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Copyright
This document, as well as the software described in it, is furnished under
license and may be used or copied only in accordance with the terms of
the license. The content of this document is furnished for informational
use only, it is subject to change without notice, and it does not represent a
commitment on the part of Corinex Communications Corp.
Corinex Communications Corp. assumes no responsibility or liability for any
errors or inaccuracies that may appear in this document.
It is our policy to enhance our products as new technologies, hardware
components, software and firmware become available; therefore, the
information contained in this document is subject to change without
notice.
Some features, functions, and operations described in this document
may not be included and sold in certain countries due to government
regulations or marketing policies.
The use of the product or its features described in this document may be
restricted or regulated by law in some countries. If you are unsure which
restrictions or regulations apply, you should consult your regional Corinex
office or the authorized reseller.
Published by:
Corinex Communications Corp.
World Trade Center
404-999 Canada Place
Vancouver, B.C.
Canada V6C 3E2
Tel.: +1 604 692 0520
Fax: +1 604 694 0061
Corinex is a registered trademark of Corinex Communications Corp.
Apple, MAC OS X are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Apple
Computer, Inc. in the U.S.A. and/or other countries.
Microsoft, MS-DOS, MS, Windows are either registered trademarks or
trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the U.S.A. and/or other countries.
All products or company names mentioned herein may be the trademarks of
their respective owners.
Copyright (c) 2001-2003 by Corinex Communications Corp.
2003-10-08 ver.1
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
1
Content
Content
Content ....................................................................................... 2
1. Introduction ............................................................................ 5
1.1 Access Point Overview .......................................................... 5
1.2 Technical Specifications ........................................................ 7
1.3 Package Content ................................................................... 8
Enclosed CD Content ............................................................ 8
1.4 Requirements ....................................................................... 9
1.5 Physical Details .................................................................... 9
Front Panel ........................................................................... 9
LED Definition .................................................................... 10
Rear Panel .......................................................................... 10
Using a different external antenna ...................................... 11
Content of the label on the bottom of the Access Point ....... 12
Environmental Parameters .................................................. 13
Electrical Parameters ........................................................... 13
2. Installation Overview ............................................................. 14
2.1 Step 1: Connecting the Access Point ................................... 15
2.2 Step 2: Configuring the Computers ..................................... 15
A. Using the Powerline Connection ...................................... 16
B. Using the Wireless Connection ......................................... 16
2.3 TCP/IP Settings .................................................................... 17
Configuring Windows XP PCs .............................................. 17
Configuring Windows 98 and Millennium PCs ..................... 21
Configuring Windows 2000 PCs .......................................... 25
Configuring Linux PCs ......................................................... 29
Configuring Macintosh clients ............................................. 35
Configuring other clients .................................................... 37
2.4 Step 3 Configuring the Access Point ................................... 38
3. Access Point Configuration ................................................... 39
3.1 Overview ............................................................................ 39
3.2 Password Entry ................................................................... 40
3.3 Home Tabs .......................................................................... 40
Status ................................................................................. 40
Help ................................................................................... 42
3.4 IP Address Tabs ................................................................... 43
IP Address Settings ............................................................. 43
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
2
Content
3.5 Wireless Tabs ..................................................................... 44
Wireless Settings ................................................................ 44
Security Settings ................................................................ 47
3.6 Powerline Tabs ................................................................... 52
SNMP Agent ...................................................................... 52
Network Encryption Key (NEK) Password Setting .............. 53
Powerline Statistics ............................................................ 54
Powerline Priority Settings ................................................. 55
3.7 Advanced Settings ............................................................. 56
MAC Address Filtering ....................................................... 56
Block Sites ......................................................................... 57
Security Log ....................................................................... 58
3.8 Utilities .............................................................................. 59
Restart Access Point ........................................................... 59
Restore Factory Default ...................................................... 60
Save/Backup Current Settings ............................................ 61
Restore Previous Settings .................................................. 63
Firmware Update ............................................................... 64
System Settings ................................................................. 66
3.9 Powerline Setup Using Corinex Setup Tool ....................... 67
Installing the Setup Tool .................................................... 67
Running the Setup Tool ..................................................... 70
3.10 Setup of Access Point SNMP Powerline Agent on the
OPM Management Station ..................................................... 73
Adding a Local Network .................................................... 74
Adding a Powerline Network ............................................. 75
Adding a Powerline Device ................................................ 77
4. Appendix A: Troubleshooting ............................................... 83
4.1 Troubleshooting Guide ...................................................... 83
4.2 Frequently Asked Questions ............................................ 85
4.3 Corinex Authorized Powerline Partners Program ............... 87
5. Appendix B: Glossary .......................................................... 88
6. Appendix C: How to Ping your ISP’s E-mail and Web
Addresses ................................................................................. 98
6.1 Step One: Pinging an IP Address ....................................... 99
6.2 Step Two: Pinging for a Web Address ................................ 100
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
3
Content
7. Appendix D: Finding the MAC Address and IP Address for
Your Wireless Adapter .......... ............................................. 101
7.1 For Windows 95, 98 and Me ............................................... 101
7.2 For Windows NT, 2000 and XP ........................................... 102
7.3 For Linux PC ....................................................................... 103
7.4 For Macintosh OS X computer ............................................ 105
Index ........................................................................................ 107
4
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Introduction / Access Point Overview
1 Introduction
Congratulations! Thank you for choosing the Corinex Wireless to Powerline
Access Point. The Access Point allows you to create a home or small
business network to share your high-speed Internet connection using a
Wireless connection.
1.1 Access Point Overview
Wireless to powerline local area network (LAN) solutions based on Corinex
Wireless to Powerline Access Point products, connect a wireless device to
the electrical wire in a premises. The electrical wires build the "backbone"
for other "wired" devices on the network, which are connected to this
backbone by Corinex powerline adapters. Any high-performance Corinex
Wireless to Powerline Access Point extends the coverage of your network
of electrical wires and provides access to the Internet and corporate or
personal information from all mobile devices without additional expensive
cabling infrastructure. The Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point
supports 802.11b standard based wireless client devices and the entirely
new designed and enhanced Corinex Powerline products family, consisting
of:
• Corinex Powerline Ethernet Adapter
• Corinex Powerline USB Adapter
• Corinex Powerline Ethernet Wall Mount
• Corinex CableLAN Adapter
• Corinex Powerline Router
The combination of the Corinex powerline and the wireless access point
technology enhances the capabilities of WLAN technology and maximizes
area coverage by utilizing existing electrical "wires" infrastructure to provide
a costs effective network deployment to any room where a connection to
wireless devices based upon the 802.11b technology is desirable.
General Description
The Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point fully complies with the
IEEE 802.11b and the HomePlug 1.0.1 standards. This means that the
wireless access point is fully interoperable with all other 802.11b compliant
products. The access point uses microwave technology operating in the
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
5
Access Point Overview
license-free 2.4 GHz band and offers bridging mode operation, DHCP
client and IP filtering functionalities. A dual (one external and one internal)
dipole antenna provides superior polarized reception and diversity. The
Access Point’s power jack is the connecting medium to the 14 Mbps
digital powerline communication network based on the HomePlug 1.0.1
standard. This allows the easiest installation of a wireless HotSpot area
where every power outlet can be used as the powerline network interface
to the access point.
Reliable Data Throughput
The highest possible data throughput at any moment is obtained by
dynamic rate scaling at a maximum of 11 Mbps, 5.5 Mbps, 2 Mbps and
1 Mbps, determined by the wireless connection. The dynamic rate scaling
broadens the range of the connectivity by decreasing the speed of digital
signal strength. Therefore the maximum speed on the network is 14 Mbps
within the Powerline segment of the powerline network.
Networking Security
The wireless access point provides a standard 40 bit Wired Equivalent
Privacy (WEP) encryption for enhanced data privacy for wireless network
segment and uses 64/128 bit WEP (Wireless) and 56 bit DES (Powerline)
link encryption with key management for secured communication over
the powerline network segment. By using DSSS (wireless) and OFDM
(powerline) technologies, data corruption, interference and unauthorized
detection are minimized.
The Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point contains HTTP server
with a web configurable SNMP powerline agent*. This enables you to
connect to it and to configure it by using your web browser. Every Corinex
Powerline, CableLAN and Wireless product, no matter where it is located
in the network, can be managed by Corinex Open Powerline Management
software or by using a web browser. This represents an ideal networking
management solution for homes, small medium size offices, schools,
hospitals, hotels and retail outlets, without pulling a new wires.
End user equipment, which uses Corinex adapters to connect to the
network can run on Windows 98/ME/2000/NT/XP, Linux and MAC OsX
operating systems and uses the full range of the Access Point networking
features.
*see chapter 3.6 and 3.10 for more details
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
6
Technical Specifications
1.2 Technical Specifications
Standard support
Interface
Modulation
MAC protocol
IEEE 802.11b
HomePlug Powerline Alliance Specification 1.0,
1.0.1
Wireless IEEE 802.11b
One DC power pin for both Powerline networking
and power supply
Powerline: OFDM / DQPSK / DBPSK
Wireless: DBPSK, DQPSK, CCK
Powerline: CSMA/CA
Wireless: CSMA/CA
Max.Bandwidth
Up to 14 Mbps
Powerline
11, 5.5, 2 and 1 Mbps, Auto Fall-Back
Wireless
Powerline Frequency
4.5 MHz to 21 MHz (HomePlug 1.0.1)
Range
− WiFi: DHCP Client
− Powerline: DHCP Server. Assign IP by range
(1~254)
− Adjustable DHCP IP range
DHCP
− IP Address Reservation
− Display DHCP Table (Computer Name,
IP Address, MAC Address)
Manual Refresh
Data Rate
1, 2, 5.5, 11 Mbps
Signal Frequency
DBPSK, DQPSK, CCK
Encryption
64bit and 128bit WEP data encryption
802.1x and WPA data encryption
Wireless Port
Channel
Properties
America/FCC˚2.412~2.462 GHz (11 channels)
Europe CE/ETSI˚2.412~2.472 GHz (13 channels)
Japan ˚2.412~2.484 GHz (14 channels)
France˚ 2.457~2.472 GHz(4 channels)
Spain: 2.457~2.462 GHz (2 channels)
RF Power Output: 20 dBm (typical)
Receiver Sensitivity: -82dBm @11Mbps,
PER<8*10-2
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
7
Technical Specifications / Package Content
Software / Firmware
Security
Forwarding Mode
Antenna
Cable
Power
Dimensions (WxDxL)
Weight
AP and Client mode support
DHCP Client
Channel Selection
Supports WEP (authentication and encryption)
Web-based configuration via popular browser
SIE, Netscape…)
− Firmware downloads and upgrades via web
server
− Reset to default by web server or hardware
button
Powerline: 56-bit DES using cipher block chaining
Wireless: Hardware-based 40/64-bit & 128-bit
WEP encryption, 802.1x and WPA encryption type
Store and Forward
Detachable SMA type antenna, 2 dB
One DC power connector for both powerline
networking and power supply
External Power Supply 6.3 VDC, 1 A
148,01mm x 106,47mm X 52,62mm
280 g
−
−
−
−
−
1.3 Package Content
When you receive your Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point, check
to be sure that your package contains:
• Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point
• Detachable wireless antenna
• AC adapter
• Installation CD-ROM with User Guide
• Quick Installation Guide
As we do constant improvement of our products, it can happen that we
have newer versions of software tools included on the installation CD. If
you want to check and/or download the latest versions of software for your
Corinex product, just click the www.corinex.com/download
Enclosed CD Content:
- Access Point Quick Start Guide
- Access Point User Guide (this document)
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
8
Requirement / Physical Details
-
Powerline Setup Tool for Windows, MAC OS X and Linux
Acrobat Reader
1.4 Requirements
• IBM Compatible PC or Macintosh computer (needed for initial
configuration the Access Point)
• AC 220/110 V power outlet
• Powerline and/or Wireless connection for each computer
• Windows 98/ME/200/NT/XP, Mac OS X or Linux operating system
• Web browser supporting JavaScript for Access Point
management
1.5 Physical Details
9
Fig. 1.1 Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point
Front Panel
Fig. 1.2 Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point Front Scheme
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Physical Details
LED Definition:
System
POWER:
Green
On:
Off:
TEST:
Yellow
On:
Off:
Powerline
LINK:
Green
On:
Off:
ACT:
Yellow
Off:
Blinking:
Wireless
LINK:
Green
On:
Blinking:
Power On
Power Off
The system is initializing
The system is ready and running
Good Link to the powerline network
No Link
No data transmit to powerline
Receiving/Transmitting data
Indicating the wireless port is initialization
Receiving/Transmitting data via WLAN
Rear Panel
Fig. 1.3 Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point Back Scheme
Reset Switch
Push = reboot
Restoring the factory default settings by pressing the Reset button
for 10 seconds.
Antenna connector
For linking to wireless devices based upon the 802.11b standard.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
10
Physical Details
Power Inlet
The device is equipped with an external power supply. Connect the
power cord supplied with the device. This connection acts for both,
the Powerline network connection and the power supply.
Using a different external antenna
Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point uses two types of antennas:
one internal and one external. The external one is a small (2dB) detachable
omni-directional antenna suitable for indoor installations and limited
distances (supplied with each Access Point).
If you want to increase the signal coverage, you can use some of the wide
variety of antennas with higher gain and connect it to the Access Point.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point can offer the following typical
wireless performance characteristics:
11
Fig 1.4. Using a different external antenna
As important as your antenna it will provide little comfort when you are
about to install your wireless devices without the appropriate cabling,
connectors and accessories.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Physical Details
Content of the label on the bottom of the Access Point
Here you can confirm the voltage and current values for your Access Point.
You can also read 2 MAC Addresses (WLAN, PLC) and serial number (SN), as
well as network password required for remote powerline password change
as defined in the Corinex Open Powerline Management Software.
US and CAN label version:
12
Fig. 1.5 Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point Safety Label for
US & CAN
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Physical Details
Euro, UK and Australian label version:
13
Fig. 1.6 Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point Safety Label for
UK, EU & AUS
Environmental Parameters
Operation
Operational Temperature:
Relative Humidity:
Storage
Temperature:
Relevant Humidity:
Altitude:
Electrical Parameters
AC Power
Input Voltage:
Line Frequency:
0~40°C (32~104°F)
10%~90% non-condensing
-25~75°C (-13~167°F)
0%~95% non-condensing
Sea level to 40,000 feet
External Power Supply 6.3VDC, 1A with
four different plugs
USA, Europe, UK, AUS (100 – 130 V for the
US and 210 - 240V for Europe, UK, AUS)
60/50Hz (USA / Europe)
Power Output to AP: 6.3VDC, 1A
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Installation Overview
2 Installation Overview
This Guide will assist you for the first time with the successful installation
and configuration of your Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point. It will
help you with basic settings, which are covering most of the settings you
may need to configure for your Internet connection to be shared through
the Powerline medium. If you however require a more sophisticated setup,
we advise you to read the Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point User
Guide, which is enclosed in the Installation CD.
14
Fig. 1.7 Installation Overview
The next chapters will explain to you how to connect your Corinex Wireless
to Powerline Access Point in three easy steps.
Step 1: Connecting the Access Point – First you need to connect the
Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point to the power.
Step 2: Configuring the Computers – Then you need to connect the
computers to the Access Point, in order to be able to configure the settings
of the Access Point. These steps differ between Wireless and Powerline
connection and they also differ between different sorts of operating
systems and computers.
Step 3: Configuring the Access Point – The last step required is to
configure your Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point settings
according to your Internet connection.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Step 1: Connecting the Access Point
2.1 Step 1: Connecting the Access Point
A. Locate an optimum location for the Corinex Wireless to Powerline
Access Point. The best place for the Access Point is usually at the center of
your wireless network, with line of sight to all of your mobile stations.
B. Fix the direction of the antenna. Try to place it in a position best covering
your wireless network.
C. Plug the supplied AC power adapter to the Corinex Wireless to Powerline
Access Point and after that, into an AC outlet.
Note: Use only the power adapter supplied with the Access Point.
Usage of a different adapter may result in product damage!
After the Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point is powered ON, verify
LED functionality described below:
• The LED on the Powerline side labelled LINK should be ON
• The LED on the Wireless side labelled POWER should be ON
Note: All other wireless devices must be operating in the infrastructure
mode, so that they can communicate with the Access Point. If any
wireless device is configured in the ad-hoc mode, it will not be
recognized by the Access Point.
2.2 Step 2: Configuring the Computers
The instructions in this chapter will help you to configure each of your
computers to be able to communicate with the Corinex Wireless to
Powerline AP. This process differs between wireless connected computers
and powerline connected computers, and it also depends on the operating
systems.
If you have a wireless connected computer, proceed to B, if you have a
powerline connected computer proceed to A.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
15
Step 2: Configuring the Computers
A. Using the Powerline Connection
We advise you to read and use the manual of your powerline adapter
to establish a powerline connection between the Corinex Wireless to
Powerline Access Point and a Powerline Adapter. Use the default Powerline
(NEK) password "HomePlug", as this is the factory default password setting
for the Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point. When you are using
the Corinex Setup Tool to configure your powerline adapter, you can
check, whether your Adapter has a powerline connection to the Corinex
Wireless to Powerline Access Point by searching for the MAC addresses
of the Access Point in the last window of the Corinex Setup Tool. You will
find the correct MAC address of your Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access
Point also on the label on the bottom of the Access Point’s plastic cover
(MAC PLC / SN).
16
Fig. 2.1 Corinex Setup Tool
B. Using the Wireless Connection
You may need to reconfigure some wireless settings to ensure that all
settings match between wireless devices.
Note: Different wireless settings will disable successful wireless network
connections between wireless adapters.
Default Wireless Interface Settings are:
SSID: Corinex
Channel: 11
WEP: Disabled
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
TCP/IP Settings
Note: WEP is disabled by default for an easier installation. For enhanced
security purposes, it is recommended that you later (after successful
configuration) enable WEP on all wireless devices.
Find out which operating system is running your computer, like Windows
95, 98, Millennium, 2000, XP, Linux or Macintosh OS X or any other
operating system. Then follow the instructions for configuring the TCP/IP
networking for your system in the following section.
2.3 TCP/IP Settings
Configuring Windows XP PCs
1. Click the Start button, then open the Control Panel. From here,
click the Network Connections icon and then the Network
Connections window appears.
2. Select the Local Area Connection icon for the applicable adapter
(Wireless adapter, if you are wireless connected or Powerline
Adapter if you are powerline connected. It is usually the first
adapter listed). Double-click the Local Area Connection.
Fig. 2.2 Local Area Connection Status
3. The Local Area Connection Status screen will appear. Click the
Properties button.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
17
TCP/IP Settings
4. Select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click the Properties button.
18
Fig. 2.3 Local Area Connection Properties
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
TCP/IP Settings
5. Select Obtain an IP address automatically and click the OK
button. Click the OK button again (or the Close button if any
settings were changed) to complete the computer configuration.
19
Fig. 2.4 Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
TCP/IP Settings
6. If you do not have DHCP server on the network, then select Use the
following IP address. Set the IP address manually in the shape
192.168.1.X and mask 255.255.255.0 of local TCP/IP settings and
click the OK button. On the next appearing screen click the OK
button again.
20
Fig. 2.5 Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
TCP/IP Settings
Configuring Windows 98 and Millennium PCs
1. Go to the network screen by clicking the Start button. Click
Settings and then Control Panel. From there, double-click the
Network icon.
2. On the Configuration tab, select the TCP/IP line for the applicable
Ethernet adapter, as shown in Figure 2.6.
21
Fig. 2.6 Local Network
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
TCP/IP Settings
Do not choose a TCP/IP entry that mention DUN, PPPoE, VPN, or
AOL names. If the word TCP/IP appears by itself, select this line. (If
there is no TCP/IP line listed, refer to Appendix D: Installing the TCP/
IP Protocol or your Ethernet Adapter’s User Guide to install TCP/IP
now.) Click the Properties button.
3. Click the IP Address tab and select Obtain an IP address
automatically, as shown in Figure 2.7.
22
Fig. 2.7 Obtain the IP Address
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
TCP/IP Settings
4. If you do not have DHCP server on the network, then select Use the
following IP address. Set the IP address manually in the shape
192.168.1.X and mask 255.255.255.0 of local TCP/IP settings and
click the OK button.
23
Fig. 2.8 Set the IP Address
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
TCP/IP Settings
5. Now click the Gateway tab to ensure that the Installed Gateway
field is left blank. Click the OK button.
24
Fig. 2.9 TCP/IP Properties Gateway
6. Click the OK button again. Windows may ask you for the original
Windows installation disk or additional files. Supply them by
pointing to the correct file location, e.g., D:\win98, D:\win9x, c:
\windows\options\cabs, etc. (if "D" is the letter of your CD-ROM
drive).
7. Windows may ask you to restart your PC. Click the Yes button.
If Windows does not ask you to restart, restart your computer
anyway.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
TCP/IP Settings
Configuring Windows 2000 PCs
1. Go to the network screen by clicking the Start button. Click
Settings and then Control Panel. From there, double-click the
Network and Dial-up Connections icon.
2. Select the Network and Dial-up Connections icon for the
applicable Ethernet adapter (usually it is the first Local Area
Connection listed). Do not choose a TCP/IP entry which name
mentions DUN, PPPoE, VPN, or AOL. Double click the Local Area
Connection.
3. The Local Area Connection Status screen will appear, as shown in
Figure 2.10. Click the Properties button.
25
Fig. 2.10 Local Area Connection Status
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
TCP/IP Settings
4.
Select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), as shown in Figure 2.11, and
click the Properties button.
26
Fig. 2.11 Local Area Connection Properties
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
TCP/IP Settings
5. Obtain an IP address automatically, as shown in Figure 2.12, then
click the OK button.
27
Fig. 2.12 Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
TCP/IP Settings
6. If you do not have DHCP server on the network, then select Use the
following IP address. Set the IP address manually in the shape
192.168.1.X and mask 255.255.255.0 of local TCP/IP settings and
click the OK button. On the next appearing screen click the OK
button again.
28
Fig. 2.13 Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties
7. Wait for a few seconds.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
TCP/IP Settings
Configuring Linux PCs
To access the Internet via the Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point,
it is sufficient to set the Access Point as the "Gateway" only. Setup differs
between various Linux distributions, we give the Mandrake as an example.
Check your distribution channel, how to change IP settings.
Note: Ensure that you are logged in as "root" before attempting any
changes, or you will be asked for root login and password later during
configuration.
DHCP Client (recommended)
The procedure below may vary according to your version of Linux and Xwindows shell.
1. Start your X Windows Shell
29
Fig. 2.14 Configuring Linux
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
TCP/IP Settings
2. Select Control Center (Fig. 2.14). If you are not logged as root, the
following screen will appear. Enter your root password.
Fig. 2.15 Entering Root Password
3. The following screen (Fig. 2.16) will appear. Select Network &
Internet.
30
Fig. 2.16 Configuring Linux Control Center
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
TCP/IP Settings
4. In the following screen (Fig. 2.17) select DrakConnect (for setting
up network & internet connection).
Fig. 2.17 Configuring Linux Control Center
5. Select the Interface entry for your Network card. Generally, this
will be called "eth1".
Fig. 2.18 Configuring Configuration Wizard
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
31
TCP/IP Settings
6.
Click the Wizard button then on next dialogue click the Next button.
Select LAN connection (Fig.2.19) and click the Next button.
Fig.2.19 Network Configuration Wizard Choosing the Connection Type
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
32
TCP/IP Settings
7. On the next screen select Automatic IP. Click on the Next buttons
on all screens until you click Finish.
33
Fig. 2.20 Network Configuration Wizard
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
TCP/IP Settings
Fixed IP Address
By default, most Linux installations use a fixed IP Address. If you wish to
continue by using a fixed IP Address, make the following changes in your
configuration.
• Set your "Default Gateway" to the IP Address of the Corinex
Wireless to Powerline Access Point
• Ensure your Domain Name Server (DNS) settings are correct.
34
Fig. 2.21 Network Configuration Wizard Static IP Address
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
TCP/IP Settings
Configuring Macintosh Clients
By using of Macintosh computers the procedure is running as follows:
1. Open the Network Control Panel in System Preferences
35
Fig. 2.22 System Preferences
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
TCP/IP Settings
2. Select Ethernet from the pop-up menu
Fig. 2.23 Network
3. Select Using DHCP from the TCP/IP tab, field Configure. The DHCP
Client ID field can be left blank.
Fig. 2.24 Network TCP/IP Using DHCP
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
36
TCP/IP Settings
4. Close the Network panel and save your settings.
Note: If using manually assigned IP addresses instead of DHCP, the
required changes are following:
• Set Router Address field to the Corinex Wireless to
Powerline Access Point IP address
• Ensure your DNS settings are correct
37
Fig. 2.25 Network TCP/IP - Manually
Configuring other clients
For fixed IP Addresses:
Ensure the Gateway field for your network port is set to IP Address of the
Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point
Ensure your DNS (Domain Name Server) settings are correct
For DHCP:
Ensure the TCP/IP address settings of your network port are set to DHCP or
Automatic
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Step 3: Configuring the Access Point
2.4 Step 3: Configuring the Access Point
In this Step, you will configure the Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access
Point.
A. Open your web browser. (You can get an error message at this point.
Ignore it.) Enter http://192.168.1.1 in the web browser’s Address field.
Press the Enter key and the Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point
Web-based configuration Utility will start.
Fig. 2.26 HTTP Address Field
B. A window requiring to enter your password will appear. Enter password
in lowercase letters in the Password field ("password" is the default
password). Then, click the Submit button.
Note: The Configuration Utility is used to configure both the wireless
and powerline aspects of your Access Point.
38
Fig. 2.27 Login
C. The Access Point configuration screen will appear. The Status screen will
allow you to review your settings (Firmware Version, Device Name, IP
Settings and Wireless Settings).
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Access Point Configuration / Overview
3 Access Point Configuration
3.1 Overview
For your convenience, use the Access Point’s web-based utility to administer
it. This chapter will explain all of the functions of this utility. The utility can
be accessed via Microsoft Internet Explorer or Netscape Navigator by the
use of wireless, or powerline computer connection to the Access Point. This
utility has a consistent design for all of its screens. It consists of the screen
selection tabs on the left screen side and the display screen.
39
TABS
SCREEN
Fig. 3.1 TABS and SCREEN
As you click on the selection tabs, different screens will be displayed.
For a network setup, most of the users have to use the following tab of the
utility only:
• System Settings/Password. The Access Point’s default password is
"password". To secure the Access Point, change the Password from its
default.
The IP Address, Wireless, Powerline, Advanced Settings and Utilities
tabs are available for setup of the Access Point. Each of these tabs groups
several similar settings, from which you can choose to access display
screens.
The display screen consists of one or more entry fields containing current
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Password Entry / Home Tabs
values of the settings. You can configure the Access Point by changing
these values. Most of the screens have a Submit Query button along with
the Reset Button on the bottom of the screen. The Submit query button
will enter the settings from the screen into the Access Point. The Reset
button will set to zero/blank all changes and then return focus to the 1st or
previous field on the screen.
3.2 Password Entry
To access the web-based utility of the Access Point, launch Internet Explorer
or Netscape Navigator and enter the Access Point’s default IP address,
192.168.1.1, in the Address field, as shown in Figure 3.2, and press
Enter.
Fig. 3.2 HTTP Address Field
The login screen shown in Figure 2.27 will pop up. Enter "password" in the
Password field. Then click the Submit button.
40
3.3 Home Tabs
Status
Select the Status tab from the Home tabs. The following screen will
appear:
Fig. 3.3 Status Table
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Home Tabs
Version Info displays the information about:
−
−
Firmware version It shows the firmware version of Access Point.
Device Name It shows the alias name of Access Point.
This information can be valuable, if you contact Corinex Technical
Support.
The Settings give you an overview of the IP settings of your Access Point.
−
−
−
−
IP Address It shows the IP address of Access Point.
Subnet Mask It shows the IP subnet mask of Access Point.
Default Gateway It shows the default gateway setting for the
outgoing data packets.
DHCP Client It shows the DHCP status of Access Point.
The Wireless section informs you about:
− SSID It shows the SSID of this Access Point. The SSID is the unique
name for Access Point and is shared among its service area, so that
all devices can recognize each other.
− Channel Number It shows the wireless channel that is currently
connected.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
41
Home Tabs
Help
Select the Help tab from the Home tabs. The following screen will
appear:
Fig. 3.4 Help Table
This is a help system online for your convenience. You can scroll down until
you will find the explanation of the term you are interested in, or you can
click on the top pointer to reach the top of the help system page.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
42
IP Address Tabs
3.4 IP Address Tabs
IP Address Settings
Select the IP Address tab from the IP Address tab. The following screen
will appear:
43
Fig. 3.5 IP Setting
On this page you can configure the IP Address, Subnet Mask and
Default Gateway used by the Web server running on this Access Point.
You can change the IP address of your Access Point. The default value is
192.168.1.1, mask 255.255.255.0. If "DHCP Client" is not enabled, the
IP address settings are set here. Otherwise, these settings are supplied
by a DHCP server on your network. If you have changed any settings it is
necessary to reboot the Access Point for the new settings to take effect.
After you have entered the values in this screen, you can set them up by
clicking the Apply button.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Wireless Tabs
3.5 Wireless Tabs
Wireless Settings
This page is used to configure the parameters for the wireless LAN clients
that may connect them selves to your Access Point. You may need to
reconfigure some wireless settings to ensure that all settings match
between wireless devices in the following situations:
• You are also using another manufacturer’s wireless products
• The Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point is being installed in
existing wireless network.
Here you may change wireless encryption settings as well as wireless
network parameters.
44
Fig. 3.6 Wireless Settings
Regulation Domain
It is illegal to use this device in any location outside of the regulatory
domain.
WLAN Interface
Check to enable, uncheck to disable the WLAN data transmission.
Reject Broadcast probe
For security purposes, this selection can be disabled, allowing only those
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Wireless Tabs
wireless network adapters with the Access Point’s SSID to communicate
with the Access Point. By default, this selection is enabled, allowing all
wireless network adapters in your wireless network to communicate with
the Access Point.
Click to enable or disable the SSID broadcast function.
Channel ID
Select the wireless communication channel from the pull-down menu. You
can choose between auto selection or you can choose one specific channel.
The default frequency channel is Channel 11.
SSID
It is the wireless network name. This unique name is shared among all
points in your wireless network. The SSID can be 32 bytes long. The default
value is Corinex.
Note: The SSID is case sensitive.
Access Point Name
It is the alias name of Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point. On your
PC, some Wireless status screens may display this name as the name of the
Access Point in use. The alias name can be 32 characters long.
Basic Rates
The basic rate is the minimum speed at which a wireless client is allowed to
connect to the Access Point.
Select the transmission data rate from the pull-down menu. The data rate
can be auto-select, 11 Mb, 5.5 Mb, 2 Mb or 1 Mbps
Data Rates
The transmission rates should be set depending on the speed of your
wireless network. You must select 1-2 (Mbps), if you have older wireless
802.11 compliant equipment on your network, such as wireless adapters
that support only 1 or 2 Mbps rates. Selection of 1-2 (Mbps) does not limit
the transmission rates of faster adapters. Select the transmission data rate
from pull-down menu. Data rate can be auto-selected, 11 Mb, 5.5 Mb,
2 Mb or 1 Mbps.
Preamble Type
The preamble defines the length of the CRC block for communication
between the Access Point and a roaming wireless network adapter. (High
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
45
Wireless Tabs
network traffic areas should use the shorter preamble type.) Click to select
the Long Preamble or Short Preamble support on the wireless data
packet transmission.
All wireless points (nodes) on your network must use the same preamble
type.
Beacon Interval
This value indicates the frequency interval of the beacon. A beacon is a
packet broadcasted by Access Point to keep the network synchronized. A
beacon includes wireless LAN service area, Access Point address, broadcast
destination addresses, time stamp, Delivery Traffic Indicator Maps, and
Traffic Indicator Message (TIM).
Set the Beacon Interval, value can be written between 20 and 1024 ms.
RTS Threshold
This value should remain at its default setting of 2000. Should you encounter
inconsistent data flow, only minor reductions are recommended.
Set the RTS Threshold, value can be written between 0 and 2347 bytes.
Fragment Threshold
This value specifies the maximum size for a packet before data fragmentation
into multiple packets. It should remain at its default setting of 0. A smaller
setting means smaller packets, which will create more packets for each
transmission. Only minor reductions of this value are recommended.
Set the data packet fragmentation threshold, value can be written between
256 and 2346 bytes.
After you have entered the values in this screen, you can set them up by
clicking Apply button.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
46
Wireless Tabs
Security Settings
Select the Security Settings tab from the Wireless tabs. From following
appearing screen you will set the encryption type for your wireless
network.
47
Fig. 3.7 Security Settings
The Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point provides three levels of
security: authentication, privacy and access authorization. The first level
consists of checking and issuing the user’s authentication by EAP, PSK and
802.1x, similar to the Windows XP authentication process. The second one
is encrypting user’s data with WEP, TKIP or AES encryption algorithms.
Finally, granting the data access privilege is offered by exchanging a specific
key under the 802.1x method only after level the user authentication.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Wireless Tabs
Type
Authentication Type
You may choose between Open System, Shared Key, Both Type,
802.1xEAP or 802.1xPSK. The Authentication Type default is set to Open
System. Shared Key is when both the sender and the recipient share a
secret key. All points on your network must use the same authentication
type. It is recommended that you use the default setting.
Encryption Type
You may choose between None, WEP, 802.1xKey, TKIP, AES. The
Encryption Type default is set to None. If None (default), data are NOT
encrypted before being transmitted.
WEP
WEP Type
WEP (64-bit (10 hex digits)/128-bit (26 hex digits)). In order to utilize
WEP encryption, select the WEP Encryption Type setting from the pulldown menu. If you do not wish to utilize WEP encryption, make sure
Encryption Type is selected None.
You may choose between 64 or 128 WEP Encryption Type
•
64 Bit Encryption
If selected, Encryption Type – WEP and WEP Type - 64, by using the
default key, before being transmitted. The receiving station must be set to
use 64 Bit Encryption, and set the same key value in the same position in its
key table. Otherwise, it will not be able to decrypt the data.
•
128 Bit Encryption
If selected, Encryption Type – WEP and WEP Type – 128, by using the
default key, before being transmitted. The receiving station must be set to
use 128 Bit Encryption, and have the same key value. Otherwise, it will not
be able to decrypt the data.
Active Key
Select the key you wish to use. Other stations must have the same key
values. Transmitted data are ALWAYS encrypted by using the Active Key,
the other keys are for decryption only.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
48
Wireless Tabs
Key Table
This table is used during encryption and decryption of data. All stations,
including this Access Point, always transmit encrypted data using their
default key. The key number (1, 2, 3, 4) is also transmitted. The receiving
station will use the key number (1, 2, 3, 4) to determine which key value to
use for decryption. If the key value does not match the transmitting station,
decryption will fail. The easiest way to ensure there are no problems is to
let every Station, including the Access Point, to use the same key table (all
entries identical).
Key 1 – Key 4.
WEP keys enable you to create an encryption scheme for wireless LAN
transmissions. Manually enter a set of values. (Do not leave the field blank)
If you use 64-bit WEP encryption, then each key must consist of exactly 10
hexadecimal characters in length. If you use 128-bit WEP encryption, then
each key must consist of exactly 26 hexadecimal characters in length. Valid
hexadecimal characters are "0"-"9" and "A"-"F".
Encryption Key 1 Secret key 1 of WEP security encryption function.
Encryption Key 2 Secret key 2 of WEP security encryption function.
Encryption Key 3 Secret key 3 of WEP security encryption function.
Encryption Key 4 Secret key 4 of WEP security encryption function.
802.1x
Known as .1x, this is the key exchange standard used between a client and
Access Point for user’s authentication process. Configuration for a large
network is much easier since individual WEP settings for each client are
no longer required. In addition, access management is performed easily in
the RADIUS server environment, making this feature valuable for network
administration.
ReAuthEnabled
You may choose between True or False. The encryption Type default is set
to False.
ReAuthPeriod
In this field you can set the encryption period. Value can be 5 digits of
alphanumeric characters. When a client requests a communication with
Access Point, the Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point reports its
own MAC address to the RADIUS server and asks for communication
approval to the client. Once the client is recognized by RADIUS, the RADIUS
issues a key to the Access Point as well as to the client for initiation of
communication.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
49
Wireless Tabs
Radius IP
In this field you can set the IP address of the RADIUS server.
Secret
The shared secret key should be used between the Access Point and the
RADIUS server. Value can be 32 digits of alphanumeric characters.
WPA Configuration
Configure WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access) setting. Do not use the WPA
function if the WEP encryption is selected from Authentication Type
field.
Support Station
You may choose between WPA, 1X, WPA+1X, WEP, WPA+WEP, 1X+WEP
or WPA+1X+WEP type of supported station.
To support the gradual transition of WEP-based wireless networks to
WPA, a wireless Access Point can support both WEP, 802.1X and WPA
clients at the same time. During the association, the wireless Access Point
determines which clients use WEP, 802.1X and which clients use WPA. The
disadvantage to support a mixture of WEP, 802.1X and WPA clients is that
the global encryption key is not dynamic. This is because WEP-based clients
cannot support it. All other benefits to the WPA clients are maintained, like
integrity.
WPA
Authorized client by RADIUS server can access this Access Point. RADIUS
Server and RADIUS Key should be entered. You should select either TKIP
(Temporal Key Integrity Protocol) or AES (Advanced Encryption Standard)
from Unicast Cipher field.
Unicast Cipher
You may choose between TKIP, AES or TKIP+AES
Key Interval
In this field you can set the Key Interval. Value can be 5 digits of
alphanumeric characters.
PSK (HEX)
Clients access this Access Point by PSK (Pre-Shared Key) without RADIUS
authorization. You should select either TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity
Protocol) or AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) from Unicast Cipher
field.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
50
Wireless Tabs
Example of WPA key is PSK (Pre-Shared Key), it must be composed of
at least 8 characters, but no more than 63 characters. The following
characters are acceptable for a WPA-PSK key: Upper case letters, lower case
letters, numbers, spaces, punctuation <>?=+&%
Note: WPA keys are case sensitive.
Use passphrash
Check to enable, uncheck to disable the wireless Passphrase. Passphrase
can be used for WPA and PSK encryption type only.
Press Apply button, if you want to enter the values in the Access Point.
51
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Powerline Tabs
3.6 Powerline Tabs
SNMP Agent*
Select the SNMP Agent tab from the Powerline tabs. The following screen
will appear:
52
Fig. 3.8 SNMP Agent
You can enable the SNMP Agent for SNMP management software (like the
Corinex Open Powerline Management Software) by checking the SNMP
Agent Enabled checkbox. Then you can change the Read Community
and Write Community strings in the corresponding fields. Default values
are public and netman, and we recommend you to change them, as they
are well known and enable to configure your Access Point from other
computers. If you want to manage your Router from the WAN port, you
have to check the Enable SNMP for WAN checkbox.
After you have entered the values in this screen, you can set them up by
clicking on the Accept button.
* If you want to have an SNMP capable device, get the necessary information on our web site
www.corinex.com: Go to the section Support and from the product list choose the Wireless
to Powerline Access Point.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Powerline Tabs
Network Encryption Key (NEK) Password Setting
Select the Network Encryption Key password setting tab from the
Powerline tabs. The following screen will appear:
Fig. 3.9 NEK Setting
The Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point is configured to work
seamlessly with other Corinex Powerline products right out of the box.
All Powerline devices must use the same Powerline Password, if they
should communicate together over powerline.
If necessary, reconfigure some devices to ensure that all devices have the
same passwords.
Note: For Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point, the default
Network Encryption Key is "HomePlug". The 56-bit DES encryption is
always enabled for Powerline data security as default.
This screen enables you to change the powerline password settings of the
embedded powerline adapter in the Access Point. You can choose which
adapter you want to configure in the Local Powerline Adapter field, and
then choose if you want to encrypt frames in the Encrypt frames checkbox.
If you have already selected Encrypt frames, you can enter the powerline
password for your adapter, the password can be 4-24 characters long.
Press Apply button, if you want to enter the values in the Access Point.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
53
Powerline Tabs
Powerline Statistics
Select the Powerline Statistics tab from the Powerline tabs. The following
screen will appear:
Fig. 3.10 Powerline Statistics
You can see the throughput as measured with the powerline protocol for
all adapters that Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point can reach in
the powerline network. Press Refresh button, if you want to update this
information.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
54
Powerline Tabs
Powerline Priority Settings
Select the Powerline Priority Settings tab from the Powerline tabs. The
following screen will appear:
Fig. 3.11 Powerline Priority Settings
This screen enables you to change the powerline priority settings of the
embedded powerline adapter in the Access Point. You can choose which
adapter you want to configure in the Local Powerline Adapter field, then
choose a level of priority from Low to Above High. Press Apply, if you
want to assign priority to the selected adapter/interface.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
55
Advanced Settings
3.7 Advanced Settings
MAC Address Filtering
Select the MAC Address Filtering tab from the Advanced Settings tabs.
The following screen will appear:
56
Fig. 3.12 MAC Address Filtering
If you want to limit access to the WAN for computer/hosts based on their
MAC addresses, you can perform it in this screen by:
- In the first step select the Enable MAC Address Filtering field and
then by adding the MAC Address,
- Following up the second step check the Block checkbox for that
machine and press Add button.
This way you can enter multiple MAC addresses.
After you have entered the values in this screen, you can set them up by
clicking the Submit Query button.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Advanced Settings
Block Sites
Select the Block Settings tab from the Advanced Settings tabs. The
following screen will appear:
Fig. 3.13 Block Sites
Here you can add sites, which you do not want to be accessible through
your WLAN connected computers/hosts. You can either enter the full name
of the site (www.corinex.com) or the beginning of the name (www.co) in
the Block Content field. In the latter case you will not be able to access all
sites beginning with www.co…. This feature can also block whole domains,
so for example mars will block the whole domain mars.corinex.com as it
will block all domains beginning with mars. You can also check if you want
to block the selected site all the time (check the Always field), or for a
limited time period (check Block field and enter the time range in the Time
fields). Do not forget to check the Enable checkbox.
After you have entered the values in this screen, you can set them up by
clicking Submit Query button.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
57
Advanced Settings
Security Log
Select the Security Log tab from the Advanced settings tabs. The following
screen will appear:
Fig. 3.14 Security Log
The Access Point keeps the log of all activity within the Access Point such
as computers logging in and out and any attempts from the Internet/WAN/
LAN to access the Access Point. The log is viewable in the display screen.
By using a Download button you can save the whole log file to the PC
for later analyzing (The Download file dialogue will appear), clicking Clear
will erase all logged events from the log, and clicking Refresh button will
refresh the display screen with actual events.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
58
Utilities
3.8 Utilities
Restart Access Point
Select the Restart Access Point tab from the Utilities tabs. The following
screen will appear:
59
Fig. 3.15 Restarting Access Point
Sometimes it might be necessary to reset or reboot the Access Point if it
begins running improperly. Resetting or Rebooting the Access Point will not
delete any of your configuration settings. Click the Restart Access Point
button below to reset the Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Utilities
Restore Factory Default
Select the Restore factory default tab from the Utilities tabs. The
following screen will appear:
Fig. 3.16 Restoring Factory Default
By using this option this will restore all of the settings in the Access Point
to the factory (default) settings. It is recommended that you backup your
settings before you restore all of the defaults. To restore the factory default
settings, click the Restore Factory Defaults button below.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
60
Utilities
Save/Backup Current Settings
Select the Save/Backup Current Settings tab from the Utilities tabs. The
following screen will appear:
Fig. 3.17 Save/Backup Current Settings
You can save your current configuration by using this feature. Saving your
configuration will allow you to restore it later if your settings are lost or
changed. It is recommended that you backup your current configuration
before performing a firmware upgrade. You can also be requested by
Corinex Technical Support to send them a saved file. In order to save
your current configuration, click Save button. The following dialogue will
appear:
Fig. 3.18 Downloading Current Settings
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
61
Utilities
Click on Save and the following dialogue will appear:
Fig. 3.19 Downloading Location
You can then choose the name and the location, where you want to save
the configuration file. Then click the Save button.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
62
Utilities
Restore Previous Settings
Select the Restore Previous Settings tab from the Utilities tabs. The
following screen will appear:
Fig. 3.20 Restoring Previous Setting
This option will allow you to restore previously saved configuration, or to
load a file sent to you through the Corinex Technical Support. Click Browse
button and select the previously saved configuration file in the following
dialogue.
Fig. 3.21 Choosing a File
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
63
Utilities
After making your selection, click Open in this dialogue, then (in the display
screen) click Restore button. Access Point will restart after successful
configuration restoring.
Firmware Update
Select the Firmware Update tab from the Utilities tabs. The following
screen will appear:
64
Fig. 3.22 Firmware Upgrade
This feature enables you to change/upgrade the Firmware (Access Point’s
internal software). Through the file found on support part of the Corinex
Web page or sent to you by Corinex Technical Support. Click on Browse
button and select the firmware file in the following dialogue.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Utilities
WARNING: Be sure that you are entering the valid firmware file,
because by entering the wrong file you will most probably destroy the
internal Access Point firmware and it will bring requirement to fix it
in the factory. These repairs are not included in the warranty period.
Also be sure that you do not switch on and/or switch off the computer
or Access Point in the time of the file transfer. It is also strongly
recommended to save your settings into the file, as most upgrades
have the default factory settings.
65
Fig. 3.23 Choosing a File
After selecting the firmware file, click the Open button then (in the display
screen) Upgrade button.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Utilities
System Settings
Select the Systems Settings tab from the Utilities tabs. The following
screen will appear:
66
Fig. 3.24 System Settings
In the Type in new Password field you can change the management access
password to the Access Point. For that you will need to enter both the
current password in the Type in current Password field, and retype a new
password in the Confirm new Password field. You can also setup the login
timeout in the range of 1-99 minutes in the Login Timeout field. Default
password from the factory is "password".
Note: Passwords are case sensitive. You can use all alphanumeric
characters (a-z, 0-9).
If required, you can setup also the time zone, along with daylight scheme
in the Time Zone and Enable Daylight Saving fields.
If you want to enable remote management of the Access Point, you can
arrange it by enabling all (Any IP address can remotely manage the Access
Point field on) or only selected IP address (Only this IP address can manage
the Access Point field remotely) to manage the Access Point. This is an
advanced feature and you should enable it only when you have changed
the Access Point access password from its default value to your own
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Powerline Setup Using Corinex Setup Tool
setting. After you have entered the values in this screen, you can set them
up by clicking the Submit Query button.
3.9 Powerline Setup Using Corinex Setup Tool
If you have different powerline devices (e.g. USB, Internet,...) on your
powerline network, you can set the NEK (Network Encryption Key) for
them. If you are not sure which NEK your adapters are programmed, use
the Corinex Setup Tool to set the password to the "HomePlug" standard.
Thus you make sure all the devices in your Powerline Network communicate
with each other.
Then by using Corinex Setup Tool, you can discover the powerline port of
the powerline adapter, as it will appear in the first window of the Tool.
Make sure, you are configuring just the powerline port of the local device,
not other adapter that Corinex Setup Tool may find in the network.
Installing the Setup Tool
1. Insert the installation CD. The CD should start the installation process
automatically. If the installation program does not start automatically, start
the application by selecting My Computer, usually found on the desktop
or Laptop startup screen. Navigate to CD drive, and make a double click on
the drive. The following screen should be displayed. The Installation CD
menu (Fig. 3.25) will appear. Click on Install Setup Tool.
Fig. 3.25 CD Menu Installation
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
67
Powerline Setup Using Corinex Setup Tool
2. The next screen will ask you where the Setup Tool should be installed.
Click Next to continue.
Fig. 3.26 Setup Tool
3. This next screen will ask you where the Setup Tool should installed. Click
Next to continue.
Fig. 3.27 Select Destination Directory
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
68
Powerline Setup Using Corinex Setup Tool
4. This screen will ask where the Setup program should place the program’s
shortcuts. Sellect the Start Menu Folder or simply click Next.
Fig. 3.28 Select Start Menu Folder
5. The following screen will appear to inform you that Setup is ready to
begin the installation of Setup Tool on your computer. Click Install.
Fig. 3.29 Ready to Install
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
69
Powerline Setup Using Corinex Setup Tool
Running the Setup Tool
So far the setup allows transmission of data encrypted with a universal
key. To set your private and personal encryption keys for the network, run
the Corinex Setup Tool provided on the CD This prevents anyone from
intercepting your transmitted data.
The Setup Tool allows the user to setup a private and secure powerline
network. Follow the steps on the screen of this guide and your secure
network will be setup correctly.
1. Make sure that your local powerline adapter is connected to the computer
directly through the Ethernet or USB cable and start the Setup Tool from
the Start menu by selecting the software folder and select Corinex Setup
Tool. Generally the detection of device takes a few seconds.
70
Fig. 3.30 Select Local Powerline Device
2. Make sure, you are configuring just the powerline port of the local
adapter, not any other adapter, which Corinex Setup Tool may find in
the network. Compare the value in the field Local Adapter on your screen
with the MAC PLC value on the bottom of your adapter plastic cover.
Click Next.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Powerline Setup Using Corinex Setup Tool
3. Now the following screen should be displayed.
Fig. 3.31 Choose Network Encryption Key
This is the screen where your network password is selected. Choose a
password between 4 and 24 characters, the password is case sensitive so
remember exactly how it was typed as it will be needed for the next device
set up. Type your password in the Network Encryption Key box and click
Next. If you do not want to use encryption, uncheck the box Encrypt
frames.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
71
Powerline Setup Using Corinex Setup Tool
4. Click Next again to program the adapter with the new encryption
key. This will take a few seconds. The next screen will look similar to the
following screen. The white box will list the MAC addresses of all other
installed powerline devices on the network that are programmed with your
chosen network password. If no other devices have been programmed, the
list will be empty. If you use other than Corinex HomePlug certified devices
in the network, these devices may be set at the default status. This default
setting makes sure that HomePlug devices find each other in a network
and connect and communicate with each other automatically. In order to
generate your private and secure network, all HomePlug certified devices in
the network must be set to the same network encryption key, either at the
default key "HomePlug" or your own key selection.
72
Fig. 3.32 Configured Devices
Note: The adapter with the MAC address 00:0B:C2:00:0F:93 acts as
local device in the network and identifies the devices shown under
Devices Address in the window as belonging to the network. The
function and performance of the devices between the local device/
adapter 00:0B:C2:00:0F:93 and the devices identified in the network is
displayed in the window Connection Quality.
5. All devices in your network must be programmed with the same
network encryption key. Run this utility on all computers with a powerline
networking device attached. If you have a powerline device that is not
connected normally to a computer, it must be first connected to a computer
and then set up with a network encryption key.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Setup of Access Point SNMP Powerline Agent...
3.10 Setup of Access Point SNMP Powerline Agent on the OPM
Management Station*
Corinex Open Powerline Management is a powerful and versatile network
management software tool that allows the operators to configure, monitor
and test all powerline devices across their entire network. Corinex Open
Powerline Management is based on SNMP (Simple Network Management
Protocol) - a standard protocol for enhanced management and testing
of communication devices. The management is independent from any
hardware configuration and as a failure-free system it is designed for
future network expansion with support for HomePlug® standard certified
Powerline devices. The Corinex Open Powerline Management software
answers wide - ranged needs of service providers, when they expand their
services based upon the new Powerline devices in the network.
Corinex Open Powerline Management (OPM) offers easy to use and intuitive
step-by-step navigation for an authorized user or a network administrator
and gives users easier implementation by installing Powerline Agents within
a powerline network. We suppose you have the OPM already installed, and
then we refer you to the OPM User and Installation Guide.
73
To add a Access Point’s agent into the OPM running on the management
station PC you need to start the OPM wizard by clicking Add button in the
OPM main window (fig. 3.33) to start Add wizard.
Fig. 3.33 Corinex Open Management Main Window
* If you want to have an SNMP capable device, get the necessary information on our web site
www.corinex.com: Go to the section Support and from the product list choose the Wireless
to Powerline Access Point.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Setup of Access Point SNMP Powerline Agent...
Adding a Local Network
After clicking on Add button in the main window (Fig. 3.33), the wizard will
appear and administrator has to choose the option Add Local Network as
shown in Fig 3.34
Fig. 3.34 Add Wizard - Option Add Local Network
After the Next button click, choose a name for the Local Network (text field
Name, for example "floor1" as shown in Fig. 3.35), then click Next button
and a dialogue as shown in Fig. 3.36 will appear.
Fig. 3.35 Choosing a Name for a Local Network
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74
Setup of Access Point SNMP Powerline Agent...
Fig. 3.36 Completing the Add Local Network Wizard
After clicking the Finish button, a Local Network named "floor 1" will be
created and you will be asked if you want to add a powerline network. If
you click Yes you will continue with adding a powerline network.
Adding a Powerline Network
75
Use the same wizard (Add button in the main window, fig 3.33) to define
a new powerline network. In the wizard window, click Add Powerline
Network option (Fig 3.37).
Fig. 3.37 Adding Powerline Network - Option Add Powerline Network
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Setup of Access Point SNMP Powerline Agent...
Then choose a name for the Powerline Network (text field Name, for
example "Powerline1" as shown in Fig. 3.38). The Local Network list allows
you to choose a Local Network (necessary, if there is more than one). A
Completing dialogue will be displayed by the Next button click.
Fig. 3.38 Choosing a Name for a Powerline Network
After clicking the Finish button in Completing dialogue, you will be asked if
you want to add a powerline device. If you click Yes you will continue with
adding a powerline device.
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76
Setup of Access Point SNMP Powerline Agent...
Adding a Powerline Device
To add powerline device, start the wizard by clicking Add button in the
main window (Fig. 3.33). Then choose an Add Powerline Device option
(Fig 3.39).
Fig. 3.39 Adding a Powerline Device.
In the following steps the user chooses a powerline network (i.e.
“Powerline1” as in Fig. 3.40) where one adapter is connected. By clicking
the Next button you will be asked to fill more information into the Add
Powerline Device window.
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77
Setup of Access Point SNMP Powerline Agent...
If you need to add a powerline device that is not connected to the powerline
now, you need to click on the Disconnected device check box. This action
will give you the possibility to remember the Powerline devices for future
reference and usage in an associated network structure.
Fig. 3.40 Choosing Local and Powerline Networks.
78
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Setup of Access Point SNMP Powerline Agent...
In the following window place a check mark on the Agent item (Fig. 3.41).
Default Powerline Agent configuration values will appear, assuming the
Agent is running on a local PC or Access Point. You should enter the IP
address of your Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point in the Agent
name/address field in this dialog box. The insertions for the fields: Port,
Read and Write community must be in accordance with the name of the
Powerline Agent settings (see SNMP Agent settings in the Powerline Tab
in web based utility chapter) and after inserting these names and number
settings click the Next button to continue.
79
Fig. 3.41 Powerline Agent Settings.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Setup of Access Point SNMP Powerline Agent...
In order to efficiently manage the network, you must search for all
powerline devices connected locally to that associated Powerline Agent
within the overall network and the system will list all devices accessible
with used SNMP read string and active communication ports. In the
following window (Fig.3.42) select Yes, search for devices option and press
Next button.
Fig. 3.42 Search for Attached Device Option.
80
If Agent settings are correct, the Select device dialog will appear. Choose
the desired device from the accessible devices list and click OK button (Fig
3.43).
Fig. 3.43 Select Device from the List.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Setup of Access Point SNMP Powerline Agent...
You can modify predefined device settings by using the following wizard
window (Fig 3.44). The text field Alias name is used for easier orientation.
In the Alias field the window shows the default name, which is MAC address
of the device. You can change it to any text string (for e.g. "Device1"). If
the device naming is pre-defined by Corinex the Corinex name will appear
automatically in the text field Manufacturer. If it is not a Corinex device,
the user must complete the Manufacturer field.
Fig. 3.44 Detailed Device Settings.
By clicking Next button of the Fig. 3.44 window, the following dialogue
will appear (Fig 3.45).
Fig 3.45 Completing the Adding Powerline Device
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81
Setup of Access Point SNMP Powerline Agent...
After clicking the wizard Finish button (Fig 3.45), the main window tree
view will contain the selected device (Fig 3.46) as recognized by the
network. Next devices, which are the part of the same powerline network,
will appear in a few seconds (max. 25).
82
Fig. 3.46 Finishing of Adding Powerline Device
This procedure has to be repeated until all devices in the network are
registered, so that the network can be managed more effectively.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Apendix A: Troubleshooting / Troubleshooting Guide
4
Appendix A: Troubleshooting
4.1 Troubleshooting Guide
This section provides possible solutions to problems regarding the
installation and operation of the Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access
Point. Read the description below to solve your problems. If you can not
find an answer here, check the Corinex website at www.corinex.com.
Computer networking can be sometimes "tricky" when many components
must work together to function properly for the ultimate network system.
The problems are usually easy to fix with the right tools. The following tools
will get you started, also available on your computer or the Corinex CD.
•
•
•
Setup Tool (from the Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point
Installation CD)
Ping (from the command prompt)
ipconfig (WinNT/2000/XP), winipcfg (Win9x/Me) (from the command
prompt) – for PC
1.The power LED does not light up after installing the Instant Access
Point device.
• Check the device is plugged into the AC outlet or check the AC
cables.
• Make sure the AC outlet is operating by plugging something else
into it. If this works, try another outlet.
2. The Link LED for Wireless status does not light up on the Access
Point.
• When the Wireless port detects a WLAN connection, the Link LED
will be blinking. Check the Wireless adapter on your computer to
see if connection and adapter work properly.
• Check the Wireless configuration of the Wireless adapter on your
computer.
See Chapter: Using the Wireless Connection.
3. I am getting interference between my other 2.4 GHz wireless devices
and my wireless network.
You can take several steps:
• Change the channel of the other 2.4 GHz Wireless devices or the
Access Point so that they can use different channels.
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83
Troubleshooting Guide
•
Move wireless devices farther away from the Access Point space.
4. I can not connect to other computers through the Wireless on my
powerline network or to the Internet.
• Make sure the IP address and TCP/IP protocol are set up correctly
for all wireless or powerline networked computers. For more
information on IP addresses, see Appendix C: IP Addressing.
• Make sure all devices are configured by using the Corinex Setup
Tool. The network password must be the same for all devices in
order to communicate with each other. See Chapter 3.9 Powerline
Setup Using Corinex Setup Tool.
5. Check that the devices exist on the powerline network.
Start the Corinex Setup Tool, click Network Statistics and see if all devices
on your network are found. If all devices are listed, skip this section. If a
device is missing, then:
• Make sure all computers have only one active network slot.
• Make sure the Corinex Powerline Adapters are plugged straight into
the powerline network through a power cable.
• Unplug all Corinex Powerline Adapters and plug them back in again,
one by one. Then run the Setup Tool Program again.
• The devices might be programmed with different passwords. Set
up all devices with a new password as described in the chapter 3.9
Powerline Setup using Corinex Setup Tool.
6. Check that TCP/IP detects the Corinex Powerline Adapters:
From the command prompt, run ping and type the computer name or IP
address of the computer you are working on [ping your computer name].
This should return 4 good packets. Now try to ping another computer on
the network. If a timeout occurs:
• Go into the TCP/IP properties and check if the buttons for obtaining
IP automatically addresses and gateway are checked. If not, make
sure that both computers are on the same subnet.
• Run ipconfig/all from the command prompt on all computers to
verify that all of them have valid IP addresses on the same subnet.
• The IP tables may be data corrupted, if this is the case then reboot
all computers and try again. If these tests work, you reach basic
connectivity and can use all network services. If this does not work,
you might have a faulty device. Please contact your reseller or local
distributor.
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84
Troubleshooting Guide / Frequently Asked Questions
7. It works but it is slow
A slow connection is almost always due to poor electrical connection.
• Make sure the device is plugged straight into the socket and not
into a power splitter or extension cord.
• Try another outlet.
If you still have the trouble, you might contact the Corinex "help desk" by
sending an e-mail to support@corinex.com. Make sure to inform us about
following items:
• describing your problem
• reporting the device types and manufacturing numbers of your
network adapters
• giving us a phone number under which you may be reached,
inclusive a convenient time to call
4.2 Frequently Asked Questions
Can the Access Point act as my DHCP Server?
No. The Access Point is nothing more than a wireless to powerline bridge,
and as such, it cannot be configured to handle DHCP capabilities. You can
use it as DHCP Client.
Can I run an application from a remote computer over the wireless
network?
This depends on whether the application is designed to be used over
a network or not. Consult the application user guide to determine if it
supports operation over the network.
Can I play multiplayer games with other users of the wireless
network?
Yes, as long as the game supports multiple players over a LAN (local area
network). Refer to the game’s user guide for more information.
What is the IEEE 802.11 b standard?
It is one of the IEEE standards for wireless networks. The 802.11b standard
allows wireless networking hardware from different manufacturers to
communicate, provided that the hardware complies with the 802.11b
standard. The 802.11b standard states a maximum data transfer rate of
11 Mbps and operating frequency of 2.4 GHz.
What is ad-hoc mode?
When a wireless network is set to ad-hoc mode, the wireless-equipped
computers are configured to communicate directly with each other.
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Frequently Asked Questions
What is infrastructure mode?
When a wireless network is set to infrastructure mode, the wireless network
is configured for communication with a wired network through a wireless
access point.
What is Spread Spectrum?
Spread Spectrum technology is a wideband radio frequency technique
developed by the military, with a purpose of usage in reliable, secure,
mission-critical communications systems. It is designed to trade off
bandwidth efficiency for reliability, integrity, and security. In other words,
more bandwidth is consumed than in the case of narrowband transmission.
However the trade-off produces a signal that is louder and thus easier to
detect in effect, provided that the receiver knows the parameters of the
spread-spectrum signal being broadcasted. If a receiver is not tuned to
the right frequency, a spread-spectrum signal looks like background noise.
There are two main alternatives, Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS)
and Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS).
Would the information be intercepted while transmitting on air?
Instant wireless products feature two-fold protection in security. On the
hardware side, as with Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum technology, it
generates security feature of scrambling. On the software side, instant
wireless products offer the encryption function (WEP) to enhance security
and access control. Users can set it up depending upon their needs. Can
instant wireless products support file and printer sharing? Instant wireless
products perform the same function as LAN products. Therefore, instant
wireless products can work with NetWare, Windows NT/2000, or other LAN
operating systems to support printer or file sharing.
What is MAC Address?
The Media Access Control (MAC) address is a unique number assigned
by the manufacturer to a networking device, such as a network adapter,
that allows the network to identify it at the hardware level. For practical
purposes, this number is permanent usually. Not like addresses, which can
change a computer logs on to the network every time the MAC address
of a device stays the same, thus making it a valuable identifier for the
network.
Do the Corinex powerline products cause interference with other
home networking or powerline products?
No. The Corinex powerline products can co-exist with phoneline and
wireless networking technologies.
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86
Corinex Authorized Powerline Partners Program
How do the Instant Powerline products handle node addressing in the
network?
The Corinex Powerline products adhere to standard Ethernet addressing
protocols using the destination and source of MAC addressing.
How can Your technology be beneficial in general?
General benefits are inexpensiveness, fastness and reliably manageable
installation.
How can Your technology be beneficial for me as internet provider?
Our technology lowers the costs and adds manageability.
How can Your technology be beneficial for me as internet user?
Our technology lowers the cost significantly and reaches the points where
there is no other alternative.
In which frequency band operates Your powerline technology?
Our powerline technology operates in 4 to 24 MHz spectrum using OFDM
modulation.
Can you manage Powerline devices remotely?
Yes, you can manage all of our devices remotely by using Open Powerline
Management software (OPM).
4.3 Corinex Authorized Powerline Partners Program
We also advise you to visit our Corinex Authorized Powerline Partners
Program web page (cappp.corinex.com), as you can find here valuable
information about complex applications and installations, along with the
partners in your area providing the installation services.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
87
Apendix B: Glossary
5
Appendix B: Glossary
Adapter - Printed circuit board that plugs into a PC the add to capabilities
or connectivity to a PC. In a networked environment, a network interface
card (NIC) is the typical adapter that allows the PC or server to connect to
the intranet and/or Internet.
Ad-hoc Network - An ad-hoc network is a group of computers, each
equipped with a wireless adapter, and connected as an independent
802.11 wireless LAN. Ad-hoc wireless computers operate on a peer-to-peer
basis, communicating directly with each other without the use of an access
point. Ad-hoc mode is also referred to as an Independent Basic Service Set
(IBSS) or as peer-to-peer mode, and is useful at a departmental scale or
SOHO operation.
AES - Advanced Encryption Standard is a symmetric 128 bit block data
encryption technique used for security.
Backbone - The part of a network that connects most of the systems and
networks together and handles the most data.
Bandwidth - 1. Measure of the information capacity of a transmission
channel, in terms of how much data the facility can transmit in a fixed
amount of time; expressed in bits per second (bps). 2. The difference
between the highest and lowest frequencies of a band that can be passed
by a transmission medium without undue distortion, such as the AM band
535 to 1705 kilohertz.
Beacon Interval - A beacon is a packet broadcast by the Access Point to
keep the network synchronized. A beacon includes the wireless LAN service
area, the AP address, the Broadcast destination addresses, a time stamp,
Delivery Traffic Indicator Maps, and the Traffic Indicator Message (TIM).
Bit - A binary digit. The value of 0 or 1 is used in the binary numbering
system. Also, it represents the smallest form of data.
Boot - The software effectuating the computer to start executing
instructions. Personal computers contain built-in instructions in a ROM
chip that are executed automatically on startup. These instructions search
for the operating system, load it, and pass control to it.
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88
Apendix B: Glossary
Bridge/Router - A device that can provide the functions of bridge, router,
or concurrently both. Bridge/router can route one or more protocols, such
as TCP/IP and/or XNS, and bridge all other traffic.
Broadband - A data-transmission scheme in which the multiple signals
share the bandwidth of a medium. This allows the transmission of voice,
data, and video signals over a single medium. Cable television uses
broadband techniques to deliver dozens of channels over one cable.
Browser - A browser is an application program that provides a way to look
at and interact with all the information on the World Wide Web or PC.
The word "browser" seems to have been originated prior to the Web as a
generic term for user interfaces that let you browse the text files online.
BSS (Basic Service Set) - An infrastructure network connecting wireless
devices to a wired network by using a single access point.
Buffer - A storage area used for handling data in transit. Buffers are often
used to compensate with differences in processing speed between network
devices.
Byte - A fundamental unit that computer uses in its operation. It is a
group of adjacent binary digits, usually 8, often used to represent a single
character.
Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Detection (CSMA/CD) A channel access mechanism wherein devices wishing to transmit first
check the channel for a carrier. If no carrier is sensed for some period
of time, devices can transmit. If two devices transmit simultaneously, a
collision occurs and is detected by all colliding devices, which subsequently
delays their retransmissions for some random length of time. CSMA/CD
access is used by Ethernet /IEEE 802.3 and HomePlug.
Database - A database is a collection of organized data so that its contents
can easily be accessed, managed, and updated.
Data Packet - One frame in a packet-switched message. Most data
communications are based on division of transmitted message into the
packets. For example, an Ethernet packet can be from 64 to 1518 bytes in
length.
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89
Apendix B: Glossary
Default Gateway - The routing device used to forward all traffic that is not
addressed to a station within the local subnet.
DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) - A protocol that lets
network administrators manage and automate the assignment of Internet
Protocol (IP) addresses centrally in an company network. Using the Internet
set of protocols (TCP/IP), each machine that can connect to the Internet
needs a unique IP address. When an organization enables to its computer
users an Internet connection, an IP address must be assigned to each
machine. Without DHCP, the IP address must be entered manually at each
computer and, if computers move to another location in another part
of the network, a new IP address must be entered. DHCP lets a network
administrator to supervise and distribute IP addresses from a central point
and automatically sends a new IP address when a computer is plugged
into a different place in the network. DHCP uses the concept of a "lease"
or amount of time that a given IP address will be valid for a computer.
The lease time can vary depending on how long a user is likely to require
the Internet connection at a particular location. It is especially useful in
education and other environments where the alternation of users is more
frequent. Using very short leases, DHCP can dynamically reconfigure
networks in which operate more computers than available IP addresses.
DHCP supports static addresses for computers containing Web servers that
need a permanent IP address.
DNS (Domain Name System) - A distributed name/address mechanism
used in the Internet.
Domain - A subnetwork comprised of a group of clients and servers under
the control of one security database. Dividing LANs into domains improves
its performance and security.
Download - To receive a file transmitted over a network. In a communications
session, download means receive, and upload means transmit.
DSSS (Direct-Sequence Spread-Spectrum) - DSSS generates a redundant
bit pattern for each bit to be transmitted. This bit pattern is called a chip
(or chipping code). The longer the chip, the greater is the probability that
the original data can be recovered. Even if one or more bits in the chip
are damaged during transmission, statistical techniques embedded in the
radio can recover the original data without any need for retransmission.
DSSS appears as low power wideband noise to an unintended receiver and
is rejected (ignored) by most narrowband receivers.
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90
Apendix B: Glossary
Dynamic IP Address - An IP address that is automatically assigned to
a client station in a TCP/IP network, typically by a DHCP server. Network
devices that serve multiple users, such as servers and printers, are usually
assigned static IP addresses.
EAP - Extensible Authentication Protocol is a function in a client PC, which
initiates the authentication login to a network through an Access Point.
If the client is approved and authenticated for a communication session,
then the client receives a unique WEP key from a network security server
such as RADIUS.
Encryption - Applying a specific algorithm to data in order to alter the
data’s appearance and prevent other devices from reading information.
Decryption applies the algorithm in reverse to restore the data to its
original form.
Ethernet - A baseband LAN specification invented by Xerox Corporation
and developed jointly by Xerox, Intel, and Digital Equipment Corporation.
Ethernet networks operate at 10 Mbps using CSMA/CD to run over coaxial
cable. Ethernet is similar to a series of standards produced by IEEE referred
to as IEEE 802.3.
Firmware - A programming that is inserted into programmable read-only
memory, thus becoming a permanent part of a computing device.
Fragmentation - A breaking the packet into smaller units when
transmitting over a network medium that cannot support the original size
of the packet.
Gateway - A device that interconnects networks with different,
incompatible communications protocols.
Home Page - The first page of Web site or HTML documents logical
group.
HomePlug - An industry alliance comprised of industry leaders at each level
of the value chain - from Technology to Services & Content. The Alliance
members bring necessary capabilities and a financial commitment to the
successful launch of the technology. The Alliance’s mission is to enable
and promote rapid availability, adoption and implementation of cost
effective, interoperable and standards-based home powerline networks
and products.
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Apendix B: Glossary
Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) - 1. A protocol most commonly used
in the World Wide Web to transfer the information from Web servers to
Web browsers. 2. A protocol that negotiates document delivery to a Web
browser from a Web server.
Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML) - 1. A language used in the World
Wide Web to create web pages with links to other documents, rich text
enhancements (bold, italic, etc.) etc. The "source" file for what you see on
a web page is written in HTML. 2. A language with which World Wide Web
documents are formatted. It defines fonts, graphics, hypertext links, and
other details. HTML is an implementation of SGML.
Infrastructure Network - A group of computers or other devices, each with
a wireless adapter, connected as an 802.11 wireless LAN. In infrastructure
mode, the wireless devices communicate with each other and with a wired
network by first going through an Access Point. An infrastructure wireless
network connected to a wired network is referred to as Basic Service
Set (BSS). A set of two or more BSS in a single network is referred to as
Extended Service Set (ESS). Infrastructure mode is useful at a corporation
scale, or when it is necessary to connect the wired and wireless networks.
92
Internet Protocol (IP) - A Layer 3 (network layer) protocol that contains
addressing information and some control information that allows packets
to be routed.
IP Address - In the most widely installed level of the Internet Protocol
(Internet Protocol) today, an IP address is a 32-binary digit number that
identifies each sender or receiver of information that is sent in packet
across the Internet. When you request an HTML page or send e-mail, the
Internet Protocol part of TCP/IP includes your IP address in the message
(actually, in each of the packets if more than one is required) and sends it
to the IP address that is obtained by looking up the domain name in the
Uniform Resource Locator you requested or in the e-mail address you are
sending a note to. At the other end, the recipient can see the IP address of
the Web page requestor or the e-mail sender and can respond by sending
another message using the IP address already received.
IPCONFIG - A Windows utility that provides querying, defining and
managing IP addresses within a network. A commonly used utility, under
Windows NT and 2000, for the configuration of networks by static IP
addresses.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Apendix B: Glossary
IPSec - IPSec (Internet Protocol Security) is a developing standard
for the security in the network or packet processing layer of network
communication. A big advantage of IPSec is that security arrangements
can be handled without are in requirement to changes to individual user
computers.
ISM band - The FCC and their counterparts outside of the U.S. had been
setting aside bandwidth for unlicensed use in the ISM (Industrial, Scientific
and Medical) band. Spectrum in the vicinity of 2.4 GHz, in particular,
is being made available worldwide. This presents a truly revolutionary
opportunity to place convenient high-speed wireless capabilities in the
hands of users around the globe.
ISP - An ISP (Internet service provider) is a company that provides to
individuals and companies an access to the Internet and other related
services such as website construction and virtual hosting.
JavaScript – A JavaScript is a scripting language that allows dynamic
behavior to be specified within HTML documents. In order to view the
JavaScript effects on Web pages, JavaScript must be supported and
enabled in your browser’s preference settings
LAN - A local area network (LAN) is a group of computers and associated
devices that share a common communications line and typically share the
resources of a single processor or server within a small geographic area (for
example, within an office building).
MAC Address - The MAC (Media Access Control) address is a unique
number assigned by the manufacturer to any Ethernet networking device,
such as a network adapter, that allows the network to identify it at the
hardware level.
Mbps (MegaBits Per Second) - One million bits per second; an unit of
data transmission measurement.
Network - A system that transmits any combination of voice, video, and/or
data between users.
Network Mask - See the "Subnet Mask".
Notebook (PC) - A notebook computer is a battery-powered personal
computer mostly smaller than a briefcase that can easily be transported
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93
Apendix B: Glossary
and conveniently used in temporary spaces such as airplanes, libraries,
temporary offices, and meeting rooms. A notebook computer sometimes
called a laptop computer typically weighs less than five pounds and its
thickness is three inches or less.
Packet - A unit of data routed between an origin and a destination in a
network.
Packet Filtering - Discarding unwanted network traffic based on its
originating address or range of addresses or its type (e-mail, file transfer,
etc.).
Passphrase - Used more as a password, a passphrase simplifies the WEP
encryption process by generating the WEP encryption keys for Corinex
products automatically.
Plug-and-Play - The ability of a computer system to configure expansion
boards and other devices automatically without requiring the user to turn
off the system during installation.
Port - A pathway into and out of the computer or a network device like a
switch or router. For example, the serial and parallel ports on a personal
computer are external sockets for plugging in communications lines,
modems, and printers.
RJ-45 - A connector similar to a telephone connector that holds up to eight
wires, used for connection of Ethernet devices.
Router - Protocol-dependent device that connects subnetworks
alltogether. Routers are useful in breaking down a very large network into
the smaller subnetworks; they introduce longer delays and usually have
much lower throughput rates than bridges.
Powerline - Powerline (Sometimes called DPL- Digital PowerLine)
technology provides the transmission of data over the same lines that carry
electric power to homes and businesses.
Server - Any computer whose function in a network is to provide the user
with access to files, printing, communications, and other services.
Software - Instructions to the computer. A series of instructions that
perform a particular task are called a "program". The two major categories
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94
Apendix B: Glossary
of software are "system software" and "application software". System
software is made up of control programs like operating system and
database management system (DBMS). Application software is any
program possessing the data for the user. A common misconception is
that software is data. It is not. Software tells the hardware how to process
the data.
SOHO (Small Office/Home Office) - Market segment of professionals who
work at home or in a small offices.
SSID (Service Set Identifier) - A unique name shared among all points in a
wireless network. The SSID must be identical for each point in the wireless
network and is case-sensitive. Also known as "ESSID".
Static IP Address - A permanent IP address that is assigned to a node in a
TCP/IP network.
Subnet Mask - The method used for splitting IP networks into a series of
subgroups, or subnets. The mask is a binary pattern that is matched up
with the IP address to turn the part of the host ID address field into a field
for subnets.
TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) - A method (protocol) used along
with the Internet Protocol (Internet Protocol) to send the data in the form
of message units between computers over the Internet. While IP cares of
the actual delivery, TCP cares for the keeping a track of individual data
(packets) unit, so that a message is divided into for efficient routing
through the Internet.
TCP/IP - Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) is the basic
communication language or protocol of the Internet. It can be also used as
communications protocol in a private network (either intranet or extranet).
If you set up a direct access to the Internet, your computer is provided with
a copy of the TCP/IP program just as every other computer so that you may
send messages or to get the information also from a copy of TCP/IP.
Throughput - The amount of data successfully transferred from one place
to another in a stated time period.
TKIP - Temporal Key Integrity Protocol is an advanced encryption method
using the RC4 algorithm. Instead of using the sequential IV, a random IV
will be used, and the IV key definition will be updated regularly at a preset
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
95
Apendix B: Glossary
time interval. For 802.11, Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) encryption is
optional. For WPA, the encryption using TKIP is required. TKIP replaces WEP
with a new encryption algorithm that is stronger than the WEP algorithm
but that uses the calculation facilities presented on existing wireless devices
to perform encryption operations.
Topology - A network topology is a logical characterization of how the
network devices and their respective distances are interconnected. The
most common network devices include hubs, switches, routers, and
gateways. Most large networks contain several levels of interconnection.
Edge backbone and wide-area connections, are the most common and
important ones.
Upgrade - The replacement of existing software or firmware with a newer
version.
Upload - To send a file transmitted over a network. In a communications
session, upload means transmit, and download means receive.
URL (Uniform Resource Locator) - The address that defines the route to
a file on the web or any other Internet facility. URLs are typed into the
browser to access Web pages, and URLs are embedded within the pages
themselves to provide the hypertext links to other pages.
UTP - Unshielded twisted pair is the most common kind of copper
telephone wiring. Twisted pair is a common copper wire that connects
home and many business computers to the telephone company. To reduce
the crosstalk or electromagnetic induction between pairs of wires, two
insulated copper wires are twisted around each other. Each signal on
twisted pair requires both wires. Since some telephone sets or desktop
locations require multiple connections, twisted pair is sometimes installed
in two or more pairs, all within a single cable.
Virtual Server - Multiple servers that appear as one server, or one system
image, to the operating system or network administration.
WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) - A data privacy mechanism based on a
64 bit, 128 bit, or 256 bit shared key algorithm, as described in the IEEE
802.11 standard.
Wide Area Network (WAN) - A network that encompasses interconnectivity
between devices over a wide geographic area. Such networks require
public rights-of way and operate over long distances.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
96
Apendix B: Glossary
WINIPCFG - A configuration utility based on the Win32 API for querying,
defining, and managing IP addresses within a network. A commonly used
utility for configuring networks with static IP addresses.
WPA - The Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.11i
wireless networking standard specifies improvements to wireless local area
networking (LAN) security. The 802.11i standard is currently in a draft form,
with ratification due at the end of 2003. The 802.11i standard addresses
many of the security issues of the original 802.11 standard. While the new
IEEE 802.11i standard is being ratified, wireless vendors have agreed on an
interoperable interim standard known as Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA).
97
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Apendix C: How to Ping your ISP's E-mail...
6 Appendix C: How to Ping your ISP’s E-mail
and Web Addresses
Virtually all Internet addresses are configured with words or characters (e.g.,
www.corinex.com, www.yahoo.com, etc.) However, recently these Internet
addresses are assigned to IP addresses, which are the true addresses on
the Internet. For example, www.corinex.com is recently 81.0.193.56 at
the time of producing this manual. If you type this address into your web
browser, you will end up at the Corinex home page every time.
Some servers translate the URL to an IP address, so called DNS (Domain
Name System) Servers. However, IP and web addresses can be long and
hard to remember sometimes. From this reason, certain ISPs will shorten
their server addresses to single words or codes on their users’ web browser
or e-mail configurations. If your ISP’s email and web server addresses are
configured with single words (www, e-mail, home, pop3, etc.) rather
than entire Internet addresses or IP addresses, the Access Point may have
problems by sending or receiving mail and by accessing the Internet.
98
The solution is to determine the true web addresses behind your ISPs code
words. You can determine the IP and web addresses of your ISP’s servers
by "pinging" them.
Important: If you do not have your ISP’s web and e-mail IP addresses,
you must either get them from your ISP or follow these steps prior to
connecting your Corinex Wireless to Powerline Access Point to your
network.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Step One: Pinging an IP Address
6.1 Step One: Pinging an IP Address
The first step to determine your ISP’s web and e-mail server address is to
ping its IP address.
1. Power on the computer and the cable or DSL modem, and restore
the network configuration set by your ISP if you have changed it.
2. Click Start, then Run, and type command. This will bring up the
DOS window.
3. At DOS command prompt, type ping corinex.com (assuming that
your desired IP address location is configured as corinex.com) and
press Enter. As an example, the following data information on
Figure 6.1., taken from a ping of Microsoft Network e-mail server,
will be displayed.
99
Fig. 6.1 Pinging an IP Address
4. Write down the IP address returned by the ping command. (In
the example above: 81.0.193.56) This IP address is the actual IP
address of the mail server, or any other value you have pinged.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
Step Two: Pinging for a Web Address
6.2 Step Two: Pinging for a Web Address
While the above-mentioned IP address could perform as your e-mail
server address, it might not be permanent. IP addresses change very
often. However, web addresses usually do not. This is the reason, why you
are likely to have fewer problems by configuring your system with web
addresses rather than IP addresses. Follow the instructions below to find
the web address assigned to the IP address you just pinged.
1. At the DOS command prompt, type ping -a 81.0.193.56, where
81.0.193.56 is the IP address you just pinged. Information such as
the following data will be displayed.
Fig. 6.2 Pinging for a Web Address
2. Write down the web address returned by the ping command (In
the example in Fig. 6.1 corinex.com is the web address). This web
address is the web address assigned to the IP address you just
pinged. While the IP address of mail could change conceivably, it is
presumably that this web address will not.
3. Replace your ISP’s abbreviated server address with this extended
web address in the corresponding Internet application (web
browser, e-mail application, etc.).
Once you have replaced the brief server address with the true server
address, the Access Point should have no problem accessing the Internet
through this Internet application.
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100
Apendix D: Finding the MAC address and IP address...
7 Appendix D: Finding the MAC address and
IP address for your Wireless Adapter
This section describes how to find the MAC address of your Ethernet
adapter of your computer to do either MAC Filtering or MAC Address
Cloning for the Access Point and ISP. You can also find the IP address of
your computer’s Wireless, Ethernet or USB adapter. The IP address is used
for filtering, forwarding, and DMZ. In this appendix follow the next steps to
find the MAC address or IP address for your adapter of your Windows 95,
98, Me, NT, 2000, XP, Linux or Macintosh Computer.
7.1 For Windows 95, 98 and Me
1. Click Start then go to Run. In the Open field, enter winipcfg, as
shown in Figure 7.1. Then press the Enter key or the OK button.
101
Fig. 7.1 Running winipcfg
2. When the IP Configuration window appears, select the Wireless,
Ethernet or USB adapter you are using to connect to the Access
Point via a wireless or through the powerline, as shown in Fig.
7.1.
3. Write down the Adapter Address as shown on your computer
screen (see Figure 7.1). This is the MAC address for your Wireless,
Ethernet or USB adapter and will be shown as a series of numbers
and letters. The MAC address/Adapter Address is what you will use
for MAC Address Cloning or MAC Filtering.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
For Windows NT, 2000, and XP
This example shows the IP address of your Wireless adapter as 10.101.2.38.
Your computer may show something different.
7.2 For Windows NT, 2000 and XP
The following steps show an alternative way of obtaining the MAC and IP
address for your wireless, Ethernet or USB adapter.
1. Click Start and Run. In the Open field, enter cmd. Press Enter key
or click the OK button.
102
Fig. 7.2 Running ipconfig
2. In the command prompt, enter ipconfig /all. Then press Enter
key.
3. Write down the Physical Address as shown on your computer
screen (Figure 7.2); it is the MAC address for your wireless, Ethernet
or USB adapter. This will appear as a series of letters and numbers.
The MAC Address/Physical Address is what you will use for MAC
Address Cloning or MAC Filtering.
The example in Figure 7.2 shows the IP address of your Wireless adapter as
192.168.1.10. Your computer might show something different.
Note: The MAC address is also called Physical Address.
When entering the information using the Access Point’s web-based utility,
type the 12-digit MAC address in this format, XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX without
the hyphens for MAC Filtering.
When entering information for MAC Address Cloning, type the 12-digit
MAC address.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
For Linux PC
7.3 For Linux PC
From the Start Button on Desktop bar, choose Terminals->Xterm (or any
other convenient terminal).
Fig. 7.3 Starting Terminal
Login as superuser by issuing su command, then press Enter. Provide the
password, and press Enter. Enter ifconfig, then press Enter. In the field
Hwaddr is the requested MAC address.
103
Fig. 7.4 Running ifconfig
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
For Linux PC
Login as superuser, by issuing su command, then press Enter. Provide the
password, and press Enter again.
Enter iwconfig, then press Enter. You can see the wireless port
parameters.
Fig. 7.5 Running iwconfig
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104
For Macintosh OS X computer
7.4 For Macintosh OS X computer
1. In Applications open Utilities.
Fig. 7.6 Applications
2. In Utilities select Network Utility
Fig. 7.7 Utilities
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105
For Macintosh OS X computer
3. Select the interface connected to the Access Point through the
wireless or through the powerline. In this section you can see the
wireless connection type.
Fig. 7.8 Network Utility
4. Field Hardware address contains MAC Address of selected
interface.
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
106
Index
IP Settings 17
ISP 93
A
AC adapter 8
AC outlet 15, 83
adapter 8, 15, 16, 17, 21, 25, 45, 53,
55, 67, 70, 72, 77, 83, 86, 88, 92, 93,
101, 102
Advanced Settings 56, 57, 58
AES 47, 48, 50, 88
Alias 81
J
JavaScript 9, 93
B
Block Sites 57
C
cable 70, 84, 89, 91, 96, 99
ce II
Channel 7, 8, 16, 41, 45
Community 52
Connection Type 32
Copyright 1
Corinex Authorized Powerline Partners
Program 87
Corinex Setup Tool 16, 67, 70
Corinex Technical Support 41, 61, 63
D
Data Rates 45
DHCP 6, 7, 8, 20, 23, 28, 29, 36, 37,
41, 43, 85, 90, 91
DMZ 101
DNS 34, 37, 90, 98
Domain 34, 37, 44, 90, 98
download 8, 90, 96
DSSS 6, 86, 90
Dynamic 90, 91
E
EAP 47, 91
en II
encrypt 53
encryption 6, 7, 8, 44, 47, 48, 49, 50,
51, 53, 70, 71, 72, 86, 88, 94, 95, 96
Ethernet 5, 21, 22, 25, 36, 70, 87,
89, 91, 93, 94, 101, 102
F
fcc III
Firmware 3, 8, 38, 41, 64, 91
Fixed IP Address 34
G
Gateway 24, 29, 34, 37, 41, 43,
90, 91
H
Help 2, 42
HomePlug 5, 6, 7, 16, 53, 67, 72,
89, 91
HTML 91, 92, 93
HTTP 6, 38, 40, 92
I
Installation CD 8, 14
Internet Explorer 39, 40
Introduction 2, 5
ipconfig 83, 84, 102
IP address 90, 91, 92, 95, 97
throughput 6, 54, 94
time zone 66
TKIP 47, 48, 50, 95, 96
L
LAN 5, 32, 44, 46, 49, 58, 85, 86, 88,
91, 92, 93, 97
link 6
Linux 2, 4, 6, 9, 17, 29, 30, 31, 34,
101, 103, 104
Log 3, 58
login 29, 40, 66, 91
M
MAC 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 12, 16, 49, 56,
70, 72, 81, 86, 87, 93, 101, 102,
103, 106
Macintosh 2, 4, 9, 17, 35, 101, 105,
106
Mbps 6, 7, 45, 85, 91, 93
U
Upgrade 64, 65, 96
URL 96, 98
Utilities 3, 39, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64,
65, 66, 105
V
Version Info 41
VPN 22, 25
W
WAN 52, 56, 58, 96
web browser 6, 38, 98
WEP 6, 7, 8, 16, 17, 47, 48, 49, 50,
86, 91, 94, 96
Windows 1, 2, 4, 6, 9, 17, 21, 24, 25,
29, 47, 86, 92, 101, 102
winipcfg 83, 101
N
NEK 3, 16, 53, 67
netman 52
Netscape 8, 39, 40
network 5, 6, 10, 11, 12, 15, 16, 20,
21, 23, 25, 28, 31, 37, 39, 43, 44,
45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 54, 67, 70, 71, 72,
73, 75, 77, 78, 80, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86,
87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96,
97, 98, 99
O
Open System 48
OPM 3, 73, 87
P
Password 2, 3, 30, 38, 39, 40, 53, 66
Ping 3, 83, 98
Port 7, 79, 94
PSK 47, 50, 51
public 52, 96
R
Restart Access Point 59
Restore Factory Defaults 60
Restore Previous Settings 63
S
Save/Backup Current Settings 61
Security Log 58
Server 7, 34, 37, 50, 85, 94, 96
SNMP 3, 6, 52, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77,
78, 79, 80, 81, 82
software 1, 6, 8, 52, 64, 70, 73, 86,
87, 88, 95, 96
SSID 16, 41, 45, 95
Static 34, 95
Status 2, 17, 25, 38, 40
Storage 13
Subnet Mask 41, 43, 93, 95
Switch 10
Systems Settings 66
T
TABS 39
TCP/IP 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24,
25, 26, 27, 28, 36, 37, 84, 89, 92, 95
Corinex Wireless to Powerline AP
107
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