MapInfo TargetPro - Product Documentation

MapInfo TargetPro™
Version 4.7
User Guide
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document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, without the written permission of MapInfo
Corporation, One Global View, Troy, New York 12180-8399.
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Xceed by Xceed Software Inc. (c) 1995-1999. All Rights Reserved.
TrueDBGrid Library by APEX Software Corporation (c) 1991, 1998. All Rights Reserved.
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libtiff © 1988-1995 Sam Leffler, copyright © Silicon Graphics, Inc.
libgeotiff © 1995 Niles D. Ritter.
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ECW by ER Mapper © 1993-2005
VM Grid by Northwood Technologies, Inc., a Marconi Company © 1995-2005.
Portions © 2003 Earth Resource Mapping, Ltd. All Rights Reserved.
MrSID, MrSID Decompressor and the MrSID logo are trademarks of LizardTech, Inc. used under license. Portions of this computer program are copyright © 19951998 LizardTech and/or the university of California or are protected by US patent nos. 5,710,835 or 5,467,110 and are used under license. All rights
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Portions © Tele Atlas, Inc (GDT, Inc.)
May 2005
TargetPro User Guide
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
TargetPro Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Software Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MapInfo Professional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Crystal Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Microsoft SQL Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Custom Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Guide Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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5
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6
6
Chapter 2: Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Starting TargetPro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Logging In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Opening a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Working with Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Studying the Project Workspace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Learning the Interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
TargetPro Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
TargetPro Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Key Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Layer Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Map Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Setting Project Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Enabling Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Displaying Login Dialogs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Displaying Warning Dialogs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Displaying MapInfo Professional Toolbars and Menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Creating Mappable Files from Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Showing Key Map and Layer Manager Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Setting a Tab File Import Threshold. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Changing the Default Key Map Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Changing the Default Zoom Layering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Additional Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Using the Workspace Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Chapter 3: Map Concepts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Zooming and Panning the Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Zooming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Panning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Map Layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About the Layer Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting the Active Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Adding a Layer to the Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a Layer from the Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing Layer Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Browsing a Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Re-ordering Layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Geographies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Refreshing the Layer Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing Map Layer Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Display Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lines, Nodes, and Centroids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Zoom Layering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Thematic Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Thematic Map Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Label Options for a Map Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Labeling Using a Column . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Labeling with Expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Layer Visibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Label Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Positioning Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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25
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34
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35
36
Chapter 4: Working with Geographies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Finding a Geography on the Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Point with Rings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Buffers Around a Set of Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Point with Rings from an Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Point with Rings from a Street Intersection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Point with Rings Using Longitude/Latitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Polygon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Drive Time and Drive Distance Trade Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Custom Geographies with MapInfo Professional. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Geographies on the Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Non-Contiguous Geographies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Contiguous Geographies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Geographies From a Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Geographies by Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Examples of Selecting Geographies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Geographies Within or Overlapped by a Region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Geography Selections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving the Current Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Displaying Previous Selections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting Geographies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Trade Areas Using the Capture Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Trade Areas Using a Customer Dataset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Trade Areas Using a Market Demographic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 5: Importing and Registering Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
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Accessing the Data Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Manager Menu and Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing Data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preparing to Import Your Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing Data from a TAB File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing Data from Other Data Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Linking to a Data Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Registering Additional Attribute Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Registering Areas Built from Registered Boundaries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Registering Boundary Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Registering Geocoded Data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Registering Non Geocoded Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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85
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Chapter 6: Working with Your Data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Exporting Data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Deleting a Linked Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Performing Batch Geocoding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Modifying Data Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Creating Custom Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Creating an Expression Variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Creating a True Median Variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Creating a Radius Based Variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Creating a Geography Based Constant Variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Creating a Geography Based Parent Variable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Working with Index Based Templates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Creating an Index Based Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Editing an Index Based Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Deleting an Index Based Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Changing Access to a Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Saving a Template with a New Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Chapter 7: Managing Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Understanding Clusters and Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PSYTE Clusters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cluster System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Filter or Weighted Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Geographic Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Product Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Product Profile from Scratch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Converting a Geographic Profile to a Product Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Customer Record Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Summarized Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Organizing Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Profile Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Folder Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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112
112
113
113
114
118
120
120
122
122
124
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Adding Profiles to a Folder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Renaming Custom Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting a Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Merging Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Getting Profile Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Target Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing the Target Group Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a New Group Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Groups to a Group Set. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Renaming a Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting a Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Target Group Colors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Clusters to a Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing Clusters from a Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Displaying Cluster Statistics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
127
127
127
128
128
128
129
129
130
130
130
131
131
131
132
Chapter 8: Running Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Quick View Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Copying the Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding Standard Demographic Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Profile Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ranking Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running a Standard Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the Reporting Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Geographies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting a Report to Run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Report Properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choosing Report Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting an Output Destination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running the Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Custom Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Redesigning the Report Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Custom Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Folders for Custom Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Custom Report Access Rights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting a Custom Report or Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving Custom Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Upgrading Custom Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running Multiple Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
136
137
137
138
139
144
144
145
146
147
148
151
151
152
153
155
155
156
157
157
157
158
Chapter 9: Running Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Choosing a Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bar Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Battlegrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gains and Lift Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chart Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running a Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Analyzing Bar Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding the Bar Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single Profile Bar Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single Profile Fever Line Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analyzing Battlegrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analyzing Gains and Lift Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lift Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing Cluster Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
163
163
164
165
167
175
176
177
Chapter 10: Preparing a Map for Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Adding a Legend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing the Legend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Scalebar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Simple Scalebar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Repositioning the Scalebar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Map Scale Accuracy for Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Scale with a Limited Frame Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Scale with a Limit on Map Zoom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Map Layout for Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up the Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing Your Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Advanced Printing Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Output Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Display and Color Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overriding the Default Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
180
181
182
182
183
184
184
184
185
185
185
185
186
186
186
186
Appendix A: Glossary of Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Appendix B: Reserved Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
SQL Server Reserved Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
ODBC Reserved Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
Future Keywords. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
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Introduction
Welcome to TargetPro® version 4.7, the marketing information system that
provides you with powerful tools to perform accurate demographic analysis. It
seamlessly integrates your customer data with any of MapInfo’s demographic,
geographic, business, and segmentation databases.
TargetPro is a mapping application built around MapInfo Professional®.
Powered by MapInfo Professional’s robust mapping functionality, TargetPro
includes many mapping features to help you display and analyze your data.
TargetPro also provides you with advanced functionality and marketing
information to answer your specific questions.
In this section:
!
!
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What is TargetPro and What Does it Do? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TargetPro Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Software Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About This Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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What is TargetPro and What Does it Do?
TargetPro is the solution that enables you to link location analysis to CRM systems and
demographic, geographic, and business databases. TargetPro helps make accurate and confident
business decisions by giving you insight into the demographic and purchase behavior
characteristics of any customer group or geographic area. With TargetPro you can profile, analyze
and understand customers and markets to predict buying behavior for virtually any business or
consumer product or service. Explore customer and prospect data within TargetPro 's robust,
analytical reporting engine, then compare it with the most accurate consumer and business
demographic data available. TargetPro is used extensively by marketers, researchers and
analysts for:
•
Market Potential Analysis
•
Site Selection
•
New Product Introductions
•
Promotional and Marketing Campaigns
•
Merger and Acquisition Analysis
You control the data you use in your analysis by selecting specific geographic areas of interest,
importing your own data, and picking the attributes and values you want to use.
Analyze your census and attribute data by comparing them against variables, or segment them
into clusters of similar neighborhood behavior patterns.
You can view the results of your analysis in a variety of ways. Outputting to a report provides a
tabular format which is especially useful when presenting results to others. Maps show the
geographic context of results by displaying the values themed in color and pattern; this makes a
strong visual impact when presenting your results. You can also export your results to other file
formats to enable further processing using other tools outside TargetPro.
Using TargetPro you can locate lucrative sites and markets, identify and reach your best
prospects, and plan the most successful cross-sell and retention programs possible.
This book describes how to use TargetPro for market analysis. It contains tips and information for
this version of the software only. Subsequent shipments of the software may or may not contain a
similar guide. This entire guide should be reviewed before commencing with market analysis.
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TargetPro Features
TargetPro provides all the mapping functionality needed to interact directly with a map, such as the
ability to control the map view detail, pan and zoom, apply thematic shades, digitize and edit points
and trade areas, directly view data for points and areas on the map, and select geographies on
which to generate reports. Select any standard area you want to study by simply pointing and
clicking on a map or by accessing a text-based list of geographic areas.
TargetPro is not exclusively a mapping application. It also contains a more traditional text-based
user interface, allowing you to select or locate particular geographies from a folder-based selection
tool.
TargetPro enables you to profile your customer and prospect data, and then compare it with the
most accurate consumer and business demographic data available. It can provide insight into the
demographic and purchase behavior characteristics of any geographic area in the United States,
helping you to make accurate and confident business decisions. With TargetPro you can profile,
analyze, and understand customers and markets to predict buying behavior for virtually any
business, consumer product, or service.
TargetPro is used extensively by marketers, researchers and analysts for site selection, new
product introductions, promotional and marketing campaigns, and merger and acquisition
analysis.
Key Features
The following are some of the key features in TargetPro that provide flexibility when analyzing your
data.
Accessing Your Data
•
COMBINE YOUR DATA WITH OTHER DATA SETS – Import or link to your customer data to
combine it with the demographic, marketing potential, media, and cluster data sets
available to you in TargetPro. You can import the data directly into TargetPro, or link to
data stored in most popular relational database platforms.
•
CREATE CUSTOM TRADE AREAS – Draw rings, generate drive-time or drive-distance areas,
use the free hand drawing tools, or use the Capture tool to create trade areas for your
analysis. You can also import custom trade areas, such as telecommunication boundaries,
from MapInfo Professional or a variety of other spatial analysis packages.
•
CREATE CUSTOM VARIABLES – You can easily create a variety of new data variables in
TargetPro using Data Manager functionality.
Running Reports
The following are features when running reports on the various databases provided with
TargetPro.
•
SAVE REPORTS IN POPULAR FORMATS – Sharing your reports and maps is easy, because
you can save and output them in a variety of formats, including Adobe Acrobat (PDF),
HTML, and Crystal Reports, or as simple spreadsheets.
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BATCH REPORTING – For speed and convenience, you can select and run multiple reports
on multiple areas at the same time. These reports can also be sent directly to the printer in
a batch.
•
EXPORTING CAPABILITIES – You can output the results of your reports to Access, Excel, and
CSV formats.
Working in an Enterprise Setting
TargetPro can be used by a single analyst on a desktop or by groups of analysts in a client server
environment. When using a centralized database, you can publish your maps and reports into
folders others can access. Projects can be marked as Private to restrict access if necessary.
Geocoding Addresses
Ability to geocode data from within the TargetPro user interface (for MapMarker® licensees).
Software Components
TargetPro gives you the tools to perform sophisticated demographic analysis by building on
existing mapping and database technology. The software components that install with TargetPro
include MapInfo Professional, Crystal Reports®, and Microsoft® SQL Server™. MapInfo
Professional provides mapping and spatial analysis functionality, Crystal Reports is a professional
reporting tool, and Microsoft SQL Server provides the database technology.
TargetPro also gives you the flexibility to work with your own custom data sources, such as a
customer database or data repository.
MapInfo Professional
MapInfo Professional is a comprehensive desktop mapping tool that provides the facilities for
complex geographic analysis such as redistricting, linking to your remote data, dragging and
dropping map objects into your applications, creating thematic maps that emphasize patterns in
your data, and much more.
TargetPro’s demographic functionality is seamlessly integrated with MapInfo Professional, which
provides advanced data analysis, mapping, and reporting facilities. TargetPro uses the standard
features of MapInfo Professional for map display, as well as navigation features such as zoom,
pan, layer control, and object selection. TargetPro provides additional demographic-specific
functionality through a menu added to MapInfo Professional’s top-level menu bar.
Crystal Reports
The TargetPro reporting facility is built using Business Objects’® Crystal Reports. Crystal Reports
provides powerful reporting functionality for creating reports from tabular data. For fast and easy
reporting, TargetPro installs with standard reports and in addition you are able to create custom
reports for your specific needs.
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Microsoft SQL Server
Microsoft SQL Server provides the database technology for TargetPro. SQL Server is a database
management system. It is used for storing the data that installs with, or can be purchased for,
TargetPro.TargetPro also takes advantage of Microsoft SQL Server’s importing and linking
capabilities.
Custom Data
You can easily integrate your own data sources, such as customer databases or information
repositories, using TargetPro’s Data Manager. The Data Manager guides you through the process
of importing from, or linking to, your custom data sources. You can import attribute data such as
number of pets per household, sales information, or car registration information and geometry data
such as boundaries, sales trade areas, or point data.
Documentation
TargetPro documentation consists of the TargetPro Installation Guide, which details the TargetPro
installation process, and this TargetPro User’s Guide. For online help for the interface, select HELP
> MAPINFO PROFESSIONAL HELP TOPICS from the menu.
Each component also has its own documentation. TargetPro’s documentation covers the tasks and
functionality that you will need to perform analysis and reporting tasks. You may want to refer to
the following documents for more detailed information, or for advanced usage:
•
MapInfo Professional – The MapInfo Professional User’s Guide and Web-enabled tutorial
provide information about the functionality that MapInfo Professional provides. The
MapInfo Professional 7.8 User’s Guide is available as a free download from the MapInfo
website, found at http://www.mapinfo.com/support/documentation/manuals.cfm.
•
Crystal Reports – For advanced reporting, refer to the Crystal Reports User’s Guide to get
the most from this program. The help system can be accessed directly at C:\Program
Files\Seagate Software\Crystal Reports\Help\crw.chm. It may be helpful to create a
shortcut to this file.
•
Microsoft SQL Server – Microsoft SQL Server installs with its own separate set of online
documents that are accessible from the START > PROGRAMS menu on your Windows
toolbar.
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Chapter 1: Introduction
About This Book
This book assumes that you are familiar with MapInfo Professional, and that the TargetPro
software is installed and running.
User Guide Summary
•
TargetPro Features.
•
Getting Started – Describes how to get started with TargetPro.
•
Map Concepts – Outlines the basic mapping concepts necessary to use TargetPro.
•
Working with Geographies – Describes how to display and select standard geographic
regions, and how to create custom geographies.
•
Importing and Registering Data – Provides an overview of how to import or link to, and
register, your custom datasets.
•
Working with Your Data – Describes how to modify data properties, perform batch
geocoding, create variables, and export data.
•
Managing Profiles – Describes how to manage your profiles and cluster groups, and
determine the market potential of databases. This helps you understand your customers,
segment them, and predict usage for your product based on their profile.
•
Running Reports – Describes how to perform analysis using the Reporting tools. You can
use an existing report, or create an entirely new custom report using your own data.
•
Running Charts – Describes how to run and analyse the charts provided with TargetPro
•
Preparing a Map for Printing – Describes how to prepare and print a map. It describes how
to add a legend and a scale bar, how to set map scale accuracy, and how to create a map
layout.
Conventions
Searching
To search for a term or for a topic, refer to the Index at the back of the book.
For the definition of a term, please refer to Glossary of Terms on page 189.
Special Notes
Notes of importance are flagged as follows:
Note:
Information specific to some users or situations is provided as a note.
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Getting Started
This chapter describes how to get started with TargetPro. Before you begin,
please be aware that this document assumes that you have access to
MapInfo Professional documentation, specifically the MapInfo Professional
User’s Guide. This is available as a free download from the MapInfo website,
found at http://www.mapinfo.com/support/documentation/manuals.cfm.
In this section:
!
!
!
!
Starting TargetPro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Learning the Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Setting Project Preferences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Using the Workspace Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
2
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Chapter 2: Getting Started
Starting TargetPro
This section describes how to get started with TargetPro by logging in, creating a new project, and
understanding how to work with projects.
Logging In
To start TargetPro you will need a user name and a password created for you by your TargetPro
Administrator. If you installed TargetPro without the help of an Administrator, it is recommended
you use NT Authentication.
From your Windows desktop select PROGRAMS > TARGETPRO from the Microsoft Start menu.
TargetPro opens and prompts you for login information.
Microsoft SQL Server lets you validate user connections using either your Microsoft Windows user
account in the Windows network, or using the user name and password assigned by your
database administrator. Windows Authentication is recommended for most users.
Please Log In Dialog
SQL Server Authentication is provided for backwards compatibility. The SQL Server
Authentication is used in cases such as accessing a server that is located in a different domain
from the one you are using. For single machine installations, use Windows Authentication.
If you are the only user for TargetPro on a machine, you may want to set TargetPro to start up
without showing the Please Log In dialog. Refer to Setting Project Preferences on page 17 for
more information on how to do this.
Enter your user name and password, and click OK.
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Opening a Project
Create a new project, or open an existing one, from the Welcome dialog.
Welcome Dialog
NEW PROJECT – Creates a new project with default settings. Provide a name for the new project.
OPEN PROJECT – Provides a list of available projects to choose from in the Project Selection dialog.
Select a project and click OK, or simply double-click the project you want to open.
RECENT PROJECT – Automatically launches the last project you worked with. This option is
particularly useful when working closely with one project.
If you choose Cancel, the Project Selection dialog closes and you are prompted to create a new
project. If you choose not to create a new project, the Welcome dialog re-displays.
Working with Projects
TargetPro projects contain information specific to your current session. This information is used to
manage the MapInfo Professional workspace specifically tailored for TargetPro, and includes
variables, geographies, custom reports, tab files, and information about selected geographies.
A project includes information about the window arrangement, zoom level, displayed layers, layer
properties, geographic selections, report properties, map layout, map layout properties, and the
current state of your work.
Project Selection Dialog
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Understanding Project Access Rights
By default all projects are private, but the user who created them (the owner) can make them
public. Private projects are only available to the project owner. Other users accessing the same
TargetPro Server do not see these projects in the Project Selection dialog.
The following icon appears next to a project to show it is private.
Private Project Icon
Public projects are accessible to all users connected to the same TargetPro server. Any user can
edit, delete, copy, or rename a public project.
The following icon appears next to a project to show it is public.
Public Project Icon
Changing a Project’s Privileges
To change a project’s access privileges in the Project Selection dialog, right-click the project and
select MAKE PUBLIC/PRIVATE. The project’s icon changes to show it is public or private.
Organizing Projects Into Folders
To organize your projects into folders:
1. Create a new folder.
Right-click in the Project Selection dialog and select NEW FOLDER. Enter a name for the
folder. The folder is created.
2. Add projects to the folder.
Select the project(s) you want to add. Hold down the CTRL key to select multiple projects
at once. Right-click and select CUT. Select the folder you just created and paste the
project into it. Repeat this for each project you want to add.
You can create a folder at the root of the project list if nothing is selected or under an existing
folder.
Deleting a Project
To delete a project from the list, select the project, right-click, and select DELETE.
Renaming a Project
To rename a project from the list, select the project, right-click, and select RENAME. Enter the new
name for the project.
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Finding a Project or Folder
If you have a large number of projects in the list, you might need to search for the project you want
to use. Use the Find functionality to do this. Right-click and select FIND. Enter all, or part of, the
project or folder name and click OK. Use FIND NEXT to search for the next item in the list.
Find Project Dialog
Saving a Project
To save a project you are currently working on, choose TARGETPRO > SAVE PROJECT from the
TargetPro menu. To save a project under a different name, choose TARGETPRO > SAVE PROJECT
AS and enter a new name for the project.
Studying the Project Workspace
After opening or creating a project, the TargetPro workspace displays. It consists of a Key Map
window, a Layer Manager dialog listing the layers used in the maps, and a Map window for
analysis.
TargetPro Workspace
You can rearrange the windows by selecting TARGETPRO > PREFERENCES > ARRANGE WINDOWS
LEFT-HANDED or ARRANGE WINDOWS RIGHT-HANDED. You can undock the windows to resize them.
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Learning the Interface
TargetPro uses the MapInfo Professional environment, but has its own toolbar and menu that
display when TargetPro starts up. If you want to display the MapInfo Professional tools and menu
in addition to the TargetPro menus, refer to Setting Project Preferences on page 17. This
section provides an overview of the TargetPro toolbar and menu. These items are specific to
TargetPro analysis, and are discussed in more detail in the rest of this guide.
TargetPro Toolbar
The TargetPro toolbar provides tools for selection, geography creation, drive time and drive
distance, as well as tools to run reports, import your data, and find geographies.
New Project button
Creates a new TargetPro project.
Open Project button
Opens an existing project.
Save Project button
Saves the current project.
Select Object button
Accesses the Select Object tool to select geographies in the
Map window. Also acts as the default pointer/cursor tool.
Marquee Select button
Accesses the Marquee Select tool to select and search for
geographies within a given rectangle (marquee box).
Radius Select button
Accesses the Radius Select tool to select and search for
geographies within a circular region.
Polygon Select button
Accesses the Polygon Select tool to select geographies
within a polygon that you draw.
Zoom In button
Accesses the Zoom In tool to get a closer area view of a
map or layout.
Zoom Out button
Accesses the Zoom Out tool so you can get a wider area
view of a map or layout.
Pan button
Accesses the Pan tool to reposition a map or layout in the
Map window.
Quick View button
Provides report information about specific geographies on
the Analysis Map.
Create Polygon button
Draws a polygon using the Create Polygon tool.
Create Rings button
Draws a series of circles/bands around a selected point.
Find Address button
Finds a point, address, or intersection on the map.
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Buffers Around Set of
Points button
Creates buffers around a set of points you have selected on
the map.
Drive Time button
Creates Drive Time polygons on the map.
Drive Distance button
Creates Drive Distance polygons on the map.
Reports button
Accesses the reporting tools, which you can use to create
or run a report.
Thematic Maps button
Accesses the Thematic Map dialog, which you can use to
create thematic maps to display your data.
Geography Selector button
Accesses the Geography Selector dialog, which you can
use to select geographies for the current project.
Profile Manager button
Accesses the Profile Manager dialog, which you can use to
organize your profiles, cluster, and target groups.
Data Manager button
Accesses the Data Manager tool to import, register, and
manage your custom data sets.
Capture Tool button
Accesses the Capture tool functionality.
Find Geography button
Accesses the Find Geography tool to search the active
layer for a geography.
Delete Geographic
Selection button
Deletes custom geographies and selections from the Map
window.
TargetPro Menu
The TargetPro menu provides TargetPro-specific functionality, which includes project, custom
selection, data, reporting, customizing, diagnostics, and exit options.
TargetPro Menu
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For a description of the MapInfo Professional menus, such as File, Edit, and Format, refer to the
online help, or your MapInfo Professional documentation.
Project
New Project
Creates a new TargetPro project.
Open Project
Opens an existing project.
Save Project
Saves the current project.
Save Project As
Saves the current project with a new name.
Open Recent Project
Lists the last four recently used projects.
Workspaces
Add a Layer To This Project >
From a Tab File
Adds a MapInfo tab file to the current project.
Add a Layer To This Project >
From Registered Geographies
Adds a custom geography layer you imported using the Data
Manager to the current project.
Workspaces > Import Project
Selections
Imports a set of geographies you selected and saved in a
previous session, to the current project.
Workspaces > Export Project
Selections
Saves a set of geographies you have selected on the Analysis
Map to a tab file.
Workspaces > Export To A
MapInfo Workspace
Makes a copy of the current workspace and exports it to MapInfo
Professional format. Files you imported using the Data Manager
are copied so that they can be opened when the workspace file
.WOR is opened in MapInfo Professional.
Workspaces > Make This The
Default Workspace
Sets the current workspace as your default when new projects
are created.
Workspaces > Workspace
Manager
Provides you with a set of options to modify your workspace
setup. Workspace Manager should be used with care as
changing certain settings in this environment can cause
TargetPro to become unstable or unusable.
Data
Geography Selector
Selects standard geographies by name for the current project.
Profile Manager
Manages and organizes profiles, cluster, and target groups.
Data Manager
Manages connections to data sources.
Reporting
Reports
Runs a report on selected geographies in the current project.
Thematic Mapping
Thematic Mapping > Use A Map
Layer in Current View
Creates a thematic map using a layer currently displayed in the
Map window.
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Thematic Mapping > Use Only
Geographies Selected on Map
Creates a thematic map using geographies currently selected on
the Analysis Map.
Thematic Mapping > Use All
Geographies in Project
Creates a thematic map on a layer from a project you have
opened.
Thematic Mapping > Thematic
Mapping Preferences
Provides you with the option of changing how you want to
prepare your thematic maps. You can change options such as
color ranges and style.
Customizing
Preferences > Arrange Windows
Left-Handed
Arranges the windows so that the Key Map and Layer Manager
windows are on the left-hand side.
Preferences > Arrange Windows
Right-Handed
Arranges the windows, so that the Key Map and Layer Manager
windows are on the right-hand side.
Preferences > Undock Windows
Used to toggle the mobility of the three TargetPro windows so that
they can be moved and resized individually. When the option is
checked they can be moved, when it is cleared the windows are
docked.
Preferences > Preferences
Manager
Provides you with the ability to change the display and setup of
the TargetPro environment.
TargetPro Management
About TargetPro
Displays information about TargetPro.
Login As New
Changes the user information to allow a new user to login.
Quit TargetPro
Closes TargetPro.
Key Map
The Key Map helps you locate the area where you are currently working. It shows the area
in relation to the Analysis Map by a red rectangle.
Key Map
Note:
The map that you see in the Key Map may be different depending on the data you have
licensed.
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To use a different layer from the default for the Key Map, refer to Setting Project Preferences on
page 17.
Layer Manager
The Layer Manager lets you add, remove, and modify the behavior of the layers displayed on the
Analysis Map. The Layer Manager is always available as a window. It contains entries for each
layer on the Analysis Map.
Layer Manager Dialog
Right-clicking on a layer in the Layer Manager displays a pop-up menu of layer options. Refer to
Working with Map Layers on page 23 for more information.
Map Window
The Map window displays data visually, and provides the option of displaying the results of
analysis you perform in TargetPro. Custom geographies, such as polygons and rings can be
drawn on the map, and selected (along with standard geographies) for analysis.
Map Window
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Setting Project Preferences
Use the TargetPro Preferences Manager to change the default settings that control how TargetPro
works. Choose TARGETPRO > PREFERENCES > TARGETPRO PREFERENCES MANAGER.
TargetPro Preferences Manager
Enabling Diagnostics
Select the Enable Diagnostics checkbox to display a message box in the bottom right-hand of the
interface. This gives a running commentary of the actions you perform in the application. By
default this is not activated.
Diagnostics Message Box
Displaying Login Dialogs
You can turn off the Login Dialog that displays when TargetPro starts up by clearing the SHOW
LOGIN DIALOGS checkbox. This makes working with TargetPro more convenient if, for example, you
are the only user on a particular machine.
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Displaying Warning Dialogs
TargetPro allows you to turn off the display of warning dialogs in the application. When you do this,
warning and information messages are not displayed. Clear the box to turn off Warning dialog
display. The default setting is to show the Warning dialogs.
Displaying MapInfo Professional Toolbars and Menus
You can set up TargetPro to show the full suite of MapInfo Professional and menus so that you can
use them in conjunction with your TargetPro tools. Check the box to display the tools, clear the box
to hide them. By default the toolbars are displayed.
Creating Mappable Files from Reports
This option lets you export any thematic maps you create to a tab file that can be displayed on the
Analysis Map.
Showing Key Map and Layer Manager Windows
By default the Key Map and Layer Manager windows are displayed in the left-hand side of the user
interface. To hide these windows, clear the check box. This setting persists as a default setting
each time you open a project.
Setting a Tab File Import Threshold
TargetPro displays a Warning message if a tab file you are importing has more rows than the
number specified here. For example, if you set this value to 500, a warning displays when a table
you are importing has more than 500 rows.
Note:
If you have the Show Warning Dialogs turned off (cleared) this Import Threshold Warning
will not display.
Changing the Default Key Map Layer
Click BROWSE to select a table to use as the Key Map Layer. The table name you select displays in
the text box and becomes the new default for the Key Map.
Changing the Default Zoom Layering
You can change the Analysis Map zoom layer by entering new minimum and maximum values (in
miles) within which you want to display the Analysis Map. For example, if you want the Analysis
Map to display between 20 and 500 miles, enter these distances in the MINIMUM and MAXIMUM
boxes. For further information refer to Zoom Layering on page 28.
Additional Settings
You can also access the Default Login dialog and Thematic Mapping Preferences dialog from this
window. See Changing Thematic Map Preferences on page 31 for more information.
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Using the Workspace Manager
The Workspace Manager lets you change how your workspace is set up. TargetPro uses
workspaces to save your work from session to session, so you do not have to reopen tables, recreate maps, and resize windows every time you work with TargetPro.
Choose TARGETPRO > WORKSPACES > WORKSPACE MANAGER to launch the workspace manager. It
is recommended that you save your project when prompted.
TargetPro Workspace Manager
If you want to use boundary files that are shared on another machine on the network, click LOCATE
THE SHARED BOUNDARY FILES, browse to the location, and click OPEN.
You can also access the Preferences Manager from this dialog, refer to Setting Project
Preferences on page 17. Click RETURN TO TARGETPRO to get back to your previous workspace.
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3
Map Concepts
TargetPro is based on MapInfo Professional’s map-based interface. This
chapter discusses the basic concepts of working with maps and displaying
your results.
In this section:
!
!
!
!
!
!
Zooming and Panning the Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Map Layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing Map Layer Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Zoom Layering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Thematic Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Label Options for a Map Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22
23
26
28
29
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Chapter 3: Map Concepts
Zooming and Panning the Map
You can change the map view by zooming or panning the map contents. You can also change the
Key Map view in the same way.
Zooming
Use the ZOOM IN tool to get a closer view of the map contents. Use the ZOOM OUT tool to get a
wider view.
Zoom In and Zoom Out Buttons
To change the zoom, click on the map with either the ZOOM IN or ZOOM OUT tool, or draw a
marquee box by dragging the cursor.
Marquee box Defining Zoom Area
To use a wheeled mouse, such as the Microsoft IntelliMouseTM, for zooming, move the wheel
forward to zoom into the map. Roll back the mouse wheel to zoom out of the map. The wheel has
a series of dents; each click is the same as one click with a zoom tool. The mouse wheel does not
recenter the view.
Panning
Panning consists of moving the entire map so that the focus is placed on a different location. Use
PAN to reposition the map contents within the Map window by clicking and dragging the map in the
appropriate direction.
Pan Button
To use a wheeled mouse, such as the Microsoft IntelliMouseTM, for panning:
1. Hold down the wheel and move the mouse to pan the map.
2. Release the wheel to end panning.
There are three panning speeds. The speed of the panning is based on the cursor’s distance from
the starting point, indicated by the origin mark. In the Map window, the distance moved at each
speed is a percentage of the zoom distance. For example, the amount to move at slow speed is
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.005 * ZoomDistance, medium speed is .01 * ZoomDistance, and super speed is .1 *
ZoomDistance. In the corresponding browser, the window is scrolled by 1, 3, and 7 lines or
columns for slow, medium, and super speeds. When the cursor is within 15 pixels of the starting
point, there is no panning.
Working with Map Layers
Computer maps are organized into layers. Think of the layers as transparencies that are stacked
on top of one another. Each layer contains different aspects of the whole map.
You can display each table of data in a Map window. Each table displays as a separate layer. Each
layer contains different geographies or map objects, such as regions, points, lines, and text.
For example, one layer may contain regional boundaries, a second layer may have symbols that
represent capital cities, a third layer might consist of text labels. By stacking these layers one on
top of the other, you begin to build a complete map. You can display one, two, or many tables at a
time.
Map Layers
Map layers form the building blocks of maps in TargetPro. Once you have created your map of
layers, you can customize the layers in a variety of ways, add and delete layers, or re-order them.
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About the Layer Manager
The Layer Manager lets you add, remove, and modify the behavior of the layers displayed on the
Analysis Map. The Layer Manager is always available as a window. It contains entries for each
layer on the Analysis Map.
Layer Manager Dialog
In the Layer Manager, each layer name is preceded by a THEME PROPERTIES button and a
LABELING check box. The currently selected layer (the active layer) is highlighted.
There are several ways to interact with the Layer Manager:
•
Click THEME PROPERTIES to view the Layer Control dialog, which is described in
Customizing Map Layer Properties on page 26. Through the Layer Control dialog you
can set display and label properties for a layer.
•
Double-click the LABELING check box to set automatic labeling for a layer. This displays
labels for the active layer.
For information on setting label properties, refer to Setting Label Options for a Map
Layer on page 33.
•
Right-click on the LAYER MANAGER to view a menu of layer options.
Layer Manager Dialog: Pop-up menu
These options include: adding or removing a layer, accessing layer properties, moving a
layer up or down in the list, selecting geographies in the project, and refreshing the Layer
Manager. These options are described in the following sections.
For information on setting layer properties using the Display Options dialog, refer to
Customizing Map Layer Properties on page 26.
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Selecting the Active Layer
The active layer is the layer that is currently selected. It is highlighted in the Layer Manager. Layeroriented commands in the Layer Manager’s menu such as removing, customizing properties,
moving, and adding labels apply to the active layer.
To make a layer active, click on the layer name in the Layer Manager. The layer is highlighted in a
darker shade.
Adding a Layer to the Map
You might want to add a layer of data to the map for cosmetic reasons or for analysis. If the layer
of data is cosmetic, you can add it to the map using the Layer Manager. If the layer is for analysis
you must import and register it through the Data Manager; refer to Importing and Registering
Data in Chapter 5 on page 63. Then choose TARGETPRO > ADD A LAYER TO THIS PROJECT >
FROM REGISTERED GEOGRAPHIES.
To add a layer to the map for cosmetic reasons (for example, to view additional information or to
prepare a map for printing), right-click on the Layer Manager and select ADD A LAYER. Locate the
TAB file that you want to open as a new layer from the Open TAB File dialog.
Removing a Layer from the Map
To remove a layer from the map, highlight and right-click on the layer you want to remove in the
Layer Manager, then select REMOVE A LAYER. The layer is removed from the Map window and
from the Layer Manager.
Viewing Layer Properties
You can view the display and label properties for a layer from the Layer Control dialog. Right-click
on the Layer Manager and select PROPERTIES. A message box displays on the Analysis Map
giving information about the selected layer. Click OK.
Browsing a Layer
You can browse a map layer that is currently displayed on the Analysis Map. Right-click in the
layer manager window on the layer you want to browse and select BROWSE. A browser window
displays the contents of the selected layer in tabular form.
Re-ordering Layers
Map layers display in the order they are listed in the Layer Manager, with the bottom layer drawn
first and the top layer drawn last. It is important to order your layers correctly. Consider the
situation where you have a layer of customer points and a layer of census tracts. If the layers are
incorrectly ordered in the Map window, the customer points might be drawn first and the census
tract layer displayed second; your points would be obscured by the census tract layer.
To re-order layers, right-click on a layer you want to move in the Layer Manager. Choose MOVE
LAYER UP or DOWN to reposition the layer in the list. When you are finished, TargetPro redraws the
Analysis Map displaying the layers in the new order.
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Selecting Geographies
Choose SELECT GEOGRAPHIES option from the Layer Manager’s pop-up menu to display the
Geography Selector dialog. This dialog lets you select geographies by name. Refer to Selecting
Geographies by Name on page 52 for more information.
Refreshing the Layer Manager
To refresh the Layer Manager dialog, right-click and select REFRESH LAYER MANAGER. You may
need to do this to reflect changes in the Layer Manager if you have removed, added, or re-ordered
layers.
Customizing Map Layer Properties
To modify the display properties for a layer, click the corresponding THEME PROPERTIES button in
the Layer Manager.
Theme Properties Button
The Layer Control dialog displays with the active layer highlighted.
Layer Control Dialog
Note:
When using this dialog from the Layer Manager window the check boxes, LAYERS,
REORDER, and THEMATIC buttons are not enabled.
From the Layer Control dialog, click DISPLAY to view the Display Options dialog. The Display
Options dialog lets you customize the display for each layer in the Map window. You can change
the default styles for the layer, set the zoom at which a layer displays, and show line direction,
object nodes, and centroids.
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Display Options Dialog
Display Mode
When you first create a project the boundaries, lines, points, and text display using project
defaults. You can change how geography layers display using the Display Mode section of the
Display Options dialog.
For example, you want to change the display of your streets to a dashed red line. In Layer Control,
choose the street layer, click the corresponding THEME PROPERTIES button, and choose DISPLAY
from the Layer Control dialog. This brings up the Display Options dialog. Check the STYLE
OVERRIDE box to activate STYLE OVERRIDE (large gray buttons). TargetPro only displays the
override buttons that are appropriate for the type of objects in the layer. For example, if the layer
contains streets, a line style override button displays. Click on it to access the Line Style dialog
where you can change the width, style, and color of the streets. If the layer contains labels, a font
style override button also displays.
For boundary layers, the style override button brings up the Region Style dialog where you can
change both the fill and borders of boundaries. The Symbol Style dialog displays when you want to
override the style for layers containing symbols or points. The Style Override is only in effect during
the current work session, as are the other display settings. To make them permanent, save the
project.
Lines, Nodes, and Centroids
The Display Options dialog (page 27) allows you to display line directions, nodes, and object
centroids. Select the SHOW LINE DIRECTION checkbox whenever you want to show the direction
line objects are drawn. For example, on a street layer, displaying line direction helps you
determine in which direction the street numbers go. Select the SHOW NODES check box to display
the nodes of objects in a layer. This is helpful for many editing procedures.
The Show Centroids box displays the centroids of each object in a layer. In TargetPro, a region’s
centroid does not represent its center of mass. Instead, the centroid represents the location used
for automatic labeling, and geocoding.
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Zoom Layering
Sometimes you want a map layer to display only at certain zoom levels. Zoom layering controls
the display of a map layer so that it displays only when the map’s zoom level falls within a preset
distance.
Examples of Zoom Layering
For example, you have a layer of streets and a layer of area boundaries. When you zoom out past
10 miles, the streets look like a black smudge in the window. This is because the zoom (window
width) is too wide to show detailed street maps. Use zoom layering to tell TargetPro to display the
street layer only when the zoom is set to a distance that allows you to see the street detail properly,
for instance, less than 5 miles.
The first map does not have zoom layering set for its street layer. At a zoom of 15 miles across,
notice how difficult it is to see any detail. The second map has zoom layering set to display the
streets when the zoom is less than five miles. Therefore, the streets layer does not display when
the window is set at 15 miles.
To set zoom layering, select a layer in the Layer Control dialog, and choose DISPLAY. Select the
DISPLAY WITHIN ZOOM RANGE checkbox to activate the zoom distance boxes. Specify a minimum
and maximum distance within which you want the layer to display.
Note:
You cannot change Display settings for more than one layer at a time.
Different layers in the same Map window can be displayed at different zoom levels. For example,
you have a layer of streets, a layer of county boundaries, and a layer of State boundaries. You
want the streets layer to be visible only when the zoom level is less than eight miles. You want the
county boundary layer to display when the zoom level falls between 20 miles and 200 miles. You
want the states boundary layer to be visible only when the zoom level is greater than 100 miles.
You can set a different zoom level for every layer in your Map window.
Change the zoom level for the whole project by setting the default zoom layering though the
PREFERENCES MANAGER. Choose TARGETPRO > PREFERENCES > PREFERENCES MANAGER, then
enter the minimum and maximum miles at which you want the map to display.
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Zoom-layering Labels
You can display labels within a specified zoom range, much the same way that you display map
layers within a certain zoom range. Click LABEL in the Layer Control dialog to display the Label
Options dialog. In the VISIBILITY section of the Label Options dialog, click DISPLAY WITHIN RANGE.
This activates the Min and Max zoom boxes. Fill in the minimum and maximum zoom distances in
the appropriate boxes.
Label size does not change with zoom or scale changes. Labels display at the size you specify at
all zoom levels as well as on printed output. Labels are never hidden behind other geographic
objects because they are always the last objects drawn on the map.
Creating a Thematic Map
You can create thematic maps to display data distribution over a specific area. There are three
options to create a thematic map: From Current View, From Current Map Selection, and From
Geographies in Project.
To create a thematic map:
1. Select the geographies to use for the thematic map.
This selection is based on the way you want to create the thematic map:
•
USE A MAP LAYER IN CURRENT VIEW – This option creates a thematic map on the
geographies currently in view in the map window.
Pan to the area on the Analysis Map where you want to create the thematic map.
•
USE ONLY GEOGRAPHIES SELECTED ON MAP – This is based on the geographies
currently selected on the Analysis Map. The thematic map is created on the selected
areas only.
Use the Select tools to choose the geographies on the Analysis Map you want to use
for the thematic map.
•
USE ALL GEOGRAPHIES IN PROJECT – This is based on all the geographies in a project
you have opened. When the thematic map is created TargetPro re-zooms to allow you
to see the whole project in one layer.
Select the project which contains the pre-selected geographies using TARGETPRO >
OPEN PROJECT.
2. Click either THEMATIC MAP or choose TARGETPRO > THEMATIC MAPPING.
Thematic Map Button
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The Thematic Mapping window displays:
Thematic Mapping Window
3. Select the type of thematic map you want to create. Choose the appropriate mapping
option from the TargetPro menu or from the Thematic Mapping dialog box.
4. Select a layer on which you want to create your map from the Thematic Map Layer dialog.
Click MAP.
Thematic Map Dialog
5. Select a Category or Report variable for your thematic map. Click OK.
The thematic map of the selected layer and variable you selected is displayed.
Thematic Map Layout
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You can create thematic maps for those layers that are currently registered with the database. The
drop-down list in the Find Geography dialog quickly displays a list of available registered layers.
You can create a maximum of ten thematic maps at any one time. If you select a category that
contains more than ten variables, only the first ten are mapped. Therefore, you should use the Ctrl
key to select the variables you want to use. To use all the variables from a folder, first open the
folder to register the variables, then highlight it.
Changing Thematic Map Preferences
Change how thematic maps are created and displayed using the Thematic Map Preferences
dialog. Choose TARGETPRO > THEMATIC MAPPING > THEMATIC MAPPING PREFERENCES.
Thematic Mapping Preferences Dialog
Changing Application Preferences
Show Thematic Maps In New Windows creates thematic maps in different windows as opposed to
the current map window. The Show Legends In New Windows box is selected by default to
prevent legends being overwritten by those associated with subsequent thematic maps. If your
data has zeros and blank values that you do not want to map, select the checkbox to ignore these
values.
You can also change the number of thematic ranges TargetPro uses to create thematic maps from
the default value of five. You may want to change this number to highlight aspects of the data you
are theming.
When an option is checked, the setting is turned on, and persists in future sessions until it is
cleared.
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Changing the Thematic Range
TargetPro creates ranged thematic maps. All records are grouped into ranges and each record’s
object is assigned the color for its corresponding range. TargetPro creates ranges automatically
using the following methods, with Equal Ranges as the default setting:
•
EQUAL RANGES – This divides the data records across ranges of equal size. For example,
if you have data with values ranging from 1 to 100, the ranges would be: 1-25, 26-50, 5175, and 76-100.
•
EQUAL COUNTS – This has the same number of records in each range. If you wanted to
group 100 records into 4 ranges, the ranges are calculated so that 25 records fall into
each range.
•
NATURAL BREAKS – This is a good way of displaying data that is not evenly distributed.
The ranges are created using the average of each range. The average of each range is as
close as possible to each of the range values in that range. This means the ranges are
well-represented by their averages, and the data records within them are fairly close
together.
•
STANDARD DEVIATION – This creates the middle range break at the mean of your data. The
ranges above and below the middle range are one standard deviation above or below the
mean.
Changing the Map Color
When creating a ranged thematic map in TargetPro, all records are assigned to a range and then
given a color based on that range. By default, TargetPro uses a Bright color palette which uses
blue as the lowest to green as the highest. TargetPro provides four different color options to
choose from: Brights - Blue to Red; Pastels - Light Blue to Pink; Monochrome - White to Black; and
Transparent - Hatch Patterns.
To see TargetPro’s color palette, you need to open TargetPro’s Palette file. To do this, click OPEN
PALETTE FILE, and browse to the palette file, found by default at C:\Program
Files\MapInfo\TargetPro\exe\Palettes.TAB. Click OPEN to load the palettes into TargetPro. The
palettes are loaded into the Color Palettes windows of the Thematic Mapping Preferences dialog.
To make thematic maps based on another TargetPro palette, highlight a different color scheme in
the Thematic Mapping Preferences dialog.
TargetPro also lets you create your own color palette from scratch, or edit an existing TargetPro
palette.
1. Ensure TargetPro’s palette files are loaded, as outlined previously in this section.
2. Click CREATE/EDIT.
If you want to edit an existing palette, highlight it first. The Palette Editor dialog displays.
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Palette Editor Dialog
3. Edit the Palette options.
Enter a new name for the palette, and click START and END STYLE to select new color and
fill patterns. Also choose between RGB (Red, Green, Blue) and HSL (Hue, Saturation,
Luminance), color models. Click OK.
4. Highlight your new palette in the Color palette window in the Thematic Mapping
Preferences dialog and click OK.
Note:
Color palettes can be changed for each user.
Setting Label Options for a Map Layer
You can change how labels are displayed for a map layer as shown in Layer Control Dialog on
page 26. Click THEME PROPERTIES for a layer in the Layer Manager to view the Layer Control
dialog. It displays with the active layer highlighted.
In the Layer Control dialog, click LABEL to view the Label Options dialog. This dialog lets you
adjust the visibility, style, and position of the labels.
Label Options Dialog
Note:
The Labeling check box in the Layer Manager must be selected to view labels for a layer.
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Labeling Using a Column
The content of labels is controlled in the Label Options dialog. You can label an object with any
column from its associated table. For example, you can label the states table with the state name,
abbreviation, 1990 population, or any other field in the table. Simply choose a column from the list,
and the objects in that layer will be labeled with the information contained in that column.
Labeling with Expressions
Label objects can be labeled with an expression. Select EXPRESSION from the drop-down list in the
Label Options dialog. Create the expression in the Expression dialog. You can type the expression
directly or use the drop-down lists to create it.
For example, you want to label geographic regions with their name and population density on two
lines. Your table contains the names and population figures for each region. To calculate the
population density, divide population by each region’s area. You can let MapInfo calculate the area
of each region using the Area function in the Expression dialog. To create the expression, in Layer
Control, highlight the table of geographic regions and choose LABEL. Select EXPRESSION from the
LABEL WITH: drop-down list in the Label Options dialog. The Expression dialog displays. Using the
drop-down lists, create the following expression:
Region + Chr$(13) + POPULATION / Area(Object, “sq mi”)
The Chr$(13) function tells MapInfo to add a carriage return to the first line. Now using the Label
tool, click on a region. MapInfo labels it with the result of the expression.
Setting Layer Visibility
You can turn labeling on or off for the active layer directly from the Layer Manager or indirectly in
the Label Options dialog. The recommended method is to set labeling through the Layer Manager.
In the Label Options dialog, the check boxes on the right side of the Visibility group control which
labels are displayed, and how they will appear on the map:
•
ALLOW DUPLICATE TEXT – Allows duplicate labels for different objects to display. This
option is often used with street maps to label street segments individually.
•
ALLOW OVERLAPPING TEXT – Allows labels to be drawn on top of each other.
•
LABEL PARTIAL SEGMENTS – Labels polylines whose centroids are not visible in the Map
window.
To specify the maximum number of labels to display on the map, type the number in the MAXIMUM
LABELS box.
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Setting Label Style
In the Label Options dialog, use the STYLE options to modify the label and text object styles.
Choose TEXT STYLE to view the Text Style dialog. Within this dialog you can set the font style and
size, text color, effects (such as bold or underline), and background options. There are three
background options:
•
NONE – Sets off background.
•
HALO – Creates a halo effect around the text. This puts the text into relief from whatever it
covers. For example part of a region, or a street.
•
BOX – Creates a background box behind the text.
When you choose either the Box or Halo backgrounds, the Color list is activated. Click on it to
choose a color for the halo or the background. A palette of color choices displays. The color you
choose corresponds to the button that is currently activated. The color displays in the box and in
the sample.
Text Style Dialog
In the Label Options dialog, also set the styles for text objects. There are three text object settings
to choose from: NONE, SIMPLE, and ARROW. If you selected either SIMPLE or ARROW, then choose
TEXT OBJECT to view the Line Style dialog and make line style settings. Within the Line Style dialog
you can set the style and color of the text object (line), and its width.
Line Style Dialog
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Positioning Labels
In the Label Options dialog, use the Anchor Point options to specify the label’s placement. The
anchor point is the label’s position relative to the map object. Click on one of the buttons to select
an anchor point. For example, place labels above and to the left of the anchor point.
The anchor point is an ongoing attribute of the label. For example, if you anchor a point object’s
label at Center left and you increase the label’s font size, the text will grow to the left. This way, the
text can never overwrite the point. The default anchor point varies with the type of map object you
are labeling:
•
Regions default to Center.
•
Lines default to above Center.
•
Points default to right.
If you are working with a layer that has line objects such as a street map, select the ROTATE LABEL
WITH LINE checkbox to position the labels parallel to the lines. Label offset is how far away a label
is from its anchor point. Specify the number of points you want the label to be from the anchor
point in the LABEL OFFSET box.
The label’s anchor point and offset move a label with respect to its current location and the current
zoom. Whenever you want to make minor adjustments to the label’s position, you should use
these two options.
You can also select and drag an individual label on the Map window to move it, but this is not
recommended because you are actually moving the label location on the map. If you drag a label a
few pixels, the distance you move it is in the current map units, regardless of the zoom. For
example, if you are displaying a map of the United States and drag New York state’s label a few
pixels, at that zoom, the label looks fine. However, if the Map Units distance is in miles and you
zoom in on New York state, the label will display much further away than at the previous zoom.
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4
Working with
Geographies
Most TargetPro workflows begin with a geographic selection. This chapter
describes how to display and select registered geographies and how to create
custom geographies.
Census/Administrative levels such as States, Counties, Market levels such as
DMAs, and Postal levels such as ZIP Codes, have well-defined and
recognizable boundaries. There are a number of ways to work with
geographic regions, including displaying regions on the map, and selecting
regions to use in analysis.
Custom geographies you can create are points with rings, drive times, drive
distances, and polygons. After you create custom geographies, you can use
them for analysis.
In this section:
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
Finding a Geography on the Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Custom Geographies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Custom Geographies with MapInfo Professional . . .
Deleting Geographies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying a Custom Geography Label Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Geographies on the Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Geographies by Name. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Geography Selections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Trade Areas Using the Capture Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Finding a Geography on the Map
There are several ways to find a geography on the Analysis Map using MapInfo Professional tools.
For example using QUERY > SQL QUERY or navigating across the map to find the geography you
need. However, it is recommended that you use the Find Geography tool when working with
TargetPro.
You can use the Find Geography tool to view a geography on the map either by name or by
geographic key: This tool can find any geographic level that is registered and currently open in the
project. For example, if you have used TARGETPRO > ADD A LAYER TO PROJECT > FROM
REGISTERED GEOGRAPHIES to open a registered layer, it can be searched using the Find
Geography tool.
1. Select FIND GEOGRAPHY on the TargetPro toolbar.
Find Geography Button
The Find Geography dialog displays.
Find Geography Dialog
2. Select the layer that you want to search.
3. Enter the name of the geography you want to find.
You can use a wildcard to search the registered layers on the Analysis Map. For example,
search the States layer for the Name New %.
4. Click FIND.
The geography is selected on the Analysis Map. If more than one geography matches the
search requirements, TargetPro displays a list of candidates.
Find Candidates Dialog Box
Click FIND to locate a candidate on the Analysis Map.
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Creating Custom Geographies
You can create several types of custom geographies for analysis: points, rings, and polygons. You
can create a site, or point with rings, directly on the Analysis Map, from a street address,
intersection, or longitude/latitude value.
Creating a Point
There are several reasons why you might need to create a point on the Analysis Map. The most
common situation is that you want to create a point of reference on the Analysis Map. You might
also want to create points to use when creating trade areas using the Capture tool. Refer to
Creating Trade Areas Using the Capture Tool on page 56 for more information. You might also
need to create individual points to use for Creating Buffers Around a Set of Points on page 41.
To create a single point, or site, on the Analysis Map using the Create Rings tool:
1. Click CREATE RINGS on the TargetPro toolbar.
Create Rings Button
2. Click on the Analysis Map where you want to create the point. The Site Properties dialog
displays.
3. Select the SITE ONLY checkbox. This grays out the Trade Area(s) section of the dialog that
is used when creating a point with rings.
Site Properties Dialog: Site Only
4. Enter a name for the new point, and optionally refine the longitude and latitude values.
5. Click OK.
The new point is created and displayed on the Analysis Map.
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A Point Displayed on the Analysis Map
Creating a Point with Rings
To create a point with rings, use the Create Rings tool.
1. Click CREATE RINGS on the TargetPro toolbar.
Create Rings Button
2. Click on the Analysis Map where you want to create the point with rings. The Site
Properties dialog displays. It has three frames: Label, Center, and Trade Area(s).
Ring Properties Dialog
3. Enter a name for the set of rings in the Label textbox (optional).
By default the point with rings is labeled incrementally as Point#. Optionally change this
name to one more meaningful to your analysis.
Optionally change the properties of the label by clicking LABEL FONT and changing the font
style, color, background and effects.
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4. Modify the center point of the rings (optional).
Within the Center frame you can move the center point’s location by entering new
Longitude and Latitude values (in map units).
Optionally change the style of the point by clicking SYMBOL STYLE and changing the
symbol style, size, and color.
5. Choose to create Standard or Banded Trade Area(s).
Standard trade areas are concentric, overlapping regions with each area originating from
the centre point. Banded trade areas are concentric, non-overlapping regions where each
area starts where the last one ended.
The default setting is Standard with To and From values of 0 to 1, 3, and 5 miles. Use the
following buttons to modify the trade areas:
•
•
•
•
ADD – Adds a new trade area.
CHANGE – Modifies a selected value.
DELETE – Removes to a selected value.
CLEAR ALL – Removes all the values.
Optionally edit the line style used to display the trade areas by clicking PEN STYLE.
6. Select the Set as Default checkbox (optional).
This makes the current settings in the Site Properties dialog the default. The next time you
create a point with rings these values are displayed in the dialog.
7. Click OK to create the point with rings.
Creating Buffers Around a Set of Points
You may want to create buffers around a set of points you have in a TAB file or displayed on the
Analysis Map. Use the Buffers Around Set of Points tool to do this.
1. Create or display the input points.
Create the individual points on the Analysis Map; refer to Creating a Point on page 39, or
import a TAB file of points. To do this choose ADD A LAYER TO THIS PROJECT > FROM A TAB
FILE from the TargetPro menu. Browse to the TAB file that contains the points and click
OPEN.
Ensure that the layer that contains your points is moved to the top of the Layer Manager
window to ensure the points are selectable, and visible, on the Analysis Map.
2. Select the points to use as the center points for the rings.
Refer to Selecting Geographies on the Map on page 50 to select the points to create
the buffers.
3. Click BUFFERS AROUND SET OF POINTS on the TargetPro toolbar.
Buffers Around Set of Points Button
The Site Properties dialog displays with the Label and Longitude/Latitude fields disabled
(these fields are already known).
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4. Choose to create Standard or Banded Trade Area(s).
Standard trade areas are concentric, overlapping regions with each area originating from
the centre point. Banded trade areas are concentric, non-overlapping regions where each
area starts where the last one ended.
The default setting is Standard with To and From values of 0 to 1, 3, and 5 miles. Use the
following buttons to modify the trade areas:
•
•
•
•
ADD – Adds a new trade area
CHANGE – Modifies a selected value
DELETE – Removes to a selected value
CLEAR ALL – Removes all the values.
Optionally edit the line style used to display the trade areas by clicking PEN STYLE.
5. Select the Set as Default checkbox (optional).
This makes the current settings in the Site Properties dialog the default. These are the
initial values that display the next time this dialog appears.
6. Click OK to create the buffers around the points.
Creating a Point with Rings from an Address
To create a point with rings from an address:
1. Select FIND ADDRESS on the TargetPro toolbar.
Find Address Button
The Find a Point Wizard displays.
Find A Point Wizard: Please select the type of point
2. Choose Street Address, then click NEXT.
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3. Enter the address information.
You do not need to enter a complete address. Entering the following information will
provide you with an address match:
•
•
•
Street address, suite number (optional), City, and State.
Street address, suite number (optional), City, and ZIP Code.
Street address, suite number (optional), State, and ZIP Code
Find a Point Wizard: Enter street address
4. Click FIND.
When a match is found, its longitude and latitude values display. Click CLEAR to remove
the address information.
5. Click NEXT after finding the address match.
NEXT only displays when a match has been found. The Site Properties dialog displays with
the address you entered as the center point. Refer to Creating a Point with Rings on
page 40 for information on how to complete the settings in this dialog.
6. Click OK to create the point with rings.
Creating a Point with Rings from a Street Intersection
To create a point with rings from a street intersection:
1. Select FIND ADDRESS on the TargetPro toolbar.
Find Address Button
The Find a Point Wizard displays.
2. Choose Street Intersection and click NEXT.
3. Enter the street intersection information.
Enter the street names and any address information that you have. You need to provide
either a City name or a valid ZIP code for the geocoding to be successful.
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Alternatively you can enter the two streets you want to use joined with && in the Street
textbox. For example: 10 ST && 41 EAGLE ST
Find a Point Wizard: Enter intersection information
4. Click FIND.
When a match is found, its longitude and latitude values display. Click CLEAR to remove
the address information.
5. Click NEXT after finding the address match.
NEXT only displays when a match has been found. The Site Properties dialog displays.
Refer to Creating a Point with Rings on page 40 for information on how to complete the
settings in this dialog.
6. Click OK to create the point with rings.
Creating a Point with Rings Using Longitude/Latitude
To create a point with rings by specifying Longitude/Latitude:
1. Select FIND ADDRESS on the TargetPro toolbar.
Find Address Button
The Find a Point Wizard displays.
2. Choose Latitude/Longitude Coordinate, then click NEXT.
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3. Enter the Latitude and Longitude of the location to find. You can also enter the location
name (optional).
Find a Point Wizard: Enter latitude and longitude
4. Click NEXT to display the Site Properties dialog.
Refer to Creating a Point with Rings on page 40 for information on how to complete the
settings in this dialog.
5. Click OK to create the point with rings.
Creating a Polygon
Use the Create Polygon tool to draw polygons. These polygons can be selected and used as study
sites for your analysis.
To create a polygon:
1. Click CREATE POLYGON in the TargetPro toolbar.
Create Polygon Button
2. Click on a starting point for the polygon on the map.
Continue to click on the Analysis Map to add segments to the polygon.
Creating a Polygon Using the Create Polygon Tool
Click on the start point to close the polygon.
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3. Enter a name.
The default name for the polygon is PolygonN. If you want to change this, provide a new
name in the Area Properties dialog, and click OK. The polygon is labeled and highlighted
on the map. If you made a mistake when drawing the polygon, click CANCEL to discard it.
Creating Drive Time and Drive Distance Trade Areas
You can create trade areas that show the region that can be driven to within a set time (in minutes)
or distance (in kilometers or miles) from a given point. The trade areas are shaded to show bands
of driving time or distance from the start point.
Creating Drive Time Trade Areas
To create drive time trade areas:
1. Click DRIVE TIME in the TargetPro toolbar.
Drive Time Button
2. Click on the Analysis Map in the place you want to be the center point for the drive time
trade areas. The Site Properties dialog displays.
Site Properties Dialog: Drive Time
3. Enter a name for the drivetime trade areas in the Label textbox (optional).
By default the drive time trade areas are labeled incrementally as Point#. Optionally
change this name to one more meaningful to your analysis.
Optionally change the properties of the label by clicking LABEL FONT and changing the font
style, color, background and effects.
4. Modify the center point of the trade areas (optional).
Within the Center frame you can move the center point’s location by entering new Latitude
and Longitude values (in map units).
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Optionally change the style of the point by clicking SYMBOL STYLE and changing the
symbol style, size, and color.
5. Choose to create Standard or Banded Trade Area(s).
Standard trade areas are concentric, overlapping regions with each area originating from
the centre point. Banded trade areas are concentric, non-overlapping regions where each
area starts where the last one ended.
The default setting is Standard with To and From values of 0 to 5, 10, and 15 minutes. Use
the following buttons to modify the trade areas:
•
•
•
•
ADD – Adds a new trade area.
CHANGE – Modifies a selected value.
DELETE – Removes to a selected value.
CLEAR ALL – Removes all the values.
Optionally edit the line style used to display the trade areas by clicking PEN STYLE.
6. Select the Set as Default checkbox (optional).
This makes the current settings in the Site Properties dialog the default. The next time you
create drive time trade areas, these values are displayed in the dialog.
7. Click OK to create the drive time trade areas.
Example of Drive Time Trade Areas
Creating Drive Distance Trade Areas
To create drive distance trade areas:
1. Click DRIVE DISTANCE in the TargetPro toolbar.
Drive Distance Button
2. Click on the Analysis Map in the place you want to be the center point for the drive
distance trade areas. The Site Properties dialog displays.
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Site Properties Dialog: Drive Distance
3. Enter a name for the drive distance trade areas in the Label textbox (optional).
By default the drive distance trade areas are labeled incrementally as Point#. Optionally
change this name to one more meaningful to your analysis.
Optionally change the properties of the label by clicking LABEL FONT and changing the font
style, color, background and effects.
4. Modify the center point of the trade areas (optional).
Within the Center frame you can move the center point’s location by entering new Latitude
and Longitude values (in map units).
Optionally change the style of the point by clicking SYMBOL STYLE and changing the
symbol style, size, and color.
5. Choose to create Standard or Banded Trade Area(s).
Standard trade areas are concentric, overlapping regions with each area originating from
the centre point. Banded trade areas are concentric, non-overlapping regions where each
area starts where the last one ended.
The default setting is Standard with To and From values of 0 to 1, 3, and 5 miles. Use the
following buttons to modify the trade areas:
•
•
•
•
ADD – Adds a new trade area.
CHANGE – Modifies a selected value.
DELETE – Removes to a selected value.
CLEAR ALL – Removes all the values.
Optionally edit the line style used to display the trade areas by clicking PEN STYLE.
6. Select the Set as Default checkbox (optional).
This makes the current settings in the Site Properties dialog the default. The next time you
create drive distance trade areas, these values are displayed in the dialog.
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7. Click OK to create the drive distance trade areas.
Example of Drive Distance Trade Areas
Creating Custom Geographies with MapInfo Professional
You may want to create custom geographies using MapInfo Professional tools that you can use in
your analysis when running reports.
1. Move the Custom Selection layer.
The custom selection layer has the same name as the current project; it should be at the
top of the list of layers in the Layer Manager. Refer to Re-ordering Layers on page 25 for
information on how to do this.
2. Display the MapInfo Professional Tools.
If you cannot see the MapInfo Professional toolbars in the interface, choose TARGETPRO >
PREFERENCES > PREFERENCES MANAGER. Select the Show MapInfo Professional Toolbars
checkbox. Several toolbars can be displayed when this option is enabled; alter the
checkbox settings under OPTIONS > TOOLBARS to show just the tools you need.
3. Draw the custom geographies.
Draw geographies using the Rectangle, Polygon, or Ellipse drawing tools. Refer to the
MapInfo Professional documentation for more detailed information.
4. Select the geographies you want to use for your report. Refer to Selecting Geographies
on the Map on page 50.
5. Begin your reporting session as outlined in Running a Standard Report on page 144.
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Modifying a Custom Geography Label Style
You can change the display settings for each individual label belonging to a custom geography.
Double-click on the label to view the Label Style dialog.
Label Style Dialog
Within the Label Style dialog you can set the following:
•
FONT – Click FONT to change the font style. In the text style dialog that displays, you can
set the font style, text color, background label type and color, and text effects.
•
ANCHOR POINT – Label position relative to the anchor point.
•
LINE – Selecting Simple draws a line from the label to the anchor point. Selecting Arrow
draws an arrow from the label to the anchor point. (To increase the distance between the
label and the anchor point, increase the offset value). Clicking LINE STYLE displays the
Line Style dialog. Within this dialog you can set line style, color, and width.
•
ROTATION ANGLE – Set the rotation of the label in degrees.
•
OFFSET – The distance in points between the label and the anchor point.
•
LABEL – Here you have the option of changing the label text.
Note:
You can change the label styles for an entire map layer through the Layer Control dialog’s
LABEL button. For more information, refer to Setting Label Options for a Map Layer on
page 33.
Selecting Geographies on the Map
After creating and displaying geographies on the map, you can select them to use in your analysis.
To select a geography from the map, simply click SELECT OBJECT on the TargetPro toolbar and
then click the geography that you want to select from the Map Window.
Select Object Button
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Selecting Non-Contiguous Geographies
To make multiple selections of non-contiguous geographies, hold down SHIFT while selecting
geographies. You can select standard geographies that are not in the top layer so long as the layer
is set to selectable in the Layer Control dialog. To open the Layer Control dialog, right-click on the
map and choose LAYER CONTROL from the pop-up menu.
You can select as many objects as you want from one layer, using the SHIFT key, then choose
TARGETPRO > GEOGRAPHY SELECTOR to add the geographies to the list of selected geographies.
Repeat this with geographies from any other layer you want to use.
Note:
Do not use the Layer Control dialog that displays when you select THEME PROPERTIES
from the Layer Manager for this operation.
Make the map layers selectable by ensuring the SELECTABLE check box is selected.
Selectable Icon
Custom geographies reside in the project layer, which is selectable by default.
To select a geography masked by another geography, use CTRL on your keyboard. For example,
to select a geographic region that is obscured by a set of trade areas, hold down CTRL and keep
clicking on the target region until it is selected. You should be able to see when the target region is
selected by the shape of the selection pattern.
Selecting Contiguous Geographies
To select multiple contiguous geographies, use one of the contiguous geography selection tools:
Marquee Select button
Accesses the Marquee Select tool so you can select and
search for map objects within a given rectangle (marquee box).
Radius Select button
Accesses the Radius Select tool so you can select and
search for map objects within a circular region.
Polygon Select button
Accesses the Polygon Select tool so you can select
objects within a polygon that you draw.
Geographies within or overlapping the marquee area are selected.
Selecting Geographies From a Browser
You can select geographies to display in the Map window directly from the layer table. Select
WINDOW > NEW BROWSER WINDOW from the main menu.
In the Browse Table dialog, choose the layer from which you want to select geographies.
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Browse Table Dialog
Another option is to right-click on the layer you want to explore in the LAYER MANAGER window and
choose BROWSE. The layer table displays in a Browser window.
Click the square box for the geography (row in the table) that you want to select. To select several
geographies, use the CTRL or SHIFT key as you click. The selected geography is highlighted in the
Map window.
Browser Window
If the Browser window disappears behind the Map window, you can bring it to the front again.
Select WINDOW from the main menu, and choose BROWSER from the list of open dialogs.
Selecting Geographies by Name
In addition to selecting geographies from the map, you can select them by name through the
Geography Selector dialog. This is convenient so not all the selections need to be made on the
Analysis Map. The Geography Selector dialog lets you select multiple geographic regions by name
to make them available for reporting purposes. Your selections are not displayed on the map.
You can access the Geography Selector dialog by clicking GEOGRAPHY SELECTOR in the TargetPro
toolbar.
Geography Selector Button
You can also choose TARGETPRO > GEOGRAPHY SELECTOR.
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Geography Selector Dialog
In the Geography Selector dialog:
1. Find your selection.
Expand the folders for the type of region that you want to find from the Available
Geographies list. Continue expanding the hierarchy of geographies to find your selection.
You can also search for a geography by right-clicking on the Available Geographies box,
and choosing Find from the pop-up menu. Enter the name of the geography to search for.
TargetPro searches for the name through the list and displays any matching names.
2. Select the geography.
Highlight your selection, and double-click, or click the right arrow button (>) to move it, or
the geographies beneath it, to the Selected Geographies list. Refer to Examples of
Selecting Geographies on page 54 for more information.
3. Remove additional geographies.
If you want to remove an item from the Selected Geographies list, simply double-click it, or
highlight one or more items and click the back arrow (<). To select all the items in the list,
right-click the Selected Geographies box and choose SELECT ALL from the pop-up menu.
From the pop-up menu you can also choose INVERT SELECTION, SELECT NONE to cancel
the current selection, CLEAR SELECTED to remove highlighted items, or CLEAR ALL to
remove all items from the listbox. Invert Selection highlights all the items that were not
previously highlighted.
4. Click OK to complete your selection.
Click APPLY to set your selection without closing the Geography Selector dialog.
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Examples of Selecting Geographies
The geographies in this dialog are organized in a “select within” arrangement. This means there
are some differences in how you make your selections. If the geography you select is not at the
bottom-level node of the geography tree, the geography is selected as a singe entity. If it is at the
bottom of the tree, the entire folder of geographies is selected.
For example, if you select Abbeville, SC in U.S. Counties, the single county is moved when you
click the right arrow button (>). However, if you select the U.S. Zip Codes subfolder of Abbeville,
the six geographies in the folder are moved when you click the right arrow button (>). This is
because it is lower in the geography tree.
The following is another example of how to select geographies:
•
To select Florida as a single geographic region – Expand the Nation folder, then the State
folder, then click the Florida folder and click the right arrow (>) button.
•
To select several counties in Florida – Expand Nation > State > Florida > U.S. Counties.
Hold down SHIFT or CTRL to select the counties you need and click the right arrow (>)
button.
Selecting Geographies Within or Overlapped by a Region
TargetPro enables you to select smaller geographies within a larger region. For example you can
select all the counties within New York State. To do this you select New York from the list of States,
then click SELECT BY.
The Select Geographies Within / Overlap by dialog displays:
Select Geographies Within/Overlap by Dialog
Select U.S. Counties from this list. This selects all the counties that lie within, or are overlapped by,
New York State. Choose to replace the existing New York selection with the counties, or add the
counties to the selection. Click OK.
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Working with Geography Selections
Within a project, any geography selected for reporting is treated like an attribute of the project. You
will see it listed as a selected feature in the Geography Selector dialog. This means that it is
available for selection every time you generate a report. You have the option of saving selected
features to a MapInfo table (TAB file), so that you can retrieve the selection at a later date, or from
other projects within a workspace.
Saving the Current Selection
You can save the selected geographies to a TAB file, so that you can use them in other projects or
future sessions. To do this, select TARGETPRO > WORKSPACES > EXPORT PROJECT SELECTIONS
from the menu. Within the Save Custom Selections dialog, enter a file name and click SAVE.
Displaying Previous Selections
To display geographies you previously exported to a workspace, select TARGETPRO > IMPORT
PROJECT SELECTIONS from the menu. Within the Open Objects Table dialog, select the table of
geographies to open and click OPEN. The previously selected geographies display on the map.
Deleting Geographies
Use the Delete Selection tool to delete both custom and standard geographies. This tool enables
you to remove any standard geographies you had selected using the Geography Selector. Any
custom geographies are removed from the list of selected geographies and destroyed
permanently.
To delete a geography:
1. Click DELETE GEOGRAPHIC SELECTION in the TargetPro toolbar.
Delete Geographic Selection Button
2. Select the geography you want to delete.
Delete Selection Dialog
Select DELETE ALL to remove all the listed geographies.
3. Click OK to delete the geographies.
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Creating Trade Areas Using the Capture Tool
TargetPro’s Capture Tool enables you to find a specified amount of customers that lie within a
certain distance of a given location. For example, you might have some potential store locations
that you have displayed on the Analysis Map as one or more points. You can select the points and
find the closest 80% of customers to those locations.
Once you have captured a segment of customers around multiple store locations and created
trade areas, you can create profiles of these customers, run reports and create thematic maps on
the areas to compare and to find the best potential location for a new store.
There are two main options for capturing a section of customers; using a customer dataset or
using a market demographic. Any customer dataset you want to use must have previously been
registered in TargetPro using the Data Manager (refer to Registering Data in Chapter 5 on
page 74). You also have the option of joining the store locations with a point dataset you have
registered in TargetPro so you can associate the information in that dataset with the store
locations.
The Capture Tool provides a distance-based trade area creation methodology. For a customer
point dataset the longitude and latitude of the points are used for distance calculations; for market
demographics, the centroids stored and registered with the boundaries are used.
Creating Trade Areas Using a Customer Dataset
This section describes using a point file that has been registered with Data Manager to create
trade areas around potential store locations. This type of capture can be used when you know
there is an attribute from the input sites that is also reflected in the point dataset you intend to use
to create the dataset.
If you want to create trade areas using boundary data, follow the instructions in Creating Trade
Areas Using a Market Demographic on page 60
1. Select input points.
Refer to Selecting Geographies on the Map on page 50 to select the site locations you
want to use as the study sites.
2. Click CAPTURE TOOL in the TargetPro toolbar.
Capture Tool Button
3. Select a label and join field.
Capture Tool: Label and Join Field Dialog
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Choose a label for the points you selected on the Analysis Map. This label field is used to
provide descriptions for the trade areas that result from this capture session. If the point
dataset you want to use has a field in common with the sites you selected on the Analysis
Map, choose the field from the store locations to join the input points with the registered
dataset.
For example, each site location selected on the Analysis Map may have a City field. If the
dataset also has a corresponding City field, TargetPro can use that field to link the two
datasets together. TargetPro can then optionally create trade areas based on attributes
from the linked registered dataset. If this option is used, then for each site location,
TargetPro selects only the customers that share the same City as the site. Refer to the
Example that Illustrates the Use of the Join Field on page 59 for more information.
Note:
If the selected input points come from the MapInfo Professional layer, this dialog is
disabled. In this case, the labels are automatically generated using a convention
that includes the longitude and latitude of each point in the label.
Click OK.
4. Choose the source of the customer data.
All the information required to create the trade areas is entered in the Capture Tool dialog.
The following is an example of a completed dialog:
Capture Tool: Create Trade Areas using a Customer Dataset
Select CUSTOMER DATASET to create trade areas using a registered customer dataset.
5. Select a geographic area level.
Once you have selected Customer Dataset, a list of point datasets that have previously
been registered with TargetPro displays in the Select Customer Point Level box. The
dataset you select is used to search for records to create the trade areas.
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6. Select a Geography/StoreId Field (optional).
This step applies only if the store locations you selected can be associated individually
with the registered dataset and you joined a table in step 3.
The Geography/StoreId field lists the variables that were registered against that dataset
when it was registered. Choose the variable that contains the Store Id information for each
store, then specify which individual record corresponds to each store selected on the
Analysis Map.
7. Provide a name for the trade area dataset.
This name is used to identify the resulting trade areas in SQL Server and in the
Geography Selector tree. By default it is the name of the customer point level dataset you
selected.
8. Enter a Threshold Percentage or Value.
Choose to accumulate a percentage of counts, or an attribute of the customer dataset
such as number of visits or amount spent. If you choose a Value of 30000, TargetPro
attempts to accumulate up to 30,000 points from the dataset you selected (if the dataset
contains this many points). However the maximum distance set in step 10 also
contributes to the resulting trade areas. The numbers often exceed the specified threshold
due to TargetPro’s trade area calculations.
If you choose 80%, the trade area that is created for each store location will contain 80%
of the total count of points in the dataset. 80% is often used because it is generally
considered that the closest 80% of customers are the real customers of a store location.
The interpretation of the threshold percentage or value depends on the selection
methodology you choose. For example, if you choose the Total Attribute Value
methodology described in step 9, and specify an OrderAmount column for the attribute
field, a value of 30000 would mean that the trade area would contain enough customers to
produce an aggregate order amount of $30,000.
9. Select a Customer Selection Methodology.
Choose how the customers should be accumulated within the distance you specified.
There are two options:
•
•
DISTANCE TO STORE (CUSTOMER COUNTS) – The number of customers within the
distance specified.
DISTANCE TO STORE (TOTAL ATTRIBUTE VALUE) – An attribute in the point dataset that
describes the customers. For example, number of visits made, or amount spent.
Select an attribute from the dataset to use for this calculation.
10. Enter the maximum distance.
This is the maximum distance TargetPro will use to calculate the trade area. For example,
if you choose 10 miles, and TargetPro has looked in this radius around the store location
and has not found the value or percentage of records you specified in the threshold, it
uses the values it has within 10 miles to create the trade areas. This might be significantly
less than the value you originally specified.
Conversely, if TargetPro has found more than 30,000 households within a 10-mile radius
of the store, it uses the 30,000 households closest to the store location to create the trade
area.
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Note:
It is important to choose the maximum distance with care. TargetPro surveys the
entire radius around each store location for information. If the maximum distance
is set too high, TargetPro may spend time looking for records unnecessarily.
11. Choose a Trade Area Creation Methodology.
Once TargetPro has selected the records to use in the trade area, this selection defines
how the trade areas are created.
There are three options:
•
•
CONVEX HULL – Takes the farthest points from the store location and joins each one to
form the trade area. The store location is also included to ensure the trade area
includes the store. A minimum of three points are required. If zero or one customer
records are found, TargetPro defaults to the radius methodology.
NEIGHBORHOOD COVERAGE AREA – Choose a level to create the NCA; a common
choice is U.S. ZIP Codes. TargetPro selects each ZIP that contains a count and fills in
the ZIPs between them to try and create a contiguous area. The fill decisions are
based on centroid distance calculations. If there are ZIPs that are associated with two
trade areas, they are not shared; the ZIP is assigned to the closest store location.
If no records are associated with a store, no trade area is created for that store.
•
RADIUS – Creates rings for the trade areas which use the distance between the store
location and the farthest customer identified (not exceeding the maximum distance
you specified in step 10) as the radius.
If zero records are found and there is one input store, the maximum distance
threshold specified in the Capture Tool dialog is used. If there is more that one input
store, the radius is computed as half the distance to the closest store.
12. Create the Trade Areas.
Click FINISH. TargetPro creates and registers the trade areas and automatically displays
them on the Analysis Map. These trade areas can then be used to run reports and create
thematic maps. The performance of these reports is good because the data has been
registered.
Example that Illustrates the Use of the Join Field
Consider the following example that shows how the Join field can be used to create trade areas. In
this example there is a single store location and a customer dataset that shows the number of
visits to a city.
Store Location
There is one input point. It is a store location in Arlington Heights.
Label
Point 1
City
Arlington Heights
Customer Dataset
There are two rows of information in the table that will be used to create the trade areas.
City
Arlington Heights
Number of Visits
150
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City
Number of Visits
Cookstown
45
If you decide to join the two datasets, you would use the City field because it is common to them
both. When TargetPro creates the trade areas, only the Arlington Heights point in the customer
dataset would be considered; the Cookstown point would be discarded, because it does not match
on the join field.
If you decide not to join the two datasets, both the customer points would be used to create the
trade areas.
Creating Trade Areas Using a Market Demographic
This section describes creating trade areas around a selection of store locations using a market
demographic as the basis for the trade area.
If you want to create trade areas using a customer point dataset that has been registered with
TargetPro, follow the instructions in Creating Trade Areas Using a Customer Dataset on
page 56.
1. Select input points.
Refer to Selecting Geographies on the Map on page 50 to select the locations you want
to use as the study sites.
2. Click CAPTURE TOOL in the TargetPro toolbar.
Capture Tool Button
3. Select a label field.
Capture Tool: Label and Join Field Dialog
Choose a label for the points you selected on the Analysis Map. This label field is used to
provide descriptions for the trade areas that result from this capture session.
Note:
The join field is not relevant if you intend to create trade areas using a Market
Demographic.
Click OK.
4. Choose the source of the customer data.
All the information required to create the trade areas is entered in the Capture Tool dialog.
The following is an example of a completed dialog which helps to illustrate how to
complete all the fields:
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Capture Tool: Create Trade Areas using Market Demographics
Note:
The Trade Area Creation Methodology listbox is grayed out if you are using a
Market Demographic.
Select MARKET DEMOGRAPHIC to create trade areas using boundary data.
5. Select a geographic area level.
Once you have selected Market Demographic, a list of standard geographies displays in
the Select Geographic Area Level box. Neither imported boundary levels nor new levels
created through the Capture tool are listed here. The geography you select is used as the
layer to search for records to create the trade areas.
Note:
The Geography/Store ID field is grayed out when creating trade areas from a
Market Demographic.
6. Provide a name for the trade area dataset.
This name is used to identify the resulting trade areas in SQL Server and in the
Geography Selector tree. By default it is the name of the geographic area level you
selected.
7. Choose an Attribute.
Select an attribute to use to calculate the trade areas. The drop-down list provides the
variables you have used recently in TargetPro. It will be empty the first time you use this
feature. Click BROWSE to launch the SELECT A VARIABLE dialog to choose an attribute. For
example, if you choose 2004 Hhlds W/ Income $45,000 - 49,000, these are the records
that are counted in the block group layer to create the trade areas. If you select a value
such as Amount Spent, TargetPro searches for the highest values.
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8. Enter a threshold value.
Once you have chosen an attribute, select a threshold value. This is the value you want to
accumulate. In this example, if you enter 30000, the trade area that is created for each
store location will contain 30,000 households with an income between $45,000 - $49,000.
The threshold value you choose should be a realistic reflection of the attribute you chose.
If the threshold is too large, the trade areas would also be large, making the results less
meaningful for analysis.
Note:
The percentage option is grayed out when you are creating trade areas from
Market Demographics.
9. Enter the maximum distance.
This is the maximum distance TargetPro will use to calculate the trade area. For example,
if you choose 10 miles, and TargetPro searches within a 10-mile radius of each store
location. If you use a Total Households variable as the attribute to be summed, and
TargetPro does not find the 30,000 households you specified as the threshold value, it
uses the values it does have to create the trade areas. This might be significantly less
than the 30,000 you originally specified.
Conversely, if TargetPro has found more than 30,000 households within a 10-mile radius
of the store, it uses the 30,000 households closest to the store location to create the trade
area.
Note:
It is important to choose the maximum distance with care. TargetPro surveys the
entire radius around each store location for information before collecting records.
If the maximum distance is set too high, TargetPro may spend time looking for
records unnecessarily.
10. Create the Trade Areas.
Click FINISH.
TargetPro creates and registers the trade areas and automatically displays them on the
Analysis Map. These trade areas can then be used to run reports and create thematic
maps. The performance of these reports is good because the data has been registered.
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Importing and
Registering Data
One of TargetPro’s key features is the ability to work with your own data. Data
Manager looks after all aspects of data handling in TargetPro including
importing, linking to, and registering custom datasets.
When you import or link data with TargetPro, you must register it before it can
be used in your analysis.
You can access the Data Manager from the TargetPro menu. You can run the
Data Manager at any time to work with your datasets.
In this section:
!
!
!
!
Accessing the Data Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Linking to a Data Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Registering Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Accessing the Data Manager
To access the Data Manager, click DATA MANAGER from the TargetPro toolbar.
Data Manager Button
You can also select TARGETPRO > DATA MANAGER from the menu.
Data Manager Dialog
Data Manager has its own menu and toolbar providing easy access to all its main features. It lists
all the custom data you have registered with TargetPro. Each dataset is displayed with its name,
the geographic level(s) that it applies to, the type of data (attribute or geography), and if the data is
available for public or private use. To list data registrations by data source, simply select the server
from the Source drop-down list.
Data Manager: LOCALSERVER Data and Geographies
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Data Manager Menu and Toolbar
The Data Manager menu and toolbars provide access to the Data Manager import, link, and data
registration tools.
Data Manager Menu
Menu Item
Button
Description
Import Data
Copies data into the TargetPro database from external files
including TAB files and other data sources.
Export Data
Exports custom point data to a file.
Link Server
Creates a link to an external database.
Delete Link Server
Deletes a linked server connection.
Register Data
Registers linked or imported tables with TargetPro so the
system understands the contents of your data.
Batch Geocode
Assigns longitude/latitude values to point data.
Note: This is only available if MapMarker is licensed.
Create Block Centroid
Correspondence
Defines a block to polygon relationship for a selected
registered dataset.
Delete Block Centroid
Correspondence
Deletes a block centroid correspondence.
Delete Data
Deletes a registered dataset from TargetPro.
Properties
Displays the dataset properties including name and vintage
information.
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Button
Description
Change Ownership
Toggles the access of a dataset between public and private. So
other users can be granted access to use the data.
Custom Variable
Creates different types of custom variables. This allows you to
combine custom and standard data into meaningful
expressions.
Template Editor
Launches the Index Based Template Editor that allows you to
override default settings.
Quit
Closes the Data Manager.
Importing Data
You can import demographic, customer, and purchase data stored in databases or spreadsheets,
and spatial data such as boundary data, sales territories, store locations, and competitor
information.
Data you import can come from a variety of sources including tab files, and other standard data
sources such as Excel, Access, SQL Server, Oracle, and FoxPro. If you have data in a database
you want to link to, but do not want to import into TargetPro, you can set up a connection to access
it live; refer to Linking to a Data Source on page 72.
Getting your data to work in TargetPro is a two-stage process. First you import your data and then
you have to register it with TargetPro. When you have imported your data, refer to Registering
Data on page 74 for instructions on how to register it.
You are given two options based on the type and source of data you want to import:
•
Importing Data from a TAB File on page 68.
•
Importing Data from Other Data Sources on page 69.
Preparing to Import Your Data
Before you start to import your data using the Data Manager, you should check the following
information to ensure the data can be processed successfully when you reach the registration
stage.
Keys
When choosing keys during the import process, ensure that they are valid and unique for each
table. If the key is not unique, an error is generated when TargetPro starts to create indices.
The keys must be a certain format depending on the type of data you are importing:
•
Point Data – Requires an integer key.
•
Boundary Data – Requires a text key (maximum 32 characters in length).
•
Parent Data – Requires a text key (maximum 32 characters in length).
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Coordinate System
If you are importing a tab file, it should be in the Longitude/Latitude (NAD 83) coordinate system.
Table Naming Conventions
The name of any table you are importing can be a maximum of 32 characters in length. It should
not contain any spaces or special characters such as + - * / , ' ; " @ # $ ! ~ ` % & ( ) : | < > ? \.
The table name may be alphanumeric, but it must start with a letter or an underscore (_).
The following list of SQL Server rules apply to the structure of any table you work with:
Table Element
Maximum Size (in bytes)
Short string column
8,000
Text, NText, or Image column
2 GB
Primary key column
900
Row
8,060
Certain words cannot be used in table names. Refer to Reserved Keywords in Appendix B on
page 201 for a detailed list.
Field Names
Field and column names in tables are limited to 32 characters. Column names greater than this
are not registered. Certain words cannot be used in field names. Refer to Reserved Keywords in
Appendix B on page 201 for a detailed list.
Labels
Fields used as labels should be text based. The label field can be left unspecified; in that case, the
key field is used as the label field. The label information is used to identify the data in the
Geography Selector.
Normalization
Normalization of keys is not supported. For example, two letter abbreviations cannot be used as
keys for data mapped onto the State level, and ZIP Codes cannot contain any formatting hyphens.
Hard Disk Space for Correspondence
You must ensure you have enough disk space on your machine if you want to create block group
correspondence when registering your data. You should check this before you start the registration
procedure. You should not cancel the correspondence procedure before it has completed.
Geocoded Data
You need to have a license to perform geocoding in TargetPro. The data you are importing should
have an IntegerKey if you want to map it in TargetPro.
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Importing Data from a TAB File
This is the first type of data import procedure you can choose from the Data Manager dialog.
Choosing this option allows you to import data from a file that uses MapInfo’s TAB format.
1. Click IMPORT DATA in the Data Manager toolbar.
Import Data Button
2. Choose IMPORT DATA FROM TAB file. Click NEXT.
3. Enter the location and name of the TAB file.
TargetPro Import Data Wizard: Tab File Name
Browse to the tab file you want to import, select the file and click OPEN. By default the
TargetPro table name is the name of the table you are importing. Change this if you want
to use a different name to refer to TargetPro's imported copy of this table. Refer to Table
Naming Conventions on page 67 for more information.
4. Choose the geography type.
Choose points or polygons, depending on the type of data you are importing:
•
•
POINTS – If your table contains a list of locations such as stores, customer addresses,
landmarks, or community centers.
POLYGONS – If your table is made up of regions or boundaries such as sales
territories, or catchment areas.
5. Click FINISH.
TargetPro uses MapInfo’s EasyLoader executable to copy the data from its current
location into the TargetPro database. A dialog displays showing the status of the import
process. EasyLoader also creates a log file, el.log, in the directory where the TAB file is
located.
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6. Register your data.
You need to register your data to use it in TargetPro. To start registering it right away, click
REGISTER NOW. Click OK to close the dialog and register the data at another time. Refer to
Registering Data on page 74 for more information.
Importing Data from Other Data Sources
This enables you to import your data from a variety of data sources such as Access, Excel or
FoxPro.
When importing your data from another data source, the Data Transformation Services (DTS)
Import/Export Wizard sets up a connection to the data source and imports the data. For more
information about DTS, refer to its online help (accessible from HELP when the application is
running).
DTS provides the flexibility to import data at a time convenient for you. For example, if you have a
lot of large tables, you can use the SCHEDULE feature to import the tables overnight.
DTS provides the opportunity to import from many different data sources, meaning there are
various possible work flows. The instructions provided here work through an example using
Microsoft Access as a data source.
To import data from another data source using the Data Manager:
1. Click IMPORT DATA in the Data Manager toolbar.
Import Data Button
2. Choose IMPORT DATA FROM OTHER DATA SOURCE. Click NEXT.
The DTS Import/Export Wizard displays. Click NEXT to the Welcome screen.
3. Choose a data source.
Select a data source from the drop-down list provided. This is the type of data provider you
are using, such as Microsoft Access, Excel, SQL Server, or Oracle.
DTS Wizard: Choose a Data Source
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Note:
These screenshots illustrate the use of Microsoft Access. The screens that display
in the DTS Wizard are different for different types of data sources.
Browse to the location of the file you want to import and click OPEN to display it. Provide
the user name and password for this dataset, if necessary. Click NEXT.
4. Select a destination.
TargetPro suggests the settings in this screen automatically.
DTS Wizard: Select Destination Location
•
•
•
•
DESTINATION – Select MS OLE DB Provider for SQL Server
SERVER – Select the server where you want to copy the data. By default TargetPro
displays the SQL Server you are currently connected to in TargetPro.
AUTHENTICATION – Select either Windows Authentication or SQL Server
Authentication and enter a user name and password. These should be the same as
your login to TargetPro.
DATABASE – Select MIGS_USERDATA.
Click NEXT.
5. Specify Table Copy or Query.
Choose to copy the tables and views from the source database. A query is advanced
functionality that enables you to select a subset of the data to copy into TargetPro.
Click NEXT.
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6. Select the source table and views.
DTS Wizard: Select Source Table and Views
If the database you are importing contains multiple tables, check the boxes of the tables
you want to import. Optionally change the table names. TRANSFORM enables you to modify
the data structure in the table you are creating. Click NEXT.
7. Save, schedule, or replicate.
Choose to run the data import immediately, or schedule the package to execute at a later
time. Check SAVE DTS PACKAGE to save the source, destination, and transformation
properties as a package, and choose the format to save it in (optional). If you save the
package, you are prompted to select a location to store it when you click NEXT.
8. Finish the DTS Import procedure.
Review the DTS Import Summary information and click BACK to change any settings.
Click FINISH to import the data.
A status bar shows the import progress. A message box displays to notify you when the
import procedure is complete. Click OK, then DONE at the Executing Package window.
DTS Import/Export Wizard: Successfully copied 1 table
9. Register your data.
You need to register your data to use it in TargetPro. To start registering it right away, click
REGISTER NOW. Click OK to close the dialog and register the data at another time. Refer to
Registering Data on page 74 for more information.
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Linking to a Data Source
If you have data that resides on a corporate database or in a location where the data will be
constantly changing and you need to set up a live access link, use a database connection.
To link to a data source using a database connection, from the Data Manager:
1. Verify the Distributed Transaction Coordinator (DTC) is started for your machine.
When TargetPro installs SQL Server, these services are turned ON by default. If you are
using a corporate instance of SQL Server that was not installed with TargetPro, you should
verify that the DTC is started.
For Windows 2000 choose START > PROGRAMS > ADMINISTRATOR TOOLS > SERVICES.
Double-click Distributed Transaction Coordinator (DTC) from the list of services. From the
General tab check that the Service Status shows Started. If not, click SERVICE STATUS to
change the Status to Started. If you intend to link to data sources frequently, it may be a
good idea to select Automatic from the Startup type drop-down list. This means DTC will
start automatically each time you restart your machine.
2. Click LINK DATA in the Data Manager toolbar.
Link Data Button
3. Choose a data source.
TargetPro Link Server Connection Wizard: Choose a Datasource
Select the data source from which you want to link your data; for example Oracle, SQL
Server, or Jet. Enter a name by which you want TargetPro to reference the linked server.
Click NEXT.
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4. Enter the name, connection string, and database catalog for the data source.
TargetPro Link Server Connection Wizard: Data Source Info
Follow the on-screen information to help you fill in these fields. The information you enter
is specific to the type of database to which you are linking.
Note:
Ensure you enter a valid database catalog. If you do not, the server is created and
registered successfully in SQL Server, but not in TargetPro which can cause
problems later on.
5. Enter a username and password.
If you need a username and password to access the database, enter it here. For Jet and
Access databases which are not password protected, enter admin as the username. The
password can be left blank. Click FINISH.
6. Click OK.
7. Register your data.
You need to register your data to use it in TargetPro. Click OK to close the dialog and then
proceed to register the data.
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Registering Data
After you have imported or linked your data, you must register your datasets so TargetPro can use
them.
For registration to be successful you need to know what type of data you are registering; TargetPro
accepts five types. Go to the relevant section for instructions on how to register that type of data:
•
ADDITIONAL ATTRIBUTE DATA – This is data that can be referenced to existing registered
geographies, including system geographies such as counties or custom geographies you
have already imported and registered. This data may be car type and dealership
information, consumer purchase information, or demographic information collected at the
country level or custom sales trade area level that you have already registered with
TargetPro.
Refer to Registering Additional Attribute Data on page 75 for information on how to
register this type of data.
•
AREAS BUILT FROM REGISTERED BOUNDARIES – This data set builds a new geographic
level from parts taken from a registered geographic level. The new geography is known is
the Parent Region; the parts that build it are known as the Child Regions. An example of
this is a set of ZIP codes that are aggregated into a set of sales territories. The child
regions being aggregated must already be registered with TargetPro.
Refer to Registering Areas Built from Registered Boundaries on page 79 for
information on how to register this type of data.
•
BOUNDARY DATA – This is data that is made up of areas you have created that you want to
use in your TargetPro analysis. For example, areas of market coverage, mall hinterlands,
and sales territories. Once a set of polygons has been imported from a TAB file it should
be registered in this way.
Refer to Registering Boundary Data on page 81 for information on how to register this
type of data.
•
GEOCODED DATA – This is a set of points that already have longitude/latitude points
associated with them.
Refer to Registering Geocoded Data on page 85 for information on how to register this
type of data.
•
NON-GEOCODED DATA – This is a data set of points that do not have longitude/latitude
points associated with them. To make this data meaningful it needs to have some
geographic reference associated with it, such as ZIP Codes or Block Groups.
Refer to Registering Non Geocoded Data on page 91 for information on how to register
this type of data.
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Registering Additional Attribute Data
These instructions describe registering additional attribute data such as car model information,
demographic data, or sales figures.
1. Click REGISTER DATA in the Data Manager toolbar.
Register Data Button
The Data Registration Wizard displays.
Note:
If you clicked REGISTER NOW immediately after importing or linking to your data,
this wizard launches automatically.
Data Registration Wizard: Select Input Table
Choose the type of data you want to register:
•
•
Table from TargetPro User Database – Select the imported table from the drop-down
list.
Linked table – Select the server and table you want to register from the drop-down
lists.
Click NEXT.
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2. Enter registration information for the additional attribute data.
Data Registration Wizard: Data Registration
Enter the following information:
•
•
•
TYPE OF DATA – Select ADDITIONAL ATTRIBUTE DATA.
CATEGORY NAME – Enter a name for the dataset you are registering. The default is the
name of the table.
CATEGORY DESCRIPTION – This should be unique and less than 32 characters long.
The default is the name of the table.
The name and description are used to identify the variables in the Custom Linked
category of the Select Variable dialog once they have been registered.
•
•
REGISTER AGAINST AN EXISTING BOUNDARY LEVEL – Choose an existing boundary level
to geographically reference the data. For example, if your dataset contains information
about sales in every county, select U.S. Counties.
CREATE BLOCK CENTROID CORRESPONDENCE – Check the box to create
correspondence (optional).
If you want to query the attribute variables attached to the boundaries by ZIP, County,
or any other custom polygon or sales trade area, you must have block centroid
correspondence set up for the dataset. Setting up correspondence may take some
processing time.
•
KEY COLUMN – Select a column in your dataset that contains the unique or primary
key. This is the ID of the geography of the data you are registering against.
For example if you are registering against ZIP Codes, this would be the ZIP column in
your table. The example shown here is registering data against counties so it shows
the county as the Key column.
Click NEXT.
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3. Select numeric columns from your dataset that you want to use in later analyses.
Data Registration Wizard: Calculated Attribute Registration
Highlight the columns you want to summarize and click > to select them. Choose the
factor you want to use as the basis for the summarization from the Aggregation Basis
drop-down list. Choose from:
•
•
•
CENTROID COUNT – Uses the centroids (geographic centers) of the regions being
aggregated to create the average.
HOUSEHOLDS (BASE YEAR) – Uses the number of households in the regions being
aggregated to create the average.
POPULATION (BASE YEAR) – Uses the population in the regions being aggregated to
create the average.
Select an aggregation method for each selected column:
•
•
•
•
COUNT – This represents the number of points that fall within a geographic area. For
example, if you create a 5-mile ring around a store location, you can find the number
of businesses within it if you use a Business variable tagged with a Count aggregation
method. This should be used for point data.
NONE – Use this option for data that will not be aggregated. For example, a cluster
code column may be attached to your database, and registered as an integer column
so it displays in this dialog. However it does not make sense to aggregate or average
this column for your analysis. You would also not want to aggregate longitude and
latitude columns.
SUM – This represents an aggregation of the data. For example, if a sales variable in
your custom database is assigned a Sum aggregation method, if you draw a 5-mile
ring you can find the total sales from your store within that ring.
WEIGHTED AVERAGE – This method is used if you want the resulting output to be an
average rather than a sum total. For example, if you assign this method to a column of
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annual revenues, you could see the average annual revenue of businesses within a
certain radius from a store.
If you want to apply an aggregation basis to multiple columns, highlight them, then select
an option from the drop-down list, and click APPLY.
Click NEXT.
4. Select columns from the dataset you would like to see when you run reports using this
data. You can optionally edit the descriptions that will display in the reports.
Data Registration Wizard: Display Attribute Registration
Highlight columns, then click > to select them. Click NEXT.
5. Review the options in the Confirmation Page and click BACK to revisit a dialog to change
your options.
6. Click FINISH.
A status bar shows the registration process.
7. Click SAVE AS FILE to save the registration summary in the Data Registration Status dialog
to a text file, or click OK to close the dialog.
The data is now listed in the Data Manager Registered Custom Data and Geographies
window.
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Registering Areas Built from Registered Boundaries
These instructions describe registering areas that are built from geographic data that has already
been registered with TargetPro. These areas might be groupings of sales territories into regional
territories, or regional catchment areas of emergency service coverage. They could also be
standard areas, such as ZIPs, combined into larger custom geographies.
1. Click REGISTER DATA in the Data Manager toolbar.
Register Data Button
The Data Registration Wizard displays.
Note:
If you clicked REGISTER NOW immediately after importing or linking to your data,
this wizard launches automatically.
Data Registration Wizard: Select Input Table
Choose the type of data you want to register:
•
•
Table from TargetPro User Database – Select the imported table from the drop-down
list.
Linked table – Select the server and table you want to register from the drop-down
lists.
Click NEXT.
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2. Enter registration information for the areas built from registered boundaries.
Data Registration Wizard: Data Registration
Enter the following information:
•
•
•
TYPE OF DATA – Select AREAS BUILT FROM REGISTERED BOUNDARIES.
PARENT NAME – Enter a name for the dataset you are registering. The default is the
name of the table.
PARENT DESCRIPTION – The Description is the name you will see when using the
dataset in TargetPro. The default is the name of the table.
The name and descriptions should be unique and less than 32 characters long. The
name and description are used to identify the variables in the Custom Linked category
of the Select Variable dialog once they have been registered.
•
CHILD BOUNDARY LEVEL – Select the Child Boundary level that indicates the
registered boundaries from which the area is built.
For example, if your dataset is a sales trade area made up of ZIP Codes, select U.S.
ZIP Codes as the Child Boundary level. If your dataset was a grouping of custom
sales territories, you would select the sales territory table that you have already
registered with TargetPro as the child boundary level.
•
•
•
•
PARENT KEY FIELD – Select a column in the dataset you are registering that contains
the unique ID values, or primary key, for the dataset.
LABEL COLUMN – Select a Label column for the parent areas.
CHILD KEY FIELD – Select a column in your dataset that contains the geography key
for the child boundaries. This could be ZIPs from which sales trade areas are built, or
territory IDs that make up a sales region.
PERCENT – Select a column that represents the percent coverage field in your dataset
(optional). This describes the percentage of the child that contributes to the parent. A
blank entry is taken to represent 100% coverage.
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Click NEXT.
3. Review the information in the Confirmation Page and click BACK to revisit a dialog to
change options.
4. Click FINISH.
A status bar shows the registration process.
5. Click SAVE AS FILE to save the registration summary in the Data Registration Status dialog
to a text file, or click OK to close the dialog.
The data is now listed in the Data Manager Registered Custom Data and Geographies
window.
Registering Boundary Data
These instructions describe registering boundary data such as sales territories, study areas, or
market coverage areas.
1. Click REGISTER DATA in the Data Manager toolbar.
Register Data Button
The Data Registration Wizard displays.
Note:
If you clicked REGISTER NOW immediately after importing or linking to your data,
this wizard launches automatically.
Data Registration Wizard: Select Input Table
Note:
You can only register boundary data that was imported into TargetPro from a TAB
file.
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Select the first radio button, and select the imported table. Click NEXT.
2. Enter registration information for the boundary data.
Data Registration Wizard: Data Registration
Enter the following information:
•
•
•
TYPE OF DATA – Select Boundary Data.
BOUNDARY NAME – Enter a name for the dataset you are registering. The default is the
name of the table.
BOUNDARY DESCRIPTION – The default is the name of the table. The Description is the
name you will see when using the dataset in TargetPro.
The name and descriptions should be unique and less than 32 characters long. The
name and description are used to identify the variables in the Custom Linked category
of the Variable Selector dialog once they have been registered.
•
CREATE BLOCK CENTROID CORRESPONDENCE – Check the box to create
correspondence (optional).
Creating correspondence speeds up processing time when running a report using
standard variables on the boundaries you are registering. It sets up links between the
specified boundary layer and the standard block groups within it. This means
TargetPro does not need to find which block groups are within the boundary each time
a query is processed, because it has a set of links it can use to quickly find the
information in the block groups. Creating correspondence makes subsequent queries
much faster, but takes some initial processing setup time.
Note:
•
If you want to query the variables attached to the boundaries by ZIP, County, or
any other polygon, you must have block centroid correspondence set up for the
dataset.
KEY FIELD – Select a column in your dataset that contains the unique or primary key.
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LABEL FIELD – Select a label field for the key (optional).
Click NEXT.
3. Select numeric columns from the dataset that you want to use in your analysis.
If you want to use data in reports or thematic maps in the future, you should specify these
columns now.
Data Registration Wizard: Calculated Attribute Registration
Highlight the columns you want to use in your analysis and click > to select them. Choose
the factor you want to use as the basis for the summarization from the Aggregation Basis
drop-down list. Choose from:
•
•
•
CENTROID COUNT – Uses the centroid of the regions being aggregated, such as ZIP
Codes, to create the average.
HOUSEHOLDS (BASE YEAR) – Uses the number of households in the regions being
aggregated to create the average.
POPULATION (BASE YEAR) – Uses the population in the regions being aggregated to
create the average.
Select an aggregation method for each selected column:
•
•
COUNT – This represents the number of points that fall within a geographic area. For
example, if you create a 5-mile ring around a store location, you can find the number
of businesses within it if you use a Business variable tagged with a Count aggregation
method. This option should only be used when registering attributes of point data, so
do not select this method when registering boundary data.
NONE – Use this option for data that will not be aggregated. For example, a cluster
code column may be attached to your database, and registered as an integer column.
However it does not make sense to aggregate or average this column for your
analysis. You would also not want to aggregate longitude and latitude columns.
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SUM – This represents an aggregation of the data. For example, if a sales variable in
your custom database is assigned a Sum aggregation method, if you draw a 5-mile
ring you can find the total sales from your store in that ring.
WEIGHTED AVERAGE – This method is used if you want the resulting output to be an
average rather than a sum total. For example, if you assign this method to a column of
annual revenues, you could see the average annual revenue of businesses within a
certain radius from a store.
If you want to apply an aggregation basis to multiple columns, highlight them, then select
an option from the drop-down list, and click APPLY.
Click NEXT.
4. Select fields from the list of dataset columns that you would like to see when you run
reports. You can optionally edit the descriptions that will display in the reports.
Data Registration Wizard: Display Attribute Registration
Highlight columns, then click > to select them. Click NEXT.
5. Review the options in the Confirmation Page and click BACK to revisit a dialog to change
options.
6. Click FINISH.
A status bar shows the registration process.
7. Click SAVE AS FILE to save the registration summary in the Data Registration Status dialog
to a text file, or click OK to close the dialog.
The data is now listed in the Data Manager Registered Custom Data and Geographies
window.
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Registering Geocoded Data
These instructions describe registering Geocoded Point Data such as customer addresses, store
locations, and recreation centers.
1. Click REGISTER DATA in the Data Manager toolbar.
Register Data Button
The Data Registration Wizard displays.
Note:
If you clicked REGISTER NOW immediately after importing or linking to your data,
this wizard launches automatically.
Data Registration Wizard: Select Input Table
Choose the type of data you want to register:
•
•
Table from TargetPro User Database – Select the imported table from the drop-down
list.
Linked table – Select the server and table you want to register from the drop-down
lists.
Click NEXT.
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2. Enter the registration information for the geocoded point data.
Data Registration Wizard: Data Registration
Enter the following information:
•
•
•
•
TYPE OF DATA – Select Geocoded Point Data.
GEOCODE – If you want to re-geocode your points, click GEOCODE. This launches the
Batch Geocode Wizard. Follow the instructions outlined in the section on Batch
Geocoding from step 3 on page 100. GEOCODE is only active if MapMarker has been
installed on the client machine.
BOUNDARY NAME – Enter a name for the dataset you are registering. The default is the
table name.
BOUNDARY DESCRIPTION – This is used to identify the dataset in the Custom Linked
category of the Variable Selector dialog once it has been registered. The default is the
table name.
The name and description should be unique and less than 32 characters long.
•
•
•
KEY COLUMN – Select an integer column in your dataset which contains the unique ID
values or primary key for the dataset. This could be any field containing a different
integer for every record in the table, such as a store ID or a customer number.
LABEL COLUMN – Select a column to label the points (optional). For example, store
name or manager name.
LONGITUDE/LATITUDE COLUMNS – Select columns in the dataset that contain the
Longitude and Latitude values.
Click NEXT.
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3. Select a column in the dataset to which you want to assign a boundary.
Data Registration Wizard: Boundary Assignment
Assigning a boundary code allows TargetPro to quickly associate that column with the
boundary code during spatial operations, which improves performance.
For example, if you have a Block Group ID column in your data, select it and move it to the
right, and assign it to the U.S. Block Groups geolevel.
If you do not have any boundary codes on your data, TargetPro can add them for you.
Select ADD NEW ROW IN GRID and choose the geolevel(s) you want to add. Enter a name
for each geolevel column.
Select an existing column, or click ADD NEW ROW IN GRID to create a new column in the
dataset (highlighted in blue). Select a geolevel to associate with the column from the dropdown list.
Click NEXT.
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4. Select or create a column to hold a Cluster Code, if you have a registered segmentation
system.
Data Registration Wizard: Cluster Assignment
Select an existing empty column or a column that contains cluster codes that need
updating, or make a new column by clicking ADD NEW ROW IN GRID.
Note:
You can only add columns to a table you have imported into TargetPro. You
cannot add columns to a linked table.
For example, if you want to associate a cluster code with each person who responded to a
survey, you could find out demographic information about each person in the list.
This procedure attaches a clustercode to each record in the table and creates a cluster
profile of the data. This information can be used in various types of analysis throughout
TargetPro.
Optionally check the box to create a Neighborhood Coverage Area (NCA) as defined on
page 195, and optionally edit the profile name from the default boundary name. If you
select the NCA base profile checkbox, a profile of this geographic region is created and
assigned as the base of the customer profile.
You can also change the base demographic for the profile by selecting it and clicking SET
BASE DEMOGRAPHIC. This allows you to select a different variable from the list. The Base
Demographic describes what the records represent; households, population, or adults. By
default households are used.
Click NEXT.
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5. Select numeric columns from your dataset to register to use in your analysis.
Data Registration Wizard: Calculated Attribute Registration
Highlight the columns you want to register and click > to select them. Select an
aggregation method for each selected column:
•
•
•
•
COUNT – This represents the number of points that fall within a geographic area. For
example, if you create a 5-mile ring around a store location, you can find the number
of businesses if you use a Business variable tagged with a Count aggregation
method.
NONE – Use this option for data that will not be aggregated. For example, a cluster
code column may be attached to your database, and registered as an integer column
however it does not make sense to aggregate or average this column. You would also
not want to aggregate longitude or latitude columns.
SUM – Use this option if you want the value in this column added for all records
landing in a specified geography. For example, if a sales variable in your customer
database is assigned a Sum aggregation method, when you draw a 5-mile ring you
can find the total sales from all your customers in that ring.
WEIGHTED AVERAGE – This method is used if you want the resulting output to be an
average rather than a sum total. For example, if you assign this method to a column
representing travel time to work, when you draw a 5-mile ring, you can find the
average time to work for customers in that ring.
A count variable is selected by default. If you remove this variable you can click ADD A
to re-assign the count variable to the dataset. You may only specify one
count variable per dataset.
COUNT VARIABLE
Click NEXT.
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6. Select columns from the dataset you would like to see when you run list reports using this
data. You can optionally edit the descriptions that display in the reports. Usually
information such as Address, Business Name, and Customer Name fall into this category.
Data Registration Wizard: Display Attribute Registration
Highlight columns, then click > to select them. Click NEXT.
7. Review the options in the Confirmation Page and click BACK to revisit a dialog to change
options.
8. Click FINISH.
A status bar shows the registration process.
9. Click SAVE AS FILE to save the registration summary in the Data Registration Status dialog
to a text file, or click OK to close the dialog.
The data is now listed in the Data Manager Registered Custom Data and Geographies
window.
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Registering Non Geocoded Data
These instructions describe registering non geocoded point data such as customer addresses and
store locations.
Note:
The dataset you are registering must have a Block Group ID or a PSYTE Code associated
with it.
1. Click REGISTER DATA in the Data Manager toolbar.
Register Data Button
The Data Registration Wizard displays.
Note:
If you clicked REGISTER NOW immediately after importing or linking to your data,
this wizard launches automatically.
Data Registration Wizard: Select Input Table
Choose the type of data you want to register:
•
•
Table from TargetPro User Database – Select the imported table from the drop-down
list.
Linked table – Select the server and table you want to register from the drop-down
lists.
Click NEXT.
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2. Enter the registration information for the non geocoded point data.
Data Registration Wizard: Data Registration
Enter the following information:
•
•
TYPE OF DATA – Select Non Geocoded Point Data.
GEOCODE – If you want to geocode your points, click GEOCODE. This launches the
Batch Geocode Wizard.
Follow the instructions outlined in the section on Batch Geocoding from step 3 on
page 100. When your data has been geocoded TargetPro changes the type of data to
Geocoded Point Data. GEOCODE is only active if MapMarker has been installed on the
client machine.
•
•
BOUNDARY NAME – Enter a name for the dataset. The default is the table name.
BOUNDARY DESCRIPTION – Enter a description by which you want to refer to the
dataset in TargetPro. The default is the table name.
The name and description should be unique and less than 32 characters long. The
name and description are used to identify the variables in the Custom Linked category
of the Variable Selector dialog once they have been registered.
•
•
KEY COLUMN – Select a column which contains the unique ID values or primary key for
the dataset. This could be store ID or customer number. The key values must be
unique, and the key field can be either an integer or character data type.
LABEL COLUMN – Select a column to label the points; for example, store name or
customer name (optional).
Click NEXT.
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3. Select a column in the dataset to which you want to assign a boundary.
Data Registration Wizard: Boundary Assignment
Assigning a boundary code allows TargetPro to quickly associate that column with the
boundary code during spatial operations, which improves performance. You must either
geocode your data, or assign a boundary code to ensure it is geographically referenced.
Select an existing column, or click ADD NEW ROW IN GRID to create a new column in the
dataset (highlighted in blue).
Note:
You can only add columns to a table you have imported into TargetPro. You
cannot add columns to a linked table.
Select a geolevel to associate with the column from the drop-down list. Click NEXT.
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4. Select or create a column to hold a cluster code, if you have a registered segmentation
system.
Data Registration Wizard: Cluster Assignment
Select an existing column that is either empty or a column that contains cluster codes that
need updating, or make a new column by clicking ADD NEW ROW IN GRID.
If you want to associate a cluster code with each person who responded to a survey, you
could find out demographic information about each person in the list.
If a block group ID is associated with the dataset, optionally select the checkbox to create
a Neighborhood Coverage Area (NCA) as described on page 195 and optionally edit
the profile name. You can also change the base demographic for the profile by selecting it
and clicking SET BASE DEMOGRAPHIC. This allows you to select a different variable from
the list. Click NEXT.
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5. Select numeric columns from the list at the left that you want to use in your analysis.
Data Registration Wizard: Calculated Attribute Registration
Highlight the columns you want to register and click > to select them. Select an
aggregation method for each selected column:
•
•
•
•
COUNT – This represents the number of points that fall within a geographic area. For
example, if you create a 5-mile ring around a store location, you can find the number
of businesses if you use a Business variable tagged with a Count aggregation
method.
NONE – Use this option for data that will not be aggregated. For example, a cluster
code column may be attached to your database, and registered as an integer column.
However it does not make sense to aggregate or average this column for your
analysis. You would also not want to aggregate latitude or longitude columns.
SUM – Use this option if you want the value in this column added for all records
landing in a specified geography. For example, if a sales variable in your customer
database is assigned a Sum aggregation method, when you draw a 5-mile ring you
can find the total sales for all of the customers in that ring.
WEIGHTED AVERAGE – This method is used if you want the resulting output to be an
average rather than a sum total. For example, if you assign this method to a column
representing travel time to work, when you draw a 5-mile ring, you can find the
average time to work for customers in that ring.
A count variable is selected by default. If you remove this variable, you can click ADD A
COUNT VARIABLE to re-assign the count variable to the dataset. You may only specify one
count variable per dataset.
If you want to apply an aggregation basis to multiple columns, highlight them, then select
an option from the drop-down list, and click APPLY.
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Data attributes for non-geocoded point data might not be available for all levels of
geography. For example, if you register data at the ZIP code level, it will not be
available for block groups.
Click NEXT.
6. Select columns from the dataset you would like to see when you run list reports using this
data. You can optionally edit the descriptions that will display in the reports. Usually
information such as Address, Business Name, and Customer Name fall into this category.
You can optionally edit the descriptions that will display in the reports.
Data Registration Wizard: Display Attribute Registration
Highlight columns, then click > to select them. Click NEXT.
7. Review the options in the Confirmation Page and click BACK to revisit a previous dialog to
change options.
8. Click FINISH.
A status bar shows the registration process.
9. Click SAVE AS FILE to save the registration summary in the Data Registration Status dialog
to a text file, or click OK to close the dialog.
The data is now listed in the Data Manager Registered Custom Data and Geographies
window.
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Working with Your Data
In addition to importing and registering your data, you can create custom
variables, geocode your data, and change dataset ownership properties using
TargetPro’s Data Manager. All the tasks in this section start from the Data
Manager.
In this section:
!
!
!
!
!
!
Exporting Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Deleting a Linked Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Performing Batch Geocoding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Modifying Data Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Creating Custom Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Working with Index Based Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
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Exporting Data
If you have a registered custom point dataset, you can export it into another format for use
elsewhere. Any data that was added during the registration process, including boundary IDs,
cluster codes and longitude/latitude values, are also exported.
To export a registered custom point dataset, from the Data Manager:
1. Click EXPORT DATA in the Data Manager toolbar.
Export Data Button
The Export Custom Point Data dialog displays.
Export Custom Point Data Dialog
2. Select a registered custom point dataset to export.
3. Select the type of file to create when exporting the point dataset.
Choose from Comma Separated Text, Microsoft Access or Excel.
4. Enter a name for the new file.
By default the file name is the name of the dataset you are exporting. The filename
extension matches the type of file you selected; .txt, mdb, or xls.
Use BROWSE to select a location on your machine to export the file.
5. Select OPEN TABLE/FILE AFTER EXPORT (optional).
This enables you to automatically access the point attribute file in the program associated
with the export file format after exporting.
6. Click FINISH.
The dataset is exported and saved in the location and format you selected.
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Deleting a Linked Server
If you no longer want to work with a server to which you had previously made a linked connection,
you can delete it. Before deleting a linked server, you must delete any tables that are registered
under that linked server.
To delete a linked server, from the Data Manager:
1. Select the Link Server connection you want to delete from the list of Registered Custom
Data and Geographies.
2. Click DELETE LINK DATA or choose TASKS > DELETE LINK SERVER from the Data Manager
menu.
Delete Link Data Button
The linked server is removed from the list of Registered Custom Data and Geographies.
Performing Batch Geocoding
Batch geocoding assigns longitude and latitude values to records in a dataset so that the points
can be viewed on a map and their associated attributes analyzed. The extent of geocoding you
can perform depends on the number of States you have licensed. You can use the batch geocoder
either to re-geocode existing records that have been updated, or to geocode new data.
Note:
You must have MapMarker Plus installed on your machine to use this functionality.
Contact your MapInfo representative for more information.
You can perform two types of geocoding:
•
ZIP CENTROID – Records are geocoded to the ZIP Code centroid in which an address is
located. MapMarker matches the ZIP Code in your input table with the ZIP Code in the
geocoding engine. The longitude and latitude values of the ZIP Code centroid are then
assigned to the records in your table. This is much faster than street address geocoding,
but less accurate.
•
STREET ADDRESS – This is more accurate than ZIP Centroid geocoding as the exact
address is found in the geocoding engine and the longitude and latitude values of that
point assigned to each record. The geocoding process takes longer than ZIP Centroid
geocoding as it is more accurate.
Note:
Your table must have a primary key or column of unique IDs for geocoding to be
successful.
1. Click BATCH GEOCODE in the Data Manager toolbar.
Batch Geocode Button
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2. Select the type of connection to make to the table you want to geocode.
Batch Geocode Wizard: Select Database Connection
•
•
CONNECT TO TARGETPRO SERVER – Select this checkbox if the table has already been
imported, or if the table currently resides on your TargetPro Server.
CONNECT USING ODBC – Select this checkbox if the table you want to geocode is in
another data source such as Access or Excel.
When connecting using ODBC the Select Data Source dialog displays. Select a data
source; use the ODBC help provided for further information on how to connect.
Click NEXT.
3. Select the table you want to geocode.
TargetPro looks for a key column for the table, if it cannot find one you may be prompted to
select it from the input table. Select the column that holds the unique ID key.
Click NEXT.
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4. Select or create columns to store the geocoding results.
Batch Geocode Wizard: Select coordinate column(s)
•
•
CREATE NEW COLUMNS – Select this option if you want TargetPro to create columns to
store the geocoding results, then enter names for the columns.
SELECT EXISTING COLUMNS – Select this option if you have columns in your input table
you want to use to store the geocoding results. Choose the appropriate columns from
the dataset.
Click NEXT.
5. Select the columns in your input table to use to geocode the addresses.
Batch Geocode Wizard: Geocode Input Address Columns
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•
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To perform ZIP Centroid geocoding – Select the checkbox then specify the column(s)
in the input table that contain the ZIP Code values. You must specify at least the ZIP
Code field for this type of geocoding.
To perform Street Address geocoding – Select the columns for the address columns in
the input table. You must specify at least the State, City, and either the Street or Firm
fields.
Check the boxes next to any fields you want to exclude from geocoding (optional). These
may be fields for which you have inaccurate or incomplete information. Click FINISH.
6. Click START to begin geocoding the records in the table.
Batch Geocode (Automatic) Status Dialog
Click DONE when the process is complete. The Batch Geocode Status dialog shows the
progress.
Modifying Data Properties
To delete, view properties, or modify the access rights of a dataset, right-click on one of the
datasets in the Data Manager, and select an option from the pop-up menu. The access class can
be public or private. Only the owner can make the data private; once it is set to private, only the
owner can access it.
Delete datasets using the DELETE DATA tool. Access this from TASKS > DELETE DATA or use
DELETE in the Data Manager toolbar. If you choose to delete any files or tables, you are asked to
confirm if you also want to delete the tables from the dataset.
You can delete the data registration without removing the data from your server. This might be
necessary if information was originally registered incorrectly. You can re-register the information at
a later time. If you want to remove both the registration and the data from your system, accept both
deletions when prompted.
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Creating Custom Variables
Create custom variables using the Custom Variable Editor which is accessed through CUSTOM
VARIABLES in Data Manager.
Custom Variable Editor
Variable names must be less than 32 characters, and should not contain any SQL reserved
keywords or special characters. Refer to Reserved Keywords in Appendix B on page 201 for
detailed information.
Custom Variables are stored in the Custom folders of the Category variables. By default custom
variables are private. To make them public, right-click and change the access.
Creating an Expression Variable
An expression variable is created by defining a formula. A formula is a valid arithmetic expression
made up of one or more variables, one or more operators, and zero or more numeric constants.
The following section describes the rules for creating a formula.
Creating a Formula
You create custom variables by building a formula. Select existing variables to include in the
formula from the available variables list in the Custom Variable Editor. Double-click a variable to
move it to the Variable Expression box. The symbols next to the Variable Expression box insert
common operators can be inserted into the formula by double-clicking. When selected, the
application inserts the corresponding operator at the position of the cursor in the formula.
•
+, -, *, and / operators are inserted with leading and trailing spaces.
•
( is inserted with a leading space.
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•
) is inserted with a trailing space.
•
Variable names are enclosed in square brackets.
When creating a formula, the use of operators must adhere to the order of operations common to
most calculations. To verify the syntax of your formula, click CHECK EXPR.
Precedence of Operators
Formulas use the order of operations common to most calculations. The following operators are
listed showing the highest to the lowest precedence. The highest precedence is listed first and the
lowest precedence is listed last:
Operator
Comments
( ) Parentheses
Expressions in parentheses are evaluated first. Where parentheses
are nested, the order of operations proceeds from innermost to
outermost.
[ ] Brackets
Brackets surround variable names. They are considered to be a
“value of” operator. Operators and constants cannot appear within
brackets. Brackets at this level of precedence ensure that data will
be retrieved before it is operated on.
^ Exponentiation
Exponents that are greater than 1 are “to the power of”. Exponents
between 0 and 1 are “root of”. Negative exponents are not
supported.
log
Decimal logarithm with a base of 10. This must be followed by a
value.
*, / Multiplication and Division
Multiplication and division binary operators require a value on
either side. When multiple instances appear in a formula, they are
evaluated from left to right.
+, - Addition and Subtraction
Addition and subtraction binary operators require a value on either
side. When multiple instances appear in a formula, they are
evaluated from left to right.
Examples of Formulas
The following are examples of valid formulas (with the assumption that the variables shown exist in
the current installation):
Name
Formula
Sales per Household
[Sales]/[Households]
Percent of Females in the Population
100*[FY Females]/[FY Population]
Population Five-Year Percent Change
100*([FY Population]/[CY Population])/[CY Population]
FY = Five Year
CY = Current Year
You may not have some of the variables given in these examples depending on the type of
installation you have.
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Creating a True Median Variable
True median variables are used when deriving medians from ranges of summary demographic
variables.
To create a true median variable from the Data Manager:
1. Click CUSTOM VARIABLES to display the Custom Variable Editor.
Custom Variables Button
2. Click SPECIAL VARIABLES, then click TRUE MEDIAN VARIABLES.
3. Enter a name, description and number of decimal places for the true median variable, and
click NEXT.
4. Select the demographic variables you want to use from the list and click NEXT.
The range variables you select must be in the correct order, from smallest to largest.
5. Define the range categories by entering the Lower and Upper values for the range
boundaries. There cannot be overlaps or gaps between ranges.
6. Click FINISH to create the ranges.
Creating a Radius Based Variable
Radius based variables return the value of an attribute within a specified radius of a given point.
For example, sales within two miles of a selected point. You might create a radius based variable if
you are creating a point list report. If you create a 3-mile radius based variable for population, the
population of a 3-mile ring would returned for each point in the list.
To create a radius based variable from within the Data Manager:
1. Click CUSTOM VARIABLES to display the Custom Variable Editor.
Custom Variables Button
2. Click SPECIAL VARIABLES, then click RADIUS BASED VARIABLE.
3. Enter a name and description for the Radius Based variable, and click NEXT.
4. Select a variable to use, and click NEXT.
5. Enter the Radius (in miles) in the text box.
6. Click FINISH to create the range.
When using a radius based variable in your analysis, the input geography must be a point.
Creating a Geography Based Constant Variable
Geography Based Constant variables deliver values that always deliver the same variable for a
fixed geographic selection. For example, you might want to normalize results against the
population for the U.S., or you might always want to look at values in relation to California
households.
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The geographic level and key uniquely specify the geographic area over which the value will be
evaluated. This geography then becomes part of the variable definition, therefore these variables
always return the same values for a specific release of data. For example, if the constant value for
comparison were Adult Population for New York, the Geographic Constant Function uses this
value as the comparison point for calculating percentages of other geographies.
To create a geography based constant variable from the Data Manager:
1. Click CUSTOM VARIABLES to display the Custom Variable Editor.
Custom Variables Button
2. Click SPECIAL VARIABLES, then click GEOGRAPHY BASED CONSTANT.
3. Enter a name for the Geography Based Constant variable, and click NEXT.
4. Select the demographic variable you want to use from the list, and click NEXT.
5. Select the level of geography. For example, State.
6. Select the Geographic Key value. For example, 36 for New York.
To find the geographic key assigned to a particular geography, choose WINDOW > NEW
BROWSER from MapInfo Professional menus. Select the table for the geography from the
BROWSE dialog. Click OK. The geography is displayed in a table format. The geography
key is the two letter code displayed in the ST_FIPS column.
7. Click FINISH.
Creating a Geography Based Parent Variable
Geography Based Parent variables return the value of a specified attribute for the parent region of
the reported geometry at a specified parent level of geometry. The parent variable provides
information about geographies related to a particular selection, but not the selection itself. For
example if you select ZIP code as the geographic level, and households as the demographic,
when any point is entered, the Geographic Parent Variable Function finds the Zip Code that
contains that point, and provides its Household count.
To create a geography based parent variable from within the Data Manager:
1. Click CUSTOM VARIABLES to display the Custom Variable Editor.
Custom Variables Button
2. Click SPECIAL VARIABLES, then click GEOGRAPHY BASED PARENT.
3. Enter a name for the Geography Based Parent variable, and click NEXT.
4. Select the demographic variable you want to use, and click NEXT.
5. Select the parent boundary level, for example State, and click FINISH.
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Working with Index Based Templates
Using an index based template is an optional feature when running an index based report. Index
based reports are discussed in detail in Make a Report Index Based on page 149.
A template is used in index based reporting to provide greater control to change the default values
with which the variables are compared. For example, the variable White Male Population has a
default comparison variable of White Population. This comparison variable can be changed to a
different value, such as Male Population, in the template editor.
The index based template editor allows you to create, delete, and edit templates.
Creating an Index Based Template
To create an index based template, from the Data Manager:
1. Click TEMPLATE EDITOR in the Data Manager toolbar.
Template Editor Button
The Index Based Template Editor displays.
2. Enter a name for the new template in the Template Name text box in the bottom right-hand
corner of the dialog.
3. Browse to the variables in the treeview that you want to use for the template.
4. Select a series of, or individual, variables holding down the SHIFT or CTRL keys.
5. Use the right arrow (>) button to copy the selected variables in to the new template.
Index Based Template Editor: New Template
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6. Override the default base variables (optional).
Highlight a variable (or variables) in the grid on the right. Browse to the variable you want
to define as the new default base variable for comparison in the variable tree on the left of
the editor. Highlight the new default base variable and click OVERRIDE. The new variable,
that replaces the default base, is displayed in the OVERRIDE VARIABLE column for the
variables you highlighted.
7. Click SAVE to save the template.
8. Click FINISH to end the Template Editor session.
9. This template is now available in the Reports and Charts dialog when making a report
index based.
Reports and Charts: Index Based Templates
Editing an Index Based Template
Once a template has been created, you can edit it to add or remove variables. To edit a template:
1. Click TEMPLATE EDITOR in the Data Manager toolbar.
Template Editor Button
2. Click EDIT to display the available Index Based Templates.
Index Based Templates Dialog
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3. Select the template you want to edit. Click FINISH.
The editor is populated with the fields from the template.
4. Add variables to the template.
Browse the treeview and select variables to add to the template. Use the SHIFT key to
select a series of variables, or the CTRL key to select individual variables. Use the right
arrow (>) button to copy the variables into the template
5. Remove variables from the template.
Highlight a variable from the list provided. Click the left arrow button (<) to remove it.
Repeat this for each variable you want to remove.
6. Click SAVE to commit the changes.
If you want to edit a different template, click CLEAR. Click EDIT and select another template to edit.
Deleting an Index Based Template
To delete an index based template:
1. Click TEMPLATE EDITOR in the Data Manager toolbar.
Template Editor Button
The Index Based Template Editor displays.
2. Click EDIT to display the available Index Based Templates.
3. Select the template you want to delete.
Right-click and select DELETE.
4. Delete the template.
Confirm that you want to delete the template you have selected. The template is deleted.
Changing Access to a Template
All index based templates are created as private; only the person who created them can use them.
If you change the access rights to Public, anyone accessing the same TargetPro server can use
the template you created. To change the access rights to an index based template:
1. Click TEMPLATE EDITOR in the Data Manager toolbar.
Template Editor Button
The Index Based Template Editor displays.
2. Click EDIT to display the available Index Based Templates.
3. Select the template you want to make public or private.
Right-click and select MAKE TEMPLATE PUBLIC/PRIVATE.
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The following icon appears next to an index based template to show it is public.
Public Index Based Template Icon
The following icon appears next to an index based template to show it is private.
Private Index Based Template Icon
4. Click FINISH.
Saving a Template with a New Name
You can make a copy of any template you have created, modify, and save it with a new name.
1. Click TEMPLATE EDITOR in the Data Manager toolbar.
Template Editor Button
The Index Based Template Editor displays.
2. Click EDIT to display the available Index Based Templates.
3. Select the template you want to save with a new name. Click FINISH.
4. Modify the template (optional).
Refer to Editing an Index Based Template on page 108 for more information.
5. Click SAVE AS and enter a name for the new template.
Index Based Template Name Dialog
Click OK.
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Managing Profiles
The TargetPro Profile Manager allows you to create profiles and create and
manage target groups. It also enables you to move or re-order profiles
between groups, or sets which makes working with your profiles very
straightforward.
The Target Group Manager is a component of the Profile Manager, and it
allows you to create new groups to use as the target areas for your analysis.
They can be easily moved from one group to another as your business
dynamics change over time.
In this section:
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Understanding Clusters and Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Filter or Weighted Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Geographic Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Product Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Customer Record Profile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Summarized Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Organizing Profiles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Target Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Understanding Clusters and Profiles
This section discusses the background to Clusters and Profiles, and provides examples of how
they are used in TargetPro.
PSYTE Clusters
Profiles are created using the PSYTE Neighborhood Classification System. PSYTE classifies U.S.
block groups into unique lifestyle segments. That is, each neighborhood in the United States is
classified into a group according to that neighborhood’s demographic and socio-economic
makeup, and product consumption habits.
The data used in creating the PSYTE clusters include current year updates to the U.S. Census
(such as household income, mobility, house value, ethnicity, education, language, occupation,
dwelling unit type which have all been influenced by the latest Census) as well as summarized
consumer expenditure behavior created from proprietary databases. The result is a prediction
database.
Each of the PSYTE clusters has a number associated with it to identify it. They are ranked on a
proprietary measure of discretionary income, with Cluster 1 being the wealthiest. Each cluster has
been further assigned to one of 18 major groups. These major groups indicate the approximate
settlement pattern of the clusters.
These are:
•
High Density Urban
•
Urban
•
High Density Suburban
•
Suburban
•
Low Density Suburban
•
Low Density Exurban
•
Rural
Another group, Group Quarters (GQ), contains two clusters, one of which is dominated by military
personnel living in barracks, the other by students in dormitories.
Profiles
Profiles, also called Cluster Profiles, are used to help you understand your customers. They
segment them into key demographic groups, and correlate the similarity between your customers
and other databases to help predict product usage in any geographic area. Profiles can be
surveys, customer databases, or even a geographic area.
For example, a company performing a mail shot could compare the cluster profile of existing
customers to that of a mailing list to determine the potential number of customers in the mailing
list. Another use is to compare the profiles of a customer database and a geographic area, to
determine the likely prospects living in that particular area.
A profile can be thought of as a collection of 72 counts. Each count represents the number of items
(such as households, and population) that are included in a particular cluster.
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There are five (5) types of profiles that can be used in your analysis.
•
GEOGRAPHIC PROFILE – This profile is created for a standard geographic area, such as
census-defined neighborhoods or ZIP Codes, or a custom geography you have created on
the Analysis Map.
•
PRODUCT PROFILE – This profile combines a standard or custom geographic area, with the
profile of a product. This allows you to analyze a group of people in a specific geographic
area that buy a certain product. For example, people who eat peanut butter in New York.
•
CUSTOMER RECORD PROFILE – This profile imports a file of customer data you have
collected and appends a cluster code to each record. This enables you to determine which
clusters your customers come from and analyze what their typical spending patterns and
lifestyle behaviors are likely to be.
•
SUMMARIZED PROFILE – This is a profile that has been created in another application and
has been imported into TargetPro.
•
WEIGHTED PROFILE – This profile allows you to weight fields in a cluster coded custom
point set you have imported. It enables you to analyze demand for a weighted field by
cluster. For example, average sales by cluster.
Cluster System
A cluster system is a collection of clusters, target groups, and profiles which can be used for
analysis. Although any number of cluster systems can be supported, they are assumed to be
independent of each other, and have their own databases and hierarchies.
Within the Profile Manager, only one cluster system can be active at a time. It is referred to as the
current cluster system, and cluster and target group management operations can only be
performed on the current cluster system. Before starting a session in the Profile Manager, you
should choose a cluster system from the drop-down list on which you want to work.
Creating Profiles
In addition to the profiles provided with TargetPro you can also create your own profiles to use in
your analysis. You can use data you have registered through the Data Manager as a profile and
geographies you have created on the Analysis Map. If you create a profile using custom linked
data, the profile is not dynamic, but a snapshot is created when the data is registered. To update
this type of profile you can delete the registered data in Data Manager and re-register it.
Any profiles you create can be used when running Segmentation Reports and charts, where you
are prompted to choose a profile for your analysis.
The location of the profiles you create depends on the folder you select before creating the profile.
•
If you select a private folder before creating a new profile, it is created in the folder you
selected.
•
If you select a custom profile and the parent folder is private, the new profile is created in
that folder.
•
If you select anything else, the new profile is created in the Custom folder.
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Profiles you create can be moved to other custom folders. Refer to Adding Profiles to a Folder
on page 127 for more information.
Creating a Filter or Weighted Profile
A filtered or weighted profile is created from a point dataset you have already registered through
the Data Manager.
To create a filter or weighted profile:
1. Import and register any point datasets you want to import as profiles using the Data
Manager. For more information see Importing and Registering Data in Chapter 5 on
page 63.
Note:
You can only create profiles of point datasets that have cluster codes associated
with them.
2. Open the Profile Manager dialog box.
Profile Manager Button
Click PROFILE MANAGER from the toolbar, or choose TARGETPRO > PROFILE MANAGER from
the main menu.
Profile Manager Dialog
3. Click FILTER/WEIGHT PROFILES.
The Weighted Profile Creation Wizard shows the custom point datasets that have been
registered through the Data Manager.
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4. Select the point dataset you want to use to create a profile.
Weighted Profile Creation Wizard: Custom Point Levels
Click NEXT.
5. Create a filter expression to make a subset of the point dataset (optional).
Weighted Profile Creation Wizard: Create Filter Expression
Use operators from the drop-down lists to create a filter expression enclosed by brackets.
If you include an AND/OR operator, a new row is automatically added to the expression.
The expression can be up to 10 rows in length. If filtering on a string field, it must be
enclosed by double quotation marks, and the % wildcard can be used anywhere within the
string.
If you do not want to filter the dataset, click NEXT to skip to step 8.
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6. Create a subset of the profile (optional).
Click ATTRIBUTE SUBSETTING if you want to create a profile that contains fewer records
than the full profile. Create a subset of the profile based either on a range of values (for
example, sales greater than $100 and less than $150) or a distinct value (for example, a
city).
Profile Manager: Profile Subsetting Dialog
Enter a name for the profile subsets and choose the type of expression. Click FINISH to
return to the Filter Expression screen.
7. Click PREVIEW DATA to see the values that were selected in the filtering expression you
created.
Preview Data Sample
Click NEXT.
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8. Select variables from the list to create weighted profiles (optional).
Weighted Profile Creation Wizard: Profile Weight Variables
The variables listed in this window are those that were specified as Calculated fields when
the dataset was initially registered through the Data Manager.
If no weighted variables are selected, the resulting profile provides a count of the variable.
You may select more than one variable. Each variable is imported as a separate profile.
Click NEXT.
9. Review the filtering and subsetting criteria you selected.
Weighted Profile Creation Wizard: Weighted Profiles Summary
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10. Set a base demographic.
If you want to set a demographic variable as a base for the profiles you are creating, click
SET BASE DEMOGRAPHIC and browse to select a variable. Click FINISH to set the variable.
11. Select one of the following methods to create a base for the profile(s):
•
•
•
•
NONE – Does not create a base for the profile(s). Use this option if you already have a
base profile you have created you want to use.
DEFAULT – TargetPro selects a suitable profile to use as a base. For example, if you
are performing geography subsetting, it will choose a geographic profile; for attribute
subsetting, it will choose a count profile.
NEIGHBORHOOD COVERAGE AREA (NCA) – TargetPro creates an NCA base. This
covers all the block groups that intersect the profile.
UNION – TargetPro creates an aggregate of the profile(s) and provides a count profile
as the base.
12. Select the AGGREGATE check box to create a base that encompasses all the individual
profiles.
13. Click FINISH to create the profile(s).
Creating a Geographic Profile
A geographic profile is based on either a standard or custom geography. The standard geography
can be selected from the Analysis Map or the Geography Selector dialog. The custom geography
is an area on the Analysis Map, such as a polygon or set of rings you have created.
A geographic profile enables you to choose a geography to store as a profile, that you can then
use in the Reports and Charts dialog. When running a report, you could compare a study area in
the analysis with this geographic profile.
For example, you might create a set of rings 10 miles around a very successful store and use it to
create a geographic profile. You could then use this geographic profile when running a report on
other stores in your territory to see how they perform by comparison.
To create a geographic profile:
1. Create any geographies you want to use as profiles.
You can use both standard geographies and custom geographies to create geographic
profiles. Create any custom geographies you want to use before starting to create the
profiles. Custom geographies can be polygons, rings, or drive time/drive distance trade
areas. Refer to Creating Custom Geographies on page 39 for more information.
2. Launch the Profile Manager.
Click PROFILE MANAGER from the TargetPro toolbar, or choose TARGETPRO > PROFILE
MANAGER from the main menu.
Profile Manager Button
3. Click CREATE/IMPORT PROFILES.
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4. Click CREATE GEOGRAPHIC PROFILES.
This displays a dialog that lists the custom geographies you created to use for the
geographic profile and any standard geographies you selected on the Analysis Map.
Import Geographic Profiles Dialog
5. Modify the list of geographies you want to use as geographic profiles.
The custom geographies you created, and any other standard geographies you have
previously selected are already listed in the dialog. Click ADD to display the Geography
Selector and browse to select any additional geographies to use as geographic profiles.
Refer to Selecting Geographies by Name on page 52 for more information on how to
work with the Geography Selector.
Select any geographies in the dialog you do not want to use as geographic profiles and
click REMOVE.
6. Select a base variable for the profiles.
The base variable is the unit used to count the occurrences within the profile. The default
setting is households for PSYTE, but this may be different for other segmentation
systems. This default is useful if you want to profile customers based on number of
televisions per household, or amount of potato chips consumed per household. However,
if you wanted to study how many cars were in a particular geography, you would want to
change the base to something more meaningful such as adults over 18 which would allow
you to show the number of cars for the adult population.
If you want to change the default, click BASE VARIABLE to display the Select Base Variable
dialog. Browse the demographic variables and double-click to select one, or highlight it
and click OK. The variable you selected is shown at the bottom of the window.
To clear the variable and return the value to the default, open the base variable dialog and
click OK without selecting a variable.
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7. Set a base profile.
A base profile provides a standard of comparison for the geographic profiles you are
creating. It could be a profile of a state or a profile of a customer database. For example, if
the geographic profile you are creating is within the state of New York, you might choose
the New York state profile as the base. This would allow you to compare the population
characteristics within the custom geography with that of the New York state.
By default the base is set to the profile itself. If you want to change the default, click SET
BASE PROFILE to display the Select Base Profile dialog. Browse the profiles and doubleclick one to select it, or highlight it and click OK. The variable you have selected is shown
at the bottom of the window.
8. Select the SUM checkbox to create an additional Summary Profile of the selected areas
(optional).
9. Click OK to import the profiles.
The geographic profiles are imported and added to the Custom Profiles folder in Profile
Manager.
Creating a Product Profile
A product profile shows the type of people who consume a particular product in a specified
geography. A geographic profile shows the type of people in a particular area. This geography can
be compared against a countrywide profile of a particular product. However, it would be more
useful to study a profile of people who use a particular product in a given region. For example,
rather than comparing people in New York with a countrywide profile of people who eat cheese, a
product profile would show the type of people who eat cheese and live in New York.
There are two ways to create a product profile:
•
Creating a Product Profile from Scratch on page 120
•
Converting a Geographic Profile to a Product Profile on page 122
Creating a Product Profile from Scratch
1. Create any custom geographies on the Analysis Map.
You can use both standard geographies and custom geographies to create geographic
profiles. Create any custom geographies you want to use before starting to create the
profiles. Custom geographies can be polygons, rings, or drive time/drive distance trade
areas. Refer to Creating Custom Geographies on page 39 for more information.
2. Launch the Profile Manager.
Click PROFILE MANAGER from the toolbar, or choose TARGETPRO > PROFILE MANAGER from
the main menu.
Profile Manager Button
3. Click CREATE/IMPORT PROFILES.
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4. Select CREATE PRODUCT PROFILES.
This dialog lists the custom geographies you created to use for the geographic profile and
any standard geographies you selected on the Analysis Map.
Import Product Profiles Dialog
5. Modify the list of geographies you want to use as product profiles.
The custom geographies you created, and any other standard geographies you have
previously selected are already listed in the dialog. Choose ADD to display the Geography
Selector and browse to select any additional geographies to use as geographic profiles.
Refer to Selecting Geographies by Name on page 52 for more information on how to
work with the Geography Selector.
Select any geographies in the dialog you do not want to use as geographic profiles and
click REMOVE.
6. Select a base variable for the profiles.
The base variable is the unit used to count the occurrences within the profile. The default
setting is households for PSYTE, but this may be different for other segmentation
systems. This default is useful if you want to profile customers based on number of
televisions per household, or amount of potato chips consumed per household. However,
if you wanted to study how many cars were in a particular geography, you would want to
change the base to something more meaningful, such as adults over 18, which would
allow you to show the number of cars for the adult population.
If you want to change the default, click BASE VARIABLE to display the Select Base Variable
dialog. Browse the demographic variables and double-click one to select it, or highlight it
and click OK. The variable you have selected is shown at the bottom of the window.
To clear the variable and return the value to the default, open the Base variable dialog and
click OK without selecting a variable.
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7. Set a base profile.
A base profile provides a standard of comparison for the geographic profiles you are
creating. It could be a profile of a state or a profile of a customer database. For example, if
the geographic profile you are creating is within the state of New York, you might choose
the New York state profile as the base. This would allow you to compare the population
characteristics within the custom geography with that of New York state.
By default, the base is set to the profile itself. If you want to change the default, click SET
BASE PROFILE to display the Select Base Profile dialog. Browse the profiles and doubleclick one to select it, or highlight it and click OK. The variable you have selected is shown
at the bottom of the window.
8. Select the SUM checkbox to create one summary profile of the selected areas (optional).
9. Click NEXT.
Browse through the list of Available Survey Profiles and select one to use as the base for
the product profile.
10. Click OK.
The product profiles are imported.
Converting a Geographic Profile to a Product Profile
To create a product profile from an existing geographic profile:
1. Create a geographic profile. Refer to Creating a Geographic Profile on page 118 for
information.
2. Right-click the geographic profile in the list of Custom Profiles in the Profile Manager.
3. Select CREATE PRODUCT PROFILES.
Browse through the list of Available Survey Profiles and select one to use as the base for
the product profile.
The product profile is added to the description of the geographic profile in the list of custom
profiles.
Creating a Customer Record Profile
A customer record profile is based on a file of customer data you have collected. It lets you import
a file of customer information, and append a cluster code to each record. This lets you determine
which clusters your customers come from and analyze what their typical spending patterns and
lifestyle behaviors are likely to be.
To create a customer record profile:
1. Launch the Profile Manager.
Click PROFILE MANAGER from the toolbar, or choose TARGETPRO > PROFILE MANAGER from
the main menu.
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Profile Manager Button
2. Click CREATE/IMPORT PROFILES.
3. Select IMPORT CUSTOMER RECORD PROFILES.
4. Locate a customer record file to import.
Highlight the type of file that holds your customer record information. Browse to the
location of the file on your system, and click OPEN. If you are importing an Access or Excel
file you can choose to import a specific table or worksheet from the customer file.
5. Provide some geographic information about the file.
You must specify at least one of the following columns in the customer data file you are
importing to provide a geographic focus for the data: Block Group Key, Latitude/Longitude,
or Segmentation System Code
6. Enter information about the customer record profile.
Enter a name by which you can identify the profile, and optionally choose an alternative
base demographic.
If you specified a Block Group Key, you can also create an Neighbourhood Coverage Area
(NCA) base profile for the dataset. This is the total area of block groups that contains all
the customer records in the dataset.
Optionally select the checkbox to create a weighted profile. Select the numeric field you
want to weight and provide a name for the weighted profile.
7. Filter the dataset (optional).
You may not want to use all the records in the customer dataset. Click FILTER to launch the
Create Filter Expression dialog to filter the dataset.
Filter Button
Create Filter Expression Dialog
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Use the filter expression builder to create a filter for the data.
Click FINISH.
8. Register the customer record dataset for future use (optional).
Select the register dataset checkbox. Enter a name for the registered dataset, and provide
a label field. This is used as the label for the dataset points.
If you do not register the dataset, the data is removed and only the profile remains when
the profile is imported.
9. Click FINISH to import the dataset.
If you chose to register the dataset, the dataset and all the associated attributes are
registered at the geographic level in the Data Manager with the name you provided. To
register more of the data at a later data refer to Registering Additional Attribute Data on
page 75.
Creating a Summarized Profile
A summarized profile is one imported from an external source. These profiles may have been
created in another source, and need to be imported into TargetPro to be used in analysis. These
can be standard or weighted profiles.
To create a summarized profile:
1. Launch the Profile Manager.
Click PROFILE MANAGER from the toolbar, or choose TARGETPRO > PROFILE MANAGER from
the main menu.
Profile Manager Button
2. Click CREATE/IMPORT PROFILES.
3. Click IMPORT SUMMARIZED PROFILES.
4. Locate a profile to import.
Highlight the file type of the profile you want to import. Select the checkbox to indicate that
this file has column names in the first row.
Browse to the location of the file on your system, and click OPEN. If you are importing an
Access or Excel file you can choose to import a specific table or worksheet from the file.
5. Choose a template for the profile (optional).
Select the checkbox to browse for a template you have already set up. Browse to the
template and click Open. Click LOAD TEMPLATE to populate the fields of the Import
Summarized Profile dialog with the template information.
If you have not already saved a template, once you have filled all the fields in the dialog,
enter a unique name in the USE TEMPLATE textbox and click SAVE TEMPLATE. You can use
this template to load these settings for future imports.
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6. Choose the type of profile you are importing.
•
•
SINGLE PROFILE – One profile with information stored in columns.
MULTIPLE PROFILES AS ROWS – More than one profile. Each profile is stored as an
individual row. Select the One Profile Per Row checkbox.
The information you need to provide depends on the structure of the profile(s) you are
importing.
Select a profile format from the list, and specify a name. Then specify the columns from
the imported profile according to the requirements for the structure of the profile as
follows.
Standard Profile
•
SINGLE PROFILE – Data contains one or two columns. The minimum requirement is a
Count column in numerical Cluster order. If there are two columns, the first is the
Count column and the second is the Cluster code. In this case, the Count column
does not need to be in numerical cluster order.
Specify the Count (and Cluster) column(s) from the profile you are importing in the
drop-down lists.
•
MULTIPLE PROFILES AS ROWS – Data contains one profile per row. This format requires
Count data for each profile in numerical Cluster order.
Specify the fields where the Count information starts for each profile.
Standard Profile with Base
•
SINGLE PROFILE – Data contains two or three columns. The minimum requirement is a
Count column in numerical Cluster order and a column of Base Counts. If there are
three columns, the additional column can be the Cluster code. In this case, the Count
column does not need to be in numerical cluster order.
Specify the Count, Base Count (and Cluster) columns from the profile you are
importing in the drop-down list.
•
MULTIPLE PROFILES AS ROWS – Data contains one profile per row. This format requires
Count data followed by the Base Count for each profile in numerical Cluster order.
Specify the fields where the Count and Base Count information starts for each profile.
Volumetric Profile
•
SINGLE PROFILE – Data contains three or four columns. The minimum requirement is a
Count column in numerical Cluster order, a Base Count column, and a Volume
(Weighted) column. If there are four columns, the additional column can be the Cluster
code. In this case, the Count column does not need to be in numerical cluster order.
Specify the Count, Base Count, Volume (and Cluster) columns from the profile you are
importing in the drop-down list.
•
MULTIPLE PROFILES AS ROWS – Data contains one profile per row. This format requires
Count data followed by the Base Count followed by the Volumes for each profile, all in
numerical Cluster order.
Specify the fields where the Count, Base Count, and Volume information starts for
each profile.
MRI Profile
MRI profiles are in a specific format, with each profile presented as a row.
The first 5 fields are "MR' 2 1 1 30.
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The next field is the description of the profile in quotes. For example "wears boots"
The next 72 fields are space separated base counts (in thousands) in numerical cluster
order (1-72).
The next 72 fields are space separated counts (in thousands) in numerical cluster order
(1-72).
The next 72 fields are space separated actual counts in numerical cluster order (1-72).
Each profile in a row is completed with an "enter"
7. Click FINISH to import the profile(s).
Organizing Profiles
TargetPro provides you with several profile categories, or sets, which contain individual profiles of
a certain type. Generally, you are provided with survey profiles created by Mediamark Research,
Inc.
The profiles are listed in the treeview in Profile Manager and can be selected by expanding the
folders and browsing to a specific profile.
Profile Manager Dialog
Creating a Profile Folder
To create a folder for your custom profiles:
1. Right-click in the Profiles treeview at the level you want to create the new folder.
2. Select NEW FOLDER.
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3. Enter a name for the new folder. Click OK.
A new folder is created at the bottom of the Profiles treeview at the level you specified. By default
this folder is created private, but the access privileges can be changed to public.
Changing Folder Properties
When a profile folder is created, its properties are set to private. To make it public, select the folder,
right-click and select TOGGLE PRIVATE/PUBLIC. If the folder is private, it is changed to public.
Public folders, and all the profiles within them, are shown by the following folder icon:
Public Custom Folder Icon
Private folders, and all the profiles within them, are shown by the following folder icon:
Private Custom Folder Icon
Note:
Only custom profiles can be modified and moved. Standard profiles can only be copied
into a folder of custom profiles.
Adding Profiles to a Folder
To add profiles to a folder you have created:
1. Highlight the profile(s) you want to add to the folder, then right-click.
2. Select COPY SELECTED PROFILES.
3. Browse to the folder you created, then right-click.
4. Select PASTE SELECTED PROFILES.
Renaming Custom Profiles
To rename a folder of custom profiles or an individual profile:
1. Highlight the custom folder or profile you want to rename, then right-click.
2. Select RENAME.
3. Enter the new name for the folder or profile.
Deleting a Profile
To delete a folder of custom profiles or an individual profile:
1. Highlight the custom folder or profile you want to delete, then right-click.
2. Select DELETE.
Note:
Deleted profiles cannot be recovered.
If you have copies of the profile you want to delete in other folders, select DELETE ALL. This
deletes all instances of the profile from your system.
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Merging Profiles
Merging profiles allows you to combine several profiles into one. For example, you might have
created a profile of your New York customers and a profile of your California customers. It might be
useful to combine these two profiles to produce one profile for the whole customer set.
You can merge custom and standard profiles. The merged profile is created in the Custom Profiles
folder. The profiles you want to merge must not overlap. and require the same segmentation
system to allow for successful demographic analysis and interpretation. The profiles may have
different base profiles because the base of the merged profile is not taken from the input profiles,
and the base can be chosen after the merged profile is created.
Note:
Only count profiles can be merged.
To merge profiles:
1. Highlight the profiles you want to merge, and right-click.
Hold down the CTRL key to select individual profiles, or use the SHIFT key to select
sequential profiles.
2. Select MERGE SELECTED PROFILES.
3. Provide a name for the merged profile in the Enter a Name dialog.
4. Click OK.
The new merged profile is listed in the Custom Profiles folder in the treeview.
Getting Profile Information
To view information about a profile in the treeview, select the profile, right-click and select INFO. An
information pop-up displays. This shows the type of profile, the PSYTE system it was created with,
the demographic base, and the number of clusters in the population.
Profile Information Dialog
Managing Target Groups
Target Groups can be used to streamline and customize your marketing practices. For example, in
your company, for a specific type of product it may have been shown that clusters 06, 09, 14, 23,
and 18 are the clusters you specifically want to focus on for your analysis. From the information
provided for those particular clusters, this collection always use your particular service whereas
the remaining clusters do not. To increase revenue across all the cities in the U.S., it would be
more economical to create a target group of these specific clusters and design a marketing
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campaign tailored specifically to them. You can then market directly to your optimum target
audience. Identify your target groups by analyzing the results of your reports. Once you have
identified the clusters to put in your target group, you are ready to start work with them.
After creating your target groups, you can modify them as your marketing strategies change over
time.
Note:
You can only modify group sets you have created. The standard group sets provided with
the application cannot be edited or modified.
Accessing the Target Group Manager
Target groups are managed in the Target Group Manager. To display the Target Group Manager,
click CREATE/EDIT from the Profile Manager.
Notice the cluster system you are currently working with is displayed in the non-editable text box at
the top of the Target Group Manager.
Target Group Manager
Creating a New Group Set
Target groups are organized into Group Sets. A group set may be made up of any number of
groups, but a cluster may only be assigned to one target group in any Group Set.
To create a new group set:
1. Click NEW next to the GROUP SET list.
2. Provide a unique name for the group set in the Enter a Name dialog. Click OK.
The new group set appears in the Group Set drop-down list. It has, by default, three empty
groups numbered 001, 002, 003, colored black.
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Adding Groups to a Group Set
After you have created a group set, you may want to add another group of clusters. By default,
group sets are created with three empty groups, but they may contain any number of groups.
First choose the Group Set you want to work with from the Group Set list. Choose one of the three
(3) following ways to add a group to the set:
•
Use the up arrow next to the Groups In This Set box.
This adds another group to the set every time you click the button.
•
Enter a new number in the Groups In This Set box.
New groups are created to make up the number of groups listed in this box. For example,
if three groups exist, and 10 is entered in the text box, seven new groups are added to the
existing three.
•
Right-click in the groups listview.
Choose NEW GROUP. A new group is added to the set.
New groups are numbered incrementally as they are added to the group set. For example, if three
groups exist and have been renamed from the default values of 001, 002, 003, when new groups
are added they still use the default numbering system and continue with 004, 005, and so on.
Renaming a Group
When you have created a new group set you can rename the groups to make them more
meaningful. To rename a group, right-click on the Target Group you want to rename. Select
RENAME GROUP and enter the new name.
Deleting a Group
When you choose to delete a group you are asked to verify your action. First choose the Group
Set you want to work with from the Group Set drop-down list.
Choose one of the three (3) following ways to delete a group from the set:
•
Use the down arrow next to the Groups In This Set box.
This removes the last group from the set every time you click the button.
•
Enter a new number in the Groups In This Set box.
New groups are removed from the bottom of the set to make the number of groups listed
in this box. For example, if ten groups exist, and 3 is entered in the text box, seven groups
are removed from the group set.
•
Right-click on the group you want to remove from the listview.
Choose DELETE GROUP. The remaining groups are not renumbered.
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Changing Target Group Colors
By default the target groups are colored black. However, you may want to change the color of each
group so that you can identify each group when running charts or reports based on those target
groups.
To change the target group color:
1. Select a Group Set from the drop-down list.
2. Highlight the group you want to change, and right-click.
3. Select CHANGE GROUP COLOR.
4. Pick a color for the group from the color picker that displays.
If you are choosing a custom color, ensure that you modify the brightness in the slider bar
at the far right of the dialog.
5. Click OK.
Adding Clusters to a Group
To add clusters to a group:
1. Choose the Group Set you want to use from the Group Set list.
2. Select the cluster(s) to add.
There are two (2) ways to add clusters to a group. The easiest way is to drag and drop
clusters into the relevant group in the set. The other option is to highlight the group to
which you want to add a cluster, then select the cluster(s) you want to add to the group.
Click the right-arrow button (>) to move them. To select multiple clusters either hold down
the CTRL key for individual clusters, or the SHIFT key for a series of clusters.
When the cluster has been used in a particular group set, it is marked as unavailable with
an X. This indicates it cannot be used in any other groups in that set.
3. Click >> OTHER.
After you have assigned the clusters to your group sets, click the >> OTHER button. This
will assign all the unused clusters to a new group called Other. Whenever you modify the
groups, click this button at the end of the session to assign the leftover clusters.
Removing Clusters from a Group
To remove clusters from a group:
1. Choose the Group Set you want to use from the Group Set drop-down list.
2. Select the cluster(s) to remove.
There are two (2) ways to remove clusters from a group. The easiest way is to drag and
drop clusters from the relevant group in the set back to the list of clusters. The other option
is to highlight the cluster(s) you want to remove, then click the left-arrow button (<) to
remove them. You can only remove individual clusters at a time in this way.
To remove all the clusters from a group, select the group and use the double left arrow
(<<). You can also right-click, select CLEAR GROUP, and confirm that you want to remove
all the clusters from the group by clicking OK. When the cluster is removed from the group
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3. Click >> OTHER.
After you have assigned the clusters to your group sets, click the >> OTHER button. This
will assign all the unused clusters to a new group called Other. Whenever you modify the
groups, click this button at the end of the session to assign the leftover clusters.
Displaying Cluster Statistics
Statistics associated with a selected profile can be viewed in the Target Group Manager. They can
be viewed individually or in comparison with the base profile.
To view statistics associated with the clusters:
1. Select a profile.
Click STATISTICS and select a profile for which you want to display statistics from the Select
a Profile dialog. Click OK.
2. Display the statistics columns.
Select a statistic from the menu that you would like to see displayed for the selected profile
in the Clusters area. Click STATISTICS again to display more columns.
Target Group Manager: Display Statistics
Choose from the following statistics:
•
•
•
•
COUNT – The number of units within each cluster for the indicated profile. Some
examples of units are demographics such as households, population, and adult
population.
BASE COUNT – The number of units within each cluster for the base profile. The base
profile represents a context set of values. For example for a survey profile, the base
count is the number of respondents per cluster; for a customer profile this could be the
trade area.
PENETRATION – This value shows how well the selected profile fits the base profile. It
represents the percentage of the base count as shown by the count for each cluster. It
is calculated as follows: [(Cluster # /Base # ) * 100].
PENETRATION INDEX – This represents the comparison between clusters. It is
calculated as follows: [(Cluster %/Base% ) * 100]. It has an average of 100. Values
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•
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greater than 100 indicate an above average penetration of a cluster in comparison
with other clusters.
WEIGHTING/AVERAGE – This is the average consumption or volume associated with
each cluster. Usually this represents the average dollars spent by each cluster. It is
calculated as the total consumption or volume by cluster divided by the number of
customers for each cluster. This statistic is only available for weighted profiles.
WEIGHTED INDEX – This provides a comparative measure of the Weighted Average
profile. It enables the spending average to be used instead of the customer count. It is
calculated as follows: [(Average Weight for cluster / Total Average Weight) * 100].
Choose ALL STATISTICS or NO STATISTICS to show or clear all the columns from the
display.
3. Choose a new profile (optional).
To display statistics for a new profile, click STATISTICS and select NEW PROFILE. The Select
a Profile dialog displays so you can choose a different profile. To clear the profile selection
click OK without selecting a profile from the list.
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8
Running Reports
This chapter describes how TargetPro helps you to analyze your
demographic, geographic, and business data to enable you to fully
understand the relationships between them. This can help to identify your
customers and markets and help you make informed business decisions
about your business strategies. You can present the results of this analysis in
two ways according to the presentation style most appropriate for your
audience; using Reports or Charts.
This chapter provides information on how to analyze your data using reports.
Reports provide you with the ability to display your results as a logical ordered
list of information, so you can easily find individual results and use them in
further analysis.
In this section:
!
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!
!
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Quick View Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding Standard Demographic Reports . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding Segmentation Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running a Standard Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Custom Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Custom Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Upgrading Custom Reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running Multiple Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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The Reporting and Charting functionality is created using the version of Crystal Reports that is
installed with TargetPro. The Crystal Reports User’s Guide is included online as a help file;
crw.chm. It can be found in the Reports folder where you installed TargetPro Client data.
Note:
We strongly recommend you use the REPORTS AND CHARTS button from the TargetPro
toolbar to access TargetPro’s reporting functionality. Do not use the Crystal Reports
functionality provided by MapInfo Professional that is accessible through TOOLS >
CRYSTAL REPORTS.
You can run any of the standard reports or charts provided with TargetPro, or create your own
custom reports designed specifically for your needs.
Quick View Information
Use the QUICK VIEW tool to check information on the fly about custom or standard geographies
using a standard or custom report.
1. Select some areas of interest on the map.
2. Click QUICK VIEW in the TargetPro toolbar.
Quick View Button
The Quick View dialog displays.
Quick View Dialog
3. Choose a report from the list.
To search for a report, expand the Report list and type the name of the report. The report
that matches the text you entered is moved to the top of the list.
4. Highlight a geography to display the data for that region.
A breakdown of report information for that geographic area is displayed.
5. Click the VARIABLE NAME header to sort the variables (optional).
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Copying the Information
If you want to copy the information displayed in the Quick View dialog to the clipboard, for example
to Notepad, do the following:
1. Select the variables you want to copy.
To select all the variables in the list, right-click and choose SELECT ALL. Use the CTRL key
to select individual variables or SHIFT to select a series of variables.
2. Right-click in the data window and select COPY.
3. Open Notepad, or any other application you want to use, and paste the information. Click
CLOSE when finished.
Understanding Standard Demographic Reports
TargetPro comes with over thirty professionally pre-formatted standard report templates to use to
analyze your data. Each template contains a list of variables to use with the geographic area(s)
you have selected. There are two major categories of reports: DEMOGRAPHIC and SEGMENTATION
Reports. Refer to Understanding Segmentation Reports on page 138 for descriptions of these
types of reports, which require a special license.
Demographic reports provide information about the age, sex, race and income of the geographic
region you selected. There are four main types of reports:
•
COMPARISON – Compares demographic information for the geographic regions you
selected. The type of information depends of the type of comparison report you run.
Choose from Update Income; Retail Sales Potential; Age by Income, Sex, or Detailed
Age; Five Year Ages, Income, or Race; Housing Value and MapInfo Demographic.
•
SUMMARY – Provides a summary of information for each geography on one page instead
of several pages. Choose from Retail Sales Potential and Financial Assets and Wealth
Summary Reports.
•
TREND – This shows how data changes over time for the geographic regions you selected.
It also gives the percentage of change over time. For example, a geography has a total
population of 127,309 in 2000 and 127,675 in 2004 which is a change of 0.29%.
•
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY – Provides a top level overview of all the data in each geography.
The reports are organized into folders relevant to the type of reports they contain: basic, age, five
year, general and income.
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Understanding Segmentation Reports
This is the category of reports used to analyze data based on geodemographic clusters. It includes
PROFILE and RANKING Reports. This section provides a description of many, but not all. of the
segmentation reports included with TargetPro.
Note:
You require a special license to access Segmentation reports.
Profile Reports
A Profile report enables you to use a profile you created in the Profile Manager to analyze your
data. Profile reports are split into three categories; SINGLE PROFILE, COMPARISON and
CONSUMPTION.
Single Profile Reports
This section describes three of the four single profile reports included with TargetPro.
Profile Detail Report
A profile detail report is the first step in analyzing and understanding your customers. Once your
custom data has been imported and an appropriate base has been selected, you should select a
profile detail report to start understanding the breakdown of your customers. The following are
some of the questions that can be answered by using a profile detail report:
•
How many households are in the Country Manors cluster?
•
Am I performing well in Country Manors in comparison to the other clusters?
•
Do my customers fall into some natural segments that I can quantify and qualify for
marketing use?
Profile Details with Totals
A profile detail report with totals is the same as the profile detail report, except it contains two
additional information columns.
The first column is the percentage of customers that falls into each cluster. The second column is
the percentage of the base counts that fall into each cluster. This information provides a relative
perspective of the counts you have generated. For example, you know you have 120 customers in
the Country Manors cluster. However, to assess if this figure is a large of small proportion of your
customers it would be helpful to know that 30% of your customer base comes from the Country
Manor cluster.
Cumulative Detail
A cumulative detail report is a type of detail report because it displays specific information about
each of the clusters in your Customer Profile. This report has cumulative columns which contain
running totals of both the current customer count and the base profile count. Typically, this report is
run to sort clusters by the Customer Count to easily identify the clusters with the highest total, to
determine where a certain percentage of customers come from. These results enable you to
assign clusters to particular groups (Target Groups) based on the breaks in the percentages, for
example 50%, 75% and 90%.
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The report can also be used to compare the accumulation of the percentages of customers against
the base customers. For example, after sorting the list of clusters by Customer Count you may find
that while 30% of customers lie in the top 5 clusters, this only represents 10% of the total base.
From this it can be concluded that there is a good degree of penetration for these clusters and this
type of PSYTE cluster composition would be optimal for future marketing investment. From a
different perspective, efforts could be focused in the same region, but these clusters may be
saturated in the current market, indicating the need to find a different set of clusters to target.
Comparison Reports
This section describes one of the two comparison reports included with TargetPro.
Detailed Profile Comparison
This report compares two profiles on a cluster by cluster basis to determine which clusters are
related. For example, you might compare your customer profile with a Radio listening preference
profile because you know there is significant correlation between your customers and this medium
of marketing delivery. The next step is to identify which clusters have high indices so that the
appropriate marketing message can be addressed to those radio listeners. Many analysts perform
some higher level ranking analyses first, before looking at specific profiles to compare them on a
cluster by cluster basis.
Ranking Reports
A ranking report enables you to rank geographies, or profiles, based on the presence or absence
of target groups or other profile information. You can see the penetration of target households by a
particular product, and identify the count of target households by ZIP Code.
Market Reports
This section describes three of the four market reports included with TargetPro.
Market Penetration for Product
This report determines which geographic markets to address from a PSYTE perspective. For
example, where would be a good location for a new store or where to deliver a marketing
campaign based on the type of people that live in those areas. Typically you would run many
geographies against a single profile to determine the areas of interest.
The report contains a Users count for each geography; this is the number of people you would
expect to become customers in that geography. The Base Count is included to provide
perspective. The base count is the total number of a demographic within that geographic area; this
demographic is usually households, adults, or total population. The base count can also be seen
as the out of value. For example, you expect to have 20 customers out of a possible 55 adults. The
penetration is the division of the expected users by the Base Count, expressed as a percentage.
The report also contains an Index. Unlike the Market Potential Report, this index is dependent on
the geographies selected. It is a comparison of how well a particular geography was penetrated to
how well the sum of the geographies was penetrated. It is computed by dividing the penetration for
a single geography by the penetration for all the geographies, multiplied by 100. Because the
statistic is dependent on the choice of geographies selected, different results are returned for a
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fixed geography if other geographies are added or removed from the analysis. For example, if a
single geography is selected, the index would be 100 because this geography is penetrated in
exactly the same way as the whole.
Market Potential for Product
This report helps you rank geographies according to a profile criterion. Typically you would select
many geographies to compare against a single profile. The report includes the following for each
of the geographies:
•
Potential – The Market Potential; the number of potential users.
•
Base Count – The base count is the total number of a demographic within that geographic
area. This is usually households, adults, or total population.
•
Market Potential Index (MPI) – A value for money statistic
The values are independent of the other geographies; if you select New York and compare it
against a profile of people who eat peanut butter, you will get the same index whether you select
New York or Massachusetts when you run the report.
The profile you select is examined on a cluster by cluster basis, and the penetration is computed
for each cluster (potential count divided by base count). These penetration rates are then applied
against the count for the clusters in a geography. This value represents the number of users in that
geography you would expect to behave in a particular way for that specific cluster. For instance, if
20% of customers from cluster 8 eat peanut butter, and in a particular geography there are 200
people from cluster 8, you could assume 40 people in that geography would eat peanut butter.
This is done across all clusters and the results are summed to derive the Potential.
The MPI is a measure of how well the clusters in the profile line up with the clusters in the
geography. For example, if a profile has a very high penetration in Cluster 14, then the Potential
will have a high contribution from Cluster 14 if the geography itself had a high count of people in
that cluster. However, if the geography has few or no Cluster 14s represented, then the high
penetration lends little to no contribution of your potential, ultimately resulting in a lower index. This
is performed across all clusters, so the relative contribution of the different clusters within the
profiles needs to be considered. Refer to Market Potential Index (MPI) on page 194 for
information on how this value is computed.
Another way to view the two values is as a raw count and a value for money statistic. The Potential
would be the number of customers you would expect to obtain in the area. The MPI is a measure
of how much you would need to spend in mailings to realize that number of customers.
A profile can have a very low Potential but a large MPI. When looking at 2 profiles compared to the
same geography, Profile 1 could have a high Potential and a low MPI, whereas Profile 2 could
have a low Potential and a high MPI. The following example illustrates the situation. The two
profiles are Gum chewers and Rolls Royce buyers, and the geographic area is Beverly Hills. Most
people, regardless of cluster, tend to chew gum. Therefore, the selected geography is not critical,
the rates will be similar across all geographies. In this case the affluence of this geographic area
would suggest that less people would chew gum than average because this population engages in
activities that prohibit gum chewing. Therefore although the actual count of people that chew gum
would still be quite high, it would be lower than average. In other words this means a high Potential
but a low MPI.
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Looking at the second profile of Rolls Royce buyers, very few people actually buy this vehicle, so
regardless of the geography, the actual count of those expected to buy a Rolls Royce will be low.
However, in Beverly Hills, the chances of someone buying this vehicle are much higher than the
average American community. This means Rolls Royce has a low Potential but a high MPI in
Beverly Hills.
Therefore when reading a Market Potential Report, you should take into consideration both the
Potential and the MPI. An area might show a high index for a profile, but there are only ten
potential users; not enough to support the costs of a marketing campaign. Although the MPI looks
good, it might actually be a geography to avoid.
Market Composition
This report provides some basic information about a particular geographic area. The
demographics on the report include the number of adults, the total population and the number of
households, all in terms of cluster.
You could use this report when trying to get a feel for the current market breakdown by cluster. If
you analyze it in conjunction with a customer profile, you can identify the strong and weak areas in
the current customer make-up.
Product
This section describes one of the five product reports included with TargetPro.
Profile Ranking by Target Group Index
This report ranks a collection of profiles according to how well they index against a specified
Target Group. Typically a Target Group system is defined to segment the clusters into three main
groupings: Primary, Secondary and Tertiary targets. All other clusters will be designated to a group
called Other.
A marketing campaign might need to address each group differently because the products,
services, attitudes, and means of reaching these customers will be different between the groups.
This report helps design the appropriate campaign for each group.
Typically you select a collection of profiles to be ranked, then a Target Group. The report displays
the profile descriptions (optionally in descending order) according to the Target Group Index (TGI).
Refer to Target Group Index (TGI) on page 199 for information on how this value is computed.
The following example shows that the profile showing Amount spent on clothing in the past 12
months has the highest TGI of 254.82. This indicates that this target group is penetrated very well
for this profile, but not so well for purchases of body powder which indexes at 84.11.
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Sample Profile Ranking by Target Group Index Report
Correlation Reports
The Spearman and Pearson Correlation Reports are used for the same purpose and produce
similar results. The difference lies primarily in the calculation. For both reports you have the ability
to compare one collection of profiles against another collection. By default TargetPro uses the set
of geographies you initially selected as the second collection.
When running this type of report, choose a Measure to use in the analysis. Choose either User
Counts/Volume to record the number of entries, or Penetration to compare the percentage of
people or households in a target group to the base count.
Spearman Correlation Ranking
For each profile in collection 1, a correlation is run independently against each profile in collection
2. The results, which lie between -1 and 1 are the coefficients and are displayed in a matrix format.
The coefficient is a measure of the linear relationship between the profiles. The closer the
coefficient is to 1, the stronger the positive linear relationship between the profiles. The closer the
coefficient is to -1, the stronger the negative linear relationship. The closer the result is to 0, the
weaker any linear relationship. In practice this means that the higher the value, the greater the
similarity between profiles; where one profile has high counts, so does the other. The lower the
negative value, the more the profiles are dissimilar; where one profile has high counts, the other
has low counts. The closer the coefficient is to 0, the less likely there is a relationship between the
two sets of profiles.
This type of report is useful for scanning potential opportunities to co-brand or determine potential
cross-selling opportunities. It can help answer questions such as:
•
What profiles match closely with my customers?
•
What types of profiles are similar so that we can package and sell them together?
•
What attitudes are similar in people that buy a particular product?
•
What types of advertising are best for selling particular products or services to my current
customer base?
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In general, it is suggested that Spearman calculations are used in a segmentation setting. Profiles
are similar if the relative relationship between the clusters is the same and does not need to rely
on actual counts.
Pearson Correlation Ranking
The major difference between the Spearman and Pearson coefficients is the calculation input. The
Pearson calculation uses raw data, the customer counts that appear in profiles, to compute the
appropriate coefficients. The Spearman calculation first ranks the cluster counts within each of the
profiles. The highest count gets a ranking of 1, the second highest count a ranking of 2, and so on.
These ranks are then submitted to the Pearson computation rather than the raw values.
The Pearson correlation becomes useful when many of the clusters are not represented in your
profile or if many values in your profile are repeated. For example, if 30 out of 60 clusters are 0, it
is difficult to provide accurate results from a ranking perspective. In these circumstances, the
Pearson correlation may give a better result.
Product Correlation Summary
This report is used to compare many profiles to a single, anchor, profile. It can be used to
determine the advertising medium for a given set of customers. Running a correlation of different
advertising media against a customer profile helps determine which advertising options are most
aligned with your customers.
Another common use is co-branding particular advertisements. If you are marketing a specific type
of car you can answer the following questions:
•
What else should be included in the advertisement?
•
How do people who buy those cars think and act?
•
What should the setting of the advertisement be (do customers tend to enjoy the outdoors
or are they city people)?
By running different correlation scenarios against that car’s purchase profile, you can begin to
understand how to put components together for an effective campaign.
The report includes the following statistics:
•
r – The correlation for each profile against the anchor. The correlation is a Spearman Rank
Order Correlation (ROC). The resultant metric of the correlation always lies between -1
and 1. The closer the correlation is to 1, the stronger the linear relationship between the
two profiles. Essentially this means that the two profiles are laid out in the same way;
where Profile 1 has high counts, so does Profile 2. The closer the correlation is to -1, the
stronger the negative relationship of the two profiles. Where Profile 1 is strong, Profile 2 is
weak. The closer the coefficient is to 0, the less likely there is a relationship between the
two sets of profiles.
•
Significance (Sig) – MapInfo has developed a t-test that takes into consideration the size
of the cluster system used and the correlation results. The significance of the t-test is then
determined and provides an indication of whether the test was significant at the 99% level
or at the 95% level. Correlations that are significant at the 99% level are denoted by **, at
the 95% level they are denoted by *, and under that level by N. The closer to 100%
significance (or a correlation coefficient of 1 for likeness or -1 for opposites) the more
compelling the significance.
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Statistics are included for both the Counts and the Penetrations for the profiles. The correlation
describing the Count is based on the users of a particular profile. In the case illustrated, the
customer count defines the profile to which a ranking would be applied. For example, if cluster 10
had a high customer count, then cluster 10 would be given a high ranking. The same is true for all
other profiles in the analysis. For the Penetration statistics, the relative values of the profiles are
ranked instead of the count values. Even though Cluster 10 had a high customer count, the base
count might have been very high and the resulting penetration very small. In comparison to the
other penetration rates of other clusters, Cluster 10 penetration ranks low, which is the opposite of
the effect illustrated using counts alone.
The values you use in your analysis depends on what you want to accomplish. For example, if you
are interested in advertising on the radio, you would probably be concerned about reaching large
raw counts instead of direct costs. In this case you would put greater emphasis on the Count
calculations. However, if you are performing a direct mail campaign, you are probably concerned
about the number of items distributed due to the direct cost associated with each brochure. In that
situation a penetration approach might be preferable. The key is to understanding the situation
and choosing the best approach for your analysis.
Running a Standard Report
You can either run a standard report provided with TargetPro, or create a custom report. This
section describes how to run a standard report. To create a custom report, refer to Creating a
Custom Report on page 152.
The following is the list of steps required to run a standard report (steps 4 and 5 are optional).
1. Starting the Reporting Process on page 144.
2. Selecting Geographies on page 145.
3. Selecting a Report to Run on page 146.
4. Setting Report Properties on page 147 (optional).
5. Choosing Report Options on page 148 (optional).
6. Selecting an Output Destination on page 151.
7. Running the Report on page 151.
Starting the Reporting Process
Standard reports are provided to give you a fast and easy way to generate information about your
data.
To run a standard report, do either of the following:
•
Click REPORTS in the TargetPro toolbar:
Reports Button
Choose TARGETPRO > REPORTS from the main menu.
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Selecting Geographies
The Refine Geography Selections dialog allows you to choose areas for your report.
Refine Geography Selections Dialog
The Refine Geography Selections dialog shows any regions you have already selected from the
Analysis Map window or using the Geography Selector.
If the list of geographies is complete for your report, click OK. If you need to modify the
geographies, consider the other options in this section.
Add a Geography for Your Report
To add a geography to those selected in the dialog:
1. Click ADD.
The Geography Selector dialog displays.
2. Use the Geography Selector to choose additional geographies for your report.
Refer to Selecting Geographies by Name on page 52.
Remove a Geography from Your Report
To remove a geography from those selected in the dialog:
1. Select any geographies you want to remove from the list.
Highlight the geographies you want to remove holding down the CTRL key for individual
geographies, or the SHIFT key for a group.
2. Click REMOVE.
The geographies are removed for this reporting run, but remain in the list of selected
geographies for subsequent reporting runs.
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Sum the Selections As One Area
You can summarize the information from a group of geographies into a single value in the report
you run. This technique is commonly used to show how a single or aggregated set of geographies
change over time.
If you have chosen more than one geography and want to create a summary report, do the
following:
1. Select the SUM checkbox.
2. Enter a heading for the summed column.
The results of all the selected geographies are summed together and outputted as a single
column when a report is run.
When you have refined your geography selections, click OK to continue with the reporting
process.
Selecting a Report to Run
Now you have selected the geographies you want to use for the reporting session, select the
reports you want to run from the Reports and Charts dialog.
Reports and Charts Dialog
Expand the list of available reports and browse to the report(s) you want to run. This list depends
on your TargetPro license.
Select a Single Report
To select a single report, double-click the report to move it to the Selected Reports list, or highlight
the report and click the right-arrow button (>).
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Select Multiple Reports
To select multiple reports, hold down the CTRL key to select individual reports, or the SHIFT key to
select a series of reports. Click the right-arrow button (>).
Remove a Report
Click the left-arrow button (<) to remove highlighted reports from the Selected list. Click the (<<)
button to clear all the reports from the Selected Reports list.
Search for a Report
To search for a report, right-click the Available Reports list and select FIND. Enter the name, or the
letters, to search for in the Find dialog.
Find Dialog
Click FIND NEXT to find the next match in the list.
Setting Report Properties
The Report Properties dialog is where you set general properties, select variables, and set sorting
and filtering options for a report.
Setting Report Properties is optional, apart from for certain reports which require specific types of
variables. For these reports, such as Segmentation Reports, the Report Properties dialog
launches automatically. Refer to Understanding Standard Demographic Reports on page 137
and Understanding Segmentation Reports on page 138 for more information about the types of
reports and their requirements.
To set the report properties, from the Reports and Charts dialog:
1. Highlight a report from the list of Available Reports you have just selected.
You can only modify the properties of one report at a time.
2. Click REPORT PROPERTIES.
Report Properties Button
3. Enter heading information for the report in the GENERAL tab.
Heading information includes the Report Title, Prepared For, and Prepared By elements of
the report. This information will appear in the header section of the report when it is
created. The default for the Report Title is the name of the report.
Note:
The Variables tab simply displays the variables used in the report. These cannot
be edited for a standard report.
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4. Select variables to sort the report in the SORT BY tab.
Report Properties Dialog
Highlight a variable, or group of variables, you want to use to sort your report. Use the
right-arrow button (>) to select the variable(s).
The first variable in the Selected Variables list is used as the primary sort key, the second
in the list as the secondary sort key, and so on. Choose to sort in ASCENDING (smallest
first) or DESCENDING (largest first) order.
If you choose a text variable, the results are sorted in alphabetical or reverse alphabetical
order.
5. Filter the number of geographies to appear in the report.
By default all the geographies are displayed. However, you can choose to display a limited
number of geographies at the top or bottom of the report.
6. Click OK to save the report properties.
When you have modified a report’s properties, the new settings are applicable to that report only.
Choosing Report Options
You can specify to make a report Index Based or base them on a specific Target Group.
Once the report options are selected, new screens are displayed in the Report Properties dialog
with these settings. However, the report options only persist while the check boxes are selected.
The report options are lost when the checkboxes are cleared, unless the report is saved as a
custom report after the report is generated.
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Make a Report Index Based
An index base is a geographic area that you can use to compare against other geographic regions.
For example, you may know that New York can be expected to deliver $500 million in revenue for
a particular product. However, this result does not show if the result is good or not for that state.
Index based reporting enables you to compare your results against another region to see if your
geography meets a standard you know to be acceptable. For example, you could compare the
results from New York with those of Florida, which you know to be performing well.
An index allows you to compare other geographic areas against the base. A measure of 100 is
assigned for each numerical value in the index base. A value of 100 indicates that the study area
is about the same as the base geography. A value lower than 100 shows the study area has fewer
counts than the base. A value higher than 100 shows the study area has more counts than the
base geography.
For example if the base geography has a male population of 45%, this is assigned as the average
value, and given a score of 100. If the study area shows an index of 98, this means that the study
geography is below the value of the base geography. If the study area has an index of 110, the
male population in the study area is 10% higher than that of the base geography.
To make a report you have selected Index Based:
1. Select the INDEX BASED REPORT checkbox.
The Report Properties dialog for with options for Index Reports displays:
Report Properties: Index
2. Select a base geography.
This is the geography against which you want to compare your geographic selections.
Choose from the following options:
•
•
GEOGRAPHIC SUM – All the geographies you selected are summed into one region.
INDIVIDUAL GEOGRAPHY – One of the geographies you selected for your analysis.
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BROWSE FOR A GEOGRAPHY – Browse to select another geography, for example USA,
to compare your study areas against.
3. Select the results you want to see in your report.
Choose the types of information you want to see in the final report. The following list
provides an explanation of what each result means:
•
•
•
COUNT – This is the number of occurrences for each variable in the report for the
geography.
PERCENT – The percentage of a variable against the total for that geography. For
example, the 2000 male population is 48.20% of the 2000 Total Population for New
York.
INDEX – The index is the comparison between the study geography and the base
geography.
It is based on a value of 100 and shows how well the study area fits with the base
geography. A value of 100 shows both the geographies have the same percentage of
the total for a particular variable.
For example, 2000 Male Population shows an index of 98.25 between New York and
the USA as the base. The 2000 male population for New York is 48.2% of the New
York total count, and the 2000 male population for the whole of the USA is 49.1% of
the USA total count. The index value of 98.25 means that New York has slightly less
than the USA percentage of 2000 males. If the percentage for New York were 49.1%,
the index would be 100.
4. Select a template to use for the index report.
If you have created an index based template to use in your analysis in Creating an Index
Based Template on page 107 select the USE TEMPLATE checkbox and select the
template you want to use.
5. Click OK.
Make a Report for a Target Group
A report based on a specific target group allows you to run a report, but only show results for a
target group you are specifically interested in.
To create a Report for Target Group:
1. Select the REPORT FOR TARGET GROUP checkbox.
The Target Group dialog with options for Target Groups automatically displays:
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Report Properties: Target Groups
2. Select a segmentation system, target group, and target from the lists.
3. Click OK.
Selecting an Output Destination
There are several output destinations available in the Select Report to Run dialog. You can specify
any of the following options for the report output:
•
REPORT TO SCREEN – Displays the results in a Crystal Reports window. From here you can
print or export the report. A report can be exported to different formats, including Microsoft
Word and pdf.
•
REPORT TO PRINTER – Displays the Print dialog where you can set standard print options
before printing the report. Make sure that you have set up your printer connection prior to
selecting this option.
•
REPORT TO TAB FILE (single report) – Saves a single report in MapInfo tab file format.
Highlight a report you want to save as a tab file. Click OK to display the Save As dialog
where you can browse to a location on your machine. Enter a name for the tab file. Click
SAVE. Geographies are stored as rows. There is a limit of 250 columns on TAB files
•
REPORT TO FILE – Allows you to save the reports as Microsoft Access, Excel or Comma
Delimited Text files. Enter the required information based on the type of file you select.
Enter a name for the file and click RUN.
Running the Report
Click OK to run the report.
The report runs and the output is presented, or stored in the format you selected in the output
options.
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Creating a Custom Report
Create a custom report to make a new report that is based on your specific reporting
requirements.
Note:
Refer to Creating Folders for Custom Reports on page 155 before creating any custom
reports.
You can create two types of custom reports using TargetPro: a DETAIL LIST report that has
variables as rows and geographies as columns or a GEOLIST report that has variables as columns
and geographies as rows.
To create a new custom report from the Reports and Charts dialog:
1. Click CREATE.
The Create Custom Report dialog displays.
Create Custom Report Dialog
2. Enter header and style information in the HEADER AND STYLE tab.
Enter the name of the report, which will also be used as the report title, and fill in the
PREPARED FOR and PREPARED BY text boxes.
Select a report style from the drop-down list. A Detail Report shows variables as rows, and
geographies as columns. A Geolist Report shows geographies as rows, and variables as
columns. By default, only three variables are displayed on each page of a geolist report.
Refer to Redesigning the Report Layout on page 153 for information on how to modify
the look and feel of a report.
3. Select variables for the report in the Variables tab.
Variables are divided into Category variables and Report variables.
•
•
CATEGORY VARIABLES – These are organized into logical folders.
REPORT VARIABLES – These are lists of each report in the system. Each report
includes a list of the variables in that report.
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To include a variable in the custom report, select it from the Available Variables list and
click the right-arrow button (>) to move it to the Selected Variables list.
To remove a variable from the Selected Variables list, select it and use the left-arrow
button (<).
4. Add a category (optional).
Variables you have selected can be grouped into categories. To place a variable into a
category, right-click it (in the Selected Variables list) and select ADD CATEGORY.
Add Category Dialog
Enter the category name in the dialog provided, and click OK.
The category name displays in the list with a red arrow. When the report is run, all the
variables that appear underneath a category are indented.
To re-order the variables in the list, use the up and down arrow buttons. This changes the
order of the variables in the report when it is run.
To delete a category, highlight the Category and click the left arrow (<). When a category is
removed, all the variables belonging to that category are merged into the category above.
5. Click OK when you have finished making your selections.
The new report displays in the Selected Reports and the Custom folder in the Available
Reports list in the Reports and Charts dialog.
6. Set Report Properties and Options.
Refer to Setting Report Properties on page 147 and Choosing Report Options on
page 148 for more information.
Note:
Sorting options set for a custom report override the settings made in the Sort By
tab.
7. Select an Output Destination.
Refer to Selecting an Output Destination on page 151 for more information.
Note:
Ensure that you use the Report to Screen option if you have created categories,
otherwise the categories are lost.
8. Run the report
The new custom report is added to the bottom of the list of Available custom reports. Refer
to Managing Custom Reports on page 155 for information on how to organize the
custom reports.
Redesigning the Report Layout
The EDIT button in the Reports and Charts dialog enables power users to adjust the layout of a
report. Reports are designed in Crystal Reports and the Crystal Reports User Guide is included
online. You can add graphs and charting to provide the finishing touches to your report.
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You can only edit reports that you have designed.
Care must be taken when editing a report layout. Data for the report is displayed in fields which
TargetPro reads to generate a report. If the contents of the fields are changed, errors could be
introduced into the report.
To open a report in design mode from the Reports and Charts dialog:
1. Highlight a report to edit from the Select Reports list.
Highlight a report in the Available Reports list and click the right arrow button (>) to move it
to the Selected Reports list. Alternatively, double-click the report to select it.
2. Click EDIT to view the report.
3. Click DESIGN REPORT.
Design Report Button
For information on how to use the program’s full complement of features, refer to the Crystal
Reports help system that can be accessed directly at HELP > CRYSTAL REPORTS HELP.
Using Cross-Tabs
Cross-tabs summarize and present data in a compact row and column format that makes it easy to
compare data and identify trends. Cross tabs are used in detail and geolist reports in the following
way.
Detail Reports
Cross-tabs in Detail reports are used to show the data (variables) as rows. The structure of the
page is defined by several formulas:
•
GROUPFACTOR – Groups the report to make it span multiple pages.
•
GEOSPERPAGES – Defines the number of geographies to be shown per page. (This
formula is also used in the GroupFactor formula).
•
SPACE – Adds empty space into the cross-tab. It should be added as a summarized field
into the cross-tab. Its summary type should be changed to 'MAX'.
Geolist Reports
Cross-tabs in Geolist reports allow the report to span multiple pages if all the requested
information does not fit onto one page.
Each cross-tab shows the information for one variable, apart from the first cross-tab in each
section which shows the geography label. By default the report shows 3 variables per page.
Var_Col… formulas in Geolist reports contain the variable names and are used as column headers
in the cross-tabs.
ReportName Formula
This formula is used to pass the report name at runtime and to show it in the report heading.
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PreparedFor and PreparedBy Formulas
These formulas pass the 'Prepared For' and 'Prepared By' strings defined in the Report Properties
dialogs and show them in the report heading.
Toggling Between the Preview and Design Screens
You can switch between the Preview and Design screens by clicking on the appropriate menu
items or buttons. The changes made on the Design screen are reflected when you switch to the
Preview screen.
Saving a Report
There are several ways to save a custom report:
•
To save a report you have modified choose FILE > SAVE from the main menu, or click
SAVE.
The report template is saved in the TargetPro metadata.
•
To save the report as another custom report choose FILE > SAVE AS from the main menu.
•
To save the report as a .rpt file click the diskette button in the menu bar in the design
mode.
Save as Crystal Reports File Button
Note:
If you do not save the report before closing, all the changes are lost.
Managing Custom Reports
This section describes how to delete a report, organize reports into categories, remove categories,
and change the custom report’s properties.
Creating Folders for Custom Reports
Custom reports can be organized into folders in the Available Reports list of the Reports and
Charts dialog. To create a folder for the custom reports, from the Reports and Charts dialog:
1. Select the Custom Reports folder, or a sub-folder, in the Available Reports list.
2. Right-click the folder you selected.
3. Select INSERT FOLDER.
Enter the name for the folder in the Add Category dialog. The new folder is added to the
end of the Custom Reports list.
To add custom reports to the folder you have created, highlight the folder before creating your
custom report. The newly created custom report is added to the selected folder.
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Changing Custom Report Access Rights
Custom reports and folders can either be Public or Private. When a custom report or folder is
created it is private, but it can be made public if required.
Understanding Private Privileges
These custom reports and folders can only be seen by the user who created them. Other users
accessing the same TargetPro Server do not see these reports or folders in the treeview. Only the
user who creates these reports and folders can edit, delete, copy, or paste them.
The following icon appears next to a custom report to show it is private.
Private Custom Report Icon
The following icon appears next to a custom folder to show it is private.
Private Custom Folder Icon
Understanding Public Privileges
Public custom reports and folders were created Private, but have been made Public by the user
who created them. Any user connected to the same TargetPro Server can see these reports and
folders and edit, delete, copy or paste them.
The following icon appears next to a custom report to show it is public.
Public Custom Report Icon
The following icon appears next to a custom folder to show it is public.
Public Custom Folder Icon
Change a Report’s Privileges
To change a report’s access privileges in the Reports and Charts dialog:
1. Right-click the custom report in the list of Available Reports.
2. Select MAKE REPORT PUBLIC/PRIVATE.
The custom report’s icon changes to show it is public or private.
Change a Folder’s Privileges
To change a folder’s access privileges in the Reports and Charts dialog:
1. Right-click the custom folder in the list of Available Reports.
2. Select MAKE FOLDER PUBLIC/PRIVATE.
The custom folder’s icon changes to show it is public or private.
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Deleting a Custom Report or Folder
Public custom reports and folders, and those you have created, can be deleted from TargetPro.
Note:
If you delete a public report or folder, it is no longer available to other users.
To delete a custom report or folder from the Reports and Charts dialog:
1. Right-click the custom report or folder in the list of Available Reports.
2. Select DELETE.
The report or folder is deleted and removed from the treeview.
Moving Custom Reports
Once created, custom reports can be moved by copying the report, pasting it to a new location and
deleting the old copy.
To move a report:
1. Select the custom report you want to move.
2. Right-click the custom report in the list of Available Reports.
3. Select COPY.
4. Choose a destination for the copied report, and select the top level folder where you want
to move the report.
5. Right-click the folder and select PASTE.
The report is copied to the new location.
6. Delete the old report.
Upgrading Custom Reports
If you are upgrading from TargetPro 4.6 with 2003 data to TargetPro 4.7, you will need to upgrade
your custom reports. When you first use the Reports and Charts dialog in TargetPro 4.7 your
custom reports need to be upgraded to use with 2004 data. For example if you have a report that
has a description of 2003 Total Population, and you have 2004 data, this utility updates the
description to 2004 Total Population.
A message displays asking if you want to upgrade your custom reports now.
Upgrade Custom Reports Dialog
To upgrade now, click YES. Click NO to update the reports at later time.
TargetPro searches for all the custom reports that need updating for the 2004 data and presents a
list of all the reports found. The reports that need upgrading appear checked.
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If you do not want to upgrade some of the reports shown in the list, clear the checkboxes next to
those reports.
Upgrade Reports: Check Reports to Upgrade
Click OK to upgrade the reports you selected.
Upgrading Later
If you decide to upgrade your reports later simply right-click in the Custom Reports folder of the
Reports and Charts dialog and choose UPGRADE REPORTS. This launches the report upgrade
application described in the previous section.
The Upgrade Reports dialog appears every time you run reports until you agree to upgrade.
Running Multiple Reports
You can run multiple reports at the same time. In the Reports and Charts dialog, simply select all
the reports you want to run and move them to the Selected Reports list, then click OK.
Note:
You can only change the properties for one report at a time. The Properties button is only
active if you highlight a single report in the Selected Reports list.
If you choose to output to the screen, or printer, all the reports in the Selected Reports window are
run at once.
Ordering How Reports Are Printed
The order reports are printed in is determined by the order the reports are listed in the Reports and
Charts dialog. To change the order, use the move up and move down arrow buttons to move a
highlighted report up or down in the Selected Reports list.
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9
Running Charts
This chapter discusses how to analyze your data visually using charts. Charts
enable you to produce graphical representation of the results of your analysis.
This is useful to provide a visual representation of the data distribution, so you
can use it for meaningful analysis. They may also be used to add visual
impact to a presentation you are preparing.
In this section:
!
!
!
!
!
Choosing a Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running a Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analyzing Bar Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analyzing Battlegrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analyzing Gains and Lift Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
160
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Charts provide a graphic representation of analysis results. Unlike a report where information is
provided as a list, charts show information visually. This allows you to analyze your results in a
different way, showing trends and significances in the data set which may not be so obvious when
looking through the information as a list.
Note:
Charting functionality is only available for users who are licensed for segmentation. If you
are not licensed for segmentation reporting, charts can be created inside your reports
using the Crystal Reports designer.
Choosing a Chart
TargetPro provides three (3) different types of charts. They are all used to give a graphic display of
the results of your analysis. Refer to Understanding Clusters and Profiles on page 112 for more
information on the concepts and details of profiles and clusters.
Bar Charts
Bar charts are based on profiles. They give a visual representation of a profile composition within a
a geographic area you have selected. Refer to Creating Profiles on page 113 for more
information. Select one of the following types of profiles.
•
GEOGRAPHIC – Compares the study area against another geographic region.
•
PRODUCT – Compares the study area with a product analysis in another geographic
region.
•
CUSTOMER RECORD – Compares the data in the geographic study area with data from a file
of customer data you have imported.
•
SUMMARIZED – Compares the data in the geographic study area with a profile you have
imported from another source.
A bar chart shows a horizontal bar for each of the PSYTE clusters. These bars are shown on a
vertical line that represents an index of 100. The index illustrates how well each of the PSYTE
clusters in a study area are penetrated in comparison with the other clusters in the profile.
TargetPro provides two types of bar charts:
•
SINGLE PROFILE BAR CHART – Compares one profile with the study area.
•
SINGLE PROFILE FEVER LINE CHART – Compares two profiles. The second profile is shown
as a line running through the bar chart. This bar chart can be used to compare two brands
or products for a specific geography, or to show the difference between customers and
expenditures.
For descriptions of how to interpret these charts, refer to Analyzing Bar Charts on page 163.
Battlegrams
A battlegram is a graphical analysis technique represented as a Quadrant Analysis chart. It is used
to display different information depending on the scenario. You can analyze your data and draw
conclusions based on where the results fall in the quadrant.
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•
TWO PROFILE CLUSTER INDEX CHART – Displays the indexes of two profiles. Each cluster is
plotted on the chart according to the intersection of the index values of each profile.
•
GAME PLAN CHART – Displays the index of a single profile. This chart reveals which
clusters outperform others and gives information on which clusters have high or low
potential for a product.
•
CONSUMPTION TO POTENTIAL INDEX CHART – Compares the potential index with the
consumption index of a single weighted profile. This chart compares how much product
each cluster consumes with how many households are in each cluster.
•
GEOGRAPHY TARGET BATTLEGRAM CHART – Compares a selection of geographies and a
weighted profile. The results show the Market Potential of the profile with the Consumption
Potential Index. The resulting battlegram shows a series of circles with different sizes and
colors to reflect the consumption value.
For descriptions of how to interpret these charts, refer to Analyzing Battlegrams on page 167.
Gains and Lift Charts
Gains and lift charts take the form of graphs with two dimensional axes. They provide a way of
analyzing the difference between a random distribution of customers (evenly spread among
clusters) and the cluster values in the actual profile.
•
GAINS CHART – Graphically displays the actual accumulated cluster values in a profile in
comparison to a theoretical random (linear) distribution. This gives a Point of Diminishing
Returns for that profile.
•
LIFT CHART – Displays the difference between the linear and gains charts.
For descriptions of how to interpret these charts, refer to Analyzing Gains and Lift Charts on
page 175.
Chart Requirements
Different charts require different inputs. The following table provides a checklist showing the
various requirements for each type of chart.
Chart
Number of Profiles
Geographies?
Target Group?
Single Profile Bar Chart
1
No
Yes
Single Profile Fever Line
2
No
Yes
Two Profile Cluster Index
2
No
Yes
Game Plan
1
No
Yes
Consumption to Potential Index
1 (weighted)
No
Yes
Geography Target Battlegram
1 (weighted)
Yes
No
Gains Chart
1
No
Yes
Lift Chart
1
No
Yes
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Running a Chart
Once you have decided which type of chart you need for your analysis, you are ready to run the
chart.
To run a chart:
1. Click REPORTS in the TargetPro toolbar:
Reports Button
The Refine Geography Selections dialog displays with your selections listed.
2. Select areas for your report (if necessary).
Select geographies appropriate for the type of chart you want to create. Refer to
Selecting Geographies on page 145 for more information.
Click OK in the Refine Area Selections dialog to continue. The Reports and Charts dialog
displays.
3. Display the Charts view.
Click the CHARTS tab to display the TargetPro charts.
Reports and Charts Dialog: Charts View
4. Select a chart.
Highlight the chart you want to run and click the right arrow (>) button.
The Report Properties dialog displays automatically with the Profiles tab selected.
5. Select the cluster system for the chart.
Choose the cluster and target group system to use from the lists provided.
6. Select the profile(s) for the chart.
Depending on the chart you select, you need to select one or two profiles. Refer to
Choosing a Chart on page 160 for more information about each chart.
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Browse to the profile you want to analyze on the chart. Highlight it, and click the right
arrow (>) to select it for the chart. Repeat if you require more than one profile.
Click OK. The Report Properties dialog closes and returns you to the Reports and Charts
dialog.
7. Run the chart.
Click OK. The chart is created and displayed.
Note:
All the charts in the Selected Charts list are run when you click OK.
8. Analyze the results of the chart.
Refer to the relevant section for help on how to read the chart you have created:
•
•
•
Analyzing Bar Charts on page 163
Analyzing Battlegrams on page 167
Analyzing Gains and Lift Charts on page 175
Analyzing Bar Charts
This section helps you analyze the bar charts you have created in TargetPro.
Understanding the Bar Chart
The two types of bar charts offered in TargetPro represent profiles. These charts have a set of
bars; each bar represents the cluster index for each of the 72 clusters in a profile. The bars run
from cluster 01 at the top to cluster 72 at the bottom. A bar chart shows how well each cluster is
penetrated in comparison with the other clusters in the profile within the geographic area you have
chosen.
Cluster Penetration
The vertical line in the center of the chart represents an index of 100. This can be thought of as the
average cluster penetration for the area. Any bars to the left of the line have a lower penetration
than average (they under-index), and those to the right of the line have a higher penetration than
average (they over-index). The actual number for each bar comes from the cluster index score.
This score is the ratio of a cluster’s penetration to the penetration of the entire profile. Refer to
Cluster Index Score on page 190 for more detailed information on how the cluster index score is
calculated.
The penetration of a cluster is defined by the count of the profile per cluster divided by the count of
the associated base profile for that cluster. Refer to Creating Profiles on page 113 for more
information on how to set a base when creating a profile.
Degree of Penetration
The length of the bar measures the degree of deviation from 100. The longer the line is, the larger
the degree of under or over-indexing. Notice that the scales are different on each side of the 100
line. This allows a visual representation of each cluster’s index score to be shown realistically. For
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example, a cluster with an index of 200 has twice the average penetration. Likewise a cluster with
an index of 50 has half the average penetration. Both these scores are placed the same distance
from 100 to show their relative scores.
If the cluster bar touches the left edge of the chart it shows it is not represented in the sample and
has a size of zero.
Cluster Count
In addition to the cluster index score it is important to analyze the count of each cluster in the
profile. The count for each cluster is shown as a small bar chart on the left of the chart. It gives
information about how well a cluster is represented in the sample. For example, although one
cluster has a very high index, the count may be low, showing that this cluster is not well
represented in the study area.
Bar Color
Each of the clusters is assigned a color according to its target group. You can run the bar chart
using one of the standard target systems; PSYTE Advantage Major Groups or PSYTE Advantage
Settlement Types. This displays each cluster with a custom color. Alternatively you can choose a
custom target group system you have created. Refer to Managing Target Groups on page 128
for a description of target groups.
Single Profile Bar Chart
A single profile bar chart displays the results of one profile for a particular geographic area. Refer
to Understanding the Bar Chart on page 163 for information on how to interpret the bar chart.
This section provides an example of a single profile bar chart and how to read it.
In the following example, the chart shows a profile for households that have bought any household
appliances in the past 12 months in New York State. This chart uses the PSYTE Advantage Major
Groups as the Target Groups System.
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Sample Single Profile Bar Chart
When analyzing the chart, PSYTE Cluster 41: Old Metro, New Hands shows a long line to the left
of 100 with an index of 49.14. This shows that this cluster has less than half the average
penetration for household appliances in New York. This is less than the average for household
appliances in New York, so Cluster 41 households should not be targeted for household appliance
sales. However, only 144,326 of 1162198 households (12.4%) were represented in the sample, so
this information might not be representative of that particular cluster.
Conversely Cluster 52: Military Towns, shows an index of 167.25. This means that this cluster is
well over the average of households who bought household appliances in the past 12 months.
This may be a cluster that would be more likely to buy household appliances.
Refer to Viewing Cluster Information on page 177 for information on how to quickly access
cluster descriptions.
Single Profile Fever Line Chart
A single profile fever line chart displays the results of two profiles. You need to choose two profiles;
the first profile is represented as a bar chart, the second as a line (fever line).
Refer to Understanding the Bar Chart on page 163 for information on how to interpret the bar
chart. This section provides an example of a single profile fever line chart and how to read it.
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Both the profiles you choose have their cluster indices mapped on the chart. The bar chart should
be read in the same way as a single bar chart. The fever line is simply a different way of
representing the profile information. Rather than showing a second set of bars, the points are
shown as stars which are connected.
The single profile fever line chart shows where two profiles are similar, and where they are
different. These differences and similarities might require different marketing actions. For example
you might select Profile 1 as your customer list, and Profile 2 as the likelihood of customers within
a geographic area to buy a sports car. You would look for those clusters that have a long bar to the
right, matched by the fever line. This would show that there are more than average of that cluster
on your customer list, and that cluster is more likely than others to buy a sports car. You could then
target that cluster in a marketing campaign.
If you see that a particular cluster under-indexes for Profile 1, but over-indexes for Profile 2, you
could investigate why there are not more customers from this cluster in your customer list as these
would be people who would be more likely to buy a sports car.
In the following example the first profile, represented by bars, shows the number of households
who buy cream cheese. The second profile, represented by the fever line, shows the number of
households who buy pretzels.
Sample Single Profile Fever Line Chart
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When the fever line closely follows the bar line the results of the two profiles fit closely together.
Areas of interest are often those where there is a gap in the chart because it shows that you
perform well for one product for a particular cluster, but not for a different product. In this example
Cluster 15: Western Sprawl over-indexes for cream cheese, but under-indexes for pretzels. Why
would those clusters buy cream cheese but not pretzels?
Cluster 65 under-indexes in both cream cheese and pretzels, showing that households in this
cluster are not likely to buy either of these products.
Refer to Viewing Cluster Information on page 177 for information on how to quickly access
cluster descriptions.
Analyzing Battlegrams
Battlegrams provide a graphical analysis technique that can be used to quickly draw conclusions
from profiles. The results are displayed in quadrants with a different type of analysis performed for
each type of battlegram.
Two Profile Cluster Index Chart
The Two Profile Cluster Index chart displays the cluster index of two profiles. It allows you to see
which clusters fall into particular categories and interpret results based on where they fall.
As with a bar chart, the quadrants are divided by a 100 index centerline. The first profile selected is
plotted on the x-axis, and the second profile is plotted on the y-axis.
The grid is centered at (100, 100). Each cluster is plotted according to the intersection of the two
cluster index values. The farther the point lies from the line, the greater the degree of deviation
from 100 and the larger the degree of under or over-indexing.
The scales are different on each side of the 100 line to allow each pair of index scores to be
represented realistically. For example, a cluster with an index of 200 has twice the average
penetration. Likewise a cluster with an index of 50 has half the average penetration. Both these
scores are placed the same distance from 100 to show their relative scores.
The most common use for this type of chart is to see how well your customer profile fits with a
survey profile for your product. This shows how well your customers match a typical profile for a
product.
Note:
This is only one of the many types of interpretation for this chart.
The following table gives interpretations where Profile 1 is a customer profile, and Profile 2 is a
survey profile:
Dominate
Profile 1
Profile 2
Result
Cluster Index > 100
Cluster Index > 100
These clusters are more than likely to
buy your product than average, and they
are well represented in your customer
profile.
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Profile 1
Profile 2
Result
Invest
Cluster Index < 100
Cluster Index > 100
These clusters are more than likely to
buy your product than average, but there
are few of them in your customer profile.
These clusters have potential to grow.
Invest in these clusters to convert them
to the Dominate quadrant.
Trim
Cluster Index < 100
Cluster Index < 100
These clusters are less than likely to buy
your product than average and you do
not have many of them in your customer
base. Therefore you should reduce your
marketing efforts to these clusters,
because there is little potential.
Maintain
Cluster Index > 100
Cluster Index < 100
These clusters are less likely than
average to buy your product, but you
have more than average of these
clusters in your customer list. You are
doing better than you expected in these
areas, but growth is limited. Therefore
you need to maintain these customers.
In the following example, households that watch soccer on television is plotted on the x-axis, and
households that watch tennis on television is plotted on the y-axis. In this scenario you could be
trying to assess which of your tennis-watching customers could be encouraged to watch soccer as
well.
Sample Two Profile Cluster Index Chart
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The areas to concentrate on are in the center of the chart. This is the area that the “battle” for
customers occurs. The clusters that lie in the outer areas of the chart are not as important to
concentrate on as those in the middle of the chart. The clusters at the outside indicate strong
characteristics that are unlikely to be changed by increased marketing or incentives.
In this example, the clusters in the Trim quadrant represent households that typically do not watch
either soccer or tennis on the television. These clusters would not be ones to target in your
marketing campaign.
Cluster 46 shows a high potential that households watch tennis on TV, but is not quite as high for
soccer watching. You could market soccer to this group to move them over to the Dominate
quadrant.
Refer to Viewing Cluster Information on page 177 for information on how to quickly access
cluster descriptions.
Game Plan Chart
The game plan chart is based on one profile. The chart displays percent and cluster index on
separate axes. The x-axis shows the percent value, or size, of a cluster. The y-axis shows the
cluster index.
The game plan is good for analyzing your customer base as it shows which clusters outperform
others, and which clusters have the bulk of customers.
The x-axis runs from 0 to 100%, with 50% as the median. The y-axis runs from 0 to 100, and 100
to infinity.
This chart accounts for not only how likely people are to buy or use a product, but also how many
customers represent that figure. For example, while a cluster may have a high potential to buy a
product, this cluster may only represent 0.07% of your customer base. This may not be a
worthwhile cluster to target as the return on investment may not be large enough. The game plan
chart enables you to identify which clusters have a high potential to buy a product and represent a
large customer base.
The four quadrants are described as follows:
Quadrant
Cluster Index
Percentage
Result
Core
Cluster Index > 100
% > 50
Highly likely to buy the product.
Large percentage of customer base.
Large percentage of market base.
These are the best customers. They need to be
maintained, and possibly targeted to increase
the per-customer contribution.
Expansion
Cluster Index > 100
% < 50
Highly likely to buy the product.
Small percentage of customer base.
Small percentage of market base.
Target this group to increase customer base to
aim for aggressive growth.
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Quadrant
Cluster Index
Non-Target
Cluster Index < 100
% < 50
Unlikely to buy the product
Small percentage of customer base.
These are not target customers. They have a
low likelihood to buy the product, and the return
on investment would not be high even if they
could be convinced to do so.
Conversion
Cluster Index < 100
% > 50
Unlikely to buy the product
Large percentage of customer base.
Large percentage of market base.
There are a lot of this type of people in your
market that you need to convert to become
customers.
Invest in these customers to try and convert the
households to core customers.
Note:
Percentage
Result
Some analysts recommend focusing on clusters that have an Index > 120, and a % > 2.5.
The following example plots a profile of households who have bought ski clothing in the past year.
Sample Game Plan Chart
This chart show many of the clusters are in the Non Target quadrant meaning that these clusters,
especially those on the edge of the chart, are very unlikely to buy ski clothing and there are very
few of them in the profile. Those in the Expansion quadrant however have a high potential to buy
ski clothing, but not many of them do. These clusters could be targeted to increase the customer
base and push these clusters into the Core quadrant. People from the clusters in the core
quadrant are very likely to buy ski clothing, making them your core customer group.
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Refer to Viewing Cluster Information on page 177 for information on how to quickly access
cluster descriptions.
Consumption to Potential Index Chart
This option requires a single weighted profile. A weighted profile is a measure of a numeric value,
usually a sales value, per cluster. Refer to Creating a Filter or Weighted Profile on page 114 for
information on how to create a weighted profile. Using a weighted profile enables you to analyze
how much customers in particular clusters spend.
The x-axis shows the Potential Index of the profile, and the y-axis indicates the Consumption Index
of the profile.
The Consumption Index compares a cluster’s percentage of the total consumption with that
cluster’s percentage of households or people. It gives an indication of the amount a person or
household consumes in a cluster compared to the average for the whole profile. Refer to
Consumption Index in Appendix A on page 190 for a definition and calculation of this index.
The Potential Index compares the cluster’s percentage of households in a target profile with the
households in a base profile. This shows the relative potential market in the target profile – how
likely your customers are to consume the product. Refer to Potential Index in Appendix A on
page 195 for a definition and calculation of this index.
The results of this battlegram show how many households within a cluster are likely to buy a
particular product and how much they are likely to buy.
The four quadrants are described as follows:
Quadrant
Potential Index
Consumption Index
Analysis
High Value
PI > 100
CI > 100
These clusters consume more than
average for the profile.
They are more likely than the average to
consume the product.
These are your best customers. They are
more likely than average to consume the
product, and when they do, they
consume a lot of it.
Specialty
PI < 100
CI > 100
These clusters consume more than
average for the profile.
They are less likely than average to
consume the product.
While these clusters consume more than
average, they are less likely to consume
it.
When you do attract people from these
clusters, they tend to spend money.
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Potential Index
Consumption Index
Analysis
Non-Target
PI < 100
CI < 100
These clusters consume less than
average for the profile.
They are less likely than average to
consume the product.
These are not target customers. They
have a low likelihood to buy the product,
and there are very few of them to do the
buying.
Convenience
PI > 100
CI < 100
These clusters consume less than
average for the profile.
They are more likely than the average to
consume the product.
These people are already likely to buy
the product; but they need to be
persuaded to buy more of it.
The following example shows sales figures for a customer record profile.
Consumption to Potential Index Chart
Refer to Viewing Cluster Information on page 177 for information on how to quickly access
cluster descriptions.
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Geography Target Battlegram Chart
This chart compares a collection of geographies with a weighted profile to identify geographic
regions best suited for investment. This chart shows four sets of information:
•
Market Potential Index (MPI) on the x-axis – This is the bang for your buck statistic. It
shows how likely people are in that cluster to buy a particular product. An index value of
100 shows that the geography or trade area you are analyzing has the same potential as
the base average. The higher the index, the more likely people in that area are to buy that
product.
•
Consumption Index on the y-axis – This is considered in relation to the Market Potential.
For example, although the geography may have a high potential to buy a particular
product the total number of people who actually buy it might be low.
•
Market Potential as the circle size – This shows how many people are likely to buy that
product. For example if we know that 2% of customers in Cluster 5 buy high-end specialty
cars and there are 200 people from Cluster 5 in our analysis area, we could expect 10
people from Cluster 5 to have a high end specialty car in that geography. The Market
Potential is illustrated by the size of the circle in the chart. The higher the potential market
in an area, the larger the circle.
•
Consumption Value as the circle color – The color of the circle indicates the value of the
geographic region. Red indicates a high value, blue indicates a low value.
A geography may have a high potential to buy a product, but if there are only a small amount of
that type of people in the geography, it may not be worth spending money to target them in a
marketing campaign. On the whole it is better to concentrate on areas that have a large amount of
a specific type of customer who have a high potential to buy a specific product.
The four quadrants are described as follows:
Quadrant
MPI
Consumption Index
Result
High Value
MPI > 100
CI > 100
These geographies consume more
than average for the profile.
They are more likely than the
average to consume the product.
These are the best geographies for
investment. People in these regions
are more likely than average to
consume the product, and when they
do, they consume a lot of it.
Specialty
MPI < 100
CI > 100
These geographies consume more
than average for the profile.
They are less likely than average to
consume the product.
When you do attract people from
these geographies, they tend to
spend money.
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MPI
Consumption Index
Result
Non-Target
MPI < 100
CI < 100
These geographies consume less
than average for the profile.
They are less likely than average to
consume the product.
These are not target geographies for
investment. They have a low
likelihood to consume the product,
and there are very few of them to do
the buying.
Convenience
MPI > 100
CI < 100
These geographies consume less
than average for the profile.
They are more likely than the
average to consume the product.
The people in these geographies are
likely to buy the product; but they
need to be persuaded to buy more of
it.
The following example shows how well seven regions of Chicago compare as a location for a new
store.
Sample Geography Target Battlegram
Polygon 6 has the highest market potential and consumption indices, putting it in the High Value
quadrant. However, it has a small blue circle which shows few people are likely to consume the
product in this area and the value is low. Polygon 7 however, while not as far in the High Value
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quadrant, shows a larger customer base and a higher value. This area would be a better option
based on the information given. Polygons 8 and 3 fall in the non-target quadrant and have small
blue circles showing low value for this region.
Analyzing Gains and Lift Charts
A gains chart allows you to show how segmenting your customers provides a benefit over treating
each customer as one from a random collection.
It is a 2-dimensional set of axes starting at (0,0). The x-axis describes the individual clusters by
descending order of cluster counts; from highest count to lowest count. The y-axis is defined by
the Cluster Percentage of total customers.
The gains chart shows two lines:
•
Straight Line – The total number of customers distributed evenly across the clusters.
•
Gains Curve – The actual cumulative counts of the individual clusters.
For example, imagine you have a set of 72 records over 72 clusters, one record per cluster. The
straight line plots an even distribution of the 72 records; there are 18 records at 25% of the
records, 36 records at 50% and so on. In reality however, we know that the 72 records come from
5 clusters with 25, 21, 15, 6, and 5 records respectively. Here we can see that the cluster with the
most counts, 25, makes up 35% of the population. We add the next count, 21, from the next cluster
to get 64% of the total. This shows that 64% of the population is concentrated within only two
clusters. When plotted, these figures form the gains curve.
The more concentrated your customers are in a few counts, the steeper the gains curve rises
initially. The more the counts are evenly distributed across all the clusters, the straighter the gains
curve. The bigger the difference between the two lines, the bigger the benefit from examining
customers through cluster analysis.
The point at which the maximum benefit can be determined is when the difference between the
two curves is the greatest. This is called the Point of Diminishing Returns, and is marked on the
graph by a yellow star. Once you have accounted for the clusters to the left of this point, any
clusters targeted to the right would deliver less return than a random target. This can be
considered the cutoff for clusters to target.
Note:
The information in a gains chart should always be considered in conjunction with
information from other reports, charts, and types of analysis.
The following example shows a gains chart for a set of sample data. The point of diminishing
returns can clearly be seen, and the type of curve shows that most of the counts occur within 23
clusters.
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Sample Gains Chart
Lift Chart
A lift chart is associated with the gains chart. The lift chart shows the difference between the lineardistribution and gains curves in the Gains chart. The lift chart displays results for those clusters
that occur before the point of diminishing returns. The difference between the gains curve and
linear-distribution line is shown so you can identify which clusters have the highest percentage of
your customers.
Sample Lift Chart
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Viewing Cluster Information
Although the bar chart gives a visual representation of the cluster index, it is also possible to view
the actual numeric details of each cluster.
To see the details of a particular cluster, click the TOGGLE GROUP TREE button from the Chart view.
Toggle Group Tree Button
This displays a tree view with a list of all the clusters. Click on a cluster you are interested in to
display the cluster information. Click on the cluster description to view a picture that describes the
type of population in that cluster. For example, the following picture describes the Family Farm Belt
cluster:
Cluster Family Farm Belt
Once you have finished with the cluster descriptions click TOGGLE GROUP TREE again to hide them.
Note:
To return to the bar chart view, click the top level of the tree to display all the clusters as
bars.
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10
Preparing a Map for
Printing
This chapter describes how to prepare for printing and print a map. It
describes how to add a legend and a scale bar, how to set map scale
accuracy, and how to create a map layout.
For more in depth information on any of these topics, please refer to your
MapInfo Professional User’s Guide.
To print a map, you need to display the full MapInfo Professional toolbars and
menus. Choose TARGETPRO > PREFERENCES > PREFERENCES MANAGER and
select the Show MapInfo toolbars and menus checkboxes.
In this section:
!
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Adding a Legend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Scalebar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Map Scale Accuracy for Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Map Layout for Printing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Adding a Legend
Adding a legend to your map helps orient you on the map and helps decipher the map symbols.
When creating a legend, you can select the layers that you want to include. This way you can give
a particular layer of data emphasis, or create a legend for several layers of data.
You can create a cartographic legend and a theme legend, or a combination of both. A
cartographic legend displays cartographic data for a map. A theme legend provides a key of the
colors, symbols, and styles used in a thematic map. This section describes how to create a basic
cartographic legend.
To create a cartographic legend:
1. Choose MAP > CREATE LEGEND.
Create Legend Dialog 1 of 3
2. Select the layers that you want to use in the legend and click NEXT.
Create Legend Dialog 2 of 3
3. Specify the legend properties and legend frame elements that you want to change and
click FINISH. Your legend displays on the screen.
Click NEXT to select set attributes for each legend frame.
The legend is in a separate window from the Map window. When you click on the map, the legend
disappears behind the Map window. To view the legend, either move the Map window or select the
legend from the open windows listed under the Window menu.
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Customizing the Legend
You can customize keys in the cartographic legend and the legend window, including the legend
frame borders, the legend title and subtitle, and the window title.
Legend keys for a layer are grouped into frames. Each frame represents a layer of data. For
example, the following legend displays keys for the layers called Project1 (Test Areas), NYD
(Display Streets), NYHP (Primary Highway), and NYHS (Secondary Highway).
Sample Legend
Modifications to the legend are applied on a frame by frame basis. If you select a legend key, its
entire frame highlights (shown in the Sample Legend). You can delete a frame by highlighting it
and then selecting the DELETE key on your keyboard. Double-clicking a frame displays the Legend
Frame Properties dialog, which is used to set frame styles.
Legend Frame Properties Dialog
Within the Legend Frame Properties dialog you can modify the frame’s title, add a subtitle, or add
a border around the frame. You can also edit key names and text style. For details on all the
Legend Frame Properties dialogs, see the MAPINFO REFERENCE. Clicking OK updates the frame
with your changes.
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Adding a Scalebar
You can show the map scale by adding a scalebar to the map. A scalebar helps to orient you on
the map, because it provides a way to measure distances on the map.
Another way to set the map scale is to choose MAP > CHANGE VIEW. This scale setting affects the
on-screen scale of your map according to your monitor size. Note that a scalebar is not produced.
Use the on-screen scale when you are making a presentation that will be viewed directly in
TargetPro.
Creating a Simple Scalebar
If you want to include scale on your map or layout for a general reference of distances, use the
Scalebar tool. The Scalebar tool includes the ability to draw a scale bar in the Layout window.
Before you can actually draw the scalebar, you need to load the Scalebar utility and set the font
size to match the scale.
1. Load the ScaleBar utility.
Choose TOOLS > TOOL MANAGER from the main menu. Scroll down the Tools list and select
the checkbox to load the ScaleBar program. The program is added to the Tools menu. A
ScaleBar tool is also added to the Tools menu.
Draw Scale Bar Button
2. Set the scale’s font size to match the scalebar.
Choose TOOLS > SCALEBAR > SET UP SCALEBAR.
Setup Scalebar Dialog
Select the Adjust font size to match scale check box. Click OK.
3. Create the scalebar.
To create a scalebar and position the left edge of it anywhere on your layout, click the
ScaleBar tool. Click on the layout where you want to position the left edge of the scalebar.
The Draw Distance Scale in Mapper dialog displays.
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Draw Distance Scale in Mapper Dialog
If a Warning dialog displays, telling you that the Layout frame and the associated Map
window are not currently set up to print to scale, you can adjust the Layout frame or the
Map window, or ignore the message. Select the checkbox if you do not want to receive
warnings about the scale again. For details on all the Draw Distance Scale in Mapper
dialogs, see the MAPINFO REFERENCE.
Choose the width of the scale bar and the aspect ratio. Set the text style and fill color. Click
OK.
Note:
Choosing TOOLS > SCALEBAR > DRAW SCALEBAR from the menu, instead of using the
DRAW SCALE BAR button, draws the scalebar into the lower left corner of your Layout
window.
If you select the CURVE SCALE BAR WITH LATITUDE LINES check box, the scalebar is accurate only
along its curve and only if the spherical calculation method is used. If you do not select the check
box, the scalebar is accurate straight across, but only if the Cartesian calculation method is used.
To see which distance calculation method is in use for your Map window, check the Map Options
dialog (MAP > OPTIONS).
Repositioning the Scalebar
To reposition the scalebar to a new location on the map:
1. Make the scalebar’s cosmetic layer selectable.
Right-click on the Map window and choose Layer Control.
Layer Control Dialog
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Make the Cosmetic Layer selectable by clicking the selectable check box. Clear the
selectable check boxes for all the other layers to make them unselectable. This ensures
that only selectable objects will be in the Cosmetic Layer.
For details on all the Layer Control dialogs, see the MAPINFO REFERENCE.
2. Click MARQUEE SELECT in the TargetPro toolbar.
Marquee Select Button
Click and drag a marquee box around the scale bar. The scale bar highlights to indicate
that it’s selected.
3. Drag the scalebar to the new location.
Please take note that you will not be able to select geographic entities from any of the map layers
until you make them selectable through the Layer Control dialog. You can hide the MapInfo
toolbars by unselecting TARGETPRO > SHOW MAPINFO PROFESSIONAL TOOLS.
Setting Map Scale Accuracy for Printing
Providing an accurate scale is important on the printed map. To get the correct scale for output,
you must coordinate the Map window with the Layout window. You must also decide on the
desired end result. For example, you may want a map that has a 1:25000 scale and fits in a nine
inch Layout frame. If this is the case, you will have to alter the zoom level of your map to fit these
conditions. Or, in the case where you must show a set distance across the map, you may have to
allow for a larger page size. The following two formulas will help you set the right map zoom, scale,
and frame width.
Setting the Scale with a Limited Frame Size
The following formula calculates the zoom that must be set in your Map window in order to have a
map meet set scale and frame width criteria.
((Frame Width in Inches * Scale)/12) /5280 = Map Zoom in Miles
For example, you need to make a map that will be in a scale of 1:24000 and fit in an eight inch
frame. You need to determine the zoom level that will accommodate the map scale and frame
width. Calculate the following:
((8 * 24000) / 12) / 5280) = 3.03
Then use MAP > CHANGE VIEW and enter 3.03 miles as your new zoom level.
Setting the Scale with a Limit on Map Zoom
The following formula calculates the number of inches to make the frame for a map in order to
meet set scale and zoom level criteria.
(Map Zoom in Miles * 5280 * 12) / Scale = Necessary Frame Width
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For example, you need to make a map that will be in a scale of 1:100000, and you must view a
twenty mile zoom level. You need to determine the frame size that will accommodate the scale and
zoom. Calculate the following:
(20 * 5280 * 12) / 100000 = 12.67
Your frame needs to be 12.67 inches wide. If your printer is not large enough to handle this,
change your layout size to spread over two pages.
Creating a Map Layout for Printing
You can either print a Map window, in which case you do not need to create a layout, or you can
create a map layout to print. For presentation, use the Layout menu to bring together all views of
your mapping session. Here you can combine different types of windows to create an attractive
and informative presentation. Choose WINDOW > NEW LAYOUT WINDOW > FRAMES FOR ALL
CURRENTLY OPEN WINDOWS. The Layout window displays the windows in your workspace. You can
use the Layout window to arrange your maps, browse tables, graphs, legends, titles and logos.
Refer to the chapter on Working with Layouts in the MapInfo Professional User’s Guide for more
information on working in the Layout window.
Printing
Once you have created the perfect map or graph, you can easily print the individual windows or
the map layout.
Setting Up the Page
Before you print your map or layout, you will need to set up your page. In the Page Setup dialog
(FILE > PAGE SETUP), specify the paper size, orientation, and margins.
Printing Your Map
When you have your page set up the way you want, you are ready to print. Choose FILE > PRINT to
display the Print dialog. The Print dialog allows you to specify printer properties, a page range in
which to print, and the number of copies that will print.
Click OPTIONS in the Print dialog to fine-tune the look of the output. A Print Options dialog
corresponding to the type of window you are printing displays (Map, Browser, Graph, 3DMap). For
maps, for example, the Map Print Options dialog displays. Here you can specify the size of the
map, how its contents will display, the scale, and its width and height. For details on all the Print
Options dialogs, see the MapInfo Reference.
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Advanced Printing Options
Advanced printing options enable you to specify how you want MapInfo to print your map or layout,
and tell MapInfo how to handle color and transparency for raster and grid images. Click ADVANCED
to display the Advanced Printing dialog.
The options that are selected when you first display this dialog are the default settings, which are
set in the Output preferences. The Advanced Printing dialog enables you to override the default
print settings for individual windows. To actually change the default print settings, you must go to
the Output preferences (OPTIONS > PREFERENCES > OUTPUT) and change the print settings there.
Output Methods
You can choose from two types of output methods. Click the button next to the method you want to
use. The Print Directly to Device method is the printing method used in previous versions of
MapInfo. The Print using Enhanced Metafile (EMF) method generates an Enhanced Metafile from
the print contents, which is then sent to the printer. This method produces good quality output
while reducing printing time and spool sizes, but your printer must be able to handle the metafile.
Display and Color Options
Additional settings control Map window borders, transparency in vector and raster images, and
color in raster images. Check the boxes next to the option(s) you want. To print a border around
your Map window, select the PRINT BORDER FOR MAP WINDOW checkbox (this option is not
available for Layout windows).
To have MapInfo handle transparent fill and bitmap symbols in vector images internally, select the
INTERNAL HANDLING FOR TRANSPARENT VECTOR FILLS AND SYMBOLS checkbox. If you clear the box,
transparency will be handled by your printer.
To have MapInfo handle transparent raster images internally, select the INTERNAL HANDLING FOR
TRANSPARENT RASTER checkbox. If you clear the box, transparency in raster images will be
handled by your printer. It is recommended that you check this option because many printers, such
as postscript, do not handle transparent images well.
Select the PRINT RASTER IN TRUE COLOR WHEN POSSIBLE checkbox to use 24-bit true color to print
raster and grid images. To be able to print a raster image in true color, the image must be 24-bit
and the printer must support more than 256 colors.
Select a dither method from the Dither Method list to use when your image must be converted from
24-bit to 256 colors. Choose either the halftone or error diffusion dither methods.
Overriding the Default Printer
The printer listed in both the Print and Page Setup dialogs is the default printer that MapInfo uses
for all print jobs. This can be either the Windows default printer or a MapInfo preferred printer that
you select. Set the default printer in the printer preferences (OPTIONS > PREFERENCES > PRINTER).
Both of these dialogs include the option of overriding the default printer for an individual print job.
To use a printer other than the one indicated in the printer preferences to print a particular window
such as Map or Layout, choose either:
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•
FILE > PRINT. Click the NAME drop-down list to see a list of the printers you have access to,
and select the one you want to use. This selection overrides the default printer setting for
this print job.
•
FILE > PAGE SETUP. In the Page Setup dialog, click the PRINTER to display the preferences
dialog for the default printer. Click the NAME drop-down list to see a list of the available
printers, and select the one you want to use. This selection overrides the default printer
setting for this print job.
Printer override applies only to the window you are currently printing. To actually change
the default setting, you must go to the Printer preferences and specify a new default
printer. See the appropriate chapter in the MapInfo Professional User’s Guide for more
information.
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Glossary of Terms
Aggregate
The total amount. For example, the Aggregate Households calculates
the total number of households within a specified area.
Aggregation
A process of grouping unique data. The aggregated data set has a
smaller number of elements than the input data set.
Average
The number found by dividing the sum of all quantities by the total
number of quantities. For example, Aggregate Household Income
divided by Total Households equals Average Household Income.
Boundary File
Boundary files represent bounded regions, such as a country, a state,
or a census tract. Each object in a boundary file is a bounded region.
For example, in a U.S. file, each state is represented by a separate
polygon.
Browser
A window for viewing a table (or database, spreadsheet or text file) in
tabular form.
Cartographic Legend
A legend window that enables you to display cartographic information
for any map layer in the Map window.
Cartography
The art and science of making maps. In GIS, it is also the geographic
presentation and visual interpretation of data.
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Glossary of Terms
Cluster
A cluster is a geodemographic classification of a neighborhood. Each geographic area has a
cluster assignment. The clusters may be categorized into various predefined groups based on
settlement patterns, such as urban and rural. The PSYTE cluster uses four settlement patterns:
urban, suburban, town, and rural. Each cluster has a code associated with it.
Clusters may be grouped into higher levels, but a particular cluster cannot be assigned to more
than one group.
Cluster Index Score
The Cluster Index Score is calculated as follows:
si
 Consumption
------------------------------------- Consumption b 
CI si = -------------------------------------------- × 100
Households si
 --------------------------------- Households b 
where:
CI si = Consumption Index for the cluster in the submarket.
Consumption si = Consumption for the cluster in the submarket.
Consumption b = Total Consumption for the geography
Households si = Household Count for the cluster.
Households b = Total household count for the base area.
Concordance
A concordance file establishes a hierarchical relationship between two levels of geography. For
example, if a trade area was made up of a combination of ZIP Codes, a concordance can be
established making the trade area the “parent” level of geography and the ZIP Codes the
“children”.
Consumption Index
The Consumption Index compares a cluster’s percentage of the total consumption (such as dollars
spent) with that cluster’s percentage of households. This is (Volume/Customers)
It is calculated as:
Consumptioni 
 ------------------------------------ Consumption b
CI i = ------------------------------------------- × 100
Households i 
 -------------------------------- Households b
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Glossary of Terms
where:
CI i = Consumption Index for the cluster
Consumption i = Consumption for the cluster
Consumption b = Total Consumption for the geography
Households i = Household Count for the cluster.
Households b = Household Count for the geography
Coordinates
An x,y location in a Cartesian coordinate system, or a Longitude, Latitude location in an earth
coordinate system. Coordinates represent locations on a map relative to other locations. Earth
coordinate systems may use the equator and the Greenwich prime meridian as fixed reference
points. Plane coordinate systems describe a two-dimensional x,y location in terms of distance from
a fixed reference and are usually in the first quadrant so that all coordinates are positive numbers.
Cosmetic Layer
The topmost layer of a Map window. Objects may be placed in this layer such as map titles and
graphic objects. It is always displayed, and all objects placed in the Cosmetic Layer must be saved
to a new or existing layer.
Custom Geographies
Geographies that are not known to TargetPro’s database engine. These include geographies
drawn on the map, such as trade areas and polygons, and selections made from layers opened
using MapInfo Professional.
Data Sources
An ODBC data source is an SQL database and the information you need to access that database.
For example, an SQL Server data source is the SQL Server database, the server on which it
resides, and the network used to access that server.
Database
Any organized collection of data. The term is often used to refer to a single file or table of
information.
Default
The value or option used in the absence of explicit specification. Often the original setting or value
for a variable.
Degrees Longitude, Degrees Latitude, Decimal Degrees
Degrees (longitude and latitude) are coordinates used to represent locations on the surface of the
earth. Longitude, or X-coordinate, represents a location’s east-west position, where any location
west of the prime meridian has a negative X value. Latitude, or Y-coordinate, represents a
location’s north-south position, where any location south of the equator has a negative Y value.
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Glossary of Terms
Density
Population divided by the geographic region’s land area. A simple basis for relating population to a
geographic region’s size. Thus, two regions with the same population can have sharply divergent
densities because of difference in land area. The figure may suffer because the land area will
include railroad freight yards, wildlife preserves, industrial parks and other non residential areas,
resulting in a misleading density level.
Deselect
The process of undoing a selection. The object or area you deselect will not be affected by
subsequent commands. Performed by selecting another area, by clicking in a blank area, or by
executing the Unselect All command.
Dot Density Map
A type of thematic map that carries information by showing a large number of tiny dots, wherein
each dot represents some specific unit quantity. For example, for a population dot density map
each dot might represent 10,000 people.
Drawing Toolbar
A MapInfo window containing twelve buttons that access tools for drawing and modifying objects
on your map or layout.
EDW
Enterprise Data Warehouse. This is a data warehouse that is maintained by the data provider.
Edit Handle
The small boxes that appear at the four corners of the minimum bounding rectangle of an object in
an editable layer of a Map window or in a Layout window.
Export
The process whereby a program saves information in a file to be used by another program.
Expression
A statement containing two parts: 1) column names and constants (i.e., specific data values, and
2) functions (e.g., area) and operators (e.g., +, -, >), in order to extract or derive information from a
database.
Field
A field in a table corresponds to a column in a Browser. A field contains a specific type of
information about an object, such as, name, abbreviation, land area, price, population, and so
forth. The record for each object consists of that object’s values for each of the fields in the
database.
File
A collection of information that has been given a name and is stored on some electronic medium
such as a tape or disk. A file can be a document or an application.
Fill Pattern
The design and color used to fill a closed geography.
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Glossary of Terms
Formula
A formula is a valid arithmetic expression consisting of one or more variables, one or more
operators, and zero or more numeric constants.
Generalization
The process of simplifying a data set to a size that can be easily manipulated and represented. For
example, a river may have many twists and turns; however, if a map covers a very large area, the
river may be represented as a straight line. Similarly, in a map of a very large area, a city might be
represented as a point marker.
Geocoding
Geocoding is the process of assigning to a street address a latitude and longitude coordinate and/
or geographic codes that associate an address to a census geography.
Geographic Information System (GIS)
A computer software system with which spatial information may be captured, stored, analyzed,
displayed, and retrieved.
Graduated Symbols Map
A type of thematic map that shows symbols (point objects) in a variety of sizes to indicate which
objects have higher or lower numerical values.
Grid Surface Map
A type of thematic map that displays data as continuous color gradations across the map. This
type of thematic map is produced by an interpolation of point data from the source table. A grid file
from the data interpolation is generated and displays as a raster image in a Map window.
Import
The process whereby a program loads a file that is the output of another program.
Individual Values Map
A type of thematic map that shades records according to individual values.
Jump
Text graphics or parts of graphics that provide links to other Help topics or more information on the
current Help topic.
Latitude
The horizontal lines on a map that increase from 0 degrees at the Equator to 90 degrees at both
the North (+90.0 degrees) and South (-90.0 degrees) poles. Used to describe the North-South
position of a point as measured usually in degrees or decimal degrees above or below the equator.
Layer
Layers are the basic building block of maps in TargetPro. A map typically consists of several
superimposed layers (e.g., a layer of street data superimposed over a layer of region boundaries).
When a table appears in a Map window, it occupies a layer in that Map window. Typically, each
map layer corresponds to one open table; there is also a special Cosmetic Layer that contains
map objects representing temporary map annotations (e.g., labels). See Cosmetic Layer.
Legend
A legend describes the symbols used in a map.
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Glossary of Terms
LDW
Local Data Warehouse. A database within your intranet, that acts as the gateway to the Replica
Data Warehouse (RDW) and to your own data warehouse.
Line, Line Object
A map object defined by a set of sequential coordinates that may represent the generalized shape
of a geographic feature (e.g., street centerlines, railroads, cables). A MapInfo street map is a
collection of thousands of line objects.
Longitude
The vertical lines on a map, running from the North to South poles, used to describe the east-west
position of a point. The position is reported as the number of degrees east (to -180.0 degrees) or
west (to +180.0 degrees) of the prime meridian (0 degrees). Lines of longitude are farthest apart at
the Equator and intersect at both poles, and therefore, are not parallel.
Map
A map is a graphic representation of part of the earth's surface. It conveys information easily and
readily to a reader. It is a snap-shot of time.
Map Scale
A statement of a measure of the map and the equivalent measure on the earth. Often expressed
as a representative ratio of distance, such as 1:10,000. This means that one unit of distance on the
map (e.g., one inch) represents 10,000 of the same units of distance on the earth.
The term scale must be used carefully. Technically, a map of a single city block is large-scale (e.g.,
1:12,000), while a map of an entire country is small-scale (e.g., 1:1,000,000). A 1:1,000,000 map
is considered small-scale because of the small numeric value obtained when you divide 1 by
1,000,000.
Map Window
A window that allows you to view a table as a map.
Market Potential Index (MPI)
This is an estimate of relative market potential. The MPI shows the relationship between the
potential for a product or service in each market and the total potential over all markets.
The calculations to determine a cluster-weighted profile are complex. The calculations estimate
the potential in an area based on that area’s cluster profile based on its census demographics and
the cluster profile of actual customers.
The MPI is the ratio of two cluster-weighted means. These are calculated as:
∑
( CI × CP )
= 1.n
CWM = i-------------------------------------∑ CP
i = 1.n
where:
CWM = Cluster Weighted Mean for the area of interest.
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Glossary of Terms
CI = Cluster Index score for the area of interest.
CP = Cluster Penetration for the area of interest (the proportion of households in the cluster)
i = 1.n = Iterate through each cluster in the cluster system.
Market Penetration Index for SubMarkets
The market penetration index for a submarket is calculated as:
CWM s
MPI i = INT  ----------------- × 100
 CWM b

where:
MPI s = Market Potential Index for the submarket.
CWM s = Cluster Weighted Mean for the submarket.
CWM b = Cluster Weighted Mean for the base area.
Match
Match is a term used to describe when the Geocoder has successfully found the geographic
location of an input record (or street address).
Median
A calculated value that divides the distribution in an area into two equal parts. One half falls above
the value and one half falls below. For example, if the median age is 21, half the population is
younger than 21 and the other half is older than 21.
MIF
MapInfo Interchange Format. This is the ASCII file format common to MapInfo products; it is used
to import into or export from MapInfo software.
Neighborhood Coverage Area (NCA)
An NCA is the collection of block groups that contains at least one record from your data.
ODBC Driver
An ODBC driver is a dynamic-link library (.DLL) file that MapInfo uses to connect to an SQL
database. Each type of SQL database requires a different ODBC driver.
ODBC Table
An ODBC table is a table residing in a remote SQL database.
Potential Index
The Potential Index is the ratio of two percentages. Like percentages, indexes provide a standard
measure for comparing sets of values which differ greatly in magnitude.
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The potential index for a cluster is calculated as follows:
 Count
------------------ti-
 Count t 
PI = ------------------------- × 100
bi
 Count
------------------ Count b 
where:
PI i = Potential Index for the cluster.
Count ti = Household count for the cluster in the target area.
Count t = Total household count for the target area.
Count bi = Household count for the cluster in the base area.
Count b = Total household count for the base area.
Interpreting the Magnitude of the Index
An index ranges from 0 to infinity, with the mid point being 100. Values below 100 and values over
100 are reciprocals of each other.
Example 1
Cluster 01 consumes 4% of product A and 2% of Product B
The Potential Index for Product A vs Product B is
100 × ( 4 ⁄ 2 ) = 200
The Potential Index for Product B vs Product A is
100 × ( 2 ⁄ 4 ) = 50
Therefore 50 and 200 are essentially the same index, but from a different perspective. The
difference comes simply from choosing which product is the numerator and denominator.
Example 2
Similarly, 20 and 500 are the same in the following example:
100 × ( 2 ⁄ 10 ) = 20
100 × ( 10 ⁄ 2 ) = 500
Pie Chart Map
A type of thematic map that displays a pie chart of thematic variables for each record in the table
from which the map is based.
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Glossary of Terms
Pixel
The acronym for picture element. The smallest dot that can be displayed on a computer screen. If
a screen is described as having a resolution of 1,024 x 768, the screen shows 1,024 pixels from
right to left, and 768 pixels from top to bottom. Each character, object, or line on the screen is
composed of numerous pixels.
•
Variables, geographies, and reports created by the user.
•
Tab files.
•
Information about the TargetPro work space (i.e., window arrangement).
•
TargetPro-specific information such as the default base geography for a set of data.
Point, Point Object
A map object defined by a single x,y coordinate pair. Each point object is represented by a symbol
style (e.g., circle, square, triangle, etc.).
Pointer
An arrow-shaped cursor on the screen that can be manipulated by a mouse.
Polygon, Polygon Object
A class of spatial objects having area and perimeter, and representing a closed boundary region of
uniform characteristics. The Polygon tool creates a single polygon.
Profile
Also called Cluster Profile. This is a list of numeric values, one for each cluster in the system.
Some examples of the numeric values can be individual consumers, dollars spent, households, or
the proportion of users responding to a survey question.
Project
A TargetPro project contains information specific to the user and the current session. This
information is used to manage the MapInfo Professional workspace and includes:
Projection
A mathematical model that transforms the locations of features on the earth’s surface to locations
on a two-dimensional surface, such as a paper map. Since a map is an attempt to represent a
spherical object (the earth) on a flat surface, all projections have some degree of distortion. A map
projection can preserve area, distance, shape or direction but only a globe can preserve all of
these attributes. Some projections (e.g., Mercator) produce maps well suited for navigation. Other
projections (e.g., equal-area projections, such as Lambert) produce maps well suited for visual
analysis.
PSYTE
PSYTE is a market segmentation system that incorporates many behavioral data elements in
addition to demographic and socio-economic variables. It classifies neighborhoods into
approximately 60 distinct groups. Each group has differences based on income level, purchasing
power, education, ethnicity, and many other factors. PSYTE is constructed based on the following
variables:
•
Socio-economic and demographic census data.
•
Measures of settlement context, density, and access to urban amenities.
•
New vehicle registrations.
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Glossary of Terms
Behavioral purchase data.
Ranged Map
A type of thematic map that displays data according to ranges set by the user. The ranges are
shaded using colors or patterns.
Region
An enclosed area defined by one or more polygons. If a region contains one or more lakes or
islands, each lake or island is a separate polygon.
Registered Geographies
Registered geographies are the levels (approximately 10) that are shipped with TargetPro and all
the geographic layers and levels that have been imported and registered using the Data Manager.
RDW
Replica Data Warehouse. A replica of the Enterprise Data Warehouse (EDW), which acts as the
central repository of TargetPro geometry and demographic data. This may be hosted by you or by
the data provider.
Scale Bar
A map element that graphically depicts the map scale (e.g., 0 –5 – 10 km).
Screening
The process of defining criteria for a subset of data from a larger dataset. This is sometimes
known as filtering. A valid screening expressing consists of one or more logical expressions, which
compare variables to other variables, or variables to contents. Screening lets you filter geographic
areas to be included in Area Analysis. Only those areas that pass the screening expression are
included in the report or shown on a thematic map.
Scroll Bar
Bars along the right and bottom sides of each window that allow you to scroll the window view.
Clicking on the shaded area moves one window screen at a time.
Source
The company that created the data.
Standard Geographies
Standard geographies are the levels (approximately 10) that are shipped with TargetPro. Standard
geographies do not include those geographic layers and levels that have been imported and
registered using the Data Manager.
Structured Query Language (SQL)
A standard language used for analyzing information stored in relational databases. MapInfo’s
database engine is based on the SQL standard.
Symbol, Symbol Object
A small, relatively simple shape (e.g., square, circle, star, push-pin) used to graphically represent a
point object (e.g., a customer location).
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Glossary of Terms
TAB File
TAB files are a simple format for storing geometric location and attribute information of geographic
features. These files contain the records or maps that come from MapInfo, or that are created
using MapInfo Professional software.
Table
MapInfo databases are organized as tables. Tables are made up of rows and columns. Each row
contains information about a particular geographic feature, event, etc. Each column contains a
particular kind of information about the items in the table. MapInfo can contain graphic objects
representing geographic objects. Such tables can be displayed as maps.
Target Group Index (TGI)
The TGI is computed by comparing the penetration of the Target Group with the entire profile.
More formally, the total customer count for the Target Group clusters is computed, and the total
base count for the Target Group clusters is computed. The ratio of users to base users is the
Target Group Penetration. The total penetration is then computed by performing the same
calculation over all the clusters (not just the Target Group clusters). Finally, the index is computed
by dividing the Target Group Penetration by the Total Penetration and multiplying the result by 100.
Text Cursor
A blinking vertical bar that shows the position where text can be edited, inserted, or deleted.
Thematic Layer
A layer containing the thematic settings for a map layer. Thematic layers are drawn directly over
the map layer on which the thematic settings are based. They are also drawn in a particular order,
depending on the number of thematic layers you have and the type of thematic map objects you
are creating.
Thematic Map
A type of map that uses a variety of graphic styles (e.g., colors or fill patterns) to graphically display
information about the map’s underlying data. Thus, a thematic map of sales territories might show
one region in deep red (to indicate the region has a large number of customers), while showing
another region in very pale red (to indicate the region has relatively few customers).
Refer to Dot Density Map, Graduated Symbols Map, Grid Surface Map, Individual Values
Map, Pie Chart Map, and Ranged Map.
Thematic Shading
Map objects — points, lines, regions — that have been shaded, using a pattern and/or color,
according to some point of information about the object, or theme (population, size, annual rainfall,
date, and so forth).
Thematic Variable
The data values displayed on a thematic map. A thematic variable can be a field or expression.
Theme Legend
MapInfo Professional’s original style legend that allows you to display legends for thematic maps
and graphs. MapInfo Professional automatically creates a theme legend window for a thematic
map. Customize its display through the Modify Thematic Map dialog. See Cartographic Legend.
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Glossary of Terms
Vintage
The date that the map or data was created or updated.
Window
In MapInfo Professional, Map windows, Browser windows, Graph windows, and Layout windows
are the major types of windows. They display the data stored in tables. The Toolbars, map
legends, and the Info tool window are other types of windows.
Workspace
A saved configuration of open MapInfo Professional tables and windows.
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Reserved Keywords
Microsoft® SQL Server™ 2000 uses reserved keywords for defining,
manipulating, and accessing databases. Reserved keywords are part of the
grammar of the Transact-SQL language used by SQL Server to parse and
understand Transact-SQL statements and batches. Although it is syntactically
possible to use SQL Server reserved keywords as identifiers and object
names in Transact-SQL scripts, this can be done only using delimited
identifiers.
B
TargetPro User Guide
Reserved Keywords
SQL Server Reserved Keywords
The following table lists SQL Server reserved keywords.
ADD
EXCEPT
PERCENT
ALL
EXEC
PLAN
ALTER
EXECUTE
PRECISION
AND
EXISTS
PRIMARY
ANY
EXIT
PRINT
AS
FETCH
PROC
ASC
FILE
PROCEDURE
AUTHORIZATION
FILLFACTOR
PUBLIC
BACKUP
FOR
RAISERROR
BEGIN
FOREIGN
READ
BETWEEN
FREETEXT
READTEXT
BREAK
FREETEXTTABLE
RECONFIGURE
BROWSE
FROM
REFERENCES
BULK
FULL
REPLICATION
BY
FUNCTION
RESTORE
CASCADE
GOTO
RESTRICT
CASE
GRANT
RETURN
CHECK
GROUP
REVOKE
CHECKPOINT
HAVING
RIGHT
CLOSE
HOLDLOCK
ROLLBACK
CLUSTERED
IDENTITY
ROWCOUNT
COALESCE
IDENTITY_INSERT
ROWGUIDCOL
COLLATE
IDENTITYCOL
RULE
COLUMN
IF
SAVE
COMMIT
IN
SCHEMA
COMPUTE
INDEX
SELECT
CONSTRAINT
INNER
SESSION_USER
CONTAINS
INSERT
SET
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CONTAINSTABLE
INTERSECT
SETUSER
CONTINUE
INTO
SHUTDOWN
CONVERT
IS
SOME
CREATE
JOIN
STATISTICS
CROSS
KEY
SYSTEM_USER
CURRENT
KILL
TABLE
CURRENT_DATE
LEFT
TEXTSIZE
CURRENT_TIME
LIKE
THEN
CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
LINENO
TO
CURRENT_USER
LOAD
TOP
CURSOR
NATIONAL
TRAN
DATABASE
NOCHECK
TRANSACTION
DBCC
NONCLUSTERED
TRIGGER
DEALLOCATE
NOT
TRUNCATE
DECLARE
NULL
TSEQUAL
DEFAULT
NULLIF
UNION
DELETE
OF
UNIQUE
DENY
OFF
UPDATE
DESC
OFFSETS
UPDATETEXT
DISK
ON
USE
DISTINCT
OPEN
USER
DISTRIBUTED
OPENDATASOURCE
VALUES
DOUBLE
OPENQUERY
VARYING
DROP
OPENROWSET
VIEW
DUMMY
OPENXML
WAITFOR
DUMP
OPTION
WHEN
ELSE
OR
WHERE
END
ORDER
WHILE
ERRLVL
OUTER
WITH
ESCAPE
OVER
WRITETEXT
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Reserved Keywords
In addition, the SQL-92 standard defines a list of reserved keywords. Avoid using SQL-92
reserved keywords for object names and identifiers. The ODBC reserved keyword list that follows
is the same as the SQL-92 reserved keyword list.
Note:
The SQL-92 reserved keywords list sometimes can be more restrictive than SQL Server
and at other times less restrictive. For example, the SQL-92 reserved keywords list
contains INT, which SQL Server does not need to distinguish as a reserved keyword.
Transact-SQL reserved keywords can be used as identifiers or names of databases or database
objects, such as tables, columns, views, and so on. Use either quoted identifiers or delimited
identifiers. The use of reserved keywords as the names of variables and stored procedure
parameters is not restricted.
ODBC Reserved Keywords
The following words are reserved for use in ODBC function calls. These words do not constrain
the minimum SQL grammar; however, to ensure compatibility with drivers that support the core
SQL grammar, applications should avoid using these keywords.
This is the current list of ODBC reserved keywords. For more information, see Microsoft ODBC 3.0
Programmer’s Reference, Volume 2, Appendix C.
ABSOLUTE
EXEC
OVERLAPS
ACTION
EXECUTE
PAD
ADA
EXISTS
PARTIAL
ADD
EXTERNAL
PASCAL
ALL
EXTRACT
POSITION
ALLOCATE
FALSE
PRECISION
ALTER
FETCH
PREPARE
AND
FIRST
PRESERVE
ANY
FLOAT
PRIMARY
ARE
FOR
PRIOR
AS
FOREIGN
PRIVILEGES
ASC
FORTRAN
PROCEDURE
ASSERTION
FOUND
PUBLIC
AT
FROM
READ
AUTHORIZATION
FULL
REAL
AVG
GET
REFERENCES
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BEGIN
GLOBAL
RELATIVE
BETWEEN
GO
RESTRICT
BIT
GOTO
REVOKE
BIT_LENGTH
GRANT
RIGHT
BOTH
GROUP
ROLLBACK
BY
HAVING
ROWS
CASCADE
HOUR
SCHEMA
CASCADED
IDENTITY
SCROLL
CASE
IMMEDIATE
SECOND
CAST
IN
SECTION
CATALOG
INCLUDE
SELECT
CHAR
INDEX
SESSION
CHAR_LENGTH
INDICATOR
SESSION_USER
CHARACTER
INITIALLY
SET
CHARACTER_LENGTH
INNER
SIZE
CHECK
INPUT
SMALLINT
CLOSE
INSENSITIVE
SOME
COALESCE
INSERT
SPACE
COLLATE
INT
SQL
COLLATION
INTEGER
SQLCA
COLUMN
INTERSECT
SQLCODE
COMMIT
INTERVAL
SQLERROR
CONNECT
INTO
SQLSTATE
CONNECTION
IS
SQLWARNING
CONSTRAINT
ISOLATION
SUBSTRING
CONSTRAINTS
JOIN
SUM
CONTINUE
KEY
SYSTEM_USER
CONVERT
LANGUAGE
TABLE
CORRESPONDING
LAST
TEMPORARY
COUNT
LEADING
THEN
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CREATE
LEFT
TIME
CROSS
LEVEL
TIMESTAMP
CURRENT
LIKE
TIMEZONE_HOUR
CURRENT_DATE
LOCAL
TIMEZONE_MINUTE
CURRENT_TIME
LOWER
TO
CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
MATCH
TRAILING
CURRENT_USER
MAX
TRANSACTION
CURSOR
MIN
TRANSLATE
DATE
MINUTE
TRANSLATION
DAY
MODULE
TRIM
DEALLOCATE
MONTH
TRUE
DEC
NAMES
UNION
DECIMAL
NATIONAL
UNIQUE
DECLARE
NATURAL
UNKNOWN
DEFAULT
NCHAR
UPDATE
DEFERRABLE
NEXT
UPPER
DEFERRED
NO
USAGE
DELETE
NONE
USER
DESC
NOT
USING
DESCRIBE
NULL
VALUE
DESCRIPTOR
NULLIF
VALUES
DIAGNOSTICS
NUMERIC
VARCHAR
DISCONNECT
OCTET_LENGTH
VARYING
DISTINCT
OF
VIEW
DOMAIN
ON
WHEN
DOUBLE
ONLY
WHENEVER
DROP
OPEN
WHERE
ELSE
OPTION
WITH
END
OR
WORK
END-EXEC
ORDER
WRITE
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Reserved Keywords
ESCAPE
OUTER
YEAR
EXCEPT
OUTPUT
ZONE
EXCEPTION
Future Keywords
The following keywords could be reserved in future releases of SQL Server as new features are
implemented.
Consider avoiding the use of these words as identifiers:
ABSOLUTE
FOUND
PRESERVE
ACTION
FREE
PRIOR
ADMIN
GENERAL
PRIVILEGES
AFTER
GET
READS
AGGREGATE
GLOBAL
REAL
ALIAS
GO
RECURSIVE
ALLOCATE
GROUPING
REF
ARE
HOST
REFERENCING
ARRAY
HOUR
RELATIVE
ASSERTION
IGNORE
RESULT
AT
IMMEDIATE
RETURNS
BEFORE
INDICATOR
ROLE
BINARY
INITIALIZE
ROLLUP
BIT
INITIALLY
ROUTINE
BLOB
INOUT
ROW
BOOLEAN
INPUT
ROWS
BOTH
INT
SAVEPOINT
BREADTH
INTEGER
SCROLL
CALL
INTERVAL
SCOPE
CASCADED
ISOLATION
SEARCH
CAST
ITERATE
SECOND
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CATALOG
LANGUAGE
SECTION
CHAR
LARGE
SEQUENCE
CHARACTER
LAST
SESSION
CLASS
LATERAL
SETS
CLOB
LEADING
SIZE
COLLATION
LESS
SMALLINT
COMPLETION
LEVEL
SPACE
CONNECT
LIMIT
SPECIFIC
CONNECTION
LOCAL
SPECIFICTYPE
CONSTRAINTS
LOCALTIME
SQL
CONSTRUCTOR
LOCALTIMESTAMP
SQLEXCEPTION
CORRESPONDING
LOCATOR
SQLSTATE
CUBE
MAP
SQLWARNING
CURRENT_PATH
MATCH
START
CURRENT_ROLE
MINUTE
STATE
CYCLE
MODIFIES
STATEMENT
DATA
MODIFY
STATIC
DATE
MODULE
STRUCTURE
DAY
MONTH
TEMPORARY
DEC
NAMES
TERMINATE
DECIMAL
NATURAL
THAN
DEFERRABLE
NCHAR
TIME
DEFERRED
NCLOB
TIMESTAMP
DEPTH
NEW
TIMEZONE_HOUR
DEREF
NEXT
TIMEZONE_MINUTE
DESCRIBE
NO
TRAILING
DESCRIPTOR
NONE
TRANSLATION
DESTROY
NUMERIC
TREAT
DESTRUCTOR
OBJECT
TRUE
DETERMINISTIC
OLD
UNDER
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Reserved Keywords
DICTIONARY
ONLY
UNKNOWN
DIAGNOSTICS
OPERATION
UNNEST
DISCONNECT
ORDINALITY
USAGE
DOMAIN
OUT
USING
DYNAMIC
OUTPUT
VALUE
EACH
PAD
VARCHAR
END-EXEC
PARAMETER
VARIABLE
EQUALS
PARAMETERS
WHENEVER
EVERY
PARTIAL
WITHOUT
EXCEPTION
PATH
WORK
EXTERNAL
POSTFIX
WRITE
FALSE
PREFIX
YEAR
FIRST
PREORDER
ZONE
FLOAT
PREPARE
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Index
Index
A
About TargetPro command 15
Accessing Data Manager 64–66
Add a layer to the project
from a TAB file 14
from Registered Geographies 14
Add Category dialog 153
Adding
legend 180
map layer 25
scalebar 182–184
Addition and subtraction operators 104
Additional attribute data, registering 75–78
Address match 43–44
Advanced print options 186
Aggregate, definition 189
Aggregation, definition 189
Areas built from registered boundaries, registering 79–81
Arrange Windows
left-handed 15
right-handed 15
undock 15
Authentication 8
Average, definition 189
B
Batch Geocode
command 65
Batch geocoding 99–102
Binary operators 104
Block Centroid Correspondence
command 65
Boundary data, registering 81–84
Boundary File, definition 189
Brackets 104
Browse Table dialog 52
Browser
definition 189
selecting geography from 51–52
Browsing a map layer 25
Buttons
Capture Tool 13
Create Polygon 12, 45
Create Rings 12, 39–40
Data Manager 13, 64
Delete Geographic Selection 13
Draw Scale Bar 182
Drive Distance 13, 47
Drive Time 13, 46
Find Address 12, 42–44
Find Geography 13, 38
Geography Selector 13, 52
Grabber 22
Marquee Select 12, 51, 184
New Project 12
Open Project 12
Pan 12
Polygon Select 12, 51
Profile Manager 13, 114, 118, 120, 123–124
Quick View 12, 136
Radius Select 12, 51
Report Properties 147
Reports 13
Rings Around Set of Points 13, 41
Save Project 12
Select Object 12, 50
Thematic Map 13
Theme Properties 26
Zoom in 12, 22
Zoom out 12, 22
C
Capture Tool
button 13
Capturing customers
using a customer dataset 56–60
using a market demographic 60–62
Cartographic legend 180, 189
Cartography, definition 189
Centroid display 27
Change Ownership
command 66
Changing
label style 50
layer properties 26–27
Cluster, definition 190
Color options, printing 186
Components
documentation 5
software 4–5
Concordance, definition 190
Contiguous geography 51
Conventions, document 6
Coordinates, definition 191
Cosmetic Layer
definition 191
make selectable 184
Create Legend dialog 180
Create Polygon button 12, 45
Create Rings button 12, 39–40
Creating
buffers around a set of points 41–42
custom geographies 39–49
using MI Pro tools 49
custom reports 152
custom variables 103–104
drive distance polygon 46–49
drive time polygon 46–49
filter/weighted profiles 114
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formula 103–104
Geography Based Constant variable 105–106
Geography Based Parent variable 106
map layout 185
new project 9
point 39–40
point with rings 40–41
point with rings from address 42–43
point with rings from intersection 43–44
point with rings from Lat/Long 44–45
polygon 45–46
profiles 113
Radius Based variable 105
True Median variable 105
Crystal Reports 4
Custom
data sources 5
legend 181
reports 155
Custom Geographies
and MapInfo Professional 49
creating 39–49
definition 191
Custom reports
creating 152
deleting 157
managing 155
Custom Variable
command 66
Custom Variable Editor 103
Customer dataset
capture tool 56–60
D
Data
importing 66–71
linking 72–73
registering 74–96
Data Manager
accessing 64–66
button 13, 64
command 14
deleting linked server 99
dialog 64
importing data 66–71
linking data 72–73
menu 65–66
registering data 74–96
toolbar 65–66
Data Manager menu 102
Data sources
custom 5
definition 191
Database, definition 191
Decimal Degrees, definition 191
Decimal logarithm 104
Default
definition 191
Index
printer, overriding 186–187
Degrees Latitude, definition 191
Degrees Longitude, definition 191
Delete Block Centroid Correspondence
command 65
Delete Data
command 65
Delete Geographic Selection button 13
Delete Link Server command 65
Deleting
a linked server 99
custom reports 157
geographies 55
target group 130
Density, definition 192
Deselect, definition 192
Detail Report 152
Dialogs
Add Category 153
Area Selection 145
Browse Table 52
Create Legend 180
Custom Report Properties 152
Data Manager 64
Display Options 27
Draw Distance Scale in Mapper 183
Find 147
Find Geography 38
Geography Selector 53
Label Options 33
Label Style 50
Layer Control 26, 183
Layer Manager 16, 24
Layer Manager pop-up menu 24
Legend Frame Properties 181
Line Style 35
Map Selection 136
Project Selection 9
Report Properties 148
Ring Properties 40
Select Report to Run 146
Setup Scalebar 182
Text Style 35
Welcome 9
Display
geography selections 55
lines, nodes, centroids 27
mode 27
options dialog 27
Documentation
conventions 6
overview 5
Dot Density Map, definition 192
Draw Distance Scale in Mapper dialog 183
Draw Scale Bar button 182
Drawing Toolbar, definition 192
Drive Distance button 13, 47
Drive Time button 13, 46
Drive Time/Distance, creating trade areas 46–49
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DTS Import/Export wizard 69–71
choose a data source 69
select destination location 70
select source table and views 71
E
Edit Handle, definition 192
EDW, definition 192
Example, zoom layering 28
Exponentiation 104
Export Data
command 65
Export Project Selections command 14
Export To A MapInfo Workspace command 14
Export, definition 192
Expression
definition 192
variable, creating 103–104
F
Features 3
Field, definition 192
File, definition 192
Fill Pattern, definition 192
Find Address button 12, 42–44
Finding
available reports 147
Find Geography button 13, 38
geography by name 52–54
geography from a table browser 51–52
geography on a map 38
Formula
creating 103–104
definition 193
example 104
Frame Properties dialog 181
Frame size, set for map scale 184
G
Generalization, definition 193
Geocoded data, registering 85–90
Geocoding
batch 99–102
definition 193
Geographies
deleting 55
Geography
creating custom 39–49
displaying selections 55
entities 37
finding on a map 38
saving selections 55
selecting by name 26, 52–54
selecting contiguous 51
selecting from browser 51–52
selecting non-contiguous 51
selecting on the map 50–52
working with 37–62
Index
working with selections 55
Geography Based Constant variable, creating 105–106
Geography Based Parent variable, creating 106
Geography Selector
button 13, 52
command 14
dialog 53
menu 53
Geolist report 152
GIS, definition 193
Grabber button 22
Graduated Symbols Map, definition 193
Grid Surface Map, definition 193
I
Import Data
command 65
Import Project Selection command 14
Import, definition 193
Importing data 66–71
from other data source 69–71
from TAB file 68–69
Individual Values Map, definition 193
Interface, learning 12–16
J
Jump, definition 193
K
Key Map 15
L
Label Options dialog 33
Label Style dialog 50
Labels
change style 50
positioning 36
setting options 33–36
styles 35
visibility 34
with column 34
with expressions 34
zoom-layering 29
Latitude, definition 193
Layer Control dialog 26, 183
Layer Manager
about 24
dialog 24
menu 24–26
overview 16
pop-up menu 24
refreshing 26
Layers
adding 25
browsing 25
definition 193
display lines, nodes, centroids 27
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display mode 27
example 23
label options 33–36
Layer Control dialog 26, 183
properties, customizing 26–27
properties, viewing 25
removing 25
reordering 25
selecting the active 25
zoom 28–29
Layouts, reports 153
LDW, definition 194
Learning the interface 12–16
Left-handed workspace 11, 15
Legend
adding 180
customizing 181
definition 193
example 181
Line display 27
Line Style dialog 35
Line/Line Object, definition 194
Link Server command 65
Linking data 72–73
Loading the ScaleBar utility 182
Logarithm 104
Login As New command 15
Longitude, definition 194
M
Make This The Default Workspace command 14
Managing
custom reports 155
target groups 128–133
Map
definition 194
finding geography on 38
key map 15
layout for printing 185
panning 22–23
printing 185–187
scale accuracy 184–185
selecting geography 50–52
units 41, 46, 48
window 16
zoom layering 28–29
zoom limit to scale 184–185
zooming 22
Map Scale, definition 194
Map Selection dialog 136
Map Window, definition 194
MapInfo Professional
documentation 5
overview 4
Mapping concepts 21–36
Market demographic
capture tool 60–62
Marquee box 22
Index
Marquee Select button 12, 51, 184
Match
address 43–44
definition 195
Mathematical operators precedence 104
Median, definition 195
Menus
Data Manager 102
Geography Selector 53
Layer Manager 24–26
options 13–15
Microsoft SQL Server
authentication 8
DTS Import/Export wizard 69–71
overview 5
MIF, definition 195
Multiplication and division operators 104
N
Navigation, key map 15
New Project, command 14
Node display 27
Non Geocoded data, registering 91–96
Non-contiguous geography 51
O
ODBC Driver, definition 195
ODBC Table, definition 195
Open Project command 14
Open Recent Project command 14
Operators, precedence 104
Options, printing 186
Output, printing methods 186
Overriding default printer 186–187
P
Page setup 185
Pan button 12
Panning a map 22–23
Parentheses 104
Password 8
Pie Chart Map, definition 196
Pixel, definition 197
Point Object, definition 197
Point with rings
creating 40–41
creating from address 42–43
creating from intersection 43–44
creating from Lat/Long 44–45
Point, creating 39–40
Pointer, definition 197
Polygon
Create Polygon button 12
creating 45–46
Draw Tool 45
drive distance 46–49
drive time 46–49
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selecting 12, 51
Polygon/Polygon Object, definition 197
Precedence of operators 104
Preparing a map for printing 179–187
Printing
advanced options 186
display/color options 186
map 185–187
map layout 185
order of reports 158
output options 186
override default printer 186–187
Product components
documents 5
software 4–5
Profile Manager
button 13, 114, 118, 120, 123–124
command 14
Profile, definition 197
Profiles
creating 113
creating filter/weighted 114
working with 126
Project
creating new 9
definition 197
New Project button 12
Open Project button 12
private 10
public 10
Save Project button 12
saving 11
Project Selection dialog 9
Projection, definition 197
Properties
command 65
dialog 152
labels 35
PSYTE, definition 197
Public, projects 10
Q
Quick View 136–137
button 12, 136
Quit TargetPro command 15
R
Radius Based variable, creating 105
Radius Select button 12, 51
Ranged Map, definition 198
RDW, definition 198
Refreshing the Layer Manager 26
Region, definition 198
Register Data
command 65
Registered geographies, definition 198
Registering data 74–96
additional attribute 75–78
Index
areas built from registered boundaries 79–81
boundary 81–84
geocoded 85–90
non geocoded 91–96
Removing, map layers 25
Reordering map layers 25
Report Properties
button 147
dialog 148
setting 147–148
Reports 135–158
button 13
command 14
custom properties dialog 152
custom, creating 152
custom, upgrading 157–158
deleting 157
layout, redesigning 153
managing custom 155
printing order 158
properties dialog 148
running 144
running multiple 158
types of 137
using custom geographies 49
Repositioning the Scalebar 183–184
Right-Handed, workspace setup 15
Rings Around Set of Points button 13, 41
Running
a report 144
multiple reports 158
S
Sample Legend 181
Save Project As command 14
Save Project command 14
Saving
geography selections 55
projects 11, 14
Scalebar
adding 182–184
definition 198
repositioning 183–184
utility 182
Screening, definition 198
Scroll Bar, definition 198
Search, this book 6
Select Object button 50
Select Report to Run dialog 146
Selectable icon 51
Selecting
active layer 25
contiguous geographies 51
geographies 26
geographies within/contained by 54
geography by name 52–54
geography from browser 51–52
geography on the map 50–52
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marquee 12
marquee box example 22
non-contiguous geography 51
polygon 12, 51
radius 12, 51
saving selections 55
Select Object button 12
Selections, displaying previous 55
Set of points, creating buffers 41–42
Setting
label options 33–36
label positions 36
label styles 35
label visibility 34
label with column 34
label with expressions 34
map scale accuracy 184–185
page setup 185
report properties 147–148
zoom-layering 29
Setup Scalebar dialog 182
Show MapInfo Professional Tools command 15
Software
components 4–5
documentation 5
Source, definition 198
Special notes 6
SQL Server
authentication 8
SQL, definition 198
Standard geographies, definition 198
Starting TargetPro 8–11
Styles
label lines 35
label text 35
labels 50
Summary, user guide 6
Symbol Object, definition 198
T
TAB file, definition 199
Table, definition 199
Target Groups
displaying statistics 132–133
managing 128–133
TargetPro, menu 13–15
Template Editor
command 66
Text Cursor, definition 199
Text Style dialog 35
Thematic Layer, definition 199
Thematic Map
button 13
creating 29–33
definition 199
preferences 15, 31–33
using a map layer in current view 14
using all geographies in project 15
Index
using only geographies selected on map 15
Thematic Shading, definition 199
Thematic Variable, definition 199
Theme
legend 180
legend, definition 199
Theme Properties Button 26
True Median variable, creating 105
Types of reports 137
U
Units, map 41, 46, 48
Upgrading, custom reports 157–158
User guide summary 6
User Name 8
V
Value Of operator 104
Variables
creating 103–106
Expression 103–104
Geography Based Constant 105–106
Geography Based Parent 106
Radius Based 105
True Median 105
Vintage, definition 200
W
Welcome dialog 9
Window
Browser 52
definition 200
map 16
Windows authentication 8
Wizards
DTS Import/Export 69–71
Find a Point 42–45
Working
with geographies 37–62
with the Profile Manager 126
Workspace
arrangement 11
definition 200
Workspace Manager command 14
Z
Zoom
a map 22
area 22
buttons 22
layering 29
layering, examples 28
limit with map scale 184–185
Zoom In button 12
Zoom Out button 12
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