User Guide
Issue 4, July 2017
This User Guide is applicable for serial numbers
M214-00151 and later with application firmware 2.0 and later
and Dante firmware 2.1.0 (Ultimo 3.10.4.1) and later
Copyright © 2017 by Studio Technologies, Inc., all rights reserved
www.studio-tech.com
50382-0717, Issue 4
This page intentionally left blank.
Table of Contents
Revision History ............................................................ 4
Introduction ................................................................... 5
System Features ........................................................... 5
Installation ..................................................................... 10
Configuration ................................................................ 13
Dante™ Configuration ................................................... 20
Operation ...................................................................... 21
Technical Notes ............................................................. 26
Specifications ................................................................ 31
Appendix A .................................................................... 32
Appendix B .................................................................... 33
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 3
Revision History
Issue 4, July 2017:
1. Documents that the unit now supports the STcontroller software application.
2. Documents the new configurable headphone output level feature.
Issue 3, March 2017:
1. Documents revised headphone operating mode choices. This relates only to application
firmware 1.3 and later as noted on the title page.
Issue 2, September 2015:
1. Documents enhanced unit identification feature.
2. Adds improvements to IP address configuration assignment explanation.
Issue 1, July 2014:
1. Initial release.
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 4
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
Introduction
What This User Guide Covers
This User Guide is designed to assist you
when installing, configuring, and using
Model 214 Announcer’s Consoles. Additional background technical information
is also provided.
System Overview
The Model 214 Announcer’s Console is
designed to serve as the audio control
center for announcers, commentators, and
production personnel. This tabletop unit
supports applications utilizing the Dante™
Audio-over-Ethernet media networking
technology. The Model 214 is suitable for
numerous applications including on-air
television sports broadcasting, stadium announce, and corporate AV. The unit integrates all on-air, talkback, and cue audio
signal routing in one compact system.
Two pushbutton switches allow the user
to control the main and talkback audio
output channels. Ease of use, configuration
flexibility, and sonic excellence are some
of the unit’s highlights.
The Model 214 is compatible with the latest
broadcast and audio system environments
that use the Dante technology. An Ethernet
connection with Power-over-Ethernet (PoE)
power is all that’s required to make the unit
part of a sophisticated, networked audio
system. Connect a microphone and pair
of headphones (or a broadcast headset)
and the installation is complete. Whether
it’s the on-air audio, the talkback audio, or
the headphone cue feed, superior audio
quality is always maintained. A range of
configuration choices allow the desired
operating parameters to be easily selected.
These choices can be made locally using
pushbutton switches or remotely using the
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
Figure 1. Model 214 front and back views
STcontroller application. And while flexible
to configure, the user is presented with
an easy-to-understand set of controls and
indicators.
System Features
User Controls and Status
Indicators
Two pushbutton switches, three LED indicators, and three rotary controls provide
the user with a clear, easy-to-use interface.
One pushbutton switch controls the status
of the main output. This is the audio channel intended for on-air, announcement, or
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 5
other primary uses. Two LEDs display the
on/off status of the main output. A second
pushbutton switch controls the status of
the talkback output channel. This is the
audio signal used to communicate with
producers, directors, spotters, or other
behind-the-scenes production personnel.
A status LED is associated with the talkback pushbutton. The pushbutton switches
use gold-plated contacts for reliable longterm operation and include backlighting
using white LEDs. Three rotary controls allow the user to adjust the content and level
of the headphone output.
Microphone Input
The Model 214 provides a high-performance microphone preamplifier which
offers low-noise, low-distortion, and high
headroom amplification over a 19 to 64 dB
range. The gain is adjustable in 3-dB steps.
A 2-digit display indicates the amplification
in dB. The microphone input is compatible with balanced dynamic or condenser
microphones. Phantom power is provided
and meets the worldwide P48 standard.
A dual-color LED indicator serves as an
aid for optimizing the setting of the preamplifier’s gain. Microphone signals are
connected to the Model 214 by way of a
standard 3-pin female XLR connector.
Microphone operating parameters can
be set both locally and by way of the
STcontroller remote control software
application. Two pushbutton switches,
accessible on the bottom of the unit, allow
adjustment of the microphone preamplifier’s gain and the on/off status of P48 phantom power. The STcontroller application
allows personal computer users to both
view and change the preamp gain and
P48 on/off status.
Issue 4, July 2017
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Output Channels and their
Operation
By way of the Dante interface, the Model
214 provides a main output channel and a
talkback output channel. The main output
channel is designed to serve as the on-air,
stadium announcement, or other primary
audio feed. The talkback output channel
is intended to provide production trucks,
control rooms, or support personnel with
talent-originated cue signals. In addition
to the main and talkback output channels
a hot mic output channel is also available.
This un-switched audio output can be
useful when the Model 214 is being used
in conjunction with an intercom system or
audio console where an “always active”
microphone signal is required. For hot mic
audio data to be present on the Dante output channel a configuration setting must
be made. This is provided for situations
where privacy is desired.
A large part of the Model 214’s unique
power is the ability to configure the operation of the main and talkback functions. To
meet the needs of the many specific broadcast and production applications, a variety
of pushbutton operating modes are available. The main pushbutton can be selected
to operate from among four modes. In
the “push-to-mute” mode the pushbutton
performs a momentary mute of the audio
signal associated with the main output
channel. In this way a “cough” pushbutton function is created, something typically
required for television sports broadcasting.
In the “push-to-talk” mode the pushbutton
provides a momentary active function for
the main output. This mode would be appropriate for an application such as stadium announcement. An alternate action
“latching” configuration allows the pushbutton to enable or disable the audio signal
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
associated with the main output channel
as desired. This is useful in radio broadcasting, announce-booth, or voice-over
applications. The fourth mode provides
a hybrid function, supporting both pushto-talk and tap-to-enable/tap-to-disable
operation. This operation is similar to that
found in many broadcast intercom system
user stations.
The pushbutton switch associated with
the talkback function can be configured
to operate from either of two modes. One
of the modes supports a “push-to-talk”
function. This is typically used for on-air
broadcast applications. The other mode
provides a hybrid function, the operation of which is discussed in the previous
paragraph. The hybrid mode is especially
useful when the Model 214 is used in a
production-support application.
Overall Model 214 operation can be configured from among one on-air and two
production modes. The Model 214’s on-air
mode is appropriate for on-air television,
radio, and streaming broadcast applications. When on-air is selected the audio
signal associated with the main output
channel will always mute when the talkback function is active. This prevents
audio that’s intended for production or
support personnel from being sent out
the on-air audio path.
For non-on-air applications, the Model
214 can be configured to operate in either
of two “production” modes. These allow
the main output to be used as a second
talkback output, rather than always muting when the talkback function is active.
Using these production modes the unit
can be even more powerful when used in
a live event application, such as serving
as a small “IFB” console for a sports-event
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
spotter, musical director, or production
assistant. In addition to changing how
the main output functions, one of the
production modes also supports using
the headphone output for connection
with amplified speakers. The headphone
output level will automatically be reduced
(attenuate or “dim”) whenever the main or
talkback output channels are active. This
can enhance intelligibility and help prevent
acoustical feedback from occurring
between the speakers and the active
microphone.
Headphone Output
The Model 214 provides a number of
configuration choices that relate to the
headphone output. These choices include
the headphone output gain range, which
audio sources are utilized, how the rotary
level controls function, and what sidetone
action will take place. Four headphone
control source assignment modes are offered. These modes impact how the three
rotary controls adjust the four Dante input
channels and the sidetone audio signals.
The first two modes support standard onair applications and use Dante audio input
channels 1 and 2. In the broadcast world
these two signals are often referred to as
talent cue or IFB audio. In live television
applications they typically originate in
production trailers or control rooms and
provide one channel of program-withinterrupt audio and a second channel
with program-only audio. The third and
fourth configuration modes allow all four
of the Dante-provided audio sources to
be utilized. These can be useful for more
complex or specialized situations.
The three headphone level controls (“rotary pots”) are provided for setting the “mix”
of the selected audio input sources as well
Issue 4, July 2017
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as adjusting the overall headphone output
level. How these controls function depend
on the selected headphone output mode.
The first mode can be used to support
traditional on-air sports applications. In
this mode it would be typical to feed (connect) program-with-interrupt audio to the
channel 1 audio input and program-only
audio to the channel 4 audio input. Rotary
control C1, located on the left side, is used
to adjust the level of the program-withinterrupt audio signal that’s routed to the
left headphone output channel. Rotary
control C2, located in the center, is used to
adjust the level of the program-only audio
signal that’s routed to the right headphone
output channel. For use with dual-channel
or stereo cue signals, another headphone
output mode provides a stereo (“level/balance”) mode. In this mode rotary control
C1 adjusts the level of both input channels
1 and 2, while rotary control C2 allows
adjustment of the left/right level balance.
In both of these modes rotary control C3,
located on the right, is used to adjust the
level of the sidetone audio signal that is
sent to both the left and right headphone
output channels.
To help minimize the chance of broadcast
cues being missed, the action of the level
controls can be configured so that there’s
always a minimum headphone output
level. Alternately, the controls can be configured to fully mute when they are at their
minimum (fully-counterclockwise) position.
When the level control on the right side is
used for sidetone it will always allow the
sidetone signal to be fully muted.
In the third headphone output mode rotary
control C1 adjusts the level of the channel
1 input audio source before it is routed to
both the left and right headphone output
channels. Rotary control C2 adjusts the
level of the channel 2 audio source before
it is routed to both the left and right headphone output channels. Rotary control
C3 adjusts the level of both the channel 3
and channel 4 audio inputs which are then
routed to, respectively, the left and right
headphone output channels.
The headphone output was designed to
meet the needs of contemporary headphones and headsets. Specifically, the
output circuits act as voltage drivers rather
than power drivers. In this configuration
they can provide high output levels with
very low distortion and noise, along with
minimal current consumption. The output
circuits can safely drive stereo or mono
loads. This ensures that all types of headphones, headsets, and earpieces can be
directly connected.
The fourth headphone output mode is
similar to the third with the exception
that input 1 is routed only to the left head-
A configuration feature allows the headphone output gain range to be selected.
The low setting is appropriate for most
Issue 4, July 2017
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phone output channel while input 2 is
routed only to the right headphone output
channel. Inputs 3 and 4 will function in the
same way in both modes 3 and 4.
The sidetone function allows audio from
the Model 214’s microphone preamplifier
to be routed to the headphone output.
This can be useful, providing the user with
an aural confirmation of the signal connected to the mic input. It is especially
important when a “mix-minus” talent cue
signal is provided for the user. For application flexibility the sidetone function can
be configured from among four choices,
specifying when it will be active in relation to the status of the main and talkback
functions.
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
applications where users need to listen at
moderate levels. The high setting can be
useful when monitoring at higher levels is
warranted by an application.
Dante Audio-over-Ethernet
Audio data is sent to and from the Model
214 using the Dante Audio-over-Ethernet
media networking technology. For flexibility in meeting a variety of sonic requirements bit depths of up to 24 and sample
rates of 44.1 and 48 kHz are supported.
Audio transmitter (output) and receiver
(input) channels on associated Danteenabled devices can be assigned to the
Model 214 using the Dante Controller
software application. This makes selecting
the way in which the Model 214 fits into
an application a simple matter. For example, the main audio output channel can
be assigned to the input of an audio console. The talkback audio output channel
could be assigned to an input of a matrix
intercom system. And the hot mic audio
output channel could be routed directly to
an amplified speaker for producer or director use. No special routing or “multing”
using cables or patch points is required
to send the output channels to multiple
destinations. And a single mouse-click
is all that’s required to reroute the audio
signals.
On the input side, the Model 214 allows
up to four headphone cue sources to be
received from an audio console, matrix
intercom system, or a variety of other
Dante-enabled devices; the sources don’t
need to originate from the same device.
“Program” audio could be supplied by
an audio console while “IFB” (interrupted
foldback or talent cue) audio could be
supplied by a matrix intercom system.
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
Ethernet Data, PoE, and DC
Power Source
The Model 214 connects to a data network
using a standard 100 Mb/s twisted-pair
Ethernet interface. The physical interconnection is made by way of a Neutrik®
etherCON RJ45 connector. While compatible with standard RJ45 plugs, etherCON
allows a ruggedized and locking interconnection for harsh or high-reliability environments. The Model 214’s operating power
can be provided by way of the Ethernet
interface using the Power-over-Ethernet
(PoE) standard. This allows fast and
efficient interconnection with the associated data network. To support PoE power
management, the Model 214’s PoE interface reports to the power sourcing equipment (PSE) that it’s a class 2 (low power)
device. The unit can also be powered
using an external source of 12 volts DC.
For redundancy, both power sources
can be connected simultaneously. If both
sources are connected PoE will power the
unit. Four LEDs display the status of the
network connection, PoE power source,
and Dante interface.
Configuration and Flexibility
Model 214 configuration settings can be
made using twelve DIP switches and two
pushbutton switches. The STcontroller
software application can be used to view
and change the gain of the microphone
preamplifier and the on/off status of P48
phantom power. The 12-position switch
array configures parameters such as the
pushbutton operating modes, headphone
operating mode, sidetone function, and
the overall system mode. The pushbuttons
are used to set the gain of the microphone
preamplifier, control the on/off status of the
microphone P48 phantom power function,
Issue 4, July 2017
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and select the headphone output gain
range. The switches and pushbuttons are
accessible via the bottom of the Model
214’s enclosure; the unit does not have to
be disassembled. Changes made to any
of the configuration parameters become
active immediately. To prevent unwanted
access to the configuration switches and
pushbuttons a security panel, included
with each unit, is attached to the bottom
of the enclosure.
In the world of broadcast and production
audio it’s fair to say that applications vary
widely. To this end, one or two additional
XLR connectors can easily be mounted
into the Model 214’s back panel. Multiple
3-position “headers” located on the Model
214’s circuit board provide technician
access to many of the input and output
connections. Using a variety of optional
factory-supplied modules and interface
cable kits allows a Model 214 to be optimized to meet the needs of specific
applications. For example, some applications may prefer to use a multi-pin XLR
connector to interface with a headset. This
can easily be accomplished by installing
the appropriate 6- or 7-pin XLR connector
kit and making a few simple connections.
Other applications may benefit from having “mult” or “loop-through” connections,
something easily incorporated into a
Model 214. And access to the relay contacts can be made adding a 4-pin XLR
connector kit.
Two general-purpose relay contacts are
provided on the Model 214’s circuit board.
Accessible using 3-pin “header” connectors they allow specialized configurations
to be created. Under software control, the
form-A (normally open) solid-state relay
contacts follow the state of the main and
talkback pushbuttons. Taking advantage
Issue 4, July 2017
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of the two locations provided for additional
XLR connectors, a technician may easily
implement a variety of functions such as
a tally indication or audio muting during
talkback.
Firmware Updating
A USB connector, located on the Model
214’s back panel, allows the operating
firmware (embedded software) to be updated using a standard USB flash drive.
The Model 214 uses Audinate’s Ultimo™
integrated circuit for implementing Dante.
The integrated circuit’s firmware can be
updated via the Ethernet connection, helping ensure that its capabilities remain up
to date.
Dante-Enabled Announcer
Console Products
The Model 214 is just one in a series of
Dante-enabled announcer console products available from Studio Technologies.
For applications that require an alternate
set of features the other products in the
200-Series should be reviewed. Complete
information is available on the Studio
Technologies website.
Installation
In this section signal interconnections will
be made using the connectors located
on the back panel of the Model 214. A
microphone signal will be interfaced by
way of a 3-pin XLR connector. A ¼-inch
3-conductor phone jack is provided for the
headphone output. An Ethernet data connection will be made using either a standard RJ45 patch cable or an etherCON
protected RJ45 plug. A 4-pin XLR connector allows the connection of an external
source of 12 volts DC.
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
System Components
Included in the shipping carton are the following: Model 214 Announcer’s Console,
user guide, and pushbutton label sheet.
If the installation or specific application
requires an external source of 12 volts DC
it needs to be provided separately. An applicable power supply, the Studio Technologies PS-DC-02, is available as an option.
Microphone Input
The Model 214 is compatible with balanced dynamic and condenser microphones. Depending on the application,
the microphone may be part of a headset
or be an independent handheld or standmounted model. The Model 214’s P48
power source will support essentially all
phantom-powered microphones. The
quality of the Model 214’s microphone
preamplifier and associated circuitry is
such that special applications may benefit from using “high-end” microphones.
If selected appropriately models from
manufacturers such as AKG, Beyer, DPA,
Sennheiser, and Shure will perform very
well in Model 214 applications.
Microphone interconnection is made by
way of a 3-pin female XLR connector
which is located on the Model 214’s
back panel. The mating connector (male)
should be wired so that pin 2 is signal
high (+ or hot), pin 3 is signal low (– or
cold), and pin 1 is shield. It’s possible that
an unbalanced microphone will also work
correctly. In this case, the mating connector (male) should be wired so that pin 2
is signal high (+ or hot), and signal common/shield is connected to both pins 1
and 3.
As of the writing date of this guide, the
Sennheiser HMD 26 and HMD 27 headModel 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
sets are very popular for on-air sports
broadcasting use. Fine products, they
work very well with the Model 214. Adding
the suffix “-XQ” to the headsets’ full part
number specifies a 3-pin male XLR
connector for the dynamic microphone
and a ¼-inch 3-conductor plug for the
stereo headphones. This configuration
is very useful, allowing the headsets to
work directly “out of the box” with the
Model 214. Another headset that users
have reported being satisfied with is the
audio-technica BPHS1. Offered at a lower
price-point, it may be applicable for some
applications.
If the writer may digress for a moment to
recount a story… an audio dealer once
shared a secret with me concerning
headsets. He loved selling the “lowerend” (much less expensive) models of
name-brand headsets, which he did by
the veritable “boatload.” Why? Because
these usually broke soon after going into
service! He knew that on a regular basis
he’d receive orders for more of them. Had
these users, from the beginning, purchased only premium-quality headsets,
their total cost of ownership would have
been much less. Enough said…
Headphone Output
The Model 214’s headphone output is
compatible with stereo or mono headphones, headsets, or earpieces. Connecting devices with a nominal impedance
of 100 ohms or greater is preferred. This
shouldn’t prove to be an issue since essentially all of the contemporary devices
meet this recommendation.
Devices are connected to the headphone
output by way of a ¼-inch 3-conductor
phone jack located on the Model 214’s
back panel. As is standard for stereo
Issue 4, July 2017
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headphones, the left channel is connected
to the tip lead of the ¼-inch headphone
jack. The right channel is connected to
the ring lead of the jack. Common for both
channels is connected to the sleeve lead.
Devices with ¼-inch 2-conductor “monaural” plugs can also be used with the Model
214’s headphone output. In this arrangement only the tip lead (left channel) will
be active. The 2-conductor plug will physically connect (“short”) the ring lead (right
channel) to the sleeve lead (common).
Technically this won’t damage the circuitry
associated with the right-channel headphone output since 10 ohm protection
resistors are electrically in series with the
headphone output circuits.
Ethernet Connection
An Ethernet connection that supports
100BASE-TX is required for the Model
214’s Dante Audio-over-Ethernet connectivity. A 10BASE-T connection is not
sufficient for Model 214 operation. A
1000BASE-T (“GigE”) connection is not
supported unless it can automatically
“fall back” to 100BASE-TX operation. An
Ethernet connection that supports Powerover-Ethernet (PoE) is preferred as it will
provide operating power for the Model
214. For Ethernet with PoE switch (PSE)
power management the Model 214 will
enumerate itself as a PoE class 2 device. If
PoE is not available an external 12 volt DC
power source can also be connected. This
will be discussed in the next section of this
guide.
The 100 Mb/s twisted-pair Ethernet connection is made by way of a Neutrik
etherCON protected RJ45 connector
that is located on the back panel of the
Model 214. This allows connection by way
of a cable-mounted etherCON plug or a
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 12
standard RJ45 plug. The Model 214’s Ethernet interface supports auto MDI/MDI-X
so that most cabling implementations will
be directly supported.
External 12 Volt DC Input
An external source of 12 volts DC can
be connected to the Model 214 by way
of the 4-pin male XLR connector which
is located on the back panel. While the
requirement for the external source is
nominally 12 volts, correct operation will
take place over a 10 to 18 volt range. The
Model 214 requires 270 milliamperes at
12 volts DC for correct operation. The DC
source should be terminated to a 4-pin
female XLR connector with pin 1 negative
(–) and pin 4 positive (+). Purchased as
an option, the PS-DC-02 power supply is
available from Studio Technologies. Its
AC mains input allows connection to 100240 volts, 50/60 Hz and its 12 volt DC,
1.5 amperes maximum output is terminated on a 4-pin female connector.
As previously discussed in this guide, an
Ethernet connection that provides Powerover-Ethernet (PoE) can serve as the
Model 214’s power source. Alternately,
an external 12 volt DC source can be
connected. For redundancy, both PoE and
the external source can be connected at
the same time. If both PoE and an external
12 volt DC source are connected, power
will be drawn only from the PoE supply.
If the PoE source becomes inoperative
the 12 volt DC source will provide the
Model 214’s power with no interruption
in operation.
Pushbutton Labeling
The two pushbutton switches used in the
Model 214 were selected for several reasons. Foremost was the fact that they are
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
highly reliable, using gold-plated contacts
for long life in less-than-ideal environments. A second reason was that applying
customized labels to the pushbutton caps
would be very simple. The labels, text
printed on clear material, are placed
under the clear caps on the top of the
pushbuttons.
sheets using a laser or inkjet printer. These
sheets are readily available from most office supply stores. A pair of scissors or an
X-ACTO (razor) knife will complete the
task.
From the factory the left pushbutton is
labeled COUGH and the right pushbutton is labeled TALKBACK. These were
selected to be appropriate for many on-air
applications in English-speaking locations.
But it’s expected that these may need to
be changed to meet the needs of specific
applications.
For the Model 214 to support the needs
of specific applications a number of operating parameters must be configured.
These include headphone output gain
range, microphone preamplifier gain, P48
phantom power on/off status, pushbutton
operation, sidetone, headphone operating
mode, and system mode. Two pushbutton switches and a 12-position DIP switch
assembly can be used to establish the desired configuration. A 2-digit LED display
will indicate the selected headphone gain
range, gain of the microphone preamplifier
and the P48 phantom power on/off status.
The pushbutton switches, LED display,
and DIP switches are accessed through
an opening in the bottom of the Model
214’s enclosure. The enclosure does not
have to be disassembled to gain access.
As a “head start” for some applications,
a clear sheet with a number of commonly
used pushbutton designations printed on
it is included in the shipping carton. These
were created at the factory using a standard personal computer graphics program
and laser printed onto sheets of transparency film. The desired pushbutton labels
can be cut out with a pair of scissors or an
X-ACTO® knife following the printed guide
lines that indicate the required size.
The clear lens on top of each pushbutton cap can be removed with a fingernail
or small screwdriver. Be certain not to
scratch the pushbutton if a screwdriver or
other small tool is used. The clear label
can be removed and replaced. The cap
is then snapped back into the top of the
housing using finger-pressure only. No
tool is required to replace the cap.
If you need to make your own labels the
process is quite simple. Use a personal
computer to create the desired text. The
finished label size should be 0.625-inches
(15.8 mm) square. The completed artwork
can then be printed on transparency film
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
Configuration
To prevent unauthorized personnel from
changing the configuration settings, a
security panel is attached to the bottom
of the Model 214’s enclosure. For convenience, the security panel provides a summary of the configurable parameters and
related information. Refer to Appendix A
for a representative view. The security panel is held in place by means of four rubber
bumpers (“feet”) that have built-in screws.
Using your fingers, remove the four bumpers so that the panel can be removed.
Refer to Figure 2 for a detailed view of the
configuration switch assemblies.
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 13
Selecting the Headphone Output Gain
Range
Upon application of Model 214 power
the 2-digit display, as part of its power-up
sequence, will first display the firmware
version and then the current setting of the
headphone output gain range. The setting
will be either low or high. During the brief
interval when the headphone gain range
is displayed the two pushbuttons can be
used to change the setting.
Configuration
DIP Switches
ON
1 2
2-digit display indicates
Headphone Output Gain Range,
Microphone Preamp Gain, and
P48 Power On/Off Status
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12
Pushbutton switches select
Headphone Output Gain Range,
Microphone Preamp Gain, and
P48 Power On/Off Status
Figure 2. Bottom view of Model 214 showing
configuration switches and 2-digit display
Headphone Output Gain
Range, Mic Preamp Gain,
and P48 Phantom Power
On the unit, two pushbutton switches,
located on the bottom of the Model 214,
are used to set the headphone gain range.
They can also be used to select the gain
of the microphone preamplifier and the
on/off status of the P48 phantom power
source. A 2-digit LED display provides a
status indication of all these functions.
As previously mentioned, the STcontroller
software application can be used to view
and revise the gain of the microphone preamplifier and the on/off status of the P48
phantom power source.
Issue 4, July 2017
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Local Selection of Mic Preamp Gain
The two pushbutton switches can be
used to select the gain of the microphone
preamplifier. The range is 19 to 64 dB in
3-dB steps. There’s no problem changing
the gain setting while the unit is operating.
Small audio clicks or pops might occur
during gain transitions, but this shouldn’t
be a major issue as long as associated
monitor loudspeakers are temporarily attenuated or muted. As expected, the
2-digit LED display will directly indicate,
in dB, the selected amount of gain.
Selecting the correct amount of gain for an
application might take a little experimentation. The goal is to bring the mic’s signal
up to the Dante reference level which is
typically considered to be –20 dBFS. (This
is 20 dB below digital maximum.) Operating at this signal level will help ensure the
delivery of “clean” audio to the destination
device or devices.
There’s no “perfect” gain setting that this
guide can recommend. The two issues
that impact the setting are output sensitivity of the connected microphone and
the acoustical output level of the microphone’s user. With some headset microphones, such as the Sennheiser HMD 26
or HMD 27, selecting an initial setting of
43 or 46 dB would be appropriate. Users
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
who speak loudly might need to have the
gain reduced to 40 or even 37 dB. Quiet
users might need 49 or 52 dB of gain.
Using the device that’s digitally connected
(via Dante) to the Model 214’s main output
channel is typically the best way to check
the signal level and the setting of the mic
preamplifier. Most devices have some
method of providing an indication of
the digital level, either in the form of a
numerical value, virtual meter, or LEDbased meter display. The Studio Technologies’ Model 5202 Dante to Phones and
Line Output Interface would also be an
excellent means of monitoring the Model
214’s output level. The Model 5202
provides a 2-channel LED level that is
calibrated in dBFS.
Level Status LED Indicator
A dual-color LED, located on the back
panel directly below the microphone
input connector, is provided as an aid
when using the Model 214. It can also be
useful when setting the gain of the Model
214’s microphone preamplifier. It provides
a 3-step indication of the output level of
the microphone preamplifier. It will light
green when the signal level is –40 dBFS
or greater, a mix of green and red when
the signal level is –14 dBFS or greater,
and red only when the signal level is
–4 dBFS or greater. When the gain of the
microphone preamplifier is set optimally a
normal signal applied to the microphone
input will cause the LED to light green
with an occasional “peak” signal causing the LED to light both green and red at
the same time. A more conservative gain
setting would find that the LED would only
light green. A gain setting that results in
the LED ever lighting only red is incorrect.
The gain must be reduced or the audio
quality will be severely compromised.
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
Local Selection of P48 Phantom Power
The Model 214 can provide P48 phantom
power to the connected microphone. The
two pushbutton switches can be used to
control whether or not P48 phantom power
is active. Pressing both pushbuttons simultaneously will toggle (change) the on/off
state. The decimal point indicator, located
on the lower right corner of the 2-digit
LED display, is used to show the P48
phantom power on/off status. When the
decimal point is lit P48 phantom power is
enabled. By the very nature of phantom
power it should be able to be left enabled
at all times. But generally people prefer
to turn it off unless required for a specific
microphone.
Remote Configuration of Gain and P48
Phantom Power
Using the STcontroller application allows
personal computer users to view and adjust the Model 214’s mic preamplifier gain
and P48 phantom power on/off status.
The application is available for download
on the Studio Technologies website
(www.studio-tech.com). Its initial release
is compatible with the Windows® operating system. Changes made using the application will be displayed in real-time on the
Model 214’s 2-digit display. Changes made
to the mic pre gain and P48 on/off status
using the Model 214’s pushbutton switches
will be displayed in STcontroller.
LED Display Time-Out
The 2-digit LED display provides an indication of the headphone output gain range,
the gain of the microphone preamplifier
as well as the on/off status of P48 phantom power. As a power-saving measure
the display will automatically stop lighting
approximately 100 seconds after the last
time that either of the bottom pushbutton
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 15
switches is pressed. A different time-out
interval applies after the Model 214 has
had power applied and neither pushbutton
is pressed; the display will light for approximately 10 seconds and then turn off.
In most cases this display auto-off function
will lead a technician or installer to initially
observe that the 2-digit display is not lighting. For example, a Model 214 has been
operating normally but the security panel
has just been removed. To cause the
2-digit display to again light just requires
pressing either of the bottom pushbutton
switches. This “wakes up” the display and
resets the timer. The initial press of either
pushbutton will not cause the gain to
change or impact the P48 phantom power
on/off status. Only when the 2-digit display
is active will the pushbuttons impact the
settings.
Operating Modes
Twelve DIP switches are used to configure
the Model 214’s operating modes. Technically, these switches “talk” to a microcontroller integrated circuit and associated software that give the Model 214 its
“smarts.” The software has been carefully
designed to provide a number of different
ways in which the unit can function. It’s
important to carefully review the available
options and choose the ones that best
meet the needs of a specific application.
Note that the switches can be changed
even while the Model 214 is powered up
and operating. The unit’s operating characteristics will change in real-time in response to switch changes.
Main Button Mode
Switches 1 and 2 configure how the main
pushbutton functions.
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 16
Figure 3. Main button mode switch settings
There are four available modes:
• Push to Mute: In this mode the audio
signal on the main output channel
is normally active. The audio signal
will mute whenever the pushbutton is
pressed and held. This is the “cough”
mode typically used for on-air sports
broadcasting applications.
• Push to Talk: In this mode the audio
signal on the main output channel is
normally muted. The main audio signal
will become active whenever the pushbutton is pressed and held.
• Latching: In this mode the audio signal
on the main output channel will change
between its active and muted states
whenever the pushbutton is pressed.
Upon power up the audio signal on the
main output will be in its muted state.
• Hybrid: This mode is a combination
of push to talk and latching action. It’s
similar to the way talk pushbuttons
function on user stations associated
with broadcast and production intercom
systems. If the pushbutton is pressed
and held, the audio signal on the main
output channel will become active until
the pushbutton is released. If the pushbutton is momentarily “tapped” the
audio signal on the main output channel
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
will change state. Upon power up the
audio signal on the main output channel
will be in its muted state.
Talkback Button Mode
Switch 3 configures the way the talkback
pushbutton functions.
Figure 5. Button backlight intensity switch
settings
to identify. High may also be useful when
identification markings have been inserted
under the clear lens caps.
Figure 4. Talkback button switch settings
Two modes are available:
Sidetone
Switches 5 and 6 configure the way the
sidetone function operates.
• Push to Talk: In this mode the audio
signal on the talkback output channel
is normally muted. The audio signal will
become active whenever the pushbutton is pressed and held.
• Hybrid: This mode is a combination of
push to talk and latching action. If the
pushbutton is pressed and held the
audio signal on the talkback output
channel will become active until the
pushbutton is released. If the pushbutton is momentarily “tapped” the
audio signal on the talkback output
channel will change state. Upon power
up the audio signal on the talkback output channel will be in its muted state.
Button Backlight Intensity
Switch 4 selects the intensity of the white
LEDs that provide backlighting for the two
pushbutton switches. Two choices are
available: low and high. Low is appropriate
when the Model 214 is to be used in an
environment where the ambient light level
is low. High would be appropriate where
other light sources in the physical area
may make the pushbuttons more difficult
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
Figure 6. Sidetone switch settings
Four modes are available:
• Off: In this mode the sidetone function
not active.
• Main Button: In this mode the sidetone
function will be active whenever the
audio signal is present on the main
output channel.
• Talkback Button: In this mode the sidetone function will be active whenever the
audio signal is present on the talkback
output channel.
• Main and Talkback Buttons: In this
mode the sidetone function will be
active whenever the audio signal is
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 17
present on the main and/or talkback
output channels.
Headphone Operating Mode
Switches 7 and 8 are used to select how
the four Dante receiver (audio input)
channels, three rotary level controls,
and 2-channel headphone output work
together.
Figure 7. Headphone operating mode switch
settings
There are four choices available:
• SW7 Off (Down)/SW8 Off (Down): Audio
input channel 1 is assigned to the left
headphone output channel and audio
input channel 2 is assigned to the right
headphone output channel. The level
of audio inputs 1 and 2 are controlled
by rotary level control C1, located on
the left side of the front panel. Audio
input channel 3 is assigned to the left
headphone output channel and audio
input channel 4 is assigned to the right
headphone output channel. The level
of audio inputs 3 and 4 are controlled
by rotary level control C2, located in
the center of the front panel. Sidetone
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 18
audio is assigned to both the left and
right headphone output channels and its
level is controlled by rotary level control
C3, located on the right side of the front
panel.
• SW7 On (Up)/SW8 Off (Down): Audio
input channel 1 is assigned to the left
headphone output channel and audio
input channel 2 is assigned to the right
headphone output channel. The level of
audio inputs 1 and 2 are controlled by
rotary level control C1, located on the
left side of the front panel. The balance
(relative level) of both these signals is
controlled by rotary level control C2,
located in the center of the front panel.
Sidetone audio is assigned to both the
left and right headphone output channels and its level is controlled by rotary
level control C3, located on the right
side of the front panel. Audio inputs 3
and 4 are not used.
• SW7 Off (Down)/SW8 On (Up): Audio
input channel 1 is assigned to both the
left and right headphone output channels. The level of the signal being sent
to both channels is controlled by rotary
level control C1, located on the left side
of the front panel. Audio input channel
2 is assigned to both the left and right
headphone output channels. The level
of the signal being sent to both channels is controlled by rotary level control
C2, located in the center of the front
panel. Audio input channel 3 is assigned
to the left headphone output channel
and audio input channel 4 is assigned
to the right headphone output channel.
The level of audio inputs 3 and 4 is controlled by rotary level control C3, located
on the right side of the front panel. The
sidetone function will not be active.
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
• SW7 On (Up)/SW8 On (Up): Audio input channel 1 is assigned to the left
headphone output channel and its level
is controlled by rotary level control C1,
located on the left side of the front panel.
Audio input channel 2 is assigned to the
right headphone output channel and its
level is controlled by rotary level control C2, located in the center of the front
panel. Audio input channel 3 is assigned
to the left headphone output channel and
audio input channel 4 is assigned to the
right headphone output channel. The
level of audio inputs 3 and 4 is controlled
by rotary level control C3, located on the
right side of the front panel. The sidetone
function will not be active.
Headphone Minimum Level
Switch 9 is used to configure the headphone output’s minimum level. In the
–40 dB setting the minimum headphone
output level is approximately 40 dB below
maximum. The headphone output will never fully mute. This ensures that any audio
signal present on the assigned audio input
channels (1 and 2 or 1, 2, 3, and 4) will always be present on the headphone output.
In most on-air broadcast applications this is
the appropriate setting, ensuring the some
level of signal is always present.
When full mute is selected moving any level
control to its fully counterclockwise position
will cause its associated channel to fully
mute. If a rotary level control is set to serve
as a balance control, moving it to either
fully counterclockwise or fully clockwise
position will cause the associated signal
to fully mute. Selecting the full mute mode
may be appropriate for applications where
minimizing the chance of audio “leakage”
is important. This could occur when the
connected headset or headphones are at
times placed on a desk or tabletop.
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
Figure 8. Headphone minimum level switch
settings
When the rotary level control on the right
side of the front panel has been assigned to
control the sidetone level the setting of the
headphone minimum level mode will not impact it. In this case when the control is in its
fully counterclockwise position it will always
cause the sidetone level to be fully muted.
Hot Mic Out
Switch 10 selects whether an audio signal
will be present on the hot mic output channel. This configuration is included so that
an audio signal will not be present unless
the hot mic function has been specifically
enabled. While the hot mic output function
can be very useful, there may be applications where the user does not want their
microphone audio signal leaving the Model
214 unless they select it to do so using the
pushbutton switches.
Note that a Dante transmitter channel for
the hot mic output will always be present
on the Model 214’s digital interface. But
only when DIP switch 10 has been placed
in its enabled position will audio from the
output of the microphone preamplifier be
present on the hot mic output channel.
Figure 9. Hot mic out switch settings
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 19
System Mode
Switches 11 and 12 are used to configure
the overall operating mode of the Model
214. Specifically, they determine how the
main output channel operates vis-à-vis the
talkback output channel as well as one
facet of the headphone output’s function.
Understanding how these three modes
impact overall system operation will ensure that correct operation and maximum
usability will occur.
Figure 10. System mode settings
• When selected to the on-air mode, the
audio signal on the main output channel will mute whenever the audio signal
on the talkback output channel is active.
The on-air mode should be selected for
all on-air broadcast applications when
it’s imperative that the audio signal
on the main output channel be muted
whenever on-air talent uses the talkback
output channel to communicate with
production personnel.
• When the system mode is set for production with dim, the audio signal on
the main output channel is never muted
in response to the audio signal on the
talkback output channel being active.
In addition, the level of the headphone
output is dimmed (reduced in level or
attenuated) by 18 dB whenever the main
or talkback output channels have audio
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 20
present. In this way the two output channels can be used independently, with
neither impacting the other. And, the
headphone output can be connected
to amplified loudspeakers. The speakers will reduce in level whenever one of
the output channels is active, preventing
acoustical feedback.
• When the system mode is set for production, the audio signal on the main
output channel is never muted in response to the audio signal on the talkback output channel being active. This
mode allows the main output channel to
be used, for example, as an additional
talkback output. In this way the main
and talkback output channels can be
used independently, with neither impacting the other. This also allows both
pushbuttons to be used simultaneously.
When selected for the correct application, the production mode can prove to
be very useful. But it’s not appropriate
for on-air use!
Conclusion
Once the desired configuration has been
established, the security panel can be reattached. The four rubber bumpers should
be hand-tightened only. No tools should
be used.
Dante
Configuration
A number of the Model 214’s Danterelated parameters can be configured.
These configuration settings will be stored
in nonvolatile memory within the Model
214’s circuitry. The Model 214 uses the
Ultimo 4-input/4-output integrated circuit
to implement the Dante architecture. All
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
four receiver (input) channels, but only
three of the transmitter (output) channels,
are utilized. This dictates which parameters can be configured and what choices
are available.
The audio receiver (input) and transmitter (output) channels associated with
the Model 214’s Dante interface must be
assigned to desired sources and destinations. This will typically be done with
the Dante Controller software application
which is available for download free of
charge at www.audinate.com. Versions
are available to support Windows® and
OS X® operating systems. Within Dante
Controller a “subscription” is the term
used for routing a transmitter flow (a group
of output channels) to a receiver flow (a
group of input channels). Note that as
of the writing of this guide the Ultimo integrated circuit limits the number of Dante
flows to two in each direction (two transmitter and two receiver).
The Model 214 has a default Dante device
name of ST-M214 and a unique suffix.
The suffix identifies the specific Model 214
that is being configured. The Model 214
provides three Dante transmitter (output)
channels with the default names of Main,
Talkback, and Hot Mic. The Model 214
has four Dante Receiver (input) channels
with default names of Headphone Ch1,
Headphone Ch2, Headphone Ch3, and
Headphone Ch4. Using Dante Controller
these names can be revised as appropriate for the specific application.
The Model 214 will support audio sample
rates of 44.1 kHz or 48 kHz with the ability
to select pull-up/pull-down values. These
parameters can be selected using the
Dante Controller application but in most
applications 48 kHz will be appropriate.
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
The Model 214 can serve as the clock master for a Dante network but in most cases
that would not be optimal.
Operation
At this point the audio, Ethernet, and
power connections should have been
made. The pushbutton labels may have
been revised. The desired configuration
should have be made using the pushbutton and DIP switches. The Dante receiver
(input) and transmitter (output) channels
should have been routed using the Dante
Controller software application. Normal operation of the Model 214 can now begin.
Initial Operation
The Model 214 will begin functioning a
few seconds after its power source is connected. As previously discussed, the power
source can be provided by Power-overEthernet (PoE) or an external source of
12 volts DC. If both are connected the PoE
source will power the unit. Should PoE
subsequently no longer be available uninterrupted operation will continue using the
external source.
Upon Model 214 power up most of the
status and backlight LEDs along with the
2-digit display will activate in a test sequence. The PoE, USB, and SIG/PEAK
LEDs, located on the back panel, will light
one after another. On the top surface of
the Model 214 the two status LEDs and
the backlight LED associated with the main
pushbutton switch and the status LED and
the backlight LED associated with the talkback pushbutton switch will momentarily
light in sequence. Once that sequence
has completed all the LEDs will begin to
function normally.
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 21
The 2-digit LED display is visible on the bottom of the unit when the security panel is
removed. Upon unit power up, all segments
of each display digit will light briefly as a
confirmation that they are functioning. The
version number of the operating firmware
(embedded software) will briefly display.
For example, the first firmware version that
shipped with the Model 214 displayed 1.0.
Next, the setting of the headphone output
level will be displayed for three seconds,
displaying either Lo or Hi. During this interval
the level setting can be changed by pressing one of the buttons that are located to the
right of the display: press the up button for
high and the down button for low. After a
few seconds the digits will briefly turn off
and the gain of the microphone preamplifier
(in dB) and the P48 phantom power on/off
status will display and remain active. Unless
either or both of the pushbutton switches are
pressed, approximately 10 seconds after the
unit begins operation the display will stop
lighting. This is a power-saving measure.
The display will again light after either or
both of the pushbuttons are pressed.
Note that the way in which the LINK/ACT,
SYS, and SYNC LEDs (all located below
the etherCON connector) will light depends
on characteristics related to the connected
Ethernet signal and the configuration of the
unit’s Dante interface. This will be covered
in detail in the next section of this guide.
After the power-up sequence has completed
the Model 214 will begin normal operation.
Depending on the selected configuration,
one status LED associated with the main
pushbutton switch may be lit. The user is
now presented with two pushbutton switches, three LEDs, and three rotary controls.
These are simple to operate and understand,
as will be described in later paragraphs.
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 22
Ethernet, PoE, and Dante
Status LEDs
Four status LEDs are located below the
etherCON connector on the Model 214’s
back panel. The LINK/ACT LED will light
green whenever an active connection to
a 100 Mb/s Ethernet network has been
established. It will flash on and off in
response to data packet activity. The PoE
LED will light green whenever Powerover-Ethernet (PoE) associated with the
connected Ethernet signal is providing operating power for the Model 214. The SYS
and SYNC LEDs display the operating status of the Dante interface and associated
network. The SYS LED will light red upon
Model 214 power up to indicate that the
Dante interface is not ready. After a short
interval it will light green to indicate that it
is ready to pass data with another Dante
device. The SYNC LED will light red when
the Model 214 is not synchronized with
a Dante network. It will light solid green
when the Model 214 is synchronized with
a Dante network and an external clock
source (timing reference) is being received. It will slowly light on and off green
when the Model 214 is part of a Dante
network and is serving as a clock master.
How to Identify a Specific
Model 214
The Dante Controller software application
offers an identify command that can be
used to help locate a specific Model 214.
When identify is selected for a specific unit
the button backlight LEDs will flash. In addition, the SYS and SYNC LEDs, located
directly below the etherCON connector
on the back panel, will slowly flash green.
After a few seconds the LED identification
patterns will cease and normal Model 214
operation will again take place.
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
Signal Present/Peak LED
A dual-color LED is located on the Model
214’s back panel, directly below the microphone input connector. It monitors the
output of the microphone preamplifier,
providing a 3-step signal level indication.
The LED will light green when the signal
level is –40 dBFS or greater, both green
and red at the same time when the signal
level is –14 dBFS or greater, and red when
the signal level is –4 dBFS or greater. During normal operation the LED should light
green and, with peak signals, occasionally both green and red at the same time.
If the LED is lit constantly green and red at
the same time the gain of the microphone
preamplifier most likely should be reduced.
The LED should never light red only as this
would indicate a signal that’s in danger of
reaching 0 dBFS (digital “clipping”). This
would indicate that the gain of the microphone preamplifier should be significantly
reduced.
Pushbutton Switches and
Status LEDs
Two pushbutton switches are used to
control the audio signals on the main and
talkback output channels. The way each
operates depends on the selected configuration. Three LED indicators are located
adjacent to the pushbuttons and reflect the
status of the audio signals associated with
the main and talkback output channels. The
pushbuttons’ clear lenses are backlit using
white LEDs. The intensity (brightness) of
the LEDs is configured from a choice of two
values, low or high. The backlighting does
not provide an indication of the associated
pushbutton’s status nor do they serve as a
tally function, but rather allow the pushbutton’s labeling and location to be visible in
low-light conditions.
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
Main Button and LED
Indicators
The pushbutton on the left, factory labeled
as COUGH, functions according to the
selected configuration. Two LED indicators,
located directly above the pushbutton, are
associated with the status of the audio signal on the main output channel. The green
LED, located on the right, is lit whenever
the microphone audio signal is connected
to the main output channel. This could be
considered as an “on-air” or “mic-active”
indicator. If the Model 214’s system mode is
configured to on-air, the red LED, located on
the left, will be lit when the audio signal associated with main output channel is muted.
If the Model 214 is configured to operate in
either of the production modes, the red LED
will never light. This is to reflect the fact that
the main pushbutton has now taken on a
function similar to that of the talkback pushbutton. To clarify, when the Model 214 is set
to either of the production modes, the red
LED will never light; the green LED will light
whenever microphone audio is connected
to the main output channel.
Main Button Modes
Depending on the selected configuration,
there are four ways the main pushbutton
can function:
• Push to Mute: If this mode is selected
the audio signal associated with the main
output channel is normally active. The
audio signal will mute whenever the
pushbutton is pressed and held.
• Push to Talk: If this mode is selected the
audio signal associated with the main
output channel is normally muted. The
audio signal will become active whenever
the pushbutton is pressed and held.
Issue 4, July 2017
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• Alternate Action: If this mode is selected
the audio signal associated with the
main output channel will alternate between its active and muted states whenever the pushbutton is pressed. Upon
power up the audio signal will be in its
muted state.
• Hybrid: This mode is a combination of
push to talk and alternate action. It’s
similar to the way talk pushbuttons function on user stations associated with
broadcast or production intercom systems. If the pushbutton is pressed and
held the audio signal associated with
the main output channel will become
active until the pushbutton is released.
If the pushbutton is momentarily
“tapped” the audio signal will change
state. Upon Model 214 power up the
audio signal will be in its muted state.
Main Output vis-à-vis
Talkback Activity
This short section applies only in the case
where the Model 214’s system mode is
configured for on-air and the main pushbutton mode is set to alternate action or
hybrid.
Talkback activity will always cause the
audio signal associated with the main
output channel to be placed in its muted state. If the audio signal was in the
“latched-on” state when talkback activity
began, once talkback activity ends that
state will resume; the audio signal associated with the main output channel will
again be in its on (“latched”) state.
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 24
Talkback Button and LED
Indicator
The pushbutton on the right, factory
labeled TALKBACK, controls the audio
signal associated with the talkback output
channel. The manner in which the talkback
pushbutton functions depends on the way
it was configured. One LED indicator, green
in color, is located directly above the talkback pushbutton. It lights whenever the microphone audio signal is connected to the
talkback output channel. If the Model 214’s
system mode is selected for on-air, whenever the talkback function is active the
audio signal associated with the main output channel will be placed in its muted
state. If the Model 214 is selected for the
production mode, the status of the talkback
pushbutton will not impact the status of the
audio signal associated with the main output channel.
Talkback Button Modes
Depending on the selected configuration,
there are two ways the talkback pushbutton
can function:
• Push to Talk: If this mode is selected the
audio signal associated with the talkback
output channel is normally muted. The
audio signal will become active whenever
the talkback pushbutton is pressed and
held.
• Hybrid: This mode is a combination of
push to talk and alternate action. If the
pushbutton is pressed and held, the
audio signal associated with the talkback
output channel will become active until
the talkback pushbutton is released. If
the talkback pushbutton is momentarily
“tapped” the audio signal will change
state. Upon Model 214 power up the audio signal will always be in its muted state.
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
Headphone Output
Three rotary controls (“pots”) are located on
the Model 214’s front panel and are associated with the headphone output. The way
the controls function depends on the selected headphone output configuration. One
configuration parameter sets what audio
input signals are assigned to the controls.
There are four modes available. Another
parameter selects whether the headphone
output channels will maintain a minimum
output level or can be fully muted.
To understand exactly how the level controls on a specific Model 214 will function
requires knowledge of how that unit has
been configured. Please refer to the Configuration section of this guide for details.
It may require a bit of study to fully understand how the controls will function. The
author would like to be able to provide a
simple explanation. But there are really four
simple explanations, one for each configuration choice!
Each level control has a mechanical step
(detent) that is located at the halfway (50%)
position of its rotation range. This is intended to serve as an aid to Model 214 users.
In an ideal installation, setting the controls
to their detent position will result in a comfortable headphone output level. The user,
in response to a changing operating environment, can then move the level controls
to get more or less level as desired. The
detent position will always remain as a useful reference point. To achieve this condition
the audio level on the appropriate audio
inputs will have to be calibrated as required.
This is somewhat counter intuitive to the
usual mentality of just providing the user
with whatever level comes up by default.
Spending a few extra minutes “trimming”
the input audio channel levels can result in
much happier, and more productive, users.
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
One of the headphone output modes uses
the control in the center of the unit as a balance function. In this case the detent position will send approximately equal levels to
both the left and right headphone output
channels. This is as one would expect from
a “stereo” balance control such as provided in consumer electronic equipment.
When the headphone minimum level configuration is set to –40 dB, turning a level
control to its fully counterclockwise position will cause the level of its associated
headphone output channel(s) to 40 dB
below maximum. This ensures that users
will never be fully “isolated” from potentially
important cue signals. In addition, when a
control is set to provide a balance function,
turning it to either its fully clockwise or fully
counterclockwise position will cause the
level on the applicable headphone output
channel to be 40 dB below its maximum.
If the headphone minimum level configuration is set for full mute, turning a level
control to its fully counterclockwise position will cause the level of the associated
channel(s) to fully mute. In addition, when
a control is configured to provide a balance
function, rotating it to either its fully clockwise or fully counterclockwise position will
cause the level of the applicable channel to
fully mute.
The overall level of the headphone output
can be configured as desired for specific
applications. The default setting, low, is
designed so that users will typically set the
rotary controls at approximately 50% of
rotation. The high setting would be applicable in cases where an extreme headphone
output level is required or the source material that is provided on the Dante receiver
(input) channels is lower than typical.
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 25
USB Interface
A USB type A connector and associated
status LED is located on the back panel of
the Model 214. This data interface is used
only for updating the unit’s operating firmware (embedded software). No audio data
of any kind will pass through it. For details
please refer to the Technical Notes section
of this guide.
Technical Notes
IP Address Assignment
By default the Model 214’s Ethernet interface will attempt to obtain an IP address
and associated settings using DHCP
(Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol). If
a DHCP server is not detected an IP address will be assigned using the link-local
protocol. This protocol is known in the
Microsoft® world as Automatic Private IP
Addressing (APIPA). It is also sometimes
referred to as auto-IP (PIPPA). Link-local
will assign an IP address in the IPv4 range
of 169.254.0.1 to 169.254.255.254. In this
way multiple Dante-enabled devices can
be connected together and automatically
function, whether or not a DHCP server is
active on the LAN. Even two Dante-enabled
devices that are directly interconnected
using an RJ45 patch cord will correctly
acquire IP addresses and be able to communicate and transport audio.
Using the Dante Controller software application the Model 214’s IP address and
related network parameters can be set for
a fixed (“static”) configuration. While this is
more involved than letting DHCP or link-local “do their thing,” if fixed addressing is
necessary then that capability is available.
But in this case it’s highly recommended
that each unit be physically marked, e.g.,
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 26
directly using a permanent marker or “console tape,” with its specific IP address. If
knowledge of a Model 214’s IP address has
been misplaced there is no reset button or
other method to restore the unit to a default
IP setting.
In the unfortunate event that a device’s IP
address is “lost,” the Address Resolution
Protocol (ARP) networking command can
be used to “probe” devices on a network
for this information. For example, in Windows OS the arp –a command can be used
to display a list of LAN information that
includes MAC addresses and corresponding IP addresses. The simplest means of
identifying an unknown IP address is to create a “mini” LAN with a personal computer
connected directly to the Model 214. Then
by using the appropriate ARP command
the required “clues” can be obtained.
For best Dante audio-over-Ethernet performance a network that supports VoIP
QoS capability is recommended. This can
typically be implemented on virtually all
contemporary managed Ethernet switches.
There are even specialized switches that
are optimized for entertainment-associated
applications. Refer to the Audinate website
(www.audinate.com) for details on optimizing networks for Dante applications.
P48 Phantom Power
The Model 214 provides a source of phantom power to support condenser-type
microphones. It’s designed to meet the P48
requirements as specified in the IEC 61938
standard. The circuitry is very simple, consisting of 6.85 k ohm resistors that provide
a path from a 45 volt source to pins 2 and 3
of the microphone input connector. The resistors and the power source work together
to provide the required 48 ±4 volts, up to a
maximum current of 10 milliamperes.
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
Travel Case
For portable applications it may be desirable to store and transport each Model
214 in a protective case. After much travel
with prototype announcer’s console units,
Studio Technologies’ personnel learned to
appreciate the Pelican Model 1450 case.
Purchased with the foam interior option,
it does an excellent job of holding one
Model 214, an external 12 volt DC power
supply, and documentation. Some applications may benefit from selecting a
larger case that would also hold a related
headset, cables, etc. A larger case could
also be selected that would hold multiple
Model 214 units. Pelican sells their products through a dealer network, many of
which can be located via a web search.
Additional Connectors
Locations
Two spare connector locations are provided on the Model 214’s back panel. They
are labeled A and B. From the factory they
contain blank plates that can be readily
removed and replaced with a variety of
“XLR style” connectors. The spare connector locations are specifically included
so that a Model 214 can be customized to
meet the many specific needs that arise in
broadcast and related audio applications.
Expected uses for these locations include
adding a 6- or 7-pin XLR connector to
allow direct connection of a broadcast
headset. Other uses include creating a
“loop through” or “mult” function for the
microphone input or headphone output
connections. A number of interface cable
assemblies, along with some special
function kits, are available from Studio
Technologies. Please refer to the website
for details on what is available.
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
The spare connector locations are compatible with the Neutrik DL-series of connectors. For flexibility, XLR versions are
available that provide from three to seven
contacts. For example, a compatible 3-pin
female connector would be Neutrik part
number NC3FD-L-1. The NC6FDS-L-1 is
often used to support headsets. This is a
6-pin female connector with the unique
Switchcraft® 6-pin arrangement. Other
connectors, such as the etherCON protected RJ45 and 3-conductor ¼-inch jack,
can be also be installed. The 4-40 threadpitch hardware that secures the blank
plates to the Model 214’s back panel are
also intended to secure the replacement
connectors.
If connectors are added to the Model
214’s spare connector locations adding
labels to them can be helpful. For a great
look it is recommended that Brother®
P-Touch ¼-inch (6 mm) labels be created.
Tape material that prints white text on a
black background works out well for the
Model 214. The Brother label cassette
number TX-3151, white on black, is appropriate for use with many of their printers.
The Model 214’s enclosure must be disassembled prior to installing connectors
in the spare locations. Four 6-32 buttonhead machine screws, two on the bottom
front of the enclosure and two on the back
panel, must be removed. A 5/64-inch hex
driver is required. The cover can then
be carefully separated from the chassis,
remaining attached by means of a flexible
cable assembly. This “flex-cable” assembly links the main printed circuit board
assembly with the board assembly that
contains the pushbutton switches and
LED indicators. Ensure that the flex cable
is not damaged while the Model 214 is
being customized.
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 27
3-Position Headers
In addition to the spare connector locations on the back panel, provision has
been made to allow easy interconnection
with the Model 214’s printed-circuit-boardmounted input and output connectors.
This was accomplished by including several 3-position male “header” connectors
on the Model 214’s circuit board. These
headers, on 0.1-inch centers, are wired in
parallel with some of the Model 214’s connectors. This “no solder” solution makes
customizing a Model 214 a simple process.
The headers, located on the Model 214’s
printed circuit board, are Molex® part
number 22-23-2031. They mate with Molex
housing number 22-01-3037. To make the
interconnection, separate crimp terminals
are attached to three loose wires and then
“snapped” into the housing. Molex part
number 08-50-0114 specifies crimp terminals that are appropriate for 22 to 30 gauge
wires. These terminals are available worldwide from sources such as Digi-Key (www.
digikey.com).
To make the process of connecting to the
Model 214’s headers a simple task an interface cable kit, part number 31087, is available from Studio Technologies. Each kit
includes five cable assemblies and a length
of heat-shrinkable tubing. Each cable assembly consists of a mating connector with
three color-coded wires attached. These
wires, approximately 12 inches in length,
allow convenient soldering to a connector
selected to be installed in a spare location
on the Model 214’s back panel. For reference, the wire color for pin 1 is gray, pin 2
is yellow, and pin 3 is blue.
The heat-shrinkable tubing is provided
so that the connector terminals or “solder
cups” can be insulated from each other. It
will also provide some strain relief to the
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 28
solder joints. Be certain to slip the desired
length of tubing over the wire prior to
soldering a connection! (If the writer had a
dollar for every time he forgot to put tubing on a wire (or slip on a connector shell)
before making a solder connection….)
Most of the 3-position headers on the
Model 214’s main circuit board assembly
are located close to their related input or
output connectors. Others headers provide access to functions such as the relays
or the contact closure inputs. For details
on the headers please refer to Appendix B
at the end of this guide.
Contact Closure Input
Connections
Provision has been made on the Model
214’s printed circuit board assembly to
allow external switches or contact closures
to control the status of the audio signal
sent to the main and talkback output
channels. Two 3-position headers provide
access to the circuitry associated with the
functions. Refer to Appendix B for connection details.The input circuitry is “active
low,” with a 3.4 k ohm resistor connected
to +3.3 volts DC to act as a pull up. A
combination of resistors and capacitors
provide ESD protection.
Relay Contacts
The Model 214 provides two normally
open (not shorted) relay contacts for use
in specialized applications. One is associated with the main pushbutton and the
other with the talkback pushbutton. Whenever audio is being sent to the main output
channel relay contact 1 will close (short).
And whenever audio is being sent to the
talkback output channel relay contact 2
will close (short). The two relays operate
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
under software control and are always active, whether or not connections are made
to them.
LED and it will pull out of the socket. (A pair
of needle-nose pliers may be required to
perform this task.)
Some “head scratching” or “brainstorming” should lead to a number of interesting
ways to take advantage of the relay contacts. Applications could include keying
wireless transmitters, activating “on-air”
lights, and muting loudspeaker systems.
To utilize the relay contacts does require
the talents of a qualified technician. This
is because the Model 214’s enclosure
must be disassembled and the desired
wiring scheme implemented. For detailed
information on interfacing with the relay
contacts refer to Appendix B at the end
of this guide.
If an LED needs to be replaced note that
it is a polarized device. If upon insertion
it does not light, simply remove the LED,
rotate it 180 degrees, then re-insert it into
the socket.
Pushbutton Backlighting
From the factory, white LEDs are installed
in the pushbutton housings. These LEDs
provide illumination (“backlighting”) of the
pushbutton switches. This may prove useful for applications where adequate room
lighting is not available. It’s important to
note that the pushbutton lighting does not
provide a tally function; it is intended to
illuminate the pushbutton’s clear lens and
associated labeling.
The socket in each of the pushbutton
housings was originally designed to allow
insertion of a pluggable T-1 bi-pin incandescent bulb. But they are also compatible with the more modern leaded T-1
LEDs. As of the time of writing this guide
the specific LED used at the factory is the
Kingbright WP7104QWC/D. If backlighting
is not desired it’s easy to remove the LED
lamps. The mating socket in each pushbutton assembly is accessed by carefully removing the pushbutton’s lens cap,
graphic label, and frosted lens. Once this
is done carefully pull on the body of the
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
Application Firmware Update
Procedure
It’s possible that updated versions of the
application firmware (embedded software)
that is utilized by the Model 214’s microcontroller (MCU) integrated circuit will be
released to add features or correct issues.
Refer to the Studio Technologies website
for the latest application firmware file. The
unit has the ability to load a revised file into
the MCU’s nonvolatile memory by way of a
USB interface. The Model 214 implements
a USB host function that directly supports
connection of a USB flash drive. The Model
214’s MCU updates its firmware using a file
named m214.bin.
The update process begins by preparing
a USB flash drive. The flash drive doesn’t
have to be empty (blank) but must be in
the personal-computer-standard FAT32 format. Save the new firmware file in the root
directory with a name of m214.bin. Studio
Technologies will supply the application
firmware file inside a .zip archive file. While
the firmware file inside of the zip file will adhere to the naming convention required by
the Model 214, the name of the zip file itself
will include the file’s version number. For
example, a file named m214v1r3MCU.zip
would indicate that version 1.3 of the application firmware (m214.bin) is contained
within this zip file. Once the USB flash drive
is inserted into the USB interface, the unit
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 29
powered off and again powered on, the
file will automatically load. The precise
steps required will be highlighted in the
next paragraphs of this guide. Once the
new file is loaded into the Model 214 the
2-digit LED display should be used to confirm that the correct firmware version has
been successfully installed.
To install the firmware file follow these
steps:
1. Remove power from the Model 214.
This will entail removing the Ethernet
connection if it is providing PoE power
and/or removing the external source of
12 volts DC if that is being used.
2. Ensure that nothing is present in the
USB port. Then again apply power
to the unit and “read” the currently
loaded firmware version using the
2-digit LED display. Note this for later
reference.
3. Remove power from the Model 214.
4. Insert the prepared USB flash drive into
the Model 214’s USB port, located on
the back panel of the unit.
5. Apply power to the Model 214. Power
can be provided by Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) associated with a connected
Ethernet signal or can be from an
external 12 volt DC source.
6. The Model 214 will run a “boot loader”
program that will immediately load the
new MCU (m214.bin) file. This process
takes only a few seconds. During this
time period the LED located below
the USB connector will flash slowly on
and off green. Once the entire loading
process is over, taking approximately
10 seconds, the Model 214 will restart
using the newly-loaded firmware.
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 30
7. At this time the Model 214 is functioning with the newly-loaded firmware and
the USB flash drive can be removed.
But to be conservative, remove power
first and then remove the USB flash
drive.
8. Apply power to the Model 214 and
“read” the MCU’s firmware version
number by observing the 2-digit display. Ensure that this is the desired
version and that it’s different from that
noted in step 2.
Note that upon power being applied to the
Model 214 if the USB flash drive doesn’t
have the correct file (m214.bin) in the root
folder no harm will occur. Upon power up
the USB LED will flash on and off rapidly
for a few seconds to indicate this condition
and then normal operation using the unit’s
existing firmware will begin.
Ultimo Firmware Update
As previously discussed in this guide,
the Model 214 implements Dante connectivity using the 4-input/4-output Ultimo
integrated circuit from Audinate. The
Dante Controller software application can
be used to determine the version of the
firmware (embedded software) residing
in the Ultimo “chip.” This firmware can be
updated by way of the Model 214’s Ethernet connection. The latest Dante firmware
file is available on the Studio Technologies website. The Dante Firmware Update
Manager application is used to install the
firmware. This program is also available
for download on the Studio Technologies
website.
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
Specifications
Power Sources:
Power-over-Ethernet (PoE): class 2 (low power)
per IEEE 802.3af
External: 10 to 18 volts DC, 270 mA max @
12 volts DC
Network Audio Technology:
Type: Dante Audio-over-Ethernet
Bit Depth: up to 24
Sample Rates: 44.1 and 48 kHz
Number of Transmitter (Output) Channels:
3 (main, talkback, hot mic)
Number of Receiver (Input) Channels: 4
Dante Audio Flows: 4; 2 transmitter, 2 receiver
Analog to Digital Equivalence: a +4 dBu input
with 0 dB gain selected results in a Dante digital
output level of –20 dBFS
Network Interface:
Type: twisted-pair Ethernet, preferably with Powerover-Ethernet (PoE) support
Data Rate: 100 Mb/s (10 Mb/s Ethernet not
supported)
General Audio Parameters:
Frequency Response: 20 Hz to 20 kHz, +0/–1 dB,
mic input to Dante output
Distortion (THD+N): 0.004%, measured at 1 kHz,
–36 dBu mic input, 40 dB gain (Dante output
approximately –20 dBFS)
Dynamic Range: >109 dB, 40 dB gain, A-weighted
Microphone Input/Preamplifier:
Type: electronically balanced
Input Impedance: 3.7 k ohms
CMRR: >76 dB, 20 Hz to 20 kHz, 40 dB gain
Gain Range: 19 to 64 dB, adjustable in 3-dB steps
EIN: –123 dBu, 22 kHz bandwidth, 64 dB gain,
150 ohm source resistance
Compatibility: dynamic or phantom-powered mics
Phantom Power: 45 volts DC, nominal, meets IEC
61938 P48 standard
Remote Configuration Capability: microphone
preamplifier gain and P48 power on/off status
(uses STcontroller application)
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
Headphone Output:
Type: stereo, configured to drive headphones
through 100 ohm series resistors
Compatibility: intended for connection to headphones or headsets with impedance of 10 ohms
or greater
Level: adjustable using rotary level control
Maximum Voltage: 7.5 Vpp, 150 ohm load
Relays Contacts: 2
Functions: one each follows main and talkback
pushbutton status
Contacts: form A (normally open, not shorted)
Rating: 100 mA, 60 volts AC/DC, maximum
Contact Resistance: 16 ohms, maximum
Access: requires user-implemented connector
scheme
Connectors:
Microphone Input: 3-pin female XLR
Headphone Output: ¼-inch 3-conductor jack
Ethernet: Neutrik etherCON RJ45
External DC: 4-pin male XLR
USB: type A receptacle
Spare Connector Locations: 2
Allows Studio Technologies’ cable assemblies or
option modules to be installed. Also compatible with
Neutrik NC*D-L-1 connectors (*=3F, 3M, 5M, 6F,
6FS, etc.).
Dimensions (Overall):
5.6 inches wide (14.2 cm)
3.3 inches high (8.4 cm)
8.5 inches deep (21.6 cm)
Weight: 2.7 pounds (1.2 kg)
Specifications and information contained in this
User Guide subject to change without notice.
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 31
Appendix A
Attached to the bottom of the unit is a security panel with text that provides a summary
of the configurable parameters and related information.
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 32
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
Appendix B
The following list provides details on the 3-pin header connectors located on the Model
214’s printed circuit board. Shown are both reference numbers and associated functions.
P2: Microphone Input
Pin 1 common
Pin 2 high (+)
Pin 3 low (–)
P3: External 12 Volt DC Input
Pin 1 – DC
Pin 2 + DC
Pin 3 not used
P5: Headphone Output
Pin 1 common
Pin 2 left channel (tip)
Pin 3 right channel (ring)
P6: DC Output
Pin 1 common
Pin 2 10-18 volts DC out
Pin 3 not used
P8: Relay Contact 2
Pin 1 common
Pin 2 normally open
Pin 3 normally open
Note: Pins 2 and 3 close (short) when
talkback pushbutton is active.
P10: Contact Closure Input – Main
Pin 1 common
Pin 2 main pushbutton
Pin 3 not used
P11: Contact Closure Input – Talkback
Pin 1 common
Pin 2 talkback pushbutton
Pin 3 not used
P7: Relay Contact 1
Pin 1 common
Pin 2 normally open
Pin 3 normally open
Note: Pins 2 and 3 close (short) when
main pushbutton is active.
Model 214 User Guide
Studio Technologies, Inc.
Issue 4, July 2017
Page 33
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