RLX2-IHx Series
802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
November 9, 2017
USER MANUAL
Your Feedback Please
We always want you to feel that you made the right decision to use our products. If you have suggestions, comments,
compliments or complaints about our products, documentation, or support, please write or call us.
How to Contact Us
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
9201 Camino Media, Suite 200
Bakersfield, CA 93311
+1 (661) 716-5100
+1 (661) 716-5101 (Fax)
www.prosoft-technology.com
support@prosoft-technology.com
RLX2-IHx Series User Manual
November 9, 2017
ProSoft Technology®, is a registered copyright of ProSoft Technology, Inc. All other brand or product names are or
may be trademarks of, and are used to identify products and services of, their respective owners.
In an effort to conserve paper, ProSoft Technology no longer includes printed manuals with our product shipments.
User Manuals, Datasheets, Sample Ladder Files, and Configuration Files are provided at our website:
www.prosoft-technology.com
Content Disclaimer
This documentation is not intended as a substitute for and is not to be used for determining suitability or reliability of
these products for specific user applications. It is the duty of any such user or integrator to perform the appropriate
and complete risk analysis, evaluation and testing of the products with respect to the relevant specific application or
use thereof. Neither ProSoft Technology nor any of its affiliates or subsidiaries shall be responsible or liable for
misuse of the information contained herein. Information in this document including illustrations, specifications and
dimensions may contain technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. ProSoft Technology makes no warranty or
representation as to its accuracy and assumes no liability for and reserves the right to correct such inaccuracies or
errors at any time without notice. If you have any suggestions for improvements or amendments or have found errors
in this publication, please notify us.
No part of this document may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including
photocopying, without express written permission of ProSoft Technology. All pertinent state, regional, and local safety
regulations must be observed when installing and using this product. For reasons of safety and to help ensure
compliance with documented system data, only the manufacturer should perform repairs to components. When
devices are used for applications with technical safety requirements, the relevant instructions must be followed.
Failure to use ProSoft Technology software or approved software with our hardware products may result in injury,
harm, or improper operating results. Failure to observe this information can result in injury or equipment damage.
Copyright © 2017 ProSoft Technology, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Printed documentation is available for purchase. Contact ProSoft Technology for pricing and availability.
Important Safety Information
The following Information and warnings pertaining to the radio module must be heeded:
WARNING – EXPLOSION HAZARD – DO NOT REPLACE ANTENNAS UNLESS POWER HAS BEEN SWITCHED
OFF OR THE AREA IS KNOWN TO BE NON-HAZARDOUS.
"THIS DEVICE CONTAINS ONE OF THE FOLLOWING TRANSMITTER MODULES:
FCC ID: OQ7IHG, RYK-WMIA199NI, NKRDCMA82, SWX-XR5
PLEASE SEE FCC ID LABEL ON BACK OF DEVICE."
"THIS DEVICE USES AN INTERNAL COMPACT FLASH RADIO MODULE AS THE PRIMARY RADIO
COMPONENT. THE COMPACT FLASH RADIO MODULE DOES NOT HAVE AN FCC ID LABEL. THE COMPACT
FLASH RADIO MODULE HAS NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS."
"THIS DEVICE COMPLIES WITH PART 15 OF THE FCC RULES. OPERATION IS SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING
TWO CONDITIONS: (1) THIS DEVICE MAY NOT CAUSE HARMFUL INTERFERENCE, AND (2) THIS DEVICE
MUST ACCEPT ANY INTERFERENCE RECEIVED, INCLUDING INTERFERENCE THAT MAY CAUSE
UNDESIRED OPERATION."
"CHANGES OR MODIFICATIONS NOT EXPRESSLY APPROVED BY THE PARTY RESPONSIBLE FOR
COMPLIANCE COULD VOID THE USER’s AUTHORITY TO OPERATE THE EQUIPMENT."
"This device is configured for operation in the USA during manufacturing. These configuration controls are not
present in the software with which the unit is shipped; therefore the end user cannot change the max power settings
or the country/region. The models sold & shipped within the U.S. are identified within the model number with –A as
part of the identifier."
China RoHS Hazardous Material Declaration Table
Industry Canada Requirements:
"THIS DEVICE HAS BEEN DESIGNED TO OPERATE WITH AN ANTENNA HAVING A MAXIMUM GAIN OF 24 dB.
AN ANTENNA HAVING A HIGHER GAIN IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED PER REGULATIONS OF INDUSTRY
CANADA. THE REQUIRED ANTENNA IMPEDANCE IS 50 OHMS."
"TO REDUCE POTENTIAL RADIO INTERFERENCE TO OTHER USERS, THE ANTENNA TYPE AND ITS GAIN
SHOULD BE CHOSEN SUCH THAT THE EQUIVALENT ISOTROPICALLY RADIATED POWER (EIRP) IS NOT
MORE THAN THAT REQUIRED FOR SUCCESSFUL COMMUNICATION."
"THE INSTALLER OF THIS RADIO EQUIPMENT MUST INSURE THAT THE ANTENNA IS LOCATED OR
POINTED SUCH THAT IT DOES NOT EMIT RF FIELD IN EXCESS OF HEALTH CANADA LIMITS FOR THE
GENERAL POPULATION; CONSULT SAFETY CODE 6, OBTAINABLE FROM HEALTH CANADA."
RLX2-IHNF, RLX2-IHA, RLX2-IHG, RLX2-IHW
This equipment is Suitable For Use in Class I, Division2, Groups A, B, C, D or Non-Hazardous Location Only.
WARNING – EXPLOSION HAZARD – Substitution of Any Components May Impair Suitability for Class I, Division 2.
WARNING – EXPLOSION HAZARD – Do not disconnect equipment unless power has been removed or the area is
known to be non-hazardous.
The unit is to be connected only to PoE networks without routing to the outside plant.
WARNING – EXPLOSION HAZARD – The SIM Card/Personality Module connection is for initial setup and
maintenance only. Do not use, connect, or disconnect unless area is known to be non-hazardous. Connection or
disconnection in an explosive atmosphere could result in explosion.
Device must be powered by a Class 2 Power Source.
Device is an open-type and is to be installed in an enclosure suitable for the environment.
RLX2-IHNF-W
The equipment shall be properly grounded with the external ground screw provided connected to building ground as
well as the antenna coaxial screen of the connector shall be grounded.
The common or earth side of the circuit is connected to the screen of the coaxial cable and to all accessible parts and
circuits.
Shall be installed in Restricted Access Location Only.
SUITABLE FOR USE IN CLASS I, DIVISION 2, GROUPS A, B, C AND D HAZARDOUS LOCATIONS, OR
NONHAZARDOUS LOCATIONS ONLY.
WARNING - EXPLOSION HAZARD - DO NOT DISCONNECT EQUIPMENT WHILE THE CIRCUIT IS LIVE OR
UNLESS THE AREA IS KNOWN TO BE FREE OF IGNITABLE CONCENTRATIONS.
WARNING - EXPLOSION HAZARD - SUBSTITUTION OF COMPONENT MAY IMPAIR SUITABILITY FOR CLASS I,
DIVISION 2.
WARNING – DO NOT CONNECT OR DISCONNECT WHEN ENERGIZED.
Antennas are to be installed in accordance with Control Drawing 06/2514
Unit does not comply to the cable assy requirements of ISA 12.12.01 but does comply with the ATEX standards
IEC60079-0 & IEC60079-15. In ATEX environments, do not connect/disconnect unless area is known to be nonhazardous.
Unit must be wired with Phoenix Contact M12 Cable Assemblies, Model Series SAC-HZ-XX-XX-XX/XXXXX/XXXXXXXXX, that are suitable for use in Class 1, Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D Hazardous Locations.
RLX2-IHNF-WC
The equipment shall be properly grounded with the external ground screw provided connected to building ground as
well as the antenna coaxial screen of the connector shall be grounded.
The common or earth side of the circuit is connected to the screen of the coaxial cable and to all accessible parts and
circuits.
Shall be installed in Restricted Access Location Only.
SUITABLE FOR USE IN CLASS I, DIVISION 2, GROUPS A, B, C AND D HAZARDOUS LOCATIONS, OR
NONHAZARDOUS LOCATIONS ONLY.
WARNING - EXPLOSION HAZARD - DO NOT DISCONNECT EQUIPMENT WHILE THE CIRCUIT IS LIVE OR
UNLESS THE AREA IS KNOWN TO BE FREE OF IGNITABLE CONCENTRATIONS.
WARNING - EXPLOSION HAZARD - SUBSTITUTION OF COMPONENT MAY IMPAIR SUITABILITY FOR CLASS I,
DIVISION 2.
WARNING – DO NOT CONNECT OR DISCONNECT WHEN ENERGIZED
Antennas are to be installed in accordance with Control Drawing 06/2514
RLX2-IHNF-TW
DGT Warning Statement
Article 12
Without permission, any company, firm or user shall not alter the frequency, increase the power, or change the
characteristics and functions of the original design of the certified lower power frequency electric machinery.
Article 14
The application of low power frequency electric machineries shall not affect the navigation safety nor interfere a legal
communication, if an interference is found, the service will be suspended until improvement is made and the
interference no longer exists.
Recommended Antennas
ProSoft offers a variety of Antennas and Cables for use with your RadioLinx device. The following is a sample of
available antennas. For a complete list and description, please visit our website:
www.prosoft-technology.com.
ProSoft Part Number
Max Gain and Type
A2403NBH-OC
3 dBi Omni N-BH jack whip less 2.4GHz
A2404NBHW-OC
4 dBi Omni N BH jack low profile 2.4GHz
A2404NJ-OC
4 dBi Omni N jack collinear with mounting hardware 2.4GHz
A2405S-OA
5 dBi Omni RP-SMA articulating 2.4GHz
A2405S-OS
5 dBi Omni RP-SMA straight 2.4GHz
A2406NJ-OC
6 dBi Omni N jack collinear with mounting hardware 2.4GHz
A2406NJ-OCD
6 dBi Omni N jack heavy duty collinear with mounting hardware 2.4GHz
A2406S3-DP
6 dBi Panel RP-SMA MIMO antenna with 3 foot pigtail 2.4GHz
A2408NJ-DP
8 dBi Directional patch panel N jack with mounting hardware 2.4GHz
A2408NJ-OC
8 dBi Omni N jack collinear with mounting hardware 2.4GHz
A2409NJ-OCD
9 dBi Omni N jack heavy duty collinear with mounting hardware 2.4GHz
A2410NJ-DY
10 dBi Directional N jack Yagi with mounting hardware 2.4GHz
A2410NJ-OCM
10 dBi Omni N jack collinear for marine environment, 2.4GHz
A2412NJ3-DP
12 dBi Panel N-Jack MIMO antenna 2.4GHz
A2413NJ-DP
13 dBi Directional patch panel N jack with mounting hardware 2.4GHz
A2415NJ-DY
15 dBi Directional N jack Yagi with mounting hardware 2.4GHz
A2416NJ-DS
16 dBi Directional 120 degree sector N jack with mounting hardware 2.4GHz
A2419NJ-DB
19 dBi Directional N jack parabolic with mounting hardware 2.4GHz
A2419NJ-DP
19 dBi patch panel N jack with mounting hardware 2.4GHz
A2424NJ-DB
24 dBi Directional N jack parabolic with mounting hardware 2.4GHz
A2502S-OA
2 dBi Omni RP-SMA articulating 2.4/5GHz
A2506NJ-OC
6/8 dBi Omni N jack collinear with mounting hardware 2.4/5GHz
A5003S-OBH
3 dBi Omni RP-SMA bulkhead mount with 5' LMR195 pigtail 5GHz
A5006NJ-OC
6 dBi Omni N jack collinear with mounting hardware 5GHz
A5007S3-DP
7 dBi Panel RP-SMA MIMO antenna with 3 foot pigtail 5GHz
A5009NJ-OC
9 dBi Omni N jack collinear with mounting hardware 5GHz
A5017NJ3-DP
17 dBi Panel N-Jack MIMO antenna 5GHz
A5019NJ-DP
19 dBi directional N jack panel with mounting hardware 5GHz
A5024NJ-DP
24 dBi directional N jack panel with mounting hardware 5GHz
A5812NJ-OC
12 dBi Omni N jack collinear with mounting hardware 5.8GHz
A5829NJ-DB
29 dBi directional N jack parabolic with mounting hardware 5.8GHz
A2503S3-O
3/4 dBi Omni RP-SMA MIMO antenna with 3 foot pigtail 2.4/5GHz
A2503S6-O
3/4 dBi Omni RP-SMA Dual MIMO antenna with 3 foot pigtail 2.4/5GHz
A2506NJ3-O
6 dBi Omni N-Jack Single MIMO antenna with 3 foot pigtail 2.4/5GHz
Note: An adapter may be needed for some of the listed antennas to operate with certain radios.
Antenna Spacing Requirements for User Safety
It is important to keep the radio's antenna a safe distance from the user. To meet the requirements of FCC part
2.1091 for radio frequency radiation exposure, this radio must be used in such a way as to guarantee at least 20 cm
between the antenna and users. Greater distances are required for high-gain antennas. The FCC requires a
minimum distance of 1 mW *cm2 power density from the user (or 20 cm, whichever is greater).
Note: If a specific application requires proximity of less than 20 cm, the application must be approved through the
FCC for compliance to part 2.1093.
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Contents
User Manual
Contents
Your Feedback Please ........................................................................................................................ 2
How to Contact Us .............................................................................................................................. 2
Content Disclaimer .............................................................................................................................. 2
Important Safety Information ............................................................................................................... 3
Industry Canada Requirements: ......................................................................................................... 4
RLX2-IHNF, RLX2-IHA, RLX2-IHG, RLX2-IHW ................................................................................. 4
RLX2-IHNF-W ..................................................................................................................................... 4
RLX2-IHNF-WC .................................................................................................................................. 5
RLX2-IHNF-TW ................................................................................................................................... 5
Recommended Antennas ................................................................................................................... 6
Antenna Spacing Requirements for User Safety ................................................................................ 7
1
Start Here
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.3.1
1.3.2
1.3.3
1.4
1.4.1
1.4.2
1.4.3
1.4.4
1.4.5
1.5
1.5.1
1.5.2
1.5.3
2
15
Before You Begin .................................................................................................... 15
About This Manual .................................................................................................. 15
About RLX2-IHx series Industrial Hotspot Products ............................................... 16
Product Overview .................................................................................................... 16
General Features .................................................................................................... 17
Antenna Port Connections ...................................................................................... 18
Package Contents ................................................................................................... 20
RLX2-IHA, -IHG, -IHNF, -IHW ................................................................................. 20
RLX2-IHNF-W ......................................................................................................... 21
RLX2-IHNF-W Cables (sold separately) ................................................................. 21
RLX2-IHNF-WC....................................................................................................... 22
Industrial Hotspot Bench Test Kit (RLX-IHBTK) ..................................................... 22
Installing the RadioLinx Industrial Hotspot Browser ................................................ 22
IH Browser System Requirements .......................................................................... 23
Installing IH Browser Software ................................................................................ 23
Starting the IH Browser ........................................................................................... 24
Network Planning
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.4.1
2.5
2.5.1
2.6
3
Installing the ProSoft Wireless Designer ................................................................. 26
Installation Questions .............................................................................................. 27
Planning the Physical Installation ............................................................................ 27
ProSoft Wireless Designer ...................................................................................... 28
Designer Functional Specifications ......................................................................... 30
Testing the Network Installation .............................................................................. 30
Improving Signal Quality ......................................................................................... 31
Detecting 802.11 Access Points ............................................................................. 32
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
3.1
3.2
3.2.1
3.2.2
3.2.3
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
25
33
Preparing the Configuration Environment ............................................................... 34
Making Power and Data Connections ..................................................................... 34
RLX2-IHW, IHNF, IHG, IHA Radio Connections ..................................................... 34
RLX2-IHNF-W Radio Connections .......................................................................... 35
RLX2-IHNF-WC Radio Connections ....................................................................... 37
Page 9 of 231
Contents
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
3.3
3.4
3.4.1
3.4.2
3.4.3
3.4.4
3.5
3.5.1
3.5.2
3.5.3
3.5.4
3.5.5
3.6
3.7
4
Radio Power-Up...................................................................................................... 41
Using the IH Browser to Configure Radios ............................................................. 41
Viewing the Radios in the IH Browser .................................................................... 41
Refreshing the Display in the IH Browser ............................................................... 42
Setting the Radio IP Address in the IH Browser ..................................................... 42
Assigning a Temporary IP Address ........................................................................ 42
Configuring a Radio - Getting Started .................................................................... 44
Connecting to the Radio Configuration Utility ......................................................... 44
Setting Up a Master Radio ...................................................................................... 46
Configuring a Repeater Radio ................................................................................ 48
Configuring a Bridging Client Radio........................................................................ 50
Configuring a Client Radio ...................................................................................... 53
Viewing a Radio's Configuration ............................................................................. 55
Replacing an Existing Radio ................................................................................... 55
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
4.1
4.1.1
4.1.2
4.1.3
4.1.4
4.1.5
4.2
4.2.1
4.2.2
4.2.3
4.3
4.3.1
4.3.2
4.3.3
4.4
4.4.1
4.4.2
4.4.3
4.4.4
4.4.5
4.5
4.5.1
4.5.2
4.6
4.6.1
4.6.2
4.6.3
4.6.4
4.6.5
4.7
4.7.1
4.7.2
4.7.3
4.7.4
4.8
4.9
Page 10 of 231
57
Connecting to the Radio Configuration Utility ......................................................... 57
Read-Only Fields .................................................................................................... 59
Configuration Help .................................................................................................. 59
Apply Changes........................................................................................................ 62
Cancelling Changes ................................................................................................ 62
Factory Defaults ...................................................................................................... 62
Viewing Radio Status .............................................................................................. 63
Viewing Available Parents for a Radio ................................................................... 65
Viewing the Radio Address Table .......................................................................... 66
Viewing the Radio Port Status ................................................................................ 67
Configuring Basic Settings ...................................................................................... 70
Basic Wireless Settings .......................................................................................... 71
Wireless Security Settings ...................................................................................... 74
Access Settings ...................................................................................................... 82
Configuring Advanced Settings .............................................................................. 83
Advanced Wireless Settings ................................................................................... 84
Roam Control Settings ............................................................................................ 88
Location Services Settings ..................................................................................... 90
Personality Module Settings ................................................................................... 91
Changing Password Settings.................................................................................. 93
Configuring Parent Link Settings ............................................................................ 94
Parent Selection Method Settings .......................................................................... 95
Repeater Parameters Settings ............................................................................... 96
Configuring Advanced Network Settings ................................................................ 99
IGMP Settings ....................................................................................................... 100
Precision Time Protocol ........................................................................................ 102
STP Settings ......................................................................................................... 103
SNMP Agent ......................................................................................................... 107
Cable Break Detection .......................................................................................... 108
Configuring Serial Settings ................................................................................... 109
Serial Encapsulation Mode Setting ....................................................................... 110
Remote IP Settings ............................................................................................... 111
Packet Delineation Settings .................................................................................. 112
Port Settings ......................................................................................................... 114
Configuring Quality of Service (QoS) Settings ..................................................... 115
Configuring VLAN Settings ................................................................................... 117
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
5
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
5.1
5.1.1
5.1.2
5.1.3
5.1.4
5.1.5
5.1.6
5.1.7
5.1.8
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
5.8
5.8.1
5.9
5.9.1
5.9.2
5.9.3
5.9.4
5.9.5
5.9.6
6
6.3.1
6.3.2
6.4
6.5
7
7.3.1
7.3.2
8
8.4.1
8.4.2
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
153
Adding the Radio to RSLogix 5000 ....................................................................... 154
Importing the Add-On Instruction .......................................................................... 157
RLX2 Controller Tags ............................................................................................ 161
RLX2.CONTROL ................................................................................................... 161
RLX2.STATUS ...................................................................................................... 162
Appendix B - Radio Hardware
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
147
Checking the Ethernet Cable ................................................................................ 148
LED Display ........................................................................................................... 148
Resetting a RLX2-IHx series Radio ...................................................................... 150
Resetting the RLX2-IHNF-W and RLX2-IHNF-WC ............................................... 150
Resetting All Other Radios .................................................................................... 151
Unable to scan for AP's error message................................................................. 151
Finding Missing Radios ......................................................................................... 152
Appendix A - Adding a Radio to RSLogix 5000
7.1
7.2
7.3
119
Viewing the Radios in the IH Browser ................................................................... 120
Refreshing the Display in the IH Browser ............................................................. 120
Defining the Scan Parameters in the IH Browser ................................................. 120
Freezing the Display in the IH Browser ................................................................. 121
Changing IH Browser Columns in List View.......................................................... 122
Switching between List and Topology Views ........................................................ 122
Printing the View in the IH Browser ....................................................................... 127
Importing and Exporting IH Browser Data ............................................................. 127
Hiding the Toolbar and Status Bar in the IH Browser ........................................... 128
Viewing the Radio Properties ................................................................................ 128
Setting the Radio IP Address in the IH Browser ................................................... 130
Assigning a Temporary IP Address ....................................................................... 131
Viewing Additional Data in the IH Browser............................................................ 132
Connecting to the Radio Configuration Utility ....................................................... 132
Updating the Radio Firmware ............................................................................... 134
Pinging Devices on the Network ........................................................................... 135
Setting the Ping Parameters ................................................................................. 136
Viewing Network Data in the IH Browser .............................................................. 137
Viewing Wireless Clients in the IH Browser .......................................................... 138
Viewing Ethernet Nodes in the IH Browser ........................................................... 139
Viewing the Scan List in the IH Browser ............................................................... 140
Viewing the Port Table in the IH Browser ............................................................. 142
Viewing the Radio Event Log in the IH Browser ................................................... 143
Viewing Parent Radios in the IH Browser ............................................................. 145
Diagnostics and Troubleshooting
6.1
6.2
6.3
Contents
User Manual
165
Radio Power Requirements (RLX2-IHNF-W)........................................................ 165
Radio Power Requirements (All other radios) ....................................................... 167
Ethernet Cable Specifications ............................................................................... 169
Ethernet Cable Configuration ................................................................................ 170
Ethernet Cable Configuration (RLX2-IHNF-W) ..................................................... 170
Ethernet Cable Configuration (all other radios) ..................................................... 171
Page 11 of 231
Contents
User Manual
9
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix C - RLX2-IHx 5 GHz Radio DFS Support
9.1
9.1.1
10
DFS Radio Operations .......................................................................................... 173
Selecting a DFS 5 GHz Channel .......................................................................... 174
Appendix D - RLX2-IHx series Virtual LAN (VLAN) Functionality
10.1
10.2
10.3
11
173
Transparent Support of VLAN Tags (802.1Q) ...................................................... 178
Port/Radio-based VLAN Tagging with Managed Switches .................................. 179
Port/Radio-based VLAN Tagging without Managed Switches ............................. 180
Appendix E - EtherNet/IP and Modbus TCP/IP Support
11.1
11.1.1
11.2
177
181
Modbus TCP/IP Server Support ........................................................................... 181
Modbus Memory Map Diagnostic Information ...................................................... 182
EtherNet/IP™ Server Support .............................................................................. 183
12
Appendix F - Master Channel-Frequency Table
185
13
Appendix G - Antenna Configuration
187
13.1
13.1.1
13.1.2
13.1.3
13.1.4
13.2
13.2.1
13.2.2
13.2.3
13.2.4
13.3
13.3.1
13.3.2
13.3.3
13.3.4
13.4
14
Antennas ............................................................................................................... 187
Control Drawing .................................................................................................... 188
Antenna Pattern .................................................................................................... 189
Antenna Gain ........................................................................................................ 190
Antenna Polarity ................................................................................................... 190
Antenna Types ...................................................................................................... 191
Whip Antennas...................................................................................................... 191
Collinear Array Antennas ...................................................................................... 191
Yagi Array Antenna ............................................................................................... 192
Parabolic Reflector Antennas ............................................................................... 193
RLX2-IHx series Approved Antennas ................................................................... 193
Approved Antenna Table ...................................................................................... 194
Approved Antennas in Europe/CE ........................................................................ 194
Approved Antennas in Mexico .............................................................................. 195
Approved Antennas with Power Amp ................................................................... 195
Antenna Location, Spacing, and Mounting ........................................................... 196
Appendix H - FCC Emission Regulations
14.1
14.2
14.3
14.4
197
2.4 GHz Band, Point-To-Multipoint ....................................................................... 197
2.4 GHz Band, Point-To-Point .............................................................................. 198
5 GHz Bands, Point-To-Multipoint ........................................................................ 198
5 GHz Bands, Point-To-Point ............................................................................... 199
15
Appendix I - Compatibility with ProSoft RLXIB Series Radios
201
16
Appendix J - Detailed Radio Specifications
203
16.1
Page 12 of 231
RLX2-IHA Detailed Specifications ........................................................................ 203
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
16.1.1
16.2
16.2.1
16.3
16.3.1
16.4
16.4.1
Contents
User Manual
Agency Approvals & Certifications ........................................................................ 204
RLX2-IHG Detailed Specifications ........................................................................ 204
Agency Approvals & Certifications ........................................................................ 205
RLX2-IHNF, -W, -WC Detailed Specifications ...................................................... 206
Agency Approvals & Certifications ........................................................................ 208
RLX2-IHW Detailed Specifications ........................................................................ 208
Agency Approvals & Certifications ........................................................................ 209
17
Appendix K - Application Examples
211
18
Support, Service & Warranty
213
18.1
18.2
19
Contacting Technical Support ............................................................................... 213
Warranty Information ............................................................................................. 215
Glossary of Terms
Index
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
217
229
Page 13 of 231
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
User Manual
Page 14 of 231
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
1
Start Here
User Manual
Start Here
In This Chapter
1.1

Before You Begin .................................................................................. 15

About This Manual ................................................................................ 15

About RLX2-IHx series Industrial Hotspot Products .............................. 16

Package Contents ................................................................................. 20

Installing the RadioLinx Industrial Hotspot Browser .............................. 22
Before You Begin
For most applications, the installation and configuration steps described in the
following topics work without additional programming. ProSoft Technology
strongly recommends that you complete the steps in this chapter before
developing a custom application.
1.2
About This Manual
This manual covers the entire RadioLinx® RLX2-IHx series Industrial Hotspot™
series of radio products. There are six models available in this product line:
Model
Standards
Maximum Output Power
RLX2-IHA
IEEE 802.11a
24 dBm (250 mW)
RLX2-IHG
IEEE 802.11b/g
24 dBm (250 mW)
RLX2-IHNF
IEEE 802.11a/b/g/n
17 dBm (50 mW)
RLX2-IHNF-W
IEEE 802.11a/b/g/n
17 dBm (50 mW)
RLX2-IHNF-WC
IEEE 802.11a/b/g/n
17 dBm (50mW)
RLX2-IHW
IEEE 802.11a/b/g
20 dBm (100 mW)
Although they have different operating frequencies and output power levels,
these radios all operate in a similar fashion. Different models operating on
common frequencies can communicate with each other. Furthermore, RLX2-IHx
series radios can communicate with ProSoft Technology’s legacy RLXIB series
of radios (except the RLXIB-IHN). See Appendix I - Compatibility with ProSoft
RLXIB Series Radios (page 200) for details on the specific differences between
the RLX2-IHx series and RLXIB series products.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 15 of 231
Start Here
User Manual
1.3
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
About RLX2-IHx series Industrial Hotspot Products
1.3.1 Product Overview
The RLX2-IHx series radio is an industrial high-speed Ethernet radio. Use it in
place of Ethernet cables to save money, extend range, and make connections
that may not otherwise be feasible. The radio operates as a wireless Ethernet
switch. Any data that can be sent over a wired network can also be sent over the
radio.
The RLX2-IHx series radio series is certified for unlicensed operation in the
United States, Canada, Europe and other approved countries at 2.4 and 5 GHz.
Contact ProSoft Technology for a list of currently approved antennas. With
approved high-gain antennas, the radios can achieve distances over 5 miles with
line-of-site between them. Multiple repeaters can be used to extend this range to
far greater distances.
A highly reliable wireless network can be developed by creating redundant
wireless paths. Multiple master radios can be installed without any special
programming or control. Repeater radios can connect to any master at any time;
if one master goes down, the repeater connects to another. Likewise, if a
repeater goes down, any repeater that was connected to it can reconnect to a
different repeater, keeping the network intact. Creating large, self-healing treelike networks can be done in this fashion. Fully redundant paths are possible
because the Spanning Tree protocol in the radios disables and enables paths as
necessary to avoid Ethernet loops, which would otherwise halt communications.
In addition to acting as a switch, every master or repeater radio in an RLX2-IHx
series wireless network can simultaneously act as an 802.11 access point. This
allows 802.11 Wi-Fi clients to connect and roam between radios for monitoring of
the wireless network or general network access. (An example of an 802.11 client
is a laptop with Wi-Fi™). The RLX2-IHx series has a special client mode that
allows connection of any Ethernet device to any existing 802.11 access point,
regardless of the brand.
Note: Wi-Fi is a trademark of the Wi-Fi Alliance, used to describe the underlying technology of
wireless local area networks (WLAN) based on the IEEE 802.11 specifications.
A high level of security is inherent with AES (Advanced Encryption Standard)
encryption. TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity Protocol) is also available. If necessary,
adding WEP128 or WEP64 (Wired Equivalent Protocol) encryption in addition to
AES or TKIP for clients that do not support AES can be done. If desired, a simple
Media Access Control (MAC) filter table also restricts the radios or clients that
can link to a selected radio according to the MAC IDs entered in the table.
The radio is designed for industrial applications with a metal enclosure, DIN-rail
mounting, and shock and vibration tested to IEC 60068.
Page 16 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Start Here
User Manual
The RLX2-IHx series radio series is easy to use. Access the built-in web pages
with any web browser to configure the radio. Also, an SNMP manager can be
used for configuration. The radio comes with a Windows-based utility called IH
Browser. It finds all the radios on the network and lists information about them. A
topology view in the IH Browser shows how the wireless network is linked
together at any point in time. Firmware updates can be done at anytime from
anywhere on the network. This includes over the wireless link or over the
Internet.
ProSoft Technology radios can easily be installed into new or existing systems.
You can download sample programs, utilities, firmware images, and
documentation for your radio from the ProSoft Technology website (www.prosofttechnology.com). If your computer does not have access to the Internet, you
must download the software from the ProSoft Technology website to removable
media, and then copy it to your computer.
1.3.2 General Features
The RadioLinx 802.11 Industrial Hotspots are high-speed wireless Ethernet
radios with Power over Ethernet (PoE) and Serial Encapsulation. All radios
operate at speeds up to 54 Mbps, and the RLX2-IHNF operates at speeds up to
300 Mbps. Designed for industrial installations, the RLX2-IHx series offers many
features including hazardous location certifications, Bridging, IGMP Snooping,
OFDM for noise immunity, repeater mode to extend range, QoS, VLANs,
RADIUS Server support, automatic parent selection for self-healing, OPC server
diagnostics, extended temperature, high vibration/shock and DIN-rail mounting.
For individual radio product specifications and agency approvals, see Appendix J
- Detailed Radio Specifications (page 203). For descriptions of the LEDs, see
LED Display (page 148).
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 17 of 231
Start Here
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
RLX2-IHA
RLX2-IHG
RLX2-IHNF
RLX2-IHNF-W
RLX2-IHNF-WC
RLX2-IHW
1.3.3 Antenna Port Connections
This section only addresses physical antenna connections. Actual antenna
selection and configuration is discussed in other chapters in this manual. You
must install antennas in accordance with Control Drawing 06/2514. See
Appendix G - Antenna Configuration (page 187) for further details.
Each radio must have an antenna connected to the Main antenna port on the
RLX2-IHA/G/W radio models. The RLX2-IHNF radio supports up to three
antennas, configurable on the Advanced Settings page. Match the #antennas
control (Port A, Port A – Port C, or Port A – Port B – Port C) to the number of
antennas that are in use. Antennas must be connected to the radio when in use
on the network.
Mount all antennas that are directly connected to the radio so that polarization is
the same. You can mount antennas with an N-jack connector directly to the radio
using an N-plug to SMA-RP-plug adapter. Screw the antenna onto the antenna
port connector until snug.
Page 18 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Start Here
User Manual
For remote placement of antennas, you may use an extension cable with Nplugs. Because the antenna cable attenuates the RF signal, use an antenna
cable length that is only as long as necessary to ensure optimum performance.
Important: If the radio is to be used in a hazardous location, you must mount the radio in an
enclosure approved for hazardous locations.
Each RLX2-IHx series radio has active antenna connectors on the top as shown
below:
RLX2-IHA
RLX2-IHG

Single Antenna Port
RLX2-IHNF

3 Active Antenna Ports

Allows MIMO operation
RLX2-IHNF-W

3 Active Antenna Ports

Allows MIMO operation

Weatherproof

Hazardous Location

Class I, DIV2 compliant
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 19 of 231
Start Here
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
RLX2-IHNF-WC

3 active antenna ports

MIMO operation

Hazardous location

Conduit version

Class I, DIV 2 compliant
RLX2-IHW

Right antenna port for transmit
and receive

Left antenna port for receive
diversity to improve
performance in some
applications
1.4
Package Contents
1.4.1 RLX2-IHA, -IHG, -IHNF, -IHW
The following components are included with standard RLX2-IHx series radio
products:
Qty.
Part Name
Part Number
Part Description
1
RLX2-IHx series
Radio
Varies
RadioLinx® RLX2-IHx series 802.11
Industrial Hotspot
1
Personality Module
001-005700
Industrial Grade microSD card (blank, in
plastic bag)
1
Power Connector
002-0116
Mating power connector for the RLX2-IHx
series radios, for attachment to customer’s
power supply.
1
Power Connector
Wiring Tool
357-0061
Tool to assist wiring the power connector.
1
Antenna
A2502S-OA
2 dBi Omni RP-SMA articulating, 2.4/5GHz.
This antenna is suitable for all RLX2-IHx
series radio products.
Page 20 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Start Here
User Manual
You can download sample programs, utilities, firmware images, and
documentation for your radio from the ProSoft Technology website (www.prosofttechnology.com). If your computer does not have access to the Internet, you
must download the software from the ProSoft Technology website to removable
media, and then copy it to your computer.
1.4.2 RLX2-IHNF-W
The following components are included with Weatherproof RLX2-IHx series radio
products:
Qty.
Part Name
Part Number
Part Description
1
RLX2-IHx series
Radio
RLX2-IHNF-W
RadioLinx® RLX2-IHx series 802.11
Industrial Hotspot Weatherproof
2
U-mounting brackets
Pole mounting brackets
1
IP67 M12 Cap
Water tight cap
You can download sample programs, utilities, firmware images, and
documentation for your radio from the ProSoft Technology website (www.prosofttechnology.com). If your computer does not have access to the Internet, you
must download the software from the ProSoft Technology website to removable
media, and then copy it to your computer.
1.4.3 RLX2-IHNF-W Cables (sold separately)
The following cables are for outdoor locations:
Part Name
Part Number
Part Description
Locking Clip
CUL-M12LOCKCLIP
7 foot (2m), M12 to RJ45, Network
Cable/ PoE
or
33 foot (10m), M12 to RJ45, Network
Cable/PoE
CULRJ45-M12-007 7 foot Network PoE cable
CULRJ45-M12-033 33 foot Network PoE cable
33 foot (10m), M12 to unterminated
CULPWR-M12-033 33 foot Power Cable
leads, Power Cable
or
10 foot (3m), M12 to unterminated leads, CUPLWR-M12-010 10 foot Power Cable
Power Cable
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 21 of 231
Start Here
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
1.4.4 RLX2-IHNF-WC
The following components are included with Weatherproof Hazardous Location
RLX2-IHx series radio products:
Qty.
Part Name
Part Number
Part Description
1
RLX2-IHx series
Radio
RLX2-IHNF-WC
RadioLinx® RLX2-IHx series 802.11
Industrial Hotspot
1
5 foot CAT 6 Ethernet
PoE cable
Preinstalled 6 foot CAT 6 Ethernet PoE
cable
1
5 foot flying leads
power cable
Preinstalled 6 foot flying leads power cable
2
U bolts for mounting
Pole mounting brackets
You can download sample programs, utilities, firmware images, and
documentation for your radio from the ProSoft Technology website (www.prosofttechnology.com). If your computer does not have access to the Internet, you
must download the software from the ProSoft Technology website to removable
media, and then copy it to your computer.
1.4.5 Industrial Hotspot Bench Test Kit (RLX-IHBTK)
The standard radio products are intended for use with production systems and do
not include accessory power supplies or cables. For bench testing of radios, an
optional bench test kit provides these accessories:
1.5
Qty.
Part Name
Part Number
Part Description
1
Power Supply
RL-PS007-2
AC Power Adapter, 12V1.6A w/2 pin & 4
plug Set
1
Cable
RL-CBL025
5 foot Ethernet Straight-Thru Cable
1
Cable
085-1007
6 foot RS232 serial cable
1
Adapter
HRDNULL-DB9
RS232 null modem serial adapter
Installing the RadioLinx Industrial Hotspot Browser
Use the RadioLinx Industrial Hotspot Browser Configuration Tool (hereafter
called the IH Browser) to set up and configure the RLX2-IHx series radios. It is
designed for personal computers running the Microsoft Windows operating
systems.
Page 22 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Start Here
User Manual
1.5.1 IH Browser System Requirements
The IH browser is designed to run on Microsoft Windows, and is supported on
the following versions:
 Microsoft Windows XP professional 32-bit with Service Pack 3
 Microsoft Windows 7 Professional 32- or 64-bit, with Service Pack 1
 Microsoft Windows 8 Release Preview 32- or 64-bit
Other Microsoft Windows operating system versions may work but have not been
tested by ProSoft Technology and are not officially supported.
The minimum hardware requirements for the IH Browser are:
 Pentium® II 450 MHz minimum. Pentium III 733 MHz (or better)
recommended
 128 Mbytes of RAM minimum, 256 Mbytes or more of RAM recommended
 100 MB available hard drive space
 256-color VGA graphics adapter, 800 x 600 minimum resolution (True Color
1024 x 768 resolution or better recommended)
 At least one 100BASET or 1000BASET network interface. A second interface
is often useful to setup a small private network for initial configuration and
testing.
In addition, these items may be needed:
 An RS-232 port on the PC or a USB-to-serial convertor cable, to use serial
encapsulation features or to access system debugging information.
 An internet connection to download updated product information from the
ProSoft Technology website at www.prosoft-technology.com.
1.5.2 Installing IH Browser Software
You must install the RadioLinx Industrial Hotspot Browser (IH Browser) software
to configure the radio. You can always get the newest version of ProSoft
Configuration Builder from the ProSoft Technology website (www.prosofttechnology.com).
To install IH Browser from the ProSoft Technology website
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Open your web browser and navigate to www.prosoft-technology.com.
Use the search box on the ProSoft Technology page to search for IH Browser
and then click the link for the RadioLinx IH Browser.
Click the Download tab and then click RadioLinx IH Browser to download the
latest version of the IH Browser.
Choose SAVE or SAVE FILE when prompted.
Save the file to your Windows Desktop, so that you can find it easily when
you have finished downloading.
When the download is complete, locate and double-click the zip file. This
extracts the installation file (RadioLinx IH Browser 3.130.msi or a newer
version).
Double-click the .msi file to install the IH Browser.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 23 of 231
Start Here
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
If your computer does not have access to the Internet, you must download the
software from the ProSoft Technology website to removable media, and then
copy it to your computer.
1.5.3 Starting the IH Browser
To start the RadioLinx Industrial Hotspot Browser (ID Browser), click START >
ALL PROGRAMS > PROSOFT > IH BROWSER. If the software is not installed, see
Installing IH Browser Software (page 23). For more information on the IH
Browser and it's functions, see Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
(page 119).
Page 24 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
2
Network Planning
User Manual
Network Planning
In This Chapter

Installing the ProSoft Wireless Designer ............................................... 26

Installation Questions ............................................................................ 27

Planning the Physical Installation .......................................................... 27

ProSoft Wireless Designer .................................................................... 28

Testing the Network Installation ............................................................ 30

Detecting 802.11 Access Points ............................................................ 32
It may be helpful to create a network plan before configuring and installing your
RLX2-IHx series radio wireless network. This topic assumes a bridge network of
Master and Repeater radios. Client radios can also be configured to work with
devices on existing wireless LANs. For more information, see Configuring a
Client Radio (page 53).
The simplest way to design the physical network of radios, antennas, connectors,
cables, amplifiers and other accessories is to use the ProSoft Wireless Designer.
This is a free software application that determines the hardware needs based on
your answers to a few questions.
The ProSoft Wireless Designer generates a Bill of Materials specifying all the
components you need for the installation. ProSoft Wireless Designer is included
on the ProSoft Technology media supplied with the RLX2-IHx series radio, and is
also available by downloading it from the ProSoft Technology website. See
Installing the ProSoft Wireless Designer (page 26).
1 To begin, identify the potential radio locations. For example, the you may
install the Master radio near a PC in a central plant location. You can then
use this PC to locate and configure the radios through the IH Browser. If the
plant is an oil refinery, for example, you may need to install radios installed
near the oil tanks.
2 The next important issue is how to link the radios. Unless the radios are very
close together, make sure that each pair of radio antennas in the network has
a clear line of sight between them. In other words, you must be able to see
from one antenna to another, either with your eyes or with binoculars.
3 If there is no line of sight between antennas, you must locate an additional
site for a Repeater radio. The Repeater radio creates a bridge between the
radio antennas.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 25 of 231
Network Planning
User Manual
4
5
6
7
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Choose the appropriate antennas for the network. You may need a power
amplifier (available from ProSoft Technology) if an antenna is connected to
the radio by a long cable. Signal loss at the radio is proportional to the
distance between an antenna and its radio (longer cable, more signal loss).
ProSoft Wireless Designer can suggest suitable antennas for the application
based on frequency band, data rate, distance, power output level, and other
factors.
Consider drawing the network plan on paper. Assign a logical name to each
radio in your plan. You can then assign these names to the Radios during
configuration.
A site survey may be helpful as part of the planning. You can hire ProSoft
Technology or a surveyor to perform a survey, or you can conduct the survey
on your own.
Plan to protect radios from direct exposure to weather, and provide an
adequate, stable power supply. Make sure the plan complies with the radio’s
power requirements and cable specifications.
Important: Radios and antennas must be located at least 8 inches (20 cm) away from personnel.
2.1
Installing the ProSoft Wireless Designer
You can install the ProSoft Wireless Designer software to help you design your
RLX2-IHx series radio network. You can always get the newest version of
ProSoft Wireless Designer from the ProSoft Technology website (www.prosofttechnology.com).
To install ProSoft Wireless Designer from the ProSoft Technology website
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Open your web browser and navigate to www.prosoft-technology.com.
Use the search box on the ProSoft Technology page to search for ProSoft
Wireless Designer and then click the link for the ProSoft Wireless Designer.
Click the Downloads tab and then click ProSoft Wireless Designer to
download the latest version of the software.
Choose SAVE or SAVE FILE when prompted.
Save the file to your Windows Desktop, so that you can find it easily when
you have finished downloading.
When the download is complete, locate and double-click the zip file. This
extracts the installation file (Installer.msi).
Double-click the .msi file to install the software.
You can download sample programs, utilities, firmware images, and
documentation for your radio from the ProSoft Technology website (www.prosofttechnology.com). If your computer does not have access to the Internet, you
must download the software from the ProSoft Technology website to removable
media, and then copy it to your computer.
Page 26 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
2.2
Network Planning
User Manual
Installation Questions
The following questions will help in getting familiar with the system.
How many radios are in the network?
Master ID:
Repeater ID:
Client ID:
Locations:
Is there a clear line of sight between them?
What type of antennas will be used in the
network?
Will you use the Personality Module configuration
restoration feature (MicroSD card)?
2.3
Planning the Physical Installation
A network's performance is affected by attributes specific to the installation site.
Consider the following cautions:
 Add Repeater radios to extend the distance to the next radio or where line of
sight to the next radio is limited.
 Radios or antennas CANNOT be placed within 8 inches (20 cm) of personnel.
Though radio frequency communication is reliable, sometimes the performance
can be affected by other factors. A good network installation plan includes both
the time and the resources for testing the performance and modifying the
installation.
Test the installation plan before the network installation is complete. See Testing
the Network Installation (page 30).
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 27 of 231
Network Planning
User Manual
2.4
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
ProSoft Wireless Designer
ProSoft Wireless Designer is a free software tool from ProSoft Technology that
simplifies the task of creating a ProSoft wireless installation. The following image
shows an example of a wireless radio network an estimate of signal quality
between two radios.
Page 28 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Network Planning
User Manual
ProSoft Wireless Designer can also compute a Bill Of Materials (BOM) for a
complete radio installation, including antennas, cables, connectors and other
required materials.
You can dowload the ProSoft Wireless Designer from the ProSoft Technology
website. It provides a variety of views of your networks, along with an accurate
description of each site in a wireless network. These include:
 Visual diagram of site layout
 Location (latitude/longitude, based on GPS coordinates)
 Radio type, frequency range, and country-specific channel and power
requirements
 Length, type and estimated signal loss for cables
 Required accessories, including lightning protection, cable adaptors and
antennas
 Complete parts list
ProSoft Technology technical personnel use ProSoft Wireless Designer if you
request a site audit for customers, and then give you a complete list of
components and a detailed description for each site and link. You can use this
information to understand and visualize your wireless network, and have the
necessary information for technical support and maintenance.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 29 of 231
Network Planning
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
2.4.1 Designer Functional Specifications
ProSoft Wireless Designer includes the following features:
 It contains a database of all currently available RadioLinx radios, antennas,
cables, connectors and accessories.
 It exports parts lists, site and link details, and setup Wizard settings into a
variety of common file formats for import into applications such as
spreadsheets, databases, and word processors.
 It checks wireless link feasibility based on path length and recommended
accessories.
 It predicts signal strength based on distance, local regulations, and hardware
choices.
 It fully documents the ProSoft Technology wireless network plan.
2.5
Testing the Network Installation
Use the following steps to test your wireless network before you permanently
install the radios and antennas.
Note: If you are using the Personality Module feature (MicroSD card), remove the MicroSD card
from its plastic bag and insert it into the Personality Module slot in each radio before you configure
the radio. After you save the configuration in the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility (or write it
to the card by clicking WRITE SD CARD on the ADVANCED SETTINGS tab), you can leave the
MicroSD card in the radio, or store it in some other location. The plastic bag for the card includes a
sheet to record the MAC ID and radio name. It is important that you keep the MicroSD card in a
secure location in case it is needed when you replace a radio.
1
Configure all the radios in the network. See Using the IH Browser to
Configure Radios (page 41). If possible, configure all the radios side by side
in an office setting and make sure they link before installing them in the field.
If feasible, test with the radios and end-device equipment together before
they are installed in the field.
Tip: To make it easier to physically identify the radios, apply a label to each radio indicating the
radio name and IP address.
2
3
4
5
Install the Master radio in its proposed permanent location.
Connect the PC with the IH Browser software to the Master radio. See
Making Power and Data Connections (page 34).
Install the other radios (Repeater, Client, and Bridging Client) in their
proposed locations.
Temporarily place each radio's antenna near its proposed mounting location.
The antenna can be held in place by hand. However, one person must hold
the antenna while the other person monitors the Remote radio's signal
strength in the IH Browser on the PC.
Page 30 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Network Planning
User Manual
6
To see how a radio is linked in the network, make sure that the Master radio
is connected to the PC. Then, in the IH Browser, from the VIEW menu click
TOPOLOGY VIEW.
7
The Topology view shows a diagram of the network’s wireless connections.
Use this view to see whether all the radios are linked, and verify that the
radios are linked correctly.
o A radio that is not linked to a parent appears as a circle outlined by a
flashing dashed red line. It may be near the bottom of the window. Scroll
down to view all available radios.
o See Improving Signal Quality (page 31) for more information on
overcoming poor signal strength between radios.
2.5.1 Improving Signal Quality
To improve the signal quality of each Remote radio, try the following.
 Increase the height of the antenna's placement
 Use higher-gain antennas
 Decrease any TX attenuation that has been configured in the radios
 Select a new location for the Remote radio and/or its antenna
 Decrease the length of antenna cable
 Determine and resolve sources of electrical noise which may be interfering
with the radio transmission
 Add a Repeater radio between the radios that are not communicating, or
reconfigure an existing radio as a Repeater if line of sight is available
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 31 of 231
Network Planning
User Manual
2.6
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Detecting 802.11 Access Points
You can use your RLX2-IHx series radio as an installation tool to analyze the
802.11 environment and provide information on choosing antenna location and
channel selection.
1 Install the radio with its correct antenna.
2 Configure the radio as a Repeater radio with a Test SSID so it continuously
scans.
3 Start the IH Browser. See Starting the IH Browser (page 24).
4 In the IH Broswer, select the radio, and then from the DIALOGS menu choose
SCAN LIST. See Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios (page 119).
The Scan List dialog box displays information all active 802.11 radios in the area,
including:
 Each 802.11 Access Point detected, including the AP's SSID
 The actual RSSI (signal strength) from each AP in dBm
 The channel of each radio detected
Use this information to help choose a channel that has the lowest utilization, or to
select appropriate antenna types and alignments to minimize interference.
Page 32 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
3
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
In This Chapter

Preparing the Configuration Environment.............................................. 34

Making Power and Data Connections ................................................... 34

Radio Power-Up .................................................................................... 41

Using the IH Browser to Configure Radios ............................................ 41

Configuring a Radio - Getting Started ................................................... 44

Viewing a Radio's Configuration ............................................................ 55

Replacing an Existing Radio.................................................................. 55
This chapter describes how to set up RLX2-IHx series radios in a minimal
configuration before deploying them in the permanent installation. The
procedures in this section help familiarize you with basic configuration
procedures, and show you how to verify that the radios are operational.
Note: If you have not designed your wireless network, see Network Planning (page 25) for the
steps to design your network using the ProSoft Wireless Designer. In addition to helping you
design your network, Prosoft Wireless Designer also creates a Bill of Materials listing all the
components for the network.
The procedures described in this section assume the radios are in their default
configurations as shipped by ProSoft. If that is not the case, you can reset the
radios to factory defaults before attempting these procedures. See Resetting a
RLX2-IHx series Radio (page 150).
Note that in any given network, there must be at least one RLX2-IHx series radio
acting as a Master. Other radios that you configure as Repeaters or Clients will
connect wirelessly to the Master to form a network bridge between their Ethernet
interfaces.
If you are replacing an existing radio with a new radio of the same type, you can
easily transfer the radio configuration from the old radio to the replacement radio.
See Replacing an Existing Radio (page 55).
Important: If you do not have a ProSoft Technology Power adapter RL-PS007-2 (supplied with the
RLX-IHBTK Bench Test Kit), see Making Power and Data Connections (page 34) for instructions
on wiring the power connector.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 33 of 231
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
3.1
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Preparing the Configuration Environment
If you have all the RLX2-IHx series radios on your workbench, you may not need
antennas for this procedure. Radios without antennas may have sufficient signal
strength to link over short distances, without radiating or receiving unnecessary
RF energy in the surrounding environment. However, we recommend that you
connect an antenna to the Master radio. See Antenna Port Connections (page
18).
Important: If the radios are close enough to each other that their received signal strength is
greater than -40 dBm, performance may be degraded. Disconnect antennas from radios during
bench testing, or move the radios further apart from each other.
Tip: To make it easier to physically identify the radios, apply a label to each radio indicating the
radio name and IP address.
3.2
Making Power and Data Connections
3.2.1 RLX2-IHW, IHNF, IHG, IHA Radio Connections
The power, Ethernet, and serial (RS-232) connections for these radios are
located on the bottom of the case.
1
Attach an Ethernet cable to the radio you want to be the Master RLX2-IHx
series radio. If you are connecting to a network, make sure this network
connection is on the same subnet as the PC running the IH Browser
configuration software.
2 Connect a power cable (power connection included with the radio) to the 1024 VDC port.
o The Ethernet DATA LED illuminates when data is sent to or received from
the radio.
o The Ethernet SPEED LED indicates the speed of the Ethernet connection:
Page 34 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Ethernet Connection speed
10 Base T
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
SPEED LED
LED is off
100 Base T
LED is on
1000 Base T
LED blinks about once every two seconds
3.2.2 RLX2-IHNF-W Radio Connections
All power and Ethernet connections for these radios are located on the bottom of
the case.
1
Attach an Ethernet cable with an M12 connector to the radio you want to be
the Master radio. If you are connecting to a network, make sure this network
connection is on the same subnet as the PC running the IH Browser
configuration software.
Note: The RLX2-IHNF-W Weatherproof radio uses M12 connectors for both Ethernet and power.
You can order these cables directly from ProSoft Technology.
2
Connect the power cable with an M12 connector to the specified port shown.
Note: The RLX2-IHNF-W radio can be powered over Ethernet (POE) with an approved injector
available from ProSoft. In this case, the Power connector would not be used.
3
4
If PoE is used, cap the Power Connector with the M12 Waterproof Cap.
Connect the Ethernet cable through the PoE injector (if using PoE) and into
the network switch.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 35 of 231
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Note: Most off-the-shelf PoE Injectors work with this unit except the 802.3at/ PoE+ Injectors.
Note: The M12 PoE cable is not included with the radio but can be ordered through ProSoft.
Warning: Do not connect or disconnect the M12 Power Port or PoE connection when energized,
that is, the cable is live.
Page 36 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
3.2.3 RLX2-IHNF-WC Radio Connections
This radio is suitable for Class I, DIV2 hazardous locations. The power and
Ethernet connections for these radios are a set of wires that protrude through a
single conduit hub located on the bottom of the case.
 One wire is terminated with an RJ45 connector for Ethernet connections. This
wire can also supply power when attached to a PoE Injector.
 The second wire supplies power to the radio if not attached to a PoE Injector.
If you are using PoE, make sure you insulate this wire from the other wires to
prevent shorting.
To install this radio
1
2
3
Place a seal cap over the top of the conduit as shown below.
Run both wires down through the conduit.
Push the conduit up into the permanently installed connector on the bottom of
the radio. Push it up as far as it will go.
Warning: The recommend conduit is Thomas & Betts® PMA Series, Cat. No. CYLT-23B.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 37 of 231
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
4
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Place the oval clip into the opening in the connector until it snaps into place.
This secures the conduit to the connector.
Page 38 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
Note: In the event that you have to remove the conduit, simply remove the oval clip by using a
screwdriver to pry it out. You can then remove the conduit from the connector.
The wire with the RJ45 connector is your Ethernet connection and supports
Power over Ethernet (PoE).
Warning: Do not connect or disconnect the PoE connection when energized.
5
If you are not using PoE, use the other wire set to power the radio.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 39 of 231
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Note: If you are using PoE to provide power to the radio, insulate the additional power cable from
other wires inside the junction box during installation to prevent the wire assembly from shorting
out.
Page 40 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
3.3
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
Radio Power-Up
RLX2-IHx series radios power-up when power is supplied to the radio—there is
no On/Off switch. The Power LED cycles when power is applied. First the Power
LED lights AMBER when power is applied, then the LED goes out for a few
seconds during initialization, and then lights GREEN. This process takes 10 to 15
seconds. Once the Power LED is green, the radio is booted and operational.
Other LEDs on the radio may become active as well.
Please note the MAC address of the RLX2-IHx series radio, printed on a label
attached to the front of the radio. The MAC address has the form 00-0D-8D-XXYY-ZZ. For example, 00-0D-8D-F0-5C-8E. This number uniquely identifies the
radio on the network. You use this number to identify the radio on the network
when using the IH Browser.
3.4
Using the IH Browser to Configure Radios
This section describes how to use the RadioLinx Industrial Hotspot Browser (IH
Browser) to set up RLX2-IHx series radios in a minimal configuration before
deploying them in the permanent installation. See Using the IH Browser to
Manage your Radios (page 119) for detailed descriptions of all the features
available in the IH Browser.
3.4.1 Viewing the Radios in the IH Browser
Start the IH Brower: see Starting the IH Browser (page 24). If the radio is
powered up and connected, it appears in the IH Browser. Note that the MAC
address is the same address as that of the label on the radio. The List view
(shown in the image below) displays the RLX2-IHx series radios (or previous
generation RLXIB radios, except the RLCIB-IHN) on the same network as the
computer running the IH Browser.
Note: You can perform many common tasks by right-clicking on the radio and choosing a
command.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 41 of 231
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
3.4.2 Refreshing the Display in the IH Browser
To refresh the display
If you have made changes to a radio's configuration, refresh the IH Browser by
clearing and scanning the display using the buttons on the toolbar.


The Erase button clears the radios from display (or from the FILE menu
choose CLEAR).
The Scan button rescans the network for RLX2-IHx series radios (or from
the FILE menu choose SCAN).
3.4.3 Setting the Radio IP Address in the IH Browser
To set the radio IP address


If the radio is on a network with a DHCP server, it gets an IP address through
DHCP.
If the radio is not on a network with a DHCP server, the radio appears with an
IP address of 0.0.0.0. You can assign a temporary IP address to assist with
configuring the radio. See Assigning a Temporary IP Address (page 42).
3.4.4 Assigning a Temporary IP Address
A temporary IP address allows you to access and configure a radio using the IH
Browser and the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility.
1 In the IH Browser, right-click the radio and then click ASSIGN IP.
Page 42 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
This opens the Assign Temporary IP Address dialog box.
2
3
4
The UNUSED IP’S list are the IP addresses that are currently available on the
network.
The IH Browser suggests the network parameters for the temporary IP
address. It queries the IP addresses, and only displays them if it does not
receive a response. Click one of the unused IP's, or enter an unused IP
address, and then click OK. The IH Browser warns you that the IP address is
temporary.
Click OK., and then refresh the display in the IH Browser. Your radio should
now appear in the IH Browser window with the temporary IP address.
To set a permanent IP address for the radio, see Configuring a Radio Getting Started (page 44).
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 43 of 231
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
3.5
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Getting Started
This section describes how to set up RLX2-IHx series radios in a minimal
configuration before deploying them in the permanent installation. See
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration (page 57) for a detailed description
of all the configuration parameters available for your radio.
3.5.1 Connecting to the Radio Configuration Utility
This section describes how to connect to the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic
Utility using a web browser such as Internet Explorer or Firefox on your PC or
other network-enabled device.
To connect to the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility
Important: Your computer or other device must be connected to the same network as the RLX2IHx series radio.
1
Open the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility for the radio. You can do
this in any of three ways:
o In the IH Browser List view or Topography view, right-click the radio and
then click CONNECT.
o In the IH Browser List view or Topography view, double-click the radio.
o Open a web browser on your PC, and then in the address bar, type
http://, followed by the IP address for the radio, and then press ENTER.
For example, http://192.168.6.10.
The login screen appears in the web browser.
2
Enter the password and then click LOGIN. The default password is password.
If you have lost the password for the radio, you can reset the radio to its
default settings. See Resetting a RLX2-IHx series Radio (page 150).
Page 44 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
This opens the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility for the radio. Note that
some parameters may be different from the image depending on your specific
radio model.
Tip: You can display the help topic for any parameter in the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility
by clicking the parameter name. The parameter name turns blue when you move the cursor over a
parameter with a help topic. There is also a short description of the cursored control at the bottom
of the window.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 45 of 231
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
3.5.2 Setting Up a Master Radio
Most wireless networks consist of one Master radio and multiple Repeater radios.
All RLX2-IHx series radios are shipped pre-configured as Repeaters by defult.
Your first task in setting up a new network is to configure one radio as the
network Master. This section describes how to configure basic settings for a
Master radio.
To configure a Master radio
1
2
Start the IH Browser.
Open the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility. See Connecting to the
Radio Configuration Utility (page 44).
Tip: You can display the help topic for any parameter in the dialog box by clicking the parameter
name. The cursor changes shape when you move it over a parameter name with help. There is
also a short description of the cursored control at the bottom of the Radio Configuration /
Diagnostic Utility window.
3
On the BASIC SETTINGS tab, in the BASIC WIRELESS SETTINGS group, click the
MASTER radio button and then select channel 1 (2412 MHZ) as shown in the
following example.
Page 46 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
Note: To communicate with each other, all RLX2-IHx series radios must communicate over the
same frequency in either the 2.4 GHz or the 5 GHz frequency band. The available frequency bands
depend on the type of radio.
The RLX2-IHA uses 5 GHz frequency band only.
The RLX2-IHG uses 2.4 GHz frequency band only.
The rest of the RLX2-IHx series radios can use both 2.4 and 5 GHz.
4
5
Edit the RADIO NAME if desired.
If you set a temporary IP address in the radio (see Assigning a Temporary IP
Address (page 42)), set the permanent IP address. On the BASIC SETTINGS
tab, in the ACCESS SETTINGS group, click OBTAIN IP ADDRESS - DHCP or USE
THE FOLLOWING IP ADDRESS.
6
Click APPLY CHANGES to reboot the Radio. The IH Browser displays a
progress bar while the radio is rebooting.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 47 of 231
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
7
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
After the radio reboots successfully, refresh the display in the IH Browser.
See Refreshing the Display in the IH Browser (page 42).The radio appears as
a Master in the IH Browser window:
3.5.3 Configuring a Repeater Radio
After you configure one radio as the Master radio, any powered RLX2-IHx series
radios in their default shipping configuration should automatically link to the
Master radio. You do not need to attach an Ethernet cable to the additional
radios.
To configure a Repeater radio
1
2
3
Start the IH Browser. After the radio starts, it should appear in the IH
Browser.
Note that the Repeater radio above (whose MAC address ends in 54 in the
above example) has linked to the Master radio (whose MAC address ends in
97).
Open the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility. See Connecting to the
Radio Configuration Utility (page 44).
If the radio IP address is 0.0.0.0, assign a temporary IP address to the
Repeater radio. See Assigning a Temporary IP Address (page 42). In this
example, the Repeater has an IP address of 192.168.2.254.
Page 48 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
4
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
On your PC, open a command prompt window and use the Ping command to
ping the Repeater radio’s IP address. The Master radio should ping the
Repeater radio so that you see the following.
If this is successful, then you have successfully configured the RLX2-IHx series
wireless network. You can add additional Repeater radios by repeating these
steps. If you want to make more changes to the radio's configuration, you can
use the following steps.
1 Open the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility.
2 Edit the RADIO NAME if desired.
Note: To communicate with each other, all RLX2-IHx series radios must communicate over the
same frequency as the Master radio.
3
4
If you set a temporary IP address in the radio (see Assigning a Temporary IP
Address (page 42)), set the permanent IP address. On the BASIC SETTINGS
tab, in the ACCESS SETTINGS group, click OBTAIN IP ADDRESS - DHCP or USE
THE FOLLOWING IP ADDRESS.
Click APPLY CHANGES to reboot the Radio. A progress bar is displayed during
reboot.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 49 of 231
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
After rebooting successfully, the radio appears as a Repeater radio in the IH
Browser window:
3.5.4 Configuring a Bridging Client Radio
You can configure RLX2-IHx series radios in Client or Bridging Client modes in
the event that you want to connect to third-party 802.11 Access Points. See
Configuring a Client Radio (page 53) for the differences in the modes. The most
straightforward way to test a Client or Bridging Client mode radio configuration is
to use a second PC connected as the downstream network device from a Client
radio. The following example assumes that there is a second PC, and shows how
to connect to the Master radio.
To configure a Bridging Client radio
1
2
3
4
Power up a new radio in the default configuration so that it connects to the
Master radio.
Start the IH Browser. After the radio starts, it should appear in the IH
Browser.
In the IH Browser, assign a temporary IP address to the Repeater radio. See
Assigning a Temporary IP Address (page 42).
Open the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility. See Connecting to the
Radio Configuration Utility (page 44).
Page 50 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
5
On the BASIC SETTINGS tab, in the BASIC WIRELESS SETTINGS group, change
the radio to BRIDGING CLIENT.
6
7
Click APPLY CHANGES to save the configuration.
Refresh the display in the IH Browser. The radio appears in the IH Browser
as a Bridging Client radio:
8
Set up another Master radio with the correct SSID. This allows the radio to
connect to the Bridging Client radio.
In this mode, multiple Ethernet devices can connect with any 3rd-party access
points (802.11 a/b/g/n).
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 51 of 231
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
The following example shows the settings for the Bridging Client radio and the
results of the Ping command for the Ethernet device attached to its Ethernet port.
The MAC address of the device is displayed by clicking ADDRESS TABLE and by
selecting DEVICES OUT OF THE ETHERNET PORT.
Page 52 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
3.5.5 Configuring a Client Radio
You can also configure RLX2-IHx series radios in Client mode in the event that
you want to connect to third-party 802.11 Access Points. The following table
highlights the most significant differences between Repeater, Client, and Bridging
Client modes on RLX2-IHx series radios.
Repeater
Client
Bridging Client
Number of attached
Ethernet devices
supported
Multiple (up to the
limits of network)
One
Multiple (up to 16)
Can other wireless
devices connect to the
radio?
Yes
No
No
Can the radio connect to No
non-ProSoft Technology
Access Points
(Masters)?
Yes
Yes
Can I see the radio MAC Repeater radio’s
address on the network? MAC address
MAC address of
connected device or
user-specified MAC
address.
Bridging Client
radio’s MAC address
Client mode is a special mode in the radio that allows a user to connect an
Ethernet device to a wireless network through any 802.11a, b, g, or n access
point. Any Ethernet device that has an RJ45 Ethernet port can, in effect, become
an 802.11a, b, g, or n wireless client by attaching the radio. Only a single device
can be connected to the radio in Client mode. Do not connect to more than one
Ethernet device (using a switch or hub).
Note: You only use client mode if you need to connect to another brand 802.11a, b, g, or n access
point. If you are using RLX2-IHx series radios, you should always use them as repeaters (and
masters). Client mode radios are not necessary in Industrial network applications where an RLX2IHx series Master radio acts as the Access Point. If you don’t need a Client RLX2-IHx series radio
in the system, you can skip this example configuration.
The most straightforward way to test a Client or Bridging Client mode radio
configuration is to use a second PC connected as the downstream network
device from a Client radio. The following example assumes that there is a second
PC, and shows how to connect to the Master radio.
To configure a Client radio
1
2
Power up a new radio in the default configuration so that it connects to the
Master radio.
Start the IH Browser. After the radio starts, it should appear in the IH
Browser.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 53 of 231
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
In the IH Browser, assign a temporary IP address to the Repeater radio. See
Assigning a Temporary IP Address (page 42).
Open the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility. See Connecting to the
Radio Configuration Utility (page 44).
In the BASIC WIRELESS SETTINGS group, change the radio to CLIENT.
Edit the RADIO NAME if desired.
If you set a temporary IP address in the radio (see Assigning a Temporary IP
Address (page 42)), set the permanent IP address. On the BASIC SETTINGS
tab, in the ACCESS SETTINGS group, click OBTAIN IP ADDRESS - DHCP or USE
THE FOLLOWING IP ADDRESS.
Click APPLY CHANGES to reboot the Radio. A progress bar is displayed during
reboot.
Refresh the display in the IH Browser. The radio appears in the IH Browser
as a Client radio.
Page 54 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
10 When the Client radio reboots, connect an Ethernet cable from the radio to
the second PC. Wait until the radio registers the MAC address of the PC’s
network interface (Client mode only).
11 Ensure that the IP address of the Ethernet interface on the second PC is on
the same subnet as the network for the Client radio. For this example, set the
IP address of the PC interface to 192.168.2.248.
12 Open a command prompt on the second PC, and verify that you can use the
Ping command to ping the IP address of the Master radio.
3.6
Viewing a Radio's Configuration
You can quickly view a radio's configuration.
1 Start the IH Browser.
2 Right-click the radio and then click PROPERTIES.
3 If you want to view all the available properties, in the Detailed Information for
Radio dialog box, click MORE.
Note that you cannot change the radio's configuration in this dialog box. If
you want to change the configuration, or view more details, see Configuring a
Radio - Getting Started (page 44) or Configuring a Radio - Detailed
Configuration (page 57).
3.7
Replacing an Existing Radio
The RLX2-IHx series of industrial hotspots include a microSD card slot for quickly
moving the configuration from an installed radio to a replacement using a
microSD card. This feature reduces the time to replace a damaged radio.
If you are replacing an existing radio that had a Personality Module (microSD
card) installed, then you do not need to manually configure the new radio.
Remove the microSD card from the existing radio with the stored configuration
and install it in the new radio. When you power up the new RLX2-IHx series
radio, the new radio uses all the configuration settings from the microSD card.
This feature eliminates the need to manually configure the replacement radio.
By default, the RLX2-IHx series radios writes configuration changes to a microSD
card (Personality Module) whenever you make configuration changes a microSD
card is present in the radio. The RLX2-IHx series (by default) also reads the
microSD card’s configuration when it powers on and uses the stored
configuration from the microSD card if the configuration is different than the
configuration in the radio's memory.
While this feature can save you time when replacing a radio in the field, it is also
a potential security risk. The configuration stored on the microSD could be
inserted into another radio, and the radio could then access the network. The file
itself on the microSD card is encrypted so the configuration information
(principally the configuration password and encryption key) cannot be extracted.
We highly recommend that you physically secure the radio and the microSD
card.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 55 of 231
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
If you are not using the Personality Module feature, we recommend that you turn
SD AUTO-CLONE ENABLE and SD AUTO-WRITE ENABLE off. See Personality
Module Settings (page 91).
Note: The RLX2-IHNF-W or WC radios do not have a microSD card slot (no Personality Module).
For these models, you must manually configure the replacement radio. See Configuring a Radio Getting Started (page 44).
Important: Before installing a new radio, please verify that all listed product items are present. See
Package Contents (page 20). If any of these components are missing, please contact ProSoft
Technology Support for replacements.
Page 56 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
4
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
In This Chapter

Connecting to the Radio Configuration Utility ........................................ 57

Viewing Radio Status ............................................................................ 63

Configuring Basic Settings .................................................................... 70

Configuring Advanced Settings ............................................................. 83

Configuring Parent Link Settings ........................................................... 94

Configuring Advanced Network Settings ............................................... 99

Configuring Serial Settings .................................................................. 109

Configuring Quality of Service (QoS) Settings..................................... 115

Configuring VLAN Settings .................................................................. 117
The RLX2-IHx series radios include a built-in Radio Configuration / Diagnostic
Utility that allows you to both monitor and to configure your radio. The utility is an
enhanced HTML webpage that you can display from any computer that can
connect to the radio through a wired Ethernet connection or a wireless
connection.
You can to monitor and change the settings for your radio using any type of
computer that has a web browser such as Microsoft Internet Explorer, Firefox, or
Chrome. These include desktop PCs, laptops, tablets, or smart phones.
4.1
Connecting to the Radio Configuration Utility
This section describes how to connect to the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic
Utility using a web browser such as Internet Explorer or Firefox on your PC or
other network-enabled device.
To connect to the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility
Important: Your computer or other device must be connected to the same network as the RLX2IHx series radio.
1
Open the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility for the radio. You can do
this in any of three ways:
o In the IH Browser List view or Topography view, right-click the radio and
then click CONNECT.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 57 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
In the IH Browser List view or Topography view, double-click the radio.
Open a web browser on your PC, and then in the address bar, type
http://, followed by the IP address for the radio, and then press ENTER.
For example, http://192.168.6.10.
The login screen appears in the web browser.
o
o
2
Enter the password and then click LOGIN. The default password is password.
If you have lost the password for the radio, you can reset the radio to its
default settings. See Resetting a RLX2-IHx series Radio (page 150).
This opens the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility for the radio. Note that
some parameters may be different from the image depending on your specific
radio model.
Page 58 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Tip: You can display the help topic for any parameter in the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility
by clicking the parameter name. The parameter name turns blue when you move the cursor over a
parameter with a help topic. There is also a short description of the cursored control at the bottom
of the window.
4.1.1 Read-Only Fields
Some of the parameters on the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility are for
display, and only provide information about the state of the radio.
Note that depending on the model of the radio, and the radio configuration, some
parameters and buttons may not be available or appear on the Radio
Configuration / Diagnostic Utility.
4.1.2 Configuration Help
Help is available for each item in the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility.
To view a brief help message about any parameter on the screen, move the
cursor over the parameter until the parameter name turns blue, or press the TAB
key to select the parameter. Refer to the text that appears at the bottom of the
screen.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 59 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
To view more help about the selected parameter, click the parameter name. This
action opens a help page in a new browser window.
Page 60 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
To view the complete online documentation for the RLX2-IHx series radio, click
the
button. This action opens the online documentation in a new browser
window. Use the Contents, Index and Search tabs in the left frame to navigate
the help system.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 61 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
4.1.3 Apply Changes
Click APPLY CHANGES to save changes to the radio configuration and restart the
radio with the new configuration. A progress bar appears after you click APPLY
CHANGES.
4.1.4 Cancelling Changes
Click CANCEL CHANGES to discard any changes to the radio configuration you
made during this session.
Note: This button only applies to changes made in the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility, and
not changes you made in the IH Browser. It only cancels the changes you made since you last
clicked APPLY CHANGES in the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility.
4.1.5 Factory Defaults
Click FACTORY DEFAULTS to reset the radio to the original default settings.
Important: This action discards all changes you have made to the radio configuration settings.
Two things to note if there is a microSD card in the radio's Personality Module
slot.
 Clicking FACTORY DEFAULTS does not reset the configurations stored on the
microSD Card in the radio's Personality Module slot.
 If you select SD AUTOWRITE ENABLE in the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic
Utility on the ADVANCED SETTINGS tab, the radio overwrites the configuration
on the microSD card with the factory default settings if you click APPLY
CHANGES in the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility. See Personality
Module Settings (page 91).
Page 62 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
4.2
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Viewing Radio Status
The RLX2-IHx series radio status parameters appear at the top of the Radio
Configuration / Diagnostic Utility.
Note: Different versions of the RLX2-IHx series radios and firmware support different functions.
There may be fewer or more parameters on this page, depending on the version of the radio and
firmware.
Most of the parameters in the radio status area are read-only, and display the
current settings and status for this radio.
Parameter
Description
Radio Name
The user-assigned name for the radio.
Radio MAC
MAC address of the selected radio. The MAC ID is also printed on the
side of the radio.
Radio Type
The Model Number of this radio; for example: RLX2-IHA, RLX2-IHG,
RLX2-IHNF, or RLX2-IHW.
Firmware
The version of firmware currently installed in the radio. All radios on the
network must have the same firmware versions to guarantee proper
operations. For more information on firmware versions, see Updating
the Radio Firmware (page 134).
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 63 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Parameter
Description
Update every
The number of seconds the webpage waits between refreshing the
data. To change the value temporarily, enter the new value and press
the TAB key. To change the value permanently, enter the new value and
press the ENTER key.
Up Time
The length of time the radio has operated since the last system powerup or reset.
Link Time
The length of time that the radio has been continuously connected to
the parent.
Signal Strength
The strength of the signal from the parent.
Parent MAC
The MAC address of the parent to which the radio is linked.
Branch Length
The number of RF links from the radio to the Master radio.
# Radios Linked
The number of other radios that are linked to this radio.
Current Channel
The current operating channel for the radio. For a Master radio, this is
the channel set in the Basic Wireless Settings. For a Repeater radio,
this is the same channel as the linked parent.
When the LINK MODE parameter shows that the unit is in 40 MHz mode,
this parameter shows the main channel number, followed by the
extension channel’s number.
Link Mode
The 802.11 Mode in which the radio is operating (a/b/g/n). For a Master
radio, this is the highest mode supported. For a Repeater radio, this is
the highest common mode supported by both:

The settings of the Repeater radio and its parent

The capability of the radio channel.
Available Parents
Click this button to view the list of Access Points and Bridges (Parents)
from which this radio can detect beacons. This button is only available
when the radio is in Repeater mode (set in the Basic Wireless Settings).
See Viewing Available Parents for a Radio (page 65).
Address Table
Click this button to view a list of MAC addresses for devices in the
radio’s address table. See Viewing the Radio Address Table (page 66).
Port Status
Click this button to view the active ports on this radio. See Viewing the
Radio Port Status (page 67).
Page 64 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
4.2.1 Viewing Available Parents for a Radio
To view the Available Access Points table, in the Radio Configuration /
Diagnostic Utility click AVAILABLE PARENTS. This table is only available when the
radio is in Repeater mode.
This page is helpful for viewing:
 The possible parents for a repeater. The current parent should normally be
the radio with the lowest cost and a matching SSID.
 Other 802.11 networks in the area.
Note: You can click on a column header to sort the table by the values in that column
Parameter
Description
Only Show Same
SSID
Select this check box to restrict the list of available parents to those with the
same SSID as the radio you are configuring.
Refresh
Click this button to re-scan the network and update the devices in the list.
Mac ID
Displays the unique hexadecimal number that identifies an available Ethernet
devices.
SSID
Displays the network name (Service Set Identifier) that identifies an available
Ethernet device.
Channel
The radio channel on which the device is transmitting. The channel list
indicates the channel number as well as the frequency (2.4 GHz or 5 GHz
bands).
Important: The RLX2-IHx series radio is supplied with a dual-band antenna
that supports both frequency ranges. If you use a different antenna with the
RLX2-IHx series radio, you must choose a channel and frequency range
supported by the antenna. See Appendix G - Antenna Configuration (page
187).
RSSI
Displays the Received Signal Strength Indication.
Security
Displays the security mode enabled for the device.
Encrypt
Displays the encryption type enabled for the device
Speed
Displays the IEEE 802.11 connection speed (a, b, g or n). The RLX2-IHx
series radio supports all of these 802.11 connection speeds.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 65 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Parameter
Description
Cost
Displays the calculated parent selection cost. The radio evaluates the link it
has to its parent once per second to determine if this link is the best parent to
use. The radio calculates the cost for each entry. The cost calculation is
based not only on the strongest signal, but on several other factors to
provide optimum network communication.
Age(s)
Displays the length of time (in seconds) since the radio last saw a packet
from this MAC address (device).
Hops
Displays the number of hops to the Master device. A value of 0 (zero)
appears for non-ProSoft Technology devices.


This list contains both 802.11 devices that are part of the same SSID as the
RLX2-IHx series itself (for example, Minerals) as well as devices that belong
to different SSIDs (for example, Network1 and ProSoftInternal). This list is
updated continuously.
The radio updates this list with each 802.11 packet that is received, whether
from a radio of the same network or one that belongs to another SSID. It can
also see radios from other vendors.
4.2.2 Viewing the Radio Address Table
To view the Address Table, in the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility click
ADDRESS TABLE.
The Address Table shows the port through which each device (MAC address) is
connected, along with the age in seconds since the radio last saw a packet from
this MAC address.
Page 66 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Parameter
Description
Radio MAC
Displays the MAC address of the radio you are configuring. The MAC
ID is also printed on the side of the radio.
Show Addresses for the
Following
Allows you to filter the address list. Options are:

ALL ADDRESSES

DEVICES OUT ETHERNET PORT

DIRECTLY LINKED RADIOS/CLIENTS

DEVICES BEYOND DIRECT RF LINKS
When you select DIRECTLY LINKED RADIOS/CLIENTS, the table displays
an additional RSSI column, showing the Received Signal Strength
(RSS) from each radio or client linked to the radio.
When you select ALL ADDRESSES, the RLX2-IHx series radio operates
as an AeroScout sensor. Each Wi-Fi device detected and reported to
the AeroScout engine appears as Detected Wi-Fi device.
Number of Rows to
Display
Defines how many MAC addresses to display at one time. Click NEXT
and PREV to scroll through the available MAC addresses.
Index
Displays the device position in the list.
MAC Address
Displays the MAC address for each device.
Connection
Displays the connection type for each device.
Age (s)
Displays the length of time (in seconds) since the radio last saw a
packet from this MAC address
Top
Click this button to display the top of the table. The table displays
updated data.
Next / Prev
Click these buttons to move up and down through the table.
Refresh
Click this button to update the data in the table.
4.2.3 Viewing the Radio Port Status
To view the Port Status Table, in the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility click
PORT STATUS.
This table shows all of the active ports on the radio. This window displays
information about the current SPANNING TREE including the MAC address of the
SPANNING TREE ROOT device, and the timing parameters for the current
Spanning Tree. Each RLX2-IHx series radio can have up to 34 active ports – one
Ethernet cable, one parent RF link, and up to 32 child RF links.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 67 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
The primary reason for creating a Spanning Tree is that it allows you to create
fully redundant paths. If any single radio in a redundant path loses its connection,
and if another path still exists, the radio updates the connection to
communication restored.
Parameter
Description
Spanning Tree Protocol:
Wireless Ports
The Spanning Tree Protocol level for the wireless port (Rapid STP or
STP).
Ethernet Port
The Spanning Tree Protocol level for the Ethernet port (Rapid STP or
STP).
Edge Port
Displays Active or Inactive based on the setting of Ethernet Edge Port in
the Spanning Tree configuration dialog.
Spanning Tree Root:
MAC
The MAC ID of the root device in the spanning tree.
Priority
Spanning Tree device with the lowest-priority value is elected the root of
the tree
Max Age
The length of time a port can stay enabled without any new spanning
updates.
Hello Time
The length of time between the transmission of spanning update packets.
Forward Delay
The length of time a port must listen for spanning information before
being activated.
#
Position in the list. Each page shows up to 10 ports. Use the Next and
Previous buttons to move up and down through the table.
Connection
This parameter indicates what the port represents: Ethernet, a Parent
radio, or a Child radio.
State
The current Spanning Tree state of the port. Possible states are
Blocking, Learning, Listening, and Forwarding. Forwarding packets can
be transferred.
Designation
The Spanning Tree designation for the branch off the port. Possible
designations are Root (ports going to the root), Designated (ports going
to a branch), or Normal.
Path Cost
The cumulative cost of all wired and wireless links from the port to the
Spanning Tree root.
Designated Bridge
The Next bridge toward the Spanning Tree root for this port.
Top
Click the TOP button to see the top of the table.
Next / Prev
If the table has more ports than it can display in the window, use the
NEXT and PREV buttons to move up and down through the table.
Refresh
Click REFRESH to update the table.
Page 68 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
The following illustration shows the IH Browser application provided with the
radios. Notice it shows the radio named Hematite_4F, linked to Amethyst_BD.
This link is shown with a red dotted line. Also visible is the level of redundancy in
their network. Each of the blue lines represents an alternate parent. From this
view, it is easily shown how much redundancy exists in their network.
To display the redundant paths, select the toolbar button denoting two "parents."
To view the redundancy on a per-radio basis, select the single Parent button,
and then click on the radio to view its available redundancies.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 69 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
4.3
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring Basic Settings
You use the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility to configure your RLX2-IHx
series radio. Basic settings include three groups:
 BASIC WIRELESS SETTINGS
 WIRELESS SECURITY SETTINGS
 ACCESS SETTINGS
Page 70 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
4.3.1 Basic Wireless Settings
You use the parameters in the BASIC WIRELESS SETTINGS group in the Radio
Configuration / Diagnostic Utility to define the identity of your RLX2-IHx series
radio.
Note: Different versions of the RLX2-IHx series radios and firmware support different functions.
There may be fewer or more parameters on this page, depending on the version of the radio and
firmware.
Parameter
Description
Radio Name
Specifies a unique name for the radio you are configuring.
Network SSID
Specifies a network name (SSID) of up to 32 characters. The radio uses
this name in all network references. All radios in a network must have
the same SSID.
Note: SSID names are case-sensitive.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 71 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Parameter
Description
802.11 Mode
(RLX2-IHNF only)
This control only apears when configuring a model RLX2-IHNF radio.
Specifies whether the radio operates in 802.11 a/g mode or in 802.11n
mode (default). In addition, it specifies whether the radio allows use of
40 MHz wide channels for Child clients.
Note: A Repeater radio automatically uses a mode that is compatible
with the Parent radio settings. For example, an RLX2-IHNF radio may
connect to an RLX2-IHW Master radio which only operates in 802.11a/g
mode, and still use 802.11n mode for any Child Repeater radios.
802.11A/G - The radio acts as an 802.11a radio on the 5 GHz band, and
an 802.11g radio on the 2.4 GHz band. Data rates are limited to the
802.11 a/g rates (54 mbps maximum, and. 802.11n operational features
are disabled. It is not necessary to select this mode for RLX2-IHNF
radios to link to other RLX2-IHx series or RLXIB series radios. These
radios link at their best possible speeds regardless of mode. This mode
is not commonly used. It is mainly used to allow 802.11 a/b/g client
devices that cannot link to 802.11n devices to work. One example of
such a device is the ProSoft 1734-AENTR wireless I/O client.
802.11N - The default operational mode of the RLX2-IHNF radio. All
802.11n features are operational, and the radio uses 20 MHz wide
channels.
802.11.N WIDE - Utilizes adjacent pairs of 20 MHz-wide channels as a
single 40 MHz-wide channel. This allows the fastest data throughput to
other 802.11n devices. Only 802.11n devices can utilize this mode, but
all RLX2-IHx series radios link at their best speed regardless of mode.
Channels in the 5 GHz band are 20 MHz apart, so the 802.11n wide
mode occupies only two channels in that band. However, channels in
the 2.4 GHz band are spaced only five MHz apart, so 802.11n wide
mode in the 2.4 GHz band occupies eight adjacent channels! Since
there are at most 13 channels in the 2.4 GHz band, and only three
channels do not overlap others, we do not recommend enabling wide
mode on 2.4 GHz band channels.
Master
Specifies that this radio is a Master radio. The Master radio is the root
device in a network. You must have at least one Master radio in your
network. For redundancy, you can assign more than one Master to a
network. See Setting Up a Master Radio (page 46).
Available Channel List
(Master radio only)
Specifies the channel number, the frequency band (2.4 GHz, 5 GHz
DFS, or 5 GHz), and the channel frequency in MHz.
For RLX2-IHNF radios:
When you set 802.11 MODE to 802.11N WIDE, each entry shows the
main channel number, followed by the extension channel number if the
particular channel supports 40 MHz.
The 20 MHz channels are used whenever sending frames at an 802.11
a/g data rate (for example, Beacons at 6 Mbits/s). The main and
extension channels are used together for 802.11n data rate
transmissions. Note that the frequency indicated when in 802.11n wide
mode is the center of the 40 MHz channel pair.
Important: The RLX2-IHx series radio is not supplied with an antenna.
When choosing an antenna for use with your RLX2-IHx series radio,
you must choose one that supports the frequency range set in the
configuration for the radio. See Appendix G - Antenna Configuration
(page 187).
Page 72 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Parameter
Description
Repeater
Specifies that this radio is a Repeater radio. Repeater mode is the
normal mode for the radios in the network that are not the Master radio.
The Master radio specifies the network channel and is the root of the
radio network tree. Repeater radios extend the range of a network and
create the signal bridges that allow networked radios to communicate
over a greater distance. All RLX2-IHx series radios are capable of being
Repeaters. See Configuring a Repeater Radio (page 48).
Bridging Client
Specifies a special mode for use where there are multiple Ethernet
devices that need to connect to any 3rd-party 802.11 a, b, g, or n
Access Points (AP). This mode uses a Layer 2 Network Address
Translation mechanism, and can only work for IP-based protocols. If
using non-IP-based protocols, then specify Client mode for this radio.
See Configuring a Bridging Client Radio (page 50).
Client
This is a special mode that allows you to transparently connect a single
Ethernet device to any non-ProSoft 802.11 a, b, g, or n Access Point
(AP). To the AP, the MAC address of the Ethernet device would appear
to be an 802.11 wireless client. Client mode supports all network
protocols. See Configuring a Client Radio (page 53).
Auto / Specify
(Client mode only)
Choose SPECIFY only if the device does not send out any unsolicited
Ethernet packets. Try AUTO first.
Client MAC
Specify the MAC ID of the device connected to this radio, only if the
device does not advertise its MAC address.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 73 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
4.3.2 Wireless Security Settings
You use the parameters in the WIRELESS SECURITY SETTINGS group in the Radio
Configuration / Diagnostic Utility to define the wireless security parameters for
your RLX2-IHx series radio.
The parameters that appear in the Wireless Security Settings group depending
on your selections these in other parameters:
 SECURITY MODE
 802.11 MODE (model RLX2-IHNF radio only)
 MASTER, REPEATER, BRIDGING CLIENT, or CLIENT radio modes
The parameters in the Wireless Security Settings group automatically change if
necessary when you make a change in any of these parameters. You do not
have to click APPLY CHANGES to see the changes in the Wireless Security
Settings.
Note: Different versions of the RLX2-IHx series radios and firmware support different functions.
There may be fewer or more parameters on this page, depending on the version of the radio and
firmware.
Page 74 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Parameter
Description
Security Mode
Specifies the security mode for the radio, as well as Legacy WEP encryption
modes for interoperability with Legacy devices.
NONE - (not recommended)
PERSONAL - Security mode using a pre-shared key for networks that don’t require
an authentication server.
ENTERPRISE - Security mode requiring the use of an external RADIUS
authentication server. For more information see Enterprise Mode Settings (page
78).
WEP - Legacy security setting using either a 64 or 128-bit key and WEP
encryption.
The following protocols are available with both Personal and Enterprise security
modes:

WPA - Original protocol introduced to replace WEP.

WPA2 - Latest 802.11 security protocol conforming to the 802.11i standard.

WPA/WPA2 - Allows client devices to connect using WPA if they do not
support WPA2.
Encryption
Specifies the encryption method for the radio. AES is the preferred encryption
mechanism as it is the most secure protocol supported by the 802.11 standard.
If using legacy devices that do not support AES, you can choose combinations
of legacy methods depending on the 802.11 mode setting.
NONE - (Not recommended)
AES - The recommended setting, and can be used with all Personal and
Enterprise modes.
TKIP - Only TKIP encryption. This setting is only available when in 802.11a/g
mode. The 802.11n standard does not allow TKIP as the only encryption
mechanism.
AES AND TKIP - Allows client devices that don’t support AES to connect to the
radio. This setting is available in all 802.11 modes.
TKIP AND WEP128 - Allows client devices that don’t support TKIP to connect to
the radio. This setting is only available in 802.11a/g mode. Note that
combinations including WEP and AES are not allowed.
WEP128 - Legacy security setting using a 128-bit key and WEP encryption. This
setting is only available when you select the WEP Security Mode.
WEP64 - Legacy security setting using a 64-bit key and WEP encryption. This
setting is only available when you select the WEP Security Mode.
For more information, see Encryption Type (page 77).
WPA phrase
Specifies the WPA pass phrase of between eight and 63 normal keyboard
characters. This control is present when you select any of the PERSONAL Security
Modes. If a WPA or WPA2 Personal Security Mode is selected, enter a WPA
phrase of between eight and 63 normal keyboard characters.
This phrase automatically generates an encryption key of 128 hexadecimal
characters. The default WPA Phrase is: passphrase
WEP Key
Specifies the WEP key.

For WEP64, enter either 5 normal text characters or 10 hexadecimal
characters in the this parameter.

For WEP128, enter either 13 normal text characters or 26 hexadecimal
characters in the this parameter.
For more information, see WEP Key (page 78).
MAC Filter
Select this check box to restrict connections by MAC address, then define the
acceptable MAC addresses by clicking EDIT FILTER. See MAC Filter (page 76).
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 75 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Parameter
Description
Edit Filter
Specifies the acceptable MAC addresses.
Hide Network
SSID
Select this check box to hide the NETWORK SSID (defined in the BASIC WIRELESS
SETTINGS group) from other 802.11 users. Clients can still connect to the radio
network by manually entering the Network SSID.
MAC Filter
To view the MAC Filter table in the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility click
the BASIC SETTINGS tab, then in the WIRELESS SECURITY SETTINGS group, select
the MAC FILTER checkbox, and finally click EDIT FILTER. The MAC Filter table
defines the acceptable MAC addresses when you configure the radio to use
MAC filtering. See Wireless Security Settings (page 74).
Parameter
Description
Add MAC
Enter the MAC address to add to the table. This address appears in
the list after you click ADD MAC.
Delete
Deletes the selected MAC address from the list. You first select the
addresses to delete by selecting the checkbox next to the address.
Address
Displays the acceptable MAC addresses that can connect to the radio.
Top
Jumps to the top of the list.
Next / Prev
Navigates up and down through the address list.
Upload File
Imports a pre-defined list of MAC addresses. This allows you to use
the same list of MAC addresses in several radios
1 Open a text editor such as Notepad.exe.
2 Enter the MAC addresses in hexadecimal format, one MAC
address per line, including the periods (for example,
00.0C.8D.F0.76.95).
3 When finished, save the text file.
4 In the MAC Filter window, click CHOSE FILE to select the text file.
5 Click UPLOAD FILE to upload the selected list of MAC addresses.
Choose File
Selects a file of MAC addresses to upload.
Page 76 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Encryption Type
We recommend that you use WPA or WPA2 (Wi-Fi Protected Access) using AES
for the SECURITY MODE and ENCRYPTION.
 Use TKIP with an older client radio that does not support AES.
 Use WEP (Wired Equivalency Protocol) with an older client radio that does
not support AES or TKIP.
 For compatibility with clients that do not support WPA, you can select
TKIP+WEP128 for the ENCRYPTION.
 Older clients can connect to the RLX2-IHx series radio using the WEP
setting, but all other links use the more secure WPA encryption.
Important: If the 802.11n data rates are supported and enabled in the RLX2-IHx series radio, then
the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility disables all TKIP and TKIP/WEP options. If a client
radio only supports TKIP, then use the AES AND TKIP option. If the client radio only supports WEP,
then in the 802.11 MODE parameter, select 802.11 A/G and then select the appropriate WEP
setting.
Important: If you select TKIP+WEP128, some clients using WPA might not be able to connect
unless you use a WEP key other than number 1, due to limitations in these clients. In such cases,
you should set WEP KEY number to a value other than 1 and set this same key for all clients that
are using WEP. See WEP Key (page 78).
When you select WEP for the SECURITY MODE, the WEP128 or WEP64
encryption types are available but neither are recommended.
WEP is the original security protocol used by 802.11 networks but should only be
used if interoperability with a legacy device is essential. Tools are available that
allow an attacker to break the WEP keys simply by sniffing an active WEP
network for a few minutes. WPA offers vastly better protection against attacks.
WPA distances the encryption key from the actual data by performing several
algorithms to create a Session key before encrypting any data, and it performs
dynamic key management by changing keys frequently.
Note: If an RLX2-IHx series radio is set to use TKIP+WEP128, it can connect to other radios set to
WPA only or WPA+WEP, but it will not communicate with radios using only WEP. Likewise, an
RLX2-IHx series radio in Client mode with TKIP+WEP128 selected will not connect to an access
point using only WEP.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 77 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
WEP Key
A WEP key is a set of hexadecimal (hex) or ASCII characters used to encrypt
data. This parameter is only available when using WEP SECURITY MODE and
ENCRYPTION. Be sure to record the WEP encryption key so you can retrieve it if
necesary.
To create a 64-bit WEP key, enter five normal text characters in the WEP key
parameter, which converts the characters automatically to 10 hex digits.
Alternatively, enter 10 hex digits (0 to 9, a to f, A to F) directly in the WEP KEY
parameter.
To create a 128-bit key, enter 13 normal text characters, which convert to 26 hex
digits, or enter 26 hex digits (0 to 9, a to f, A to F) directly in the WEP KEY
parameter.
Note: Clients often support more than one WEP key. Packets received can be decrypted using any
one of the keys if programmed, but packets are always transmitted with the default WEP key
number. If a transmit key number is set on the RLX2-IHx series radio, make sure all other radios
and clients use the same key. To set keys other than key 1 on some clients using Windows,
Advanced settings may be used.
Use these steps to program more than one key on the RLX2-IHx series radio.
1 Selecting the key number for the WEP KEY.
2 Enter the actual WEP key
3 Save the changes to the radio by clicking APPLY CHANGES.
4 After the radio restarts, repeat these steps for each WEP key, clicking APPLY
CHANGES after each one.
5 Select the desired transmit key number if necessary and save again (If ****
appears in the WEP Key parameter, the previously programmed key will not
be changed when changes are applied).
Enterprise Mode Settings
When you select one of the ENTERPRISE modes in the SECURITY MODE control in
the WIRELESS SECURITY SETTINGS group, the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic
Utility automatically displays a set of controls for Enterprise mode parameters.
There are two sets of controls:
 The first set is for the RLX2-IHx series radio in Master mode
 The second set is for the RLX2-IHx series radio Repeater or Client mode.
Enterprise mode parameters
In Enterprise mode, the radio authenticator communicates directly with the
RADIUS Server while it is relaying 802.1x frames received from an associating
note’s Supplicant. You must configure the following parameters in the WIRELESS
SECURITY SETTINGS group on the Master radio in this SECURITY MODE:
Page 78 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Parameter
Description
IP Address
Specifies the IP address of the RADIUS server with which the Network
Administrator has registered this radio.
UDP Port
Specifies the UDP port number the RADIUS server is using to listen to Radius
frames from this radio. The default port number used for the Radius protocol is
1812.
Secret
Specifies the pass phrase that was used when this radio was registered to the
RADIUS server. This validates that the Radius frames received on either end are
legitimate.
Repeater or Client mode parameters
When in Repeater or Client mode, the RLX2-IHx series radio Supplicant
communicates via its Parent radio’s authenticator with a RADIUS server. Several
different authentication protocols are available and can be set using the following
parameters.
Parameter
Description
EAP Method
Specifies the EAP Method, sometimes referred to as the ‘outer
protocol’ defines the mechanism used to create a secure tunnel
between the Supplicant and RADIUS server during the first phase of
the Authentication sequence. The following EAP methods are
supported:
EAP-PEAP - EAP method using the Protected Extensible
Authentication Protocol
EAP-TLS - EAP method based on X.509 certificates that provides for
mutual authentication. This is the most secure authentication
mechanism available for 802.11. Certificates are required both on the
radio and the RADIUS server. The only authentication option available
for EAP-TLS is to use TLS for the inner protocol.
EAP-TTLS - EAP Tunneled TLS. Similar to EAP-PEAP.
Anonymous ID
Specifies the identity request in the first phase of the exchange that is
sent in the clear. The identity sent in this first phase can be set to an
anonymous identity (for example anon_user) or an anonymous identity
at a domain (for example anon@xyz.com). The real identity
(username) is sent encrypted after the EAP tunnel is established in the
second phase of the radius exchange.
Use this parameter if you are concerned about the username being
sent in the clear. Your IT department should specify the text for this
parameter based on their RADIUS server(s) configuration.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 79 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Parameter
Description
Authentication Method
Specifies the authentication method, sometimes referred to as the
inner protocol. This defines the mechanism used to authenticate the
Supplicant of the radio with the RADIUS server. The following
authentication methods are supported:
MS-CHAPV2 - Microsoft’s version of the Challenge Handshake
Authentication Protocol. This method provides mutual authentication
between the Supplicant and the RADIUS server, using a user name
and password and challenge text responses.
MD5 - Message Digest cryptographic hashing algorithm based on a
user name and password.
TLS - Certificate-based inner authentication protocol.
User Name
Specifies the user name of the account that is to be authenticated.
When using EAP-TLS, this represents the identity of the entity
assigned to the device certificate being used.
Password
Specifies the required password when using EAP-PEAP or EAP-TTLS
with MS-CHAPV2 or MD5. This is the password of the account
corresponding to the USER NAME.
Certificates
Displays the current certificates installed in the radio, and provides
controls to upload new certificates into the unit. For more information,
see Certificate Management (page 80).
Note: The RLX2-IHx series radio does not ship with any certificates
installed.
Certificate Management
When using Enterprise-level security, some EAP methods require the use of
X.509 certificates that you must upload to the RLX2-IHx series radio. There are
two certificate types; a certificate from a ‘Certification Authority’ used to
authenticate the RADIUS server to the radio supplicant, and device or client
certificate created by the RADIUS server for the radio. The RLX2-IHx series radio
is able to hold one of each certificate type.
 If using EAP-PEAP authentication, you need a CA Certificate (to authenticate
the RADIUS server) and a username and password.
 If using EAP-TLS, you need a CA Certificate, a Client Certificate, and Private
Key (contained in a single p12 file) to authenticate the client. The p12 file is
encrypted and requires a password.
 Your IT person will provide you with the appropriate files that you’ll need to
load to the RLX2-IHx series Repeater radio.
To configure the RLX2-IHx series Repeater radios with certificates
1
2
3
4
Obtain the required certificate files from your IT department.
Start the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility for your radio. See
Connecting to the Radio Configuration Utility (page 44).
In the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility click the BASIC SETTINGS tab,
then in the WIRELESS SECURITY SETTINGS group, select the EAP METHOD.
Enter the USERNAME.
Page 80 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
5
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Click CERTIFICATES. This displays the Certificate Management dialog box
where you enter the certificate files.
Parameter
Description
Certificate Type
Specifies the type of certificate that you are uploading. It is important
that this is set correctly as the RLX2-IHx series radio does not
distinguish between certificate types in any other way.
A CA Certificate is required for both PEAP and EAP-TLS. This is used
to authenticate the server’s certificate. Additionally, for EAP-TLS, a
client certificate and private key are required.
Certificate Passphrase
If the certificate is encrypted, enter the passphrase that was used to
create it on the RADIUS server.
File Location
Selects the certificate file on your local PC that to be uploaded.
Don't Validate Server's
Certificate
The radio does not validate the server's certificate.
6
7
Select the CERTIFICATE TYPE.
Click CHOOSE FILE to select CA Certificate file created previously
(CAcert.pem) and click APPLY.
8 Click CHOOSE FILE to select the Client Certificate combined file
(clientcert.p12) and the password associated with the file, and then click
APPLY.
9 Close the Certificate Management dialog box.
10 In the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility window, click APPLY CHANGES
and attempt to connect to the Master radio.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 81 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
4.3.3 Access Settings
You use the parameters in the ACCESS SETTINGS group in the Radio
Configuration / Diagnostic Utility to define how your RLX2-IHx series radio gets
an IP address.
Note: Different versions of the RLX2-IHx series radios and firmware support different functions.
There may be fewer or more parameters on this page, depending on the version of the radio and
firmware.
Parameter
Description
Obtain IP Address -DHCP
Select this if the radio is to automatically get an IP address through
DHCP
Use the following IP address
Select this to manually define IP address for the radio. You must
also enter the IP address information in the remaining parameters.
IP Address
Specifies the unique IP address assigned to the module
Netmask
Specifies the subnet mask of module
Def. Gateway
Specifies the network gateway (if used)
Primary DNS
Specifies IP address of the primary Domain Name Server
Secondary DNS
Specifies IP address of the secondary Domain Name Server
Page 82 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
To assign the IP address for your radio
1
2
3
4.4
On the BASIC SETTINGS tab, in the ACCESS SETTINGS group, click OBTAIN IP
ADDRESS - DHCP or USE THE FOLLOWING IP ADDRESS.
If you selected USE THE FOLLOWING IP ADDRESS, enter the information for the
IP address.
Click APPLY CHANGES to reboot the Radio.
Configuring Advanced Settings
It is important to allow many industrial protocols to communicate properly over
the RLX2-IHx series radios. The standard 802.11 AP operation for transmitting
broadcast messages is to accumulate them and transmit them on specific time
intervals. This allows clients that are in power-save mode to wake up at the
synchronized time interval and receive the broadcast packets. However, the
power-save mode is rarely used in industrial networks.
Additionally, many industrial protocols utilize multicast traffic, which is sent as
broadcast messages over the wireless network. By enabling immediate
broadcasting, these multicast messages are not delayed by waiting for the next
time interval to occur. This results in improved network performance.
The settings allow you to configure the transmission rate and broadcast mode to
optimize this radio’s use on an industrial network.
Advanced settings include:
 ADVANCED WIRELESS SETTINGS
 ROAM CONTROL
 LOCATION SERVICES
 PERSONALITY MODULE
 CHANGE PASSWORD
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 83 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
4.4.1 Advanced Wireless Settings
You use the parameters in the ADVANCED WIRELESS SETTINGS group in the
Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility to specify the wireless communication
parameters of your RLX2-IHx series radio.
Note: Different versions of the RLX2-IHx series radios and firmware support different functions.
There may be fewer or more parameters on this page, depending on the version of the radio and
firmware.
Page 84 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Parameter
Description
Max Data Rate
Specifies the maximum data rate for generic data traffic for the radio.
MCS rates are available only for model RLX2-IHNF radios.

0 to 7 are available with one antenna. This is the default configuration.

To select rates of 8 and above, configure the Active Antennas parameter
to be A AND C, or A, B, C. See Max Data Rate (page 86) for a table of
data rates.
Max Basic Rate
Specifies the rate at which control packets such as beacons and acks are
sent as well as packets that need to go to the entire network such as
broadcasts.
Because the packets are intended for the whole network, the MAX BASIC RATE
setting for the Master radio is advertised to each of the radios in the network
through beacons. Each radio, other than the Master radio, inherits the MAX
BASIC RATE setting of the Master. Therefore, the setting only needs to be
made in the Master radio. This setting for all other radios is ignored.
Optimize For
Specifies the radio operating environment. The Radio Configuration /
Diagnostic Utility automatically selects the best choices for the parameters
based on the OPTIMIZE FOR setting.

MANUAL - Does not optimize the selections.

3RD PARTY CLIENTS - Optimizes these parameters for peer devices such
as laptops, tablets, phones or any other Wi-Fi devices that perform
regular power savings and are expected to connect to this radio. If you do
not select 3RD PARTY CLIENTS, then client devices may have difficulty in
finding the network’s SSID, and their communication may be erratic due
to broadcasts not being transmitted when expected. RLX2 Bridging still
functions, although the RLX2-IHx series radios respond to all scanning
client devices which may introduce some jitter to data being transferred.

RLX2 BRIDGING - Optimizes these parameters when peer devices are
primarily other RLX2-IHx series radios.

SECURE BRIDGING - Similar to RLX2 BRIDGING but also enables the
PROSOFT-ONLY CLIENTS control which rejects any connections from 3rdParty clients.
Immediate Bcasts
Specifies that the radio forwards multicast traffic immediately, rather than
waiting for specific time intervals.
Ignore Probes
Specifies that the radio does not respond to general probe requests that are
not specific to the radio’s SSID.
ProSoft-only
Clients
Specifies that the radio rejects connections from 3rd-party clients. Used with
SECURE BRIDGING.
Range (km)
Specifies that the radio accounts for round trip delays. The RANGE setting
should be the same in all radios in the network and should be at least large
enough to account for the length of any links.

Increasing the RANGE beyond what is necessary can cause a slight
decrease in throughput.

Reducing the range setting for systems at closer range may improve
throughput.

The default LONG range is 25km, which is valid for all operating modes of
all radios.
TX Attenuation
Specifies how much the amount the output power of the radio is attenuated.
Zero implies no attenuation meaning the radio uses full power.
Active Antennas
Specifies the number of active antennas. Available only for models RLX2IHNF and RLX2-IHW radios. See Active Antennas: RLX-IHNF (page 87) and
Active Antennas: RLX2-IHW (page 87).
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 85 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Max Data Rate
802.11n mode, Mbit/s 802.11n wide mode,
Mbit/s
MCS
Index
Active
Antennas
800 ns GI 400 ns GI 800 ns GI 400 ns GI
0
1, 2 or 3
6.50
7.20
13.50
15.00
1
1, 2 or 3
13.00
14.40
27.00
30.00
2
1, 2 or 3
19.50
21.70
40.50
45.00
3
1, 2 or 3
26.00
28.90
54.00
60.00
4
1, 2 or 3
39.00
43.30
81.00
90.00
5
1, 2 or 3
52.00
57.80
108.00
120.00
6
1, 2 or 3
58.50
65.00
121.50
135.00
7
1, 2 or 3
65.00
72.20
135.00
150.00
8
2 or 3
13.00
14.40
27.00
30.00
9
2 or 3
26.00
28.90
54.00
60.00
10
2 or 3
39.00
43.30
81.00
90.00
11
2 or 3
52.00
57.80
108.00
120.00
12
2 or 3
78.00
86.70
162.00
180.00
13
2 or 3
104.00
115.60
216.00
240.00
14
2 or 3
117.00
130.00
243.00
270.00
15
2 or 3
130.00
144.40
270.00
300.00
The radio automatically selects the Guard Interval (GI) based on current
operating conditions. The system attempts to use a 400 microsecond GI, but will
fall back to an 800 microsecond GI if excessive data corruption is detected. The
radio will periodically attempt to resume using a 400 microsecond GI as
conditions improve. A 400 microsecond GI results in about 11% more throughput
than using an 800 microsecond GI. The user has no control of the GI.
For RLX2-IHW/A/G only: ADVANCED WIRELESS SETTINGS includes the MAX DATA
RATE (see image below). The ACTIVE ANTENNAS parameter allows you to choose
one or two antennas.
Page 86 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Active Antennas: RLX-IHNF
There are three options for the ACTIVE ANTENNAS parameter.
 A, B, C (the default setting; use for a three connector MIMO antenna).
 A ONLY for one antenna
 A, C for two antennas. Note that if two antennas are used, they must be
attached to the ANT A and ANT C antenna connectors
MIMO antennas generally have three connections so all three antenna ports
must be activated. In general, using three antenna ports gives the best
performance. When more than one antenna port is active, the radio monitors the
signal appearing at all antenna ports and dynamically select the port(s) with the
best signal. However, there are situations where performance may improve if
fewer antenna ports are active. If radios are very close together (typically a few
feet), all three antenna ports will receive essentially identical signal strengths and
the radio may continuously change antenna ports, resulting in degraded
performance.
Active Antennas: RLX2-IHW
There are three options for the ACTIVE ANTENNAS parameter.
 1 (one antenna, default setting). Use the main connector labeled Antenna.
 2 (two antennas). If you want to improve performance in high multipath
environments through RX diversity, you can add a second antenna to the
connector labeled Rx Only and set ACTIVE ANTENNA to 2 Antennas.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 87 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
4.4.2 Roam Control Settings
You use the parameters in the ROAM CONTROL group in the Radio Configuration /
Diagnostic Utility to specify the roaming wireless communication parameters of a
RLX2-IHx series Repeater radio.
Note: Different versions of the RLX2-IHx series radios and firmware support different functions.
There may be fewer or more parameters on this page.
In roaming applications, a mobile platform equipped with an RLX2-IHx series
Repeater radio roams from one Master radio’s coverage area to another radio's
coverage area. By default, a Repeater radio roams automatically by calculating
the cost for each roam candidate based only on RSSI and hop count. A lower
cost determines when a better Parent radio candidate is present.
The RLX2-IHx series radio uses parts of the Fast Transition (FT) standard to
reduce the time it takes to roam. An FT Roam will be used if the Repeater radio,
the current Parent radio, and the next Parent radio all have FT enabled. You can
disable FT ROAMING, which results in normal non-FT Roaming.
Independent to the type of Roaming, there are several limitations when the
RLX2-IHx series radios are operating in autonomous roam mode that you can
overcome by using Parent Assisted Roaming.
Given that the current RLX2-IHx series radio only has one radio module, all
Master radios, by necessity, have to be on the same channel to allow the
roaming Repeater radios to detect them.
Page 88 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
In applications where the mobile platform is traveling a known path, it is
necessary to have an unambiguous option when it reaches a roam point. If
multiple Parent radios are in range at the roam point, the radio may choose to
roam to the wrong Parent radio.
The Repeater radio uses the ROAM THRESHOLD and PARENT MARGIN parameters
for every roam. Due to topology variances, there may be one or two coverage
areas that would operate better with different settings for these roam parameters.
The following settings allow for Parent Assisted roaming by advertising these
parameter values to any Child Repeater radio that associates to this unit. You
can enable each parameter separately. Only enabled parameters are advertised
to Child Repeater radios.
Parameter
Description
Disable FT
When checked this disables Fast Transition (FT) roaming in this unit and FT capability is
not advertised in this unit's beacons. Note: When FT is disabled, the roam duration could
double and roams are no longer 'hitless' as there may be some frame loss in the Parent-toChild direction.
FT should be enabled other than a few exceptional circumstances. For example, if a 3rd
party client device will not associate to this unit because FT is enabled, or if the RSSI to
the Parent is so low at a roam point that FT frames are lost during the roam.
Disable
Blackout
When a Repeater's Parent Link is broken due to Sync Loss or if the initial connection fails
for any reason a Blackout time is set to a Parent candidate so that the Parent selection
algorithm will be forced to try another Parent even if its inferior. This works well when there
are always other decent Parent candidates available. In some applications the physical
setup is such that all other candidates in some locations are so weak, that any connection
to them will be unusable. When it is known that there might only be one valid Parent
candidate at times, this control when checked in the Repeater will allow the Parent
selection algorithm to ignore any Blackout time that's been set to a Parent and allow an
immediate reconnection attempt and prevent a lengthy connection outage. This control is
disabled when in Master mode.
None
Select this box to negate all other parameters so that no roam parameters are advertised
to Child Repeater radios.
Next Parent
Select this box to advertise the unit that a Child Repeater radio should roam to next. The
Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility automatically populates with all the RLX2-IHx
series units with the same SSID that are on the same Ethernet network as a unit.
Each entry is represented by the Name of the RLX2-IHx series radio, so it is important that
you give each radio a unique name. If the desired next Parent radio has not been detected
because it is not currently powered up or attached to the network, it does not appear in the
list. In this case, you can manually enter its MAC Address into the parameter. Once saved,
this MAC Address appears in the select box until that unit is detected on the Ethernet, at
which time the radio's name replaces the MAC Address.
When an advertised NEXT PARENT radio is on the same channel as the current unit, the
Child Repeater radio roams to the Next Parent radio when the Next Parent radio’s cost is
lower than its current Parent radio. When the advertised Next Parent radio is on a different
channel, the radio uses the ROAM THRESHOLD to make the roam decision.
Roam
Threshold
Select this box to advertise the ROAM THRESHOLD that a Child Repeater radio uses. This
Roam Threshold overrides the Child Repeater radio's equivalent setting, only when the
Child Repeater radio is associated to this unit. If the Parent radio is not advertising a Roam
Threshold, the Child Repeater radio reverts to using its own value configured on the
PARENT LINK tab of the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility for the Child Repeater radio.
This parameter is critical when a Next Parent is also being advertised and that Parent is
configured to be on a different channel than this unit. The Child Repeater uses this
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 89 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
threshold to determine when to switch to the Next Parent’s channel and associate with it.
You must ensure that at a point where the current Parent’s RSSI goes below the threshold,
the Next Parent is in range. Otherwise, the roam fails.
The main point to remember is that a Child Repeater does not roam while its current
Parent’s RSSI is higher than the current Roam Threshold value. In the case where a Next
Parent radio is not being advertised or the Next Parent radio is on the same channel, then
the cost comparison to determine when to roam only occurs when the current Parent’s
RSSI is below the Roam Threshold. This allows the roam point to be controlled when a
mobile platform travels a known path.
Parent
Margin
Select this box to advertise the PARENT MARGIN that a Child Repeater radio uses. This
Parent Margin overrides the Child Repeater radio’s equivalent setting, but only while the
Child Repeater radio is associated to this unit. If the Parent radio is not advertising a
Parent Margin, the Child Repeater radio reverts to using its own configured value. See
Configuring Parent Link Settings (page 94).
4.4.3 Location Services Settings
You use the parameters in the LOCATION SERVICES group in the Radio
Configuration / Diagnostic Utility to enable and disable support for the
AeroScout™ Location Services of a RLX2-IHx series Repeater radio. If not
present, the feature was disabled at the factory.
The AeroScout service listens on Port 1141 for commands from the AeroScout
engine.
Parameter
Description
AeroScout
Specifies the state of the AeroScout service.

DISABLED - Disables the AeroScout service.

TAG ENABLED MODE - Forwards any Tag Reports received by the radio to the
AeroScout location engine.

TAG AND MU ENABLED - Forwards Tag Reports and any mobile unit packets
heard from on the RLX2-IHx series radio’s channel.
Page 90 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
4.4.4 Personality Module Settings
You use the parameters in the PERSONALITY MODULE group in the Radio
Configuration / Diagnostic Utility to enable and disable the use of the microSD
card (Personality Module) feature of a RLX2-IHx series Repeater radio. You can
use the microSD card to save the radio's configuration. This makes it easy to
replace the radio with a new radio by moving the microSD card from the old radio
to the replacement radio. See Replacing an Existing Radio (page 55).
Note: The configuration files on the microSD card are stored in a binary format so sensitive data
(e.g. passwords, encryption keys) cannot be easily read from the files.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 91 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Parameter
Description
SD Auto Write Enable
Select this check box to have the radio write a copy of its configuration
to the microSD card whenever new settings are saved from the Radio
Configuration / Diagnostic Utility. The radio renames previous radio
configuration files with a unique file name that allows you to audit
changes made to the radio's configuration.
SD Auto Clone Enable
Select this check box to have the radio use the configuration from the
microSD card when the radio powers up.

If a microSD card is present and has a configuration file that is
different from the radio's current configuration, the radio uses the
configuration from the SD Card.

If the configuration on the micro SD card matches the radio's
configuration, or there is no configuration file on the SD Card, then
no action is taken.

If you insert a microSD Card into a running radio, and if the
configuration file on the SD Card is different from the radio's
current configuration, the radio warns you by flashing the Signal
Strength, MOD and NET LEDs. If you reboot the radio or cycle
power to the radio, it uses the configuration from the microSD
card.
If you want to save this control as enabled (checked), either the SD
card slot in the radio must be empty, or you must enable the SD AUTO
WRITE ENABLE control before saving. If these conditions are not
present, the software disables this control before saving. This prevents
the unit from unintentionally reverting back to a configuration file on the
SD Card after resetting.

To use the configuration file on an SD card when this control is
already enabled, insert the SD card and cycle power to the radio.

If this control is not enabled, enable and save the setting without
the SD card inserted (click APPLY CHANGES), then insert the SD
card, and then cycle power to the radio.
Note: Do not enable SD AUTO WRITE ENABLE if you do not want the
active configuration file on the SD card to be replaced when the unit
loads and saves the SD card's current configuration file.
Write SD Card
Page 92 of 231
Immediately writes a copy of the unit's configuration file to the SD
card, independent of the SD AUTO WRITE ENABLE setting.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
4.4.5 Changing Password Settings
You use the parameters in the CHANGE PASSWORD group in the Radio
Configuration / Diagnostic Utility to change the radio password to acces the
Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility for the RLX2-IHx series radio.
To change the password
1
2
3
4
Enter the old password in OLD.
Enter the new password in NEW.
Enter the new password again in REPEAT.
Click APPLY CHANGES.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 93 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
4.5
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring Parent Link Settings
You use the PARENT LINK tab in the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility to
specify how a RLX2-IHx series Repeater, Bridging Client, or Client radio
connects to the network. Parent Link includes two groups:
 PARENT SELECTION METHOD
 REPEAT PARAMETERS
Page 94 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
4.5.1 Parent Selection Method Settings
You use the parameters in the PARENT SELECTION METHOD group in the Radio
Configuration / Diagnostic Utility to specify how the RLX2-IHx series Repeater
radio chooses a Parent radio in a wireless network.
Parameter
Description
Automatically Choose
Best
Calculates a "cost" metric for each possible parent radio that it detects
and selects the Parent radio based on the lowest cost.
The radio's calculation includes:

RSSI - Stronger signals receive a lower cost.

Hop Count - Fewer hops from the Master radio is given preference
and therefore a lower cost
Parent Branch Length
Calculates the branch length to other radios and chooses the Parent
radio strictly by the number of Repeater radios between this radio and
the Master radio.

If you choose a branch length of 1, the radio links only to the
Master radio.

If you choose a branch length of 2, the radio links only to another
RLX2-IHx series radio that is linked to the Master radio, and so on.

If multiple candidate radios are available at a particular hop count,
the radio chooses the Parent radio that has the smallest cost as
calculated by the Automatically Choose Best algorithm.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 95 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Parameter
Description
Preferred Parent
Specifies how the radio selects a Parent radio from the list of possible
Parent radios. When you select this option, you can specify a list of up
to eight radios by entering the MAC addresses for each radio. The
radio chooses its Parent radio based on your selection for PREFERRED
PARENT:
BEST IN LIST - The radio selects its Parent radio using the Automatically
Choose Best algorithm, but limits the selection to the Preferred Parent
list of radios. This selects the Parent radio in the list with the lowest
cost.
FOLLOW LIST PRIORITY - The radio selects its Parent radio from the list
giving preference to the 1st entry followed by the 2nd entry and so on.
2.4 GHZ PARENTS ONLY - The radio only selects a Parent radio from the
list that is operating in the 2.4 GHz band.
5 GHZ PARENTS ONLY - The radio only selects a Parent radio from the
list that is operating in the 5 GHz band.
4.5.2 Repeater Parameters Settings
You use the parameters in the REPEAT PARAMETERS group in the Radio
Configuration / Diagnostic Utility to specify the wireless communication
parameters of a RLX2-IHx series Repeater radio.
Page 96 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Parameter
Description
Signal Strength Threshold
Specifies a signal strength above which a stronger signal does not
improve the quality of the link any further. For signals that are above
that threshold, the radio only gives preference to Parent radios with
fewer hops from the Master radio.
Another way to consider this in Fast Roam applications is that the
radio does not Roam to a new Parent radio at the same hop count
level until its current Parent radio’s RSSI goes below (weaker) than
this value.
Default Parent Margin
Specifies a signal strength below which the radio will not select a
different Parent radio. You can use this in Fast Roam applications
where the radio is on a mobile platform, or there is a lot of movement
in the environment causing RSSI levels to fluctuate. The radio keeps
its current Parent radio unless another Parent radio’s RSSI is stronger
than this value. The radio adds this margin value to the current Parent
radio’s RSSI prior to calculating its cost. It is desirable to Roam to a
new Parent radio before losing the connection with the current Parent
radio, since losing the connection results in data loss.

If you enter a value that is too small, it can lead to the radio
rapidly switching back and forth between two Parent radios as the
RSSI levels change.

If you enter a value that is too large, it can result in preventing a
Roam until the radio moves out of range, even though a
candidate exists that is actually better than the current Parent
radio.
The default value is 5 dB.

Use larger values (10-15 dB) to prevent false roams from
occurring due to temporary RSSI inversions between the current
Parent radio and another candidate.

Make sure that that when Roaming that the RSSI difference
between the current Parent radio and the new Parent radio is
greater than this value.
Rate to Parent
Specifies how the radio selects the rate to the Parent radio.
AUTO - The default setting. The radio selects the best rate to use to the
Parent radio, and adapt over time.
FIXED RATE - Fixes a lower rate to improve performance; for example if
the link to the Parent radio has a low signal strength.
The actual rate used between this radio and its Parent radio is the
lower value of this setting and the Max Data Rate setting in the Parent
radio. So use RATE TO PARENT in this radio, and MAX DATA RATE in the
Parent radio in conjunction if you want to customize the rate of each
parent link. See Advanced Wireless Settings (page 84).
Note: When configuring an RLX2-IHNF, this parameter is only
enabled if the 802.11 MODE parameter on the BASIC SETTINGS page is
set to 802.11A/G mode. See Basic Wireless Settings (page 71).
Allow Children
Specifies whether the Repeater radio acts as a Parent radio to other
802.11 radios.
YES - Allows this radio to be a Parent radio to other 802.11 radios.
NO - Disguises the radio’s SSID to prevent other 802.11 devices from
finding it. This is useful in Fast Roam applications where you do not
want any other devices connect to a Repeater radio that moving and
roaming.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 97 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Optimize Fast Roam
Parameters
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Select this check box to optimize the radio for Fast Roaming. In typical
Fast Roam applications a Repeater is installed on a mobile pallet or
platform and a set of Master units forms a backbone infrastructure
network, through which the Repeater must roam.

Selecting the check box automatically sets these parameters
accordingly along with a predetermined optimum value for the
cost threshold.

Clearing the check box reverts the parameters back to their
previous values before the check box state was saved.
Repeater radio - The relevant parameters that are automatically set
for the Repeater radio are:

Do not allow Child Repeaters (ALLOW CHILDREN).

Use a SIGNAL STRENGTH THRESHOLD set high enough so that the
radio uses RSSI to determine the link cost to a Parent radio.
Master radio - The relevant parameters that you must manually set
for the Master radio are:

Clear HIDE NETWORK SSID on the BASIC SETTINGS tab to make the
Master radio SSID visible to other devices. See Wireless Security
Settings (page 74).

Disable SPANNING TREE on the ADVANCED NETWORK SETTINGS tab.
See STP Settings (page 103).
Note: You must manually disable Spanning Tree and clear Hide
Network SSID on all Master units, as this parameter only affects the
current Repeater radio.
You can change any of these Repeater radio parameters later. For
example you can set a different value for the Signal Strength
Threshold. Changing any of the related parameters in the Repeater
radio clears the Optimize Fast Roam Parameters check box.
Page 98 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
4.6
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Configuring Advanced Network Settings
You use the ADVANCED NETWORK SETTINGS tab in the Radio Configuration /
Diagnostic Utility to specify the IGMP (Internet Group Management Protocol),
STP (Spanning Tree Protocol), SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol),
and Cable Break Detection parameters for a RLX2-IHx series radio. The
Advanced Network Settings includes four groups:
 IGMP SETTINGS
 STP SETTINGS
 SNMP AGENT
 CABLE BREAK DETECTION
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 99 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
4.6.1 IGMP Settings
You use the parameters in the IGMP SETTING group in the Radio Configuration /
Diagnostic Utility to specify the Internet Group Management Protocol parameters
of your RLX2-IHx series radio.
RLX2-IHx series radios support IGMP v1 and v2. The IGMP functions are
enabled in the radios by default.
Parameter
Description
IGMP Multicast Filtering
Specifies the state of IGMP multicast filtering (DISABLED or ENABLED).
Default Propagation
Action
Specifies how the radio handles multicast addresses that are not in the
radio’s address table.
FLOOD - The radio sends unknown multicast packets to all ports.
FILTER - The radio filters unknown multicast packets, and does not send
them to any ports.
IGMP Query Generation
Specifies the state of IGMP query generation in the radio.
DISABLED - Disables IGMP query generation.
TIMED INTERVAL - Enables IGMP query generation. Use IGMP Query
Interval to specify the query time interval.
Page 100 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Parameter
Description
IGMP Query Interval
Specifies the number of seconds between queries (if the timer is not
pre-empted by a query from another device).
By RFC specification, only one device on a network should generate
IGMP queries. As such, the radio only sends an IGMP query if another
device has not sent a query within the radio's IGMP QUERY INTERVAL
setting, even if IGMP QUERY GENERATION is enabled.
Multicast State Count
Specifies the number of queries the radio generates before a device is
removed from the multicast group on this radio if no response is
received from the device.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 101 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
4.6.2 Precision Time Protocol
The Precision Time Protocol (PTP) is used in industrial networks to synchronize
time between devices. Given the protocol uses multicast addressing, a PTP
packet sent by one device is sent over every wireless link in that network. PTP is
only needed amongst a set of local Ethernet connected units. The injection of
PTP packets arriving over a wireless link (connecting this local network to the
main network) may cause large errors in time synchronization.
To prevent leaking of PTP packets, the following control allows the RLX2-IHx
Series to filter any PTP packets received on its Ethernet port. When this
capability is desired, this control should be enabled on all Masters and Repeaters
in the network.
Parameter
Description
Enable PTP Filter
Check this box to enable the PTP Filter feature.
Page 102 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
4.6.3 STP Settings
You use the parameters in the STP SETTING group in the Radio Configuration /
Diagnostic Utility to specify the Spanning Tree Protocol parameters of your
RLX2-IHx series radio.
Parameter
Description
Enable Spanning Tree
Select this check box to enable Spanning Tree Protocol (STP).

If you enable Spanning Tree (recommended), the radio blocks
redundant connections. Additionally, the radio flushes the Ethernet
switch table when the network topology changes. See Rapid
Spanning Tree Functionality (page 105).

If you disable Spanning Tree (clear the check box), there can be
redundant connections if the radio creates multiple radio links in
parallel with each other. This also disables the other parameters in
the STP SETTINGS group.
All RLX2-IHx series radios support the Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol
(RSTP), and default to this mode when you enable Spanning Tree.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 103 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Parameter
Description
Ethernet Edge Port
Select this check box to enable the Ethernet Edge Port function
(recommended) when no RSTP device is connected to the Ethernet port.
This allows immediate communication through the Ethernet port.
Because RSTP is an active protocol, it depends on communication
between RSTP devices. If no RSTP device is connected to the radio’s
Ethernet port, the handshake cannot take place. In this case, RSTP
reverts to STP. This means that the Ethernet port is forced to adhere to
the timer based transition protocol of STP.
Therefore on network transitions and power up, communications are not
allowed over the Ethernet port for 30 to 45 seconds unless you enable
ETHERNET EDGE PORT. This setting specifies that no redundant
connections exist out the Ethernet port and communication can start
immediately. If for some reason the radio receives a BPDU (bridge
protocol data unit) on this port, the RSTP protocol negotiates properly
and handles any possible redundant paths.
Note: You can select ETHERNET EDGE PORT without selecting ENABLE
SPANNING TREE.
Bridge Times
Configures the timing intervals to use.
Priority
Determines which device is the root of the RSTP. The RSTP device with
the lowest priority becomes the root bridge.

The accepted standard value for this is 32768. If wired switches
exist in the network that support RSTP, they should always be
allowed to be the root.

For Master radios, set this value to 32769 to prevent the radio from
being the root over a wired switch.

For Repeater radios, set this value to 32770. This specifies that if
the network only has RLX2-IHx series radios, the Master radio
becomes the root.
Hello Time
Specifies the rate at which the radio sends out BPDUs. The
recommended industry standard is 2 seconds.
Max Age
Specifies the age limit for protocol information for a port.
The radio measures the age of the received protocol information
recorded for a port and discards it when the information's age limit
exceeds this value. The timeout value for this timer is the maximum age
parameter of the root.
Forward Delay
Specifies the timeout for time spent by a port in the learning and listening
states. The timeout value is the forward delay parameter of the root.
Path Costs
RSTP and STP algorithms use a cost to determine which connections
should be used in the Spanning Tree. The radio forms the Spanning
Tree by determining the lowest cost paths from any RSTP device back
to the root.
Wireless
Gives preference to a wired connection, set the Wireless cost to 200.
Ethernet
Gives preference to a wired Ethernet connection, set the Ethernet cost to
100.
Page 104 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Rapid Spanning Tree Functionality
Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) is an advanced networking function that
shuts off ports as necessary to prevent data packet loops when more than one
network path is available. If loops exist in an Ethernet network, the devices can
circulate packets endlessly, consuming all the bandwidth and making the network
unusable.
RSTP allows the radios to create truly redundant connections between any two
points in the network, but use only one path at a time. The radios detect the
redundant paths and use only one primary connection for communications. If the
primary connection fails, the radios quickly change to the secondary connection
to a state to forward packets, allowing the network to adapt itself to handle
problems without requiring your intervention.
RTSP uses active communications between network devices to quickly
propagate changes and transitions in the network. Because RTSP is an IEEE
standard, RLX2-IHx series radios work in conjunction with wired Ethernet
switches to form a redundant network.
Each RSTP device (RLX2-IHx series radio or Ethernet switch) communicates
with other RSTP devices in the network using packets called Bridge Protocol
Data Units (BPDUs). Each device sends BPDUs out each of the devices ports. In
a wired switch, this is from each of the Ethernet ports. In an RLX2-IHx series
Radio, this is from both the Ethernet port and each wireless link. BPDUs allow
each RSTP device in the network to make sure that the proper connections still
exist.
The Port Status dialog box shows a list of all ports and their state. In the Radio
Configuration / Diagnostic Utility, on the BASIC SETTINGS tab, click PORT STATUS.
See Viewing the Radio Port Status (page 67). In this example, the RLX2-IHx
series radio has 4 RSTP "ports":
 Ethernet port (1)
 A port for its parent connection (2)
 A port for each of its two child connections (11 and 12)
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 105 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
BPDUs are sent out the port at a rate called the Hello Time set in the Radio
Configuration / Diagnostic Utility on the ADVANCED NETWORK SETTINGS tab. The
accepted standard value for this parameter is 2 seconds. If a radio (or any other
RSTP device) does not get a BPDU from a device for a time period equal to two
Hello Times, the radio assumes the RSTP device is no longer available. The
radio can then open a redundant path if one is available. This process is much
like the STP process. If other devices on the network are not operating in Rapid
Spanning Tree mode, the radio reverts to normal Spanning Tree operation on the
ports connected to those devices.
RSTP provides a performance enhancement over STP.
 A radio using the STP algorithm reverts its port to the listening state, and then
to the learning state, before returning to the forwarding state. Each of these
states takes at least 15 seconds, during which the STP devices are listening
for BPDUs to re-negotiate the network topology.
 A radio using the RSTP algorithm uses active handshaking between adjacent
RSTP devices to re-negotiate the network topology. This process takes only
one to two seconds.
Each RLX2-IHx series radio contains a switch table that tells the radio how to
forward Ethernet packets to get them to their correct destination. When the
network topology changes, the radio immediately flushes its Ethernet switch
table. This allows the radio to pass traffic immediately over the new network
topology and learn the configuration in the process. Until the radio completely
learns the new topology, it broadcasts the packets to their destination. As the
radios see each packet and rebuilds the Ethernet switch table, the radios return
to directing packets to their destinations.
Page 106 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
4.6.4 SNMP Agent
You use the parameters in the SNMP AGENT group in the Radio Configuration /
Diagnostic Utility to specify the Simple Network Management Protocol
parameters of your RLX2-IHx series radio.
SNMP is a network management protocol that is often used with TCP/IP and
Ethernet. It offers an alternative to using the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic
Utility, and allows you to use an SNMP manager application to change radio
settings and view diagnostics.
Parameter
Description
Enable
Select this check box to enable the following SNMP agent.
Allow Any Manager
Specifies that any user can change the radio configuration from any
computer using SNMP.
Allow IP
Specifies that only an SNMP manager with a particular IP address can
change the radio configuration. You must enter the IP address.
Community String
Specifies a community string (similar to a password) that an SNTP
manager must use to access the radio’s SNMP agent.
Permission
Specifies the permission level to assign to this radio.
READ ONLY - The SNMP manager can view, but cannot change the
radio configuration.
READ/WRITE - The SNMP manager can view and make changes to the
radio configuration.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 107 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual



RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
The RLX2-IHx series radio's SNMP agent supports SNMP protocol version
1.4 and 2.
MIBs:
o RFC12133-MIB (partial; internet.mgmt.MIB-2.system, .interfaces, .snmp)
o ROMAP-MIB (internet.private.enterprises.romap)
It also supports a selection of standard SNMP traps, including Cold Start,
which the radio sends when it initializes.
4.6.5 Cable Break Detection
One common application interconnects a line of RLX2-IHx Masters with
Radiating Cable, allowing mobile platforms to move down the line roaming from
Master to Master. The radiating cable between the Masters allows them to
receive each other's packets, in particular each other's Beacon frames. It is
therefore possible for a Master to detect if the Radiating Cable between itself and
the next or previous Master is broken or damaged. When enabled, this feature
will produce an SNMP Trap whenever it detects an RSSI drop to one of its
Monitored Peers.
A cable break is defined as a change in RSSI greater than the Cable Break
Threshold. The RLX2-IHx will automatically determine the closest Peers and will
adopt a baseline RSSI from each Peer when it is first picked to be monitored.
Parameter
Description
Enable
Select this check box to enable the Cable Break Detection feature
Threshold
Configures the RSSI change (in dB) observed while monitoring a neighboring
RLX2-IHx Master that will trigger a cable break indication via an SNMP Trap.
Page 108 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
4.7
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Configuring Serial Settings
You use the SERIAL SETTINGS tab in the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility
to specify the serial communication parameters for a RLX2-IHx series radio.
Serial Settings includes four groups:
 SERIAL ENCAPSULATION MODE
 REMOTE IP SETTINGS
 PACKET DELINEATION
 PORT SETTINGS
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 109 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
4.7.1 Serial Encapsulation Mode Setting
You use the SERIAL ENCAPSULATION MODE parameter in the Radio Configuration
/ Diagnostic Utility to specify the serial encapsulation parameter of your RLX2IHx series radio.
Parameter
Description
Serial Encapsulation
Mode
Specifies the serial encapsulation that the radio uses in serial
communication.
NONE - No serial data encapsulation.
UDP - You can use programs on networked computers to send short
messages or Datagrams. The radio uses the serial port to transmit and
receive packets.
Note: In UDP mode if you enter a multicast group address in the
REMOTE IP SETTINGS group parameters, then packets are sent to that
address or addresses.
TCP SERVER - Only connections from this address will be accepted.
Once the session is established, the serial port is enabled to transmit
and receive packets.
Note: To accept connections from any IP address the parameter
should be set to 0.0.0.0.
TCP CLIENT - In TCP Client mode, a TCP connection will be established
with this address.
When the session is established, the serial port is enabled to transmit and
receive packets.
Page 110 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
4.7.2 Remote IP Settings
You use the REMOTE IP SETTINGS parameters in the Radio Configuration /
Diagnostic Utility to specify the address and port information for the remote
radios for serial communication of your RLX2-IHx series radio.
Parameter
Description
Single IP/URL Address
Specifies the IP address or URL of the radio to receive encapsulated
serial protocol packets from this radio.
Range of IP Addresses
Specifies up to 4 IP Address ranges for radios to receive encapsulated
serial protocol packets from this radio.
Rmt Port
Specifies the remote UDP port number to use for encapsulated serial
data transmission.
Loc Port
Specifies the local UDP port number to use for encapsulated serial
data transmission.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 111 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
4.7.3 Packet Delineation Settings
You use the PACKET DELINEATION parameters in the Radio Configuration /
Diagnostic Utility to specify the way the radio separates serial packets for serial
communication of your RLX2-IHx series radio.
Parameter
Description
Delineation
Method
Specifies the packet separator.
TIME GAP - The radio uses a minimum time gap between characters that that
the radio interprets as a delineator for a packet. This uses the EOL TIME GAP
parameter.
NONE - The radio sends all data received between packet delineation events to
the remote radio in a single network frame.
CHARACTER - The radio uses a character sequence in the stream of characters
that indicates the delineator for the packet. This uses the EOL DELINEATOR
parameter.
Page 112 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
EOL Delineator
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Specifies the type of delineator the radio uses between packets when you
select CHARACTER for DELINEATION METHOD.
Type
Decimal
Hex
Use Text
Description
Any string of characters. Enter the
string of characters in the EOL
Delineator box.
CR
13
0D
Carriage Return
ESC
27
1B
Escape
LF
10
0A
Line Feed (New Line / nl)
Null
00
00
Null
Spacebar
32
20
Space
Tab
09
09
Horizontal Tab
EOL Time Gap
(milliseconds)
Specifies the time gap the radio uses between packets when you select TIME
GAP for DELINEATION METHOD. This is the length of time that must elapse after a
character is received (from the local attached device) before the radio marks
the end of a packet.
The smallest valid value for this parameter is limited by the device and is
platform dependent.
Packet Rate
(milliseconds)
Specifies the minimum time gap that the radio interprets as an inter-packet
space. When the radio detects this time gap, it defines the characters received
up to that point as a single packet and sends it to the remote radio.
Valid values are 1,000 to 500,000.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 113 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
4.7.4 Port Settings
You use the PORT SETTINGS parameters in the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic
Utility to specify the serial port settings of your RLX2-IHx series radio.
Parameter
Definintion
Baud Rate
Specifies the baud rate for the serial port on the radio. This must
match the baud rate setting on the connected serial device.
Data Bits
Specifies the number of data bits for the serial port on the radio. This
must match the data bits setting on the connected serial device.
Values: 5, 6, 7 or 8
Parity
Specifies the parity for the serial port on the radio. This must match the
parity setting on the connected serial device.
Values: None, Even, Odd, 1 or 0
Flow Control
Specifies the flow control (handshaking) mode for the serial port on the
radio. This must match the handshaking mode setting on the
connected serial device.
Values: None or Hardware
Stop Bits
Specifies the stop bits for the serial port on the radio. The stop bits on
the radio must match the stop bits setting on the connected serial
device.
Values: 1 or 2
Page 114 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
4.8
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Configuring Quality of Service (QoS) Settings
You use the QOS settings tab in the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility to
specify the packet priority value parameters for a RLX2-IHx series radio.
RLX2-IHx series radios always prioritize frames using QoS for packets received
already marked with a priority value. The QOS tab allows you to set the default
priority for frames that the radio receives without any priority markings. In
addition, you can map a priority value to packets received without priority
markings according to a set of matching criteria.
Parameter
Description
QoS Map Enable
Specifies whether the the RLX2-IHx series radio uses the priority mapping
function.
ENABLED - The radio uses the priority mapping table to prioritize packets
without a priority value. You must select Enabled before you can edit the QoS
Map table.
DISABLED - The radio does not set priority values for packets without a priority
value.
Default Priority
Specifies the default priority for packets received on the Ethernet interface
without a priority value (default is 0 - no priority).
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 115 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Parameter
Description
QoS Map Table
Specifies up to eight separate match criteria to identify and assign priority
values to received Ethernet packets. Each filter has several parameters that
you can enable by selecting the check box to the left of each parameter.
When you enable multiple parameters in a row, all enabled parameters in that
row must match before the radio assigns the specified PRIORITY value to a
packet.
PRIORITY - The priority value the radio assigns to the received Ethernet frame
if it was not already marked with a priority value and if all enabled parameters
in the same row match.
SOURCE IP ADDRESS - A parameter match occurs for all packets received from
the device with this source IP address.
DESTINATION IP ADDRESS - A parameter match occurs for all packets received
addressed to the device with this destination IP address.
SOURCE PORT NO. - A parameter match occurs for all IP packets received with
this source port value.
DEST PORT NO. - A parameter match occurs for all IP packets received with
this destination port value.
PROTOCOL NO. - A parameter match occurs for all IP packets received with this
protocol number.
PACKET LENGTH - A parameter match occurs for all iP packets received with
the correct packet length.

You must enter a packet length threshold

You must select the match criteria:
Select < to match if the length of the received packet is LESS THAN the
threshold.

Select  to match if the length is GREATER THAN OR EQUAL TO the threshold.

Select both < and  to match ALL PACKET LENGTHS.
Page 116 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
4.9
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
Configuring VLAN Settings
You use the VLAN tab in the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility to specify
the Virtual Local Area Network parameters of a RLX2-IHx series radio. When the
radio sends a packet, it includes the selected VLAN packet ID.
RLX2-IHx series radios support port based VLANs. Each RLX2-IHx series radio
can be considered to have 3 different ports or interfaces; the Ethernet interface,
the local applications stack of the radio itself, and the 802.11 BSS created by
each radio, allowing client devices to associate. You can configure the VLAN
settings for the Ethernet interface on all RLX2-IHx series radios. You can
configure the VLAN for the Local and SSID ports on the Master radio. The
Master radio pushes these settings to each connected Repeater radio. This
allows the VLAN settings for a bridged network rooted at a Master radio to have
common settings for these two ports. This ensures, for example, that if the Local
interface is set to a management VLAN, the all Repeater radios are accessible
from a Management PC. For more information, see Appendix D - RLX2-IHx
series Virtual LAN (VLAN) Functionality (page 177).
You can think of the Ethernet ports for the Master radio and its associated
Repeater radios as a smart switch. Transporting tagged frames to the
appropriate remote Ethernet port is automatic and does not require any settings.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 117 of 231
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Parameter
Description
VLAN Enable
Select this check box to enable the VLAN function of the radio.

When enabled, packets received by the radio on an interface that
are not VLAN tagged are assigned to the VLAN as set by the PVID
parameter of the respective interface.

When disabled, the radio still bridges received Ethernet packets
that are VLAN tagged but does not act on the VLAN ID of the
frame or add or remove any VLAN tags.
Ethernet (ingress) PVID
SSID (ingress) PVID
Local/Mgmt (ingress)
PVID
Specifies the PVID setting representing the VLAN ID to assign to nontagged ingress frames from each interface (Ethernet, SSID,
Local/Mgmt).
Access Local from all
VLANs
Select this check box to allow the Mgmt interface to be accessible from
all VLANs and interfaces (supported by the Local/Mgmt interface).
VLAN Settings
Specifies the details for each VLAN.
You use the VLAN Table to make each of the interfaces a member of a
particular VLAN ID, and specify whether frames sent from the Ethernet
interface should be tagged or untagged for a particular VLAN. You can
configure up to 10 different VLAN ID's.
VLAN ID - The ID of the VLAN to be assigned to the radio’s interfaces.
Valid VLAN ID's range from 1 to 4096. Note that VLAN ID's 1956 and
1957 are reserved and cannot be used.
ETHERNET MEMBER - Select this check box to make the Ethernet
interface of the radio a member of the VLAN indicated by the row’s
VLAN ID.
ETHERNET EGRESS ACTION - Specifies whether frames belonging to the
row’s VLAN ID are sent out the Ethernet port as TAGGED or UNTAGGED.
SSID MEMBER - Select this check box to make the SSID (BSS) of the
RLX2-IHx series a member of the VLAN indicated by the row’s VLAN
ID.
LOCAL/APP MEMBER - Select this check box to make the radio's
Local/App interface is a member of the VLAN indicated by the row’s
VLAN ID.
Page 118 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
5
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
In This Chapter

Viewing the Radios in the IH Browser ................................................. 120

Viewing the Radio Properties .............................................................. 128

Setting the Radio IP Address in the IH Browser .................................. 130

Assigning a Temporary IP Address ..................................................... 131

Viewing Additional Data in the IH Browser .......................................... 132

Connecting to the Radio Configuration Utility ...................................... 132

Updating the Radio Firmware .............................................................. 134

Pinging Devices on the Network .......................................................... 135

Viewing Network Data in the IH Browser ............................................. 137
The RadioLinx Industrial Hotspot Browser (IH Browser) finds RLX2-IHx series
radios connected to the network. It displays the radio’s status and basic settings.
You can use the IH Browser to perform a number of tasks, including:

View all the radios connected through the
network to your PC in either a list (table) or
topology view.

Open the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic
Utility in a web browser on your PC to
configure or check diagnostics for your
radio.

Assign a temporary IP address to a radio.

Show the Event Log with a history of events
that occurred on the radio.

Update the firmware in the radio.

Send a ping command to a radio or other IP
address.

View a list of client radios.

View a list of wired Ethernet nodes
connected to the network.

View a list of all the access points detected
on the network (including those from other
vendors)

View a list of all the active interface ports on
the radio.

View the radio’s properties.

View the radio’s Event Log.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 119 of 231
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
5.1
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Viewing the Radios in the IH Browser
Start the IH Brower: see Starting the IH Browser (page 24). If the radio is
powered up and connected, it appears in the IH Browser. Note that the MAC
address is the same address as that of the label on the radio. The List view
(shown in the image below) displays the RLX2-IHx series radios (or previous
generation RLXIB radios, except the RLCIB-IHN) on the same network as the
computer running the IH Browser.
Note: You can perform many common tasks by right-clicking on the radio and choosing a
command.
5.1.1 Refreshing the Display in the IH Browser
To refresh the display
If you have made changes to a radio's configuration, refresh the IH Browser by
clearing and scanning the display using the buttons on the toolbar.


The Erase button clears the radios from display (or from the FILE menu
choose CLEAR).
The Scan button rescans the network for RLX2-IHx series radios (or from
the FILE menu choose SCAN).
5.1.2 Defining the Scan Parameters in the IH Browser
You use the Scan Setup dialog box to specify how the IH Browser refreshes the
display when scanning the network. By default, the program sends a broadcast
Scan message to all the radios at the same time, then waits for them to respond.
Broadcasts are limited to a local network, and will not be passed through a
router.
If there is a router between the PC running the IH Browser and the radio, enter
the IP address of a single radio or the range of IP addresses of multiple radios.
This adds them to the IP addresses the IH Browser scans.
Page 120 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
To define the scan parameters, from the FILE menu, choose SCAN SETUP.
Parameter
Description
Local network scanning
interval
Specifies how often the IH Browser scans the network before updating
the display.
Enter zero to disable automatic scanning. You can still scan the network
manually. See Refreshing the Display in the IH Browser (page 42).
Additional IP addresses
Displays the IP addresses the IH Browser scans at the scanning
interval.
Remove
Removes the selected IP address or range. Click on an IP address or
address range to select it.
New Address / Range
Enter the new IP address (in FROM) or range of IP addresses (in FROM
and TO) and then click ADD.
5.1.3 Freezing the Display in the IH Browser
Freezing the display in the IH Browser prevents it from updating with new data.
To freeze the display


The Freeze button on the IH Browser toolbar prevents the display from
updating (or from the FILE menu choose FREEZE).
Click the Freeze button again to start updating the display.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 121 of 231
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
5.1.4 Changing IH Browser Columns in List View
You can change the columns that appear in the IH Browser main window in List
View.
To change the columns in the IH Browser window
1
2
From the VIEW menu, click SELECT COLUMNS.
In the Select Columns dialog box, click the check boxes for the columns you
want to appear in the window.
To reset the columns in the IH Browser window to the default
From the VIEW menu, click RESET COLUMNS.
5.1.5 Switching between List and Topology Views
You can switch between the List and Topology Views in the IH Browser main
window.
 The List View is the default view, and shows a list of all the connected radios
in a grid, similar to a spreadsheet.
 The Topology View shows a diagram of the network’s wireless connections. If
a radio does not appear in the view, it is not connected to the network. The
Topology View is display-only. If you want to change the way a radio is linked
to the network, see Configuring Parent Link Settings (page 94).
To switch between the List and Topology views


The List View button switches to the List View (or from the VIEW menu
choose LIST VIEW). For a description of the available columns, see List View
Columns (page 123).
The Topology View button switches to the Topology View (or from the
VIEW menu choose TOPOLOGY VIEW). For a description of the Topology View,
see Topology View Description (page 126).
To change the columns in the List View




To resize a column, click between column headers and drag to the left or
right.
To re-order the columns, click a column header and drag it to the left or right.
To sort the radios, click a column header to change the sort order
To change the displayed columns, from the VIEW menu choose SELECT
COLUMNS.
To zoom in and out in the Topology View


The Zoom In button magnifies the Topology View (or from the VIEW menu
choose ZOOM IN).
The Zoom Out button shrinks the Topology View (or from the VIEW menu
choose ZOOM OUT).
Page 122 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots

Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
The Zoom to Fit button resizes the Topology View to fit the window (or
from the VIEW menu choose ZOOM TO FIT).
To sort radios alphabetically in the Topology View

The Sort Alphabetically button sorts the radios in the by name Topology
View (or from the VIEW menu choose SORT ALPHABETICALLY).
To change a radio's configuration in either view
Double-click a radio to start the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility for the
radio. See Connecting to the Radio Configuration Utility (page 44).
List View Columns
This topic describes the available columns in the List View. See Switching
between List and Topology Views (page 122) for more information on the List
View columns.
Note: You can display most of the same information for the radio in the Detailed Information dialog
box the IH Browser. See Viewing the Radio Properties (page 128).
Column Name
Description
Name
Displays the devices in the IH Browser. Names appear in a nested tree
order. The icons on some entries help identify the type of device.
Computer
Wired Network Interface
Master Radio
Repeater Radio
Client Radio
Bridging Client Radio
Mode
Displays a text description of the devices in the IH Browser.
THIS UTILITY - This instance of the IH Browser.
UTILITY - Other instances of IH Browsers running on other systems on the
same network.
LOCAL INTERFACE - A network interface detected on the computer running
this instance of the IH Browser.
MASTER - A radio on the network in Master mode.
ETHERNET CLIENT - A radio on the network in Client mode
BRIDGING CLIENT - A radio on the network in Bridging Client mode.
REPEATER - A radio in the network in Repeater mode.
MAC
Displays the physical Media Access Control (MAC) address of the
devices. All ProSoft Technology devices have a MAC address in the form
00:0D:8D:XX:YY:ZZ.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 123 of 231
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
IP
Displays the IP addresses assigned to the devices.
Mask
Displays the network mask for the device.
Gateway
Displays the IP address of the network gateway for the device.
SSID
Displays the Service Set Identifier (SSID). This is a name assigned to a
wireless network device. Repeater and Client radios must be configured
with the same SSID to connect. Note that Master radios typically
broadcast their SSID. However, you can disable SSID broadcasting so
that other wireless devices cannot detect the Master radio, If a Master is
not broadcasting its SSID, this field includes the word HIDDEN along with
the SSID of the radio; for example ProSoft/hidden.
Connection
Displays the connection state for a Repeater radio.
SCANNING - The radio is searching for a Master radio.
CONNECTED - The radio is linked to a Master radio.
Signal (dBm)
Displays the signal strength, in dBm of a Repeater or Client radio’s link to
a Master device. Master devices do not report signal strength.
Hops
Displays the number of wireless connections from the device to the wired
connection of a Master. This value is always 1 for a Master radio. For
Repeater radios, the value is at least 2, but can be higher if there are more
hops to the Master radio. Client radio do not display a hop value.
Parent
Displays the MAC address of the Parent radio to which this Repeater or
Client radio is linked. This is blank for Master devices.
Associations
Displays the number of non-bridge wireless connections to this radio.
Client or Bridging Client radios that are connected always show 1 in this
column (and 0 in the Bridges column).
Bridges
Displays the number of non-bridge wireless connections to this radio.
Client or Bridging Client radios that are connected always show 1 in this
column (and 0 in the Bridges column).
Tx (kbits/sec)
Displays a moving average of transmit throughput in kilobits/second. It
does not count packet overhead, and only counts payload data. For
Repeater radios, this shows the throughput only for the radio link to the
Parent radio. For Master radios, this is the throughput sum of all the
Master's radio links.
Rx (kbits/sec)
Displays a moving average of receive throughput in kilobits/second. It
does not count packet overhead, and only counts payload data. For
Repeater radios, this shows the throughput only for the radio link to the
Parent radio. For Master radios, this is the throughput sum of all the
Master’s radio links.
FW Ver
Displays the firmware version number.

For IH Browser entries, this is the version of the IH Browser itself.

For radios, this is the version of the firmware code in the radio. This is
not the version of the image file installed into the radio (for that
information see IMAGE VER described below).
Boot Ver
Displays the boot loader code version number.

For IH Browser entries, this is the version of the network
communication engine in the IH Browser (e.g. WinXP, WinVista).

For radios, this is the version of the boot loader code in the radio.
Image
Displays the type of the firmware image that the radio is currently running
(PRIMARY or SECONDARY). Each radio has two copies of operating firmware
installed, and the radio will automatically switch from one to the other if
one of them becomes corrupted.
Page 124 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
Compression
Displays the compression state of the firmware images in the radio
(COMPRESSED or UNCOMPRESSED).
Ethernet
Displays the Ethernet status for the radio.
ATTACHED - The radio is connected to a wired Ethernet network.
DETACHED - The radio is not connected to a wired Ethernet network.
Channel/Width
Displays the operating channel and channel width. The width value is
always 20MHz except on 802.11n devices where it can be 20MHz or
40MHz.
Example: 48, 20 MHZ for channel 48 with a 20 MHz channel width.
Security
Displays the encryption type setting for the radio. Some valid settings are
AES, TKIP, AES&TKIP, WEP128 TKIP, WEP128, WEP64.
Misses
Displays the number of times the IH Browser has failed to receive a
response from the device after a scan. Ideally this number should always
be zero.
RSTP
Displays the setting for RSTP in the radio (ENABLED, DISABLED, and STP).
The STP state is a legacy "non-rapid" Spanning Tree mode that the radio
automatically uses if it detects a peer wired bridge in STP mode. All radios
on a network must have the same RSTP state to link properly.
Link Time
Displays the link time of the device; for example 24d,13h,10m,32s. This
time resets to zero on a Roam, or if the link is dropped and re-established
with the same Parent radio.
TX Rate
Displays the current modulation data rate that the radio is using for
transmission. This may be slower than the configured nominal rate
because of retries or other environmental factors.

For 802.11a/b/g devices, the data rate is expressed in kilobits or
megabits per second (for example, 54Mb/s).

For 802.11n devices, the data is expressed in MCS rates from 0 to 15
(for example, MCS7).
Temperature
Displays the internal temperature of the radio as measured on the circuit
board in degrees Celsius. Note that internal measured temperature always
exceeds the ambient external temperature.
Retries(%)
Displays the ratio of packet re-transmission to total packet transmissions
during the last five-second interval for the radio.
Uptime
Displays the amount of time the radio has been running since the last
power cycle or reset; for example, 1d,4h,13m,25s.
Product
Displays the model number of the RLX2 radio; for example RLX2-IHA,
RLX2-IHG, RLX2-IHFN, RLX2-IHFN-W, or RLX2-IHW.
Image Ver
Displays the name of the image file loaded into the radio; for example,
RLX2_V0036_R. It matches the Firmware label displayed for the radio in
the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 125 of 231
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Topology View Description
This topic describes the Topology View. See Switching between List and
Topology Views (page 122) for more information on the Topology View.
Indicates the Master radio; always shown at the top,
Indicates a radio linked to the network
Indicates a radio not linked to to a Parent radio, but on
the same network as the computer hosting the IH
Browser.
Indicates that an Ethernet connection exists to the
radio, but does not indicate the number of devices on
the connection
Indicates that wireless clients (such as laptops and
tablet computers) are linked to this radio. The number
of clients linked is indicated by the number of boxes
and/or a number.
Indicates signal strength between radios. The width of
the line is not calibrated, but a wider line indicates a
relatively stronger signal strength.
Indicates links to alternate Parent radio candidates that
could be chosen if the current Parent link drops or
degrades.
Page 126 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
5.1.6 Printing the View in the IH Browser
You can print the current view in the IH Browser.
 To print the current view, from the FILE menu choose PRINT.
 To define the page orientation, paper source, and size, from the FILE menu
choose PRINT SETUP.
 To preview the printed view, from the FILE menu choose PRINT PREVIEW. This
can help you adjust the view in the IH Browser so it does not break across
pages when printed.
 In the Topology View, to display a border around the area to be printed, do
one of the following:
o From the VIEW menu, choose PRINT AREA.
o On the IH Browser toolbar click the
Show Page Outline button.
5.1.7 Importing and Exporting IH Browser Data
You can export data from, and import data into, the IH Browser. Exporting data
creates and saves an XML file containing the current configuration and status of
all radios discovered by the IH Browser. You can use this command under the
direction of ProSoft Technical Services, for troubleshooting purposes. Importing
data brings in the data from a previously created IH Browser XML file.
 To export data from the IH Browser, from the FILE menu choose EXPORT.
You can choose to include the data from the current Wireless Client, Ethernet
Nodes, Scan List, and Port Table tables. See Viewing Additional Data in the
IH Browser (page 132) for information about those tables.

To import data from an export file created in the IH Browser, from the FILE
menu choose IMPORT.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 127 of 231
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
5.1.8 Hiding the Toolbar and Status Bar in the IH Browser
You can hide and display the Toolbar and Status bar in the IH Browser window.
 To hide and show the Toolbar (1 in the image below), from the VIEW menu
choose TOOLBAR.
 To hide and show the Status Bar (2 in the image below), from the VIEW menu
choose STATUS BAR.
5.2
Viewing the Radio Properties
The Detailed Information dialog box shows information about the currently
selected radio.
1 In the IH Broswer, select (click) a radio in either the List View or Topology
View.
2 From the DIALOGS menu choose PROPERTIES, or right-click the radio and
choose PROPERTIES.
Page 128 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
3
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
Click MORE to display more information.
Note: You can display most of the same information in the List View in the IH Browser. See List
View Columns (page 123).
Parameter
Description
MAC
Displays the MAC address of the selected radio.
IP
Displays the IP address of the selected radio.
Mode
Displays the mode of the selected radio (MASTER, REPEATER, CLIENT,
BRIDGING CLIENT)
SSID
Displays the SSID of the selected radio.
TX Rate
Displays a green bar when there is transmit activity.
RX Rate
Displays a green bar when there is receive activity.
Master
Displays the MAC address of the radio's current Master radio.
Signal
Displays a green bar when there is a signal.
More / Less
Click MORE to expand the dialog box and display more information.
Click LESS to reduce the dialog box and display less information.
Mask
Displays the network mask for the current radio.
Gateway
Displays the network gateway IP for the current radio.
Connection
Displays the connection state for a Repeater radio.
SCANNING - The radio is searching for a Master radio.
CONNECTED - The radio is linked to a Master radio.
Software Version
Displays the version of the firmware code in the radio. This is not the
version of the image file installed into the radio (for that information see
IMAGE described below).
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 129 of 231
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
5.3
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Parameter
Description
Boot Version
Displays the boot loader code version number. This is the version of the
boot loader code in the radio.
Image
Displays the type of the firmware image that the radio is currently
running (PRIMARY or SECONDARY). Each radio has two copies of
operating firmware installed, and the radio will automatically switch from
one to the other if one of them becomes corrupted.
Compression
Displays the compression state of the firmware images in the radio
(COMPRESSED or UNCOMPRESSED).
Associations
Displays the number of non-bridge wireless connections to this radio.
Client or Bridging Client radios that are connected always show 1 in this
column (and 0 in the Bridges column).
Bridges
Displays the number of non-bridge wireless connections to this radio.
Client or Bridging Client radios that are connected always show 1 in this
column (and 0 in the Bridges column).
Hop Count
Displays the number of wireless connections from the device to the
wired connection of a Master. This value is always 1 for a Master radio.
For Repeater radios, the value is at least 2, but can be higher if there
are more hops to the Master radio. Client radio do not display a hop
value.
Channel
Displays the operating channel for radio.
Ethernet
Displays the Ethernet status for the radio.
ATTACHED - The radio is connected to a wired Ethernet network.
DETACHED - The radio is not connected to a wired Ethernet network.
Security
Displays the encryption type setting for the radio. Some valid settings
are AES, TKIP, AES&TKIP, WEP128 TKIP, WEP128, WEP64.
Missed Responses
Displays the number of times the IH Browser has failed to receive a
response from the device after a scan. Ideally this number should
always be zero.
Setting the Radio IP Address in the IH Browser
To set the radio IP address


If the radio is on a network with a DHCP server, it gets an IP address through
DHCP.
If the radio is not on a network with a DHCP server, the radio appears with an
IP address of 0.0.0.0. You can assign a temporary IP address to assist with
configuring the radio. See Assigning a Temporary IP Address (page 42).
Page 130 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
5.4
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
Assigning a Temporary IP Address
A temporary IP address allows you to access and configure a radio using the IH
Browser and the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility.
1 In the IH Browser, right-click the radio and then click ASSIGN IP.
This opens the Assign Temporary IP Address dialog box.
2
3
4
The UNUSED IP’S list are the IP addresses that are currently available on the
network.
The IH Browser suggests the network parameters for the temporary IP
address. It queries the IP addresses, and displays them if it does not receive
a response. Click one of the unused IP's, or enter an unused IP address, and
click OK. The IH Browser warns you that the IP address is temporary.
Click OK and refresh the display in the IH Browser. Your radio should now
appear in the IH Browser window with the temporary IP address.
To set a permanent IP address for the radio, see Configuring a Radio Getting Started (page 44).
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 131 of 231
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
5.5
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Viewing Additional Data in the IH Browser
Start the IH Brower (see Starting the IH Browser (page 24)). If the radio is
powered up and connected, it appears in the IH Browser. Note that the MAC
address is the same address as that of the label on the radio. The List view
(shown in the image below) displays the RLX2-IHx series radios (or previous
generation RLXIB radios, except the RLCIB-IHN) on the same network as the
computer running the IH Browser.
Note: You can perform many common tasks by right-clicking on the radio and choosing a
command.
5.6
Connecting to the Radio Configuration Utility
This section describes how to connect to the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic
Utility using a web browser such as Internet Explorer or Firefox on your PC or
other network-enabled device.
To connect to the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility
Important: Your computer or other device must be connected to the same network as the RLX2IHx series radio.
1
Open the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility for the radio. You can do
this in any of three ways:
o In the IH Browser List view or Topography view, right-click the radio and
then click CONNECT.
o In the IH Browser List view or Topography view, double-click the radio.
o Open a web browser on your PC, and then in the address bar, type
http://, followed by the IP address for the radio, and then press ENTER.
For example, http://192.168.6.10.
Page 132 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
The login screen appears in the web browser.
2
Enter the password and then click LOGIN. The default password is password.
If you have lost the password for the radio, you can reset the radio to its
default settings. See Resetting a RLX2-IHx series Radio (page 150).
This opens the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility for the radio. Note that
some parameters may be different from the image depending on your specific
radio model.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 133 of 231
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Tip: You can display the help topic for any parameter in the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility
by clicking the parameter name. The parameter name turns blue when you move the cursor over a
parameter with a help topic. There is also a short description of the cursored control at the bottom
of the window.
5.7
Updating the Radio Firmware
From time to time, ProSoft Technology may release new firmware for the RLX2IHx series radio that may include new features and corrected anomalies. We
recommend that all RLX2-IHx series radios in a network use the same firmware
version. If your network has a mix of RLX2-IHx series models, you can load the
same firmware image file into each of them.
To update the firmware in the radio
1
2
3
4
5
6
Download the radio firmware image from the Prosoft Technology web site at
www.prosoft-technology.com and save it to a known location (such as the
Windows Desktop).
Start the IH Browser and click on an RLX2-IHx series radio to select it.
From the OPERATIONS menu choose UPDATE FIRMWARE. You can also rightclick the radio and choose UPDATE F/W.
Enter the password for the radio. This is the same password that you use to
log into the radio when you start the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility.
See Connecting to the Radio Configuration Utility (page 44).
Click BROWSE to locate the firmware image file to load.
Click UPDATE to begin copying the new firmware to the radio.
Important: Do not turn off power to the radio during this operation.
Page 134 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
5.8
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
Pinging Devices on the Network
You can use the Ping command to test the latency of the network link between
the PC running the IH Browser and any other PC that is also running the IH
Browser (called Ping Stations).
Note: Currently there is no location information when a ping station responds to an IH Browser
scan, therefore, all Ping stations are shown connected to the top main network. It is also possible
to select an RLX2-IHx series and start a Ping Session with it.
1
2
Start the IH Browser on your computer.
To start the ping session, do one of the following:
o From the VIEW menu choose SHOW PING STATIONS.
o
Click the Show Browsers button on the toolbar.
3
4
Click (highlight) one of the other computers visible in the IH Browser.
From the OPERATIONS menu choose PING DEVICE to open the Ping Results
Dialog box.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 135 of 231
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
5
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
This dialog box displays statistics on the minimum, maximum and average
latency between two points on the network.
Click SHOW OPTIONS to change the Ping parameters. See Ping Options
Dialog Box (page 136).
Note: If there is no PC with an IH Browser behind a remote RLX2-IHx series radio, you can select
and ping the radio itself to text its wireless link.
5.8.1 Setting the Ping Parameters
Use the Ping Options dialog box to choose Ping parameters, logging options,
and response to other stations. For more information, see Pinging Devices on the
Network (page 135).
Parameter
Description
Send Interval
Specifies the time between ping signals in milliseconds. The minimum interval
is 10 ms.
Buffer Size
Specifies the buffer size in bytes (the number of bytes sent on the ping).
Start and Stop
Pinging
Select this check box to log the beginning and ending of the ping session.
Every Send
Select this check box to log every ping signal sent.
Every Receive
Select this check box to log every ping response received.
Missed
Responses
Select this check box to log every missed ping response (when a device does
not respond to a ping signal.
Page 136 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
Respond when
another utility
pings you
Select this check box to reply to a ping request from another device.
Log these
responses
Select this check box to log each ping response sent to another device.
When applied,
Select this check box to use these settings for all future ping sessions with
these become the any device.
default for all new
ping sessions
5.9
Viewing Network Data in the IH Browser
The IH Browser DIALOGS displays four dialog boxes that allow you to monitor the
network connections for the selected radio in either the List View or Topology
View. The four dialog boxes show:
 The Wireless clients attached to the radio.
 The Information about devices detected via the Ethernet interface of the
radio.
 The 802.11 Access Points that are detected by this particular radio.
 The active ports on the radio.
You can display two or more of the dialog boxes at the same time.
 You can display all four dialog boxes with one command: from the DIALOGS
menu choose All 4 DIALOGS.
 You can also close all the open dialogs boxes: from the DIALOGS menu
choose CLOSE ALL.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 137 of 231
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
5.9.1 Viewing Wireless Clients in the IH Browser
The Client List dialog box shows information about wireless clients connected to
the currently selected radio.
1 In the IH Broswer, select (click) a radio in either the List View or Topology
View.
2 From the DIALOGS menu choose WIRELESS CLIENTS, or right-click the radio
and choose WIRELESS CLIENTS.
Parameter
Description
Refresh
Specifies the data refresh interval in seconds or minutes. Select
MANUALLY to prevent the IH Browser from automatically updating the
data.
Now
Click NOW to manually update the data.
IP
Displays the IP addresses of the wireless clients connected to the
selected radio.
MAC
Displays the MAC addresses of the wireless clients connected to the
selected radio.
Signal (dBm)
Displays the strength of the signal from the wireless clients connected
to the selected radio.
Age (sec)
Displays the age of the connection to the wireless clients connected to
the selected radio (the amount of time since a packet has been
received from that device).
Page 138 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
5.9.2 Viewing Ethernet Nodes in the IH Browser
The Ethernet Node List dialog box shows information about devices detected by
the Ethernet interface to the currently selected radio.
1 In the IH Broswer, select (click) a radio in either the List View or Topology
View.
2 From the DIALOGS menu choose ETHERNET NODES, or right-click the radio
and choose ETHERNET NODES.
Parameter
Description
Refresh
Specifies the data refresh interval in seconds or minutes. Select
MANUALLY to prevent the IH Browser from automatically updating the
data.
Now
Click NOW to manually update the data.
IP
Displays the IP addresses of the wireless clients connected to the
selected radio.
MAC
Displays the MAC addresses of the wireless clients connected to the
selected radio.
Age (sec)
Displays the age of the connection to the wireless clients connected to
the selected radio (the amount of time since a packet has been
received from that device).
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 139 of 231
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
5.9.3 Viewing the Scan List in the IH Browser
The Scan List dialog box shows all 802.11 Access Points known to the selected
radio on this channel (through beacons), even if the Access Point is not linked to
the radio (has a different SSID or uses different encryption). See Detecting
802.11 Access Points (page 32).
Note: This list shows some of the same information available in the Available Parents table in the
Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility. See Viewing Available Parents for a Radio (page 65).
1
2
In the IH Broswer, select (click) a radio in either the List View or Topology
View.
From the DIALOGS menu choose SCAN LIST, or right-click the radio and
choose SCAN LIST.
List entries marked with an asterisk * indicate that the entry is an alternate path,
which you can also see if you select the
Parents button from the toolbar in the
Topology view (blue lines link the radio to its alternate parents).
Parameter
Description
Refresh
Specifies the data refresh interval in seconds or minutes. Select
MANUALLY to prevent the IH Browser from automatically updating the
data.
Now
Click NOW to manually update the data.
BSS ID
Displays the Basic Service Set Identifier. This is the MAC addresses of
the wireless clients known to the selected radio.
(name)
The name for RLX2-IHx series radios.
Page 140 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
Parameter
Description
Cost
Displays the calculated parent selection cost. The radio evaluates the
link it has to its parent once per second to determine if this link is the
best parent to use. The radio calculates the cost for each entry. The
cost calculation is based not only on the strongest signal, but on several
other factors to provide optimum network communication.
Channel
The radio channel on which the device is transmitting. The channel list
indicates the channel number as well as the frequency (2.4 GHz or 5
GHz bands).
Important: The RLX2-IHx series radio is supplied with a dual-band
antenna that supports both frequency ranges. If you use a different
antenna with the RLX2-IHx series radio, you must choose a channel
and frequency range supported by the antenna. See Appendix G Antenna Configuration (page 187).
SSID
Displays the network name (Service Set Identifier) of the Ethernet
device to which the radio is connected. The radio name appears for
RLX2-IHx series radios.
Signal (dBm)
Displays the strength of the signal from the wireless clients connected
to the selected radio.
Hop Count
Displays the number of hops to the Master device. A value of 0 (zero)
appears for non-ProSoft Technology devices.
Age (sec)
Displays the age of the connection to the wireless clients connected to
the selected radio (the amount of time since a packet has been
received from that device).
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 141 of 231
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
5.9.4 Viewing the Port Table in the IH Browser
The Port List dialog box shows all active ports on the selected radio.
1 In the IH Broswer, select (click) a radio in either the List View or Topology
View.
2 From the DIALOGS menu choose PORT TABLE, or right-click the radio and
choose PORT TABLE.
The port table is a list of all the active ports on the radio.Each RLX2-IHx series
radio has up to 34 active ports: one Ethernet wired port, one parent radio
frequency link, and up to 32 child radio frequency links.
Parameter
Description
Refresh
Specifies the data refresh interval in seconds or minutes. Select
MANUALLY to prevent the IH Browser from automatically updating the
data.
Now
Click NOW to manually update the data.
Port #
Displays the selected radio's port number.
Type
Displays the type of the port (ETHERNET PORT, PARENT RF LINK, CHILD
RF LINK).
Designated Bridge
The next bridge toward the Spanning Tree root for this port.
State
Displays the current Spanning Tree state of the port (BLOCKING,
LEARNING, LISTENING, and FORWARDING). Forwarding packets can be
transferred.
Peer Name
Displays the name of the Master radio if the current radio is a Repeater
radio.
Peer MAC
Displays the MAC address of the Master radio if the current radio is a
Repeater radio.
Page 142 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
5.9.5 Viewing the Radio Event Log in the IH Browser
The Event Log dialog box displays the history of events that have been recorded
by the currently selected radio. This can be useful for troubleshooting problems.
1 In the IH Broswer, select (click) a radio in either the List View or Topology
View.
2 From the DIALOGS menu choose EVENT LOG, or right-click the radio and
choose EVENT LOG.
The Event Log shows the history of a particular radio. You can save the Event
Log to a text file for troubleshooting purposes.
Note: The filter conditions that you set in the Event Log Filter dialog box affect both the display of
events in the Event Log dialog box, and the events in the file you create when you click SAVE. See
Setting the Event Log Filter (page 144).
Parameter
Description
Refresh
Specifies the data refresh interval in seconds or minutes. Select
MANUALLY to prevent the IH Browser from automatically updating the
data.
Now
Click NOW to manually update the data.
Save
Click SAVE to save the Event Log to a file for troubleshooting or sending
to ProSoft Technology Technical Support.
Filter Dialog
Click FILTER DIALOG to change the Event Log filtering to show or hide
certain events. See Setting the Event Log Filter (page 144).
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 143 of 231
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Setting the Event Log Filter
The Event Filter dialog box allows you to include or exclude specific event types
from the Event Log. The filter conditions that you set in this dialog box affect both
the display of events in the Event Log dialog box, and the events in the file you
create when you click SAVE in the Event Log dialog box.
Note: The filter conditions are reset to the default state (include all events) when you close the
Event Log dialog box.
1
2
3
4
5
In the IH Broswer, click on a radio in either the List View or Topology View.
From the DIALOGS menu choose EVENT LOG, or right-click the radio and
choose EVENT LOG.
In the Event Log dialog box, click FILTER.
Double-click on an event in the EVENT LIST to add it to the SELECTED EVENTS
list. An asterisk (*) appears next to the event types in the Selected Events list.
You can double-click on the event in the EVENT LIST a second time to remove
it from the SELECTED EVENTS list.
Use the EVENTS SHOULD BE parameters to include only the selected events,
or exclude the selected events.
Parameter
Description
Event List
Displays a list of different types of events in the log, sorted by EVENT ID. By
default, this list only includes events types that are in the radio's Event Log.

Double-click an event type to add it to the Selected Events list.

Double-click the event type again to remove it from the Selected Events
list.
Show all events
Select this check box to show all event types, even if the type is not in the
radio's Event Log.
Selected Events
Displays the list of selected event types.
Events should be
Specifies whether to include only the selected events, or exclude them.
INCLUDED - Show only the selected events in the Event Log.
EXCLUDED - Show all events in the Event Log except the selected events.
Page 144 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual
5.9.6 Viewing Parent Radios in the IH Browser
You can show the current Parent radio or all possible alternate Parent radios for
the Repeater radios in the Topology View.

The Show Selected Parents button (or from the VIEW menu choose SHOW
PARENTS - ONE) shows the link from Repeater radios to their current Parent
radio in red.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 145 of 231
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios
User Manual

RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
The Show All Parents button (or from the VIEW menu choose SHOW
PARENTS - ALL) shows links to alternate Parent radios in blue (If the Repeater
radios can detect other radios in the network). This gives a graphical
representation of the number of alternate paths available to a radio should its
parent link go down.
Note: You can also display a detailed list of each of the alternate Parent radios right-clicking a
radio and choosing SCAN LIST. This list shows the RLX2-IHx series radios in the same network and
all 802.11 Access Points on other networks. See Viewing the Scan List in the IH Browser (page
140).
Page 146 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
6
Diagnostics and Troubleshooting
User Manual
Diagnostics and Troubleshooting
In This Chapter

Checking the Ethernet Cable............................................................... 148

LED Display......................................................................................... 148

Resetting a RLX2-IHx series Radio ..................................................... 150

Unable to scan for AP's error message ............................................... 151

Finding Missing Radios ....................................................................... 152
Use the IH Browser’s diagnostic and signal strength settings at the top of the
Radio Settings window to make sure the network is working properly:



Signal Strength: This shows the radio’s signal strength.
o Master appears if this is a Master radio.
o Scanning appears if the radio is scanning to find another radio to connect
to.
o Not Connected appear If the radio is not connected to a network and not
currently scanning.
Update every: Specifies the interval (in seconds) between updates to the
display. The default is 15 seconds.
The other parameters on this display are Read-only, and describe the radio
and its current state.
Tip: You can display the help topic for any parameter in the dialog box by clicking the parameter
name. The parameter name turns blue when you move the cursor over a parameter with a help
topic.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 147 of 231
Diagnostics and Troubleshooting
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
You can perform the following troubleshooting routines:
 Check the Ethernet cable
 Check the LEDs on the radio
 Retrieve the default password by resetting the radio
 View error messages in the IH Browser
 Find missing radios
6.1
Checking the Ethernet Cable
If the radio’s Ethernet port is connected to a PC or network, and the Ethernet
LED does not light on the radio, there may be a problem with the Ethernet cable.
Verify that the cable is plugged into the radio at one end, and to an Ethernet hub,
a PC, or a 10/100/1000 Base-T Ethernet switch at the other end.
If using the PoE injector, verify that the M12 to RJ45 cable is connected between
the radio and the injector and also that the Ethernet patch cable is connected
between the injector and the switch.
Note: The RLX2-IHx series radio auto-detects the Ethernet connection type, and does not require
a crossover cable for direct connection to a PC.
6.2
LED Display
The RLX2-IHx series radio front panel includes a set of LEDs that indicate the
radio’s status.
LED
Description
POWER
Booting up
Fully operational
This two-color LED turns amber when power is first applied. After power is applied, this
LED goes out completely for about four seconds while the internal hardware is initialized.
After initialization the power LED turns green, indicating the radio is fully operational.
RF
TRANSMIT
Transmitting data over the wireless interface
RF RECEIVE
Receiving data over the wireless interface
SERIAL
Receiving serial data
ETHERNET
Transmitting Ethernet data over the wireless interface
Note that the state of the front-panel ETHERNET LED may not necessarily correspond to
the state of the DATA LED on the Ethernet connector. The DATA LED on the Ethernet
connector indicates traffic over the wired link, while the ETHERNET LED indicates network
data sent or received through the wireless link.
For example, if the radio is pinged over the wired link, the DATA LED on the Ethernet
connector blinks but the ETHERNET LED does not (because the ping packet was not
transmitted over the air).
NET
Blinks if SD card with new configuration inserted. Reserved for future additional use.
MOD
Blinks if SD card with new configuration inserted. Reserved for future additional use.
Page 148 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
LED
SIGNAL
STRENGTH
Diagnostics and Troubleshooting
User Manual
Description
Blinks if SD card inserted with new configuration. This is for all radio modes.
Radios in Master mode:
No radios linked
One or more radios linked (right LED blinking).
DFS Channel Availability Check in progress (all LEDs blinking Amber)
Radios in Repeater or Client mode:
No Signal
Radio linked, Poor Signal
Radio linked, Fair Signal
Radio linked, Good Signal
The following LEDs should light when you connect the power and Ethernet
cables to the radio.
 The POWER LED should turn green.
 The SPEED LED on the Ethernet connector should indicate a valid wired link.
This LED is located at the top of the Ethernet RJ-45 connector and is marked
SPEED
o OFF = 10 MB
o ON = 100 MB
o BLINK = 1GB.
 The RF TRANSMIT and RF RECEIVE LEDs should start to blink
occasionally.
For radios in Repeater or Client mode, all three SIGNAL STRENGTH LEDs blink
just after the radio links to the Master radio but before fully authenticating the link.
Normally this lasts only a few seconds. If the SIGNAL STRENGTH LEDs blink for
longer than a few seconds, or do not stop blinking, it usually means the
encryption keys are not correct. The Wireless Security Settings on a Repeater
radio must match those on the Master radio. See Configuring a Radio - Getting
Started (page 44).
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 149 of 231
Diagnostics and Troubleshooting
User Manual
6.3
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Resetting a RLX2-IHx series Radio
If you lose the password to a radio, you cannot change the radio settings. You
can reset the radio to restore the default password, but the radio loses all the
configuration settings and returns to the default settings.
6.3.1 Resetting the RLX2-IHNF-W and RLX2-IHNF-WC
These steps resets the radio to its default settings, including the default
password.
1 Remove power from the radio.
2 Press the Reset button. The Reset button is located on the front of the unit
just under the ProSoft logo.
3
While holding down the button, apply power to the radio and continue to hold
the button down for 30 seconds.
This resets the radio to its default settings. You can now log in to the Radio
Configuration / Diagnostic Utility for the radio using the default password:
password.
Page 150 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Diagnostics and Troubleshooting
User Manual
6.3.2 Resetting All Other Radios
These steps reset the radio to its default settings, including the default password.
1 Remove power from the radio.
2 Locate the Reset button hole.
3
4
6.4
Insert the end of a paperclip or similar device into the hole to press the reset
button.
While pressing the reset button in with a paperclip, apply power to the radio,
and continue to hold down the reset button for 30 seconds.
This resets the radio to its default settings. You can now log in to the Radio
Configuration / Diagnostic Utility for the radio using the default password:
password.
Unable to scan for AP's error message
The Unable to scan for AP's error message may appear in the IH Browser when
it attempts to scan for radios and no valid network connection exists on the PC
(wired or wireless).
To correct this error
1
2
Confirm that the PC has at least one active network (LAN) connection. It
could be a wired Ethernet connection or a wireless 802.11 connection.
Confirm that the network connection has a valid IP address. The network
connection might need to have a static IP address assigned to it. Check the
IP address of the network connection to determine that one has been
assigned.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 151 of 231
Diagnostics and Troubleshooting
User Manual
6.5
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Finding Missing Radios
If the radios are not visible in the IH Browser, try the following:
1 Refresh the IH Browser display. See Refreshing the Display in the IH
Browser (page 42). The IH Browser sends scans as broadcast messages,
which can be dropped in RF connections, requiring that you repeat the scan.
2 Disable any software firewall running on the PC (This is most common in
Windows XP and newer). Open the Network connections folder in the
Windows Control Panel, then open the Local Area Connection Properties
window and verify that the check box under INTERNET CONNECTION FIREWALL
is not checked.
3 If these steps do not help, verify that the PC running the IH Browser and the
radios are connected to the same local network.
4 In the IH Browser, change to the Topology view. From the VIEW menu, click
TOPOLOGY VIEW. Any unlinked radios may appear at the bottom of the
window. Scroll down to see all the unlinked radios. If you still cannot see the
radios in the IH Browser, call ProSoft Technology Technical Support. See
Contacting Technical Support (page 213).
Page 152 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
7
Appendix A - Adding a Radio to RSLogix 5000
User Manual
Appendix A - Adding a Radio to RSLogix 5000
In This Chapter

Adding the Radio to RSLogix 5000 ..................................................... 154

Importing the Add-On Instruction......................................................... 157

RLX2 Controller Tags .......................................................................... 161
You can use an Add-On Instruction (AOI) to add an RLX2-IHx series radio to
RSLogix 5000™. You can then extract information from the radio and transfer it
to the ControlLogix processor connected by EtherNet/IP™. This allows you to
view and use the radio status and diagnostic information in the program on the
controller.
Note: You must download the RLX2-IHx series radio Add-On Instruction from the ProSoft
Technology website. Go to www.prosoft-technology.com and search for your radio. From the
RLX2-IHx series radio webpage, download the Add-On Instruction.
There are two procedures that you must complete in order to import and use the
RLX2-IHx series Add-On Instruction in RSLogix 5000.
1 Add the RLX2-IHx series radio to a project in RSLogix 5000.
2 Import the AOI into the MainRoutine ladder logic in the same project.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 153 of 231
Appendix A - Adding a Radio to RSLogix 5000
User Manual
7.1
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Adding the Radio to RSLogix 5000
1
2
In RSLogix 5000, open an existing project, or create a new project
In the Controller Organizer, right-click 1756 BACKPLANE, 1756-A7 and then
click NEW MODULE.
3
In the Select Module Type dialog box, select the correct Ethernet card (ENBT
in this example) and click OK.
Page 154 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix A - Adding a Radio to RSLogix 5000
User Manual
4
Enter a name for the card (Ethernet in this example) and the IP ADDRESS and
then click OK.
5
In the Controller Organizer, right-click the new ETHERNET module and then
click NEW MODULE.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 155 of 231
Appendix A - Adding a Radio to RSLogix 5000
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
6
In the Select Module Type dialog box, click ETHERNET-BRIDGE GENERIC
ETHERNET/IP CIP BRIDGE and then click OK.
7
8
In the New Module dialog, enter the NAME (RLX2 in this example).
Select the IP ADDRESS radio button and type in the IP address of the RLX2IHx series radio, and then click OK.
Page 156 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
9
7.2
Appendix A - Adding a Radio to RSLogix 5000
User Manual
In the Module Properties dialog box, click OK. The Ethernet Bridge appears
in the Controller Organizer.
Importing the Add-On Instruction
1
2
3
In RSLogix 5000, in the Controller Organizer window, expand the TASKS
folder until you see the MAINPROGRAM folder.
Under the MAINPROGRAM folder, double-click MAINROUTINE to open the
MainRoutine in the Ladder Editor.
Right-click an empty rung in the routine, and then click IMPORT RUNG...
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 157 of 231
Appendix A - Adding a Radio to RSLogix 5000
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
4
Navigate to the location on your PC where you saved the Add-On Instruction
(for example, Desktop). Select the .L5X file and click IMPORT.
5
This opens the Import Configuration dialog box. Click TAGS to see the
controller tags that the Add-On Instruction creates.
Page 158 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix A - Adding a Radio to RSLogix 5000
User Manual
6
Click OK to import the AOI. A progress bar appears during the import.
7
After the import completes, the new rung with the Add-On Instruction appears
in the Ladder editor.
The procedure also imports new User Defined Data Types, Controller Tags,
and the Add-On instruction for your project.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 159 of 231
Appendix A - Adding a Radio to RSLogix 5000
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
8
Ensure that a communications path exists using the Who Active dialog as
shown.
9
Save the project. When ready, download the project to the processor.
Page 160 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
7.3
Appendix A - Adding a Radio to RSLogix 5000
User Manual
RLX2 Controller Tags
You use the controller tags in RSLogix 5000 to monitor and control elements of
the RLX2-IHx series radio from RSLogix 5000. You use only the RLX2.xxx
controller tag structure for this purpose.
7.3.1 RLX2.CONTROL
This array contains trigger bits used to request functions from the RLX2-IHx
series radio. The description is "Main RLX2 Radio definition Reads status of
Diagnostic data from RLX2."
After execution, the bit is reset to 0 to be ready for the next execution.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 161 of 231
Appendix A - Adding a Radio to RSLogix 5000
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
7.3.2 RLX2.STATUS
This array is populated when the RLX2.CONTROL.Get_Status_Data is triggered.
The following is the CIP™ object definition to read the RLX2-IHx Diagnostics and
Status information.
CIP Data Tag Name
Data Type Description
RLX2.STATUS.SSID
SINT[32]
Service Set Identifier is a name assigned to the
wireless network
RLX2.STATUS.IPAddress
SINT[4]
IP address of RLX2-IHx radio
RLX2.STATUS.MACAddress
SINT[6]
Physical Media Access Control (MAC) address of
the device
RLX2.STATUS.NetworkMode
SINT
RLX2 radio network mode (Master= 6 Repeater=7
Client=1)
RLX2.STATUS.ConnectionState
SINT
Connection State of RLX2 radio found at the bitlevel (RLX2.STATUS.ConnectionState.x)
Bit sequence [yyyy 0001] = 1 = Not connected
Bit sequence [yyyy 0010] = 2 = Scanning
Not reported
= 3 = Locally connected
Bit sequence [yyyy 0100] = 4 = Globally connected
Where y = RLX2 radio model type:
Bit sequence [0001 zzzz] = 802.11g (2.4 GHz) radio
Bit sequence [0010 zzzz] = 802.11a (5 GHz) radio
Bit sequence [0011 zzzz] = 802.11n radio
Example:
Bit sequence 0010 0100 = 36 = Globally connected
5 Ghz radio
RLX2.STATUS.SignalStrength
INT
Current Strength of the signal in dBm
RLX2.STATUS.Channel
SINT
Current Channel in which RLX2-IHx is transmitting
RLX2.STATUS.WEP
SINT
WEP encryption key
RLX2.STATUS.Flags
DINT
Flags:
Flag [0/1 ]= Extension channel
Flag [2] = SSIDhidden
Flag [3] = Allow Children
Flag [4/5] = STP/RSTP
Flag [6] = TXusingGI
RLX2.STATUS.MasterMACAddress
SINT[6]
MAC Address of Parent Radio in which Repeater or
Client is linked
RLX2.STATUS.HopCount
SINT
Number of hops to the master
RLX2.STATUS.PortStatus
SINT
Ethernet Port Status
1 = 10 Mb/s
2 = 100 Mb/s
3 = 1000 Mb/s
RLX2.STATUS.Associations
INT
Number of network elements to which radio has
wireless connection
RLX2.STATUS.BridgeAssociations
INT
Number of devices to which radio has wireless
connection
Page 162 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix A - Adding a Radio to RSLogix 5000
User Manual
RLX2.STATUS.TxRadioThroughput
INT
Transmit throughput in kilobits per second
RLX2.STATUS.RxRadioThroughput
INT
Receive throughput in kilobits per second
RLX2.STATUS.Uptime
INT
This is the amount of time the radio has been
running since power up
(Days/Hours/Minutes/Seconds)
RLX2.STATUS.Linktime
DINT
The time the radio has been linked
(Days/Hours/Minutes/Seconds)
RLX2.STATUS.TxPacketRate
DINT
Total number of packets transmitted
RLX2.STATUS.RxPacketRate
DINT
Total number of packets received
RLX2.STATUS.ModuleName
DINT
The name of the radio
RLX2.STATUS.ProductName
SINT[32]
Name of product
RLX2.STATUS.ImageVerStr
SINT[32]
Firmware version loaded in device
RLX2.STATUS.TxGood
SINT[28]
Number of Good Transmitted Frames
RLX2.STATUS.RxGood
DINT
Number of Good Received Frames
RLX2.STATUS.TxBad
DINT
Number of Bad Transmitted Frames
RLX2.STATUS.RxBad
DINT
Number of Bad Received Frames
RLX2.STATUS.TxDirectedFrames
DINT
Number of Transmitted Directed Frames
RLX2.STATUS.TxMulticastFrames
DINT
Number of Transmitted Multicast Frames
RLX2.STATUS.TxBroadcastFrames
DINT
Number of Transmitted Broadcast Frames
RLX2.STATUS.RxDirectedFrames
DINT
Number of Received Directed Frames
RLX2.STATUS.RxMulticastFrames
DINT
Number of Received Multicast Frames
RLX2.STATUS.RxBroadcastFrames
DINT
Number of Transmitted Broadcast Frames
RLX2.STATUS.RxCRCErr
DINT
Number of CRC Errors
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 163 of 231
User Manual
Page 164 of 231
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
8
Appendix B - Radio Hardware
User Manual
Appendix B - Radio Hardware
In This Chapter
8.1

Radio Power Requirements (RLX2-IHNF-W) ...................................... 165

Radio Power Requirements (All other radios) ..................................... 167

Ethernet Cable Specifications ............................................................. 169

Ethernet Cable Configuration .............................................................. 170
Radio Power Requirements (RLX2-IHNF-W)
These cables are available for purchase from ProSoft Technology:
Description
ProSoft Part Number
Power Cable, 3m (7 ft), M12 to un-terminated leads
CULPWR-M12-010
Power Cable, 10m (33 ft), M12 to un-terminated leads
CULPWR-M12-033
The RLX2-IHNF-W and WC radios accept PoE configuration.
 The RLX2-IHNF-W radio is equipped with a power M12 port (IEC 61076-2101).
 The RLX2-IHNF-WC Ethernet and PoE cable protrudes from the module.
There is no M12 port.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 165 of 231
Appendix B - Radio Hardware
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Contact Assignment of the M12 Socket


BK (Black) and BU (Blue) wires are tied together and connect to "+".
BN (Brown) and WH (White) wires are tied together and connected to "-".
Pin Assignment M12 Socket, 4-pos, A-coded, View Female Side
Page 166 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
8.2
Appendix B - Radio Hardware
User Manual
Radio Power Requirements (All other radios)
Note: The following instructions do not pertain to the RLX2-IHNF-W radio.
The RLX2-IHx series radios accept voltages between 10 and 24 VDC, with an
average power draw of less than 8 Watts. A detachable power connector comes
with the radio, as shown below. The connector terminals are labeled + (positive
DC connection) and - (DC ground connection).
You can use the AC-to-DC power supply adapter supplied with the optional RLXIHBTK Bench Test Kit to convert the input power. The DC power wires must be
less than 3 meters in length to meet regulatory requirements.
Warning: When wiring the power connector supplied with the radio, be sure to observe the proper
polarity markings on the power connector. Wiring the connector incorrectly can cause serious
damage to the radio which is not covered under the ProSoft Technology warranty.
The power connector (ProSoft Technology part number 002-0116) is shown on
the left in the photo above. Note the + and – polarity markings. The wire
installation tool (ProSoft part number 357-0061) shown on the right is helpful for
installing wires into the spring-loaded contacts inside power connector.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 167 of 231
Appendix B - Radio Hardware
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
To use the installation tool, insert it into the connector as shown below.
Press down on the installation tool to use it as a level to open the connector’s
contacts to insert a wire. A properly-wired power connector is shown below.
The RLX2-IHx series radios accept power from 802.3af Mode B or passive
Power over Ethernet (PoE) sources supplying 48VDC, with an average power
draw of less than 8 watts. ProSoft Technology offers the following passive PoE
injectors for use with the RLX2-IHx series radios:
POE-48I-AC
Power over Ethernet Injector, AC input
POE-48I-DC-DC
Power over Ethernet Injector, 9 to 36 VDC input voltage


The radio shall be installed by trained personnel only, as outlined in the
installation instructions provided with each radio.
The equipment shall be installed by a qualified installer/electrician. The
installer/electrician is responsible for obtaining a secured ground connection
between the lug terminal on the surge protector to a verified common ground
point using a minimum 6 AWG gauge wire. This must be done when
attaching power lines to the radio during installation.
Page 168 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix B - Radio Hardware
User Manual
Danger: A solid ground connection should be verified using a meter prior to applying power to the
radio. Failing to secure a proper ground could result in serious injury or death as a result of a
lightning strike.
Using Power over Ethernet (PoE) to power remote devices has several
advantages:
 "Carrier Class" Power Over Ethernet system.
 Power can be supplied over long distances, up to 300 feet.
 Power can be available wherever network access is available.
 The power supply can be centrally located where it can be attached to an uninterruptible power supply.
 You can easily power or reset the attached equipment from a remote
location.
 There is no need to run additional power cabling to the device as power can
be supplied over the CAT5, CAT5E, or CAT6 Ethernet cable.
 You can save on the cost of coax cable and reduce RF losses for remote
mounted radios.
 Built-in Ethernet surge protection to prevent equipment damage.
 Overload and short circuit protection.
8.3
Ethernet Cable Specifications





The recommended cable is Category 5 or better. A Category 5 cable has four
twisted pairs of wires, which are color-coded and cannot be swapped. The
module uses only two of the four pairs when running at 10 MBit or 100 MBit
speeds. All eight wires are used when running at 1000 MBit speeds.
Category 5e or better cable is recommended for 1000 MBit speeds.
The Ethernet port on the module is Auto-Sensing. Use either a standard
Ethernet straight-through cable or a crossover cable when connecting the
module to an Ethernet hub, a 10/100/1000 Base-T Ethernet switch, or directly
to a PC. The module detects the cable type and uses the appropriate pins to
send and receive Ethernet signals.
Ethernet cabling is similar to U.S. telephone cables, except that it has eight
conductors. Some hubs have one input that can accept either a straightthrough or crossover cable, depending on a switch position. In this case,
ensure the switch position and cable type agree.
Refer to Ethernet Cable Configuration (page 170) for a diagram of how to
configure Ethernet cables.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 169 of 231
Appendix B - Radio Hardware
User Manual
8.4
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Ethernet Cable Configuration
8.4.1 Ethernet Cable Configuration (RLX2-IHNF-W)
The RLX2-IHNF-W weatherproof radio uses cables with M12 connectors on one
end and RJ45 connectors on the other. These are Power over Ethernet (PoE)
cables that you can purchase directly from ProSoft Technology.
Description
ProSoft Part Number
Network Cable, 2m (7 ft) M12 to RJ45
CURJ45-M12-007
Network Cable, 10m (33 ft) M12 to RJ45
CURJ45-M12-033
This PoE cable contains an M12 (IP65, IP67) connector on one end that attaches
to the radio. The other end contains an RJ45 connector for a network connection
or power injector.
Pin Assignments
M12 socket, 8-pos, A-coded, female
RJ45 pin assignment
Page 170 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix B - Radio Hardware
User Manual
Circuit Diagram
8.4.2 Ethernet Cable Configuration (all other radios)
The RLX2-IHx series radios (except the RLX2-IHNF-W weatherproof radio) use
Ethernet cable. A diagram of the pin assignments appears below.
Straight-Though Cable
RJ-45 Pin
RJ-45 Pin
1 Rx+
1 Tx+
2 Rx-
2 Tx-
3 Tx+
3 Rx+
6 Tx-
6 Rx-
Crossover Cable
RJ-45 Pin
RJ-45 Pin
1 Rx+
3 Tx+
2 Rx-
6 Tx-
3 Tx+
1 Rx+
6 Tx-
2 Rx-
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 171 of 231
Appendix B - Radio Hardware
User Manual
Page 172 of 231
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
9
Appendix C - RLX2-IHx 5 GHz Radio DFS Support
User Manual
Appendix C - RLX2-IHx 5 GHz Radio DFS
Support
In This Chapter

DFS Radio Operations ........................................................................ 173
Some channels in the 5 GHz band are shared with radar and must adhere to
Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) rules. If the radio detects the presence of
radar on its operating frequency, it must automatically change to another
frequency.
Note: This applies only to radios that can operate at frequencies in the 5 GHz band.
9.1
DFS Radio Operations
If radar is detected on an operating channel, transmissions must cease within the
required Channel Closing Transmission Time, and must move to a new channel
within the required Channel Move Time. Before transmitting on a new DFS
channel that has not been previously checked for radar, the RLX2-IHx series
radio must monitor the channel for the Channel Availability Check Time before
transmitting. Operations cannot return to a channel where radar was detected for
at least the Non-Occupancy Period. The values for these parameters are noted
in the table below:
Parameter
FCC Value
ETSI Value
ETSI Value
5.600 to 5.650 GHz
(Channels 120, 124, &
128)
Channel Availability
Check Time
60 seconds
60 seconds
10 minutes
Channel Move Time
10 seconds (12 seconds 10 seconds
for "long pulse" radar
10 seconds
Channel Closing
Transmission Time
200 milliseconds (plus
up to 60 milliseconds
over 10 seconds)
1 second
1 second
Non-Occupancy Period
30 minutes
30 minutes
30 minutes
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 173 of 231
Appendix C - RLX2-IHx 5 GHz Radio DFS Support
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
If a Master radio detects radar, it issues a channel change announcement to all
Client and Repeater radios in the network. It then moves to a new channel within
the Channel Move Time. (Typically, this move time is 500 milliseconds or less.) If
the selected channel was not previously checked for the presence of radar, the
Master radio must do so for the Channel Availability Check Time before it can
begin to transmit. If the newly-selected channel is not a DFS channel, or if the
channel was previously monitored for radar since the radio was powered on,
transmissions can begin immediately.
During the Channel Availability Check Time, a radio blinks all three amber Signal
Strength LEDS approximately once per second. If radar is detected on the new
channel during the Channel Availability Check Time, the Master radio selects
another channel and begins the process again.
If a Client or Repeater radio detects radar, in addition to stopping data
transmission, must notify its parent of the presence of radar. Each unit receiving
a radar notification from a child unit treats it the same as if it had detected radar
itself and acts accordingly. Thus radar notifications always reach the Master
radio which causes a channel change order to be issued.
After a Master radio successfully selects a DFS channel, Repeater or Client
radios connect to the Master and scan for radar for an additional 60 seconds
(Channel Availability Check Time). If a chain of Repeater radios ultimately
connects to a Master radio using a DFS channel, the time to connect is 60
seconds for each Repeater radio in the chain as DFS channels are initially
scanned for radar transmissions.
9.1.1 Selecting a DFS 5 GHz Channel
For [ModelNumber] Master radios operating in the 5 GHz band, you can select a
DFS channel, or let the radio automatically select the DFS channel. DFS
channels are a 5 GHz radio parameter only, and apply to all RLX2-IHx series
radios except the RLX2-IHG.
Note: In some cases, the radio may select a channel in the 5 GHz Upper Band if it does not find an
open channel in the 5 GHz DFS Band.
Page 174 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix C - RLX2-IHx 5 GHz Radio DFS Support
User Manual
To Select a DFS Channel
In the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility, on the BASIC SETTINGS tab, in the
BASIC WIRELESS SETTINGS group, select the starting DFS channel. If the radio
detects a radar signal on this channel, it changes the channel as described in
DFS Radio Operations (page 173).
The actual channel in operation is always shown in the CURRENT CHANNEL
display.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 175 of 231
Appendix C - RLX2-IHx 5 GHz Radio DFS Support
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
To Use DFS Auto Select
In the Radio Configuration / Diagnostic Utility, on the BASIC SETTINGS tab, in the
BASIC WIRELESS SETTINGS group, select the Master radio channel DFS Auto
Select.
With this selection the radio randomly selects a DFS channel for operation. The
actual channel in operation is always shown in the CURRENT CHANNEL display.
Page 176 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix D - RLX2-IHx series Virtual LAN (VLAN) Functionality
User Manual
10 Appendix D - RLX2-IHx series Virtual LAN
(VLAN) Functionality
In This Chapter

Transparent Support of VLAN Tags (802.1Q) ..................................... 178

Port/Radio-based VLAN Tagging with Managed Switches .................. 179

Port/Radio-based VLAN Tagging without Managed Switches ............. 180
Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANs) are typically used to segment core network
components and network access rules. A VLAN provides the equivalent of a
wired patch panel through software (packet filtering) rather than hardware
(physical wires).
Constraining data to a particular Virtual LAN requires that the radio tag packets
with a VLAN identifier. VLAN tagging simply adds extra information in the packet
header of Ethernet frames so VLAN-enabled switches know how to pass along
the data.
The RLX2-IHx series radios (version 33 and later) provide:
 Transparent support of VLAN tags (802.1Q)
 Port/Radio-based VLAN tagging with Managed Switches
 Port/Radio-based VLAN tagging without Managed Switches
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 177 of 231
Appendix D - RLX2-IHx series Virtual LAN (VLAN) Functionality
User Manual
10.1
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Transparent Support of VLAN Tags (802.1Q)
The following provides an example of transparent communication between
Managed Switches using VLAN trunking.
Page 178 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
10.2
Appendix D - RLX2-IHx series Virtual LAN (VLAN) Functionality
User Manual
Port/Radio-based VLAN Tagging with Managed Switches
In this example, the network has three VLANs (capacity for 8). Each VLAN has
access to a Managed Switch pre-configured to assign each VLAN to a specific
port. The Radio supporting the Managed Switch passes on the 802.1Q frames.
This example shows support for Radio to Radio VLANs using one or more Trunk
Links.
 PLC, Drive, and HMI communicate on VLAN 1 and with the Control Network
(same subnet).
 Mobile worker communicates to the SCADA network only (VLAN 2). The
laptop communicates to Internet/Business Network only (VLAN 3).
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 179 of 231
Appendix D - RLX2-IHx series Virtual LAN (VLAN) Functionality
User Manual
10.3
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Port/Radio-based VLAN Tagging without Managed Switches
In the following example, the network has three VLANs (capacity for 8). Each
VLAN has access to a specific Radio port. The Radio supporting the Managed
Switch passes on the 802.1Q frames. The wireless network also supports Radio
to Radio VLANs using one or more Trunk Links.
 PLC, Drive & HMI communicate on one VLAN on the same subnet.
 Mobile Worker/Laptop communicate with a fixed server on VLAN 2 (separate
subnet).
Page 180 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix E - EtherNet/IP and Modbus TCP/IP Support
User Manual
11 Appendix E - EtherNet/IP and Modbus TCP/IP
Support
In This Chapter

Modbus TCP/IP Server Support .......................................................... 181

EtherNet/IP™ Server Support ............................................................. 183
You can get diagnostic and status information from the RLX2-IHx series radio by
querying the radio using either the Ethernet/IP or Modbus TCP/IP protocols.
11.1
Modbus TCP/IP Server Support
You can use a Modbus TCP/IP client to poll the RLX2-IHx series radio for
diagnostic and status information. The Modbus TCP/IP server in the radio
monitors port 502 and port 2000, and responds to requests from the port eth0
(Ethernet port) or ppp0 (Point-to-Point Protocol). PPP is a data link layer protocol
that establishes a connection between two nodes.
The radio supports up to five concurrent Modbus TCP/IP client connections.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 181 of 231
Appendix E - EtherNet/IP and Modbus TCP/IP Support
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
11.1.1 Modbus Memory Map Diagnostic Information
The topic lists the is the Modbus register addresses that you use to read the
RLX2-IHx series radio diagnostic and status information.
Name
Data Type
Access
Modbus Register
RLX2_Diag.SSID
SINT[32]
Read
30001 – 30016
RLX2_Diag.IPAddress
SINT[4]
Read
30017 – 30018
RLX2_Diag.MACAddress
SINT[6]
Read
30019 – 30021
RLX2_Diag.NeworkMode
SINT
Read
30022
RLX2_Diag.ConnectionState
SINT
Read
30023
RLX2_Diag.SignalStrength
INT
Read
30024
RLX2_Diag.Channel
SINT
Read
30025
RLX2_Diag.WEP
SINT
Read
30026
RLX2_Diag.Flags
DINT
Read
30027 – 30028
RLX2_Diag.MasterMACAddress
SINT[6]
Read
30029 – 30031
RLX2_Diag.HopCount
SINT
Read
30032
RLX2_DiagStatus
SINT
Read
30033
RLX2_Diag.NumAssociations
INT
Read
30034
RLX2_Diag.NumBridgeAssocs
INT
Read
30035
RLX2_Diag.TxRadioThroughput
INT
Read
30036
RLX2_Diag.RxRadioThroughput
INT
Read
30037
RLX2_Diag.Uptime
DINT
Read
30038 – 30039
RLX2_Diag.LinkTime
DINT
Read
30040 – 30041
RLX2_Diag.TxPktThput
DINT
Read
30042 – 30043
RLX2_Diag.RxPktThput
DINT
Read
30044 – 30045
RLX2_Diag.ModuleName
SINT[32]
Read
30046 – 30061
RLX2_Diag.ProductName
SINT[32]
Read
30062 – 30077
RLX2_Diag.ImageVerStr
SINT[28]
Read
30078 – 30091
RLX2_Diag.tx_good
DINT
Read
30092 - 30093
RLX2_Diag.rx_good
DINT
Read
30094 – 30095
RLX2_Diag.tx_bad
DINT
Read
30096 – 30097
RLX2_Diag.rx_bad
DINT
Read
30098 – 30099
RLX2_Diag.tx_directed_frames
DINT
Read
30100 – 30101
RLX2_Diag.tx_multicast_frames
DINT
Read
30102 – 30103
RLX2_Diag.tx_broadcast_frames
DINT
Read
30104 – 30105
RLX2_Diag.rx_directed_frames
DINT
Read
30106 – 30107
RLX2_Diag.rx_multicast_frames
DINT
Read
30108 – 30109
RLX2_Diag.rx_broadcast_frames
DINT
Read
30110 – 30111
RLX2_Diag.rx_crc_error
DINT
Read
30112 - 30113
Modbus Function Code 4 (Read Input Registers(3X)) is supported.
Page 182 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
11.2
Appendix E - EtherNet/IP and Modbus TCP/IP Support
User Manual
EtherNet/IP™ Server Support
The topic lists the is the CIP™ object definition that you use to read the RLX2IHx series radio diagnostic and status information.
Class ID: 0xA1 (161)
Number of Instances: 1
CIP Data Tag Name
Data Type
Access
RLX2_Diag.SSID
SINT[32]
Read
RLX2_Diag.IPAddress
SINT[4]
Read
RLX2_Diag.MACAddress
SINT[6]
Read
RLX2_Diag.NetworkMode
SINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.ConnectionState
SINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.SignalStrength
INT
Read
RLX2_Diag.Channel
SINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.WEP
SINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.Flags
DINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.MasterMACAddress
SINT[6]
Read
RLX2_Diag.HopCount
SINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.Status
SINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.NumAssociations
INT
Read
RLX2_Diag.NumBridgeAssocs
INT
Read
RLX2_Diag.TxRadioThroughput
INT
Read
RLX2_Diag.Uptime
INT
Read
RLX2_Diag.Linktime
DINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.TxPktThput
DINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.RxPktThput
DINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.ModuleName
DINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.ProductName
SINT[32]
Read
RLX2_Diag.ImageVerStr
SINT[32]
Read
RLX2_Diag.tx_good
SINT[28]
Read
RLX2_Diag.rx_good
DINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.tx_bad
DINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.rx_bad
DINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.tx_directed_frames
DINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.tx_multicast_frames
DINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.tx_broadcast_frames
DINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.rx_directed_frames
DINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.rx_multicast_frames
DINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.rx_broadcast_frames
DINT
Read
RLX2_Diag.rx_crc_err
DINT
Read
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 183 of 231
Appendix E - EtherNet/IP and Modbus TCP/IP Support
User Manual
Page 184 of 231
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix F - Master Channel-Frequency Table
User Manual
12 Appendix F - Master Channel-Frequency Table
The following table shows the channels/frequencies available in each RLX2-IHx
series radio. Note that radios configured for FCC and ETSI regulatory domains
do not have the same channels available. Also, some channels may have usage
or power restrictions (for example, indoor or outdoor) in some locations.
FCC
RLX2-XXX-A versions
Channel
Number
Center
Frequency
(MHz)
1
IHA
ETSI
RLX2-XXX-E versions
IHG
IHNF
IHW
2412


2
2417

3
2422
4
5
IHA
IHG
IHNF
IHW












2427





2432





6
2437





7
2442





8
2447





9
2452





10
2457





11
2462





12
2467


13
2472


36
5180





40
5200





44
5220





48
5240





52 (DFS)
5260

56 (DFS)
5280


60 (DFS)
5300


64 (DFS)
5320


100 (DFS)
5500


104 (DFS)
5520


108 (DFS)
5540


112 (DFS)
5560


116 (DFS)
5580


5600


120 (DFS)
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017

Page 185 of 231
Appendix F - Master Channel-Frequency Table
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
124 (DFS)
5620


128 (DFS)
5640


132 (DFS)
5660


136 (DFS)
5680


140 (DFS)
5700


149
5745



153
5765



157
5785



161
5805



165
5825



Page 186 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix G - Antenna Configuration
User Manual
13 Appendix G - Antenna Configuration
In This Chapter
13.1

Antennas ............................................................................................. 187

Antenna Types .................................................................................... 191

RLX2-IHx series Approved Antennas .................................................. 193

Antenna Location, Spacing, and Mounting .......................................... 196
Antennas
There are several important electrical characteristics that you must consider
when selecting antennas for a RLX2-IHx series radio.
 Antenna pattern
 Antenna gain
 Antenna polarity
 Antenna location, spacing, and mounting
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 187 of 231
Appendix G - Antenna Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
13.1.1 Control Drawing
Page 188 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix G - Antenna Configuration
User Manual
13.1.2 Antenna Pattern
Wireless devices transfer Information using electromagnetic energy radiated by
one antenna and received by another antenna. The power radiated by most
antennas is not uniform in all directions and has varying intensities. The power
radiated by the antenna in various directions is called the pattern of the antenna.
Mount each antenna so that the direction of strongest radiation points toward the
other antenna or antennas with which it will exchange signals.
Complete antenna patterns are three-dimensional. Often only a two-dimensional
slice of the pattern is shown when all the antennas of interest are located in
roughly the same horizontal plane instead of above or below one another. A slice
taken in a horizontal plane through the center (or looking down onto the pattern)
is called the azimuth pattern. A slice taken in a vertical plan from the side is
called the elevation pattern.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 189 of 231
Appendix G - Antenna Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
An antenna pattern with equal or nearly equal intensity in all directions is called
omnidirectional. In two dimensions, an omnidirectional pattern appears as a
circle (in three dimensions, an omnidirectional antenna pattern is a sphere, but
no antenna has a true omnidirectional pattern in three dimensions). An antenna
is considered omnidirectional if one of its two dimensional patterns, either
azimuth or elevation pattern, is omnidirectional.
Beamwidth is an angular measurement of how strongly the power is
concentrated in a particular direction. Beamwidth is a three dimensional quantity
but can be broken into two-dimensional slices just like the antenna pattern. The
beamwidth of an omnidirectional pattern is 360 degrees because the power is
equal in all directions.
13.1.3 Antenna Gain
Antenna gain is a measure of how strongly an antenna radiates in its direction of
maximum intensity compared to the strength of the radiation if the same power
were applied to an omnidirectional antenna (one that radiated all of its power
equally in all directions). In the antenna pattern, the gain is the distance to the
furthest point on the pattern from the origin. For an omnidirectional pattern, the
gain is 1, or equivalently 0 dB. The higher the antenna gain, the narrower the
beamwidth, and vice versa.
The amount of power received by the receiving antenna is proportional to the
transmitter power multiplied by the transmit antenna gain, multiplied by the
receiving antenna gain. Therefore, you can make trade-offs between the
antennas' gain and transmitting power. For example, doubling the gain of one of
the antennas has the same effect as doubling the transmitting power. Doubling
the gain for both antennas has the same effect as quadrupling the transmitting
power.
13.1.4 Antenna Polarity
Antenna polarization refers to the direction in which the electromagnetic field
lines point as energy radiates away from the antenna. In general, the polarization
is elliptical. The simplest and most common form of this elliptical polarization is a
straight line, or linear polarization.
An antenna only receives the portion of the transmitted power that has the same
polarization as the receiving antenna polarization. For example:
 If the transmitting antenna polarization is in the vertical direction (vertical
polarization), and the receiving antenna also has vertical polarization, the
maximum amount of power possible is received.
 On the other hand, if the transmit antenna has vertical polarization and the
receiving antenna has horizontal polarization, no power should be received. If
the two antennas have linear polarizations oriented at 45° to each other, only
half of the possible maximum power is received.
Page 190 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
13.2
Appendix G - Antenna Configuration
User Manual
Antenna Types
Antenna types used with a RLX2-IHx series radio include whip, collinear array,
yagi array, and parabolic reflector. See the RLX2-IHx series Approved Antennas
(page 193) section for other types of approved antennas.
13.2.1 Whip Antennas
For RLX2-IHx series radios, use a 1/2 wave straight whip antennal or a 1/2 wave
articulating whip (2 dBi) antenna. These antennas are the most common type in
use today.
 They are approximately 5 inches long, and are likely to be connected directly
to the client radio enclosure.
 These antennas do not require a ground plane.
 Articulating antennas and non-articulating antennas work in the same way.
An articulating antenna bends at the connection as shown in the image
below.
13.2.2 Collinear Array Antennas
A collinear array antenna is typically composed of several linear antennas
stacked on top of each other. The more stacked elements it has, the longer it is,
and the more gain it has. The signal is connected at one end.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 191 of 231
Appendix G - Antenna Configuration
User Manual



RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
The antenna pattern is torroidal. Its azimuthal beamwidth is 360°
(omnidirectional). Its vertical beamwidth depends on the number of
elements/length, and more elements produce a narrower beamwidth.
The antenna gain also depends on the number of elements/length, and more
elements produce a higher gain. The typical gain for this antenna is 5 to 10
dBi.
The antenna polarity is linear, or parallel to the length of the antenna.
13.2.3 Yagi Array Antenna
A yagi array antenna is composed of an array of linear elements, each parallel to
one another and attached perpendicular to, and along the length of, a metal
boom. The signal is connected to only one of the elements. Elements on one
side of the connected element are longer and act as reflectors; elements on the
other side are shorter and act as directors. This causes the antenna to radiate in
a beam out of the end with the shorter elements. The pattern depends on the
overall geometry, including the number of elements, element spacing, element
length, and so on. Sometimes the antenna is enclosed in a protective tube hiding
the actual antenna geometry (as shown in the image below).



The antenna pattern is a beam pointed along the boom toward the end with
the shorter elements. The beamwidth varies with antenna geometry but
generally is proportional to the length (where longer length produces a
narrower beam).
The antenna gain varies with antenna geometry but generally is proportional
to the length (where longer length produces higher gain). Typical values are 6
to 15dBi.
The antenna polarity is Linear (parallel to the elements, perpendicular to the
boom).
Page 192 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix G - Antenna Configuration
User Manual
13.2.4 Parabolic Reflector Antennas
A parabolic reflector antenna consists of a parabolic shaped dish and a feed
antenna located in front of the dish. The feel antenna radiates power toward the
reflector. Due to the parabolic shape, the reflector concentrates the radiation into
a narrow pattern, resulting in a beam with high gain.


13.3
The antenna pattern is a beam pointed away from the concave side of the
dish. Beamwidth and antenna gain vary with the size of the reflector and the
antenna construction. Typical gain values are 15 to 30 dBi.
The antenna polarity depends on the feed antenna polarization.
RLX2-IHx series Approved Antennas
If you are located In the U.S. and Canada, use antennas that are specifically
approved by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and Industry
Canada for use with the RLX2-IHx series radios. Contact ProSoft Technology or
visit www.prosoft-technology.com for a current list of approved antennas.
Antenna selection depends on whether the bi-directional amplifier is being used
or not. For each approved antenna, there is a specified minimum distance the
antennas must be separated from users for safe exposure limits, according to
FCC part 2.1091.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 193 of 231
Appendix G - Antenna Configuration
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
13.3.1 Approved Antenna Table
Use the following approved antennas when the RLX2-IHx series radio module is
connected directly to an antenna. See Approved Antennas with Power Amp
(page 195) for a table of approved antennas with bi-directional power amplifiers.
Type
Pattern
Gain
Connector
Size (cm)
Min. distance
from Body
1/2 Wave
Omni
2 dB
SMA-RP
7H x 1.5
20 cm
1/2 Wave art.
Omni
2 dB
SMA-RP
10H x 1.0
20 cm
Collinear Array
Omni
3 dB
SMA-RP
6H x 3.0
20 cm
Collinear Array, art. Omni
5 dB
SMA-RP
19H x 1.0
20 cm
Collinear Array
Omni
5 dB
SMA-RP
19H x 1.0
20 cm
Collinear Array
Omni
8 dB
N-RP
43H x 1.6
20 cm
Collinear Array
Omni
9 dB
N-RP
43H x 1.6
20 cm
Collinear Array
Omni
12 dB
N-RP
106H x 4.0
25 cm
Patch
Directional
8 dB
SMA-RP
15.0H x 15.0
20 cm
Patch
Directional
11 dB
SMA-RP
22H x 12.7
22 cm
Patch
Directional
13 dB
N-RP
22H x 22
28 cm
Patch*
Directional
19 dB
N-RP
15.5 x 15.5
57 cm
Yagi
Directional
14 dB
N-RP
81L x 9.0
28 cm
Parabolic*
Directional
15 dB
N-RP
40H x 51W x 25D
36 cm
Parabolic*
Directional
19 dB
N-RP
58H x 66W x 26D
57 cm
Parabolic*
Directional
24 dB
N-RP
78H x 96W x 29D
100 cm
* Only allowed in a point-to-point network.
13.3.2 Approved Antennas in Europe/CE
In Europe/CE, the gain of the antenna connected to the RLX2-IHx series radio
main antenna port, minus the antenna cable loss, must be less than 4 dB to stay
below the 100-mW EIRP transmit power limit.
The AUX port on the radio is only used to receive; it never transmits.
Note: In France, the user is responsible for ensuring that the selected frequency channels comply
with French regulatory standards. At the time of this printing, only channels 10 through 13 can be
used in France.
Page 194 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix G - Antenna Configuration
User Manual
13.3.3 Approved Antennas in Mexico
The gain of the antenna connected to the RLX2-IHx series radio main antenna
port, minus the antenna cable loss, must be less than 12 dB to stay below the
650-mW EIRP transmit power limit.
Note: In Mexico, the user is responsible for ensuring that the selected frequency channels comply
with Mexican regulatory standards. At the time of this printing, only channels 9 through 11 can be
used outdoors (1 through 8 cannot); however, channels 1 through 11 can all be used indoors.
13.3.4 Approved Antennas with Power Amp
When the RLX2-IHx series radio is used in conjunction with the amplifier, the
antennas are limited to antennas listed in the following table.
Type
Pattern
Gain
Connector
Size (cm)
Min. distance from
Body
1/2 Wave
Omni
2 dB
SMA-RP
7H x 1.5
20 cm
1/2 Wave art.
Omni
2 dB
SMA-RP
10H x 1.0
20 cm
Collinear Array
Omni
3 dB
SMA-RP
6H x 3.0
20 cm
Collinear Array, art. Omni
5 dB
SMA-RP
19H x 1.0
20 cm
Collinear Array
Omni
5 dB
SMA-RP
19H x 1.0
20 cm
Collinear Array
Omni
8 dB
N-RP
43H x 1.6
20 cm
Collinear Array
Omni
9 dB
N-RP
43H x 1.6
20 cm
Collinear Array*
Omni
12 dB
N-RP
106H x 4.0
25 cm
Patch
Directional
8 dB
SMA-RP
15.0H x 15.0
20 cm
Patch*
Directional
11 dB
SMA-RP
22H x 12.7
20 cm
Patch*
Directional
13 dB
N-RP
22H x 22
28 cm
Yagi*
Directional
14 dB
N-RP
81L x 9.0
28 cm
* Only allowed in a point-to-point network.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 195 of 231
Appendix G - Antenna Configuration
User Manual
13.4
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Antenna Location, Spacing, and Mounting
Consider the following points regarding RLX2-IHx series radio antenna location,
spacing, and mounting:
 When placing antennas, ensure a clear line of sight between the Master
radio's antenna and all of the other radio antennas.
 If the site contains obstructing terrain or structures, mount the antenna on a
tower or rooftop to provide a line-of-sight path. This line-of-sight consideration
becomes more important as the transmission path becomes longer.
 Mount the antennas as high off the ground as is practical for greater range.
 Mount the antennas away from massive structures. For example, radio
signals bounce off metal walls, which can compromise a clear signal.
 Mount the antennas and install radios away from sources of RF interference.
 Use the shortest possible antenna cable length. Signals lose power over the
length of the cable.
 Choose antennas that are appropriate for the network's intended function.
 If antennas are on radios on the same network, mount them with matching
polarity. If the antennas are on separate networks, mount them with different
antenna polarity; for example, mount one antenna vertically and the other
horizontally.
 Space radios at least three feet (one meter) apart so they do not overload
each other. If radio antennas must be near each other:
o Mount omnidirectional antennas directly above each other.
o Position directional antennas so they do not point at nearby antennas:
place antennas side by side if they point in the same direction; place
antennas back to back if they point in opposite directions.
Page 196 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix H - FCC Emission Regulations
User Manual
14 Appendix H - FCC Emission Regulations
In This Chapter

2.4 GHz Band, Point-To-Multipoint ...................................................... 197

2.4 GHz Band, Point-To-Point ............................................................. 198

5 GHz Bands, Point-To-Multipoint ....................................................... 198

5 GHz Bands, Point-To-Point .............................................................. 199
The charts in this section show the maximum emissions allowed for the FCC in
the United States. These data should only be considered guidelines. Consult
official FCC documents for the latest official regulations.
In the 2.4 GHz band, the maximum Equivalent Isotropically Radiated Power
(EIRP) is 4W for multipoint links: that is, radios with omnidirectional antennas.
Point-to-Point links using directional antennas are allowed higher EIRP.
14.1
2.4 GHz Band, Point-To-Multipoint
Maximum Power From Radio
Maximum
Antenna Gain
Maximum EIRP
dBm
mW
dBi
dBm
W
30
1000
6
36
4
27
500
9
36
4
24
250
12
36
4
21
125
15
36
4
18
63
18
36
4
15
32
21
36
4
12
16
24
36
4
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 197 of 231
Appendix H - FCC Emission Regulations
User Manual
14.2
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
2.4 GHz Band, Point-To-Point
Maximum Power From Radio
Maximum
Antenna Gain
Maximum EIRP
dBm
mW
dBi
dBm
W
30
1000
6
36
4.0
29
800
9
38
6.3
28
630
12
30
10.0
27
500
15
42
16.0
26
400
18
44
25.0
25
316
21
46
39.8
24
250
24
48
63.0
23
200
27
50
100.0
22
160
30
52
158.0
The FCC states that for every 1 dBi power reduction in the radio’s transmitter
output, the antenna gain may be increased by 3 dB.
14.3
5 GHz Bands, Point-To-Multipoint
5 GHz Band
Frequency
Channels
Range (GHz)
Permitted
Location
Maximum Power
from Radio
Maximum EIRP
dBm
mW
dBm
mW
UNII
5.15 – 5.25
36, 40, 44,
48
Indoor Only
16
40
22
160
UNII-2
5.25 – 5.35
52, 56, 60,
64
Indoor or
Outdoor
23
200
29
800
UNII-2
Extended
5.470 – 5.725 100, 104,
108, 112,
116, 120,
124, 128,
132, 136,
140
Indoor or
Outdoor
23
200
29
800
UNII-3
5.725 – 5.825 149, 153,
157, 161,
165
Typical
Outdoor
29
800
35
3200
Page 198 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
14.4
Appendix H - FCC Emission Regulations
User Manual
5 GHz Bands, Point-To-Point
5 GHz Band
Frequency
Range
(GHz)
Channels
Permitted
Location
Maximum
Power from
Radio
Maximum EIRP
dBm
mW
dBm
mW
UNII
5.15 – 5.25
36, 40, 44, Indoor
48
Only
16
40
22
160
UNII-2
5.25 – 5.35
52, 56, 60, Indoor or
64
Outdoor
23
200
29
800
UNII-2
Extended
5.470 –
5.725
100, 104,
108, 112,
116, 120,
124, 128,
132, 136,
140
Indoor or
Outdoor
23
200
29
800
UNII-3
5.725 –
5.825
149, 153,
157, 161,
165
Typical
Outdoor
30
1000
53
200,000
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 199 of 231
User Manual
Page 200 of 231
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix I - Compatibility with ProSoft RLXIB Series Radios
User Manual
15 Appendix I - Compatibility with ProSoft RLXIB
Series Radios
The RLX2-IHx series radios are 100% functionally compatible with ProSoft’s
legacy RLXIB-IHA, RLXIB-IHG, and RLXIB-IHW radio models. This allows
customers with RLXIB series radios to add RLX2-IHx series radios to their
existing networks without any reconfiguration of existing assets or problems with
obsolescence. The main differences in the RLX2-IHx series radios are the
following improvements:





Different enclosure size for more efficient heat dissipation
Faster, more efficient electronics that consume less power
Gigabit Ethernet
MicroSD memory cards for configuration data storage
Internal temperature sensor
The RLX2-IHx series radios will acquire additional functionality as new firmware
features are added. These new features will not be added to the RLXIB radios,
but the RLX2-IHx series radios will continue to work with RLXIB radios using their
existing functionality.
The RLX2-IHNF is an 802.11n device that does not have an RLXIB series
equivalent. It cannot function as a Repeater or Master radio to ProSoft’s RLXIBIHxN series radio products. Specific differences by product are noted in the
following table. Specifications that have not changed between the RLXIB and
RLX2-IHx series radio products are not listed.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 201 of 231
Appendix I - Compatibility with ProSoft RLXIB Series Radios
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
RLXIBIHA
RLX2IHA
RLXIBIHG
RLX2-IHG RLXIBIHW
RLX2-IHW RLX2-IHNF
Dimensions
4.5/115
Wx
4.6/117
Hx
1.75/45
D
(inches/
mm)
5.82/14
8W x
4.64/11
8H x
1.48/38
D
(inches/
mm)
4.5/115W
x 4.6/117H
x 1.75/45
D (inches/
mm)
5.82/148W
x
4.64/118H
x 1.48/38D
(inches/
mm)
4.5/115W
x 4.6/117H
x 1.75/45
D (inches/
mm)
5.82/148W
x
4.64/118H
x 1.48/38D
(inches/
mm)
5.82/148W x
4.64/118H x
1.48/38D
(inches/mm)
Weight
1.1 lbs
(499g)
1.1 lbs
(499g)
1.1 lbs
(499g)
1.1 lbs
(499g)
1.06 lbs
(479g)
1.06 lbs
(479g)
1.1 lbs
(499g)
Typical Power
Consumption
< 9W
5.7W
< 9W
4.5W
<6W
4.5W
7.1W
Max Power
Consumption
9W
10W
9W
8W
6W
8W
9W
Active antenna
ports
1
1
1
1
1 Tx/Rx, 1 1 Tx/Rx, 1
optional
optional
Rx only
Rx only
1, 2, or 3,
MIMO or
independent
antennas
10/100
MBit
10/100/
1000 MBit
10/100/
1000 MBit
Ethernet Speeds 10/100
MBit
10/100/ 10/100
MBit
1000
MBit
10/100/
1000 MBit
NET and MOD
Status LEDs




Fast Roaming




MicroSD card




Onboard
temperature
sensor





5 GHz band DFS
channels

Use RLXIB
Firmware Image
Use RLX2-IHx
series Firmware
Image
Page 202 of 231






ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix J - Detailed Radio Specifications
User Manual
16 Appendix J - Detailed Radio Specifications
In This Chapter
16.1

RLX2-IHA Detailed Specifications ....................................................... 203

RLX2-IHG Detailed Specifications ....................................................... 204

RLX2-IHNF, -W, -WC Detailed Specifications ..................................... 206

RLX2-IHW Detailed Specifications ...................................................... 208
RLX2-IHA Detailed Specifications
RLX2-IHA Radio
Frequency Band
(Varies by country)
802.11a
5.150 GHz to 5.250 GHz (FCC/ETSI)
5.725 GHz to 5.850 GHz (FCC)
Wireless Standards
802.11a, 802.11i
Transmit Power (Programmable) 23 dBm (200 mW)
(varies by country)
Channel Data Rates
(Modulation)
802.11a: 54, 48, 36, 24, 18, 12, 9, 6 Mbps (OFDM)
Receiver Sensitivity (Typical)
-92 dBm @ 6 Mbps
-84 dBm @ 24 Mbps
-72 dBm @ 54 Mbps
Channel Selection
36, 40, 44, 48, 149, 153, 157, 161, 165
Security
WPA2 - 802.11i with 128 bit AES-CCM
Legacy WPA TKIP, WEP support
MAC ID filter, Admin password
Physical
Enclosure
Extruded aluminum with DIN and panel mount
Size
(H x W x D)
14.8 x 11.8 x 3.8 cm
5.82 x 4.64 x 1.48 in
Shock
IEC 60068 2-6 (20g, 3-Axis)
Vibration
IEC 60068 2-27 (5g, 10Hz to 150Hz)
Ethernet Ports
(1) 10/100/1000 Base-T, RJ45 connector
Serial Port
(1) DB9 female (serial tunneling & encapsulation)
Antenna Port
(1) RP-SMA connector
Weight
1.1 lbs (499g)
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 203 of 231
Appendix J - Detailed Radio Specifications
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Environmental
Operating Temperature
-40°C to +75°C (-40°F to +167°F)
Humidity
Up to 100% RH, with no condensation
External Power
Power over Ethernet
10 VDC to 24 VDC
802.3af Compliant
Peak Power Consumption
< 7W
16.1.1 Agency Approvals & Certifications
Wireless Approvals
Visit www.prosoft-technology.com for current wireless approval information.
Hazardous Locations
Regulatory
UL/cUL; Class1, Div 2
CSA/CB Safety
Ex Certificate (ATEX Directive,
Zone 2)
CE Mark
FCC/IC
ETSI
16.2
RLX2-IHG Detailed Specifications
Radio
Frequency Band
(Varies by country)
802.11g:
2.412 GHz to 2.462 GHz (FCC)
2.412 GHz to 2.472 GHz (ETSI)
Wireless Standards
802.11b, 802.11g, 802.11i
Transmit Power (Programmable) Up to 24 dBm (250 mW)
(varies by country)
Channel Data Rates
(Modulation)
802.11g: (OFDM) Mbps
54, 48, 36, 24, 18, 12, 9, and 6
802.11b: (DSS) Mbps
11, 5.5, 2, and 1
Receiver Sensitivity (Typical)
-94 dBm @ 1 Mbps
-92 dBm @ 11 Mbps
-84 dBm @ 24 Mbps
-72 dBm @ 54 Mbps
Channel Selection
802.11g:
1 to 11 (FCC), 1 to 13 (ETSI)
Security
WPA2 Enterprise – 802.11i AES w/RADIUS
[PEAP, TTLS, TLS, EAP]
WPA2 Personal – 802.11i AES w/Passphrase
Legacy WPA TKIP, WEP support
Page 204 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix J - Detailed Radio Specifications
User Manual
Physical
Enclosure
Extruded aluminum with DIN and panel mount
Size
(H x W x D)
14.8 x 11.8 x 3.8 cm
5.82 x 4.64 x 1.48 in
Shock
IEC 60068 2-6 (20 g, 3-Axis)
Vibration
IEC 60068 2-27 (5 g, 10 Hz to 150 Hz)
Ethernet Ports
(1) 10/100/1000 Base-T, RJ45 connector
Serial Port
(1) DB9 female (serial tunneling & encapsulation)
Antenna Port
(1) RP-SMA connector
Environmental
Operating Temperature
-40°C to +75°C (-40°F to +167°F)
Humidity
Up to 100% RH, with no condensation
External Power
Power over Ethernet
10 VDC to 24 VDC
802.3af Compliant
Peak Power Consumption
< 7W
16.2.1 Agency Approvals & Certifications
Wireless Approvals
Visit www.prosoft-technology.com for current wireless approval information.
Hazardous Locations
Regulatory
UL/cUL; Class1, Div 2
CSA/CB Safety
Ex Certificate (ATEX Directive,
Zone 2)
CE Mark
FCC/IC
ETSI
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 205 of 231
Appendix J - Detailed Radio Specifications
User Manual
16.3
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
RLX2-IHNF, -W, -WC Detailed Specifications
Radio
Specification
Frequency
Channel
Frequency Band
(Varies by country)
2.412 GHz to 2.462 GHz (FCC)
2.412 GHz to 2.472 GHz (ETSI)
1 to 11
1 to 13
5.150 GHz to 5.250 GHz (FCC/ETSI)
5.260 GHz to 5.580 GHz (FCC/ETSI)*
5.660 GHz to 5.700 GHz (FCC/ETSI)*
5.725 GHz to 5.850 GHz (FCC/ETSI
Series C only)
* DFS channels with RADAR detection
36 to 48
52 to 116*
132 to 140*
149 to 165
Wireless Standards
802.11n, 802.11a, 802.11g,
802.11h (DFS), 802.11i (Security), 802.11e (QoS)
802.112Q (VLAN), 802.113af (PoE), IGMPv2
Transmit Power
(Programmable)
*Subject to Regional
Regulatory Limits
22 dBm @ MCS0, MCS8 (802.11an/gn)
17 dBm @ MCS7, MCS15 (802.11an/gn)
22 dBm @ 6 Mbps (802.11a/g)
17 dBm @ 54 Mbps (802.11a/g)
Antenna Impact:
3 Antennas/MIMO: Use values above
2 Antennas: Subtract 2 dB from values above
1 Antenna: Subtract 5 dB from values above
Channel data rates
(802.11n)
MCS0 through MCS15,
1 Channel or 2 Channels with 1 Stream or 2 Streams
1 Channel
2 Channels
Rate
Streams
6.5 Mbps
13.5 Mbps
MCS0
1 Stream
65 Mbps
150 Mbps
MCS7
13 Mbps
27 Mbps
MCS8
130 Mbps
300 Mbps
MCS15
802.11b
802.11a/g
11, 5.5, 2, 1 Mbps
54, 48, 36, 24, 18, 12, 11, 9, 6, 5.5, 2, 1 Mbps
Receiver Sensitivity
(Typical)
-92 dBm @ MCS0, MCS8 (802.11an/gn)
-70 dBm @ MCS7, MCS15 (802.11an)
-74 dBm @ MCS7, MCS15 (802.11gn)
-92 dBm @ 6 Mbps (802.11an/gn)
-74 dBm @ 54 Mbps (802.11a)
-78 dBm @ 54 Mbps (802.11g)
Security
WPA2 Personal/Enterprise – 802.11i AES
WPA2 Personal – 802.11i AES w/ Passphrase
Legacy WPA TKIP, WEP support
MAC ID filter
Page 206 of 231
2 Streams
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix J - Detailed Radio Specifications
User Manual
Physical
Enclosure
Extruded aluminum with DIN rail mount (RLX2-IHNF)
Die-cast Aluminum with Pole Mount (RLX2-IHNF-W and
RLX2-IHNF-WC)
Size
(H x W x D)
14.8 x 11.8 x 3.8 cm (RLX2-IHNF)
5.82 x 4.64 x 1.48 in
29.2 x 17.8 x 7 cm (RLX2-IHNF-W and WC)
11.5 x 7 x 2.75 in
Shock
IEC 60068 2-6 (20G, 3-Axis)
Vibration
IEC 60068 2-27 (5G, 10 to 150 Hz)
Ethernet Port
(1) 10/100 Base-T connector, shielded RJ45
IEEE 802.3, 802.3u, 802.3x
Water/Dust Tight M12 Connector (RLX2-IHNF-W)
10/100/1000 Base-T connector, shielded RJ45
IEEE 802.3, 802.3u, 802.3x, 802.3af, Passive PoE
Not 802.3at/PoE+ compatible
Water/Dust Tight (RLX2-IHNF-WC)
10/100/1000 Base-T connector, shielded RJ45
IEEE 802.3, 802.3u, 802.3x, 802.3af
Antenna Port
(3) RP-SMA connector
(3) N-Type Connectors (RLX2-IHNF-W and WC)
Personality Module
Industrial SD Memory Module
No Personality Module on RLX2-IHNF-W or WC
Weight
1.1 lbs (499 g) (RLX2-IHNF)
3 lb 9 oz, 1.6Kg – less cables and pole mounting bracket
(RLX2-IHNF-W or WC)
Environmental
Operating Temperature -40°F to +167°F (-40°C to +75°C)
-40°F to +158°F (-40°C to +70°C), RLX2-IHNF Series B and
C only
Humidity
Up to 100% RH, with no condensation
External Power
PoE Injector
10 to 24 VDC
802.3af PoE Powered Device
The RLX2-IHNF-WC has a 6-foot attached cable and a 6foot attached CAT6 cable for PoE applications
Peak Power
Consumption
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
< 9W (Series B), < 8W (Series C)
Page 207 of 231
Appendix J - Detailed Radio Specifications
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
16.3.1 Agency Approvals & Certifications
Wireless Approvals
Visit www.prosoft-technology.com for current wireless approval information.
Hazardous Locations
Regulatory
ANATEL (Brazil)
UL/cUL; Class I, Div 2
CSA/CB Safety
Ex Certificate (ATEX Directive, Zone 2)
CE Mark
FCC/IC
ETSI
MIC (Japan)
NCC (Taiwan)
NTRA (Egypt)
16.4
RLX2-IHW Detailed Specifications
Radio
Frequency Band
(Varies by country)
2.412 GHz to 2.462 GHz (FCC)
2.412 GHz to 2.472 GHz (ETSI)
5.150 GHz to 5.250 GHz (FCC/ETSI)
5.725 GHz to 5.850 GHz (FCC)
Wireless Standards
802.11a, 802.11b, 802.11g, 802.11i
Transmit Power (Programmable)
(varies by country)
2.4 GHz: Up to 100 mW (20 dBm)
5 GHz: Up to 64 mW (18 dBm)
Channel data rates (Modulation)
802.11b:11, 5.5, 2,1 Mbps (DSSS,BPSK,QPSK,CCK)
802.11g: 54, 48, 36, 24, 18, 12, 9, 6 Mbps (OFDM)
802.11a: 54, 48, 36, 24, 18, 12, 9, 6 Mbps (OFDM)
Receiver Sensitivity (Typical)
-90 dBm @ 1 Mbps
-85 dBm @ 11 Mbps
-82 dBm @ 24 Mbps
-75 dBm @ 54 Mbps
Channels Selection
1 to 13 (802.11b/g)
36, 40, 44, 48, 149, 153, 157, 161, 165 (802.11a)
Security
WPA2 - 802.11i with 128 bit AES-CCM
Legacy WPA TKIP, WEP support
MAC ID filter, Admin password
Physical
Enclosure
Extruded aluminum with DIN and panel mount
Size
(H x W x D)
14.8 x 11.8 x 3.8 cm
5.82 x 4.64 x 1.48 in
Shock
IEC 60068 2-6 (20g, 3-Axis)
Vibration
IEC 60068 2-27 (5g, 10Hz to 150Hz)
Ethernet Ports
(1) 10/100/1000 Base-T, RJ45 connector
Page 208 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix J - Detailed Radio Specifications
User Manual
Serial Port
(1) DB9 female (serial tunneling & encapsulation)
Antenna Ports
(2) RP-SMA connectors (1 trans/rec, 1 rec only)
Environmental
Operating Temperature
-40°C to +75°C (-40°F to +167°F)
Humidity
Up to 100% RH, with no condensation
External Power
PoE (Power over Ethernet)
10 to 24 VDC
802.3af Compliant
Peak Power Consumption
< 6W
16.4.1 Agency Approvals & Certifications
Wireless Approvals
Visit www.prosoft-technology.com for current wireless approval information.
Hazardous Locations
Regulatory
UL/cUL; Class1, Div 2
CSA/CB Safety
Ex Certificate (ATEX Directive,
Zone 2)
CE Mark
FCC/IC
ETSI
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 209 of 231
User Manual
Page 210 of 231
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Appendix K - Application Examples
User Manual
17 Appendix K - Application Examples
This chapter provides example applications using RLX2-IHx series radios.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 211 of 231
Appendix K - Application Examples
User Manual
Page 212 of 231
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Support, Service & Warranty
User Manual
18 Support, Service & Warranty
In This Chapter
18.1

Contacting Technical Support ............................................................. 213

Warranty Information ........................................................................... 215
Contacting Technical Support
ProSoft Technology, Inc. is committed to providing the most efficient and
effective support possible. Before calling, please gather the following information
to assist in expediting this process:
1 Product Version Number
2 System architecture
3 Network details
If the issue is hardware related, we will also need information regarding:
1 Module configuration and associated ladder files, if any
2 Module operation and any unusual behavior
3 Configuration/Debug status information
4 LED patterns
5 Details about the serial, Ethernet or Fieldbus devices interfaced to the
module, if any.
Note: For technical support calls within the United States, ProSoft’s 24/7 after-hours phone support
is available for urgent plant-down issues. Detailed contact information for all our worldwide
locations is available on the following page.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 213 of 231
Support, Service & Warranty
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Asia Pacific
Europe / Middle East / Africa
Regional Office
Phone: +603.7724.2080
asiapc@prosoft-technology.com
Languages spoken: Bahasa, Chinese, English,
Japanese, Korean
REGIONAL TECH SUPPORT
support.ap@prosoft-technology.com
Regional Office
Phone: +33.(0)5.34.36.87.20
europe@prosoft-technology.com
Languages spoken: French, English
REGIONAL TECH SUPPORT
support.emea@prosoft-technology.com
North Asia (China, Hong Kong)
Phone: +86.21.5187.7337
china@prosoft-technology.com
Languages spoken: Chinese, English
REGIONAL TECH SUPPORT
support.ap@prosoft-technology.com
Southwest Asia (India, Pakistan)
Phone: +91.98.1063.7873
india@prosoft-technology.com
Languages spoken: English, Hindi, Urdu
Australasia (Australia, New Zealand)
Phone: +603.7724.2080
pacific@prosoft-technology.com
Language spoken: English
Southeast Asia (Singapore, Indonesia,
Philippines)
Phone: +603.7724.2080
seasia@prosoft-technology.com
Languages spoken: English, Bahasa, Tamil
Middle East & Africa
Phone: +971.4.214.6911
mea@prosoft-technology.com
Languages spoken: Hindi, English
REGIONAL TECH SUPPORT
support.emea@prosoft-technology.com
North Western Europe (UK, IE, IS, DK, NO, SE)
Phone: +44.(0)7415.864.902
nweurope@prosoft-technology.com
Language spoken: English
Central & Eastern Europe, Finland
Phone: +48.22.250.2546
centraleurope@prosoft-technology.com
Languages spoken: Polish, English, Russia & CIS
Phone: +7.499.704.53.46
russia@prosoft-technology.com
Languages spoken: Russian, English
Austria, Germany, Switzerland
Phone: +33.(0)5.34.36.87.20
germany@prosoft-technology.com
Language spoken: English, German
Northeast & Southeast Asia
(Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia)
Phone: +603.7724.2080
neasia@prosoft-technology.com
Languages spoken: English, Chinese, Japanese
BeNeLux, France, North Africa
Phone: +33(0)5.34.36.87.27
france@prosoft-technology.com
Languages spoken: French, English
Korea
Phone: +603.7724.2080
korea@prosoft-technology.com
Languages spoken: English, Korean
Mediterranean Countries
Phone: +39.342.8651.595
italy@prosoft-technology.com
Languages spoken: Italian, English, Spanish
Page 214 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Support, Service & Warranty
User Manual
Latin America
North America
Regional Office
Phone: +52.222.264.1814
support.la@prosoft-technology.com
Languages spoken: Spanish, English
REGIONAL TECH SUPPORT
support.la@prosoft-technology.com
Regional Office
Phone: +1.661.716.5100
info@prosoft-technology.com
Languages spoken: English, Spanish
REGIONAL TECH SUPPORT
support@prosoft-technology.com
Brazil
Phone: +55.11.5084.5178
brasil@prosoft-technology.com
Languages spoken: Portuguese, English
REGIONAL TECH SUPPORT
support.la@prosoft-technology.com
Mexico
Phone: +52.222.264.1814
mexico@prosoft-technology.com
Languages spoken: Spanish, English
REGIONAL TECH SUPPORT
support.la@prosoft-technology.com
Andean Countries, Central America &
Caribbean
Phone: +507.6427.48.38
andean@prosoft-technology.com
Languages spoken: Spanish, English
Southern Cone (Argentina, Bolivia, Chile,
Paraguay & Uruguay)
Phone: +54.911.4565.8119
scone@prosoft-technology.com
Languages spoken: Spanish, English
18.2
Warranty Information
For complete details regarding ProSoft Technology’s TERMS & CONDITIONS
OF SALE, WARRANTY, SUPPORT, SERVICE AND RETURN MATERIAL
AUTHORIZATION INSTRUCTIONS, please see the documents at:
www.prosoft-technology/legal
Documentation is subject to change without notice.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 215 of 231
User Manual
Page 216 of 231
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Glossary of Terms
User Manual
19 Glossary of Terms
Symbols & Numeric
802.11
A group of wireless specifications developed by the IEEE. It details a wireless
interface between devices to transport packet traffic.
802.11a
Operates in the 5 GHz frequency range with a maximum 54 Mbit/sec signaling
rate.
802.11b
Operates in the most commonly used 2.4 GHz Industrial, Scientific, and
Measurement (ISM) band. Provides signaling rates of up to 11 Mbit/sec using
CCK modulation.
802.11g
Similar to 802.11b but supports signaling rates of up to 54 Mbit/sec using OFDM
modulation. Operates in the heavily used 2.4 GHz ISM band.
802.11i
Sometimes called Wi-Fi Protected Access 2 (WPA 2). WPA 2 exclusively uses
the 128-bit and above Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), along with 802.1x
authentication and key management features.
802.11n
Uses higher modulation rates and packet aggregation to raise effective WLAN
throughput to more than 100 Mbit/sec.
A
Access Point
A generic term for an 802.11 radio that "attaches" other 802.11 (clients) to a
wired network. Some access points (APs) can also bridge to other APs.
Ad hoc Mode
Wireless network framework in which devices can communicate directly with one
another without using an accesspoint or a connection to a regular network.
RLX2-IHx series radio products do not support Ad hoc mode.
AES
Advanced Encryption Standard. New standard for encryption adopted by the U.S.
government for secure communications.
Amplifier
A device connected to an antenna that increases the signal strength and
amplifies weak incoming signals.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 217 of 231
Glossary of Terms
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Antenna
A device connected to a wireless transceiver that concentrates transmitted and
received radio waves to increase signal strength and thus the effective range of a
wireless network.
ASCII
American Standard Code for Information Interchange. A communication mode in
which each eight-bit byte in a message contains one ASCII character code.
ASCII characters (or hexadecimal characters) are sometimes used as a key to
encrypt data and ensure its secure transmission.
Association
Process whereby two 802.11 radios establish communications with each other.
Requirements for communication include the same SSID (network names) and
encryption settings.
Authenticate
The process of confirming the identity of someone connecting to a network.
Authentication Server
A back-end database server that confirms the identity of a supplicant to an
authenticator in an 802.1x-authenticated network.
B
Band
Another term for spectrum used to indicate a particular set of frequencies.
Wireless networking protocols work in either the 2.4 GHz or the 5 GHz bands.
Bandwidth
(see Throughput)
Bridging Client, Radio Mode
A radio in Bridging Client mode can connect to any Access Point, and can
support one multiple Ethernet device but can only bridge IP-based traffic. See
also Repeater, Radio Mode.
C
CACT
CACT is an acronym for Channel Availability Check Time, a parameter used in
DFS channel selection. During DFS when a radio changes channels, it must
listen for the CACT on the new channel before beginning operations. For most
channels the CACT is 60 seconds.
Channel
One portion of the available radio spectrum that all devices on a wireless network
use to communicate. Changing the channel on the access point/router can help
reduce interference.
D
Page 218 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Glossary of Terms
User Manual
dBi
Decibels referenced to an ideal isotropic radiator in free space; frequently used to
express antenna gain
dBm
Decibels referenced to one milliwatt (mW); an absolute unit used to measure
signal power (transmit) power output or received signal strength)
DCE
Data communications equipment. A modem, for example.
Decibel (dB)
A measure of the ratio between two signal levels; used to express gain (or loss)
in a system.
Default Gateway
The IP address of a network router where data is sent if the destination IP
address is outside the local subnet. The gateway is the device that routes the
traffic from the local area network to other networks such as the Internet.
Device-to-Device Network (Peer-to-Peer Network)
Two or more devices that connect using wireless network devices without the
use of a centralized wireless access point. Also known as a peer-to-peer
network.
DFS
DFS stands for Dynamic Frequency Selection, a requirement for operation on
certain frequencies in the 5 GHz band in many countries. When a radio operates
on a DFS frequency, it must sense the presence of radar and automatically
change to another channel if radar is detected.
DHCP
The dynamic host configuration protocol is an Internet protocol, similar to BootP,
for automating the configuration of computers that use TCP/IP. DHCP can be
used to automatically assign IP addresses, to deliver IP stack configuration
parameters, such as the subnet mask and default router, and to provide other
configuration information, such as the addresses for printer, time, and news
servers.
Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum
A modulation mechanism that spreads the signal for a wide band, allowing
reception even for overlapping data signals. 802.11b uses DSSS modulation.
Directional Antenna
Transmits and receives radio waves in a single direction.
Diversity Antenna
An antenna system that uses multiple antennas to reduce interference and
maximize reception and transmission quality.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 219 of 231
Glossary of Terms
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
DTE
Data Terminal Equipment, for example, a computer or terminal.
Dual Band
A device that is capable of operating in two frequency bands. On a wireless
network, dual-band devices are capable of operating in both the 2.4 GHz
(802.11b/g) and 5 GHz (802.11a) bands.
E
EAP
Extensible Authentication Protocol. A protocol that provides an authentication
framework for both wireless and wired Ethernet enterprise networks.
EIRP
Equivalent isotropically radiated power (EIRP) is the amount of power that would
have to be emitted by an isotropic antenna (that evenly distributes power in all
directions and is a theoretical construct) to produce the peak power density
observed in the direction of maximum antenna gain.
Encryption
Method of scrambling data so that only the intended viewers can decipher and
understand it.
F
Firmware
Firmware is the embedded software code that that runs in hardware containing a
CPU (similar to the BIOS in a personal computer). This is distinguished from the
IH Browser software that is installed on the Configuration PC.
Fresnel Zone
An elliptical area on either side of the straight line of sight that must also be clear
for a long-range wireless network to work.
Full-Duplex
A communications circuit or system designed to simultaneously transmit and
receive two different streams of data. Telephones are an example of a full-duplex
communication system. Both parties on a telephone conversation can talk and
listen at the same time. If both talk at the same time, their two signals are not
corrupted.
G
Gain, Antenna
The amount by which an antenna concentrates signal strength in a wireless
network.
Gateway
In wireless terms, a gateway is an access point with additional software
capabilities such as providing NAT and DHCP and access to a Wide Area
network (WAN), Internet or other main network.
Page 220 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Glossary of Terms
User Manual
Guard Interval (GI)
An interval of time between data symbols during transmission. The guard interval
time for 802.11a/b/g systems is fixed at 800 microseconds. 802.11n devices can
also use a 400 microsecond guard interval, falling back to 800 microseconds if
excessive data corruption is detected.
H
Half-Duplex
A communications circuit or system designed to transmit and receive data, but
not both simultaneously. CB or walkie-talkie radios are an example of a halfduplex communication system. Either parties on a radio conversation may talk or
listen; but both cannot talk at the same time without corrupting each other's
signal. If one operator is sending, the other must be receiving to have successful
communication.
Hz
Hertz. The international unit for measuring frequency equivalent to the older unit
of cycles per second. One megahertz (MHz) is one million hertz. One gigahertz
(GHz) is one billion hertz. The standard US electrical power frequency is 60 Hz.
802.11a devices operate in the 5 GHz band; 802.11b and g devices operate in
the 2.4 GHz band.
I
IEEE
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. IEEE is a professional
organization with members in over 175 countries and is an authority in technical
areas such as computer engineering and telecommunications. IEEE developed
the 802.11 specifications.
IP Address
A 32-bit identification number for each node on an Internet Protocol network.
These addresses are represented as four sets of 8-bit numbers (numbers from 0
to 255), separated by periods ("dots").
Networks using the TCP/IP protocol route messages based on the IP address of
the destination. Each number can be 0 to 255. For example, 192.168.0.100 could
be an IP address. Each node on the network must have a unique IP address.
K
Key
A set of information (often from 40 to as much as 256 bits in size) that is used as
a seed to an encryption algorithm to encrypt (scramble) data. Ideally, the key
must also be known by the receiver to decrypt the data.
L
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 221 of 231
Glossary of Terms
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
LAN
Local Area Network. A system of connecting PCs and other devices within the
same physical proximity for sharing resources such as internet connections,
printers, files, and drives. When Wi-Fi is used to connect the devices, the system
is known as a wireless LAN or WLAN.
LED
Light-emitting diode.
Line of Sight (LoS)
A clear line from one antenna to another in a long-range wireless network.
M
MAC ID
Media Access Control address. Every device has its own MAC address which is
a unique identifier used to unambiguously identify the source and destination of
any packet on the network.
Mbps
Megabits per second, or a million bits per second. A measure of data rate.
Megahertz
A measure of electromagnetic wave frequency equal to one million hertz. Often
abbreviated as MHz and used to specify the radio frequency used by wireless
devices.
MIC
Message Integrity Check. One of the elements added to the TKIP standard. A
signature is added by each radio on each packet it transmits. The signature is
based on the data in the packet, a 64-bit value (key) and the MAC address of the
sender. The MIC allows the receiving radio to verify (check) that the data is not
forged or altered.
MIMO
Multiple Input Multiple Output refers to using multiple antennas in a Wi-Fi device
to improve performance and throughput. MIMO technology takes advantage of a
characteristic called multipath, which occurs when a radio transmission starts out
at Point A and the reflects off or passes through surfaces or objects before
arriving, via multiple paths, at Point B. MIMO technology uses multiple antennas
to collect and organize signals arriving via these paths.
Modbus
The Modbus protocol provides the internal standard that the MODICON®
controllers use for parsing messages. During communications on a Modbus
network, the protocol determines how each controller knows its device address,
recognizes a message addressed to it, determines the kind of action to be taken,
and extracts any data or other information contained in the message. If a reply is
required, the controller constructs the reply message and sends it using Modbus
protocol.
Page 222 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Glossary of Terms
User Manual
Modem
MOdulator-DEModulator, a device that converts digital signals to analog signals
and vice-versa. Analog signals can be transmitted over communications links
such as telephone lines.
N
Network
A series of stations or nodes connected by some type of communication medium.
A network may consist of a single link or multiple links.
Node
An address or software location on the network.
Non-Occupancy Period
The time during which a radio cannot return to a frequency where radar was
detected. This time is typically 30 minutes. Typically a radio will not return to a
channel where radar was previously detected unless absolutely necessary.
Null Modem Cable
A specialty cross-communication cable with female connectors on each end used
for direct connection between DTE devices when no modems are present.
Commonly used as a quick and inexpensive way to transfer files between two
PCs without installing a dedicated network card in each PC.
P
Panel Antenna
An antenna type that radiates in only a specific direction. Panel antennas are
commonly used for point-to-point situations. Sometimes called Patch antennas.
Parabolic Antenna
An antenna type that radiates a very narrow beam in a specific direction.
Parabolic antennas offer the highest gain for long-range point-to-point situations.
Peer-to-Peer Network
Each radio in a Peer-to-Peer network has the ability to receive data from, and
transmit data to, any other radio in the network.
Point-to-Multipoint
A wireless network in which one device (the access point or Master Bridge)
serves multiple other devices associated to it.
Point-to-Point Network
A network consisting of a single Master radio and a single Remote radio.
Poll
A method of electronic communication.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 223 of 231
Glossary of Terms
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Power Supply
A device that supplies electrical power to the I/O chassis containing the
processor, coprocessor, or other modules.
Protocol
The language or packaging of information that is transmitted between nodes on a
network.
Q
QoS
Quality of Service. Required to support wireless multimedia applications and
advanced traffic management. QoS enables Wi-Fi access points to prioritize
traffic and optimize the way shared network resources are allocated among
different applications.
R
Range
The distance covered by a wireless network radio device. Depending on the
environment and the type of antenna used, Wi-Fi signals can have a range of up
to a several miles.
Repeater
A Repeater is a device used to extend the range of a Wi-Fi signal. Placed at the
edge of signal reception, a repeater can receive and re-transmit the signal.
Repeater, Radio Mode
A RLX2-IHx series radio in Repeater mode can only connect to other ProSoft
radios, but can bridge any number of Ethernet network devices attached to it. It
also simultaneously functions as an access point, allowing other wireless devices
to associate to it. See also Client, Radio Mode.
RS-232
Recommended Standard 232; the standard for serial binary signals between
DTE and DCE devices.
S
Sector Antenna
An antenna type that radiates in only a specific direction. Multiple sector
antennas are commonly used in point-to-multipoint situations.
Signal Diversity
A process by which two antennas are used to send and receive, combining their
results for better effect.
Signal Loss
The amount of signal strength that’s lost in antenna cable, connectors, and free
space. Signal loss is measured in decibels (dB). Also referred to as gain loss.
Signal Strength
The strength of the radio waves received at a wireless device.
Page 224 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Glossary of Terms
User Manual
Site Survey
A comprehensive facility study performed by network managers to ensure that
planned service levels will be met when a new wireless LAN or additional WLAN
segments to an existing network are deployed. Site surveys are usually
performed by a radio frequency engineer and used by systems integrators to
identify the optimum placement of access points to ensure that planned levels of
service are met. Site surveys are sometimes conducted following the deployment
to ensure that the WLAN is achieving the necessary level of coverage. Site
surveys can also be used to detect rogue access points.
Spectrum
A range of electromagnetic frequencies.
Spread Spectrum
A form of wireless communication in which a signal’s frequency is deliberately
varied. This increases bandwidth and lessens the chances of interruption or
interception of the transmitted signal.
SSID
Service Set Identifier is a sequence of characters unique to a specific network or
network segment that’s used by the network and all attached devices to identify
themselves and allow devices to connect to the correct network when one or
more than one independent network is operating in nearby areas.
Subnet Mask
A mask used to determine what subnet an IP address belongs to. An IP address
has two components: the network address, and the host (node or device)
address; for example the IP address 150.215.017.009. Assuming this is part of a
Class B network (with a subnet mask of 255.255.0.0), the first two numbers
(150.215) represent the Class B network address, and the second two numbers
(017.009) identify a particular host on this network.
T
TKIP
Temporal Key Integrity Protocol. A wireless security encryption mechanism in WiFi Protected Access (WPA).
U
UART
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter
W
WDS
Wireless Distribution System. Enables access points to communicate with one
another in order to extend the range of a wireless networks. Used in 802.11g
based access points.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 225 of 231
Glossary of Terms
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
WEP
Wired-Equivalent Privacy protocol was specified in the original IEEE 802.11
standard to provide a WLAN with a minimal level of security and privacy
comparable to a typical wired LAN, using data encryption.
Wi-Fi
A certification mark managed by a trade group called the Wi-Fi Alliance. Wi-Fi
certification encompasses numerous standards including 802.11a, 802.11b,
802.11g, WPA, and more. Equipment must pass compatibility testing to receive
the Wi-Fi mark.
Wi-Fi CERTIFIED™
The certification standard designating IEEE 802.11-based wireless local area
network (WLAN) products that have passed interoperability testing requirements
developed and governed by the Wi-Fi alliance.
Wi-Fi Interoperability Certificate
A statement that a product has passed interoperability testing and will work with
other Wi-Fi CERTIFIED products.
Wi-Fi Protected Setup
Wi-Fi Protected Setup™ (previously called Wi-Fi Simple Config) is an optional
certification program developed by the Wi-Fi alliance designed to ease set up of
security enabled Wi-Fi networks in the home and small office environment. Wi-Fi
Protected Setup supports methods (pushing a button or entering a PIN into a
wizard-type application) that are familiar to most consumers to configure a
network and enable security.
Wireless Gateway
A term used to differentiate between an access point and a more-capable device
that can share an internet connection, serve DHCP, and bridge between wired
and wireless networks.
Wireless Network
A network of connected using a centralized wireless access point.
WLAN
Wireless Local Area Network. A type of local area network in which data is sent
and received via high-frequency radio waves rather than cables or wires.
WPA
Wi-Fi Protected Access is a data encryption specification for 802.11 wireless
networks that replaces the weaker WEP. It improves on WEP by using dynamic
keys, Extensible Authentication Protocol to secure network access, and an
encryption method called Temporal Key Integrity Protocol (TKIP) to secure data
transmissions.
WPA2
An enhanced version of WPA. It is the official 802.11i standard. It uses Advanced
Encryption Standard instead of TKIP. AES supports 128-bit, 192-bit, and 256-bit
encryption keys.
Page 226 of 231
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Glossary of Terms
User Manual
Y
Yagi Antenna
An antenna type that radiates in only a specific direction. Yagi antennas are used
in point-to-point situations.
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 227 of 231
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Glossary of Terms
User Manual
Page 228 of 231
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Glossary of Terms
User Manual
B
Index
Basic Wireless Settings • 71, 97
Before You Begin • 15
C
2
2.4 GHz Band, Point-To-Multipoint • 197
2.4 GHz Band, Point-To-Point • 198
5
5 GHz Bands, Point-To-Multipoint • 198
5 GHz Bands, Point-To-Point • 199
A
About RLX2-IHx series Industrial Hotspot Products •
16
About This Manual • 15
Access Settings • 82
Active Antennas
RLX2-IHW • 85, 87
RLX-IHNF • 85, 87
Adding the Radio to RSLogix 5000 • 154
Advanced Wireless Settings • 84, 97
Agency Approvals & Certifications • 204, 205, 208, 209
Antenna Gain • 190
Antenna Location, Spacing, and Mounting • 196
Antenna Pattern • 189
Antenna Polarity • 190
Antenna Port Connections • 18, 34
Antenna Spacing Requirements for User Safety • 7
Antenna Types • 191
Antennas • 187
Appendix A - Adding a Radio to RSLogix 5000 • 153
Appendix B - Radio Hardware • 165
Appendix C - RLX2-IHx 5 GHz Radio DFS Support •
173
Appendix D - RLX2-IHx series Virtual LAN (VLAN)
Functionality • 117, 177
Appendix E - EtherNet/IP and Modbus TCP/IP Support
• 181
Appendix F - Master Channel-Frequency Table • 185
Appendix G - Antenna Configuration • 18, 65, 72, 141,
187
Appendix H - FCC Emission Regulations • 197
Appendix I - Compatibility with ProSoft RLXIB Series
Radios • 15, 201
Appendix J - Detailed Radio Specifications • 17, 203
Appendix K - Application Examples • 211
Apply Changes • 62
Approved Antenna Table • 194
Approved Antennas in Europe/CE • 194
Approved Antennas in Mexico • 195
Approved Antennas with Power Amp • 194, 195
Assigning a Temporary IP Address • 42, 47, 48, 49,
50, 54, 130, 131
Assigning an IP address • 46, 48, 50, 53, 82
Cable Break Detection • 108
Cancelling Changes • 62
Certificate Management • 80
Changing IH Browser Columns in List View • 122
Changing Password Settings • 93
Checking the Ethernet Cable • 148
Collinear Array Antennas • 191
Configuration Help • 59
Configuring a Bridging Client Radio • 50, 73
Configuring a Client Radio • 25, 50, 53, 73
Configuring a Radio - Detailed Configuration • 44, 55,
57
Configuring a Radio - Getting Started • 43, 44, 55, 56,
131, 149
Configuring a Repeater Radio • 48, 73
Configuring Advanced Network Settings • 99
Configuring Advanced Settings • 83
Configuring Basic Settings • 70
Configuring Parent Link Settings • 90, 94, 122
Configuring Quality of Service (QoS) Settings • 115
Configuring Serial Settings • 109
Configuring VLAN Settings • 117
Connecting to the Radio Configuration Utility • 44, 46,
48, 50, 54, 57, 80, 123, 132, 134
Contacting Technical Support • 152, 213
Content Disclaimer • 2
Control Drawing • 188
D
Defining the Scan Parameters in the IH Browser • 120
Designer Functional Specifications • 30
Detecting 802.11 Access Points • 32, 140
DFS Radio Operations • 173, 175
Diagnostics and Troubleshooting • 147
E
Encryption Type • 75, 77
Enterprise Mode Settings • 75, 78
Ethernet Cable Configuration • 169, 170
Ethernet Cable Configuration (all other radios) • 171
Ethernet Cable Configuration (RLX2-IHNF-W) • 170
Ethernet Cable Specifications • 169
EtherNet/IP™ Server Support • 183
F
Factory Defaults • 62
Finding Missing Radios • 152
Freezing the Display in the IH Browser • 121
G
General Features • 17
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 229 of 231
Glossary of Terms
User Manual
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Glossary of Terms • 217
R
H
Hiding the Toolbar and Status Bar in the IH Browser •
128
How to Contact Us • 2
I
IGMP Settings • 100
IH Browser System Requirements • 23
Important Safety Information • 3
Importing and Exporting IH Browser Data • 127
Importing the Add-On Instruction • 157
Improving Signal Quality • 31
Industrial Hotspot Bench Test Kit (RLX-IHBTK) • 22
Industry Canada Requirements: • 4
Installation Questions • 27
Installing IH Browser Software • 23, 24
Installing the ProSoft Wireless Designer • 25, 26
Installing the RadioLinx Industrial Hotspot Browser • 22
IP address, Assigning • 46, 48, 50, 53, 82
L
LED Display • 17, 148
List View Columns • 122, 123, 129
Location Services Settings • 90
M
MAC Filter • 75, 76
Making Power and Data Connections • 30, 33, 34
Max Data Rate • 85, 86
Modbus Memory Map Diagnostic Information • 182
Modbus TCP/IP Server Support • 181
N
Network Planning • 25, 33
S
P
Package Contents • 20, 56
Packet Delineation Settings • 112
Parabolic Reflector Antennas • 193
Parent Selection Method Settings • 95
Password, Changing • 93
Personality Module Settings • 56, 62, 91
Ping Options Dialog Box • 136
Pinging Devices on the Network • 135, 136
Planning the Physical Installation • 27
Port Settings • 114
Port/Radio-based VLAN Tagging with Managed
Switches • 179
Port/Radio-based VLAN Tagging without Managed
Switches • 180
Preparing the Configuration Environment • 34
Printing the View in the IH Browser • 127
Product Overview • 16
ProSoft Wireless Designer • 28
Page 230 of 231
Radio Power Requirements (All other radios) • 167
Radio Power Requirements (RLX2-IHNF-W) • 165
Radio Power-Up • 41
Rapid Spanning Tree Functionality • 103, 105
Read-Only Fields • 59
Recommended Antennas • 6
Refreshing the Display in the IH Browser • 42, 48, 120,
121, 152
Remote IP Settings • 111
Repeater Parameters Settings • 96
Replacing an Existing Radio • 33, 55, 91
Resetting a RLX2-IHx series Radio • 33, 44, 58, 133,
150
Resetting All Other Radios • 151
Resetting IH Browser Columns • 122
Resetting the RLX2-IHNF-W and RLX2-IHNF-WC •
150
RLX2 Controller Tags • 161
RLX2.CONTROL • 161
RLX2.STATUS • 162
RLX2-IHA Detailed Specifications • 203
RLX2-IHA, -IHG, -IHNF, -IHW • 20
RLX2-IHG Detailed Specifications • 204
RLX2-IHNF, RLX2-IHA, RLX2-IHG, RLX2-IHW • 4
RLX2-IHNF, -W, -WC Detailed Specifications • 206
RLX2-IHNF-W • 4, 21
RLX2-IHNF-W Cables (sold separately) • 21
RLX2-IHNF-W Radio Connections • 35
RLX2-IHNF-WC • 5, 22
RLX2-IHNF-WC Radio Connections • 37
RLX2-IHW Detailed Specifications • 208
RLX2-IHW, IHNF, IHG, IHA Radio Connections • 34
RLX2-IHx series Approved Antennas • 191, 193
RLX2-IHx series Quick Setup • 33
Roam Control Settings • 88
Selecting a DFS 5 GHz Channel • 174
Serial Encapsulation Mode Setting • 110
Setting the Event Log Filter • 143, 144
Setting the Radio IP Address in the IH Browser • 42,
130
Setting Up a Master Radio • 46, 72
SNMP Agent • 107
Spanning Tree Protocol • 103
Start Here • 15
Starting the IH Browser • 24, 32, 41, 120, 132
STP Settings • 98, 102, 103
Support, Service & Warranty • 213
Switching between List and Topology Views • 122,
123, 126
T
Temporary IP Address, Assigning • 42
Testing the Network Installation • 27, 30
Topology View Description • 122, 126
Transparent Support of VLAN Tags (802.1Q) • 178
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
RLX2-IHx Series ♦ 802.11a, b, g, n
Industrial Hotspots
Glossary of Terms
User Manual
U
Unable to scan for AP's error message • 151
Updating the Radio Firmware • 63, 134
Using the IH Browser to Configure Radios • 30, 41
Using the IH Browser to Manage your Radios • 24, 32,
41, 119
V
Viewing a Radio's Configuration • 55
Viewing Additional Data in the IH Browser • 127, 132
Viewing Available Parents for a Radio • 64, 65, 140
Viewing Ethernet Nodes in the IH Browser • 139
Viewing Network Data in the IH Browser • 137
Viewing Parent Radios in the IH Browser • 145
Viewing Radio Status • 63
Viewing the Port Table in the IH Browser • 142
Viewing the Radio Address Table • 64, 66
Viewing the Radio Event Log in the IH Browser • 143
Viewing the Radio Port Status • 64, 67, 105
Viewing the Radio Properties • 123, 128
Viewing the Radios in the IH Browser • 41, 120
Viewing the Scan List in the IH Browser • 140, 146
Viewing Wireless Clients in the IH Browser • 138
W
Warranty Information • 215
WEP Key • 75, 77, 78
Whip Antennas • 191
Wireless Security Settings • 74, 76, 98
Y
Yagi Array Antenna • 192
Your Feedback Please • 2
ProSoft Technology, Inc.
November 9, 2017
Page 231 of 231
Download PDF
Similar pages