Age Grade &
MiniMini-Rugby
Manual
Prepared by Paul S. Timperley
Director of Youth Rugby
British Columbia Rugby Union
Tel.
Fax.
(604) 737-3065
(604) 921-6673
e-mail
ptimperley@home.com
October 2, 2001
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION 1
PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
PAGE 3
SECTION 2
RFU RUGBY CONTINUUM:
THE LAWS OF MINI RUGBY
PAGE 26
COACHING GUIDE
PAGE 63
SECTION 3
MINI RUGBY CONTACT LIST
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
PAGE 104
Page 2
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
SECTION 1
PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
To prepare and implement a detailed five-year plan for the development of Mini-Rugby in
all BC Rugby Clubs.
STRATEGIC PRIORITIES:
In order of priority, are:
1.
Mini-Rugby in your Club
1. Promote Mini-Rugby as a Game of Choice
2. Introduce Rugby to 5-15 year old boys and girls
3. Introduce players to Mini-Rugby in a controlled safe environment
4. Promote Rugby as an enjoyable experience
5. Encourage/Ensure acquisition of good basic Rugby skills
6. Retain interest and participation of players
7. Encourage/ensure advancement to Junior Rugby
8. Strengthen Membership of Club by recruiting
Mini-Rugby Players
Parent Social members
Parent Participating members
9. Self Funding through Sponsorship/Membership/Clubhouse Receipts/Program Fees
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 3
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
2.
Mini-Rugby in your neighbourhood
1. Promote Mini-Rugby as a Game of Choice for 5-15 year old boys and girls
2. Promote Mini-Rugby as a desirable/necessary program for schools/bodies
3. Promote your Club as centre of choice
4. Secure B.C.R.U. recognition/support
3.
Mini-Rugby in B.C.
1. Promote Mini-Rugby as a Game of Choice for 5-15 year old boys and girls
2. Promote Mini-Rugby as a desirable/necessary program for B.C.R.U.
Clubs/schools/bodies.
3.
4.
Introduce Inter-Club competition/interplay
Mini-Rugby in Canada
1. Promote Mini-Rugby as a Game of Choice for 5-15 year old boys and girls
2. Promote Mini-Rugby as a desirable/necessary program for clubs/schools/bodies
3. Promote B.C. as centre of excellence
4. Secure C.R.F.U. recognition/support/finance
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 4
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
OUTLINE ACTION PLAN
MINI-RUGBY IN YOUR RUGBY CLUB
1. Promote Mini-Rugby as a Game of Choice
2. Introduce Rugby to 5-15 year old boys and girls
A. Sources of Mini-Rugby Participants:
• Your Club Mini Age Group Parents/Siblings
• Your Club Mini Age Group Kids
• Your neighbourhood Mini Age Group Kids
• Local Elementary Schools
• Local Rec. programs
• Local Mini Age Group Parents
• Other Rugby Clubs without Mini Rugby programs/Rugby player/ex-player
parents
B. Methods of Promotion
i.
Initial emphasis should be in recruiting participants from WITHIN your Club. We
therefore need to identify those members of the Club with children or younger
brothers/sisters in the Mini-Rugby age group of 5-15 years.
This group should be quantified and contacted via parents, and invited to attend an
initial Mini-Rugby camp to be held at the Club on a Sunday morning.
Objective of the camp is FUN and a SAFE introduction to Mini-Rugby for both
players and parents.
Camp should repeat in the following week with a Buddy Day: each participant to
bring at least one friend to participate: prize for participant bringing most new players.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 5
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
Training should, thereafter, be held each Sunday morning throughout the Rugby
season.
ii. Ongoing Contact/Promotion Program should be implemented with
•
Kids/Parents via local Elementary Schools
•
Kids/Parents via local Rec. Program
•
Kids via ongoing Buddy Program/Newsletter
•
Parents via Newspaper Ads/Editorial
•
Kids/Parents via Other Vancouver Rugby Clubs
Objective is to encourage Kids to attend Sunday Morning Mini-Rugby training
sessions AT Your Club
iii. Mini-Rugby Camps should be organised at Your Club during school vacations.
Objective of these sessions should be to create ongoing interest in Mini-Rugby and to
recruit new players to participate in the ongoing Sunday morning sessions. Camps
should be promoted via schools, rec. centres and local newspapers. “Celebrity”
players such as members of the Canadian National Team should be invited to give
motivational talks to kids during these sessions. A charge should be made to cover the
costs of the Camp, and Tee shirts with promotional logo should be given to all
participants.
iv. Programs should be instituted with local elementary schools to conduct an
introductory Mini-Rugby promotional presentation within the schools. These sessions
should be a short presentation, taking no more than 10 to 15 minutes, which may, or
may not, be followed by a short training session: training sessions should be short and
fun oriented and give each child a “feel of the ball”. The objective of these sessions
should be to create sufficient interest in the game for students to wish to attend
Sunday training sessions at Your Club. A copy of the BCRU Mini-Rugby Video
should be shown at these sessions and left at the school for future use and reference.
The accompanying brochure outlining the benefits and stressing the safety of MiniRugby should be given to each student to take home to introduce and promote your
Club Mini-Rugby Program to parents. Encourage the schools to feature your program
in their regular newsletters to parents.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 6
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
v.
The Club should approach local School Boards to arrange half or full day Professional
Day training sessions for elementary school teachers. These Sessions should be
chargeable (suggest $30 - $40 per attendee) and should include lunch/morning snack,
Coaches Manual and Size 4 Rugby Ball for each participant. The objective of the
session should be for the teacher to be able to teach a simple Rugby program within
the PE program at the school, and to be motivated to promote the Club’s Mini-Rugby
program to his/her students. The school’s Sports and Athletic contact should be the
teacher targeted with this program.
vi. Regular mailings to schools should be made via the central mailing facilities of the
local school board, appraising Principals and interested teachers of start and restart of
programs, and of events of interest such as tournaments, Mini-Rugby games allied to
major senior games or events.
vii. Contact should be made with Rec. Centres with the objective of promoting the Your
Club Mini-Rugby Program as part of the local Continuing Education Program for
Kids.
viii. The BCRU promotional poster promoting Mini-Rugby should be distributed to
schools, rec. centres and to other BC Rugby Clubs.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 7
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
3. Introduce players to Mini-Rugby in a controlled safe environment
4. Promote Rugby as an enjoyable experience
5. Encourage/Ensure acquisition of good basic Rugby skills
1.
Coaching
i. Recruitment
Coaches should be recruited from the following sources:
•
Mini-Rugby Program Participants’ Parents (including your Club’s
players/ex-players)
•
Your Club’s Senior, Women and Over-Forties players
•
Overseas players sponsored by your Club under a Rugby
development program
•
Your Club’s Juniors/local High School players
•
B.C.R.U. coaches
•
School teachers with an interest in Rugby
Emphasis should be placed on recruiting interested parents to participate in the regular
Sunday coaching program as it has been proven elsewhere that continuity and reliability is
greater within this group.
The aim should be for each age group (under 7’s, under 8’s, under 9’s, under 10’s, under
11’s, under 12’s, under 14’s, under 16's) to have at least two trained coaches.
Senior players who are not in full time employment and local High School teachers should
be invited to coach Summer Camps (on a paid basis). Investigate the use of Parents/Over
Forties/Juniors/High School players to participate in the elementary school introductory
sessions.
Liaise with local High Schools to investigate the acquisition of grade credits for students
offering assistance in the Program.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 8
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
ii.
Training of Coaches
A Mini-Rugby Coaches program should be put in place to train the coaches under the
guidance of the Mini-Rugby Committee and Your Club Director of Coaching.
The Mini-Rugby Program and Coaches Manual should be distributed to coaches. This
includes a full description of the game, and detailed training sessions, tailored to
players’ ages, to coach the following skills:
Passing
Ruck & Maul
• Running pass
• Making Ball Available
• Standing/Scrum half pass
• Retaining possession
Picking Up/Putting down Ball
Tackling
• Support/Binding on
Running Skills
• Front
• Side-step
• Side
• Swerve
• Rear
• Hand-off
• Falling
• Change of Pace
• Smother Tackle
• Dummy Pass & Kick
Falling on ball defensively
Kicking Off/Receiving
Scrummage
Kicking and Catching
Kicking and Catc
• Foot position
• Punt/Drop Kick/Place Kick
• Binding
• Catching Ball
• Hooking
Line Out
• Pushing/Channelling
Laws of the Game
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 9
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
A typical training session should have the following format:
A) Warm Up
•
Stretch/Running/Fitness games
•
“Fun” game e.g. British Bulldogs, End Ball, Corner Ball
B) Skills Session
•
Demonstration
•
Simple Practice Exercise
•
More Complex Exercises
C) Controlled Game
•
Emphasis on Using Skill Learnt Today (plus using previous skills learned)
Consider holding a “Skills Day”, when players will be tested and evaluated on the various skills
they have acquired. A small prize should be given to the winner in each age group.
iii. Safety
Coaching emphasis should at all times be on safety and fun.
Players (Boys and Girls) should play within narrow controlled age/size bands.
Physical Contact should be introduced gradually into the game, considering the abilities and
age group of players. Emphasis in all age groups should be on running and passing, with the
objective of “graduating” players into the Junior Program (age 14 and over, Grade 8) with a
full range of Rugby skills.
⇒ Under 7 (Grade 1 and under) Age Group
< 7 players
No Tackling (Introduce 2-handed touch)
No Scrummage
No Line Out
No Kicking
No Rucking or Mauling
Play-the-ball start/restart/penalty
No differentiation between forwards and backs
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 10
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
⇒ Under 8 (Grade 2) Age Group
7 Players
No Scrummage (may be introduced in 2nd half as no-push, no counter-strike
scrum with 2 Props, Hooker + Scrum-half, Stand-off, centre, 2 Wings).
Place kick start*; play-the-ball restart/penalty
No Conversions
No Tackling
No Line Out
No Kicking
No Rucking/Mauling
⇒ Under 9 (Grade 3) Age Group
9 Players
Three Player no-push, no counter-strike scrum (2 Props, Hooker)
Scrum-half, Stand-off, 2 Centres, 2 Wings.
Place kick start*; drop kick restart*; play-the-ball penalty
Introduce Tackling
Introduce Mauling
Introduce Rucking; No Pile-ups
No Conversions
No Line Out
No Kicking
⇒ Under 10 (Grade 4) Age Group
Three Player contested scrum (2 Props, Hooker)
Scrum-half, Stand-off, 2 Centres, 2 Wings.
Place kick start*; drop kick restart*; play-the-ball penalty
No Conversions
Introduce Line Out
No Pile-ups
⇒ Under 11 (Grade 5) Age Group
Five Player scrum (2 Props, Hooker, 2 Locks)
Scrum-half, Stand-off, 2 Centres, 2 Wings.
Place kick start; drop kick restart; play-the-ball penalty
No Pile-ups
⇒ Under 12 (Grade 6) Age Group
Five Player scrum (2 Props, Hooker, 2 Locks)
Scrum-half, Stand-off, 2 Centres, 2 Wings.
Place kick start; drop kick restart; play-the-ball penalty
Kicking in attack
No Pile-ups
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 11
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
⇒
Under 13/14 (Grade 7 & 8) Age Group
Five Player scrum (2 Props, Hooker, 2 Locks)
Scrum-half, Stand-off, 2 Centres, 2 Wings, Fullback.
Place kick start; drop kick restart; play-the-ball penalty
Amended U19 Laws (see later section)
⇒
Under 15/16 (Grade 9 & 10) Age Group
Six Player scrum (2 Props, Hooker, 2 Locks, No.8)
Scrum-half, Stand-off, 2 Centres, 2 Wings, Fullback.
Place kick start; drop kick restart; play-the-ball penalty
Amended U19 Laws (see later section)
iv. NOTE: “* ”: RFU does not recommend introducing kicking until “under 11” age group:
my experience is that kids enjoy kicking off/catching the ball and I always include this in my
coaching. I do not include conversions in my games until U14 as they waste playing time
and goal posts are often not available.
v. Each age group should have at least two Coaches. During games, one coach should act as
referee, and one coach should be allowed on the pitch behind his/her team during play to
provide constructive positional advice and guidance to players. Referees should
explain/coach players at breakdowns in play.
vi. All players must wear mouth guards.
vii. All players must wear appropriate clothing and footwear. Coaches are responsible for
checking for worn or otherwise dangerous cleats and equipment.
viii. All coaches should be required to be members of your Club (and hence BCRU) and to
submit to a police background check.
ix. Coaches should be encouraged to participate in BCRU coaching programs and to gain
BCRU accreditation. At least one coach in each age group should be Level 1 certified.
Regular Mini-Rugby orientated level 1 courses are run throughout the province and can be
run on site for groups of coaches from individual clubs.
x. The Club MUST ensure that all Coaches are covered by liability insurance (BCRU or
otherwise).
xi. All participants/parents MUST be obliged to sign waiver form before participating in any
practice, game or activity.
xii. An excellent coaching resource is the CANCoach/BCRU Mini-Rugby CD, available from
CANCoach at (604) 736-9068 (www.cancoach.com). This product has an excellent section
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 12
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
on planning practice sessions and drills. It is recommended that all coaches at least make
themselves familiar with its content.
6. Retain interest and participation of players
7. Encourage/ensure advancement to Junior Rugby
8. Strengthen Membership of Club by recruiting
1. The Mini Rugby Program should be organised in age/size bands, with “graduation” to the
next band at the end of each season, having achieved the requisite skills of the age group.
Emphasis in all age bands should be on Players and Parents enjoying their “Rugby
Experience”, and looking forward to the next stage of development.
2. During the initial stages, training should take place within the Club: as Mini-Rugby develops
within Vancouver (see later section), tournaments/interclub games should add the element of
competition, with players competing to gain a place in “Teams” at each age group (though the
objective of “Teams” should be to give all players, of varying abilities, equal opportunity to
play in the “Team”).
3. All participants in Sunday Sessions should be invited/obliged to join your Club Mini-Rugby
Section after attending their first training. Cost of this membership should be $40 per player.
This sum includes full player insurance. Parents should be encouraged to join the Club as
social members. The Club should consider a family membership package. For liability reasons,
it is essential that all players, coaches and assistant coaches complete the BCRU registration
form, and that this form is sent to the BCRU office without delay. No player should be
allowed to participate in any game, practice or activity (including "Buddy Days") without
having first completed the form and having it countersigned by a parent or guardian.
4. Training/playing Sessions should be followed by “Social” session in the Clubhouse with
“pop”/chips/hot dogs/videos/games machines available to Kids and limited bar service
available to parents who have taken social membership (wine, coffee and beer), and parents of
visiting teams. Coffee, donuts and bacon sandwiches should be available to parents before and
during Training Sessions.
5. Experience in other countries shows that most players involved in well run Mini-Rugby
programs should pass on to the Junior Rugby Program. We currently run programs for all age
groups from Kindergarten to Grade 12, with a competitive league and cup program for Under
14 (Grade 7 & 8) age groups, and a competitive League and Cup for U16s (grade 9 & 10).
Our aim is that players will pass from these programs to U19, U21 and adult programs
without the drop-out effect of school leavers found with players exposed to the game solely in
High school.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 13
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
BRITISH COLUMBIA RUGBY UNION / YOUR RFC MINI RUGBY SECTION
INDIVIDUAL REGISTRATION FORM
All information gathered by the BCRU is strictly confidential
NAME _______________________________________________
PLAYED LAST YEAR? YES / NO
BIRTHDATE
LANDED IMMIGRANT
dd
mm
yr
CITIZENSHIP: CANADIAN
OTHER
ADDRESS
TELEPHONE (
) __________________ E-MAIL____________________________________
SCHOOL ________________________________________GRADE _______________
PLAYS RUGBY AT SCHOOL? YES / NO
GENDER ___________
B.C. MEDICAL #
The BCRU insurance policy does not replace your BC medical coverage. You MUST be covered by BC Medical or
private/overseas insurance (sport specific) to be eligible for BCRU medical insurance
Office Use Only:
Registration Fee Paid: Cash
Cheque
BCRU MEMBER #:
CONSENT TO PLAY - Please Ensure You Complete Both Parts A & B
A. PARTICIPANT
I,
, born
, hereby acknowledge that I wish to play and participate
as a member of YOUR RUGBYCLUB in the sport of rugby, and I hereby acknowledge and agree as follows:
1. That I am aware that the sport of rugby is a game of physical contact and constant physical motion that may result in serious
personal injury to its participants;
2. That I am aware that one must be healthy and maintain a certain level of physical conditioning to participate in the sport of
rugby, and I believe that I am in such state of health and physical condition to enable me to participate safely in the
sport of rugby;
3. That I acknowledge and accept that all members of YOUR RUGBY CLUB, of YOUR RUGBY UNION and the BRITISH
COLUMBIA RUGBY UNION, including those who are on the executive, all coaches, all trainers and all playing
members, are volunteers who contribute their time freely to further the development and enjoyment of those
participating in the sport of rugby;
4. That I have carefully read the above and understand the terms, and I freely and voluntarily sign this document and consent
to playing and participating as a member of YOUR RUGBY CLUB in the sport of rugby.
Signature of participant:
B. PARENT/GUARDIAN ACKNOWLEDGMENT (for junior players under 19)
and/or
being
I/We,
parent(s)/legal guardian(s) of the above named participant (hereinafter called "my child"), do hereby acknowledge and agree:
1.
That I/we have carefully read and understand the Consent to Play as above.
2.
That I/we wish my/our child to participate in the sport of rugby, and in particular, as a member of YOUR RUGBY
CLUB.
Signature of parent(s)/guardian(s) ________________________________
_____________________________________
Dated at YOUR CLUB LOCATION, BRITISH COLUMBIA, the _____ day of _____________________ in the year 199____
The Mini-Rugby Program is run entirely by parent volunteers and funded by donations from Sponsors: please help us to provide your child with a
superb Rugby experience by volunteering to help out in one of the following roles:
Coach Coaching Assistant Catering Fund Raiser Schools Liaison Registration Desk Consignment/Uniform Shop Committee Member
Set Up/ Clear Away Sponsor Team Manager
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 14
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
6. You should set up a Mini-Rugby Committee to administer the running of the Mini-Rugby
Section. This elected Committee should be comprised mainly of parents and should report to
Your Club Executive through its Chairman. Duties and responsibilities should include:
7.
•
Recruitment of Players
•
Recruitment/Induction/Training/Allocation of Coaches
•
Administration/Staffing of Schools Program
•
Liaison with Recreation Bodies
•
Liaison with BCRU
•
Organisation of Tournaments/Camps
•
Recruitment of Mini-Rugby Team Sponsors
•
Publicity
•
Organisation of Catering and Bar Service
•
Organisation of Social Events (Kids Discos/Parents Dances, Xmas Party, End of
Season Banquet, After-Training Videos etc.)
•
Liaison with Your Club re. Scheduling/use of facilities
•
Registration of players, collection of dues and control of expenditure
•
Design and acquisition of Tee Shirts, Uniforms, etc.
•
Liaison and reporting to Your Club Executive
Consider setting up the Mini-Rugby section of your club as a separate society under the
Societies Act with its own Constitution and by-laws. The advantage of this approach is that it
allows you to approach local municipalities, trusts, foundations and the BC Gaming
Commission for funds as an organisation whose sole aims are providing community based
programs for children. There is a much better chance of obtaining funds via this route than as
a section of an adult Rugby club, who may be excluded entirely from access to these sources
(especially in the case of the Gaming Commission).
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 15
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
9. Self Funding through Sponsorship/Membership/Clubhouse Receipts/Program Fees
Mini Rugby has proven to be a valuable source of revenue to clubs in other countries. A typical example
would be in England, where over 150 under 12 age group players, plus a similar number of parents, would
use the facilities of an average size Club on Sunday morning Mini-Rugby game days (with about half that
number training on Wednesday evenings). Parents buy refreshments and use the bar facilities as social
members. Sunday Mini-Rugby bar receipts are often as high as on Saturday senior team game days, with
“pop” sales contributing as high an overall return as beer sales.
Sources of Income
Expenditure
Players Registration Fees
Coaching Manuals (Free from BCRU) and
CANCoach CD ROMs
Parents Social Membership Fees
Profit on Sales of Players’ Club Shirts, Shorts
and Socks
Mini Rugby Promotional Brochure (Free
from BCRU)
Mini Rugby Promotional Posters (Free)
Profit on Mouthguard Sales
Mini Rugby Promotional Videos (Free)
Profit on Sales of Coffee/Donuts/Bacon
Sandwiches to Mini-Rugby parents
Balls (Size 3 and 4): 6 for Each Age Group
Profit on Sales of Hot Dogs/Hamburgers
Pitch Marker Flags (Use Club’s if available)
Chips and Pop sales to Mini-Rugby Players
Training Cones (If unavailable from your
senior Club)
Profit on Bar Sales to Social Members/Visitors
Tackling Bags (If unavailable from Club)
Profit on Social Functions/Dances etc.
Tee Shirts for Training Camps
Game Day/Tournament Raffle
Payment of Training Camp Coaches (?)
Tournament Registration Fees
After-Game/Training Video Rental
Training Camp Registration Fees
Buddy Day Prizes
External Sponsorship
Game Day/Tournament Raffle Prizes
Gaming Commission, Local Foundation grants
Advertising - Local Newspapers
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 16
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
Typical Mini Rugby Budget
Number
Income
Players Registration Fees
80 @ $40.00
$3,200.00
Parents Social Membership Fees
40 @ $25.00
$1,000.00
Sales of Players’ Club Game Shirts
80 @ $32.50
$2,600.00
80 @ $26.75
$2,140.00
80 @ $ 3.00
$240.00
less Cost of Sales
Mouthguard Sales
less Cost of Sales
Sales of Players’ Club Game Shorts
less Cost of Sales
Sales of Players’ Club Game Socks
less Cost of Sales
Sales of Balls
less Cost of Sales
Profit on Sales of Food & Pop
Profit on Bar Sales to Social Members/Visitors
Game Day/Tournament Raffle
80 @ $ 1.00
$80.00
80 @ $15.00
$1,200.00
80 @ $13.00
$1,040.00
80 @ $10.00
$800.00
80 @ $ 6.00
$480.00
20 @ $30.00
$600.00
20 @ $20.00
$400.00
$460.00
$160.00
$160.00
$320.00
$200.00
24 @ $80.00
$1,920.00
If Applicable
Varies $200-600
$$$
50 @ $30.00
$1,500.00
External Sponsorship
Varies by Club
$$$
Gaming Commission Casino Grant
Varies by Club
$$$
Local Foundation Grants
Varies by Club
$$$
Summer Camp Registration Profit
Expenditure
BCRU Mini-Rugby Levy (NB, Not in First Year)
80 @ $20.00
$ 4,000.00
Coaching Manuals
14 @ $10.00
Free from
BCRU
$
45.00
CANCoach Coaching CD ROM
Mini Rugby Promotional Brochure
1 @ $45.00
2000 @ $ .10
Mini Rugby Promotional Posters
40 @ $ 5.00
Mini Rugby Promotional Videos
20 @ $10.00
Free from
BCRU
Free from
BCRU
Free from
BCRU
$
100.00
Membership Cards/Printing etc.
Balls (Size 3 and 4): 6 for Each Age Group
42 @ $20.00
Tee Shirts for Training Camps
50 @ $ 8.00
$
400.00
After-Game/Training Video Rental
20 @ $ 4.50
$
90.00
2 @ $20.00
$
40.00
Donated by
Sponsors
80 @ $ 5.00
$
400.00
Buddy Day Prizes
Game Day/Tournament Raffle Prizes
Xmas Party Gift
Xmas Party Food
Paid by Sponsor
Xmas Party Entertainment
Paid by Sponsor
Banquet Trophies
Paid by Sponsor
Advertising - Local Newspaper
Coaches Police Checks
Coaches Certification
Total
$ 840.00
Varies
Usually Free
Paid by Coaches
$8,920.00
(+ $$$)
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
$
5,915.00
(less $4,000
in Year 1)
Page 17
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
Balls and Equipment
When we first decided to run mini-rugby, we tried to find kid-sized rugby clothing, and
size 3 and 4 rugby balls to use in our programs. Unfortunately we couldn't find anything
we needed domestically at any price. After a lot of searching we imported some balls and
jerseys from a source in England, but the price and inconvenience made it impractical as a
long-term solution.
Our goal was to make it possible for kids to get their hands on a high quality rugby balls
and equipment at a reasonable price. Our ultimate goal was for coaches to be able to give
a ball to every young player and enable the cost to be absorbed into our program fees.
There are a number of suppliers who now realise that there is a large market for Rugby
equipment with junior players and are able to supply our needs for jerseys, shorts, socks
and boots (their contact details are listed at the end of this manual). However, as these are
all commercial organisations, their prices include a their own (and often wholesalers’)
mark-ups and profits. Prices of balls and mouthguards, in particular, tend to be very high
and quality is often not as good as we would like.
For that reason, we decided to source balls and mouthguards directly from the overseas
manufacturers (nearly all Rugby balls, except the most expensive Gilbert match balls, are
made in the Indian sub-continent), and to supply them directly at factory prices to our
clubs. Once we chose suppliers, we went to great lengths to satisfy ourselves that any
products to carry our endorsement were produced without the use of child labour. An
independent monitoring organization has certified that the factories we use do not employ
any child labour. We understand that this is not necessarily the case with many other balls
available commercially in Canada. As there are no profit mark-ups once the products leave
the factory, our only add-ons being freight, duty. GST and PST, our balls represent superb
value for our clubs, both for their own use and to sell to players (often as an Xmas gift) as
a fundraiser.
We can supply a top quality junior rugby ball, size 3, 4 or 5, custom designed with your
mini-rugby club logos, for much less than the cost of a low quality commercial alternative.
Our mouthguards are made in the USA, come in adult, youth and child sizes in a range of
“fashion” colours, and are better quality than anything we were able to source locally,
together with an inclusive insurance policy should the player experience any accidental
tooth damage whilst wearing the device.
Contact Paul Timperley, BCRU Director of Age Grade and Mini Rugby programs on
(604) 921-6623 for details of these BCRU products.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 18
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
Mini-Rugby in Vancouver/B.C.
1. Promote Mini-Rugby as a Game of Choice
2. Promote Mini-Rugby as a desirable/necessary program for B.C.R.U. Clubs/
Schools/bodies
3. Introduce Inter-Club competition/interplay
B.C.R.U Mini-Rugby Sub Committee
We have set up a BCRU mini-rugby sub-committee to promote the game, to
establish uniformity of playing standards, to co-ordinate our approach to potential
sponsors, and to organise an ongoing program of tournaments and inter-club
fixtures. The committee meets monthly throughout the Rugby season. We urge all
clubs to identify those members interested in starting mini-rugby programs, and to
encourage them to attend the committee’s meetings, and to participate in this
exciting new initiative.
Inter Club Competition
i. It is important for the development of both the sport of Mini-Rugby, and your own
players, that we create an environment where your players can play games against
other clubs and in Mini-Rugby tournaments.
It should be your objective to have your players playing competitive rugby (probably
in 3 or 4 club mini-tournaments) at least once a month in the medium term, and on a
weekly basis with additional mid-week training session in the longer term (see
attached timescale/schedule).
ii. Jamborees
Jamborees will be run every three weeks in the first half and every 2 weeks in the
second half. An international end-of-season Festival will take place at the end of the
season to which all teams playing Mini-Rugby in North America will be invited.
BCRU will publish a schedule of Jamborees each season. One or two Jamborees will
usually be run on these dates, depending on the facilities available at the venue (see
Size Guidelines below).
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 19
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
For ages 4-13 (K to Grade 7), jamborees are non-competitive and non-elitist: every
player should get equal playing time/opportunity and scores should not be recorded
or posted: the objective is for each player to have fun and enjoy the experience of
playing against other teams and clubs.
•
Size Guidelines
Duration of Jamborees should be no longer than 3 hours for grades 3 to 7 and two
hours for grades K to 2.
To ensure this, the following guidelines should be adhered to:
Club has one pitch only
3 Clubs maximum: two games per team
Club has two pitches
4 Clubs maximum: three games per team
Club has three pitches
6 Clubs maximum: three games per team
Club has four pitches
8 Clubs maximum: three games per team
Jamborees should start promptly at 10 am and organisers must ensure that games
run to schedule.
•
Laws
Wherever possible, the laws as set out in the Rugby Continuum should be followed.
Where children have not yet progressed to the level of the Continuum, modified
games without tackling, scrummaging, lineouts etc. should be played at the
discretion of the coaches, who should agree local rules before each age groups’
games.
No over-competitive or rough play should be permitted at any level, persistent
offenders being removed from the game and counselled by their coach. Over
enthusiastic or competitive support by parents should be discouraged.
•
Organisation of Jamborees
The Jamboree should provide an enjoyable rugby experience for children, parents
and coaches. 600-700 players may attend a jamboree, which means that over 1200
parents and 600 cars could visit the club.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 20
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
It is important that the host Club plans the Jamboree carefully and ensures that
sufficient facilities and volunteers are available to cope with the expected influx of
cars and visitors and to enable the Jamboree to progress in a well-organised manner.
a) Parking:
Should be in designated areas, clearly signed and marshals available to assist drivers
to park their cars in an orderly fashion with minimum annoyance to neighbours.
Marshals should be distinguished by orange dayglo vests or similar means of
identification.
Marshals should assist drivers to leave the vicinity of the jamboree at the conclusion
of the day’s play.
b) Catering:
A catering service for players and parents should be available from the outset of play
to the end of the tournament.
Minimum requirement is the provision of coffee and baked goods for parents and
pop, juice, hot chocolate and hot dogs for players.
Alcohol should not be available in the proximity of areas to which children have
access.
Price lists should be clearly displayed in catering areas.
Tents should be erected in catering areas and seating/tables available if clubhouse
facilities are not available.
Garbage facilities should be provided in both the catering and playing areas.
An example menu is attached.
c) Shelter:
Sheltered areas should be available adjacent to each playing area to allow players to
keep warm and dry between games. Tents should be set up if no other suitable
shelter is available.
d) Washrooms:
Adequate male and female washrooms should be provided adjacent to playing
areas to deal with the numbers of players/parents attending the Jamboree.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 21
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
e) Changing Facilities:
Boys and Girls changing facilities and ideally, showers, should be available and
clearly signed. Closed tents should be set up if no other facilities are available.
f) First Aid:
A qualified first aid provider and first aid kit MUST be present throughout the
Jamboree. A First Aid Post should be set up and clearly signed.
Field Marshals should be made aware of the location of the First Aid Post and a
stretcher should be available.
If clubhouse facilities are not available, a tent should be available for First Aid use.
g) Public Address System:
Should be available to address the players/coaches prior to commencement of the
tournament and to make announcements throughout the tournament (e.g. lost
children/parents).
Players should be advised of the schedule, necessity of adhering to time, and
encouraged to have an enjoyable experience prior to commencement of play.
h) Field Organisation:
Each field should be clearly marked with signs for the appropriate age group. Line
markings and corner flags should designate the playing area for each age group.
If goal posts are adjacent to playing areas, post pads MUST be put up to prevent
impact/collision injuries.
Field marshals should be allocated to each age group’s playing area to co-ordinate
each age group’s activities, ensure adherence to schedules, provide match play balls,
ensure that referees and coaches are available for each game, clear the pitch at the
end of each game and to assist coaches to get their teams on and off the pitch before
and after each game.
Marshals should wear dayglo vests or similar means of identification and should be
provided with a copy of their section’s schedule with sufficient extra copies for the
coaches of each team playing in their section.
Marshals must be aware of the procedure to be followed in case of injury to players
in their field section.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 22
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
i) Balls:
It is the responsibility of the organising club to provide match balls for each age
group/field area.
j) Schedules:
It is the responsibility of the organising club to provide each coach and field marshal
with a copy of the schedule of the day’s play.
Schedules should be posted in conspicuous positions around the playing area.
k) Role of Coaches/Referees:
Each team in each age group should have at least two coaches present: one to be
present behind his/her team during the game to offer positional/coaching advice and
guidance, and one to be available to referee the game.
Players should be freely substituted at half-time and if injuries occur to ensure that all
players get equal opportunity to play.
Referees should be proactive and use breakdowns in play as opportunities to coach
players in the reasons for breakdown. Referees should adjust the strictness of their
law interpretation according to the age and experience of the players to allow games
to flow as freely as possible.
Teams and coaches should congratulate their opponents at the end of each game.
The team listed as the “home” team will normally provide the referee for each game:
coaches may agree a different policy if they so wish.
Schedulers should ensure that each team has equal designation as “home” team.
l) Uniforms
Each team should ensure that its players have distinctive Rugby jerseys, tee-shirts or
coloured bibs to allow team identification during games.
m) Fund Raising:
No charge should be made for entry to the ground.
Clubs are encouraged to run a raffle or similar fund raising event during the
Jamboree to raise funds for their program.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 23
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
Sample Mini-Rugby Sunday Menu
Cookies……………………………………….…..….$…0.50
Cheezies………………………………………………….0.50
Chips…………………………………………….……….1.00
Donuts/Muffins………………………………………….1.00
Cinammon Bun………………………………………….1.00
Hot Dog………………………………………………….2.00
Bacon Sandwich……..………………………..……….…2.00
Egg Sandwich……………………………………….……2.00
Bacon & Egg Sandwich………………………………….3.00
Bacon & Double Egg Sandwich…………..………….….4.00
Coffe/Tea…………………………………….……..…….1.00
Hot Chocolate………………………………………….…1.00
Juice………………………………………………………1.00
Bottled Water……………….………………………...…1.00
Sports Blast Drink………..……………………………...1.00
Gatorade………………………………………………….2.00
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 24
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
TIMESCALES:
Activity
Suggested Deadline
Responsibility
Establish Mini-Rugby Relationship with BCRU Mini-Rugby Director
- 3 months
Mini-Rugby Director
Establish Liaison with other Vancouver Clubs
- 3 months
Mini-Rugby Director
Secure mandate to prepare and implement Plan
- 2 months
Club Executive
Canvas Club Membership for potential players
- 3 weeks
Mini-Rugby Director
Canvas Club Membership for potential coaches
- 3 weeks
Mini-Rugby Director
Order Coaches Manuals
- 3 weeks
Mini-Rugby Director
Order Balls, Cones etc.
- 3 weeks
Mini-Rugby Director
Arrange/Run Coaches' Initial Training Session
- 2 weeks
Mini-Rugby Director
Arrange Police Checks on Coaches
- 1 week
Mini-Rugby Director
Arrange/Run Initial Mini Rugby Camp & invite participants
Week 1
Mini-Rugby Director
Arrange/Run Follow-up Buddy day
Week 2
Mini-Rugby Director
Arrange Parents Meeting/Elect Committee
Week 3
Mini-Rugby Director
Allocate Responsibilities to Committee Members
Week 3
Mini-Rugby Committee
Schedule Coaches' Training Sessions/Allocate coaches
Week 4
Mini-Rugby Committee
Schedule Player Training sessions
Week 4
Mini-Rugby Committee
Schedule Social Activities (Xmas, Easter, End of Season)
Week 4
Mini-Rugby Committee
Order Promotional Brochures
Week 4
Mini-Rugby Committee
Order Promotional Videos ( 1 per school )
Week 4
Mini-Rugby Committee
Order Promotional Posters
Week 4
Mini-Rugby Committee
Commence ongoing Elementary School Program
Week 5
Mini-Rugby Committee
Establish relationship with local Rec. Program
Week 5
Mini-Rugby Committee
Design and Order Uniforms
Week 6
Mini-Rugby Committee
Attend Mini-Rugby Tournament/Arrange Ongoing Tournaments
Week 12
Mini-Rugby Committee
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 25
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
SECTION 2
RFU RUGBY CONTINUUM: THE LAWS OF MINI RUGBY
RULES OF PLAY
1. Except where the following Rules amend or adapt the Laws of the Game to suit the
development of young players, the Laws of the Game shall apply.
2. The International Rugby Board has recommended as appropriate the following KEY
STAGES for each age group.
Key Stage 1
Non-Contact Mini Rugby Under 7 (in BC this is Grades K - 1)
Key Stage 2
Non-Contact Mini Rugby Under 8 (in BC this is Grade 2)
Mini Rugby Under 9 (in BC this is Grade 3)
Mini Rugby Under 10 (in BC this is Grade 4)
Key Stage 3
Under 11 Midi Rugby (in BC this is Grade 5)
Under 12 Midi Rugby (in BC this is Grade 6)
In addition, BCRU has extended its program to include age groups classified by the IRB
as "Age Grade Rugby"
Key Stage 4
Under 13 Age Grade Rugby (in BC this is Grade 7)
Under 14 Age Grade Rugby (in BC this is Grade 8)
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 26
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
Key Stage 5
Under 15 Age Grade Rugby (in BC this is Grade 9)
Under 16 Age Grade Rugby (in BC this is Grade 10)
Key Stage 6
Under 17 Age Grade Rugby (in BC this is Grade 11)
Under 19 Age Grade Rugby
Key Stage 7
Under 21 Age Grade Rugby
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 27
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
KEY STAGE 1: Non-Contact Mini Rugby Under 7 (Grade K to 1)
7.1 The object of the game is to score a try (5 points) in accordance with the Laws of the
Game.
7.2 The game is played between teams of not more than seven players.
7.3 The ball can ONLY be passed sideways or backwards.
7.4 The game is started or re-started from the centre of the field, or after a penalty, with a
free pass. The starter’s team must be behind the ball (i.e. nearer their own try line than
the starter). Before the pass is taken, the opposing team must be 7 metres away nearer
its own goal line. If the place for the free pass is given within 7 metres of the goal line,
the free pass is to be taken at or behind the mark on a line through the mark at least 7
metres from the goal line.
NOTE: At the free pass the ball is held in two hands off the ground and is to be
passed through the air to a team member. The referee is to ensure that the opposition
are 7 metres back before indicating that play is to commence. The receiver of the free
pass must start no more than 2 metres behind the passer but may be at any distance
laterally across the width of the field of play. The passer must not run with the ball or
dummy pass. Normal play resumes as the ball leaves the hand of the passer.
7.5 If a player running with the ball is touched with two hands below the waist by an
opponent, the player must pass the ball immediately. Opponents must not prevent the
passer from passing the ball. (Penalty: A free pass re-start to the opposition). If a
player running with the ball is in the immediate act of touching the ball down for a try
when touched by the opposition, a try should be awarded (otherwise the ball has to
be passed).
NOTE 1: Touch below waist/hip area and not above.
NOTE 2: At this level, players should be allowed some leeway, i.e. a tackled player
must be allowed to pass the ball even if it is knocked out of his/her hands. Any player
going to ground after a touch must be allowed to regain his/her feet and pass the ball.
NOTE 3: If a player, in the immediate act of scoring a try is legally touched, a try
shall be awarded, provided the ball is touched down and the player was considered by
the referee to be in the act of touching down.
NOTE 4: It is helpful for the referee to indicate that a “tackle” has been made, i.e.
that the player has been touched, by shouting “tackled”.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 28
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
7.6 If a player, legally touched, fails to pass, the ball goes to the opposing team for a free
pass re-start.
7.7 When the ball, or player carrying the ball goes into touch, the game shall be restarted with a free pass to the opponents of the team who carried or last touched the
ball before it went into touch. The position of the free pass shall be 2 metres in from
touch, parallel to the point where the ball or ball carrier crossed the touchline. The
team not re-starting shall retire as for a free pass re-start (detailed in 7.4 above).
7.8 The offside line in games at this level is the ball.
NOTE: A player in front of the ball carrier of his own team is to be penalised for
being offside unless that player is making an obvious attempt to return to an onside
position (i.e. behind the ball).
7.9 A player must not hand-off or fend-off an opponent in any way. (Penalty: A free pass
re-start to the opposition). (A hand-off or fend-off is defined as "any movement of
the hand, arm or ball to ward off a would-be tackler").
NOTE: Players are recommended to carry the ball in two hands.
7.10 A player may not kick the ball. If this happens, possession goes to the opposing
team for a free pass re-start at the point at which the ball was kicked.
7.11 After a try has been scored, the game re-starts from the centre with a free pass (as
in 7.4 above) to the side which conceded the try. The re-start shall not take place
until the opponents have returned to a line 7 metres back from the centre on the side
which they are defending.
7.12 In addition to the provision to Law 26, a player shall not use excessive force in
tackling another player (such as pushing an opponent over) nor should a player
carrying the ball deliberately barge or run into any other players. (Penalty: A free
pass re-start to the opposition). Any push into touch is to be penalised and the free
pass is to be taken 2 metres from the touchline, level with the place where the player
went into touch.)
7.13 After any stoppage not covered in the Rules, the game shall re-start with a free pass
to the team who were moving forward, or if neither team were moving forward, by
the team who were last in possession of the ball.
7.14 A game should be made up of two halves, each of up to ten minutes duration.
During the interval, coaches should take adequate time to talk to, encourage, coach
and explain the game to the players. During the game, coaches can direct and
develop play in a coaching sense from on the field of play, ideally behind their teams.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 29
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
Coaches Instructions:
1.
A size 3 ball should be used.
2.
The emphasis should be on enjoyment. The children should be encouraged to enjoy
the physical skills of running, passing, and evasion and coached accordingly.
3.
A coaching session should last no longer than 60 minutes with no more than 20
minutes devoted to match play.
4.
All players are advised to wear mouth guards.
5.
Coaches are advised to check studs before training sessions, games or tournaments
in accordance with the Laws of the Game.
IN THIS VERSION OF THE GAME THERE IS A TOTAL EMPHASIS ON
RUNNING WITH THE BALL, EVASION, RUNNING IN SUPPORT OF THE
BALL CARRIER, PASSING AND RUNNING TO TOUCH THE BALL
CARRIER.
THERE IS NO TACKLING
NO SCRUMMAGE
NO LINE-OUT
NO KICKING
NO HAND-OFF/FEND-OFF
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 30
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
KEY STAGE 2: Non-Contact Mini Rugby Under 8 (Grade 2)
8.1 The object of the game is to score a try (5 points) in accordance with the Laws of the
Game.
8.2 The game is played between teams of not more than seven players.
8.3 The ball can ONLY be passed sideways or backwards.
8.4 The game is started or re-started from the centre of the field, or after a penalty, with
a free pass. The starter’s team must be behind the ball (i.e. nearer their own try line
than the starter). Before the pass is taken, the opposing team must be 7 metres away
nearer its own goal line. If the place for the free pass is given within 7 metres of the
goal line, the free pass is to be taken at or behind the mark on a line through the
mark at least 7 metres from the goal line.
NOTE: At the free pass the ball is held in two hands off the ground and is to be
passed through the air to a team member. The referee is to ensure that the
opposition are 7 metres back before indicating that play is to commence. The
receiver of the free pass must start no more than 2 metres behind the passer but may
be at any distance laterally across the width of the field of play. The passer must not
run with the ball or dummy pass. Normal play resumes as the ball leaves the hand of
the passer.
8.5 If a player running with the ball is touched with two hands below the waist by an
opponent, the player must pass the ball immediately. Opponents must not prevent
the passer from passing the ball. (Penalty: A free pass re-start to the opposition). If a
player running with the ball is in the immediate act of touching the ball down for a
try when touched by the opposition, a try should be awarded (otherwise the ball has
to be passed).
NOTE 1: Touch below waist/hip area and not above.
NOTE 2: At this level, players should be allowed some leeway, i.e. a tackled player
must be allowed to pass the ball even if it is knocked out of his/her hands. Any
player going to ground after a touch must be allowed to regain his/her feet and pass
the ball.
NOTE 3: If a player, in the immediate act of scoring a try is legally touched, a try
shall be awarded, provided the ball is touched down and the player was considered
by the referee to be in the act of touching down.
NOTE 4: It is helpful for the referee to indicate that a “tackle” has been made, i.e.
that the player has been touched, by shouting “tackled”.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 31
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
8.6 If a player, legally touched, fails to pass, the ball goes to the opposing team for a free
pass re-start.
8.7 When the ball, or player carrying the ball goes into touch, the game shall be restarted with a free pass to the opponents of the team who carried or last touched the
ball before it went into touch. The position of the free pass shall be 2 metres in from
touch, parallel to the point where the ball or ball carrier crossed the touchline. The
team not re-starting shall retire as for a free pass re-start (detailed in 8.4 above).
8.8 The offside line in games at this level is the ball.
NOTE: A player in front of the ball carrier of his own team is to be penalised for
being offside unless that player is making an obvious attempt to return to an onside
position (i.e. behind the ball).
8.9 A player must not hand-off or fend-off an opponent in any way. (Penalty: A free pass
re-start to the opposition). (A hand-off or fend-off is defined as “any movement of
the hand, arm or ball to ward off a would-be tackler”).
NOTE: Players are recommended to carry the ball in two hands.
8.10 A player may not kick the ball. If this happens, possession goes to the opposing
team for a free pass re-start at the point at which the ball was kicked.
8.11 After a try has been scored, the game re-starts from the centre with a free pass (as
in 8.4 above) to the side which conceded the try. The re-start shall not take place
until the opponents have returned to a line 7 metres back from the centre on the side
which they are defending.
8.12 In addition to the provision to Law 26, a player shall not use excessive force in
tackling another player (such as pushing an opponent over) nor should a player
carrying the ball deliberately barge or run into any other players. (Penalty: A free
pass re-start to the opposition). Any push taken 2 metres from the touchline level
with the place where the player went into touch.
8.13 After any stoppage not covered in the Rules, the game shall re-start with a free pass
to the team who were moving forward, or if neither team were moving forward, by
the team who were last in possession of the ball.
8.14 A game should be made up of two halves, each of up to ten minutes duration.
During the interval, coaches should take adequate time to talk to, encourage, coach
and explain the game to the players.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 32
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
Coaches Instructions:
1.
A size 3 ball should be used.
2.
The emphasis should be on enjoyment. The children should be encouraged to enjoy
the physical skills of running, passing, and evasion and coached accordingly.
3.
A coaching session should last no longer than 60 minutes with no more than 20
minutes devoted to match play.
4.
As the end of the season approaches (but NOT before 1st February), the concept of
the set piece play of scrummage and back line may be introduced a three player
uncontested scrummage. The scrummage should be made up of one row of three
players from each team. The ball is put into the scrummage as laid down in the Laws
of the Game of Rugby Football Union. The centre player of the three in the nonoffending team sweeps the ball back through the legs of the player on their left with
the right foot (see diagrams below). The players of the offending team in the
scrummage must not attempt to hook the ball or push their opponents backwards.
5.
The back line in the team not putting the ball into the scrummage must remain 7
metres behind the scrummage until normal play re-starts, with the exception of the
scrum half, who must remain behind the hindmost foot of the scrummage, until
normal play re-starts. Normal play should re-start when the ball has emerged from
the scrummage.
6.
As the end of the season approaches (but NOT before 1st February), tackling might
be introduced into training sessions but not introduced to the game format until the
next age group (i.e. Under 9). Tackling must be introduced progressively.
9.
All players are advised to wear mouth guards.
10.
Coaches are advised to check studs before training sessions, games or tournaments
in accordance with the Laws of the Game.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 33
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
IN THIS VERSION OF THE GAME THERE IS A TOTAL EMPHASIS ON
RUNNING WITH THE BALL EVASION, RUNNING IN SUPPORT OF THE
BALL CARRIER, PASSING AND RUNNING TO TOUCH THE BALL
CARRIER.
THERE IS NO TACKLING
NO SCRUMMAGE
NO LINE-OUT
NO KICKING
NO HAND-OFF/FEND-OFF
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 34
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
KEY STAGE 2: Mini Rugby Under 9 (Grade 3)
9.1 The object of the game is to score a try (5 points) in accordance with the Laws of the
Game.
9.2 The game is played between teams of nine players, three of whom and no more
should form the scrummage, the remaining six should form the back line. Positions
should be interchangeable.
9.3 The ball can ONLY be passed sideways or backwards.
9.4 The game is started or re-started from the centre of the field, or after a penalty, with
a free pass. The starter’s team must be behind the ball (i.e. nearer their own try line
than the starter). Before the pass is taken, the opposing team must be 7 metres away
nearer its own goal line. If the place for the free pass is given within 7 metres of the
goal line, the free pass is to be taken at or behind the mark on a line through the
mark at least 7 metres from the goal line.
NOTE: At the free pass the ball is held in two hands off the ground and is to be
passed through the air to a team member. The referee is to ensure that the
opposition are 7 metres back before indicating that play is to commence. The
receiver of the free pass must start no more than 2 metres behind the passer but may
be at any distance laterally across the width of the field of play. The passer must not
run with the ball or dummy pass. Normal play resumes as the ball leaves the hand of
the passer.
9.5 If the ball is passed forward or knocked on, an uncontested scrummage is awarded.
9.6 Any player who has the ball and is on his/her feet (except in a maul) can be tackled
as laid down in the Laws of the Game. (Penalty for illegal tackle: A free pass re-start
to the opposition). A player so tackled must play the ball immediately.
NOTE 1: Any tackle level with or above the armpit is to be considered a high tackle.
(Penalty: A free pass re-start to the opposition).
NOTE 2: The referee should encourage tackler and tackled player to get away from
the ball IMMEDIATELY so that the game can continue. Where a ruck or maul
occurs, the off-side line for players not in the ruck or maul is at the hindmost foot on
their side of the ruck or maul. (Penalty: A free pass re-start to the opposition).
9.7 If the ball is not playable IMMEDIATELY after a tackle, an uncontested
scrummage is awarded. The scrummage is awarded to the team designated under
Laws 21 and 22 of the Laws of the Game.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 35
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
9.8 The scrummage should be made up of one row of three players (and no more) from
each team. The team awarded the scrummage should put the ball into the
scrummage and must be allowed to win it without contest. (Opponents cannot push
or strike for the ball). With these exceptions the Laws of the Game pertaining to the
scrummage should apply. (Penalty: A free pass re-start to the opposition).
9.9 The back line of the team not putting the ball into the scrummage must remain 7
metres behind the scrummage until normal play resumes, with the exception of the
scrum half, who must remain behind the hindmost foot of the scrummage until the
ball emerges.
9.10 Normal play should re-start when the ball has emerged from the scrummage.
9.11 Offside in general play shall be penalised in accordance with the Laws of the Game.
A player off-side in general play is to be penalised for being off-side unless that
player is making an obvious attempt to return to on-side position. (Penalty: A free
pass re-start to the opposition).
9.12 When the ball, or player carrying the ball, goes into touch, the game shall be restarted with a free pass to the opponents of the team who carried or last touched the
ball before it went into touch. The position of the free pass shall be 7 metres in from
touch, parallel to the point where the ball or carrier crossed the touchline. The team
not re-starting shall retire as for a free pass re-start in 9.4
9.13 After a try has been scored, the game re-starts from the centre with a free pass (as
in 9.4 above). The re-start shall not take place until the opponents have returned to
a line 7 metres back from the centre on the side which they are defending.
A player must not hand-off or fend-off an opponent in any way. (Penalty: A free
pass re-start to the opposition). (A hand-off or fend-off is defined as "any
movement of the hand, arm or ball to ward off a would-be tackler").
NOTE: Players are recommended to carry the ball in two hands.
9.15 A player may not kick the ball. If this happens, possession goes to the opposing
team for a free pass re-start at the point at which the ball was kicked.
9.16 Following an infringement for:
off-side
high or late tackle
obstruction
hand-off/fend-off
kicking
scrum feeding
striking for the ball and pushing in the scrummage
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 36
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
a free pass re-start ensues. The offending team must retire 7 metres from the point
of re-start, towards their own goal line.
9.17 After any stoppage not covered in the Rules, the game shall re-start with a
scrummage to the team moving forward, or, if neither team were moving forward,
by the team who were in possession of the ball.
9.18 A game should be made up of two halves, each of not more than 15 minutes
duration.
During the interval, coaches should take adequate time to talk to,
encourage, coach and explain the game to the players.
Coaches Instructions:
1. A size 3 ball should be used.
2. Tackling must be introduced progressively.
3. The formation of the scrummage must be introduced in a progressive way with great
emphasis placed on body position, foot placement, binding, putting the ball into the
scrummage and hooking techniques.
4. The emphasis should be on enjoyment. The children should be encouraged to enjoy the
physical side of running, passing, and evasion and coached accordingly.
5. A coaching session should last no longer than 60 minutes with no more than 20 minutes
devoted to match play.
6. On match days against outside opposition, a coaching session should normally precede
the match. Matches should be used as an extension of the coaching session, with the
emphasis being on the quality of performance rather than the result.
7. All players are advised to wear mouth guards.
8. Coaches are advised to check studs before training sessions, games or tournaments in
accordance with the Laws of the Game.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 37
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
IN THIS VERSION THERE IS:
NO PUSH IN SCRUM
NO LINE-OUT
NO KICKING
NO HAND-OFF/FEND-OFF
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 38
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
KEY STAGE 2: Mini Rugby Under 10 (Grade 4)
10.1 The object of the game is to score a try (5 points) in accordance with the Laws of
the Game.
10.2 The game is played between teams of nine players, three of whom and no more
should form the scrummage, and the remaining six who should form the back line.
Positions should be interchangeable.
10.3 The ball can ONLY be passed backwards or sideways.
10.4 The game is started or re-started from the centre of the field, or after a penalty, with
a free pass. The starter’s team must be behind the ball (i.e. nearer their own try line
than the starter). Before the pass is taken, the opposing team must be 7 metres away
nearer its own goal line. If the place for the free pass is given within 7 metres of the
goal line, the free pass is to be taken at or behind the mark on a line through the
mark at least 7 metres from the goal line.
NOTE: At the free pass the ball is held in two hands off the ground and is to be
passed through the air to a team 7 metres back before indicating that play is to
commence. The receiver of the free pass must start no more than 2 metres behind
the passer but may be at any distance laterally across the width of the field of play.
The passer must not run with the ball or dummy pass. Normal play resumes as the
ball leaves the hand of the passer.
10.4 The ball can ONLY be passed backwards of sideways.
10.5 If the ball is passed forward or knocked on, a contested scrummage is awarded. At
this age group the scrummage can be contested.
10.6 Any player who has the ball and is on his/her feet (except in a maul) can be tackled
as laid down in the Laws of the Game. (Penalty for illegal tackle: A free pass re-start
to the opposition). A player so tackled must play the ball immediately.
NOTE 1: Any tackle level with or above the armpit is to be considered a high tackle.
(Penalty: A free pass re-start to the opposition).
NOTE 2: The referee should encourage tackler and tackled player to get away from
the ball IMMEDIATELY so that the game can continue. Where a ruck or maul
occurs, the off-side line for players not in the ruck or maul is at the hindmost foot on
their side of the ruck or maul. (Penalty: A free pass re-start to the opposition).
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 39
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
10.7 If the ball is not playable IMMEDIATELY after a tackle, a contested scrummage is
awarded. The scrummage is awarded to the team designated under Laws 21 and 22
of the Laws of the Game.
10.8 The scrummage should be made up of one row of three players (and no more) from
each team. The team awarded the scrummage should put the ball in. All the Laws of
the Game pertaining to the U19 scrummage, including off-side should apply except
that the scrum-half of the team not putting in the ball must remain behind the
hindmost foot of the forwards until normal play re-starts. Normal play should restart when the ball has emerged from the scrummage. In the event of a strike
against the head, the scrum-half who has put the ball into the scrummage must not
follow the ball until it is out of the scrummage. In the interests of safety, each prop
should touch on their opponents upper arm, then pause prior to engagement in
sequence: crouch, touch, pause, engage. Players may not push the opposing scrum
more than 1.5 metres from the original middle line of the scrummage towards either
goal line.
10.9 If the ball or player carrying the ball goes out of play, a contested line-out at the
point at which the ball or players crossed the touch-line should take place. A quick
throw in is not permitted.
10.9.1 The line-out should be made up of no more than two players from each team
plus the player throwing the ball in and an immediate opponent who must stand
within the 2 metre area and one player from either side in a position to receive the
ball (i.e. scrum-half). Both the thrower in and his immediate opponent are able to
take an active role in the game as soon as the ball has been touched by one of the
players contesting the line-out.
10.9.2 The line-out should extend from 2 to 7 metres from the touch-line.
10.9.3 The opponents of the team who carried or last touched the ball before it went
into touch shall throw the ball in.
10.9.4 Lifting is prohibited at this level.
10.10 The off-side line for all players not participating in the line-out (all players other
than those described under Rule 10.9.1 above) should be 7 metres back from the line
of touch parallel to the goal-line and they must remain behind that off-side line until
the line-out has ended.
NOTE: See Laws of the Game for when line-out ends.
10.11 Offside in general play shall be penalised in accordance with the Laws of the
Game. A player off-side in general play is to be penalised for being off-side unless
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 40
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
that player is making an obvious attempt to return to on-side position. (Penalty: A
free pass re-start to the opposition).
10.12 A player must not hand-off or fend-off an opponent in any way. (Penalty: A free
pass re-start to the opposition). (A hand-off or fend-off is defined as "any movement
of the hand, arm or ball to ward off a would-be tackler").
10.13 After a try has been scored, the game re-starts from the centre with a free pass (as
in 10.4 above). The re-start shall not take place until the opponents have returned to
a line 7 metres back from the centre on the side which they are defending.
10.14 A player may not kick the ball. If this happens, possession goes to the opposing
team for a free pass re-start at the point at which the ball was kicked.
10.15 Following an infringement for:
off-side
high or late tackle
obstruction
hand-off/fend-off
kicking
scrum feeding
a free pass re-start ensues as in 10.4 above.
10.16 After any stoppage not covered in the Rules, the game shall re-start with a
scrummage to the team moving forward, or, if neither team were moving forward,
by the team who were last in possession of the ball.
10.17 A game should be made up of two halves, each of not more than fifteen minutes
duration. During the interval, coaches should take adequate time to talk to,
encourage, coach and explain the game to the players.
Coaches Instructions:
1. Size 4 ball should be used.
2. Tackling must be introduced progressively.
3. The formation of the scrummage must be introduced in a progressive way with great
emphasis placed on body position, foot placement, binding, putting the ball into the
scrummage and hooking techniques. In the interests of safety, each prop should touch
on their opponents upper arm, then pause prior to engagement in sequence: crouch,
touch, pause, engage. Players may not push the opposing scrum more than 1.5 metres
from the original middle line of the scrummage towards either goal line.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 41
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
4. Line-out must be introduced following the progressions described in "Even Better
Rugby" with great emphasis placed on body positions, support for and protection of
the catcher.
3. The emphasis should be on enjoyment. The children should be encouraged to enjoy the
physical side of running, passing, and evasion and coached accordingly.
4. Coaching session should last no longer than 60 minutes with no more than 20 minutes
devoted to match play.
5. On match days against outside opposition, a coaching session should normally precede
the match. Matches should be used as an extension of the coaching session, with the
emphasis being on the quality of performance rather than the result.
6. All players are advised to wear mouth guards.
7. Coaches are advised to check studs before training sessions, games or tournaments in
accordance with the Laws of the Game.
IN THIS VERSION THERE IS:
NO KICKING
NO HAND-OFF/FEND-OFF
NO LIFTING IN LINE-OUT
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 42
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
KEY STAGE 3: Under 11 Midi Rugby (Grade 5)
11.1 The object of the game is to score a try (5 points) in accordance with the Laws of
the Game.
11.2 Teams should be made up of eleven players, five of whom and no more should be
forwards with the remaining six forming the back line.
11.3 At this age, the game should start with a KICK-OFF from the centre of the field.
The kicker's team must be behind the ball until it has been kicked and the receiving
team must be at least 7 metres back from the ball.
NOTE: See Laws of the Game if the ball is kicked off directly into touch and ingoal.
In all other situations, the Laws of the Game of Rugby Union Football apply with
the following exceptions:
11.4 SCRUMMAGE
a. The locks forming the second row must bind to each other with their inside arm and
with their outside arm around the hips of the front row (props).
b. The scrum-half not putting the ball in must remain behind the off-side
line (the hindmost foot) until the ball has emerged from the scrummage.
In the event of a strike against the head, the scrum-half who has put the
ball into the scrummage must not follow the ball until it is out.
c. In the interests of safety, each prop should touch on their opponents
upper arm, then pause prior to engagement in sequence: crouch, touch,
pause, engage. Players may not push the opposing scrum more than 1.5
metres from the original middle line of the scrummage towards either
goal line.
d. See the Under 19 Laws.
11.5 LINE-OUT
a. The line-out should be made up of two, three or four players from each side plus the
player throwing the ball in and the latter's immediate opponent who must stand
within the 2 metre area and one player from either side in a position to receive the
ball (i.e. scrum-half). Both the thrower-in and his immediate opponent are able to
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 43
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
take an active role in the game as soon as the ball has been touched by one of the
players contesting the line-out. A quick throw in is NOT permitted.
b. The line-out should extend from between 2 - 10 metres from the touch-line.
c. See the Under 19 Laws, except that lifting is prohibited at this level.
11.6 All off-side lines defined in the Laws of the Game also apply in these Rules.
11.7 Any player who has the ball and is on his/her feet (except in a maul) can be tackled
as laid down in the Laws of the Game. (Penalty for illegal tackle: A penalty kick). A
player so tackled must play the ball immediately.
NOTE 1: Any tackle level with or above the armpit is to be considered a high tackle.
(Penalty: Penalty kick).
NOTE 2: The referee should encourage tackler and tackled player to get away from
the ball IMMEDIATELY so that the game can continue. Where a ruck or maul
occurs, the off-side line for players not in the ruck or maul is at the hindmost foot on
their side of the ruck or maul. (Penalty: A penalty kick).
At all penalty kicks, the offending team must retire 7 metres towards their own goalline from the place where the penalty kick is awarded.
11.8 If the ball is not playable IMMEDIATELY after a tackle, a scrummage is awarded.
The scrummage is awarded to the team designated under Laws 21 and 22 of the
Laws of the Game.
11.9 A player must not hand-off or fend-off an opponent in any way. (Penalty: A penalty
kick to the opposition). (A hand-off or fend-off is defined as "any movement of the
hand, arm or ball to ward off a would be tackler").
NOTE: Players are recommended to carry the ball in two hands.
11.10 All the Laws of the Game pertaining to kicking in open play should apply, except
that players may not kick the ball other than out of their hands. Fly hacking is not
permitted (Penalty: A penalty kick).
11.11 After a try has been scored, the game should re-start with a drop kick.
11.12 When an infringement occurs as per the Laws of the Game, a penalty or free kick
should be awarded. The opposition must retire at least 7 metres back towards
their own goal line from the place where the kick is awarded.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 44
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
11.13 After any stoppage not covered in the Rules, the game shall re-start with a
scrummage to the team who were moving forward, or, if neither team were
moving forward, by the team who were last in possession of the ball.
11.14 A game should be made up of two equal halves, each of not more than 20
minutes. During the interval, coaches should take adequate time to talk to,
encourage, coach and explain the game to players.
Coaches Instructions:
1. A size 4 ball should be used.
2. Tackling must be introduced progressively.
3. The formation of the scrummage must be introduced in a progressive way with great
emphasis placed on body position, foot placement, binding, putting the ball into the
scrummage and hooking techniques. In the interests of safety, each prop should touch
on their opponents upper arm, then pause prior to engagement in sequence: crouch,
touch, pause, engage. Players may not push the opposing scrum more than 1.5 metres
from the original middle line of the scrummage towards either goal line.
4. The emphasis should be on enjoyment. The children should be encouraged to enjoy the
physical side of running, passing, and evasion and coached accordingly.
5. A practical coaching session that includes talks and videos etc., should last no longer
than two hours including a maximum of 40 minutes devoted to match play.
6. In match days against outside opposition, a coaching session should normally precede
the match. Matches should be used as an extension of the coaching session, with the
emphasis being on the quality of performance rather than the result.
7. All players are advised to wear mouth guards.
8. Coaches are advised to check studs before training sessions, games or tournaments in
accordance with the Laws of the Game.
IN THIS VERSION THERE IS:
NO HAND-OFF/FEND-OFF
NO LIFTING IN LINE-OUT
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 45
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
KEY STAGE 3: Under 12 Midi Rugby (Grade 6)
12.1 The object of the game is to score a try (5 points) in accordance with the Laws of
the Game.
12.2 Teams should be made up of eleven players, five of whom and no more should be
forwards with the remaining six forming the back line.
12.3 At this age, the game should start with a KICK-OFF from the centre of the field.
The kicker's team must be behind the ball until it has been kicked and the receiving
team must be at least 7 metres back from the ball.
NOTE: See Laws of the Game if the ball is kicked off directly into touch and ingoal.
IN ALL OTHER SITUATIONS, THE LAWS OF THE GAME OF RUGBY UNION
FOOTBALL APPLY WITH THE FOLLOWING EXCEPTIONS:
12.4 SCRUMMAGE
a. The locks forming the second row must bind to each other with their inside arm and
with their outside arm around the hips of the front row (props).
b. The scrum-half not putting the ball in must remain behind the off-side line (the
hindmost foot) until the ball has emerged from the scrummage. In the event of a
strike against the head, the scrum-half who has put the ball into the scrummage
must not follow the ball until it is out.
c. In the interests of safety, each prop should touch on their opponents upper arm,
then pause prior to engagement in sequence: crouch, touch, pause, engage. Players
may not push the opposing scrum more than 1.5 metres from the original middle
line of the scrummage towards either goal line.
d. See the Under 19 Laws.
12.5 LINE-OUT
a. The line-out should be made up of two, three or four players from each side plus the
player throwing the ball in and the latter's immediate opponent who must stand
within the 2 metre area and one player from either side in a position to receive the
ball (i.e. scrum-half). Both the thrower-in and his immediate opponent are able to
take an active role in the game as soon as the ball has been touched by one of the
players contesting the line-out. A quick throw in is now permitted.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 46
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
b. The line-out should extend from between 2 - 10 metres from the touch-line.
c. See the Under 19 Laws, except that lifting is prohibited at this level.
12.6 All off-side lines defined in the Laws of the Game also apply in these Rules.
12.7 Any player who has the ball and is on his/her feet (except in a maul) can be tackled
as laid down in the Laws of the Game. (Penalty for illegal tackle: A penalty kick). A
player so tackled must play the ball immediately.
NOTE 1: Any tackle level with or above the armpit is to be considered a high tackle.
(Penalty: Penalty kick).
NOTE 2: The referee should encourage tackler and tackled player to get away from
the ball IMMEDIATELY so that the game can continue. Where a ruck or maul
occurs, the off-side line for players not in the ruck or maul is at the hindmost foot on
their side of the ruck or maul. (Penalty: A penalty kick).
At all penalty kicks, the offending team must retire 7 metres towards their own goalline from the place where the penalty kick is awarded.
12.8 If the ball is not playable IMMEDIATELY after a tackle, a scrummage is awarded.
The scrummage is awarded to the team designated under Laws 21 and 22 of the
Laws of the Game.
12.9 A player must not hand-off or fend-off an opponent in any way. (Penalty: A penalty
kick to the opposition). (A hand-off or fend-off is defined as "any movement of the
hand, arm or ball to ward off a would be tackler").
NOTE: Players are recommended to carry the ball in two hands.
12.10 All the Laws of the Game pertaining to kicking in open play should apply, except
that players may not kick the ball other than out of their hands. Fly hacking is not
permitted (Penalty: A penalty kick).
12.11 After a try has been scored, the game should re-start with a drop kick.
12.12 When an infringement occurs as per the Laws of the Game, a penalty or free kick
should be awarded. The opposition must retire at least 7 metres back towards their
own goal line from the place where the kick is awarded.
12.13 After any stoppage not covered in the Rules, the game shall re-start with a
scrummage to the team who were moving forward, or, if neither team were moving
forward, by the team who were last in possession of the ball.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 47
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
12.14 A game should be made up of two equal halves, each of not more than 20 minutes.
During the interval, coaches should take adequate time to talk to, encourage, coach
and explain the game to players.
Coaches Instructions:
1. A size 4 ball should be used.
2. Tackling must be introduced progressively.
3. The formation of the scrummage must be introduced in a progressive way with great
emphasis placed on body position, foot placement, binding, putting the ball into the
scrummage and hooking techniques. In the interests of safety, each prop should touch
on their opponents upper arm, then pause prior to engagement in sequence: crouch,
touch, pause, engage. Players may not push the opposing scrum more than 1.5 metres
from the original middle line of the scrummage towards either goal line.
4. The emphasis should be on enjoyment. The players should be encouraged to enjoy the
physical side of running, passing, and evasion and coached accordingly.
5. A practical coaching session that includes talks and videos etc., should last no longer
than two hours including a maximum of 40 minutes devoted to match play.
6. In match days against outside opposition, a coaching session should normally precede
the match. Matches should be used as an extension of the coaching session, with the
emphasis being on the quality of performance rather than the result.
7. All players are advised to wear mouth guards.
8. Coaches are advised to check studs before training sessions, games or tournaments in
accordance with the Laws of the Game.
IN THIS VERSION THERE IS:
NO HAND-OFF/FEND-OFF
NO LIFTING IN LINE-OUT
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 48
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
KEY STAGE 4: Under 13/14 Age Grade Rugby (Grade 7 & 8)
14.1 The object of the game is to score a try (5 points) in accordance with the Laws of
the Game.
14.2 Teams should be made up of twelve players, five of whom and no more should be
forwards with the remaining seven forming the back line.
14.3 The game will consist of two 30-minute halves. The game should start with a KICKOFF from the centre of the field. The kicker's team must be behind the ball until it
has been kicked and the receiving team must be at least 10 metres back from the ball.
NOTE: See Laws of the Game if the ball is kicked off directly into touch and ingoal.
IN ALL OTHER SITUATIONS, THE LAWS OF THE GAME OF RUGBY UNION
FOOTBALL
AS AMENDED FOR U19 PLAYERS APPLY WITH THE
FOLLOWING EXCEPTIONS:
14.4 SCRUMMAGE
a. The locks forming the second row must bind to each other with their inside arm and
with their outside arm around the hips of the front row (props).
b. The scrum-half not putting the ball in must remain behind the off-side line (the
hindmost foot) until the ball has emerged from the scrummage. In the event of a
strike against the head, the scrum-half who has put the ball into the scrummage
must not follow the ball until it is out.
c. In the interests of safety, each prop should touch on their opponents upper arm,
then pause prior to engagement in sequence: crouch, touch, pause, engage. Players
may not push the opposing scrum more than 1.5 metres from the original middle
line of the scrummage towards either goal line.
d. See the Under 19 Laws.
14.5 LINE-OUT
a. The line-out should be made up of two, three or four players from each side plus the
player throwing the ball in and the latter's immediate opponent who must stand
within the 5 metre area and one player from either side in a position to receive the
ball (i.e. scrum-half). Both the thrower-in and his immediate opponent are able to
take an active role in the game as soon as the ball has been touched by one of the
players contesting the line-out. A quick throw in is permitted.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 49
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
b. The line-out should extend from between 5 - 10 metres from the touch-line.
c. See the Under 19 Laws. Lifting is not permitted at this level.
14.6 All off-side lines defined in the Laws of the Game also apply in these Rules.
14.7 Any player who has the ball and is on his/her feet (except in a maul) can be tackled
as laid down in the Laws of the Game. (Penalty for illegal tackle: A penalty kick). A
player so tackled must play the ball immediately.
NOTE 1: Any tackle level with or above the armpit is to be considered a high tackle.
(Penalty: Penalty kick).
NOTE 2: The referee should encourage tackler and tackled player to get away from
the ball IMMEDIATELY so that the game can continue. Where a ruck or maul
occurs, the off-side line for players not in the ruck or maul is at the hindmost foot on
their side of the ruck or maul. (Penalty: A penalty kick).
At all penalty kicks, the offending team must retire 10 metres towards their own
goal-line from the place where the penalty kick is awarded.
14.8 If the ball is not playable IMMEDIATELY after a tackle, a scrummage is awarded.
The scrummage is awarded to the team designated under Laws 21 and 22 of the
Laws of the Game.
14.9 All the Laws of the Game pertaining to kicking in open play should apply.
14.10 After a try has been scored, the team can attempt to convert the try into a goal.
The kick at goal should take place from anywhere in front of the posts.
14.11 After a try or goal has been scored, the game should re-start with a drop kick.
14.12 When an infringement occurs as per the Laws of the Game, a penalty or free kick
should be awarded. The opposition must retire at least 10 metres back towards their
own goal line from the place where the kick is awarded.
14.13 After any stoppage not covered in the Rules, the game shall re-start with a
scrummage to the team who were moving forward, or, if neither team were moving
forward, by the team who were last in possession of the ball.
14.14 A game should be made up of two equal halves, each of not more than 30 minutes.
During the interval, coaches should take adequate time to talk to, encourage, coach
and explain the game to players.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 50
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
Coaches Instructions:
1. A size 5 ball should be used.
2. In league games, teams should be made up of twelve players, five of whom, and no
more, should be forwards with the remaining seven forming the back line
3. Under 14 games should take place on a full-size field. Post pads, touch flags etc. must
be provided.
4.
League games will consist of two 30-minute halves.
5. There will be no body slam tackles.
6. The formation of the scrummage must be introduced in a progressive way with great
emphasis placed on body position, foot placement, binding, putting the ball into the
scrummage and hooking techniques. In the interests of safety, each prop should touch
on their opponents upper arm, then pause prior to engagement in sequence: crouch,
touch, pause, engage. Players may not push the opposing scrum more than 1.5 metres
from the original middle line of the scrummage towards either goal line.
7. A practical coaching session that includes talks and videos etc., should last no longer
than two hours including a maximum of 60 minutes devoted to match play.
8. All players are advised to wear mouth guards.
9. Coaches are advised to check studs before training sessions, games or tournaments in
accordance with the Laws of the Game.
10. If the point differential is greater than 40 in inter-club games, the game is either
abandoned or the players are mixed into two more evenly matched teams.
11. There are no penalty kicks at goal in this age group.
12. Coaches will referee league games in this age group, the home team providing the
referee. All coaches acting as referees must have taken the level 1 refereeing course
and clubs must ensure all coaches are fully familiar with the laws, especially the ones
regarding safety in contact.
14. U14 is grade 7 & 8 only. No players from younger age groups are allowed to play in
older age group teams. Age is under 14, on 1st January of the current season. (i.e. 1st
January 2002 for the 2001/2002 season).
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 51
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
All registration forms for players in these age groups must be submitted to BCRU
before players are allowed to participate in league or cup games. Each coach must
have a file with copy birth certificates and registration forms for each player available
for inspection by the opposing coach. Any player for whom this documentation is
unavailable will not be allowed to play in the U16 league under any circumstances.
If players have been kept down or advanced a grade at school, they must play up or
down in their actual age grade. Under no circumstances will U16 players be allowed to
play in the U14 league, even if teams are short: options are to "borrow" players from
opposing team (the preferred way) or to default. If over-age players are found to have
played in a game, penalty in the first instance is to award the game to the nonoffending team and a 5 league point deduction to the offending team; ejection from the
league for subsequent offences.
Please note that it is a requirement that U14 league home teams provide a suitably
qualified referee for all league games: coaches without the level 1 certification will not
be allowed to referee, and in the absence of a certified referee, the away team will win
the game by default.
15. Under 14 league regulations:
No scores over 40 points spread will be recorded.
Coaches must stop the game and mix the teams if a 40 point spread occurs:
Score submitted to BCRU will be the score recorded at this stage.
KICK OFF TIMES, SUNDAY 11-15 am.
3 points for WIN or WIN BY DEFAULT
2 points for DRAW
1 point for LOSS
0 points for FAILURE TO FULFIL FIXTURE NOTIFIED BEFORE PREVIOUS SUNDAY
-1 points for FAILURE TO FULFIL FIXTURE NOTIFIED BEFORE PREVIOUS WEDNESDAY
-3 points for FAILURE TO FULFIL FIXTURE AFTER THESE TIMES
-5 points for NO SHOW WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION
All scores must be sent to BCRU office by winning team manager/ coach
By 9 am Monday following game
Tel: 737-3065/ Fax 737-3916/ bcrugby@bc.sympatico.ca
LEAGUE CO-ORDINATOR IS DAN WOOD:
HOME 980-8176/ WORK 647-7322/ FAX 641-1447/ brittanialionsrugby@home.com
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 52
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
KEY STAGE 5: Under 15/16 Junior Rugby (Grade 9 & 10)
16.1 The object of the game is to score a try (5 points) in accordance with the Laws of
the Game.
16.2 Teams should be made up of thirteen players, six of whom and no more should be
forwards with the remaining seven forming the back line.
16.3 At this age, the game should start with a KICK-OFF from the centre of the field.
The kicker's team must be behind the ball until it has been kicked and the receiving
team must be at least 10 metres back from the ball.
NOTE: See Laws of the Game if the ball is kicked off directly into touch and ingoal.
IN ALL OTHER SITUATIONS, THE LAWS OF THE GAME OF RUGBY UNION
FOOTBALL APPLY, AS AMENDED FOR U19 PLAYERS WITH THE
FOLLOWING EXCEPTIONS:
16.4 SCRUMMAGE
a. The Scrummage will consist of 2 props, hooker, 2 locks and a No.8.
b. The locks forming the second row must bind to each other with their inside arm and
with their outside arm around the hips of the front row (props).
c. The scrum-half not putting the ball in must remain behind the off-side line (the
hindmost foot) until the ball has emerged from the scrummage. In the event of a
strike against the head, the scrum-half who has put the ball into the scrummage
must not follow the ball until it is out.
d. In the interests of safety, each prop should touch on their opponents upper arm,
then pause prior to engagement in sequence: crouch, touch, pause, engage. Players
may not push the opposing scrum more than 1.5 metres from the original middle
line of the scrummage towards either goal line.
e. The No. 8 may not pick up the ball from the set scrum and run with it.
f. See the Under 19 Laws.
16.5 LINE-OUT
a. The line-out should be made up of two, three, four, or five players from each side
plus the player throwing the ball in and the latter's immediate opponent who must
stand within the 5 metre area and one player from either side in a position to receive
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 53
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
the ball (i.e. scrum-half). Both the thrower-in and his immediate opponent are able
to take an active role in the game as soon as the ball has been touched by one of the
players contesting the line-out. A quick throw in is permitted.
b. The line-out should extend from between 5 - 15 metres from the touch-line.
c. See the Under 19 Laws. Lifting is permitted at this level.
16.6 All off-side lines defined in the Laws of the Game also apply in these Rules.
16.7 Any player who has the ball and is on his/her feet (except in a maul) can be tackled
as laid down in the Laws of the Game. (Penalty for illegal tackle: A penalty kick). A
player so tackled must play the ball immediately.
NOTE 1: Any tackle level with or above the armpit is to be considered a high tackle.
(Penalty: Penalty kick).
NOTE 2: The referee should encourage tackler and tackled player to get away from
the ball IMMEDIATELY so that the game can continue. Where a ruck or maul
occurs, the off-side line for players not in the ruck or maul is at the hindmost foot on
their side of the ruck or maul. (Penalty: A penalty kick).
At all penalty kicks, the offending team must retire 10 metres towards their own
goal-line from the place where the penalty kick is awarded.
16.8 If the ball is not playable IMMEDIATELY after a tackle, a scrummage is awarded.
The scrummage is awarded to the team designated under Laws 21 and 22 of the
Laws of the Game.
16.9 All the Laws of the Game pertaining to kicking in open play should apply.
16.10 After a try has been scored, the team can attempt to convert the try into a goal.
The kick at goal should take place from anywhere in front of the posts.
16.11 After a try or goal has been scored, the game should re-start with a drop kick.
16.12 When an infringement occurs as per the Laws of the Game, a penalty or free kick
should be awarded. The opposition must retire at least 10 metres back towards their
own goal line from the place where the kick is awarded.
16.13 After any stoppage not covered in the Rules, the game shall re-start with a
scrummage to the team who were moving forward, or, if neither team were moving
forward, by the team who were last in possession of the ball.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 54
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
16.14 A game should be made up of two equal halves, each of not more than 30 minutes.
During the interval, coaches should take adequate time to talk to, encourage, coach
and explain the game to players.
Coaches Instructions:
1. Under 16 games should take place on a full-size pitch. Post pads, touch flags etc. must
be provided.
2. A size 5 ball should be used.
3. The formation of the scrummage must be introduced in a progressive way with great
emphasis placed on body position, foot placement, binding, putting the ball into the
scrummage and hooking techniques. In the interests of safety, each prop should touch
on their opponents upper arm, then pause prior to engagement in sequence: crouch,
touch, pause, engage. Players may not push the opposing scrum more than 1.5 metres
from the original middle line of the scrummage towards either goal line.
4. A practical coaching session that includes talks and videos etc., should last no longer
than two hours including a maximum of 60 minutes devoted to match play.
16. All players are advised to wear mouth guards.
17. Coaches are advised to check studs before training sessions, games or tournaments in
accordance with the Laws of the Game.
18. If official society referees are not available, Coaches will referee league games in this
age group, the home team providing the referee. All coaches acting as referees must
have taken the level 1 refereeing course and clubs must ensure all coaches are fully
familiar with the laws, especially the ones regarding safety in contact.
19. U16 is grade 9 & 10 only. No players from younger age groups are allowed to play in
older age group teams. Age is under 16 on 1st January of the current season (i.e. 1st
January 2002 for the 2001/2002 season).
All registration forms for players in these age groups must be submitted to BCRU
before players are allowed to participate in league or cup games. Each coach must
have a file with copy birth certificates and registration forms for each player available
for inspection by opposing coach. Any player for whom this documentation is
unavailable will not be allowed to play in the U16 league under any circumstances.
If players have been kept down or advanced a grade at school, they must play up or
down in their actual age grade. Under no circumstances will U18 players be allowed to
play in the U16 league, even if teams are short: options are to "borrow" players from
opposing team (the preferred way) or to default. If over-age players are found to have
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 55
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
played in a game, penalty in the first instance is to award the game to the nonoffending team and a 5 league point deduction to the offending team; ejection from the
league for subsequent offences.
20. All registration forms for players in these age groups must be submitted to BCRU
before players are allowed to participate in league or cup games.
21. Under 15/16 league regulations:
No scores over 40 points spread will be recorded.
Coaches must stop the game and mix the teams if a 40 point spread occurs:
Score submitted to BCRU will be score recorded at this stage
KICK OFF TIMES, SUNDAY 11-15 am.
3 points for WIN or WIN BY DEFAULT
2 points for DRAW
1 point for LOSS
0 points for FAILURE TO FULFIL FIXTURE NOTIFIED BEFORE PREVIOUS SUNDAY
-1 points for FAILURE TO FULFIL FIXTURE NOTIFIED BEFORE PREVIOUS WEDNESDAY
-3 points for FAILURE TO FULFIL FIXTURE AFTER THESE TIMES
-5 points for NO SHOW WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION
Home team to provide suitably qualified referee (Level 1 certified)
All scores must be sent to BCRU office by winning team manager/ coach
By 9 am Monday following game
Tel: 737-3065/ Fax 737-3916/ bcrugby@bc.sympatico.ca
League co-ordinator is Ed Wight
Tel: 261-7545/ Fax: 266-7545/ E-mail enwight@telus.net
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 56
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
KEY STAGE 6: Under 17/19 Junior Rugby
The Under 19 Variation Laws apply to this Age Grade
KEY STAGE 7: Under 21
The full Laws of the game apply to this Age Grade
Under 16 Fast Track Elite Athlete Development Program
The program is aimed at Rugby players aged Under 16 on 31st December 2001, and aims
to take a group of c.40 athletes, identified by their coaches as potential high level Rugby
players, and develop their potential in terms of speed, agility, strength and conditioning,
nutrition, Rugby skills and knowledge of the game.
1.
Selection of Participants
I. Players must be playing in the BCRU Under 16 League to be eligible for this
program.
II. Selection will be based upon the recommendation of the players’ club coaches,
who will recommend players for inclusion at 3 Regional Development Camps, to
be held as follows:
• 8th December 2001 Vancouver
• 9th December 2001 Fraser Valley
• 15th December 2001 Vancouver Island
Submissions for inclusion of players in the Regional Development Camps should be
made by Club U16 coaches on the U16 Fast Track Program Application Form,
copies of which will be distributed to all clubs.
III. 40 Players will be selected from these camps to participate in an inaugural camp to
be held on 5th and 6th January (Lower Mainland venue to be confirmed).
2.
Schedule
•
•
•
•
•
•
5th/6th January 2002 Inaugural Camp
2nd Feb. Elite Athlete Development Camp
2nd March Elite Athlete Development Camp
30th March Elite Athlete Development Camp
27th April Elite Athlete Development Camp
25th May Elite Athlete Development Camp
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 57
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
•
•
•
3.
29th June Elite Athlete Development Camp
28th July Elite Athlete Development Camp
5th/6th August BC U-16 Rep Games in Conjunction with BC Summer
Games
Coaching Structure
I. John Graf, BCRU Youth Development Officer, will coordinate the program
II. A Coach and Manager will be appointed. These positions will be advertised during
October 2001 with the objective of having them filled by 1st November.
III. A selection committee consisting of the YDO, Coach, Club U16 coaches, and
other invited coaches will select the participants in the program.
IV. Top coaches and experts will be invited to attend the monthly camps and to cover
particular aspects of play/conditioning.
V. All players will be fitness tested at the commencement of the program and set
fitness and conditioning goals, which must be met on an ongoing monthly basis.
4.
Games
The season will culminate in August 2002 with the BC Summer Games (Aug 1-4 in
Nanaimo). We will seek to set up 2 Rep. Games for the Squad in conjunction with
the Games, against incoming touring sides, other Provinces or a Summer Games All
Star Team.
5.
Database/ Further Development of players
I. A central database of players will be established and updated with all relevant data
concerning players participating in Regional Development Camps.
II. We envisage that the players will move up to a new U17 Fast Track Program to be
established in conjunction with the proposed 2002/3 U17 League at the end of
Season 1.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 58
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
Under 19/ 17/ 16/ 15/14 League Programs Age Grade/Group Integrity
These provisions are based on the regulations set down by Rugby Canada for Provincial
Team Age Grade Championships.
The intent of the BCRU in promoting Age Grade Rugby in the club system is to provide a
clear continuum of developmental progression for participants to learn the game and hone
their skills while strengthening the base of participation in their local club. Age Grade
Rugby is not about the championship or league titles. Age Grade Rugby is about fostering
development and learning for the young Rugby athletes in a fair and safe manner. The
structure will allow individuals to progress through Junior Rugby to adult Rugby while
developing a broad base of skills. It is not adult Rugby with age limits.
Skill development is one of the primary reasons the BCRU has implemented reduced
numbers for Age Grade competitions: 12-a-side for U-13/14 and 13-a-side for U-15 and
U-16 competitions. Reduced numbers in an Age Grade game makes it easier for a club to
put together a team in an given Age Grade, simplifies the game, making it easier to learn
for the novice and, most importantly, promotes open Rugby for the participants. The
reduced numbers structure allows a more expansive game to be developed and gives an
enhanced opportunity to the participants to develop open field running, jinking, swerving,
passing and tackling skills while playing the game.
There is no doubt that youth undergo radical physical changes between the ages of 12 and
21 and should not all play in one mixed group. In order to keep the game safe and not to
have too great a discrepancy in size and maturation of the age grade participants, the
BCRU Junior Age Grade Rugby competitions occur in age year bands at U-14, U-15, U16, U-17 and U-19. The BCRU has also instituted a U-21 competition allowing a final
developmental phase, incorporating a 3-year age span played under senior law, for
participants not yet ready for open senior competition.
Implementation of Age Grade Policies
BCRU is committed to preserving age-grade integrity in all of our Youth Rugby
Programs, to ensure the safety of our players, and not to have too great a discrepancy in
size and maturation of the age grade participants.
FOR SAFETY AND LIABILITY REASONS, INDIVIDUALS OLDER THAN THE
MAXIMUM AGE ARE NOT ALLOWED TO PARTICIPATE IN A YOUNGER AGEGRADE UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES.
The BCRU does not recommend that players be encouraged to play out of their correct
age group under any circumstances. However, exceptional players ONE BIRTH YEAR
ONLY below the age band may play in the next higher age band team if: © Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 59
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
1.
This BCRU policy statement has been made clear IN WRITING by the coach to
the player’s parents and doctor.
2.
Players MUST have a signed letter from each of:
I.
II.
III.
The player’s parent
The player’s coach
The player’s doctor
which clearly states that each of the authors fully understands the implications and risks of
the player competing in the older age group, and that they each affirm that the player is
physically, socially and mentally mature enough to play at that next higher Age Grade.
3.
Copies of the Coach’s letters to the doctor and parents, and the letters from the
parents, doctor, and coach, together with copies of the player’s registration form, birth
certificate and high school picture ID must be filed with the BCRU prior to the athlete
taking the field in an Age Grade game above his/her natural age band.
AGE GRADE AGE LIMITS ARE AS FOLLOWS:
U-21: Age is under 21 on January 1st, 2002 for the 2001/02 season. No players from
older age groups are allowed to play in this age group under any circumstances.
U-18: Age is under 18 on January 1st, 2001 for the 2001/02 season. No players from
older age groups are allowed to play in this age group under any circumstances.
U-16 is grade 9 & 10 only. Age is under 16 on January 1st, 2002 for the 2001-2002
season. No players from older age groups are allowed to play in this age group under any
circumstances.
U-15 is grade 9 only. Age is under 15 on January 1st, 2002 for the 2001-2002 season. No
players from older age groups are allowed to play in this age group under any
circumstances.
U-14 is grade 7 & 8 only. Age is under 14 on January 1st, 2002 for the 2001-2002 season.
No players from older age groups are allowed to play in this age group under any
circumstances.
All registration forms for players in these age groups must be submitted to BCRU before
players are allowed to participate in league or cup games. Each coach must have a file
with copy birth certificates or passport with proof of age, High School picture ID, and
registration forms for each player available for inspection by the opposing coach or referee
at each league game played (including jamborees). Any player for whom this
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 60
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
documentation is unavailable will not be allowed to play in any age grade league game
under any circumstances.
If players have been kept down or advanced a grade at school, they must play up or down
in their actual age grade. Under no circumstances will older players be allowed to play in a
younger age grade league, even if teams are short: options are to "borrow" players from
opposing team (the preferred way) or to default. If over-age players are found to have
played in a game, penalty in the first instance is to award the game to the non-offending
team and a 5 league point deduction to the offending team; ejection from the league for
subsequent offences.
Please note that it is a requirement that all age-grade league home teams provide a suitably
qualified referee for all league games: coaches without the level 1 referee certification will
not be allowed to referee, and in the absence of a certified referee, the away team will win
the game by default. Clubs are encourage to participate in the regular referee certification
seminars run throughout BC.
.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 61
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
THE PITCH
(Note: Grades K ,1 and 2 play in half field width of Grade 3 -5 pitch.
U14 League games take place on a full size field.)
5 metre
line
5 metre
line
5 metre line
Grades 3 - 5
10 metre
line
HALF WAY
Grades 6, 7, 8
5 metre line
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 62
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
SECTION 3
MINI-RUGBY COACHING GUIDE
Training Session:
A training session should last for one hour: content should depend on the age group and
skill level of the children participating, but should follow this model: -
1 Hour Program:
1. Warm Up - 20 minutes
Stretch
Fun Game
e.g. British Bulldogs: Pig in the Middle: Murder Ball
(contact level adapted to age group); End Ball; Corner Ball
Fitness Games: e.g. Relay Races (with ball): Wheelbarrow race; Piggy Back
Race; Fireman’s Lift race; Neck Support race; Pendulum
Carry race
Run to 20 metre line, 5 push ups, run back
Run to 20 metre line, 5 sit ups, run back (or combine)
Slalom Running (swerve)/Slalom Running (sidestep)
Agility Ladder Routines
Chase around the circle
Number running
2. Skills Session - 20 minutes
Demonstrate
Simple Practice Exercise
More Complex Exercise
3. Controlled Game - 20 minutes
Emphasize Use of Skill Learnt Today (plus consolidate previous skills)
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 63
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
BASIC SKILLS
These are the basic techniques of the game that are essential to the development of good
playing skills. Every player’s aim should be to pass the ball, to tackle, to kick and to catch
and receive the ball effectively. This section is designed to break each skill into elements
and to teach them to all players. The coach’s aim should be that the players understand
the object of each exercise, and perform the drills correctly.
The basic skills are:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Passing and Receiving the Ball
Picking up the Ball
Tackling
Falling on the Ball
Kicking and Catching the Ball
1.
Passing
1.1
Running pass
i. This is the pass that is given laterally to a receiver running alongside in
support. The passer should deliver the ball without the receiver having to
slow down, stop or deviate from his/her direction.
ii. The ball is held in both hands, with the fingers outspread, little fingers
almost touching.
iii. The passer looks at the receiver.
iv. The target area for the pass is above the waist and just in front of the
receiver so that he/she can run onto the ball and take the ball in full stride.
v. The ball is swung across the body, with the arms giving direction to the
pass and a good follow-through is given with the hands and arms.
vi. The receiver must play his/her part by being in the correct position to take
the pass. Younger players should be encouraged to make a “target” with
their hands for the passer to aim at.
vii.The receiver looks at the passer, waiting for the ball to be released. As
he/she receives and controls the ball, he/she accelerates to take him/her
away from would-be tacklers.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 64
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
1.2 The Scrum-half Pass
i. This is a standing pass and is given when the ball is passed from the
ground (i.e. when it comes out of a scrum, maul or ruck), or from a
standing position as at a line-out.
ii. The back foot should be close to the ball when it is grasped; the front
foot should be thrust towards the receiver. This gives a firm, wide base,
enabling the passer to execute a long, firm, and accurate pass.
iii. The passer looks at the receiver when releasing the ball
iv. The target area is the same as for the running pass - level at above waist
height and out in front of the receiver. The ball is swung across the body
with hands behind the ball. The follow-through of the arms is important
to give accuracy to the pass.
v. The spin pass should not be taught until the player has learned to pass
correctly in the basic manner.
1.3 Passing Drills
The following exercises are intended to demonstrate and teach the basic skills of
passing.
i.
Basic Passing Drill
Purpose:
To learn passing and receiving the ball
No. of players: 2, rising to 3 as basic skill is mastered
Procedure:
a. The players pass the ball between them whilst walking from the goal line to the
20-metre line.
b. Vary the drill as the basic concept is mastered by progressing to fast walk,
jogging, running and fast running.
c. Add a third player to the group as the basic skill is mastered.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 65
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
d. ii. Passing in Circle - Stationary
Purpose:
To improve passing and receiving the ball
No. of players: Any number (at least 3)
Playing Area: Size dependent on the number of players in the circle
Procedure:
a. The players stand in a circle. The first player passes to the nearest team-mate,
who passes the ball around the circle.
Change the drill by having players face inwards or outwards, by reversing the
direction of the pass, or by using 2 balls.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 66
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
iii Passing in Circle - Moving
Purpose:
To improve passing and receiving the ball
No. of players: Any number (at least 3)
Playing Area: Size dependent on the number of players in the circle
Procedure:
a. The players stand in a circle with one player in the middle of the circle
b. The first player in the centre passes to a stationary player in the outer circle,
who passes the ball back to him/her.
c. Vary the drill by having the players in the outer circle run around the central
player, who passes to the moving players, who in turn pass the ball back to the
central player.
iv Passing in Circle - Following Pass
Purpose:
To improve passing and receiving the ball
No. of players: Any number
Playing Area: Size dependent on the number of players in the circle
Procedure:
a. The players stand in a circle facing inwards or outwards
b. The first player passes to a player next to him/her, who in turn passes the ball
around the outside of the circle. Having passed the ball, the original passer
immediately runs around the outside of the circle of players, following the
direction of his/her pass. The objective is for the first player to get back to
his/her original position before the ball arrives there. Repeat the exercise until
every player has run.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 67
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
v High pressure passing: Auckland Grid
Purpose:
To improve passing and receiving the ball
No. of players: Any number (at least 4)
Playing Area: 10 metre grid
Procedure:
a. The players stand in two groups (A & C) facing each other at opposite corners
of the grid.
b. The ball carrier (Group A) runs across the grid diagonally and passes to the
first player in the opposite group ( C ), who runs towards the ball carrier: the
receiver passes to the next player in Group A. After passing, the players go to
the back of the Group.
c. Vary the drill by increasing the speed of running, and adding two more groups,
B and D, to add the skill of running in a congested area.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 68
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
i. Passing In Line
Purpose: To learn techniques of passing and receiving the ball
No. of players: 3 to 5
Procedure:
a. The players line up side-by-side, but each being slightly behind his/her
nearest team-mate to make a diagonal line across the playing area.
b. The first player has the ball and passes to his/her nearest player, who takes
it on the run.
c. On receiving the ball, the player accelerates and passes the ball along the
line.
d. The movement is continued until the ball reaches the end of the line of
players. Turn and restart the exercise.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 69
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
ii. Passing 2 on 1
Purpose: To improve passing and receiving under pressure
No of players: 3
Playing Area: 10-metre square
Procedure:
a.
Two attackers move towards a single defender.
b.
As the defender approaches the ball carrier, the ball is passed to the
supporting player.
c.
When the receiver takes the ball, he/she should run on and touch the ball to
the ground. If the pass is dropped, intercepted or knocked down, the passer
should change places with the defender.
d.
The players change roles at frequent intervals.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 70
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
iii. Passing in Line with Overlap:
No. of Players: 3 to 5
Purpose: To improve techniques of passing and receiving the ball:
Procedure:
a. The players line up side by side, each being slightly behind his/her nearest teammate to make a diagonal line across the playing area
b. The first player has the ball and passes it to his/her nearest player, who takes the
ball on the run.
c. The passer, on completion of the pass, runs around the back of the moving line
to join at the end in time to collect the last pass
d. The first receiver accelerates and passes the ball, which goes along the line
e. The movement is continued until the ball reaches the end of the line and the
original passer has the ball. The exercise is then repeated with another player
taking the first spot.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 71
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
A variation, as skill levels increase, is for each player to loop in turn after he/she
has passed the ball. Vary the drill with the looping player coming into other points
in the line.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 72
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
2.
Picking Up/Putting down the ball.
A.
The player must keep his/her eye on the ball.
B.
The approach should be made alongside the ball, with the knees being bent
and the front foot beside the ball.
C.
The rear hand moves towards the ball and at the same time as it touches the
ball, the other hand comes down and clamps the ball from the opposite side,
bringing it under firm control.
D.
The player then rises to the normal running position with the ball held in
both hands.
i.
Drills for Picking up and Putting down the Stationary Ball
No. of players: 2-6
Procedure:
a. Players line up in teams behind each other.
b. The ball is placed 5 - 10 metres in front of the start line.
c. The first player runs towards the ball, picks it up and runs on.
d. He/she touches the 20 metre line, turns and runs back to the start line,
replacing the ball on the original spot in a controlled manner, exerting
downward pressure.
e. He/she passes the next front player, touches him/her and returns to the
rear of the team.
f. The front player repeats the drill. The sequence continues until all the
players are back in their original positions. The team that finishes first is
the winner.
See over….
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 73
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
ii. Drills for Picking up the Moving Ball
No. of players: 2-6: 1 or 2 teams
Procedure: 1
a. Players line up in behind each other on the start line.
b. The coach stands on the start line and rolls the ball towards the 20 metre
line.
c. The first player runs towards the ball, intercepts it, picks it up and runs
on.
d. He/she touches the 20 metre line, turns and runs along his/her original
path, passing the ball back to the coach, and returns to the rear of the
team.
e. The front player repeats the drill. The sequence continues until all the
players are back in their original positions.
Procedure: 2
a. Players line up in behind each other on the goal line.
b. The coach stands on the 20 metre line and rolls the ball towards the goal
line.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 74
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
c. The first player runs towards the ball, intercepts it, picks it up and runs
on.
d. He/she passes the ball back to the coach, touches the 20 metre line,
turns and runs back to the rear of the team. The front player repeats the
drill. The sequence continues until all the players are back in their
original positions.
iii High pressure pick up/put down and passing: Auckland Grid
Purpose:
To improve picking up and passing the ball
No. of players: Any number
Playing Area: 10 metre grid
Procedure:
a. The players stand in two groups (A & C) facing each other at opposite
corners of the grid.
b. The ball carrier (Group A) runs across the grid diagonally and places
the ball in the centre of the grid. The first player in the opposite group
( C ) runs towards the ball, picks it up and passes the ball to the next
player in Group A, who repeats the exercise. After passing, the players
go to the back of the Group. Vary the drill by increasing the speed of
running, and adding two more groups, B and D.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 75
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
3.
Tackling
3.1
The techniques of tackling should be introduced progressively, allowing the tackler
and player being tackled to gain confidence in the techniques taught.
3.2
Players should be taught that the way to tackle effectively is to go in low, hit hard,
squeeze the arms and go down with the ball carrier. Tackling is largely a
combination of technique, coupled with timing and commitment. Hesitation on the
part of the tackler could result in the tackle being unsuccessful and the ball carrier
continuing. Mismanaged tackling can also result in injury to both tackler and the
ball carrier.
3.3
Before discussing the techniques of tackling, the principles of preparing to be
tackled should be noted. A successful tackle without injury is important to both
the attacker and the defender, and the technique of falling correctly should be
taught. The relative positions of attacker and defender are major factors in a
successful and safe tackle. The main points of being tackled are:
i. Try and spread the impact over as large an area of the body as possible.
ii. Do not thrust out an arm in order to save yourself.
iii. Try to relax and roll onto the ground.
iv. Try not to land on your front or back: always try to turn to land on your side
with your back to the opposition and the ball on your team’s side.
3.4
The general types of tackles are:
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 76
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
i. From the side
Tackling from the side is the easiest to perform. A low body position is
important to get the tackler under attempted hand-offs. The shoulder should
be aimed into the target area, the thigh between the knee and hip, and the
tackler's head should always be behind the tackled player in order to avoid
contact with the knees when the tackler goes down. At the time of impact.
the low body position is combined with a hard drive or dive with the legs.
The impetus, together with the arms pulling the legs tightly together, should
bring the ball carrier down safely.
ii. From the front
The front tackle is a little more difficult. The body position is again low,
the tackler aiming to contact at the target area, the thigh between the knee
and hip, with one shoulder with the head to one side of the person being
tackled. At the time of impact, the tackler squeezes his/her arms around
the thighs to pull them together (and falls backward with the ball carrier.)
As the ball carrier touches the ground, the tackler turns him/her over in
order to be in an uppermost position.
iii. From the rear
·
The technique for the rear tackle is similar to the side tackle. The target
area is the waist to the buttocks. The tackler slides down the legs, pulling
them together with his/her arms and bringing the carrier to the ground. The
tackler should ensure that he/she falls to the side of the person being
tackled to avoid falling onto his/her heels (painful !).
iv. The smother tackle
The purpose of this tackle is to halt the advance of the ball carrier and to
"smother' any attempt to pass the ball and continue the attacking
movement. The method is to grasp the carrier around the shoulders and
arms. Stopping the ball carrier is the first objective, and stopping the pass
becomes the next priority. The tackler should be taught to “turn” his/her
opponent to ensure possession from the ensuing maul.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 77
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
3.5 Tackling Drills
It is not intended that all of these progressions for tackling should be attempted in any one
session. Gradually introduce the practices over the first 5 or 6 weeks of the programme,
until players have the confidence to tackle while both running at match speed.
Each time - especially in the very early stages the shoes come off as this removes 90 per
cent of the main fear of physical injuries. If they are encouraged to hold on tight every
time, the chance of injury is less. As technique improves ask the person being tackled to
carry a ball and encourage him/her to keep it "available"- as he/she is tackled.
TRY TO ENSURE THAT THEY ARE WITH PLAYERS THEIR OWN SIZE AND
WEIGHT
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 78
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
i. Side tackle: Players in pairs with shoes off
Stage 1
1.
Players kneel together, tackler at the side of the ball carrier. Tackler places his/her
shoulder into thigh, arms around thighs, head behind buttocks. (right of photo)
2. Tackler pulls with arms, and drives with shoulders. (middle of photo)
3. HOLD ON TIGHT (left of photo)
Stage 2.
Still on both knees. Player to be tackled
moves as fast as he/she can on his/her knees
past the tackler. Tackler then dives in and
tackles. HOLD ON TIGHT.
Stage 3
Tackler kneeling. The player to be tackled
walks past and is tackled from the side.
HOLD ON TIGHT.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 79
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
Stage 4
Tackler now tackles the walking partner
from the crouch position. HOLD ON
TIGHT.
Stage 5.
As in Stage 4 only the attacker puts
his/her hand up in a "pretend" hand-off.
This makes the tackler bend low under
the hand and drive in at a low level.
Progress with jogging and then running tackles starting from the upright position.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
Page 80
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
ii. Tackle from behind: Players in pairs with shoes off
Stage 1.
Both players on knees, tackler facing ball carrier’s back.
1.
Tackler puts his/her shoulder into buttock, arms around thighs.
2.
Drive forward with shoulder and pull with arms.
3.
Pull legs to side and HOLD ON TIGHT.
Stage 2
Kneel side by side. On the word “GO",
one kneeler moves forward as fast as
possible. The tackler dives immediately
to tackle him/her and prevent him/her
getting away. HOLD ON TIGHT.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
Page 81
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
Stage 3
Same object as in Stage 2 only the starting position is on all fours.
Stage 4
Partner starts behind tackler - he/she
then walks briskly past, only to be
tackled by tackler who is in the crouch
position
PROGRESS
running
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
to
both
jogging
Page 82
and
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
iii. Tackle from the front: Players in pairs with shoes off
Stage 1
Kneeling tackler and walking ball carrier.
1.
Ball carrier walks towards tackler.
Tackler places his/her shoulder into
thigh, arms around thighs, head behind
to one side.
2.
Tackler pulls with arms, and drives with
shoulders. Grips tight and turns to land
on top of attacker.
Stage 2
As above only tackler now in the crouch
position.
Stage 3
From standing position, get
to the side of the attacker.
PROGRESS
to
both
jogging
and
running.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
Page 83
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
iv. Side tackle/being tackled team drill
No. of Players: 2 Teams of 4 to 8
Procedure:
a. Team 1 lines up on the goal line facing the 20 metre line.
b. Team 2 lines up 10 metres from goal line parallel to the goal line.
c. 1st Player of Team 1 walks in a direct line from the goal line to the Twenty-metre line.
d. 1st Player of team 2 tackles him/her. Team 1 player must not try to evade tackle or hand
off.
e. Team 1 player rejoins back of Team 2 line.
f. Team 2 player rejoins back of Team 1 line.
g. Player 2, 3 etc. repeat exercise.
h. Progress by Team 1 jogging, running, running fast.
v
SIDE TACKLE TEAM DRILL: TECHNIQUE/CONFIDENCE BUILDING DRILL
No. of Players: 2 to 8 + Coach with Tackling Bag
Procedure:
a. Coach holds Tackling Bag and stands 10 metres from goal line.
b. Players line up on the goal line facing the Coach.
c. Each player in turn tackles the bag. Coach releases bag at moment of impact. Coach
should encourage a strong hit on the bag.
d. Tackler rejoins back of line.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
Page 84
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
4. Falling On The Ball
4.1. The player must keep his/her eyes on the ball.
4.2. The player lines up the ball and falls with his/her back to the opposition, pulling the ball in it
to his/her body with his/her hands.
4.3. If the player is alone at the place of fall, that is if there is no opposition to immediately
challenge him/her, then he/she must regain his/her feet and continue with the play.
4.4. If he/she is held or tackled by an opponent, he/she must release the ball from his/her hands
and a ruck should form.
4.5 Drills for Falling on the Ball
No. of players: 2
Procedure: 1: Stationary Ball
a. Players 1 places ball on ground in front of him, 5 metres in front of player 2
b. Player 2 walks up to ball and drops on it, positioning his/her body between the
ball and Player 1.
c. Player 2 gets up with the ball.
d. Repeat the exercise, reversing roles.
e. Progress to jogging and running to fall on the ball.
Procedure: 2: Moving Ball
a. Players 1 rolls the ball on ground in front of him, 5 metres from player 2.
b. Player 2 walks up to ball and drops on it, positioning his/her body between the
ball and Player 1.
c. Player 2 gets up with the ball.
d. Repeat the exercise, reversing roles.
e. Players progress to jogging and running to fall on the ball..
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
Page 85
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
5. Kicking and Catching the Ball (Under 11s & Under 12/13’s)
Kicking does not play as major a role in Mini Rugby as it does in the 15-a-side game. However, kicking
skills are an integral part of the sport, and are an important learning factor for the senior game. For this
reason these skills should be introduced to U11 & U12 age groups.
The kicks in Mini Rugby are:
i. Place Kick
Is used at the initial kick-off and in try conversions (only for older players).
Placing the ball
The ball should be placed upright with the axis pointing in the anticipated line of the kick.
The run up
The run up should be a few steps, finishing with the non-kicking foot at the side of the
ball taking the whole weight of the kicker’s body. During the run up the eyes must be
upon the ball.
The kick
The kicking foot makes contact with the ball, with the toe below the middle.
The follow-through
A good follow-through is essential for length and accuracy.
ii. The Punt
Is used defensively to kick into touch, and in attack, to place the defence under
pressure. A punt is made by dropping the ball from the hands and kicking it before it
touches the ground.
Holding the Ball
The ball should be held in both hands at the angle at which it should be placed upon the
foot, and with the axis of the ball pointing along the anticipated line of the kick. The
ball should be released when the kicker is perfectly balanced on his/her non-kicking
foot. The ball itself is not thrown up or pushed down onto the foot, but is placed onto
the foot when the kicking action has started. The kicker's eyes should always be on the
ball during the kick.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
Page 86
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
The kick
The whole body weight is placed on the non-kicking foot as the kick is made. The
impact is made with the top of the instep, the foot is stretched tight and the upper body
begins to lean backwards.
The follow-through
A smooth action is essential, with the weight on the non-kicking foot and the body
leaning back and balanced. The kicking leg should follow through after the contact to
ensure a stabbing contact has not been made.
iii. Drop Kick
The drop kick is made when the foot strikes the ball as it touches the ground, causing
the ball to rise. It is used for restarts for older players.
Holding the ball
The ball is held on both sides with the vertical axis slightly inclined and the base of
the ball leaning away from the kicker.
The kick
The ball is dropped from the hands, tilted slightly backwards so that the ball bounces
backward on to the instep of the kicking foot. The point of contact is the centre of the
lower portion of the ball. The foot is inclined downward with the leg straightened. The
angle at which the ball is dropped, together with the swing of the leg, gives height to
the ball during flight.
The follow-through
A good follow-through is important to give the accuracy and length needed for drop kicks.
iv. Catching the Ball
This is another area in which all team members should be proficient. Positioning under
the ball is most important, the catcher's eye always being on the ball. When the ball
comes closer, he/she reaches up with both hands and makes a cradle to gather the ball
into his/her chest. The action should be smooth, and not be a snatching action as the
ball enters the hands.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
Page 87
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
v. Kicking Drills
Punt and Catch
a. Players pair off. One is the kicker and the other is the catcher. They face each other
about10 metres apart.
b. The kicker punts the ball towards the catcher. The object is to kick the ball to the
catcher so that it can be caught without the catcher having to move his/her feet.
c. The catcher then becomes the kicker and returns the ball.
d. The distance between them is increased as the accuracy improves.
Drop-kick and Catch
a. The players pair off. One is the kicker and the other is the catcher. They face each
other about 10 metres apart.
b. The kicker drop-kicks the ball toward the catcher. Emphasis must be placed on
developing the timing of the foot contact. The ball rising in a controlled manner is a
measure of success.
c. The catcher then becomes the kicker and returns the ball.
d. The distance between the players is increased as the accuracy improves.
Place kick at goal
a. The ball is placed on the 15-metre line, directly in front of the goal.
b. The kicker stands in front of the ball, then walks backwards a few steps, keeping
his/her eyes on the ball.
c. The run-up should be of steady pace and ends with the non-kicking foot alongside the
ball supporting the whole of the player's body weight.
d. The ball is kicked with the toe of the boot being square at the underside of the ball.
(A soccer style or "side angle" kick may also be used.)
e. The follow-through for the kick is most important to develop. The length and the
swing of the kicking leg after the impact gives length and direction to the path of the
ball. The catcher kicks in the same manner, the original kicker becoming the catcher.
f. All players should attempt goal kicks.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
Page 88
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
6. Ruck & Maul
The importance of rucking and mauling is as great in Mini Rugby as it is in the 15-aside game.
Each player on the team should know and understand the basic principles of the ruck and maul,
be proficient in the techniques and should participate in all the practices.
The difference between rucking and mauling should also be noted. The ruck is formed
following a tackle when the ball has gone to ground, whereas the maul is formed when the ball
carrier is still on his/her feet after being stopped.
6.1 The Maul
The two main factors in the maul are:
i.
The Ball Carrier
a. The ball carrier must always
be prepared to continue the
play when challenged by a
defender. When a tackle
seems inevitable he/she must
drive into the defender,
turning at the moment of
contact and screening the
ball away from the tackler.
b. The player sets up a maul by turning his/her back to the opposition so as to face
his/her own goal line. He/she encompasses the ball with his/her arms so as to
protect it from sudden snatching and knocking from his/her grasp, swinging
his/her shoulders to make any firm grip on him/her by the defenders more
difficult.
c. He/she has become the centre point of the maul.
ii.
The Supporting Players
a. The first two players to reach the ball carrier go one to either side of him/her and
drive hard against the oncoming opposing players, binding over the ball carrier's
back to form a protective platform.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
Page 89
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
b. The other supporting players drive into the maul, bind onto the nearest players,
watch the ball, and keep a clear way at the rear for the ball carrier to pass the ball
to the Half Back, or to slip the ball to a supporting “mauler”.
c. When the Half Back calls for the ball, the carrier must be prepared to passes the
ball back to him/her.
d. All the players in the maul must bind in and push. Anyone who is within the area
bounded by the parallel lines through the last foot at either side of the maul and
not bound in is offside.
6.2 The Ruck
The principles are similar to the maul except that the ruck starts when the ball is on the
ground following a tackle.
a. The ball carrier at the moment of tackle should try to fall with his/her back
towards his/her opponents goal line, thus protecting the ball with his/her back and
ensuring that the only way the ball can go is towards his/her own team..
b. He/she must release the ball before or as he/she touches the ground.
c. The first two players reaching the ball should step over the fallen player and bind
onto each other and, with their bodies in a low position, step over the player on
the ground, making contact with the first two players of the defending team.
d. Other supporting players bind around them, forming a solid unit, driving hard and
low and keeping eyes on the ball. The object is to push the opponents from the
ball, enabling the Halfback to gather the ball when it comes free and then to
continue with the play, but if it is impeded then to direct it back with the feet.
e. A Halfback should always be in position at the rear of the ruck ready to collect
the ball when it emerges. The ball has to be free and clear of the ruck before it
can be handled.
6.3 Drills for Ruck and Maul
i.
Mauls – Drill 1
No. of Players:
2 to 6
Procedure:
a. One player acts as defender.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
Page 90
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
b. One player with the ball runs to the defender and, as he/she nears the defender,
turns his/her shoulder into his/her opponent with his/her body angled. The ball
is held away from his/her opponent. He/she must stay on his/her feet, with
his/her legs braced to give a firm base.
c. The next players come in and bind to the ball carrier, each with his/her inside
arm over the back of the carrier. This forms a platform of support for the ball
carrier.
d. The Halfback is in position at the back of the maul and calls for the bail to be
passed by the ball carrier. Do not allow release until the Halfback calls.
e. Players change roles.
ii.
Maul - Drill 2
No. of Players:
3 to 6 + Coach with Tackling Target
Procedure:
a. Coach with tackling target acts as defender.
b. One player with the ball runs slowly to the Coach (defender) and, as he/she
nears the Coach, turns his/her shoulder into the tackling target with his/her body
angled. The ball is held away from his/her opponent and available to the
supporting players.
c. He/she must stay on his/her feet, with his/her legs braced to give a firm base.
d. The next player comes in and takes the ball from the ball carrier and feeds back
to a supporting player who acts as Halfback.
e. Halfback passes to supporting player(s) who pass the ball down a line.
f. Progress by speeding up exercise to full speed running.
iii.
Maul - Drill 3
No. of Players:
3 to 6 + 2 Coaches with tacking targets
Procedure:
a. 2 Coaches with tackling target act as defenders.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
Page 91
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
b. One player with the ball runs slowly to Coach 1 (defender) and, as he/she nears
the Coach, turns his/her shoulder into the tackling target with his/her body
angled. The ball is held away from his/her opponent and available to the
supporting players.
c. He/she must stay on his/her feet, with his/her legs braced to give a firm base.
d. The next player comes in and takes the ball from the ball carrier and feeds back
to a supporting player who peels from the maul.
e. Supporting player runs slowly on to Coach 2 who has taken a position c.10
metres on from Coach 1: as the player nears Coach 2, player turns his/her
shoulder into the tackling target with his/her body angled. The ball is held away
from his/her opponent and available to the supporting players who have broken
from the first maul and have come up in support. He/she must stay on his/her
feet, with his/her legs braced to give a firm base.
f. The next player comes in and takes the ball from the ball carrier and feeds back
to a supporting player who acts as Halfback.
g. Halfback passes to supporting player(s) who in turn pass the ball down a line.
h. Progress by speeding up exercise to full speed running.
iv. Ruck - Basic Practice Drill
No. of Players: groups of 7
Procedure:
a. Three players form the ruck support group by interlocking arms facing away
from the direction of the play (or 2/3 coaches with tackling bags/targets).
b. One player with the ball runs toward the three players and, as he/she nears them,
he/she drops onto the ground with his/her back towards the feet of the three
players.
c. Two players follow behind the ball carrier and when he/she drops, they drive
into the three defenders, binding together and pushing against the resistance of
their rear ends.
d. The remaining player acts as Scrumhalf and gathers the ball at the back of the
ruck, passing to any remaining players.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
Page 92
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
e. Players change roles and act as ruck support, ball carrier and attackers.
f. Progress by speeding up the exercise, or by adding more players to the ruck.
6. Scrummage
The main factors of good scrummaging are
6.1
The position of the feet
This is most important, for if the feet of the
forwards are not in the correct position at
the right time, the ball should not exit from
the scrum correctly.
The prop positioned on the left side of the mini scrum is known as the loose head prop.
He/she packs down with legs apart and both feet placed firmly on the ground. He or she
should have a fairly wide base for stability and place his/her left foot slightly ahead of
his/her right, providing a clear channel for the ball.
The prop positioned on the right side of the mini scrum is known as the tight head prop.
He/she packs down with legs apart, though not as wide as the loose head prop, and both
feet placed firmly on the ground. His/her right foot is slightly ahead of his/her left.
The other front row player, the hooker, uses his/her right foot to strike for the ball.
He/she supports his/her weight on his/her left foot, which is placed slightly back (next to
the prop's right foot) and allows him/her to push as he/she strikes for the ball. The hooker
may strike for the ball with either foot, though his/her right should afford him/her more
comfort and control.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
Page 93
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
The two locks pack with their legs back and
shove off the inside of their feet. The locks
pack down between the props and hooker,
and their legs must be back with the instep of
their feet firmly planted on the ground.
The back row packs with his/her feet placed
back, and his/her legs apart and shoves off
the inside of his/her feet.
6.2 Scrum Techniques - Mini Rugby
The binding of the forwards has a
preferred order. The 2 props and the
hooker should first bind together
with the hookers arms bound over
the tops of the props’ shoulders and
the props’ arms tightly around the
hooker, just below his/her armpits.
Next the locks. The best way for the locks to bind is to get down on one knee to place
their shoulders just above the knees of the front row players. As they lift their knees from
the ground, they slide their shoulders up until they reach the bottom of the buttocks.
Finally the back row packs down under the buttocks of the locks.
A lot of emphasis has been placed upon this correct procedure for packing low but the
main criteria should be (a) the establishment of the best positions for that particular group
of players (b) the positions that are the most comfortable to get possession of the ball.
The coach must ensure that each forward has maximum stud contact with the ground. It is
important that the whole scrum packs down tightly.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
Page 94
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
6.3 Scrummaging Drills
Scrum Practice - Stage 1
Purpose: To develop the technique of binding in the scrum
No. of Players: in pairs
Procedure:
a. The players face each other, bend and
place shoulder to shoulder.
b. They bind together by gripping across
the back.
c. Players push against each other for short
periods.
d.
Players should change shoulders and
repeat the exercise.
Scrum Practice - Stage 2
Purpose: To develop the technique in binding in the scrum
No. of Players: 2 pairs of 2 ( graded by size)
Procedure:
a. Each pair stands side by side and binds to each other using their inside arms and
gripping around each other’s waist.
b. The pairs face each other, bend and position shoulder to shoulder, with one
taking the “inside” head.
c. They bind together, each prop gripping his/her opponent's upper back with the
outside arm.
d. Pairs change position with the player in the "Inside head" position changing to
the "Outside head' position and repeating the exercise.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
Page 95
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
Scrum Practice - Stage 3
No. of Players: 2 teams of 3 ( graded by size)
Procedure:
a. Each team stands side by side and binds to each other.
b. The teams face each other, bend and position shoulder to shoulder, with one
taking the “inside” head.
c. They bind together, each prop gripping his/her opponent's upper back with the
outside arm.
d. Teams change position with the player in the "Inside head" position changing
to the “Outside head” position and repeating the exercise.
THIS IS THE FRONT ROW OF THE MINI-RUGBY SCRUM, AND THE
SCRUM FOR U 9’s, U 10’s and U11's
Scrum Practice - Stage 4
a. As Stage 3 above but adding 2 locks to each team.
b. The exercise is repeated with all positions being changed.
THIS IS THE MINI-RUGBY SCRUM FOR U 12’s
Scrum Practice - Stage 5
As Stage 4 above but adding a back row to each team.
THIS IS THE MINI-RUGBY SCRUM FOR U 14’s
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 96
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
7. The Line Out
There are four main skills to be learnt in relation to the line-out:
a. throwing
b. jumping
c. catching
d. supporting
Players should be coached to catch the ball in two hands: tapping back/down should
not be coached at this level. Boosting should also not be allowed at this level.
7.1 Line Out Drills
Line Out Practice - Stage 1
No. of Players: 4 ( 2 jumpers, with a thrower and scrum half)
a. Two players should stand in line-out jumping position, 1 metre apart, 5 metres
from the touch line.
b. Thrower should throw the ball between the two jumpers. Jumper 1 is to catch
the ball, Jumper 2 to provide opposition, but not to try to catch the ball.
c. Jumper 1 should jump to make a clean catch, holding the ball as in a mauling
position after the “take” before feeding the ball back to the scrum-half.
d. The exercise is repeated with all positions being changed.
e. Thrower should try both ”bullet” and “lob” throws.
Line Out Practice - Stage 2
No. of Players: 3-6 in two teams with a scrum half
a. Two Teams should stand in line-out jumping position, 1 metre apart, 5 metres
from the touch line.
b. Thrower should throw the ball between the two lines, changing the position to
which he/she throws.
c. Jumpers should jump to make a clean catch, holding the ball as in a mauling
position after the “take”: remaining players should move into supporting
positions as in Maul before feeding the ball back to the scrum-half.
d. The exercise is repeated with all positions being changed.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 97
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
8. Running Skills
The ability to evade tackles is greatly enhanced by the acquisition of good running
skills. These skills can be coached; the most important areas to concentrate on are:
•
Side-step
•
Swerve
•
Hand-off
•
Change of Pace
•
Dummy pass and kick
Drills for Running:
Slalom Running
The Players divide into two or more teams of equal number
a. The first player takes the ball in two hands and runs in and out of the cones,
using the skill chosen by the coach for this exercise (ie. swerve, sidestep or
dummy pass or kick)
b. Player returns to the start position and hands the ball to the next player who
continues the exercise. The first team to finish is the winner.
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 98
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
Training session examples
Session 1:
Lesson Objective: Introduction to Rugby: Learn basic Passing skills
1. Warm Up
Stretch
British Bulldogs: 2 handed touch
Running Races
2. Skills Session
Demonstrate Passing technique
Simple Practice Exercise: passing in circle (groups of 4/5)
More Complex Exercise: walking pass with partner, progressing to jogging/running
3. Controlled Game
Simple touch and pass:
When touched, stop and pass ball (backwards passing).
Knock on hands over
Tap start
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 99
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
Session 2:
Lesson Objective: Learn basic Pick up/Put down skills; Consolidate passing
1. Warm Up
Stretch
End Ball Passing Game
Running races with ball in hand
2. Skills Session
Demonstrate Pick Up/put down
Simple Practice Exercise: run out, pick up, run back, put down (groups 4/5)
More Complex Exercise: with partner. Partner rolls ball out for pick up. Run and
pick up, pass to partner (repeat between 25 and goal line)
Passing Practice: groups of 3
3. Controlled Game
Simple touch and pass: when touched, pass ball within 2 paces (backwards
passing).
Start by running from line: 1st there picks up
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 100
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
Session 3:
Lesson Objective: Learn basic side tackle/Consolidate passing/pick up
1. Warm Up
Stretch
Corner Ball
Pick Up/Put Down race
2. Skills Session
Demonstrate Side tackle/how to be tackled
Simple Practice Exercise: SHOES OFF , with partner (OF OWN SIZE), kneeling
stationary side tackle
More Complex Exercise: with partner kneeling and moving (on knees) side tackle
Passing race: teams of 8 ( 4 pairs). 4 passes between 25 and goal line & 4 back again
3. Controlled Game
Simple touch and pass: when touched, pass ball within 2 paces (backwards
passing).
Start by running from line: 1st there picks up
Two handed touch below the waist
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 101
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
Session 4:
Lesson Objective: More Tackling/Consolidate passing/pick up
1. Warm Up
Stretch
British Bulldogs (tackle)
Races/Passing games
2. Skills Session
Demonstrate Side tackle/how to be tackled
Simple Practice Exercise: SHOES OFF, with partner, tackler kneeling, player to be
tackled walking
More Complex Exercise: with partner: standing tackle player to be tackled walking
Snake Relay (with ball) teams of 6-8
3. Controlled Game
Simple touch and pass: when touched, pass ball within 2 paces (backwards
passing).
Start by running from line: 1st there picks up
Two handed touch below the waist
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 102
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS, SOURCES & READING LIST:
The Coaching Guide to Mini Rugby (Video) - RFU
Even Better Rugby (Publication and Video) - RFU
Mini Rugby Directive - Revised May 1992, May 1997 (and to be found in the RFU
1997/98 Handbook and Laws of the Game)
RU Proficiency Awards Pamphlet
New Image Pamphlet - RFU
Six Stages to New Image Video and Notes - RFU
RFU Safety Pamphlets 1-8
RFU Start Coaching Rugby Pack
RFU Mini Rugby Pamphlet
RFU Working with Children Booklet
Coaching Assoc. of Canada: Straight Talk about Children and Sport
3M Canada NCCP Level 1, 2 & 3 Rugby Coaching Manuals
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 103
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
BCRU Mini-Rugby Contact List
Name
Phone/ Fax/Email (All Area Code 604 unless indicated)
BCRU Director of Age
Grade and Mini-Rugby
Paul Timperley
921-6623/ 921-6673/ ptimperley@home.com
BCRU Youth Devlt.
Officer
John Graf
313-3350/ 737-3916/ bcruydo@telus.net
BCRU Office
Dick Woldring
737-3065/ 737-3916/ bcrugby@bc.sympatico.ca
Secretary, BCRU
Mini-Rugby Committee
Graeme Dearnley
987-9870/
Abbotsford
Doug Primrose
(w) 859-7125/ / doug_primrose@sd34.abbotsford.bc.ca
Bayside
Peter Holt
531-6999/531-2924/ peter@holt.ca (cell) 218-8997
Burnaby
Tanya Donaldson
294-BLRC// tanya_donaldson@city.vancouver.Bc.Ca
Britannia Lions
Dan Wood
980-8176/ 641-1447/ brittanialionsrugby@home.com (w) 647-7323
Campbell River
Rich McLeod
(250) 926-0559
Capilanos
Paul Timperley
Graeme Dearnley
921-6623/ 921-6673/ ptimperley@home.com
987-9870/ / Dearnley@bcsympatico.ca
Chilliwack
Terry Puckey
604-858-0637/604-858-0687/ paisley@telus.net
Cowichan
Barkley Logan
250-246-3522/ / blogan@cow-net.com
Delta Mini-Lions
Don Brown
599-4633/ / nodbbrown@dccnet.com
Douglas
Sharon Maxwell
444-4677/ / sharon_maxwell@hotmail.com
Fort St. John
Steve Woods
phone/fax 250-785-4857
Gibsons
John Rainer
740-0851/ 886-8187 (w) 886-7616 jrainer@uniserve.com
Kelowna
Chris Bayne
phone/fax 250-762-4338 / chris_bayne@bc.sympatico.ca
Langley
Randy Vaydo
Brenda Weir
530-9592/ / vaydo@imag.net / (w) rjv@ddabc.com (w)882-0900 x269
534-6753/ / (w) 576-0089 brenda@fastfind.com
Meralomas
Ed Wight
Martha Williams
261-7545/ 266-7545/ enwight@telus.net
732-7064/ / mmwilliams@telus.net
Nanaimo
Drew Cooper
Bob Saunders
250-753-3245/ 250-741-2586/ dcooper@pacificsport.com
250-758-7056/250-751-3405/ jbaldwin@nanaimo.env.gov.bc.ca
Penticton
Dave Reid
d.reid@home.com
Surrey
Mike Jeffreys
930-4640/ / 888-9021/ mjeffreys@plea.bc.ca
Richmond
Paul Gillette
277-5559// vickiam@planeteer.com
Rowing Club
John Thomas
Andrea Battiston
Phone/fax 929-5695/ (w) 929-6669/ thomascrew@home.com (cell) 728-5716
725-9071/725-9061/ andrea_battiston@hotmail.com
Salmon Arm
John La Boyne
John.LaBoyne@gems4.gov.bc.ca
Sidney
Don Burgess
burge@home.com
/ Dearnley@bcsympatico.ca
Clubs
rich.mcleod@sd72.bc.ca
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 104
B.C.R.U. YOUTH RUGBY PROGRAM
UBCOB Ravens
Phillip Adams
736-3181/276-4275 / pandeadams@home.com
Velox
Des Lynch
250-477-1115/ /dclynch@pacificcoast.net
Vernon
Ian Busfield
250-558-4590/ 250-542-2028/ irbusfield@sd22.bc.ca
Williams Lake
Morley Wilson
mort@uniserve.com
California
Mike Sagehorn
925.779.9343/ / deltarugby@yahoo.com
Oregon
Jeff Arker
503- 288-1572 / / jeff@chinook-usa.com
Seattle
Michael Marks
mmarks04@sprynet.com
© Paul S. Timperley, Director of BCRU Age Grade & Mini-Rugby Programs
October 2, 2001:
All Rights reserved.
Page 105
Download PDF
Similar pages