OP-1224 Pushbutton Panel

OP-1224
Pushbutton Panel
Manual Number OP-1224-M
WARNING
Thank you for purchasing automation equipment from PLCDirectä. We want your new DirectLOGICä automation
equipment to operate safely. Anyone who installs or uses this equipment should read this publication (and any other
relevant publications) before installing or operating the equipment.
To minimize the risk of potential safety problems, you should follow all applicable local and national codes that regulate
the installation and operation of your equipment. These codes vary from area to area and usually change with time. It is
your responsibility to determine which codes should be followed, and to verify that the equipment, installation, and
operation is in compliance with the latest revision of these codes.
At a minimum, you should follow all applicable sections of the National Fire Code, National Electrical Code, and the
codes of the National Electrical Manufacturer’s Association (NEMA). There may be local regulatory or government
offices that can also help determine which codes and standards are necessary for safe installation and operation.
Equipment damage or serious injury to personnel can result from the failure to follow all applicable codes and
standards. We do not guarantee the products described in this publication are suitable for your particular application,
nor do we assume any responsibility for your product design, installation, or operation.
If you have any questions concerning the installation or operation of this equipment, or if you need additional
information, please call us at 1--800--633--0405.
This publication is based on information that was available at the time it was printed. At PLCDirectä we constantly
strive to improve our products and services, so we reserve the right to make changes to the products and/or
publications at any time without notice and without any obligation. This publication may also discuss features that may
not be available in certain revisions of the product.
Trademarks
This publication may contain references to products produced and/or offered by other companies. The product and
company names may be trademarked and are the sole property of their respective owners. PLCDirectä disclaims any
proprietary interest in the marks and names of others.
Stage is a trademark of Koyo Electronics Industries Co., LTD. Texas Instruments is a registered trademark of Texas
Instruments, Inc. TI, TIWAY, Series 305, Series 405, TI305, and TI405 are trademarks of Texas Instruments, Inc.
Siemens and SIMATIC are registered trademarks of Siemens, AG. GE is a registered trademark of General Electric
Corporation. Series One is a registered trademark of GE Fanuc Automation North America, Inc. MODBUS is a
registered trademark of Gould, Inc. IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines. MS-DOS and
Microsoft are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Windows is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
OPTOMUX and PAMUX are trademarks of OPTO 22.
Copyright 1997, PLCDirectä Incorporated
All Rights Reserved
No part of this manual shall be copied, reproduced, or transmitted in any way without the prior, written consent of
PLCDirectä Incorporated. PLCDirectä retains the exclusive rights to all information included in this document.
1
Manual Revisions
If you contact us in reference to this manual, remember to include the revision number.
Title: OP-1224 Pushbutton Panel User Manual
Manual Number: OP--1224--M
Issue
Original
Date
11/95
Rev. A
3/96
Rev. B
6/98
Effective Pages
Description of Changes
Cover/Copyright
Contents
Manual Revisions
1 — 45
Index
10
Original Issue
All
Various
Manual Revisions
Downsize to spiral
Minor changes
Rev. B
Pinout diagram for OP-4CBL-1 cable
showed the wrong pins tied together
1
EU Information
This product is manufactured in compliance with European Union (EU) Directives and carries the CE
mark. The following information is provided to comply with EU documentation requirements.
NOTE: Products with CE marks perform their required functions safely and adhere
to relevant standards as specified by EC directives provided they are used
according to their intended purpose and that the instructions in this manual are
adhered to. The protection provided by the equipment may be impaired if this
equipment is used in a manner not specified in this manual. Only replacement parts
supplied by PLCDirect or its agents should be used. A listing of international affiliates
is available at our Web site
http://www.plcdirect.com
Technical Support
If you need technical assistance, please call the technical support group at
PLCDirect (3505 Hutchinson Rd., Cumming, GA 30040, U.S.A.) at 800--633--0405.
They are available Monday through Friday from 9:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. Eastern
Standard Time. Their Web Site address is
http://www.plcdirect.com
SELV Circuits
All electrical circuits connected to the communications port receptacle are rated as
Safety Extra Low Voltage (SELV).
Environmental
Specifications
Operating Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0° to 50° C
Storage Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --20° to 70° C
Operating Humidity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95% (non-condensing)
Air Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No corrosive gases permitted
Preventative
Maintenance and
Cleaning
No preventative maintenance is required. To clean the exterior of the panel
disconnect the input power and carefully wipe the panel with a cloth moistened with
plain water.
External Fuse
Protection
for Input Power
There are no internal fuses for the input power circuits, so external circuit protection
is needed to ensure the safety of service personnel and the safe operation of the
equipment itself. To comply with EU specifications, the input power must be fused.
Use a fuse rated at twice the input current rating of the panel. For example, if the
panel has an input current rating of 0.5 amperes, use a fuse rated for 1 ampere.
1
Table of Contents
Getting Started
i
The Purpose of this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contents of the Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional Manuals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Product Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How the OP-1224 Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PLCDirect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Allen-Bradley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Pushbutton Panel...5 Easy Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 1: Preparing the Pushbutton Labels (Pages 6 -- 7) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 2: Install the Panel (Pages 8--15) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 3: Load the OPEditor Software (Page 16) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 4: Configure the Panel to Work with your CPU (Pages 17--22) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 5: Write the Ladder Logic (Pages 23--47) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
2
2
2
3
3
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
Applying Text to Each Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Template for Creating Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6
7
Panel Specifications: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dimensions for Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power and Cabling Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What Are Your Application Needs? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PLC to Panel Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choosing the Proper Connecting Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting a Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting the Panel to your Personal Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning an Address to the OP-1224 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Set the Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Termination Resistor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the OP-9001 to Connect Multiple Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8
8
8
8
9
10
10
11
11
12
13
14
14
14
14
15
Preparing the Pushbutton Labels
Installing the Panel
ii
Table of Contents
Configuring the Panel
System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Install . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step-by-Step Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 1: Load the OPEditor and Complete the Editor Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 2: Select the LPT and COM ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 3: Choose from Single or Multiple Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 4: Select the Source for your Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 5: Enter the Correct PLC Brand and Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 6: Select Configure Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 7A: Complete the Communications Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 7B: Select the Base Register Address and File Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 8: Set the Flash Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 9: Set the LED Separation Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 10: Set the Force Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 11: Configure the Pushbutton Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 12: Save and Download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16
16
17
17
17
17
18
18
18
19
20
20
21
21
22
22
General Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Memory Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Addressing Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Three Different Ways to Use the Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Method 1: Bit-of-Word DL450 and Allen-Bradley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Method 2: Internal Relays (All Functions Used) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Method 3: Remapping (Selected Functions Used) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the OP-1224 with the DL450 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Pushbutton Status Via Ladder Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controlling LEDs Separately with the DL450 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Flashing with the DL450 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Force Function Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Forcing Pushbuttons ON/OFF with DL450 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL205/DL305/DL405 (Using All Functions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Pushbutton Status Via Ladder Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controlling LEDs Separately . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Flashing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Force Function Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Forcing Pushbuttons ON or OFF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23
23
24
25
25
25
25
26
26
27
28
29
30
31
31
32
33
34
35
Applying Ladder Logic
Table of Contents
DL205/DL305/DL405 (Using Selected Functions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Remapping Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Pushbutton Status Via Ladder Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controlling LEDs Separately . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Flashing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Force Function Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Forcing Pushbuttons ON or OFF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the OP-1224 with an Allen-Bradley PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Pushbutton Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controlling LEDs Separately . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Flashing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Force Function Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Forcing Pushbuttons ON or OFF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
iii
36
36
37
38
39
40
41
43
43
44
45
46
47
OP--1224
Pushbutton Panel
In This Manual. . . .
— Introduction
— Preparing the Pushbutton Labels
— Installing the Panel
— Configuring the Panel
— Applying Ladder Logic
1
2
Getting Started
Getting Started
The Purpose of
this Manual
This manual shows you how to install and operate your OP-1224 Pushbutton Panel.
It includes wiring diagrams and power requirements, as well as the information you
need for selecting the proper connecting cables.
Contents of the
Manual
In this manual you will learn how to use
the OPEditor configuration software
(purchased separately) to configure your
panel. And in the back of this manual, we
will show you some simple ladder logic
that demonstrates the versatility of the
panel, both for PLCDirectt
and
Allen-Bradley products.
Additional Manuals
OP-1224
OP-1224
There are several other manuals you will find helpful or necessary:
D
D
D
Technical
Assistance
How to
Use the
DirectSOFTt User Manual--Shows you how to use the DirectSOFT Windows
software to write your ladder logic for PLCDirect programmable controllers.
Respective PLC User Manuals--Shows you the memory conventions, programming
instruction sets, data or file types, communications protocol, etc.
OP--9001--M Communications Master User Manual provides details of how to use the
OP-9001 for connecting multiple OP-Panels to a single CPU.
After completely reading this manual, if you are not successful with implementing the
OP-1500 or OP-1510, you may call PLCDirect at (800) 633-0405, Monday through
Friday from 9:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time. Our technical support
group will work with you in answering your application questions. If you have a
comment or question about our products, services, or manuals which we provide,
please fill out and return the suggestions card included with this manual.
33
Getting Started
How the OP-1224
Works
PLCDirect
The purpose of the panel is to provide you with 24 tactile pushbuttons that can function as
maintained or mometary type switches. An additional benefit of this panel is found in the
LEDs that are in the upper left hand corner of each pushbutton. These LEDs can operate as
indicators to reflect the status of the individual pushbutton, or they can operate independent
of the pushbutton status. The LEDS can turn ON or OFF and even flash for added attention.
To link the pushbuttons and the LEDs to your PLC, the OP-1224 uses a process called
“memory mapping”. This process ties the pushbuttons and LEDs to specific reserved
areas of memory in the PLC. You can use any available memory as long as it is
consecutive.
You enter these base register addresses during initial configuration using the OPEditor
software. Each of the functions for the pushbuttons and LEDs are controlled by the status
of their assigned bits within the memory words that you have reserved. You interface
these words of memory through your ladder logic. The logic below shows how you can
use the various features of the OP-1224. We’ll cover everything in detail later.
Prior to connecting the OP-1224 to
your PLC, you load the OPEditor
configuration software onto your
personal computer, and begin to
define how you want to use the
functions that have been designed into
the panel. Among other decisions, you
are prompted to fill in a base register
address. In the example we have
shown here, we have used V40600 as
the start of the mapped memory
addresses.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
PLCDirect Ladder Logic Example
C4
Momentary
OUT
Configured as momentary
PLCDirect
C6
Mapped Memory Location
Function
OUT
m+2 (such as V40602) C40-C57
LEDs 1-16 flash
SET
LEDs 17-24 flash
C47
m+5 (such as V40605) C120-C137 LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6 (such as V40606) C140-C157 Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7 (such as V40607) C160-C177 Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
Release
Jog
Jog
Initial
State
Push and
Release
Dryer
Dryer
Jog
Push
Again
Dryer
Configured as maintained
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+4 (such as V40604) C100-C117 LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
Push and
Hold
Y11
m (such as V40600) C0-C17
m+1 (such as V40601) C20-C37
m+3 (such as V40603) C60-C77
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
Maintained
Initial
State
Y10
Alarm
X10
Momentary
Separate
C107
SET
Alarm
Acknowledge
C7
C107
RST
C47
RST
Flashing
Alarm
?
?
Add
Resin
Push and
Release
Add
Resin
Add
Resin
Light
OFF to
indicate
reset.
Notice in this example we are using Pushbuttons 5, 7 and 8. These are controlled by
internal relays C4, C6, and C7. Your configuration software (OPEditor) allows you to
operate your pushbuttons as either momentary switches or ”maintained” alternate action
switches. We have made C4 a momentary switch and C6 is a maintained switch. C7 is a
momentary switch but we are controlling the separate ON/OFF and flashing of
Pushbutton 8 with C47 and C107 respectively.
4
Getting Started
Allen-Bradley
The same OPEditor configuration
software used for the PLCDirect
product is also used for the
Allen-Bradley product. As you move
through the screens, one of the key
items you complete is the base register
address for storing data relative to the
pushbuttons. In the example below, we
have used N7:0/0 as the start of the
mapped memory addresses. This
means the base address is 0.
Allen-Bradley Ladder Logic Example
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
7
8
Initial
State
Momentary
N7:0
4
Push and
Hold
O:1
Jog
10
Jog
Jog
Configured as momentary
Allen-Bradley
Maintained
N7:0
Mapped Memory Location
Function
m (such as N7: 0/0-- 0/15)
m+1 (such as N7: 1/0 1/15)
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
m+2 (such as N7: 2/0 2/15)
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3 (such as N7: 3/0 3/15)
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4 (such as N7: 4/0 4/15)
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5 (such as N7: 5/0 5/15)
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6 (such as N7: 6/0 6/15)
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7 (such as N7: 7/0 7/15)
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
Dryer
6
Configured as maintained
Alarm
I:2
Initial
State
Alarm
Acknowledge
Flashing
Alarm
L
7
N7:2
L
?
7
N7:4
N7:0
Push
Again
Dryer
Dryer
11
Momentary
Separate N7:4
0
Push and
Release
O:1
U
8
7
N7:2
U
?
Add
Resin
Push and
Release
Add
Resin
Add
Resin
Light
OFF to
indicate
reset.
7
Notice in this example we are using Pushbuttons 5, 7 and 8. These are controlled
by bits 4, 6 and 7 in integer file N7:0/0. Your configuration software (OPEditor)
allows you to operate your pushbuttons as either momentary switches or
“maintained” alternate action switches. We have made Pushbutton 5 a
momentary switch and Pushbutton 7 is a maintained switch. Pushbutton 8 is a
momentary switch but we are making its LED flash with N7:2/7 and controlling
the LED ON/OFF separately from the button status with N7:4/7.
55
Getting Started
Using the Pushbutton Panel...5 Easy Steps
Step 1: Prepare Your
Pushbutton Labels
(Pages 5 -- 6)
Step 2: Install the
Panel
(Pages 7--14)
First, you need to prepare the labels for each of the
pushbuttons. The labels insert into plastic sleeves
behind the main cover. To access the sleeve, you
merely snap loose the front bezel.
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Preparing for installation, you will want to
check the individual specifications. These
include dimensions, power requirements,
cabling requirements, and NEMA ratings. We
include information you will need for mounting;
i.e. cutout dimensions, cabling requirements,
components needed, etc.
7
8
Cables
External Power
Step 3: Load the
OPEditor Software
(Page 15)
You need the OptiMatet OPEditor
software in order to configure your
panel. At the time of publication, we
have a DOS version with the
introduction of a Windows version
due in early 1996. This software is the
same regardless of whether you are
connecting
to
PLCDirect
or
Allen-Bradley product.
Step 4: Configure the
Panel to Work with
your CPU
(Pages 16--20)
After setting a DIP switch on the rear of the panel and
attaching the programming cable, you are ready to
configure your panel. The simple and easy-to-follow
screens make configuration a painless process.
Step 5: Write the
Ladder Logic
(Pages 21--45)
The amount of ladder logic programming
knowledge you need is very basic. In most
cases, you are already familiar with the
elements of logic that are required. We’ll give
you examples in the final section of this
manual, and you will see right away just how
easy it is.
Your PC
OptiMate
OptiMate Configuration
Editor Version 1.11 2/95
OMCFG01
DIP
Switch
C4
Y10
OUT
C6
Y11
OUT
6
Preparing the Labels
Preparing the Pushbutton Labels
Applying Text to
Each Label
Preparing the labels for the OP--1224 panel requires you to slide a legend
transparency into a pocket in the panel overlay. Use the following procedure:
1. Remove the bezel from the module by unsnapping the four tangs that hold
the bezel to the module frame.
2. Create a legend transparency. There are several ways of doing this. A
template is provided on the next page that gives you the available
dimensions. The nicest legends result from using a computer graphics
program and a laser printer to create the transparency.
Finished Legend
Insert legend between
window frame and cabinet
Window Frame
Bezel
3. Slide the finished legend into the pocket space between the window frame and
LED bars.
4. Re--attach the bezel by snapping the bezel onto the case.
Preparing the Labels
Template for Creating Labels
(Actual Size)
0.625 in.
0.625 in.
0.125 in.
6.125 in.
2.800 in.
0.125 in.
0.645 in.
0.125 in. 0.030 in.
77
8
Installing the Panel
Installing the Panel
In this section, you will be given all of the information you need to install the panel.
Before actually installing the OP-1224 panel, it may be helpful to examine the
specifications and make sure that the requirements of your application are met.
Panel Specifications:
Physical
Specifications
Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 ounces
Panel Fasteners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Four 6x32 threaded studs
NEMA Rating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NEMA 4
Environmental
Specifications
Operating Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
0° to 50° C
Storage Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --20° to 80° C
Operating Humidity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 to 95% (non-condensing)
Air Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No corrosive gases permitted
Operating
Specifications
Power Budget Requirement . . . . . . . 4 VA @ 8 -- 30 VDC
240 mA @ 12 VDC (all LEDs OFF)
310 mA @ 12 VDC (all LEDs ON)
120 mA @ 24 VDC (all LEDs OFF)
155 mA @ 24 VDC (all LEDs ON)
Power Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Removable Terminal Block
2 position
Absolute Maximum Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 VDC
Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power On, CPU
Communication Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RS232 or RS422
4800, 9600 and 19200* baud
15 pin female D type connector
*Only 4800 and 9600 baud will work
with Allen-Bradley PLCs.
Installing the Panel
Dimensions for Mounting
Cutout Area
Example panel mounting
Dimensions in Inches
9.50
0.5”
1.00
3.50
2.00
3.5”
8.40
1.00
8.85
1.75”
99
10
Installing the Panel
Power and Cabling Requirements
What Are Your
Application Needs?
Your communication cable requirements really depend on your particular
application. There are two types of configuration possibilities. Point-to-point — a
single operator interface connected to a CPU. Multi-drop — multiple operator
interfaces connected to a CPU.
D
Point-to-Point -- If you only need one operator interface connected to one
CPU, then just choose the appropriate cables from the chart on Page 13, and
you’re ready to go!
D
Multi-drop -- By using an OptiMate OP--9001 Communications Master, you
can connect multiple Optimate units to a single CPU. Up to 31 individual units
can be connected in a daisy-chain fashion to the OP--9001. Communications
are via RS422 between the OP--9001 and the operator interfaces. If you use
a good quality shielded cable, you can have a total distance of up to 4000
feet between the OP--9001 and the last operator interface unit in the chain. If
you only have a short distance (up to 30 feet), you can use ribbon cable and
easy-to-install crimp-on ribbon connectors.
1. Point-to-Point
2. Multi-drop
A single cable connection
from the PLC to the panel
gives you access to the PLC’s
data registers and ladder logic.
Multiple OP-panels can be interfaced to a single PLC.
This requires the use of the OP-9001 Communications
Master. With the Communication Master, up to 31
panels can be interfaced to a single CPU port. Each can
be programmed for entirely different functions. Panels
can be distributed up to 4000 feet* from the OP-9001.
OP-9001
Power
Source
DL405 CPU Base
Power Supply
OP-panels
NOTE: Please read and follow the cabling requirements in the OP-9001 User
Manual (OP-9001-M) when using multiple panels. Failure to follow the
guidelines of the User Manual may affect the integrity of the RS422 link,
resulting in communication errors.
11
11
Installing the Panel
Programming Cable
The OP-ACBL--1 is used to connect your OP-1224 panel to your computer for programming.
You must have this cable to configure the panel.
DB9
3
2
5
7
8
DB15
3
2
5
Panel
Computer
1
OP-ACBL--1
9
5= 0V
4= not used
3= Dout
2= Din
1= not used
1= not used
2= Dout
3= Din
9= not used
10= not used
9=not used
8= CTS
7= RTS
6=not used
11= not used
12= not used
4= not used
5= 0V
13= not used
14= not used
15= not used
1
6= not used
7= not used
8= not used
15
PLC to Panel Cable
The OP-ACBL--1 (shown above) is also used to connect Allen-Bradley SLC 5/03 and 5/04
PLCs to an OP-1224 panel. Since the OP-1224 is compatible with all of the PLCDirect and
compatible CPUs, your cabling requirements wll vary depending on the CPU type you are
using. Refer to the table on the next page for matching the proper cable to your PLC. Pin
diagrams refer to the ends of the cables and not the communication ports.
See the next page for matching your PLC to the correct cable.
RJ12 (PLC)
4
3
1
RJ11 (PLC)
2
1
4
DB15
3
2
5
DB15
3
2
5
PLC
1= 0V
2= not used
3= Din
4= Dout
5= not used
6= not used
RJ12
(6P6C)
RJ12
OP-2CBL
DB9
Panel
1
12 3456
RJ11
(4P4C)
1= Din
RJ11
2= Dout
3= not used
4= 0V
OP-3CBL
DB15 11= not used
DB25 (PLC)
2
3
7
4
5
15-pin (PLC)
2
3
7
4
5
DB15
3
2
5
13= not used
14= not used
15= not used
DB15
3
2
5
DB15
3
2
5
13= not used
12= not used
11= not used
10= not used
9= not used
8= not used
7= 0V
6= not used
5= CTS
4= RTS
3= Din
2= Dout
1= not used
15= tied (0V)
14= tied (0V)
13= tied (0V)
12= not used
11= not used
10= not used
9= not used DB15
1
25
1
25= not used
24= not used
23= not used
22= not used
21= not used
20= not used
19= not used
18= not used
17= not used
16= not used
15= not used
14= not used
8= not used
7= 0V
6= not used
5= CTS
4= RTS
3= RXD
2= TXD
1= not used
6= not used
7= not used
8= not used
15
15
8= YOM
7= CTS
6= not used
5= not used
4= On-line
3= Din
2= Dout
1= YOP
4= not used
5= 0V
12= not used
1234
DB15 (PLC)
2
3
4
13
14
15
1
7
8
1= not used
2= Dout
3=Din
9= not used
10= not used
OP-4CBL--1
RS422 Pinout
DB15
OP-4CBL--2
DB25
15= not used
14= not used
13= not used
12= not used
11= not used
10= not used
9= not used
DB15
PLC
Din +
Din -Dout +
Dout -RTS+
CTS+
RTS-CTS--
Panel
11 = Dout+
12 = Dout -9 = Din +
10 = Din--
OP--2CBL--1
15-pin
DB15
12
Installing the Panel
Choosing the Proper Connecting Cables
OptiMate Panel Cables
Depending on which PLC you are
using, you may require as many as
two cables--one to connect the
panel to a personal computer for
configuration; and one to connect
the panel to the PLC. Here are the
requirements:
D
D
OP-ACBL-1: all units require this cable
for configuration. This is a 9-pin male to
15-pin male cable that connects your
personal computer to the OptiMate unit.
(This cable is also used to connect an
OptiMate panel to the Allen-Bradley
SLC--500 CPU.
CPU Cables: You will also need the
appropriate cable to connect your CPU
to the OptiMate unit. Use the chart shown
to the right to choose the correct
communications cable.
OP--9001 Cable Connectors
OptiMate Cables
D
of
4
For electrically noisy environments,
we recommend a good shielded
cable, such as Belden 9729 or
equivalent. This type of cable will
require the solder-type connectors. If
you’re going 30 feet or less, you can
use ribbon cable. For ribbon cable,
we recommend Belden 9L28015 or
3M 3365/15. See Page 14 for more
information.
Cable
DL130
Only port
OP--2CBL
DirectLOGICt
DL205
DL230
One port (RJ12)
OP--2CBL
DL240
Top port (RJ12)
OP--2CBL
Bottom port (RJ12)
OP--2CBL
DL330
Requires DCU*
OP--4CBL--2
DL330P
Requires DCU*
OP-4CBL--2
DL340
Top port (RJ11)
OP-3CBL
DL340
Bottom port (RJ11)
OP-3CBL
DL350
Top port
OP-2CBL
Bottom port
OP-4CBL-2
Top port (15-pin)
OP-4CBL--1
Bottom port (25-pin)
OP-4CBL--2
Top port (15-pin)
OP-4CBL--1
Bottom port (25-pin)
OP-4CBL--2
Phone Jack (RJ12)
OP-2CBL
Top port (15-pin)
OP-4CBL--1
Bottom port (25-pin)
OP-4CBL--2
D4--DCM (module)
One port (25-pin)
OP-4CBL--2
Slice I/O panels
One port (15-pin)
OP-4CBL--1
IC610CPU105
Requires DCU*
OP-4CBL--2
IC610CPU106
Requires DCU*
OP-4CBL--2
325--07, PPX:325--07
Requires DCU*
OP-4CBL--2
330--37, PPX:330--37
Requires DCU*
OP-4CBL--2
325S--07 (or 325 w/ Stage Kt)
Requires DCU*
OP-4CBL--2
330S--37, PPX:330S--37
Requires DCU*
OP-4CBL--2
335--37, PPX:335--37
Phone Jacks (RJ11)
OP-3CBL
If DCU is used*
OP-4CBL--2
425--CPU, PPX:425--CPU **
One port (15-pin)
OP-4CBL--1
430--CPU, PPX:430--CPU
Top port (15-pin)
OP-4CBL--1
Bottom port (25-pin)
OP-4CBL--2
Top port (15-pin)
OP-4CBL--1
Bottom port (25-pin)
OP-4CBL--2
DirectLOGICt
DL305
DirectLOGICt
DL405***
DL430
DL440**
DL450
OP--CMCON--1 — pack of 4 ribbon
cable connectors.
OP--CMCON--2 — pack
solder-type connectors.
Port
DirectLOGICt
DL105
If you’re planning to use multiple
panels and an OP--9001, then
you’ll need to build your own
custom cables. Since the proper
cable choice really depends on
your application, we offer the
following connectors.
D
CPU
(or other device)
Family
GEâ
Series 1
TI305t /
SIMATICâ
TI305t
TI405t /
SIMATICâ
TI405t
435--CPU, PPX:435--CPU **
Smart Slicet I/O panels
One port (15-pin)
OP-4CBL--1
Allen-Bradley
SLC500
5/03
5/04
Bottom port
OP-ACBL--1
Allen-Bradley
MicroLogix
Only port
OP-ACBL--2
* — requires RS232 Data Communications Unit (D3--232--DCU)
**--also DC versions
Installing the Panel
13
13
Connecting a Power Supply
Power Supply
Connections
The OP-1224 panel can operate on DC voltages between 8 and 30 VDC rated at 4 watts.
Connect the panel to a power supply (within the required voltage range and wattage) using
the terminal block connector supplied. The connector is polarized to prevent reversing the
connections. The male receptacle on the rear of the panel will only connect in one way with
the female connector that is supplied with your OP-1224 panel. Pin 1 is the positive
connection, while Pin 2 is the negative, or ground, connection.
You must use an external power supply that can
deliver voltages in the 8 to 30 VDC range, and
can supply 4 watts of power.
A two-prong male connector
is on the rear of the unit.
Your OP-panel is shipped
with the female connector.
+ GND
Install the female connector to a
cable for attachment to your power
supply.
The power supply is not sold by PLCDirect.
Model
OP-1224
Current Consumed at 12VDC
Current Consumed at 24VDC
0.24A (all LEDs OFF)
0.12A (all LEDs OFF)
0.31A (all LEDs ON)
0.16A (all LEDs ON)
14
Installing the Panel
Connecting the Panel to your Personal Computer
Assigning an
Address to the
OP-1224
A 6-position DIP switch on the rear of the OP-1224 allows you to assign a hardware Aaddress
to your panel. Each panel must have a unique address. You can use any address between 0
and 30 when communicating between a panel and a PLC or the OP-9001 Master
Communications panel. Address 31, however, is reserved. See the note that follows.
NOTE: You must use Address No. 31 when you are using the OPEditor software to
download to your OP-1224 panel. No other address will work for the configuration
process. In a similar manner, if you are connecting more that one OP-panel to a single
CPU (through an OP-9001), then the OP-9001 needs to know which set of
configuration parameters belong to which OP-panel. You do this by assigning an
address in the range of 0 to 30 to each panel connected. Each panel must have a
different address.
DIP Switch
How to Set the
Address
Rear View
To set the address on the OP-1224, simply set the apppropriate switches on the dip switch to
the desired address. The figure below shows the binary weighting of each switch position.
Notice that it is in decimal format. To select address 14 for example, you would press switches
2, 3 and 4 down to the right, and switches 1, 3 and 5 to the left (2 + 4+ 8 = 14). Any address
between 0 and 30 is valid for the OptiMate-to-CPU (or to OP9001) communications. Address
31, however selects the configuration mode. Use this mode when you connect your personal
computer to the panel for configuration. To select address 31, turn switches 1 through 5 ON.
NOTE: Please note that when the dip switches are changed, the OP-1224 must be
power cycled before the new settings will take effect.
Switch
On
123456
The Termination
Resistor
SW1 Position 1 2 3 4 5 6
Address Value
ON = ENABLE
1 2 4 8 16 T
Termination
Resistor.
(See text
below.)
OFF = DISABLE
Switch position 6 enables or disables an internal termination resistor. The OptiMate panels
communicate via an RS232 or RS422 communcations network. If you are using a single
panel that will be located less than 50 feet from the CPU, then you can use RS232 and are not
required to use a termination resistor (i.e. switch position 6 is turned OFF).
If a panel will be located more than 50 feet from the CPU or you want to use multiple panels,
you must use RS422. For single panel installations, this means that switch 6 must be
enabled (ON). For multi-drop installations, this means the last panel only must have switch
6 enabled (ON). All other panels must have switch 6 disabled (OFF). A more detailed
description of multiple panel installations is given in the OP-9001-M User Manual.
Installing the Panel
15
15
Using the OP-9001 to Connect Multiple Panels
With the addition of the OP-9001 Communications Master panel, you can connect up to 31
panels per a useable CPU port of the PLC. Shown below are the connection requirements.
For specifics of the OP-9001 panel itself, please refer to the Communications Master User
Manual (OP-9001--M).
NOTE: The OP-9001 must be used in a multiple panel configuration.
Ribbon cable with DB15 male connectors attached.
Panels can be connected directly to the OP-9001 ports
or be daisy-chained to other OP-panels.
OP-9001
Power
Source
PLC
Power Supply
OP-panels
Note: Panels can be located as far away as 4000 feet from the OP-9001 when
using shielded cable (Belden 9729 or equivalent). Flat ribbon connections can be
used for a distance of 30 feet maximum. For ribbon cable, we recommend Belden
9L28015 or 3M 3365/15.
Belden 9279 Specifications
No. twisted pairs
2
Nom. Impedance (ohms)
100
Nom. Capacitance (pF/m)
41.0
Wire Gauge (AWG)
24
Power supply receptacle.
Same as the one on the
OP-1224. See Page 15.
DB15 for connecting to the PLC.
See chart on Page 13 for selection
of the proper cable.
Two DB15 ports for RS422 connection to any OP-panel.
16
Configuring the Panel
Configuring the Panel with the OPEditor Software
You configure the OP-1224 by loading the OPEditor software on a personal computer and selecting the
appropriate options. The setup options answer basic questions concerning your system configuration
such as type of PLC being used, communications protocol, and the type of panel being used. The
same software is used for all of the Optimate panels; so once you’ve set up one panel, you understand
most of the procedures required to configure any of the other panels.
System
Requirements
In order to use the OPEditor software, you must have the following components:
D
D
D
D
IBM 386 (or better) compatible computer
VGA or SVGA video board and color monitor
DOS 5.0 or higher and 3 1/2” disk drive
At least 1 meg of hard drive space and 1 meg of RAM
At the time of publication of this manual, we are providing a DOS
version of the OptiMate OPEditor configuration software. In
early 1996, we will have a Windows version available.
OptiMate
OptiMate Configuration Editor
Version 1.11 2/95 OMCFG01
There is only one installation disk for this software. You must
have a 3-1/2 inch drive in order to install it. We suggest you make
a backup copy of this disk before making the installation.
How to Install
Here are the easy steps for successful installation of the software:
1. Insert the disk in the 3 1/2” floppy drive of your computer.
2. From the DOS prompt, log onto the drive where you have the disk and execute
the INSTALL.EXE file. For example, if the disk is in drive A:
. . . . . . . . . A: install
press <Return>
3. You will be prompted to accept the default directory (C:\OP) or change it. Make
the choice and press Enter.
4. The software will automatically insert files in the directory you have named.
These will use about 400 kilobytes of hard drive space. You should view the
OPTITEXT.WRI file to take advantage of demo files and other useful
information. The main file is OPEDITOR.EXE. The other files are for fonts and
configuration information. Two subdirectories are created: (1) modules, and (2)
systems. These are used to store your configuration data.
5. You will automatically be returned to the DOS prompt after the files and
directories have been created, and you press the Return key. Installation is now
complete!
Configuring the Panel
17
17
Step-by-Step Procedure
NOTE: You do not have to be connected to the OP-panel in order to design
your configuration. You can save it to disk and download it to the panel later.
Step 1
Load the OPEditor
and Complete the
Editor Setup
Step 2
Select the
LPT and COM
ports
Step 3
Choose from
Single or Multiple
Configurations
You can operate the OPEditor as a
DOS program out of DOS only. Do
not attempt to operate the program
out of Windows. If you are in
Windows,
close
Windows
completely, change to the directory
in which you have stored the
OPEditor executable file (default is
C:\OP), and then type the file name
(OPEDITOR) from the DOS prompt.
The first configuration screen has 4
choices. You should select the first
choice, Editor Setup.
The setup screen provides two
serial port options: You must specify
which of the serial ports (COM1 or
COM2) that you will be using when
communicating with your OP-panel.
The setup screen will also allow you
to designate which parallel port
(LPT1 or LPT2) to use for printing
your configuration.
Next, you must press <ESC> to
return to the first screen again. Here
you will need to select either the
Single-Panel Configuration or the
Multi-Panel Configuration. For
this example, we will use the
“Single”
choice,
but
the
“Multi-Panel” choice follows much
the same way. Refer to the OP-9001
User Manual (OP-9001-M) for
instructions on how to use the
OPEditor when putting together a
system
that
uses
multiple
OP-panels.
18
Configuring the Panel
Step 4
Select the
Source for your
Configuration
When you select either single or
multi-module installation, another
menu appears that allows you to
choose from the following actions:
D
Read a configuration from the
OP subdirectory
D
Enter a path and filename of
another directory for reading a
configuration.
D
Create a new configuration
(default).
You will want to select Use Defaults
For OP-1224, since you are creating
a configuration file for the first time.
Step 5
Enter the Correct
PLC Brand and
Type
As soon as you make the above
selection and press the <Enter>
key, you will return to a screen that
allows you to enter the type of PLC
you will be using. It leads you to a
second screen with two choices.
Here you should select either
PLCDirect or Allen-Bradley.
Press the <Enter> key to return to
previous screen.
Step 6
Select Configure
Protocol
Now select the second
Configure Protocol.
line,
This will take you to another screen
that gives you a selection of PLC
Subtype. The default subtype is
indicated. In the example shown, the
default is 205 Direct-Net. To change
this, press the <Enter> key.
Select the desired protocol for the
CPU subtype that you are using.
Refer to the appropriate CPU User
Manual for the correct protocol
corresponding
to
the
communications port you are using.
Make sure your choice here matches
the CPU port into which you will
actually be connected. On some
models, one port is K-sequence and
another may be DirectNet. On others,
you may only have one protocol
available.
19
19
Configuring the Panel
Step 7A
Complete the
Communications
Information
You should now be looking at a
screen similar to the one shown
here. If you are using a PLCDirect
programmable controller, check
the chart below for the proper baud
rate, parity and stop bit settings.
For other PLCs, check the
respective User Manuals for the
proper
specifications.
The
OP-panels will support 4800, 9600
and 19200 baud. Other baud rates
of the PLCs are not supported. The
table shown below only includes
those baud rates that are
supported by the OptiMate panels.
You also see a PLC timeout selection on the above screen. This
means when the panel receives a
communications error, it will wait a
specified amount of time to receive
a good transmission. If it does not
receive a good transmission within
this timeout period, it will
acknowledge the error by flashing
all of the LEDs on the panel at a 4
Hz rate. The default is 0.3 seconds
for the timeout period. You can
change this if you want--the valid
range is from 0.3 seconds to 25.5
seconds.
PLC Model Port/Baud Rates
Parity
Top
Odd
DL230/240
9600
1
Bottom (DL240 only)
1200/9600/19.2k
Odd/None
DL330
DCU
Odd/None
DL340
Top
1200/4800/9600/19.2k
1200/9600/19.2k
Bottom
1200/4800/9600/19.2k
DL430/440
Top
9600
Bottom
1200/9600/19.2k
DL450
Stop
Bit
1
None
1
None
Odd
Odd/None
Odd
DB15
9600
DB25
1200/4800/9600/19.2k Odd/None
RJ12
1200/4800/9600/19.2k Odd/None
1
1
20
Configuring the Panel
Step 7B
Select the Base
Register Address
and File Number
Here you need to indicate a base
register address in your PLC that
will be used for the mapping
process. You should read the next
section of this manual and make
sure you understand the mapping
process and how it relates to your
PLC and ladder logic. Read your
respective PLC User Manual for
details on CPU memory types and
memory available.
For PLCDirect and compatible
CPUs, you will enter a Base
Register Address. This is the
V-memory ( DL205/DL405) or
R-memory (DL305) location where you want to store panel data. For example,
you might choose V40600. You do not enter the letter V or R. You merely enter the
starting memory number (i.e. 40600).
If you chose Allen Bradley as your PLC Type, you must now enter the PLC File
Number in addition to a Base Register Address. The panel will only recognize
integer file types N7 and pre-defined user file types N9 through N255. You enter
only the number and not the prefix letter N. The Base Register Address is any
number between 0 and 255. For example, if you want the starting address N7:0,
you enter a PLC File Type: 7 and a Base Register Address: 0.
Step 8
Set the Flash
Option
After you have completed Step 7B,
press the <Escape> key and you will
be taken back to the same screen
used for Step 6. Here you can select
the flashing option if you plan to have
any of the LEDs flash during your
ladder logic operation. Flashing can
provide added emphasis to one or
more LEDs that you may want to
stand out from the rest. Be aware you
consume less PLC memory if you
don’t enable the flashing feature.
Default is set for no flashing.
If you want to change the flashing
option, position the cursor on Flash
Option:Disabled (shown above) and
then press the <Enter> key. The new
screen (shown to the right) gives you
a choice of Enabled or Disabled.
Make your selection and press the
<Enter> key again. This will return
you to the original screen (top). Note:
The flash option will only work for
those buttons you have configured
to act as “momentary”. See Step
11.
Configuring the Panel
Step 9
Set the LED
Separation Option
Move the cursor down to LED
Separation. If this function is
disabled, an LED will only light when
the status of its respective pushbutton
is ON. If you enable this feature, the
status of the LED is controlled by
ladder logic independently of the
pushbutton. If you enable this feature,
you can still have a pushbutton LED
illuminate when pushbutton is turned
ON. However, you would have to use
your ladder logic to check the status of
the pushbutton and actually trigger
the LED lighting instead of it
happening automatically.
If you want to enable the separation
option, position the cursor on LED
Separation:Disabled (shown above)
and then press the <Enter> key. The
new screen (shown to the right) gives
you a choice of Enabled or Disabled.
Make your selection and press the
<Enter> key again. This will return
you to the original screen (top). Note:
This function is only available for
those pushbuttons configured as
“momentary” . See Step 11.
Step 10
Set the Force
Option
There are some applications where it
may be desirable to “force” the status
of a pushbutton ON or OFF with your
ladder logic. For example, you might
have a pushbutton configured that
starts a process and you want to know
when the process has been
completed. In such a case, you might
want the pushbutton ON when you
start a process, but then have your
ladder logic turn the pushbutton OFF
when the process is complete.
If you want to enable this Force
Option, position the cursor on Force
Option:Disabled (shown above) and
then press the <Enter> key. The new
screen (shown to the right) gives you
a choice of Enabled or Disabled.
Make your selection and press the
<Enter> key again. This will return
you to the original screen (top).
21
21
22
Configuring the Panel
Step 11
Configure the
Pushbutton Type
We mentioned earlier that your
pushbuttons can operate either as
momentary
pushbuttons
or
maintained pushbuttons. Momentary
pushbuttons only remain ON for as
long as you are manually pressing on
them. Maintained pushbuttons (also
called Alternate) will change status
everytime you press them, and
maintain that status until you press
them again. You can determine which
way you want each button to operate
by
selecting
Alternate
or
Momentary. Use the <Enter>key to
change from one mode to the other.
You must do this for each key. When
you are finished, the button diagram
will show M’s for all the Momentary
buttons, and show A’s for all the
Maintained (Alternate action) buttons.
When finished, press <Escape>
Step 12
Save and
Download
If you have done your configuration
without being connected to the
OP-panel, then you can either save it
to a disk and download it to the panel
later; or you can connect to the panel
now, and make your download. To
download, select Download to
Module and press the <Enter> key.
The panel will retain the configuration
in its non-volatile, EEPROM memory,
but you should also save it to your
hard drive or a disk.
23
23
Applying Ladder Logic
Applying Ladder Logic
General Concepts
Memory Mapping
On Pages 2 and 3 of this manual, we introduced you to the basic concept of memory
mapping. The OP-1224 uses memory mapping in order to link itself to a PLC.
Memory mapping is a technique that maps the memory of the OP-1224 into the
memory of the PLC. During initial configuration, you indicate where in the PLC
memory you want to start the mapping process (See Step 7B on Page 18). By
knowing where the data of the specific panel is mapped, this data can be moved,
changed or monitored using ladder logic.
Your PC
PLCDirect
During configuration, you determine the starting address
for the memory mapping process.
1
2
3
4
5
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
6
7
8
Mapping Assignments
Mapped Memory Location
m (such as V40600) C0-C17
m+1 (such as V40601) C20-C37
Function
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+2 (such as V40602) C40-C57
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3 (such as V40603) C60-C77
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4 (such as V40604) C100-C117 LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5 (such as V40605) C120-C137 LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6 (such as V40606) C140-C157 Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7 (such as V40607) C160-C177 Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
Allen-Bradley
Mapped Memory Location
m (such as N7: 0/0-- 0/15)
m+1 (such as N7: 1/0 1/15)
Function
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+2 (such as N7: 2/0 2/15)
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3 (such as N7: 3/0 3/15)
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4 (such as N7: 4/0 4/15)
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5 (such as N7: 5/0 5/15)
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6 (such as N7: 6/0 6/15)
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7 (such as N7: 7/0 7/15)
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
The pushbuttons
are numbered
left to right
starting in the
upper left
corner.
24
Applying Ladder Logic
Addressing
Conventions
Before we jump into ladder logic programming, let’s take a moment to review and
compare the addressing conventions used by PLCDirect and Allen-Bradley.
PLCDirect Memory--A typical address within a PLCDirect programmable
controller is Vxxxx (such as V40600 for the DL205 or DL405 families) or Rxxx (such
as R16 for the DL330/340 family). The V-memory in the DL205 and DL405 is divided
into 16-bit boundaries, and the R-memory in the DL330/340 is divided into 8-bit
boundaries. Refer to your individual User Manuals for complete memory
information. The two diagrams below show you how the lamps of the OP-1224 could
be mapped during configuration. In this example, we have arbitrarily chosen V40600
and R16 as starting boundaries to map the pushbuttons to the PLC, but it could
actually be any available user or internal relay memory areas as long as they are
consecutive:
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8
DL205, D3--350
or DL405
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
R17
D3--330/340
V40600
pushbutton number
bit
pushbutton number
V40601
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
bit
pushbutton number
R16
bit
pushbutton number
R20
bit
Allen-Bradley Memory--A typical address for Allen-Bradley might be N7:0/0 or
N27:0/0. The OP-1224 will allow you to define your starting address for mapping
purposes using either Allen-Bradley’s integer (N7) file type or user-defined integer
file types (N9--N255). If you plan to use an integer file between N9 and N255, you
must define these in the Allen-Bradley memory map before configuring the panel.
Below we have shown you how 16-bit integer files could be used to map the
pushbuttons to the Allen-Bradley PLC.
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8
Integer File Type
User-Defined
Integer File Type
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
N7: 0/0--0/15
pushbutton number
bit
pushbutton number
N7: 1/0--1/15
bit
pushbutton number
N27: 0/0--0/15
bit
pushbutton number
N27: 1/0--1/15
bit
Applying Ladder Logic
25
25
Three Different Ways Depending on the type of CPU and the number of OP-1224 functions selected, there
to Use the Panel
are three different ways to interface your ladder logic with the panel.
1. Bit-of-Word
2. Internal Relays
3. User Memory Combined with Internal Relays
Method 1:
Bit-of-Word
DL250/350/450 and
Allen-Bradley
Which of these methods is best for you depends on the make and model of the PLC
you are using. Let’s look at each of these three methods and discuss their relative
merits.
The most direct way to address the individual bits with your ladder logic is to use
“bit-of-word”. This method is available to the DL250/350/450 (PLCDirect) and SLC
5/03 and 5/04 (Allen-Bradley). Below is a rung of logic that shows how the
DL250/350/450 might use the status of bit 3 to control a process connected to Y12.
Don’t worry about understanding exactly how it works at this point. We will cover that
just a few pages later. Refer to Pages 24--28 for DL250/350/450 examples, Pages
40--47 for Allen-Bradley.
V2000.3
Method 2:
Internal Relays
(All Options Used)
Y12
OUT
This method is only available to PLCDirect programmable controllers. If you are
already familiar with the DL205, DL305 and DL405 PLCs, then you know about
internal relays. These relays, by PLC design, are mapped to certain bits in reserved
memory areas. You can make use of these relays during configuration with the
OPEditor by mapping directly to the control relay reserved memory area. This
method should only be used if you plan to use all of the functions of the panel;
otherwise it will consume internal relays unnecessarily. Using this method
automatically consumes 128 internal relays. In the example below, we have used
one of the mapped pushbuttons to control the output Y12. Refer to Pages 29--33.
C3
Method 3:
Remapping
(Selected Options)
Pushbutton 4
Y12
Pushbutton 4
OUT
A better way to make use of internal relays when you are not using all of the OP-1224
options is to use a process of “remapping”. With this technique you map your panel
to user memory (such as V2000), and then map parts of your user memory only to
those relays you actually need to use. The example below shows ladder logic
necessary to detect when a pushbutton has been pressed. It maps V2000/V2001 to
V40600/V40601 and consumes only 32 relays. The point is--it uses only the relays
necessary for the option you have selected. We’ll make this clearer in a moment
when we give you specific ladder logic examples that use this technique. By
convention, in this manual we will use syntax of the form V2000:V40600 to
refer to memory locations that have been mapped together. Refer to Pages
34--39 for ladder logic examples.
SP1
LDD
V2000
OUTD
V40600
C3
Pushbutton 4
Y12
OUT
26
Applying Ladder Logic
Using the OP-1224 with the DL250/350/450
Using Pushbutton
Status Via Ladder
Logic
By convention we are using the letter m to refer to consecutive memory locations in
the PLC. Memory locations m and m+1 reflect the state of the pushbuttons. If you
have the DL250/350/450, the status of the individual bits of these two words is easily
determined by using the bit-of-word instruction. The example shown below uses a
base register address of V2000 to map the status of the pushbuttons. When
Pushbutton 3 is pressed it affects bit 2 of V2000. Likewise, Pushbutton 4 affects bit 3.
Pushbutton 23 affects bit 6 of V2001.
DL250/350/450 Only
Mapped Memory Location
m
Function
V2000
m+1 V2001
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+2 V2002
m+3 V2003
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4 V2004
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5 V2005
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6 V2006
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7 V2007
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
7
8
LEDs 1-16 flash
DL250/350/450
Only
V2000.2
V2000.3
V2001.6
Pushbutton 3
Pushbutton 4
Pushbutton 23
Y12
OUT
Y13
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0
V2000
OUT
Y14
OUT
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m+1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
pushbutton number
bit
pushbutton number
bit
V2001
27
27
Applying Ladder Logic
Controlling LEDs
Separately with the
DL250/350/450
By default, the LED simply shows the state of the pushbutton--ON or OFF. If a
pushbutton is configured for momentary operation, there are two options available
for the LED. It can show the state of the pushbutton or it can be controlled
independently by enabling the LED Separation feature. When you have enabled
the LED Separation feature, the ON/OFF state of the LED is controlled only by the
status of the bits in m+4 and m+5. These bits can be manipulated via your ladder
logic. Remember: Any pushbutton configured for maintained (alternate
action) will ignore the bits in these two words.
In the example below, we show how the bit-of-word instruction can control LEDs 3, 4
and 23 when you have designated V2000 as the base address during configuration
with your OPEditor software. X12 turns ON LED3, X13 turns ON LED4, and X14
turns ON LED23. Remember: Independent control of the LEDs can only be
accomplished if you have Enabled LED Separation during your initial
configuration. (See Page 19, Step 9.)
DL250/350/450 Only
Mapped Memory Location
m
X12
X13
m+1
V2000
V2001
m+2
V2002
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3
V2003
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4
V2004
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5
V2005
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6
V2006
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7
V2007
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
DL250/350/
450 Only
Light LED 3
V2004.2
Light LED 4
V2004.3
OUT
OUT
X14
Function
Light LED 23 V2005.6
OUT
1
2
3
4
5
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m+4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m+5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
V2004
LED number
bit number
LED number
V2005
bit number
6
7
8
28
Applying Ladder Logic
Adding Flashing with If you plan to use this feature with one or more pushbuttons, there are three things
the DL250/350/450
you must always remember during configuration:
1. Flashing is only available for those buttons that have been configured as
Momentary.
2. LED Separation must be Enabled.
3. The Flash Option must be Enabled.
The Flashing Option is triggered through your ladder logic. On the previous page, we
showed you how to turn ON an LED, this example shows you how to add flashing to
an LED that has been turned ON. The flashing feature is controlled by the status of
the bits in m+2 and m+3 memory areas. In the example below, we have begun our
mapping at V2000 during the initial configuration. We are turning ON LED4 and then
making it flash. Bit 3 of V2004 turns the LED ON, and bit 3 or V2002 makes it flash.
DL250/350/450 Only
Mapped Memory Location
m
X13
Light LED 4
m+1
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+2
V2002
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3
V2003
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4
V2004
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5
V2005
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6
V2006
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7
V2007
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
V2004.3
OUT
Add flashing
V2002.3
OUT
3
4
5
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
6
7
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m+4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m+5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
X14
2
Function
V2000
V2001
DL250/350/
450 Only
1
LED 4 turns ON and flashes
V2004
LED number
bit number
LED number
V2002
bit number
8
29
29
Applying Ladder Logic
Force Function
Registers
The OP-1224 has the capability to “force” a pushbutton ON or OFF through your
ladder logic. If you plan to use this function, you must enable the force option during
configuration. (See Page 20, Step 10.)
NOTE: The Force Function will only work for those pushbuttons that you have
configured as “maintained” (alternate action). It will not work for momentary
pushbuttons.
Mapping Assignments
2
3
4
5
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
6
7
8
Function
Mapped Memory Location
m (such as V2000)
m+1 (such as V2001)
PLCDirect
1
9
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+2 (such as V2002)
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3 (such as V2003)
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4 (such as V2004)
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5 (such as V2005)
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6 (such as V2006)
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7 (such as V2007)
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
How the Memory is Used--Looking at the above memory map, m+6 stores the
forcing data for Pushbuttons 1-16 and m+7 stores forcing data for Pushbuttons
17-24. There are three modes of the force function. These modes are controlled by
the 3 most significant bits of m+7.
Mode 1 (M1)-- This forces all of the Pushbuttons to reflect the status stored in m+6
and m+7. For example, the data shown below would force Pushbuttons 3, 4 and 23
to ON and all the others would be forced OFF. Notice that bit 15 of m +7 is set to 1 for
this mode. M2 and M3 are set to 0’s.
Mode 2 (M2)-- This forces ON only those Pushbuttons matching the bits set in
registers m+6 and m+7. The bits not set do not affect the status of the Pushbuttons.
You would set M2 to 1 while M1 and M3 are set to 0.
Mode 3 (M3)-- This forces OFF only those Pushbuttons matching the bits set in
registers m+6 and m+7. The bits not set do not affect the status of the Pushbuttons.
You would set M3 to 1, while M1 and M2 are set to 0.
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8
0
Force Function
Registers
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0
0
0 0 1
1
0 0
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m+6
M1 M2 M3
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0 0
0
0
0
m+7
pushbutton number
bit
pushbutton number
bit
Think of forcing as a one-shot process. That is, once you have set the mode in
m+7, the bit patterns in m and m+1 are changed (according to the mode
selected), and then, all of the bits in m+6 and m+7 are set to zero. What this
means is that all pushbuttons return to normal manual operation after the
forcing is completed.
30
Applying Ladder Logic
Forcing Pushbuttons You can also use bit-of-word with the DL250/350/450 to force pushbuttons ON or
ON/OFF with
OFF. Here, during configuration with the OPEditor, we have chosen V2000 as our
DL250/350/450
base address for the mapping in the PLC. In this example, we are using Pushbutton
14 to start a process, and then forcing the pushbutton OFF when the process is
completed. Memory location m (V2000 in this case) holds the bit that reflects the
status of Pushbutton 14. Memory locations m+6 and m+7 hold the data for the
forcing. Here we have chosen to use Mode 3. With this mode, whichever bits are set
to 1 in m+6 and m+7, the corresponding pushbuttons will be forced to OFF. In the
following example, we only set bit 13 in m+6; so only Pushbutton 14 is turned OFF.
DL250/350/450 Only
Mapped Memory Location
m
m+1
V2000
V2001
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+2
V2002
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3
V2003
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4
V2004
m+5
V2005
m+6
V2006
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7
V2007
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
DL250/350/450
Only
Pushbutton 14 ON
V2000.13
Start Process
Y10
OUT
Process Finished
X13
Function
V2006.13
OUT
V2007.13
OUT
Pushbutton 14 OFF
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
7
8
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
Pushbutton 14 is pressed ON
1
2
3
4
5
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
6
7
Pushbutton 14 forced OFF
Pushbutton number
bit
V2000
Pushbutton number
bit
V2006
M1 M2 M3
V2007
Pushbutton number
bit
8
31
31
Applying Ladder Logic
DL205/DL305/DL405 (Using All Functions)
Using Pushbutton
Status Via Ladder
Logic
When you configure the OP1224, you must choose a base address in the CPU. This
address can be a direct mapping to the reserved memory locations that are tied to
internal relays. The internal relays of the DL205 and DL405 families start at V40600
and the internal relays of the DL305 family start at R16. Using this method, the total
mapping consumes 128 internal relays. You should only use this method when using
all of the OP-1224 functions. In the examples below, we have chosen V40600 as the
starting address for either a DL205 or DL405. We have chosen R16 as our starting
address for the DL305. Notice that the internal control relays are numbered in octal
and not decimal. In the examples below, our ladder logic is interacting with
Pushbuttons 3, 4 and 23.
DL205/DL350 or DL405 Families
C2
C3
Pushbutton 3
Pushbutton 4
C26
Pushbutton 23
Function
Mapped Memory Location
DL205/DL350 or
DL405
m
Y12
OUT
Y13
OUT
Y14
OUT
m+1
V40600 (C0-C17)
V40601 (C20-C37)
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+2
V40602 (C40-C57)
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3
V40603 (C60-C77)
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4
V40604 (C100-C117)
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5
V40605 (C120-C137)
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6
V40606 (C140-C157)
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7
V40607 (C160-C177)
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
37 36 35 34 33 32 31 30 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20
m+1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
m
m+1
DL330/340
C162
Pushbutton 3
R16/R17 (C160 to C177)
R20/R21 (C200 to C217)
R22/R23 (C220 to C237)
LEDs 1-16 flash
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4
R26/R27 (C260 to C277)
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5
R30/R31 (C300 to C317)
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
R32/R33 (C320 to C337)
Force Function Data (1-16)
R34/R35 (C340 to C357)
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
IO14
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
R17
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 1 01 0 0
OUT
OUT
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
7
8
V40601
m+7
C206 Pushbutton 23
13
6
7
8
pushbutton number
m+6
IO13
5
12
1
2
3
4
5
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
6
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
R24/R25 (C240 to C257)
C163 Pushbutton 4
4
11
internal relay number
Function
m+3
OUT
3
10
V40600
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
m+2
IO12
2
9
pushbutton number
internal relay number
DL330/340 Family
Example Memory Locations
1
Not Used
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
pushbutton number
R16
pushbutton number
internal relay number
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
R21
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
internal relay number
R20
Note: To determine the control relay number, use the register number as the first two digits and the bit
number as the last digit. For example, Bit 3 of R16 is referenced as C163.
32
Applying Ladder Logic
Controlling LEDs
Separately
By default, the LED simply shows the state of the pushbutton--ON or OFF. If a
pushbutton is configured for momentary operation, there are two options available
for the LED. It can show the state of the pushbutton or it can be controlled
independently by enabling the LED Separation feature. When you have enabled
the LED Separation feature, the ON/OFF state of the LED is controlled only by the
status of the bits in m+4 and m+5. These bits can be manipulated via your ladder
logic. In the examples below, our ladder logic is controlling LEDs 3, 4 and 23.
Remember: Any pushbutton configured for maintained (alternate action) will
ignore the bits in these two words. Independent control of the LEDs can only
be accomplished if you have Enabled LED Separation during your initial
configuration. (See Page 19, Step 9.)
DL205/DL350 and DL405 Family
DL205/DL350 or
DL405
Function
Mapped Memory Location
m
V40600 (C0-C17)
V40601 (C20-C37)
C102
m+1
OUT
m+2
V40602 (C40-C57)
LEDs 1-16 flash
X13 Light LED 4
C103
m+3
V40603 (C60-C77)
LEDs 17-24 flash
OUT
m+4
V40604 (C100-C117)
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5
V40605 (C120-C137)
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6
V40606 (C140-C157)
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7
V40607 (C160-C177)
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
X14
Light LED 23
C126
OUT
2
3
4
5
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
6
7
8
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
Light LED 3
X12
1
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m+4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m+5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
LED number
internal relay number
(Add number starting at C100)
V40604
LED number
internal relay number
(Add number starting at C120)
V40605
DL330/340 Family
m
DL330/340
IO12
IO13
IO14
Light LED 3
Light LED 4
Light LED 23
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Function
Example Memory Locations
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
m+1
R16/R17 (C160 to C177)
R20/R21 (C200 to C217)
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+2
R22/R23 (C220 to C237)
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3
R24/R25 (C240 to C257)
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4
R26/R27 (C260 to C277)
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5
R30/R31 (C300 to C317)
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6
R32/R33 (C320 to C337)
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7
R34/R35 (C340 to C357)
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
7
8
C262
OUT
C263
OUT
C306
OUT
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Not Used
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
R27
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 1 01 0 0
LED number
R26
LED number
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
R31
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
internal relay number
R30
internal relay number
Note: To determine the control relay number, use the register number as the first two digits and the bit
number as the last digit. For example, Bit 3 of R26 is referenced as C263.
33
33
Applying Ladder Logic
Adding Flashing
If you plan to use this feature with one or more pushbuttons, there are three things
you must always remember during configuration:
1. Flashing is only available for those buttons that have been configured as
Momentary.
2. LED Separation must be Enabled.
3. The Flash Option must be Enabled.
The Flashing Option option is triggered through your ladder logic. On the previous
page, we showed you how to turn ON an LED, this example shows you how to add
flashing to an LED that has been turned ON. The flashing feature is controlled by the
status of the bits in m+2 and m+3 memory areas. In the example below, we have
begun our mapping at V40600 during the initial configuration. We are turning ON
LED4 and then making it flash. Bit 3 of m+4 turns the LED ON, and bit 3 of m+2
makes it flash.
DL205/DL350 or DL405 Families
DL205/DL350 or
DL405
X12 Light LED 4
X13 Add flashing
m
V40600 (C0-C17)
V40601 (C20-C37)
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+2
V40602 (C40-C57)
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3
V40603 (C60-C77)
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4
V40604 (C100-C117)
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5
V40605 (C120-C137)
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+1
C103
OUT
C43
OUT
1
2
3
4
5
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Function
Mapped Memory Location
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
7
6
8
LED 4 turns ON and flashes
m+6
V40606 (C140-C157)
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7
V40607 (C160-C177)
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
m+4
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
m+2
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0
LED number
internal relay number
(Add number starting at C100)
V40604
LED number
internal relay number
(Add number starting at C40)
V40602
DL330/340 Family
Example Memory Locations
m
DL330/340
IO12 Light Lamp 4
m+1
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+2
R22/R23 (C220 to C237)
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3
R24/R25 (C240 to C257)
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4
R26/R27 (C260 to C277)
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5
R30/R31 (C300 to C317)
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6
R32/R33 (C320 to C337)
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7
R34/R35 (C340 to C357)
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
1
2
3
4
5
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
C223
OUT
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
6
7
LED 4 turns ON and flashes
C263
OUT
IO13 Add flashing
Function
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
R16/R17 (C160 to C177)
R20/R21 (C200 to C217)
R26
LED number
internal relay number
(Add number starting at C160)
R22
LED number
internal relay number
(Add number starting at C220)
8
34
Applying Ladder Logic
Force Function
Registers
The OP-1224 has the capability to “force” a pushbutton ON or OFF through your
ladder logic. If you plan to use this function, you must enable the force option during
configuration. (See Page 20.)
NOTE: The Force Function will only work for those pushbuttons that you have
configured as “maintained” (alternate action). It will not work for momentary
pushbuttons.
Mapping Assignments
Function
Mapped Memory Location
m (such as V40600, C0-C17)
m+1 (such as V40601, C20-C37)
PLCDirect
1
2
3
4
5
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
6
7
8
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+2 (such as V40602, C40-C57)
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3 (such as V40600, C60-C77)
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4 (such as V40604, C100-C117)
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5 (such as V40605, C120-C137)
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6 (such as V40606, C140-C157)
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7 (such as V40607, C160-C177)
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
How the Memory is Used--Looking at the above memory map, m+6 stores the
forcing data for Pushbuttons 1-16 and m+7 stores forcing data for Pushbuttons
17-24. There are three modes of the force function. These modes are controlled by
the 3 most significant bits of m+7.
Mode 1 (M1)-- This forces all of the Pushbuttons to reflect the status stored in m+6
and m+7. For example, the data shown below would force Pushbuttons 3, 4 and 23
to ON and all the others would be forced OFF. Notice that bit 15 of m +7 is set to 1 for
this mode. M2 and M3 are set to 0’s.
Mode 2 (M2)-- This forces ON only those Pushbuttons matching the bits set in
registers m+6 and m+7. The bits not set do not affect the status of the Pushbuttons.
You would set M2 to 1 while M1 and M3 are set to 0.
Mode 3 (M3)-- This forces OFF only those Pushbuttons matching the bits set in
registers m+6 and m+7. The bits not set do not affect the status of the Pushbuttons.
You would set M3 to 1 while M1 and M2 are set 0.
Force Function
Registers for
DL205/DL350/
DL405
Force Function
Registers for
DL3330/340
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0
0
0 0 1
1
0 0
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m+6
M1 M2 M3
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0
1
0
0 0
0
0
0
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
m+7
m+6
M1 M2 M3
m+7
pushbutton number
bit
pushbutton number
bit
pushbutton number
bit
pushbutton number
bit
Think of forcing as a one-shot process. That is, once you have set the mode in
m+7, the bit patterns in m and m+1 are changed (according to the mode
selected), and then, all of the bits in m+6 and m+7 are set to zero. What this
means is that all pushbuttons return to normal manual operation after the
forcing is completed.
35
35
Applying Ladder Logic
Forcing Pushbuttons In this example, we have used Mode 3 of the Force Function to force Pushbutton 14
ON or OFF
OFF when a process has been completed. Be sure and read Page 32 (if you haven’t
already done so) to learn the function of all three modes. For the DL205/DL405
example, we have used a base address of V40600. And for the DL305, we have
used R16.
DL205/DL350 or DL405 Families
Function
Mapped Memory Location
m
V40600 (C0-C17)
V40601 (C20-C37)
m+1
DL205/DL350 or
DL405
Pushbutton 14 ON
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
1
2
3
4
5
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
V40602 (C40-C57)
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3
V40603 (C60-C77)
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4
V40604 (C100-C117)
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
1
2
3
4
5
m+5
V40605 (C120-C137)
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
m+6
V40606 (C140-C157)
Force Function Data (1-16)
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
m+7
V40607 (C160-C177)
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
Pushbutton 14 is pressed ON
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
OUT
Process Finished
C155
C175
OUT
Pushbutton 14 OFF
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
V40606
V40607
Pushbutton number
relay number
(Add number starting at C160)
DL330/340
Pushbutton 14 ON
C175
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+2
R22/R23 (C220 to C237)
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3
R24/R25 (C240 to C257)
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4
R26/R27 (C260 to C277)
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5
R30/R31 (C300 to C317)
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6
R32/R33 (C320 to C337)
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7
R34/R35 (C340 to C357)
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
Start Process
IO10
OUT
Process Finished
IO13
C335
OUT
C355
Pushbutton 14 OFF
OUT
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Function
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
m+1
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Not Used
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
R17
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
R33
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
R35
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
M1 M2 M3
8
Pushbutton number
relay number
(Add number starting at C140)
DL330/340 Family
R16/R17 (C160 to C177)
R20/R21 (C200 to C217)
7
Pushbutton number
relay number
(Add number starting at C60)
M1 M2 M3
Example Memory Locations
6
Pushbutton 14 forced OFF
V40600
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
OUT
m
8
m+2
Y10
X13
7
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
Start Process
C15
6
7
8
Pushbutton 14 is pressed ON
1
2
3
4
5
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
6
7
Pushbutton 14 forced OFF
Pushbutton number
relay number
R16
Pushbutton number
relay number
R32
Pushbutton number
relay number
R34
Note: To determine the control relay number, use the register number as the
first two digits and the bit number as the last digit. For example, Bit 5 of R33
is referenced as C335.
8
36
Applying Ladder Logic
DL205/DL305/DL405 (Using Selected Functions)
Using the
Remapping Process
We briefly discussed the “remapping” process back on Page 23 as a method that
allows you to easily manipulate individual bits to take advantage of the panels
several functions. All the functions are bit-controlled. By using this method, we only
consume the number of relays we actually need for the functions we select.
OPEditor
Your Ladder Logic
Configuration
A.
mapping
B.
User Memory
128 Consecutive Bits
Consumed
mapping
Internal Relay Memory
Use Only the Words You Need
C.
mapping
Your Ladder Logic
Using the remapping method, when you first indicate a base register address with
your OPEditor software and download it to the panel, the panel configuration will
automatically consume 128 consecutive memory bits in PLC User Memory. This is
indicated by the arrow A. But since User Memory doesn’t give you bit control, you
need to remap the User Memory with Internal Relay Memory. By remapping
between User Memory and Internal Relay Memory, you only consume the Relay
Memory you need. You have two directions in which you can have your ladder logic
do the remapping between User Memory and Internal Relay Memory:
1. For using the Pushbutton Status to control outputs, you will want to write ladder
logic that maps User Memory to Internal Relay Memory (arrow B). This affects
the User Memory in the m and m+1 locations.
2. For controlling all other functions of the panel, you will want to write your ladder
logic to map Internal Relay Memory to User Memory (arrow C). This affects the
User Memory in locations m+2 through m+7.
Let’s look at two examples of remapping accomplished with ladder logic that
demonstrate the two types of remapping that can be used with this technique. We
will assume here that V2000 was used as the base register address:
Example of User Memory being mapped to Internal Relay Memory
SP1
LDD
V2000
m =V2000
m+1 = V2001
remapping = V2000:40600
= V2001:40601
OUTD
V40600
C2
Y12
OUT
Here we are using SP1 to map V2000/V2001 to
V40600/V40601. This consumes 32 relay bits, 24 of
which are tied to the 24 pushbuttons of the panel. By
pressing Pushbutton 3, you affect the status of the
third relay in V40600 which is C2. In turn, C2 will
control output Y12.
Example of Internal Relay Memory being mapped to User Memory
SP1
LDD
V40604
m+4 =V2004
m+5 = V2005
remapping = V40604:V2004
= V40605:V2005
OUTD
V2004
X12
Light LED 3
C102
OUT
Here we are using SP1 to map V40604/V40605 to
V2004/V2005. This consumes 32 relay bits, 24 of which are
tied to the 24 LEDs of the panel. When a relay is ON, its
corresponding LED is ON. By turning ON X12 with our
ladder logic, we can thus turn on the LED corresponding to
C102. C102 is bit 2 of the V40604 word and is tied to LED3
through the mapping process. See your PLC User Manual
for relay number assignments
37
37
Applying Ladder Logic
In this example, we are going to remap user memory to internal relay memory in
order to use the the pushbutton status to control outputs. The internal relays of the
DL205 and DL405 families start at V40600 and the internal relays of the DL305
family start at R16. In the examples below, we have chosen V2000 as the base
address for either a DL205 or DL405 and then used SP1 (always ON relay) in our
ladder logic to map it to V40600. We have chosen R400 as our base address for the
DL305 and then used normally closed C374 in our ladder logic to map it to R16.
Using SP1 and normally closed C374, the remapping is done every scan, otherwise
m and m+1 would not be updated. In the examples below, our ladder logic is
interacting with Pushbuttons 3, 4 and 23.
Using Pushbutton
Status Via Ladder
Logic
DL205/DL350 or DL405 Families
DL205/DL350 or
DL405
Function
Mapped Memory Location
SP1
m
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
m+2 V2002
m+3 V2003
LEDs 1-16 flash
V2000:V40600
m+1 V2001:V40601
LDD
V2000
OUTD
V40600
m+4 V2004
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5 V2005
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
Y13
m+6 V2006
Force Function Data (1-16)
OUT
m+7 V2007
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
C26
Y14
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0
OUT
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
37 36 35 34 33 32 31 30 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20
m+1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Example Memory Locations
m
C374
DSTR
R400
DOUT
R16
DSTR
R402
DOUT
R20
C162
IO12
OUT
C163
IO13
OUT
C206
IO14
OUT
R400/R401:R16/R17
m+1 R402/R403:R20/R21
m+2 R404/R405
6
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
V2001:V40601
Function
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
7
8
pushbutton number
internal relay number
internal relay number
1
2
3
4
5
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
6
7
8
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
LEDs 1-16 flash
LEDs 17-24 flash
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5 R412/R413
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6 R414/R415
m+7 R416/R417
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
Not Used
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5
12
pushbutton number
m+3 R406/R407
m+4 R410/R411
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
4
11
V2000:V40600
DL330/340 Family
DL330/340
3
10
Syntax shown in the form
of of V2000:V40600 refers
to two memory locations
that have been mapped
together.
LEDs 17-24 flash
Y12
C3
2
9
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
OUT
C2
1
Force Function Data (1-16)
R401:R17
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 1 01 0 0
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
Syntax shown in the form of of
R400/R401:R16/R17 refers to
two consecutive memory
registers mapped to two other
consecutive memory registers.
pushbutton number
internal relay number
R400:R16
pushbutton number
internal relay number
R403:R21 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 R402:R20
Note: To determine the control relay number, use the register number as the first two digits and the bit
number as the last digit. For example, Bit 3 of R16 is referenced as C163.
38
Applying Ladder Logic
By default, the LED simply shows the state of the pushbutton--ON or OFF. If a pushbutton is
configured for momentary operation, there are two options available for the LED. It can show
the state of the pushbutton or it can be controlled independently by enabling the LED
Separation feature. When you have enabled the LED Separation feature, the ON/OFF state
of the LED is controlled only by the status of the bits in m+4 and m+5. These bits can be
manipulated via your ladder logic. In the examples below we have remapped the user
memory to control relay memory to control LEDs 3, 4 and 23. Remember: Any pushbutton
configured for maintained (alternate action) will ignore the bits in these two words.
Independent control of the LEDs can only be accomplished if you have Enabled LED
Separation during your initial configuration. (See Page 19, Step 9.)
Controlling LEDs
Separately
DL205/DL350 or DL405 Family
DL205/DL/350 or
DL405
m
SP1
LDD
V40604
OUTD
V2004
X12
Light LED 3
C102
X13 Light LED 4
C103
X14
C126
OUT
OUT
Light LED 23
Function
Mapped Memory Location
OUT
m+1
V2000
V2001
m+2
V2002
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3
V2003
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4
V40604:V2004
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5
V40605:V2005
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6
V2006
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7
V2007
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m+5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
IO12
IO13
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
R404/R405
LEDs 1-16 flash
DSTR
R30
m+3
R406/R407
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4
R26/R27:R410/R411
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
DOUT
R412
m+5
R30/R31:R412/R413
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6
R414/R415
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7
R416/R417
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
OUT
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
C263
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
C306
OUT
Light LED 23
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
6
7
8
Not Used
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Syntax shown in the form
of of V2000:V40600 refers
to two memory locations
that have been mapped
together.
LED number
internal relay number
(Add number starting at C100)
internal relay number
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
7
8
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
m+2
OUT
IO14
Function
Example Memory Locations
R400/R401
R402/R403
Light LED 4
5
V40605 :V2005 (Add number starting at C120)
m
m+1
Light LED 3
C262
4
LED number
C374
DOUT
R410
3
V40604 :V2004
DL330/340 Family
DSTR
R26
2
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m+4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0
DL330/340
1
R27:R411
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0
Syntax shown in the form of of
R400/R401:R16/R17 refers to
two consecutive memory
registers mapped to two other
consecutive memory registers.
LED number
R26:R410
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
R31:R413 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 R30:R412
internal relay number
LED number
internal relay number
Note: To determine the control relay number, use the register number as the first two digits and the bit
number as the last digit. For example, Bit 3 of R26 is referenced as C263.
39
39
Applying Ladder Logic
If you plan to use this feature with one or more pushbuttons, there are three things
you must always remember during configuration:
1. Flashing is only available for those buttons that have been configured as
Momentary.
2. LED Separation must be Enabled.
3. The Flash Option must be Enabled.
The Flashing Option is triggered through your ladder logic. On the previous page, we
showed you how to turn ON an LED, this example shows you how to add flashing to
an LED that has been turned ON. The flashing feature is controlled by the status of
the bits in the m+2 and m+3 memory areas. We have mapped the user memory in
these locations to internal relay memory. In the example below, we have begun our
mapping at V2000 during the initial configuration. We are turning ON LED4 and then
making it flash. Bit 3 of m+4 turns the LED ON, and bit 3 of m+2 makes it flash.
Adding Flashing
DL205/DL350 or DL405 Families
DL205/DL350 or DL405
SP1
LDD
V40602
OUTD
V2002
C103
X13 Add flashing
C43
OUT
m
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
m+2 V2002:V40602
m+3 V2003:V40603
LEDs 1-16 flash
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4 V2004:V40604
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5 V2005:V40605
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6 V2006
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7 V2007
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
V2000
m+1 V2001
OUTD
V2004
X12 Light LED 4
m+4
m+2
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0
Example Memory Locations
C374
DOUT
R410
Function
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
m
m+1
R400/R401
R402/R403
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+2
R404/R405:R22/23
LEDs 1-16 flash
R406/R407:R24/R25
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+3
m+4
R410/R411:R26/R27
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5
R412/R413:R30:/R31
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
DOUT
R404
m+6
R414/R415
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7
R416/R417
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
C263
OUT
IO13 Add flashing
C223
4
5
6
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
8
LED 4 turns ON and flashes
Syntax shown in the form
of of V2000:V40600 refers
to two memory locations
that have been mapped
together.
V40604:V2004
LED number
internal relay number
(Add number starting at C100)
V40602:V2002
internal relay number
(Add number starting at C40)
1
2
3
4
5
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
6
7
8
Syntax shown in the form of of
R400/R401:R16/R17 refers to
two consecutive memory
registers mapped to two other
consecutive memory registers.
R26:R410
LED number
internal relay number
(Add number starting at C160)
R22:R40
LED number
internal relay number
(Add number starting at C220)
OUT
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
7
LED 4 turns ON and flashes
DSTR
R22
IO12 Light Lamp 4
3
LED number
DL330/340 Family
DL330/340
2
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
OUT
DSTR
R26
Function
Mapped Memory Location
LDD
V40604
1
40
Applying Ladder Logic
Force Function
Registers
The OP-1224 has the capability to “force” a pushbutton ON or OFF through your
ladder logic. If you plan to use this function, you must enable the force option during
configuration. (See Page 20.)
NOTE: The Force Function will only work for those pushbuttons that you have
configured as “maintained” (alternate action). It will not work for momentary
pushbuttons.
Mapping Assignments
2
3
4
5
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
6
7
8
Function
Mapped Memory Location
m (such as V40600:V2000)
m+1 (such as V40601:V2001)
PLCDirect
1
9
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+2 (such as V40602:V2002)
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3 (such as V40603:V2003)
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4 (such as V40604:V2004)
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5 (such as V40605:V2005)
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6 (such as V40606:V2006)
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7 (such as V40607:V2007)
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
How the Memory is Used--Looking at the above memory map, m+6 stores the
forcing data for Pushbuttons 1-16 and m+7 stores forcing data for Pushbuttons
17-24. There are three modes of the force function. These modes are controlled by
the most significant bits of m+7.
Mode 1 (M1)-- This forces all of the Pushbuttons to reflect the status stored in m+6
and m+7. For example, the data shown below would force Pushbuttons 3, 4 and 23
to ON and all the others would be forced OFF. Notice that bit 15 of m +7 is set to 1 for
this mode. M2 and M3 are set to 0’s.
Mode 2 (M2)-- This forces ON only those Pushbuttons matching the bits set in
registers m+6 and m+7. The bits not set do not affect the status of the Pushbuttons.
You would set M2to 1 while M1 and M3 are set to 0.
Mode 3 (M3)-- This forces OFF only those Pushbuttons matching the bits set in
registers m+6 and m+7. The bits not set do not affect the status of the Pushbuttons.
You would set M3 to 1 while M1 amd M2 are set to 0.
Force Function
Registers for
DL205/DL350/
DL405
Force Function
Registers for
DL330/340
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0
0
0 0 1
1
0 0
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m+6
M1 M2 M3
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0
1
0
0 0
0
0
0
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
m+7
m+6
M1 M2 M3
m+7
pushbutton number
bit
pushbutton number
bit
pushbutton number
bit
pushbutton number
bit
Think of forcing as a one-shot process. That is, once you have set the mode in m+7, the
bit patterns in m and m+1 are changed (according to the mode selected), and then, all
of the bits in m+6 and m+7 are set to zero. What this means is that all pushbuttons
return to normal manual operation after the forcing is completed.
41
41
Applying Ladder Logic
Forcing Pushbuttons In this example, we have used Mode 3 of the Force Function to force Pushbutton 14
ON or OFF
OFF when a process has been completed. Be sure and read Page 37 (if you haven’t
already done so) to learn the function of all three modes. For the DL205/DL405
example, we have used a base address of V40600. And for the DL305, we have
used R16.
DL205/DL350 or DL405 Families
SP1
LDD
V40600
OUTD
V2000
LDD
V40602
OUTD
V2006
Pushbutton 14 ON
C15
Y10
OUT
C55
OUT
C75
Pushbutton 14 OFF
OUT
Function
V2000:V40600 (C0--C17)
m+1 V2001:V40601 (C20--C37)
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+2 V2002
m+3 V2003
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4 V2004
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
2
3
4
5
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
LEDs 1-16 flash
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6 V40602 (C40--C57):V2006
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7 V40603 (C60--C77):V2007
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
6
7
8
Pushbutton 14 is pressed ON
m+5 V2005
Start Process
Process Finished
X13
Mapped Memory Location
m
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
7
8
Pushbutton 14 forced OFF
V40600:V2000
Pushbutton number
relay number
(Add number starting at C0)
V40602:V2006
Pushbutton number
relay number
(Add number starting at C40)
V40603:V2007
Pushbutton number
relay number
(Add number starting at C60)
M1 M2 M3
42
Applying Ladder Logic
DL330/340 Family
C374
DSTR
R400
DOUT
R16
DSTR
R402
DOUT
R20
DSTR
R414
DOUT
R22
C235
OUT
C255
OUT
Pushbutton 14 OFF
5
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
6
7
8
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
R404/R405
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3
R406/R407
LEDs 17-24 flash
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
m+4
R410/R411
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5
R412/R413
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6
R414/R415:R22/R23
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7
R416/R417:R24/R25
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
M1 M2 M3
Process Finished
4
11
m+2
DOUT
R24
IO10
3
10
R400/R401:R16/R17
R402/R403:R20/R21
DSTR
R416
OUT
Start Process
2
9
m
m+1
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
C175
IO13
Function
Example Memory Locations
1
Not Used
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
R17:R401
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
R23:R415
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
R25:R417
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pushbutton 14 is pressed ON
7
8
Pushbutton 14 forced OFF
R16:R400
R22:R414
R24:R416
Pushbutton number
relay number
(Add number starting at C160)
Pushbutton number
relay number
(Add number starting at C220)
Pushbutton number
relay number
(Add number starting at C240)
Note: To determine the control relay number, use the register number as the
first two digits and the bit number as the last digit. For example, Bit 5 of R23
is referenced as C235.
43
43
Applying Ladder Logic
Using the OP-1224 with an Allen-Bradley PLC
Using the
Pushbutton Status
As mentioned earlier, you can map integer type files for the Allen-Bradley PLC when
using it with the OP1224. In the example below, we have mapped integer file
registers starting at base address N7:0. We are using Pushbutton 3 to control Output
5 (O:3/5). We are using Pushbutton 4 to control Output 6 (O:3/6). And we are using
Pushbutton 23 to control Output 7 (O:3/7).
SLC 5/03 or 5/04
Mapped Memory Location
N7:0
Pushbutton 3
O:3
2
N7:0
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+2 (such as N7: 2/0 2/15)
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3 (such as N7: 3/0 3/15)
LEDs 17-24 flash
3
4
5
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
6
7
8
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
m+4 (such as N7: 4/0 4/15)
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5 (such as N7: 5/0 5/15)
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6 (such as N7: 6/0 6/15)
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7 (such as N7: 7/0 7/15)
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
O:3
3
6
Pushbutton 23
6
m (such as N7: 0/0-- 0/15)
m+1 (such as N7: 1/0 1/15)
2
9
5
Pushbutton 4
N7:1
Function
1
O:3
7
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m+1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
N7:0
pushbutton number
bit
pushbutton number
bit
N7:1
44
Applying Ladder Logic
Controlling LEDs
Separately
You can control the LEDs separately from the status of the pushbuttons. In the
example below, we are using Allen-Bradley input type files (I:0/2, I:0/3 and I:0/4) to
trigger the ON/OFF of LED3, LED4 and LED5. Remember: Any pushbutton
configured for maintained (alternate action) will ignore the bits in these two
words. Independent control of the LEDs can only be accomplished if you have
Enabled LED Separation during your initial configuration. (See Page 19, Step
9.)
SLC 5/03 or 5/04
Mapped Memory Location
m (such as N7: 0/0-- 0/15)
m+1 (such as N7: 1/0 1/15)
I:0
Light LED 3
N7:4
2
I:0
2
Light LED 4
N7:4
3
I:0
3
Light LED 23
4
N7:5
6
Function
1
2
3
4
5
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+2 (such as N7: 2/0 2/15)
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3 (such as N7: 3/0 3/15)
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4 (such as N7: 4/0 4/15)
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5 (such as N7: 5/0 5/15)
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6 (such as N7: 6/0 6/15)
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7 (such as N7: 7/0 7/15)
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m+4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m+5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
N7:4
LED number
bit number
LED number
N7:5
bit number
6
7
8
45
45
Applying Ladder Logic
Adding Flashing
To draw extra attention to an LED that is lit, you can add flashing. If you plan to use
this feature with one or more pushbuttons, there are three things you must always
remember during configuration:
1. Flashing is only available for those buttons that have been configured as
Momentary.
2. LED Separation must be Enabled.
3. The Flash Option must be Enabled.
The Flashing Option is triggered through your ladder logic. On the previous page, we
showed you how to turn ON an LED, this example shows you how to add flashing to
an LED that has been turned ON. The flashing feature is controlled by the status of
the bits in the m+2 and m+3 memory areas. We have mapped the user memory in
these locations to internal relay memory. In the example below, we have begun our
mapping at N7:0 during the initial configuration. We are turning ON LED4 and then
making it flash. Bit 3 of m+4 turns the LED ON, and bit 3 of m+2 makes it flash. In the
example below, we are using input type files (I:0/3 and I:0/4). I:0/3 turns ON LED 4
and I:0/4 turns ON the flashing feature for that particular LED.
SLC 5/03 or 5/04
Mapped Memory Location
I:0
Light LED 4
I:0
3
Add flashing
4
m (such as N7: 0/0-- 0/15)
m+1 (such as N7: 1/0 1/15)
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+2 (such as N7: 2/0 2/15)
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3 (such as N7: 3/0 3/15)
LEDs 17-24 flash
N7:5
6
2
3
4
5
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
6
7
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
m+4 (such as N7: 4/0 4/15)
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5 (such as N7: 5/0 5/15)
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6 (such as N7: 6/0 6/15)
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7 (such as N7: 7/0 7/15)
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m+4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
N7:4
3
Function
1
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m+5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
LED 4 turns ON and flashes
N7:0
Pushbutton/LED number
bit number
Pushbutton/LED number
N7:
bit number
8
46
Applying Ladder Logic
Force Function
Registers
The OP-1224 has the capability to “force” a pushbutton ON or OFF through your
ladder logic. If you plan to use this function, you must enable the force option during
configuration. (See Page 24.)
NOTE: The Force Function will only work for those pushbuttons that you have
configured as “maintained” (alternate action). It will not work for momentary
pushbuttons.
Mapping Assignments
2
3
4
5
6
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
7
8
Function
Mapped Memory Location
Allen-Bradley
1
9
m (such as N7: 0/0-- 0/15)
m+1 (such as N7: 1/0 1/15)
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
m+2 (such as N7: 2/0 2/15)
LEDs 1-16 flash
m+3 (such as N7: 3/0 3/15)
LEDs 17-24 flash
m+4 (such as N7: 4/0 4/15)
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5 (such as N7: 5/0 5/15)
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
m+6 (such as N7: 6/0 6/15)
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7 (such as N7: 7/0 7/15)
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
How the Memory is Used--Looking at the above memory map, m+6 stores the
forcing data for Pushbuttons 1-16 and m+7 stores forcing data for Pushbuttons
17-24. There are three modes of the force function. These modes are controlled by
the most significant bits of m+7.
Mode 1 (M1)-- This forces all of the Pushbuttons to reflect the status stored in m+6
and m+7. For example, the data shown below would force Pushbuttons 3, 4 and 23
to ON and all the others would be forced OFF. Notice that bit 15 of m +7 is set to 1 for
this mode. M2 and M3 are set to 0’s.
Mode 2 (M2)-- This forces ON only those Pushbuttons matching the bits set in
registers m+6 and m+7. The bits not set do not affect the status of the Pushbuttons.
You would set M2 to 1 while M1 and M3 are set to 0.
Mode 3 (M3)-- This forces OFF only those Pushbuttons matching the bits set in
registers m+6 and m+7. The bits not set do not affect the status of the Pushbuttons.
You would set M3 to 1 while M1 amd M2 are set to 0.
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0
Force Function
Registers
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 0 1
1
0 0
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
m+6
M1 M2 M3
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0 0
0
0
0
m+7
pushbutton number
bit
pushbutton number
bit
Think of forcing as a one-shot process. That is, once you have set the mode in
m+7, the bit patterns in m and m+1 are changed (according to the mode
selected), and then, all of the bits in m+6 and m+7 are set to zero. What this
means is that all pushbuttons return to normal manual operation after the
forcing is completed.
47
47
Applying Ladder Logic
Forcing Pushbuttons You can also use Allen-Bradley integer file types to force pushbuttons ON or OFF.
ON or OFF
Here we have chosen N7:0 as our base address for the mapping in the PLC. In this
example, we are using Pushbutton 14 to start a process, and then forcing the
pushbutton OFF when the process is completed. N7:0 holds the bit that reflects the
status of Pushbutton 14. N7:6 and part of N7:7 hold the data that the force feature
uses when executing one of the three selectable modes (M1, M2 or M3). These
modes are selectable in the upper three bits of the mapped memory area m+7. In the
example, below the mode is embedded in N7:7.
Here we have chosen to use Mode 3. Mode 3 looks at N7:6, and whichever bits are
set to 1 , the corresponding pushbuttons are forced OFF. Since we set the 13th bit of
N7:7 (corresponding to LED14), the OP-1224 will force LED14 OFF.
SLC 5/03 or 5/04
Mapped Memory Location
Pushbutton 14 ON
N7:0
13
m (such as N7: 0/0-- 0/15)
m+1 (such as N7: 1/0 1/15)
Pushbuttons 17-24 ON/OFF
5
2
3
4
5
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Pushbuttons 1-16 ON/OFF
6
7
8
Pushbutton 14 is pressed ON
m+2 (such as N7: 2/0 2/15)
LEDs 1-16 flash
1
m+3 (such as N7: 3/0 3/15)
LEDs 17-24 flash
9
10
11
12
13
m+4 (such as N7: 4/0 4/15)
14
15
16
LEDs 1-16 ON/OFF
m+5 (such as N7: 5/0 5/15)
LEDs 17-24 ON/OFF
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
m+6 (such as N7: 6/0 6/15)
Force Function Data (1-16)
m+7 (such as N7: 7/0 7/15)
Force Function Mode/Data (17-24)
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Pushbutton 14 forced OFF
Start Process
O:3
2
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
N7:6
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Process Finished
I:0
Function
1
13
Not Used
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pushbutton/LED number
bit
N7:0
Pushbutton/LED number
bit
N7:6
M1 M2 M3
N7:7
13
Pushbutton 14 OFF
If LED is linked to Pushbutton status,
it goes OFF when button is OFF
N7:7
Pushbutton/LED number
bit
1
Index
D
A
Address
Assigning a hardware address, 14
Conventions, 24
Setting the dip switch, 14
Termination resistor, 14
DCM, 12
Addressing conventions, 24
DIP switch, 5
Allen--Bradley (Cables for), 12
Micrologix, 12
SLC500, 12
5/03, 12
5/04, 12
DirectSOFT, 2
DCU, 12
Decimal numbers, 31
Dimensions for Mounting, 9
DOS, 16
downloading, 22
F
B
File number (Allen-Bradley), 20
Base register address, 20
Force Function, 29
Baud Rate, 16, 19
Force option, 21
Bezel, 6
Bit-of-Word, 25
G
GE Series 1, 12
C
Cable requirements, 10
shielded cable, 12
Communications master, 10
Connector Specification, 11
Programming Cable, 11
PLC-to-Panel Cable, 11
Control relays, 31, 37
Cutout Area for Panel, 9
I
Internal Relays, 25
Index--2
L
S
Labels, 6
Preparing labels, 6
Template, 7
Separation of LED, 21
SIMATIC, 12
SLC500, 12
LED separation, 21
Slice I/O, 12
Legend, 6
Specification, Storage Temperature, 8
Octal numbers, 31
Specifications, 8
Communication Link, 8
Diagnostics, 8
NEMA rating, 8
Operating Humidity, 8
Operating Temperature, 8
NEMA rating, 7
storage temperature,7
operating humidity, 7
operating temperature, 7
power budget, 7
power connector, 7
weight, 7, 13
OP-9001, 10, 15
System requirements, 15
M
Memory mapping, 3
N
NEMA, 5
O
OP-CMCON-1, 12
OP-CMCON-2, 12
OPEditor, 2
T
TI305, 11
TI405, 11
P
Power supply, 13
R
R-memory, 20
Remapping, 25, 36
Ribbon cable, 10
RS422, 15
Pinouts, 11