Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide, Release€3.3

Cisco Network Boot Installation and
Configuration Guide
Release 3.3
Corporate Headquarters
Cisco Systems, Inc.
170 West Tasman Drive
San Jose, CA 95134-1706
USA
http://www.cisco.com
Tel: 408 526-4000
800 553-NETS (6387)
Fax: 408 526-4100
Text Part Number: OL-6442-01
THE SPECIFICATIONS AND INFORMATION REGARDING THE PRODUCTS IN THIS MANUAL ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL
STATEMENTS, INFORMATION, AND RECOMMENDATIONS IN THIS MANUAL ARE BELIEVED TO BE ACCURATE BUT ARE PRESENTED WITHOUT
WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED. USERS MUST TAKE FULL RESPONSIBILITY FOR THEIR APPLICATION OF ANY PRODUCTS.
THE SOFTWARE LICENSE AND LIMITED WARRANTY FOR THE ACCOMPANYING PRODUCT ARE SET FORTH IN THE INFORMATION PACKET THAT
SHIPPED WITH THE PRODUCT AND ARE INCORPORATED HEREIN BY THIS REFERENCE. IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO LOCATE THE SOFTWARE LICENSE
OR LIMITED WARRANTY, CONTACT YOUR CISCO REPRESENTATIVE FOR A COPY.
The Cisco implementation of TCP header compression is an adaptation of a program developed by the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) as part of UCB’s public
domain version of the UNIX operating system. All rights reserved. Copyright © 1981, Regents of the University of California.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER WARRANTY HEREIN, ALL DOCUMENT FILES AND SOFTWARE OF THESE SUPPLIERS ARE PROVIDED “AS IS” WITH
ALL FAULTS. CISCO AND THE ABOVE-NAMED SUPPLIERS DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, WITHOUT
LIMITATION, THOSE OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT OR ARISING FROM A COURSE OF
DEALING, USAGE, OR TRADE PRACTICE.
IN NO EVENT SHALL CISCO OR ITS SUPPLIERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY INDIRECT, SPECIAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, INCLUDING,
WITHOUT LIMITATION, LOST PROFITS OR LOSS OR DAMAGE TO DATA ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THIS MANUAL, EVEN IF CISCO
OR ITS SUPPLIERS HAVE BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
CCSP, the Cisco Square Bridge logo, Follow Me Browsing, and StackWise are trademarks of Cisco Systems, Inc.; Changing the Way We Work, Live, Play, and Learn, and iQuick
Study are service marks of Cisco Systems, Inc.; and Access Registrar, Aironet, ASIST, BPX, Catalyst, CCDA, CCDP, CCIE, CCIP, CCNA, CCNP, Cisco, the Cisco Certified
Internetwork Expert logo, Cisco IOS, Cisco Press, Cisco Systems, Cisco Systems Capital, the Cisco Systems logo, Cisco Unity, Empowering the Internet Generation,
Enterprise/Solver, EtherChannel, EtherFast, EtherSwitch, Fast Step, FormShare, GigaDrive, GigaStack, HomeLink, Internet Quotient, IOS, IP/TV, iQ Expertise, the iQ logo, iQ
Net Readiness Scorecard, LightStream, Linksys, MeetingPlace, MGX, the Networkers logo, Networking Academy, Network Registrar, Packet, PIX, Post-Routing, Pre-Routing,
ProConnect, RateMUX, ScriptShare, SlideCast, SMARTnet, StrataView Plus, SwitchProbe, TeleRouter, The Fastest Way to Increase Your Internet Quotient, TransPath, and VCO
are registered trademarks of Cisco Systems, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the United States and certain other countries.
All other trademarks mentioned in this document or Website are the property of their respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship
between Cisco and any other company. (0501R)
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
Copyright © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
CONTENTS
About This Guide
Objectives
Audience
vii
vii
vii
Related Documentation
x
Obtaining Documentation x
Cisco.com x
Ordering Documentation xi
Documentation Feedback
xi
Obtaining Technical Assistance xi
Cisco Technical Support Website xi
Submitting a Service Request xii
Definitions of Service Request Severity
xii
Obtaining Additional Publications and Information
CHAPTER
1
Product Overview
Introduction
1-1
1-1
Network Structure
Configuration Basics
1-2
1-4
Boot Sequence Overview
CHAPTER
2
1-4
Before Installing Cisco Network Boot
Prerequisite Tasks
Requirements
3
2-1
2-1
2-1
Collecting Configuration Information
CHAPTER
xii
2-3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Prerequisite Tasks
3-1
3-1
Configuration Tasks 3-2
Replication the Boot Image 3-2
Booting an IP Host from the Network
Example Configurations 3-2
Checking the Network Configuration
Creating a Master Boot Image
3-2
3-5
3-7
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
iii
Contents
Installing the Operating System and Applications
Installing the iSCSI Driver 3-8
Configuring the Network Interface 3-8
NIC With PXE Enabled 3-8
NIC Without PXE Enabled 3-9
Installing the Replication Utility 3-10
3-7
Configuring iSCSI Targets for Replication 3-11
Cisco SN 5400 Series System 3-11
Cisco MDS 9000 Series System 3-12
Replicating Boot Images 3-14
Using the Network Boot Administration Utility 3-14
Creating a Partition 3-14
Replicating a Boot Image to an iSCSI Target 3-16
Completing the Replication Process 3-18
Setting up the TFTP Server 3-19
Microsoft Windows Example
Linux Example 3-20
3-19
Setting Up the DHCP Server 3-20
Microsoft Windows Example 3-20
Linux Example 3-23
Configuring an IP Host to Boot from the Network
CHAPTER
4
Using the Command Line Utility
CHAPTER
5
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
5-1
Maintenance 5-1
Replacing a Host 5-1
Changing the Network Drivers
5-2
3-25
4-1
Troubleshooting 5-2
Finding Log Files 5-2
Example Displays for Cisco Network Boot 5-3
Running the PxeCheck Utility 5-4
Error Messages 5-5
Cisco Network Boot and Host Errors 5-5
Network Errors 5-6
DHCP iSCSI Option Format Errors 5-7
Login Errors 5-9
iSCSI Target Errors 5-10
Network Boot Administration Utility for Microsoft Windows Replication Errors
5-11
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
iv
OL-6442-01
Contents
INDEX
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
v
Contents
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
vi
OL-6442-01
About This Guide
This preface describes the objectives, audience, organization and command syntax conventions of the
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide. It also provides information on how to obtain
related documentation and technical assistance.
Objectives
This installation and configuration guide describes how to install and configure Cisco Network Boot
software so that a diskless host connected to a Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system network can
boot a Microsoft Windows operating system. It does not describe every possible configuration but does
describe those tasks commonly required to configure the software.
This guide does not describe general configuration information for Cisco SN 5400 Series systems,
MDS 9000 Series systems, or the iSCSI driver. To configure a Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series
system, refer to the appropriate Cisco Software Configuration Guide and release notes. To install and
configure the Cisco iSCSI driver for Microsoft Windows, see the readme file that accompanies the iSCSI
driver (in the downloaded driver archive file) and the appropriate release notes.
Note
Cisco Network Boot also supports the boot of Linux operating systems. This functionality is available
as Open Source, via the Replication Utility for Linux and the iSCSI driver for Linux, available from
SourceForge. See the readme files that accompany the software downloads for detailed information.
Audience
This guide is intended primarily for the following audiences:
•
System administrators who are familiar with the specifics of Cisco storage networking products and
the iSCSI protocol, and who know the fundamentals of internetworking and network storage
devices.
•
System administrators who are responsible for configuring network storage equipment.
•
Support personnel with Microsoft Windows 2000, Microsoft Windows XP or Microsoft Windows
Server 2003 experience and basic TCP/IP administration skills.
•
System administrators and support personnel with DHCP and TFTP server skills.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
vii
About This Guide
Organization
Organization
This guide contains the following chapters (Table 1):
Table 1
Document Organization
Chapter
Title
Description
Chapter 1
Product Overview
Describes what you should understand prior to
installing and configuring Cisco Network Boot.
Chapter 2
Before Installing Cisco Network Boot Describes what you need to do before you install
and configure the Cisco Network Boot.
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco
Network Boot Operation
Provides procedures for installing and
configuring Cisco Network Boot. It includes
procedures for creating a master boot image,
configuring the iSCSI targets for replication,
setting up the DHCP and TFTP servers,
configuring the IP host to boot from the
network, and replicating the master boot image.
Chapter 4
Using the Command Line Utility
Explains how to use the Cisco Network Boot
Command Line Utility to automate the
replication process using command line scripts.
Chapter 5
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Provides help in resolving problems.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
viii
OL-6442-01
About This Guide
Command Syntax Conventions
Command Syntax Conventions
Table 2 describes the syntax used with the commands in this document.
Table 2
Syntax Conventions
Convention
Description
boldface font
Indicates commands and keywords that you enter
literally as shown.
italic font
Indicates arguments for which you supply values.
[x]
Square brackets indicate an optional element
(keyword or argument).
{x}
Braces indicate a required element (keyword or
argument).
{s | y | z}
Braces and vertical bars indicate a required choice
of keywords or arguments, separated by the
vertical bars within the braces.
[ x {y | z}]
Braces and vertical bars within square brackets
indicate a required choice within an optional
element.
/bits
The value entered for /bits specifies a network
mask in classless interdomain routing (CIDR)
style. That is, the value equals the number of bits
in a network mask counting from the most
significant side (left) of an IP address. For
example, a /bits value of 24 is the equivalent of a
network mask of 255.255.255.0. Similarly, a /bits
value of 32 specifies using the entire IP address.
“user text”
Indicates that user text (a user-defined text string)
that contains a space or spaces must be enclosed
using double or single quotes. If single quotes or
an apostrophe is used as part of the text string,
enclose the string using double quotes. If double
quotes are used as part of the text string, enclose
the string using single quotes.
For example, both “Pat’s storage router” and
‘number “2”’ are valid text string entries.
Note
The question mark (?) character cannot be
used as part of a text string.
screen font
Examples of information displayed on the screen.
boldface screen font
Examples of information you must enter.
<>
Nonprinting characters, for example, passwords
appear in angle brackets.
[
Default responses to system prompts appear in
square brackets.
]
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
ix
About This Guide
Related Documentation
Note
Caution
Timesaver
Means reader take note. Notes contain helpful suggestions or references to additional information and
material.
Means reader be careful. In this situation, you might do something that could result in equipment
damage or loss of data.
Means the described action saves time. You can save time by performing the action described in the
paragraph.
Related Documentation
Refer to the following documents for additional information:
•
Cisco SN 5428 Storage Router Hardware Installation Guide
•
Cisco SN 5428-2 Storage Router Hardware Installation Guide
•
Cisco SN 5428 Storage Router Software Configuration Guide, Release 3.2 or later
•
Cisco SN 5428-2 Storage Router Software Configuration Guide, Release 3.2 or later
•
Cisco MDS 9000 Family Software Configuration Guide, Release 1.1(1a) or later
•
Release Notes for the Cisco SN 5428 Storage Router, Release 3.2.1 or later
•
Release Notes for Cisco SN 5428-2 Storage Router, Release 3.2.1 or later
•
Cisco MDS 9000 Family Release Notes for Cisco MDS SAN-OS Release 1.1(1a) or later
•
Release Notes for Cisco iSCSI Driver for Microsoft Windows, version 4.1.3 (or later)
•
Cisco iSCSI driver readme file
Obtaining Documentation
Cisco documentation and additional literature are available on Cisco.com. Cisco also provides several
ways to obtain technical assistance and other technical resources. These sections explain how to obtain
technical information from Cisco Systems.
Cisco.com
You can access the most current Cisco documentation at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/home/home.htm
You can access the Cisco website at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com
You can access international Cisco websites at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/public/countries_languages.shtml
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
x
OL-6442-01
About This Guide
Documentation Feedback
Ordering Documentation
You can find instructions for ordering documentation at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/es_inpck/pdi.htm
You can order Cisco documentation in these ways:
•
Registered Cisco.com users (Cisco direct customers) can order Cisco product documentation from
the Ordering tool:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/partner/ordering/index.shtml
•
Nonregistered Cisco.com users can order documentation through a local account representative by
calling Cisco Systems Corporate Headquarters (California, USA) at 408 526-7208 or, elsewhere in
North America, by calling 800 553-NETS (6387).
Documentation Feedback
You can send comments about technical documentation to bug-doc@cisco.com.
You can submit comments by using the response card (if present) behind the front cover of your
document or by writing to the following address:
Cisco Systems
Attn: Customer Document Ordering
170 West Tasman Drive
San Jose, CA 95134-9883
We appreciate your comments.
Obtaining Technical Assistance
For all customers, partners, resellers, and distributors who hold valid Cisco service contracts, Cisco
Technical Support provides 24-hour-a-day, award-winning technical assistance. The Cisco Technical
Support Website on Cisco.com features extensive online support resources. In addition, Cisco Technical
Assistance Center (TAC) engineers provide telephone support. If you do not hold a valid Cisco service
contract, contact your reseller.
Cisco Technical Support Website
The Cisco Technical Support Website provides online documents and tools for troubleshooting and
resolving technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. The website is available 24 hours a day,
365 days a year at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/techsupport
Access to all tools on the Cisco Technical Support Website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.
If you have a valid service contract but do not have a user ID or password, you can register at this URL:
http://tools.cisco.com/RPF/register/register.do
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
xi
About This Guide
Obtaining Additional Publications and Information
Submitting a Service Request
Using the online TAC Service Request Tool is the fastest way to open S3 and S4 service requests. (S3
and S4 service requests are those in which your network is minimally impaired or for which you require
product information.) After you describe your situation, the TAC Service Request Tool automatically
provides recommended solutions. If your issue is not resolved using the recommended resources, your
service request will be assigned to a Cisco TAC engineer. The TAC Service Request Tool is located at
this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/techsupport/servicerequest
For S1 or S2 service requests or if you do not have Internet access, contact the Cisco TAC by telephone.
(S1 or S2 service requests are those in which your production network is down or severely degraded.)
Cisco TAC engineers are assigned immediately to S1 and S2 service requests to help keep your business
operations running smoothly.
To open a service request by telephone, use one of the following numbers:
Asia-Pacific: +61 2 8446 7411 (Australia: 1 800 805 227)
EMEA: +32 2 704 55 55
USA: 1 800 553 2447
For a complete list of Cisco TAC contacts, go to this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/techsupport/contacts
Definitions of Service Request Severity
To ensure that all service requests are reported in a standard format, Cisco has established severity
definitions.
Severity 1 (S1)—Your network is “down,” or there is a critical impact to your business operations. You
and Cisco will commit all necessary resources around the clock to resolve the situation.
Severity 2 (S2)—Operation of an existing network is severely degraded, or significant aspects of your
business operation are negatively affected by inadequate performance of Cisco products. You and Cisco
will commit full-time resources during normal business hours to resolve the situation.
Severity 3 (S3)—Operational performance of your network is impaired, but most business operations
remain functional. You and Cisco will commit resources during normal business hours to restore service
to satisfactory levels.
Severity 4 (S4)—You require information or assistance with Cisco product capabilities, installation, or
configuration. There is little or no effect on your business operations.
Obtaining Additional Publications and Information
Information about Cisco products, technologies, and network solutions is available from various online
and printed sources.
•
Cisco Marketplace provides a variety of Cisco books, reference guides, and logo merchandise. Visit
Cisco Marketplace, the company store, at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/go/marketplace/
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
xii
OL-6442-01
About This Guide
Obtaining Additional Publications and Information
•
The Cisco Product Catalog describes the networking products offered by Cisco Systems, as well as
ordering and customer support services. Access the Cisco Product Catalog at this URL:
http://cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/pcat/
•
Cisco Press publishes a wide range of general networking, training and certification titles. Both new
and experienced users will benefit from these publications. For current Cisco Press titles and other
information, go to Cisco Press at this URL:
http://www.ciscopress.com
•
Packet magazine is the Cisco Systems technical user magazine for maximizing Internet and
networking investments. Each quarter, Packet delivers coverage of the latest industry trends,
technology breakthroughs, and Cisco products and solutions, as well as network deployment and
troubleshooting tips, configuration examples, customer case studies, certification and training
information, and links to scores of in-depth online resources. You can access Packet magazine at
this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/packet
•
iQ Magazine is the quarterly publication from Cisco Systems designed to help growing companies
learn how they can use technology to increase revenue, streamline their business, and expand
services. The publication identifies the challenges facing these companies and the technologies to
help solve them, using real-world case studies and business strategies to help readers make sound
technology investment decisions. You can access iQ Magazine at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/go/iqmagazine
•
Internet Protocol Journal is a quarterly journal published by Cisco Systems for engineering
professionals involved in designing, developing, and operating public and private internets and
intranets. You can access the Internet Protocol Journal at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/ipj
•
World-class networking training is available from Cisco. You can view current offerings at
this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/learning/index.html
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
xiii
About This Guide
Obtaining Additional Publications and Information
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
xiv
OL-6442-01
C H A P T E R
1
Product Overview
This chapter is the starting point for installing, configuring and using Cisco Network Boot software. It
provides some very basic information to help you understand its operation. It contains the following
topics:
•
Introduction, page 1-1
•
Network Structure, page 1-2
•
Configuration Basics, page 1-4
•
Boot Sequence Overview, page 1-4
Introduction
Cisco Network Boot allows you to boot a computer without an attached disk drive. Cisco Network Boot
supports a boot of the following operating systems:
•
Microsoft Windows 2000
•
Microsoft Windows XP
•
Microsoft Windows Server 2003
•
Various Linux operating systems, via the Replication Utility for Linux and the iSCSI driver for
Linux, available as Open Source from SourceForge. See the readme files that accompany the
software downloads for detailed configuration and usage information.
With Cisco Network Boot, a computer without a directly attached disk drive uses iSCSI protocol via an
iSCSI driver to boot from an iSCSI disk through an IP network and a Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series
system (see Figure 1-1). As with any iSCSI disk, even though it is not directly attached to the computer
accessing it, the disk appears to the computer as if it were directly attached.
Note
The iSCSI protocol is an IETF-defined protocol for IP storage (ips). For more information about the
iSCSI protocol, refer to the IETF standards for IP storage at http://www.ietf.org.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
1-1
Chapter 1
Product Overview
Network Structure
Figure 1-1
Cisco Network Boot Using Cisco SN 5400 Series System
Computers
without disks
directly attached
Cisco SN 5400
Series system
Disks
IP
A computer boots from a disk through
an IP network and a Cisco SN 5400
Series system.
94969
Boot images
Cisco Network Boot consists of three components:
Note
•
Network Boot Program—initiates the boot process, when downloaded (via TFTP) by the IP host.
The Network Boot Program (inbp.com) runs as a Network Bootstrap Program (NBP) in the Preboot
Execution Environment (PXE).
•
Network Boot Administration Utility for Microsoft Windows—used to create and format partitions
on iSCSI targets, and to replicate the master boot image. Use this utility if the master boot host is
running a Microsoft Windows operating system.
•
Network Boot Command Line Replication Utility for Microsoft Windows—used to replicate the
master boot image. This command line utility is suitable for scripting. Use this utility if the master
boot host is running a Microsoft Windows operating system.
The Preboot Execution Environment (PXE) is part of a set of industry-standard specifications that
defines a uniform set of preboot services for network-based booting. For more information about PXE,
refer to the Wired for Management (WfM) specifications at http://www.intel.com/labs/manage/wfm.
Network Structure
Cisco Network Boot requires a network that includes the following elements:
•
IP hosts with network interface cards (NICs) or integrated ethernet ports that have PXE capability
•
One or more Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series systems
•
Fibre Channel (FC) storage devices that hold the boot images
•
DHCP and TFTP servers (one server may provide both functions)
•
Storage directly attached to one of the IP hosts, known as the master boot host (only required to
create the initial master boot image)
Figure 1-2 shows the structure of a basic network that employs Cisco Network Boot. Table 1-1 describes
each element.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
1-2
OL-6442-01
Chapter 1
Product Overview
Network Structure
Figure 1-2
Basic Network Structure with Cisco SN 5400 Series System
DHCP/TFTP server
IP hosts
Directly
attached
disk drive
FC storage
devices mapped
as iSCSI
targets and LUNs
Master
boot host
Cisco SN 5400
Series system
IP
94967
host
host
Table 1-1
Basic Network Components
Component
Description
IP hosts
Each host uses Cisco Network Boot to boot from an iSCSI target
via a Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system. Each IP host
requires an iSCSI target with a boot image for that host.
Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000
Series systems
Provides iSCSI targets for IP hosts. The IP hosts access the
physical storage represented by the iSCSI targets through the
Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system.
Fibre Channel storage devices
The physical storage that holds the boot images.
DHCP and TFTP servers
IP hosts require access to both a DHCP server and a TFTP server.
One server may provide both functions.
Storage directly attached to one IP To create a master boot image, one IP host (known as the master
host
boot host) requires a directly attached disk drive. The master
boot image is used to replicate a boot drive image for each
individual IP host.
Note
The master boot host requires a directly attached disk to
create a master boot image. After the master boot image
is replicated, the master boot host can also be configured
to boot from the network. Then the directly attached disk
can be removed.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
1-3
Chapter 1
Product Overview
Configuration Basics
Configuration Basics
Before using Cisco Network Boot, you must perform the following configuration tasks:
•
LAN configuration—Make the network connections and configure the Cisco switches to support
your IP network.
•
Configure a Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system—Configure and specify iSCSI targets for
the hosts.
•
Configure a DHCP server and a TFTP server—For each host, specify the appropriate parameters for
booting over a network.
•
Create a master boot image—Install the operating system, iSCSI driver, the Network Boot
Administration Utility (or Replication Utility for Linux) and any desired applications on a disk drive
directly attached to the master boot host. The master boot image is replicated to the iSCSI targets
from this drive.
Cisco Network Boot supports the following host operating systems:
– Microsoft Windows 2000 (Professional, Advanced Server or Datacenter Server)
– Microsoft Windows XP (Professional Edition)
– Microsoft Windows Server 2003 (Enterprise or Standard Edition)
– Various Linux operating systems, via the Replication Utility for Linux and the iSCSI driver for
Linux, available as Open Source from SourceForge. See the readme files that accompany the
software downloads for detailed configuration and usage information.
•
Replicate the master boot image—Generate a boot image for each IP host, based on the master boot
image. One iSCSI target is required for each replicated boot image. An iSCSI target may also be
used to save the master boot image, allowing the directly attached disk to be removed from the
master boot host.
•
Configure the IP hosts to boot from the network.
Boot Sequence Overview
After the configuration tasks are completed, the IP host can boot using Cisco Network Boot. The
following steps describe the IP host boot sequence, using Cisco Network Boot:
Step 1
The host requests boot information from the DHCP server.
Step 2
The DHCP server returns boot information, which includes:
Step 3
•
The IP address to be used by the host
•
The host name
•
The root path to the iSCSI target
•
The IP address of the TFTP server
•
The name of the boot file (the name of the Network Boot Program, inbp.com)
•
Other optionally configured information, such as the default router and domain name
The host downloads the boot file from the TFTP server.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
1-4
OL-6442-01
Chapter 1
Product Overview
Boot Sequence Overview
Step 4
The host runs the downloaded program, which boots the host from a boot image that resides on the iSCSI
target. The IP host accesses the boot image using the iSCSI protocol over the IP network to the Cisco
SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system.
Step 5
When the operating system starts, the computer is ready to run applications.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
1-5
Chapter 1
Product Overview
Boot Sequence Overview
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
1-6
OL-6442-01
C H A P T E R
2
Before Installing Cisco Network Boot
This chapter describes what you need to do before you install and configure Cisco Network Boot.
This chapter contains the following sections:
•
Prerequisite Tasks, page 2-1
•
Requirements, page 2-1
•
Collecting Configuration Information, page 2-3
Prerequisite Tasks
Before installing Cisco Network Boot, make sure you have finished the following tasks:
•
Determine the number and operating systems of the hosts to be booted.
•
Install and configure the Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system and the attached Fibre Channel
(FC) storage, according to the appropriate Hardware Installation Guide and Software Configuration
Guide. Each host requires at least one LUN on its own iSCSI target.
•
Verify that the IP network configuration is adequate for the environment.
•
Verify that security for both the FC and IP networks is adequate for the environment.
Requirements
Table 2-1 describes the requirements for Cisco Network Boot’s key network components:
•
Master boot hosts and other IP hosts
•
DHCP and TFTP servers
•
iSCSI targets
•
Network equipment
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
2-1
Chapter 2
Before Installing Cisco Network Boot
Requirements
Table 2-1
Requirements
Item
Master boot host
Requirements
•
IBM PC-compatible computer with an Intel Pentium III or higher
processor, with BIOS support for PXE 2.1 or later.
•
A network interface and NIC supported by PXE.
•
A directly attached disk drive configured with a supported operating
system and the appropriate iSCSI driver.
Cisco Network Boot supports the following Microsoft Windows
operating systems, with the Cisco iSCSI driver version 3.1.2 (or
later) for Microsoft Windows:
– Microsoft Windows 2000 (Professional,Advanced or
Datacenter Server) with Service Pack 3 (or higher)
– Microsoft Windows XP (Professional Edition) with Service
Pack 2 (or higher)
– Microsoft Windows Server 2003 (Enterprise, Standard or Web
Edition) with Service Pack 1 (or higher)
If you are using the dynamic IP address boot feature of Cisco
Network Boot, you must use the Cisco iSCSI driver version
4.2.1 (or later) for Microsoft Windows.
Note
Cisco Network Boot also supports a boot of various Linux operating
systems, with the Linux iSCSI driver version 3.4.1 (or later) and the
Replication Utility for Linux. The iSCSI driver and the Replication
Utility are both Open Source, and are available from SourceForge.
See the readme files that accompany the software downloads for
detailed requirements, configuration and usage information.
Other hosts
•
IBM PC-compatible computer with an Intel Pentium III or higher
processor, with BIOS support for PXE 2.1 or later.
•
A network interface supported by PXE.
The hardware must be identical to the master boot host
hardware, including identical network hardware and
connections.
Note
DHCP and TFTP servers
•
A DHCP server configured with reserved IP addresses for each host.
•
A TFTP server to transfer the iNBP.com file to the host.
Note
One server may provide both functions.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
2-2
OL-6442-01
Chapter 2
Before Installing Cisco Network Boot
Collecting Configuration Information
Table 2-1
Requirements (continued)
Item
iSCSI targets
Requirements
•
iSCSI targets configured on one or more of the following systems:
– SN 5428 Storage Router, running software release 3.2 or later
– SN 5428-2 Storage Router
– MDS 9000 Series system, running SAN-OS Release 1.1(1) or
later
•
Note
Network equipment
Note
A suitable storage device (JBOD or storage array) with sufficient
space to hold the boot image. The iSCSI target block size must be
512 bytes.
Storage arrays are recommended because they provide
redundancy and are more flexible than JBODs.
•
Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system.
•
Ethernet switch or hub (optional).
•
Fibre Channel switch or hub (optional).
Refer to the Cisco.com website for interoperability information.
Collecting Configuration Information
Use the configuration worksheets to help gather the system information that is needed when you go
through the configuration process. The values in these worksheets are based on information requested in
the process in Chapter 3, “Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation”. Refer to the
following tables for information on the values needed for your configuration.
•
Table 2-2, Configuration Worksheet—IP Hosts
•
Table 2-3, Configuration Worksheet—Cisco SN 5400 Series System and iSCSI Targets
•
Table 2-4, Configuration Worksheet—Cisco MDS 9000 Series System and iSCSI Targets
•
Table 2-5, Configuration Worksheet—DHCP and TFTP Servers
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
2-3
Chapter 2
Before Installing Cisco Network Boot
Collecting Configuration Information
Table 2-2
Configuration Worksheet—IP Hosts
Configuration Item
Description
Host name
The name of the IP host. This is also referred to as the
Reservation name/host in Table 2-5.
Note
NIC IP address
When setting up the replication process, the host
name is used as the destination computer name.
The IP address of the network interface. This is also
referred to as the Host IP address in Table 2-3 and
Table 2-4, and the IP address in Table 2-5. This IP address
can be used as either the source IP address or the
destination IP address.
Note
NIC type and interface
If you are using the dynamic IP address boot
feature of Cisco Network Boot, you must use the
Cisco iSCSI driver version 4.2.1 (or later) for
Microsoft Windows.
The manufacturer, model, type of NIC, and module name.
See your NIC documentation.
Note
If the host runs a Microsoft Windows operating
system, the NIC type and interface must be
identical to the master boot host NIC type and
interface.
TCP/IP properties
The TCP/IP properties for each IP host, including host
name, domain name, IP address, subnet mask, default
gateway, and primary and secondary DNS servers.
Boot image
List the operating system, iSCSI driver version, and other
software applications that will be included in the boot
image.
Tip
Value
Make a copy of this worksheet for each host that you will configure.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
2-4
OL-6442-01
Chapter 2
Before Installing Cisco Network Boot
Collecting Configuration Information
Table 2-3
Configuration Worksheet—Cisco SN 5400 Series System and iSCSI Targets
Configuration Item
Description
Value
SCSI routing instance name
The name of the SCSI routing instance on the Cisco
SN 5400 Series system. This is the name you enter when
you create a SCSI routing instance. For example, the
following CLI command creates a SCSI routing instance
named bootrtr.
[SN5428A]# scsirouter bootrtr
SCSI routing instance IP
address
The Gigabit Ethernet IP address assigned to the SCSI
routing instance on the Cisco SN 5400 Series system.
iSCSI Name
The iSCSI Name of the target. To obtain the target’s iSCSI
Name, enter the show scsirouter CLI command. For
example, to display information about the SCSI routing
instance named bootrtr, enter the following CLI command:
[SN5428A] show scsirouter bootrtr
LUN
The LUN number of the iSCSI target.
Access list name (optional)
•
If the host runs a Cisco iSCSI driver version 4.1.3 (or
earlier), the boot image must always be LUN 0.
•
If the host runs a Cisco iSCSI driver version 4.2.1 (or
later), the boot image may be any LUN number.
The name of the access list associated with the iSCSI target
in the Cisco SN 5400 Series system. The iSCSI target can
only be accessed by the IP hosts specified in the access list.
Host IP address and netmask The IP address and netmask of the IP host. This
(optinoal)
information is entered in the access list associated with the
target to be used by the host.
The host IP address should be the same as the NIC IP
address described in Table 2-2.
See “Collecting Configuration Information,” in the
Other configuration
information for setting up a documentation for the Cisco SN 5400 Series system.
SCSI routing instance in the
Cisco SN 5400 Series system
Tip
Make a copy of this worksheet for each host that you will configure.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
2-5
Chapter 2
Before Installing Cisco Network Boot
Collecting Configuration Information
Table 2-4
Configuration Worksheet—Cisco MDS 9000 Series System and iSCSI Targets
Configuration Item
Description
Gigabit Ethernet IP address
IP address of the Gigabit Ethernet interface (IP storage
port) to which the IP host is going to connect. To obtain the
IP address, enter the show interface gigabitethernet CLI
command. For example:
Value
switch# show interface gigabitethernet 8/1
GigabitEthernet8/1 is up <-----------The interface
is in the up state.
Hardware is GigabitEthernet, address is
0005.3000.a98e
Internet address is 10.1.3.1/24
...
iSCSI target name
The iSCSI Name of the target. To obtain the target’s iSCSI
Name, enter the show iscsi virtual-target CLI command.
For example:
switch# show iscsi virtual-target
...
target: iqn.1987-05.com.cisco:vt1
...
LUN
The LUN number of the iSCSI target.
Host IP address (optional)
•
If the host runs a Cisco iSCSI driver version 4.1.3 (or
earlier), the boot image must always be LUN 0.
•
If the host runs a Cisco iSCSI driver version 4.2.1 (or
later), the boot image may be any LUN number.
The IP address of the IP host. This information is used to
configure the list of initiators allowed to access the target
used by the host.
The host IP address should be the same as the NIC IP
address described in Table 2-2.
Other configuration information See “Configuring IP Storage,” in the documentation for the
for setting up iSCSI targets and Cisco MDS 9000 Series system.
iSCSI initiators in the Cisco
MDS 9000 Series system
Tip
Make a copy of this worksheet for each host that you will configure.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
2-6
OL-6442-01
Chapter 2
Before Installing Cisco Network Boot
Collecting Configuration Information
Table 2-5
Configuration Worksheet—DHCP and TFTP Servers
Configuration Item
Description
Reservation name/host
The name of the IP host, for example, HERMES_master or
HOMER. The name should be the same as the Host name
described in Table 2-2.
System hostname
IP address
Value
The IP address of the host. This address must match the
host IP address configured in the access list associated with
the iSCSI target in the SN 5400 Series system. The IP
address should be the same as the NIC IP address described
in Table 2-2.
Note
MAC address
If you are using the dynamic IP address boot
feature of Cisco Network Boot, you must use the
Cisco iSCSI driver version 4.2.1 (or later) for
Microsoft Windows.
The media access control address of the NIC in a host with
PXE support enabled. This is the physical, 6-byte hex
address. You can obtain this address from the NIC
documentation or by booting the host and having PXE
display the address.
If the host is running Microsoft Windows 2000, issue the
following command from a Command Prompt window to
display the NIC physical address:
ipconfig /all
Description
User-defined identification information associated with the
reservation name/host.
Gigabit Ethernet IP address
One of the following:
•
The Gigabit Ethernet IP address assigned to the SCSI
routing instance on the Cisco SN 5400 Series system.
This value should match the SCSI routing instance IP
address listed in Table 2-3.
•
The Gigabit Ethernet IP address assigned to the IP
storage port on the Cisco MDS 9000 Series system.
This value should match the Gigabit Ethernet IP
address listed in Table 2-4.
iSCSI port number
The listening port number used for iSCSI traffic. The
default port number is 3260.
Target’s iSCSI name
The iSCSI Name of the target. This value should match the
iSCSI Name listed in Table 2-3 or the iSCSI target node
name listed in Table 2-4.
LUN
The LUN number of the iSCSI target. This value should
match the LUN number listed in Table 2-3 or Table 2-4.
Tip
Make a copy of this worksheet for each host that you will configure.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
2-7
Chapter 2
Before Installing Cisco Network Boot
Collecting Configuration Information
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
2-8
OL-6442-01
C H A P T E R
3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network
Boot Operation
This chapter explains how to install and configure the software needed to implement Cisco Network
Boot.
When going through this process for the first time, you will create a master boot image on a master boot
host. After the master boot image is created, it is replicated to the iSCSI targets.
This chapter contains the following topics.
•
Prerequisite Tasks, page 3-1
•
Configuration Tasks, page 3-2
•
Checking the Network Configuration, page 3-5
•
Creating a Master Boot Image, page 3-7
•
Configuring iSCSI Targets for Replication, page 3-11
•
Setting up the TFTP Server, page 3-19
•
Setting Up the DHCP Server, page 3-20
•
Replicating Boot Images, page 3-14
•
Configuring an IP Host to Boot from the Network, page 3-25
Prerequisite Tasks
Before installing and configuring for Cisco Network Boot operation, make sure you have collected the
configuration information described in Chapter 2, “Before Installing Cisco Network Boot.” You should
also locate and download the most current iSCSI drivers and the latest release of Cisco Network Boot
from Cisco.com.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
3-1
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Configuration Tasks
Configuration Tasks
Cisco Network Boot installation and configuration procedures are divided into two main tasks:
•
Replication the Boot Image, page 3-2
•
Booting an IP Host from the Network, page 3-2
Replication the Boot Image
To configure for Cisco Network Boot replication, perform the following steps:
Step 1
Check the network configuration.
Step 2
Create a master boot image.
Step 3
Configure iSCSI targets for replication.
Step 4
Replicate the boot image to the iSCSI targets.
Booting an IP Host from the Network
To configure IP hosts for Cisco Network Boot operation, perform the following steps:
Step 1
Set up the TFTP server.
Step 2
Set up the DHCP server.
Step 3
Configure the IP hosts to boot from the network.
Example Configurations
Figure 3-1 illustrates the example configuration for the key elements in the Cisco Network Boot
environment with an SN 5400 Series system and Figure 3-2 illustrates the example configuration of the
SCSI routing instance used in this chapter.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
3-2
OL-6442-01
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Configuration Tasks
Figure 3-1
Example Configuration with Cisco SN 5400 Series System
DHCP/TFTP server
IP hosts
Directly
attached
disk drive
Master
boot host
IP: 10.2.50.49
IP: 10.2.50.18
FC storage
devices mapped
as iSCSI
targets and LUNs
Cisco SN 5428
IP
IP: 10.2.50.102
94970
host
IP: 10.2.50.48
host
IP: 10.2.50.47
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
3-3
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Configuration Tasks
Figure 3-2
Example SCSI Routing Instance Configuration
Access list
Name: boot_HERMES
IP / Mask: 10.2.50.49/255.255.255.255
iSCSI targets
For SCSI routing instance: bootrtr
Target name: masterbootdisk
Mapped to LUN 0
iSCSI Name: iqn.1987-05.com.cisco.00.04aeccb6d6099d06325595df2480730cc.masterbootdisk
Cisco SN 5428 configured for SCSI routing
Server interface
For SCSI routing instance: bootrtr
Interface: ge2
IP address: 10.2.50.102
FC interfaces
Contains an FC storage device mapped as an ISCSI target
iSCSI Name:
iqn.1987-05.com.cisco.00.04aeccb6d6099d06325595df24
80730cc.masterbootdisk
Other
Hosts
DHCP/TFTP Server
IP: 10.2.50.46 through 10.2.50.40
Various MAC addresses
IP: 10.2.50.18
MAC: 00:02:ab:54:29:89
Host
IP
Host
Host
IP: 10.2.50.49
MAC: 00:04:56:ac:71:29
NAME: HERMES_master
IP: 10.2.50.48
MAC: 00:06:bd:23:14:11
NAME: HOMER
94968
IP: 10.2.50.47
MAC: 00:08:ad:23:14:18
NAME: HORATIO
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
3-4
OL-6442-01
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Checking the Network Configuration
Figure 3-3 illustrates the example configuration for the key elements in the Cisco Network Boot
environment with an MDS 9000 Series system
Figure 3-3
Example Configuration with Cisco MDS 9000 Series System
DHCP/TFTP server
IP hosts
Directly
attached
disk drive
Master
boot host
IP: 10.2.51.49
IP: 10.2.51.82
FC storage
devices mapped
as iSCSI
targets and LUNs
Cisco MDS 9000
Family Switch
IP
host
IP: 10.2.51.50
Target iSCSI Name:
iqn.1987-05.com.cisco:vt1
99019
IP: 10.2.51.72
Checking the Network Configuration
Cisco Network Boot requires a network configuration that includes a 10/100 or Gigabit Ethernet
connection between the IP hosts, the DHCP and TFTP servers, and the Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000
Series system.
To set up the network for Cisco Network Boot operation, perform the following steps:
Step 1
Make sure you have checked or included the items in Table 3-1 on page 3-6.
Step 2
Ensure that the NICs with PXE enabled are connected to the Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system
and the DHCP server, via the IP Ethernet connection.
Step 3
Verify that the Cisco switches are configured to work with DHCP.
To check the DHCP settings, enter the following command at the > enable prompt:
#show dhcp server
To set the DHCP server IP address, enter the following commands at the > enable prompt:
#configure terminal
#ip dhcp-server A.B.C.D
Step 4
Verify that the Cisco switches on the Gigabit Ethernet or the 10/100 Ethernet ports are set to initialize
quickly. The switch must have Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) enabled, and the appropriate ports should
be configured with the PortFast feature. When enabled on a port, the PortFast feature causes the port to
immediately switch from blocking mode to forwarding mode. This helps prevent time-outs on clients
that use DHCP to obtain an IP address.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
3-5
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Checking the Network Configuration
Note
This setting is not required for ports connected to Linux hosts. However, configuring the
PortFast feature will avoid a potential delay in obtaining an IP address from the DHCP server.
For example, to enable the PortFast feature for interface #1 and interface #2, enter the following
commands for each port at the > enable prompt:
#configure terminal
#interface GigabitEthernet 0/1
#Spanning Tree PortFast
#exit
#interface GigabitEthernet 0/2
#Spanning Tree PortFast
Caution
Table 3-1
The PortFast feature should only be enabled on ports connected to a single host. Connecting
hubs, concentrators, switches, bridges, routers, and other similar devices, to a port with
PortFast enabled can cause Spanning Tree loops, which can disrupt your network.
Network Configuration Items
Item
Description
Gigabit Ethernet or 10/100 Ethernet
You need Gigabit Ethernet or 10/100 Ethernet connections
for the IP network that connects the IP hosts, DHCP and
TFTP servers, and the Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series
system.
Each host requires a 10/100, 10/100/1000, or Gigabit
Ethernet port that is capable of PXE, and that has access to
the DHCP and TFTP servers, and the Cisco SN 5400 or
MDS 9000 Series system. This port can be an onboard
Ethernet port or provided as a NIC.
VLANs
If VLANs are in use, make sure that all VLAN
configurations are correct. VLANS are another way to
manage multiple network segments.
For example, if a host is on VLAN 20 and the DHCP server
is on VLAN 40, then you must configure a routing between
the VLANs, using a DHCP helper address.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
3-6
OL-6442-01
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Creating a Master Boot Image
Table 3-1
Network Configuration Items
Item
Description
DHCP helper address
A DHCP helper address helps a host locate a DHCP server,
if the DHCP server is on a different network (segment) than
the host.
Cisco routers, and switches based on Router IOS, need a
DHCP helper address.
Spanning Tree PortFast
If you are using Cisco devices, you need a Cisco version of
the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP), a loop-prevention
protocol. The ports connected to single hosts should have
the PortFast feature enabled.
Note
This setting is not required for ports connected to
Linux hosts. However, configuring the PortFast
feature will avoid a potential delay in obtaining an
IP address from the DHCP server.
Creating a Master Boot Image
The master boot image is the initial boot image created on the directly attached disk drive of the master
boot host. Creating a master boot image consists of the following tasks:
•
Installing the Operating System and Applications, page 3-7
•
Installing the iSCSI Driver, page 3-8
•
Configuring the Network Interface, page 3-8
•
Installing the Replication Utility, page 3-10
Installing the Operating System and Applications
Step 1
Step 2
Install a supported operating system on the directly attached disk drive of the master boot host. Cisco
Network Boot supports the following operating systems:
•
Microsoft Windows 2000 (Server or Advanced Server) with Service Pack 3
•
Microsoft Windows XP (Professional Edition) with Service Pack 1
•
Microsoft Windows Server 2003 (Enterprise, Standard or Web Edition)
•
Various Linux operating systems, via the Replication Utility for Linux and the iSCSI driver for
Linux, available as Open Source from SourceForge. See the readme files that accompany the
software downloads for detailed configuration and usage information.
Install all other software and applications that need to be included on the master boot image. For
example, install Microsoft Office, SQL Server, or sound card drivers.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
3-7
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Creating a Master Boot Image
Installing the iSCSI Driver
The master boot image must include the appropriate iSCSI driver. Cisco Network Boot supports the
Cisco iSCSI driver version 3.1.2 (or later) for Microsoft Windows.
To install the iSCSI driver for Microsoft Windows, perform the following steps:
Step 1
Download the most current Cisco iSCSI driver for Microsoft Windows from Cisco.com.
Step 2
Install and configure the Cisco iSCSI driver using the Cisco iSCSI driver readme file and Release Notes.
The readme file accompanies the iSCSI driver (in the downloaded driver archive file).
Step 3
Enter the IP address associated with the iSCSI target on the Discovery Addresses node, using the New
Discovery Address toolbar option. See the SCSI routing instance IP address configuration item in
Table 2-3 or the Gigabit Ethernet IP address item in Table 2-4.
Step 4
On the Boot Type node, change the boot type to Early Boot.
.
Configuring the Network Interface
You must configure the network interface(s) for the master boot image. The master boot image may have
multiple network interfaces. To configure the network interface(s), you specify the TCP/IP properties,
including the host IP address.
Follow these guidelines when you configure the network interface(s) and assign IP addresses:
Note
•
Follow the steps in the “NIC With PXE Enabled” section on page 3-8 to configure the network
interface attached to the host that is also connected to DHCP and to the iSCSI targets in the Cisco
SN 5400 Series system. This NIC must have the PXE program enabled.
•
Follow the steps in the “NIC Without PXE Enabled” section on page 3-9 to configure other network
interfaces that are attached to the host, but connected to another network. These NICs do not have
PXE enabled.
The NIC type and interface number that is selected for the booting process must be the same on all hosts
that will use this master boot image.
NIC With PXE Enabled
Use your NIC documentation to assign a static or dynamic IP address for the NIC that is PXE enabled.
For example, perform the following steps in a Microsoft Windows 2000 environment:
Note
To use a dynamic IP address, the host must be running a Cisco iSCSI driver for Microsoft Windows
version 4.2.1 (or later).
Step 1
Click Start > Settings > Network and Dialup Connections > Local Area Connection. Choose the
local area connection for the NIC with PXE enabled.
Step 2
Configure the TCP/IP properties. (See Figure 3-4.)
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
3-8
OL-6442-01
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Creating a Master Boot Image
Figure 3-4
Step 3
Example - TCP/IP Properties
To use a static IP address, click the Use the following IP address radio button and assign the host IP
address, subnet mask and default gateway, using the values from Table 2-2, Configuration
Worksheet—IP Hosts. The IP address assigned to this NIC must be the same address that is specified in
the DHCP Reservation configuration IP Address option. (See Table 3-5.)
To use a dynamic IP address, click the Obtain an IP address automatically radio button.
Note
To use a dynamic IP address, the host must be running the Cisco iSCSI driver for Microsoft
Windows, version 4.2.1 (or later).
Step 4
Assign any other desired TCP/IP properties, such as the IP address of the preferred and alternate DNS
servers.
Step 5
Click OK to save your changes.
NIC Without PXE Enabled
If the host uses multiple NICs, any additional NICs should be configured to use DHCP to obtain a
dynamic IP address. If additional NICs are configured with a static IP address, then each of the replicated
systems will also have that static IP address assigned to the additional NICs. This will cause a variety of
network problems.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
3-9
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Creating a Master Boot Image
Use your NIC documentation to configure any NIC that is not PXE enabled to obtain an IP address
automatically using DHCP.
For example, perform the following steps in a Microsoft Windows 2000 environment:
Step 1
Click Start > Settings > Network and Dialup Connections > Local Area Connection. Choose the
local area connection with a NIC that is not PXE enabled.
Step 2
Configure the TCP/IP properties.
Step 3
Click the Obtain an IP address automatically radio button.
Step 4
Assign any other desired TCP/IP properties, such as the IP address of the preferred and alternate DNS
servers.
Step 5
Click OK to save your changes.
Installing the Replication Utility
The Network Boot Administration Utility is the Cisco Network Boot component that allows you to
perform administrative tasks, including boot image replication, from master boot hosts running a
Microsoft Windows operating system. These tasks are described in the “Using the Network Boot
Administration Utility” section on page 3-14.
To install the Network Boot Administration Utility, perform the following tasks:
Step 1
Download the most current Cisco Network Boot package from Cisco.com.
Step 2
Unzip the Cisco Network Boot package and double-click setup.exe. The Network Boot Administration
Wizard appears.
Step 3
Click Next and read the license agreement and the readme file. Click Yes to acknowledge the license
agreement and then click Next.
Step 4
Fill in the Customer Information and click Next.
Step 5
Choose the Destination Location and click Next.
Step 6
Once the wizard has completed the installation, click Finish.
Note
Cisco Network Boot also supports the boot of Linux operating systems. This functionality is available
as Open Source, via the Replication Utility for Linux and the iSCSI driver for Linux, available from
SourceForge. See the readme files that accompany the software downloads for detailed configuration and
usage information.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
3-10
OL-6442-01
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Configuring iSCSI Targets for Replication
Configuring iSCSI Targets for Replication
You must configure iSCSI targets for the replicated images used by each IP host, including the master
boot host (if you intend to configure the master boot host to boot from an iSCSI target). iSCSI targets
are configured on the Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system.
You must configure one iSCSI target for use with each IP host. You can configure all of the iSCSI targets
that you will need at one time, or you can configure each iSCSI target as you go through the process to
replicate a boot image for the associated IP host.
Follow these guidelines when you configure an iSCSI target:
•
The iSCSI target must be at least the size of the files on the master boot host’s directly attached disk,
plus 10%. If a larger swap space is needed, the target must be larger.
•
If the host runs Cisco iSCSI driver for Microsoft Windows version 4.1.3 (or earlier), the first disk
mapped to an iSCSI target must be LUN 0. This device is used as the boot disk. All other disks
mapped to this iSCSI target should be numbered sequentially, such as LUN 1, LUN 2, LUN 3.
•
If the host runs a Cisco iSCSI driver for Microsoft Windows version 4.2.1 (or later), any LUN may
be used as the boot disk.
Use the procedures that follow to configure iSCSI targets using:
•
Cisco SN 5400 Series System
•
Cisco MDS 9000 Series System
Cisco SN 5400 Series System
To configure the iSCSI target for replication on the Cisco SN 5400 Series system, perform the following
steps:
Step 1
Verify the SN 5400 Series system installation and SCSI routing instance configuration. Refer to the
appropriate Software Configuration Guide. See the configuration worksheets in Chapter 2, “Before
Installing Cisco Network Boot,” for additional information.
Step 2
Make sure the iSCSI targets and the associated access lists are configured so that the master boot host
can access all of the iSCSI targets.
Initially every iSCSI target should be accessible by the master boot host. After the replication process is
complete, delete the IP address of the master boot host from the access list and add the IP address of the
IP host that will use the iSCSI target for boot purposes. If you have configured an iSCSI target to be used
by the master boot host, you do not need to make any changes to that access list.
Before making changes to an access list, power down any host that can access the corresponding iSCSI
target.
Caution
Only one IP host should be allowed to access an iSCSI target that contains a boot image at any time. If
more than one host has access, a data loss may occur.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
3-11
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Configuring iSCSI Targets for Replication
Step 3
Make a note of the target’s iSCSI Name. You can access the target’s iSCSI Name by entering a CLI
command on the Cisco SN 5400 Series system as shown in the following example:
[SN5428-2A]# show scsirouter bootrtr
where bootrtr is the name of the SCSI routing instance.
You will use the target’s iSCSI Name when setting up the DHCP server.
Table 3-2
Example: iSCSI Target Configuration on the SN 5400 Series System
Example
Description
bootrtr
The name of SCSI routing instance.
10.2.50.102
The Gigabit Ethernet IP address of the SCSI routing
instance.
0
The LUN for the iSCSI target that will be mapped to the
host.
iqn.1987-05.com.cisco:00.c48888c4d21f
.masterbootdisk
•
If a host runs the Cisco iSCSI driver for Microsoft
Windows version 4.1.3 (or earlier), this must be
LUN 0.
•
If the host runs the Cisco iSCSI driver for Microsoft
Windows version 4.2.1 (or later), this may be any
LUN number.
The iSCSI Name of the target.
Cisco MDS 9000 Series System
To configure the iSCSI target for replication on a Cisco MDS 9000 Series system, perform the following
steps:
Step 1
Verify the MDS 9000 Series system installation. Refer to the appropriate Software Configuration Guide.
See the configuration worksheets in Chapter 2, “Before Installing Cisco Network Boot,” for additional
information.
Step 2
Configure the Gigabit Ethernet IP address for the IP storage port. For example:
switch(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 2/1
ip address 10.2.51.72 255.255.255.255
Step 3
Make sure the iSCSI targets and the associated iSCSI-based access control are configured so that the
master boot host can access all of the iSCSI targets. Because access control is required, the iSCSI targets
must be statically mapped. For example:
switch(config)# iscsi virtual-target name iqn.1987-05.com.cisco:vt1
switch(config)# initiator ip address 10.2.51.49 permit
Initially every iSCSI target should be accessible by the master boot host. After the replication process is
complete, change the iSCSI access control so that the IP host that will use the iSCSI target for boot
purposes is the only IP host allowed to access the iSCSI target. If you have configured an iSCSI target
to be used by the master boot host, you do not need to make any changes to the iSCSI access control.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
3-12
OL-6442-01
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Configuring iSCSI Targets for Replication
Each host should be powered down when you make changes to the iSCSI-based access control for the
iSCSI target.
Caution
Only one IP host should be allowed to access an iSCSI target that contains a boot image at any time. If
more than one host has access, a data loss may occur.
Step 4
Verify that the zoning for the target and initiator is correctly configured. If the zoning status is in permit
mode, no additional zoning is needed.
If the zoning status is in deny mode, verify that the target and the initiator are members of the appropriate
zone. For example:
switch(config)# interface iscsi 2/1
switchport initiator id ip-address
switch(config)# zoneset name PXE vsan 100
switch(config)# zone name Client1
switch(config)# member pwwn 22:00:00:04:cf:e6:1d:d1
switch(config)# member symbolic-nodename 10.2.51.49
switch(config)# zoneset activate name PXE vsan 100
Note
Step 5
In the above example, the iSCSI initiator's zoning information is based on its IP address (10.2.51.49)
because its name is created dynamically. The switchport initiator id ip-address command is required
to configure the MDS 9000 Series system to use the IP address instead of the name to identify the iSCSI
initiator.
Make a note of the target’s iSCSI Name. This is the iSCSI target node name, and can be displayed by
entering a CLI command on the Cisco MDS 9000 Series system, as shown in the following example:
switch# show iscsi virtual-target
...
target: iqn.1987-05.com.cisco:vt1
...
You will use the target’s iSCSI Name when setting up the DHCP server.
Table 3-3
Example: iSCSI Target Configuration on the MDS 9000 Series System
Example
Description
10.2.51.72
The Gigabit Ethernet IP address of the IP storage port.
10.2.51.49
The master boot host IP address.
0
The LUN for the iSCSI target that will be mapped to the host.
•
If a host runs the Cisco iSCSI driver for Microsoft Windows
version 4.1.3 (or earlier), this must be LUN 0.
•
If the host runs the Cisco iSCSI driver for Microsoft
Windows version 4.2.1 (or later), this may be any LUN
number.
iqn.1987-05.com.cisco:vt1
The iSCSI Name of the target.
22:00:00:04:cf:e6:1d:d1
The virtual target’s PWWN.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
3-13
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Replicating Boot Images
Replicating Boot Images
Use Network Boot Administration Utility, installed on the master boot host, to perform the replication
process. You must replicate a boot image for every IP host. If you intend to remove the master boot host’s
directly attached disk after the replication process, you must also replicate a boot image for the master
boot host.
Note
If the master boot host is running a Linux operating system, use the Replication Utility for Linux,
available from SourceForge. See the readme file that accompanies the software download for detailed
configuration and usage information.
Using the Network Boot Administration Utility
Before you begin replicating boot images, you can use the Administration Utility to create and format
partitions on the iSCSI targets.
Note
If all the boot disks were configured as iSCSI target/LUN 0, the number of devices that can be replicated
is limited to 8. After replication, the configuration for the Cisco SN 5400 Series system must be adjusted
to allow access to another 8 boot disks, and so on, until all the boot disks are replicated. Alternatively,
for replication only, the boot disks can be LUNs 0-n. If this is done, be sure to reconfigure back to LUN 0
after replication, if necessary.
Creating a Partition
To create a partition on an iSCSI target, perform the following tasks:
Step 1
Click Start > Programs > Cisco Storage Networking > Network Boot Administration.
Step 2
In the netboot window, choose Disk Management. A window showing disks with partitions appears.
(See Figure 3-5.)
Step 3
Right-click an unallocated region of a basic disk and click Create Partition....
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
3-14
OL-6442-01
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Replicating Boot Images
Figure 3-5
Disk Management Window
Step 4
In the Create Partition wizard, click Next.
Step 5
In the Select Partition Type window, select Primary Partition > Next.
Step 6
In the Specify Partition Size window, fill in Amount of disk space to use and click Next.
The partition size must be at least the size of the used space on the source volume, plus 10%. If a larger
swap space is needed, the partition size must be larger. In our example, the source volume is the master
boot host’s directly attached disk.
Step 7
In the Assign Drive letter or path window, choose Assign a drive letter, choose or enter a drive letter,
and click Next.
Step 8
In the Format Partition window, choose Format this partition > Perform quick format and click
Next > Finish.
Step 9
When the formatting process is complete, the partition displays the name of the new volume, the size,
and the term, healthy. (See Figure 3-6.) Right-click the partition and select Mark Partition Active.
Step 10
Once you mark the partition active, the name New Volume and the term, healthy (active), appears. (See
Figure 3-6.)
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
3-15
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Replicating Boot Images
Figure 3-6
Healthy/Active Volume
Replicating a Boot Image to an iSCSI Target
Best Practices
When replicating a boot image, the Administration Utility does a file by file copy. If you attempt to
replicate the master boot host’s local disk while it is booted, some files may be open and in use by
running application. If this occurs, the Administration Utility may fail to copy these open files, leading
to a replication failure, or corruption of the replicated boot image.
Cisco recommends that the master boot host have a fresh installation of Microsoft Windows on the local
disk with only one user, Administrator, created and logged in, before proceeding with the replication
process.
However, it is common to require a standard set of applications and user accounts on the replicated boot
images. To avoid separately installing these applications and creating user accounts on every replicated
boot image, follow these steps:
Step 1
Start with a fresh installation of the desired Microsoft Windows operating system (with a minimal
feature set) on the local disk of the master boot host.
Step 2
Log in as Administrator, and perform the replication. Do not install any additional applications or create
any new user accounts before performing the replication. Close any running applications before you start
the replication process.
Step 3
Network boot the host from the replicated iSCSI disk prepared in Step 2.
Step 4
Install all desired applications and create additional user accounts, as needed. This image becomes the
reference boot image.
Step 5
Shutdown and boot the host from the local disk again (as in Step 1.)
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
3-16
OL-6442-01
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Replicating Boot Images
Step 6
While the master boot host is booted from the local disk, perform the replication, using the reference
boot image (the iSCSI disk prepared in Step 4) as the source, to the other iSCSI disks (targets). Do not
use the local disk as the replication source.
By following these procedures, the replication process uses a source boot image that is not currently
booted. This avoids the possibility of a replication failure or corruption of the replicated boot image, due
to file sharing violations while the Administration Utility copies files.
Performing the Replication Process
To replicate a boot image, perform the following tasks:
Step 1
Click Start > Programs > Cisco Storage Networking > Network Boot Administration.
Step 2
Expand Source Volumes.
Step 3
Select the source drive. The source is the master boot image, and can come from one of the following:
•
The directly attached disk drive on the master boot host.
•
A volume that was previously created using the replication process.
In the example configuration used in this chapter, the source master boot image is the master boot host’s
directly attached disk drive. (See Figure 3-1.)
Step 4
The Destination Volumes window appears with the drives that can be chosen as destinations. Choose the
destination drive. This is the iSCSI target that will receive the replicated boot image. In the example, the
source volume C is copied to the destination volume E. (See Figure 3-7.)
Figure 3-7
Step 5
Destinations Window
Click Replicate Boot Volume.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
3-17
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Replicating Boot Images
Step 6
Confirm the data on the Confirm Replication of Volume screen and click Next.
Step 7
Enter the replication details. In this example, the master boot image is being replicated for the IP host
named HOMER.
Note
If the Netboot Helper is not installed (the host runs a Cisco iSCSI driver version 4.1.3 or earlier), the
replication utility requires the Souce IP address and Destination IP address, as described in Table 3-4.
If the Netboot Helper is installed (the host runs a Cisco iSCSI driver version 4.2.1 or later), the
replication utility does not use the Source IP address and Destination IP address parameters.
Table 3-4
Note
Replication Details
Value
Description
Example Entry
Source IP address
The IP address of the host that contains the master boot 10.2.50.49
image. This is the IP address of the NIC with PXE
enabled. See Table 2-2, Configuration Worksheet—IP
Hosts.
Destination IP address
The IP address of the host that will use the boot image. 10.2.50.48
This is the IP address of the NIC with PXE enabled.
See Table 2-5, Configuration Worksheet—DHCP and
TFTP Servers.
Destination computer
name
The name of the host designated as the destination
computer. See Table 2-5, Configuration
Worksheet—DHCP and TFTP Servers.
HOMER
If you are replicating a boot image to be used by the master boot host, the source and destination IP
addresses will be the same. For example, to replicate a boot image to be used by the master boot host
named HERMES_master, the Source IP address and the Destination IP address would both be
10.2.50.49.
Step 8
Click Next, and confirm the replication details.
Step 9
Click Finish. A dialog box with a progress bar displays, allowing you to monitor the progress of the
replication process.
Step 10
(Optional) Repeat steps 3 through 9 to replicate the master boot image to additional destinations.
Completing the Replication Process
To complete the replication process, perform the following tasks:
Step 1
When the replication process for all destinations is complete, shut down the master boot host. If you
replicated a boot image for the master boot host, you can now remove the directly attached disk drive.
Step 2
Establish a management session with the Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
3-18
OL-6442-01
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Setting up the TFTP Server
Step 3
Modify the access control for each target so that only the appropriate IP host can access its iSCSI target.
For example, if the targets are configured on the SN 5400 Series system, delete the master boot host’s
access list entry from each target’s access list and add an entry for the IP host that will use the target for
boot purposes.
Refer to the appropriate Software Configuration Guide for the Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series
system for further information about adding and deleting access list entries, or configuring iSCSI-based
access control.
Caution
Failing to properly configure access can lead to data corruption.
Setting up the TFTP Server
Before the IP host can boot from the iSCSI target, it must download the Network Boot Program
(inbp.com) from the TFTP server. In this procedure, you will install the inbp.com file on the server in
the appropriate directory.
You can obtain more information about the installation of TFTP by referring to the appropriate software
documentation for your TFTP server.
Note
One server may be configured to provide both TFTP and DHCP functions.
Microsoft Windows Example
For example, to set up a TFTP server in a Microsoft Windows 2000 environment, perform the following
steps:
Step 1
Install the TFTP server by installing the remote Installation services. Do not configure the remote
Installation services at any time.
Step 2
Create the following directory, if not present, by entering:
c:\tftpdroot
Step 3
Copy the inbp.com file into the c:\tftpdroot directory. The inbp.com file is part of the Cisco Network
Boot package, available for download from Cisco.com.
Step 4
Open Administrative Tools in Control Panel, and double-click Services. (Administrative Tools can also
be opened from Microsoft Management Console, or from Start > Settings > Control Panel >
Administrative Tools.)
Step 5
Double-click Trivial FTP Daemon service and check the status. The status should display Started.
If it does not display Started, click Start and set Startup Type to Automatic.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
3-19
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Setting Up the DHCP Server
Linux Example
For example, to set up a TFTP server in a Linux environment, perform the following steps:
Step 1
Install the appropriate TFTP server package from the OS installation CD-ROM, or other source.
Step 2
Edit the /etc/xinetd.d/tftp file and enable TFTP. For example:
disable=no
Step 3
Set the directory permissions for the /tftpboot directory to allow access to all users. For example:
#chown nobody:nobody /tftpboot
#chmod 777 /tftpboot
Step 4
Restart xinetd. For example:
#/etc/init.d/xinetd restart
Step 5
Transfer the inbp.com file to the /tftpboot directory.
Step 6
Enable the file permission for inbp.com to 777 for TFTP transfer when booting from the network.
Setting Up the DHCP Server
You must set up a DHCP server and provide scope, reservation and configuration options for each
network and IP host. The configuration settings specified in this section are required for Cisco Network
Boot. Depending on your network and other DHCP requirements, you may provide additional
configuration information.
You can obtain more information about the installation of DHCP by referring to the appropriate software
documentation for your DHCP server.
Note
One server may be configured to provide both DHCP and TFTP functions.
Microsoft Windows Example
For example, to set up a DHCP server in a Microsoft Windows 2000 environment, perform the following
steps:
Step 1
Install the appropriate service pack and hotfixes. Boot the system and log in with Administrator
privileges.
Step 2
Open Administrative Tools in Control Panel, and double-click DHCP. (Administrative Tools can also be
opened from Microsoft Management Console, or Start > Settings > Control Panel > Administrative
Tools.)
Step 3
From the Action menu, choose Add server.
Step 4
Create a scope by specifying the appropriate scope options for your configuration. Refer to your DHCP
documentation for details.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
3-20
OL-6442-01
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Setting Up the DHCP Server
Step 5
Right-click Reservations under Scope and select New Reservation. Add the information for each of the
following options:
•
Reservation name (the name of the IP host)
•
IP address
•
Media access control (MAC) address
•
Description
See Table 3-5 for a description and sample for each option.
Step 6
If you are adding more hosts to the network, click Add and return to Step 5. Repeat for each host you
will be adding to the network. Click Close when you have completed creating reservations for all hosts.
Step 7
From the Reservations menu, select Master and right-click to view Configuration Options.
Step 8
Check and add the scope and reservation options. Add the following information for each of the options:
Scope (This is done for each LAN.) See Table 3-6 and Table 3-7 for a sample of each option.
•
043 - vendor-specific options
•
066 - name or IP address of an alternate DHCP server (optional)
•
067- bootfile name
Reservation (This is done for each host.)
Step 9
•
012 - host name
•
017 - root file
Save these options, and exit DHCP.
Table 3-5
New Reservation Options for the Master Boot Host
Option
Description
Example Entry
Reservation name
The name of the IP host.
HERMES_master
Note
Each reservation name must be unique.
IP Address
The IP address of the host.
MAC Address
The media access control address of the NIC with PXE 00:04:56:AC:71:29
support enabled. This is the physical, 6-byte hex
address.
10.2.50.49
You can obtain this address from the NIC
documentation or by booting the host and having PXE
display the address.
If you are running Microsoft Windows 2000, you can
also issued the ipconfig command with the all
parameter from a Command Prompt window to display
the NIC physical address. For example:
ipconfig /all
Description
User-defined identification information associated with iSCSI boot master
the reservation name.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
3-21
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Setting Up the DHCP Server
Table 3-6
Configuration Options—Scope
Option
Description
Example Entry
043
Vendor-specific information
03 06 01 03
This is a fixed value that should be set for every
scope configured for Cisco Network Boot.
This value means “ignore any other PXE
servers”.
066
Boot Server Host Name
(Optional) This is the name or IP address of an
alternate DHCP server.
067
Bootfile name
inbp.com
This is the Cisco Network Boot file that the IP
host downloads from the TFTP server. This is
a fixed value that should be set for every scope
configured for Cisco Network Boot.
Table 3-7
Configuration Options—Reservation
Option
Description
Example Entry
012
Host name
HERMES_master
Note
017
The Replication Utility generates
an iSCSI initiator name on
successful completion of
replication. This name must be
used as the Host name in the DHCP
configuration. If you are using the
SN 5400 Series system, the default
value of netboot_master is
acceptable. If you are using the
MDS 9000 Series System, you
must enter the generated iSCSI
initiator name as the Host name to
allow access.
Root path to the name of the iSCSI target.
When you load the inbp.com file on to the
master boot host, the root path to the iSCSI
target is also loaded.
Table 3-8
iscsi:10.2.50.102:tcp:3260:0:
iqn.1987-05.com.cisco:
00.c48888c4d21f.masterbootdisk
See Table 3-8 for a description of each element
in this root path.
Root Path Elements
Element
Description
iscsi
A required prefix.
10.2.50.102
The Gigabit Ethernet IP address of the SCSI
routing instance or the IP storage port, configured
in the “Configuring iSCSI Targets for
Replication” section on page 3-11.
tcp (or 6)
Specifies that the TCP protocol is used.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
3-22
OL-6442-01
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Setting Up the DHCP Server
Table 3-8
Root Path Elements (continued)
Element
Description
3260
The iSCSI port number. The default listening port
(assigned by IANA) is 3260.
0
The LUN to use. (If a host runs a Microsoft
Windows operating system, this must be 0.)
iqn.1987-05.com.cisco:00.c48888c4d21f.maste
rbootdisk
The target’s iSCSI Name. See “Configuring iSCSI
Targets for Replication” section on page 3-11.
Linux Example
For example, to set up a DHCP server in a Linux environment, perform the following steps:
Step 1
Install the appropriate DHCP server package from the OS installation CD-ROM, or other source.
Step 2
Edit the /etc/dhcpd.conf file and specify the following entries for each host (Example 3-1):
•
TFTP server address
•
filename (inbp.com)
•
System hostname
•
Hardware address of the PXE enabled NIC
•
IP address to be assigned to the DHCP client
•
Netmask to be assigned to the DHCP client
•
Gateway IP address
•
Vendor-specific information
•
Root path to the iSCSI target disk
See Table 3-9 for a description and sample for each entry.
Step 3
Restart the dhcpd.
Table 3-9
dhcpd.conf File Entries
Entries
Description
Example Entry
TFTP server address
The IP address of the TFTP server.
next-server 10.2.50.18
filename
This is the Cisco Network Boot file that
the IP host downloads from the TFTP
server. This is a fixed value.
filename “inbp.com”
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
3-23
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Setting Up the DHCP Server
Table 3-9
dhcpd.conf File Entries (continued)
Entries
Description
Example Entry
System hostname
The name of the IP host.
HERMES_master
Note
Hardware address of
PXE-enabled NIC
The Replication Utility generates
an iSCSI initiator name on
successful completion of
replication. This name must be
used as the Host name in the
DHCP configuration. If you are
using the SN 5400 Series system,
the default value of
netboot_master is acceptable. If
you are using the MDS 9000
Series System, you must enter the
generated iSCSI initiator name as
the Host name to allow access.
The media access control address of the
NIC with PXE support enabled. This is
the physical, 6-byte hex address.
hardware ethernet
00:04:56:AC:71:29
You can obtain this address from the NIC
documentation or by booting the host and
having PXE display the address.
IP address for DHCP
client
fixed-address 10.2.50.49
The IP address that will be assigned to
the host with the specified MAC address
(hardware ethernet entry).
Netmask for DHCP
client
The subnet mask to be used by the IP
host.
netmask 255.255.0.0
Gateway IP address
The gateway IP address.
option routers 10.2.50.225
Vendor-specific
information
This is a fixed value. This value means
“ignore any other PXE servers”.
option
vendor-encapsulated-options
“03060103”
Root path to iSCSI
target disk
Root path to the name of the iSCSI target.
When you load the inbp.com file onto the
master boot host, the root path to the
iSCSI target is also loaded.
option root-path
iscsi:10.2.50.102:tcp:3260:0:
iqn.1987-05.com.cisco:
00.c48888c4d21f.masterbootdisk
See Table 3-8 for a description of
each element in this root path.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
3-24
OL-6442-01
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Configuring an IP Host to Boot from the Network
Example 3-1
Example dhcpd.conf File
.......
subnet 10.2.0.0 netmask 255.255.0.0 {
range dynamic-bootp 10.2.50.5 10.2.50.255;
default-lease-time 21600;
max-lease-time 43200;
option routers 10.2.50.225;
# we want the nameserver to appear at a fixed address
group {
next-server 10.2.50.18;
filename "inbp.com";
host HERMES_master {
hardware ethernet 00:04:56:AC:71:29;
fixed-address 10.2.50.49;
option root-path "iscsi:10.2.50.102:tcp:3260:0:iqn.1987-05.com.cisco:00.c48888c4d21f.masterbootdisk";
option vendor-encapsulated-options "03060103";
}
}
}
Configuring an IP Host to Boot from the Network
After completing the replication process, you must configure each IP host to boot from the network by
changing the boot order specified in the host’s System Setup utility.
The IP host must have a valid DHCP reservation. See the “Setting Up the DHCP Server” section on
page 3-20 for details.
To configure the IP host to boot from the network, perform the following steps:
Step 1
Boot the diskless IP host.
Step 2
Press F2 or use the configured system method of accessing the System Setup.
Step 3
Verify that PXE support is enabled for the NIC. (This is the NIC at the IP address specified in the host’s
DHCP reservation.)
Step 4
Change the boot order to Boot from the network first.
Step 5
Press F10 or use the host’s method of saving the System Setup options.
After you have saved the System Setup options, the boot process continues.
Step 6
Verify that Cisco Network Boot is running and accessing the DHCP server properly. Look for the
following indicators:
•
The IP addresses, subnet masks, and default gateways displayed on the host should match those
specified in the host’s DHCP reservation.
•
After inbp.com is downloaded from the TFTP server and begins the boot process, messages should
appear on the screen. Check for a message that shows version information, such as:
Cisco Network Boot version 3.3.1
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
3-25
Chapter 3
Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
Configuring an IP Host to Boot from the Network
•
Check for a line that displays the appropriate LUN and FC storage device information (Table 3-10),
such as:
iSCSI LUN: 0000 Seagate ST318452 00023CV08080
•
Note
The operating system boots successfully.
On some systems, a flashing light on the storage array may indicates that the host is communicating with
the storage.
Table 3-10 Description of Line
Example
Description
iSCSI LUN
Line introduction
0000
LUN number of the iSCSI target that was found
Seagate
Manufacturer of the storage device
ST318452
Model number of the storage device
00023CV08080
Serial number of the storage device
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
3-26
OL-6442-01
C H A P T E R
4
Using the Command Line Utility
The Cisco Network Boot Command Line Utility (Replicate.exe) is a command line tool that can be used
manually or in command line scripts to automate the replication process. The Command Line Utility is
only available if the master boot host is running a Microsoft Windows operating system.
Note
To get online help for the replication commands supported by the Command Line Utility, change to the
Network Boot Administration Utility path and enter replicate /? at the Windows command prompt.
This chapter covers the following commands:
•
replicate, page 4-2
•
replicate check, page 4-4
•
replicate showdisks, page 4-5
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
4-1
Chapter 4
Using the Command Line Utility
replicate
replicate
To replicates the boot image from a source disk to a destination disk, use the replicate command.
replicate source destination computername [sourceIP destinationIP] [-v]
Syntax Description
source
The source disk from which the image is to be replicated. This is the master
boot image.
destination
The destination disk to which the image is to be replicated. This is the iSCSI
target that will receive the replicated boot image.
computername
The computer name of the destination image. This is the name of the host
designated as the destination computer.
sourceIP
(Optional). The IP address of the host that contains the master boot image.
This is the IP address of the NIC with PXE enabled on the source system.
This parameter is ignored if the Netboot Helper is installed and you are
using the dynamic IP configuration option.
destinationIP
(Optional). The IP address of the host that will use the boot image. This is
the IP address of the NIC with PXE enabled on the destination system. This
parameter is ignored if the Netboot Helper is installed and you are using the
dynamic IP configuration option.
-v
Keyword used to select the “verbose” option. The progress of the
replication is displayed on the console.
Defaults
None.
Command Modes
You must be logged in with Administrator authority.
Command History
Release
Modification
3.3.1
This command was introduced.
Usage Guidelines
You can use this command manually, from the Windows command line, or you can enter the command
in a script and execute the script to perform the replication. You can enter multiple commands in a script.
Each command will be performed in sequence.
Examples
The following example replicates the C: source disk at the IP address 10.2.50.49, to the E: destination
disk on the computer named Homer at the IP address 10.2.50.48. The replication progress will display
on the console.
C:\>replicate C E Homer 10.2.50.49 10.2.50.48 -v
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
4-2
OL-6442-01
Chapter 4
Using the Command Line Utility
replicate
Related Commands
Command
Description
replicate check
Checks for the Netboot Helper driver.
replicate showdisks
Shows the disks available for replication.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
4-3
Chapter 4
Using the Command Line Utility
replicate check
replicate check
To determine if the Netboot Helper driver is installed, use the replicate check command.
replicate check
Syntax Description
This command has no arguments or keywords.
Defaults
None.
Command Modes
You must be logged in with Administrator authority.
Command History
Release
Modification
3.3.1
This command was introduced.
Usage Guidelines
Use this command to determine if the Netboot Helper driver is installed on the computer.
The Netboot Helper driver is responsible for configuring a NIC when a computer is DHCP-enabled in
Cisco Network Boot. It is installed when the Cisco iSCSI Driver for Microsoft WIndows is installed.
If this driver is not installed, you must use the sourceIP and destinationIP arguments with the replicate
command to perform a boot image replication.
Examples
The following example determines if the Netboot Helper driver is installed. In this example, the Netboot
Helper driver is not installed.
C:\>replicate check
The NetBoot Helper driver is not installed.
Related Commands
Command
Description
replicate
Replicate the boot image from a source disk to a destination disk.
replicate showdisks
Shows the disks available for replication.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
4-4
OL-6442-01
Chapter 4
Using the Command Line Utility
replicate showdisks
replicate showdisks
To see the disks available for replication, use the replicate showdisks command.
replicate showdisks
Syntax Description
This command has no arguments or keywords.
Defaults
None.
Command Modes
You must be logged in with Administrator authority.
Command History
Release
Modification
3.3.1
This command was introduced.
Usage Guidelines
Use this command to see a list of the disks available for replication. Issue this command before you issue
the replicate command to be sure your desired source disk is available.
Examples
The following example lists one disk available for replication. It is the C: drive, ABCMain.
C:\>replicate showdisks
Available disk(s):
C: ABCMain(Active)
Related Commands
Command
Description
replicate
Replicate the boot image from a source disk to a destination disk.
replicate check
Checks for the Netboot Helper driver.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
4-5
Chapter 4
Using the Command Line Utility
replicate showdisks
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
4-6
OL-6442-01
C H A P T E R
5
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
This chapter explains how to perform maintenance and how to troubleshoot Cisco Network Boot
operations. The troubleshooting section includes a display from a normal boot process, and information
about error messages you might encounter when installing and configuring Cisco Network Boot. It also
includes actions you can take to resolve the errors.
This chapter contains the following topics:
•
Maintenance, page 5-1
•
Troubleshooting, page 5-2
Maintenance
Maintenance tasks include replacing an IP host, and changing the network drivers.
Replacing a Host
Note
If a host runs a Microsoft Windows operating system, the replacement host must have the same NIC and
interface number as the original host. If it does not, the boot will fail.
To replace a host, perform the following steps:
Step 1
Record the media access control (MAC) address of the NIC to be used for storage access.
Step 2
Modify the host’s reservation in the DCHP server with the new MAC address.
Step 3
Boot the host.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
5-1
Chapter 5
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Changing the Network Drivers
You may need to change the network drivers if the NIC vendor makes a new driver version available, or
if you install a service pack that includes driver updates.
Note
For complete procedures to configure iSCSI driver software, refer to the readme file that accompanies
the iSCSI driver (in the downloaded driver archive file).
To change the network drivers, perform the following steps:
Step 1
Start the Cisco iSCSI Initiator Configuration Management application by double-clicking on the desktop
shortcut. (The application can also be opened from Start > Programs > Cisco iSCSI Initiator
Configuration Management.) The Cisco iSCSI config dialog box displays.
Step 2
On the Boot Type node, change the boot type to Normal Boot. (This setting is immediate. You do not
need to save your changes.)
Step 3
Exit the application.
Step 4
Make the necessary network driver changes.
Step 5
After the changes are complete, open the Cisco iSCSI Initiation Configuration Management application
and change the boot type on the Boot Type node to Early Boot.
Step 6
Exit the application.
Step 7
Re-replicate the boot images that were created from this master boot image, as necessary.
Troubleshooting
If you experience a problem with Cisco Network Boot, you can troubleshoot the situation by taking one
or more of the following actions:
Note
•
Review the normal Cisco Network Boot displays.
•
Use the dynamic PxeCheck utility.
•
Follow the recommended actions for specific error messages.
Rather than using a repair diskette or CD ROM for troubleshooting, iSCSI volumes should be mounted
on a working system and repaired from there.
Finding Log Files
If you need to contact Cisco TAC about a Cisco Network Boot problem that occurs in a Microsoft
Windows environment, they may ask you to produce a log file. Cisco Network Boot creates log files for
each replication. The log file name is ciscoopX.log, where X is the drive letter of the replication
destination.
For example, the log file name for a replication to disk E would be ciscoopE.log. This log file provides
insight on the failure and is created in the install directory of the Network Boot Administration Utility.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
5-2
OL-6442-01
Chapter 5
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Example Displays for Cisco Network Boot
During the boot process, each system displays its own PXE-specific information. The displays differ
based on the system manufacturer. The first example shows a normal Cisco Network Boot display
(Example 5-1), followed by examples of the additional system-specific information that needs to appear
before Cisco Network Boot can run (Example 5-2, Example 5-3, and Example 5-4).
Note
If the IP host’s display differs significantly from the normal Cisco Network Boot display, check the
connection to the DHCP server or to the Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system.
Example 5-1
Normal Cisco Network Boot Display
Cisco Network Boot netboot-3.2.1 25-Sept-2003.04:46:21
PXE Version: 02.01
Client Name: squall1
MAC: 67:22:95:88:01:54
Client IP: 10.2.50.10
DHCP IP: 10.2.50.18
Gateway IP: 10.2.50.1
Netmask: 255.255.255.0
iSCSI IP: 10.2.50.102
TCP Port: 3260
Initiator:
iqn.1987-05.com.cisco:00.c48888c4d21f.masterbootdisk
Target:
iqn.1987-05.com.cisco.00..bootdisk-01
Boot LUN: 0000
iSCSI MAC: 43:87:18:44:23:22 Alias: bootdisk-01
iSCSI LUN: 0000
iSCSI LUN: 0001
Disk
00
01
02
Type
iSCSI
iSCSI
BIOS
3.75GB
7.85GB
Cylinders
0x03ff
0x03ff
0x03ff
SEAGATE
SEAGATE
Heads
0xfe
0xfe
0xfe
ST318452
ST318452
Sectors
0x3f
0x3f
0x20
002EV08074
002EV08075
Max C: Size
7.8 GB
7.8 GB
3.8 GB
Booting from......
Example 5-2
Intel Eclipse Display
Intel UNDI, PXE-2.1 (build xxx)
Copyright...
Client MAC Addr: xx xx xx xx xx xx GUID:
Client IP: nn.nn.nn.nn Mask: nn.nn.nn.nn
Gateway IP: nn.nn.nn.nn
Example 5-3
DHCP IP: nn.nn.nn.nn
Compaq Booting from an Onboard Intel NIC
Prolient DL380
Initializing Intel 9R) boot agent version 4.017
PXE 2.0 build 083 (WFM 2.0)
Intel (R) boot agent version 4.0.17
Copyright
Client MAC Addr: xx xx xx xx xx xx GUID:
Client IP: nn.nn.nn.nn Mask: nn.nn.nn.nn DHCP IP: nn.nn.nn.nn
Gateway IP: nn.nn.nn.nn
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
5-3
Chapter 5
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Example 5-4
Dell Booting from an Onboard Intel NIC
PowEdge 1650
Initializing Intel 9R) boot agent version 4.017
PXE 2.0 build 083 (WFM 2.0)
Intel (R) boot agent version 4.0.17
Copyright
Client MAC Addr: xx xx xx xx xx xx GUID:
Client IP: nn.nn.nn.nn Mask: nn.nn.nn.nn DHCP IP: nn.nn.nn.nn
Gateway IP: nn.nn.nn.nn
Running the PxeCheck Utility
If you receive PXE errors from Cisco Network Boot, you may need to run the PxeCheck Interactive
utility. PxeCheck Interactive is a utility that checks a host system to see whether the Cisco Network Boot
program will likely run. PxeCheck Interactive is available as an option when you boot a host over the
network (Example 5-5).
PxeCheck Interactive performs the following tests on the IP host system:
•
Checks for PXE 2.0 or 2.1 implementations. PxeCheck Interactive fails and issues an error message
if the required PXE support is not found.
•
Checks and displays the amount of high memory above 512K. If less that 24K is available,
PxeCheck Interactive fails and issues an error message.
•
Tests the UNDI packet driver by sending a DHCP request and waiting for a response. PxeCheck
Interactive fails and issues an error message is no response is received within five seconds.
•
Displays any internal disk drives and their geometries.
•
Checks for APCI (interrupt 15). PxeCheck Interactive fails and issues an error message if APCI is
not found.
To run PxeCheck, perform the following steps:
Step 1
Boot the IP host that encountered the error.
Step 2
When the host loads inbp.com during the boot process, press Escape to access the interactive options
(Example 5-6).
Step 3
Press p to run PxeCheck Interactive. See Example 5-7 for a typical PxeCheck Interactive display for a
host system that is correctly configured for Cisco Network Boot.
Example 5-5
inbp Display
Cisco Systems iNBP 3.2
Copyright (C) 2001-2003, Cisco Systems Inc.
Press <ESC> for iNBP interactive
Example 5-6
inbp Interactive Options
p. Run PxeCheck Interactive
q. Quit (continue boot) <Control-Alt-Delete> to reboot
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
5-4
OL-6442-01
Chapter 5
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Example 5-7
Cisco iNBP
Successful PxeCheck Interactive Normal Display
inbp-3.2 system check utility
08-Jul-2003.11:33:00
PXE Version: 2.1
Available high memory 61 kbytes (need about 24k)
UNDI network driver OK
Disk
Type
Cylinders Heads Sectors
Max C: Size
00
BIOS
0x03ff
0xfe
0x20
3.8 GB
ACPI OK
PXE implementation on this system appears to be working
Error Messages
Cisco Network Boot issues a variety of informational and error messages. Messages are categorized as
follows:
•
Cisco Network Boot and Host Errors
•
Network Errors
•
DHCP iSCSI Option Format Errors
•
Login Errors
•
iSCSI Target Errors
•
Network Boot Administration Utility for Microsoft Windows Replication Errors
Cisco Network Boot and Host Errors
Error Message PXE not found
Explanation The host does not support PXE.
Recommended Action Install and configure a PXE-supported 10/100 or Gigabit Ethernet NIC, such
as the Intel Pro/1000 XT server.
Error Message Not enough conventional memory. NBP segment at 0x is below 512k
(0x8000)
Explanation . The PXE implementation does not leave enough memory for Cisco Network Boot to
run. Cisco Network Boot will not run at all on the host in this configuration.
Recommended Action Install and configure a PXE-supported 10/100 or Gigabit Ethernet NIC, such
as the Intel Pro/1000 XT server. For more information, run PxeCheck Interactive. (See “Running the
PxeCheck Utility” section on page 5-4 for details.)
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
5-5
Chapter 5
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Error Message System boots up to the Windows splash screen; a blue screen displays
the message, “BOOT DEVICE NOT AVAILABLE.”
Explanation The iSCSI driver on the master boot host was not configured to use Early Boot during
installation.
Recommended Action Boot the master boot host from the directly attached disk drive. Open the Cisco
iSCSI Initiator Configuration Management application, and change the Boot Node boot type to
Early. (See “Changing the Network Drivers” section on page 5-2 for details.) After making the
change, replicate the boot image to the iSCSI target again.
Network Errors
Error Message No ARP response from target IP address
Explanation The network could not find the hardware address (MAC address) of the iSCSI target.
Recommended Action Make sure that the iSCSI target is online. Check the DHCP configuration and
the reservation for the IP host, and verify that the IP address in the root path (option 017) is correct.
Also, make sure that the default gateway (if needed) is the first one in the router list (option 003)
and that the subnet mask is correct.
Error Message Unable to find boot drive on iSCSI target
Explanation No internal or iSCSI targets found.
Recommended Action Make sure that the iSCSI target has a valid copy of the BIOS on the boot image.
Error Message No BIOS or iSCSI hard disks
Explanation No internal or iSCSI targets found.
Recommended Action Make sure that the iSCSI target has a valid copy of the BIOS on the boot image.
Error Message No boot disk, insert disk and press Ctrl+Alt+Del
Explanation No bootable device was found.
Recommended Action Insert a bootable diskette, install an operating system, or replicate an existing
iSCSI boot disk.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
5-6
OL-6442-01
Chapter 5
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Error Message No ARP response yet, please wait or use control-alt-delete to reboot
Explanation The iSCSI target IP address is incorrect, the iSCSI target is not operational, or the
network is down between the host and the iSCSI target. Cisco Network Boot will retry the ARP
request every five seconds for 15 or 20 minutes. This may also happen under very heavy network
traffic with high packet loss.
Recommended Action If the target address is incorrect, fix the iSCSI root path in the DHCP
reservation, and reboot the host. If the target address is correct, wait for the iSCSI target to become
operational (this may happen if both the host and the target are powered on at the same time), or
correct the network problem.
Error Message No DHCP response yet, please wait or use control-alt-delete to reboot
Explanation The DHCP server may have gone down or is being restarted, or network problems may
have occurred between the host and the DHCP server. This could also happen under very heavy
network traffic with high packet loss. Cisco Network Boot will retry the DHCP request every five
seconds for about 10 minutes.
Recommended Action Start up the DHCP server if it is stopped, correct the network problem, or wait
for the retries to work.
Error Message DNS resolution failed.
Explanation The host name in the DHCP root path parameter could not be resolved to an IP address.
Recommended Action Verify that the DNS server is up and running, and that the host name
(option 12) in the DHCP reservation configuration is valid. If necessary, correct the host name
parameter so it can be resolved to a valid IP address.
DHCP iSCSI Option Format Errors
Error Message DHCP iSCSI option format error - option must start with iscsi
Explanation The root path (option 017) in the DHCP reservation for the host is not formatted
correctly.
Recommended Action Begin the option with “iscsi:” as described in the example in “Setting Up the
DHCP Server” in Chapter 3, “Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation.”
Error Message DHCP iSCSI option format error - non-dotted decimal character in IP
address
Explanation The root path (option 017) in the DHCP reservation for the host is not formatted
correctly.
Recommended Action Correct the formatting of the IP address in the root path. You must use a
dotted-decimal IP address, as described in “Setting Up the DHCP Server” in Chapter 3, “Installing
and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation.”
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
5-7
Chapter 5
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Error Message DHCP iSCSI option format error - transport protocol field must be tcp
or blank
Explanation The root path (option 017) in the DHCP reservation for the host is not formatted
correctly.
Recommended Action Correct the formatting of the root path by entering tcp (or 6), or by leaving the
field blank. See the example in “Setting Up the DHCP Server” in Chapter 3, “Installing and
Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation.”
Error Message DHCP iSCSI option format error - non-decimal character in TCP port
number field
Explanation The root path (option 017) in the DHCP reservation for the host is not formatted
correctly.
Recommended Action Correct the formatting of the root path. The default iSCSI listening port
number is 3260. See the example in “Setting Up the DHCP Server” in Chapter 3, “Installing and
Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation.”
Error Message DHCP iSCSI option format error - non-hexadecimal character in LUN field
Explanation The root path (option 017) in the DHCP reservation for the host is not formatted
correctly.
Recommended Action Correct the formatting of the root path. The LUN field must be in hexadecimal.
Only the first four characters are used. See the example in “Setting Up the DHCP Server” in
Chapter 3, “Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation.”
Error Message DHCP iSCSI option format error - iSCSI Target option not returned by
DHCP
Explanation The root path (option 017) in the DHCP reservation for the host is not formatted
correctly.
Recommended Action Correct the formatting of the root path. The target’s iSCSI Name must be
specified correctly. See the example in “Setting Up the DHCP Server” in Chapter 3, “Installing and
Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation.”
Error Message DHCP iSCSI option format error - target not specified
Explanation The root path (option 017) in the DHCP reservation for the host is not formatted
correctly.
Recommended Action Correct the formatting of the root path. Add the target’s iSCSI Name to the end
of the root path option. See the example in “Setting Up the DHCP Server” in Chapter 3, “Installing
and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation.”
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
5-8
OL-6442-01
Chapter 5
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Login Errors
Error Message target not found
Explanation The iSCSI target does not exist at the specified IP address.
Recommended Action Correct the target’s iSCSI Name or IP address in the root path (option 017) in
the DHCP reservation for the host.
Error Message initiator was not successfully authenticated by target
Explanation The connection failed due to an authentication error.
Recommended Action When iSCSI authentication is enabled, iSCSI drivers provide user name and
password information each time an iSCSI TCP connection is established. iSCSI authentication uses
the iSCSI Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP) authentication method. For
complete procedures to configure the iSCSI driver and the SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system for
iSCSI authentication, refer to the readme file that accompanies the iSCSI driver (in the downloaded
driver archive file) and the appropriate SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system Software Configuration
Guide.
Error Message initiator not authorized to access target
Explanation The connection failed due to an authorization error.
Recommended Action Make sure that the IP host is allowed access to the iSCSI target. On a Cisco
SN 5400 Series system, the access list associated with the target must allow the host to access the
iSCSI target. On a Cisco MDS 9000 Series system, the target must be configured with iSCSI-based
access control that allows the IP host to access the target.
Error Message unexpected initiator error
Explanation The connection failed due to an unexpected initiator problem.
Recommended Action Report the error to Cisco TAC.
Error Message unexpected target error
Explanation The connection failed due to an unexpected target error.
Recommended Action Make sure that the Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system is running and
available. If the error persists, report it to Cisco TAC.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
5-9
Chapter 5
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Error Message iSCSI login status Ox
Explanation The connection failed.
Recommended Action Report the error to Cisco TAC. If the error is 0x207 (Unexpected initiator
error), check the DHCP configuration. The Replication Utility generates an iSCSI initiator name on
successful completion of replication. This name must be used as the Host Name in the DHCP server.
If you are using the SN 5400 Series system, the default value of netboot_master is acceptable. If you
are using the MDS 9000 Series System, you must enter the generated iSCSI initiator name as the
Host Name in the DHCP configuration to allow access.
Error Message Unsupported iSCSI target
Explanation The iSCSI target is not a Cisco target, or it is a Cisco target running an older system
software release.
Recommended Action Install a Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system, or upgrade the system
software as specified in Chapter 2, “Before Installing Cisco Network Boot.”
iSCSI Target Errors
Error Message iSCSI initialization failed
Explanation The iSCSI driver initialization failed.
Recommended Action Report this error to Cisco TAC.
Error Message iSCSI test unit ready failed
A display such as the following is also shown.
SCSI Command returned status 0x02
Check condition; sense key 0x05, ASC/Q0x2500
LUN Not Supported
Exp. The LUN does not exist on the iSCSI target.
Action: Add the LUN or fix the boot string.
Explanation The iSCSI test unit failed.
Recommended Action Check that the Fibre Channel (FC) storage device connected to the Cisco
SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system is powered up and ready, and that the specified LUN exists.
Error Message iSCSI read failed
A display such as the following is also shown.
SCSI Command returned status 0x02
Check condition; sense key 0x05, ASC/Q0x2500
LBA Out of Range
Explanation The iSCSI read failed.
Recommended Action Make sure that the LUN is mapped to a valid iSCSI target.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
5-10
OL-6442-01
Chapter 5
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Error Message iSCSI get capacity failed
A display such as the following is also shown.
SCSI Command returned status 0x02
Check condition; sense key 0x05, ASC/Q0x2500
LUN Not Supported
Exp. The LUN does not exist on the iSCSI target.
Action: Add the LUN or fix the boot string.
Explanation The iSCSI get capacity failed.
Recommended Action Make sure that the LUN is mapped to a valid iSCSI target.
Error Message iSCSI device block size not 512 bytes
Explanation The block size of the physical device is not 512 bytes.
Recommended Action Access the FC storage device and reconfigure it to use a 512-byte block size.
Error Message iSCSI inquiry failed
A display such as the following is also shown.
SCSI Command returned status 0x02
Check condition; sense key 0x05, ASC/Q0x2500
LUN Not Supported
Exp. The LUN does not exist on the iSCSI target.
Action: Add the LUN or fix the boot string.
Explanation The iSCSI inquiry failed.
Recommended Action Check that the FC storage device connected to the Cisco SN 5400 or
MDS 9000 Series system is powered up and ready, and that the specified LUN exists
Network Boot Administration Utility for Microsoft Windows Replication Errors
Error Message Can’t find iSCSI driver or is not set to Early Boot
Explanation The iSCSI driver has not been installed or is not set to Early Boot.
Recommended Action Check to make sure you have the Cisco iSCSI driver for Microsoft Windows
installed, and that the boot type is set to Early Boot. For complete procedures to configure iSCSI
driver software, refer to the readme file that accompanies the iSCSI driver (in the downloaded driver
archive file).
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
5-11
Chapter 5
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Error Message Could not validate source IP address or could not find iSCSI driver
registry entries
Explanation In the Network Boot Administration Utility, the wrong source IP address was specified
for the host that contains the boot image, or the TCP/IP properties of the master boot host were not
configured correctly.
Recommended Action Check to make sure you have entered the correct IP address. This IP address is
the static IP address of the master boot host.
Error Message Couldn’t find physical device for source
Explanation The wrong device was selected.
Recommended Action Quit and restart the Network Boot Administration Utility, and then verify that
the correct device is selected.
Error Message Couldn’t find physical device for destination
Explanation The wrong device was selected.
Recommended Action Quit and restart the Network Boot Administration Utility, and then verify that
the correct device is selected.
Error Message Invalid copy source
Explanation No boot partition was found on the source.
Recommended Action Verify that the correct source is selected in the Network Boot Administration
Utility, and that the source includes an active partition.
Error Message Invalid copy destination
Explanation No boot partition was found on the destination.
Recommended Action Verify that the correct destination is selected in the Network Boot
Administration Utility. When creating the partition on the destination volume, be sure to check Mark
Active Partition after the partition is created.
Error Message Not a bootable NTFS partition
Explanation The volume is not formatted with NTFS or is not set to Healthy - Active.
Recommended Action Check the device selection in the Network Boot Administration Utility. Be sure
that the volume is formatted with NTFS and that the term “healthy” appears. If necessary, reformat
the partition.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
5-12
OL-6442-01
Chapter 5
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Error Message Failure trying to get source and destination free and used space sizes.
Explanation The Microsoft API failed.
Recommended Action Quit and restart the Network Boot Administration Utility.
Error Message Destination is too small to hold source.
Explanation The size of the destination volume is not large enough to contain the source volume.
Recommended Action The size of the destination volume should be 10% more than the size of the
used space on the source volume. Make a new partition of the required size, and then format and
activate the partition. See “Creating a Partition” in Chapter 3, “Installing and Configuring for Cisco
Network Boot Operation.” When you are finished, restart the replication process.
Error Message Invalid copy destination, invalid BPB (BIOS parameter block) or not
formatted for NTFS
Explanation The volume is not formatted with NTFS or you did not select the correct volume.
Recommended Action Check the device selection in the Network Boot Administration Utility. Verify
that the correct volume is selected and that the format is NTFS. If necessary, reformat the disk.
Error Message Invalid copy destination, invalid bytes per sector
Explanation The number of bytes per sector is not correct.
Recommended Action Check the format of the storage device. The volume disks must have 512 bytes
per sector. (This value is independent of the cluster size.) If necessary, reformat the disk.
Error Message I/0 Failure for the current destination
Explanation The current destination cannot be verified. This is a Microsoft API failure.
Recommended Action Repeat the replication process. If the problem persists, contact Cisco TAC.
Error Message Is a systemroot and can’t be a replication destination.
Explanation The destination already contains an operating system (OS) that is currently active. You
cannot replicate to a disk where an OS is active.
Recommended Action Check the device selection in the Network Boot Administration Utility.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
5-13
Chapter 5
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
5-14
OL-6442-01
GLOSSARY
B
BIOS
A relatively small program that resides in memory on a personal computer. The BIOS is responsible
for booting the computer and performing certain operations.
boot image
An instance of an operating system and application programs for a host. With Cisco Network Boot, a
boot image also contains a supported iSCSI driver, network drivers, and the network configuration
necessary to complete the network connection. A boot image resides on an iSCSI target/LUN zero from
which a host boots. See also master boot host.
C
Cisco MDS 9000
Series system
The phrase used when referring to all models of the Cisco MDS 9000 Series family. The Cisco
MDS 9000 Series family currently includes the MDS 9216 Fabric Switch, and MDS 9509 and
MDS 9506 Director.
Cisco Network Boot A Cisco software product that allows a diskless computer to boot from an iSCSI target via a Cisco
SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system.
Cisco SN 5400
Series system
The phrase used when referring to all models of the Cisco SN 5400 Series family. The Cisco SN 5400
Series family currently includes the SN 5420, SN 5428 and SN 5428-2 Storage Router.
D
DHCP
A protocol that provides a mechanism for allocating IP addresses dynamically so that an address can
be reused when a host no longer needs it.
diskless
Refers to a computer that has no fixed disk drive or any other storage device.
diskless boot
A process used by the computer to boot without a disk drive. This process typically allows the computer
to obtain its boot image from the network, using a network interface card (NIC).
Dynamic Host
Configuration
Protocol
See DHCP.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
GL-1
Glossary
F
Low-level software for booting and operating an intelligent device. Firmware generally resides in
read-only memory (ROM) on the device.
firmware
H
hardware ethernet
address
See MAC address.
host
See IP host. See also master boot host.
I
inbp.com
A software program that allows a computer to boot without a disk directly attached to the computer.
The program runs as a Network Bootstrap Program (NBP) in the Preboot Execution Environment
(PXE). The program is stored on a TFTP server for downloading to a computer that is configured to
boot from the network.
Internet Small
Computer System
Interface
See iSCSI.
IP host
A computer system on an IP network. With Cisco Network Boot, each host boots from an iSCSI target
on a Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system. Each IP host requires an iSCSI target/LUN with a
boot image for that host. See also master boot host.
iSCSI
(Internet Small Computer System Interface) Refers to the IETF-defined protocol for IP storage (ips).
For more information about the iSCSI protocol, refer to the IETF standards for IP storage at
http://www.ietf.org.
iSCSI driver
The iSCSI driver provides an IP host with the ability to access storage through an IP network. The
iSCSI driver uses iSCSI protocol to transport SCSI requests and responses over an IP network between
the IP host and a Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system. (See also iSCSI.)
iSCSI target
A logical representation of a Fibre Channel (FC) storage device (or devices) that is connected to a Cisco
SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system. An iSCSI target is configured with one or more accompanying
iSCSI LUNs on a Cisco SN 5400 or MDS 9000 Series system. With Cisco Network Boot, an IP host
accesses a boot image contained on the FC storage device mapped as the iSCSI target/LUN.
L
LUN
(Logical Unit Number) A SCSI identifier within a target assigned to each FC accessible disk so that the
host can address and access the data on those devices.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
GL-2
OL-6442-01
Glossary
M
MAC address
(Media Access Control) A standardized data link layer address that is required for every port or device
that connects to a LAN. Other devices in the network use these address to locate specific ports in the
network, and to create and update routing tables and data structures. MAC addresses are 6 bytes long
and are controlled by IEEE.
mapping
Conversion or connection between two data addressing spaces.
master boot host
A host with a directly attached disk drive. The purpose of the master boot host is to create a master boot
image. The master boot image is a source for replicating boot images for other hosts. See also IP host.
master boot image
An initial boot image that is created on the directly attached disk drive of the master boot host. All other
boot images within the iSCSI targets are replicated directly or indirectly from this boot image. See also
boot image.
N
A component in Cisco Network Boot that allows a user to perform Cisco Network Boot administrative
Network Boot
Administration
tasks, including boot image replication, when the master boot host is running a Microsoft Windows
Utility for Microsoft operating system.
Windows
Network Boot
Replication Utility
for Linux
An Open Source application that allows a user to automatically create and format partitions on iSCSI
targets and to perform boot image replication, when the master boot host is running a Linux operating
system and iSCSI driver for Linux. The Replication Utility for Linux and the iSCSI driver for Linux
are both available as Open Source from SourceForge. See the readme files that accompany the software
downloads for detailed configuration and usage information.
network interface
card
A board that provides network communication capabilities to and from a computer system.
NIC
See network interface card.
P
partition
A subdivision of the capacity of a disk. Partitions are consecutively numbered ranges of blocks that are
recognized by MS-DOS, Microsoft Windows, and most UNIX operating systems.
PXE
Preboot Execution Environment (PXE) architecture for booting a client computer. This is an Intel
standard and lies within the system BIOS of a computer. Cisco Network Boot uses this architecture for
the booting process.
PxeCheck
Interactive
An interactive utility, used to troubleshoot PXE errors or other PXE-related problems, from Cisco
Network Boot.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
GL-3
Glossary
R
replicate
(noun) A general term for a copy of a collection of data. (verb) The action of making a replicate. It can
also mean duplicate or copy.
reservation
In DHCP, a method of assigning a static IP address to a client.
ROM
Read-Only memory
S
scope
In DHCP, an administrative grouping of computers running the DHCP Client service. You create a
scope for each subnet on the network to define parameters for that subnet.
SCSI routing
instance
SCSI routing is the routing of SCSI requests and responses between IP hosts in an IP network and
storage devices in an FC storage network. On the Cisco SN 5400 Series system, a SCSI routing instance
provides IP hosts access to FC storage.
storage array
A group of disk drives that collectively acts as a single storage system. Two types of storage arrays are
available: RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) and JBOD (Just a Bunch Of Disks). A RAID
system provides fault tolerance by storing the same data redundantly on multiple disks, but appears as
a single disk. A JBOD is a group of individual disks cabled together in a chassis. JBODs typically
include a redundant power supply and may also include some maintenance capabilities.
T
TFTP
(Trivial File Transfer Protocol). An internet software utility for transferring files, similar to File
Transfer Protocol (FTP). The TFTP service is provided by a server daemon.
Trivial File Transfer
Protocol
See TFTP.
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
GL-4
OL-6442-01
INDEX
Numerics
C
10/100 Ethernet
changing the network
3-6
CIDR style
3-5 to 3-7
classless interdomain routing style
See CIDR style
access list
iSCSI target
modify
name
ix
Cisco switches
A
5-2
collecting configuration information
(worksheets) 2-3 to 2-7
3-11
3-18
command syntax conventions
2-5
completing the replication process
active volume
example
components
3-16
DHCP server
address
angle brackets
1-3
1-3
FC storage devices
See IP address.
IP hosts
ix
1-3
1-3
MDS 9000 Series system
vii
SN 5400 Series system
TFTP server
B
3-18
1-2
attached storage
See also healthy volume.
audience
ix
1-3
1-3
1-3
configuration
basic description
basic network components (table)
boldface font
ix
boldface screen font
boot image
ix
2-4
replication
3-14 to 3-19
See also master boot image.
boot order
changing
saving
3-25
braces
ix
1-3
1-4
items
access list name
boot image
2-4
description
2-7
1-4
2-5
Gigabit Ethernet IP address
host IP address
host name
2-4
IP address
2-7
iSCSI Name
3-25
boot sequence
basics
1-1 to 1-2
2-5, 2-6
2-5
iSCSI port number
2-7
iSCSI target name
2-6
LUN
2-6, 2-7
2-5, 2-6, 2-7
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
IN-1
Index
MAC address
2-7
NIC interface
2-4
NIC IP address
NIC type
creating
DHCP scope
master boot image
2-4
partition
2-4
reservation name
SCSI routing instance IP address
SCSI routing instance name
target’s iSCSI Name
process
3-7 to 3-10
3-14 to 3-15
reservation
2-7
TCP/IP properties
3-20
3-21
2-5
2-5
D
2-7
2-4
destination
3-2
computer name
worksheets
3-18
IP address, example
DHCP server
IP hosts
2-7
target
2-4
SN 5400 Series system and iSCSI targets
TFTP server
3-17
window, example
MDS 9000 Series system and iSCSI targets
2-6
2-5
2-7
3-18
3-17
dhcpd.conf file entries
filename
3-23
gateway IP address
3-24
configuration worksheet-Cisco MDS 9000 Series system
and iSCSI targets (table) 2-6
hardware address of PXE-enabled NIC
configuration worksheet-Cisco SN 5400 Series system and
iSCSI targets (table) 2-5
netmask for DHCP client
configuration worksheet-DHCP and TFTP servers
(table) 2-7
configuration worksheet-IP hosts (table)
system hostname
3-24
3-23
boot information returned
3-23
DHCP server, Microsoft Windows example
IP host to boot from the network
iSCSI targets
3-20
3-25 to 3-26
component
configuration items
error messages
1-4
MDS 9000 Series system
1-4
TFTP server
helper address
host IP address
1-4
2-7
Linux example
1-4
LUN
1-4
2-7, 3-24
confirm replication of volume
3-18
ix
5-7
2-7
3-23
2-7
MAC address
1-4
2-7
3-7
iSCSI port number
3-8
to boot from network
2-7
5-7
iSCSI option format
1-4
SN 5400 Series system
1-4
Gigabit Ethernet IP address
1-4
master boot image replication
network interface
3-24
1-3
configuration worksheet
3-11 to 3-13
master boot image
3-24
DHCP server
1-4
DHCP server, Linux example
conventions
3-24
vendor-specific information
DHCP server
network
3-24
root path to iSCSI target disk
TFTP server address
2-4
configuring
LANs
IP address for DHCP client
3-24
2-7, 3-24
Microsoft Windows example
requirements
3-20
2-2
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
IN-2
OL-6442-01
Index
reservation
F
description
2-7, 3-21
IP address
MAC address
name
FC storage
3-21
1-3
format errors
3-21
5-7
2-7, 3-21
options
3-21, 3-23
root path option
setting up
G
3-22, 3-24
Gigabit Ethernet
3-20 to 3-23
target’s iSCSI Name
document conventions
3-6
2-7
ix
document organization (table)
H
viii
healthy volume
example
E
3-16
See also active volume.
error messages
host
5-5 to 5-13
DHCP iSCSI option format errors
boot sequence
5-7
1-4
iSCSI login
5-9
changing drivers
iSCSI target
5-10
component
network
2-4
configuring NICs with PXE
configuring NIC without PXE
examples
3-8
3-9
configuring to boot from the network
basic network structure
1-2
IP address
Cisco Network Boot overview
destination computer name
destination IP address
destination window
dhcpd.conf file
1-2
name
3-18
3-25
2-5, 2-6, 2-7
2-4
replacing
3-18
5-1
requirements
2-2
3-17
3-25
I
displays
Compaq with an Intel Processor
Dell with an Intel Processor
Intel Eclipse
5-3
5-4
5-3
copying
3-19, 3-20
3-2
installing
3-16
iSCSI driver
3-3
3-8
operating system
iSCSI target configuration
source IP address
inbp.com
installation process
5-3
healthy/active volume
IP address
1-3
configuration worksheet
5-6
Network Boot Administration Utility for Microsoft
Windows replication errors 5-11
normal
5-2
3-18
3-12, 3-13
3-7
IP address
destination
source
3-18
3-18
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
IN-3
Index
IP host
first
See host.
requirements
IP network configuration
IP storage (ips)
1-1
installation
M
3-8
requirements
iSCSI Name
MAC address
2-2
description
2-5
example
iSCSI option format errors
iSCSI port number
iSCSI protocol
5-7
2-7
3-21, 3-24
3-3
master boot host
2-7
3-21, 3-24
maintenance
1-1
changing the network drivers
iSCSI target
general information
access list
2-5
configuration
replacing the host
3-11 to 3-13
with SN 5400 Series system
creating volumes
error messages
3-11
accessing iSCSI targets
3-11, 3-12
access list configuration
3-11
configuring network interfaces
3-12, 3-13
requirements
3-16 to 3-19
master boot image
3-14
2-3
about
2-2
2-2
3-7
MDS 9000 Series system
3-15
ix
configuration
items
J
2-6
verification
3-12
worksheets
2-6
Gigabit Ethernet IP address
JBOD
host IP address
2-3
installation
LUN
5-9
2-6
2-6
3-12
iSCSI target name
L
login, error messages
3-7
1-3
creating
3-22, 3-24
3-8
installing the operating system
operating systems
3-8
3-7
installing the iSCSI driver
3-11
size requirements
3-18
installing applications
5-10
replication limitation
requirements
2-5
2-5, 2-7
minimum size
replication
2-6
3-11, 3-12
example configuration
iSCSI Name
5-1
master boot host
with MDS 9000 Series system
controlling access
5-2
5-2
management session
configuration worksheet
italic font
2-5, 2-6
3-6
iSCSI driver
root path
3-11
2-6
2-6
requirements
2-3
LUN
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
IN-4
OL-6442-01
Index
creating
N
3-14
mark active
NBP
1-2
primary
network
1-2
changing drivers
components
See PXE.
3-5 to 3-6
PXE
1-3
configuration
about
3-5
LAN
3-6
key elements
3-2
requirements
1-2, 2-3
NIC
Network Boot Replication Utility for Linux
Network Bootstrap Program
3-8
1-2
3-9
R
RAID
related documentation
NIC
replacing the host
connection
3-5
x
5-1
Replicate Boot Volume box
2-4
best practices for Microsoft Windows
2-4
PXE enabled
3-8
PXE not enabled
boot images
completion
3-9
3-18
error messages
5-2
normal Cisco Network Boot display
iSCSI target
5-3
process
3-16 to 3-18
3-14
3-14 to 3-15
replicating the boot image to the iSCSI
target 3-16 to 3-18
O
operating systems
1-4, 3-7
requirements
options
DHCP server
3-22
organization of document (table)
iSCSI driver
viii
iSCSI targets
2-2
2-2
2-3, 3-15
iSCSI target size
3-11
master boot host
2-2
MDS 9000 Series system
partition
3-11 to 3-13
5-11
creating a partition
P
3-16
3-14 to 3-19
configuring iSCSI targets
2-4
reservation
3-17
replication
2-4
module name
updating
3-8
See storage array.
See NBP.
IP address
3-8
not enabled
Network Boot Administration Utility for Microsoft
Windows 1-2
interface
1-2
enabled
5-6
IP connections
3-7
Preboot Execution Environment
5-2
checking configuration
type
3-15
PortFast feature
basic structure
errors
3-15
network equipment
2-3
2-3
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
IN-5
Index
operating systems
other hosts
SCSI routing instance
2-2
IP address
2-2
SN 5400 Series system
TFTP server
name
2-3
example
description
example
enabling
2-7
requirements
3-21
3-5
3-5
square brackets
2-4, 2-7, 3-21
3-7
3-5
PortFast feature
3-21
MAC address
ix
storage
3-22
root path
3-17
Spanning Tree Protocol
3-22
Gigabit Ethernet IP address
options
3-18
Source Volumes
2-7, 3-21
IP address
2-5
source IP address
2-2
reservation
name
2-5
target iSCSI Name
2-2
requirements (table)
2-5
array requirements
3-22, 3-24
2-3
for master boot image
iSCSI targets
S
1-3
physical devices
creating
command syntax convention
3-20
options
3-22
screen font
ix
syntax conventions (table)
System Setup
screen font, boldface
IP address
3-25
target destination
2-5
setting up the TFTP server
3-20 to 3-25
3-19
setup.exe
3-17
TCP/IP
properties
2-4, 3-8
text strings, user-defined
command syntax convention
1-2
SN 5400 Series system
access list
1-3
requirements
verification
worksheet
3-11
setting up
2-7
2-2
3-19
troubleshooting
2-5
host IP address
installation
1-3
configuration worksheet
2-5
ix
TFTP server
component
2-5
configuration
LUN
ix
T
2-5
setting up the DHCP server
items
ix
ix
SCSI routing instance
about
1-3
strings, user-defined text
scope
name
1-3
5-2 to 5-13
2-5
3-11
2-5
requirements
2-3
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
IN-6
OL-6442-01
Index
U
user-defined text strings
command syntax convention
ix
V
vertical bars
VLANs
ix
3-6
volume
configuring
new
3-11
3-15
source
3-17
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
OL-6442-01
IN-7
Index
Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide
IN-8
OL-6442-01
Download PDF
Similar pages