telemotive - Overhead Crane Parts

TELEMOTIVE
10K12 RECEIVER
With telePILOT™ &
™
telePENDANT
TRANSMITTERS
Magnetek Material Handling
Radio Control Equipment
Instruction Manual
TCTX12M-1 Rev. B January 2006
Part Number: 30085T
©Copyright 2006 Magnetek Material Handling
Table of Contents
1- Service Information ...............................................................................................3
2- Radio Controlled Crane Safety.............................................................................4
3- General System Information...............................................................................11
4- Installation Procedure .........................................................................................12
5- Operation ................................................. See Appropriate Transmitter Manual
6- Wiring Diagram ...................................................................................................16
7- Programming........................................................................................................36
8- Servicing................................................................................................................43
9- Spare Parts ...........................................................................................................47
2
Section 1 – Service Information
U.S. Service Information
For questions regarding service or technical
information, contact 1-866-MAG-SERV
(1-866-624-7378).
CAUTION
• ONLY TRAINED QUALIFIED INDIVIDUALS
SHOULD DO SERVICING.
Magnetek Material Handling
N49 W13650 Campbell Drive
Menomonee Falls, WI 53051
Telephone:
800-288-8178
•
STRICT
ANTI-STATIC
HANDLING
PROCEDURES MUST BE FOLLOWED.
Website:
e-mail:
www.magnetekmh.com
info@magnetekmh.com
• FAILURE TO FOLLOW THIS CAUTION
COULD RESULT IN SERIOUS DAMAGE TO
EQUIPMENT AND/OR VOID THE WARRANTY.
.
Fax Numbers
Main:
800-298-3503
Sales:
262-783-3510
Service:
262-783-3508
Canada Service Information:
2610 Dunwin Drive
Mississauga, Ontario
L5L 1J5 Canada
Phone: 1-800-792-7253
Fax: 1-905-828-5707
Telemotive
Industrial
Control
trademarks:
Boommate,
GateMate,
10K,
inteleSmart,
Telemotive, telePilot, telePendant, Laser Guard,
Teledrive, Teltec, TeleMotion are either trademarks
or registered trademarks of Telemotive Industrial
Controls.
Third-party trademarks: All other trademarks, trade
names or company names referenced herein are used
for identification only and are the property of their
respective owners.
3
Section 2 – Radio Controlled Safety
2-1. Warnings, Cautions And Notes.
2-2. Critical Installation Considerations.
Through out this document WARNING, CAUTION
and NOTE statements have been deliberately placed
to highlight items critical to the protection of
personnel and equipment.
WARNING
WARNING – A warning highlights an essential
operating or maintenance procedure, practice, etc.
which if not strictly observed, could result in injury
or death of personnel, or long term physical hazards.
Warnings are highlighted as shown below:
ALL EQUIPMENT MUST HAVE A MAINLINE
CONTACTOR INSTALLED AND ALL TRACKED
CRANES AND SIMILAR EQUIPMENT MUST
HAVE A BRAKE INSTALLED. FAILURE TO
FOLLOW THIS WARNING COULD RESULT IN
SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH AND DAMAGE
TO EQUIPMENT.
WARNING
CAUTION – A caution highlights an essential
operating or maintenance procedure, practice, etc.
which if not strictly observed, could result in damage
to, or destruction of equipment, or loss of functional
effectiveness. Cautions are highlighted as shown
below:
WARNING
ON ALL REMOTE CONTROLLED CRANES AN
AUDIBLE AND/OR VISUAL WARNING MEANS
MUST BE PROVIDED. THESE AUDIBLE
AND/OR VISUAL WARNING DEVICES MUST
MEET ALL GOVERNMENTAL REQUIREMENTS. FAILURE TO FOLLOW THIS WARNING COULD RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR
DEATH AND DAMAGE TO EQUIPMENT.
CAUTION
NOTE – A note highlights an essential operating or
maintenance procedure, condition or statement. Notes
are shown as below:
NOTE
WARNINGS, CAUTIONS AND NOTES SHOULD
NEVER BE DISREGARDED.
WARNING
The safety rules in this section are not intended to
replace any rules or regulations of any applicable
local, state, or federal governing organizations. The
following information is intended to be used in
conjunction with other rules or regulations already in
existence. It is important to read all of the safety
information contained in this section before installing
or operating the Radio Control System.
REMOVE ALL ELECTRICAL POWER FROM
THE CRANE OR MACHINERY BEFORE ATTEMPTING ANY INSTALLATION PROCEDURES. DE-ENERGIZE AND TAG OUT ALL
SOURCES OF ELECTRICAL POWER BEFORE
TOUCH TESTING ANY EQUIPMENT. FAILURE
TO FOLLOW THIS WARNING COULD RESULT
IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH AND DAMAGE TO EQUIPMENT.
4
Section 2 – Radio Controlled Safety (Continued)
Anyone being trained to operate a radio-controlled
crane should possess as a minimum the following
knowledge and skills before operating the crane:
WARNING
The operator should have knowledge of hazards
peculiar to crane operation.
THE DIRECT OUTPUTS OF THIS PRODUCT
ARE NOT DESIGNED TO INTERFACE DIRECTLY TO TWO STATE SAFETY CRITICAL
MAINTAINED FUNCTIONS, I.E., MAGNETS,
VACUUM LIFTS, PUMPS, EMERGENCY
EQUIPMENT, ETC. A MECHANICALLY LOCKING INTERMEDIATE RELAY SYSTEM WITH
SEPARATE POWER CONSIDERATIONS MUST
BE PROVIDED. FAILURE TO FOLLOW THIS
WARNING COULD RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH AND DAMAGE TO EQUIPMENT.
The operator should have knowledge of the safety
rules for radio-controlled cranes.
The operator should have the ability to judge distance
or moving objects.
The operator should have knowledge of the radio
transmitter.
The operator should know the limit switch test
procedure.
The operator should know, where authorized,
instructions for plugging motions.
2-3. General.
Radio controlled overhead cranes and other material
handling equipment operate in several directions.
They are large, bulky pieces of equipment that handle
heavy loads efficiently at high speeds. Quite
frequently, the equipment is operated in areas where
people are working on the floor below. The crane
operator must exercise extreme caution at all times.
Workers must constantly be alert to avoid accidents.
The following rules have been included to indicate
how your careful and thoughtful actions may prevent
injuries, damage to equipment, or even save a life. If
radio controlled material-handling equipment is
operated from the cab, special care must be taken to
secure the transmitter. Refer to section titled Section
2-9. Boarding The Crane for specific safety rules.
The operator should have knowledge of the use of
crane warning lights and alarms.
2-4. Persons Authorized To Operate Radio
Controlled Cranes.
The operator should be trained in transferring radio
control box to another person.
Only properly trained persons designated by
management should be permitted to operate radiocontrolled cranes.
The operator should be trained how and when to
report unsafe or unusual operating conditions.
The operator should have knowledge of observing
crane signal lights.
The operator should be trained to avoid striking any
obstructions.
The operator should have knowledge of the proper
clearance of lifts or hooks before moving bridge or
trolley.
The operator should have knowledge of the proper
storage space for radio control box when not in use.
The operator should be trained how to exhibit caution
in approaching bridge or trolley bumpers.
Radio controlled cranes should not be operated by
any person who cannot read or understand signs,
notices and operating instructions that pertain to the
crane.
The operator should know equipment capacity.
The operator should be trained in making lifts below
floor level.
Radio controlled cranes should not be operated by
any person with insufficient eyesight or hearing or by
any person who may be suffering from a disorder or
illness or is taking any medication that may cause
loss of crane control.
The operator should be trained in making side pulls.
The operator should know how to keep himself and
other people clear of lifts and to avoid "pinch" points.
2-5. Training Checklist For Crane Operators.
5
Section 2 – Radio Controlled Safety (Continued)
The operator should know cable and hook inspection
procedures.
centered over an area free of personnel and
equipment.
The operator should know procedures for testing
hoist, trolley, and bridge brakes.
Visually inspect the hook, load lines, trolley, and
bridge as much as possible from the operator's
station; in most instances, this will be the floor of the
building.
2-6. Operating Area.
Aisles between equipment, stock, etc., should be free
of obstructions so the crane operator can move freely.
These aisles should be a minimum of three feet (one
meter) wide, or meet local regulations.
The bridge and trolley brakes should be tested. On
transmitter units equipped with two or more speeds,
use the "lowest" speed when testing braking devices.
When lifting maximum loads, the crane operator
should test the hoist brakes by raising the load a few
inches from the floor. If the brakes do not hold, the
load should immediately be lowered to the floor.
Crane operators should always position themselves
for the best view of the crane they are controlling.
The crane should never be operated blindly. The
operator should stay as close to the crane load as
possible. Operators should never position themselves
in a "pinch" point.
If provided, test the lower-limit switch.
Test all warning devices.
2-7. Transmitter Unit.
Test all direction and speed controls for both bridge
and trolley travel.
Transmitter switches should never be mechanically
blocked ON or OFF for any crane motion. When not
in use turn the transmitter OFF. A secure storage
space should be provided for the transmitter unit and
the transmitter unit should always be placed there
when not in use. This precaution will prevent
unauthorized people from operating the crane.
Test all bridge and trolley limit switches, where
provided, if operation will bring the equipment in
close proximity to the limit switches.
Test the transmitter emergency stop.
Spare transmitters should be stored in a secure
storage space and only removed from the storage
space after the current transmitter in use has been
turned OFF, taken out of the service area and
secured.
Test the hoist brake to verify there is no drift without
a load.
Before putting the transmitter in service the
transmitter unit should be inspected for any damage
or excessive wear. Units with, but not limited to, any
of the following: broken housings, switches or
handles, missing battery doors, switch boots or
switch knobs should be repaired before putting into
service.
2-8.2. General Rules For Operation.
If any crane or hoist that any of the above tests notify
the supervisor and lock out and tag for repair.
Consult the crane manufacturer, local and
governmental regulations for complete rules of
operation. In general the following rules apply to
remotely controlled cranes:
The limit switches should never be used as a regular
stopping device. They are intended to be protective
devices.
2-8. Operating The Crane.
2-8.1. Pre-operation Test.
Do not make lifts in excess of the equipment rated
capacity.
At the start of each work shift, or when a new operator takes control of the crane, operators shall do as
a minimum the following steps before making lifts
with any crane or hoist:
The bridge and trolley should be centered directly
over the load when the load is raised to prevent
swinging when making lifts.
Test the upper-limit switch. Slowly raise the
unloaded hook block until the limit switch trips.
When checking limit switches the hoist should be
A crane designed for this purpose and only with
supervisor permission should make side pulls. When
a lift is being made, the crane operator should not be
6
Section 2 – Radio Controlled Safety (Continued)
Never leave suspended
emergency, if the crane
suspended, notify the
barricade and post signs
and load.
positioned in the line of travel. The crane or hoist
should be operated from a position either to the side
or opposite from the direction of travel.
When raising or lowering a load, proceed slowly and
make certain the load is under control. Tag lines
should be used for handling unusual lengths or bulky
loads. Remove slack from chains or slings gradually.
Make certain all personnel are clear before making a
lift.
loads unattended. In an
is inoperative and a load
supervisor immediately,
on the floor beneath crane
If power to the crane is removed, the crane operator
should turn the transmitter unit OFF and keep it OFF
until power is restored.
If the crane fails to respond properly, the crane
operator should stop operation, turn the transmitter
unit OFF and immediately report the condition to
their supervisor.
The crane operator should keep all body parts away
from the lift and should never be positioned under the
lift.
Outdoor cranes, which are subject to movement by
wind, should be securely anchored when left
unattended. If the crane is equipped with bridge
brakes, the parking brake should be set immediately.
Do not make a lift or move a load if anyone is in a
location where they could be struck by the crane or
the load.
If the crane operator is being helped, the crane should
not be moved until the helper signals they are clear of
the crane and its load.
2-9. Boarding The Crane.
The crane should not be boarded without permission
of the supervisor.
When a load is hanging from the crane hook and the
crane is being moved, the crane operator should
sound all warning devices frequently.
The crane operator should turn off the transmitter and
take it with them when boarding the crane.
Loads should not be carried over workers heads. If a
worker is in the path of crane travel, the crane
operator should stop the crane and clear the area
before proceeding.
If more than one person is boarding the crane, one
person should be made responsible for ensuring all
personnel are off the crane before the system is
returned to operation.
Runway stops or other cranes should never be
bumped into.
2-10. Crane Maintenance And Repair.
Qualified personnel must maintain a regularly, i.e.,
such as monthly, scheduled crane inspection. During
this crane inspection the functionality and safety of
the crane remote control must also be tested. The
inspection shall include, but be not limited to items
listed in Section 2-12. Condition Of The Radio
Controlled Crane. Consult crane manufacturer, local
and governmental regulations for recommended
inspection intervals and proper inspection
procedures. Problems noted during this inspection
must be repaired before using the crane or the remote
control.
When moving the crane, the crane operator should be
sure that the hook block and attachments or cables
would not catch on nearby equipment. Slings, chains,
or cables should never be dragged along the floor.
Unless required for operator safety, gloves should not
be worn when operating the transmitter unit.
All loose materials or parts should be removed from
the load before starting the lift.
The crane operator should always hoist lifts high
enough to clear all equipment and workers.
Minor repairs include routine maintenance and
repairs such as greasing, cleaning and control
troubleshooting. All other repairs should be considered major. If the repair crew consists of more
than one person, one person should be designated as
the repair crew leader with the following
responsibilities. If the repair crew consists of only
one person, that person has the following
responsibilities:
The crane operator should never permit anyone to
ride on the load or hook except when authorized by
the supervisor.
When another crane on the same runway is stationary
with a load hanging, the crane operator should
maintain a safe distance between the stationary crane
and the one under their control.
7
Section 2 – Radio Controlled Safety (Continued)
For minor repairs warning signs should be placed on
the floor beneath the crane or suspended from the
crane. For major repairs, the floor area below the
crane should be roped off.
All tools and equipment should be moved onto the
crane by the use of hand lines. The tools and
equipment should be adequately secured to the hand
lines.
When major repairs are to take place, all persons
operating other cranes on the same or adjacent
runways, if any, must be notified prior to starting
repairs. Notification should include the nature of the
repair, safeguards provided, and movement
limitations while repairs are in progress.
If it is necessary to have the crane control circuits
energized, all power circuits for crane movement
must be opened prior to energizing the control
circuits.
All personnel and tools should be moved to a safe
spot before moving the crane during repairs.
When practical, radio controlled cranes which cannot
be moved during repairs must be protected against
being bumped by other cranes on the runway.
Bumpers should be installed on the exposed side or
sides of the crane under repair. They should be
placed as far away as possible. The location of these
bumpers should be indicated by red lights placed so
that they are clearly visible to other crane operators
traveling on the same runway. When it is not possible
to use bumpers, red lights must be placed so they are
clearly visible to other crane operators traveling on
the same runway to indicate the restricted travel zone.
All crane operators on the same runway must be
informed of the repair effort and thoroughly
instructed to what their operations are limited to and
informed they will be notified when repairs are
completed.
Headroom is at a minimum in some crane cabs and
on some crane walkways. Caution should be
exercised when boarding or working on cranes. Hard
hats should be worn whenever possible.
When repairs are finished, all personnel, tools and
repair equipment should be removed before
energizing the crane circuits.
2-11. Using The Crane As A Work Platform.
When the crane is to be used as a stationary work
platform, follow all rules provided in Section 2-10.
Crane Maintenance and Repair. When it is necessary
for the crane to be moved from time to time, the
crane operator should board the crane with the
transmitter unit. The crane operator should ensure all
personnel working on the crane are in a secure
position before moving the crane to the next
workstation. It should also be the crane operator’s
responsibility to ensure the main switch is open and
locked down before work is resumed.
If any hazard involving the repairmen exists when
there is a runway adjacent to the crane under repair,
the adjacent runway should be blocked off as
described above. When it is necessary to continue
crane operation on the adjacent runways warning
lights must be installed and be visible to operators of
cranes on those runways. All cranes should come to a
complete stop prior to entering the restricted area and
should proceed through this area only after receiving
permission from a signal person designated for this
purpose. Access of persons to and from the crane
being repaired should be under control of the repair
crew leader.
WARNING
THE CRANE OPERATOR SHOULD NOT ATTEMPT TO REPAIR ANY OF THE ITEMS
STATED BELOW. THE CRANE CONDITION
SHOULD BE REPORTED TO THE SUPERVISOR.
FAILURE TO FOLLOW THIS WARNING COULD
RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH AND
DAMAGE TO EQUIPMENT.
When boarding the crane, the transmitter should be
turned OFF and the transmitter should remain with
the repair crew leader. The leader should board the
crane first, open and lock out the main switch, and
then signal the other members of the crew it is safe to
board the crane.
2-12. Condition Of The Radio Controlled Crane.
If work on the crane is to be done in areas not
protected by standard handrails, the repair crew
should wear approved safety belts.
If the crane fails to respond properly, the crane
operator(s) should notify their supervisor. When
serious conditions are noticed (conditions that make
the crane unsafe to operate), the crane should be shut
8
Section 2 – Radio Controlled Safety (Continued)
down immediately and the supervisor notified. The
following is a list of some of the items that should be
included in the report. (See the crane manufacturer
for specifics and possible additional items):
Mechanical parts loosened by vibration (loose rivets,
covers, bolts, etc.).
Condition of hoisting cable and hook block (broken
strands, clipped sheave wheels, etc.).
Condition of collector shoes or bars.
Uneven riding (worn or damaged wheels).
Condition of warning or signal lights and horns.
(Burned out or broken).
Condition of brakes (hoist, trolley, and bridge). (No
bluing, rivets on shoes showing, glazing, etc.).
2-13. Batteries
Condition of trolley and rail stops.
Condition of bridge structure.
Condition of festoon system.
WARNING
Broken welds in any part of the crane structure.
KNOW AND FOLLOW PROPER BATTERY
HANDLING, CHARGING AND DISPOSAL PROCEDURES. IMPROPER BATTERY PROCEDURES CAN CAUSE BATTERIES TO EXPLODE
OR DO OTHER SERIOUS DAMAGE. FAILURE
TO FOLLOW THIS WARNING COULD RESULT
IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH AND DAMAGE TO EQUIPMENT.
Proper fluid levels and lubrication.
Condition of bridge and trolley stops.
Carbon dust or signs burning on the covers of motors.
Indication of fluid, oil or grease leaks.
Condition of rail sweeps.
2-13.1. Battery Handling.
Walkways required handrails and ladders are in
place, sturdy and not loose.
Use only batteries approved by Telemotive for the
specific product.
Protective guards are in place for all moving parts.
Do not dispose of a battery pack in fire; it may
explode.
Alignment of bridge (screeching or squealing wheels
indicate bridge is out of line).
Do not attempt to open the battery pack.
Broken, cracked, or chipped rails on trolley or
runway.
Do not short circuit battery.
Condition of limit switches.
For intrinsically safe environments only use specified
Telemotive intrinsically safe batteries.
Condition of electrical and mechanical control
(electrical or mechanical defects which cause faulty
operation such as un-commanded stopping or starting
of any crane motions, warning devices, lights, or
auxiliary functions).
Keep the battery pack environment cool during
charging operation and storage, (i.e., not in direct
sunlight or close to a heating source).
2-13.2. Battery Charging.
Condition of gears (grinding or squealing may
indicate foreign materials in gear teeth or a lack of
lubrication.
For those transmitters equipped with battery chargers,
please familiarize all users with the instructions of
the charger before attempting to use.
All controls especially E-STOPs are in place and in
working order.
Use only Telemotive approved chargers for the
appropriate battery pack.
Frequent relay tripping of power circuits.
Do not attempt to charge non-rechargeable battery
packs.
9
Section 2 – Radio Controlled Safety (Continued)
Avoid charging the battery pack for more than 24
hours.
Charger units are not intended for outdoor use. Use
only indoors.
Do not charge batteries in a hazardous environment.
2-13.3. Battery Disposal.
Do not short charger.
Before disposing of batteries consult local and
governmental regulatory requirements for proper
disposal procedures.
Do not attempt to charge a damaged battery.
Do not attempt to use a battery that is leaking,
swollen or corroded.
10
Section 3 – General System Information
3-1. General System Information.
3-3. Channel Designations:
The Telemotive Radio Control System (system)
provides remote control of overhead cranes using
radio signals. The system consists of a hand held
portable battery operated transmitter unit and a fixed
station receiver unit.
AK01 - 439.8 MHz
AK02 - 439.6 MHz
AK03 - 439.4 MHz
AK04 - 439.2 MHz
AK05 - 439.0 MHz
AK06 - 438.8 MHz
AK07 - 438.6 MHz
AK08 - 438.4 MHz
AK09 - 438.2 MHz
AK10 - 438.0 MHz
A unique 16-bit code (Access Code) for each system
is preset in every transmitter and receiver. The
receiver considers any received signal, which does
not match the receiver access code setting, invalid.
The Access Code is made up of 16-bits (65,000
combinations) and no two similar codes are assigned
to any two Telemotive systems.
AK11 - 437.8 MHz
AK12 - 437.6 MHz
AK13 - 437.4 MHz
AK14 - 437.2 MHz
AK15 - 437.0 MHz
AK16 - 436.8 MHz
AK17 - 436.6 MHz
AK18 - 436.4 MHz
AK19 - 436.2 MHz
AK20 - 436.0 MHz
AKA00 - 433.125 MHz
AKA01 - 433.325 MHz
AKA02 - 433.525 MHz
AKA03 - 433.725 MHz
AKA04 - 433.925 MHz
Up to four systems may be used with the same
frequency in a 600-foot area (220 meters). Each
transmitter operating on the same frequency may be
operated in close proximity, not less than six feet (1.9
meters), to each other.
AKA05 - 434.125 MHz
AKA06 - 434.325 MHz
AKA07 - 434.525 MHz
AKA08 - 434.725 MHz
3-4. Receiver Specifications.
3-2. TMS Low Power Signaling.
Receiver housing: NEMA 4.
TMS (Time Multiplexed Signaling) is a Telemotive
proprietary high-speed packet data system. The
system software is structured to minimize "on the air"
transmission time of any transmitter. This allows for
multiple transmitters to share a common frequency.
The TMS system is designed so that a transmitter will
send a signal for a predetermined ON time, and then
will turn OFF. The length of transmitter ON time is
referred to as data burst or packet. The packet length
is a function of the quantity of data to be sent, and the
data rate (baud). Once the packet is sent, the
transmitter will turn OFF. This allows for other
transmitters to time-share the same frequency when a
transmitter has turned OFF. The TMS system software determines the OFF period and repetition rate of
the ON period. Since each system has its own access
code, up to 4 transmitters can share and have equal
access to the same frequency. TMS also allows for
reduced battery consumption and extended battery
life.
Operating Temperature: –22° F to +158° F (-30º C to
+70º C) ambient.
Humidity: up to 95 % (non-condensing).
Typical Operating Range: 200 feet (70 meters).
3-5. Receiver Unit.
The receiver unit consists of a synthesized RF
module, antenna, power supply, microprocessor
controlled output motor control and auxiliary
function relays and mainline contactor relay. The
receiver unit contains circuitry, which matches the
frequency and access code of the transmitter.
These systems have low power pulsed signaling,
FCC certified under Part 15 Telecommunications
Code of Regulations, no license is required. The
transmitter unit is frequency modulated, low power
and is certified under the appropriate regulations. A
license is not required for the transmitter or operator.
Modifications to the RF section of this system are not
permitted and could void FCC certification.
11
Section 4 – Installation
4-4. Line Input Considerations.
4-1. Pre-Installation Considerations.
To ensure reliable and safe operation of the
system, the following items must be considered
before installing the receiver unit.
WARNING
THE UNIT MUST BE WIRED TO THE CORRECT VOLTAGE, AND BE CONNECTED TO
THE CORRECT TERMINAL AS REQUIRED
BY THE ACTUAL LINE VOLTAGE. FAILURE FOLLOW THIS WARNING COULD RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH AND
DAMAGE TO EQUIPMENT.
WARNING
THE RECEIVER UNIT OR RELAYS ARE
NOT RATED AS EXPLOSION PROOF. THE
RECEIVER UNIT MUST NOT BE INSTALLED IN EXPLOSIVE ENVIRONMENTS
UNLESS APPROPRIATE SECONDARY ENCLOSURE MEASURES ARE TAKEN. FAILURE TO FOLLOW THIS WARNING COULD
RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH
AND DAMAGE TO EQUIPMENT.
4-2. Receiver Unit
Considerations.
Mounting
The receiver unit has direct and separate connect
provisions for operation from 120 or 240 VAC
(nominal), 50-60 Hz power.
For applications where line voltage deviation
exceeds 20% of nominal values or if 440 VAC
power is used, a step up or step down
transformer must be used.
Location
Ensure the mounting location is as far as possible
from exposed trolley wires and sources of
electromagnetic or radiated noise
NOTE
THE RECEIVER UNIT SHOULD NOT BE
CONNECTED TO LINES CONTAINING
EXCESSIVE POWER UP TRANSIENTS OR
CONTINUOUS COMMUTATOR NOISE. A
LINE CONDITIONER MAY BE NECESSARY
IN SOME INSTALLATIONS.
The receiver unit requires a mounting area of
approximately 14" wide by 18" long. A depth of
at least 18" must be provided to allow the cabinet
door to open.
The mounting surface must be smooth and
continuous. Mounting the cabinet on uneven
surfaces could cause warpage or stress internal
components.
4-5. Wiring Considerations.
1.
Read this manual before installation.
2. Please observe appropriate local and
National Electrical Codes when wiring electrical
devices.
The receiver unit may be mounted in any
position. Greatest radio control range is obtained
when the receiver unit is mounted with the
antenna at the top.
3. Do not connect or disconnect wiring, or
perform circuit checks while the power is turned
on.
If possible, avoid installing receiver unit to a
surface where high vibration or shock is present.
If this cannot be avoided, use appropriate shock
mounts.
4. The motor wiring should be in a separate
metal conduit from the power wiring, which
should also be in metal conduit.
4-3. Antenna Mounting Considerations.
5. Low voltage wires shall be wired with
proper low voltage class wiring procedures.
The antenna should not be placed near large
metal objects that could be close to or cover the
antenna. Allow at least six inches Around the
antenna for clearance.
12
Section 4 – Installation (Continued)
FROM HOLDING IN THE DRIVE. SEE
FIGURE 8-1. RECEIVER LAYOUT FOR THE
LOCATION OF THE MOV'S. THE MOV’S
ARE NEXT TO THE RELAYS THEY
PROTECT. THE MOV’S CAN BE CUT OUT
OF THE CIRCUIT WITH A WIRE CUTTER.
REMEMBER TO DO THIS WITH ALL
POWER OFF ON THE CRANE AND ALL
ASSOCIATED CONTROLS.
6. Control wiring as well as antenna wiring
shall be in separate conduit and shall be kept as
short as possible.
7. All terminals shall be tightened to specified
terminal torque 4.4 IN-LBS (.5 N·m). Unless
otherwise specified.
8. Remove excess metal screws, metal filings
and wire clippings from inside of unit.
9. Inspect to make sure no exposed wire has
contact with any other wiring or terminals.
1.
Normally it should not be necessary to set
the access codes, they are preset. Program
the unit for any special crane configurations
or other parameters, if desired, see Section
7. Programming for details.
2.
Position the receiver. Locate as far as
possible from exposed trolley wire and
sources of electromagnetic or radiated noise.
Cabinet mounting dimensions and mounting
template is on next page see Figure 4-2.
Receiver Mounting Details. Antenna should
be kept as clear as possible of any metal
object.
3.
Mount the receiver. There are mounting
holes on the top and bottom mounting
flanges of the receiver. Recommended
mounting hardware is 5/16” hex machine
screws of appropriate length, with
appropriate "keps" or elastic stop nuts. Flat
washers should be used in front of nuts
when receiver unit is mounted to a non
structural surface. Mount receiver unit
cabinet securely to mounting surface.
4.
Wire the unit using the appropriate electrical
drawings for the specific transmitter and
crane orientation selected, see Section 6.
Wiring. For the Membrane or Pendant
transmitter determine crane orientation; if
the direction pair labeled on the transmitter
better describes the equipment movement.
Use this pair to wire the motor directionals
respectively. If you need to remove the main
board (4 screws) the antenna unplugs from
the RF Receiver, be sure to dress the
antenna cable under the hook on the RF
Receiver when reinstalling the antenna
cable.
5.
Wire the power to J1 input power connector.
The connections are Ground (GND), Neutral
(N) and 120 or 220 VAC 50-60 Hz. See
Figure 4-1. Input Power Connections.
10. Suppressors are strongly recommended on
all contactors.
4-6. Receiver/Equipment Interface
Considerations.
All output relay contacts are rated at 16 Amps
110 VAC, 5 Amps 250 VAC and 28 VDC.
Connection to equipment or contactors with
higher voltage or current requirements will
require intermediate relays.
All relay outputs are normally open, momentary
contact. Since a relay closure is only active while
the transmitter unit key is pressed and held,
devices such as lights or lifting magnet must use
a mechanical auxiliary latching relay.
4-7. Receiver Unit Cabinet Mounting.
See Figure 4-2. Receiver Mounting Details.
Allow room in mounting the receiver for the
door to swing open.
Mount receiver unit cabinet securely to mounting
surface. Actual cabinet mounting dimensions are
shown on Figure 4-2. Receiver Mounting
Details.
4-8. Receiver Installation.
NOTE
CONNECTING OUTPUTS TO DRIVES.
MOV’S (TRANSIENT PROTECTORS) ARE
ON ALL THE OUTPUT RELAYS TO
PROTECT THE RELAYS FROM POWER
SURGES. MOV’S ALLOW A SMALL
LEAKAGE CURRENT THAT CAN AFFECT
SOME HIGH IMPEDANCE CIRCUITS.
WHEN CONNECTING OUTPUT RELAYS TO
DRIVES, IT MAY BE REQUIRED TO
REMOVE THE MOV TO PREVENT THE
LEAKAGE CURRENT THROUGH THE MOV
13
Section 4 – Installation (Continued)
6.
Wiring of the system should now be
complete.
7.
Turn switch SW1 OFF (Receiver CPU
Board) and SW1 ON (Power Supply Board).
Stand clear of the crane and apply AC power
to receiver unit. Check to see if the
following LEDs are lit: (green DS1 (on
steady), green DS2 (on steady), yellow DS8
(on steady), yellow DS10 (flashing), yellow
DS14 (on steady) and red RF Receiver ON
(on steady). If none are lit check AC power,
power switch SW1 and fuse. See Figure 8-1.
for LED locations.
9.
If there are any problems see Section 8.
Servicing.
Turn transmitter ON. Check to see if the
yellow LED is now lit (DS4). At this point
the MR relay is disabled, the functions of
the transmitter can be checked by noting the
120 N GND N 120 240
120 N GND N 120 240
Ground
Neutral
110 VAC Wiring
240 VAC
J1 Power Supply
Board
Ground
Neutral
120 VAC
8.
turning ON of the appropriate red LEDs
next to the control relays (K1-K6) on the
two output boards positions A and B. After
checking out the functions, turn switch SW1
ON (Receiver CPU Board) to enable the MR
relay (red LED DS3 should now turn ON),
check function and direction by jogging
each motion. Installation should now be
complete.
220 VAC Wiring
Figure 4.1 Input Power Connections
14
Figure 4.2 Receiver Mounting Details
Drawing not to scale
Section 4 – Installation (Continued)
15
Section 6 – Wiring
At the top of the left hand page for each
configuration is shown the appropriate relay
sequencing on each wiring configuration. Check
to see if the configuration sequencing is correct
for the application. An “X” on the grid indicates
a relay closure on the labeled output for that
position of the specified switch.
6-1. Wiring Diagrams.
Your system comes pre-programmed. The
following pages in this section have individual
wiring
diagrams
for
different
crane
configurations. Find the appropriate wiring
diagram and if necessary set the Configuration
Switch to match the S3 Switch Settings shown in
the appropriate diagram. Terminal designators
are marked on the wiring diagram corresponding
to designators found on the Receiver Board. For
terminal locations see Figure 8-1. Receiver
Layout. After selecting the appropriate motors
for each function remember to use the
appropriate label on your transmitter for
describing the appropriate command.
This is only for wiring configurations where the
Aux 3 (relay K1 Relay Output Board A, output
A1) is being used for the Alarm function, placing
a jumper on JU2 on the Receiver CPU Board
will allow the alarm to function after an E-STOP
command. See Figure 8-1. Receiver Layout for
jumper location.
6-2. Installation.
6-6. Connecting Outputs To Drives.
Follow Section 4. Installation Procedure for
instructions on how to install the receiver.
MOV’s (transient protectors) are on all the
output relays to protect the relays from power
surges. MOV’s allow a small leakage current
that can affect some high impedance circuits.
When connecting output relays to drives, it may
be required to remove the MOV to prevent the
leakage current through the MOV from holding
in the drive. See Figure 8-1. Receiver Layout for
the location of the MOV's. The MOV’s are next
to the relays they protect. The MOV’s can be cut
out of the circuit with a wire cutter. Remember
to do this with ALL power OFF on the crane and
all associated controls.
6-5. Alarm After E-STOP.
6-3. Alarms And Horns.
Make sure that the installation includes the
proper alarms, horns, indicator lights and their
associated controls as required by local and
governmental regulations.
6-4. Relay Sequencing.
16
Section 6 – Wiring (Continued)
Legend
The following is the legend for the wiring
diagrams below:
#
#
K#
C#
An input with the terminal
number # matching the connector in the receiver.
An output with the terminal Customer supplied
number # matching the con- contactor coil with arc
nector in the receiver.
suppressor in parallel.
Matching relay contacts
in radio receiver panel
by number.
Figure 6-1. Legend.
ON/OFF & Low Battery Indicators
Motor 1
Dir 1
ON/
OFF
Auxiliary
Controls
Motor 1
Dir 1
Dir 2 HOIST*
ON/
OFF
Motor 2
Dir 1
Dir 2 TROLLEY
AUX 1
AUX 2
Auxiliary
Controls
Motor 3
Dir 1 BRIDGE
Dir 2
AUX 3
A
TX12M-2
A
AUX 1
AUX 2
AUX 3
AUX 4
AUX 5
AUX 6
Dir 2
Motor 3
Dir 1
B
E-STOP
E-STOP
Programmable
Motor Control and Select Indicators
2-Speed telePilot
2-Speed telePendant
*NOTE: Hoist, Trolley and Bridge are listed
here as traditional configurations, the installer
may choose to define the motors differently.
Figure 6-2. telePilot and telePendant, Output Controls
17
HOIST*
Motor 2
Dir 1
Dir 2
B
Optional
4th Motor or Select Indicators
Dir 2
TROLLEY
BRIDGE
Section 6 – Wiring (Continued)
TABLE 2(A) 2-SPEED WIRING DIAGRAM.
STANDARD CONFIGURATION HOIST, TROLLEY AND BRIDGE
240 VAC
SW1
120 VAC
J1
FUSE
*NOTE: If it is necessary to operate the Alarm
Function during E-Stop condition, wire the input to the
alarm relay “AJ3-1” for the alarm function to the
control power hot side (relay “K1” (MR) on P/S Board
de-energized).
240
120
ON/OFF
TO POWER
TRANSFORMER
•(2)K1 (MR)
•(4)
E10171-X
P/S BOARD
•
* See Note
N
GND
•(6)
• K1 (MR)
•(8)
AJ3
•
•
1
HOT
RET
MLC
MAIN LINE
CONTACTOR
AJ2
K1
1
AUX 3
(*ALARM)
2
K2
2
•
3
K3
3
AUX 1
•
•
•
4
K4
4
TROLLEY
DI R 2
5
K5
5
6
K6
6
2
1
1
AUX 2
2
TROLLEY
2ND SPEED
TROLLEY
DIR 1
BJ3
2
1
1
2
BJ2
1
K1
2
K2
•
3
K3
3
•
•
4
K4
4
HOIST
DOWN
5
K5
5
BRIDGE
DIR 1
6
BRIDGE
2ND SPEED
•
•
TO
CONTROL
POWER
6
K6
1
2
HOIST
UP
All connections to outputs AJ2 and BJ2
are to contactors, with proper arc
suppressors across them, controlling the
appropriate listed function to the right.
HOIST
2ND SPEED
Telemotive receiver output boards
(E10165-X).
BRIDGE
DIR 2
18
Section 6 – Wiring (Continued)
TABLE 2(A) 2-SPEED PROGRAMMING DIAGRAM.
STANDARD CONFIGURATION HOIST, TROLLEY AND BRIDGE
OUTPUTS
B1
B2
B3
HOIST*
MOTOR 1
UP
2ND
1ST
DN
1ST
OUTPUTS
A6
A5
A4
2ND
TROLLEY*
MOTOR 2
A3
A2
A1
MOTOR 1 CONNECTIONS
B1 HOIST UP
B2 HOIST 2ND SPEED
B3 HOIST DOWN
Dir 1
2ND
Dir 2
1ST
OUTPUTS
B6
B5
B4
1ST 2ND
BRIDGE*
MOTOR 3
Dir 1
2ND
1ST
Dir 2
1ST
2ND
INDEPENDENT OUTPUTS
AUX 1
AUX 2
AUX 3 ALARM
MOTOR 2 CONNECTIONS
A6 TROLLEY DIR 1
A5 TROLLEY 2ND SPEED
A4 TROLLEY DIR 2
MOTOR 3 CONNECTIONS
B4 BRIDGE DIR 1
B5 BRIDGE 2ND SPEED
B6 BRIDGE DIR 2
INDEPENDENT CONNECTIONS
A3 AUX 1 (LATCHABLE S2-7)
A2 AUX 2 (LATCHABLE S2-6)
A1 AUX 3 ALARM
TRANSMITTER SWITCH SETTINGS
telePilot or telePendant USE PDA SCREEN (Program the configuration switches 5, 6 and 7 to OFF. Under
“Main/Aux” select the setting “Aux”).
MEMBRANE USE SW3 “C”
PENDANT, JLTX AND SLTX USE SW4 “D”
TRANSMITTER SWITCH SETTINGS:
S3
Position-5
OFF
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1
0
Position -6
OFF
Position -7
OFF
For these switch
positions see
programming
section.
Indicates Switch in OFF Position.
*NOTE: Hoist, Trolley and Bridge are listed here as traditional configurations, the installer may choose to define the
motors differently.
19
Section 6 – Wiring (Continued)
TABLE 2(B) 2-SPEED WIRING DIAGRAM.
2-SPEED with DIRECTIONAL CONTROLS: ALL MOTIONS
240 VAC
SW1
120 VAC
J1
FUSE
240
120
ON/OFF
TO POWER
TRANSFORMER
E10171-X
P/S BOARD
•
•
(2)
K1 (MR)
(4)
AJ3
2
1
N
GND
•(6)
• K1 (MR)
•(8)
1
2
RET
MLC
TO
CONTROL
POWER
MAIN LINE
CONTACTOR
AJ2
1
K1
•
•
2
K2
3
K3
3
•
•
4
K4
4
5
K5
5
•
6
K6
6
•
HOT
1
2
HOIST
UP/DOWN
TROLLEY
DIR 1/DIR 2
BRIDGE
DIR 1/DIR 2
TROLLEY
DIR 2
TROLLEY
2ND SPEED
TROLLEY
DIR 1
BJ3
2
1
1
2
BJ2
•
1
K1
1
•
•
2
K2
2
3
K3
•
•
4
K4
4
5
K5
5
BRIDGE
DIR 1
6
K6
6
BRIDGE
2ND SPEED
3
HOIST
UP
HOIST
2ND SPEED
HOIST
DOWN
BRIDGE
DIR 2
20
All connections to outputs AJ2 and BJ2
are to contactors, with proper arc
suppressors across them, controlling the
appropriate listed function to the right.
Telemotive receiver output boards
(E10165-X).
Section 6 – Wiring (Continued)
TABLE 2(B) 2-SPEED PROGRAMMING DIAGRAM.
2-SPEED with DIRECTIONAL CONTROLS: ALL MOTIONS
OUTPUTS
B1
B2
B3
A1
HOIST*
MOTOR 1
UP
2ND
DN
1ST
1ST
MOTOR 1 CONNECTIONS
B1 HOIST UP
B2 HOIST 2ND SPEED
B3 HOIST DOWN
A1 HOIST UP/DOWN
OUTPUTS
A6
A5
A4
A2
2ND
TROLLEY*
MOTOR 2
Dir 1
2ND
Dir 2
1ST
BRIDGE*
MOTOR 3
1ST 2ND
MOTOR 2 CONNECTIONS
A6 TROLLEY DIR 1
A5 TROLLEY 2ND SPEED
A4 TROLLEY DIR 2
A2 TROLLEY DIR1/DIR2
Dir 1
OUTPUTS
B4
B5`
B6
A3
2ND
1ST
Dir 2
1ST
2ND
MOTOR 3 CONNECTIONS
B4 BRIDGE DIR 1
B5 BRIDGE 2ND SPEED
B6 BRIDGE DIR 2
A3 BRIDGE DIR1/DIR2
NOTE
CHECK GOVERNMENTAL AND LOCAL REGULATIONS ON THE REQUIREMENTS OF HORNS OR ALARMS
BEFORE USING THIS CONFIGURATION, AS THERE IS NOT A SEPARATE ALARM CONTROL.
TRANSMITTER SWITCH SETTINGS
telePilot or telePendant USE PDA SCREEN (Program the configuration switches 5, 6 & 7 to match the settings
shown below).
MEMBRANE USE SW3 “C”
PENDANT, JLTX AND SLTX USE SW4 “D”
TRANSMITTER SWITCH SETTINGS:
S3
Position-5
ON
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1
0
Position -6
OFF
Position -7
OFF
For these switch
positions see
programming
section.
Indicates Switch in OFF Position.
*NOTE: Hoist, Trolley and Bridge are listed here as traditional configurations, the installer may choose to define the
motors differently.
.
21
Section 6 – Wiring (Continued)
TABLE 2(C) 2-SPEED WIRING DIAGRAM.
2-SPEED, 2-WINDINGS: ALL MOTIONS
240 VAC
SW1
120 VAC
J1
FUSE
240
120
ON/OFF
TO POWER
TRANSFORMER
E10171-X
P/S BOARD
•(2)K1 (MR)
•(4)
AJ3
•
•
2
1
N
GND
•(6)
• K1 (MR)
•(8)
1
2
K1
1
HOT
RET
MLC
TO
CONTROL
POWER
MAIN LINE
CONTACTOR
AJ2
1
2
K2
•
3
K3
3
•
•
•
4
K4
4
5
K5
5
6
K6
6
2
HOIST
HIGH SPEED
TROLLEY
HIGH SPEED
BRIDGE
HIGH SPEED
TROLLEY
DIR 2
TROLLEY
LOW SPEED
TROLLEY
DIR 1
BJ3
2
1
1
2
BJ2
•
•
1
K1
2
K2
2
•
3
K3
3
•
•
4
K4
4
HOIST
DOWN
5
K5
5
BRIDGE
DIR 1
6
K6
6
BRIDGE
LOW SPEED
1
HOIST
UP
HOIST
LOW SPEED
BRIDGE
DIR 2
22
All connections to outputs AJ2 and BJ2
are to contactors, with proper arc
suppressors across them, controlling the
appropriate listed function to the right.
Telemotive receiver output boards
(E10165-X).
Section 6 – Wiring (Continued)
TABLE 2(C) 2-SPEED PROGRAMMING DIAGRAM.
2-SPEED, 2-WINDINGS: ALL MOTIONS
OUTPUTS
B1
B2
B3
A1
HOIST*
MOTOR 1
UP
2ND
DN
1ST
1ST
OUTPUTS
A6
A5
A4
A2
2ND
MOTOR 1 CONNECTIONS
B1 HOIST UP
B2 HOIST LOW SPEED
B3 HOIST DOWN
A1 HOIST HIGH SPEED
TROLLEY*
MOTOR 2
Dir 1
2ND
Dir 2
1ST
OUTPUTS
B4
B5
B6
A3
1ST 2ND
MOTOR 2 CONNECTIONS
A6 TROLLEY DIR 1
A5 TROLLEY LOW SPEED
A4 TROLLEY DIR 2
A2 TROLLEY HIGH SPEED
BRIDGE*
MOTOR 3
Dir 1
2ND
1ST
Dir 2
1ST
2ND
MOTOR 3 CONNECTIONS
B4 BRIDGE DIR 1
B5 BRIDGE LOW SPEED
B6 BRIDGE DIR 2
A3 BRIDGE HIGH SPEED
NOTE
CHECK GOVERNMENTAL AND LOCAL REGULATIONS ON THE REQUIREMENTS OF HORNS OR ALARMS
BEFORE USING THIS CONFIGURATION, AS THERE IS NOT A SEPARATE ALARM CONTROL.
TRANSMITTER SWITCH SETTINGS
telePilot or telePendant USE PDA SCREEN (Program the configuration switches to match the pattern and
position shown).
MEMBRANE USE SW3 “C”
PENDANT, JLTX AND SLTX USE SW4 “D”
TRANSMITTER SWITCH SETTINGS:
S3
Position-5
OFF
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1
0
Position -6
ON
Position -7
OFF
For these switch
positions see
programming
section.
Indicates Switch in OFF Position.
*NOTE: Hoist, Trolley and Bridge are listed here as traditional configurations, the installer may choose to define the
motors differently.
23
Section 6 – Wiring (Continued)
TABLE 2(D) 2-SPEED WIRING DIAGRAM.
ACCO CONTROLS: ALL MOTIONS
240 VAC
SW1
120 VAC
J1
FUSE
240
120
ON/OFF
TO POWER
TRANSFORMER
E10171-X
P/S BOARD
•(2)K1 (MR)
•(4)
AJ3
2
1
N
GND
•(6)
• K1 (MR)
•(8)
1
2
RET
MLC
TO
CONTROL
POWER
MAIN LINE
CONTACTOR
AJ2
1
K1
2
K2
•
3
K3
3
•
•
•
4
K4
4
5
K5
5
6
K6
6
•
•
HOT
1
2
HOIST DOWN
2ND SPEED
TROLLEY DIR 2
2ND SPEED
BRIDGE DIR 2
2ND SPEED
TROLLEY
DIR 2
TROLLEY DIR 1
2ND SPEED
TROLLEY
DIR 1
BJ3
2
1
1
2
BJ2
•
•
1
K1
2
K2
2
•
3
K3
3
•
•
4
K4
4
HOIST
DOWN
5
K5
5
BRIDGE
DIR 1
6
K6
6
BRIDGE
2ND SPEED
1
HOIST
UP
HOIST
2ND SPEED
BRIDGE
DIR 2
24
All connections to outputs AJ2 and BJ2
are to contactors, with proper arc
suppressors across them, controlling the
appropriate listed function to the right.
Telemotive receiver output boards
(E10165-X).
Section 6 – Wiring (Continued)
TABLE 2(D) 2-SPEED PROGRAMMING DIAGRAM.
ACCO CONTROLS: ALL MOTIONS
OUTPUTS
B1
B2
B3
A1
HOIST*
MOTOR 1
UP
2ND
DN
1ST
1ST
OUTPUTS
A6
A5
A4
A2
2ND
MOTOR 1 CONNECTIONS
B1 HOIST UP
B2 HOIST 2ND SPEED UP
B3 HOIST DOWN
A1 HOIST 2ND SPEED DOWN
TROLLEY*
MOTOR 2
Dir 1
2ND
Dir 2
1ST
OUTPUTS
B4
B5
B6
A3
BRIDGE*
MOTOR 3
1ST 2ND
MOTOR 2 CONNECTIONS
A6 TROLLEY DIR 1
A5 TROLLEY 2ND SPEED DIR 1
A4 TROLLEY DIR 2
A2 TROLLEY 2ND SPEED DIR 2
Dir 1
2ND
1ST
Dir 2
1ST
2ND
MOTOR 3 CONNECTIONS
B4 BRIDGE DIR 1
B5 BRIDGE 2ND SPEED DIR 1
B6 BRIDGE DIR 2
A3 BRIDGE 2ND SPEED DIR 2
NOTE
CHECK GOVERNMENTAL AND LOCAL REGULATIONS ON THE REQUIREMENTS OF HORNS OR ALARMS
BEFORE USING THIS CONFIGURATION, AS THERE IS NOT A SEPARATE ALARM CONTROL.
TRANSMITTER SWITCH SETTINGS
telePilot or telePendant USE PDA SCREEN (Program the configuration switches 5, 6 & 7 to match the settings
shown below).
MEMBRANE USE SW3 “C”
PENDANT, JLTX AND SLTX USE SW4 “D”
TRANSMITTER SWITCH SETTINGS:
S3
Position-5
ON
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1
0
Position -6
ON
Position -7
OFF
For these switch
positions see
programming
section.
Indicates Switch in OFF Position.
*NOTE: Hoist, Trolley and Bridge are listed here as traditional configurations, the installer may choose to define the
motors differently
25
Section 6 – Wiring (Continued)
TABLE 2(E) 2-SPEED WIRING DIAGRAM.
P&H: 2-SPEED, 2-WINDINGS for HOIST and TROLLEY;
STANDARD BRIDGE
240 VAC
SW1
120 VAC
J1
FUSE
240
120
ON/OFF
TO POWER
TRANSFORMER
E10171-X
P/S BOARD
•(2)K1 (MR)
•(4)
AJ3
2
1
N
GND
•(6)
• K1 (MR)
•(8)
1
2
HOT
RET
MLC
•
•
1
2
K2
2
•
3
K3
3
•
•
•
4
K4
4
TROLLEY
DIR 2
5
K5
5
6
K6
TROLLEY
LOW SPEED
6
2
1
1
2
MAIN LINE
CONTACTOR
AJ2
K1
BJ3
TO
CONTROL
POWER
1
HOIST
HIGH SPEED
TROLLEY
HIGH SPEED
AUX 1
TROLLEY
DIR 1
BJ2
•
•
1
K1
1
HOIST
UP
2
K2
2
HOIST
LOW SPEED
•
3
K3
3
•
•
4
K4
4
5
K5
5
6
K6
6
HOIST
DOWN
BRIDGE
DIR 1
BRIDGE
2ND SPEED
BRIDGE
DIR 2
26
All connections to outputs AJ2 and BJ2
are to contactors, with proper arc
suppressors across them, controlling the
appropriate listed function to the right.
Telemotive receiver output boards
(E10165-X).
Section 6 – Wiring (Continued)
TABLE 2(E) 2-SPEED PROGRAMMING DIAGRAM.
P&H: 2-SPEED, 2-WINDINGS for HOIST and TROLLEY;
STANDARD BRIDGE
OUTPUTS
B1
B2
B3
A1
HOIST*
MOTOR 1
UP
2ND
DN
1ST
1ST
OUTPUTS
A6
A5
A4
A2
2ND
TROLLEY*
MOTOR 2
A3
Dir 1
2ND
Dir 2
1ST
OUTPUTS
B4
B5
B6
1ST 2ND
BRIDGE*
MOTOR 3
Dir 1
2ND
1ST
Dir 2
1ST
2ND
INDEPENDENT OUTPUTS
AUX 1
MOTOR 1 CONNECTIONS
MOTOR 2 CONNECTIONS
MOTOR 3 CONNECTIONS
B1
B2
B3
A1
A6
A5
A4
A2
B4 BRIDGE DIR 1
B5 BRIDGE 2ND SPEED
B6 BRIDGE DIR 2
HOIST UP
HOIST LOW SPEED
HOIST DOWN
HOIST HIGH SPEED
TROLLEY DIR 1
TROLLEY LOW SPEED
TROLLEY DIR 2
TROLLEY HIGH SPEED
INDEPENDENT CONNECTIONS
A3 AUX 1 (LATCHABLE S2-7)
TRANSMITTER SWITCH SETTINGS
telePilot or telePendant USE PDA SCREEN (Program the configuration switches 5, 6 & 7 to match the settings
shown below).
MEMBRANE USE SW3 “C”
PENDANT, JLTX AND SLTX USE SW4 “D”
TRANSMITTER SWITCH SETTINGS:
S3
Position-5
OFF
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1
0
Position -6
OFF
Position -7
ON
For these switch
positions see
programming
section.
Indicates Switch in OFF Position.
*NOTE: Hoist, Trolley and Bridge are listed here as traditional configurations, the installer may choose to define the
motors differently.
27
Section 6 – Wiring (Continued)
TABLE 2(F) 2-SPEED WIRING DIAGRAM.
P&H: 2-SPEED, 2-WINDINGS for HOIST;
STANDARD TROLLEY and BRIDGE
240 VAC
SW1
120 VAC
J1
FUSE
240
120
ON/OFF
TO POWER
TRANSFORMER
E10171-X
P/S BOARD
•(2)K1 (MR)
•(4)
AJ3
2
1
N
GND
•(6)
• K1 (MR)
•(8)
1
2
•
1
•
•
2
K2
2
3
K3
3
•
•
4
K4
4
5
K5
5
•
6
K6
6
2
1
1
2
1
MLC
MAIN LINE
CONTACTOR
HOIST
HIGH SPEED
AUX 2
AUX 1
TROLLEY DIR 2
TROLLEY
2ND SPEED
TROLLEY DIR 1
BJ2
1
K1
•
•
2
K2
2
3
K3
3
•
•
4
K4
4
5
K5
5
6
K6
6
•
RET
TO
CONTROL
POWER
AJ2
K1
BJ3
HOT
1
HOIST UP
HOIST
LOW SPEED
HOIST DOWN
BRIDGE DIR 1
BRIDGE
2ND SPEED
BRIDGE DIR 2
28
All connections to outputs AJ2 and BJ2
are to contactors, with proper arc
suppressors across them, controlling the
appropriate listed function to the right.
Telemotive receiver output boards
(E10165-X).
Section 6 – Wiring (Continued)
TABLE 2(F) 2-SPEED PROGRAMMING DIAGRAM.
P&H: 2-SPEED, 2-WINDINGS for HOIST;
STANDARD TROLLEY and BRIDGE
OUTPUTS
B1
B2
B3
A1
HOIST*
MOTOR 1
UP
2ND
DN
1ST
1ST
OUTPUTS
A6
A5
A4
TROLLEY*
MOTOR 2
2ND
A3
A2
Dir 1
2ND
Dir 2
1ST
1ST
Dir 1
OUTPUTS
B4
B5
B6
2ND
BRIDGE*
MOTOR 3
2ND
1ST
Dir 2
1ST
2ND
INDEPENDENT OUTPUTS
AUX 1
AUX 2
MOTOR 1 CONNECTIONS
MOTOR 2 CONNECTIONS
MOTOR 3 CONNECTIONS
B1
B2
B3
A1
A6 TROLLEY DIR 1
A5 TROLLEY 2ND SPEED
A4 TROLLEY DIR 2
B4 BRIDGE DIR 1
B5 BRIDGE 2ND SPEED
B6 BRIDGE DIR 2
HOIST UP
HOIST LOW SPEED
HOIST DOWN
HOIST HIGH SPEED
INDEPENDENT CONNECTIONS
A3 AUX 1 (LATCHABLE S2-7)
A2 AUX 2 (LATCHABLE S2-6)
TRANSMITTER SWITCH SETTINGS
telePilot or telePendant USE PDA SCREEN (Program the configuration switches 5, 6 & 7 to match the settings
shown below).
MEMBRANE USE SW3 “C”
PENDANT, JLTX AND SLTX USE SW4 “D”
TRANSMITTER SWITCH SETTINGS:
S3
Position-5
ON
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1
0
Position -6
OFF
Position -7
ON
For these switch
positions see
programming
section.
Indicates Switch in OFF Position.
*NOTE: Hoist, Trolley and Bridge are listed here as traditional configurations, the installer may choose to define the
motors differently.
29
Section 6 – Wiring (Continued)
TABLE 2(G) 2-SPEED WIRING DIAGRAM.
DEMAG: 2-SPEED, 2-WINDINGS for HOIST;
STANDARD TROLLEY and BRIDGE
240 VAC
SW1
120 VAC
J1
FUSE
240
120
ON/OFF
TO POWER
TRANSFORMER
E10171-X
P/S BOARD
•(2)K1 (MR)
•(4)
AJ3
2
1
N
GND
•(6)
• K1 (MR)
•(8)
1
2
•
1
•
•
2
K2
2
3
K3
3
•
•
4
K4
4
5
K5
5
•
6
K6
6
2
1
1
2
1
MLC
MAIN LINE
CONTACTOR
HOIST DOWN
2ND SPEED
AUX 2
AUX 1
TROLLEY DIR 2
TROLLEY
2ND SPEED
TROLLEY DIR 1
BJ2
1
K1
•
•
2
K2
2
3
K3
3
•
•
4
K4
4
5
K5
5
6
K6
6
•
RET
TO
CONTROL
POWER
AJ2
K1
BJ3
HOT
1
HOIST UP
HOIST UP
2ND SPEED
HOIST DOWN
BRIDGE DIR 1
BRIDGE
2ND SPEED
BRIDGE DIR 2
30
All connections to outputs AJ2 and BJ2
are to contactors, with proper arc
suppressors across them, controlling the
appropriate listed function to the right.
Telemotive receiver output boards
(E10165-X).
Section 6 – Wiring (Continued)
TABLE 2(G) 2-SPEED PROGRAMMING DIAGRAM.
DEMAG: 2-SPEED, 2-WINDINGS for HOIST;
STANDARD TROLLEY and BRIDGE
OUTPUTS
B1
B2
B3
A1
HOIST*
MOTOR 1
UP
2ND
1ST
DN
1ST
OUTPUTS
A6
A5
A4
TROLLEY*
MOTOR 2
2ND
A3
A2
Dir 1
2ND
Dir 2
1ST
OUTPUTS
B4
B5
B6
1ST 2ND
BRIDGE*
MOTOR 3
Dir 1
2ND
1ST
Dir 2
1ST
2ND
INDEPENDENT OUTPUTS
AUX 1
AUX 2
MOTOR 1 CONNECTIONS
MOTOR 2 CONNECTIONS
MOTOR 3 CONNECTIONS
B1
B2
B3
A1
A6 TROLLEY DIR 1
A5 TROLLEY 2ND SPEED
A4 TROLLEY DIR 2
B4 BRIDGE DIR 1
B5 BRIDGE 2ND SPEED
B6 BRIDGE DIR 2
HOIST UP
ND
HOIST UP 2 SPEED
HOIST DOWN
HOIST DOWN 2ND SPEED
INDEPENDENT CONNECTIONS
A3 AUX 1 (LATCHABLE S2-7)
A2 AUX 2 (LATCHABLE S2-6)
TRANSMITTER SWITCH SETTINGS
telePilot or telePendant USE PDA SCREEN (Program the configuration switches 5, 6 & 7 to match the settings
shown below).
MEMBRANE USE SW3 “C”
PENDANT, JLTX AND SLTX USE SW4 “D”
TRANSMITTER SWITCH SETTINGS:
S3
Position-5
OFF
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Position -6
ON
1
0
Position -7
ON
For these switch
positions see
programming
section.
Indicates Switch in OFF Position.
*NOTE: Hoist, Trolley and Bridge are listed here as traditional configurations, the installer may choose to define the
motors differently.
31
Section 6 – Wiring (Continued)
TABLE 2(H) 2-SPEED WIRING DIAGRAM.
STANDARD 2-SPEED 4 MOTOR SYSTEM
240 VAC
SW1
120 VAC
J1
FUSE
240
120
ON/OFF
TO POWER
TRANSFORMER
E10171-X
P/S BOARD
•(2)K1 (MR)
•(4)
AJ3
2
1
N
GND
•(6)
• K1 (MR)
•(8)
1
2
HOT
RET
MLC
•
K1
1
AUX HOIST
UP
•
•
2
K2
2
3
K3
3
AUX HOIST
2ND SPEED
AUX HOIST
DOWN
•
•
4
K4
4
TROLLEY
DIR 2
5
K5
5
TROLLEY
2ND SPEED
•
6
K6
6
TROLLEY
DIR 1
2
1
1
2
MAIN LINE
CONTACTOR
AJ2
1
BJ3
TO
CONTROL
POWER
BJ2
•
1
K1
1
•
•
2
K2
2
3
K3
3
•
•
4
K4
4
5
K5
5
6
K6
6
HOIST UP
HOIST
2ND SPEED
HOIST DOWN
BRIDGE
DIR 1
BRIDGE
2ND SPEED
BRIDGE
DIR 2
32
All connections to outputs AJ2 and BJ2
are to contactors, with proper arc
suppressors across them, controlling the
appropriate listed function to the right.
Telemotive receiver output boards
(E10165-X).
Section 6 – Wiring (Continued)
TABLE 2(H) 2-SPEED PROGRAMMING DIAGRAM.
STANDARD 2-SPEED 4 MOTOR SYSTEM
OUTPUTS
B1
B2
B3
MAIN HOIST*
MOTOR 1
UP
2ND
DN
1ST
1ST
OUTPUTS
A6
A5
A4
2ND
TROLLEY*
MOTOR 2
OUTPUTS
A1
A2
A3
AUX HOIST*
MOTOR 4
Dir 1
2ND
Dir 2
1ST
1ST 2ND
UP
2ND
OUTPUTS
B4
B5
B6
BRIDGE*
MOTOR 3
Dir 1
2ND
1ST
Dir 2
1ST
2ND
DN
1ST
1ST
2ND
MOTOR 1 CONNECTIONS
MOTOR 2 CONNECTIONS
MOTOR 3 CONNECTIONS
B1 HOIST UP
ND
B2 HOIST 2 SPEED
B3 HOIST DOWN
A6 TROLLEY DIR 1
A5 TROLLEY 2ND SPEED
A4 TROLLEY DIR 2
B4 BRIDGE DIR 1
B5 BRIDGE 2ND SPEED
B6 BRIDGE DIR 2
MOTOR 4 CONNECTIONS
A1 AUX HOIST UP
A2 AUX HOIST 2ND SPEED
A3 AUX HOIST DOWN
NOTE
CHECK GOVERNMENTAL AND LOCAL REGULATIONS ON THE REQUIREMENTS OF HORNS OR ALARMS
BEFORE USING THIS CONFIGURATION, AS THERE IS NOT A SEPARATE ALARM CONTROL.
TRANSMITTER SWITCH SETTINGS (This configuration does not apply to the Membrane transmitter).
telePilot or telePendant USE PDA SCREEN (Program the configuration switches 5, 6 and 7 to OFF. Under
“Main/Aux” select the setting “Motor”).
PENDANT, JLTX AND SLTX TRANSMITTER SWITCH SW4 “D” SETTINGS:
Position-1
Position-2
Position-5
Position -6
Position –7
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
S3
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1
0
For these switch
positions see
programming
section.
Indicates Switch in OFF Position.
*NOTE: Hoist, Trolley and Bridge are listed here as traditional configurations, the installer may choose to define the
motors differently.
Additional programming available:
Tandem operation, both Hoist and Aux Hoist being ON at the same time, can be disabled by un-checking the box marked
“Tandem” on the telePilot and telePendant or turning on the Configuration Switch SW 4 “D” for the 10K Pendant, JLTX
and SLTX.
33
Section 6 – Wiring (Continued)
TABLE 2(I) 2-SPEED WIRING DIAGRAM.
STANDARD 2-SPEED 3, 4 & 5 MOTOR SYSTEM using SELECT
240 VAC
SW1
120 VAC
J1
FUSE
*NOTE: If it is necessary to operate the Alarm
Function during E-Stop condition, wire the input to the
alarm relay “AJ3-1” for the alarm function to the
control power hot side (relay “K1” (MR) on P/S Board
de-energized).
240
120
ON/OFF
TO POWER
TRANSFORMER
•
•
(2)
K1 (MR)
(4)
AJ3
E10171-X
P/S BOARD
•
* See Note
2
1
N
GND
•(6)
• K1 (MR)
•(8)
1
2
K1
HOT
RET
MLC
1
•
•
2
K2
3
K3
3
•
•
4
K4
4
TROLLEY
DIR 2
5
K5
5
•
6
K6
6
TROLLEY
2ND SPEED
TROLLEY
DIR 1
2
1
1
2
1
2
MAIN LINE
CONTACTOR
AJ2
•
BJ3
TO
CONTROL
POWER
AUX 3
SELECT 1 Note 2
SELECT 2 Note 2
BJ2
•
1
K1
•
•
2
K2
2
3
K3
3
•
•
4
K4
4
5
K5
BRIDGE
DIR 1
5
BRIDGE
2ND SPEED
6
K6
1
HOIST UP
HOIST
2ND SPEED
HOIST DOWN
6
BRIDGE
DIR 2
34
Note 2
The select function can be inverted by
turning Receiver CPU switch S4 position
4 to “ON”.
For details see the Programming Section
All connections to outputs AJ2 and BJ2
are to contactors, with proper arc
suppressors across them, controlling the
appropriate listed function to the right.
Telemotive receiver output boards
(E10165-X).
Section 6 – Wiring (Continued)
TABLE 2(I) 2-SPEED PROGRAMMING DIAGRAM.
STANDARD 2-SPEED 3, 4 & 5 MOTOR SYSTEM using SELECT
OUTPUTS
B1
B2
B3
UP
DN
OUTPUTS
A6
A5
A4
MAIN HOIST*
MOTOR 1
Dir 1
Dir 2
TROLLEY*
MOTOR 2
A3
A2
BRIDGE*
MOTOR 3
A3
A2
ST
2ND 1
1ST
2ND
OUTPUTS
B4
B5
B6
Dir 1
2ND
1ST
Dir 2
1ST
2ND
SELECT 2
SELECT 1
2ND
1ST
1ST 2ND
INDEPENDENT OUTPUTS
A1
AUX 3 ALARM
MOTOR 1 CONNECTIONS
MOTOR 2 CONNECTIONS
MOTOR 3 CONNECTIONS
B1 HOIST UP
B2 HOIST 2ND SPEED
B3 HOIST DOWN
A6 TROLLEY DIR 1
A5 TROLLEY 2ND SPEED
A4 TROLLEY DIR 2
B4 BRIDGE DIR 1
B5 BRIDGE 2ND SPEED
B6 BRIDGE DIR 2
INDEPENDENT CONNECTIONS
A3 SELECT 2
A2 SELECT 1
A1 AUX 3 ALARM
TRANSMITTER SWITCH SETTINGS (This configuration does not apply to the Membrane transmitter).
telePilot or telePendant USE PDA SCREEN (Program the configuration switches 5, 6 and 7 to OFF. Under
“Main/Aux” select the word “Select”).
PENDANT, JLTX AND SLTX TRANSMITTER SWITCH SW4 “D” SETTINGS:
Position-1
Position-2
Position-5
Position -6
Position –7
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
S3
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1
0
For these switch
positions see
programming
section.
Indicates Switch in OFF Position.
*NOTE: Hoist, Trolley and Bridge are listed here as traditional configurations, the installer may choose to define the
motors differently.
Additional programming available:
The select function can be inverted by turning switch position 4 to ON (the Configuration Switch on the telePilot and
telePendant or SW4 “D” for the 10K Pendant, JLTX and SLTX). Tandem select operation, both Select 1 and 2 ON at the
same time, can be disabled by un-checking the box marked “Tandem” on the telePilot and telePendant or turning on the
Configuration Switch SW 4 “D” for the 10K Pendant, JLTX and SLTX.
35
Section 7 – Programming
7-1. Access Codes.
10K Receiver CPU Board
Transmitter PDA
1
1
A ON 8
B ON 8
1 B1
0
A1
OFF
Receiver access code
B OFF 8
OFF
1
1
0
OFF
SW5
ON
8
A OFF 1
SW4
ON
Indicates switch in OFF position
WARNING
MODEL # -10KXXXXXXXX
S/N=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
ACCESS CODE SETTING
1
A
8
1
B
8
01000111
01100010
FREQ : = AK01
J # = XXXXX
AFTER CHANGING THE ACCESS CODES
ON THE TRANSMITTER, TEST THE UNIT
BY TURNING IT ON AND OFF NEAR THE
APPROPRIATE RECEIVER. IF THE RECEIVER DOES NOT RESPOND, DO NOT
ACTIVATE A FUNCTION BUTTON! THE
TRANSMITTER MAY HAVE THE WRONG
ACCESS CODE, WHICH COULD MOVE
ANOTHER CRANE. RE-CHECK THE
ACCESS CODE IN THE TRANSMITTER
AND RETEST. FAILURE TO FOLLOW THIS
WARNING COULD RESULT IN SERIOUS
INJURY OR DEATH AND DAMAGE TO
EQUIPMENT.
Sample Membrane or Pendant Transmitter
Access Code Label
Sample access code only do not use
Figure 7-1. Access Code Setting.
(A dot on a switch position or a “1” in the
label is an indication that the respective
switch position should be ON).
7-1.1.
Programming Access Codes.
The access code is set at the factory and should
not be changed unless absolutely necessary. The
programming in the receiver(s) must match the
transmitter. If you are reprogramming a spare or
new transmitter make sure the other transmitter
is securely taken out of service.
WARNING
THE ACCESS CODES IN THE RECEIVER
ARE UNIQUE AND FACTORY PRESET. DO
NOT CHANGE THESE ACCESS CODES
UNLESS YOU ARE REPLACING AN EXISTING RECEIVER AND ITS ACCESS CODE.
CHANGING THIS CODE COULD MAKE IT
COMMON WITH ANOTHER RECEIVER
ACCESS CODE, WHICH COULD MOVE
ANOTHER CRANE. NO TWO SYSTEMS IN
ANY LOCATION SHOULD EVER HAVE
THE SAME ACCESS CODES INDEPENDENT
OF FREQUENCY. FAILURE TO FOLLOW
THIS WARNING COULD RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH AND DAMAGE TO
EQUIPMENT.
WARNING
TWO OPERATIONAL TRANSMITTERS
WITH THE SAME ACCESS CODES OPERATING AT THE SAME TIME IS A DEFINITE
SAFETY HAZARD. FAILURE TO FOLLOW
THIS WARNING COULD RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH AND DAMAGE TO
EQUIPMENT.
For detailed instructions on setting parameters
including access codes see Section 7.1.2.
36
Section 7 – Programming (Continued)
7-1.2.
oscillator and synthesizer that are controlled by a
microprocessor. This eliminates the need for
specific crystals to change frequencies. The
onboard microprocessor automatically retunes
the RF receiver when the channel is changed; no
retuning or any other adjustment is required.
Receiver Access Code Setting.
The access code is preset at the factory and
should not be changed unless absolutely
necessary. The access code switches are labeled
“B” and “A”. See Figure 8-1. Receiver Layout
for switch location.
7-2.2.
The programming in the receiver(s) must match
the transmitter. If looking at the PDA or
documentation sent with the transmitter, take
note that positions “A” and “B” number from the
left 1 through 8.
Reading The Channel (Frequency).
Using Figure 8-1. Receiver Layout. locate the
RF Receiver Board. Locate the Top Viewing
Window (see Figure 7-2. RF Receiver Board).
Looking in the Top Viewing Window close to
the edge of the board is a red LED that, with the
power to the receiver ON, is constantly lit. This
indicates the RF Receiver Board is ON and
working. Looking farther back into the Top
Viewing window there are two flashing LEDs, a
red one and a green one. These LEDs flash
repeatedly and slowly so allow some time to see
them flash. These flashing LEDs indicate the
channel (frequency) the unit is receiving.
NOTE
IN EVENT OF REPROGRAMMING OF
ACCESS CODES IS REQUIRED, TAKE
SPECIAL CARE TO CORRECTLY LOCATE
ACCESS CODE SWITCHES A AND B. LOOK
FOR THE LABELS A AND B ON THE
PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD NEAR THE
RESPECTIVE SWITCHES. DETERMINE
THEIR ORIENTATION. THE SWITCHES
MAY NUMBER FROM LEFT TO RIGHT OR
RIGHT TO LEFT. LOOK FOR THE
NUMBERING ON THE SWITCHES. MATCH
ACCESS CODES A1, A2, - -- B1, B2 ETC.
Red RF Receiver “ON” LED
Red Channel Counting LED
NOTE
FOR THE RECEIVER. DO NOT USE A
PENCIL TO TOGGLE THE SWITCHES. THE
LOOSE GRAPHITE FROM THE PENCIL
CAN DAMAGE THE SWITCH.
Green Count
Separating LED
After changing the access code, test the receiver
(s) with a matching transmitter. (If the red LED
DS9 comes ON in the receiver the code does not
match, recheck the access code settings).
Programming
Pins
Viewing Windows
7-2. Receiver Frequency Programming.
Antenna cable connector
plugs in here.
The receiver is equipped with a frequency
synthesizer that allows frequencies to be easily
changed without retuning. Normally the
frequency does not have to be changed; the unit
comes programmed to a specific frequency listed
on the Frequency and Access Code Label on the
receiver door.
7-2.1. RF
Synthesizer.
Receiver
Board
Frequency
RF Receiver Board
End View
RF Receiver Board
Front View
Figure 7-2. E13157-S
Synthesized RF Receiver Board.
Located in the receiver is the RF Receiver Board.
The circuitry on this board contains a digital
37
Section 7 – Programming (Continued)
The counting is done in two digits, where the
two digits indicate channel number. The red
LED counts (flashes) the channel number in two
digits; the green LED indicates (flashes) the
spacing and position of the counted digit. The
ones digit is counted first and then the tens digit
with one green LED flash indicating the
beginning of the count of ones digit and two
green LED flashes indicating the beginning of
the tens digit count.
An example is if the channel is AK04 the
channel number is 04. The ones digit is 4 (four
red flashes) and the second is zero (no red flash).
The repeated sequence for reading channel 4 is:
Long pause, green, red, red, red, red, short pause
green, green, (no red flash, zero).
The repeated sequence for reading channel 12 is:
Long pause, green, red, red, short pause, green,
green, red.
437.6 MHz
437.4 MHz
437.2 MHz
437.0 MHz
436.8 MHz
436.6 MHz
436.4 MHz
436.2 MHz
436.0 MHz
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
AKA00
AKA01
AKA02
AKA03
AKA04
AKA05
AKA06
AKA07
AKA08
433.125 MHz
433.325 MHz
433.525 MHz
433.725 MHz
433.925 MHz
434.125 MHz
434.325 MHz
434.525 MHz
434.725 MHz
Reprogramming The Synthesizer.
Locate the Programming Pins by looking at the
side of the RF Receiver Board. To reprogram the
synthesizer a small metal tipped blade
screwdriver or other tool is necessary to short the
two pins together to put in the reprogramming
mode.
Having located the programming pins and while
watching the flashing red Channel Counting
LED, short the programming pins together and
keep them shorted. (Do not be concerned while
shorting these pins together about touching the
metal RF Receiver shield with the shorting tool,
it will not cause any damage to the circuitry).
When the Programming Pins are shorted the RF
Receiver will go into the programming mode.
KEEP THE PINS SHORTED UNTIL THE
PROGRAMMING IS COMPLETE. The green
and red channel indicating LEDs will complete
one last channel indication and then only the red
LED Channel Counting LED will start to flash.
The synthesizer will start programming from
channel AK01 and count up in sequence for each
channel with a pause in between each channel
count. A full count of flashes will be made for
each channel with a short pause in between each
channel counts by the red Channel Counting
LED. The channel counts will increase by one
channel after each pause. Keep track of the
individual channel counts to determine which
frequency the synthesizer is on.
Channel and Frequency Designations by
Count.
Channel
Designator
AK01
AK02
AK03
AK04
AK05
AK06
AK07
AK08
AK09
AK10
AK11
AK12
AK13
AK14
AK15
AK16
AK17
AK18
AK19
AK20
7-2.3.
Other examples are (equals count):
AK01 (1): green, red, short pause, green, green.
AK02 (2): green, red, red, short pause, green,
green.
AK05 (5): green, red, red, red, red, red,
short pause, green, green.
AK07 (7): green, red, red, red, red, red, red, red
short pause, green, green.
AK10 (10): green, short pause, green, green, red.
AK11 (11): green, red, short pause, green, green,
red.
AK14 (14): green, red, red, red, red, short pause,
green, green, red.
AK20 (20): green, green, green, red, red.
AKA06 (27): green, red, red, red, red, red, red,
red, short pause, green, green, red, red.
Indicator
Count
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
Actual
Frequency
439.8 MHz
439.6 MHz
439.4 MHz
439.2 MHz
439.0 MHz
438.8 MHz
438.6 MHz
438.4 MHz
438.2 MHz
438.0 MHz
437.8 MHz
38
Section 7 – Programming (Continued)
The flashing sequence is as follows: one flash
(AK01) short pause, two flashes (AK02), short
pause, three flashes (AK03), etc. For channel
numbers ten and greater the red LED will still
count these out completely, so for channel AK12
there will be twelve flashes. The green LED
DOES NOT flash during channel programming.
WARNING
IF YOUR UNIT HAS MULTIBOX DO NOT
ATTEMPT TO PROGRAM ADDITIONAL
TRANSMITTERS IN THE FIELD. TELEMOTIVE MUST COORDINATE ACCESS CODE
ASSIGNMENTS WITH THE NEW TRANSMITTERS PRIOR TO EXPANDING MULTIBOX. PLEASE CONTACT TELEMOTIVE IF
YOU NEED TO ADD ADDITIONAL
TRANSMITTERS. FAILURE TO FOLLOW
THIS WARNING COULD RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH AND DAMAGE TO
EQUIPMENT.
When you have reached the correct count for the
channel desired, remove the short from the
shorting pins immediately. Wait a minute for the
RF Receiver to automatically retune itself and
the green and red channel indicating light should
then start to flash indicating the current channel
number.
Check the channel count to verify that the RF
Receiver is programmed to the desired channel.
(If you have passed the channel number desired
wait a minute for the green LED to flash and reshort the pins, the count will begin again from
channel AK01).
The receiver has Multibox capability that allows
up to 8 transmitters to access a single system.
Only one transmitter may control the receiver at
a given time. Access is on a first come first serve
basis. Once a transmitter has gained control,
another transmitter may not access the receiver
until the controlling transmitter relinquishes
control by transmitting an OFF command to the
receiver or the receiver times out due to
inactivity.
Multibox.
7-2.4.
Multibox Operation.
WARNING
The first transmitter to send an ON command
after the receiver has been released will then gain
control of the receiver. The number of
transmitters (1-8) allowed to control the receiver
is selectable on the Receiver.
IF YOUR UNIT WAS NOT ORDERED WITH
MULTIBOX DO NOT ATTEMPT TO PROGRAM MULTIBOX IN THE FIELD. TELEMOTIVE MUST COORDINATE ACCESS
CODE ASSIGNMENTS WITH THE TRANSMITTERS PRIOR TO ENABLING MULTIBOX. PLEASE CONTACT TELEMOTIVE IF
YOU NEED TO ADD MULTIBOX. FAILURE
TO FOLLOW THIS WARNING COULD
RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH
AND DAMAGE TO EQUIPMENT.
NOTE
THE DESIRED MULTIBOX TRANSMITTERS
MUST HAVE CONSECUTIVE ACCESS
CODES BEGINNING FROM THE FIRST
ACCESS CODE.
See Table 7-1. Multibox Switch Settings below
for appropriate settings for both the transmitters
and receiver.
39
Section 7 – Programming (Continued)
Position 3 turns
Multibox ON
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
0FF
ON
S3
Figure 7-3. S3 Receiver Multibox Dip
Switches
Table 7-1. Multibox Switch Settings.
Receiver
Rx Status Word
S1 Switch Settings
S3-8
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
S3-7
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
Transmitter (Membrane and Pendant only).
Access Code Switch
Settings
Maximum of
Transmitters
S3-6
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
First Access Code
First Access Code + 1 bit
First Access Code + 2 bits
First Access Code + 3 bits
First Access Code + 4 bits
First Access Code + 5 bits
First Access Code + 6 bits
First Access Code + 7 bits
40
Section 7 – Programming (Continued)
7-3. Receiver
Diagram.
Programming
Options
Summary
B
A
enables it. See the appropriate Programming Diagram for
the Alarm Relay Location.
The receiver CPU board is shown above.
Refer to
paragraphs below for switch and jumper settings.
S3 Switch Settings
S3-1
Not used
S3-2
Time Out Timer
OFF
Time Out Enabled
ON
Time Out Disabled
S3-3
Multibox
OFF
Multibox Disabled
ON
Multibox Enabled
S3-4 and -5
Not used
S1 Switch Settings
Controls power to the Master Relay. With the switch set
to ON power is on to all relays. Move the switch to OFF
for circuit testing without activating external controls.
S2 Switch Settings
S2-1
Auto Alarm
OFF
Auto Alarm Disabled
ON
Auto Alarm Enabled
S2-2
EMS Alarm
OFF
EMS Alarm Disabled
ON
EMS Alarm Enabled
S2-3
Master Control Relay
OFF
MCR Disabled
ON
MCR Enabled
S2-4
Not used
Not used
S2-5
S2-6, 7 & 8
Aux Relay Latching*
OFF
Latching Disabled
ON
Latching Enabled
* See the specific configuration for your application for
details on which switch controls which relay.
S3 Multibox Setting (Only with S3-3 On)
S3-6
S3-7
S3-8
TXS
Access Code
OFF
OFF
OFF
1
Base Address
OFF
OFF
ON
2
Base Address +1
OFF
ON
OFF
3
Base Address +2
OFF
ON
ON
4
Base Address +3
For more Base Address’ please contact Telemotive.
JU2 Jumper Settings
In the lower position (the position shown) the alarm
relay is disabled after an E-Stop shutdown. This is the
factory default setting. Moving it to the upper position
41
Section 7 – Programming (Continued)
of transmitter function, relay position and dip switch
position, is to try various dip switch setting and see
which relays are latched and which transmitter controls
them. Make sure all three switch positions are off, turn
S2-6, S2-7 and S2-8 on separately and note which relay
is affected by the appropriate LED indication.
System Functions Selection
Special programming exists to allow some of the Aux
relays to be dedicated for special system functions.
Setting certain dip switches on the CPU Board enables
this programming.
Auto Alarm and EMS Alarm
You can have either one of these functions or both. The
use of either one of these two functions dedicates one
specific control relay to operate an external alarm. An
external alarm (not supplied) needs to be connected to
this relay.
WARNING
MAKE SURE S1 ON RECEIVER CPU BOARD MASTER CONTROL RELAY (MCR) IS TURNED OFF
BEFORE ATTEMPTING SETTING OF ANY PROGRAMMING SWITCH TO PREVENT ACTIVATION
OF EXTERNAL CIRCUITRY. FAILURE TO FOLLOW THIS WARNING COULD RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH AND DAMAGE TO
EQUIPMENT.
Auto Alarm (S2-1)
Description
Gives about 5 seconds of alarm when the transmitter is
first turned on.
To Enable
Connect an external alarm. Move dip switch S2-1 on the
CPU Board to the ON position.
Time Out Timer Enable (S3-2)
Emergency Stop (EMS) Alarm (S2-2)
The receiver contains a time out timer. If a receiver once
turned on by a transmitter does not receive a signal from
a transmitter for a period of 15 minutes the receiver shuts
down. Setting S3-2 to ON disables this function.
Description
Gives about 5 seconds of alarm when the Emergency
Stop (EMS) is activated on the transmitter.
To Enable
Connect an external alarm. Move dip switch S2-2 on the
CPU Board to the ON position and set jumper JU2 to the
upper position. (As a safety measure during EMS
shutdown all control lines to relays are disabled. Jumper
JU2 facilitates bypassing the EMS shutdown to the
Alarm Relay so it can be activated during an EMS
shutdown.)
Master Control Relay (MCR) Monitoring Disable
(S2-3)
Disables the contact monitoring of the MCR. Used for
special diagnostic purposes only. In normal operation
switch S2-3 should be set to OFF. Set to ON to disable
contact monitoring of MCR.
Auxiliary
Function
(S2-6, -7 and -8)
Relay
Latching
Enables the appropriate auxiliary function relay to
operate in a latched mode, on or off, rather than as a
momentary contact. Which function is latchable and
which relay is latched depends on the particular
transmitter used.
Switch S2, positions 6 through 8 on the CPU Board each
enable a separate relay to be latched when turned on. If
your transmitter does not have a document describing
these functions, the easiest way to determine correlation
42
Section 8 – Servicing
Figure 8-1. Receiver Layout
S4
S5
0FF
DS4
DS6
0FF
1
K
RF Synthesized
Receiver Board
2
8 7 65 4 321
8 7 6 5 4 3 21
B
A
Access Code Switches
J4
J5
CPU BOARD
S3
DS-15
JU2
J7
J8
T
R
A
N
S
F
O
R
M
E
R
J2
ON
S1
DS3
0FF
0FF
87654321
J3
DS1
K
DS5
DS2
87654321
DS-7 -8 -9 -10 -11-12 -13-14
J1
S2
J6
ON LED
J1
DS 1
DS2
J1
DS2
DS 3
DS4
DS5
DS6
DS1
J3
DS2
DS3
DS4
DS5
DS6
DS
7
K1
K2
K3
K4
K5
K6
DS
7
K1
K2
K3
K4
K5
J2
K6
DS
1
POWER
SUPPLY
BOARD
J5
SW1
ON
F2
OFF
J6
Antenna
MOV’s one per
each respective
output
J7
F1
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
J3
J2
F1
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
8
MASTER
CONTROL K1
RE LAY
4
(MCR)
6
2
F1
J3
J2
120 N GND N 120 240
J1
1 2 3 4 5 6
1 2 3 4 5 6
RELAY BOARD
OUTPUTS INPUTS
Position A
1 2 3 4 5 6
1 2 3 4 5 6
RELAY BOARD
OUTPUTS INPUTS
Position B
NOTE
IF THE SYSTEM STOPS WORKING, CHECK THE RED INDICATOR ON THE TRANSMITTER. IF IT DOES
NOT COME ON WITH PUSHING THE ON BUTTON OR A WEAK BATTERY IS INDICATED ON THE
TRANSMITTER REPLACE THE TRANSMITTER BATTERIES.
Table 8-1. Receiver Diagnostic LED Functions. (See Figure 8-1. Receiver Layout for LED locations).
LED
DS1
COLOR
Green
FUNCTION
Monitors the 12 VDC power to the Microprocessor Control Board.
Normally ON.
If 12 VDC power is present then LED is illuminated. LED is off if 12 VDC power is not present.
Check power supply, fuses and if power is on to receiver.
DS2
Green
Monitors + 5 VDC regulated voltage.
Normally ON.
If 5 VDC power is present then LED is illuminated. LED is off if 5 VDC power is not present.
Check connectors, the +5 VDC regulator, or for shorts on the board.
DS3
Red
Monitors closure of the Master Control Relay (MCR) relay (K1).
LED will be illuminated when the MCR relay has been enabled by an ON command recieved
from the Transmitter Unit. Led will extinguish, when an OFF command has been transmitted, an
EMS condition is present, or SW1 is set to 0.
The MCR controls the 12 VDC power to the Master Relay on the Power Supply Board.
DS4
Yellow
Monitors closure of the Security Relay output (K2).
The LED will be illuminated when the Security Relay has been enabled by an ON command
received from the Transmitter Unit. LED will extinguish when an OFF command is transmitted,
or an EMS condition is present.
The Security Relay controls the 12 VDC power to the MCR relay (K2) and the power to the coils
of the control relays (K1 through K8) on the Relay Output Modules.
43
Section 8 – Servicing (Continued)
LED
DS5
COLOR
Yellow
FUNCTION
Monitors the AC bias pump line for the Security Relay (K2).
LED will flash only when the Receiver has been enabled by an ON command.
The Security Relay is enabled by an AC signal generated by the slave microcomputer. The AC
signal is capacitively isolated from the slave microcomputer to help prevent the Security Relay
from being latched ON if the slave microcomputer fails. LED will not be illuminated when an
OFF command has been sent or an EMS condition is present.
DS6
Yellow
Monitors AC bias pump line for the Master Control Relay (K1).
LED will flash only when the Receiver Interface Control Module has been enabled by an ON
command.
The Master Control Relay (K1) is enabled by an AC signal generated by the slave microcomputer.
The AC signal is capacitively isolated from the slave microcomputer to help prevent the MCR
from being latched ON if the slave microcomputer fails. The LED will not be illuminated when an
OFF command has been sent or is in an EMS mode.
DS7
Yellow
Monitors data synchronization. (Flashes when a properly formatted data signal is received from
the transmitter).
This LED will flash rapidly when data is transmitted. The LED can be used with DS9 to analyze
incoming data. If DS9 is illuminated or flashing when DS7 also is flashing, another Transmitter
Unit on the same frequency may be present. This is normal. As more Transmitter Units operated
on the same frequency, LED will flash brighter and more often.
DS8
Yellow
Monitors continuity between receiver and CPU modules.
Normally ON.
Off indicates a malfunctioning receiver.
DS9
Red
Normally OFF.
Wrong
Access
Code
Check
first!
DS10
Monitors received data errors.
A flashing LED during data transmission may indicate interference of the received data. If LED
is illuminated continuously when data is transmitted and the system will not respond the Access
Code of the Receiver and Transmitter Units may not match. If LED is illuminated when data is
not transmitted, another Transmitter Unit may be present on the same frequency with a different
Access Code. The presence of activity on this LED does not necessarily indicate a problem. It
should be used with other indicators in analyzing system status.
Yellow
Monitors system activity.
Normally FLASHING.
If not flashing the microprocessor is dead.
DS11
Red
Monitors the ON command from the Transmitter.
LED will flash when an ON command is being received from the Transmitter.
While pushing the ON button on the Transmitter this should light.
DS12
Red
Monitors the OFF command from the Transmitter.
LED will flash when an OFF command is being received from the Transmitter Unit.
While pushing the OFF button on the Transmitter this should light.
44
Section 8 – Servicing (Continued)
LED
DS13
COLOR
Red
FUNCTION
Monitors EMS condition.
Normally OFF.
LED will flash when an EMS command is transmitted and illuminate continuously when the EMS
condition is in effect. An EMS condition may be created when an EMS command is transmitted
or when a failure mode is detected by the slave microcomputer. If both DS11 and DS13 are
illuminated, a contact monitoring error has been detected. If both DS9 and DS13 are illuminated,
the incoming data on the ICC bus has been corrupted.
DS14
Yellow
Monitors the AC activity for the Security Relay (K1).
Normally ON.
If the system is ON and the light is not lit there is a serious microprocessor error.
DS15
Red
Monitors the watchdog timer.
Normally OFF.
The LED will illuminate momentarily when power is applied to or removed from the system. If
the LED is continuously flashing or on, the computer is not working properly. If LED is
illuminated constantly (no flashing), the +5 VDC is probably too low. This could be caused by
shorts on the board or by a defective voltage regulator. If the LED flashes at a constant rate, the
microcomputer chip or EPROM may be defective.
DS16
Not used.
RF Receiver Module
LED
COLOR
RF
Red
FUNCTION
Power is on to the RF Receiver.
Normally ON.
Receiver
Monitors power to the RF Receiver Board. If the main receiver is ON and the RF
Receiver ON LED is OFF. Check to see if the RF Receiver Board is properly plugged in
to the main board.
ON
LED
Power Supply Module
LED
COLOR
DS1
Green
FUNCTION
Monitors unregulated 12 VDC.
Normally ON.
Check fuse, wiring to unit and AC power to unit.
DS2
Green
Monitors regulated 12 VDC.
Normally ON.
DS2 off and DS1 on, check for shorts on regulated output or blown regulator. Disconnect
power supply connector to computer control board, if DS2 light comes back on there is a
short on one of the other boards.
45
Section 8 – Servicing (Continued)
Relay and Output Modules
LED
COLOR
DS1-6
Green
The numbers of LEDs depend on the number of functions per board. LEDs are located
next to the relay or switch they control. Ground is switched to the relay coil or switch to
turn it on; this also turns on the light.
DS1-8
or
DS9
Monitors the power to the relay coil or switching device.
Normally OFF unless command is sent to turn ON.
or
DS7
FUNCTION
Green
Monitors 12 VDC to the relay or output module.
Normally ON.
LED off indicates no power to the relay or output module.
46
Section 9 - Spare Parts
RECEIVER
PART NUMBER
E13151-5XA
E10163-1
E10163-5
E10163-3
E10163-4
E10171-0
E10165-0
E10112-0
K2116-1
K1304-0
F2711-0
F2711-1
F2711-3
W1098-2
W1098-4
AN100-0
E2028-2
DESCRIPTION
UHF RECEIVER MODULE
CPU EPROM (10K12 SINGLE BOX) System ROM FW2832-0
CPU EPROM (10K12 MULTI-BOX) System ROM FW2833-0
CPU EPROM (10K16/24 SINGLE BOX) System ROM FW2834-0
CPU EPROM (10K16/24 MULTI-BOX) System ROM FW2835-0
POWER SUPPLY MODULE
OUTPUT RELAY MODULE (6 RELAYS)
OUTPUT RELAY MODULE (8 RELAYS)
RELAY DPST-N.O. 25A, 12VDC COIL (POWER SUPPLY BOARD)
RELAY SPDT, 16A, 12VDC COIL (OUTPUT BOARD)
FUSE, 10A, 250V, 5X20mm SLO-BLO
FUSE, 1.0A, 250V, 5X20mm SLO-BLO
FUSE, 0.3A, 250V, 5X20mm SLO-BLO
JUMPER, INSULATED, 2-CIRCUITS
JUMPER, INSULATED, 4-CIRCUITS
ANTENNA
OPTIONAL REMOTE EXTERNAL ANTENNA KIT
47