THE CRASH ZONE
Version 6.0
Software To Draw With, Experience to Draw From
The CAD Zone 4790 SW Watson
Beaverton, OR 97005
Phone: (800) 641-9077
(inside the US) (503) 641-0334
FAX: (503) 641-9077
Copyright© 2002, The CAD Zone, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
Index
Symbol
C
.BMP 1 - 3
.JPEG 1 - 3
.WMF 1 - 3
3D Builder (B3) 3 - 196
3D View (M3) 3 - 193
Calculator 3 - 200
Cascade 3 - 207
Center Lane Type 4 - 5
See Also: Line Types
Center Polygon (PC) 3 - 99
Centerlines 4 - 17
Changing the View 6 - 7
See Also: View
Clean Up the Intersection 6 - 8
Close (File Close, FC) 3 - 5
Close All Windows 3 - 208
Collision 6 - 12
Collision Diagram 4 - 1
Command icons 2 - 7
Compatibility 1 - 3
Continuous Line (LC) 3 - 76, 4 - 5
Control Point 4 - 19
Conventions Used 2 - 3
Copy commands 4 - 18
Copy (CO) 2 - 4, 3 - 36, 4 - 8
Copy (Ctrl + C) 3 - 23
Correcting Mistakes 2 - 4
Create Folder 4 - 3
Create Symbol (YC) 3 - 110
Crosshairs 4 - 29
Cursor Free (CF) 3 - 138
Curve (CV) 3 - 101
Cut (Ctrl + X) 3 - 22
Cutout (CT) 3 - 59, 4 - 26
A
Add a Border 6 - 17
Adding a Leader 4 - 20
Adding Dimensions 4 - 21
Adding Skid Marks 4 - 17
Adding Symbols 4 - 6
Adding Text 4 - 19
Advanced Traffic Diagrams 6 - 2
Angle Draw
Bar 2 - 6
Buttons 4 - 10, 6 - 3
Angle Draw On/Off (Ortho Mode, OR) 3 - 136
Angle Locking 2 - 7
See Also: Angle Trap
Angle Trap On/Off (OT) 3 - 129, 3 - 139
Arc:
Center-Start-End (Two-Point Arc, A2) 3 - 96
Length-Radius-Tangent (AX) 3 - 98
Start-End-Middle (AM) 3 - 97
Arrow (AW) 3 - 77, 6 - 28
Arrow Pointer 2 - 5
Auto Backup 4 - 16
Auto Snaps (AU) 3 - 128
AutoCAD 1 - 3
Automatic Save 4 - 8, 4 - 16
AutoSketch 1 - 3
Autosnaps 2 - 14
See Also: Snap Commands
B
Back button 2 - 20
Base Line 6 - 21
Bird’s Eye View (ZB) 3 - 121
Bodies 2 - 17, 3 - 183, 4 - 28
Border 6 - 17
Break (BR) 3 - 47
Breaking an Opening 4 - 14, 6 - 24
Bring to Front (TF) 3 - 124
Build Title Block 4 - 23
See Also: Title Block Setup
D
Delete (Erase, ER) 3 - 72
Diagram
starting from scratch 2 - 10
steps to creating 2 - 2
Diameter Circle (CD) 3 - 93
Dimension 2 - 18
Angular 3 - 160
Linear (DL) 3 - 154
Radius (DR) 3 - 162
Dimensioning 4 - 19, 4 - 21, 6 - 27
Dimension Settings (TBD) 3 - 163
Direction Arrows 6 - 14
Direction-Distance 2 - 19
Display Window 4 - 4
Double It Up (Offset, OF) 3 - 65
Double Line (LD) 3 - 84, 4 - 10
Settings 4 - 11
Double Line Int. Clean (IT) 3 - 61
Drawing 2 - 13, 4 - 3
An Intersection 4 - 5
Drawing Screen 2 - 5
Dynamic Symbol Scale 2 - 8, 4 - 19, 4 - 26
E
Easy Intersection (IW) 3 - 180, 4 - 4
Easy Lines (EZL) 2 - 14, 3 - 78, 4 - 3, 6 - 20
Toolbox 2 - 14
Easy Lines (EZL) 3 - 177
Easy Streets (EZS) 3 - 178
Toolbox 2 - 19, 6 - 4
Edit
Button 4 - 8
Commands 2 - 4
Mode 4 - 18
Properties (ED) 3 - 70
Editing
Dimension Text 4 - 22
Text 4 - 21
Ellipse (EP) 3 - 94
Erase 2 - 4
Blue Markers (MX) 3 - 73
Exit (FX) 3 - 19
Explode (YX) 3 - 69
Symbol (YX) 3 - 111
Export Images (VB) 3 - 11
See Also: BMP, JPEG, WMF
F
Fillet (FI) 3 - 57, 6 - 9
Radius 4 - 5
Font Size 4 - 22
Forms 3 - 186, 4 - 23
Four-Way Arrow 4 - 19
G
Ghost Image 2 - 16, 4 - 14
Grid
Commands 3 - 140
Display (GR) 3 - 141
Origin (GO) 3 - 144
Size (GS) 3 - 143
Group (GT) 3 - 67
H
Handle (Symbol) 4 - 29
Hatch/Fill Settings (TBH) 3 - 105
Help Resources 1 - 4
Home (EZH) 3 - 204
Homicide Diagram 4 - 1, 4 - 30
Horizontal/Vertical 4 - 6
I
Import
Drawings 1 - 3
Images (BI) 3 - 10
Installing 2 - 12
interior walls. 4 - 13
Intersection wizard 4 - 4
Introduction to The Diagram Program 1 - 2
Invert List (SI) 3 - 33
L
Lane
Number Option 4 - 4
Width 4 - 4
Layer Manager (MGL) 3 - 189
Leader (Arrow with Text) (LE) 3 - 151, 4 - 9, 4 - 20
Settings (TBL) 3 - 153
Shoulder 4 - 9
Learning Center (LR) 2 - 10, 3 - 202
Left and Right Toolbox On/Off 2 - 7, 3 - 126
Left Mouse Button 2 - 12
Left-Hand Toolbox 2 - 7
Line
Break 4 - 15
Draw 2 - 15
Types (LT) 3 - 185, 4 - 3, 6 - 15
Load a Template 4 - 2
M
Marker 4 - 11, 6 - 21
Match Entity (ME) 3 - 171
Measure Area (MA) 3 - 166
Measure Distance and Angles (MD) 3 - 164
Merge (FM) 3 - 9
Message Bar 4 - 18
Mirror (MI) 3 - 55
Mouse Pointer 2 - 5
Move (MV) 3 - 45, 4 - 19
A Section of Road 6 - 6
Move Point (MP) 3 - 46
Multi-Lane Int. Clean 3 - 63
N
Name View (NV) 3 - 123
New (File New, FN) 3 - 2
Normal Rectangle (R2) 3 - 87
North Arrow 6 - 14
Number of Lanes 4 - 11
O
Object Info (OI) 3 - 172
Offset 4 - 10
Location 4 - 18
Open (File Open, FO) 3 - 3
Opening 4 - 8
An Existing Drawing 2 - 9
Options button 4 - 4
P
Pack Data (PD) 3 - 174
Pan (PA) 3 - 120
Paste (Ctrl + V) 3 - 24
Pick Area (HD) 3 - 104
Place
Intersection 4 - 12
Intersection Button 4 - 4
Symbols 2 - 8, 2 - 15, 4 - 13, 6 - 10
Text 4 - 18, 6 - 16
Point (PO) 3 - 86
Pre-Drawn
Symbols 2 - 8
Template 4 - 2
Print (PR) 3 - 12, 4 - 21, 4 - 25, 6 - 19
Tiling 3 - 14
Setup (PT) 3 - 18
Program Features 3 - 1
Pull-down menus 2 - 6
Q
Quick
Copy (MC) 3 - 43
Dimension (QD) 2 - 18, 3 - 157, 4 - 10, 4 - 21,
Dimension Toolbox 2 - 18
Edit (QE) 3 - 71
Label (QL) 3 - 147, 4- 8
Scene 4 - 1
Tour 2 - 2
R
Radial Copy (RC) 3 - 41
Re-sizing 4 - 19
Redo (RE) 3 - 21
Redraw (RD) 3 - 114
Reference Line 6 - 4
Remove
Label 4 - 9
Markers 4 - 13
Reset 3 - 175
Right Mouse Button 2 - 12
Right-Hand Toolbox 2 - 7
Road 4 - 10
Length Bar 4 - 4
Length slider 4 - 12
Segment boxes 4 - 4
Rotate (RO) 2 - 4, 3 - 48, 4 - 29
Rotation handle 4 - 4, 4 - 12
Round Corners (Fillet) 6 - 9
Rows and Columns 3 - 38
Run (FU) 3 - 201
S
Save (DS) 3 - 6, 4 - 8
Drawing 4 - 8
Template 4 - 3
Your diagram 4 - 16
Your Work! 6 - 8
Save As (FA) 3 - 7
Scale (SZ) 3 - 50
Scaled
Borders 3 - 187
Print Border 4 - 23
Select
A Command 2 - 7
Adjoining (SJ) 3 - 31
All 3 - 26
Bar (S1) 3 - 34
Crossing 3 - 29
Last (SL) 3 - 30
Layer (SY) 3 - 32
Object 3 - 27
Window (SW) 3 - 28
Send to Back (TB) 3 - 125
Set
Angle (Ortho Angle, OA) 3 - 137
Angle Rectangle (R3) 3 - 89
Properties 3 - 113
Settings (Systems Tab (TBS) 3 - 168, 3 - 169
Shift key 4 - 29
Show Arrow option 4 - 9
Show Title Box 6 - 18
Side Polygon (PS) 3 - 100
Single Line (LS) 3 - 75
Skid Marks 4 - 17
See Also: Line Types
Slope Calculator 3 - 198
Snap
Commands 3 - 127
Endpoint (Snap Closest, SC) 3 - 130
Grid (SG) 3 - 142
Intersection (SI) 3 - 133
Midpoint (SM) 3 - 132
Object (SO) 3 - 131
Perpendicular (SP) 3 - 134
Tangent (ST) 3 - 135
Snapping 6 - 23
Snapshot Manager (S3) 3 - 194
Start Drawing 6 - 3
Start Up Diagram 2 - 13
Stretch 2 - 4
Stretch (SS) 2 - 4, 3 - 52
Symbol Count 3 - 112
Symbol Manager 2 - 8, 3 - 106
System Requirements 1 - 4
T
Template 4 - 2
Toolbox 4 - 2
Text (TL) 2 - 18, 3 - 145, 4 - 19
Font 2 - 18
Height 2 - 18, 4 - 10
Settings (TBT) 2 - 18, 3 - 150, 4 - 19
The Learning Center 2 - 9
The Quick Start Tutorial 2 - 12
The Speedbar 2 - 6
Tile
Horizontal 3 - 206
Vertical 3 - 205
Title Block 4 - 23
Setup 6 - 18
Trace Boundary (HB) 3 - 102
Traffic Investigation Tutorial 6 - 2
Triangulation 6 - 29
Trim/Extend (TR) 2 - 4, 3 - 56
Tutorial 2 - 12
Two-way Arrow 4 - 19
U
Undo (OO) 2 - 4, 3 - 20
Ungroup (GU) 3 - 68
Unselect 4 - 29
V
View 2 - 16, 4 - 9
Window 4 - 9
Visio 1 - 3
W
Wheelbase Center Markers 6 - 25
Window Stretch (WS) 3 - 54
Z
Zoom
All (ZA) 3 - 115
In (ZI) 3 - 117
Out (ZO) 3 - 118
Previous (ZP) 3 - 119
View (ZN) 3 - 122
Zoom Window (ZW) 2 - 16, 3 - 116
Zooming 4 - 9
Chapter 6. - Advanced Traffic Features
Chapter 6 Advanced Traffic Features
This chapter guides you through the process of creating an advanced
traffic collision diagram. It presents you with more powerful commands that make creating a Traffic diagram easier and faster. Chapter 6 also presents you with an specialized tutorial designed for
learning the program features used specifically for creating diagrams
using Baseline & Triangulation methods.
In this Chapter
Part 1
• Creating a Traffic
Diagram
• Drawing Roads
• Moving a section of road
• Creating Intersections
• Placing Crash Symbols
• Dynamic Symbol Scale
• Placing Text
• Editing Dimensions
• Placing a Border
• Printing
Pt. 2 - Advanced Features
• Using Easy Lines
• Drawing in Baseline
• Using Markers for
Wheelbase Centers
• Placing Symbols
• Dimensioning
• Placing Text Leaders
• Triangulation Methods
6-1
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Creating advanced traffic diagrams
Along with this Traffic tutorial, you should also go through the Homicide
tutorial found in Chapter 4. The Traffic tutorial is complete, but specifically
addresses collision diagraming. The Homicide tutorial covers other drawing
fundamentals that assist you in any type of diagram you create. The more
hands-on time you spend with the program the more proficient you will become.
Introduction to the Traffic Investigation Tutorial
In the first part of this tutorial you will recreate a two car collision in a two
lane intersection. Part 1 will show you how to draw a “quick scene,” the type
of diagram you might do for a nonfatal collision. In the second part of this
tutorial you will use more exact methods to draw roads with varying lane
widths and place a vehicle at exact points using baseline and triangulation
methods. Figure 6.1 shows the finished diagram for Part 1 of this tutorial.
General Overview
The following Figure shows the Crime Zone drawing screen and highlights
some of the main tools you’ll be using. In this Tutorial, you will select the
Easy Streets feature to create the intersection. You will use the Angle Draw
buttons to help draw straight roads. You will select symbols from the Symbol
Manager. You will place text and finish the diagram by placing a automatic
border around the diagram. The Automatic Borders command can be found in
the Forms Bin.
6-2
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Start Drawing
First, you’re going to draw a horizontal 100' section of road using the Easy
Streets feature. Easy Streets converts a selected line, arc, curve or circle into a
roadway defined by the information you enter into the toolbox. This road
section will be 2 lanes, 12' per lane, and have a dashed centerline.
First draw a single 100' line on the screen that will represent the Easy Street
road guideline.
Click on the Draw Bin on the left-hand toolbox and select the
Line command.
Click near point A in Figure 6.2 to set the first point of the road
section.
The Draw Bin Button
Next we are going to use the Angle draw buttons to ensure that our line segment is drawn horizontal.
The Line Icon
Click on the horizontal Angle Draw button, near the top center
of the screen.
Figure 6.2 - Starting the road section
The Horizontal/Vertical
Angle Draw Buttons
6-3
This will constrain your mouse pointer so you can only move horizontally or
vertically.
Move your mouse towards the right side of the screen.
Type a distance of 100' on the keyboard and press the Enter
button.
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
A 100' line segment will be drawn in the drawing area.
Next, we will open the Easy Streets toolbox and set the definitions for the
section of road to be drawn.
Figure 6.3 - The completed road baseline.
Click on the Easy Streets bin on the Right-Hand Toolbox.
The Easy Street
Bin Button
The Easy Streets toolbox allows you to create a road section up to ten lanes
across. Lane widths and centerline types can be set for each individual line.
The lanes and line types are displayed in the toolbox as well as a preview
window at the top of the toolbox. This allows you to see what your road section will look like before it is drawn on the screen.
Set the selections on the Easy Streets toolbox to the following settings.
• Click in the X column for the first lane and make sure that it
is checked.
• Click on the Width column for the first lane and type 12' (if it
is set to some other width.)
• Click on the Line Type field and set it to a
dashed line.
• Check Lane #2, set the Line Type to a solid
type, and set the width to 12'.
• Turn off any other lanes that may be
checked.
Once you have defined the lane attributes, you then
select the road’s reference line. The red line in the preview indicates the reference line origin. By clicking the
three reference line buttons, you can change the orientation of the reference line relative to the lanes.
Click on the left reference line icon to place
the reference line at the top.
Next, convert the single line in the drawing area into a
road.
Easy Streets Toolbox
6-4
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Click on the line segment you drew previously to select it.
This activates the Apply button on the Easy Streets Toolbox.
Click on the “OK- Apply Road button.
The OK-Apply Button
The reference line is now converted into a road segment using the road model
that you defined in the Easy Streets toolbox. You can still toggle between the
different reference line buttons to change the road’s placement on the drawing
screen. You can also change line types and lane settings “on-the-fly” and see
the changes displayed on the screen.
The Finish Button
After the “OK-Apply Road” button is clicked it changes
automatically to a “Finish.” Click this button to finish the Easy
Streets command.
Figure 6.4 - The completed road section
You can use the same procedure to draw the vertical section of the intersection as you did to draw the horizontal section.
Use the same lane information as you did for the horizontal section:
Lane #1 - Dashed centerline type, 12' in width.
Lane #2 - Solid line type, 12' in width.
Be sure to click the Finish button to complete the road.
Click on the Line command on the left-hand toolbox.
Click near point A to set the first point in drawing the road
section.
Click near point A in Figure 6.5 to set the first point for the
vertical section.
Now move your mouse toward the bottom of the screen.
Type in a distance of 100' on the keyboard and press the Enter
button.
6-5
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Since the Easy Streets toolbox is still displayed, we can easily apply the lane
data to this vertical line.
Click on the vertical reference line to select it.
Click the Apply button on Easy Streets to build the road
section.
Click the Finish button to end the command.
Figure 6.5 - Drawing the vertical road section.
Moving a Section of Road
If your vertical street is not centered you can use the Move command to drag
the street section around until it’s centered over the horizontal street section.
The Move Icon
The Select
Crossing Icon
6-6
Select the Move command from the Modify bin on the lefthand toolbox. (Notice that the Speedbar now changes to a
selection set of Icons.)
Choose the “Select Crossing” command from the speedbar.
Position your mouse back on the drawing screen and click
near point A and point B to place a selection window that
crosses through the top section of the vertical road as shown
in Figure 6.6.
Click the OK button on the Selection toolbar.
Next, position the mouse pointer inside the control points of
the street and click the left-mouse button.
Move the mouse until the road section is positioned properly,
then click the left-mouse button again.
When finished, click on an empty part of the screen or press
the Esc key to deselect the road section.
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Figure 6.6 - Selecting the road with a Selection Crossing
Notice you can only move the street exactly horizontally or vertically. To
eliminate this constraint, turn off the Angle Draw mode either by clicking on
the speedbar icon or by typing OR on the keyboard.
Changing the View
You drew street sections that were 100' long on a screen that’s maybe a little
more than a foot across and yet you can still see the entire intersection. When
you first start The Diagram Program you have a visible working area of approximately 550' long by 350' wide. By changing views, you change the
amount of visible area. For example, you could draw a hundred of the 100' by
100' intersections side-by-side in the program and still be able to view them.
Let’s change the view of the current diagram:
The Zoom All Icon
Click on the View bin on the left-hand toolbox. Position your
mouse pointer over the Zoom All icon. Let up on the mouse
button to select the Zoom All feature.
The intersection should fill up the entire screen. If you wish to give yourself a
little more room to work, you can zoom out with the Zoom Out feature.
The Zoom In Icon
6-7
Select the Zoom Out feature from the View Features, using the
same method as described above.
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Figure 6.7 - The centered road sections.
Save Your Work!
Don’t forget to save you work! It’s a good idea to save your work at least
every 15 minutes or so. If you don’t save it, you could lose all your work if
there was a power outage, a computer glitch, or other problem.
The first time you save your diagram use the Save As feature. The Save As
feature is found on the File pull-down menu. Save As will let you enter the
name of the diagram before saving it. Pick a name you will remember. In this
case you may want to save the diagram as Traffic Tutorial .CZD.
Once you’ve saved using the Save As feature you will see the name of your
diagram at the top of the screen. Then you can just click on the Save feature
to save the diagram and it will automatically save to the specified name. The
Save feature is on the File pull-down menu and is also represented by the disk
icon which is at the top of the screen just left of the scissors.
Clean Up the Intersection
Now you need to clean up the intersection where the lines intersect each
other.
Click on Multi-lane Clean icon on the Easy Streets Toolbox.
Refer to Figure 6.8 for the following instructions.
The Multi-Lane
Clean Icon
6-8
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Click near point A.
Click near point B.
Click near point C.
Click near point D.
Click again near point A.
The intersection is now automatically cleaned up and the intersecting lines
through the center are erased!
Figure 6.8 - Cleaning up the intersection
Round Corners (Fillet)
Now we will polish up your intersection by rounding off its corners with the
Fillet (FI) feature, as described below. Fillet (pronounced “fill it”) will round
off the point at which two lines intersect. The amount of rounding is determined by the fillet radius. The fillet radius is set at the top left of the screen
when the Fillet command is selected. The fillet feature can also be selected by
pressing the “FI” key on your keyboard. Figure 6.9 shows the intersection
with rounded corners.
The Fillet Icon
Select Fillet (FI) from the Edit ~ Edit Commands pull-down,
the left-hand toolbox, or press “FI” on your keyboard.
The default value for the fillet radius is 12'. You can leave it at
12' or change it by selecting the Fillet Radius option at the top
left of the screen.
Click on line A and then click on line B as shown in Figure 6.9.
You will see a ghost image of the fillet between the lines.
Position the fillet to the desired position by moving your
mouse to one side of the line or the other. When positioned
correctly click your left-mouse button and the corner will
automatically be rounded.
Repeat the same procedure for the other corners. Select the Fillet feature, or
press the spacebar, which repeats the last command used, and click on the
corners intersected by lines C and D, E and F, and H and G.
6-9
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Figure 6.9 - Using Fillet to round the street corners
Placing Symbols
The Symbols Bin Icon
Now you are going to place the symbols for the vehicles that collided. In this
tutorial we’ll place the vehicles at their start point, the point of collision, and
final resting positions after the collision.
Click the Back button on the right-hand toolbox.
Select the Symbol Bin from the right-hand toolbox.
Double click on the Quick Pick symbol folder to open it.
Click on the Quick Car symbol to select it.
Position your mouse pointer near point A as shown in Figure
6.10, and click the left-mouse button.
Move the cursor horizontally to the left to position the symbol
on the street. (Make sure the Angle Draw mode is still on.)
Once the symbol is in position, click the left mouse button
again to finish placing it.
6-10
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Figure 6.10 - Placing the car symbol
Referring to Figure 6.11, place a Quick Car symbol vertically near point A, as
follows:
Figure 6.11 - Placing the Vertical car symbol
6-11
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Select the Quick Car symbol from the symbol manager.
Click once near point A to anchor the first point (also the
rotation point in this case).
Make sure the Horizontal/Vertical Angle Draw mode is turned
on, or click it to be sure that it is selected.
Move the mouse upward so that the Angle Value (upper-left
corner of the screen) reads 90° and then click to finish placing
the symbol.
Place numbers in the Quick Cars
Next, you’re going to place a 1 and a 2 to label the Quick Car symbols. You
could place ordinary text in your diagram, but in this case the numbers you’ll
place are pre-drawn symbols just like the Quick Car symbol. This is faster
than selecting the text feature and typing in a number.
Refer to Figure 6.14 for which car gets which number.
Select the “1” symbol from the Quick Pick folder and place it
on the horizontal car.
Select the “2” symbol and place it on the vertical car.
The Collision
All symbols in the program are placed the same way. Just repeat the procedure to place the remaining symbols.
Figure 6.12 - Placing text in the car symbols
6-12
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Place more car symbols in the diagram as shown in Figure
6.12. This is the point of collision. Car 2 is still vertical. Car 1
will be slightly rotated when you place it. To do this first turn
off Angle Draw (Ortho) mode by selecting it from the
speedbar.
Be sure to add the numbers as well.
Place the Crash Area symbol where the cars collided.
The Angle Draw (Ortho)
Mode Icon
Figure 6.12 - Adding collision symbols
6-13
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Car Resting Positions After Collision
Place another symbol for each car near points A and B as shown in Figure
6.13. Don’t forget to place the number symbols in the cars.
Figure 6.13 - Final resting position of the car symbols.
Note - In Part 2 of this tutorial you will place exact points for the location of
a vehicle and then place the vehicle on the points. Here we simply approximate the vehicle’s size.
Direction Arrows and North Arrow
Now you can place arrows showing the path of the vehicles before and after
the collision. In this tutorial, a solid arrow is used before the collision and a
dashed arrow is used to show travel after the collision.
Figure 6.14 shows the position of the arrows. The arrows are special “Line
Types” that can be drawn with any of the drawing tools. For instance the
solid arrow line type can be drawn using the Curve command to show the
path the vehicle moved. Any of the drawing tools can be used with line types
so you can draw arc, circles, and so on.
6-14
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Before Crash Line Type
After Crash Line Type
Click the Back button on the right-hand toolbox.
Click the Line Types button on the toolbox.
Select the Solid Arrow Line Type, labeled “Before Crash
Line.”
Select the Line command from the Draw Bin on the left-hand
toolbox or type LS on the keyboard.
Draw the lines for the two “Before Crash” arrows as shown in
Figure 6.14
Select the “After Crash Line” from the Line Types bin and
draw final arrows.
When you are finished select the Normal Line Type from the
toolbox.
Figure 6.14 - Placement of the North & Direction arrows.
Now place a North arrow symbol so it is pointing straight up.
Use the Angle Draw buttons to help you keep the arrow pointing straight up.
Select the North Arrow Symbol from the Quick Pick folder.
Click on the Horizontal/Vertical Angle Draw button.
Move the mouse pointer onto the drawing screen and click
again to finish placing the symbol.
6-15
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Placing Text
Next let’s label the streets. As shown in Figure 6.15, the vertical street is
labeled “135th” and the horizontal street is labeled “Wilson Ave.” First, label
the horizontal street.
Select the Text feature from the Text Bin on the left-hand
toolbox. (It’s the big white “T”).
The Text Icon
The various Text settings are then displayed on a horizontal bar near the top
of the screen, as shown below.
Text
Rotation
Text Entry Window
Font
Height
Font
Type
Paragraph
Mode
Click once inside the text entry window. Type in the word
“Wilson Ave.” (Do not press the Enter key!)
Move your mouse pointer onto the drawing screen and notice
a box attached to it that represents the text at the size it will
be when it’s placed.
Figure 6.15 - Placement of text in the diagram.
6-16
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Change your text height to 5 in the text menu. Just click in the
text size box, delete the current value and type in 5 (for 5’).
Now move your text so it is positioned below the horizontal
street, as shown in Figure 6.15. Since you want Wilson Ave. to
be horizontal, double-click the left mouse button to place it.
Now select the Text feature and type in the word “135th.”
Click once to anchor the starting point as shown in Figure
6.15.
If Angle Draw mode is not already on click on the Horizontal/
Vertical Angle Draw button.
Move your mouse pointer downward and below the first point
placed. Click your left-mouse button. The text should then be
placed vertically at 270° as shown in Figure 6.15.
Add a Border to the Diagram - The Finishing Touch
Now that the diagram is complete you may want to place a border around it
for the finishing touch. Figure 6.16 shows the border around the diagram.
This border makes it easier to print the diagram at a particular scale.
Place Border Icon
Select the Back Button on the Right-hand toolbox, then click
on the Forms Bin icon.
This causes the Border toolbox to be displayed.
Select the paper size (8 ½” X 11" in this case).
Select the orientation of the border (Check Best Fit).
Let the program calculate the scale by checking the Best
Scale button.
Select the Place Border button to place the border around the
diagram.
Figure 6.16 - Adding the Print Border.
6-17
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
You can make changes to the border at any time by selecting different
changes on the toolbox and clicking the Update Border button.
Next we will add a Title Block to the border so that you can include important information about the diagram.
Select the Title Block Setup icon from Forms toolbox.
Title Block Setup Icon
This opens the Title Block Setup window.
Check mark the first square in the window to activate the field.
Click in the Label field and type Case Number:
Click in the String field and type 991404.
Use the same procedure to enter in the following information:
Check mark the second square. In the Label field type Date
Drawn: and enter today’s date in the String field.
Check mark the third square. In the Label field type Drawn
By: and type your name in the String field.
Next check in the Show Title Box on the Forms toolbox to
display the Title Block within the border.
You may change the position of the Title Block by clicking on the “Corner
Icons.” If you have a lot of information on your Title Block, you may split it
up into columns by changing the number in the Columns box.
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Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Print Your Work of Art
Select Print from the File pull-down menu or from the Printer
icon at the top left of the screen. The Print Options box
appears.
The Print Dialog Box
For this case the radio buttons “Fit to Paper” and
“Landscape” should be selected.
Click on the “Print” button to send the diagram to your
printer.
Congratulations! You’re done with Part 1 of the advanced traffic tutorial!
6-19
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Part 2: Advanced Traffic Features!
This Section will cover features that make it easier for you to position items
in your diagram to exact measurements. You will use the Easy Lines feature
to position markers using baseline procedures.
Many of the basics needed to create diagrams were already covered in Part 1
of this tutorial. In the case where features have already been explained such
as using View features or using Dynamic Symbol Scale, no additional explanation of those features will be given.
Figure 6.17 shows the end result of this tutorial. To get started you need to
draw the baseline which is a horizontal line 50’ long. To do this we’ll use the
Figure 6.17 - Placing the “Zero Point”
Easy Lines feature. North is pointing straight up in this example. The points
you will place in this diagram will be West and South of the zero point.
Using the Easy Lines Feature
Bulls-eye Icon
6-20
If you are continuing on from the previous tutorial, select the
New command from the File Menu
Select Easy Lines from the Right-Hand toolbox.
The message “Click on Bulls-eye to set a Start Point” will
appear on the message bar.
Click on the Bulls-eye in the center of Easy Lines.
Click to the right of your screen near point A as shown in
Figure 6.17 This will also be our “zero point”.
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
The first line (or marker) is placed at the direction and distance you enter, as
measured from the start point. Each new line is then drawn relative to the last
endpoint placed.
The First Marker
First let’s place a marker at our zero point:
Click on the Marker button on the Easy Lines Toolbox. A
marker will appear at the start point you selected, as shown in
Figure 6.18.
Figure 6.18 - Placement of the zero point marker.
The Marker Icon
Draw the Base Line
Click on the button that points to the left on the Easy Lines
Toolbox. Notice that the Angle display box on the toolbox
shows 180.
Click 5 and 0 on the Easy Lines number pad to enter 50 feet
into the distance display box.
Click on the line icon on the Easy Lines Toolbox. A line 50'
long will be drawn from the start point towards the left side of
the screen.
The Line Icon
Figure 6.19 - Drawing the Base Line
6-21
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
You can click inside either the angle or distance box with your mouse and
type in a value if you prefer. For example, you may want to enter an angle
that isn’t represented by one of the arrows. Just click inside the angle display
box and type or use the Easy Line number pad to enter a value (such as 30).
Tip - Since you placed your start point at the right side of the screen you’ll
want to draw your line to the left so it doesn’t go off the screen. If your lines
or objects ever go off the screen, you can scroll or change your view to see
them again. Changing views, placing symbols, drawing objects, will not
affect the last point placed with Easy Lines. Easy Lines always remembers
the location of the last point it placed.
Now you can build the roadway off this baseline with the Easy Streets feature
as follows:
Click on the Back button on the Right -hand toolbox.
Click on the Easy Streets Bin to open the Easy Streets
Toolbox.
In the toolbox enter these settings:
Lane #1 - Solid Line, 4’5”
Lane #2 - Dashed Line, 11’
Lane #3 - Solid Line, 12’
Lane #4 - Solid Line, 2’
Lane #5 - Solid Line, 11’6”
Click on the baseline to select it and click the Apply button.
Click the reference line button at the right of the toolbox to
place the reference line on top.
Figure 6.20 - Finishing the roadway
6-22
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Next click the Flip button so the road looks like that in Figure
6.20.
Be sure to click the Finish Button to complete the street when
you are satisfied with it.
Mark the Entrance
ue
Cl
Since this reference line
was drawn from right to
left, the Reference Line
icons on the toolbox
actually work in reverse
of how they are pictured.
If you are not sure of
which one to use, just
click each one until you
get the result on the
screen that you want.
Now let’s mark the two points that represent an entrance to a gas station.
Figure 6.21 shows the location of the markers you will place.
Select the Easy Lines Toolbox from the Right-hand toolbox.
Click on the Bulls-eye then snap to the zero point (point A in
Figure 6.21) using the AutoSnap as described below:
Figure 6.21 - Marking the entrance
Snapping Dead On
Snapping to a point allows you to attach the mouse pointer to an exact point
so objects are connected and the drawing is accurate. This allows you to accurately reference from one point to another as you will do in this section for
the driveway opening.
The Snap commands can also be activated from the keyboard by typing the
appropriate two-letter code. For example, to snap to an endpoint, move your
mouse pointer near the endpoint and press the SC key combination on your
keyboard. The snap features can also be selected from the Snaps Bin, on the
Left-Hand Toolbox and the Snaps pull-down menu. In this case we are going
to use the “AutoSnap” feature to make things a little easier.
When using AutoSnaps all you need to do is position the cursor crosshairs
over the point that you would like to snap to and click your mouse. The program will attach the two points exactly.
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Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Autosnaps Icon
Click on the Autosnaps icon on the Speedbar. You will see a
cross hair attached to your mouse pointer.
Move the mouse pointer near point A in Figure 6.21 and click
with your left-mouse button. The mouse pointer should jump
or snap exactly onto the marker.
Click on the left arrow button on the Easy Lines Toolbox. Click
in a distance of 16’8" and then click on the marker button.
A marker should show up to the left of point A, near point B as shown in
Figure 6.21.
Click on the bulls-eye button on the Easy Lines Toolbox to
select a new start point. Snap to the endpoint at Point A in
Figure 6.21 again.
Click on the left-arrow button on the Easy Lines Toolbox.
Click in a distance of 33’6" and then click on the marker
button.
A marker should show up near point C as shown in Figure 6.21.
Now you have the two points that mark the entrance.
Breaking an Opening
Next, we will break out the line between the two entrance point markers. Use
the Break feature from the Edit~Modify Features menu to accomplish this
task. Figure 6.22 shows the section of line broken out of the baseline.
Select the Break command from the Modify menu.
Click anywhere on the baseline near Point A as shown in
Figure 6.22.
Snap to Point B, then Snap to Point C as labeled in Figure
6.22. (It doesn’t really matter whether you start with point C
and then go to B or vise-versa.)
Figure 6.22 - Breaking the Opening
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Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
You will be able to see the line being broken as you move the
cursor.
Snap to Point C to complete the break.
Vehicle Wheelbase Center Markers
Place the next four markers for the vehicle wheelbase centers relative to the
zero point. Figure 6.23 shows the location of the next four markers.
Use the Easy Lines Baseline feature to place the four markers as described
below. The following lists the distances you’ll need for markers A, B, C, and
D as shown in Figure 6.23.
Marker A (left front wheelbase center) - 7’2" left (West of zero
point) and 18’2" down (South).
Marker B (right front) - 10’1" left and 23’2" down.
Marker C (right rear) - 20’6" left and 17’2" down.
Marker D (left rear) - 17’7" left and 12’2" down.
For marker A, you would:
Figure 6.23 - Location of the Wheelbase Center Markers
Baseline Mode Icon
6-25
1) First select the Baseline mode from the Easy Lines toolbox.
2) Click on the bulls-eye to pick a new start point.
3) Snap to the zero point marker with Autosnaps.
4) Snap to the marker at the left to establish the Baseline
direction.
5) Enter 7’2 on the number pad for the D1 distance. (The
Distance along the baseline.)
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
6) Enter 18’2” for the D2 distance, the distance perpendicular
to the baseline.
7) Click on the marker button to place the marker at the wheel
base location.
That completes placement of the first marker for the left-front wheelbase
center of the vehicle. Repeat the steps 5-7 to place markers B, C, and D using
the distances listed previously.
Placing the Vehicle
Now place the large pickup truck symbol in the diagram. The large pickup
truck symbol is found on the Vehicles ~ Top Views symbol folder.
Select the Vehicles ~ Top Views symbol folder.
Make sure you have Dynamic Symbol Scale turned on. Remember, Dynamic
Figure 6.24 - Placing the Truck Symbol
Symbol Scale is located on the Symbol Manager. It’s a toggle. If you select it
and it’s off, select it again to turn it on.
Select the Large Pick-Up symbol.
Snap the first handle of the truck to marker A as shown in
Figure 6.24.
Snap the second handle of the truck to marker B. (You must
have Angle Draw mode turned off to do this.)
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Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Dimensioning
You may want to throw in some quick dimensions for reference purposes.
Since you created this drawing using exact, real world measurements, you
can let the program calculate the dimensions for you. If you place a border
around this drawing, like you did in Part 1 of this tutorial your scale would be
a valid number. If the scale came out to 1"=25', you could put your rule up to
the diagram and take measurements off of the printed out diagram.
Now place some reference dimensions in the diagram using the Dimension
feature. This feature is found on the Text/Dimension pull-down menu and on
the Left-hand Toolbox in the same category where you found text. You could
try using the dimension feature with arrows, as well, but in this case the arrows clutter the drawing.
Select the Linear Dimension (Text Only) feature.
Snap to Endpoint at point A, as shown in Figure 6.25.
Snap to Endpoint at point B, as shown in Figure 6.25.
The Linear
Dimension Icon
Now move your mouse pointer towards the left side of your screen to set the
location of the dimension text. Click your left-mouse button when you’re
satisfied with the location of the dimension text.
Use the same procedure to dimension the distance between each of the road
lanes, also shown in Figure 6.25.
C
Figure 6.25 - Placing the dimension text.
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Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Dimensions - Arrow and a Note
The Leader feature, also found on the Text/Dimension command group, lets
you draw an arrow with a note attached. Use this feature to place an arrow
note to show the width between the double lane line and the zero point, as
shown in Figure 6.26.
Select the Leader feature.
At the top of the screen in the text box type: 2’.
Click the first point where you want the arrowhead located,
near Point C in Figure 6.26
Move the mouse pointer up and to the right and click again for
the “shoulder” of the arrow.
Move the mouse pointer to the right to position the text and
click again.
If make a mistake while entering a point, just press the Esc key. Every time
you press the Esc key the program backs up one step. This works well when
placing text, drawing lines, placing symbols, placing dimensions, and so on.
Esc has no effect, however, once you’ve completed the command.
Finishing Touch
In Figure 6.27 you can see that we added the North arrow symbol and drew a
chart using the Line, Copy, and Text commands to show the baseline coordinates we used for this tutorial. You may also notice that all the markers have
been erased. You can erase all the markers in your diagram with one easy
command.
The Erase Blue
Markers Icon
Figure 6.27 - Adding the Chart
Select the Erase Blue Markers feature from the Edit/Modify
pull-down menu and the markers, except the Zero Point
marker, all disappear!
6-28
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Triangulation
Sometimes a more accurate way to locate a point is with “Triangulation.”
This method uses straight line measurements between two points of known
location and the object of interest.
Since we didn’t use triangulation in the previous example we’ll discuss the
steps you can use to triangulate a point here. Refer to Figure 6.28 for the
following steps.
For this example we will use the same roadway you just created. As shown in
Figure 6.28, point A is our zero point, and point B is 50' to the left of point A.
At the scene, a tape was pulled from point A to the object in the road. It was
measured as 32'. A tape pulled from point B to the object measured 36'. Here
is how to draw this in the program:
Easy Lines - Placing Markers
The Triangulation
Mode Icon
Select the Easy Lines toolbox, then select the Triangulation
Mode Icon.
Click on the bulls-eye and snap to the first reference point
(Point A.)
Move your mouse to the left (make sure the Horizontal Angle
Draw mode is on) type 50’ on the keyboard, and press Enter to
place the second reference point.
In the first distance box type 32'. In the second distance box
type 36', and select the marker icon to place a marker at the
intersection point.
Figure 6.28 - The Finished Triangulation Diagram
6-29
Chapter 6. - Creating a Quick Collision Scene
The point where the marker is placed is the exact intersection of the two
circles with the radii you entered. If you wanted to place an object, (symbol,
line, marker, or other) exactly at that point, you could simply snap to the
marker using one of the Snap commands.
This concludes the Advanced Collision Diagram tutorial. For further information on the commands used in this and the previous tutorials, please refer to
the Electronic On-line Help and Chapter 3. Program Features in the Electronic User’s Manual.
6-30
Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
Chapter 5 Creating a Collision Diagram
This chapter guides you through the process of creating a quick
collision scene. It demonstrates shortcuts and tools that are useful for
creating simple collision sketches where exact measurements are not
required. Part One presents you with individual lessons addressing
specific features, while Part Two offers you a complete Quick Scene
tutorial to work through.
In this Chapter
Part 1
• Pre-drawn Templates
• Easy Intersections
• Adding Symbols
• Adding Text
• Placing Dimensions
• Changing Properties
Part 2
• Creating a New Drawing
• Features of the Easy
Intersection Toolbox
• Easy Intersection tutorial
• Changing the Centerline
• Placing Vehicle Symbols
• Placing Text
• Placing Dimensions
• Printing your Diagram
5-1
Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
Lesson 1: Using a Pre-Drawn Template
The “Load a Template” toolbox allows you to preview and select pre-drawn
templates roads and intersections. The pre-drawn templates that are included
with the Diagram Program are all stored in sub-folders under the main Templates folder. You may also display the Templates Toolbox at any time by
clicking on the button labeled Templates on the left-hand toolbox.
To place a template in your drawing simply select it from the appropriate
folder in the templates toolbox (by clicking on its name) and clicking Open
Template. Then place the template in the diagram by clicking or snapping to a
specific point in your drawing.
1. Select the Template button from the right hand toolbox to
open the “Load a Template” toolbox.
2. Select the desired Template folder from the Template
toolbox clicking on the folder name in the upper portion of the
templates toolbox.
3. Click on any template name and notice a preview of the
symbol appears in the upper-right of the toolbox.
4. Click the Open Template button and move the cursor back
into the drawing window. Notice an outline of the template
attached to the cursor.
5. Click the left-mouse button ( or snap to an existing point ) to
place the template in the drawing window.
Current Folder - Shows
the currently selected folder.
Any templates shown in the list
below are located in this folder
Template Preview Shows all the templates
available in the selected
folder. If no templates are
displayed in this list you
must double-click on one of
the sub-folders shown
above.
Create Folder - Allows you to create a new
folder that you name. All new folders are created
under the Templates directory.
The Template Toolbox
5-2
Mirror Vertically or
Horizontally - If these
buttons are pressed all
templates will be
mirrored about either a
vertical line or a
horizontal line when they
are placed.
Preview Window Shows what the selected
template looks like. This
view is updated if you
change the symbol’s
rotation or mirroring.
Save Template - Allows you to
create your own custom template and
add it to the currently selected
template folder.
Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
To create a new folder in the Templates directory:
1. Click the Create Folder button on the Template toolbox.
2. A “Create Folder” Dialog box will appear prompting you to
enter a name for the folder.
3. Click in the blank field, type the desired name of the folder,
and click the OK button.
4. The new folder is saved under the Templates directory.
To create and save a new Template:
1. In the Template toolbox navigate to the desired folder where
you want the custom template to be saved.
1. Click the Save Template button on the Template toolbox.
2. A “Save Template” dialog box will appear prompting you to
save the new template in the currently selected folder. If this
folder is not correct, click the Cancel button and repeat Step
One.
3. Click in the “Enter Template Name” field and type the desire
name of the custom template.
4. Click the OK button to save the new template in the
selected template folder.
5-3
Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
Lesson 2: Using Easy Intersection.
The Easy Intersection wizard allows you to create an intersection by simply
clicking and selecting from the various options. (You may also display the
Easy Intersection Toolbox at any time by clicking on the button labeled Easy
Intersection on the left-hand toolbox.)
Features on the Easy Intersection toolbox:
1. Display Window - This is where you view the intersection model as it is
being built.
2. Road Segment boxes - Check mark the road segment boxes to add a road
segment to the intersection.
3. Lane Number Option - Click the arrows to increase or decrease the
number of lanes in each road segment.
4. Road Length Bar - Move the slider arrow to increase or decrease the
overall road length.
5. Place Intersection Button - Click to place the completed intersection in
your drawing.
6. Rotation Handles - Drag this square to rotate the road segment to a new
angle.
7. Options button - brings up the following dialog box with the following
options:
3. Lane Number Option
2. Road Segment Boxes
1. Display Window
7. Options Button
6. Rotation Handles
4. Road Length Bar 5. Place Intersection Button
Lane Width - Sets the overall width for the lanes of the road
segments.
Road Length - Sets the maximum length of an individual road
segment. This number determines how big you can make the
5-4
Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
intersection when using the Road Length slider. (Ex. By setting the
maximum length to 1000 feet, the two road segments opposite of each
other would create an overall intersection length of 2000 feet.)
Fillet Radius - Used to round the corners of the intersection. Uncheck the box next to Fillet Radius if you want square corners (90
degrees).
Center Lane Type - Use this option to choose either dashed or solid
center lines. If you want some other line type (such as a double solid
center line) you must place the intersection first, then select the line to
be changed and choose one of the line types from the Properties menu
on the left-hand toolbox.
Sets the overall lane width for all lanes.
Sets the length of an individual road segment.
( for use with the Road Length slider bar. )
Sets the fillet (rounded corners) radius.
Sets lane centerlines to be dashed or solid.
To Draw an intersection using the Easy Intersection toolbox:
1. Select Easy Intersection from the Left-hand Toolbox.
2. Build the intersection you want to place in the diagram by
check marking the road segment boxes.
3. Click the arrows to increase or decrease the number of lanes
in each road segment.
4. Move the Road Length slider to the left or right to increase or
decrease the length of the road segments.
5. Drag the red rotate handle to adjust the angle of a section, if
needed.
6. Click on the Place Intersection button to place the intersection
in the diagram.
5-5
Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
Lesson 3: Adding Symbols
Symbols are collections of objects that are grouped together, named, saved,
and then placed and manipulated as a single object. You can insert them
repeatedly in the same drawing, or save them on disk for use in future drawings. This saves you the time that would be necessary to draw the same
objects over and over, and also provides some additional advantages. For
example, each symbol is defined just once in the drawing definition, so that
repeated placements of the same symbol have little impact on drawing file
size. The same symbol can be inserted in different locations, and at different
rotations and sizes. Symbols can consist of anything you want, such as a
vehicle, a street sign, or even an entire intersection.
Preview what symbols are available to you and select symbols to place in
your diagrams from the Symbol Manager. To place a symbol in your drawing
simply select it from the appropriate folder in the Symbol Manager (by
clicking on its name) and then place the symbol handles by clicking or snapping to specific points in your drawing. From Symbol Manager you can also
select options that affect how the symbol is to be placed such as it’s color and
whether it is mirrored on placement. You can also choose whether you want
to dynamically size and rotate the symbol as it is placed, or place it at its
default size and rotation.
Current Folder Shows the currently
selected folder. Any
symbols shown in the
list below are located
under this folder. If a
plus sign is displayed
to the left of the folder
name, double click on
the folder to see the
subfolders under it.
- Shows
all the symbols available
in the selected folder. If
this area is blank, you
must first select a folder
or sub-folder from the list
above by double clicking
on it.
Symbol List
Mirror
- Causes all
symbols to be mirrored
about either a vertical line
or a horizontal line when
they are placed.
5-6
Symbol Color Dynamic Scale Press this button when
you want to dynamically
change the size (or scale)
of symbols as you place
them in the drawing.
Click on this button to
select a color to be
applied to any symbol
being placed.
Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
To place a symbol in a diagram:
Tip:
If no symbols are
displayed in the lower
portion of the Symbol
Manager, you need to
first select a folder or
sub-folder.
5-7
1. Select the Symbols button from the left-hand toolbox to bring
up the Symbol Manager.
2. Select the folder where the desired symbol files are located by
double-clicking on the folder name in the upper portion of the
Symbol Manager.
3. Click on any symbol name and move the cursor back into the
drawing window.
4. You will see a ghost image of the symbol attached to the
cursor.
5. Click or snap to an existing point to place the first handle of
the symbol.
6. Move the cursor and notice that you can rotate the symbol as
you move the mouse.
7. Move the mouse until the symbol has the desired rotation
angle and click the left-mouse button to finish placing the
symbol.
8. Select and place additional symbols, or click the close button
to exit the symbol manager
Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
Lesson 4 - Adding a Quick Label to the diagram
Use the Quick Label command to place notes and labels in your drawings.
To place labels in the diagram:
The Text Icon
1. Choose the Quick Label command from the Quick menu on the
left-hand toolbox.
2. Click in the Enter Text field in the upper-left corner of the text
toolbox.
3. Type in the text or choose one of the predefined labels by
clicking on the desired label from the list.
4. If necessary, adjust the size of the text by clicking on the
“larger” or “smaller” text buttons.
Move the cursor into the drawing window and notice a bounding box appears
which expands as you change the text in the text box. This box shows the
currently selected size and rotation for the text. You can change the text
properties at any time before you place the final point and the bounding box
is updated to reflect the changes. Any settings you choose will apply to the
whole line of text.
5. Click or snap a point to anchor the lower-left corner of the text.
6. Move the cursor and notice that you can rotate the text around
the anchor point.
7. When the text has the desired rotation angle, click or snap to
finish placing it. To place the text horizontally you can simply
press the Enter key for the final point.
8. Place additional text or click the Close button to exit the Text
Toolbox.
Enter Text type the text you
want to place in
the diagram.
Predefined
Text Labels allows you to
choose one of
these predefined
labels to use in
the drawing.
The Edit Icon
5-8
Text Height adjust the size of
the text by clicking
the larger or
smaller icons.
Add or Remove Label allows you to add or remove
labels from the list of
predefined labels.
To edit text once it is placed in the drawing simply select the desired text by
clicking on it and re-select the Text button from the left-hand toolbox or click
the Edit Button on the speedbar at the top of the screen. The text toolbox
appears with the selected text in the Text field. Make any changes to the text
and click the OK button to complete the changes.
Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
The Text toolbox contains many predefined text labels but you can also add
and remove your own labels.
To add a label to the text toolbox:
1. Type the desired label in the Enter Text field.
2. Click the Add Label button.
3. When prompted to add the label, click the yes button.
4. The label now appears in the predefined list.
To remove a predefined label:
1. Select the label to be removed from the label list.
2. Click the Remove Label button.
3. When prompted to remove the label, click the Yes button.
The label is now removed from the label list.
To place a leader:
1. Checkmark the Show Arrow option on the Templates
toolbox.
2. Type the leader text in the Enter Text field.
3. Change the Text height on the dialog box, if desired.
4. Move the cursor and notice a ghost image of the leader
attached to the cursor.
5. Click or snap to set the tip of the arrowhead.
6. Click to set the second endpoint of the leader. The leader
text will appear next to the leader shoulder. As you move the
cursor to the left or right, the leader text will “flip” to the
opposite side of the shoulder. Remember that the final
segment or “shoulder” will be drawn automatically to connect
the leader lines to the text block.
7. When the text is placed where desired, click to place the
leader text.
5-9
Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
Lesson 5 - Placing Quick Dimensions.
Use the Quick Dimension command to measure a distance and display it in
the drawing. Normally, dimensions are used to show the length of an object,
like a skidmark, or to show the distance between objects.
The Dimension Icon
To place a Quick Dimension:
1. Choose the Quick Dimension command from the Quick
menu on the left hand toolbox
2. The first point should be placed precisely using the
AutoSnap command, since it will be the basis for the
measurement. Select AutoSnaps to turn it on.
3. Snap to select the ending point for the dimension.
4. As you move the cursor, a dynamic preview of the
dimension now appears, constrained to move perpendicular
to the dimension direction. You can place the dimension on
either side of the line you are measuring.
5. If needed, you can dynamically change the size of the text
by clicking the “Larger” and “Smaller” text buttons.
6. You can overwrite the text of the dimension by clicking in
the dimension text field and entering a new value. This text
will be placed in the dimension instead of the actual
measurement between the two points.
7. Drag the dimension line to the desired location away from
the dimensioned object, and place a point to set the
dimension line and complete the dimension.
Set Dimension Text - Enter
text here to overwrite the existing
dimension text.
Text Height - adjust the size of
the text by clicking the larger or
smaller icons.
5-10
Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
Part 2: Creating a Quick Collision Scene
Many times an extensive accident reconstruction diagram is not needed, but a
quick sketch showing the important elements of the scene will suffice. This is
usually the case where exact measurements are not required. Nonfatal collisions, DMV accident reports, and sketches used by auto insurance companies
are all examples of the “quick scene.”
Easy Intersection Tutorial
Follow these steps to create the quick scene diagram shown on Page 6-7
using the new Easy Intersection feature.
Open the Crash Zone program.
Once the program opens, click the Easy Intersection button
on the right-hand toolbox.
Build the intersection by checkmarking the road segment
boxes as shown in figure 4.1.
Figure 4.1 - Checkmarking the Road Sections
Next, change the number of lanes to four, by clicking the Lane
Number arrow buttons next to each road segment, shown in
figure 4.2.
Figure 4.2 - Changing the number of lanes.
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Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
Since not all road segments are at 90 degree angles to each other, let’s change
the angle of the lower road segment.
To rotate a road segment:
1. Place your mouse pointer on the red rotation handle of the
lower road segment and notice it changes to a round arrow
icon.
2. Hold your left-mouse button, then drag the road segment to
the desired angle as shown in figure 4.3
Figure 4.3 - Rotating the road sections.
3. Next, shorten the length of the road segments by clicking
the Road Length slider bar and moving it to the left as shown
below in figure 4.4.
Figure 4.4 - Adjusting the road length.
Next, place the intersection onto the drawing screen.
1. Click the Place Intersection button as shown in figure 4.5.
Figure 4.5 - The Place Intersection button.
2. The Easy Intersection toolbox closes. A ghost image of the
intersection appears on the screen, attached to your cursor.
Position the image within the border and click your left-mouse
button to place it.
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Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
At this point you can change line types of the centerlines, add symbols, text,
and dimensions. You can also stretch different segments of the intersection to
different lengths and break or cut out sections of the roads to show driveways
or other openings.
Placing Symbols
Now you are going to place the symbols for the vehicles that collided. In this
tutorial we’ll place the vehicles at their point of collision, but first we’ll zoom
in on the intersection so that we can see the area we are working in more
clearly.
Zoom Window Icon
1. Select Zoom Window (ZW) command from the speedbar.
2. Click the mouse pointer below the lower, left-hand corner
of the intersection, near Point A, as shown in figure 4.6.
3. Move the mouse pointer up and to the right of the
intersection, and click near Point B.
Figure 4.6 - Performing the Zoom Window command.
The display should now show an expanded view of the intersection, showing
everything that you enclosed in the window. You will frequently use the
View commands, like Zoom Window, that make it easier to place symbols
and see the details of your diagrams. You can think of these like using the
zoom lens of a camera. The View Menu contains all the View
commands, as well as a command that refreshes the Drawing Window.
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Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
Symbols Bin Button
Tip:
If the Symbol Toolbox
is in the way, position
your mouse pointer on
the top bar of the
toolbox and drag it to a
new location.
1. Select Symbols from the Left-hand toolbox.
2. If not already open, click on the Quick Pick symbol folder to
open it.
3. Click on the Quick Car symbol to select it.
4. Position your mouse pointer near point A as shown in
Figure 4.7, and click the left-mouse button.
5. Move the cursor horizontally to the left to position the
symbol on the street.
6. Once the symbol is in position, click the left mouse button
again to finish placing it.
Figure 4.7 - Placement of the quick car symbols.
Referring to Figure 4.7, place a Quick Car symbol vertically near point B, as
follows:
1. Select the Quick Car symbol from the symbol manager.
2. Click once near point B to anchor the first point (also the
rotation point in this case).
3. Move the mouse vertically downward and click the leftmouse button to finish placing the symbol.
Place numbers in the Quick Cars
Next, you’re going to place a 1 and a 2 inside the cars to label the Quick Car
symbols. You could place ordinary text in your diagram, but in this case we’ll
use pre-drawn symbols just like the Quick Car symbol. This is faster than
selecting the text feature and typing in a number. Refer to Figure 4.8 for
which car gets which number.
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Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
Figure 4.8 - Labelling the quick car symbols.
1. Select the “1” symbol from the Quick Pick folder and place
it on the horizontal car.
2. Select the “2” symbol and place it on the vertical car.
If you are not happy with the way the numbers are positioned in the cars,
move them to a new position using these steps:
1. Position the mouse pointer above and to the left of the
desired number.
2. Hold down the mouse button and drag the pointer
diagonally until it is below and to the right of the number
symbol. Let up on the mouse button and all the objects that
were fully enclosed in the window are selected, just the
number symbol in this case.
3. Move your mouse pointer inside the eight selection nodes.
When the pointer changes shape to a four-way arrow, press
and hold down your mouse button.
4. Drag the symbol to it’s new location, then let up on the
mouse button.
5. Click on a blank area of the drawing to deselect the symbol
and finish the command.
Placing the remaining symbols
All symbols in the program are placed the same way. Just repeat the procedure to place the remaining symbols. The results are shown in Figure 4.9. The
symbols are arranged alphabetically, so use the scroll arrow to scroll down to
the bottom of the symbol list to locate the North Arrow symbol.
Select the North Arrow Symbol and place it in the drawing.
Next, place the Crash Area symbol (from the Conditions folder) where the
cars collided.
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Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
Location of the
Incident folder
The Crash
Area Icon
Figure 4.9 - Placing the remaining symbols.
1. Double-click on the Incident folder icon to display it’s
contents.
2. Select the Crash Area symbol and place it in the drawing
where the cars collided.
3. Click the Close button to close the Symbol Toolbox.
Saving Your Work
Before continuing, save your diagram to ensure that none of your work is
lost. To be on the safe side, get in the habit of saving your diagram at regular
intervals, at least every 10 - 15 minutes.
To save your diagram:
1. Select the File pull-down menu.
2. Select the Save (DS) command.
Assuming you already gave the drawing a name, The Diagram Program saves
it to disk and you can proceed with more drawing.
The Diagram Program includes an automatic save feature that is set to save
your work with the existing file name every sixty seconds. If you have not yet
assigned a name to the drawing, Auto Backup will perform a “Save As” and
prompt you to enter a file name.
However, you don’t want to become to dependent on the auto backup feature.
You never know when your computer might hang up or a power loss will
occur, and you don’t want to lose your latest work. You may also want to quit
for the night, or take a break and come back to the diagram later. Saving it to
the hard disk lets you do just that.
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Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
Changing the center line types
Now let’s change the centerline of each lane to a double solid line as follows:
Zoom All Icon
Double Solid
Line Type Icon
1. First select the Zoom All command from the speedbar.
2. Select one of the center lines by clicking on it with the leftmouse button.
3. Once selected, click the Edit icon located on the Quick
menu’s left-hand toolbox.
4. Click the double solid line type icon, and notice that the
centerline changes to a double line type.
Repeat these steps to change the other centerlines in the drawing as shown in
figure 4.10
Figure 4.10 - Changing the centerline types.
Adding Skid Marks
Now Add skid marks to the diagram, as shown in figure 4.11:
Tip:
If you don’t like the
position of the second
point you place on the
arc, press Esc on the
keyboard. Then you
can place the point
again.
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1. Select the desired skid mark line type from the Line Types
menu on the left-hand toolbox.
2. Select the Arc command from the Draw/Edit menu on the
left-hand toolbox.
3. Place the starting point for the arc near the rear of Car 2.
4. Place the middle point of the arc at any intermediate point
on the arc. (A preview of the arc appears, connected on one
end to the cursor.)
5. When the arc is in the desired position click again to place
the endpoint of the arc.
Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
6. Place another skidmark for the other tire of car 2.
7. When finished drawing the Skid Marks change the line type
back to Normal by clicking the Norm icon from the left-hand
toolbox.
Finally, add the finishing touches to your diagram by placing text and dimensions.
Normal Line Icon
Figure 4.11 - Adding skidmarks to the drawing.
Placing Text
Next let’s label the streets. As shown in Figure 4.12, the angled street is
labeled “135th” and the horizontal street is labeled “Wilson Ave.” First, label
the horizontal street.
Text Icon
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1. Select Draw/Edit from the left-hand toolbox, and then select
the Text Command.
2. Click once inside the text entry window. Type in the word
“Wilson Ave.”
Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
Text Size Icon
3. Move your mouse pointer onto the drawing screen and
notice a box attached to it that represents the size of the text.
4. Change your text height to 7 by clicking the text size box,
until it displays 7.
5. Next move your mouse pointer so it is positioned below the
horizontal street, near point A in Figure 4.12. Click once to
anchor the first letter of the text, move horizontally to the
right, and click again to finish.
6. Click in the Enter Text field again, delete the Wilson Ave.
text, and type in the word “135th.”
7. Click once where you want the starting point of the text,
near point B in figure 4.12.
8. Move your mouse pointer downward at an angle parallel to
Figure 4.12 - Adding text to the diagram.
the street. Click your left-mouse button. The text should then
be placed as shown in Figure 4.12.
9. Click the Close button to close the text toolbox.
Dimensioning
You may want to add some quick dimensions for reference purposes. If we
had created this drawing using exact, real world measurements, we could let
the program calculate the dimensions for us. However we are just creating a
simple sketch, so you may need to enter in the dimension values.
The Dimension feature is found on the Quick Menu bin on the left-hand
toolbox. To ensure the accuracy of the dimension, we’ll select the Autosnap
command so we can snap to exact points in the diagram.
Autosnap Icon
5-19
1. Select the Autosnap icon from the speedbar. Make sure that
the message bar at the bottom of the screen reads
“AutoSnaps On” If not, click the AutoSnap icon again to turn
it on.
Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
2. Select the Dimension command from the left-hand toolbox.
Next, we’ll measure the width of the road as follows:
1. Snap to Endpoint at point A, as shown in Figure 4.13.
2. Move the cursor straight up and snap to the line near point
B, as shown in Figure 4.13.
3. The Dimension dialog box is displayed. You can click in the
text field and enter a new dimension text if needed. You can
also change the height of the text.
4. Click OK when finished setting the text options.
5. Now move your mouse pointer towards the left side of your
screen to set the location of the dimension text. When you’re
satisfied with the location of the dimension text, click your
left-mouse button to place it.
6. Click the AutoSnap icon to turn it off.
Figure 4.13 - Adding dimensions to the diagram.
Adding a Leader
The Leader feature, also a option on the Quick Label toolbox, lets you draw
an arrow with a note attached. Use the Leader feature to label the point of
collision as shown in Figure 4.14.
1. Select the Quick Label command from the Quick bin of the
left-hand toolbox. Checkmark the Show Arrow option located
on the bottom of the toolbox.
2. Click in the Enter Text field and type “Point of Collision”.
3. Use the Text Size buttons to change the height of the text to
a size of 4.
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Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
4. Move the mouse pointer onto the drawing screen and click
near Point “C” to place the arrowhead, as shown in Figure
4.14
5. Move the mouse pointer down and to the left and click
again for the “shoulder” of the arrow.
6. Move the mouse pointer to the left to position the text and
click again.
7. Click the Close button on the leader toolbox to close it.
Figure 4.14 - Placement of the text leader.
If you make a mistake while entering a point, just press the Esc key on the
keyboard. Every time you press the Esc key the program backs up one step.
This works well when placing text, drawing lines, placing symbols, placing
dimensions, and so on. Esc has no effect, however, once you’ve completed
the command.
Print Your Diagram
Now you are ready to print your drawing, but since you have added a lot to it,
let’s save it once more.
Print Icon
Select the Save icon from the speedbar.
Now let’s print the Diagram:
1. Select Print from the File pull-down menu or click the
Printer icon at the top left of the screen.
2. The Print Options box appears.
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Chapter 5. - Creating a Collision Diagram
From this dialog box you can set a variety of options that control how your
diagram will be printed. For example, you can enter an exact scale for printing or choose to fit the diagram to the paper.
The Print Dialog Box.
3. For this case the radio buttons “Fit to Paper” and
“Landscape” should be selected.
4. Click on the “Print” button to send the diagram to your
printer.
Congratulations! You’ve just completed the Quick Scene tutorial! Figure 4.15
shows what the completed diagram should look like.
Figure 4.15 - The completed tutorial diagram.
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
Chapter 4 Creating a Homicide Diagram
This chapter guides you through the process of creating a basic
diagram. It presents you with more powerful commands that make
creating a diagram easier and faster. Chapter 4 also presents you
with a specialized Homicide Tutorial designed for learning the
program features used specifically for Homicide diagrams.
In this Chapter
Part 1
• Creating a Basic
Diagram
• Drawing the Building
• Changing Line Styles
• Building a Road Section
• Placing Symbols
• Creating Openings in
Walls
• Text & Dimensions
• Editing Dimensions
• Placing a Border
• Printing & Print Tiling
Part 2
• Creating a Homicide
Diagram
• Placing Bodies
• Labelling Evidence and
Photo Locations
• Placing a Print Border
4- 1
Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
Creating a Homicide Diagram
The following tutorial guides you through the steps of creating your first
diagram with The Crime Zone. Even if this sample diagram is not exactly like
the diagrams you normally create, this tutorial provides the hands-on experience you need to get started. A traffic scene diagram tutorial is also included
in Chapter 5, however, it is recommended that you complete this basic tutorial before moving on to the traffic diagram. Once you complete these exercises, you will be ready to apply the basic Crime Zone program commands to
create your own diagrams.
In the beginning of the tutorial you are given step-by-step instructions for
every drawing task. However, as you progress through the diagram, it is
assumed that you have learned how to perform the basic functions, such as
moving through the menus, selecting objects, inserting symbols, changing
views, and saving your diagram to disk. If you forget how to do something
later in the tutorial, refer back to the first time that task was performed for
more comprehensive step-by-step instructions. The on-line help is another
good source of information on how to perform specific commands.
The Basic Tutorial
Figure 4.1 shows the final diagram that results from completing the first part
of this tutorial.
Figure 4.1 - The basic tutorial diagram with dimensions
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
Drawing the Building
The first step to creating a diagram is to draw the outline of the room or
building (if you are more interested in creating traffic accident diagrams, refer
to the tutorial in the next chapter). For this you can use any of the Line commands on the Draw menu. You can also use some of the other commands in
the Line Type bin to preset the line widths and colors to represent a different
wall thickness.
There are several ways to draw lines (or walls) to a specific length in The
Crime Zone. In this tutorial we will use the Easy Lines command, which is
the fastest, easiest method to draw the outline of the building to exact specifications.
Before drawing the outer walls of the building, change the line width and line
color by selecting one of the preset Line features:
The Line Types
bin Icon
Select the Line Types bin from the Right Toolbox.
Click on the Medium Line width button.
Now select the Easy Lines command from the Speedbar, as follows:
The Easy Line
bin Icon
Select the Easy Lines bin from the right-hand toolbox.
Click on the Bulls-eye to select a new drawing point.
Notice that when the Bulls-eye was clicked the message bar instructs you to
select a Start Point.
Position the mouse pointer in the upper-left area of the
screen.
Click the left-mouse button to designate the first endpoint for
the right-side wall of the building.
Selecting the
Bulls-eye
4- 3
This sets the first endpoint of the line at Point A, in Figure 4.2 which will
become the upper-left corner of the building. The Easy Lines Toolbox has
arrow buttons that correspond to each different direction, as shown in Figure
4.2. To draw each line segment you click on the arrow button for the desired
direction, then key in the length of the line using the numeric keypad on the
toolbox. A user-specified angle can also be entered by clicking inside the
Angle box on the toolbox and then typing in the exact angle. This feature will
not be used in this tutorial but you can experiment with it on your own.
Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
Figure 4.2 - The Easy Lines Toolbox
Now draw the first line segment for the left-vertical wall of the building:
The Line Icon
Click on the Down Arrow (on the Easy Lines Toolbox) to draw
a line downward.
Enter 75 (on the keypad on the toolbox) for the length of the
wall in feet.
Click on the Line icon on the lower-left corner of the toolbox
to finish the line.
The mouse pointer will move down 75 feet to form the left wall of the building. Now continue to enter the following directions and dimensions and
complete the outline of the building:
If you make a mistake
when entering a
particular distance or
an angle you can press
the C button on the
Easy Lines toolbox to
clear the entry and
enter it again. Once you
click the Line icon to
draw a line, you can
erase that line by
immediately clicking on
the Oops button on the
toolbox.
4- 4
Click on the Right arrow, enter 40 on the keypad, and click on
the Draw Line Icon to draw the lower wall.
Click on the Up arrow, enter 25 on the keypad, and click on
the Draw Line Icon.
Click on the Right arrow, enter 30 on the keypad, and click on
the Draw Line Icon.
Click on the Up arrow, enter 50 on the keypad, and click on
the Draw Line Icon.
Click on the Left arrow, enter 70 on the keypad, and click on
the Draw Line Icon.
Figure 4.3 shows the completed outline of the building. (Remember that the
dimensions are all shown on Figure 4.1).
Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
Figure 4.3 - The completed building outline.
Add a Shed Using the Line Command
Now use the Continuous Line Command to quickly sketch in a shed next to
the main building.
Select the Continuous Line Command (LC) from the Draw bin
on the Left-Hand Toolbox.
Continuous Line Icon
Place the first corner of the shed near point A in Figure 4.4, as follows:
Figure 4.4 - The first corner of the shed.
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
Place the mouse pointer near the letter A in Figure 4.4 (to the
right of the building), then click the left-mouse button.
This sets the first endpoint of the line at Point A, which will become the
upper-left corner of the shed. When using this method to draw lines, be sure
that you are in Angle Draw (Ortho) Mode so it is easy to draw in the exact
angle you desire.
The Horizontal/Vertical
Angle Draw Icon
Click the Horizontal/Vertical constraint button to draw in Ortho
Mode.
As you move the mouse, you should see a line rubber-banding between the
mouse pointer and the initial point you placed.
Now draw the first line segment for the left-vertical wall of the shed, as
shown in Figure 4.6:
Figure 4.6 - Drawing the first wall of the shed.
The Angle/ Distance Bar
Move the mouse pointer downward, the Angle Value Box
(labeled A:) should read approximately 270. Type 30' on the
keyboard, and press the Enter key.
To draw the remaining walls:
Move the mouse pointer to the right, type 30' and press the
Enter key.
Move the mouse pointer upward, type 30' and press the Enter
key.
Move the mouse pointer to the left until it is near the starting
point, Point A.
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
To complete the line (and the outline of the shed), you want to snap the
mouse pointer exactly back to the starting point. Snap exactly to it like this:
Autosnaps Icon
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Cl
Click on the Autosnap Icon (the Magnet) located on the righthand portion of the Speedbar.
Position the mouse pointer crosshairs near the upper-left
corner of the shed. So the endpoint is inside the crosshair.
Click the left-mouse button to complete the line and the shed
outline.
Press the Enter key to finish the line.
If you make a mistake
when setting a point on
the line, press the ESC
key and you can reset
the last point. If you
complete the line
accidently, then you
must erase the line and
start over. To erase the
line, click on it once to
select it, then press the
Delete key.
Figure 4.6 - The completed shed
Change the Line Style Back To Normal
Now that you are finished with the exterior walls of the shed and building,
you will want to set your line style back to the default value of thin, black
lines:
Select the Line Types bin on the right-hand toolbox.
Select the Normal Line icon.
This automatically sets the line width to 0.
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
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Be sure to save your
drawing every 10-15
minutes!
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The current file name is
always displayed at the
very top of the program
screen in brackets.
Saving Your Work
Before continuing, save your diagram to ensure that none of your work is
lost. To be on the safe side, get in the habit of saving your diagram at regular
intervals, at least every 10 - 15 minutes. The Crime Zone does have an
Autosave feature, but you never know when your computer might hang up or
a power loss will occur, and you don’t want to lose your whole diagram. You
may also want to quit for the night, or take a break and come back to the
diagram later. Saving it to the hard disk lets you do just that.
To save your diagram:
Select the File pull-down menu.
Select the Save As (FA) command.
Type the name of the diagram file, or select it from the list of
file names.
For this diagram, type the file name: TUTORIAL (Press Enter
or click OK).
When the “Save Drawing File” dialog box is displayed, the current diagram
name with the path is displayed on your screen. To use the current diagram as
the file name, simply press Enter or click on OK. If you want to use some file
name other than that shown, type in the new name at the prompt and then
press Enter or click OK. Once a diagram has been saved under a particular
file name, you can save it again by simply clicking on the Save icon found
just below the File pull-down menu (the floppy disk icon
). Clicking on this icon saves the latest diagram to disk with the current file
name.
If this is the first time you have saved this diagram, The Crime Zone saves it
to disk and you can proceed with more drawing. If you saved the diagram
earlier, you are asked if you want to overwrite the old file or rename the
diagram. If you’re updating the diagram and want to save the current changes
to the existing diagram file, click on Yes to replace the older diagram file and
save the most current version.
Opening (Loading) Your Diagram In the Future
Due to the length of this tutorial, you may not want to complete it in one
drawing session. To continue working on your diagram at another time, you
must save it (as described above) before you quit the Crime Zone, then follow
these steps to return to where you left off:
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
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Get into the habit of
reading the Message
Bar at the bottom of the
screen. As you perform
various commands the
toolbox gives you
instructions on how to
complete the various
commands.
Start the Crime Zone as you did at the start of this tutorial.
Select the File pull-down menu.
Select Open (FO).
Type in the diagram name, TUTORIAL in this case, and then
press Enter or click OK. You can also pick the diagram from
the displayed list. To do this, double click on the desired file
name, or click once on the diagram and then click OK or press
Enter.
Changing the View
When an entire building and site of this scale are displayed on the screen, it
may be hard to see the details of the whole diagram. To solve this, change the
view so that just the area of the diagram on which you’re working (the shed
in this case) fills the entire screen. This is also called ”zooming in” and is
very helpful for looking at the details of the diagram. The View commands on
the Left-Hand Toolbox and on the View pull-down menu allow you to adjust
the view of the diagram on the screen so you can see exactly what you want
to see.
Select the View Window command from the Left-Hand Toolbox as follows:
Position the mouse pointer on the View Bin on the Left-Hand
Toolbox.
Drag the mouse pointer over to the View Window Icon. (This
is the magnifying glass with the W inside.)
Next, draw a box, or “window,” around the area of the diagram that you want
to expand on the screen, as shown in Figure 4.7:
The Zoom Window Icon
Click near Point A, above and to the left of the corner of the
building.
Click near Point B, below and to the right of the entire shed.
Your screen should now look like the Figure shown here, with the area you
placed inside the window (the shed in this case) expanded to fill the entire
screen.
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
Figure 4.7 - The Zoom Window View
Building a Road
Next, you’re going to draw a road that extends from the main building. There
are three different ways to create a road:
1) Draw lines, arcs, and curves using the “Double Line” command.
2) Place any of the available symbols for intersections or streets, explode
the symbol, and modify them to fit your diagram.
3) Use the Easy Streets command to construct each section of street (this
method is used in the Traffic tutorial in the following chapter).
In this tutorial we’ll use the Double Line command (method 1 from above) to
draw the streets. To illustrate another way to draw lines, we will also use the
Angle Draw Buttons to ensure we draw only lines that are exactly horizontal
and vertical.
Select the Double Line (LD) command from the Draw Bin on
the Left-Hand Toolbox.
Move the mouse pointer near Point A on the building (Figure
4.8).
Snap the mouse pointer exactly onto the upper-right side wall
of the building, using the Autosnaps feature.
The default width of the road is 12', and is displayed as 6’ in both of the Line
Offset Boxes at the upper-left of the program screen. Change the width of the
road before finishing it:
4- 10
Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
Figure 4.8 - Creating the first side of the road
Move the mouse pointer up to the Double line settings
toolbox.
Change the left and right line offsets to 7.
Move the mouse pointer back down into the drawing window
and you should notice that the width of the road is larger than
before.
Move the mouse pointer up to the Speedbar and click on the
horizontal/vertical Angle Draw Button.
The Angle Draw buttons are the two arrow buttons in the center of the
Speedbar. Each button restricts the movement of the mouse pointer to the
angles shown by the arrow. When the horizontal/vertical Angle Draw Button
is selected you can only move the mouse pointer vertically up or down, or
horizontally to the side.
The Horizontal/Vertical
Angle Draw Button
Move the mouse pointer to the right, until it is past the shed
and click the left mouse button.
Move the mouse pointer downward until the road looks like
that in Figure 4.8 and double click to finish it.
Now we’ll draw the interior of the building, but first let’s place markers to
show where the interior walls are located. The Marker symbol is used to
temporarily mark a specific location so you can snap to it for the start of a
line or to place a symbol. The Marker command is performed from the Easy
Lines Toolbox used earlier. First, place a Marker 20' up from Point A on the
left side of the building, as shown in Figure 4.9.
Perform a Zoom All (ZA) to view the entire drawing.
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
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Be sure to use the
Autosnap command to
attach to markers and
lines!
The Drawing Marker
Icons
Figure 4.9 - Placement of the drawing markers.
Select the Easy Lines bin from the right-hand toolbox.
Click on the Bulls-eye to pick a new start point.
Move the mouse pointer near Corner A in Figure 4.9 so the
corner is inside the crosshairs.
Click the left-mouse button to autosnap.
Since you want to place the marker straight up from the
corner, press the up arrow button on the Easy Lines Toolbox.
Enter 20 on the keypad on the Easy Lines Toolbox to move
the mouse pointer upward 20'.
Click on the blue marker icon in the lower part of the Easy
Lines Toolbox.
A small cross hair (the marker) is placed at Point B, 20' up
from Point A, as shown in Figure 4.9. Click the blue marker
button again to place another marker at Point C, 20’ up from
Point B.
Easy Lines keeps the coordinates that you key in until you change them. All
you have to do to place a second marker at 20’ is click the Marker Icon a
second time.
Now that the markers show where the endpoints of the interior walls are
located, you can easily use a Line command to draw the walls between the
markers, as shown in here in Figure 4.10
Select the Continuous Line (LC) command from the Draw Bin.
This command works just like the standard Line command,
except you can draw continuous line segments instead of just
one line section.
Move the mouse pointer near Marker A in Figure 4.10 and
press the left-mouse button to autosnap exactly to the center
of the Marker and start the line.
Move your mouse to the right, type 20' and press the Enter
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
key.
Move the mouse pointer down to the lower wall and click the
left mouse button to Autosnap exactly to the wall. Press the
Enter key to finish the line.
Repeat the previous steps to draw an interior wall that starts
at Marker B and ends directly across on the right wall of the
building.
Remove the Markers
Figure 4.10 - Drawing the interior walls.
To remove the Markers at points A and B, select the Erase Markers command
on the Edit/Modify pull-down menu. When you select the Erase Marker
command, all Markers in the drawing are automatically erased.
Placing Symbols
The next step is to insert symbols in the diagram that represent the basic
items in the building like doors, windows, stairs, fixtures, and furniture. The
word “Symbol” is used to refer to these and other pre-drawn objects that are
available for easy placement in your diagrams.
To place a symbol in your diagram, you first select the desired symbol category from one of the groups found on the Symbol Manager. Move the
mouse pointer to the desired symbol group folder and double click on it to
open a particular group of symbols. Then you can pick the desired symbol
from the icons in the group of symbols that are displayed in the bottom
window of the symbol manager.
The Symbol
Manager Toolbox
4- 13
Click on the point where the symbol is to be placed to anchor the first
Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
“handle” of the symbol at that point. Before you identify the symbol’s location in the diagram, The Diagram Program shows a ghost image of the symbol to show you its size and orientation. Clicking the left-mouse button again
places the symbol at the angle defined by the points you set.
Note: To keep the symbols at their default size during placement, be sure
the Dynamic Symbol Scale feature is “turned off.” This command is
located on the Symbol Manager, and allows you to scale the symbols as
you are placing them when it is “turned on.” This feature is set in the
“off” mode when the program starts up.
Placing the Door Symbols
There is one exterior door on this building, a double door on the right side
and a single door on the top wall of the “office” area (the lower-left corner
room we created earlier). In this example we’ll just place the doors “by
sight,” or at an approximate position. When completing your diagrams, if you
want more accuracy you may want to place Markers and then snap the door
symbols to them.
Remember that the default rotation angle of a symbol is the orientation shown
on its symbol icon. This means that the door symbols initially come into the
diagram so they can be placed on a line that is horizontal. This is just what we
need for the door on the top wall of the office, so let’s place a door there, as
shown in Figure 4.11:
Figure 4.11 - Placing the door symbols
Select the “Single Door” symbol from the “Building ~ Doors
and Windows” symbol folder. Move your cursor with the
ghost image attached to it to the wall near Point A.
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
Click to Autosnap the symbol to the wall.
Move the cursor to the left (make sure Angle Draw mode is on)
to orient the door properly and click again.
Next, place the double door at Point B in Figure 4.11:
Select the Double Door symbol.
The default rotation (horizontal) for the door doesn’t work in this case, so we
need to rotate it to fit on this vertical line.
Move the ghost image of the symbol over the line and
Autosnap it by clicking the left-mouse button.
Make sure the Horizontal/Vertical angle draw mode is on.
Move the mouse pointer downward (to cause the symbol to
have a vertical orientation) and click the left-mouse button to
finish placing it.
Placing the second handle of the door ( by clicking the left-mouse button
again) finishes placing the symbol. Before setting the second point you can
rotate the symbol around completely (360 Degrees) by moving the mouse
pointer. If you want the symbol to be placed at an exact angle, use the Angle
Draw buttons to help establish the desired angle of the symbol.
Breaking an Opening in the Walls for the Door
Next, we’ll use the Line Break command to break an opening in the wall
where the doors are positioned. This command can be used to break an
opening in any line, regardless of whether or not a door symbol is present.
Refer to Figure 4.12 for the following steps:
The Line Break Icon
First, Zoom In on the Single Door symbol.
Open the Modify bin on the Left-Hand toolbox
Click on the Line Break (BR) icon
Click on the wall beside the door to select the line.
Autosnap to the hinge of the door symbol at Point A.
Move your mouse in the direction of point B on the Door
symbol. Notice that as your mouse moves the line is erased.
Autosnap to the edge of the door symbol at Point B.
An opening will automatically be made in the line. It is not really necessary
to snap to the endpoints of the door, but it does create an opening that is more
accurately sized. Now you can perform the same procedure to break a hole in
the vertical wall for the other door in Figure 4.13.
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
Figure 4.12 - Breaking the line for the door opening
More Doors
In this section, we’ll add an Overhead Door symbol on an interior wall and
break an opening for it.
Refer to Figure 4.13 for the following steps:
Place the Overhead Door symbol near Point A on the top right
wall (where the driveway meets the building). Remember to
Autosnap the door exactly onto the wall.
Select the Horizontal/Vertical Angle Draw Button.
Move the mouse pointer downward and left-mouse click to
position the door vertically.
Select the Line Break command from the left toolbox.
Click on the line where the door is located.
Autosnap to the top side of the overhead door.
Autosnap again to the bottom side of the overhead door.
Repeat the previous steps to break an opening in the interior wall near Point
B using the Line Break command. In this case, it is not necessary to snap for
the points, you can just approximate them by clicking two points on the line.
Placing the Remaining Building Symbols
Almost all the remaining symbols are placed exactly the same way as the
door symbols. Simply select the desired symbol from the Symbol Manager,
click to anchor the symbol, and then either press Enter or set a second point to
adjust it’s rotation. Let’s place some of the other symbols, as shown in Figure
4.14:
Select the Window symbol from the Building - Doors &
Windows symbol category.
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
Figure 4.13 - Placement of the overhead door
Place the symbol on the lower office wall, near point A in
Figure 4.14.
In this case, you want to place the window at its default rotation, so just
Autosnap to the wall to place it.
Placing the Fire Escape and Stairway Symbols
Figure 4.14 - Placement of the remaining symbols
Use the same method to place the fire escape and stairway symbols (all from
the Building - Stairs & Cabinets category), as shown in Figure 4.14:
Place the Fire Escape-Left symbol near Point B. Be sure to
Auto snap the Fire Escape to the wall.
Place the Stairs symbol at Point C. Use the Autosnap
command to place the first anchor, then click the vertical
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
Angle Draw button, move the mouse pointer down, and click
the left-mouse button.
Copying the Stairway Symbol
Next, we’re going to make a copy of the stairway symbol. We could just
place another stairway symbol by selecting it from the symbol icons, but
instead we will use this as a reason to demonstrate how to create a copy of an
object. There are a couple of ways you can copy an object or objects in The
Crime Zone. You can use the various Copy commands found on the Edit
pull-down menu, in the Edit Bin, or use Clipboard Copy. In this tutorial, we’ll
use the standard copy method to make the copy. Refer to Figure 4.15 for the
following steps:
Click once on the existing stairway symbol to select it.
It will change colors and be enclosed in eight control points. This puts you in
the “edit mode.” Select the Copy command from the Modify~Copy commands menu. The Message Bar at the bottom of the screen now prompts you
to select a reference point.
Snap to Point A in Figure 4.15, the top right corner of the
stairway, using Autosnaps.
Next, select a second reference point for the offset location, the point where
the handle of the new copy will be placed, as follows:
Move the mouse pointer to the right. You’ll see the ghost
image of the new symbol attached to your mouse pointer
while the original stairway remains in place.
Snap to point B, the far right side corner of the interior wall to
place the copy so it is exactly attached to the corner.
Figure 4.15 - Copying the staircase
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
Press Esc to deselect the original stairway symbol.
Refresh the screen by typing the two-letter code RD.
Re-sizing and Moving Symbols
If you click on any item to select it, whether it’s a symbol or another individual object, a set of control points are displayed around the object. By
placing your mouse pointer exactly on one of these control points you can
drag the selected objects to a new size.
When you position the mouse pointer within the boundary of the control
points, the mouse pointer changes from the standard selection arrow into a
four-way arrow. The four-way arrow mouse pointer signifies that the selected
entity is in drag mode. By holding down the left-mouse button while moving
the mouse pointer, you can drag the selected item(s) to a new location. Just let
up on the mouse button when the desired location is reached.
If the mouse pointer is positioned directly over a control point, the mouse
pointer will change to either a horizontal two-way arrow, a vertical two-way
arrow, or if it’s positioned on a corner control point, then it will change to a
diagonal four-way arrow.
If you drag a control point of an object, then that object will change scale
uniformly along both the horizontal and vertical directions.
Another way to adjust the size of the symbol is to select the Dynamic Symbol
Scale button from the Symbol Manager before you select the symbol to place.
This feature allows you to adjust the size of the symbol while you are placing
it. After turning Dynamic Symbol Scale on, select the symbol and click to
anchor it in the drawing, then move the mouse pointer around and notice that
the ghost image of the symbol changes size. When the symbol is at the
desired size and rotation, click the left-mouse button again to finish placing it.
Adding Text to the Diagram
You can add text in your diagram in the form of notes and labels by using the
text command on the Text/Dimension pull-down menu. Once the Text command is selected, you can change the text font, size, rotation, justification and
style (bold or italic), by selecting the Text Settings tab. You can also choose
to enter text in a single line format, or in paragraph format. Here, we will use
the default font which is Arial, but you can select from any of the available
fonts for your diagrams. Figure 4.16 shows the completed text.
Text Size Box
Text Entry Box
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
The Text Icon
ue
Cl
Pressing the Spacebar
repeats the last
command performed!
Select the Text Bin from the Left-Hand Toolbox.
Position your mouse cursor near point A in Figure 4.16 and
click the left-mouse button.
At the top of the screen, the Text Entry box will be displayed:
Click in the Text Entry Box (upper-left side of screen) and
type: Shop
Make sure the Horizontal/Vertical Angle Draw mode is turned
on, and move the mouse upward and click again to finish
placing the text.
The text size is entered as a measurement in feet, which will be printed to the
designated scale when the diagram is printed on paper. Now complete the
remaining text in the diagram, as shown in Figure 4.16:
Type the keys TL on the keyboard. (This is a shortcut method
of starting the Text command.)
Click in the Text Entry Box and type: Driveway
Position the mouse pointer in the driveway, as shown in
Figure 4.16.
Double-click the left-mouse button to place the horizontal text.
Press the spacebar to repeat the Text Line command.
Click in the Text Entry Box and type: Shed
Position the mouse pointer within the outline of the shed, as
shown in Figure 4.16.
Double-click the left-mouse button to place the text
horizontally.
Figure 4.16 - Placement of text in the diagram
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
Editing Text
There is no special command for editing text. Simply click on the text to
highlight it, then click your right-mouse button. A Menu Box is displayed
that allows you to select the Text Editor feature. In this case, we will edit the
Driveway label, as shown in Figure 4.17:
Position the mouse pointer on the word “Driveway” and leftmouse click to select it. Next right-mouse click to open the
Menu Box.
When the pop-up Menu Box appears, select the Text Editor
command.
A Text Edit dialog toolbox will appear on the screen.
Backspace over the word “Driveway” and type: Oak Drive
Click OK to place the new text and close the Text Editor.
Figure 4.17 - Editing text.
Adding Dimensions
The Quick
Dimension Icon
4- 21
Dimensions can be added to show the exact measurements of anything in
your diagram. In this section, we’ll show the overall dimensions of the building. Figure 4.18 identifies the points that will be used to dimension the
building, as follows:
Select the Quick Dimension (QD) command from the LeftHand toolbox.
Position the mouse pointer “crosshairs over the upper lefthand corner of the building and click your left-mouse button
to set the first dimension point.
Move the mouse pointer to the upper right-hand corner of the
building and left-mouse click to set the second point.
Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
You may want to set the font size of the dimension text. To do this:
Text Size Buttons
Click on the “Text Larger” or “Text Smaller” icons on the
Quick Label toolbox, until the text size is set to 6.
Press OK after changing the text size.
Move the mouse pointer upwards and notice the dimension
stretches out from the building.
Click to place the dimension text where you want it.
Figure 4.18 - Placement of dimensions in the diagram.
Next, use the same procedure to place the other dimensions as shown in
Figure 4.18.
Editing Dimension Text
In our example, the vertical dimension is shown to be 75' and the horizontal
line is shown to be 70'. Since we drew the building using Easy Lines, these
dimensions should be correct. However, if you estimated the length of your
walls when you drew them, or discovered that one of the dimensions in the
diagram is incorrect, you may want to change the dimension rather than
changing the drawing. In this case, let’s change the text of the 70' dimension
to read 72', as shown in Figure 4.19:
Left-click the dimension text to select it.
Select the Quick Edit command from the left-hand toolbox.
Click inside the Set Dimension Text field and type in the new
dimension text of 72' 0".
Click the OK button to overwrite the dimension text.
4- 22
Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
ue
Cl
If the values in your dimensions are somewhat different, just use the above
procedure to adjust them to your liking. You may want to modify both the
horizontal and vertical dimension values in your diagram, as needed. Note,
however, editing the dimension text this way does not change the actual size
of the line — only the text value in the dimension.
Changing the dimension
text does not change the
actual size of the building
- only how it is displayed.
Figure 4.19 - Editing the Dimension Text.
Placing a Scaled Print Border
The last step in this portion of the tutorial is to place a Scaled Print Border on
the diagram. This border makes it easier to print the diagram at a particular
scale.
Select the Forms Bin icon from the Right-Hand toolbox.
Click on the Place Border icon. This causes the Border
toolbox to be displayed.
Select the paper size (8 ½” X 11" in this case).
Select the orientation of the border (Choose Best Fit).
Select the scale. (Chose Best Scale).
Select the Place Border button to place the border around the
diagram.
You can make changes to the border at any time by selecting different
changes on the toolbox and clicking the Update Border button.
Next we will add a Title Block to the border so that you can include important information about the diagram.
Select the Build Title Block icon from Forms toolbox.
This opens the Title Block Setup window.
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
Check mark the first square in the window to activate the field.
Click in the Label field and type Case Number
Click in the String field and type 991404.
Figure 4.20 - Adding the Print Border.
Use the same procedure to enter in the following information:
Check mark the second square. In the Label field type: Date
Drawn, and enter todays date in the String field.
Check mark the third square. In the Label field type: Drawn
By and type your name in the String field.
Click OK to complete the Title Block Setup.
Next Check mark the Show Box on the Forms toolbox to
display the Title Block within the border.
You may change the position of the Title Block by clicking on the “Corner
Icons.” If you have a lot of information on your Title Block, you may split it
up into columns by changing the numbers in the Columns box.
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
Printing Your Diagram
The Print
Command Icon
To output your diagram to a printer, use the Print command found on the File
menu or select the Print icon from the top of the screen at the left of the
Speedbar. With this command, you can set the scale and orientation of the
diagram as it will appear on the paper. You can also choose to use the “Print
Tile” feature and print the drawing upon several sheets of paper, enabling you
to print to plotter-size outputs. Make sure your printer is turned on, has paper,
and is on-line. Then:
Select the Print command. The Print box will appear.
If the diagram is positioned correctly on the paper, click on
the Print button.
The Print Dialog Toolbox
Congratulations, you’ve now completed your first diagram in the Diagram
Program!
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
Adding Homicide Investigation Details
Next we will create a new diagram file for this scene and add the details of a
homicide investigation to it. However, since our homicide evidence will only
be in a certain portion of the building, we will first “cut out” that section. To
do this:
Perform a Zoom Window (ZW) on the lower-left portion of the building so
the screen looks like Figure 4-21.
Figure 4.21 - The cutout section of the drawing.
Add Symbols to the Homicide Diagram
The first step to start the homicide diagram is to add the office furnishing
symbols.
Select the Furniture ~ Office symbol folder from the Symbol
Manager.
Click on the “Desk with Return” symbol and place it at point A
in Figure 4-22.
Click on the “Desk” symbol icon and place it near point B.
(Rotate the symbol at the angle shown in the Figure.)
Click on the “Computer” symbol and place it near point C,
rotated vertically.
Since all the symbols in The Crime Zone are drawn to actual scale, some of
the smaller symbols may not show up as well when placed in a room or in a
building. In this diagram we will change the size of the knife symbol as we
place it by using the Dynamic Symbol Scale feature:
4- 26
Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
The Dynamic
Symbol Scale Icon
Figure 4.22 - Placement of the Furniture Symbols
Click on the Dynamic Symbol Scale Icon on the Symbol
Manager.
Select the Weapons - Miscellaneous symbol folder.
Select the “Carving Knife” symbol.
Set the first handle of the Knife near point A in Figure 4-23.
Figure 4.23 - Placement of the knife symbol
Notice the size of the symbol changes as you move the mouse
pointer away from the first point.
4- 27
Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
When the size and angle of the symbol approximately match
that of the Figure, click to set the final point.
Click the Back Button on the Right-hand toolbox to return to
the main toolbox.
Be sure to turn the Dynamic Symbol Scale feature “off” if you wish the other
symbols you place to come in at their default size and rotation.
Placing a Body Symbol
The Bodies toolbox is located on the right-hand toolbox. Click on the bodies
button to open the bodies toolbox enter the following information about the
body:
Select the Bodies Bin in the Right-hand toolbox.
Click on the Female Icon button to select the gender.
Click on the Medium Build icon to select the build.
Click on the arrows to enter the length of the body as 5' 6".
Click on the Full View (front view) icon.
Click on the Place Body button.
Click to set a point near Point A in Figure 4.24 for the position
of the feet.
Click again near Point B to define the angle between the head
and the feet. (If necessary click on the Ortho Button to turn
Angle Draw mode off.
The Ortho Mode
On/Off Icon
Figure 4.24 - Placement of the Body symbol
4- 28
Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
The two points set are only meant to show the angle of the body. Don’t worry
if the two points are not the correct distance apart, as the body symbol will
always come in at the height you select in the Bodies Toolbox.
Next, rotate the arm and leg of the body, as shown in Figure 4.25. Rotating
the arm as follows:
Zoom in on the body using the View Window command.
Click on the left hand to select it.
Holding down the Shift key, click on the left forearm and leftupper arm to also select them.
Once the additional parts are selected release the Shift key.
Move your mouse pointer over the red target symbol and
notice it change into a “crosshairs” icon. This is the axis point
that the selected objects are rotated around.
Click and hold your left-mouse button, then drag the
crosshairs to the shoulder to reposition the axis point.
Move your mouse pointer over the square red “handle” and
notice it changes to a round arrow icon. Click and hold the left
mouse button.
Figure 4.25 - Rotating the body symbol.
Now move your mouse until the “ghost image” of the arm
matches the position in Figure 4.25.
After the arm is at the desired rotation angle, release the leftmouse button.
Unselect the objects to complete the command.
Use this procedure to rotate the leg as shown in Figure 4.25.
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Chapter 4. - Creating a Homicide Diagram
When finished, View Full the diagram as shown in Figure 4.26.
Figure 4.25 - The final position of the Body symbol.
Note: Hands, feet, forearms, heads, and so on, may all be rotated individually. Once selected, any of these body parts can also be erased, or moved to
another part of the diagram. You may also select body parts using a selection
box, however, zooming in and selecting them with the Shift key as we have
done in this example helps ensure that unwanted parts are not selected.
Figure 4.26 - The Completed Homicide Diagram.
4- 30
Chapter 3. - Program Features
Chapter 3 Program Features
This chapter introduces you to the program features and explains the
programs commands in detail.
In this Chapter
• Instruction on how to
use every command in the
program.
3- 1
Chapter 3. - Program Features
File Menu
New (File New, FN)
Use the New command to start a new drawing from scratch. The Diagram Program assigns the first file
created within a drawing session the name UNTITLED1, the second file UNTITLED2, and so on.
The Diagram Program automatically sets up the drawing environment for a new file based on preferences you have specified when saving other drawings, or on defaults shipped with the program.
To start a new drawing:
Start The Diagram Program without specifying an existing drawing file to load.
or
If The Diagram Program is running, choose the New command.
3-2
Chapter 3. - Program Features
Open (File Open, FO)
Use the Open command to continue work on a drawing, or to load an AutoCAD, Generic CADD, or
DXF-format file as a Diagram Program file.
To open an existing drawing file, using the Open command:
1.
Choose the Open command.
2. If necessary, in the List Files of Type list, change the file type.
(By default, The Diagram Program lists files with the CZD extension. You can also select AutoCAD
(.DWG) files, .DXF files, Generic CADD (.GCD) files, The Diagram Program (.VCD) files, or previous
CAD Zone (.DW2) files.)
3. If necessary, change the path and drive in order to locate the file you wish to open.
3-3
Chapter 3. - Program Features
Open cont...
4. In the list box, double-click the file name, or select the file name and click OK.
Tip:
If you want the program to remember the file path so the same path is displayed the next time you open
a file, check the “Save Current Path” box.
3-4
Chapter 3. - Program Features
Close (File Close, FC)
Use the Close command to close the active drawing file, either prior to exiting The Diagram Program or
before opening another drawing. Having only one drawing file open at a time will conserve memory.
To close the current drawing:
Choose the Close command.
The Diagram Program remains active after the drawing file closes, but will only display the File and
Help menus.
3-5
Chapter 3. - Program Features
Save (DS)
Use the Save command to save your drawing data. Save often during a drawing session as protection
against power outages or computer crashes, and save at the end of a drawing before exiting The Diagram
Program. This command saves the drawing to disk under the current name.
To save the current drawing:
Choose the Save command.
If the file has been previously saved and named, The Diagram Program saves the file under the current
name.
If the file has not yet been saved, The Diagram Program displays a Save File dialog box where you can
name the file and set the path location, as described for the Save As command.
3-6
Chapter 3. - Program Features
Save As (FA)
Use the Save As command to rename and save a drawing with another name, or to save a copy of an
existing drawing so that it can be used as the base of a new drawing. Save As preserves the last-saved
version of the file, and saves a copy under the name you give it.
You can also use this command to save the file into a different file format, so that it can be used with
other computer-aided drawing programs.
To save a drawing under a new name:
1. Choose the Save As command.
A dialog box appears with a list of existing drawings displayed in the current path. This dialog box
functions just like that found in other Windows programs.
2. If necessary, change drives or paths to place the drawing in the location of your
choice.
3. If necessary, change the drawing extension in the Type box to one of the other supported file types.
This causes the file to be saved in the selected file type so that the drawing can be read by other drawing
or CAD programs.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Save As cont...
4. Type a name for the file in the File Name box.
5. Click OK.
The drawing is saved in the chosen format, name, drive and path. The new file name is displayed at the
top of the drawing window.
3-8
Chapter 3. - Program Features
Merge (FM)
Use the Merge command to combine the contents of two drawings. The name and drawing environment
of the first drawing loaded are maintained, and all the symbols and attributes of the second drawing are
added to those of the first (conflicts, such as duplicate symbol names are resolved in favor of the first
drawing).
To merge another drawing file into the current drawing:
1. Choose the Merge command. Remember that both files that you are trying to merge
must both be .CZD files.
2. If necessary, change the path and drive in order to locate the file you wish to merge.
3. In the list box, double-click the file name, or select the file name and click OK.
Once loaded, the merged file will be represented by an “extent” box that is attached to the cursor at the
lower left corner. (An extent box is a box that represents the outer edges of your drawing.)
4. Drag the extent box of the merged file to the desired location, then click to place the
merged drawing in place.
Tip:
If you want the same file path to be displayed the next time you merge a file, check the “Save Current
Path” box. Also remember that you can only merge files that are both .CZD files.
3-9
Chapter 3. - Program Features
Import Images (BI)
Use this command to import Bitmap (.BMP) and JPEG (.JPG) files into a diagram. Once placed in a
diagram these images can be viewed, printed, or moved. However, you can not modify the images in any
way. They are treated as a single object in the diagram.
To import an image:
1. Choose the Import Images command from the File menu.
2. Click (or snap) to place two, diagonal points in the diagram where you want to place
the image.
A dialog box appears that allows you to select the desired image file.
3. Using standard Windows methods, select the proper drive and folder, then select the
desired image file. Normally only .BMP and .JPG files are listed.
The image is inserted into the diagram at the location specified earlier.
Files from other CAD programs, such as AutoCAD and Visual CADD, or files of type .DXF can be
imported into The Diagram Program with the Open File command.
3 - 10
Chapter 3. - Program Features
Export Images (VB)
Use this command to export diagrams out of the program in Bitmap (.BMP) Metafile (.WMF) and JPEG
(.JPG) format. Once saved these images may be used by other applications such as Microsoft Word or
Lotus Notes.
To export an image:
1. Choose the Export Images command from the File menu.
A dialog box appears that allows you to select the desired image format that you wish to save in.
2. Using standard Windows methods, select the proper drive and folder, then select the
desired image file. Normally only .BMP and .JPG files are listed.
The image is saved in the specified file type.
.
3 - 11
Chapter 3. - Program Features
Print (PR)
The Print dialog can also be accessed from the main speedbar icon by typing the 2 letter command, PR.
The dialog maintains all the settings for accessing and controlling the printed output. The available
options allow for full control over standard print features such as orientation and size along with a
variety of options for improving print output and performance.
Printer - the printer section displays the currently active printer. To change the printer select the
“Setup..” button.
Page Size - the page size is dependent on the installed printer. To change the page size or review other
sizes supported by the current driver select the “Setup…” button.
Print Scale - the print scale setting displays the current scale factor for printing. The value is only used
when the scale option is selected. Values are entered in paper units versus real world coordinates. For
example, 1 in. = 48 in. will print the drawing at quarter inch scale (48"/12" = 4’). The Real World units
always reflect the smallest unit in the current system settings. For example, when the current units are
“ft.-in.” the smallest unit is the inch.
Fit to Paper, Current View or Scale - defines the mode the current print job is to use. The drawing can
be scaled automatically to fit the current paper size, scaled to display the current view to fit the page or
to a factor entered.
Portrait or Landscape - determines the paper orientation between horizontal (landscape) or vertical
(portrait).
Print to File - send the output to a file on disk. The Diagram Program will prompt for a file path and
name after the “Print” button is selected.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Print Cont...
Time/Date Stamp - includes a time and date stamp on the printed page. The location of the time stamp
are controlled by settings in Windows.
Selection Only - prints only the selected entities in the drawing.
Copies - sets the number of copies to print.
Preview - shows a preview of the drawing as it will print using the current settings.
Center - centers the drawing on the given page based on the current margin settings.
Setup - used to select a new printer or initiate the driver setup for the active printer. The print routine
utilizes the Windows drivers provided by the printer manufacturers. These drivers contain printer specific settings that may improve overall print performance. The drivers vary between printer and printer
manufacturer. For details on options available through the driver please refer to the printer manufacturers documentation.
Update - used to update the print preview screen after changes have been made to the print settings.
Print Setup - Use this command to display the Print Setup dialog box. The Print Setup dialog is used to
select a new printer or initiate the driver setup for the active printer. The print routine utilizes the Windows drivers provided by the printer manufacturers. These drivers contain printer specific settings that
may improve overall print performance. The drivers vary between printer and printer manufacturer. For
details on options available through the driver please refer to the printer manufacturers documentation.
To display the Print Setup dialog box:
1. Choose the Print Setup command, or click Setup in the Print dialog box.
Make changes as necessary to the settings for printer.
2. Click Properties to display a dialog box of printer-specific options like , paper size,
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Print Cont...
page orientation, and paper source. The driver information is also available through the
Window Print Manager. In Windows 95 select the start button on the taskbar and choose
Setting ~ Printers.
3. Click OK to accept the printer setup options.
Tip:
The Print command uses the standard Windows drivers for output to the printer. If your printed drawing
does not look like the one on the screen or if you have other problems printing, you may need to obtain
updated printer drivers from your printer manufacturer. You can normally call your manufacturer for
more information or visit their web page and download new drivers from there.
Print Tiling
When printing diagrams to an exact scale, it is possible to specify a scale that does not allow the diagram
to fit on one sheet of paper. In this case the program automatically uses Print tiling to divide the drawing
up so it can be printed on multiple sheets. If you don’t have access to a large-scale plotter, print tiling
gives you the ability to print your diagrams on multiple sheets and tape them together to construct a
larger print.
A single sheet of 8.5" x 11" paper is commonly referred to as an A-size sheet of paper. A B-size sheet of
paper is 11" x 17", or two A-size sheets taped together side-by-side. A C-size sheet of paper is 17" x
22", or four sheets of A-size taped together in two columns and two rows. This process continues
upward. If you don’t have a large paper plotter, print tiling gives you the ability to piece together any
number of A-size sheets to construct your own “plot.”
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Print Cont...
Using the Print Tiling Feature:
1. To use Print Tiling, the Scale radial button must be selected. The other two selections
do not allow tiling. Fit to Paper will fit the entire diagram on a single sheet of paper.
Current View will display the current zoomed view of the diagram on the drawing screen
and print out on a single sheet.
2. The Print Scale must be set to a scale that requires more then one sheet of paper to
print the drawing. As the scale value decreases, the number of required panels increases. For example, it takes more panels to print a diagram at a scale of 1" = 20' than
at a scale of 1" = 50'.
3. After setting the scale, click on the Update button to see your results. You will need
to click Update each time you enter a new scale to see the effect that scale value has on
the print.
Tip:
If you want to optimize how your drawing fits on the paper, try switching between Portrait and Landscape orientation. In some cases this will result in fewer panels needed to print out the drawing.
4. The message below the preview window shows the number of panels required with
the number of columns (number of panels horizontally) and number of rows (number of
panels vertically) shown in parenthesis.
5. By default all the panels will be printed. If you want to just print individual panels,
click on the ones you want to print to select them.
6. Select the Print button to print out all of your selected panels. A message will appear
telling you how many panels you’re about to print, giving you a chance to Cancel the
print if this number is not what you intended.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Print Cont...
Advanced Tiling Features
Close After Print
If this box IS NOT checked, you will be returned to the print dialog after each print so you can continue
with other print jobs. If this box IS checked then the print dialog box automatically closes each time you
click the Print button and you are returned to the drawing screen. Whenever the print dialog is closed,
the drawing re-center’s itself and any previously selected tiles are de-selected. Other settings may be
affected as well.
Printing Individual Panels: You can click on
individual panels in the print preview window. Each
panel you click on is highlighted with a yellow
background. When you select the Print button, only the
selected (highlighted) panels will print. This will come
in handy if you want to print out a particular piece of
the drawing or if you want to avoid printing blank
panels.
Tip:
You may have blank panels depending on the shape (content) of the drawing especially if you drag the
drawing to fit better in the panels and intentionally drag the drawing out of some panels.
Positioning the Drawing: Once the scale and the number of panels has been established you can drag
the drawing around inside the panels. Depending on the shape of the drawing, you might be able to get
the drawing to fit better by moving it within the panels. Just move your cursor over the display, hold
down your left mouse button, and drag the drawing to a new position.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Print Cont...
Page Marks and Stamps
Since your printer can’t print all the way to the edge of a sheet of paper (there is always a required
margin) you will need to trim your panels before taping them together. In the Stamp section of the print
dialog you’ll find selections for Page Marks including None (no page marks), Corner, or Outline.
Use Corner marks if you have a paper cutter that allows you to lay down a sheet of paper, line
up the corners, and pull down the blade to trim the edge away.
Use Outline if you intend to use scissors to trim the excess paper away.
The Stamp selections, if checked, will print the selected stamp(s) at the bottom of EACH page,
including the page number, filename, date printed, and drawing scale. If you have many panels to print,
you may not want all of the stamps (such as filename and date) printed on each page. In this case, click
on just one panel to select it, and print that panel with all the stamps. Then turn off those stamps and
print the remaining panels with just the page numbers.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Printer Setup (PT)
Use the Printer Setup command to display the Printer Setup dialog box. The Printer Setup dialog is used
to select a new printer or initiate the driver setup for the active printer. The print command uses the
Windows drivers provided by your printer manufacturer. These drivers contain printer specific settings
that may improve overall print performance. The drivers vary between printer and printer manufacturer.
For details on options available through the driver please refer to the printer manufacturer’s documentation.
To display the Printer Setup dialog box:
1. Choose the Printer Setup command, or click Setup in the Print dialog box.
Make changes as necessary to the settings for the printer.
2. Click Options to display a dialog box of printer-specific options like , paper size, page
orientation, and paper source. The driver information is also available through the Window Print Manager. In Windows 95 select the start button on the taskbar and choose
Settings…Printers.
3. Click OK to accept the printer setup options.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Exit (FX)
Use the Exit command to exit The Diagram Program. If unsaved drawings are loaded, The Diagram
Program prompts you to save the drawing files before closing the program.
To exit The Diagram Program :
Choose the Exit command.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Edit Menu
Undo (OO)
Use the Undo command to reverse one or more of your last commands. Any operation that changes the
drawing can be reversed. For example, erased objects are restored, drawn objects are removed and
moved objects are replaced in their original positions. Operations that do not change the entities in the
drawing such as zoom commands, selections, hiding/displaying of layers, settings, and so on, are not
affected by the Undo command.
To reverse the last operation performed:
Choose the Undo command.
The last operation is undone; a drawn object will disappear, an erased object will reappear, etc.
Tip:
If you accidentally undo an operation, you can use the REDO command to cancel the undo.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Redo (RE)
Use the Redo command immediately after an Undo command to reverse the effect of the Undo command by “redoing” the command. If several consecutive operations were undone, Redo can be used
repeatedly to restore each one.
To redo the last operation undone:
Choose the Redo command.
The last undo operation is canceled.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Cut (Ctrl + X)
Use the Cut command to move objects to different locations in your drawing or to other drawings or
other Windows applications. Cut removes the selected objects from the drawing and places them onto
the Windows clipboard. Use the Paste command to copy these objects from the clipboard back into a
drawing or into another Windows application.
To cut objects from the drawing onto the clipboard:
1. Select the objects to be removed from the drawing and placed on the clipboard.
2. Choose the Cut command.
The selected objects disappear from the drawing and are placed on the clipboard.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Copy (Ctrl + C)
Use the Copy command to copy objects from your drawing to other locations in your drawing, to other
drawings or to other Windows applications. Copy places these objects onto the Windows clipboard. Use
the Paste command to paste them from the clipboard back into your current drawing, into other drawings
or into other applications.
To copy objects onto the clipboard:
1. Select the objects to be copied to the clipboard.
2.
Choose the Copy command.
The selected objects remain in the drawing but are also copied to the clipboard.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Paste (Ctrl + V)
Use the Paste command to copy information from the Windows clipboard into your drawing or into
other Windows applications.
To paste objects from the clipboard into your drawing:
1. Choose the Paste command.
A box indicating the extent (width and height) of the clipboard contents appears, attached at the upper left corner to the cursor. You drag this box to position the contents
in the drawing.
2.
Click to paste the clipboard objects into the drawing.
The clipboard contents are pasted into the drawing. The objects remain in the clipboard,
ready to be placed elsewhere.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Select Commands
In order to modify objects in your drawing (i.e. move, copy, rotate, stretch them) they must first be
selected. The program is normally in the “selection mode” unless you are actively performing another
command like one of the Draw commands. This allows you to quickly select objects using various
mouse methods instead of having to select a command from the menu. Alternatively, you can choose
any of the Select commands from the Edit Menu and follow the prompts at the bottom of the screen to
select objects with the chosen method.
When objects are selected they change to a pink color and they are enclosed in eight “selection nodes” or
handles. You can use these selection nodes to move, scale, and stretch the selected objects.
When you want to modify objects with one of the editing commands there are two ways
to select the desired objects:
1. Use the mouse methods or Select commands (from the Edit menu) to select the desired objects before choosing the desired editing command.
2. Choose an editing command with no objects pre-selected and buttons for the various
selection commands pop up automatically on the Settings Bar at the top of the screen.
Use one of these selection commands to select the desired objects, then click the OK
button at the upper-right of the screen (on the Settings Bar).
Tip:
In a complex drawing you can combine selection commands to select only the objects you want. For
example you can use the Select Window command to select a group of objects, then use the Select
Object command (or hold down the shift key) to pick additional, individual objects.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Select All
Use this command to select all the objects in the drawing.
Tip:
Hold down the shift-key on the keyboard and click on individual objects to deselect them.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Select Object
Click on this command and then click on any object to select it. If you click the Select Object command
again you can then select another to add to the selected objects.
You can also hold down the shift key on the keyboard and click on another object to select it along with
the first object. As long as you continue to hold the shift key you can continue to add objects to the
selected objects.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Select Window (SW)
Use this command to select all objects that are fully enclosed in a selection “window” that you draw on
the screen. To perform the Select Window command:
1. Click on the Select Window command.
2. Click and hold the mouse button at a point above and to the right of the objects you
wish to select.
3. Move your mouse downward and to the left and notice the selection window
rubberbanding from your original point.
4. When all the objects you wish to select are completely enclosed in the window, release the mouse button to select them.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Select Crossing
Use this command to select all objects that are cross through a selection “window” that you draw on the
screen. To perform the Select Crossing command:
1. Select the Select Crossing command.
2. Click a point below and to the right of the objects you wish to select.
3. Move your mouse upward and to the left and notice the selection window
rubberbanding from your original point.
4. When all the objects you wish to select cross through the window, click again to
select them.
You can also execute this feature by typing the 2-letter command SX or with a “mouse method.” With
the mouse method you position the mouse pointer below and to the right of the desired objects, hold
down the mouse button and drag the pointer diagonally until it is above and to the left of the objects. Let
up on the mouse button and all the objects that were fully enclosed in the window are selected.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Select Last (SL)
This command restores the previous selection set. If you take time to select a number of objects and then
find that you need to select those same objects again, use the Select Last command.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Select Adjoining (SJ)
Selects any objects that are joined together at their end points. Use it to select continuous lines or polygons that have been exploded, arcs, curves, or any other “chain” of objects that have end points in
common.
Click on one Object to select it.
Click on the Select Adjoining command to select any object that is adjoined to the first.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Select Layer (SY)
This command selects all objects on a layer that you specify. To select all the objects on a particular
layer:
1. Choose the Select Layer command from the Edit Menu (Select commands).
2. Choose the desired layer from the pull-down list that appears on the Settings Bar
(upper-left of the screen).
All the objects on the specified layer will be selected.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Invert List (SI)
Selects all objects that have not been selected and deselects all objects that have been selected. This
option is available directly as a the 2-letter command SI.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Selection Bar (S1)
Use the Select command to specify which objects are acted upon by a subsequent editing command. The
selection operation can be performed as a separate command, prior to choosing an editing command, or
is initiated automatically if you choose an editing command with no objects pre-selected. After you
choose the Select command, a pop-up menu appears to the side listing the following options available to
create your selection set:
To activate the Selection Bar
1. Choose an editing command with no objects pre-selected and buttons for the various
selection commands pop up automatically on the Settings Bar at the top of the screen.
Use one of these selection commands to select the desired objects, then click the OK
button at the upper-right of the screen (on the Settings Bar).
Tip:
In a complex drawing you can combine selection commands to select only the objects you want. For
example you can use the Select Window command to select a group of objects, then use the Select
Object command (or hold down the shift key) to pick additional, individual objects.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Edit Commands
Tip:
When performing any of the Modify commands you can use the Escape (Esc) key on the keyboard to
back up one step. For example, when using the Copy command press Esc if you want to select a different reference point or handle. Then select the new point and continue with the command normally.
3 - 35
Chapter 3. - Program Features
Copy Commands
Copy (CO)
Use the Copy command to make a copy of objects already in the drawing. You can make just one copy
or make multiple copies arranged in a line. In the latter case each item in the series is placed at the same
user-defined offset from the previous item.
To copy objects:
1. Select one or more objects to copy.
2. Choose the Copy command.
A Settings Bar will appear in the upper-left of the screen with a box labeled “Number of
copies.” By default, the number of copies is set to 1, or the last number you used for a
copy operation.
3. If necessary, click in this box and change the number of copies.
4. Click or snap a point on the object to define the starting point for the relative offset of
each copy. This is the point at which the objects will be copied from.
5. Move your cursor back into the drawing area and you should see a ghost outline of
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Copy cont..
the copies. This provides a dynamic preview of where the copies will be placed.
6.
Place a second point to define where the objects are to be copied to.
Think of the first point you select as a handle from which you are grabbing the objects,
then the distance and angle from that handle to the second point are used to determine
where each new copy is placed. Neither point has to actually be on, or even near the
objects being copied.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Rows and Columns (Array Copy, AC)
With the Rows and Columns Copy command you create a “grid” of copies of the selected objects. For
example, you could easily draw rows of vehicles in a parking lot or a grid of sprinkler heads in a building. The grid need not be just horizontal and vertical; it can be oriented in any direction and “shaped”
like any parallelogram.
To copy objects in a grid of rows and columns:
1. Select the object(s) you wish to copy.
2. Choose the Rows and Columns Copy command.
A Settings Bar will appear in the upper-left of the screen, with text boxes for “Number of
copies” and “Number of Rows.” The number of copies and rows will be preset to 1, or
to the last numbers you used in the Rows and Columns Copy command.
3. If necessary, change the number of desired copies and/or rows.
The first number determines the number of copies of the objects that will be used to
create the first row of copies. Note: the original selection does not count as one of the
copies. The second number determines how many rows of copies will be created.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Rows and Columns cont...
4.
Click or snap to place a point in the drawing to define the reference point for the
first copy. This is the handle point at which the objects will be “grabbed.”
5.
Move your cursor and you should see a ghost outline of the first row of copies.
This provides a dynamic preview of where the copies will be placed.
6. Place a point to define where the first copy is to be placed. If you are placing objects
in a horizontal/vertical grid, this would be called the “column offset” since it locates the
distance and direction between the columns.
The distance and angle from the first reference point to the second point will be used as
the offset distance and direction from copy to copy in the first row. A second rubber
band line will then appear, tethered to the first reference point you selected. Each copy
will appear, with the spacing between rows determined by the length and angle of that
second rubber band line.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Rows and Columns cont...
7.
Place a point to define the distance that determines the spacing between the
rows of copies. If you are placing objects in a horizontal/vertical grid, this would be
called the “row offset” since it locates the distance and direction between the rows.
All the copies will then be placed. None of the points you specify have to actually be on,
or even near the objects being copied.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Radial Copy (RC)
Use the Radial Copy command to create copies in a radial pattern, such as spokes around the hub of a
wheel. This type of command is sometimes called a radial or circular array.
To create radial copies of selected objects:
1. Select one or more objects.
2. Choose the Radial Copy command.
A Settings Bar appears, with an editing cursor in the “Number of copies” box. The
number of items will be preset to 2 (the original objects plus one new copy), or the last
number you used for the Radial Copy operation.
3. If necessary, change the number of copies and the angle spanned by the copies.
A dynamic preview will appear, showing the copies in the correct relationship to the
originally-selected object(s) and the cursor. The copies are shown as bounding boxes
radiating around the cursor, which represents the center of the array.
4. Place a point to set the center of the copies.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Radial Copy cont...
The copies will be placed around the center point, with the copies spanning the specified angle. Each copy will be the same distance away from the center point, with the
original selection at the beginning of the angular span, and the last copy at the end of
the angular span.
Tip
· Unlike the Copy command, in the Radial Copy command you specify the total number of items,
including the original.
· A span of 360 is treated as a special case. Normally, the last copy is placed at the end of the specified
span angle; however, in the case of 360 , this would cause the last copy to be placed directly on top of
the originally selected objects. Normally, when you specify a span of 360 , you want the original and
all copies to be uniformly spaced around a full circle. The Diagram Program does this by not placing
the last copy when the span angle is exactly 360 .
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Quick Copy (MC)
Use this command to make multiple copies of objects at user defined points within the drawing. Unlike
the standard Copy or Rows & Columns Copy, this command allows you to continue to place individual
copies by simply clicking until the command is ended.
To make quick, multiple copies of an object:
1. Select the object or objects you wish to duplicate.
2. Click the Quick Copy Tool.
3. Click to define a reference point - the point at which the objects will be copied from.
An image of the object now follows your cursor around the drawing area.
4. Click to place the reference point of the duplicate objects at the new point.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Quick Copy cont...
5. Repeat step 4 as many times as desired
6. To end the command either double-click the mouse to place the last copy, or press
the Enter key.
Tip: Press Escape on the keyboard if you wish to change the original reference point.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Move (MV)
Use the Move command to change the location of an object or some selected objects.
To move objects:
1. Select the object(s) you wish to move.
2. Choose the Move command.
3. Click or snap to place a reference point that will define where the selected objects will
be moved from.
4. Place a point to define where the selected objects will be moved to.
The selected objects are moved to the new location. The reference point acts like a
handle, you pick up the objects by the handle and move the handle point to the new
location. To move the objects to an exact location be sure to use a Snap command to
snap to a reference point and then snap to the new location.
Tip:
You can also move objects without selecting a command by using a “mouse method.” To do this, select
the desired objects and move your mouse pointer inside the eight selection nodes. Press and hold down
your mouse button and drag the objects to their new location, then let up on the mouse button.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Move Point (MP)
Use the Move Point command to move any point on any object. Primitive objects, such as the Standard
Point (PO), lines, circles, arcs, ellipses, and curves can have their size, shape and location changed with
the Move Point (MP) command. You can use Move Point to move their construction points (the points
used to define the geometry of an object.) Construction points can be seen if the Construction Point
option is checkmarked on the Systems Tab of the Setting toolbox.
To move the point of an object:
1. Click on the object that you want to move the point on.
2. Click or snap on the endpoint that you want to move.
3. Move your cursor, and notice the point attached rubberbands from the cursor.
4. Click the mouse a second time to place the point in its new position.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Break (BR)
Use the Break command when you want to break a gap or hole in an object. For example, you may want
to insert an opening in a wall for a door or window.
To create a break in an object:
1. Select the object that you want to break.
2. Place a point at or near where you want the break to begin.
This point need not be exactly on the object; the break will start at the point closest to
the point you place. However, if you want to break the opening at an exact location be
sure to place Markers (use Easy Lines command) and then Snap exactly to them.
3. Move your mouse and a dynamic preview of the break appears, shadowing the cursor movement.
4. Place a point at or near where you want the break to end.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Rotate (RO)
Use the Rotate command to rotate the selected objects around an axis.
To rotate selected objects:
1. Select the object(s) to be rotated.
2. Choose the Rotate command.
3. Click or snap to place a point to serve as the center of rotation.
Move the cursor and notice the ghost image of the objects as it rotates around that
point.
4. When the objects are at the desired orientation, click or snap to place the final point.
3 - 48
Chapter 3. - Program Features
Rotate cont..
Alternatively, you can type in a specific rotation angle on the Settings Bar then click OK.
Tip:
If you wish to select a different center of rotation, press the Esc key on your keyboard to back up one
step. Then you can select a new rotation point and continue the command normally.
Tip:
Use the Angle Draw (ortho) buttons to restrict the rotation to certain angles such as 90 or 180
A Settings Bar appears with a text block that displays the rotation angle. The selection will rotate as the
cursor moves around the axis point.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Scale (SZ)
Use the Scale command to make selected objects larger or smaller in the X or Y directions, relative to a
specified point. This command works by changing the horizontal and/or vertical distances between a
specified fixed reference point and the definition or handle points of selected objects. If you wish, you
can specify separate scale factors for the X and Y directions so the objects are scaled disproportionately.
To re-scale selected objects:
1.
Select the object(s) you wish to re-scale.
2. Choose the Scale command.
3. Place a reference point.
A Settings Bar will appear, with current X and Y scale factors displayed.
4. Change the X and Y scale factors as desired. If you change the X scale factor, the Y
factor is automatically updated to match it. You can then change the Y factor also if you
wish to perform a non-symmetrical scale.
5. Click OK or press Enter on the keyboard.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Scale cont...
The selected objects will be re-scaled about the reference point.
Tip:
Normally, if you set the X scale factor but leave the Y factor equal to 1.0 the re-scaling direction will be
horizontal; if you set just the Y scale factor, the re-scaling direction will be vertical. However, the X and
Y directions for symbols and text rotate with them. For example, if you place text at a rotation of 90 ,
that text will re-scale vertically when scaled in the X direction, because the X direction for the text has
been rotated with the text, and is now vertical.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Stretch (SS)
Use the Stretch command to stretch or reshape objects. Once the objects to be stretched are selected,
you place another selection window around the endpoints or sides you want to stretch. Then you place
starting and ending points to show the distance and direction the objects are to be stretched. For example, you can easily change the length of a rectangle by selecting the rectangle, enclosing one side in a
selection window, then “stretching” that side to a new location.
To stretch selected objects:
1. Select the objects that you want to stretch.
2. Choose the Stretch command.
3. Drag a “stretch window” that encloses the points on the objects to be moved to the
new location.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Stretch cont...
4. Click or snap to place a starting reference point.
5. Click or snap to place an ending reference point.
The captured points (and any objects that were completely inside the stretch window)
will be stretched to the new location, and the shape or size of the selected objects will
be updated accordingly.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Window Stretch (WS)
Use the Window Stretch command to stretch objects to a new size or shape. The area to be stretched is
defined by two points set in opposite corners of a selection box. Then a point is set for the original
location of the reference point. A second point is set for the new position of this point. The objects
contained in the area are stretched so that the first point that was set is moved to the new location.
To stretch selected objects:
1. Select the Stretch command from the Edit/Modify menu or the Left-Hand Toolbox.
2. Set two points to draw a box that encloses the endpoints of the objects to be
stretched (Step 1 below).
3. Set a reference point to define the original location (Step 2 below).
4. Set a point for the new location of the reference point (Step 3 below).
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Mirror (MI)
Use the Mirror command to draw a mirror image of selected objects, for example to show a mirror
image of a vehicle symbol.
To create a mirror image copy of selected objects:
1. Select the objects to be mirrored.
2. Choose the Mirror command.
3. Place the first point of the mirror line.
This point and the next point define the edge view of the “mirror” that the selected
objects will be mirrored about.
Tip:
If you wish to mirror the objects about a line that is exactly vertical or horizontal use the Angle Draw
buttons to restrict the cursor’s movement.
4. Pick the ending point of the mirror line.
The selection will be “mirrored” about the line defined by these two points. The “mirrored” image will be the same distance and angle from the mirror line as the original.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Trim/Extend (TR)
Use the Trim/Extend command when you want to trim or extend an object so it ends exactly at another
object. You can use this command to trim or extend lines, continuous lines, arcs, and curves. For example, when creating an intersection you can trim or extend a line that represents one side of a street so
it ends exactly at another line.
To trim or extend an object to another “target object”:
1. Choose the Trim/Extend command.
2. Click the object to be trimmed.
Tip:
If you are trimming the object, be sure to click on the side of the object that you wish to keep.
3. Click the target object.
The first object will be trimmed or extended so it ends exactly at the second target
object.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Fillet (FI)
Use the Fillet command to create rounded corners between lines, arcs, and rectangles.
To fillet two objects:
1. Choose the Fillet command.
2. The Fillet Settings Bar appears in the upper left of the screen where you can select
various options:
Enter a new radius in the “Fillet Radius” text box.
Check the Auto Fillet box if you want all corners of Continuous and Double lines
to be automatically filleted.
Check the Preview box to display a dynamic preview of the fillet arc before you
click to place it.
3.
Click the first line or arc to be filleted.
4.
Click the second line or arc to be filleted.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Fillet cont...
Move your cursor around the intersection and notice the preview of the fillet arc moves
from corner to corner (assuming the Preview box is checked).
5.
Click when the preview fillet arc is in the correct location.
The filleted objects will be trimmed automatically to meet the fillet arc exactly at the
tangent points.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Cutout (CT)
Use this command to “cut-out” a selected portion of a drawing. The cut-out section remains selected so
you can save it as a new diagram file or modify it using any of the commands found on the Edit menu.
The Cut-out command works on any line, hatch, fill or text in the drawing, allowing for a more precise
selection than was available in previous versions of the program.
To cut-out a section of diagram:
1. Choose the Cut-out command from the Edit menu.
The message bar prompts you to place a polygon (selection window) around the region to be cut-out.
2. Click to place the first corner of the cut-out box just to the outside of the objects you
wish to select.
3. Move your mouse to the other corner of the selection area and notice the section
window rubberbanding from your original point.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Cutout cont...
4. When all the objects you wish to select are completely enclosed in the window, click
the mouse again to finish the selection.
Any lines or objects that are enclosed in this box are now broken and remain selected so you can move,
modify, or save them as a new diagram file.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Double Line Int. Clean (IT)
Use the Trim Intersection command to automatically break or trim two sets of intersecting double lines
to create one of three types of junctions. For example, you can use this command to create junctions of
double-line walls or intersections of streets.
To create an “L”, “X” or “T”-type intersection between two sets of double lines:
1. Choose the Trim Intersection command.
2. Click anywhere inside the quadrilateral formed by the intersection of the two sets of
parallel lines.
As you move the cursor around the intersection you will see a preview of the various
“L”, “X” or “T”-type junctions that can be created at the intersection.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Double Line Int. Clean cont...
3. When the type of junction you want appears, click the mouse button.
The junction will be drawn to match the preview.
Tip:
This command can only be used where four lines intersect, such as an intersection of two, one-lane
streets. If you have more than four intersecting lines use the Multi-lane Intersection Trim command
found on the Easy Streets Toolbox.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Multi-Lane Int. Clean
Use this command to erase the unwanted lines that run through the center of an intersection that you
have created either with the Double Line command or with Easy Streets.
To clean a multi-lane intersection:
1. Draw an intersection with the Line command, Double Line command, or with Easy
Streets.
Tip
If you are working with a large area you may want to use the Zoom Window command to zoom in
around the intersection.
2. Select the Multi-Lane Intersection Clean command from the Modify menu or from the
Easy Streets Toolbox.
3. Click a point near a corner where two of the lines cross, but outside of the intersection.
4. Move around the intersection, clicking a point outside each corner to trace a box
around the intersection.
5. Finish by clicking back where you placed the first point.
Any lines that cross the box you traced are broken and the pieces inside the box are
erased. The larger you make the box the larger the area that is erased.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Multi-Lane Int. Clean...
Tip
Once the intersection is cleaned use the Fillet command on the Modify menu to place arcs or rounded
corners between the edges of the streets.
Tip
If you want to change the intersection to another configuration, such as a T or L shape, use the Double
Line Intersection Clean command instead of Multi-Lane Intersection Clean.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Double It Up (Offset, OF)
Use the Double It Up command to draw parallel objects to lines, continuous lines, polygons, curves,
circles, arcs, and ellipses.
To draw a parallel object:
1. Select the object or objects to be copied and used as the “base” for the parallel object.
2. Choose the Double It Up command.
A Settings Bar will appear that displays the current “Offset distance.” This is the distance between the original object and the new, parallel object that is to be drawn.
The Settings Bar also displays a check box marked “Fixed”. When this box is checked,
the offset distance is set to the value specified in the “Offset distance” box, and moving
the cursor will simply allow you to pick on which side of the original object you want the
parallel object to be drawn. If the Fixed box is not checked, the parallel object moves
freely as you move the cursor, and the distance between the two objects is dynamically
displayed in the Offset distance box.
Tip:
If more than one object is selected to be doubled up, a fixed offset distance must be entered, i.e. there is
no rubberbanding preview as with single objects.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Double It Up cont...
3. If you want to specify a numeric offset distance, check the Fixed box, and enter the
desired offset distance in the Offset distance box.
4. Move your cursor from side to side of the original object and notice the preview of the
parallel object being drawn.
5.
When the parallel object is in the desired location, click to place it.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Group (GT)
Use the Group Command to combine any objects into a group so they can be selected and edited
(moved, copied, rotated, and so on) as a single object.
For example, you might use the Group command to group a street intersection together or a symbol that
has been exploded so it can be selected and moved or re-scaled as one object.
To create a Group:
1. Select the objects on the drawing to make into the group.
2. Select the Group command from the Edit menu.
3. Deselect the objects.
4. Now when you click anywhere on any one of the objects in the group and the entire
group is selected.
Once a group is created, it is saved with the diagram. The next time you load that diagram, any groups
you created will still be a part of the diagram.
Note: You can create “Nested” (or groups within groups) groups in the diagram by Grouping on set of
previously grouped objects to another set of objects.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Ungroup (GU)
Use the Ungroup command to “explode’’ a group back into its component parts. This allows you to
select the separate objects that make up the group so they can be edited individually (moved, copied,
stretched, and so on).
To explode a group:
1. Select the group to explode.
2. Select the Edit Menu.
3. Select the Explode Group Command.
4. The group is exploded into its component parts.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Explode (YX)
You use the Explode command to explode continuous lines or symbols that have already been placed in
a drawing. You must explode symbols before you can change properties of the objects that make them
up (like color, line width or line type). Symbols can be scaled or rotated but you cannot make design
changes within a symbol unless you first explode it.
To explode symbols or continuous lines already placed in the drawing:
1. Select the symbol(s) or continuous lines that you wish to explode.
2. Choose the Explode command.
The objects are exploded into the entities that make them up. You can then select the
individual objects and use the Edit command to change their properties.
You can also explode symbols as you place them so that instead of a symbol, the individual objects that
make it up are placed in the drawing. To explode symbols as you place them:
1. Bring up the Symbol Manager.
2. Click the Explode Upon Placement button (the stick of dynamite) and make sure it is
pressed which shows the option is turned on.
3. Select a symbol and place it in the drawing normally.
Click anywhere on the symbol that was just placed and notice that only an individual
object is selected, not the entire symbol. This shows that the symbol is exploded.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Edit Properties (ED)
Use this command to make changes to the properties (the line color, line type, layer, etc.) of selected
objects.
To change the properties of selected objects:
1. Select one or more objects to be changed.
2. Choose the Edit Properties command.
A Settings Bar appears that displays properties that are common to the selected objects. If only one type of object is selected, then all properties that apply to that object
type will be displayed.
3. Change the properties that you want, then click OK
.
The changes will be applied to the selected objects.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Quick Edit (QE)
Use this command to edit text and dimensions using the Quick Label and Quick Dimension toolboxes.
To edit text or dimensions already placed in the diagram:
1. Select the text to be edited by clicking on it.
2. Click the Quick Edit command from the Quick menu.
3. The Edit toolbox appears with the selected text (or dimension) in the Enter Text field.
Make any changes to the text.
4. Click the OK button to complete the changes.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Delete (Erase, ER)
Use the Delete (or Erase) command to delete unwanted objects.
To delete objects from your drawing:
1. Select the objects to be deleted.
2. Choose the Delete command or press the Delete key on the keyboard. The objects
will be deleted.
Tip
Like other drawing and editing commands, Erase is reversible. To restore an item or selection that has
been erased, click the Undo button on the Modify menu or hold down Ctrl and press Z on the keyboard.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Erase Blue Markers (MX)
Use Erase Marker to erase all the temporary markers in your drawing with just one command. Markers
are placed using the Easy Lines feature to temporarily mark locations in the drawing for snapping or
other reference purposes. As you create your drawing you can place as many markers as you need, then
use Erase Marker to erase them all at once.
To erase all the temporary markers in the drawing:
1. Choose the Erase Marker command.
All the temporary markers are erased. If you erased them by mistake and need to bring
them back use the Undo command.
Tip:
Permanent markers are not erased by the Erase Marker command. If you wish to erase permanent
markers just use the selection commands to select the marker and press the Delete key or perform the
Delete command.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Draw Menu
Draw Pull-Down Menu
Use these commands to draw objects such as lines, circles, arcs, ellipses, and curves. This menu also has
the Set Properties command which is used to preset properties for the objects to be drawn such as layer,
color, line type, and line width.
Tip:
All the Draw commands apply the current properties of layer, color, line type and line width to the
object being drawn. Once an object is drawn you can select it and change its properties with the Edit
Properties command on the Modify menu.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Draw ~ Lines
Single Line (LS)
Use the Single Line command to draw a single line by specifying a start and end point.
To draw a single line:
1. Choose the single line command.
2. Click or snap to place the starting point.
3. Click or snap to place the ending point.
Tip:
If you are drawing lines to exact measurements, you can use direction-distance entry to place the ending
point. Just place the starting point, move the cursor in the direction you want the line to go and type in
the line’s length on the keyboard.
Tip:
When drawing lines you can use the Angle Draw buttons to restrict the cursor so it only moves at specific angles. This allows you to draw lines at exact angles.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Continuous Line (LC)
Use the Continuous Line command to create a continuous line consisting of one or more line segments.
Continuous lines may be selected and edited as single objects.
To draw a continuous line:
1. Select the Continuous Line command.
2. Click or snap to place the starting point.
3. Click or snap to place the end point of the first line segment.
This point also becomes the starting point for the second line segment.
4. Place additional points to create the line segments of the continuous line.
5. To stop drawing line segments either double-click to place the last point or press the
Enter key.
Tip:
If you inadvertently place a point in the wrong location, you do not need to abort the command and start
over. Press the Esc key on the keyboard to “backspace” through the line segments you have placed, then
make the correction and continue.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Arrow (AW)
Use the Arrow command to create an arrow consisting of only one line segments.
To draw an Arrow:
1. Select the Arrow command.
2. Set the Arrow properties on the Arrow Toolbox if desired.
3. Click or snap to place the starting point.
4. Either double-click or press the Enter key to finish drawing the Arrow.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Easy Lines (EZL)
There are several ways to draw lines in The Diagram Program, but the Easy Lines command, available
on the Right-Hand Toolbox, provides the easiest way to draw a building or anything with lines to exact
measurements. This is the best way to draw lines when you want to ensure their complete accuracy, as
opposed to using the standard Line command.
Easy Lines is a special toolbox that you use to easily select the angle and length of each line segment
you wish to draw. You can continue drawing as many connected line segments as you need.
To draw a building with the Easy Lines command:
1. Click on the Easy Lines bin on the Right-Hand Toolbox.
The Easy Lines Toolbox is then displayed which consists of a ‘’compass” of arrows pointing in different
directions and a numeric keypad.
2. Click on the Bulls-eye button in the center of the compass.
3. Click in the diagram to place the first corner of the building.
This sets the first endpoint of the line, which will become the upper-left corner of the building. Click on
one of the arrow keys to select that angle as the direction you wish to move away from the Start Point
for the line segment. Next, click on the desired value on the Toolbox’s numeric keypad for the length of
the line segment. For example, to enter the direction and length of the first line segment for the
left-vertical wall of the building:
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Easy Lines cont...
4. Click on the downward arrow on the Easy Lines Toolbox to signify drawing downward from the Start Point. An angle of 270 is displayed in the Angle box towards the
bottom of the Toolbox.
5. Using the numeric keypad on the Toolbox, click on a length of 150 (for the Metric
version, enter a distance in mm). This distance is displayed in the Distance box near the
bottom of the Toolbox.
6. To finish the first line segment, click on the Line icon in the lower left corner of the
Toolbox:
The line segment is then drawn on the screen, between the initial Start Point you selected and a new
endpoint 150' away, at an angle of 270 degrees. Next, continue drawing the remaining line segments of
the building, in consecutive order. This becomes the Start Point for the next line segment.
7. Click on the right arrow to select a drawing angle to the right.
8. Select 75 for the distance from the numeric keypad.
9. Click on the Line icon to draw the second line segment.
10. Continue to enter the direction and distance for each remaining side of the building.
You can execute any of the View commands while you are drawing lines so you can zoom in and out on
the area of the diagram where you are working, as needed.
Other Features on the Easy Lines Toolbox
• Direction Arrows - Use these arrows to choose the direction of the Line or marker that you would like
to place. If the angle of a line you wish to draw is not represented by one of the arrow keys, simply
click once inside the Angle box on the toolbox and then select the desired angle from the numeric
keypad (or the regular keyboard). Similarly, to edit an angle or a distance value, click inside the text
display box and use the keyboard to edit the value normally. Once you click inside the Angle or
Distance box, select the C button on the toolbox to clear, or erase, the value that is currently displayed
in that box.
• Bull’s -Eye - If you wish to ‘’pick up the pencil” and start drawing lines from a new starting pointing,
click on the Bull’s Eye icon in the middle of the angle arrows. This allows you to select a new Start
Point for the next line segment.
• Angle and Distance boxes - The Angle (A:) and Distance (D:) fields will retain the last data entered
after selecting a line or marker. In other words the angle and distance fields will not refresh until you
pick a new angle and enter a new distance from the number pad. There are two reasons for this new
feature; First, this info needs to be available for the Repeat feature to work. Second, you may want to
keep the last distance value you entered and only change the angle.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Easy Lines cont...
This comes in handy if you wanted to draw a box with equal sides. First start by entering 20' at 0° and
click on Line. A line will be drawn 20' to the right. Next, click on the down arrow and then click on
line again. The angle will change accordingly, but since you didn’t click on the number pad the previous distance remained.
• Numeric Keypad - Use the Numeric keypad to enter the distance of the line to be drawn, or the
marker to be placed. The keypad defaults to feet, so you will need to enter the Inch Mark when entering values in feet and inches.
• Line Icon - Choose the Line icon to place a line at the angle and distance that you specified in the Easy
Lines toolbox. Each line segment drawn with the Easy Lines command is a separate Line Object. You
can select them and edit them individually without first using the Explode command, unlike line
segments drawn with the standard Line command.
• Marker Icons - Markers are placed with exactly the same method as Lines, except you complete the
entry of each angle and distance by selecting the Marker icon from the bottom of the toolbox instead
of the Line icon.
Note: There are two marker types to select from. The first being a normal or temporary marker. This
marker is cleared from the screen after the “Erase Markers” feature is selected. Erase Markers is found
next to Undo and Redo on the speedbar.
The second marker selection is a “Permanent Marker.” This marker can be erased manually, but will not
be erased when the Erase Markers feature is selected.
Undo - The Undo feature will undo an unlimited number of steps.
• Repeat - The Repeat feature will repeat the last routine every time it’s selected. Example: If you place
a marker 10' to the right (0°) and then hit Repeat, another marker will be place 10' to right of the
previous one. Keep clicking Repeat and a marker will keep appearing 10' to the right of the last.
• Survey Mode - This button will change the angle values of the Easy Line angle arrows. It changes the
top arrow from 90° to North or 0°. The angles then increase positively clockwise. What was 0° becomes 90° and so on. When you’re in survey mode you will notice that the bulls eye is changed to a
compass. Click on the Survey mode button again to return to normal Easy Line angles.
• Modes - The bottom three buttons will let you switch effortlessly between the different Easy Line
modes. From left to right you have Normal Easy Lines, EZ Baseline, and EZ Triangulation.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Easy Lines cont...
Drawing in EZ Baseline
Baseline Easy Lines is used to set points (markers) based on baseline measuring procedures. When
drawing in Baseline Mode, all points are relative to the base point and baseline you set with the bulls
eye.
When you switch to EZ Baseline the color of the arrows changes to green. The angle field changes form
A: to D1: and the next field is D2: Also notice that the Line button (next to Marker) is missing. The
arrow buttons are actually inactive, there is no need to enter an angle when doing baseline point entry.
To place points using the Baseline Easy Lines Method:
1. Click on the bulls eye to set the Base Point.
Click anywhere on the screen to set your base point. The base point will be shown as a green circle with
cross hairs inside it. Like a permanent marker you will have to erase it manually if you want to remove
the base point.
2. After setting the base point you will be prompted to show the direction of the
baseline. Move in the desired direction - left, right, up, or down and click to accept the
direction.
Note: If you want to set the angle of your baseline to anything other than 0°, 90°, 180°, or 270° then
move up to the speedbar and click on the Angle Draw “Off” button. The default mode is set to the
baseline angle with the Angle Draw features, but you can actually use any angle.
3. Click the number pad and enter the first distance (D1:). This is the distance along the
baseline from the base point.
Tip: If you enter a negative number for D1: the distance will be along the baseline in the opposite direction.
4. Click in the second field (D2:) or press the Tab key. The distance you enter here will
be the distance perpendicular to the baseline.
5. Click on one of the marker buttons, either the temporary (blue) marker or the permanent (red) marker.
Tip: If the marker is on the wrong side of the baseline then click on the “Flip” button and pick the
marker again. It will place the marker on the opposite side of the baseline. Once you select the Flip
feature it will stay selected until you click on it again.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Easy Lines cont...
Note: The Flip feature does not change the direction of the baseline, only the side of the baseline
the point is positioned. D2: is only affected by Flip. To change the direction of the D1: distance and
move along the baseline in the opposite direction, enter a negative (minus sign) distance in the D1:
field.
6) Repeat steps 3 through 5 to place as many markers as you need.
Once the markers are placed in the drawing you can snap lines or vehicles to them so they are placed
exactly at the desired location.
EZ Triangulation
With triangulation measurements, two reference points are set which become the center points of the
triangulating circles. Other points are located as being at the intersection of the two circles based on
radius measurements. For example, a point may be located so it is at the intersection of a 50' radius
circle centered on the first reference point, and a 125' radius circle centered on the second point.
When you switch to EZ Triangulation you’ll notice the color of the arrows changes to red. The arrow
buttons are inactive since you have no need to enter an angle when doing triangulation point entry. The
angle field changes form A: to D1: and the next field is D2: The Line button (next to Marker) is missing,
as Triangulation Easy Lines is used to set points (markers) based on triangulation measuring procedures.
To enter points using the Triangulation Easy Lines Method
1. Click on the bulls eye to set the reference points.
Note: Unlike previous versions, no message will pop up that prompts you to pick a start point. All
messages are displayed in the dialog box at the bottom of the screen.
2. Click or snap anywhere on the screen to set your first reference point. Click anywhere
on the screen to set your second base point.
Tip: Be sure to use Direction Distance entry or snaps to locate theses reference points exactly.
The base point will be shown as magenta colored triangles with cross hairs inside them. Like a permanent marker you will have to erase it manually if you want to get rid of it.
3. Click on the number pad to enter the first distance (D1:). This is the length of radius
from the first base point.
4. Click in, or tab to the second field (D2:). This is the length of radius from the second
base point.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Easy Lines cont...
5. Now pick a marker, either a temporary (blue) marker or a permanent (red) marker.
Where the two radii intersect (entered above) is where your marker will be placed. If the
marker is on the wrong side of the baseline then click on the “Flip” button and pick the
marker again. It will place the marker on the opposite side of the baseline. Once you
select the Flip feature it will stay selected until you click on it again.
6. Repeat steps 3 through 5 to place the remaining points.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Double Line (LD)
Double lines are useful for drawing walls, roads, pipes, and other parallel lines.
To draw a double line:
1. Choose the Double Line command.
2. The Double Line Settings Bar appears in the upper left of the screen that displays the
current settings.
Make changes as needed to the left and right offsets (see Tips below).
Check the Solid Fill box if you wish to have the space between the lines filled with the current line
color.
Turn Auto Fillet mode on if you wish to have the corners of the lines rounded as you draw them. You
can also change the fillet radius in the text box. Check the Auto Fillet box to turn Auto Fillet on. Check
the Fillet Preview box to have a dynamic preview of the filleted corners displayed while drawing.
3. Place the starting point.
4. Move the cursor and notice the double (parallel) lines rubberbanding from the initial
point. The cursor is exactly centered between the two lines unless you specifically set
the left and right offsets to not be equal.
5. Place points to define each new corner in the set of double lines.
6. To complete the command double-click to place the final endpoint or press the Enter
key.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Double Line cont..
Tips
The “left” and “right” offset directions are defined relative to the movement of the cursor. If you imagine that you are the cursor moving forward, the “left” offset is always the distance to your left, and the
“right” offset is always the distance to your right. This applies whether the cursor is moving up, down,
left or right on the screen. For example, if you are drawing from the bottom of the screen to the top, the
“left” offset line is on the left side of the double line as you view your screen. If, however, you are
drawing from the top to the bottom, the “left” offset is actually on the right side of the double line as you
view your screen (If you were the cursor moving downward you would actually view the screen upside
down).
Most double line settings can be changed “on the fly,” while you are using the command. When you
start the command a Settings Bar appears at the top of the screen with the current double line settings.
Make any changes, then return to drawing and the changes take effect with the start of the next double
line.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Point (PO)
Use the Point command to place a point for use during the construction of another object.
To place a point:
1.
2.
Choose the Point command.
Place a point where you want the point marker to be located.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Draw ~ Rectangles
Normal Rectangle (R2)
Use the Normal (Two-Point) Rectangle command to create a rectangle with exact horizontal and vertical
sides.
To draw a normal rectangle:
1. Choose the Normal Rectangle command.
2. Place any corner of the rectangle. Move the cursor and notice the rectangle take
shape.
3. Place the opposite corner.
Tip:
The ideal way to create a two-point rectangle to exact measurements is by using X and Y (horizontal and
vertical) coordinate entry. In this mode, the second point (representing the diagonally-opposite corner)
of the rectangle can be specified by entering the width and height of the rectangle, as follows:
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Normal Rectangle cont...
1. Click on the Coordinate Display toggle button on the Settings Bar to switch to X - Y
coordinate entry mode.
2. Move the cursor up into the X coordinate text box and type in the length of the horizontal side of the rectangle.
3. Move the cursor up into the Y coordinate box and type in the length of the Vertical
side of the rectangle.
4. Press Enter to complete the rectangle.
5. Click on the Coordinate Display toggle button to switch back to the normal Angle/
Distance mode of coordinate entry.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Set Angle Rectangle (R3)
Use the Set Angle (Three-Point) Rectangle command to create a rectangle at any angle by defining its
length and height with three points.
To draw a Set Angle rectangle:
1. Choose the Set Angle Rectangle command.
2. Place a point at any corner (vertex) of the rectangle.
3. Move the cursor in the direction of the next corner and click to place that corner.
4. Move the cursor perpendicular to the side you just drew. Notice the rectangle take
shape.
5. Place a third point to complete the rectangle.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Set Angle Rectangle cont..
Tips
In most cases, the second and third points can be placed using direct distance entry or a snap command.
To use direct distance entry, click to place the first corner, move the cursor in the desired direction and
type in the length of the side on the keyboard.
To draw a rectangle at a common angle such as 45 , click to place the first endpoint then click on the
desired Angle Draw button on the Settings bar. This restrains the cursor to move exactly at those angles.
Click to turn Angle Draw mode off when you are finished.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Draw ~ Circles
2 - Point Circle (C2)
Use the Two-Point Circle command to create a circle when you know the location of the center point
and the circle’s radius, or the location of any point on the circumference (perimeter) of the circle.
To draw a two-point circle:
1. Choose the Two-Point Circle command.
2. Place the center point of the circle.
3. Place the second point on the circumference of the circle.
Tip
There are several ways you can place the second point:
Using direct distance entry, you can simply type the radius on the keyboard.
If you know the diameter, you can use direct distance entry, and let The Diagram Program calculate the
radius for you. For example: if the diameter is 2' 3 3/4", you could type (2' 3 3/4")/2 as the radius.
Use any of the snap commands to place a perimeter point precisely at any location.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
3-Point Circle (C3)
Use the Three-Point Circle command to create a circle when the center and radius are not known. The
circumference must pass through three specific points in your drawing.
To draw a three-point circle:
1. Choose the Three-Point Circle command.
2. Place the first of the three points for the circle to pass through.
3. Place the second point.
As you move the cursor, a rubberbanding line connects the second point to the cursor.
4. Place a third point to complete the circle.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Diameter Circle (CD)
Use the Diameter Circle command to create a circle whose diameter you define by placing two points.
To draw a diameter circle:
1. Choose the Diameter Circle command.
2. Place a point that will be on the circumference of the circle.
As you move the cursor, you see a dynamic preview of the circle.
3. Place a second point to define the circle.
Tip
If you know the diameter, simply type it while you are dragging the preview circle in the desired direction. This will place the second point at the distance.
If you just know the radius, do the same thing, but enter the diameter as a mathematical expression—for
example: (radius)*2.
You can also use Snap commands to make the circle exactly fill the space between two objects.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Ellipse (EP)
Use the Ellipse command to draw an ellipse defined by the length and width at its principal axes.
To draw an ellipse:
1. Choose the Ellipse command.
2. Place the starting point of the first axis.
3. Place the endpoint of the first axis.
This defines the length and orientation of the ellipse. As you move the cursor perpendicular to the first axis, a preview of the ellipse follows your cursor.
4. Place a third point to complete the ellipse.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Draw ~ Arcs
3-Point Arc (A3)
Use the Three-Point Arc command to create an arc when you know the beginning point, a point on the
arc, and the endpoint.
To draw a three-point arc:
1. Choose the Three-Point Arc command.
2. Place the starting point for the arc.
3. Place any intermediate point on the arc.
A preview of the arc appears, connected on one end to the cursor.
4. Place the endpoint of the arc.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Center-Start-End (Two-Point Arc, A2)
Use the Center-Start End Arc command to create an arc when you know its centerpoint, the starting
point of the arc, and any point on the line connecting the center point with the end of the arc (or the
extension of that line).
To draw a center-span arc:
1. Choose the Center-Start End Arc command.
2. Place a point at the center of the arc.
A rubberbanding line connects the center with the cursor which shows a preview of the
radius.
3. Place the first endpoint of the arc.
This point determines the radius as well as one endpoint of the arc.
4. When you have opened the arc to the desired angle or alignment, place the third
point.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Arc: Start-End-Middle (AM)
Use the Start-End-Middle Arc command to create an arc when you know its beginning and end points,
but need to determine the centerpoint.
To draw a center-span arc:
1. Choose the Center-Start End Arc command.
2. Place the first point of the arc.
3. Place the endpoint of the arc.
A rubberbanding line connects the center with the cursor which shows a preview of the radius.
4. When you have positioned the arc to the desired angle or alignment, place the third
point.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Arc: Length-Radius-Tangent (AX)
Use the Length-Radius-Tangent Arc command to create an arc when you know the beginning point and
the endpoint.
To draw a Length-Radius-Tangent Arc:
1. Choose the Length-Radius-Tangent Arc command.
2. Enter the arc’s length and radius on the Settings bar at the top of the screen.
3. Click on the line where you want the arc to be tangent. Click near the end of the line
where you want arc to be placed.
A preview of the arc appears, tangent to the selected line. Move the mouse from one side of the line to
the other and notice the arc flip from side to side.
4. When the arc has the correct orientation, click to finish the arc.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Draw ~ Polygons
Center Polygon (PC)
Use the Center Polygon command to draw a regular polygon.
To draw a regular polygon by first placing a center point:
1. Choose the Center Polygon command.
2. Enter the number of sides for the polygon on the Settings Bar at the top-left of the
screen.
3. Click or snap to place a point to locate the center of the polygon.
4. Move the mouse and notice the polygon take shape.
5. Place a point to complete the polygon.
If the Inscribed option on the Settings Bar is checked, the second point used to define
the polygon will represent a vertex (corner point) of the polygon. If you are drawing the
polygon inside a circle, with this option checked, place the point on the perimeter of the
circle. If the Inscribed command is not checked, the second point will represent the
midpoint of a side of the polygon.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Side Polygon (PS)
Use the Side Polygon command to draw a regular polygon when you know the length, orientation and
location of one side.
To draw a regular polygon using one-side construction:
1. Choose the Side Polygon command.
2. Enter the number of sides for the polygon on the Settings Bar at the top-left of the
screen.
3. Place the starting point for one side of the polygon.
4. Place the endpoint for that side of the polygon.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Curve (CV)
Use the Curve command to create a smooth curve that passes through each point you place.
To draw a curve:
1. Choose the Curve command.
2. Place the starting point of the curve.
3. Place as many points on the curve as needed to define it. (The curve will pass
through these points).
4. Double-click to place the last point or press the Enter key to complete the curve.
Tips
The Diagram Program provides snap, break, and trim commands that can be applied to curves. For
example, you can trim a curve to a line, circle, or even to another curve.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Draw ~ Hatch/Fill
Trace Boundary (HB)
Use the Trace Boundary command to draw a hatch pattern or solid fill within an area that you specify by
placing points, as follows:
1. Choose the Trace Boundary command.
2. Select the hatch pattern or fill settings from the Settings Bar at the top of the screen.
From this bar you can select the pattern type, color, pattern angle, and pattern scale.
You can also select the pointing hand icon to match the settings of an existing pattern.
3. Click or snap to place points to define the boundary that will enclose the hatch pattern.
Rubberband lines are displayed connecting the cursor to the last point placed and to
the first point placed. These lines provide a preview of the area to be hatched.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Trace Boundary cont..
4. When finished defining the area to be hatched, press Enter or double click to place
the final point.
The defined area will be filled with the selected pattern or solid color.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Pick Area (HD)
Use the Pick Area hatch command to add a hatch pattern or solid fill to closed objects such as circles,
polygons, rectangles, polygons, etc.
Tip:
Closed objects located inside other closed objects remain unhatched.
To draw a hatch pattern within selected objects:
1. Choose the Pick Area command.
(Remember that the objects must be closed (sharing the same beginning and end
point).
2. Click inside the area to be hatched.
The objects will be filled with the currently selected hatch pattern or solid fill.
Tip
If there are 100 or more objects on screen when you select the Pick Area command The Diagram Program will prompt you to narrow the list of entities to include using selection methods.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Hatch/Fill Settings (TBH)
Use the Hatch/Fill Settings command to select different options for drawing hatch patterns and solid
fills, as follows:
Hatch Name - Lists the available hatch patterns. Click on the down arrow or scroll bar to
scroll through the list of patterns.
Angle - Sets the selected hatch pattern’s angle. Type a positive or negative value between
0 and 360 degrees.
Scale - Sets the scale of the selected hatch pattern; 1.0 = 100%.
Hatch Color - Sets the color, which applies to all hatch patterns and solid fills.
Show Boundary - If checked this option displays fill and hatch boundaries as lines on the
screen.
Tip
Hatches and fills are both drawn on the current layer.
Hatches may be exploded into lines, just select the hatch pattern and choose the Explode command from the Modify commands on the Edit Menu. Exploding a hatch pattern allows you to change the
pattern to a different line type or modify the pattern.
Tip:
Hatch patterns can also be selected from the left toolbar. Just click on the Hatch button at the bottom of
the toolbar to bring up the Hatch commands. Click on one of the pattern buttons to select the desired
pattern and start the Trace Boundary command. Click the up or down arrows to show more available
patterns.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Symbol Manager
Symbols are collections of objects that are grouped together, named, saved, and then placed and manipulated as a single object. You can insert them repeatedly in the same drawing, or save them on disk for
use in future drawings. This saves you the time that would be necessary to draw the same objects over
and over, and also provides some additional advantages. For example, each symbol is defined just once
in the drawing definition, so that repeated placements of the same symbol have little impact on drawing
file size. The same symbol can be inserted in different locations, and at different rotations and sizes. You
can create symbols yourself from objects you have drawn or use the pre-drawn symbols included with
The Diagram Program.
Symbols can consist of anything you want, such as a vehicle, a fire hydrant, or even an entire intersection. When you create a symbol you assign it two “handle” points that determine how the symbol is
aligned when you place it into a drawing. Once placed in a diagram you can only modify a symbol if
you first “explode” it into its various components.
For more information on how to use symbols see the descriptions of the specific commands below. In
general, you work with symbols in The Diagram Program like this:
Create symbols with the Create Symbol command found on the Draw menu, under the Symbol Tools
sub-menu (YC command on your keyboard). To create a symbol you select the objects to make it up,
assign the symbol a name and assign it two handle points. See the Create Symbol command description
below for more information.
Preview what symbols are available to you and select symbols to place in your diagrams from the
Symbol Manager. The pre-drawn symbols that are included with The Diagram Program are all stored in
sub-folders under the Symbols folder of your main program folder. See the description of the Symbol
Manager toolbox below for more information.
Preview what symbols are available to you and select symbols to place in your diagrams from the
Symbol Manager. To place a symbol in your drawing simply select it from the appropriate folder in the
Symbol Manager (by clicking on its name) and then place the symbol handles by clicking or snapping to
specific points in your drawing. From Symbol Manager you can also select options that affect how the
symbol is to be placed such as it’s color and whether it is mirrored on placement. You can also choose
whether you want to dynamically size and rotate the symbol as it is placed, or place it at its default size
and rotation.
Once you have placed a symbol into a drawing you can divide it back into its individual component entities with the Explode command. First select the symbol (or symbols), select the Draw menu,
select Symbol Tools, and then select Explode. You can also explode symbols as you place them by
selecting the Auto Explode icon from the Symbol Manager.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Symbol Manager cont...
Select symbols for placement and choose from the various symbol options on the Symbol Manager
dialog box. To display the Symbol Manager click on the button labeled Symbols on the right-side
toolbox. To return to the standard toolbox when you are finished placing symbols click on the Home
button at the bottom of the Symbol Manager.
Current Folder Shows the currently
selected folder. Any
symbols shown in the
list below are located
under this folder. If a
plus sign is displayed
to the left of the folder
name, double click on
the folder to see the
subfolders under it.
Symbol List - Shows
all the symbols available
in the selected folder. If
this area is blank, you
must first select a folder
or sub-folder from the list
above by double clicking
on it.
Mirror
- Causes all
symbols to be mirrored
about either a vertical line
or a horizontal line when
they are placed.
Symbol Color
Dynamic Scale Press this button when
you want to dynamically
change the size (or scale)
of symbols as you place
them in the drawing.
Click on this button to
select a color to be
applied to any symbol
being placed.
To place a symbol in a diagram:
The first step to placing a symbol in your diagram is to select the desired symbol from
the Symbol Manager list.
1. Select the Symbols button from the right-hand toolbox to bring up the Symbol Manager (or select it from the Draw menu).
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Symbol Manager cont...
2. Select the folder where the desired symbol files are located by clicking on the folder
name in the upper portion of the Symbol Manager.
3. Click on any symbol in the lower symbol list.
4. Move the cursor back into the drawing window and you will see a ghost image of the
symbol attached to the cursor.
Once a symbol has been selected you can double click the mouse to place it at its default orientation. The default rotation of the symbol is the orientation as it is shown in
the preview window. To place the symbol at another angle, you either use one of the
Angle Draw Buttons or use the mouse to rotate the symbol, as follows:
5. Click or snap to an existing point to place the first handle of the symbol (where the
cursor is located).
6. Move the cursor and notice that you can rotate the symbol as you move the mouse.
Look at the Angle box (labeled A:) in the upper-left area of the screen to see the current
rotation of the symbol.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Symbol Manager cont...
7. Type in an exact rotation angle in the Angle box or move the mouse until the symbol
has the desired rotation angle.
-Or7. Click one of the Angle Draw Buttons to constrain the symbol to a specific rotation
angle. For example, select the Vertical/Horizontal Angle Draw Button to rotate the symbol at 90°.
8. Move the cursor to establish the symbol’s direction.
9. Click the left-mouse button to finish placing the symbol.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Create Symbol (YC)
Use the Create Symbol command to create a symbol made up of existing objects, which may then be
placed repeatedly in the drawing (rotated and re-scaled as desired) or saved to disk for future use.
To create a symbol:
1. Draw the objects to be included in the symbol.
2. Select the objects to be included in the symbol by clicking on them or drawing a
selection box around them.
3. Select the Draw menu, select Symbol Tools, and then select Create Symbol (or press
YC on the keyboard).
4. Type in the symbol’s name and it will appear on the Settings Bar at the top of the
screen. Press Enter or click on OK.
5. Select two handle points to use for placing the symbol. Normally you will want to
snap exactly to the handle points. The objects should then return to their normal color
and no longer be selected.
Tip:
The first handle point you select is the point where the cursor is attached when you place the symbol.
Also, if Dynamic Scale is turned on, the symbol can be scaled relative to this handle point.
Refresh the Symbol Manager list by clicking on the down arrow next to the current folder’s name, then
click on the desired symbol folder’s name. The new symbol you created should then appear in alphabetical order in the selected folder.
Next to the Symbol name box on the Settings Bar is a check box labeled “Replace original w/symbol.” If
you check this box, the selected objects in your drawing are replaced by the symbol. If unchecked, the
objects remain separate and the symbol is loaded into memory but is not placed in the drawing.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Explode Symbol (YX)
Use the Explode Symbol to explode symbols that were previously place in the drawing. Doing this
allows you to change the properties of the individual objects that make up the symbol, which you cannot
do when objects are grouped together as a symbol. Symbols can be scaled or rotated, but you cannot
change properties like line color, width and type, unless the symbol is exploded back to the original
objects.
To explode symbols already placed in a drawing:
1. Select the symbol(s).
2. Choose the Symbol Explode command.
The symbols are exploded back into the entities that make them up.
Tip:
You can also explode symbols at the time they are placed in the drawing. From the Symbol Manager
click the Explode Upon Placement button (make sure it is pressed). All symbols placed from then on
will be exploded when placed. Click the Explode Upon Placement button to turn this feature off.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Symbol Count
Symbol Count exports the name and count of each symbol present in the current drawing to .WK1 or
.CSV (comma delimited format).
To export a Symbol Count into Spreadsheet format:
1. Open or create a drawing containing symbols. (If the drawing does not contain symbols, you will get an error message.)
2. Choose Symbol Count from the Symbols menu.
3. Choose the file type to which you wish to export. Name the file and change the path if
necessary.
4. Click OK when done.
The Diagram Program will write the file to disk to the path and file name you chose. This file may now
be opened in any number of spreadsheet or other programs and manipulated. Here is an example of a
Symbol Count file:
SYMBOL NAME:
DOOR
DOOR - 3 HOUR RATED
DOUBLE DOOR
ELEVATOR
WINDOW
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COUNT:
3
2
1
2
4
Chapter 3. - Program Features
Set Properties
Use this command to preset the properties (the line color, line type, layer, etc.) to be used for future
objects. To preset object properties:
1. Choose the Set Properties command.
A Settings Bar appears that displays properties that are common to all objects including layer, color, line type, and line width.
2. Set the properties as desired, then click OK.
These properties will be applied to any objects drawn from then on, until the properties
are changed again.
Tip:
The pointing hand icon represents the Match command. Click on the pointing hand icon, then click on
any object already in the diagram to set the object properties so they match the selected object.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
View Menu
Redraw (RD)
Use the Redraw command to refresh the screen. When you move or erase an object, its old location is
redrawn with the background color. This effect tends to break up or obscure remaining objects that it
overlapped or intersected. You can use the Redraw command to clean up the screen after this happens.
This command is especially useful when editing lines drawn on top of each other or objects that overlap.
When you execute the Redraw command, the objects are redrawn in the order you drew or edited them.
To redraw the display:
Choose the Redraw command.
The screen is immediately redrawn.
Tip:
For a large drawing press the Esc key during redrawing to terminate the process. This can save you time
if you only need to redraw a portion of the drawing.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Zoom All (ZA)
Use the Zoom All command to see the entire drawing. This helps you get an overview of what you have
drawn, and also helps you find objects that may have been accidently placed far from the main drawing
area. These objects can cause problems when you load a drawing or try to plot or print using the “Fit to
Page” option.
To Zoom All:
Choose the Zoom All command.
The screen is redrawn so the entire drawing (everything on the currently displayed
layers) fills the screen.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Zoom Window (ZW)
Use the Zoom Window command to select a portion of the drawing and enlarge it so it fills the entire
screen. To zoom in on a portion of the drawing:
1. Choose the Zoom Window command.
2. Click once above and to the right of the area to be enlarged.
3. Move the cursor downward and to the left and notice the zoom window take shape.
4. When the desired portion of the drawing is completely enclosed in the zoom window,
click again to complete the window.
The area enclosed by the window is enlarged to fill the screen.
Note:
Place the two points that form the Zoom Window on any two diagonal corners.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Zoom In (ZI)
Use the Zoom In command to quickly magnify the current screen image by a factor of 2. The image on
the screen is made twice its size and is magnified relative to a point at the center of the screen.
To zoom in on an image:
1. Choose the Zoom In command.
The drawing is redrawn at the new magnification.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Zoom Out (ZO)
Use the Zoom Out command to quickly reduce the current screen image by a factor of 1/2. The image on
the screen is made half its size and is reduced relative to a point at the center of the screen.
To zoom out on an image:
1. Choose the Zoom Out command.
The drawing will be redrawn at the reduced magnification.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Zoom Previous (ZP)
Use the Zoom Previous command to quickly revert to a previous view. This command is especially
useful during drawing or editing operations where selecting a point or object accurately requires that you
zoom in close for detail work. When finished with the detail work, use Zoom Previous to return to the
prior view to continue drawing or editing. Choose the command again to toggle back to the same enlarged view for accurate point or object selection.
To return to the previous view:
Choose the Zoom Previous command.
The previous view is displayed.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Pan (PA)
Use the Pan command to pan across your drawing without changing the magnification.
To use the Pan command:
1. Choose the Pan command.
2. Place a point where you want the new view to be centered.
The screen view is shifted to center about this point.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Bird’s Eye View (ZB)
Use the Bird’s Eye View to open a small window displaying a thumbnail view of your entire drawing.
The Bird’s Eye View window always shows the drawing at a Zoom All view. If you click anywhere in
the Bird’s Eye View window, that portion of the drawing is displayed in the full drawing screen. Using
the Bird’s Eye View window to zoom and pan can greatly speed up viewing a large drawing by eliminating unnecessary redraws.
To use Bird’s Eye View:
1.
Choose the Bird’s Eye command from the View menu.
2.
Click in the Bird’s Eye window to center the view around that point or right click
for zoom options.
To turn off the Bird’s Eye window select the command again from the View menu or
click on the close button (the X button) in the upper-right corner of the Bird’s Eye window.
Tip:
When using the Bird’s Eye View window some two-letter zoom commands may be disabled. To use any
of the Zoom commands, just right click the mouse and select the zoom command from the menu that is
displayed.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Zoom View (ZN)
Use the Zoom View command to open a saved view of a diagram as described in the Named View
command topic. The Zoom View command is useful when you need to refer back to a particular area of
your diagram or you are trying to break a larger diagram down into easier to read areas.
To use Zoom View:
1. Choose the Zoom View command from the View menu.
2. Choose the saved Zoom View from the Select View drop down list.
3. The saved view is loaded onto the drawing screen.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Name View (NV)
Use the Name View command to save a particular view in a diagram. The Name View command is
useful when you need to refer back to a particular area of your diagram or you are trying to break a
larger diagram down into easier to read areas.
To use the Name View command:
1. Use the View commands to adjust the view of the diagram to the area that you wish to
save as a named view.
2. Choose the Name View command from the View menu.
2. Click in the Enter View Name filed and type in a name for the view. Click the OK
button at the end of the toolbox.
3. The view is saved in the drawing.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Bring to Front (TF)
As you draw, type, or import objects, each object is positioned in a stacking order (the order in which
objects overlap one another on the same layer within a page). You can change the order at any time.
Bring to Front moves selected objects to the front of any overlapping objects.
To use the bring to front command:
1. Select the object that is to be brought to the front of the overlapping object.
2. Select the Bring to Front command from the View menu.
3. The selected object is brought to the front of the overlapping object.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Send to Back (TB)
As you draw, type, or import objects, each object is positioned in a stacking order (the order in which
objects overlap one another on the same layer within a page). You can change the order at any time.
Send to Back moves selected objects to the back of any objects it is overlapping.
To use the send to back command:
1. Select the object that is to be sent to the back of the overlapping object.
2. Select the Send to Back command from the View menu.
3. The selected object is sent to the back of the overlapping object.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Left and Right Toolbox On/Off
Left Toolbox On/Off
This command is a toggle which turns on or off the display of the left-hand toolbox. Turning this
toolbox off will give you more space on your screen for your drawing. This toolbox is convenient for
selecting commands quickly, but all the commands can also be selected either from the pull-down
menus or by using two-letter command shortcuts. If the left toolbox is currently displayed, selecting this
command will turn it off. If the left toolbox is currently not displayed, selecting this command will turn
it on.
Right Toolbox On/Off
This command is a toggle which turns on or off the display of the right-hand toolbox. Turning this
toolbox off will give you more space on your screen for your drawing. This toolbox is convenient for
using Easy Lines and Easy Streets, selecting line types, placing symbols, and so on, but most of these
commands can also be selected from the pull-down menus. If the right toolbox is currently displayed,
selecting this command will turn it off. If the right toolbox is not currently displayed, selecting this
command will turn it on.
Note: The left-hand toolbox can be re-sized (+ and -) or turned off and on from the speedbar. We can easily
add and remove buttons and features from either toolbox. Features in the bins can be mixed and matched easily.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Snaps Menu
Snap Commands
One of the most important features of The Diagram Program is the ability to place points so they exactly
attach to other points or objects already in your diagram. This ensures that your final drawing is accurate
with lines and symbols attached neatly together. To attach points or objects together you use “Snap
commands.” When you use a snap command to place a point, you can see the point “snap” into position.
You can use a snap command whenever you are expected to place a point.
For example, when you choose the Line command, you are prompted for the starting point of the line.
Before you click the point, you can choose a snap command, and attach the line’s endpoint exactly to
some other object. You can also use snaps to attach symbols when you place them, for example to snap
door symbols exactly to a wall.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Auto Snaps (AU)
On the Snaps menu and the top speedbar there is a feature called Auto Snaps. Selecting this feature will
toggle it on or off. When Auto Snaps is ON a circular aperture will appear at the center of your cross
hairs. If an endpoint or object is within the aperture when you click the left mouse button the cursor will
snap to that point.
Changing Aperture Size - If you want to increase or decrease the size of the aperture do the following:
1. Go the to the Utilities pull-down menu.
2. Select Settings.
3. Go to the System tab.
4. Find the Selection group (upper left hand corner).
5. Change the Search Tolerance value (currently set to .01)
6. Select OK.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Angle Trap On/Off (OT)
The Angle Locking Draw feature simplifies drawing lines by automatically straightening the line you
are drawing when you come within five degrees of horizontal or vertical.
For instance, when you select the line command you click once on the drawing screen to place the first
point of the line. At this point you can move the cursor in any direction. Notice that anytime your cursor
moves within 5 degrees of horizontal or vertical, it will automatically straighten out. When your line is
at the desired angle, click the left-mouse button a second time to finishing placing it.
Angle Trap On / Off is a toggle; click the command once to turn it on, again to turn it off.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Snap Endpoint (Snap Closest, SC)
Use the Snap Endpoint command to snap or attach to the nearest endpoint or construction point on an
object.
To snap to the closest endpoint:
1. Start one of the Draw or Edit commands.
2. When prompted to pick a point, choose the Snap Endpoint command or type SC.
3. Position the cursor near the endpoint where you wish to attach and click.
The Diagram Program attaches exactly to the closest endpoint to the cursor.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Snap Object (SO)
Use the Snap Object command when drawing or editing to locate a point exactly on an object when the
specific location on the object is not critical.
To snap exactly to an object:
1.
2.
3.
Start one of the Draw or Edit commands.
Choose the Snap Object command or type SO.
Position the cursor near the object to which you want to attach and click.
The point is set on the target object at the point closest to where the cursor was located.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Snap Midpoint (SM)
Use the Snap Midpoint command when drawing or editing to attach exactly to the midpoint of a line, or
to the midpoint along the perimeter of an arc.
To find the midpoint of an object:
1. Start one of the Draw or Edit commands.
2. Choose the Snap Midpoint command or type SM.
3. Click anywhere on the target line or arc.
The point is set at the midpoint of the target object.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Snap Intersection (SI)
Use the Snap Intersection command whenever you want to attach exactly to the intersection of two
objects.
To snap to the intersection of two objects:
1. Start one of the Draw or Edit commands.
2. Choose the Snap Intersection command or type SI.
3. Click near the point where the two target objects intersect.
The point is set at the point of intersection of the two target objects. If there are multiple points of intersection (such as a line passing through a circle), The Diagram Program finds the point of intersection nearest the mouse click.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Snap Perpendicular (SP)
Use the Snap Perpendicular command when a single or continuous line must be drawn perpendicular to
another object. You can Snap Perpendicular to lines, continuous lines, circles, arcs, rectangles, polygons,
ellipses, and curves.
To snap a line perpendicular to another object:
1. Choose the Line command and click or snap to place the first endpoint.
A rubberbanding line is displayed between the first endpoint and the cursor. You are
prompted to pick the second point.
2. Choose the Snap Perpendicular command or type SP.
3. Click the target object to set the second point.
The line is placed so it is perpendicular to the chosen object and it ends exactly at that
object. If the line cannot be drawn perpendicular to the target object itself, the line is
drawn perpendicular to a calculated extension of the object.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Snap Tangent (ST)
Use the Snap Tangent command primarily when a line must be drawn tangent to another object. Objects
to which you can snap tangent include circles, arcs, ellipses, and curves.
To snap a line tangent to an object:
1. Start the Line command and click or snap to place the first endpoint.
You are prompted to pick the second endpoint.
2. Choose the Snap Tangent command or type ST.
3. Click the target object, near the side where you want to find the tangent.
The line is drawn tangent to the object and so it ends exactly at that object. If the line
cannot be drawn tangent to the target object itself, the line is drawn tangent to an imaginary extension of the object.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Angle Draw Commands
Angle Draw On/Off (Ortho Mode, OR)
Much of your work in The Diagram Program consists of drawing or editing in exactly horizontal or
vertical directions. To make this easier you can turn on “Angle Draw” which constrains the cursor to
only move in those directions. You can also set the drawing angle if you want to draw at some angles
other than horizontal and vertical. (Ortho is an abbreviation for orthogonal, meaning at right angles or
perpendicular.)
Choose the Angle Draw On/Off command from the Snaps menu to turn it on. A checkmark precedes the
command on the menu when it is turned on. You can turn Angle Draw on before or in the midst of
another drawing or editing command.
Tip:
If you need to enter only a few points orthogonally, you can press the Ctrl key while drawing to temporarily turn Angle Draw mode on. (If you’re already in Angle Draw mode, holding the Ctrl key takes you
temporarily out of Angle Draw).
Although the default orientation of the Angle Draw axes is 0 and 90 , these axes can be rotated to any
angle you choose. This allows you to draw or edit by placing points that are in 90 alignment to one
another but not on the horizontal and vertical axes. When you choose the Angle command, The Diagram
Program displays the Angle Draw Settings Bar, where you can specify the angle of constraint. Entry
points are then constrained to the angle you specify, and to 90 increments from that angle.
Tip:
Most context-sensitive menus that appear when you click the right mouse button will include the Ortho
Angle command (the Angle Draw Angle).
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Set Angle (Ortho Angle, OA)
Use the Angle command to set the Angle Draw (Ortho) angle.
To set the Angle Draw Angle:
1. Choose the Angle command.
2. Type the desired angle in the text box on the Settings Bar.
The Angle Draw angle is set to the specified angle. When you start one of the Draw or
Edit commands the cursor will then be constrained to move at only those angles.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Cursor Free (CF)
The Cursor Free command is used along with Angle Draw mode when you want to set a point on the
orthogonal axis, but snap it to some object that is off the axis. When Cursor Free is toggled on, you can
position the cursor over or snap to any target point in the drawing, and a point is set on the orthogonal
axis. When Cursor Free is toggled off, the cursor remains attached to the rubberbanding line on the
Angle Draw axis.
To toggle the Cursor Free command on or off:
Choose the Cursor Free command.
The Diagram Program toggles the Cursor Free mode on or off.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Angle Trap On/Off (OT)
The Angle Locking Draw feature simplifies drawing lines by automatically straightening the line you
are drawing when you come within five degrees of horizontal or vertical.
For instance, when you select the line command you click once on the drawing screen to place the first
point of the line. At this point you can move the cursor in any direction. Notice that anytime your cursor
moves within 5 degrees of horizontal or vertical, it will automatically straighten out. When your line is
at the desired angle, click the left-mouse button a second time to finishing placing it.
Angle Trap On / Off is a toggle; click the command once to turn it on, again to turn it off.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Grid Commands
The Diagram Program features an optional ‘’snap grid’’ or network of imaginary points that can be a
helpful reference when drawing. When the grid is on, the screen is covered with small red dots which
provide a guide for setting points and placing symbols. Since the grid points are imaginary, they will not
appear on the drawing when it is printed out.
The grid is called a snap grid because when it is turned on you can only move the cursor exactly from
one grid point to another. In other words, whenever you try to draw an object (like a line, circle, or
rectangle) or place a symbol, the cursor ‘’snaps’’ exactly to the grid points. This is very useful if you
want to place several symbols so they are exactly 10' apart; you simply set up a 10' snap grid and place
the symbols on the grid points.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Grid Display (GR)
The Grid Display command is used to turn the visible display of the grid on or off. As you zoom the
display in or out the grid display is adjusted to show either more or fewer grid points.
To toggle the grid display:
Choose the Grid Display command.
The grid display status is reversed (if it was previously hidden, the grid is now displayed and so on).
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Snap Grid (SG)
When Snap Grid is on, the cursor can move only from one grid point to another (The grid need not be
visible for Snap Grid to be in effect. See Grid Display). This constraint is toggled on or off with the
Snap Grid command.
To constrain cursor movement to grid points:
Choose the Snap Grid command.
Cursor movement will be constrained to only move between the grid points (see exception below), even if Grid Display is toggled off.
Note
Some commands conflict with Snap Grid, and are resolved as follows:
· Manual coordinate entry of coordinates (such as Direction-Distance entry) overrides the Snap Grid.
Points placed manually will be located as entered, regardless of the status of the Snap Grid toggle.
· Other snaps override Snap Grid.
· Orthogonally-constrained operations (Angle Draw commands) maintain the orthogonal constraint even
if Snap Grid is on. If cursor free is off, then the cursor will stay on the orthogonal axis (rather than on
grid points) but will “jump” to positions that are as close as possible to the nearest grid points. If cursor
free is on, then the cursor will move from one grid point to another, while the end of the
orthogonally-constrained rubber band line “shadows” it.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Grid Size (GS)
Use the Grid Size command to set the spacing of grid points to any convenient spacing in the X (horizontal) and Y (vertical) directions.
To set the grid size:
1. Choose the Grid Size command.
A Settings Bar will appear with the current settings for the X and Y grid spacing displayed.
2. Edit the X and Y grid spacing as desired. When finished, click OK.
The new grid spacing will be set as specified, with the new grid originating about the drawing origin (by
default) or the most-recently specified grid origin point.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Grid Origin (GO)
Use the Grid Origin command to move the display/snap grid so that a specified point of the drawing
falls exactly on a grid point (The grid does not actually have an origin, as such. This command simply
aligns the grid with any point you choose). By properly aligning and sizing the grid, and turning Snap
Grid on, you can quickly and accurately place objects at multiples of base X and Y offsets from a specified point. With this command, for example, you could quickly place sprinkler head symbols in a fire
protection design or place trees or shrubs in a site drawing.
To align the grid with a specified point:
1. Choose the Grid Origin command.
2. Click or snap to place a point where you want a grid point to be located.
The Diagram Program will move the grid so that a grid point is located precisely at the specified point.
Even if you were to change the grid size, a grid point will be located on this point until you turn off the
grid or reissue the Grid Origin command.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Text & Dimension Menu
Text (TL)
You can use the Text command to create any text for notes and labels in your drawings.
To place text with the Text command:
1. Choose the Text command.
2. Click in the text box at the upper-left corner of the screen on the Settings Bar.
3. Type in the desired text.
4. Change any of the text options on the Settings Bar for font, size, justification, bold,
italics and so on.
When you move the cursor down into the drawing window a bounding box appears which expands as
you change the text in the text box. This box shows the currently selected size and rotation for the text.
You can change the text properties at any time before you place the final point and the bounding box is
updated to reflect the changes. Any settings you choose will apply to the whole line of text.
5. Click or snap a point to anchor the lower-left corner of the text.
6. Move the cursor and notice that you can rotate the text around the anchor point.
7. When the text has the desired rotation angle, click or snap to finish placing it. To
place the text horizontally you can simply press the Enter key for the final point.
Once text is placed in the drawing use the Edit command to change it. Select the desired text and select
Edit Properties from the Modify pull-down menu, or select the Text button from the left-hand toolbox
and then select Edit.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Text (TL) cont...
Tip:
To place the text at some exact angle, either type in the angle on the Text Settings Bar (0 is horizontal to
the right and angles increase going counterclockwise) or use the Angle Draw Buttons to select a specific
angle.
Tip:
To create multiple lines of text, click the Paragraph button on the Settings Bar.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Quick Label (QL)
You can use the Quick Label command to create any text for notes and labels in your drawings.
To place text with the Quick Label command:
1. Choose the Quick Label command.
2. Click in the Enter Text field in the upper portion of the text toolbox.
Larger and
Smaller Buttons
3. Type in the desired text.
4. If necessary, adjust the size of the text by clicking on the “larger” or “smaller” text
buttons.
When you move the cursor down into the drawing window a bounding box appears which expands as
you change the text in the text box. This box shows the currently selected size and rotation for the text.
5. Click or snap a point to anchor the lower-left corner of the text.
6. Move the cursor and notice that you can rotate the text around the anchor point.
7. When the text has the desired rotation angle, click or snap to finish placing it. To
place the text horizontally you can simply press the Enter key for the final point.
Checkmarking the “Repeat” option on the toolbox allows you to keep placing the same text or leader
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Quick Label (QL) cont..
over and over again in the diagram.
To edit text once it is placed in the drawing simply select the desired text by clicking on it and re-select
the Text button from the left-hand toolbox. The text toolbox appears with the selected text in the Text
field. Make any changes to the text and the OK button to place the new text back in the diagram.
The Text toolbox contains many predefined text labels but you can also add and remove your own
labels.
To add a label to the text toolbox:
1. Type the desired label in the Enter Text field.
2. Click the Add Label button.
3. When prompted to add the label, click the yes button.
The label now appears in the predefined label list.
To remove a predefined label:
1. Select the label to be removed from the label list.
2. Click the Remove Label button.
3. When prompted to remove the label, click the Yes button.
The label is now removed from the label list.
You may also place a Leader using the Quick Label feature by checkmarking the “Show Arrow” option.
Leaders (or “call-outs”) are notes that identify or call attention to objects or areas in the drawing. An
arrowhead-tipped line connects the object to a block of text.
To place a leader:
1. Checkmark the Show Arrow option on the Templates toolbox.
2. Type the leader text in the EnterText field.
3. Change the Text height on the dialog box, if desired.
4. Move the cursor and notice a ghost image of the leader attached to the cursor.
5. Click or snap to set the tip of the arrowhead.
6. Click to set the second endpoint of the leader.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Quick Label (QL) cont..
The leader text will appear next to the leader shoulder. As you move the cursor to the left or right, the
leader text will “flip” to the opposite side of the shoulder. Remember that the final segment or “shoulder” will be drawn automatically to connect the leader lines to the text block.
7. When the text is placed where desired, click to place the leader text.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Text Settings (TBT)
Use the Text Settings dialog box to change these settings for text you wish to place in the drawing.
Text Font - choose from a list of the available Windows fonts on your computer to use.
Use Text Layer - if this is checked then any text placed will be placed on the specified Text
Layer. If this is not checked, new text is placed on the current layer.
Text Layer - use the pull down arrow to select the layer to use for text.
Text Color - select the color to use for new text.
Text Height - enter the height of the text.
Text Rotation - enter the rotation of the text; 0 is horizontal to the right and angles increase
going counterclockwise.
Bold, Italics, or Underline - use these buttons to select one or more options for the text.
Text Justification - Select left, center, or right justification.
Note, these settings do not affect any existing text only new text being placed. To change existing text
you must use the Edit command on the Text left-hand toolbox or on the Modify pull-down menu.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Special Text
Use the Special Text command to place textual information for an exposure, insured area, gravity tank, and
stack text.
For example, use the Exposure text to place information on an exposure in your diagram. When you select this
command you are prompted to enter four pieces of information:
The Occupancy Name or description of the exposure.
The year the exposure was built.
The type of construction used for the exposure.
The overall dimensions of the exposure.
The sprinkler system present - fully sprinklered, partially sprinklered, or no sprinklers.
To create an exposure, follow these steps:
1. Draw a box or use lines to draw the outline of the exposure.
2. Select Special Text from the Text/Dimension pull-down menu.
3. Select the Exposure Text Command.
4. Type in the name of the occupancy or building for the exposure.
5. Type in the year the exposure was built.
6. Type in the type of construction used for the exposure.
7. Select the type of sprinkler system in the exposure by clicking the appropriate radio button:
Fully Sprinklered
Partially Sprinklered
Non-Sprinklered
8. Click the OK button to close the Exposure Text dialog box.
9. Move the cursor to position the text inside the exposure and click to place it.
The Insured, Gravity Tank, and Stack Text are placed using the same method listed above. Only the information
contained in the individual toolboxes are different
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Special Text
Insured Text
Use the Insured’s Text command to place textual information in a building, such as that commonly used for
insurance purposes. When you select this command you are prompted to enter four pieces of information:
The building name.
The description of the building occupancy.
The year building was built.
The type of construction used for the insured building.
The dimensions of the building.
The sprinkler system present - fully sprinklered, partially sprinklered, or no sprinklers.
Gravity Text
Use the Gravity Tank Text command to place textual information beside a gravity tank. When you select this
command you are prompted to enter three pieces of information:
The capacity of the tank.
The height of the bottom of the tank.
The distance that the tank is above the top line of the sprinkler in the building.
Stack Text
Use the Stack Text command to place textual information beside a stack. When you select this command you
are prompted to enter three pieces of information:
The height of the stack.
The stack construction.
The type of stack.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Bubble Text (B4)
The Diagram Program gives you the option to place Bubble Text “markers” to draw attention to witness,
sample, photo, evidence, and other items located in your diagram
The Bubble Text command is found in the Text bin or the Text/Dimension pull-down menu. Once opened, you
can choose Witness, Evidence, Photo, Sample, or a generic Bubble marker to place in your diagram.
Clicking a marker icon causes it to be displayed in the preview window, whereupon the bubble text can be
edited. The Witness, Evidence, Photo, and Sample labels are edited by clicking the “Up and Down” scroll
arrows to change the label numbers. The all-purpose bubble text is changed using the standard Windows
method of editing text; by clicking inside the text field, and re-typing over the existing text.
Clicking on the “Larger and Smaller” text icons changes the text height if desired, and the color of the bubble
may be changed using the Color Palette button. You are also given the option bold the text and to “Show
Arrows” attached to the Bubble Text (to point at a specific object or point in the diagram.)
To place Bubble Text
1. Select the Bubble Text command from the Text bin on
the left-hand toolbox.
2. When the Bubble Text toolbox appears, click on the
Photo Location marker.
Text Label Numbers - Click the Up and Down arrows to
change the Label Numbers.
The Photo marker appears in the preview window.
3. Click on the arrow buttons to enter the number 12 for
the photograph number and 1 for the roll number (or click
in the text field and type in the numbers.)
4. Move your mouse pointer into the Drawing Screen and
click the left-mouse button once to place the first point of
the bubble text arrow leader.
5. Move your mouse pointer to position the bubble text to
the desired location in the diagram and click the left-mouse
button to finish placing the text bubble.
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Text Height - adjust the size of the text
by clicking the larger or smaller icons.
Chapter 3. - Program Features
Leader (Arrow with Text) (LE)
Leaders (or “call-outs”) are notes that identify or call attention to objects or areas in the drawing. An
arrowhead-tipped line connects the object to a block of text.
To place a leader:
1. Choose the Leader command.
2. Type the leader text in the Settings Bar at the top of the screen.
As you type leader text, a bounding box appears next to the leader shoulder in the
drawing. This box indicates the position of the leader text, although you will later be
able to shift it to either side of the leader shoulder.
3. Modify any of the Leader settings on the settings bar, such as text height, color,
arrow type, and whether to use bold, italics, or underline text.
4. Move the cursor and notice a ghost image of the leader attached to the cursor.
5. Click or snap to set the tip of the arrowhead.
6. Click to set the second endpoint of the leader.
The leader text will appear next to the leader shoulder. As you move the cursor to the
left or right, the leader text will “flip” to the opposite side of the shoulder. Remember
that the final segment or “shoulder” will be drawn automatically to connect the leader
lines to the text block.
6. When the text is placed where desired, click to place the leader text.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Leader cont...
You can also change these settings for leaders from the Settings command on the Utilities menu:
Leader Text Font
Leader Text Height
Leader Text Bold, Italics, or Underline
Leader Text Color
Arrowhead Type
Arrowhead Angle
Tip:
The Leader arrowhead is sized to match the text height. Selecting a larger text height will create a
proportionally larger arrowhead.
Tip:
If you don’t like where the leader is placed you can change its location before you click the final point.
Just press the Esc key on the keyboard to back up one point so you can place it differently.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Leader Settings (TBL)
Text Settings options
• Height - Specifies the size (height) of leader text characters in the current drawing unit. The height of
the text is measured in real-world scale.
• Bold - Specifies bold type when checked. This option applies only to True Type text.
• Italic - Specifies italic type when checked. This option applies only to True Type text.
• Underline - Specifies underlined type when checked. This option applies only to True Type text.
Arrow Settings options
These options determine the type and angle of arrowheads that will terminate the end of each leader.
• Arrow list box - Lists the types of arrowhead to place at the end of the leader.
• Angle - Adjusts the shape of the arrowhead or the angle of the slash.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Dimension Linear (DL)
Use the Dimension Linear command to measure a distance and display it in the drawing. Typically,
linear dimensions are used to show the length of an object like a wall, but they can also show the distance between objects, or any other distance. Once placed, a linear dimension is “associative.” If the
dimensioned items are moved, stretched or re-scaled, the associated dimension is updated automatically.
To place a linear dimension:
1. Choose the Dimension Linear command.
2. The dimension settings are displayed on the Settings bar; make any changes you
wish, then proceed with the dimensioning operation. You can change the following:
Text Height
Dimension Color
Arrowhead type
Dimension direction - horizontal, vertical, or aligned
Text Content
All dimension settings can also be changed from the Settings dialog box, accessed
through the Utilities menu.
3. Place the starting point for the dimension. The first point should be placed precisely
with one of the Snap commands, since it will be the basis for the measurement.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Dimension Linear cont..
4. Snap to select the ending point for the dimension.
As you move the cursor, a dynamic preview of the dimension now appears, constrained
to move perpendicular to the dimension direction. You can place the dimension on
either side of the line you are measuring. If you don’t like the dimension settings (such
as the size of the text) you can dynamically change them on the Settings Bar. Move the
cursor back down into the drawing window to see the changes take effect on the dimension.
Tip:
You can overwrite the text of the dimension at this time by clicking in the Overwrite box (make sure it is
checked, then enter the new text in the box to the right of Overwrite. This text will be placed in the
dimension instead of the actual measurement between the two points.
5. Drag the dimension line to the desired location away from the dimensioned object,
and place a point to set the dimension line and complete the dimension.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Dimension Linear cont..
Tip:
The direction in which dimensions are measured is either horizontal, vertical, or aligned. If the line is at
some other angle, a horizontal or vertical dimension measures the line’s projection in that direction,
rather than the true length of the line. For example, if a line is exactly horizontal its vertical dimension is
0. To measure a line at some other angle use the aligned direction which measures the true distance
between the measuring points, or the true length of a line.
Tip:
You can change the “precision” of the dimension (the number of digits displayed to the right of the
decimal point) from the Settings command on the Utilities menu. Choose Settings and then click the
Numeric tab on the dialog box. Here you can adjust the number of decimal places displayed and the way
fractions are displayed.
Tip:
If you need to place several dimensions in your drawing, you can press the Space bar on your keyboard
to repeat the command.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Quick Dimension (QD)
Use the Dimension command to measure a distance and display it in the drawing. Often, linear dimensions are used to show the length of an object, like a wall. They can also show the distance between
objects, or any other distance.
To place a linear dimension:
1. Choose the Dimension Linear command.
2. The dimension settings are displayed on the Dimension Toolbox; make any changes
you wish, such as text height, then proceed with the dimensioning operation.
3. Place the starting point for the dimension. The first point should be placed precisely
with one of the Snap commands, since it will be the basis for the measurement.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Quick Dimension cont..
4. Snap to select the ending point for the dimension.
As you move the cursor, a dynamic preview of the dimension now appears, constrained
to move perpendicular to the dimension direction. You can place the dimension on
either side of the line you are measuring. If you don’t like the dimension settings (such
as the size of the text) you can dynamically change them on the dialog box. Move the
cursor back down into the drawing window to see the changes take effect on the dimension.
Tip:
You can overwrite the text of the dimension by clicking in the dimension text field and entering a new
value. This text will be placed in the dimension instead of the actual measurement between the two
points.
5. Drag the dimension line to the desired location away from the dimensioned object
and place a point to set the dimension line and complete the dimension.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Quick Dimension cont..
Also available on the Dimension dialog box is are the “Move Text” and “Slide Text” features. These
features are only available as an editing feature to be used on Dimension text that has already been
placed in the diagram.
To use either Move Text or Slide Text
1. Click on the existing dimension text that you wish to edit.
2. Select the Edit feature from the Speedbar or Draw/Edit menu.
3. When the Dimension Text dialog box appears on the screen, click either the Move
Text or Slide Text button depending on which command you wish to use.
The Move Text option allows you to move the text away from the dimension legend line.
The Slide Text option allows you to slide the text along the dimension legend line.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Dimension Angular
Use the Angular Dimension command to measure and display any angle in your drawing by first identifying a vertex and then a point on each ray of the lines being measured. For every angle, you have a
choice of dimensioning either the inside or the outside measurement.
Once placed, angular dimensions are “associative.” This means if the objects that make up the dimensioned angle change, the associated angular dimension will be updated automatically.
To place an angular dimension:
1. Choose the Dimension Angular command.
If you are dimensioning the angle spanned by an arc, just click on the arc and The Diagram Program will find the endpoints and determine the angle. If this is the case, you
can skip to step 5. If you are dimensioning an angle between two lines, continue with
identifying the vertex and rays of the angle:
2. Snap to the vertex of the angle (the corner between the two lines.
3. Snap to a second point to identify the first ray of the angle (either use Snap Endpoint
or Snap Object to snap exactly to the line).
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Dimension Angular cont..
4. Snap to a third point to identify the second ray of the angle (either use Snap Endpoint or Snap Object to snap exactly to the line).
5. Move the mouse from one side of the vertex to the other and notice a dynamic preview of the angular dimension.
6. Drag the preview dimension to the desired location and click to place a point to position the dimension.
Just as with linear dimensions, you can adjust how angular dimensions look by changing the options on
the Settings Bar. For example, you can use the Settings Bar to adjust text height, dimension color,
arrowhead type, dimension direction (horizontal, vertical, or aligned), and text content.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Dimension Radius (DR)
Use the Dimension Radial command to measure the radius of a circle or arc. Once placed, a radial
dimension is “associative;” if the dimensioned items are stretched or re-scaled, the associated dimension
will be updated automatically.
To place a radial dimension:
1. Choose the Dimension Radial command.
2. Click on the circle or arc you wish to dimension.
A preview of your dimension appears along a path which passes through the object’s
center-point and your cursor. As you move the mouse, the dimension line rotates to
stay aligned with the cursor. The dimension arrow points outward toward the circle
perimeter when the cursor is inside the circle, and inward toward the circle when the
cursor is outside the circle.
3. Move the mouse to place the dimension in the desired position, then click to complete the radial dimension.
You can hold down the CTRL key while you click the final point to place the dimension
so the text is exactly horizontal or vertical.
Tip
Just as with linear dimensions, you can adjust how radial dimensions look by changing the options on
the Settings Bar. For example, you can use the Settings Bar to adjust text height, dimension color,
arrowhead type, dimension direction (horizontal, vertical, or aligned), and text content.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Dimension Settings (TBD)
Use the Dimension Settings dialog box to change these settings for dimensions you wish to place in the
drawing.
Text Font - choose from a list of the available Windows fonts on your computer to use for the
dimensions.
Text Height - enter the height of the text.
Dim Layer check box- if this is checked, any dimensions placed will be placed on the specified
Dimension Layer. If this is not checked, new dimensions are placed on the current layer.
Dim Layer - use the pull down arrow to select the layer to use for dimensions.
Text Only - check use this option to show only the text of dimensions without lines or arrowheads.
Arrows - select the desired arrowhead type from this pull-down list
Angle - enter the angle of the arrowhead.
Color - select the color to use for new dimensions.
Text Alignment - enter the alignment of the text, either horizontal, aligned with the dimension
line, in line (inside the dimension line), or above line (above the dimension line).
Centered - check this option to center text along the dimension line, otherwise you click an
additional point to show where the text is to be placed.
Dimension Direction - either horizontal, vertical, or aligned with the objects being dimensioned.
Text Justification - Select left, center, or right justification.
Note, these settings do not affect any existing dimensions only new dimensions being placed. To change
existing dimensions use the Edit Properties command on the Modify menu.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Measure Distance and Angles (MD)
Use this command to measure the distance and angle between points, and report the result in a text box.
You can continue to click or snap to points and obtain a cumulative distance from the original point. To
measure the distance between two points:
1. Select Measure Distance & Angles.
2. Click or snap to place a point where you want the distance to be measured from.
3. Click or snap to place the next point and measure the distance from the first point.
The distance is displayed in the Segment Distance box on the Settings Bar, and a new
rubberband line will stretch between the last point placed and the cursor.
4. You may keep placing points to measure additional distances.
The distance between the last two points placed is displayed as the “segment distance,” as well as the cumulative length of all distances measured in the current Measure operation (total distance). The distance is displayed in the current numeric format
and units.
5. When finished measuring distances click OK on the Settings Bar or press the Enter
key.
To measure the angle between two points:
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Measure Distance and Angles cont..
1. Select Measure Distance & Angles.
2. Select two points to define the angle.
3. The angle is displayed on the Settings Bar.
The angle is measured in a counterclockwise direction from the first point selected to
the second.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Measure Area (MA)
Measures the area enclosed by a series of points you select or the area of a selected object that is a
completely enclosed object.
To measure an area defined by a series of points
1. Select the Measure Area command.
A Settings Bar appears that displays the area as it is being defined.
2. Enclose the area to be measured by snapping to select a series of consecutive
points.
The Diagram Program connects the last point placed to the first point to create a closed
shape, calculates the area, and displays the result on the Settings Bar.
3. When finished, click OK on the Settings Bar to complete the command.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Measure Area cont..
Before finishing the command you can easily place text in the diagram to label the measured area, just
click the Place Area Text button on the Settings Bar. Move the cursor back into the drawing window and
notice a rectangle attached to the cursor that represents the text. Click to position the text and press Enter
to place it horizontally, or click a second point to place the text at the angle between the two points. The
size and other properties of the text are determined by the current Text Settings (select Text Settings
from the Text & Dimensions menu or the Utilities menu).
To measure the area of an enclosed object:
1. Select the closed object whose total area is to be measured before you select the
Measure Area command.
Any closed objects may be selected; however, they must be truly closed. With each
endpoint connected by snap commands.
2. Select Measure Area.
The Settings Bar appears with the total area displayed. You can choose to place the
area text in the diagram or click OK to complete the command.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Utilities Menu
Settings (Systems Tab (TBS)
These options control the amount of visual feedback you receive on screen as you draw or edit. Turning
these functions off can reduce the time required to edit large selection sets, since highlighting or dragging large groups of objects can take a considerable amount of time.
General Options
• Search Tolerance - Sets the maximum distance in on-screen inches (meters), the cursor may be from
an object for The Diagram Program to snap to it or select it. This also sets the tolerance used for Auto
Snap mode; if Auto Snaps is turned on, the program searches for the closest endpoint or object that is
within the Search Tolerance distance.
• Cursor Size - Specifies, in on-screen inches (meters), the size of the cursor’s horizontal and vertical
crosshairs. For example, a value of 1.0 sets the cursor size to 1 inch. To specify a full-screen cursor,
type 0.
• Auto Backup - If Backup is checked, The Diagram Program will automatically save your work with
the existing file name. When checked, all named drawings, in all document windows will be saved at
the specified interval. Only drawings that are named and have changed (i.e., entities added, deleted,
moved, etc.) will be automatically saved. Named drawings to which no changes have been made will
not be saved. If you have not yet assigned a name to the drawing, Auto Backup will perform a “Save
As” and prompt you to enter a file name.
• Min - Specifies the interval, in minutes, at which drawings will be automatically saved. The Diagram
Program will not save at the specified interval if a dialog box, such as the Text Editor or Assign Script,
is open or a tool is active. Once the dialog is closed or the operation completed the file is saved.
• Use File Locking - When checked, subsequently opened drawings cannot be modified by another
Diagram Program user on your network until the drawing is saved or closed. Other users can only
open, view, and copy the drawing.
• Right Button = Snap End Point - Programs the right-mouse button to perform a Snap End Point
(closest point) instead of bringing up the context sensitive menu. This is especially useful for compatibility with previous versions of The Diagram Program.
• Show opening Screen - Specifies whether the Learning Center splash screen is loaded upon opening.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Settings (Systems Tab (TBS)
Display Colors Options
These options let you change the color of the drawing background, cursor, selected objects, and the
rubberband line. Clicking on any item displays a drop-down list of available colors.
Note:
Choosing a background color changes only how the drawing appears on the screen. Because The Diagram Program does not print or plot the background, the background color does not affect printed output.
Display options
These options let you determine how or whether certain items are displayed on the screen as well as in a
print or plot of the drawing. Turning off the display of some of these items can reduce the visual clutter
in the drawing and increase the speed of redraws.
• Construction Points - Specifies if geometric construction handle points are displayed and printed or
plotted.
• Symbol Handles - Specifies if symbol handle points are displayed.
• Selection Handles - Specifies if selection handle points are displayed when an object or objects are
selected.
• Scrollbars - Specifies if the scrollbars are to be displayed on the screen or not.
• Points - Specifies if drawing points are to be displayed on the screen or not.
Hatch/Fill Settings Tab - The options on this tab of the Settings dialog box are the same as described
on the Draw Menu under Hatch/Fill Settings.
Text Settings Tab - The options on this tab of the Settings dialog box are the same as described on the
Text & Dimensions Menu under Text Settings
Leader Settings Tab - The options on this tab of the Settings dialog box are the same as described for
the Leader command on the Text & Dimensions Menu.
Dimension Settings Tab - The options on this tab of the Settings dialog box are the same as described
on the Text & Dimensions Menu under Dimension Settings
Numeric Settings Tab - Use these options to select the numeric settings for dimensions, numeric entry,
and display.
Tip:
If you prefer to use Metric units for drawing and dimensions select the following Numeric Settings:
Dimension Unit - Select the desired Metric unit, millimeters, centimeters, meters, or kilometers.
Entry & Display Unit - Select the desired Metric unit, millimeters, centimeters, meters, or kilometers.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Import/Export Tab cont...
DWG Settings Tab
This tab allows you to set the base measurement units that the drawing will imported as. You can also
choose whether color numbers are to be preserved in the translations (this option may be more important
for users of pen plotters, even though this may cause object colors to change), or if the colors numbers
should be changed so that the on-screen colors are preserved during the translation (this option should be
selected if it is more important for the drawing to look the same after translation).
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Match Entity (ME)
Use Match Entity to quickly set all current properties to match those of an existing object in the drawing.
This command matches line color, line type, line width, layer, angle, length, and/or all other appropriate
properties of the target object.
To match the properties of an existing object:
1. Select the Utilities menu and then select Match Entity.
2. Click an object whose properties you wish to match.
All property settings appropriate to that object type are matched to that object. Any new object you
draw will then have those settings.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Object Info (OI)
The Object Information dialog box displays entity-specific information about the entity or entities
currently selected. Basic information, such as coordinate data and layer are displayed, as well as information unique to each type of entity. For example, the information for a circle would include not only
coordinate data, layer, line type, and line width, but radius and diameter as well. The information for text
would include its reference point, font, and font height, among others.
Object information displays the following basic information for all selected entities (with the exception
of text and dimensions):
Entity Number
Entity Type
Layer
Color
Line Type
Line Width
If no entities are selected, Object Information displays information about the current drawing window.
This information includes: the total number of entities in the drawing, valid entities in the drawing, and
the drawing extent. The total number of entities in the drawing includes both current valid entities as
well as entities maintained in memory as the undo list. For example, if a box is drawn and then undone
(OO), the total number of entities in the drawing is one although the number of valid entities is zero.
Saving the drawing to disk or the Pack Data command will clear the undo list.
To display Object Information for currently selected entities:
1. Select the entities about which you want to see information.
2. Click the Utilities menu, click Tools, and then click Object Information.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Object Info cont...
The Object Information dialog box appears containing the pertinent information.
3. Click Close or press the Esc key to close the dialog box.
Information from the Object Information dialog box can be copied onto the clipboard for
use in other Windows programs.
To copy Object Information onto the clipboard:
1. Select the text you want.
2. Type Ctrl-C to copy the information to the clipboard
3. Open the desired destination program
4. Click the Edit menu, and then click Paste.
Tip:
You cannot edit or modify any of the object’s information from this command. To modify object information use the Edit Properties on the Modify menu, or select Edit from the right side of the Speedbar.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Pack Data (PD)
Whenever you draw or modify an object, you make changes to a Diagram Program drawing file. The
Diagram Program keeps track of the changes by marking the items that have been changed, but it does
not actually remove them from the drawing file. This technique allows previous states of the drawing to
be restored with the Undo and Redo commands.
However, maintaining old copies of entities takes up memory and slows system performance. The Pack
Data command allows you to free up this memory and restore optimal performance by purging old
drawing data from the drawing file. Use this command periodically when running The Diagram Program, particularly after you have made numerous or complex changes to the drawing.
Warning: The Pack Data command removes all noncurrent drawing file entries, and is irreversible. Once
you execute this command, you will not be able to undo any actions that have been performed previously.
To use the Pack Data command:
1. Select the Utilities menu, select the Pack Data command.
A message box will appear, asking you to confirm that you want to proceed with the
Pack Data command.
2. Click Yes to confirm that you want to go through with the Pack Data command.
The drawing file will be packed. If you try to use the Undo command before performing
another command, The Diagram Program will display a prompt indicating that there is
nothing to undo.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Reset
Use this command to restore all the default environment settings that are in effect when you first install
The Diagram Program. These settings include all options found on the Settings tabs (selected from the
Utilities menu), file locations, object color, line type, line width, layer settings, default text settings like
height, font, rotation, justification, default dimension settings, and so on.
As you draw and change settings, if you find that you want to restore the program settings back to the way they were:
1) Select the Utilities menu.
2) Select the Restore command (or click the Restore button on the Speedbar).
3) When asked if you want to restore default settings, click Yes.
As you use The Diagram Program to create a drawing, any changes you make to the program settings
are automatically stored in two “environment” files when you save that drawing file:
DEFAULT.CZD and SYSSET.ENV.
Even if you close the program and load that drawing file at another time, the most recent environment is
restored, along with all the current settings. However, whenever you start a new drawing the program
default settings are reinstated.
Tip:
This is only recommended for expert users! It is possible to change the default environment settings so if
you select the Restore command your new settings are restored. To create your own default environment:
1) Open or start a drawing and make all the desired changes to the program settings.
2) Save the drawing.
3) Close The Diagram Program and open Windows Explorer or your preferred file manager program.
4) Rename these files (found in the main program folder) as follows:
Rename RESET.CZD to RESETOLD.CZD
Rename RESET.ENV to RESETOLD.ENV
Rename DEFAULT.CZD to RESET.CZD
Rename SYSSET.ENV to RESET.ENV
5) Open The Diagram Program and start a new drawing.
6) Click the Reset button or select Reset from the Utilities menu. All your saved settings
will be in effect.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Reset cont...
If you ever need to restore the “factory settings” that came with The Diagram Program, just rename the
RESETOLD.CZD and RESETOLD.ENV files back to their original names. Then open the program and
select the Reset command.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Special Menu
Easy Lines(EZL)
Refer to pages 3-78 to 3-83 for complete documentation on the Easy Lines feature.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Easy Streets (EZS)
The Easy Street toolbox allows you to convert a selected line, arc, curve, or circle into a roadway. You
select options on the toolbox to define the number of lanes, individual lane widths, and centerline types.
To draw a street or road using Easy Streets:
1. Draw a single line, arc, or curve that will be the guide, or reference object, for the
street.
2. Click on the reference object to select it.
You may draw multiple objects attached together to define the street, for example by attaching an arc or
curve to a line. Once the lanes are defined with the Easy Streets toolbox, you can quickly apply them to
each part of the street.
3. Select the Easy Streets command from the right-hand Toolbox.
4. Click in the box to “turn on” each lane. A lane that is turned on is marked with an X.
You can define a road of up to ten (10) lanes.
5. Enter a width for each individual lane.
6. Click in the Line Type column for each lane to bring up a pull down list of centerline
types. Select a centerline type for each lane.
The number of lanes and centerline types is displayed in a preview window at the top of the Easy Street
toolbox.
7. If you have not already selected the reference line in the diagram, you can do so now.
Three buttons at the bottom of the toolbox allow you to change how the lanes are applied to the reference line, whether the reference line is at the top, center, or bottom of the lanes.
8. Click on the “OK - Apply” button.
The lanes you’ve defined will appear on the screen referenced off the guideline you selected. You can
still toggle between the different reference line buttons at the bottom of the toolbox and see the effect in
the drawing. You can also change the line type and lane settings on-the-fly and see the changes reflected
in the diagram.
9. When you’re satisfied with the street click on the “FINISH” button. Note: The “Apply
Road” button changes to “FINISH” once the lanes have been applied.
From this point you can select the next line, arc, or curve and then click the Apply button to apply the
same lanes to another section of the street. Alternatively, or you can build a completely new model.
Other features available on the Easy Streets Toolbox:
Erase Guideline - The “Erase Guidelines” button is located next to the “Apply Road” button. This
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Easy Streets cont...
button is a toggle that is ON when depressed. If it is ON then the selected guideline will be erased when
you click on “FINISH.”
Reset - The first time you click the “Reset” button all of the lanes will reset themselves to 12 ft. wide.
Then second time you click “Reset” the lanes will reset back to two lanes with a dashed centerline. Note,
if you have more than two lanes but they’re all set to 12 ft., then the first time you click on “Reset” the
values will go back to two lanes with a dashed centerline.
Intersection Clean - This feature is the same as the Multi-Lane Intersection Clean command on the
Modify menu. Use it to erase the unwanted lines that run through the center of the intersection. Refer to
the help on that topic for more information.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Easy Intersection (IW)
The Easy Intersection wizard allows you to create intersection by selecting options on the Intersection
toolbox to speed up the diagraming process.
To Draw an intersection using the Easy Intersection toolbox;
1. Select Easy Intersection from the Right-hand Toolbox.
2. Build the intersection you want to place in the diagram by checkmarking the desired
road segment boxes.
3. Click the arrows to increase or decrease the number of lanes in each road segment.
4. Move the Road Length slider to the left or right to increase or decrease the length of
the road segments.
5. Click and hold on the red rotate handle to adjust the angle of a section, if needed.
6. Click on the Place Intersection button to place the intersection on the drawing screen.
At this point you can change line types of the intersections, add symbols, text, and dimensions. You can
also use the edit/modify commands to stretch different segments of the intersection or break and cut out
sections of the roads to show driveways or other openings.
Features on the Easy Intersection toolbox:
Road Segment boxes - Click on the road segments to add them to the intersection.
Lane Number Option - Click to increase or decrease the number of lanes in each road segment.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Road Length Bar - Move the slider to increase or decrease the overall road length.
Place Intersection button - Click place the completed intersection in your drawing.
Display Window - View the intersection model, and any changes you make to it in the display window
that is located on the right side of the toolbox.
Options button- brings up the following dialog box with the following options:
From the Options dialog box you can set:
Lane Width - Sets the overall width for all the lanes of the roads.
Road Length - Set the maximum length of the road segments. This number determines how big you can
make the intersection when using the Road Length slider. (Ex. By setting the maximum length to 1000
feet, picking two segments opposite of each other would create an overall intersection length of 2000
feet.
Fillet Radius - Used to round the corners of the intersection. Un-check the box next to Fillet Radius if
you want square corners (90 degrees).
Center Lane Type - Set to determine either dashed or solid center lines. If you want a different line type
(such as a double solid center line), select the line to be changed and choose one of line types from the
Quick Pick or the Line Types menus.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Easy Builder
The Easy Builder toolbox is an easy-to-use alternative to the Easy Lines toolbox for creating basic building
shapes in your diagrams. It allows you to create an intersection by simply clicking and selecting from the various
options. You may display the Easy Intersection Toolbox at any time by clicking on the button labeled Easy
Intersection on the left-hand toolbox.
Features on the Easy Intersection toolbox
1. Basic Shape Icons – Click these icons to select a basic shape and load it into the Model Window. Choose
a shape that most resembles the building you are going to be drawing. In most cases the basic shape will not be
an exact model of your building, but you may quickly edit the shape using the Wall Section Fields and Control
Handles.
2. Wall Section Fields – Use these fields to dynamically change the lengths of the wall for the labeled section
selected. The lettered fields correspond directly to the same labeled wall section displayed on the Basic Shape
Icon and in the Model Window.
For example, on the basic four-sided building model, the four sides are labeled “A, B, C, D” Clicking in the wall
section arrows for the line section labeled “A” will dynamically increase or decrease the line labeled “A” in the
model window. Likewise, the dimension of the wall segment shown in the segment field will be exactly the same
as that shown in the model window. In the case of a four-sided building, (where two opposite sides of a building
are usually the same length), the program will automatically adjust the opposing line to match the length of the
line segment you just edited.
2. Wall Section
Fields
1. Basic Shape Icons
3. Model Preview Window
4. 90° Icon
5. Mirror X & Y Icons
6. Show Dimension Icon
7. Options Button
9. Place Building Button
8. Building Length Slider Bar
Features on the Easy Builder Toolbox
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Easy Builder
You may also click inside a Wall Section field and manually enter a dimension. This is useful if you already have
the dimensions of the building recorded and you want to draw the model of the building without using the Wall
Section Arrows. When manually entering in dimensions the changes are not dynamically made to the model, you
must click the update button to apply the changes.
3. Model Window – This window displays the model of the shape that you are working on. If allows you see
the building model and manually edit wall segments by clicking and dragging on them. Also included with the
Model Window are four icons used to adjust the building model before placing it in the diagram. They are;
4. 90° Icon – Clicking this icon rotates the diagram 90° in a clockwise manner.
5. Mirror X and Mirror Y Icons – Clicking either of these icons “flips” the building model across the
horizontal or vertical axis, depending on which mirror icon is chosen.
6. Show Dimension Icon – Clicking this icon toggles the wall section between a labeled dimension, and a
green “control handle.” When in “dimension mode” the letter label and the dimension label of the line are
displayed. These labels correspond with it’s Wall Section Field.
When in “Control Handle” mode, the label is changed to a green control handle. Click and hold on these
handles to manually reposition the selected wall section. As you are dragging the wall section, the green handle
changes back to a dimension label so you can visually determine the length of the wall section as you move it.
Not that the Wall Section Field also dynamically changes to reflect the length of the wall section as you drag it.
When the wall section is at the desired dimension, release the mouse button. The dimension label returns to
display the green handle.
7. Options - The Options Toolbox allows you to customize the Easy Builder settings in the following manner;
Incremental Step – Adjusts the increments (in feet) that a line
in draw in when using the Control Handle method of resizing a
wall section.
Building Length Fields – Allows you to set the minimum,
maximum, and default building lengths for the basic model
shapes.
Place Bolded Lines – Checkmark this option to have the
building models line drawn in a bold linetype when placed in the
diagram.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
8. Building Length Slider Bar – Changes the overall size of the building model by dynamically resizing it as
you move the slider bar. The maximum and minimum sizes that can be adjusted with the Slider Bar are set in the
Options Toolbox. Click and hold on the slider bar and move your mouse up and down the scale to resize the
building model.
9. Place Building – Use this button to place the finished building model in the diagram. When clicked the Easy
Builder toolbox is closed and the building model is placed in the diagram.
To Draw an building using the Easy Builder toolbox:
1. Select Easy Builder from the Left-hand Toolbox.
2. Build the basic building shape by clicking one of the Building Shape Icons
3. Adjust the wall lengths of your building model by clicking inside the Wall Section fields and entering a new
dimension; or click on one of the wall sections “control handles” and drag it to a new position to resize it.
4. Click on the Place button to place the building model in the diagram.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Symbol Manager (MGY)
Refer to pages 3-106 to 3-109 for complete documentation on Symbol Manager.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Templates
The “Load a Template” toolbox allows you to preview and select pre-drawn templates roads and intersections.
The pre-drawn templates that are included with the Diagram Program are all stored in sub-folders under the
main Templates folder. You may also display the Templates Toolbox at any time by clicking on the button
labeled Templates on the left-hand toolbox.
To place a template in your drawing simply select it from the appropriate folder in the templates toolbox (by
clicking on its name) and clicking Open Template. Then place the template in the diagram by clicking or snapping to a specific point in your drawing.
1. Select the Template button from the right hand toolbox to open the “Load a Template”
toolbox.
2. Select the desired Template folder from the Template toolbox clicking on the folder name in
the upper portion of the templates toolbox.
3. Click on any template name and notice a preview of the symbol appears in the upper-right
of the toolbox.
4. Click the Open Template button and move the cursor back into the drawing window. Notice
an outline of the template attached to the cursor.
5. Click the left-mouse button ( or snap to an existing point ) to place the template in the drawing window.
Current Folder - Shows
the currently selected folder.
Any templates shown in the
list below are located in this
folder
Template Preview Shows all the templates
available in the selected
folder. If no templates are
displayed in this list you
must double-click on one
of the sub-folders shown
above.
Create Folder - Allows you to create a
new folder that you name. All new
folders are created under the Templates
directory.
The Template Toolbox
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Mirror Vertically or
Horizontally - If these buttons
are pressed all templates will be
mirrored about either a vertical
line or a horizontal line when
they are placed.
Preview Window - Shows what
the selected template looks like.
This view is updated if you
change the symbol’s rotation or
mirroring.
Save Template - Allows you to create
your own custom template and add it
to the currently selected template
folder.
Chapter 3. - Program Features
Templates
To create a new folder in the Templates directory:
1. Click the Create Folder button on the Template toolbox.
2. A “Create Folder” Dialog box will appear prompting you to enter a name for the folder.
3. Click in the blank field, type the desired name of the folder, and click the OK button.
4. The new folder is saved under the Templates directory.
To create and save a new Template:
1. In the Template toolbox navigate to the desired folder where you want the custom template
to be saved.
1. Click the Save Template button on the Template toolbox.
2. A “Save Template” dialog box will appear prompting you to save the new template in the
currently selected folder. If this folder is not correct, click the Cancel button and repeat Step
One.
3. Click in the “Enter Template Name” field and type the desire name of the custom template.
4. Click the OK button to save the new template in the selected template folder.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Bodies Toolbox
Use this toolbox to place a body in a drawing by selecting a gender, height, build type, and view.
Figure of toolbox
• Flip button - use this button to create a mirror image of the body when using a side view, walking, or
sitting body.
• Preview window - this window shows a preview of the body according to the current selected options.
• Gender - Click on a button to select a male or female body.
• Length (height) - Enter the height of the body in feet and inches or the metric equivalent.
• Build - Choose from one of the four available body builds: slight, medium, heavy or skeleton.
• View - Choose from one of the four available body views: front, side, walking, or sitting.
• Place Body button - Click this button when you have set all the options and are ready to place the
body in the diagram.
To place a body:
1) Choose the Utilities menu, then choose the Bodies command or select Bodies from
the right-hand toolbox.
2) Make the desired selections from the toolbox, then click the Place Body button.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Bodies Toolbox cont..
3) Click in the drawing to place the feet of the body. You should see a ghost image of
the body attached to the cursor at the feet (assuming you are zoomed in enough).
4) Move the cursor slowly and notice the body rotate about the anchor point (the feet).
5) When the body has the desired rotation, click the mouse again.
Once placed in a drawing you can select any of the body parts and rotate them to show
exactly how the body was found.
Tip:
When selecting multiple body parts to rotate, you may want to turn on the display of symbol handles.
Choose the Utilities menu, then choose Settings. On the System tab, click in the box beside Symbol
Handles and make sure it is checked. This causes an asterisk to be displayed at the “handle” of each
body part, just click on the handle to select that part. Hold down the shift key on the keyboard and click
on the symbol handle of another body part to also select it.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Line Types (LT)
Line Types (or line styles) are found on the Right-hand Toolbox. In this bin you’ll find custom line types
to help improve your productivity. Once a line type is selected any new entity drawn will be drawn with
that line type until another Line Type is selected. There are line types that are simply patterns such as
dashes and dots, or more complex line types like railroad tracks, fences, footprints, guard rails, and so
on.
These line types work with any of the Draw commands such as Continuous Line, Arc, Curve, Circle,
Rectangle, and Polygons. Since Line Types are actual line entities they can broken, moved, and modified just like any other object drawn in the program.
To draw a line using a different Line Type:
1. Select Line Types from the right-hand toolbox.
2. Select the desired Line Type from the Line Type toolbox.
3. Draw any object on the screen using any of the Draw Commands.
4. The object will be drawn with the selected Line Type.
To change the Line Type of an existing object:
1. Select Line Types from the right-hand toolbox.
2. Click to select the object whose line type you want to change.
3. Select the desired Line Type from the Line Type toolbox.
4. The selected objects are changed to have the selected Line Type.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Forms
Several forms are available on Forms Toolbox which can be automatically placed around your diagrams.
The Crime and Crash Zone includes:
Two Custom forms (that can be used specifically for your department)
One Diagram and Physical Evidence sheet.
The Fire Zone includes the following forms:
Two different Pre-fire Forms
One Cover Sheet
One Elevator Panel Form.
One Post-Incident Form
Four Custom Forms (that can be used specifically for your department)
Two Custom Planning Forms
Three Airforce Forms
The Insurance Zone includes a large number of title blocks, scale bars and charts for different paper
sizes and printing scales, depending on the version used by your company.
If you wish to use one of these forms, create your entire diagram and then select the desired form from
the menu. The form will be sized automatically to fit around the diagram.
Most forms have several locations, or ''fields,'' where text can be entered such as the name and address of
the building in the diagram. Some forms, such as the Arson Form will prompt you to enter each line of
the information on the form. Other forms allow you to pick and choose which fields of information you
wish to fill out.
To fill out the information in any of these fields:
1. Right mouse click on the X beside any of the field titles and select Text Editor from
the pop-up menu.
2. Replace the existing X with the desired text, and click on the OK button.
3. The X on the form is replaced with the new text that you entered in the Text Editor.
You can change to another form at any time by simply selecting the new form from the menu. The
original form is erased and replaced with the new form. However, if you have filled out any text on the
original form, that will be erased too so be sure you are satisfied with the form before you edit it.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Scaled Borders
The Forms feature is used to automatically place a rectangular border around your diagram. This makes
it easier for you to print the diagram at a specific scale. These borders ‘’preset’’ many of the options for
you that would normally have to be done when you print the diagram.
To place a form around your Diagram:
1. After you have finished drawing your diagram, select the Forms
feature.
Use the various buttons displayed on the toolbox to adjust the paper size, orientation, and scale that you wish to print the final diagram at. The Print Border is then
placed around the diagram.
2. Choose Paper Size - Select a paper size by clicking the scroll arrow
on the toolbox and choosing a size from the drop-down list displayed.
3. Choose Paper Orientation - Next you are prompted to select the
orientation of the paper on which the diagram will be printed:
• Portrait (paper is upright)
• Landscape (paper is sideways, or the wide way)
• Best Fit (The Diagram Program calculates the best orientation for you)
3. Drawing Scale - Enter a numeric value in the Scale entry field, or
use the scroll arrows to increase or decrease the default value of 1'.
4. Select the Place Border Button - Based on the selected paper size and orientation, the
print border is placed around the diagram and the print scale is automatically calculated. The scale value that is calculated (such as 1'’ = 25' or 1'’ = 8') refers to the scale
the diagram will have when it is printed. (You do not draw to this scale, you still draw
everything to actual measurements.)
Tip: Selecting one of the Scaled Print Borders simply sets up the diagram to be printed at a particular
scale on a particular paper size, it does not actually send the diagram to the printer. To print the diagram
you must then select the Print Command from the File menu.
Tip: You can make changes to the border at any time by selecting different changes on the toolbox and
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
clicking the Update Border button.
The last step is to place a Title Box within the Print Border so that you can include important information about the diagram.
1. Checkmark the Show Box to display the Title Block in your Border.
2. Select the number of columns you would like to split your Title Block into. Splitting
the Title Block into columns makes it easier to display the information in the drawing
border.
3. Click the Title Block Setup Icon to opens the Title Block Setup menu.
On this menu:
Check mark the first square in the window to activate the field.
Click in the Label field and type the desired information (ex. Case Number)
Click in the String field and type the desired information. (Ex. 991404.)
Use the same procedure to enter in any additional information on the remaining lines of the Setup menu.
Tip: You may make changes or Update your Title Block at any time by clicking the Title Block Setup
Icon.
4. Use the “Corner” Icons to change the position of the Title Block on the border by
clicking on the four “Corner Icons.”
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Layer Manager (MGL)
The Layer Manager offers a way of isolating different objects in the drawing onto different levels or
pages. Imagine a stack of clear sheets of paper, each sheet being a different layer. Much like human
anatomy sections in encyclopedias which allow you to pull away layers of the body such as skin, veins,
muscle, down to the skeleton. While layering is a lot more powerful than turning pages in a book, the
concept is the same.
Layers are essential if you have a complex diagram of entities or one that might consist of different time
frames such as a car crash. You could set up a layer for the roads, a layer for the cars before the crash, a
layer for the cars at impact, and a layer for the cars after the crash at their resting positions. You would
also set up layers for text and dimensions.
To open Layer Manager:
1. Select Layer Manager from the Special pull-down menu.
A dialog box appears, displaying a list of 1024 available layers. Use the scroll
bar to view the status of all layers supported by The Diagram Program. Layer
numbers and names are displayed, the current layer is displayed in boldface,
and layers with data on them are marked with asterisks (*). Listings for hidden
layers are grayed.
Buttons on Layer Manager
The buttons on the layer dialog are used to control layer display (on/off),
current layer, layer properties, layer sorting, and layer locking. You can also
find these features and some bonus features on a pop up menu by right clicking
in the layer dialog.
Layer Display
The Layer Display button is an on/off toggle. When the selected layer is currently displayed, clicking on this button will hide it and visa versa. A hidden
layer’s name or number is displayed in italics.
Important: You cannot hide the current layer. In order to hide the current layer
first set a different layer to be current, and then go back and hide the layer.
Make Selected Layer Current
Clicking on this button will make the selected layer the current layer. You can also double click on a
layer to make it current. Anything drawn or placed in the diagram are placed on the current layer. When
starting a new drawing Layer 0 is the default layer.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Layer Manager cont...
Set Layer Properties This button activates the properties dialog box for the current layer. Different properties may be set for
different layers. Color, line type, and line width properties can be set using the properties dialog box.
To set Layer Properties;
1. Click on layer 10 to select it.
2. Click on the Properties button.
3. Set color to red and line width 2.
4. Click OK on the properties dialog to accept the properties settings.
5. Click the “Apply” button to apply the desired properties to the selected layer.
You may also select a different layer, change property settings, and apply settings for that layer without
closing the properties box. When finished be sure to click the OK button or the layer properties dialog
will remain open.
With these properties set, anything you draw on that layer will be red and have a thick line width. If you
don’t set layer properties then the current property settings in the program will still be in effect.
Once layer properties are set for a layer an icon will appear on that layer showing the color set in layer
properties. If line type is set in layer properties then a “T” will be displayed in the icon. If line width is
set in layer properties then a “W” will be displayed in the icon as well.
Selecting and Modifying Multiple Layers
You can select more than one layer at a time by holding down the Shift key and dragging over the layers
you want select. You can then click the Layer Display or Layer Properties buttons and modify all the
selected layers. To select multiple layers that are not in consecutive order, hold down the Control key
and click on the desired layers.
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Layer Manager cont...
You can highlight ranges of layers by dragging across the desired range of layers, or by clicking the
select all feature. You can also select ranges of layers by typing them in the text field located above the
layer list box. You can indicate a range with a dash, and separate individual layers or ranges with commas. For example, you can select several layers by typing : 3_8, 10, 14, 17_25, 60.
Setting Different Properties
On the Layer Properties Settings Bar, you may select options from the drop - down list to set the layer
properties. Click the Apply button to assign those properties to the selected layer. Click OK to close the
Layer Properties Settings Bar.
Changing Properties of Objects on Layers with Property Settings
If you want to change properties of an object that has automatically been assigned the properties set for
that layer, select the object(s) and then select Edit Properties from the Edit/Modify pull-down menu. Set
the desired properties from the Settings Bar or from the dialog box that is displayed.
Determining the Layer of a Selected Object
To determine what layer an item is on you can; select the object and click the Edit Properties button. The
layer of the selected object will be displayed in the layer field of the Properties dialog.
Sort Layers Alphabetically or Numerically
Click on this button to sort your layers alphabetically or numerically. This feature is helpful if you have
a mixture of named and numbered layers.
Naming Layers
To name or rename a layer, click once on the layer to select it, then again click within the selected text
field to activate the text cursor (the same process that is used by Window Explorer ). Type in the desired
layer name and press Enter.
Important: You cannot rename a layer using a number for the first character. If you want to show a
number followed by text then begin the name with a dash or underscore. Example: _2ndLevel
Lock or UnLock Layers
The “All Layers Locked/Unlocked” button allows you to view a layer, but prevents it from being edited
or modified. All other layers except for the current locked layer will be editable. You could hide a layer
if you didn’t want to inadvertently edit it, but you may need the layer displayed for reference but don’t
want to be able to select it or alter it. If this is the case then you will want to lock all layers. You will still
be able to snap to points on locked layers.
For instance, say you imported a photo (bitmap) and you wanted to draw over the top of it (such as an
aerial photo of an intersection). You might want to draw lines over the photo to highlight the streets and
place vehicle symbols on it. If you don’t put the photo on it’s own layer and lock the layers then every
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Layer Manager cont...
time you click on or near the photo it will be selected and overlap the line art that you’ve drawn. If you
lock the layers and use a different layer for drawing entities then the photo (bitmap) will not get selected
accidentally and will remain at the bottom of the layer stacking order.
Pop Up Layers Menu When the mouse cursor is positioned inside the layers dialog box and the right-mouse button is clicked a
layers pop up menu will appear in the upper lefthand corner of the screen. This menu contains most of
the commands that appear in the layer toolbox, and offers you another way of selecting them..
Features found on this menu include;
• Hide and Display
• Select All in List - highlights all layers in the list.
• Current
• Alphabetical Sort
• Properties
• Select Layer(s) in Drawing
• Short List - displays only those layers that have been named or have data on them.
• Layer Redraw - if checked, layers will redraw when the display is changed between Hide and •
• Display (light bulb on or off). If un-checked you will have to manually refresh the screen when
hiding or displaying a layer.
• Apply to All Views - n/a
• All Layer Edit
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
3D View (M3)
Takes you from the 2D program to the 3D Viewer. The 2D program is not shut down but remains active
with the 2D plan view drawing still loaded. You can make changes to the 2D plan diagram at anytime,
by simply clicking the "Close and Return to 2D Program" button on the 3D viewer speedbar. After
making any additional changes to your diagram, you may load it into the 3D viewer again. This process
can be repeated as many times as you like working back and forth between the Diagram Program and the
3D Viewer until your diagram is perfect.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Snapshot Manager (S3)
Brings up a dialog containing all the snapshots taken in the 3D Viewer. A snapshot can be taken from
any position in the drawing. These snapshots are automatically numbered and saved as .JPG's to a
snapshots directory. The Snapshots dialog displays thumbnails of all the snapshots you took in the 3D
viewer. Any snapshot can be viewed and placed into the 2D drawing. Because they're .JPG’s they can
easily be inserted into reports or emailed to anybody.
To use the Snapshot Dialog Toolbox:
1. Use the various actions commands to change the view of the drawing to one that
your wish to take a snapshot of.
2. When the desired view is achieved, click the Camera icon.
A snapshot of the current view will be saved to the snapshot directory of the Diagram Program.
3. Click the "Return to 2D" icon from the speedbar.
4. Upon returning to the Diagram Program, click the camera icon on the speedbar to
open the Snapshot dialog toolbox.
All 3D snapshots taken of the currently loaded drawing will be displayed as thumbnail in the dialog preview
window.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Snapshot Manager (S3) cont...
5. Click on any snapshot for a larger view in the view window.
Note: Check the "Show All" box to see all snapshots currently in the snapshots directory. These would
include snapshots of the current drawing as well as any snapshots taken of previous drawings. Select any
snapshots you want to delete and hit the "Remove" key. You can select multiple snapshots using the
Shift and Control key selection methods.
6. Place a snapshot in the current drawing by clicking on the snapshot thumbnail and
then clicking the "Place" button.
Snapshots are automatically scaled to 1/8 the overall size of the drawing on the screen. Once placed in
the drawing screen the snapshots can be selected in the diagram and then moved and re-sized.
7. Click on the "Close" button to exit the Snapshots dialog.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
3D Builder (B3)
Turns typical 2D objects into 3D objects. 3D Builder uses a custom dialog box to add 3D elevation and
height data to objects selected in a 2D drawing. Add walls elevations to buildings and rooms, elevate
objects off the ground, stack objects on top of each other, or create custom 3D objects.
To use the 3D Builder Toolbox:
1. Select the object(s) that you wish to add 3D data to. (You must have the object(s)
selected before opening up the 3D Builder dialog.)
2. Click on 3D Builder off the speedbar
Set the following options on the toolbox to the desired settings:
Wall Height - sets the wall height of the selected object(s). This feature works on lines, arcs, curves,
circles, and rectangles. You cannot extrude a point, symbol, text, or dimension. Most commonly this
feature would be used to model a building, but there are many things you can create with this feature,
including bus stops, light poles, silos, stacks, tanks, almost anything you can imagine.
Elevation Object/Point - sets the elevation of the selected object(s). This will work on all selected
objects. Use this feature to elevate an object on top of a building such as a roof access or skybridge
between two buildings. This feature, combined with the Wall Height feature are powerful tools for
creating unique 3D models.
Wall Paint - when checked will add a fill of the selected color to the walls.
Roof - when checked will fill in the top of enclosed objects that were extruded using the Wall
Height feature. This feature makes buildings look like buildings instead of hollow tubes. The roof
will appear in the color selected for roofs.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
3D Builder (B3) cont...
Apply to Selected Object(s) - click on this button when all the settings are correct. This will apply
all the 3D data set to the selected entities and will close the 3D Builder dialog.
Cancel - closes the 3D toolbox without any of the changes being applied to the selected object.
3. Click the Apply to selected objects button to finish the command.
Tip: To change the 3D settings of an object that already contains 3D data, just click on the object and
then open the 3D Builder toolbox. The current settings for that object will be displayed in the 3D Builder
toolbox. Make any changes to the current data and then click the Apply button.
Note: To quickly check the 3D settings of a object in 2D mode, just click on the desired object to select
it and then read the data on the Command Line (yellow bar at bottom of screen). The command line will
display the 3D elevation and 3D height of the selected object only if they actually contain 3D information. Only 3D objects generated with the 3D Builder will display 3D info, non-3D objects will display
their own unique attribute information.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Slope Calculator
This command calculates the 3D point data commonly found in .RAW, .DXF., and .DWG files. The
calculated data can then be placed in the diagram as text using the Quick Label command.
To use the Slope Calculator
1. With your drawing opened in the diagram program, choose the Slope Calculator
command from the Dimensions toolbox on the left-hand menu.
2. Click the "Click Point 1" button on the Slope Calculator and click the first point to be
measured in the diagram
The resulting calculation is displayed in the Point 1 text field.
3. Click the "Click Point 2" button on the Slope Calculator and click the second point to
be measured in the diagram.
The resulting calculation is displayed in the Point 2 text field.
The rest of the calculations in the calculator toolbox are also automatically figured and displayed.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
4. Next place the calculation text in the diagram by clicking the Place Quick Text button.
The Quick Label toolbox appears with the Slope Calculation text appearing in the text field.
5. Move your mouse pointer onto the drawing screen, positioning the text at the desired
location in the diagram.
6. Double click your left-mouse button to place the quick label in the diagram.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Calculator
Use the Calculator in standard view to perform simple calculations, or in scientific view to perform
advanced scientific and statistical calculations.
To start Calculator;
1. Click the Calculator command from the Special Pull-down menu. You can also start
Calculator by clicking Start, pointing to Programs, pointing to Accessories, and then
clicking Calculator.
To perform a simple calculation;
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Enter the first number in the calculation.
Click + to add, - to subtract, * to multiply, or / to divide.
Enter the next number in the calculation.
Enter any remaining and numbers.
Click the Equals ( =) sign.
You can also use your numeric keypad to enter numbers and operators by pressing NUMLOCK.
To perform a scientific calculation;
1. On the View menu, click Scientific.
2. Click a number system. The four number systems available are decimal, hexadecimal,
octal, and binary.
3. Enter the first number.
4. Click an operator.
5. Enter the next number in the calculation.
6. Enter any remaining operators and numbers.
7. Click the Equals (=) sign.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Run (FU)
Use the Run command to open another application from within the diagram program, without having to
first close down.
To use Run;
1. Select the Run command from the Special pull-down menu.
2. Click in the Command Line field of the Run dialog box and enter the file path or the
program you wish to open. You may use the browse button to navigate through your
program files if you don’t know where the file path is located.
3. Click the OK button to run the command line and open the desired application.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Learning Center(LR)
The Learning Center is designed to help you get started drawing faster than ever before! With shortcuts
to your drawings, the electronic User’s Manual, quick-time tutorial movies, and links to on-line technical support, the learning center will help you master the Diagram Program in no time!
When you first open the program the first thing that you will see is the new Let’s get started splash
screen. From there you can select to: open an existing drawing, start a new drawing from scratch, or
open the Learning Center.
Opening an Existing Drawing
Choose this option to load an existing drawing that you created previously with the Diagram Program.
1. Click the “Open Existing Drawing” button on the Welcome dialog box.
2. Scroll through the diagrams listed in the “open a diagram” window, or click the
Browse button to look in another file folder.
3. Select the diagram you wish to open and click the OK button to load it into the Diagram Program.
Starting a new Diagram from Scratch
Choose this option to create a new drawing within The Diagram Program. You can set the measurement
units and name your drawing from this dialog box.
1. Click the “Start Drawing from Scratch” button on the Welcome dialog box.
2. Set the default settings (either Feet and Inches or Metric), the drawing units (feet &
inches, millimeters, etc.) and the measurement precision.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Learning Center cont...
3. Click in the Drawing Name field and type in the desired name of your drawing.
4. Click the OK button to load up the Diagram Program with a blank drawing screen
labeled with the drawing name you assigned it.
Using the Learning Center
Choose the Learning Center option to gain access to Help File Topics, Electronic Tutorials, Movies,
Manuals, and Internet to the CAD Zones Web Site, Discussion forum, and on-line help.
1. Click the “Learning Center” button on the Welcome dialog box.
2. Click the topic that you would like to see displayed in the learning center window. For
example, clicking the Movies topic displays all of the quick-time movies available.
3. Scroll through all of the movie titles displayed in the learning center window. Click on
the desired movie title to run that movie.
If you don’t want the Learning Center dialog box to appear again, click the checkmark option labeled
“don’t show this dialog again”
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Home (EZH)
Use the Home command to return you to the right-hand toolboxes home menu. This command comes in
handy if your screen resolution has changed and the bottom of the right-hand menu is cut off, preventing
you from using the back button.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Windows Menu
Tile Vertical
(The commands on the Windows menu are similar to those found in other Windows applications. Use
them to display multiple open drawings at once.)
Use the Tile Vertical command to see open drawing files with the screen initially split into equal vertical
windows. (You can readjust the size and shape of the windows using normal Windows procedures.)
Each drawing is displayed in its new window in the same view (zoom) that was in effect the last time the
drawing was active.
To display all open drawings in a vertical format:
1. Choose the Tile Vertical command.
2. The drawing area will be split into equal vertical windows, one for each open drawing.
You can re-size the windows by dragging the window edges or corners with the pointer,
or move the windows by dragging the title bars, according to standard Windows conventions.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Tile Horizontal
You use the Tile Horizontal command to see all open drawing files with the screen initially split into
equal horizontal windows. You can re-size the windows by dragging the window edges or corners with
the pointer, or move the windows by dragging the title bars, according to standard Windows conventions. The active window - the window that is set to accept program commands - is indicated with
highlighted borders and title bar. Each drawing appears in its window in the same view (zoom) that was
in effect the last time the drawing was active.
To display all open drawings in a horizontal format:
1. Choose the Tile Horizontal command.
2. The drawing area will be split into equal horizontal windows, one for each open drawing. You can re-size the windows by dragging the window edges or corners with the
pointer, or move the windows by dragging the title bars, according to standard Windows conventions.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Cascade
Use the Cascade command when you want quick access to all open drawing files in a stacked format
with the active drawing on top. You can re-size the windows by dragging the window edges or corners
with the pointer, or move the windows by dragging the title bars, according to standard Windows conventions. The active window - the window that is set to accept program commands - is indicated with
highlighted borders and title bar.
Each drawing is displayed in its new window in the same view (zoom) that was in effect the last time the
drawing was active.
To display all open drawings in a cascaded format:
1. Choose the Cascade command.
2. Click on any visible part of a window to make that window active, and to bring it to
the top of the stack.
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Chapter 3. - Program Features
Close All Windows
Use this command to close all active windowscurrently displayed on the drawing screen.
1. Choose the Close All Windows command.
2. All active Windows are saved and closed.
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Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
Chapter 2 The Quick Tour!
This chapter familiarizes you with the fundamental tools and concepts that are used in The Diagram Program. It offers you a “quick
tour” of the program screen and commands, and also presents you
with an on-screen tutorial designed to help you learn the program
quickly and easily.
In this Chapter
• The Quick Tour
• Steps To Create A
Diagram
• Conventions Used In
This Manual
• The Program Screen
• The Quick Start Tutorial
• Installing the Program
• Starting the Program
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Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
Chapter 2: The Quick Tour
On the following pages you will find a “quick tour” of The Diagram Program. This
tour is intended to get you familiar with the basics tools and concepts you need to
understand in order to use The Diagram Program efficiently. This chapter also
contains a simple tutorial designed to help you start drawing as quickly as possible.
Your success with the program depends on how carefully you work through the
tutorials included in the manual. The Diagram Program is a tool, and like any tool it
takes practice to become an expert. As you spend more time using The Diagram
Program, you will gain the ability to create all your diagrams more quickly and
efficiently than ever.
As you start to work through the methods and features introduced to you in this
chapter, keep in mind that only the most basic commands are being introduced
here. Refer to this manual and the on-line help to learn how to draw with even
greater accuracy and speed using the rest of the program command features.
Steps To Creating A Diagram
Here are the general steps for creating a diagram, although you may want to change
the order of some of the steps to best apply to your particular diagram:
1) Start The Diagram Program and use the “Let’s Get Started wizard to set up
a new drawing, load a drawing template, or run the Easy Intersection toolbox.
2) Draw the basic features of the site using the program’s drawing commands.
This could be a room, building, street or intersection.
3) Use features from the Speedbar or the Draw Pull-Down menu to draw
nearby streets, drives, parking lots, fences, and railroad tracks and other
details around the scene.
4) Insert symbols for the various portions of the diagram such as building
features like doors, windows, stairways, and other items such as furnishings,
and vehicles.
5) Label your diagram and add dimensions with the text and dimension features
in the program.
6) Save your diagram to disk and print it.
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Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
Conventions Used In This Manual
As you begin working in The Diagram Program, some terms may be unfamiliar to
you, especially if you are new to CAD. Use the following guidelines to become
acquainted with the basic terms and ideas presented in this manual.
Normally, in this manual, you will be given a summary of the task to perform and
then the exact step-by-step instructions will be listed. These instructions are shown
in a different font, and are indented for easier identification. For example, you are
commonly given an instruction like this:
Click on the stairway to select it.
Here, you would move your mouse pointer until it is on the stairway symbol and
then click your left-mouse button once quickly.
Click on the Vehicles Symbols Folder
Here, you would place your mouse pointer on the folder named vehicles and
rapidly click the left-mouse button. Another common instruction is:
Select the “Draw” pull-down menu.
Here, move your mouse pointer up to the menu headings at the top of the program
screen, place your mouse pointer on the menu called “Draw” and click the leftmouse button. Once the menu is displayed, you can then click on a command name
to select it.
You may also be instructed to select commands this way:
Select “Easy Lines” from the right-hand toolbox.
Here, position your mouse pointer so it is on the Easy Lines button (located on the
right-hand toolbox) and click once with your left-mouse button.
When you are prompted to click on an Icon, or when you are prompted to select a
command, the equivalent toolbar icon will be shown in the column.
When you are drawing or editing objects, you may be instructed in this way:
Click near point A.
Here, click your mouse near the approximate location on your screen identified by
the letter “A” on the designated figure. To attach exactly to a specific point (like the
endpoint of a line) you will be instructed like this:
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Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
Snap to point A
There are several ways to snap, or attach, exactly to a specific point. The easiest
way to do this is to use the “Autosnaps” feature. When this command is turned on,
you position the mouse pointer’s crosshairs near the point labeled “A” and click the
left-mouse button. This causes the mouse to “jump” or snap exactly to the closest
endpoint, center of a circle, or center of an arc.
You can also type 2-letter keyboard shortcuts to perform most of The Diagram
Program commands. When you are prompted to select a command, the equivalent
two-letter keyboard shortcut will be shown in Uppercase Parenthesis. For
example, if you see this, you would type SA:
Save (SA)
Correcting Mistakes
As you begin to draw, you are bound to make mistakes, so The Diagram Program
provides you with the commands Undo (OO), and Redo (RE), found on the Edit
Pull-Down menu and the Left-hand Toolbox.
The Undo command will let you undo the last command that was performed during
the current drawing session. If you need to Undo multiple commands, select Undo
again to undo the second command. For example, if you need to undo the erasing
of ten individual objects, you would have to select Undo ten times to bring them all
back.
The Edit commands can also be used to help correct mistakes. Use commands like
Erase, Copy, Rotate, Trim/Extend, and Stretch to change objects in the diagram
that were not placed exactly the way you want them to be.
If the screen looks a little cluttered after all the erasing, undoing, rotating, and so
on, select the Refresh command either from the View pull-down menu, the
Speedbar, or the Command Toolbox.
Remember that you can also use the Esc key to abort a command. If you select the
wrong item from the menu, pick the wrong point, or want to start a command over,
press the Esc key. For commands that require multiple operations or points to be
set, pressing Esc backs you up a single step, instead of completely terminating the
command. For instance, if you’re drawing the outline of a building using the Line
command and you set a point incorrectly, just press Esc and re-select that point.
Each time you press Esc while in the Line mode, you’ll go back to the previous
point that was set until the Line command is finally aborted.
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Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
The Diagram Program Screen
When you start The Diagram Program, the first thing to appear on your computer
monitor is the Diagram Program drawing screen. The program screen has
everything you need to draw a complete diagram conveniently located on one
screen, - all the program commands and tools, and the drawing window.
The Drawing Window and the Mouse Pointer
The Drawing Window is the large, blank area that covers the center portion of the
screen. This is the area where you draw your diagram. Everything else you see on
the screen are the individual tools that help you get the exact diagram that you
want.
Menu Bar
Every command can be
selected from the pull-down
menus.
Speed Bar
Angle Draw Bar
Drawing
Window
The area where you create your
diagrams in.
Left-Hand Toolbox
Contains the Draw, Snaps, Edit, Text,
Dimension, View, and Hatch
toolboxes.
Right-Hand
Toolbox
(Available in Standard Menu setup)
Contains the Easy Lines, Easy Streets,
Symbols, Line Type, Bodies, and Form
toolboxes.
Message Bar
Displays step-by-step instructions
for using the program commands.
Inside the Drawing Window is a floating pointer that you control by moving your
mouse. The mouse pointer is used to select features from the menus and toolboxes,
perform the drawing functions, and place objects in the diagram. The mouse
pointer starts as an arrow, but may change shape depending on which feature you
are using. The Arrow Pointer is used to represent the “selection mode” which
means the program expects you to select an object or command from the program
screen.
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Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
Pull-down menus
All of the Diagram Program commands and special features can be executed from
the Pull-down menus. Most of these commands and special features can also be
selected from the speedbar and left/right toolboxes. Most of the commonly used
commands can also be performed by typing in their two-letter code on the
keyboard.
The Speedbar
The Speedbar, located just below the pull-down menus, provides a shortcut for the
most powerful, commonly used commands, as well as the 3D Viewer icons. The
speedbar commands can also be selected from the pull-down menus and the left
toolbox, but the speedbar provides the fastest way of selecting them. In Express
Menu mode the speedbar is deactivated and it contents moved to the left-hand
toolbox.
Angle Draw Bar
The Angle Draw Bar is located just above the drawing window. It contains entry
boxes for the drawing angle and distance values, all the Angle Draw Buttons for
constraining mouse pointer movement, and the Layer pull-down information list. In
Express Menu mode, the Layer Manager, Reset, and Left/Right toolbox
commands are moved to the left-hand menu.
The Angle
Draw Buttons
The angle value is displayed in box A: and the Distance Value box is labeled D:
Each time you set a point in the Drawing Window, the starting of a line for
example, the angle and distance values go to zero. As you move your mouse, the
mouse pointer’s position from that starting point is shown by these two boxes.
By watching these values change as you move the mouse pointer, you can draw
lines and other objects to exact measurements.
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Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
Sometimes it is easier to draw or move objects if you limit the angle the mouse
pointer can move. The buttons in the middle of the Angle Draw Bar are used to
constrain mouse pointer movement to just the angle the button implies (up and
down, side to side, or 45°.)
Angle Locking
The Angle Locking Draw feature simplifies drawing lines by automatically
straightening the line you are drawing when you come within five degrees of
horizontal or vertical.
The Left & Right Hand
Toolboxes.
For instance, when you select the line command you click once on the drawing
screen to place the first point of the line. At this point you can move the cursor in
any direction. Notice that anytime your cursor moves within 5 degrees of horizontal
or vertical, it will automatically straighten out. When your line is at the desired
angle, click the left-mouse button a second time to finishing placing it.
Left and Right Toolboxes
The Left-Hand Toolbox runs along the left portion of the drawing window. While
all of the commands can be found on the Pull-Down menus, the Left-hand Toolbox
offers a quicker way to select many of them. The commands found on the toolbox
are arranged in “Bins” (groups) of similar features such as drawing, editing, placing
text and dimensions, view changes, and symbols - just as the commands are
arranged on the Pull-Down Menus.
The Left-hand toolbox may be re-sized by clicking the + and - symbols to give you
more drawing area. If you wish, the toolboxes can even be turned on and off from
the speedbar.
The left-hand menu in
Express mode
In Standard Menu mode, the Right-Hand Toolbox runs along the right side of the
drawing window and contains the Easy Lines, Easy Intersection, Easy Streets,
Symbol Manager, Bodies, Line Types, and Forms toolboxes.
In Express Menu mode the right-hand menu is turned off, and its contents are
moved to the left-hand menu. The Easy Streets and Bodies commands are selected
as an icon from the Draw/Edit toolbin.
Selecting Commands from the Toolboxes
Opening the Draw Bin
Selecting Commands
from the Bins
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To see all of the command icons in a bin, position the mouse pointer on the desired
bin, and click the left-mouse button. All of the command icons are displayed at the
top of the toolbox.
To select a command from the selected bin, move the mouse pointer over the
desired command icon. Once you are positioned over the desired command, click
the left-mouse button to start that command.
Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
Symbol Manager
The Diagram program includes many pre-drawn
symbols that you can insert into any of your
diagrams. Once placed into a diagram, symbols can
be moved, rotated, erased, or copied just like any
individual line or circle.
Since so many symbols are included in the program,
they have been divided into several different groups
and are sorted into folders in the Symbol Manager.
You navigate and use the folders the same way that
you do in Windows Explorer. To open a different
set of symbols, simply double-click on a different
folder to open it.
First double click the desired symbol category folder
from the Symbol Manager to open it. Next, pick the
desired symbol from the Icons that appear in the
bottom window of the Symbol Manger. Before you
identify the symbol’s location in the diagram the
program shows you a ghost image outline of the
symbol to show you its size and orientation. Move your cursor back into the
drawing window to see the symbol’s ghost image. You can also change the
symbol’s rotation or color by clicking the appropriate icons on the Symbol Manger
before you even place the symbol in the drawing!
To place a symbol click once in the drawing to anchor the symbol. Move the
cursor to establish the symbol’s direction and click again.
You can also adjust the size of any symbol as you place it by selecting the Dynamic
Symbol Scale feature, located on the Symbol Manger. Select the Dynamic Symbol
Scale Icon and set the symbol’s first handle, as you would do normally. Now as
you move the mouse pointer the size of the symbol’s ghost image grows or shrinks
depending on the position of the mouse pointer. Click the second point when the
symbol’s ghost image has reached the desired size and angle. The Dynamic Symbol
Scale feature is a “toggle” switch command and remains in effect until you select the
command again to turn it off.
Pull-Down Menus, Icons, Toolboxes, or Two-Letter Codes?
So, what is the best way to select a command - use the menus, toolboxes, Icons,
or keyboard commands? There really is no “best” way. You simply use whatever
method is the most convenient at the time. The more you use the two-letter
commands and the speedbar, the more likely you are to
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Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
memorize the commands associated with them. Using them can provide a
significant shortcut over searching through the pull-down menus. Throughout this
manual, all of the different methods will be used so you can become familiar with
the flexibility of the program.
The Learning Center
The Learning Center is designed to help you get started drawing faster than ever
before! With shortcuts to your drawings, the electronic User’s Manual, quick-time
tutorial movies, and links to on-line technical support, the learning center will help
you master the Diagram Program in no time!
When you first open the program the first thing that you will see is the new “Let’s
get started” splash screen. From there you can select to: open an existing drawing,
start a new drawing from scratch, or open the Learning Center.
Opening an Existing Drawing
Choose this option to load an existing drawing that you created previously with the
Diagram Program.
Click the “Open Existing Drawing” button on the Welcome
dialog box.
Scroll through the diagrams listed in the “open a diagram”
window, or click the Browse button to look in another file
folder.
Select the diagram you wish to open and click the OK button
to load it into the Diagram Program.
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Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
Starting a new Diagram from Scratch
Choose this option to create a new drawing within The Diagram Program. You can
set the measurement units and name your drawing from this dialog box.
Click the “Start Drawing from Scratch” button on the Welcome
dialog box.
Set the default settings (either Feet and Inches or Metric), the
drawing units (feet & inches, millimeters, etc.) and the
measurement precision.
Click in the Drawing Name field and type in the desired name
of your drawing.
Click the OK button to load up the Diagram Program with a
blank drawing screen labeled with the drawing name you
assigned it.
The Learning Center
Choose the Learning Center option to gain access to Help File Topics, Electronic
Tutorials, Movies, Manuals, and to the CAD Zones internet Web Site, including a
Discussion forum, and on-line help.
Click the “Learning Center” button on the Welcome dialog
box.
Click the topic that you would like to see displayed in the
learning center window. For example, clicking the Movies topic
displays all of the quick-time available.
Scroll through all of the movie titles displayed in the learning
center window. Click on the desired movie title to run that
movie.
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Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
If you don’t want the Learning Center dialog box to appear again, click the
checkmark option labeled “don’t show this dialog again”
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Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
The Quick Start Tutorial
This Tutorial is helpful if you have little or no experience using Windows computer
drawing programs. Many basic drawing concepts and terms are discussed here which
will become second nature as you practice using this program.
Installing The Diagram Program
Install The Diagram Program just like most other Windows programs, as follows:
Start Microsoft Windows and Program Manager.
Insert The Diagram Program CD into the drive bay.
Select the Law Enforcement Options Button.
Select either the Evaluation copy or Purchased copy button.
The Diagram Program will be installed into the \Crime Zone
(or \Crash Zone) directory of the hard disk drive or partition
you specify.
Follow the instructions on the screen to insert the remaining
program diskettes and set up The Diagram Program.
Starting The Diagram Program
If you are using Windows 95 follow these steps to start The Diagram Program:
Click on the Start Button.
Select Programs.
Select The Crime Zone folder.
Click on The Crime Zone icon.
Quick Start Tutorial - Let’s Get Going!
Go through this Quick Start Tutorial for immediate, hands-on experience with The
Diagram Program! It should take about 20 minutes to complete the example diagram.
After working through this exercise, you may want to try the advanced tutorials in
Chapters 4 and 5 for even more “hands on” practice.
Throughout this tutorial you will be given step-by-step instructions on how to perform
each task, but you will not always be told why things are done in a certain way. The
purpose of the Quick Start Tutorial is to get you started drawing in the program as soon
as possible. Then you can review the rest of this manual for explanations of the concepts
and methods associated with each feature.
Use the left button to set points in the Drawing Window and the right button to open
command sensitive “Pop-up” menus that modify or finish the object that you are
working on. If you have a three-button mouse, pressing the middle button acts the same
as pressing the Enter Key on the keyboard. In this tutorial, it is assumed that you are
using a two-button mouse.
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Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
Drawing the Building
First, start The Diagram Program and load the Quick Start Tutorial drawing as
follows:
Once the program loads, the “Let’s Get Started” dialog box
appears on the drawing screen.
Click the “Open Existing Drawing” button.
Scroll through the diagrams listed in the “open a diagram”
window, or click the Browse button to browse another folder.
Scroll down and click on the STARTUP.CZD file to select it.
Click the OK button to open the drawing.
You should then see the diagram in Figure 2.1 load on the screen. The finished diagram
is shown in Figure 2.2, so you may want to refer to that as you complete each of the
following steps.
The diagram you just loaded has several numbered points which will be referred
to throughout this tutorial. Please note that these points are labeled to establish
general locations. You do not snap exactly to the bubbles or the numbers. Follow
the steps below to put a garage on the house, place some symbols, and then place
some text and dimensions, as shown in Figure 2.2, the completed diagram.
Figure 2.1 - The Start Up Diagram
The first step is to use the Easy Lines command to draw the walls starting at the
corner labeled 1. This feature will allow you to draw lines at exact angles and
measurements. Other ways of drawing lines will be covered later in the
Electronic User’s Manual. Now start drawing the lines that make up the garage:
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Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
Click on the Easy Lines Icon to select it from the right-hand
toolbox.
Click on the Bull’s-eye Icon to select a start point.
Selecting the
Easy Lines Command
The Autosnaps
Icon
Next, you’ll need to “snap,” or attach, directly to the corner of the wall at point
1. The easiest way to do this is to use the Autosnaps feature.
Click on the Autosnaps (AU) icon, located on the speedbar, to
turn it on.
Move your mouse until the mouse pointer crosshairs are
positioned over the corner of the wall, near Point 1.
Title Bar (Drag Box)
New Start Point
(Bulls-Eye)
Number Pad
Clear Last Entry
Undo/Redo Last Steps
Angle and Distance Displays:
Line and Marker Buttons:
You may also click in these
fields and type in a value.
Determines whether a line,
marker or permanent
marker is placed.
Normal, Baseline, and
Triangulation Mode
Buttons.
Survey Mode Button:
Changes the Angle value of the top arrows
from 90° to North (or 0°). The angles
increase positively clockwise from 0°.
The Easy Lines Toolbox
Click the left-mouse button to set the first endpoint of the line
on that corner point.
Once you have selected a Start Point for the line, you are ready to enter the angle
and distance of the first line segment.
Click on the right compass arrow button on the Easy Lines
Toolbox to draw a new line horizontally to the right. An angle
of 0 is displayed in the Angle box at the bottom of the
Toolbox.
Click the 1, 3, and 5 keys on the numeric keypad in the center
of the Easy Lines Toolbox to set the length of the line
segment as 135'.
Click on the Line Draw icon on the lower-
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Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
left corner of the Easy Lines Toolbox to complete the line
segment and cause the line to be drawn on the screen.
Note: A distance of feet is assumed so you do not have to enter the foot mark
(‘) in this case. When entering a distance of just inches or of feet and inches
you must include the feet and inch marks, or use a decimal point (like 5’ 6"
or 5.5). The feet and inch marks are included as buttons on the right side of
the numeric keypad on the Toolbox so you can click on them when needed.
The first endpoint of the line is the Start Point you selected at the beginning
of the command. The second endpoint of the line is located away from that
Start Point at the distance and angle you just entered on the Toolbox, 135'
and 0 . (An angle of 0 degrees is horizontal to the right and angles increase in
the counter clockwise direction.) There are other ways we could have done
this but this is the easiest and fastest.
Now complete the walls of the garage by drawing lines to Point 3 and over to
Point 4:
The Line
Draw Icon
Click on the downward compass arrow on the Easy Lines
Toolbox, then click on the numeric keypad to select a
distance of 65 (for 65 feet).
Click on the Line Icon at the lower left of the Easy Lines
Toolbox to finish the line segment.
Click on the left-hand downward diagonal compass arrow,
enter a distance of 60, and select the Line icon.
Click on the left compass arrow, enter a distance of 93, and
click the line icon to finish the line segment.
Select the View Pull-down Menu.
Select the Zoom All command.
Placing Symbols
Many of the objects that you place in your diagrams are already pre-drawn for you
as “symbols.” The symbols are divided up into groups that are shown by icons in the
Symbol Manager located on the right-hand toolbox. If you are using the Express Menu
setup, Symbol Manager will be found on the left-hand menu.
Note: If you are using a customized version of The Diagram Program that
was created just for your company, you may have different symbol categories
and different symbols than those described here. To complete the tutorial,
simply select the symbol category and symbols that are similar to those
shown in the figures here. The purpose of the tutorial is to show you how the
various features of the program are performed, the exact symbols you place
are not really important.
The Symbol Manager
First, let’s place a stairway symbol near Point 6, as follows:
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Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
Stair Symbol as it
appears on the
symbol manager.
Click the Back button on the right-hand toolbox to go back to
the main menu.
Click the Symbols Icon on the right-hand toolbox to open
Symbol Manager.
Click on the Building ~ Vertical Openings folder to display the
symbols contained in that folder. (The Symbol Icons for all the
Elevators & Stairs appear in the lower window of the Symbol
Manager.)
Click on the “Stairs in Combustible Shaft” Symbol Icon to
select it.
Move the mouse pointer onto the drawing screen and notice
the “ghost image” that represents the symbol attached to the
“crosshair” mouse pointer. (The Crosshair shows that the
“Autosnap” feature has been turned on.)
Move the mouse pointers crosshairs over the wall next to
Point 6.
Click the left-mouse button to snap directly to the wall and set
the symbol’s anchor point.
Move the mouse pointer and notice that the symbol box is dynamically
rotated about the anchor point as you move the Mouse Pointer. The instantaneous rotation angle is shown in the Angle Value box (labeled A:) on the
Angle Draw Bar near the top left of the screen.
Angle Draw Button
Click on the Horizontal/Vertical Angle Draw Button to
constrain its rotation.
This constrains the symbol so that it only moves, in a
horizontal/ vertical direction.
Move the mouse pointer straight to the right to define the
symbol’s direction.
Press Enter or click the left-mouse button to finish placing the
symbol.
The same method is used to place all the symbols in The Diagram Program.
Later, you can experiment more with the Symbol Manager options to mirror,
explode and change the color of symbols as you place them. If you want to
change the size of a symbol as it is being placed, you can use the Dynamic Scale
command on the Symbol Manager or select the symbol after it has been placed,
and then drag one of its control points to re-size it. Now let’s apply this method
to place some more symbols:
Select the Extinguishers folder from within Symbol Manager.
Click the Partially Sprinkled symbol icon to select it.
Position the ghost image near Point 10 and click the leftmouse button to set the first point, move the mouse to the right
and click again to finish placing the symbol.
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Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
Next, use the same method to place the hydrant symbol in the drawing:
From the Symbol Manager select the Water~Hydrants folder.
From the Symbol Icons, select the Public Hydrant - 2 Hoses
with Pumper symbol.
Using the same method described previously, place it just
above Point 9.
Changing The View
Now we want to place a door symbol near Point 8, but first, let’s expand the
view of that area in order to make it easier to see what is happening:
View Window Icon
Select the View Pull-Down Menu.
Select Zoom Window (ZW).
Click the mouse pointer near Point 11.
Move the mouse pointer down and to the right, and click near
Point 7.
The display should now show an expanded view of the lower right area of the
building, showing everything that you enclosed in the window. You will
frequently use the View commands, like Zoom Window, that make it easier to
place symbols and see the details of your diagrams. You can think of these like
using the zoom lens of a camera. The View Menu contains all the View
commands, as well as features to pan around and refresh the Drawing Window.
Next, place a door symbol near Point 8, using the Dynamic Symbol Scale
feature as follows:
Door Symbol as it
appears on the
symbol manager.
Dynamic Symbol
Scale Icon
From the Symbol Manager, select the Building - Doors and
Windows symbol folder.
Select the Single Door symbol.
To place the symbol, position it on the wall near point 8 and
click the mouse.
Click on the Dynamic Symbol Scale icon, located on the Symbol
Manger.
Move the mouse and notice the Door symbol gets larger or
smaller.
When your symbol has the desired size and rotation, click the
left mouse button again to finish placing it.
(Since Angle Draw is still on, you could only rotate the door to
be exactly horizontal of vertical.)
If your door symbol seems small, it is because the symbols are drawn
approximately to their actual size. A door that is three feet long will look
small in relation to a building that is several hundred feet long.
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Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
There are two ways to make your symbols larger, if desired. You can either
set the Dynamic Symbol Scale (on the Symbol Manger) to the ON position
before you select the symbol (as we did here), or you can click on the symbol
after it is placed to highlight it and use the mouse to drag one of its control
points to a larger size.
Note: The Dynamic Symbol Scale feature is a toggle, it stays turned on until
you click the icon again to turn it off.
Copying Objects
Next we want to make a copy of the elevators and attach them exactly to the
existing elevator symbols. First, let’s expand the view of that area using the
View Window command, as previously explained.
Click the Zoom All icon on the speedbar.
Select the Zoom Window icon.
Click below the lower, left-hand corner of the building (near
Point 12), move the mouse pointer up and click again near
Point 11.
The display should now show an expanded view of the lower right area of the
drawing, showing everything that you enclosed in the window.
Copying the elevator symbol using the clipboard.
1. Select the symbol to copy by
clicking on it with the mouse pointer.
2. Select the Clipboard Copy
command or click the icon.
3. Select the Clipboard Paste
command or click the icon.
4. Use Autosnaps or the SC
command on your keyboard
and snap the copy to the
existing symbol.
Next, make a copy of the symbol, as follows:
Copy Icon
2- 18
Make sure Autosnaps mode is turned on.
Click on the right elevator symbol with the mouse pointer to
select it.
Select Copy from the Edit Menu or the Speedbar.
Select the Edit Menu again and choose the Paste command.
Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
Zoom All Icon
Move the Mouse Pointer back onto the drawing screen and
position the crosshair over the lower right-hand corner of the
right-most elevator.
Click with the left-mouse button to attach the copy to the
existing elevator symbol.
Click in the “white space” above the elevators to deselect the
copied elevator symbol.
Pull down the View menu and select Zoom All.
Alternatively, you could use the Copy command under the Edit commands on
the Edit/Modify menu.
This command let’s you choose a reference point, or handle, to use for the
copy.
Adding Text
Next, let’s add some text near Point 11 to add an address to the drawing:
The Quick Label Icon
Select the Quick Label (QL) command from the Text &
Dimensions pull-down menu.
Click in the Enter Text field at the top of the toolbox and type:
“Original Construction”
If desired, you can change the text height by clicking on the text height arrows
below and to the right of the Enter Text field.
Horizontal/Vertical Icon
2- 19
Click on the Larger Text
Height button
repeatedly until the text
is changed to a height
to 8.0.
Move the mouse pointer
back on the Drawing
Screen and notice that
the text is represented
by a box attached to the
Mouse Pointer.
Position the text box to
the right of Point 11 and
click the left mouse
button to anchor the lower-left corner of the text at that point.
Move your mouse and notice the text rotates around the
anchor point.
Click the Horizontal/Vertical angle draw button to turn it on.
Move your mouse to the right and click again to finish placing
the text.
Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
Placing a Dimension
Now let’s place a dimension between Points 12 and 13:
Select the Text/Dimension menu.
Select the Quick Dimension (QD) caommand.
Position the mouse pointer “crosshairs” over the corner of
the building near Point 12 and click your left-mouse button to
set the first dimension point.
Move the mouse pointer to the right corner of the building
(near point 13) and left-mouse click to set the second
dimension point.
Adjust the dimension height by clicking the Text Height
(larger) button until the text height is 8.0.
Next, move the mouse pointer downward and notice a rubberbanding dimension line with a box attached that represents
the dimension text.
When the dimension line is positioned at the desired location,
click the left-mouse button to finish placing it.
Add a Section of Road
The Easy Street feature can be used to construct multi-lane streets and highways, including sidewalks and medians. You can set the individual width of
each lane, or section, and select a centerline type. In this case we will use
Easy Street to add a section of road to the diagram. The first step is to draw a
guideline, arc, or curve that represents one edge of the street.
Lane Width
Road Model Window
Click on the number
to set a new value.
View your road model before
you apply it to the drawing.
Lane On/Off
Check-mark the box
to activate the lane.
Lane Line Style
Click on the field
to change the line type.
Flip
Mirrors the lane values
in the opposite direction.
Lane Reference
Change the reference
guideline that the model
is built on.
Apply/Finish
Use apply and the road
model is drawn on the
screen. Automatically
changes to the “Finish”
button that you click
when you want to end
the command.
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Intersection Clean
Trace over the intersection and the
program cleans it automatically!
Erase Guideline
The Easy Streets Toolbox
Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
Single Line Icon
Click the Draw icon on the left-hand toolbox to bring up icons
for the Draw commands.
Select the Single Line command.
Move the cursor below point 15.
Click the left-mouse button to start the first point of the line.
Make sure Angle Draw mode is turned on. (This is also called
Ortho Mode).
Move the cursor to the right, type 400’ on the keyboard, and
press the Enter key. This draws a horizontal line that is
exactly 400’ long.
This line was drawn with the “direction-distance” method, which is a very
fast way of drawing to exact measurements. Whenever you need to place a
point (like the endpoint of a line), you can simply move the cursor in the
desired direction and type in the distance on the keyboard. By turning Angle
Draw mode On, the cursor was restrained to only move at selected angles just horizontal or vertical in this case. Now we are ready to use the Easy
Street toolbox:
Click the Back button on the right-hand toolbox, if necessary,
to return the toolbox to the Home menu.
Click on the Easy Street Icon.
This opens the Easy Streets Toolbox.
Make sure that three lines have an “X” mark in the center
column of the toolbox, if not click in the box to place an X
there. This “turns on” those lanes.
Click in the width column for the second lane to highlight it (it
may already may be set to 12’), type in 15 and press Enter.
Click in the Line Type column and change it to a dashed line
type.
Click in the width column for the third lane, type in 15 and
press Enter.
Move your cursor into the Drawing Window and click on the
guideline that we drew previously, somewhere below Point
15. This selects the line.
Click on the Apply button on the bottom of the Easy Street
toolbox.
This applies the lane data we set up to the selected line, drawing the section
of road beside it. When you create your own diagrams, features on the
toolbox allow you to flip the lane width values and change the location of the
guideline.
Click the Finish Button on the toolbox to finish the road.
You have just completed your first diagram! If you save your completed
2- 21
Chapter 2. - The Quick Tour!
diagram to disk, be sure to use the Save As feature on the File Pull-Down Menu.
This lets you enter in a different name for the diagram file. Do not save your
diagram with the original name of STARTUP.CZD, in case you would like to do
this tutorial again in the future.
(Note, if you are using the Evaluation version of the program the Save feature is
disabled.)
Figure 2.2 - The completed Start Up diagram.
You have just completed your first diagram with The Diagram Program! If you
wish to save your completed diagram to disk, be sure to use the Save As feature
on the File Pull-Down Menu. This lets you enter in a different name for the
diagram file. Do not save your diagram with the original name of
STARTUP.DW2, in case you or an associate would like to do this tutorial again
in the future.
2- 22
Chapter 1. - Welcome!
Chapter 1 Welcome to The Diagram
Program!
This chapter introduces you to the new Diagram Program - Drawing
Software for Investigators. It explains the basic ideas behind CAD,
differences between the new and old versions, new features, and how to
get help with the program if you need it.
In this Chapter
• Introduction
• Getting Started
• To Our New Users
What Is CAD?
Why Use CAD?
• System Requirements
• Help Resources
1- 1
Chapter 1. - Welcome!
Introduction to The Diagram Program
The Diagram Program for Windows was created to fill the needs of fire fighters,
fire protection engineers, and any other professionals who need to create crime and
accident scene diagrams faster and easier than ever before. The program contains
many special tools that allow the user to easily create accurate diagrams perfectly
to scale, and will save time at the incident scene and in the office. Even if you are
new to computers, The Diagram Program makes it easy for you to create professional looking diagrams with a minimum of effort.
Since you have chosen The Diagram Program for Windows, you are probably
already using other Windows software applications, like a word processor. You
will find that many features of The Diagram Program are similar to those found in
other Windows programs. This will make it easier for you to learn to use The
Diagram Program since you will already be familiar with how to use Windows.
Getting Started
Whether you are new to The Diagram Program or an experienced Diagram Program user, The Diagram Program User’s Manual contains vital information you
need to know to be productive in your efforts.
1- 2
Chapter 1. - Welcome!
To our New User
What is CAD?
CAD (Computer Aided Drafting) is an automated drawing system that eliminates
the redundant tasks done in manual drafting. When drawing on paper, you have to
redraw an object each time it is used in a drawing. In CAD you draw an object
once, and reuse it as often as you need in the drawing. Your CAD program is like
a toolbox - it contains powerful commands for each of your conventional drafting
tools like the T-square, Templates, and so on.
The Diagram Program was created for the investigation industry as a low
cost, easy to use alternative to “off-the-shelf” drawing programs like
AutoSketch or Visio. Because of its ease of use and industry specific features,
The Diagram Program is the only drawing program available for creating
accurate professional diagrams and actually helping to win more cases in the
courtroom.
Why use CAD?
The biggest advantage to using CAD is in its accuracy, neatness, and the
ability to modify and update existing drawings quickly and easily. CAD uses
precise lines, not the dots or pixels used in a paint program, so your drawings
always look good in the courtroom. The diagrams drawn in The Diagram
Program are also extremely accurate and can be updated or modified with
new information in just minutes. With CAD you never need to do something twice!
How do I get started?
Make sure to start by taking The Quick Tour in Chapter 2, and working
through the Tutorials in Chapter 4 and 5. Doing this will familiarize you with
the basic tools and concepts needed to complete your diagrams successfully.
As you become more experienced with the program, refer to Chapter 3 and
the on-line help for a complete reference of all the program commands.
Compatibility
With The Diagram Program you can import drawings from most other CAD
programs including AutoCAD®, AutoSketch®, Generic CADD®, and previous
versions of The Diagram Program - all with no conversion! Also, the new Diagram
Program will allow you to save to .BMP, .WMF, and .JPEG formats for easy
placement into text documents!
1- 3
Chapter 1. - Welcome!
System Requirements
A Pentium PC with Windows 98, 2000, NT 4.0 or later. A VGA monitor with
graphics card, a Windows compatible mouse, 64 MB of RAM and 80 MB of hard
disk space (depending on the options you choose during installation.)
Additional Help Resources
The following resources will help you get the information you need about
The Diagram Program and assistance with all of your Diagram Program questions.
The CAD Zone web site at: http://www.cadzone.com
Email support: info@cadzone.com
Phone Support: (503) 641-0334 (Mon - Fri, 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. PST)
FAX: (503) 641-9077
1- 4
Contents
Chapter 1 - Welcome to The Diagram Program! ..........................................................................................
Introduction to The Diagram Program .............................................................................................................
Getting Started ...............................................................................................................................................
To our New User ............................................................................................................................................
What is CAD? ................................................................................................................................................
Why use CAD? ...............................................................................................................................................
How do I get started? .....................................................................................................................................
Compatibility ..................................................................................................................................................
System Requirements ....................................................................................................................................
Additional Help Resources..............................................................................................................................
1-1
1-2
1-2
1-3
1-3
1-3
1-3
1-3
1-4
1-4
Chapter 2 - The Quick Tour! ......................................................................................................................... 2 - 1
Steps To Creating a Diagram .......................................................................................................................... 2 - 2
Conventions Used In This Manual .................................................................................................................. 2 - 3
Correcting Mistakes ........................................................................................................................................ 2 - 4
The Diagram Program Screen ........................................................................................................................ 2 - 5
The Drawing Window and the Mouse Pointer .................................................................................................. 2 - 5
Pull-down menus ............................................................................................................................................ 2 - 6
The Speedbar ................................................................................................................................................ 2 - 6
Angle Draw Bar .............................................................................................................................................. 2 - 6
Angle Locking ................................................................................................................................................. 2 - 7
Left and Right Toolboxes ................................................................................................................................ 2 - 7
Selecting Commands from the Toolboxes ....................................................................................................... 2 - 7
Symbol Manager ............................................................................................................................................ 2 - 8
Pull-Down Menus, Icons, Toolboxes, or Two-Letter Codes? ............................................................................ 2 - 8
The Symbol Manager ..................................................................................................................................... 2 - 8
The Learning Center ....................................................................................................................................... 2 - 9
Opening an Existing Drawing .......................................................................................................................... 2 - 9
Starting a New Diagram From Scratch .......................................................................................................... 2 - 10
The Quick Start Tutorial ................................................................................................................................ 2 - 12
Installing The Diagram Program .................................................................................................................... 2 - 12
Starting The Diagram Program ..................................................................................................................... 2 - 12
Quick Start Tutorial - Let’s Get Going! ........................................................................................................... 2 - 12
Drawing the Building ..................................................................................................................................... 2 - 13
Placing Symbols........................................................................................................................................... 2 - 15
Changing The View ...................................................................................................................................... 2 - 16
Adding Text .................................................................................................................................................. 2 - 18
Placing a Dimension ..................................................................................................................................... 2 - 18
Add a Driveway and Sidewalk....................................................................................................................... 2 - 19
Chapter 3 - Program Features ...................................................................................................................... 3 - 1
New (File New, FN) ........................................................................................................................................ 3 - 2
Open (File Open, FO) ..................................................................................................................................... 3 - 3
Close (File Close, FC) .................................................................................................................................... 3 - 5
Save (DS) ...................................................................................................................................................... 3 - 6
Save As (FA) .................................................................................................................................................. 3 - 7
Merge (FM) .................................................................................................................................................... 3 - 9
Import Images (BI) ........................................................................................................................................ 3 - 10
Export Images (VB) ...................................................................................................................................... 3 - 11
Print (PR) ..................................................................................................................................................... 3 - 12
Print Tiling .................................................................................................................................................... 3 - 14
Advanced Tiling Features ............................................................................................................................. 3 - 16
Printer Setup (PT) ........................................................................................................................................ 3 - 18
TOC - 1
Exit (FX) .......................................................................................................................................................
Undo (OO) ...................................................................................................................................................
Redo (RE) ....................................................................................................................................................
Cut (Ctrl + X) ................................................................................................................................................
Copy (Ctrl + C) .............................................................................................................................................
Paste (Ctrl + V) ............................................................................................................................................
Select All ......................................................................................................................................................
Select Object ................................................................................................................................................
Select Window (SW).....................................................................................................................................
Select Crossing ............................................................................................................................................
Select Last (SL) ............................................................................................................................................
Select Adjoining (SJ) ....................................................................................................................................
Select Layer (SY) .........................................................................................................................................
Invert List (SI) ...............................................................................................................................................
Selection Bar (S1) ........................................................................................................................................
Copy (CO) ....................................................................................................................................................
Rows and Columns (Array Copy, AC) ...........................................................................................................
Radial Copy (RC) .........................................................................................................................................
Quick Copy (MC) ..........................................................................................................................................
Move (MV) ...................................................................................................................................................
Move Point (MP) ..........................................................................................................................................
Break (BR) ...................................................................................................................................................
Rotate (RO) .................................................................................................................................................
Scale (SZ) ....................................................................................................................................................
Stretch (SS) .................................................................................................................................................
Window Stretch (WS) ...................................................................................................................................
Mirror (MI) ....................................................................................................................................................
Trim/Extend (TR) ..........................................................................................................................................
Fillet (FI) .......................................................................................................................................................
Cutout (CT) ..................................................................................................................................................
Double Line Int. Clean (IT) ............................................................................................................................
Multi-Lane Int. Clean ....................................................................................................................................
Double It Up (Offset, OF) ..............................................................................................................................
Group (GT) ..................................................................................................................................................
Ungroup (GU) ..............................................................................................................................................
Explode (YX) ................................................................................................................................................
Edit Properties (ED) .....................................................................................................................................
Quick Edit (QE) ............................................................................................................................................
Delete (Erase, ER) .......................................................................................................................................
Erase Blue Markers (MX) .............................................................................................................................
Draw Pull-Down Menu ..................................................................................................................................
Single Line (LS) ............................................................................................................................................
Continuous Line (LC) ....................................................................................................................................
Arrow (AW) ..................................................................................................................................................
Easy Lines (EZL) ..........................................................................................................................................
Double Line (LD) ..........................................................................................................................................
Point (PO) ....................................................................................................................................................
Normal Rectangle (R2) .................................................................................................................................
Set Angle Rectangle (R3) .............................................................................................................................
2 - Point Circle (C2) ......................................................................................................................................
3-Point Circle (C3) ........................................................................................................................................
Diameter Circle (CD) ....................................................................................................................................
Ellipse (EP) ..................................................................................................................................................
3-Point Arc (A3) ............................................................................................................................................
Center-Start-End (Two-Point Arc, A2) ...........................................................................................................
Arc: Start-End-Middle (AM) ...........................................................................................................................
TOC - 2
3 - 19
3 - 20
3 - 21
3 - 22
3 - 23
3 - 24
3 - 26
3 - 27
3 - 28
3 - 29
3 - 30
3 - 31
3 - 32
3 - 33
3 - 34
3 - 36
3 - 38
3 - 41
3 - 43
3 - 45
3 - 46
3 - 47
3 - 48
3 - 50
3 - 52
3 - 54
3 - 55
3 - 56
3 - 57
3 - 59
3 - 61
3 - 63
3 - 65
3 - 67
3 - 68
3 - 69
3 - 70
3 - 71
3 - 72
3 - 73
3 - 74
3 - 75
3 - 76
3 - 77
3 - 78
3 - 84
3 - 86
3 - 87
3 - 89
3 - 91
3 - 92
3 - 93
3 - 94
3 - 95
3 - 96
3 - 97
Arc: Length-Radius-Tangent (AX) ................................................................................................................. 3 - 98
Center Polygon (PC) .................................................................................................................................... 3 - 99
Side Polygon (PS) ...................................................................................................................................... 3 - 100
Curve (CV) ................................................................................................................................................. 3 - 101
Trace Boundary (HB) ................................................................................................................................. 3 - 102
Pick Area (HD) ........................................................................................................................................... 3 - 104
Hatch/Fill Settings (TBH) ............................................................................................................................ 3 - 105
Symbol Manager ........................................................................................................................................ 3 - 106
Create Symbol (YC) ................................................................................................................................... 3 - 110
Explode Symbol (YX) ................................................................................................................................. 3 - 111
Symbol Count ............................................................................................................................................ 3 - 112
Set Properties ............................................................................................................................................ 3 - 113
Redraw (RD) .............................................................................................................................................. 3 - 114
Zoom All (ZA) ............................................................................................................................................. 3 - 115
Zoom Window (ZW) ................................................................................................................................... 3 - 116
Zoom In (ZI) ............................................................................................................................................... 3 - 117
Zoom Out (ZO) ........................................................................................................................................... 3 - 118
Zoom Previous (ZP) ................................................................................................................................... 3 - 119
Pan (PA) .................................................................................................................................................... 3 - 120
Bird’s Eye View (ZB) ................................................................................................................................... 3 - 121
Zoom View (ZN) ......................................................................................................................................... 3 - 122
Name View (NV) ........................................................................................................................................ 3 - 123
Bring to Front (TF) ...................................................................................................................................... 3 - 124
Send to Back (TB) ...................................................................................................................................... 3 - 125
Left and Right Toolbox On/Off .................................................................................................................... 3 - 126
Snap Commands ....................................................................................................................................... 3 - 127
Auto Snaps (AU) ........................................................................................................................................ 3 - 128
Angle Trap On/Off (OT) .............................................................................................................................. 3 - 129
Snap Endpoint (Snap Closest, SC) ............................................................................................................. 3 - 130
Snap Object (SO) ....................................................................................................................................... 3 - 131
Snap Midpoint (SM) .................................................................................................................................... 3 - 132
Snap Intersection (SI) ................................................................................................................................. 3 - 133
Snap Perpendicular (SP) ............................................................................................................................ 3 - 134
Snap Tangent (ST) ..................................................................................................................................... 3 - 135
Angle Draw On/Off (Ortho Mode, OR) ......................................................................................................... 3 - 136
Set Angle (Ortho Angle, OA) ....................................................................................................................... 3 - 137
Cursor Free (CF) ........................................................................................................................................ 3 - 138
Angle Trap On/Off (OT) .............................................................................................................................. 3 - 139
Grid Commands ......................................................................................................................................... 3 - 140
Grid Display (GR) ....................................................................................................................................... 3 - 141
Snap Grid (SG) .......................................................................................................................................... 3 - 142
Grid Size (GS) ............................................................................................................................................ 3 - 143
Grid Origin (GO) ......................................................................................................................................... 3 - 144
Text (TL) .................................................................................................................................................... 3 - 145
Quick Label (QL) ........................................................................................................................................ 3 - 147
Text Settings (TBT) .................................................................................................................................... 3 - 150
Leader (Arrow with Text) (LE) ..................................................................................................................... 3 - 151
Leader Settings (TBL) ................................................................................................................................ 3 - 153
Dimension Linear (DL) ................................................................................................................................ 3 - 154
Quick Dimension (QD) ................................................................................................................................ 3 - 157
Dimension Angular ..................................................................................................................................... 3 - 160
Dimension Radius (DR) .............................................................................................................................. 3 - 162
Dimension Settings (TBD) .......................................................................................................................... 3 - 163
Measure Distance and Angles (MD) ........................................................................................................... 3 - 164
Measure Area (MA) .................................................................................................................................... 3 - 166
Settings (Systems Tab (TBS) ..................................................................................................................... 3 - 168
TOC - 3
Match Entity (ME) .......................................................................................................................................
Object Info (OI) ...........................................................................................................................................
Pack Data (PD) ..........................................................................................................................................
Reset .........................................................................................................................................................
Easy Lines(EZL) .........................................................................................................................................
Easy Streets (EZS) .....................................................................................................................................
Easy Intersection (IW) ................................................................................................................................
Bodies Toolbox ..........................................................................................................................................
Line Types (LT) ..........................................................................................................................................
Forms ........................................................................................................................................................
Scaled Borders...........................................................................................................................................
Layer Manager (MGL) ................................................................................................................................
3D View (M3) .............................................................................................................................................
Snapshot Manager (S3) ..............................................................................................................................
3D Builder (B3) ...........................................................................................................................................
Slope Calculator .........................................................................................................................................
Calculator ...................................................................................................................................................
Run (FU) ....................................................................................................................................................
Learning Center(LR) ...................................................................................................................................
Home (EZH) ...............................................................................................................................................
Tile Vertical ................................................................................................................................................
Tile Horizontal ............................................................................................................................................
Cascade ....................................................................................................................................................
Close All Windows ......................................................................................................................................
3 - 171
3 - 172
3 - 174
3 - 175
3 - 177
3 - 178
3 - 180
3 - 183
3 - 185
3 - 186
3 - 187
3 - 189
3 - 193
3 - 194
3 - 198
3 - 198
3 - 200
3 - 201
3 - 202
3 - 204
3 - 205
3 - 206
3 - 207
3 - 208
Chapter 4 -Creating a Homicide Diagram .................................................................................................... 4 - 1
The Basic Tutorial .......................................................................................................................................... 4 - 2
Drawing the Building ....................................................................................................................................... 4 - 3
Add a Shed Using the Line Command ............................................................................................................ 4 - 5
Change the Line Style Back To Normal ........................................................................................................... 4 - 7
Saving Your Work .......................................................................................................................................... 4 - 8
Opening (Loading) Your Diagram In the Future ............................................................................................... 4 - 8
Changing the View ......................................................................................................................................... 4 - 9
Building a Road ............................................................................................................................................ 4 - 10
Remove the Markers .................................................................................................................................... 4 - 13
Placing Symbols........................................................................................................................................... 4 - 13
Placing the Door Symbols ............................................................................................................................ 4 - 14
Breaking an Opening in the Walls for the Door .............................................................................................. 4 - 15
More Doors .................................................................................................................................................. 4 - 16
Placing the Remaining Building Symbols ...................................................................................................... 4 - 16
Placing the Fire Escape and Stairway Symbols ............................................................................................. 4 - 17
Copying the Stairway Symbol ....................................................................................................................... 4 - 18
Re-sizing and Moving Symbols ..................................................................................................................... 4 - 19
Adding Text to the Diagram .......................................................................................................................... 4 - 19
Editing Text .................................................................................................................................................. 4 - 21
Adding Dimensions ...................................................................................................................................... 4 - 21
Editing Dimension Text ................................................................................................................................. 4 - 22
Placing a Scaled Print Border ....................................................................................................................... 4 - 23
Printing Your Diagram .................................................................................................................................. 4 - 25
Adding Homicide Investigation Details .......................................................................................................... 4 - 26
Add Symbols to the Homicide Diagram ......................................................................................................... 4 - 26
Placing a Body Symbol ................................................................................................................................. 4 - 28
Chapter 5 -Creating a Collision Diagram ..................................................................................................... 5 - 1
Lesson 1: Using a Pre-Drawn Template .......................................................................................................... 5 - 2
Lesson 2: Using Easy Intersection. ................................................................................................................. 5 - 4
TOC - 4
Lesson 3: Adding Symbols ............................................................................................................................. 5 - 6
Lesson 4 - Adding a Quick Label to the diagram ............................................................................................. 5 - 8
Lesson 5 - Placing Quick Dimensions. .......................................................................................................... 5 - 10
Part 2: Creating a Quick Collision Scene ....................................................................................................... 5 - 11
Easy Intersection Tutorial ............................................................................................................................. 5 - 11
Placing Symbols........................................................................................................................................... 5 - 13
Place numbers in the Quick Cars .................................................................................................................. 5 - 14
Placing the remaining symbols ..................................................................................................................... 5 - 15
Saving Your Work ........................................................................................................................................ 5 - 16
Changing the center line types ...................................................................................................................... 5 - 17
Adding Skid Marks ....................................................................................................................................... 5 - 17
Placing Text ................................................................................................................................................. 5 - 18
Dimensioning ............................................................................................................................................... 5 - 19
Adding a Leader ........................................................................................................................................... 5 - 20
Print Your Diagram ....................................................................................................................................... 5 - 21
The Print Dialog Box. .................................................................................................................................... 5 - 22
Chapter 6 - Advanced Traffic Features ........................................................................................................ 6 - 1
Creating advanced traffic diagrams ................................................................................................................. 6 - 2
Introduction to the Traffic Investigation Tutorial ............................................................................................... 6 - 2
General Overview .......................................................................................................................................... 6 - 2
Start Drawing ................................................................................................................................................. 6 - 3
Moving a Section of Road ............................................................................................................................... 6 - 6
Changing the View ......................................................................................................................................... 6 - 7
Save Your Work! ............................................................................................................................................ 6 - 8
Clean Up the Intersection ............................................................................................................................... 6 - 8
Round Corners (Fillet) .................................................................................................................................... 6 - 9
Placing Symbols........................................................................................................................................... 6 - 10
Place numbers in the Quick Cars .................................................................................................................. 6 - 12
The Collision ................................................................................................................................................ 6 - 12
Car Resting Positions After Collision ............................................................................................................. 6 - 14
Direction Arrows and North Arrow ................................................................................................................. 6 - 14
Placing Text ................................................................................................................................................. 6 - 16
Add a Border to the Diagram - The Finishing Touch ...................................................................................... 6 - 17
Print Your Work of Art ................................................................................................................................... 6 - 19
Part 2: Advanced Traffic Features! ................................................................................................................ 6 - 20
Using the Easy Lines Feature ....................................................................................................................... 6 - 20
The First Marker ........................................................................................................................................... 6 - 21
Draw the Base Line ...................................................................................................................................... 6 - 21
Mark the Entrance ........................................................................................................................................ 6 - 23
Snapping Dead On ....................................................................................................................................... 6 - 23
Breaking an Opening .................................................................................................................................... 6 - 24
Vehicle Wheelbase Center Markers .............................................................................................................. 6 - 25
Placing the Vehicle ....................................................................................................................................... 6 - 26
Dimensioning ............................................................................................................................................... 6 - 27
Dimensions - Arrow and a Note .................................................................................................................... 6 - 28
Finishing Touch ............................................................................................................................................ 6 - 28
Triangulation ................................................................................................................................................ 6 - 29
Easy Lines - Placing Markers ....................................................................................................................... 6 - 29
TOC - 5
Index
Symbol
C
.BMP 1 - 3
.JPEG 1 - 3
.WMF 1 - 3
3D Builder (B3) 3 - 196
3D View (M3) 3 - 193
Calculator 3 - 200
Cascade 3 - 207
Center Lane Type 4 - 5
See Also: Line Types
Center Polygon (PC) 3 - 99
Centerlines 4 - 17
Changing the View 6 - 7
See Also: View
Clean Up the Intersection 6 - 8
Close (File Close, FC) 3 - 5
Close All Windows 3 - 208
Collision 6 - 12
Collision Diagram 4 - 1
Command icons 2 - 7
Compatibility 1 - 3
Continuous Line (LC) 3 - 76, 4 - 5
Control Point 4 - 19
Conventions Used 2 - 3
Copy commands 4 - 18
Copy (CO) 2 - 4, 3 - 36, 4 - 8
Copy (Ctrl + C) 3 - 23
Correcting Mistakes 2 - 4
Create Folder 4 - 3
Create Symbol (YC) 3 - 110
Crosshairs 4 - 29
Cursor Free (CF) 3 - 138
Curve (CV) 3 - 101
Cut (Ctrl + X) 3 - 22
Cutout (CT) 3 - 59, 4 - 26
A
Add a Border 6 - 17
Adding a Leader 4 - 20
Adding Dimensions 4 - 21
Adding Skid Marks 4 - 17
Adding Symbols 4 - 6
Adding Text 4 - 19
Advanced Traffic Diagrams 6 - 2
Angle Draw
Bar 2 - 6
Buttons 4 - 10, 6 - 3
Angle Draw On/Off (Ortho Mode, OR) 3 - 136
Angle Locking 2 - 7
See Also: Angle Trap
Angle Trap On/Off (OT) 3 - 129, 3 - 139
Arc:
Center-Start-End (Two-Point Arc, A2) 3 - 96
Length-Radius-Tangent (AX) 3 - 98
Start-End-Middle (AM) 3 - 97
Arrow (AW) 3 - 77, 6 - 28
Arrow Pointer 2 - 5
Auto Backup 4 - 16
Auto Snaps (AU) 3 - 128
AutoCAD 1 - 3
Automatic Save 4 - 8, 4 - 16
AutoSketch 1 - 3
Autosnaps 2 - 14
See Also: Snap Commands
B
Back button 2 - 20
Base Line 6 - 21
Bird’s Eye View (ZB) 3 - 121
Bodies 2 - 17, 3 - 183, 4 - 28
Border 6 - 17
Break (BR) 3 - 47
Breaking an Opening 4 - 14, 6 - 24
Bring to Front (TF) 3 - 124
Build Title Block 4 - 23
See Also: Title Block Setup
D
Delete (Erase, ER) 3 - 72
Diagram
starting from scratch 2 - 10
steps to creating 2 - 2
Diameter Circle (CD) 3 - 93
Dimension 2 - 18
Angular 3 - 160
Linear (DL) 3 - 154
Radius (DR) 3 - 162
Dimensioning 4 - 19, 4 - 21, 6 - 27
Dimension Settings (TBD) 3 - 163
Direction Arrows 6 - 14
Direction-Distance 2 - 19
Display Window 4 - 4
Double It Up (Offset, OF) 3 - 65
Double Line (LD) 3 - 84, 4 - 10
Settings 4 - 11
Double Line Int. Clean (IT) 3 - 61
Drawing 2 - 13, 4 - 3
An Intersection 4 - 5
Drawing Screen 2 - 5
Dynamic Symbol Scale 2 - 8, 4 - 19, 4 - 26
E
Easy Intersection (IW) 3 - 180, 4 - 4
Easy Lines (EZL) 2 - 14, 3 - 78, 4 - 3, 6 - 20
Toolbox 2 - 14
Easy Lines (EZL) 3 - 177
Easy Streets (EZS) 3 - 178
Toolbox 2 - 19, 6 - 4
Edit
Button 4 - 8
Commands 2 - 4
Mode 4 - 18
Properties (ED) 3 - 70
Editing
Dimension Text 4 - 22
Text 4 - 21
Ellipse (EP) 3 - 94
Erase 2 - 4
Blue Markers (MX) 3 - 73
Exit (FX) 3 - 19
Explode (YX) 3 - 69
Symbol (YX) 3 - 111
Export Images (VB) 3 - 11
See Also: BMP, JPEG, WMF
F
Fillet (FI) 3 - 57, 6 - 9
Radius 4 - 5
Font Size 4 - 22
Forms 3 - 186, 4 - 23
Four-Way Arrow 4 - 19
G
Ghost Image 2 - 16, 4 - 14
Grid
Commands 3 - 140
Display (GR) 3 - 141
Origin (GO) 3 - 144
Size (GS) 3 - 143
Group (GT) 3 - 67
H
Handle (Symbol) 4 - 29
Hatch/Fill Settings (TBH) 3 - 105
Help Resources 1 - 4
Home (EZH) 3 - 204
Homicide Diagram 4 - 1, 4 - 30
Horizontal/Vertical 4 - 6
I
Import
Drawings 1 - 3
Images (BI) 3 - 10
Installing 2 - 12
interior walls. 4 - 13
Intersection wizard 4 - 4
Introduction to The Diagram Program 1 - 2
Invert List (SI) 3 - 33
L
Lane
Number Option 4 - 4
Width 4 - 4
Layer Manager (MGL) 3 - 189
Leader (Arrow with Text) (LE) 3 - 151, 4 - 9, 4 - 20
Settings (TBL) 3 - 153
Shoulder 4 - 9
Learning Center (LR) 2 - 10, 3 - 202
Left and Right Toolbox On/Off 2 - 7, 3 - 126
Left Mouse Button 2 - 12
Left-Hand Toolbox 2 - 7
Line
Break 4 - 15
Draw 2 - 15
Types (LT) 3 - 185, 4 - 3, 6 - 15
Load a Template 4 - 2
M
Marker 4 - 11, 6 - 21
Match Entity (ME) 3 - 171
Measure Area (MA) 3 - 166
Measure Distance and Angles (MD) 3 - 164
Merge (FM) 3 - 9
Message Bar 4 - 18
Mirror (MI) 3 - 55
Mouse Pointer 2 - 5
Move (MV) 3 - 45, 4 - 19
A Section of Road 6 - 6
Move Point (MP) 3 - 46
Multi-Lane Int. Clean 3 - 63
N
Name View (NV) 3 - 123
New (File New, FN) 3 - 2
Normal Rectangle (R2) 3 - 87
North Arrow 6 - 14
Number of Lanes 4 - 11
O
Object Info (OI) 3 - 172
Offset 4 - 10
Location 4 - 18
Open (File Open, FO) 3 - 3
Opening 4 - 8
An Existing Drawing 2 - 9
Options button 4 - 4
P
Pack Data (PD) 3 - 174
Pan (PA) 3 - 120
Paste (Ctrl + V) 3 - 24
Pick Area (HD) 3 - 104
Place
Intersection 4 - 12
Intersection Button 4 - 4
Symbols 2 - 8, 2 - 15, 4 - 13, 6 - 10
Text 4 - 18, 6 - 16
Point (PO) 3 - 86
Pre-Drawn
Symbols 2 - 8
Template 4 - 2
Print (PR) 3 - 12, 4 - 21, 4 - 25, 6 - 19
Tiling 3 - 14
Setup (PT) 3 - 18
Program Features 3 - 1
Pull-down menus 2 - 6
Q
Quick
Copy (MC) 3 - 43
Dimension (QD) 2 - 18, 3 - 157, 4 - 10, 4 - 21,
Dimension Toolbox 2 - 18
Edit (QE) 3 - 71
Label (QL) 3 - 147, 4- 8
Scene 4 - 1
Tour 2 - 2
R
Radial Copy (RC) 3 - 41
Re-sizing 4 - 19
Redo (RE) 3 - 21
Redraw (RD) 3 - 114
Reference Line 6 - 4
Remove
Label 4 - 9
Markers 4 - 13
Reset 3 - 175
Right Mouse Button 2 - 12
Right-Hand Toolbox 2 - 7
Road 4 - 10
Length Bar 4 - 4
Length slider 4 - 12
Segment boxes 4 - 4
Rotate (RO) 2 - 4, 3 - 48, 4 - 29
Rotation handle 4 - 4, 4 - 12
Round Corners (Fillet) 6 - 9
Rows and Columns 3 - 38
Run (FU) 3 - 201
S
Save (DS) 3 - 6, 4 - 8
Drawing 4 - 8
Template 4 - 3
Your diagram 4 - 16
Your Work! 6 - 8
Save As (FA) 3 - 7
Scale (SZ) 3 - 50
Scaled
Borders 3 - 187
Print Border 4 - 23
Select
A Command 2 - 7
Adjoining (SJ) 3 - 31
All 3 - 26
Bar (S1) 3 - 34
Crossing 3 - 29
Last (SL) 3 - 30
Layer (SY) 3 - 32
Object 3 - 27
Window (SW) 3 - 28
Send to Back (TB) 3 - 125
Set
Angle (Ortho Angle, OA) 3 - 137
Angle Rectangle (R3) 3 - 89
Properties 3 - 113
Settings (Systems Tab (TBS) 3 - 168, 3 - 169
Shift key 4 - 29
Show Arrow option 4 - 9
Show Title Box 6 - 18
Side Polygon (PS) 3 - 100
Single Line (LS) 3 - 75
Skid Marks 4 - 17
See Also: Line Types
Slope Calculator 3 - 198
Snap
Commands 3 - 127
Endpoint (Snap Closest, SC) 3 - 130
Grid (SG) 3 - 142
Intersection (SI) 3 - 133
Midpoint (SM) 3 - 132
Object (SO) 3 - 131
Perpendicular (SP) 3 - 134
Tangent (ST) 3 - 135
Snapping 6 - 23
Snapshot Manager (S3) 3 - 194
Start Drawing 6 - 3
Start Up Diagram 2 - 13
Stretch 2 - 4
Stretch (SS) 2 - 4, 3 - 52
Symbol Count 3 - 112
Symbol Manager 2 - 8, 3 - 106
System Requirements 1 - 4
T
Template 4 - 2
Toolbox 4 - 2
Text (TL) 2 - 18, 3 - 145, 4 - 19
Font 2 - 18
Height 2 - 18, 4 - 10
Settings (TBT) 2 - 18, 3 - 150, 4 - 19
The Learning Center 2 - 9
The Quick Start Tutorial 2 - 12
The Speedbar 2 - 6
Tile
Horizontal 3 - 206
Vertical 3 - 205
Title Block 4 - 23
Setup 6 - 18
Trace Boundary (HB) 3 - 102
Traffic Investigation Tutorial 6 - 2
Triangulation 6 - 29
Trim/Extend (TR) 2 - 4, 3 - 56
Tutorial 2 - 12
Two-way Arrow 4 - 19
U
Undo (OO) 2 - 4, 3 - 20
Ungroup (GU) 3 - 68
Unselect 4 - 29
V
View 2 - 16, 4 - 9
Window 4 - 9
Visio 1 - 3
W
Wheelbase Center Markers 6 - 25
Window Stretch (WS) 3 - 54
Z
Zoom
All (ZA) 3 - 115
In (ZI) 3 - 117
Out (ZO) 3 - 118
Previous (ZP) 3 - 119
View (ZN) 3 - 122
Zoom Window (ZW) 2 - 16, 3 - 116
Zooming 4 - 9
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