used to control the package or
system. Hycomp supplies only high quality components,
they are reliable and robust, however because of the
delicate nature of any electronic component great
care must be taken to keep the control panel and its
internal components free of debris, dust and moisture.
(See Figure 19.)
Human Machine Interface (HMI) – Your control panel
may be supplied with an HMI, this is the display on
the outside of the panel used to monitor and control
the functions of your Hycomp system. See Figures
20 and 21.
Hycomp engineers packages and systems to specific
customer needs, please refer to your control panel
manual for your Hycomp system, and HMI model
for specific information. Some
���������������������������
of the user functions
displayed on the HMI may include the following
information, depending on application.
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
Real time unit run conditions.
PLC
Real time pressures and temperatures.
Discharge Temperature
Interstage Temperature (if applicable)
Discharge Pressure
Interstage Pressure (if applicable)
Suction Pressure
Oil Pressure
Relays
Circuit
Breakers
Unit load and unload status.
Unit enabled/disabled.
Unit standby and run conditions.
Active and historic alarms.
Active and historic faults.
Pressure and temperature set point adjustments.
Fault and alarm set points.
Timing set points.
Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) – If your
Hycomp system is supplied with a Hycomp factory
control panel it will contain a PLC. This acts as the
“brain” of the system; it contains proprietary software
and programming specific to your Hycomp unit. The
HMI is the interface to the PLC to input user options,
acknowledge and clear alarms or faults, and monitor
the run conditions of your Hycomp system. Refer to
your specific Hycomp control panel manual for further
information.
Note: The PLC and HMI are not field serviceable,
please contact Hycomp factory support with any
questions or issues.
Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD) – If your
Hycomp system was provided with a Hycomp factory
controls panel it will have calibrated RTD(s). This
device is used to monitor temperature at various points
on the Hycomp unit including discharge temperature
and interstage temperature. Note: Your Hycomp
compressor or booster must not exceed 340 F
under any circumstance, exceeding this will cause
rapid failure of your Hycomp unit!
The RTD uses resistance to read temperature and
transmits that resistance to the PLC where it will be
converted to F (Fahrenheit) or C (Celsius). Note: Do
not modify the wires on the RTD, doing so will
change the calibrated resistance of the RTD and it
will no longer accurately read temperature.
Pressure Transducer - If your Hycomp system was
provided with a Hycomp factory control panel, it will
have pressure range specific transducers. These are
used to monitor system pressures at certain points,
examples of these points include suction pressure,
discharge pressure, interstage pressure (if applicable),
and oil pressure.
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
DC Power
Supply
Pressure
Transducers
Transformer
Figure 19: Control Panel and Parts
The transducer sends a signal in millivolts to the
PLC where it is converted into PSIG, PSIA, Bar, kPa
depending on your specific requirements. Note: Only
use Hycomp supplied transducers, a transducer
with the incorrect range can damage your Hycomp
unit. Never offset or scale a transducer without first
contacting Hycomp factory service for advice.
Motor Contact and Overload Protection – If your
Hycomp system was provided with a Hycomp factory
controls panel it will have a motor contact and overload
protection (motor starter). This device is what starts
and powers the drive motor on your Hycomp system,
it is controlled by the PLC and a run relay, when the
coil on the contact receives current the coil pulls the
high voltage contact closed and completes the high
voltage circuit to the drive motor. In the event of a motor
high amp draw condition the overload will interrupt
the low voltage to the coil causing the high voltage
contacts to open breaking the high voltage circuit to
the motor; this protects both the motor and Hycomp
compressor or booster. Note: The motor contact is
a high voltage component. Great care and proper
isolation and Lockout/Tagout procedures of
incoming electrical power must be followed before
any service or troubleshooting. Failure to follow
27
Figure 20: HDC1 HMI Screen
Figure 21: HDC2 HMI Screen
proper procedures can result in serious injury or
Death.
breakers should not be used as positive electrical
isolation when servicing components on the
circuit, please follow proper isolation and Lockout/
Tagout procedures. Failure to do so could result
in serious injury or death.
Transformer – If your Hycomp system was provided
with a Hycomp factory controls panel it may have a
transformer, this device “steps down” high voltage to
low voltage used to power low voltage components
in the panel.
Relays – If your Hycomp system was provided with
a Hycomp factory controls panel it will have relays,
these take a signal from the PLC and relay power to
a specific system control component, some examples
of these relays might include the following:
“RR” or run relay sends current to the motor contact
coil.
Caution: The control panel summary only applies
to Hycomp factory supplied controls. Any user
supplied control is not the responsibility of
Hycomp and any damage to the Hycomp booster or
compressor is not the responsibility of Hycomp.
Caution: Refer to the Hycomp supplied Control
Panel Manual for complete information regarding
the details of your system.
“LR” or load relay controls the load/unload
mechanism.
“FR” or fault relay, this can also be used as a user
defined fault in some applications, please contact
Hycomp factory support for details on your specific
unit.
Other relays may be used in specific applications,
please refer to your factory supplied electrical drawings
or contact Hycomp factory support for advice.
DC Power Supply – If your Hycomp system was
provided with a Hycomp factory controls panel it will
have a DC power supply, this is used to convert AC
current to DC current for the transducers and other DC
powered components.
Circuit Breakers – If your Hycomp system was
provided with a Hycomp factory controls panel it
will have circuit breakers, these are used to protect
components downstream of the breaker in the event
of a short or high amp draw. Note: Panel circuit
28
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
PRE-STARTUP CHECKLIST
WARNING: Failure to perform the pre-start-up
checklist may result in mechanical failure, property
damage, serious personal injury, or even death.
Steps 1-14 must be performed prior to connecting
the unit to a power source.
1.
Become familiar with the function of all piping
associated with the compressor. Know the use
of each line, valve and control device!
2.
Verify that actual operating conditions will match
conditions the unit was originally designed for.
If conditions do not match, contact your local
representative or the factory.
3
Remove all tools from the compressor and check
for installation debris. Loose tools/debris may
be thrown upon start-up and injure personnel.
4.
Check motor pulley and compressor sheaves for
alignment and proper belt tension. Typically 1/4”
to 3/8” belt deflection is acceptable. Contact the
belt manufacturer for more details.
5.
Manually rotate compressor sheave through
several full rotations to be sure there is no
mechanical interference felt.
6.
Check inlet piping installation and all pressure
connections for tightness.
7.
Make sure all pressure relief valves are properly
installed and free to operate.
8.
Be sure all belt guards are in place and
secure.
9.
Check fuses, circuit breakers and thermal
overloads for proper sizing.
10.
Open all manual shut-off valves downstream of
the compressor discharge.
11.
Fill water cooling system (if applicable), and
check for leaks. Purge of air.
12.
Check oil levels in crankcase. If low, fill with
a high quality non-detergent oil of the proper
viscosity.
13.
Check for loose connections or loose
fasteners.
14.
DOUBLE CHECK ALL THE ABOVE!
15.
Connect unit to a proper power source.
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
INITIAL STARTUP AND
OPERATION (AMBIENT AIR
COMPRESSORS)
Ambient Air Compressors are compressors whose inlet
source is the ambient air surrounding the compressor.
All air compressors are broken in and tested at the
factory prior to shipment. In most cases, it is not
necessary to perform any special start-up procedures
on a new compressor. Occasionally the unit may
need an extended amount of ‘break-in’ time to seat
the piston rings and create proper wear patterns.
Units that have been in storage for an extended
length of time may require special attention. Refer to
sections in this manual on Inspection After Extended
Storage, and Compressor Storage, or contact the local
representative or the factory.
With the pre-start-up checklist completed and satisfied,
turn the compressor on briefly (1-2 seconds) to check
the direction of rotation. Be sure it agrees with the
rotation arrow embossed on the compressor sheave
(counterclockwise when viewed from the flywheel side
of the compressor). If the compressor is not turning in
the proper direction, it will not achieve oil pressure and
will shut down. Fix the problem before re-starting.
Start the compressor. Watch and listen for excessive
vibration and strange noises. If either exist, stop the
compressor immediately.
Watch the oil pressure gauge to be sure the oil
pressure is adequate. Oil pressure should rise to
working pressure within 10-15 seconds. If there is
a question about oil pressure, stop the compressor
and investigate. Refer to Section 4, “Maintenance
and Troubleshooting” for assistance if operation is
not normal.
Check the air receiver pressure gauge or system
pressure gauges for proper readings. If inadequate
or excessive air pressure conditions occur, shutdown
the compressor.
Observe the compressor operation closely for the first
hour of operation and then frequently (every 1/2 hour)
for the next seven hours. As the compressor comes
to normal operating conditions, temperature distortion
may cause changes in the operating parameters,
excessive vibration or previously unnoticed noises.
THIS IS NOT NORMAL. Shutdown the compressor
and investigate the problem.
Test each shutdown device, unloader device, dump
valve and safety valve. Record the actual setpoints
and adjust as necessary.
After the first eight hours of operation, the compressor
29
should be monitored at least once every 6-8 hours.
After two days of operation, check the belt tension, oil
level and inspect for leaks.
On new and newly rebuilt units, the valve hold-down
screws, valve cover bolts and cylinder head bolts must
be re-torqued after 8 and 36 hours of running time.
Also check all mounting bolts, flywheel bolts, etc. The
standard two day check period should be used after this
initial run-time. Units run in extreme environments and
air temperature ranges may require special attention.
Expansion and contraction of parts due to the unit
warming up from lower temperatures may cause bolts
and screws to loosen at an accelerated rate.
INITIAL STARTUP AND
OPERATION (AIR BOOSTERS AND
GAS COMPRESSORS)
Air Boosters - these are compressors that compress
air that is taken from a source other than the ambient
air. Generally the inlet air source is at an elevated
pressure, but vacuum applications can also be
accomplished The inlet air is usually taken from
customer’s existing plant air system.
Gas Compressors - These are compressors pumping
any gas other than air.
All air boosters and gas compressors are broken in
and tested at the factory prior to shipment. In most
cases, it is not necessary to perform any special
start-up procedures on a new unit. Occasionally it
may need an extended amount of ‘break-in’ time to
seat the piston rings and create proper wear patterns.
Units that have been in storage for an extended
length of time may require special attention. Refer to
sections in this manual on Inspection After Extended
Storate, and Compressor Storage, or contact the local
representative or the factory.
With the pre-start-up checklist completed and satisfied,
turn the compressor on briefly (1-2 seconds) to check
the direction of rotation. Be sure it agrees with the
rotation arrow embossed on the compressor sheave
(counterclockwise when viewed from the flywheel side
of the compressor). If the compressor is not turning in
the proper direction, it will not achieve oil pressure and
will shut down. Fix the problem before re-starting.
Start the compressor. Watch and listen for excessive
vibration and strange noises. If either exist, stop the
compressor immediately.
Watch the oil pressure gauge to be sure the oil
pressure is adequate. Oil pressure should rise to
working pressure within 10-15 seconds. If there is a
30
question about oil pressure, stop the compressor and
investigate. Refer to the Section titled “Maintenance
and Troubleshooting” for assistance if operation is not
normal.
Check the pressure gauges or system pressure
gauges for proper readings. If inadequate or excessive
pressure conditions occur shutdown the compressor.
Design conditions must be met before the compressor
will operate properly
Observe the compressor operation closely for the first
hour of operation and then frequently (every 1/2 hour)
for the next seven hours. As the compressor reaches
normal operating conditions, temperature distortion
may cause changes in the operating parameters,
excessive vibration or previously unnoticed noises.
THIS IS NOT NORMAL. Shutdown the compressor
and investigate the problem.
After the first eight hours of operation, the compressor
should be monitored at least once every 6-8 hours.
After two days of operation, check the belt tension, oil
level and inspect for leaks.
Test each shutdown device, unloader device, dump
valve and safety valve. Record the actual setpoints
and adjust as necessary.
On new and newly rebuilt units, the valve hold-down
screws, valve cover bolts and cylinder head bolts must
be re-torqued after 8 and 36 hours of running time.
Also check all mounting bolts, flywheel bolts, etc. The
standard two day check period should be used after this
initial run-time. Units run in extreme environments and
air temperature ranges may require special attention.
Expansion and contraction of parts due to the unit
warming up from lower temperatures may cause bolts
and screws to loosen at an accelerated rate.
Gas packings require a period of run-time to seat in, as
do piston rings depending upon running conditions. All
Hycomp compressors have been tested at the factory
for a minimum of four hours, but more time may be
needed to fully break in the packings and rings into their
wear patterns. When gas packings are pressurized
under static (unloaded/idle) conditions there will be an
audible minor leakage sound.
At initial start-up, and any time after replacement of
the packings and/or rings, the compressor must be
closely monitored for leakage past the packings. If
leakage occurs in amounts beyond safe limits, then the
compressor must be broken in with a gas that can be
released to the local atmosphere like air, or nitrogen if
it acceptable to release it locally.
If a break-in period is required, the compressor must
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
be completely isolated from the supply gas. If the
air or nitrogen break-in gas will adversely affect the
downstream system, it too must be isolated.
Since all industrial gases are dangerous to human
life, it must be ensured that there are no leaks in the
system that would compromise the safety of personnel
or property.
Leak detection may be accomplished with a ‘bubble
test’ or an electronic sniffer that determines the amount
of the gas in the surrounding air.
Any leaks that are found must be fixed at once, before
standard operation of the compressor is resumed.
DAILY STARTUP CHECKLIST
1.
Check the oil level in the crankcase.
2.
Drain liquid from the air receiver and moisture
traps (if equipped).
3.
Turn on cooling water (if not regulated by the
system).
4.
Start compressor per previous section.
5.
Check system pressure.
6.
Check oil pressure.
7.
Check relief valves for proper operation.
8 .
Check control system for proper operation.
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
31
SECTION 3
MAINTENANCE AND TROUBLESHOOTING
NOTICE: Hycomp compressor service and
maintenance shall only be performed by qualified
technicians. Service and maintenance shall
conform to all applicable local and national
regulations and safety standards
WARNING: Never assume a compressor is safe to
work on just because it is not operating. It could
restart at any time. The following procedures
should be used when stopping to maintain or
service a compressor.
1.
Per OSHA regulation 1910.147: The Control
of Hazardous Energy Sources (lockout/tagout),
disconnect and lockout the main power source.
Display a sign in clear view at the main power
switch stating that the compressor is being
serviced.
2.
Isolate the compressor from the compressed air/
gas supply by closing any manual shut-off valves
upstream and downstream from the compressor.
Display signs in clear view at the shut-off valves
stating that the compressor is being serviced.
3.
Lock open a pressure relief valve within the
pressurized system to allow the system to
completely depressurize.
4.
Shut off the cooling water supply (where
applicable).
5.
Open all drain valves within the area to be
serviced.
6.
Wait for the unit to cool before servicing.
Temperatures above 120°F can cause burns to
the skin.
MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE
(AMBIENT AIR COMPRESSORS)
To insure maximum performance and service life of
your compressor, a routine preventive maintenance
schedule should be developed and followed. Table
6 contains a maintenance/inspection schedule for
compressors housed within a weather proof building,
with relatively clean ambient air and 75°F ambient
temperatures, running 8 hours per day. Time frames
may need to be shortened in harsher environments. A
32
general PM Schedule is included in every parts book,
to assist with ordering of parts.
Contact the factory or your closest authorized Hycomp
dealer for questions about designing a maintenance
schedule to fit requirements differing from the listed
conditions. Reasonable judgement in the frequency
of maintenance and the stocking of spares must be
exercised by the customer. Facilities that cannot afford
to be shutdown without excessive costs or hardships
must provide a more rigorous schedule and larger
quantity of spares than facilities that can do without
the compressor for a short period of time.
MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE
(AIR BOOSTERS & GAS
COMPRESSORS)
To insure maximum performance and service life of
your compressor, a routine preventive maintenance
schedule should be developed and followed. As
gas compressors have the possibility of causing
great damage to personnel and property, a proper
maintenance schedule must be created and rigorously
adhered to. Table 6 contains a maintenance schedule
for compressors housed within a weather proof
building, with relatively clean inlet conditions (no acidic
components, filtered to 0.1 micron) and 75°F ambient
temperatures, running 8 hours per day. Time frames
may need to be shortened in harsher environments.
Contact the factory or your closest authorized Hycomp
dealer for questions about designing a PM schedule
to fit requirements differing from the listed conditions.
Reasonable judgement in the frequency of maintenance
and the stocking of spares must be exercised by the
customer. Facilities that cannot afford to be shutdown
without excessive costs or hardships must provide a
more rigorous schedule and larger quantity of spares
than facilities that can do without the compressor for
a short period of time.
The gas packings need only periodic inspection
once the compressor has been broken in. As the
packings are the heart of the leakage control system,
it is imperative that they not be allowed to deteriorate
beyond reasonable limits. Once the lifetime of the
packings are known in an application, they can be
replaced prior to failure.
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
DAILY
VISUALLY CHECK THE COMPRESSOR
X
CHECK OIL PRESSURE
X
CHECK DISCHARGE PRESSURE
X
DRAIN THE CONDENSATE FROM PIPING
SYSTEM, DRAIN LEGS AND AIR RECEIVER
X
WEEKLY
CHECK FOR OIL IN DISTANCE PIECE
X
CHECK THE CRANKCASE OIL LEVEL
X
CHECK FOR LEAKS IN THE PIPING SYSTEM
X
MONTHLY
MANUALLY OPERATE ALL SAFETY VALVES
X
CLEAN CYLINDER, INTERCOOLER AND
AFTERCOOLER COOLING SURFACES
X
CHECK V-BELT TENSION
X
BIANNUALLY
REPLACE INTAKE FILTER ELEMENT
X
CHANGE OIL AND OIL FILTER *
X
INSPECT VALVES, REPLACE GASKETS ON
REASSEMBLY
X
INSPECT UNLOADER DIAPHRAGMS/PISTONS
X
INSPECT ALL CONTROL SWITCHES
X
ANNUALLY
INSPECT MOTOR STARTER CONTACTS
X
LUBRICATE MOTOR BEARINGS IN ACCORDANCE WITH MANUFACTURER’S RECOMMENDATIONS**
X
REPLACE RINGS, VALVES, PACKINGS (not on
Ambient Air Compressors), OIL SCRAPERS
X
* OIL AND FILTER SHOULD BE CHANGED EVERY 2,000 HOURS OR 6 MONTHS, WHICHEVER OCCURS FIRST. UNITS WITHOUT AN
OIL FILTER SHOULD BE CHANGED EVERY 1,000 HOURS OR 6 MONTHS, WHICHEVER OCCURS FIRST.
** Humid climates and certain operating conditions can cause moisture to be drawn into the motor. THE
MOTOR SHOULD BE RUN ON A CLEAR DAY WITHOUT THE V-BELTS FOR AT LEAST AN HOUR. DURING THIS TIME THE MOTOR
SHOULD HEAT UP ENOUGH TO VAPORIZE THE MOISTURE WITHIN THE MOTOR.
Table 6: Maintenance Schedule
TROUBLESHOOTING
Find the section describing the general problem
exhibited, then check the probable cause.
WARNING: The compressor MUST be locked out
from all energy sources prior to inspection, and
all pressure MUST be relieved from unit to prevent
unexpected release.
If it is not possible to diagnose the cause of the
problem, contact Hycomp or a Hycomp authorized
dealer for assistance. There are times when any compressor, no matter how
well built and how accurately maintained, will exhibit
some trouble. While Hycomp engineers are available
to assist any customer experiencing compressor
difficulties, the following tables are provided to assist
with initial diagnostics.
The only additional problem encountered with the
gas compressors is excess loss of gas through the
packings. Generally the problem is caused by improper
maintenance of the gas packings. However, if the gas
packings have been well maintained, and leaks still
persist, contact the factory.
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
33
INSUFFICIENT AIR PRESSURE OR VOLUME
PROBABLE CAUSE
SUGGESTED REMEDY
AIR LEAKS
LOCATE AIR LEAKS BY SOUND OR SOAP BUBBLE TEST. TIGHTEN OR REPLACE
LEAKING FITTINGS ONLY AFTER REDUCING AIR PRESSURE TO ZERO.
LEAKING VALVES
REMOVE VALVES AND INSPECT FOR DAMAGE TO VALVE SEAT OR VALVE DISC.
REPLACE SUSPECT COMPONENTS AND REINSTALL VALVES USING NEW VALVE
SEAT GASKETS AND COVER GASKETS.
PISTON RING NOT SEALING
REMOVE PISTON RINGS AND CHECK FOR WEAR. IF RING THICKNESS HAS
BEEN REDUCED TO 3/16 INCH OR LESS AT ANY SPOT, THE RINGS SHOULD
BE REPLACED. DO NOT BORE OR HONE THE CYLINDER UNLESS IT IS BADLY
SCORED OR PITTED.
RESTRICTED AIR INLET
REPLACE THE AIR FILTER ELEMENT. CHECK FOR ANY OBSTRUCTIONS IN INLET
AIR PIPING.
BLOWN GASKETS
CHECK CYLINDER HEAD AND VALVE GASKETS - REPLACE AS NECESSARY.
VALVE UNLOADERS NOT
FUNCTIONING PROPERLY
WITH THE COMPRESSOR RUNNING, DISCONNECT THE TUBING TO THE VALVE
UNLOADER ON THE CYLINDER HEAD. IF AIR DOES NOT ESCAPE, BUT THE
COMPRESSOR CONTINUES TO RUN PARTIALLY OR COMPLETELY UNLOADED,
REMOVE THE UNLOADER ASSEMBLIES AND VALVES AND INSPECT. IF AIR DOES
ESCAPE FROM THE DISCONNECTED TUBING WITH THE COMPRESSOR RUNNING
CHECK FOR LOW OIL PRESSURE. IF AIR ESCAPES BUT OIL PRESSURE IS NORMAL, REMOVE THE HYDRAULIC UNLOADER AND PILOT VALVE AND CHECK THEIR
VALVE SEATS. IT IS NORMAL FOR AIR TO LEAK FROM THE DISCONNECTED TUBE
WHEN THE COMPRESSOR IS STOPPED IF A HYDRAULIC UNLOADER IS USED.
KNOCKING OR THUMPING SOUNDS
PROBABLE CAUSE
SUGGESTED REMEDY
LOW OIL LEVEL
CHECK FOR PROPER OIL LEVEL. IF LOW, CHECK FOR DAMAGE TO BEARINGS.
NO OIL PRESSURE
CHECK ALL POSSIBLE REMEDIES LISTED UNDER “LOW OIL PRESSURE” IN THIS
SECTION.
LOOSE FLYWHEEL OR
MOTOR PULLEY
CHECK FOR TIGHTNESS OF FLYWHEEL AND PULLEY CLAMPING BOLTS.
WORN BEARINGS
INSPECT CONNECTING ROD INSERTS AND WRIST PIN BUSHINGS FOR
EXCESSIVE WEAR. REPLACE AS NECESSARY.
LOOSE ROLLER MAIN
CHECK FOR CRANKSHAFT END PLAY BY PUSHING AND PULLING ON FLYWHEEL.
IF PLAY CAN BE FELT CHECK FOR DAMAGE TO ROLLER BEARINGS. IF
NO DAMAGE IS EVIDENT TO THE BEARINGS, PROCEED WITH REMOVING
CRANKSHAFT END PLAY PER SERVICE SECTION.
LOOSE GUIDE PISTON
CHECK DIAMETER OF GUIDE PISTON. IF WITHIN SPECIFICATION, GUIDE
CYLINDER MAY BE WORN.
WORN COMPRESSION
PISTON GUIDE RING
REPLACE GUIDE RING BY REMOVING CYLINDER HEAD AND PISTON. CHECK
COMPRESSION CYLINDER AND PISTON FOR DAMAGE.
VALVE ASSEMBLIES LOOSE
REMOVE VALVES AND INSPECT VALVE AND CYLINDER HEAD FOR DAMAGE.
USING A NEW VALVE SEAT GASKET, TIGHTEN VALVE COVER, THEN VALVE CLAMP
SCREW.
PISTON HITTING CYLINDER
HEAD
REMOVE COMPRESSOR CYLINDER HEAD AND INSPECT FOR FOREIGN MATERIAL
ON PISTON TOP. ADJUST PISTON TO PROPER CYLINDER HEAD CLEARANCE.
REPLACE USING NEW GASKETS.
Table 7: Troubleshooting
34
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
LOW OR NO OIL PRESSURE
PROBABLE CAUSE
SUGGESTED REMEDY
LOW OIL LEVEL
FILL CRANKCASE TO FULL MARK.
CLOGGED OIL STRAINER
REMOVE AND CLEAN OIL STRAINER.
DEFECTIVE OIL PRESSURE
REGULATING VALVE
‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’, ‘E’, AND ‘V’ BLOCKS: REMOVE REGULATING VALVE ADJUSTING SCREW,
SPRING AND BALL. CHECK FOR WEAK OR BROKEN SPRING OR DAMAGED SEAT.
REPLACE OR REPAIR AS NECESSARY.
‘F’ BLOCK: REMOVE OIL PUMP AND INSPECT REGULATING VALVE PLATE, SPRING,
AND SEAT. REPLACE OR REPAIR DAMAGED PARTS AS NECESSARY.
WORN OUT OIL PUMP
REPLACE OIL PUMP.
OIL PUMP SUCKING AIR DUE
TO GASKET FAILURE
CHECK GASKET OR SEAL IN OIL PICKUP LINE. REPLACE AS NECESSARY.
DEFECTIVE OIL PRESSURE
GAUGE
CHECK GAUGE AND REPLACE AS NECESSARY.
INCORRECT FLYWHEEL
ROTATION
CHECK THAT THE FLYWHEEL FAN IS CLOCKWISE WHEN VIEWED FROM THE OIL
PUMP END, IF NOT, CHECK WITH A COMPETENT ELECTRICIAN TO SEE IF THE
MOTOR ROTATION CAN BE CHANGED BY RECONNECTING THE MOTOR LEADS.
OVERHEATING
PROBABLE CAUSE
SUGGESTED REMEDY
DIRTY COOLING SURFACES
CLEAN THE COOLING SURFACES OF THE CYLINDER HEAD, CYLINDERS,
INTERCOOLER AND AFTER COOLER INCLUDING ANY WATER PASSAGEWAYS.
INADEQUATE VENTILATION
RELOCATE THE COMPRESSOR TO A MORE SUITABLE AREA HAVING CLEAN, DRY,
COOL AIR WITH GOOD VENTILATION. AIR COOLED COMPRESSORS SHOULD NOT
BE LOCATED IN HOT OR HIGH HUMIDITY AREAS.
LEAKING SECOND STAGE
VALVES CAUSING HIGH
FIRST STAGE AIR PRESSURES
CHECK FOR LEAKING VALVES OR VALVE GASKETS ON SECOND STAGE.
CORRECT AS NECESSARY.
RESTRICTED AIR LINES
CHECK DISCHARGE PIPING AND INTERCOOLER FOR DAMAGE TO LINES CAUSING
RESTRICTION IN AIR FLOW.
EXCESSIVE V-BELT WEAR
PROBABLE CAUSE
SUGGESTED REMEDY
PULLEY NOT PROPERLY
ALIGNED
REALIGN MOTOR PULLEY WITH THE COMPRESSOR FLYWHEEL.
BELT TOO TIGHT OR TOO
LOOSE
ADJUST BELT TENSION PER TABLE 4, IN SECTION 2, COMPRESSOR STARTUP.
PULLEY WOBBLE
CHECK FOR BENT PULLEY, FLYWHEEL OR SHAFTS.
Table 7: Troubleshooting (Continued)
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
35
SECTION 4
COMPRESSOR SERVICING
NOTICE: Hycomp compressor service and
maintenance shall only be performed by qualified
technicians. Service and maintenance shall
conform to all applicable local and national
regulations and safety standards.
TORQUE VALUES
WARNING: Never assume a compressor is safe to
work on just because it is not operating. It could
restart at any time. The following procedures
should be used when stopping to maintain or
service a compressor.
1.
Per OSHA regulation 1910.147: The Control
of Hazardous Energy Source (lockout/tagout),
disconnect and lockout the main power source.
Display a sign in clear view at the main power
switch stating that the compressor is being
serviced.
2.
Isolate the compressor from the compressed
air supply by closing any manual shut-off valves
upstream and downstream from the compressor.
Display signs in clear view at the shut-off valves
stating that the compressor is being serviced.
3.
Lock open a pressure relief valve within the
pressurized system to allow the system to
completely depressurize.
4.
Shut off the cooling water supply (where
applicable).
5.
Open all drain valves within the area to be
serviced.
6.
Wait for the unit to cool before servicing.
Temperatures above 120°F can cause burns to
the skin.
Refer to the proper Hycomp compressor parts list
to assist with disassembly, reassembly and torque
specifications. This section is a general guide to
servicing Hycomp oil-free air compressors, air boosters
and gas compressors. It is not meant to replace proper
training and common sense.
Each compressor parts manual lists the torque values
required for each bolt within the compressor. Torque
values are DRY. The use of lubricant on the bolt threads
will cause the bolt pre-tension value to be greatly higher
and may lead to bolt failure. Table 8 is supplied as a
guideline only for use where a torque setting is not
given. The table is not meant to replace researching
the proper torque value for the application.
TOOL LIST FOR SERVICING
A list of tools needed for service Hycomp compressors
is included in Appendix 1. This is a fairly comprehensive
list, but site conditions may require additional tooling
not listed here.
CLEARANCES AND TOLERANCES
Clearances and tolerances are given on the following
pages for various conditions and compressors. If
additional information is required, please contact the
factory.
Thread
Sizes
Hex Head Grade 5
Dry Torque Values (ft-lb)
1/4-20
6-8
5/16-18
13 - 17
3/8 - 16
24 - 30
1/2 - 13
60 - 75
5/8 - 11
120 - 150
3/4 - 10
210 - 260
7/8 - 9
320 - 400
1-8
460 - 580
Table 8: General Bolt Torque Specifications
for Grade 5 Cap Screws
36
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
Crankshaft end play
0.002 loose to 0.003 interference
Oil pump end clearance (ring & rotor)
0.001 to 0.003
Piston rod diameter
0.8735 to 0.8755
Cylinder bore diameter (under 1.50”)
0.0015 maximum over nominal
Cylinder bore diameter (1.50” - 3.00”)
0.003 maximum over nominal
Cylinder bore diameter (3.25” - 7.50” )
0.005 maximum over nominal
Cylinder bore diameter (over 7.50”)
0.006 maximum over nominal
HJ Compression Ring radial thickness
0.188 minimum
HL Guide Ring radial thickness (under 8” dia)
0.350 minimum
HL Guide Ring radial thickness (over 8” dia)
0.475 minimum
HM Compression Ring radial thickness
*Contact factory
HN Guide Ring radial thickness
*Contact factory
Compression cylinder wall surface finish
12-16 RMS
Guide cylinder wall surface finish
12-18 RMS
* HM & HN style piston rings are available in a wide variety of materials and designs. Contact the factory if you
are unsure if your rings need to be replaced.
Table 9: General Clearances and Tolerances
For all compressors, measured in inches.
MINIMUM
CLEARANCE
MODEL
MODEL
MINIMUM
CLEARANCE
‘A’ & ‘B’ Block, General
0.045
2WN35, 2WN40
0.055
‘C’ Block, General
0.050
0.060
‘D’ Block, General
0.055
AN14E, AN20E, AN27E,
AN72E
‘E’ Block, General
0.060
2AN61, 2AN76
0.060
‘F’ Block, General
0.070
0.060
AN3A, AN4A, AN6, WN4A
0.045
WN14E, WN20E, WN72,
WN90
AN12, 2AN8
0.045
0.060
AN6C, AN10C, AN26
0.050
2WN13E, 2WN17E,
2WN22E, 2WN61, 2WN76
2AN3C, 2AN10C, 2AN11C,
2AN13C, 2AN17
0.050
AN154
0.070
2AN22F, 2AN137
0.070
WN26
0.050
0.070
2WN10C, 2WN17
0.050
WN28F, WN35F, WN44F,
WN98
AN12D, AN17D, AN44
0.055
0.070
2AN10D, 2AN15D, 2AN26,
2AN35, 2AN40
0.055
2WN28F, 2WN150H,
2WN150L
WN44
0.055
Table 10: Compression Piston to Head Clearances
Measured in inches, between top of compression piston and top of cylinder head gasket. Values shown are minimums, Tolerances +0.015/0.0. Shims available in 0.010” thickness.
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
37
Rod Bearing
Clearance
Crosshead
Piston
Clearance
Crosshead
Piston
Diameter
Crank Pin
Diameter
Wrist Pin
Bushing
Clearance
Wrist Pin
Diameter
‘A’ & ‘B’ Blocks, including AN3A,
AN4A, AN6, 2AD4A, WN4A
0.0015 to
0.0025
0.003 to
0.004
2.9960 to
2.9930
1.7500 to
1.7505
0.0003 to
0.0006
0.8745 to
0.8755
‘C’ Block, including AN6C, AN10C,
AN26, 2AN3C, 2AN10C, 2AN11C,
2AN13C, 2AN17, WN26, 2WN10C,
2WN17
0.0015 to
0.0030
0.003 to
0.004
2.9960 to
2.9930
1.7500 to
1.7505
0.0003 to
0.0006
0.8745 to
0.8755
‘D’ Block, including AN12D, AN17D,
AN44, 2AN10D, 2AN15D, 2AN26,
2AN35, 2AN40, WN44, 2WN35,
2WN40
0.0020 to
0.0035
0.003 to
0.004
2.9960 to
2.9930
2.2475 to
2.2485
0.0003 to
0.0006
0.8745 to
0.8755
‘E’ Block, including AN14E, AN20E,
AN27E, AN72E, 2AN61, 2AN76,
WN14E, WN20E, WN72, WN90,
2WN13E, 2WN17E, 2WN22E,
2WN61, 2WN76
0.0020 to
0.0035
0.0035 to
0.0050
3.9929 to
3.9950
2.2475 to
2.2485
0.0004 to
0.0008
1.1240 to
1.1255
‘F’ Block, including AN154, 2AN22F,
2AN137, 2WN150F, WN28F, WN35F,
WN44F, WN98
0.0025 to
0.0040
0.0045 to
0.0060
4.9925 to
4.9950
3.2509 to
3.2519
0.0005 to
0.0010
2.0000 to
2.002
‘V’ Block, including 3AN44V
0.0020 to
0.0035
0.003 to
0.004
2.9960 to
2.9930
2.2475 to
2.2485
0.0003 to
0.0006
0.8745 to
0.8755
Block / Model
Table 11: Crankcase and Crosshead Clearances and Tolerances
For individual compressors, measured in inches.
Compressor Disassembly
WARNING: Before starting work on the compressor,
all pressure must be bled off from both the first and
second stages, suction and discharge.
This is only a general outline of how to disassemble a
Hycomp compressor. Certain specifics may apply to
your compressor that are not listed here. Contact an
authorized distributor or the factory for assistance on
disassembling your compressor.
CYLINDER HEAD AND COMPRESSION
CYLINDER
1. Support the intercooler on two stage models in
such a way that it will not fall, causing it to twist at the
bottom support and possibly bending the tubes, or
damaging the cooling fins. Often it is acceptable to tie
the intercooler to the crosshead cylinder.
2. Detach loadless starting and constant speed
unloader tubing (if supplied) from the compressor.
3. Remove the intercooler cap screws from the
underside of the intercooler flange on two stage
models. Remove the center and outboard head cap
screws from the cylinder head.
38
4. Remove the cylinder head assembly and head
gasket from the cylinder. The suction and discharge
valve assemblies will remain in the head. Remove the
intercooler gasket from the intercooler flange. Throw
out both gaskets. Be sure the intercooler is securely
held.
5. Unbolt and remove the compression cylinder using
a suitable hoist and chain as necessary, being careful
that the cylinder is lifted vertically until it clears the
pistons, and that it does not cock and thereby damage
the pistons or rings.
6. ‘A’ - ‘E’ & ‘V’ Blocks: Using an adequate heat source
such as a torch, heat the piston rod just below the
compression piston to a temperature just below 400°
F. This will soften the Loctite so that the rod bolt can
be loosened without galling the threads or disturbing
the opposite end rod bolt integrity. Wear gloves so as
not to burn yourself on the piston or rod. Be careful not
to allow the rod to get so hot as to discolor it. A Tempil
stick or other temperature measuring device should be
used to get appropriate temperatures.
While the rod end is hot, use the special rod clamping
tool Cat ID 19284 to hold the rod while removing the
rod bolt. Remove the piston and store any shims or
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
thrust washers with the piston. Repeat this process for
the second piston. You may remove the piston rings
from the piston at this point.
‘F’ Block: Use the special rod clamping tool Cat
�������
ID
19284�������������������������������������������������
to hold the piston rod while removing the upper
piston rod nut. Remove piston from the piston rod.
Repeat for the second piston. There are NO shims.
You may remove the piston rings from the piston at
this point.
PLENUM CHAMBER
Air boosters and gas compressors incorporate a
‘Plenum’ chamber that sits below the compression
cylinder, and above the crosshead guide cylinder. The
plenum chamber can be removed with the piston rod
packing case still attached, by loosening the bolts that
hold the plenum to the crosshead cylinder, and sliding
the plenum chamber up the rods.
To remove the gas packing case, remove the four
screws per case, and push the case out the bottom
of the plenum. The case is sealed to the plenum with
an O-ring, and may resist removal. If this is the case,
jacking screw ports are provided in the bottom case
flange. Use the bolts that were removed from this
flange, to jack it out of the plenum case.
CROSSHEAD GUIDE CYLINDER
7. Remove the oil packing box gland (cover) from the
oil packing box. Remove the oil packings. Remove
the oil packing box from the crosshead guide cylinder.
Discard old O-rings.
realigned during assembly. The connecting rod parts
are not interchangeable and must be reassembled with
the same mating parts. Work on only one connecting
rod at a time to avoid confusion.
12. Remove both snap rings from the guide piston.
13. Heat crosshead piston evenly with a torch until
there is clearance between the crosshead piston and
wrist pin. Wrist pin should slide easily out of piston.
Heat evenly to avoid overheating and warpage. Do
not attempt to press out the wrist-pin.
14. Repeat this procedure for the second assembly.
‘A’ - ‘E’ and ‘V’ Blocks: If necessary, the piston rod can
be removed from the crosshead piston by heating the
piston rod just above the crosshead piston, while the
piston rod is clamped with tool ������������������������
Cat ID 19284������������
. When the
piston rod reaches a temperature of just under 400° F,
the lower piston rod bolt can be safely removed. Wear
leather gloves or similar heat resistant protection. See
previous step 6 for further information.
15. Bronze wrist pin bushings can be pressed out of the
connecting rod and new ones pressed in and honed
before use. Roller bearings can be removed by heating
the connecting rod end until the bearings slide out.
16. If the crankshaft bearings, crankshaft or oil pump
must be replaced, refer to the next section titled
“Oil Pump Replacement”, or the following “Bearing
Replacement”.
8. Remove the crosshead guide cylinder cap screws.
Rotate the flywheel so that one crosshead piston is
up and one is down. Lift the crosshead guide cylinder
from the crankcase. Do NOT allow the crosshead
pistons to fall against the side of the crankcase as this
will damage them.
OIL PUMP REPLACEMENT
1. Follow steps 1-12 of the “Compressor Disassembly”
section.
CROSSHEAD PISTONS & CONNECTING RODS
9. Remove the crankcase inspection cover(s).
‘B’ - ‘E’ and ‘V’ Blocks:
a. Remove the hex head cap screws fastening the
oil pump cover to the bearing carrier. Remove
the oil pump cover.
10. Remove the locknuts from the connecting rod bolts.
It is best to only loosen the locknuts a few turns on both
sides evenly, and to then loosen the connecting rod cap
by blocking the guide piston on top of the crankcase
and rotating the flywheel to cause the crankshaft to
push against the connecting rod cap. This procedure
will keep the connecting rod cap from jamming on the
connecting rod bolts and being damaged.
11. Carefully lift the crosshead piston and connecting
rod assembly out of the crankcase. Keep the
connecting rod cap with the connecting rod/crosshead
assembly. Each cap and connecting rod is marked with
a dot or number on one side so they can be properly
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
2. Remove oil pressure gauge and hydraulic
unloader.
b. Check the rotor to cover clearance. There should
be 0.001 - 0.003 inches of clearance. Replace
rotor/shaft/gear assembly or oil pump cover if
necessary.
c. Remove the hex head cap screws fastening the
bearing carrier to the crankcase. Remove the
bearing carrier from the crankcase.
d. Remove the O-ring from the oil pump shaft
and slide the shaft/gear assembly through the
bearing carrier bushing. Install new shaft/gear
39
assembly in bearing carrier and replace O-ring.
Replace outer rotor in oil pump cover. Place a
few drops of oil or grease in the oil pump cover
to lubricate at start-up.
e. With the oil pump drive shaft assembly in the
bearing carrier, set the oil pump shaft so that the
slot in the shaft aligns with the drive pin in the
crankshaft when the bearing carrier is mounted
to the crankshaft. Replace the bearing carrier
gasket, and mount the carrier to the crankcase
and install bolts by hand. Rotate the oil pump
drive shaft by hand until it is aligned with the drive
pin on the crankshaft and the bearing carrier
draws flush to the crankcase. Torque bolts to
proper specification.
f. Set the new oil pump cover O-ring into the recess
of the carrier, and set the oil pump cover into
the recess. Be sure the cover is rotated so
the rotational direction arrow is pointing in the
same direction as the flywheel rotation. See
the “Oil Pump Direction of Rotation” section in
the Operation portion of this manual for more
information. Hand-tighten the six oil pump cover
bolts. If the oil pump cover can not be drawn
flush with the bearing carrier, the rotor/gear or
housing/bearing carrier are misaligned. DO NOT
tighten with a wrench. Remove and inspect.
g. Torque all bolts to proper specification.
‘F’ Block:
a. Remove the hex head cap screws fastening the
oil pump to the carrier. Carefully remove the oil
pump.
b. Remove the two Allen head cap screws holding
the thrust plate to the oil pump housing. Because
of the spring force behind the plate, hold the
thrust plate against the oil pump housing, either
with a C-clamp device, or another set of hands.
The oil pressure valve and gerotor assembly
should now be accessible.
c. To increase the oil pressure, add more valve
discs Cat ID 17506. To decrease oil pressure,
remove valve discs. There must be at least one
valve disc. Each additional valve disc (�������
Cat ID
17506�������������������������������������������
) increases oil pressure approximately 2.5
psig.
d. Check rotor to housing clearance. There
should be .001 - .003 inches of clearance.
Replace rotor/shaft/gear assembly or housing
if necessary.
e. Replace thrust plate onto oil pump housing.
40
Be careful to align valve spring vertically over
the center of the valve discs. If not aligned
properly, the valve spring will damage the oil
pump housing upon final torque of Allen screws.
Torque Allen screws.
f. Replace oil pump shaft O-ring and oil pump
housing O-ring.
g. Set the oil pump shaft so that the slot in the
shaft aligns with the drive pin in the crankshaft
when the oil pump is mounted to the bearing
carrier. Mount the oil pump to the carrier (aligned
with dowel pins) and install bolts. Torque to
appropriate level.
ALL BLOCKS:
3. Wrap all pressure fittings with fresh Teflon tape
before reattaching.
4. Replace pressure gauge and loadless start unloader
(also constant speed unloader if furnished with your
machine).
‘B’ - ‘E’ and ‘V’ Blocks: Adjust oil pressure regulating
screw all the way in, and back out 1.5 turns.
5. Pressurize unloader assembly so the machine will
start without load.
6. Start the compressor paying close attention to oil
pressure. If pressure doesn’t rise to 20 PSIG for ‘B’ ‘E’ and ‘V’ Blocks or 40-50 PSIG for ‘F’ Blocks, within
thirty (30) seconds, shut the unit down and inspect
for leaks.
7. Check oil pressure when machine is hot to be
assured the pressure range is between 20 - 25
PSIG for ‘B’ - ‘E’ and ‘V’ Blocks, or 45-50 PSIG for
‘F’ Blocks. Adjust oil pressure as needed to obtain
proper operation.
BEARING REPLACEMENT
NOTICE: When replacing the bearings, the entire
bearing assembly including the cup and cone, must be
replaced, as well as the oil seal if applicable.
1. Follow steps 1-12 of the “Compressor Disassembly”
section.
2.Remove the flywheel and drive key from the
crankshaft.
3. Remove the oil pump and/or bearing carrier per the
“Oil Pump Replacement” section.
4. Remove the bearing cup from the bearing carrier
using a bearing puller.
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
5. Slide the crankshaft through the oil-pump end of the
crankcase. The bearing cones can be removed from
the crankshaft with a bearing puller.
6. Remove the bearing cover plate from the flywheel
end of the crankcase. The bearing cup is pressed into
the crankcase and must be removed with a bearing
puller. Remove all shims from the bearing cover plate
and crankcase.
7. Grease the outer edges of the new bearing cups.
Press the flywheel end bearing cup into the crankcase
with the large end of the taper away from you (towards
oil pump). Press until the cup is flush with the outside
of the crankcase. Press the oil pump end bearing
cup into the bearing carrier with the larger end of the
taper away from the bearing carrier (toward you) until
it stops.
8. Press the proper bearing cone onto each end of the
crankshaft with the larger end of the taper towards the
center of the crankshaft. The bearing races should rest
against the crankshaft shoulder. Lubricate the bearing
cones thoroughly with clean, high quality grease.
9.Install the crankshaft through the oil pump end of
the crankcase.
10. Install the bearing carrier onto the crankcase with a
new bearing carrier gasket. Tighten bolts to specified
torque.
11. If the bearings have not been replaced, reinstall
the flywheel end bearing plate and the same shims.
If new bearings have been installed, use a thicker
set of shims. Torque the bearing cover plate bolts to
proper tightness.
12. Rotate the crankshaft by hand to be sure it is free
to spin. Verify the proper amount of end-play of the
crankshaft per Tables 9, 10 and 11. If necessary,
remove shims until end play is within tolerance.
13. If the crankshaft binds, or there is no end-play,
remove the bearing carrier, crankshaft and bearing
plate, and drive the flywheel end bearing cone slightly
farther out of the crankcase. Re-install the bearing
carrier and crankshaft, and put thicker shims in front
of the bearing plate. Replace the bearing plate and
torque to proper tightness. Repeat step 12-13 until
bearing play is within tolerance.
14. Reinstall the oil pump or oil pump cover per “Oil
Pump Replacement”.
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
COMPRESSOR ASSEMBLY
This is only a general outline of how to assemble a
Hycomp compressor. Certain specifics may apply to
your compressor that are not listed here. Contact an
authorized distributor or the factory for assistance on
assembling your compressor.
Compressor assembly is generally the opposite of
compressor disassembly. Before assembling, clean all
parts thoroughly and check surfaces for burrs, nicks,
dings or excessive wear patterns. Replace all O-rings
and gaskets that were removed during disassembly.
‘A’ - ‘E’ and ‘V’ Blocks: If the crosshead piston and
piston rod have been disassembled, it will be necessary
to reassemble them first.
Clamp the piston rod into tool Cat ID 19284 and clamp
this tool to a work surface. Apply 4 drops of Loctite
(Item #266) to end of bolt thread. Do not touch threads
with your hands as this will contaminate the Loctite.
Attach guide piston to piston rod. Torque bolt to proper
specification.
CONNECTING ROD & CROSSHEAD PISTON
NOTICE: When replacing one crosshead piston or
connecting rod, the new part and remaining part
must both have the same part number. Differences
may lead to unbalanced conditions and excessive
vibration.
1. To replace wrist pin bushings in connecting rod,
press the new bushing into the connecting rod and
hone to proper diameter. To replace wrist pin bearings,
heat connecting rod until the bearings slide easily into
hole. The side of the bearing with the part number
stamped on it should face out. The bearings should
go in until they are just flush with the outside of the
connecting rod. Do not put bearings in too far as they
will block flow from the oil passage through the center
of the connecting rod. Liberally grease bearings or
bushing with an appropriate assembly grease.
2. Replace one snap ring into crosshead piston. Heat
the crosshead piston until the wrist pin slides easily
into piston. Slide the connecting rod into bottom of
crosshead piston until bearing/bushing is aligned with
wrist pin. Allow wrist pin to slide through connecting
rod and into other end of the crosshead piston. Put
the second snap ring in place. Allow the assembly to
cool. Repeat with second assembly.
3. After connecting rod and crosshead assembly
have cooled, place the split bearing halves into the
connecting rod halves, aligning the bearing tang with
the grooves in the connecting rod. Liberally coat the
bearing faces with grease.
41
4. Set the top of the connecting rod/crosshead
assembly over the crankshaft journal. Replace the
proper connecting rod cap, aligning the dots or numbers
on the connecting rod and cap so they are both on the
same side. Start the nuts onto the connecting rod bolts
and torque to proper tightness. Repeat with second
assembly. Do not allow crosshead piston to fall against
crankcase as this may damage the piston.
‘F’ Blocks: Reinstall piston rods into crosshead piston.
Screw jam nut all the way up the lower thread of the
piston rod. Screw piston rod all the way into crosshead
piston and back out 3 full turns. The crosshead piston
has locking threads, so expect some resistance. Do
not tighten jam nut yet.
CROSSHEAD GUIDE
5. Replace the crosshead to crankcase gasket with
a new one.
6. Coat the inside of the crosshead guide cylinder
with oil. Lightly grease the outside of the crosshead
pistons.
7. Set the crosshead guide cylinder over the crosshead
pistons and slowly lower onto crankcase. Make certain
the crosshead guide pistons are started straight into
the bores of the crosshead guide cylinder to prevent
damage. Set crosshead guide cylinder onto crankcase
and hand tighten bolts.
8. Replace the oil packing box and new O-rings and
hand tighten bolts. Do not fully tighten bolts yet. Slide
the oil packings down the piston rod, being certain not
to damage the packing face or inner diameter. Replace
oil packing box gland and hand tighten bolts.
9. Fill the crankcase with the proper amount of oil.
Squirt oil onto the crankshaft bearings and connecting
rod bearings.
10. Re-install crankcase inspection plate with new
gaskets, and tighten to proper torque.
11. Rotate the crankshaft a few times and then tighten
crosshead guide cylinder cap screws to proper
torque. Rotate crankshaft again to insure smooth
movement.
Pre-assemble the gas packing case(s), ensuring
correct orientation of the gas packings (see diagram
that comes with new gas packings). Install a new
O-ring on the gas packing case, using a minimum of
compatible O-ring lubricant. Insert the case(s) into
the plenum chamber and tighten bolts to specified
torque.
Rotate the crankshaft so one piston rod is at top dead
center (the other will be at bottom dead center). Install
tool Cat ID 19286 (packing install tool) onto the top of
the highest rod. Orient the plenum chamber so the
dowel pins align, and carefully lower the plenum down
the piston rods. Once the first set of gas packings is
past the top of the rod, remove the install tool (�������
Cat ID
19286���������������������������������������������������
) and place on the other rod. Finish lowering the
plenum down to the crosshead cylinder. Tighten bolts
to specified torque.
COMPRESSION CYLINDER AND PISTONS
12. Install compression cylinder over piston rods.
Lower onto crosshead guide cylinder, insuring proper
alignment with dowel pins. Torque cap screws to
proper tightness.
‘A’ - ‘E’ and ‘V’ Blocks:
a. Install pistons into cylinder and tighten piston
bolt or nut to 20 ft-lbs.
b. Measure piston to head (top of head gasket)
clearance at four points on each piston.
Determine necessary head clearance.
c. Remove pistons and place sufficient .010 inch
thick shims (Cat ID 17095) on top of the piston
rod to reduce minimum clearance to proper
amount.
d. Place expander rings onto piston with gaps
180° apart from each other. Place compression
rings over expander rings, with gaps 180° from
expander ring gap. No compression ring gaps
should be aligned. Install rider ring onto pistons.
Install piston into cylinder.
‘A’-’E’ Blocks: Tighten the oil packing box bolts and
gland bolts to proper torque.
e. Place 4 drops of Loctite (Item # 266) near end of
thread of each of the two bolts. Being careful not
to contaminate Loctite, screw both bolts into rods
and tighten to specified torque. Use piston rod
tool P/N SA003 to keep piston rod from spinning
and loosening lower bolt.
‘F’ Blocks: Do not tighten oil packing box bolts.
f. Recheck piston to head clearance.
PLENUM CHAMBER & GAS PACKING CASE
Air and gas boosters require the plenum chamber
installed on top of the crosshead guide.
42
‘F’ Blocks:
a. Remove bolts holding oil packing box to
crosshead cylinder. Slide oil packing box up
the piston rods until the crosshead piston is
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
accessible.
b. Install pistons in cylinder onto piston rod, and
tighten piston nut to specified torque while
holding the piston rod with the P/N SA003 tool.
c. Measure piston to head (top of head gasket)
clearance at 4 points on each cylinder. Determine
proper clearance.
d. Adjust clearance by screwing piston rod into or
out of crosshead piston. Tighten lower piston
rod jam nut to full torque when piston clearance
is properly adjusted.
e. Double check cylinder head (top of head gasket)
to piston clearance. It may change when
tightening the jam nut. Readjust as necessary,
following steps c. and d.
f. Slide oil packing box down onto crosshead guide
cylinder and hand tighten bolts. Torque bolts to
proper tightness.
CYLINDER HEAD
If the valve assemblies must be removed from the
cylinder head, refer to the “Valve Replacement”
section.
13. Place a new head gasket on the compression
cylinder and intercooler. Use compatible gasket
sealant if acceptable. Lower cylinder head down onto
compression cylinder.
14. Center bolts that pass through air passages on
‘B’ - ‘E’ and ‘V’ blocks must have a copper bolt gasket
installed into the bolts.
15. Install center and outer head bolts as well as
intercooler bolts. Tighten head bolts to snug, starting
with center bolts, and working outward. When done,
retighten to one-half final torque, and then to full torque.
Tighten intercooler bolts to final torque.
16. Rotate the compressor by hand to be certain it
turns freely and the pistons are not hitting the cylinder
head.
17. Follow all procedures listed in the “Compressor
Start-up” section.
18. After 1-2 hours of normal operating temperatures,
stop the compressor, lock it out from electrical sources,
and retighten the valve hold down screws and cylinder
head bolts to proper tightness.
VALVE REPLACEMENT
NOTICE: Suction and discharge valves must be
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
installed in the correct cylinder head locations.
To avoid confusion, work only on the inlet or the
discharge valves at one time, or tag the valves
and valve pockets with a note to indicate suction
or discharge.
NOTICE: It is critical that the valve hold-down
screws be backed out when changing a valve, as
the valve cover plate may crack if the new valve is
slightly taller than the previous valve and the valve
cover plate is torqued to final tightness.
ALL MODELS EXCEPT: 2WN150L, 2WN150H
1. Remove unloader piping from unloader towers and unloader controls.
2. Unloaded suction valves:
a. Remove the unloader assembly. Remove and
discard unloader gaskets. Remove hold-down
screw with appropriate spanner wrench.
b. Remove valve cover. Discard valve cover
gasket.
c. Remove the valve clamp and unloader tube, the
unloader platform, and additional valve clamp on
certain models. Remove valve assembly and
discard valve seat gasket.
d. Disassemble the valve and inspect the valve seat,
plate, spring, guide and unloader fingers/springs
for wear. Repair or replace as necessary. Valve
seats can be lapped to remove minor damage.
Valve plates should be replaced if damaged.
Turning over a damaged valve plate will lead
to premature failure of the plate and possible
damage downstream from debris. Valve and
unloader springs and valve guides should be
replaced if in doubt.
e. Reassemble the valve in the reverse order it was
disassembled. Check for free movement of the
valve plate.
f. Reinstall a new valve seat gasket into the valve
pocket. Install valve assembly, verifying correct
valve orientation. The inlet valve plate should
move down when pushed from above with a
probe.
g. Install lower clamp (on certain valve models),
unloader fingers, springs & platform. Install
valve clamp.
3. Discharge valves and non-unloaded suction valves:
43
a. Remove the valve hold-down screw nut (Cat ID
17675 or 17676). Remove the valve hold-down
screw with an Allen wrench.
listen for air moving across the valves.
b. Remove the valve cover and discard valve cover
gasket.
MODELS 2WN150L, 2WN150H
1. Remove unloader piping from unloader towers and
unloader controls..
c. Remove the clamp and/or spacer, valve
assembly and valve gasket.
d. Disassemble the valve and inspect the valve
seat, plate, spring and/or, guide. Repair or
replace as necessary. Valve seats can be lapped
to remove minor damage. Valve plates should be
replaced if damaged. Turning over a damaged
valve plate will lead to premature failure of the
plate and possible damage downstream from
debris. Valve springs and guides should be
replaced if in doubt.
e. Reassemble the valve in the reverse order it
was disassembled. Check for free movement of
the valve plate. Tighten valve stud to specified
torque.
f. Reinstall a new valve seat gasket into the valve
pocket. Install valve assembly, verifying correct
valve orientation. Inlet valves placed upside
down act as discharge valves, and vice-versa.
The inlet valve plate should move down when
pushed from above with a probe. The discharge
valve plate should NOT move when pushed from
above with a probe.
g. Install valve clamp and/or spacer.
4. Lightly lap top of valve cover at seating surface for
unloader tower assembly or valve hold-down screw
nut. Lap mating faces of unloader towers and valve
hold-down nut. While the unloader towers use a gasket
to seal and do not need fine lapping, the hold-down
screw nut, Cat ID 17675, is a metal to metal contact
and should be well lapped to insure positive seal. The
hold-down screw nut Cat ID 17676 utilizes an O-ring
- replace it.
5. Install valve cover with new valve cover gasket.
Use compatible gasket sealant if acceptable. Torque
cap screws to proper tightness.
9. Reinstall unloader tubing.
2. Suction valves:
a. Remove the unloader assembly. Remove and
discard unloader gaskets.
b. Remove valve cover. Discard valve cover Oring.
c. Remove the unloader tube and valve assembly
and discard valve seat gasket.
d. Disassemble the valve and inspect the valve
seat, plate, spring, guide and unloader finger/
spring for wear. Repair or replace as necessary.
Valve seats can be lapped to clean up minor
damage. Valve plates should be replaced if
damaged. Turning over a damaged valve plate
will lead to premature failure of the plate and
possible damage downstream from debris.
Valve and unloader spring and valve guide
should be replaced if in doubt.
e. Reassemble the valve in the reverse order it
was disassembled. Check for free movement
of the valve plate. Tighten valve nut to specified
torque.
f. Reinstall a new valve seat gasket into the valve
pocket. Install valve assembly, verifying correct
valve orientation. The inlet valve plate should
move down when pushed from above with a
probe.
3. Discharge valves:
a. Remove the valve cover and discard valve cover
O-ring. Remove the valve assembly.
7. Install the valve hold-down screw nut or unloader
tower and gasket. Torque to final tightness.
b. Disassemble the valve and inspect the valve
seat, plate, and spring. Repair or replace as
necessary. Valve seats can be lapped to clean
up minor damage. Valve plates should be
replaced if damaged. Turning over a damaged
valve plate will lead to premature failure of the
plate and possible damage downstream from
debris. Valve springs should be replaced if in
doubt.
8. Rotate the flywheel by hand to insure there is no
interference between the valves and pistons. Also
c. Reassemble the valve in the reverse order it
was disassembled. Check for free movement
6. Install and torque the hold-down screw to proper
tightness.
44
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
of the valve plate. Tighten valve nut to specified
torque.
d. Reinstall a new valve seat gasket into the valve
pocket. Install valve assembly, verifying correct
valve orientation. The discharge valve plate
should NOT move when pushed from above
with a probe.
4. Install valve cover with new valve cover O-ring.
Torque cap screws to proper tightness.
5. Install the unloader tower and gasket on suction
valve covers. Torque to final tightness.
6. Rotate the flywheel by hand to insure there is no
interference between the valves and pistons. Also
listen for air moving across the valves.
7. Reinstall unloader tubing.
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
45
APPENDIX 1
TOOL LIST
Hycomp compressor assemblies utilize “English Customary Measurements” for sizing tools and specifying torque
values, tolerances, and clearances.
Common tools and sizes suitable for Hycomp compressor service include:
o
Open end box wrench set 3/8” to 1-1/4”
o
12 point 1/2” drive socket set & ratchet 1/2” to 1-1/4”
o
6 point 1/4” drive socket set & ratchet 3/8” to 3/4”
o
1/4”, 3/8”, ½” socket drive extensions
o
1/2” drive torque wrench 20-150 ft-lb
o3/8” drive torque wrench 5-80 ft-lb
o
6”, 8”, 12”, 14” adjustable end wrench
o
Flat head screwdriver assortment
o
Phillips head screwdriver assortment
o
Hex head wrench (Allen) assortment 5/32” to 3/8” (socket drive also suggested)
o
Internal snap ring pliers
o
Ball peen hammer
o
Soft head mallet
o
6” or 8” Precision caliper (.0001 accuracy)
o
Precision depth gauge dial indicator (.001 accuracy)
o
V-belt gauge
o
Gasket scraper tool
o
6” Rule
o
Flashlight
o
Brass drift
o
Propane torch
o
Multimeter (w/temperature probe desirable)
o
Ammeter
o
Abrasive pad (ScotchBrite or similar)
o
Oil free silicone o-ring lubricant
o
Teflon pipe thread tape and Loctite 545 thread sealant
o
High temperature silicone gasket sealer
o
Thread locking compound (Loctite 242,246,and 266)
o
Pipe wrench and or monkey wrench
o
Pliers & diagonal cutter
o
O-ring pick
o
Lockout / Tagout set for secure power isolation
Special tools required for some service tasks include:
o
o
o
o
46
Hycomp Rod Clamp Tool Cat ID 19284 – Required for piston removal.
Hycomp Rod End Tool Cat ID 19286 – Required for gas packing insertion.
“Short” 3/8” hex head (Allen) wrench – Required on some air cooled cylinders to remove base fasteners.
Hycomp Valve Clamp Tool Cat ID 19282– Required to remove/install threaded valve clamp.
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
APPENDIX 2
COMPRESSOR STORAGE
If a compressor is not to be put into service or is to be
taken out of service for an extended length of time,
the following procedures should be taken to prevent
corrosion and deterioration.
1. Fill the crankcase with rust inhibiting oil. Squirt oil
on the piston rods and crosshead pistons.
2. Loosen V-belts to relieve tension on the
bearings.
3. Remove valves and place a bag of dust free
desiccant inside of each valve pocket. Store valves
in a sealed plastic bag with desiccant in each bag.
Plug all openings to compressor. Place several
bags of desiccant into crosshead area.
NOTICE: Tag the unit with a warning that the
compressor is partially disassembled. Copy
the tag printed on this page.
4. Store the unit under plastic, off the ground. The
box/pallet the unit came in is excellent storage
container. Store the unit indoors.
NOTICE: COMPRESSOR IS PARTIALLY
DISASSEMBLED AND MAY CONTAIN
DESICCANT. CAREFULLY INSPECT
VALVE POCKETS AND CROSSHEAD
AND REMOVE ANY DESICCANT FOUND
BEFORE RUNNING COMPRESSOR.
REINSTALL REMOVED VALVES.
5. When the compressor is to be put into service,
change the crankcase oil, remove any desiccant
and re-install valves. See the “Pre-Start-up
Checklist” and “Start-up Procedure” sections in
this manual.
FR-020-007, Rev. 0
47
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