Alarm 2000 Residential Fire System Site Manual

SITE MANUAL
Issue 5
ALARM 2000
Residential Fire System
MA260
November 2017
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
DOCUMENT HISTORY
Issue
Date
Description
Software
revision
Written By
Checked
By
Chris Orr
3.0
6/6/2006
Last updated issue
V2.2
Anis
Shenouda
4.0
6/8/2012
Update document to the new Brooks format
and update software for SUB760 to V2.3
V2.3
Anis
Shenouda
4.1
16/2/2016
Minor mods in PSU supervision and main
modules data sheets
V2.3
Anis
Shenouda
5
27/10/2017
Reference to new AS3786:2015 Alarms
added, update drawings, add Visalert
section and connection diagram.
V2.3
Edwin Thein
2
Anis
Shenouda
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
Table of contents
Table of contents ...........................................................................................................................3
1 INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................5
2 SYSTEM OVERVIEW ..............................................................................................................6
3 SYSTEM COMPONENTS .......................................................................................................7
3.1 SMOKE / HEAT ALARMS .................................................................................................7
3.1.1 Basic Information about your Smoke / Heat Alarm ........................................................7
3.1.2 Technology Available .....................................................................................................7
3.1.3 Photoelectric model........................................................................................................7
3.1.4 Ionisation Model .............................................................................................................8
3.1.5 Heat Model .....................................................................................................................8
3.1.6 Visalert............................................................................................................................9
3.2 RESIDENTIAL FIRE INDICATOR PANEL - ALARM 2000 ........................................... 11
3.2.1 General.........................................................................................................................11
3.2.2 Options: ........................................................................................................................11
3.2.3 Power Supply: ..............................................................................................................11
3.2.3.1
Primary Power Supply: ..................................................................................... 11
3.2.3.2
Standby Supply:................................................................................................ 11
3.2.4 Field Wiring:..................................................................................................................12
3.2.4.1
Mains Voltage Input: ......................................................................................... 12
3.2.4.2
Battery Input:..................................................................................................... 12
3.2.4.3
Smoke / Heat Alarm Field Wiring:..................................................................... 12
3.2.5 Transient Suppression: ................................................................................................12
3.3 RESIDENTIAL FIRE INDICATOR MODULES .............................................................. 13
3.3.1 Smoke Alarm Module:..................................................................................................13
3.3.2 Sprinkler Module: .........................................................................................................15
3.3.3 Manual Override Module:.............................................................................................17
3.3.4 Ancillary Control Module: .............................................................................................18
Air-conditioning................................................................................................................... 18
3.3.5 Gas Shutdown Module:................................................................................................20
3.3.6 Power Supply Supervision Module: .............................................................................23
3.3.7 3rd Party Alarm Signaling Equipment ...........................................................................24
4 SYSTEM DESIGN................................................................................................................. 25
4.1 GENERAL ...................................................................................................................... 25
4.2 ALARM LOCATION........................................................................................................ 25
4.2.1 Smoke Alarms ..............................................................................................................25
4.2.2 Heat Alarms..................................................................................................................25
4.2.3 Single Storey Dwelling .................................................................................................25
4.2.4 Multi Story Dwelling ......................................................................................................26
4.2.5 Maximum Protection ....................................................................................................26
4.3 POSITIONING YOUR SMOKE / HEAT ALARMS ......................................................... 27
4.3.1 Ceiling Mounting...........................................................................................................27
4.3.2 Wall Mounting...............................................................................................................27
4.3.3 Locations to Avoid ........................................................................................................27
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4.4 LIMITATIONS OF SMOKE ALARMS ............................................................................ 28
4.5 CONTROL PANEL ......................................................................................................... 29
4.5.1 Location ........................................................................................................................29
4.5.2 Covering Door ..............................................................................................................29
5 INSTALLATION .................................................................................................................... 30
5.1 GENERAL ...................................................................................................................... 30
5.2 SMOKE / HEAT ALARMS .............................................................................................. 30
5.2.1 Mounting.......................................................................................................................30
5.2.2 Wiring ...........................................................................................................................31
5.2.3 Additional Precautions for Interconnected Alarms: ......................................................33
5.3 RESIDENTIAL FIRE INDICATOR PANEL .................................................................... 34
5.3.1 Surface Mounting Instructions......................................................................................34
5.3.2 Cable Terminations ......................................................................................................34
5.4 PLACING INTO OPERATION: ...................................................................................... 35
5.5 FUNCTIONAL TESTING................................................................................................ 36
5.5.1 Smoke / Heat Alarms ...................................................................................................36
5.5.2 Checking you can hear your Smoke Alarm .................................................................36
5.5.3 Residential Fire Indicator Panel (RFIP)........................................................................36
5.5.3.1
Alarm Test:........................................................................................................ 36
5.5.3.2
Fault Test: ......................................................................................................... 37
5.5.3.3
System Off Test: ............................................................................................... 37
5.5.3.4
Sprinkler Module Testing: ................................................................................. 37
5.5.3.5
Manual Override Module Testing: .................................................................... 38
5.5.3.6
Ancillary Control Module Testing: ..................................................................... 38
5.5.3.7
Gas Shutdown Module Testing: ....................................................................... 39
5.5.3.8
Power Supply Supervision Module: .................................................................. 39
6 INSTALLER’S STATEMENT ............................................................................................... 41
7 COMMISSIONING TEST REPORT - Alarm 2000 ............................................................... 46
8 Operator’s GUIDE ................................................................................................................ 51
8.1 INDICATORS ................................................................................................................. 51
8.2 CONTROL SWITCHES.................................................................................................. 52
9 Spare Parts........................................................................................................................... 53
10
COMPATIBLE DEVICES .................................................................................................. 54
11
GUARANTEE .................................................................................................................... 55
12
APPENDICES.................................................................................................................... 56
12.1
APPENDIX “A” BATTERY CALCULATION ............................................................... 56
12.2
APPENDIX B............................................................................................................... 57
12.3
APPENDIX “C” ............................................................................................................ 67
12.3.1 Ancillary Control Module: .............................................................................................67
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1
INTRODUCTION
Brooks Australia is a specialist company offering 30 years of experience in design,
manufacture, installation, service and maintenance of fire detection and alarm systems.
These years of experience have, over the last 20 years, been focused on Residential Fire
Safety. The Building Code of Australia has set out the fire detection and alarm
requirements for residential occupancies, at the same time creating an awareness of the
need for such life safety systems within the wider community. Australian Standards have
established performance criteria for smoke and heat alarms.
Recognising the unique problems associated with early warning of fire in residential
accommodation, Brooks Australia has developed a range of residential fire alarm
equipment that enables systems design criteria normally applied to commercial premises
to now be adapted to residential occupancies.
In keeping with the philosophy of innovation, flexibility, reliability and quality, Brooks
Australia now offers a new residential fire safety system, the “ALARM 2000”. The Alarm
2000 is specifically designed for small residential occupancies requiring a Smoke Alarm
System under section E2.2 of the Building Code of Australia.
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2
SYSTEM OVERVIEW
The System comprises a full range of mains powered Smoke / Heat Alarms, Manual Call
Points and supplementary warning devices both audible and visual connected to a
Residential Fire Indicator Panel.
The Smoke / Heat Alarms are capable of independent automatic operation, however the
Alarm 2000 Residential Fire Indicator Panel provides for the manual activation of the
Smoke and Heat Alarms as well as integration with other essential facilities within the
building, particularly those requiring control under fire conditions. These are selected as
options to the basic system and include Residential Sprinklers, Manual Door Release,
Emergency Lighting, Security, Air-conditioning/Heating Shutdown, Gas Supply Shutdown
and Power Supply Supervision. Circuitry is either supervised or fail safe to ensure system
integrity.
The Alarm 2000 residential panel;

Supports specific warning devices for the Hearing-Impaired. These provide both
visual and tactile responses and can be configured to operate from the common
alarm output from the Alarm 2000 panel or as an individual output from a specific
Smoke / Heat Alarm.

Is capable of being remotely monitored via 3rd Party Alarm Signalling Equipment.

Employs both solid state and microprocessor based electronic circuit design.

Is housed in an attractive powder coated steel cabinet providing not only high
reliability, ease of installation and aesthetic but is extremely rugged product.
The vast majority of fire fatalities - particularly residential - occur due to the inhalation of
smoke and toxic fumes. A correctly designed and installed Residential Smoke Alarm
System provides an effective LIFE SAFETY SYSTEM, which raises the alarm and
maximises your opportunity to escape.
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3
SYSTEM COMPONENTS
3.1
SMOKE / HEAT ALARMS
3.1.1 Basic Information about your Smoke / Heat Alarm
A Smoke / Heat Alarm does not prevent fires but correctly located and maintained they will
provide the earliest possible warning of fire in order that occupants may exit safely. A
Smoke Alarm is an early warning device, Heat Alarms are not therefore are supplementary
to Smoke Alarms for those areas where Smoke Alarms would not be suitable. Where Heat
Alarms are used they MUST be interconnected to the Smoke Alarms installed
3.1.2 Technology Available
Brooks Australia offers a full range of detection technologies.
Ionisation Smoke detection
Photoelectric Smoke detection
Heat detection
3.1.3 Photoelectric model
Photoelectric Smoke Alarms respond to a sufficiently wide
range of fires to be of general use, but are particularly
responsive to smouldering fires and the dense smoke given
off by foam filled furnishings or overheated PVC wiring. They
are much less prone to nuisance alarms from cooking, and
furthermore, contain no radioactive material. However, all
photoelectric Smoke Alarms are prone to nuisance alarms
caused by dust or insect contamination.
Mesh screens are effective in reducing insect ingress, but it
is impossible to make the alarms dust proof, since they would
then
be effectively smoke proof! For this reason, it is essential
Figure 1 EIB166e
that photoelectric Smoke Alarms are always kept clean. This
type, with consideration to the above, should be installed
within bedrooms and living areas adjacent to kitchens.
Operating Principle
Light scattering - transmitter produces pulses of light which are detected by a receiver
when smoke enters the sensing chamber.
Advantages






No radioactive material
No legal requirements for disposal
Particularly responsive to smouldering fires and dense smoke given off from foam
filled furnishings, bed linen or over-heated PVC wiring
Less prone to false alarms due to fumes from cooking or gas/oil heaters
Ideally suited adjacent to kitchens and bedrooms
Suitable for general use
Disadvantages


More expensive to produce
Prone to false alarms due to dust build up or steam - must be kept clean
Brooks models: EIB166e, EIB146RC and discontinued EIPFSPTLH.
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3.1.4 Ionisation Model
Ionisation Smoke Alarms respond to a sufficiently wide range of
fire to be of general use and they are particularly responsive to
fast flaming fires where little visible smoke may occur. They are
seldom troubled by dust or insect contamination. However,
ionisation alarms are vulnerable to irritating nuisance alarms
caused by cooking fumes or oil / gas heaters. Furthermore
ionisation alarms will be slower to respond to smoke produced by
slow smouldering fire.
Figure 2 EIB161e
This type, with consideration to the above, can be installed in
passageways and areas leading to bedrooms.
Operating Principle
Radioactive source ionises the air molecules within the sensing chamber.
Advantages




Least expensive
Dual chamber compensates for changing ambient conditions
Less prone to false alarms due to dust and steam
Suitable for general use
Disadvantages



Contains radioactive material – Americium 241 0.9 microcurries
Prone to false alarms due to fumes from cooking or gas/oil heaters
Not sensitive to dark smoke from a slow smouldering fire.
Brooks models: EIB160e, EIP146RC and discontinued EIPFSITL.
3.1.5 Heat Model
Heat Alarms require the least maintenance of any Alarm. There
are locations where the installation of a Smoke Alarm is not
recommended, eg kitchens, laundries etc. Yet these areas are a
potential of fires and the need for an alternative method of fire
detection is, in the opinion of many fire officers and specifiers,
essential in this and other vulnerable locations of residential
properties.
The Heat Alarm provides such an alternative. Fixed temperature
heat alarms are designed to trigger when the temperature
Figure 3 EIB164e reaches 58 degC. (136 degF.). The Heat Alarm is not sensitive
to smoke, but in a closed room with a vigorous fire they will tend
to respond faster than a smoke alarm a distance away in the hallway. A Heat Alarm MUST
be interconnected to your Smoke Alarms so that the alarm can be heard throughout the
building. This type, with consideration to the above, can be installed in kitchens, laundry’s,
garages and boiler houses and other areas where there are normally high levels of fumes,
smoke or dust i.e. places where Smoke Alarms cannot be installed without the risk of
excessive nuisance alarms.
Operating Principle
Thermistor sensor - resistance value varies with temperature.
Advantages

Ideal for those areas where protection is deemed necessary but where the use of
Smoke Alarms will cause constant false/nuisance alarms i.e. kitchens, garages or
laundries
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
Whilst not sensitive to smoke, in a closed room with a vigorous fire this Alarm would
tend to ‘alarm’ faster than a Smoke Alarm in an adjacent hallway
Disadvantages


More expensive to produce
Not an early warning device, MUST always be interconnected to other Smoke
Alarms within the residence.
Brooks Models: EIB164e, EIB144RC and discontinued EIPFSTTL.
3.1.6 Visalert
Visalert is a visual warning device which can be interconnected with Brooks mains
powered Alarms e.g. EIB160e series, EIB140RC series and TL series (discontinued).
Visalert has a lead acid re-chargeable battery backup, a feature Brooks considers
essential. The battery provides the necessary standby power so that the Alarm is still
capable of providing a warning even if the 230 Volt mains supply fails (i.e. electrical fire).
As the intense strobe light provides the warning for the hearing impaired person, this
should be battery backed for the same reason.
Visalert can be placed in both the bedroom and living areas. The hearing impaired will be
alerted whether in bed or watching television.
For more details refer to Brooks Technical Datasheet TDS020
Keep both battery negative and neutral soldered together if the isolate feature is not used.
Separate them if the isolate feature is required. The wiring in Error! Reference source
ot found. shows with the isolate feature.
To identify the battery negative and neutral in the Visalert plug and harness, Figure 4
shows the plug and the arrangement of the four wires. Carefully separate the two blue
wires (neutral and battery negative) as shown in Figure 4 and connect to the field wiring.
PLUG & HARNESS
ACTIVE
(BROWN)
NEUTRAL
(BLUE)
BATTERY -VE
(BLUE)
INTERCONNECT
(WHITE)
Figure 4 Visalert plug
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The Visalert and EIB160e series Alarms can be simply connected as shown Figure 5 in
below.
Figure 5 Visalert and EIB160e series Alarms connected to Alarm 2000
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3.2
RESIDENTIAL FIRE INDICATOR PANEL - ALARM 2000
3.2.1 General
The RFIP provides the controls, indicators, monitoring, power and stand-by supplies,
termination and distribution point for the system. The RFIP can be configured to specific
installation and system requirements by the selection of optional modules.
The basic RFIP comprises a Smoke / Heat Alarm module, power supply and standby
batteries. It was designed to interface with the Brooks EIB160e / EIB140RC Series mains
power Smoke/Heat Alarms and provides not only the control functions for the Smoke /
Heat Alarms, but also interface to other optional modules. However, the TL Series is
obsolete and is replaced with the EIB160e Series. When using this new Smoke Alarm
series, use only EIBPLATE and discard the standard mounting plate that is packaged with
EIB160e.
EIBPLATE is compatible with Brooks Alarm Isolator BAAISO and BAATLS, or when the
EIB160e Series is used with Alarm 2000 residential control panel.
3.2.2 Options:








Ancillary control module with high current relays
Residential Sprinkler module
Manual door override module
Gas supply shutdown module
Power supply supervision module
Power supply 2.2 Amp to 10 Amp.
Standby batteries 7 to 12 A H for standard enclosures
1.6mm zinc annealed steel, powder coated Oyster secured via a 003 key lock.
Enclosure: Large enclosure 680H x 320W x 167D mm (with door)
3.2.3 Power Supply:
The primary and standby supplies are calculated to suit system alarm and standby
requirements. If the primary power supply fails, the secondary supply will provide sufficient
current to maintain the system fully operational for a period determined by the added
options to the system. Special consideration must be taken when the Gas Shutdown and
Manual Override modules are fitted. This is due to the higher quiescent current these
modules require.
3.2.3.1 Primary Power Supply:
The primary power supply is fully regulated 28V DC switch mode power supply featuring:





Universal AC input 85-264V AC, 47-63Hz
Output Voltage 28V DC adjustable
Output Current 2.2 Amp (standard); 5Amp and 10Amp optional.
Built-in EMI filter, low ripple noise.
Short circuit, over load and over voltage protection
Note: Power supply voltage output can be adjusted (if required) to the nominal
voltage using potentiometer SVR1 on the power supply PCB.
3.2.3.2 Standby Supply:
Battery capacity is calculated to suit systems requirements with sizes up to 15AH suitable
for the RFIP enclosure.
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3.2.4 Field Wiring:
All field wiring enters the RFIP via knock-outs on either the top or rear of the enclosure.
Termination is via compression terminals located on the ‘termination’ board specific to the
module options fitted.
3.2.4.1 Mains Voltage Input:
The 230 Vac mains cable terminates at a 3-way junction box located on the inside rear of
the cabinet with switched outputs to the switch mode power supply and the Smoke Alarm
main Termination Board.
3.2.4.2 Battery Input:
Colour coded battery leads are provided to connection of the standby batteries to either
a)
b)
Power supply supervision card, where fitted; or
The Switch Mode Power Supply through an isolating diode (1N5404-3A) where
the power supply supervision option is not fitted. The diode is used to isolate the
DC power of the batteries to the DC power of the power supply so the mains on
LED will extinguish in case of power fail.
The battery leads are colour coded to ensure correct fitting to the batteries. Connect the
black lead to the negative terminal of the first battery, red lead to the positive terminal of
the second battery and the blue lead between positive of the first battery to the negative of
the second battery.
Note: If the Power Supply Supervision Card is not fitted, ensure that the circuit
breaker TH1 and link LK1 are fitted to the RFIP main Termination Board.
3.2.4.3 Smoke / Heat Alarm Field Wiring:
The Smoke/Heat Alarms are wired according to whether the isolate function is
incorporated in the system.
(a) Without isolate function - 3 Wire Systems:
If the alarm isolate facility is not required, the Smoke/Heat Alarms will be terminated
to TB1 on the Main Control and Termination Board mounted on the rear of the
enclosure. Connect Active (brown) to “A”, Neutral (blue) to “N” and Interconnect
(white) to “I” (refer to Drawing No. F563).
Note: The two blue wires must remain linked.
(b) With isolate function - 4 Wire Systems:
If the alarm isolate facility is required, the Smoke/Heat Alarms will be terminated to
TB2 on the Main Control and Termination Board. To terminate the Smoke/Heat
Alarms in a 4 wire system, the two blue wires (normally used as Neutral) must be
separated to a Neutral and Battery negative as shown in the block wiring diagram
F563. Connect Active to “A”, Battery negative to “N1”, Neutral to “N2” and
Interconnect to “I”.
Warning: The battery negative and neutral should not be interchanged.
3.2.5 Transient Suppression:
The RFIP provides transient suppression comprising metal oxide varistors (MOV’s) on all
inputs and outputs on the main Termination Board and on all the optional modules.
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3.3
RESIDENTIAL FIRE INDICATOR MODULES
3.3.1 Smoke Alarm Module:
The Smoke Alarm Module (SAM) provides the basic building block for the RFIP and
consists of the Main Control and Termination Board, Display Board, with the standard
Alarm 2000 system being fitted with a 24VDC / 2.2 Amp switch mode power supply and
stand-by supply of 2x7AH rechargeable sealed lead acid batteries.
The Main Control and Termination Board provides the interface and controls for the
Smoke/Heat Alarms and Manual Call Points. All the field wiring is terminated on this board.
In addition, it provides the interface to all other optional modules fitted.
The Display Board provides the control switches, indicators and fault sounder. This board
is mounted on the rear of the faceplate behind the decal.
OFF AU TO FIR E
BROOKS
R ESIDENTIAL FIRE SAFETY SYSTEM
ALARM 2000
MA INS ON
POWER SU PPLY FAU LT
ALA RM
ALA RM LOCA TE
MC P A LAR M AC TIVA TED
ALA RM ISOLA TE
MC P FA ULT
SOU ND ER SILEN CE
ALA RM OUTPU T FA ULT
Inputs:

Supervised N/O dry contact for manual activation of system. (MCP).

Alarm signal from Smoke / Heat alarms.
Note: Maximum number of Smoke/Heat alarms connected to the panel is 20.

Panic – N/O dry contact for remote activation of ‘Fire’ mode.
Outputs:


Alarm - supervised 24VDC 1 Amp maximum.
Alarm - set of voltage free contacts.
Note: The alarm outputs are selectable which can be activated by MCP only
and/or Smoke/Heat Alarms and/or Fire Mode, see DIP switch settings on
Drawing No F565-A.



'System switched off' – set of voltage free contacts.
Common Fault - set of voltage free contacts.
Auxiliary Supply - 24Volts DC fused to 1Amp.
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Controls:



Alarm Locate - silences all Smoke / Heat Alarms except the Alarm(s) that have
actuated. Used to locate the source of the fire or a faulty or contaminated Smoke /
Heat Alarm. Automatically resets after approximately five (5) minutes.
Alarm Isolate - silences all Smoke / Heat Alarms. Used to silence the units while
smokes, cooking fumes or steam are cleared from the Smoke / Heat Alarm.
Automatically resets after approximately five (5) minutes.
Sounder Silence - mutes the integral RFIP fault sounder. Automatically resets to
normal after fault condition is cleared.
Key Switch:


AUTO - system 'ON', set for automatic alarm response.
OFF - system 'OFF', charger 'on', system off output activated.
Note: A red indicator on the front panel adjacent the key switch will flash to
provide a local warning to the occupants that the system has been turned
'OFF'. A signal output is provided for remote monitoring of this condition.

FIRE - all Smoke/Heat Alarms sound, alarm outputs selected activate.
Indicators:









Mains ON, green LED, steady
System OFF, red LED, flashing
Alarm Activated, red LED, flashing
Alarm Output Fault, amber LED, steady
MCP Input Fault, amber LED, steady
Alarm Locate selected, amber LED, steady
Alarm Isolate selected, amber LED, steady
Sounder Silence selected, amber LED, steady
Power Supply Fault – optional, amber LED, steady
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3.3.2 Sprinkler Module:
MONITORED VALVE
SPRINKLER
TAMPER
ACTIVATED
OUTPUT FAULT
OUTPUT FAULT
INPUT FAULT
INPUT FAULT
OUTPUT DISABLE
This module enables a residential sprinkler system to be connected to and monitored by
the RFIP. The module provides an individual supervised input and output for both the flow
switch and monitored valve tamper. A facility is provided to disable the tamper alarm output
for a period of either 3 or 6 hours to allow for sprinkler system maintenance. (refer to the
Sprinkler Module data sheet F565_b)
Inputs:


Flow/Pressure Switch - supervised normally open dry contact.
Monitored Valve Tamper - supervised normally open dry contact.
Outputs:

Sprinkler Alarm - supervised 24VDC, 1 Amp.
2 sets of voltage free contacts

Monitored Valve Tamper - supervised 24VDC, 1 Amp.
2 sets of voltage free contacts
Note: Outputs can be set to either independent or common activation.
Controls:

Monitored Valve Tamper Disable - isolates the monitored valve tamper alarm
output for selectable 3 or 6 hours then automatically resets. Can be manually reset
at any time by pressing the Monitored Valve disable switch for 4-6 second.
Indicators:







Sprinkler activated, red LED, flashing
Sprinkler alarm output fault amber LED, steady
Sprinkler flow/pressure switch input fault, amber LED, steady
Monitored valve tamper, red LED, flashing
Monitored valve tamper fault, amber LED, steady
Monitored valve tamper alarm output fault, amber LED, steady
Monitored valve output disabled, amber LED, steady
Sprinkler Module application required for DHHS:
The sprinkler module has two separate supervised inputs, sprinkler input and monitored
valve input. Each. When an input is activated, the corresponding 24Vdc output will be
activated. Each output drives separate warning device e.g. alarm bell.
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DHHS in Victoria require the monitored valve input to activate the sprinkler output but the
sprinkler input will not activate the monitored valve output. To achieve this requirement, a
diode is fitted in the jumper and connects the common (middle) terminal to the “A” terminal
of jumper link LK1 as shown in Figure 6. Figure 6 forms part of the circuitry for SUB710.
Sprinkler Input
Monitored Valve Input
Figure 6 Diode arrangement in Sprinkler Module on SUB710
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3.3.3 Manual Override Module:
MANUAL OVERRIDE
The Manual Override Module is fitted where access and/or smoke doors within the
residence are to be secured or held open via electronic locks which require automatic
operation under fire alarm conditions but must also allow for manual operation to regulate
entry and exit. The module provides six individual manual override switches. Electric locks
are configured to be fail safe i.e. removal of power will cause the locks to open.
Under fire alarm operation, an output delay is provided to avoid the locks operating from a
false alarm due to a transient alarm condition. The delay time can be set to 1-2 Sec, 15
Sec or 30 Sec (refer to Manual Override Module data sheet F565D).
Note: This delay is specific to this module and is in addition to any other selected
i.e. locate or isolate
Input:

Alarm signal from either and/or the Smoke / Heat Alarms, MCP, or Sprinkler
system.
Output:

Six (6) 24VDC supplies
Total current permitted for all 6 outputs - 1 Amp maximum.
Controls:

Six (6) toggle switches for manual override of each supply output.
Indicators:

Amber LED integrated within each switch body for each of the six (6) manual
override switches.
Time Delay:



LK1.1 = 30 sec
LK1.2 = 15 sec
LK1.3 = 1-2 sec
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3.3.4 Ancillary Control Module:
ANCILLARY CONTROL
EMERGENCY LIGHTING
HEATING/COOLING
PRESS & REL EASE T O ST ART T EST ING
PRESS & REL EASE T O SHUT DO W N A/C
PRESS & HO L D F O R 5 SEC T O T ERMINAT E T EST
PRESS & HO L D F O R 5 SEC T O REST O RE
AUTO/TEST
AUTO/OFF
Note: Older version of Ancillary Control Module is found in Appendix “C”
The new Ancillary Control Module provides similar controls and indications for automatic
and manual operation of emergency lighting and Cooling / heating system but in different
way and with new added features. The Emergency Lighting design has been updated to
achieve the requirements of the Australian Standard AS2293.
A selectable control output delay is provided to avoid Air-Conditioning shutdown and
emergency lighting activation from a false alarm due to transient alarm conditions. This
delay time can be configured for 0 or 15 seconds.
A new test facility is added to activate the emergency lighting for a selected time depending
on a DIP switch setting, refer to Drawing F593. The emergency lighting test time may be
selected to 30, 60, 90 or 120 minutes.
Emergency Lighting
In the ‘AUTO’ mode (LED is extinguished), the emergency lighting will be automatically
activated if a fire alarm signal is received from a Smoke/Heat Alarm, MCP or Sprinkler
alarm dependent upon the configuration selected.
The emergency lighting can be manually tested by pressing and releasing the
'AUTO/TEST' button. In the ‘TEST’ mode, the amber LED integrated to the switch body
will illuminate and the emergency lights will turn “ON”. Depending on the timer setting
(S1.3 & S1.4), the lights stay “ON” for the selected time. After the test is completed the
emergency lights will turn “OFF” and the amber LED will also extinguish. To restore the
auto condition while the emergency lighting test is running, press & hold the “AUTO/TEST”
button until the amber LED extinguishes (approximately 5 Seconds).
Air-conditioning
In the AUTO mode (LED is extinguished), the air-conditioning/heating is automatically shut
down if a fire alarm signal is received from a Smoke/Heat Alarm, MCP or Sprinkler alarm
dependent upon the configuration selected.
The air-conditioning/heating system may be manually switched ‘OFF’ by pressing and
releasing the 'AUTO/OFF' button. In the ‘OFF’ mode the amber LED integrated to the
switch body will illuminate and will remain in this condition until manually de-selected. To
restore to the auto condition, press and hold the “AUTO/OFF” button until the amber LED
extinguishes (approximately 5 Seconds).
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Input:

Alarm signal from either the Smoke / Heat Alarms, the MCP or Sprinkler Module.
The alarm input may be normally open contact that switches negative when
closed.
Outputs:

Air-conditioning / heating
1. 24VDC to drive high current relay - rated 230VAC 10Amps
2. set of Air-conditioning / heating voltage free contact

Emergency Lighting –
1. 24VDC to drive high current relay - rated 230VAC 10 Amps
2. Set of Emergency Lighting voltage free contact
Controls:

Heating/Cooling - AUTO/OFF

Emergency Lighting - AUTO/TEST
Indicators:

Heating/Cooling - AUTO/OFF, amber LED

Emergency Lighting - AUTO/TEST, amber LED
Note: The 230VAC for the high current relays of the Air conditioning and
the emergency lighting must be wired to a circuit separate to the RFP
mains
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3.3.5 Gas Shutdown Module:
GAS SHUTDOWN SYSTEM
MAIN VALVE OPEN
ISOLATE
PRESSURE FAULT
RESET
TEST
The Gas Shutdown System is composed of high quality, proven components to ensure
safe, reliable protection of a gas pipe-work system that does not have existing safety shut
off equipment. For example, open stove burners in kitchens, or gas Bunsen burners in a
laboratory. The Gas Shutdown System can also guard against restoring gas if downstream
pipe-work is damaged or a gas outlet is open. The system consists of two principle
components, the gas shutdown module and Gas Valve/flexible coupling assembly.
The gas shutdown module is designed to be interlocked with sprinkler systems, fire and
smoke detection systems, gas detection systems or emergency stop devices, so that in
the event of an emergency the gas supply can be automatically shutdown as well as
providing outputs for gas valve and occupant warning system actuation.
The Gas Valve Assembly is designed to provide the main gas shut off valve, bypass valve,
bypass valve flow adjuster and gas pressure switch as a pre-assembled, pre-tested
module. This, together with the flexible coupling provided, ensures both ease and
consistency of installation. This modular format also facilitates any servicing or
maintenance that may become required. The valve assembly comes standard in 25mm,
but can be configured up to 150mm.
To properly configure and size the system, the following need to be considered.
Interlocking systems or emergency device requirements




Gas Type
Gas Pressure
Gas Flow
Control Voltage
HOW IT WORKS
Where an unsupervised burner may be extinguished by the operation of an emergency
stop device, sprinkler system or manual valve, it is essential that the gas cannot be
restored unless all of the gas burners are off, and the associated pipe-work remains
undamaged.
The gas shutdown system, when properly installed and commissioned, guards against the
accidental restoration of gas when gas burners are left on or pipe-work damaged.
The main gas isolating solenoid valve is installed in the gas supply to the unsupervised
appliances. When the gas supply needs to be isolated, power to the main gas solenoid
valve is interrupted and the valve closes. Before the main gas solenoid valve can reopened, the pressure in the downstream gas pipe-work is verified by a pressure switch.
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On restoration of the power to the valve assembly, if the pressure switch detects that the
downstream pressure is acceptable, i.e. there have been no leaks, the main gas valve is
opened and no manual reset is necessary. The main valve open indicator illuminates.
If the pressure in the down-stream pipe-work is not at the correct level, then there is no
guarantee that the pipe-work or appliances are pressure tight, the main gas valve will not
open and the main valve open indicator remains extinguished. This indicates to the
operator that the gas appliances and/or pipe-work requires checking, before the system is
now manually reset.
To reset the system, having checked the integrity of the gas appliances and pipe-work,
press and hold the reset button. This action opens the bypass gas solenoid valve that
passes only enough gas to fill the system IF THERE ARE NO LEAKS.
If the appliances or pipe-work are not gas tight, the gas provided by the bypass valve will
not fill the system. The pressure switch will not actuate and therefore will not allow the main
gas valve to operate. The main gas supply remains OFF and the Gas Stop Fault indicator
is illuminated. If the pipe-work is gas tight, the system will pressurize causing the pressure
switch to actuate allowing the main valve to open. The main valve open indicator will
illuminate and the gas stop fault indicator will extinguish.
WARNING: It is essential that the gas shutdown system be set up correctly and in
accordance with the instructions provided. A “Safety Check” must be carried
out to ensure the correct operation of the system. Failure to do this may
cause a dangerous situation.
Note: Because of the large range of valve and pressure switch options available, it
is essential to check that the gas supply pressure and system operating voltage are
correct for the components provided before installation. The Valve Assembly must
be installed and commissioned by a licensed plumber.
Input:


Alarm signal from either and/or the smoke/heat alarms, MCP or sprinkler system.
Pressure Switch - downstream from main valve.
Output:


Main Shut-off Valve - 24VDC 3 Amps.
By-pass Valve - 24VDC 3 Amps.
Controls:



Main valve isolate - used when testing the sprinkler system to avoid an
unnecessary gas shutdown.
Reset - used to control the bypass valve to manually re-open the main valve after
a complete shutdown. Test - manually closes the main valve to test shutdown
operation.
Test – used to simulate sprinkler alarm so, gas shut down can be tested.
Indicators:





Main Valve Open.
Pressure Fault.
Main valve isolated.
Reset.
Test.
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Standard Valve Assembly
Voltage:
24Volts DC / 36 Watts
Size:
25mm
Components: Main Gas Solenoid valve
Bypass Gas Solenoid Valve
Bypass Gas Flow Rate Adjuster
Gas Pressure Switch
Flexible Coupling
600mm Stainless Steel Corrugated Tube 11/4” O.D. x 1” I.D.
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3.3.6 Power Supply Supervision Module:
General
The power supply supervision module has been designed to meet the requirements of
AS4428.5. The module provides additional power supply supervision not available in the
AS1603.4 CIE.
The module constantly monitors the power supply status and upon detection of a fault
condition will within one hour signal a power supply fault.
Power Supply Fault
The power supply fault, open collector output (LED indication) and voltage free contact will
be activated if one of the following occurs:






Charger high : charger voltage is higher than 28.2V
Charger low : charger voltage is less than 26.5V
50% Battery capacity : battery voltage less than 23.8V
Power fail : voltage less than 21V
Battery disconnected
Auto battery test fail (latching LED)
Note: once the supply fault is rectified or the power restored, the power supply fault
LED will clear unless the fault occurred during the auto battery test.
Power Fail
A set of voltage free contact is available if the mains power is lost and battery voltage
becomes less than 21V.
Test Inhibit Facility (Optional)
If an alarm occurred during the one hour auto battery test, the test will terminate to ensure
sufficient power to the fire panel and the ancillary equipment in full alarm condition. Two
terminals are provided on the power supply supervision board to connect normally open
alarm contact as shown in the data sheet.
Battery Present Test
A battery present test is conducted by disconnecting the batteries from the system for
approximately 100mSec. On startup, the battery test is carried out once every 15 seconds
for the first 250 seconds then once every one hour. If the batteries are missing, the power
supply fault is indicated.
Note: A battery present test is not performed if a charger fault exists.
Auto Battery Test
An auto battery test is conducted approx. every 71 Hours where the system quiescent load
will be disconnected off the system power supply and placed on the batteries.
The auto battery test will not be conducted and will be terminated if one of the following
conditions is exist:




Battery missing or disconnected
Battery low (50% capacity) or fail condition
Charger high or low fault
If the auto-test inhibit input is activated.
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The activation of the auto-test inhibit input will terminate the test immediately, no supply
fault will be indicated. An auto-test can be inhibited by voltage free (Normally Open)
contact.
During the auto battery test, any supply fault occurs it will terminate the test and latch the
supply fault outputs. If the condition that caused the supply fault is rectified, the supply fault
outputs will not be reset until the beginning of the next auto-test. Provision for manually
resetting a latched fault is provided by means of an onboard switch.
If the Battery is removed during an auto battery test, the power to the system will be lost
for approximately 15 - 20mSec.
Normal / Default status of indicators:
LED No.
LED Col.
LED 1
Green
LED 2
Description
Normal (default)
Mains ON
ON
Red
Auto battery test running
OFF
LED 3
Red
Battery isolate i.e. battery removed
permanently or during auto test
OFF
LED 4
Red
Auto test inhibited
OFF
LED 5
Green
Power fail
ON
LED 6
Yellow
Supply fault O.C. (open collector)
OFF
LED 7
Green
Supply fault
ON
3.3.7 3rd Party Alarm Signaling Equipment
There are various ASEs available in the market that can be connected to Alarm 2000 e.g.
Romteck, CodeRed, Tyco etc. Please refer to their manuals and wiring diagrams as to
whether they require a 24VDC output from Alarm 2000 or just a dry contact. Alarm 2000
can provide both depending the ASE’s input requirements. Please refer to Drawing F565A for available outputs. Typically on SUB700, the monitored output terminals on TB6
labelled Alarm +/- are used for this purpose. Depending on requirements, other dry contact
outputs on TB6 e.g. alarm, fault, and system OFF outputs, which are not monitored, can
also be used. Some ASEs have their own monitoring methods for taking dry contacts from
FIPs, please consult their manuals.
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4
SYSTEM DESIGN
4.1
GENERAL
The Smoke / Heat Alarms should be installed in compliance with the requirements of
Building Code of Australia and for guidance Australian Standard AS1670.6, AS1670 part
1 and this manual. Wiring should be installed to AS3000.
All Smoke/Heat Alarms must be interconnected to ensure the warning will be heard
throughout the protected area, giving particular attention to sleeping areas.
A properly designed early warning fire system ensures the alarm is given before the
escape route becomes blocked with smoke. Therefore Smoke Alarms must be installed
along the escape routes, Heat Alarms would not give sufficient warning.
Ideally the Alarm should be installed in the centre of the ceiling at least 300mm from
light fittings.
4.2
ALARM LOCATION
4.2.1 Smoke Alarms
Sufficient smoke must enter the Smoke Alarm before it will respond. The Smoke Alarm
needs to be within 7.5 metres of the fire to respond quickly. It also needs to be in a position
where its alarm can be heard throughout the residence, in order that all occupants will be
alerted in time for all to escape. A single Smoke Alarm will give some protection if it is
properly installed, but most residences will require two or more Smoke Alarms. To ensure
that a reliable early warning is given, the first Smoke Alarm should be located between the
sleeping area and the most likely sources of fire (living room or kitchen for example). But
it should not be more than 7.5 metres from the door to any room where a fire might start
and block your escape from the house.
4.2.2 Heat Alarms
Heat Alarms are intended to be supplementary to Smoke Alarms and should only be
placed where Smoke Alarms cannot be used. A Heat Alarm should only be used in a room
adjoining an escape route, in conjunction with Smoke Alarms on the escape routes. The
Heat Alarm must be interconnected to the other Alarms.
4.2.3 Single Storey Dwelling
If the residence is on one level the first Smoke Alarm should be placed in a corridor or
hallway between the sleeping and living areas. Place it as near to the living area as
possible, but make sure you can hear it loudly enough to wake you in the bedroom, see
Figure 7.
Figure 7 Single Story Dwelling
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If the residence is very large and/or the corridor or hallway is more than say 15 metres
long, one Smoke Alarm will not be sufficient. No matter where it is located it will be more
than 7.5 metres from potential fires and there is the likelihood that the warning will not be
heard throughout the areas requiring protection.
In residences with more than one sleeping area, Smoke Alarms should be placed between
each sleeping area and the living area.
4.2.4 Multi Story Dwelling
If the dwelling is on more than one level, you will require at least one smoke alarm on each
level. The first should be located in the lower floor hallway near the stairs see Figure 8.
Smoke is likely to be detectable in this hallway before it reaches the upstairs landing and
bedrooms.
The second Smoke Alarm should be located upstairs adjacent to the bedrooms. The
downstairs Smoke Alarm is unlikely to detect the smoke from a fire in the bedroom area
upstairs. Both Smoke Alarms should be interconnected to ensure the earliest possible
warning.
4.2.5 Maximum Protection
For maximum protection locate an Alarm in all the rooms where fire is most likely to
breakout, selecting smoke or heat as appropriate. The living room is the most likely place
for a fire to start at night, followed by the kitchen and then the dining room. You should
also consider putting Smoke Alarms in any bedrooms where fires might occur, for instance,
where there is an electrical appliance such as an electric blanket or where the occupant is
a smoker. You could also consider putting Smoke Alarms in any rooms where the
occupant is unable to respond very well to a fire starting in the rooms, such as an elderly
or sick person or a very young child.
Figure 8 Positioning Smoke Alarms
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Minimum Protection
Smoke Alarms located on:
On each storey
Within 3 metre (10 ft) of all bedroom doors
Every 7.5 metres (25 ft) or hallways and rooms
Maximum Protection
Smoke Alarms located as above plus:
All rooms (except bathroom, shower rooms and kitchen)
In houses with more than one sleeping area, Smoke Alarms should be placed between
each sleeping area and the living area (for example, see Figure 8).
Heat Alarms located in kitchens, garages, boiler rooms etc. within 5.3 metre of
potential fire sources
4.3
POSITIONING YOUR SMOKE / HEAT ALARMS
4.3.1 Ceiling Mounting
Hot smoke rises and spreads out, so a central ceiling position is the preferred location.
The air is “dead” and does not move in corners, therefore Smoke and Heat Alarms must
be mounted away from corners. Place the unit at least 30cm (12 inches) from any light
fitting or decorative object which might obstruct smoke / heat entering the Alarm. Keep at
least 15cm (6 inches) away from walls and corners. (See Figure 8).
On a Sloping Ceiling
In areas with sloping or peaked ceilings, install your Smoke Alarm 90 cm (3 feet) from the
highest point measured horizontally, see Figure 8, because “dead air” at the apex may
prevent smoke from reaching the unit.
4.3.2 Wall Mounting
When a ceiling position is not practical (for example on a ceiling having exposed beams or
joists, or built-in radiant heating) put the top edge of your Smoke Alarm between 15 and
30 cm (6 and 12 inches) below the ceiling. Keep at least 15cm (6 inches) from corners.
(see Figure 8).
Wall mounting is not recommended for Heat Alarms.
4.3.3 Locations to Avoid
Don’t place your Smoke Alarm in any of the following areas:

Kitchens, Bathrooms, shower rooms, garages or other rooms where the
smoke alarm may be triggered by steam, condensation, normal smoke or fumes.

Attics or other places where extremes of temperature may occur (below 4°C/34°F
or above 40°C/104°F).

Near a decorative object, door, light fitting, window moulding etc., that may
prevent smoke from entering the Smoke Alarm.
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
Surfaces that are normally warmer or colder than the rest of the room (for example
attic hatches, uninsulated exterior walls etc.), Temperature differences might stop
smoke from reaching the unit.

Next to or directly above heaters or air conditioning vents, windows, wall vents
etc. that can change the direction of airflow.

In very high or awkward areas where it may be difficult to reach the alarm (for
testing, maintenance etc.).

Locate unit at least 1.5m (5 feet) and route wiring at least 1m (3 feet) away from
fluorescent light fittings as electrical “noise” and/or flickering may affect the unit.

Locate away from very dusty or dirty areas as dust build-up in the chamber can
make unit too sensitive and prone to alarm. It can also block the insect screen
mesh and prevent smoke from entering the chamber.

Do not locate in insect infested areas. Small insects getting in to the chamber
can cause intermittent alarms.

Do not place Heat Alarms in bathroom, shower room or other room where the unit
may be triggered by steam or condensation.

Ionisation Smoke Alarms should be placed away from kitchens or airflows likely to
carry cooking fumes.

Photoelectric smoke alarms should be located away from bathrooms or other
potential sources of steam
Note: Electrical noise induced onto the Alarm power circuit can cause
intermittent chirping. Avoid power circuits with inductive loads or fluorescent
fittings. If unavoidable, a line filter may be required.
4.4
LIMITATIONS OF SMOKE ALARMS
Smoke / Heat Alarms have significantly helped to reduce the number of fire fatalities in
countries where they are widely installed.
However, independent authorities have stated that they may be ineffective in up to 35% of
all fires. There are a number of reasons for this:

The Smoke / Heat Alarms will not work if the mains power is off and the battery is
depleted.

Smoke / Heat Alarms will not detect fire if sufficient smoke or heat does not reach
the Alarm. Smoke / heat may be prevented from reaching the alarm if the fire is too
far away, for example, if the fire is on another floor, behind a closed door, in a
chimney, in a wall cavity, or if the prevailing air draughts carry the smoke away.
Installing Smoke / Heat Alarms on both sides of closed doors and installing more
than one Smoke / Heat Alarm as recommended in the installer’s instructions very
significantly improves the probability of early detection.

Smoke / Heat Alarms which are not maintained or are tampered with may not
function reliably.

The Smoke / Heat Alarm may not be heard.

A Smoke / Heat Alarm may not wake a person who has taken drugs or alcohol.
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4.5

Smoke / Heat Alarms may not detect every type of fire to give sufficient early
warning. They are particularly ineffective with fires caused by escaping gas, violent
explosions, poor storage of flammable rags and/or liquids, (for example petrol,
paint, spirits etc.) overloaded electrical circuits, arson, children playing with
matches.

Smoke / Heat Alarms don’t last indefinitely. The manufacturer recommends
replacement after 10 years as a precaution.

The battery life expectancy is over 10 years.
CONTROL PANEL
4.5.1 Location
The Residential Fire Indicator Panel (RFIP) should be located in a secure position and be
clearly visible and readily accessible for the authorised person or persons. The RFIP
should be installed such that the required visible indicators and controls are not less than
750mm or more than 1850 mm from the floor. The RFIP should be installed in an
environment that will not jeopardise its reliable operation.
4.5.2 Covering Door
Where the RFIP is obscured by a door, then that door should be marked in contrasting
colour to the general colour scheme with the words ‘RESIDENTIAL FIRE INDICATOR
PANEL’ in letters 50 mm high. No other letters shall be on the door. The door should not
be lockable.
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5
INSTALLATION
5.1
GENERAL
The 230VAC mains supply for the RFIP should be derived from the main distribution board
in the residence. This supply circuit must be a dedicated circuit from the residence’s main
distribution board. In which case no other electrical equipment should be connected to this
circuit (other than a dedicated monitoring device installed to indicate failure of the mains
supply to the system), or
The system must be continuously powered, there should be no interposing switch that can
be used to turn off the system.
The mains supply to the Smoke / Heat Alarms must be derived from the main Termination
Board of the RFIP.
WARNING: Do not connect the Smoke / Heat Alarms to mains supply derived from an
inverter that provides for a square wave output e.g. solar panel conversion.
The Alarm must have a sinusoidal 230VAC supply.
WARNING: Do not megger the supply circuit to the alarms while the Alarms are
connected. If the circuit must be meggered, the Alarms and RFIP MUST be
removed prior to circuit testing.
Do not install the Alarms or RFIP in new or renovated buildings until all work is completed
(including floor coverings) and the building has been fully cleaned.
To avoid contaminating the Alarm, after checking operation of the Alarm, fit the protective
dust cover provided until required for use.
Note: Excessive dust and debris from building work can contaminate the smoke
chamber or heat sensor causing nuisance alarms or incorrect operation.
Contamination will invalidate the product guarantee.
Disconnect the AC mains supply to the system circuit at the main distribution board prior
to installation of the RFIP or Alarms. Do not attempt to open the Smoke / Heat alarms as
they are permanently sealed for safe.
5.2
SMOKE / HEAT ALARMS
5.2.1 Mounting
Mains powered Alarms must be installed and interconnected by a licensed electrician in
accordance with the regulations for electrical installation AS3000. Failure to install the
Alarm correctly may expose the user to shock or fire hazards.
The Alarm is designed to be permanently mounted onto a rectangular junction box and
connected to the 230VAC 50Hz mains supply from the RFIP. It requires a current of 40mA.
Select an appropriate location and position for the Alarm. The Alarm must not be exposed
to dripping or splashing. The selected location of the Alarm must comply with applicable
building regulations. Place EIBPLATE onto the surface and mark out the mounting screw
holes then remove the wiring cover (Figure 9) from the mounting plate to wire connections.
The standard mounting plate supplied with EIB160e series can only be used in 3 wire
systems. When EIB160e Smoke or Heat Alarms are intended to be used in Alarm 2000
application where the isolate feature is required, the standard mounting plates must be
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replaced with a special mounting plates EIBPLATE where the four wires can be
terminated.
Figure 9 EIBPLATE Remove cover for Terminals
5.2.2 Wiring
Wiring is done on the Isolator Base EIBPLATE terminals. The alarm head slides and clicks
into the EIBPLATE. It is recommended to use EIBPLATE in all installations to avoid rework
should the isolator feature be used in future. The EIBPLATE base separates the battery
negative and neutral connections to provide a 4-wire circuit where the isolator feature
is required in a Smoke / Heat Alarm system.
Figure 10 EIBPLATE Terminal Connections
Slide off the conduit cover (Figure 10) for cable entry into the base. Cut along the guide
notches for a smaller conduit size of 16x16mm.
Terminate the wiring from Alarm 2000 to the terminal block of EIBPLATE as follows:
L: Live - connects to the Active incoming wire from Alarm 2000 A.
N: Neutral - connects to the Neutral incoming wire from Alarm 2000 N2.
B: Battery -Ve - connects to the battery -Ve incoming wire from Alarm 2000 N1.
IC: Interconnect - connects to IC between Smoke / Heat Alarms.
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Note: battery negative incoming wire must be fitted with the black wire connected
to “B” terminal as shown in Figure 10.
EIB160e Series and EIB140RC Series Smoke / Heat Alarm heads, slides onto this
EIBPLATE and locks into place with a click sound heard. Read respective Alarm manuals
for details of head removal and attachment.
Mixing the Active and Neutral (or Battery –Ve)
connections will damage the alarm.
Ensure that the same colors are used throughout the
premises for Active, Neutral, Battery negative and
Interconnect wires.
EIBPLATE Mains Isolator Base and Smoke / Heat
Alarms must be installed by a licensed electrician as
per the requirements of AS3000.
Choose a suitable mounting hole on the Isolator Base to secure with screws onto the
ceiling. Do not peel off the foam at the bottom of the base. This foam is to prevent air flow
movement around it from affecting the Smoke Alarm.
Active
Connect the Brown wire to the terminal marked with the letter “L” or coloured red or brown
and the appropriate terminal on the RFIP Termination Board.
Neutral / Battery Negative1
The Smoke/Heat Alarms are wired according to whether the isolate function is
incorporated in the system.
Without isolate function - 3 Wire Systems: If the alarm Isolate facility is not required,
the Smoke / Heat Alarm field wiring is terminated to TB2 on the Main Control and
Termination Board mounted on the rear of the enclosure. Connect Active (brown) to “A”,
Neutral (blue) to “N” and Interconnect (white) to “I” (refer to Drawing No. F563).
Note for TL Series Smoke Alarms only: The two blue wires must remain linked.
With isolate function - 4 Wire Systems: If the alarm Isolate facility is required, the Smoke
/ Heat Alarms will be terminated to TB1 on the Main Control and Termination Board
mounted on the rear of the enclosure. To terminate the Smoke / Heat Alarms in a 4 wire
system. Connect Active to “A”, Battery negative to “N1”, Neutral to “N2” and Interconnect
to “I”.
Warning: DO NOT INTERCHANGE THE BATTERY NEGATIVE AND NEUTRAL WIRES,
THIS MAY DAMAGE THE ALARM.
Interconnection
The common interconnect wire from the Smoke / Heat alarms is terminated in TB1 in “I”
terminal as shown in Figure 11.
Note: As the battery negative is referenced to the neutral therefore the interconnect
cable must be treated as LV.
1
In the discontinued TL series Alarms, the two blue wires in the plug are supplied joined, this is to disconnect
the battery when the plug is removed. The two wires must be separated when isolate feature is required.
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Figure 11 Smoke / Heat Alarm Wiring to SUB700
5.2.3 Additional Precautions for Interconnected Alarms:
1. Only interconnect Brooks Smoke or Heat Alarms to the models nominated as
compatible for interconnection and do not exceed the maximum number for alarm
interconnection. Do not interconnect the Brooks alarms to those of any other
manufacturer. Doing this will void warranty and may damage the Alarms and could
result in a shock or fire hazard.
2. The interconnect wire (minimum 0.75mm cable) must be treated as if it was an
active. It should be insulated and sheathed.
3. A maximum of 250 metres of wire can be used (maximum resistance between
detectors 50 Ohms).
4. Smoke / Heat Alarms should be interconnected only within the confines of a single
residential building.
5. Do not use an earth wire for the interconnect wire.
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5.3
RESIDENTIAL FIRE INDICATOR PANEL
The RFIP is factory pre-wired and fully tested before delivery. After receipt of the panel,
the unit should be carefully unpacked and checked for any possible mechanical damage
during transportation. Report any damage to your supplier immediately.
5.3.1 Surface Mounting Instructions
1. Locate the position where the panel is to be sited.
2. Mark the position of the two mounting holes (240mm apart) and the cable cut-outs,
5 knockouts are available on the back and 5 on the top of the enclosure.
Note that Power and ELV cables are to be kept segregated.
3. Select the appropriate mounting hardware and prepare the two mounting holes.
4. Fix the top two points, leaving approximately 6 mm of the protrusion from the wall.
Mount the Panel and secure all mounting hardware.
5.3.2 Cable Terminations
AC Power
The 230 Vac input is terminated on the mains isolate switch and earth stud provided on
the rear inside of the enclosure.
The mains isolate switch delivers AC mains to the switch mode power supply and to RFIP
main and control Termination Board which supply mains power to the Smoke / Heat
Alarms.
Drawing no. F563 shows the block wiring diagram of the basic Alarm 2000 system.
Field Wiring
Terminate all field cabling provided on the Main Control Board and on the Termination
Boards of the optional modules as per drawing no. F563 and F564. The Block Wiring
Diagram uses 3 or 4 core cable to interface the Smoke / Heat Alarms depending on
whether the Isolator feature is used.
Cables should be terminated as required. Ensure all cables are neat and secured using
approved plastic ties.
Batteries
Fit Batteries into bottom of the enclosure.
RED
Positive
BLACK
Negative
BLUE
Positive 1 / Negative 2
Using the mounting hardware provided, secure the front panel to the enclosure.
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5.4
PLACING INTO OPERATION:
Before commencing to test your Alarm 2000 system, it is important to ensure that the
equipment interfaced to the system e.g. Sprinkler system, Gas Supply or Air-conditioning,
has been isolated using the suitable isolate facility either in the panel or on the equipment
itself. It is also important to notify the occupants and the monitoring centre if the system is
monitored. The following check procedures are recommended following each installation.
Initial Check List:
A visual inspection should be performed to the system to ensure no physical damage or
loose wires or components inside the enclosure.










Cabinet visual check
Viewing window clear and firmly secured
All boards firmly mounted
DIP Switch correctly set
Optional modules as per client order
Mains Smoke/Heat Alarms wiring correctly terminated
All 230VAC mains cables correctly terminated
All ribbon Cables firmly secured
EOL resistors & diodes correctly terminated on the field devices
Manuals and instructions supplied
Power up Check List:








Ensure Key switch in the OFF position
Turn ON the mains isolating switch
Main on LED illuminates
Connect batteries
Place the Key switch in the AUTO position
Ensure all LED’s are ‘OFF’ except Mains on LED
Ensure no Smoke / Heat Alarm is sounding
Check charger output voltage 27.3V DC
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5.5
FUNCTIONAL TESTING
This section describes the system testing procedures to ensure that the Alarm 2000 is fully
functional. The testing depends on the configuration of the system i.e. the optional modules
added to the basic system.
Note: Testing of Alarm 2000 system must be performed by a fully licensed and
qualified technician.
5.5.1 Smoke / Heat Alarms
Check that the green mains indicator light is ‘ON’ on all Smoke / Heat Alarms. (If it is off,
check circuit breakers, fuses, wiring and RFIP etc.) Check the red light behind the button
or on the cover flashes every 40 seconds.
Press the test button for up to 10 seconds on each Smoke / Heat Alarm to ensure the
sensor chamber, electronics and sounder are working.
Check the red light behind the test button or on the cover flashes while horn is sounding.
The Alarm will stop within a few seconds when the test button is released. Pressing the
test button simulates the effect of smoke or heat during a real fire and is the best way to
ensure the Alarm is operating properly.
Warning: Do not test with flame. This can damage the Alarm or may set fire to the house.
We do not recommend testing with smoke or heat as the results can be
misleading unless special apparatus is used.
With the Smoke / Heat Alarm in normal mode, check that the Test button flashes red once
per minute to indicate correct self-check is functional
Check that all interconnected Alarms operate when each test button is pressed for 10
seconds.
Note: If the mains is disconnected and the battery is almost depleted the unit will
beep every 40 seconds for at least 30 days provided it has been fully charged
initially.
Note: The ionisation Smoke Alarms (EIB161e / EIB1411RC) give two short beeps
about a second apart at the end of the hush period (i.e. about 10 minutes after
test/hush button has been pressed). These two beeps should not be confused with
low battery beeps.
Refer to smoke alarm user instructions for full indications and troubleshooting.
5.5.2 Checking you can hear your Smoke Alarm
With the Smoke Heat Alarms sounding in its intended locations, check you are able to hear
them in each bedroom with the door closed, above the sound of your radio. The radio
should be set to a reasonably loud conversation level. If you can’t hear it over your radio
the chances are that it wouldn’t wake you. Re-assess the locations and number chosen.
5.5.3 Residential Fire Indicator Panel (RFIP)
5.5.3.1 Alarm Test:
Ensure the “Mains On” (Green) light is on
1. Turn the Key Switch to “FIRE”
 All Smoke / Heat Alarms connected to the system should sound
 If DIP switch 1.1 is ON, the 24VDC monitored output will activate
 If DIP switch 1.3 is ON, the alarm output relay contact changes over
 Any other facility connected to the alarm bus will activate
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2. Simulate activation of the Manual Call Point (if fitted)
 The “MCP Alarm Activated” LED flashes
 Monitored 24VDC alarm output is switched on (Bell ringing if fitted)
 Any other facility connected to the alarm bus will activate
3. Activate the “Panic Input”, the system activates the Fire Mode as per step1
4. Go to any Smoke / Heat Alarm press and hold the test button, all the Smoke or
Heat Alarms will sound. With the test button still pressed and the Smoke / Heat
Alarm still sounding press the “Alarm Locate” switch. All the Smoke / Heat Alarms
should stop sounding except the unit with the test button pressed. The Locate
facility should be active for approximately 5 minutes. To cancel the five minutes
timer, turn the key switch to “Off” position then press and hold the Locate button
until the amber LED in the switch body distinguish.
Repeat step 4 by pressing the “Alarm Isolate” switch (if the Smoke / Heat Alarms are wired
as a 4-wire system) instead of “Alarm Locate”, all the Smoke or Heat Alarms will be
disabled for approximately 5 minutes including the Smoke Alarm that has been activated.
5.5.3.2 Fault Test:
1. Remove EOL Resistor of the MCP

“MCP Fault” LED illuminates

Fault sounder is sounding

Common fault relay is energised
Press “Sounder Silence” button, the fault sounder will mute.
2. Remove EOL Resistor of the monitored alarm output

“Alarm Output Fault” LED illuminates

Fault sounder is sounding

Common fault relay is energised
Press “Sounder Silence” button, the fault sounder will mute.
5.5.3.3 System Off Test:
Turn the key switch to “OFF” position


System Off red LED (rectangular) will be flashing
System OFF relay is energised
5.5.3.4 Sprinkler Module Testing:
1. Simulate Sprinkler alarm input by bridging sprinkler input terminals (SPK/IN)
 “Sprinkler Activated” red LED flashes
 Monitored 24VDC Sprinkler alarm output is activated
 Sprinkler alarm relay is energised
Note: If the Sprinkler alarm is required to activate all the Smoke / Heat Alarms, a
normally open Sprinkler alarm relay contact must be connected to the Panic input
in the Main Control board.
2. Simulate Monitored Valve alarm input by bridging the Monitored Valve input
terminals (MV/IN)
 “Monitored Valve Tamper” red LED flashes
 Monitored 24VDC Monitored Valve alarm output is activated if the output is
not disabled
 Sprinkler alarm relay is energised
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Note: Due to routine and emergency maintenance of the Monitored Valve, the
24VDC output is required to be disabled for a period of time to avoid activating the
Monitored Valve alarm bell.
The Monitored Valve disable switch if pressed, it will disable the output for either 3 or 4
hours depending on the position of link LK2 as shown in the Sprinkler Module data sheet.
3. Move link LK1 from position “B” to position “A” and simulate Sprinkler input alarm
or Monitored Valve input alarm, all outputs will be activated “COMMON MODE”.
Move the link back to the position “A” i.e. “INDEPENDENT MODE”.
4. Remove EOL resistor of the Sprinkler input
 “Sprinkler Input Fault” yellow LED illuminates
 Fault sounder activates
 Common fault relay will be energised
5. Remove EOL resistor of the monitored 24VDC Sprinkler output
 “Sprinkler output Fault” yellow LED illuminates
 Fault sounder activates
 Common fault relay will be energised
6. Remove EOL resistor of the Monitored Valve input
 “Monitored Valve Input Fault” yellow LED illuminates
 Fault sounder activates
 Common fault relay will be energised
7. Remove EOL resistor of the monitored 24VDC Monitored Valve output
 “Monitored Valve Input Fault” yellow LED illuminates
 Fault sounder activates
 Common fault relay will be energised
5.5.3.5 Manual Override Module Testing:
1. Check all doors have 24VDC power to the door strikes i.e. door 1 to door 6 are locked.
2. Activate any Smoke or Heat Alarm connected to the system, all doors should be
released (switch off 24VDC power to each door strike, total 6 outputs) after a time
delay determined by the position of link LK1
 LK1 Position 1 = 30 Sec
 LK2 Position 2 = 16 Sec
 LK3 Position 3 = 1-2 Sec
3. Place the system back to normal condition and press the first door switch, the first
door strike will be released and the LED build in the switch body should illuminate.
Note that the switch is toggle action i.e. must be released to supply power to
the door strike which allows the door to be locked.
4. Repeat step 2 for door switch 2 to 6
5.5.3.6 Ancillary Control Module Testing:
1.
Activate a Smoke or Heat Alarm. After the output delay time has elapsed (selectable
0 or 15 seconds), the relay outputs to control the Heating / Cooling system and the
emergency lighting will energise, that causes the Heating / Cooling to shut down and
the emergency lights to turn on.
2. Press and release the Emergency Lighting AUTO/TEST button:
 The amber LED integrated to the switch body illuminates.
 The testing timer starts
 The control relay energises and turns off the mains power to the emergency
lights, which turns the lights on for the time set by the Dip switch (30, 60, 90
or 120 Minutes).
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
To re-activate the mains power to the emergency lights and terminate the
test, press & hold the emergency lighting AUTO/TEST button until the
amber LED extinguishes (approximately 5 seconds).
3. Press and release the Heating / Cooling AUTO/OFF button:
 The amber LED integral to the switch illuminates.
 The control relays energise and turn off the mains power to the Heating /
Cooling system, which shuts down the air conditioning.
 To re-activate the mains power to the Heating / Cooling system.
Press & hold the Heating/Cooling AUTO/OFF button until the amber LED
extinguishes (approximately 5 seconds).
5.5.3.7 Gas Shutdown Module Testing:
1. Simulate Sprinkler alarm activation (-Ve switching) to the alarm input of the gas
shutdown module:
 24VDC power to main gas valve turns off
 “Main Valve Open” LED extinguishes
 “Gas Pressure Fault” LED illuminates
Note: Now the DC supply to the main gas valve remains off even when the
sprinkler alarm restores. To re-initialise the system, go to step 2
2. Press and hold the “Reset” button:
 The 24VDC power will be available to the by-pass valve
 The by-pass valve opens and pressurise the gas until the main valve opens.
Once the main valve be opened i.e. the green main valve open LED
illuminates, at this moment release the Reset button
 Gas pressure fault LED extinguishes
3. Press “Gas Test” button (simulate alarm input):
 “Gas Test” LED illuminates
 Repeat as per step 1
 Restore the switch and repeat as per step 2
4. Press “Gas Isolate” button:
 “Gas Isolate” LED illuminates
 24VDC supply to the main valve is guaranteed even when the sprinkler is
activated.
Note: Gas Isolate facility is used so maintenance of the sprinkler system can
be performed.
5.5.3.8 Power Supply Supervision Module:
The Power Supply Supervision Module is tested and set up in the factory, no further
adjustments or testing required in the field.
LED’s Normal Status







LD1
LD2
LD3
LD4
LD5
LD6
LD7
Mains on – ON
Auto test Running – OFF
Battery isolate – OFF
Auto test inhibited – OFF
Power fail (relay output) – ON
Power supply fault open collector (to RFP) – OFF
Power supply fault (Relay output) - ON
Charger and Battery threshold:


Normal
Charger high
27.5V
28.2V
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


Charger low
Battery low
Battery fail
26.5V
23.8V
21.0V
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6
INSTALLER’S STATEMENT
SMOKE ALARM SYSTEM – Alarm 2000
1. Name of premises: ………………………………………………………………….
2. Site reference (if applicable) ……………………………………………………….
3. Address: ……………………………………………………………………………...
……………………………………………………………………………..
……………………………………………………………………………..
4. I/We have installed in the premises above:
New system.
Alteration to an existing system.
Modification to an existing system
5. Is the system being remotely monitored?
No
Yes
if yes,
Monitoring Centre .……………………………………………………..
Contact Name .………………………………………………………….
Phone No ………………………………………………………………..
Date of Connection ……………………………………………………..
6. Modules fitted to control panel:
Smoke alarm
Gas shutdown
Power supply supervision
Sprinkler
Ancillary control
Manual override
Monitoring (if required)
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7. Location and type of smoke/heat alarms
Location
Type
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8. Location and type of ancillary equipment
Location
Type
Model
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9. System conditions remotely monitored
Smoke / Heat Alarm activation
Sprinkler activation
Monitored valve tamper
System fault
System ‘OFF’
Control panel enclosure tamper
Power supply fault
Power supply fail
Emergency lighting activation
Heating/cooling shutdown activation
Other (see attachment)
10. Are the Smoke / Heat Alarms interconnected?
Yes
No
11. Is the interconnect wire rated for LV and segregated from the 230 Volt supply lines?
Yes
No
12. Does the 230 Volt power to the smoke/heat alarms originate from the control panel?
Yes
No
13. Are the Smoke / Heat Alarms wired for the isolate function (4 wires)
Yes
No
14. Does the 230 Volt power to the ancillary equipment originate from the control panel?
Yes
No
15. Are all protective and segregation shrouds fitted correctly?
Yes
No
16. Have all cable terminations been checked against the appropriate wiring diagram to ensure
correct location and polarity, giving particular attention to Active/neutral and battery
connections?
Yes
No
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17. Primary power source
Dedicated circuit
18. Is the appropriate circuit breaker marked ‘FIRE ALARM SYSTEM’?
Yes
19. Power supply capacity
No
…………………………………………………...
20. Standby batteries - type and capacity
…………………………………
21. Is the power supply and battery capacity the correct size to meet the system standby and
alarm time requirements?
Yes
No
22. Has the ‘fire’ mode been tested for correct operation?
Yes
No
23. Does the ‘system OFF’ indicator flash with the key switch in the off position?
Yes
No
24. Has the operator’s handbook been supplied?
Yes
No
25. Have ‘as-installed’ drawings been supplied?
Yes
No
NOTE: ANY DEFECTS WITH SYSTEM INSTALLATION MUST BE RECTIFIED PRIOR
TO THE COMMISSIONING AND HANDOVER.
I/We hereby certify that the installation has been thoroughly tested;

from each actuating device; and


the system functions as required; and
where the system is remotely monitored, that a test transmission of the alarm
signal to the monitoring centre has been satisfactorily carried out; and
the system complies to the requirements of the Building Code of Australia; and
is as represented in the ‘as-installed’ drawings and this installer’s statement.


Date: ………………………
Name: ……………………………………
Signature: ……………………………….
Installation company: ……………………………………………………….
Address: ……………………………………………………………………...
Phone: …………………………………
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7
COMMISSIONING TEST REPORT - Alarm 2000
Installed at
Name of premises: ………………………………………………………………
Site reference (if applicable) ……………………………………………………
Address: …………………………………………………………………………...
The system being commissioned is:
New system.
Alteration to an existing system.
Modification to an existing system
Date of Commissioning tests: …………………………………
The purpose of this commissioning test report is to verify the system design and
performance at the time of system handover. The commissioning is to be carried out in
conjunction with the operators manual, installer’s statement and ‘as installed’ drawings.
Should any defects be found, such defects are to be recorded on the commissioning report
of the day, shall be rectified prior to the completion of commissioning, with a supplementary
report being completed on final commissioning.
Commissioning Company: ……………………………………………………………..
Address: ………………………………………………………………………………….
Commissioning Person: ………………………………………………………………...
Signature: ………………………………………………………………………………...
NOTE: It is recommended that the commissioning person read the test report in full
and be conversant with its requirements prior to commencing the commissioning
tests.
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Tick the relevant boxes
INSTRUCTIONS
1. Is this report a supplementary to a previous commissioning report?
Yes
No
Not applicable
2. Is the following documentation available?
(a) Operators manual
Yes
No
Not applicable
(b) Installer’s statement
Yes
No
Not applicable
(c) ‘As installed’ drawings
Yes
No
Not applicable
(d) Previous Com. Reports
Yes
No
Not applicable
SYSTEM INFORMATION
Basic Configuration
3. Check that the control panel is suitably located and secured against tampering
Yes
No
Not Applicable
4. Ensure control panel is configured as per the installer’s statement
Yes
No
Not Applicable
5. Ensure that all Smoke and Heat Alarms are:
(a) Listed in the installer’s statement
Yes
No
Not Applicable
(b) Compatible with the control panel
Yes
No
Not Applicable
(c) Installed in an environment for
Yes
No
Not Applicable
(a) Listed in the installer’s statement
Yes
No
Not Applicable
(b) Compatible with the control panel
Yes
No
Not Applicable
(c) Installed in an environment for
Yes
No
Not Applicable
which they are suited.
6. Ensure that all ancillary equipment is
which they are suited.
7. Check that the primary power source for the system has been provided in
accordance with AS3000 or TS009 as appropriate, and that the isolating switch
disconnects the active conductors.
Yes
47
No
Not Applicable
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
8. Check that all cable terminations within the control panel are suitably grouped, tidy
and secured as appropriate, and that all protective shrouds are in place.
Yes
No
Not Applicable
9. Check that both the primary and secondary power sources are of a suitable type
and capacity to meet the systems maximum load requirements, and are capable
of meeting the nominated standby and alarm times.
Yes
No
Not Applicable
10. Check the float voltage to ensure the charger setting is correct.
Battery type: ……………………………………………….
Battery capacity: …………………………………………..
Float Voltage (27.5 +/- 0.5%): ……………………………….
11. With primary power supplied check that the control panel ‘Mains on’ indicator and
the green power on indicators for all Smoke / Heat Alarms are illuminated.
Yes
No
Not Applicable
12. Where the Smoke / Heat Alarms are interconnected, locate the last unit on the
circuit and check that the operation of the test button causes all Smoke / Heat
Alarms to sound.
Yes
No
Not Applicable
13. Where the Smoke / Heat Alarms are interconnected and with all Smoke / heat
Alarms sounding, check that the locate function silences all Smoke / Heat Alarms
except the unit initiating the alarm, and that the locate control indicator illuminates.
Yes
No
Not Applicable
14. Where the Smoke / Heat Alarms are interconnected and with all Smoke / Heat
Alarms sounding, check that the isolate function silences all Smoke / Heat Alarms,
and that the isolate control indicator illuminates.
Yes
No
Not Applicable
15. Open circuit and short circuit the end of line device on the manual call point circuit,
or conduct other appropriate tests to ensure that fault and alarm conditions are
operating correctly, and that the sounder silence facility functions correctly.
Yes
No
Not Applicable
16. Open circuit and short circuit the end of line device on the alarm output circuit to
ensure that fault and alarm conditions are operating correctly.
Yes
No
Not Applicable
17. Conduct appropriate tests to ensure that each output functions as required.
Yes
48
No
Not Applicable
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
OPTIONS
Where additional modules have been added to the system the following additional tests
shall be carried out, as required.
Power supply monitoring
Note: The operating parameters and threshold voltages are factory pre-set, the
following test is to confirm functionality.
18. Disconnect the standby supply, check that within 1 hour the power supply fault
indicator illuminates, and ensure that the PSU fault output functions correctly
Yes
No
Not Applicable
Residential Sprinkler
19. Open circuit and short circuit the end of line device on the sprinkler system flow
switch circuit, or conduct other appropriate tests to ensure that fault and alarm
conditions are operating correctly, and ensure that each associated output
operates as required.
Yes
No
Not Applicable
20. Open circuit and short circuit the end of line device on the monitored valve circuit,
or conduct other appropriate tests to ensure that fault and tamper conditions are
operating correctly, and ensure that each associated output operates as required.
Yes
No
Not Applicable
Manual Override
21. Operate each override control in turn and check that each output and associated
ancillary equipment functions correctly, and ensure each control indicator
illuminates.
Yes
No
Not Applicable
Ancillary Control
22. With the emergency lighting controls set to automatic, place the system into an
alarm condition, ensure that the emergency lighting is activated whilst the system
is in that condition.
Yes
No
Not Applicable
23. With the Heating / Cooling controls set to automatic, place the system into an alarm
condition, ensure that the Heating / Cooling output is activated whilst the system is
in that condition.
Yes
No
Not Applicable
24. Ensure that the ‘OFF’ function for the Heating / Cooling functions correctly, and the
control indicator illuminates.
Yes
49
No
Not Applicable
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
Gas Shutdown
25. Check that the main valve operates correctly under the specified alarm conditions.
Yes
No
Not Applicable
26. Check that the main valve cannot be reset with the downstream piping
depressurised.
Yes
No
Not Applicable
27. Confirm the reset hold time nominated in the installer’s statement
Yes
No
Not Applicable
28. Check that the main valve ‘isolate’ control functions correctly
Yes
No
Not Applicable
Monitoring
29. Check that the correct alarm signaling equipment has been installed.
Yes
No
Not Applicable
30. Check that the signals requiring remote monitoring are allocated to the correct zone
Yes
No
Not Applicable
31. Conduct appropriate tests between the system and the monitoring centre to verify
successful transmission and correct signal identification.
Yes
50
No
Not Applicable
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Alarm 2000 Iss 5
8
Operator’s GUIDE
8.1
INDICATORS
Module
QTY
1
1
Main
Module
Sprinkler
Manual
Override
Name
Mains On
Power Supply Fault
Colour
Green
Yellow
Sounder
Illuminates to indicate mains power is on
Illuminates if: Charger high or Low
Batteries is less than50%
capacity
Auto battery test fail (latching)
1
MCP input Fault
Yellow
1
Alarm Output Fault
Yellow
1
Alarm Activated
Red
Battery disconnected or missing
Illuminates if MCP input is open circuit
Illuminates if 24VDC Output is short or open
circuit
Flashes if MCP input is activated
1
Alarm Locator
Yellow
Illuminates during locate timer (5 minutes)
1
Alarm Isolator
Yellow
Illuminates during isolate timer (5 minutes)
1
Sounder Silence
Yellow
Illuminates while the sounder is silenced
1
System Off
Red
Flashes if the system is turned off
1
Sprinkler Alarm
Red
1
Monitored Valve Alarm
Red
1
Sprinkler Input Fault
Yellow
1
Sprinkler Output Fault
Yellow
1
Mon. Valve Input Fault
Yellow
Flashes if the sprinkler has been activated
Flashes if the Monitored Valve has been
closed
Illuminates if the Sprinkler input is open
circuit
Illuminates if the Sprinkler output is open or
short circuit
Illuminates if the Mon. Valve input is open
circuit
1
Mon. Valve Output
Fault
Illuminates if the Mon. Valve output is open
or short circuit
1
Monitored Valve
Disable
6
Door Isolate
Yellow
1
Emer. Lighting Test
Yellow
1
A/C Off
Yellow
1
Main Valve Open
Green
Flashes during the Monitored Valve disable
timer
Illuminates if the door release switch has
been pressed. The LED is built in the switch
body.
Illuminates if the AUTO/TEST switch is
pressed to indicate that Emergency lighting
is in test mode
Illuminates if the AUTO/OFF switch is
pressed to indicate that A/C heating/cooling
is off
Illuminates to indicate that the power is
available to the main valve i.e. the valve is
opened
1
Gas Pressure Fault
Yellow
Illuminates to indicate gas pressure fault due
to a gas leakage or faulty pressure switch
1
Gas Test
Yellow
Illuminates when the gas test button is
pressed to simulate Sprinkler activation
1
Gas Isolate
Yellow
Illuminates to indicate that gas has been
isolated to maintain the Sprinkler System
Ancillary
Control
Gas
Shutdown
Function
51
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
8.2
Module
CONTROL SWITCHES
QTY
Type
Name
Function
OFF - System is switched off, Charger is on and
System fail output is activated
1
3 Pos. Key
Switch
Off/Auto/Fire
Main
Control
AUTO - System on and normal, automatic alarm
response
FIRE - All Smoke / Heat Alarms sound and alarm
outputs are activated if selected
1
1
1
Momentarily
Switch
Momentarily
Switch
Momentarily
Switch
Alarm Locate
Locate the activated Smoke / Heat Alarm (s) for 5
Minutes
Alarm Isolate
Isolate all the Smoke / Heat Alarms for 5 Minutes
Sounder Silence
Mute the Sounder
Sprinkler
1
Momentarily
Switch
Monitored Valve
output Disable
Isolate the Monitored Valve output for 3 or 6 hours,
automatically resets after the timer times out
Manual
Override
6
Toggle Switch
Door 1-6
Release
When pressed, it overrides the alarm condition and
manually release the doors
1
Momentarily
Switch
Auto/Test
When pressed, it activates the output to the
Emergency lighting relay and start testing
1
Momentarily
Switch
Auto/Off
When pressed, it activates the output to the Air
conditioning relay and shutdown the A/C
1
Toggle Switch
Gas Isolate
supplies 24VDC to the main valve to ensure testing
the Sprinkler System does not stop gas flowing
1
Momentarily
Switch
Reset
Activates the bypass valve output to manually reopen the gas main valve
1
Momentarily
Switch
Test
Simulates Sprinkler activation to enable gas
shutdown operation
Ancillary
control
Gas
shutdown
52
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
9
Spare Parts
Description
Stock Code
Photoelectric Smoke Alarm (Rechargeable Lithium Batt)
Ionisation Smoke Alarm (Rechargeable Lithium Batt)
Heat Alarm (Rechargeable Lithium Batt)
Photoelectric Smoke Alarm (Alkaline Batt)
Ionisation Smoke Alarm (Alkaline Batt)
Heat Alarm (Alkaline Batt)
Ionisation Smoke Alarm (obsolete)
Photoelectric Smoke Alarm (obsolete)
Heat Alarm (obsolete)
Main Termination and Control Board
Main Display Board
Sprinkler Termination Board
Sprinkler Display Board
Manual Override Termination Board
Manual Override Display Board
Ancillary Control Termination Board (obsolete)
Ancillary Control Termination Board AS2293
Ancillary Control Display Board (obsolete)
Ancillary Control Display Board AS2293
Gas Shutdown Termination Board
Gas Shutdown Display Board
Power Supply Supervision Card
3 Position 003 Key Switch
Cam Lock 003 Key
10 Way Ribbon Cable Assembly 500mm
20 Way Ribbon Cable Assembly 600mm
Fuse Fast Blow 1 Amp 1 AG
Fuse Fast Blow 1.5 Amp 1 AG
Fuse Fast Blow 3 Amp 1 AG
Relay Base 2 C/O
Plug in Relay 24VDC DC 2 C/O 10A
12V / 7AH Sealed Lead Acid Battery
12V / 12AH Sealed Lead Acid Battery
Switch Mode Power Supply 28V / 60W
Mains Isolate Switch
Decal Label Alarm 2000 Main Board
Decal Label Alarm 2000 Sprinkler
Decal Label Alarm 2000 Manual Override
Decal Label Alarm 2000 Ancillary
Decal Label Alarm 2000 Gas Shutdown
Decal Label Alarm 2000 Blank
53
EIB166e
EIB161e
EIB164e
EIB146RC
EIB141RC
EIB144RC
EIPFSITL
EIPFSPTL
EIPFSTTL
SUB700
SUB705
SUB710
SUB715
SUB720
SUB725
SUB740
SUB741
SUB745
SUB746
SUB750
SUB755
SUB760
SK150
LO100
CA105
CA110
FU160
FU155
FU170
RL140
RL360
BBAT12V6.5
BBAT12V12
BAPS28V60W
SW160,SW161 & SW162
LA775
LA780
LA785
LA790
LA895
LA800
PCB no.
PCB176
PCB175
PCB169
PCB168
PCB178
PCB177
PCB180
PCB195
PCB179
PCB194
PCB171
PCB170
PCB181
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
10 COMPATIBLE DEVICES
Smoke/Heat Alarms2:






EIB166e Mains powered Photoelectric Smoke Alarm c/w integral rechargeable
lithium battery backup.
EIB161e Mains powered Ionisation Smoke Alarm c/w integral rechargeable
lithium battery backup.
EIB164e Mains powered Heat Alarm c/w integral rechargeable lithium battery
backup.
EIB146RC Mains powered Photoelectric Smoke Alarm c/w Alkaline battery
backup.
EIB141RC Mains powered Ionisation Smoke Alarm c/w Alkaline battery backup.
EIB144RC Mains powered Heat Alarm c/w Alkaline battery backup.
Break Glass Alarm:

MRCSRR Red (dry contact) or equivalent.
Alarm Bell:

B024CR 155mm 24VDC Red or equivalent.
Sounders / Strobes:

All Brooks 24VDC electronic sounders, strobes or combinations. (See catalogue).
Hearing Impaired:



EIB170RF Wireless Deaf Alarm, only when wireless module EIB100MRF is fitted
in EIB160e Alarms.
EIB173P Vibralarm 230 VAC
BAVISA230 Visalert 230 VAC c/w rechargeable lead acid battery backup.
Emergency Lighting:

MBMM10 Non-maintained 10 Watt Halogen or equivalent.
Additional Inputs:

Any normally open voltage free dry contact device.
Panel Batteries:

2
BB Battery: BBAT12V6.5 & BBAT12V12, SSL Listing No. AFP-1228
EIPFSPTLH, EIPFSITL and EIPFSTTL are compatible but these are discontinued.
54
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
11 GUARANTEE
If the product has any defect due to faulty workmanship or material it is to be returned to
one of the Brooks offices shown in this manual. Brooks will, at its sole discretion, repair or
replaced the item free of charge.
On returning a component or complete product, proof or purchase will be required. If
returning the complete product all accessories and documentation MUST be returned.
This guarantee does not cover damage caused to the product or its components as a
result of incorrect installation, accident, neglect, misuse, unauthorised dismantling or
contamination howsoever caused, careless handling or where repairs have been made or
attempted by others. On site warranty repairs will be carried out at the discretion of the
manufacturer.
No other guarantees written or verbal are authorised to be made on behalf of Brooks. All
other conditions and warranties whether expressed or implied are, to the extent permitted
by law, hereby excluded.
As Brooks Australia has no control over the system's design, installation to the relevant
Australian Standard or maintenance, the Company and its agents take no responsibility
for any damage, consequential loss or injury caused to any equipment, property or persons
resulting from the use of the Residential Fire Panels.
Brooks guarantees system components, other than smoke/heat alarms for a period of
either three years from the date of purchase. Smoke / Heat Alarms are guaranteed to the
original purchaser for a five year period after the original date of purchase.
Remember the EIB161e and EIB141RC contain a small quantity of radioactive material.
You must return unwanted Smoke Alarms to your supplier or your local Department of
Health. Transportation of the Smoke Alarm must be by hand, courier or similar means.
Disposal via the post is not permitted.
55
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
12 APPENDICES
12.1
APPENDIX “A” BATTERY CALCULATION
Example:
Alarm 2000 Power Supply & Battery Calculations
26-Oct-17
Project:
Job No.
RFP
QTY
Basic Alarm 2000 System, Main Control Module
Quiescent (A)
Alarm (A)
0.020
0.120
Sprinkler Module
1
0.020
0.150
Ancillary Control Module
1
0.005
0.175
Manual Override Module
1
0.001
0.025
1
0.060
0.000
Gas Shutdown Module
1
1.667
0.067
Power Supply Supervision Module
1
0.051
0.051
Number of Door Strikes
Current Drain of Miscellaneous Ancillaries in Alarm
0.000
1.824
Total System Current (A)
Back up Time Required in Quiescent (decimal)
4.000
Back up Time Required in Alarm (decimal)
1.000
Fire Panel Battery Requirements (A/h)
Fire Panel Power Supply Requirements (A)
Inc. +25%
Combined System Battery Requirements (A/h)
Nearest Standard Battery Size (A/h)
Next Largest Standard Battery Size (A/h)
Inc. +25%
-0.7%
-0.7%
0.588
9.855
2.235
12.090
12.0
12.0
Select
X
Use of this form:
Complete the sections highlighted to calculated battery size required. Suggested
battery size will be marked 'X' .
Complete quiescent back up time (4-24 Hours) and alarm back up (0.5 Hour)
Battery Calculation
{(Total "Q" Current x "Q" Back up Time) + 2 x (Total "A" Current x "A" Back up Time)} x 1.25
"Q" : Quiescent
"A" : Alarm
An automated battery calculations spreadsheet is available from BROOKS. Please
contact BROOKS Sales.
56
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
12.2
APPENDIX B
DATA SHEETS & WIRING DIAGRAMS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Main Control Module Data sheet
Sprinkler Module
Ancillary Control Module
Manual Override Module
Gas Shutdown Control Module
Power Supply Supervision Module
Basic System Block Wiring Diagram (with power supply supervision module)
Alarm 2000 Options Block Wiring Diagram
57
Site Manual
M7
ALARM
SYSTEM OFF
FAULT
COM N/O N/C COM N/O N/C COM N/O N/C
BROOKS
M6
COM. FAULT
ALARM
SYSTEM OFF
DRY CONTACT
PANIC
I
I
N
R20
Q5
Q7
D11
TB5
+
C4
R12
D3
+
Q8
C10
R18
Q10
RP2
R17 R16
Q9
R19
555
R21 U1
+
C9
MAINS ON
24V IN
DESCRIPTION
R10
TB7
J2
MO
R9
R8
PSU FAULT
FLASH BUS
C6
Q6
C11
R5
R4
B-
U3
+
D4
B+
LM324
D2
C5
D10
+ 24V -
RL6
D13
F2
D1
M3
TH1
FAULT
FL
C7
+
Q4
RP1
C8
C12
RL4
D17
R13
SF
1 2 3 4 5 6
R11 R15 R14
U4
M1
A
+ C3
TB4
ALARM IN
ALARM OUT
RP3
SW1
+
LK1
D9
D14
D16
D8 D15
N
F4
+ +
Q1
FT
C2
D7
+
-
ALo
RL1
-+
ALi
R6
R7
D5
Q3
RL3
F1
TB6
D6
M8
M9
M10
RL5
RL7
TB3
240V
IN
M4
M5
C1
D12 RL2
M2
Q2
ZD1
U2
F3
TB1
- 24V +
PCB176R1 SUB700
D18
TB2
Serial No
BGA IN
DRY CONTACT
ALARM OUTPUT
24V DC/1A
R1
ALARM OUTPUT
PANIC INPUT
AUX 24V
BGA IN (N/O)
A
R22
N1
R2
R3
N2
+
A
-
ISOLATOR
+
WITH
ISOLATOR
-
ALARMS
WITHOUT
+
TO SMOKE
ALARMS
-
TO SMOKE
AUX. 24V
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
Vout COM+ 0V
TO KEY SWITCH
: ALARM 2000 Main Control and Termination Board provides the necessary control, monitoring and
termination of Mains Smoke / Heat Alarms and Manual Call Points.
SPECIFICATIONS : Operational Voltage : 24V DC
Current Consumption : 20 mA Quiecent
120 mA Maximum alarm current including MCP activation
INPUTS
: 240V AC to supply power to Smoke/ Heat Alarms, TB3
Monitored Manual Call Point input, EOL Resistor is 3K3, TB6
Panic input (normally open contact) to activate Smoke/Heat alarms and/or Manual Call Point output, TB6
OUTPUTS
: 240V AC to connect Smoke/Heat Alarms with Alarm Isolator, TB1
240V AC to connect Smoke/Heat Alarms without Alarm Isolator, TB2
Monitored 24V DC alarm output, EOL resistor 3K3, TB6
Voltage free contact alarm output, TB6
Voltage free contact fault output, TB6
Voltage free contact System OFF, TB6
Auxillary fused 24V DC @ 1A for other applications, TB6
CONTROLS & INDICATORS (on Display Board) :
Alarm Locator Switch : Locate the activated Smoke/Heat Alarm with built in Amber LED which illuminates during locate timing
Alarm Isolator Switch : To isolate activated Smoke/Heat Alarms for 5 minutes
Fault Sounder Sielence Switch : Mute sounder with built in Amber LED
DIP Switch Setting
Alarm Activated LED : Flashing Red
System OFF LED : Flashing Red
Alarm Output Fault LED : Steady Amber
MCP Input Fault LED : Steady Amber
Power Supply Fault LED : Steady Amber
Mains ON LED : Green
S1
ON
S2
S3
S4
S5
S6
Fire Mone activates 24V DC BGA output
Only BGA input activates alarm dry contact output
OFF ON
Only Smoke/Heat Alarms activate alarm dry contact output
ON ON
Both Smoke/Heat Alarms and BGA input activate alarm dry contact output
ON OFF
Only BGA input activate Optional Modules
Only Smoke/Heat Alarms activates Optional Modules
OFF ON
ON ON
Both Smoke/Heat Alarms and BGA input activate Optional Modules
ON BGA input initiate Fire Mode
ON OFF
FUSES : F1 = 3A
F2 = 1A
F3 = 1A
F4 = 1.5A
ALL FUSES ARE FAST BLOW & 1 AG
TITLE
BROOKS
AUSTRALIA
ALARM 2000 RESIDENTIAL PANEL
2
ADD FUSE FUNCTION, RATING & TYPE
O.P.
A.S.
13/3/2002
1
UPDATE TO Vcad
O.P.
A.S.
21/11/2000
0
ORIGINAL ISSUE
O.P.
A.S.
DATE
ISS
20/8/2002
REVISION
MAIN CONTROL BOARD
DATA SHEET
DRN CHK
DRAWN
O.P.
PART No.
DRAWING No.
ISSUE
No.
A.S.
SUB700
21/11/00
58
CHECKED
21/11/00
F565-A
SH 1 of 6
2
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
SPRINKLER ALARM
24V EOL 3K3
SPK MONITOR
SPK ALARM
SPK/OP
COM1 NO1 NC1 COM2NO2 NC2 +
-
Q4
C14
U2
R4
R5
R6
RP2
C7
C6
C9
C8
RL3
M5
M6
M8
M7
NC
M4
RP3
LM324
MV MONITOR
MV ALARM
COM1 NO1 NC1 COM2 NO2 NC2
COM NO
M3
COMMON
FAULT
COM FAULT
RL1
RL2
RL4
RL6
LK2
FL
ZD1
C10
+
R7
U3
D6
D9
D8
A
B
LK1
D10
Q7
F1
FT
R8
AL
D1
TO MAIN
BOARD
+
D2
TB1
D5
D11
J1
D3
C12
+
D7
U4
+
Q5
D4
C11
C5
-
RL5
C4
PIC
12C508A
Q2
MV/OUT
+
-
TB3
M2
RP1
RP5
U1 C2
RP4
+
LM324
MV/IN
+
-
M1
C13
Q3
SPK/IN
+
-
1 2 3 4
PCB169R2 SUB710
C1
+
+
TB2
C3
R1
R2
R3
MONITORED VALVE TAMPER
DRY CONTACT
BROOKS
SPRINKLER ALARM
DRY CONTACT
FLOW SWITCH I/P
N/O EOL 3K3
Q1
MONITORED VALVE TAMPER
24V EOL 3K3
Serial No
MONITORED VALVE I/P
N/O EOL 3K3
F2
Q6
DESCRIPTION
: The Sprinkler Module is used to control and monitor the Residential Sprinkler Systems.
SPECIFICATIONS: Operational Voltage : 27V DC
Current consumption : 30mA Quiececnt
96 mA alarm current of either Sprinkler alarm or Monitored Valve tamper
150 mA maximum alarm current of both Sprinkler alarm and Monitored Valve tamper
INPUTS :
Supervised N/O contact for Flow/Pressure switch
Supervised N/O contact for Monitored Valve Tamper
Alarm input (-ve switching) from the Main Module activated by Smoke/Heat Alarms or Manual Call Points
Note : The alarm input to the Sprinkler Module can be used as a Sprinkler alarm output to acivate Smoke
Alarms or Ancillary Control Module.
OUTPUTS :
Supervised 27V DC / 1Amp fused output, Sprinkler alarm
Supervised 27V DC / 1Amp fused output, Monitored Valve tamper
2 sets of voltage free contacts, Sprinkler alarm
2 sets of voltage free contacts, Monitored Valve tamper
Common Fault voltage free contact
EOL Resistor :
3K3 for inputs and outputs
CONTROLS & INDICTORS (on display board) :
Monitored Valve Disable Switch SW1 : Momentary action, when pressed once, it isolates the Monitored
Valve output (24V dc) for 3 or 6 hours depending on Link 2 setting and then reset. Pressing the switch
for 5 seconds will reset the timer.
Sprinkler Activated LED : flashing red, LD6
Monitored Valve Tamper LED : Flashing red, LD5
Sprinkler Input & Output Fault LED's : Steady yellow, LD4 & LD2
Monitored Valve Input & Output Fault : Steady Yellow, LD3 & LD2
Link Setting :
LK1.A common output for Sprinkler alarm and Monitored Valve tamper
LK1.B separate output for Sprinkler alarm and for Monitored Valve tamper
LK2.1 Test Mode
: Used only during board testing to check timers
LK2.2 Normal Mode : LK2.3 isolate the Monitored Valve output for 3 hours
LK2.4 isolate the Monitored Valve output for 6 hours
Fuses :
F1 = 1A & F2 = 1A, FAST Blow, 1AG
TITLE
BROOKS
AUSTRALIA
ALARM 2000 RESIDENTIAL PANEL
20/8/20002
2
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O.P.
A.S.
13/3/2002
1
UPDATE TO Vcad
O.P.
A.S.
21/11/2000
0
ORIGINAL ISSUE
O.P.
A.S.
DATE
ISS
REVISION
SPRINKLER MODULE
DATA SHEET
DRN CHK
DRAWN
O.P.
PART No.
DRAWING No.
ISSUE
No.
A.S.
SUB710
21/11/2000
59
CHECKED
21/11/2000
F565-B
SH 2 of 6
2
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
A/C HEATING / COOLING
24V
+
EMERGENCY LIGHTING
24V
DRY CONTACTS
-
COM NO NC
A/C
HEATING/
COOLING
1A
1AG
FAST
F1
DRY CONTACTS
-
+
COM NO
2A
NC
1AG
FAST
EMERGENCY
LIGHTING
TB1
F2
TB3
TB2
+
FROM PREVIOUS
MODULE
RL2
Q1
RL1
Q2
AL
S1
R4
CR1
U1
S/N
C2
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
R1 R2
C4
D3
+
R6
AL
ZD1
J1
C1
C5
C3
RP1
DESCRIPTION :
PCB195R1
SUB741
D1
U2
D2
R3
TO NEXT
MODULE
TB4
* The Ancillary Control Module provides 2 outputs to control the operation of Air-Conditioning
system and Emergency Lighting via 2 external relays.
* Both outputs will be automatically activated on the reciept of an alarm.
* Response time to alarm either immediately or after 15 second delay depending on S1.2 setting.
* To test the Emergency Lighting, press and release the AUTO/TEST button, the LED integrated
in the switch body illuminates.
* The testing time may be set to 30, 60, 90 & 120 minutes, depending on S1.3 & S1.4 setting.
* To override Emergency Lighting test, press and hold the AUTO/TEST button, until the LED
exstinguish (approximately 5 seconds).
* To shutdoun the air conditioning system manually, press and release the AUTO/OFF button,
the LED illuminates and the air conditioning shuts down.
* To return to normal, press and hold the button, until the LED extinguish (approximately 5 sec).
SPECIFICATIONS : Operational Voltage : 24V DC
Current consumption : 5 mA Quiecent
78 mA Alarm without external relays
INPUT :
OUTPUTS :
175 mA alarm with external relays
TB3 & TB4 Alarm input (-ve switching) from Main Module
24V DC / 1 Amp. maximum & 1 set of dry contact rated 24V DC 5A
24V DC / 1 Amp. maximum & 1 set of dry contact rated 24V DC 5A
CONTROLS & INDICATORS(On Display Board):
FUSES :
AUTO/TEST switch with built in Amber LED for Emergency lighting to indicate "TEST" position
AUTO/OFF switch with built in Amber LED for Air-Conditioning/Heating to indicate "OFF" position
F1 = 1A & F2 = 2A, Fast Blow, 1 AG
DIP SWITCH SETTING:
S1.1 Factory use only (must be OFF)
S1.2 Set alarm response time "ON" 0 second "OFF" 15 second
S1.3 & S1.4 Set Emergency Lighting test time
*S1.3 OFF S1.4 OFF 30 Min.
*S1.3 ON S1.4 OFF 60 Min.
*S1.3 OFF S1.4 ON 90 Min.
*S1.3 ON S1.4 ON 120 Min.
S1.5
S1.6
S1.7
S1.8
Set output of the Air conditioning System to 24V normal and 0V in alarm (fail safe)
Set output of the Air conditioning System to 0V normal and 24V in alarm
Set output of the Emergency Lighting to 24V normal and 0V in alarm (fail safe)
Set output of the Emergency Lighting to 0V normal and 24V in alarm
TITLE
BROOKS
AUSTRALIA
ALARM 2000 RESIDENTIAL PANEL
23/06/2003
13/6/2003
DATE
1
0
ISS
ORIGINAL ISSUE
O.P.
PROTOTYPE
O.P.
REVISION
NEW ANCILLARY CONTROL MODULE (AS2293)
DRAWN
CHECKED
DATA SHEET
O.P.
A.S.
PART No.
DRAWING No.
A.S.
A.S.
SUB741
DRN CHK
13/6/2003
60
13/6/2003
F593
ISSUE
No.
1
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
D2
D1
FROM PREVIOUS
MODULE
+
-
+
-
+
-
+
TB3
D3
-
D4
+
D5
DOOR 2
RELEASE
-
D6
DOOR 4
RELEASE
DOOR 1
RELEASE
+
DOOR 6
RELEASE
DOOR 3
RELEASE
-
DOOR 5
RELEASE
F1
D8
RL3
RL2
RL1
RL7
AL
+
M1
-
RL4
M2
R2
R3
BROOKS
RL5
M3
R6
R5
R4
M4
D2
D1
+
D7
U1
C1
J1
S/No
D3
AL
D4
R8
Q1
R7
-
D5
+
R1
D6
TB2
PCB178 R1 SUB720
RL6
M5
LK1 1 2 3
M6
TB1
TO NEXT
MODULE
DESCRIPTION :
The Manual Override Module provides 24V dc output for 6 individual electric door locks. Upon
the receipt of an alarm, 24V supply to electric door locks switch off and release the doors.
The doors can be released manualy using an independent override switch for each door. The
The switches have build in LED's which illuminate to indicate that the switch is active i.e.
the doors are opened.
Note : If more than 6 switches are required, additional modules can be added to the system.
SPECIFICATIONS :Operational Voltage : 24V DC
Current Consumption : 1 mA Quiecent
25 mA Alarm
120 mA Override, 6 switches
INPUTS :
Alarm input (-ve switching) from the main module activated by Smoke / Heat Alarms and
Manual Call Point.
OUTPUTS :
24V dc for 6 door locks rated to 1 Amp. maximum, D1-D6
CONTROLS & INDICATORS (On Display Board) :
6 Toggle action switches with built in amber LED
Note : Maximum supply current to the module is 2 Amp. (F1)
Time Delay Setting : LK1.1 = 30 Sec
LK1.2 = 15 Sec
LK1.3 = 1-2 Sec
FUSES :
F1 = 2A, Fast Blow, 1 AG
TITLE
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ALARM 2000 RESIDENTIAL PANEL
2
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O.P.
A.S.
13/3/2002
1
UPDATE TO Vcad
O.P.
A.S.
21/11/2000
20/20/2002
0
ORIGINAL ISSUE
O.P.
A.S.
DATE
ISS
REVISION
MANUAL OVERRIDE MODULE
DATA SHEET
DRN CHK
DRAWN
O.P.
PART No.
DRAWING No.
ISSUE
No.
A.S.
SUB720
21/11/2000
61
CHECKED
21/11/2000
F565-D
SH4 of 6
2
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
GAS PRESSURE
FAULT
MAIN VALVE SUPPLY
GAS
ISOLATED
MAIN VALVE
GAS PRESSURE SWITCH
CLOSED
ALARM INPUT
ACTIVATED
BY-PASS VALVE
M V CLOSED
COM N/O N/C
MVS
GPS
N/O COM N/C
B/P V
+
AL
0V
R1
R2
D5
RL2
AL
D4
DESCRIPTION :
F3
D2
TB2
J1
D1
F2
Q1
0V
FROM
SPRINKLER
MODULE
+24V
0V
RL1
SPK ALARM
+24V
RL3
+24V
S/No
M2
M4
RL5
D3
RL4
M3
BROOKS
PCB171 R1 SUB750
M1
+24V
F1
TB1
TB4
TB3
-
PRES FAULT
COM N/O N/C
+
M V ISOL
COM N/O N/C
-
INPUT ACT'TD
COM N/O N/C
SPK ALARM
0V
TO
NEXT
MODULE
The Gas Shutdown Module is used to control natural gas or LPG flow in premises where
Sprinkler System is installed.
The main gas valve is powered from the module via a normally energized relay (fail safe).
When the sprinkler system operates, an alarm signal from the sprinkler module will cause
the relay to de-energize and switch off the power to the main gas valve which shutdown
the gas to the appliances.
SPECIFICATIONS : Operational Voltage : 24V DC
Current Consumption : 67 mA Quiecent + 1.6 Amp. for gas valve
27 mA Sprinkler Alarm
INPUTS :
Alarm input (-ve switching) from the sprinkler module, TB1.2
Dry contact com/no/nc from main gas valve pressure switch, TB3
OUTPUTSt :
24V dc for main valve supply rated to 3 Amp. maximum, TB3
24V dc for by-pass valve rated to 3 Amp. maximum, TB3
Voltage free contact for sprinkler alarm input activation, TB4
Voltage free contact for gas isolated, TB4
Voltage free contact for pressure switch fault, TB4
Voltage free contact for main valve closed, TB4
CONTROLS & INDICATORS (On Display Board) :
GAS TEST Switch : simulate sprinkler alarm activation
GAS ISOLATE : Override sprinkler alarm to allow for sprinkler system maintenance
GAS RESET Switch : To open the by-pass valve to pressurise the pipes
MAIN VALVE OPEN LED
GAS PRESSURE FAULT LED
FUSES :
F1 - F3 = 3A, Fast Blow, 1 AG
TITLE
BROOKS
AUSTRALIA
ALARM 2000 RESIDENTIAL PANEL
20/8/2002
2
ADD FUSE FUNCTION, RATING & TYPE
O.P.
A.S.
13/3/2002
1
UPDATE TO Vcad
O.P.
A.S.
0
ORIGINAL ISSUE
O.P.
A.S.
21/11/2000
DATE
ISS
REVISION
GAS SHUTDOWN MODULE
DATA SHEET
DRN CHK
DRAWN
O.P.
PART No.
DRAWING No.
ISSUE
No.
A.S.
SUB750
21/11/2000
62
CHECKED
21/11/2000
F565-E
SH 5 of 6
2
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
63
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
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Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
65
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
66
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
12.3
APPENDIX “C”
Older Revision of Ancillary Control Module
12.3.1 Ancillary Control Module:
ANCILLARY CONTROL
EMERGENCY LIGHTING
HEATING/COOLING
AUTO/TEST
AUTO/OFF
Provides controls for the automatic and manual operation of air-conditioning / heating plant
and emergency lighting.
Air-conditioning
In the AUTO mode the air-conditioning/heating is automatically shut down if a fire alarm
signal is received from a Smoke/Heat Alarm, MCP or Sprinkler alarm dependent upon the
configuration selected. An output delay is provided to avoid a plant shutdown from a false
alarm due to a transient alarm condition. The delay time is set to 15 Seconds.
The air-conditioning/heating plant may be manually switched ‘OFF’ by pressing and
releasing the 'AUTO/OFF' button. In the ‘OFF’ mode the amber LED integral to the switch
will illuminate and will remain in this condition until manually de-selected. To restore to the
auto condition, press and release the “AUTO/OFF” button, the amber LED will extinguish.
Emergency Lighting
In the ‘AUTO’ mode the Emergency lighting will be automatically switched on if a fire alarm
signal is received from a Smoke/Heat Alarm, MCP or Sprinkler alarm dependent upon the
configuration selected. An output delay is provided to avoid unnecessary activation from a
false alarm due to a transient alarm condition. The delay time is set to 15 Seconds.
The emergency lighting can be manually turned ‘ON’ for testing purposes by pressing and
releasing the 'AUTO/TEST' button. The amber LED built in the switch body will illuminate.
After the test is completed the emergency lighting “AUTO/TEST” button must be pressed
to restore the module to the AUTO mode, the LED will distinguish.
Input:


Alarm signal from either the Smoke / Heat Alarms or the MCP
Sprinkler alarm voltage free contact to switch negative to the module (if required)
67
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
Outputs:

Air-conditioning / heating
1. 24VDC to drive high current relay - rated 240volt AC 10Amps
2. set of Air-conditioning / heating voltage free contact

Emergency Lighting –
1. 24VDC to drive high current relay - rated 240volt AC 10 Amps
2. Set of Emergency Lighting voltage free contact
Controls:

Heating/Cooling - AUTO/OFF

Emergency Lighting - AUTO/TEST
Indicators:

Heating/Cooling - AUTO/OFF, amber LED

Emergency Lighting - AUTO/TEST, amber LED
Note: The 240V AC for the high current relays of Air conditioning and emergency
lightings must be wired to a circuit separate to the RFP mains
68
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
MONITORING OF
EMERGENCY LIGHTING
TO EMERGENCY
LIGHTING
TO POWER RELAY OF
COOLING/HEATING
+
+
-
-
NO COM NC
AIR CON
HEATING
COOLING
EMERGENCY
LIGHT
MONITORING OF
COOLING/HEATING
FROM PREVIOUS
MODULE
NO COM NC
E/L
24V DC
A/C
24V DC
F1
TB1
D5
AL
D7
R2
RL2
-
D4
R3
D2
F3
R1
D3
+
SUB740
R6
C1
R9
Q1
D1
U1
-
RL1
F2
AL
+
J1
LM358
PCB180 R1
D6
BROOKS
+
TB4
S/No
TB3
R7
TB2
TO NEXT
MODULE
DESCRIPTION :
The Ancillary Control Module provides 2 outputs to control the operation of Air-Conditioning
/Heating system and Emergency Lighting via 2 external relays. The contact rating of the 2
external relays 240V AC / 10 Amps.
The Emergency Lighting will be automaticaly activated by an alarm signal after approximately
15 seconds time delay. To manualy test the Emergency Lighting, press the AUTO / TEST
button, the switch build in LED will illuminate to indicate that the Emergency lighting is in
test mode. To exit the test mode, press AUTO/TEST switch.
The second output of the Ancillary Control Module is used to shutdown the Air-Conditioning
/Heating system. The time delay from receiving alarm signal until the system shuts down is
approximately 15 seconds. To shutdown the Air-Conditioning/Heating system press AUTO/
OFF switch, the LED illuminates and the system stays OFF until manualy de-selected.
SPECIFICATIONS : Operational Voltage : 24V DC
Current consumption : 1 mA Quiecent
44 mA Alarm with no external relays
140 mA with external relays
INPUT :
Alarm input (-ve switching) from Main Module activated by Smoke/Heat Alarms and/or
Manual Call Point
OUTPUTS :
Fused 24V DC / 1 Amp to drive Emergency Lighting high current relay
Fused 24V DC / 1 Amp. to drive Air-Conditioning/Heating high current relay
Voltage free contact For Emergency Lighting activation 24V/2A
Voltage free contact for Air-Conditioning/Heating shutdown 24V/2A
CONTROLS & INDICATORS(On Display Board):
AUTO/TEST switch with built in Amber LED for Emergency lighting
AUTO/OFF switch with built in Amber LED for Air-Conditioning/Heating
FUSES :
F1 - F3 = 1A, Fast Blow, 1 AG
TITLE
BROOKS
AUSTRALIA
ALARM 2000 RESIDENTIAL PANEL
20/8/2002
2
ADD FUSE FUNCTION, RATING & TYPE
O.P.
A.S.
13/3/2002
1
UPDTAE TO Vcad
O.P.
A.S.
21/11/2000
0
ORIGINAL ISSUE
O.P.
A.S.
DATE
ISS
REVISION
ANCILLARY CONTROL MODULE
DATA SHEET
DRN CHK
DRAWN
O.P.
PART No.
DRAWING No.
ISSUE
No.
A.S.
SUB740
21/11/2000
69
CHECKED
21/11/2000
F565-C
SH 3 of 6
2
Site Manual
Alarm 2000 Iss 5
NSW - Head Office
4 Pike Street Rydalmere NSW 2116
Ph: 02 9684 1466
Fax: 02 9684 4146
Website: www.BROOKS.com.au
VIC
1/3 Molan Street, Ringwood, VIC 3134
Ph: 03 9879 5294
Fax: 03 9879 5249
SA
729A Port Road, Woodville, SA 5011
Ph: 08 8347 0000
Fax: 08 8347 0600
QLD
2/49 Boyland Ave Coopers Plains, QLD 4108
Ph: 07 3373 8222
Fax: 07 3373 8022
WA
P.O. Box 2114, Midland DC W.A. 6936
Ph: 08 6262 8095
Fax: 02 9684 4146
New Zealand
Unit 106 “The Zone” 23 Edwin St, Mt Eden, Auckland 1024
Ph: +64 9 638 4644, Toll Free 0800 220 007 (NZ only)
Fax: +64 9 638 4645
Or National Australian Sales Number: 1300 78 FIRE (3473)
For the cost of local call.
70
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