Data protection for HPE 3PAR StoreServ with HPE StoreEver Tape

Data protection for
HPE 3PAR StoreServ with
HPE StoreEver Tape Libraries
Using EMC NetWorker
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Contents
Introduction ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................3
Technology overview ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................3
HPE StoreEver Tape—key features and benefits ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................3
HPE 3PAR StoreServ Storage—key features and benefits ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................4
HPE StoreAll Storage—key features and benefits..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................5
Integrating HPE StoreEver Tape with EMC NetWorker .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................5
Installation and configuration .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................5
Installation checklist ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................5
Installing EMC NetWorker ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................6
Installing EMC NetWorker software.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................9
Initial setup...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................11
Connecting to the NMC .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................11
Backup and restore jobs...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................15
Performance and tuning.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................16
Block size................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................17
File (data) compression ratio ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................18
Source disk and file systems ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................18
Tape drive .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................19
Conclusion ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................20
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Introduction
In today’s business environment, enterprise customers rely on the most efficient, high performing, and reliable data protection and archiving
systems. Customers need to protect increasing levels of data while keeping costs under control. In particular, businesses today are concerned
about the costs of backing up and archiving important data from mission-critical servers.
Tape storage is a critical component of a comprehensive, tiered, and converged data protection and archiving solution that balances cost and
performance. The ideal approach to data protection and archiving is to match the access, retention, and cost requirements for a business with the
right storage technology. Most often, the result is a multi-tier strategy that blends the access speeds of disk with the low cost, offline, and long
shelf life benefits of the tape.
When paired with HPE 3PAR StoreServ Storage and HPE StoreAll Storage—which incorporate Hewlett Packard Enterprise innovations such as
storage federation, scale-out architecture, and adaptive optimization—HPE StoreEver Tape lowers costs while increasing data security and
reliability. HPE Storage enables businesses to efficiently respond to new and ever changing demands.
Technology overview
HPE StoreEver Tape—key features and benefits
HPE StoreEver Tape products protect your data longer, for less.
As the worldwide leader 1 in tape drives and automation, HPE StoreEver Tape provides tape storage that is critical to comprehensive data
protection and archiving. HPE StoreEver also addresses all of your long-term retention needs. With the broadest and most advanced portfolio in
the industry, HPE StoreEver features support for linear tape–open 7 (LTO-7). HPE StoreEver includes tape media, standalone tape drives, and
tape libraries that accommodate more than 180 PB 2 in a single system.
HPE StoreEver Tape automation libraries include HPE StoreEver ESL G3 and MSL Tape library families.
HPE StoreEver:
• Reduces TCO and management burden—efficiently protect and retain rapidly growing data
With support for LTO-7, HPE StoreEver offers significant cost, energy, and footprint advantages. Lowest cost per gigabyte for longer-term
storage with limited power or energy requirements as the less frequently accessed data is stored or as media become full.
The HPE MSL6480 Tape Library offers up to 195 TB/s (equivalent to 13 LTO-7 tape cartridges) per 1U of rack space using LTO-7 drives, while
providing the highest tape drive density per module of any mid-range tape library, providing flexible options to consider for your business.
HP Command View for Tape Libraries software is a single pane of glass management software which eases data protection with remote
management, diagnostics, and configuration of all your ESL G3 and MSL tape libraries through a single console.
• Is reliable—protect and retain data over the long term
New HP Data Verification software increases the verification of a successful restore of critical business data from infrequently accessed LTO
tape cartridges by periodically scanning tapes to validate the quality of data on each tape.
With enhanced reliability, extreme durability, and proactive monitoring by HP TapeAssure Advanced technology, you can store essential but
less frequently accessed data with confidence.
1
2
According to the IDC Branded Tape Tracker CQ2 2013, Hewlett Packard Enterprise is the worldwide market share leader in total branded tape drive units.
Using 2.5:1 compression and a fully populated 16-frame ESL G3 tape library.
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TapeAssure Advanced makes managing, fine-tuning, and archiving faster and easier with comprehensive reports on status, performance,
utilization, and health of all tape drives and media. The advanced analytics feature of TapeAssure Advanced makes use of predictive analytics
to predict the likelihood of failures, bottlenecks, and load balancing issues in the tape infrastructure. This data can be exported on demand or
at scheduled times through HP Command View Tape Library software.
HPE StoreEver Tape is ideal for archiving cold or active data with a media shelf life of up to 30 years in normal ambient conditions.
• Is secure—enable a vital “last line of defense”
Hardware-based data encryption, write once, read many (WORM) protection, and removable storage that are offline to threats make
HPE StoreEver a highly reliable safety net and an optimal platform for long-term digital archive.
• Delivers enormous scalability and high availability—answer data growth challenges
The HPE StoreEver ESL G3 Tape Library can scale from 100 to up to 12,006 tape cartridges—from 1 to 192 LTO-5 and newer Ultrium tape
drives—and 1 to 16 library frames, with each frame in a standard 19-inch rack form factor which is the smallest enterprise library footprint
available.
Support ongoing host and SAN connectivity under varying conditions with library logical unit number (LUN) control failover. Achieve
near-continuous data access with new dual-robotic capabilities available with the HPE StoreEver ESL G3 Tape Library.
The HPE StoreEver MSL6480 Tape Library has scale-out architecture which allows you to pay as you grow—simply add in new modules to
boost capacity and performance without investing in a whole new library.
An HPE StoreEver MSL6480 Tape Library can scale vertically from 80 to 560 cartridge slots to store up to 8.4 PB in a single 19-inch rack; add
in between 1 and 42 LTO-5 and newer half-height SAS or Fibre Channel (FC) drives for speed of up to 113.4 TB/hr (assumes LTO-7 with 2.5:1
data compression) which can save you a lot of time.
HPE 3PAR StoreServ Storage—key features and benefits
HPE 3PAR StoreServ Storage products enhance your storage on the fly to help maximize capacity utilization while delivering high
service levels.
HPE 3PAR StoreServ Storage are storage systems which range from tier 1, mission-critical solutions with the highest performance and scalability
that support cloud and IT as a service (ITaaS) environments, to storage solutions with enterprise class features at a midrange price, designed for
the virtualized data center.
HPE 3PAR StoreServ is:
• Efficient
Reduce capacity requirements by 50 percent—guaranteed. 3
• Autonomic
Simplify, automate, and expedite storage management by handling storage provisioning, tiering, and change management
autonomically—intelligently, at a sub-system level, and without administrator intervention—reducing administration time by up to 90 percent.
• Federated
Meet the needs of today’s data center with the ability to move data and workloads between arrays without impact to applications, users, or
services. Simply and non-disruptively shift data between HPE 3PAR StoreServ systems without additional management layers or appliances.
3
Requires the use of HPE 3PAR Thin Conversion software and HPE 3PAR Thin Provisioning software. For details, refer to the Get Thin Guarantee Terms and Conditions. More
information is available at: hp.com/storage/getthin.
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HPE StoreAll Storage—key features and benefits
HPE StoreAll Storage products let you hyperscale your storage to tame and mine business value from your large amounts of unstructured data.
HPE StoreAll Storage reduces the cost, complexity, and time to store, protect, and extract business value from massive amounts of unstructured
data. HPE StoreAll Storage instantaneously pinpoints data and turns it into actionable intelligence. Bring structure to unstructured data with
custom metadata attributes, data retention policies, and autonomic protection for data durability.
HPE StoreAll is:
• Hyperscale—massive scalability without complexity
Scale to over 1,000 nodes, 16 PB, and billions of objects and files in a single namespace.
• Harnessed—structure for unstructured data
Custom meta tagging, rapid deployment tools, and autonomic protection for data durability.
• Instant—ultra-fast search and value extraction at petabyte scale
Express Query from HPE Labs lets you access billions of files in minutes. Run scans and queries you could never execute before due to time
constraints.
Integrating HPE StoreEver Tape with EMC NetWorker
EMC NetWorker is an enterprise class data protection application. NetWorker backup and recovery software centralizes, automates, and
accelerates data backup and recovery across your IT environment. NetWorker delivers a wide range of data protection options to safeguard your
critical business data. For more information, visit emc.com/backup-and-recovery/networker.
Installation and configuration
Hewlett Packard Enterprise has partnered with leading software companies to develop a comprehensive approach to help ensure that all
hardware, firmware, driver, and software components are properly fitted into certified and supported data protection and archiving solutions.
Before configuring and implementing a data protection and archiving solution, refer to the following:
• The HPE StoreEver information held within the HPE Backup, Recovery and Archive (BURA) Solutions Design
Guide—hp.com/go/buracompatibility.
Extensive documentation to design, configure, and implement a broad selection of data protection and archiving solutions that are fully
supported and certified with HPE StoreEver Storage in homogeneous and heterogeneous environments.
• The StoreEver section of the most recent version of the HPE Data Agile BURA Compatibility Matrix—hp.com/go/buracompatibility.
It is a single point of reference for the latest HPE StoreEver interoperability and device compatibility details. It contains tape device
connectivity details including supported servers, operating systems, controllers and infrastructure components, as well as Backup and Archival
ISV partner compatibility.
• HPE SAN Design Reference Guide explains how HPE Storage systems, storage management tools, and FC products can be used in open
heterogeneous SANs.
Installation checklist
If the answer to each of the following questions is “yes,” then all components on the SAN are logged in and configured properly:
• Are all of the following hardware components at the minimum supported firmware revisions specified in the current Data Agile BURA
Compatibility Matrix: servers, host bus adapters (HBAs), FC switches, Command View Tape Library, tape drives, and library robots?
• Is the minimum patch level support for each OS installed?
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• Is the minimum supported drivers specified in the Data Agile BURA Compatibility Matrix installed (HBAs, tape drives, etc.)?
• Is the HPE StoreEver tape library or partition(s) online?
• Are all of the host HBAs correctly logged into the FC switch?
• If the FC switches are cascaded or meshed, are all Inter-Switch Link (ISL) ports correctly logged in?
• Was congestion control enabled on the FC to avoid oversubscription of ISLs?
• Are all tape and robotic devices zoned, configured, and presented to each host from the FC switch?
• Are the host(s) HBAs, tape, and robotic devices in the same switch zone(s)? See the below note.
• Are there separate zones for tape devices? Do not mix disk and tape devices in the same zones.
• Did you limit the zoning of tape devices to only systems that actively use them? Doing so limits external interferences and enables quicker
diagnostics when issues are encountered.
• Is single initiator zoning being used? Each zone should contain only one HBA, but can contain multiple targets (tape devices).
• Are one-gigabyte interfaces or multi-vendor switches in a single SAN cloud being used? One-gigabyte interfaces are not tape-safe and using
multi-vendor switches causes equipment to run in a compatibility mode that does not include FCP-2 tape-safe extensions.
• Do the hosts detect all of the tape and robotic devices intended to be used?
Are all HPE StoreEver Storage devices seen by HP Command View Tape Library?
• Has connectivity been verified using HP Library and Tape Tools or OS specific tools (for example, the sg3_utils package for Linux®)?
Note
Hewlett Packard Enterprise strongly recommends creating zones by HBA port. For more detailed information on creating zones by HBA port,
refer to the BURA Solutions Design Guide: hp.com/go/buracompatibility.
Installing EMC NetWorker
After all components on the SAN are logged in and configured, the hosts are ready for installation of EMC NetWorker.
Before installing NetWorker, it is recommended that you complete the following tasks particularly when using tape libraries and drives:
• Go to the EMC online support (registration required) to gain access to documentation, release notes, software updates, or information about
EMC products, licensing, and service. The following documents should be downloaded for reference:
1. NetWorker Hardware Compatibility Guide—provides the most up-to-date list of supported devices.
2. NetWorker Installation Guide—describes how to install NetWorker on Windows®, Linux, Mac OS-X, HP-UX, Solaris, and AIX.
3. NetWorker Administration Guide—describes how to configure and maintain the NetWorker software.
4. Configuring Tape Devices for EMC NetWorker technical note—describes best practices for configuring tape devices for use by NetWorker
servers and storage nodes.
5. NetWorker Performance Optimization Planning Guide—provides basic performance information to size, plan, and optimize the NetWorker
environment.
6. NetWorker Licensing Guide—describes how to license the NetWorker products and features.
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• Verify that the TCP/IP requirements have been met:
1. The /etc/hosts file on all Linux NetWorker hosts contains an entry for the Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) loopback address:
a. 127.0.0.1
localhost.localdomain
localhost
2. The NetWorker server, when configured as a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) client, uses a reserved address that is
synchronized with DNS.
3. The name of the host that the hostname command returns on the system must match the name that the IP address resolves to when
using the command nslookup.
4. The hostname does not contain an underscore character (_).
5. The IPv6 loopback interface is configured on each host as NetWorker does not support temporary or link-local IPv6 addresses. The host’s
file on each NetWorker host has an entry that associates the IPv6 loopback interface (::1) with the localhost. Add the IPv6 interface entry
before the IPv4 loopback entry (127.0.0.1 localhost):
a. ::1 localhost
b. 127.0.0.1
localhost.localdomain
localhost
6. The IPv6 loopback entry must remain in the hosts file when the host is operating in a pure IPv4, pure IPv6, or dual stack configuration.
• If the NetWorker software is installed on a file allocation table (FAT) partition, do not disable long name support.
• Enable Windows Error Reporting (WER). WER replaces the Dr. Watson user dumps used in earlier releases of Windows and provides the ability
to collect full User-Mode Dumps after an application crash. MSDN describes how to configure WER to collect User-Mode Dumps.
• Enable Data Execution Prevention to protect essential Windows programs and services:
1. Navigate to Start -> Control Panel -> System and Security -> System -> Advanced system settings
2. Select Advanced -> Performance -> Settings -> Data Execution Prevention
3. Select Turn on DEP for essential Windows programs and services only
4. Click OK (reboot required)
• Follow the recommendations in the section Adjusting antivirus software settings in the Installation Guide.
• Configure persistent bindings and naming at the OS level then verify for the FC HBA. This will prevent device-ordering issues. For the
Windows 2008 R2 hosts, Emulex FC HBAs were used (latest Hewlett Packard Enterprise drivers are installed) and auto mapping was enabled
by default (binding by World Wide Port Name). Detailed recommendations regarding LTO device configuration for different OSs (AIX, Solaris,
Windows, Linux, and HP-UX) can be found in the section Device configuration best practices of the Configuring Tape Devices for EMC
NetWorker technical note.
For Windows 2008:
– For Windows 2008 R2, only step 3 had to be completed as test unit ready requests were already disabled and Window Removable Storage
Manager (RSM) was not selected for installation during the OS install.
1. Disable all Test Unit Ready (TUR) requests for a tape device using Windows knowledgebase article 842411:
support.microsoft.com/kb/842411.
2. If Window RSM is installed, start RSM and remove all tape drives from the RSM configuration so that it does not attempt to check device
status at regular intervals which causes unwanted SCSI resets. RSM is no longer installed by default on Windows 2008 (or newer).
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3. Configuration of persistent naming is recommended at the OS layer to stop the OS from changing device file order on reboots. A reboot is
required after completing the configuration.
a. For Microsoft® and other vendor-provided device drivers, set the registry key (The Microsoft knowledge base article 873337 provides
details.): HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Tape\Persistence: DWORD=1 support.microsoft.com/kb/873337.
b. After a reboot, run regedit again. Under HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Tape you should see folders for each tape
device with names such as Tape2147483646. The folders can be renamed, Tape100 for example, if the preference is for simple device
names. Right-click on each folder and choose rename. Provide a unique name for each folder then reboot the system. Once the system
boots up, open device manager and right-click on any of the tape drives. Under the tab Tape Symbolic Name, you will find the custom
name provided.
For Linux:
– The minimum recommended version of Red Hat® Enterprise Linux (RHEL) for use with Common Device Interface (CDI) is RHEL 4
Update 4, with kernel version 2.6.9-39.
– The minimum recommended version of Novell SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for use with CDI is SLES9 SP3, with kernel
version 2.6.5-7.267.
1. Linux provides a built-in HBA driver for both QLogic and Emulex but with limited capabilities only, without monitoring or full plug and play
functionalities. It is recommended to use vendor-provided drivers for HBAs.
2. Configuration of persistent naming is recommended at the OS layer to stop the OS from changing device file order on reboots. Persistent
naming is achieved by using udev rules that are controlled by /etc/udev/udev.conf and included folders or files.
3. Newer versions of the udev subsystem already contain rules for tape devices, so no additional OS configuration is needed.
4. Check if the device file is already created under /dev/tape/*. In that case, simply enable “Use Persistent Names” from NetWorker
Management Console (NMC) after all of the pre-installation recommendations have been completed, and you are scanning for devices or
configuring all libraries.
5. If the appropriate udev rule for tape devices is present on the system but device filenames are not being created, refer to the Linux section
of the Device configuration best practices technical note for more detailed information.
• Before you install NetWorker on Linux systems, create a backup of the OS configuration file and configure the target host to support
NetWorker. Create a backup copy of the OS configuration files:
1. cp /etc/rpc /etc/rpc.orig
2. cp /etc/ld.so.conf /etc/ld.so.conf.orig
3. Ensure that the PATH variable for the root and user accounts contains the /usr/sbin directory
4. If you have enabled Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux) on your system, add the file contexts and the security contexts that the NetWorker
software requires
5. To add file contexts, type:
a. semanage fcontext -a -t textrel_shlib_t “/usr/lib/nsr/lib.*\.so”
b. To update the security contexts, type:
c. restorecon -R “/usr/lib/nsr”
• Enable the CDI tool by making sure to set it to “SCSI commands” for each tape device. Refer to step 7 in the section Configure backup
devices under Initial Setup.
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• Hewlett Packard Enterprise recommends that you remove any other backup software currently configured on your computer before installing
NetWorker. Other backup software, tape device applications that are part of the OS, and SAN or system management software can negatively
affect how NetWorker installs and functions.
• Proper NetWorker licensing is required to run the application beyond the trial period of 30 days. For detailed instructions, login to the EMC
online support (registration required) and search for the NetWorker Licensing Guide which contains the section How to permanently license
the NetWorker software: support.emc.com.
Installing EMC NetWorker software
NetWorker components
• NetWorker datazone is a single NetWorker server and its client and storage node hosts.
• NetWorker server provides services to back up and recover the data of any NetWorker host in a datazone. The NetWorker server can also act
as a storage node and control multiple remote storage nodes. The NetWorker server schedules and queues all backup operations, tracks
real-time backup and restore related activities, and all Console server communication.
• NetWorker storage node controls storage devices such as tape drives, disk devices, auto-changers, and silos. The NetWorker server is a local
storage node. Data is backed up directly to devices local to a NetWorker server or remotely to a NetWorker storage node.
• NetWorker client software communicates with the NetWorker server and provides client initiated backup and recovery functionality. The
NetWorker client software is installed on all machines that are backed up to the NetWorker server.
• NMC server or Console server is a Java-based Web application and database server that provides centralized management, monitoring, and
backup reporting of multiple NetWorker servers across multiple datazones.
Note
You can install the Console server software on the NetWorker server but EMC does not recommend this configuration when the NetWorker
server manages 50 or more clients and when the Console server will monitor multiple datazones. The Installation Guide lists minimum system
requirements for a Console server host when monitoring 50, 100, or 200 servers.
For this guide, a NetWorker server and multiple NetWorker clients were installed following instructions in the EMC NetWorker 8.1 Installation
Guide. Figure 1 shows one example of the EMC NetWorker architecture.
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Figure 1. NetWorker architecture with an HPE StoreEver ESL G3 Tape Library, an HPE 3PAR StoreServ system, and an HPE StoreAll
system
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Initial setup
Connecting to the NMC
The Console server is a Java-based Web application that manages NetWorker server operations. Refer to the NetWorker Installation Guide for
more detailed information about connecting to the Console server including troubleshooting issues.
1. From a supported Web-browser session, type the URL of the Console server:
a. http://server_name:http_service_port
I. server_name is the name of the Console server, and http_service_port is the port for the embedded HTTP server. The default HTTP
port is 9000. For example: http://lugo:9000.
2. In the Welcome window, click Start.
3. In the Security Warning window, click Start to install and run NetWorker Console.
4. In the Licensing Agreement window, select Accept.
5. If you did not install the appropriate Java Runtime Environment (JRE) version on the system, a prompt to install JRE appears. Follow the
onscreen instructions to install JRE.
6. In the Welcome to the Console Configuration Wizard window, click Next.
7. In the Set Administrator password window, type the preferred NMC password, then click Next.
8. In the Set Database Backup Server window, specify the name of the NetWorker server that will back up the Console server database, and
then click Next.
9. In the Add NetWorker servers window, specify the name of the NetWorker server that the Console server will manage. Leave the default
options (Capture Events and Gather Reporting Data) enabled. The NetWorker Administration Guide on the EMC online support site
describes how to run reports and the reports that are available.
10. Click Finish. The NetWorker Management Console window and the Preface/Getting Started window should appear.
11. The Management Console will open with the Enterprise button selected. Right-click the NetWorker server listed and select Launch
Application. The NetWorker Administration interface should open. If no NetWorker server is listed, right-click on Enterprise, select New,
and then choose Host. Specify the NetWorker server.
Configure backup devices
The NetWorker software provides the ability to scan, detect, and configure library and tape devices that will be used for backups and recoveries
directly from the NMC GUI. This is the recommended way to configure libraries. Autodetection is a scanning process that applies only to physical
tape libraries and virtual tape libraries (VTLs).
The maximum number of configured devices for any NetWorker server and storage node combination is 512. The maximum number, including
non-configured devices, can vary depending on the specific server that is being administered.
• Scanning of devices should not be performed while devices are in use.
• NetWorker recommends using only one device driver for all of the tape devices which should be the native OS device drivers when possible or
auto-detect operations might not function correctly.
• Multipathing can be configured for tape devices but is not directly utilized. The OS will maintain device files for the same device visible over
different paths and for when there is a path failure, the device must be reconfigured in NetWorker. Automatic path failover is not possible for
sequential input/output used by tape drives so any backup or restore in progress is aborted regardless of the multipathing solution in place.
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Note
If you run Scan for Devices or Configure All Libraries from the server folder instead of the storage node folder, then all storage nodes on the
NetWorker server are automatically selected for configuration in the wizard, or for scanning, respectively.
To verify that all of your tape libraries and drives are seen by NetWorker:
1. In the server’s NetWorker Administration interface, click on the Devices button.
2. Right-click on the server name at the top of the navigation tree, and select Scan for Devices to detect available devices. The Scan for
Devices window appears.
3. Select the storage node to be scanned. If the appropriate storage node is not listed, click on Create a New Storage Node.
4. When creating a new storage node, replace the default value in the Name field with the name of the new storage node.
5. Fill in any required information such as scan for SCSI devices and whether to search all LUNs.
6. Click on Start Scan. Check the scan status by clicking the Monitoring button at the top of the interface then selecting the Log tab. When the
operation completes, you can return to the Devices navigation tree.
7. Select either the Devices folder or the Storage Nodes folder in the navigation tree. All detected tape libraries and drives are listed. Any
devices that are not configured are preceded by a circular icon that displays a wrench.
8. To display SCSI or Network Data Management Protocol (NDMP) libraries available to the NetWorker server, select the Libraries folder in the
navigation tree. Any available library or silo appears in the Libraries detail table.
After verifying that all of the expected devices are seen by NetWorker, you can automatically configure all of the detected devices:
1. In the server’s NetWorker Administration interface, click on the Devices button.
2. Expand the Storage Nodes folder in the navigation tree.
3. Right-click on the preferred storage node and choose Configure All Libraries. This opens a wizard that can configure all detected libraries.
4. In the Configure All Libraries wizard, step through the configuration providing:
a. Library type (SCSI was selected).
b. Adjust the Enable new device option if necessary (The default of Yes was used).
c. Current server sharing policy (The default of maximal sharing was used).
d. Click on Next then select the Storage node to which libraries can be configured (The NetWorker server Lugo was selected by default).
e. Update the storage node properties, if necessary (Yes was selected for Search all LUNs and Use Persistent Names; Library
Configuration Type was SCSI).
5. Click on Start Configuration. The configuration window displays a message that the Configure All Libraries process has started. Check the
configuration status by clicking the Monitoring button then selecting the Log tab. When the operation completes, you can return to the
Devices navigation tree.
6. When the configuration is complete, click Finish to close the configuration wizard. If problems occur during the configuration, you can click on
the Back button in the configuration window to repeat the process (steps 4 and 5) and adjust any of the settings.
7. Once all libraries have been successfully configured, verify that the CDI tool is enabled:
a. Expand the Libraries folder in the navigation tree then click on one of the tape libraries listed.
b. The library details will be displayed to the right. Right-click on one of the listed tape drives and select Properties.
c. The Device Properties window will open. Click on the Advanced tab.
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d. Under Device Configuration -> CDI: SCSI commands should be selected by default. CDI is enabled if and when SCSI commands are
selected.
e. Repeat for all tape drives in each tape library.
f.
A reconfiguration of the library to scan for device serial numbers must be performed after changing the device’s CDI attribute from Not
Used to SCSI Commands.
CDI allows for functionality in NetWorker to check the serial number of a device before issuing any mount requests, and enables the use of
the TapeAlert feature and on-demand auto-cleaning of tape drives. CDI is required for:
– Many of the newer features added to recent versions of NetWorker
– WORM and future encryption support
– Support for Persistent SCSI Reserve/Release
8. To rename a tape library with user-friendly naming:
a. Expand the Libraries folder in the navigation tree then right-click on a library and choose Properties.
b. The Library Properties window will open showing the General tab. Under Identity, provide a user-friendly Name for the library. For an
ESL G3 Tape Library with LTO-6 tape drives, a user-friendly name could be ESLG3-LTO6.
c. Click on OK to save the changes.
d. Repeat for all tape libraries.
Note
To reconfigure a library in case a device path has been added to, or removed from, the library, refer to the section Library Reconfiguration in the
NetWorker Administration Guide.
Create backup groups
Backup groups specify the starting time for a client’s scheduled backup. A default backup group is already created for you. For this guide, new
backup groups were created so that each client type had specific backup schedules. The newly created backup groups will be selected when
creating media pools and backups.
1. In the server’s NetWorker Administration interface, click on the Configuration button.
2. From the navigation tree, right-click on Groups and choose New.
3. Under the Setup tab, provide the following:
a. Name and optionally, a comment. All new groups were named for the client being backed up.
b. Start time and if Autostart should be set to Enabled.
c. The default settings were used for Clones, Output, and Snapshots.
4. Under the Advanced tab, you can specify:
a. Schedule and Interval (how often backups would run) were modified. Autorestart was enabled. The defaults were used for all other
settings.
5. Click on OK to save the new group.
Note
For additional details on any of the fields that can be modified when viewing properties for an object or device, click on the ? symbol inside of the
circle at the bottom left-hand corner of the window. The Field Help is available for the majority of the sections in this guide.
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Create media pools
While NetWorker contains pre-configured media pool types to keep different types of data separate, it is useful to create media pools by library
or drive type to make managing media easier.
1. In the server’s NetWorker Administration interface, click on the Media button.
2. From the navigation tree, right-click on Media Pools and choose New.
3. The Create Media Pool window opens. Provide the following:
a. Under the Basic tab, a useful name. An example would be to name the media pool ESL-LTO6 if the pool is for an ESL G3 library with
LTO-6 tape drives.
b. Optionally, add a comment for the media pool.
c. Verify that the Configuration is enabled, the Pool type is Backup, and the Label template is specified (Full was selected).
d. Select one of the previously created Backup Groups (in the previous section Create backup groups under Initial Setup) for the Data
Source.
e. Under the Selection Criteria tab, the ESL G3 LTO-6 tape drives were selected as Target Devices.
f.
Media type preferred was specified as LTO Ultrium-6.
g. Under the Configuration tab, Month was selected for the Retention Policy.
4. You can create media pools for each of your tape libraries.
Inventory library volumes
1. In the NetWorker Administration interface, click Devices.
2. Expand the Libraries folder in the navigation tree. The Libraries detailed table appears.
3. Select a library in the navigation tree, then right-click, and select Inventory. The Inventory Library window appears.
4. Type the numbers of the first and last slots to be inventoried in the Slot Range area.
5. The defaults were used for the remaining settings.
6. Click OK. If the media does not have barcode labels, the NetWorker software must mount each media, read its label, and then unmount it. In
this case, the inventory process can take some time to complete.
Format the media
Note
Prior to formatting the media, any user defined media pools should already be created.
1. In the NetWorker Administration interface, click Devices.
2. Expand the Libraries folder in the navigation tree. The Libraries detailed table appears.
3. Select a library in the navigation tree. You have two options for formatting the media:
a. Right-click on one of the tape drives listed and choose Label. This requires that you know all of the slots containing the media to be
formatted. This method automatically specifies which tape drive will be used to format the media.
b. From the list of media to the far right of the pane, highlight all of the media to be formatted then right-click and choose Label. This can
be time consuming if you have hundreds of media to format, and the tape drive used for formatting the media is automatically selected
by the application.
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4. The Label Library Media will open.
5. If you choose option A for Step 3, under Slot Range, the radio button for Slot List will be selected by default. Type the numbers of the first
and last slots to be inventoried. If you choose option B for Step 3, under Slot Range the radio button for Selected Slots will be selected by
default. The media that you previously highlighted will already be selected/listed.
6. Target Media Pool should be modified to one of the user defined media pools that were previously created.
7. The defaults were used for the remaining settings.
8. Click OK. If the volumes do not have barcode labels, the NetWorker software must mount each volume, read its label, and unmount it. In this
case, the inventory process can take some time to complete.
Note
If multiple tapes require formatting and multiple tape drives are available to format the media, divide the number tapes by the number of tape
drives to efficiently format the media. To do so, repeat steps 3–8 above selecting or specifying different slots and a different tape drive each time.
Backup and restore jobs
Create a backup job
You can create a scheduled backup for NetWorker servers or clients quickly by using the Client Backup Configuration wizard.
1. In the server’s NetWorker Administration interface, click on the Configuration button.
2. From the navigation tree, right-click on Clients and choose New Client Wizard.
3. For Specify the Client Name and Type, the fully qualified client name was provided and Traditional NetWorker client was selected. Click
Next to continue.
4. When selecting the Backup Application Type, verify the following (and modify if necessary):
a. Client OS version (Windows Server® 2008 R2 6.1 for example).
b. NetWorker version (8.1 build 162 for example).
c. Application type (Filesystem for example).
5. Click on Next to continue.
6. Now you will specify the Client Backup Options. The defaults were accepted for all settings except:
a. Target Pool which was modified to be one of the user defined media pools that were previously created (ESLG3-LTO6).
7. Click on Next to continue.
8. When you select the Filesystem Objects that will be backed up, the entire contents of the client will be backed up by default. For this guide,
only the contents of the local E: drive was selected to be backed up. Click on Next to continue.
9. Select the NetWorker Client Properties. The defaults were accepted for all settings. Click on Next to continue.
10. Specify the NetWorker Backup Group. The user defined backup group Sly, which was created following the section Create backup groups
under Initial Setup, was selected. You could also create a new group now if you skipped creating a backup group earlier.
11. Specify the Storage Node Options. For this guide, Backup to NetWorker server only was selected since there were no additional
NetWorker servers or storage nodes configured.
12. Lastly, verify the Backup Configuration Summary. If any changes are necessary, click on Back, otherwise click on Create, to configure the
client backup.
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13. You should then see a message indicating that the new client is successfully added.
14. In the server’s NetWorker Administration interface, click on the Monitoring button.
15. You should see all of the backup groups that have been created listed under Groups and Policies. You can also view when the groups were
last run and when the next run will be.
Create a restore job
You can recover NetWorker data by using the NMC Recovery wizard on the NMC server:
1. In the server’s NetWorker Administration interface, click on the Configuration button.
2. From the navigation tree, click on Clients to view a list of the clients in the right pane.
3. Right-click on the desired client and choose Recover. The Recovery wizard will open.
4. First, verify the source host, the destination host, and the recovery type. Make changes if necessary otherwise, click on Next to continue.
5. Now select the data to recover. You can:
a. Browse for files from a specific date and time
b. Search for file system objects from a specific date and time or
c. Perform a Save Set Recover from a specific date and time
For this guide, the Save Set Recover option was used as the preference is to restore data from a backup completed on an earlier date and
time. Click on Next to continue.
6. When specifying the Recovery Options, you can choose to restore the data to the original path or to a new destination path as well as how to
handle duplicate files. Click on Next to continue.
7. For Obtain the Volume Information, you can either allow the Recovery wizard to select the required media or you can manually select the
required media. Click on Next to continue.
8. The final step is to Perform the Recovery. The recovery can be started now or scheduled for later after you have provided a name for the
recover. Click on Run Recovery to start the restore.
9. Check the Recovery Results will automatically be displayed allowing you to monitor the progress of the restore operation.
Performance and tuning
To analyze speed and performance, it is necessary to examine the entire backup and archive process as a system. Although many factors
contribute to the overall performance of the system, there are five main factors that must be thoroughly understood to determine the maximum
performance in any specific situation. These factors are:
• Storage connection—For BURA Solutions with HPE StoreEver Tape Libraries, this is the FC connection.
• Block size—BURA Solutions with NetWorker supports configurable sizes. See “Block size” in the next section for specific details.
• File (data) compression ratio—The amount of compression has a direct impact on the rate at which a tape drive can read or write data.
• Source disk and file systems—Data source, local disk, RAID array storage, file system type, and volume type.
• Tape drive—In BURA Solutions, these are the various types of tape drives in HPE StoreEver Storage.
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Block size
Note
To achieve the best results, first optimize your environment by installing the latest drivers and firmware, optimize your network, and so on. Refer
to the section Installation Checklist under Installation and Configuration and review the NetWorker Performance Optimization Planning
Guide which thoroughly describes how to help optimize the NetWorker software using non-disruptive performance tuning options.
Block size indicates the size of the data on a single transfer to the physical tape. This is dependent on the tape device, SCSI controller, and SCSI
controller driver. Different devices have different block sizes, which can be used, but may not be optimal. By adjusting the block size, you can
enhance the performance of the tape drive. Default block size varies on different platforms, and as a result, data actually written on tape might be
in a different format that cannot be easily interpreted by another host. The actual block size is assigned to a tape during the labeling process and
marked in the header of the tape. The label operation uses the value defined in the Device block size attribute for the device. The block size for
both read and write operations uses the block size defined in the media header during the label operation rather than the device block size.
The NetWorker software has the ability to control block sizes, but only if it is allowed to do so by the OS. In cases where the OS assigns a specific
value for block size, the NetWorker settings no longer have any impact.
EMC strongly recommends that the OS configuration is set to use a variable block size, thus allowing application control over it, otherwise
recoveries can fail resulting in data loss. Configuring a variable block size is achieved by setting it to a value of 0. For specific information about
configuring a variable block size, consult the OS documentation.
Warning
Different SCSI hardware limitations exist between UNIX® and Microsoft Windows OSs. This can lead to data block size compatibility problems
(although they are less likely to occur now than in the past, given larger FC capacities). For example, with a device defined in UNIX that is
physically attached to a Windows HBA, it is possible to define a block size greater than that is allowed by the Windows hardware. This could lead
to I/O errors in both write and read states on the device. In order to use both OSs, it is necessary to determine a block size that is acceptable
to both.
To determine the allowable block size, check the Properties window of a mounted volume while in Diagnostics Mode:
1. In the NetWorker Administration interface, click Devices.
2. Next click on View and select Diagnostic Mode.
3. Now expand the Libraries folder in the navigation tree and select the drive that contains the mounted volume with the block size being
verified.
4. Right-click on the device in the devices details table and select Properties.
5. In the properties window, select the Volume tab. In the Loaded Volume area, one of the displayed volume attributes is the Volume Block
Size.
6. Click OK to close the properties window.
You can set the block size of a backup device by:
1. In the NetWorker Administration interface, click Devices.
2. Next click on View and select Diagnostic Mode.
3. Now select Devices in the navigation tree. The devices details table will be displayed.
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4. Double-click on the device in the devices details table and select the Advanced tab within the Device Properties window.
5. In the Device block size attribute, select a value. In NetWorker 8.0.1 and later, the default block size for an LTO device is 256 KB.
6. Click OK to save the changes.
7. Re-label all media that the device or devices use for the new setting to take effect. Refer to the section Format the media under Initial Setup
for more detailed information.
Note
Forcing larger block sizes has a positive performance impact on high-speed tape drives, but it can also waste space on the media.
File (data) compression ratio
Hewlett Packard Enterprise tests show that not all data can be compressed equally. The compression ratio affects the amount of data that can
be stored on each tape cartridge, as well as the speed at which the tape drives can read or write the data. Table 1 shows typical compression
ratios of various applications.
Table 1. Typical file compression ratios
DATA TYPE
TYPICAL COMPRESSION
Computer-aided (or -assisted) design (CAD)
3.8:1
Spreadsheet/Word processing
2.5:1
Typical file/print server
2.0:1
Lotus Notes databases
1.6:1
Microsoft Exchange/SQL Server databases
1.4:1
Oracle/SAP® databases
1.2:1
Source disk and file systems
In the past, tape performance was typically identified as a bottleneck. However, tape performance has now surpassed many of the source
systems available today. Items to consider when calculating desired throughput and performance metrics include:
• Source hardware (disk subsystems)
• Source file system status
• Server configuration
The following factors critically affect the speed of backup from disk to tape:
• Data file size
The larger the number of smaller files, the larger the overhead associated with backing them up. The worst-case scenario for backup is large
numbers of small files due to system overhead of file accession.
• Data compressibility
Incompressible data will back up slower than higher compressible data. For example, JPEG files are not very compressible, but database files
can be highly compressible. The accepted standard for quoting tape backup specifications revolves around an arbitrary figure of 2:1
compressible data.
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• Disk array performance
It is often overlooked that data cannot be put onto tape any faster than it can be read from disk. Backup is more sequential in nature than
random (from a disk array access perspective). Disk array performance depends on the number of disks, RAID configuration, the number of
FC ports accessing the array and queue depth available, for example.
• Fragmentation
The more fragmented the files are on disk, the more random will be the disk access method; hence the backup will take longer. If the system
has a defragmentation utility, it is advisable to run it before full backups or on a regular scheduled basis to help ensure that files are
contiguously arranged on the disk.
Tape drive
The tape drives are the remaining factor in determining backup and restore performance. HPE StoreEver Tape Drives have varying levels of
performance. Factors such as file size (larger is better), directory depth, and data compressibility all affects system performance. Data interleaving
during backup also affects restore performance. Table 2 shows performance information for various HPE StoreEver Tape Drives.
Table 2. Tape drive throughput speed (native)
TAPE DRIVE
NATIVE THROUGHPUT MB/s
Ultrium 15750 (LTO-7 FH)
300
Ultrium 15000 (LTO-7 HH)
300
Ultrium 6650 (LTO-6 FH)
160
Ultrium 6250 (LTO-6 HH)
160
Ultrium 3280 (LTO-5 FH)
140
Ultrium 3000 (LTO-5 HH)
140
Ultrium 1760 (LTO-4 HH)
80
Ultrium 920 (LTO-3 HH)
60
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Conclusion
Enterprise business customers demand an efficient, reliable, data growth management backup and archiving solution while managing costs.
Hewlett Packard Enterprise Storage provides a comprehensive range of reliable data protection storage solutions which allow enterprise
business customers to help maximize the value from their data over its entire lifecycle while help minimizing total cost of ownership (TCO).
HPE StoreEver Storage with EMC NetWorker can provide a complete solution in itself or be used as a major constituent of a disk-to-disk-to tape
implementation. HPE StoreEver Tape systems offer significant cost, energy, and footprint advantages, while addressing data growth by adding
drives and capacity on-demand as needed. In all, HPE StoreEver Storage systems integrate easily with EMC NetWorker and are a critical
component for comprehensive data protection and archiving of mission-critical applications.
Resources
HPE Backup, Recovery and Archive Solutions and Compatibility Matrices
HPE StoreEver MSL6480 Tape Library manuals
HPE 3PAR StoreServ 10000 Storage manuals
HPE 3PAR StoreServ 7000 Storage manuals
HPE StoreAll Storage manuals
EMC NetWorker
Learn more at
hp.com/go/StoreEver
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© Copyright 2014–2015 Hewlett Packard Enterprise Development LP. The information contained herein is subject to change without
notice. The only warranties for HPE products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products
and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. HPE shall not be liable for technical or editorial
errors or omissions contained herein.
Microsoft, Windows, and Windows Server are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States
and/or other countries. UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group. Java and Oracle are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its
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countries.
4AA5-2419ENW, December 2015, Rev. 1
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