EMC® DiskXtender®

EMC® DiskXtender®
Release 6.5 Service Pack 2
Microsoft Windows Version
Best Practices Guide
P/N 300-012-468
REV A01
EMC Corporation
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Published April, 2011
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All other trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
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EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
Contents
Preface
Chapter 1
Introduction
Understanding DiskXtender for Windows ......................................................... 14
How to use this guide ............................................................................................ 15
DiskXtender configuration overview .................................................................. 16
Chapter 2
Installation
System requirements ..............................................................................................
DiskXtender server requirements ..................................................................
Extended drive requirements .........................................................................
Storage device requirements...........................................................................
Networking requirements ...............................................................................
Licensing ..................................................................................................................
Adding a license ...............................................................................................
Basic installation .....................................................................................................
Installation in a Microsoft cluster .........................................................................
Number and type of cluster nodes.................................................................
Cluster system requirements ..........................................................................
Cluster failover model .....................................................................................
Licensing in a cluster........................................................................................
Connecting users to the extended drive........................................................
Pre-install steps in a cluster.............................................................................
Running the cluster installation .....................................................................
Configuration after installation ......................................................................
Post-installation checklist ................................................................................
Installation in an AutoStart domain ....................................................................
Number and type of AutoStart nodes ...........................................................
AutoStart system requirements ......................................................................
AutoStart failover model .................................................................................
Connecting users to the extended drive........................................................
Pre-install steps for AutoStart.........................................................................
Running the installation ..................................................................................
Configuration after installation ......................................................................
Post-installation checklist ................................................................................
Installation on VMware .........................................................................................
Number of virtual machines ...........................................................................
VMware clustering support ............................................................................
EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
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Contents
VMotion support............................................................................................... 41
VMware system requirements ........................................................................ 42
Pre-install steps for VMware ........................................................................... 42
Running the installation................................................................................... 42
Installation on Hyper-V.......................................................................................... 43
Number of virtual machines ........................................................................... 43
Clustering on Hyper-V..................................................................................... 43
Hyper-V system requirements ........................................................................ 43
Pre-install steps for Hyper-V........................................................................... 43
Running the installation................................................................................... 43
Installation with replication software .................................................................. 44
Chapter 3
Media Management
EMC Centera............................................................................................................ 46
Preparing the EMC Centera cluster................................................................ 46
Building the connection string ........................................................................ 46
Specifying EMC Centera media service options .......................................... 47
Creating EMC Centera media ......................................................................... 48
Deleting EMC Centera media ......................................................................... 51
Reclaiming deleted media space on EMC Centera ...................................... 51
Adding custom metadata to files on EMC Centera ..................................... 51
Performance tuning for EMC Centera ........................................................... 52
Troubleshooting EMC Centera ....................................................................... 54
NAS ........................................................................................................................... 56
Creating the shares for NAS media................................................................ 56
Adding a NAS media service.......................................................................... 57
Creating and managing NAS media .............................................................. 57
Deleting NAS media......................................................................................... 57
Performance tuning for NAS........................................................................... 58
Optical and tape ...................................................................................................... 60
Installing MediaStor and adding a library .................................................... 60
Setting up Sun StorageTek ACSLS ................................................................. 61
Adding a MediaStor or ACSLS media service.............................................. 62
Managing removable media............................................................................ 62
Performance tuning for removable media .................................................... 69
IBM Tivoli Storage Manager.................................................................................. 74
Installing TSM and adding a TSM media service ........................................ 74
Creating TSM media......................................................................................... 74
Deleting TSM media ......................................................................................... 75
Performance tuning for TSM media............................................................... 75
Cloud media............................................................................................................. 77
Adding the cloud media service..................................................................... 77
Creating cloud media ....................................................................................... 77
Removing cloud media from the system....................................................... 78
Performance tuning for cloud media ............................................................. 78
Chapter 4
Extended Drive Management
Creating an extended drive ................................................................................... 80
Extended drive schedules ................................................................................ 80
Metadata exports............................................................................................... 80
Extended drive options .................................................................................... 81
Extended drive indexing settings ................................................................... 81
Creating media folders ........................................................................................... 82
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EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
Contents
Number of media folders ................................................................................
Consider folder rename restrictions ..............................................................
Consider filename length restrictions............................................................
Background scans ...................................................................................................
Background scan schedule ..............................................................................
Disabling background scans ...........................................................................
Tuning background scan speed......................................................................
Performing advanced or maintenance scans................................................
Virus scans ...............................................................................................................
Antivirus software interoperability ...............................................................
Installing the virus scan client ........................................................................
Configuring the virus scan..............................................................................
Antivirus software filtering.............................................................................
Chapter 5
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File Management
Migrating files to media......................................................................................... 86
Developing a file migration strategy ............................................................. 86
Setting up standard migration........................................................................ 88
Setting up multi-target migration .................................................................. 88
Setting up tiered migration ............................................................................. 89
Configuring media groups.............................................................................. 90
Configuring move rules................................................................................... 92
Scheduling file migration ................................................................................ 92
Disabling file migration ................................................................................... 92
Retention .................................................................................................................. 93
Enabling retention ............................................................................................ 93
Changing retention........................................................................................... 95
Deleting retained files ...................................................................................... 96
Indexing files ........................................................................................................... 97
Enabling indexing............................................................................................. 97
Resynchronizing the index files and the extended drive ......................... 102
Disabling indexing ......................................................................................... 103
Purging files........................................................................................................... 104
Recommended purge methods for different environments..................... 104
Combining purge methods in a mixed environment................................ 105
Enabling purging ............................................................................................ 107
Controlling user access to purged files ....................................................... 108
Fetching files from media.............................................................................. 108
Prefetching files from media......................................................................... 108
Reading files directly from media................................................................ 109
Controlling third-party software access to purged files ........................... 111
Deleting files.......................................................................................................... 112
Manually deleting files .................................................................................. 112
Automatically deleting files .......................................................................... 112
Recovering deleted files................................................................................. 113
Chapter 6
Monitoring DiskXtender
Monitoring service events, errors, and warnings ............................................
Monitoring file activity ........................................................................................
Monitoring media .................................................................................................
Media status indicators..................................................................................
Media task queue............................................................................................
Media group free space .................................................................................
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Contents
Media logs ........................................................................................................ 120
Monitoring licensing............................................................................................. 121
Reports .................................................................................................................... 122
Audit logs ............................................................................................................... 123
Chapter 7
Backup and Recovery
Developing a backup strategy............................................................................. 126
Backing up the extended drive ........................................................................... 128
Qualified backup software that is EA-aware.............................................. 128
Installing and configuring EA-aware backup software ............................ 128
Configuring DiskXtender for EA-aware backup software ....................... 129
Ensuring storage redundancy ............................................................................. 132
Copying removable media ............................................................................ 132
Replicating EMC Centera .............................................................................. 132
Backing up NAS .............................................................................................. 133
Backing up TSM .............................................................................................. 133
Backing up cloud media ................................................................................ 133
Multi-target migration.................................................................................... 133
Backing up the DiskXtender server .................................................................... 134
Protecting against accidental deletion of files................................................... 135
Recovering the system after a failure ................................................................. 136
Appendix A
Special Environments
High volume environments................................................................................. 140
Defining a high volume environment.......................................................... 140
Recommended settings for high volume environments ........................... 140
User home directories........................................................................................... 144
Use recommended media types.................................................................... 144
Assign necessary privileges to the service account.................................... 144
Migrate only inactive files ............................................................................. 144
Purge only inactive files................................................................................. 146
Avoid Direct Read .......................................................................................... 147
Disable real-time moves................................................................................. 147
Schedule media activities appropriately ..................................................... 147
Index
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EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
Tables
Title
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
Page
Supported operating systems.............................................................................................. 20
Minimum and recommended hardware requirements for DiskXtender ..................... 23
Extended drive data requirements ..................................................................................... 24
Supported CentraStar versions ........................................................................................... 25
Supported DiskXtender environments for License Server ............................................. 30
Pre-install cluster configuration.......................................................................................... 35
Supported VMware cluster models.................................................................................... 41
Best practices for EMC Centera media service options ................................................... 48
File system support by media type..................................................................................... 64
Status of media in the Available Media tree ................................................................... 65
Media group options for removable media ...................................................................... 70
Service options for optical and tape media ....................................................................... 72
Recommended media group options for each media type............................................. 90
Retention editing options..................................................................................................... 95
Recommended environments for each purge method .................................................. 105
Available criteria for selecting files to purge .................................................................. 106
Steps to enable purging...................................................................................................... 107
File recovery requirements by media type...................................................................... 114
Event Viewer icons for events, warnings, and errors .................................................... 116
Media status indicated by color ........................................................................................ 119
Reports.................................................................................................................................. 122
Recommended media protection methods ..................................................................... 126
Media fill methods .............................................................................................................. 142
EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
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Tables
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EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
Preface
As part of an effort to improve and enhance the performance and capabilities of its product
lines, EMC periodically releases revisions of its hardware and software. Therefore, some
functions described in this document may not be supported by all versions of the software or
hardware currently in use. For the most up-to-date information on product features, refer to
your product release notes.
If a product does not function properly or does not function as described in this document,
please contact your EMC representative.
Audience
This document is part of the EMC DiskXtender for Windows documentation set, and
is intended for use by those who already have significant experience with and a
thorough understanding of DiskXtender for Windows and the environments in
which it is installed, such as EMC employees and partners.
Readers of this guide are expected to be familiar with the following topics:
◆
◆
◆
Related
documentation
Conventions used in
this document
DiskXtender installation and configuration
Microsoft Windows network administration
Storage media and hardware device management
Related documents include:
◆
EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 SP2 Microsoft Windows Version Installation Guide
◆
EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 SP2 Microsoft Windows Version Administration Guide
◆
EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 SP2 Microsoft Windows Version API Reference Guide
◆
EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 SP2 Microsoft Windows Version Technical Product
Overview
◆
EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 SP2 Microsoft Windows Version Release Notes
◆
EMC DiskXtender Search Module Release 2.0 Installation Guide
◆
EMC DiskXtender Search Module Release 2.0 Release Notes
EMC uses the following conventions for special notices.
Note: A note presents information that is important, but not hazard-related.
!
CAUTION
A caution contains information essential to avoid data loss or damage to the system
or equipment.
EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
9
Preface
!
IMPORTANT
An important notice contains information essential to operation of the software.
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EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
Preface
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EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
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Preface
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EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
1
Introduction
The following topics provide an introduction to this best practices guide:
◆
◆
◆
Understanding DiskXtender for Windows ............................................................... 14
How to use this guide................................................................................................... 15
DiskXtender configuration overview......................................................................... 16
Introduction
13
Introduction
Understanding DiskXtender for Windows
EMC® DiskXtender® for Windows is an automated, policy-based file system
archiving solution for long-term data retention.
DiskXtender “extends” primary volumes by making them seem to have an unlimited
amount of space. User data is automatically migrated from the local Windows NT
File System (NTFS) volume to secondary storage based on system policies. However,
the files still appear to be resident on the local volume.
Users and applications can seamlessly recall the data from secondary storage when
necessary for viewing or editing.
For example, users on the network may typically save data to a drive on a Microsoft
Windows file server. If the drive is an NTFS volume, you can use DiskXtender to
move the files to media, such as an EMC Centera® content addressable storage (CAS)
system, tape in a library managed by DiskXtender MediaStor™, or cloud media,
without affecting the file listing as seen by the end user.
When the users need to access the data again at a later time, they open the files
normally and the files are recalled from media. The user is not aware of the retrieval
process.
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EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
Introduction
How to use this guide
This guide is intended for those who already have significant experience with and a
thorough understanding of DiskXtender for Windows and the environments in
which it is installed.
The content is intended to provide guidance on how to configure DiskXtender for
Windows to maximize performance. The information is drawn from the DiskXtender
for Windows installation and administration guides. However, this guide is not
intended to replace those guides. Rather, it is a supplement, and it provides
configuration highlights.
The following types of information are available only in the installation and
administration guides:
◆
Conceptual background information on product components and features
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Detailed explanations for different configuration strategies
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Step-by-step instructions to configure DiskXtender by using the File System
Manager Administrator (GUI) interface
Use this guide as a quick reference for the best practices to configure DiskXtender.
The installation and administration guides provide in-depth details and
explanations. To facilitate reference between the guides, the structure of the best
practices guide deliberately follows the general structure of the installation and
administration guides.
How to use this guide
15
Introduction
DiskXtender configuration overview
To install and configure DiskXtender for Windows:
1. Ensure that the environment meets DiskXtender system requirements, which are
discussed in “System requirements” on page 20.
2. Install DiskXtender by using the instructions in Chapter 2, “Installation.”
3. Connect DiskXtender to a storage device:
• To use an EMC Centera cluster, provide the connection information to
DiskXtender and create virtual pieces of “media” that simulate divisions of the
EMC Centera cluster.
• To use a share on a network-attached storage device, create the shares, and
connect DiskXtender to the shares. Each share is considered an individual
piece of “media” in DiskXtender.
• To use a storage device with removable media such as tape or optical, connect
DiskXtender to the software managing the device (either MediaStor or Sun
StorageTek ACSLS) and add media to the device.
• To use an IBM Tivoli Storage Manager (TSM) system to store DiskXtender
files, install the TSM client on the DiskXtender server, connect DiskXtender to
the TSM server, and then create virtual pieces of “media” that simulate
divisions of the TSM server.
• To use cloud media to store DiskXtender files, configure cloud media as a
media service. Private as well as public cloud networks can be configured as a
media in DiskXtender.
Chapter 3, “Media Management,” provides details on how to connect
DiskXtender to one or more of these devices.
4. Identify the Microsoft Windows NTFS drives on the DiskXtender server that you
want to extend by creating extended drives. “Creating an extended drive” on
page 80 provides details
5. Identify or create the folders on the extended drive that will contain the files you
want to move to storage by creating media folders. “Creating media folders” on
page 82 provides details.
6. Configure file migration by specifying the criteria that files must meet before
DiskXtender migrates them (move rules) and the media to which the files should
be moved (media groups). Details on the available options for file migration are
provided in “Migrating files to media” on page 86.
7. Configure file purging. You can automatically purge files from the extended drive
in one of the following ways:
• Immediately after they are moved to storage.
• When extended drive space is low.
• Each night during the next background scan.
“Purging files” on page 104 provides details.
8. (Optional) To index and search for files on the extended drive by using the
DiskXtender Search Module, configure file indexing. “Indexing files” on page 97
provides details.
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EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
Introduction
9. (Optional) Enable the DiskXtender Recycler to protect against the accidental
deletion of files from the extended drive. “Manually deleting files” on page 112
provides details on the Recycler.
10. (Optional) Configure automatic deletion of files by creating delete rules.
“Automatically deleting files” on page 112 provides details.
11. Develop a comprehensive backup and recovery strategy for the DiskXtender
system. Chapter 7, “Backup and Recovery,” provides guidance on the aspects of
the DiskXtender system that must be protected, as well as best practices for the
tools needed for backup and recovery.
After you configure DiskXtender, monitor the system regularly by using the tools
discussed in Chapter 6, “Monitoring DiskXtender.”
DiskXtender configuration overview
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Introduction
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EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
2
Installation
The following topics provide best practices for installing DiskXtender for Windows:
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System requirements ....................................................................................................
Licensing.........................................................................................................................
Basic installation............................................................................................................
Installation in a Microsoft cluster ...............................................................................
Installation in an AutoStart domain ...........................................................................
Installation on VMware................................................................................................
Installation on Hyper-V................................................................................................
Installation with replication software ........................................................................
Installation
20
30
32
33
37
41
43
44
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Installation
System requirements
The following topics list the system requirements to install DiskXtender for
Windows:
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DiskXtender server
requirements
A DiskXtender server must meet the requirements listed in the following topics:
◆
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Operating system
requirements
Table 1
20
“DiskXtender server requirements” on page 20
“Extended drive requirements” on page 23
“Storage device requirements” on page 25
“Networking requirements” on page 29
“Operating system requirements” on page 20
“Hardware requirements” on page 23
DiskXtender and its components are supported on the operating systems listed in
Table 1 on page 20.
Supported operating systems (page 1 of 2)
Application
Operating system
File System Manager and MediaStor
• Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Standard (64-bit)
with Service Pack 2 or R2
• Microsoft Windows Storage Server 2003 Standard
(64-bit) with Service Pack 2 or R2
• Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Standard /64-bit or
R2 with Service Pack 1
• Microsoft Windows 7 (64-bit))
• Microsoft Windows Vista (64-bit) (only for
DiskXtender Client)
File System Manager in a Microsoft clustering
environment
• Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition
(64-bit) with Service Pack 2 or R2
• Microsoft Windows Storage Server 2003 Enterprise
Edition (64-bit) with Service Pack 2 or R2
• Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Enterprise Edition or
R2 with Service Pack 1(64-bit)
File System Manager on VMware
• Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Standard,
Enterprise, or Small Business Edition (64-bit) with
Service Pack 2 or R2
• Microsoft Windows Storage Server 2003 Standard or
Enterprise Edition (64-bit) with Service Pack 2 or R2
• Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Standard,
Enterprise, or Small Business Edition, or R2 with
Service Pack 1/(64-bit)
File System Manager on VMware with Microsoft
clustering
• Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition
(64-bit) with Service Pack 2 or R2
• Microsoft Windows Storage Server 2003 Enterprise
Edition (64-bit) with Service Pack 2 or R2
File System Manager on Hyper-V
• Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Standard or
Enterprise Edition with Service Pack 1 (x64) or
Service Pack 2 or R2 with Service Pack 1
EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
Installation
Table 1
Supported operating systems (page 2 of 2)
Application
Operating system
File System Manager on Hyper-V with Microsoft
clustering
• Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Enterprise Edition
with Service Pack 1 or Service Pack 2 (x64)
MediaStor
• Windows 2003 Standard or Enterprise Edition with
Service Pack 2 (x64)
• Windows Server 2008 Standard or Enterprise Edition
with Service Pack 1, or R2 with Service Pack 1 (x64)
Explorer Add-ons and Remote Administrators
• Windows 2003 Standard or Enterprise Edition with
Service Pack 2 (x64)
• Windows Server 2008 Standard or Enterprise Edition
with Service Pack 1, or R2 with Service Pack 1 (x64)
• Windows XP Professional with Service Pack 3
• Windows Vista with Service Pack 1
Note: DiskXtender and its components are not supported in the following environments: on a
Server Core installation of Windows Server 2008, or on any version of the operating system for
Itanium-based architectures.
If the server on which you plan to install DiskXtender is not running one of the
supported operating systems, upgrade the operating system before you install
DiskXtender.
If DiskXtender is already installed on a server with an operating system that is no
longer supported, you must contact EMC Professional Services to assist with
migrating the installation to a server with a supported operating system.
The EMC DiskXtender Software Compatibility Guide, available on the Powerlink®
website, provides information on the latest Microsoft Windows operating system
versions, service packs, and hot fixes certified for use with DiskXtender.
Windows Server 2008 considerations
Keep the following points in mind if you install DiskXtender on Windows Server
2008:
◆
If you install MediaStor on Windows Server 2008 as well as DiskXtender, then
you must install two Microsoft hotfixes on both the DiskXtender server and the
MediaStor server:
• The first hotfix is required to resolve a memory leak that occurs with Windows
Server 2008 during an RPC client callback function, which is used when
DiskXtender and MediaStor communicate to perform media management
tasks. To obtain the hotfix, contact Microsoft Support and reference KB article
949887.
• The second hotfix is required to resolve a truncated registry entry that
DiskXtender and MediaStor use to retrieve device type information. To obtain
the hotfix, look up KB article 953390 the Microsoft website.
Both hotfixes are also required if you use the StorageTek ACSLS media service.
However, install them only on the DiskXtender server.
The hotfixes should be incorporated in a future Windows Server 2008 service
pack.
◆
Ensure that all other software necessary for the environment is supported on
Windows Server 2008.
System requirements
21
Installation
◆
22
If the User Account Control setting is enabled in Windows Server 2008, which is
the default setting, then some operations cannot be completed for files on media
that has been removed from a media group and then later restored. Specifically,
you cannot change file attributes or delete files with the Read-Only attribute
enabled. As a result, disabling the User Account Control setting is recommended.
EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
Installation
Hardware
requirements
Table 2
The servers on which you install File System Manager and MediaStor should meet
the requirements listed in Table 2 on page 23.
Minimum and recommended hardware requirements for DiskXtender
Requirement
Minimum
Recommended
Processora
1.3 GHz
2.8 GHz
Memory
1 GB
2 GB
Free space on the system drive
200 MB
20% free
Total size of the extended drive
100 MB
10 GBb
a. DiskXtender is supported on x64 platforms running a supported version of the Windows operating
system, including Intel and AMD x64 processors. Neither Itanium processors nor Windows operating
systems for Itanium-based architectures are supported.
b. The optimal size of the extended drive depends on the amount of data and expected growth.
Extended drive
requirements
Number of extended
drives
DiskXtender extended drives should meet the following requirements. Each
extended drive should be:
◆
Formatted as an NTFS volume.
◆
A local drive on the DiskXtender server. The drive must be directly attached to
the server by using a block-level protocol such as SCSI or ATA, and it must be
mapped as a local drive.
◆
Not the system drive or a drive where applications are running.
◆
Not a volume mount point. DiskXtender cannot fetch, move, delete, or purge files
from a mount point.
◆
Not a network share that is attached to the DiskXtender server by using any
network system protocol, including CIFS or NFS.
◆
Dedicated to files that are managed by DiskXtender.
◆
A minimum of 100 MB in size (10 GB or more is recommended), with sufficient
space planned for future growth. The maximum size of an extended drive is 2 TB.
◆
A drive that contains (or will contain) no more than 20 million to 25 million files.
If possible, a good rule of thumb for an appropriate number of extended drives is
n – 1, where n is the number of processor nodes. For example, a server with a
four-node processor should manage only three extended drives.
In environments where some of the extended drives are relatively inactive, a good
rule of thumb is seven or fewer extended drives, where only three or fewer are active.
Sizing extended drives
Each extended drive must be at least 100 MB, and 10 GB or more is recommended.
Larger extended drives generally yield faster user response time. This is because you
can keep more file data on the drive, which improves the chance that any file
requested is already on the drive. The maximum size of an extended drive is 2 TB.
Determining the amount of space you need for files is subjective. Consider the
following in your calculations:
◆
The current and expected file load
◆
The time span covered by the files on the server
◆
The quantity of data that is accessed frequently, and therefore should remain on
the drive to ensure faster user response time
System requirements
23
Installation
◆
The quantity of inactive data that can be moved to storage media and purged
from the drive
Note: Remember that purged files remain accessible through file tags on the extended
drive. When a file has been migrated to a single piece of media, a file tag consumes
between 0 bytes and 4 KB of disk space.When a file has been migrated to a single piece of
media, then a file tag is likely to consume 1 KB of disk space. When a file has been
migrated to multiple pieces of media through multi-target migration, then a file tag is
likely to consume 4 KB of disk space.
◆
File overhead
Note: In addition to the space used for file data, you must account for the file overhead
required by the NTFS file system to store the attributes of each file. To calculate the total file
overhead, multiply the total number of files by 1,500. For example, if there are 350,000 files
on an extended drive, the amount of additional space those files consume is: 350,000 x
1,500 (bytes) = 525,000,000 bytes (or approximately 501 MB).
Extended drive data
requirements
Table 3
DiskXtender supports a wide variety of file types. Because DiskXtender does not
need to open a file in order to manage it, DiskXtender can manage most file types that
can be saved on a Microsoft Windows NTFS volume. However, DiskXtender is
designed to serve as an archiving tool for fixed or unstructured data. As a result,
adherence to the guidelines in Table 3 on page 24 ensures optimal system
performance.
Extended drive data requirements
File type
Details
Common file types used with
DiskXtender
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Microsoft Office files (.doc, .ppt, .xls, and so on)
Adobe Acrobat files (.pdf)
Text files (.txt)
HTML files (.htm or .html)
XML files (.xml)
ZIP archives (.zip)
Image files, such as JPEGs (.jpg), TIFFs (.tif), bitmaps (.bmp), and GIFs
(.gif)
• Macintosh files
• Personal Folder files (.pst)
Note: The DiskXtender Search Module can index a majority of the common
file types in this list. The DiskXtender Search Module installation guide
provides a complete list of the file types that can be indexed.
File and data types that are not
recommended for use with
DiskXtender
24
• Frequently accessed files, such as email files or files in user home
directories or temporary directories
• Data that is part of a database
• Application files
EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
Installation
International character support
DiskXtender can manage files with Unicode characters in either the filename or the
file data. However, characters may display incorrectly if the correct language code
pages are not installed.
Some applications used with DiskXtender do not provide the same level of
international character support. The DiskXtender installation guide provides details.
You should verify international character support statements for all applications
installed on the DiskXtender server before you configure file migration.
Path and filename length limitations
The full path and filename for a file on the extended drive should total no more than
259 UTF-16 characters. DiskXtender does not prevent users from saving a file to the
extended drive when the character count for the path and filename exceeds 259
characters. However, files with excessive path and filenames may not be migrated to
media, depending on the type of media and the file system with which it is formatted.
Storage device
requirements
Ensure that the storage devices that you are planning to use with DiskXtender meet
the requirements listed in the following topics. The EMC DiskXtender Software
Compatibility Guide and the DiskXtender for Windows Supported Device List, both
available on the Powerlink website, provide information on the latest versions of
compatible hardware and software for use with DiskXtender.
EMC Centera
When you install DiskXtender, a compatible version of the EMC Centera SDK is also
installed automatically on the DiskXtender server to facilitate communication
between DiskXtender and an EMC Centera cluster.
A supported version of the CentraStar® operating system must be installed on the
EMC Centera cluster. Table 4 on page 25 lists the supported CentraStar versions.
Table 4
NAS
Supported CentraStar versions
If you are using this general
CentraStar version
Ensure that this specific CentraStar
version is installed
2.4
2.4.2-1178-679-13052 or later
3.0
3.0.2-1204-702-13053 or later
3.1
3.1.1-1207-703-13222 or later
3.2 or later
Any version
DiskXtender considers Network Attached Storage (NAS) media to be any media
available through a connection to a share on a network, including:
◆
A network share on a disk-based storage device, such as CLARiiON®, Celerra®,
Symmetrix®, EMC Isilon®, EMC VNX/VNXe® series or other RAID and NAS
devices
◆
A shared folder on a server on the network
◆
A shared media folder on another DiskXtender extended drive
Note: You cannot migrate files from a media folder on one extended drive to a location on the
same extended drive.
DiskXtender can connect to these shares by using network system protocols such as
CIFS.
System requirements
25
Installation
Each DiskXtender installation can have only one NAS media service. However, you
can create as many pieces of NAS media for that media service as you want, and each
piece of media can write to a different share on a different device.
Even if the NAS media service is writing to a single device, you should create several
partitions and shares so that you can create multiple pieces of NAS media.
NAS security requirements
Only the DiskXtender service account should have full access to the share that
corresponds to a piece of NAS media. No other user accounts or applications should
have write access to the share.
NAS share requirements
The shares that will be identified as NAS media should meet the following
requirements:
◆
The shares should not be located at the root of the storage device. Create shares
for either folders or partitions on the device.
◆
The DiskXtender service account and any accounts required for backup
purposes—and only these accounts—should have write access to the share.
◆
The shares should be visible over the network to the DiskXtender server.
◆
The absolute file path (in other words, the full file path on the device plus the file
path of any files on the extended drive) must not exceed the maximum number of
UTF-16 characters supported by both DiskXtender and the device.
Note: You can create more than 256 pieces of NAS media in DiskXtender if you create that
many shares. However, no more than 256 pieces of media can be online in DiskXtender at one
time. You cannot write files to or read files from the media that DiskXtender does not set online
at initialization.
MediaStor
The following topics provide details on the requirements to use the MediaStor media
service with DiskXtender.
File System Manager compatibility
You can install MediaStor 6.5 to format media with OTG file system as well as media
with UDF file system.
DiskXtender architecture with MediaStor
MediaStor must be installed on a Microsoft Windows server that is attached to the
library or standalone drive you want to manage. MediaStor should be installed on a
different server than DiskXtender to optimize system performance. The DiskXtender
architecture with MediaStor is flexible. Consider the following possible
environments:
26
◆
You can dedicate a MediaStor server with a single hardware device to a
DiskXtender server.
◆
You can set up a single MediaStor server to manage multiple hardware devices
that are all available to a single DiskXtender server.
◆
You can connect a single DiskXtender server to multiple MediaStor servers, each
managing one or more hardware devices.
◆
Multiple DiskXtender servers can also connect to a single MediaStor server that
manages one or multiple hardware devices. However, keep in mind the potential
performance impact of sharing hardware devices among multiple DiskXtender
installations.
EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
Installation
A single MediaStor installation must manage a hardware device. Multiple MediaStor
installations cannot share a device, and the device cannot be shared with other
non-DiskXtender applications.
You can use the MediaStor media service when DiskXtender is installed in a cluster.
However, the MediaStor server must be outside the cluster.
MediaStor device and media requirements
The DiskXtender for Windows Supported Device List, available on the Powerlink
website, contains a complete list of supported storage devices and adapters. The
DiskXtender installation guide provides additional details on selecting the hardware
to use with MediaStor.
MediaStor supports the following removable media types:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
DVD-R
DVD-RAM
DVD-ROM
Magneto-optical (MO)
MO WORM
Tape
Tape WORM
Ultra-density optical (UDO)
UDO WORM
DVD drive considerations
Because different types of DVD media can be read and written in different types of
DVD drives, you need to ensure that the hardware is configured to enable drives to
perform the appropriate functions. Keep in mind the following considerations:
◆
If there are combo drives, different drive types, or both, all media must be
readable in all library drives. For example, if a library contains both DVD-R and
DVD-ROM drives, you cannot insert DVD-RAM media into the library because
DVD-RAM media is not readable in DVD-ROM drives.
All read/write library media must be both readable and writable in all
read/write library drives.
◆
Unfinalized DVD-R media cannot be mounted in a read-only drive (a drive not
configured to write to media). If you intend to update copies of media before the
originals are finalized, you must have at least two write drives in the system: one
drive for the copy and one for the unfinalized original. This is not an issue if you
plan to only update the copy after the original is finalized.
◆
If the library contains both a read drive and a write drive, you must ensure that
the drives are on separate buses, according to typical manufacturer’s instructions.
Carefully follow all manufacturer recommendations for hardware before you
configure hardware in a DiskXtender system.
System requirements
27
Installation
UDO drive considerations
DiskXtender supports both UDO1 and UDO2 media and hardware.
You can install UDO1, UDO2, and MO drives in a UDO library. When you add such a
library to the MediaStor configuration, select UDO2 as the drive type for the library.
This enables you to use UDO1, UDO2, and MO media in the library. If you select
UDO1 as the drive type for the library, then you can only use UDO1 and MO media
in the library. If you select MO as the drive type for the library, you can only use MO
media in the library.
In a UDO library with mixed drives, you can only read from and write to MO media
by using MO drives. Similarly, you can only read from and write to UDO1 media by
using UDO1 drives.
A UDO2 drive can read UDO1 and UDO2 media and write to UDO2 media.
However, a UDO2 drive cannot write to UDO1 media. If you insert UDO1 media into
a UDO library that has only UDO2 drives, then the media is inventoried as read-only
media. If you later add a UDO1 drive to the library to enable writes to UDO1 media,
you must reinventory the media to reset the UDO1 media to read/write status.
IBM Tivoli Storage
Manager
Sun StorageTek ACSLS
To use TSM as a media service, the TSM server must be running version 5.4, 5.5, or
5.5.1 on either the Microsoft Windows or IBM AIX operating system. In addition, you
must install and configure version 5.5 or 5.5.1 of the TSM Backup/Archive Client on
the DiskXtender server. (TSM 5.5.1 is required for Windows Server 2008.) “Installing
TSM and adding a TSM media service” on page 74 provides details.
To use a Sun StorageTek ACSLS installation as a media service, version 7.3 must be
installed on the ACSLS server. In addition, you must install LibAttach 1.4.2 on the
DiskXtender server.
Use a SCSI cable to connect the DiskXtender server to one or more drives in the Sun
StorageTek tape library.
If the operating system on the DiskXtender server is Windows Server 2008, perform
the following additional steps:
◆
Make an exception in the Windows firewall to enable LibAttach to communicate
properly with the ACSLS server. The LibAttach 1.4.2 and Windows Server 2008 —
Firewall Configuration document, available on the Sun website at www.sun.com,
provides instructions on how to add LibAttach as an exception program for the
Windows firewall.
◆
Install two Microsoft hotfixes on the DiskXtender server:
• The first hotfix is required to resolve a memory leak that occurs with Windows
Server 2008 during an RPC client callback function, which is used when
DiskXtender and MediaStor communicate to perform media management
tasks. To obtain the hotfix, contact Microsoft Support and reference KB article
949887.
• The second hotfix is required to resolve a truncated registry entry that
DiskXtender and MediaStor use to retrieve device type information. To obtain
the hotfix, look up KB article 953390 the Microsoft website.
Both hotfixes should be incorporated in a future Windows Server 2008 service
pack.
28
EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
Installation
Networking
requirements
Install all DiskXtender components to the same domain for ease of administration
and performance. Do not install DiskXtender on a domain controller. However,
ensure that the domain controller is running normally and is available on the
network to ensure proper DiskXtender functioning.
DiskXtender is supported in a Microsoft Windows Distributed File System (DFS)
environment. However, DiskXtender manages only the files that are physically
located on the server where it is installed. It does not manage files on other servers
that are connected to it by DFS links. The DiskXtender installation guide provides
details.
System requirements
29
Installation
Licensing
DiskXtender licensing is capacity-based. A capacity-based license specifies the
number of DiskXtender servers allowed, as well as the quantity of extended drive
data that DiskXtender can manage. If you are installing DiskXtender in a Microsoft
clustering environment or AutoStart domain, the license must account for each active
File System Manager installation, and it must also be cluster-enabled. Additional
licensing details are available in the DiskXtender installation guide.
License Server
DiskXtender licenses are managed by the Xtender Solutions License Server product.
The computer on which you install License Server depends on the environment:
◆
If License Server must manage only a DiskXtender license for a single
DiskXtender installation, then it can be safely installed on the DiskXtender server
without a significant impact on performance.
◆
If License Server must manage a DiskXtender license for multiple DiskXtender
installations, then you may want to install it on a separate computer that is
accessible to all of the DiskXtender servers.
◆
If License Server must manage licenses for both DiskXtender and multiple
ApplicationXtender® clients, then it should be installed on a separate computer to
avoid an impact on DiskXtender server performance.
The computer on which you install License Server determines the release of License
Server that you need:
Table 5
◆
If you plan to install License Server on a DiskXtender 6.5 SP 2 server, then use
License Server 6.5 SP 2.
◆
If you plan to install License Server on a separate machine from DiskXtender, then
the operating system on the machine determines the necessary License Server
release. For a 32-bit operating system, use a 32-bit release of the License Server.
For a 64-bit operating system, use a 64-bit release of the License Server. Either a
32-bit release of the License Server on a 32-bit operating system or a 64-bit release
of the License Server on a 64-bit operating system can license DiskXtender.
Table 5 on page 30 provides details on supported environments.
Supported DiskXtender environments for License Server
License Server release Supported DiskXtender environments
6.5 SP2
• One or more DiskXtender 6.5 SP2 (64-bit) servers
•
License Server 6.5 SP2 supports the following 64-bit operating systems:
◆
Microsoft Windows 2003 Standard or Enterprise Edition with Service Pack 2 (x64)
◆
Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Standard or Enterprise Edition with Service Pack
1, or R2 with Service Pack 1 (x64)
The minimum system requirements for these operating systems are sufficient to run
License Server.
The License Server computer must belong to the same domain as all other
DiskXtender servers.
30
EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
Installation
Before you install License Server, create a service account for License Server. The
account should have access to the network and be a local administrator on the
License Server computer.
The necessary files to install License Server are available on the DiskXtender
installation CD. A wizard leads you through the steps to install License Server.
Evaluation licensing
When you install File System Manager, you are prompted to select whether you are
installing a licensed version or a 30-day evaluation version. If you choose a 30-day
evaluation license, you must set up a license and point the program to the License
Server before the 30 days expire, or the functionality of the product is disabled.
Adding a license
To obtain a product license and add the license for DiskXtender to use:
1. Determine the machine ID number for the License Server computer by opening
the General tab of the Service Properties dialog box in the License Server
Administrator after you install License Server. The machine ID is required to
generate a product license.
2. Use the License Management process available on the Powerlink website, or
contact the EMC Licensing Support team at licensing@emc.com.
If you receive DiskXtender product license information in the form of a file with a
.lic extension, you have a license file. If you receive DiskXtender product license
information in the form of a series of numbers and letters, you have a license key.
3. Use the New License Wizard in the License Server Administrator to add the
license file or key to License Server.
To start the New License Wizard, open the Tools menu in the License Server
Administrator, and select New License Wizard.
4. Connect DiskXtender to License Server:
a. If License Server is installed on a different computer than DiskXtender, give
the necessary user accounts the required privileges on the License Server
computer:
– Add the DiskXtender service account to the local Administrators group on
the License Server computer.
– If you log in to the DiskXtender server by using an account other than the
DiskXtender service account, add the account to the local Administrators
group on the License Server computer.
b. Use the Edit product license information option on the DiskXtender setup
wizard to point DiskXtender to the License Server installation with the license.
Licensing
31
Installation
Basic installation
To install DiskXtender:
1. Ensure that the environment meets or exceeds the requirements listed in “System
requirements” on page 20.
2. Check the Powerlink website for updates to the release notes for this release.
Review the release notes.
3. Create a service account and log on to the server with the account. The service
account must meet the following requirements:
• Be a member of the Administrators group on the server
• (File System Manager only) Have privileges on the extended drive
• Have the Log on as a service right
Note: It might be necessary to assign the Act as part of operating system right to the service
account if the service fails to log on to the server after the installation.
4. (Optional) Obtain a product license as discussed in “Adding a license” on
page 31.
5. Run the DiskXtender setup wizard and select the Install new product option.
You can install DiskXtender to multiple servers at the same time if you select the
servers on the Target Computers page of the wizard.
6. Check the Powerlink website for any patches to this release. Download the
patches and install them, if necessary, by using the instructions in the patch
documentation.
32
EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
Installation
Installation in a Microsoft cluster
You can install DiskXtender in a Microsoft clustering environment to maximize
DiskXtender availability in a nonstop business environment. Before you install
DiskXtender in a Microsoft clustering environment, consider the following best
practices:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
Number and type of
cluster nodes
“Number and type of cluster nodes” on page 33
“Cluster system requirements” on page 34
“Cluster failover model” on page 34
“Licensing in a cluster” on page 34
“Connecting users to the extended drive” on page 34
“Pre-install steps in a cluster” on page 35
“Running the cluster installation” on page 35
“Configuration after installation” on page 36
“Post-installation checklist” on page 36
As you plan a DiskXtender installation in a cluster, you must answer the following
questions about the number of cluster nodes and the type of DiskXtender installation
on each node:
◆
How many nodes should be in the cluster?
◆
How many nodes should have an active DiskXtender installation (active nodes)?
◆
How many nodes should have a passive DiskXtender installation (passive
nodes)?
You can install DiskXtender in a cluster with as many as eight nodes. The
DiskXtender installation guide lists the supported cluster models of active and
passive DiskXtender installations.
To determine the number of active and passive DiskXtender installations to include
in the cluster, consider how many active DiskXtender installations are necessary. Each
active DiskXtender installation has at least one extended drive. Anticipate the
workload of each active DiskXtender installation and evaluate your tolerance for
decreased system performance in the event of a failover.
If you anticipate a light workload for each installation and few situations requiring a
failover, a cluster with more active nodes might be more appropriate. In this case, an
active node should be able to handle the workload of another active node (in addition
to its own) if a failover occurs, with a tolerable impact to system performance.
If you anticipate a heavy workload, however, consider dedicating a passive node for
each active node. This ensures a minimal impact to system performance in the event
of a failover, because the passive node would need to handle only the workload of the
failed node.
You should also consider any additional workload on cluster nodes for other
applications. As with a standalone DiskXtender installation (outside a cluster), a
dedicated server is recommended for each DiskXtender installation in a cluster. In
addition, as a best practice, you may want to dedicate the entire cluster environment
to DiskXtender. Maintain the high availability of other critical applications by
dedicating a cluster to each application.
Installation in a Microsoft cluster
33
Installation
Cluster system
requirements
Ensure that the cluster meets (or preferably exceeds) DiskXtender requirements for
operating in a cluster. These requirements include the hardware, operating system,
and media services.
Hardware and operating system requirements are listed in “DiskXtender server
requirements” on page 20. All media services except for Sun StorageTek ACSLS are
supported in a cluster. However, MediaStor must be installed outside the cluster.
Cluster failover
model
If all of the DiskXtender installations in the cluster are active, decide whether you
want to fail over an entire DiskXtender installation at once, or if you want the ability
to manually fail over a single extended drive.
Failing over a single extended drive might improve system performance when all of
the extended drives for a DiskXtender installation on one node are receiving
numerous file requests, but the DiskXtender installation on another node is less
active. By moving one or more extended drives to another node in the cluster, the file
requests are spread out and the system can respond more efficiently.
This functionality is only available if all of the DiskXtender installations in the cluster
are active. You cannot fail over an extended drive to a passive node.
Licensing in a
cluster
When you obtain a license for a DiskXtender installation in a cluster, ensure that the
license is cluster-enabled and that the license accounts for each active DiskXtender
installation in the cluster.
In addition, decide whether to manage the DiskXtender license from within the
cluster or on a server outside the cluster.
When installed in the cluster, License Server runs actively on one node in the cluster.
It can then fail over to one of the other nodes in the environment. In other words,
License Server runs in active/passive mode in a cluster.
You can assign the License Server cluster resources to the same virtual server group
as the DiskXtender resources. This enables License Server to fail over to another node
in the cluster at the same time as DiskXtender. Alternatively, you can create a separate
virtual server for the License Server cluster resources. This virtual server could fail
over separately from DiskXtender, if necessary, or it could fail over at the same time,
if the node with both virtual servers fails.
Note: License Server runs active/passive even if DiskXtender is running active/active. This is
true regardless of whether License Server resources are assigned to the DiskXtender virtual
server.
Connecting users to
the extended drive
Users and applications that access the extended drives can connect to shares on the
drives by using the virtual server name (or virtual server IP address), and not the
Windows computer name of the node on which the virtual server is hosted.
If you create shares for the extended drive, associate the shares with File Share
resources in the Cluster Administrator.
34
EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
Installation
Pre-install steps in a
cluster
Table 6
Before you install DiskXtender in a Microsoft cluster, use the Cluster Administrator to
configure the items in Table 6 on page 35.
Pre-install cluster configuration
Cluster configuration
Details
DiskXtender virtual server
Create a virtual server for the DiskXtender service on each cluster node that will
have an active DiskXtender installation. Ensure that the virtual server is assigned
to its primary owner node.
Do not create a virtual server on nodes that will have a passive DiskXtender
installation.
Extended drive virtual server If you want the ability to manually fail over a single extended drive, create a
separate virtual server for the extended drive on the preferred owner node for the
drive. Ensure that the virtual server is assigned to its primary owner node.
If there are multiple extended drives, you can create a virtual server for each
extended drive, or group extended drives together in one or more virtual servers.
Running the cluster
installation
Physical Disk resources
On each cluster node that will have an active DiskXtender installation, move the
shared Physical Disk resources for the extended drives to the appropriate virtual
server group:
• If you want all extended drives to fail over with the DiskXtender service, move
the Physical Disk resources to the DiskXtender virtual server group.
• If you want the ability to manually fail over a single extended drive, move the
Physical Disk resource for that drive into the virtual server group that you
created for the drive.
Verify that each Physical Disk resource has all necessary cluster nodes listed as
Possible Owners.
File Share resource
If you set up a file share for users to access an extended drive, create a File Share
resource for the share to enable the share to remain accessible when a failover
occurs.
The File Share resource should belong to the virtual server group that contains the
Physical Disk resource for the drive associated with the file share (either the
DiskXtender virtual server group or the extended drive virtual server group).
When you run the setup wizard to install DiskXtender in a cluster, you only have to
run the wizard once. The wizard enables you to install to multiple servers (cluster
nodes) at the same time. When you select the nodes on which to install DiskXtender,
it is important to understand whether you want an active or passive DiskXtender
installation on the node:
◆
For active installations, you select the DiskXtender virtual server name in the
wizard. This is the name of the virtual server that you created in the Cluster
Administrator.
◆
For passive installations, you select the Windows computer name for the node. To
determine the Windows computer name, right-click My Computer on the
Windows desktop, and select Properties. The computer name is listed on the
Computer Name tab of the System Properties dialog box.
When you install License Server in a cluster, a License Server Service resource is
created in the default cluster group. Move the License Server Service resource out of
the default cluster group to follow Microsoft best practices:
◆
To fail over License Server with DiskXtender, move the resource to the
DiskXtender virtual server group.
◆
To fail over License Server separately from DiskXtender, create a new virtual
server and move the resource to the new virtual server group.
Installation in a Microsoft cluster
35
Installation
Configuration after
installation
In general, DiskXtender configuration in a cluster is the same as it is outside a cluster.
Keep in mind the following points:
◆
When you create an extended drive in the File System Manager Administrator,
select the drive associated with the Physical Disk resource in the Cluster
Administrator. The Physical Disk resource for the drive should be assigned to a
virtual server group.
After you create the extended drive, a DiskXtender Disk resource is automatically
created in the same virtual server group as the associated Physical Disk resource.
The DiskXtender Disk resource is named ExtendedDrive-VSName, where
VSName is the name of the virtual server to which it is assigned.
Only one DiskXtender Disk resource is created in each virtual server group,
regardless of the number of extended drives (Physical Disk resources) assigned to
the group.
Post-installation
checklist
◆
If there are two or more active DiskXtender installations in the cluster, use caution
when you develop media naming conventions. The media names associated with
the DiskXtender installation on each cluster node should be unique. This enables
you to easily identify media from each node when DiskXtender is running on a
standby node.
◆
To use TSM as a media service, there are additional configuration steps to set up
the media service. The DiskXtender administration guide provides instructions.
To verify that the DiskXtender installation in a cluster is successful, ensure that the
appropriate cluster resources have been created in the correct virtual server groups,
and then initiate a failover of each virtual server by using the Cluster Administrator.
The following resources should be in the DiskXtender virtual server group:
◆
IP Address and Network Name resources for the virtual server
◆
A Physical Disk resource for the extended drive
◆
An extended drive (DiskXtender Disk) resource
◆
A File Share resource for the share on the extended drive
Note: This resource is optional, depending on whether you set up a share for users to
access the extended drive.
◆
The DiskXtender Service resource
If you assign the Physical Disk resource for the extended drive to a different virtual
server than the DiskXtender Service resource, then the extended drive virtual server
group contains all of the resources except for the DiskXtender Service resource.
The License Server Service resource is listed as well if you move it to the virtual
server group.
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Installation in an AutoStart domain
You can install DiskXtender in an AutoStart domain to maximize DiskXtender
availability in a nonstop business environment. Before you install DiskXtender in an
AutoStart domain, consider the following best practices:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
Number and type of
AutoStart nodes
“Number and type of AutoStart nodes” on page 37
“AutoStart system requirements” on page 37
“AutoStart failover model” on page 37
“Connecting users to the extended drive” on page 38
“Pre-install steps for AutoStart” on page 38
“Running the installation” on page 39
“Configuration after installation” on page 39
“Post-installation checklist” on page 39
There is no limit to the number of AutoStart nodes on which you can install
DiskXtender in an AutoStart domain. The number of DiskXtender nodes is limited
only by the node requirements of the domain itself. The AutoStart documentation
provides details on the number of nodes supported in a domain.
There must be an active DiskXtender installation (service) on each node.
AutoStart system
requirements
Ensure that the environment meets (or preferably exceeds) DiskXtender
requirements, which include the hardware, operating system, media services, and
licensing.
Hardware and operating system requirements are listed in “DiskXtender server
requirements” on page 20. However, the hardware must also meet documented
AutoStart requirements.
If the hardware includes a Symmetrix device, then Symmetrix Remote Data Facility
(SRDF®) can be used to mirror an extended drive from one AutoStart node to
another.
You can also use PowerPath® to provide automatic failover and dynamic multipath
load balancing for the I/O components that connect a DiskXtender server and the
PowerPath supported device it uses as an extended drive.
The EMC Centera and NAS media services are supported in an AutoStart domain.
The DiskXtender license in an AutoStart domain must be cluster-enabled and must
account for the total number of AutoStart nodes with an active DiskXtender
installation. You must install License Server on a server outside the AutoStart
domain.
AutoStart failover
model
Decide whether you want to fail over an entire DiskXtender installation at once, or if
you want the ability to manually fail over a single extended drive.
Failing over a single extended drive might improve system performance when all of
the extended drives for a DiskXtender installation on one node are receiving
numerous file requests, but the DiskXtender installation on another node is less
active. By moving one or more extended drives to another node in the cluster, the file
requests are spread out and the system can respond more efficiently.
Installation in an AutoStart domain
37
Installation
Connecting users to
the extended drive
Users and applications that access the extended drives can connect to shares on the
drives. The file share includes an AutoStart node alias (\\NodeAlias\DriveLetter\...),
and not the Windows computer name of the node.
Pre-install steps for
AutoStart
Perform the following steps to prepare the AutoStart environment before you install
DiskXtender:
1. Prepare the AutoStart domain by installing AutoStart and (optionally) SRDF and
PowerPath.
2. Open the AutoStart Console and add data sources for each extended drive.
3. Run the enabler wizard (AutoStartDx62Enabler.exe) to copy the required support
files to each node in the AutoStart domain.
4. Run the configuration wizard (AsDxWizard.exe) to add a DiskXtender service
resource group for each node.
The service resource group contains a process that monitors the DiskXtender
service. If the process detects that the service has stopped, it will go into a failed
state, triggering a restart of the resource group.
5. Run the configuration wizard again to add resource groups for the drives you
want to extend through DiskXtender.
If you want all of the drives on a node to fail over together, create one extended
drive resource group. If you want each drive to fail over separately, create one
extended drive resource group for each extended drive.
You can either create new resource groups or use existing resource groups for the
extended drive resource groups.
Each extended drive resource group contains the AutoStart data source resources
for the drives you want to extend and manage with the group, as well as the
following processes:
• A process that monitors DiskXtender registry changes. When a change occurs,
the process exports the registry to a file on the extended drive. The file is then
used during a failover to update the registry on the receiving node.
• A process that prevents the resource group from coming online until the
registry import is complete.
• Processes that notify the DiskXtender service to set the resources in the group
online or offline as necessary.
6. In the AutoStart Console, type the login information for the
ResourceGroupName_Start and ResourceGroupName_Stop utility processes.
Note: The MonServ and RegMon2_64 processes and the RegCheck_64 utility process do
not require entry of login credentials.
The accounts must belong to the local Administrators group on each node in the
Microsoft Windows domain. In addition, the accounts for the Start and Stop
utility processes must belong to the DxAdministrators group.
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7. (Optional) If you are configuring the system in a wide area network environment
and you used a Node Group Separator to separate the nodes at one site from the
nodes at another site in the list of available nodes for an extended drive resource
group, select the Auto Node Group Failover option for the group. This option
enables a resource group to automatically fail over "across" the Node Group
Separator to the first listed node from the different site.
8. Verify that each node alias, data source, and resource group is online and
allocated to its preferred owner node.
Running the
installation
When you run the setup wizard to install DiskXtender in an AutoStart domain, you
only have to run the wizard once. The wizard enables you to install to multiple
servers (AutoStart nodes) at the same time.
When you select the nodes on which to install DiskXtender, select or add only the
node aliases for the DiskXtender service resource groups.
Configuration after
installation
In general, DiskXtender configuration in an AutoStart domain is the same as it is
outside an AutoStart domain. Keep in mind the following points:
◆
When you create an extended drive in the File System Manager Administrator,
select the drive that is associated with the AutoStart data sources that you
created.
◆
Use caution when you develop media naming conventions. The media names
associated with the DiskXtender installation on each node should be unique. This
enables you to easily identify media from each node when DiskXtender is
running on another node.
◆
Even though you configure EMC Centera media auto-creation when you create
the media groups, the media is not created until you set the extended drive
resource group online in the AutoStart Console.
As you configure the extended drives, media services, and media in DiskXtender, the
AutoStart configuration is updated. This enables AutoStart to begin to monitor the
system accordingly.
Post-installation
checklist
Review the following checklist after the installation is complete to ensure that all
necessary items have been configured in the AutoStart Console:
Isolation settings
❑ (Optional but recommended) Requires addition of isolation IP addresses for
gateway addresses or a router that is accessible to all nodes in the AutoStart
domain
Resource groups
❑ DiskXtender service resource groups (one for each node in the domain)
❑ Created with the configuration wizard
❑ Contains the following resources:
– IP address (if an IP address was specified through the wizard)
– Node alias
– MonServ process (named ResourceGroupName_MonServ)
❑ Requires no additional configuration
Installation in an AutoStart domain
39
Installation
❑ Extended drive resource groups (at least one for each node; can also be one for
each extended drive, or one containing several extended drives)
❑ Created with the configuration wizard
❑ Contains the following resources:
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
IP address (if an IP address was specified through the wizard)
Node alias
Data sources for each extended drive
30-second delay
RegMon2_64 process (named ResourceGroupName_RegMon2_64)
RegCheck_64 utility process (named ResourceGroupName_RegCheck_64)
Start utility process (named ResourceGroupName_Start)
Stop utility process (named ResourceGroupName_Stop)
❑ (Optional) Selection of the Auto Node Group Failover checkbox on the
Options tab
Processes
❑ ResourceGroupName_RegMon2_64 (one for each extended drive resource group)
❑ Created automatically when creating an extended drive resource group with
the configuration wizard
❑ Contains additional environmental variables for changing optional
configuration settings
❑ ResourceGroupName_MonServ (one for each DiskXtender service resource group)
❑ Created automatically when creating a DiskXtender service resource group
with the configuration wizard
Node aliases
❑ One for each DiskXtender service resource group
❑ Specified when the group is created with the configuration wizard
❑ One for each extended drive resource group
❑ Specified when the group is created with the configuration wizard
Data sources
❑ One data source for each extended drive (either a Shared Disk Device for
Windows data source or an EMC SRDF Mirroring data source)
❑ Must be created manually before the resource groups are created
IP addresses
Utility processes
❑ (Optional but recommended) One for each service resource group
❑ ResourceGroupName_RegCheck_64 (one for each extended drive resource group)
❑ Created automatically when creating an extended drive resource group with
the configuration wizard
❑ ResourceGroupName_Start (one for each extended drive resource group)
❑ Created automatically when creating an extended drive resource group with
the configuration wizard
❑ Requires entry of login credentials
❑ ResourceGroupName_Stop (one for each extended drive resource group)
❑ Created automatically when creating an extended drive resource group with
the configuration wizard
❑ Requires entry of login credentials
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EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
Installation
Installation on VMware
You can install DiskXtender File System Manager on a VMware ESX Server. VMware
enables you to create multiple virtual machines to maximize and consolidate your
current hardware and enhance security. Virtual machines are completely isolated
from the host server and from other virtual machines. If a virtual machine crashes, all
others are unaffected. Before you install DiskXtender in a VMware environment,
consider the following best practices:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
“Number of virtual machines” on page 41
“VMware clustering support” on page 41
“VMware system requirements” on page 42
“Pre-install steps for VMware” on page 42
“Running the installation” on page 42
Number of virtual
machines
You can install File System Manager on as many as four virtual machines running on
a single VMware ESX Server. Each File System Manager installation should manage
no more than four extended drives, for a total of 16 extended drives managed on one
VMware server. Otherwise, performance problems may occur.
VMware clustering
support
You can install File System Manager on VMware virtual machines that are clustered
with Microsoft clustering. VMware supports cluster environments of as many as two
nodes. DiskXtender can run actively on both nodes (active/active), or it can run
actively on one node and passively on another (active/passive).
DiskXtender supports the VMware cluster models listed in Table 7 on page 41.
Table 7
Supported VMware cluster models
Cluster model
Description
Cluster in a box
The clustered VMware virtual machines run on the same VMware ESX Server.
Cluster across boxes The clustered VMware virtual machines run on two different VMware ESX Servers.
Mixed cluster
The cluster contains one VMware virtual machine and one physical server that is not a
VMware server.
DiskXtender can run active/active or active/passive regardless of the cluster
configuration. If DiskXtender is running active/passive, then the active installation
can be on either a virtual machine or on a physical server.
Regardless of the cluster configuration, each DiskXtender installation should manage
no more than three extended drives, for a total of six extended drives shared by the
cluster. Otherwise, performance problems may occur.
VMotion support
You can install DiskXtender 6.4 in a VMware environment that includes VMotion.
VMotion moves live, running virtual machines—including virtual machines with a
DiskXtender installation—from one host to another while maintaining continuous
service availability. When this move happens, users continue to access files by using
the same virtual machine name.
The DiskXtender and VMware environment should not include Microsoft clustering.
VMotion does not currently support migration of applications clustered using
Microsoft clustering.
Installation on VMware
41
Installation
VMware system
requirements
Consult a VMware representative for assistance in determining the appropriate
specifications for the VMware server to ensure an acceptable level of performance
and reliability based on the expected workload.
Each VMware virtual machine must meet or exceed the minimum hardware and
operating system requirements listed for a DiskXtender server in “DiskXtender
server requirements” on page 20.
All media services except for the Sun StorageTek ACSLS media service are supported
with VMware. However, MediaStor must be installed on a separate, non-VMware
server.
Pre-install steps for
VMware
Perform the following steps to prepare the VMware environment before you install
DiskXtender:
1. Install VMware on the server before you install any other applications. The
VMware install eliminates any other applications or data. The VMware ESX
Server documentation, available on the VMware website, provides detailed
information.
2. Configure the virtual machines:
• For a basic installation, use the instructions in the main VMware
documentation.
• For a cluster installation, use the instructions in the VMware Setup for Microsoft
Cluster Service document, available on the VMware website, to prepare the
virtual machines and set up the cluster. You should also prepare the cluster for
DiskXtender by using the instructions in the DiskXtender installation guide.
3. (Optional) Configure VMotion by using the instructions in the VMware
documentation.
Running the
installation
When you run the setup wizard to install DiskXtender in a VMware environment,
you only have to run the wizard once. The wizard enables you to install to multiple
virtual machines at the same time.
When you run the setup wizard for a basic installation, select the virtual machine(s)
as the target computers for installation on the Target Computers page of the wizard.
When you run the setup wizard for a cluster installation, select the cluster virtual
server name for an active DiskXtender installation and the Windows computer name
for a passive installation, just as you would with a non-VMware cluster installation.
“Running the cluster installation” on page 35 provides details.
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Installation
Installation on Hyper-V
You can install DiskXtender and License Server on a virtual machine in a Hyper-V
virtualization environment. Hyper-V enables the creation of a virtualized server
computing environment on a server that uses the Windows Server 2008 operating
system.
Before you install DiskXtender in a Hyper-V environment, consider the following
best practices:
◆
◆
◆
◆
“Number of virtual machines” on page 43
“Hyper-V system requirements” on page 43
“Pre-install steps for Hyper-V” on page 43
“Running the installation” on page 43
Number of virtual
machines
You can install DiskXtender or License Server on one virtual machine per host
(physical) server. The virtual machine should meet or exceed the minimum
requirements listed in the DiskXtender installation guide. There is no limit to the
number of extended drives that DiskXtender on the virtual machine can manage in a
Hyper-V environment, aside from general DiskXtender guidelines.
Clustering on
Hyper-V
You can install DiskXtender or License Server on a cluster in a Hyper-V environment.
Hyper-V system
requirements
DiskXtender and License Server are supported on either Windows Server 2008
Standard or Enterprise Edition with Hyper-V enabled or on a dedicated Microsoft
Hyper-V Server 2008 machine. The virtual machines that run on a Hyper-V server can
run on other Windows operating systems that DiskXtender and License Server
support, including 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Windows Server 2003 and Windows
Server 2008.
Each virtual machine must meet or exceed the minimum hardware and operating
system requirements listed for a DiskXtender server in “DiskXtender server
requirements” on page 20.
All media services except for the Sun StorageTek ACSLS media service are supported
with VMware. However, MediaStor must be installed on a separate, non-VMware
server.
Pre-install steps for
Hyper-V
Perform the following steps to prepare the Hyper-V environment before you install
DiskXtender:
1. Prepare the Hyper-V environment by either installing Hyper-V or enabling the
Hyper-V role on the server.
The Microsoft Hyper-V documentation provides detailed information.
2. Configure the virtual machines by using the instructions in the Hyper-V
documentation.
Running the
installation
When you run the setup wizard to install DiskXtender or License Server, select the
virtual machine as the target computer for installation on the Target Computers page
of the wizard.
Installation on Hyper-V
43
Installation
Installation with replication software
You can replicate files on the DiskXtender extended drive from one server to another
by using EMC replication products. RepliStor® can replicate files on a Windows
server, MirrorView™ replicates files on a CLARiiON device, and SRDF replicates files
on a Symmetrix device.
Before you install DiskXtender in a RepliStor environment, consider the following
best practices:
◆
Ensure that the environment meets (or preferably exceeds) DiskXtender
requirements, which include the hardware, operating system, media services, and
licensing:
• Hardware and operating system requirements are listed in “DiskXtender
server requirements” on page 20. However, the hardware must also meet
documented RepliStor requirements.
• All DiskXtender media services are supported in a DiskXtender environment
with RepliStor.
• Because DiskXtender is installed on two servers, the DiskXtender license must
be enabled for two DiskXtender servers.
◆
On the source system, exclude the DiskXtender file migration process from
replication. This prevents RepliStor from sending useless attribute changes (made
as a result of DiskXtender file migration, purging, and fetching) to the target.
◆
If antivirus software is running on the source system, exclude it from replication.
This prevents RepliStor from sending useless attribute changes (made as a result
of the virus scan) to the target.
◆
On the Advanced tab of the Options dialog box in RepliStor, leave the Replicate
DX Stub Files checkbox clear.
◆
On the source system, add a Global Exclude specification for the DxLogs
directory on each DiskXtender extended drive. This prevents the directory from
being replicated to an extended drive on the target system. If the DxLogs
directory is replicated, it might overwrite active work lists in the directory on the
target system.
◆
On the target system, add DiskXtender as an exception process. This enables
DiskXtender to have the necessary read and write access to migrate and fetch
files.
◆
If you are setting retention on files that are being replicated with RepliStor, then
enable Copy-on-Close. This enables RepliStor to replicate files as temporary files
and then rename them to the correct filename after they are closed. By using
Copy-on-Close replication with RepliStor, DiskXtender does not set retention on
the files until after they have been completely and successfully replicated.
◆
Set up a synchronization schedule. The RepliStor documentation provides
instructions.
To install and configure DiskXtender with MirrorView or SRDF, contact EMC
Professional Services. To install and configure DiskXtender and ApplicationXtender
with RepliStor, consult the best practices that are provided in the ApplicationXtender
documentation.
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3
Media Management
The following topics provide best practices for managing media with DiskXtender for
Windows:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
EMC Centera..................................................................................................................
NAS .................................................................................................................................
Optical and tape ............................................................................................................
IBM Tivoli Storage Manager........................................................................................
Cloud media...................................................................................................................
Media Management
46
56
60
74
77
45
Media Management
EMC Centera
You can migrate files on a DiskXtender extended drive to an EMC Centera cluster.
Consider the following best practices:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
“Preparing the EMC Centera cluster” on page 46
“Building the connection string” on page 46
“Specifying EMC Centera media service options” on page 47
“Creating EMC Centera media” on page 48
“Deleting EMC Centera media” on page 51
“Reclaiming deleted media space on EMC Centera” on page 51
“Adding custom metadata to files on EMC Centera” on page 51
“Performance tuning for EMC Centera” on page 52
“Troubleshooting EMC Centera” on page 54
Preparing the EMC Centera cluster
Work with an EMC Centera technical representative to install and configure the EMC
Centera cluster before you attempt to connect DiskXtender to the cluster. Consider
the following best practices:
◆
Create one or more virtual pools to segregate data you write to EMC Centera
through DiskXtender.
◆
Create one or more access profiles to provide access to the pools. The profile must
have the Write, Read, Delete, and Query capabilities. To allow privileged deletes
of retained files, the profile should also have the Privileged Delete right.
This step should result in a .pea file. Copy the file to a location on the DiskXtender
server. You specify the .pea file when you add the media service.
◆
(Optional) To use retention classes, have an EMC Centera administrator configure
them for you.
◆
If you enable replication of data between EMC Centera clusters, determine
whether to use unidirectional or bidirectional replication. In addition, decide
whether to configure deletion of files from both the source cluster and all target
clusters (delete propagation). Consult an EMC Centera representative to
determine the appropriate replication strategy for the environment.
Building the connection string
When you create an EMC Centera media service in DiskXtender, you specify the
connection string that the EMC Centera SDK uses to enable DiskXtender to connect
to an EMC Centera cluster. The connection string includes information about the
EMC Centera access nodes, as well as the access profile that should be used for the
DiskXtender connection.
To build the connection string for a single EMC Centera media service:
1. Collect the IP addresses for all access nodes on the primary EMC Centera cluster
to which DiskXtender should write files.
!
IMPORTANT
If EMC Centera replication is configured in the environment, do not include
the IP addresses for the access nodes on the target cluster.
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2. Configure node name aliases for the access nodes. To configure node name
aliases, add the appropriate entries for the access nodes to a common DNS server.
If you do not have access to the DNS server, edit the local HOSTS file on the
DiskXtender server to include the access node aliases.
Note: The connection string for a media service is limited to 512 characters. Keep this limit
in mind when you define node name aliases. The aliases should be kept to a reasonable
length. Otherwise, you may not be able to specify a sufficient number of access nodes on
the connection string to enable reliable connections in the event of a node failure.
3. On a single line in a text or word processor file, list the nodename aliases for the
access nodes on the primary EMC Centera cluster, and separate the aliases with a
comma. For example, if there are four access nodes on the primary cluster and the
nodename aliases for the nodes are defined as Node1, Node2, Node3, and Node4,
then type:
Node1,Node2,Node3,Node4
4. In the text or word processor file with the list of nodename aliases, add a question
mark (?) after the nodename aliases, and then include the path on the
DiskXtender server to the .pea file for the access profile that DiskXtender should
use to connect to the EMC Centera cluster.
For example, if the .pea file is located on the system drive at
C:\Centera\DXProfile.pea, then the connection string would appear as:
Node1,Node2,Node3,Node4?C:\Centera\DXProfile.pea
5. Ensure that the string with the nodename aliases and the path to the .pea file is
fewer than 512 characters.
Specifying EMC Centera media service options
When you create an EMC Centera media service, there are several options that
control how DiskXtender writes and reads files to and from EMC Centera. Figure 1
on page 47 illustrates the media service options.
Figure 1
Media service wizard - Centera Information page
EMC Centera
47
Media Management
Table 8 on page 48 lists the best practices for each EMC Centera media service option.
Table 8
Best practices for EMC Centera media service options
Media service option
Best practice
Pool Address
Type the connection string that you built in “Building the connection string” on
page 46 to enable DiskXtender to connect to EMC Centera.
Replica Address
Type the connection string that includes information about the EMC Centera
access nodes of replica EMC Centera.
PEA File Name
Type the name of the PEA file for the access profile that DiskXtender should
use to connect to EMC Centera
File Delete Audit String
Type the custom audit string to attach to file data when the file data is deleted
from EMC Centera. The audit string is included in the reflection that remains
on the EMC Centera cluster for the file. The audit string enables you to identify
the data as deleted DiskXtender data if you perform an EMC Centera query to
search for deleted data.
Embedded Blob Threshold
If you have a significant number of unique, small files (less than 100 KB), type
a threshold in KB. The file data for files that are smaller than the threshold are
embedded in the CDF instead of being stored separately. Embedding file data
in the CDF can decrease read and write times, since the overhead required to
manage two objects (CDF and BLOB) is greater than the overhead required to
manage a single object.
Do not specify a threshold (in other words, leave the default of 0 KB) if most of
your files are larger than the 100 KB maximum for the threshold, or if there are
a significant number of duplicate files. If the EMC Centera is configured for
Storage Strategy Capacity (single-instance storage), embedding BLOBs for
files smaller than 100 KB will not allow you to realize the benefits of the
storage strategy for these files. This is because the file content is embedded in
the CDF. If you embed the BLOBs for files smaller than 100 KB, then
single-instance storage is applied only to files larger than 100 KB.
Collision Avoidance
Enable collision avoidance only in environments where even the most remote
possibility of data loss is unacceptable, or in environments where
single-instance storage is forbidden, usually due to legal regulations.
Collision avoidance ensures that a unique CA is created for each file stored on
EMC Centera, even if the file is a duplicate of another file stored on the cluster.
If the file is edited and re-migrated, then a different unique CA is created. This
feature is designed to prevent the unlikely event where the same CA is
created for different files.
Collision avoidance should not be used in most environments because it
prevents the primary benefit of single-instance storage—the elimination of
duplicate content so that only a single copy of each file is stored.
Client-Side ID (hash)
Calculation
Support for client-side ID calculation is being removed from DiskXtender in a
future release. As a result, use of this feature is discouraged.
Creating EMC Centera media
When you configure a media group, you can enable the automatic creation of virtual
EMC Centera media for that media group. This method of creating media is
recommended in most environments because it ensures that media is available for file
migration without requiring you to monitor each media group.
On the Automation page for the media group, you can choose whether to
automatically create media based on the amount of free space in the media group or
on the number of active media (media that is not marked as full) in the media group.
Figure 2 on page 49 illustrates the options to automatically create EMC Centera
media.
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EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
Media Management
Figure 2
Options for automatic creation of EMC Centera media
Creating media based on the number of active media is recommended because it
enables you to optimize the number of media that DiskXtender writes to and reads
from simultaneously. This optimization can be configured by using the Maximum
media simultaneously receiving files option for the media group, which is available
on the Options page for the media group.
To create media based on the count of active media, select Auto-create virtual media
to maintain a count of __ active media on the Automation page, and then specify the
count to maintain. “Calculating the optimal number of active media” on page 49
provides guidance on how to determine the appropriate count.
In addition, type a media naming convention and select the media service in which
the media should be created on the Automation page.
Calculating the optimal number of active media
When you control the number of active media, you effectively control the number of
EMC Centera communication threads that can be used for file migration.
To calculate the optimal number of active media to maintain in a media group, first
determine the number of EMC Centera communication threads that are available for
DiskXtender file activity. The equation to determine the optimal number of threads
available for DiskXtender file migration and file fetches is as follows:
(N x 20) - A - R = Available threads
where:
◆
N is the number of access nodes in the EMC Centera cluster
◆
20 is the optimal number of threads per node
◆
A is the number of threads used by other applications, including other
DiskXtender installations
◆
R is the number of threads used for EMC Centera replication, if replication is
enabled
EMC Centera
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For example, if you plan to write to an EMC Centera cluster with four access nodes,
the cluster is dedicated to the DiskXtender installation, and replication is enabled and
uses two threads, then the optimal number of threads available for file activity is 78,
or:
(4 access nodes x 20) - 0 - 2 = 78
Then, to determine the appropriate count of active media for each media group,
divide the number of available threads by the number of media groups. For example,
if the DiskXtender installation has two extended drives, each extended drive has two
media folders, and each media folder has one EMC Centera media group, then there
are a total of four media groups that target the EMC Centera cluster:
2 drives x 2 media folders x 1 media group (each) = 4 media groups
If there are 78 available threads for the installation and you anticipate that file
migration and fetch activity will be evenly distributed among the media groups, then
divide the number of threads by the number of media groups:
78 available threads / 4 media groups = 19.5 pieces of active media
Since it is not possible to have a half of a piece of media, you may want to round up to
20 pieces of active media for each media group.
Note: In an active environment where simultaneous moves and fetches are enabled and are
likely to occur, you should divide the number of active media by two. With simultaneous
moves and fetches, two threads are used by each piece of media. “Service options for EMC
Centera” on page 54 provides details on simultaneous moves and fetches.
Fine-tuning the equation to optimize performance
The equation to determine the optimal number of available threads—and ultimately
the number of pieces of active media for each media group—does not take into
consideration the volume of file migration and file fetch activity to and from the EMC
Centera cluster at different times of the day. As a result, you may need to adjust the
DiskXtender or EMC Centera configuration to remain within the recommended
number of available threads per access node and to maximize system performance.
Consider the following tasks to fine-tune the usage of available threads:
◆
Increase the number of access nodes in the EMC Centera cluster to increase the
number of available threads. When more threads are available, determine
whether to increase the number of active media in each media group:
• If file migration dominates the communication threads, then increase the
number of active media in each media group to take advantage of the
additional threads for file migration.
• If file fetches from full media (not active media) dominate the communication
threads, then you may want to leave the same number of active media in each
media group so that the additional threads can be used for file fetches.
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◆
Schedule file migration so that it does not occupy the communication threads
when they are needed for file fetches. By default, the file migration schedule is
active at night, so that files are migrated when users typically do not fetch as
many files. You may need to customize this schedule for the environment.
◆
Reduce the number of fetch requests from media so that they do not occupy the
communication threads when they are needed for file migration. To reduce the
number of requests for files on the EMC Centera cluster, leave as much active
data on the extended drive as possible. Use DiskXtender purge rules to purge
only file data that is no longer likely to be requested.
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Deleting EMC Centera media
You can delete any piece of EMC Centera virtual media, even if you applied retention
to files that were written to the media. When you delete the media, you cannot restore
the files on the media through DiskXtender. This is because the relationships between
the file pointers used by DiskXtender and the file data on the EMC Centera device are
removed when you delete the media.
!
CAUTION
Do not delete a piece of EMC Centera media unless you are absolutely certain that
you no longer need the files on the media. If you think you might need the files,
compact the media before deleting it. Compaction writes the files on the media
back to the extended drive so that they can be migrated to another piece of media.
Before you delete a piece of media, assign a Compact media task to the media. This
task copies all migrated files and file data on the media back to the extended drive,
which prevents you from losing access to files that were written to the media.
Then, run a Format media task on the media to reclaim space on EMC Centera by
deleting the files that were written to the media. “Reclaiming deleted media space on
EMC Centera” on page 51 provides details.
Finally, ensure that the media service is online and then deallocate and delete the
media by using the File System Manager Administrator.
Reclaiming deleted media space on EMC Centera
If you no longer need the files that have been written to a piece of EMC Centera
virtual media, you can run a Format media task on the media to clear the files from
the media. The EMC Centera Garbage Collection feature then reclaims the space
made available by the deleted files.
If you have an EMC Centera GE or CE+ device, then you cannot format media if there
are retained files on the media. If you assign a Format media task to a piece of media
on a GE or CE+ device and there are retained files on the media, then the task fails
and the media goes into an error state.
If you have an EMC Centera Basic, then files can always be deleted when you format
a piece of media. This is because retention is not applied to the files on EMC Centera,
even if you set retention for the files on the extended drive.
Adding custom metadata to files on EMC Centera
If you use EMC Centera Seek and Chargeback Reporter, you can enhance reports by
adding custom metadata to each file that DiskXtender writes to EMC Centera media.
The custom metadata, along with other standardized metadata, is added to the CDF.
For example, you could add metadata to a group of files to indicate that they are
associated with a particular department in the company, such as Human Resources or
Legal.
To add custom metadata to each file stored on an EMC Centera device, specify the
metadata on the Metadata page when you create or edit an EMC Centera media
group.
EMC Centera
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Performance tuning for EMC Centera
Review the following recommendations to improve DiskXtender performance with
EMC Centera through adjustment of the configuration of media folders, media
groups, rules, file deletions, and service options.
Media folder considerations for EMC Centera
Use extra caution when you plan the directory structure and create media folders on
the extended drive. After files move to media, you cannot change the directory
structure.
Media group considerations for EMC Centera
When you create media groups, consider the following settings to optimize
DiskXtender performance with EMC Centera:
◆
Enable automatic media creation based on the number of active media in the
media group. “Creating EMC Centera media” on page 48 provides instructions.
◆
On the Options page for the media group:
• Leave the Media fill method option set to Random. This is the default setting.
It allows DiskXtender to connect to any available piece of media in the
group—and even multiple pieces of media at the same time—during file
migration, rather than filling one piece of media and then moving on to the
next one.
• Adjust the Maximum media simultaneously receiving files option as
necessary. The default value for this option is the media count threshold that
you type on the Automation page.
DiskXtender should be configured to write to as many pieces as is appropriate
for the best system efficiency. The number depends on the optimal number of
media that should receive files at any given time, as discussed in “Calculating
the optimal number of active media” on page 49.
• Leave the attributes checkboxes on the Recognize file attribute changes option
clear. This enables DiskXtender to ignore unnecessary file attribute changes
resulting from scans by system tools.
• If there are a significant number of media transactions that flush at the same
time, such as delete transactions that occur when you delete many files,
consider enabling the Prioritize fetches over media transactions option. The
option enables fetches to occur even while media transactions are in progress.
As a result, users no longer need to wait to fetch a purged file during media
transactions.
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◆
If you use EMC Centera Seek and Chargeback Reporter and you want to enhance
the reports, type custom metadata on the Metadata page for the media group, as
discussed in “Adding custom metadata to files on EMC Centera” on page 51.
◆
If you configure multi-target migration through DiskXtender and the media in
two different targets are two EMC Centera clusters, do not use EMC Centera
replication. If you use both replication and multi-target migration, the CDF for
each file may be stored on each EMC Centera cluster twice. If single-instance
storage is disabled, then the file data will also be stored on each cluster twice.
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Move rule considerations for EMC Centera
When you create move rules, consider the following settings to optimize DiskXtender
performance with EMC Centera:
◆
To prevent files on the extended drive from being edited or deleted for a certain
period of time, select a retention setting for the files on the Retention page of the
move rule wizard. The retention applies when the file qualifies for the rule.
◆
On the Settings page for the move rule, do not select the options to purge files
immediately after they are moved or to set Direct Read on the files. Instead, use
the purge recommendations in “Purge rule considerations for EMC Centera” on
page 53, and review the recommendations for when to use Direct Read in
“Reading files directly from media” on page 109.
Purge rule considerations for EMC Centera
To maintain as many access node threads available as possible, limit the number of
times that user requests for files are satisfied by having to fetch file data from the
EMC Centera. In other words, leave as much file data on the extended drive as
possible by waiting to purge files until it is absolutely necessary.
To do this, configure an age delay for the purge rule. Select the Apply rule to files of
age greater than option on the Age page of the purge rule wizard, specify the number
of days (typically 30 or 60), and then select Last access time from the drop-down list.
Also, on the Settings page of the purge rule wizard, select Do not force purges
during background scans. This option prevents files from being purged until disk
space is needed.
File deletion considerations for EMC Centera
When deleting files, consider the following to optimize DiskXtender performance
with EMC Centera:
◆
When a significant number of delete transactions are sent to the EMC Centera
device, the completion of those transactions may take a long time. During that
time, file fetches may be delayed or even canceled due to timeout issues. Consider
enabling the Prioritize fetches over media transactions option, which enables
fetches to occur even while the delete transactions are in progress. As a result,
users no longer need to wait to fetch a purged file during the transactions.
Alternatively, do not empty the DiskXtender Recycler when users are most likely
to access the system. Or, if the Recycler is disabled, do not delete a significant
number of files from the extended drive when users are most likely to access the
system.
◆
If the EMC Centera is a Basic or GE device, you can delete retained files with a
privileged delete. To perform a privileged delete through DiskXtender, use the
Privileged Delete option in the Explorer Add-ons utility.
◆
You can use delete rules and retention periods to keep files protected under
retention for a specified period of time, and then automatically delete them when
they are no longer needed. “Automatically deleting files” on page 112 provides
instructions on how to set up delete rules to automatically delete files after a
certain period of time.
EMC Centera
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Service options for EMC Centera
On the Options tab of the Service Properties dialog box, consider adjusting the
following settings to optimize DiskXtender performance with EMC Centera:
◆
For the Enable simultaneous moves and fetches option, select Enable
simultaneous moves and fetches for Centera and NAS media. By default,
simultaneous moves and fetches are disabled.
When you enable simultaneous moves and fetches, DiskXtender can both read
from and write to a single piece of media at the same time. This setting can
improve performance in an active environment where file migration is necessary
at the same time that file fetches are likely to occur.
When simultaneous moves and fetches are disabled, and a fetch request occurs
while a file is being moved, the fetch must wait until the move is complete.
◆
When DiskXtender communicates with a piece of EMC Centera media to write
files, it maintains the connection for at least 5 seconds. If necessary, you can adjust
this connection time by using the EMC Centera timeslice - minimum mount
option.
The timeslice option controls the minimum amount of time that DiskXtender
keeps virtual media mounted in a virtual drive for file moves.
For file fetches, DiskXtender maintains the connection for 1 second. You cannot
edit the file fetch connection time.
◆
If replication is enabled, decide whether DiskXtender should perform
synchronous deletion of files from all replica clusters. Synchronous deletion by
DiskXtender is necessary only if the timing of delete transaction processing on the
target clusters is important. Synchronous deletion may result in performance
degradation when you delete files from the extended drive. This is because
DiskXtender must process the deletion on all eligible clusters instead of on just
the source cluster.
To enable DiskXtender synchronous deletion, use the Enable synchronous deletes
on replicated Centeras service option. Synchronous deletion is disabled by
default.
If the timing of delete transaction processing on the target clusters is not
important, enable only the EMC Centera Replicate Delete feature. This enables
EMC Centera to process the deletion as scheduled.
Troubleshooting EMC Centera
If you encounter unexpected errors, performance issues, or access problems between
DiskXtender and EMC Centera, you can enable a log that traces EMC Centera events
for DiskXtender.
To enable the EMC Centera trace log:
1. Ensure that there is sufficient space for the log file on the system drive of the
DiskXtender server. The log increases in size by as much as 1 GB each day.
2. Use Windows Explorer to navigate to the DiskXtender bin directory,
drive:\Program Files\EMC\DiskXtender\Bin, where drive is the system drive.
3. Right-click and select New > Text Document.
4. Name the new text file Dx_EmcService.log.
5. Click Yes on the pop-up message that warns you about changing file extensions.
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6. Stop and restart the DiskXtender service.
7. After you finish troubleshooting and you no longer need the trace log, disable the
log:
a. Stop the DiskXtender service.
b. Delete the Dx_EmcService.log file.
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NAS
You can migrate files on a DiskXtender extended drive to a share on a
network-attached storage device. Consider the following best practices before you
configure the environment:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
“Creating the shares for NAS media” on page 56
“Adding a NAS media service” on page 57
“Creating and managing NAS media” on page 57
“Deleting NAS media” on page 57
“Performance tuning for NAS” on page 58
Creating the shares for NAS media
Before you add the NAS media service in the File System Manager Administrator,
prepare the shares that will be identified as NAS media. The shares must meet the
requirements listed in “NAS” on page 25.
You should also decide the appropriate number of shares to create, and ensure the
security of the shares.
Deciding how many shares to create
You can create as many as 256 shares for 256 pieces of NAS media, and each piece of
media can write to a different share on a different device.
Even if the NAS media service is writing to a single device, you should create several
partitions and shares so that you can create multiple pieces of NAS media. This is
important for the following reasons:
◆
DiskXtender performance improves when the system can write to and read from
multiple media at once. Focusing all system activity on a single piece of media
can cause a performance bottleneck.
◆
You can take advantage of the flexible file migration features available in
DiskXtender. You can migrate data from multiple media folders to different
locations (pieces of media) by using customized migration rules.
◆
More files remain available if an error or other system problem occurs. If a piece
of media becomes inaccessible (for example, as a result of a failed transaction), the
files on other pieces of media remain accessible while the inaccessible media is
offline.
The number of media you should create depends on the environment and your
tolerance for system downtime. For assistance in how to determine the number of
pieces of NAS media to create, contact EMC Professional Services.
NAS share security
Only the DiskXtender service account and any accounts required for backups should
have full access to the share that corresponds to a piece of NAS media. No other user
accounts or applications should have write access to the share.
!
CAUTION
This restriction is critical to protect the data that DiskXtender manages.
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If a user saves, edits, or deletes a file directly on the NAS share instead of through the
extended drive, the files and file tags on the extended drive are not synchronized
with the files on media. If this occurs, users receive Access Denied errors when they
attempt to open those files from the extended drive.
If the file is renamed directly on the media, the file data (or file tag, if the file is
purged) on the extended drive becomes orphaned.
Adding a NAS media service
You can configure only one NAS media service for each DiskXtender server, but you
can use multiple network shares as pieces of NAS media for that media service.
Use the File System Manager Administrator to create the NAS media service. There
are no options to configure for the media service. “Creating and managing NAS
media” on page 57 provides guidance on creating the media for the media service.
Creating and managing NAS media
NAS media is considered "virtual" media because it does not correspond directly to a
specific piece of media (like a tape cartridge). However, it does correspond to a
specific location (the share) on a magnetic drive.
When you create NAS media for the NAS media service, you specify:
◆
The path to the network share.
◆
Descriptive information about the media, which appears in the File System
Manager Administrator to identify the media.
◆
The type of NAS media. In most cases, this is Standard NAS.
Note: Aggregate NAS media is intended only when the share is a media folder on another
DiskXtender extended drive as part of a tiered migration strategy. Retained NAS media is
for a standard share on a retention-capable NAS device, such as a Celerra Network Server
with the File Level Retention (FLR) file system and Network Appliance (NetApp) NAS
devices with SnapLock software.
After you create the media, allocate the media to the extended drive and add the
media to a media group to make it available for file migration.
Deleting NAS media
Before you delete a piece of NAS media, you must remove the media from its media
group. During this process, you have the choice of whether to remove the files on the
media from the extended drive or to copy the files back to the extended drive:
◆
To copy the files on the media back to the extended drive and move the files to
other media, compact the media. The media is automatically removed from the
media group during compaction.
◆
To remove the files on the media from the extended drive altogether, simply
remove the media from the media group.
Finally, ensure that the media service is online and then deallocate and delete the
media by using the File System Manager Administrator.
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The files remain on the NAS share when you remove it from the system. DiskXtender
does not delete the files even when you remove the association between DiskXtender
“media” and the NAS share.
Performance tuning for NAS
Review the following recommendations to improve DiskXtender performance with
NAS through the adjustment of the configuration of media folders, media groups,
rules, file deletions, and service options.
Media folder considerations for NAS
If you use Aggregate NAS or Retained NAS, use extra caution when you plan the
directory structure and create media folders on the extended drive. When you use
Aggregate NAS or Retained NAS, folder renames are not allowed on the extended
drive. After files move to media, you cannot change the directory structure.
As a result, do not use Aggregate NAS or Retained NAS if you plan to archive files
that change frequently, such as user home directories.
Media group considerations for NAS
When you create media groups, consider the following settings on the Options page
for the media group to optimize DiskXtender performance with NAS:
◆
Set the Media fill method option to Random. By default, the media fill method is
set to Sequential. Setting the option to Random enables DiskXtender to connect to
any available piece of media in the group—and even multiple pieces of media at
the same time—during file migration, rather than filling one piece of media and
then moving on to the next one.
This option can improve DiskXtender performance during migration to more
than one piece of NAS media in a media group.
◆
Adjust the Maximum media simultaneously receiving files option to the total
number of media that are in the media group. This enables DiskXtender to write
to all media as necessary.
◆
Since you must manually create NAS media when it is needed, enable the Warn
when group free space falls below option so that you are notified when the NAS
media in the media group starts to run out of space. You can then configure the
warning to be sent out as an email alert.
Move rule considerations for NAS
When you create move rules, consider the following settings to optimize DiskXtender
performance with NAS:
58
◆
If you use Retained NAS, specify a retention period in days for the files on the
Retention page of the move rule wizard. You must specify a retention period of
one or more days for move rules that move files to a Retained NAS media group.
The retention applies when the file qualifies for the rule.
◆
On the Settings page of the move rule wizard, consider whether to purge files
immediately after they are moved and whether to mark them for Direct Read. To
decide, review the purge recommendations and the recommendations for when
to use Direct Read in “Purging files” on page 104.
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Purge rule considerations for NAS
File retrieval from NAS media is typically faster than from other media types. As a
result, the purge strategy you select depends on other factors in your environment,
such as the type of files on the extended drive and the volume of files that
DiskXtender manages. Review the purge recommendations in “Purging files” on
page 104 to determine an appropriate purge strategy for your environment.
File deletion considerations for NAS
If you use Retained NAS, you can use delete rules and retention periods to keep files
protected under retention for a specified period of time, and then automatically
delete them when they are no longer needed. “Automatically deleting files” on
page 112 provides instructions on how to set up delete rules to automatically delete
files after a certain period of time.
Service options for NAS
Although simultaneous move and fetch from a single piece of media is available for
the NAS media service, its use is not recommended. The Enable simultaneous moves
and fetches option on the Options tab of the Service Properties dialog box controls
this behavior. Simultaneous moves and fetches are disabled by default.
There is no performance advantage to using the feature with NAS. In addition, when
you use the feature with NAS, multiple files may be kept open at the same time,
which leaves the system more vulnerable in the event of a system failure.
Instead, leave the option disabled so that all activity to a piece of media, including
reads and writes, are serialized, or performed in a single thread. Serial media activity
prevents applications from backing up or restoring data to or from the same pieces of
media at the same time.
Note: Simultaneous moves and fetches are recommended for the EMC Centera media service.
However, the feature is a global setting; you cannot configure it differently for EMC Centera
than you do for NAS. If you use both NAS and EMC Centera, carefully weigh the performance
advantages of this feature for EMC Centera against the failure risks of using it with NAS.
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Optical and tape
You can migrate files on a DiskXtender extended drive to optical and tape devices.
Consider the following best practices before you configure the environment:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
“Installing MediaStor and adding a library” on page 60
“Setting up Sun StorageTek ACSLS” on page 61
“Adding a MediaStor or ACSLS media service” on page 62
“Managing removable media” on page 62
“Performance tuning for removable media” on page 69
Installing MediaStor and adding a library
MediaStor is a DiskXtender for Windows device management component that
manages the retrieval, mounting, and dismounting of removable media in a variety
of libraries and standalone drives.
To install MediaStor and add a library, perform the following steps:
1. Ensure that the environment meets the requirements in “System requirements”
on page 20.
2. If the operating system on the MediaStor and DiskXtender servers is Windows
Server 2008, then install two Microsoft hotfixes on both servers:
• The first hotfix is required to resolve a memory leak that occurs with Windows
Server 2008 during an RPC client callback function, which is used when
DiskXtender and MediaStor communicate to perform media management
tasks. To obtain the hotfix, contact Microsoft Support and reference KB article
949887.
• The second hotfix is required to resolve a truncated registry entry that
DiskXtender and MediaStor use to retrieve device type information. To obtain
the hotfix, look up KB article 953390 the Microsoft website.
The hotfixes should be incorporated in a future Windows Server 2008 service
pack.
3. Check the Powerlink website for updates to the release notes for this release.
Review the release notes.
4. Create a service account and long on to the server with the account. The service
account must meet the following requirements:
• Be a member of the Administrators group on the server
• Have the Log on as a service right
Note: It might be necessary to assign the Act as part of operating system right to the service
account if the service fails to log on to the server after the installation.
5. Run the MediaStor setup wizard and select Install new product.
You can install MediaStor to multiple servers at the same time if you select the
servers on the Target Computers page of the wizard.
6. Check the Powerlink website for any patches to this release. Download the
patches and install them, if necessary, by using the instructions in the patch
documentation.
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7. Confirm that all hardware is properly configured, specifically SCSI devices:
a. Ensure that all devices and the SCSI adapter are properly terminated.
b. Power on all SCSI devices before starting Microsoft Windows.
c. Install any necessary drivers for the devices.
d. Test access to the devices through Microsoft Windows.
8. If you are adding an iSCSI library, configure an iSCSI HBA or the Microsoft iSCSI
Initiator when using a LAN card, and configure the port in the device.
9. If you are adding a tape library with automatic drive cleaning capability, disable
the automatic drive cleaning function for the library.
10. Open the MediaStor Administrator, right-click the Hardware node, and select
New to launch the Hardware Wizard.
Refer to the MediaStor Administrator online help for details on proceeding
through the pages of the wizard.
11. Restart the server.
12. Perform a drive configuration test to determine if the order of the library drives in
the configuration is correct:
a. Set the library offline.
b. Right-click the library and select Modify.
c. Proceed through the pages of the Hardware Wizard until you reach the
Library Drives page.
d. Click Test Config.
13. Set the library online, selecting the option to perform a full inventory of the
library.
Setting up Sun StorageTek ACSLS
If you have already invested in Sun StorageTek Automated Cartridge System Library
Software (ACSLS), you can use DiskXtender to migrate files from a Microsoft
Windows server to tape media in libraries managed by the ACSLS server.
To set up Sun StorageTek ACSLS for use with DiskXtender:
1. Use SCSI cables to physically connect the DiskXtender server and the library
drives that DiskXtender should use.
2. Install and configure ACSLS and configure the library as described in the Sun
StorageTek documentation, including access control privileges.
3. In the ACSSS Command Processor Window, gather identifier and drive
information for the drives that are connected to the DiskXtender server.
4. In the Registry Editor on the DiskXtender server, gather and construct the device
names for the drives.
Optical and tape
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5. If the operating system on the DiskXtender server is Windows Server 2008,
perform the following steps:
a. Make an exception in the Windows firewall to enable LibAttach to
communicate properly with the ACSLS server. The LibAttach 1.4.2 and
Windows Server 2008 — Firewall Configuration document, available on the Sun
website at www.sun.com, provides instructions on how to add LibAttach as
an exception program for the Windows firewall.
b. Install two Microsoft hotfixes on the DiskXtender server:
– The first hotfix is required to resolve a memory leak that occurs with
Windows Server 2008 during an RPC client callback function, which is
used when DiskXtender and MediaStor communicate to perform media
management tasks. To obtain the hotfix, contact Microsoft Support and
reference KB article 949887.
– The second hotfix is required to resolve a truncated registry entry that
DiskXtender and MediaStor use to retrieve device type information. To
obtain the hotfix, look up KB article 953390 the Microsoft website.
Both hotfixes should be incorporated in a future Windows Server 2008 service
pack.
Adding a MediaStor or ACSLS media service
When you create a MediaStor media service in the File System Manager
Administrator, you specify the name of the server on which MediaStor is installed.
After you create the media service, all of the media in the hardware that is connected
to the MediaStor server is listed for the media service in the File System Manager
Administrator and is available for allocation to an extended drive, as long as the
media is not allocated already to a different extended drive.
When you create an ACSLS media service, you confirm the ACSLS configuration and
add drive information for the tape library drives that are connected to the
DiskXtender server.
Managing removable media
The following steps detail the lifecycle process for removable media:
1. Insert the media into the hardware device by using the instructions from the
hardware manufacturer.
If you use MediaStor, some libraries support the Insert Library Media function
available in MediaStor.
2. Allocate the media to the extended drive:
• If you use MediaStor, use either the File System Manager Administrator or
the MediaStor Administrator.
• If you use ACSLS, use ACSLS to assign ownership of a range of media to the
extended drive.
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3. Ensure that the media is formatted with a supported file system and labeled:
• If the media is blank, format and label the media.
• If the media has already been formatted with a supported file system, label the
media.
• If the media has been formatted with a file system that is not supported,
reformat the media and then label it.
“Formatting and labeling removable media” on page 64 provides details.
4. Add the media to a media group.
Note: To add DVD-ROM media to the system and make the files available on the extended
drive, create a standard media group and select DVD-R as the media type for the group.
5. DiskXtender moves files to the media until the media is considered full.
6. The full media remains in the media group. This enables continued access to the
files on the media.
7. (Optional) If the media is formatted with the UDF file system and it becomes
corrupt, attempt to repair the media with a Check Disk media task. “Repairing
corrupt media” on page 66 provides details.
8. (Optional) To reuse the media—for example, because of an excessive amount of
wasted space on the media—compact and reformat the media. “Reusing media”
on page 66 provides details.
9. If the media is DVD-R, finalize the media when it becomes full to stabilize the
media and purge the files from the extended drive. “Finalizing DVD-R media” on
page 68 provides details.
10. (Optional) If you no longer need the files that have been migrated to the media, or
if you want to move the files to a different piece or type of media, remove the
media from the media group. There are two ways to remove media from a media
group:
• To copy the files on the media back to the extended drive and move the files to
other media, compact the media. The media is automatically removed from
the media group during compaction.
• To remove the files on the media from the extended drive altogether, simply
remove the media from the media group.
11. (Optional) Deallocate the media from the extended drive, and delete it from the
media service.
12. (Optional) Remove the media from the hardware device.
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Formatting and labeling removable media
Review the following topics for best practices to format and label media:
◆
◆
◆
◆
“Supported file systems” on page 64
“Deciding whether to format or label media” on page 64
“Choosing a format and label method” on page 65
“Low-level SCSI format” on page 66
Supported file systems
DiskXtender can write files to and read files from removable media that is formatted
with either the OTG file system or the UDF file system. Table 9 on page 64 lists the file
systems that DiskXtender supports for each type of media.
Table 9
File system support by media type
Media type
Supported file systems
DVD-R
UDF
DVD-RAM
• OTG
• UDF
Magneto-optical (MO)
• OTG
• UDF
MO WORM
• OTG
• UDF
Tape
OTG
Tape-WORM
OTG
UDO (UDO1, UDO2)
• OTG
• UDF
UDO WORM (UDO1 WORM, UDO2 WORM))
• OTG
• UDF
Note: DiskXtender can only read DVD-ROM if the media is formatted with the UDF file
system. DVD-ROM must be created in another system. DiskXtender cannot write to
DVD-ROM.
In general, if media portability (the ability to read from and write to media outside of
DiskXtender) is a concern, choose the UDF file system. In addition, there are some
operations (deletions, renaming of files and directories, and file attribute changes)
that are allowed for media with one file system but not the other. The DiskXtender
administration guide lists file and folder behavior based on the file system.
Deciding whether to format or label media
After you insert media into a hardware device and allocate it to an extended drive,
the File System Manager Administrator helps you to determine whether the media
needs to be formatted or labeled. The allocated media appears under a node in the
Available Media tree based on the status of the media.
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Table 10 on page 65 lists the status of the media, depending on the Available Media
tree node under which it is listed.
Table 10
Status of media in the Available Media tree
Available Media
tree node
Media status
Required steps for the media
Original
Media has been formatted and
labeled.
Add the media to a media group for file migration and file
fetches.
Copy
Media is a copy of a piece of
original media, with the same data
but a different serial number.
DiskXtender updates the media as necessary to ensure
that it matches the original. The copy can be promoted to
an original if the original becomes unreadable.
Duplicate
Media has the same serial number
as another piece of media.
The presence of duplicate media likely indicates a
problem in the system. Contact EMC Customer Service
by using the Powerlink website for assistance.
Blank
Media has been formatted but not
yet labeled.
Label the media to make it a piece of original media, or
label it as a copy of a piece of original media. You can
also reformat the media.
Note: DiskXtender automatically inventories new MO
WORM media as blank media for the OTG file system.
You can only format new MO WORM media if you want to
use the UDF file system.
Foreign
Media has been formatted for a file
system that is not supported for
that media type, or the media was
inserted in a library with a different
drive type.
If the media was formatted and written to by DiskXtender
in a different library with a different drive type selected,
then remove the media from the current library and
reinsert it into the original library.
If DiskXtender supports the type of media and you are
sure that the media was formatted and written to outside
of DiskXtender, then format foreign media with a
supported file system, and then label the media.
Unknown
DiskXtender does not recognize
the media.
The problem could be an unsupported media type or an
unsupported file system. Ensure that the media type is
supported, and format the media with a supported file
system. Then label the media.
Unformatted
Media is not formatted.
Format and label the media.
Corrupt
DiskXtender recognizes the media
but cannot use it because of
problems with the media itself.
Media corruption most often occurs as a result of a power
failure while files are being written to the media. Perform
a Check Disk media task on the media to attempt to find
and repair the errors.
Choosing a format and label method
There are several ways to format and label media in DiskXtender. The most efficient
method depends on the status of the media and the number of media that need to be
formatted and labeled.
◆
To format and label multiple pieces of unformatted media at once, use the Media
Prepare Manager.
Note: The Media Prepare Manager is only available for media in a library configured
through the MediaStor media service.
◆
To format and label a single piece of unformatted media, assign the Format and
Label media tasks to the media.
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Media Management
◆
To format but not label a single piece or multiple pieces of unformatted media,
assign a Format media task to the media. You can then enable automatic labeling
of the media through a media group, or you can label the media individually later
by assigning a Label media task.
◆
To label a single piece of blank media, assign a Label media task.
◆
To set up automatic labeling and addition of blank media to a media group, use
the Automation tab of the Media Group Properties dialog box. Media is labeled
and added to the media group when the amount of free space on media in the
group falls below a configured threshold.
Low-level SCSI format
When you format a piece of media, you must choose whether to perform a low-level
SCSI format or a quick format by selecting or clearing the Force low-level SCSI format
checkbox.
Perform a low-level SCSI format when media has repeatedly failed for the current
drive type due to media errors, or if the media is unformatted DVD-RAM that is not
pre-certified.
Perform a quick format (and leave the checkbox clear) if the media is preformatted or
if the media has been previously low-level formatted for the current drive type. A
quick format clears the file table of all pointers to files on the media, but not the actual
information on the media.
Repairing corrupt media
If media is formatted with the UDF file system and the media becomes corrupt, you
can run the Check Disk media task to attempt to repair the media. Corrupt media is
listed in the Corrupt node of the Available Media tree in the File System Manager
Administrator.
For MO, MO WORM, UDO, UDO WORM, and DVD-RAM media formatted with the
OTG file system, the Check Disk media task performs a scan of DiskXtender file tags.
Reusing media
To ensure the most efficient use of media, you may want to eliminate wasted space on
the media by compacting and reformatting the media. The following topics provide
best practices:
◆
◆
◆
“When media reuse is necessary” on page 66
“Understanding the media reuse process” on page 67
“Automatically reusing media” on page 68
When media reuse is necessary
DiskXtender writes files sequentially to most removable media types. When you edit
a file on the extended drive that has been written sequentially to rewritable media,
DiskXtender does not "go back" to edit the file data on the media. Instead, when a
migrated file is edited, the file is written as a new file to the next blank area on the
media, and the file tag on the extended drive is updated to point to the new file. The
old file data still remains on the media, but is orphaned. This is true for DVD-RAM,
MO, UDO, and tape media.
Similarly, when you delete a file that has been written sequentially to these media
types, the file and its data are only deleted from the extended drive and are not
removed from the media. Deleting the file on the extended drive removes the file tag,
which contains the location information for the file on the media. Without the file tag,
DiskXtender can no longer track that file on the media (even though the data is still
there), and the file is orphaned.
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The only exception to this is when a file is renamed on rewritable media. In that case,
the file trailer on the rewritable media, where the filename is kept, is updated to
reflect the new filename.
The space taken up by older versions of files and deleted files is wasted space on the
media. “Understanding the media reuse process” on page 67 provides details on how
to reuse the media and minimize the amount of wasted space.
Understanding the media reuse process
You can reclaim this wasted space on media and use the media more efficiently. To
reuse media:
1. Return all valid versions of files to the extended drive through compaction.
2. Rewrite the files to another piece of media.
3. Reformat the media.
4. Write new files to the media.
When you compact a piece of media, DiskXtender evaluates each file on the media. If
there is a file tag on the extended drive for a file on the piece of media, the file data is
copied back to the extended drive and the migration information for the file is
removed. In this way, the file appears as if it has never been migrated to media.
!
IMPORTANT
If you allow folder renames on media that does not support folder renames, do not
compact the media. Data loss might occur because DiskXtender does not find the
corresponding file tags on the extended drive, so the files are not copied back to
the drive.
DiskXtender then evaluates the file against configured move rules. Because the files
have already been written to media once, they usually qualify for migration as soon
as they are copied back to the extended drive. This means that the files are migrated
back to media as soon as the file migration schedule is active (and a background scan
occurs, if an age delay is configured for the assigned move rules).
When DiskXtender finishes evaluating each file on a piece of media during
compaction, the media is automatically removed from the media group to which it is
assigned. The media can then be reformatted, labeled, and assigned to a media group.
This enables DiskXtender to begin migrating new files to the media.
Note: You can compact other removable media types, including DVD-R, MO WORM, UDO
WORM, and tape-WORM. However, you cannot reformat those media types. After the files are
copied back to the extended drive through compaction and the media is removed from its
media group, it remains assigned to the extended drive. The files also remain on the media.
You can deallocate the media and remove it from the system. If you add the media to a media
group again instead, the files are restored—again—to the extended drive, and DiskXtender
continues to write files to the media from the point at which it last stopped. As a result, you
cannot reuse these media types.
You can configure DiskXtender to automatically reuse media based on the amount of
wasted space on the media. You can also monitor the media by using DiskXtender
reports, and then manually perform the steps to reuse the media at the appropriate
time.
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Automatically reusing media
If you use DVD-RAM, MO, UDO, or tape media in a device configured as part of a
MediaStor media service, then configure DiskXtender to automatically compact a
piece of media, reformat it, re-label it, and re-add it to a media group. This automatic
reuse occurs based on the percentage of wasted space on the media, and is configured
by using the automation features on the Automation page for the media group,
which are illustrated in Figure 3 on page 68.
Figure 3
Media group automation options for removable media
After the automatic compaction, media is reformatted with the same file system that
was originally on the media. It is then labeled based on the configured label
specifications, and added to the same media group.
Finalizing DVD-R media
After you finish writing files to a piece of DVD-R media, finalize the media.
Finalization is a process of "closing" the media, which makes it read-only and
prevents DiskXtender from writing any more files to it.
Finalizing media makes the media more stable, better protecting the data on the
media. It also enables the media to be removed from the DiskXtender system and
read on a computer with the Windows XP, Windows 2003, or Windows Server 2008
operating system.
When you finalize media, the files on the media can be purged from the extended
drive. Files are not purged until the media is finalized because of the potential
instability of unfinalized media.
To ease the maintenance burden of monitoring the system to determine when media
is full, set up automatic finalization of full media through the media group options.
DiskXtender can automatically finalize DVD-R media when it is marked as full.
Media is marked as full automatically when it reaches the free space threshold
configured on the Mark media full when free space falls below option on the Options
page for a media group. By default, this threshold is 1 MB.
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Use the Auto-finalize DVD+/-R media after marking full option, also available on the
Options page for media groups, to automatically assign the Finalize media task to
media in the media group after the media reaches the free space threshold. You can
also choose whether to automatically purge all files on the media after it has been
finalized, as well as whether to mark the files for Direct Read.
Note: If you do not automatically purge the files after the media is finalized, the files are
purged according to configured purge rules.
If you have copies of the media, DiskXtender automatically finalizes the copy after it
is updated. DiskXtender recognizes that the original is finalized, and therefore no
more updates are made to the original, meaning that no more updates are made to
the copy.
Performance tuning for removable media
Review the following recommendations to improve DiskXtender performance with
removable media by adjusting the configuration of media folders, media groups,
rules, file deletions, and service options.
Media folder considerations for removable media
Use extra caution when you plan the directory structure and create media folders on
the extended drive. With some types of removable media, folder renames are not
allowed on the extended drive. After files are moved to media, you cannot change the
directory structure.
Media group considerations for removable media
When you create media groups, consider the following settings to optimize
DiskXtender performance with removable media:
◆
To create a media group for DVD-ROM media, select DVD-R as the media type.
◆
To automatically label media and add it to the media group as space is needed,
enable automatic labeling on the Automation page for the media group.
◆
To automatically compact media based on wasted space on the media, enable
automatic compaction on the Automation page for the media group.
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◆
Table 11
On the Options page for the media group, review, and if necessary, adjust the
options in Table 11 on page 70.
Media group options for removable media
Option
Description
Library mount - minimum
number of files
This option controls the minimum number of files that must be on the move list
before the media in the media group is mounted for file writes. The default value is
one file.
In an environment where files are written slowly to the extended drive, you may
want to increase this value to ensure that media is not mounted until there are at
least a few files that need to be written.
This setting only controls whether DiskXtender requests the media be mounted
specifically for media writes. If the media is already mounted when the file moves
are activated, DiskXtender attempts to write to the media regardless of the number
of files on the move list.
Media fill method
Leave the media fill method set to sequential to fill media one at a time in the order
they appear in the tree view of the File System Manager Administrator or on the
Items tab of the Media Group Properties dialog box.
Sequential fill is designed to maximize file retrieval times for library media.
Auto-finalize DVD+/-R
media after marking full
If you use DVD-R, this option controls whether you automatically finalize a piece of
media after it is marked as full. Media is automatically marked full when the amount
of free space falls below 1 MB, as configured on the Mark media full when free
space falls below option for media groups.
If you do not automatically finalize full media, you must manually assign a Finalize
media task to the media to finalize it.
“Finalizing DVD-R media” on page 68 provides details.
Purge files after
auto-finalizing media
If you choose to automatically finalize DVD-R media when it is full, you can
automatically purge all files on the media from the extended drive after the media is
finalized.
You should only purge files automatically after finalization if it is likely they will no
longer be accessed. If users are likely to continue accessing the files on the
finalized media, then you should configure purge rules instead to purge the files
when they are no longer being used.
Note: Even if you enable automatic purging of files after finalization, you should still
configure purge rules. If a purged file is fetched from finalized media, it cannot be
purged again unless it qualifies for a purge rule.
Direct read files after
auto-finalizing media
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If you choose to automatically purge files after DVD-R is automatically finalized,
then you can also mark those files for Direct Read. Direct Read is strongly
discouraged in most environments.
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Move rule considerations for removable media
When you create move rules, consider the following settings to optimize DiskXtender
performance with removable media:
◆
With removable media, it is often best to set up an age restriction from last write
time in the move rule. This limits the number of times frequently changing files
are written and rewritten to the media.
◆
On the Settings page for the move rule, do not select the options to purge files
immediately after they are moved or to set Direct Read on the files. Instead,
configure purging based on the age of the file or other criteria by using purge
rules.
◆
If you use DVD-R, the Purge files immediately after move and Mark files for
direct read options on the move rule Settings page are dimmed because you
cannot purge files until the media is finalized.
Purge rule considerations for removable media
When you create purge rules, consider the following settings to optimize
DiskXtender performance with removable media:
◆
Because access to files on library media can be slower than other media types,
limit the number of times that user requests for files are satisfied by having to
fetch file data from the media. In other words, leave as much file data on the
extended drive as possible by waiting to purge files until it is absolutely
necessary.
To do this, configure an age delay for the purge rule. Select the Apply rule to files
of age greater than option on the Age page of the purge rule wizard, specify the
number of days (typically 30 or 60), and then select Last access time from the list
box.
Also, on the Settings page of the purge rule wizard, select Do not force purges
during background scans. This option prevents files from being purged until
disk space is needed.
◆
If you use DVD-R, you cannot purge files until the media they are written to is
finalized. The Finalize media task and the media group auto-finalization
functions both enable you to purge files when the media is finalized. If you do not
choose to purge files as a function of finalization, the data for those files remains
on the extended drive until the files qualify for configured purge rules. Then it is
the selections made in the purge rules that determine when the files are purged
from the extended drive.
Note: Even if you enable automatic purging of files after finalization, you should still
configure purge rules. If a purged file is fetched from finalized media, it cannot be purged
again unless it qualifies for a purge rule.
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File deletion considerations for removable media
When you delete files, consider the following to optimize DiskXtender performance
with removable media:
◆
When you delete a file from the extended drive, the type of media and the file
system on the media control whether the file is deleted from the media.
DiskXtender can successfully delete files from DVD-RAM, MO, and UDO media
formatted with the UDF file system.
With the media types in the following list, however, DiskXtender cannot delete
the file from media:
•
•
•
•
•
DVD-R and DVD-ROM
DVD-RAM formatted with the OTG file system
MO WORM and UDO WORM
MO and UDO formatted with the OTG file system
Tape and tape-WORM
Instead, the file is marked for deletion. It still exists on the media, but it becomes
an orphaned file and is no longer recognized or tracked by DiskXtender.
The deleted files are not actually removed from the media unless the media is
compacted and reformatted. You can reformat DVD-RAM, MO, UDO, and tape
media.
◆
When a significant number of delete transactions are sent to removable media in a
library, the completion of those transactions may take a long time. During that
time, file fetches may be delayed or even canceled due to timeout issues. Do not
empty the DiskXtender Recycler when users are most likely to access the system.
Or, if the Recycler is disabled, do not delete a significant number of files from the
extended drive when users are most likely to access the system.
Service options for removable media
On the Options tab of the Service Properties dialog box, consider adjusting the
settings listed in Table 12 on page 72 to optimize DiskXtender performance with
removable media.
Table 12
72
Service options for optical and tape media
Media type
Options
DVD-R, DVD-RAM, and DVD-ROM
•
•
•
•
DVD - drive saver
DVD timeslice - minimum mount
DVD timeslice - last fetch
DVD timeslice - maximum mount
MO, UDO, MO WORM, and UDO WORM
•
•
•
•
Optical drive saver
Optical timeslice - minimum mount
Optical timeslice - last fetch
Optical timeslice - maximum mount
Tape
•
•
•
•
•
Tape timeslice - minimum mount
Tape timeslice - last fetch
Tape timeslice - maximum mount
Tape block size default value
Use hardware compression
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The options apply at the service level. This means that you cannot customize the
option for each media service. For example, if you configure multiple MediaStor
media services with different DVD libraries connected to each, the drive saver setting
applies for all of them.
Drive saver
The drive saver options enable you to specify how long DiskXtender waits after
media becomes inactive before it automatically spins down the media. The default
value is 5 minutes.
Automatically spinning down media means that the media is still mounted but lies
idle until the media is requested by DiskXtender or dismounted.
Timeslice - minimum mount
The minimum mount timeslice options enable you to specify the minimum amount
of time DiskXtender keeps removable media in a drive after it has been mounted.
This means that the media is mounted for at least the amount of time you specify.
DiskXtender does not automatically dismount the media, and you cannot dismount
the media before the time limit is up.
For DVD and optical media, the default value is 30 seconds. For tape media, the
default value is 300 seconds.
Timeslice - last fetch
The last fetch timeslice options enable you to specify the amount of time removable
media must remain mounted in a drive after DiskXtender has fetched data from that
media.
This means that the media is not dismounted immediately after a fetch. Instead,
DiskXtender waits at least the entered amount of time before dismounting the media.
For DVD and optical media, the default value is 5 seconds. For tape media, the
default value is 60 seconds.
Timeslice - maximum mount
The maximum mount timeslice options enable you to limit the amount of time that
removable media can stay mounted in a drive if it is inactive and has no pending
fetches, and if there is other media that has pending fetches.
This enables DiskXtender to dismount inactive media in favor of other media that is
being requested.
The default value for DVD and optical media is 60 seconds. The default value for tape
media is 1,200 seconds.
Tape block size default value
The tape block size default value enables you to configure the size settings
DiskXtender uses to format tape and tape-WORM media.
The value you use dictates the default block size of tape and tape-WORM media that
DiskXtender uses to format the media when the Media Prepare Manager or the
Format media task are run.
The default value is 64 KB.
Use hardware compression
If a tape hardware device supports data compression, you can configure DiskXtender
to compress data with the Use hardware compression option.
Data compression enables DiskXtender to store data in a format that requires less
space than usual.
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IBM Tivoli Storage Manager
If you use IBM Tivoli Storage Manager (TSM) as a data storage or data backup
system, you can migrate files on a DiskXtender extended drive to the TSM server.
TSM can subsequently move the files to storage devices managed by the TSM server.
Consider the following best practices before you configure the environment:
◆
◆
◆
◆
“Installing TSM and adding a TSM media service” on page 74
“Creating TSM media” on page 74
“Deleting TSM media” on page 75
“Performance tuning for TSM media” on page 75
Installing TSM and adding a TSM media service
Perform the following steps to install TSM and add a TSM media service:
1. Install and configure TSM Server.
2. Install the TSM Backup/Archive Client on the DiskXtender server, and set the
Allow Backup Delete option to Yes.
3. Copy the dsm.opt file from the BACLIENT subdirectory of the TSM client
installation directory to the BIN subdirectory of the DiskXtender installation
directory, and edit the copied file to include the IP address of the TSM server and
the client nodename configured on the TSM server for DiskXtender. In addition,
type the word “prompt” for the passwordaccess field.
4. Stop and restart the DiskXtender service to enable the changes to take effect.
5. When you add the TSM media service in the File System Manager Administrator,
you specify the options file that identifies the TSM server to connect to with this
media service and the client password that the DiskXtender service uses to log on
to the TSM client defined in the dsm.opt file.
Creating TSM media
TSM media is considered "virtual" media because it does not correspond directly to a
specific piece of media, like a tape cartridge. Instead, the virtual media is designed to
simulate divisions of a TSM server and corresponds to a filespace on the TSM server.
Using virtual media enables you to take advantage of the flexible file migration
features available in DiskXtender.
You can create as many pieces of TSM media for a media service as you want, up to
the DiskXtender limit of 512 pieces of media. This maximum number may be further
limited by the number of client sessions allowed by settings on the TSM server.
Even if the TSM media service writes to a single TSM server, create multiple pieces of
TSM media. This is important for the following reasons:
74
◆
DiskXtender performance improves when the system can write to and read from
multiple pieces of media at once. Focusing all system activity on a single piece of
media can cause a performance bottleneck.
◆
You can take advantage of the flexible file migration features available in
DiskXtender. You can migrate data from multiple media folders to different
locations (pieces of media) with customized migration rules.
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◆
More files remain available if an error or other system problem occurs. If a piece
of media becomes inaccessible (for example, as a result of a failed transaction), the
files on other pieces of media remain accessible while the inaccessible media is
offline.
The number of media to create depends on the environment and your tolerance for
system downtime. There must be at least one piece of media for each media folder on
the extended drive.
For assistance in determining how many pieces of TSM media to create, contact EMC
Professional Services.
After you create the media, you must allocate the media to an extended drive and
add it to a media group to make the media available for file migration.
Deleting TSM media
If necessary, you can delete a piece of virtual TSM media. When you delete the media,
you can never restore the files on the media through DiskXtender. The filespace on
the TSM server, as well as the files in the filespace, are deleted when you delete the
media from DiskXtender.
!
CAUTION
Do not delete a piece of TSM media unless you are absolutely certain that you no
longer need the files on the media. If you think you might need the files, compact
the media before you delete it. Compaction writes the files on the media back to
the extended drive so that they can be migrated to another piece of media.
Performance tuning for TSM media
Review the following recommendations to improve DiskXtender performance with
TSM by adjusting the configuration of media folders, media groups, rules, and
service options.
Media folder considerations for TSM
You can rename and delete folders on the extended drive when you migrate files to
TSM. As a result, you have a considerable amount of flexibility as you create the
directory structure on the extended drive.
However, keep in mind that you cannot move files and folders outside their original
media folder. As a result, use caution when you designate media folders.
Media group considerations for TSM
When you create media groups, consider the following settings on the Options page
for the media group to optimize DiskXtender performance with TSM:
◆
Set the Media fill method option to Random. By default, the media fill method is
set to Sequential. Setting the option to Random enables DiskXtender to connect to
any available piece of media in the group—and even multiple pieces of media at
the same time—during file migration, rather than filling one piece of media and
then moving on to the next one.
This option can improve DiskXtender performance when writing to more than
one piece of TSM media in a media group.
IBM Tivoli Storage Manager
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◆
Adjust the Maximum media simultaneously receiving files option to the total
number of media that are in the media group. This enables DiskXtender to write
to all media as necessary.
◆
Since you must manually create TSM media when it is needed, enable the Warn
when group free space falls below option so that you are notified when the TSM
media in the media group is starting to run out of space. You can then configure
the warning to be sent out as an email alert.
Move rule and purge rule considerations for TSM
File migration and retrieval from TSM media is typically faster than from other media
types. As a result, the file migration and purge strategy you select depends on other
factors in the environment, such as the type of files on the extended drive and the
volume of files that DiskXtender is managing. Review the recommendations in
Chapter 5, “File Management,” to determine appropriate migration and purge
strategies for the environment.
Service options for TSM
When DiskXtender communicates with a TSM server to write files, it maintains the
connection for at least 5 seconds. If necessary, you can adjust this connection time by
using the TSM timeslice - minimum mount option on the Options tab of the Service
Properties dialog box.
The timeslice option controls the minimum amount of time that DiskXtender keeps
virtual media mounted in a virtual drive for file moves. You can mount virtual media
in as many as 256 virtual drives at one time. If that number is exceeded, the
additional mount requests are queued. The requests are then serviced as media is
dismounted from the other virtual drives and the drives become available.
For file fetches, DiskXtender maintains the connection for 1 second. You cannot edit
the file fetch connection time.
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Cloud media
The cloud storage can be used as a data archival system or data storage and files can
be migrated from the DiskXtender extended drive onto the cloud. You can configure
cloud storage as a media service in DiskXtender and manage the cloud media
through various rules.
DiskXtender can be used to migrate files to cloud storage which serves as a back-end
media. Similarly, files can be fetched from the cloud media back to the primary
storage using DiskXtender.
DiskXtender currently works only with EMC Atmos, the cloud storage infrastructure
from EMC.
Consider the following best practices before you configure the environment:
◆
◆
◆
◆
“Adding the cloud media service” on page 77
“Creating cloud media” on page 77
“Removing cloud media from the system” on page 78
“Performance tuning for cloud media” on page 78
Adding the cloud media service
You can add the cloud storage as a media service and manage it through
DiskXtender. Files can be moved to the cloud storage by configuring Move rules, and
can be retrieved when required.
Both private and public cloud storage can be configured to work with DiskXtender.
Private or in-premises cloud network is an internal network which is installed and
managed within an organization. Before configuring DiskXtender with a private
cloud network, ensure you have obtained the hostname or an alias name of the cloud
service, subtenant ID, user ID, and the shared secret from the Atmos administrator. A
Public cloud connection is the cloud infrastructure which is used by the organization,
but managed by an external service provider. Obtain the token ID and shared secret
from the Atmos online administrator before configuring DiskXtender with the cloud
storage.
While configuring a private cloud service, providing hostnames of multiple access
nodes will ensure better performance. Multiple nodes facilitate load balancing, and
access to files will, thus be faster. If you are specifying the IP address of the nodes,
provide the IP address without ‘http’ or ‘https’ preceding the address.
Creating cloud media
Because cloud is a highly scalable media, the storage capacity of which can be
increased with requirements, it makes sense to have only one virtual cloud media per
media group. When you create a piece of virtual cloud media, it initially is created
with a size of 256 GB, but it dynamically expands with the data.
Before creating the cloud media, ensure that the cloud media service is online. Once
the cloud media as well as the extended drive are created, you can allocate the media
to the extended drive. If you have created media folders and media groups, add the
media to a media group.
You can also add cloud media to a multi-target group and migrate data from other
media to the cloud storage.
Cloud media
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Removing cloud media from the system
If necessary, you can delete the virtual cloud media. When you delete the media, you
will never be able to restore the files on the media through DiskXtender. Make sure
you no longer need the files on the cloud media, before deleting the piece of media
from DiskXtender.
Performance tuning for cloud media
Review the following recommendations for improving DiskXtender performance
with cloud media by adjusting the configuration of media folders, media groups,
rules, and service options.
Media service considerations for cloud media
When configuring media services with multiple access nodes, it is recommended that
the multiple nodes are geographically co-located. This is because, all the nodes
participate equally while data is being migrated from DiskXtender to the cloud
media; and physical distance between the nodes will hamper the performance.
Media folder considerations for cloud media
If you have a media folder which has a media group containing cloud media, folder
renames are not allowed on the extended drive. Ensure you plan the directory
structure well and create media folders accordingly. After files are moved to media,
you cannot change the directory structure.
Media group considerations for cloud media
For the Enable simultaneous moves and fetches option, select Enable simultaneous
moves and fetches for EMC Centera, NAS media, and cloud media. By default,
simultaneous moves and fetches are disabled.
When you enable simultaneous moves and fetches, DiskXtender can both read from
and write to a single piece of media at the same time. This setting can improve
performance in an active environment where file migration is necessary at the same
time that file fetches are likely to occur.
When simultaneous moves and fetches are disabled, and a fetch request occurs while
a file is being moved, the fetch must wait until the move is complete.
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Extended Drive
Management
The following topics provide best practices for creating and managing a DiskXtender
for Windows extended drive:
◆
◆
◆
◆
Creating an extended drive .........................................................................................
Creating media folders .................................................................................................
Background scans..........................................................................................................
Virus scans......................................................................................................................
Extended Drive Management
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Creating an extended drive
Before you extend a drive in DiskXtender, ensure that the drive meets the
requirements listed in “Extended drive requirements” on page 23. As you create the
extended drive, consider adjusting the schedules and enabling indexing. In most
cases, you should not configure metadata exports or change the defaults for the
extended drive options.
Extended drive schedules
On the Settings page of the extended drive wizard, verify and set the schedules for
file migration, media task processing, copy media updates, and file fetches.
The file migration, media task, and copy media update schedules are active daily
between 8 P.M. and 9 A.M. by default. The file fetch schedule is active 24 hours a day,
7 days a week.
!
IMPORTANT
The default settings for these schedules mean that files are not moved to media
except between 8 P.M. and 9 A.M. If you configure DiskXtender during the day and
then force a background scan, files are added to the move list. However, they do
not move to media until the file migration schedule is active. To test a successful
configuration and verify that files are moved to media during the day, edit the file
migration, or Move Files to Media, schedule for the extended drive.
Adjust these schedules to balance the processing requirements for the DiskXtender
server. System performance decreases as the DiskXtender server is required to
manage more activities at the same time. These activities include:
◆
Users and applications saving files to the extended drive (and qualification of the
files against move and index rules)
◆
Users and applications fetching purged files from media
◆
Moving files to media
◆
Background scans
◆
Media tasks
◆
Copy media updates
◆
Backups and DiskXtender metadata exports
◆
Virus scans
Schedule file migration, media tasks, and copy media updates for the times when
users are less likely to be accessing the files on the extended drive.
Metadata exports
Also on the Settings page for an extended drive, do not configure metadata exports.
Most environments do not require extended drive metadata exports. Review the
information in “Backing up the extended drive” on page 128 to determine whether
metadata exports are necessary. If regular metadata exports are necessary, you can
configure the schedule after you create the extended drive.
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Extended drive options
On the Options page for an extended drive, leave the defaults when you create the
extended drive. As you configure the rest of the DiskXtender system, you may need
to change the defaults. You can edit the options at that time.
Extended drive indexing settings
On the Indexing page, type the Index and Search Engine (ISE) server information if
you plan to use the DiskXtender Search Module to index and search for files on the
extended drive. “Indexing files” on page 97 provides details.
Creating an extended drive
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Creating media folders
Consider the number of media folders, folder rename restrictions, and filename
length restrictions when you create media folders on the extended drive.
Number of media folders
Create a single media folder at the root of the extended drive only if:
◆
You want to manage all of the files on the extended drive.
◆
You plan to use a relatively simple file management strategy. A simple strategy
typically involves a single type of media and only one or two move rules.
Create multiple media folders to segregate the data on both the extended drive and
the storage media. By organizing the files into the media folders, you can control the
media to which files are written, as well as the migration rule that should apply to the
files. This enables you to simplify the rules for each media folder. For example, save
all files that should be migrated to one type of media in one media folder, and all files
that should be migrated to another type of media in a different media folder. Or, save
all files that should be migrated immediately in one media folder, and all files that
should be migrated after 30 days in a different media folder.
You can even create a media folder for the subdirectory of another media folder to
more precisely control how files are moved to media and otherwise managed. If you
configure these overlapping media folders, order the folders to set the priority in
which the files in the folders are evaluated against the rules assigned to each folder. If
a file is located in overlapping media folders, the file is evaluated for migration,
indexing, purge, or deletion based on the rules assigned to the media folder listed
first in the tree view of the Administrator.
Consider folder rename restrictions
If you use a type of media that does not allow folder renames, such as EMC Centera
or removable media formatted with the OTG file system, then use extra caution when
you plan the directory structure. After files move to media, you cannot change the
directory structure.
Consider filename length restrictions
Do not use lengthy directory names, and minimize the depth of the directory
hierarchy. The full path and filename of a file on the extended drive should total no
more than 259 UTF-16 characters. Lengthy directory names can cause files to exceed
the character count that DiskXtender supports for managing the files. Files with
names that exceed the maximum character count are not moved to media.
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Background scans
Consider adjusting the background scan schedule and tuning the speed of the scan
for performance. Do not disable background scans, enable advanced scans, or set
maintenance options unless you are troubleshooting or performing special
maintenance tasks on the extended drive.
Background scan schedule
By default, background scans run daily, starting at midnight. The background scan
continues until it has evaluated each file on the drive. If necessary, you can adjust the
background scan schedule to balance the processing requirements for the
DiskXtender server. System performance decreases as the DiskXtender server is
required to manage more activities, such as file fetches and file migration, at the same
time. Schedule background scans for the times when users are less likely to be
accessing the files on the extended drive.
Disabling background scans
Do not disable background scans. If you disable background scans, you expose the
DiskXtender system to a number of risks. Details on these risks are provided in the
DiskXtender administration guide.
Tuning background scan speed
You can adjust the speed of the background scan, altering the processor resources
needed to run the scan. Slower scans use less resources, while faster scans use more.
If a significant amount of system activity occurs during background scans, you may
want to slow the background scan to improve system performance. However, keep in
mind that a slower scan takes more time to complete.
Conversely, if background scans occur during periods of low system activity but they
take a long time to complete, you may want to increase the speed of the scan.
To adjust the speed of background scans, right-click the extended drive and select
Background Scan. Tuning options are available on the Extended Drive Background
Scan dialog box.
Performing advanced or maintenance scans
Do not set the advanced scan options for a background scan, available by clicking
Advanced Configuration on the Extended Drive Background Scan dialog box. These
options are necessary only to troubleshoot the system.
Do not set scan maintenance options for a background scan, available by clicking
Scan Maintenance Options on the Extended Drive Background Scan dialog box,
unless you need to perform special maintenance tasks to change the files on the
extended drive.
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Virus scans
Consider antivirus software interoperability requirements with DiskXtender, and
install the virus scan client on the DiskXtender server. In addition, consider virus scan
configuration best practices, and add the executable for the antivirus software to the
special application list.
Antivirus software interoperability
Confirm that the antivirus software you use is certified for use with DiskXtender. The
EMC DiskXtender Software Compatibility Guide provides details and can be found on
the Powerlink website.
Installing the virus scan client
Install the virus scan client on the DiskXtender server. Do not allow a user machine
that is mapped to the DiskXtender server to run virus scans on the extended drive.
Configuring the virus scan
Minimize the impact of the virus scan on DiskXtender performance by using one of
the following virus scan configuration strategies:
◆
Disable any real-time virus scanning options. Instead, schedule periodic virus
scans. The scheduled scans should not run concurrently with DiskXtender
background scans. Instead, they should occur during times of low system activity.
or
◆
If the antivirus software allows it, add the DxDmService.exe file to the exclude list
for virus scans. (DxDmService.exe is the program executable for the DiskXtender
service.) In addition, configure the scan for inbound files only. In other words,
only scan files that are written to the extended drive, not those that are read.
Antivirus software filtering
Add the executable for the virus scan software to the special application list by using
the Use special application filtering feature on the Options tab of the Service
Properties dialog box. When you add the executable, set the action for the executable
to No Recall.
By default, the Special Applications List already contains executables for the
following antivirus software:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
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AVX Antivirus
Dr. Solomon’s Antivirus
F-Secure Antivirus
McAfee Antivirus
Norton Antivirus
Trend Micro Antivirus
Symantec Antivirus
Panda Antivirus
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File Management
The following topics provide best practices for managing files on an extended drive
with DiskXtender for Windows:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
Migrating files to media ............................................................................................... 86
Retention......................................................................................................................... 93
Indexing files.................................................................................................................. 97
Purging files ................................................................................................................. 104
Deleting files ................................................................................................................. 112
File Management
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Migrating files to media
The following topics provide best practices for configuring migration of files from the
extended drive to storage media:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
“Developing a file migration strategy” on page 86
“Setting up standard migration” on page 88
“Setting up multi-target migration” on page 88
“Setting up tiered migration” on page 89
“Configuring media groups” on page 90
“Configuring move rules” on page 92
“Scheduling file migration” on page 92
“Disabling file migration” on page 92
Developing a file migration strategy
The flexible file migration features in DiskXtender are designed to accommodate both
simple and complex migration strategies. A simple migration strategy may involve
migrating all files on the extended drive to a single back-end storage device. A more
complex strategy may involve migrating different types of files, or files in different
locations, to different types—or even multiple pieces—of media.
Using DiskXtender file migration policies, you can configure, very specifically, which
files are migrated to which media.
Choosing the files to migrate
DiskXtender move rules enable you to target, very specifically, which files to migrate
to media, and also which files should not be moved to media. You can select files for
migration or exclusion from migration based on the filename, size, age, or attributes.
Consider also the following strategies.
Simplifying move rules by grouping files in media folders
If possible, group files into media folders based on the migration rule that should
apply to the files. This enables you to simplify the rules for each media folder. For
example, save all files that should be migrated to one type of media in one media
folder, and all files that should be migrated to another type of media in a different
media folder. Or, save all files that should be migrated immediately in one media
folder, and all files that should be migrated after 30 days in a different media folder.
Delaying file migration until files are finalized
Specify an age delay on move rules to prevent DiskXtender from moving files until
they are finalized and will no longer be edited. This may be especially useful with
optical media because of the way files are written to optical media. It limits the
number of times frequently changing files are written and rewritten to the media,
thereby minimizing unnecessary system activity and improving performance.
To specify an age delay, select the Apply rule to files of age greater than option on
the Age page for the move rule, specify the number of days (typically 30 or 60), and
then select Last write time from the list box.
Excluding unnecessary files from migration
Create move rules to exclude any files that you do not want migrated to media. For
example, you should never extend a system drive or a drive that contains application
files. However, if there are system or application files on the extended drive, be sure
to configure an exclude rule that excludes all files with the System attribute. This
prevents the application and system files from being moved and subsequently
purged.
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Rules that exclude files from migration are called exclusive move rules. To create an
exclusive move rule, select the Exclude option on the Type page when you create the
rule.
Prioritizing overlapping move rules
Even if a file meets the criteria for more than one move rule, the file is migrated or
excluded from migration based on only one of the move rules—the one that is listed
first in the File System Manager Administrator.
If you create multiple move rules in a media folder, you must order the rules to define
how files are evaluated against the rules. To edit the priority for a move rule,
right-click the rule and select either Promote or Demote.
Keep in mind the following guidelines:
◆
If a file qualifies for two different move rules, the file is moved based on the rule
that is listed first in the tree view of the Administrator.
◆
If the file fails to qualify for migration based on the first rule, the file is evaluated
against the second rule.
◆
If the file is excluded from migration based on the first rule, then the file is not
migrated, even if it qualifies based on the second rule.
◆
If the file qualifies for migration based on the first rule, then the file is migrated,
even if it is excluded from migration based on the second rule.
As a result of the last two guidelines, exclusive rules and rules with more specific file
criteria should generally appear first in the list of rules. This enables exclusions and
special conditions to take effect, while more general criteria in the later rules in the list
can capture any remaining files.
Choosing the media for the files
DiskXtender media groups enable you to select the media to which files in a media
folder are migrated. When you configure the rules that select files for migration, you
also specify the media groups that receive the files.
Each move rule can target only one media group. If you create multiple move rules,
you can create multiple media groups to receive the files that qualify for the move
rules.
However, a media group is not exclusively owned by a move rule. In other words,
you can configure multiple move rules that all point to the same media group.
You only need to create multiple media groups in each media folder to use multiple
types of media or to segregate files on different pieces of media. For example, you
may want to write frequently accessed files to a faster media type, such as NAS, and
infrequently accessed files to a slower media type, such as tape. Or, you may want to
write certain file types to a retention-capable media type, such as EMC Centera, while
other file types do not require retention and can be written to NAS.
The way that you configure the media groups determines how files are written to the
media in the groups:
◆
With the standard migration model, files are migrated to the media in a single
media group. The media group contains only one type of media and is called a
standard media group. The standard media group belongs to the media folder in
which the file is located.
◆
With multi-target migration, each file is migrated from the extended drive to
multiple targets, which are pieces, and even different types of media. Multi-target
migration is achieved through configuration of multi-target media groups. A
Migrating files to media
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multi-target media group is designed solely to contain as many as four media
"targets," which consist of standard media groups that contain the media to which
to write files.
◆
With tiered migration, also called hierarchical storage management (HSM), each
file is migrated twice: from one extended drive to another extended drive, and
then from that extended drive to tape media. To accomplish this through
DiskXtender, media folders on the second extended drive are configured as
Aggregate NAS media on the first DiskXtender server. The files from the first
extended drive are migrated to the Aggregate NAS media (the second extended
drive) by using a standard migration process. The DiskXtender installation on the
second server then moves the files to tape media, also with a standard migration
process.
Setting up standard migration
Perform the following steps to enable standard file migration:
1. Create one or more standard media groups in each media folder.
2. Allocate media from the media service to the extended drive.
3. Add the allocated media to the media groups.
4. Create move rules to specify which files should and should not be migrated to
media.
Setting up multi-target migration
The procedure to set up multi-target migration depends on whether it is a new
environment or an environment where files are already migrating to media through a
standard migration model.
Configuring multi-target migration in a new environment
Perform the following steps to enable multi-target file migration in a new
environment:
1. Create the multi-target media group in the media folder.
2. Create one or more standard media groups in the media folder.
3. Add the standard media groups to the multi-target media group.
Note: If you add two or more EMC Centera media groups to a multi-target group, then the
media in those media groups must be from the same media service. A multi-target media
group cannot contain media groups with media from different EMC Centera media
services.
4. Select the priority in which DiskXtender selects the target (standard media group)
from which it is going to fetch a purged file that has been requested by a user. To
change the order, drag-and-drop the media groups within the multi-target group.
Note: You cannot control the order in which each file is written to each target. Files are
moved to media as the media is available.
5. Allocate media from the media service to the extended drive.
6. Add the allocated media to the standard media groups.
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7. Create move rules to specify which files should and should not be migrated to
media, selecting the multi-target media group as the target media group on the
Settings page for the move rule.
8. (Optional) Configure an expiration policy to automatically delete files from
standard media groups once the files meet certain age criteria. Files are qualified
against the expiration policy during a background scan. Files that meet the
criteria are deleted from the media during the background scan. However, the
files are not placed in the DiskXtender Recycler since they are still active on the
extended drive and on other media. To set an expiration policy, use the
Automatically expire files option on the Options page for each target media
group except for the final target media group on which the file will reside.
9. (Optional) To configure automatic deletion of files from the final target group,
create a delete rule that targets the files and uses an appropriate age delay after
the files are expired from the other targets. Keep in mind, however, that once a file
is deleted from the final group, it can no longer be accessed.
Configuring multi-target migration in an existing environment
When you enable multi-target migration in an existing environment, the files that
have already been written to media and purged must be fetched back to the extended
drive so that they also can be written to the new media. The files are then purged
again. This fetch process synchronizes the files on the first media with the files on the
second media, and is called “sync-fetch.” Sync-fetch occurs during a background
scan and is a system-intensive procedure. As a result, it is important to carefully plan
sync-fetch to minimize the impact on user activity. The DiskXtender administration
guide provides details.
Setting up tiered migration
Perform the following steps to enable tiered file migration:
1. On the second DiskXtender server (which migrates files to tape media), add a
MediaStor or Sun StorageTek ACSLS media service, and add media to the media
service.
2. Create one or more extended drives, and create a media folder for each share that
you intend to use as Aggregate NAS media on the first DiskXtender server.
3. Create a standard media group that moves files to tape media for each media
folder. In other words, select Tape from the Media Type list box on the New
Media Group page of the media group.
4. Allocate tape media from the MediaStor or ACSLS media service to the extended
drive.
5. Add the media to the media group.
6. Create a move rule that moves all files in the media folder to the tape media
group. In other words, type *.* as the filename specification on the File Name
page for the move rule, and select the tape media group from the Media Group
To Receive Files list box on the Settings page for the move rule.
7. Create a share for each media folder on the second DiskXtender server that you
want to use as Aggregate NAS media. Only the DiskXtender service account on
the first DiskXtender server should have access to the share.
8. On the first DiskXtender server, create a NAS media service, and create Aggregate
NAS media for the shares to the media folders on the second DiskXtender server.
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9. Create one or more standard media groups in each media folder, selecting NAS as
the type of media to add to the group.
10. Allocate the Aggregate NAS media from the media service to the extended drive.
11. Add the allocated media to the media groups.
12. Create move rules to specify which files should and should not be migrated to
media, selecting the Aggregate NAS media group as the target media group on
the Settings page for the move rule.
Configuring media groups
When you create a multi-target media group, you simply name the media group.
After you create the multi-target media group, you add the standard media groups to
it.
When you create a standard media group, you name the media group and select the
type of media you plan to add to the group. In addition, configure the following
options for the media group:
Table 13
90
◆
If you selected EMC Centera as the media type for the group, you can select
options on the Automation page to automatically create virtual media for the
media group based on the amount of available free space on the media in the
group or based on the number of active (not full) media in the group. On the
Metadata page, you can also specify custom metadata that is stored with each file
that is written to the EMC Centera media in the group. The custom metadata can
be used to enhance EMC Centera Seek and Chargeback Reporter reports.
◆
If you selected removable media—such as tape or optical—as the media type for
the group, you can select options on the Automation page to automatically label
blank media and add it to the media group based on the amount of available free
space in the media group. You can also compact media, remove it from the media
group, and reformat the media when the amount of wasted space on the media
reaches a certain percentage.
◆
Consider the options in Table 13 on page 90, depending on the type of media you
select for the group.
Recommended media group options for each media type (page 1 of 2)
Media type
Option
Recommended setting
EMC Centera
Media fill method
Random (the default).
Maximum media simultaneously
receiving files
The default value for this option is the media count
threshold that you type on the Automation page.
You can tell DiskXtender to write to as many pieces
as is appropriate for the best system efficiency. The
number you enter depends on the optimal number of
media that should receive files at any given time.
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Table 13
Recommended media group options for each media type (page 2 of 2)
Media type
Option
Recommended setting
NAS and TSM
Media fill method
Random.
Note: For NAS and TSM media groups, the default is
Sequential, so you must edit the setting.
MO, UDO, tape,
and WORM
DVD-RAM and
DVD-R
Maximum media simultaneously
receiving files
Set this value to the total number of media that you
plan to add to the media group. This enables
DiskXtender to write to all media as necessary.
Warn when group free space falls
below (MB)
Since you must manually create NAS and TSM
media when it is needed, you should enable this
option so that you are notified when the media in the
media group is starting to run out of space.
You can then configure the warning to be sent out as
an email alert.
Media fill method
Sequential (the default).
Warn when group free space falls
below (MB)
If you use the automation features for the media
group to automatically label and add media to the
group when it is needed, then you do not need to
enable this option.
However, if you do not enable automation, then you
should enable this option so that you are notified
when the media in the media group is starting to run
out of space.
You can then configure the warning to be sent out as
an email alert.
Media fill method
Sequential (the default).
Warn when group free space falls
below (MB)
If you use the automation features for the media
group to automatically label and add media to the
group when it is needed, then you do not need to
enable this option.
However, if you do not enable automation, then you
should enable this option so that you are notified
when the media in the media group is starting to run
out of space.
You can then configure the warning to be sent out as
an email alert.
Mark media full when free space falls
below (MB)
If you plan to enable auto-finalization of DVD-R,
leave this option enabled. Otherwise,
auto-finalization is not available.
Auto-finalize DVD+/-R media after
marking full
Choose whether to automatically finalize DVD-R
when it is marked as full.
Purge files after auto-finalizing media Choose whether to purge all files on DVD-R from the
extended drive after it is finalized.
If you leave this option disabled, then files are purged
based on configured purge rules.
Direct read files after auto-finalizing
media
Choose whether to mark files for Direct Read after
they are automatically purged after automatic
finalization. Direct Read is strongly discouraged in
most environments. “Reading files directly from
media” on page 109 provides details.
Migrating files to media
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For all other options, the default value is recommended. The File System Manager
Administrator online help provides details on each option.
Configuring move rules
DiskXtender move rules enable you to target, very specifically, which files to migrate
to media, and also which files should not be moved to media. You can select files for
migration or exclusion from migration based on the filename, size, age, or attributes.
Additional strategies are discussed in “Choosing the files to migrate” on page 86.
Scheduling file migration
File migration takes place between 8 P.M. and 9 A.M. by default. In other words, files
may qualify for move rules at any time when they are saved to the extended drive,
but they do not actually move to media until the file migration schedule is active,
which is overnight. If necessary, you can change the file migration schedule for each
extended drive.
Note: The media task and copy update schedules are active at the same time as the file
migration schedule. The file fetch schedule is active 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You can
configure these schedules along with the file migration schedule.
To change the file migration schedule, open the Extended Drive Properties dialog
box, select the Settings tab, and click Schedule.
Disabling file migration
You can temporarily disable file migration, if necessary by editing the file migration
schedule for the extended drive. Keep in mind, however, that DiskXtender may
continue to access storage media for file fetch activity when you disable the file
migration schedule. To disable all media activity—for example, to perform hardware
maintenance—set the media service or hardware device offline.
In addition, files continue to qualify for move rules and are written to the move list
when you disable the file migration schedule.
You should only disable file migration for a limited period of time. When files cannot
be migrated, then they also cannot be purged. As a result, extended drive space issues
may occur.
You can also permanently disable file migration—for example, if you are preparing to
uninstall DiskXtender—by deleting all configured rules, media groups, and media
folders, and finally, the extended drive itself.
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Retention
The term “retention” or “file retention” refers to the placement of an attribute on a file
that restricts anyone from editing or deleting the file, effectively making the file
read-only. Consider the following best practices to enable and change retention, as
well as to delete retained files.
Enabling retention
To set retention automatically for files on the extended drive, configure retention by
using the Retention page for the move rules. You can also set retention on individual
files by using the DiskXtender Explorer Add-ons.
You may want to enable retention in a test environment first to ensure that you
understand how it works. Depending on the settings you select, it may be very
difficult or impossible to change or remove retention after you implement it.
Take the following information into consideration as you enable retention.
Retention restrictions for saving files to the extended drive
If files qualify for move rules with retention as soon as the files are saved to the
extended drive (because there are no age delays configured for the rules and real-time
moves are enabled), then users cannot create files directly on the extended drive. This
is because the files are protected from further editing once they are saved—or
created—on the extended drive. If this is the case, then users must create and edit
files in another location and then move them to the extended drive when they are
finished.
Alternatively, you may want to disable real-time moves or specify an age delay for
the move rule. When real-time moves are disabled, files only qualify for move rules
during a background scan. When move rules contain an age delay, files do not qualify
for the rules until a certain number of days have passed since the file was created, last
accessed, or last written to (modified). Retention is applied and the file is moved to
media after the age delay has passed.
DiskXtender retention compared with EMC Centera retention
DiskXtender protects files on the extended drive as soon as they qualify for move
rules with a retention setting. The retention is then passed to the media when the file
is migrated.
If you set global retention on the EMC Centera device and then you configure a
different retention period through DiskXtender, the DiskXtender retention period
applies. This is true even if the DiskXtender retention period is 0 days (no retention).
When you set a retention period of 0 days through DiskXtender, then the file is not
protected on the EMC Centera device, even if EMC Centera is configured for a global
retention period of 1 or more days.
Note: DiskXtender always applies a retention period to files written to EMC Centera, even if
the retention period is 0 days (no retention). You cannot automatically apply the global
retention period set on the EMC Centera device to files on the extended drive. To match the
global retention period on EMC Centera with the retention set on files on the extended drive,
specify the same retention setting in DiskXtender as on EMC Centera.
Retention
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In the unlikely event that there is a delay between the time that the file qualifies for a
move rule and the time that the file is actually migrated, then the total retention
period is equivalent to the retention setting in the move rule plus the amount of time
that the file was protected on the extended drive before it was migrated.
For example, assume that the retention period on a move rule is 30 days. A file
qualifies for the move rule as soon as it is saved to the extended drive on Monday at 9
A.M. The file is immediately protected on the extended drive starting at 9 A.M.
However, the file is not migrated to media until Wednesday at 1 P.M. because the
media is offline. When DiskXtender migrates the file on Wednesday, it passes the
retention period of 30 days to the media. The file is then protected on the media for 30
days after it is migrated to the media. DiskXtender updates the retention information
for the file so that it is synchronized with the media for 30 days of retention.
However, the file has already been protected on the extended drive for two days. As a
result, the file is protected on the extended drive for a total of 32 days, and not the 30
days specified in the move rule.
Retention class considerations
A retention class is a symbolic representation of a retention period. When the
retention class is defined on EMC Centera, you specify a name and a retention period
in days. If necessary, you can edit the retention period for a retention class by
changing the class definition, thereby changing the retention period for a group of
files.
!
CAUTION
Because they can be edited—albeit only by someone with administrative
privileges on the EMC Centera cluster—retention classes do not provide the same
level of file security as a fixed retention period. If you have an EMC Centera
Governance Edition device, an unscrupulous individual could edit a retention
class to reduce the retention period so that retention expires early, thereby leaving
important files vulnerable to editing or deletion. Use caution when you assign
retention classes and EMC Centera administrative privileges.
The list of retention classes and their definitions in DiskXtender is refreshed every
time the EMC Centera media service is refreshed. This occurs approximately every
two minutes. The list is stored and updated locally on the DiskXtender server (in
addition to the definition on the EMC Centera). This enables retention enforcement
on the extended drive even if the EMC Centera device is unavailable.
Retention class restrictions
There are several restrictions when you use retention classes to apply retention to files
on a DiskXtender extended drive:
94
◆
If you have an EMC Centera CE+ device, then you can only extend the retention
period definition for a retention class.
◆
Even though you can configure retention classes of less than one day on the EMC
Centera cluster, you cannot use those retention classes in DiskXtender. Retention
classes of less than one day are not listed in the DiskXtender interface.
◆
You cannot apply retention classes to files that are written to media in a media
group if the media group contains media from two different EMC Centera media
services. In other words, you must assign retention by using either a retention
period in days, infinite retention, or no retention if you want to mix media from
different EMC Centera media services in a media group.
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This includes media in both standard and multi-target media groups. If you use
multi-target migration and there are two standard media groups in the
multi-target group, each pointing to two different EMC Centera media services,
then you cannot apply retention classes to files that are written to the media in the
multi-target group.
This restriction is intended to protect against the scenario where the retention
class on one EMC Centera is applied to files that have been migrated to a different
EMC Centera.
Changing retention
After you apply retention to a file, the only way to change the retention setting for the
file is by using the DiskXtender Explorer Add-ons.
You cannot change the retention setting for a file by changing the move rule for which
the file originally qualified. Once a file qualifies for a move rule with a retention
setting of 1 or more days (or a retention class or infinite retention), then the retention
on the file is not changed automatically, even if the file is qualified against the move
rules again as part of a background scan.
When you change retention for a purged file, the file remains purged. In other words,
DiskXtender does not need to fetch a file to change the retention setting for the file.
If you have Retained NAS media, then you cannot edit the retention period for a file
until the original retention period expires.
If you have EMC Centera, you can extend the retention period or change the retention
class. You cannot, however, reduce a retention period or switch from a retention class
to either a fixed retention period or infinite retention. If you have an EMC Centera
CE+, then you cannot reduce the time period assigned to a retention class.
In addition, you cannot edit the name of a retention class. To change the name of a
retention class, create a new retention class with the desired name, and then switch
the retention setting on the files to the new retention class.
Table 14 on page 95 lists the options to edit retention on files that have been migrated
to EMC Centera.
Table 14
Retention editing options
If you are using this retention option
Then you can switch to this retention option
A fixed retention period
• A different fixed retention period, as long as you are extending the
retention period.
• A retention class, as long as the retention class definition is for a
time period that is greater than the current fixed retention period.
• Infinite retention.
A retention class
A different retention class.
Note: The new retention class definition can be a shorter time period
than the previous retention class definition.
Infinite retention
Not applicable. If you use infinite retention, you cannot switch to a
different retention option.
Retention
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Deleting retained files
If you have an EMC Centera Basic or EMC Centera GE device, you can delete
retained files by performing a privileged delete with the DiskXtender Explorer
Add-ons. To delete retained files on a CE+ device, contact an EMC Centera technical
representative.
Note: Consider the compliance regulations followed by your company before you perform a
privileged delete.
The profile that DiskXtender uses to connect to EMC Centera must have the right to
perform privileged deletes.
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Indexing files
The DiskXtender Search Module, available separately from DiskXtender for
Windows, enables you to index and search data on the extended drive. The following
topics provide best practices for configuring indexing of files on the extended drive:
◆
◆
◆
Enabling indexing
“Enabling indexing” on page 97
“Resynchronizing the index files and the extended drive” on page 102
“Disabling indexing” on page 103
You must configure index collections on the ISE and enable indexing on the
DiskXtender server before content indexing can begin.
To set up indexing:
1. On the ISE, create an index collection for each extended drive that contains files
you want to index.
An index collection is a set of all index files for an extended drive. Index collection
information is stored in a database on the ISE.
2. On the ISE server, add the DiskXtender service account to the DxIndexers group.
This provides DiskXtender with the necessary permission to communicate with
the ISE.
3. (Optional) If you plan to index Microsoft Visio files, download the Visio IFilter
2003 Add-in from the Microsoft website (http://www.Microsoft.com) and install
it on the ISE server.
4. On the DiskXtender server, enable content indexing for each extended drive that
contains files you want to index. On the Indexing page for an extended drive, you
must specify:
• The ISE server that should index the files on the extended drive.
• The index collection that should receive the files.
• A schedule for when indexing should occur. Indexing can be scheduled to
occur regularly on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis. You can also manually
force indexing to occur once at a certain date and time. To maximize system
performance, you should schedule indexing to occur at a time when there is
minimal system activity.
5. On the DiskXtender server, in each media folder, create DiskXtender index rules
to identify which files you do—and which files you do not—want to index. If you
do not want to index any files in the media folder, do not create an index rule.
The rule criteria you can use to select files for indexing or exclusion from indexing
include file location, name, type, size, attributes, and age.
Review the following topics for information on developing an indexing strategy
that will maximize performance and avoid common problems based on the type
of environment in which you are installing the DiskXtender Search Module. The
following scenarios are covered:
• “Indexing in a new DiskXtender environment with no files” on page 98
• “Indexing in an environment with existing files” on page 98
• “Adjusting an indexing strategy for ongoing maintenance” on page 100
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Indexing in a new DiskXtender environment with no files
You have many indexing strategy options if you are installing DiskXtender on a new
server that does not already have files. To maximize performance in a new
environment:
◆
Exceed the minimum hardware and network requirements for the ISE and
DiskXtender servers. Servers with a faster CPU speed, additional memory, plenty
of disk space, and faster networks perform better than servers that meet only the
minimum requirements.
◆
Review the list of supported file types for indexing in the DiskXtender Search
Module documentation, and determine whether you are going to be storing any
unsupported file types on the extended drive. Try to minimize the number of
unsupported files that are submitted to the ISE for indexing. Indexing
performance improves when you limit the number of files that the ISE is required
to scan. Some strategies to accomplish this include:
• Save unsupported file types in a separate media folder than the supported file
types. In the media folder with the unsupported file types, do not create any
index rules.
• Create exclusive index rules to exclude unsupported file types from being
indexed. (On the first page of the Index Rule Wizard, select Exclude. Then
type *.extension on the File Name page, where extension is the file extension for
the unsupported file type.) You must create one rule for each unsupported file
type to exclude. In addition, exclusive index rules should be listed first in the
list of index rules for a media folder. Ordering the rules this way ensures that
the appropriate files are excluded from indexing.
IMPORTANT
!
You may want to create separate purge rules for files that are excluded from
indexing. Excluded files are eligible to be purged as soon as disk space is
needed. They do not need to be indexed first.
◆
Review the guidelines in “Adjusting an indexing strategy for ongoing
maintenance” on page 100. These guidelines also apply to a new environment
that does not yet have a significant number of files.
Indexing in an environment with existing files
There are a number of important considerations for setting up indexing if you are
installing the DiskXtender Search Module to index files in one of the following
situations:
◆
In addition to installing the DiskXtender Search Module, you are installing
DiskXtender in the environment. However, the server on which you are installing
DiskXtender already contains a number of files.
◆
You are installing the DiskXtender Search Module in an environment where
DiskXtender is already managing files.
These indexing strategy considerations are designed to ensure that you are able to
avoid errors and maintain an acceptable level of system performance while
DiskXtender and the DiskXtender Search Module perform the system-intensive
process of indexing (and migrating and purging, as necessary) the existing files on
the extended drive. Once this initial processing is complete, you might be able to
adjust the indexing strategy to more of a maintenance strategy—one that only needs
to accommodate new files saved to the extended drive on an ongoing basis.
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If there are a significant number of files on the extended drive when you install the
DiskXtender Search Module, consider the following indexing strategy tips:
◆
Analyze the files on the extended drive, and try to minimize the number of
unsupported files that are submitted to the ISE for indexing. Create exclusive
index rules to exclude unsupported file types from being indexed. (On the first
page of the Index Rule Wizard, select Exclude. Then type *.extension on the File
Name page, where extension is the file extension for the unsupported file type.)
You must create one rule for each unsupported file type to exclude. In addition,
exclusive index rules should be listed first in the list of index rules for a media
folder. Ordering the rules this way ensures that the appropriate files are excluded
from indexing.
IMPORTANT
!
You may want to create separate purge rules for files that are excluded from
indexing. Excluded files are eligible to be purged as soon as disk space is
needed. They do not need to be indexed first.
◆
Do not submit all files on the extended drive for indexing at once. Stagger the
indexing of files over time. Some strategies to accomplish this include:
• Create index rules for one media folder at a time over the course of an
appropriate time period. For example, create the index rules for one media
folder on one night. The files in that media folder are then qualified against the
rules during the next background scan and submitted for indexing based on
the indexing schedule. On the next night, create the index rules for the next
media folder, and so on.
• Target specific, high-priority files for the initial indexing effort by creating an
index rule with a File Name specification based either on the file type or
filename. For example, index all Microsoft Word files first. Then add index
rules over time to include the remaining files on the extended drive.
• Index all the most recent—or the oldest—files on the extended drive first.
Then change the age specification incrementally over time to include more
files. For example, index all files that have been created within the last 30 days.
(On the Age page of the Index Rule Wizard, select the Less than option, type
30 in the Days text box, and select Create time from the Since list box.) After
all of the qualifying files have been indexed, change the rule to files created
within the last 60 days, then 90 days, and so on.
• Use the advanced background scan option to limit the number of files that are
qualified for indexing during a single scan. (Edit the Max pending files value
next to the Perform index rule evaluation option on the Advanced Scan
Configuration dialog box. The default value is 100,000 files.)
◆
If this is a new DiskXtender installation, wait to purge files until after they have
been indexed. File data must be present on the extended drive to be indexed. If a
file is purged when it qualifies for an index rule, then the file is fetched to the
extended drive before it is qualified and submitted for indexing. The file is then
automatically purged again after it is indexed. In systems with a significant
number of files, this process can significantly impact performance.
To delay purging, wait to configure purge rules until after all files in a media
folder have been indexed. Alternatively, configure an appropriate age delay on
the purge rules. Do not use the Purge files immediately after move option on
move rules. “Purging files” on page 104 provides details on configuring purging.
Indexing files
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◆
If this is an existing DiskXtender installation, prefetch purged files when you are
ready to index them. During a prefetch, DiskXtender retrieves files from storage
media and writes the file data to the extended drive. File data must be present on
the extended drive to be indexed. For example, if you are indexing a single media
folder at a time, use the Prefetch Request Manager to create a prefetch request for
all files in the media folder before the background scan occurs to qualify the files
for indexing.
CAUTION
!
Determine the amount of available free space on the extended drive before you
prefetch files. You do not want to fill the extended drive with the prefetched
files.
◆
If a single ISE server is indexing files for two or more DiskXtender servers, do not
submit all files on all servers for indexing at once. Balance the processing
requirements for the ISE server by staggering the indexing schedules. You should
only index the files on one of the servers at a time. After the initial indexing
process for the first server is complete, then you can index the files on the second
DiskXtender server, and so on.
CAUTION
!
Errors may occur if more than one DiskXtender server submits all files for the
initial indexing process at the same time. The DiskXtender Search Module
installation guide provides details on troubleshooting the errors.
Note: Each ISE server can index files from no more than 10 DiskXtender servers. Each
DiskXtender server that submits files for indexing should manage no more than five
extended drives.
Once the initial indexing process for all servers is complete, the ISE server can
index files from no more than 25 extended drives at one time. (Requests from
additional extended drives are denied. The connection between the ISE server
and the additional extended drives is retried after 30 minutes.) In addition, errors
can occur when the ISE server is required to process too many requests at the
same time.
Adjusting an indexing strategy for ongoing maintenance
After you finish indexing all existing files on the extended drive, consider the
following tips to adjust the indexing strategy for ongoing maintenance:
◆
Maintain or establish exclusive index rules to exclude common unsupported file
types from indexing. Indexing performance improves when you limit the number
of files that the ISE is required to scan.
◆
Ensure that files are indexed before they are purged:
• The best purge option to ensure that files are indexed first is to purge files
based on the purge watermarks (amount of used space) on the extended drive.
• If you purge files during background scans, configure an age delay for the
purge rule so that the purging takes place after indexing.
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• If you configure an age delay on the index rules, ensure that the age delay on
the purge rules is equal to or greater than the age delay on the index rules.
• Do not purge files immediately after they are moved with the move rule
option for purging.
“Purging files” on page 104 provides details on purging files.
◆
Ensure that indexing is taking place successfully on a regular basis so that
indexed files can be purged as disk space is needed. Files that qualify for index
rules are not written to the purge list until after they are submitted for
indexing—even if they qualify for both an index rule and a purge rule at the same
time (during a background scan). If files are not indexed regularly, then the files
may never be written to the purge list, meaning there may not be any files to
purge if the extended drive begins to run out of disk space.
You may also want to create separate purge rules for files that are excluded from
indexing. Excluded files are eligible to be purged as soon as disk space is needed.
They do not need to be indexed first.
◆
Balance the processing requirements for the DiskXtender server by adjusting
activity schedules. System performance decreases as the DiskXtender server is
required to manage more activities at the same time. These activities include:
• Users and applications saving files to the extended drive (and qualification of
the files against move and index rules)
• Users and applications fetching purged files from media
• Moving files to media
• Background scans
• Media tasks
• Copy media updates
• Backups and DiskXtender metadata exports
• Virus scans
You should balance the schedules for the movement of files to media, background
scans, media tasks, copy media updates, backups, metadata exports, and virus
scans during the times when users are less likely to be accessing the files on the
extended drive.
To improve performance on busy systems where a large number of files are saved
to the extended drive in a short period of time, disable real-time moves and
indexing qualification. System resources can then be freed to service other
requests, such as file fetches. By default, DiskXtender qualifies files against move
rules and index rules as soon as the files are saved to the extended drive (in "real
time"). If there are a significant number of users saving files to and accessing files
on the extended drive during a certain period of time, you can change this default
behavior so that files are only qualified for migration and indexing during a
background scan. To disable real-time moves and qualification for indexing,
select Disable real-time moves option for the Enable real-time moves option on
the Options tab of the Service Properties dialog box in the File System Manager
Administrator.
◆
If a single ISE server is indexing files for multiple DiskXtender servers and
extended drives, balance the processing requirements for the ISE server by
staggering the indexing schedules. The ISE server can index files from no more
than 25 extended drives at one time. (Requests from additional extended drives
are denied. The connection between the ISE server and the additional extended
drives is retried after 30 minutes.) In addition, errors can occur when the ISE
Indexing files
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File Management
server is required to process too many requests at the same time. The DiskXtender
Search Module installation guide and online help provide details on
troubleshooting the errors.
Note: Each ISE server can index files from no more than 10 DiskXtender servers. Each
DiskXtender server submitting files for indexing should manage no more than five
extended drives.
Resynchronizing the index files and the extended drive
DiskXtender and the ISE work together to ensure that the index files on the ISE are
current with the files on the extended drive. However, in the unlikely event that the
files on the extended drive are not synchronized with the indexes on the ISE, you can
schedule a resynchronization process.
The resynchronization process ensures that:
!
◆
There is corresponding index information on the ISE for all files on the extended
drive that are marked as indexed.
◆
There are no orphan indexes on the ISE for files that have been deleted from the
extended drive.
IMPORTANT
Resynchronization is designed to repair a damaged system. It is a system-intensive
process and should be scheduled accordingly to accommodate the necessary
system resources for an appropriate duration of time.
Scenarios that may require resynchronization include:
◆
Files that have been indexed are deleted or renamed on the extended drive while
the DiskXtender service is stopped.
◆
Files that have been indexed are deleted or renamed on the extended drive while
indexing was disabled.
◆
An extended drive is damaged and an out-of-date backup is used to restore the
drive.
◆
One or more index files are deleted and an out-of-date backup is used to restore
the files.
To schedule index resynchronization, use the Resync Options button on the
Indexing page for the extended drive.
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Disabling indexing
If necessary, you can disable content indexing either for a single extended drive or for
all extended drives that submit files to an ISE for indexing.
Disabling indexing for an extended drive
There are two elements to content indexing that you can disable for an extended
drive:
◆
The qualification of files against index rules and the writing of files to the Index
Transaction Log (ITL).
To disable this indexing feature, clear the Enable content indexing of files on this
extended drive checkbox on the Indexing tab of the Extended Drive Properties
dialog box in the File System Manager Administrator.
◆
The indexing schedule (processing of the ITL and submission of files to the ISE for
indexing).
To disable this indexing feature, select the Disable option in the Index
Scheduling section on the Indexing tab of the Extended Drive Properties dialog
box in the File System Manager Administrator.
Note: If you disable the indexing schedule while the schedule is active and processing the ITL,
then DiskXtender does not stop the ongoing processing of the ITL. Once the ongoing process is
complete, the indexing schedule is disabled and the ITL is no longer processed. To stop
DiskXtender from processing the ITL while it is ongoing, clear the Enable content indexing of
files on this extended drive checkbox.
If you disable rule qualification, then the indexing schedule is also disabled. If you
disable the indexing schedule but do not disable rule qualification, however, files
continue to be written to the ITL as they qualify for configured index rules. This is
useful if you want to temporarily disable the indexing process; for example, if you
need to perform maintenance on the ISE. However, keep in mind that the ITL for each
extended drive is kept as a file on the extended drive of the DiskXtender server. The
file will continue to grow, occupying additional space on the drive, until you either
delete the index rules or disable rule qualification as well.
In addition, files that qualify for index rules cannot be purged. If the indexing
schedule is disabled for a significant amount of time, extended drive space issues are
likely to occur.
Disabling all content indexing
To disable indexing for all extended drives that the ISE indexes, you can pause the
ISE. You may want to pause the ISE for system maintenance—for example, to take a
snapshot of the system for backup purposes.
You should not disable indexing for a significant amount of time. Files on the
DiskXtender extended drives continue to qualify for index rules, and therefore cannot
be purged. Extended drive space issues are likely to occur unless indexing takes place
regularly.
The DiskXtender Search Module installation guide and online help provide details on
pausing the ISE and disabling all indexing.
Indexing files
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Purging files
The following topics provide best practices for when and how to purge files from the
extended drive, as well as how to manage user access to purged files:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
“Recommended purge methods for different environments” on page 104
“Combining purge methods in a mixed environment” on page 105
“Enabling purging” on page 107
“Controlling user access to purged files” on page 108
“Controlling third-party software access to purged files” on page 111
Because space and file retrieval requirements vary, DiskXtender provides several
different ways to purge files from the extended drive, enabling you to be very specific
as to when files are purged from the extended drive.
Files cannot be purged from the extended drive until they are moved to media and
indexed, if indexing is enabled. If a file is being moved to multiple pieces of media as
part of a multi-target migration strategy, then the file must also be moved to all target
media before it can be purged.
The purge options you choose are likely determined by a number of factors,
including the type of storage media you are using, how much space you have on the
extended drive, how often files are accessed, and how long files are normally active.
Recommended purge methods for different environments
In most cases, only inactive files—files that are no longer being viewed or edited by
users—on the extended drive should be purged.
System performance improves when fewer files must be recalled from media for
viewing and editing. Recalling files can be a system-intensive process, especially with
media types such as removable media and EMC Centera. DiskXtender must locate
the file on the media and copy the file back to the extended drive before the file is
opened. For removable media, this also means mounting the media with the file in a
drive before the file can be copied.
However, you must balance the need to maintain file data on the drive for viewing
and editing with the need to remove file data to maintain an adequate amount of free
disk space for other files.
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Table 15 on page 105 lists the recommended environments for each purge method.
Table 15
Recommended environments for each purge method
Purge method
Recommended environments
Purging based on disk space
• Environments with media types that have a slower file retrieval time, such
as removable media, which must be mounted in a drive
• Environments with EMC Centera, which has a limited number of
communication threads available for total file activity
• High-volume environments, where a significant number of files are being
moved to media and then accessed for viewing or editing
• Environments where DiskXtender is managing user home directories
• Environments where the DiskXtender Search Module is indexing files on
the extended drive
Purging during background scans • Environments with media types that have a faster file retrieval time, such
as NAS or TSM
• Environments where DiskXtender is being used to archive files that are
infrequently or never accessed again for viewing or editing
• Environments where the volume of file activity is such that file migration
must be scheduled to take place at a different time than file purging
(background scans)
• Environments that need to maintain a high volume of free space on the
extended drive—even if it means sacrificing system performance during
file retrieval
Purging immediately after
migration
• Environments with media types that have a faster file retrieval time, such
as NAS or TSM
• Environments where DiskXtender is being used to archive files that are
infrequently or never accessed again for viewing or editing
• Low-volume environments where file migration can take place at the same
time as file purging with a minimal impact to system performance
• Environments that need to maintain a high volume of free space on the
extended drive—even if it means sacrificing system performance during
file retrieval
Purging manually using the
Explorer Add-ons
Small environments where an administrator is responsible for manually
monitoring the capacity of the extended drive and can target certain inactive
files for purging
Automatically purging files moved
to DVD-R as soon as the media is
finalized
• Environments with DVD-R
• Environments where the files on the finalized media are infrequently or
never accessed again for viewing
Combining purge methods in a mixed environment
It may be the case that an environment contains a mix of file types. Some of the files
may be used on a regular basis, while others are never accessed again after they are
saved to the extended drive. You may want to target the immediately inactive files for
immediate move and purge to free up space on the extended drive, while leaving the
frequently accessed files on the drive forever (never purging them) or until it is
absolutely necessary to recover space on the drive.
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DiskXtender rules enable you to target, very specifically, how to manage files. You
can select files for different move and purge methods by using the criteria in Table 16
on page 106.
Table 16
Available criteria for selecting files to purge
Criteria
Details
Filename
You can specify a particular filename, which may be useful to exclude a file from being
purged. You can also use the asterisk (*) symbol as a wildcard to substitute for one or more
characters in a filename. For example:
• Specify *.* to target all files in a media folder.
• Specify *.doc to target all files with a .doc extension.
• Specify Payroll* to target all files with a filename that begins with the word “Payroll,”
regardless of the file’s extension.
• Specify *.tmp to target temporary files for exclusion from purging.
File size
You can target files smaller than a certain size in KB, larger than a certain size in KB, or
within a range of sizes in KB.
File age
Age criteria enable you to specify the number of days that must pass since the file was
created, last edited, or last accessed before DiskXtender moves or purges the file.
File attributes
You can target certain files with the Read-only, Archive, Compressed, Hidden, or System
attributes. File attribute criteria are most effectively used to exclude files with certain
attributes, such as the System attribute, from being purged.
Consider the following purge strategies for mixed environments:
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◆
If possible, group different file types into different media folders. This enables
you to simplify the rules for each media folder. For example, save all frequently
accessed files in one media folder, and save all infrequently accessed files in
another media folder. Then create a single purge rule for each media folder that
applies to all files in the media folder.
◆
Create purge rules to exclude certain frequently accessed files from purging.
These rules are called exclusive purge rules. To create an exclusive purge rule,
select the Exclude option on the Type page when you create the rule.
◆
If there are other files on the extended drive that should not be purged, such as
files with the System attribute, then create exclusive purge rules to prevent the
files from being purged.
◆
Select the Force files to purge during background scans option for purge rules
that target large, infrequently accessed files. This enables DiskXtender to clear
space on the drive by purging large, inactive files quickly.
◆
Specify an age delay on purge rules to prevent DiskXtender from purging files
until they are no longer needed. To specify an age delay, select the Apply rule to
files of age greater than option on the Age page for the purge rule, specify the
number of days (typically 30 or 60), and then select Last write time or Last access
time from the list box. This sets an age delay for purging files that may be viewed
or edited for a limited duration of time after they are created. Keep in mind,
however, that applications, such as backup and antivirus applications, may also
access files.
◆
Create multiple purge rules to select files for purging based on extended drive
space, and set the priority for the purge rules so that certain files are written to the
purge list—and therefore purged—first. For example, create a purge rule that
targets all files larger than 100 KB for purge based on extended drive space, and
then create a second purge rule that targets all other files for purge based on
extended drive space. Set the priority for the first purge rule to First on the
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Settings page of the purge rule, and the priority for the second purge rule to
Second. This way, files larger than 100 KB are purged first, which frees space more
quickly on the extended drive when it reaches the purge start watermark.
◆
If you create multiple purge rules in a media folder, you must order them to
define how files are evaluated against the rules. To edit the priority for a purge
rule, right-click the rule and select either Promote or Demote. Keep in mind the
following guidelines:
• If a file qualifies for two different purge rules, the file is purged based on the
purge rule that is listed first in the tree view of the Administrator.
• If the file fails to qualify for purging based on the first purge rule, the file is
evaluated against the second purge rule.
• If the file is excluded from purging based on the first purge rule, then the file is
not purged, even if it qualifies based on the second purge rule.
• If the file qualifies for purging based on the first purge rule, then the file is
purged, even if it is excluded from purging based on the second purge rule.
As a result of the last two guidelines, exclusive rules and rules with more specific
file criteria should generally appear first in the list of rules. This enables
exclusions and special conditions to take effect, while more general criteria in the
later rules in the list can capture any remaining files.
!
IMPORTANT
Even if you plan to purge files immediately after they are moved by using the
move rule option, you should still configure purge rules. If you do not configure
purge rules and the purged files are fetched, the files may not be purged again.
Enabling purging
Table 17
The steps to enable purging depend on the purge method you select. Table 17 on
page 107 provides purge configuration details for each method.
Steps to enable purging
Purge method
Prerequisite steps
Purging based on disk space
1. Configure purge rules that select the files to purge, and select the Do not
force purges during background scans option for the rules.
2. Adjust the purge watermarks for the extended drive to specify when purging
should begin and end to maintain a reasonable amount of free space on the
extended drive. The purge watermarks are available on the Options page for
an extended drive.
Purging immediately after
migration
Select the Purge files immediately after move option for the move rules that are
used to select files for migration.
Purging during background
scans
Configure purge rules that select the files to purge, and select the Force files to
purge during background scans option for the rules.
Purging manually using the
Explorer Add-ons
Use the Purge Files option on the Explorer Add-ons.
Purging files moved to DVD-R
Finalize the media by using one of the following methods:
• Automatically based on media group settings
• Manually with a Finalize media task
“Finalizing DVD-R media” on page 68 provides details.
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Controlling user access to purged files
The following topics provide details on how to recall purged files from media when
necessary:
◆
◆
◆
“Fetching files from media” on page 108
“Prefetching files from media” on page 108
“Reading files directly from media” on page 109
Fetching files from media
If a user attempts to access a file on the extended drive that has been migrated to
media and purged, the file is retrieved from the media and copied back to the
extended drive. The user can then open the file on the extended drive. Retrieving a
purged file from media is called a fetch.
If a user fetches a large file that exceeds the amount of available free space on the
extended drive, then this activates the purge start watermark and DiskXtender
attempts to purge files on the purge list to free space on the extended drive. If
DiskXtender is not able to free enough space on the extended drive, then the fetch
fails.
If the environment is a multi-target migration environment, purged files are fetched
from the first target media group listed under the multi-target group. You can change
the media priority from which DiskXtender fetches the file by changing the order in
which the standard media groups are listed under the multi-target group.
When purge rules are configured, fetched files are qualified against the purge rules
again during the next background scan, and purged again as appropriate based on
purge rule settings.
Prefetching files from media
To reduce read requests from media during high traffic times, you can anticipate file
retrieval needs and prefetch frequently used files. During a prefetch, DiskXtender
retrieves files from storage media and writes the file data to the extended drive.
DiskXtender provides two ways to prefetch files:
◆
If you know that you will need specific files, you can select the files by setting up
a prefetch request through the Prefetch Request Wizard. To launch the Prefetch
Request Wizard, open the Tools menu in the File System Manager Administrator
and select Prefetch Request Manager. The File System Manager Administrator
online help provides details on selecting the options on each page of the wizard.
◆
To temporarily remove a piece of media from a device (for example, to perform
maintenance), you can prefetch all files from the piece of media by assigning a
Prefetch media task to the media.
Prefetched files, regardless of method, remain in a "migrated" state and continue to be
subject to purge rules, as with any other normally migrated files. Also, if you remove
the media containing the files from the media group, DiskXtender removes the file
data from the extended drive as it normally would, even though the files are
prefetched.
If you prefetch a file marked for Direct Read, the file is fetched and the Direct Read
attribute is removed from the file. Depending on how you choose to mark files for
Direct Read, the file might be marked for Direct Read again when it is purged.
“Reading files directly from media” on page 109 provides details on Direct Read.
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Reading files directly from media
In some situations, you may want to read purged files directly from media, rather
than copying (fetching) the files back to the extended drive and opening them there.
This behavior is called Direct Read in DiskXtender.
Direct Read is strongly discouraged in most DiskXtender environments. In select
situations, Direct Read can ease the strain on system resources caused by fetching
certain files back to the extended drive. However, Direct Read requests can be as
much as three times slower than normal fetch requests.
Direct Read is not intended to preserve the amount of free space on the extended
drive. When planning a file migration strategy, you must consider the amount of
space required for files that will be fetched from media in addition to new files that
are written to the extended drive. Use file purging features instead of Direct Read to
manage extended drive free space.
The following topics provide more information on Direct Read.
When to enable Direct Read
Direct Read can be beneficial in archive environments with the following types of
files:
◆
Large files that are accessed through applications that employ Byte Offset Read
Note: Byte Offset Read enables an application to read a very small portion of a file rather
than reading the entire file.
◆
Files with fixed content (read-only files, or files that are not edited once they are
created) that are not accessed frequently
◆
Files that are permanently archived and are not accessed frequently
When to avoid Direct Read
Direct Read should not be used in environments where the extended drive is used as
a file server for active and frequently accessed files. Avoid the use of Direct Read with
the following types of files:
◆
Files that are accessed frequently, such as files in user home directories or
database index files.
◆
Files that are accessed through applications that must open the entire file.
Also avoid using Direct Read in the following environments:
◆
A significant number of users (more than 500) are accessing the same or different
files.
◆
Files are moved to a slow media type, such as tape. Bottlenecks and media
damage can occur if DiskXtender must repeatedly mount media to read files.
◆
Files are moved to multiple media groups (multi-target migration). If you attempt
to open a file that is marked for Direct Read and the first target in a multi-target
media group is unavailable, then the operation fails. DiskXtender does not open
the file from the other targets.
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How to enable Direct Read
Direct Read can be enabled when you purge a file. You can either set Direct Read for
all purged files on an extended drive or target certain files. The Direct Read option is
also available when you are restoring files from a piece of media to the extended
drive. You have the following options to enable Direct Read:
◆
To set Direct Read for all files on an extended drive, select the Force direct read
for all files option on the Options tab of the Extended Drive Properties dialog
box.
This option does not change the Direct Read attribute for a file. Rather, it
overrides the attribute. Therefore, you can view the results of changing this
setting relatively quickly. You might want to use this option to evaluate the
performance impact of implementing Direct Read before you configure move
rules with Direct Read.
◆
To target certain files for Direct Read:
• Select the files in Microsoft Windows Explorer and use the Direct Read option
for the DiskXtender Explorer Add-ons.
• When you create a move rule to move the files to media, select the Mark file
for direct read after move option on the Settings page.
• When you finalize DVD-R media, select the Direct Read option.
The Direct Read file attribute is enabled when you use any of these four options.
As a result, if later you decide to disable the Direct Read option, the change can
take a significant amount of time to complete. This is because DiskXtender must
edit the attributes for each file. If you are unsure whether Direct Read is
appropriate for your environment, use the extended drive option listed
previously instead of these options.
◆
To set Direct Read during a file restore:
• When you add a piece of media with files to a media group, select the Direct
read checkbox on the Media Restore page of the Add Media to Media Group
Wizard.
• When you add a File Restore media task to a piece of media, select the Direct
read checkbox on the Media Tasks page.
Setting the Direct Read memory cache
If you enable Direct Read, the file data for Direct Read files must be fetched to a
temporary cache for distribution to the requesting client. The Direct read memory
cache option determines how much space to allow for that temporary cache.Each
open file consumes at least 64 KB of this cache. You should configure the size of the
cache based on the expected number of concurrently open files on the extended drive.
The default value for this setting is 1 MB, which handles 16 concurrently open files
(64 KB x 16 = 1 MB).
The Direct Read cache should never exceed more than 10 percent of the available
physical memory on the system.
To change the size of the Direct Read cache, use the Direct read memory cache option
on the Options page for an extended drive.
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Direct Read exceptions
There are some exception situations in which a file marked for Direct Read might be
fetched anyway, or when the Direct Read attribute might be automatically removed
from a file:
◆
When a file marked for Direct Read (that is not read-only) is opened with a "write
access" application such as Microsoft Word, the file is fetched to the extended
drive instead of being read directly from the media.
◆
DiskXtender cannot read a file with streams directly from the media. For this
reason, when a streamed file marked for Direct Read is requested, the file is
fetched and the Direct Read attribute is removed from the file.
◆
If you prefetch a file marked for Direct Read, the file is fetched and the Direct
Read attribute is removed from the file. Depending on how you choose to mark
files for Direct Read, the file might be marked for Direct Read again when it is
purged.
Controlling third-party software access to purged files
You can configure DiskXtender to force a type of data access for purged files when
those files are called by specific software applications. For example, you might not
want antivirus software to recall purged file data from media during a virus scan. The
DiskXtender special application filtering option enables you to specify applications
and whether DiskXtender should allow the application to read purged files directly
from media or to ignore purged files altogether.
Note: DiskXtender can only filter applications that run locally on the DiskXtender server.
DiskXtender cannot filter applications that are installed on a different machine but act on the
files on the extended drive. Contact EMC Customer Service by using the Powerlink website for
details on the limitations and special situation configurations for special application filtering.
To add, edit, and delete applications for special application filtering, use the Use
special application filtering option on the Options tab of the Service Properties
dialog box in the File System Manager Administrator.
A list of common antivirus, backup, and security software executables and the
recommended action (either No recall or Direct read) is provided in the list already,
including:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
Microsoft Forefront
AVX Antivirus
Dr. Solomon’s Antivirus
F-Secure Antivirus
McAfee Antivirus
Norton Antivirus
Trend Micro Anti-Virus
Panda Antivirus
Tivoli Backup
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Deleting files
In certain situations, you might not want to keep files on the extended drive after a
period of time. There are two ways to delete files from the extended drive:
◆
Manually (for example, through Microsoft Windows Explorer)
◆
Automatically, by using DiskXtender delete rules
Manually deleting files
In most cases, you can manually delete files from the extended drive by using
Microsoft Windows Explorer. The only situation in which you cannot delete files is if
the files have been moved to EMC Centera or Retained NAS media and retention is
set.
However, you may be able to delete even retained files if you have an EMC Centera
Basic or Governance Edition device and you perform a privileged delete.
If you enable the DiskXtender Recycler, files that are deleted manually are placed in
the Recycler. You can then delete the files permanently or restore them to the
extended drive, if necessary. If you delete a file from the Recycler and the file has been
migrated to media, DiskXtender attempts to also delete the file from media.
If you leave the DiskXtender Recycler disabled and you delete files from the extended
drive, DiskXtender attempts to delete the file from media (if the file has been
migrated to media).
Files deleted through privileged deletes are not placed in the Recycler. Instead, they
are deleted permanently.
Automatically deleting files
DiskXtender can automatically delete files from the extended drive based on certain
file criteria by using delete rules.
Delete rules can be used, for example, to help manage archival of particular files kept
to comply with legal requirements. You could create a delete rule that deletes all files
in a particular directory when you are no longer legally required to keep them. After
the files no longer meet the required criteria (for example, the files reach a certain
age), DiskXtender can automatically delete them in accordance with a delete rule.
If you have EMC Centera or Retained NAS media, you can use delete rules and
retention periods to keep files protected under retention for a period of time, then
automatically delete them when they are no longer needed.
!
CAUTION
You should never extend a system drive or a drive that contains application files.
However, if there are system or application files on the extended drive, be sure to
configure an exclude rule that excludes all files with the System attribute. This
prevents the application and system files from being deleted. You can view file
attributes through Microsoft Windows Explorer.
Note: To clear space on the extended drive but leave files accessible on the drive, purge the files
instead of deleting them.
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Delete rules do not, however, prevent users from manually deleting files. To prevent
users from deleting files, use file retention.
You can configure delete rules for each media folder. The criteria you can use to select
files for deletion or exclusion from deletion include file location, name, type, size,
attributes, and age.
Files that qualify for delete rules are not placed in the Recycler. Instead, they are
deleted permanently.
Recovering deleted files
The following topics discuss the options to recover a file that has been accidentally
deleted from the extended drive:
◆
◆
“Recovering files from the DiskXtender Recycler” on page 113
“Recovering files from a backup” on page 114
Recovering files from the DiskXtender Recycler
If the DiskXtender Recycler is enabled and a user accidentally deletes a file, you can
restore the file to the extended drive. The restored file retains all of its migration
information, if it was migrated to media. You do not need to re-migrate the restored
file to media. As a result, enabling the Recycler is recommended.
The DiskXtender Recycler is disabled by default, meaning that users can delete files
permanently from the extended drive. To enable the DiskXtender Recycler, disable
the Microsoft Windows Recycle Bin on the DiskXtender server, and then double-click
the DiskXtender Recycler in the tree view of the File System Manager Administrator.
When you enable the Recycler, you should also configure the following options:
◆
You can exclude certain files from being placed in the Recycler when they are
deleted from the extended drive. Instead, the files are deleted permanently when
they are deleted from the extended drive. These exclusions are intended to save
space on the extended drive by preventing files from being placed in the Recycler
when you are certain that they will never need to be restored.
◆
Set a schedule to automatically empty the Recycler. The Recycler is not a
substitute for regular backups of the extended drive. It is intended only for
short-term storage of deleted files to provide rapid recovery when an accidental
deletion takes place. As a result, the Recycler is located on the extended drive,
and it factors into the total amount of space on the extended drive. To avoid filling
the drive with deleted files, you should empty the Recycler on a regular basis by
using the scheduling options on the Recycler Properties dialog box.
If the DiskXtender Recycler is enabled and a file is deleted from the extended drive,
you can restore the file to the extended drive by opening the Recycler, selecting the
file, and selecting Restore from the File menu.
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Recovering files from a backup
When files on the extended drive are accidentally deleted, you may be able to restore
the files from a backup of the extended drive.
Files should be restored to the same location from which they were deleted. Do not
restore files to a different location.
The type of media to which the files are migrated determines whether you need to
restore the file tag or the full file with all of its data. Table 18 on page 114 lists the
media types that require recovery of the file tag or the full file.
Table 18
File recovery requirements by media type
Media types that allow recovery of the file tag
Media types that require recovery of the full file
•
•
•
•
• DVD-RAM formatted with the UDF file system
• EMC Centera without retention or after
retention expires
• MO, MO WORM, UDO, and UDO WORM
formatted with the UDF file system
• Standard and Aggregate NAS
• TSM
DVD-R
DVD-RAM formatted with the OTG file system
DVD-ROM
MO, MO WORM, UDO, and UDO WORM
formatted with the OTG file system
• Tape
• Tape-WORM
These requirements are necessary because the type of media determines whether a
file can be deleted from the media when it is deleted from the extended drive. Files
that have been migrated to the media types in the first column of Table 18 on page 114
cannot be deleted from the media when they are deleted from the extended drive. In
that scenario, the file remains on the media until the media is compacted and
reformatted. Since the file remains on the media, you can restore the file tag from the
backup, and the connection between the file tag on the extended drive and the file on
the media is restored, as long as the backup software supports EAs.
If a file is deleted from the media when it is deleted from the extended drive (which
happens with the media types in the second column of Table 18 on page 114), then
you must restore the full file with all of its data to the extended drive. The file can
then be re-migrated to media and purged, if necessary.
If you are using a media type that requires recovery of the full file, then you must
ensure that there is at least one backup set with a copy of the full file. In addition, you
must be able to easily identify which backup set contains the copy of the full file.
Backup sets from backup software that supports EAs (which includes most backup
software) are likely to contain file tags for some files and the full file data for other
files. This can make the process of tracking the backup location of the full data for
each file quite complex. As a result, using the DiskXtender Recycler is recommended
for restoring accidentally deleted files from the media types in the second column of
Table 18 on page 114.
!
IMPORTANT
If the DiskXtender Recycler is enabled, do not restore a file from a backup set
unless you are certain that the file is not in the DiskXtender Recycler and that the
file in the backup set is a full version of the file (not a file tag). Data loss can occur
when you restore a file tag from a backup set but the file data is no longer on the
media.
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Monitoring
DiskXtender
The following topics provide best practices for monitoring the health of DiskXtender
for Windows:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
Monitoring service events, errors, and warnings.................................................... 116
Monitoring file activity................................................................................................ 117
Monitoring media ........................................................................................................ 119
Monitoring licensing................................................................................................... 121
Reports .......................................................................................................................... 122
Audit logs ..................................................................................................................... 123
Monitoring DiskXtender
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Monitoring DiskXtender
Monitoring service events, errors, and warnings
A visual indicator appears in the Administrator window when a warning or error
occurs. The Event Viewer icon on the toolbar changes from an informational icon to a
triangular caution symbol to indicate a warning or an exclamation point to indicate
an error, as illustrated in Table 19 on page 116.
Table 19
Event Viewer icons for events, warnings, and errors
Event Viewer toolbar icon
Toolbar icon for warnings in
the Event Viewer
Toolbar icon for errors in the
Event Viewer
If the toolbar icon indicates that warnings or errors have occurred, click the icon to
open the Event Viewer and view details about the problem.
In addition, the number of errors and warnings since the service was last started is
listed in the status bar at the bottom of the Administrator.
You should configure DiskXtender to automatically send an email alert to a specific
email address when a warning or error occurs. By default, DiskXtender does not send
email alerts. You can add, edit, and delete email alerts for specific email addresses by
using the Alerts tab on the Service Properties dialog box.
In addition to the automatic alerts that DiskXtender issues, there are two configurable
alerts:
◆
Extended drive free space — You can configure DiskXtender to send an alert
when the amount of free space on the extended drive falls below a specified
threshold (in MB). The threshold is configured by using the Warn when free space
is getting low option on the Options tab of the Extended Drive Properties dialog
box. The default is 10 MB.
When you receive this alert, you can take the necessary action to purge or delete
files from the extended drive before it runs out of space.
◆
Media group free space — You can configure DiskXtender to send an alert when
the amount of free space in a media group falls below a specified threshold (in
MB). The threshold is configured by using the Warn when group free space falls
below option on the Options tab of the Media Group Properties dialog box.
This alert is disabled by default. If you use automated media preparation
features, such as automated EMC Centera media creation or automated labeling
for removable media, you would not need this alert. In this case, DiskXtender can
add media to the media group automatically as necessary.
However, if you are not using automated media preparation, enable this alert so
that you are notified when you need to add media to the media group so that
DiskXtender has a ready supply of media available for file migration.
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Monitoring file activity
You can monitor statistics for the number of files pending migration, purge, and
indexing. You can also monitor statistics indicating how many files have already been
migrated, purged, deleted, and submitted for indexing. Reviewing these statistics
periodically enables you to verify that these file activities are occurring.
Note: Indexing statistics are only available if you are using the DiskXtender Search Module
and you have enabled indexing for the extended drive.
Monitoring pending file activity
Monitor the following locations for statistics on the number of files pending
migration, purge, and indexing:
◆
Background Scan Properties, Statistics tab — Provides the number of files
qualifying for move rules and index rules during the last background scan.
◆
Description view (bottom right pane) of the File System Manager
Administrator when an extended drive is selected — Provides the number of
files pending migration and purge for the extended drive. This is a count of the
number of files currently on the move and purge lists.
Note: Because the move list might contain multiple entries for any given file, the actual
count for files queued for a move represents an approximation rather than an exact count.
(Duplicate entries are discarded when moves are processed.) The statistics are intended to
provide a window into DiskXtender system activity to indicate that file migration and
purging is occurring. They are not intended to provide an exact count of files awaiting
migration or purging.
These statistics enable you to verify that files are qualifying for configured rules.
You can also verify that files are qualifying for configured index rules by ensuring
that the ITL file is being updated. To check for updates, monitor the date on the file.
The ITL for an extended drive is located in the \DxLogs\Transaction Logs folder on
the extended drive.
Monitoring completed file activity
The following topics discuss how to monitor completed file activity:
◆
◆
“Viewing summary statistics for completed file activity” on page 117
“Tracking indexing activity” on page 118
Viewing summary statistics for completed file activity
Monitor the following locations for statistics on the number of files successfully
migrated, purged, deleted, and submitted for indexing:
◆
Background Scan Properties, Statistics tab — Provides the number of files
purged and deleted during the last background scan.
◆
Extended Drive Properties, Statistics tab — Provides the total number and size
in bytes of files fetched, migrated, purged, submitted for indexing, and edited or
deleted on the extended drive since the service was restarted or since the counts
were manually reset.
Monitoring file activity
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◆
Media Group Properties, Statistics tab — Provides the total number and size in
bytes of files migrated to the media group since the service was restarted or since
the counts were manually reset.
These statistics enable you to verify that file migration, purging, and deletion are
occurring after files qualify for configured rules, and that files are being submitted to
the ISE for indexing.
Tracking indexing activity
To monitor that files are being submitted to the ISE for indexing and that indexing is
taking place:
◆
Select the extended drive in the tree view of the File System Manager
Administrator. The number of files that have been indexed is listed in the bottom
right pane of the window.
Note: The statistic for indexed files is reset each time the DiskXtender service is restarted.
◆
Check the DiskXtender Event Viewer. Events that indicate that indexing is
successfully occurring appear similar to the following examples:
MSG 04/06/2011 18:43:26 (05B4) Index synchronization for extended
drive X: has started.
MSG 04/06/2011 18:43:26 (05B4) Index synchronization for extended
drive X: has completed successfully.
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◆
Check the index root directory on the ISE server, and ensure that index files are
being created and updated.
◆
Check the ISE event log.
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Monitoring media
The following topics provide information on the DiskXtender options available to
monitor media and clear errors when they occur:
◆
◆
◆
◆
“Media status indicators” on page 119
“Media task queue” on page 119
“Media group free space” on page 120
“Media logs” on page 120
Media status indicators
The label for each piece of media automatically changes color in the tree view of the
Administrator depending on its status, as listed in Table 20 on page 119.
Table 20
Media status indicated by color
Media color
Media status
Black
Online
Green
Online but with a task pending, in progress, or suspended
Blue
Full
Red
Error
Yellow
Offline
If the label for a piece of media is red in the Administrator, it means that an error has
occurred on the media. This might occur when a task for a piece of media fails, or
when an aborted task remains in the task queue as a failed task. It might also occur if
DiskXtender encounters problems while writing files to the media. When a media
encounters errors, you might need to clear the error status before any other activities
for that media can take place.
To clear the error status for a piece of media, right-click the media and select Clear
Error Status.
Media task queue
If you assign media tasks to multiple pieces of media, you can monitor the status of
the tasks with the Media Task Queue Manager.
Note: Media tasks are assigned to media either individually, by using a right-click menu
option, or in groups, by using features such as the Media Prepare Manager and the Copy
Media Manager.
You can change the processing order of the media in the queue by using the arrow
buttons on the right side of the Media Task Queue Manager dialog box. Because all
assigned tasks for a piece of media are processed together, moving a piece of media in
the queue also moves all tasks assigned to that media.
If necessary, you can stop, or abort, a media task that is currently in progress.
Monitoring media
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Media group free space
Automated media preparation features enable you to set up a variety of automated
media functions and eliminate a time-consuming requirement of system
administration: the need to manage media groups and the available space within
them by creating, preparing, or compacting media when necessary.
These features include automated EMC Centera media creation and automated
labeling for removable media, which are configured on the Automation page for a
media group.
However, if you do not use automated media preparation, configure DiskXtender to
send an email alert when the amount of free space in the media group falls below a
specified threshold (in MB). The threshold is configured by using the Warn when
group free space falls below option on the Options tab of the Media Group Properties
dialog box. When you enable this alert, the system notifies you when you need to add
media to the media group so that DiskXtender has a ready supply of media available
for file migration.
Media logs
DiskXtender maintains a log of activity for each piece of media. These logs are useful
to view task processing information and error codes/status for failed tasks. In
addition, if a media task is suspended, an entry in the media log notes when the task
will be retried. To open a media log, right-click the piece of media and select View
Log.
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Monitoring licensing
As files are added to the extended drive for DiskXtender to manage, you can
regularly monitor the DiskXtender license to ensure that you do not exceed the
capacity allotted by the license.
By default, DiskXtender sends a warning if the amount of data that DiskXtender
manages exceeds 80 percent of the licensed capacity. The warning appears in the
event logs and as an email alert, if alerts are configured. If necessary, you can disable
the alert by using the Enable high license capacity usage warning setting on the
Options tab of the Service Properties dialog box.
If you exceed the storage capacity of the license, a 90-day grace period commences.
You must update the license with additional storage capacity before the grace period
expires. Otherwise, file migration is disabled. Contact the EMC Licensing Support
team at licensing@emc.com for assistance with updating the license.
You can monitor license usage for a single DiskXtender installation from the File
System Manager Administrator by opening the Service Properties dialog box and
viewing the Licensing Information tab.
The License Server Administrator enables you to monitor total license usage by all
DiskXtender installations when you select a license or open the License Manager
dialog box.
You should also regularly review the License Server event logs to ensure that the
License Server service and the licenses it manages are healthy and available to the
DiskXtender servers that rely on them.
Monitoring licensing
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Monitoring DiskXtender
Reports
The DiskXtender reporting feature is a useful tool to track system statistics. You may
want to run regular reports on the system and compare them to previous reports in
order to monitor system activity.
Table 21 on page 122 lists the reports available in DiskXtender.
Table 21
Reports
Report name
Description
Extended Drive Information
Displays information about the extended drives you select, including properties
and assigned media.
Full reports also display additional information, including schedule information,
metadata export statistics, move statistics, and fetch statistics.
Media
Includes information on the selected media, either as a summarized list or a
detailed description of properties.
Information displayed in the detailed report includes location information, total
used/free space, and read/write/mount statistics.
Media Files
Provides information about the files on the selected pieces of media.
Note: You can also run a file report (for a selected group of files rather than for a
piece of media) by using the Explorer Add-ons.
Media Services
Provides information on the media services configured on the selected
DiskXtender servers.
Media Tasks
Displays a list of media tasks that are pending, are in progress, or that have failed
for selected media on the selected extended drives.
Product Registry Information Provides a complete listing of all information contained in the Microsoft Windows
registry about the DiskXtender service on the selected servers.
To run a report, use the Report Generator feature available on the Tools menu in the
File System Manager Administrator.
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Audit logs
You should regularly review the DiskXtender and MediaStor audit logs, which
enable you to monitor important DiskXtender events, including:
◆
Addition, editing, and deletion of configuration objects (extended drives, media
folders, media groups, rules, and so on)
◆
Media management tasks
◆
Service stops and starts
Audit logging is automatically enabled, and the DiskXtender service account is
automatically added to the security administrators group (DxSecurityAdmins on the
DiskXtender server and MsSecurityAdmins on the MediaStor server), during
DiskXtender installation.
To view the audit log, open the Audit Log Configuration Settings dialog box from
the Tools menu, and click Display.
Frequent backups of the audit log are recommended. DiskXtender does not automate
the backup of audit logs. Therefore, you must manually back up the file by using a
dedicated backup software solution.
Audit logs
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Monitoring DiskXtender
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7
Backup and
Recovery
The following topics provide best practices for backing up and recovering the
DiskXtender for Windows system:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
Developing a backup strategy...................................................................................
Backing up the extended drive .................................................................................
Ensuring storage redundancy ...................................................................................
Backing up the DiskXtender server..........................................................................
Protecting against accidental deletion of files.........................................................
Recovering the system after a failure .......................................................................
Backup and Recovery
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128
132
134
135
136
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Developing a backup strategy
DiskXtender is an archival product that stores the primary copy of a file on storage
media. Because it is the primary copy of a file that resides on storage media in
DiskXtender—not a backup copy of a file—it is important to establish a
comprehensive backup process to make a copy of the file. This copy can be used to
recover the data if it is lost.
A comprehensive backup strategy enables you to restore individual files, or even the
full DiskXtender system, in the event of problems or an entire system shutdown. The
strategy should protect the three basic components of the DiskXtender system:
◆
The extended drive—from both the accidental deletion of individual files and the
more complete destruction or corruption of the entire volume
◆
The DiskXtender server, including the DiskXtender installation
◆
The hardware devices and storage media to which files are migrated
This chapter discusses the considerations to implement a regular backup process for
each one of these components. It also provides guidelines for the necessary tools that
are available to every DiskXtender installation for backup and restore procedures.
However, each DiskXtender environment is unique. Different hardware devices,
network configurations, existing tools outside of DiskXtender, and business needs
contribute to the infinite variety of configurations that are available. It is important to
take all of these variables into consideration when you develop a backup strategy.
If necessary, EMC Professional Services staff can assist you in choosing the
appropriate backup software and developing a custom backup solution.
The following best practices are recommended to back up the DiskXtender system:
◆
Use qualified backup software to back up each extended drive and the system
drive on the DiskXtender server.
Qualified backup software is listed in the EMC DiskXtender Software Compatibility
Guide on the Powerlink website.
Table 22
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◆
Use the Registry Log Wizard to change the location in which the DiskXtender
registry backup is saved. The new location should be on a network drive that is
backed up regularly.
◆
Enable the DiskXtender Recycler so that you can restore files that have been
accidentally deleted from the extended drive.
◆
Ensure that there is an additional copy of the secondary storage to which you
migrate files through DiskXtender. Table 22 on page 126 provides details for each
type of storage.
Recommended media protection methods (page 1 of 2)
Type of storage
Recommended protection method
EMC Centera
Enable EMC Centera replication to another EMC Centera cluster.
NAS
Use qualified backup software to back up the NAS device.
Removable media
(tape or optical)
Create copies of each piece of media by using the DiskXtender Copy Media Manager, or
configure multi-target migration to another type of media. (Available for both the
MediaStor and Sun StorageTek ACSLS media services.)
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Table 22
Recommended media protection methods (page 2 of 2)
Type of storage
Recommended protection method
TSM
Follow recommended TSM backup practices.
EMC Atmos
Replication is enabled while creating resource management groups while configuring
EMC Atmos.
Note: Ensuring high availability of the DiskXtender system through the use of Microsoft
clustering or AutoStart is discussed in the DiskXtender installation guide. Replicating the
extended drive through products like RepliStor, SRDF, or MirrorView is also covered in the
DiskXtender installation guide.
Developing a backup strategy
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Backing up the extended drive
Most backup applications, including all of the applications qualified for use with
DiskXtender, are capable of backing up a file on the extended drive and its metadata,
including the extended attributes (EAs) that DiskXtender uses to store migration
information. If a file is restored to the extended drive without its extended attributes,
then DiskXtender treats the file as a new file and migrates it again.
When backup software is EA-aware, backup performance is improved. This is
because the backup software can back up file tags for managed files on the extended
drive.
Note: Even if backup software is capable of successfully backing up file tags, you may want to
back up a full version of each file before it is migrated and purged to ensure that there is a full
copy of each file available in one of the backup sets.
When backup software is not EA-aware, such as IBM Tivoli Storage Manager, file tags
are backed up as zero-byte files, and the migration information for a file is not
captured. Therefore, if you restore a zero-byte file from backup, the file is
re-migrated, and data loss can occur. To prevent this situation, you must include the
full file data in each backup. Purged files must be read from media so that they can be
included in the backup. This slows system performance and requires more disk space
for the backup set. Details on using this backup method are available in the
DiskXtender administration guide.
Qualified backup software that is EA-aware
The EMC DiskXtender Software Compatibility Guide, available on the Powerlink
website, provides a complete and updated list (including supported versions) of the
backup software qualified for use with DiskXtender. The qualified applications
include:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
NetWorker®
EMC Avamar®
Microsoft Windows NTBackup
Symantec Backup Exec
Symantec NetBackup
HP OpenView Storage DataProtector
CA ARCserve Backup
BakBone NetVault
CommVault Galaxy Enterprise Edition
Installing and configuring EA-aware backup software
Follow the recommended best practices of the qualified backup software to install the
software and perform regular full, incremental, and differential backups according to
company backup policies. In addition, the following general best practices are
recommended:
128
◆
Install the client software for the backup program on the DiskXtender server.
Install backup server software on a different computer.
◆
If you use Avamar, configure Avamar to back up files based on whether the
Archive attribute is enabled. The Interoperability of Avamar and DiskXtender for
Windows Technical Note, which is available on the EMC Powerlink website,
provides details.
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Back up the DxLogs directory on the extended drive, as well as all media folders.
This ensures a more comprehensive recovery if you must restore the entire
extended drive.
Note: The DxLogs directory includes the DiskXtender Recycler and all of the files within
the Recycler. The Recycler should only be restored from a backup if you must restore the
entire extended drive. In other words, do not restore individual files from a backup to the
Recycler. Otherwise, data loss may occur.
◆
Schedule backups for times of minimal system activity to minimize the impact to
system performance. Consider all system activity on the DiskXtender server,
including virus scans, background scans, file migration, file fetch activity, and so
on.
Configuring DiskXtender for EA-aware backup software
Consider the following DiskXtender configuration best practices when you use
EA-aware backup software to back up the extended drive:
◆
When you configure DiskXtender for EA-aware backup software, you must
choose whether to back up only the file tag or the full file data for fetched files. To
back up only the file tags for fetched files, leave the default selection of Fast
backup - read migration info only for the 3rd party backup mode for managed
files option on the Options page for an extended drive. To back up the full file
data for fetched files, select Snapshot compatible - unfiltered file data for the
option.
◆
If the backup software backs up files based on whether the Archive attribute is
enabled, such as Avamar, configure DiskXtender to enable the Archive attribute
when the extended attributes for a file change.
Some backup programs, such as Avamar, may not recognize that the backup for a
file needs to be updated after an EA change. As a result, you can configure
DiskXtender to enable the Archive attribute, and then configure the backup
program to back up the file based on the change to the Archive attribute.
To configure DiskXtender to enable the Archive attribute based on EA changes,
select Enable the Archive file attribute when extended attribute (EA) changes
occur for a file for the Enable ‘Archive’ attribute after EA changes option on the
Options tab of the Service Properties dialog box.
◆
If you set retention on files that are migrated to EMC Centera or Retained NAS
media, you may want to increase the delay period before retention is applied. The
default setting of 10 seconds may not be sufficient when you restore files with
retention. This is because some backup programs restore a file in two passes: the
first pass includes the file data, and the second pass includes file metadata,
including EAs. If the delay is not sufficient, retention may be applied after the
first pass, which prevents the second pass from being successful to complete the
file restore.
You should increase the retention delay before retention is applied to files. If you
increase the retention delay after retention is applied, the delay setting will not
take effect when the file is restored.
To delay retention enforcement, use the Delay in seconds before retention
period is enforced option on the Options page for an extended drive.
Backing up the extended drive
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Note: If you cannot increase the retention delay due to file retention procedures at your
company, you can avoid file restore issues with retention by restoring files from the backup
to an alternate location and then copying the restored files back to the extended drive.
No additional configuration steps beyond these should be required in DiskXtender.
Do not enable metadata exports of the extended drive. If the backup software relies
on the Archive attribute to determine which files should be included in an
incremental backup, then a metadata export can interfere. This is because the
metadata export process clears the Archive attribute. If the attribute is cleared by a
metadata export, then the file is not included in the next incremental backup by the
backup software because the backup software sees the cleared attribute and skips the
file, assuming that the file was backed up in a previously scheduled process.
Creating snapshot backups of the extended drive
The following snapshot and backup software is qualified for creating a snapshot
backup of the DiskXtender extended drive:
◆
Microsoft Windows 2003 Volume Shadow Copy Services (VSS)
Note: The backup software used to back up the VSS snapshot, such as NetWorker or
NTBackup, must be licensed and enabled for use with VSS. It must also be EA-aware. Do
not use IBM Tivoli Storage Manager, which does not support EAs, to back up VSS
snapshots.
!
◆
NetWorker PowerSnap Module for CLARiiON and the PowerSnap Module for
Symmetrix DMX™
◆
NetWorker SnapImage™ Module for Microsoft Windows
IMPORTANT
SnapImage is not qualified with DiskXtender when setting retention on files
migrated to EMC Centera and Retained NAS media.
Updates to this list (including supported versions) are provided in the EMC
DiskXtender Software Compatibility Guide, available on the Powerlink website.
Follow the recommended best practices of the qualified snapshot and backup
software to install the software and perform regular snapshot backups according to
your company’s backup policies.
A snapshot backup does not fetch files from media, even if you change the 3rd party
backup mode setting on the Options tab of the Extended Drive Properties dialog box
to Full backup. In other words, file tags are backed up as file tags, and full files are
backed up as full files.
To configure DiskXtender for snapshot backups, set the 3rd party backup mode for
managed files option on the Options page for the extended drive to Snapshot
compatible - unfiltered file data. This option enables the snapshot software to back
up the full file data for fetched and unmanaged files, and the file tags for purged files.
In other words, it enables the software to back up the extended drive in its exact state
at the time of the snapshot.
If you set retention on files that are migrated to EMC Centera or Retained NAS
media, you may want to increase the delay period before retention is applied by
using the Delay in seconds before retention period is enforced option on the Options
page for an extended drive.
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No additional configuration steps should be required in DiskXtender. Do not enable
metadata exports of the extended drive. If the backup software relies on the Archive
attribute to determine which files should be included in an incremental backup, then
a metadata export can interfere. This is because the metadata export process clears
the Archive attribute. If the attribute is cleared by a metadata export, then the file is
not included in the next incremental backup by the backup software because the
backup software sees the cleared attribute and skips the file, assuming that the file
was backed up in a previously scheduled process.
Backing up the extended drive
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Backup and Recovery
Ensuring storage redundancy
The following topics provide recommendations for ensuring redundancy of the
media to which files on the extended drive are migrated:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
“Copying removable media” on page 132
“Replicating EMC Centera” on page 132
“Backing up NAS” on page 133
“Backing up TSM” on page 133
“Backing up cloud media” on page 133
“Multi-target migration” on page 133
Copying removable media
To back up all removable media types supported by the MediaStor (tape or optical)
and Sun StorageTek ACSLS media services (tape), create a copy of each piece of
media. Copy media are media that are being used as copies, or backups, of original
media on the extended drive. If an original piece of media becomes unreadable, the
copy of the media can be promoted to original status (after the original is removed
from the system).
DiskXtender provides two ways to create copy media:
◆
The Copy Media Manager enables you to create copies of multiple pieces of
media at one time. Open the Tools menu and select Copy Media Manager to
launch this feature.
◆
The Label Copy media task enables you to create a copy of a single side of a single
piece of media, or if you need to copy from a standalone drive to a library drive or
the other way around, or between two standalone drives.
If necessary, you can even create and maintain offsite copies of original media for
disaster recovery. The DiskXtender administration guide provide details.
Replicating EMC Centera
The EMC Centera replication feature protects against data corruption and data loss
by automatically copying data from one EMC Centera cluster to another EMC
Centera cluster. As an EMC Centera cluster acquires new content from an application,
the replication mechanism ensures that this new content is automatically and
transparently transferred across a WAN or LAN to a designated EMC Centera in
another location.
Replication is used on an ongoing basis to keep two or more EMC Centera clusters
synchronized with new content. In a typical replication setup, the EMC Centera
clusters are geographically separate to ensure disaster recovery or to distribute the
content for access from another location. For example, a company may replicate to a
second EMC Centera cluster to enable recovery from the loss of the primary EMC
Centera or to avoid multiple requests for the same content across a WAN connection.
The replication process itself is transparent to DiskXtender. In other words, after
DiskXtender migrates files to EMC Centera, the files are replicated from the source
cluster to the target cluster without any DiskXtender involvement.
However, when a failure occurs on the source cluster, DiskXtender enables users to
read files from a target cluster. “Specifying EMC Centera media service options” on
page 47 provides details.
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Backing up NAS
Use dedicated backup software to back up files on the NAS device shares configured
as NAS media in DiskXtender. Because the full file data (and not file tags) are stored
on the shares, the extended attribute restrictions that apply to backing up the
extended drive do not apply to backing up NAS.
Perform full and incremental backups of the NAS shares on a regular basis according
to your company’s recommended backup policies.
!
IMPORTANT
Only the DiskXtender service account and any accounts required for backups
should have full access to the share that corresponds to a piece of NAS media. No
other user accounts or applications should have write access to the share.
Backing up TSM
Follow recommended TSM procedures to back up the TSM system, including the
TSM server and client configuration, as well as the media to which the TSM server
ultimately writes.
Backing up cloud media
Files migrated to cloud media can be simultaneously migrated to another piece of
media which has been added to the same multi-target group. You can also follow the
back up procedures recommended by the cloud solution provider.
Multi-target migration
Regardless of the type of media you use, you can ensure redundancy of files on
media by migrating files on the extended drive to multiple pieces of media with the
DiskXtender multi-target migration feature. With multi-target migration, you can
migrate a single file to different pieces—and even different types—of media at the
same time.
Note: If there are two standard media groups in the multi-target group, each pointing to two
different EMC Centera media services, then you cannot apply retention classes to files that are
written to the media in the multi-target group. This restriction is intended to protect against the
scenario where the retention class on one EMC Centera is applied to files that have been
migrated to a different EMC Centera.
“Setting up multi-target migration” on page 88 provides details on multi-target
migration.
Ensuring storage redundancy
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Backing up the DiskXtender server
In addition to backing up the files on the extended drive, you should perform regular
backups of the rest of the DiskXtender server, including the system drive and the
DiskXtender configuration itself, which is stored in the Microsoft Windows registry.
The following topics provide details.
You should also record the following information in a document dedicated to backup
and restore procedures:
◆
◆
◆
◆
The name of the servers on which DiskXtender is installed
The version of the operating system on the DiskXtender servers
The size and drive letter of each partition
The volume serial number for each partition (extended drive)
This information is necessary to restore the server in the event of a total system
failure.
Backing up the system drive
Use a dedicated backup tool to back up the system drive on the DiskXtender server
according to your company’s backup policy.
Backing up DiskXtender registry settings
To back up the DiskXtender configuration for either File System Manager or
MediaStor, you need to back up the DiskXtender settings that are stored in the
Microsoft Windows registry. The Registry Log Wizard, available in both the
File System Manager Administrator and the MediaStor Administrator, enables you to
do this.
For "virtual" media such as TSM and EMC Centera, the registry log backup is
especially important because "virtual" media is defined through the File System
Manager configuration. In the event of system failure, it is most efficient to restore
that configuration to access and restore, if necessary, files on the media.
By default, the registry log is saved to a folder in the DiskXtender installation
directory. You should designate a different location in which to store the registry log
files by using the Set the automatic registry log location option on the Registry Log
Wizard. The registry log should be stored at a network location. In addition, you
should archive the registry log files as you would any other backup data for disaster
recovery.
Note: Each DiskXtender installation creates its own registry log file. You cannot restore a
registry log file from one server to another server in order to move or reuse a DiskXtender
configuration. The server to which you restore a registry log file must have the same name as
the server from which the registry log file was generated. In addition, you must restore a
registry log file to a DiskXtender installation with the same release as the one that was used to
create the registry log file.
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Protecting against accidental deletion of files
You can prevent users from accidentally deleting files from the extended drive by
controlling access to the files, setting the read-only attribute for the files, or by setting
retention on the files.
For environments where these methods are not appropriate, however, you can enable
the DiskXtender Recycler, which enables you to restore files that have been
accidentally deleted. You may also be able to restore files from backup sets if you are
using a qualified backup tool.
“Recovering files from the DiskXtender Recycler” on page 113 provides details.
Protecting against accidental deletion of files
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Recovering the system after a failure
The following tasks are required to restore the DiskXtender server after a system
failure:
1. If necessary, reformat the hard drive on the DiskXtender server.
2. Reinstall the operating system on a server with the same name as the failed
DiskXtender server.
3. Create partitions on the hard drive for the extended drive(s).
4. Reinstall and configure the necessary media service software:
• If you have EMC Centera and you were using an application profile to connect
to the EMC Centera cluster, copy the DiskXtender .pea file to the same location
it was in before the failure.
• If you use MediaStor, recover the MediaStor server, if necessary. (If the
MediaStor server did not encounter any failures, then the recovery steps that
follow are not necessary. Proceed to step 5 .)
a. Reformat the hard drive and reinstall Microsoft Windows.
b. Ensure that all necessary hardware is attached properly to the server.
c. Reinstall MediaStor.
d. Use the Registry Log Wizard in the MediaStor Administrator to restore the
MediaStor registry log file.
e. Restart the server.
f. Use the MediaStor Administrator to set all libraries online and perform a
full inventory.
• If you use NAS, recover the files on the NAS device by using backup
application recovery procedures, if necessary.
• If you use TSM, install the TSM Backup/Archive Client on the DiskXtender
server, and set the Allow Backup Delete option to Yes.
You should also restore the dsm.opt file from backup to the DiskXtender bin
directory, or copy the file from the TSM BACLIENT directory and edit it as
you did when you initially set up the TSM media service.
• If you use Sun StorageTek ACSLS, connect the server to the library drives, and
power on the libraries.
5. Install DiskXtender.
6. Restore the extended drives to the new partitions. If you used backup software
that is EA-aware, or if you used snapshot backup software, follow the restore
procedures provided in the documentation for the software. Procedures for other
backup environments are provided in the DiskXtender administration guide.
7. Use the Registry Log Wizard in the File System Manager Administrator to restore
the DiskXtender registry log file.
Note: If the volume serial number and the drive letter have been changed, then use the
Change Extended Drive Serial Number Wizard to change the extended drive ID and the
drive letter. The wizard launches automatically when necessary. The online help for the
wizard provides assistance in completing the wizard.
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8. Restart the server.
9. Verify that the restore procedure was successful:
• Ensure that all hardware and services are online.
• Verify that all DiskXtender settings are configured correctly.
• Verify that files can be migrated, fetched, purged, and deleted as expected.
Contact EMC Customer Service if you have any questions or need assistance to
restore the system after a failure.
Recovering the system after a failure
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Special Environments
The following topics provide best practices for special DiskXtender environments:
◆
◆
High volume environments....................................................................................... 140
User home directories................................................................................................. 144
Special Environments
139
Special Environments
High volume environments
DiskXtender is a scalable file storage solution. However, system performance is
impacted by the hardware environment, the network environment, and the number
of files that DiskXtender migrates and retrieves. Environments where the
performance is impacted as a result of the amount of system activity are considered
high volume environments.
An EMC technical account representative can assist you in evaluating whether your
hardware and network are sufficient for the DiskXtender implementation you are
planning. You may want to consider adding DiskXtender servers and distributing
files among multiple servers to improve performance.
In addition, there are several best practices to configure DiskXtender in a high
volume environment:
◆
◆
“Defining a high volume environment” on page 140
“Recommended settings for high volume environments” on page 140
Defining a high volume environment
In a high volume environment, performance is impacted as a result of one or more of
the following issues:
◆
There are a significant number of simultaneous file requests, file edits, file
deletions, or other file activities.
◆
There are not enough drives to satisfy the requests.
◆
There are not enough system resources to perform all requested activities.
Both migration performance and fetch performance can be impacted. For example,
the operation may "time out" when a user tries to open a file, or a file may take a
significant amount of time to migrate once it qualifies for a move rule.
Recommended settings for high volume environments
If you are installing DiskXtender in a high volume environment, adhere to the
recommendations in the sections that follow.
Exceed the minimum server requirements
The minimum requirements for the DiskXtender server listed in the DiskXtender
installation guide are not sufficient for high volume environments. Instead, the
higher recommendations should be used.
In addition, the DiskXtender server can benefit from the use of multiple processors.
Do not run other processes or applications on the DiskXtender server. The server
should be dedicated to the DiskXtender installation.
An EMC technical account representative can assist you in evaluating whether your
hardware and network are sufficient for the DiskXtender implementation you are
planning.
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Select faster media types
In general, DiskXtender performance is faster when writing to virtual media, such as
NAS and TSM, than when writing to removable media, such as tape, optical, or DVD.
In particular, NAS is recommended when you migrate files in high volume
environments.
Disable real-time moves
By default, DiskXtender qualifies files against move rules as soon as they are saved to
the extended drive.
If there is a significant number of users saving files to and accessing files on the
extended drive during the day, you can change this default behavior so that files are
only qualified for migration during a background scan. By default, background scans
begin automatically at midnight each night and run only once during the day.
However, you can change the time and frequency at which background scans occur
to maximize system performance. System resources are then freed during the day to
service other requests, such as file fetches.
Note: If move rules are configured with an age delay, files are qualified against the rules only
during a background scan, regardless of whether real-time moves are enabled or disabled.
To disable real-time moves, select the Disable real-time moves setting for the Enable
real-time moves option on the Options tab of the Service Properties dialog box.
Then stop and restart the DiskXtender service for the change to take effect.
Schedule media activities for times with the least system activity
If a significant number of users access and save files on the extended drive during a
certain period of the day, schedule other media activities to occur during the times of
least system activity. These media activities include file migration, media task
processing, and copy media updates.
In concert with the disabling of real-time moves, this allows DiskXtender to focus on
servicing fetch requests.
To schedule media activities, click Schedule on the Settings page for the extended
drive.
High volume environments
141
Special Environments
Use the appropriate media fill method
DiskXtender can write files to media either sequentially or randomly. Table 23 on
page 142 describes the fill methods available in DiskXtender.
Table 23
Media fill methods
Fill method
Description
Intended media type
Sequential
Fills media one at a time in the order they appear
either in the tree view of the Administrator or on the
Items tab of the Media Group Properties dialog box.
Write times are slower using Sequential fill, but file
retrieval times are considerably faster for removable
media.
This is the default for all media types except for EMC
Centera.
Removable media, including:
• Tape
• Optical
• DVD-R
• DVD-RAM
Random
Allows DiskXtender to write to any available media in
the media group, and to write to multiple pieces of
media at once.
Because virtual media does not have to be physically
mounted to retrieve files, there should be no effect on
client file request retrieval times (as there can be with
random fill of removable media).
This is the default for EMC Centera.
Virtual media, including:
• EMC Centera
• NAS
• TSM
To edit the media fill method, select the Media fill method item on the Options page
when adding or editing a media group.
If you select the Random fill method, you can specify the number of media that
DiskXtender can write to simultaneously. To edit this setting, use the Maximum
media simultaneously receiving files option when you add or edit a media group.
Migrate only inactive files
If you migrate a file and it changes, the file must be migrated again. If a migrated file
changes frequently, then it must be migrated each time it changes. The additional
migrations provide a negative impact on system performance.
In an environment where files are changing frequently, you can ease the strain on
system resources by only migrating files once they are no longer edited.
To limit file migration to relatively static files, create an inclusive move rule with an
age delay based on the last write time for a file. Start with an age delay of 60 or 90
days. If you find that the extended drive is running out of space with this
configuration, you may want to reduce the age delay. However, the age delay should
not be less than 30 days.
Note: If you use a third-party backup or antivirus application and you are certain that the
applications do not change the last access time for a file, select Last access time instead.
Purge only inactive files
When you reduce the number of fetch requests, performance improves, particularly
in high volume environments.
To reduce fetch requests, maintain as much data on the extended drive as possible.
Therefore, purge files only when they are no longer being accessed, and purge files
only as disk space is needed.
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To purge files only when they are no longer being used, configure purge rules with an
age delay. The recommended age delay is 30 days since the file was accessed. To
purge files as disk space is needed, select the Do not force purges during
background scans option when configuring the purge rule.
When you select this option, files are written to the purge list when they qualify for
the purge rule. The files are not actually purged until the amount of used space on the
extended drive reaches a certain percentage (the purge start watermark).
DiskXtender then continues to purge files on the purge list until the percentage of
used space is reduced to an acceptable level (the purge stop watermark).
You can customize the purge watermarks on the Options tab of the Extended Drive
Properties dialog box. By default, the purge start watermark is set to 95 percent, and
the purge stop watermark is set to 90 percent. To maintain a sufficient amount of free
space on the extended drive, a best practice is to change the purge start watermark to
80 percent and the purge stop watermark to 75 percent.
Avoid Direct Read
When you mark a purged file for Direct Read, the file is opened directly from the
media when requested, rather than being fetched back to the extended drive and
opened there.
The Direct Read feature is not intended for use in high volume environments. Direct
Read requests can be as much as three times slower than normal fetch requests.
Take advantage of the prefetch feature
To reduce fetch requests during high traffic times, anticipate file retrieval needs and
prefetch frequently used files. During a prefetch, DiskXtender retrieves files from
storage media and writes the file data to the extended drive. “Prefetching files from
media” on page 108 provides details.
High volume environments
143
Special Environments
User home directories
DiskXtender has traditionally been targeted to serve in an archiving capacity rather
than as a file server for active and frequently accessed files, such as those in user
home directories.
However, if you need to use DiskXtender to extend a drive that contains user home
directories, there are a number of settings that you should change from the default to
maximize system performance:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
“Use recommended media types” on page 144
“Assign necessary privileges to the service account” on page 144
“Migrate only inactive files” on page 144
“Purge only inactive files” on page 146
“Avoid Direct Read” on page 143
“Disable real-time moves” on page 141
“Schedule media activities for times with the least system activity” on page 141
Use recommended media types
In general, DiskXtender performance is faster when writing to virtual media, such as
NAS and TSM, than when writing to removable media, such as tape, optical, or DVD.
In particular, NAS is recommended when migrating files from user home directories.
This is because that type of environment typically experiences a higher volume of
media transactions, and a faster media type can improve performance.
Assign necessary privileges to the service account
The DiskXtender service account must have full access to all directories and files on
the extended drive, including all directories and files in user home directories.
This level of access is necessary so that DiskXtender can migrate and purge files on
the extended drive.
Migrate only inactive files
If you migrate a file and it changes, the file must be migrated again. If a migrated file
changes frequently, then it must be migrated each time it changes. The additional
migrations provide a negative impact on system performance.
In an environment where files are changing frequently, as they do with user home
directories, you can ease the strain on system resources by only migrating files once
they are no longer accessed.
To limit file migration to relatively static files:
1. Create a media folder for the folder on the extended drive that contains the user
home directories:
a. Right-click the extended drive and select Create Media Folder.
b. Click Browse.
c. Browse to the primary directory containing the user home directories.
d. Click OK.
e. Click OK again.
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2. In the primary media folder, create an inclusive move rule with an age delay
based on the last write time for a file. This rule identifies which files should be
moved to media.
a. Right-click the Move Rules node and select New.
b. Select Include on the Type page of the move rule wizard.
c. Click Next.
d. Proceed through the File Name, Size, and Attributes pages of the wizard,
selecting migration criteria as appropriate.
e. On the Age page, select Apply rule to files of age.
f. Select Greater than.
g. Type the number of days that must elapse before a file is migrated.
The value depends on your environment. Start with 60 or 90 days. If you find
that the extended drive is running out of space with this configuration, you
may want to reduce the age delay. However, the age delay should not be less
than 30 days.
h. From the Since list box, select Last write time.
Note: If you use a third-party backup or antivirus application and you are certain that
the applications do not change the last access time for a file, select Last access time
instead.
i. Click Next.
j. On the Settings page, select the media group that should receive the files, and
then click Next.
Do not select the Mark files for direct read after move or Purge files
immediately after move checkboxes. Direct Read and immediate purge of
files is strongly discouraged in high volume environments, including
environments where you manage user home directories. “Purge only inactive
files” on page 146 and “Avoid Direct Read” on page 143 provide details.
k. Click Finish on the summary page.
3. In the primary media folder, create exclusive move rules to exclude frequently
accessed files (like Desktop.ini and email files) from movement to media:
a. Right-click the Move Rules node and select New.
b. Select Exclude on the Type page of the move rule wizard.
c. Click Next.
d. On the File Name page, type the file name criteria (such as Desktop.ini) in the
File Name text box.
e. Click Next.
f. Proceed through the remaining pages of the wizard.
g. Click Finish on the summary page.
4. In the primary media folder, create an exclusive move rule to exclude
application-related files (such as .exe and .dll files) from movement to media.
5. In the primary media folder, create an exclusive move rule to exclude temporary
files (such as .tmp files) from movement to media.
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6. In the tree view of the File System Manager Administrator, reorder the move rules
in the primary media folder so that the exclusive move rules appear first
underneath the media folder.
This ensures that the frequently accessed, application, and temporary files are
excluded from migration, even though the primary media folder contains an
inclusive move rule that applies to all files within it.
To reorder the move rules, right-click the move rules and select Promote or
Demote.
7. If temporary Internet files are stored in the user home directories on the extended
drive, create media folders and exclusive move rules to exclude them from
migration:
a. Create a media folder for the Temporary Internet Files directory in each user’s
home directory.
To do this, right-click the extended drive and select Create Media Folder. Then
browse to the Temporary Internet Files directory for a user.
b. Right-click the Move Rules node in the new media folder and select New.
c. Select Exclude on the Type page of the move rule wizard.
d. Click Next.
e. On the File Name page, type *.* in the File Name text box.
f. Click Next.
g. Proceed through the remaining pages of the wizard.
h. Click Finish on the summary page.
8. Reorder the media folders so that the primary media folder is listed last in the tree
view of the File System Manager Administrator.
This ensures that the files in the Temporary Internet Files directories are excluded
from migration, even though the root/main media folder contains an inclusive
move rule that applies to all files within it.
To reorder the media folder, right-click the media folder and select Demote.
Purge only inactive files
When you reduce the number of fetch requests, performance improves, particularly
in high volume environments, such as when migrating files from user home
directories.
To reduce fetch requests, you should maintain as much data on the extended drive as
possible. Therefore, purge files only when they are no longer being accessed, and
purge files only as disk space is needed.
To purge files only when they are no longer being used, configure purge rules with an
age delay. The recommended age delay is 30 days since the file was accessed.
To purge files as disk space is needed, select the Do not force purges during
background scans option when you configure the purge rule. When you select this
option, files are written to the purge list when they qualify for the purge rule. The
files are not actually purged until the amount of used space on the extended drive
reaches a certain percentage (the purge start watermark). DiskXtender then continues
to purge files on the purge list until the percentage of used space is reduced to an
acceptable level (the purge stop watermark).
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You can customize the purge watermarks on the Options tab of the Extended Drive
Properties dialog box. By default, the purge start watermark is set to 95 percent, and
the purge stop watermark is set to 90 percent. To maintain a sufficient amount of free
space on the extended drive, a best practice is to change the purge start watermark to
80 percent and the purge stop watermark to 75 percent.
Avoid Direct Read
When you mark a purged file for Direct Read, the file is opened directly from the
media when requested, rather than being fetched back to the extended drive and
opened there.
Direct Read is strongly discouraged in most DiskXtender environments, especially in
high volume environments, including environments where you migrate user home
directories. Direct Read requests can be as much as three times slower than normal
fetch requests.
Disable real-time moves
By default, DiskXtender qualifies files against move rules as soon as they are saved to
the extended drive.
Because the files in user home directories change frequently as users work during the
day, you can change this default behavior so that files are only qualified for migration
during a background scan. By default, background scans begin automatically at
midnight each night and run only once during the day. However, you can change the
time and frequency at which background scans occur to maximize system
performance. System resources are then freed during the day to service other
requests, such as file fetches.
Note: If move rules are configured with an age delay, files are qualified against the rules only
during a background scan, regardless of whether real-time moves are enabled or disabled.
To disable real-time moves, select the Disable real-time moves setting for the Enable
real-time moves option on the Options tab of the Service Properties dialog box.
Then stop and restart the DiskXtender service for the change to take effect.
Schedule media activities appropriately
Because the files in user home directories change frequently as users work, schedule
other media activities to occur during the times of least system activity. These media
activities include file migration, media task processing, and copy media updates.
For example, if most users work during normal business hours, schedule media
activities to occur overnight. If you also disable real-time moves so that files are
evaluated for move only during a background scan, DiskXtender daytime system
activity is further reduced. This enables DiskXtender to focus more on servicing fetch
requests for users during the day.
To schedule media activities, click Schedule on the Settings page for the extended
drive.
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Index
A
shares 38
access
NAS share 26, 56
profile (EMC Centera) 46
account, service
DiskXtender 133, 144
License Server 31
MediaStor 60
ACSLS. See Sun StorageTek ACSLS
active cluster nodes 33
adding a library 61
age delay
index rule 99, 101
move rule 86, 93, 142
purge rule 106
aggregate NAS 57, 88, 89
alert, email 116
alias, node
AutoStart 38, 40
EMC Centera 47
antivirus. See virus scans
ApplicationXtender 44
ArcServe 128
Atmos, EMC Atmos 77
audit
EMC Centera string for deleted files 48
log 123
automation
EMC Centera media creation 48 to 50
removable media compaction 68
removable media labeling 66
AutoStart
data source 38, 39, 40
extended drive 38, 39, 40
extended drive connection 38
failover behavior 37
installation 38 to 40
licensing 37
media services supported 37
node alias 38, 40
processes 38, 40
requirements 37
resource groups 38, 39
B
background scan 83
backup
DiskXtender configuration (registry settings) 126, 134
DiskXtender server 80, 134
extended drive 126, 128 to 131
media 126, 132 to 133
restoring deleted files from 114
scheduling 129
snapshot 130
strategy 126
Backup Exec 128
BakBone NetVault 128
BLOB, embedded 48
BrightStor ArcServe 128
C
cache, Direct Read 110
calculating file overhead 24
Celerra 25, 57
Centera. See EMC Centera
characters, international 25
Chargeback Reporter, EMC Centera 51
Check Disk 66
CLARiiON
as NAS media 25
PowerSnap module 130
replication 44
class, retention 94
client-side ID calculation (EMC Centera) 48
cloud
EMC Atmos 77
storage, media 77
cloud storage
create media 77
delete media 78
removing media 78
clustering
extended drive 35, 36
extended drive connection 34
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Index
failover behavior 34
installation 35 to 36
license 30, 34
media services supported 34
number and type of nodes 33
requirements 34
resources 35, 36
shares 34, 35
virtual server 34, 35
VMware 41
collision avoidance (EMC Centera) 48
combo drive 27, 28
communication threads, EMC Centera 49 to 50
CommVault Galaxy 128
compaction 63, 66 to 68
compression, hardware 73
Computer Associates BrightStor ArcServe 128
content indexing 97 to 103
copy media 132
corrupt media 65, 66
D
data
supported for indexing 98
supported on the extended drive 24
data source, AutoStart 38, 39, 40
delete audit string (EMC Centera) 48
delete propagation 46, 54
delete rule
and Recycler 113
criteria 113
EMC Centera considerations 53
NAS considerations 59
removable media considerations 72
suggested uses 112
deleting
cloud media 78
EMC Centera media 51 to??
files from the extended drive 112
files on EMC Centera 53
files on NAS 59
files on removable media 72
NAS media 57
retained files 96
TSM media 75
device requirements 27
Direct Read
enabling 110
exceptions 111
for user home directories 147
how it works 109
in high volume environments 143
memory cache 110
performance 109
recommended uses 109
when not to use 109
disaster recovery
DiskXtender system 136 to 137
EMC Centera 136
extended drive 136
150
MediaStor 136
NAS 136
TSM 136
disk space requirements 23
Distributed File System (DFS) 29
DNS entries for EMC Centera 47
domain configuration 29
drive
automatic cleaning 61
combo 27, 28
DVD 27
saver 73
UDO 28
DVD
drive types 27
finalization 68
purging files from 68
supported media types 27
E
email alert 116
embedded BLOB (EMC Centera) 48
EMC Atmos
create media 77
delete media 78
EMC Avamar 128
EMC Centera 46 to 55
access profile 46
audit string 48
backing up media 132
client-side ID calculation 48
collision avoidance 48
communication threads 49 to 50
connection string 46 to 47
delete propagation 46, 54
deleting files from 53
deleting media 51 to??
disaster recovery 136
embedded BLOB 48
formatting media 51
Garbage Collection 51
media creation 48 to 50
media folder considerations 52
media group considerations 52
media service options 47 to??
metadata 51
move rule considerations 53
node aliases 47
performance tuning 52 to 54
pool address 48
privileged delete 96
purge rule considerations 53
reclaiming deleted space 51
replication 46, 54, 132
requirements 25
retention 46, 93 to 96
retention class 94
Seek and Chargeback Reporter 51
simultaneous moves and fetches 54
synchronous deletion 54
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Index
troubleshooting 54
virtual pools 46
error
alert 116
log 116
evaluation license 31
event log
DiskXtender 116
EMC Centera 54
extended attributes (EAs), DiskXtender 128
extended drive
AutoStart 38, 39, 40
backup 126, 128 to 131
cluster 34, 35, 36
creating 80 to 81
free space alert 116
indexing 81
metadata export 80
recovering 136
replication 44
requirements 23 to 25
schedules 80
size requirements 23
supported file types 24
F
failover
AutoStart 37
clustering 34
fetching files 108
File Level Retention (FLR) 57
file streams 111
file system
extended drive 23
media 64
file types
supported for indexing 98
supported on the extended drive 24
filename length restriction 82
filtering applications 84, 111
finalizing DVD media 68
foreign
language support 25
media 65
format
EMC Centera media 51
removable media 63, 64, 64 to 66, 66 to 68
G
Galaxy, CommVault 128
Garbage Collection (EMC Centera) 51
grace period, license 31
H
hard drive sizing 23
hardware
compression 73
MediaStor 27
requirements 23
hardware adapters 26
high volume environment 140 to 143
HP OpenView Storage DataProtector 128
HSM (hierarchical storage management) 88, 89
Hyper-V 43
I
index collection
creating 97
definition 97
index rule 97, 98, 99, 100
Index Transaction Log (ITL) 103, 117
indexing 97 to 103
disabling 103
enabling 97
pausing 103
purging with 98, 99
requirements 98
schedule 97, 103
scheduling 99, 101
statistics 117, 118
strategy 98 to 102
synchronization 102
installation
AutoStart 38 to 40
basic 32
Hyper-V 43
MediaStor 60 to 61
Microsoft cluster 35 to 36
operating system requirements 20
recommended hardware 23
VMware 42
international character support 25
interoperability
File System Manager and MediaStor 26
iSCSI library configuration 61
Itanium-based architecture 21
J
jukebox
adding to MediaStor 61
drive cleaning 61
iSCSI 61
requirements 27
L
labeling media 63, 64 to 66
language support 25
length of filenames 82
library
adding to MediaStor 61
drive cleaning 61
iSCSI 61
requirements 27
License Server 30 to 31, 34, 35
licensing 30 to 31, 34, 37, 121
links, DFS 29
log
audit 123
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Index
EMC Centera trace 54
error 116
event 116
ISE events 118
media 120
warning 116
M
magneto-optical (MO) support 27
media
backup 126, 132 to 133
copying 132
corrupt 65, 66
EMC Centera 46 to 55
file system 64
finalization 68
for user home directories 144
foreign 65
format 63, 64, 64 to 66
in high volume environments 141
label 63, 64 to 66
log 120
monitoring 119 to 120
NAS 56 to 59
removable (optical and tape) 60 to 73
removable types 27
removing 63
requirements 25 to 28
reuse 66 to 68
spinning down 73
TSM 74
media folder
creating 82
EMC Centera considerations 52
NAS considerations 58
removable media considerations 69
setting priority 82
TSM considerations 75
user home directory 144 to 147
media group
automatic finalization 68
EMC Centera automation 48 to 50
EMC Centera considerations 52
free space alert 116, 120
multi-target 87, 88 to 89, 133
NAS considerations 58
recommended settings 90 to 92
removable media automation 66, 68
removable media considerations 69 to 70
strategy 87 to 88
TSM considerations 75
Media Prepare Manager 65
media service
ACSLS 62
EMC Centera 47 to??
in a cluster 34
MediaStor 62
NAS 57
TSM 74
with AutoStart 37
152
with VMware 42
media task
monitoring 119
schedule 80
MediaStor 61
adding a media service 62
device requirements 26
disaster recovery 136
installation 60 to 61
iSCSI library configuration 61
requirements 26 to 28
memory
cache, Direct Read 110
requirements 23
metadata
EMC Centera 51
export, DiskXtender 80, 130, 131
Microsoft cluster
extended drive 35, 36
extended drive connection 34
failover behavior 34
installation 35 to 36
license 30, 34
media services supported 34
number and type of nodes 33
requirements 34
resources 35, 36
shares 34, 35
virtual server 34, 35
VMware 41
Microsoft Windows, supported versions 20
migration, file 86 to 92
MirrorView 44
move rule
age delay 86, 93, 142
EMC Centera considerations 53
for user home directories 145
in high volume environments 142
NAS considerations 58
order of 87
recommended settings 92
removable media considerations 71
strategy 86 to 87
TSM considerations 76
multi-target migration 87, 88 to 89, 133
N
NAS 56 to 59
backing up 133
creating shares for media 56 to 57
deleting files from 59
disaster recovery 136
media creation 57
media deletion 57
media folder considerations 58
media group considerations 58
media service creation 57
move rule considerations 58
performance tuning 58 to 59
purge rule considerations 59
EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
Index
requirements 25 to 26
security 26, 56, 133
share requirements 26
simultaneous moves and fetches 59
NetVault 128
Network Appliance (NetApp) SnapLock 57
NetWorker 128
NetWorker PowerSnap 130
NetWorker SnapImage 130
networking requirements 29
node
alias, AutoStart 38, 40
alias, EMC Centera 47
AutoStart 37
cluster 33
NTBackup 128
O
operating system requirements 20
OTG file system 64
overview
configuration 16
product 14
P
passive cluster nodes 33
pausing indexing 103
PEA file 46, 47
performance
Direct Read 109
tuning for background scans 83
tuning for EMC Centera 52 to 54
tuning for NAS 58 to 59
tuning for tape and optical 69 to 73
tuning for TSM 75 to 76
permissions
EMC Centera 46
NAS shares 26, 56
pool address, EMC Centera 48
PowerPath 37
PowerSnap 130
prefetch
how it works 108
in high volume environments 143
with indexing 100
privileged delete 96
privileges
EMC Centera 46
NAS shares 26, 56
processes, AutoStart 38, 40
processor requirements 23
profile, EMC Centera 46
promoting
media folders 82
move rules 87
purge rules 107
purge rule
criteria 106
EMC Centera considerations 53
for user home directories 146
in high volume environments 142
NAS considerations 59
order of 107
removable media considerations 71
TSM considerations 76
with indexing 98, 99
purging 104 to 111
enabling 107
in high volume environments 142
statistics 117
strategy 104 to 107
user home directories 146
with indexing 99, 100
R
RAM requirements 23
recovery
deleted space on EMC Centera 51
DiskXtender configuration (registry settings) 136
DiskXtender system 136 to 137
restoring files from the Recycler 113
Recycler 112, 113, 126
and delete rules 113
backing up 129
restoring files from 113
reformatting media 66 to 68
registry
backup 126, 134
recovery 136
registry log 126, 134, 136
related documentation 9, 15
replication
deletes on EMC Centera 46, 54
EMC Centera 46, 54, 132
extended drive 44
RepliStor 44
reports
DiskXtender 122
EMC Centera 51
requirements
AutoStart 37
disk space 23
EMC Centera 25
extended drive 23 to 25
hardware 23
high volume environment 140
Hyper-V 43
indexing 98
international character 25
MediaStor 26 to 28
MediaStor device 27
memory 23
Microsoft cluster 34
NAS 25 to 26
networking 29
operating system 20
processor 23
removable media 27
storage device 25 to 28
EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
153
Index
VMware 42
resource
clustering 35, 36
groups, AutoStart 38, 39
restoring
deleted files 113 to 114
DiskXtender configuration 136
DiskXtender system 136 to 137
resynchronization 102
retained NAS 57, 59, 95
retention 93 to 96
class 94
EMC Centera 46
NAS 57, 59
with RepliStor 44
S
scheduling
background scan 83
backups 129
copy media updates 80
extended drive activities 80
file migration 92
for user home directories 147
in high volume environments 141
indexing 97, 99, 101, 103
indexing resynchronization 102
media tasks 80
search
extended drive data 97 to 103
security
NAS 26, 56, 133
Seek, EMC Centera 51
service account
DiskXtender 133, 144
License Server 31
MediaStor 60
shares
in a cluster 34, 35
NAS media 26, 56 to 57
with AutoStart 38
simultaneous moves and fetches 54, 59
SnapImage 130
snapshot backup 130
special application filtering 84, 111
spinning down media 73
SRDF 37, 44
statistics
file activity 117
reports 122
storage requirements 25 to 28
streams, file 111
Sun StorageTek ACSLS 28, 61, 62
Symantec 128
Symmetrix 25
Symmetrix PowerSnap module 130
synchronization
between EMC Centera devices 132
indexing 102
synchronous deletion, EMC Centera 54
154
T
tape
block size 73
support for 27
threads, communication (EMC Centera) 49 to 50
tiered migration 88, 89
timeslice options 73
Tivoli Storage Manager (TSM)
as a backup application 128
as a media service 28, 74 to 76
creating virtual media 74
disaster recovery 136
performance tuning 75 to 76
tracing events
DiskXtender 116
EMC Centera 54
troubleshooting
DiskXtender 116
EMC Centera 54
media 119 to 120
U
UDF file system 64
UDO
drive types 28
supported media types 27
user home directories 144 to 147
V
Veritas Backup Exec 128
virtual pools (EMC Centera) 46
virtual server 34, 35
virus scans 44, 84, 111
Visio, Microsoft (file type) 97
VMware 41 to 42
Volume Shadow Copy Services (VSS) 130
W
warning log 116
Windows, Microsoft. See Microsoft Windows
WORM support 27
EMC DiskXtender Release 6.5 Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Version Best Practices Guide
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