SAS Warranty Analysis 4.2: Administrator'

®
SAS Warranty Analysis 4.2
Administrator’s Guide
The correct bibliographic citation for this manual is as follows: SAS Institute Inc. 2009. SAS ® Warranty
Analysis 4.2: Administrator’s Guide. Cary, NC: SAS Institute Inc.
SAS ® Warranty Analysis 4.2: Administrator’s Guide
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Contents
Chapter 1 • About SAS Warranty Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Components of SAS Warranty Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Purpose of SAS Warranty Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Client Applications and Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Chapter 2 • System Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
The Client Tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
The Middle Tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
The Server Tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
SAS Tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Warranty Data Tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Batch Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Chapter 3 • Finding Scripts, Files, and Other System Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Finding Installation and Configuration Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Finding SAS Server Tier Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Finding Middle-Tier Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Chapter 4 • Working with Domain Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Overview of Domain Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Domain Object Types and Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Domain Object and Results Ownership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
When Someone Leaves the Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
When Available Disk Space Is Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
When Data Losses Occur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Chapter 5 • Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
SAS Business Intelligence Platform Groups and Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Protected Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Security Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Creating a User Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Granting Access through Group Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Denying Access to Emerging Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Creating New Groups for Domain Object Sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Filtering Out Groups from Domain Object Sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Chapter 6 • Starting and Stopping the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Tier Dependencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Metadata Server Start Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Object Spawner Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Warranty Share Server Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Application Server Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Analytics Platform Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Service Dependencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Chapter 7 • The Diagnostic Client (Experimental) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
iv Contents
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Main Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Navigation Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Diagnostic Summary Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Interactive Performance Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Batch Performance Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
General Performance Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Metadata Management Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Chained Report Listings Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Log File Listings Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Anatomy of a Job Log File Listing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Configuration Related Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Miscellaneous Tools Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Chapter 8 • Working with Jobs, Tasks, and Queues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
About Jobs, Tasks, and Queues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Managing Interactive and Batch Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Managing Queues in the Rich Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Using the Diagnostic Client to View Queues (Experimental) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Using the Diagnostic Client to View Job Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Chapter 9 • Working with Batch Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Overview of Batch Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Job Control Tables and Scheduling Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Batch Processing Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Running the Batch Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Chapter 10 • Understanding Emerging Issues Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
About Emerging Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Additional Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Chapter 11 • Using SAS Warranty Analysis Business Rules with SAS Enterprise Guide . . . . 63
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Setting User Access Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Chapter 12 • Configuring System Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Overview of Configuring System Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Report Generation Configuration Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Sharing Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Initialization Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
System Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Job Control Table Synchronization Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Logging Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Numeric Formatting Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Role Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Group Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Storage Location Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Chapter 13 • Working With Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Record the Problem Context . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
General System Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Gathering Information from the Log Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Contents
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Appendix 1 • Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
The Analytics Platform Server Fails to Start Properly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
An Analysis Fails to Execute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
The Rich Client Fails to Open from the SAS Warranty Analysis Landing Page . . . . . . 86
Deletion of a Data Selection Fails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
A User Is Granted Access to SAS Warranty Analysis, but the
System Malfunctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Any User Logging into the System Receives the “System
Experienced Fatal Error” Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
The User Interface Is Unresponsive or an Interactive Job Does Not Progress . . . . . . . . 87
A Batch Job Does Not Progress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
JobSynchLock Is Locked . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
vi Contents
1
Chapter 1
About SAS Warranty Analysis
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Components of SAS Warranty Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Purpose of SAS Warranty Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Client Applications and Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
The SAS Warranty Analysis Thin Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
The SAS Warranty Analysis Rich Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
The SAS Warranty Analysis Diagnostic Client (Experimental) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Introduction
SAS Warranty Analysis is an integrated, Web-deployed reporting and analysis tool. The
application provides you with the flexibility and functionality to do the following:
•
identify problems
•
prioritize warranty-related activities
•
determine the root causes for warranty issues
SAS Warranty Analysis uses established, familiar technologies such as the Eclipse Rich
Client Platform, HTML, Common Gateway Interface (CGI), and JavaScript to render the
application interface. The program logic is written in the Base SAS and SAS macro
languages.
SAS Warranty Analysis is designed specifically for warranty reporting and analysis for
any organization that warrants its products. It uses the following:
•
an industry-specific data model that was designed for advanced analysis and reporting
•
specialized, industry-recognized algorithms to process and display warranty data
The rich client interface enables you to do the following:
•
examine warranty data from diverse sources
•
drill down on details
•
distribute analytical results using report-sharing, exporting, or more traditional print
and e-mail processes
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Chapter 1
•
About SAS Warranty Analysis
SAS Warranty Analysis enables companies to overcome the data availability barrier. It
provides superior methods for decision makers to gain advanced understanding of warranty
issues and the actions required to resolve those issues.
Components of SAS Warranty Analysis
SAS Warranty Analysis includes four main functional components:
•
data warehousing
•
analysis and reporting
•
advanced analytics
•
the clients
These components are seamlessly integrated to offer a true end-to-end solution that accepts
data from various systems and sources in different formats, brings the data together, and
applies the appropriate analytical methods to support making advanced business decisions.
SAS Enterprise Guide enhances the capabilities of SAS Warranty Analysis by providing
ad hoc access to the SAS Warranty Analysis data mart and to data sources that are external
to SAS Warranty Analysis.
The SAS Warranty Analysis Add-In enables SAS Enterprise Guide users to do the
following:
•
find the location of the data mart
•
open a project and create a report of PARMSL.DATASOURCEIDS
•
access their own data sets with descriptive data set labels
•
access data sets from the complete SAS Warranty Analysis data mart
•
select a data set for inclusion in a SAS Enterprise Guide project
•
perform further analyses on warranty data in a SAS Enterprise Guide project
Note: Users are allowed to see only their own data sets.
Purpose of SAS Warranty Analysis
SAS Warranty Analysis provides the following:
•
functionality for a wide range of users with varying information needs
•
accessibility to a centralized warranty data mart
•
availability of warranty-focused analytics and reports that can rapidly discover and
disseminate vital performance information
SAS Warranty Analysis provides the following base analyses:
•
details table
•
exposure
•
forecasting
•
geographic
The SAS Warranty Analysis Thin Client
•
multivariate statistical drivers
•
Pareto
•
reliability
•
statistical drivers
•
text analysis
•
time of claim
•
trend/control
•
trend by exposure
3
SAS Warranty Analysis also provides the following techniques for early detection of
emerging issues:
•
analytical automated process
•
threshold watch list process
•
analytical watch list process
Client Applications and Sessions
Overview
SAS Warranty Analysis manages a session for each user who logs on. The behavior depends
on which client is used for logon. The following sections describe each client application,
its purpose, and how it manages sessions.
Access to the clients is controlled through security settings that you set up. For more
information, see Chapter 5, “Security,” on page 25.
The SAS Warranty Analysis Thin Client
The most frequently used client is the Web-based thin client. This client enables users to
browse analytic results that are generated by other users and shared for public consumption.
These results include analytic reports and emerging issues output. Your site might also
show site-specific information that is created by the on-site SAS support personnel who
set up your system.
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Chapter 1
•
About SAS Warranty Analysis
The thin client is not a stand-alone Web application. It is displayed as a set of tabs in the
SAS Information Delivery Portal, which comes with the SAS Business Intelligence
platform.
Users must log on to the SAS Portal to access the warranty-related tabs and the portletbased information that they contain. User sessions are programmed to expire after a
configurable amount of time.
Access to the SAS Portal and access to warranty content in it are governed by separate
security settings. A user can be granted access to the SAS Portal but denied access to the
warranty-related portion of the portal content. When this happens, the warranty-related tabs
are visible, but the related pages display only a message stating that the user is not
authorized to view the warranty-related content.
Users can launch the rich client from a link in the SAS Portal. When the rich client is
launched in this way, the user ID and server information are passed on to the logon dialog
box. After entering the password for the initial launch of the rich client, users can select an
option to have the logon dialog box “remember” the password for subsequent launches.
The SAS Warranty Analysis Rich Client
The rich client application is meant for a smaller audience of analysts, data experts, and
administrators. The rich client enables users to create projects, data selections, and analyses.
Analyses can be saved as reports to be displayed in the thin client. Emerging issues analyses
can also be created and can be displayed as thin client content.
The SAS Warranty Analysis Diagnostic Client (Experimental)
5
The rich client is installed on a client machine in one of two ways:
•
by invoking it from the thin client, which runs a Web-enabled download that uses Java
Web Start technology
•
by running a client installation program
The rich client session never expires unless the middle tier or the SAS tier are shut down
and restarted.
Note: The rich client starts a session of its own in all cases, even when it is launched from
the thin client. Thus, the rich client can run indefinitely, even after the portal session
times out.
The SAS Warranty Analysis Diagnostic Client (Experimental)
The diagnostic client application is an experimental program that does not create or show
any business information. It presents various views that reflect how SAS Warranty Analysis
is running, enables you to retrieve log files more easily, and performs other useful
operations.
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Chapter 1
•
About SAS Warranty Analysis
The diagnostic client starts its own session that expires when the thin client times out.
Note: You must be a member of the SAS Warranty Analysis Full Administrators group to
use the diagnostic client.
For more information, see Chapter 7, “The Diagnostic Client (Experimental),” on page
37.
7
Chapter 2
System Architecture
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
The Client Tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
The Middle Tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
The Server Tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
SAS Tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Warranty Data Tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Batch Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Introduction
SAS Warranty Analysis uses a multi-tiered architectural style that incorporates these tiers:
•
the client tier
•
the middle tier
•
the server tier
•
the SAS tier
•
the data tier
The Client Tier
The SAS Warranty Analysis client tier supports both a thin client and a rich client.
8
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System Architecture
The SAS Warranty Analysis rich client was developed by using the Eclipse Rich Client
Platform (RCP) and Java Swing frameworks. The thin client is built on top of the SAS
Information Delivery Portal. The thin client provides read-only access to public reports
and emerging issues alerts that have been authored with the SAS Warranty Analysis rich
client. The thin client is the primary interface through which users view their warranty data.
Which functionality is available to each user is controlled by that user’s role in your
organization. For additional discussion of roles, see Chapter 5, “Security,” on page 25.
Java Web Start is the primary vehicle for distributing the SAS Warranty Analysis rich
client. Users select a link within the SAS Warranty Analysis thin client to download the
rich client from the middle tier. Java Web Start also updates the rich client when new
releases are available. If the machine on which the rich client is being installed does not
have the appropriate Java Runtime Environment (JRE), then Java Web Start directs the
user to the JRE download site. The SAS Warranty Analysis rich client runs in an “allpermissions trusted” environment. (See section 5.6, “Trusted Environments,” in the Java
Network Launching Protocol and API Specification (JSR-56) Version 1.0.1 for additional
information.)
The SAS Warranty Analysis rich client communicates with the middle tier by using Java
Remote Method Invocation.
The Middle Tier
The SAS Warranty Analysis middle tier runs within the SAS Analytics Platform, which
provides access to SAS Business Intelligence technologies. The middle tier fulfills client
requests by applying business rules and controlling access to shared resources (for example,
SAS workspace server connections).
The Server Tier
9
The SAS Warranty Analysis diagnostic client is served from a servlet container that is
embedded in the SAS Analytics Platform.
The Server Tier
The SAS Warranty Analysis server tier uses the SAS Metadata Server, SAS Stored
Processes Server, SAS workspace server, and the SAS information service to fulfill user
requests to analyze warranty data. Most of the work is performed by the SAS workspace
server.
All access to the data tier from the middle tier is issued through the SAS workspace server,
and SAS Analytics are also run from the SAS workspace server. The SAS Stored Process
Server runs short, utility-type programs on behalf of the middle tier.
10
Chapter 2
•
System Architecture
SAS Management Console and SAS Metadata Server are used to administer SAS Warranty
Analysis users, groups, and roles. The SAS Metadata Server handles the following:
•
user authentication
•
access to the rich client
•
access authorization to SAS Warranty Analysis objects, such as
•
•
data selections
•
projects
•
reports
access to SAS services, such as the SAS workspace server
SAS Tier
All actual analytics, and much of the data handling and data preparation, are handled within
SAS. Small utility programs that accomplish tasks such as populating an analysis dialog
box are run as stored processes. Larger processes, such as running an actual analytic, use
the SAS workspace server.
SAS also handles all data sets, which belong to the warranty data tier (see “Warranty Data
Tier” on page 10.)
Warranty Data Tier
SAS Warranty Analysis creates and manages many types of objects (for example, data
selections, projects, and analyses). These objects are maintained in SAS data sets and
catalogs that are stored in several utility libraries known as USERDL, USERRL, EIOUT,
and USERFDL.
The USERDL library contains information that defines users’ data selections, projects,
analyses, and reports. This information is used to display the objects in the user interface
and to construct the SQL code that subsets the data mart and creates filtered data sets.
The USERRL library contains information that defines the results of analyses (reports).
These data are used to display each report in the user interface, to maintain summarized
data, and to track the filtered data that was used to create a report.
The EIOUT library contains information about individual batch runs of the emerging issues
processes (including alerts, analytic watch list analyses, and threshold watch list analyses).
Unlike the previously mentioned libraries, which are shared by all users, there is a separate
USERFDL library for each user. Each user’s USERFDL library stores the filtered data that
is created by that user.
The location of the USERFDL library for each user is defined in the
PARMSL.USERATTRIBUTES data set. The contents of the library include the query
SQL, the claims data set, the products data set, and the labor codes and replaced parts data
sets (if they exist) for each filtered data subset that is created.
Another library, PARMSL, stores the metadata that tailors the application to a specific site.
These data sets are configured by on-site SAS support personnel during the installation
process.
Batch Processing
11
In addition to the data sets and libraries, the SAS Metadata Server contains entries for each
project, data selection, and report. Security settings can be applied to these entries to control
access to these items based on user permissions.
Warranty data is stored in the SAS Warranty Analysis data mart. The data mart resides in
a library that is usually referred to as SWADM. The name and location of the data mart are
specified in the PARMSL.DATASOURCEIDS data set. This library represents the
warranty data of each individual customer, and it is documented in the information that is
supplied by on-site SAS support personnel during the installation of the software.
Batch Processing
SAS Warranty Analysis enables users to run ad hoc analyses, to produce reports, and to
run emerging issues analyses either interactively or as batch processes that are scheduled
to run at a specified time. To permit greater flexibility, scheduling is not handled by SAS
Warranty Analysis. Instead, users specify when the work will run, and a job scheduler (such
as Platform Computing’s Job Scheduler/LSF product) triggers processing via a custom
program that updates the SAS Warranty Analysis job control table.
Your on-site SAS support personnel provide details of the scheduling setup for your site.
For additional information about batch processing, see Chapter 9, “Working with Batch
Processes,” on page 51.
12
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System Architecture
13
Chapter 3
Finding Scripts, Files, and Other
System Components
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Finding Installation and Configuration Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Finding SAS Server Tier Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
SAS Metadata Server Start Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Warranty Object Spawner Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Warranty Share Server Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Application Server Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Data Library Directories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Finding Middle-Tier Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Diagnostic Client URL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Analytics Platform Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Warranty app.config File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Overview
The physical locations that are described in this chapter are the default locations that are
created during the standard installation and configuration processes. The on-site SAS
support personnel working at your site are likely to change some or all of these locations
when they customize your setup to meet your site’s requirements. Your on-site SAS support
personnel provide documentation of the locations for your site.
Finding Installation and Configuration Files
This administrator’s guide indicates where you can find key resources by referring to the
following two standard file system locations where SAS places the software:
•
The SAS installation directory (written as <SASInstall>) refers to the directory path
where the SAS installation process initially places the software bundle resources before
any site-specific configuration.
•
The SAS configuration directory (written as <SASConfig>) refers to the directory path
where the SAS configuration process writes the finalized software image.
Different files are written to these locations, depending on the server tier. Also, the on-site
SAS support personnel who sets up your system might change these locations. Your on-
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•
Finding Scripts, Files, and Other System Components
site SAS support personnel provides documentation of the exact paths to these locations
for your site.
In general, you can find these locations in the following locations in a Windows
environment:
•
<SASInstall> defaults to C:\Program Files\SAS.
•
<SASConfig> defaults to C:\SAS\<ImageName>, where <ImageName> represents
the site-specific name for your software bundle as defined in the SAS plan file that is
part of your order.
In general, you can find these locations in the following locations in a UNIX environment:
•
<SASInstall> defaults to usr/local/SAS.
•
<SASConfig> defaults to usr/local/<ImageName>, where <ImageName>
represents the site-specific name for your software bundle as defined in the SAS plan
file that is part of your order.
Finding SAS Server Tier Components
SAS Metadata Server Start Scripts
For details, see “Metadata Server Start Scripts” on page 34.
Warranty Object Spawner Scripts
For details, see “Object Spawner Scripts” on page 34.
Warranty Share Server Scripts
For details, see “Warranty Share Server Scripts” on page 34.
Application Server Scripts
For details, see “Application Server Scripts” on page 34.
Data Library Directories
By default, the SAS Warranty Analysis libraries are found in the following subdirectories
in the <SASConfig>\Lev1\AppData\SAS WarrantyAnalysis4.2 folder in a
Windows environment: dmref, eiout, lookup, parmsl, userdl, userrl, usertl,
and userfdl.
The on-site SAS support personnel who set up your system might move some of these
libraries (especially the data mart and user libraries) to site-specific locations. You can
view the locations of the data library directories for PARMSL, USERDL, USERRL, and
EIOUT in SAS Management Console under Data Library Manager ð Libraries.
The entries PARMSLBASE, USERDLBASE, USERRLBASE, USERTL , and
EIOUTBASE contain the path specifications for each of these libraries.
Analytics Platform Scripts
15
The directories for all USERFDL libraries, which are used to store the filtered data sets for
each user, are defined in the SERVERPATH column of the
PARMSL.USERATTRIBUTES data set.
Finding Middle-Tier Components
Diagnostic Client URL
By default, the diagnostic client runs through port 6401 on the middle-tier machine. The
URL to invoke it is as follows:
http://hostname:6401/SASWarrantyAnalysis/JobStatus
Analytics Platform Scripts
For details, see “Analytics Platform Scripts” on page 35.
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Finding Scripts, Files, and Other System Components
Warranty app.config File
The SAS Warranty Analysis extensions for the SAS Analytics Platform are configured
largely by the app.config property file. The app.config file contains a set of named
properties with associated values (in name/value pairs).
You can find the app.config file in a directory such as the following in a Windows
environment:
<SASConfig>\Lev1\AnalyticsPlatform\apps\SASWarrantyAnalysis
\app.config
You can find the app.config file in a directory such as the following for UNIX:
<SASConfig>/Lev1/AnalyticsPlatform/apps/SASWarrantyAnalysis/
app.config
CAUTION:
The app.config file contains system values. It should be altered only by someone
with a comprehensive understanding of the SAS Warranty Analysis system.Your
on-site SAS support personnel provide additional instructions for editing any sections
of the app.config file that need to be altered during routine administration.
17
Chapter 4
Working with Domain Objects
Overview of Domain Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Domain Object Types and Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Domain Object and Results Ownership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Domain Object Ownership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Execution Results Ownership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Filtered Subset Sharing, Updating, and Copying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Automatic Deletion of Filtered Subsets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
When Someone Leaves the Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
When Available Disk Space Is Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Clear Existing Disk Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Move Users to Different Volumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
When Data Losses Occur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Filtered Subset Loss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
SAS Metadata Server Data Loss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Domain Object Table Loss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Overview of Domain Objects
The domain objects that SAS Warranty Analysis creates are the business objects that store
users’ choices and other information that is related to business concepts (reports, for
example). The SAS Warranty Analysis domain objects record what a rich client user does
while working through the various analytical processes that are available in the system.
SAS Warranty Analysis manages most of these objects automatically throughout their life
cycle. However, there are a few minor administrative tasks that you can perform manually.
These administrative tasks are limited to special cases. With regard to domain objects, the
most important roles for administrators include ensuring that the system runs smoothly and
ensuring that sufficient disk space is always available.
Note: SAS Warranty Analysis generates a large amount of data, most of which belongs to
specific users. To ensure that the growth of users’ data does not impede SAS Warranty
Analysis processes, you can move users’ data onto a separate volume. You can do this
in advance, or you can wait and move users as the need arises and more disk space
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Working with Domain Objects
becomes available. For instructions to move users’ data, see “Move Users to Different
Volumes” on page 23.
The following sections explain how analytic definitions and results are stored and organized
on your servers as domain objects and describe related administrative tasks.
Domain Object Types and Characteristics
This chapter covers the following types of domain objects:
•
Project definitions govern how the rich client organizes the work that a user performs.
A project definition is just an organizing container for data selections and analyses and
never has any execution results associated with it.
•
Data selection definitions determine how the rich client stores the instructions for
extracting from the data mart the data that is used in warranty analyses. A data selection
definition produces a filtered subset, which is one or more SAS data sets that contain
an extraction from the SAS Warranty Analysis data mart. This method enables multiple
analyses to run against the same filtered subset, and it helps analyses to run more quickly
than if they ran against the data mart directly.
•
Report definitions determine how the rich client makes analytical results available to
be shared with other users. A report definition produces summarized analytic results
that consist of XML and SAS data sets that are later displayed in the SAS Warranty
Analysis clients.
These domain objects share the following characteristics:
•
They are retained in SAS data sets and SAS Metadata Server objects.
•
They are used to drive back-end processes that produce results in the form of data
artifacts.
Here is an illustration that depicts the basic layout for storage of persistent domain objects.
Execution results are not attached to the domain objects. The results are created during
execution and are then associated with domain objects.
Domain Object Ownership
19
The content and execution results of different domain objects are stored in different places.
For the SAS libraries used to store different types of persistent data, see “Warranty Data
Tier” on page 10.
Domain Object and Results Ownership
Overview
In order for SAS Warranty Analysis to run well, a number of rules and dependencies must
be honored. For example, ownership of domain objects is handled differently from
ownership of the execution results that are associated with domain objects. The connections
among the domain objects, their execution results, and the users who created the domain
objects are complex. If you attempt to manually move data around in the system, it is
extremely likely that you will damage some of those connections.
Different mechanisms are used for securing domain objects and results. Domain objects
are secured by using metadata access privileges. Results data is secured with file system
access control by placing them in special directories that are associated with a specific user.
This distinction can help you to better understand the following sections.
Domain Object Ownership
SAS Warranty Analysis uses the SAS Metadata Server to secure access to domain objects
and to grant ownership privileges to users. The rules for access to domain objects are as
follows:
•
The user who creates an object “owns” it (that is, can see and modify it).
•
Ownership of each object is also granted to members of the SAS Warranty Analysis
Full Administrators group.
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Working with Domain Objects
•
An object’s owner can grant read-only access to other users and groups.
Use SAS Management Console to find the metadata components of warranty domain
objects, as shown here:
Use SAS Management Console to see the access privileges that are assigned to specific
users.
CAUTION:
Do not manually alter any of the system-assigned privileges that are related to
warranty domain objects that persist into the SAS Metadata Server. Do not
manually alter the privileges that are related to any of the container objects, such
as the folders or the SAS Warranty Analysis software component itself. The system
relies on these settings to work properly.
Execution Results Ownership
Overview
Two of the SAS Warranty Analysis domain objects, data selections and analytic results,
produce execution results. These results are owned by the user who created the domain
object that produces the results. (Analytic results can be shared as public reports.)
Data Selection Results
The data selection domain object produces filtered subsets. The following characteristics
of filtered subsets are very important to note:
•
Filtered subsets can take a long time for the system to create.
•
Filtered subsets that result from executing a data selection can require a large amount
of disk space.
For these reasons, filtered subsets are an expensive resource. Most of the disk space that
SAS Warranty Analysis uses (other than for the data mart) is taken up by filtered subsets.
Ownership of filtered subsets is indicated within the system as follows. Each filtered subset
is created in a specially named subdirectory. The name of the subdirectory associates the
directory and its contents with the user who created the data selection that produced the
filtered subset.
Filtered Subset Sharing, Updating, and Copying
21
Analytic Results
Analytic results are owned by the user who created the analysis or report. But, unlike filtered
subsets, analytic results are not stored in a subdirectory that is associated with the user.
Instead, analytic results are stored in SAS catalogs that can be found in the SAS library
that is associated with that type of analysis (USERRL or EIOUT). These catalogs are
described in Chapter 2, “System Architecture,” on page 7.
Issues with Manual Deletion of Results
Do not manually delete the results of SAS Warranty Analysis domain objects.
CAUTION:
All domain objects that have results share the following behavior. If the results
of domain object are deleted in any way other than by the SAS Warranty Analysis
system during normal operation, then the domain object’s definition is no longer
usable.You can view the various settings in the client programs, but the objects are no
longer functional. The only way to make these domain objects functional again is to
re-create them with the same settings and then rerun them.
CAUTION:
Do not rename or copy results from one user’s directory to another.This
circumvents the SAS Warranty Analysis system. Such changes are not detected by the
system and are not handled correctly.
Filtered Subset Sharing, Updating, and Copying
Overview
Because filtered subsets are such an expensive resource, SAS Warranty Analysis was
designed to attempt to reduce their impact on the capacities of the servers that run the
system. The application attempts to reuse filtered subsets whenever possible and tracks
these filtered subsets to determine when they need to be updated and copied.
Filtered subsets are created or updated during the execution of an analysis, if the data has
not been generated yet or if it is out of date. Each analysis depends on a data selection
definition. Therefore, it also depends on the filtered subset that is associated with the data
selection. The system checks all of these dependencies (and other factors) to determine
whether a filtered subset should be created. After a filtered subset is created, it is reused
by all analyses that require it.
For example, SAS Warranty Analysis attempts to conserve disk space by allowing multiple
projects and public reports to share data selection definitions. As long as two or more
projects or reports are using the same data selection definition, then the filtered subset is
not duplicated. However, when a user who has imported a public report performs an
“Analyze in Project” action, the filtered data is copied to that user’s filteredData
folder.
Note: Obsolete reports should be deleted on a regular basis. Deleting obsolete reports also
deletes the filtered subsets that are associated with them and frees system resources.
When Data Selection Definitions Are Copied
Multiple data selection definitions can point to the same filtered subset. This is one way in
which SAS Warranty Analysis reuses a filtered subset. The following circumstances cause
a data selection definition to be copied:
•
saving a project-based analysis as a public report
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Working with Domain Objects
•
drilling into an emerging issues threshold report or public report to perform further
analyses in a project
SAS Warranty Analysis does not attempt to reuse data selection definitions, but rather uses
them to track reuse of filtered subsets. For information, see “When a Previous Version of
a Filtered Subset Is Kept” on page 22.
When a Previous Version of a Filtered Subset Is Kept
The following circumstances cause the system to keep an older version of a filtered subset
and generate a newer version:
•
A retired (static) public report or project-based analysis still uses the older filtered
subset.
•
The data selection definition has been updated.
•
The data mart has been refreshed.
When Data Selection Definitions Are Copied
Filtered subsets are copied when a user imports a public report from another user and then
performs an “Analyze in Project” action.
Automatic Deletion of Filtered Subsets
It is important for users to delete analyses and reports when they are no longer needed. This
practice reduces the impact of filtered data sets on disk space because SAS Warranty
Analysis automatically deletes any filtered subsets that are no longer associated with any
analysis or report.
When Someone Leaves the Company
The user who creates a domain object owns that object. Administrators can see and delete
the object, but not the filtered subsets that are owned by the user and are stored in that user’s
system directory. SAS Warranty Analysis cannot transfer ownership of a domain object
from one user to another.
To ensure efficient transfer of information and data access privileges when a user leaves
the company, the administrator should do the following:
1. Ensure that the exiting employee trains another employee about the domain objects.
2. Have the employee who is taking over the exiting employee’s work duplicate all of that
employee’s object definitions and rerun them.
3. Have the exiting employee delete the successfully duplicated objects and the related
filtered subsets.
CAUTION:
Do not manually move data and permissions.For information, see“Issues with
Manual Deletion of Results” on page 21.
Move Users to Different Volumes
23
When Available Disk Space Is Low
Overview
SAS Warranty Analysis requires that adequate disk space be available on all tiers in order
to perform properly. Administrators must monitor disk space and take measures to clear
disk space as needed. Use the Disk Usage utility on the Tools menu in the rich client to
monitor disk space. See “The Disk Usage Utility” in either the online Help or the SAS
Warranty Analysis: User’s Guide for more information.
CAUTION:
If any domain object results are deleted, then the domain objects no longer
execute properly, and you must re-create the domain objects with the same
settings and execute them again.
Clear Existing Disk Space
Try the following actions when disk space gets full:
•
Ask your user community to delete old reports and analyses.
•
Monitor the decrease as old definitions are deleted.
•
Monitor disk space usage over time to make sure your servers have enough space.
Move Users to Different Volumes
If the preceding measures do not alleviate the problem, then you can move specific users
to another volume if your SAS server has multiple volumes.
Note: In SAS Warranty Analysis, the user-filtered data must remain on the application
server. This data can be moved to a different volume on the application server, but it
must never be moved to a separate computer.
To move a user’s filtered data folder to a different volume:
1. In an interactive SAS session, edit the PARMSL.USERATTRIBUTES data set. For
the specified user, change the value of the column SERVERPATH (the directory path
on the server for user data selections) to point to the desired drive and base path. Leave
intact the lowest-level folder, which is assigned by the application.
2. Create the folder where you want to store the user’s data. The name of this folder is
supplied by the SERVERPATH column, and the \filteredData subdirectory is
under it.
Note: You must use this naming convention, or the application will fail to find the
moved data.
3. Use the operating system to copy or move all of the filtered data sets from the original
location to the new location defined by \SERVERPATH\filteredData.
4. When the user logs in to the application again, the new location for the user’s filtered
subsets is used. When the user creates new filtered data sets, the data sets are stored in
the new location.
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Working with Domain Objects
When Data Losses Occur
Overview
Various types of system failures can cause data to be lost. Data loss applies to single domain
objects or to the full collection being managed by the system.
Filtered Subset Loss
It is best to back up filtered subsets. However, this backup is not required. SAS Warranty
Analysis is still functional to some extent even if all the filtered subsets are lost, but there
is some loss of functionality. For example, you cannot create a new analysis under a data
node if the data for that node no longer exists.
If the filtered subsets are lost, but the data selection definitions (in the Data Selections
workspace) remain intact, users must complete the following steps to re-create their filtered
data sets:
1. In the Data Selections workspace, re-create the simple data selection or combined data
selection definitions from their product and event components. Use new names for the
new definitions.
2. In the Projects workspace, click Replace data selection, and select the newly re-created
simple or combined data selection definitions.
3. Rerun the analyses using these definitions to re-create the lost data.
4. When prompted to replace the existing analyses, click Edit. (There is no need to first
copy the existing analyses, because their data is lost.)
SAS Metadata Server Data Loss
Your SAS Metadata Server’s persistent storage should always be backed up so that the data
is never lost. However, one or more domain objects could possibly lose their metadata
objects. Without the metadata object, the domain object will never be seen again in any
SAS Warranty Analysis client. All access to domain objects occurs through the SAS
Metadata Server.
For more information about backing up the SAS Metadata Server’s repository, see the SAS
9.2 Intelligence Platform: System Administration Guide:
http://support.sas.com/documentation/cdl/en/bisag/60945/PDF/
default/bisag.pdf
Domain Object Table Loss
The SAS Warranty Analysis application tables (or “warranty metadata,” which is stored
in SAS data sets and is not to be confused with the SAS Metadata Server data) should
always be backed up so that the domain object tables are never lost. However, one or more
domain objects could possibly lose their tabular data. If this happens, the SAS Metadata
Server objects still exist. The system ignores any domain object IDs that come back from
SAS Metadata Server queries and do not match up with any table-based information.
25
Chapter 5
Security
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
SAS Business Intelligence Platform Groups and Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Protected Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Application Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Application Metadata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Security Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Nested Groups for Cumulative Access Privileges and Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Creating a User Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Granting Access through Group Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Denying Access to Emerging Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Creating New Groups for Domain Object Sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Filtering Out Groups from Domain Object Sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Roles Never Show Up for Sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Groups Never Show Up for Sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Exclude Additional Groups Using app.config . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Overview
SAS Warranty Analysis administrators grant users access to functionality by making users
members of the standard SAS Warranty Analysis groups.
The following chapters describe the group structure and explain how to use it to grant or
deny users access to system functionality.
26
Chapter 5
•
Security
SAS Business Intelligence Platform Groups and
Roles
The SAS Business Intelligence platform uses the “Group” and “Role” concepts regarding
system security:
•
Groups protect access to system resources. System resources become available within
the system when an administrator assigns a user to a group. Each group encompasses
associated roles.
•
Roles provide access to specific software features. The software features that a user
can access in the client user interfaces are determined by the roles that are associated
with the group that the user is assigned to.
Use SAS Management Console to view the SAS Warranty Analysis roles and groups. (The
icon for a group is
, and the icon for a role is
.)
SAS Warranty Analysis has a group for every role. Membership in a group enables a
member to access any system resources that are controlled through the group’s access
control list (ACL). In addition, membership in a group automatically assigns the user to
any role that is associated with the group. This role membership enables the user to access
all of the software functionality that is enabled by the role.
Note: It is important to use group membership to associate users with roles. If you assign
a user to a role directly, the user does not have access to required system resources. In
this case, the system would malfunction for that user.
Application Metadata
27
Protected Resources
Overview
SAS Warranty Analysis uses a number of system resources. The application protects these
resources by assigning access privileges to the various system groups and requiring that a
user be a member of a group in order to acquire the access privileges of that group.
For additional information about the system resources, see “Security Model” on page
28.
Application Server
SAS Warranty Analysis provides its own SAS Business Intelligence platform application
server with application-specific command-line options. SAS Warranty Analysis cannot use
the default SASApp application server. The Warranty system groups provide the access
privileges that are necessary to work on this application server.
Application Metadata
As explained in Chapter 4, “Working with Domain Objects,” on page 17, SAS Warranty
Analysis has a place to store the metadata portion of its domain objects. The system is
installed and configured to have access privileges to the SAS Warranty Analysis software
component and to the folders beneath it. Additionally, access privileges are placed on the
domain object metadata objects when they are created.
28
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•
Security
Security Model
Overview
The following figure shows how data and computing resources are secured in the SAS
Warranty Analysis system.
The roles (in pink) show how user types are defined within the system, and the roles control
which software features users can access. The roles are cumulative; if a user is assigned a
role, he or she automatically receives all the privileges of all the roles to the left of the
Nested Groups for Cumulative Access Privileges and Roles
29
assigned role. The groups (in green) define the access privileges to the various system
resources (in blue) that the system uses.
Note: Always associate users with roles by assigning membership to the groups that the
roles correspond to. SAS Management Console enables you to assign a user to a role,
but this user would not receive the access privileges that are provided by group
membership and therefore would be unable to run the software.
CAUTION:
Do not change any permissions for any of the roles or groups.SAS Warranty
Analysis depends on these settings remaining as they are.
Note: The abbreviation “MD” means “metadata.”
Roles
The SAS Warranty Analysis system roles are as follows:
Warranty Analysis: Information Consumption
enables access to any content in the thin client.
Note: All SAS Warranty Analysis users must be assigned to the SAS Warranty
Analysis View Users group, which then applies this role.
Warranty Analysis: Data Analysis
enables access to the rich client, but not to data selection editing.
Warranty Analysis: Data Administration
enables access to the rich client’s data selection-building screens.
Note: The user also needs to be associated with the Warranty Data Analyst role.
Warranty Analysis: EI Administration
enables access to the emerging issues run-time setup functionality.
Warranty Analysis: System Administration
enables access to all other screens that are related to system configuration and that are
not included in this list.
Nested Groups for Cumulative Access Privileges and Roles
SAS Warranty Analysis groups have nested membership. This nesting means that users
with membership in a given group inherit membership in all other groups that are
subordinate to the initial group.
For example, if you make a user a member of the SAS Warranty Analysis Normal Users
group, then that user also has access to all of the functionality that is provided by the SAS
Warranty Analysis Restricted Users group and the SAS Warranty Analysis View Users
group because these groups are subordinate to, or nested under, the Normal Users group.
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Chapter 5
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Security
Creating a User Account
Here are the general steps to create a user account:
1. Do one of the following steps:
a. (UNIX) Create a UNIX user account with a valid home directory and a primary
user group that is the same as the sasdemo user. The command to create a new user
account is similar to the following:
useradd -d /users/swauser1 -g swagroup -m -s /bin/ksh
swauser1
Note: To create a user account, you must be logged on as a user with root
permissions. There are no additional local policy settings required on UNIX.
b. (Microsoft Windows) Add credentials for the user account in Microsoft Windows,
and then set the local policy to allow the user account to log on as batch.
2. In SAS Management Console, do the following steps:
a. Add the user account.
b. In the properties for the user account, set the login properties to the credentials
specified in step #1.
c. Add the user account to one of the SAS Warranty Analysis user groups.
Granting Access through Group Membership
You can grant a user access to the SAS Warranty Analysis system by using SAS
Management Console to make the user a member of one of the five SAS Warranty Analysis
groups.
Note: You do not need to make a user a member of multiple groups. Group membership
nesting makes this unnecessary.
Denying Access to Emerging Issues
Some SAS Warranty Analysis customers want to enable their suppliers to view some public
reports, but the customers do not want the suppliers to see emerging issues alerts. SAS
Warranty Analysis offers an optional role and group that enable you to deny a user the
ability to see emerging issues. Although the user cannot see emerging issues, the user can
see public reports.
When you deny access to emerging issues, this denial overrides any other emerging issues
user access privileges granted by membership in the five standard SAS Warranty Analysis
groups or any other group created at your site.
To deny access to emerging issues, SAS Warranty Analysis uses a specific group name
(SAS Warranty Analysis Deny EI Access) in a specific role name (Warranty Analysis:
Overview
31
Deny EI Access). After you add a user to the group, the user is denied access to emerging
issues.
Note: The role name and the group name are not created by the standard installation and
configuration process. You must create them manually, with these exact names, for the
denial behavior to work.
To deny access to emerging issues:
1. In SAS Management Console, navigate to the User Manager plug-in.
2. Create a role named Warranty Analysis: Deny EI Access.
3. Create a group named SAS Warranty Analysis Deny EI Access.
4. Add the group to the role.
5. Assign users and groups to the SAS Warranty Analysis Deny EI Access group.
6. Instruct the users that you added to the SAS Warranty Analysis Deny EI Access group
to log off of SAS Warranty Analysis, and then to log back on.
Note: The access denial takes effect only on logon.
Creating New Groups for Domain Object Sharing
Use SAS Management Console to add new groups. No warranty-specific privileges need
to be applied to them.
Filtering Out Groups from Domain Object Sharing
Overview
SAS Warranty Analysis enables users to share data selection definitions and public reports
with other users. Users can open a dialog box in the rich client where they can choose users
and groups as targets for sharing.
A disadvantage of using SAS Management Console and SAS software to administer
Groups is that the platform makes no distinction between system-oriented groups and
business-oriented groups. The system-oriented groups are created during the default
installation and configuration process. The business-oriented groups are created later by
SAS Warranty Analysis administrators. All groups that are displayed in SAS Management
Console (unless they are otherwise filtered out) show up as potential targets for information
sharing in the rich client. Filtering out groups that are not appropriate for sharing keeps the
display simpler and easier to use. For this reason, SAS Warranty Analysis automatically
filters out the default groups. But if you add more groups later, you must filter these out
manually.
The following sections describe what is automatically excluded from the user interfaces
for domain object sharing and what you should exclude manually.
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Security
Roles Never Show Up for Sharing
SAS Warranty Analysis does not show any roles for the purpose of domain object sharing.
Roles are not used in sharing domain objects so they are excluded from display in the user
interface.
Groups Never Show Up for Sharing
SAS Warranty Analysis automatically excludes the default groups from the user interfaces
for sharing of domain objects. The system was created with special assumptions about how
groups are used that make it preferable not to use groups for sharing.
Exclude Additional Groups Using app.config
More system groups can be added during additional site-specific configuration. None of
these groups are appropriate for sharing. If groups other than the default groups are added
during installation and configuration for your site, you should exclude these additional
groups from displaying in the user interface for sharing of domain objects.
To add more group names to the list of groups to be excluded, open the app.config file and
scroll down to a series of numbered properties like those in the following example. (For
the location of the app.config file, see Chapter 3, “Finding Scripts, Files, and Other System
Components,” on page 13.)
# Identities to filter out of the sharing user interfaces
sharing.identityFilter.name1=SASUsers
sharing.identityFilter.name2=Public
sharing.identityFilter.name3=SAS System Services
sharing.identityFilter.name4=SAS General Servers
sharing.identityFilter.name5=SAS Administrator
sharing.identityFilter.name6=SAS Demo User
sharing.identityFilter.name7=SAS Warranty Analysis Server User
sharing.identityFilter.name8=SAS Web Administrator
sharing.identityFilter.name9=SAS Trusted User
sharing.identityFilter.name10=SAS Warranty Analysis View Users
sharing.identityFilter.name11=SAS Warranty Analysis Restricted Users
sharing.identityFilter.name12=SAS Warranty Analysis Normal Users
sharing.identityFilter.name13=SAS Warranty Analysis EI Administrators
sharing.identityFilter.name14=SAS Warranty Analysis Full Administrators
sharing.identityFilter.name15=Performance Testing
sharing.identityFilter.name16=Portal Admins
sharing.identityFilter.name17=Portal Demo
Add to this list the group names that you want to exclude from displaying in the user
interface. You can have as many such properties as you need.
CAUTION:
These properties are numbered (for example, name1 to name5), and the numbers
must be strictly sequential. As soon as SAS Warranty Analysis fails to find the
next one in sequence, it stops applying the properties.
Note: You must restart the SAS Analytics Platform server to apply these changes.
33
Chapter 6
Starting and Stopping the System
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Tier Dependencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Metadata Server Start Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Object Spawner Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Warranty Share Server Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Application Server Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Analytics Platform Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Service Dependencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Overview
This section explains how to start and stop the entire SAS Warranty Analysis system (which
might consist of multiple machines). Chapter 2, “System Architecture,” on page 7,
describes the SAS tier and the middle tier. Scripts in both tiers need to be addressed.
Note: The scripts described in this chapter are the default scripts created by the standard
installation and configuration process for the SAS Warranty Analysis bundle. The onsite SAS support personnel who set up your site’s system might have customized the
scripts to make the starting and stopping process easier and more streamlined. On-site
SAS support personnel provide documentation that describes these site-specific
customizations.
Tier Dependencies
The SAS Warranty Analysis middle tier depends on the resources available from the SAS
Warranty Analysis server tier. Because of this dependency, start up the system as follows:
1. SAS tier
The SAS services must be started first, or the middle tier will not run.
2. Middle tier
The middle tier comes up next to enable clients to run.
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Chapter 6
•
Starting and Stopping the System
Shut down the system as follows:
1. Middle tier
The middle tier must shut down and release all SAS tier resources (such as server
connections) and terminate the ability of clients to invoke anything else on the SAS
tier.
2. SAS tier
The SAS tier shuts down cleanly without any locked sessions.
Metadata Server Start Scripts
In a UNIX environment, use the following command:
<SASConfig>/Lev1/SASMeta/MetadataServer/MetadataServer.sh
start
Note: <SASConfig> refers to your SAS Business Intelligence configuration folder.
In a Windows environment, use the following command:
<SASConfig>\Lev1\SASMeta\MetadataServer\MetadataServer.bat
start
Object Spawner Scripts
In a UNIX environment, use the following command:
<SASConfig>/Lev1/ObjectSpawner/ObjectSpawner.sh start
In a Windows environment, use the following command:
<SASConfig>\Lev1\ObjectSpawner\ObjectSpawner.bat start
Warranty Share Server Scripts
In a UNIX environment, use the following command:
<SASConfig>/Lev1/<SASWarrantyAnalysisShareServerContext>/
ShareServer.sh start
In a Windows environment, use the following command:
<SASConfig>\Lev1\<SASWarrantyAnalysisShareServerContext>
\ShareServer.bat start
Application Server Scripts
Before you start your Web application server, start the remote services.
Service Dependencies
35
In a UNIX environment, use the following command:
<SASConfig>/Lev1/Web/Applications/RemoteServices/
RemoteServices.sh start
In a Windows environment, use the following command:
<SASConfig>\Lev1\Web\Applications\RemoteServices
\RemoteServices.bat start
For Web application servers such as Oracle WebLogic and IBM WebSphere, instructions
for starting are provided in the file instructions.html, which is generated after the SAS
Deployment Wizard configures the application server. The file Instructions.html is located
in <SASConfig>\lev1\Documents.
The SAS configuration process provides a batch script to start JBoss.
<JBossInstallLocation>/bin/SASServer1.sh start
In a Windows environment, use the following command:
<JBossInstallLocation>\bin\SASServer1.bat start
Analytics Platform Scripts
In a UNIX environment, use the following commands to start the SAS Analytics Platform
server:
<SASConfig>/Lev1/AnalyticsPlatform/AnalyticsPlatform.sh start
In a Windows environment, the scripts to start and stop the SAS Analytics Platform are
provided in the menu. Select Start ð Programs ð SAS.
You can also start the SAS Analytics Platform by using the following command:
<SASConfig>\Lev1\AnalyticsPlatform\AnalyticsPlatform.bat start
Service Dependencies
The following SAS server tier services are started first in the following order:
1. metadata server
2. Object spawner
3. warranty SHARE server
The following middle tier services are started next in the following order:
1. remote services application
2. SAS Analytics Platform
3. Web server (JBoss, Oracle WebLogic, or IBM WebSphere)
The client tier does not have any services that need to be started. However, if the server
tiers are not started, then the thin client fails to show web pages, and the rich client detects
that the servers are not available, displays an error message, and terminates itself.
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•
Starting and Stopping the System
37
Chapter 7
The Diagnostic Client
(Experimental)
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Main Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Navigation Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Diagnostic Summary Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Interactive Performance Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Batch Performance Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
General Performance Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Metadata Management Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Chained Report Listings Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Log File Listings Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Anatomy of a Job Log File Listing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Job Log Header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Job Log Java Error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Job Log SAS Error or Warning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Ignore Errors Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Job Log Statistics Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Configuration Related Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Miscellaneous Tools Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Overview
The diagnostic client is an experimental client that is part of the SAS Warranty Analysis
solution. It enables you to view some of the system’s back-end processes. The diagnostic
client can also help you to trace system errors that need to be worked through with SAS
Technical Support.
Use the following URL to access the diagnostic client: http://hostname:6041/
SASWarrantyAnalysis/JobStatus.
This chapter describes those parts of the diagnostic client not covered in other chapters.
For example, the diagnostic client’s job-related views are discussed in Chapter 8, “Working
with Jobs, Tasks, and Queues,” on page 45.
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Chapter 7
•
The Diagnostic Client (Experimental)
Note: You must be a member of the SAS Warranty Analysis Full Administrators group to
use the diagnostic client.
Main Page
The main page of the diagnostic client shows all available operations. Almost all of this
information is read-only. Some of the information is useful for monitoring system health.
Navigation Bar
Links on the navigation bar include a logoff link and a link back to the home (operation)
page, if you are not already on the home page.
The navigation bar also displays the user ID of the currently logged in user, the build
number, how often the Job Control Table synchronization cycle runs, and when it last ran.
Diagnostic Summary Area
The Diagnostic Summary area shows how many critical errors appear in each job log.
Error logs age out of the system, so this area generally shows only the most recent errors.
Batch Performance Area
39
Click the error count to drill to a table of job descriptions. Each job description has a link
to a related job log. This is a quick way to see what critical errors have happened in the
system.
The Diagnostic Summary area displays the following summaries:
•
Failed Analysis Jobs
Monitor the Failed Analysis Jobs log to determine what might be interfering with
analysis runs. If runs have failed, scan the log file and note any errors. Your on-site
SAS support personnel or SAS Technical Support can assist you with interpreting the
errors.
•
Failed JCT Synchronization Jobs
Job control table (JCT) synchronization is the process by which the SAS Warranty
Analysis middle tier keeps synchronized with the PARMSL JobControl table. These
jobs are important because they keep batch processing moving. Errors should not occur
in these jobs. If you do notice any such errors, investigate them immediately.
•
Failed Other Jobs
Most jobs are either for analyses or for JCT synchronization. However, other types of
jobs run, and this last count shows how many of them have errors.
•
Server Connect Errors
Server Connect Errors is a dashboard counter that displays the number of server
connections that have failed. These are serious errors indicating that the SAS back end
is not working properly. Click the error count link to display a table that lists the number
and nature of each problem. If you see many of these errors, then restart the SAS and
middle-tier machines and have everyone log on again to continue their work. If
problems continue after the restart, then call SAS Technical Support for assistance.
•
Memory Cache Size (K)
This area shows the size of the memory cache in kilobytes.
•
File Cache Size (K)
This area shows the size of the file cache in kilobytes.
•
Log File Size (K)
This area shows the size of the log file cache in kilobytes.
Interactive Performance Area
For information, see Chapter 8, “Working with Jobs, Tasks, and Queues,” on page 45.
Batch Performance Area
For information, see Chapter 8, “Working with Jobs, Tasks, and Queues,” on page 45.
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The Diagnostic Client (Experimental)
General Performance Area
The General Performance area shows information about system performance.
The General Performance area displays the following summaries:
•
System Execution
This area provides the most comprehensive view of how the queuing system is running.
It shows the job queue, available tasks waiting to run, and the execution queues with
work in progress. You can verify that work is running smoothly by monitoring this
area.
•
Cache View
This area provides information about middle-tier caching.
Metadata Management Area
The Metadata Management area shows information about metadata. This area provides
links for use during installation and configuration when SAS Warranty Analysis is migrated
to a newer version.
CAUTION:
Use this area only under the guidance of SAS Technical Support.These links are
used only once.
The Metadata Management area displays the following summaries:
•
Run Migrated Analyses
•
Orphaned Metadata
•
Orphaned Table Data
Chained Report Listings Area
This set of views assists you with low-level debugging rather than routine administrative
maintenance. These views enable you to drill into public reports, emerging issues threshold
reports, or emerging issues analytical reports to see how they have been cloned during the
batch “auto-update/create new” process. These views are useful for tracing the contents of
the USERDL.analysis table for more in-depth debugging.
Log File Listings Area
The Log File Listings area of the diagnostic client window is especially helpful when you
are working with SAS Technical Support because it provides several ways to find specific
log files. The SAS Warranty Analysis system records a large number of smaller log files,
one per job, to help you to identify the specific circumstances that might have caused an
Job Log Header
41
error. The smaller log files prevent the need to weed through one large, all-inclusive log
file. For each category of log file listings, you can select the first link, which displays all
available logs, or the second link, which displays a more limited set of logs.
The links in this area include the following:
•
List all log files by date/time
The first link displays all of the log files in chronological order. You probably do not
want to use this link unless you are looking for the most recent log files. The second
link filters for only the analysis job runs.
•
List all log files by user
The first link displays a complete listing of all of the log files on the system, sorted by
user. The second link shows only analysis job runs sorted by user.
•
List error log files by date/time
The first link displays a chronological listing of all error log files that contain errors.
The second link shows only analysis job runs in chronological order.
•
List error log files by user
The first link provides a listing of all log files that contain errors, sorted by user. The
second link shows analysis job runs that contain errors, sorted by user.
The last set of links do not lead to job log files, but to a journal file of major events that
occurred in queuing.
•
Meta Message Logs
This link lists all available meta message log files.
•
Today’s Meta Messages
This link takes you directly to the current day’s meta message log file.
Anatomy of a Job Log File Listing
Overview
SAS Warranty Analysis creates a new log file for each job that runs. This log provides
comprehensive information about what happened during the job on both the SAS tier and
the middle tiers.
The diagnostic client provides a way to navigate through the log files to view each error
or warning that is generated. The following sections explain what to look for in a job log
file listing.
Job Log Header
The first part of a job log contains header information, which includes the following:
•
job filename
•
optional table of errors with links to the errors and warnings in the log
•
start date, time, and duration for the job
Here is an example of this content:
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Chapter 7
•
The Diagnostic Client (Experimental)
Job Log Java Error
Job logs contain every type of error and warning that can be generated during a job (for
example, Java errors, SAS errors, and SAS warnings). A Java error shows the Java stack
trace for an error that occurs during the Java portion of a job. An example of this follows:
Job Log SAS Error or Warning
The job log SAS errors and warnings show up in the content as follows:
Ignore Errors Section
Occasionally, sections of the log file contain particular blocks of SAS code that are
deliberately surrounded with special log comments. The log comments prevent any errors
that might happen from causing the job to fail. These blocks of code are used when the
SAS code is expected to generate a benign error such as failure to achieve a table lock. For
example, when the SKIP_SAS_ERRORS() code is used, the software anticipates file
contention and tries again to achieve the lock if the first attempt fails. These SAS code
blocks look like the following example:
Configuration Related Area
43
Job Log Statistics Summary
Every job log ends with a summary of the performance statistics for the job run. This content
resembles the following example:
Configuration Related Area
The Configuration Related area enables you to see or test aspects of the configuration.
The information includes the following:
•
Configuration Parameters
This area provides a partial display of the app.config file configuration parameters that
are currently in force.
•
Configuration Test
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Chapter 7
•
The Diagnostic Client (Experimental)
This area displays a set of diagnostic tests to determine how the system responds.
•
SAS Options Listing
This area runs PROC OPTIONS to display a listing of the SAS engine settings that
govern the running of SAS code. At certain times, this information can be useful to
know. For example, the MEMSIZE system option value can help you ensure that SAS
is configured properly for the underlying hardware.
Miscellaneous Tools Area
The Miscellaneous Tools area enables you to run various tools.
CAUTION:
Use these tools only under the guidance of SAS Technical Support.
The information includes the following:
•
Diagnostic Trial
This area enables an administrator to try SQL queries or SAS code fragments while
debugging on-site problems.
•
Run Driver Program
This area enables an administrator to run (apart from the clients) a SAS stored procedure
(the driver program) that executes most of the SAS Warranty Analysis SAS code. For
the code to work, the proper parameters must be supplied.
45
Chapter 8
Working with Jobs, Tasks, and
Queues
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
About Jobs, Tasks, and Queues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Managing Interactive and Batch Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Managing Interactive Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Managing Batch Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Managing Queues in the Rich Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Using the Diagnostic Client to View Queues (Experimental) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Viewing Interactive Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Viewing Batch Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Using the Diagnostic Client to View Job Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Viewing Interactive Job Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Viewing Batch Job Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Overview
This chapter explains how SAS Warranty Analysis manages work through the software
stack.
Most queuing tasks are done in the rich client. See “The Job Queue Utility” in either the
online Help or the SAS Warranty Analysis User’s Guidee for more information about the
job queue utility in the rich client.
Note: The rich client’s administrative options for queuing affect only batch jobs.
The information in this chapter can help you to better understand Chapter 9, “Working with
Batch Processes,” on page 51.
About Jobs, Tasks, and Queues
SAS Warranty Analysis performs all work, whether batch work or work in response to user
interactions with a client, within the context of a job. A job is a logical unit of work that
includes one or more tasks. Each task is a specific processing operation such as running a
query or executing SAS code.
46
Chapter 8
•
Working with Jobs, Tasks, and Queues
Every job is run in a queue, where its progress can be monitored. SAS Warranty Analysis
runs all jobs on a first-come, first-served basis. Depending on the hardware capacity, a
specified number of jobs can run simultaneously.
Managing Interactive and Batch Jobs
Managing Interactive Jobs
Interactive jobs are created and run in response to user actions within a SAS Warranty
Analysis client. Interactive jobs, which are expected to run quickly (that is, in several
seconds or less), are not tracked in the same way as batch jobs. After an interactive job
starts, the client does not allow further actions until the results from that job are returned.
Managing Batch Jobs
Batch jobs are created and run for any work that is expected to take a long time. This
includes executing an analysis either by a user from the rich client or by means of the batch
processing subsystem (see Chapter 9, “Working with Batch Processes,” on page 51).
Batch jobs are tracked more thoroughly than interactive jobs are tracked. When a user
invokes a batch analysis in the rich client, the client does not prevent the user from doing
other work. While the analysis runs, its status is updated; for example, the middle tier
notifies the client to change the “gear” icon to a green check when the analysis finishes.
Managing Queues in the Rich Client
Users who are members of the SAS Warranty Analysis Full Administrators group have
more options available to them in the rich client than other users. Among these options are
the following:
•
the ability to delete jobs that have not yet started running
•
the ability to remove finished jobs that were submitted by any user
Using the Diagnostic Client to View Queues
(Experimental)
Viewing Interactive Jobs
The diagnostic client provides several useful read-only views into the SAS Warranty
Analysis queuing subsystem.
The URL to invoke the diagnostic client is http://hostname:6098/
SASWarrantyAnalysis/JobStatus.
The Interactive Job Monitoring area shows a summary of the currently running
interactive jobs. This area refreshes frequently so that you can see how the system is
supporting its various interactive clients.
Viewing Batch Jobs
47
The Submitted Jobs area shows the following:
•
the number of jobs that are currently running (Running)
•
the highest number of jobs that have run simultaneously (Max Running)
•
the number of jobs that are in the queue to run but have not yet started (Waiting)
•
the highest number of jobs that have been in the queue waiting to run (Max Waiting)
•
the number of jobs that are done (Done)
The Performance Links section contains links that connect to more detailed screens about
system performance.
Other fields provide the following information for each job:
•
Job Name: the internal names of currently running jobs
•
Run Date: the date and time when the job starts
•
Done Date: the date and time when the job completes
•
Run Code: the status of the job (Running, Resetting, Finished, or Starting)
•
User ID: the logon ID of the user who requests the job
Job Type, Subject Type, and Subject ID are internal to the system.
Viewing Batch Jobs
The Batch Job Monitoring area shows a summary of the currently running batch jobs.
This area refreshes frequently so that you can track changes in the batch environment.
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Chapter 8
•
Working with Jobs, Tasks, and Queues
The Submitted Jobs section shows the following:
•
the number of jobs that are currently running (Running)
•
the highest number of jobs that have run simultaneously (Max Running)
•
the number of jobs that are in the queue to run but have not yet started (Waiting)
•
the highest number of jobs that have been in the queue waiting to run (Max Waiting)
•
the number of jobs that are done (Done)
The Performance Links section contains links that connect to more detailed screens about
system performance.
Other fields provide the following information for each job:
•
Job Name: the internal names of currently running jobs
•
Run Date: the date and time when the job starts
•
Done Date: the date and time when the job completes
•
Run Code: the status of the job (Running, Resetting, Finished, or Starting)
•
User ID: the logon ID of the user who requests the job
Job Type, Subject Type, and Subject ID are internal to the system.
Using the Diagnostic Client to View Job
Performance
Viewing Interactive Job Performance
The Interactive Job Performance area summarizes statistics for all of the interactive jobs
that have run so far. The Running Times area provides information about total running
time, and the Wait to Start Times area provides information about how long jobs take to
start.
Viewing Batch Job Performance
49
Viewing Batch Job Performance
The Batch Job Performance area shows a summary of all the batch jobs run so far. This
area also shows a comparison view for how long it took for jobs to start up. The Running
Times area provides information about total running time, and the Wait to Start Times
area provides information about how long jobs take to start.
50
Chapter 8
•
Working with Jobs, Tasks, and Queues
51
Chapter 9
Working with Batch Processes
Overview of Batch Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Job Control Tables and Scheduling Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Job Control Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Job Control Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Batch Processing Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Running the Batch Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
The Emerging Issues Batch Script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Examples Using the Emerging Issues Batch Script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
The Restore Batch Script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Other Batch Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Examples Using Other Batch Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
SAS Log Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Overview of Batch Jobs
For SAS Warranty Analysis, a batch job is either of the following:
•
any job that is started from the rich client but does not “freeze” the user interface while
the job is running. For example, if a user selects the Submit Now option to update an
analysis, the analysis starts immediately and runs in the background. The user does not
have to wait for the analysis to end before he or she can perform other tasks.
These jobs run in the background immediately when they are invoked, unlike jobs that
are started using the Submit Later option, which must be scheduled for execution.
•
all work that is run outside of any SAS Warranty Analysis client (for example, by using
command lines or a scheduling package). Examples include emerging issues reports or
public reports that are defined within the rich client. By default, these reports become
batch jobs that do not run until a SAS Warranty Analysis command-line program
releases them to run. This type of work usually consists of batch jobs that you administer
during off-peak hours to reduce the impact on the servers that run your SAS Warranty
Analysis system.
The SAS Warranty Analysis system includes the following types of batch jobs:
•
analysis, submit later
When a user selects the Submit Later option to schedule an analysis for later execution,
the analysis is queued for batch processing.
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Chapter 9
•
Working with Batch Processes
•
public report
A user in the Projects workspace can save a given analysis as a report. These reports
can be set to run once (Auto Update) or run repeatedly (Auto Update Create New).
Both of these end up in batch processing.
•
emerging issues analytic and emerging issues threshold
A user in the Emerging Issues area of the Administration workspace can define reports
that are similar to public reports, but whose results are displayed in the Emerging Issues
workspace instead of the Reports workspace. These emerging issues reports run as
individual analyses just as analyses in the Projects workspace and reports in the Reports
workspace do.
•
emerging issues automated
A user in the Administration workspace can also define automated reports. These
reports differ from all other reports in that a more involved analytic process scans a
potentially larger amount of data and generates potentially hundreds of reports. Like
emerging issues analytic reports and emerging issues threshold reports, emerging issues
automated reports can be viewed in the Emerging Issues workspace.
Each of these job types has its own requirements for running. Typically, it is best to run
them separately from one another, because their run-time characteristics can vary. The
following sections describe the scheduling and run-time characteristics of batch jobs in
more detail.
Job Control Tables and Scheduling Integration
Overview
The SAS Warranty Analysis system was not designed with any particular scheduling
package in mind. Rather, the system is designed to support any scheduling package, or
none at all. If you prefer, you can drive batch processing from a command line. SAS
Warranty Analysis enables you to run batch jobs in any environment by defining tables to
store the batch job information and scripts to run the various types of jobs.
Job Control Tables
SAS Warranty Analysis has four tables in the PARMSL library that contain job-related
information:
•
JobControl
This table has one row for each batch job that is defined. This table stores rows for
finished analysis jobs that were executed by using the Submit Now option in the rich
client. You can use the Job Queue utility in the rich client to clear out these rows before
you invoke a batch run. Clearing out the rows makes it easier for you to see what remains
to be run in the batch queue.
•
JobAttributes
Each row in this table stores a single attribute of a batch job that has been defined in
the JobControl table.
•
JobPerform
This table stores measurements of how long each job runs.
Batch Processing Overview
•
53
JobSynchLock
This table enables the SAS Warranty Analysis middle-tier processes and SAS tier
processes to coordinate write access to the job control tables.
Note: You will not perform operations on these tables directly. This administration guide
mentions them because you can see the contents of the JobControl table in the
diagnostic client or by using the Job Queue utility in the rich client.
For more information about monitoring batch processing, see Chapter 7, “The Diagnostic
Client (Experimental),” on page 37. See “The Job Queue Utility” in either the online Help
or the SAS Warranty Analysis: User’s Guide for more information about the job queue
utility in the rich client.
Job Control Scripts
The JobControl table contains a number of columns that are involved in managing batch
jobs. To make batch processing easier to manage, the system includes a few scripts that
enable you to invoke batch job processing on each of the batch job types:
•
start_OP (.bat or .sh) enables off-peak analyses (that is, analyses submitted by using
the Submit Later option in the rich client) to be run as a set.
•
start_BR (.bat or .sh) enables batch (public) reports to be run as a set.
•
start_EI (.bat or .sh) enables emerging issues (analytic, threshold, or automated) to be
run as a set.
Each of these scripts is described in more detail, with examples, in the sections that follow.
Batch Processing Overview
The strategy for batch processing design varies with each site. There might be few enough
jobs to run them all in one evening, or processing might need to be spread over a number
of days. The on-site SAS support personnel who install your system help you to determine
what works best for you.
Regardless of how much time it takes, you should run each of the following types of batch
processing separately:
•
data mart refresh
•
off-peak (analyses submitted by using the Submit Later option)
•
batch report (public reports)
•
emerging issues analytic
•
emerging issues threshold
•
emerging issues automated
The job control scripts can be used to invoke each of these processes separately. The data
mart refresh batch script, which is site-specific, is provided by your on-site SAS support
personnel.
Refresh the data marts first, and then start processing of the various batch job types.
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Working with Batch Processes
Running the Batch Scripts
The Emerging Issues Batch Script
The syntax of the start_EI batch script is as follows.
In a Windows environment:
<SASRootPath>\wrtyanlmva\sasmisc\batch\start_EI.bat <EIType><datasourceid>
[<maxtimelimit> [<minutes2sleep>]]
In a UNIX environment:
<SASRootPath>/misc/wrtyanlmva/batch/start_EI.sh <EIType><datasourceid>
[<maxtimelimit> [<minutes2sleep>]]
The batch script parameters are as follows:
<EIType> (required)
specifies which emerging issues analysis to run. The value must be 'EIANALYTIC',
'EIAUTOMATED', or 'EITHRESHOLD'.
<datasourceid> (required)
specifies a single existing data source ID number, typically 1 or 2, and so on.
Note: A data source ID is generally a positive integer (for example, 1, 2, and so on).
The batch scripts start_EI and start_BR both require a data source ID specification;
they are generally executed following a successful update of the data mart that
corresponds to the specified data source IDs.
•
For start_EI, the datasourceid parameter can be only a single data source ID
(for example, start_EI EIAUTOMATED 1).
•
For start_BR, the datasourceid parameter can be a single data source ID, a list
of data source IDs separated by |, a combined data source ID, or a list of
combined data source IDs separated by |. The specification of a data source ID
list or a combined data source ID must be enclosed in double quotes. A
combined data source ID is specified as a list of comma-separated data source
IDs.
<maxtimelimit> (optional)
specifies the maximum time, in hours, during which the batch process can submit jobs
to the execution queue. The default value is 999 (hours). The <maxtimelimit> option
is not necessary for emerging issues automated runs.
Note: Take care when specifying the <maxtimelimit> option if one of these batch
scripts is used as a component of another master batch script. Once
<maxtimelimit> is exceeded, control is given back to the master batch script even
though analysis jobs initiated by start_EI or start_BR might still be running. If
subsequent steps in the master batch script expect all activity initiated by start_EI
or start_BR to be complete, then <maxtimelimit> should be set to an arbitrarily
large number (for example, maxtimelimit=999). Since the units are hours, 999
should be ample time for completion.
<minutes2sleep> (optional)
specifies the time, in minutes, between job status checks on submitted jobs. The default
value is 2. If <minutes2sleep> is specified, then <maxtimelimit> must be specified.
The <minutes2sleep> option is not necessary for emerging issues automated runs.
Other Batch Scripts 55
Examples Using the Emerging Issues Batch Script
Example 1: To run the emerging issues automated process for two data sources, include
the following commands in the start_EI batch script:
start_EI.bat EIAUTOMATED 1
start_EI.bat EIAUTOMATED 2
Example 2: To run all emerging issues processes for one data source and specify
<maxtimelimit> 7 and <minutes2sleep> 3, include the following commands in the start_EI
batch script:
start_EI.bat EIAUTOMATED 1
start_EI.bat EITHRESHOLD 1 7 3
start_EI.bat EIANALYTIC 1 7 3
The Restore Batch Script
The exec_eirestore batch script restores and re-initializes the Enterprise-Analytic
(EIAUTO) issues by deleting Enterprise-Analytic Analysis runs based on an EI run group
ID.
The syntax of the exec_eirestore batch script is as follows.
<SASConfig>\Lev1\Applications\SASWarrantyAnalysis4.2\batch\exec_eirestore.bat
<EIRunGroupID>
The batch script parameters are as follows:
<EIRunGroupID>
specifies the ID number for a run group that has been run in Enterprise-Analytic
Analysis.
Note: Before you run the exec_eirestore batch script, create the log file <SASConfig>
\Lev1\Applications\SASWarrantyAnalysis4.2\batch
\exec_eirestore.log.
Other Batch Scripts
The start_BR and start_OP batch scripts have the same syntax. The following syntax and
examples are for start_BR, but they apply equally for start_OP.
The start_BR batch script executes any of the standard (that is, not emerging issues) batch
analysis reports. It is invoked by providing the correct parameters to the start_BR.sh (or .bat
in aWindows environment) shell batch script.
The syntax of the start_BR or start_OP batch script is as follows.
In a Windows environment:
<SASRootPath>\wrtyanlmva\sasmisc\batch\start_BR.bat
<datasourceid>[<logfilename> [<maxtimelimit> [<minutes2sleep>]]]
In a UNIX environment:
<SASRootPath>/misc/wrtyanlmva/batch/:start_BR.sh <datasourceid>[<logfilename>
[<maxtimelimit> [<minutes2sleep>]]]
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The batch script parameters are as follows:
<datasourceid> (required)
specifies a single existing data source ID number, typically 1 or 2, and so on.
Note: A data source ID is generally a positive integer (for example, 1, 2, and so on).
The batch scripts start_EI and start_BR both require a data source ID specification;
they are generally executed following a successful update of the data mart that
corresponds to the specified data source IDs.
•
For start_EI, the datasourceid parameter can be only a single data source ID
(for example, start_EI EIAUTOMATED 1).
•
For start_BR, the datasourceid parameter can be a single data source ID, a list
of data source IDs separated by |, a combined data source ID, or a list of
combined data source IDs separated by |. The specification of a data source ID
list or a combined data source ID must be enclosed in double quotes. A
combined data source ID is specified as a list of comma-separated data source
IDs.
<logfilename> (optional)
specifies the filename of the log file. The path and extension (.log) are provided by the
batch script. The default value is batch.
<maxtimelimit> (optional)
specifies the maximum time, in hours, during which the batch process can submit jobs
to the execution queue. The default value is 6. If <maxtimelimit> is specified, then
<logfilename> must be specified.
Note: Take care when specifying the <maxtimelimit> option if one of these batch
scripts is used as a component of another master batch script. Once
<maxtimelimit> is exceeded, control is given back to the master batch script even
though analysis jobs initiated by start_EI or start_BR might still be running. If
subsequent steps in the master batch script expect all activity initiated by start_EI
or start_BR to be complete, then <maxtimelimit> should be set to an arbitrarily
large number (for example, maxtimelimit=999). Since the units are hours, 999
should be ample time for completion.
<minutes2sleep> (optional)
specifies the time, in minutes, between job status checks on submitted jobs. The default
value is 2. If <minutes2sleep> is specified, then <maxtimelimit> must be specified.
Examples Using Other Batch Scripts
Example 1: To run batch reports for two data sources (1 and 2), include either of the
following sets of commands in the start_BR batch script:
start_BR.bat 1}
start_BR.bat 2}
or
start_BR.bat "1|2"
Example 2: To run all batch reports for combined filters based on data source ID 1 and data
source ID 2 and specify <logfilename>, <maxtimelimit> 7, and <minutes2sleep> 3,
include the following command in the start_BR batch script:
start_BR.bat "1,2|2,1" batch_1C2 7 3
Example 3: To run all batch reports from either data source ID 1 or data source ID 2, include
the following command in the start_BR batch script:
SAS Log Files
57
start_BR "1|2"
Example 4: To run all batch reports that use combined filters based on data source IDs 1
and 2, include the following command in the start_BR batch script:
start_BR "1,2|2,1"
The combined datasource ID “1,2” is not equivalent to “2,1”, so the specification “1,2|2,1”
is required in order to run both.
SAS Log Files
SAS log files are created when the start_EI or start_BR batch scripts are executed.
In a Windows environment, the logs are in the following location:
<SASRootPath>\wrtyanlmva\sasmisc\batch\logs
In a UNIX environment, the logs are in the following location:
<SASRootPath>/misc/wrtyanlmva/batch/logs
For emerging issues runs, the logs are named <EIType>_<datasourceid>.log.
For batch report runs, the logs are named <logfilename>.log; the default for
<logfilename> is batch. If problems exist in report output, examine one of these logs first.
58
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Working with Batch Processes
59
Chapter 10
Understanding Emerging Issues
Processes
About Emerging Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Threshold Watch List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Automated Analytical Process and Analytical Watch List Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Additional Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
About Emerging Issues
Overview
Emerging issues processes are highly parameter-driven; therefore the implementation is
site-specific. Your on-site SAS support personnel provide site-specific documentation so
that you know how to set up and administer your emerging issues functionality. For
instructions for invoking emerging issues batch processing, see Chapter 9, “Working with
Batch Processes,” on page 51.
The emerging issues functionality within SAS Warranty Analysis includes these processes:
•
threshold watch list process
•
automated analytical process
•
analytical watch list process
These processes monitor warranty data and identify emerging issues by determining when
the following have occurred in claims activity:
•
upward trends that are statistically significant
•
sudden increases that are above a value that you have specified as acceptable
The processes require input from users with an administrator role. Users with this profile
must be members of the SAS Warranty Analysis EI Administrators group. For more
information about SAS Warranty Analysis groups and roles, see Chapter 5, “Security,” on
page 25.
Threshold Watch List
The threshold watch list process monitors values of a variable (called the reporting
variable) on a defined subset of data (specified by a data selection) in order to determine
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Understanding Emerging Issues Processes
whether values of a calculated quantitative value (called the analysis variable) surpass a
specified threshold value.
Emerging issues administrators can use the rich client to define a new data selection, or
they can import a data selection that another user has already defined.
A threshold watch list report definition consists of a data selection and a collection of
analysis options, such as the reporting variable and a threshold value. A report definition
can be defined only by users in one of these groups:
•
SAS Warranty Analysis Full Administrators
•
SAS Warranty Analysis Emerging Issues Administrators
Members of either of these groups are referred to as emerging issues administrators.
These report definitions are processed in batch whenever a refresh of the data mart is
completed. A report is generated (that is, an issue is flagged) from a report definition when
the calculated analysis variable exceeds the specified threshold value for at least one value
of the reporting variable in the subset of data that is being analyzed. The threshold output
displays in the form of a Pareto chart the values of the reporting variable for which the
analysis variable exceeds the threshold value.
When creating a report definition, the emerging issues administrator can specify which
users are to receive e-mail notification whenever any values of the reporting variables are
flagged as issues. However, any SAS Warranty Analysis user who is not specifically denied
permission to view the emerging issues watch list reports can access these reports from the
Emerging Issues workspace.
Automated Analytical Process and Analytical Watch List Process
The automated analytical process and the analytical watch list process are both used to
monitor claims activity on a defined subset of units in order to identify significant upward
shifts in claims activity. Instead of using a specified threshold value, these processes use
analytical methods to compare current claim activity levels with expected future levels
(based on history) and to flag those items for which the actual level is significantly greater
than the expected level. The automated analytical process and the analytical watch list
process are similar in their use of the same analytic methods. The two processes differ in
how the defined subset of units that are being monitored is derived and how parameters
that affect the processing (such as the sensitivity of the statistical tests performed) are
defined. Additional differences are noted in subsequent sections of this document.
For these processes, the variable and the subset of product information that is to be
monitored are defined by individual emerging issues administrators.
For the automated analytical process, the claim variable that is to be monitored is called
the defined entity, and the rule (or variable hierarchy) that is used to group product units is
called the defined hierarchy. The defined hierarchy defines the product information subsets
that are to be monitored. The automated process monitors the values of the defined entity
by the values of the defined hierarchy. A defined entity, defined hierarchy, and additional
processing parameters make up an automated analytical run group. An automated analytical
run group is the set of analysis options that are used to create the emerging issues reports.
For the analytical watch list process, the subset of product information that is to be
monitored is defined by a data selection. Emerging issues administrators can define a data
selection by using the data selection function in the application, or they can import a data
selection that another user of the application has already defined.
The emerging issues administrator also selects the variable that is to be monitored (called
the reporting variable) and additional processing options such as the sensitivity of
hypothesis tests and number of periods to monitor. Additional parameters that affect how
Additional Reading
61
the process runs are also defined in the application metadata. The reporting variable is
similar to the defined entity in the automated process, but the reporting variable can include
product attributes in addition to claim attributes, whereas the defined entity can be only a
claim attribute. Each report definition consists of a data selection, a reporting variable, and
other analysis options. The report definition for the analytical watch list process is similar
to the run group for the automated analytical process.
Report definitions for the analytic watch list process are processed in batch on a scheduled
basis whenever a refresh of the data mart is completed. A report is generated (that is, an
issue is flagged) from a report definition when the process detects a significant upward
shift in claims activity for any value of the reporting variable that is being analyzed.
When creating a report definition for the analytical watch list, the emerging issues
administrator can specify users to receive e-mail notification whenever any values of the
reporting variables are flagged as issues. However, any SAS Warranty Analysis user who
is not specifically denied permission to view the emerging issues watch list reports can
access these reports from the Emerging Issues workspace.
In addition to the analysis options settings, the automated analytical and analytical watch
list processes also incorporate business rules that are designed to exclude from monitoring
those items that do not have adequate sample sizes and data to support this type of analysis.
The business rules are created in the application metadata and are the same for both
processes.
Two statistical analysis methods are applied in the analytical watch list and automated
analytical processes to identify upward shifts in claims activities:
•
production period analysis, a method proposed by Wu and Meeker (2002). The analysis
monitors claims activity and the sample size at risk relative to particular production
periods for different time-in-service periods (for example, 1 month in service, 2 months
in service, and so on). Given a particular production period and in-service period
combination, the analysis compares the actual claim rate to the expected claim rate and
flags an issue when the actual claim level is significantly greater than the expected
level. The expected level of claims activity for a calendar period is based on the
population at risk within that calendar period, historic claim rates, seasonality factors
(automated analytical process only), and the specified false alarm rate. The output
includes a matrix chart that identifies the flagged periods in red.
•
claim period analysis, also called the Model A method. The claim period analysis
monitors claim counts across calendar periods and flags an issue when the actual claim
count that occurs in a calendar period significantly exceeds what is expected to occur
for that calendar period. The expected level of claims activity for a calendar period is
based on the population at risk within that calendar period, historic claim rates,
seasonality factors (analytic automated process only), and the specified false alarm rate.
The output from the claim period analysis is a plot of claim count (y-axis) versus
calendar periods (x-axis). An issue is flagged if the actual claim count is greater than
or equal to the critical value for any of the calendar periods that are being investigated.
The chart shows three lines: actual claim count, expected claim count, and calculated
critical value.
Additional Reading
Please refer to the site-specific documentation that your on-site SAS support personnel
provide for more specific information about the parameter-driven configuration that is
required for SAS Warranty Analysis emerging issues.
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Reference
Wu, H. and W. Meeker. 2002 “Early Detection of Reliability Problems Using Information
from Warranty Databases.” Technometrics 79, 120–133.
63
Chapter 11
Using SAS Warranty Analysis
Business Rules with SAS
Enterprise Guide
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Setting User Access Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Overview
You can use SAS Enterprise Guide or other SAS tools to calculate warranty metrics outside
of SAS Warranty Analysis but retain the SAS Warranty Analysis methodology (business
rules). You can calculate metrics by time in service and one (or many) categorical variables.
The output is a SAS data set.
Note: This feature is intended for consultants and advanced users so that they can create
custom reports.
To use SAS Warranty Analysis business rules with other SAS tools, you must set certain
user access permissions.
Setting User Access Permissions
To set the access permissions for a user to access the SAS Warranty Analysis Application
Server context using other SAS tools:
1. Log in as an administration user on the SAS tier.
2. Set the user access permissions for the sasv9.cfg file located in
\Lev1\WarrantyApp to Read & Execute and Read.
Note: The name for the SAS Warranty Analysis Application Server context can be
different from the one shown in the previous example (WarrantyApp). The name
is specified during the installation and configuration process at your site.
3. Set the user access permissions for the swabrmain.sas file located in
\Lev1\Applications\SASWarrantyAnalysis4.2\install to Read &
Execute and Read.
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65
Chapter 12
Configuring System Options
Overview of Configuring System Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Report Generation Configuration Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
report.autoUpdateCounter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
lookupTablePageSize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
maxPagedTablePagesForPdfExport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
pdfgen.default.fontSize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
pdfgen.default.fontName . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
pdfgen.default.midTier.fontName . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Sharing Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Initialization Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
metaserver.hostname . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
metaserver.hostport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
metaserver.trusteduserid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
metaserver.trusteduserpw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
metaserver.deploymentname . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
metaserver.authdomainname . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
metaserver.repositoryname . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
apserver.host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
System Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
security.loginIdsCaseSensitive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
metaserver.trusteduserlocale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
sas.wsps.driver.program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
sas.stps.driver.program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
user.login.history.threshold.limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
ETL.messageCounter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Job Control Table Synchronization Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
analysis.rescueOrphanedMinutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
queue.jobControlTableSynchIntervalMinutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
queue.housekeepingIntervalMinutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
queue.finishedJobExpirationIntervalMinutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
queue.statisticsSnapshotCountMax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Logging Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
queuing.stats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
logging.sql . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
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logging.xml . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
logging.jobLogExpirationDaysOld . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
logging.jobLogSystemExpirationHoursOld . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
logging.stripHtml . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Numeric Formatting Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
default.decimal.fractiondigits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
default.currency.fractiondigits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
default.percent.fractiondigits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
default.integer.fractiondigits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Role Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
metaPersist.infoConsumerRoleName . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
metaPersist.dataAnalystRoleName . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
metaPersist.dataAdministratorRoleName . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
metaPersist.batchAdministratorRoleName . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
metaPersist.systemAdministratorRoleName . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
metaPersist.denyEIAccessRoleName . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Group Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
sharing.identityFilter.name10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
sharing.identityFilter.name11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
sharing.identityFilter.name12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
sharing.identityFilter.name13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
sharing.identityFilter.name14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
metaPersist.denyEIAccessGroupName . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Storage Location Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
warranty.softwareComponentName . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
warranty.projectTreeName . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
warranty.dataSelectionTreeName . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
warranty.analyticReportTreeName . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
warranty.categoryTreeName . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
warranty.applicationSASCodeTreeName . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Overview of Configuring System Options
This chapter explains how to change the configuration of various system options that are
read in by the SAS Warranty Analysis middle tier and used throughout the system. All of
these configuration options are specified in the app.config file, which is the SAS Warranty
Analysis configuration file within the SAS Analytics Platform extensions area.
In a Windows environment, you can find the app.config file in a directory such as the
following:
<SASConfig>\Lev1\AnalyticsPlatform\apps\SASWarrantyAnalysis
\app.config
In a UNIX environment, you can find the app.config file in a directory such as the following:
<SASConfig>/Lev1/AnalyticsPlatform/apps/SASWarrantyAnalysis/
app.config
pdfgen.default.fontSize
67
CAUTION:
The app.config file is a Java properties file. Therefore, it must always be an ASCII
file. If you need to enter property values in languages other than English, you
must use the Unicode representation of those values. The app.config file cannot
be saved in any other file format except ASCII. If the format of this file is not ASCII,
then the system will not function normally.
Note: The default values listed in the following sections refer to the values that the system
provides if the property is not included in the app.config file.
Report Generation Configuration Parameters
Overview
The report generation configuration parameters control how the SAS Warranty Analysis
system generates and formats reports.
report.autoUpdateCounter
Each report that a user creates uses processing time in batch. The SAS Warranty Analysis
system is designed to minimize batch overhead, so a given report stops refreshing after a
number of iterations unless a user takes action to keep the report in play. The system assigns
this configuration parameter value as the report’s refresh counter. The system decrements
the counter each time the report runs, and it does not run any more when the counter reaches
zero. The user must edit the report to reset the counter.
Note: The counter is decremented either by invoking the report interactively from the rich
client or by batch processing when the data mart is refreshed.
The default value of report.autoUpdateCounter is 5.
lookupTablePageSize
The SAS Warranty Analysis system does not show large amounts of data in one scrollable
screen. This parameter controls the maximum number of rows that a lookup table displays
per page.
The default value of lookupTablePageSize is 250. By default, this value is commented out.
maxPagedTablePagesForPdfExport
The SAS Warranty Analysis system does not print out all the rows of a large table into a
PDF document. If a user wants to see all the rows, then the client program’s paging table
views can be used. This parameter controls the number of pages that a table outputs before
the PDF generation process truncates the table.
The default value of maxPagedTablePagesForPdfExport is 2.
pdfgen.default.fontSize
SAS Warranty Analysis provides control over the point size of all text in a PDF report with
this parameter.
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The default value of pdfgen.default.fontSize is 12.
pdfgen.default.fontName
SAS Warranty Analysis provides control over the font to be used in a PDF report with this
parameter.
Note: SAS Warranty Analysis generates PDF content on the client machine when running
the rich client, but it generates PDF content on the middle tier machine when running
the web client. This parameter sets the font name for both machines unless the middle
tier configuration parameter is set differently by the pdfgen.default.midTier.fontName
parameter.
The default value of pdfgen.default.fontName is 'Arial Unicode MS'.
pdfgen.default.midTier.fontName
SAS Warranty Analysis enables the PDF content that is invoked by theWeb client to use
a different font than PDF content that is invoked by the rich client. This parameter must be
set when the middle tier machine either has a different set of fonts installed or is a different
platform entirely from the client machines (for example, the middle tier is running a UNIX
variant and the clients are running on Windows platforms). In these situations, PDF
generation from the Web fails unless this parameter is set properly.
The value of this parameter defaults to the value specified for the pdfgen.default.fontName
parameter.
Sharing Groups
SAS Warranty Analysis uses SAS Metadata Server Persons and Groups as the means to
share warranty content with other users. By default, the creating user and all members of
the SAS Warranty Analysis Full Administrators group can read and modify a given
analytical definition (for example, Public Report or Data Selection). Owners can then
grant read access to others by opening the rich client UI, invoking the share dialog box,
and selecting Persons and Groups.
However, you probably do not want the SAS Warranty Analysis content-sharing UI to
show every person and group that is available in the SAS Metadata Server. The intention
is for the system administrator to create a set of warranty business groups and show only
those. The app.config mechanism for this is to use the sequential property base name
sharing.identityFilter.name and create a list of person and group names to subtract from all
those available.
An example of this content follows. The numbers need to start at 1 and increase
sequentially.
CAUTION:
Any gap in the sequence causes the rest of the entries to be ignored.
# Identities to filter out of the sharing user interfaces
sharing.identityFilter.name1=SASUsers
sharing.identityFilter.name2=Public
sharing.identityFilter.name3=SAS System Services
sharing.identityFilter.name4=SAS General Servers
sharing.identityFilter.name5=SAS Administrator
sharing.identityFilter.name6=SAS Demo User
metaserver.hostport
69
sharing.identityFilter.name7=SAS Warranty Analysis Server User
sharing.identityFilter.name8=SAS Web Administrator
sharing.identityFilter.name9=SAS Trusted User
sharing.identityFilter.name10=SAS Warranty Analysis View Users
sharing.identityFilter.name11=SAS Warranty Analysis Restricted Users
sharing.identityFilter.name12=SAS Warranty Analysis Normal Users
sharing.identityFilter.name13=SAS Warranty Analysis EI Administrators
sharing.identityFilter.name14=SAS Warranty Analysis Full Administrators
sharing.identityFilter.name15=Performance Testing
sharing.identityFilter.name16=Portal Admins
sharing.identityFilter.name17=Portal Demo
Note: The five SAS Warranty Analysis system groups might appear in app.config by
default. These groups can be removed, because the system automatically excludes them
from showing up regardless of the content of app.config. It does not hurt to have them
in the list, but they are not necessary. Just make sure that the group names defined in
the Group Names section match the names in the SAS Metadata Server.
Initialization Parameters
Overview
The SAS Analytics Platform and SAS Warranty Analysis application initialization
parameters are set during the installation and configuration process, and most do not need
to be changed. They are documented in the following sections in case credentials or
passwords are updated or your site installation requires customization.
Note: When you see the value configured, it means that the code does not supply a default
value and that the proper values are inserted in the app.config file when the SAS
Configuration Wizard runs.
metaserver.hostname
This parameter specifies the host name for the machine that hosts the SAS Metadata Server.
There is no default value. The proper values are automatically inserted in the app.config
file when the SAS Configuration Wizard runs.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
metaserver.hostport
This parameter specifies the host port for the machine that hosts the SAS Metadata Server.
There is no default value. The proper values are automatically inserted in the app.config
file when the SAS Configuration Wizard runs.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
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metaserver.trusteduserid
This parameter specifies the user logon ID for the credential that is used to initialize the
SAS Warranty Analysis extensions within the SAS Analytics Platform application server.
There is no default value. The proper values are automatically inserted in the app.config
file when the SAS Configuration Wizard runs.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
metaserver.trusteduserpw
This parameter specifies the user logon password for the credential that is used to initialize
the SAS Warranty Analysis extensions within the SAS Analytics Platform application
server.
There is no default value. The proper values are automatically inserted in the app.config
file when the SAS Configuration Wizard runs.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
metaserver.deploymentname
This parameter specifies the name of the SAS Business Intelligence Platform services
deployment that the SAS Analytics Platform and SAS Warranty Analysis use to run all
SAS server work.
There is no default value. The proper values are automatically inserted in the app.config
file when the SAS Configuration Wizard runs.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
metaserver.authdomainname
This parameter specifies the name of the SAS Metadata Server authentication domain to
use for all metadata access.
The default value of metaserver.authdomainname is 'DefaultAuth'.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
metaserver.repositoryname
This parameter specifies the name of the SAS Metadata Server repository to use for all
metadata access.
The default value of metaserver.repositoryname is 'Foundation'.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
sas.stps.driver.program
71
apserver.host
This parameter specifies the name of the server machine where the SAS Analytics Platform
application server is running.
There is no default value. The proper values are automatically inserted in the app.config
file when the SAS Configuration Wizard runs.
System Parameters
Overview
The system parameters control a set of miscellaneous (and largely unrelated) behaviors in
the SAS Warranty Analysis system.
security.loginIdsCaseSensitive
By default, SAS Warranty Analysis treats logon IDs as case-insensitive. The default works
fine in a Windows environment. However, in a UNIX environment, you should change this
value to 'true' because UNIX authentication respects the case of the login ID.
The default value of security.loginIdsCaseSensitive is 'false'.
metaserver.trusteduserlocale
This parameter specifies the locale value that is used for batch work if no other locale is
specified for any jobs that are run as the SAS Warranty Analysis initialization user
credential (see “metaserver.trusteduserid” on page 70). This parameter is seldom used for
batch reports, because they take on the locale of the analysis.
The default value of metaserver.trusteduserlocale is 'en_US'.
sas.wsps.driver.program
This parameter specifies the path in the SAS Metadata Server to the SAS Warranty Analysis
stored process that is used to kick off all SAS tier work that uses the workspace server.
The default value is set during installation and configuration. The only reason the default
value should be changed is if site customization requires a different version of the stored
process to be run. In this case, on-site SAS support personnel change this value.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
sas.stps.driver.program
This parameter specifies the path in the SAS Metadata Server to the SAS Warranty Analysis
stored process that is used to kick off all SAS tier work that uses the SAS Stored Process
Server.
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The default value is set during installation and configuration. The only reason this should
be changed is if site customization requires a different version of the stored process to be
run. In this case, on-site SAS support personnel change this value.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
user.login.history.threshold.limit
SAS Warranty Analysis keeps track of logon attempts. This parameter specifies the number
of records that need to be maintained in the logon history for each user.
The default value of user.login.history.threshold.limit is 5.
ETL.messageCounter
This parameter specifies the number of refreshes that show in messages in the clients.
The default value of ETL.messageCounter is 3.
The SAS Warranty Analysis middle tier monitors the system to detect when a data mart
refresh event happens.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
Job Control Table Synchronization Parameters
Overview
The job control table (JCT) synchronization is a process that the SAS Warranty Analysis
middle tier runs every few minutes (see “queue.jobControlTableSynchIntervalMinutes”
on page 73). The configuration parameters described in this section show how to control
the many tasks performed by the JCT synchronization.
analysis.rescueOrphanedMinutes
If the SAS Warranty Analysis middle-tier machine (or services) is stopped and restarted
while SAS jobs are in the queue to be run, then it is possible for a SAS job to become
“orphaned.” This configuration option affects analysis jobs that never actually started
executing.
A job becomes orphaned if the following sequence of events occurs:
1. The job is released to run.
2. The analysis is set to Updating.
3. The middle tier is stopped and restarted.
When a job becomes orphaned, the analysis (and its JCT record) stay in the Updating state
because nothing happens to change the state. However, it is impossible to discriminate
between an orphaned job and normal analysis execution, where there can be a delay
between release and starting execution. After the delay defined by this parameter, measured
logging.sql
73
against the job start time, the JCT synchronization process resets the jobs back to the
Ready state.
The default value of analysis.rescueOrphanedMinutes is 5.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
queue.jobControlTableSynchIntervalMinutes
This parameter specifies how many minutes pass between runs of the JCT synchronization
process.
The default value of queue.jobControlTableSynchIntervalMinutes is 5.
queue.housekeepingIntervalMinutes
This parameter specifies how many minutes pass between runs of the general housekeeping
process. The main purpose of this process is to delete old log files.
The default value of queue.housekeepingIntervalMinutes is 60.
queue.finishedJobExpirationIntervalMinutes
This parameter specifies how many minutes a job can be left in the Finished state before
being deleted.
The default value of queue.finishedJobExpirationIntervalMinutes is 1440.
queue.statisticsSnapshotCountMax
This parameter specifies how many SAS Warranty Analysis queuing snapshots can be
cached in memory. You can see the queuing snapshots in the diagnostic client.
The default value of queue.statisticsSnapshotCountMax is 120.
Logging Parameters
queuing.stats
This parameter causes all statistics related to SAS Warranty Analysis queue management
and batch processing to be printed to the SAS Analytics Platform console output. The Java
stream used is System.err.
The default value of queuing.stats is 'false'. By default, this value is commented out.
logging.sql
This parameter causes every SQL statement run by the system to be written to the SAS
Analytics Platform console output. These SQL statements are not currently written to the
job log files.
The default value of logging.sql is 'false'. By default, this value is commented out.
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Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
logging.xml
This parameter causes the analysis options and analysis output XML file to be written to
the job log. This XML information is not currently written to the SAS Analytics Platform
console output.
The default value of logging.xml is 'false'.
logging.jobLogExpirationDaysOld
This parameter controls how many days old a normal log file must be to be automatically
deleted.
The default value of logging.jobLogExpirationDaysOld is 5.
logging.jobLogSystemExpirationHoursOld
This parameter controls how many hours old a system log file must be to be automatically
deleted.
The default value of logging.jobLogSystemExpirationHoursOld is 4.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
logging.stripHtml
This parameter controls whether the HTML syntax is stripped from the job log files.
Keeping the HTML intact enhances the log content with navigation links and highlighting
of errors in red, warnings in orange, and other important information in blue.
The default value of logging.stripHtml is 'N'.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
Numeric Formatting Options
Overview
This set of configuration parameters controls the formatting and rounding of numbers in
the SAS Warranty Analysis system.
default.decimal.fractiondigits
This parameter specifies the default fraction digits that are used in rounding the decimal
values that are stored in SAS data sets. This configuration is used mainly for precision
searching of formatted values (in the SAS ROUNDE function) against the raw data that is
stored in SAS data sets.
Overview
75
The default value of default.decimal.fractiondigits is 0.001.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
default.currency.fractiondigits
This parameter specifies how many decimal fraction digits are used to round currency
values stored in SAS data sets. This configuration is used mainly for precision searching
of formatted values (in the SAS ROUNDE function) against the raw data that is stored in
SAS data sets.
The default value of default.currency.fractiondigits is 0.01.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
default.percent.fractiondigits
This parameter specifies how many decimal fraction digits are used to round percentage
values stored in SAS data sets. This configuration is used mainly for precision searching
of formatted values (in the SAS ROUNDE function) against the raw data that is stored in
SAS data sets.
The default value of default.percent.fractiondigits is '(String) null'.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
default.integer.fractiondigits
This parameter specifies how many decimal fraction digits are used to round integer values
stored as decimals in SAS data sets with integer formats. This configuration is used mainly
for precision searching of formatted values (in the SAS ROUNDE function) against the
raw data that is stored in SAS data sets.
The default value of default.integer.fractiondigits is '(String) null'.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
Role Names
Overview
The SAS Warranty Analysis system uses SAS Metadata Server role names in its code. The
names to be used are defined by the following configuration properties.
CAUTION:
Keep these names synchronized with the actual names used in SAS Management
Console, or the system will not work properly.
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metaPersist.infoConsumerRoleName
This parameter specifies a role name to match the corresponding role in SAS Management
Console for the Warranty Information Consumer role.
The default value of metaPersist.infoConsumerRoleName is 'Warranty Analysis:
Information Consumption'.
metaPersist.dataAnalystRoleName
This parameter specifies a role name to match the corresponding role in SAS Management
Console for the Warranty Data Analyst role.
The default value of metaPersist.dataAnalystRoleName is 'Warranty Analysis: Data
Analysis'.
metaPersist.dataAdministratorRoleName
This parameter specifies a role name to match the corresponding role in SAS Management
Console for the Warranty Data Administrator role.
The default value of metaPersist.dataAdministratorRoleName is 'Warranty Analysis: Data
Administration'.
metaPersist.batchAdministratorRoleName
This parameter specifies a role name to match the corresponding role in SAS Management
Console for the Warranty EI Administrator role.
The default value of metaPersist.batchAdministratorRoleName is 'Warranty Analysis: EI
Administration'.
metaPersist.systemAdministratorRoleName
This parameter specifies a role name to match the corresponding role in SAS Management
Console for the Warranty System Administrator role.
The default value of metaPersist.systemAdministratorRoleName is 'Warranty Analysis:
System Administration'.
metaPersist.denyEIAccessRoleName
This parameter specifies a role name to match the corresponding role in SAS Management
Console for the Warranty Deny EI Access role.
The default value of metaPersist.denyEIAccessRoleName is 'Warranty Deny EI Access'.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
sharing.identityFilter.name14
77
Group Names
Overview
The SAS Warranty Analysis system uses SAS Metadata Server group names in its code.
The names to be used are defined by the following configuration properties.
CAUTION:
Keep these names synchronized with the actual names used in SAS Management
Console, or the system will not work properly.
For more information, see Chapter 5, “Security,” on page 25.
sharing.identityFilter.name10
This parameter specifies a group name to match the corresponding group in SAS
Management Console for the SAS Warranty Analysis View Users group.
The default value of metaPersist.viewUserGroupName is 'SAS Warranty Analysis View
Users'.
sharing.identityFilter.name11
This parameter specifies a group name to match the corresponding group in SAS
Management Console for the SAS Warranty Analysis Restricted Users group.
The default value of metaPersist.restrictedUsersGroupName is 'SAS Warranty Analysis
Restricted Users'.
sharing.identityFilter.name12
This parameter specifies a group name to match the corresponding group in SAS
Management Console for the SAS Warranty Analysis Normal Users group.
The default value of metaPersist.normalUsersGroupName is 'SAS Warranty Analysis
Normal Users'.
sharing.identityFilter.name13
This parameter specifies a group name to match the corresponding group in SAS
Management Console for the SAS Warranty Analysis EI Administrators group.
The default value of metaPersist.eiAdminGroupName is 'SAS Warranty Analysis EI
Administrators'.
sharing.identityFilter.name14
This parameter specifies a group name to match the corresponding group in SAS
Management Console for the SAS Warranty Analysis Full Administrators group.
The default value of metaPersist.adminGroupName is 'SAS Warranty Analysis Full
Administrators'.
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Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
metaPersist.denyEIAccessGroupName
This parameter specifies a group name to match the corresponding group in SAS
Management Console for the SAS Warranty Analysis Deny EI Access group.
The default value of metaPersist.denyEIAccessGroupName is 'SAS Warranty Analysis
Deny EI Access'.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
Storage Location Names
Overview
The SAS Warranty Analysis system makes use of SAS Metadata Server software
component and folder names in its code. The names to be used are defined by the following
configuration properties.
CAUTION:
Keep these names synchronized with the actual names used in SAS Management
Console, or the system will not work properly.
For more information, see Chapter 5, “Security,” on page 25.
warranty.softwareComponentName
This parameter specifies a software component name to match the corresponding software
component in SAS Management Console.
The default value of warranty.softwareComponentName is 'Warranty Analysis 4.2'.
warranty.projectTreeName
This parameter specifies a folder name to match the corresponding folder in SAS
Management Console for the folder where SAS Warranty Analysis project definition
metadata objects are stored.
The default value of warranty.projectTreeName is 'Projects'.
warranty.dataSelectionTreeName
This parameter specifies the folder name to match the corresponding folder in SAS
Management Console for the folder where SAS Warranty Analysis data selection definition
metadata objects are stored.
The default value of warranty.dataSelectionTreeName is 'Data Selections'.
warranty.applicationSASCodeTreeName
79
warranty.analyticReportTreeName
This parameter specifies the folder name to match the corresponding folder in SAS
Management Console for the folder where SAS Warranty Analysis public report definition
metadata objects are stored.
The default value of warranty.analyticReportTreeName is 'Analytic Reports'.
warranty.categoryTreeName
This parameter specifies a folder name to match the corresponding folder in SAS
Management Console for the folder where SAS Warranty Analysis category definition
metadata objects are stored.
The default value of warranty.categoryTreeName is 'Categories'.
warranty.applicationSASCodeTreeName
This parameter is not used in SAS Warranty Analysis.
The default value of warranty.applicationSASCodeTreeName is 'Application SAS Code'.
Note: By default, this parameter is not included in the file. You can add this parameter
manually.
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Chapter 13
Working With Technical Support
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Record the Problem Context . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
General System Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Gathering Information from the Log Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Overview
SAS Technical Support can be reached in any of the following ways:
Phone: 919-677-8008
E-mail: support@sas.com
Internet: http://support.sas.com
When you contact SAS Technical Support, the help desk representative asks for the
following information:
•
your SAS site number
•
the operating system on the machine where the problem occurred
•
the version of the SAS software that you are using
The following sections help you to collect additional information to assist your SAS
Technical Support representative in resolving your problem.
Record the Problem Context
First, create an accurate description of the problem based on information from the SAS
Warranty Analysis user who is experiencing a problem. The following questions are a good
starting point:
•
What workspace was the user working in?
•
What role was the user a member of?
•
If applicable, what task was the user attempting when the problem occurred (for
example, what analysis was submitted or what report was requested)?
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Provide instructions for duplicating the problem scenario in as much detail as possible. For
example:
1. Include the steps that caused the problem.
2. Include a description of the data selection, if applicable, and its name.
3. Provide screen shots that illustrate the problem.
4. Provide a description of any recent changes or disruptions in the environment, such as
the following:
•
software upgrades
•
database modifications
•
power interruption
•
Internet service interruptions
General System Questions
Here are some specific questions that your SAS Technical Support contact might ask you.
Be prepared to answer them as part of a general diagnostic process.
•
Is this issue related to a specific user?
•
Is the SAS Warranty Analysis system administrator able to log on to the application?
•
Is the error related to the user interface or to batch reports?
•
Are the SAS Warranty Analysis services running in the middle tier via the SAS
Analytics Platform?
•
Is the SAS Information Delivery Portal running in the middle tier?
•
Is the remote services application running in the middle tier?
•
Are the SAS Business Intelligence services running in the SAS tier?
•
What are the versions of the operating system and SAS Warranty Analysis?
•
What is the error message?
•
Can the user reproduce the reported issue?
•
Has this error occurred previously?
•
Is there any other pertinent information that might be helpful?
Gathering Information from the Log Files
Most of the time, a job log file is available to help diagnose problems. The following types
of job log files are available in SAS Warranty Analysis:
•
Analysis execution logs are associated with the analysis ID assigned to them.
•
Non-analysis execution logs are identified by the log filename, which suggests the
operation that was in progress when an error occurred.
Gathering Information from the Log Files
83
For instructions to look up log files, see “Anatomy of a Job Log File Listing” on page
41. Use the user name, analysis ID, and the date and time of the problem to narrow down
which log file to collect if you are using the diagnostic client. The diagnostic client can
subset logs by user and error. For example, if a user reports an error for an analysis ID,
click the User Error Logs link in the diagnostic client to display a list of the logs with
errors, grouped by user. Click the link for the user in the Error Log Files by User ID
section and locate the log by using the analysis ID and the time when the problem occurred.
You can use the browser’s View Source option to get the text of the log and save it to a
file. Then you can e-mail it to SAS Technical Support, where it will be placed as an
attachment to the trouble ticket.
Alternatively, if you get the log file from the file system, you need to go to the <analytics
platform location>/apps/SASWarrantyAnalysis/logs directory and find
the file in the user’s directory.
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85
Appendix 1
Troubleshooting
The Analytics Platform Server Fails to Start Properly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
An Analysis Fails to Execute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
The Rich Client Fails to Open from the SAS Warranty Analysis
Landing Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Deletion of a Data Selection Fails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
A User Is Granted Access to SAS Warranty Analysis, but the
System Malfunctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Any User Logging into the System Receives the “System
Experienced Fatal Error” Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
The User Interface Is Unresponsive or an Interactive Job Does Not Progress . . . . 87
A Batch Job Does Not Progress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
JobSynchLock Is Locked . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
The Analytics Platform Server Fails to Start
Properly
Problem: The SAS Analytics Platform console output shows that exceptions occurred
during startup.
Solution: Make sure that the user ID and password that are specified in the server.config
file to initialize the SAS Warranty Analysis queuing subsystem are correct. Look at the
errors that are displayed, and contact SAS Technical Support for assistance.
An Analysis Fails to Execute
An analysis might fail to execute for several possible reasons. Locate the logs for the
analysis run that fails, and provide information from the logs to SAS Technical Support
for assistance.
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The Rich Client Fails to Open from the SAS
Warranty Analysis Landing Page
Problem: Pop-up blockers prevent the rich client from starting from the SAS Warranty
Analysis landing page. If you click Launch SAS Warranty Analysis Client on the SAS
Warranty Analysis portal landing page and a new window opens, but the rich client does
not open, it is likely that a pop-up blocker in the browser is preventing the rich client from
opening.
Solution: To turn off the pop-up blocker in Internet Explorer, select Tools ð Pop-up
Blocker ð Turn Off Pop-up Blocker. If third-party applications such as the Google
Toolbar or the Yahoo Toolbar are installed, ensure that their pop-up blockers are turned
off as well. All pop-up blockers must be turned off.
Deletion of a Data Selection Fails
Problem: A user attempts to delete a data selection definition, and the operation fails. The
log indicates that a permissions error at the operating system level prevented the filtered
subset from being deleted.
Solution: Verify that full rights have been granted to the SASSRV operating system
credential for the root directories used to store user-filtered data sets (the USERFDL library
locations). The paths are defined in the SERVERPATH column of the
PARMSL.USERATTRIBUTES table.
Those full rights are required so that any filtered subsets can be deleted by SASSRV during
the analysis results deletion process.
A User Is Granted Access to SAS Warranty
Analysis, but the System Malfunctions
Problem: You grant access to the system for a user, but the system malfunctions frequently
and does not allow progress for that user.
Solution: Make sure the user was granted access to a group and not directly to a role. For
more information, see Chapter 5, “Security,” on page 25.
Any User Logging into the System Receives the
“System Experienced Fatal Error” Message
Problem: If the “System Experienced Fatal Error” message displays, then it is likely that
the SAS Analytics Platform failed to start properly, especially the SAS Warranty Analysis
extensions to the SAS Analytics Platform. The most common cause is that the user
credential specified in the SAS Warranty Analysis server.config file could not log on
successfully because it was not set up correctly during installation.
JobSynchLock Is Locked
87
Solution: Look in the SAS Analytics Platform log, and find the first error listed. The SAS
Analytics Platform log location is site-specific. Your on-site SAS support personnel will
tell you where to find it. The first error is the best information related to the problem. There
can be other causes as well. Work with SAS Technical Support to extract all required log
files to diagnose the problem.
The User Interface Is Unresponsive or an
Interactive Job Does Not Progress
Problem: Interactive jobs are meant to run fairly quickly. Therefore, it is unusual for an
interactive job (as seen in the diagnostic client’s Interactive Job Monitoring area) to last
more than thirty seconds or so.
Solution: If you have a user whose client appears to be unresponsive and the diagnostic
client indicates that one of this user’s jobs is not progressing, then you must restart the
middle tier.
A Batch Job Does Not Progress
Problem: A batch job appears not to be progressing.
Solution: First, make sure that the job is actually not progressing, because it could be an
analytical job file that is processing a large amount of data. Depending on site-specific
factors, analysis jobs can take from a few minutes up to half an hour, and a few can take
even longer. If a job does not finish after half an hour, consult the batch job performance
statistics in the diagnostic client and note the average and maximum job times for the
particular analytic being used. If the statistics indicate that a long run time is common for
this analysis, then the job is probably running as expected. Emerging issues automated runs
can also take a while to complete. If all else fails and it appears that the batch job really is
failing to progress, you might need to restart the servers. Restart the servers only if you
have no other recourse.
JobSynchLock Is Locked
Problem: An error message in the job logs indicates that the JobSynchLock is locked. If
the JobSynchLock table is locked, the system cannot synchronize the job control tables.
Solution: Complete the following steps:
1. Stop the middle tier.
2. Stop the SAS tier.
3. Restart the middle tier.
4. Restart the SAS tier.
The lock is automatically cleared by the restart.
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Troubleshooting
Your Turn
We welcome your feedback.
•
If you have comments about this book, please send them to
yourturn@sas.com. Include the full title and page numbers (if
applicable).
•
If you have comments about the software, please send them to
suggest@sas.com.
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