MSSIAH Mono Synthesizer User Manual

Mono Synthesizer
Introduction ............................................................................................................................. 5
Using the Mono Synthesizer ................................................................................................... 6
Starting Up ............................................................................................................................ 6
Main Screen .......................................................................................................................... 6
Sound Controls ...................................................................................................................... 7
General Controls ................................................................................................................... 7
Sequencer .............................................................................................................................. 7
Setup Screen .......................................................................................................................... 7
Sequencer Modes .................................................................................................................. 8
Normal Mode ........................................................................................................................ 8
Pitch Mode ............................................................................................................................ 8
Time Mode ............................................................................................................................ 8
Transpose Mode .................................................................................................................... 8
MIDI Mode ........................................................................................................................... 8
New ....................................................................................................................................... 8
Quit/Reboot ........................................................................................................................... 8
User Input Controls ................................................................................................................. 9
Joystick.................................................................................................................................. 9
Potentiometers ....................................................................................................................... 9
Select Control ........................................................................................................................ 9
Assigning Potentiometers.................................................................................................... 10
MIDI Mode ............................................................................................................................ 11
Connect your MIDI Cable ................................................................................................... 11
MIDI Channel ..................................................................................................................... 11
Mode ................................................................................................................................... 11
Bend Range up .................................................................................................................... 12
Bend Range down ............................................................................................................... 12
Mod wheel Sensitivity......................................................................................................... 12
Velocity Sensitivity ............................................................................................................. 12
Velocity Modulation ........................................................................................................... 12
Legato.................................................................................................................................. 12
Synchronization in MIDI mode .......................................................................................... 12
Note Length Trig Problem .................................................................................................. 12
Edit Sounds ............................................................................................................................ 14
Changing the Current Patch ................................................................................................ 14
The Structure of a Sound..................................................................................................... 14
Oscillator A ......................................................................................................................... 14
Oscillator B ......................................................................................................................... 15
Tuning with PAL / NTSC ................................................................................................... 15
Pitch Wheel ......................................................................................................................... 15
Mixer ................................................................................................................................... 16
Filter .................................................................................................................................... 16
A word about the SID filter ................................................................................................. 17
Amplifier ............................................................................................................................. 17
A word about the SID envelopes ........................................................................................ 17
Initialize Envelopes ............................................................................................................. 17
Envelope Modulation .......................................................................................................... 18
LFO ..................................................................................................................................... 18
How to Improve Audio Quality .......................................................................................... 19
Tap ...................................................................................................................................... 20
2
Second SID ......................................................................................................................... 20
Detune ................................................................................................................................. 20
Using Control Change ......................................................................................................... 20
The Pattern Sequencer .......................................................................................................... 21
Playing Patterns................................................................................................................... 21
Open the Demo Patterns...................................................................................................... 21
Select Patterns ..................................................................................................................... 21
Run Mode............................................................................................................................ 21
Tempo ................................................................................................................................. 22
Shuffle ................................................................................................................................. 22
Chain Play ........................................................................................................................... 22
Transpose ............................................................................................................................ 22
External Synchronizing ....................................................................................................... 23
External Pattern Select ........................................................................................................ 23
Editing Patterns ..................................................................................................................... 24
Pitch Mode .......................................................................................................................... 24
Play or Hold ........................................................................................................................ 24
Time Mode .......................................................................................................................... 25
Slides / Octaves ................................................................................................................... 25
Pattern Length ..................................................................................................................... 26
Graphic Note and Time Line Display ................................................................................. 26
Insert and Delete ................................................................................................................. 26
Cut / Copy / Paste................................................................................................................ 27
Settings ................................................................................................................................... 28
Controls ............................................................................................................................... 28
Synchronization .................................................................................................................. 28
System ................................................................................................................................. 29
Slide Time ........................................................................................................................... 29
Advanced Random Composer .............................................................................................. 30
Lock Notes .......................................................................................................................... 30
Length ................................................................................................................................. 30
Range .................................................................................................................................. 30
Slide .................................................................................................................................... 31
Accent ................................................................................................................................. 31
Group/Section/Pattern ......................................................................................................... 31
Random! .............................................................................................................................. 31
Example .............................................................................................................................. 31
Editor................................................................................................................................... 31
Navigating ........................................................................................................................... 32
Delete .................................................................................................................................. 32
Insert.................................................................................................................................... 32
Clear Pattern ........................................................................................................................ 32
Alter Notes .......................................................................................................................... 33
Change Pattern .................................................................................................................... 33
Toggle grid .......................................................................................................................... 33
Files ......................................................................................................................................... 34
Media .................................................................................................................................. 34
Opening the Demo Files...................................................................................................... 36
Save Project......................................................................................................................... 37
Verifying SDR Saves .......................................................................................................... 38
Open Project ........................................................................................................................ 38
3
Export Pattern ..................................................................................................................... 40
Import Pattern ..................................................................................................................... 41
Export Patch ........................................................................................................................ 42
Import Patch ........................................................................................................................ 43
Example Guide to Editing Patterns ..................................................................................... 45
Key Map ................................................................................................................................. 47
MIDI Implementation Chart ................................................................................................ 49
MIDI Controller List ............................................................................................................. 50
4
Introduction
The MSSIAH Mono Synthesizer software is designed to be a monophonic synthesizer application
imitating the behaviors of classic analog machines.
Running in mono mode only, the idea is to put all processing power and audio features into a onevoice synthesizer and thereby increase parameter resolution and modulation capabilities beyond
the other apps in the MSSIAH suite.
The Mono Synthesizer is fully controllable via MIDI to make a good companion with the other
gear in your recording studio. Playing it with a keyboard is so expressive it makes you think your
C64 has a Moog label on the back.
To provide even further resemblance to vintage gear, Mono Synthesizer takes the input from up
to four game paddles (stock or home built potentiometers) to turn its virtual knobs.
If you’re short on a MIDI keyboard you can play the Mono Synthesizer directly on the C64’s
keyboard (compatible with the “Music Maker” keyboard overlay). Imagine solo playing in front
of a live audience guaranteed to get really excited by the sheer look of someone actually playing a
classic game computer from the 80s! (Sorry, we don’t carry straps..)
Additionally the program is built around a TB-303 style sequencer that offers repetitive patterns
to be played or synchronized externally.
If you’re out of inspiration, the “Advanced Random Composer” is featured to create sequencer
patterns randomly. A few basic input parameters make an impressive result.
Wrapped up in an appealing user interface anyone can learn in a few minutes makes the Mono
Synthesizer a worthy member of the MSSIAH family.
We hope it will be a great tool at hand whenever you need raw monophonic MIDI SID power.
This manual covers all the things you need to know to operate the program.
5
Using the Mono Synthesizer
Starting Up
To start the Mono Synthesizer, select Mono Synthesizer in the startup menu and press return.
The program loads from the cartridge and starts up in approx. 10 seconds.
Note:
The user is strongly advised to carefully read the instructions on how to properly handle the
cartridge in the booklet MSSIAH - Getting Started available for download at
http://www.mssiah.com.
Main Screen
The Mono Synthesizer Main Screen is the default outlook when started up.
From here you alter sound parameters, change patches and edit patterns to play.
The Main Screen consists of three sections:
Sound Controls
General Controls
Pattern Sequencer
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Sound Controls
The Sound Controls reside on the upper part of the screen. Every parameter is assigned a special
key on the C64’s keyboard. Some parameters share the same key thus requiring multiple keypresses to activate.
When a knob is active you can tweak it with your joystick or game paddle. The knob visualizes
its current value “virtually” on a circular scale. That way you can roughly read out the value with
just a quick look at the knob’s position.
When using potentiometers (game paddles) you can have four knobs active at the same time.
General Controls
The General Controls section is where to change patches, assign the current input control, change
tempo and banks, activate MIDI mode etc.
The CRSR UP/DOWN and CRSR LEFT/RIGHT keys select the General Control. The active
control is underlined with a dotted line. Holding COMMODORE (C=) key while pressing the
CRSR keys alters the value.
Sequencer
The pattern sequencer provided is accessed from the bottom of the screen. It closely resembles
the Roland TB-303 step sequencer and operates in three different modes; Normal Mode (playing),
Pitch Mode (enter note data) and Time Mode (enter a time line).
If you are a TB-303 sequencer novice, you may have some difficulties to grasp the concept at
first. Once you get a hold of it though, you will see the great potential creating interesting
compositions with this tool
(If not, the Advanced Random Composer still provides an additional graphic editor).
Last, there is a second screen provided:
Setup Screen
Pressing the CTRL key switches display to the
Setup Screen. From here you can choose which
control to use, whether you run the software on
an NTSC or PAL machine, access the file
operations and much more.
The Setup Screen user interface has several
windows in a DOS like environment.
Use the CRSR keys to open windows,
RETURN key to select and ← key to close window/cancel.
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Sequencer Modes
The pattern sequencer on the Main Screen operates in three different modes affecting the whole
Main Screen:
Normal Mode
Normal Mode is the default mode in which you edit sounds, select patterns, play patterns
and synchronize the sequencer to MIDI clock.
Pitch Mode
In Pitch Mode you enter and edit notes for the current pattern. Sound Controls and
General Controls are inactivated.
Time Mode
Here is where you enter a time line for the notes in the current pattern. Sound Controls
and General Controls section are inactivated.
Transpose Mode
Not really an operating mode but a special state in Normal Mode, this mode is activated
to alter the transpose setting for the current pattern playing.
MIDI Mode
MIDI mode is the opposite of the Sequencer mode.
To activate MIDI mode, press COMMODORE (C=) key and CRSR UP key with the cursor on
the MIDI/Seq parameter in the controls section. The screen goes blank and awaits MIDI input. If
you haven’t plugged in your MIDI cable into the MIDI input of the MSSIAH cartridge yet, now
is the time to do so. Press the RUN/STOP key to exit MIDI mode.
New
In the Setup screen (CTRL key) you can erase all the patterns currently residing in the pattern
sequencer. Select the New item in the FILE menu. This does not affect the current patches.
Patterns are also lost when quitting the application.
Quit/Reboot
You can quit the Mono Synthesizer and return to the startup menu at anytime by entering the
Setup screen (CTRL key) and select the Reboot menu item in the QUIT menu.
All the sound and general controls are saved in between sessions and even if the computer is
switched off if you choose to save changes before turning off the MSSIAH.
Pattern data is not saved.
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User Input Controls
MSSIAH Mono Synthesizer uses two types of input controls: Joystick and Potentiometers.
Joystick
Joystick is the default input control. Moving the joystick up and down makes the current
parameter increase or decrease. Pressing FIRE button speeds up the rate of alteration. Joysticks
are plugged into controller port #2 that is the one just next to the power switch.
Potentiometers
A potentiometer is a variable resistor that changes its resistance when you turn its knob.
The Commodore 64 is capable of sampling the resistance value for applications such as the
MSSIAH or Prophet64.
Four potentiometers are handled simultaneously by connecting two pots into each controller port.
Mono Synthesizer is fully configurable so that you can freely select which pot to use or not.
Potentiometers stay active in MIDI mode too.
Technically, it is the audio chip inside the computer that takes care of handling the
potentiometers. If your audio chip’s pot-readers are defective in any way, one or more pots cannot
be used and the same goes for a computer with the audio chip pulled out. Check out the port
diagnostics in the MSSIAH Cartridge Startup menu to test your potentiometers.
Old game paddles designed for Commodore computers are in fact potentiometers. If you manage
to find one or two of those, you have a true retro style computer and are more than ready to start
tweaking the Mono Synthesizer. If not, you can build one yourself. Check out the booklet
MSSIAH - Getting Started on our website for schematics.
Select Control
Being a modern computer user, one has gotten used to things like plug and play these days.
However, the MSSIAH Mono Synthesizer has no way of auto-detecting the control currently
attached to your computer. Unless you just started up the application and intend to run a joystick
(default), you will have to take care of setting the controls yourself:



Open the Setup Screen by pressing the CTRL key.
Navigate with the CRSR keys to the second menu from the left: SETTINGS
Open up the drop-down menu and select Controls.
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The first option sets the current control type, either joystick or potentiometers (POT / JOY). As
you select POT, all four potentiometers can be turned on or off individually.
The second option blocks the potentiometers unless the
LEFT SHIFT key is depressed. Why?
Well, as you will notice, potentiometers can be a bit ‘shaky’
switching values periodically.
It’s not so much of a problem when turning the VCF
frequency or LFO amount but causes unintentional tweaks in
case you select the wrong parameter by accident.
The L-Shift option only passes through your pot movements
whenever the LEFT SHIFT key is depressed. Release it and the pots have no effect on the
parameter value.
With the L-Shift option activated it is fully possible to hit the CAPS LOCK key and manually
cancel the shift key prevention. This is not recommended as it may cause C64 keyboard conflicts
and select unwanted parameters.
Assigning Potentiometers
When using potentiometers in the Main Screen you can tweak them all at the same time and all
the knobs will turn accordingly. However, selecting the active sound parameter for each
individual potentiometer is done one at a time. The Assign parameter in the General Controls
section holds the current active potentiometer.
As the pot is activated, pressing the sound control keys will select the active knob for that specific
pot only.
Alias
1-X
2-X
1-Y
2-Y
Controller port pin
1
2
1
2
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MIDI Mode
When editing sounds, patterns and various other parameters Mono Synthesizer operates in
Sequencer mode. That means it responds to internal/external clock signals and plays the pattern
sequencer whenever it is started.
Switching the Mono Synthesizer into MIDI mode however, blanks the screen and instead
responds to MIDI according to the configuration in the setup menu (if selected as primary control,
potentiometers are still active in MIDI mode too).
MIDI mode is switched on in the General Controls section.
To switch back to Sequencer mode, press the RUN/STOP key.
Connect your MIDI Cable
MSSIAH Mono Synthesizer is integrated with the MSSIAH Cartridge’s built in MIDI interface.
The connector on top of the cartridge is a MIDI input and that is where you insert your MIDI
cable that goes to the output of your sequencer or master keyboard. Note that the MSSIAH
cartridge does not have a MIDI output.
Though MIDI mode is activated in the Main Screen, its setup parameters are accessed via the
setup screen.
MIDI Channel
The MIDI channel parameter sets the receive channel 1-16 or off (displayed with two dashes - -).
It does not make a lot of sense turning off the receive channel but since the MSSIAH Sequencer
application is capable of handling six MIDI channels simultaneously it can also turn off
individual tracks. The other applications (such as this one, the Mono Synthesizer) use it for
compatibility reasons.
Mode
When switched to MIDI mode Mono Synthesizer awaits MIDI input such as note events (key on
and key offs), control change messages etc.
However, by selecting C64 Keyboard instead of MIDI Notes, MIDI mode will ignore all MIDI
note events in favor of the built in keyboard of the C64. Control change and program change
messages still work though and so does the potentiometers.
In other words, this mode turns your MSSIAH equipped favorite 80s computer to a cool stage
keyboard to really play the machine in front of a live audience.
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The C64 keys used for playing notes are the ones on the upper half of the keyboard
(Q2W3ER..etc) thereby offering full compatibility with the old “Music Maker” keyboard overlay
in case you happen to have one of those lying around..
Use the F1 key to increase the base octave and F3 key to decrease it. Use the F5 and F7 keys to
increase and decrease the current patch number.
Bend Range up
Adjust the bend range of the pitch wheel when moved upwards in 24 semitone steps.
Bend Range down
Adjust the bend range of the pitch wheel when moved downwards in 24 semitone steps.
Mod wheel Sensitivity
Adjust the modulation wheel sensitivity, i.e., how much the wheel will affect the LFO modulation
depth. Mod wheel is the equivalent to control change #01.
Velocity Sensitivity
Adjust the velocity sensitivity from the MIDI keyboard.
Velocity Modulation
You can choose to apply the velocity to either VCA’s sustain level or the filter envelope
modulation depth.
Sustain level velocity is applied to the VCA’s sustain level directly so make sure your envelope
has got a full sustain level and preferably no decay.
Legato
Select whether to slide in between legato notes (played without release in between) or not.
This setting also applies to the C64 keyboard if MIDI mode is operating in C64 Keyboard mode.
Synchronization in MIDI mode
MIDI clock is still active in MIDI mode to sync the LFO. If you select the user port as clock
source in the SYNC settings (see Synchronization section in the Settings chapter) DIN sync is
activated instead.
Note Length Trig Problem
Most grid editors found on popular PC/Mac sequencers will default the note length to a full 16th
or 32rd note (see left image on next page).
That means the note off is sent just before the next adjacent (if any) note triggers.
Though most synthesizers handle this well the SID does not. When trigging off a SID oscillator
the chip needs a little extra time to recover before the next trig occurs.
12
Therefore, when working with an external sequencer, shorten the length of notes so that a note off
doesn’t get too close to the next note on (right image).
13
Edit Sounds
The MSSIAH Mono Synthesizer can store eight patches with your sounds.
A patch is the full collection of parameters that makes up the sound you are playing.
All the instrument data of the eight patches is saved in between sessions and can even be recalled
the next time you start up the MSSIAH if you choose to save your changes before turning off the
computer.
Changing the Current Patch
Change the current patch in the general controls section. Put the general control cursor under
PATCH and hold the COMMODORE (C=) key. Then scroll through the patches by pressing the
CRSR keys.
Patches can also be changed via MIDI sending a program change message. Note that both manual
patch changes as well as MIDI program changes set the new patch instantly. That may cause
incorrect pitching to occur if pitch modulation has been applied. Playing a new note immediately
corrects the pitch.
The Structure of a Sound
The Mono Synthesizer’s sound layout is based on two oscillators, A and B, playing in unison.
Each oscillator has four different waveforms and separate tuning. There are additional effects for
the oscillators such as ring modulation, waveform synchronization and fine tune.
The filter has a hardware envelope that can be routed to modulate both oscillator frequency and
pulse width. Filter types are low pass, band pass and high pass or all combined. External sources
can be filtered too.
The third SID oscillator operates as an LFO with four waveforms, capable of modulating
oscillator frequency, waveform pulse widths and filters. It is also possible to synchronize the LFO
to the internal or external clock. Volume curve is set by the SID hardware envelope.
Note:
Each parameter described in this chapter is accessed with an assigned key on the C64 keyboard.
In the Key Map chapter you will find a complete list of those keys.
Oscillator A
The Oscillator A section contains all parameters to control
Oscillator A.
Waveforms
The symbols on the left represent the available SID
oscillator waveforms. Though this software allows you to add waveforms freely it’s not
certain that it will produce the results you want. The 8580 is capable of mixing the saw
tooth, triangle and pulse waveforms whereas only triangle and pulse generally work with
the 6581. The noise waveform cannot be mixed.
Frequency
The frequency parameter sets the pitch for Oscillator A in semi-note steps. You can pitch
it up and down 24 semi-notes.
14
Pulse Width
When selecting the pulse waveform the PW (Pulse Width) parameter adjusts the width of
the pulse wave. This produces a variety of sounds ranging from the total bleepiness of a
full pulse width to warmer or sharper sounds with a narrow pulse.
Modulating the pulse width produces animated sounds that are similar to two detuned
oscillators. Classic C64 leads and fat bass sounds were built up this way. The default
value of 225 makes a completely full 50/50 pulse waveform.
Waveform Synchronization
To synchronize a waveform means locking Oscillator A’s frequency to the frequency of
Oscillator B. To hear the typical sync effect you need to change either oscillator’s
frequency manually or with the envelope/ LFO. Take a look at default (factory) patch #5
for some examples. Synchronization is a SID hardware feature.
Ring Modulation
With this effect oscillator A becomes ring modulated to oscillator B. The outcome is
completely dependent on oscillator A’s frequency in relation to osc. B. When modulating
frequencies, go for osc. A.
Ring modulation works best when using the triangle waveform on both oscillators.
On
The On-setting toggles the oscillator on/off. Note that this parameter is turned on/off
inverted to the others. Push your controller up to turn it off and down to turn it on. When
turned off, Oscillator A is completely shut off.
Oscillator B
The Oscillator B section contains all parameters to control the
Oscillator B. Those are the same as for osc. A.
Fine
The extra fine tune parameter is the only thing that differs
the osc. A and B sections. It enables you to tune the Boscillator up or down in fifty steps each.
Fine tuning two oscillators is a great way of adding “air” to your sound. Overdo it and
you get the classic Euro-pad, like default (factory) patch #2.
Tuning with PAL / NTSC
The current pitch of the Mono Synthesizer is determined by the PAL/NTSC-setting on the Setup
Screen. Since NTSC-machines run a little faster than PAL machines, tuning is affected also.
The NTSC/PAL setting is automatically set on startup, if this fails (Mono Synthesizer plays out of
tune) you need to select system manually. Read more about it in the Settings chapter.
Pitch Wheel
When using extreme bend ranges for MIDI Pitch Wheel and playing higher notes, you might
experience stepped pitching, a.k.a. “stair casing”. This is due to the SID circuit not using linear
values when converting digital frequency to analog audio. MSSIAH itself uses the full 14-bit
resolution for pitch wheel control.
15
Mixer
Balance
Balance sets the balance between oscillator A and B. Actually the
SID oscillators do not have individual volume settings. The only way
to manipulate the volume is through the VCA envelope.
The balance setting is therefore a software compromise. It adjusts the VCA sustain value
for the oscillators respectively to match the balance setting. It works really well when
using an envelope with a maximum sustain value and preferably a zero decay. Keep this
in mind when relying on balance in your current patch: tweaking the envelope may
cancel the balance effect.
Volume
The volume parameter directly affects the overall SID volume level.
If you experience distortion when using the filters, try to lower this level one to three
steps and see if it helps out.
Filter
The filter section gives you direct control of filter type,
frequency tweaks and the filter envelope.
Filter Type
You can set the SID filter to low pass, band pass or
high pass. Any of the three filter types can be
combined with various results. If you wish to input
an external signal through the C64 audio input/output activate the EXT parameter.
Cutoff Frequency
The cutoff frequency is directly routed to the SID filter frequency. It works as long as no
other modulator affects it. When using LFO on the filter the cutoff setting determines the
lowest point of the LFO modulation.
Resonance
This parameter sets the SID filter resonance.
Envelope Modulation
This parameter applies envelope modulation to the filter. When tweaking it, it’s a good
idea to leave cutoff frequency at a zero value. That way the filter won’t jump up to
whatever setting the frequency parameter has got when you reach the parameter bottom
(as zero envelope amount ‘releases’ the filter modulation). Envelope and LFO
modulation can be used at the same time. Activate filter LFO mod in the LFO section.
Envelope
The envelope parameters Attack, Decay, Sustain and Release operate a SID envelope
especially dedicated to the filter. It can also be routed to modulate other parameters in the
Mono Synthesizer.
Beware of that SID envelopes have some flaws that make them behave irrationally.
Read more about it below in the section A word about the SID envelopes.
16
A word about the SID filter
In a perfect SID world the filters would work just like any other analog, digital or software filter.
Unfortunately the filters were inconsistent in between the SID revisions. All of this is covered in
the booklet MSSIAH - Getting Started available for download on our site.
In short, filters on older SIDs do not sound as good as the newer ones. In fact, some really old
ones are completely silent when the filters are turned on. In that case Mono Synthesizer and
Bassline applications might appear not to work at all.
Amplifier
The amplifier section controls the volume envelope that shapes
the volume curve of the sound.
Attack, Decay, Sustain and Release all affects the built in SID
VCA envelope.
A word about the SID envelopes
SID envelope anomalies make them fail to trigger properly every five to eight notes or so.
The effect is apparent when you lower the sustain value and start applying decay settings. To
overcome the constant ‘hiccups’ one trick is to set the attack time to a non-zero value, like 1. If
you don’t wish an audible envelope attack, don’t worry, the value of 1 is hardly noticeable.
Initialize Envelopes
The trick with a low attack is not always helpful, e.g. when using extreme ADSR-settings.
Luckily there is another way to tame the stubborn SID envelopes and that is to brutally initialize it
before the next note triggers, a technique often referred to as “Hard restart”.
The best timing considered is to restart it approx. 33 milliseconds before the new note triggers.
Mono Synthesizer offers two ways of achieving this:
Init Envelope on Release
This is the simplest form of initialization and works with both MIDI data and the internal
pattern sequencer. By setting this parameter every note release causes the envelope to
reset.
For example, playing the pattern sequencer makes every note trig off a “hard restart”.
Playing your MIDI keyboard makes a hard restart to occur whenever you release the
current key (legato playing is not affected).
Note that with the Init Env setting you cannot use envelope release cycles. The audio is
completely shut off on release. This is by far the simplest form of initializing envelopes.
You find the Init Env setting in the MIDI settings window on the Setup Screen.
Control Change #65
This option is when using the Mono Synthesizer in MIDI mode. By sending the control
change message #65 the envelope is immediately initialized.
Together with the change message 65 you also provide the type of restart that you wish to
use with a value of 0 to 8. In the MIDI Controller List chapter there is a list of the
different restart values.
For example, the value 2 means that the ADSR is reset with a full decay value (the rest of
them being zero) and the envelope trig is set to 8 (disable the oscillator).
17
(The type #6 says “reload”. This means that the ADSR is reloaded with the current
setting instead of given an extreme restart value).
The type of reset that will work best depends on the envelope setting. When tweaking
that MIDI sequence to perfection, you will probably need to try out a couple of different
init types before you find the best solution.
Note: When sending a change message 65 to the Mono Synthesizer you also change the
default init type for key release-init. You can use any type except #6. Default is #5.
Tips:
In your MIDI sequencer, put the control change #65 message on the
same events as the notes. Do this in an empty sequence on the same
MIDI channel. Then alter the properties for the control change
sequence so that your MIDI sequencer plays it back 33 milliseconds
ahead of the others. If 33 ms doesn’t cut it, try slightly lower or
higher delay settings. Also play around with the init type 0-8.
When you nail it, you’ll have a perfectly triggered SID envelope!
Envelope Modulation
The envelope modulation section routes the filter envelope to other
destinations.
Filter Envelope
The amount of filter envelope is set with the Fil Env knob. Zero means no modulation but
does not turn it off. As long as any of the destination buttons are activated the Mono
Synthesizer has ‘locked’ the filter envelope modulation to that particular destination.
Frequency
Filter envelope can be applied to the frequency of both oscillator A and B. Good
examples of this are sirens and drum sounds with a pitch slope. It makes a perfect sync
and ring mod. effect too.
Pulse Width
The pulse width of both oscillators A and B can be modulated by the filter envelope. You
won’t hear the effect unless the oscillator is set to a pulse waveform.
LFO
The LFO used in the Mono Synthesizer app is in fact SID oscillator #3 running at a lower
frequency rate. It can be used to modulate several
parameters and set to operate in any of the four standard
SID waveforms.
As an extra feature you can synchronize the LFO to the
internal or external (MIDI) clock.
18
Frequency
You can set the frequency of the LFO in 255 steps. At zero the LFO stops completely.
The LED in the lower right corner of the LFO section blinks whenever the LFO cycle is
in its upper range. That way you can monitor the LFO speed.
If LFO sync is activated, the number displayed in the FREQ knob represents the length of
a full LFO cycle.
Amount
With the amount parameter you decide how much LFO modulation to apply to the
various destinations. Zero means no modulation. When using modulation wheel in MIDI
mode any non-neutral position will override this setting.
Waveform
Selects any of the four SID waveforms: Saw tooth, Triangle, Square or Noise (random).
Frequency
You can set the LFO to modulate the frequency of either oscillator A, B or both.
A common use for this is when creating a vibrato.
Pulse Width
This parameter routes the LFO amount to the pulse width of either oscillator A, B or
both. By modulating the pulse with a lower frequency rate, classic C64 pads and bass
sounds come to life.
Filter
Toggles the filter cutoff frequency as LFO destination.
Trig
Activating the LFO to trig means that it restarts whenever a new note triggers (not legato
notes).
Sync
The S-button switches the LFO to sync mode. LFO oscillation is now synchronized with
the internal or external (MIDI) clock. With this you can create cool LFO sweeps in sync
with the music.
How to Improve Audio Quality
When using the SID circuit inside the Commodore 64, the computer’s graphic chip (the VIC)
adds a significant amount of noise in the audio chain.
The easiest way to reduce the noise is to blank out the screen. In the Mono Synthesizer, the screen
goes blank whenever you press the SPACE BAR key. Press it again and it reappears.
A convenient way to put this off your checklist when recording is to make use of the automatic
blank-screen feature. It blanks the screen whenever the sequencer starts playing and brings it back
when it stops. External or internal sync mode does not matter, it works in both
modes. You find the setting in the general controls as a monitor icon.
In MIDI mode the screen goes blank no matter the blank screen setting.
19
Tap
You can test the sound at any time by pressing the tap button (RETURN key). This produces a
middle-C tone as long as you keep the tap button depressed. It’s a great way to quickly test your
current patch.
The tap feature works in normal mode only.
It is disabled when Mono Synthesizer is set to external sync mode.
Second SID
Mono Synthesizer mirrors all sound parameters onto a second SID. If you have one installed (like
with the SID2SID circuit board) you can hear the sound coming out of both SIDs.
You do not need to activate anything as long as it’s correctly installed it plays back the same
audio.
Use it to play fat unison leads or pan hard left/hard right for some stereo SID sounds or simply
choose the SID you think sounds the best.
Detune
The rightmost setting in the General Controls section is a detune
setting that sets the pitch slightly off center in each direction for SID
#1 and #2. Detuning may affect other oscillator tunings in the current patch as well.
When set to zero no detune is applied.
Using Control Change
Mono Synthesizer MIDI mode enables you to control all the sound parameters via MIDI with
control change messages. In the MIDI Controller List chapter you will find a complete list of the
control change numbers and values accepted.
MIDI control change messages accept a value between 0 and 127. As you may have noticed,
some of Mono Synthesizer’s knobs range from 0 to 255. This is true for LFO frequency,
oscillator pulse and filter cutoff frequency.
There are three different ways of altering these parameters via control change messages:´
Quick
Lower
Upper
applies your value multiplied by two. You reach the full range but misses every
second value.
applies the value directly but only gets up to 127 as top value.
applies the value + 128. That way you reach the upper range 128-255.
Using Lower and Upper together you can reach the full range in intervals of one. If you need
quick tweaking across the full scale and settle with half the resolution, go for the Quick option.
Remember to make some room in between messages when sending control change messages to
the MSSIAH Mono Synthesizer. It accepts cc-messages with an interval of approximately 2 ms.
That means you shouldn’t put two control change messages on the same MIDI event.
20
The Pattern Sequencer
Playing Patterns
Playing patterns on the Mono Synthesizer is pretty straightforward. If you are only interested in
using the Mono Synthesizer for MIDI playing you can skip this and the next chapter.
Open the Demo Patterns
To have some patterns to play around with you can start by opening the demo project patterns.
The demo contains both sounds and patterns to try out the software. Now we will only open the
patterns.
Enter the Setup Screen using the CTRL key. Then, using the CRSR keys to navigate and
RETURN key to select, choose to Open in the FILE menu.
Now select the last item, DEMO, select PATTERNS and press RETURN
key. Press Y key to confirm when asked if you are sure to load the demo.
Loading is ready in a split second. Use ← key to return to the Main Screen.
Select Patterns
Mono Synthesizer memorizes a total of 64 patterns organized into four groups.
With a specific group selected you can play any of its 16 patterns.
Patterns are arranged into sections of two with eight patterns in each section.
To select a pattern use keys 1 - 8.
To switch sections use key £ for section A and CLR/HOME for section B.
Selecting a pattern while another one is playing will put the next one on hold until it’s time to
play it. Patterns that are currently playing flash in sync with the current tempo. Patterns put on
hold do not flash until they start playing.
Run Mode
Press the RUN/STOP key to start playing. The LED on the run/stop button lights
up to indicate that the ‘machine’ is now in run mode. Press RUN/STOP key
again to stop playing.
If Mono Synthesizer is synced to MIDI clock then the pattern sequencer starts when the MIDI
master device sends a start signal. The run/stop button has no effect.
21
Tempo
You set the internal tempo in the general controls section. The BPM value displayed is an
estimated value.
If you are running the software on an NTSC-machine, make sure to adjust the system setting to
NTSC (see the Settings chapter for more info).
Shuffle
The shuffle setting is next to the tempo setting.
Shuffle alters the ‘swing’ of the playback with various amounts and
manipulates the sync signal accordingly. Too high a shuffle set at higher tempos may cause drop
outs.
Chain Play
You can play a row of up to eight consecutive patterns by holding down the key for the first one
and then the last one. The row of patterns lights up with the active one flashing.
When selecting new patterns or a new chain of patterns Mono Synthesizer first plays through the
old row of patterns before moving on to the next.
Transpose
Press and hold F5 key to enter transpose mode while playing.
While holding F5 key, select a note for the transpose with the upper C64 keyboard.
The selected transpose starts at the next measure. If a whole chain of patterns are active the
transpose starts at the next round.
When you restart the sequencer, the transpose value is reset to normal (none).
Release the F5 key to exit transpose mode.
22
Note:
Tips! If you want to start the transpose immediately without waiting for the next measure, hold
down the RIGHT SHIFT key while pressing the transpose key (F5).
External Synchronizing
You can choose to synchronize the Mono Synthesizer’s pattern sequencer with an external MIDI
clock signal or a Sync24 signal input on the user port.
To activate external synchronization use the general controls and move the cursor to the clock
icon. When active, the clock icon lights up in blue color.
Mono Synthesizer is now in slave mode and responds to MIDI start and stop and plays in time
with your MIDI clock.
In the sync settings on the setup screen (see the Settings chapter) you can choose to use a Sync24
signal fed through the user port instead. Read more about hooking up Sync24 gear to the
MSSIAH in the booklet MSSIAH - Getting Started (available for download on our site).
External Pattern Select
All sixteen white keys between C1 and D3 on your MIDI keyboard correspond to pattern 1 to 16
in the current group. It is possible to play this on the MIDI receive channel during external MIDI
synchronization and have the Mono Synthesizer change pattern accordingly.
For this to work the Mono Synthesizer’s sync mode must be set to MIDI+PSEL in the sync
settings (see the Settings chapter).
23
Editing Patterns
Editing patterns with the MSSIAH Mono Synthesizer is much like using the Roland TB-303’s
step sequencer. Even though beginners find the concept a bit confusing at first, it is quite simple
once you learn how to use it.
If one seeks to create different harmonic textures that stand out, the TB-303 way of editing surely
is a good place to start. Mono Synthesizer offers some extra help by laying out the time code
visually.
The procedure is to first enter the notes included in the pattern. Second is to edit a time line, i.e.
when and where to trigger the notes. This is quite the opposite of other sequencers where notes
and time lines are blended together (like grid editors).
Note and time edits affect the currently selected pattern. When chaining patterns only the first one
will be edited.
Pitch Mode
The notes are entered into the pattern in Pitch Mode. Enter Pitch Mode by pressing the F1 key.
Pitch mode disables sound parameters and general controls. All you can do is enter
the notes into the selected pattern. The pitch mode LED lights up and the normal
mode LED goes out.
A pattern contains up to 16 notes. As you press the keys Q 2 W 3 E R 5 T 6 Y 7 U I on the upper
part of the keyboard you input the note into the pitch storage of the pattern. The note counter
increments until it reaches 16 and flips over to the first note again. You can reset the counter
manually at anytime by pressing the pitch mode button (F1 key) once again. New notes entered
overwrite old ones.
The note LED lights up when you press the
corresponding key. You can see the current note and
octave in the lower left corner.
Pressing the octave buttons (+ - £ keys) together with a note button
toggles the note’s octave.
Using the Tap (RETURN key) and Back (INST/DEL key) buttons
you can step through the note data back and forth without altering the notes. Press and hold the
Tap button and you can alter the octaves and slide for the current note. Read more about the slide
further down this chapter.
Play or Hold
The Sync window on the Setup Screen provides two different settings for handling audio
playback during Pitch Mode or Time Mode edits.
24
HOLD means that audio is stopped if the sequencer is running and all your edits echo its sound to
the audio output.
PLAY means that your edits are silent. Audio is still controlled by the sequencer and the pattern
continues to play during editing.
Regardless of what you use the sequencer still stays in sync with the current clock source. Exiting
Pitch or Time mode after editing using HOLD, the sequencer “catches up” and still plays in sync
with the rest of your gear.
Note that even if a chain of patterns is playing, only the first pattern in the chain is the one that is
actually being edited.
Time Mode
After entering a set of notes into the pattern it is time to create the time line.
The length of the time line is equal to the pattern length. Each step defines whether to:



Trig a new note (i.e., pick the next one from the list of notes you entered in Pitch Mode)
Pause 1/16th step and hold (tie) the previous note
Pause playing, no sound for 1/16th step.
Enter Time Mode by pressing F3 key. If the sync setting in the Setup Menu is set to HOLD, the
sequencer stops running when entering Time Mode.
Use the following keys to define the timing information for each
1/16th note:
+ key
- key
£ key
Trig note
Pause and hold
Pause and silence
It is not possible to insert a pause-and-hold after a silent pause. The Time Mode editor adjusts this
automatically.
Use Tap button (RETURN key) to step forward in the editor. The corresponding LEDs light up
and display the time data for each step. Step backwards using the DELETE key.
When the step counter has reached the pattern length, Time Mode exits back to Normal Mode.
If you wish to do this manually at anytime, press the Normal Mode button (F7 key).
Slides / Octaves
If you press and hold the Tap button (RETURN key) in pitch mode, slides and octaves are
toggled with the following keys:
DOWN button
UP button
+2 button
SLIDE button
( + key )
( - key )
( £ key )
( CLR/HOME key )
one octave down
one octave up
two octaves up
slide
Whenever the sequencer plays a note that contains a slide, it instantly starts to slide from the
previous note. However, if the note was preceded by a silent pause the slide is ignored, obviously,
and the note triggers as normal.
25
Pattern Length
Pattern lengths are variable in 16 steps. You set the length pressing and holding Normal Mode
button (F7 key) and tap the DOWN button (+ key) the number of times its new length.
E.g., if you wish the pattern to be 12 steps long, press and hold F7 and tap the DOWN button
twelve times.
All patterns default to a length of 16 at startup.
Graphic Note and Time Line Display
When both Time and Pitch Mode are active the graphic note and time display below the
sequencer’s keyboard becomes visible and shows the timing information with a cursor at the
current position.
The symbol represents:
●
○
Trig note
Pause and hold
Pause and silence
By looking at the graphic display you can quickly see where and what you are editing.
In Time Mode, as you are tapping back and forth, the note at the current position is displayed in
the lower left corner next to the time line.
In Pitch Mode, as you go back and forth and enter notes, the cursor moves to the next trig
position.
Insert and Delete
To insert a note or time information, place the cursor where you want the insertion and press:
RIGHT SHIFT key and INST/DEL key.
Pitch mode inserts the same note as on the current position.
Time mode inserts the same time code as on the current position. If it’s a note it also inserts the
same note as on the current position.
To delete, place the cursor where you want the deletion to take place and press:
COMMODORE (C=) key and INST/DEL key.
The remaining pattern data to the right of the cursor is shifted one step to the left into the cursor’s
position.
Note that as you can only place the cursor on notes in Pitch Mode you need to enter Time Mode
to insert and delete pauses.
26
Cut / Copy / Paste
Cut-Copy-Paste operations are performed by pressing and holding the
PATT.CLR button (← key) together with the pattern you wish to cut, copy or
paste into.
The screen border turns gray and the software stops and awaits your choice of action.
Then press:

X key

C key


V key
RUN/STOP key
to cut the pattern selected. The pattern is erased and its
content is placed into the copy buffer.
to copy the pattern selected. The pattern is left untouched but
its content is placed into the copy buffer.
to paste the copy buffer data into the pattern selected.
Cancel operation
As you can see Mono Synthesizer uses the same standard keys like any other PC operating
system for cutting, copying and pasting so it’s quite easy to remember.
When you have performed the copy/paste the screen border returns to black and you regain
control of the program.
27
Settings
The Mono Synthesizer settings, i.e., MIDI, controls, synchronization etc., are available in the
Setup Screen. Access the screen by pressing the CTRL key and use the CRSR keys, ← key and
RETURN key to navigate, cancel and select action.
Controls
Pot/Joy settings were covered earlier in this manual. Check out the section Select Control in the
chapter User Input Controls to learn how to select controls for this application.
Synchronization
Sync
Sync selects the input for synchronization to play the sequencer patterns via MIDI.
MIDI CLK
MIDI + PSEL
USER PORT
MIDI clock through the MIDI Input of the MSSIAH MIDI interface on
the cartridge
MIDI clock + pattern select
Use Sync24 input on the user port
When Mono Synthesizer is switched to external sync mode these settings determine how
the program responds to external sync signals.
The MIDI+PSEL accepts MIDI note input on the MIDI receive channel (see the MIDI
Mode chapter). Any white key between C1 and D3 corresponds to pattern 1-16 in the
current group.
The USERPORT option makes Mono Synthesizer respond to a Sync24 signal fed into two
dedicated pins on the user port. That way you can slave the application to units such as
the TR-606, TR-707 etc.
Read more about Sync24 and the user port in the booklet MSSIAH – Getting Started,
download it on www.mssiah.com.
Tics
Tics refer to how many tics of the sync clock it takes to play a full beat. A value of 24 is
the standard sync rate whereas 48 makes the Mono Synthesizer play at half speed thus
needs the double tempo to keep up.
48 tics is a great way of getting some extra shuffle resolution but it requires your master
sequencer to play at double speed.
On Edit
This parameter controls the behavior of the pitch and time modes.
If you select PLAY the notes you play or tap do not echo and the sequencer continues
playing. Live changes while the pattern is playing are possible.
28
HOLD means that the pattern sequencer stops and you will be able to hear the notes play
back when entered or tapped.
Release
This parameter decides how to deal with note offs in MIDI and the pattern sequencer.
If you select NORMAL the sequencer trigs off notes in a normal fashion.
If you select INIT ENV the envelope is initialized (“hard restart”).
Read more about initializing envelopes in the section Initialize Envelopes in the Edit
Sounds chapter.
System
Commodore 64s came in two different versions, one for the NTSC TV-system and one for the
PAL TV-system. Since NTSC versions run a little faster and play music at a slightly higher pitch,
it’s a good idea to adjust the Mono Synthesizer to whatever system your computer was built for.
So how do you know what system your C64 is adapted to? Well, it’s a matter of knowing what
type of TV-system your country/region has got. Generally one can say that most countries in
Europe run the PAL system whereas North America and Japan use NTSC.
Slide Time
The slide time is adjustable in four steps on the Mono Synthesizer.
That means it can be used both as a legato portamento effect as well as a 303 slide.
A setting of 3 (default) is equal to the TB-303 slide.
MIDI
Check out the chapter MIDI Mode for more info on MIDI settings.
29
Advanced Random Composer
The Advanced Random Composer (A.R.C.) is a built in randomize feature where you can create
harmonically interesting results from a set of rudimentary input parameters.
The program then uses those parameters to fill a pattern with total random notes, though predetermined out of your settings.
The result can be anything from totally awesome new inspiring music to a complete mayhem, it
all depends on your inputs.
Your C64 needs to be equipped with a fully operational SID in the original socket (SID oscillator
#3 is used to obtain random numbers).
The A.R.C. is located in the Setup screen. Press the CTRL key to access it and then use the
CRSR keys to navigate to the A.R.C menu.
Random patterns are created by first telling the A.R.C. how to operate
(Settings) and then executing the randomizer itself (Random!).
Lock Notes
Use the upper and lower part of your C64 keyboard to toggle the notes you wish to
include in the randomize process.
Press CLR/HOME key to clear all selected notes.
Length
The length parameter determines how many notes that will be included in the pattern.
Select any number of notes in between 1 and 16. If you choose RND, the A.R.C. makes a
random decision for you instead.
Range
The locked notes can also be randomly placed in any octave. By setting a range of 1 to 3
octaves, you increase the octave span used in the random process.
30
Slide
Select whether to include a random slide or not.
Accent
Accent is a feature of the MSSIAH Bassline. It is not available on the Mono Synthesizer.
Group/Section/Pattern
Select which pattern to use for the random process by choosing Group (1-4), Section
(A/B) and Pattern (1-8). The currently selected pattern is automatically pre-selected
when entering the Setup screen. If you change the selected pattern in the A.R.C. it also
changes the selected pattern on the Main Screen.
Random!
When you have completed the A.R.C. settings, enter the
Random! menu item in the SETTINGS menu and the random
process starts.
Note that if you haven’t locked any notes for this process, the
task exits.
When the A.R.C. is done creating your random
pattern it automatically opens it with the editor
window.
Example
Look at the picture of the overall A.R.C. settings in the top of this chapter and input the
same parameters. Those settings have proved to produce interesting results more than
often. Try it out, add some notes, try it with and without slide.
Learn to use the Advanced Random Composer as a tool to complement your creativity, or
for that matter, a last minute help in absence thereof.
Editor
There is an alternative way of editing patterns featured in the A.R.C.
It is opened automatically when a random pattern has been created. You can open it manually by
selecting the Edit item in the A.R.C. menu.
31
The editor is a simple form of piano-bar grid editor where the horizontal positioning of the ‘dot’
represents the timing and the vertical position its note value.
Navigating
Use the CRSR keys to move the cursor forward and backwards. The cursor is the vertical
bar just above and below the grid. The lower left corner of the window shows the note
value at the current position in plain text.
Each note octave is represented by different colors. Blue notes reside one octave down,
green notes are played back at normal pitch whereas light green notes are transposed one
octave up and yellow ones are the ones in the highest octave (+2).
Delete
If you press the INST/DEL key all the notes to the right are shifted one step to the left
overwriting the note at the cursor’s position.
Note that even the pattern length is decreased at the same time. If you wish to keep the
same pattern length you will need to make the appropriate insertion to make up for the
shortened length.
Insert
Insert is the opposite of delete. When inserting a note, all the ones to the right are pushed
one step forward. Use RIGHT SHIFT key together with the INST/DEL to perform an
insertion. As you make the insert, the rest of the pattern is moved one step to the right and
leaves an open space at the cursor’s position for you to insert a new note. Notes that are
pushed out of the window are lost.
Clear Pattern
Press RIGHT SHIFT key and CLR/HOME key to clear the whole pattern. You are
asked to confirm your choice before the pattern is cleared.
32
Alter Notes
Use the note keys (Q2W3ER5T6Y7UI) to alter the note value at the cursor’s position.
Octaves and slides are not affected.
Octaves
Use +, - and £ keys to toggle the octave on the note at the cursor’s
position. If you try this at a point where there is no note, no data is
changed.
Slides
Use CLR/HOME key to toggle a slide for the note at the cursor’s position. If there is no
note there, no data is changed.
Change Pattern
When you start up the editor it holds the current pattern selected.
You can change this at any time.
F1/F2 keys
F3 key
F5/F6 keys
change banks
toggle section A/B
select pattern
If you change the pattern in the editor, it stays selected as you return to the Main Screen.
Toggle grid
You can toggle the grid on/off by pressing the F7 key.
33
Files
Press CTRL key to open the setup screen. From here you access the Mono Synthesizer file
operations. Use CRSR keys and RIGHT SHIFT to navigate and RETURN key to execute a
function/select file etc. Use ← key to cancel/step back.
Media
Mono Synthesizer uses three types of media to load and save data: disk, tape and SDR.
Disk
All disk operations start by asking you to choose device number:
Unless you have changed your disk drive’s device number, 8 is default, use CRSR keys
to change device number.
Loading from disk means that a directory window opens with a list of valid files on your
floppy. You then select the file you wish to load.
The directory window shows the amount of free blocks in the upper right corner.
The file operations for the floppy drive make use of the operating system’s basic disk
functionality. There are no delete-functions and no replace-and-save options built in. If
you try to save the file onto disk using an already existing name the save is interrupted
and the drive light flashes.
When you need to scratch files, use the Disk File Manager in the startup menu.
When reading the directory the correct type of files is automatically collected.
If there are no files of that particular type on the disk you will get a No Files error. It does
not necessarily mean that the disk is empty rather than empty of that type of files.
The file type depends on the file operation you selected, whether it’s a full project load or
a specific import.
34
MSSIAH Mono Synthesizer File Types:
File suffix
.P64
.PAT
.PCH
Disk space
11 blocks
Tape no.
≈ 23
1 block
1 block
≈7
≈6
Size
2.5 Kb Mono Synthesizer project
< 1 Kb Single pattern export
< 1 Kb Single patch export
Pattern export files are compatible with the MSSIAH Bassline and vice versa.
Note: the suffix .P64 comes from its predecessor the Prophet64 (www.prophet64.com).
MSSIAH Mono Synthesizer reads Prophet64 Mono Synthesizer .p64 files.
Tape
The tape functions are standard C64 and not turbo tape.
A small modification bypasses the regular start and record button sensitivity so that it’s
up to the user to initiate the start of a tape load or save.
This opens up the possibility to modify a digital audio source to replace the standard 1530
datasette unit.
Whenever loading and saving you will have to press SPACE key on the C64 to make the
computer start the load/save.
When loading, Mono Synthesizer checks the type of the file found. If the file suffix does
not match the correct one, loading is interrupted and you are notified.
If the file type is correct, loading automatically continues and the screen color turns green
to confirm that the file is ok.
Note:
The tape motor is shut off at all times until you request a load or save. As the dialog
box asks you to start recording or playing it is finally switched back on.
You probably need to rewind or forward the tape to the right position before
loading or saving so now is the time to do so. Since the datasette buttons are not
being sensed, pressing rew/ffw will not trigger the load/save. Only the SPACE key
does.
SDR
SDR is short for Serial Data Register, a hidden feature never used by any peripheral
device released for the C64 platform.
The SDR works with a serial data stream on the user port. A dedicated device must
handle this data to store it on a separate media.
35
This makes file management an issue for the user and not the MSSIAH file functions. For
example, one could save SDR data onto a digital device like raw audio data. The user
then decides where to put the file, how to handle multiple saves etc.
The procedure for saving and loading SDR data is very simple. You are asked to start
your digital device and then press space to start the C64 read/write sequence.
Saving can be switched to verifying instead. That makes the program read from the SDR
device comparing the saved data to the current memory. The save is then considered valid
if the SDR data is identical to the memory data.
Several speeds are available for SDR save, enabling the output to fit
various devices. Speed is selected when saving. SDR loading
automatically adjusts to incoming data.
While saving and loading the screen flashes in different colors. Every new block of 256
bytes makes the colors change.
If the type of the file found when loading is wrong, loading halts and you are notified.
Note that the C64 does not have any control of the SDR device’s current state i.e., it
cannot control the player to actually start or stop.
Opening the Demo Files
To open the demo patterns or patches:

Select Open in the FILE menu.

Navigate with the CRSR keys to the menu item DEMO.
36


Press RETURN key to select to open the demo project.
Choose whether to load the demo patterns or demo patches #1 (leads) or #2 (bass
sounds).


Press Y key or RETURN key to confirm. The N key or ← key cancels.
When loading is done (takes a split second) press ← to return to the Main Screen.
Save Project
A project save includes all the patterns and patches and as well as control settings.
Make sure to save often to avoid losing your work!!
To save a Mono Synthesizer project:
Disk:
 Select Save in the FILE menu.


Use CRSR keys and select DISK as media source and press RETURN key.
Enter a non-existing filename in the filename dialog.
You can use all letters from a-z and 0-9 as well as some additional characters. Use
37



Tape:








SDR:









INST/DEL key with and without the LEFT SHIFT key to insert/delete text.
Press RETURN when ready or ← to cancel and go back.
Select device (8 is default)
File saves onto disk. After saving is done press ← key to return to the Main Screen.
If the disk already contains a project file with the same filename the drive light flashes
and you are notified with a Save Error message box.
Select Save in the FILE menu.
User CRSR keys to select Tape as media source and press RETURN key.
Enter a filename in the dialog and press RETURN when ready or ← to cancel.
A dialog box asks you to press REC+PLAY on your tape recorder and then press SPACE
key to start the save. The tape motor is now unlocked for you to first rewind or forward
the tape to the correct position.
Press SPACE key to start saving.
Screen goes blank while saving.
When saving is done press ← key to return to the Main Screen.
You can break the save operation anytime during saving by pressing the RUN/STOP
key.
Select Save in the FILE menu.
Use CRSR keys to select SDR as media source and press RETURN key.
Enter a filename in the dialog and press RETURN when ready or ← to cancel.
Select a speed for SDR. Start by using slower speeds and gradually try out the device
with faster settings.
Now make your digital device ready (start recording).
Press SPACE key.
Screen goes blank and flashes while saving.
When saving is done press ← key to return to the Main Screen.
You can break the save operation anytime during saving by pressing the RUN/STOP
key.
Verifying SDR Saves
After an SDR save, data can be verified:





Go through the save process once again from the start and enter the exact same filename.
When the message box asks you to press space there is also an option to press CTRL key
to start the verifying process.
Press CTRL key. Screen goes blank.
Start supplying data from your digital device (that is, play it back, not record!).
If data is found to deviate from the current memory the verify process is interrupted and
you are notified. If not, the verify process continues until the file is fully compared and
you are notified that everything is ok.
Open Project
To open a Mono Synthesizer project:
38
Disk:
 Select Open in the FILE menu.






SDR:









Insert the disk with the project file you wish to open.
Use the CRSR keys to select DISK as media source and press RETURN key.
Select device (8 is default)
Wait until the directory is loaded.
In the directory window use CRSR keys to navigate to the file you wish to load and press
RETURN key to start loading. If you wish to cancel press ← key to go back one step.
If there are no files on the disk you will be notified by a message box saying No files. In
that case press ← key to go back, insert a new disk and try again.
When the file is loaded you press the ← key to exit the files screen.
Select Open in the FILE menu.
Use the CRSR keys to select SDR as media source and press RETURN key.
Make your digital device ready.
The dialog box asks you to press space and then start your digital device.
Press SPACE key. Screen goes blank and awaits your digital device.
Start your digital device (play back). Screen flashes as data is received.
When the file is loaded press the ← key to exit the files screen
If a file is found with a different file type, loading stops and you are notified.
You can break the operation anytime during loading by pressing the RUN/STOP key.
However, this opens the initialize screen asking you to clear the memory.
39
Note:
Important! If you interrupt a load process of a Mono Synthesizer project you are warned that the
application could suffer from an unrecoverable failure. While this is a major case for the
Sequencer application it is of lesser importance for the Mono Synthesizer. To not cause
misbehavior of the application you are advised to initialize memory if you for any reason have
interrupted a load operation.
Press Y key or RETURN key to go through and initialize the memory.
If you do not carry out this initialization now you can do it later at any time with the New
function in the FILE menu.
This message pops up if you interrupt an import also. However, imports cannot do any harm
whatsoever so you can just ignore it.
Export Pattern
You can export the full content of a pattern onto disk, tape or SDR.
The exported pattern can be imported back into the Mono Synthesizer and Bassline editions.
To export a pattern:

Select Export in the FILE menu.

Use CRSR keys to select to export a pattern then press RETURN key.
40

The pattern that is exported is the current pattern selected in the Main Screen.
If you have selected a chain of patterns only the first one is exported.
Continue to read the section for your media choice below:
Disk:
 Use CRSR keys to select Disk as media source and then press RETURN key.
 Enter a non-existing filename in the filename dialog. You can use all letters from a-z and
0-9 as well as some additional characters. Use INST/DEL key with or without the LEFT
SHIFT key to insert/delete text.
 Press RETURN key to start saving or ← to cancel.
 Select device (8 is default)
 When done saving, press ← key to return to the Main Screen.
 If the disk you have inserted already contains a pattern file with the same name the drive
light flashes and you are notified with a Save Error message box.
Tape:
 User CRSR keys to select Tape as media source and press RETURN key.
 Enter a filename in the dialog and press RETURN when ready or ← to cancel.
 A dialog asks you to press REC+PLAY on your tape recorder and then press SPACE key
to start the save. The tape motor is now unlocked for you to first rewind or forward the
tape to the correct position.
 Press SPACE key to start saving.
 Screen goes blank while saving.
 When saving is done press ← key to return to the Main Screen.
 You can break the save operation anytime during saving by pressing the RUN/STOP
key.
SDR:









Use CRSR keys to select SDR as media source and then press RETURN key.
Enter a filename in the dialog and press RETURN when ready.
Select the SDR speed.
Now make your digital device ready (start recording).
Press SPACE key.
Screen goes blank and flashes while saving.
When done saving press ← key to return to the Main Screen.
You can break the save operation anytime during saving by pressing the RUN/STOP
key.
SDR saves can be verified as described in Verifying SDR Saves earlier in this chapter.
Import Pattern
Exported patterns can be imported into existing ones. Even exported Bassline patterns are
compatible (except for the accent data).
The pattern is imported into the currently selected pattern on the Main Screen.
Selecting a chain of patterns does not matter, the import loads into the first one in the chain.
To import a pattern:
41

Select Import in the FILE menu.


Use CRSR keys to select to import a pattern then press RETURN key.
Press RETURN key and continue to read the section for your media choice below:
Disk:
 Use CRSR keys to select Disk as media source and then press RETURN key.
 Select device (8 is default).
 Select a file in the directory list.
(If the disk you have inserted does not contain any pattern files you are notified with the
No files message box.)
 When done loading, press ← key to return to the Main Screen.
Tape:
 Use the CRSR keys to select Tape as media source and press RETURN key.
 A dialog asks you to press PLAY on your tape recorder and then press SPACE key to
start loading. The tape motor is now unlocked for you to first rewind or forward the tape
to the correct position.
 Press SPACE key to start loading and the screen goes blank.
 When a pattern file (.PAT) is found the screen color turns green and the file continues to
load. If a different file type is found the operation is halted.
 When loading is done press ← key to return to the Main Screen.
 You can break the load operation anytime during the load process by pressing the
RUN/STOP key.
However, this opens the initialize screen asking you to clear the memory. Read more
about it in the Open Project section.
SDR:





Use CRSR keys to select SDR as media source and then press RETURN key.
Press SPACE key when you are asked to start your SDR device.
Start playing back data on your SDR device. Screen flashes as data is received.
When done loading, press ← key to return to the Main Screen.
If a file is found with a different file type, loading stops and you are notified.
Export Patch
You can export a patch including all the sound parameters onto disk, tape or SDR.
To export a patch:

Select Export in the FILE menu.
42

Use CRSR keys to select to export a patch then press RETURN key.

The patch that is exported is the selected one in the Main Screen.
Continue to read the section for your media choice below:
Disk:
 Use CRSR keys to select Disk as media source and then press RETURN key.
 Enter a non-existing filename in the filename dialog. You can use all letters from a-z and
0-9 as well as additional characters. Use INST/DEL key with or without the LEFT
SHIFT key to insert/delete text.
 Press RETURN key to start saving or ← to cancel.
 Select device (8 is default).
 When done saving, press ← key to return to the Main Screen.
 If the disk you have inserted already contains a patch file with the same name the drive
light flashes and you are notified with a Save Error message box.
Tape:
 User CRSR keys to select Tape as media source and press RETURN key.
 Enter a filename in the dialog and press RETURN when ready or ← to cancel.
 A dialog asks you to press REC+PLAY on your tape recorder and then press SPACE key
to start the save. The tape motor is now unlocked for you to first rewind or forward the
tape to the correct position.
 Press SPACE key to start saving.
 Screen goes blank while saving.
 When saving is done press ← key to return to the Main Screen.
 You can break the save operation anytime during saving by pressing the RUN/STOP
key.
SDR:








Use CRSR keys to select SDR as media source and then press RETURN key.
Enter a filename in the dialog and press RETURN when ready.
Select the SDR speed.
Now make your digital device ready (start recording).
Press SPACE key.
Screen goes blank and flashes as data is transmitted.
When saving is done press ← key to return to the Main Screen.
You can break the save operation anytime during saving by pressing the RUN/STOP
key.
Import Patch
An exported patch can be imported back into any of the eight patches in the Mono Synthesizer.
The current patch selected on the Main Screen is used as destination when importing.
To import a patch:
43



Select Import in the FILE menu.
Use CRSR keys to select to import a patch then press RETURN key.
Press RETURN key and continue to read the section for your media choice below:
Disk:
 Use CRSR keys to select Disk as media source and then press RETURN key.
 Select device (8 is default)
 Select a file in the directory list.
(If the disk you have inserted does not contain any patches you are notified with the No
files message box.)
 Press RETURN key to start loading or ← to cancel.
 When done loading, press ← key to return to the Main Screen.
Tape:
 Use the CRSR keys to select Tape as media source and press RETURN key.
 A dialog asks you to press PLAY on your tape recorder and then press SPACE key to
start loading. The tape motor is now unlocked for you to first rewind or forward the tape
to the correct position.
 Press SPACE key to start loading and the screen goes blank.
 When a patch file (.PCH) is found the screen color turns green and the file continues to
load. If a different file type is found the operation is halted.
 When loading is done press ← key to return to the Main Screen.
 You can break the load operation anytime during the load process by pressing the
RUN/STOP key.
However, this opens the initialize screen asking you to clear the memory. Read more
about it in the Open Project section.
SDR:





Use CRSR keys to select SDR as media source and then press RETURN key.
Press SPACE key.
Start playing back data on your digital device.
When done loading, press ← key to return to the Main Screen.
If a file is found with a different file type, loading stops and you are notified.
44
Example Guide to Editing Patterns
For beginners, the concept of pattern editing might be a bit confusing at first.
A neat help on the way to master the skills of 303 pattern editing is real world examples:
- Example 1 – Michael Jackson,”Thriller”
The first example uses the classic bass line that is repeated throughout the 1982 Michael Jackson
hit song “Thriller”. The musical score looks something like this:
Translated to Mono Synthesizer pitches and time lines it looks like this:
-C# MINOR, sixteen stepsPitches:
B C# E F# C# C# C#
Time line:
ON-OFF-ON-OFF-ON-OFF-ON-OFF-ON-OFF-PAUSE-ON-PAUSE-PAUSE-PAUSE-ON
The first and sixth notes are played in the lowest octave.





Select an empty pattern with 1 - 8 keys.
Enter Pitch Mode with the F1 key.
Enter all the notes with the following keys: U 2 E 5 2 2 2
Enter the octaves: Press F1 key once to rewind pitch mode counter, press and hold the
RETURN key and then press the + key
Tap (RETURN key) forward to the sixth one, hold the tap button and press + key.
The notes are now entered. Move on to the time line:


Enter Time Mode with F3 key.
Enter timing values with keys: + - + - + - + - + - £ + £ £ £ +
This will correspond with the time line of on, offs and pauses that we picked out from the
score earlier.
Hit RUN/STOP key or, if synced externally, start the master sequencer and listen to the result.
45
- Example 2 – ”Billie Jean”
-F# minor, sixteen stepsPitches:
F# C# E F# E C# B C#
Time line:
ON OFF ON OFF ON OFF ON OFF ON OFF ON OFF ON OFF ON OFF
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
Follow the procedure from example 1 but use these keys instead:
PITCH: 5 2 E 5 E 2 B--+ 2
TIME: + - + - + - + - + - + - + - + (B--+ means that B and + are pressed at the same time)
46
Key Map
A full overview of keys used in the MSSIAH Mono Synthesizer (US/English keyboard).
General Keys:
RUN/STOP
SPACE
F1
F3
F5
F7
CTRL
CRSR keys
COMMODORE (C=)
RETURN
←
Start/stop playing / Exit MIDI mode
Manually blank the screen
Pitch Mode
Time Mode
Transpose Mode
Normal Mode
Setup Screen
Move General Control cursor
Alter General Control values
Tap (test tone)
Pattern clear
Tone Controls
Env mod
Q
W
E
Fil Env
Freq A / B
Pulse Width A / B
LFO
A
S
Z
X
C
D
F
Frequency
Waveform
Amount
Frequency A / B
Pulse Width A / B
Filter Frequency / LFO sync
Key Trig
Oscillator A
R
T
Y
U
I
Waveforms
Frequency
Pulse Width
Osc Sync / Ring Modulation
Oscillator On / Off
Oscillator B
G
H
J
V
B
Frequency
Fine Tune
Oscillator On / Off
Waveforms
Pulse Width
47
Mixer
N
M
Balance
Volume
Filter
O
P
@
*
↑
L
:
;
=
External Filter Input
Filter Type
Frequency
Resonance
Envelope Amount
Attack
Decay
Sustain
Release
Amplifier
,
.
/
RIGHT SHIFT
Attack
Decay
Sustain
Release
Pattern Sequencer Pitch Mode
F1
F7
RETURN
INST/DEL
Q2W3ER5T6Y7UI
+
£
CLR/HOME
RIGHT SHIFT + INST/DEL
COMMODORE (C=) + INST/DEL
Reset step counter (restart editing)
Normal Mode
“Tap”, one step forward / edit current
One step backward
Note keys
Toggle -1 octave (down)
Toggle +1 octave (up)
Toggle +2 octaves
Toggle slide
Insert note at current position
Delete note at current position
Pattern Sequencer Time Mode:
F3
F7
RETURN
INST/DEL
+
£
RIGHT SHIFT + INST/DEL
COMMODORE (C=) + INST/DEL
Reset step counter (restart editing)
Normal Mode
“Tap”, one step forward
One step backward
Note on
Note off
Pause
Insert note at current position
Delete note at current position
48
MIDI Implementation Chart
MSSIAH
Mono Synthesizer
Function
Version: 1.00
MIDI Implementation Chart
Transmitted *1
Recognized
Remarks
Basic
Channel
Default
Changed
X
X
1-16, off
1-16, off
Mode
Default
Messages
X
X
Mode 4
X
True Voice
X
X
24-107 (C0 – B6)
24-107 (C0 – B6)
Velocity
Note On
Note Off
X
X
9nH, v=1-127
9nH, v=0 or 8nH
After
Touch
Key’s
Channel’s
X
X
X
X
X
‫ס‬
X
X
X
X
X
‫ס‬
‫ס‬
‫ס‬
‫ס‬
‫ס‬
X
X
‫ס‬
System Exclusive
X
X
System
Common:
Song pos
Song sel
Tune
X
X
X
X
X
X
System
Real Time:
Clock
Commands
X
X
‫ס‬
‫ס‬
Start, Stop
Aux
Messages:
All Sound OFF
Reset Cntrl
Local ON/OFF
All Notes OFF
Active Sens
System Res
X
X
X
X
X
X
‫) ס‬021(
‫ס‬
Pitch Wheel only
Note
Number:
Pitch Bend
1
7
65-104
120
123
Control
Change
Program
Change:
True #
Notes
Mode 1: OMNI ON, POLY
Mode 3: OMNI OFF,POLY
1-8
Memorized
Memorized
0-24 semitone steps
(14 bit resolution)
*2
*2
*2 *3
X
‫( ס‬123)
X
X
*1 MSSIAH Cartridge does not transmit MIDI.
*2 Values outside of limits are recognized as top or bottom value.
*3 Program changes switches patch immediately.
Mode 2: OMNI ON, MONO
Mode 4: OMNI OFF, MONO
‫ ס‬: Yes
X : No
49
MIDI Controller List
No. Function
Limit
Remarks
1
Modulation Wheel
0-127
7
Patch Volume
0-15
65
Envelope Init (hard restart)
0–8
66
Slide Time
1-4
67
Envelope Modulation
0-31
68
Envelope Mod Frequency
0-3
0 = None
1 = Frequency Osc A
2 = Frequency Osc B
3 = Both
69
Envelope Mod Pulse Width
0-3
0 = None
1 = Pulse Width Osc A
2 = Pulse Width Osc B
3 = Both
70
Osc A Waveform
0-32
See separate table below
71
Osc B Waveform
0-8
See separate table below
72
Osc A Frequency
40-88
64 = zero
73
Osc B Frequency
40-88
64 = zero
74
Osc B Fine Tune
14-114
64 = zero
75
Osc A Pulse Width Quick
0-127
True #: multiply by 2
76
Osc A Pulse Width Lower
0-127
True #: 0-127
77
Osc A Pulse Width Upper
0-127
True #: 128-255
78
Osc B Pulse Width Quick
0-127
True #: multiply by 2
79
Osc B Pulse Width Lower
0-127
True #: 0-127
80
Osc B Pulse Width Upper
0-127
True #: 128-255
81
LFO Frequency Quick
0-127 *
True #: multiply by 2
82
LFO Frequency Lower
0-127 *
True #: 0-127
83
LFO Frequency Upper
0-127 *
True #: 128-255
84
LFO Amount
0-31
0 = ADSR=0000, Trig=0
1 = ADSR=0000, Trig=8
2 = ADSR=0F00, Trig=8
3 = ADSR=00FF, Trig=8
4 = ADSR=FFFF, Trig=8
5 = ADSR=0F0F, Trig=8
6 = ADSR=reload, Trig=8
7 = ADSR=0000, Trig=9
8 = ADSR=0000, Trig=1
50
85
LFO Control
0-3
0 = None
1 = Key Trig
2 = MIDI clk sync LFO
3 = Key Trig + MIDI clk sync LFO
86
LFO Waveform
0-4
0 = None
1 = Sine
2 = Saw
3 = Pulse
4 = Noise
87
LFO Destination Freq
0-3
0 = None
1 = Osc A Frequency
2 = Osc B Frequency
3 = Osc A + B Frequency
88
LFO Destination Pulse + Filter
0-7
0 = None
1 = Filter
2 = Osc A Pulse Width
3 = Osc B Pulse Width
4 = Osc A + B Pulse Width
5 = Filter + Osc A Pulse Width
6 = Filter + Osc B Pulse Width
7 = Filter + Osc A + B Pulse Width
89
Mixer
57-71
57 = A-7, 64 = middle, 71 = B-7
90
Filter Type
0-15
0 = OFF
1 = Lowpass
2 = Bandpass
3 = Highpass
4 = Lowpass + Bandpass
5 = Lowpass + Highpass
6 = Bandpass + Highpass
7 = Lowpass + Bandpass + Highpass
8 = Lowpass + Ext
9 = Bandpass + Ext
10 = Highpass + Ext
11 = Lowpass + Bandpass + Ext
12 = Lowpass + Highpass + Ext
13 = Bandpass + Highpass + Ext
14 = Lowpass + Bandpass + Highpass + Ext
15 = Ext
91
Filter Cutoff Quick
0-127
True #: multiply by 2
92
Filter Cutoff Lower
0-127
True#: 0-127
93
Filter Cutoff Upper
0-127
True#: 128-255
94
Filter Resonance
0-15
95
Filter Envelope Amount
0-31
96
Filter Envelope Attack
0-15
97
Filter Envelope Decay
0-15
51
98
Filter Envelope Sustain
0-15
99
Filter Envelope Release
0-15
100
VCA Attack
0-15
101
VCA Decay
0-15
102
VCA Sustain
0-15
103
VCA Release
0-15
104
SID #1 / SID #2 Detune
0-9
120
All Sound OFF
Any
121
Reset All Controllers
Any
123
All Notes OFF
Any
Resets pitch wheel only
* Limit is 0-13 when LFO runs in clock
mode. Use cc #82 to set LFO speed in clock
mode since #81 multiplies by 2 and #83
constantly sets top value (‘32’)
Notes
Selectable Waveforms (Control Change #70, # 71)
+ Ringmod.
+ Sync
+ Ringmod. + Sync
1 Sine
9
17
25
2 Saw
10
18
26
3 Pulse
11
19
27
4 Noise
12
20
28
5 Sine + Saw
13
21
29
6 Sine + Pulse
14
22
30
7 Saw + Pulse
15
23
31
8 Saw + Sine + Pulse
16
24
32
0 OFF
MIDI channel and bend ranges are saved in between sessions and even when the computer is
switched off if you choose to save your changes when shutting down the MSSIAH.
52