wall mount ultrasonic flow meter

CONTENTS
1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................................... 6
1.1
Preface..................................................................................................................................6
1.2
Features ................................................................................................................................6
1.3
Flow Measurement Principle ................................................................................................6
1.4
Packaging List.......................................................................................................................7
1.5
Optional Parts .......................................................................................................................8
1.6
Typical Applications ..............................................................................................................8
1.6.1 Applications sorted by industry / process .........................................................................8
1.7
Product Identification ............................................................................................................9
1.8
Specifications........................................................................................................................9
2.0 Installation and Measurement................................................................................................................. 11
2.1
Unpacking ...........................................................................................................................11
2.2
Installation Considerations..................................................................................................11
2.2.1 Mounting the Main Unit ...................................................................................................11
2.2.2 Installing Transducers.....................................................................................................12
2.2.3 Distance from Main Unit to Transducer ..........................................................................12
2.2.4 Cables .............................................................................................................................12
2.2.5 Power Supply Wiring.......................................................................................................12
2.2.6 Other Electrical Connections ..........................................................................................13
2.3
Power Up ............................................................................................................................13
2.4
Keypad ................................................................................................................................14
2.5
Menu Windows ...................................................................................................................15
2.6
Menu Window List...............................................................................................................16
2.7
Steps to Configure the Parameters ....................................................................................16
2.8
Transducer Mounting Allocation .........................................................................................18
2.9
Transducers Wiring.............................................................................................................19
2.10 Transducers Installation......................................................................................................19
2.11 Installation Check-up ..........................................................................................................20
2.11.1 Signal Strength............................................................................................................20
2.11.2 Signal Quality ..............................................................................................................21
2.11.3 Total Transit Time and Delta Time..............................................................................21
2.11.4 Transit Time Ratio.......................................................................................................21
3.0 How To ................................................................................................................................................................. 22
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
3.10
3.11
How to check if the instrument works properly...................................................................22
How to check the liquid flowing direction............................................................................22
How to change units systems.............................................................................................22
How to select a flow rate unit..............................................................................................22
How to use the totaliser multiplier.......................................................................................22
How to turn on / off the totalisers........................................................................................23
How to reset the totalisers ..................................................................................................23
How to restore the factory default setups ...........................................................................23
How to use the damper to stabilize the flow rate................................................................23
How to use the low-flow cut off function .............................................................................23
How to conduct zero calibration .........................................................................................23
3.12
3.13
3.14
3.15
3.16
3.17
3.18
3.19
3.20
3.21
3.22
3.23
3.24
3.25
3.26
3.27
3.28
3.29
3.30
3.31
3.32
3.33
3.34
How to change the scale factor ..........................................................................................24
How to use the password locker.........................................................................................24
How to use the keypad locker ............................................................................................24
How to use scheduled data output .....................................................................................24
How to use 4-20mA current loop output .............................................................................24
How to output analogue voltage signal ..............................................................................25
How to use the Frequency Output......................................................................................25
How to use the Totaliser Pulse Output ...............................................................................26
How to produce an alarm signal .........................................................................................26
How to use the OCT output ................................................................................................27
How to use the relay output ..................................................................................................4
How to use the built-in Buzzer ..............................................................................................4
How to modify the built-in calendar ......................................................................................4
How to adjust the LCD ..........................................................................................................4
How to use the RS232 serial interface .................................................................................4
How to view the totalized flow ..............................................................................................5
How to connect analogue input signals................................................................................5
How to compensate the flow not measured during offline ...................................................5
How to use the Working Timer .............................................................................................6
How to use the manual totaliser ...........................................................................................6
How to use the batch process controller ..............................................................................6
How to calibrate the analogue output ...................................................................................6
How to check the ESN ..........................................................................................................7
4.0 Menu Window Details .................................................................................................................................... 8
5.0 Troubleshooting .............................................................................................................................................. 19
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
Introduction .........................................................................................................................19
Power-on Errors..................................................................................................................19
Working Status Errors.........................................................................................................20
Other Problems and Solutions............................................................................................21
6.0 Communication Protocol............................................................................................................................ 24
6.1
RS232 Connector Pin-out...................................................................................................24
6.2
RS232 Wiring ......................................................................................................................25
6.3
Communication Protocol.....................................................................................................25
6.3.1 Basic Commands ............................................................................................................25
6.3.2 Protocol Prefix Usage .....................................................................................................27
6.4
The M command and the ASCII Codes..............................................................................28
6.5
Programming Examples .....................................................................................................29
7.0 Measurements of Thermal and Other Physical Parameters ................................................. 30
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
Introduction .........................................................................................................................30
Wiring Analogue Inputs.......................................................................................................30
Thermal Energy Measurement ...........................................................................................31
Configure Analogue Measurement Ranges .......................................................................32
Read Input Analogue Values from a Network Computer ...................................................32
8.0 Warranty and Service .................................................................................................................................. 33
8.1
8.2
Warranty..............................................................................................................................33
Service ................................................................................................................................33
9.0 Appendix ............................................................................................................................................................. 35
9.1
Wiring Diagram and Outline Drawings ...............................................................................35
9.2
Clamp-on Transducer Installation Guide ............................................................................37
9.2.1 Choose Installation Method ............................................................................................37
V-method Installation..................................................................................................................37
Z-method Installation..................................................................................................................37
W-method Installation.................................................................................................................37
9.2.2 Transducer Spacing ........................................................................................................37
9.2.3 Prepare the Pipe Surface................................................................................................37
9.2.4 Prepare the Transducers ................................................................................................38
9.2.5 Install the Transducers....................................................................................................38
9.2.6 Fine Tune the Installation................................................................................................39
9.3
Standard Pipe Dimensions .................................................................................................39
9.4
Sound Speed Tables ..........................................................................................................40
1.0
INTRODUCTION
1.1
Preface
The wall-mount ultrasonic flow meter is designed to be installed in a fixed installation for long-term
flow measurement.
The flow meter is based on transit-time flow measurement principle. It measures the flow rate of liquid
in a closed pipe by using a pair of clamp-on or wetted ultrasonic transducers. In general, the liquid
should be full in the pipe, and should contain no or small amount of particles or air bubbles. Examples
of applicable liquids are: water (hot water, chilled water, city water, sea water, etc.); sewage; oil
(crude oil, lubricating oil, diesel oil, fuel oil, etc.); chemicals (alcohol, acids, etc.); waste water;
beverage, liquid food, solvents and other liquids.
The utilizes state-of-the-art technologies such as advanced signal processing, low-voltage
transmitting, small signal receiving, self-adaptation, the latest electronics, etc., to achieve high
accuracy and reliable performance. Besides, the product provides versatile output interfaces, both
analogueue and digital, which can be easily used by a host computer or a flow controller.
1.2
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1.3
Features
Better than 1% linearity.
±0.2% of repeatability.
±1% of accuracy at velocity above
0.6ft/s (0.2m/s).
Positive / negative / net flow
totaliser.
Proprietary low-voltage
transmission and self-adaptation
technologies.
Anti-interference design.
Dual CPU. 100 Pico-second time
measurement resolution.
Operates with transducers,
including clam-on, insertion wetted
and flow-cell (spool-piece) wetted
types.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Die-cast aluminium weather-resistant
enclosure (standard version).
Able to measure electrically conductive
and non-conductive liquids.
RS-232 interface. Complete
communication protocol for instrument
networking.
Can be used as a flow RTU.
5 channel 12 bits analogue 4-20mA input
1 channel programmable 4-20mA output
2 channel programmable digital output
(isolated OCT and Relay)
Frequency output.
Internal batch process controller.
2x20 letters backlight LCD display. 4x4key, tactile-feedback membrane keypad.
Flow Measurement Principle
The ultrasonic flow meter is designed to measure the velocity of liquid within a closed conduit. It uses
the well-know transit-time measurement principle, plus our proprietary signal processing and
ultrasonic transceiving technologies.
As shown in Figure 1, the utilizes a pair of ultrasonic transducers which are mounted on the pipe
upstream and downstream respectively. Each transducer functions as both ultrasonic transmitter and
receiver. The main unit operates by alternately transmitting and receiving a coded burst of sound
energy between the two transducers. The transit-times in the upstream direction as well as in the
downstream direction are measured. The difference of the two transit times is directly and exactly
related to the velocity of the liquid in the pipe,
FIGURE 1: TRANSIT TIME FLOW MEASUREMENT PRINCIPLE
Down stream transducer
V=
MD
∆T
×
sin2θ Tup •Tdown
flow
Tdown
Tup
θ
spacing
Upstream transducer
Where
θ is the angle between the sound path and the flow direction
M is the number of times the sound traverses the flow
D is the pipe diameter
Tup is the time for the beam travelling from upstream the transducer to the downstream transducer
Tdown is the time for the beam travelling from the downstream transducer to the upstream transducer
ΔT = Tup – Tdown
The flow rate is then computed by combining the velocity information with pipe parameters and a
scale factor. The scale factor is normally determined by calibration in factory.
Three types of transducers can be used with the main unit, which are including the clamp-on
transducer, the insertion wetted transducer (also called “hot tap”) and the flow-cell transducer. All of
them do not block the flow, thus, do not generate pressure drop. The transducers can be mounted in
V-method where the sound transverses the pipe fluid twice, or in W-method where the sound
transverses the pipe fluid four times, or in Z-method where the transducers are mounted on opposite
sides of the pipe and the sound crosses the pipe fluid once. The selection of the mounting methods
depends on pipe and liquid characteristics.
1.4
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Packaging List
Main unit, 85-264VAC /DC24V
M1- type clamp-on transducer for 2”~28” pipe(DN50~700mm)
Dedicated shielded transducer cable
Clamp-on fixture
User’s Manual
Allen Wrench
Certification
Pakcing list
1 unit
1 pair
5 Metrex2
1 set
1 unit
1 unit
1 page
1 page
1.5
Optional Parts
•
S1-type clamp-on transducer for small pipe 1/2”~4”(DN15~100mm)
•
L1-type clamp-on transducer for large pipe 11”~240”(DN300~6000mm)
•
S1H-type clamp-on transducer
1/2”~4”(DN15~100mm) (0-160℃)
•
M1H-type clamp-on transducer for middle pipe with high temperature liquid 2”~28”
(DN50~700mm) (0-160℃)
1.6
for
small
pipe
with
high
temperature
liquid
Typical Applications
The flow meter can be applied to a wide range of pipe flow measurements. Applicable liquids include
pure liquids as well as liquid with small quantity of tiny particles. Examples are:
•
Water (hot water, chilled water, city water, sea water, waste water, etc.);
•
Sewage with small particle content;
•
Oil (crude oil, lubricating oil, diesel oil, fuel oil, etc.);
•
Chemicals (alcohol, acids, etc.);
•
Plant effluent;
•
Beverage, liquid food;
•
Ultra-pure liquids;
•
Solvents and other liquids
1.6.1
Applications sorted by industry / process
Water and waste water management;
Water and waste water treatment plants;
Power plants, such as nuclear power plants and hydraulic power plants;
Mining and metallurgy plants;
Petroleum process monitoring and control;
Chemical process monitoring and control;
Pulp and paper process monitoring and control;
Food and beverage processing;
Marine maintenance and operation;
Pipeline leakage detection;
HVAC, hydronic balancing;
Energy supply and production systems;
Flow measurement networking.
1.7
Product Identification
Each set of the series flow meter has a unique product identification number or ESN (electronic serial
number) written into the software that can only be modified with a special tool by the manufacturer. In
case of any hardware failure, please provide this number which is located on menu window M61
when contacting the manufacturer.
Main Unit
1.8
Specifications
Linearity
Better than ±1%.
Accuracy
±1% of reading at rates >0.6 ft/s (0.2m/s). Assume a fully developed
flow profile.
Repeatability
±0.2%.
Velocity
±0.03 ~ ±105 ft/s (±0.01 ~ ±30 m/s), bi-directional
Measurement
Period
0.5s
Display
LCD with backlight. 2x20 English letters.
Keypad
4x4-key membrane keypad with tactile feedback
Units
English (U.S.) or metric.
Outputs
Analogue output: 4-20mA or 0-20mA current output. Impedance
0∼1kΩ. Accuracy 0.1%. .
Isolated OCT output: for frequency output (0∼9,999Hz), alarm
driver, or totaliser pulse output, ON/OFF control, etc.
Relay output 1A@125VAC or 2A@30VDC. For ON/OFF control,
alarm driver, totaliser output, etc.
Internal Alarm (Buzzer): user programmable.
External Alarm Driver: alarm signal can be transmitted to Relay or
OCT output terminals to drive an external alarm.
RS-232 serial port.
Input
Five channel 4-20mA current inputs for signals such as
temperature, pressure, liquid level, and etc.. Accuracy 0.1%.
Two of the five input channels are wired to terminal blocks. The
remaining three channels are optional.
Others
Capable of offline compensation for flow totaliser, automatic /
manual selectable.
Self-diagnosis.
Automatically record the following information:
Enclosure
•
· The totaliser data of the last 64 days / 64 months / 5 years;
•
The power-on time and corresponding flow rate of the last
64 power on and off events. Allow manual or automatic flow
loss compensation
•
The instrument working status of the last 64 days
Die-cast aluminum enclosure.
Protection Class: IP65 (NEMA 4X). Weather-resistant.
Size: 9.88”x7.56”x3.15” (251x192x80mm3) for standard version
Transducer
Clamp-on
S1-type: for pipe size 1/2”~4” (DN15~DN100mm)
M1-type: for pipe size 2”~28”(DN50~DN700mm)
L1-type: for pipe size 11”~240”(DN300~DN6,000mm)
S1H-type: for pipe size 1/2”~4” (DN15~DN100mm) (0˚C - 160˚C)
M1H-type: for pipe size 2”~28”(DN50~DN700mm) (0˚C - 160˚C)
Liquid Types
Virtually all commonly used clean liquids.
Liquids with small quantity of tiny particles may also be applicable.
Particle size should be less than 75um, particle concentration less
than 10,000ppm.
Liquids
Liquids should contain no or very minor air bubbles.
Examples are chilled/hot water, sea water, waste water, chemical
liquids, oil, crude oil, alcohol, beer, etc.
Liquid Temp
0˚C - 160˚Cfor clamp-on transducer. Higher temperatures can be
accommodated. Consult the manufacturer for assistance.
Pipe
-40˚C - 160˚C for wetted transducer.
Suspension
concentration
< 20,000ppm and particle size less than 80um. May contain very
small amount of air bubbles.
Pipe Size
1/2” ~ 240” (DN15mm ~ DN6,000mm).
Pipe Material
All metals, most plastics, fiber glass, etc. Allow pipe liner.
Pipe Straight
run
15D in most cases, 30D if a pump is near upstream, where D is pipe
diameter.
Cable should not be laid in parallel with high-voltage power lines, neither should it be
close to strong interference source such as power transformers.
AC: 85-264240V DC: 8VDC~36VDC
Weight
Environment
Main unit: 14˚F ~ 158˚F (-10˚C ~ 70˚C)
Temperature
Power
Cable
Shielded transducer cable. Standard length
(5mx2). Can be extended to
(500m). Contact the manufacturer for longer cable requirement.
2.0
Humidity
Clamp-on transducer: -22˚F ~ 212˚F (-30˚C ~ 100˚C)
Main unit: 85% RH
Transducer: water-submersible, water depth less than 10’ (3m)
Power consumption: < 2W
Standard main unit: 6.6lb (3kg)
INSTALLATION AND MEASUREMENT
2.1
Unpacking
Please unpack the shipping box and check the parts and documents against the packing slip. If there
is something missing, the device is damaged, or something is abnormal, please contact us
immediately and do not proceed with the installation.
WARNING!
The flow meter can be used to measure the flow of many liquids.
Some of the liquids may be hazardous. It is very important that you
comply with local safety codes and regulations in installing and
using electronic devices in your area.
2.2
Installation Considerations
This section provides guidelines for installing the main unit (electronics enclosure) and its transducers.
2.2.1
Mounting the Main Unit
The main unit electronics (standard version) are housed in an IP65 (NEXA 4X) weather-resistant and
dust-tight enclosure. Therefore, the main unit can be installed indoors and outdoors. Usually, it is
mounted in a meter shed or on a location where one can easilly access for meter testing and
servicing. Please refer to Appendix 9.1 for the enclosure dimensions.
2.2.2
Installing Transducers
First, you need to select a proper installation site. For this, one usually needs to consider the
accessibility of the location, operating space needed for the installation, safety code compliance, etc.
In addition, flow and pipe conditions near the installation site are also very important. Please refer to
section 2.8 for site selection details.
Then, follow the installation guidelines given in Appendix 9.2 for installing clamp-on transducers.
2.2.3
Distance from Main Unit to Transducer
In general, the closer the transducer to the main unit, the better the signals. All major cable suppliers
can supply up to 1640ft (500m) long transducer cable as per specifications.
2.2.4
Cables
The flow meter utilizes a double-balanced driving technique for high performance ultrasonic
transimision and receiving. It requires twisted shielded cable for the transducer. We recommend to
use the cable supplied by the manufacturer. If you want to do the transducer cabling yourse, please
consult the manufacturer in advance.
Try not route the transducer cable along with high current AC lines. Aviod strong interference
sources.Make sure the cables and cable connections are protected from weather and corrosive
conditions.
WARNING!
The transducers may have static charges accumulated during
transportation. Before connecting the transducers to the main unit,
please do discharge the transducers in a safe area by shorting the
centre conductor of the transducer cable connectors to the metal shield
of the connector.
2.2.5
Power Supply Wiring
The user normally selects the type of power supply when the order is placed. There are three types of
power supply options, 110VAC, 220VAC and 8-36VDC. You must make sure the power supply type
WARNING!
Be careful about the power supply type of your flow meter and the
power supply wiring! Connecting to a wrong type power source or
improper connection of line power could damage the flow meter. It may
also cause hazardous voltage at enclosure, the transducer, flow cell,
and associated piping.
of your flow meter matches the power source to which the flow meter will be connected.
Open the flow meter enclosure. On the lower right corner (refer to the figures in Appendix 9.1), you
should see three terminal blocks which pins are labelled as 11, 12 and 13. Normally, pin 13 should be
connected to your Earth ground. Make sure your Earth ground is good. Pins 11 and 12 should be
connected to Neutral and Line, respectively.
If 8-36VDC power source is used, its positive lead and negative lead should be connected to pin 24
and 23 respectively. Note that in this case the 4-20mA output may not be available, except special
instruction was given when the order was processed.
Please refer to Appendix 9.1 for more wiring information.
2.2.6
Other Electrical Connections
Wiring RS232 Port
Refer to sections 6.1, 6.2 and Appendix 9.1 for details.
Wiring 0/4-20mA Output
Using standard twisted-pair wiring. Refer to Appendix 9.1 for details.
Wiring 0/4-20mA Inputs
There are five analogue input channels which can be used to accommodate five channels of
analogue input signals. Two of them are wired to terminal blocks (pin 65, 64 and 63). You can assign
temperature, pressure and other physical signals to those channels. An internal 24VDC is provided
for loop-powered transmitters.
Using standard twisted-pair wiring. Refer to Chapter 7 for details.
Wiring Alarms
Using standard twisted-pair wiring. Refer to sections 3.21 and 3.22 for details.
2.3
Power Up
The flow meter does not have power ON/OFF switch. When it is connected to power, it will start to run
automatically.
WARNING!
Before connecting the device to power source, please do a final check
to make sure all the wirings are correct and all the local safety codes
are followed.
After the power is turned on, the flow meter will run a self-diagnostic program, checking first the
hardware and then the software integrity. If there is any abnormality, corresponding error messages
will be displayed. (Please refer to chapter 5 for error code explanations.)
After successful internal checks, the flow meter will display menu window #01 (short for M01), or the
menu window which was active at last power off. It will also start the measurements by using the
parameters configured last time by the user or by the initial program.
The flow measurement program always operates in the background of the user interface. This means
that the flow measurement will keep running regardless of any user menu window browsing or
viewing. Only when the user enters new pipe parameters will the flow meter change measurement to
reflect the new parameter changes.
When the power is turned on or new pipe parameters are entered, the flow meter will enter into a selfadjusting mode to adjust the gain of the receiving circuits so that the signal strength will be within a
proper range. By this step, the flow meter finds the best system gain which matches the pipe material
and fluid type. The user will see the progress by the number s1, s2, s3 and s4, located on the upper
left corner of the LCD display. If the self-adapting process is completed successfully, letter “#R” will be
displayed.
When the user adjusts the position of the installed transducers, the flow meter will re-adjust the signal
gain automatically.
Any user-entered configuration value will be stored in the NVRAM (non-volatile memory), until it is
modified by the user.
2.4
Keypad
The keypad of the flow meter has 16 keys (Figure 2.1).
Keys 0 ~ 9 and . are keys to enter numbers.
Key ▲/+ is the going UP key when the user wants to go to the upper menu window. It also works as
+ key when entering numbers.
Key ▼/- is the going DOWN key when the user wants to go to the lower menu window. It also works
as the ‘–‘ key when entering numbers.
Key ◄ is the backspace key when the user wants to go left
or wants to backspace the left character that is located to the
left of the cursor.
Key ENT is the ENTER key for any input or selections.
Key MENU is the key for the direct menu window jump over.
Whenever the user wants to proceed to a certain menu
window, the user can press this key followed by a 2-digit
number.
7
8
9
MENU
4
5
6
/+
1
2
3
/-
0
•
ENT
Figure 2.1 Keypad layout
The MENU key is shortened as the ‘M’ key hereafter when referring to menu windows.
Key-pressing induced beep sound can be enabled / disabled in menu window M77.
2.5
Menu Windows
The flow meter user interface comprises about 100 independent menu windows that are numbered by
M00, M01, M02, …, M99, M+0, M+1, etc.
There are two methods to visit a menu window:
(1) Direct jump in. Simply press the MENU key followed by a 2-digit number. For example, if you want
to visit menu window M11 for pipe outer diameter, press the following three keys consecutively,
MENU 1 1 .
(2) Press the ▲/+ or ▼/- key. Each time of the ▲/+ key pressing will lead to the lower-numbered
menu window. For example, if the current window is on M12, the display will go to window M11 after
the ▲/+ key is pressed once.
You do not need to remember all the menu windows. Just remember the most commonly used
window numbers and the approximate window number of some uncommonly used windows would be
sufficient. You can always use ▲/+ and ▼/- keys to find the right window.
There are three different types of menu windows:
(1) Menu windows for number entering, e.g., M11 for setting up pipe outer diameter.
(2) Menu windows for option selection, e.g., M14 for the selection of pipe materials.
(3) Results display windows, e.g., window M00 for displaying flow rate, etc.
For number entering windows, the user can directly press the digit keys if the user wants to modify the
value. For example, if the current window is on M11, and the user wants to enter 219.2345 as the
pipe outer diameter, then, the flowing keys should be pressed: 2 1 9 . 2 3 4 5 ENT.
For option selection windows, the user should first press the ENT key to get into option selection
mode. Then, use ▲/+ , ▼/- , or digit key to select the right option. Consequently, press the ENT to
make the selection.
For example, assume your pipe material is stainless steel and you are currently on menu window M14
which is for the selection of pipe materials (if you are on a different window, you need to press MENU
1 4 first in order to enter into the M14 window.) You need to press the ENT key to get into the
option selection mode. Then, either press the ▲/+ and ▼/- keys to make the cursor on the line that
displays “1. Stainless Steel”, or press the 1 key directly. At the end, press ENT again to make the
selection.
Generally, the ENT key must be pressed to get into the option selection mode for option modifications.
If the “Locked M47 Open’ message is indicated on the bottom line of the LCD display, it means that
the modification operation is locked out. In such cases, the user should go to M48 to have the
instrument unlocked before any further modification can be made.
2.6
Menu Window List
M00~M09 windows for the display of the instantaneous flow rate, net totaliser value, positive totaliser
value, negative totaliser value, instantaneous flow velocity, date time, current analogue
input values, current working status, etc.
M10~M29 windows for entering system parameters, such as pipe outer diameter, pipe wall thickness,
liquid type, transducer type, transducer installation method, etc. Transducer installation
spacing is then calculated according to those parameters and displayed on one of the
windows.
.
M30~M38
windows for flow rate unit selection and totaliser configuration. User can use these
windows to select flow rate unit, such as cubic meter or liter, as well as to turn on / off
each totaliser, or to reset the totalisers.
M40~M49 windows for setting response time, zeroing / calibrating the system, locking / unlocking
keypad, changing network address ID, password, etc.
M50~M89 windows for digital and analogue outputs, such as scheduled output, RS232 output, relay
output, analogue current loop output, LCD, frequency output, alarm output, analogue
inputs. Besides, there are also windows for configuring analogue inputs, date / time, and
day/month/year accumulator.
M90~M94 windows for displaying diagnostic data, including the installation triplet. Those data are
very useful when doing a more accurate measurement.
M95
Upon entering into this window, the circular display function is started automatically. The
following windows will be displayed one by one, each window will stay for about 4
seconds: M95 ->M00 -> M01 -> M02 -> M03 -> M04 -> M05 -> M06 -> M07 -> M08 ->
M09 -> M90 -> M95.
M+0~M+9 windows for some additional functions, including a single precision calculator, display of
the total working time, and display of the time and the flow rate when the device is turned
on and turned off.
Other menu windows are used for factory debugging.
For detailed explanation of the above windows please refer to chapter 3 “How to” and chapter 4
“Menu Window Details”.
2.7
Steps to Configure the Parameters
In order to make the flow meter work properly, the user must follow the following steps to configure
the system parameters:
(1) Pipe size and pipe wall thickness
For standard pipe, please refer to Appendix §9.4 for outer diameter and wall thickness data. For nonstandard pipe, the user has to measure these two parameters.
(2) Pipe materials
For non-standard pipe material, the sound speed of the material must be entered. Please refer to
Appendix 9.5 for sound speed data.
For standard pipe materials and standard liquids, the sound speed values have already been
programmed into the flow meter, therefore there is no need to enter them again.
(3) Liner material, its sound speed and liner thickness, if there is any liner.
(4) Liquid type (for non-standard liquid, the sound speed of the liquid should be entered.)
(5) Transducer type.
(6) Transducer mounting methods (the V-method and Z-method are the common methods)
(7) Check the transducer distance displayed on window M25 and install the transducers accordingly.
Example: For standard (commonly used) pipe materials and standard (commonly measured) liquids,
the parameter configuration steps are as following:
(1) Press keys MENU 1 1 to enter into M11 window. Input the pipe outer diameter through the
keypad and press ENT key.
(2) Press key ▼/- to enter into M12 window. Input the pipe thickness through the keypad and press
ENT key.
(3) Press key ▼/- to enter into M14 window. Press ENT key to get into the option selection mode.
Use keys ▲/+ and ▼/- to scroll up and down to the proper pipe material, and then press ENT key.
(4) Press key ▼/- to enter into M16 window. Press ENT key to get into the option selection mode.
Use keys ▲/+ and ▼/- to scroll up and down to the proper liner material, and then press ENT
key. Select “No Liner”, if there is no liner.
(5) Press key ▼/- to enter into M20 window. Press ENT key to get into the option selection mode.
Use keys ▲/+ and ▼/- to scroll up and down to the proper liquid, and then press ENT key.
(6) Press key ▼/- to enter into M23 window. Press ENT key to get into the option selection mode.
Use keys ▲/+ and ▼/- to scroll up and down to the proper transducer type, and then press ENT
key.
(7) Press key ▼/- to enter into M24 window. Press ENT key to get into the option selection mode.
Use keys ▲/+ and ▼/- to scroll up and down to the proper transducer mounting method, and then
press ENT key.
(8) Press key ▼/- to enter into M25 window. The transducer installation distance will be displayed on
the window. Based on this distance and the transducer installation method selected above, install
the transducers on the pipe (refer to Appendix §9.2 for more installation details.)
(9) After installation is completed, check if the triplet (signal strength S, signal quality Q and transittime ratio R) are in the right range. Press keys MENU 9 0 to enter into M90 window for visiting
S and Q and press MENU 9 1 to visit R.
(10) Press MENU 0 1 to enter into window M01 to visit the measurement result.
2.8
Transducer Mounting Allocation
The first step in the installation process is to select an optimal location for installing the transducers in
order to make the measurement reliable and accurate. A basic knowledge about the piping and its
plumbing system would be advisable.
An optimal location would be defined as a long straight pipe line full of liquid that is to be measured.
The piping can be in vertical or horizontal position. The following table shows examples of optimal
locations.
Principles to select an optimal location:
(1) Pipe must be full of liquids at the measurement site.
(2) No heavy corrosion of deposition inside of the pipe.
(3) Must be a safe location.
(4) The straight pipe should be long enough to eliminate irregular-flow-induced error. Typically, the
length of the straight pipe should be 15 times of the pipe diameter. The longer the better.
The transducers should be installed at a pipe section where the length of the straight pipe at
upstream side is at least 10D and at downstream side is at least 5D, where D stands for pipe
outer diameter.
FIGURE 2: INSTALLATION SITE SELECTION
(5) If there are flow disturbing parts such as
pumps, valves, etc. on the upstream, the
straight pipe length should be increased
(refer to the table on the right for more
details.) The disturbance strength are in
the following order (low to high): Single
Bend -> Pipe Reduction / Enlargement ->
Outflow Tee -> Same Plane Multiple
Bends -> Inflow Tee -> Out of Plane
Multiple Bends -> Valve -> Pump.
(6) Make sure that the temperature on the
location does not exceed the range for
the transducers. Generally speaking, the
closer to the room temperature, the
better.
Piping Configuration
and
Transducer Position
L up
L up
L up
Upst ream
Dime nsio n
Downs trea m
Dimen sion
L up
x D ia m e ters
L dn
x D ia m e ters
L dn
10D
5D
10D
5D
10D
5D
12D
5D
20D
5D
20D
5D
30D
5D
L dn
L dn
L up
L up
L up
L up
L dn
L dn
L dn
L dn
(7) Select a relatively new straight pipe line if it is possible. Old pipe tends to have corrosions and
depositions, which could affect the results. If you have to work on an old pipe, we recommend you
to treat the corrosions and depositions as if they are part of the pipe wall or as part of the liner. For
example, you can add an extra value to the pipe wall thickness parameter or the liner thickness
parameter to take into account the deposition.
(8) Some pipes may have a kind of plastic liner which creates a certain amount of gaps between liner
and the inner pipe wall. These gaps could prevent ultrasonic waves from direct travelling. Such
conditions will make the measurement very difficult. Whenever possible, try to avoid this kind of
pipe. If you have to work on this kind of pipe, try our plug-in transducers that are installed
permanently on the pipe by drilling holes on the pipe while liquid is running inside.
(9) When select the measurement site, you may need to consider where to mount the flow meter main
unit. Normally, electronics are housed in a weather-resistant enclosure. It can be mounted in a
meter shed, or a location that allows easy access to the flow meter for programming and servicing.
(10) When select the measurement site, you may also need to consider how to install the
transducers. Make sure you have enough spatial space for easy operation.
2.9
Transducers Wiring
Since the flow meter utilizes balanced topology for high-performance ultrasonic transmitting and
receiving, it is recommended to use high-frequency twisted cable with shielding as the transducer
cable in order to guarantee the signal quality. Please refer to section 2.2 and Appendix 9.1 on how to
wire transducers to the flow meter terminals.
2.10
Transducers Installation
The transducers used by the flow meter series ultrasonic flow meter are made of piezoelectric crystals
both for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals through the wall of liquid piping system. The
measurement is realized by measuring the travelling time difference of the ultrasonic signals. Since
the difference is very small, the spacing and the alignment of the transducers are critical factors to the
accuracy of the measurement and the performance of the system. Meticulous care should be taken
for the installation of the transducers.
Clamp-on transducer installation steps:
(1) Locate an optimal position where the straight pipe length is sufficient (see the previous section),
and where pipes are in a favourable condition, e.g., newer pipes with no rust and ease of
operation.
(2) Calculate the transducer spacing. Just enter the pipe, fluid and transducer information through
menu M11 to M24, the flow meter will calculate the transducer spacing automatically. The value
will be shown in M25. Marking the transducer installation spots on the pipe according to this
spacing value.
(3) Clean any dust and rust on the spot where the transducers are to be installed. For a better result,
polishing the pipe outer surface with a sander is strongly recommended.
(4) Apply adequate ultrasonic couplant (grease, gel or Vaseline) onto the transducer surface as well
as to the installation area on the pipe surface.
(5) Strap on the transducers using clamp fixture. If the pipe is metal, no need to use clamp fixture
since the transducer has magnetic built-in. Make sure there is no gap between the transducer
surface and the pipe surface.
(6) Fine tune transducer position until the triplet, signal strength S, signal quality Q and transit-time
ratio R, have the best readings and those reading are in their operational ranges (S≥60, Q≥60 and
97%≤ R ≤103%). It is even better if you can tune those readings into their optimal ranges (S≥80,
Q≥80 and 99%≤ R ≤101%. Note, for large velocity flow, the R values may exceed this range to
some degree.
For more details on clamp-on transducer installation, please refer to Appendix 9.2.
2.11
Installation Check-up
After the completion of transducer installation, the user should check the following items: the receiving
signal strength S, the signal quality Q value, the delta time (traveling time difference between the
upstream and the downstream signals), the estimated liquid sound speed, the transit time ratio R, and
etc. As such, one can be sure that the flow meter is working properly and the results are reliable and
accurate.
2.11.1
Signal Strength
Signal strength S indicates the amplitude of receiving ultrasonic signals by a 3-digit number. [000]
means there is no signal detected, and [999] refers to the maximum signal strength that can be
received. Note that sometimes when no confusion will be introduced, S value is expressed by two
digits (00-99) for simplicity.
Although the instrument works well when the signal strength ranges from 60 to 99, stronger signal
strength should be pursued, because a stronger signal means a better result. The following methods
are recommended to obtain strong signals:
(1) If the current location is not good enough for a stable and reliable flow reading, or, if the signal
strength is lower than 60, relocate to a more favorable location.
(2) Try to polish the outer surface of the pipe, and apply more couplant to increase the signal strength.
(3) Tenderly adjust the position of the two transducers, both vertically and horizontally, while checking
the signal strength. Stop at the position where the signal strength reaches to maximum. Then,
check the transducer spacing to make sure it is the same as or very close to what window M25
shows.
(4) If the installation method is V-method and the pipe is big, you may need to try Z-method in order to
get stronger signals.
2.11.2
Signal Quality
Signal quality is indicated as the Q value in the instrument. A higher Q value would mean a higher
Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR), and accordingly a higher degree of accuracy able to be achieved. Under
normal pipe condition, the Q value is in the range of 60-99, the higher the better.
Causes for a lower Q value could be:
(1) Interference from other instruments and devices nearby, such as a power frequency transverter
which could cause strong interference. Try to relocate the flow meter to a new place where the
interference can be reduced.
(2) Bad sonic coupling between the transducers and the pipe. Try to polish the pipe surface again,
clean the surface and apply more couplant, etc.
(3) The selected pipe section is difficult to conduct the measurement. Relocate to a more favorable
pipe line.
2.11.3
Total Transit Time and Delta Time
The total transit time (or traveling time) and the delta time are displayed on menu window M93. They
are the primary data for the instrument to calculate the flow rate. Therefore, the measured flow rate
will vary as the total transit time and delta time vary.
The total transit time should remain stable or vary in a very small range.
The delta time normally varies less than 20%. If the variation exceeds 20% in either positive or
negative direction, there could be certain kinds of problems with the transducer installation. The user
should check the installation for sure.
2.11.4
Transit Time Ratio
Transit-time ratio R is usually used to check whether the transducer installation is good and whether
the entered pipe parameters are in consistency with their actual values. If the pipe parameters are
correct and the transducers are installed properly, the transit time ratio should be in the range of
100±3 %. Particularly, when the flow is stand-still, the ratio should be very close to 100%. If this range
is exceeded, the user should check:
a) If the entered pipe parameters are correct?
b) If the actual spacing of the transducers is the same as or close to what shown on window M25?
c) If the transducer are installed properly in the right direction?
d) If the mounting location is good, if the pipe has changed shape, or if the pipe is too old (i.e., too
much corrosion or deposition inside the pipe)?
e) If there is any interference source inside of the pipe?
f)
If there are other aspects which do not meet the measurement requirements as recommended
earlier?
3.0
HOW TO
3.1
How to check if the instrument works properly
Switch to menu M08 by entering MENU 0
is working properly.
8 keys. If ‘R’ is displayed on the screen, the instrument
If ‘E’ is displayed, the current loop output is over-ranged. Increasing the range setting in M57 will
make the ‘E’ letter disappear. If you do not use current loop output, you may ignore this error.
If ‘Q’ is displayed, the frequency output is over-ranged. Increasing the range setting in M69 will make
the ‘Q’ letter disappear. If you do not use frequency output, you may ignore this error.
If ‘G’ is displayed, the flow meter is adjusting system gain. This is normal as far as it does not last long.
If ‘I’ is displayed, there is no signal received. Check if the transducer cables are connected properly
and transducers are clamped firmly.
If ‘J’ is displayed, there is hardward problem. Turn off the power, then, turn on the power again. If the
problem remains, refer to Chapter 5 for diagnosis details.
If an ‘H’ flashes instead, the received signal is poor.
Please refer to Chapter 5 for diagnosis information.
3.2
How to check the liquid flowing direction
Assume that transducer A is connected to the upstream terminals and transducer B is connected to
the downstream terminals.
First, make sure that the instrument works properly.
Then, check the flow rate reading. If the value is positive, the direction of the flow will be from
transducer A to B. Otherwise, the flow is from B to A.
3.3
How to change units systems
Use menu window M30 for the selection of units systems, either English (option 0) or in Metric (option
1).
3.4
How to select a flow rate unit
Use menu window M31 to select the flow rate unit, use menu window M32 to select the flow totaliser
unit.
3.5
How to use the totaliser multiplier
Use window M33 to select a proper multiplying factor for the totalisers (POS, NEG and NET). Make
sure that the rate of the totaliser pulse is not too fast, neither too slow. A speed of several pulses per
minute is preferable.
If the totaliser multiplying factor is too small, the output pulse will be very fast and there could be a
loss of pulses. The designed minimum pulse period is 500 milliseconds.
If the totaliser multiplying factor is too large, the output pulse will be very slow, which might be a
problem if the master device requires fast response.
3.6
How to turn on / off the totalisers
Use M34, M35 or M36 to turn on or turn off the POS, NEG or NET totaliser, respectively.
3.7
How to reset the totalisers
Use M37 to reset the flow rate totalisers.
3.8
How to restore the factory default setups
Go to window M37. Press the . ◄ Keys. This operation will erase all the parameters entered by the
user and setup the instrument with factory default values.
3.9
How to use the damper to stabilize the flow rate
The damper acts as a filter for a stable reading. Its damping constant is entered in window M40. Its
unit is in second. If ‘0’ is entered, that means there is no damping. A bigger constant number brings a
more stable effect. But bigger numbers will prevent the instrument from acting quickly.
A constant from 5 to 30 is commonly used for the damper value.
3.10
How to use the low-flow cut off function
The value displayed in window M41 is the low-flow cut off. When the absolute value of the measured
flow velocity is below this value, the measured velocity as well as flow rate will be replaced with ‘0’.
This is to avoid any invalid accumulation when the actual flow is below the low-flow cut off value.
Application example: when a pump is shut down, the liquid will not stop immediately. It will keep
moving (may be backward) for a little while. During this period, the totaliser should be prevented from
accumulating. This can easily be done by setting the low-flow cut off velocity to a certain value, such
as 0.1ft/s (0.03m/s)
The low-flow cut off operation does not affect the flow measurement when the actual flow is greater
than the low-flow cut off value.
3.11
How to conduct zero calibration
When the flow in a pipe is absolutely stopped, the flow meter could still give a small non-zero flow rate
reading. In order to make the measurement accurate, it is necessary to remove this “zero point”
reading.
Window M42 allows us to take care of this issue. At first, the user should make sure that the liquid in
the pipe is totally stopped (no velocity). Then, go to window M42 and press the ENT key to start the
zero point setup function. Wait until the counter reading goes down to ‘00’.
3.12
How to change the scale factor
A scale factor is the ratio between the ‘actual flow rate’ and the flow rate measured by the flow meter.
It can be determined by calibration with standard flow calibration equipment. You may change the
scale factor in menu window M45.
The scale factor is transducer dependent. Prior to shipment from the factory, the scale factor of a
transducer pair is calibrated on a pipe with water flowing inside. If you ordered multiple pairs of
transducers, be sure you entered the scale factor of the transducer pair you are using.
The scale factor is also affected by other factors such as pipe size, fluid viscosity, installation variation,
etc. It is therefore recommended to do on-site calibration when accuracy is of crucial importance.
3.13
How to use the password locker
The password locker provides a means of preventing inadvertent configuration changes or totaliser
resets. When the system is locked, the user can still browse menu windows, but cannot make any
modifications on the windows.
The password locking / unlocking is done in window M47. The system can be locked without a
password or with a password consisted of 1 to 4 digits.
For no-password locking / unlocking, just press ENT key in window M47.
If the password is forgotten, please contact the manufacturer.
3.14
How to use the keypad locker
First, switch to the menu window which will be displayed after the keypad is locked.
Then, press MENU 4 8 to switch to menu M48. Press ENT and enter a 1-8 digit long password.
Password should be numerical only. Press ENT again to set the password. The system will return to
the previously selected window automatically.
3.15
How to use scheduled data output
Data can be sent to RS232 serial port by a preset schedule.
The data items to be output are selected in M50. Switch to menu M50, select “ON”, followed by data
items, then press ENT. If you do not want to output data through RS232, select “OFF” in M50 and
press ENT.
The output time, interval and last period are set in window M51. Refer to the next chapter for details
on M51.
3.16
How to use 4-20mA current loop output
The accuracy of the current loop output is better than 0.1%. It can be configured to different mode,
such as 4-20mA mode, 0-20mA modem, etc. Mode selection can be made in menu M55. Refer to the
next chapter for details on M55.
In order to use the 4-20mA output function, you need not only select the mode to be 4-20mA in M55,
but also set the flow rate values which correspond to the minimum current (4mA) and the maximum
current (20mA). Enter the two values in M56 and M57.
Example A: flow rate range is 0-500m3/h. Just enter 0 in M56 and 500 in M57.
Example B: flow rate range is -500-0-1000m3/h. If flow direction is not an issue for you, you may
select 20-4-20mA mode in M55. Then, enter 500 in M56 and 1000 in M57. If flow direction is an issue,
you may select 0-4-20mA mode in M55. This means that the current loop will output 0-4mA when flow
rate is negative and 4-20mA when flow rate is positive. Enter -500 in M56 and 1000 in M57.
You may need to calibrate and test the current loop output before using it. Just go to menu M58 and
do the following:
First, connect an ammeter to the current loop output.
Press MENU 5 8, then, ENT to enter into menu M58.
Use ▲/+ and ▼/- to display “0mA”, “4mA”, “8mA”, “16mA”, “20mA” orderly, record the corresponding
reading on the ammeter. Calculate the differences between the readings and the selected ones. For
instance, when 4mA is selected, the actual output current shown on the ammeter is 4.01mA. Then,
the difference is 0.01mA.
If the differences are not within tolerance, calibrate the current loop (see section 3.33.)
The present current loop output is displayed in Window M59. It changes along with flow rate change.
3.17
How to output analogue voltage signal
Connect a 250Ohm/0.25W resistor across the two current loop output terminals (terminals 21 and 22).
This will convert the 4-20mA current signal into 1-5V voltage signal.
3.18
How to use the Frequency Output
All the flow meters have Frequency Output functionality. This frequency output signal, which
represents the flow rate, is intended to connect with other instruments.
The Frequency Output is totally user-configurable. Usually, four parameters should be configured.
Enter the lower limit of flow rate in window M68 and the higher limit of flow rate in window M69.
Enter the frequency maximum and minimum in window M67.
For example, assume that the flow rate varies in a range from 0m3/h to 3000m3/h, and the required
output signal frequency should be in a range from 200Hz to 1000Hz. The user should enter 0 in M68
and 3000 in M69, and enter 200 and 1000 in window M67.
Please note that the user needs to select the frequency output option (the 13th option, “FO output”) in
window M78. The user must also make the OCT hardware connection to the device which is
supposed to use the frequency output signal. Refer to Appendix §9.1 for wiring information.
3.19
How to use the Totaliser Pulse Output
The flow meter is able to produce a pulse output every time when it reaches a unit flow of liquid. This
pulse could be used by an external pulse counter to accumulate the flow rate.
Refer to §3.4 and §3.5 for the setup of the totaliser units and multiplier.
The totaliser pulse output can only be transmitted through OCT or relay devices. Therefore, it is
necessary to configure the OCT or relay. This can be done in menu M78 and M79. Refer to the next
chapter for detail on M78 and M79.
For example, assume that we need to output the POS totaliser through the relay in pulse form, and
every pulse represents 0.1cubic meter of liquid flow. The following steps must be performed:
(1) Select the Cubic Meter (m3) unit in window M32.
(2) Select the Multiplier factor as ‘2. X0.1’ in window M33.
(3) Select the output option ‘9. POS INT Pulse’ in window M77. (INT stands for integrated or totalized )
Note that the totaliser pulse must be set properly. It should be neither too large nor too small. If it is
too large (e.g., long period), the output pulse will be very slow. If it is too small (e.g., short period), the
relay may activate too frequently and its lifetime may be shortened. Besides, pulse loss error may
occur. It is recommend to be within 1-60 pulse/minute. You can adjust the pulse period by selecting
different totaliser multiplier factor in M33.
3.20
How to produce an alarm signal
There are two types of hardware alarms that are available with this instrument. One is the audible
alarm, and the other is the ON/OFF output signal which can drive an alarm. The audible alarm is also
called Buzzer. It is generated internally and can be configured in M77. The ON/OFF output signal is
generated through the OCT or relay output which is connected to an external alarm circuitry.
The triggering sources of the alarming events for both the Buzzer and the ON/OFF alarm signal could
be:
(1) There is no receiving signal.
(2) The signal received is too weak.
(3) The flow meter is not in normal measurement mode.
(4) The flow direction is changed.
(5) Overflow occurs at the analogue outputs by 120% or more.
(6) Overflow occurs at the frequency output by 120% or more.
(7) The flow rate is out of the specified range, which is configured in windows M73 and M74 for Alarm
#1, and in windows M75 and M76 for Alarm #2.
Example A: assume we need the Buzzer to start beeping when the flow meter is not ready in normal
measurement. Switch to M77, select item “2. Abnormal Measurement State”
Example B: assume we need the Buzzer to start beeping when the flow rate is less than 300 m3/h
and greater than 2000m3/h. The following setup steps would be recommended:
(1) Enter flow rate lower limit 300 in M73 for #1 alarm,
(2) Enter flow rate upper limit 2000 in M74 for #1 alarm,
(3) Select item ‘6. Alarm #1’ in M77.
Example C: assume we need the OCT output to activate when flow rate exceeds 100~500m3/h and
the relay output to activate when flow rate exceeds 600~1000m3/h. The following setup steps would
be recommended:
(1) Enter flow rate lower limit 100 in M73
(2) Enter flow rate upper limit 500 in M74
(3) Enter flow rate lower limit 600 in M75
(4) Enter flow rate lower limit 1000 in M76
(5) Select item ‘6. Alarm #1’ in M78
(6) Select item ‘6. Alarm #1’ in M79.
3.21 How to use the OCT output
Terminals
Optocoupler
Isolation
The OCT output is an ON/OFF type, electrically
isolated collector open circuit output. It is userconfigurable. You can program it to be an ON/OFF
type alarm signal or a totaliser pulse signal.
C
Vx
Rx
61
External Alarm
Or Relay Control
E
62
Notice that the Frequency Output shares the same
OCT hardware. When used as Frequency Output,
the OCT cannot be used for other purpose (neither
alarm signal nor totaliser pulse signal).
The OCT has two wiring terminals, terminals 61 and 62. Terminal 61 is collector and terminal 62 is
emitter. Be careful of the polarity. An external DC power supply Vx and an external pull-up resistor
Rx are needed for using the OCT (Figure 3). Vx can be from +8VDC to +24VDC. Rx can be from
1KOhm to 10KOhm. The OCT can drive an alarm, pulse counter, frequency counter, etc. It can also
be used to drive a relay, which operates a valve system, for instance.
Refer to the next chapter on menu M78 for OCT
configuration.
3.22
How to use the relay
output
Terminals
Relay
NO
The relay output is a single-pole single-throw
(SPST), normally ON output device. Its
maximum operating frequency is 1Hz. Its
load current is 1A at 125VAC, or, 2A at
30VDC.
C
71
72
External Alarm
The relay output is user-configurable and can
be configured as an ON/OFF type alarm
signal or a totaliser pulse signal. Its signal is sent to terminals 71 and 72, which can be
connected to a remote counter or alarm device (Figure 4). Refer to the next chapter on menu
M79 for relay configuration.
3.23
How to use the built-in Buzzer
The built-in buzzer is user-configurable. It can be used as an alarm. Use M77 for setups.
3.24
How to modify the built-in calendar
The current date and time is displayed in menu M04 in format “yy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss”. If this is
the first time you run the flow meter, please do make sure that the date and time are correct. If
not, please make correction. Besides, if “daylight saving” applies in your area, you may also
need to change the time accordingly.
To make changes on the date and time, press MENU 6 0 ENT to switch to menu M61 and
modify the settings. Use the dot key to skip over these digits that need no modifications.
3.25
How to adjust the LCD
Use M70 to adjust the LCD backlight. Press MENU 7 0 ENT. You should see “>” on the
screen, which indicates that the system is ready for modification. Use ▲/+ and ▼/- to select
the desired option. “Always On” means that the backlight will remain on always. “Always Off”
means that the backlight will remain off always. “Time=” means that the backlight will keep on
for “x” seconds which should be keyed in after selecting “Time=”.
Use M71 to adjust the LCD contrast. This is necessary when the letters on the screen are not
clear and the viewing angle is offset. Press MENU 7 1 ENT. You should see “>” on the screen.
Use ▲/+ or ▼/- to increase or decrease the contrast.
3.26
How to use the RS232 serial interface
The flowmeter family flow meters are equipped with a RS232C standard serial interface. The
RS232 interface is wired to a DB9 connector. The data rate can be set to 75-115200 Baud.
Use M62 to configure this interface. Refer to Chapter 6 for more details
You may use an external RS232-to-RS485 converter to connect the flow meter to a 485 bus.
3.27
How to view the totalized flow
Use M82 to view the daily, monthly and yearly totalized flow.
To view the last 64 days’ flow history, press MENU 8 2, then, select item 0 for “Day”. You
should see the serial number and the date on the first line, and the net totalized flow for this
specific day.
Note that, on the upper right corner, you may see “----”, which indicates that the system was
normal during that day. If you see other characters, error occurred in that day. Please refer to
chapter 5 for error code explanation and resolution.
To view the flow for a month or a year, press MENU 8 2 and select item 1 for “Month” or 2 for
“Year”.
3.28
How to connect analogue input signals
There are five analogue input channels which can be used to connect to five channels of 420mA signals. They are digitized and then acquired by the flow meter. The data can then be
sent to a remote computer or controller through RS232 upon request. Refer to chapter 6 for
communication details.
The input analogue signal can be of pressure, temperature or other physic quantities. When
analogue inputs AI1 and AI2 are connected to the “hot” and “cold” temperature sensors of a
liquid thermal energy supply system, the flow meter can measurement the thermal energy
consumption of the system.
Menu window M06 displays the present current and its corresponding pressure / temperature
value.
The terminals assigned to these analogue inputs are (refer to Appendix §9.1):
AI1: 64 and 63; AI2: 65 and 63; AI3: 73 and 63; AI4: 74 and 63; AI5: 75 and 63.
AI3, AI4 and AI5 are not connected to terminals. Please contact the manufacturer if needed.
3.29
How to compensate the flow not measured during offline
When the power is down, the flow meter will not be able to conduct flow measurement. In
order to compensate the flow uncounted during the offline period, you need to enable
Automatic Amending function before the flow meter is offline.
To enable the Automatic Amending function, switch to M83, press ENT key, then, select YES
and press ENT again.
To disable this function, just select OFF in menu M83.
Refer to the next chapter for M83 details and how the uncounted flow is estimated.
3.30
How to use the Working Timer
Use the working timer to check the time that has passed with a certain kind of operation.
The working timer value is displayed in window M72. To reset the timer, press ENT key and
select YES.
3.31
How to use the manual totaliser
Use M38 for the manual totaliser setup. Switch to M38. Press ENT key to start and stop the
totaliser. This function can be used for flow meter calibration.
3.32
How to use the batch process controller
The flowmeter has a batch process controller built-in. It can be used for flow quantity control or
the batching of specific volumes.
This batch controller utilizes the keypad or the rising edge or falling edge of an analogue input
signal as its control signal input (or triggering signal). It utilizes the OCT or relay as its output.
When using analogue as the input signal, the input current must be larger than 2mA to indicate
a logic “1” and 0mA to indicate a logic “0”.
The user needs to select the type of input control signal in menu M80. The user also needs to
select the output type to be item 8 “output as batch controller” in M78 for OCT output or in M79
for relay output.
Use M81 to enter batch value. After completion, the display will be in batch control mode and
the batch controller is waiting for triggering signal. If you selected “0. Key Input” as the
triggering source in M80, you may press the ENT key to start the batch process. Otherwise,
just wait the specified triggering event is detected. Refer to the next chapter for M80 and M81
details.
3.33
How to calibrate the analogue output
In general, there is no need to calibrate the analogue output since it has been calibrated in
factory. However, when conducting current loop calibration (see §3.16), if you find the current
value shown in M58 differs from the actual current shown in the ammeter, you do need to
recalibrate the analogue output.
Calibration steps:
First, put the flow meter into calibration mode. Press MENU 8 2 ENT, enter password
“4213068”, and press ENT again.
Then, connect a precise ammeter to the current output loop.
Press MENU - 5 ENT to calibrate the current loop 4mA output. Read the ammeter. If the
reading is not 4mA, use ▲/+ or ▼/- to adjust the output current until the ammeter reads
4.00mA.
Press ENT again to calibrate 20mA output, similar to the above step.
Press MENU - 6 ENT to save the results in the internal non-volatile EEPROM.
3.34
How to check the ESN
Each product of the flowmeter series has a unique electronic serial umber (ESN) to identify
itself. The user can use the ESN for instrumentation management.
The ESN is displayed in window M61.
Use M+1 to view the total working time since the instrument left the factory. Use M+4 to view
the total number of times the instrument has been turned on and off since the instrument left
the factory.
4.0
MENU WINDOW DETAILS
Note 1: It is recommended to practice those menu windows on your flow meter while reading
this chapter for the sake of easy understanding.
Note 2: To quickly switch to a menu window, just press MENU followed by the window number
(a two digit number). To move from one window to the next, use ▲/+ or ▼/- key.
Menu
window
Function
No.
M00
Display flow rate and net totaliser value.
If the net totaliser is turned off in M34, the net totaliser value shown on the screen is the total prior to its turn off.
M01
Display flow rate and velocity.
M02
Display flow rate and POS (positive) totaliser.
Select the positive totaliser units in menu M31.
If the POS totaliser is turned off, its value shown on the screen is the total prior to its turn off.
M03
Display flow rate and NEG (negative) totaliser. Select the negative totaliser units in M31.
If the NEG totaliser is turned off, its value shown on the screen is the total prior to its turn off.
M04
Display the current date time and flow rate. The time setting method is found in M60.
M05
Display Instantaneous Caloric and Totalized Caloric.
M06
Display Analogue Input AI1 / AI2 current value and its corresponding temperature, pressure or liquid level value.
M07
M08
System Error Codes
Display the working condition and the system error codes. Refer to Chapter 5 for details.
M09
Display today’s total NET flow
M10
Window for entering the peripheral of the pipe.
If pipe outer diam eter is known, skip this menu and go to menu M11 to enter the outer diameter.
M11
Window for entering the outer diameter of the pipe. Valid range: 10 to 6000mm.
Note, you just need to enter either outer diameter in M11 or pipe peripheral in M10.
M12
Window for entering pipe wall thickness. You may skip this menu and enter inner diameter in M13 instead.
M13
Window for entering the inner diameter of the pipe. If pipe outer diameter and wall thickness are entered correctly, the
inner diam eter will be calculated automatically, thus no need to change anything in this window.
M14
Window for selecting pipe material.
Standard pipe materials (no need to enter the material sound speed) include:
(0) carbon steel (1) stainless steel (2) cast iron
(4) copper
(5) PVC
(6) aluminum
(3) ductile iron
(7) asbestos
(8) fiberglass-epoxy (9) Other (need to enter sound speed in M15)
M15
Window for entering the sound speed of non-standard pipe materials
M16
Window for selecting the liner material. Select none for pipes without any liner.
Standard liner materials (no need to enter liner sound speed) include:
(1) Tar Epoxy
(2) Rubber
(5) Polystryol
(6)Polystyrene
(9) Ebonite
(10) Teflon
(3) Mortar
(4) Polypropylene
(7) Polyester (8) Polyethylene
(11) Other (need to enter sound speed in M17)
M17
Window for entering the sound speed of non-standard liner materials
M18
Window for entering the liner thickness, if there is a liner
M19
M20
Window for selecting fluid type
For standard liquids (no need to enter liquid sound speed) include:
(0) Water
(1) Sea Water
(5) Crude Oil
(2) Kerosene
(6) Propane at -45C
(3) Gasoline (4) Fuel oil
(7) Butane at 0C
(8) Other (need to enter sound speed in M21 and viscosity in M22)
(9) Diesel Oil (10) Caster Oil
(11) Peanut Oil
(12) #90 Gasoline
(13) #93 Gasoline (14) Alcohol
(15) Hot water at 125C
M21
Window for entering the sound speed of non-standard liquids. Used only when item 8 “Other” is selected in menu M20.
M22
Window for entering the viscosity of non-standard liquids. Used only when item 8 “Other” is selected in menu M20.
M23
Window for selecting transducer type. There are 13 types:
0.
Standard M
7. Not Used
1.
Plug-in Type C
8. Standard-HS
2.
Standard-S
9. Standard-HM
3.
User Type
10. Standard-M1
4.
Standard-B
11. Standard-S1
5.
Plug-in Type B45
12. Standard-L1
6.
Stand-L
M24
Window for selecting the transducer mounting methods
Four methods can be selected:
0.
V-method (commonly used);
1.
Z-method (most commonly used);
2.
N-method (for small pipe. rarely used);
3.
W-method (for small pipe).
M25
Display the transducer mounting spacing or distance
M26
Entry to store/load the system setup parameters (pipe parameters, fluid parameters, transducer parameters, etc.). Three
operation methods available:
4.
Entry to Save
5.
Entry to Load
6.
To Browse
To save the current setup parameters, select “Entry to Save” and press ENT. An address number and original parameters
will be displayed. Use ▲/+ or ▼/- key to change address number. Press ENT again will save the current setup
parameters into the selected address space.
M27
Display the cross-sectional area inside the pipe.
M28
Entry to determine whether or not to keep the last good value when poor signal condition occurs. This function allows
continued flow totalizing. YES is the factory default.
M29
Entry to set empty pipe signal threshold. When the signal strength is less than this threshold, the pipe is classified as
empty pipe, and the flow meter will not totalize the flow.
This is based on the fact that, when the pipe is empty, the transducer can still receive signal, just smaller than normal. As
a result, the flow meter will show normal operation, which is not correct.
M30
Window for selecting unit system. The conversion from English to Metric or vice versa will not affect the unit for totalisers.
M31
Window for selecting flow rate unit system.
Flow rate can be in
0. Cubic meter
short for (m3)
1. Liter
(l)
2. USA gallon
(gal)
3. Imperial Gallon
(igl)
4. Million USA gallon
(mgl)
5. Cubic feet
(cf)
6. USA liquid barrel
(bal)
7. Imperial liquid barrel
(ib)
8. Oil barrel
(ob)
The flow unit in terms of time can be per day, per hour, per minute or per second. So there are 36 different flow rate units
in total for selection.
M32
Window for selecting the totalisers’ unit. Available unit options are the same as those in M31.
M33
Window for setting the totaliser multiplying factor
The multiplying factor ranges from 0.001 to 10000. Factory default is 1.
M34
Turn on or turn off the NET totaliser
M35
Turn on or turn off the POS totaliser
M36
Turn on or turn off the NEG totaliser
M37
(1) Totaliser reset
(2) Restore the factory default settings. Press the dot key followed by the backspace key. Attention, it is recommended to
make notes on the parameters before doing the restoration.
M38
Manual totaliser used for calibration. Press any key to start and press the key again to stop the totaliser.
M39
Not used,
M40
Flow rate damper setup. The damping parameter ranges from 0 to 999 seconds.
0 means there is no damping. Factory default is 10 seconds.
M41
Low flow rate (or zero flow rate) cutoff to avoid invalid accumulation.
M42
Zero calibration / Zero point setup. Make sure the liquid in the pipe is not running while doing this setup.
M43
Clear the zero point value, and restore the factory default zero point.
M44
Set up a flow bias. Generally this value should be 0.
M45
Flow rate scale factor.
Keep this value as ‘1’ when no calibration has been made.
M46
Network address identification number (IDN). Any integer can be entered except 13(0DH, carriage return), 10 (0AH, line
feeding), 42 (2AH*), 38 (26H&), 65535.
Every set of the instrument in a network environment should have a unique IDN. Please refer to chapter 6 for
communications.
M47
System locker to avoid modification of the system parameters. Contact the manufacturer if the password is forgotten.
M48
Keypad locker to avoid any operation errors by unauthorized personnel. Contact the manufacturer if the password is
forgotten.
M49
Communication tester.
M50
Window to configure the scheduled output function.
To turn on the function, select YES. The system will ask for selecting the output data items. There are 15 data items
available. Turn on all the items you want to output.
M51
Window to setup the time of the scheduled output function. This includes start time, time interval and lasting period.
Minimum time unit is second. Maximum time interval is 24 hours.
M52
M53
Used for analogue input AI5.
Display the current loop value and corresponding temperature / pressure / liquid level of analogue input channel AI5.
M54
Used for analogue input AI5.
Set the minimum and maximum values of temperature / pressure / liquid level which correspond to input current of 4mA
and 20mA.
M55
Select the current loop (CL) mode. Available options:
0. 4-20mA Output Mode
(set up the output range from 4-20mA)
1. 0-20mA Output Mode
(set up the output range from 0-20mA)
2. RS232 controls 0-20mA
(set up to control by Serial Port)
3. Turn off the current loop
(turn off the current loop to save battery life. Default.)
4. 20-4-20mA Mode
(set up the output range from 20-4-20mA)
5. 0-4-20mA Mode
(set up the output range from 0-4-20mA)
6. 20-0-20mA Mode
(set up the output range from 20-0-20mA)
7. 4-20mA Corresponding Velocity (set up the current loop output range from 4-20mA)
8. 4-20mA Corresponding Heat Flow (set up the current loop output range from 4-20mA)
The output current value is controlled by sending a parameterized command to the flow meter through its RS232 serial
port. The command formats are explained in chapter 6.
Example, if you want to output a 6mA current through the current loop, you need to select mode “0-20mA Via RS232” in
menu M55 and send command “A06 (CR)” to the flow meter. This function allows the flow meter to control valve
openness.
Other different current output characteristics are illustrated in the following figures. The user can select one of them
according to his actual requirements. The minimum and maximum values indicated in the figure are those set in menu
windows M57 and M58. In the 4-20mA and 0-20mA modes, the minimum and maximum can be a positive or negative flow
value as long as the two values are not the same. In the 20-4-20mA and 20-0-20mA modes, the polarity of the actual flow
reading is ignored. In 0-4-20mA mode, the minimum must be negative, and the maximum must be positive.
The last one in the following figures is for velocity output. The output current represents flow velocity.
M56
4mA or 0mA output value
Set the flow rate value which corresponds to 4mA or 0mA output current (4mA or 0mA is determined by the settings in
M55). The flow unit options are the sam e as those in M31. If “velocity 4-20mA” is selected in M55, the unit should be
set to m/s.
M57
20mA output value
Set the flow rate value which corresponds to 20mA output current. Refer to M31 for flow unit options.
M58
Current loop verification.
Check if the current loop has been calibrated before leaving the factory. Press ENT, and use ▼/+ or ▼/- to display
0mA, 4mA - 24mA one after another. For each one, check with an ammeter to verify that current loop output terminals
agree with the displayed values. It is necessary to re-calibrate the current loop if over the permitted tolerance. For
more information, refer to section §3.29 for analogue output calibration.
M59
Display present output of the current loop circuit.
Re-calibration is needed if the displayed value differs significantly from the actual output value measured with an
ammeter.
M60
Set up system date and time. Press ENT for modification. Use the dot key to skip the digits that need no modification.
M61
Display software version inform ation and Electronic Serial Number (ESN) that are unique for each series flow meter.
The user can use the ESN for instrumentation management
M62
RS-232 configuration. All the devices connected with RS232 link should have matched serial configuration.
The following parameters can be configured: Baud rate (75 to 115,200 bps), parity, data bits and stop bit.
M63
AI1 value range
Used to enter the temperature / press values corresponding to 4mA and 20mA input current. The displayed values
have no unit, so that they can represent any physical parameters.
M64
AI2 value range
Used to enter the temperature / press values represented by 4mA and 20mA input current.
M65
AI3 value range
Used to enter the temperature / press values represented by 4mA and 20mA input current.
M66
AI4 value range
Used to enter the temperature / press values represented by 4mA and 20mA input current.
M67
Window to set up the frequency range (lower limit and upper limit) for the frequency output function. Valid values: 1Hz9999Hz. Factory default is 1-1001 Hz.
Note that the frequency signal can only be transmitted through the OCT output. Therefore, you need to set the OCT to
be in frequency output mode.
M68
Window to set up the minimum flow rate which corresponds to the lower frequency limit of the frequency output
M69
Window to set up the maximum flow rate which corresponds to the upper frequency limit of the frequency output
M70
LCD backlight control. Available options: Always OFF; Always ON and Lighting For.
When Lighting For option is selected, you need to enter a value which indicates how many seconds the backlight will
be on with every key pressing.
M71
LCD contrast control. The LCD will become darker when a sm all value is entered.
M72
Working timer. It can be reset by pressing ENT key, and then select YES.
M73
Alarm #1 lower threshold setup.
When flow rate is below this threshold, the Alarm #1 OCT circuit or relay will be activated.
There are two alarming methods, OCT and relay. User must select the alarming output method in window M78 or
M79.
M74
Alarm #1 upper threshold setup.
When flow rate is above this threshold, the Alarm #1 OCT circuit or relay will be activated.
There are two alarming methods, OCT and relay. User must select the alarming output method in window M78 or
M79.
M75
Alarm #2 lower threshold setup.
When flow rate is below this threshold, the Alarm #2 OCT circuit or relay will be activated.
There are two alarming methods, OCT and relay. User must select the alarming output method in window M78 or
M79.
M76
Alarm #2 upper threshold setup.
When flow rate is below this threshold, the Alarm #2 OCT circuit or relay will be activated.
There are two alarming methods, OCT and relay. User must select the alarming output method in window M78 or
M79.
M77
Buzzer setup.
If a proper input source is selected, the buzzer will beep when the trigger event occurs. The available trigger sources
are:
M78
0.
No Signal
9. POS Int Pulse
1.
Poor Signal
10. NEG Int Pulse
2.
Not Ready
11. NET Int Pulse
3.
Reverse Flow
12. Energy Pulse
4.
AO Over 120%
13. ON/OFF via RS232
5.
FO Over 120%
14. Fluid Sound Speed Changed
6.
Alarm #1
15. Buzzer on when key down
7.
Alarm #2
16. Buzzer off
8.
Batch Control
OCT (Open Collector Transistor output) setup.
By selecting a proper triggering source, the OCT circuit will close when the trigger event occurs. The OCT wiring
diagram is shown in Appendix §9.1. The available triggering sources are:
M79
0.
No Signal
9. POS Int Pulse
1.
Poor Signal
10. NEG Int Pulse
2.
Not Ready
11. NET Int Pulse
3.
Reverse Flow
12. Energy Pulse
4.
AO Over 120%
13. FO (frequency output)
5.
FO Over 120%
14. FO via RS232C
6.
Alarm #1
15. ON/OFF via RS232
7.
Alarm #2
16. Fluid Sound Speed Changed
8.
Batch Control
17. OCT off
Relay output setup.
By selecting a proper triggering source, the relay circuit will close when the trigger event occurs. The relay is singlepole and constant-on. The available triggering sources are:
0.
No Signal
9. POS Int Pulse
1.
Poor Signal
10. NEG Int Pulse
2.
Not Ready
11. NET Int Pulse
3.
Reverse Flow
12. Energy Pulse
4.
AO Over 120%
13. ON/OFF via RS232
5.
FO Over 120%
14. Fluid Sound Speed Changed
6.
Alarm #1
15. Relay off
7.
Alarm #2
8.
Scheduled Output
The relay output is a single-pole single-throw (SPST), always on type drive. Its maximum operating frequency is 1Hz.
Its load current is 1A at 125VAC, or 2A at 30VDC.
M80
For batch process controller.
Select the triggering signal of the internal batch process controller:
0.
Key ENT down
4. AI2 Falling Edge
1.
AI1 Rising Edge
5. AI3 Rising Edge
2.
AI1 Falling Edge
6. AI3 Falling Edge
3.
AI2 Rising Edge
7. AI4 Rising Edge
For the input analogue current signal, 0mA indicates “0” and 20mA indicates “1”.
M81
For batch process controller.
Set the flow batch value (dose).
M81 and M80 should be used together to configure the internal batch process controller.
M82
View the daily, monthly and yearly totaliser values.
The flow total data of the last 64 days, last 64 months and last 5 years are saved in memory. Use ENT, ▼/+ (this
should be the “UP” arrow) or ▼/- to display them.
The first line on the screen has a dash line “-------“. Be aware if there is other letter after the dash line. If a “G”
appeared, the system gained was adjusted automatically at least once. This could happen when the flow meter was
offline once on that day. If a “H” appeared, poor signal was detected at least once. It indicates that there was
interference or the installation was not good. Refer to the next chapter for diagnosis inform ation.
M83
Automatic Amending function for automatic offline compensation.
Select YES to enable this function, select NO to disable it.
When the function is enabled, the flow meter will estimate the average flow uncounted (or “lost”) during the offline
session and add the result to the totaliser.
The estimation of the uncounted flow is made by computing the product of the offline time period and the average flow
rate, which is the average of the flow rate before going offline and the one after going online.
M84
Set the thermal energy unit.
M85
Select temperature source:
0. temperature from input AI1 and AI2;
1. fixed difference.
When selecting ”1. fixed difference”, you need to enter the temperature difference in this window.
M86
Select the specific heat value.
M87
Energy totaliser switch.
M88
Set energy multiplier factor.
M89
Reset energy totaliser.
M90
Display the signal strength S (one for upstream and one for downstream) and signal quality Q.
S, Q and R (see M91) are the so-called installation triplet. They are the key criteria for justifying whether an installation
is bad, operational or optimal.
Your installation is bad if S<60, Q<60 and R<97% or R>103%.
Your installation is operational if S≥60, Q≥60 and 97%≤R≤103%.
Your installation is optimal if S≥80, Q≥80 and 99%≤R≤101%. Note, for high velocity flow, the optimal range for R may
be relaxed.
M91
Display the transit time ratio R. It is one of the installation triplet.
Refer to the above m enu (M90) for more details.
M92
Display the fluid sound speed estimated by using the measured transit-time.
If this value has an obvious difference with the actual fluid sound speed, the user is recommended to check if the pipe
parameters are correct and if the transducer installation is good.
M93
Display the average transit time and the delta time (transit time difference between upstream and downstream
traveling).
Normally, the delta time should not fluctuate over 20%. If it does, the system is not in stable condition. You need to
check your transducer installation and the entered installation parameters.
For small pipe, the transit time value may not be stable. In such case, try to adjust transducer position until the transit
time becomes stable.
M94
Display the Reynolds number and the pipe factor used by the flow rate measurement program. Pipe factor is
calculated from the line-averaged velocity and cross-section-averaged velocity information.
M95
Upon entering into this window, the circular display function is started automatically. The following windows will be
displayed one by one, each window will stay for about 4 seconds: M95 ->M00 -> M01 -> M02 -> M03 -> M04 -> M05 > M06 -> M07 -> M08 -> M09 -> M90 -> M95.
This function allows the user to visit all the important information without any manual action.
To disable the function, simply switch to anther window.
M96
Not used
M97
Not used
M98
Not used
M99
Not used
M+0
View the last 64 records of power on and off events. The recorded information include the date and time as well as the
corresponding flow rate when the power on or off occurs
M+1
Display the total working time of the instrument since the flow meter left the factory.
M+2
Display the date and time of the last power-off event.
M+3
Display the flow rate of the last power-off event.
M+4
Display the total number of times the flow meter has been powered on and off since the flow meter left the factory.
M+5
A scientific calculator for the convenience of field applications.
All the values are in single accuracy. All the mathematic operators are selected from a list.
The calculator can be used while the flow meter is conducting flow measurement.
M+6
Set fluid sound speed threshold.
When the estimated sound speed (M92) exceeds this threshold, an alarm signal will be generated and transmitted to
OCT or relay.
This function can be used to generate an alarm when fluid material changes.
M+7
Not used
M+8
Display the received signal. In normal condition, this signal should be stable and signal amplitude does not vary much.
M+9
Display the present temperature values (integer portion) of analogue input AI1 and AI2.
Display water heat capacity at this temperature.
M-0
Entry to hardware adjusting windows. Valid for the manufacturer only.
5.0
TROUBLESHOOTING
5.1
Introduction
The flowmeter series flow meters utilized high-reliability design, thus, their malfunction
probability is quite low. However, due to improper settings, harsh environment or misusage,
problem could occur. Therefore, flowmeter is equipped with a complete set of self-diagnosis
functions. The errors are displayed in the upper right corner of the menu window via
identification code in a timely order. Hardware self-diagnosis is conducted every time when
power is on. Some errors can even be detected during normal operation. For those errors
undetectable due to incorrect settings or improper testing conditions, the flow meter will also
display useful information to help the user to quickly debug the error and solve the problem.
There are two types of errors, one is hardware error, another is operational error. Details are
presented in the following sections.
5.2
Power-on Errors
When powered on, the ultrasonic flow meter automatically starts the self-diagnosis process to
find if there are any hardware and software problems. If a problem is identified, an error
message will be displayed. The following table shows the possible error messages, the
corresponding causes and their solutions.
Table 5.1 Hardware self-diagnosis errors and solutions
Error message
Causes
Solutions
ROM Parity Error
ROM operation illegal /
(1) Reboot the system
error
Stored Data Error
User-entered parameters
lost.
(2) Contact the manufacturer.
(1) Reboot the system
(2) If problem persists, press ENT key to restore the
factory default configuration.
SCPU Fatal Error
SCPU hardware fatal error
System Clock Slow or
Problem with the system
Fast Error
clock or the crystal
oscillator.
(1) Reboot the system
(2) Contact the manufacturer.
CPU or IRQ Error
Problem with CPU or IRQ
hardware
System RAM Error
Problem with RAM chip
Time Date Error
Problem with date/time chip
(1) Initialize the calendar in menu window M61.
(2) Contact the manufacturer.
No Display. Erratic or
Problem with wiring
Double check wiring connections.
Keypad is locked
Unlock the keypad.
Abnormal Operation
No
response
to key
pressing
Bad plug connection
Reboot repetitively
5.3
Hardware problems
Contact the manufacturer
Working Status Errors
The ultrasonic flow meter will show an Error Code (a single letter like I, R, etc.) in the upper
right corner on menu windows. When any abnormal Error Code shows, counter-measures
should be taken.
Table 5.2 Working status errors and solutions
Error
code
Message on
window M08
Causes
R
System Normal
No error
I
No Signal
(1)Unable to receive signal
(2)Transducers installed
improperly
(3)Loosen contact or not
enough couplant between
transducer and pipe
surface.
(4)Pipe liners are too thick or
Solutions
(1)Polish the pipe surface and clean the spot.
Remove paint.
(2)Make sure the couplant is enough
(3)Make sure the transducer is in tight contact
with pipe surface
(4)Check the transducer cables
(5)Check installation parameter settings
the deposition inside of the
(6)Find a better measurement site. Newer pipe,
pipe is too thick.
no corrosion, no deposition
(5)Transducer cables are not
properly connected
J
Hardware Error
Hardware problem
Contact the manufacturer
H
Poor Sig. Detected
Poor signal detected
Similar to error code I
Similar to error code I
E
Current Loop Over
4-20mA loop output over
20mA
120%
Improper settings for current
loop output
(1) Ignore it if current loop output is not used
(2) Check current loop settings in M56.
(3) Confirm if the actual flow rate is too high.
Q
Frequency Output
(1) The frequency output is
Over
120% over.
(2) Improper settings for
frequency output
(3) The actual flow rate is too
high
F
System RAM Error
Date Time Error
CPU or IRQ Error
(1) Temporary problems with
RAM, RTC
(2) Permanent problems with
hardware
(1) Ignore it if frequency output is not used
(2) Check the values entered in window M66,
M67, M68 and M69.
(3) Use a larger value in M69 if needed.
(4) Confirm if the actual flow rate is too high.
(1) Reboot the system
(2) Contact the manufacturer
Refer to Table 5.1 as well
ROM Parity Error
G
Adjusting Gain >s1
Adjusting Gain >s2
Adjusting Gain >s3
Instrument is in the progress of
No need for action
adjusting the gain for the
signal, and the number
indicates the progressive steps
Adjusting Gain >s4
(shown in M00-M03)
K
Empty pipe
(1) No liquid inside the pipe
(2) Incorrect setup in M29
(1) If the pipe is not full, relocate the meter to
where the pipe is full of liquid
(2) If the pipe is full, enter 0 in M29
5.4
Other Problems and Solutions
(1) Q: Why the instrument displays 0.0000 flow rate while the liquid in the pipe is actually
flowing? The signal strength is checked to be good (the working status is “R”) and the
signal quality Q has a satisfactory value.
A: The problem is likely to be caused by the incorrect “Zero Point” setting. The user may
have conducted the “Zero Point” setup while the flow was not standstill. To solve this
problem, use the ‘Reset Zero’ function in menu window M43 to clear the zero point.
(2) Q: The displayed flow rate is much lower or much higher than the actual flow rate in the
pipe under normal working conditions. Why?
A: The entered offset value might be wrong. Enter ‘0’ offset in window M44.
(a) Incorrect transducer installation. Re-install the transducers carefully.
(b) The ‘Zero Point’ is wrong. Go to window M42 and redo the “Zero Point” setup. Make
sure that the flow inside the pipe is standstill. No velocity is allowed during this setup
process.
(3) Q: Why there is no signal? The installation requirements are met, pipe is new and pipe
material is in good quality.
A: Check the following:
(a) Is the installation method suitable for your pipe size?
(b) Are the entered installation parameters correct?
(c) Are the wirings correct?
(d) Adequate couplant? Transducers are in good contact with pipe?
(e) Is pipe full?
(f) Is the transducer distance in consistency with the one shown in M25?
(g) Is transducer head/tail in the right direction?
(4) Q: How to conduct measurement on an old pipe? Heavy scale inside, no signal or poor
signal detected.
A: (a) Check if the pipe is full of liquid.
(b) Try Z method. If the pipe is close to a wall and it is hard to do Z-method installation, you
may work on a vertical or inclined pipe with flow upwards.
(c) Carefully select a good pipe section and fully polish/clean the installation area of the
pipe surface. Apply a wide band of couplant on each transducer face. Install the transducer
properly.
(d) Slowly and slightly move each transducer with respect to each other around the
installation point until the maximum signal is found. Be careful that the new installation
location is free of scale inside the pipe and that the pipe is concentric (not distorted) so that
the sound waves do not bounce outside of the proposed area.
(e) For pipe with thick scale inside or outside, try to clean the scale off, if it is accessible
from the inside. (Note: Sometimes this method might not work and sound wave
transmission is not possible because of the layer of scale between the transducers and
pipe inside wall).
(5) Q: Why no current in the current loop output?
A: Check if the current output mode is set correct in M55. You need to turn the current loop
on in M55. Check the hardware connection: open the electronics enclosure, check to see if
the short-circuit terminal near terminal 22 is in place between 1-2, i.e. Direct Output Mode.
Note that positions 2-3 are used for Transmitter Mode in which an external power supply is
needed for the current loop output.
(6) Q: Why is the current output not correct?
A: (a) Check if the current output mode is set correct in M55.
(b) Check the upper and lower current settings in M56 and M57.
(c) Re-calibrate the current loop. Verify the output with M49.
(7) Q: Can the flow meter work normally for a few years without stop under harsh environment
where power supply voltage varies widely?
A: Yes. The flow meter employed intelligent signal processing algorithms to handle strong
interference coming from either power line or radiation. It also automatically adjusts itself to
the optimal operation status when sound wave strength varies due to changing
environment.
6.0
COMMUNICATION PROTOCOL
The ultrasonic flow meter integrates a standard RS-232C communication interface and a
complete set of communication protocol. Its hardware supports MODEM for phone-line based
data networking. With the aid of a RS232-RS485 converter, the flow meter can be connected
to a RS485 network bus. You may also use our GSM short-message module to transmit flow
data to a remote computer. With the GSM module, you are even able to check the flow data
and flow meter status from your cell phone.
When using RS232 for networking, you may use the flow meter’s IDN as its network address,
and use [W]-extended command set as the communication protocol. The current loop output
and OCT output can be used to control analogue-based or stepper-based valve openness,
and the relay output can be used to turn on and off other devices. The four channel analogue
inputs can be used to input pressure, temperature and other signals. In brief, complete flow
measurement or thermal energy measurement RTU.
The maximum transmission distance is 15m for RS232C and 1000m for RS485. If longer
distance is needed, current loop, MODEM, GSM can serve the purpose.
All the flow meter operations can be made on a remote computer, except the modification of
IDN which can only be done locally through the flow meter’s keypad. The communication
protocol is based on master-slave principle. Master (remote computer) sends a command,
slave (the flow meter) responses the command.
You may use the Hyper Terminal software in your computer to send commands to and view
responses from the flow meter. Please refer to your computer’s manual on how to configure
the Hyper Terminal. Note that the COM port settings need to match those in menu window
M62.
6.1
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
RS232 Connector Pin-out
Definition
Not Used
RXD
TXD
DTS
GND
DSR
+5V
Not Used
Ring input for connecting a modem
FIGURE 5: RS232 WIRING DIAGRAM
RS232 Wiring
6.2
Refer to Figure 6.1 for connecting the flow meter to a remote computer through RS232. Lines
2 and 3 of the connecting cable are crossed over. Note that the regular RS232 cable obtained
in the stores cannot be used directly. You need to make modification according to Figure 6.1.
Consult the User’s Manual of your computer for RS232 wiring as well.
Communication Protocol
6.3
The protocol is comprised of a set of basic commands that are strings in ASCII format, ending
with a carriage (CR) and line feed (LF). Commonly used commands are listed in the following
table.
6.3.1
Basic Commands
Command
Function
Data Format
DQD(CR) 1
Return flow rate per day
±d.ddddddE±dd(CR)(LF)2
DQH(CR)
Return flow rate per hour
±d.ddddddE±dd(CR)(LF)
DQM(CR)
Return flow rate per minute
±d.ddddddE±dd(CR)(LF)
DQS(CR)
Return flow rate per second
±d.ddddddE±dd(CR)(LF)
DV(CR)
Return instantaneous flow velocity
±d.ddddddE±dd(CR)(LF)
DI+(CR)
Return POS totaliser
±dddddddE±d(CR)(LF)3
DI-(CR)
Return NEG totaliser
±dddddddE±d(CR)(LF)
DIN(CR)
Return NET totaliser
±dddddddE±d(CR)(LF)
DIE(CR)
Return Caloric Totaliser Value
±dddddddE±d(CR)(LF)
DID(CR)
Return Identification Number
(IDN)
ddddd(CR)(LF)
E(CR)
Return Instantaneous Caloric
Value
±d.ddddddE±dd(CR)(LF)
DL(CR)
Return signal strength and signal
quality
UP:dd.d,DN:dd.d, Q=dd(CR)(LF)
DS(CR)
Return the percentage of
analogue output A0.
±d.ddddddE±dd(CR)(LF)
DC(CR)
Return the present error code
4
DA(CR)
OCT or RELAY alarm signal
TR:s, RL:s(CR)(LF) 5
DT(CR)
Return the current date and time
yy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss(CR)(LF)
M@(CR)****
Send a key value as if a key is
pressed
M@(CR) )(LF) 6
LCD(CR)
Return the current display
contents
C1(CR)
OCT close
C0(CR)
OCT open
R1(CR)
RELAY close
R0(CR)
RELAY open
FOdddd(CR)
Force the FO output to output a
frequency of dddd Hz
Fdddd(CR)(LF)
Aoa(CR)
Output current a at the current
loop output terminal
A0a(CR)(LF) 7
BA1(CR)
Return current value of AI1 (020mA)
±d.ddddddE±dd(CR)(LF)
BA2(CR)
Return current value of AI2 (020mA)
±d.ddddddE±dd(CR)(LF)
BA3(CR)
Return current value of AI3 (020mA)
±d.ddddddE±dd(CR)(LF)
BA4(CR)
Return current value of AI4 (020mA)
±d.ddddddE±dd(CR)(LF)
AI1(CR)
Return temperature/pressure
value of AI1
±d.ddddddE±dd(CR)(LF)
AI2(CR)
Return temperature/pressure
value of AI2
±d.ddddddE±dd(CR)(LF)
AI3(CR)
Return temperature/pressure
value of AI3
±d.ddddddE±dd(CR)(LF)
AI4(CR)
Return temperature/pressure
value of AI4
±d.ddddddE±dd(CR)(LF)
ESN(CR)
Return the electronic serial
number (ESN) of the flow meter
dddddddt(CR)(LF) 8
W
Prefix of an IDN-addressing-based
networking command. The IDN
address is a word, ranging 065534.
9
N
Prefix of an IDN-addressing-based
networking command. The IDN
address here is a single byte
value, ranging 00-255.
9
P
Prefix of any command with
checksum
&
Command binder to make a
longer command by combining up
to 6 commands
RING(CR)(LF) Handshaking Request from a
MODEM
ATA(CR)(LF)
OK(CR)
No action
Acknowledgement from a
MODEM
Handshaking Request from a Flow AT(CR)(LF)
meter
GA(CR)
A Command for GSM messaging
10
GB(CR)
Please contact the manufacturer for
detail
B Command for GSM messaging
10
GC(CR)
DUMP
11
C Command for GSM messaging
Return the print buffer content
In ASCII string format
DUMP0
Clear the whole print buffer
In ASCII string format
DUMP1(CR)
Return the whole print buffer
content
In ASCII string Format (24KB long)
Notes:
1. (CR) stands for Carriage Return. Its ASCII code is 0DH. (LF) strands for Line
Feed. Its ASCII code is 0AH.
2. “d” stands for a digit number of 0~9. 0 is expressed as +0.000000E+00.
3. “d” stands for a digit number of 0~9. The number before “E” is integer.
4. Working status code, 1-6 letters. Refer to Table 5.2 for error code.
5. “s” is “ON”, “OFF” or “UD’”. For instance, “TR:ON, RL:UD” means that the OCT is
in closed state and RELAY is not used.
6. @ stands for key value. For instance, value 30H means key “0”, command “M4” is
equivalent to press key “4”.
7. “a” stands for current value, a digit number of 0~20. For instance, A02.34, A00.2
8. “dddddddt” stands for 8-digit electronic serial number. “t” stands for flow meter
type.
9. If there are more than one flow meters in a network, all the basic commands must
be prefixed with N or W. Otherwise, multiple flow meters may reply to the same
request.
10. Adding a GSM module to the flow meter allows the user to check flow meter flow
rate and other parameters from a cell phone.
11. Used for visiting the printer buffer content.
6.3.2
Protocol Prefix Usage
(1) Prefix P
The prefix P can be added before any command in the above table to have the returning data
followed with two bytes of CRC check sum, which is the adding sum of the original character
string.
Take command DI+(CR) (Return POS Totaliser Value) as an example. The binary data for
DI+(CR) is 44H, 49H, 2BH and 0DH. Assume the return value of this command is
+1234567E+0m3(CR)(LF) ( the string in hexadecimal is 2BH, 31H, 32H, 33H, 34H, 35H, 36H,
37H, 45H, 2BH, 30H, 6DH, 33H, 20H, 0DH, 0AH).
Then, the P-prefixed command, PDI+(CR), would return +1234567E+0m3!F7(CR)(LF). The ‘!’
acts as the starter of the check sum (F7) which is obtained by adding up the string, 2BH+
31H+ 32H+ 33H+ 34H+ 35H+ 36H+ 37H+ 45H+ 2BH+ 30H+ 6DH+ 33H+ 20H = (2) F7H.
Please note that it is allowed to not have data entry or to have SPACES (20H) character
before the ‘!’ character.
(2) Prefix W
The prefix W is used for networking commands. The format of a networking command is:
W + IDN address string + basic command.
The IDN address should have a value between 0 and 65534, except 13(0DH), 10 (0AH),
42(2AH,*), 38(26H, &).
For example, if you want to visit the instantaneous flow velocity of device IDN=12345, the
following command should be sent to this device: W12345DV(CR). The corresponding binary
code is 57H, 31H, 32H, 33H, 34H, 35H, 44H, 56H, 0DH.
(3) Prefix N
The prefix N is a single byte IDN network address, not recommended in a new design.
(4) Command binder &
The & command binder or connector can connect up to 6 basic commands to form a longer
command so that it will make the programming much easier.
For example, assume we want device IDN=4321 to return the flow rate, velocity and POS
totaliser value simultaneously. The combined command would be W4321DQD&DV&DI+(CR),
and the result would be:
+1.234567E+12m3/d(CR)
+3.1235926E+00m/s(CR)
+1234567E+0m3(CR)
6.4
The M command and the ASCII Codes
The protocol provides the capability of virtual key-pressing. A remote RS-232C terminal can
send an ‘M’ command along with a key code to simulate the scenario that the key is pressed
through the keypad of the flow meter. This functionality allows the user to operate the flow
meter in the office far away from the testing site.
For example, the command “M1” is sent to the flow meter through the RS-232C link, the flow
meter will treat the command as if the user has pressed the 1 key through the keypad.
The ASCII codes and corresponding key values of the keypad keys are listed in the following
table.
Key
Hexadecima
l
Key code
Decimal
ASCII
Key code
Code
Key
Hexadecimal
Decimal
ASCII
Key code
Key code
Code
0
30H
48
0
8
38H
56
8
1
31H
49
1
9
39H
57
9
2
32H
50
2
.
3AH
58
:
3
33H
51
3
◄
3BH,0BH
59
;
4
34H
52
4
MENU
3CH,0CH
60
<
5
35H
53
5
ENT
3DH,0DH
61
=
6
36H
54
6
▲/+
3EH
62
>
7
37H
55
7
▼/-
3FH
63
?
6.5
Programming Examples
Example 1: VB requests the instantaneous (in second) flow rate.
VB Code: mscom1.input = “dqs” + vbcrlf;
Example 2: VB requests the 4321 flow meter to return the following data with checksum: (a)
instantaneous flow rate; (b) instantaneous flow velocity; (c) Positive totaliser value; (d) Heat
totaliser value; (e) AI1 input current; (f) AI2 input current.
VB Code: mscom1.input = “W4321PDQD&PDV&PDI+&PDIE&PBA1&PAI2” + vbcrlf;
Example 3: VB requests to change the pipe OD to 345mm.
VB Code: mscom1.input = ”M<” +VBCRLF +”M1” +VBCRLF +”M1” +VBCRLF+”M3”
+VBCRLF +”M4” +VBCRLF +”M5” +VBCRLF +”M=” +VBCRLF
Note that “M<” represents the MENU key, “M=” represents the ENT key,, “M1”
represents the “1” key.
7.0
MEASUREMENTS OF THERMAL AND OTHER PHYSICAL
PARAMETERS
7.1
Introduction
The standard model flow meter has two analogue input modules built into its hardware system.
It can accommodate three other analogue input modules. These modules provides five
analogue channels, AI1 – AI5, which can be connected to analogue sensors to measure
physical quantities, such as temperature, pressure, etc. By combining the flow rate information,
the meter can provide very valuable information for resources management and process
control.
For thermal energy measurement (or caloric measurement), two temperature transmitters are
required to be installed on the measuring site, one on the supply side of the flow, and the other
on the return side. They should provide accurate temperature data to the flowmeter through
analogue input channels AI1and AI2. Their signals must be 4-20mA or 0-20mA standard
current signals.
All the results can be sent to a master computer through the built-in serial port (see chapter 6
for the communication). This means that a flowmeter can be used as a RTU in a flow
monitoring network. It helps to reduce the cost and complexity while improving the reliability of
a monitoring network.
Note that the analogue-to-digit conversion resolution of these analogue channels is 12-bit, and
there is no electrical isolation for those channels. If the working environment is subjected to
strong interference, it is recommended to add external isolation to protect the flow meter
device.
7.2
Wiring Analogue Inputs
For caloric measurement, the supply side temperature transmitter should be connected to
channel AI1 (terminal blocks 64 and 63), and the return side transmitter should be connected
to channel AI2 (terminal blocks 65 and 63) with twisted-pair wiring (Figure 7-1). An internal
+24VDC power is proved to the terminals, thus, no external power supply is needed. This
means that the temperature (or pressure) transmitter must be two-wire type transmitter.
GND
63
AI1
64
AI2
65
Menu window M06 displays the current
analogue input data and its corresponding
pressure or temperature value.
AI3
73
Press Transmitter
Temp Transmitter
Temp Transmitter
The flowmeter can accommodate five
analogue signals with its five analogue
input modules. AI1 and AI2 are available
in standard options. The other three
modules are available only upon request.
FIGURE 6: ANALOGUE INPUT WIRING
7.3
Thermal Energy Measurement
There are two methods for thermal energy calculation:
(1) Qt = Q x (T2 – T1) x Ct,
(2) Qt = Q x (TC2 – TC1)
Where Qt is the thermal energy (or caloric) consumed, Q is the flow rate, T1 and T2 are the
temperature at supply and return points, respectively. Ct is the specific heat (or the thermal
capacity coefficient) of the fluid, which can be entered in menu M86. For water, it is normally
about 0.0041868GJ/m3°C. TC1 and TC2 are the thermal capacities corresponding to
temperature T1 and T2, which are calculated by the flow meter according to international
standards and displayed in M05.
The following menu windows might be used when performing thermal energy measurement:
Menu window M05: display energy and totalized energy.
Menu window M06: display the current values of input AI1 and AI2 and their corresponding
temperature values.
Menu window M63: set the minimum and maximum temperature values which correspond to
the minimum current (4mA) and maximum current (20mA) of channel AI1.
Menu window M64: set the minimum and maximum temperature values which correspond to
the minimum current (4mA) and maximum current (20mA) of channel AI2.
Menu
window
M84:
thermal
unit
KCAL/s - Kilocalories/second, GJ/s – Giga Joules/second
selection.
Menu window M85: temperature source selection: 0. temperature from input AI1 and AI2; 1.
fixed difference. When selecting fixed difference, enter the difference in
this menu.
Menu window M86: specific heat (or thermal capacity coefficient) input
Menu window M87: thermal totaliser on/off switch
Menu window M88: thermal totaliser multiplier factor
Menu window M89: thermal totaliser reset
Note that, if the fluid temperatures at both supply and return points are stable, you may choose
not to use temperature transmitters. Instead, you can directly enter the temperature difference
of the two points on menu window M85.
7.4
Configure Analogue Measurement Ranges
Temperature, pressure and other signals are entered into the flow meter through analogue
channels AI1-AI4. Their measurement ranges can be set on windows M63-M66. The first
number of these windows is the minimum of the measurement range, corresponding to an
analogue input of 4mA. The second number is the maximum, corresponding to 20mA input
current.
Example 1: assume a temperature transmitter provides 4mA at 10°C and 20mA at 150°C. And
this transmitter is connected to channel AI1. Then, you need to enter 10 and 50 at menu
window M63 for the first and second numbers, respectively. You can view the present current
signal value and corresponding temperature data from window M06.
Example 2: assume a pressure transmitter outputs current 4mA at 0.98kg pressure and 20mA
at 10.5kg pressure. The transmitter is connected to channel AI3. Then, you need to enter 0.98
and 10.5 in window M65. The present values of input current and corresponding temperature
are shown in M07.
If you find the current value from the transmitter is different from the one shown in M06 (or
M07), you need to calibrate the corresponding analogue channel. Please see section §3.16 for
calibration detail.
7.5
Read Input Analogue Values from a Network Computer
When the flow meter is networked, all the analogue data can easily be visited from a remote
computer.
For visiting the present analogue input current, use command BA1, BA2, BA3 or BA4.
For visiting the temperature/pressure value represented by the analogue input current, use
command AI1, AI2, AI3 or AI4.
8.0
WARRANTY AND SERVICE
8.1
Warranty
The products manufactured are warranted to be free from defects in materials and
workmanship for a period of one year from the date of shipment to the original purchaser.
manufactory’ obligation should be limited to restoring the meter to normal operation or
replacing the meter, at manufactory’ choice, and shall be conditioned upon receiving written
notice of any alleged defect within 10 days after its discovery. manufactory will determine if the
return of the meter is necessary. If it is, the user should be responsible for the one-way
shipping fee from the customer to the manufacturer.
manufactory is not liable to any defects or damage attributable to miss usage, improper
installation, out-of-spec operating conditions, replacement of unauthorized parts and acts of
nature. Besides, fuses and batteries are not part of this warranty.
THE FOREGOING WARANTY IS EXCLUSIVE AND IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED WARRANTIES (INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, AND WARRANTIES
ARISING FROM DEALING, TRADE OR USAGE.)
8.2
Service
For operational problems, please contact the technical support department by telephone, fax,
email or internet. In most cases, problems could be solved immediately.
For any hardware failure of the instrument, we recommend our customers to send back the
instrument for service. Please contact the technical support department with the model
number and serial number of the unit before sending the unit back to us. Both numbers can be
found on the product label. For each service or calibration request, we will issue a Return
Materials Authorisation (RMA) number.
Take notice that the cost for repairing can only be determined after receipt and inspection of
the instrument. A quotation will be sent to the customer before proceeding with the service.
Important Notice for Product Return
Before returning the instrument for warranty repair or service, please read the following
carefully:
1. If the return item has been exposed to nuclear or other radioactive environment, or has
been in contact with hazardous material which could pose any danger to our personnel, the
unit cannot be serviced.
2. If the return item has been exposed to or in contact with dangerous materials, but has been
certified as hazard-free device by a recognized organization, you are required to supply the
certification for the service.
3. If the return item does not have a RMA# associated, it will be sent back without any service
conducted.
9.0
APPENDIX
9.1
Wiring Diagram and Outline Drawings
The following wiring diagram is for standard version of the flowmeter. For desktop version,
please contact manufactory
The internal structure of the standard version of the flowmeter is shown in the following picture.
All the wiring terminal blocks are located on the lower part of the box, right above the interface
label. The terminal block pins are numbered and marked right below the pins.
Fuse
Interface label
AC power
terminals
DC power
terminals
11 12 13
Line Voltage and Fuse Ratings:
For 8-36VDC power supply: 3.0A Slo-Blo
For 110VAC power supply: 1.0A Slo-Blo
For 220VAC power supply: 0.5A Slo-Blo
As indicated in the right picture, the fuse is located on the lower right corner of the unit, right
below the keypad panel. If you want to replace the fuse, you may need to remove the keypad
panel to have better access.
WARNING!
Disconnect power before removing fuse.
Be careful not to touch the on-board electronic parts when you
replace the fuse. Otherwise, they may be damaged by static
discharge!
Wiring diagram:
ANA INPUT
A15
ANA INPUT
A14
ANA INPUT
A13
RELAY
OUTPUT
RELAY
OUTPUT
EARTHE GROUND (CHASIS)
LINE POWER CONNECTION
NEUTRAL CONNECTION
DC POWER POSITIVE (+)
DC POWER NEGATIVE (-)
4-20mA ANALOGUE OUTPUT ()
PULL-UP
RESISTOR 1-10kΩ
TRANSDUCER
CABLE
4-20mA ANALOGUE OUTPUT
SHIEDIN
BLACK
BLACK
SHEIDING
G
RS232
4-20mA
INPUT A12
4-20mA
INPUT A11
4-20mA INPUT
GROUND
OCT
OUTPUT – (E)
OCT
OUTPUT + (C)
RED
13
12
11
2 1 2 2 23 24
45
44
43
42
41
61 62 63 64 65
DOWNSTREAM
TRANSDUCER
UPSTREAM
TRANSDUCER
RED
Outline diagram:
Unit: mm
9.2
9.2.1
Clamp-on Transducer Installation Guide
Choose Installation Method
The following three installation methods are often used in normal applications. Select the right
installation method according to your pipe size.
V-method Installation
V-method installation is commonly used with
pipe diameters ranging from 1/2” (15mm) to 4”
(100mm). It is also called reflective method.
Z-method Installation
Z-method is commonly used when the pipe
diameter is between 4” (100mm) and 240”
(6,000mm). This is method often yields the
best signal return.
Down stream transducer
flow
Tdown
Tup
θ
spacing
Upstream transducer
W-method Installation
W-method is used on plasticl pipes with
pipe diameter1/2”-4”(15mm-100mm).
9.2.2
Transducer Spacing
The flowmeter will calculate the transducer
spacing for you. All you need to do is to enter
all the installation information, including
installation method, pipe parameters, fluid
parameters, etc., through menu windows M11M24. The spacing value will be displayed on
menu window M25.
The transducer spacing is referred to the
distance between the two ends of the two
transducers (see the figure on the right).
9.2.3
Prepare the Pipe Surface
Locate the installation site according to the site selection rules suggested in section 2.8.
Based on the transducer spacing obtained in the above step, approximately mark the area of
the pipe surface where the transducers will be mounted.
Clean the marked area. Remove rust and paint. Sand the surface if not smooth. Use wet cloth
to wipe off the powder after sanding. Dry up the surface. A dry, clean surface will ensure a
good acoustic bond between transducer and pipe.
Based on the transducer spacing, accurately mark the transducer installation spots on the pipe
surface. Make sure the two spots are in the cleaned area.
9.2.4
Prepare the Transducers
Clean the transducer surface. Keep the surface dry.
Apply a wide band of ultrasonic couplant* down the centre of each
transducer face as shown on the right figure. Also apply a band of
couplant on the pipe surface. If the couplant is very sticky, you
may need to slightly massage the pipe surface with the couplant so that the couplant can fill up
the tiny pits which may exist on pipe surface.
9.2.5
Install the Transducers
Notice: For horizontal pipe line, it is
recommended to install the transducers on the
side instead of on the top or bottom of the pipe.
This is to avoid air bubbles on the top and
sediments on the bottom of the pipe.
First, mark the transducer installation location
on the pipe surface according to the mounting
spacing given in menu M25. You may need to
make a paper template to help you accurately
and quickly locate the transducer positions as
well as to center the transducers, especially if you plan to use Z-method for the installation.
Then, connect the mounting fixture around the pipe. Leave the chain loose so you can slip the
transducer underneath.
Apply a small amount of couplant in the prepared area of the pipe where transducers will be in
contact.
Slip the transducer under the clamp fixture. Tighten the screw. Do the same thing for the other
transducer. Use the figure on the right as a reference.
If the pipe material is metal, you do not need the clamp fixture. The transducers will
automatically attach to the pipe by magnetic force. You may need to press the transducer
against the pipe with certain strength in order to make the contact tight.
Finally, connect the transducers to the main unit with the preferred transducer cables. Refer to
section 2.2.2 for more information.
9.2.6
Fine Tune the Installation
Switch to menu window M90 and then M91. Check the readings of the triplet (signal strength S,
signal quality Q and transit-time ratio R). Make sure they are at least in the operational ranges:
S ≥ 60, Q ≥ 60, 97% ≤ R ≤ 103%.
Operational Ranges:
S ≥ 80, Q ≥ 80, 99% ≤ R ≤ 101%*.
Optimal Ranges:
*
Note that when flow velocity is very high, the range for R may be
wider.
In ideal case where pipe condition and fluid condition are favourable for sound propagation,
the triplet readings could be fine turned into the optimal ranges. If your triplet readings are not
close to their optimal ranges, or, even not in their operational ranges, you need to adjust your
transducer installation slightly and slowly, until you get the best readings.
If you are unable to get the triplet into their operational ranges, no mater how hard you try,
then, you may need to check all the parameters you entered in menu windows M11 to M24.
Make sure those values are correct. Whenever you make a change to those parameters, you
need to check the transducer spacing reading in menu M25. If the spacing is changed, you
need to reinstall the transducers accordingly.
If you still cannot get the right triplet readings, check the following:
Is the pipe too old?
Too much deposition inside of the pipe?
Too much corrosion? Too much air bubble?
Too thick liner? Empty or half-full pipe?
Too close to pump / valve / elbow?
Please refer to section §2.11 for more suggestions.
*Note: Ultrasonic couplant can be silicon, epoxy, grease, or Vaseline. Silicon can last for a
long time and is thus normally recommended. Please read the instructions on those products
carefully before using them. manufactory will not be responsible for any consequences caused
by these products.
9.3
Standard Pipe Dimensions
As pipe dimensions can vary between countries and standards please search pipe
manufacturers on line in your country for standard charts.
9.4
Sound Speed Tables
Table 9.5.1: Sound Speed in Water at atmosphere pressure. Unit:t (℃) v (m/s)
t
v
t
v
t
v
t
v
0
1402.3
25
1496.6
50
1542.5
75
1555.1
1
1407.3
26
1499.2
51
1543.5
76
1555.0
2
1412.2
27
1501.8
52
1544.6
77
1554.9
3
1416.9
28
1504.3
53
1545.5
78
1554.8
4
1421.6
29
1506.7
54
1546.4
79
1554.6
5
1426.1
30
1509.0
55
1547.3
80
1554.4
6
1430.5
31
1511.3
56
1548.1
81
1554.2
7
1434.8
32
1513.5
57
1548.9
82
1553.9
8
1439.1
33
1515.7
58
1549.6
83
1553.6
9
1443.2
34
1517.7
59
1550.3
84
1553.2
10
1447.2
35
1519.7
60
1550.9
85
1552.8
11
1451.1
36
1521.7
61
1551.5
86
1552.4
12
1454.9
37
1523.5
62
1552.0
87
1552.0
13
1458.7
38
1525.3
63
1552.5
88
1551.5
14
1462.3
39
1527.1
64
1553.0
89
1551.0
15
1465.8
40
1528.8
65
1553.4
90
1550.4
16
1469.3
41
1530.4
66
1553.7
91
1549.8
17
1472.7
42
1532.0
67
1554.0
92
1549.2
18
1476.0
43
1533.5
68
1554.3
93
1548.5
19
1479.1
44
1534.9
69
1554.5
94
1547.5
20
1482.3
45
1536.3
1554.7
95
1547.1
21
1485.3
46
1537.7
71
1554.9
96
1546.3
22
1488.2
47
1538.9
72
1555.0
97
1545.6
23
1491.1
48
1540.2
73
1555.0
98
1544.7
24
1493.9
49
1541.3
74
1555.1
99
1543.9
70
Table 9.5.2: Sound Speed and Viscosity Data of Liquids
Liquids
Sound Speed
@ 25℃ (77°F)
Kinematic Viscosity
X 10-6
m/s
ft/s
m2/s
ft2/s
Acetone
1,174
3,851.7
0.399
4.293
Acetaldehyde Alcohol
1,180
3,870
Alcohol
1,207
3,960
1.396
15.02
Aviation kerosene
1,298
4,257
Benzene
1,306
4,284.8
0.711
7.65
Carbine
1,121
3,677
Ethanol
1,207
3,690
1.39
14.956
Ethyl benzene
1,586
4,389.8
(68°F)
0.797
(17℃)
8.575
(63°F)
Ethylene chloride
1,193
3,914
0.61
6.563
Ethylene trichloride
1,050
3,444
Gasoline
1,250
4,100
0.8
0.1980
Gasoline 66#
1,171
3,841
Gasoline 80#
1,139
3,736
Glycol
1658
5,439.6
50%Glycol / 50%H2O
1,578
5,177
Glycerin
1,904
6,246.7
757.1
8,081.8
Ketone
1,310
4,297
Kerosene
1,420
4,658
2.3
24.7
Oil (Castor)
1,477
4,854.8
0.670
7.209
Oil (Diesel)
1,250
4,101
Oil (Peanut)
1,458
4,783.5
Petroleum
1,290
4,231
926
3,038.1
0.607
6.531
1,328
(20℃)
4,357
(68°F)
0.644
6.929
1,498
4,914.7
1.0
10.76
Tetrachlor-Methane
Toluene
Water, distilled
Table 9.5.3: Sound Speed Data of Solids
Material
Sound Speed
Shear Wave(25℃)
Sound Speed
Long. Wave(25℃)
m/s
ft/s
mm/us
in/us
Steel, 1% Carbon, hardened
3,150
10,335
5.88
0.2315
Carbon Steel
3,230
10,598
5.89
0.2319
Mild Steel
3,235
10,614
5.89
0.2319
Steel,1% Carbon
3,220
10,565
302 Stainless Steel
3,120
10,236
5.690
0.224
303 Stainless Steel
3,120
10,236
5.640
0.222
304 Stainless Steel
3,141
10,306
5.920
0.233
304L Stainless Steel
3,070
10,073
5.790
0.228
316 Stainless Steel
3,272
10,735
5.720
0.225
347 Stainless Steel
3,095
10,512
5.720
0.225
Aluminum
3,100
10,171
6.32
0.2488
Aluminum(rolled)
3,040
9,974
Copper
2,260
7,415
4.66
0.1835
Copper(annealed)
2,235
7,628
Copper(rolled)
2,270
7,448
CuNi(70%Cu 30%Ni)
2,540
8,334
5.03
0.1980
CuNi(90%Cu 10%Ni)
2,060
6,759
4.01
0.1579
Brass(Naval)
2,120
6,923
4.43
0.1744
Gold(hard-drawn)
1,200
3,937
3.24
0.1276
Inconel
3,020
9,909
5.82
0.2291
Iron(electrolytic)
3,240
10,630
5.90
0.2323
Iron(Armco)
3,240
10,630
5.90
0.2323
Ductile Iron
3,000
9,843
Cast Iron
2,500
8,203
4.55
0.1791
Monel
2,720
8,924
5.35
0.2106
Table 9.5.3 (continued): Sound Speeds in Solids
Material
Sound Speed
Shear Wave(25℃)
Sound Speed
Long Wave(25℃)
m/s
ft/s
mm/us
in/us
Nickel
2,960
9,712
5.63
0.2217
Tin,rolled
1,670
5,479
3.32
0.1307
Tintanium
3,125
10,253
6.10
0.2402
Tungsten,annealed
2,890
9,482
5.18
0.2039
Tungsten,drawn
2,640
8,661
Tungsten,carbide
3,980
13,058
Zinc,rolled
2,440
8,005
4.17
0.1642
Glass,Pyrex
3,280
10,761
5.61
0.2209
Glass,heavy silicate flint
2,380
7,808
Glass,Iight borate crown
2,840
9,318
5.26
0.2071
Nylon
1,150
3,772
2.40
0.0945
Nylon,6-6
1,070
3,510
2.31
0.0909
Polyethylene(LD)
Polyethylene(LD)
540
1,772
1.94
0.0764
PVC,CPVC
1,060
3,477
2.40
0.0945
Acrylic
1,430
4,690
2.73
0.1075
Asbestos Cement
2.20
0.0866
Tar Epoxy
2.00
0.0787
Mortar
2.50
0.0984
Rubber
1.90
0.00748