VERONA HIGH SCHOOL
CURRICULUM BULLETIN
Scheduling for the
2013-2014
School Year
VERONA HIGH SCHOOL
January 2013
Dear Verona High School Students:
This curriculum guide has been designed to assist you in planning your high school education. I hope you
find it useful in making your course selections and in planning for your future. This booklet includes
descriptions of all the courses and programs offered in the high school and it represents a starting point for
you and your parents in building an appropriate program of studies.
Our curriculum is extensive and diverse. It is also constantly changing as the high school continually works to
meet the needs of a dynamic student population. The courses you select should support your own individual
goals for 2013-2014 school year and your objectives after graduation. If you have a special interest, examine
the courses available in that area. If you plan to further your education, be sure you have checked with your
counselor that you have included the courses necessary to meet the requirements suggested by the college,
university, or technical school of your choice. Whatever your interests and goals, our curriculum has a course
of study for you.
In planning a program which will best fit your needs, discuss your immediate and long-range plans and goals
with your parents and your counselor. To learn more about the courses offered, you should talk with your
teachers and the subject area supervisors.
Throughout your school years, you have been apprised of your academic strengths. By now, you should know
yourself well enough to understand where your needs are and to expand your greatest effort in being the best,
most fulfilled person you can be. The staff at Verona High School is here to help you so you can graduate with
all the necessary tools for personal achievement.
Sincerely,
Glenn Cesa
Principal
VERONA HIGH SCHOOL
January 2013
Dear Verona High School Parents:
Enclosed you will find all the materials necessary to complete the scheduling process for the 2013-2014 school
year. Course selection is a process that requires students and parents to make thoughtful and realistic course
choices that address student goals, abilities, interests, and past performance. Our course offerings provide a
wide variety of learning opportunities and therefore require students to make decisions that will have great
impact on their educational development. It is imperative that students and parents carefully review the
Curriculum Bulletin and mutually select those courses that are in the best interest of the student and help to
formulate a solid load of academic courses.
As you begin the process, please pay particular attention to the “General Information” section following this
letter. You will find information on educational planning, graduation requirements, and minimum required
courses described on these pages, as well as other pertinent information that is extremely important to your
child’s high school career. Detailed course descriptions can be found throughout the rest of the book. Lastly,
use the “course selection sheet” to select and keep a record the desired courses of your son or daughter’s 20132014 school year.
Be sure to have your child discuss his or her goals and interests with the school counselor. If your child is
planning to attend college, it is essential to create a four-year plan that will best qualify him or her for college
admissions. While the high school graduation requirements at Verona High School are rigorous and meet state
requirements, colleges often have additional requirements. In addition, colleges will be looking at your child’s
academic record from their freshman year all the way through their senior year. They will also be interested in
participation in extracurricular activities.
If the career world is more of an appropriate fit after high school graduation, it is still essential to meet with the
counselor to develop a plan early. The counselors may guide a student into elective courses that may help
achieve future goals, as well as inform the student of post-secondary opportunities at a vocational or technical
school.
Best of luck as you plan for the future. If you have any questions or concerns regarding the scheduling process
or a four year plan, please feel free to contact your child’s counselor. A breakdown of counselor assignments
can be found on page 1 of this book.
Sincerely,
Kimberly Ferlauto
Kimberly Ferlauto
Director of Guidance
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Contact Information………………………………………………………………………………………………Page 1
Educational Planning, College Admissions Policies, Students Expectations.……………………………………Page 2
Graduation Requirements, Summer School Policy, Accelerated Summer School Policy ………………........... .Page 3
GPA and Rank………………………………………………… …….………………………………………….. Page 4
National Honor Society, Athletic Eligibility, Attendance ………………………………………………………. Page 5
Scheduling Information …………………………………………………………………………………………. Page 6
Level Changes, Dual Enrollment…………………………………. ……………………………………………..Page 7
On-line Courses, Timetable, Important Reminders ……………………………………………………………...Page 8
Study Activity Program …………………………………………………………………………………………. Page 9
Course Selection Worksheet ……………………………………………………………………………….…….Page 10
Four Year Plan Worksheet ………………………………………………………………………........................ Page 11
21st Century Life and Careers/Career-Tech Ed Course Descriptions ……… …………………………………...Page 12
English Course Descriptions ……………………………………………………………………………...……...Page 18
Fine and Performing Arts Course Descriptions ……..……………………………………………………………Page 22
Health and Physical Education..……………………………………………………………………………….... Page 27
History and Social Sciences…………………………………………………………............................................Page 28
Mathematics Course Descriptions ……………………………………………………………………………… Page 32
Science Course Descriptions ……………………………………………………………….................................. Page 37
World Language Course Descriptions ……………………………………………………………………………Page 40
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION POLICY
It is the policy of the Verona Public Schools not to discriminate on the basis of race, creed, color, national origin,
ancestry, age, sex, affectation or sexual orientation, marital status, religious affiliation, liability for services in the Armed
Forces of the United States, or atypical hereditary cellular or blood trait of any individual, in employment or in
educational opportunities. Further, state and federal protection is extended on account of disabilities, actual or potential
parenthood, or family status in compliance with Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, NJAC 6:4-1.1 et seq.,
and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Compliance inquiries may be directed to Mrs. Libby Skinner,
Affirmation Action Officer, The Department of Special Services, 121 Fairview Avenue, Verona, NJ 07044 (973-5712029, Ext. 7512). Grievance procedures for the handling of discrimination complaints are on file in each school. (Policy
#2224)
VERONA HIGH SCHOOL
ADMINISTRATIVE TEAM
Principal
Assistant Principal
Director of Athletics/
Supervisor of Health & Phys. Ed
Mr. Glenn Cesa
Mr. David Galbierczyk
Mr. Gary Farishian
SCHOOL COUNSELING DEPARTMENT
For immediate assistance, call 973-571-6750, x 1015
Director of School Counseling
Administrative Assistant
Mrs. Kimberly Ferlauto
Mrs. Diane Newman
SCHOOL COUNSELORS
Mrs. Allyson Carvell
acarvell@veronaschools.org
Maternity Leave for
Ms. Kathleen Grant
kgrant@veronaschools.org
Ms. Colleen Green
cgreen@veronaschools.org
Mrs. Kimberly Ferlauto
kferlauto@veronaschools.org
Mrs. Dana Lustig
dlustig@veronaschools.org
A-G
973-571-6750, x1020
H-R
973-571-6750, x1018
S-Z
973-571-6750, x1019
Student Assistance Counselor/
Anti-Bullying Specialist
973-571-6750, x1041
CHILD STUDY TEAM
Dr. Michael Shrem
mshrem@veronaschools.org
Mrs. Joan Serpico
jserpicio@veronaschools.org
Mrs. Josephine Schiff
jschiff@veronaschools.org
School Psychologist
973-571-6750, x1021
Learning Disabilities
Teacher/Consultant
School Social Worker
973-571-6750, x1022
973-571-6750, x7517
DISRICT SUPERVISORS
Dr. Sumit Bangia
sbangia@veronaschools.org
Dr. Nicole Santora
nsantora@veronaschools.org
Mrs. Gina Venezia
gvenezia@veronaschools.org
Supervisor of Humanities
(English, Social Studies, and
World Language)
Supervisor of
Mathematics and Science
Supervisor of
Special Services
1
973-571-2029, x7522
973-571-2029, x 7022
973-571-2029, x 7513
EDUCATIONAL PLANNING
The selection of a program of studies represents one of the most important decisions a student will make during his/her
high school career. A student's success and happiness are directly related to the choosing of courses which are appropriate
to his/her goals, needs, and abilities.
At conferences conducted with students beginning in February, the counselor assists the students in developing their
program of courses and reviews the number of credits accumulated as well as career and future educational goals. Parents
must give their approval of the proposed schedule and are encouraged to contact the counselor as questions arise.
In planning a program of studies, you should ask these questions:
 What courses are offered and at what level? E.g.: Advanced Placement, Honors, College Preparatory
 In what subjects do I have the most success?
 In what subjects do I have the most difficulties?
 What are the course and credit requirements for graduation?
 Am I satisfying the requirements for college entrance?
 What are my career interests?
 What subjects will help me accomplish my goals?
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS POLICIES
Most college standards require students to have a strong preparatory curriculum in high school. They must
successfully complete a MINIMUM of 16 academic units of high school course work in college preparatory subjects.
An academic unit is a full year academic college preparatory, honors, or AP level course. A strong academic transcript
should minimally include four units in English, three units of Mathematics (Algebra I & II and Geometry are
minimum, Pre-Calculus and Calculus are preferred for more competitive colleges), three units of Social Studies
(World History, U.S. History I & II), three units of laboratory science (Biology, Chemistry, and Physics), and at least
2 units, preferably 3 or 4 units for more competitive colleges, of World Language (consecutive years of the same
language are preferred). The remaining units of academic course work should be in any course in the above core
content areas. For Engineering, Architecture, and Science majors, this should include another year of
mathematics. For Science majors, another year of science should be taken.
Seniors planning to go to college should be taking 4 years in each academic subject to be competitive in the
admissions process.
Some colleges have unique requirements. It is advisable to consult each institution in order to determine exactly
which courses are suitable.
STUDENT ACADEMIC EXPECTATIONS
 All students are expected to master the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards.
 All students are expected to produce quality work both inside and outside the classroom.
 All students are expected to maintain at least a “C” average.
 All students are expected to take and pass a mid-term and final exam.
 Student absences from class may be detrimental to academic success.
 Students taking Advanced Placement (AP) courses are expected to successfully complete the national AP
curriculum and are required to take the respective AP test.
2
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Verona High School graduation requirements include completion of 120 credits in courses designed to meet all of the
Core Curriculum Content Standards, including but not limited to the following:
Core Curriculum Content
Language Arts Literacy
Minimum Course & Credit Requirement
At least 20 credits (5 cr. each year), including English 1,
2, 3, 4
Mathematics
At least 15 credits, including Algebra I & II, Geometry
Science
At least 15 credits, including Biology and Chemistry
Social Studies
At least 15 credits, including World History, U.S. History
I & II
World Language
At least 10 credits of the same language
Visual & Performing Arts
At least 5 credits
21st Century Life and Careers/ Career-Tech At least 5 credits
Education (Effective with the Class of 2017, all
students will be required to take Intro to Digital
Arts)
Economics (Effective with the Class of 2017, all At least 2.5 credits in financial, economic, business, and
students will be required to take Intro to Financial entrepreneurial literacy
Literacy)
Health, Safety, & Physical Education
At least 5 credits for each year of enrollment
(Students must pass Phys. Ed. & Health)
* Cross-content workplace readiness may be satisfied through infusion into existing courses, course equivalents, or career
education courses.
*State Assessment Requirements: All students must demonstrate proficiency in all sections of the New Jersey High
School Proficiency Assessment (HSPA), which is administered in the spring of their junior year.
SUMMER SCHOOL POLICY
Students who receive a final grade of “F” in a course required for graduation must either attend an accredited summer
program at their own expense or repeat the course. A summer program remedial course must consist of at least 60 hours
of instruction and may extend to as many as 120 hours of instruction.
Students who lose credit due to excessive absences may also attend summer school or repeat the course. In either case, the
student must pass the course in which they lost credit.
In order to be eligible for summer school, a student must remain in a course to its completion. A student who is dismissed
from a class because of disciplinary reasons prior to the conclusion of a course, is not permitted to attend a summer
program to make it up.
ACCELERATED SUMMER SCHOOL POLICY
A student may take an accelerated course of at least 120 hours of instruction at an accredited summer program in lieu of a
regularly offered course at Verona High School. The course will not be included in grade point average and cannot count
toward the graduation requirements. Approval must be obtained through the School Counseling Office.
3
GPA and RANK
Grade point average will be calculated beginning at the conclusion of freshman year. All courses with the
exception of Pass/Fail and summer school courses are included in the grade point average. Calculations will be
represented to the nearest thousandth. Grade point averages will be run at the end of 9th, 10th, and 11th grades. In
addition, grade point average will be calculated after five semesters for college planning purposes and after
seven semesters for mid-year reports to colleges, as well as for determining Verona High School’s valedictorian
and salutatorian. As per the Curriculum Bulletins since the 2010-2011 school year it was decided that
beginning with the Class of 2014, Verona High School will no longer rank its students. Deciles will be
used for a broader idea of student performance. For example, students who fall into the 1 st
decile are in the top 10% of their class. Students in the 5th decile are in the top 50% of their class.
GRADE POINT AVERAGE CALCULATIONS
Grade Point Average is computed on the basis of cumulative points in ALL SUBJECTS with the exceptions of P/F grades
and summer school grades. The following numerical values are given to each letter grade for purposes of determining a
student's grade point average.
Grade
A+
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
DF
Point Value
AP
5.3
5
4.7
4.3
4
3.7
3.3
3
2.7
2.3
2
1.7
0
Honors
4.8
4.5
4.2
3.8
3.5
3.2
2.8
2.5
2.2
1.8
1.5
1.2
0
College Prep
4.3
4
3.7
3.3
3
2.7
2.3
2
1.7
1.3
1
.7
0
Grade Point Average (GPA) will be calculated by multiplying the number of credits per course times the grade weight to
determine quality points. (See chart below for example)
PERIOD
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
CLASS
Hon. Soc. Studies
AP English
AP Math
Phys.Ed
Health
Study
Elective
Hon. Physics
AP Spanish
GRADE
A
BAB+
B
A+
B
C+
WEIGHT
4.5
3.7
4.7
3.3
3.0
4.3
3.5
3.3
TOTAL
CREDITS
5
5
5
3.75
1.25
5
6
5
36
Q.P.
22.5
18.5
23.5
12.375
3.75
21.5
21
16.5
139.625
GPA=
3.878
TRANSFER STUDENTS
1. Students who transfer into Verona High School before September 30th of their 11th grade will be included in the
class decile. The counselor will use the student's final 9th and 10th grade transcripts to determine grades and
credits. Only those courses that are designated "Honors or Advanced Placement" on their previous school's
transcript will be weighted.
2. Students who enter after September 30th of the 11th grade will be given a parallel class decile encompassing all the
previous course work completed.
3. Students who transfer into Verona High School in their senior year will be given the designation that was
assigned by their previous school.
4. For Verona High School students who spend a year abroad, it is the practice not to give credit for the exchange
year in determining the student's class decile.
5. For students who come to Verona High School from foreign countries, only work completed at Verona High
school will be counted toward class decile.
4
NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY
Membership in the National Honor Society is limited to juniors and seniors. This honor is conferred upon students in
recognition of outstanding accomplishments in scholarship, leadership, character and service. Induction and continued
membership in the National Honor Society are based upon the criteria outlined in the bylaws.
CRITERIA FOR STUDENT INDUCTION:
SCHOLARSHIP -Students with a minimum weighted grade point average of 3.85 will be eligible for selection after
completing five or six semesters of high school. Students will not be eligible if they have a final grade of "F" in any
course during their freshman, sophomore, or junior year.
SERVICE AND LEADERSHIP -A student will be eligible for induction if he/she participated in at least two school
activities and earned four points for his participation. Service and leadership apply only to Verona High School activities.
CHARACTER -The student must have demonstrated positive signs of fine character. Thus, the student must never have
been suspended. In addition, he/she must never have been disciplined for cheating, plagiarizing, stealing, cutting,
vandalizing, forging a document, or using or possessing alcohol or drugs. Juniors and seniors are inducted in the spring.
ATHLETIC ELIGIBILITY
Athletic eligibility standards are determined by New Jersey Interscholastic Athletic Association as outlined below:
1. To be eligible for athletic competition during the 1st semester (September 1-January 31) of the 10th grade
or higher, a pupil must have passed 25% of the credits (30) required by the State of New Jersey for
graduation (120), during the immediately preceding academic year.
2. To be eligible for athletic competition during the 2nd semester (February 1-June 30) of the 9th grade or
higher, a pupil must have passed an equivalent of 12.5% of the credits (15) required by the State of New
Jersey for graduation (120) at the close of the preceding semester (January 31). Full-year courses shall be
equated as ½ of the total credits to be gained for the full year to determine credits passed during the
immediately preceding semester.
ATTENDANCE
Daily attendance is an essential component to the academic success of our students. In order to receive credit for courses
in grades 9-12, a student's total number of absences must not exceed the following:
FULL YEAR COURSE:
14
2 MARKING PERIOD COURSE
7
1 MARKING PERIOD
3
Students will have two days to make up assigned work for every one day they are absent. Adjustments to long-term
absences will only be made due to a long-term illness. Following an absence of six or more consecutive school days, the
student and teacher must meet within a period of three days to develop a make-up plan.
Non-Cumulative Absences: The Verona Board of Education permits absences from school for the following reasons:
1. Religious Holidays (18A:36:14-16)
2. Death in the immediate family
3. Suspension from school
4. School sanctioned activities
5. Court Subpoena
6. A personal illness of four consecutive days or longer accompanied by a doctor's note stating diagnosis and specific days
of illness. This note must be presented to school within two weeks of said absence.
Letters will be sent home emphasizing the potential loss of credit due to excessive absences as listed below:
Full Year Course
½ Year
¼ Year
7
4
1
11 days
6 days
2 days
Reminder: Every three (3) tardies equals one cumulative absence. Students who are tardy to class and miss more than
half the period will be charged with an absence in that course.
5
SCHEDULING INFORMATION
COURSE LEVEL PLACEMENT
Teachers make course recommendations based on a variety of criteria including, grade in the current course, work ethic,
and interest in the course. A student seeking to move from College Prep to Honors level course(s) should conference with
their teacher, demonstrate a level of mastery in the subject matter, and should be maintaining no less than a “B-” average
in the College Prep course in which they are currently enrolled.
In order to continue enrollment in the Honors level in a subject area when selecting his or her schedule for the following
academic year, a student must maintain no less than a “C” average in the Honors level course in which they are currently
enrolled.
COURSE OVERRIDE
If a parent and student do not agree with the course for which they were recommended, they must complete the Course
Override form no later April 19, 2013 and acknowledge the following:
 The recommendation was made by the teacher for this course because the student did not meet the established
entrance criteria needed to register for this course.
 The level change indicates a faster pace and increased rigor of the course. In order for my child to be successful,
he/she may have to increase study habits, stay after school for extra help, and/or get assistance from a tutor.
 Once the student is added to this course, he/she will have until the last day of the first marking period to move to a
lower level class. However, the move is not guaranteed and is dependent upon space and availability. This could
potentially mean that the change cannot happen if a course is already full or the student schedule may have to be
rearranged and other classes dropped to accommodate the request.
Requests made after April 19th will only be honored if there is availability.
CHANGING THE SCHEDULE
Because of the complexity of the schedule, it is difficult to accommodate schedule changes. Therefore, students
should make careful and thoughtful decisions when choosing all courses, including electives and alternate
choices. While every effort is made to schedule all subjects selected by students, limitations of staff, building space, and
time occasionally make necessary either the cancellation of undersubscribed course offerings or the substitution of
alternate course choices.
A schedule change request is not guaranteed. It is dependent upon space and availability. This could potentially mean
that the change cannot happen if a course is already full or the student schedule may have to be rearranged and
other classes dropped to accommodate the request.
When school resumes in September, the following situations will only be addressed during days 1-12 of school:
1. The correction of a clerical error in the schedule (i.e. a missing course, a conflict between two or more courses, or not
having the appropriate prerequisite).
2. A recommendation from the Child Study Team.
3. A student is repeating a course with the same teacher he/she previously had.
4. A student wishing to eliminate a study hall and take an additional course, which does not entail the dropping of any
other courses.
5. A student wishing to eliminate an elective to take a study hall.
6. A recommendation from a teacher for a level change, space permitting.
Scheduling changes for any of the following reasons will be addressed only during days 5-12 of the school year if
availability and space allows:
1. Preference for some other subject.
2. Course content or standards differing from student expectations.
* A Schedule Change Form must accompany any request for a schedule change.
** Students must carry a schedule of 6 academic courses, in addition to physical education and health. Therefore,
students may not have more than one study hall per marking period.
6
LEVEL CHANGES
Level changes will be accommodated until the last day of the first marking period. Prior to a level change, the following
must happen:
 Student must meet with current teacher and have them sign the Level Change Form as notification that they
intend to drop their course.
 Student must meet with new teacher and have them sign the Level Change Form as acknowledgement that both
the student and teacher have discussed the expectations of the class as well as what will be needed to be caught
up.
 Upon completion, the student and parent must sign the Level Change Form and submit it to his/her school
counselor.
Full-year courses within the five major academic areas (English, Mathematics, Science, History, World
Language) which do not have a level may also be dropped until the end of the first marking period. However,
they may not replace the course with a first semester course if the change occurs after the 12th day of school
and students may not have more than one study hall per marking period.
VHS DUAL ENROLLMENT PROGRAMS
Dual Enrollment programs provide high school students a unique opportunity to jump-start their college career.
According to the U.S. Department of Education, college credits earned prior to high school graduation reduce the average
time-to-degree and increase the likelihood of graduation. For parents, it is a chance to reduce future college expenses by
shortening the time to college graduation.
Dual enrollment allows qualified high school students to enroll in college coursework while still in high school.










Admissions requirements reflect admissions standards at the college
Courses are taught by VHS faculty who meet the college’s credentialing requirements.
Credit for dual enrollment courses is widely accepted among private and public colleges, depending on your
major. Students can contact colleges of interest to discuss the applicability of dual enrollment coursework.
Earns college credits at a reduced rate.
Provides college-level instruction to high school students, during regular school hours.
Accelerates a student’s college career and provides quality, affordable education close to home.
Enriches the course opportunities for outstanding high school students.
Students enter college with credits applicable to their degree program.
Students gain understanding of the rigor of college work as well as college faculty expectations.
Provides access to college resources, facilities and services such as advising, career counseling and mentoring.
Currently, we have relationships with the following institutions to offer dual enrollment credit:
Bergen Community College
Caldwell College
Fairleigh Dickinson University
New Jersey Institute of Technology
Seton Hall University
Syracuse University
Potential Dual Enrollment Courses are indicated with a “DE” in this Curriculum Bulletin.
7
HAVE YOU CONSIDERED TAKING AN ON-LINE COURSE?
Juniors and seniors may use the option of taking elective coursework on-line through an approved Educere course.
Educere is a database of on-line courses ranging from high school to college level in a variety of subject areas. All
instruction and grading is done over the internet by a certified teacher who is not an employee of the district. Verona High
School counselors will be able to assist with minor technical issues, but there is no staff on site to assist with curriculum
related questions. To explore possible courses, please go to www.educere.net. An on-line course:






Cannot be taken in place of a course offered in the Curriculum Bulletin and cannot be used to meet a requirement.
Must be approved by your school counselor.
On-line courses are NOT calculated into your Verona High School grade point average or decile.
The Verona High School Drop/Add policies apply to on-line courses.
Students must be computer proficient, highly motivated, and be able to work independently to be successful.
Students are responsible for the tuition and other related fees associated with the registration and participation.
TIMETABLE
January 2013
January 10, 2013
January 11, 2013
February 2013
February - April 2013
April 19, 2013
June 2013
Revised Curriculum Bulletin will be posted online
Eighth Grade Parent Orientation
School counselors and peer leaders will visit HBW and discuss
the transition to VHS with the incoming 9th grade students
Teachers will make course recommendations through Genesis
Students will meet with their School Counselor to finalize course
selection.
Last day students may override teacher recommendations
Students will be able to confirm course selections
IMPORTANT REMINDERS
1. Verona High School operates on a modified block schedule. A zero period is available for all students
participating in Vocal Music. All students in grades 9-12 must enroll in a minimum of six courses yearly in
addition to physical education and health.
2. Students and parents should review the entire curriculum guide and carefully read all sections.
3. Students should feel free to talk to teachers, department supervisors, school counselors, parents, and other
students about courses before they make a selection.
4. Remember when selecting courses to think in terms of your four-year high school program of courses and how
this program will best prepare you for life after high school.
5. All course offerings are subject to adequate student enrollment.
6. Study halls are available based on student enrollment, staff limitations and building space.
8
GETTING INVOLVED
As a high school student, getting involved can mean joining a club, participating in student activities, or doing community
service. Being involved in community service and extracurricular activities can help you get into college by giving you a
well-rounded résumé and interesting experiences to write about in your admission essays. Extracurricular activities could
also help you win scholarship dollars, figure out your future career, even help you network.
Remember, though, that "quality over quantity" holds true for many things, including getting involved. Don't fill your
schedule with so many extracurricular activities that you sacrifice your good grades!
From: http://www.nextstepmagazine.com/nextstep/college-activities.aspx
VERONA HIGH SCHOOL
STUDENT ACTIVITY PROGRAM
Verona High School proudly offers the following activities/clubs to our students:
ACTIVITIES
Academic Competitions
Film Club
Mandarin Honor Society
Spanish Honor Society
Art National Honor Society
French Club
Math Competition Team
Spotlight Players
Band/ Color Guard
French Honor Society
Math Honor Society
Sports Medicine Club
Chorus
Model UN Club
STAR
Chess Club
Future Educators of
America
Gay Straight Alliance
Moot Court/Mock Trial
Stock Market Club
Creative Arts Festival
Girls Learn International
National Honor Society
Student Council
DAN Club
Heroes and Cool Kids
Fairviewer Newspaper
DECA
High School Bowl
Paws and Claws
Students’ Music
Organization
Shadows Yearbook
Engineering Club
International Weekend
Peer Leadership
Teens for Troops
Environmental Club
Literary MagazineAvant Garde
Mandarin Club
Publicity Club
World Language Academic
Competitions
Euro Challenge
Spanish Club
ATHLETICS
FALL
WINTER
SPRING
Cheerleading
Basketball- Boys/Girls
Baseball
Cross Country – Boys/Girls
Cheering
Golf
Football
Ice Hockey
Lacrosse- Boys/Girls
Soccer- Boys/Girls
Indoor Track – Boys/Girls
Softball
Tennis-Girls
Swimming - Boys/Girls
Tennis- Boys
Volleyball- Girls
Wrestling
Track – Boys/Girls
9
VERONA HIGH SCHOOL
2013-2014 COURSE SELECTION WORKSHEET
SECTION I: Select 30 credits in “required” courses.
DEPARTMENT
SELECTED COURSE
HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION
CREDITS
5
ENGLISH
5
MATH
5
SCIENCE
5
SOCIAL STUDIES
5
WORLD LANGUAGE
5
SECTION II: Select 10 credits in “first choice” elective courses
COURSE NAME
CREDITS
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
SECTION III: Select 15 credits in “alternate” elective courses.
COURSE NAME
CREDITS
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
10
Four-Year Plan Worksheet
STUDENT:
COUNSELOR:
Subject Area
(Required/Recommended Courses)
Credits
Needed
English/
Language Arts
20
Grade 9
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
(English 1,2, 3, 4)
Social Studies
15
(World History, US History 1 & 2)
Science
15
(Bio, Chem, Science Choice)
Mathematics
15
(Min. Algebra 1 & 2 and Geometry)
World Language
10
(Two years of same language)
Physical Education & Health
20
(5 cr. per year)
21st Century Life and Careers/
Career-Tech Education
5
(Practical Arts)
Intro to Digital Arts and Intro to
Financial Literacy meets this
requirement
Fine & Performing Arts
5
Financial Literacy
2.5
(Introduction to Financial Literacy
is required for all 9th grade students)
Other Electives
Total Credits Earned
Total Credits Needed to Pass
120
to
Grad
ua
te
120 to
Graduate
11
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
21St CENTURY LIFE and CAREERS/
CAREER-TECH EDUCATION
5 Credit Requirement
Suggested Business Course Sequence
9th Grade
10th Grade
11th Grade
Essentials of
Marketing in the
21st Century
Sales: The Art of
the Deal
Careers in
Education Honors
Event Marketing
Financial
Literacy/
Digital Arts
Sales: The Art of
the Deal
Introduction to
Business
12th Grade
OR
Senior Career
Seminar
Event Marketing
Honors Accounting
BUSINESS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL LITERACY (Grade 9)
THIS COURSE IS REQUIRED OF ALL STUDENTS ENTERING VHS
1 Semester, 2.5 credits
Prerequisite: None
This course encompasses the financial literacy skills that are essential in the development of 21st century scholars.
Financial literacy topics include Money Management, Borrowing, Earning Power, Investing, Financial Services and
Insurance.
INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL ARTS (Grade 9)
THIS COURSE IS REQUIRED OF ALL STUDENTS ENTERING VHS
1 Semester, 2.5 credits
Prerequisite: None
Students will create their own digital portfolio while reflecting on what their digital footprint is and how it will change
during their school career. Students will use professional software applications and explore the areas of graphic design,
digital design, CAD and others. The projects that the student completes will become a component of their digital portfolio
along with their best works from all of their course work. Material learned in this class will also help support students in
their academic and social transition to high school. This course also satisfies many of the technological components of
NJCCCS 8.1 and 8.2.
12
HONORS CAREERS IN EDUCATION/TOMORROW’S TEACHERS (Grade 12) DE
Full Year, 5 credits
Prerequisite: None
This year- long course is designed for seniors who aspire to become teachers. The course will incorporate four themes:
Experiencing the Learner; Experiencing the Profession; Experiencing Education; and Experiencing the Classroom. A
strong emphasis will be placed on hands-on activities, observations and required field experiences. The course will also
explore critical issues in education ranging from funding and staffing schools to the need for underrepresented diversity in
the teaching profession. In addition, there will be an opportunity for students to develop leadership skills and experience
personal growth and development. The course will also require extensive reading, research, timeliness in meeting
deadlines and presenting work in a large group setting.
INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
Introduction to Business is a course designed to introduce the student to the business world. It provides the student with
necessary background needed to understand economic problems of today's modern and complex business world. In this
program of studies an emphasis is placed on career education. The Introduction to Business course explains the role and
purpose of business in our economic system with emphasis on what everyone should know to function effectively as a
consumer, a worker, and a citizen in a free enterprise system. This is a course designed to aid every student, not just
business education majors.
THE ESSENTIALS OF MARKETING IN THE 21ST CENTURY (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 credits
Prerequisite: None
This year- long course explores the basic concepts of marketing. This project-oriented course will allow the student to
practically apply the marketing concepts that they learned. A business plan will be the culminating project in which the
student will create a business of their choice. The major elements of Product, Place, Promotion and Pricing will be
studied.
SALES: THE ART OF THE DEAL (Grades 10-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Introduction to Business OR The Essentials of Marketing in the 21st Century
This class will provide the opportunity for the student to understand the elements of selling. Students will study the makeup of a target market, understand business markets, incorporate production skills to sell the product, and use promotional
techniques to influence the buyer. Students will have to assemble a sales promotion presentation incorporating all
concepts learned in this class
EVENT MARKETING (Grades 10-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: The Essentials of Marketing in the 21st Century
This semester class will focus on the marketing skills and knowledge needed by an entrepreneur to actively conduct a
business in the sports, entertainment, or recreation venues. The class will use the before mentioned areas to understand
branding, promotion, and management. Students will have a sports fantasy simulation as their major project in which all
functions of marketing will be demonstrated.
13
HONORS ACCOUNTING (Grades 10-12) DE
Full Year, 5 credits
Prerequisite: Introduction to Financial Literacy – Minimum Grade of C
This full year class introduces students to financial accounting concepts that aid entrepreneurs, managers, investors and
creditors in planning, operating and analyzing a business. Emphasis in this course is on the interpretation of financial
statements.
In addition to the use of a traditional textbook, lectures, quizzes and exams to deliver basic accounting skills, students are
required to complete a comprehensive project that demonstrates their ability to analyze the financial statements of
publicly traded companies and make an informed investment decision based on the analysis.
By the end of the course, students are expected to understand the basic accounting information system, have the ability to
read and understand a set of basic financial statements, have awareness of the current issues in financial accounting and
their impact on organizational stakeholders, and understand career opportunities available to accounting graduates.
SENIOR CAREER SEMINAR (Grade 12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
This course explores career planning activities and the development of a digital student portfolio for use as part of the
college application process and/or career employment opportunities. Search techniques with hands-on activities, as well as
opportunities to interact with guest speakers, will be used to explore a variety of career clusters. As a result of techniques
developed in this course, students produce and/or update their digital portfolio that can be used for application purposes.
This course is project-oriented and will include field trips to a variety of local businesses.
TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
DIGITAL DESIGN 1 (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
The students will develop the skills that lay the foundation for producing web-ready communications: graphic design
principles, storyboards, and web development. Project activities focus on developing effective communications that can
be deployed on the web. Students develop a variety of graphical images, a web portfolio, and a client website. Key skills
emphasized are: Designing a website for clients, problem solving that helps support multiple perspectives, reflection
about the design process and effective communication, technical web publishing. Students use Adobe Photoshop CS5,
Adobe Illustrator CS5, and Adobe Fireworks CS5 to develop static and interactive graphics. The students use Adobe
Dreamweaver CS5 to design and build websites.
DIGITAL DESIGN 2 (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Digital Design1 – Minimum Grade of C
The students will build on student design and development skills by focusing on rich media development as well as
website design and development. Students continue to work individually or on teams and produce rich media
communications such as digital narratives and rich media elements of client websites. They focus on effective rich media
design, multimedia storyboarding, design specifications, and interactive development with clients. They produce design
documents and visual comps that clients review. They develop rich media designs that solve specific communication
challenges. Students learn Adobe Flash Professional CS5 to apply design solutions requiring rich media and interactivity.
14
APPLIED TECHNOLOGY (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
Students will use tools and machinery to design and build creative solutions to real world problems. Applied technology
will give students the foundation to take wood technology, and computer-aided design. This course will teach students the
ability of how to think, not what to think.
WOOD TECHNOLOGY (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Applied Technology
Wood Technology is for the student interested in all aspects of woodworking. Review of hand tools, portable power floor
machines, safety, planning and operations are done each year to reinforce previously learned information. Students will
learn the process of furniture design from the beginning sketches to the finished product.
ADVANCED WOOD TECHNOLOGY (Grades 10-12)
Full Year, 5 credits
Prerequisite: Wood Technology
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a chance to do directed, self-study work in traditional methods of
woodworking. The student will prepare a statement of interest item schedule, preliminary sketches (where applicable) and
other ideas. After an interview and discussion on the plan of study, the individual will begin work. Study is not limited to
just one area, but can span several, with any combination of time blocks. Culmination will take the form of a finished
project and display at the Creative Arts Festival and possibly other shows.
ADVANCED WOODWORKING (Grades 11-12)
Full Year, 5 credits
Prerequisite: Advanced Wood Technology
This course is designed to challenge students throughout the entire process of furniture design. Students learn different
attributes of various furniture styles and use this knowledge to design and build a furniture piece of their own. They are
expected to render detailed drawings, provide a parts and procedure list, and fabricate their design throughout the course
of the year.
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER-AIDED DRAFTING (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
This pre-engineering and pre-architectural course is designed to provide students with both drafting and computer skills.
This course will guide students from basic orthogonal and isometric drawing to complex 3-dimensional modeling and
design. The software that is used in class is the same that is utilized by professionals in the engineering and architecture
field.
INDUSTRIAL DESIGN (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Intro to CAD
This course introduces the studio practice of industrial design. It covers contemporary product design issues, threedimensional problem solving, and the design process. Computer-aided designs and physical models are created to
visualize design concepts and to evaluate solutions.
15
INTRODUCTION TO STRUCTURES AND ENGINEERING (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
This course introduces students to the hands-on exploration of how things work and fail. Students will be presented with
design tasks that will challenge the way they approach materials and structures in both individual and collaborative
settings. This course will give students the opportunity to apply what they have learned in math, science and art.
ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
This course is designed for students interested in Architecture, Interior Architecture, Architectural Drafting, Carpentry, or
other building trades. Students are introduced to industry-standard software that aids their understanding of designing and
constructing architectural buildings and interior spaces through 3-dimensional computer models.
3D ANIMATION (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
3D Animation uses 3Ds MAX graphics software to produce 3D models and animations. This course will introduce
students to 2D and 3D graphics environments, animation planning, storyboard development, and the animation process.
3D ANIMATION II (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: 3D Animation
3D Animation uses 3Ds MAX graphics software to produce 3D models and animations. It will expand understanding of
2D and 3D graphics environments, animation planning, storyboard development, and the animation process.
ADVANCED 3-DIMENSIONAL MODELING AND DESIGN (Grades 11-12)
Full Year, 5 credits
Prerequisite: Complete 3 semesters of following classes: CAD, Architectural Design, 3D Animation, Industrial Design
This course is the third segment of the Computer-Aided Design program. The course is designed to help students develop
a portfolio which will be used to apply toward architecture and/or engineering programs in college. Students will learn
advanced techniques in 3-Dimensional modeling through hypothetical design problems that challenge technical and
creative sensibilities.
PARAMETRIC DESIGN AND 3-D ANIMATION (Grades 11-12)
Full Year, 5 credits
Prerequisite: Advanced 3-Dimensional Modeling and Design
This fourth and final segment of the Computer-aided Design program will focus on the student and their projects as a
body of work. Their work will be subject to constructive critiques in which students will have to defend their methods of
design and articulate their work process. Students will be asked to present their work in a professional manner with
modern presentation quality. This course takes advantage of our full software suite, which includes the latest software in
parametric design, BIM (Building Information Modeling) and 3-Dimensional animation which turns a complex project
into a fully accessible animation for the untrained eye.
16
TRANSITION I & II (Grades 9, 10, 11, 12)
Credits 5
Prerequisite: CST Recommendation
The purpose of the Transition course is to teach students how to successfully transition from Verona High School into the
post-secondary environment. In particular, students are taught how to develop communication skills, set realistic career
goals, and make informed career choices. Students complete interest surveys, learn about career choices, practice
completing job applications, and learn how to write a resume. Students learn to develop a career action plan, to take
action on each plan, and to learn to adjust their plans as needed. Additionally, students will learn how to appropriately
participate in and lead their IEP meetings in an effort to promote self-determination, self-advocacy skills, and the
development of meeting skills. Ultimately, students practice developing all of the skills needs for post-secondary success.
JOB SAMPLING I & II (Grades 9, 10, 11, 12)
Credits 5
Prerequisite: CST Recommendation
The purpose of the job sampling course is to provide students with a job experience in the local community or within the
school building. Students complete job surveys, explore realistic career options and develop many of the skills needed to
be successful in the work force. Skills such as completing a job application, practicing phone etiquette, writing a resume
and cover letter, and developing appropriate communication skills are all addressed. Each student’s needs and skills
development will be based on individual goals stated in the IEP (e.g. responding appropriately to authority, developing
daily living skills, enhancing communication skills). Personalized work goals and objectives are developed once a job
placement has been established. Monitoring of the goals and objectives occurs at the mid-point and at the end of the job
experience. Joint supervision is conducted by the special education teacher and a designated mentor within the work site.
A career internship is available in conjunction with this course for additional credits.
17
ENGLISH
Suggested English Course Sequence
9th Grade
10th Grade
English I
English II
English I
Honors
English II
Honors
11th Grade
12th Grade
English III
English IV
AP Language
and
Composition
AP Literature
and
Composition
English III
Honors
Electives
Creative Writing
Public Speaking
Journalism I
Journalism II
Broadcast Journalism
ENGLISH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ENGLISH I (Grade 9)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
The English I curriculum is designed to introduce the skills necessary for the student to become proficient in a high school
language arts program. These skills include the areas of listening, speaking, collaborating, reading, writing, analyzing
literature, and researching. Literature will be presented through thematic units that include works from different genres,
including the short story, the novel, poetry, drama, and nonfiction. Students will write an I-search paper in the spring
semester. The process approach to writing will be emphasized.
ENGLISH I HONORS (Grade 9)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Minimum of an A- average for the first and second marking period in on level English 8 with an 8th
grade recommendation OR Minimum of a B- average for the first and second marking period in above level English 8
with an 8th grade recommendation.
The English I Honors curriculum is designed to introduce the skills necessary for the student to become proficient in the
honors track of the high school language arts program. These skills include the areas of listening, speaking, reading,
analyzing, researching and writing. Higher order thinking skills will be expected. Students will read and analyze selected
works from all genres: short story, novel, poetry, drama and nonfiction. The process approach to writing will be
emphasized.
18
ENGLISH II (Grade 10)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: English I
The English II curriculum is designed to reinforce the learning from English I and to introduce a more sophisticated
approach to literature and to writing. The process approach to writing will also be emphasized with particular attention
to writing for different audiences, analytic and comparative writing, and self-editing. The research paper in its entirety
will be taught in this course.
ENGLISH II HONORS (Grade 10)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: English I Honors
The English II Honors curriculum is designed to reinforce the learning from English I and to introduce a more
sophisticated approach to literature and to writing. The process approach to writing will also be emphasized with
particular attention to writing for different audiences, analytic and comparative writing, and self-editing. The
research paper in its entirety will be taught in this course. Students will be expected to read independently and
extensively.
ENGLISH III (Grade 11)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: English II
English III is a study of the various genres of American literature using a thematic approach. The curriculum is
designed to reinforce learning from English II and to introduce a more sophisticated approach to literature and to
writing. The process approach to writing will continue to be emphasized with particular attention to analytic and
comparative writing, style, and self-editing. Research skills will be reviewed with particular attention to the
incorporation of literary criticism into student writing.
ENGLISH III HONORS (Grade 11)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: English II Honors or teacher recommendation
The English III Honors curriculum is designed to reinforce the learnings from English II Honors and to introduce a more
sophisticated approach to literature and to writing. The literature will be that of American authors. It will be studied
chronologically. Selections will be chosen from colonial authors through contemporary authors. The process approach to
writing will continue to be emphasized with particular attention to analytic and comparative writing, style, and selfediting. Research skills will be reviewed, and each student will complete several research assignments.
AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION (Grade 11)
5 Credits
Prerequisites: English II Honors or teacher recommendation
The AP English Language and Composition curriculum is designed to prepare students for the advanced placement
examination, which is given in May. The course follows a thematic approach with an emphasis on American literature.
Students will focus on complex fiction, essays, letters, and documents, from a variety of disciplines, time periods, and
rhetorical modes, to determine, among other things, a writer's purpose and manipulation of the subtleties of language. The
course will create writers adept at addressing many writing challenges. Student must take the AP exam to earn AP course
credit.
19
ENGLISH IV (Grade 12) DE
5 Credits
Prerequisite: English III
The English IV curriculum is designed to reinforce the learning from English III and to introduce a more sophisticated
approach to literature and to writing. Most of the literature will be selected from that of England. Some of the literature
will be selected from countries other than England or the United States. The literature will be organized chronologically.
The process approach to writing will again be emphasized with particular attention to writing for different audiences,
analytic and comparative writing and self-editing. Using their previously acquired skills, students will be expected to
complete several research assignments.
AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (Grade 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Advanced Placement English Language and Composition or English III H and teacher recommendation
The AP English Literature and Composition curriculum is designed to prepare students for the advanced placement
examination, which is given in May. The emphasis of the course is the in-depth study of fiction and poetry. The focus of
the course will be on British literature, although some American works and world literature will be studied. The process
approach to writing will again be emphasized with particular attention to writing for different audiences, analytic and
comparative writing, and self-editing and revision. Students will be expected to complete several independent, analytical
reading and writing assignments. Student must take the AP exam to earn AP course credit.
COMMUNICATIONS LAB (Grades 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Scores Partially Proficient on the HSPA
Communications Lab is a course designed specifically for students who are having difficulty with the skills that are
necessary for success on High School Proficiency Assessment. Eligibility for this course is determined by lack of success
on the 11th grade High School Proficiency Assessment. The course objectives are to help students to become proficient in
the reading and writing skills that are necessary for success on the HSPA. Students will remain in the communications lab
until their level of proficiency is sufficient for them to achieve success on the HSPA. The course is graded on a pass/fail
basis.
CREATIVE WRITING (Grades 10, 11, 12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
This is a one semester course whose focus is to explore the short story, drama and poetry and to read, analyze, model and
create these forms. Students will be required to write each day in class. Writing will include free-write and response
journals, exercises to strengthen the writing skills related to the different genre, and the expansion and revision of pieces
contained in written journals. The emphasis of the course will be to increase communication through creative writings.
PUBLIC SPEAKING (Grades 10, 11, 12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
This is a one-semester elective whose focus is to introduce students to the principles of various types of public speaking.
Students will learn how to research, plan, write and deliver different types of speeches. In addition, students will be able
to analyze and evaluate fellow students' presentations. This course will also include units of instruction on
extemporaneous speaking, interview techniques, and oral interpretation of literature. This course will build on student
research skills which were acquired in English I and will emphasize performance and presentation.
20
JOURNALISM I (Grades 10, 11, 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
Journalism I is a full-year course designed primarily to familiarize students with all aspects of journalistic writing, and to
study the role of the media historically and currently. Students will learn the inverted pyramid style of straight news
writing in order to make their writing more focused and concise. They will also analyze and write in most of the styles one
would find in a daily newspaper including features, editorials, and reviews.
JOURNALISM II (Grade 11, 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in Journalism I
Journalism II is a full-year course. Only students who have completed Journalism I are eligible for the Journalism II class.
In this course, students increase their understanding of all aspects involved in publishing a newspaper and a yearbook.
Independent work and application of learned skills are the objectives of this course, which produces both the high school
newspaper and the yearbook.
BROADCAST JOURNALISM (Grade 11, 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Journalism I
This is a full-year course that allows students to apply principles of video communication and journalism. Students will
sharpen their communication skills in such areas as news production, investigative reporting, and broadcast news writing.
Students will study the techniques of TV reporting by viewing TV news broadcasts and, using camcorders and editing
systems, create their own news program about events and people of Verona High School. In addition, students will use
their creative skills to produce short films, commercial advertisements, and music videos. Student will write screenplays,
create storyboards, and demonstrate an understanding of visual language to tell their stories. The culmination of the course
will be the creation of a "senior video" for the graduating class.
21
FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS
5 Credit Requirement
BAND (Grades 9-12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: A desire to play a musical instrument
This course is designed to broaden the students' concept and knowledge of music by developing the skills to perform in
various ensembles (i.e.: marching, jazz and concert bands). A constant striving toward excellence in technical and musical
skills will be valuable long after the final performance. In addition to the skills needed for a good performance, the
students should know the general and historical setting of the composition; notice and understand the rhythmic, melodic,
harmonic and design principles used by the composer. They should also be able to relate the style of each composition to
that of the works that they have heard or played.
COLOR GUARD (Grades 9-12)
1.25 Credits
Prerequisite: None
Color Guard is intended for students who wish to participate in the Marching Band but who do not play a wind, brass,
or percussion instrument. (Please note if you wish to participate in Color Guard and play an instrument that you should
sign up for band.) Students who enroll in Color Guard sign up for marking period one and are assigned to a study hall for
marking period 2 and may choose a study hall or second semester elective (Grades 10-12), if available, for marking
periods 3 and 4.
CHOIR (Period 0) Grades 9-12
3 Credits
Prerequisite: A desire to sing
This course is designed to broaden the students' concept and knowledge of music by the skills to perform in various
ensembles including concert choir and jazz choir. The students will learn proper singing techniques, including posture
and breathing as well as repertoire from different cultures and languages.
MUSIC THEORY I (Grades 9-12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: A basic interest in learning music on a more sophisticated level. Approval of instructor required.
This course is designed to be the basis of a beginning theory program with no prerequisites other than demonstrable
performance skill on an instrument and a serious interest in learning more about the nature of music. The course moves
from the basic properties and notation of tone through two or three voice combinations to four-part harmonic writing. An
important part of the course is learning to write music from dictation and reading notation using the solfeggio system.
MUSIC THEORY II (Grades 10, 11, 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Music Theory I
On the second year level, this course is a continuation of Music Theory I elements but on an intermediate to advanced
level. Figured bass symbols are used as they were understood by our musical predecessors to whom they were more
effective prompters of performance than our more specific contemporary notation. This course attempts to describe and
illustrate chromatic usage regarding application, testing, and experimentation.
22
ADVANCED PLACEMENT MUSIC THEORY (Grades 11, 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Music Theory II and Teacher Recommendation
AP Music Theory is a course designed for the potential music major or any musician wishing an in depth exploration of
the harmonic, rhythmic and melodic components of music. The curriculum is similar to that of the Music Theory I & II
courses, but with more emphasis on listening, dictation and sight singing skills. Instruction is geared to the successful
completion of the AP exam given in May. Students must take the AP exam in order to receive AP course credit.
GRAPHIC DESIGN – DIGITAL ILLUSTRATION (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 credits
Prerequisite: None
Students will learn to use Adobe Illustrator, an industry-standard for designers and illustrators. You will learn about the
possibilities and limitations of Adobe Illustrator. Projects will include creating original illustrations, cartoons, logo design,
typography and layout.
GRAPHIC DESIGN – IMAGE DEVELOPMENT (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 credits
Prerequisite: None
Students will learn the art of image manipulation and creation. They will also explore the limitless possibilities that Adobe
Photoshop offers. Projects will include creating original illustrations, correcting damaged photos and developing original
imagery.
GRAPHIC DESIGN – PRINT DESIGN (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 credits
Prerequisite: None
Students will learn Adobe InDesign, an industry-standard tool for creating page layouts for print and digital publications.
Students will design layouts for posters, flyers, brochures, as well as content suited for magazine, newspaper, and book
publication.
GRAPHIC DESIGN – 2D ANIMATION (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 credits
Prerequisite: None
In this class students will learn Adobe Flash Professional to create animations and for digital media. Students will create
original 2-dimensional animations, such as motion graphics, info graphics, and other content for web applications and
mobile phones.
ADVANCED GRAPHICS (Grades 10-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 credits
Prerequisite: Students must have received at least a B in the following classes: Graphic Design – Image Development,
Graphic Design – Digital Illustration and Graphic Design – Print Design
In this class students will have the opportunity to further explore topics in graphic design through more detail oriented and
time intensive projects. This class will also provide the student with portfolio building time.
23
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 credits
Prerequisite: Students must have received at least a B in Graphic Design -Image Development, General Graphics
In this class, students will be introduced to the basic techniques of digital photography. Students will learn how to use the
manual features of their camera as well taking well-composed shots. It is suggested that students bring their own camera if
they have one.
INTRO TO FASHION DESIGN (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 credits
Prerequisite: Students must have received at least a B in Graphic Design–Digital Illustration or General Graphics
In this class students will learn the basics of fashion illustrations, creating mood boards, design research and history of
fashion designers and styles.
ADVERTISING DESIGN (Grades 10-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 credits
Prerequisite: Students must have received at least a B in Graphic Design–Image Development, Graphic Design–Digital
Illustration and Graphic Design–Print Design
This course teaches the conceptual skills to create advertisements and related graphics. We will look at the evolution of
advertising trends, past and present.
DRAWING, PAINTING, AND COLLAGE I (Fall Semester only) (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 credits
Prerequisite: None
This studio course will help students to develop their skills of visual observation, and their drawing and painting skills as a
means of personal expression and communication and will also encourage them to focus on the use of a wide variety of
media to develop a more imaginative approach to image making. Students will keep a personal sketchbook/journal and
will work in a variety of media: pencil, ink, charcoal, pastel, watercolor, tempera paint, etc. Students will apply critical
thinking skills to produce a variety of studio projects that grow out of their study of the elements and principle of design,
visual culture and art history. Found images, photographs, cut paper, and untraditional materials will be layered to create a
complex and rich background for painted and drawn images. Relief printmaking techniques such as block printing may be
included. Students will use mixed media to interpret familiar themes in new and imaginative ways.
DRAWING, PAINTING AND COLLAGE II (Fall Semester only) (Grades 10-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 credits
Prerequisite: Drawing and Painting I
This course is a continuation of Drawing, Painting, and Collage I. It is designed for students who wish to further their
skills in a variety of styles and media. The curriculum includes historical and contemporary issues in drawing, painting,
and collage. Students will continue to keep a sketchbook/journal and work both traditionally and nontraditionally with a
variety of drawing, painting, and collage media.
CERAMICS AND MOSAICS I (Spring Semester only) (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 credits
Prerequisite: None
This studio course will give students the opportunity to learn the basic techniques and processes of Ceramics and Mosaics.
In Ceramics, students will create functional and/or decorative clay pieces using hand building techniques. They will also
decorate and glaze these pieces for firing. Possible projects include mugs, bowls, plates, vases, tiles, and sculptures. In
Mosaics, students will learn how to cut and arrange small pieces of colored glass, china and mirror into designs and
patterns on a wooden support. Grouting and finishing techniques will be demonstrated. Historical Ceramic and Mosaic
works of art will be studied.
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CERAMICS AND MOSAICS II (Spring Semester only) (Grades 10-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 credits
Prerequisite: Ceramics and Mosaics I
This course is a continuation of Ceramics and Mosaics I. It is an opportunity for students to further explore these two
areas. Students will be able to develop mastery of the materials through advanced projects. Historical works of art will be
studied.
INTRODUCTION TO SCULPTURE (Grades 9-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
This course is an introduction to Sculpture techniques and concepts. Students will survey and explore the creation and
processes of sculpture through various materials. Students will use both power equipment and hand tools to execute their
projects.
SCULPTURE II (Grades 10-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Introduction to Sculpture
This course is a continuation of Introduction to Sculpture. Students will further develop their ideas through various media.
Students will use both power equipment and hand tools to execute their projects.
ADVANCED ART II (Grades 10-12)
Full Year, 5.0 credits
Prerequisite: Must have completed at least 2 semesters of art electives or have taken General Art and must have earned a
grade of “B-“ or better in the above courses or receive a teacher recommendation.
Advanced Art II is a course designed to intensify and expand the experiences acquired in all of the semester segments that
are offered. Students at this level will be encouraged to develop their own personal style of expression which will result in
the creation of portfolio quality pieces. Art history and the ideas motivating twentieth century art will be examined in
relation to the student's work. Information on careers, art schools and portfolio preparation will be made available.
ADVANCED ART III (Grades 11-12)
Full Year, 5.0 credits
Prerequisite: Must have earned a grade of a “B-“in Advanced Art II or receive a teacher recommendation.
Projects will encourage the students to develop a focus in an area of specific interest with the goal of developing their
portfolio, based upon a central theme and unifying concept. The student will study works by the masters, concentrating on
their compositions, techniques and expression. They will also examine the major ideas and forces motivating the arts in
the twentieth century. Information on careers, art schools and portfolio preparation will be discussed on an individual
basis.
DRAMA (Grades 10-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
Drama is a one semester course whose focus is the reading, performing and/or viewing of representative plays from
different literary periods. In essence Drama is a theater history course, tracing the evolution of the theater from ancient
Greece to the late 20th century. Students will see drama as an important social institution and trace its development
through the years. Reading and writing skills will be emphasized as students study both the structure and the background
of the various pieces of drama in the course.
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THEATER ARTS (Grades 10-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
Theater Arts is a one semester course whose focus is the practical performance and technical side of theater. In other
words this is a course in acting and technical theater. Students will be expected to perform in front of their peers. They
will participate in improvisational exercises and learn acting and performance techniques. The course will also provide an
introduction to the technical side of theater and the skills involved in directing a play and mounting a theatrical
production.
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HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Grades 9-12)
Credits 3.75
Prerequisite: None
This required course is designed to help students develop skills, attitudes and knowledge in physical fitness, wellness and
problem solving. Units of instruction in the principles of individual and team activities are the means for conveying the
course objective. Students will learn concepts and methods of assessment for their fitness needs, weight control and
nutrition. Fitness evaluations are conducted each year to provide students with an individual needs assessment and
achievement towards national fitness standards.
HEALTH EDUCATION (Grade 9)
Credits 1.25
Prerequisite: None
Ninth grade health is designed so that our young people are given the opportunity to acquire accurate health information.
The emphasis will be to develop healthful behavior. The decision-making process will teach the necessary skills to
examine, analyze and evaluate information to which they are exposed in their daily lives, understanding that decisions
made today have a strong impact on their well-being. Students must pass health to meet the Physical Education &
Health graduation requirement.
DRIVERS EDUCATION (Grade 10)
Credits 1.25
Prerequisite: None
The Driver Education program is designed to develop a basic knowledge of the rules and regulations governing driving
behavior. This includes the development of a corresponding attitude of respect for the dangers that are present in the
ownership and operation of a motor vehicle. A major part of the course is devoted to learning the New Jersey motor
vehicle laws and regulations for the class administered state driver examination. Students must pass Drivers Education to
meet the Physical Education & Health graduation requirement.
HEALTH EDUCATION (Grade 11)
Credits 1.25
Prerequisite: None
Eleventh grade health presents the basic guidelines for first aid. Priorities and appropriate actions will be explained and
techniques for handling common emergency situations are delineated. The students will be given an opportunity to learn
and practice CPR and the Heimlich maneuver. In addition, the students will be provided with current relevant health
information in the areas of substance abuse, addictions, and diseases so that they may make informed intelligent decisions
regarding their own life. Students must pass health to meet the Physical Education & Health graduation requirement.
FAMILY LIVING (Grade 12)
Credits 1.25
Prerequisite: None
Twelfth grade health is designed to help teenagers develop the skills they need to make successful transition from
adolescence into adulthood, marriage and family life. Students are taught to critically evaluate and seek correct health
information. Students must pass Family Living to meet the Physical Education & Health graduation requirement.
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HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Suggested History and Social Sciences Course Sequence
9th Grade
10th Grade
11th Grade
12th Grade
Modern World
History Honors
U.S. History I
Honors
AP U.S.
History II
Elective
Modern
World History
U.S. History I
U.S. History II
Elective
Electives
AP American Government and Politics
AP European History
Contemporary Issues
Government
History & the Hollywood Cinema
Sociology
Economics
Global Perspectives
Holocaust and Genocide
Law and Criminal Justice in America
HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCES COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
MODERN WORLD HISTORY (Grade 9)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
The major focus of this course is to expand awareness and critical thinking while increasing knowledge about the modern
world. The class scope will encompass world activities from the Renaissance epoch to the late 20th century. The course
will promote world citizenship with a study of historical, geographical, political, social, and economic aspects of life
around the world. By reading about world histories and cultures, students will learn to recognize and analyze patterns of
continuity and change. This course places an emphasis upon challenging activities and questions that promote critical
thinking.
MODERN WORLD HISTORY HONORS (Grade 9)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: 8th grade Social Studies with an 8th grade recommendation.
The major focus of this course is to expand awareness and critical thinking while increasing knowledge about the modern
world. The class scope will encompass world activities from the Renaissance epoch to the late 20th century. The course
will attempt to promote world citizenship with a study of historical, geographical, political, social, and economic aspects
of life around the world. By reading about world histories and cultures, students will learn to recognize and analyze
patterns of continuity and change. This course places an emphasis upon challenging activities and questions that promote
critical thinking. Emphasis will be placed upon scholarly readings and work from advanced texts.
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UNITED STATES HISTORY I (Grade 10)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Modern World History
A study of United States History from the Pre-Colonial period through Reconstruction concentrating on the following
general themes: the European-American heritage ,the Native-American heritage, African-American heritage, the role of
women in American history, the Colonial Period, the American Revolution, the Constitutional Era, Jacksonian
Democracy, the Reform Era, Manifest Destiny, the Civil War and Reconstruction. Multi-cultural contributions to
developing American society will be stressed.
UNITED STATES HISTORY I HONORS (Grade 10)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Modern World History Honors or teacher recommendation
A study of United States History from the Pre-Colonial period through Reconstruction concentrating on the following
themes: the European-American heritage, the Native-American heritage, African-American heritage, the role of women in
American history, the Colonial Period, the American Revolution, the Constitutional Era, Jacksonian Democracy, the
Reform Era, Manifest Destiny, the Civil War and Reconstruction. Multi-cultural contributions to developing American
society will be stressed. Emphasis will be placed upon scholarly readings and work from advanced college texts.
UNITED STATES HISTORY II (Grade 11)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: U.S. History I
This course is a continuation of U.S. History I and the content includes a study of United States history from
Industrialization (circa 1860) to the present concentrating on the following general themes: Industrial America. Protest
Movements, Imperialism, the Progressive Movement, the First World War, the Great Depression, F.D.R. and the New
Deal, the Second World War, the Cold War, the Kennedy-Johnson years, the Vietnam War, Post-Watergate foreign and
domestic affairs, and contemporary America. Multi-cultural contributions to American society will be stressed.
Additionally, students are offered the opportunity to work on a curriculum-based community service project.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY II (Grade 11)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Honors U.S. History I or teacher recommendation
This course is a continuation of Honors U.S. History I. The content includes a study of United States history from
Industrialization (circa 1860) to the present concentrating on the following general themes: Industrial America, Protest
Movements, Imperialism, the Progressive Movement, the First World War, the Great Depression, F.D.R. and the New
Deal, the Second World War, the Cold War, the Kennedy-Johnson years, the Vietnam War, Post-Watergate foreign and
domestic affairs, and contemporary America. Emphasis will be placed upon scholarly readings and work from advanced
college level texts. Multi-cultural contributions to American society will be stressed. The purpose of this course is to
prepare the student to take the Advanced Placement U.S. History examination. Consequently, all instruction and learning
is built around the form of the national Advanced Placement examination. Additionally, students are offered the
opportunity to work on a curriculum-based community service project during the year. Student MUST take the AP exam
to earn AP course credit.
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ADVANCED PLACEMENT AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (Grades 11, 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation
This course is designed to educate students about American government and its role within society and their everyday
lives. In addition, students will be expected to express and develop their individual thoughts and ideas as well as begin to
shape their own individual viewpoints. Students will begin their study of government by analyzing the various political
philosophies that have been proposed throughout the ages. Students will determine how these various philosophies have
impacted the development of the representative democracy found within the United States. Students will continue their
governmental studies through the intense examination of American government. This examination will include the study
of the three governmental branches as well as their overall powers and functions. Finally, students will analyze the
individual rights as guaranteed by the Constitution of the United States as well as discuss the overall limits to our
freedoms. Students MUST take the AP exam to earn AP credit within the class.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT EUROPEAN HISTORY (Grades11, 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation
The study of European history since 1450 introduces students to cultural, economic, political and social developments that
played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which they live. Without this knowledge, we would lack the context for
understanding the development of contemporary institutions, the role of continuity and change in present-day society and
politics and the evolution of current forms of artistic expression and intellectual discourse. In addition to providing a basic
narrative of events and movements, the goals of AP European History are to develop (a) an understanding of some of the
principle themes in modern European history, (b) an ability to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretation,
and (c) an ability to express historical understanding in writing. Student MUST take the AP exam to earn AP course
credit.
CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (Grades 10-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
In this one semester elective course, students will examine various dynamic issues facing today’s world, whether as a
citizen of the United States or as a member of the world community at large. This examination will enable them to
discover their values and responsibilities as citizens in that society. Major historical, social, cultural, political, and
economic issues in contemporary United States history will be highlighted in this course.
GOVERNMENT (Grades 11, 12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
This one semester course focuses on modern world governments and how each functions. An emphasis is placed upon an
analysis of the government of the United States and how the framework of the Constitution allows for a system of check
and balances among the executive, legislative, and judicial branches. Another focus of the course is a study of the
functions and authority of local, county, state, and federal governments. A portion of the course will be devoted to an
analysis of modern governments throughout the world, including socialist, communist, fascist, and representative regimes.
HISTORY & THE HOLLYWOOD CINEMA (Grades 11, 12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
This one semester course examines “historical” commercial films as they are presented to modern moviegoers. Students
will learn to question what they see on the screen. Sorting through the hype for the accurate historical content and
assessing the value of a film will be done through critical movie viewing, and research and analysis of primary and
secondary sources
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SOCIOLOGY (Grades 10-12)
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
This one semester introductory course focuses the social science discipline of Sociology. Sociology is the study of the
interaction of individuals with one another and in groups. Topics include deviance and conformity, social class, global
stratification, race and ethnicity, sports, gender, age, the family, education, religion, politics and urbanization. Emphasis
will be placed on understanding the social forces that shape our changing world.
ECONOMICS (Grade 10-12) NOT OFFERED IN THE 2013-2014 SCHOOL YEAR
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
The world is faced with the ever difficult task of managing its limited resources. Such issues impact the daily lives of
every member of the global population. The study of economics is an exploration of how scarce resources are allocated.
Students will investigate how economics simultaneously influences, and is influenced by, local, national, and international
issues. This one semester survey course will explore economic issues including supply and demand, business cycles,
inflation and deflation, money supply, trade, monopolies and oligarchies, fiscal policy, banking, technology, and
globalization. The course will culminate in a class competition designed to address the real-world economic problems
analyzed during the semester.
HOLOCAUST AND GENOCIDE (Grade 11, 12) NOT OFFERED IN THE 2013-2014 SCHOOL YEAR
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
Holocaust and Genocide focuses on the impact of inhumanity throughout the history of the world. This one semester
course will trace the history of Genocide in Modern Society and the impact these events have had on policy and overall
societal tolerance. The course will have a primary focus on the inhumane behavior displayed in Nazi Germany before and
during World War II. The class will initially study of the roots of anti-Semitism in Europe. This will be followed by a
study of the philosophy, literature, propaganda and economic circumstances that conditioned the German populace for
acceptance of Anti-Semitic policies. After intensive study of this event, the course will demonstrate that genocide has
occurred in multiple places throughout the world in the modern era. The course will explore genocides such as the
Armenian genocide, the genocide of American Indians and the Rwandan Genocide. The class will conclude by discussing
if it is possible to eliminate events such as these or if this type of behavior is implicit within human society.
GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES (Grades 10, 11, 12) NOT OFFERED IN THE 2013-2014 SCHOOL YEAR
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
In this one semester survey course, students will investigate the regions and concerns of the modern world. The intention
is for the student to gain a deeper understanding and respect for cultural differences in an increasingly global world.
Students taking this course will have an opportunity to become more familiar with current world issues through
discussions, cooperative learning, analytical and research writing, and individual or group-based projects and research.
Active participation is a vital component of this class.
LAW AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE IN AMERICA (Grades 11, 12) NOT OFFERED IN THE 2013-2014 SCHOOL YEAR
1 Semester, 2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
This is a one semester course whose focus is designed to familiarize students with the basic concepts and vocabulary of
the modern American legal system. Topics include the overall criminal justice system, juvenile justice system, civil law,
contract law, consumer law, juvenile law, family law, and Constitutional law. Activities include familiarization with the
trial process through the use of mock trial simulations, the analysis of major U.S. court cases, and interviewing guest
speakers (i.e., lawyers, judges and members of the law enforcement community).
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MATHEMATICS
Suggested Mathematics Course Sequence
Grade 9
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Pre-Calculus and
Trigonometry
Algebra I
College Prep
Algebra II
College Prep
Geometry
College Prep
College Algebra/
Trigonometry
AP Statistics
Elective
AP Calculus
AB or BC
Geometry
Algebra II
Honors
Pre-Calculus/
Trig Honors
AP Statistics
Honors
Elective
Algebra II
AP
Statistics
Pre-Calculus/
Trig Honors
Honors
AP Calculus
AB or BC
Electives
Discrete Math
Fundamentals of Computer Science
AP Computer Science
Honors Advanced Topics in Computer Science
Software Engineering: Mobile Devices
Software Engineering: Game Development
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Elective
MATHEMATICS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ALGEBRA I COLLEGE PREP (Grade 9)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: 8th Grade Mathematics
In this course students have the opportunity to develop a solid foundation in Algebra. Students will learn how to utilize
and analyze algebraic concepts leading to a deeper understanding of mathematics and stronger critical thinking skills.
Topics for this course include Number Sense and Operations, Algebraic Expressions, Linear Functions, Linear Equations
and Inequalities, Non-Linear Relationships and Data and Statistical Analysis. Graphing calculators will be an important
tool that will routinely be used in instruction.
GEOMETRY COLLEGE PREP (Grades 9, 10)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Algebra I College Prep
This course is designed to enhance students’ prior knowledge of geometric topics. This course will deepen student
understanding of geometric concepts leading to the ability to prove geometric theorems. Topics for this course include:
Congruence, Proofs, Constructions, Similarity, Right Triangles and Trigonometry, Circles, Expressing Geometric
Properties with Equations, Geometric Measurement and Dimension, and Geometric Modeling. The course is designed to
promote inquiry learning in which students have the ability to discover geometric concepts.
GEOMETRY HONORS (Grades 9, 10)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: 8th Grade Algebra I or teacher recommendation
This course is designed to enhance and enrich students’ prior knowledge of geometric topics. This course will deepen
student understanding of geometric concepts leading to the ability to prove geometric theorems. Topics for this course
include: Congruence, Proofs, Constructions, Similarity, Right Triangles and Trigonometry, Circles, Expressing Geometric
Properties with Equations, Geometric Measurement and Dimension, and Geometric Modeling. The course is designed to
promote inquiry learning in which students have the ability to discover geometric concepts.
ALGEBRA II COLLEGE PREP (Grades 10, 11, 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Geometry College Prep
This course is designed to enhance the concepts developed in Algebra I College Prep A and Geometry College Prep A.
Students will continue to improve their ability to model situations and solve a variety of equations including linear,
quadratic, rational and radical. Topics for this course include: Polynomial, Rational and Radical Relationships,
Trigonometric Functions, and Conics. Graphing calculators will be an important tool that will routinely be used in
instruction.
ALGEBRA II HONORS (Grades 9, 10, 11)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: 8th Grade Geometry, Geometry Honors, or teacher recommendation
This course is designed to enrich the concepts developed in Honors Algebra I and Honors Geometry. Students will
continue to improve their ability to model situations and solve a variety of equations including linear, quadratic, rational
and radical. Topics for this course include: Polynomial, Rational and Radical Relationships, Trigonometric Functions,
and Conics. Graphing calculators will be an important tool that will routinely be used in instruction.
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COLLEGE ALGEBRA/TRIGONOMETRY (Grades 11, 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Algebra II College Prep
This course is designed for students who have completed Algebra II, but are not planning on continuing their math
education after high school. This course will cover topics in a standard college-level Algebra course, including Linear,
Quadratic, Polynomial, Exponential and Logarithmic Functions, Transformations, Sequences and Series, Systems,
Absolute Value and Basic Matrices. These topics will be put in the context of real world applications. Graphing
calculators will be an important tool that will routinely be used in instruction.
PRE-CALCULUS/TRIGONOMETRY (Grades 11, 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Algebra II College Prep
This course is designed to enhance students’ preparation for Calculus in high school or college. The course will focus on
improving students’ knowledge of trigonometric and other types of functions, including polynomial, rational, exponential
and logarithmic functions. Other topics include: Analytic Trigonometry, Applications of Trigonometry, Sequences and
Series, Conic Sections, Parametric Equations, Polar Coordinates, Limits, Probability and Statistics. Much of this course
involves real-world applications and mathematical modeling. Graphing calculators will be an important tool that will
routinely be used in instruction.
PRE-CALCULUS/TRIGONOMETRY HONORS (Grades 11, 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Algebra II Honors or teacher recommendation
This course is designed to enhance students’ preparation for Honors and AP Calculus. The course will focus on improving
students’ knowledge of trigonometric and other types of functions, including polynomial, rational, exponential and
logarithmic functions. Other topics include: Analytic Trigonometry, Applications of Trigonometry, Sequences and Series,
Conic Sections, Parametric Equations, Polar Coordinates, Limits, Probability and Statistics. Much of this course involves
real-world applications and mathematical modeling. Graphing calculators will be an important tool that will routinely be
used in instruction.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS AB (Grades 11, 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Minimum of a C in Honors Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry or teacher recommendation
This is a college-level course which follows the College Board’s AP Calculus AB Course Description. Two central
concepts are introduced: the Derivative, and the Integral. Through these concepts the course unites and generalizes the
student’s prior four years of study Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, and Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry. AP Calculus AB is
equivalent to a college Calculus I course. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement exam in May to earn
course credit. A score of 4 or 5 on the exam will generally earn the student one course of college credit and placement
into a college Calculus II course. The course is particularly well-suited for students who wish to study college-level
Calculus in high school, but whose expected undergraduate course of study may not require Calculus II. Graphing
calculators will be routinely used throughout the course.
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ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS BC (Grades 11, 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Minimum of a C in Honors Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry or teacher recommendation
This is a college-level course which follows the College Board’s AP Calculus BC Course Description. Two central
concepts are introduced: the Derivative, and the Integral. Additional topics which extend the AP Calculus AB course are
also studied. The course unites and generalizes the student’s prior four years of study Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry,
and Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry, and is equivalent to Calculus I and Calculus II in college. Students are required to take
the Advanced Placement exam in May to earn course credit. A score of 4 or 5 on the exam will generally earn the student
two courses of college credit and placement into a college Calculus III (Multivariate Calculus) course. The course is
particularly well-suited for students who wish to study college-level Calculus in high school, and whose expected
undergraduate course of study requires Calculus I and Calculus II. Examples of such courses of study are: Engineering,
Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics, and Biological Sciences. Graphing calculators will be routinely used throughout the
course.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT STATISTICS (Grades 10, 11, 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Minimum of a C in Algebra II College Prep or teacher recommendation
This course is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Statistics Exam. This course is for students that
have completed Algebra II and possess sufficient mathematical maturity and quantitative reasoning ability. The topics for
this course have been organized into four conceptual themes: Exploring Data, Sampling and Experimentation,
Anticipating Patterns, and Statistical Inference. Graphing calculators will be an important tool that will routinely be used
in instruction.
CONSUMER MATHEMATICS I, II, III (Grades 9-12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: CST Recommendation
This course is designed to teach students the mathematical literacy needed as citizens and consumers in society. Students
will be exposed to a variety of consumer topics related to real fife situations. Students will study topics such as banking,
personal finance, sales tax, calculating wages, automobile loans, credit cards, interest rates, etc. Targeted skills and
concepts will be reinforced throughout the units using drill and practice activities and culminating math projects.
MATH LAB (Grade 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Scores Partially Proficient on the HSPA
Math Lab is designed for students who have fallen below the state minimum testing standards. Skill development will
occur through the utilization of small group instruction. The overall aim of this course is not only to develop student
proficiency for testing purposes, but to make these students more mathematically literate and better able to meet the
demands of society.
DISCRETE MATH AND DECISION MAKING
Full Year, 5 credits
Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry
This course is designed to teach students how to effectively make decisions using non-traditional discrete mathematics
topics. These topics will include probability, game strategies, voting/fair decision methods, optimization, and network
analysis. Other topics such as cryptology and fractals may be introduced. This course is recommended to be taken
independently as a fourth year math elective or to be taken in conjunction with a traditional math course.
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FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SCIENCE
1 Semester, 2.5 credits
Prerequisite: None
Students learn the fundamentals of software engineering. Students will design, code, and test computer programs using the
Alice programming language. Alice is an innovative 3D programming environment developed by Carnegie Mellon
University in which beginner students can create an animation to tell a story, to create an interactive game, or to create a
working model a real-world situation. Alice uses 3D graphics and a drag-and-drop interface to facilitate a more engaging,
less frustrating introduction to Computer Science.
AP COMPUTER SCIENCE DE
Full Year, 5 credits
Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Computer Science or Supervisor Approval
Students will use the Java programming language to learn object-oriented programming with a concentration on problem
solving and algorithm development. This course is aligned with the College Board’s Advanced Placement Computer
Science A course and examination and is the equivalent of a first-semester college-level course in Computer Science.
Students will write, run and debug object-oriented software, develop and select appropriate algorithms and data structures
to solve problems, and learn to read and understand large programs consisting of many software components. Student
must take the AP exam to earn AP course credit.
HONORS ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
Full Year, 5 credits
Prerequisite: AP Computer Science
This course uses an interdisciplinary approach, where students apply their computer science knowledge to solve realworld problems in other disciplines. The course highlights the role of computing in applied mathematics, engineering, the
physical and biological sciences, finance, and computer science itself, emphasizing how these disciplines are intertwined
in the modern world. Students will apply their knowledge of software engineering developed in prior computer science
courses to solve “classic” problems in these disciplines. Students will also learn how to use more advanced data structures
and algorithms in solving these problems.
SOFTWARE ENGINEERING: MOBILE DEVICES
1 Semester, 2.5 credits
Prerequisite: Honors Advanced Topics in Computer Science
This course introduces mobile application development for the Android platform. Students will learn skills for creating
and deploying Android applications, with particular emphasis on software engineering topics including software
architecture, software process, usability, and deployment. Students will create and deploy an Android application as the
culminating activity of the course.
SOFTWARE ENGINEERING: GAME DEVELOPMENT
1 Semester, 2.5 credits
Prerequisite: Honors Advanced Topics in Computer Science
Students will use software engineering skills developed in prior coursework to develop 2-D and 3-D games. Computer
game development requires many facets of Computer Science, including Computer Graphics, Algorithms, Data
Structures, Networking, and Human-Computer Interaction. It also requires knowledge of other disciplines including
Economics, Mathematics, Physics, and Psychology. Students will create and deploy 2-D or 3-D game as the culminating
activity of the course.
36
SCIENCE
Suggested Science Course Sequence
Grade 9
Biology
Grade 9
Grade 11
Grade 10
Grade 12
Physics
Environmental
Science
Environmental
Science
Physics
Chemistry
Grade 11
Grade 10
Grade 12
Chemistry
AP*
Biology
Honors
Chemistry
Honors
Physics
Honors
Biology AP*
Physics AP
Grade 9
Biology
Honors
Grade 11
Grade 10
Chemistry
Honors
Physics
Honors
AND
AND
Biology AP*
Chemistry
AP*
Grade 12
Physics AP
Environmental
Science
*These courses may be taken in 10th or 11th grade if the student meets all the prerequisite requirements.
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SCIENCE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
BIOLOGY (Grade 9)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: None
This course is designed to satisfy the benchmarks set forth by New Jersey End of Course Biology Exam. Biology is the
study of living organisms using an inquiry approach. Through the use of laboratory techniques, class discussions,
cooperative learning, current events and independent work, the student will develop an appreciation and understanding of
the following modern biological concepts: microscopy, biochemistry, genetics, evolution, taxonomy, microbiology,
animal and plant anatomy and physiology, and ecology.
BIOLOGY HONORS (Grade 9)
6 Credits
Prerequisite: Minimum of an A- in 8th grade Science or teacher recommendation
This course is designed to exceed the benchmarks set forth by New Jersey End of Course Biology Exam. The Honors
Biology program is designed to introduce students to the ever changing, complex, and fascinating principles of biology.
Students are expected to demonstrate an outstanding work ethic and solid performance in the comprehension of scientific
reading material, analysis of data, and performance of laboratory experiments. Students are also expected to conduct
independent research on a topic of their choice that is related to a current biological event.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY (Grades 10, 11, 12)
6 Credits
Prerequisite: Minimum of a C in Biology Honors or teacher recommendation
Advanced Placement Biology is a course designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory biology
course which is usually taken by biology majors during their first year in college. A major goal is to provide the students
with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, critical thinking skills, analytical skills, and laboratory experience that
will enhance their understanding of biological principals. AP students must possess an extraordinary work ethic and solid
performance in the comprehension of scientific reading material such as published articles, text, and laboratory protocols.
The course given at VHS follows the syllabus of the AP Biology Committee of the College Board. Students must take AP
exam in order to receive AP course credit.
CHEMISTRY (Grades 10, 11, 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Algebra I College Prep
The purpose of the course is to prepare students who plan to pursue non-science careers for college level chemistry. This
course analyzes the important role that chemistry will play in their personal and professional lives. Students will learn to
use principles of chemistry to think more intelligently about current issues involving science and technology. The course
emphasizes basic chemical principles, develops basic laboratory skills, and has the students learn problem solving
methods. The course stands alone as a basic study, but serves as a foundation for future science courses.
CHEMISTRY HONORS (Grades 10, 11, 12)
6 Credits
Prerequisite: Biology Honors or teacher recommendation
The Honors level of Chemistry is a faster paced, more math-intensive version of the Chemistry course. The students will
learn facts, formulas and principles of chemistry as well as how to apply them to their world. They will come to
understand the reason why the facts, formulas and principles exist as they continue to develop critical thinking and
problem-solving skills, for use in chemistry, science and life.
38
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY (Grades 11, 12)
6 Credits
Prerequisite: Minimum of a C in Chemistry Honors or teacher recommendation
Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry exposes students to college level Chemistry curriculum. The course moves at a very
fast, demanding pace and is very math intensive. The students are challenged with complex problems on a variety of
topics, both in the laboratory and in the classroom. The course is designed to maximize the students' chances to pass the
AP Chemistry examination; passing this test can earn students up to 8 college credits toward General Chemistry, fulfilling
a core college requirement. Students must take AP exam in order to receive AP course credit.
PHYSICS (Grades 11, 12)
6 Credits
Prerequisites: Algebra I College Prep and Geometry College Prep
This course presents the basic concepts of physics in a logical sequence. The organization of the text and the style of the
writing are designed to meet the needs of today's students without compromising content. A fully integrated laboratory
sequence follows the course so that the students engage in scientific discovery through their own experiments. Physics
satisfies the requirements for a college preparatory program.
PHYSICS HONORS (Grades 11, 12)
6 Credits
Prerequisites: Algebra I College Prep and Geometry College Prep
This course presents the concepts and the mathematics of physics in a logical sequence. The organization of the text and
the style of the writing are designed to meet the needs of today's student without compromising precision or content. A
fully integrated laboratory sequence follows the course so that the students engage in scientific discovery through their
own experiments. Physics Honors satisfies the requirements for a college preparatory program.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS C (Grade 12)
6 Credits
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus and Physics Honors or teacher recommendation
This course provides a systematic introduction to the main principles of physics and emphasizes the development of
conceptual understanding and problem-solving ability using Trigonometry and Calculus. This course focuses on a wide
range of topics including: Kinetics; Newton’s Law of Motion; Work, Energy and Power; Systems of Particles and Linear
Momentum; Circular Motion and Rotation; and Oscillations and Gravitation. The course given at VHS follows the
syllabus of AP Physics C as prescribed by the College Board. Students must take the AP Exam in order to receive AP
course credit.
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (Grades 10, 11, 12)
6 Credits
Prerequisite: Biology
Environmental Science carefully analyzes the various interactions that are taking place between modern humans and their
environment. Special emphasis is placed on our need for and use of energy and mineral resources. The course develops
the ecosystem concept and the basic laws that govern energy/resources use. It examines our traditional energy sources and
consumption patterns and then analyzes our current supply-demand situation. Finally, our alternatives for the future are
carefully considered. In addition, the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of large-scale energy development and
mineral use are examined. The role played by government, industry, international policies and the individual in the
energy/resource/environmental system are all considered. Emphasis is placed on direct student involvement in specially
designed and classroom tested lab-type activities.
39
WORLD LANGUAGE
Recommended World Language Course Sequence
9th Grade
10th Grade
11th Grade
Level I
Level II
Level III
Level II
Level III
Honors
Level IV
12th Grade
Honors
Level IV
Level V
Advanced
Placement
WORLD LANGUAGE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
FRENCH I (Grades 9-12)
Credits 5
Prerequisite: None
This course is an introduction to the French language and culture, emphasizing the four skills of listening, speaking,
reading and writing. The language is presented within the context of the contemporary French-speaking world and its
culture. In addition to a textbook, technology will be used to enhance the topics covered. Students will learn to perform a
variety of language functions: to list, to ask questions, to describe, to give and follow directions, to narrate and to express
opinions. These functions will be incorporated in a variety of contexts, for example, at home, in school, at work, when
traveling, while shopping and playing. Students will be able to perform these tasks with an appropriate level of accuracy
using interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes.
FRENCH II (Grades 9, 10, 11, 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: French I or for entering HBW students, teacher recommendation based on student assessment
This course will continue to emphasize the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing which were begun in
Level I. Constant reentry of past lessons will be part of each new lesson. Technology will be used to enhance the topics
covered. Topics covered in this course include household items, entertainment, sports and health, weekend activities,
physical and character description of others and oneself. The use of past, present, and future tenses are reinforced
throughout the year. Many of the class activities incorporate cooperative practice and critical thinking, as well as,
opportunities to develop multicultural awareness through the study of the regions of France and French speaking
countries.
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FRENCH III Grades 10, 11, 12)
5 Credits
Prerequisite: French II
This course will continue to encourage students to develop fluency in the language by maintaining their focus on the
message being communicated utilizing the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. In addition to structure,
the course affords the student the opportunity to compare French and American cultures through the study of the
geography and customs of the French speaking African countries. Topics covered in this course include house and home,
clothes and accessories, travel and vacations. Several new tenses will be learned including the conditional and the
subjunctive. Many of the class activities incorporate cooperative practice and critical thinking, as well as, opportunities to
practice reading comprehension skills through the use of short stories and a novel.
FRENCH IV Honors (Grades 11, 12)
Credits 5
Prerequisite: French III
This course provides a continuing study of the French language and culture presented within the context of the
contemporary French-speaking world. Attainment of proficiency of the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and
writing are emphasized with materials including a textbook, a twentieth century novel, CDs and DVDs. In addition to
structure, the course introduces students to the impressionist movement and its’ artists. Topics covered in this course
include physical descriptions of people and objects, the environment and its protection, shopping and services provided at
various establishments, national and international travel, occupations and education, health issues and how they are being
solved in different French speaking countries. Students will continue to describe events using idiomatic expressions as
well as past, present, and future tenses; expand on their use of the subjunctive mood and be able to recognize and
comprehend the written past tense in a literary work. Critical thinking skills will be reinforced through the writing of the
thematic essays during the year.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT FRENCH V (Grade 12)
Credits 5
Prerequisite: French IV Honors
This course provides a continuing study of the French language and culture presented within the context of the
contemporary French-speaking world. Attainment of proficiency of the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and
writing are emphasized with materials including several textbooks, novels, CDs and DVDs. This course is designed to
allow students to gain deeper insight into the nature and structure of the French language and literature of the French
speaking countries. The course emphasizes knowledge of the works as required by the Advanced Placement reading list,
the ability to interpret literary texts, and the refined and sophisticated use of the French language. Students must take AP
exam in order to receive AP course credit.
SPANISH I (Grades 9-12)
Credits 5
Prerequisite: None.
This course is an introduction to the Spanish language and culture, emphasizing the four skills of listening, speaking,
reading and writing. The language is presented within the context of the contemporary Spanish-speaking world and its
culture. In addition to a textbook, technology will be used to enhance the topics covered. Students will learn to perform a
variety of language functions: to list, to ask questions, to describe, to give and follow directions, to narrate and to express
opinions. These functions will be incorporated in a variety of contexts, for example, at home, in school, at work, when
traveling, while shopping and playing. Students will be able to perform these tasks with an appropriate level of accuracy
using interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes.
41
SPANISH II (Grades 9-12)
Credits 5
Prerequisite: Spanish I or for entering HBW students.
This course will continue to emphasize the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing which were begun in
Level I. Constant reentry of past lessons will be part of each new lesson. Technology will be used to enhance the
topics covered. Students will learn to perform a variety of language functions: Discuss leisure time, comment on travel,
comment on food, talk about the past, discuss fine art, express activity preferences, and to ask for and give information.
These functions will be performed in a variety of contexts for example, at home, in school, at work, when traveling, while
shopping and playing. Students will be able to perform these tasks with an appropriate level of accuracy using
interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes.
SPANISH III (Grades 9-12)
Credits 5
Prerequisite: Spanish II
This course will continue to encourage students to develop fluency in the language by maintaining their focus on the
message being communicated utilizing the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Technology will be used
to enhance the topics covered. Students will learn to perform a variety of language functions: Describe childhood
experiences, narrate in the past, talk about present and past activities in progress, talk about daily routine, and to tell
someone what to do. Students will be able to perform and apply all language skills tasks with an appropriate level of
accuracy using interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes. Writing continues to be presented as a process that
develops writing skills along a competency continuum that moves them into a cohesive essay stage. The use of
audiovisuals motivates students to use their critical thinking skills and to make cross-cultural comparisons.
SPANISH IV HONORS (Grades 11, 12)
Credits 5
Prerequisite: Spanish III
A content based approach to teaching advanced level Spanish. The course provides multiple levels of authentic
comprehensible input through three types of readings: historical, literary, and journalistic. Learning activities are designed
to motivate students and to foster the use of critical thinking skills. The development of listening, speaking, reading, and
writing skills accommodate students' different learning styles. Students will learn to perform a variety of language
functions: Talk about health and illness, give advice, talk about travel, persuade and make suggestions to others, make
future plans, talk about how to solve a problem, and talk about nature and the environment. Students will be able to
perform these tasks with an appropriate level of accuracy using interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes.
Writing continues to be presented as a process that develops writing skills along a competency continuum that moves
them into a cohesive essay stage. There is an active discovery of culture using critical thinking to compare and contrast,
predict and question. People and events are described in the context of the past, the present, and the future so students not
only gain insight into Hispanic cultures and civilizations, but also achieve a more global understanding of the issues these
people and their countries face now and in the future. The course is conducted almost entirely in Spanish.
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ADVANCED PLACEMENT SPANISH V (Grade 12)
Credits 5
Prerequisite: Spanish IV Honors
This course will use a content-based approach to teaching advanced level Spanish. The course provides students the tools
to develop a strong command of the language in all language skills in order to communicate with native speakers at a
natural pace, with a variety of regional pronunciations, in both informal and formal contexts. Students are exposed to a
variety of authentic level appropriate readings, audiovisuals, and realia. Students are required to express themselves with
reasonable and sustained fluency in oral and written expression utilizing strategies learned. Learning activities are
designed to motivate students, to foster the use of critical thinking skills, and to promote mastering of listening, speaking,
reading, and writing skills. All four skills are combined in order to demonstrate understanding of authentic Spanishlanguage source materials. Learning activities closely reflect the format of the AP language exam. The Advanced
Placement Program prepares students to take the AP Spanish language examination as a possible means of obtaining
advanced standings or credit at the college level. Students must take the AP exam in order to receive AP course credit.
The course is conducted almost entirely in Spanish.
MANDARIN I (Grades 9-12) (Will not be offered during the 2013-2014 school year)
Credits 5
Prerequisite: None
This course focuses on developing a working vocabulary as well as the ability to produce meaningful communication. A
variety of activities will be used such as role-plays, skits, celebrations of holidays, and collages. The aim of this course is
for the student to develop skills in the three communicative language modes by being able to understand, converse,
interact, and present oral and written products in Mandarin. Opportunities to learn about and explore Chinese culture are
also emphasized throughout the course.
MANDARIN II (Grades 9, 10, 11, 12)
Credits 5
Prerequisite: Mandarin I or for entering HBW students, teacher recommendation based on student assessment
The goals of this course are to continue to develop the ability to communicate in Mandarin in a meaningful way, to
continue to increase the student’s appreciation of the Chinese culture, and to increase language fluency. By using the three
communicative modes;: interpretive, interpersonal and presentational, the student will be able to understand, converse,
interact and present using oral and written orally and literarily in Mandarin. Grammar and vocabulary learned in Mandarin
I-New are briefly reviewed. The expectation is that the student has established a firm language foundation during
Mandarin I-New.
MANDARIN III (Grades 10, 11, 12)
Credits 5
Prerequisite: Mandarin II
Mandarin III continues to emphasize the development of the three communication modes: interpretive, interpersonal and
presentational, but at a much higher level. The use of audio-visual aids, classroom activities, projects and texts continues
to strengthen understanding, speaking and the knowledge of grammatical structures. Students will learn thematic
vocabulary relevant to practical everyday life situations. Customs and culture are reflected in festival and culture-related
activities.
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MANDARIN IV Honors (Grades 11, 12)
Credits 5
Prerequisite: Mandarin III
Mandarin IV Honors-New continues to emphasize the student development of the three modes of communication:
interpretive, interpersonal and presentational. Students are expected to be able to complete assignments using more
complex diction. Students will be expected to participate in oral presentations, class discussions, and forums. In addition,
character writing will be further developed through increased practice and drills. Explored topics are relevant to aspects of
student lives. A more critical comparison of American and Chinese cultures is emphasized.
AP CHINESE LANGUAGE AND CULTURE V (Grade 12)
Credits 5
Prerequisite: Mandarin IV Honors
Advanced Placement Mandarin is designed to provide the student with an intellectual challenge through the advanced
study of language. While literature is included in the course, the emphasis is on composition and conversation. This
course is comparable in both content and difficulty to a college-level Mandarin language course. The course seeks to
develop language skills that can be applied to various activities and disciplines rather than the mastery of any specific
subject matter. Students must take AP exam in order to receive AP course credit.
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