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MF2412C/MF2413C/MF2414C
Microwave Frequency
Counter
Operation Manual
Sixth Edition
For safety and warning information, please read this
manual before attempting to use the equipment.
Keep this manual with the equipment.
ANRITSU CORPORATION
Document No.: M-W2897AE-6.0
Safety Symbols
To prevent the risk of personal injury or loss related to equipment malfunction, Anritsu Corporation uses the
following safety symbols to indicate safety-related information. Ensure that you clearly understand the meanings of
the symbols BEFORE using the equipment. Some or all of the following symbols may be used on all Anritsu
equipment. In addition, there may be other labels attached to products that are not shown in the diagrams in this
manual.
Symbols used in manual
DANGER
This indicates a very dangerous procedure that could result in serious injury or
death if not performed properly.
WARNING
This indicates a hazardous procedure that could result in serious injury or death if
not performed properly.
CAUTION
This indicates a hazardous procedure or danger that could result in light-to-severe
injury, or loss related to equipment malfunction, if proper precautions are not taken.
Safety Symbols Used on Equipment and in Manual
The following safety symbols are used inside or on the equipment near operation locations to provide information
about safety items and operation precautions. Ensure that you clearly understand the meanings of the symbols and
take the necessary precautions BEFORE using the equipment.
This indicates a prohibited operation. The prohibited operation is indicated
symbolically in or near the barred circle.
This indicates an obligatory safety precaution. The obligatory operation is
indicated symbolically in or near the circle.
This indicates a warning or caution. The contents are indicated symbolically in or
near the triangle.
This indicates a note. The contents are described in the box.
These indicate that the marked part should be recycled.
.
MF2412C/MF2413C/MF2414C
Microwave Frequency Counter
Operation Manual
9
20
April
2007 (First Edition)
November 2013 (Sixth Edition)
Copyright © 2007-2013, ANRITSU CORPORATION.
All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced without the prior written permission of the
publisher.
The contents of this manual may be changed without prior notice.
Printed in Japan
ii
For Safety
WARNING
• ALWAYS refer to the operation manual when working near locations
at which the alert mark shown on the left is attached. If the advice in
the operation manual is not followed, there is a risk of personal injury
or reduced equipment performance. The alert mark shown on the left
may also be used with other marks and descriptions to indicate other
dangers.
• Overvoltage Category
This equipment complies with overvoltage category II defined in IEC
61010. DO NOT connect this equipment to the power supply of
overvoltage category III or IV.
Electric Shock
• To ensure that the equipment is grounded, always use the supplied
3-pin power cord, and insert the plug into an outlet with a ground
terminal. If power is supplied without grounding the equipment, there
is a risk of receiving a severe or fatal electric shock or causing
damage to the internal components.
Repair
• Only qualified service personnel with a knowledge of electrical fire and
shock hazards should service this equipment. This equipment cannot
be repaired by the operator. DO NOT attempt to remove the
equipment covers or unit covers or to disassemble internal
components. There are high-voltage parts in this equipment
presenting a risk of severe injury or fatal electric shock to untrained
personnel. In addition, there is a risk of damage to precision
components.
Calibration
• The performance-guarantee seal verifies the integrity of the equipment.
To ensure the continued integrity of the equipment, only Anritsu
service personnel, or service personnel of an Anritsu sales
representative, should break this seal to repair or calibrate the
equipment. Be careful not to break the seal by opening the
equipment or unit covers. If the performance-guarantee seal is
broken by you or a third party, the performance of the equipment
cannot be guaranteed.
iii
For Safety
WARNING
iv
Falling Over
• This equipment should always be positioned in the correct manner. If
the cabinet is turned on its side, etc., it will be unstable and may be
damaged if it falls over as a result of receiving a slight mechanical
shock.
Always set up the equipment in a position where the power switch
can be reached without difficulty.
Replacing Battery
• When replacing the battery, use the specified battery and insert it
with the correct polarity. If the wrong battery is used, or if the battery
is inserted with reversed polarity, there is a risk of explosion causing
severe injury or death.
Battery Fluid
• DO NOT short the battery terminals and never attempt to disassemble
the battery or dispose of it in a fire. If the battery is damaged by any of
these actions, the battery fluid may leak. This fluid is poisonous.
DO NOT touch the battery fluid, ingest it, or get in your eyes. If it is
accidentally ingested, spit it out immediately, rinse your mouth with
water and seek medical help. If it enters your eyes accidentally, do
not rub your eyes, rinse them with clean running water and seek
medical help. If the liquid gets on your skin or clothes, wash it off
carefully and thoroughly.
Battery Disposal
• DO NOT expose batteries to heat or fire. Do not expose batteries to
fire. This is dangerous and can result in explosions or fire. Heating
batteries may cause them to leak or explode.
For Safety
CAUTION
Fuse Replacement
• Always remove the mains power cable from the power outlet before
replacing blown fuses. There is a risk of electric shock if fuses are
replaced with the power cable connected. Replace the fuses with the
same type. Failure to do so may result in fire.
T3.15A indicates a time-lag fuse.
Cleaning
• Always remove the main power cable from the power outlet before
cleaning dust around the power supply and fan.
• Clean the power inlet regularly. If dust accumulates around the
power pins, there is a risk of fire.
Keep
the cooling fan clean so that the ventilation holes are not
•
obstructed. If the ventilation is obstructed, the cabinet may
overheat and catch fire.
Check Terminal
• Never input a signal of more than the indicated value between the
measured terminal and ground. Input of an excessive signal may
damage the equipment.
Use in a Residential
Environment
This equipment is designed for an industrial environment.
In a residential environment, this equipment may cause radio
interference in which case the user may be required to take adequate
measures.
Use in Corrosive
Atmospheres
Exposure to corrosive gases such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfurous acid,
and hydrogen chloride will cause faults and failures.
Note that some organic solvents release corrosive gases.
v
Equipment Certificate
Anritsu Corporation certifies that this equipment was tested before shipment
using calibrated measuring instruments with direct traceability to public
testing organizations recognized by national research laboratories, including
the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, and
the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, and
was found to meet the published specifications.
Anritsu Warranty
Anritsu Corporation provides the following warranty against stoppages
arising due to manufacturing error, and against problems with operation
occurring even though the procedures outlines in the operation manual were
followed.
Hardware:
Problems occurring within a period of one year from the date of delivery will
be corrected by Anritsu Corporation at no cost to the user.
Software:
Software reported as faulty within a period of 6 months from the date of
delivery will be corrected or replaced by Anritsu Corporation at no cost to the
user.
Following correction or replacement the software will remain under warranty
for either the remainder of 6 months from the date of initial delivery, or for a
period of 30 days, whichever is shorter.
The hardware and software warranties are not valid under any of the
following conditions:
• The fault is outside the scope of the warranty conditions separately
described in the operation manual.
• The fault is due to mishandling, misuse, or unauthorized modification or
repair of the equipment by the customer.
• The fault is due to severe usage clearly exceeding normal usage.
• The fault is due to improper or insufficient maintenance by the customer.
• The fault is due to natural disaster, including fire, wind, flooding,
earthquake, lightning strike, or volcanic ash, etc.
• The fault is due to damage caused by acts of destruction, including civil
disturbance, riot, or war, etc.
• The fault is due to explosion, accident, or breakdown of any other
machinery, facility, or plant, etc.
The
fault is due to use of non-specified peripheral or applied equipment
•
or parts, or consumables, etc.
vi
• The fault is due to use of a non-specified power supply or in a
non-specified installation location.
(Note)
.
• The fault is due to use in unusual environments
• The fault is due to activities or ingress of living organisms, such as
insects, spiders, fungus, pollen, or seeds.
In addition, this warranty is valid only for the original equipment purchaser. It
is not transferable if the equipment is resold.
Anritsu Corporation shall assume no liability for injury or financial loss of the
customer due to the use of or a failure to be able to use this equipment.
Note:
For the purpose of this Warranty, "unusual environment" means use:
• In places of direct sunlight
• In dusty places
• Outdoors
• In liquids, such as water, oil, or organic solvents, and medical fluids, or
places where these liquids may adhere
• In salty air or in place chemically active gases (sulfur dioxide, hydrogen
sulfide, chlorine, ammonia, nitrogen dioxide, or hydrogen chloride etc.)
are present
• In places where high-intensity static electric charges or electromagnetic
fields are present
• In places where abnormal power voltages (high or low) or instantaneous
power failures occur
• In places where condensation occurs
• In the presence of lubricating oil mists
• In places at an altitude of more than 2,000 m
• In the presence of frequent vibration or mechanical shock, such as in
cars, ships, or airplanes
Anritsu Corporation Contact
In the event of this equipment malfunctions, contact an Anritsu Service and
Sales office. Contact information can be found on the last page of the printed
version of this manual, and is available in a separate file on the CD version.
vii
Notes On Export Management
This product and its manuals may require an Export License/Approval by
the Government of the product's country of origin for re-export from your
country.
Before re-exporting the product or manuals, please contact us to confirm
whether they are export-controlled items or not.
When you dispose of export-controlled items, the products/manuals need
to be broken/shredded so as not to be unlawfully used for military purpose.
viii
Crossed-out Wheeled Bin Symbol
Equipment marked with the Crossed-out Wheeled Bin Symbol complies with
council directive 2002/96/EC (the “WEEE Directive”) in European Union.
For Products placed on the EU market after August 13, 2005, please contact
your local Anritsu representative at the end of the product's useful life to
arrange disposal in accordance with your initial contract and the local law.
ix
CE Conformity Marking
Anritsu affixes the CE Conformity marking on the following product(s) in
accordance with the Council Directive 93/68/EEC to indicate that they
conform to the EMC and LVD directive of the European Union (EU).
CE marking
1. Product Model
Model:
MF2412C/MF2413C/MF2414C
Microwave Frequency Counter
2. Applied Directive
EMC:
LVD:
Directive 2004/108/EC
Directive 2006/95/EC
3. Applied Standards
• EMC: Emission: EN 61326-1: 2006(Class A)
Immunity: EN 61326-1: 2006(Table2)
IEC 61000-4-2 (ESD)
IEC 61000-4-3 (EMF)
IEC 61000-4-4 (Burst)
IEC 61000-4-5 (Surge)
IEC 61000-4-6 (CRF)
IEC 61000-4-11 (V dip/short)
Performance Criteria*
B
A
B
B
A
B, C
*: Performance Criteria
A: During testing, normal performance within the
specification limits.
B: During testing, temporary degradation, or loss of
function or performance which is self-recovering.
C: During testing, temporary degradation, or loss of
function or performance which requires operator
intervention or system reset occurs.
x
Harmonic current emissions:
EN 61000-3-2: 2006 +A1:2009 A2:2009
(Class A equipment)
: No limits apply for this equipment with an active input
power under 75W.
LVD:
EN
61010-1:
2010 (Pollution Degree 2)
•
4. Authorized representative
Name:
Address, city:
Country:
Murray Coleman
Head of Customer Service EMEA
ANRITSU EMEA Ltd.
200 Capability Green, Luton
Bedfordshire, LU1 3LU
United Kingdom
xi
C-tick Conformity Marking
Anritsu affixes the C-tick marking on the following product(s) in accordance
with the regulation to indicate that they conform to the EMC framework of
Australia/New Zealand.
C-tick marking
1. Product Model
Model:
MF2412C/MF2413C/MF2414C
Microwave Frequency Counter
2. Applied Standards
EMC: Emission: EN 61326-1: 2006(Class A equipment)
xii
Power Line Fuse Protection
For safety, Anritsu products have either one or two fuses in the AC power
lines as requested by the customer when ordering.
Single fuse:
A fuse is inserted in one of the AC power lines.
Double fuse:
A fuse is inserted in each of the AC power lines.
Example 1: An example of the single fuse is shown below:
Fuse Holder
Example 2: An example of the double fuse is shown below:
Fuse Holders
xiii
xiv
About This Manual
This Operation Manual describes operations and maintenance of the
MF2412C/MF2413C/MF2414C Microwave Frequency Counters. Read
Section 1 “Overview” for a better understanding of the basic functional
operations of this unit. More detailed descriptions are provided in the
subsequent sections, being arranged so that the required information can
be found easily.
I
Table of Contents
For Safety ....................................................
iii
About This Manual........................................
I
Section 1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
Overview ....................................
1-1
Product Overview..........................................................
Manual Configuration ....................................................
Product Composition.....................................................
Specifications ................................................................
1-2
1-4
1-5
1-7
Section 2
2.1
2.2
2.3
Preparation Before Use ............
2-1
Environmental Conditions of Installation Site ...............
Safety Measures ...........................................................
Power Connection.........................................................
2-2
2-4
2-9
Section 3
3.1
3.2
Panel Layout and
Operation Overview ..................
3-1
Panel Layout .................................................................
Operation Overview ......................................................
3-2
3-9
Section 4
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
Panel Operation.........................
4-1
Power-On and Self-Check ............................................
Screen Descriptions ......................................................
Setting Parameters .......................................................
Measurement ................................................................
4-3
4-6
4-16
4-44
Section 5
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
II
GPIB ...........................................
5-1
Overview .......................................................................
Function ........................................................................
Interface Function .........................................................
Device Message List .....................................................
Setting and Checking GPIB ..........................................
Sample Programs .........................................................
5-2
5-3
5-5
5-6
5-36
5-38
Section 6
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
Operating Principles .................
6-1
Configuration .................................................................
Frequency Measurement ..............................................
Burst Width Measurement/Burst Period Measurement
Trigger Error ..................................................................
6-2
6-3
6-7
6-8
Section 7
7.1
7.2
7.3
Performance Test ......................
7-1
When to Run Performance Tests .................................
List of Performance Test Equipment ............................
Performance Test .........................................................
7-2
7-3
7-4
Section 8
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
Storing and Transporting .........
8-1
Cleaning the Cabinet ....................................................
Notes on Storage ..........................................................
Repackaging and Transporting .....................................
Final Disposal ...............................................................
8-2
8-3
8-4
8-4
Appendix A List of Initial Values and Preset
Values ...................................... A-1
Appendix B Performance Test
Result Sheet ............................
B-1
Index .......................................................... Index-1
III
IV.
Section 1 Overview
This section provides a product overview of the MF2412C/MF2413C/
MF2414C Microwave Frequency Counters (hereinafter, referred to as
“this unit”) and describes the structure of this operation manual,
standard composition, optional products and accessories for expanding
functions, standard specifications, and specifications of optional products.
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
Product Overview ......................................................
Manual Configuration .................................................
Product Composition .................................................
1.3.1 Standard composition ....................................
1.3.2 Options ..........................................................
1.3.3 Optional accessories .....................................
Specifications .............................................................
1.4.1 Standard specifications .................................
1.4.2 Specifications for Option 003 ........................
1-2
1-4
1-5
1-5
1-5
1-6
1-7
1-7
1-15
1-1
Section 1 Overview
1.1 Product Overview
This unit is a microwave frequency counter capable of directly measuring
frequencies without an external mixer. It also has burst wave carrier
frequency measurement and pulse width measurement capabilities,
which are indispensable for evaluating circuits and mobile radio
communications devices.
This device offers simple operability. A simple one-step operation on the
front panel permits switching between continuous wave measurement
and burst wave measurement. It is also possible to enter a variety of
settings from the front panel directly, including measurement resolution,
gate timing for pulse width measurement, and delay time.
The available frequency range and the Input1 input connector type differ
depending on the models. Table 1.1-1 lists the available frequency
ranges and input connector types for each model.
Table 1.1-1 Models, Available Frequency Ranges,
and Input 1 Connector Types
Model
Available Frequency Range
(Input1 and Input2)
Input1 Connector
Type
MF2412C
MF2413C
MF2414C
10 Hz to 20 GHz
10 Hz to 27 GHz
10 Hz to 40 GHz
N
SMA
K
Features
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1-2
Wide band measurement from 10 Hz to 40 GHz (MF2414C)
High-speed measurement using a fast counter module
High-accuracy burst measurement
Graphical display
Built-in template function*1
High-speed transient measurement*2
GPIB standardly equipped
1.1
Product Overview
*1: The template function is used to show whether the measured
frequency value is acceptable. The frequency range is specified in
advance by the upper and lower limits, and if a measured frequency
value falls within the specified range, “Go” is displayed. If not,
“No-Go” is displayed. This function also outputs a TTL level high
signal or a TTL level low signal from the AUX terminal, according to
the measured frequency value.
*2: The high-speed sampling function is used to measure the input
frequency in the minimum sampling period (10 µsec), without
measurement pause time. It is also usable for measuring the VCO
activation characteristics.
1-3
Section 1 Overview
1.2 Manual Configuration
This operation manual consists of eight sections and two appendices (A
and B). Table 1.2-1 shows an overview of these sections and appendices.
Table 1.2-1 Manual Configuration
Sections
Description
Provides a product overview and describes the structure
of this operation manual, standard composition, optional
Section 1
Overview
products and optional accessories for expanding
functions, and specifications.
Preparation
Describes what you must do before using (turning on)
Section 2
Before Use
this unit.
Describes the layout, function, and operation method of
Panel Layout and
Section 3
the keys, connectors, and displays on the front, side, and
Operation Overview
rear panels.
Section 4
Panel Operation
Describes detailed operation in manual mode.
Describes the functions, specifications, device messages,
Section 5
GPIB
and program examples of the standard GPIB interface
for controlling the unit remotely.
Describes the measurement principle, frequency
Section 6
Operating Principles measurement accuracy, pulse width measurement
accuracy, and trigger error.
Describes the measurement instruments, setup, and
Section 7
Performance Test
performance tests required for testing the performance
of this unit.
Storage and
Describes the daily care for the unit and how to store,
Section 8
Transportation
repack, and transport the unit.
Describes parameter values that are set automatically
when the parameter initial value setting command is
List of Initial Value executed or either there is no backup data or backup
Appendix A
and Preset Values
data is damaged when the unit is turned on. Also
describes parameter values that are set when the Preset
key is pressed.
Performance Test
Appendix B
Provides a sheet to record performance test results.
Result Sheet
1-4
1.3
Product Composition
1.3 Product Composition
This section describes the product composition.
1.3.1
Standard composition
Table 1.3.1-1 shows the standard product composition.
Table 1.3.1-1 Standard Product Composition
Item
Main unit
Standard
accessories
1.3.2
Options
Model
Name/No.
Product Name
Q’ty
MF2412C
MF2413C
MF2414C
Microwave Frequency Counter
1
Power cord (2.5 m)
1
F0012
Fuse (T3.15A)
2
W2897AE
Operation Manual
1
Remarks
Select one of
these models
Not included at
present
Table 1.3.2-1 shows the options for this unit.
Table 1.3.2-1 Options
Model
Name/No.
MF2412C-003
MF2413C-003
MF2414C-003
Product Name
Crystal Oscillator
Q’ty
Remarks
1
Aging rate: ±5 × 10−10/day
Select one of these models according
to the main unit model used.
1-5
Section 1 Overview
1.3.3
Optional accessories
Table 1.3.3-1 shows the optional accessories for this unit.
Table 1.3.3-1 Optional Accessories
Model
Name/No
Product Name
−Coaxial adapter−
K224
Coaxial adapter
34RKNF50
Coaxial adapter
K-P•K-J, SMA compatible (DC to 40 GHz, SWR1.2)
For MF2414C
Reinforced K-M•N-F (DC to 20 GHz, SWR1.2)
For MF2414C
−Coaxial cord−
1-6
K-P•K-P (DC to 40 GHz)
For MF2414C
BNC-P•RG-58A/U•BNC-P
Duel-end N-P (20 GHz)
For MF2414C
Duel-end APC3.5-P (27 GHz)
For MF2413C and MF2414C
J0527
Coaxial cord
J0127A
Coaxial cord (1 m)
J0853
Coaxial cord (2 m)
J0854
Coaxial cord (2 m)
J0007
J0008
B0409
B0598A
B0329L
B0390G
B0411A
−Others−
GPIB connection cable (1 m)
GPIB connection cable (2 m)
Carrying case
Carrying bag
Protective cover
Rack mounting
Rack mounting
Notes:
Remarks
With protection cover
Soft type, with protection cover
1/2MW2U
19” type, for single unit
19” type, for 2 parallel units
•
When connecting or disconnecting the K plug connector for
measuring to/from the K connector used on MF2414C Input 1,
make sure that the center pin does not rotate. If you will be
frequently connecting or disconnecting it, insert a coaxial
adapter such as K224 between the connectors so as to prevent
the cable from being damaged.
•
If there is a risk of this unit becoming electrically overloaded,
input the signal via the fuse terminal to prevent the counter's
internal circuit from being damaged.
1.4
Specifications
1.4 Specifications
1.4.1
Standard specifications
Table 1.4.1-1 shows the standard specifications of this unit.
Table 1.4.1-1 Standard Specifications
No.
1
1.1
1.2
(1)
(2)
(3)
2
3
4
5
6
Item
Frequency range
CW measurement
Input1
Input2
Pulse-modulated
wave measurement
Carrier frequency
Input1
Input2
Pulse width
MF2412C
MF2413C
MF2414C
10 Hz to 20 GHz
10 Hz to 27 GHz
10 Hz to 40 GHz
600 MHz to 20 GHz
600 MHz to 27 GHz
600 MHz to 40 GHz
10 MHz to 1 GHz (50 Ω), 10 Hz to 10 MHz (1 MΩ)
600 MHz to 20 GHz
600 MHz to 27 GHz
600 MHz to 40 GHz
Pulse-modulated wave cannot be measured.
Pulse Width Narrow:
100 ns to 0.1 s
Wide:
1 µs to 0.1 s
Pulse repetition
340 ns to 0.1 s (Pulse off time ≥ 240 ns)
External
trigger ≥1 µs
pulse width
Reference input
1, 2, 5, 10 MHz (≤ 1 ppm)
Reference output
Internal reference signal (10 MHz) or external reference input signal
(1, 2, 5, 10 MHz)
Input level range
Input1 (sine wave input): −33 to +10 dBm (<12.4 GHz)
−28 to +10 dBm (<20 GHz)
−25 to +10 dBm (<27 GHz)
{0.741 × f (GHz) − 44.6} to +10 dBm (≤40 GHz)
Input2 (sine wave input): 25 mVrms to 10 Vrms (1 MΩ)
25 mVrms to 2 Vrms (50 Ω)
External Trigger Input: 1.5 VDC ±(2 to 10) Vp-p
Reference Input:
1 to 5 Vp-p
Reference Output:
≥2 Vp-p (open terminal)
Input/output
Input1:
50 Ω
impedance
(nominal value)
Input2:
1 MΩ (≤35 pF), 50 Ω
External Trigger Input: ≥100 Ω
Reference Input:
≥1 kΩ
Reference Output:
≤400 Ω
1-7
Section 1 Overview
Table 1.4.1-1 Standard Specifications (Cont’d)
No.
Item
7
Connection
8
Input/output
connectors
MF2412C
Input1:
Input2:
External Trigger Input:
Reference Input:
Reference Output:
MF2414C
AC
AC
DC
AC
AC
Input1
N
SMA
K
Input2
BNC
←
←
BNC
←
←
BNC
←
←
BNC
←
←
External Trigger
Input
Reference Input
Reference Output
9
9.1
Gating function
Trigger
9.2
Trigger delay
9.3
Gate width
1-8
MF2413C
Int:
Detects trigger using measured signal
Ext:
Detects trigger using External Trigger Input
Line:
Detects trigger using AC Line
Time from trigger detection to count start: OFF, 20 ns to 0.1 s
≤320 ns: Variable in 20-ns steps
320 ns to 1 µs: Variable in 40-ns steps
≥1 µs: Continuously variable in two significant digits
100 ns to 0.1 s (Pulse Width Narrow)
1 µs to 0.1 s (Pulse Width Wide)
<1 µs: Variable in 20-ns steps
≥1 µs: Continuously variable in two significant digits
1.4
Specifications
Table 1.4.1-1 Standard Specifications (Cont’d)
No.
10
10.1
(1)
Item
Pulse modulated
wave measurement
Carrier frequency
measurement
Maximum
resolution
MF2412C
MF2413C
MF2414C
(Measured in Manual mode)
Maximum
Resolution (Hz)
1M
100 k
10 k
1k
100
10
1
100 m
10 m
10 n
100 n
1µ
10 µ
100 µ
1m
10 m
100 m
Gate width (s)
(2)
Measurement time
Resolution vs. Measurement time
(measurement carrier frequency: 1 GHz)
Resolution
Measurement
Time
1 Hz
10 Hz
100 Hz
1 kHz
10 kHz
100 kHz
1 MHz
200 s
20 s
2s
200 ms
20 ms
5 ms
5 ms
Measurement Time
TMS = max(T,Ts) × 1/(fR×TGW)2
f R:
Resolution
TGW: Gate width
TS:
Processing time (50 µs)
T:
Period
The above table shows an example of measurement time when
TGW = 0.1/fR and T = 2/fR.
(3)
Accuracy
±2 count ± Time base accuracy × Measurement frequency ± Trigger error
± Residual error 2 *
*: Residual error 2 = Measured frequency (GHz)/2 counts (rms)
1-9
Section 1 Overview
Table 1.4.1-1 Standard Specifications (Cont’d)
No.
Item
10.2
Modulated-pulse
width measurement
Resolution
Accuracy
Displayed unit
Pulse cycle
measurement
Resolution
Accuracy
Displayed unit
(1)
(2)
(3)
10.3
(1)
(2)
(3)
1-10
MF2412C
MF2413C
MF2414C
1 ns
±20 ns ± Time base accuracy × Measurement pulse width ± Trigger error
Fixed to µs
1 ns
±20 ns ± Time base accuracy × Measurement cycle ± Trigger error
Fixed to µs
1.4
Specifications
Table 1.4.1-1 Standard Specifications (Cont’d)
No.
11
11.1
Item
MF2412C
Frequency (CW)
measurement
Resolution/
Measurement time
MF2413C
MF2414C
Input1:
1 MHz/1 µs to 0.1 Hz/10 s (normal)
1 MHz/0.18 µs to 0.1 Hz/1.8 s (Fast, typical)
Input2:
10 MHz to 1 GHz (50 Ω): 1 MHz/1 µs to 0.1 Hz/10 s
10 Hz to 10 MHz (1 MΩ): 1 MHz to 0.001 MHz
See the graph below for the measurement time.
102
10
103
104
Measurement Cycle (Times)
105
106
107
108
(1mHz) (10mHz)
101
2
1
(100 mHz)
Measurement 100 m
Time
(Second)
10 m
(1 Hz)
(10 Hz)
1m
(100 Hz)
0.1 m
10
100
1k
10 k
100 k
1M
10 M
Input Frequency (Hz)
11.2
Measurement
accuracy
Input1
Count mode
Normal:
Fast:
Input2
(50 Ω)
(1 MΩ)
±1 count
± Time base accuracy × Measurement frequency
± Residual error 1 *
*: Measured frequency (GHz)/10 counts (rms)
Example: 0.5 counts (rms) at 5 GHz measurement
±1 count
± Time base accuracy × Measurement frequency
± Trigger error
± Residual error 2 *
*: Measured frequency (GHz)/2 counts (rms)
Example: 2.5 counts (rms) at 5 GHz measurement
10 MHz to 1 GHz: ±1 count
± Time base accuracy × Measurement frequency
10 Hz to 10 MHz: ±1 count
± Time base accuracy × Measurement frequency
± Trigger error
1-11
Section 1 Overview
Table 1.4.1-1 Standard Specifications (Cont’d)
No.
12
12.1
Item
MF2412C
MF2413C
Auto/Manual
measurement
Auto
(CW measurement)
FM tolerance:
Acquisition time:
(Burst measurement) FM tolerance:
Acquisition time:
MF2414C
35 MHzp-p
≤50 ms
35 MHzp-p
Measurement carrier frequency: 1 GHz,
Level: 0 dBm
Acquisition time TACQ = TACQ1 + TACQ2
TACQ1: See Table A.
TACQ2 = 4 × {(TP + 200 µs) × K}
K: See Table B.
TP: Pulse repetition cycle
Table A Pulse Repetition Cycle TP vs. TACQ1
Pulse Repetition Cycle
TP
TACQ1
1 µs ≤ TP ≤ 1 ms
1 ms < TP ≤ 10 ms
10 ms < TP ≤ 100 ms
1.1 s
1.6 s
6.1 s
Table B Gate Time TG vs. K
Gate Time TG
K
1 µs ≤ TG ≤ 10 µs
10 µs < TG ≤ 100 µs
100 µs < TG ≤ 100 ms
10000
100
5
Table C Test Data TG = 100 µs, K = 100
12.2
Manual
Pulse Repetition Cycle
TP
Acquisition Time
(Maximum) TACQ
200 to 400 µs
400 to 600 µs
600 to 800 µs
800 µs to 1 ms
1340 ms
1420 ms
1500 ms
1580 ms
Input tolerance:
(CW measurement) Acquisition time:
1-12
±30 MHz (600 MHz to 1 GHz),
±40 MHz (≥1 GHz)
≤15 ms
1.4
Specifications
Table 1.4.1-1 Standard Specifications (Cont’d)
No.
Item
12.3
Manual
(Burst
measurement)
13
Sample rate
14
14.1
High-speed sampling
Frequency resolution
MF2412C
MF2413C
MF2414C
30 MHz (0.6 to 1 GHz, Pulse Width Wide Only)
20 MHz (1 GHz, Pulse Width Narrow)
40 MHz (1 GHz, Pulse Width Wide)
Acquisition time: 15 ms (pulse repetition cycle < 1 ms)
Auto:
10 ms to 10 s (1-2-5 steps), Hold
Manual:
1 ms to 10 s (1-2-5 steps), Hold
Input tolerance:
Input1 High-Speed Sampling Cycle vs. Frequency Resolution
High-Speed Sampling
Cycle
Frequency
Resolution
10 s
100 s
1 ms
10 kHz
1 kHz
100 Hz
Input2 High-Speed Sampling Cycle vs. Frequency Resolution
(Measurement frequency 100 MHz)
14.2
14.3
14.4
14.5
15
15.1
15.2
High-Speed Sampling
Cycle
Frequency
Resolution
10 s
100 s
1 ms
100 kHz
10 kHz
1 kHz
Frequency accuracy 1 count
 Time base accuracy  Measurement frequency  Trigger error
 Residual error 2 *
*: Residual error 2 = Measurement frequency (GHz)/2 counts(rms)
Time accuracy
Input1:  Time base accuracy  Measurement time  Trigger error
 800 ns
Input2:  Time base accuracy  Measurement time  Trigger error
 64 ns/Measurement frequency
Data count
100 to 2000 (1-2-5 steps)
Sampling cycle
10 s to 1 ms (1-2-5 steps)
Template function
Limit frequency
0 Hz to 20 GHz
0 Hz to 27 GHz
0 Hz to 40 GHz
range
Setting resolution
1 Hz
1-13
Section 1 Overview
Table 1.4.1-1 Standard Specifications (Cont’d)
No.
16
Item
Allowable spurious
range
MF2412C
MF2413C
MF2414C
fc: Signal frequency, fs: Spurious signal frequency
|fcfs|  500 MHz
Signal level < 2 dBm
Signal Frequency
600 MHz  fc  40 GHz
Allowable spurious range
27 dBc
Signal level  2 dBm
Signal Frequency
600 MHz  fc  40 GHz
Allowable spurious range
35 dBc
|fcfs| > 500 MHz
Signal level < 2 dBm
Signal Frequency
600 MHz  fc  20 GHz
20 GHz < fc  27 GHz
27 GHz < fc  40 GHz
Allowable spurious range
27 dBc
32 dBc
{0.741  fc (GHz) + 12} dBc
Signal level  2 dBm
Signal Frequency
600 MHz  fc  20 GHz
20 GHz < fc  27 GHz
27 GHz < fc  40 GHz
17
17.1
17.2
18
19
Display
Display digits
Display type
Backup
Reference oscillator
stability
20
External control
21
Power supply
22
23
Temperature range
Dimensions/Mass
35 dBc
40 dBc
{0.741  fc (GHz) + 20} dBc
12 digits and one digit for minus sign
Fluorescent display, 256  64 dots
The settings at power off are stored into backup memory.
Activation
characteristics: 5  108/10 minutes
Aging rate:
5  109/Day,  8  108/year
(after 24 hours from power-on)
Temperature
characteristics: 5  108 ( 0 to 50C, at 25C as a reference)
Frequency:
10 MHz
GPIB (conforms to IEEE488.2)
Interface function:
SH1, AH1, T6, L4, SR1, RL1, PP0, DC1, DT1, C0, E2
100 to 120 V, 200 to 240 V* (auto switching), 50 to 60 Hz
During startup: 90 VA, Under normal operation : 80 VA
0 to 50C
88 (H)  213 (W)  350 (D) mm, 5 kg
*:
1-14
Allowable spurious range
Operating voltage: within the range of +10% to –15% from the rated
voltage
1.4
Specifications for Option 003
Table 1.4.2-1 Specifications for Option 003
Item
MF2412C-003, MF2413C-003, MF2414C-003
Frequency
Frequency
stability
1.4.2
Specifications
Aging rate
Temperature
/day
/year
Condition
10 MHz
±5 × 10−10
±2 × 10−8
After 72 hours from power-on
±5 × 10−9
−10 to +60°C (at 25°C as a reference)
1-15
Section 1 Overview
1-16.
Section 2 Preparation Before Use
This section describes the preparations and safety measures to be
performed before using this unit. The safety measures in this operation
manual refer to those required for avoiding the risk of injury and damage
to measuring instruments, including this unit. The safety measures are
divided into two types: measures to be performed through preparation,
and measures the user should know before using this unit.
2.1
2.2
2.3
Environmental Conditions of Installation Site ............ 2-2
Safety Measures ........................................................ 2-4
2.2.1 Measures related to power ............................ 2-4
2.2.2 Voltage overload on Input1 connector........... 2-5
2.2.3 Voltage overload on Input2 connector........... 2-6
2.2.4 Voltage overload on Reference 1, 2, 5, 10 MHz
Input connector .............................................. 2-7
2.2.5 Voltage overload on External Trigger Input
connector ....................................................... 2-8
Power Connection ..................................................... 2-9
2.3.1 Power requirements ...................................... 2-9
2.3.2 Connecting the power cord ........................... 2-9
2.3.3 Changing fuses.............................................. 2-11
2-1
Section 2 Preparation Before Use
2.1 Environmental Conditions of Installation Site
This unit normally operates in the temperature range from 0 to 50C.
Avoid using it under any of the following environment conditions which
may cause failure.











In places of direct sunlight
In dusty places
Outdoors
In liquids, such as water, oil, or organic solvents, and medical fluids,
or places where these liquids may adhere
In salty air or in place chemically active gases (sulfur dioxide,
hydrogen sulfide, chlorine, ammonia, nitrogen dioxide, or hydrogen
chloride etc.) are present
In places where high-intensity static electric charges or
electromagnetic fields are present
In places where abnormal power voltages (high or low) or
instantaneous power failures occur
In places where condensation occurs
In the presence of lubricating oil mists
In places at an altitude of more than 2,000 m
In the presence of frequent vibration or mechanical shock, such as in
cars, ships, or airplanes
CAUTION
Dew may form inside of this unit if it is moved to a warm
location after operating for a long time in a cool location.
In such a case, be sure to wait until the unit becomes
completely dry before turning on the power switch.
Doing so with condensation present may cause a short
circuit and damage the unit.
2-2
2.1
Environmental Conditions of Installation Site
Distance from fan :
A cooling fan is provided at the rear of this unit to prevent the internal
temperature from rising. Install this unit at least 10 cm away from
walls, peripheral devices, or the like to prevent blockage of ventilation
(see Figure 2.1-1).
At least
10 cm
Ventilation hole
for cooling fan
Figure 2.1-1 Unit Placement
CAUTION
Since this unit is equipped with an internal high-accuracy
oscillator, it must be installed horizontally to secure
high-accuracy measurement.
Do not use the unit if it is placed with its side or rear down,
or it is tilted.
If the unit is not installed horizontally, a small shock may
turn it over and harm the user.
2-3
Section 2 Preparation Before Use
2.2 Safety Measures
This section describes the safety measures to be taken to prevent electric
shock and damage to the unit.
2.2.1
Measures related to power
WARNING
Earth this unit before turning on power. Failing to do so
may lead to electric shock causing injury or even death.
Also perform a voltage check. Applying an abnormal
voltage exceeding the specifications may damage the unit
and cause fire.
Have only service personnel with proper training perform
maintenance on this unit.
2-4
2.2
2.2.2
Safety Measures
Voltage overload on Input1 connector
Figure 2.2.2-1 Input1 Connector
CAUTION

The Input1 connector does not have an overvoltage
protection circuit for protecting circuits from voltage
overloads. The maximum value of the input signal is
+10 dBm. Do not input voltage higher than this value.
Failing to obey this warning may cause the internal
circuits to burn out.

Be sure to input a sine wave signal to the Input1
connector.
Anritsu will not guarantee the measurement results
when a rectangular or pulse wave is input.

Internal local (Comb oscillation) leakage from the
Input1 connector may have influence on measurement
results of other instruments.
Local leakage (typical): About 35 dBm
If the effect from the local leakage cannot be ignored,
take measures for the system design, such as
providing isolation for the input part of the Input1
connector.
2-5
Section 2 Preparation Before Use
2.2.3
Voltage overload on Input2 connector
Figure 2.2.3-1 Input2 Connector
CAUTION

The Input2 connector has an overvoltage protection
circuit for protecting circuits from voltage overloads.
The maximum value is 10 Vrms when impedance 1 M
is selected, and is 2 Vrms when impedance 50  is
selected. Do not input voltage higher than this value.
Failing to obey this warning may cause the internal
circuits to burn out.

Be sure to input a sine wave signal to the Input2
connector.
Anritsu will not guarantee the measurement results
when a rectangular or pulse wave is input.
2-6
2.2
2.2.4
Safety Measures
Voltage overload on Reference 1, 2, 5, 10 MHz Input connector
Figure 2.2.4-1 Reference 1, 2, 5, 10 MHz Input Connector
CAUTION
The input level for the Reference 1, 2, 5, 10 MHz Input
connector is 1 to 5 Vp-p.
Applying a voltage exceeding 7 Vp-p may cause the
internal circuits to burn out.
2-7
Section 2 Preparation Before Use
2.2.5
Voltage overload on External Trigger Input connector
Figure 2.2.5-1 External Trigger Input Connector
CAUTION
The External Trigger Input connector has an overvoltage
protection circuit for protecting circuits from voltage
overloads. The maximum value is 10 Vp-p.
Do not input voltage higher than this value. Failing to
obey this warning may cause the internal circuits to burn
out.
2-8
2.3
Power Connection
2.3 Power Connection
2.3.1
Power requirements
For normal operation of this unit, observe the power voltage range
described below.
Power Source
Voltage Range
Frequency
100 Vac system
200 Vac system
100 to 120 V
200 to 240 V
50 to 60 Hz
50 to 60 Hz
Changeover between 100 and 200 V systems is made automatically.
CAUTION
Supplying power exceeding the above range may result in
electrical shock, fire, failure, or malfunction.
WARNING and CAUTION labels are affixed to the unit as safety
precautions to attract the attention of users.
2.3.2
Connecting the power cord
Check that the main power switch on the rear panel is turned off
(switched to the (O) side).
Insert the power plug into an outlet, and connect the other end to the
power inlet on the rear panel. To ensure that the instrument is earthed,
always use the supplied 3-pin power cord, and insert the plug into an
outlet with an earth terminal.
2-9
Section 2 Preparation Before Use
WARNING
Always connect the instrument to a properly grounded
outlet. Do not use the instrument with an extension cord or
transformer that does not have a ground wire.
If the instrument is connected to an ungrounded outlet,
there is a risk of receiving a fatal electric shock. In
addition, the peripheral devices connected to the
instrument may be damaged.
Unless otherwise specified, the signal-connector ground
terminal, like an external conductor of the coaxial
connector, of the instrument is properly grounded when
connecting the power cord to a grounded outlet. Connect
the ground terminal of DUT to a ground having the same
potential before connecting with the instrument. Failure to
do so may result in an electric shock, fire, failure, or
malfunction.
CAUTION
If an emergency arises causing the instrument to fail or
malfunction, disconnect the instrument from the power
supply by either turning off the main power switch on the
rear panel (switch to the (O) side), or by pulling out the
power cord or the power inlet.
When installing the instrument, place the instrument so
that an operator may easily operate the main power
switch.
If the instrument is mounted in a rack, a power switch for
the rack or a circuit breaker may be used for power
disconnection.
It should be noted that, the power switch on the front
panel of the instrument is a standby switch, and cannot be
used to cut the main power.
2-10
2.3
2.3.3
Power Connection
Changing fuses
This unit comes with two fuses. Use them when the fuse in the unit
burns out.
If the fuse burns out due a problem with the unit, make sure to fix the
problem before replacing the fuse.
Rated
Voltage
Fuse Rating
Indication
Fuse Rating
Fuse Name
Model
Name/No.
100 V
230 V
T3.15 A
T3.15 A
3.15 A, 250 V
3.15 A, 250 V
T3.15A250V
T3.15A250V
F0012
F0012
Fuse holder
Rated voltage
Fuse rating
WARNING

Make sure to switch off power and unplug the power
cord from the power outlet before attempting to replace
the fuse. Failing to obey this warning may result in
electric shock.

Before turning on the power again after replacing the
fuse, make sure that the unit is earthed as described
above and the appropriate AC power supply is used.
Failing to earth the unit may result in electric shock.
Using the wrong AC power supply may damage the
unit.
2-11
Section 2 Preparation Before Use
CAUTION
If you run out of spare fuses, obtain new ones that have
the same type and same ratings as the ones that originally
came with the unit.

If you do not use the same type and same ratings of
fuse, you may experience problems such as not being
able to install it, problems connecting it, or delays in
blowout.

If you use a fuse with a voltage rating that is too high, it
may not blow out the next time there is a problem,
putting the unit at risk of catching on fire.
After taking the safety measures described above, replace the fuse,
following the procedure below.
Step
Fuse Replacement Procedure
1
Turn off the power line switch on the rear panel. Confirm that the
LCD on the front panel and all LEDs go out at this time.
2
Open the fuse holder shown below.
Fuse holder
Rated voltage
*:
2-12.
Fuse rating
3
Remove the fuse from the fuse holder, and insert a new fuse*.
4
Return the fuse holder to its original position.
Replacement fuses may be ordered from our service department when
necessary. Provide us with the model name, number, part name, and
quantity you need.
Section 3 Panel Layout and Operation Overview
This section describes the layouts and functions of the keys, switches,
LEDs, connectors, and displays on the front, and rear panels of this unit.
This section also provides an overview of how to operate these controls.
For more information on operating the unit, refer to Section 4 “Panel
Operation.”
3.1
3.2
Panel Layout ..............................................................
3.1.1 Front panel layout ..........................................
3.1.2 Rear panel layout ..........................................
Operation Overview ...................................................
3.2.1 Operation overview........................................
3.2.2 Parameter setup hierarchy ............................
3.2.3 Functions of each key....................................
3-2
3-2
3-7
3-9
3-9
3-10
3-13
3-1
Section 3 Panel Layout and Operation Overview
3.1 Panel Layout
This section describes the keys, switches, LEDs, connectors, and displays
on the front and rear panels.
3.1.1
Front panel layout
Figure 3.1.1-1 shows the layout of the front panel, followed by Table
3.1.1-1, which provides functional descriptions of each component.
13
12
1
11
2
3
10
4
5
6
7
Figure 3.1.1-1 Front Panel Layout
3-2
9
8
3.1
Panel Layout
Table 3.1.1-1 Function of Components on Front Panel
No.
Label
Description
1
Power switch, Stby LED and On LED
When the Power Line switch on the rear panel is turned from Off to On,
this unit enters the standby state, in which power is supplied only to the
internal crystal oscillator. The Stby LED lights up orange during the
standby state.
When the unit is in the standby state, pressing the Power switch turns
on the unit and supplies power to all circuits, allowing you to use the
unit. The On LED lights up green when the unit becomes ready.
If the Power switch is pressed when the unit is on, the unit enters the
standby state.
2
Input1 input connector and Input1 LED
Connect the signal to this connector when measuring frequencies of
600 MHz or higher, particularly frequencies of 1 GHz or higher.
The available frequency range and the connector type differ depending
on models. See Table 1.1-1 for details.
The Input1 LED lights up when the Input1 connector becomes usable.
To use the Input1 connector, select “Input1” from the Input CH menu
on the Input parameter setup screen.
3
Input2 input connector and Input2 LED
Connect the signal to this connector when measuring frequencies from
10 Hz to 1 GHz.
The Input2 LED lights up when the Input2 connector becomes usable.
To use the Input2 connector, select “Input2” from the Input CH menu
on the Input parameter setup screen.
4
Hold key, Restart key, and Hold LED
While frequency measurement is being performed repeatedly, pressing
the Hold key stops measurement and keeps the current value display.
This state is referred to as a hold state. While the unit is in the hold
state, pressing the Hold key restores the repetition measurement.
The Hold LED lights when the unit enters the hold state.
Pressing the Restart key restarts a measurement or statistical process.
While the unit is in the hold state, pressing the Restart key performs a
measurement or statistical process only once and places the unit in the
hold state again. This operation is referred to as single measurement.
3-3
Section 3 Panel Layout and Operation Overview
Table 3.1.1-1 Function of Components on Front Panel (Cont'd)
No.
Label
Description
5
Frequency Acquisition LED
This LED indicates whether the frequency of the signal input to the
Input1 connector is to be acquired automatically (Auto) or manually
(Manual).
When “Auto” is selected, the unit measures the input signals across the
entire measurement frequency bands and then measures only the signal
frequencies that have reached the prescribed level.
When “Manual” is selected and a signal within the prescribed frequency
input tolerance is input, the unit measures the frequency of that signal.
The Frequency Acquisition LED lights up when “Auto” is selected as the
frequency acquisition mode. To select automatic frequency acquisition,
select “Auto” from the Mode menu on the Freq Acq parameter setup
screen.
6
Meas Mode key and Meas Mode LED
The Meas Mode key is used to determine whether to measure burst
waves (Burst) or continuous waves (CW).
When burst wave measurement is selected, the unit can measure the
carrier frequency, burst signal width, and burst repetition period.
When continuous wave measurement is selected, the unit measures
that frequency.
The Meas Mode LED lights up when burst wave measurement is
selected.
7
Return to Meas key and Setup LED
To return to the measurement screen from a parameter setup screen,
press the Return to Meas key.
The Setup LED lights up when the parameter setup screen is selected
(displayed).
3-4
3.1
Panel Layout
Table 3.1.1-1 Function of Components on Front Panel (Cont'd)
No.
8
9
10
11
Label
Description
Numeric keys and direct keys
In the numeric input mode, numeric values from 0 to 9 and a dot
(printed on the lower right of each key) can be entered by pressing the
corresponding keys. Also, the +/, GHz, MHz, kHz, and BS keys are
used to enter numeric values, and they are collectively referred to as
“numeric keys.”
In modes other than the numeric input mode, the above keys are used
to display the parameter setup screens corresponding to the items
printed above the panel. These keys are collectively referred to as
“direct keys.”
Freq: Used to display the Freq Acq parameter setup screen.
Level: Used to display the Level Acq parameter setup screen.
Burst: Used to display the Burst parameter setup screen.
Trig: Used to display the Trigger parameter setup screen.
TD:
Used to display the Trigger Delay parameter setup screen.
GW: Used to display the Gate Width parameter setup screen.
Temp: Used to display the Template parameter setup screen.
Ofs: Used to display the Offset parameter setup screen.
Stat: Used to display the Statistic parameter setup screen.
Input: Used to display the Input parameter setup screen.
Sys: Used to display the System parameter setup screen.
Pressing any of the direct keys displays the corresponding parameter
setup screen and turns on the Setup LED.
<, >, and Enter key
When a measurement screen is displayed, pressing the < or > key
changes the frequency measurement resolution.
When a parameter setup screen is displayed, pressing the < or > key
moves the cursor.
The Enter key is used to toggle between two parameters, select one of
three or more parameters, or turn on/off the input mode of the numeric
input menu.
 and  keys
When a measurement screen is displayed, pressing the  or  key
changes the measurement pause time (Sample Rate).
When the Level Acq parameter setup screen is displayed, pressing the 
or  key changes the manual amplitude discrimination value.
When the Trig Delay or Gate Width parameter setup screen is displayed,
pressing the  or  key increments or decrements the numeric
parameter value.
256  64 dot LCD
This display is used to display frequency measurement results and set
various parameters.
3-5
Section 3 Panel Layout and Operation Overview
Table 3.1.1-1 Function of Components on Front Panel (Cont'd)
No.
12
13
3-6
Label
Description
Local key and Remote LED
Pressing the Local key changes the state of this unit from the remote
control state to the local control state. The Remote LED lights up when
the unit is in the remote state.
Preset key
Pressing the Preset key restores all the parameters to the default
values. For details on parameter setting values, refer to Appendix A
“List of Initial Value and Preset Values.”
3.1
3.1.2
Panel Layout
Rear panel layout
Figure 3.1.2-1 shows the layout of the rear panel, followed by Table
3.1.2-1 that provides the functional description of each component.
8
7
6
9
1
2
3
4
5
Figure 3.1.2-1 Rear Panel Layout
3-7
Section 3 Panel Layout and Operation Overview
Table 3.1.2-1 Function of Components on Rear Panel
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
3-8
Label
Description
Power line switch
Switch for supplying power to the unit. Power is supplied to the
crystal oscillator when this switch is switched from the Off to the On
position (pressed down). At this time, if the power button on the
front panel is turned on, power is supplied to the components on this
unit.
Fuse holder
A fuse is contained. When replacing the fuse, make sure to use one
of the same type and rating (T3.15A), to avoid bodily harm or damage
to the unit.
AC power inlet
Connect the power cord. Make sure to use only a cord properly rated
for this unit to avoid bodily harm or damage to the unit.
Functional earth terminal
This is the terminal that is electrically connected to the chassis of the
equipment.
GPIB interface connector
Connect a GPIB cable to this connector and connect the other end to
the host computer when controlling the unit from a host computer.
Make sure to turn off the unit and host computer before connecting
the cable.
Reference signal input connector and reference signal output
connector
When operating the unit using an external reference signal, input the
signal to the reference signal input connector. The unit supports
four frequencies: 1, 2, 5, and 10 MHz.
The reference signal used by the unit is output from the reference
signal output connector.
Cooling fan
Provided to let out hot air from inside the unit. The fan must be at
least 10 cm away from any surrounding obstacles.
External trigger input connector
Provided to input an external trigger signal for performing frequency
measurement in synchronization with external equipment. This
connector is active when the external trigger (Ext Trig) is enabled.
AUX output connector
Provided to output a signal from a unit component. The signal to be
output is selected according to the parameter setting.
3.2
Operation Overview
3.2 Operation Overview
3.2.1
Operation overview
This unit has two major states: measurement state and parameter setup
state. Also, two screen display types are provided, in accordance with
these states.
When the unit is turned on, the start screen showing the self-check
results is displayed for several seconds, and the measurement screen is
then displayed.
The measurement screen and the parameter setup screen can be
switched by pressing a direct key or the Return to Meas key, as shown in
Figure 3.2.1-1. Pressing a direct key changes the screen from the
measurement screen to the corresponding parameter setup screen, and
pressing the Return to Meas key changes from a parameter setup screen
to the measurement screen.
Power On
Start screen
Normal end of self-check
<Normal Operation Screens>
Measurement screen
Pressing a direct key
Setup LED: Off
Parameter setup screen
Pressing the
Return to Meas
key
Setup LED: On
Fiure. 3.2.1-1 Screen Transition
3-9
Section 3 Panel Layout and Operation Overview
3.2.2
Parameter setup hierarchy
Pressing a direct key to set parameters displays the corresponding
parameter setup screen. In the setup screen, the parameters listed in
Level 1 column of Table 3.2.2-1 can be set.
If a parameter that cannot be set from Level 1 is selected, the Level 2
parameters are displayed on the setup screen, enabling you to set various
parameters. See Table 3.2.2-1 for the hierarchical structure of each
parameter setup screen.
Table 3.2.2-1 Hierarchical Structure of Parameter Setup Screens
Conventions
Mode (frame):
Indicates a key.
[Mode] (brackets):
Indicates a displayed menu item.
Auto/Manual (slash): Indicates exclusive selection.
Direct Key
Measurement mode
Meas Mode
CW/Burst
Frequency acquisition*1
Freq
Level acquisition*1
Level
Burst*1
Burst
3-10
Level 1
Level 2


Mode [Mode]
Auto/Manual
Measurement result assignment
[Last Meas]
Frequency value input [Set Freq]
Counting method [Count]
Fast/Normal
Mode [Mode]
Auto/Manual
Auto setup value assignment
[Last Meas]
Level up []
Level down []
Burst measurement mode [Mode]
Freq/Width/Period
Burst measurement polarity
[Polarity]
Pos/Neg
(Pos)/
(Neg)
Burst width [Width]
Wide/Narrow











3.2
Operation Overview
Table 3.2.2-1 Hierarchical Structure of Parameter Setup Screens (Cont’d)
Direct Key
Trigger & gate End
Trig
Trigger delay
TD
Gate width
GW
Template
Temp
Offset
Ofs
Statistic processing
Stat
Input
Input
Level 1
Level 2
Trigger mode [Mode]
Int/Ext/Line


Trigger polarity [Slope]
Rise/Fall
(Rise)/
(Fall)

Gate End [Gate End]
On/Off
Burst monitor screen
[Trig Delay]
Burst monitor screen
[Gate Width]
Template [Template]
On/Off
Upper frequency limit
[Upper Limit]
Lower frequency limit
[Lower Limit]
Movement direction indicator
[Indicate]
On/Off
Offset mode [Mode]
Off/+Offset/Offset/ppm
Measurement value assignment
[Last Meas]
Offset frequency input
[Set Freq]
Update mode [Update]
On/Off
Statistic processing mode [Mode]
Off/Mean/MaxMin/P-P
Statistic processing extract mode
[Extract]
Disc/Overlap
Statistic processing
sampling count [Sample]
1/2/3/4/5/6
(See Table 4.3.11-1 for details.)
Input connector [Input CH]
Input1/Input2
Input impedance*2 [Impd2]
50 /1 M
Input ATT*3 [ATT2]
On/Off

















3-11
Section 3 Panel Layout and Operation Overview
Table 3.2.2-1 Hierarchical Structure of Parameter Setup Screens (Cont’d)
Direct Key
Level 1
Level 2
Recall [Recall]
0 to 9
Save [Save]
0 to 9
GPIB [GPIB]
System
Sys
Config [Config]


Address setup [Address]
1 to 30
Reference signal [Freq Ref]
Auto/Int
AUX [AUX]
Off/Go/End/Lvl/Gate/Rest/Acq
Intensity [Intensity]
Off/25%/50%/75%/100%
System screen [System]
*1: Valid only for signals input to Input1.
*2:
*3:
3-12
Valid only when Input2 is set.
Valid only when Input2 and 1 M are set.
3.2
3.2.3
Operation Overview
Functions of each key
The unit enters the parameter setup state when a direct key is pressed.
The function of each key in the parameter setup state is described below.
(1) Resolution keys
Function as right/left cursor keys.
(2) Sample Rate key
Clears entered items before they are finalized.
(3) Menu keys
Function as numeric, unit, and backspace (BS) keys.
Table 3.2.3-1 shows the function of each key and the Setup LED status in
the measurement screen and setup screen.
Table 3.2.3-1 Functions of Keys and Setup LED Statuses in Measurement and
Parameter Setup Screens
Functions
<>

Measurement
screen
Resolution
setting
Setup screen
Cursor
Sample rate
setting
Setting value
change*
*:
Direct Keys
(Numeric Keys)
Setup
LED
Direct keys
Off
Direct keys or
numeric keys
On
For Level acquisition setup and Burst monitor screens
3-13
Section 3 Panel Layout and Operation Overview
3-14.
Section 4 Panel Operation
This section describes the panel operations of this unit. Refer to Section
5 “GPIB” for remote control operations using the GPIB.
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
Power-On and Self-Check ......................................... 4-3
4.1.1 Turning on the unit......................................... 4-3
4.1.2 Self-check ...................................................... 4-4
Screen Descriptions ................................................... 4-6
4.2.1 Measurement screen ..................................... 4-6
4.2.2 Setup screen ................................................. 4-11
4.2.3 System screen ............................................... 4-15
Setting Parameters .................................................... 4-16
4.3.1 Switching input .............................................. 4-16
4.3.2 Sample rate ................................................... 4-17
4.3.3 Frequency resolution ..................................... 4-18
4.3.4 Measurement mode....................................... 4-20
4.3.5 Level acquisition ............................................ 4-21
4.3.6 Frequency acquisition.................................... 4-22
4.3.7 Burst measurement mode ............................. 4-24
4.3.8 Gating function .............................................. 4-26
4.3.9 Trigger and gate end ..................................... 4-29
4.3.10 Offset ............................................................. 4-30
4.3.11 Statistical processing ..................................... 4-32
4.3.12 Template function .......................................... 4-36
4.3.13 Hold ............................................................... 4-37
4.3.14 Restart ........................................................... 4-37
4.3.15 System ........................................................... 4-38
4.3.16 High-speed sampling function ....................... 4-42
4.3.17 Data storage function .................................... 4-43
Measurement ............................................................. 4-44
4.4.1 CW frequency measurement via Input1
(Measurement with frequency acquisition = Auto,
level acquisition = Auto) ................................ 4-44
4.4.2 CW frequency measurement via Input1
(Measurement with frequency acquisition = Manual,
level acquisition = Auto) ................................ 4-45
4.4.3 CW frequency measurement via Input1
(Measurement with frequency acquisition = Auto,
level acquisition = Manual) ............................ 4-46
4.4.4 Burst wave measurement via Input1
(Measurement with frequency acquisition = Auto,
level acquisition = Auto) ................................ 4-47
4-1
Section 4 Panel Operation
4.4.5
Burst wave measurement via Input1
(Measurement with frequency acquisition = Manual,
level acquisition = Auto) ................................ 4-49
4.4.6 Burst wave measurement via Input1
(Measurement with frequency acquisition = Manual,
level acquisition = Manual) ............................ 4-50
4.4.7 Burst wave pulse width and repetition period
measurement via Input1 ................................ 4-51
4.4.8 Burst wave measurement via Input1 using gating
function .......................................................... 4-54
4.4.9 Frequency measurement via Input2
(10 MHz to 1 GHz)......................................... 4-57
4.4.10 Frequency measurement via Input2
(10 Hz to 10 MHz) ......................................... 4-58
4-2
4.1
Power-On and Self-Check
4.1 Power-On and Self-Check
4.1.1
Turning on the unit
Turn on the unit, from Step 1, following the procedure below sequentially.
Step 1:
Make sure that the power supply voltage is the proper rating (100 to 120
V or 200 to 240 V, 50 to 60 Hz) and the unit is properly earthed (refer to
Sections 2.2 and 2.3).
Step 2:
Turn on the power line switch on the rear panel.
Step 3:
Wait until the unit warms up and the crystal oscillator frequency is
stabilized. The warm-up time required for the crystal oscillator to reach
the necessary level of stability depends on the crystal oscillator type used,
as shown in Table 4.1.1-1 below. The warm-up time is defined as the
elapsed time from the moment the power line switch on the rear panel is
turned on.
Table 4.1.1-1 Required Warm-Up Time
Crystal Oscillator
Type
Standard Product
Option 003
Activation Characteristics
Warm-Up
Time
At least
1 hour
At least
1 hour
Rating
5  108
5  108
Aging Rate
Warm-Up
Time
At least
24 hours
At least
72 hours
Rating
5  109/day
5  1010/day
Step 4:
Turn on the power switch on the front panel.
At this time, if the setting values at the last time the unit was turned off
are saved in the backup memory, these values are loaded and applied. If
not, the initial setting values described in Appendix A are applied.
It is also possible to turn on the unit with the initial setting values.
Turn on the power switch while pressing down the Enter key.
Step 5:
Frequency measurement is now possible with this unit.
4-3
Section 4 Panel Operation
4.1.2
Self-check
When the unit is turned on, the self-check screen shown in Figure 4.1.2-1
(a) is displayed and a simple self-check is started.
If the self-check is completed successfully, the self-check completion
screen shown in Figure 4.1.2-1 (b) is displayed for about one second.
The measurement screen is then displayed and measurement starts
according to parameters set in advance.
If the simple self-check finds an error with the unit, Fail is displayed for
the erroneous point (see Figure 4.1.2-1 (c)) and then the unit stops
operation.
It is also possible to conduct a detailed self-check by turning on the power
switch on the front panel while pressing down the Return to Meas key.
The screens during a detailed self-check are the same as those during a
simple self-check (see Figure 4.1.2-1 (a) and (b)).
If the detailed self-check finds an error with the unit, Fail is displayed for
the erroneous point (see Figure 4.1.2-1 (d)) and then the unit stops
operation.
If the problems discovered during a simple self-check are only GPIB
errors (see Figure 4.1.2-1 (e)), it is possible to perform the measurement
with the GPIB function cancelled (measurement through panel
operation), by pressing the Preset key.
The following descriptions are provided, taking the MF2414C as an
example. Replace MF2414C in the description with MF2412C or
MF2413C when using the MF2412C or MF2413C.
4-4
4.1
Power-On and Self-Check
(a) Self-check (simple and detailed) screen
(b) Self-check completed (simple and detailed) screen
(c) Self-check failed (simple) screen
(d) Self-check failed (detailed) screen
(e) Self-check GPIB failed (simple) screen
Figure 4.1.2-1 Self-Check Screens
4-5
Section 4 Panel Operation
4.2 Screen Descriptions
This unit has three major screens: a measurement screen, a setup screen,
and a system screen. The measurement screen consists of two screens:
a normal measurement screen and a template screen. The setup screen
consists of a menu screen and a burst monitor screen.
This section provides a basic description of screen display.
Table 4.2-1 Screen Configuration
Major
Measurement screen
Setup screen
System screen
4.2.1
Minor
Normal measurement screen
Template screen
Menu screen
Burst monitor screen
Self-check result display screen
Measurement screen
When the self-check after power-on is completed normally, the unit
enters the measurement state and the measurement screen is displayed.
This unit has two kinds of measurement screens: a normal measurement
screen and a template screen.
[Normal measurement screen]
Figure 4.2.1-1 shows a normal measurement screen example, where
frequency measurement results are indicated by nominal values. This
screen is displayed after the initial setup is performed.
(1) Main display
(2) Unit display
(4) State display
(3) Sub display
Figure 4.2.1-1 Normal measurement screen
The following describes the items (1) through (4) in Figure 4.2.1-1.
(1) Main display
Displays frequency measurement results.
(2) Unit display
Displays units for each set of three digits of frequencies displayed on
the main display.
4-6
4.2
Screen Descriptions
(3) Sub-display
Displayed content changes, depending on what function is specified
such as the statistical processing result, offset frequency value,
pulse width during burst measurement, and repetition period.
(4) State display
Displays the measurement state.
Table
measurement states and provides an overview.
4.2.1-1
lists
the
Table 4.2.1-1 Measurement State Display
Display
Gate
UNCAL
Description
When “ ” is displayed next to “Gate”, the frequency
of the input signal is being measured.
Measurement is stopped when “ ” is not displayed.
Displayed when the specifications of the unit cannot
be guaranteed because the input signal maintaining
the level required to obtain the set resolution is not
being supplied continuously.*
Auto
Displays the unit’s level setting and input level.
*: UNCAL is displayed in the following case, indicating the measurement
is not valid.
 The input signal level is out of the measurable range.
 The set measurement resolution cannot be obtained from the
measurement result.
 A burst signal that has a pulse width with which a settable
measurement resolution cannot be obtained, even if it is averaged,
is input during burst carrier frequency measurement.
 Input2 is selected as the signal input terminal connector when the
burst measurement mode is set.
4-7
Section 4 Panel Operation
The level display of the (4) State display in Figure 4.2.1-1 is described
below (see Figure 4.2.1-2).
Input display
Level display
Figure 4.2.1-2 Level display
The level display consists of the input display showing how to handle the
input signal and the level display showing the power of the input signal.
Table 4.2.1-2 describes the items displayed in the input display, and
Table 4.2.1-3 describes the indication in the level display.
Table 4.2.1-2 Items in Input Display
Displayed
Item
Auto
L0 to L7
ATTon
No display
Description
Indicates that Input1 is selected and the level acquisition
mode is set to Auto, or that Input2 is selected and the
impedance is set to 50 .
Indicates that the amplitude discrimination value is set
to one of L0 to L7 when Input1 is selected and the level
acquisition mode is set to Manual.
Indicates that the 20-dB attenuator is set to On when
Input2 is selected and the input impedance is set to 1
M.
Indicates that Input2 is selected and the input impedance
is set to 1 M.
Table 4.2.1-3 Indication in Level Display
Indication
Description
Over
Indicates that the input level is too high.
Measurement cannot be performed normally until the
input level is lowered.
Indicates that the input level is proper.
to
Indicates that the input level is measurable.
Indicates that the input level is too low.
Measurement cannot be performed normally until the
input level is raised.
4-8
4.2
Screen Descriptions
[Template screen]
Figure 4.2.1-3 shows the template screen, which visually indicates
whether the frequency measurement results fall within the preset range.
This screen allows making a decision instantly during adjustment,
without calculating frequency values.
(9) Movement direction indicator
(Displayed only when the measurement
result is out of the display range.)
(2) Frequency position indicator
(8) Judgment result
(1) Frequency display
Analog display area
(3) Lower frequency limit
position
(4) Lower frequency limit
(7) Central frequency position
(6) Upper frequency limit
(5) Upper frequency
limit position
Figure 4.2.1-3 Template Screen
The following describes the items (1) through (9) in Figure 4.2.1-3.
(1) Frequency display
Displays the frequency measurement results.
(2) Frequency position indicator
Indicates the position of the measured frequency within the range
set in advance by the upper frequency limit and the lower frequency
limit. If the measured frequency exceeds the LCD display range,
the frequency position indicator is held at the left or right end.
(3) Lower frequency limit position
Indicates the set lower frequency limit on the LCD.
(4) Lower frequency limit
Displays the set lower frequency limit value.
(5) Upper frequency limit position
Indicates the set upper frequency limit on the LCD.
(6) Upper frequency limit
Displays the set upper frequency limit value.
(7) Central frequency position
Indicates the position of the central frequency obtained from the
upper and lower frequency limits.
4-9
Section 4 Panel Operation
(8) Judgment result
The measured result is judged regarding whether it is within the
frequency range determined by the upper and lower frequency limits,
and the judgment result is displayed.
Within the range:
Displays “Go”
Outside of the range: Displays “No-Go”
(9) Movement direction indicator
When the measured frequency value is out of the LCD display range,
the measured frequency value is compared with the previously
measured value to find out whether the frequency is falling or rising,
and the direction of movement is displayed here.
The movement direction indicator can be displayed (on) or hidden
(off) by setting the parameter.
Table 4.2.1-4 shows the meaning of the display of the movement
direction indicator.
Table 4.2.1-4 Movement Direction Indicator
Indicator
Description
Indicates that the measured frequency value is
moving to the left (lower frequency direction).
Indicates that the measured frequency value is
moving to the right (higher frequency direction).
Indicates that the measured frequency value is
constant.
4-10
4.2
4.2.2
Screen Descriptions
Setup screen
When a direct key is pressed when the unit is in the measurement state
(the measurement screen is displayed and the Setup LCD on the front
panel goes off), the unit enters the parameter setup state (the setup
screen is displayed and the Setup LCD on the front panel lights up).
The following describes the two types of setup screens.
[Menu Screen]
The menu screen displays a list of menu items corresponding to the
direct key pressed. Use the < and > keys to select parameters and
setting values, and enter numeric data. Figure 4.2.2-1 shows a menu
screen example.
(1) Frequency
(4) Title
(2) Setting display
(3) Menu
Figure 4.2.2-1 Menu Screen
The following describes the items (1) through (4) in Figure 4.2.2-1.
(1) Frequency
Displays the frequency measurement results.
(2) Setting display
Displays numeric data, such as frequencies. This area is also used
as a response display area, in which numeric values entered from
the numeric keypad are displayed as they are.
(3) Menu
 The menu displays up to four function selections at the same time.
For the sake of convenience, these function are called F1, F2, F3,
and F4, starting from the left.
 A function selected by the < and > keys is highlighted and
displayed within a thick frame.
 The structure of each menu is as follows:
(a)
Function name
[Setting state]
(b)
Lower screen
 Displays the name of the function.
 The content in brackets indicates the
value of the selected parameter.
 When the menu can extend to a lower
*
level, the group name is displayed
affixed with an asterisk (*).
4-11
Section 4 Panel Operation
 The menu operation methods are described below.
(a) Select a menu (F1 through F4) to be set using the < and >
keys.
(b) Set the parameters as necessary. The setup procedure
differs depending on the selected menu. See Table 4.2.2-1
below.
Table 4.2.2-1 Parameter Setup Procedure
Parameter Type
Setup Procedure
Parameters are changed alternately by pressing the Enter key.
The following figure shows an example of [Auto/Manual]. If the Enter
key is pressed when [Manual] is selected, [Auto] is selected, and vice
versa.
Menu with two selections
Ex.: [On/Off],
[Auto/Manual]
Enter
Enter
Measurement starts once the parameter is switched.
Pressing the Enter key pops up a parameter menu. Select a parameter
using the < and > keys and fix it by pressing the Enter key.
Menu with three or more
selections
The measurement is started with the parameters changed and fixed.
Ex.: [Off/Offset/ppm]
Numeric value input
menu
Ex.: [Manual Freq]
4-12
Select a menu that requires numeric value input, and then press the
Enter key. The setting value display is highlighted, enabling numeric
values to be input using the numeric keypad. When a numeric value is
input, this area becomes a response data display area that displays the
input numeric value. Pressing the unit key fixes the input value and
starts the measurement. The setting value is still highlighted at this
time, allowing another numeric value to be input. Press the Enter,
Return to Meas, < or > key to exit from the numeric value input mode.
4.2
Screen Descriptions
(4) Title
Displays the title given to each setup screen.
See Table 3.2.2-1 for the parameters that can be set using the direct
keys and the menu screen.
4-13
Section 4 Panel Operation
[Burst Monitor Screen]
The trigger delay value and gate width can be set in this screen.
Pressing TD or GW displays the burst monitor screen shown in Figure
4-2.2-2 below. Values can be set while monitoring the detection signal
for input signals of one burst.
(1) Carrier frequency
(2) Trigger delay cursor
(3) Internal detection signal
(4) Trigger delay
(7) Gate width
(5) Gate
(6) Gate width cursor
Figure 4.2.2-2 Burst monitor screen
(1) Carrier frequency
Displays the carrier frequency measured by the currently selected
gate.
(2) Trigger delay cursor
Shows the position of the trigger delay. The cursor moves right
and left according to the trigger delay value.
(3) Internal detection signal
Displays the burst detection signal.
(4) Trigger delay
Displays the trigger delay.
(5) Gate
Displays the gate interval using a thick line. The gate interval
moves right and left according to the trigger delay and gate width.
(6) Gate width cursor
Indicates the gate width. The cursor moves to the right and left
according to the gate width.
(7) Gate width
Displays the gate width.
The parameter that can be set is highlighted. Use the cursor keys, <
and >, and numeric keypad to make settings.
4-14
4.2
4.2.3
Screen Descriptions
System screen
Figure 4.2.3-1 shows the system screen that displays self-check results.
The simple self-check result system screen is displayed, following the
start screen after power-on. The detailed self-check results system
screen is displayed when the Sys key is pressed and [Config] and
[System] are then selected from the menu.
(a) Simple self-check result system screen
(b) Detailed self-check result system screen
Figure 4.2.3-1 System screens
4-15
Section 4 Panel Operation
4.3 Setting Parameters
This section describes the parameters and their setting method.
When parameter settings are changed by using the panel keys, frequency
measurement or statistical processing is restarted and a new
measurement is performed.
When parameters are changed in the hold state, frequency measurement
or statistical processing is performed once and the unit returns to the
hold state.
4.3.1
Switching input
The connector and signal input impedance for the signal to be measured
can be selected, and the attenuator setting can be configured in the
screen shown in Figure 4.3.1-1. This screen is displayed by pressing the
Input key.
Figure 4.3.1-1 Input Switching Screen
(1) Menu F1: Input CH
Selects the connector for inputting the signal to be measured along
with the measurement frequency.
The following shows the
correspondence between the selected connector and frequency
ranges:
Input1: 600 MHz to 20 GHz (for MF2412C)
600 MHz to 27 GHz (for MF2413C)
600 MHz to 40 GHz (for MF2414C)
Input2: 10 Hz to 1 GHz (common to MF2412C/MF2413C/MF2414C)
(2) Menu F2: Impd2
Selects the input impedance for Input2. The impedance can be
switched between 50  and 1 M for Input2, though the input
impedance for Input1 is fixed to 50 . The following shows the
correspondence between the selected impedance and frequency
ranges:
50 :
1 M:
10 MHz to 1 GHz
10 Hz to 10 MHz
(3) Menu F3: ATT2
Enables (on) or disables (off) the 20-dB attenuator inserted in the
Input2 1-M system.
4-16
4.3
4.3.2
Setting Parameters
Sample rate
Sample rate refers to a measurement pause time from the end of a
measurement to the start of the next measurement. It can be set to
from 1 ms to 10 seconds.
The sample rate can be set using the  and  keys when the
measurement screen is displayed.
Press the  key to set a long time, and the  key to set a short time.
Figure 4.3.2-1 shows a sample rate setup screen example.
Figure 4.3.2-1 Sample Rate Setup Screen
Notes:

When automatic frequency acquisition measurement is set for
Input1, the minimum sample rate is 10 ms. (Even if the
sample rate is set to 5 ms or less, measurement will be
performed at a sample rate of 10 ms.)

When the frequency acquisition mode is set to Auto in the burst
measurement mode, the pause time may by longer than the set
sample rate, depending on the pulse width and period of the
pulse modulation signal.
4-17
Section 4 Panel Operation
4.3.3
Frequency resolution
The number of display digits of frequency measurement results can be
set using the < and > keys. The frequency setting range varies
depending on the difference between the input channel and impute
impedance, selected previously, and the settable measurement resolution
is accordingly varies.
Tables 4.3.3-1 and 4.3.3-2 show the settable resolutions.
Table 4.3.3-1 Frequency display (with input impedance = 50 )
 Input connector: Input1 (50 ), Input2 (50 )
Measurement
Resolution
0.1 Hz
20 000 000 000.0
GHz
MHz
kHz
Hz
1 Hz
20 000 000 000.
10 Hz
20 000 000 000
100 Hz
20 000 000 000
1 kHz
20 000 000
10 kHz
20 000 000
100 kHz
20 000 000
1 MHz
4-18
< Key
Function
Display
GHz
GHz
GHz
GHz
GHz
GHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
20 000
GHz
MHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
Hz
Hz
Hz
kHz
Hz
kHz
Hz
kHz
Hz
kHz
Hz
> Key
Function
4.3
Setting Parameters
Table 4.3.3-2 Frequency display (with input impedance = 1 M)
 Input connector: Input2 (1 M)
Measurement
Resolution
1 mHz
10 mHz
100 mHz
1 Hz
10 Hz
100 Hz
1 kHz
10 kHz
100 kHz
1 MHz
< Key
Function
Display
> Key
Function
10 000 000.000
GHz MHz
kHz
Hz
10 000 000.00
GHz MHz
kHz
Hz
10 000 000.0
GHz MHz
kHz
Hz
10 000 000.
GHz MHz
kHz
10 000 000
GHz MHz
kHz
10 000 000
GHz MHz
kHz
10 000
GHz MHz
kHz
10 000
GHz MHz
10 00
GHz MHz
10
GHz MHz
Hz
Hz
Hz
Hz
kHz
Hz
kHz
Hz
kHz
Hz
When measuring the carrier frequency of a burst signal, the pulse width
of the burst signal determines the maximum frequency resolution that
can be measured. When the set frequency resolution is higher than the
maximum frequency resolution that can be measured, UNCAL is
displayed in the screen and then the frequency measurement is
performed at the maximum frequency resolution possible.
For example, when the frequency resolution is set to 1 kHz and the
measurement result could only obtain a resolution up to 10 kHz, the
screen display becomes as follows:
4-19
Section 4 Panel Operation
Figure 4.3.3-1 UNCAL display example
Figure 4.3.3-2 shows the relationship between the burst pulse width and
the maximum frequency resolution.
Maximum Resolution (Hz)
1M
100 k
10 k
1k
100
10
1
100 m
10 m
10 n
100 n
1
1m
10 
100 
Burst Pulse Width (s)
10 m
100 m
Figure 4.3.3-2 Pulse Width vs. Maximum Frequency Resolution
4.3.4
Measurement mode
Whether to measure burst waves or continuous waves (CW) can be
selected by using the Meas Mode key. To measure burst waves, press
the Meas Mode key so that the Burst LED lights up. To measure
continuous waves (CW), press the Meas Mode key so that the Burst LED
goes off.
In burst measurement, carrier frequency, pulse width, and pulse
repetition period can be measured.
The Input2 connector cannot be used for burst measurement. Make
sure to select continuous measurement when Input2 is selected.
4-20
4.3
4.3.5
Setting Parameters
Level acquisition
Level acquisition can be performed only when Input1 is selected.
Whether to set the optimum amplitude discrimination value (level
acquisition) according to the input signal in the Auto or Manual mode
can be selected. When Manual is selected for level acquisition, set the
manual amplitude discrimination value from the maximum attenuation
level 0 (L0, attenuation of 42 dB) to the minimum attenuation level 7 (L7,
attenuation of 0 dB), in 6-dB steps.
Pressing the Level key displays the level acquisition setup screen shown
in Figure 4.3.5-1. The manual amplitude discrimination value can be
set in this screen, using  and  keys.
Figure 4.3.5-1 Level Acquisition Setup Screen
(1) Menu F1: Mode
Select Auto or Manual for level acquisition.
When Auto is selected, the level is automatically set to the optimum
reception level.
When Manual is selected, also set the manual amplitude
discrimination value.
(2) Menu F2: Last Measure
Sets the amplitude discrimination value set in the Auto mode, as the
manual amplitude discrimination value.
(3) Menu F3: 
When the Enter key is pressed with menu F3 selected, the manual
amplitude discrimination value is incremented by 1. Use this when
the input level is low. The manual amplitude discrimination value
can be incremented up to L7.
The  key can be used to increment the manual amplitude
discrimination value even if menu F3 is not selected.
(4) Menu F4: 
When the Enter key is pressed with menu F4 selected, the manual
amplitude discrimination value is decremented by 1. Use this when
the input level is high. The manual amplitude discrimination value
can be decremented up to L0.
The  key can be used to decrement the manual amplitude
discrimination value even if menu F4 is not selected.
4-21
Section 4 Panel Operation
4.3.6
Frequency acquisition
Frequency acquisition can be performed only when Input1 is selected.
Whether to set the acquisition frequency value in the Auto or Manual
mode can be selected.
When Manual is selected for frequency
acquisition, set the acquisition frequency value (manual frequency value)
in 1-MHz steps.
The settable frequency ranges are as follows:
 MF2412C: 600 MHz to 20 GHz
 MF2413C: 600 MHz to 27 GHz
 MF2414C: 600 MHz to 40 GHz
Pressing the Freq key displays the frequency acquisition setup screen
shown in Figure 4.3.6-1. Set the parameters as necessary, in this
screen.
Figure 4.3.6-1 Frequency Acquisition Setup Screen
(1) Menu F1: Mode
Select Auto or Manual for frequency acquisition.
When Auto is selected, the input frequency is automatically acquired
and measured.
When Manual is selected, the frequency obtained by adding the
input tolerance to the manual frequency value is measured. Make
sure to set the manual frequency value.
Tables 4.3.6-1 and 4.3.6-2 show the input tolerances.
Table 4.3.6-1 Input Tolerance (CW Measurement)
Manual Frequency Value
Input Tolerance
600 MHz to 1 GHz
1 GHz or higher
30 MHz
40 MHz
Table 4.3.6-2 Input Tolerance (Burst Measurement)
Manual Frequency
Value
600 MHz to 1 GHz
1 GHz or higher
4-22
Burst Width Setting
Input Tolerance
Wide
Narrow
Wide
30 MHz
20 MHz
40 MHz
4.3
Setting Parameters
Note:
Manual mode operation is not guaranteed when the manual
setting value for the input signal exceeds the input tolerance. If
this happens, an incorrect measurement result may be displayed.
Check the input signal before deciding the manual setting value.
(2) Menu F2: Last Measure
Sets the frequency measurement result as a manual frequency
value.
(3) Menu F3: Set Freq
Select this menu to set the manual frequency value.
Select [Set Freq] and press the Enter key. Manual Freq is
highlighted, and a manual frequency value can be input from the
numeric keypad.
Figure 4.3.6-2 shows an example where “12” is input from the
numeric keypad. Pressing the GHz key at this time sets 12 GHz as
the acquisition frequency value, and measurement is started.
Figure 4.3.6-2 Setting Manual Frequency
After a numeric value is input and the measurement unit is set,
Manual Freq is still highlighted, allowing another frequency to be
input.
Press the Enter, <, >, or Return to Meas key to exit from the
numeric value input mode.
(4) Menu F4: Count
Sets the count method to either Fast or Normal.
When Fast is selected, pressing the Enter key with menu F4 selected
newly sets “Normal”.
When Fast is set, the unit performs counting using the reciprocal
method.
When Normal is set, the unit performs counting using the direct
count method. However, when Meas Mode is set to Burst, the unit
counts using the Fast (reciprocal) method even if Mode is set to
Normal.
4-23
Section 4 Panel Operation
4.3.7
Burst measurement mode
The burst measurement mode is only available when Meas Mode is set to
Burst. Select carrier frequency, burst width, or burst repetition period
for the burst measurement target. In addition, set whether to perform
burst width measurements and burst period measurements with burst
On (positive polarity) or burst Off (negative polarity) and set the burst
wave to be measured to correspond to the burst width.
Table 4.3.7-1 shows the measurement range.
Table 4.3.7-1 Relationship between Burst Measurement Target and Burst Measurement Polarity
Measurement Item
Burst Measurement Polarity
Positive
Negative
Measures during burst-on time
Measures during burst-off time
Measures during a period between
burst-on start points
Measures during a period between
burst-off start points
Burst
Width
Burst
Period
Pressing the Burst key displays the burst mode screen shown in Figure
4.3.7-1. Set the parameters as necessary, in this screen.
Figure 4.3.7-1 Burst Mode Screen
4-24
4.3
Setting Parameters
(1) Menu F1: Mode
Sets whether to measure carrier frequency, burst width, or burst
repetition period.
Pressing the Enter key with menu F1 selected displays the burst
mode selection screen shown in Figure 4.3.7-2.
Select Freq, Width, or Period using the cursor keys, and then press
the Enter key to fix the selection. The burst mode screen (Figure
4.3.7-1) is displayed again, with the set parameter displayed in
brackets of menu F1.
Figure 4.3.7-2 Burst Mode Selection Screen
(2) Menu F2: Polarity
Sets the polarity (positive/negative) for burst measurement.
When positive polarity is set, pressing the Enter key with menu F2
selected changes the polarity to negative, and Polarity [
]
(Neg) is displayed on the screen. Conversely, pressing the Enter
key with menu F2 selected when negative polarity is selected
changes the polarity to positive, and Polarity [
] (Pos) is
displayed.
(3) Menu F3: Width
Selects Wide or Narrow according to the width of the burst wave to
be measured.
Table 4.3.7-2 shows the measurable burst widths and input
tolerances for each setting (Wide/Narrow).
Table 4.3.7-2 Relationships between Measurable Burst Width and Input
Tolerance for Each Burst Width Setting (Wide/Narrow)
Burst Width
Measurable Range
Wide
1 s to 0.1 s
Narrow*
100 ns to 0.1 s
Input Tolerance
Carrier Frequency
30 MHz
40 MHz
20 MHz
0.6 to 1 GHz
1 GHz
1 GHz
*: Narrow setting is valid only when the manual frequency value is 1
GHz or higher. If the manual frequency value is less than 1 GHz,
measurement will be performed in Wide mode.
4-25
Section 4 Panel Operation
4.3.8
Gating function
The gating function measures a frequency in any interval of the
measured signal to be input to the counter. Based on the trigger signal,
it defines the interval for measuring the frequency according to the
specified parameters such as a trigger delay, gate width, and gate end.
Note that the signal to be measured at the prescribed level must exist in
the measurement interval. Figure 4.3.8-1 shows the relationships
between the parameters.
This function enables measuring of the frequency at a specific position of
a burst signal.
Signal to be measured
Level of signal to be
measured
Trigger signal (reference)
Trigger delay
Gate width
T
Trig Delay
Gate Width
Gate end: On
Frequency
measurement
interval
Gate end: Off
Figure 4.3.8-1 Gating Function Overview
The trigger delay width and gate width can be set while checking the
burst signal on/off state displayed on the screen.
The trigger delay width can be set from 0 ns to 100 ms. The setting
resolutions are as table 4.3.8-1:
4-26
4.3
Setting Parameters
Table 4.3.8-1 Relationships between Trigger Delay Width and Setting
Resolution
Trigger Delay Width
Setting Resolution
0 to 320 ns
320 ns to 1 s
1 s to 100 ms
20 ns
40 ns
Number of significant bits: 2
The gate width can be set from 100 ns to 100 ms. The setting
resolutions are listed in Table 4.3.8-2.
When “Wide” is set for the burst width, the minimum value of the gate
width becomes 1 s. At this time, if a value less than 1 s is set as the
gate width, measurement will be performed at the gate width of 1 s.
Table 4.3.8-2 Relationships between Gate Width and Setting
Resolution
Gate Width
Setting Resolution
100 ns to 1 s
1 s to 100 ms
20 ns
Number of significant bits: 2
Pressing the TD key displays the burst monitor screen for trigger delay
setting shown in Figure 4.3.8-2. The trigger delay value can be set
using the  and  keys. Pressing the  key increases the trigger delay
value, and pressing the  key decreases the trigger delay value.
To input a numeric value using the numeric keypad, press the Enter key
at this timing. “Trig Delay” is highlighted, and a numeric value can be
input (numeric value input mode). After inputting a value, press the
Enter key to display Trig Delay (underscored).
Pressing the < or > key displays Gate Width (underscored), allowing the
gate width to be set. Pressing the < or > key at this time displays Trig
Delay (underscored), allowing the delay width from the trigger to be set.
4-27
Section 4 Panel Operation
Burst Monitor Screen for Trigger Delay Setting (Numeric Input mode)
Pressing the Enter key highlights “Trig Delay.”
A trigger delay can be set using the numeric keypad.
Pressing the Enter key displays Trig Delay.
Pressing the TD key displays
the burst monitor screen for
trigger delay setting.
A trigger delay can be set
using the  and  keys.
Burst Monitor Screen for Trigger Delay Setting
Pressing the < or > key displays the burst
monitor screen for trigger delay setting.
Pressing the < or > key displays the burst
monitor screen for gate width setting.
key
Pressing
the
GW
displays the burst monitor
screen for gate width setting.
A gate width can be set
using the  and  keys.
Burst Monitor Screen for Gate Width Setting
Pressing the Enter key displays Gate Width.
Pressing the Enter key highlights “Gate Width.”
A gate width can be set using the numeric
keypad.
Burst Monitor Screen for Gate Width Setting (Numeric Input mode)
Figure 4.3.8-2 Transition of Burst Monitor Screens
Pressing the GW key displays the burst monitor screen for gate width
setting shown in Figure 4.3.8-2. The gate width can be set using the 
and  keys. Pressing the  key increases the gate width, and pressing
the  key decreases the gate width.
Switching to the numeric value input mode, and the < and > key
functions are the same as those for the burst monitor screen for trigger
delay setting.
4-28
4.3
4.3.9
Setting Parameters
Trigger and gate end
This function selects the trigger signal identifying the start of frequency
measurement, select trigger polarity, and sets the gate end.
Pressing the Trig key displays the trigger setup screen shown in Figure
4.3.9-1. Set the parameters as necessary, in this screen.
Figure 4.3.9-1 Trigger Setup Screen
(1) Menu F1: Mode
Selects the trigger from internal trigger (Int), external trigger (Ext),
and line trigger (Line).
Selecting menu F1 displays the trigger selection screen shown in
Figure 4.3.9-2. Select Int, Ext, or Line using the cursor keys, and
then press the Enter key to fix the selection. The trigger setup
screen (Figure 4.3.9-1) is displayed again, with the set parameter
displayed in brackets of menu F1.
Figure 4.3.9-2 Trigger Selection Screen
(2) Menu F2: Slope
Sets the polarity (rising/falling) for detecting an external trigger
signal and line trigger.
(3) Menu F4: Gate End
Sets whether to use gate width for finishing the carrier frequency
measurement.
When Gate End is set to On, carrier frequency is measured using
the gate within the width set by the gate value. When Gate End
is set to Off, carrier frequency is measured using the gate within a
width until the burst wave goes to “Off”.
Note:
When Gate End is On, set the trigger delay and gate width so that
their timings are sufficiently before the timing when the burst
waves are turned Off. When there isn’t enough interval from Gate
End to the burst waves’ turning Off, the expected results may not
be obtained.
4-29
Section 4 Panel Operation
4.3.10 Offset
This function uses the offset frequency value set in advance, to perform
the following calculations for the measured frequency and display the
results.
+Offset:
Offset:
ppm:
Adds the offset value to the measured frequency value.
Subtracts the offset value from the measured frequency
value.
Obtains the deviation from the measured frequency value
and displays it in parts per million.
Pressing the Ofs key displays the offset parameter setup screen shown in
Figure 4.3.10-1. Set the parameters as necessary, in this screen.
Figure 4.3.10-1 Offset Parameter Setup Screen
(1) Menu F1: Mode
Sets the offset mode.
Pressing the Enter key with menu F1 selected displays the offset
mode selection screen shown in Figure 4.3.10-2.
Select Off, +Offset, -Offset, or ppm using the < and > keys, and then
press the Enter key. The offset parameter setup screen (Figure
4.3.10-1) is displayed again, with the selected parameter displayed
in brackets of menu F1.
Figure 4.3.10-2 Offset Mode Selection Screen
(2) Menu F2: Last Measure
Pressing the Enter key with menu F2 selected sets the measured
frequency value at that time as the offset frequency value.
(3) Menu F3: Set Freq
Select this menu to set the offset frequency using the numeric
keypad.
Select [Set Freq] and press the Enter key.
Offset Freq is
highlighted and an offset frequency value can be input using the
numeric keypad.
4-30
4.3
Setting Parameters
Press the Enter, <, >, or Return to Meas key to exit from the
numeric value input mode.
The offset frequency can be set from 0 Hz to Fmax, in 1-mHz steps.
Fmax = 20 GHz (for MF2412C)
27 GHz (for MF2413C)
40 GHz (for MF2414C)
(4) Menu F4: Update
Enables (on) and disables (off) the update mode.
When the update mode is enabled (on), the unit sequentially updates
using the previous measurement value as an offset value.
Figure 4.3.10-3 shows the displayed values when –Offset is selected
while the update mode is enabled.
Frequency
f4
f3
f2
f1
Time
Displayed Value
f1
f2-f1
f3-f2
f4-f3
Figure 4.3.10-3 Displayed values when Update = On and Offset is
selected
4-31
Section 4 Panel Operation
4.3.11 Statistical processing
This function calculates mean, minimum, and maximum values from
frequency measurement results, and then displays the calculation results.
Whether to calculate the mean, minimum, or maximum value, or
perform another calculation, can be selected in the statistical processing
mode setup screen. The statistical processing mode is described in “(1)
Menu F1: Mode” below.
Statistical processing requires collecting many data (samples) to be used
for calculation. Make sure to set the number of necessary samples
(frequency measurement count) in advance, as the sample count. The
sample count is described in “(3) Menu F3: Sample” below.
It is also required to set the combination of the collected sample data for
calculation. How to set a combination is described in “(2) Menu F2:
Extract” below.
Pressing the Stat key displays the statistical processing parameter setup
screen shown in Figure 4.3.11-1. Set the parameters as necessary, in
this screen.
Figure 4.3.11-1 Statistical Processing Parameter Setup Screen
4-32
4.3
Setting Parameters
(1) Menu F1: Mode
Sets the statistical processing mode.
The statistical processing mode selection screen shown in Figure
4.3.11-2 is displayed when menu F1 is selected.
Select Off, Mean, Max, Min, or P-P using the < and > keys, and then
press the Enter key. The statistical processing mode selection
screen (Figure 4.3.11-1) is displayed again, with the selected
parameter displayed in brackets of menu F1.
Figure 4.3.11-2 Statistical Processing Mode Selection Screen
In a statistical processing mode, the following processing will be
performed depending on the selected statistical processing
extraction mode. Dn and N indicate the n-th measurement value
and the set number of samples, respectively.
 Mean (Extraction mode: Discrete)
The arithmetic average value of the measurement values for the
number of samples N is calculated.
N
Mean = (1/N){(Di)}
i=1
 Mean (Extraction mode: Overlap)
The moving average value of the measurement values for the
number of samples N is calculated.
N
Mean = (1/N){(Di)}
i=nN+1
where, n  N
 MaxMin (Extraction mode: Discrete)
Max = Maximum (Di, i = 1, 2, ..., N)
Min = Minimum (Di, i = 1, 2, ..., N)
 MaxMin (Extraction mode: Overlap)
Max = Maximum (Di, i = nN+1, ..., n1, n)
Min = Minimum (Di, i = nN+1, ..., n1, n) where, n  N
 P-P
P-P = Max  Min
Note:
When Max or Min is selected, the display on the screen is the same
(Max on the upper row and Min on the lower row), but the response
value to the data collection by remote control via the GPIB
(issuance of MSTA or OM) is different.
Refer to Section 5.4.4 “Device message list” for details.
4-33
Section 4 Panel Operation
(2) Menu F2: Extract
Sets Overlap/Disc (Discrete) for the statistical processing extraction
mode.
In the Discrete mode, statistical processing results are output each
time data is collected for the specified sample count.
In the Overlap mode, statistical processing results are output first
when data is collected for the specified sample count, and then the
results are output each time data of one sample is collected.
Figure 4.3.11-3 shows the processing in each mode.
Restart
TMEAS
Measured
values
TMEAS
D1
TMEAS
D2
DN
TMEAS
D1
TSTA
D2
DN
TSTA
1
Statistical
processing values
st
nd
2
where, N:
Sample count
*1
*2
TMEAS: Measurement repetition period = Acquisition time + Measurement time + Sample rate
TSTA: Statistical processing time = Sample count N  TMEAS
(a) Statistical processing in Discrete mode
Restart
TMEAS
Measured
values
D1
Statistical
processing values
where; N:
TMEAS:
TSTA1:
TSTA2:
TMEAS
TMEAS
D2
DN
TSTA1
TMEAS
DN+1
TSTA2
st
1
DN+2
TSTA2
2
nd
3
rd
Sample count
*1
*2
Measurement repetition period = Acquisition time + Measurement time + Sample rate
Statistical processing time 1 = Sample count N  TMEAS
Statistical processing time 2 = TMEAS
(b) Statistical processing in Overlap mode
Figure 4.3.11-3 Statistical Processing Extraction Mode
*1: The acquisition time is generated at an acquisition loss when
automatic acquisition processing is set.
*2: The measurement time is determined by the frequency of the input
signal and the measurement resolution.
4-34
4.3
Setting Parameters
(3) Menu F3: Sample
Sets n for the sample count (2n: Overlap mode, about 10n: Discrete
mode).
When menu F3 is selected, the sample count selection screen shown
in Figure 4.3.11-4 is displayed. Select 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 using the <
and > keys, and then press the Enter key.
The statistical
processing mode selection screen (Figure 4.3.11-1) is displayed again,
with the selected parameter displayed in brackets of menu F3.
Figure 4.3.11-4 Sample Count Selection Screen
Table 4.3.11-1 shows the correspondence between the statistical
processing sample counts and the statistical processing extraction modes.
Table 4.3.11-1 Correspondence between Extraction Mode and Sample Count
Parameter
Extraction Mode
Discrete
Overlap
1
2
3
4
5
6
10
(16)*
2
100
(128)*
4
1000
(1024)*
8
10000
(16384)*
16
100000
(131072)*
32
1000000
(1048576)*
64
*: Actual sample count in the Discrete mode (10n should be taken as a
rough indication.)
4-35
Section 4 Panel Operation
4.3.12 Template function
This function displays the frequency of the signal being measured, judges
whether the measured frequency is within the range of the upper and
lower frequency limits, and then displays Go/No-Go for the judgment
result. The judgment result can be output from the Aux terminal in the
TTL level. In addition, the indicator can be displayed as shown in
Figure 4.3.12-1, to visually indicate whether the measured result falls
into the previously set range.
Figure 4.3.12-1 Measurement Screen Using Template Function
Pressing the Temp key displays the template setup screen shown in
Figure 4.3.12-2. Set the template function parameters as necessary, in
this screen.
Pressing the Return to Meas key while the template function is enabled
displays the measurement screen shown in Figure 4.3.12-1.
Figure 4.3.12-2 Template Setup Screen
(1) Menu F1: Template
Enables (on) or disables (off) the template function.
(2) Menu F2: Upper Limit
Select this menu to set the upper frequency limit value*, using the
numeric keypad on the front panel.
When this menu is selected, Upper Limit in the middle of the screen
is highlighted, and an upper frequency limit can be input.
(3) Menu F3: Lower Limit
Select this menu to set the lower frequency limit value*, using the
numeric keypad on the front panel.
When this menu is selected, Lower Limit in the middle of the screen
is highlighted, and a lower frequency limit can be input.
4-36
4.3
Setting Parameters
*: The upper and lower frequency limits can be set from 0 Hz to Fmax, in
1-Hz steps.
Fmax = 20 GHz (for MF2412C)
27 GHz (for MF2413C)
40 GHz (for MF2414C)
(4) Menu F4: Indicate
Sets whether to display (on) or hide (off) the movement direction
indicator (see Figure 4.2.1-3) when the measured frequency value is
out of the LCD display range. Set On to display the indicator, and
set Off to hide it.
Note:
Judgment result Go/No-Go output is held until the next judgment
result is obtained (see Figure 4.3.12-3 below).
Measurement state
Measurement
(Judgment: Go)
Go/No-Go output
Pause
Measurement
(Judgment: No-Go)
Go
Pause
Measurement
(Judgment: Go)
No-Go
Go
Figure 4.3.12-3 Go/No-Go Judgment Result Output
4.3.13 Hold
This function stops frequency measurement operation and maintains the
display of the last measurement value.
Pressing the Hold key lights the LED on the key, indicating that the unit
is in the hold state. When the Restart key is pressed or parameters are
set by panel keys at this time, measurement is performed once and then
the unit enters the hold state again. In addition, when statistical
processing is enabled, the first statistical processing result is calculated
and then the unit enters the hold state.
If the Hold key is pressed in the hold state, the LED goes off and the unit
enters the normal measurement state, resuming the stopped
measurement.
4.3.14 Restart
Pressing the Restart key restarts the frequency measurement from the
first. During statistical processing, the sample measurement execution
count is cleared and the statistical processing is started from the first
sample.
When the Restart key is pressed in the hold state, measurement or
statistical processing is performed once and then the unit enters the hold
state again.
4-37
Section 4 Panel Operation
4.3.15 System
This function performs a variety of tasks such as saving and recalling
parameters, selection of a reference signal, selection of a signal to be
output from the AUX output connector, setting the GPIB, and checking
the self-check results.
Ten parameters from 0 to 9 can be saved.
The external reference signals that can be input are 1 MHz, 2 MHz, 5
MHz, and 10 MHz. When automatic selection of the reference signal is
enabled, this function automatically distinguishes these reference signals
and uses them as the reference signals for the counter.
Pressing the Sys key displays the system setup screen shown in Figure
4.3.15-1.
Figure. 4.3.15-1 System Setup Screen
(1) Menu F1: Recall
Sets the saved parameters to this unit.
Select menu F1 using the < and > keys, and then press the Enter
key to display the recall number selection screen shown in Figure
4.3.15-2.
On this screen, the numbers for which parameters are saved are
highlighted. Use the numeric keypad to input the number to be
recalled, and then press the Enter key to set the corresponding
saved parameters to the unit.
Figure 4.3.15-2 Recall Number Selection Screen
4-38
4.3
Setting Parameters
(2) Menu F2: Save
Saves the parameters being executed.
Select menu F2 using the < and > keys, and then press the Enter
key to display the save number selection screen shown in Figure
4.3.15-3.
On this screen, the numbers for which parameters are already saved
are highlighted. Use the numeric keypad to input a number to be
saved, and then press the Enter key to save the parameters being
executed.
The saved data is cleared after initialization (performed by
supplying power while holding down the Enter key), but not cleared
by pressing the Preset key.
Figure 4.3.15-3 Save Number Selection Screen
(3) Menu F3: GPIB
Select menu F3 using the < and > keys, and then press the Enter
key to display the GPIB setup screen shown in Figure 4.3.15-4.
When the Enter key is pressed at this time, Address is highlighted,
and a GPPIB address can be input using the numeric keypad.
The GPIB address can be set from 0 to 30.
Figure 4.3.15-4 GPIB Setup Screen
(4) Menu F4: Config
Select menu F4 using the < and > keys, and then press the Enter
key to display the Config setup screen shown in Figure 4.3.15-5.
Figure 4.3.15-5 Config Setup Screen
4-39
Section 4 Panel Operation
(a) Menu F1: Freq Ref
The reference signal selection is changed by pressing the Enter
key.
When [Int] is selected, only the internal reference signal is used
as the reference signal for the counter.
When [Auto] is selected, the reference signal is automatically
switched to the external reference signal when a reference
signal is externally input.
The set parameter is displayed in brackets of menu F1.
(b) Menu F2: AUX
Selects a signal to be output from the AUX connector.
Select menu F2 using the < and > keys, and then press the
Enter key to display the AUX signal selection screen shown in
Figure 4.3.15-6. Select Off, Go, End, Lvl, Gate, Rest, or Acq
using the < and > keys, and then press the Enter key. The
Config setup screen (Figure 4.3.15-5) is displayed again, with
the set parameter displayed in brackets of menu F2.
Figure 4.3.15-6 AUX Signal Selection Screen
The signals that can be output from the AUX connector and their
function are as follows:
[1] Off: No output
No signal is output. The output level is always high.
[2] Go: Go/No-Go judgment result output
When the template function is enabled, the judgment
result is output.
High: The measured frequency falls within the setting
range.
Low: The measured frequency is out of the setting range.
A low level is output when the template function is
disabled.
[3] End: Count End output
A low-level pulse of 1 s 50 ns is output each time
frequency measurement is finished.
[4] Lvl: Level Det output
The detection signal within the counter is monitored during
burst measurement.
A high level is output during CW measurement.
4-40
4.3
Setting Parameters
[5] Gate: Internal Count Gate output
The internal gate signal used for counting frequencies is
output. A high level is output when the gate is open.
[6] Rest: Restart output
A low-level pulse of 1 s 50 ns is output each time the
Restart command is executed.
[7] Acq: Acquisition output
A low level is output when the counter is in the acquisition
operation.
A high level is output during frequency measurement.
(c)
Menu F3: Display
Sets the LCD display intensity (brightness).
Select menu F3 using the < and > keys, and then press the
Enter key to display the intensity selection screen shown in
Figure 4.3.15-7. Select Off, 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% using the
< and > keys. When a parameter is selected, the intensity of
the LCD display changes accordingly.
Press the Enter key to fix the intensity. The Config setup
screen (Figure 4.3.15-5) is displayed again, with the set
parameter displayed in brackets of menu F3.
Figure 4.3.15-7 Intensity Selection Screen
Note:
When Off is selected, a measurement screen is displayed with
the intensity off, but a setup screen is displayed with the
intensity 25%.
(d) Menu F4: System
Select menu F4 using the < and > keys, and then press the
Enter key to display the results of the self-check that were
executed at power-on, in the format shown in Figure 4.3.15-8.
Figure 4.3.15-8 System Screen (Self-Check Result Display Screen)
4-41
Section 4 Panel Operation
4.3.16 High-speed sampling function
This function is valid only when the unit is controlled via the GPIB.
The measurement time interval is continuously measured at an arbitrary
time interval (T).
This function enables measuring of a fluctuation of frequency in a short
time period by obtaining saved data via the GPIB, as well as VCO
activation characteristics. Make sure to set the manual frequency and
the manual amplitude discrimination value in advance when using
Input1 as the signal input connector.
Figure 4.3.16-1 shows the relationships between the parameters for the
high-speed sampling function. “T” stands for sample interval and “N”
stands for sample count.
Set time interval
T
T
T
Measurement
time interval
Reference count
value
m1
m2
mN
T1
T2
TN
1st measurement
2nd measurement
Nth measurement
Figure 4.3.16-1 Parameters for High-Speed Sampling Function
The frequency Fi for each measurement can be calculated from the
measurement time interval mi and the reference count value Ti through
the following expression : Read out mi and Ti by device message MTRS
(high-speed sample count value).
Fi = (mi/Ti)  109 [Hz]
where, i = 1, 2, 3, ..., N
To multiply the frequency resolution by K, the following combination is
used:
K-1
K-1
Fi = (mI+p/TI+p)  109 [Hz]
where, i = 1, 2, 3, ..., N  K + 1
p=0 p=0
When using Input2 as the measurement signal input connector, the
frequency can be obtained using the expression above. When using
Input1, add the offset frequency value Fo to the obtained frequency value
Fi. Refer to Section 5 “GPIB” for details on the parameter setting
method, the offset frequency value, and high-speed sample count value.
4-42
4.3
Setting Parameters
4.3.17 Data storage function
This function is valid only when the unit is controlled via the GPIB.
When a data storage start command is executed, 100 pieces of frequency
measurement data are stored in the internal memory. When the 101st
piece of data is stored, the first data is invalidated, and the second to
101st data (a total of 100 pieces of data) are valid. A hundred pieces of
data stored in the internal memory are updated in this manner, until a
data storage stop command is executed.
Stored data can be read by executing a stored data read command.
0 Hz (execution error) is output in the following cases:
 When a stored data read command is executed without executing a
data storage stop command after executing a data storage start
command
 When a data storage stop command or stored data read command is
executed before 100 pieces of data have been stored
Refer to Section 5 “GPIB” for details on the data storage start command,
data storage stop command, and stored data read command.
4-43
Section 4 Panel Operation
4.4 Measurement
4.4.1
CW frequency measurement via Input1
(Measurement with frequency acquisition = Auto, level acquisition = Auto)
The frequency ranges that can be measured via Input1 are as follows:
MF2412C: 600 MHz to 20 GHz
MF2413C: 600 MHz to 27 GHz
MF2414C: 600 MHz to 40 GHz
(1) Connecting input signal
Connect the signal to be measured to Input1 on the front panel.
Note:
Do not input a signal of +10 dBm or higher into Input1.
(2) Setup
[1] Press the Preset key to preset the unit.
Input1, CW measurement, automatic frequency acquisition, and
automatic level acquisition are set by preset.
[2] Set the frequency measurement resolution using the < and >
keys.
[3] Set the sample rate using the  and  keys.
4-44
4.4
4.4.2
Measurement
CW frequency measurement via Input1
(Measurement with frequency acquisition = Manual, level acquisition = Auto)
When the frequency of the input signal is known, manual frequency
acquisition measurement can be performed by setting the frequency
acquisition mode to Manual and setting a manual frequency value.
Manual frequency acquisition measurement can be started quickly
because frequency acquisition is not executed. This measurement is
effective when measurement cannot be performed normally due to a
spurious signal.
(1) Connecting input signal
Connect the signal to be measured to Input1 on the front panel.
Note:
Do not input a signal of +10 dBm or higher into Input1.
(2) Setup
[1] Press the Preset key to preset the unit.
[2] Set the frequency acquisition mode to Manual.
Press the Freq key to display the frequency acquisition setup
screen, select menu F1 using the < and > keys, and then press
the Enter key to set the frequency acquisition mode to Manual.
Figure 4.4.2-1 Frequency Acquisition Setup Screen
[3] Set the manual frequency value.
Select menu F3 using the < and > keys, and then press the
Enter key.
Manual Freq is highlighted, and a manual
frequency value can be input.
Figure 4.4.2-2 Manual Frequency Value Input Screen
This unit measures the set manual frequency value within the
input tolerance. If the signal to be measure is not within the
input tolerance, it cannot be measured properly.
In the frequency range of 600 MHz to 1 GHz, the manual
frequency value  30 MHz is valid for the measurement signal.
4-45
Section 4 Panel Operation
In the frequency range of 1 GHz or higher, the manual
frequency value ± 40 MHz is valid.
[4] Press the Return to Meas key to display the normal
measurement screen.
[5] Set the frequency measurement resolution using the < and >
keys.
[6] Set the sample rate using the  and  keys.
4.4.3
CW frequency measurement via Input1
(Measurement with frequency acquisition = Auto, level acquisition = Manual)
The manual level acquisition measurement can be performed by setting
the level acquisition mode to Manual.
Manual level acquisition measurement can be started quickly because
level acquisition is not executed. When performing CW measurement
with the frequency acquisition mode set to Manual and the level
acquisition mode set to Manual, set the frequency acquisition mode to
Manual, by referring to Section 4.4.2, and then follow the procedure
described in this section.
(1) Connecting input signal
Connect the signal to be measured to Input1 on the front panel.
Note:
Do not input a signal of +10 dBm or higher into Input1.
(2) Setup
[1] Press the Preset key to preset the unit.
[2] Set the level acquisition mode to Manual.
Press the Level key to display the level Acquisition setup screen,
select menu F1 using the < and > keys, and then press the
Enter key to set the level acquisition mode to Manual.
Figure 4.4.3-1 Level Acquisition Setup Screen
[3] Select the manual amplitude discrimination value using the 
and  keys.
4-46
4.4
Measurement
[4] Press the Return to Meas key to display the normal
measurement screen.
If the displayed level is not optimum, press the Level key and
select the manual amplitude discrimination value again so that
the optimum level is displayed.
Figure 4.4.3-2 Level Acquisition Measurement Screen
Table 4.4.3-1 Level Indicator
Over
Very low
Slightly low
Optimum
Slightly high
Very high
[5] Set the frequency measurement resolution using the < and >
keys.
[6] Set the sample rate using the  and  keys.
4.4.4
Burst wave measurement via Input1
(Measurement with frequency acquisition = Auto, level acquisition = Auto)
Carrier frequency, pulse width, and pulse repetition period of pulse
modulation signals can be measured in the burst measurement mode.
(1) Connecting input signal
Connect the signal to be measured to Input1 on the front panel.
Notes:
1. When automatic frequency acquisition measurement is
performed, the pulse modulation width must be at least 1
s.
2. Do not input a signal of +10 dBm or higher into Input1.
(2) Setup
[1] Press the Preset key to preset the unit.
[2] Set the burst measurement mode.
Press the Meas Mode key. Check that the Burst LED lights
up.
[3] Set the frequency measurement resolution using the < and >
keys.
4-47
Section 4 Panel Operation
The maximum frequency resolution depends
on the pulse width of the measurement
signal.
When a resolution higher than the maximum
resolution is set, UNCAL is displayed and the
digits of the frequency value that cannot be
displayed are represented by asterisks (*).
Figure 4.4.4-1 Burst Carrier Frequency Measurement Screen
Maximum Resolution (Hz)
1M
100 k
10 k
1k
100
10
1
100 m
10 m
10 n
100 n
1
1m
10  100 
Burst Pulse Width (s)
10 m
100 m
Figure 4.4.4-2 Pulse Width vs. Maximum Frequency Resolution
[4] Set the sample rate using the  and  keys.
Notes:
4-48

In automatic frequency acquisition measurement, the
pause time may by longer than the set sample rate
depending on the pulse width and period of the pulse
modulation signal.

Automatic frequency acquisition measurement may not be
performed if the burst wave length (pulse width) is shorter
than the period. Perform the measurement in manual
frequency acquisition mode in this event.
4.4
4.4.5
Measurement
Burst wave measurement via Input1
(Measurement with frequency acquisition = Manual, level acquisition = Auto)
Carrier frequency, pulse width, and pulse repetition period of pulse
modulation signals can be measured in the burst measurement mode.
(1) Connecting input signal
Connect the signal to be measured to Input1 on the front panel.
Note:
Do not input a signal of +10 dBm or higher into Input1.
(2) Setup
[1] Press the Preset key to preset the unit.
[2] Set the burst measurement mode.
Press the Meas Mode key. Check that the Burst LED lights
up.
[3] Set the manual frequency value.
Refer to Section 4.3.6 or 4.4.2 for the setting method. Note
that the input tolerance differs between the burst measurement
and CW measurement.
(For burst measurement, the input tolerance is 30 MHz for the
manual frequency range of 600 MHz to 1 GHz, 20 MHz for the
manual frequency range of 1 GHz or higher in Narrow mode,
and 40 MHz for the manual frequency range of 1 GHz or
higher in Wide mode.)
[4] Set the measurement resolution and sample rate.
Notes:

Refer to Section 4.4.7 for measuring the pulse width or
pulse repetition period at the same time.

If the frequency is not displayed at all or not displayed
properly, set the level acquisition mode to Manual and
then perform measurement.
Automatic level acquisition measurement may not be
performed if the burst wave length (pulse width) is shorter
than the period.
In this event also, perform the
measurement in manual frequency acquisition mode.
4-49
Section 4 Panel Operation
4.4.6
Burst wave measurement via Input1
(Measurement with frequency acquisition = Manual, level acquisition =
Manual)
Carrier frequency, pulse width, and pulse repetition period of pulse
modulation signals can be measured in the burst measurement mode.
(1) Connecting input signal
Connect the signal to be measured to Input1 on the front panel.
Note:
Do not input a signal of +10 dBm or higher into Input1.
(2) Setup
[1] Press the Preset key to preset the unit.
[2] Set the burst measurement mode.
Press the Meas Mode key. Check that the Burst LED lights
up.
[3] Set the manual frequency value.
Refer to Section 4.3.6 or 4.4.2 for the setting method. Note
that the input tolerance differs between the burst measurement
and CW measurement.
(For burst measurement, the input tolerance is 30 MHz for the
manual frequency range of 600 MHz to 1 GHz, 20 MHz for the
manual frequency range of 1 GHz or higher in Narrow mode,
and 40 MHz for the manual frequency range of 1 GHz or
higher in Wide mode.)
[4] Set the manual amplitude discrimination value, by referring to
Section 4.3.5 or 4.4.3.
[5] Set the measurement resolution and sample rate.
Note:
Refer to Section 4.4.7 for measuring the pulse width or pulse
repetition period at the same time.
4-50
4.4
4.4.7
Measurement
Burst wave pulse width and repetition period measurement via
Input1
When the Input1 connector is selected and in the burst measurement
mode, either the pulse width or the pulse repetition period of pulse
modulation signals can be measured along with the carrier frequency.
Pulse width
(burst on)
Pulse width
(burst off)
Repetition period (rising edge)
Repetition period (falling edge)
Figure 4.4.7-1 Burst Wave Measurement (Measuring Pulse Width or
Repetition Period)
(1) Connecting input signal
Connect the signal to be measured to Input1 on the front panel.
Note:
Do not input a signal of +10 dBm or higher into Input1.
(2) Setup
[1] Press the Preset key to preset the unit.
[2] Set the burst measurement mode.
Press the Meas Mode key. Check that the Burst LED lights
up.
[3] Select the frequency acquisition mode.
It is set to Auto by preset. Refer to Section 4.4.2 for setting
Manual.
[4] Select the level acquisition mode.
It is set to Auto by preset. Refer to Section 4.4.3 for setting
Manual.
[5] Set the pulse width or pulse repetition period mode.
Press the Burst key to display the burst mode selection screen.
Select menu F1 using the < and > keys, and then press the
Enter key to display the burst mode selection screen.
Figure 4.4.7-2 Burst Mode Selection Screen
4-51
Section 4 Panel Operation
Select the measurement mode using the < and > keys. Select
Width for measuring the pulse width, and select Period for
measuring the pulse repetition period. Then press the Enter
key to fix the selection.
[6] Select the measurement polarity.
Select menu F2 using the < and > keys, and then press the
Enter key. The polarity changes between positive and negative
by pressing the Enter key.
When the negative polarity is selected for pulse width
measurement, the pulse width in the burst-off interval is
measured. When the negative polarity is selected for pulse
repetition period measurement, the period between falling
edges is measured.
Figure 4.4.7-3 Burst Measurement Polarity Selection Screen
[7] Select the burst width, Wide or Narrow.
Select menu F3 using the < and > keys, and then press the
Enter key.
The burst width changes between Wide and Narrow by pressing
the Enter key.
Make sure to set Narrow if the burst pulse width is 1 s or
shorter. Otherwise, the pulse width cannot be measured
properly.
Figure 4.4.7-4 Burst Width Selection Screen
[8] Press the Return to Meas key to display the measurement
screen.
[9] Set the frequency measurement resolution using the < and >
keys.
4-52
4.4
Measurement
The maximum frequency resolution depends
on the pulse width of the measurement
signal.
When a resolution higher than the maximum
resolution is set, UNCAL is displayed and the
digits of the frequency value that cannot be
displayed are represented by asterisks (*).
Figure 4.4.7-5 Burst Carrier Frequency Measurement Screen
[10] Set the sample rate using the  and  keys.
Note:
If the frequency is not displayed at all or not displayed
properly, set both the frequency acquisition mode and the
level acquisition mode to Manual and then perform
measurement.
Automatic acquisition measurement may not be performed if
the burst wave length (pulse width) is shorter than the period.
In this event also, perform the measurement in manual
acquisition mode.
4-53
Section 4 Panel Operation
4.4.8
Burst wave measurement via Input1 using gating function
The frequency at a specific position of a burst signal can be measured
using the gating function.
Signal to be measured
Level of signal to be
measured
Trigger signal (reference)
Trigger delay
Gate width
T
Trig Delay
Gate Width
Gate end: On
Frequency
measurement
interval
Gate end: Off
Figure 4.4.8-1 Gating Function Overview
(1) Connecting input signal
Connect the signal to be measured to Input1 on the front panel.
Note:
Do not input a signal of +10 dBm or higher into Input1.
(2) Setup
[1] Press the Preset key to preset the unit.
[2] Set the burst measurement mode.
Press the Meas Mode key. Check that the Burst LED lights
up.
[3] Select the frequency acquisition mode.
It is set to Auto by preset. Refer to Section 4.4.2 for setting
Manual.
[4] Select the level acquisition mode.
It is set to Auto by preset. Refer to Section 4.4.3 for setting
Manual.
4-54
4.4
Measurement
[5] Set the trigger delay.
Press the TD key to display the burst monitor screen for trigger
delay setting. (This screen can also be displayed by pressing
the < or > key from the burst monitor screen for gate width
setting.)
When Trig Delay (underscored) is displayed on the lower left of
the screen, press the Enter key. “Trig Delay” is highlighted,
and the numeric value can be changed using the  and  keys.
It is also possible to input a numeric value directly using the
numeric keypad.
After inputting a value, press the Enter key to display Trig
Delay (underscored) again.
[6] Select the measurement polarity.
Select menu F2 using the < and > keys, and then press the
Enter key.
The polarity changes between positive and negative by pressing
the Enter key.
When the negative polarity is selected for pulse width
measurement, the pulse width in the burst-off interval is
measured. When the negative polarity is selected for pulse
repetition period measurement, the period between falling
edges is measured.
[7] Set the gate width.
Press the GW key to display the burst monitor screen for gate
width setting. (This screen can also be displayed by pressing
the < or > key from the burst monitor screen for trigger delay
setting.)
4-55
Section 4 Panel Operation
Burst Monitor Screen for Trigger Delay Setting (Numeric Input mode)
Pressing the Enter key highlights “Trig Delay.”
A trigger delay can be set using the numeric keypad.
Pressing the Enter key displays Trig Delay.
Pressing the TD key displays
the burst monitor screen for
trigger delay setting.
A trigger delay can be set
using the  and  keys.
Burst Monitor Screen for Trigger Delay Setting
Pressing the < or > key displays the burst
monitor screen for trigger delay setting.
Pressing the < or > key displays the burst
monitor screen for gate width setting.
key
Pressing
the
GW
displays the burst monitor
screen for gate width setting.
A gate width can be set
using the  and  keys.
Burst Monitor Screen for Gate Width Setting
Pressing the Enter key displays Gate Width.
Pressing the Enter key highlights “Gate Width.”
A gate width can be set using the numeric
keypad.
Burst Monitor Screen for Gate Width Setting (Numeric Input mode)
Figure 4.4.8-2 Transition of Burst Monitor Screens
[8] Press the Return to Meas key to display the measurement
screen.
[9] Set the frequency measurement resolution using the < and >
keys.
[10] Set the sample rate using the  and  keys.
4-56
4.4
4.4.9
Measurement
Frequency measurement via Input2 (10 MHz to 1 GHz)
To measure frequencies from 10 MHz to 1 GHz, select the Input2
connector and an impedance of 50 .
Refer to Section 4.4.10 for measurement of frequencies from 10 Hz to 10
MHz.
(1) Connecting input signal
Connect the signal to be measured to Input2 on the front panel.
Note:
Do not input a signal of 2 Vrms (with 50- impedance)/10
Vrms (with 1-M impedance) or higher into Input2.
(2) Setup
[1] Press the Preset key to preset the unit.
[2] Set the input channel to Input2.
Press the Input key to display the Input switching screen, and
then select menu F1 using the < and > keys. At this time,
Input1 and Input2 are switched by pressing the Enter key.
Select Input2.
[3] Press the Return to Meas key to display the measurement
screen.
[4] Set the frequency measurement resolution using the < and >
keys.
[5] Set the sample rate using the  and  keys.
4-57
Section 4 Panel Operation
4.4.10 Frequency measurement via Input2 (10 Hz to 10 MHz)
To measure frequencies from 10 Hz to 10 MHz, select the Input2
connector and an impedance of 1 M.
Refer to Section 4.4.9 for measurement of frequencies from 10 MHz to 1
GHz.
(1) Connecting input signal
Connect the signal to be measured to Input2 on the front panel.
Note:
Do not input a signal of 2 Vrms (with 50- impedance)/10
Vrms (with 1-M impedance) or higher into Input2.
(2) Setup
[1] Press the Preset key to preset the unit.
[2] Set the input channel to Input2.
Press the Input key to display the Input switching screen, and
then select menu F1 using the < and > keys. At this time,
Input1 and Input2 are switched by pressing the Enter key.
Select Input2.
[3] Set the input impedance to 1 M.
Select menu F2 using the < and > keys. At this time, 50  and
1 M are switched by pressing the Enter key. Select 1 M.
[4] Press the Return to Meas key to display the measurement
screen.
[5] Set the frequency measurement resolution using the < and >
keys.
[6] Set the sample rate using the  and  keys.
4-58.
Section 5 GPIB
This section describes remote operations using the GPIB interface that
comes with this unit as standard.
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
Overview .................................................................... 5-2
Function ..................................................................... 5-3
Interface Function ...................................................... 5-5
Device Message List .................................................. 5-6
5.4.1 Overview ........................................................ 5-6
5.4.2 IEEE488.2 common commands .................... 5-8
5.4.3 Status registers.............................................. 5-9
5.4.4 Device message list....................................... 5-12
5.4.5 Compatibility with MF76A Microwave Frequency
Counter .......................................................... 5-34
Setting and Checking GPIB ....................................... 5-36
5.5.1 Connecting GPIB cables ............................... 5-36
5.5.2 Setting and checking GPIB address.............. 5-37
5.5.3 Recommended GPIB board manufacturers .. 5-37
Sample Programs ...................................................... 5-38
5-1
Section 5 GPIB
5.1 Overview
This unit comes with a GPIB interface as standard, enabling automatic
measurement by connecting to a host computer. It also makes it
possible to measure a fluctuation of frequency in a short time, such as
VCO activation characteristics, by using the high-speed sampling
function achieved through data processing by the host computer.
5-2
5.2
Function
5.2 Function
This unit offers the following functions by using the GPIB.
Table 5.2-1 Available Functions and Corresponding Device Messages
Function
Device Message
Input:
Switching of measurement signal input channels
INPCH
Switching of Input2 attenuator
ATTN
Switching of Input2 input impedance
INP2Z
Setting of manual frequency
AF
Switching of frequency acquisition mode
ACF
Switching of level acquisition mode
ACL
Setting of Input1 amplitude discrimination value (attenuator)
AD
Reference signal:
Selection of reference signal
REF
Measurement:
Switching of count mode
Selection of measurement start/stop
CNTMD
SH
Setting of frequency resolution
RES
Setting of sample rate
SMP
Burst signal:
Switching of burst measurement on/off
BST
Selection of burst signal measurement mode
BSTMD
Switching of burst signal polarity
BSTPL
Switching of burst signal measurement width
BSTWDT
Gating:
Switching of gate end on/off
GTEND
Setting of gate width
GTWDT
Trigger:
Switching of trigger source
Setting of trigger delay
Selection of trigger polarity
TRG
TRGDLY
TRGPL
Template:
Switching of template function on/off
Switching of movement direction indicator on/off
LMT
LMTDIR
Setting of template lower frequency limit
LMTL
Setting of template upper frequency limit
LMPU
5-3
Section 5 GPIB
Table 5.2-1 Available Functions and Corresponding Device Messages (Cont’d)
Function
Device Message
Data output:
Switching of data output format and timing
OM
Reading of measured results:
Carrier frequency of burst signal
MBCF
Burst width
MBWDT
Repetition period of burst signal
MBPRD
Frequency of CW signal
MCW
Offset frequency
MOFS
Statistical processing value
MSTA
High-speed sampling count
MTRS
Offset value calculation processing:
Selection of offset function
Selection of offset value setting method
Setting of offset frequency value
OFS
OFSDT
OFSFRQ
Statistical processing:
Selection of statistical processing function
STS
Selection of sample data extraction method
STSBLK
Setting of sample count
STSMPL
High-speed sampling function:
Switching of High-speed sampling mode on/off
Setting of sample count
TRS
TRSSMP
Setting of sampling period
TRSRT
Reading of offset frequency
TRSOFS
Data storage function:
Data storage start
DSTA
Data storage stop
DSTP
Stored data read
MDS
GPIB:
Selection of terminator
TRM
End status register
ESE2, ESR2
Error status register
ESE3, ESR3
Display:
Setting of display brightness
DSPL
Others:
5-4
Selection of signal output to AUX connector
AUX
Switching to measurement screen
RTM
5.3
Interface Function
5.3 Interface Function
This unit provides the GPIB interface functions listed in Table 5.3-1.
Table 5.3-1 Interface Functions
Code
SH1
AH1
T6
L4
SR1
RL1
PP0
DC1
DT1
C0
Interface Function
Full source handshake
Full acceptor handshake
Basic talker
Serial poll
Talk only
Talk release using MLA
Basic listener
No listen only
Listen release using MTA
Full service request and status byte
Full remote/local
No parallel poll
Full device clear
Full device trigger
No controller function
5-5
Section 5 GPIB
5.4 Device Message List
5.4.1
Overview
Device messages refer to data messages that are transmitted and
received between a controller and device (this unit in this case) via the
GPIB interface. There are two types of device messages: program
messages and response messages. In addition, these messages consist
of common commands conforming to the IEEE 488.2 standard and
messages unique to this unit. Refer to Section 5.4.2 “IEEE 488.2
common commands” for the common commands, and Section 5.4.4
“Device message list” for the messages unique to this unit.
(1) Program messages
ASCII data messages transmitted from the controller to the device.
They are divided into commands and queries.
[1] Commands: Used to set parameters and instruct the starting of
measurement for the device.
[2] Queries:
Used to inquire device states for the device and
obtain measurement data from the device.
(2) Response messages
ASCII data messages transmitted from the device to the controller.
They transfer device states and measurement data to the controller.
This unit
Program message
Response message
Controller
Device
Figure 5.4.1-1 Device Messages
5-6
5.4
Device Message List
When using device messages to transmit and receive numeric data
such as frequencies, a unit (suffix code) can be attached to the
numeric data to be transferred. For example, when setting 1 MHz
for the frequency data, attach a suffix code and send 1000000 HZ,
1000 KHZ, or 1 MHZ, instead of transmitting 1000000.
The following shows the suffix codes that can be used with this unit:
(1) Suffix codes when transferring frequency data
*
Unit
Suffix Code
GHz
MHz
kHz
Hz
GHZ, G
MHZ, MA
KHZ, K
HZ, omitted
*: All suffix codes are recognized as uppercase even if entered
in lower case.
Note:
Millihertz (mHz) is not supported.
(2) Suffix codes when transferring time data
*
Unit
Suffix Code
Second
Millisecond
Microsecond
Nanosecond
S
MS, M
US, U
NS, N, omitted
*: All suffix codes are recognized as uppercase even if entered
in lower case.
5-7
Section 5 GPIB
5.4.2
IEEE488.2 common commands
Table 5.4.2-1 lists the commands that can be used with this unit, from
among 39 common commands defined in the IEEE488.2 standard.
Table 5.4.2-1 Common Commands
Name
*IDN?
*RST
*TST?
*OPC
*OPC?
*WAI
*CLS
*ESE n
*ESE?
*ESR?
*SRE n
*SRE?
*STB?
*TRG
*RCL n
*SAV n
5-8
Description
Returns MF24xxC, ANRITSU, 0, n.
xx: 12 = MF2412C, 13 = MF2413C, 14 = MF2414C
n: Firmware version number
Presets the unit (same function as the Preset key).
Returns the value n in which the corresponding bits of the following ones
are set if an error occurs as a result of a self-check.
bit 0 (LSB): CPU, bit 1: EXT-RAM, bit 2: GPIB, bit 3: LCD, bit 4: ASIC,
bit 5: +12 V, bit 6: +15 V, bit 7: 15 V, bit 8: 5 V, bit9 : PLL1,
bit 10: PLL2, bit 11: Frequency Measure, bit 12: +5 V, bit 13: +3.3 V,
bit 14: +7 V
Sets bit 0 of the standard event status register (SESR) when the previous
command ends.
If bit 0 of the standard event status enable register (SESER) is set at that
time, SRQ is generated.
Returns 1 when the previous command execution ends.
Nothing is returned until the previous command execution ends.
The next command is not executed until the previous command execution
ends.
Executes the clear function defined in the IEEE488.2 standard.
Sets the value of the standard event status enable register (SESER) (0 to
255).
Returns the value of the standard event status enable register (SESER)
(0 to 255).
Returns the value of the standard event status register (SESR) (0 to 255).
Sets the value of the service request enable register (SRER) (0 to 255).
Returns the value of the service request enable register (SRER) (0 to 255).
Returns the value of the status byte register (0 to 255).
Execute the same function as that of the group execute trigger.
Recalls the device state saved in the specified memory (0 to 9).
Saves the current device state in the specified memory (0 to 9).
5.4
Status registers
Figure 5.4.3-1 shows the configuration of the status registers.
(MSB)
(LSB) Standard Event
PON URQ CME EXE DDE QYE RQC OPC
Logical OR
&
&
7
6
(MSB)
Logical OR
Service
Request
Generation
&
5
&
4
&
3
&
2
(MSB)
RQS
7
ESB MAV ERR END
MSS
&
&
7
(MSB)
(MSB)
7
6
Logical OR
&
&
7
6
(MSB)
&
&
7
&
6
&
7
6
(MSB)
&
5
4
3
2
5
4
3
2
&
5
&
4
&
5
&
5
4
&
4
&
&
Status Register
*ESR?
&
Standard Event
Status Enable Register
1
0 *ESE<NR1>
(LSB) *ESE?
(LSB)
1
&
0
Status Byte Register
*STB?
(LSB) End Event
Status Register
STA MEA
ESR2?
&
1
&
End Event
Status Enable Register
3
(LSB) ERR Event
Status Register
2 NOG UNC
3
Output
Queue
Service Request
Enable Register
1
0 *SRE<NR1>
(LSB) *SRE?
2
&
Queue
Not-Empty
:
:
&
3
(MSB)
Logical OR
5.4.3
Device Message List
0 ESE2<NR1>
(LSB) ESE2?
ESR3?
&
2
&
&
ERR Event
Status Enable Register
1
0 ESE3<NR1>
(LSB) ESE3?
Figure 5.4.3-1 Configuration of Status Registers
5-9
Section 5 GPIB
(1) Standard Event Status Register
The function and setting condition of each bit are described in Table
5.4.3-1.
Table 5.4.3-1 Standard Event Status Register
Bit
Function
Setting Condition
PON
URQ
Power on
User request
CME
Command error
EXE
Execution error
DDE
Device dependent
error
QYE
Query error
RQC
Request control
OPC
Operation complete
When power is turned on (power off  power on).
When a user request is generated (not used and always 0).
When the format of a received message cannot be
interpreted, a message having an unsupported header is
received, or GET is detected while receiving a program
message.
When the program data following the header is out of the
normal range, or the program message cannot be
processed due to a previously set value.
When a device-unique error has occurred (not used and
always 0).
A read request is issued when the output queue is empty,
or the output queue data is lost.
When the controller function is requested (not used and
always 0).
When all the specified operations are completed in
response to *OPC.
(2) Standard Event Status Enable Register
This register allows events of the standard event status register to
be reflected to the ESB bit of the status byte register.
(3) Status Byte Register
The function and setting condition of each bit are described in Table
5.4.3-2.
Table 5.4.3-2 Status Byte Register
5-10
Bit
Function
Setting Condition
MSS
Master summary
status
RQS
Request service
ESB
Event status
MAV
Message available
ERR
Error event status
END
End event status

Other bits
When an event concerning END, ERR, MAV, or ESB
occurs.
When a service request concerning END, ERR, MAV, or
ESB occurs.
When at least one event allowed by the standard event
status enable register occurs.
When the output queue has data.
When at least one event allowed by the ERR event status
enable register occurs.
When at least one event allowed by the END event status
enable register occurs.
The other bits are undefined and always 0.
5.4
Device Message List
(4) Service Request Enable Register
This register allows service requests.
(5) END Event Status Register
The function and setting condition of each bit are described in Table
5.4.3-3.
Table 5.4.3-3 END Event Status Register
Bit
Function
MEA
End of measurement
End of statistical
processing
Other bits
STA

Setting Condition
When the specified measurement ends
When the specified statistical processing ends
The other bits are undefined and always 0.
(6) END Event Status Enable Register
This register allows events of the END event status register to be
reflected to the END bit of the status byte register.
(7) ERR Event Status Register
The function and setting condition of each bit are described in Table
5.4.3-4.
Table 5.4.3-4 ERR Event Status Register
Bit
Function
Setting Condition
UNC
Uncal error
NOG
No-Go judgment

Other bits
When the measurement result is UNCAL.
When the template function valid and the judgment result
is No-Go.
The other bits are undefined and always 0.
(8) ERR Event Status Enable Register
This register allows events of the ERR event status register to be
reflected to the ERR bit of the status byte register.
5-11
Section 5 GPIB
5.4.4
Device message list
(1) A
[1] ACF
frequency acquisition
Sets whether to acquire the frequency manually or automatically.
Also sets whether to use the measured frequency value or the
frequency value set by the manual frequency setting command
AF for the measurement target frequency value (manual
frequency) in manual frequency acquisition mode.
Command:
Query:
Response:
ACF n(,s)
ACF?
ACF n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 ............... AUTO (Initial value)
1 ............... MANUAL
Value of s
0 ............... Measures at the frequency set by the command
AF (Default value).
1 ............... Measures at the frequency measured previously
(AF setting value is overwritten).
[2] ACL
level acquisition
Sets whether to acquire the level manually or automatically.
Also sets whether to use the current set value or the value set
in advance by the amplitude discrimination value setting
command AD for the amplitude discrimination value in manual
level acquisition mode.
Command:
Query:
Response:
ACL n(,s)
ACL?
ACL n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 ............... AUTO (Initial value)
1 ............... MANUAL
Value of s
0 ............... Measures at the level set by the command AD
(Default value).
1 ............... Measures at the level measured previously (AD
setting value is overwritten).
5-12
5.4
Device Message List
[3] AD
manual amplitude discrimination
Sets the value of the attenuator inside Input1 used as the
amplitude discrimination value.
Command:
Query:
Response:
AD n
AD?
AD n
<Program data>
Value of n
0 ...............
1 ...............
2 ...............
3 ...............
4 ...............
5 ...............
6 ...............
7 ...............
Set value
42 dB (Initial value)
36 dB
30 dB
24 dB
18 dB
12 dB
6 dB
0 dB
Note:
0 dB is set if n is set to 7 or greater.
[4] AF
frequency for manual acquisition
Sets the frequency to be set for manual frequency acquisition in
advance.
Command:
Query:
Response:
AF n
AF?
AF n
<Program data>
Value of n
For MF2412C: 600  106 to 20  109 Hz
For MF2413C: 600  106 to 27  109 Hz
For MF2414C: 600  106 to 40  109 Hz
Suffix code:
GHZ, MHZ, KHZ, HZ, G, MA, K
The setting resolution is 1 MHz. The digits lower than MHz
are rounded off.
5-13
Section 5 GPIB
[5] ATTN
input2 attenuator
Sets the input attenuator to be inserted into the system with
Input2 and 1 M.
Command:
Query:
Response:
ATTN n
ATTN?
ATTN n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 ............... ATT Through
1 ............... 20 dB ATT On (Initial value)
[6] AUX
auxiliary output
Select the signal to be output from the AUX connector on the
rear panel.
Command:
Query:
Response:
AUX n
AUX?
AUX n
<Program data>
Value of n
0 ...............
1 ...............
2 ...............
3 ...............
4 ...............
5 ...............
6 ...............
Set value
Off (Initial value)
Go/NoGo
Count End
Level Det
Int Gate
Restart
Acquisition
Off:
Always outputs a high level when the template
function is disabled.
Outputs the template function judgment result.
Outputs a high level when the measured
frequency falls within the setting range.
Outputs a low level when the measured
frequency is out of the setting range.
Outputs a low-level pulse each time frequency
measurement ends.
Outputs the detection signal within the counter
during burst signal measurement.
Outputs the internal gate signal used for
frequency counting.
Outputs a high level when the gate is open.
Go/NoGo:
Count End:
Level Det:
Int Gate:
5-14
5.4
Restart:
Acquisition:
Device Message List
Outputs a low-level pulse when the Restart
command is executed.
Outputs a low level during acquisition operation.
(2) B
[1] BST
burst measurement
Specifies whether to perform burst measurement or CW
measurement.
Command:
Query:
Response:
BST n
BST?
BST n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 ............... Burst off: CW measurement (Initial value)
1 ............... Burst on: Burst measurement
[2] BSTMD
burst mode
Specifies whether to measure carrier frequency, burst width, or
burst repetition period during burst measurement.
Command:
Query:
Response:
BSTMD n
BSTMD?
BSTMD n
<Program data>
Value of n
0 ...............
1 ...............
2 ...............
Set value
Carrier frequency (Initial value)
Burst width
Burst period
5-15
Section 5 GPIB
Table 5.4.4-1 Relationship between Burst Measurement Target and Burst Measurement Polarity
Measurement Item
Burst Measurement Polarity
Positive
Negative
Measures during burst-on time
Measures during burst-off time
Measures during a period between
burst-on start points
Measures during a period between
burst-off start points
Burst
Width
Burst
Period
[3] BSTPL
burst polarity
Sets the position (see “[2] BSTMD”) as follows when measuring
burst width or burst period.
Command:
Query:
Response:
BSTPL n
BSTPL?
BSTPL n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 ............... Positive (Initial value)
1 ............... Negative
[4] BSTWDT
burst width
Sets the burst width to be measured.
Command:
Query:
Response:
BSTWDT n
BSTWDT?
BSTWDT n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 ............... Wide (Initial value, Burst width: 1 s to 0.1 s)
1 ............... Narrow (Burst width: 100 ns to 0.1 s)
Note that the carrier frequency must be at least 600 MHz for
Wide, and at least 1 GHz for Narrow.
5-16
5.4
Device Message List
(3) C
[1] CNTMD
count mode
Sets the Input1 count method to Fast (reciprocal) or Normal
(direct count).
Command:
Query:
Response:
CNTMD n
CNTMD?
CNTMD n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 ............... Fast (Initial value)
1 ............... Normal
(4) D
[1] DSPL
display intensity
Sets the intensity (brightness) of the LCD.
Command:
Query:
Response:
DSPL n
DSPL?
DSPL n
<Program data>
Value of n
0 ...............
1 ...............
2 ...............
3 ...............
4 ...............
Set value
Off*
25%
50%
75%
100%
*: When Off is selected, a measurement screen is displayed
with the intensity off, but a setup screen is displayed with
the intensity 25%.
[2] DSTA
data storage start
Starts the data storage function that traces the measured
frequency values into the internal memory.
Command:
DSTA
[3] DSTP
data storage stop
Stops the data storage function, enabling traced data to be
loaded.
Command:
DSTP
5-17
Section 5 GPIB
Note:
Make sure to executed DSTP after the measured
frequency values have been traced into the internal
memory by using *WAI or *OPC?.
Normal frequency measurement values may not be
obtained if DSTP is executed during date saving.
(5) E
[1] ESE2
End Event Status Enable Register
Sets each bit of the END event status enable register, which is a
GPIB status enable register.
Command:
Query:
Response:
ESE2 n
ESE2?
ESE2 n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 to 255 .... Refer to Section 5.4.3 “Status Registers.”
(Initial value: 0)
[2] ESE3
ERR Event Status Enable Register
Sets each bit of the ERR event status enable register, which is a
GPIB status enable register.
Command:
Query:
Response:
ESE3 n
ESE3?
ESE3 n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 to 255 .... Refer to Section 5.4.3 “Status Registers.”
(Initial value: 0)
[3] ESR2
End Event Status Register
Returns the value of the END event status register, which is a
GPIB status register.
Query:
Response:
ESR2?
n
<Response data>
Refer to Section 5.4.3 “Status registers.”
5-18
5.4
Device Message List
[4] ESR3
ERR Event Status Register
Returns the value of the ERR event status register, which is a
GPIB status register
Query:
Response:
ESR3?
n
<Response data>
Refer to Section 5.4.3 “Status registers.”
(6) G
[1] GTEND
gate end
Sets whether the carrier frequency measurement range is to be
extended to the end of the gate width or to the end of the burst.
Command:
Query:
Response:
GTEND n
GTEND?
GTEND n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 ............... End of burst (Initial value)
1 ............... End of gate width
Note that when the burst ends before the end of
the gate width, the measurement ends at the
end of the burst.
[2] GTWDT
gate width
Sets the gate width.
Command:
Query:
Response:
GTWDT n
GTWDT?
GTWDT n
<Program data>
Value of n
100  109 to 100  103
Suffix code:
NS, US, MS, S, N, U, M
Make sure to set the value n in 20-ns steps for the range
from 100 ns to 1 s, and in two significant digits for the
range from 1 s to 100 ms. Values exceeding these ranges
will be rounded off.
5-19
Section 5 GPIB
(7) I
[1] INPCH
input channel
Select the connector to input signals.
Command:
Query:
Response:
INPCH n
INPCH?
INPCH n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
1 ............... Input1 (Initial value)
2 ............... Input2
[2] INP2Z
ch2 input impedance
Switches the input impedance of the Input2 connector.
Command:
Query:
Response:
INP2Z n
INP2Z?
INP2Z n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 ............... 50  (Initial value)
1 ............... 1 M
(8) L
[1] LMT
limit on/off (template function)
Sets whether to enable or disable the template function.
Command:
Query:
Response:
LMT n
LMT?
LMT n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 ............... Template function off (Initial value)
1 ............... Template function on
[2] LMTDIR
limit direction indicator
Sets whether to display or hide the indicator, which is used to
indicate the movement (change) direction of the measurement
frequencies (i.e., closing to the frequency range on the analog
display screen or departing from it) when the measured
frequency value greatly exceeds the frequency range defined by
the upper and lower limits.
Command:
Query:
Response:
5-20
LMTDIR n
LMTDIR?
LMTDIR n
5.4
Device Message List
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 ............... Indicator off (Initial value)
1 ............... Indicator on
[3] LMTL
lower limit
Sets the lower frequency limit for the template function.
Command:
Query:
Response:
LMTL n
LMTL?
LMTL n
<Program data>
Value of n
10 to Fmax*
Suffix code:
GHZ, MHZ, KHZ, HZ, G, MA, K
*: Fmax = 20 GHz (for MF2412C)
27 GHz (for MF2413C)
40 GHz (for MF2414C)
[4] LMTU
upper limit
Sets the upper frequency limit for the template function.
Command:
Query:
Response:
LMTU n
LMTU?
LMTU n
<Program data>
Value of n
10 to Fmax*
Suffix code:
GHZ, MHZ, KHZ, HZ, G, MA, K
*: Fmax = 20 GHz (for MF2412C)
27 GHz (for MF2413C)
40 GHz (for MF2414C)
(9) M
[1] MBCF
measurement data (burst carrier frequency)
Outputs the burst carrier frequency during burst measurement.
This is a measurement result read function.
Query:
Response:
MBCF?
n
<Response data>
Value of n
Outputs in frequency units (Hz).
“0HZ” is returned during CW measurement (burst off).
5-21
Section 5 GPIB
[2] MBWDT
measurement data (burst width)
Outputs the burst width during burst measurement. This is a
measurement result read function.
Query:
Response:
MBWDT?
n
<Response data>
Value of n
Outputs in time units (NS).
“0NS” is returned during CW measurement (burst off).
[3] MBPRD
measurement data (burst period)
Outputs the burst repetition period during burst measurement.
This is a measurement result read function.
Query:
Response:
MBPRD?
n
<Response data>
Value of n
Outputs in time units (NS).
“0NS” is returned during CW measurement (burst off).
[4] MCW
measurement data (continuous wave)
Outputs the measured frequency value during CW measurement.
This is a measurement result read function.
Query:
Response:
MCW?
n
<Response data>
Value of n
Outputs in frequency units (Hz).
“0HZ” is returned during burst measurement (burst on).
[5] MOFS
measurement data (offset frequency)
Outputs the +/offset calculation result and the ppm calculation
result. This is a measurement result read function.
Query:
Response:
MOFS?
n
<Response data>
Value of n
 Outputs in frequency units (HZ) when the offset mode is
set to +Offset or Offset.
 Outputs in deviation units (ppm) when the offset mode is
set to ppm.
 “0HZ” is returned when the offset mode is set to Off.
5-22
5.4
Device Message List
[6] MSTA
measurement data (frequency from the statistic
point of view)
Outputs statistical processing results for mean, p-p, min, and
max.
Query:
Response:
MSTA?
n1(,n2)
<Response data>
 Uses n1 for mean or p-p.
Value of n1: Outputs in frequency units (HZ).
 Uses n1 and n2 for max.
Value of n1: Outputs in max frequency units (HZ).
Value of n2: Outputs in min frequency units (HZ).
 Uses n1 and n2 for min.
Value of n1: Outputs in min frequency units (HZ).
Value of n2: Outputs in max frequency units (HZ).
 “0HZ” is returned when the statistical processing is off.
[7] MTRS
measurement data (transient frequency)
Reads the result obtained by the high-speed sampling function.
It uses this result to calculate the deviation (fi) from the offset
frequency (fo), and then calculate the input frequency (Xfi) by
adding the deviation to the offset frequency.
Query:
Response:
MTRS? n
T1,m1
T2,m2
:
Tn,mn
<Program data>
Value of n:
100, 200, 500, 1000, 2000
<Response data>
Reads n group data in the combination of Ti and mi (i = 1 to
n). Using the result, the frequency fi for each measurement
time i is calculated from the following expression:
fi = (mi/Ti)  109 [Hz]
where, i = 1, 2, 3, ..., n
To multiply the frequency resolution by k, the following
combination is used:
k-1
k-1
p=0
p=0
fi = (mi+p/Ti+p)  109 [Hz]
where, i = 1, 2, 3, ..., n  k + 1
5-23
Section 5 GPIB
The offset frequency f0 is output by the query message
TRSOFS?. The input frequency Xfi is calculated by the
following expression:
Xfi = abs (fo) + fi (when fo  0)
Xfi = abs (fo)  fi (when fo < 0)
Note that abs (fo) is the absolute value of fo.
[8] MDS
measurement data (frequency from the data
storage memory)
Reads data traced in the internal memory.
100 pieces of data are output from the oldest one (r1).
Query:
Response:
MDS?
r1
r2
:
r100
Note:
“0HZ” is returned as response data when data cannot be
read out.
(10) O
[1] OFS
offset
Adds or subtracts the previously set offset value to/from the
measured frequency result, or calculate the deviation.
Command:
Query:
Response:
OFS n(,s)
OFS?
OFS n
<Program data>
Value of n
0 ...............
1 ...............
2 ...............
3 ...............
Set value
Offset (Initial value)
+Offset
Offset
ppm
Value of s
Value set
0 ............... The value set by the command OFSFRQ is used
as the offset value (Default value).
1 ............... The previously measured value is used as the
offset value (the value set by the command
OFSFRQ is overwritten.)
5-24
5.4
Device Message List
[2] OFSDT
offset data
Selects whether to set the offset value update mode on or off.
When the update mode is set to on, the previously measured
value is successively updated as the offset value.
Command:
Query:
Response:
OFSDT n
OFSDT?
OFSDT n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 ............... Update mode off (Initial value)
1 ............... Update mode on
[3] OFSFRQ
offset frequency
Sets the offset frequency value.
Command:
Query:
Response:
OFSFRQ n
OFSFRQ?
OFSFRQ n
<Program data>
Value of n
0 to Fmax*
Suffix code:
GHZ, MHZ, KHZ, HZ, G, MA, K
*: Fmax = 20 GHz (for MF2412C)
27 GHz (for MF2413C)
40 GHz (for MF2414C)
[4] OM
output mode
Sets the unit to the continuous output mode for numeric output
format data used by the MF76A Microwave Frequency Counter.
The host CPU can continuously read the measurement data
when an Input statement (specify this unit as the talker) after
the following command message.
Command:
Query:
Response:
OM n
OM?
OM 2
<Program data>
Value of n
Set content
0 ............... The unit is specified as the talker by the Input
statement of the host CPU. The measured
result immediately after a data output request is
output (initial value).
5-25
Section 5 GPIB
Count operation
Talker specification
Data transmission
Figure 5.4.4-1 Data Transmission Timing When OM 0 Is Set
1 ............... The unit is specified as the talker by the Input
statement of the host CPU, and the data output
request generation timing and the frequency
measurement timing are synchronized. The
next measurement does not start until the
measured result is output.
Count operation
Talker specification
Data transmission
Figure 5.4.4-2 Data Transmission Timing When OM 1 Is Set
2 ............... Sets the IEEE488.2 communication format.
Note:
The OM mode is automatically set to 2 when a program
message is transmitted with OM = 0 and OM = 1.
5-26
5.4
Device Message List
F S G - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 . 2 E + 0
D1 D2 D3 D4
D5
D6
C L
R F
D7
Figure 5.4.4-3 Numeric Value Output Format
D1:
Indicates the data type.
F:
Frequency (Unit: Hz)
R:
Parts per million (Unit: ppm)
W:
Pulse width (Unit: second)
P:
Pulse repetition period (Unit: second)
D2:
Indicates whether the offset calculation is performed.
S:
Offset on
Blank: Offset off
D3:
Indicates whether the invalid display of read values,
specification judgment result, or statistical processing is
performed.
Priority
U:
UNCAL
L:
No-Go (lower side)
H:
No-Go (higher side)
G:
Go
M:
Mean value
X:
Maximum value
N:
Minimum value
P:
p-p
Blank: The above is off
High
Low
When there are two or more conditions, the one having
the highest priority is applied.
D4:
Indicates the sign of the data.
When the data sign is .
:
Bank: When the data sign is +.
D5:
Indicates twelve-digit data consisting of a numeric value
and a floating point.
D6:
Indicates the exponent for numeric data.
E+0 = 100, E+3 = 103, E+6 = 106, E+9 = 109
D7:
Indicates the terminator.
LF^EOI:
TRM0 (Initial value)
CR LF^EOI: TRM1
5-27
Section 5 GPIB
(11) R
[1] REF
reference frequency
Selects whether to use only the internal signal or to enable
automatic switching for the reference signal.
Command:
Query:
Response:
REF n
REF?
REF n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 ............... Auto (Initial value)
1 ............... Internal
[2] RES
frequency resolution
Sets the frequency measurement resolution.
Command:
Query:
Response:
RES n
RES?
RES n
<Program data>
Value of n
0 ...............
1 ...............
2 ...............
3 ...............
4 ...............
5 ...............
6 ...............
7 ...............
8 ...............
9 ...............
Set value
1 mHz
10 mHz
100 mHz
1 kHz
10 kHz
100 Hz (Initial value)
1 kHz
10 kHz
100 kHz
1 MHz
[3] RTM
return to measure
Displays the measurement screen.
Command:
5-28
RTM
5.4
Device Message List
(12) S
[1] SH
sampling hold
Starts or stops frequency measurement.
Command:
Query:
Response:
SH n
SH?
SH n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 ............... Sampling (Initial value)
1 ............... Hold
Note:
When the unit is in the hold state (SH 1), frequency
measurement can be restarted by executing *TRG or GET
(address command).
[2] SMP
sampling rate
Sets the sample rate (pause time).
Command:
Query:
Response:
SMP n
SMP?
SMP n
<Program data>
Value of n
0 ...............
1 ...............
2 ...............
3 ...............
4 ...............
5 ...............
6 ...............
7 ...............
8 ...............
9 ...............
10 .............
11 .............
12 .............
Set value
1 ms
2 ms
5 ms
10 ms
20 ms
50 ms
100 ms (Initial value)
200 ms
500 ms
1s
2s
5s
10 s
5-29
Section 5 GPIB
[3] STS
statistic function
Selects the statistical processing.
Command:
Query:
Response:
STS n
STS?
STS n
<Program data>
Value of n
0 ...............
1 ...............
2 ...............
3 ...............
4 ...............
Set value
Off (Initial value)
mean
max
min
p-p
[4] STSBLK
statistic sample extraction
Sets whether to perform overlap processing for statistical
processing.
Command:
Query:
Response:
STSBLK n
STSBLK?
STSBLK n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 ............... Discrete block sequence (Initial value)
1 ............... Overlap block sequence
[5] STSMPL
statistic sample point
Sets the sample count used for statistical processing to 10 to the
n-th power (STSBLK = 0, discrete mode) or to 2 to the n-th
power (STSBLK = 1, overlap mode).
Command:
Query:
Response:
STSMPL n
STSMPL?
STSMPL n
<Program data>
Value of n
1 to 6 (Initial value: 1)
The sample count is 10n when STSBLK = 0, and is 2n when
STSBLK = 1.
Note:
See Table 4.3.11-1 for details on the sample count.
5-30
5.4
Device Message List
(13) T
[1] TRG
trigger mode
Selects the trigger source.
Command:
Query:
Response:
TRG n
TRG?
TRG n
<Program data>
Value of n
0 ...............
1 ...............
2 ...............
Set value
Internal (Initial value)
External
Line (AC)
[2] TRGDLY
trigger delay
Sets the trigger delay value.
Command:
Query:
Response:
TRGDLY n
TRGDLY?
TRGDLY n
<Program data>
Value of n
0,
20  109 to 100  103 (sec)
Suffix code:
NS, US, MS, S, N, U, M
Make sure to set the value n in 20-ns steps for the range
from 20 ns to 320 ns, in 40-ns steps for the range from 320 ns
to 1 s, and in two significant digits for the range from 1 s
to 100 ms. Values exceeding these ranges will be rounded
off.
Delay off when 0 is set.
[3] TRGPL
trigger edge polarity
Sets the trigger detection polarity.
Command:
Query:
Response:
TRGPL n
TRGPL?
TRGPL n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 ............... Positive (Initial value)
1 ............... Negative
5-31
Section 5 GPIB
[4] TRM
terminator
Selects the terminator when transmitting response data.
Program message: TRM n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 ............... LF (Initial value)
1 ............... CRLF
[5] TRS
transient mode
Enables (on) or disables (off) the high-speed sampling function.
Command:
Query:
Response:
TRS n
TRS?
TRS n
<Program data>
Value of n
Set value
0 ............... Off (Initial value)
1 ............... On
Note:
The high-speed sampling measurement can be started by
executing *TRG or GET (address command).
[6] TRSOFS
transient offset
Outputs the offset frequency fo that is used for calculating the
input frequency during high-speed sampling measurement.
Refer to “[7] MTRS” in (9) M for the use method.
Query:
Response:
TRSOFS?
n
<Response data>
Value of n
Outputs in frequency units (HZ).
“0HZ” is returned when Input2 is selected.
[7] TRSSMP
transient sample point
Sets the sample count to be measured, using the high-speed
sampling function.
Command:
Query:
Response:
TRSSMP n
TRSSMP?
TRSSMP n
<Program data>
Value of n
100, 200, 500, 1000, 2000 (Initial value: 2000)
5-32
5.4
Device Message List
[8] TRSRT
transient sample rate
Sets the sampling interval to store the high-speed sampling
data.
Command:
Query:
Response:
TRSRT n
TRSRT?
TRSRT n
<Program data>
Value of n
10  106 to 1000  106 (sec) (Initial value: 1000  106)
Suffix code:
NS, US, MS, S, N, U, M
The setting resolution is 10 s.
5-33
Section 5 GPIB
5.4.5
Compatibility with MF76A Microwave Frequency Counter
Table 5.4.5-1 lists the GPIB commands for MF76A Microwave Frequency
Counter (hereinafter, referred to as “MF76A”) and those for this unit,
showing the compatibility between them.
The operation when an MF76A command in the left column is executed
and the operation when a command for this unit is executed are
equivalent.
Note that the MF76A commands keep the minimum necessary level of
compatibility to be compatible with older models. Do not use these
commands for new designs.
Table 5.4.5-1 Compatibility with MF76A GPIB Program Messages
MF76A GPIB Commands
Service request
generation mode
Data terminator
Measurement start
command
Initialization
command
Switching of input
range
Switching of
measurement
resolution
5-34
GPIB Commands for This Unit
RQ
DT
IN
RQ0
RQ1
RQ2
RQ3
RQ4
RQ5
RQ6
RQ7
*SRE 0
ESE2 1
*ESE 32
ESE2 1
*ESE 16
ESE2 1
*ESE 48
ESE2 1
DT0
DT1
TRM 1
No corresponding
command
RS
*TRG
CL
*RST
IN10
IN11
IN2
INPCH 2
INPCH 2
INPCH 1
RE2
RE3
RE4
RE5
RE6
RE7
RE8
RE9
RE13
RE14
RE15
RE16
RES 2
RES 3
RES 4
RES 5
RES 6
RES 7
RES 8
RES 9
RES 0
RES 1
RES 2
RES 3
RE
*SRE 4
*SRE 32
*ESE 32
*SRE 32
*ESE 16
*SRE 32
*ESE 48
INP2Z 0
INP2Z 1
INP2Z 0
*SRE 36
*SRE 36
*SRE 36
5.4
Device Message List
Table 5.4.5-1 Compatibility with MF76A GPIB Program Messages (Cont’d)
MF76A GPIB Commands
Switching of
sample rate
SR
Selection of
manual mode
MA
Selection of offset
mode
OF
Selection of parts
per million mode
RA
Selection of burst
mode
BU
Switching of
amplitude
discrimination
Switching of output
mode
AD
OM
GPIB Commands for This Unit
SR0
SR1
SR2
SH 0
SH 1
SH 0
MA0
MA10
ACF 0
ACF 1,1
OF0
OF10+
OF10
OF20+
OF20
OFS 0
OFS 1,1
OFS 2,1
OFSDT 1
OFSDT 1
RA0
RA1
OFS 0
OFS 3
BU0
BU1
BST 0
BST 1
AD0
AD10
ACL 0
ACL 1,1
OM0
OM1
OM 0
OM 1
SMP 0
OFS 1
OFS 2
5-35
Section 5 GPIB
5.5 Setting and Checking GPIB
This section describes how to connect GPIB cables, set parameters, and
check the cable connection and parameter settings required before using
the GPIB.
5.5.1
Connecting GPIB cables
The GPIB interface connector is provided on the rear panel.
Up to fifteen devices, including the controller, can be connected to one
GPIB system.
Connect the GPIB cables as shown in Figure 5.5.1-1.
GPIB interface connector
GPIB cables
Total cable length
20 m
Cable length between devices
4 m
Number of connectable devices 15
Figure 5.5.1-1 Conditions for GPIB Cable Connection
CAUTION
Make sure to connect the GPIB cables before turning on
the unit.
5-36
5.5
5.5.2
Setting and Checking GPIB
Setting and checking GPIB address
The GPIB address cannot be set or checked externally. Set and check it
through panel operation.
The following table shows the setting contents.
Table 5.5.2-1 GPIB Address Setting Range
Setting Item
Range
Factory Setting
GPIB address
0 to 30
8
Note:
The above setting contents are retained even after the unit is
turned off.
5.5.3
Recommended GPIB board manufacturers
The recommended manufacturers of the GPIB board (GPIB card) used by
the host computer are as follows.
Manufacturers:
National Instruments Corporation.
Interface Corporation.
5-37
Section 5 GPIB
5.6 Sample Programs
This section provides sample programs for reference. These programs
are provided assuming that an National Instruments GPIB board and
NI-488.2TM software are used, and Visual Basic is used for control.
(1) The following is a sample program that sets Input1, CW, Auto
measurement, sample rate 1 s, and resolution 1 Hz, uses serial
polling to wait for measurement to end, and reads and displays the
measured frequency value.
 Sample program using Visual Basic
Sub SAMP1 ()
Dim ADRS(2) As Integer
ADRS(1) = 8
‘Sets GPIB address
ADRS(2) = -1
Cls
Call SendIFC(0)
‘Interface clear
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), "Error: IFC")
End If
Call EnableRemote(0, ADRS)
‘Remote enable
if ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), “Error: REN”)
End If
Call DevClear(0, ADRS(1))
‘Device clear
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), "Error: DCL")
End If
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "*RST;*CLS;TRM 1", NLend)
‘Specifies preset, status clear, and terminator
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), "Error: SENDING COMMAND")
End If
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "ESE2 1", NLend)
‘Permits measurement end event status
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "SMP 9;RES 3", NLend)
‘Sets sample rate 1 s and resolution 1 Hz
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "*CLS;*TRG", NLend)
‘Sets status clear and trigger command
For I% = 1 To 10
FREQ$ = Space$(20)
Call Serpoll(ADRS(1))
‘Serial polling
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "MCW?", NLend)
‘Reads measured frequency value
Call Receive(0, ADRS(1), FREQ$, STOPend)
Print FREQ$
Next I%
5-38
‘Displays measured frequency value
5.6
Sample Programs
Call ibonl(ADRS(1), 0)
End Sub
Sub Serpoll (ADR%)
‘Serial polling routine
Do
Call ReadStatusByte(0, ADR%, Status%)
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADR%, "Error: could not read status byte.")
End If
Loop Until (Status% And &H4) = &H4
Call Send(0, ADR%, "*CLS", NLend)
End Sub
Sub ERRMSG (ADR% msg$)
‘Error message display routine
emsg$ = “ADRS:” & ADR% & “ “ & msg$
MsgBox emsg$, vbCritical, “Error”
‘Displays message on the screen
Call ibonl(ADR%, 0)
End
‘End of program
End Sub
5-39
Section 5 GPIB
(2) The following is a sample program that sets Input2, impedance 50 ,
sample rate 10 ms, resolution 10 Hz, statistical processing Max, and
hold mode, uses a service request to wait for measurement to end,
and reads and displays the statistical processing value.
 Sample program using Visual Basic
Sub SAMP2 ()
Dim ADRS(2) As Integer
ADRS(1) = 8
‘Sets GPIB address
ADRS(2) = -1
Cls
Call SendIFC(0)
‘Interface clear
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), "Error: IFC")
‘See sample program (1).
End If
Call EnableRemote(0, ADRS)
‘Remote enable
if ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), “Error: REN”)
End If
Call DevClear(0, ADRS(1))
‘Device clear
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), "Error: DCL")
End If
Call Send(0, ADRS%, "*RST;*CLS;TRM 1", NLend)
‘Specifies preset, status clear, and terminator
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), "Error: SENDING COMMAND")
End If
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "ESE2 2;*SRE 4", NLend)
‘Permits statistical processing end event status
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "INPCH 2", NLend)
‘Sets Input2 for input channel
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "STS 2", NLend)
‘Sets statistical processing Max
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "SMP 3;RES 4;SH 1", NLend)
‘Sets sample rate 10 ms, resolution 10 Hz, hold
‘and END service request
For I% = 1 To 10
FREQ$ = Space$(40)
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "*CLS;*TRG", NLend)
‘Sets status clear and trigger command
Call Waisrq(ADRS(1))
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "MSTA?", NLend)
Call Receive(0, ADRS(1), FREQ$, STOPend)
Print FREQ$
Next I%
Call ibonl(ADRS(1), 0)
End Sub
5-40
‘Reads statistical processing value
5.6
Sub Waisrq (ADR%)
Sample Programs
‘SRQ routine
Do
Call WaitSRQ(0, SRQasserted%)
If SRQasserted% = 0 Then
Call ERRMSG(ADR%, "Error: did not assert SRQ. ")
End If
Call ReadStatusByte(0, ADR%, Status%)
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADR%, "Error: could not read STB. ")
End If
Loop Until (Status% And &H4) = &H4
Call Send(0, ADR%, "*CLS", NLend)
End Sub
5-41
Section 5 GPIB
(3) The following is a sample program that sets Input1, burst mode,
sample rate 100 ms, resolution 100 kHz, manual frequency 10 GHz,
and hold mode, uses a service request to wait for measurement to
end, and reads and displays the carrier frequency and pulse width
values.
 Sample program using Visual Basic
Sub SAMP3 ()
Dim ADRS(2) As Integer
ADRS(1) = 8
‘Sets GPIB address
ADRS(2) = -1
Cls
Call SendIFC(0)
‘Interface clear
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), "Error: IFC")
‘See sample program (1).
End If
Call EnableRemote(0, ADRS)
‘Remote enable
if ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), “Error: REN”)
End If
Call DevClear(0, ADRS(1))
‘Device clear
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), "Error: DCL")
End If
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "*RST;*CLS;TRM 1", NLend)
‘Specifies preset, status clear, and terminator
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), "Error: SENDING COMMAND")
End If
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "ESE2 1;*SRE 4", NLend)
‘Permits measurement end event status and
‘END service request
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "ACF 1;AF 1GHZ", NLend)
‘Sets manual measurement, manual frequency
‘1 GHz
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "BST 1;BSTMD 1", NLend)
‘Sets burst mode, burst width measurement
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "SMP 6;RES 8;SH 1", NLend)
‘Sets sample rate 100 ms, resolution 100 kHz
For I% = 1 To 10
FREQ$ = Space$(20)
WDT$ = Space$(20)
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "*CLS;*TRG", NLend)
Call Waisrq(ADRS(1))
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "MBCF?", NLend)
Call Receive(0, ADRS(1), FREQ$, STOPend)
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "MBWDT?", NLend)
Call Receive(0, ADRS(1), WDT$, STOPend)
Print FREQ$; WDT$
Next I%
Call ibonl(ADRS(1), 0)
End Sub
5-42
‘Sets status clear and trigger command
‘See sample program (2).
‘Reads burst carrier frequency value
‘Reads measured burst width value
‘Displays measurement results.
5.6
Sample Programs
(4) The following is a sample program that sets Input2, impedance 1
M, ATT On, sample rate 10 ms, resolution 1 Hz, and statistical
processing Mean, and reads and outputs the measured value in the
output mode 0 numeric value format.
 Sample program using Visual Basic
Sub SAMP4 ()
Dim ADRS(2) As Integer
ADRS(1) = 8
‘Sets GPIB address
ADRS(2) = -1
Cls
Call SendIFC(0)
‘Interface clear
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), "Error: IFC")
‘See sample program (1).
End If
Call EnableRemote(0, ADRS)
‘Remote enable
if ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), “Error: REN”)
End If
Call DevClear(0, ADRS(1))
‘Device clear
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), "Error: DCL")
End If
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "*RST;TRM 1", NLend)
‘Specifies preset, status clear, and terminator
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), "Error: SENDING COMMAND")
End If
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "INPCH 2;INP2Z 1;ATTN 1", NLend) ‘Sets input channel Input2, 1 M, and ATT On
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "SMP 3;RES 3;STS 1", NLend)
‘Sets sample rate 10 ms, resolution 1 Hz, mean
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "OM 0", NLend)
‘Specifies the output mode 0 numeric value
‘format
For I% = 1 To 10
FREQ$ = Space$(40)
Call Receive(0, ADRS(1), FREQ$, STOPend)
‘Read measured value
Print FREQ$
Next I%
Call ibonl(ADRS(1), 0)
End Sub
5-43
Section 5 GPIB
(5) The following is a sample program that sets Input1, manual
frequency 1 GHz, amplitude discrimination L3, high-speed sample
count 100, high-speed sampling period 100 s, external trigger, and
trigger delay 100 s, enables the high-speed sampling function, uses
service request to wait for measurement to end, reads the count
value and converts it to frequency to obtain the frequency value.
 Sample program using Visual Basic
Sub SAMP5 ()
Dim ADRS(2) As Integer
ADRS(1) = 8
‘Sets GPIB address
ADRS(2) = -1
Static FREQ#(100)
Cls
Call SendIFC(0)
‘Interface clear
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), "Error: IFC")
‘See sample program (1).
End If
Call EnableRemote(0, ADRS)
‘Remote enable
if ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), “Error: REN”)
End If
Call DevClear(0, ADRS%)
‘Device clear
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), "Error: DCL")
End If
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "*RST;*CLS;TRM 1", NLend)
‘Specifies preset, status clear, and terminator
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), "Error: SENDING COMMAND")
End If
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "ESE2 1;*SRE 4", NLend
‘Permits measurement end event status and
‘END service request
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "ACF 1;AF 1GHZ;ACL 1;AD 3", NLend)
‘Sets Manual measurement, 1 GHz, and L3
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "TRG 1;TRGDLY 100US", NLend)
‘Sets external trigger and trigger delay 100 s
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "TRSSMP 100;TRSRT 100US;TRS 1", NLend)
‘Sets sample count 100, sample period 100 s,
‘and high-speed sampling function on
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "*CLS;*TRG", NLend)
‘Sets status clear and trigger command
Call Waisrq(ADRS(1))
‘See sample program (2).
OFS$ = Space$(40)
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "TRSOFS?", NLend)
Call Receive(0, ADRS(1), OFS$, STOPend)
5-44
‘Reads offset value
5.6
Sample Programs
FOFS# = Val(OFS$)
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "MTRS? 100", NLend)
For I% = 0 To 99
BUF$ = Space$(40)
Call Receive(0, ADRS(1), BUF$, STOPend)
SEP% = InStr(BUF$, ",")
CNT1# = Mid(BUF$, 1, SEP% - 1)
CNT2# = Mid(BUF$, SEP% + 1)
If FOFS# >= 0 Then
‘Branches the processing according to
‘the offset value polarity (positive/negative)
FREQ#(I%) = FOFS# + (CNT2# / CNT1#) * 1000000000
‘Processing when the offset value is positive
Else
FREQ#(I%) = FOFS# - (CNT2# / CNT1#) * 1000000000
‘Processing when the offset value is negative
End If
Print FREQ#(I%)
‘Displays the measured value
Next I%
Call Send(0, ADRS%, "TRS 0;RTM", NLend)
Call ibonl(ADRS(1), 0)
End Sub
5-45
Section 5 GPIB
(6) The following is a sample program that sets Input2, impedance 1
M, ATT On, sample rate 50 ms, resolution 1 kHz, and uses the data
storage function to obtain the measured frequency value.
 Sample program using Visual Basic
Sub SAMP6 ()
Dim ADRS(2) As Integer
ADRS(1) = 8
‘Sets GPIB address
ADRS(2) = -1
Cls
Call SendIFC(0)
‘Interface clear
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), "Error: IFC")
‘See sample program (1).
End If
Call EnableRemote(0, ADRS)
‘Remote enable
if ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), “Error: REN”)
End If
Call DevClear(0, ADRS(1))
‘Device clear
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS%, "Error: DCL")
End If
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "*RST;*CLS;TRM 1", NLend)
‘Specifies preset, status clear, and terminator
If ibsta% And EERR Then
Call ERRMSG(ADRS(1), "Error: SENDING COMMAND")
End If
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "INPCH 2;INP2Z 1;ATTN 1", NLend) ‘Sets Input2, impedance 1 M, and ATT On
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), "SMP 5;RES 6", NLend)
‘Sets sample rate 50 ms and resolution 1 kHz
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), “DSTA”, NLend)
‘Starts data storage
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), “*TRG”, NLend)
‘Sets trigger command
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), “*WAI”, NLend)
‘Waits until data storage is completed
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), “DSTP”, NLend)
‘Enables measured frequency value to be read
Call Send(0, ADRS(1), “MDS?”, NLend)
‘Reads measured frequency value
For I% = 1 To 100
FREQ$ = Space$(20)
Call Receive(0, ADRS(1), FREQ$, STOPend)
Print FREQ$
Next I%
Call ibonl(ADRS(1), 0)
End Sub
5-46.
‘Displays measured frequency value
Section 6 Operating Principles
This section describes the measurement principle, frequency
measurement accuracy, pulse width measurement accuracy, and trigger
error for this unit.
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
Configuration..............................................................
Frequency Measurement ...........................................
6.2.1 Measurement method for
Input2/50  system .......................................
6.2.2 Measurement method for
Input2/1 M system ......................................
6.2.3 Measurement method for Input1 ...................
Burst Width Measurement/
Burst Period Measurement ........................................
Trigger Error...............................................................
6-2
6-3
6-3
6-5
6-6
6-7
6-8
6-1
Section 6 Operating Principles
6.1 Configuration
Figure 6.1-1 shows this unit’s configuration.
Input1
MIX
AMP
SCHMITT
IF Signal
BURST DET
IF Detect
LOCAL
SYNTHESIZER
COUNT BLOCK
COUNT
LEVEL DET
IF Level
GATE
External Trigger
Input2
50/1M
CLK
GATE
SIGNAL
GENERATE
AMP
Reference Input
(1M/2M/5M/10M)
10MHz
LEVEL DET
Input2
Level
SCHMITT
Input2
Signal
COUNT
CLK
SELECT
TIME
BASE
SELECTOR
MAIN
COUNT
CLOCK
CPU
Power Off
Reference Output
Power On
DISPLAY
MEMORY
Figure 6.1-1 Block diagram
6-2
GPIB
AUX
GPIB
AUX
6.2
Frequency Measurement
6.2 Frequency Measurement
Frequency means the number of vibrations per unit of time.
Direct counting, the most basic operating principle of frequency
measurement, opens a gate between a precise unit of time created by a
reference signal generation circuit, passes through the signal, counts it
using a counting circuit, and then displays the result.
6.2.1
Measurement method for Input2/50  system
The 50  system (measurement frequency of 10 MHz to 1 GHz) input
signal on Input2 of this unit is measured with the direct count method.
Connected signal to the Input2 connector passes a 50 /1 M input
impedance switch circuit and is added to the AMP and SCHMITT circuits.
To prevent miscounts due to noise, the AMP amplitude is controlled so
that the input level of the SCHMITT circuit remains constant regardless
of the input level.
The SCHMITT circuit converts the waveform of the amplified signal to a
pulse and then sends it to the counting circuit.
The counting circuit uses the reference signal generator signal as the
standard, opens the gate only as long as the gate time of the count signal
time (1 s at a resolution of 1 Hz and 1 ms at a resolution of 1 kHz) for
obtaining the necessary resolution, and then counts the number of pulses.
This pulse number is sent to the CPU which displays it as a
measurement frequency.
Measurement
signal
Measurement
signal conversion
to pulse
Gate time T1
Rest time T2
Gate time T1
Gate
Count pulse
Number of pulses = 5
Number of pulses = 6
Figure 6.2.1-1 Direct counting
6-3
Section 6 Operating Principles
The pulse that is input has a 1 count error for the number of pulses
because it is a signal not synchronized with the gate. This error is the
1 count item noted in the measurement error. Consequently, the final
measurement accuracy is as follows:
Measurement accuracy = 1 count
 time base accuracy  Measurement frequency
6-4
6.2
6.2.2
Frequency Measurement
Measurement method for Input2/1 M system
The 1 M system (measurement frequency of 10 Hz to 10 MHz) input
signal on Input2 of this unit is measured with the reciprocal method.
The measurement signal, which was converted into a pulse waveform, is
divided in the range from 1/2 to 1/109 by the counting circuit. This
division rate is decided by calculating the optimum value on the CPU
from the correspondence between the necessary frequency resolution and
the frequency of the measurement signal.
The counting circuit opens the gate for the amount of time required to
divide the measurement signal by the division rate, measures the gate
time, and then uses the CPU to calculate the frequency of the
measurement signal from this gate time T (Internal reference clock
frequency  Number of clocks “M”) and the division rate N.
Measurement
signal
Measurement
signal
conversion to
pulse
N division of
measurement
signal
… N
1
2
3
………
N
1
2
3
………
N
1
2
3
…...
Gate time T
1 ………………………… N
Internal count
reference clock
Count clock
Number of clocks = M
Figure 6.2.2-1 Reciprocal method
In the reciprocal method, the count error value will vary according to the
noise level applied to the input signal because the gate time is
determined by the input signal. This is added as trigger error noted by
measurement error (Section 6.4 “Trigger Error” describes count error due
to trigger error). The final measurement accuracy is as follows:
Measurement accuracy = 1 count
 time base accuracy  Measurement frequency
 Trigger error
6-5
Section 6 Operating Principles
6.2.3
Measurement method for Input1
When measuring the input signal at the Input1 connector, the signal is
first converted into an IF signal using the heterodyne down converter
method. The count results using either the direct count method (when
count mode is Normal) or the reciprocal method (when count mode is
Fast) are then displayed.
Connecting the measurement signal to the Input1 connector mixes it
with the local N harmonics in the harmonic mixer to obtain the IF signal.
Measurement
signal
(frequency Fx)
MIX
IF signal
(frequency Fx-NF1)
N-ary harmonics signal
(frequency NF1)
Figure 6.2.3-1 Heterodyne down converter method
The IF signal is amplified by the IF AMP, and then counted at the
counter circuit.
If Fx is the frequency of the measurement signal, F1 is the local
frequency, and F2 is the frequency of the IF signal counted, we get the
following calculation:
Fx = NF1  F2
When the count mode is Normal, measurement error is the same as the
direct count method, and when it is Fast, it is the same as the
reciprocal method. In addition, error due to harmonic mixing cannot
be ignored on Input1. This error is called “residual stability”. The
following shows whether to operate the measurement signal source and
this unit at the same reference signal, and the accuracy when the unit
uses a highly stable external reference signal:
<Count mode = Normal>
Measurement accuracy = 1 count
 time base accuracy  Measurement frequency
 Residual error 1 *
*: Residual error 1 = Measurement frequency (GHz)/10 counts (rms)
<Count mode = Fast>
Measurement accuracy = 1 count
 time base accuracy  Measurement frequency
 Trigger error  Residual error 2 *
*: Residual error 2 = Measurement frequency (GHz)/2 counts (rms)
6-6
6.3
Burst Width Measurement/Burst Period Measurement
6.3 Burst Width Measurement/Burst Period
Measurement
The measurement signal input from Input1 is detected by the BURST
DET circuit to generate a pulse signal. This pulse signal is taken as the
gate time, and the number of clocks of the internal count clock is counted.
This number of clocks is used to obtain the gate time by calculating on
the CPU, and then displayed as the burst width.
For the burst period, the time from the start of a burst to the time of the
start of the next burst (or the time from an end to the next end) is taken
as the gate time, and the same operation takes place.
Burst period
Burst width
Measurement
burst signal
N division of
measurement
signal
Gate time T
1 …………………………… N
Internal count
reference clock
Count clock
Number of clocks = M
Figure 6.3-1 Burst width measurement
The gate is generated from the measurement signal, and the counting
method using the counting circuit is the same as that for the reciprocal
method. The error is also the same. Note that error due to detection is
newly added for burst width and period measurement. This will be 20
ns when using this unit to measure a burst signal at an On/Off ratio of
40 dB and 0 cross (when On/Off is performed when the carrier signal
phase is 0 degrees). Consequently, measurement accuracy is as follows:
Measurement accuracy = 20 ns
 time base accuracy  Measurement pulse width
 Trigger error
Measurement burst signal : On/Off ratio of 40 dB, 0 cross
6-7
Section 6 Operating Principles
6.4 Trigger Error
When the count mode on Input1 is Fast and Input2 is the 1 MΩ system,
this unit employs measurements using the reciprocal method that
calculates and displays frequency by making calculations from period
measured value.
When performing period measurements, it takes the measurement signal
as the gate time unlike the frequency measurement, therefore the error
will occur by minute noise components as fluctuation of the count time.
As shown in Figure 6.4-1, when the gate opens/closes due to a noise
signal at the trigger point, the gate time lengthens and shortens by T.
If S is the gradient (V/sec.) of the ideal signal in the trigger level and EN
is the peak value of the noise signal, the following relationship is
established:
S = EN/T
This means that the maximum measurement period deviation due to noise
is 2T, and if the measurement period is T, the trigger error is expressed
by the ratio of 2T and the measurement period T as follows:
2T/T = 2 EN (peak value)/TS
For example, for a sine wave of period T and amplitude ES, the gradient
S of the trigger level is 2ES/T, resulting in the following equation:
2T/T = EN (peak value)/ES (amplitude)
As shown in Figure 6.4-1, an error of 2T occurs when there was trigger
error for the ideal GATE. This is the counter error in the reciprocal
frequency measurement described in Section 6.2 and burst width
measurement/burst period measurement described in Section 6.3.
6-8
6.4
Measurement period T
Trigger Error
EN
ES
T
Maximum period deviation
= 2T
Ideal Gate
… Gate width: T
… Gate width: T–2T
Gate with
trigger error
… Gate width: T+2T
Figure 6.4-1 Trigger error due to noise
Figure 6.4-2 to 6.4-5 show the relationship between count error and input
level, assuming that noise exists only in this unit (assumes there is no
input signal noise).
20
10
Input level (dBm)
0
-10
-20
-30
40GHz
-40
<27GHz
<20GHz
<12.4GHz
-50
-60
±0.1
±1
±10
±100
Count error
Figure 6.4-2 Count error vs. input level for Input1 frequency measurement
6-9
Section 6 Operating Principles
10
100Hz
Resolution
=0.001
1
Resolution
=0.001
10kHz
Resolution
=0.1
100kHz
Resolution
=10
1MHz
Resolution
=1k
10MHz
Resolution
=100k
10Hz
Resolution
=0.001
0.1
Input level (Vrms)
1kHz
1×10-2
1×10-3
1×10-4
1×10-5
±0.001
±0.01
±0.1
±1
±10
±1×102
±1×103
Count error (Hz)
Figure 6.4-3 Count error vs. input level for Input2 frequency measurement
20
10
Input level (dBm)
0
-10
-20
-30
40GHz
-40
<27GHz
<20GHz
<12.4GHz
-50
-60
±1×10-10
±1×10-9
±1×10-8
±1×10-7
Count error (s)
Figure 6.4-4 Count error vs. input level for Input1 pulse width measurement
(Wide)
20
10
Input level (dBm)
0
-10
-20
-30
40GHz
-40
<26.5GHz
<20GHz
<12.4GHz
-50
-60
±1×10-10
±1×10-9
±1×10-8
±1×10-7
Count error (s)
Figure 6.4-5 Count error vs. input level for Input1 pulse width
measurement (Narrow)
6-10.
Section 7 Performance Test
This section describes the measurement equipment, setup, and
performance tests necessary for testing this unit performance.
7.1
7.2
7.3
When to Run Performance Tests ..............................
List of Performance Test Equipment .........................
Performance Test ......................................................
7.3.1 Continuous frequency measurement ............
7.3.2 Burst wave carrier frequency measurement .
7.3.3 Burst width measurement ..............................
7-2
7-3
7-4
7-4
7-7
7-8
7-1
Section 7 Performance Test
7.1 When to Run Performance Tests
The purpose of performance tests is preventative maintenance in order to
detect and head off degraded performance before it occurs. The
performance tests that are required include a test after purchase, routine
test, and performance test after repairs.
The following items are tested during each of the tests described above.
 Continuous frequency measurement
 Burst wave carrier frequency measurement
 Burst width measurement
Periodically carry out performance tests for preventative maintenance.
The minimum recommended number of tests is one or two a year.
Contact our service department if a performance test discovers that the
unit is not performing according to its specifications.
7-2
7.2
List of Performance Test Equipment
7.2 List of Performance Test Equipment
Table 7.2-1 shows the equipment for performance tests.
Table 7.2-1 List of Performance Test Equipment
Test Item
7.3.1.1
Continuous
frequency
measurement
(Input1)
7.3.1.2
Continuous
frequency
measurement
(Input2, 50 )
7.3.2
Burst wave
carrier frequency
measurement
7.3.3
Burst width
measurement
Test Equipment
(Recommended Anritsu Model No.)
Power meter
(ML2437A/ML2438A)
10 MHz to 50 GHz
Power sensor
(MA2473D)
10 MHz to 32 GHz, –70 to +20 dBm
(MA2474D)
10 MHz to 40 GHz, –70 to +20 dBm
Fixed attenuator*2
(MP721D)
20 dB
Signal generator
(MG3692B)
Up to 20 GHz
(MG3693B)
Up to 30 GHz
(MG3694B)
Up to 40 GHz
Power meter
7.3.1.3
Continuous
frequency
measurement
(Input2, 1 M)
Power sensor
Signal generator
Required Performance
*1
Frequency range
10 MHz to 20 GHz: MF2412C
10 MHz to 27 GHz: MF2413C
10 MHz to 40 GHz: MF2414C
Sensitivity
–33 to 0 dBm
Frequency range
10 MHz to 20 GHz: MF2412C
10 MHz to 27 GHz: MF2413C
10 MHz to 40 GHz: MF2414C
Output level
–33 to 0 dBm
Pulse modulation width
100 ns
Pulse modulation accuracy
10 ns or less
Frequency range
10 Hz to 10 MHz
Sensitivity
25 mVrms
Frequency range
10 Hz to 10 MHz
Output level
25 mVrms
*1: Some of the performance items that can cover performance
measurement tests have been excluded.
*2: Used when testing at –33 dBm.
7-3
Section 7 Performance Test
7.3 Performance Test
When performing the performance tests, warm up the unit to be tested
and the measuring equipment (refer to Section 4.1.1 for warm-up time of
this unit) and wait for it to stabilize before proceeding with testing.
To achieve maximum measurement sensitivity, you must also perform
tests at room temperature and make sure there is little fluctuation in the
AC power supply and that there is not a harmful amount of noise,
vibration, dust, or humidity.
7.3.1
Continuous frequency measurement
7.3.1.1 Continuous frequency measurement on Input1
(1) Test specifications
 Frequency range
600 MHz to 20 GHz (MF2412C)
600 MHz to 27 GHz (MF2413C)
600 MHz to 40 GHz (MF2414C)
 Input sensitivity
–33 dBm: <12.4 GHz
–28 dBm: <20.0 GHz
–25 dBm: <27.0 GHz
{0.741  f (GHz) –44.6}dBm: 40.0 GHz
 Measurement accuracy
Count mode Normal (direct count) :
1 count  time base accuracy  Measurement frequency
 Residual error 1
Note: Residual error 1
= {Measurement frequency (GHz)/10 counts (rms)}
Count mode Fast (reciprocal):
1 count  time base accuracy  Measurement frequency
 Residual error 2  Trigger error
Note: Residual error 2
= {Measurement frequency (GHz)/2 counts (rms)}
(2) Test equipment
 Signal generator
 Power meter
 Power sensor
7-4
7.3
Performance Test
(3) Test procedure
1)
Set the unit to preset values. To perform a test in Normal
mode, switch the count mode setting.
2)
Connect the Reference Output connector on the rear panel of the
unit and the external reference input connector on the signal
generator.
3)
Use a measurement cable to connect the signal generator output
connector to the power meter input connector.
4)
Adjust the signal generator output level so that the read value
on the power meter is adjusted to the rated sensitivity.
5)
Disconnect the measurement cable from the power meter input
connector, and connect it to Input1 connector of the unit.
6)
Check that the output frequency of the signal generator is being
displayed on the counter.
7)
Change the output frequency of the signal generator, repeat
steps 3) to 6), and check that frequency is properly displayed
within the specified range.
7.3.1.2 Continuous frequency measurement on Input2 (50 : 10 MHz to 1 GHz)
(1) Test specifications
 Frequency range
10 MHz to 1 GHz
 Input sensitivity
25 mVrms
 Measurement accuracy
1 count  time base accuracy  Measurement frequency
(2) Test equipment
 Signal generator
 Power meter
 Power sensor
(3) Test procedure
1)
Set the unit to preset values.
2)
Set the input channel to Input2.
3)
Connect the Reference Output connector on the rear panel and
the external reference input connector on the signal generator.
4)
Use a measurement cable to connect the signal generator output
connector to the power meter input connector.
7-5
Section 7 Performance Test
5)
Adjust the signal generator output level so that the read value
on the power meter is adjusted to the rated sensitivity.
6)
Disconnect the measurement cable from the power meter input
connector, and connect it to Input2 connector of the unit.
7)
Check that the output frequency of the signal generator is being
displayed on the counter.
8)
Change the output frequency of the signal generator, repeat
steps 4) to 7), and check that frequency is properly displayed
within the specified range.
7.3.1.3 Continuous frequency measurement on Input2 (1 M: 10 Hz to 10 MHz)
(1) Test specifications
 Frequency range
10 Hz to 10 MHz
 Input sensitivity
25 mVrms
 Measurement accuracy
1 count  Trigger error
(2) Test equipment
 Signal generator
 Power meter
 Power sensor
(3) Test procedure
7-6
1)
Set the unit to preset values.
2)
Set the input channel to Input2, impedance to 1 M and ATT to
Off.
3)
Connect the Reference Output connector on the rear panel and
the external reference input connector on the signal generator.
4)
Use a measurement cable to connect the signal generator output
connector to the power meter input connector.
5)
Adjust the signal generator output level to the rated sensitivity
of the power meter.
6)
Disconnect the measurement cable from the power meter input
connector, and connect it to Input2 connector of the unit.
7)
Check that the output frequency of the signal generator is being
displayed on the counter.
8)
Change the output frequency of the signal generator, repeat
steps 4) to 7), and check that frequency is properly displayed
within the specified range.
7.3
7.3.2
Performance Test
Burst wave carrier frequency measurement
(1) Test specifications
 Frequency range
600 MHz to 20 GHz (MF2412C)
600 MHz to 27 GHz (MF2413C)
600 MHz to 40 GHz (MF2414C)
 Input sensitivity
–33 dBm: <12.4 GHz
–28 dBm: <20.0 GHz
–25 dBm: <27.0 GHz
{0.741  f (GHz) –44.6}dBm: 40.0 GHz
 Pulse width
100 ns (Burst width: Narrow)
 Measurement accuracy
1 count  time base accuracy  Measurement frequency
 Residual error 2  Trigger error  1/TGW
Note: Residual error 2
= {Measurement frequency (GHz)/2 counts (rms)},
TGW= Gate width
(2) Test equipment
 Signal generator capable of pulse modulation or a signal
generator and pulse modulator
 Power meter
 Power sensor
(3) Test procedure
1)
Set the unit to preset values.
2)
Make the following settings:
3)
Burst width:
Narrow
Measurement resolution:
1 MHz
Frequency acquisition mode: Manual
Manual frequency:
Output frequency of signal generator
Connect the Reference Output connector on the rear panel and
the external reference input connector on the signal generator.
4)
Set signal generator output to continuous wave (pulse
modulation Off), and then use a measurement cable to connect
the signal generator output connector to the power meter input
connector.
5)
Adjust the signal generator output level so that the read value
on the power meter is adjusted to the rated sensitivity.
7-7
Section 7 Performance Test
6)
Disconnect the measurement cable from the power meter input
connector, and connect it to Input1 connector of this unit.
7)
Check that the output frequency of the signal generator is being
displayed on the counter.
8)
Set the pulse modulation width to 100 ns, repetition period to 50
ns, and turn pulse modulation On.
9)
Set the unit's Meas Mode to Burst.
10) Check that the output frequency of the signal generator is being
displayed on the counter.
11) Change the output frequency of the signal generator, repeat
steps 4) to 10), and check that frequency is properly displayed.
7.3.3
Burst width measurement
(1) Test specifications
 Pulse width
100 ns to 100 ms (Burst width: Narrow)
* Manual frequency: 1 GHz or more
1 s to 100 ms (Burst width: Wide)
 Input sensitivity
–33 dBm: <12.4 GHz
–28 dBm: <20.0 GHz
–25 dBm: < 27.0 GHz
{0.741  f (GHz) – 44.6}dBm: 40.0 GHz
 Measurement accuracy
20 ns  time base accuracy  Measurement pulse width
 Trigger error
(2) Test equipment
 Signal generator capable of pulse modulation or a signal
generator and pulse modulator
 Power meter
 Power sensor
7-8
7.3
Performance Test
(3) Test procedure
1)
Set the unit to preset values.
2)
Make the following settings:
Burst width:
Burst mode:
Measurement resolution:
Frequency acquisition mode:
Manual frequency:
Narrow
Width
1 MHz
Manual
Output frequency of signal generator
3)
Set the pulse modulation width to 100 ns and repetition period
to period to pulse modulation width + 1 s.
4)
Connect the Reference Output connector on the rear panel and
the external reference input connector on the signal generator.
5)
Set signal generator output to continuous wave (pulse
modulation Off), and then use a measurement cable to connect
the signal generator output connector to the power meter input
connector.
6)
Adjust the signal generator output level so that the read value
on the power meter is adjusted to the rated sensitivity.
7)
Disconnect the measurement cable from the power meter input
connector, and connect it to Input1 connector of this unit.
8)
Check that the output frequency of the signal generator is being
displayed on the counter.
9)
Turn pulse modulation On.
10) Set the unit's Meas Mode to Burst.
11) Check that the burst width measurement value displays the
pulse modulation width.
12) Change the output frequency of the signal generator, repeat
steps 5) to 11), and check that the burst width measurement
value is properly displayed.
7-9
Section 7 Performance Test
Note :
The pass-fail decision standard varies depending on the pulse
modulation accuracy of the signal generator used for performance
tests. For example, when the pulse modulation accuracy is 10 ns,
the precision ratio against the unit's burst width measurement
accuracy, 20 ns, is 2.0. In this case, the tolerance coefficient
(guard band coefficient) is 0.935, which means that the pass-fail
decision standard is as follows:
( 20 ns  time base accuracy  Measurement pulse width
 Trigger error )  0.935
Table 7.3.3-1 shows the main precision ratios and tolerance
coefficients.
Table 7.3.3-1 Main Precision Ratios and Tolerance Coefficients
7-10.
Precision Ratio
Tolerance
Coefficient
4.0
3.5
3.0
2.5
2.0
1.5
1.0
1.00
0.990
0.975
0.960
0.935
0.895
0.825
Section 8 Storing and Transporting
This section describes daily maintenance for this unit and how to store,
repackage, and transport it.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
Cleaning the Cabinet .................................................
Notes on Storage .......................................................
8.2.1 Before storing ................................................
8.2.2 Recommended storage conditions ................
Repackaging and Transporting..................................
8.3.1 Repackaging..................................................
8.3.2 Transporting ..................................................
Final Disposal ............................................................
8-2
8-3
8-3
8-3
8-4
8-4
8-4
8-4
8-1
Section 8 Storing and Transporting
8.1 Cleaning the Cabinet
Make sure to turn power off and unplug the unit before cleaning it.
Clean the outside cabinet of the unit as follows:
• Wipe it with a soft, dry cloth.
• When the unit is dirty, you have been using it in an area with a lot of
dust, or it has been stored away for a long period of time, apply a
diluted mild cleaner to a soft cloth and use it to wipe the unit clean.
Immediately wipe the unit dry with a soft, dry cloth.
• If you notice any of the screws or other parts are loose, use the proper
tools to tighten them.
CAUTION
Make sure to turn power off and unplug the unit before
cleaning it.
Do not use benzene, thinner, alcohol, or other strong
chemicals to clean the cabinet. Failing to obey this
warning may damage or discolor it.
8-2
8.2
Notes on Storage
8.2 Notes on Storage
This section provides information for storing the unit for extended
periods of time.
8.2.1
Before storing
(1) Wipe away any dust, finger prints, or stains from the unit.
(2) Avoid storing in the following locations:
 Areas exposed to direct sunlight or large amounts of dust.
 Areas with high humidity where condensation may occur.
 Areas exposed to volatile gases or areas where the unit might
oxidize.
 Areas with the following temperature and humidity:
Temperature: 70C, –30C
Humidity: 80%
8.2.2
Recommended storage conditions
In addition to the above mentioned conditions, make sure to observe the
following environment conditions when storing the unit for a long period
of time.
 Temperature: 0 to 30C
 Humidity: 40 to 70%
 Place with little daily temperature and humidity variation
8-3
Section 8 Storing and Transporting
8.3 Repackaging and Transporting
Note the following information when sending this unit to Anritsu for
repairs.
8.3.1
Repackaging
Use the packaging materials and box the unit originally came with. If
they are not available, use the following materials:
(1) Wrap the unit in plastic or similar material.
(2) Obtain a cardboard or aluminum box large enough to hold material
for absorbing physical shock from all sides.
(3) Fill the box on all sides with material for absorbing physical shock
so that the unit will not move within the box.
(4) To prevent the box from opening during transportation, seal the box
shut tightly with plastic bands, adhesive tape, or other suitable
means.
8.3.2
Transporting
Transport by avoiding vibrations as much as possible and fulfilling the
conditions recommended above.
8.4 Final Disposal
Follow the instructions of your local waste disposal office when disposing
of the MF2412C/MF2413C/ MF2414C.
8-4.
Appendix A List of Initial Values and Preset Values
The following is a list of initial values and preset values for this unit.
Group
Measurement mode
Resolution
Sample rate
Input
Frequency
Level
Burst
Trigger
Gate
Template
Offset
Statistical processing
High-speed sampling
Memory
Reference signal selection
GPIB
AUX
Intensity
Parameter
Measurement mode
Resolution
Sample rate
Input connector
Input2 impedance
Input2•1 MΩ system 20 dBmATT
Frequency acquisition
Manual frequency value
Count method
Level acquisition
Manual amplitude discrimination value
Burst mode
Burst measurement polarity
Burst width
Trigger mode
Trigger polarity
Trigger delay value
Gate width value
Gate end
Template
Upper frequency limit value
Lower frequency limit value
Movement direction indicator
Offset
Offset value
Update mode
Statistical processing
Extraction mode
Sample count
High-speed sampling
Sampling period
Sampling times
Save
Reference signal selection
Address
AUX
Intensity
Initial Value/Preset Value
CW/CW
100 Hz/100 Hz
100 ms/100 ms
Input1/Input1
50 Ω/50 Ω
On/On
Auto/Auto
Fmax*/Fmax*
Fast/Fast
Auto/Auto
L0/L0
Freq/Freq
Pos/Pos
Wide/Wide
Int/Int
Rise/Rise
Off/Off
100 ms/100 ms
Off/Off
Off/Off
Fmax*/Fmax*
0 Hz/0 Hz
Off/Off
Off/Off
0 Hz/0 Hz
Off/Off
Off/Off
Disc/Disc
1/1
Off/Off
1 ms/1 ms
2000/2000
All clear/(unavailable)
Auto/Auto
8/(unavailable)
Off/Off
75%/(unavailable)
* : Fmax = 20 GHz (for MF2412C)
27 GHz (for MF2413C)
40 GHz (for MF2414C)
A-1
Appendix A List of Initial Values and Preset Values
A-2.
Appendix B Performance Test Result Sheet
Test location:
Report No.:
Date :
Tester:
Model name:
MF2412C/MF2413C/MF2414C Microwave Frequency Counter
Model No.
Power frequency:
Hz
Ambient temperature:
%
Relative humidity:
°C
Notes:
Equipment used for performance testing
Power meter:
Power sensor:
Signal generator:
Others:
Performance test name: CW frequency measurement (Input1)
Measurement Frequency
600 MHz
1 GHz
10 GHz
20 GHz
Note:
27 GHz
30 GHz
40 GHz
Measurement Uncertainty
Performance test name: CW frequency measurement (Input2)
Measurement Frequency
10 Hz
100 Hz
1 MHz
10 MHz
Note:
100 MHz 500 MHz
1 GHz
Measurement Uncertainty
Performance test name: Burst wave carrier measurement
Measurement Frequency
600 MHz
1 GHz
10 GHz
20 GHz
Note:
27 GHz
30 GHz
40 GHz
10 ms
100 ms
Measurement Uncertainty
Performance test name: Burst width measurement
Measurement Frequency
100 ns
1 µs
10 µs
Note:
100 µs
1 ms
Measurement Uncertainty
B-1
Appendix B Performance Test Result Sheet
B-2.
Index
Symbol
< and > keys
 and  keys
F
3.1.1, 3.2.3
3.1.1, 3.2.3
A
AC power inlet
Attenuator
ATTon display
Auto display
AUX output connector
3.1.2
4.3.1
4.2.1
4.2.1
3.1.2
G
B
Block diagram
Burst key
6.1
3.1.1
Burst measurement mode 4.3.7, 4.4
Burst monitor screen
4.2.2, 4.3.8, 4.4.8
Burst pulse width and the maximum
frequency resolution
4.3.3
Burst repetition period
4.3.7, 4.4
Burst width
4.3.7, 4.4
C
Cleaning
CNF
Compatibility with MF76
8.1
4.2.1, 4.3.12
5.4.5
D
Data storage function
Device message
Device message list
Direct count method
Direct key
Discrete mode
4.3.17, 5.2, 5.4.4
5.2, 5.4
5.4.4
4.3.6, 6.2.1, 6.2.3
3.1.1, 3.2, 4.2.2
4.3.11
E
Earth terminal
Enter key
Fan
2.1, 3.1.2
Final Disposal
8.4
Freq key
3.1.1
Frequency Acquisition LED
3.1.1
Frequency acquisition
4.3.6, 4.4
Frequency resolution
3.1.1, 4.3.3
Fuse holder
2.3.3, 3.1.2
Fuse replacement
2.3.3
2.3.2, 3.1.2
3.1.1
External Trigger Input
2.2.5, 3.1.2
External trigger
4.3.9
External trigger input connector
2.2.5, 3.1.2
Gate
Gate end
Gate width
Gating
Go
GPIB address
GPIB board
GPIB cable connection
GPIB interface connector
GPIB interface function
GW key
Guard band coefficient
4.2.1
4.3.8, 4.3.9
4.3.8, 4.4.8
4.3.8, 4.4.8
4.2.1, 4.3.12
4.3.15, 5.5.2
5.5.3
5.5.1
3.1.2
5.3
3.1.1
7.9
H
Heterodyne down converter method
6.2.3
High-speed sampling function
4.3.16
Hold
3.1.1, 4.3.13
Hold key
3.1.1
Hold LED
3.1.1
I
IEEE488.2 common command
5.4.2
Indicator display
4.3.12
Input impedance
4.3.1
Input key
3.1.1
Input1 LED
3.1.1
Input1 input connector
2.2.2, 3.1.1
Index-1
Index
Input2 LED
Input2 input connector
Internal trigger
3.1.1
2.2.3, 3.1.1
4.3.9
L
L0 to L7
4.2.1
LCD
3.1.1
Level acquisition
4.3.5, 4.4
Level display
4.2.1
Level key
3.1.1
Line trigger
4.3.9
List of initial values and preset values
Appendix A
Local key
3.1.1
LOF
4.2.1, 4.3.12
M
Manual amplitude discrimination value
4.3.5, 4.4
Manual frequency value
4.3.6, 4.4
Meas Mode key
3.1.1
Meas Mode LED
3.1.1
Measurement mode
4.3.4
Measurement screen
4.2, 4.2.1
Menu screen
4.2.2
Moving direction indicator 4.2.1, 4.3.12
N
No-Go
4.2.1, 4.3.12
Normal measurement screen
4.2.1
Numeric keypad
3.1.1, 3.2.3, 4.2.2
O
Offset
Ofs key
On LED
Operating principle
Option
Optional accessory
Overlap mode
Index-2
4.3.10
3.1.1
3.1.1
Section 6
1.3.2, 1.4.2
1.3.3
4.3.11
P
Performance test result sheet
Appendix B
Power line switch
2.3.3, 3.1.2
Preset key
3.1.1
R
Recall
4.3.15
Reciprocal method
4.3.6, 6.2.2, 6.2.3, 6.3
Reference Input
2.2.4, 3.1.2
Reference signal input connector
2.2.4, 3.1.2
Reference signal output connector
3.1.2
Remote LED
3.1.1
Repacking
8.3.1
Residual error 1
1.4.1, 6.2.3, 7.3.1
Residual error 2
1.4.1, 6.2.3, 7.3.1,
7.3.2
Resolution key
3.2.3
Restart
3.1.1, 4.3.14
Restart key
3.1.1
Return to Meas key
3.1.1
S
Safety measures
2.2
Sample Rate key
3.2.3
Sample program
5.6
Sample rate
3.2.3, 4.3.2
Save
4.3.15
Self check
4.1.2, 4.2.3, 4.3.15
Setup LED
3.1.1
Setup screen
4.2, 4.2.2
Specifications for Option 003
1.4.2
Standard composition
1.3.1
Standard specifications
1.4.1
Stat key
3.1.1
Statistical processing function
4.3.11
Stby LED
3.1.1
Suffix code
5.4.1, 5.4.5
Index
Switching input
Sys key
System
System screen
4.3.1
3.1.1
4.3.15
4.2.3
T
TD key
Temp key
Template function
Template screen
Trig delay
Transporting
Trig key
Trigger and gate end
Trigger delay
Trigger error
3.1.1
3.1.1
4.3.12
4.2.1, 4.3.12
4.3.8, 4.4.8
8.3.2
3.1.1
4.3.9
4.3.8, 4.4.8
1.4.1, 6.2, 6.3, 6.4
U
UNCAL
UPF
4.2.1, 4.3.3, 4.4
4.2.1, 4.3.12
Index-3
Index
Index-4.
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