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Copyright © 2010 by Ed Bott, Carl Siechert, and Craig Stinson
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Contents
Contentsatata Glance
a Glance
Part 1: Getting Started
Chapter 1
What’s New in Windows 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Chapter 2
Installing and Configuring Windows 7. . . . . . . . 21
Chapter 3
Obtaining Help and Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Chapter 4
Personalizing Windows 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Chapter 5
Adding, Removing, and Managing
Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Chapter 6
Using Internet Explorer 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Chapter 7
Adding Windows Live Programs
and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
Part 2: File Management
Chapter 13
Sharing and Syncing Digital Media. . . . . . . . . 441
Chapter 14
Using Windows Media Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . 463
Part 4: Security and Networking
Chapter 15
Security Essentials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 497
Chapter 16
Managing User Accounts, Passwords,
and Logons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 543
Chapter 17
Setting Up a Small Office or
Home Network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 585
Chapter 18
Sharing and Managing Network
Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 615
Chapter 19
Fixing and Tweaking Your Network. . . . . . . . 667
Chapter 8
Organizing Files and Information. . . . . . . . . . 267
Part 5: Tuning, Tweaking, and
Troubleshooting
Chapter 9
Using Windows Search. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307
Chapter 20
Tuning Up and Monitoring Performance . . . . 703
Chapter 10
Advanced File Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337
Chapter 21
Performing Routine Maintenance. . . . . . . . . . 739
Chapter 11
Backup, Restore, and Recovery. . . . . . . . . . . . . 375
Chapter 22
Using Advanced System Management
Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 763
Part 3: Digital Media
Chapter 12
Playing and Organizing Digital
Media Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407
Chapter 23
Troubleshooting Windows Errors
and Crashes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 811
v
vi
Contents at a Glance
Part 6: Windows and Your PC
Appendixes
Chapter 24
Setting Up and Configuring Hardware . . . . . . 855
Appendix A
Windows 7 Editions at a Glance . . . . . . . . . . . 947
Chapter 25
Managing Disks and Drives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 895
Appendix B
Working with the Command Prompt. . . . . . . . 955
Chapter 26
Using Pen, Touch, and Voice Input. . . . . . . . . . 923
Table of Contents
Foreword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi
Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxiii
Conventions and Features Used in This Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxv
Text Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxv
Design Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxv
About the CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvii
What’s on the CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvii
System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvii
Support Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxviii
Part 1: Getting Started
Chapter 1
What’s New in Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Introducing the Windows 7 Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Adjusting to the Windows 7 Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Organizing and Finding Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Saving, Sharing, and Playing Digital Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Networking in New Ways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Keeping Your PC Speedy and Safe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Using Internet Explorer 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Chapter 2
Installing and Configuring Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Before You Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Know Your Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Avoiding Software Compatibility Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Backing Up Data and Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performing a Clean Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setup and Your Hard Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Upgrading a Previous Windows Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating and Configuring a Multiboot System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21
23
24
25
25
27
36
40
43
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vii
viii
Table of Contents
Upgrading from Another Windows 7 Edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing and Updating Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Activating and Validating Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering a Product Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Activating a Retail Copy of Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Activation Requirements for OEM Installations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Product Activation and Corporate Licensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dealing with Product Validation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Transferring Files and Settings from Another Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Making a Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choosing What to Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Restoring Files and Settings on Your New Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tweaking and Tuning Your Windows Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjust Basic Display Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Update the Windows Experience Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Check Your System’s Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Test Network and Internet Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjust Windows Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choose Default Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Personalize Power and Sleep Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fine-Tune System Protection Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create Additional User Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set Up a Regular Backup Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 3
Obtaining Help and Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Using Windows Help And Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ensuring Access to Online Help Topics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Browsing Through Windows Help And Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching for Help Topics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting to Another PC with Windows Remote Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Remote Assistance Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Asking for Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Offering Remote Assistance via DCOM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working in a Remote Assistance Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Remote Assistance with Earlier Windows Versions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maintaining Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Improving Remote Assistance Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 4
50
52
53
54
55
58
59
59
60
62
64
67
69
69
70
71
72
72
74
75
75
76
76
78
79
81
81
82
83
87
92
93
96
96
97
Personalizing Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Working with the New Taskbar and Start Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Opening and Monitoring Programs from Taskbar Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Opening Programs from the Start Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Jump Lists on the Taskbar and Start Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Personalizing the Taskbar and Start Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Taskbar’s Appearance and Behavior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controlling How Notifications Appear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Personalizing the Start Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
100
100
105
107
109
109
114
116
Chapter 5
Table of Contents
ix
Mastering Window Management with Windows 7 Tricks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resizing and Moving Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing the Desktop and Gadgets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Switching Between Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Personalizing Theme Elements: Visuals and Sounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing the Desktop Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Colors and Modifying Color Schemes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Sounds for Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choosing a Screen Saver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing Mouse Pointers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Desktop Icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving, Sharing, and Finding Theme Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Your Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Screen Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring a Multimonitor Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Making Text Easier to Read . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Font Smoothing to Make Text Easier on the Eyes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calibrating Your Display’s Colors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using and Customizing Desktop Gadgets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Power and Sleep Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting a Power Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing a Power Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding Sleep States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjusting Ease of Access Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
121
121
124
125
125
127
130
133
134
135
137
139
140
140
141
143
145
146
146
148
149
150
151
151
153
Adding, Removing, and Managing Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Dealing with User Account Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dealing with Compatibility Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running Legacy Applications in Windows XP Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Downloading and Installing Windows XP Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running Windows XP Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharing Data with Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharing Devices with Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Windows Virtual PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Programs on 64-Bit Editions of Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Startup Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controlling Startup Programs with the System Configuration Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Running Programs and Processes with Windows Task Manager . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running a Program as an Administrator or Another User . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Uninstalling Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Default Programs, File Type Associations, and AutoPlay Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Default Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing File Type Associations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Program Access and Computer Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Turning Windows Features On or Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting AutoPlay Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
158
160
164
164
165
167
169
169
170
170
172
173
176
178
179
180
181
183
187
188
189
x
Table of Contents
Chapter 6
Using Internet Explorer 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Choosing a Default Web Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Browsing with Internet Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Home Page(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the Command Bar and Menu Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Compatibility View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Tabs and Tab Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finding Your Way Back to Familiar Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Zooming In or Out to Make Text Readable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Favorites and the Favorites Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with RSS Feeds and Web Slices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Personalizing Internet Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding, Removing, and Managing Search Providers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Accelerators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Toolbars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing and Troubleshooting Add-ons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using (or Refusing) AutoComplete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Security and Privacy Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Protected Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using and Customizing Internet Security Zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Protecting Yourself from Unsafe and Unwanted Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Scripts Wisely . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Identifying Deceptive (Phishing) Websites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Cookies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using InPrivate Filtering to Restrict Information Flow to Advertisers . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clearing Personal Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Browsing Privately . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 7
191
192
192
193
194
196
199
202
203
207
210
210
214
215
216
219
220
221
222
226
230
230
231
234
235
236
Adding Windows Live Programs and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
Using Windows Live Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Obtaining a Windows Live ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Windows Live Messenger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Windows Live Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Windows Live Photo Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Windows Live Web Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding People to Your Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Storing and Sharing with SkyDrive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Uploading and Sharing Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing, Sharing, and Subscribing to Calendars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
239
240
242
244
251
258
259
260
262
262
Part 2: File Management
Chapter 8
Organizing Files and Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
Mastering Windows Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Navigating in Windows Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What’s What and Where in a User Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Common Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
268
272
274
282
282
Table of Contents
xi
Using Compressed (Zipped) Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288
Arranging Data in Windows Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289
Managing File Properties and Metadata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299
Chapter 9
Using Windows Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307
Configuring Search and Indexing Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Which Files and Folders Are in the Index? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring the Index, and Tuning Indexer Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other Index Maintenance Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Basic Search Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching from the Start Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Refining a Search in Windows Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Advanced Search Tools and Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching by Item Type or Kind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Scope of a Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching for Item Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Multiple Criteria for Complex Searches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Wildcards and Character-Mode Searches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching with Natural Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching Nonindexed Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving Searches and Clearing Search History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 10
Advanced File Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337
Recovering Lost, Damaged, and Deleted Files and Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recovering Files and Folders with the Recycle Bin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Restoring Previous Versions of Files and Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronizing Files Between Multiple Computers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Staying in Sync with Offline Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Caching Options on the Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Staying in Sync with Live Mesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Staying in Sync with Windows Live Sync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronizing Web Favorites with Windows Live . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Relocating Personal Data Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Encrypting Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Encrypting File System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Encrypting with BitLocker and BitLocker To Go . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Industrial-Strength File Management with Robocopy and Robocopy GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 11
308
309
314
316
318
319
322
325
327
328
329
331
331
332
333
334
337
338
341
343
343
352
356
360
363
363
365
366
368
372
Backup, Restore, and Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375
Using the Windows Backup Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing a Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a System Image Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Restoring Files from a Backup Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Restoring a System Image Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Saved Backups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring System Protection Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rolling Back to a Stable State with System Restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using System Restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Restore Do’s and Don’ts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
376
381
384
386
388
391
393
398
399
402
xii
Table of Contents
Part 3: Digital Media
Chapter 12
Playing and Organizing Digital Media Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407
Which File Formats and Codecs Does Windows 7 Support? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Windows Media Player . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Playing Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Watching Videos and DVDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing the Navigation Pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Playlists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ripping CDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choosing an Audio Format and Bit Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deciding How to Name Your Files and Where to Store Them . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Your Media Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Ratings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Metadata and Album Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with (and Around) Digital Rights Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 13
408
412
416
417
419
421
426
428
432
434
434
435
438
Sharing and Syncing Digital Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 441
Sharing Digital Media over a Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 442
Sharing Media Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 444
Streaming Digital Media to Other PCs or Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 446
Remote Streaming over the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 449
Synchronizing Digital Media with Portable Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 450
Manual or Automatic Sync? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 451
Customizing Sync Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 453
Syncing Files from a Device to a PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 455
Burning Music and Other Media to CDs and DVDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 456
Creating and Sharing Picture and Video DVDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 459
Chapter 14
Using Windows Media Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463
Setting Up and Customizing Media Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mastering the Media Center Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Navigating and Entering Text with a Remote Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Media Center with a Mouse or Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Playing Music, Pictures, Videos, and Movies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Ratings and Playing Favorites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CDs, DVDs, and Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing Shared Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recording and Watching TV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up One or More TV Tuners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recording TV Programs and Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Watching and Managing Recorded TV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting and Using a Media Center Extender . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
464
469
472
474
476
479
481
482
482
483
485
489
490
Table of Contents
xiii
Part 4: Security and Networking
Chapter 15
Security Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 497
Understanding Security Threats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What’s New in Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring Your Computer’s Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Blocking Intruders with Windows Firewall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Windows Firewall in Different Network Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Windows Firewall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling or Disabling Windows Firewall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Allowing Connections Through the Firewall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Restoring Default Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Advanced Tools for Managing Windows Firewall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Staying Secure with Windows Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Blocking Viruses and Worms with an Antivirus Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finding an Antivirus Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using an Antivirus Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scanning for Viruses—Without an Antivirus Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stopping Spyware with Windows Defender . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scanning Your Computer for Spyware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Real-Time Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Responding to Windows Defender Alerts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Allowed and Quarantined Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disabling Windows Defender . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preventing Unsafe Actions with User Account Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What Triggers UAC Prompts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dealing with UAC Prompts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying UAC Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working Around UAC Without Disabling It . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 16
498
500
502
505
509
509
510
512
514
514
516
517
519
521
521
522
524
527
527
529
531
531
532
535
538
540
Managing User Accounts, Passwords, and Logons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 543
Introducing Access Control in Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Permissions and Rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Accounts and Security Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Learning About Your Own Account with Whoami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with User Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a New User Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Account Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Guest Account for Visitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting an Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Effectively Implementing User Accounts on a Shared Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Other Account Management Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting a Logon Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Secure Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting a Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recovering from a Lost Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
544
548
548
552
553
554
556
558
558
560
562
564
565
565
567
xiv
Table of Contents
Managing the Logon Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing the Logon Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bypassing the Logon Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Logging Off, Switching Users, or Locking Your Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controlling Your Children’s Computer Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Parental Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Other Controls to Keep Your Children Safe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 17
Setting Up a Small Office or Home Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 585
Introducing Windows 7 Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What’s New in Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Network And Sharing Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding Network Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Your Network Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wired or Wireless? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing and Configuring a Network Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Making Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up a Wireless Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding Security for Wireless Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring a Router or Wireless Access Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting to a Wireless Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up an Ad Hoc Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting Wireless Devices to Your Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using HomeGroup to Connect Your Computers at Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Homegroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Joining a Homegroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 18
569
571
573
575
577
578
583
586
586
588
589
591
593
595
595
597
597
599
603
609
610
611
611
613
Sharing and Managing Network Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 615
Sharing Files, Digital Media, and Printers in a Homegroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deciding What to Share—And What Not to Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Browsing Shared Folders and Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Streaming Media in a Homegroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharing a Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using HomeGroup with a Domain-Based Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Leaving a Homegroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disabling HomeGroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HomeGroup: How It Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharing Resources with Older Windows Versions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding Sharing and Security Models in Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Your Network for Sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharing Files with Public Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharing Files and Folders from Any Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharing a Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
616
618
622
624
624
625
626
626
627
627
628
629
633
634
643
Chapter 19
Table of Contents
xv
Finding and Using Shared Resources on a Windows Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Mapped Network Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting to a Network Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting to Another Computer with Remote Desktop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Your Network for Remote Desktop Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling Inbound Remote Desktop Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using a Remote Desktop Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
646
647
648
648
651
653
656
Fixing and Tweaking Your Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 667
Viewing Status in Network And Sharing Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnosing Problems Using Network Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting Network Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting HomeGroup Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Troubleshooting Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting TCP/IP Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maximizing Network Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Network Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifying the Order and Connection Properties of Preferred Wi-Fi Networks . . .
Renaming Your Workgroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Renaming Your Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Network Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting IP Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Power Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
667
669
673
674
676
677
684
686
686
688
689
691
692
694
698
Part 5: Tuning, Tweaking, and Troubleshooting
Chapter 20
Tuning Up and Monitoring Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703
Establishing a Performance Baseline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Windows Experience Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Generating a System Health Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring Performance in Real Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Windows Task Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Resource Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Basic Strategies for Improving Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ensuring That You Have Adequate RAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ensuring That You Have an Adequate Virtual-Memory Configuration . . . . . . . . . . .
Tuning and Troubleshooting SuperFetch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using ReadyBoost to Compensate for a Slow Hard Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Startup Programs and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keeping Your Disks Defragmented . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maintaining Adequate Free Space on Your Disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Avoiding Tweaks of Dubious Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Advanced Performance Analysis Tools and Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
704
705
708
710
710
716
721
721
724
727
728
731
733
733
733
735
xvi
Table of Contents
Chapter 21
Performing Routine Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 739
Introducing Action Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keeping Your System Secure with Windows Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating Device Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Windows Update Manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing an Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating More Than One Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking Disks for Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defragmenting Disks for Better Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Disk Defragmenter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running Disk Defragmenter from a Command Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defragmenting Solid-State Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Disk Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cleaning Up with Disk Cleanup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 22
739
742
746
747
747
747
748
753
754
756
758
758
759
Using Advanced System Management Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 763
Viewing System Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digging Deeper with Dedicated System Information Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finding and Decoding Information in System Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exporting System Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Microsoft Management Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running MMC Consoles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MMC Consoles and User Account Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running a Console in Author Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using MMC Consoles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Your Own MMC Consoles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Windows 7 Task Scheduler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Services Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting and Stopping Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Services from Task Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing the Registry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding the Structure of the Registry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Registry Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Registry Virtualization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Avoiding Registry Mishaps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Backing Up Before You Edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Browsing and Editing with Registry Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using .Reg Files to Automate Registry Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
763
765
766
768
768
769
770
770
771
774
779
783
790
790
792
792
797
798
798
801
801
802
803
805
807
Chapter 23
Table of Contents
xvii
Troubleshooting Windows Errors and Crashes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 811
Reporting Problems and Finding Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding Windows Error Reporting and Privacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding the Windows Error Reporting Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Windows Error Reporting Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking for Solutions to Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reviewing the Problem History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Troubleshooters to Solve Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Problem Steps Recorder to Get Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reviewing Problem Reports with Reliability Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting Hangs and Other Problems with Resource Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digging Deeper with Event Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding the Event Logs Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing Individual Logs and Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Task to Run When a Specific Event Occurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding Stop Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing How Windows Handles Stop Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Read a Stop Error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dealing with Stop Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analyzing Crash Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recovering from a Crash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Advanced Boot Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Making Repairs with the Windows Recovery Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
811
812
813
815
817
818
820
821
823
824
825
827
828
828
834
834
834
836
837
839
840
840
846
Part 6: Windows and Your PC
Chapter 24
Setting Up and Configuring Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 855
Installing a New Plug and Play Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Devices with Devices And Printers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Printers and Print Queues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a Non–Plug and Play Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Devices with Device Stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Devices with Device Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A Crash Course in Device Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Legacy Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Settings for an Installed Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjusting Advanced Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing and Changing Resource Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Installed Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating a Device Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rolling Back to a Previous Driver Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Uninstalling a Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling and Disabling Individual Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Decoding Hardware Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
855
858
860
861
862
863
866
871
876
878
879
881
884
885
886
886
889
890
xviii Table of Contents
Chapter 25
Managing Disks and Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 895
The Windows 7 Disk-Management Toolkit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running Disk Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Disks from the Command Prompt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up a New Hard Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Windows on a New Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a New Disk to an Existing Windows Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choosing a File System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Existing Disks and Volumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Extending a Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shrinking a Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting a Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Converting a FAT32 Disk to NTFS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning or Changing a Volume Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning and Changing Drive Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mapping a Volume to an NTFS Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking the Properties and Status of Disks and Volumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Virtual Hard Disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 26
895
896
898
901
901
902
905
908
908
909
910
910
912
912
913
917
920
Using Pen, Touch, and Voice Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 923
Enabling and Customizing Pen and Touch Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calibrating the Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Redefining Tablet PC Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reading, Writing, and Editing with Pen and Touch Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Gestures in Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Writing Pad and Touch Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Speech Recognition and Voice Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tuning and Tweaking Windows Speech Recognition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controlling a PC with Voice Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Speech to Enter and Edit Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
924
929
929
930
931
932
935
938
939
940
942
Appendixes
Appendix A Windows 7 Editions at a Glance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 947
Features Available in All Windows 7 Editions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows 7 Starter and Home Basic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows 7 Home Premium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows 7 Professional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows 7 Ultimate/Enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
948
950
950
952
953
Table of Contents
xix
Appendix B Working with the Command Prompt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 955
Starting and Ending a Command Prompt Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting Command Prompt at a Particular Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting Command Prompt and Running a Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using AutoRun to Execute Commands When Command Prompt Starts . . . . . . . . . .
Using Cmd’s Command-Line Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using File-Name and Folder-Name Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Wildcards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing the Command Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Command Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pausing or Canceling Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Simplifying Command Entry with Doskey Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Environment Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing Environment Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying Environment Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing Command Prompt Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Window Size and Position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting a Font . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Colors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Other Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
955
957
957
958
959
960
961
961
962
962
964
967
967
968
968
968
970
970
971
972
973
Index to Troubleshooting Topics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 975
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 977
What do you think of this book? We want to hear from you!
Microsoft is interested in hearing your feedback so we can continually improve our books and learning
resources for you. To participate in a brief online survey, please visit:
www.microsoft.com/learning/booksurvey/
Foreword
I
and collectively, the three authors who wrote Windows 7 Inside Out have been
working with Windows for as long as many of the most senior developers at Microsoft.
Ed, Carl, and Craig focus on Windows from a unique perspective—they are experts and
enthusiasts who want to share their expertise and enthusiasm with you.
ndividually
With Windows 7, our development team was dedicated to building a brand new release of
the OS while also making sure your investments in hardware and software are effectively
brought forward. We took a deliberate approach to building new features, refining existing
features, and making sure at every step we were true to our goals of delivering an awesome
release of Windows. Ed, Carl, and Craig do an awesome job of providing readers with the
ins and outs of the full range of features of Windows 7, which will help you to get the most
out of the product.
As we engineered Windows 7, we opened a dialog with a broad community of enthusiasts
on our Engineering Windows 7 blog (blogs.msdn.com/e7). Through this blog, we discussed
the engineering side of building Windows 7—from the bottom up, so to speak. We know
that for many, these topics were interesting as Windows 7 was being developed. Through
the blog and through all of our forms of learning as we developed Windows 7, we were
asked many questions not just about the “how” but about the “why” of features. We offered
our insights from the product development perspective. With their unique perspective, few
are more qualified to offer further explanations of the ins and outs of Windows 7 than the
authors of Windows 7 Inside Out.
With Windows 7 now in the hands of customers around the world, our collective interests
turn to making the most of Windows 7. I know from 15 years of following the work of Ed,
Carl, and Craig that they have the same commitment to delivering real-world advice from
a perspective that is grounded in experience and knowledge of how Windows works. Over
the years, they’ve met with many teams here in Redmond to talk about Windows and how
they can help you, our shared customers and readers, be more productive. I hope you enjoy
Windows 7 Inside Out.
Steven Sinofsky
President, Windows Division
Microsoft Corporation
xxi
Acknowledgments
If we tried to list all the people who have helped us in one way or another on this project,
we’d have to add another 50 pages. So we apologize in advance to those we don’t thank
by name.
We’d like to acknowledge the tremendous assistance offered by Steve Ball, Mark Russinovich, Dan Plastina, Gabe Aul, Charlie Owen, Chris Flores, and Jerry Koh of Microsoft. They
are among literally dozens of developers, product managers, and technical professionals at
Microsoft who enthusiastically shared their time and their deep knowledge of Windows 7
with us. Our thanks also to their bosses, Jon DeVaan and Steven Sinofsky, for their support
in making those contacts possible. We also benefitted greatly from a nonstop public dialogue with our fellow beta testers, bloggers, Microsoft MVPs, and Windows enthusiasts.
Our production team was led by the extraordinarily capable Curt Philips, who somehow
makes this grueling process look easier each time. Technical editor Randall Galloway was
indispensable in helping us triple-check the fine details that we strive to get right and also
did a fine job putting together the companion CD. We owe a big debt to Roger LeBlanc,
copyeditor, and Andrea Fox, proofreader, for helping us weed out typos or grammatical
errors.
Our partners and collaborators at Microsoft Press have been a source of support for many
terrific years: big thanks to Juliana Aldous, product planner; Sandra Haynes, content development manager; and Valerie Woolley, project editor.
Our literary agent and good friend Claudette Moore has provided much encouragement
as we’ve all watched the book business transform, provided excellent guidance, talked us
down a few times when it was necessary, and continued to make sure that this project came
together to everyone’s benefit.
And although they didn’t add anything directly to the content of this book, we’d like to
offer our thanks and admiration to Luke Akard, M.D., F.A.C.P.; Mark A. Dayton, M.D., Ph.D.;
Michael Dugan, M.D.; Jan Jansen, M.D., Ph.D.; and James Thompson, D.O., F.A.C.P. Without
these life-saving professionals, we quite literally would have been unable to write this book.
Thanks to one and all.
Ed Bott, Carl Siechert, and Craig Stinson
August 2009
xxiii
Conventions and Features Used in This Book
This book uses special text and design conventions to make it easier for you to find the
information you need.
Text Conventions
Convention
Meaning
Abbreviated
commands for
navigating menus
For your convenience, this book occasionally uses abbreviated
commands. For example, “Click View, Sort By, Name” means that
you should click the View menu, then click Sort By, and finally
click the Name command.
Boldface type
Boldface type is used to indicate text that you type.
Initial Capital Letters
The first letters of the names of tabs, dialog boxes, dialog box
­ lements, and commands are capitalized. Example: the Save As
e
dialog box.
Italicized type
Italicized type is used to indicate new terms.
Plus sign (+) in text
Keyboard shortcuts are indicated by a plus sign (+) separating
two key names. For example, Ctrl+Alt+Delete means that you
press the Ctrl, Alt, and Delete keys at the same time.
Design Conventions
INSIDE OUT
Get more details about a process
These are the book’s signature tips. In these tips, you’ll get the straight scoop on what’s
going on with the software—inside information about why a feature works the way it
does. You’ll also find handy workarounds to deal with software problems.
Sidebars
Sidebars provide helpful hints, timesaving tricks, or alternative procedures related to
the task being discussed.
xxv
xxvi Conventions and Features Used in This Book
TROUBLESHOOTING
Some folders no longer display using their saved view settings
Look for these sidebars to find solutions to common problems you might encounter.
Troubleshooting sidebars appear next to related information in the chapters. You can
also use “Index to Troubleshooting Topics” at the back of the book to look up problems
by topic.
Cross-references point you to other locations in the book that offer additional information
about the topic being discussed.
!
CAUTION
Cautions identify potential problems that you should look out for when you’re completing a task or problems that you must address before you can complete a task.
Note
Notes offer additional information related to the task being discussed.
About the CD
The companion CD that ships with this book contains tools and resources to help you get
the most out of your Inside Out book.
What’s on the CD
Your Windows 7 Inside Out CD includes the following:
●●
eBook A complete electronic version of Windows 7 Inside Out.
●●
Troubleshooting tips “Before You Call Tech Support” helps you to troubleshoot
issues on your own.
●●
References Microsoft resources to help keep your computer up to date and secure.
●●
Bonus content Links to downloadable gadgets and other tools to help you
customize Windows 7; an eBook of Microsoft Computer Dictionary, Fifth Edition; and
links to the authors’ website, product demos, and product support.
Digital Content for Digital Book Readers: If you bought a digital-only edition of this book, you can
enjoy select content from the print edition’s companion CD.
Visit http://www.microsoftpressstore.com/title/9780735626652 to get your downloadable content. This content
is always up-to-date and available to all readers.
System Requirements
The following are the minimum system requirements necessary to run the CD:
●●
Windows Vista, Windows XP with Service Pack 2, Windows Server 2003 with SP1 or
Windows Server 2008, or newer operating system
●●
500-megahertz (MHz) processor or higher
●●
2 gigabytes (GB) of storage space (a portion of this disk space will be freed after
installation if the original download package is removed from the hard drive)
●●
256 megabytes (MB) of RAM
●●
CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive
xxvii
xxviii About the CD
●●
1024 by 768 or higher resolution monitor
●●
Windows or Windows Vista–compatible sound card and speakers
●●
Microsoft Internet Explorer 6 or newer
For descriptions of the system requirements for running Windows 7, visit
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/products/system-requirements/
Support Information
Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the contents of this book and of the
CD. As corrections or changes are collected, they will be added to a Microsoft Knowledge
Base article. Microsoft Press provides support for books and companion CDs at the following website:
http://www.microsoft.com/learning/support/books/
If you have comments, questions, or ideas regarding the book or the CD, or questions that
are not answered by visiting the site above, please send them via e-mail to:
mspinput@microsoft.com
If your question is about the software, and not about the content of this book, please visit
the Microsoft Help and Support page or the Microsoft Knowledge Base at:
http://support.microsoft.com
In the United States, Microsoft software product support issues not covered by the
Microsoft Knowledge Base are addressed by Microsoft Product Support Services. Locationspecific software support options are available from:
http://support.microsoft.com/gp/selfoverview/
CHAPTER 4
Personalizing Windows 7
Working with the New Taskbar and Start Menu. . . . . . . 100
Configuring Your Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Personalizing the Taskbar and Start Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Using and Customizing Desktop Gadgets . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Mastering Window Management with Windows 7
Tricks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Working with Fonts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Adjusting Ease of Access Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Personalizing Theme Elements: Visuals and Sounds. . . . 125
O
of the most obvious changes that Microsoft made in moving from Windows
Vista to Windows 7 is the taskbar, which has a bold new look, lots of new functionality, and new ways to customize, all of which we explain in this chapter. We also
cover the many new techniques that make it easier to perform various window tasks, such
as maximizing, resizing, and so on.
ne
A subtler change is the inclusion of the word Personalize prominently in the user interface
of the new operating system. Certainly, earlier versions of Windows could be tailored, customized, and modified to suit a user’s needs and preferences—in a word, personalized. But
the P word itself was missing. Now, when you right-click your desktop, the shortcut menu
that pops up features an icon-festooned Personalize command. ­Personalize Windows is also
one of the items that appear in the new operating system’s Getting Started task list.
So the message is clear: It’s your operating system; make it reflect your tastes, your needs,
your style. Make it work for you. More than any previous version of Windows, Windows 7
provides myriad tools for doing just that—tools that we survey in this chapter.
What’s in Your Edition?
The ability to personalize your computing environment by changing desktop backgrounds, window colors, and sounds is not available in Windows 7 Starter edition. Lack
of Aero support in Starter edition means you can’t get transparent window frames, live
taskbar previews, and other visual effects, and Aero Peek is unavailable. And Starter
edition does not support the use of multiple monitors. All other features described in
this chapter are available in all editions.
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Working with the New Taskbar and Start Menu
The taskbar is that strip of real estate along one screen edge (bottom by default) that
contains the Start menu button, program buttons, and status icons. The taskbar made its
first appearance in Windows 95. In the years since, it has slowly evolved: installing Internet
Explorer 4 in Windows 95 also added a Quick Launch toolbar and other toolbars; Windows
XP reduced clutter by introducing taskbar grouping; and Windows Vista added taskbar
previews, small window representations that increased your chances of clicking the correct
taskbar button for the program you want to bring to the front.
The evolution continues in Windows 7, but at a generation-skipping pace. The Windows 7
taskbar (see Figure 4-1) continues to serve the same basic functions as its progenitors—
launching programs, switching between programs, and providing notifications—but in a
way that makes these basic tasks easier and more efficient.
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Figure 4-1 Although the taskbar designs in Windows XP (top), Windows Vista (center), and
Windows 7 (bottom) comprise the same basic elements, the appearance has evolved a bit—and
the functionality has advanced by leaps and bounds.
Opening and Monitoring Programs from Taskbar Buttons
As in previous Windows versions, the taskbar houses the Start menu button, a button for
each running program, and the notification area. You can use these task buttons to switch
from one running program to another. You can also click a task button to minimize an
open window or to restore a minimized window. But in a departure from earlier Windows
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versions, which had separate bands dedicated to a Quick Launch bar (from which you can
open programs) and to taskbar buttons (which represent programs that are currently running), the Windows 7 taskbar combines these functions. That is, buttons between the Start
button and the notification area can be used both for opening programs and for switching
between programs.
Adding and Removing Pinned Programs, Documents, and Folders
Programs that you use often (the ones that you might’ve had on the Quick Launch toolbar
in the past) can be easily pinned to the taskbar so that a single click launches them. To open
a program that is pinned to the taskbar, you don’t need to open the Start menu or dig
down to find a desktop shortcut. To pin a program to the taskbar, simply drag its icon or a
shortcut (from the desktop, from the Start menu, or from any other folder) to the taskbar.
Alternatively, right-click a program icon wherever you find it and choose Pin To Taskbar.
To remove a pinned program from the taskbar, right-click the pinned icon and choose
Unpin This Program From Taskbar. This same command also appears on other shortcuts to
the program, including those on the desktop and on the Start menu.
●●
To pin a document to the taskbar, drag its icon or a shortcut to the taskbar. If the
taskbar already has a button for the program associated with the document, Windows adds the document to the Pinned section of the program’s Jump List. (For more
information about Jump Lists, see “Using Jump Lists on the Taskbar and Start Menu”
on page 107.) If the document’s program is not on the taskbar, Windows pins the program to the taskbar and adds the document to the program’s Jump List.
●●
To pin a folder to the taskbar, drag its icon or a shortcut to the taskbar. Windows adds
the folder to the Pinned section of the Jump List for Windows Explorer.
●●
To open a pinned document or folder, right-click the taskbar button and then click
the name of the document or folder.
●●
To remove a pinned document or folder from the Jump List, right-click the taskbar
button and point to the name of the document or folder to be removed. Click the
pushpin icon that appears.
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You can also pin frequently used documents and folders to the taskbar, using similar
methods:
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INSIDE OUT
Restore the Quick Launch toolbar
Some habits die hard. If you just can’t bear to give up the Quick Launch toolbar, you
can display it in Windows 7. To do so, add the hidden Quick Launch folder as you
would any other folder. (For details, see “Using Additional Toolbars” on page 112.) In
the New Toolbar dialog box, type %AppData%\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Quick
Launch in the Folder box.
To mimic the appearance of the Quick Launch toolbar in previous Windows versions,
unlock the taskbar. (Right-click the taskbar and, if there’s a check mark by Lock The
Taskbar, choose that command.) Right-click the Quick Launch toolbar and clear the
Show Title and Show Text commands. Then drag the handle (the dotted line) on the
left side of the Quick Launch toolbar so that it’s next to the Start button, and drag
the handle on the right side of the toolbar to set the width you want. Then relock the
taskbar.
If you later decide you don’t need the Quick Launch toolbar after all, right-click the
taskbar and select Toolbars, Quick Launch to remove the check mark and the toolbar.
Opening Programs
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To open a program, click its taskbar button. A few simple (but not obvious) tricks let you do
more:
●●
To open a new instance of a program, Shift+click its taskbar button. This is useful for
programs that are already running, in which an ordinary click switches to the existing
instance or, if you already have multiple open instances, displays the window thumbnails. (If you have a wheel mouse or other three-button mouse, middle-click serves
the same purpose as Shift+click.)
●●
To open a new instance with administrative privileges, Ctrl+Shift+click a taskbar
button.
Switching Tasks
When you open a pinned program, the appearance of its taskbar button changes to indicate that the program is running, as shown in Figure 4-2. The icon for a running program
has a button-like border, and when you mouse over the button, the background color
becomes similar to the program’s window colors. A program that has more than one window or tab open appears as a stack of buttons. Opening other programs adds a button for
each program to the taskbar.
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Stacked buttons represent multiple windows
An outlined button represents a single window
Figure 4-2 Taskbar buttons for programs that are not running have an icon but no border and
share the same background as the taskbar itself.
As in previous Windows versions, you can switch to a different program by clicking its taskbar button. Much of the guesswork required to pick the correct taskbar button in previous
versions is gone in Windows 7, however. Now, when you hover the mouse pointer over a
taskbar button, a thumbnail image of the window appears next to the taskbar button. If a
taskbar button represents more than one window (because the program has multiple open
windows), hovering the mouse pointer over the taskbar button displays a preview of each
window.
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Still not sure which is the correct window? Use another new Windows 7 feature, Aero
Peek. Hover the mouse pointer over one of the preview images, and Windows brings that
window to the fore and indicates the location of all other open windows with outlines, as
shown in Figure 4-3.
Figure 4-3 Aero Peek makes it easy to see the contents of a window, even when it’s buried
among a stack of open windows.
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Note
Taskbar preview images and Aero Peek are available only when you use an Aero theme.
(For more information about Aero and themes, see “Understanding and Using Windows Aero” on page 126.) If you’re not using an Aero theme, hovering the mouse pointer
over a taskbar button displays each window’s full title.
When the preview (or the title bar, if you’re not using Aero) of the window you want is
displayed, simply click that preview to switch to that window. You also have the option
of closing a window by clicking the red X in the upper right corner of the preview or by
­middle-clicking anywhere in the preview image. Other basic window tasks are available on
the context menu that appears when you right-click the preview image.
INSIDE OUT Use Ctrl+click to cycle through windows
If you’re not using Aero, you don’t get thumbnail previews and you can’t use Aero
Peek to view full-size windows or tabs before you switch to them. However, if you hold
down the Ctrl key while you click a taskbar button that represents a group of windows,
you’ll see each window in turn. Release the Ctrl key when you see the one you want.
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INSIDE OUT Use shortcut keys for taskbar buttons
The first 10 taskbar buttons are accessible by keyboard as well as mouse. Press Windows logo key+1 for the first, Windows logo key+2 for the second, and so on (using 0
for the tenth). Using one of these shortcuts is equivalent to clicking the corresponding
taskbar button: if its program isn’t running, it starts; if it has a single open window, you
switch to that window; if it has multiple open windows, Windows displays previews of
all windows and a “peek” view of the first window.
Note that you can move taskbar buttons, which therefore determines the key number
that opens a particular icon. To move a taskbar button, simply drag it to the desired
location.
Another useful shortcut key is Windows logo key+T, which brings focus to the first
item on the taskbar, as indicated by a faint glow at the bottom of that taskbar button.
At that point, you can repeatedly press Windows logo key+T, Shift+Windows logo
key+T, or the arrow keys to select other taskbar buttons. When a taskbar button is
selected, you can press Spacebar to “click” the button, press the Menu key to display its
Jump List, or press Shift+F10 to display its context menu.
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As you use Windows 7, you’ll notice other enhancements to the taskbar. Some taskbar
previews do more than simply show a thumbnail image of the window; for example, the
preview for Windows Media Player includes basic player controls (previous, pause/play, and
next). And with some taskbar buttons, you don’t even need to display a preview to know
what’s going on with the program; windows or dialog boxes that show a progress bar, for
example, indicate their progress with a colored background in the taskbar button itself.
Opening Programs from the Start Menu
Although improvements to the taskbar in Windows 7 have reduced the number of necessary trips to the Start menu (shown below), the Start menu continues to provide access to
nearly everything you need to do in Windows.
Pinned programs
Recently used programs
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Link to All Programs menu
Start menu search box
Like the default Start menu in Windows XP and Windows Vista, the Windows 7 Start menu
is a two-­column affair, the left side of which is reserved for the programs you use most
often or that you have used most recently. Windows 7 devotes the right side of the menu
to various important system folders, such as your Documents and P
­ ictures folders, Control
Panel, and Devices And Printers.
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Four areas of the Start menu make it easy to run the programs and open the documents
you need most. They are listed here in descending order of convenience and ease of use:
●●
Pinned programs The area in the upper left corner of the Start menu, above the
horizontal line, is reserved for the programs you want to be accessible at all times.
After you have pinned an item to this part of the Start menu, it stays there (unless
you subsequently remove it).
●●
Recently used programs Windows populates the area directly below the pinned
programs with programs that you have used recently. You can change the number
and types of programs that appear here; for details, see “Customizing the Left Side of
the Start Menu” on page 117.
●●
Start menu search box The Start menu includes a search box (at the bottom on
the left, directly below All Programs). You can get to anything on the menu, no
matter how deeply nested it might be, by typing a few characters into this box. In the
preceding illustration, for example, Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 does not appear
on the left side of the menu because we haven’t pinned it to the top of the menu
or used it recently. Navigating to this program’s menu entry would require a couple
of clicks and a bit of scrolling (one click to open All Programs, another to open
Microsoft Office). As Figure 4-4 shows, three characters in the search box are enough
to bring Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 to the Programs area of the search results, at
the top of the Start menu.
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Figure 4-4 Typing one into the search box is sufficient to bring Microsoft Office OneNote
2007 to the top of the Start menu.
Provided you’re not completely averse to typing, the search box pretty much eliminates the hassle of finding items that are buried several folders deep within the menu
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structure. The Start menu search box doesn’t limit its searches to programs, however;
it’s an entry point to the full-fledged search capabilities of Windows 7. For complete
details, see Chapter 9, “Using Windows Search.”
●●
All Programs folder Clicking All Programs opens a hierarchically arranged list of
program icons similar to that found in earlier Windows versions. The All Programs
menu is generated by merging the contents of two folders:
●●
A personal folder, located at %AppData%\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\
Programs
●●
An “all users” folder, located at %ProgramData%\Microsoft\Windows\Start
Menu\Programs
As you might expect, items stored in the personal folder appear only on your own
Start menu. Items stored in the “all users” folder appear on the Start menu of everyone who has an account on your computer.
Adding and Removing Pinned Programs
Note
If no shortcut menu appears when you right-click an item, and you can’t drag the item
to the pinned programs area, open the Customize Start Menu dialog box. (For details,
see “Personalizing the Start Menu” on page 116.) In the list of options, select Enable Context Menus And Dragging And Dropping.
To remove an item from the pinned programs area, right-click it and choose Unpin From
Start Menu.
Using Jump Lists on the Taskbar and Start Menu
A powerful addition to the taskbar and Start menu is the Jump List, a menu of options
closely related to the program associated with a taskbar button or an entry on the Start
menu. Programs that are written to take advantage of Jump Lists in Windows 7 might
include on the Jump List various common commands and tasks that can be performed
with that program.
Chapter 4
To add a program to the pinned programs area of the Start menu, right-click it wherever
you see it (elsewhere on the Start menu, for example) and choose Pin To Start Menu. The
item will take up residence at the bottom of the pinned programs area. If you’d like to give
it a more prominent location, drag it upward.
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Jump Lists can be big timesavers even with older programs. For those programs, Windows
adds to the Jump List a list of recently used documents, making it easy to reopen a recent
document quickly.
In addition, each taskbar Jump List includes commands to open the program, to pin (or
unpin) the program to the taskbar, and to close all open windows represented by the
button.
Figure 4-5 shows Jump Lists for Internet Explorer.
Figure 4-5 A taskbar Jump List (left) usually includes commands not on a Start menu Jump List
(right).
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To open a taskbar Jump List, use either of these techniques:
●●
Right-click the taskbar button.
●●
Using a stylus (or your finger, if you have a touch-capable computer), drag the taskbar button away from the edge of the screen in a flicking motion. When you release,
the Jump List appears.
●●
The preceding technique was created for use with tablet and touch computers, but
it also works with a mouse: point to the taskbar button, press the left mouse button,
drag away from the taskbar, and release the mouse button.
On the Start menu, a Jump List is available only for programs that have been pinned and
those in the recently used list. To display the Jump List associated with a Start menu item,
click the arrow next to the program name or simply hover the mouse pointer over the
menu item.
Most of the Jump List content is created by the program’s author or, in the case of recent
items, generated by Windows. To keep favorite documents always available on the Jump
List, you can pin an item in the recent documents list: point to it and click the pushpin icon,
or right-click it and choose Pin To This List.
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To protect your privacy or simply to clean up a cluttered list, you can remove an item
from the recent list or the pinned list: right-click and choose Remove From This List (or, for
pinned items, Unpin From This List).
INSIDE OUT Clear recent items from all Jump Lists
The recent items lists on Jump Lists, grouped by program, largely replace the need for
a Recent Items menu on the Start menu, which is disabled by default in Windows 7.
(If you want to restore the Recent Items menu, open the Customize Start Menu dialog
box and select Recent Items.) Like the Recent Items menu in previous Windows versions, the recent items shown on Jump Lists are derived from the contents of the folder
%UserProfile%\Recent. Note that you can’t add items to recent lists by making direct
additions to %UserProfile%\Recent. For the purposes of building these lists, Windows
simply ignores anything in the Recent folder that it didn’t put there itself.
Personalizing the Taskbar and Start Menu
The new look of the taskbar and the default selection of commands on the Start menu are
not for everyone. In this section, we describe the tools and methods for customizing them
to work the way you like.
Changing the Taskbar’s Appearance and Behavior
As described in the following sections, you can modify the order, size, appearance, and
grouping of taskbar buttons and change the overall taskbar size and location. Many of
these changes are made most easily through the Taskbar And Start Menu Properties dialog
box (see Figure 4-6), which you can open by right-clicking an unoccupied area of the taskbar and choosing Properties.
Chapter 4
To clear all recent items (but not pinned items) from Jump Lists and from the Recent
Items menu, right-click the Start button and choose Properties. On the Start Menu
tab of the Taskbar And Start Menu Properties dialog box, clear the Store And Display
Recently Opened Items In The Start Menu And The Taskbar check box. Windows clears
out the %UserProfile%\Recent folder when you do this.
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Figure 4-6 You can also display this dialog box by right-clicking the Start button, choosing
Properties, and clicking the Taskbar tab.
Changing the Order of Taskbar Buttons
Chapter 4
One of the most useful personalizations you can make doesn’t require a visit to any dialog
box. To change the order of buttons on the taskbar, simply drag them to the place you
want. Pinned program icons retain their order between sessions, allowing you to quickly
find your most used programs in their familiar (to you) location.
Changing the Size, Appearance, and Grouping of Taskbar Buttons
Two items on the Taskbar tab of Taskbar And Start Menu Properties control the size and
appearance of taskbar buttons:
●●
Use Small Icons Select Use Small Icons if you want to reduce the height of taskbar
buttons, making them similar to the button size in earlier Windows versions.
●●
Taskbar Buttons The default setting for Taskbar Buttons is Always Combine, Hide
Labels. This setting suppresses the display of labels (window titles) and causes
Windows to always group multiple windows from a single application into a single
taskbar button.
With either of the other settings (Combine When Taskbar Is Full or Never Combine),
Windows displays the window title (or as much as it can fit) on the taskbar button,
much like it does in earlier versions of Windows. (See Figure 4-7.) The difference
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111
between these settings is that with Combine When Taskbar Is Full each window gets
its own separate taskbar button until the taskbar becomes too crowded, whereupon
Windows groups windows from a program into a single taskbar button. With Never
Combine, taskbar buttons continue to diminish in size as you open more windows.
Figure 4-7 Selecting Use Small Icons and Combine When Taskbar Is Full results in a
taskbar similar to what you see in Windows XP or Windows Vista.
The default height of the taskbar is enough to display one taskbar button. (If you switch
between large and small icons, the taskbar automatically adjusts its height to fit.) You can
enlarge it—and given the typical size and resolution of computer displays these days,
enlarging it is often a great idea. Before you can change the taskbar’s dimensions, you need
to unlock it. Right-click an unoccupied area of the taskbar, and if a check mark appears next
to the Lock The Taskbar command, click the command to clear the check mark. Then position the mouse along the border of the taskbar furthest from the edge of the screen. When
the mouse pointer becomes a two-headed arrow, drag toward the center of the screen to
expand the taskbar. Drag the same border in the opposite direction to restore the original
size.
Getting the Taskbar Out of Your Way
By default, the taskbar remains visible even when you’re working in a maximized program.
If that’s inconvenient for any reason, you can tell it to get out of the way. In the Taskbar
And Start Menu Properties dialog box, shown in Figure 4-6, select Auto-Hide The Taskbar.
With this option selected, the taskbar retreats into the edge of the desktop whenever any
window has the focus. To display the taskbar, move the mouse pointer to the edge of the
desktop where the taskbar is “hidden.”
Note
Regardless of how you set the auto-hide option in the Taskbar And Start Menu Properties dialog box, you can make the taskbar visible at any time by pressing the Windows
logo key or Ctrl+Esc.
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Changing the Taskbar’s Size and Appearance
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Moving the Taskbar
The taskbar docks by default at the bottom of the screen (the main screen, if you have
more than one), but you can move it to any other edge, including any edge of a secondary screen. To move the taskbar, select a Taskbar Location On Screen option in Taskbar And
Start Menu Properties.
As an alternative, you can manipulate the taskbar directly: Unlock it (right-click an unoccupied spot and choose Lock The Taskbar—unless no check mark appears beside that command, which means that taskbar is already unlocked). Then drag any unoccupied part of
the taskbar in the direction you want to go. (Don’t drag the edge of the taskbar closest to
the center of the screen; doing that changes the taskbar’s size, not its position.)
Using Additional Toolbars
A seldom-used feature of the taskbar is its ability to host other toolbars. Optional toolbars might comprise shortcuts to folders, documents, and applications, or they might be
mini-applications that operate entirely within the confines of the taskbar. Toolbars you can
choose to install include the following:
Chapter 4
●●
Address The Address toolbar provides a place where you can type an internet
address or the name and path of a program, document, or folder. When you press
Enter or click the Go button, Windows takes you to the internet address, starts the
program, opens the document, or displays the folder in a Windows Explorer window.
The Address toolbar is functionally equivalent to the Start menu’s Run command or
the address bar in Windows Explorer or Internet Explorer.
●●
Links The Links toolbar provides shortcuts to internet sites; it is equivalent to the
Links toolbar in Internet Explorer.
●●
Tablet PC Input Panel The Tablet PC Input Panel toolbar provides a single tool—an
icon you can click (or, more likely, tap with a stylus) to display or hide the panel that
encompasses the writing pad and touch keyboard. (For details about using the Tablet
PC Input Panel, see “Using the Writing Pad and Touch Keyboard” on page 935.)
●●
Desktop The Desktop toolbar provides copies of all the icons currently displayed on
your desktop. In addition, it includes links to your Libraries, Homegroup, Computer,
Network, Control Panel, and other user profile folders. When you click the toolbar’s
double arrow, a cascading menu of all the folders and files on your system appears.
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Note
Pinned icons on the taskbar obviate the Quick Launch toolbar, a regular taskbar feature
since the days of Windows 95. But if you prefer to use it, we show you how: see the tip
“Restore the Quick Launch toolbar” on page 102.
Installing and Removing Toolbars To install a new toolbar or remove one you’re currently
using, right-click any unoccupied part of the taskbar or any existing toolbar. Choose Toolbars from the shortcut menu that appears, and then choose from the ensuing submenu. A
check mark beside a toolbar’s name means that it is already displayed on the taskbar. Clicking a selected toolbar name removes that toolbar.
Note
Sizing and Positioning Toolbars Before you can change a toolbar’s size or position on the
taskbar, the taskbar itself must be unlocked. To do that, right-click an unoccupied area of
the taskbar and, if a check mark appears next to the Lock The Taskbar command, click the
command to clear the check mark.
When the taskbar is not locked, a dotted vertical bar appears at the left edge of every
toolbar. (If the taskbar is displayed vertically against the left or right edge of the desktop,
the bar is horizontal and appears at the top of the toolbar.) This is the toolbar’s handle. To
reposition a toolbar within the taskbar, drag the handle.
Note
Unlike Windows XP, Windows 7 insists that toolbars be docked to the taskbar.
Creating a New Toolbar Any folder on your system can become a toolbar. To create a
new toolbar, right-click an existing toolbar or a spot on the taskbar, choose Toolbars, and
then choose New Toolbar. In the next dialog box, navigate to a folder and click Select
Folder.
Chapter 4
You can also display any of the predefined toolbars (listed earlier) or remove any currently displayed toolbar using the Toolbars tab of the Taskbar And Start Menu Properties dialog box.
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Chapter 4 Personalizing Windows 7
The folder’s name becomes the name of the new toolbar, and each item within the folder
becomes a tool.
Controlling How Notifications Appear
In previous versions of Windows, the notification area (also sometimes called the system
tray or the status area) often becomes crowded with tiny icons—many of which don’t
“notify” you of anything. To deal with notification-area congestion, Windows 7, by default,
keeps a few icons visible at all times but hides the icons that you aren’t actually using. And
unlike previous Windows versions, the notification area doesn’t consume an increasingly
large chunk of the taskbar; new icons are corralled in a box that appears only when you
click the arrow at the left end of the notification area to display the hidden items.
You can personalize this behavior in the Notification Area Icons control panel. To get there,
display the hidden notification area icons and click Customize. Alternatively, begin typing
notification in the Start menu search box or the Control Panel search box, and then click
Notification Area Icons.
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115
For each notification area icon, you can select one of three options:
●●
Show Icon And Notifications Selecting this option displays the icon on the taskbar
at all times.
●●
Hide Icon And Notifications With this option, the icon appears only when you click
the arrow at the left end of the notification area. Notifications from the program are
squelched.
●●
Only Show Notifications Like the previous option, this one hides the icon, but it
allows its program to pop up notification messages.
Chapter 4
The system icons (Clock, Volume, Network, Power, and Action Center) can be remanded
to the box of hidden icons by selecting either of the last two options. But if you’d rather
banish one or more of them altogether, click Turn System Icons On Or Off. The dialog box
shown in Figure 4-8 appears.
Figure 4-8 Windows displays four (or five, for battery-powered computers) notification area
icons unless you modify the System Icons options here.
One final option can come in handy if you don’t like having to click the arrow to display
hidden icons (and you don’t mind having a string of notification area icons as long as your
arm). If you want to see all your notification area icons at all times, select Always Show All
Icons And Notifications On The Taskbar. This is an all-or-nothing proposition, but remember
that you can turn off any of the system icons you don’t use. Also, some well-behaved programs have an option (usually accessible by clicking the notification area icon and choosing
Options) to not display their icons.
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Chapter 4 Personalizing Windows 7
INSIDE OUT Drag notification area icons
Perhaps the easiest way to specify the appearance option for a notification area icon
is to simply drag the icon—a technique you can apply to system icons (except Clock)
as well as to other notification area icons. Dragging an icon to the hidden area sets it
to Only Show Notifications, whereas dragging to the taskbar is equivalent to selecting Show Icon And Notifications. Dragging also lets you specify the order of icons in
each area.
INSIDE OUT Use a keyboard shortcut for notification area tasks
If you’re one of those users whose fingers never leave the keyboard, you can press
Windows logo key+B to move the focus to the notification area. Use the arrow keys to
highlight different icons on the taskbar or, when the arrow is highlighted, press Spacebar to display the hidden icons. You can then use arrow keys to select an icon, and the
Menu or Shift+F10 keys to display the icon’s menu.
Chapter 4
Personalizing the Start Menu
Although Windows 7 does not offer a “classic” Start menu as found in Windows XP and
Windows Vista, it offers plenty of other personalization options. Begin your fine-tuning on
the Start Menu tab of the Taskbar And Start Menu Properties dialog box (shown in Fig­
ure 4-9), which you reach by right-clicking the Start button and choosing Properties.
Figure 4-9 Options and check boxes on the Start Menu tab of the Taskbar And Start Menu
Properties dialog box let you control the default action of the Power button and erase evidence
of what you’ve been doing at your computer.
Personalizing the Taskbar and Start Menu
117
Many more options become available when you click Customize to display the Customize
Start Menu dialog box, shown in Figure 4-10.
Figure 4-10 Don’t fail to scroll down in this crowded dialog box to expose many more options.
Customizing the Left Side of the Start Menu
Quite apart from which programs appear in the pinned programs section at the top of
the left side of the Start menu (see “Adding and Removing Pinned Programs” on page 107
for information about customizing that aspect of the menu), you have several choices that
control the menu’s left side.
For starters, your choices under Privacy on the Start Menu tab of Taskbar And Start Menu
Properties (shown earlier in Figure 4-9) determine whether Windows keeps track of recently
used programs and displays them below the pinned programs, and whether Windows
keeps track of recently opened documents and displays them as a Jump List associated with
a pinned or recently used program. If you choose to keep those options enabled, you can
proceed to the Customize Start Menu dialog box (shown in Figure 4-10) and, using the settings under Start Menu Size, specify the maximum number of recent programs to include
on the Start menu (the allowable range is 0 through 30) and the maximum number of
recent items to include on each Jump List (0 through 60).
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INSIDE OUT Control which programs are included in the recent list
The list of recently used programs—the items that appear below the pinned programs
on the left side of the Start menu—is controlled by Windows. The list includes only
shortcuts to executable files you open, such as .exe files and .msc files. The following items are excluded by default (for more information, see Knowledge Base article
282066, “Frequently Used Programs Not Automatically Added to the Start Menu,” at
w7io.com/0401):
Chapter 4
●●
Programs listed in the AddRemoveApps value of the registry key HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FileAssociation. By default,
the following items are excluded: Setup.exe, Install.exe, Isuninst.exe, Unwise.exe,
Unwise32.exe, St5unst.exe, Msoobe.exe, Lnkstub.exe, Control.exe, Werfault.exe,
Wlrmdr.exe, Guestmodemsg.exe, Msiexec.exe, Dfsvc.exe, and Wuapp.exe. By
modifying this registry value, you can tailor the exclusion list to suit your needs.
●●
Items whose shortcut names include any of the following text: Documentation,
Help, Install, More Info, Readme, Read Me, Read First, Setup, Support, What’s
New, or Remove. This list of exclusion strings is specified in the AddRemove­
Names value of HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\
FileAssociation.
●●
Items in the Games folder (Professional, Ultimate, and Enterprise editions only).
Apparently to prevent workers who goof off from getting in trouble, business
editions of Windows 7 exclude games from the list of recently used programs.
Other options scattered about the Customize Start Menu dialog box (all selected by
default) determine the appearance and behavior of the left side of the Start menu:
●●
Sort All Programs Menu By Name When selected, Windows always sorts the All
Programs menu alphabetically. Clear this option to display the menu in the order that
items were added to it, or in the order you create by moving items around the menu.
●●
Use Large Icons Clear this option if you want to fit more items on the left side.
●●
Enable Context Menus And Dragging And Dropping When this option is
selected, you can move items on the left side of the menu and on the All Programs
menu by dragging. In addition, context menus (the menu that appears when you
right-click an item on the left side of the menu or on the All Programs menu) are
enabled. Clearing this option disables both capabilities.
●●
Highlight Newly Installed Programs When this option is selected, new programs
are highlighted with a colored background so that they’re easy to find; if you find
that distracting, clear the option.
Personalizing the Taskbar and Start Menu
●●
119
Open Submenus When I Pause On Them With The Mouse Pointer When this
option is selected, Jump Lists and cascading menus on the right side of the Start
menu appear when you hover the mouse; when this option is cleared, you must click
the arrow to display these items.
Customizing the Right Side of the Start Menu
The right side of the Start menu has an assortment of buttons that open various data folders and system folders. Options in Customize Start Menu (shown in Figure 4-10) let you add
to or subtract from this collection, and they let you control the behavior of certain items.
INSIDE OUT Change your Start-menu picture
Choosing Link, Menu, or No Show Several of the items in the Customize Start Menu list
offer you the choice of Display As A Link, Display As A Menu, and Don’t Display This Item.
The first option displays a button that opens the folder in Windows Explorer, whereas the
second option displays a button that opens the folder’s contents as a submenu sprouting from the side of the Start menu. Following is a list of folders you can customize in this
manner:
●●
Computer
●●
Music
●●
Control Panel
●●
Personal Folder
●●
Documents
●●
Pictures
●●
Downloads
●●
Recorded TV
●●
Games
●●
Videos
INSIDE OUT Use links and submenus interchangeably
You can have it both ways. If you opt for submenus, you can still open items in Windows Explorer. Just right-click and choose Open.
Chapter 4
The picture that appears at the top of the right side of the Start menu is the one associated with your user account (the one that also appears on the Welcome screen). If
you’re not happy with it, click it. That will take you to the User Accounts section of
Control Panel, where you can specify a different picture.
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Displaying Other Folders Other folders don’t offer the link vs. submenu option, but your
Start-menu customization is not complete until you decide whether to include any of these
folders for single-click access:
●●
Favorites Menu (displays your Favorites menu as a cascading submenu)
●●
Homegroup (displays shared resources on your home network)
●●
Network (displays computers and devices on your network)
●●
Recent Items (displays your 15 most recently opened documents, from all
applications)
●●
Default Programs (opens the Control Panel tool for specifying which program opens
each document type)
●●
Devices And Printers (opens the Control Panel tool for managing your computer
hardware)
●●
System Administrative Tools (displays a menu of advanced system-management
programs)
●●
Connect To (displays a list of available network connections)
●●
Help (opens Help And Support)
Chapter 4
Displaying the Run Command The Run command, a perennial favorite of computer
enthusiasts, is no longer a standard Start menu feature. You can make sure it’s still part of
your Start menu by selecting Run Command in the Customize Start Menu dialog box.
You might find you can live comfortably without the Run command. When you’re tempted
to type a program name in the Run dialog box, try typing it in the Start menu search box
instead. The Search feature won’t always get you where you want to go (it’s no good when
you need a command-line switch, for example), but it’s more versatile than you might
expect. Typically, you can run an executable by simply typing its name in the search box
and pressing Enter, just as you would in the Run dialog box. On the other hand, the Run
dialog box remembers command strings that you have entered before, and the search box
has nothing to replace that.
INSIDE OUT Open the Run dialog box with a keypress
Whether or not your Start menu includes it, you can always get to the Run dialog box
by pressing Windows logo key+R.
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Controlling Where the Search Box Searches
Two options in the Customize Start Menu dialog box let you customize the behavior of the
Start menu search box:
●●
Search Other Files And Libraries The default setting, Search With Public Folders,
includes in a Start-menu search the same document files and folders that are
included in other searches. (For details, see “Configuring Search and Indexing
Options” on page 308.) With the other settings, you can limit the scope of a search to
exclude public folders, or you can completely disable the search of documents and
folders.
●●
Search Programs And Control Panel With this option selected (the default setting),
searches look for program names and Control Panel tools or tasks that match your
search text.
For more information, see “Searching from the Start Menu” on page 319.
Mastering Window Management with Windows 7 Tricks
And don’t worry: All the keyboard shortcuts and other tricks you’ve used in previous versions of Windows continue to work the same way in Windows 7.
Resizing and Moving Windows
New mouse gestures in Windows make it easy to work with certain windows without being
distracted by the clutter of others:
●●
Aero Snap has three functions. The first one makes it easy to maximize a window
or restore it to its previous size and position. Simply drag the title bar to the top of
the screen to maximize it, or drag the title bar away from the top edge to restore it.
(Although Windows has long offered comparable capability with the Maximize and
Restore buttons in the title bar, this new gesture offers a much bigger target. This feature also makes it possible to move a maximized window from one screen to another
on a multimonitor system.)
The second Aero Snap function makes it easy to split the screen space between two
windows for easy side-by-side editing or comparisons: drag a window title bar to the
Chapter 4
Windows 7 includes a host of keyboard shortcuts and mouse gestures that greatly simplify
the everyday tasks of managing windows: resizing, moving, minimizing, switching, and so
on. These new methods are easily learned and remembered—but they’re not easily discovered. In this section, we’ll show you the way.
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left edge of the screen, and it snaps to fill the left half of the screen. (Note that the
window resizes when the mouse pointer hits the edge of the screen. So to use this
feature with minimal mouse movement, start your drag action by pointing at the title
bar near the edge you’re going to snap to.) Drag a title bar to the right edge to fill
the right half of the screen. Begin dragging a window that has been resized this way
away from the edge of the screen, and it returns to its previous size and position.
The third function is useful if you want full-height side-by-side windows but you
don’t want them to fill exactly half the screen width. It’s also good for obtaining maximum window height without making text lines too long to read, especially on widescreen monitors. Drag the top window border (not the title bar) to the top edge of
the screen, or drag the bottom border to the bottom edge of the screen. With either
action, when you reach the edge the window snaps to full height, without changing
its width. When you drag the border away from the window edge, the opposite border snaps to its previous position.
●●
Aero Shake minimizes all windows except the one you want to use. To do that, point
to the window’s title bar, hold down the mouse button, and quickly move it back
and forth a few times. Suddenly, all windows except that one retreat to the taskbar.
This one takes a bit of practice, but once you get the hang of it you’ll probably use
it often. It requires only three “shakes”—a smooth left, right, left motion is best—not
maniacal shaking.
Chapter 4
Note
Although the names of these features include the word Aero, unlike the Aero Peek
feature, you do not need to have Aero enabled to use these mouse gestures. Without
Aero, you lose some of the associated visual effects, but the outcome is the same.
Windows 7 includes keyboard shortcuts that correspond with the preceding mouse gestures. These are shown in Table 4-1.
The new taskbar in Windows 7 also uses a new trick to expose the traditional window
menu: hold the Shift key as you right-click a taskbar button. For a button that represents a
single window, the menu includes commands to Restore, Move, Size, Minimize, Maximize,
and Close the window. Shift+right-clicking a grouped taskbar button displays commands to
arrange, restore, minimize, or close all windows in the group.
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123
Task
Keyboard Shortcut
Mouse Gesture
Maximize
Windows logo key+
Up Arrow
Drag title bar to top of
screen
Resize window to full screen height Shift+Windows logo
without changing its width
key+Up Arrow
Drag top or bottom border
to edge of screen
Restore a maximized or full-height Windows logo key+
window
Down Arrow
Drag title bar or border
away from screen edge
Minimize a restored window
Windows logo key+
Down Arrow
Click the Minimize button
Snap to the left half of the screen
Windows logo key+
Left Arrow*
Drag title bar to left edge
Snap to the right half of the screen Windows logo key+
Right Arrow*
Drag title bar to right edge
Move to the next monitor to the
left
Shift+Windows logo
key+Left Arrow
Drag title bar
Move to the next monitor to the
right
Shift+Windows logo
key+ Right Arrow
Drag title bar
Minimize all windows except
the active window (press again
to restore windows previously
­minimized with this shortcut)
Windows logo key+
Home
“Shake” the title bar
Minimize all windows
Windows logo key+M
Restore windows after minimizing
Shift+Windows logo
key+M
* Pressing this key repeatedly cycles through the left, right, and restored positions. If you have more than
one monitor, it cycles these positions on each monitor in turn.
INSIDE OUT
Disable Aero Snap and Aero Shake
If you find it disconcerting to have windows snap to a certain size and position when
you drag their title bars, you can disable Aero Snap. Unfortunately, the setting for
doing so is no more obvious than the mouse gestures themselves. In the Start menu
search box or in Control Panel, type mouse and then click Change How Your Mouse
Works. Near the bottom of the window that appears, select Prevent Windows From
Being Automatically Arranged When Moved To The Edge Of The Screen. Selecting this
option disables Aero Snap and Aero Shake altogether, including keyboard shortcuts.
Chapter 4
Table 4-1 Keyboard Shortcuts and Mouse Gestures for Resizing and Moving Windows
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Chapter 4 Personalizing Windows 7
Viewing the Desktop and Gadgets
Sometimes you need to get to the bottom of things, whether it’s to use a desktop icon,
view a desktop gadget, or simply enjoy your gorgeous desktop background. Windows 7 has
some ways to simplify these tasks.
If you’re using Aero, you can view the desktop with an overlay of outlines representing all
open windows, as shown in Figure 4-11; simply point to the Show Desktop tool, the empty
space at the right end of the taskbar. (If your taskbar is on the left or right side of the
screen, Show Desktop is at the bottom.) When you move the mouse pointer away, the previous window arrangement returns. You can get the same effect by pressing Windows logo
key+Spacebar.
Chapter 4
Figure 4-11 View the desktop, including gadgets, without a single mouse click.
For a more lasting effect, click Show Desktop, and all windows are hidden. (This works with
or without Aero enabled.) To restore the previous arrangement, click Show Desktop again. If
you prefer to use the keyboard, Windows logo key+D toggles between these two views.
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125
You can bring your gadgets to the fore without minimizing or hiding your open windows;
simply press Windows logo key+G. For more information about desktop gadgets, see
“Using and Customizing Desktop Gadgets” on page 146.
Switching Between Windows
In addition to the taskbar-centric methods described in “Switching Tasks” on page 102,
the time-honored task-switching keyboard shortcuts continue to work in Windows 7.
Alt+Tab cycles among the open windows (and, with Aero enabled, invokes Aero Peek);
Shift+Alt+Tab reverses the order. Windows logo key+Tab cycles through the open windows
using the visually flashy Flip 3D feature introduced in Windows Vista.
Personalizing Theme Elements: Visuals and Sounds
Chapter 4
The most obvious way to personalize your Windows experience is to customize its visual
appearance—the desktop background, the window colors, and so on—and to select the
sounds that Windows uses to let you know what it’s up to. Those settings are made in the
aptly named Personalization, a Control Panel tool that appears when you right-click the
desktop and choose Personalize. You can also open Personalization, which is shown in
­Figure 4-12, by starting to type personalization in the Start menu search box or in the
Control Panel search box, and then clicking the Personalization link that appears.
Figure 4-12 Personalization is your home base for setting backgrounds, colors, sounds, screen
savers, desktop icons, and mouse pointers.
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Chapter 4 Personalizing Windows 7
A theme in Windows 7 is an über configuration that combines and names the various personalization settings that you can make. Themes can incorporate the following:
●●
Desktop background
●●
Window color
●●
Settings that you make in the “advanced” Window Color And Appearance dialog box
●●
Sound scheme
●●
Screen saver
●●
Desktop icons
●●
Mouse pointer scheme
Note that these are all settings that pertain to your own profile; that is, they’re specific to
your user account. Settings that apply to all users at your computer, such as screen resolution, are not included in the current theme.
Windows 7 includes some terrific predefined themes, and you can select one simply by
clicking it in Personalization. The theme is applied right away, so if you don’t like what you
see and hear, you can select another before you close Personalization.
Chapter 4
For information about saving your own settings as a theme and using themes that others
have created, see “Saving, Sharing, and Finding Theme Settings” on page 139.
Understanding and Using Windows Aero
This chapter contains several references to Windows Aero, which is the default graphical user interface in most editions of Windows. The Aero interface uses desktop composition to achieve effects such as these:
●●
Transparent window frames
●●
Live previews of running programs via buttons on the taskbar
●●
Live previews of the windows that you can switch to by pressing Alt+Tab
●●
Flip 3D—a feature that shows all open windows (and the desktop) as a threedimensional stack when you press the Windows logo key+Tab
●●
Smoother window dragging
●●
Interactive window controls (Close buttons that glow on hover, for example)
●●
Animated window closings and openings
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With desktop composition on, applications write to video card memory buffers instead
of directly to the screen, and the Desktop Window Manager feature of Windows 7
arranges the video surfaces in the appropriate order and presents the results to the
screen.
In a nutshell, the requirements to use Aero are as follows:
●●
Windows 7 Home Premium, Professional, Ultimate, or Enterprise (Aero is not
available with Windows Starter edition)
●●
A DirectX 9–class graphics processing unit (GPU) with a Windows Display Driver
Model (WDDM) 1.0 or higher display driver
●●
An Aero-based theme (one from the Aero Themes category in Personalization or
one based on any of those themes)
Turning Aero Off
If Aero slows you down or annoys you for any other reason, you can turn it off. In
Personalization, choose any of the themes in the Basic And High Contrast Themes
category. For a solid, if stolid, user interface that retains the new look and feel of Windows 7 without taxing your graphics subsystem, choose Windows 7 Basic.
What if you like transparency but don’t care for the animated opening and closing of
windows or certain other effects? In the Start menu search box, type effects and then
click Adjust The Appearance And Performance Of Windows. Clearing the Animate Windows When Minimizing And Maximizing check box, on the Visual Effects tab in Performance Options, turns off these animated transitions. Other options let you squelch
other unwanted Aero effects.
Customizing the Desktop Background
You can perk up any desktop with a background image. Your background can be supplied
by a graphics file in any of several common formats (.bmp, .gif, .jpg, .png, and .tif). And
you’re not stuck with a static image, either. You can set up a slide show of images, and you
can even use an RSS feed to supply new images.
Chapter 4
Even if you’re not wild about transparency and animation, there’s plenty to like about
Aero. Smoother window dragging, the preview icons on the taskbar, and the improved
task-switching features are well worth the price of admission—for most users. Nevertheless, admission is not entirely free; the Aero interface uses more graphics memory
than the non-Aero interface—especially because achieving smoother window movement requires Aero to store the contents of all open windows in video memory, not
just the windows that are currently visible.
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Chapter 4 Personalizing Windows 7
To select a background, right-click the desktop, choose Personalize from the shortcut menu,
and then click Desktop Background. The Picture Location box in Desktop Background
(shown in Figure 4-13) provides a selection of useful categories. The Windows Desktop
Backgrounds category itself is divided into several image categories. The Top Rated Photos
category includes pictures from your own Pictures library to which you’ve assigned a fourstar or five-star rating. You might want to maximize the dialog box to get a better look at
the offerings.
Chapter 4
Figure 4-13 If you get tired of the wallpaper selections that come with Windows, you can always
use your own pictures instead.
If you don’t find what you need, click Browse. Folders to which you navigate via the Browse
button will subsequently appear in the Location list, making it easy for you to go back and
grab a different image from the same folder.
Personalizing Theme Elements: Visuals and Sounds
INSIDE OUT 129
ind more great photographs hidden in your Windows
F
installation
In the Windows Desktop Backgrounds picture location, you might’ve noticed a category with your country name or region as its name; the category includes a number
of photographs taken in that place. With a little digging, you can find pictures of other
places already installed on your hard drive. To do so, follow these steps:
1. Display “super-hidden” files. In the Start menu search box, type folder options.
On the View tab of Folder Options, select Show Hidden Files, Folders, And Drives
and clear Hide Protected Operating System Files (Recommended). Then click
Apply.
2. In Desktop Background, click Browse, and navigate to %Windir%\Globalization\
MCT. (On most systems, %Windir% is C:\Windows.) The MCT folder has a
subfolder for each installed country. Expand one of those, and then select the
subfolder with the country name spelled out. (For example, the full path might
be C:\Windows\Globalization\MCT\MCT-ZA\South Africa.)
3. Return to Folder Options, undo the changes you made in step 1 (or simply click
Restore Defaults), and click OK.
The newly found pictures appear in Desktop Background. And it’s easy to get back to
these pictures later; the country name now appears as an option in the Picture Location
list.
You can select one or more images in Desktop Background. (To select multiple images, click
a category name or select the check box that appears when you point to each image you
want to use. Alternatively, Ctrl+click each image.) When you select multiple images, Windows switches among the selected images periodically, creating a slide show effect.
After you have chosen your images, select one of the five Picture Position options to let
Windows know how you want to handle images that are not exactly the same size as your
screen resolution.
Then, if you’ve selected more than one image, specify how often you want Windows to
change the background; the settings range from 10 seconds to 1 day. Selecting Shuffle
causes the backgrounds to be chosen randomly from your selected images; otherwise, Windows cycles through the images in the same order they appear in Desktop Background.
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Chapter 4 Personalizing Windows 7
INSIDE OUT
Use pictures from an RSS feed
If you want an ever-changing collection of pictures to use as your desktop background,
you can configure a theme to obtain images from an RSS feed. If you post your own
photos to a photo-sharing site, for example, you could configure your computer to
pick up those pictures and use them. (Not every photo feed works, however. You must
use one that includes the photo as an enclosure. Flickr is one service that uses enclosures.) Because Windows 7 doesn’t provide an interface for enabling RSS-fed images
as desktop backgrounds, the easiest way to set one up is to edit an existing .theme file
that includes a slide show. Open it in Notepad and, in the [Slideshow] section, remove
the ImagesRootPath line and all ItemnPath lines. Replace them with a line like this
(using the URL to the RSS feed, of course):
RSSFeed=http://www.example.com/rssfeed
For complete details about .theme files, see the MSDN article “Creating and Installing
Theme Files” at w7io.com/0402.
Here are some other ways to change the wallpaper:
Chapter 4
●●
Right-click an image file in Windows Explorer, Windows Photo Viewer, or Windows
Live Photo Gallery and choose Set As Desktop Background. This centers the selected
image.
●●
Right-click an image in Internet Explorer and choose Set As Background. This displays
the selected image using the current picture position setting.
●●
Open any image file in Paint, open the Paint menu (the icon to the left of the Home
tab), and choose Set As Desktop Background. A submenu lets you choose among Fill,
Tile, and Center picture positions.
Selecting Colors and Modifying Color Schemes
With a beautiful desktop background in place, your next personalization step might be to
select a complementary color for the window borders, Start menu, and taskbar. To do that,
right-click the desktop, choose Personalize, and then click Window Color.
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131
If you’re using an Aero theme, Window Color And Appearance appears, as shown below. If
none of the 16 choices meets your needs exactly, you can click Show Color Mixer and dial
in your own blend of Hue, Saturation, and Brightness.
You can also adjust the transparency of your window frames. Dragging the Color Intensity
slider to the right makes window frames darker and less transparent. If you want lighter colors but don’t fancy transparency at all, clear the Enable Transparency check box. You might
find this “Aero sans trans” approach convenient at times if you need to generate pictures
of windows for presentation purposes and don’t want the pictures to include distracting
“behind the scenes” material.
If you’re not using an Aero theme, clicking Window Color displays a different Window
Color And Appearance dialog box, as shown next.
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Chapter 4 Personalizing Windows 7
Click a screen element
in this area . . .
. . . and specify its color
and other settings
in this area.
Note
Chapter 4
This same dialog box appears when you click Advanced Appearance Settings in the
Aero version of Window Color And Appearance. There’s no particular reason to go
there if you’re using Aero, however, as most settings in this dialog box apply only to
basic and high-contrast (that is, non-Aero) themes.
Each basic and high-contrast theme comprises a group of settings that specifies fonts and
sizes of certain interface elements, as well as colors. In the sample window of the Window
Color And Appearance dialog box, click the screen element you want to change. Then use
the lists and buttons at the bottom of the dialog box to make your color, font, and size
selections. For title bars, you can specify two colors; Windows creates a gradient from Color
1 (at the left end of the title bar) to Color 2 (at the right end). The Item list includes some
items that don’t appear in the sample window, so you might want to review it in its entirety
before you move on.
The Color button for each item opens a selection of standard colors. If you don’t see the
one you’re looking for, click the Other button. Windows then displays a Color dialog box.
Should you fail to find exactly the color you want in the Basic Colors palette, you can define
your own custom colors. Change the color that appears in the Color box, either by adjusting the positions of the hue/saturation crosshair and the luminosity arrow or by specifying
Personalizing Theme Elements: Visuals and Sounds
133
numeric values. When you have found the color you want, click Add To Custom Colors. If
you want to replace an existing custom color, select it before you specify your new color.
!
CAUTION
The Window Color And Appearance dialog box itself has a distinctly 20th-century
appearance. The squared-off windows in its sample area betray its ancient heritage, and
the text below the sample window gives fair warning. You won’t find Undo or Default
buttons anywhere. Experiment carefully and keep your own mental cookie trail. If you
want to be absolutely sure you can find your way out of the woods, create a restore
point before you proceed. (See “Configuring System Protection Options” on page 393.)
Selecting Sounds for Events
Chapter 4
To specify the sounds that Windows plays as it goes through its paces, right-click the desktop, choose Personalize from the shortcut menu, and then click Sounds. In the Sound dialog box (shown below), you can select a predefined collection of beeps, gurgles, and chirps
that Windows plays in response to various system and application events. Simply choose an
item in the Sound Scheme list.
In the same dialog box, you can customize the sound schemes. To see what sounds are
currently mapped to events, scroll through the Program Events list. If an event has a sound
associated with it, its name is preceded by a speaker icon, and you can click Test to hear it.
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Chapter 4 Personalizing Windows 7
To switch to a different sound, scroll through the Sounds list or click Browse. The list displays .wav files in %Windir%\Media, but any .wav file is eligible. To silence an event, select
(None), the item at the top of the Sounds list.
If you rearrange the mapping of sounds to events, consider saving the new arrangement as
a sound scheme. (Click Save As and supply a name.) That way, you can experiment further
and still return to the saved configuration.
The Sound dialog box is also the place to silence the Windows Startup sound. Perhaps
you’ve had this experience: You arrive a moment or two late for a meeting or class, discreetly turn on your computer at the end of the table or back of the room, and then cringe
as your speakers trumpet your arrival. True, the Windows Startup sound is less raucous in
Windows 7 than it was in Windows XP. But it’s still a recognizable item, apt to cause annoyance in libraries, classrooms, concert halls, and other hushed venues. You can’t substitute
your own tune, but you can turn the startup sound off. In the Sound dialog box, clear the
Play Windows Startup Sound check box.
INSIDE OUT
Mute your computer
Chapter 4
If you like event sounds in general but occasionally need complete silence from your
computer, choose No Sounds in the Sound Scheme list when you want the machine to
shut up. (Be sure to clear the Play Windows Startup Sound check box as well.) When
sound is welcome again, you can return to the Windows Default scheme—or to any
other scheme you have set up. Switching to the No Sounds scheme won’t render your
system mute (you’ll still be able to play music when you want to hear it), but it will turn
off the announcement of incoming mail and other events.
If you want to control sound levels on a more granular level—perhaps muting some
applications altogether and adjusting volume levels on others—right-click the volume
icon in the notification area and choose Open Volume Mixer. (Alternatively, click the
icon and then click Mixer.) Volume Mixer provides a volume slider (and a mute button)
for each output device and each running program that emits sounds.
Choosing a Screen Saver
Screen savers don’t save screens. (In long-gone days when screens were invariably CRTs
and many offices displayed the same application at all hours of the working day, having an
image move about during idle times probably did extend the service life of some displays.)
And they certainly don’t save energy. But they’re fun to watch. To see the current offerings,
right-click the desktop, choose Personalize from the shortcut menu, and then click Screen
Saver.
Personalizing Theme Elements: Visuals and Sounds
135
Note
If you use a multimonitor setup, some of the screen savers supplied with Windows
(specifically, 3D Text and Photos), unfortunately, “save” only the primary screen. The
others go blank when the screen saver goes into action.
Chapter 4
The Screen Saver Settings dialog box (shown below) includes a handy On Resume, Display
Logon Screen check box. If you work in an environment where privacy is not a big concern,
you can save yourself some hassle by clearing this check box. (Password entry might also be
required when your computer wakes from sleep; for details, see “Customizing a Power Plan”
on page 150.)
Customizing Mouse Pointers
As you have undoubtedly noticed, Windows has dispensed with the time-­dishonored hourglass mouse pointer. That might be a welcome development, particularly if you’ve logged a
lot of hours with earlier versions of Windows. On the other hand, if you think an hourglass
depicts the passage of time more unambiguously than a rolling doughnut, you can easily
bring back the old shape. You can customize the entire array of pointer shapes your system
uses by right-clicking the desktop, choosing Personalize, and then clicking Change Mouse
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Pointers (in the left pane of Personalization, shown in Figure 4-12). On the Pointers tab of
the Mouse Properties dialog box, you can select a pointer type in the Customize box, and
then click Browse to select an alternative pointer shape. (The Browse button takes you to
%Windir%\Cursors and displays files with the extensions .cur and .ani. The latter are animated cursors.)
Just as Windows encapsulates a collection of sound choices as a sound scheme, it wraps up
a gamut of pointer shapes as a mouse-pointer scheme. The system comes with a generous
assortment of predefined schemes, making it easy for you to switch from one set of pointers to another as needs or whims suggest. Figure 4-14 shows the list.
Chapter 4
Figure 4-14 Some of the predefined mouse-pointer schemes are better suited for challenging
light conditions than the default (Windows Aero) scheme.
If you sometimes use your portable computer in lighting conditions that make it hard for
you to find the pointer, consider switching to one of the large or extra large schemes. If
nothing else, those will give your eyeballs a larger target to pursue.
For something perhaps more novel than large or animated pointers, try one of the inverted
schemes. These make your mouse pointer appear to pass behind the text on your screen,
rather than in front of it. (It’s an acquired taste.)
If you’re inclined to roll your own mouse scheme (by using the Browse button to assign cursor files to pointer types), be sure to use the Save As command and give your work a name.
That way you’ll be able to switch away from it and back to it again at will.
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137
It’s worth taking a minute or two to explore the remaining tabs in the Mouse Properties
dialog box. Some of the more useful options there are Button Configuration (on the Buttons tab), which lets you swap the roles of the left and right mouse buttons; Display Pointer
Trails, in the Visibility section of the Pointer Options tab (this one makes the mouse cursor
even easier to find in lousy lighting conditions); and Select A Pointer Speed, in the Motion
section of the Pointer Options tab. This last option governs the rate at which the pointer
travels in response to mouse movement. If you have switched to a high-DPI setting (see
“Making Text Easier to Read” on page 143) and a higher-resolution display, you might also
need to increase the pointer speed to accommodate the increased number of pixels on
your screen.
Configuring Desktop Icons
You can choose to display
or hide any of these five
system icons
If you’re really into customization, you can change any of the five icons that appear in the
large box in the center. Note that the Control Panel icon does not appear in this c­ enter box
even if you select its check box; Windows doesn’t provide a way to change it.
Chapter 4
A fresh, cleanly installed Windows 7 desktop (as opposed to one generated by an upgrade
installation) includes a single lonely icon—Recycle Bin. If you want other system icons,
right-click the desktop, choose Personalize, and click Change Desktop Icons (in the left
pane). The Desktop Icon Settings dialog box, shown below, provides check boxes for five
system folders—Computer, the root folder of your own profile (User’s Files), Network,
­Recycle Bin, and Control Panel.
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To change an icon, select it in the center box and click Change Icon. You’ll find an interesting assortment of alternative icons in the file %Windir%\System32\­Imageres.dll. (Be sure
to use the horizontal scroll bar to see them all.) If none of those suit you, try browsing to
%Windir%\System32\Shell32.dll.
Note
The icons you choose for system folders become part of a theme, if you save the configuration as described in the next section. However, other settings for desktop icons,
including which ones you choose to display, their size, and their arrangement, are
not saved in the theme file, allowing you to safely change themes without the risk of
changing any of these customizations.
Chapter 4
After you’ve populated your desktop with icons, you might want to control their arrangement. If you right-click the desktop, you’ll find two commands at the top of the shortcut
menu that will help in this endeavor. To make your icons rearrange themselves when you
delete one of their brethren, click View and then click Auto Arrange Icons. To ensure that
each icon keeps a respectable distance from each of its neighbors (and that the whole gang
stays together at the left side of your screen), click View, Align Icons To Grid. And if your
icons occasionally get in the way (for example, if you want to take an unimpeded look at
the current desktop background image), click View, and then click Show Desktop Icons.
(Return to this command when you want the icons back.)
INSIDE OUT
Customize icon spacing and size
If you’re really into desktop icons, you might find it worthwhile to move the ones you
have closer together—so that you’ll have room for more or to keep the current collection from completely overrunning the desktop. The most effective way we’ve found
to do that is by adjusting the Icon size in the Window Color And Appearance dialog
box for non-Aero themes. (In the Start menu search box, type color. Then click Change
Window Colors And Metrics.) The Size setting for the Icon item, curiously enough,
does not change the size of icons. (We explain how to change icon size in a moment.)
The Size setting does change the icons’ spacing, however. Reducing the value from the
default 32 to 16 (the minimum) produces a compact icon display without sacrificing
readability. You can also change the spacing, of course, with the Icon Spacing (Horizontal) and Icon Spacing (Vertical) items, which have a default value of 43.
To adjust the icon size, click the desktop, hold the Ctrl key, and then turn the mouse
scroll wheel forward or back. This method produces a continuous zoom effect; if you
want to get back to a standard size, right-click the desktop, click View, and select a size.
Personalizing Theme Elements: Visuals and Sounds
139
To change the sort order of your desktop icons, right-click the desktop and click Sort By.
You can sort on any of four attributes: Name, Size, Item Type, or Date Modified. Sorting a
second time on any of these attributes changes the sort order from ascending to descending (or vice versa).
Saving, Sharing, and Finding Theme Settings
If you’ve got all the visual and aural aspects of your profile set up just the way you want
them, and you want to be able to experiment further but still return to the current settings,
it’s time to revisit Personalization (right-click the desktop and choose Personalize), shown
earlier in Figure 4-12 on page 125. At the top of the themes list, in the My Themes category,
you’ll see Unsaved Theme if you have made changes to whatever theme was previously in
effect. To make those changes reusable, click Save Theme and supply a name. (The name
you furnish is the display name that appears in Personalization; you needn’t follow restrictive file-naming rules that prohibit several common punctuation symbols.)
If you make additional changes, you’ll once again generate an Unsaved Theme entry.
There’s no limit to the number of themes you can create. Windows saves each group of
settings as a .theme file in your %LocalAppData%\Microsoft\Windows\Themes folder. (A
.theme file is a standard text file that describes all the theme settings. For complete details
about theme files, see “Creating and Installing Theme Files” at w7io.com/0402.) You can
delete unwanted items from the My Themes list; simply right-click the item you no l­onger
want and choose Delete Theme. Note that you can’t delete the theme that’s currently
in use.
After you create a theme you like, you might want to use it on your other computers
or share it with other users. Because a .theme file is just a text file, it doesn’t contain the
graphic images of your desktop, the sound files you use for various events, or other necessary files that make up the entire theme experience. For the purpose of sharing themes,
Windows uses a .themepack file, which includes the .theme file as well as all other nonstandard theme elements. A .themepack file uses the standard compressed folder (.zip archive)
format to envelop its component files. To create a .themepack file of an item in My Themes,
first select it to make it the current theme. Then right-click it and choose Save Theme For
Sharing. Unless you specify otherwise, Windows saves the .themepack file in the default
save location of your Documents library.
To use a theme that was saved in .theme or .themepack format, simply double-click it. (Of
course, a .theme file won’t offer the full experience if the theme components aren’t available on your computer in folders to which you have access.)
Because themes are so easily portable, you can find many compelling Windows 7 themes
online. Start your quest by clicking Get More Themes Online (under My Themes in Personalization), where Microsoft offers a nice selection.
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Chapter 4 Personalizing Windows 7
!
CAUTION
If you search for themes elsewhere on the internet, be sure to download theme files
only from people or companies you know and trust. Some theme elements (most
notably, screen savers, which include executable program code) have long been notorious vectors for viruses and spyware. (A study released in 2009 by the security software
vendor McAfee found “screen savers” to be the web’s most dangerous search term,
because the results pages often lead to malware downloads. As Windows 7 gains in
popularity, searches for “free themes” are likely to produce risky results too. You can
read the study at w7io.com/0403.) Also, other types of malware could be disguised as a
theme pack. (That is, you think that by double-clicking a file you’re installing a theme,
but you could in fact be installing a nefarious program instead.)
Configuring Your Display
The previous sections about themes and desktop backgrounds describe how to put eyepleasing elements on your screen. Another important personalization step is to properly
configure your display hardware for your purposes and preferences, which is the subject of
the following sections.
Chapter 4
Configuring Screen Resolution
Changing the screen resolution changes the number of pixels that Windows displays on
your screen. Increasing the resolution—say, from 1024 by 768 to 1600 by 1200—lets you
see more action on your display: more windows, more text, larger graphics, and so on—
with various tradeoffs. Text at a given point size will appear smaller at higher resolutions.
A mouse at a given pointer speed will require more arm and wrist motion to traverse a
high-resolution screen than a low-resolution one. And higher resolutions use more video
memory. In short, the right resolution for you depends on your hardware, your preferences,
and visual acuity.
To change the screen resolution, right-click the desktop and choose Screen Resolution. To
make a change, click Resolution and drag the slider up or down. (See Figure 4-15.)
Note
A change in screen resolution affects all accounts at a particular computer, not just the
account that makes the change.
Configuring Your Display
141
Figure 4-15 Click Advanced Settings to adjust the color depth or examine the drivers for the
display adapter and monitor.
Configuring a Multimonitor Display
Extending your desktop across two or more monitors can be a great way to increase your
productivity. You can do your main work on one screen and keep auxiliary information,
e-mail, or even Windows Media Player open and visible on the second. Or if you work with
large spreadsheets or database tables, you can spread them across multiple screens so that
you can see more data without having to set your resolution to stratospheric levels.
If your display adapter supports two monitors (these days, most do), the Screen Resolution
dialog box show two boxes, labeled 1 and 2, when you have a second monitor connected.
(Of course, if you have more than two monitors attached, Windows displays a numbered
box for each one.) You can click these boxes to configure the monitors independently. If
adjusting the settings for monitor 1 appears to be affecting what you consider to be monitor 2, click Identify. Windows displays large white numerals on your screen temporarily
to let you know which screen is which. If it happens that screen 2 is on the left of screen
1, drag the boxes in Screen Resolution so that they match the physical layout of your
monitors.
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Assuming you want to add screen space to your visual layout, be sure to select Extend
These Displays in Multiple Displays. If you prefer to have your second monitor function as a
duplicate display (for example, to make a presentation easier for a group of clients to see),
select Duplicate These Displays.
Chapter 4
Some third-party programs exist to enhance your multimonitor experience. For example,
with DisplayFusion from Binary Fortress Software (w7io.com/0408), you can put a different
desktop background on each monitor or have a single image span multiple monitors.
INSIDE OUT
Change multimonitor options with a keyboard shortcut
Windows logo key+P, the keyboard shortcut for switching to a network projector, also
provides a quick and easy way to switch among multimonitor display arrangements.
Configuring Your Display
143
Making Text Easier to Read
In earlier versions of Windows, users who wanted larger text sometimes bumped up the
point size for one or more screen elements. Scaling up this way was problematic, though,
because not all elements of the Windows user interface could be scaled successfully. Dialog
box text in particular was a problem, so users sometimes found themselves looking at large
title bars and scroll bars and large menu text, but small dialog-box text. Windows 7 offers a
better way.
●●
Look for scaling (“zoom”) commands in the text-centric programs you use. Many
programs, including most modern word processors, include these scaling features.
Scaling text up to a readable size this way is a good solution for particular programs
but doesn’t change the size of icon text, system menus (such as the Start menu), or
system dialog boxes.
●●
To enlarge part of the screen, use the Magnifier tool. (For more information, see
“Adjusting Ease of Access Options” on page 153.)
●●
Use the scaling options in the Display control panel—the “better way” offered by
Windows 7. Adjusting the scaling to a higher level enables you to have readable text
at higher screen resolutions.
To adjust display scaling, right-click the desktop and choose Personalize. In Personalization,
click Display, a link in the left pane. (Alternatively, type display in the Start menu search box
and click Display.) Select one of the options shown below.
Chapter 4
If you like to work at high screen resolutions but you find yourself straining to read the text,
you can try the following:
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For a greater range of settings, as well as greater precision, click Set Custom Text Size (DPI).
(DPI stands for dots per inch.) Figure 4-16 shows the Custom DPI Setting dialog box.
Figure 4-16 You can set the scaling from 100% to 500% of normal (96 DPI).
To change the scaling factor, drag any part of the ruler. Alternatively, you can either select a
value in the Scale To This Percentage Of Normal Size list or type directly into this box. What
scaling factor is right? It depends on many things—the size and resolution of your screen,
the programs you use, your eyes, and your preferences. You will likely need to try more
than one combination of screen resolution and scaling factor to get your system exactly the
way that works best for you.
Chapter 4
The Use Windows XP Style DPI Scaling check box offers a measure of compatibility for
(mostly older) applications that are not written to use high DPI settings. Some compromise
is required: when selected, some elements (dialog box text or icons, for example) might not
align or resize properly, whereas clearing this option causes blurry text in some applications. By default, for DPI settings of 120% or below, the option is selected; for larger sizes it
is cleared.
When you change DPI scaling, you must log off before the change takes effect. After you
log on again, test some text-centric applications to see if you like the result. If you don’t,
return to the Display dialog box and try another setting.
Configuring Your Display
145
TROUBLESHOOTING
Some programs produce fuzzy text
If you’re running Aero and have applied a nondefault font scaling factor, some of your
older programs might produce fuzzy text. Newer DPI-aware programs get information about the current scaling factor from the operating system and adjust themselves
accordingly. Older applications that were not designed with DPI scaling in mind assume
they are running under the default scale of 96 DPI, and the operating system scales
them. A side effect of this is that fonts and icons can sometimes appear fuzzy. If you
find a particular program’s display unsatisfactory, right-click its entry in the Start menu,
choose Properties from the shortcut menu, and click the Compatibility tab. In the Settings section, select Disable Display Scaling On High DPI Settings.
ClearType is a font-smoothing technology that reduces jagged edges of characters, thus
easing eye strain. Although it is optimized for LCD (flat panel) displays, ClearType is turned
on by default on all systems, regardless of display type. Microsoft believes that ClearType
improves readability on both cathode-ray tube (CRT) and LCD displays, but if you’re a CRT
user you should probably try turning ClearType off to see which works better for you. (You
can also turn font-smoothing off altogether by clearing the Smooth Edges Of Screen Fonts
check box on the Visual Effects tab of Performance Options, but it’s hard to imagine any
benefit from doing so.)
To check or change your font-smoothing settings, type cleartype in the Start menu search
box and click Adjust ClearType Text. Doing so opens ClearType Text Tuner, which, in its first
screen, has a check box that turns ClearType on when selected. The ensuing screens that
appear each time you click Next offer optometrist-style choices (“Which is better, number 1
or number 2?”) to help you reach ClearType perfection.
Windows includes seven new fonts that are optimized for ClearType. The names of six of
these—Constantia, Cambria, Corbel, Calibri, Candara, and Consolas—begin with the letter c—just to help cement the connection with ClearType. If you’re particularly prone to
eye fatigue, you might want to consider favoring these fonts in documents you create.
(Constantia and Cambria are serif fonts, considered particularly suitable for longer documents and reports. The other four are sans serif fonts, good for headlines and advertising.)
The seventh ClearType-optimized font, Segoe UI, is the typeface used for text elements
Chapter 4
Using Font Smoothing to Make Text Easier on the Eyes
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Chapter 4 Personalizing Windows 7
throughout the Windows user interface. (Windows also includes a ClearType-optimized
font called Meiryo that’s designed to improve the readability of horizontally arrayed Asian
languages.)
For information about how ClearType works, visit Microsoft’s ClearType site, at
w7io.com/0404.
Calibrating Your Display’s Colors
To get the most accurate rendition of images and colors on your screen, you should calibrate it. You’ve probably noticed, but perhaps not fiddled with, the buttons on your monitor that control various display settings. A new tool included with Windows 7, Display Color
Calibration, helps you to calibrate your screen using your monitor’s display controls as
well as various Windows settings. With Display Color Calibration, you set gamma, brightness, contrast, color balance, and other settings, all of which are explained in the on-screen
descriptions.
To run Display Color Calibration, in the Start menu search box, type display and then click
Calibrate Display Color. (Even easier, type dccw, the name of the executable file for Display
Color Calibration, and press Enter.) Calibrate Color is also an option in the Display control
panel. No matter how you start it, Display Color Calibration opens a full-screen application
that leads you through the steps of adjusting your display by making settings and adjusting
monitor controls until the images displayed at each step look their best.
Chapter 4
Using and Customizing Desktop Gadgets
One of the most conspicuous new features in Windows Vista was Windows Sidebar, a
repository for miniprograms (called gadgets) that can amuse, inform, and distract you all
day long. Windows 7 continues to support gadgets, but they’re no longer constrained
to the sidebar along one edge of your screen; they can be scattered anywhere on your
desktop.
You can easily add or remove gadgets whenever you feel the need for something new
on your computer screen. The gadget gallery that comes with Windows includes about a
dozen offerings but has a handy link to a much larger online gallery.
To add a gadget to your desktop, right-click the desktop and choose Gadgets to summon
the gadget gallery.
Using and Customizing Desktop Gadgets
147
For clues about what a gadget might do, select it and click Show Details. To install a gadget, you can either drag it to the desktop or right-click it and choose Add. After you have
installed a gadget, you’ll probably want to prod it with your mouse (try both buttons, and
click on various parts) to see what tricks it knows and what options it offers. Each gadget is
different, but they’re all designed to make their features discoverable. Many gadgets sprout
a wrench icon when you point to them; click it to make settings and customizations. Some
gadgets (Weather, for example) include a Make Smaller or Make Larger icon, which changes
the amount of information the gadget displays.
Close
Make Smaller/Make Larger
Options
Drag handle
Many gadgets rely on online updates (weather and stocks, for example). When you don’t
have an internet connection, these gadgets show information from the last online update
and include a time stamp at the bottom that shows how old the data is.
To remove a gadget, click the Close button. Gadgets that you close remain in the gallery
for easy recovery; if you want to remove a gadget from your computer, open the gadget
gallery, right-click the gadget, and choose Uninstall. If you’d rather hide your gadgets temporarily without removing them, right-click the desktop and choose View, Show Desktop
Gadgets to remove the check mark and hide your gadgetry.
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Chapter 4 Personalizing Windows 7
To get to the online gadget site, click Get More Gadgets Online, in the bottom right corner
of the gadget gallery. If you download a gadget from this site, it takes up residence in the
gallery, so you can easily close it and reopen it whenever you want. The search box in the
gadget gallery is also a list. By opening the list, you can filter the gallery to show recently
installed gadgets or gadgets from particular publishers.
INSIDE OUT Display desktop gadgets with a single keystroke
Bring all your gadgets to the foreground at any time by pressing Windows logo key+G.
If you want to view just your gadgets without the clutter of other open windows, press
Windows logo key+D. (Press it again to restore the windows.)
Setting Power and Sleep Options
Chapter 4
Do power settings really make a difference? In a word, yes. You can not only achieve
greater battery life on a portable computer with the appropriate settings, but you can save
considerable amounts of energy on desktop computers. The green effect of reducing power
consumption can be significant, whether you interpret “green” to mean saving dollars or
saving the environment. Microsoft has published a white paper that describes the changes
in Windows 7 power management and helps you to assess the energy savings, financial
savings, and environmental savings of proper power management; download it from
­w7io.com/0405. You can calculate your own savings using the Energy Star Computer Power
Management Savings Calculator, a Microsoft Office Excel spreadsheet you can download at
w7io.com/0406.
INSIDE OUT
Diagnose energy efficiency and sleep problems
Windows 7 includes a command-line tool called Powercfg that can analyze your system
for common energy efficiency and battery life problems. The tool is used primarily
by hardware manufacturers and device driver developers, but it can provide useful
information for end users. To use it, close all applications, and then open a Command
Prompt window (in the Start menu search box, type cmd and press Enter). At the command prompt, type powercfg –energy. After the program finishes running and the
command prompt returns, type energy-report.html, and a diagnostic report opens in
your web browser.
Setting Power and Sleep Options
149
The report can also tell you what is preventing a computer from sleeping (or waking)
as it should. This problem can be caused by a driver, application, or service that doesn’t
respond properly to sleep notifications. Drivers and applications that have been certified for Windows 7 have been tested not to block sleep.
Selecting a Power Plan
Chapter 4
Power management in Windows 7 is significantly different from power management in
Windows XP, both in its user interface and in its under-the-hood operation. Windows provides three predefined power plans, and some computer manufacturers include additional
predefined plans. To select a power plan, open Power Options (in the Start menu search
box, type power and click Power Options), shown in Figure 4-17.
Figure 4-17 Use the Create A Power Plan link in the left pane to add to the list of ready-made
power schemes. Click Change Plan Settings to adjust individual options for a plan.
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Chapter 4 Personalizing Windows 7
On a portable computer, there’s an easier way to switch plans: click the Power icon in the
notification area and make your selection.
Customizing a Power Plan
To customize the current power plan, click one of the links in the left pane of Power
Options, or click Change Plan Settings next to the name of any plan. As you dig into Power
Options, you’ll discover a wealth of useful settings, especially on notebook computers,
where you can make adjustments that are different based on whether a system is running
on batteries or on AC power.
Chapter 4
You can do additional fine-tuning by clicking Change Advanced Power Settings in the window shown above.
Working with Fonts
151
Note
If you’ve made changes to a predefined power plan, you can restore its default settings
by clicking Change Plan Settings and then clicking Restore Default Settings For This
Plan. Not sure what those default settings are? The United States Environmental Protection Agency will tell you; visit w7io.com/0407.
Understanding Sleep States
●●
Do Nothing disables the switch.
●●
Sleep switches to a low-power sleep state that allows quick resumption.
●●
Hibernate copies an image of memory to the hard disk and powers off the computer,
enabling you to return to where you left off.
●●
Shut Down performs an orderly shutdown of Windows and switches off the power.
By default, when you choose Sleep, Windows 7 uses hybrid sleep, which combines the benefits of the low-power sleep state (the system uses just enough power to keep everything in
volatile memory, ready to resume quickly) and hibernation (saves the contents of memory
to a hard disk so that nothing is lost if power is shut off or the battery drains completely).
Working with Fonts
The days when your choice of fonts ended just beyond Arial and Times New Roman are
long gone; if you include all the language variants and style variants (bold, italic, and so
on), Windows 7 comes with hundreds of fonts. Something else that is gone (and won’t be
missed): the Add Fonts dialog box, which has been in every version of Windows virtually
unchanged since Windows 3.1.
The headquarters for font management is Fonts in Control Panel, which is shown next.
From this list of fonts, you can select a font (or a font family, which appears as a stack) and
then click Preview to open a window that shows the font’s characters in sizes ranging from
12 point to 72 point. (A point is a printer’s measurement that is still used in modern digital
typography. There are 72 points to an inch.)
Chapter 4
When you click Choose What The Power Buttons Do (in the left pane of Power Options),
you’ll see that for each power switch, you can specify Do Nothing, Sleep, Hibernate, or Shut
Down. What do these terms mean?
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Chapter 4 Personalizing Windows 7
A stack indicates
multiple fonts in a
font family (italic,
bold, and so on)
Dim text indicates a
hidden font, which
is one designed for
an input language
you don’t use.
Hidden fonts
don’t appear in
application font lists.
Chapter 4
The primary font format used by Windows is OpenType, which is a format jointly developed
by Microsoft and Adobe as an extension of Apple’s TrueType format. Windows also supports TrueType fonts and PostScript Type 1 fonts. To install a new font, you can drag its file
from a folder or compressed .zip archive to Fonts in Control Panel. But it’s not necessary
to open Fonts; the simplest way to install a font is to right-click its file in Windows Explorer
and choose Install. Because font file names are often somewhat cryptic, you might want to
double-click the file, which opens the font preview window, to see what you’re getting. If
it’s a font you want, click the Install button.
!
CAUTION
Download and install fonts only from people or companies you know and trust.
Note
PostScript Type 1 fonts normally comprise two or three files. The one you use to install
the font—regardless of which method you use—is the .pfm file, whose file type is
shown in Windows Explorer as Type 1 Font File.
Adjusting Ease of Access Options
153
Adjusting Ease of Access Options
The Ease Of Access Center provides a prominent link to each of the following tools, which
can be used alone or in combination:
●●
Magnifier This tool enlarges part of the screen, making it easier for persons with
vision impairments to see objects and read text. (You can also launch Magnifier with a
keyboard shortcut: Press Windows logo key+plus sign to launch it and zoom in. Press
again to zoom in more, or press Windows logo key+minus sign to zoom out.)
●●
Narrator This tool converts on-screen text to speech and sends it to your computer’s
speakers. This option allows people who are blind or have severe vision impairments
to use Windows.
●●
On-Screen Keyboard This tool provides an alternate means for Windows users with
impaired mobility to enter text using a pointing device. Options that appear when
you click Options let you control how On-Screen Keyboard works—you can choose
whether to select a letter by clicking, for example, or by allowing the pointer to pause
over a key for a specific amount of time.
Chapter 4
The Windows family has had a longstanding commitment to making computing accessible and easier to use for persons with vision, hearing, or mobility impairments. Windows 7
groups these options into the Ease Of Access Center, which you can find in Control Panel or
by using its keyboard shortcut, Windows logo key+U.
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Chapter 4 Personalizing Windows 7
●●
High Contrast This tool uses a high-contrast color scheme (by default, white text
on a black background) that makes it easier for visually impaired users to read the
screen.
Many more tools—including Windows stalwarts Mouse Keys (uses the numeric keypad to
control the mouse pointer), Sticky Keys (lets you press key combinations one key at a time),
and Filter Keys (ignores repeated keystrokes)—are available through links at the bottom of
the Ease Of Access Center. However, the easiest way to configure your computer for adaptive needs in one fell swoop is to click Get Recommendations To Make Your Computer
Easier To Use, a link near the center of the page. The link launches a wizard, shown below,
which walks you through the process of configuring accessibility options.
Chapter 4
If you want accessibility options to be available at all times, even before logging on to the
computer, click the Change Administrative Settings link in the left pane. This option (shown
next) applies any changes you make to the logon desktop. If you choose not to enable this
option, you can still turn accessibility features on or off at the logon screen; click the small
blue Ease Of Access icon in the lower left corner of the logon screen to display a list of
available settings, and then press the Spacebar to enable each one.
Adjusting Ease of Access Options
155
Windows 7 offers another useful accessibility tool in speech input. For details, see “Using
Speech Recognition and Voice Commands” on page 938.
Chapter 4
Index
Symbols and Numbers
16-bit programs not installable in 64-bit Windows, 170
32-bit programs running in 64-bit Windows, 170–171
32-bit versions of Windows 7
editions available in, 6
hardware minimum requirements, 23
installing from 64-bit editions prohibited, 26
3G support, 587
64-bit versions of Windows 7
16-bit programs not installable, 170
32-bit programs running in, 170–171
device driver signing requirement, 874
driver availability, 24
hardware minimum requirements, 23
increasing prevalence of, 6
installing from 32-bit editions prohibited, 26
installing programs in, 170–171
memory requirements and limitations, 722
security features of, 501
A
AAC (Advanced Audio Coding) format, 409, 412
accelerators, Internet Explorer 8
configuring, 214–215
definition of, 19–20
access control
Advanced Sharing, setting with, 641–642
children, controlling computer access of. See Parental
Controls
discretionary approach to, 544–545
effective permissions, 642–643
entries. See ACEs (access control entries)
Full Control access, 547
Integrity Levels, 548
List Folder Contents permissions, 547
lists. See ACLs (access control lists)
Modify access, 547
NTFS permissions. See ACLs (access control lists)
permissions for. See permissions
Read & Execute permission, 547
Read permission, 547
rights, 548
security access tokens for, 544–545
SIDs, role of, 544–545
Special Permissions, 547
UAC interactions with, 547
user accounts for. See user accounts
Write permission, 547
access control lists. See ACLs (access control lists)
account types, 548–550
accounts, user. See user accounts
ACEs (access control entries)
Advanced Sharing, setting with, 642
Allow settings, 642
definition of, 546
Deny settings, 642
Integrity Levels, 548
ACLs (access control lists)
Advanced Sharing, setting with, 642
combining with shared resource permissions, 642–643
DACLs, 546
definition of, 546
editing, 546
effective permissions, 642–643
permission types, 547
purpose of, 545
ACPI (Advanced Configuration and Power Interface)
IRQs with, 881–884
Plug and Play capabilities from, 856
Acronis True Image, 25
Action Center
antivirus setup, 71–72
checking for solutions, 817–818
clearing alert categories from, 504–505
histories of problems, 818–819
maintenance with, 739–742
management tricks, 293
new feature in Windows 7, 17–18
opening, 502
opening Windows Update from, 742–743
Privacy Policy link, 813
Problem Reporting Settings, 815–817
Problem Reports window, 818–819
Reliability Monitor, link to, 823
977
978
actions, Task Scheduler
Action Center, continued
Security section of, 502–505
security, monitoring of essentials, 499
Set Up Backup button, 376
third-party software with, 503
troubleshooting wizards, 820
Windows Error Reporting, configuring, 815–817
actions, Task Scheduler
definition of, 783
setting for tasks, 787–788
activating Windows 7
30-day grace period, 55
Activate Now boxes, 60
automatic setting for, 55–57
confirming status of, 55–56
corporate licensing issues, 59
disabling automatic after setup, 57
extending grace periods, 55
hardware upgrades, effects of, 57–58
help for, 60
manual option for, 57
OEM installations, activation methods, 58–59
product keys, entering, 54–56
purpose of, 53
recommendations for, 57
registration, difference from, 57
reinstall limitations, 57
retail copy activation methods, 55–58
System Builder copy activation, 59
telephone activation, 56
unactivated copies, running, 60
Volume Licensing activation, 59
active partitions, 900
Active Server Pages, 230
ActiveX controls
definition of, 229
disabling downloaded add-ons, 218–219
Low privilege access in Protected Mode, 221
security options for, 229–230
virus scanning of, 229
Windows Live Mail, prohibited in, 248
ad hoc networks, 609–610
Add Hardware wizard
device drivers on CDs, 876
legacy devices, 876–878
add-ons, Internet Explorer 8, 216–219
address bar commands, 958
Address Space Layout Randomization (ASLR), 501
Address toolbar, 112
Admin Approval Mode, 532
administrative privileges. See also administrator
accounts
Command Prompt windows with, 956
legacy software requiring, 163
opening programs with, 102, 178–179
program installations, requirements for, 158–160
program launches, UAC effect on, 547
Runas command with, 179
running programs under from standard accounts, 561
VirtualStore folder bypasses, 281
Administrator account, 33, 551
administrator accounts
Administrator account compared to, 551
changing an account to, 557
Command Prompt windows, opening with, 540–541
minimizing use of, 560–561
protected mode, 532
security access tokens for, 544
tasks allowed for, 549. See also administrative privileges
tokens, UAC effects of, 535
Administrators group
Domain Admins group membership in, 552
Mange Printers permission, 643
tasks allowed for, 549
Adobe Photoshop, 24
Adobe Reader preview handler, 269
ADTS Audio format, 409
Advanced Audio Coding (AAC) format. See AAC
(Advanced Audio Coding) format
Advanced Boot Options
Debugging Mode, 845
definition of, 840
Directory Services Restore Mode, 845
Disable Automatic Restart On System Failure, 846
Disable Driver Signature Enforcement, 846
Enable Boot Logging, 845
Enable Low-Resolution Video option, 845
F8 to start, 840, 843
Last Known Good Configuration option, 844–845
msconfig to start, 843
Repair Your Computer command, 846
Safe Mode, 842–844
Safe Mode With Command Prompt, 844
Safe Mode With Networking option, 844
troubleshooting, 843
Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI). See
ACPI (Advanced Configuration and Power Interface)
Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), 366
advanced file management. See file management
Advanced Query Syntax (AQS), 325–327
advanced searches
overview of, 325–327
scope of searches, 328
type or kind, searching by, 327–328
Advanced Sharing, 630–632, 639–642
Advanced Systems Format (ASF), 411
Advanced User Accounts feature
automatic logons, setting up, 573–575
capabilities of, 562–563
advertising, internet, 234–235
Aero
color settings, 130–133
desktop composition effects, 126–127
disabling, 127
enabling not required for mouse gestures, 122
Flip 3D feature, 126
requirements for, 127
Starter edition, not supported for, 99
themes, 127
transparency settings, 131
Aero Peek, 7–8, 103–104
Aero Shake
disabling, 123
effects of, 122
Aero Snap
disabling, 123
full-height snaps, 122
maximizing and restoring windows, 121
splitting windows, 121–122
touch-enabled screens with, 934
AES (Advanced Encryption Standard), 366. See also
encryption
affinity, setting, 178
album art, 435–438
All Programs folder, 107
All Users Startup folder, 172
Allmusic, 428
allocation units, 904. See also clusters, disk
Allow ACEs, 642
AMD Virtualization (AMD-V), 164
Analyze Wait Chain, 824–825
antispyware programs
compatibility issues, 24–25
domain-based systems, for, 523
importance of, 499
multiple allowed, 504
Windows Defender, 500, 522–523
antivirus programs
ActiveX controls, scanning, 229
certifications of, 519
compatibility issues, 24–25
configuring, 521
finding, 519
importance of, 499
Malicious Software Removal Tool, 521–522
Microsoft Security Essentials, 5, 521
multiple not allowed, 504
performance issues with, 520
security without, 520
audio
setting up, 71
virus mechanics, 517–519
Windows Live scanner, 522
zero-day exploits, 520
any folder sharing, 628
Anytime Upgrade, 50–51
APIPA (Automatic Private IP Addressing), 695
APPDATA environment variable, 969
AppData folder
backing up, 383
purpose of, 277
subfolders of, 277–278
application events, 827
application programs. See programs, application
Applications And Services Logs, 827
AQS (Advanced Query Syntax), 325–327
ASF (Advanced Systems Format), 411
ASLR (Address Space Layout Randomization), 501
associations, file type. See file type associations
audio
AAC (Advanced Audio Coding) format, 409
album art for, 435–438
bit rate selection for syncs, 453–454
CD audio tracks, 412
CD format issues, 431–432
classical music metadata, 428
codecs required to play, 408
compression issues, 428–429
container formats, 408–409
device to PC transfers, 455
DRM with, 438–440
editing metadata, 303–305
Exact Audio Copy, 432
libraries for organizing, 283. See also libraries
metadata in music files, 299, 435–438
MP3 files, 412
MPEG-4 Audio format, 409
Music folder template, 291
My Music folder, 276
Narrator tool, 153
newly supported formats, 408–409
player for, default. See Windows Media Player 12
playing music, 416–417
playlists, 421–426
previewing tracks, 435
rating, 299
rating with Windows Media Center, 479–480
ripping CDs. See ripping digital media files
sharing. See sharing digital media
Sound Recorder, 949
sound schemes in themes, 126
speaker icon menu, 408
storage issues, 429
979
980
Audit event types
audio, continued
streaming to remote devices, 446–449
synchronizing with portable devices, 450–455
transcoding, 453–454
troubleshooting, 408
Windows Media Center for. See Windows Media Center
WMA file support, 411
Audit event types, 828
authentication. See also logons
802.1x wireless authentication, 603
passwords for. See passwords
Authenticode, 226
authors, searching by, 329
Auto Playlists, 421–422, 424–425
Autochk.exe, 751
AutoComplete
Internet Explorer, options for, 219–220
security issues with, 220
setting in Internet Explorer 8, 212
autoelevation of programs, 533–534
Autoexec batch equivalent, 958–959
Autoexec.bat environment variables, 968
automatic logons, 573–575
automatic sync relationships, 451
Automatic Update settings, 34. See also Windows
Update
AutoPlay
audio CD settings for, 416–417
AutoRun for USB media, 190
Conficker worm use of, 518
importing to Windows Live Photo Gallery option,
253–256
purpose of, 189
setting options for, 189
Windows Media Center, launching automatically, 481
AutoRun, 190, 958–959
Autoruns tool, 732
AVC format support, 13
AVCHD format, 409
AVI (Audio Video Interleave)
definition of, 411
DVD Maker support for, 459–460
B
Back button, flick gesture for, 933
background tasks, performance hits from, 705
backups
images for. See system images
initial scheduling of, 76
managing, 391–392
restoring. See restoring data
system images for, 383–386
system repair discs, 76, 386
Windows Backup for. See backups with Windows Backup
XP, restoring in Windows 7, 25
backups with Windows Backup
additional locations, adding, 383
AppData folder backups, 383
Computer tree backups, 383
customizing backups, 381–383
destination selection, 377–379
displaying progress of, 380
edition variations for, 375, 378
empty backup folders, 392
excluded files, 384
external hard drives for, 378
file system requirements, 384
future proofing settings, 383
images, restoring, 850–851
importance of backups, 375
improvement over legacy versions, 376
Let Me Choose setting, 381–383
libraries, selectively backing up, 382
managing, 391–392
newly created users option, 383
removable media drives for, 378
restoring. See restoring data
saving settings, 380
scheduling backups, 379–380
sets of backups, 391
setting up, 376–380
shared network folders for, 378–379
skipping the setup process, 376
startup locations, 376
system images, 383
troubleshooting, 392
users, backing up only particular, 381–382
what to back up, choosing, 379
BadApp.exe testing tool, 815
baselines, performance
System Health Reports for, 708–710
tools for creating, list of, 705
Windows Experience Index (WEI), 705–708
WinSAT results, 708
basic disks, 900
batteries, power plans for, 149–151
BCD (Boot Configuration Data) stores
EasyBCD utility, 48–49
editing, 47–48
fixing, 850
multiboot system role of, 45
Bing Search, 211
biometric devices
recommended for UAC, 541
Windows Biometric Service, 501
BIOS (basic input/output system)
compatibility for installations, 31
digital cable tuner support, 485
IRQ issues, 881–884
Plug and Play compatibility requirement, 856
Stop errors for, 838
BitLocker Drive Encryption
definition of, 365–366
recommendation for, 368
BitLocker To Go
purpose of, 366
steps for encryption, 369–371
.bkf files, 25
blogs, Windows Live Mail for, 245
blue screen of death. See Stop errors
Blue-ray support
Media Center Extender issues, 493
requirements for, 418
Boot Configuration Data. See BCD (Boot Configuration
Data) stores
boot menus
editing, 47–48
editing with VistaBootPRO, 48–49
multiboot system processing for, 45–46
Startup And Recovery options, 48
boot partitions, 900
boot process
advanced options for. See Advanced Boot Options
Bootrec tool, 850
Enable Boot Logging, 845
multiboot systems, for, 45–46
recovery environment. See Windows Recovery
Environment
Safe Mode. See Safe Mode
Windows Error Recovery menu, 841
bootable flash disks, 916
BootExecute registry values, 174
bootmgr, 45–46
botnets, 498
BranchCache, 587
breadcrumb trail navigation, 270
broadband connections
equipment for. See routers
mobile broadband support, 587
browsers, web. See Internet Explorer 8
buffer overrun protection, 501
burning CDs and DVDs
burn process, 459
current disc settings, viewing, 456–457
dedicated partitions for, 755
DRM issues, 459
format selection, 457
ISO files to DVD, 916
Check Disk, Windows
list creation, 456
music, format issues, 431–432
Next Disc markers, 457
options for burning, 457–459
rights issues, 459
software compatibility issues, 24–25
starting burns, 459
track break options, 459
types of discs Media Player can create, 456
volume options, 459
Windows DVD Maker, 459–462
Windows Media Center for, 472
buttons
notification area, customizing behavior of, 8
pinning programs to the taskbar, 101
taskbar buttons, 7–8
themes, configuring through, 126
C
CableCARDs, 485
cabling, Ethernet, 592–593, 595–596
cache, offline, 354–355
cached memory (RAM), 723
calendar. See Windows Live Calendar
cameras, importing pictures from, 253–256. See also
images
caret feature, Internet Explorer 8, 198
Category 5 cabling, 592–593
CDs
audio compared to data, 456
audio files of, 412
AutoPlay for music CDs, 416–417
AutoPlay settings, 189–190
backups to, 378
bootable, settings for, 28
burning. See burning CDs and DVDs
Exact Audio Copy, 432
Mastered Optical Media, 906
No Media drive status, 918
playing music, 416–417
ripping. See ripping digital media files
UDF (Universal Disk Format), 896, 905–906
Windows Media Center with, 481–482
cell phones, 450
Change access, 642
Check Disk, Windows
abnormal shutdowns, running after, 750–751
Autochk.exe, scheduling with, 751
Automatically Fix File System Errors option, 749–750
bad sectors, recovering data from, 752
canceling scheduled checks, 751
capabilities of, 748
command line version options, 751–752
981
982
children, controlling computer access of
Check Disk, Windows, continued
dismounting volumes, 751–752
fix detected errors switch, 751
index entry checks, 752
Scan For And Attempt Recovery Of Bad Sectors option,
749–750
scheduling to run on startup, 750
steps for running, 748–750
time required to run, 750
troubleshooting, 752
Windows Recovery Environment, running in, 752
children, controlling computer access of. See Parental
Controls
Chkdsk.exe. See Check Disk, Windows
Chkntfs.exe, 751
Cipher.exe, destroying data with, 907
classic sharing, Windows XP, 629
clean installations
activation requirements. See activating Windows 7
Automatic Update settings, 34
BIOS compatibility, 31
computer name selection, 32
definition of, 26
drive letter assignment in multiboot systems, 44
Drive Options (Advanced), 38–40
dual-boot setup. See multiboot systems
image files for, 28
initiating, 27
language preference screens, 29
network setup during, 35–36
partitioning advanced options, 38–40
partitioning for, 29
product keys, entering, 33
progress bar for, 32
sharing versions on single partitions, 31
time and date settings, 34
troubleshooting, 28, 30–31
user name selection, 32
Where Do You Want To Install Windows dialog box,
29–30, 38
Which Type Of Installation dialog box, 29
Windows.old folder, deleting, 760
ClearType, 145–146
Client For Microsoft Networks, 692
Clipboard
Remote Desktop options for, 661
Virtual Windows XP’s sharing of, 169
clusters, disk
choosing while formatting with Disk Management, 904
fragmentation, role in, 753
Cmd.exe, 957. See also Command Prompt windows
codecs
adding, 410
definition of, 408
DivX, 410
newly supported, 408–409
troubleshooting, 410
Xvid, 410
colors
calibrating, 146
custom, defining, 132–133
High Contrast tool, 154
schemes for desktops, 130–133
Command bar, Internet Explorer 8, 193–194, 216
Command Prompt windows
/A argument, 959
/C argument, 957–958
/D argument, 959
/E argument, 959
/F argument, 959, 962
/K argument, 957–958
/Q argument, 959
/S argument, 960
/U argument, 959
/V argument, 959–960
administrator, for UAC, 540–541
AutoRun, 958–959
canceling commands, 967
Cmd.exe, 957
colors for, 972
Command History options, 973
command symbols, table of, 964
Command.com, 957
cursor size, setting, 973
customizing appearance of, 970
defaults for, 970
delayed variable expansion, 959–960
Doskey macros, 967–968, 973
echo off argument, 959
editing command lines, 962–963
elevated command prompts, 956
encoding system, specifying, 959
ending sessions in, 956–957
entering commands, 960
environment variables with, 968–969
folders, starting in, 957
fonts for, setting, 971–972
help for, 960
immediately running a command when starting,
957–958
Insert Mode, 973
multiple commands and symbols on one line, 966–967
multitasking interactions of programs, 964
name completion feature of, 961–962
number allowed, 955
opening, 955
other types of command prompts, 958
pausing commands, 967
pipes, 966
positioning windows, 970–971
PROMPT environment variable, 969
properties for, 970
QuickEdit option, 973
quotation marks in command strings, 960
redirecting input and output, 964–966
registry settings, overriding, 959
Runas command, 179
running programs from, 178–179
Safe Mode With Command Prompt, 844
Set statements, 968–969
shortcuts for elevated, 956
sizing windows, 970–971
standard error devices, output to, 965–966
Start command, 961
starting programs from, 961
startup, executing on, 958–959
syntax for, 959–960
Type command, 965–966
UAC with, 956
wildcards in, 962
Windows-based programs, starting from, 961
Windows Explorer, opening from, 961
Windows Recovery Environment, opening in, 852
command prompts, non–Command Prompt window,
958
Command.com, 957. See also Command Prompt
windows
Commit Change, 723, 725
common dialog boxes
navigation techniques in, 274
searches from, 325
compact privacy statements, 232–233
CompactFlash cards, ReadyBoost with, 728–730
compatibility of legacy software
16-bit programs not installable in 64-bit Windows 7,
170
32-bit programs running in 64-bit Windows, 170–171
administrative privileges sometimes required, 163
installing programs, notices after, 160–161
problematic software types, 24–25
restore points, recommendation to set, 162
running in a compatibility mode, 163
testing during upgrades, 42
troubleshooting with Program Compatibility, 161–162
Upgrade Advisor, 21–22
video issue resolution, 163
VirtualStore folder, 280–281
XP Mode for. See Windows XP Mode
compatibility tools, Internet Explorer, 194–196
Complete PC Backup. See system images
compression, file
Disk Management compression option, 904
customizing Windows 7
983
NTFS compression, 904, 909
zipped files and folders, 288–289
computer defaults, 187–188
Computer Management console, 769
computer manufacturer customizations, 6
computer names, setting, 32
computer-to-computer networks, 609–610
Conficker worm, 518
Connect To A Network command, 604
Connect To folder, 120
consent prompts, 535. See also UAC (User Account
Control)
contacts. See Windows Live Contacts
Contacts folder, Windows Explorer, 249, 276
container formats, 408–409
Control Panel
backups, setting up from, 376
desktop icon configuration for, 137
Devices And Printers folder, 858–863
environment variables, editing, 968
Fonts folder, 151–152
management tricks, 293
Programs And Features, 293
System application, 5, 763–764
Uninstall A Program, 179
Convert utility, 910–912
cookies
consent types, 233
Cookies folder, 277
first-party cookies, 234
InPrivate browsing rules for, 237
P3P (Platform for Privacy Preferences), 232
personally identifiable information, 233
purpose of, 231–232
session cookies, 233
settings for, 232
site exceptions for settings, 234
third-party cookies, 234
copying files with Robocopy, 372–373
CPUs. See processors (CPUs)
crashes
Crash Analyzer wizard, 839
errors causing. See Stop errors
recovering from, 840
credentials prompts, 535. See also UAC (User Account
Control)
Ctrl+Alt+Del logon method, 569–571
Ctrl+Alt+Del menu options, 576
CurrentControlSet, restoring, 805
cursors. See mouse pointers
customizations by manufacturers, 6
customizing Windows 7. See personalizing Windows 7
984
DACLs
D
DACLs (discretionary access control lists). See ACLs
(access control lists); NTFS permissions
DaRT (Diagnostics and Recovery Toolset), 839
data files, separating from system files, 363–365
data redirection
definition of, 501
VirtualStore folder for, 280–281
data types, registry, 801, 809
dates
navigator for, 295
searching by, 329–330
setting during installation, 34
DCOM, Remote Assistance invitations with, 92–93
DCTs (digital cable tuners), 485
debugging
Debugging Mode, 845
Windows Debugging Tools, 839
default gateways
definition of, 695
viewing, 681
Default profiles, 282
default programs
Default Programs folder in Start menu, 120
opening Default Programs, 180
setting file type associations, 181–187
settings for, 74–75
web browser, setting default, 191–192
default Windows features, configuring, 188
Defender, Windows. See Windows Defender
defragmentation
Disk Defragmenter, 753–758
fragmentation mechanics, 753
MFTs, moving to beginnings of volumes, 911
minimum free space requirement, 757
performance effects of, 733
solid state media, of, 758
deleting files, 338–339, 372–373
denial of service, wireless, 597
Deny ACEs, 642
desktop backgrounds
alternate methods for editing, 130
flexibility of, 8–10
logon screens, setting custom for, 571–572
options for, 127
positioning images for, 129
Presentation Mode, 952
RSS feeds for, 130
selecting images for, 128–129
slide show effects for, 129
themes, relation to, 126
desktop composition, 126–127
Desktop folder
Internet Explorer link to, 273–274
purpose of, 276
Desktop toolbar, 112
Desktop Window Manager, 127
desktops
backgrounds of. See desktop backgrounds
changes in Windows 7 from legacy versions, 7–10
color scheme customization, 130–133
gadgets on. See gadgets
icon configuration, 137–139
notification areas of. See notification areas
Personalizations dialog box, 8–10
Show Desktop tool, 124
taskbars of. See taskbars
transparency settings, 131
Developer Tools, Internet Explorer, 216
device drivers
64-bit installation rule, 874
adding new, methods for, 872
availability for Windows 7, 52
bad, dangers of, 875
catalog files of, 874
CDs containing, 876
definition of, 871
Device Manager for driver information, 868–870
Disable Driver Signature Enforcement boot option, 846
Driver Verifier Manager, 886–888
error codes, 890–893
Found New Hardware wizard, 857–858
importance of up-to-date, 52
IRQ conflicts from, 884
Last Known Good Configuration option, 844–845
legacy devices, 876–878
libraries included with Windows, 872
listing all, 870
multiboot systems, testing with, 43
performance issues from outdated, 704
Plug and Play device installation, 855–858
Plug and Play, uninstalling, 889
printer, 862–863
restore points, creating before changing, 885
rights needed to install, 872
rolling back, 884, 886
Safe Mode, reinstalling in, 839
Setup Information files, 873
signing of, levels of trust for, 874
Stop errors from, 837
System Health Report, 871
troubleshooting, 886–888
trusted vs. untrusted publishers of, 872, 874
uninstalling, 884, 886, 889
unsigned, choosing to install, 872–873, 875–876
updating, 746, 884–885
verification of, 52
WHQL-signed, 874–875
Windows Experience Index (WEI), effects on, 708
device management. See also Device Manager
Create Shortcut command, 860
Device Stage, 863–864
Devices And Printers folder, 858–863
Found New Hardware wizard, 857–858
IRQs, 881–884
legacy devices, 876–878
Plug and Play device installation, 855–858
printers, 860–863
Properties command, 860
System Health Report, 871
Troubleshoot command, 860
Windows Mobility Center, 865
Device Manager
advanced settings for devices, 879–881
device IDs, 878
DEVMGR environment variable, 878
disabling devices, 889
disk drives, Volumes tab, 879
driver information, 868–870
driver verification with, 52
DVD drive settings, 880
enabling devices, 889
error codes, 890–893
formerly installed devices, viewing, 878
IRQs, viewing, 881–884
launching from System, 764
layout of, 866–868
modems, 879
network adapter cards, 879–880
non–Plug and Play devices, displaying, 878
opening, 866
Power Management tabs, 879
rolling back device drivers, 884, 886
Safe Mode, running in, 843–844
uninstalling device drivers, 884, 886, 889
updating device drivers, 884–885
USB hub Power tab, 881
Device Stage, 863–864
Devices And Printers folder, 120
DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol)
IP address assignment by, 695
IP Configuration Utility, 676
residential gateways, role in, 592
troubleshooting, 680–682
diacritical marks, results for searches, 319
Diagnostics and Recovery Toolset (DaRT), 839
dialog boxes, navigation techniques in, 274
digital cable tuners (DCTs), 485
Digital Living Network Alliance (DLNA), 443
Disk Defragmenter
985
digital media
burning to discs. See burning CDs and DVDs
codecs required to play, 408
container formats, 408–409
libraries for organizing, 283
movies. See video
music. See audio
new features for in Windows 7, 12–14
newly supported formats, 408–409
playlists, 421–426
rating, 299, 479–480
sharing. See sharing digital media
synchronizing with portable devices, 450–455
television. See TV
Windows DVD Maker, 459–462
Windows Media Center for. See Windows Media Center
Windows Media Player for. See Windows Media
Player 12
digital rights management. See DRM (digital rights
management)
digital signatures, 226, 229
Digital Video Recording (DVR) format, 412
digitizers, 925
DirectAccess, 587
directories. See also folders
definition of, 957
DirectX
version required for Aero, 127
version support requirements, 23
disability options, 153–155
Disk Cleanup
command-line switches for, 761–762
features of, 759–760
Hibernation file removal, 759–760
opening, 759
programs, option for uninstalling, 760–761
Recycle Bin, emptying, 759–760, 762
restore points, deleting, 760–761
saving settings for, 761–762
scheduling runs, 761–762
shadow copies, deleting, 760–761
shortcuts for specific tasks, 762
system files cleanup, 733, 760–761
Temporary Files, deleting, 760
upgrades to Windows 7, running after, 43
viewing findings of, 759
Disk Defragmenter
automatic nature of, 753
command lines, running from, 756–757
defragmenting particular files, 758
errors interfering with, 757
files not defragmented, 757
minimum free space requirement, 757
multiple disk options, 755
986
disk drives
Disk Defragmenter, continued
scheduling, 754–755
solid state media defragmentation, 758
switch options, 756–757
troubleshooting, 757
disk drives
CD drives. See CDs
cleaning up files. See Disk Cleanup
DVD drives. See DVDs
hard drives. See hard disks
managing storage, 758–762
managing volumes. See Disk Management console
UDF (Universal Disk Format), 896
Disk Management console
adding hard disks with, 902–905
adding volumes, 904
administrative credentials requirement, 896
allocation units, 904
capabilities of, 896–897
command-line alternative. See Diskpart
compression option, 904
Create VHD command, 920–922
definition of, 895–896
deleting volumes, 910
disk information from, 917–919
drive letters, assigning to volumes, 903
drive letters, changing, 912–913
extending existing volumes, 908–909
file system choices, 903
formatting new volumes, 903–905
layout of, 897–898
mapping volumes to folders, 913–916
New Simple Volume wizard, 902–905
opening, 896
quick formatting, 904
shrinking partitions, 47
shrinking volumes, 909–911
specifying capacity of new simple volumes, 902–903
status messages for disks, 917–919
viewing basic disk data, 897
virtual hard disk creation, 920–922
volume labels, 904, 912
disk partitioning. See partitioning
Diskpart
active partitions, creating for flash drives, 916
disadvantages of, 899
graphic interface alternative. See Disk Management
console
listing commands for, 898
opening, 898
primary partition creation with, 37
Windows Recovery Environment with, 898–899
disks
basic, 900
CD. See CDs
DVD. See DVDs
dynamic. See dynamic disks
hard drives. See hard disks
displays. See desktops; screens
DivX, 410
DLNA (Digital Living Network Alliance), 443
DMA channels, 890
DNS (Domain Name System)
dnsstuff.com, 684
dynamic DNS for Remote Desktop, 652
IP Configuration Utility, 676
Name Server Lookup (Nslookup.exe), 676
Nslookup command, 684
problems, indicator of, 679
troubleshooting, 683–684
Do Nothing power button, 151
documents
Documents folder, 275
Documents folder template, 291
Documents library, 328
metadata in, 299
organizing. See Windows Explorer
pinning to the taskbar, 101
search technique for, 328
sharing files online (SkyDrive), 260–261
Domain Admins group, 552
domain controllers, 552
domain user accounts, 552
domains
account and group databases in, 552
definition of, 552
homegroups, using with, 625–626
logging on to, 569–571
Network Map with, 671
User Accounts feature with, 554
Windows Firewall with, 509–510
workgroups compared to, 591
Doskey macros, 967–968
Downloads folder
Internet Explorer link to, 273–274
purpose of, 276
DPI scaling of text, 143–144
drive letters
assigning to new volumes, 903
changing, 912–913
multiboot systems, assignment for, 44
Driver Verifier Manager, 886–888
Driverquery command, 870
drivers. See device drivers
DRM (digital rights management)
avoiding, 439
burning CDs, checking before, 459
content not indexed, 314
crimes associated with, 439
M4P file extensions indicating, 412
moving files with DRM, 440
PlayReady, 488
purpose of, 438–439
TV, copy protected programs, 488
variations in terms of, 439–440
dual-boot systems. See multiboot systems
dual-core systems, 712
dual-monitor displays, 141–142
dump files
analyzing, 839–840
options for, 836
DVDs
AutoPlay, 189–190
backups to, 378
bootable, settings for, 28
burning, 456–459
data DVDs compared to video DVDs, 456
decoders not included in some editions, 407
Device Manager settings for, 880
ISO files, transferring to, 916
Mastered Optical Media, 906
Media Center Extender issues, 493
MPEG-2 format, 412
No Media drive status, 918
playing movies from, 13
subtitles, 418
UDF (Universal Disk Format), 896, 905–906
Windows DVD Maker, 459–462
Windows Media Center for playing, 482
Windows Media Player 12, playing with, 417–419
DVR files, 412
DVR-MS, 488
DVRs (Digital Video Recorders). See recording TV
dynamic disks
advantages of, 900
Failed status message for, 919
Offline status, 918
Online (Errors) status, 918
dynamic DNS, 652
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. See DHCP
(Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol)
dynamic updates, 23, 41
E
Ease Of Access Center, 153–155
Easy Connect for Remote Assistance, 87–89, 96
Easy Transfer
64-bit to 32-bit transfers not allowed, 61
choosing what to transfer, 64–66
clean installs with, 60–61
connections, establishing, 62–63
LAN connections for, 62
e-mail
987
mapping drives, 67–68
network stored folders for, 63
program transfers, 61, 66
purpose of, 60–61
removable media for, 63
replication vs. single account transfers, 65
reports from, 68–69
restore process on new computer, 67–69
setup steps for transfers, 63–64
USB cable connections for, 62
user account transfers, 65
user names, differing, 67
EasyBCD utility, 48–49
editions of Windows 7
32-bit versions. See 32-bit versions of Windows 7
64-bit versions. See 64-bit versions of Windows 7
encryption, differences for, 366
Enterprise edition. See Enterprise edition of Windows 7
European editions, 7
file management feature differences, 337
hardware configurations supported by, 947
hardware minimum requirements, 23
Home Basic edition. See Home Basic edition of
Windows 7
Home Premium edition. See Home Premium edition of
Windows 7
listing installed edition, 5
multiple on retail DVDs, 26
offline files feature availability, 343
overview of, 4, 6
product keys tied to, 54
Professional edition. See Professional edition of
Windows 7
Remote Desktop support differences, 616, 649–650
sharing resources, differences in, 616
Starter edition. See Starter edition of Windows 7
Ultimate edition. See Ultimate edition of Windows 7
upgrades among, 50–51
user account differences for, 543–544
Windows Backup feature variations with, 375, 378
Windows DVD Maker availability, 459
Windows Media Center availability, 463
Windows Media Player 12 differences for, 407
x86 vs. x64, 6
effective permissions, 642–643
EFS. See Encrypting File System (EFS)
e-mail
Gmail in Windows Live Mail, 247
Live Mail for. See Windows Live Mail
missing legacy programs for, 4
tasks, scheduling to send, 787–788
user account passwords, issues with changing, 567
virus blocking by servers, 520
viruses attached to, 517–518
988
emptying the Recycle Bin
emptying the Recycle Bin, 341
Enable Boot Logging, 845
Enable Low-Resolution Video option, 845
Encrypting File System (EFS)
definition of, 365
disadvantages of, 368
file encryption certificate management, 557
files, individually encrypted, 368
keys for (FEKs), 366
passwords associated with, 567
recommendations for, 366
recovery requirements, 368
steps for encrypting folders, 366–367
using encrypted files, 368
encryption
AES (Advanced Encryption Standard), 366
BitLocker Drive Encryption, 365–366, 368
BitLocker To Go, 366, 369–371
edition differences for, 366
EFS. See Encrypting File System (EFS)
file encryption certificate management, 557
folders, steps for, 366–367
indexing encrypted files, 317
offline file encryption, 352
tools for, overview of, 365–366
Enterprise edition of Windows 7
definition of, 6
feature set of, 953
hardware configurations supported by, 947
environment variables
Command Prompt commands with, 968–969
Control Panel, editing from, 968
editing, 558
modifying, 968–969
predefinition of, 969
viewing, 968
errors
BadApp.exe testing tool, 815
blue screen errors. See Stop errors
Event Viewer for troubleshooting. See Event Viewer
hangs, resolving with Resource Monitor, 824–825
not responding messages, 811–812
Problem Steps Recorder, 821–822
reporting problems. See Windows Error Reporting
shutdowns triggered by. See Stop errors
Stop. See Stop errors
Essentials. See Windows Live Essentials
Ethernet, 593, 684. See also networking
event planning services, 258
Event Viewer
administrator, running as an, 826
application events, 827
Applications And Services Logs, 827
arranging events, 830–831
Audit event types, 828
capabilities of, 825–826
copying event information, 830
custom views, 833
details of events, 829–830
Error level events, 828
event property types, 828–829
exporting event data, 833
filtering events, 831–832
forwarded events, 827
Information level events, 828
log summaries, 828
online event information, 830
properties of events, 829–830
purpose of, 769
Registry Editor with, 827
Run As Administrator for full capabilities of, 826
searching events, 833
security events, 827
Security logs, 828
setup events, 827
Show Analytic And Debut Logs option, 827
starting, 826
system events, 827
Task Scheduler, evoking from, 782–783
Task Scheduler, selecting event triggers with, 786
tasks, using events as triggers for, 834
Warning level events, 828
Everyone group
effects of sharing with, 635–636
printer permissions, 643
Read permission default for new shares, 641
Exact Audio Copy, 432
exFAT file system
compared to FAT32, 907
formatting with Disk Management console, 903
explicit consent, 233
Extenders, Windows Media Center, 490–493
extending partitions, 39
extensions, file associations for. See file type associations
F
Fast Ethernet, 593, 684
Fast User Switching
Starter edition, not available in, 544
switching users with, 575–576
FAT and FAT32 file systems
advantages of, 905
compared to exFAT, 907
converting FAT32 disks to NTFS, 910–912
formatting disks as, 905
security limitations of, 544
USB flash drives, formatting with, 905
Windows Backup, ignored by, 384
favorites
adding favorites, 203–204
definition of, 203
editing, 204–205
Favorites bar, 203–204, 206
Favorites Bar folder, 206
Favorites Center, opening, 203
Favorites Center, organizing in, 205–206
Favorites menu, displaying in Start menu, 120
groups of pages, adding, 204
keyboard shortcut for adding, 203
keyboard shortcuts for specific, 205
MMC consoles, adding to, 777
organizing, 204–206
Play Favorites command, Windows Media Center, 481
preserving favorites while deleting History, 235–236
registry Favorites list, 806
RSS feeds in, 209–210
subfolders, putting items in, 203–204
synchronization on web, 363
Windows Explorer Favorites folder, 276
Windows Explorer Favorites list, 273–274
Windows Explorer, organizing in, 206
Windows Media Center settings for, 480–481
faxing, 948
feature list, adjusting, 72–74, 188
feature set available to all Windows 7 editions, table of,
948–949
feeds. See web feeds
File And Printer Sharing For Microsoft Networks, 692
File And Printer Sharing option, 630
File Download - Security Warning dialog boxes, 227–228
file management
advanced, definition of, 337
backing up files. See backups with Windows Backup
edition differences for, 337
encrypting files. See encryption
Live Mesh for. See Live Mesh
offline files. See offline files feature
Previous Versions, 341–342
recovering files, 341–342. See also Recycle Bin
restoring files from backups. See restoring data
Robocopy, 372–373
synchronization. See synchronizing files
user profile folder relocation, 363–365
Windows Live Sync, 360–363
File Sharing Connections options, 630
file systems
choosing while formatting, 903
choosing, criteria for, 905–907
definition of, 900
exFAT. See exFAT file system
FAT and FAT32. See FAT and FAT32 file systems
Flip 3D feature
list of systems supported by Windows 7, 900
NTFS. See NTFS file system
UDF (Universal Disk Format), 905–906
file type associations
changing by extension type, 183–185
Default Programs, opening, 180
default setup of, 180
Other Programs, populating, 184–185
purpose of, 180
recommended programs, 183–184
setting default programs, 181
troubleshooting, 185
web browser, effects of setting default, 191–192
Windows Explorer, changing from, 186–187
Windows Media Player 12, 410–411
files
compressing. See compression, file
deleting, 338–339
managing. See file management
metadata of. See metadata, file
organizing. See Windows Explorer
permissions for, editing, 546
preview handlers, 269
Previous Versions of, 341–342
properties of, 299–301
Robocopy management of, 372–373
size, searching by, 330–331
films. See video
filtering network packets, 587
filters
contents of folders, for, 294–297
indexing, 309, 313
searches with, 323–326
fingerprint readers
fingerprint data management, 558
recommended for UAC, 541
support for, 501
firewalls. See also Windows Firewall
importance of keeping on, 499
multiple, 504
third-party, Windows Firewall with, 508
troubleshooting network connectivity, 679–680
FireWire
driver verification for, 52
Plug and Play compatibility, 856
first-party cookies, 234
flash drives, USB
bootable, 28, 916
synchronizing files on, 450–455
transfers of files to PCs, 455
flick gesture, 933
Flickr for desktop backgrounds, 130
Flip 3D feature, 125–126
989
990
folders
folders
Change Your View menu, 289–290
changing templates for, 292
date navigation, 295
default user data folders, 276
Documents template, 291
filtering contents of, 294–297
General Items template, 291
grouping within, 297–298
headings, settings for, 290–291
icon sizes in, adjusting, 289–290
junctions, 278–280
keyboard shortcuts for navigation, 297
Music template, 291
permissions for, editing, 546
Pictures template, 291
pinning to the taskbar, 101
Previous Versions of, 341–342
Robocopy management of, 372–373
sharing folders in homegroups, 618–620
sorting contents of, 293–294
templates for, 291
types, determining, 292
Videos template, 291
VirtualStore folder, 280–281
zipped, 288–289
Foldershare, 360–363
fonts
Add Fonts dialog box removed, 151
ClearType fonts, 145–146
color scheme customization, 130–133
installing, 152
management of, 151–152
new fonts, 145–146
OpenType, 152
PostScript, 152
security issues for, 152
smoothing, 145–146
TrueType, 152
formatting disks
definition of, 899
existing data, effect on, 907
files systems for. See file systems
new volumes, 903–905
quick, 904
forms, autocompletion of, 219
Forward button, flick gesture for, 933
Forwarded Events log, 827
Found New Hardware wizard, 857–858
fragmentation
avoiding, 755
fixing. See defragmentation
mechanics of, 753
performance effects of, 733
free memory (RAM), 723
fsmgmt.msc, 352–353
Fsutil, 899
Full Control access
Advanced Sharing, setting with, 642
permission granted by, 547
Sharing wizard, setting in, 636
full names
changing, 556
definition of, 554
full-height window snaps, 122–123
G
gadgets
adding, 147
closing, 147
definition of, 10
foreground, bringing to, 125
gallery of, viewing, 146–147
Indexer Status gadget, 316
keystroke shortcuts for, 148
moving to top of desktop, 10
online site for, 148
sidebar no longer necessary for, 146
games
included with all editions, list of, 948
parental control of access to, 581–582
premium games included, list of, 951
Saved Games folder, 276
touch-enabled gestures for, 934–935
General Items folder template, 291
Generate A System Health Report command, 708–710
gestures, touch screen, 931–938
Get MAC Address (Getmac.exe), 676
GIF file metadata, 302
Gigabit Ethernet, 593, 684
Gmail, Windows Live Mail access to, 247
GoToMyPC, 650
GPT (GUID Partition Table), 900
grace period for activation, 55–56
Gracenote Media Recognition Service, 428
graphics processors, minimum requirements, 23
grep search engine, 308
Group Policy
logon script specification, 174
startup programs in, 174
grouping items in folders, 297–298
groups, security
Advanced Sharing settings for, 641–642
cumulation of permissions and rights, 551
Everyone, 635–636, 641
HomeUsers, 616–617, 627
local, 552
Local Users And Groups snap-in, 563
Net Localgroup command, 563–564
not recommended except on domains, 551
purpose of, 551
share permissions, setting, 641–642
Whoami utility, 552–553
workgroup versus domain, 552
guest accounts
allowing shared access with Sharing wizard, 635–636
anonymous sharing, 634
enabling, 558
guidelines for, 550–551, 562
network sharing with no password protection, 632
privileges of, 550
profile for, 282
GUID Partition Table (GPT), 900
H
H.264 format
AVCHD Video use of, 409
support for, 13
hangs, resolving with Resource Monitor, 824–825. See
also errors
hard disks
adding new, 902–905
basic, 900
Check Disk utility for, 748–752
compatibility for installations, 30
compression of. See NTFS compression
defragmenting. See defragmentation
destroying data, 907
Device Manager, Volumes tab, 879
diagnostic programs for, 704
Disk Cleanup wizard, 733
dynamic. See dynamic disks
error checking of. See Check Disk, Windows
formatting. See formatting disks
free disk space, maintaining adequate, 733
Fsutil management utility, 899
GPTs for, 900
I/O activity, viewing in Resource Monitor, 718
managing. See Disk Management console; Diskpart
MBRs. See MBR (master boot record)
minimum requirements, 23
new, setting volumes while installing Windows, 901–902
partitions on. See partitioning
ReadyBoost with, 728–730
recommendations for, 895
removable, security restrictions for, 502
status messages for, 917–919
structure of, 753
SuperFetch performance enhancement, 727–728
histories of problem reports
system image restore issues, 390
unreadable, 918
virtual hard disks, 920–922
WEI Notes section indicator, 708
hard faults, 724
hardware
bottlenecks, 24
compatibility testing during upgrades, 42
configurations supported by editions, table of, 947
Devices And Printers folder, 858–863
error codes, 890–893
Found New Hardware wizard, 857–858
installing devices, 855–858
IRQs for, 881–884
ISA devices, 856
legacy devices, 876–878
managing. See device management
minimum requirements, 23
network. See network hardware
performance issues of, 704
profiles discontinued, 889
Stop errors from, 837
troubleshooting, 890–893
Upgrade Advisor on compatibility, 21–22
Hardware Update wizard, 884
Harmony remote controls, 470
help
.hlp legacy help file format, 80
Microsoft Knowledge Base, 82
remote assistance for. See Remote Assistance
Help And Support application
Ask button, 79, 82
Browse button, 79
browsing, 81
Contact Technical Support, 82
Home button, 79
improvement program, 79
Microsoft Knowledge Base, 82
navigation buttons, 79
online help, settings for access to, 79
Options menu, 79
Print button, 79
purpose of, 77
searching within, 81
Start menu, opening from, 120
starting, 78
toolbar buttons of, 79
hibernation
Hibernation file removal, 759–760
settings for, 151
High Contrast tool, 154
hints, password, 566, 568
histories of problem reports, 818–819
991
992
History lists, Internet Explorer
History lists, Internet Explorer
address bar access to, 201–202
Delete Browsing History option, 235–236
finding items in, 200–201
History folder, 277
opening, 200
history lists, search, 335
hives, registry, 800, 803–804
HKCR key, 800–802
HKCU key, 800–801
HKLM key, 801–802
Home Basic edition of Windows 7
definition of, 7
DVD decoder not included in, 407
hardware configurations supported by, 947
limitations of, 950
Home Network type location
configuration as, 630
guidelines for selecting, 589
homegroups availability with, 590
home pages, setting for Internet Explorer 8, 192–193
Home Premium edition of Windows 7
definition of, 6
feature set of, 950–951
hardware configurations supported by, 947
homegroups
advantages of, 586, 616–618
browsing with Windows Explorer, 622
creating, 611–613, 617–618
default sharing settings, 614
definition of, 16
disabling, 626
domains with, 618, 625–626
editions required to create, 617
folders not in libraries, sharing, 619–620
Home Network location required for, 590
HomeGroup Connections advanced option, 632
Homegroup folder, displaying in Start menu, 120
Homegroup node, Windows Explorer, 622
HomeGroup troubleshooting wizard, 674–675
HomeGroup, opening, 618–619
HomeGroupUser$ accounts, 616–617, 627
HomeUsers group, 627
how they work, 627
joining, 613–614, 617–618
leaving, 626
legacy Windows versions not supported by, 611
limiting sharing to particular users, 620
mixed networks with, 617
multiple locations, extending to, 624
multiple user accounts on computers in, 621
networked devices with, 617
passwords not required, 616–617
passwords, blank, 564
printer sharing in, 624–625
purpose of, 611
requirements for, 617
root folders, warning about sharing, 620
sharing and networking services used by, 627
sharing capabilities, 617
sharing digital media in, 442
sharing with libraries, 618–620
small network recommendations, 633
Start menu, linking to Homegroup folder, 623
Starter edition unable to create, 585
streaming enabled by default, 442–443
streaming media in, 624
Windows Firewall configuration by, 627
Windows Media Center, browsing from, 623
Windows Media Player, browsing from, 623
Xbox 360s with, 617
HomePNS networks, 594
Hostname utility, 676
Hotmail
New Session command, 207
Windows Live ID, using as, 241
Windows Live Mail account with, 247
HTML, content indexing supported by, 312
HTTP, Windows Live Mail support for, 247
hubs
connecting, 595–596
definition of, 592
Hyper-V, 46, 920–922
I
icons
auto arranging desktop icons, 138
desktop, configuring, 137–139
hiding desktop icons, 138
notification area, customizing behavior of, 8
pinning programs to the taskbar, 101
sizes, adjusting, 138, 289–290
sorting, 139
taskbar buttons, 7–8
themes, configuring through, 126
themes, limited settings saving by, 138
ICS (Internet Connection Sharing)
address assignment by, 699
definition of, 586
images
editing with Photo Gallery, 257–258
editor for not available by default, 12
metadata in, 299–305
My Pictures folder, 276
Photo Gallery for. See Windows Live Photo Gallery
Pictures folder template, 291
properties of files, 299–301
rating, 299
System Image Recovery command, 850–851
tagging. See tagging images
Windows DVD Maker, 459–462
Windows Live web photo sharing, 262
Windows Media Player playlists with, 417
images, disk, 25
images, system. See system images
IMAP, Windows Live Mail support for, 247
implicit consent, 233
indexing service
Cisvc.exe legacy support, 310
construction of indexes, 309
content, always searching option, 334
encrypted files, indexing, 317
excluded locations, 314
extensionless file names not indexed, 314
faxes, indexing of, 312
filters for, 309, 313
formats supporting content indexing, 312–314
included locations, 309
Indexer Status gadget, 316
Indexing Options dialog box, 309, 316
libraries always indexed, 309–311
listing indexed locations, 309–312
locating of indexes, non-default, 317
manually setting locations to index, 311
maximizing speed of, 316
monitoring, 314–315
Outlook 2007 performance effects, 315–316
performance of, 315–316
Properties And File Contents option, 313–314
property handlers for, 309, 313
protocol handlers for, 309
purpose of, 308
Rebuild command, 317
remote indexes, 334
rights management file content, 314
selectivity of, 309
storage location for indexes, 308
system folders, 334
TIFF files, text in, 312
.inf files, 856–858, 873
ink data, 937
InPrivate Browsing, 236–237
InPrivate Filtering, 234–235
Input Panel, Tablet PC, 935–938
installing programs
32-bit programs running in 64-bit Windows, 170–171
64-bit Windows issues, 170–171
administrative credentials required for, 158
installer-detection technology, 158
Program Compatibility Assistant, 160–161
reboots, UAC issues with, 160
restore points, creating before, 162
setup event log, 827
installing Windows 7
Start menu highlighting, 159
troubleshooting, 159
UAC requirements for, 158
Windows Live Essentials, 239
Windows XP Mode, into, 167–168
installing Windows 7
activation requirements. See activating Windows 7
Anytime Upgrade, 50–51
Automatic Update settings, 34
BIOS compatibility, 31
bootable flash disks, 916
booting from the DVD, 27
clean method. See clean installations
clean vs. upgrade paths, 26
compatibility, legacy software and hardware, 21–22
computer name selection, 32
decisions required for, 26
default programs settings, 74–75
drive letter assignment in multiboot systems, 44
drive types prohibited as system drives, 36
drivers for, 52
dual-boot setup. See multiboot systems
extending partitions for, 39
feature list, adjusting, 72–74
grace period for activation, 55–56
language preference screens, 29
multiple boot options, 26
network setup during, 35–36
networking, verifying functioning of, 72
overview of, 21
partitioning advanced options, 38–40
post-install setting adjustments, 69–76
product keys, entering, 33
reinstall limitations, 57
reinstalling, 27
Repair Your Computer option of Windows DVD, 846
running from within Windows, 26–27
sharing Windows versions on single partitions, 31
shrinking partitions for, 40
System Builder copies, 59
System Locked Preinstallation (SLP), 58
System Reserved partitions, 37
time and date settings, 34
transferring files and settings. See Easy Transfer
updates during, 23, 41
upgrade method. See upgrading to Windows 7
upgrading Windows 7 editions, 50–51
user name selection, 32
validation, 59–60
virtualization with, 46
volumes, setting number and size of, 901–902
Where Do You Want To Install Windows dialog box,
29–30, 38
Which Type Of Installation dialog box, 29
Windows Live Essentials, 239
993
994
Integrity Levels
Integrity Levels, 548
Intel Virtualization Technology (Intel VT), 164
interface, Windows 7. See desktops
internet
basic process steps for troubleshooting, 669
browsers. See Internet Explorer 8
censoring for children. See Parental Controls
disconnection methods, 511
hardware issues for connecting to. See modems; routers
ICS (Internet Connection Sharing), 586
mobile broadband support, 587
network issues for connecting to. See networking
new features in Windows 7, 586–588
public IP addresses, 699
remote digital media streaming over, 449–450
searches, extending to, 329
security. See Internet Explorer 8 security
security zones. See security zones
shared connections to. See sharing internet connections
sharing files online (SkyDrive), 260–261
stateful inspection packet filtering of connections, 507
Temporary Internet Files folder, 277
web addresses. See URLs (Uniform Resource Locators)
web desktop feature, Live Mesh, 356
Internet Connection Sharing. See ICS (Internet
Connection Sharing)
Internet Explorer 8
32-bit and 64-bit versions, 170–171
accelerators, 19–20, 214–215
add-in issues, 170–171
add-on management, 216–219
address bar tricks, 201–202, 210–211
advertising, internet, 234–235
AutoComplete options, 219–220
Bing Search, 211
colored tab groups, 196
Command bar, 193–194, 216
compatibility tools, 20, 194–196
cookies, 231–234
custom search provider creation, 213
default web browser, setting, 191–192
Developer Tools, 216
disabling add-ons, 217–219
enhancements from version 7, 191
Favorites, 203–207
full-screen display mode, 215
gestures for multitouch-enabled screens, 935
History lists, 200–202
home pages, setting, 192–193
InPrivate Browsing, 236–237
Integrity Level set low, 548
Internet Options command, 197
Jump Lists for, 108, 199
magnification, 202–203
menu bar, making visible, 193–194
new features of, 19–20
New Session command, 207
New Tab page, 197, 199–200
opening new window in new session, 207
personal information, clearing, 235–236
pinning, 199
Protected Mode, 220–222
removing, 73–74
reopening closed tabs, 199–200
RSS feed display, 207–210
search history options, 212
search provider settings, 210–213
security. See Internet Explorer 8 security
session cookies, 207
standards compliance, 194
subscribing to feeds, 209
tabbed browsing options, 197–198
tabs, 196–200
Temporary Internet Files folder, 277
text selection with caret feature, 198
toolbar management, 215–216
updating with Windows Update, 744
Visual Search providers, 212
web slices, 207–208
Zoom control, 202–203
Internet Explorer 8 security
Active Scripting option, 230
ActiveX settings, 229–230
best safety practices, 226–230
cookies, 231–234
Delete Browsing History option, 235–236
digital signatures for executable files, 226, 229
disabling Protected Mode, 221–222
executable file downloads, 227–229
hidden add-ons, 227
InPrivate Browsing, 236–237
InPrivate Filtering, 234–235
Low privilege access, 221
opening content warning boxes, 228
personal information, clearing, 235–236
phishing websites, 230–231
Privacy tab, 232
Protected Mode, 220–222
registry protection, 221
script security issues, 230
Security Warning dialog boxes, 227–228
SmartScreen filter, 231
UAC dialog boxes with, 228
unsafe downloads, blocking, 227–229
virtual folders for file storage, 221
zones. See security zones
Internet zone
definition of, 222
Medium-High default security level, 223
intranets
Compatibility View default for web pages in, 195
security zone. See Local Intranet zone
IP (Internet Protocol). See TCP/IP (Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol)
IP addresses
Alternate IP Configuration feature, 696–697
APIPA addressing method, 695
assignment methods, 695–696
Automatic Private IP Addressing, 699
composition of, 694–695
DHCP assignment method, 695
private, 699
public, 699
setting, 694–697
static addressing method, 695–697
subnet masks, 681–682, 695
troubleshooting, 680–682
viewing for devices, 672
IP Configuration Utility, 676, 681
iPhones, Apple
MPEG-4 Audio format, 412
synchronizing, 450
iPods, Apple. See also portable audio players
MPEG-4 Audio format, 412
synchronizing, 450
IPsec (Internet Protocol security), 603
IPv4 (Internet Protocol version 4), 692
IPv6 (Internet Protocol version 6)
advantages over IPv4, 693–694
default for Windows 7, 692
implementation of, 587
IRM (Information Rights Management), 314
IRQs, 881–884, 890
ISA devices, 856, 884
ISO burn method, 906, 916
iTunes, Apple
MPEG-4 Audio format, 409, 412
setting as default, 74–75
synchronizing portable devices with, 450
IZArc, 289
J
JavaScript, 230
JPEG file metadata, 302
Jump Lists
advantages of, 107–108
definition of, 107
hover options with Start menu, 119
Internet Explorer, for, 199
opening, 108
pinned documents with, 101, 108
purpose of, 8
libraries
removing items from, 109
Start menu options for, 117
junctions
creating, 913–916
permissions required for, 279–280
purpose of, 278
table of, 280
viewing, 278–279
K
kernel memory, 723
kernel memory dumps, 839–840
keyboard shortcuts
Administrator, running programs as, 179
Favorites, setting for, 205
navigation with, 297
taskbar button access with, 104
windows manipulation, table of, 122–123
Windows Media Center, for, 474–475
keyboards
On-Screen Keyboard, 153
settings command, Devices And Printers folder, 859
Sticky Keys tool, 154
Keyfinder utility, 58
keys, registry, 806, 808
L
Laplink Everywhere, 650
Laplink Gold, 650
Last Known Good Configuration, 844–845
least privilege rule, 531–532
libraries
actual file locations in Windows Explorer, 287
advantages of, 283
Arrange By options, 287
backup, custom made for, 382
backups of, 382
creating, 284
data files, separating from system files with, 363–365
default libraries, 11
definition of, 10–11, 282
folders eligible for inclusion in, 285–286
indexing automatic for folders in, 309–311
indexing requirements, 285–286
layouts in Windows Media Center, 476–478
Libraries folder, 277
managing in Windows Media Player 12, 434
media collections, advantages for, 283
populating, 284–286
projects, advantages for, 283
scenarios for using, 283
search technique for, 328
settings, storage of, 286
995
996
licensing, Volume Licensing activation
libraries, continued
shared, Windows Media Center access to, 482
sharing in homegroups, 618–620
sharing options in Windows Media Player, 444–446
Windows Explorer management of, 282–287
Windows Media Center setup options, 466
Windows Media Player 12, in navigation pane, 419–420
workgroups, advantages for, 283
licensing, Volume Licensing activation, 59
limited accounts. See standard user accounts
Link Layer Topology Discovery (LLTD) protocol,
669–672, 692
Links folder, 276
Links toolbar, 112, 203
Linux
multiboot systems with, 50
Remote Desktop client program for, 650
List Folder Contents permission, 547
Live Desktop, 356–360
Live Mesh
accessing from another computer, 360
adding devices to, 357
capabilities of, 356
enabling, 356–357
folders, adding to Live Desktop, 357–359
Live Desktop feature, 356–359
peer-to-peer synchronization feature, 356
settings for, 359
Live Messenger, Windows. See Windows Live Messenger
LLTD (Link Layer Topology Discovery) protocol,
669–672, 692
Load value listed programs, 173
Local folder, 277
local groups, 552
Local Intranet zone
adding sites to, 225
Compatibility View default for web pages in, 195
default assignments to, 224
definition of, 222
Medium-Low level default setting, 223
options for, 225
Local Security Policy
console setting rights, from, 548
UAC customization with, 539
local user accounts, 552
local user profiles, 274. See also user profiles
Local Users And Groups snap-in, 563
LOCALAPPDATA environment variable, 969
LocalLow folder, 277
Location Aware Printing, 625
locking the system, 576
logging off, 575
LogMeIn, 650
Logon scripts, startup programs opened by, 174
logons
automatic, 573–575
bypassing, 573–575
Ctrl+Alt+Del method, 569–571
customizing screens for, 571–573
domain vs. standalone, 569–570
last users, hiding, 571
passwords for. See passwords
text size settings for logon screens, 572–573
time restrictions for, 562
touch keyboard options, 938
lossy compression, 428–429
M
M4P files, 412
MAC (Media Access Control) addresses
Get MAC Address (Getmac.exe), 676
viewing, 672
Mac OSs, Remote Desktop client for, 650
magnification
Internet Explorer Zoom control, 202–203
Magnifier tool, 153
maintenance
Action Center for, 739–742
disk drives, of. See Disk Cleanup; Disk Defragmenter
overview of tasks for, 739
updating the system. See updates; Windows Update
Malicious Software Removal Tool, 521–522
malware. See also spyware; viruses
compromised web sites, 519
definition of, 498
Microsoft Malware Protection Center, 498
performance hits from, 705
scripts as, 519
themes containing, 140
transmission methods of, 517–519
user-installed, 499
Manage Wireless Networks feature
deleting networks, 691
editing network settings, 686–687
opening, 686
renaming networks, 690
management tools
consoles for. See MMC (Microsoft Management
Console)
viewing system information. See system information,
viewing
Mandatory Integrity Control, 221
mapped network folders
mapping volumes to, 913–916
steps for creating, 647–648
master boot record. See MBR (master boot record)
Mastered Optical Media, 906
Matroska Video format, 410
maximizing windows, 121, 123
MBR (master boot record)
fixing, 850
GPT compared to, 900
multiboot system role of, 45
overwriting by newest installs, 49
MDOP (Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack), 839
Media Center. See Windows Media Center
Media Player. See Windows Media Player 12
Media Transfer Protocol (MTP), 450
meeting space service, 258
memory (RAM)
cached, 723
Commit Change, 723
free, 723
hard faults, definition of, 724
hard faults, viewing in Resource Monitor, 718, 720
memory-intensive programs, 24
minimum requirements, 23
monitoring, recommendation for, 724
paged vs. nonpaged, 723
performance issues of, 704
performance, ensuring adequacy for, 721–724
performance, viewing in Windows Task Manager, 711
requirements and limits for Windows 7, 722
Stop errors from, 838
Windows Memory Diagnostic, 851
Working Sets, 723
memory cards, Hide Empty Drives option, 913
memory dumps, 839–840
meshes. See Live Mesh
Messenger. See Windows Live Messenger
metadata, file
editing, 303–305
managing in Windows Explorer, 299–305
music file metadata management, 435–438
portability of, 301
privacy issues, 305
property handlers for, 301–302
storage of, 438
tagging music while ripping, 427
troubleshooting, 302–303
MFTs (Master File Tables), 911
microphones, 938
Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack (MDOP), 839
Microsoft Fix it, 821
Microsoft Forefront Client Security, 523
Microsoft Knowledge Base (MSKB), 82
Microsoft Malware Protection Center, 498
monitors
997
Microsoft Office
content indexing supported by, 312
metadata issues, 305
updating using Windows Update, 744
Microsoft Office Live workspaces, 258
Microsoft Outlook
moving contacts to Windows Live Contacts, 249
Temporary Internet Files folder for attachments, 277
Microsoft Security Essentials, 521
Microsoft TechNet Security Center, 517
Microsoft Update Catalog, 748
Microsoft Update, merging into Windows Update, 744
MIME, content indexing support for, 312
mini dumps, 839–840
minimizing windows, 123
MMC (Microsoft Management Console)
Action menu, 772
action pane, 771
adding snap-ins and extensions, 774–776
Author mode, 770–771
console tree, 771, 774
creating consoles, 774–779
Customize View command, 777
customizing consoles, 769
customizing layouts of, 771, 777
definition of, 768–769
details pane, 771–773
exporting data from, 773
Favorites in, 777
layouts of, 771–773
naming consoles, 778
predefinition of consoles, table of, 769–770
restricting access to, 778–779
running consoles, 769
running with no snap-in, 774
saving consoles, 779
Services snap-in. See Services console
shortcut menus, 773
steps for creating custom consoles, 774
Task Scheduler console. See Task Scheduler
taskpad views, adding, 776–777
UAC issues for, 770
User mode, 770–771, 778–779
View menu, 772
windows within, creating, 777
mobile broadband support, 587
modems
Device Manager advanced settings for, 879
troubleshooting, 669
Modify access, 547
monitors. See also screens
dual, 141–142
settings command, Devices And Printers folder, 859
998
motherboard replacement, effect on licenses
motherboard replacement, effect on licenses, 57–58
mounted volumes
creating, 913–916
definition of, 899
mouse devices
button configuration, 137
settings command, Devices And Printers folder, 859
wheels, zooming with, 202
mouse gestures
table of, 122–123
windows snaps, 121–122
Mouse Keys tool, 154
mouse pointers
customizing, 135–137
schemes, 136
speed settings, 137
themes, relation to, 126
Movie library
layout in Windows Media Center, 476–478
specifying ripped DVD locations, 479
Movie Maker, Windows, 488
movies. See video
moving files with Robocopy, 372–373
MP3 files
metadata in, 299, 438
setting for ripping to, 429
support for, 412
MP3 players. See portable audio players
MP4 Video format, 409
MPEG-2 format, 412, 488
MPEG-2 TS Video format, 409
MPEG-4 Audio format, 409, 412
MPEG-4 AVC, 409
MS-DOS commands, 957–958
Msinfo32.exe. See System Information (Msinfo32.exe)
MSKB (Microsoft Knowledge Base), 82
MSRT (Malicious Software Removal Tool), 521–522
MTP (Media Transfer Protocol), 450
multiboot systems
advantages of, 43
drive letters for, 44
driver testing with, 43
editing the boot menu, 47–48
Linux with Windows 7, 50
partitions required for, 46–47
removing Windows 7, 49
restore point issues for, 398
Startup And Recovery options, 48
startup process for, 45–46
troubleshooting, 49
virtualization alternative, 46
XP boot loaders, restoring, 49
XP overwrites of Windows 7 boot menus, 49
multiple monitor displays
configuring, 141–142
Remote Desktop display on, 659
multiprocessor systems monitoring options, 712
multitouch-enabled screens
Aero Snap with, 934
calibrating the screen, 929
enabling, 926
flick gesture, 933
gestures, 931–935
Handedness option, 928
Internet Explorer 8 with, 935
Jump Lists with, 934
Pen And Touch dialog box options, 926–928
pointer display option, 926
right-click simulation, 926
rotate gesture, 934
screen orientation options, 929–930
scrolling gesture, 933
Show Desktop button, 934
support issues, 925
touch behavior options, 926
touch keyboards for, 935–936
Touch Pack for, 934–935
two-finger tap, 934
writing pad, 935–938
zoom gesture, 933–934
music. See audio; Windows Media Center; Windows
Media Player 12
Music library
commands in Windows Media Center, 478
editing metadata in, 303–305
layout in Windows Media Center, 476–478
Windows Media Player 12 view options, 420–421
My Documents folder, 275–276
My Music folder, 276, 421–422
My Pictures folder, 276
My Videos folder, 276
N
Name Server Lookup (Nslookup.exe), 676
Narrator tool, 153
NAT (Network Address Translation)
IPv6 advantages over, 693–694
public IP addresses with, 699
Remote Assistance with, 84–85
residential gateways, role in, 592
subnet issues, 699
troubleshooting, 679–680
natural language searches, 332–333
navigation
breadcrumb trails for, 270
Windows Explorer, within, 272–274, 297
Nbtstat.exe (NetBIOS Information utility), 676
NDF (Network Diagnostics Framework), 673
Net Localgroup command, 563–564
Net services (Net.exe), 676
Net User command, 563–564
NetBIOS, 676
netbooks
bootable flash disks for installing Windows 7, 916
ReadyBoost with, 729
Starter edition of Windows 7, 950
netplwiz command, 562
Netsh.exe (Network Command Shell)
advanced firewall settings with, 516
purpose of, 676
TCP/IP stack restoration with, 683
Netstat.exe, 676
network adapters
Device Manager advanced settings for, 879–880
installing, 595
PC Card, disabled in Safe Mode, 844
properties, viewing, 595
purpose of, 591–592
Network Address Translation. See NAT (Network
Address Translation)
Network And Sharing Center
administrator privileges, tasks requiring, 589
broken connectivity indicator, 667–668
Change Adapter Settings menu option, 669, 680
Connect To A Network command, 604
deleting networks, 691
Diagnose This Connection command, 669
Home Network type location, 589–590
homegroups, Home Network required for, 590
launching Windows Network Diagnostics from, 667–668
locations, changing, 591
naming networks, 689–690
network adapter properties, 595
opening, 588–589
Public Network type location, 589, 605
redesign from Vista, 15–16
security profile type dependence, 590–591
See Full Map command, 669–670
Set Up A Connection Or Network wizard, 607–610
status indicators, 667–668
Troubleshoot Problems command, 673–674
verifying network functionality, 72
wireless networks, configuring routers, 599–602
Work Network type location, 589–590
Network Command Shell (Netsh.exe)
advanced firewall settings with, 516
purpose of, 676
TCP/IP stack restoration with, 683
network connections
checking, 677–680
network troubleshooting
999
Diagnose This Connection command, 669
features of, 692
information about, viewing, 692
Local Area Connection, 693
Network Connections window, 669
renaming, 693
viewing data for all, 681
Wireless Area Connection, 693
Network Diagnostics Framework (NDF), 673
Network Discovery, 630
Network folder
accessing network resources with, 646
purpose of, 120
network folders, mapped. See mapped network folders
network hardware
adapters. See network adapters
cabling, Ethernet, 592–593
central connection points, 592
connecting wired components, 595–596
hubs, 592, 595–596
NICs. See network adapters
residential gateways, 592, 595–596
routers. See routers
switches, 592, 595–596
wireless access points, 599–603
network interface cards. See network adapters
Network Map, 669–673
Network Monitor, 677
Network News Transfer Protocol (NNTP), 247
network shares
backups to, 378–379
offline files feature with. See offline files feature
server caching, settings for, 352–353
Windows Live Sync for, 360–363
network troubleshooting
basic process steps for, 669
broken connectivity indicator in Network And Sharing
Center, 667–669
command-line utilities for, 676–677
computers not visible on networks, 605
Diagnose This Connection command, 669
DNS issues, 683–684
firewall issues, 679–680
HomeGroup troubleshooting wizard, 674–675
IP addresses, 680–682
IP Configuration Utility, 676, 681
NAT (Network Address Translation) issues, 679–680
NDF (Network Diagnostics Framework), 673
Net services (Net.exe), 676
Netstat.exe, 676
Network Command Shell (Netsh.exe), 676, 683
Network Map, 669–673
Network Monitor, 677
overview of, 667
1000 networking
network troubleshooting, continued
PathPing, 676, 679
Ping command, checking connectivity with, 677–679
repairing TCP/IP configurations, 682–683
TCP/IP Ping utility, 676
TCP/IP problems, 677–684
TCP/IP Route utility, 676
timeouts, 678
Traceroute utility (Tracert.exe), 676, 679
troubleshooting wizards, 673–674
warning about bad advice for tweaking, 685
networking
activity, viewing in Resource Monitor, 718
ad hoc networks, 609–610
addresses. See IP addresses
Advanced Sharing Settings, 630–632
advantages of, 586
audio files. See sharing digital media
command-line utilities for, 676–677
Connect To folder, 120
deleting networks, 691
digital media. See sharing digital media
hardware. See network hardware
HomeGroup feature. See homegroups
HomePNS networks, 594
ICS (Internet Connection Sharing), 586
LLTD protocol, 669–670
mapped network folders, 647–648
mobile broadband support, 587
naming networks, 689–690
NDF (Network Diagnostics Framework), 673
Network folder, 120, 646
Network Map, 669–673
Network Shortcuts folder, 277
new features of Windows 7, 15–16, 586–588
Next Generation TCP/IP stack, 587
overview of, 585
packet loss, 678
performance, maximizing, 684–685
power line networks, 594
power management, 698
Receive Window Auto-Tuning, 587
renaming workgroups, 688–689
Safe Mode With Networking option, 844
scheduled tasks requiring connections to run, 790
setup during installations, 35–36
shared internet connections, 586
sharing network resources. See sharing resources
Starter edition limitations, 585
subnet masks, 681–682
troubleshooting. See network troubleshooting
troubleshooting missing computers on networks, 605
verifying functioning of, 72
Wake On LAN feature, 698
Windows Media Center Extenders, 490–493
wireless. See wireless networking
new features in Windows 7
Action Center, 17–18. See also Action Center
digital media feature changes, 12–14
Internet Explorer 8, 19–20. See also Internet Explorer 8
libraries. See libraries
networking, 15–16, 586–588
overview of, 3–4
Reliability Monitor. See Reliability Monitor
Resource Monitor changes, 18
security features, 500–502
Windows Explorer changes, 10–12
Windows Media Center, 14. See also Windows Media
Center
New Session command, 207
New Simple Volume wizard, 902–905
newsgroups, Windows Live Mail accounts for, 247
Next Generation TCP/IP stack, 587
NICs (network interface cards). See network adapters
NNTP (Network News Transfer Protocol), 247
Non-Microsoft option for default programs, 187–188
Norton Ghost, 25
Not Responding tasks, 176–177
notification area
balloon messages in, 739–740
buttons hidden by default, 8
customizing button behavior, 8, 114–115
keyboard shortcut for, 116
new Windows 7 default behavior, 114
speaker button, 408
system button behavior, 115
Nslookup command, 684
NTFS compression
advantages of, 909
Disk Management option for, 904
NTFS file system
advantages of, 906–907
converting FAT32 disks to NTFS, 910–912
formatting with Disk Management console, 903
NTFS permissions. See also ACLs (access control lists)
combining with shared resource permissions, 642–643
operation of, 642
O
OCR (optical character recognition), 312
OCUR (Open Cable Unidirectional Receiver), 485
OEMs (original equipment manufacturers)
activating Windows 7 on computers from, 58–59
types of, 58–59
Office, Microsoft. See Microsoft Office
offline files feature
all files offline caching option, 353
Caching command, 352
conflicts, 348–349
disabling with caching option, 353
editions available in, 343
encryption options, 352
errors, synchronization, 344–345
local cache size limit settings, 354–355
manual synchronization for, 347
marking items for offline availability, 344
mechanics of synchronization, 348
Offline Files dialog box, 354
opening files, 347
power management options, 351
purpose of, 343
removing access to items, 355–356
scheduling synchronization, 349–351
server cache settings for, 352–353
size of cache, viewing, 354
status indicators for, 345–346
Sync Center, opening, 345
synchronization options, 343
temporary file management, 354
troubleshooting, 347
working offline, 347
OneNote ink data, 937
On-Screen Keyboard, 153
Open Cable Unidirectional Receiver (OCUR), 485
opening programs, taskbar buttons for, 102
OpenType fonts, 152
OpenWithList registry key, 185
original equipment manufacturers. See OEMs (original
equipment manufacturers)
Outlook 2007
indexing performance effects, 315–316
searches of items, 328
Outlook Express not included, 4
owners, assignment of permissions by, 548
P
P3P (Platform for Privacy Preferences), 232
packet filtering
stateful inspection packet filtering, 507
Windows Filtering Platform for, 587
packet loss, 678
page faults, 724
page files
configuration options, 726
myths about, 734
paged memory, relation to, 723
performance issues for, 724–727
recommendations for managing, 726–727
paged memory
definition of, 723
page faults, 724
passwords 1001
Paint, touch-enabled gestures for, 934–935
Parental Controls
activity reporting, 584
additional controls, finding, 584
blocking programs, 582–583
configuring, 578–583
domains, not available in, 544
game access controls, 581–582
Protect Your Family web page, 577
purpose of, 577
requirements for, 577
restricting logon hours, 579–580
status of, viewing, 580
turning on, 578
user account options for, 556–557
web filtering, 583–584
Windows Live Family Safety, 584
Windows Media Center options for, 467
parental ratings, digital media sharing permissions by,
444–445
partitioning
active partitions, 900
adjusting before installations, 38–40
basic disk limitations, 900
boot partitions, 900
creating new from unallocated space, 39
dedicating partitions to CD burning, 755
deleting existing partitions, 39
extending partitions, 39
labels for volumes, 40
programs for, compatibility issues, 24–25
sharing Windows versions on single partitions, 31
shrinking partitions, 40, 47
simple volumes, equivalence to partitions, 900
system partitions, 900
System Reserved partitions, 37
upgrades vs. new installations, changing during, 27
Where Do You Want To Install Windows dialog box, 38
password-protected sharing options, 631–632, 634
passwords
AutoComplete feature with, 219–220
automatic logons, 573–575
blank, policies for remote logon attempts, 564
case sensitivity of, 565
changing for user accounts, 556
changing, issues with, 567
encrypted files associated with, 567
guidelines for selecting, 565
guidelines for user accounts, 561–562
hints for, 33, 566, 568
homegroup users, not required for, 616–617
HomeGroupUser$ accounts, 627
importance of for user accounts, 564
recovering from lost, 567–569
1002 patch Tuesday
passwords, continued
Remote Assistance, for, 87–90
reset disks for, 557, 567–569
setting during installations, 32
setting, methods for, 565–566
troubleshooting, 565
wireless networking passphrases, 602
patch Tuesday, 744
PatchGuard, 501
PathPing, 676, 679
paths. See also folders
copying, 271
shared folder, issues with, 638
viewing full, 271
PC Card
disabled in Safe Mode, 844
Plug and Play compatibility, 856
PCI & PCIe cards
IRQ issues, 881–884
Plug and Play compatibility, 856
PDF files
filters for indexing, 313
preview handler for, 269
Peek, Aero, 7–8
peer-to-peer networks. See homegroups; workgroups
peer-to-peer synchronization, 356
pen input
calibrating the screen, 929
drivers for, 925
enabling, 926
gestures, 931–935
ink data, 937
pen actions, table of, 927–928
Pen And Touch dialog box options, 926–928
pointer display option, 926
screen orientation options, 929–930
touch behavior options, 926
touch keyboards for, 935–936
writing pad, 935–938
performance
baselines for comparisons. See baselines, performance
causes of poor performance, 704–705
CPU viewing with Windows Task Manager, 711
fragmentation effects, 733
free disk space, maintaining adequate, 733
hardware issues with, 704
indexing service effects on, 315–316
malware-based issues, 705
memory, viewing with Windows Task Manager, 711
monitoring overview, 710
network, maximizing, 684–685
overview of getting best, 703
page file myths, 734
Performance Information And Tools dialog box, 708–709
Performance Monitor, 735–736
prefetching issues, 734–735
Process Explorer, 737
processes dragging down, 705
processor, viewing in Resource Monitor, 718–720
RAM adequacy, ensuring, 721–724
ReadyBoost, 728–730
Remote Desktop options for, 663–664
Resource Monitor for evaluating. See Resource Monitor
services, guidelines for tweaking, 735
startup program impact on, 731–732
strategies for improving, overview of, 721
SuperFetch for enhancing, 727–728
System Health Report baselines, 708–710
Task Manager. See Windows Task Manager
tools for creating baselines, list of, 705
tweaks, counterproductive, 733–735
virtual memory, ensuring adequate, 724–727
Windows Experience Index (WEI) baselines, 705–708
WinSAT results, 708
permissions
Advanced Sharing, setting with, 641–642
assigning, 548
Change, 642
changing for a file of folder, 639
definition of, 548
editing, 546
effective permissions, 642–643
Full Control, 547, 636, 642
group cumulation of, 551
List Folder Contents, 547
Modify, 547
NTFS. See ACLs (access control lists)
Read, 547, 636, 641–642
Read & Execute, 547
Read/Write permission, 636
shared resource and NTFS together, 642–643
Sharing wizard, setting with, 636
Special Permissions, 547
Write, 547
personal data folder relocation, 363–365
personalizing Windows 7
backgrounds for desktops. See desktop backgrounds
changes from prior versions, 8–10
desktop button configuration, 137–139
edition differences for, 99
Jump List customization, 107–109
mouse pointer customization, 135–137
notification area options, 114–116
opening Personalization tool, 125
Personalize command, 99
purpose of, 99
screen savers, 134–135
sounds, 133–134
Start menu personalization. See Start menu
taskbar personalization. See taskbar
text, adjusting, 143–146
themes for. See themes
personally identifiable information, 233
phishing websites, 230–231
phones
Apple. See iPhones, Apple
cell, 450
Photo Gallery. See Windows Live Photo Gallery
photos. See images
Photoshop, Adobe, 24
physical memory. See memory (RAM)
Pictures library
commands in Windows Media Center, 478
layout in Windows Media Center, 476–478
library organization, 11
Windows Live Photo Gallery with, 251–253
PIDs (process identifiers)
Processes tab for viewing, 716
services linked to, 797–798
Pin To Taskbar command, 101
pinging networks
Ping command, checking connectivity with, 677–679
Ping.exe, 676
pinning
documents to taskbar, 101
folders to taskbar, 101
Internet Explorer, 199
program buttons to taskbar, 101
programs in Start menu, 107
pipes, 966
Platform for Privacy Preferences (P3P), 232
playback device indicators, 408
playlists
Auto Playlists, 421–422, 424–425
creating, 422–423
definition of, 421
deleting items from, 423–424
details pane, appearance in, 424
editing, 422–424
exporting, 426
file formats for, 426
importing, 426
item properties, editing, 424
List Options menu, 423
names of, 426
navigation pane, appearance in, 424
saving, 423
skipping option for, 423–424
storage location for, 421–422
synchronizing to portable devices, 452–453
troubleshooting, 426
PlayReady, 488
printers 1003
Plug and Play
installing devices, 855–858
printers, installing, 861–862
uninstalling drivers for devices, 889
PNG file metadata not supported, 302
pointers. See mouse pointers
policy settings. See Group Policy
POP3, Windows Live Mail support for, 247
portable audio players
automatic sync relationships, 451–453
bit rate selection for synchronizing, 453
customizing device-specific synchronization settings,
453
drivers for, 450
iPods. See iPods, Apple
manual syncs, 451–453
synchronizing media on, 450–455
Windows Media Player 12 with, 412
POST (power-on self test), 45
PostScript fonts, 152
power line networks, 594
power settings
checking, 75
Device Manager Power Management tabs, 879
Do Nothing power button, 151
energy efficiency, diagnostic for, 148–149
hibernation, 151
importance of, 148
plan customization, 150
plan selection, 149–150
restoring defaults, 151
scheduled tasks, AC power option, 789
Shut Down button, 151
sleep state, 151
Wake On LAN feature, 698
power-on self test (POST), 45
prefetching, 734–735
Presentation Mode, 952
previews, taskbar
controls in, 105
definition of, 100
preview handlers, 269
viewing, 103–104
Previous Versions, 341–342
printers
Devices And Printers folder, 858–863
drivers for, 644, 862–863
installing, 861–863
Location Aware Printing, 625
managing, 860
Print Management console, 645
Print Spooler service, 791–792
sharing. See sharing printers
troubleshooting, 791–792
1004 privacy
privacy
Action Center Privacy Policy link, 813
advertising, internet, 234–235
compact privacy statements, 232–233
explicit consent, 233
first-party cookies, 234
implicit consent, 233
InPrivate Browsing, 236–237
InPrivate Filtering, 234–235
Internet Explorer 8 Privacy tab, 232
metadata issues, 305
P3P (Platform for Privacy Preferences), 232
personal information, clearing, 235–236
personally identifiable information, 233
third-party cookies, 234
Windows Error Reporting privacy protection, 813
Windows Media Center settings for, 467
wireless networking issues with, 597
private IP addresses, 699
privileges. See also permissions; rights
definition of, 548
least privilege rule, 531–532
Whoami utility for viewing, 552–553
Problem Reports
grouping reports, 293
problem histories, viewing, 818–819
Problem Steps Recorder, 821–822
problems, reporting to Microsoft. See Windows Error
Reporting
Process Explorer, 737
processes
Analyze Wait Chain for analyzing dependencies,
824–825
assigning to specific processors, 178
CPU use, listing in order of, 715
ending, 177
ending, problems from, 824
performance hits from, 705
PIDs (process identifiers), 716, 797–798
Processes tab of Windows Task Manager, 712–716
Processes table, Resource Monitor, 721
programs, matching to, 177
Task Manager, Processes tab, 177
troubleshooting, 714
Working Sets, 723
processors (CPUs)
assigning processes to, 178
minimum requirements, 23
multiprocessor performance, 712
performance, viewing in Resource Monitor, 718–720
performance, viewing in Windows Task Manager, 711
PROCESSOR_ variables, 969
utilization, listing processes in order of, 715
product keys
activation dialog box, required for, 56
activation of Windows, role in, 54–55
Anytime upgrades with, 51
editions, identification through, 54
entering during clean installations, 33
OEM methods for, 58
preinstallation of, 54
recovering, 58
skipping entering during installation, 54
Professional edition of Windows 7
definition of, 6
feature set of, 952
hardware configurations supported by, 947
profiles
common, 282
Default profiles, 282
Guest account profile, 282
Public profiles, 282
roaming. See roaming profiles
sharing folders of, issues with, 638
temporary, 282
user. See user profiles
Program Compatibility Assistant, 160–161
Program Compatibility troubleshooter, 161–162
program guides, 485–486
ProgramFiles folder, 281
Programs And Features
sorting programs by publisher, 293
programs, application
32-bit programs running in 64-bit Windows, 170–171
access defaults, 187–188
administrators, running as, 178–179
All Programs folder, 107
allowing through Windows Firewall, 512–514
AppData folder, 277–278
application events, 827
Applications And Services Logs, 827
autoelevation of, 533–534
command prompt, running from, 178–179
defaults, setting as, 181, 187–188
determining if 32- or 64-bit, 171
display scaling compatibility option, 145
ending in Task Manager, 177
installing. See installing programs
managing. See Windows Task Manager
moving to new PC with PCMover, 61
pinned to Start menu, 106–107
prefetching, 734–735
processes, matching to, 177
recently used, 106
recovery and restart functions for developers, 812
running as an administrator from standard accounts,
561
running as another user, 178–179
searching for, 319–322
startup, launching automatically during. See startup
programs
Temp folder, 277
uninstalling, 179
updates for, 158
PROMPT environment variable, 969
properties
audio tracks, editing for, 424
dialog box for files, 300–301
editing, 303–304
files, of, 299–301
privacy issues, 305
property handlers, 301–303
searches based on, 329–331
property handlers for indexes, 309, 313
Protected Mode, Internet Explorer 8
definition of, 19
working with, 220–222
protocol handlers for indexes, 309
PUBLIC environment variable, 969
Public folder sharing
allowing access to network users, 633
default access to computer users, 633
option for enabling, 630
purpose of, 628
Public Network type location
definition of, 589
discovery turned off for, 605
Public profiles, 282
Q
QoS Packet Scheduler, 692
quad-core systems, 712
Quick Launch toolbar, 100–102
QuickTime
MOV files, 411
support for, 13, 409
R
RAM (random access memory). See memory (RAM)
rating digital media
assigning ratings in Windows Media Player, 434
star system for, 299
Windows Media Center method for, 479–480
Read & Execute permission, 547
Read permission
ACEs, effect of allowing, 642
Everyone default for new shares, 641
privileges provided by, 547
Sharing wizard, setting in, 636
Read/Write permission, 636
registry 1005
ReadyBoost, 728–730
Really Simple Syndication. See RSS (Really Simple
Syndication) feeds
Receive Window Auto-Tuning, 587
recent items
Recent Items folder, 277
Recent Items menu, 109, 120
Recent Places folder, 273–274
recently used programs
controlling programs included in, 117–118
definition of, 106
recording TV
DVR files, 412
DVR-MS, 488
Media Center, steps for, 485–488
recovery CD activation issues, 58
Recycle Bin
bypassing for deletes, 338
defragmenting files in, 757
deleted files not sent to, 338
desktop icon, making visible, 339
Disk Cleanup for emptying, 759–760, 762
emptying, 341
not indexed or searched, 314
purpose of, 338
restoring files from, 339–341
settings for, 338–339
.reg files
comments in, 810
creating, 803
data types in, 809
default values, 809
deleting data with, 810
elements of, 808–810
example of, 807
header lines, 808
key names, 808
legacy version of, 804
line continuation characters, 809
managing the registry with, 807
merging into the registry, 810
uses of, 803
value names, 809
values, 809
registry
.reg files for. See .reg files
AutoRun value specification, 958–959
backing up, 803–804
comments in, 810
CurrentControlSet, restoring, 805
data types for, 801, 809
default values, 799, 809
Device Manager error code for, 891
editing. See Registry Editor
1006 Registry Editor
registry, continued
editing generally unnecessary, 798
format of, 799
guidelines for protecting, 802–803
hive files format, 803–805
hives, 800
HKCR key, 800–802
HKCU key, 800–801
HKLM key, 801–802
Internet Explorer 8 security for, 221
keys, 806
restore points for protecting, 805
restoring from exported hives, 804–805
restoring system images, effects of, 389
root keys of, 798–799
RunOnce keys, 160, 173
RunServices keys, 174
startup programs, methods for, 173–174
structure of, 798–801
subkeys of, 798–799
text files, exporting to, 804
troubleshooting, 805
values of keys, 799–800, 806, 809
virtualization of, 501, 801–802
VirtualStore folder, 280–281
Winlogon key, 174
Registry Editor
backing up registry, 803–804
dangers of, 802–803
editing data, 806
event sources, viewing, 827
Favorites list, adding to, 806
Find command, 805
keyboard shortcuts for, 806
keys, adding or deleting, 806
keys, displaying, 798
merging .reg files to registry, 810
restoring from exported hives, 804–805
searches, running from, 322
values, adding or deleting, 806
Reliability And Performance Monitor, 769
Reliability Monitor
interpreting, 823–824
new features in Windows 7, 18
opening, 823
Problem Reports, grouping items in, 293
reminders, 251
remote access
assistance. See Remote Assistance
digital media streaming, 449–450
program for. See Remote Desktop
Remote Assistance
accepting invitations with Easy Connect, 88–89
connections, network types for, 84–85
DCOM invitations, 92–93
desktop view for, 83, 93–94
disabling, 97
Easy Connect, 87–89, 96
encryption setting, 97
ending sessions, 96
experts, 83, 88–89
firewall issues, 85–86
Help Someone Who Has Invited You, 89
invitation files for help requests, 90–91, 96
inviting help with Easy Connect, 87–88
legacy Windows versions for, 96
lifespans of invitations, 90–91, 97
Live Messenger connections, 89–90
manually expiring invitations, 97
mechanics of, 83
NAT with connections, 84–85
network requirement, 83
novice control during sessions, 95
novices, 83
opening, 87
passwords for, 87–90, 97
pausing sessions, 96
performance, improving, 97–98
privilege issues, 95
purpose of, 82–83
RA tickets, 83
reconnecting, 87
Remote Desktop, compared to, 84
router issues with, 85
security maintenance issues, 96–97
Teredo with, 85
toolbar functions for, 94
troubleshooting connections, 85
UPnP with, 85
versions available with, 83
voice chat support, 96
XP limitations, 96
remote control, Windows Media Player for, 446–449
remote controls
special navigation keys, 472
text entry with, 472–474
Windows Media Center, for, 470
Remote Desktop
advantages of, 648–649
alternatives to, 650
client computers, 649–650
client resource access during sessions, 660–661
Clipboard, 661
configuring internet access, 651–653
configuring local access, 651
connecting to, 656–658
disconnecting sessions, 665
display settings for, 658–659
edition support for, 616, 649–650
enabling inbound connections, 653–655
ending sessions, 665
firewall issues, 657
improvements over earlier versions of, 648–649
IP address issues, 651–652
keyboard shortcut options, 661
keyboarding with, 662–663
local printers option, 661
locking sessions, 665
logging off, 665
multiple monitors with, 659
non–Windows 7 clients for, 650
password requirement, 654
performance options, 663–664
pinning to Start menu or taskbar, 657
ports, PC, 656
ports, router, 651, 656
Remote Assistance, compared to, 84
remote computers, 649
requirements for, 649–650
router configuration, 651
saving configurations, 664–665
security warnings, 662
switching between local and remote desktops, 658
title bar for, 658–659
troubleshooting, 657, 662
Users group, editing, 655
Windows Media Center Extender use of, 492
Windows Server gateways for, 653
Repair Your Computer option of Windows DVD, 846
reparse points. See junctions
reporting problems. See Windows Error Reporting
residential gateways
connecting, 595–596
definition of, 592
resolution, screen, 69
resource allocations (IRQs), 881–884, 890
Resource And Performance Monitor, System Diagnostics
Reports, 708–710
Resource Monitor
chart panes, 718
columns of, 717–718
CPU indicators, 718–720
filtering the display, 721
graphs, 718–719
hangs, resolving with, 824–825
key tables, 717
layout of, 716–718
memory hard faults, viewing, 718, 720
memory utilization, 724
metrics available, table of, 718
new features in Windows 7, 18
opening, 716
Overview tab, 716, 718
pausing the display, 720
ripping digital media files 1007
process associates identification, 721
purpose of, 710
saving layouts, 719
SuperFetch, monitoring, 727–728
tables of, 717–718
usability of, 716
restore points
creating before new program installations, 162
creation, events triggering, 393–394
default data location, 397
definition of, 394
deleting with Disk Cleanup, 760–761
disk space usage, 396–397
file types monitored for, 394
manual creation of, 397
Previous Versions, recovery with, 341–342
registry protection with, 805
restoring. See System Restore
scheduling creation of, 398
System Protection settings for. See System Protection
restoring data
Backup And Restore Control Panel, 386
network shared image files, 389
Recycle Bin, from, 339–341
Restore Files wizard, 386–387
system images, from, 388–390
XP backups, restoring in Windows 7, 25
restoring windows, 121, 123
Restricted Sites zone
adding sites to, 224
definition of, 222
High default security level, 223
Windows Live Mail in, 248
rights
definition of, 548
group cumulation of, 551
setting, 548
ripping digital media files
Audio Quality slider with, 430
basic CD audio track ripping, 426–427
CD burning issues, 431–432
codec issues, 410
compression issues, 428–429
default location for files, 427
file names, 432–433
metadata sources for, 427–428, 432
MP3 setting, 429
progress indicator for, 415
settings for, 429–432
storage defaults for, 432
storage issues, 429
uncompressed WAV files, 428
WAV settings, 430
Windows Media Center for, 481–482
WMA settings, 429–430
1008 Roaming folder
Roaming folder, 277–278
roaming profiles
configuration, 557–558
VirtualStore data with, 281
Robocopy, 372–373
rolling back to restore points. See System Restore
root folders, warning about sharing, 620
root keys, registry, 798
Route.exe (TCP/IP Route utility), 676
routers
configuring wireless, 599–603
connecting, 595–596
definition of, 592
IP addresses of, determining, 651
Network Map support for, 673
non-WPS setups for wireless routers, 602
Remote Desktop, configuring for, 651–652
resetting, 600
security protocols, selecting, 601
troubleshooting, 600, 669
RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feeds
definition of, 207
desktop backgrounds based on, 130
Favorites, adding to, 209–210
new posts, indications of, 207–208
slices, 207–208
subscribing to, 208–209, 247
viewing, 208
Windows Live Mail handling of, 245, 247
rstrui command, 399
Run command, 120, 958
Run keys, registry, 173–174
Run These Programs At User Logon policy, 174
Runas command, 179
running programs as another user, 178–179
RunOnce keys, registry
installing programs, issues with, 160
startup programs in, 173
RunServices keys, 174
S
Safe Mode
administrative credentials with, 842
Advanced Boot Options for, 840
Device Manager with, 843–844
effects of running in, 842
Last Known Good Configuration option, 844–845
restores from, 403
Stop error troubleshooting with, 839
System Configuration, setting from, 843
tools available in, 843
Safe Mode With Command Prompt, 844
Safe Mode With Networking option, 844
Saved Games folder, 276
schemes
color, 130–133
High Contrast tool, 154
mouse pointer, 136
sound, 134
screen savers
configuring, 134–135
themes, as part of, 126
screens
color calibration, 146
CRT versus LCD, font smoothing, 145–146
High Contrast tool, 154
moving windows in dual-screen systems, 123
multiple displays, 69, 141–142
resizing for touch gestures, 932
resolution of, setting, 69, 140
Snipping Tool, 951
touch-enabled. See touch-enabled screens
visual elements of. See desktops
WDDM driver versions, impact on performance, 708
scripts
malware in, 519
web, security issues, 230
Sdclt.exe. See backups with Windows Backup
searching
accelerators, from, 214
advanced search overview, 325–327
authors, by, 329
basic techniques for, 318–319
beginning of word rule, 318
case sensitivity, lack of, 319
category results, 320
common dialog boxes, from, 325
complex searches, 331
content, always searching option, 334
context-sensitive searching, 11
customization options, 321
dates, by, 329–330
diacritical marks, 319
entire index searches, starting points for, 318
exact phrases, for, 319
excluded locations, 314
file size, by, 330–331
filters for, 323–326
grep search engine, 308, 333
Help And Support, within, 81
History lists, 200–201
history lists of searches, 335
included locations, 309
indexes for. See indexing service
Internet Explorer 8 provider settings, 210–212
internet, extensions to, 329
listing indexed locations, 309–312
locations of search boxes for, 3
natural language searches, 332–333
nonindexed locations, 333–334
operators for, 331
parameters for, 326–327
previewing documents, 320–321
programs, for, 319–322
property-based searches, 329–331
providers, choosing, 211–213
refining searches, 321–325
rules governing, 318–319
saving searches, 334–335
scope of searches, 320–321, 328
Search Again In lists, 321
Search Builder feature, 323–325
Search Home window, 318
Searches folder, 276
See More Results link, 320–321
Start menu Search, legacy, 318
Start menu searches, 106–107, 121, 319–322
starting points for, 318
strict character matches, 332
system folders, 334
TV listings, 486
type or kind, searching by, 327–328
Visual Search providers, 212
web page searches, 319
wildcard characters, 322, 331–332
Windows Explorer search box, 272
Windows Media Player 12 search box for, 415
Windows Search overview, 307–308
word-wheel nature of, 319
XP, changes from, 307–308
sectors, disk, 753
secure desktop, 536–537
SecureDigital cards, ReadyBoost with, 728–730
SecureZIP Express, 289
security
access to resources. See access control
Action Center monitoring of essentials, 499
advertising, internet, 234–235
alerts from Microsoft, 517
antivirus. See antivirus programs
AutoComplete issues, 220
compromised web sites, 519
cookie issues. See cookies
discretionary approach to, 544–545
essential security steps, 499
events, logging of, 827
file system effects on, 544
identifiers. See SIDs (security identifiers)
improvements in Windows 7, 497, 500–502
Internet Explorer 8. See Internet Explorer 8 security
least privilege rule, 531–532
services 1009
owners of resources, 544
patch Tuesday, 744
personal information, clearing, 235–236
phishing websites, 230–231
remote invitation lifespans, setting, 91
resource list for, 517
Security logs, 828
transmission methods for malware, 517–519
updates for, 744
web. See Internet Explorer 8 security
Windows Defender, 500, 522–523
Windows Live Mail, 248
Windows Update security updates, 516–517
wireless network, 597–599
zones, Internet. See security zones
security access tokens
administrative, 544
checking of, 544–545
creation of, 544
UAC effects of, 535
Security Center replaced with Action Center, 502
security groups. See groups, security
Security logs, 828
Security Warning dialog boxes, 227–228
security zones
adding sites to, 223–224
changing settings for, 225–226
effects on browsing, 223
Internet. See Internet zone
Intranet. See Local Intranet zone
list of, 222
purpose of, 222
resetting, 226
Restricted Sites. See Restricted Sites zone
Trusted Sites. See Trusted Sites zone
See More Results link, 320–321
Send To menu
creating shortcuts in, 277–278
SendTo folder, 277–278
zipped folder creation from, 288–289
server caching, settings for, 352–353
services
configuring, 792–796
console for managing. See Services console
definition of, 790
dependencies, 795
essential services, 791–792
managing with Task Manager, 797–798
names of, variations of, 796
pausing, 792
performance hits from, 705, 735
PIDs with, 797–798
properties of, displaying, 791
start parameters for, 792
1010 Services console
services, continued
starting, 792, 797
stopping, 792, 797
System account for, 790
Windows Task Manager Services tab, 716
Services console
accounts, specifying for running, 793
administrator privileges recommended for, 790
commands available for, 791
configuring services, 792–796
dependencies, viewing, 795
essential services, 791–792
layout of, 791
names of, variations of, 796
pausing services, 792
properties of services, displaying, 791
purpose of, 770
recovery actions, specifying, 794–795
sorting column contents, 791
start parameters for services, 792
starting, 790
starting services, 792
startup options, setting, 793
stopping services, 792
session cookies, 233, 237
Set Program Access And Computer Defaults dialog box,
187–188
Set Up A Connection Or Network wizard
ad hoc network setup, 609–610
non-broadcasting wireless networks, setting up
connections to, 607–608
wireless networks, configuring routers, 599–602
setting up Windows 7. See installing Windows 7
settings, moving to upgraded machines, 25–26
setup information files, 856–858, 873
Sfc utility, 849
shadow copies
deleting with Disk Cleanup, 760–761
Previous Versions, recovery with, 341–342
Shake, Aero, 122
Shared Folders management console, 352–353
sharing digital media
automatic sync relationships, 451
bit rate selection, 453
device access, controlling, 443–444
device to PC transfers, 455
homegroups for, 442, 611
libraries for, 442, 444–446
manual syncs, 451–453
Media Transfer Protocol (MTP), 450
options for, overview of, 442
Other Libraries in Windows Media Player, 444
owner controls over, 444–446
parental ratings, 444–445
permissions for, 442
portable device synchronization, 450–455
registry issues, 448
remote internet streaming, 449–450
sharing libraries in homegroups, 618–620
standards setting group for, 443
Stream menu of Windows Media Player, 442–443
streaming media out, 442, 446–449
transcoding, 453–454
troubleshooting, 448
Windows Media Center Extenders, 490–493
Windows Media Center shared library access, 482
sharing files and folders
Advanced Sharing, 639–642
advantages of, 586
anonymous sharing, 634
any folder sharing, 628
concurrent user limits, 640–641
descriptions of contents, adding, 640
ending sharing of particular folders, 638
Everyone group, 635–636
File And Printer Sharing option, 630
File Sharing Connections options, 630
finding shared files, 646
group permissions, setting, 641–642
homegroups for, 611
models for, 628–629
multiple share names for folders, 640
online sharing with SkyDrive, 260–261
paths, issues with, 638
permissions, combined shared and NTFS, 642–643
permissions, setting, 636, 639, 641–642
profile folders, issues with, 638
Public folder sharing, 628, 630, 633
root folders, warning about sharing, 620
share names, 640
sharing libraries in homegroups, 618–620
Sharing tab display, 639
subfolders, 641
user accounts, listing specific for a share, 635
wizard for setting up. See Sharing wizard
sharing internet connections
advantages of, 586
ICS (Internet Connection Sharing), 586
sharing printers
adding network printers, 648
advantages of, 586
connecting to shared printers, 648
File And Printer Sharing option, 630
homegroups for, 611, 624–625
Location Aware Printing, 625
Manage Printers permission, 643
permissions for, 643
Print Management console, 645
Print Server Properties, setting, 644–645
setting up, 643
spool file locations, 645
sharing resources
Advanced Sharing, 630–632, 639–642
anonymous sharing, 634
configuring networks for sharing, 629–633
digital media sharing. See sharing digital media
edition differences for, 616
file sharing. See sharing files and folders
finding shared resources, 646
folder sharing. See sharing files and folders
homegroups for. See homegroups
internet connection sharing. See sharing internet
connections
libraries for, 618–620. See also sharing digital media
models for, 628–629
overview of, 615
password-protected sharing options, 631–632, 634
permissions, shared resource and NTFS together,
642–643
printer sharing. See sharing printers
Public folder. See Public folder sharing
Simple File Sharing, Windows XP, 615
small network recommendations, 633
Windows XP sharing models, 629
wizard for setting up. See Sharing wizard
Sharing wizard
Advanced Sharing, 639–642
advantages of, 615, 634
folder and file sharing steps, 635–638
miscellaneous capabilities of, 637–638
permission settings, 636
Shell service objects, startup programs with, 174
shims, 23
shortcuts, pinning programs to the taskbar, 101
Show Desktop tool, 124
Shut Down button, 151
shutdowns triggered by errors. See Stop errors
Sidebar, 146. See also gadgets
SIDs (security identifiers)
assignment to user accounts, 545
definition of, 544
deleted accounts, of, 545
resources linked to deleted, 559
structure of, 545
viewing, 545
well-known SIDs, 545
Whoami utility, 552–553
Simple File Sharing, Windows XP, 615, 629
simple volumes
definition of, 900
drive letters, assigning to, 903
extending existing, 908–909
Sports strip, Windows Media Center 1011
formatting new, 903–905
New Simple Volume wizard, 902–905
specifying capacity of new, 902–903
status messages for, 917–919
SkyDrive, 260–261
slate Tablet PCs, 924
sleep settings
checking, 75
hybrid sleep, 151
Sleep button effect, 151
slices, web, 207–208
slide shows
desktop backgrounds, using for, 129–130
Windows DVD Maker, creating with, 459–462
Windows Media Center, building in, 478–479
SLP (System Locked Preinstallation), 58
SmartScreen filter
definition of, 19
operation of, 231
turning on, 231
snap-ins, 768–769. See also MMC (Microsoft
Management Console)
snaps. See Aero Snap
Snipping Tool, 951
social networking, 258–260
Software Assurance subscriptions, 839
software compatibility
display scaling options, 145
pre-testing for. See Upgrade Advisor
problematic software types, 24–25
software programs. See programs, application
solutions to errors
Automatically Check For Solutions options, 816
checking for, 817–818
histories of problem reports, 818–819
Windows Error Reporting display of, 814
songs. See audio
sorting folder contents, 293–294
Sound Recorder, 949
sounds. See also audio
events, selecting for, 133–134
missing, troubleshooting, 408
muting all, 134
schemes, saving, 134
silencing particular items, 133–134
Volume Mixer, 134
spanned volumes, 900
speaker icon, 408
Special Permissions, 547
speech recognition, 938–943
splitting windows, 121–122
Sports strip, Windows Media Center, 470
1012 spyware
spyware
antispyware program compatibility issues, 24–25
capabilities of, 498
performance hits from, 705
Spyware Warrior forums, 529
themes containing, 140
Windows Defender, 522–528
SSDs (solid state disks), 729
SSL (Secure Sockets Layer), 224
standard user accounts
changing an account to, 557
guidelines for enforcing, 560–561
recommended for security, 534
running programs as an administrator from, 561
tasks available to, 549–550
tokens, UAC effects of, 535
stars, rating system of. See rating digital media
Start menu
Administrator, running programs as, 179
All Programs folder, 107
classic menu not available, 116
context menu options, 118
Customize Start Menu dialog box, 117
dragging options, 118
folder display options, 119
Help And Support, launching, 78
highlighting newly installed programs, 118, 159
hover options for Jump Lists, 119
icon size options, 118
Jump Lists with, 108
layout of, 105–106
optional folders available, 120
picture for, changing, 119
pinning programs, 106–107
Privacy choices, 117
program access defaults, 187–188
Recent Items menu, 109
recently used programs, 106, 117–118
right side of, customization options, 119–120
Run command, 120
search box in, 106–107, 121
searching from, 319–322
size of, setting, 117
sorting options for programs, 118
Start Menu folder, 278
tab for changing properties of, 116
Starter edition of Windows 7
Aero not supported, 99
definition of, 7
DVD decoder not included in, 407
Fast User Switching not available in, 544
hardware configurations supported by, 947
limitations of, 950
networking limitations, 585
personalization limitations of, 99
startup process
booting. See boot process
multiboot systems, for, 45–46
Safe Mode for. See Safe Mode
silencing, 134
Startup And Recovery options, 48
Startup Repair option, Windows Recovery Environment,
848–850
startup programs
Autoruns for managing, 732
Check Disk, scheduling for, 750
controlling with System Configuration utility, 174–175
disabling, 175
methods used to configure, 173–174
performance management for, 731–732
setting up, 172
System Information list of startup programs, 175
Task Manager for setting, 786
troubleshooting, 172
Windows Defender list no longer available, 174–175
stateful inspection packet filtering, 507
static IP addresses, 695–697
Sticky Keys tool, 154
Sticky Notes, 951
Stop errors
additional resources for, 834
automatically restart option, 835
BIOS errors, 838
causes of, 837–839
customizing handling of, 834–836
definition of, 834
device drivers, troubleshooting, 886–888
Disable Automatic Restart On System Failure boot
option, 846
drivers causing, 837
dump file options, 836
generating, 837
hardware errors, 837
Knowledge Base for, 838
low system resources causing, 839
memory errors, 838
reading error information, 836–837
recently added software or hardware, 838
recovering from, 840
system file damage, 839
troubleshooting checklist for, 837–839
storage
backing up data. See backups with Windows Backup
disks for. See hard disks
managing, 758–762. See also Disk Cleanup
shared. See sharing resources
SkyDrive online file storage, 260–261
SSDs (solid state disks), 729
streaming media
homegroups, within, 624
library sharing options, 444–446
media streaming networking setting, 630
out to other devices, 446–449
remote internet access to, 449–450
Stream menu, Windows Media Player, 442–443
URIs for streamed files, 445
striped volumes, 900, 909
subnet masks
NAT issues, 699
purpose of, 695
setting, 696–697
troubleshooting, 682
viewing, 681
subscribing to RSS feeds, 209
SuperFetch
performance enhancement with, 727–728
virtual memory for, 724
support. See Help And Support application
Svchost.exe
components of, listing, 714
disabling components of, 735
PIDs of, 716
swap files. See virtual memory
switches, network
connecting, 595–596
definition of, 592
switching users, 575–576. See also Fast User Switching
Sync Center, 293
synchronizing files
automatic sync relationships, 451–453
customizing device-specific settings, 453
device to PC transfers, 455
favorites synchronization, 363
Live Mesh for. See Live Mesh
offline files. See offline files feature
peer-to-peer synchronization, 356
portable media players, with, 450–455
solutions for, 343
Windows Live Sync, 360–363
Windows Music Player, from, 482
System account, services running in, 790
System Administrative Tools folder, 120
System application, Control Panel
information available from, 763–764
installed edition, listing, 5
System Builder copies, 59
System Configuration utility
Safe Mode, booting to, 843
startup program control, 174–175
System Diagnostics Reports, 708–710
system event log, 827
System Reserved partitions 1013
system files
corrupted, recovering from, 846–850
images of. See system images
removing with Disk Cleanup, 760–761
restoring system images, effects of, 389–390
Sfc utility for repairing, 849
system folders, searching, 334
System Health Report
performance baselines, establishing, 708–710
running, 871
System Image Recovery command, 850–851
system images
backups of, 383–386
hard drive issues for, 390
restoring data from, 388–390
Volume Shadow Copy Service required for, 391
System Information (Msinfo32.exe)
advantages of, 766
Find feature of, 767
layout of, 766–767
saving information from, 768
starting, 766
startup programs, listing, 175
system information, viewing
Device Manager, launching, 764. See also Device
Manager
Msinfo32.exe for. See System Information (Msinfo32.exe)
System application for, 763–764
Systeminfo command-line utility, 765–766
Windows Experience link, 764. See also Windows
Experience Index (WEI)
Windows Management Instrumentation (Wmic.exe), 766
System Locked Preinstallation (SLP), 58
system partitions, 900
System Protection
default data location, 397
defaults for options, 394
disk space usage, 396–397
drives, selecting for automatic restore point creation,
395
manual creation of restore points, 397
opening, 394
options for, 75
purpose of, 393
registry protection with, 805
restore point creation, events triggering, 393–394
scheduling restore point creation, 398
snapshots by, 393
System Restore for rollbacks. See System Restore
turning off, 911
System Recovery Options. See Windows Recovery
Environment
system repair discs, 76, 386, 388
System Reserved partitions, 37
1014 System Restore
System Restore. See also System Protection
capabilities of, 399
data files, effects on, 401–402
disk space usage, 396–397
importance of, 395
listing all restore points, 400
new user account destruction by, 402
opening, 399–400
restore procedure, 399–401
Safe Mode issues, 403
scanning for affected programs, 400
setting disk space for, 75
summaries for selected restores, 401
testing restores, 402
uninstall issues, 402–403
Windows Recovery Environment created issues, 403
Windows Recovery Environment, running from, 850–851
wizard, 400
T
Tablet PCs
Aero Snap with, 934
calibrating the screen, 929
convertible vs. slate designs, 924
definition of, 924
flick gesture, 933
gestures, 931–935
Handedness option, 928
ink data, 937
Input Panel views, 935
Input Panel, adding to the taskbar, 112
Jump Lists with, 934
logon security, 938
multitouch-enabled, 925. See also multitouch-enabled
screens
Pen Options, 927–928
programs with gestures enabled for, 934–935
rotate gesture, 934
screen orientation options, 929–930
scrolling gesture, 933
Show Desktop buttons, 934
tablet buttons, 930–931
technology of, 925
touch keyboards, 935–936
two-finger tap, 934
writing pad, 935–938
zoom gesture, 933–934
tabs, Internet Explorer 8
closed tabs, reopening, 199–200
Favorites, adding groups of tabs to, 204
managing, 196–198
New Tab page, 197
tagging images. See also metadata, file; properties
editing tags, 303–304
metadata and properties, 299–301
privacy issues, 305
rating, 299
troubleshooting, 302–303
Windows Live Photo Gallery for, 254–257
tagging music files, 435–438
Task Manager. See Windows Task Manager
Task Scheduler
actions, 783, 787–788
capabilities of, 779
conditions, 783
console tree navigation, 781
creating tasks, overview of, 783–784
default tasks in, 781
Disk Cleanup, running from, 761–762
Event Viewer in, 782–783, 786
events, using as task triggers, 834
History tab, 782–783
idle, starting a task on, 786, 788
layout of, 779–780
logged-in users for, requiring, 784
messages as tasks, 787–788
MMC nature of, 779
naming tasks, 783
network connections, requiring for tasks, 790
power, requiring AC, 789
refreshing, 780
security contexts for tasks, 783
settings for tasks, 783
startup programs, 173
terminology for, 783
triggers, 783–787
viewing active tasks, 781–782
waking computers to run tasks, 789
wizard for, 783
taskbar buttons
changes in Windows 7, 7–8
order of, changing, 110
small icons option, 110
stacks of buttons, 102
Taskbar Buttons options, 110–111
touch-enabled screen changes for, 934
types of buttons, 102
taskbar
Address toolbar, 112
Aero Peek, 103–104
arranging buttons, 7
Auto Hide option, 111
buttons of. See taskbar buttons
changes from Vista, 100–101
closing windows from, 104
cycling through window groups, 104
definition of, 100
Desktop toolbar in, 112
Device Stage buttons, 864
enhancements, 105
features of, 100–101
Jump Lists, 8, 101, 107–109
layout of, 7–8
Links toolbar, 112
moving, 112
notification area of. See notification area
opening programs from, 102
orange flashing buttons in, 537
pinning items to, 101
pinning programs to, 101
pinning shortcuts to, 7
previews, 100
Quick Launch toolbar, 100–102
removing pinned items, 101
showing if invisible, 111
size of, setting, 111
small icons option, 110
stacks of buttons, 102
switching tasks with, 102–104
Tablet PC Input Panel, adding, 112
Taskbar And Start Menu Properties dialog box, 109
thumbnail previews, 7–8, 103–104
toolbars, hosting additional, 112–114
UAC buttons in, 537
unlocking, 111
Unpin This Program command, 101
TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet
Protocol)
addresses. See IP addresses
connection issues, checking, 677–680
DNS issues, 683–684
IP Configuration Utility, 676
Netstat.exe, 676
Next Generation TCP/IP stack, 587
packet filtering, 587
Ping command, checking connectivity with, 677–679
repairing configurations, 682–683
resetting the connection with Microsoft Fix it, 821
subnet masks, 681–682
TCP/IP NetBIOS Information utility, 676
TCP/IP Ping utility, 676
TCP/IP Route utility, 676
TCP/IP Traceroute utility, 676
timeouts, 678
troubleshooting overview, 677
warning about bad advice for tweaking, 685
telephones
Apple. See iPhones, Apple
cell, 450
television. See TV
Temp folder, cleaning up, 760
Templates folder, 278
touch-enabled screens 1015
Temporary Internet Files folder
Disk Cleanup for emptying, 759–760
kinds of files in, 277
Teredo, Remote Assistance with, 85
text. See also fonts
DPI settings, 143–144
font smoothing for, 145–146
size of, scaling, 143
speech, converting to, 153
troubleshooting for legacy programs, 145
text messaging with Windows Live Messenger, 244
themes
Aero, 127
colors in, 130–133
definition of, 126
icon settings, saving, 138
organizing, 139–140
profile specificity of, 126
saving, 139
sharing with .themepack files, 139
sounds, selecting for events, 133–134
theme files for slideshow backgrounds, 130
virus warning for, 140
third-party cookies, 234
thumbnail previews, 7–8
TIFF files
metadata, 302
OCR feature for, 312
time, setting during installation, 34
tokens, security. See security access tokens
toolbars
Command bar, Internet Explorer, 193–194, 216
creating new, 114
docking requirement, 113
Favorites bar, 203
handles of, 113
hosting additional in taskbar, 112–114
Internet Explorer toolbar management, 215–216
notification area options, 114–116
Start menu personalization. See Start menu
taskbar. See taskbar
Windows Explorer toolbar, 270
Windows Media Player 12, 414–415
touch-enabled screens
Aero Snap with, 934
calibrating the screen, 929
capabilities of, 924
drivers for, 925
enabling, 926
flick gesture, 933
gestures, 931–935
Handedness option, 928
Jump Lists with, 934
multitouch-enabled, 925
1016 Traceroute utility
touch-enabled screens, continued
Pen And Touch dialog box options, 926–928
pointer display option, 926
programs with gestures enabled for, 934–935
right-click simulation, 926
rotate gesture, 934
screen orientation options, 929–930
scrolling gesture, 933
Show Desktop button, 934
Tablet PCs with, 924
technology of, 925
touch behavior options, 926
touch keyboards for, 935–936
touch-enabled PCs, 924
two-finger tap, 934
writing pad, 935–938
zoom gesture, 933–934
Traceroute utility (Tracert.exe), 676, 679
transferring files and settings. See Easy Transfer
transparency settings, 131
triggers, task
creating, 784–787
definition of, 783
troubleshooting wizards, 820
TrueType fonts, 152
Trusted Sites zone
adding sites to, 224
appropriate sites for, 224
definition of, 222
Medium default security level, 223
Protected Mode not affecting sites in, 222
TrustedInstaller security context
All Users Startup folder, access to, 172
definition of, 158
tunes. See audio
TV
burning to DVD, 472
CableCARDs, 485
channel configuration, 483–484
copy-protected programs, 488
deleting recordings, 489
Details window, Windows Media Center, 470–472
Favorite Lineups, 484
high-definition setup issues, 485
managing recordings of, 489–490
program guide configuration, 483–484
recording formats, 412
recording with Windows Media Center, 485–488
storage space issues, 488, 490
tuner setup, 483–485
watching recordings of, 489–490
Windows Media Center for, 482–490. See also Windows
Media Center
Windows Recorded TV Show format, 488
U
UAC (User Account Control)
access control interactions with, 547
administrator account consent prompts, 533
administrator Command Prompt windows for, 540–541
autoelevation of programs, 533–534
changes for Windows 7, 531
color indicators for prompts, 536
controversy about, 531
credentials prompts, 535
dealing with prompts, 535–537
disabling, consequences of, 281
effectiveness of, 531–532
fingerprint readers, advantages of, 541
importance of keeping on, 540
Internet Explorer 8, executable file warnings, 228
least privilege rule, 531–532
Local Security Policy with, 539
MMC (Microsoft Management Console) issues with, 770
modifying settings for, 538–540
program installation requirements, 158
programs, compatibility with, 531–532
prompts, actions triggering, 532–533
Protected Mode use of, 221
reboots while installing programs, 160
registry virtualization, 801–802
secure desktop, 536–537
settings, table of, 539
standard accounts recommended for security, 534
standard user, running as a, 541
tokens, effects of, 535
troubleshooting, 537, 539
turning off, effects of, 547
updates for programs requiring, 158
VirtualStore folder, 280–281
work arounds for, 540–541
XP, upgrading from, 3
UDF (Universal Disk Format), 896, 905–906
UFDs (USB Flash Drives). See USB devices
Ultimate edition of Windows 7
definition of, 6
feature set of, 953
hardware configurations supported by, 947
UltraVNC, 650
UNC paths, security zone for, 224
uninstalling programs
issues with, 179
steps for, 179
System Restore issues for, 402–403
updates
automatic, setting while installing, 34
classes of, 744
device drivers, for, 746, 885
dynamic updates for upgrades, 23, 41
Microsoft Update Catalog, 748
Microsoft Updates for Office, 744
multiple computers, updating options, 747–748
patch Tuesday, 744
program, UAC with, 158
removing, 747
security updates, 744
Windows. See Windows Update
WSUS (Windows Server Update Services), 748
Upgrade Advisor
problematic software types, 24–25
purpose of, 21–22
startup screen, running from, 27
upgrading to Windows 7. See also clean installations
activation requirements. See activating Windows 7
antivirus program not included, 5
antivirus programs compatibility issues, 24–25
Anytime Upgrade, 50–51
backups for data and settings, 25
changes new to Vista users, 4
cleaning up after, 43
compatibility test phase, 42
drive letter assignment in multiboot systems, 44
dynamic updates with, 23, 41
features new to XP users, 3
limitations on, 40
missing legacy programs, 4
new features. See new features in Windows 7
operations automatically occurring during, 42
paths supported for, 40–41
running setup from within Windows, 26–27
starting, 41
temporary folders for, 42–43
updates, downloading during, 41
Upgrade Advisor, 21–22
XP, from, clean installation required, 40–41
upgrading Windows 7 editions, 50–51
UPnP
Network Map with, 672
Remote Assistance with, 85
URLs (Uniform Resource Locators)
address bar, Internet Explorer 8, 201–202
AutoComplete feature with, 219–220
searching for, 319
USB devices
AutoPlay, 189–190
BitLocker To Go, 366, 369–371
bootable flash disks, 916
disabled, troubleshooting, 190
driver verification for, 52
Hide Empty Drives option, 913
hubs, power management, 881
Plug and Play compatibility, 856
ReadyBoost with memory devices, 728–730
user names 1017
removable drive restriction settings, 502
Virtual Windows XP sharing issues, 169–170
User Account Control. See UAC (User Account Control)
user accounts
account types, 548–550
administrators. See administrator accounts
Advanced User Accounts feature, 562–563
changes for Windows 7, 551
creating new, 554–556
credentials management, 557
deleting, 558–560
editions of Windows, variations for, 543–544, 564
environment variable settings, 558
file encryption certificate management, 557
fingerprint data management, 558
group memberships of, 551. See also groups, security
guest. See guest accounts
guidelines for assigning types, 550–551
guidelines for shared computers, 560–562
hints, changing, 556
HomeGroupUser$, 616–617, 627
identification of, 548
Link Online IDs, 557
local, 552
Local Users And Groups snap-in, 563
logon time restrictions for, 562
miscellaneous account types, 550
names, changing, 556
Net User command, 563–564
network sharing considerations, 632
Parental Controls options, 556–557
password guidelines for, 561–562
password reset disks, 557
passwords, changing, 556
pictures, associating with, 556
purpose of, 76, 543
restricting file access for, 562
roaming profile configuration, 557–558
running programs as an administrator from standard
accounts, 561
security groups, relation to, 551
setting up during installations, 32
standard. See standard user accounts; Users group
types of, changing, 557
UAC relationship to, 547
User Accounts feature for managing, 553–554
Whoami utility, 552–553
workgroup versus domain, 552
user names
AutoComplete feature with, 219–220
creating new, 554–556
full names, 554, 556
identification of accounts by, 548
setting during installations, 32
Whoami utility, 552–553
1018 user profiles
user profiles
definition of, 274
deleting, 558–560
Documents folder, 275
folder relocation, 363–365
hidden files and folders, 275
library settings, 286
opening, 274–275
USERPROFILE environment variable, 969
Users folder junctions, table of, 280
Users group
Domain Users group membership in, 552
tasks available to members of, 549–550
V
validation of Windows 7, 59–60
VAN (View Available Networks) panel, 604
VBScript, 230
video
AVCHD format, 409
AVI (Audio Video Interleave), 411
Blue-ray support, 418
codecs required to play, 408
container formats, 408–409
device to PC transfers, 455
displays. See screens
DivX, 410
DVD decoders not included in some editions, 407
Enable Low-Resolution Video option, 845
libraries for organizing, 283
Matroska Video format, 410
MP4 Video format, 409
MPEG-2 format, 412, 488
MPEG-2 TS Video format, 409
MPEG-4 AVC, 409
My Videos folder, 276
newly supported formats, 408–409
playing, 13
program compatibility options for, 163
rating, 299
rating with Windows Media Center, 479–480
recording TV, 485–488
sharing. See sharing digital media
storage space issues, 488, 490
subtitles, 418
synchronizing with portable devices, 450–455
television. See TV
transcoding, 453–454
Videos folder template, 291
Windows DVD Maker, 459–462
Windows Live Photo Gallery with, 251
Windows Media Center for. See Windows Media Center
Windows Media Player 12 playback capabilities,
417–419
Windows Movie Maker, 488
Xvid, 410
video cards, Aero use of, 127
Videos library
choosing from Windows Media Player 12, 418
layout in Windows Media Center, 476–478
virtual hard disks, 920–922
virtual memory
Commit Change of, 723, 725
configuration options, 726
definition of, 723
ensuring adequate, 724–727
myths about, 734
page files, 724–727
recommendations for managing, 726–727
size of, 725
SuperFetch use of, 724
viewing current configuration of, 725
Virtual PC, Windows
installing, 164
purpose of, 46
running 32-bit programs using, 171
VirtualBox, 46
virtualization of operating systems
AMD vs. Intel hardware options for, 164
options for, 46
registry virtualization, 801–802
running 32-bit programs using, 171
Windows XP Mode hardware requirements, 164
virtualization, registry, 280–281, 501
VirtualStore folder, 280–281
viruses
ActiveX controls, in, 229
capabilities of, 498
Malicious Software Removal Tool, 521–522
performance hits from, 705
themes containing, 140
transmission methods of, 517–519
zero-day exploits, 520
Vista, Windows, upgrade paths to Windows 7, 40–41
VistaBootPRO, 48–49
Visual Search providers, 212
VL (Volume Licensing), 59
VMware, 46
voice commands, 938–943
Volume Licensing (VL), 59
Volume Mixer, 134
Volume Shadow Copy Service
deleting all copies, 911
shrinking volumes, effects on, 909–910
system image backup dependence on, 391
volumes
basic disks limitations, 900
checking for errors. See Check Disk, Windows
definition of, 899
deleting, 910
drive letters, assigning to, 903
extending existing, 908–909
formatting new, 903–905
labels for, 40, 904, 912
mapping to NTFS folders, 913–916
of mounted drives, 899
New Simple Volume wizard, 902–905
setting number and size while installing Windows 7,
901–902
shrinking, 909–911
simple, 900
spanned, 900
specifying capacity of new, 902–903
status messages for, 917–919
striped, 900
VPN Reconnect, 587
W
Wake On LAN feature, 698
wallpaper. See desktop backgrounds
war driving, 597
WAV files
ripping to, setting for, 430
size issues with, 428
WDDM (Windows Display Driver Model)
driver versions, impact on performance, 708
version support requirements, 23
web browsers
default, setting, 74–75, 191–192
Microsoft. See Internet Explorer 8
web desktop feature, Live Mesh, 356
web feeds
definition of, 207
Favorites, adding to, 209–210
new posts, indications of, 207–208
slices, 207–208
subscribing to, 208–209
viewing, 208
web pages
compatibility tools for, 194–196
viewing. See Internet Explorer 8
web slices, 207–208
WEI (Windows Experience Index). See Windows
Experience Index (WEI)
WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy)
disadvantages of, 598
guideline for replacing, 598–599
passphrases for, 602
Whoami utility, 552–553
WhoCrashed, 840
WHQL (Windows Hardware Quality Labs), 874–875
Windows Defender 1019
WIA (Windows Image Acquisition) driver, 253
Wi-Fi. See wireless networking
Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA). See WPA (Wi-Fi Protected
Access)
Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS). See WPS (Wi-Fi Protected
Setup)
Win.ini startup programs, 173
windows
Aero Shake, 122–123
Aero Snaps, 121–122
closing from taskbar, 104
color scheme customization, 130–133
Flip 3D feature, 125
full-height snaps, 122–123
maximizing, 121, 123
minimizing, 123
moving to alternate screen, 123
restoring to unmaximized, 121, 123
snapping to side of screen, 123
splitting, 121–122
switching between, 125
table of mouse gestures and keyboard shortcuts, 123
themes, relation to, 126
transparency settings, 131
Windows 7 editions. See editions of Windows 7
Windows Activation Technologies, 53
Windows Backup. See backups with Windows Backup
Windows Biometric Service, 501
Windows Boot Manager, 45–46
Windows Calendar, 250–251
Windows Check Disk. See Check Disk, Windows
Windows Debugging Tools, 839
Windows Defender
Allow actions, 528
automatic scanning options, 524–526
batch scans, 526
Clean System command, 528
command-line utility for, 526
definition of, 500
difficult to remove spyware, 529
disabling, 531
excluding files from scans, 525
full vs. quick scans, 525
legitimate programs tagged as spyware, 528
managing allowed and quarantined items, 529–530
manual scans, 526
purpose of, 522–523
Quarantine actions, 528
real-time protection option, 527
Remove actions, 528
responding to alerts, 527–528
scanning with, 524–526
Show Details command, 528
spyware definition updates, 524
1020 Windows Display Driver Model
Windows Display Driver Model. See WDDM (Windows
Display Driver Model)
Windows DVD Maker, 459–462
Windows Error Recovery menu, 841
Windows Error Reporting
application recovery functions for developers, 812
Ask Me Before Checking option, 816
Automatically Check For Solutions options, 816
BadApp.exe testing tool, 815
Bucket IDs, 819
changes from Windows XP, 812
Check Online For A Solution option, 814
checking for solutions, 817–818
configuring, 815–817
data included in reports, 812–813
excluding particular programs from reporting, 817
features of, 812
histories of problems, 818–819
known solutions, display of, 814
Never Check For Solutions option, 816
not responding messages, 811–812
privacy protection, 813
process of responding to errors, 813–814
restarts of programs, 814
user accounts, setting different options for, 816
Windows Experience Index (WEI)
baselines, establishing with, 705–708
categories making up, viewing, 706–707
drivers, effects of, 708
Notes section, 708
numbers, interpreting, 706–707
starting up, 70, 706, 764
Windows Explorer
address bar, 270
AppData folder, 277–278
breadcrumb trail feature, 270
Change Your View menu, 289–290
Choose Details dialog box, 291
column width adjustment, 291
configuring layout of, 272
Contacts folder, 249
copying paths, 271
data arrangement overview, 289
date navigation, 295
details pane, 269, 299
disk information from, 917–919
Documents folder, 275
editing metadata, 303–305
Favorites folder, 276
Favorites list, 273–274
file metadata management, 299–305
file property management, 299–301
file type associations, changing from, 186–187
filtering contents of folders, 294–297
Folder Options dialog box, 270
folder templates, 291
grouping within folders, 297–298
headings, settings for, 290–291
Hide Empty Drives option, 913
Homegroup node, 622
icon sizes, adjusting, 289–290
indexing performance effects, 315–316
internet searches, extending to, 329
junctions, 278–280
keyboard shortcuts for navigation, 297
layout of, 268–272
libraries. See libraries
library management, 282–287
library pane, 270
Links folder, 276
menu bar, 270
navigation pane, 269
navigation techniques, 272–274, 297
new features in Windows 7, 10–12
opening from Command Prompt window, 961
Organize menu, 270, 272
paths, viewing full, 271
preview pane, 269
properties of files, displaying, 299–301
purpose of, 268
Restore Previous Versions command, 341–342
Roaming folder, 277–278
search box of, 272
searches, refining, 322–325
Send To menu, 277–278
Sharing wizard, launching from, 635
shell shortcuts to hidden folders, 277–278
Show All Folders option, 272
sorting contents of folders, 293–294
starting, method for, 273
status messages for disks, 917–919
toolbar, 270
Up button functionality for, 271
user profiles, viewing, 274–275
VirtualStore folder, 280–281
volume labels, changing, 912
XP folder name redirection, 278–280
XP-style folder display, 272
zipped folders, 288–289
Windows Fax and Scan, 948
Windows Features, configuring, 188
Windows Filtering Platform, 587
Windows Firewall
advanced tool for. See Windows Firewall With Advanced
Security console
allowing program or feature connections through,
512–514
Block All Incoming Connections option, 511
coexisting with other firewalls, 504
default actions of, 506
default settings, restoring, 514
disabling, 510
Domain profile, 509
enabling, 510–511
homegroups, configuration by, 627
importance of keeping on, 499, 506
improvements over XP version, 508
managing, 509
multiple access firewall profiles, 500, 509
opening, 509
outbound traffic allowed default, 506
Private profile, 509
profiles, 509
Public profile, 509
purpose of, 505
Remote Assistance, allowing, 85–86
security profile type dependence, 590–591
stateful inspection packet filtering, 507
third-party firewalls with, 508
Windows XP Mode with, 508
Windows Firewall With Advanced Security console
command-line interface for, 516
definition of, 770
HomeGroup settings in, 674
purpose of, 514–515
starting, 515
Windows Home Server, Windows Map with, 672
Windows Image Acquisition (WIA) driver, 253
Windows Live Calendar
managing, 262–263
opening, 250–251
sharing calendars, 262–263
web service for portability, 258
Windows Live Contacts
adding new contacts, 248
importing contacts into, 249
views available for, 248
web service for portability, 258
Windows Live Mail use of, 248–249
Windows Live Essentials
Calendar. See Windows Live Calendar
Contacts. See Windows Live Contacts
definition of, 239
downloading, 239
IDs, Mail features enabled by, 245
IDs, obtaining, 240–241
installing, 239
Link Online IDs, 557
Live Mesh, 356–360
Mail. See Windows Live Mail
media streaming to remote locations, 449–450
Messenger. See Windows Live Messenger
Windows Live Photo Gallery 1021
Photo Gallery. See Windows Live Photo Gallery
privacy policy, 241
reminders, 251
safety scanner, 522
social networking, 258–260
web services. See Windows Live web services
Windows Live toolbar, 363
Windows Live Family Safety, 584
Windows Live IDs, 240–241, 245
Windows Live Mail
account creation, 246–247
ActiveX prohibition, 248
blogging with, 245
Calendar, 250–251
Contacts folder, Windows Explorer, 249
contacts, online, 245, 248–249. See also Windows Live
Contacts
display names, 246
e-mail types supported by, 244–245
enhancements from earlier programs, 244–245
Essentials integration, 245
instant messaging functions, 245
mail server information for, 247
newsgroups, accounts for, 247
passwords, 246
photo e-mails, 245
RSS feeds into, 245, 247
security options, 248
setting associations for, 181
Windows Live IDs, features enabled by, 245
Windows Live Messenger
blocking invitations, 243
categories for contacts, 243
contact management, 242–243
contacts added to Windows Live Contacts, 249
Contacts folder, Windows Explorer, 249
file sharing with, 244
invitations, creating, 242–243
invitations, responding to, 243
menu system, 242
purpose of, 242
Remote Assistance through, 89–90
sending messages with, 244
telephone calls with, 242
text messaging with, 244
Windows Live Mail instant messaging functions, 245
Windows Live Photo Gallery
capabilities of, 251
displaying pictures, 253
editing images with, 257–258
erasing pictures from cameras while importing, 256
folders included in, 251
importing pictures, 253–256
organizing pictures while importing, 253–255
1022 Windows Live Sync
Windows Live Photo Gallery, continued
Pictures libraries with, 251–253
tags, adding while importing, 254–255
tags, organizing with, 256–257
user interface of, 251–252
web photo sharing service, 262
Windows Live Sync, 360–363
Windows Live toolbar, 363
Windows Live web services
adding people to your network, 259–260
calendar. See Windows Live Calendar
home page, 259
list of, 258–259
Microsoft Office Live workspaces, 258
photo sharing, 262
SkyDrive, 260–261
Windows Mail not included, 4, 73
Windows Management Instrumentation (Wmic.exe),
766
Windows Media Audio. See WMA (Windows Media
Audio) files
Windows Media Center
10-foot interface concept, 469
Automatic Downloads options, 467
automatic startup of, 468
AutoPlay settings with, 481
capabilities of, 463
CDs, playing and ripping, 481–482
definition of, 14
deleting TV recordings, 489
Details window, 470–472
DVDs, playing, 482
editions of Windows available in, 463
Extenders, 490–493
Favorite Lineups, TV, 484
Favorites settings, 480–481
galleries, 476–477
games, 470
History option, TV recordings, 487
Homegroup folder, browsing, 623
image editing, 471
keeping on top of desktop, 468
keyboard navigation of, 474–475
library layouts, 476–478
library setup options, 466
managing TV recordings, 489–490
Media Only option, 468
menu design, 469
monitor configuration options, 465
More Info button, 471–472
mouse control of, 474
Movie library commands, 479
music favorites setup, 480–481
Music library commands, 478
navigation controls, 474
Now Playing strip, 470
optimization options, 467
options, general, 467
Parental Controls option, 467
Pictures library commands, 478
pivot views, 477
Play Favorites command, 481
playback controls, 474
Privacy settings, 467
program guide use, 485–486
purpose of, 463
rating items, 479–480
ratings, 299
recording TV, 485–488
remote control hardware with, 470
removing, 73–74
right clicks, remote control equivalent, 471
ripping CDs from, 481–482
searching TV listings, 486
setting up, custom, 465–468
setting up, express, 464–465
Settings menu, 466–467
Setup options, 467
shared library access, 482
slide shows, building, 478–479
speaker setup, 465
special navigation keys, 472
Sports strip, 470
Start menu, 469–470
Startup And Windows Behavior options, 467–468
storage space issues, 490
strips, 469
support community for, 464
synchronizing devices with, 482
text entry, 472–474, 478
touch-enabled gestures for, 934–935
Turbo Scroll mode, 478
TV tuner setup, 483–485
TV viewing and recording with, 482–490
Visual And Sound Effects options, 467
watching TV recordings, 489–490
Windows TV format, 412
Windows Media metafiles, 411
Windows Media Network Sharing Service, 450
Windows Media Player 12
address bar of, 414
Advanced Systems Format (ASF), 411
Advanced Tag Editor, 437
album art, 435–438
allowing remote control of, 447–448
Auto Playlists, 424–425
automatic sync relationships, 451–453
Windows Recorded TV Show format 1023
AVI (Audio Video Interleave), 411
Blue-ray support, 418
burning CDs and DVDs with, 456–459
capabilities of, 412–413
codecs, adding, 410
customizing the navigation pane, 419–422
definition of, 13
details pane of, 414
device access, controlling, 443–444
device to PC transfers, 455
DivX, 410
DRM with, 438–440
DVD navigation, 418
DVR files, 412
edition differences for, 407
fast-forwarding, 416
file associations for, 410–411
format options, 410–411
formats, separating tracks by, 422
frequency spectrum display, 415
full screen display, 419
hidden information, displaying, 415
Homegroup folder, browsing, 623
homegroup settings, 442–443
iTunes support, 409
layout of, 13
libraries, hiding, 420
library management, 434
library sharing options, 444–446
List Options menu, 423
list pane of, 414
manual syncs, 451–453
Matroska Video format, 410
menu bar of, 414–415
metadata for music files, 435–438
MP3 files, 412
MPEG-4 Audio format, 412
music, playing, 416–417
Mute button, 416
My Music folder, 276
navigation pane of, 414, 419–422
network streaming capability, 14
newly supported formats, 408–409
Next button, 416
Now Playing view, 415–416
Other Libraries heading, 444
Pause button, 416
photos in, 417
Play button, 416
Play To controller, 448–449
Play To menu, 447–448
playback controls of, 414–416
Player Library elements, 413–414
playlist play modes, 416
playlists with, 421–426
portable devices, synchronizing with, 450
previewing tracks, 435
Previous button, 416
QuickTime support, 409, 411
ratings, assigning, 434
remote controls, using as for other devices, 442,
446–449
remote internet streaming, 449–450
removing, 73–74
Repeat mode, 416
ripping music with. See ripping digital media files
search box of, 415
Seek slider control, 416
shared libraries in navigation pane, 442
Shuffle mode, 416
Skin view, 416
skipping option for playlists, 423–424
slow and fast playback modes, 415
Stream menu, 442–443, 447, 449
streaming media out to other devices, 446–449
subtitles, 418
Switch To Library button, 415
Switch To Now Playing button, 415
synchronizing with portable devices, 450
toolbar of, 414–415
touch-enabled gestures for, 934–935
transcoding, 453–454
TV, recording formats, 412
video formats supported by, 13
video playback capabilities, 417–419
Videos library access, 418
view options, 420–421
Windows Media metafiles, 411
WMA file support, 411
WMV file support, 411
Xvid, 410
Windows Media Video (WMV), 411
Windows Memory Diagnostic, 851
Windows Metadata Internet Service, 427–428
Windows Mobile operating system, 450
Windows Mobility Center, 865
Windows Movie Maker, 488
Windows Network Diagnostics, 667–668
Windows Photo Viewer
capabilities of, 417
editing not available in, 12
Windows Portable Devices (WPD) standard, 253
Windows PowerShell, 948
Windows Rally technologies, 672
Windows RE. See Windows Recovery Environment
Windows Recorded TV Show format, 488
1024 Windows Recovery Environment
Windows Recovery Environment
Check Disk, Windows, 752
command prompt, working from, 852
copying files with, 390
Diskpart with, 898–899
DVD, launching from a, 846
network accessibility from, 852
opening, 846–847
purpose of, 840, 846
restoring system images with, 384
Startup Repair option, 848–850
System Image Recovery command, 850
System Restore issues from, 403
System Restore, running from, 850–851
Windows Memory Diagnostic, 851
Windows Search. See searching
Windows Server
2003, Windows Map with, 672
2008, R2 enabled features, 587
2008, Terminal Services Gateway, 653
Home Server for Remote Desktop, 653
Windows Server Update Services (WSUS), 748
Windows Speech Recognition, 938–943
Windows System Assessment Tool (WinSAT), 708
Windows Task Manager
64-bit process identification, 713
Always On Top option, 712
Applications tab, 176–177
columns, configuring, 715–716
Commit fraction, 725
CPU performance, viewing, 711
CPU use, listing processes in order of, 715
definition of, 176
ending programs, 177
keyboard shortcuts for, 176, 710
memory performance, viewing, 711
multiprocessor views, 712
network performance measurement, 684–685
Not Responding tasks, 176–177
opening, 710
Performance tab of, 711
PIDs (process identifiers), 716
process fields available in, 713–714
process troubleshooting, 714
Processes tab of, 177, 712–716
purpose of, 710
Services tab, 716
services, managing, 797–798
starting, 176, 797
startup, setting tasks to run during, 786
status of programs, 176–177
update speed for graphs, setting, 711–712
Windows TV format, 412
Windows Update
classes of updates, 744
device drivers, updating, 746
downloading and installing options, 744
driver updates, 52
hiding unwanted, 746
importance of, 743
important updates, 744–745
installed updates, 747
main window of, 743
manual updates, 747
Microsoft Updates for Office with, 744
multiple computers, updating options, 747–748
opening, 742–743
optional updates, 744–745
patch Tuesday, 744
recommended updates, 744–745
scheduling, 744
security updates, 516–517
security, importance to, 499
settings, editing, 744–746
troubleshooting, 746
undoing updates, 747
validation requirement, 60
wake ups for, 745
Windows Virtual PC, 920–922
Windows Vista upgrade paths to Windows 7, 40–41
Windows XP
fundamental changes for Windows 7, 3
LLTD for, 672
multiboot starts of, 45. See also multiboot systems
programs for, running virtually. See Windows XP Mode
Recovery Console, 852
Remote Assistance issues, 96
Remote Desktop Connection, 650
restore point issues for, 398
searching, changes from, 307–308
sharing models of, 629
upgrades to Windows 7 prohibited, 40–41
Windows XP Mode
application message display, 168
closing options, 166–167
configuring settings for, 170
device sharing with, 169–170
edition requirements of, 157
firewalls for, 508
full screen, running in, 166
hard disk virtualization with, 169
hardware requirements, 164
installing, 164–165
installing programs, 167–168
launching programs from Windows 7 Start menu,
167–168
purpose of, 164
sharing data from, 169
starting, 165
Windows.old folder, 760
Winload.exe, 45
Winlogon key, launching startup programs with, 174
Winresume.exe, 45
WinSAT (Windows System Assessment Tool), 708
WinZip, 289
Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP), 598
wireless access points. See also routers
configuring, 599–603
purpose of, 592
wireless networking
802.11 standards, 593–594
802.1x authentication, 603
ad hoc networks, 609–610
administration, disabling remote, 603
automatic vs. manual connection settings, 687
connecting to, 603–608
denial of service, 597
destructive intrusion into, 597
devices, adding to, 610
extra security precautions, 603
firmware upgrades, 603
guidelines for choosing, 593–595
hidden, connecting to, 607–608
IPsec (Internet Protocol security) with, 603
Manage Wireless Networks feature, 687
naming networks, 601
Network Map support for, 673
Next Generation TCP/IP stack support for, 587
non-WPS setups for routers, 602
order of connection attempts, 686–687
passphrases, 602
per-user connections, 608
printed configuration details, 602
privacy issues, 597, 607
routers for, 592
routers, configuring, 599–603
security key generation, 602
security keys, connecting with, 606–607
security protocols, setting for routers, 601
security setup, 597–599
setting up, overview of, 597
setup during Windows 7 installations, 35–36
SetupSNK program, 605–606
SSIDs, 601, 603, 607–608
switching between networks, preventing, 686
technologies for, 593–594
theft of service, 597
troubleshooting missing computers on networks, 605
troubleshooting setting up, 600
USB drives (UFDs), creating connections with, 605–606
USB drives (UFDs), setup with, 602, 606
Write permission 1025
virtual private networks in, 603
WEP, 598–599
Wi-Fi, 593–594
Windows Media Center Extender issues, 492
wireless access points, 592, 599–603
Wireless Area Connection, renaming, 693
wireless gateways, 592
WPA, 598
WPA2, 598
WPS (Wi-Fi Protected Setup), 587
WPS buttons, connecting with, 604
WPS, configuring routers with, 599–602
WMA (Windows Media Audio) files
lossless compression, 428
metadata in, 299, 438
Pro format, 430
settings for ripping to, 429–430
Windows Media Player 12 support for, 411
Wmic.exe (Windows Management Instrumentation),
766
WMV (Windows Media Video)
definition of, 411
DVD Maker support for, 459–460
WordPad
content indexing supported by, 312
metadata issues, 302–303
Work Network type location
changing homegroups to, 626
configuration as, 630
guideline for choosing, 589–590
workgroups. See also homegroups
account and group databases in, 552
advantages of, 586
domains compared to, 591
including all computers on the network in, 629
libraries for project management, 283
renaming, 688–689
Working Sets, 723
worms
capabilities of, 498
Conficker, 518
transmission methods of, 517–519
WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access)
passphrases for, 602
purpose of, 598
WPA2, 598
WPD (Windows Portable Devices) standard, 253
WPS (Wi-Fi Protected Setup)
buttons, connecting with, 604
configuring routers with, 599–602
definition of, 587
devices using, 610
Network Map support for, 673
Write permission, 547
1026 writing pad, Tablet PC Input Panel
writing pad, Tablet PC Input Panel, 935–938
WSUS (Windows Server Update Services), 748
WTV (Windows Recorded TV Show) format, 412, 488
X
x64 editions of Windows 7, 6. See also 64-bit versions of
Windows 7
x86 editions of Windows 7, 6. See also 32-bit versions of
Windows 7
Xbox 360
homegroups with, 617
Media Center Extender capability, 491
XML content indexing, 312
XP Mode (XPM). See Windows XP Mode
XP, Windows. See Windows XP
XPS Document Writer and Viewer, 948
Xvid, 410
Y
Yahoo! Mail, 247
Z
zero-day exploits, 520
zipped folders
compression with, 288–289
viruses attached with, 517–518
zombies, 498
zones, security. See security zones
Zoom control, Internet Explorer 8, 202–203
zoom gesture, 933–934
Zune player, 450
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