ConneXium TCSESB Basic Managed Switch Web

ConneXium
S1A78429.00
TCSESB Basic Managed Switch
Web-based Interface Reference Manual
www.schneider-electric.com
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Contents
Safety Information
7
About this Manual
9
Key
11
Opening the Web-based Interface
13
1
Basic Settings
19
1.1
System
20
1.2
Network
24
1.3
Software
1.3.1 View the software versions present on the device
1.3.2 TFTP Software Update
1.3.3 HTTP Software Update
26
26
27
27
1.4
Port Configuration
29
1.5
Loading/Saving the Configuration
1.5.1 Loading the configuration
1.5.2 Saving the Configuration
1.5.3 URL
1.5.4 Deleting a configuration
1.5.5 Using the Memory Backup Adapter (EAM)
1.5.6 Canceling a configuration change
31
32
32
33
33
34
35
1.6
Restart
37
2
Security
39
2.1
Password / SNMPv3 access
40
2.2
SNMPv1/v2 Access Settings
42
2.3
Web Access
2.3.1 Description of Web Access
45
45
3
Time
47
3.1
SNTP configuration
49
3.2
PTP (IEEE 1588)
53
Contents
4
Switching
55
4.1
Switching Global
56
4.2
Filters for MAC addresses
57
4.3
Multicasts
4.3.1 Global Configuration
4.3.2 IGMP Querier and IGMP Settings
4.3.3 Multicasts
4.3.4 Settings per Port (Table)
59
59
60
62
64
5
QoS/Priority
67
5.1
Global
68
5.2
Port Configuration
5.2.1 Entering the port priority
70
71
5.3
802.1D/p mapping
72
5.4
IP DSCP mapping
74
6
Redundancy
77
6.1
Ring Redundancy
6.1.1 Configuring the HIPER-Ring
6.1.2 Configuring the MRP-Ring
78
80
83
6.2
Rapid Spanning Tree
6.2.1 Global
6.2.2 Rapid Spanning Tree Port
86
88
93
7
Diagnostics
97
7.1
Event Log
98
7.2
Ports
7.2.1 Statistics table
7.2.2 Utilization
99
99
100
7.3
Topology Discovery
102
7.4
Port Mirroring
104
7.5
Device Status
106
7.6
Signal contact
7.6.1 Manual setting
7.6.2 Function monitoring
7.6.3 Device status
108
108
108
109
4
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Contents
7.6.4 Configuring Traps
110
7.7
Alarms (Traps)
111
7.8
Report
113
7.9
Self Test
114
8
Advanced
8.1
DHCP Relay Agent
A
Appendix
A.1
Technical Data
120
A.2
List of RFCs
121
A.3
Underlying IEEE Standards
123
A.4
Underlying IEC Norms
124
A.5
Copyright of Integrated Software
A.5.1 Bouncy Castle Crypto APIs (Java)
A.5.2 Broadcom Corporation
125
125
126
B
Index
S1A78429 - 12/2010
115
116
119
127
5
Contents
6
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Safety Information
Safety Information
 Important Information
Notice: Read these instructions carefully, and look at the equipment to
become familiar with the device before trying to install, operate, or
maintain it. The following special messages may appear throughout this
documentation or on the equipment to warn of potential hazards or to call
attention to information that clarifies or simplifies a procedure.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
7
Safety Information
PLEASE NOTE: Electrical equipment should be installed, operated,
serviced, and maintained only by qualified personnel. 
No responsibility is assumed by Schneider Electric for any consequences
arising out of the use of this material. 
© 2010 Schneider Electric. All Rights Reserved.
8
S1A78429 - 12/2010
About this Manual
About this Manual
Validity Note
The data and illustrations found in this book are not binding. We reserve the
right to modify our products in line with our policy of continuous product
development. The information in this document is subject to change without
notice and should not be construed as a commitment by Schneider Electric.
Product Related Information
Schneider Electric assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear
in this document. If you have any suggestions for improvements or
amendments or have found errors in this publication, please notify us.
No part of this document may be reproduced in any form or by any means,
electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, without express written
permission of Schneider Electric.
All pertinent state, regional, and local safety regulations must be observed
when installing and using this product. For reasons of safety and to ensure
compliance with documented system data, only the manufacturer should
perform repairs to components.
When devices are used for applications with technical safety requirements,
please follow the relevant instructions.
Failure to use Schneider Electric software or approved software with our
hardware products may result in improper operating results.
Failure to observe this product related warning can result in injury or
equipment damage.
User Comments
We welcome your comments about this document. You can reach us by
e-mail at techpub@schneider-electric.com
S1A78429 - 12/2010
9
About this Manual
Related Documents
Title of Documentation
ConneXium TCSESB Basic Managed Switch Redundancy
Configuration User Manual
ConneXium TCSESB Managed Switch Basic Configuration User
Manual
ConneXium TCSESB Basic Managed Switch Command Line Interface
Reference Manual
ConneXium TCSESB Basic Managed Switch Web-based Interface
Reference Manual
ConneXium TCSESB Basic Managed Switch Installation Manual
Reference-Number
S1A78418
S1A78213
S1A78426
S1A78429
S1A78204
Note: The Glossary is located in the Reference Manual “Command Line
Interface”.
The “Web-based Interface” reference manual contains detailed information
on using the Web interface to operate the individual functions of the device.
The “Command Line Interface” Reference Manual contains detailed
information on using the Command Line Interface to operate the individual
functions of the device.
The “Installation” user manual contains a device description, safety
instructions, a description of the display, and the other information that you
need to install the device.
The “Basic Configuration” user manual contains the information you need to
start operating the device. It takes you step by step from the first startup
operation through to the basic settings for operation in your environment.
10
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Key
Key
The designations used in this manual have the following meanings:



Link
Note:
Courier
List
Work step
Subheading
Indicates a cross-reference with a stored link
A note emphasizes an important fact or draws your
attention to a dependency.
ASCII representation in user interface
Symbols used:
WLAN access point
Router with firewall
Switch with firewall
Router
Switch
Bridge
S1A78429 - 12/2010
11
Key
Hub
A random computer
Configuration Computer
Server
PLC -
Programmable logic
controller
I/O -
Robot
12
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Opening the Web-based Interface
Opening the Web-based Interface
To open the Web-based interface, you need a Web browser (a program that
can read hypertext), for example Mozilla Firefox version 1 or later, or
Microsoft Internet Explorer version 6 or later.
Note: The Web-based interface uses Java software 6 (“Java™ Runtime
Environment Version 1.6.x”).
Install the software from the enclosed CD-ROM. To do this, you go to the
“ConneXium” directory on the CD-ROM, open the “Java” directory, and start
the installation program.
Figure 1: Installing Java
S1A78429 - 12/2010
13
Opening the Web-based Interface
 Start your Web browser.
 Make sure that you have activated JavaScript and Java in the security
settings of your browser.
 Establish the connection by entering the IP address of the device which
you want to administer via the Web-based management in the address
field of the Web browser. Enter the address in the following form:
http://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
The login window appears on the screen.
Figure 2: Login window
 Select the desired language.
 In the drop-down menu "Login", you select
– user, to have read access, or
– admin, to have read and write access
to the device.
14
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Opening the Web-based Interface
 The password “public”, with which you have read access for the login
"user", is preset in the password field. If you wish to have write access to
the device, use the login "admin", select the contents of the password field
and overwrite it with the password “private” (default setting).
 Click on OK.
The website of the device appears on the screen.
Note: The changes you make in the dialogs will be copied to the device when
you click “Set”. Click “Reload” to update the display.
To save any changes made so that they will be retained after a power cycle
or reboot of the device use the save option on the "Load/Save" dialog (see
page 31 „Loading/Saving the Configuration“)
Note: If you enter an incorrect configuration, you may block access to your
device. 
Activating the function “Cancel configuration change” in the “Load/Save”
dialog enables you to return automatically to the last configuration after a set
time period has elapsed. This gives you back your access to the device.
You can also launch the website for a device via the program. Refer to the
"TCSESB Managed Switch Basic Configuration User Manual" for additional
information.
Proceed as follows:
 Start the program.
 Select the device by clicking on the corresponding device line.
 Click in the menu bar on ”Edit“ and select the menu item ”Start Web
Interface“, or click on the button bar on the ”WWW“ symbol.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
15
Opening the Web-based Interface
Figure 3: Launching the device website via Ethernet Switch Configuration Adapter
The website of the device appears on the screen.
Figure 4: Website of the device with speech-bubble help
16
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Opening the Web-based Interface
The menu section displays the menu items. By placing the mouse pointer in
the menu section and clicking the alternate mouse button you can use “Back”
to return to a menu item you have already selected, or “Forward” to jump to
a menu item you have already selected.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
17
Opening the Web-based Interface
18
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Basic Settings
1 Basic Settings
The Basic Settings menu contains the dialogs, displays and tables for the
basic configuration:






System
Network
Software
Port configuration
Load/Save
Restart
S1A78429 - 12/2010
19
Basic Settings
1.1 System
1.1 System
The “System“ submenu in the basic settings menu is structured as follows:




Device Status
System data
Device view
Reloading data
Figure 5: "System" Submenu
 Device Status
This section of the website provides information on the device status and
the alarm states the device has detected.
20
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Basic Settings
1
1.1 System
2 3
Figure 6: Device status and display of detected alarms
1 - Symbol indicates the Device Status
2 - Cause of the oldest existing alarm detected
3 - Time of the oldest existing alarm detected
 System Data
This area of the website displays the system parameters of the device.
Here you can change
– the system name,
– the location description,
– the name of the contact person for this device,
Name
Name
Location
Contact
Basic module
Power supply (P1/P2)
Uptime
Meaning
System name of this device
Location of this device
The contact for this device
Hardware version of the device
Status of power units (P1/P2)
Time that has elapsed since this device was last restarted.
Table 1: System Data
 Device View
The device view shows the device with the current configuration. The
symbols underneath the device view represent the status of the individual
ports.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
21
Basic Settings
1.1 System
Figure 7: Device View
Meaning of the symbols:
The port (10, 100 Mbit/s, 1 Gbit/s) is enabled 
and the connection is OK.
The port is disabled by the management 
and it has a connection.
The port is disabled by the management 
and it has no connection.
The port is in autonegotiation mode.
The port is in HDX mode.
The port (100 Mbit/s) is in the discarding mode of a redundancy
protocol like e.g. Spanning Tree or HIPER-Ring.
22
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Basic Settings
1.1 System
 Updating
This area of the website at the bottom left displays the countdown time
until the applet requests the current data of this dialog again. Clicking the
"Reload" button calls the current dialog information immediately.
The applet polls the current data of the device automatically every
100 seconds.
Figure 8: Time until update
S1A78429 - 12/2010
23
Basic Settings
1.2 Network
1.2 Network
With the Basic settings:Network dialog you define the source from
which the device gets its IP parameters after starting, and you assign the IP
parameters and configure the access.
Figure 9: Network parameters dialog
 Under “Mode”, you enter where the device gets its IP parameters:
 In the BOOTP mode, the configuration is via a BOOTP or DHCP
server on the basis of the MAC address of the device (see on page 31
„Loading/Saving the Configuration“).
 In the DHCP mode, the configuration is via a DHCP server on the
basis of the MAC address or the name of the device (see on page 31
„Loading/Saving the Configuration“).
 In the local mode the net parameters in the device memory are used.
 Enter the parameters on the right according to the selected mode.
24
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Basic Settings
1.2 Network
 You enter the name applicable to the DHCP protocol in the “Name” line in
the system dialog of the Web-based interface.
 The Ethernet Switch Configurator protocol allows you to allocate an IP
address to the device on the basis of its MAC address. Activate the
Ethernet Switch Configurator protocol if you want to allocate an IP
address to the device from your PC with the enclosed Ethernet Switch
Configurator protocol software (setting on delivery: operation “on”, access
“read-write”).
Note: When you change the network mode from ”Local“ to ”BOOTP“ or
”DHCP“, the server will assign a new IP address to the device. If the server
does not respond, the IP address will be set to 0.0.0.0, and the BOOTP/
DHCP process will try to obtain an IP address again.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
25
Basic Settings
1.3 Software
1.3 Software
The software dialog enables you display the software versions in the device
and to carry out a software update of the device via file selection.
Figure 10: Software dialog
1.3.1
View the software versions present on the
device
You can view:
 Stored Version 
The software version stored in the flash memory.
26
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Basic Settings
1.3 Software
 Running Version 
The currently loaded software version.
 Backup Version 
The previous software version stored in the flash memory.
1.3.2
TFTP Software Update
For a tftp update you need a tftp server on which the software to be loaded
is stored.
The URL identifies the path to the software stored on the tftp server. The URL
is in the format 
tftp://IP address of the tftp server/path name/file name 
(e.g. tftp://192.168.1.1/device/device.bin).
Click "tftp Update" to load the software from the tftp server to the device. 
To start the new software after loading, cold start the device (see on page 37
„Restart“).
1.3.3
HTTP Software Update
For an HTTP software update (via a file selection window), the device
software must be on a data carrier that you can access from your
workstation.
 In the file selection frame, click on “...”.
 In the file selection window, select the device software (name type: *.bin,
e.g. device.bin) and click on “Open”.
 Click on “Update” to transfer the software to the device.
The end of the update is indicated by one of the following messages:
 Update completed successfully.
 Update failed. Reason: incorrect file.
 Update failed. Reason: error when saving.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
27
Basic Settings
1.3 Software
 File not found (reason: file name not found or does not exist).
 Connection error (reason: path without file name).
 After the update is completed successfully, you activate the new software: 
Select the Basic settings: Restart dialog and perform a cold start.
In a cold start, the device reloads the software from the non-volatile
memory, restarts, and performs a self-test.
 In your browser, click on “Reload” so that you can access the device again
after it is booted.
28
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Basic Settings
1.4 Port Configuration
1.4 Port Configuration
This configuration table allows you to configure each port of the device and
also display each port‘s current mode of operation (link state, bit rate (speed)
and duplex mode).
 In the “Name” column, you can enter a name for every port.
 In the “Ports on” column, you can switch on the port by selecting it here.
 In the “Propagate connection error” column, you can specify that a link
alarm will be forwarded to the device status and/or the the signal contact
is to be opened.
 In the “Automatic Configuration” column, you can activate the automatic
selection of the the operating mode (Autonegotiation) and the automatic
assigning of the connections (Auto cable crossing) of a TP port by
selecting the appropriate field. After the autonegotiation has been
switched on, it takes a few seconds for the operating mode to be set.
 In the “Manual Configuration” column, you set the operating mode for this
port. The choice of operating modes depends on the media module. The
possible operating modes are:
– 10 Mbit/s half duplex (HDX)
– 10 Mbit/s full duplex (FDX)
– 100 Mbit/s half duplex (HDX)
– 100 Mbit/s full duplex (FDX)
 The “Link/Current Operating Mode” column displays the current operating
mode and thereby also an existing connection.
 In the “Cable Crossing (Auto. Conf. off)” column, you assign the
connections of a TP port, if “Automatic Configuration” is deactivated for
this port. The possible settings are:
– enable: the device swaps the send and receive line pairs of the
TP cable for this port (MDIX).
– disable: the device does not swap the send and receive line pairs of
the TP cable for this port (MDI).
– unsupported: the port does not support this function (optical port).
Note: The active automatic configuration has priority over the manual
configuration.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
29
Basic Settings
1.4 Port Configuration
Note: The following settings are required for the ring ports in a HIPER-Ring:
Port Type Bit Rate
Optical
TX
all
100 Mbit/s
Autonegotiation 
(Automatic Configuration)
off
off
Port Setting
on
on
Duplex
Mode
full
full
Table 2: Port Settings for Ring Ports
Figure 11: Port Configuration Table Dialog
30
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Basic Settings
1.5 Loading/Saving the Configuration
1.5 Loading/Saving the
Configuration
With this dialog you can:






load a configuration,
save a configuration,
enter a URL,
restore the delivery configuration,
use the TCSEAM0200 for loading/saving the configuration,
cancel a configuration change.
Figure 12: Load/Save dialog
S1A78429 - 12/2010
31
Basic Settings
1.5.1
1.5 Loading/Saving the Configuration
Loading the configuration
In the “Load” frame, you have the option to
 load a configuration saved on the device,
 load a configuration stored under the specified URL,
 load a configuration stored on the specified URL and save it on the
device,
 load a configuration saved on the PC in binary format.
If you change the current configuration (for example, by switching a port off),
the Web-based interface changes the “load/save” symbol in the navigation
tree from a disk symbol to a yellow triangle. After saving the configuration,
the Web-based interface displays the “load/save” symbol as a disk again.
Note: Loading a configuration deactivates the ports while the configuration is
being set up. Afterwards, the Switch sets the port status according to the new
configuration.
1.5.2
Saving the Configuration
In the “Save” frame, you have the option to
 save the current configuration on the device,
 save the current configuration in binary form in a file under the specified
URL,
 save the current configuration in binary form on the PC,
32
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Basic Settings
1.5 Loading/Saving the Configuration
Note: The loading process started by DHCP/BOOTP (see „Network“ on
page 24) shows the selection of “from URL & save local” in the “Load” frame.
If you get an error message when saving a configuration, this could be due
to an active loading process. DHCP/BOOTP only finishes a loading process
when a valid configuration has been loaded. If DHCP/BOOTP does not find
a valid configuration, finish the loading process by loading the local
configuration from the device in the “Load” frame.
If you change the current configuration (for example, by switching a port off),
the Web-based interface changes the “load/save” symbol in the navigation
tree from a disk symbol to a yellow triangle. After saving the configuration,
the Web-based interface displays the “load/save” symbol as a disk again.
1.5.3
URL
The URL identifies the path to the tftp server on which the configuration file
is to be stored. The URL is in the format: tftp://IP address of the tftp server/
path name/file name (e.g. tftp://192.168.1.100/device/
config.dat).
The configuration file includes all configuration data, including the passwords
for accessing the device. Therefore pay attention to the access rights on the
tftp server.
1.5.4
Deleting a configuration
In the "Delete" frame, you have the option to
S1A78429 - 12/2010
33
Basic Settings
1.5 Loading/Saving the Configuration
 Reset the current configuration to the state on delivery. The configuration
saved on the device is retained.
 Reset the device to the state on delivery. After the next restart, the IP
address is also in the state on delivery.
1.5.5
Using the Memory Backup Adapter (EAM)
The EAMs are devices for loading/saving the configuration data of a device.
An EAM enables the configuration data to be transferred easily by means of
a substitute device of the same type.
Note: TCESEB Basic switches use Memory Backup Adapter:
TCSEAM0200.
 Storing the current configuration data in the EAM:
You have the option of transferring the current device configuration,
including the SNMP password, to the EAM and the flash memory by using
the “to device” option in the “Save” frame .
 Transferring the configuration data from the EAM:
When you restart with the EAM connected, the device adopts the
configuration data of the EAM and saves it permanently in the flash
memory. If the connected EAM does not contain any valid data, for
example, if the delivery state is unchanged, the device loads the data from
the flash memory.
Note: Before loading the configuration data from the EAM, the device
compares the password in the device with the password in the EAM
configuration data.
34
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Basic Settings
1.5 Loading/Saving the Configuration
The device loads the configuration data if
 the admin password matches or
 there is no password saved locally or
 the local password is the original default password or
 no configuration is saved locally.
Status
notPresent
ok
Meaning
No EAM present
The configuration data from the EAM and the device
match.
removed
The EAM was removed after booting.
notInSync
- The configuration data of the EAM and the device do
not match, or only one file existsa,
or 
- no configuration file is present on the EAM or on the
deviceb.
outOfMemory The local configuration data is too extensive to be
stored on the EAM.
wrongMachin The configuration data in the EAM originates from a
e
different device type and cannot be read or converted.
checksumErr The configuration data is damaged.
Table 3: EAM status
a
In these cases, the EAM status is identical to the status “EAM not in
sync”, which sends “Not OK” to the signal contacts and the device status., 
b
In this case, the EAM status (“notInSync”) deviates from the status “EAM
not in sync”, which sends “OK” to the signal contacts, and the device
status.
1.5.6
Canceling a configuration change
 Function
If the function is activated and the connection to the device is interrupted
for longer than the time specified in the field “Period to undo while
connection is lost [s]”, the device then loads the last configuration saved.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
35
Basic Settings
1.5 Loading/Saving the Configuration
 Activate the function before you configure the device so that you will
then be reconnected if an incorrect configuration interrupts your
connection to the device.
 Enter the “Period to undo while the connection is lost [s]” in seconds. 
Possible values: 10-600 seconds.
Default setting: 600 seconds.
Note: Deactivate the function after you have successfully saved the
configuration, so that the device does not reload the configuration after
you close the web interface.
 Watchdog IP address
“Watchdog IP address” shows you the IP address of the PC from which
you have activated the (watchdog) function. The device monitors the link
to the PC with this IP address, checking for interruptions.
36
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Basic Settings
1.6 Restart
1.6 Restart
With this dialog you can:
 initiate a cold start of the device. The device reloads the software from the
non-volatile memory, restarts, and performs a self-test.
In your browser, click on “Reload” so that you can access the device again
after it is booted.
 initiate a warm start of the device. In this case the device checks the
software in the volatile memory and restarts. If a warm start is not
possible, the device automatically performs a cold start.
 reset the entries with the status “learned” in the filter table (MAC address
table).
 reset the ARP table. 
The device maintains an ARP table internally. 
If, for example, you assign a new IP address to a computer and
subsequently cannot set up a connection to the device, you then reset the
ARP table.
 reset the port counters.
 delete the log file.
Note: During the restart, the device temporarily does not transfer any data,
and it cannot be accessed via the Web-based interface or other management
systems.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
37
Basic Settings
1.6 Restart
Figure 13: Restart Dialog
38
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Security
1.6 Restart
2 Security
The “Security” menu contains the dialogs, displays and tables for configuring
the security settings:
 Password/SNMPv3 access
 SNMPv1/v2 access
 Web access
S1A78429 - 12/2010
39
Security
2.1 Password / SNMPv3 access
2.1 Password / SNMPv3 access
This dialog gives you the option of changing the read and read/write
passwords for access to the device via the Web-based interface, via the CLI,
and via SNMPv3 (SNMP version 3). Please note that passwords are casesensitive. 
Set different passwords for the read password and the read/write password
so that a user that only has read access (user name “user”) does not know,
or cannot guess, the password for read/write access (user name “admin”). 
If you set identical passwords, when you attempt to write this data the device
reports a general error.
The Web-based interface and the user interface (CLI) use the same
passwords as SNMPv3 for the users “admin” and “user”.
 Select “Modify read-only password (user)” to enter the read password.
 Enter the new read password in the “New password” line and repeat your
entry in the “Please retype” line.
 Select “Modify read-write password (admin)” to enter the read/write
password.
 Enter the read/write password and repeat your entry.
Figure 14: Dialog Password/SNMP Access
40
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Security
2.1 Password / SNMPv3 access
Note: If you do not know a password with “read/write” access, you will not
have write access to the device.
Note: For security reasons, the device does not display the passwords.
Make a note of every change. You cannot access the device without a valid
password.
Note: For security reasons, SNMPv3 encrypts the password. With the
“SNMPv1” or “SNMPv2” setting in the dialog Security:SNMPv1/v2
access, the device transfers the password unencrypted, so that this can
also be read.
Note: Use between 5 and 32 characters for the password in SNMPv3, since
many applications do not accept shorter passwords.
Access via a Web browser can be blocked in a separate dialog (see on
page 45 „Web Access“).
Access at IP address level is restricted in a separate dialog (see on page 42
„SNMPv1/v2 Access Settings“).
S1A78429 - 12/2010
41
Security
2.2 SNMPv1/v2 Access Settings
2.2 SNMPv1/v2 Access Settings
With this dialog you can select access via SNMPv1 or SNMPv2. In the state
on delivery, both protocols are activated.
You can thus use the device to communicate with earlier versions of SNMP.
Note: To be able to read and/or change the data in this dialog, log in to the
Web-based interface with the user name “admin” and the relevant password.
 In the “Index” column, you enter the sequential number to which the
access restriction applies.
 In the “Password” column, you enter the password with which a
management station may access the device via SNMPv1/v2 from the
specified address range. Please note that passwords are case-sensitive.
 In the “IP Address” column, you enter the IP address which may access
the device. No entry in this field, or the entry “0.0.0.0”, allows access to
this device from computers with any IP address. In this case, the only
access protection is the password.
 In the “IP Mask” column, much the same as with netmasks, you have the
option of selecting a group of IP addresses.
Example: 
255.255.255.255: a single IP address 
255.255.255.240 with IP address = 172.168.23.20: 
the IP addresses 172.168.23.16 to 172.168.23.31.
42
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Security
2.2 SNMPv1/v2 Access Settings
Binary notation of the mask 255.255.255.240:
1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 0000
mask bits
Binary notation of the IP address 172.168.23.20:
1010 1100 1010 1000 0001 0111 0001 0100
The binary representation of the mask with the IP address yields
an address range of:
1010 1100 1010 1000 0001 0111 0001 0000 bis
1010 1100 1010 1000 0001 0111 0001 1111
i.e.: 172.168.23.16 to 172.168.23.31
 In the “Access Mode” column, you specify whether this computer can
access the device with the read password (access mode “readOnly”) or
with the read/write password (access mode “readWrite”).
Note: The password for the “readOnly” access mode is the same as the
SNMPv3 password for read access. The password for the “readWrite”
access mode is the same as the SNMPv3 password for read/write
access. When you change one of the passwords, the device
automatically synchronizes the corresponding password for SNMPv3
(see on page 40 „Password / SNMPv3 access“).
 You can activate/deactivate this table entry in the “Active” column.
Note: If you have not activated any line, the device does not apply any
access restriction with regard to the IP addresses.
 The “Create entry” button enables you to create a new row in the table.
 With “Delete entry” you delete selected rows in the table.
Note: The row with the password currently in use cannot be deleted or
changed.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
43
Security
2.2 SNMPv1/v2 Access Settings
Figure 15: SNMPv1/v2 Access Dialog
44
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Security
2.3 Web Access
2.3 Web Access
This dialog allows you to switch off the Web server on the device.
Figure 16: Web Access dialog
2.3.1
Description of Web Access
The Web server of the device allows you to configure the device by using the
Web-based interface. Deactivate the Web server if you do not want the
device to be accessed from the Web.
On delivery, the server is activated.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
45
Security
2.3 Web Access
After the Web server has been switched off, it is no longer possible to log in
via a Web browser. The login in the open browser window remains active.
Note: The Command Line Interface allows you to reactivate the Web server.
46
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Time
2.3 Web Access
3 Time
With this dialog you can enter time-related settings independently of the time
synchronization protocol selected.
 The “IEEE/SNTP time” displays the time with reference to Universal Time
Coordinated (UTC). 
The time displayed is the same worldwide. Local time differences are not
taken into account.
 The “System time” uses the “IEEE 1588 / SNTP time”, allowing for the
local time difference from “IEEE 1588 / SNTP time”.
“System time” = “IEEE 1588 / SNTP time” + “Local offset”.
 “Time source” displays the source of the following time data. The device
automatically selects the source with the greatest accuracy. 
Possible sources are: local and sntp. The source is initially local. If
SNTP is activated and if the device receives a valid SNTP packet, the
device sets its time source to sntp.
 With “Set time from PC”, the device takes the PC time as the system time
and calculates the IEEE 1588 / SNTP time using the local time difference. 
“IEEE 1588 / SNTP time” = “System time” - “Local offset”
 The “Local Offset” is for displaying/entering the time difference between
the local time and the “IEEE 1588 / SNTP time”.
 With ”Set offset from PC“, the device determines the time zone on your
PC and uses it to calculate the local time difference.
Note: When setting the time in zones with summer and winter times, make
an adjustment for the local offset, if applicable. The device can also get the
SNTP server IP address and the local offset from a DHCP server.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
47
Time
2.3 Web Access
Interaction of PTP and SNTP
According to PTP (IEEE 1588) and SNTP, both protocols can exist in parallel
in the same network. However, since both protocols affect the system time of
the device, situations may occur in which the two protocols compete with
each other.
The PTP reference clock gets its time either via SNTP or from its own clock.
All other clocks favor the PTP time as the source.
Figure 17: Time Dialog
48
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Time
3.1 SNTP configuration
3.1 SNTP configuration
The Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) enables you to synchronize the
system time in your network. 
The device supports the SNTP client and the SNTP server function.
The SNTP server makes the UTC (Universal Time Coordinated) available.
UTC is the time relating to the coordinated world time measurement. The
time displayed is the same worldwide. Local time differences are not taken
into account.
SNTP uses the same packet format as NTP. In this way, an SNTP client can
receive the time from an SNTP server as well as from an NTP server.
Note: For very accurate system time distribution with cascaded SNTP
servers and clients, use only network components (routers, switches, hubs)
in the signal path between the SNTP server and the SNTP client which
forward SNTP packets with a minimized delay.
Parameter
Function
Meaning
Switch the SNTP function on and off
In this frame you switch the SNTP function on/off. 
When it is switched off, the SNTP server does not send any SNTP
packets or respond to any SNTP requests. 
The SNTP client does not send any SNTP requests or evaluate any
SNTP Broadcast/Multicast packets.
Table 4: Configuration SNTP Client and Server
Parameter
SNTP Status
Meaning
Possible Values
Displays conditions such as “Server cannot be reached”.
Default Setting
-
Table 5: SNTP Status
S1A78429 - 12/2010
49
Time
Parameter
3.1 SNTP configuration
Meaning
Possible
Values
Server status
Switches the SNTP server on and off.
On, Off
Anycast destination IP address, to which the SNTP server of the Valid IPv4
address
device sends the SNTP packets (see
address
table 7).
Anycast send interval Time interval at which the device sends
1 - 3,600
SNTP packets.
Disable Server at
Enables/disables the SNTP server function if On, Off
local time source
the status of the time source is local (see
Time dialog).
Default
Setting
On
0.0.0.0
120
Off
Table 6: Configuration SNTP Server
IP destination
address
0.0.0.0
Unicast
224.0.1.1
255.255.255.255
Send SNTP packets
periodically to
Nobody
Unicast
Multicast
Broadcast
Table 7: Periodic sending of SNTP packets
50
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Time
Parameter
3.1 SNTP configuration
Meaning
Possible Values
Default
Setting
Client Status
Switches the SNTP client on and off.
On, Off
On
External server IP address of the SNTP server from which the Valid IPv4 address 0.0.0.0
address
device periodically requests the system time.
Redundant
IP address of the SNTP server from which the Valid IPv4 address 0.0.0.0
server address device periodically requests the system time if
it does not receive a response to a request
from the “External server address” within 0.5
seconds.
Server request Time interval at which the device requests
1 s - 3,600 s
30 s
interval
SNTP packets
Accept SNTP
Specifies whether the device accepts the
On, Off
On
Broadcasts
system time from SNTP Broadcast/Multicast
packets that it receives.
Threshold for
The device changes the time as soon as the 0 - 2.147.483.647 0
obtaining the
deviation from the server time is above this
(231-1)
UTC [ms]
threshold in milliseconds. This reduces the
frequency of time changes.
Disable client
Enable/disable further time synchronizations On, Off
Off
after successful once the client, after its activation, has
synchronization synchronized its time with the server.
Table 8: Configuration SNTP Client
Note: If you have enabled PTP at the same time, the SNTP client first
collects 60 time stamps before it deactivates itself. The device thus
determines the drift compensation for its PTP clock. With the preset server
request interval, this takes about half an hour.
Note: If you are receiving the system time from an external/redundant server
address, you do not accept any SNTP Broadcasts (see below). Otherwise
you can never distinguish whether the device is displaying the time from the
server entered, or that of an SNTP Broadcast packet.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
51
Time
3.1 SNTP configuration
Figure 18: SNTP Dialog
52
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Time
3.2 PTP (IEEE 1588)
3.2 PTP (IEEE 1588)
Precise time management is required for running time-critical applications via
a LAN.
The IEEE 1588 standard with the Precision Time Protocol (PTP) describes a
procedure that assumes one clock is the most accurate and thus enables
precise synchronization of all clocks in a LAN.
For devices without a real-time (RT) module (module without timestamp
unit):
 enable/disable the PTP function in the PTP dialog.
 select PTP mode in the PTP dialog.
– Select v1-simple-mode if the reference clock uses PTP Version 1.
– Select v2-simple-mode if the reference clock uses PTP Version 2.
Figure 19: Dialog PTP
S1A78429 - 12/2010
53
Time
54
3.2 PTP (IEEE 1588)
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Switching
3.2 PTP (IEEE 1588)
4 Switching
The switching menu contains the dialogs, displays and tables for configuring
the switching settings:
 Switching Global
 Filters for MAC Addresses
 Multicasts
S1A78429 - 12/2010
55
Switching
4.1 Switching Global
4.1 Switching Global
Variable
Meaning
MAC address Display the MAC address of the device
(read only)
Aging Time (s) Enter the Aging Time in seconds for
dynamic MAC address entries.
Possible Values
15-3.825
30
Table 9: Switching:Global dialog
Figure 20: Dialog Switching Global
56
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Switching
4.2 Filters for MAC addresses
4.2 Filters for MAC addresses
The filter table for MAC addresses is used to display and edit filters. Each row
represents one filter. Filters specify the way in which data packets are sent.
They are set automatically by the device (learned status) or manually. Data
packets whose destination address is entered in the table are sent from the
receiving port to the ports marked in the table. Data packets whose
destination address is not in the table are sent from the receiving port to all
other ports. The following conditions are possible:
 learned: The filter was created automatically by the device.
 invalid: With this status you delete a manually created filter.
 permanent: The filter is stored permanently in the device or on the URL
(see page 31 „Loading/Saving the Configuration“).
 igmp: The filter was created by IGMP Snooping.
In the “Create” dialog (see buttons below), you can create new filters.
Figure 21: Filter Table dialog
S1A78429 - 12/2010
57
Switching
4.2 Filters for MAC addresses
Note: This filter table allows you to create up to 100 filter entries for Multicast
addresses.
58
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Switching
4.3 Multicasts
4.3 Multicasts
With this dialog you can:
 activate/deactivate the IGMP Snooping protocol,
 configure the IGMP Snooping protocol globally and per port.
Figure 22: Multicasts dialog
4.3.1
Global Configuration
In this frame you can:
 activate/deactivate the IGMP Snooping protocol.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
59
Switching
4.3 Multicasts
Parameter
IGMP Snooping
disabled
Meaning
Default setting
Activate IGMP Snooping globally for the entire device. deselected
Deactivate IGMP Snooping globally for the entire device. selected
If IGMP Snooping is switched off:
 the device does not evaluate Query and Report
packets received, and
 it sends (floods) received data packets with a
Multicast address as the destination address to all
ports.
Table 10: Global setting
4.3.2
IGMP Querier and IGMP Settings
With these frames you can enter global settings for the IGMP settings and
the IGMP Querier function.
Prerequisite: The IGMP Snooping function is activated globally.
60
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Switching
Parameter
IGMP Querier
IGMP Querier
enabled
Protocol Version
Send Interval
4.3 Multicasts
Meaning
Value range
Default setting
Switch query function on/off
on/off
off
Select IGMP version 1, 2 or 3.
Enter the interval at which the switch
sends query packets.
All IGMP-capable terminal devices
respond to a query with a report
message, thus generating a network
load.
1, 2, 3
2-3599 sa
2
125 s
IGMP settings
Current querier IP
address
Max. Response
Time
Display the IP address of the router/
switch that contains the query function.
Enter the time within which the
Multicast group members respond to a
query.
The Multicast group members select
random values within the response
time for their response, so that all the
Multicast group members do not
respond to the query at the same time.
Group Membership Enter the period for which a dynamic
Interval
Multicast group remains entered in the
device if it does not receive any report
messages.
Protocol Version  10 s
- 1,2: 1-25 sa
- 3: 1-3598 sa
3-3600 sa
260 s
Table 11: IGMP Querier and IGMP settings
a.) Note the connection between the parameters Max. Response Time,
Send Interval and Group Membership Interval, (see table 12)
The parameters
– Max. Response Time,
– Send Interval and
– Group Membership Interval
have a relationship to each other:
Max. Response Time < Send Interval < Group Membership Interval.
If you enter values that contradict this relationship, the device then replaces
these values with a default value or with the last valid values.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
61
Switching
4.3 Multicasts
Parameter
Max. Response Time,
Send Interval
Group Membership Interval
Protocol
Version
1, 2
3
1, 2, 3
1, 2, 3
Value range
Default setting
1-25 seconds
1-3,598 seconds
2-3,599 seconds
3-3,600 seconds
10 seconds
125 seconds
260 seconds
Table 12: Value range for
- Max. Response Time
- Send Interval
- Group Membership Interval
For “Send Interval” and “Max. Response Time”,
– select a large value if you want to reduce the load on your network and
can accept the resulting longer switching times,
– select a small value if you require short switching times and can accept
the resulting network load.
4.3.3
Multicasts
In this frame you specify how the device transmits packets with
 unknown MAC/IP Multicast address not learned with IGMP Snooping
 known MAC/IP Multicast address learned with IGMP Snooping.
Prerequisite: The IGMP Snooping function is activated globally.
62
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Switching
Parameter
Unknown Multicasts
4.3 Multicasts
Meaning
Value range
Default setting
 Send to Query Ports: 
The device sends the packets
with an unknown MAC/IP
Multicast address to all query
ports.
 Send to All Ports: 
The device sends the packets
with an unknown MAC/IP
Multicast address to all ports.
 Discard: 
The device discards all packets
with an unknown MAC/IP
Multicast address.
Send to Query Send to All
Ports, Send to Ports
All Ports,
Discard
 Send to query and registered
ports: 
The device sends the packets
with a known MAC/IP Multicast
address to all query ports and
to registered ports.
The advantage of this is that it
works in many applications
without any additional
configuration. 
Application: 
“Flood and Prune” routing in
PIM-DM.
Send to query Send to
and registered registered ports
ports, send to
registered
ports
Known Multicasts
 Send to registered ports: 
The device sends the packets
with a known MAC/IP Multicast
address to registered ports.
The advantage of this setting is
that it uses the available
bandwidth optimally through
direct distribution. It requires
additional port settings. 
Application: 
Routing protocol PIM-SM.
Table 13: Known and unknown Multicasts
S1A78429 - 12/2010
63
Switching
4.3 Multicasts
Note: The way in which unlearned Multicast addresses are handled 
also applies to the reserved addresses from the “Local Network Control
Block” (224.0.0.0 - 224.0.0.255). This can have an effect on higher-level
routing protocols.
4.3.4
Settings per Port (Table)
With this configuration table you can enter port-related settings for:
 IGMP
Figure 23: Port-related settings
64
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Switching
4.3 Multicasts
Parameter
Module
Meaning
Module number for modular devices,
otherwise 1.
Port
Module and port numbers to which this
entry applies.
IGMP Snooping on Switch IGMP on/off for each port. 
Switching IGMP off at a port prevents
registration for this port.
Prerequisite: In the
Switching:Multicasts:IGMP
dialog, IGMP is enabled.
IGMP Forward All Switch the IGMP Snooping function
“Forward All” on/off. 
With the IGMP Forward All setting,
the device sends to this port all data
packets with a Multicast address in the
destination address field.
Prerequisite: In the
Switching:Multicasts:IGMP
dialog, IGMP is enabled.
Value range
Default setting
-
-
on, off
on
on, off
off
Note: If a number of routers are
connected to a subnetwork, you must
use IGMP version 1 so that all the
routers receive all the IGMP reports.
Note: If you use IGMP version 1 in a
subnetwork, then you must also use
IGMP version 1 in the entire network.
IGMP Automatic
Query Port
Displays which ports the device has
yes, no
learned as query ports if “automatic” is
selected in “Static Query Port”.
Prerequisite: In the
Switching:Multicasts:Global
Setting dialog, the IGMP Snooping
mode is selected.
-
Table 14: Settings per port
S1A78429 - 12/2010
65
Switching
Parameter
Static Query Port
Learned Query
Port
4.3 Multicasts
Meaning
The device sends IGMP report
messages to the ports at which it
receives IGMP queries (default
setting). This column allows you to also
send IGMP report messages to: other
selected ports (enable) or connected
Schneider Electric devices
(automatic).
Prerequisite: In the
Switching:Multicasts:Global
Setting dialog, the IGMP Snooping
mode is selected.
Shows at which ports the device has
received IGMP queries if “disable” is
selected in “Static Query Port”.
Prerequisite: In the
Switching:Multicasts:IGMP
dialog, IGMP is enabled.
Value range
enable,
disable,
automatic
Default setting
disable
yes, no
-
Table 14: Settings per port
Note: If the device is incorporated into a HIPER-Ring, you can use the
following settings to quickly reconfigure the network for data packets with
registered Multicast destination addresses after the ring is switched:
 Switch on the IGMP Snooping on the ring ports and globally, and
 activate “IGMP Forward All” per port on the ring ports.
66
S1A78429 - 12/2010
QoS/Priority
4.3 Multicasts
5 QoS/Priority
The device enables you to set
 how it evaluates the QoS/prioritizing information of incoming data
packets:
 VLAN priority based on IEEE 802.1Q/ 802.1D (Layer 2)
 Type of Service (ToS) or DiffServ (DSCP) for IP packets (Layer 3)
 which QoS/prioritizing information it writes to outgoing data packets
(e.g. priority for management packets, port priority).
The QoS/Priority menu contains the dialogs, displays and tables for
configuring the QoS/priority settings:




Global
Port configuration
IEEE 802.1D/p mapping
IP DSCP mapping
S1A78429 - 12/2010
67
QoS/Priority
5.1 Global
5.1 Global
With this dialog you can:
 enter the IP-DSCP value for management packets in the range 0 to 63
(default setting: 0 (be/cs0)). 
In order for you to have full access to the management of the device, even
when there is a high network load, the device enables you to prioritize
management packets. 
In prioritizing management packets (SNMP, Telnet, etc.), the device
sends the management packets with priority information. 
Note the assignment of the IP-DSCP value to the traffic class (see
table 19).
Note: Certain DSCP values have DSCP names, such as be/cs0 to cs7
(class selector) or af11 to af43 (assured forwarding) and ef (expedited
forwarding).
 display the maximum number of queues possible per port. 
The device supports 4 priority queues (traffic classes in compliance with
IEEE 802.1D).
 select the trust mode globally. You use this to specify how the device
handles received data packets that contain priority information.
 “untrusted”: 
The device ignores the priority information in the packet and always
assigns the packets the port priority of the receiving port.
 “trustDot1p”: 
The device prioritizes received packets that contain VLAN tag
information according to this information (assigning them to a traffic
class - see „802.1D/p mapping“). 
The device prioritizes received packets that do not contain any tag
information (assigning them to a traffic class - see „Entering the port
priority“) according to the port priority of the receiving port .
68
S1A78429 - 12/2010
QoS/Priority
5.1 Global
 “trustIpDscp”: 
The device prioritizes received IP packets (assigning them to a traffic
class - see „IP DSCP mapping“) according to their DSCP value. 
The device prioritizes received packets that are not IP packets
(assigning them to a traffic class - see „Entering the port priority“)
according to the port priority of the receiving port .
Traffic class
0
1
2
3
New VLAN priority
when receiving port 
has an even port priority
0
2
4
6
New VLAN priority
when receiving port 
has an odd port priority
1
3
5
7
Table 15: VLAN priority remarking
Figure 24: Global dialog
S1A78429 - 12/2010
69
QoS/Priority
5.2 Port Configuration
5.2 Port Configuration
This dialog allows you to configure the ports. You can:
 assign a port priority to a port.
Parameter
Module
Port
Port priority
Meaning
Module of the device on which the port is located.
Port to which this entry applies.
Enter the port priority.
Table 16: Port configuration table
Figure 25: Port configuration dialog
70
S1A78429 - 12/2010
QoS/Priority
5.2.1
5.2 Port Configuration
Entering the port priority
 Double-click a cell in the “Port priority” column and enter the priority (0-7).
According to the priority entered, the device assigns the data packets that
it receives at this port to a traffic class (see table 17).
Prerequisite: 
setting in the Global:Trust Mode dialog: untrusted (see on
page 68 „Global“) or 
setting in the Global:Trust Mode dialog:trustDot1p(see on
page 68 „Global“) and the data packets do not contain a VLAN tag or 
setting in Global:Trust Mode dialog: trustIpDscp(see on
page 68 „Global“) and the data packets are not IP packets.
Port priority
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Traffic class (default setting)
1
0
0
1
2
2
3
3
IEEE 802.1D traffic type
Best effort (default)
Background
Standard
Excellent effort (business critical)
Controlled load (streaming multimedia)
Video, < 100 ms of latency and jitter
Voice, < 10 ms of latency and jitter
Network control reserved traffic
Table 17: Assigning the port priority to the 4 traffic classes
S1A78429 - 12/2010
71
QoS/Priority
5.3 802.1D/p mapping
5.3 802.1D/p mapping
The 802.1D/p mapping dialog allows you to assign a traffic class to every
VLAN priority.
Figure 26: 802.1D/p Mapping dialog
 Enter the desired value from 0 to 3 in the Traffic Class field for every
VLAN priority.
72
S1A78429 - 12/2010
QoS/Priority
Port priority
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
5.3 802.1D/p mapping
Traffic class (default setting)
1
0
0
1
2
2
3
3
IEEE 802.1D traffic type
Best effort (default)
Background
Standard
Excellent effort (business critical)
Controlled load (streaming multimedia)
Video, < 100 ms of latency and jitter
Voice, < 10 ms of latency and jitter
Network control reserved traffic
Table 18: Assigning the VLAN priority to the 4 traffic classes
Note: Network protocols and redundancy mechanisms use the highest traffic
class 3. Therefore, select other traffic classes for application data.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
73
QoS/Priority
5.4 IP DSCP mapping
5.4 IP DSCP mapping
The IP DSCP mapping table allows you to assign a traffic class to every
DSCP value.
 Enter the desired value from 0 to 3 in the Traffic Class field for every
DSCP value (0-63).
Figure 27: IP DSCP mapping table
The different DSCP values get the device to employ a different forwarding
behavior, namely Per-Hop Behavior (PHB). 
PHB classes:
 Class Selector (CS0-CS7): For reasons of compatibility to TOS/IP
Precedence
 Expedited Forwarding (EF): Premium service.
Reduced delay, jitter + packet loss (RFC 2598)
74
S1A78429 - 12/2010
QoS/Priority
5.4 IP DSCP mapping
 Assured Forwarding (AF): Provides a differentiated schema for handling
different data traffic (RFC 2597).
 Default Forwarding/Best Effort: No particular prioritizing.
DSCP value
DSCP name
0
1-7
8
9,11,13,15
10,12,14
16
17,19,21,23
18,20,22
24
25,27,29,31
26,28,30
32
33,35,37,39
34,36,38
40
41,42,43,44,45,47
46
48
49-55
56
57-63
Best Effort /CS0
CS1
AF11,AF12,AF13
CS2
AF21,AF22,AF23
CS3
AF31,AF32,AF33
CS4
AF41,AF42,AF43
CS5
EF
CS6
CS7
Traffic class
(default setting)
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
Table 19: Mapping the DSCP values onto the traffic classes
S1A78429 - 12/2010
75
QoS/Priority
76
5.4 IP DSCP mapping
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Redundancy
5.4 IP DSCP mapping
6 Redundancy
Under Redundancy you will find the dialogs and views for configuring and
monitoring the redundancy functions:
 Ring Redundancy
 Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP)
S1A78429 - 12/2010
77
Redundancy
6.1 Ring Redundancy
6.1 Ring Redundancy
The concept of the Ring Redundancy enables the construction of highavailability, ring-shaped network structures.
If a section is down, the ring structure of a
 HIPER-(HIGH PERFORMANCE REDUNDANCY) Ring with up to 50
devices typically transforms back to a line structure within 80 ms (possible
settings: standard/accelerated).
 MRP (Media Redundancy Protocol) Ring (IEC 62439) of up to 50 devices
typically transforms back to a line structure within 80 ms (adjustable to
max. 200 ms/500 ms).
With the help of the Ring Manager (RM) function of a device, you can connect
both ends of a backbone in a line structure to form a redundant ring.
 Within a HIPER-Ring, you can use any combination of the following
devices:
– TCSESM
– TCSESM-E
– TCSESB
 Within an MRP-Ring, you can use devices that support the MRP protocol
based on IEC62439.
– TCSESM
– TCSESM-E
– TCSESB
Depending on the device model, the Ring Redundancy dialog allows you to:







Select one of the available Ring Redundancy versions, or change it.
Display an overview of the current Ring Redundancy configuration.
Create new Ring Redundancies.
Configure existing Ring Redundancies.
Enable/disable the Ring Manager function.
Receive Ring information.
Delete the Ring Redundancy.
Note: Enabled Ring Redundancy methods on a device are mutually
exclusive at any one time. When changing to another Ring Redundancy
method, deactivate the function for the time being.
78
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Redundancy
6.1 Ring Redundancy
Parameter
Version
Meaning
Select the Ring Redundancy version you want to use: 
HIPER-Ring
MRP
Default setting is HIPER-Ring
Ring port No. In a ring, every device has 2 neighbors. Define 2 ports as ring ports to which the
neighboring devices are connected.
Module
Module identifier of the ports used as ring ports
Port
Port identifier of the ports used as ring ports
Operation
Value depends on the Ring Redundancy version used. Described in the
following sections for the corresponding Ring Redundancy version.
Table 20: Ring Redundancy basic configuration
S1A78429 - 12/2010
79
Redundancy
6.1.1
6.1 Ring Redundancy
Configuring the HIPER-Ring
For the ring ports, select the following basic settings in the Basic
Settings:Port Configuration dialog:
Port Type Bit Rate
Optical
TX
all
100 Mbit/s
Autonegotiation 
(Automatic Configuration)
off
off
Port Setting
on
on
Duplex
Mode
full
full
Table 21: Port Settings for Ring Ports
WARNING
RING LOOP HAZARD
To avoid loops during the configuration phase, configure all the devices of
the HIPER-Ring individually. Before you connect the redundant line, you
must complete the configuration of all the devices of the Ring.
Failure to follow these instructions can result in death, serious injury,
or equipment damage.
Parameter
Meaning
Ring port X.X operation Display in “Operation” field:
active: This port is switched on and has a link.
inactive: This port is switched off or it has no link.
Redundancy Manager Status information, no input possible:
Status (Ring Manager) Active (redundant line): the redundant line was closed
because a data line or a network component within the ring is
down.
Inactive: the redundant ring is open, and all data lines and
network components are working.
Redundancy Manager If there is exactly one device, you switch the Ring Manager
Mode (Ring Manager) function on at the ends of the line.
Table 22: HIPER-Ring configuration
80
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Redundancy
Parameter
Ring Recovery
6.1 Ring Redundancy
Meaning
The settings in the ”Ring Recovery“ frame are only effective for
devices that are ring managers.
In the ring manager, select the desired value for the test packet
timeout for which the ring manager waits after sending a test
packet before it evaluates the test packet as lost.
 Standard: test packet timeout 480 ms
 Accelerated: test packet timeout 280 ms
Note: The settings are especially meaningful if at least one line in
the ring consists of a 1,000 MBit/s twisted pair line. The
reconfiguration time after connection interruption existing due to
the reaction characteristic of 1,000 MBit/s twisted pair ports can
thus be accelerated considerably.
Information
If the device is a ring manager: The displays in this frame mean: 
“Redundancy working”: When a component of the ring is down, the
redundant line takes over its function.
“Configuration failure”: You have configured the function
incorrectly, or there is no ring port connection.
Table 22: HIPER-Ring configuration
Figure 28: Selecting ring redundancy, entering ring ports, enabling/disabling ring
manager and selecting ring recovery.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
81
Redundancy
6.1 Ring Redundancy
Note: Deactivate the Spanning Tree protocol for the ports connected to the
redundant ring, because the Spanning Tree and the Ring Redundancy work
with different reaction times ( Redundancy:Rapid Spanning Tree:Port).
Note: When activating the HIPER-Ring function, the device sets the
corresponding settings for the pre-defined ring ports in the configuration table
(transmission rate and mode). If you switch off the HIPER-Ring function, the
ports, which are changed back into normal ports, keep the ring port settings.
82
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Redundancy
6.1.2
6.1 Ring Redundancy
Configuring the MRP-Ring
To configure an MRP-Ring, you set up the network to meet your demands.
For the ring ports, select the following basic settings in the Basic
Settings:Port Configuration dialog:
Port Type Bit Rate
Optical
TX
all
100 Mbit/s
Autonegotiation 
(Automatic Configuration)
off
off
Port Setting
on
on
Duplex
Mode
full
full
Table 23: Port Settings for Ring Ports
WARNING
RING LOOP HAZARD
To avoid loops during the configuration phase, configure all the devices of
the MRP-Ring individually. Before you connect the redundant line, you must
complete the configuration of all the devices of the Ring.
Failure to follow these instructions can result in death, serious injury,
or equipment damage.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
83
Redundancy
6.1 Ring Redundancy
Parameter
Meaning
Ring port X.X Display in “Operation” field:
operation
forwarding: This port is switched on and has a link.
blocked: This port is blocked and has a link.
disabled: This port is switched off.
not connected: This port has no link.
Configuration Deactivate the advanced mode if a device in the ring does not support the
Redundancy advanced mode for fast switching times. Otherwise you activate the advanced
Manager
mode.
(Ring
Manager)
Note: All TCSESM (from vers. 4.1), TCSESM-E and TCSESB devices that
support the MRP-Ring also support the advanced mode.
Redundancy If there is exactly one device, you switch the Ring Manager function on at the
Manager
ends of the line.
Mode (Ring
Manager)
Operation
When you have configured all the parameters for the MRP-Ring, you switch the
operation on with this setting. When you have configured all the devices in the
MRP-Ring, you close the redundant line.
Ring
For the device for which you have activated the ring manager, select the value
Recovery
200 ms if the stability of the ring meets the requirements for your network.
Otherwise select 500 ms.
Note: Settings in the “Ring Recovery” frame are only effective for devices that
are ring managers.
Information
If the device is a ring manager: The displays in this frame mean: 
“Redundancy working”: When a component of the ring is down, the redundant
line takes over its function.
“Configuration failure”: You have configured the function incorrectly, or there is
no ring port connection.
Table 24: MRP-Ring configuration
84
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Redundancy
6.1 Ring Redundancy
Figure 29: Selecting MRP-Ring version, entering ring ports and enabling/disabling
ring manager
Note: For all devices in an MRP-Ring, activate the MRP compatibility in the
Redundancy:Spanning Tree:Global dialog if you want to use RSTP in
the MRP-Ring. If this is not possible, perhaps because individual devices do
not support the MRP compatibility, you deactivate the Spanning Tree
protocol at the ports connected to the MRP-Ring. Spanning Tree and Ring
Redundancy affect each other.
Note: If you combine RSTP with an MRP-Ring, you must give the devices in
the MRP-Ring a better (i.e. numerically lower) RSTP bridge priority than the
devices in the connected RSTP network. You thus avoid a connection
interruption for devices outside the Ring.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
85
Redundancy
6.2 Rapid Spanning Tree
6.2 Rapid Spanning Tree
With this dialog you can:
 switch the Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol on/off
 display bridge-related information on the Spanning Tree Protocol
 configure device-related parameters of the Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol
 set port-related parameters of the Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol.
Note: The Spanning Tree Protocol is a protocol for MAC bridges. For this
reason, the following description employs the term bridge for Switch.
Local networks are getting bigger and bigger. This applies to both the
geographical expansion and the number of network participants. Therefore,
it is advantageous to use multiple bridges, for example:
 to reduce the network load in sub-areas,
 to set up redundant connections and
 to overcome distance limitations.
However, using multiple bridges with multiple redundant connections
between the subnetworks can lead to loops and thus loss of communication
across of the network. In order to help avoid this, you can use Spanning Tree.
Spanning Tree enables loop-free switching through the systematic
deactivation of redundant connections. Redundancy enables the systematic
reactivation of individual connections as needed.
RSTP is a further development of the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and is
compatible with it. If a connection or a bridge becomes inoperable, the STP
required a maximum of 30 seconds to reconfigure. This is no longer
acceptable in time-sensitive applications. RSTP achieves average
reconfiguration times of less than a second. When you use RSTP in a ring
topology with 10 to 20 devices, you can even achieve reconfiguration times
in the order of milliseconds.
86
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Redundancy
6.2 Rapid Spanning Tree
Note: RSTP reduces a layer 2 network topology with redundant paths into a
tree structure (Spanning Tree) that does not contain any more redundant
paths. One of the Switches takes over the role of the root bridge here. The
maximum number of devices permitted in an active branch (from the root
bridge to the tip of the branch) is specified by the variable Max Age for the
current root bridge. The preset value for Max Age is 20, which can be
increased up to 40.
If the device working as the root is inoperable and another device takes over
its function, the Max Age setting of the new root bridge determines the
maximum number of devices allowed in a branch.
Note: The RSTP standard dictates that all the devices within a network work
with the (Rapid) Spanning Tree Algorithm. If STP and RSTP are used at the
same time, the advantages of faster reconfiguration with RSTP are lost in the
network segments that are operated in combination. 
A device that only supports RSTP works together with MSTP devices by not
assigning an MST region to itself, but rather the CST (Common Spanning
Tree).
Note: By changing the IEEE 802.1D-2004 standard for RSTP, the Standards
Commission reduced the maximum value for the “Hello Time” from 10 s to
2 s. When you update the Switch software from a release before 5.0 to
release 5.0 or higher, the new software release automatically reduces the
locally entered “Hello Time” values that are greater than 2 s to 2 s. 
If the device is not the RSTP root, “Hello Time” values greater than 2 s can
remain valid, depending on the software release of the root device.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
87
Redundancy
6.2.1
6.2 Rapid Spanning Tree
Global
Note: Rapid Spanning Tree is activated on the device by default, and it
automatically begins to resolve the existing topology into a tree structure. If
you have deactivated RSTP on individual devices, you avoid loops during the
configuration phase.
WARNING
RSTP LOOP HAZARD
To avoid loops during the configuration phase, configure all the devices of
the RSTP configuration individually. Before you connect the redundant
lines, you must complete the configuration of all devices in the RSTP
configuration.
Failure to follow these instructions can result in death, serious injury,
or equipment damage.
88
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Redundancy
Parameter
Function
MRP
compatibility
Root 
Information
Meaning
6.2 Rapid Spanning Tree
Possible
Values
Switch the RSTP function for this device on, 
“On” or “Off”. If you switch off the RSTP for off
a device globally, the device floods the
RSTP packets received like normal
Multicast packets to the ports. Thus the
device behaves transparently with regard
to RSTP packets.
MRP compatibility enables RSTP to be
On, 
used within an MRP-Ring and when
Off
coupling RSTP segments to an MRPRing. The prerequisite is that all devices in
the MRP-Ring must support MRP
compatibility.
If you combine RSTP with an MRP-Ring,
you must give the devices in the MRPRing a better (i.e. numerically lower) RSTP
bridge priority than the devices in the
connected RSTP network. You thus avoid
a connection interruption for devices
outside the Ring.
In every RSTP environment, there is a root
Switch that is responsible for controlling
the RSTP function. 
The parameters of the current root Switch
are displayed here.
– Root ID: Displays the bridge identifier of
the root Switch. This is made up of the
priority value and the MAC address of the
device. 
“This device is root”: A checkmark shows
that the device is currently the root Switch. 
– Root Port: Displays the port that leads
to the root Switch. If you have configured
the device itself as the root Switch, 0.0 is
displayed. 
– Root Cost: Displays the root costs
to the root Switch. If you have configured
the device itself as the root Switch, 0 is
displayed for the costs.
Default Setting
Off
Table 25: Global Spanning Tree settings, basic function
S1A78429 - 12/2010
89
Redundancy
Parameter
Meaning
Sets the local bridge priority. 
The bridge priority and its own MAC
address make up this separate Bridge
ID. The device with the best (numerically
lowest) priority assumes the role of the
root bridge. Define the root device by
assigning the device the best priority in the
Bridge ID among all the devices in the
network. 
Enter the value as a multiple of 4,096.
Hello Time
Sets the Hello Time. 
The local Hello Time is the time in
seconds between the sending of two
configuration messages (Hello packets).
If the local device has the root function, the
other devices in the entire network take
over this value. Otherwise the local device
uses the value of the root bridge in the
“Root” column on the right.
Forward Delay Sets the Forward Delay parameter. 
In the previous STP protocol, the Forward
Delay parameter was used to delay the
status change between the statuses
disabled, discarding, learning,
forwarding. Since the introduction of
RSTP, this parameter has a subordinate
role, because the RSTP bridges negotiate
the status change without any specified
delay.
If the local device is the root, the other
devices in the entire network take over this
value. Otherwise the local device uses the
value of the root bridge in the “Root”
column on the right.
Max Age
Sets the Max Age parameter. 
In the previous STP protocol, the Max Age
parameter was used to specify the validity
of STP BPDUs in seconds. For RSTP,
Max Age signifies the maximum
permissible branch length (number of
devices to the root bridge).
If the local device is the root, the other
devices in the entire network take over this
value. Otherwise the local device uses the
value of the root bridge in the “Root”
column on the right.
Priority
6.2 Rapid Spanning Tree
Possible
Values
0 ≤ n*4096 ≤ 
61440
Default Setting
1-2
2
4 - 30 s
See the note
following this
table.
15 s
6 - 40 s
See the note
following this
table.
20 s
32,768
Table 25: Global Spanning Tree settings, basic function
90
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Redundancy
Parameter
Meaning
Bridge ID
(read only)
The local Bridge ID, made up of the local
priority and its own MAC address.
The format is 
ppppp / mm mm mm mm mm mm, 
with: ppppp: priority (decimal) and
mm: the respective byte of the MAC
address (hexadecimal).
This field displays the number of changes
since RSTP started.
This field displays the time that has
elapsed since the last network
reconfiguration.
This frame shows whether there is a
configuration conflict.
In this case, the device with the MAC
address displayed is located outside the
MRP-Ring. The priority displayed for this
device is better (numerically smaller) than
the priority of the root bridge in the MRPRing.
To resolve this conflict, set the device
displayed to a worse priority (numerically
greater) than the priority of the root bridge
in the MRP-Ring.
Topology 
Changes
Time since
last change
Information
6.2 Rapid Spanning Tree
Possible
Values
Default Setting
Table 25: Global Spanning Tree settings, basic function
Note: The parameters Forward Delay and Max Age have the following
relationship:
Forward Delay ≥ (Max Age/2) + 1
If you enter values that violate this rule, the device will replace these values
by the last valid values or the default values.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
91
Redundancy
6.2 Rapid Spanning Tree
Figure 30: RSTP global dialog
92
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Redundancy
6.2.2
6.2 Rapid Spanning Tree
Rapid Spanning Tree Port
Parameter
STP State
Port state
Port Priority
Meaning
Here you can turn RSTP on or off
for this port. If you turn RSTP off for
this port while RSTP is globally
enabled for the device, the device
will discard RSTP frames received
on this port.
Displays the port state.
Possible Values
on, 
off
Default Setting
on
disabled, 
forwarding,
discarding,
blocking,
learning
16 ≤ n·16 ≤ 240
-
Here you enter the first byte of the
port identificatio.
Port Path Cost Enter the path costs to indicate
0 - 200.000.000
preference for redundant paths. If
the value is 0, the Switch
automatically calculates the path
costs according to the transmission
rate.
Admin EdgePort If the parameter is set to "true“, the true, false
port will transition to the forwarding
state. If the port nevertheless
receives an RSTP frame, it will
transition to the blocking state and
the bridge will then determine the
new port role.
.If the parameter’s value is "false“,
the port remains in the blocked state
until the bridge has determined the
port role. Only after that will the port
transition to its final state.
Oper-Edge-Port Is "true“ if no RSTP frames have
true, false
been received, i. e., a terminal
device that does notsend RSTP
frames is connected to this port. Is
"false“ if RSTP frames have been
received, i. e., no terminal device
but a bridge is connected.
128
0
false
-
Table 26: Port-related RSTP settings and displays
S1A78429 - 12/2010
93
Redundancy
Parameter
Meaning
Auto Edge Port The setting for Auto Edge Port only
takes effect if the parameter "Oper
Edge Port“ has been set to "false“.
if "Auto Edge Port“ is set to "true“,
the port will transition to the
forwarding state within 1.5 * Hello
Time (3 seconds). If is is set to
"false“, it will take 30 seconds until
the edge port forwards data frames.
Oper
If there is a full-duplex connection
PointToPoint
between two RSTP devices at this
port, Oper PointToPoint is “true”;
otherwise “false” is displayed (e.g. if
a hub is connected). The point-topoint connection makes a direct
connection between two RSTP
devices. The direct, decentralized
communication between the two
Switches results in a fast
reconfiguration time.
Designated
Displays the bridge identification of
Root
the designated root bridge for this
port.
Designated
Display of the costs for the path from
Cost
this port to the root Switch.
Designated Port Display of the port identifier (on the
designated Switch) of the port that
connects to the root bridge - for the
local port.
6.2 Rapid Spanning Tree
Possible Values
true, false
Default Setting
true
true, false
auto 
(determined
from duplex
mode: 
FDX: true
HDX: false)
Bridge identification
(hexadecimal)
-
Cost
-
Port identification 
(hexadecimal) and
port number
-
Table 26: Port-related RSTP settings and displays
94
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Redundancy
6.2 Rapid Spanning Tree
Figure 31: RSTP Port dialog
S1A78429 - 12/2010
95
Redundancy
96
6.2 Rapid Spanning Tree
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Diagnostics
6.2 Rapid Spanning Tree
7 Diagnostics
The diagnosis menu contains the following tables and dialogs:
 Event Log
 Ports (statistics, utilization)
 Topology Discovery
 Port Mirroring
 Device Status
 Signal Contact
 Alarms (Traps)
 Report (log file, system information)
 Self Test
In service situations, they provide the technician with the necessary
information for diagnosis.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
97
Diagnostics
7.1 Event Log
7.1 Event Log
The table lists the logged events with a time stamp. 
The “Reload” button allows you to update the content of the event log, and
with the “Delete” button you delete the content of the event log.
Figure 32: Event log table
98
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Diagnostics
7.2 Ports
7.2 Ports
The port menu contains displays and tables for the individual ports:
 Statistics table
 Utilization
7.2.1
Statistics table
This table shows you the contents of various event counters. In the Restart
menu item, you can reset all the event counters to zero using "Warm start",
"Cold start" or "Reset port counter". 
The packet counters add up the events sent and the events received.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
99
Diagnostics
7.2 Ports
Figure 33: Port statistics, table
7.2.2
Utilization
This table displays the network load of the individual ports. 
In the “Upper Threshold[%]” column you enter the upper threshold value for
network load. If this threshold value is exceeded, the device sets a check
mark in the “Alarm” field.
In the “Lower Threshold [%]” column you enter the lower threshold value for
network load. If the current load falls below this threshold value, the device
removes the check mark previously set.
100
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Diagnostics
7.2 Ports
Figure 34: Network load dialog
S1A78429 - 12/2010
101
Diagnostics
7.3 Topology Discovery
7.3 Topology Discovery
This dialog allows you to switch on/off the topology discovery function
(LLDP). The topology table shows you the collected information for
neighboring devices. This information enables the network management
station to map the structure of your network.
The option "Show LLDP entries exclusively" allows you to reduce the number
of table entries. In this case, the topology table hides entries from devices
without active LLDP support.
Figure 35: Topology Discovery dialog
If several devices are connected to one port, for example via a hub, the table
will contain one line for each connected device.
102
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Diagnostics
7.3 Topology Discovery
When devices both with and without an active topology discovery function
are connected to a port, the topology table hides the devices without active
topology discovery.
If only devices without active topology discovery are connected to a port, the
table will contain one line for this port to represent all devices. This line
contains the number of connected devices.
MAC addresses of devices that the topology table hides for the sake of
clarity, are located in the address table (FDB), (see page 56 „Switching
Global“).
S1A78429 - 12/2010
103
Diagnostics
7.4 Port Mirroring
7.4 Port Mirroring
The port mirroring function enables you to review the data traffic at a device
port for diagnostic purposes. The device additionally forwards (mirrors) this
data to another port. This process is also called port mirroring. 
The port to be observed is called the source port. The port to which the data
to be observed is copied is called the destination port.
In port mirroring, the device copies valid incoming and outgoing data packets
of the source port to the destination port. The data traffic at the source port is
not influenced by port mirroring. 
A management tool connected at the destination port, e.g. an RMON probe,
can thus monitor the data traffic of the source port. Set the destination port
as a member in all VLANs.
The destination port forwards both data to be sent and received data.
 Select the source port whose data traffic you want to observe.
 Select the destination port to which you have connected your
management tool.
 Select "enabled" to switch on the function.
The "Delete" button in the dialog allows you to reset all the port mirroring
settings of the device to the state on delivery.
Note: In active port mirroring, the specified port is used solely for observation
purposes.
104
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Diagnostics
7.4 Port Mirroring
Figure 36: Portmirroring dialog
S1A78429 - 12/2010
105
Diagnostics
7.5 Device Status
7.5 Device Status
The device status provides an overview of the overall condition of the device.
Many process visualization systems record the device status for a device in
order to present its condition in graphic form.
Figure 37: Device Status Dialog
 In the "Monitoring" field, you select the events you want to monitor.
106
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Diagnostics
7.5 Device Status
The events which can be selected are:
Name
Power supply ...
EAM removal
Connection error
Ring Redundancy
Meaning
Monitor/ignore supply voltage(s).
Monitor/ignore the removal of the EAM.
Monitor/ignore the link status (Ok or inoperable) of at least one port.
The reporting of the link status can be masked for each port by the
management (see on page 29 „Port Configuration“). Link status is not
monitored in the state on delivery.
Monitor/ignore the ring redundancy (for the HIPER-Ring, only in ring
manager operation).
On delivery, ring redundancy is not monitored.
Note: If the device is a normal ring member and not a ring manager, it
doesn't report anything for the HIPER-Ring; for the Fast HIPER-Ring and
for MRP it only reports detected errors in the local configuration.
Table 27: Device Status
 Select "Generate Trap" in the "Trap Configuration" field to activate the
sending of a trap if the device state changes.
Note: With a non-redundant voltage supply, the device reports the absence
of a supply voltage. If you do not want this message to be displayed, feed the
supply voltage over both inputs or switch off the monitoring (see page 108
„Function monitoring“).
S1A78429 - 12/2010
107
Diagnostics
7.6 Signal contact
7.6 Signal contact
The signal contacts are used for
 controlling external devices by manually setting the signal contacts,
 monitoring the functions of the device,
 reporting the device state of the device.
7.6.1
Manual setting
 Select the tab page "Alarm 1" or "Alarm 2" (for devices with two signal
contacts).
 In the "Signal contact mode" field, you select the "Manual setting" mode.
With this mode you can control this signal contact remotely.
 Select "Opened" in the "Manual setting" frame to open the contact.
 Select "Closed" in the "Manual setting" frame to close the contact.
Application options:
 Simulation of an error during SPS monitoring.
 Remote control of a device via SNMP, such as switching on a camera.
7.6.2
Function monitoring
 Select the tab “Signal contact 1” or “Signal contact 2” (for devices with two
signal contacts).
108
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Diagnostics
7.6 Signal contact
 In the “Mode Signal contact” box, you select the “Monitoring correct
operation” mode. In this mode, the signal contacts monitor the functions
of the device, thus enabling remote diagnosis.
A break in contact is reported via the potential-free signal contact (relay
contact, closed circuit).
 Loss of the supply voltage 1/2 (either of the external voltage supply or of
the internal voltage). Select “Monitor” for the respective power supply if
the signal contact shall report the loss of the power supply voltage, or of
the internal voltage that is generated from the external power supply.
 The removal of the EAM. Select “Monitor” for EAM removal if the signal
contact is to report the removal of an EAM (for devices which support the
EAM).
 The inoperable link status of at least one port. The reporting of the link
status can be masked via the management for each port in the device.
Link status is not monitored in the state on delivery. Select “Monitor” for
bad connections if the signal contact is to report an inoperative link status
for at least one port.
 If the device is part of a redundant ring: the elimination of the reserve
redundancy (i.e. the redundancy function did actually switch on), (see on
page 78 „Ring Redundancy“). Select “Monitor” for the ring redundancy if
the signal contact is to report the elimination of the reserve redundancy in
the redundant ring. 
Default setting: no monitoring.
Note: If the device is a normal ring member and not a ring manager, it
doesn't report anything for the HIPER-Ring; for the MRP it only reports
detected errors in the local configuration.
7.6.3
Device status
 Select the tab page “Alarm 1” or “Alarm 2” (for devices with two signal
contacts).
S1A78429 - 12/2010
109
Diagnostics
7.6 Signal contact
 In the “Mode Signal Contact” field, you select the “Device status” mode.
In this mode, the signal contact monitors the device status (see on
page 106 „Device Status“) and thereby offers remote diagnosis. 
The device status “Error detected” (see on page 106 „Device Status“) is
reported by means of a break in the contact via the potential-free signal
contact (relay contact, closed circuit).
7.6.4
Configuring Traps
 Select generate Trap, if the device is to create a trap as soon as the
position of a signal contact changes when function monitoring is active.
Figure 38: Signal Contact Dialog
110
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Diagnostics
7.7 Alarms (Traps)
7.7 Alarms (Traps)
This dialog allows you to determine which events trigger an alarm (trap) and
where these alarms should be sent.
 Select "Create entry“.
 In the "Address“ column, enter the IP address of the management station
to which the traps should be sent.
 In the "Enabled“ column, you mark the entries which should be taken into
account when traps are sent.
 In the "Selection“ frame, select the trap categories from which you want
to send traps.
The events which can be selected are:
Name
Authentication
Link Up/Down
Spanning Tree
Chassis
Redundancy
Meaning
The device has rejected an unauthorized access attempt (see on page 42
„SNMPv1/v2 Access Settings“).
At one port of the device, the link to another device has been established/
interrupted.
The topology of the Rapid Spanning Tree has changed.
Summarizes the following events: 
– The status of a supply voltage has changed (see the System dialog).
– The status of the signal contact has changed.
To take this event into account, you activate “Create trap when status
changes” in the Diagnostics:Signal Contact 1/2 dialog.
– A media module has been added or removed (only for modular devices).
– The Memory Backup Adapter (EAM) has been added or removed.
The redundancy status of the ring redundancy (redundant line active/
inactive) or (for devices that support redundant ring/network coupling) the
redundant ring/network coupling (redundancy exists) has changed.
Table 28: Trap categories
S1A78429 - 12/2010
111
Diagnostics
7.7 Alarms (Traps)
Figure 39: Alarms Dialog
112
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Diagnostics
7.8 Report
7.8 Report
The following reports are available for the diagnostics:
 Log file. 
The log file is an HTML file in which the device writes important deviceinternal events.
 System information.
The system information is an HTML file containing system-relevant data.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
113
Diagnostics
7.9 Self Test
7.9 Self Test
With this dialog you can:
 activate/deactivate the RAM test for a cold start of the device.
Deactivating the RAM test reduces the boot-up time for a cold start of the
device.
 allow or disable a restart due to an undefined software or hardware state.
Figure 40: Self-test dialog
114
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Advanced
7.9 Self Test
8 Advanced
The menu contains the dialogs, displays and tables for:
 DHCP Relay Agent
S1A78429 - 12/2010
115
Advanced
8.1 DHCP Relay Agent
8.1 DHCP Relay Agent
On the device's front panel you will find the following hazard message.
WARNING
UNINTENDED OPERATION
Do not change cable positions if DHCP Option 82 is enabled. Check the
Basic Configuration user manual before servicing (refer to DHCP OPTION
82 topic).
Failure to follow these instructions can result in death, serious injury,
or equipment damage.
This dialog allows you to configure the DHCP relay agent.
 Enter the DHCP server IP address.
If one DHCP server is not available, you can enter up to 3 additional
DHCP server IP addresses so that the device can change to another
DHCP server.
 With Option 82, a DHCP relay agent which receives a DHCP request
adds an “Option 82” field to the request, as long as the request received
does not already have such a field.
When the function is switched off, the device will forward attached “Option
82” fields, but it will not add any on. Under “Type”, you specify the format
in which the device recognition of this device is entered in the “Option 82”
field by the DHCP relay agent.
The options are:
– IP address
– MAC Address (state on delivery)
– System name (client ID)
– Other (freely definable ID, which you can specify in the following rows).
116
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Advanced
8.1 DHCP Relay Agent
“Remote ID entry for DHCP server” shows you the value which you enter
when configuring your DHCP server. “Type display” shows the device
recognition in the selected form.
 The “Circuit ID” column shows you the value which you enter when
configuring your DHCP server. The “Circuit ID” contains the port number
and the ID of the VLAN from which the DHCP has been received.
Example of a configuration of your DHCP server:
Type: mac
DHCP server for Remote ID entry: 00 06 00 80 63 00 06 1E
Circuit ID: B3 06 00 00 01 00 01 01
This results in the entry for the “Hardware address” in the DHCP server:
B306000001000101000600806300061E
 In the “Option 82 on” column, you can switch this function on/off for each
port.
 In the “Schneider Electric Device” column, you mark the ports to which a
Schneider Electric device is connected.
Figure 41: DHCP Relay Agent dialog
S1A78429 - 12/2010
117
Advanced
118
8.1 DHCP Relay Agent
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Appendix
8.1 DHCP Relay Agent
A Appendix
S1A78429 - 12/2010
119
Appendix
A.1 Technical Data
A.1 Technical Data
Switching
Size of MAC address table
(incl. static filters)
Max. number of statically configured multicast
MAC address filters
Max. number of statically configured unicast
MAC address filters
Max. length of over-long packets (from rel.
03.0.00)
120
2,048
64
100
1,552 bytes
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Appendix
A.2 List of RFCs
A.2 List of RFCs
RFC 768
RFC 783
RFC 791
RFC 792
RFC 793
RFC 826
RFC 854
RFC 855
RFC 951
RFC 1112
RFC 1157
RFC 1155
RFC 1212
RFC 1213
RFC 1493
RFC 1542
RFC 1643
RFC 1757
RFC 1769
RFC 1867
RFC 1901
RFC 1905
RFC 1906
RFC 1907
RFC 1908
RFC 1945
RFC 2068
RFC 2131
RFC 2132
RFC 2233
RFC 2236
RFC 2246
RFC 2271
RFC 2346
RFC 2365
RFC 2570
RFC 2571
RFC 2572
RFC 2573
(UDP)
(TFTP)
(IP)
(ICMP)
(TCP)
(ARP)
(Telnet)
(Telnet Option)
(BOOTP)
(IGMPv1)
(SNMPv1)
(SMIv1)
(Concise MIB Definitions)
(MIB2)
(Dot1d)
(BOOTP-Extensions)
(Ethernet-like -MIB)
(RMON)
(SNTP)
(Form-Based File Upload in HTML)
(Community based SNMP v2)
(Protocol Operations for SNMP v2)
(Transport Mappings for SNMP v2)
(Management Information Base for SNMP v2)
(Coexistence between SNMP v1 and SNMP v2)
(HTTP/1.0)
(HTTP/1.1 protocol as updated by draft-ietf-http-v11-spec-rev-03)
(DHCP)
(DHCP-Options)
(The Interfaces Group MIB using SMI v2)
(IGMPv2)
(The TLS Protocol, Version 1.0)
(SNMP Framework MIB)
(AES Ciphersuites for Transport Layer Security)
(Administratively Scoped Boundaries)
(Introduction to SNMP v3)
(Architecture for Describing SNMP Management Frameworks)
(Message Processing and Dispatching for SNMP)
(SNMP v3 Applications)
S1A78429 - 12/2010
121
Appendix
RFC 2574
RFC 2575
RFC 2576
RFC 2578
RFC 2579
RFC 2580
RFC 2613
RFC 2618
RFC 2620
RFC 2674
RFC 2818
RFC 2851
RFC 2865
RFC 2866
RFC 2868
RFC 2869
RFC 2869bis
RFC 2933
RFC 3164
RFC 3376
122
A.2 List of RFCs
(User Based Security Model for SNMP v3)
(View Based Access Control Model for SNMP)
(Coexistence between SNMP v1, v2 & v3)
(SMI v2)
(Textual Conventions for SMI v2)
(Conformance statements for SMI v2)
(SMON)
(RADIUS Authentication Client MIB)
(RADIUS Accounting MIB)
(Dot1p/Q)
(HTTP over TLS)
(Internet Addresses MIB)
(RADIUS Client)
(RADIUS Accounting)
(RADIUS Attributes for Tunnel Protocol Support)
(RADIUS Extensions)
(RADIUS support for EAP)
(IGMP MIB)
(The BSD Syslog Protocol)
(IGMPv3)
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Appendix
A.3 Underlying IEEE Standards
A.3 Underlying IEEE Standards
IEEE 802.1AB
IEEE 802.1af
IEEE 802.1D
IEEE 802.1D-1998, 
IEEE 802.1D-2004
IEEE 802.1w-2001
IEEE 802.1X
IEEE 802.3-2002
IEEE 802.3ac
IEEE 802.3x
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Topology Discovery (LLDP)
Power over Ethernet
Switching, GARP, GMRP, Spanning Tree
(Supported via 802.1S implementation)
Media access control (MAC) bridges (includes IEEE 802.1p Priority
and Dynamic Multicast Filtering, GARP, GMRP, Spanning Tree)
Rapid Reconfiguration (RSTP)
Port Authentication
Ethernet
VLAN Tagging
Flow Control
123
Appendix
A.4 Underlying IEC Norms
A.4 Underlying IEC Norms
IEC 62439
124
High availability automation networks; especially: Chap. 5, 
MRP – Media Redundancy Protocol based on a ring topology
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Appendix
A.5 Copyright of Integrated Software
A.5 Copyright of Integrated
Software
A.5.1
Bouncy Castle Crypto APIs (Java)
The Legion Of The Bouncy Castle
Copyright (c) 2000 - 2004 The Legion Of The Bouncy Castle 
(http://www.bouncycastle.org)
Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy
of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal
in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to
use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies
of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to
do so, subject to the following conditions:
The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all
copies or substantial portions of the Software.
THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY
KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE
AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM,
DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF
CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN
CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER
DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.
S1A78429 - 12/2010
125
Appendix
A.5.2
A.5 Copyright of Integrated Software
Broadcom Corporation
(c) Copyright 1999-2007 Broadcom Corporation. All Rights Reserved.
126
S1A78429 - 12/2010
Index
A.5 Copyright of Integrated Software
B Index
8
802.1D/p mapping
72
A
Accept SNTP Broadcast
51
Access with Web-based interface, password
40
Advanced
115
AF
75
Aging Time
56
Alarm
111
Assured Forwarding
75
C
Cable crossing
Class Selector
CLI access, password
Clock
Cold start (after software update)
Coldstart
Configuring the MRP-Ring
D
Device status
DHCP Option 82
DHCP Relay Agent
Diagnose
DiffServ
DSCP
29
74
40
53
27
37
83
106
116
116
97
67
67
G
General
H
Hello Time
HIPER-Ring (source for alarms)
S1A78429 - 12/2010
J
Java Runtime Environment
JavaScript
L
57
26
90
19
90
111
60
60
60
67, 74
68
13
14
29
14
M
Max Age
90
Media module (for mudular devices), source
for alarms
111
Message URL http://myHostName/base/
113
system/event_log.html
Message URL http://myHostName/base/
system/systemInfo.html
113
N
Network load
NTP
O
Option 82
EAM
31, 111
EF
74
Ethernet Switch Configuration Adapter
program
15
Event log
98
Expedited Forwarding
74
Filters for MAC addresses
Firmware update
Forward Delay
IGMP Querier
IGMP settings
IGMP Snooping
IP DSCP mapping
IP-DSCP value
Link State (Port)
Login
E
F
I
86, 100
49
116
P
Password
15, 41
Password for access with Web-based
interface
40
Password for CLI access
40
Password for SNMPv3 access
40
Per-Hop-Behavior (PHB)
74
Port configuration
29, 70
70
Port configuration (QoS/priority)
Port priority
70, 71
Port State (Link)
29
Port Statistics
99
Port-Mirroring
104
Ports
99
Precedence
74
Precision Time Protocol
53
Priority Queue
68
PTP
53
127
Index
Q
QoS/Priority
A.5 Copyright of Integrated Software
67
R
RAM test
114
Rapid Spanning Tree
77, 86
Rapid Spanning Tree Dialog
86
Rapid-Spanning-Tree Port protocol
93
Read access
15
Reboot
37
Redundancy functions
77
Redundancy Manager
78
Redundant
78
Redundant connections
86
Report
113
Request interval (SNTP)
51, 51
Restart
37
Restore default settings
31
Restore state on delivery
31
RFC
121
Ring
78
Ring Manager
78
Ring Redundancy
77
Ring Redundancy basic configuration
79
Ring structure
78
Ring/Network coupling (source for alarms)
111
Ringport
80
RM function
78
RMON-Probe
104
RSTP
77, 86
S
Security
Self-test
Set
Signal contact
Signal contact (source for alarm)
SNMPv1/v2 access settings
SNMPv3 access, password
SNTP
SNTP Broadcast
SNTP client
SNTP request
SNTP server
Software update
Statistics table
Supply voltage
Switching
Switching Global Dialog
Symbol
System time
128
T
Time
Time management
Timestamp unit
ToS
Trap
Trust mode
TrustDot1p (global trust mode)
TrustIpDscp (global trust mode)
Type of Service
U
Untrusted (global trust mode)
V
VLAN Mapping
VLAN priority
W
Web Access
Web-based interface
Web-based management
Website
Write access
47
53
53
67
111
68
68
69
67
68
67
67
45
13
14
15, 16
15
39
114
15
108
111
42
40
49
51
49, 49
49
49, 49
26
99
111
55
56
11
51
S1A78429 - 12/2010