POLL MANAGERS HANDBOOK

2014 EDITION
south carolina election commission
POLL MANAGERS HANDBOOK
Poll Managers Handbook
for Conduct of Elections
P.O. Box 5987
2221 Devine Street, Suite 105
Columbia, South Carolina 29205
phone: 803.734.9060
fax: 803.734.9366
Download a copy at www.scVOTES.org
Commissioners
Training Staff
Billy Way, Jr.
Chairperson
Heather Sherman
Training Coordinator
Mark A. Benson
Arlene Criswell Mahoney
Training Instructor
Marilyn Bowers
Chris Whitmire
Director
Public Information & Training
E. Allen Dawson
Nicole Spain White
Revised April 2014
7035_37 34,000_042014
To the manager
Thank you for your willingness to serve as a poll manager on election day.
Poll managers play an important role in conducting fair and impartial elections. As a poll manager, you will be the face of the election community
as you assist voters in a friendly and courteous manner. Poll managers are
expected to put aside any personal political views and party allegiances. Our
goal is to ensure voters have a pleasant experience and that polling places
are free of intimidation and barriers that restrict access.
COMMISSIONERS
BILLY WAY, JR.
Chairperson
MARK A. BENSON
This handbook provides you with the information necessary to efficiently and
effectively conduct elections in the polling place. Even if you have worked
as a poll manager before, it is important to review the information to make
sure you are aware of any changesthat may have occurred. In addition to the
handbook, an online poll manager training program is available. Online poll
manager training can be accessed at anytime via the Internet. Ask your county voter registration and elections office to provide you with access to
the system.
MARILYN BOWERS
E. ALLEN DAWSON
Again, thank you for serving as a poll manager.
NICOLE SPAIN WHITE
MARCI ANDINO
Executive Director
2221 Devine Street
P.O. Box 5987
Columbia, SC 29250
803.734.9060
Fax: 803.734.9366
www.scvotes.org
Sincerely,
Marci Andino
Executive Director
Table of Contents
I
Conduct of Elections
Types of managers
1
Qualifications of managers
1
Number of managers1
General Elections 1
Special or Municipal Elections 1
Party Primaries on the Second Tuesday in June
1
All Other Party Primaries2
Training2
Failure of Managers to Attend Election2
Before Polls Open
Arrival 3
Manager’s Oath3
Manager’s Badges3
Ballot Type3
Ballot Styles3
Ballot Box4
Arrangement of Polling Place4
Managing Long Lines5
Diagram of a Large Polling Place7
Diagram of Small Polling Place8
Voter Registration List
Electronic Voter Registration List (EVRL)9
EVRL Benefits
9
Using EVRL9
Voters10
Absentee Voters10
Reports10
Paper Voter Registration List11
Marking the Paper Voter Registration List11
General Elections12
Party Primaries12
Primary Runoffs13
Municipal Elections13
Poll List14
Voter’s Oath14
Opening the Polls15
Closing the Polls15
Table of Contents
Processing the Voter
Step
Step
Step
Step
Step
Step
Step
Step
Step
Step
1. Voter Presents Photo Identification
16
2. Verify Photo, Expiration Date and Signature
16
3. Locate Voter On Voter Registration List
16
4. Verify Address16
5. Check for Status Codes17
6. Primary Elections18
7. Voter Signs Poll List18
8. Marked Voter & Initial List18
9. Determine Ballot Style18
10. Direct Voters to Voters Terminal18
Election Day Issues
Voter Without Qualifying Photo Identification
19
Voter Answers “Yes” (Reasonable Impediment)19
Voter Answers “NO” 20
Photo ID Questions and Answers
“What is a reasonable Impediment?”21
“Will my vote count?”21
“What if my Driver’s License is expired?”22
“My Driver’s License is suspended. Can I still use it?”
22
“I’ve misplaced my Photo ID”22
“What is considered a federal, military ID?”
22
“Can I vote with my Concealed Weapons Permit (CWP)?”
23
Election Day Issues
Voter’s Identity in Doubt24
24
Voter Qualifications Challenges / Challenges by the Managers
Voter Qualification Challenge Procedure
24
Step 1. Explain Qualifications
25
Step 2. Voter Insists on Voting25
Step 3. Manager Completes the Provisional Ballot Envelope
25
Step 4. Manager provides Provisional Ballot25
Step 5. Voter Votes Ballot25
Step 6. Provide Notice of Provisional Ballot Hearing
26
Watchers26
Every Watcher must26
Challenges by Watchers and Electors27
Observers27
Assistance to Voters27
Procedure For Determining If Voter Is Entitled to Assistance
28
II
Table of Contents
III
Curbside Voting28
Curbside Voting Procedure29
29
Name Not Found On Voter Registration List
Voter Address Discrepancy30
Failsafe Voting31
Distributing and Displaying Campaign Literature at Polls
33
Candidates33
Candidate’s Representatives33
Power of Managers34
Police Officers
34
Crossover Voting35
Instruction After Voter Has Entered Booth35
Husband and Wife Voting Together35
Children in the Voting Booth35
Cell Phones, Cameras35
Voter Wishes to Take Sample Ballot Into Voting Booth
35
36
Voter Returns Absentee Ballot to Polling Place
Voter Decides Not to Vote After Signing Poll List
36
Insufficient Ballots
36
Defaced or Spoiled Ballots37
37
Primaries – Voters Can Only Voter In One Party’s Primary
Primary Runoffs38
Voting Machine Procedures
Use of the Machine39
Voting System Seals39
Using the Cast/Cancel Function
39
Accessibility Features40
Time for Voter to Remain in Voting Machine Booth
40
Instructions After the Voter has Entered the Voting Machine Booth
40
Procedure When Machine Will Not Operate40
Computer Does Not Register 00041
Locking of Machines After Election41
Canvassing and Reporting of Vote Totals at Polling Place
41
Observers After the Polls Close42
Voting by Paper Ballot
Voter Asks to Vote a Paper Ballot43
Time Allowed in the Voting Booth When Using Paper Ballots
43
Number of Booths43
Write-In Votes43
Accounting For Ballots After Election43
Counting of Ballots: Posting Results44
Table of Contents
Counting of Ballots: Volunteer Personnel44
Ballots Improperly Marked45
Appendix
Qualifying Photo IDs
No Campaign Materials Allowed
Opening and Closing Tapes
Primary Voter Registration List
Primary Poll List
General Election Voter Registration List
General Election Poll List
Municipal Voter Registration List
SC Voters Change of Address Form
Provisional Ballot Envelope (Front)
Provisional Ballot Envelope (Back)
Notice of Hearing on Provisional Ballots
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
IV
Introduction to reference terms used in the Handbook V
Statutory References
Statutory references in this booklet (for example, 7-13-72) refer to sections of the 1976 Code of Laws
of South Carolina as amended.
Voter Registration Lists
All voter registration lists in this Poll Managers Handbook are public record. These lists are used for
training purposes only. While the names in these lists are factual, some signatures shown in these
lists are not actual signatures of these voters and are not intended to be used as actual signatures,
but are only for demonstration purposes.
Terms
Please note that the terms elector/voter and poll manager/manager of election are used interchangeably throughout this handbook.
For purposes of clarification only, certain language within laws has been modified. This was not intended to change the meaning of the law in any way.
NOTE: At the end of this section of the handbook, you will find samples of some forms to be used
during an election.
Conduct of Elections 1
Types of managers
• Clerk – The county election commission appoints one manager in each precinct to be clerk.
The clerk is the lead poll manager (7-13-72).
•Poll Managers – All managers assigned to the polling place, including clerks and assistants,
are poll managers and are responsible for the operating of polling place.
•Poll Manager’s Assistant – One 16 or 17-year-old assistant may be appointed for every two poll managers. Assistants must complete poll manager training. Assistants may not serve as clerk but have the same responsibilities as a poll manager (7-13-110).
Qualifications of managers
• Managers must be registered electors of the county in which they are appointed to work, or in an adjoining county (7-13-110).
•Managers may not be a candidate or the spouse, parent, child, brother, or sister of a candidate at any polling place where the candidate’s name appears on the ballot (7-13-120).
Number of managers
General Elections
For general elections, the election commissioners appoint three managers of election for each polling
place in the county for every 500 voters registered to vote at such polling place or portion thereof (713-72). For example, if 1,350 persons are registered to vote at a particular voting place, nine managers should be appointed.
Special or Municipal Elections
For special or municipal elections, the authority charged by law with conducting the election appoints
three managers for the first 500 electors registered to vote in each precinct in the county, municipality, or other election district and one additional manager for each 500 registered voters over the first
500 (7-13-72).
Party Primaries on the Second Tuesday in June
For primary elections held on the second Tuesday in June of each general election year, the election
commission appoints three managers of election for each polling place in the county for the first 500
electors registered to vote at such polling place, and may appoint three additional managers for each
additional 500 electors registered to vote there.
Conduct of Elections 2
All Other Party Primaries
For all other primaries, the election commission appoints three managers of election for the first 500
electors registered to vote in each precinct involved in the primary election and one additional manager for each 500 electors registered to vote in the precinct above the first 500.
Forty-five days prior to any primary, except municipal primaries, each political party holding a primary should submit a list of prospective managers to the county election commission. The commission
must appoint at least one manager for each precinct from the list of names submitted by each political party holding a primary, if such list is submitted (7-13-72).
Training
Efficiently run elections are essential to an orderly form of government. All elections must be uniform
and conducted within the boundaries of the laws of the state. Poll manager training is necessary for
the conduct of good elections and is required by law. The county election commission is responsible
for training poll managers. The State Election Commission is responsible for providing poll manager
training materials (7-13-72).
While you may be required to attend in-person training, all managers are encouraged to complete all
poll manager training at scVOTES.org. Your county election commission will provide you a username
and password.
After completing training managers must take and sign the following oath prescribed by Article III,
Section 26 of the South Carolina Constitution:
“I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I am duly qualified, according to the Constitution of this State, to exercise the duties of the office to which I have been appointed, and that I will, to the best of my ability, discharge the duties thereof, and preserve protect and defend the
Constitution of this state and of the United States. So help me God.”
This oath should be filed immediately with the Clerk of Court, or if there is no clerk, then with the
Secretary of State (7-13-72).
Failure of Managers to Attend Election
If any of the managers fail to attend or if they have not been appointed, the qualified voters of the
precinct who are present may appoint a manager to act in the place of the absent manager. If the
duly appointed managers attend within a reasonable time, they will act as managers (7-13-170).
Before Polls Open
3
Before Polls Open
Arrival
Managers should arrive at the polling place at least 45 minutes before the polls are scheduled to
open.
Manager’s Oath
Before opening the polls, the managers must take and sign a second oath in addition to the oath
signed at training (included in polling place materials).
“We do solemnly swear that we will conduct this election according to law and will allow no
person to vote who is not entitled by law to vote in this election, and we will not unlawfully
assist any voter to prepare his ballot and will not advise any voter as to how he should vote at
this election.” (7-13-100)
The oath must be returned to the county election commission.
Manager’s Badges
Manager will be provided with identification badges and must wear them at all times.
Ballot Types
Voting Machines – Each polling place should have one voting machine for each 250 registered voters,
or portion thereof, or as near thereto as may be practicable (7-13-1680). For example, if a polling
place has 700 registered voters, three machines should be provided. Voting machines are housed
in a voting machine booth, which provides for voter privacy. Voters must cast ballots on voting machines, except under limited circumstances detailed below.
Emergency/Provisional Ballots – These are paper ballots included with your polling place supplies and
should not exceed 10% of the registered voters in the precinct (7-13-430). These ballots are used
for two purposes: Emergency Ballots and Provisional Ballots.
Failsafe Provisional Ballots – Paper ballots included with your polling place supplies and should not
exceed 5% of the registered voters in the precinct (7-13-430(C)). These ballots are used for voters
who vote failsafe at the polling place.
Ballot Styles
A ballot style is a unique combination of offices that appear on a voter’s ballot depending on the
Before Polls Open
4
voter’s address. Your polling place may have numerous ballot styles. Poll managers must provide the
correct ballot style to each voter.
In primaries, each polling place will receive a separate set of paper ballots for each party holding a
primary. Each voting machine will have separate ballots for each party holding a primary (7-13-610).
Ballot Box
At least one ballot box for paper ballots must be provided by the county election commission. The
box must be of sufficient size to handle the volume of ballots (7-13-340).
Arrangement of Polling Place
Proper polling place arrangement is essential to ensure the secrecy of the ballot, an orderly flow of
voters, accessibility for all voters, and polling place security. Managers should arrange their polling
place in the most efficient manner possible.
•Each polling place must have a table for the managers
•Ballot boxes must be kept secure and should be arranged so that the voter can deposit his ballot without crowding, confusion, or interference.
•A manager must be stationed beside the ballot box to collect ballot stubs.
•Voting booths must be provided so that the voter can mark his ballot in secret.
•A guard rail must be provided around the voting booths so that no one except authorized person can approach nearer than five feet to the booths. The guard rail can be provided through the use of rope, tape, or other means. The primary objectives are to avoid crowding
and interference, and to preserve the secrecy of the ballot (Section 7-13-130).
•Voting machines must be placed at least three feet from every wall or partition and at least five feet from manager’s table or any manager’s station.
•The machine booth should be placed so that the face of the machine can be plainly seen by the managers when not in use.
•The managers must prevent any other person from being in a position to view any voter’s
ballot.
•Sample ballots and all posters and signs should be posted in a conspicuous area. Posters should be posted so that the center of the poster is approximately four feet off the floor.
Before Polls Open
5
Managing Long Lines
In elections with heavy turnout, managers need to take additional steps to help reduce wait times.
Visit the polling place prior to election day to determine the best layout:
•Think about where the line will form and arrange the manager’s table to maximize the indoor
waiting area.
•Use tape on the floor to direct traffic flow. Think about a line leading to an amusement park
ride or a bank teller.
•In a large polling place, consider having one line at the manager’s table and another smaller
line waiting to use voting machines. If this method is used, be sure to keep the number of
voters waiting on machines manageable so that there is no confusion over who has been
checked in.
•Think about flow from the entrance door, to the manager’s table, to the voting machine, to the exit door, and maximize your space.
•Consider using a resolution table. A resolution table can be set to the side and out of the way of the normal flow of voters. Voters who are voting provisional ballots, have address
changes, or have other issues, can be processed at the resolution table. This allows these
voters to be processed without slowing down the flow of traffic.
•Consider using signs to make it clear to voters where to go and what step is next. It’s best
to place these directional signs above head level so they can be seen in a crowd.
Use defined roles in the polling place to help reduce wait times. In smaller precincts or in elections with low turnout, one manager may play multiple roles:
•Clerk – The clerk is the lead poll manager and is in charge of the polling place. It’s the clerk’s
job to assign roles, arrange the polling place, monitor the flow of traffic, and ensure an orderly voting process.
•Greeters – These managers should be stationed near the entrance of the polling place, greet
voters, ask voters if they have the proper Photo ID, ask voters to have their ID ready, identify voters with issues, direct voters to the manager’s table or resolution table, monitor for
curbside voting, and monitor for any issues inside or outside the polling place.
•Manager’s Table – Processes voters.
•Resolution Table – Processes voters with address issues, provisional ballots, and other issues.
•Curbside Manager – If your polling place has a heavy curbside voting turnout, you may consider dedicating a manager for curbside voting.
Before Polls Open
6
•Ballot Activator – Greets voters and directs them to a voting booth, activates ballots, provides
“I Voted” stickers, directs voters to the exit.
•Exit Monitor – Similar to a ballot activator this manager can direct voters to the exit, provide
“I Voted” stickers, monitor the ballot box, and also help with the activities of the Greeter,
Curbside Manager, or Ballot Activator.
Properly manage the voter registration list:
•If using a paper voter registration list, remember to split the list so that there are an approximately equal number of voters in each section. While you should split the list at a letter
break, do not split the list so that there are an equal number of letters in each section. This
will likely result in unbalanced lines.
•If using multiple EVRL laptops, the laptops should be networked. Networking the laptops
means that they are connected to each other. A voter processed on one laptop is automatically updated on the others. If laptops are networked, the lines should not be split. In other
words, any voter can go to any laptop and be processed.
Also:
•Managers should use the ADA machine for all voters, not just voters who need the audio
ballot.
•Don’t use the same machine all the time for curbside voting. Continually removing the same
machine from the booth can quickly reduce the battery charge. Don’t forget to reconnect
the power cord when returning the machine.
•Managers can provide curbside voters with an Absentee Voting brochure (if available) and
remind them that absentee voting is an option
•Curbside voting doesn’t necessarily allow a voter to “jump” to the front of the line. A curbside voter marker can be given to another voter in line to alert the manager’s table when it’s
a curbside voter’s turn to vote.
Before Polls Open 7
•This diagram is provided as an example only. Every polling place is different. Use this
diagram and the suggestions and instructions in this handbook, to arrange the polling
place for maximum efficiency.
•Colored painters tape can be used on the floor to direct the flow of traffic.
•The number of managers in the 2nd Queue waiting to vote should be close to the
number of machines you have in your polling place.
•Post all materials provided by the election Commission Office (Painters tape or masking
tape works best)
Before Polls Open 8
•This diagram is provided as an example only. Every polling place is different. Use this
diagram and the suggestions and instructions in this handbook, to arrange the polling
place for maximum efficiency.
•No one (other than the voter who is casting their ballot and the poll manager activating
the ballot) should be within 5 feet of voting machine.
•Post sample ballot (s) on the wall at wheel chair eye level in a conspicuous location.
•Post all materials provided by the Election Commission Office (painters tape or masking
tape works best)
Voter Registration List 9
Voter Registration List
The voter registration list is used by poll managers to help determine whether or not a person is eligible to vote in an election. The voter registration list contains the names of registered voters in the
precinct.
Voters must vote in their precinct of residence. The list will help determine whether the voter is registered in the precinct. The list will identify voters who have already been issued an absentee ballot.
The voter registration list helps the manager identify the voters correct ballot style (the ballot containing the unique combination of election districts in which the voter resides).
Electronic Voter Registration List (EVRL)
EVRL is an electronic version of the voter registration list. EVRL laptops are provided for use at polling places by the county voter registration and elections office. EVRL provides basic information of
each registered voter in a county and allows the poll managers to determine whether or not a person
is eligible to vote in an election as well as if the voter is in the correct polling place.
EVRL Benefits
EVRL allows voters to be checked in faster at the registration table. It eliminates the need for dividing the lines alphabetically by last name. EVRL identifies voters who have already been issued an
absentee ballot and helps the manager identify the voter’s correct ballot style.
Using EVRL
For specific instructions on using EVRL, refer to the EVRL Poll Manager’s User Manual.
If multiple EVRL laptops are used in the polling place, the laptops should be networked together so
that it’s not necessary to separate lines alphabetically. When networked, any voter can be processed
at any laptop.
The EVRL Main Menu screen will display the election name, date, and county.
The Main Menu has three options:
1. Voters
2. Absentee Voters
3. Reports
Voter Registration List 10
Voters
The Voters option is the primary function managers will use to record voter participation throughout election day. Select Voters to access the Voter Search screen to search for the voter. The Voter
Search screen displays some additional information about the election including the precinct name
and number of voters who have voted in the election. Search by entering the voter’s name or registration number. If the EVRL laptop is equipped with a scanning device, this can be done by scanning
the barcode on the voter’s voter registration card. Some scanners will also be capable of scanning
the barcode on the voter’s Driver’s License. The search may return multiple voters.
Select the correct voter, and the voter’s information will appear on the screen. Enter the page and
line number on which the voter signed the poll list. Enter the manager’s initials. If the voter is casting a provisional ballot, denote this on the screen. The screen will include the voter’s ballot style
and/or district information. Use this to determine the voter’s correct ballot style. Specific instructions
on determining ballot styles will be provided by the county voter registration and elections office.
Once complete, click “Update Voter” and return to the Voter Search screen to process the next voter.
If the search does not display the correct voter, the manager can select the “Other Precincts” option
to determine if the voter is registered in another precinct and direct the voter to the correct polling
place. If the voter’s name cannot be found, follow the procedures in the “Process Voter Not on List”
section. If a voter whose name is not on the list is ultimately allowed to vote, select “Not Found –
Add Voter” to add the voter’s name to the list. Complete the screen with all required information and
click “Save Voter.”
Absentee Voters
The records of voters who have been issued absentee ballots must be updated on the EVRL laptop.
Most absentee voters will have already been updated by the county voter registration and elections
office. However, some voters who voted late in the absentee process will need to be added on election morning. Click “Absentee Voters” to access the “Absentee Voter Search” screen. Using the list of
absentee voters provided by the county voter registration and elections office, search for each voter
on the list. Select the correct voter. On the “Record Voters with Absentee Ballots” screen, select
“Mark Voter as Absentee.” If a Primary, select the appropriate political party.
Reports
EVRL allows managers to run reports showing the number of voters who have voted, the number of
voters who have not voted, or both. The report can be viewed on the screen but not printed. Reports can be run at any time but should not be run while voters are waiting. Voters cannot be processed while in report mode.
Voter Registration List 11
Paper Voter Registration List
State law requires that when a precinct has more than 750 registered voters, the paper voter
registration list must be divided alphabetically so that each list contains no more than 750
voters, with separate managers provided for each list (7-7-730). The list should be split into
equal sections containing approximately the same number of voters in each section. The list
should be split at an alphabetical break. The list should not necessarily be split with an even
number of letters in each line (A-L, M-Z). In most cases, this would result in an unbalanced
number of voters assigned to each line.
Once the voter has presented identification, use a ruler or straight edge to locate the voter on the
voter registration list. If the voter cannot be found on the voter registration list, see “Name Not
Found on Voter Registration List” section in this handbook.
Marking the Paper Voter Registration List
After the election, the paper voter registration list is processed with a computerized scanner to give
each voter credit for voting in the election. It is very important that managers understand and comply with the following instructions for marking the voter registration list:
•Use a number 2 pencil
•Keep manager’s initials, page number, and line number inside the boxes
•Fully shade the VOTED, PARTY, and/or RUNOFF circles. No “x”s, checks, or other marks,
please.
•Do not fold or crease the pages
•Do not write notes on the list (such as deceased, moved, etc.)
Voter Registration List 12
General Elections
Once the voter’ eligibility has been determined, initial the Manager’s Initials column. Then write the
page and line number on which the voter signs the poll list. Also shade in the circle under the
“VOTED” column.
NOT AN OFFICIAL LIST
Manager must initial the “MGR INIT” column.
Party Primaries
The columns to the right of the voter’s name and headed “PARTY” reflect the political parties holding
primary elections and are used to indicate the political party primary in which a voter wishes to vote.
In the sample section of the voter registration list, both Republican and Democratic primary elections
are being held. Each square is labeled “R” (Republican) or “D” (Democratic). The appropriate circle
is to be shaded in after the voter declares to the manager the primary in which he wishes to vote. In
the example, the circle in the Republican column is shaded in by the poll managers. Manager must
initial in the column to the right of the voter’s name, and write the page and line number the voter
signed on the poll list.
NOT AN OFFICIAL LIST
Managers must be extremely careful to mark the
list correctly and in the manner indicated. Manager
must shade in the party column.
Voter Registration List 13
Primary Runoffs
A voter who voted in the one party’s primary may vote only in the same party’s runoff. In other
words, the voter may not switch from one party in the primary to another party in the runoff.
In a primary runoff, the poll manager must shade the circle in the RUNOFF column, initial under the
circle in the RUNOFF column, and complete the page and line number for the RUNOFF.
A voter who did not vote in the first primary but was eligible to vote in the first primary may vote in
the runoff. In this situation, the above procedure should be followed. Additionally, the manager must
write his initials in the Manager’s Initial’s column for the Primary and shade in the appropriate
“PARTY” column.
Municipal Elections
Once the voter’s eligibility has been determined, initial the Manager’s Initials column. Then write the
page and line number on which the voter signs the poll list. Also shade in the circle under the “VOTED” column. In the event of a municipal runoff election, initial the manger’s initials column under
“RUNOFF” and write the page and line number on which the voter signs the poll list. Also shade in
the circle under the “VOTED” column under “RUNOFF.” If the voter did not vote in the original election, do not complete the “ELECTION” section, only the “RUNOFF” section.
NOT AN OFFICIAL LIST
Example shown
Voter Registration List 14
Poll List
The poll list is a list of the signatures of every voter who has voted at the polling place. Blank poll
lists are provided with the polling place supplies. Every voter must sign the poll list before receiving a
ballot. A separate poll list is used for curbside voters. (See Curbside Voting)
Voters should sign the poll list with an ink pen.
Voter’s Oath
The Voters oath is printed on the poll list. By signing the poll list, the voter is taking the voters oath.
General & Special Elections
“I do solemnly swear or affirm that I am qualified to vote at this election according to the Constitution of this state, and that I have not voted during this election.”
Party Primaries
“I do solemnly swear or affirm that I am qualified to vote at this election according to the
Constitution of this state, and that I have not voted during this election. Further, I do solemnly
swear or affirm that I am duly qualified to be at this primary election and that I have not voted
before at this primary election or in any party’s primary election or officially participated in the
nominating convention for any vacancy for which this primary is be held” (7-13-1010).
It is not necessary for a manager to read the oath to the voter (unless the voter is illiterate or blind).
The manager should ask the voter to read the oath before signing.
If the voter us unable to write, or is presented form signing by physical disability he must sign his
name to the poll list by mark with the assistance of one of the managers. The voter should make
a cross mark (X) after which the manager will write the voter’s name and phrase “his mark” in the
following manner:
His
John (X) Smith DCR <- Manager’s Initials
Mark
The manager should place his initials on the line beside the mark (7-13-710).
Opening the Polls 15
Opening the Polls
At 7 a.m., the chairman of the managers should announce that the polls are officially open. He should
then proceed to unlock the ballot boxes and publicly display that they are empty. The ballot boxes
should then be locked and the keys returned to the managers until the polls are closed and counting
begins. If using numbered seals, the ballot boxes must be sealed. Ballot boxes cannot be opened
again during the election (7-13-840).
It is suggested that the first voter verify that there are 000 votes on each voting terminal
Closing the Polls
At 7 p.m., the clerk must announce that the polls are closed. Any voters, who are in the process
of voting or waiting to vote at this time must be allowed to vote. No one who arrives after the
announcement that the polls are closed may be allowed to vote (7-13-850).
Processing the Voter
16
Processing the Voter
STEP 1 - Voter Presents Photo Identification
Attention: The rules for presentation of identification at the polls changed on
January 1, 2013.
When a voter presents himself to vote, the manager must ask the voter to present one of the following forms of current and valid photo identification (7-13-710).
•S. C. drivers license
•S.C. Department of Motor Vehicles identification card
•S.C. Voter Registration card with a photograph
•Federal Military identification card with a photograph
•U.S. Passport
If voter does not present qualifying Photo ID, voter may vote a provisional ballot. See “Voter Without
Qualifying Photo Identification” in the Election Day Issues section.
STEP 2 - Verify Photo, Expiration Date and Signature
The manager must verify that the photograph on the qualifying Photo ID is that of the person seeking to vote. Check any expiration date the Photo ID may have. If the ID is expired, the manager
should ask the voter if he has any other forms of qualifying Photo ID. If not, follow the procedures
under “Voter Without Qualifying Photo ID” in the “Election Day Issues” section. Additionally, the
signature on the voter’s identification should be checked against his signature on the poll list after the
voter signs this list.
STEP 3 - Locate Voter on Voter Registration List
See detailed instruction in Voter Registration List section.
STEP 4 - Verify Address
The manager must ask the voter if the address on the voter registration list is the voter’s current
residence address. If the voter’s address is correct as shown, the voter should be allowed to vote.
If the voter’s current address is different from what is listed on the voter registrations list, see Voter
Address Discrepancy” in the Election Days Issues section.
Processing the Voter
17
STEP 5 - Check for Status Codes
The manager must check the voter registration list for any status codes. Listed below are the codes
and steps to process each.
ABS Indicates the voter has been issued an absentee ballot.
The voter may not vote unless he provides the manager a letter from the voter registration
office stating he is allowed to vote. (This voter must have returned his unvoted absentee ballot
to the county voter registration office, and requested to vote at his polling place.) (7-15-430).
I-M
Stands for “Inactive – Moved” and indicates that the State Election Commission has received information that the voter has moved. See steps under I-F below.
I-F Stands for “Inactive – Failed to Respond” and indicates the voter failed to respond to a
confirmation mailing conducted by the State Election Commission to verify the voter’s address.
The “I-M” and “I-F” designations do not necessarily require any extra action by the poll
manager. These designations are used primarily by the voter registration office. It is
essential to ask every voter whether his address is correct, including voters with “I-M”
and “I-F” designations. If a voter with one of these designations states that the address
on the voter registration list is correct, the voter should be allowed to vote a regular ballot.
If the voter states the address is incorrect, follow the procedures in the “Voter Address
Discrepancy” section.
ID
Voters are required to provide proof of identification when registering to vote by mail. Voters
who did not provide this registration ID when registering, must provide ID before voting. A voter providing any one of the five qualifying Photo IDs for voting has satisfied this registration
ID requirement, and no additional ID is necessary. Therefore, the ID status code usually
requires no further action.
However, if the voter is voting a provisional ballot under the reasonable impediment exception (see “Voter Without Qualifying Photo ID” in the Election Day Issues Section), the voter must provide this additional ID to complete the voter registration process. This additional ID may
include any one of the following current and valid documents:
•photo identification (includes employee and student IDs, does not require address on ID)
•utility bill (must show address in county)
•bank statement (must show address in county)
•paycheck (must show address in county)
•government document (must show address in county, paper voter registration card without
photo cannot be used as government document)
Processing the Voter
18
If the voter does not have one of these additional IDs, and the voter is voting a reasonable
impediment provisional ballot; the voter must provide the county voter registration office with
the additional ID prior to certification of the election for the ballot to count. A copy of the
additional ID can be provided by fax, email, or delivered in person.
STEP 6 - Primary Elections
If not a Primary, Skip to STEP 7.
If more than one primary is being held, ask the voter to declare in which political party’s primary he
wishes to vote.
IMPORTANT: Do not ask the voter “Are you a Republican or Democrat”
Instead politely ask the voter:
“In which party’s primary do you wish to vote today?”
If only one party’s primary is being held, inform the voter:
“You will be voting in the _________________ Party Primary today”
STEP 7 - Voter Signs Poll List Ask the voter to read the oath printed on the poll list and then sign the poll list. If a primary, voter
must sign the appropriate party specific poll list.
STEP 8 - Marked Voted & Initial List
Record your manager’s initials on the voter registration list. Record the page and line number the
voter signed on the poll list. Also record that the voter has voted. If a primary, record the appropriate
political party.
STEP 9 - Determine Ballot Style
Check the BALLOT STYLE or DISTRICT section to determine the ballot style the voter is entitled to
vote. Your county voter registration and elections office will provide you specific instructions on determining ballot styles.
STEP 10 - Direct Voter to Voting Terminal
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Election Day Issues
Voter Without Qualifying Photo Identification
If a voter does not present one of the qualifying Photo IDs, the manager must ask:
“Did you forget to bring your Photo ID to the polls?
or do you not have a Photo ID?”
1.
If the voter forgot to bring his Photo ID, the voter has two options:
a.Leave polling place, retrieve Photo ID, return and vote a regular ballot
b.Vote provisional ballot now and present Photo ID later to county election commission (CEC) no later than provisional ballot hearing. Explain ballot will NOT count unless voter
presents Photo ID by that time. Poll manager should check the box in section C of the
Provisional Ballot Envelope. Voter does NOT complete Reasonable Impediment Affidavit.
Provide voter with Notice of Provisional Ballot Hearing, which includes the CEC office location and date and time of the provisional ballot hearing.
2.
If the voter does not have a Photo ID, ask the voter the following question:
“Is there an obstacle that prevented you from getting
one of the necessary Photo IDs?”
Voter Answers “Yes” (Reasonable Impediment)
1. Manager asks voter to show his paper voter registration card without a photo.
2. If voter shows the paper voter registration card without a photo, proceed to Step 3.
a.
If voter has a paper voter registration card without a photo but did not bring it to the polls, he has the option of retrieving it and proceeding to Step 3.
b.
If voter does not have a paper voter registration card without a photo and does not
retrieve one, voter must vote a provisional ballot that will NOT count unless the voter presents one of the qualifying Photo IDs to the county election commission prior to
certification of the election. Completes Steps 2-4 under Voter Answers “No” below.
3. Manager completes Voter Information Section of Provisional Ballot Envelope.
4. Voter completes Reasonable Impediment Affidavit in Section D of the Provisional
Ballot Envelope.
5. Notary notarizes affidavit (if available), or manager attests to voter’s signature by
signing affidavit.
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6. Voter vote’s provisional ballot and manager provides voter with Notice of Provisional
Ballot Hearing.
Voter Answers “No”
1. Manager informs voter he may vote a provisional ballot that will NOT count unless the
voter presents one of the qualifying Photo IDs to the county election commission prior to certification of the election.
2. Manager must inform voter he may obtain a free Photo ID from the Department of Motor Vehicles or the county voter registration and elections office.
3. Manager completes Voter Information section of Provisional Ballot Envelope and checks the box in Section C indicating the voter will need to provide Photo ID to the county
election commission prior to certification of the election.
4. Voter votes provisional ballot and manager provides voter with Notice of Provisional
Ballot Hearing.
Photo ID Questions and Answers
21
Photo ID Questions and Answers
“What is a reasonable impediment?”
By asking the voter if there is “an obstacle that prevented you from getting one of the necessary photo IDs,” the manager is determining if the voter wishes to claim the “reasonable impediment” exception to providing photo ID at the polling place.
If the voter doesn’t understand reasonable impediment, the manager should explain that a reasonable impediment is any obstacle that prevented the voter from obtaining any one of the qualifying
photo IDs. Some reasonable impediments may include:
•A religious objection to being photographed
•Disability or illness
•Work schedule
•Lack of transportation
•Lack of birth certificate
•Family responsibilities
•Any other obstacle the voter finds reasonable
“I have a reasonable impediment” or “I have a good reason for not having a photo ID” or
any similar statement.
Manager must consider such statements by the voter as a “yes” answer to the reasonable impediment question. Manager should follow procedure for voter answering “yes’ under “Voter Without
Qualifying Photo Identification” in the Election Day Issue Section.
“Can I just say I don’t have a car?” or “I have kids, is that reason enough?” or “I just
don’t have time. Can I claim that?” or similar questions.
Manager should explain that the voter may claim any obstacle to obtaining a qualifying ID that he
finds reasonable as long as it is true. Only the voter determines what is reasonable. In other words,
only the voter can say whether any particular obstacle created a reasonable impediment to obtaining
a photo ID. Managers and other election officials do not determine the reasonableness of the claimed
impediment.
“Will my vote count?”
A provisional ballot cast under the reasonable impediment exception will count unless the county
Photo ID Questions and Answers
22
election commission has grounds to believe the affidavit is false. In other words, the county election
commission would have to have convincing evidence that the voter is either not who he claims to be,
or that the voter lied about his impediment.
“What if my Driver’s License is expired?”
State law requires that the qualifying Photo ID be current (not expired). Not all Photo IDs have an
expiration date, but managers must check any expiration date that is on the ID (see “Processing the
Voter” section). If the ID is expired, it cannot be accepted. If the voter has no other qualifying Photo ID, the manager follows the procedure under “Voter Without Qualifying Photo Identification.”
“My Driver’s License is suspended. Can I still use it?”
State law requires that the qualifying Photo ID be valid (not suspended, cancelled, revoked). In
most cases, managers will not know whether a Photo ID has been suspended, cancelled, revoked,
etc. However, if the manager has knowledge that the Photo ID is not valid (e.g., voter volunteers the
information), the ID cannot be accepted for voting. If the voter has no other qualifying Photo ID, the
manager follows the procedure under “Voter Without Qualifying Photo Identification.”
“I’ve misplaced my Photo ID”
A person who has lost or misplaced their Photo ID and has no other approved Photo ID should be
considered as not having a Photo ID. This voter would be eligible to vote under the reasonable impediment exception in “Voter Without Qualifying Photo Identification.” The voter would not be treated the same as a voter who simply left his Photo ID at home. The voter who leaves his Photo ID at
home either has to retrieve it or vote a provisional ballot and show a Photo ID prior to certification of
the election.
“What is considered a federal, military ID?”
There are numerous Photo ID cards that are considered federal, military IDs:
•Active duty military IDs (see Appendix for image)
•Retiree and spouse military IDs (see Appendix for image)
•Contractor or civilian employee military IDs
•Any other photo ID issued by the Department of Defense
Photo ID Questions and Answers
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•Veteran’s Affairs Benefits Card (see Appendix for image)
When in doubt about whether a photo ID is a federal, military ID, ask yourself these questions:
Is it federal?
Is it military?
Does it have a photograph?
If the answer to all three questions is “yes,” the ID is a qualifying Photo ID acceptable for voting. If
the answer to any of the questions is “no,” it is not a federal military ID. The manager may contact
the county voter registration and elections office for guidance. If the ID is not a federal military ID,
ask the voter if he has any other form of qualifying Photo ID. If not, follow procedures under “Voter
Without Qualifying Identification” in the Election Day Issues section.
“Can I vote with my Concealed Weapons Permit (CWP)?”
No. The list of qualifying Photo IDs in state law includes only the voter registration card with
a photograph, federal military ID, U.S. Passport, S.C. Driver’s License, or a Photo ID issued by
the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). While the CWP looks very similar to a Driver’s License
or DMV ID Card, it is actually issued by the State Law Enforcement Division (SLED) and is not a
qualifying Photo ID.
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Election Day Issues
Voter’s Identity in Doubt
The manager must verify that the photograph on the qualifying ID is that of the person seeking to
vote. Additionally, the signature on the voter’s ID should be checked against the voter’s signature
on the poll list. In comparing the photograph, the manager must take into account the issue date of
the ID, changes in hair style or color, eyewear, or other changes to the voter’s appearance that could
make the voter appear differently at present than at the time the photo was taken. For example,
a voter may look substantially different today than they look in a photograph taken ten years ago.
Likewise, a person’s signature may change over time. Managers must err on the side of the voter in
making these comparisons.
If after examining the voter’s photograph and signature on the voter’s ID the manager disputes the
identity of the voter, the poll manager should ask the voter if he has any other form of qualifying
photo ID. If the voter provides a second qualifying photo ID, and the manager no longer disputes the
voter’s identity, the voter must be allowed to vote a regular ballot. If the voter cannot provide a satisfactory, secondary qualifying photo ID, the manager must allow the voter to vote a provisional ballot.
The manager must complete the Voter Information Section of the Provisional Ballot Envelope and
complete Section B, Voter Qualification Challenge, marking “ Photo Does Not Match” as the reason for
the challenge. See Voter Qualification Challenges” in the Election Day Issues Section (7-13-710).
Voter Qualification Challenges
Challenges by the Managers
The law provides that if the managers are reasonably sure that the person presenting himself is entitled to vote, they will deliver to him a ballot (7-13-730).
The law also provides that the managers of election should prevent any person from voting when
they have good reason to believe that such person has already voted. (For example, ABS is shown
next to the voter’s name). It provides also that they should refuse to allow any person to vote who
is not a registered voter or who have become disqualified for any cause to vote in the precinct. It is
the duty of managers to challenge the voter of any person who may be known or suspected not to be
a qualified voter (7-13-810). Any manager who challenges voter’s qualifications should be present at
the provisional ballot hearing.
Voter Qualification Challenge Procedure
Any voter’s ballot may be challenged by a manager, watcher (see section titled Watchers”) or other
voter (7-13-810, 7-13-820, 7-13-830).
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Challenges must be made before the voter casts his ballot on a voting machine or deposits his ballot
in a ballot box. No challenge may be considered after that time.
Step 1: Explain Qualifications
When a manager, watcher, or voter challenges a ballot.
The manager must explain to the voter the qualifications of a voter (7-5-120).
•Must be at least 18 years of age
•Must be citizen of the United States, a resident of South Carolina, the country, and the voting
precinct at which he offers to vote
•Must not be under a court order declaring him mentally incompetent
•Must not be confined in a prison or jail (does not apply to persons awaiting trail)
•Must not have been convicted of a felony or crimes against the elections laws (unless he has
served his complete sentence, including any probation or parole time and paid restitution, or
has been pardoned for such offenses, and has registered to vote after completing his sentence)
•Must have been duly registered by the board of registration at least 30 days prior to the election
Step 2: Voter Insists on Voting
If the person whose ballot is challenged insists that he is qualified, and the challenge is not
withdrawn, he will vote a provisional ballot. Manager completes voter registration list, and
voter signs poll list.
Step 3: Manager completes the Provisional Ballot Envelope
•Manager completes Voter Information Section of Provisional Ballot Envelope
•Manager completes Section B, Voter Qualification Challenge, listing the reason for the challenge and the challenger’s information.
Step 4: Managers provides Provisional Ballot
The manager provides the voter with the appropriate paper provisional ballot style.
Step 5: Voter Votes Ballot
The voter must be provided with a voting booth to ensure the secrecy of his ballot. This can be accomplished with a separate booth or the voting machine booth. If the voting machine booth is used,
protect the machines touchscreen by covering it with this handbook (or other cover) or by turning
the terminal over in the booth. The voter returns the ballot to the manager. The manager places the
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ballot in the Provisional Ballot Envelope and seals it. The managers places the envelope in the ballot
box.
Step 6: Provide Notice of Provisional Ballot Hearing
The manager must provide the voter and the challenger with the Notice of Provisional Ballot Hearing
and should verbally inform the voter of the date, time, and location of the hearing.
Unless the challenger is present at the hearing, produces witnesses in support of the challenge, or
provides evidence in writing to support the challenge prior to the hearing, the provisional ballot will
be counted. The challenger should make every effort to be in attendance at the hearing. Nothing prohibits the county election commission from continuing any challenge administratively as long as it has
evidence to sustain the challenge.
Watchers
Each candidate in the party primary and nonpartisan candidate in an election may appoint one watcher at a time for any polling place where the candidate’s name is on the ballot. In any general or
special election, all candidates of the same political party will be jointly represented at any one polling
place by not more than two watchers at a time for each 1,000 registered voters or fraction thereof
registered in the precinct.
Every watcher must:
•Be a qualified voter in the county where he is to watch.
•Be certified to the managers of the voting precinct to which assigned. This certification must
be in writing and signed by the candidate or by an appropriate party official as having been
designated as a watcher.
•Wear a badge not to exceed 4 ¼” X 4 ¼” at all times which specifies the name of the
candidate or party he represents. This badge must contain letters no larger than ¼ inch in
height or width and must not be a color that has florescent quality.
•Conduct himself in a manner that will not interfere with the orderly conduct of the election
(7-13-860).
The managers have authority to require that the watchers station themselves in such a place as the
managers designate. Watchers must be placed where they can observe the entire election procedure,
but managers should not permit the activity of the watchers to interfere with the orderly conduct of
the election or to permit the watcher to talk with the voter. Except as allowed by law, watchers may
not approach within five feet of any voting booth. Watchers must conduct themselves in an orderly
Election Day Issues
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manner. Watchers who are disorderly or unruly may be removed from the polling place. (7-13-140,
7-13-860, 7-13-130)
The voter registration list is a matter of public record. Under supervision of the poll managers, poll
watchers should be allowed to look at the list as long as it does not interfere with or disrupt the orderly voting process.
To be more knowledgeable about election day procedures, poll watchers may want to attend poll
manager training conducted by the county election commission. Special poll watchers training may
also be available.
Challenges by Watchers and Electors
1. If the watcher desires to challenge a voter, he must address himself to a manager and not to the
voter.
2. The manager should then follow the procedure outlined in the preceding section entitled “Voter
Qualification Challenge Procedure”.
Observers
Since elections are a public process, anyone should be allowed to observe under certain conditions.
Any member of the public in a polling place who isn’t performing a specific role (manager, voter,
watcher, etc) is considered an observer. Observers may stay inside polling place if they do not talk to
voters or interfere with the election process. Because of a polling place size, observers may be limited
in number. Observers, as with anyone inside the polling place, may not display any type of campaign
literature including a badge or item of clothing. Observers must conduct themselves in an orderly
manner. Observers who are disorderly or unruly may be removed from the polling place (7-13-140).
Assistance to Voters
Generally, no one except a voter preparing his ballot is allowed within five feet of the voting booth.
However, voters with disabilities and voters who are blind, have low vision and voters who are unable
to read or write may receive assistance in voting (7-13-780).
Section 208 of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, as amended, states:
“Any voter who requires assistance to vote by reason of blindness, disability, or inability to read or
write may be given assistance by a person of the voter’s choice, other than the voter’s employer or
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agent of that employer or officers or agent of the voter’s union”
Procedure For Determining If Voter Is Entitled to Assistance
Step 1. The voter must request assistance. Caution: Do not assume that anyone needs
assistance, “volunteer” anyone for assistance, or allow anyone else to do so.
Step 2. The manager says to the voter: “The law provides that any voter, who is blind, has low
vision, disabled, or unable to read or write is entitled to assistance in voting. Do you request assistance for one of these reasons?”
Step 3. If the voter’s answer is yes, the manager then says: “You may choose anyone you wish to
assist you in casting your ballot except for your employer, an agent of your employer, an officer of your union, or an agent of your union if you are a union member.”
Step 4. After the voter has selected an assistant, the managers should ask the person chosen whether he is the voter’s employer, agent of that employer, or officer (or agent) of the
voter’s union.
Step 5. The voter and his chosen assistant enter the voting booth to cast the voter’s ballot.
Under the Voting Rights Act, voters who are entitled to receive assistance in voting may obtain that
assistance from any person they choose with a few exceptions. This includes friends, candidates, poll
watchers, poll managers, voters waiting in line, relatives, non-relatives, pre-teenagers and anyone
else who is not the voter’s employer, an agent of that employer, or an officer (or agent) of the voter’s
union. The assistant does not have to have any particular attributes that would qualify him. A voter
may choose a person, who has already assisted other voters, or a person who is too young to vote,
or a person who is not registered to vote in South Carolina or any other state.
Under normal circumstances a poll manager would accompany the voter into the voting booth only
if he has been chosen to be the voter’s assistant. However, if the managers have credible evidence
or good reason to suspect that there is any scheme to defraud voters who are entitled to assistance,
a poll manager may be appointed to accompany the voter and the voter’s assistant into the voting
booth to act as any observer. An example of this may be if a non-poll manager is frequently asked to
assist. This manager cannot mark the ballot, or take any part in assisting the voter: he is there only
as an observer to ensure that the ballot is marked in strict accordance with the voter’s wishes. If the
manager, acting as an observer, sees that the person chosen by the voter is not marking the ballot as
the voter wishes, or is otherwise action improperly, the manger should challenge the ballot.
Curbside Voting
Any voter who, because of a disability or being age 65 or older, cannot enter the polling place in
which he is registered to vote, or is unable to stand in line to vote, may vote outside the polling place
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inside the vehicle in the closest available parking area (7-13-771) and the National Voting Accessibility
for the Elderly and Handicapped Act)
Only those who meet these qualifications may vote curbside. The driver of the vehicle or the voter’s
caregiver may not vote curbside unless he meets these qualifications. The driver or caregiver would
need to vote normally at his polling place or vote absentee if qualified.
Curbside voting signs must be displayed in the designated curbside parking area. Managers should
constantly monitor the curbside parking area in intervals of no more than 15 minutes.
Curbside Voting Procedure
Step 1. The voter or caregiver presents Photo ID to the manager.
Step 2. The manager marks the voter registration list as normal writing “curbside” next to the
voter’s name.
Step 3.
Two managers take the curbside poll list and a voting machine terminal to the voter’s
vehicle. The managers should label a separate poll list as “curbside” at the beginning of the
day. This allows for curbside voting without disruption to polling place voting. Any voting machine terminal may be used for curbside voting.
NOTE: Using the same voting machine terminal throughout the day for curbside voting may result
in rapid battery decline. Rotating curbside use amongst a number of voting machines in the polling
place will help ensure the batteries stay charged.
Step 4. The manager verifies the photo, expiration date, and signature on the Photo ID.
Step 5. The voter signs the poll list.
Step 6. The voting machine terminal is given to the voter inside the vehicle. No person other than
the voter is permitted inside the vehicle in which the voter is casting his ballot unless the voter is entitled to assistance in voting (see “Assistance to Voters” section).
Name Not Found On Voter Registration List
A voter’s name not being on the voter registration list could be an indicator that a voter is not registered or has moved away from the precinct. However, just because a voter’s name is not on the voter registration list does not necessarily mean the voter cannot vote at that polling place. For various
reasons, a voter may be a qualified voter in the precinct but his name has been excluded from the
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voter registration list. Managers must help ensure each voter casts a ballot in the polling place in his
precinct of residence. Voting in an incorrect precinct may cause a voter’s vote not to count.
In some cases, the county board of voter registration and elections may provide the voter with a
letter instructing the managers in the precinct to allow the voter to vote. If so, the managers must
allow the voter to vote a regular ballot (continue with number 6 below).
When any person offers to vote and his name does not appear on the voter registration list, follow
these steps (S.C. Code 7-13-820):
1. If using EVRL, the manager should first search for the voter on the EVRL laptop. EVRL contains records of all registered voters in the county. If the voter is registered in another precinct, direct the voter to the correct polling place.
2.
If using the paper voter registration list, or if the voter’s name cannot be found in EVRL, the manager should call the County Board of Voter Registration and Elections. If the call is long distance, it can be made collect, and the Board must accept the call. The manager should notify any poll watchers present. Poll watchers can accompany the manager to the phone and have the information repeated to each of them. The manager will give the Board the name of the voter as it appears on the ID presented by the voter. The Board will search its records to determine if the voter is registered and the voter’s correct precinct. To help locate the voter’s record, the
voter may provide his voter registration number or Social Security Number.
3.
If the Board cannot locate the voter’s record, and the voter insists he is registered in the precinct, the voter may vote a provisional ballot. Follow the procedures in the “Voter Qualification
Challenges” section. Managers who challenge a voter solely because his name cannot be found on the voter registration list do not have to attend the provisional ballot hearing. The county
election commission will verify the voter’s eligibility.
4. If the voter is registered in another precinct, direct the voter to the correct precinct.
5. If the person is eligible to vote in the precinct, the Board will provide the manager with the voter’s date of birth. The manager should ask the voter to provide his date of birth. If the voter
provides the correct date of birth, the voter will be allowed to vote a regular ballot.
6.
The manager must enter the information from the voter’s ID in EVRL (see “Using EVRL” in the “EVRL” section), or record the information in the appropriate spaces on the last page of the paper voter registration list. Properly mark the voter registration list (as instructed earlier) and have the voter sign the poll list.
Voter Address Discrepancy
In processing the voter, the manager must ask each voter if the address on the voter registration list
is correct. If the voter says the address on the list is not correct, follow these steps:
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1. Ask the voter his current address.
2. Determine if the address is inside or outside the precinct. If you do not know, refer to any maps or street lists provided to you by the county voter registration and elections office or call the office to confirm.
3. If the address is inside the precinct
a. Voter completes Change of Address form (see Appendix). Save the form with materials to be returned to the county voter registration and elections office.
b. Manager marks voter registration list
c. Voter signs poll list
d. Manager determines voter’s correct ballot style. Manager may need to call the voter
registration office.
e. Voter votes a regular ballot on voting machine
4. If the address is outside the precinct, Failsafe Voting applies.
Failsafe Voting
Failsafe voting is designed to allow voters who have moved from one precinct to another and failed to
update their address on election day and vote (7-5-440). Failsafe voting applies in two situations:
1. Voter moves from one precinct to another within the same county.
2. Voter moves from one South Carolina county to another within 30 days of an election.
A voter in either of these situations has two options:
1. Vote at the polling place where the voter’s name is on the books (in the voter’s previous
precinct). The voter votes a limited, failsafe ballot containing only federal, statewide,
countywide, and municipal-wide offices.
2. Go to the voter registration office in the voter’s current county of residence (the voter’s new
county if he has changed counties), complete a change of address form, and vote a full ballot.
If voting failsafe at the polling place, follow these steps:
1. Manager completes Voter Information section and Section A of Provisional Ballot Envelope.
2. Voter signs Section A of Provisional Ballot Envelope.
3. Manager provides voter with paper Failsafe Provisional Ballot. In most cases, there is only one Election Day Issues
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Failsafe Provisional Ballot style. If there are multiple styles (e.g., precincts with multiple
Congressional Districts, precincts split by municipal lines), select the correct ballot style.
4. Voter votes ballot. The voter must be provided with a voting booth to ensure the secrecy of his ballot (see Step 5 in the “Voter Qualification Challenges” section).
5. Voter returns ballot to manager. Manager places ballot in Provisional Ballot Envelope and seals it. Manager places envelope in ballot box.
6.Manager provides voter with Notice of Provisional Ballot Hearing. Inform voter that the ballot will count as long as he has completed and signed Section A of the Provisional Ballot Envelope.
Failsafe voting does not apply in these situations:
•Voter moves within his precinct. This voter votes a regular ballot (see “Voter Address Discrepancy” section).
•A voter who has moved from one South Carolina county to another prior to 30 days before
the election. In this case, the voter should have registered in his new county by the 30-day
deadline. If the voter moved before the 30-day mark and did not register in his new county,
the voter is not eligible to vote in the election.
Failsafe Voting in Municipal Elections
Failsafe voting also applies to municipal elections, with some differences:
1.A voter must have resided within the municipality for at least 30 days to be eligible to vote in the municipal election.
a. If a voter has moved inside his precinct and inside the municipality, the voter votes a
regular ballot (see “Voter Address Discrepancy” section).
b. If a voter has moved from one precinct inside the municipality to another precinct inside the municipality, follow the failsafe voting procedures above.
c.
If a voter has moved from outside a municipality to inside a municipality, ask the voter
when the move occurred. If the move occurred before the 30-day mark, failsafe voting applies because the voter has been a resident of the municipality for 30 days. If the move
occurred after the 30-day mark, the voter may not vote because he has not resided in
municipality for 30 days.
2. There are additional considerations when a municipal election is being held with a county or state election and when a municipality is split by county lines. In these situations, refer to your county voter registration and elections office for assistance.
Election Day Issues
33
Distributing and Displaying Campaign Literature at Polls
On election day, it is unlawful for any person to distribute or display any type of campaign literature
or place any political posters within 200 feet of any entrance used by the voters to enter a polling
place. It is the duty of poll managers to keep this prohibited area clear of political literature and displays. County and municipal law enforcement officers should, upon the request of the poll managers,
remove or cause to be removed any material distributed or displayed within 200 feet of any such
entrance (7-25-180 (a)). (See “No Campaign Materials Allowed” posted in the Appendix)
Candidates
Candidates may not:
• Display or distribute campaign materials within the 200-foot area.
• Wear a candidate badge inside the polling place.
• Actively campaign inside the polling place.
• Intimidate voters.
• Interfere with the orderly election process.
Candidates may:
• Campaign verbally within 200 feet of the entrance to the polling place as long as it does not
interfere with the election process.
• Wear a badge no larger than 4 ¼” X 4 ¼” This badge may contain only the candidate’s name
and office sought.
• Enter the polling place. Candidate badge must be removed before entering.
• View the voter registration list and poll list if it does not interfere with the election process.
Candidate’s Representatives
Candidate’s Representatives may not:
• Display or distribute campaign materials within the 200-foot area.
• Wear any type of campaign badge.
Election Day Issues
34
• Campaign inside the polling place.
• Intimidate voters.
• Interfere with the orderly election process
Candidate’s Representatives may:
• Campaign verbally within 200 feet of the entrance to the polling place as long as it does not
interfere with the election process.
Any complaint regarding polling place campaigning should be directed to the poll managers. Managers should use their best judgment to settle any issues and maintain an orderly election process. See
“Power of Managers” section (7-25-180 b).
The voter registration list and poll list are a matter of public record. Under supervision of the poll
managers; poll watchers, candidates, and candidate’s representatives should be allowed to look at
the list as long as it does not interfere or disrupt the orderly voting process.
Power of Managers
The poll managers have such police power as necessary to carry out the provisions of the election
laws. They have full authority to maintain good order at the polls and to require obedience to their
commands during the election and during the counting of the ballots. All peace officers are required
to answer the manager’s calls for help in preserving peace (7-13-140).
For example, if a poll watcher is disorderly or unruly, a police officer may be requested to remove
that poll watcher.
Police Officers
Peace officers may call upon bystanders to assist them, and bystanders are required to render such
assistance (7-13-150).
Unless called within the polls by a majority of the managers for assistance, no sheriff, deputy, policeman, or other officer is allowed to come within the polling place. This does not prevent a police officer from entering the polling place for the purpose of casting his ball (7-13-160). Once he has voted,
however, the peace officer should leave the polling place.
Election Day Issues
35
Crossover Voting
Crossover voting is the act of voting a straight party ballot then “crossing over” and voting for a candidate of another party for a particular office. Crossover voting is allowed.
Instruction After Voter Has Entered Booth
If a voter asks for instruction after entering the voting booth, he will be instructed by two of the managers. Upon the completion of their instruction, the mangers immediately leave the voting area and
allow the voter to cast his ballot in secrecy (7-13-1830).
Husband and Wife Voting Together
It is illegal for husbands and wives who are capable of voting separately to enter the voting booth
together for the purpose of voting.
The State Supreme Court has ruled that Section 7-13-750 of the 1976 South Carolina Code of Laws,
which allowed husbands and wives to enter the voting booth together for the purpose of voting is unconstitutional. (See Governor James B. Edwards vs. Sol Abrams, Opinion No. 20578, Janaury 10, 1978.)
Children in the Voting Booth
Minor children (age 17 and under) of a voter may accompany the voter in the voting booth while
he is casting his ballot. The voter must confirm that the child or children accompanying him are his
children.
Cell Phones, Cameras
For voting system security and as a courtesy to others, ask voters not to use cell phones, tablets, or
cameras in the voting area.
Voter Wishes to Take Sample Ballot Into Voting Booth
There is no prohibition against a voter taking a sample ballot into the voting booth. Managers should
check the voting booths on a regular basis to ensure that no sample ballots have been left behind
that might possibly influence voters as to how to vote.
Election Day Issues and Voted or Un-Voted
36
Voter Returns Absentee Ballot to Polling Place
Poll Managers cannot, under any circumstances, accept absentee ballots at the polling place. If voters
bring absentee ballots (voted or un-voted) to your polling place, direct them to deliver their absentee ballot to the absentee ballot precinct in your county and follow the instructions given them at the
absentee ballot precinct (7-15-430).
Voter Decides Not to Vote After Signing Poll List
If after signing the poll list a voter notifies the poll manager that he no longer wishes to vote, the poll
manager should:
•Escort the voter back to the manager’s table
•Erase all marks by the voter’s name on the voter registration list if using an electronic voter
registration list, delete the voter’s participation information
•Cross through voter’s signature on poll list and write “ballot cancelled/spoiled”
•If voter has been issued a ballot, the ballot must be cancelled
If the voter registration list and poll list are corrected, the voter may return to vote.
Insufficient Ballots
In each polling place where voting machines are used, emergency provisional ballots must be provided, not to exceed 10% of the registered voters at the polling place.
When a sufficient number of ballots are not available, the poll managers must provide ballots made
as nearly as possible to the official ballots. Use any resource available if necessary to create these
ballots. Under no circumstance should an eligible voter be turned away from the polls
during voting hours without being given the opportunity to vote. A ballot must be provided.
Call the election commission immediately to receive instructions concerning replacement of ballots.
One remedy is to photo copy one of the remaining paper ballots before they are used. Remember to
renumber these copied ballots consecutively before issuing to voters (7-13-1870).
A poll manager who fails to comply with the provisions of this law with regard to providing such ballots is guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction, must be fined not more than $500.00
(7-13-430).
Election Day Issues
37
Defaced or Spoiled Ballots
If a voter defaces or spoils his ballot, he may obtain one additional ballot upon returning the defaced
or spoiled ballot to the managers with the stub attached. Unless the ballot with the stub attached is
returned, the voter may not be given a second ballot.
When a ballot is given by the managers to replace a spoiled one, the manager in charge of the voter
registration list will:
1.Write the number of the new ballot on the poll list beside the voter’s name.
2.Write “spoiled” across the face of the spoiled ballot and place it in a file (7-13-790).
3.Write “spoiled” on the poll list on the next available line (7-13-790). (See example below.)
In the example below, a voter was given a ballot with the stub number 2 attached to it. The voter
spoiled that ballot and returned it with the stub attached. He was then given an additional ballot, stub
number 4. The number was then written on the poll list where number 2 was previously placed.
All defaced or spoiled ballots must be accounted for and turned over to the commissioners of election
by the managers following the election.
Primaries – Voter Can Only Vote in One Party’s Primary
State law requires the voter to choose the primary in which he wishes to vote. A voter is prohibited
from voting in more than one party’s primary on the same day. By voting in a party’s primary, the voter is selecting representatives to run in the general election for that political party (7-13-1010). (See
“Voter’s Oath.”)
If a voter votes in a Presidential Primary, the voter will still be allowed to vote in either party’s primary election in June, regardless of which Presidential Primary the voter chose. The Presidential Primary
is considered separate from the June primary.
Election Day Issues
38
Primary Runoffs
When a candidate does not receive a majority of the votes in the first primary, a runoff must be held
two weeks later. A voter is entitled to vote in this runoff under two scenarios:
•If a voter cast a ballot in a particular party’s primary, this voter may cast a ballot only in that
same party’s runoff.
•If a voter did not cast a ballot in either party’s primary, this voter may cast a ballot in either
party’s runoff.
For example, if a voter casts a ballot in the Republican primary, this voter can also cast a ballot in the
Republican runoff; however, this voter cannot cast a ballot in the Democratic runoff. Even if there is
no Republican runoff, this voter cannot cast a ballot in the Democratic runoff (7-13-50, 7-13-1040,
7-17-610).
Voting Machine Procedures
39
Voting Machine Procedures
Use of Machines
Instructions for using the voting machines should be posted in the polling place. An illustration showing how to use the machine or a demonstration model should be available to voters. Instructions on
using the machine are included on the first page of every activated ballot (7-13-1810, 7-13-1640(9)).
Detailed instructions on how to use the Voting Machine are available in the South Carolina State Election Commission brochure titled:1-2-3 Vote How to use South Carolina’s Voting System brochure.
Voting System Seals
The voting booths, the flash card door on the back of each machine, and the communications pack
will all be sealed using numbered seals.
The seal numbers will be recorded on the seal envelope. After breaking any of these seals, place
them in the seal envelope.
Unused closing seals will be provided to the managers inside the seal envelope. The serial number of
each voting machine, the number of the seal, and the number on each machine’s protective counter
is recorded on the envelope.
The envelope containing these seals should not be opened until at least three of the managers of the
precinct are present and can examine the envelope to see that it has not been opened.
Using the Cast/Cancel Function
If a voter walks away from a voting machine ballot without properly casting the ballot, and the
managers weren’t able to alert the voter, the managers must assume the voter intended to cast the
ballot. The managers must cast the ballot using the “Cast/Cancel” function. Do not vote the ballot
by pressing the VOTE button. At least two managers should be present at the booth. Hold the vote
button down and insert the red PEB. Choose to “Cast” the ballot and select the appropriate reason
for casting the ballot from the list on the screen.
If a voter is given an incorrect ballot style or indicates to the manager that he no longer wishes to
vote a ballot, the ballot must be cancelled. In this case, follow the procedure above, choosing to
“Cancel” the ballot. Select the appropriate reason for cancelling the ballot from the list on the screen.
Voting Machine Procedures
40
Accessibility Features
The voting machine and booth has several accessibility features that make voting easier for voters
with disabilities.
•Any voting booth can be made accessible to a voter in a wheelchair by removing the legs
from the voting booth and placing it on a table. Ensure that the voting booth can still be
plugged into a power source instead of relying on battery power.
•The ADA machine features an audio ballot that makes voting accessible to voters who are
blind or visually impaired. The ADA machine has Braille-embossed buttons and a headphone
jack. Don’t assume a voter is blind or visually impaired. If a voter indicates he is blind or
visually impaired, the manager should offer use of the ADA machine. Headphones should
be included in polling place supplies, but the voter may also use his own headphones. The
visually impaired person may also choose to vote with assistance from another person (see
“Assistance to Voters” section).
•Any voting machine can be removed from the booth and used for curbside voting (see “Curbside Voting” section). A voting machine can be placed in the lap of a voter in a wheelchair if
the voter requests it.
Time for Voter to Remain in Voting Machine Booth
No voter is allowed to remain in a voting machine longer than three minutes. If the voter refuses to
leave after a lapse of three minutes, the voter may be removed by the managers. After three minutes
has passed and if other voters are waiting, the voter should be reminded of the three minute rule and
asked to finish voting (7-13-1820).
Instructions After the Voter has Entered the Voting Machine Booth
After a voter has entered a voting machine booth and asks for further instructions concerning the
manner of voting, two of the managers should give instructions to him. But no election official should
in any manner request or seek to persuade or induce any voter to vote in any particular manner. After giving instructions, the voter must be allowed to cast his ballot in secret (7-13-1830).
Procedure When Machine Will Not Operate
If one machine becomes inoperative, the managers must notify the election commission and continue
Voting Machine Procedures
41
using the other machines in the polling place. If possible, a substitute machine will be delivered to
replace the inoperative machine. If a substitute machine is used, at the closing of the polls the record
of both machines will be taken. The votes shown on both counters should be added together. Poll
managers should use emergency/provisional ballots when voting machines are inoperative, and in
their judgment, the inoperative machines are causing delays in the voting process.
The emergency/provisional ballots should be used as necessary until the inoperative machines are repaired or replaced. If the supply of emergency/provisional ballots is exhausted, then unofficial ballots
must be prepared and used (See “Insufficient Ballots” section).
Counter Does Not Register 000
Before opening the polls, each manager should examine the machines and see that no vote has been
cast and that the public counter registers zero (000). If the counter does not register zero, take the
following steps:
•Call the county election commission and report the problem immediately.
•Do not use this voting machine. Use the other machines available. If none are available, use
the emergency/provisional ballots.
•Make written statement designating letter and number of such counter, together with the
number registered. Sign and post the statement upon the wall of the voting place where it
should remain during the day of the election. In making the statement of canvass, subtract
such a number from the number of registered ballots (7-13-1770).
Locking of Machines After Election
The seal to the voting machine will be in a Seal Envelope stating the serial number of the machine.
After the managers seal the machines, they must remain sealed for a period of 30 days, or as much
longer as necessary or advisable should a contest develop, or except as may be necessary to prepare
the machines for another election. An exception is that the machines may be opened and all data
examined upon the order of a court of competent jurisdiction (7-13-1890).
Canvassing and Reporting of Vote Totals at Polling Place
After the polls have closed and all voters waiting in line have voted, the managers must immediately
close the machines. No further voting is allowed. The managers shall canvass and announce the results as shown on the totals tape. Three managers must sign the totals tapes, posting one copy in a
Voting Machine Procedures
42
conspicuous location at the polling place, and return the other totals tape with other election supplies
(7-13-1880).
Observers After the Polls Close
After the polls close, the public, including poll watchers, will be allowed to remain in the polling place
to observe the canvassing process.
Voting by Paper Ballot
43
Voting by Paper Ballot
Voter Asks to Vote a Paper Ballot
According to the current state law, a paper ballot may only be used for the following reasons:
•Emergency – for use if a voting machine becomes inoperable (7-13-830)
•Provisional – for a challenged ballot (7-13-830)
•Failsafe – if a voter has moved into another precinct but did not change his voter registration
address (7-13-440)
Note: For any other than one of the above reasons, a voter must use the voting machine.
Time Allowed in the Voting Booth When Using Paper Ballots
When voting with a paper ballot, no voter can occupy a voting booth for longer than 5
minutes, whether or not the voter is receiving assistance. After having voted, declined, or failed to
vote within 5 minutes, the voter should immediately withdraw from the voting place and should not
be allowed to enter into the polling place again during the election (7-13-760).
Number of Booths
The law requires that the governing body of any county or municipality using vote recorders will provide for each polling place at least one voting machine for each 250 registered voters in the precinct
(7-13-740).
Write-in Votes
In general and special elections, the voter may write in the name of any person he chooses for a particular office except for President and Vice President.
Electronic voting machines allow for write-in votes (7-13-800).
Note: Write-in votes are not allowed in primary elections.
Accounting For Ballots After Election
When the canvassing and counting of the votes is completed, the chair of the managers or one of
them to be designated in writing by the managers, will deliver to the commissioners of election the
Voting by Paper Ballot
44
voter registration list, the boxes containing the ballots, and a written return of the results of the election in the precinct. The managers are responsible for all ballots furnished them (7-13-1150).
At the close of the election, the managers shall account to the commissioners of election for all ballots delivered to them and mark the following returns:
•the number of ballots furnished
•the number of spoiled ballots returned by voters
•the number of unused ballots to be returned to the election commissioners
•the number of ballots actually voted
The commissioners of election will keep all unused ballots as well as those that have been spoiled until the time for contesting the election has expired. Any ballot that has been lost must be accounted
for by a certificate from the chairman of the managers of the particular precinct covering the circumstances (7-13-850).
In addition, at the close of the election, the poll managers must turn over the envelopes containing
provisional (challenged) ballots to the election commissioners. Managers do not include challenged
ballots in their tally. The sealed envelopes containing these ballots must not be opened by the managers.
At the provisional ballot hearing, the commissioners will hear all objections to such ballots. If the
challenger appears, or produces witnesses or evidence in support of the challenge, the commissioners will proceed to hear and determine the question. If the challenger or witnesses or evidence does
not appear to sustain a challenge made at the polls, the ballot will be removed from the envelope and
mingled with the regular ballots and counted. Their decision will be final (7-13-820).
Counting of Ballots: Posting Results
The managers of each precinct must post a copy of the results of the election in that precinct in a
conspicuous site at the polling place (7-13-1110).
Counting of Ballots: Volunteer Personnel
At the close of the election, the managers and clerk should immediately proceed to publicly open the
ballot boxes and count the ballots. The managers are authorized to use additional volunteer personnel in counting the ballots. A volunteer counter cannot be a candidate or a watcher for a candidate
for an office to be voted on in the election, and they must take the following oath prior to assuming
their duties:
Voting by Paper Ballot
45
“I do solemnly swear or affirm that I am not a candidate or a watcher in this election, am qualified elector of this county, that I will count the ballots entrusted to
my care in a fair and impartial manner, and make to the best of my ability a correct
tabulation of the results.”
The managers are required to make a list of such volunteer counters and turn this list in with other
election material to the commissioners of election.
It is emphasized that the counting of the ballots must be done in public. The Constitution of the State
and the statutes of the state require this. While the public has a right to be present when the ballots
are being counted, no one can unduly interfere with or impede the process of counting the ballots.
The managers should permit full observation of the counting, but they should maintain absolute control of the entire proceeding to ensure that the ballots are properly counted and accounted for.
The counting must continue without interruption until it is completed.
After the counting is completed, the managers shall sign such statements of the results of the election as may be required (7-13-1110).
Ballots Improperly Marked
If it is impossible to tell how the voter intended to vote in a particular race, the ballot should not be
counted for that race, but may be counted when the voter’s choice can be determined for any other
race in the election (7-13-1120).
The determination of a voter’s choice is sometimes a difficult task. A check mark or a cross mark may
be placed near a square so as to make determining how the voter intended to vote extremely difficult. The board of managers is required to exercise its best judgment as to how the voter intended to
cast his ballot.
A vote must be counted when there is a no question as to the voter’s intent in choice of candidate or
answer to a question.
It is important that ballots in such cases be preserved so that the commissioners of election or the
courts can survey the problem on appeal.
Note: In past years the “Full-Slate Law” was in effect in South Carolina. This is no longer
true. In 1972 the General Assembly repealed the full-slate requirements. A voter need not
vote for as many candidates as positions to be filled in order to have his vote counted. If a
voter marks more names than there are persons to be elected or nominated to an office,
this section of the ballot will not be counted. The sections of the ballot that are properly
marked should be counted.
Appendix
Appendix
The following pages include samples of each form, to be used during an election, from opening and
closing tapes to poll list and other materials used during the election process.
1. Qualifying Photo IDs
2. No Campaign Materials Allowed
3. Opening and Closing Tapes
4. Primary Voter Registration List
5. Primary Poll List
6. General Election Voter Registration List
7. General Election Poll List
8. Municipal Voter Registration List
9. SC Voters Change of Address Form
10.Provisional Ballot Envelope (Front)
11.Provisional Ballot Envelope (Back)
12.Notice of Hearing on Provisional Ballots
Appendix
Qualifying Photo ID
Note: This is not a definitive list of acceptable Photo IDs
S.C. Drivers License
S.C. Department of Motor Vehicles Identification Card
1
Appendix
1 continued
S.C. Voter Registration Card with photograph
Federal Military identification card with photograph
U.S.Passport
Appendix
No CampaigN
materials
allowed
YOUR
CANDIDATE
This
material
includes
but is not
limited to:
YOUR
CANDIDATE
YOUR TE
IDA
CAND
Buttons
YOUR
CANDIDATE
T-Shirts
R E
U AT R TE
YODID OUIDA
Y D
N
N
CA
CA
Literature
Hats
YOUR
CANDIDATE
Posters
Pins
YO
CAND UR
IDATE
Signs
any material that advertises a candidate or political party is not allowed inside
the polling place or within 200 feet of any entrance to the polling place.
exceptions include poll watcher and candidate badges.
s.C. Code of laws § 7-25-180  
4098_01_200_042210
On Election Day it is unlawful for any person to display any type of campaign literature
or place any political posters within 200 feet of any entrance used by the voters to
enter a polling place.
2
Appendix
3
Opening and Closing Tapes
Zero tape
Totals tape
Appendix
Primary Voter Registration List
4
Appendix
5
Primary Poll List
Republican Primary Poll List
County
Election
Precinct
Date
Election Number
Precinct Code
Voters Oath - Please read: I do solemnly swear or affirm that I am qualified to vote in this election
according to the Constitution of this State and that I have not voted during this election; further, I do
solemnly swear or affirm that I am duly qualified to vote at this primary election and that I have not voted
before at this primary election or in any other party’s primary election or officially participated in the
nominating convention for any vacancy for which this primary is being held.
Signatures of Voters
1
26
2
27
3
28
4
29
5
30
6
31
7
32
8
33
9
34
10
35
11
36
12
37
13
38
14
39
15
40
16
41
17
42
18
43
19
44
20
45
21
46
22
47
23
48
24
49
25
50
Page No. _______
Appendix
General Election Voter Registration List
6
Appendix
7
General Election Poll List
Poll List
County
Election
Precinct
Date
Election Number
Precinct Code
Voters Oath - Please read: I do solemnly swear or affirm that I am qualified to vote in this election
according to the Constitution of this State and that I have not voted during this election.
Signatures of Voters
1
26
2
27
3
28
4
29
5
30
6
31
7
32
8
33
9
34
10
35
11
36
12
37
13
38
14
39
15
40
16
41
17
42
18
43
19
44
20
45
21
46
22
47
23
48
24
49
25
50
Page No. _______
Appendix
Municipal Voter Registration List
8
Appendix
9
SC Voters Change of Address Form
Each voter whose address has changed should complete a Change of Address form.
Appendix
Provisional Ballot Envelope (Front)
10
Appendix
11
Provisional Ballot Envelope (Back)
Appendix
Notice of Hearing on Provisional Ballots
Notice of Hearing on Provisional Ballots
5433-07 2011
THE COUNTY BOARD OF CANVASSERS WILL HOLD A HEARING
TO DETERMINE THE VALIDITY OF YOUR PROVISIONAL BALLOT.
If you are the challenged voter:
H You are entitled to be present at this hearing.
H You are entitled to be represented by legal
counsel and to present evidence.
H If you did not provide photo ID, you must
H
provide ID to the election commission no later
than the time of the provisional ballot hearing
for your vote to count.
If you did not provide photo ID due to a
religious objection or suffering from an
impediment and you completed the affidavit,
your vote will count unless the election
commission has grounds to believe your
affidavit is false.
The provisional ballot hearing will be held:
DATE
TIME
ADDRESS
CITY
SOUTH CAROLINA
If you are the challenger:
H You may be present at the hearing to present
Check the status of your provisional ballot:
H At SCVotes.org, click on “Voters”, then
H
H Or call the State Election Commission toll-free
H
evidence and/or witnesses.
Prior to the hearing, you may present written
evidence to the county election commission.
If you do none of these to support the challenge,
the ballot will be counted.
“Check Your Provisional Ballot”.
at 1-866-200-6110.
This notice was issued as required by Section 7-13-830
of the 1976 South Carolina Code of Laws.
12
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes