Virginia Evans - Jenny Dooley

Minimum System Requirements
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Windows 2000/XP/Vista Operating System
Pentium® II 400 MHz CPU
128 MB R∞ª
32 MB RAM graphics card
QuickTime Player 6 or later
CD-ROM drive
16-bit sound card
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Mac OS X
G4 @ 200 MHz CPU
256 MB RAM
32 MB RAM Graphics Card
CD-ROM drive
16-bit sound card
Virginia Evans - Jenny Dooley
Published by Express Publishing
Liberty House, New Greenham Park, Newbury,
Berkshire RG19 6HW
Tel.: (0044) 1635 817 363
Fax: (0044) 1635 817 463
e-mail: inquiries@expresspublishing.co.uk
http://www.expresspublishing.co.uk
© Virginia Evans – Jenny Dooley, 2008
First published 2008
Made in EU
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or
transmitted in any form, or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without the prior
written permission of the publishers.
This book is not meant to be changed in any way.
ISBN 978-1-84862-277-7
Part A (User’s Manual)
1. What is an Interactive Whiteboard? .............................................................
2. What equipment do I need to use the IWB software? ............................
3. Running the application ...........................................................................
On an IBM compatible PC ..........................................................................
On a Mac OS ..............................................................................................
4. Navigation .................................................................................................
5. Task types and how to complete them ....................................................
Clicking ......................................................................................................
Clicking and dragging ................................................................................
6. The toolbar ................................................................................................
7. The toolbar at a glance .............................................................................
8. Using the tools ..........................................................................................
PC Mode ....................................................................................................
Pencil ..........................................................................................................
Highlighter .................................................................................................
Create Text Box ..........................................................................................
Select Pencil / Highlighter Thickness ...........................................................
Select Pencil / Highlighter Colour ................................................................
Zoom ..........................................................................................................
Eraser and Eraser Thickness ........................................................................
Hide Part of the Screen ..............................................................................
Isolate Part of the Screen ...........................................................................
Page Controls .............................................................................................
Print ...........................................................................................................
Clear Notes ................................................................................................
Undo / Redo ...............................................................................................
Save and Load Notes ..................................................................................
Saving Notes ..........................................................................................
Loading Notes ........................................................................................
9. Using Note Exporter on an IBM compatible PC ...........................................
Exporting Notes ..........................................................................................
Importing Notes ..........................................................................................
10. Using Note Exporter on a Mac OS ..............................................................
Exporting Notes ..........................................................................................
Importing Notes ..........................................................................................
11. Troubleshooting ........................................................................................
12. Contact support ........................................................................................
Part B (Teacher’s Guide) .............................................................................
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Welcome to Access 2 Interactive Whiteboard (IWB)* software.This application
is designed to follow the Access 2 course and enhance your own and your
learners’ experience in the language classroom.
What is an Interactive Whiteboard?
An Interactive Whiteboard is a type of touch-sensitive board, which has the power to transform
any classroom into a dynamic learning environment.
It allows teachers and students to participate interactively in activities projected onto the board
from a data projector which is connected to a computer.
Interactive whiteboards are very popular in schools and are considered a more lively and
interesting approach than conventional teaching. They provide ways to show students anything
which can be presented on a computer (educational software, videos, websites, etc). Research has
shown that teaching through interactive whiteboard software has numerous advantages:
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can accommodate different learning styles
is suitable for both small and larger groups of students
helps increase students’ attention span
facilitates the assimilation of new information
dramatically increases real teaching time
reduces the time teachers need for preparation
eliminates the need for additional equipment (DVD player, CD player, etc)
All in all, it is a powerful teaching tool that will transform your lesson and your classroom!
What equipment do I need to use the IWB software?
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A computer (IBM compatible or Mac OS)
A projector
An interactive whiteboard or a device that turns a plain whiteboard into an interactive whiteboard
Speakers
*Note: All the Express Publishing IWB software includes a User’s Manual in PDF format. After the
software has run automatically, click the ‘X’ button on the top right corner of the screen to exit.
Then go to ‘My computer’, right click on the drive this software is in, and click ‘Explore’. This will
open up a window with all components of the software, including the User’s Manual. Double click
on the name of the manual to open it.
The User’s Manual includes everything the teacher needs to know about using the IWB software.
We strongly suggest that the teacher takes some time to familiarise him/herself with the
applications (i.e. using the toolbar, task types and how to complete them, etc) on the IWB before
proceeding any further.
4
Running the application
On an IBM compatible PC
The application should run automatically when you insert the CD into your CD drive. If it does not,
please follow these steps:
1. Go to START>MY COMPUTER.
2. Locate the icon of your CD drive. With the Access 2 Interactive Whiteboard disk inside your
drive, right-click the icon of your CD drive and choose EXPLORE.
3. In the new window that appears, double-click on Access_2.exe.
On a Mac OS
When you insert the CD into your drive, an icon will appear on your desktop with the name
Access_2 (see Fig 1).
Fig 1
If you click it, the contents of the CD will appear in a browser window with the following icons
and file names (see Fig 2).
Fig 2
Click the
icon to run the application.
5
Navigation
By clicking this button you
can EXIT the application,
at any time.
Once the application has run in your
system, the first screen you see is the
MAIN MENU (see Fig 3). By clicking any of
the titles or their numbers, you can enter
the corresponding section of the course.
All sections that appear in the MAIN MENU
lead to SUBMENUS. For example, if you
wish to enter Unit 1, Click 1 or Day after day
(see Fig 3).
Fig 3
Once in the MODULE MENU (see Fig 4)
you can enter the desired lesson of Unit 1
by clicking the cover page, 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d,
1e or 1f.
If you click this button,
you can go back to the
MAIN MENU at any time.
Fig 4
In the LESSON MENU the active tasks you
can enter are indicated by a red circle (see
Fig 5). Click a task to enter. This allows you
the flexibility to skip certain tasks or pick
up from where you left off in the previous
lesson.
This button will take you to
the previous menu; in this
case, the MODULE 1 MENU.
Fig 5
6
Fig 7
Fig 6
These two buttons will take you to
the PREVIOUS and NEXT tasks,
respectively.
Clicking this button SHOWS
THE ANSWER(S) to the tasks.
For example, Fig 6 shows the screen for Exercise 2, in Lesson 2b.
While navigating, you will notice a few
more buttons that are designed to help
you do the tasks. For instance:
Some exercises provide
you with the additional
option of DELETING THE
ANSWER KEY. Clicking
this button will allow you
to restart the task as
many times as you wish.
Fig 8
Click this button to PLAY a
further extension GAME.
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Fig 10
Fig 9
Clicking this button will show a screen with
the GRAMMAR REFERENCE related to the
particular unit and exercise (see Fig 10).
Once you have gone through the Grammar
Reference, click this button to return to the
EXERCISE SCREEN.
Clicking this button will activate
the ANIMATED PRESENTATION
of grammar for the particular
exercise (see Fig 11).
Click this button to EXIT.
Click this arrow to GO TO
THE NEXT SCREEN.
Fig 11
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The SONGSHEETS and SELF CHECK sections are organised in a similar way. For instance, if you
click to enter the SONGSHEETS section from the MAIN MENU, first you will see the SONGSHEETS
MENU (see Fig 12). Clicking any of the song titles or their pictures will take you to that particular
song (see Fig 13).
Fig 13
Fig 12
Clicking on the PLAY button underneath the lyrics of
the song activates the AUDIO. You can click on the
PAUSE button at anytime. As each line is sung, it is highlighted in
a different colour, to help students follow the correct line as they
sing along.
In a similar manner, if you enter the SELF CHECK section, first you will see the
SELF CHECK MENU (see Fig 14). Clicking any of the spreads will take you to the corresponding
submenu (see Fig 15). Again, the circled activities are the interactive tasks included in the software.
Fig 14
Fig 15
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Task types and how to complete them
The Access 2 IWB is designed as a teaching aid to be used in conjunction with the coursebook
and for this reason the content is identical. However, in order to do the exercises, you will have to
carry out two basic computer actions – clicking and clicking and dragging.
Here is an overview of the types of tasks in this software and how to do them:
Clicking
In most exercises click the SHOW KEY buttons to reveal the suggested answers (see Fig 16-17).
Fig 17
Fig 16
The buttons shown in Fig 18 are the SHOW KEY buttons.
Fig 18
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Fig 19
Fig 20
Sometimes, clicking on the correct answer will reveal another SHOW KEY button. Clicking that
SHOW KEY button reveals the reference in the text (see Fig 19) or further language practice (see
Fig 20).
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In multiple choice tasks clicking the correct answer may change its colour (see Fig 21), underline it
(see Fig 22) or circle it to indicate its accuracy (see Fig 23).
Fig 21
Fig 22
Fig 23
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Clicking is also used in pronunciation tasks. Click the HEADPHONES next to each item to activate
the audio as well as the SHOW KEY button to reveal the answer to the task (see Fig 24). In some
tasks, clicking the correct column will reveal a tick (see Fig 25).
Fig 24
Fig 25
In listening exercises, there is a simple
AUDIO PLAYER (see Fig 26). All its buttons
are activated by a click (see Fig 27).
Click the numbers of each
item to reveal a CLUE.
Fig 26
Click and drag the
SEEK BAR INDICATOR
to locate a specific
point in the recording.
Click and drag this indicator to
the left or right to adjust the
VOLUME of the recording.
Fig 27
PLAY / PAUSE
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GO TO THE BEGINNING /
END of the recording.
You will also notice a TAPESCRIPTS
button in listening tasks. This will
reveal the tapescript of an audio
recording.
Fig 28
In Listen, read and check tasks, the tapescripts or the texts will be revealed if you click the SHOW
KEY button (see Fig 29-30).
Fig 29
Fig 30
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In Explain the words in bold tasks, the definitions and examples of the words will be revealed if you
click on the bolded words in the text (see Fig 31-32).
Fig 31
Fig 32
In all reading tasks, the texts will be revealed if you click the SHOW TEXT button (see Fig 33). By
clicking the
button, you can hide the text and return to the task (see Fig 34).
Fig 33
Fig 34
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The Extra activities for weaker classes present similar tasks (see Fig 35-36).
Fig 35
Fig 36
Click to exit the extra
activity.
Click to enter the extra
activity.
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Clicking and dragging
Fig 37
Fig 38
Fig 39
Fig 40
To match any item (word, phrase, picture, etc) to another, you simply click the item and drag it to
the place you have chosen (see Fig 37-40). If the answer is wrong, it will bounce back to its original
position.
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The toolbar
At the bottom of every screen, you will find the Toolbar (see Fig 41-43).
Fig 42
Fig 41
If for any reason you wish to hide the toolbar during your lesson, you can do so by
clicking the arrow on the left-hand side. To make it reappear, you can click the remaining arrow
at the bottom on the right.
The toolbar at a glance
These little green triangles indicate that there
are further options available for this tool.
Select pencil /
highlighter
colour
Pencil
Create
text box
Highlighter
PC mode
Select pencil /
highlighter
thickness
Isolate part
of the
screen
Zoom
Save notes
Print
Eraser and
eraser
thickness
Undo
Redo
Notes page
controls
Hide part of
the screen
Fig 43
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Load notes
Clear notes
Using the tools
PC MODE: After you have used one
of the tools, click this to regain your
normal mouse pointer function. This
way you can once again click and click
and drag.
PENCIL: Click to turn your mouse
pointer into a pencil. Now you can
make your own notes on every screen
provided in this software – a very useful
tool if you want to write students’ own
answers during prediction warm-up or
error correction (see Fig 44). Make sure
you select a colour and thickness for
your pencil before you actually write
anything (see SELECT PENCIL /
HIGHLIGHTER THICKNESS and COLOUR).
Fig 44
HIGHLIGHTER: Click and drag on
every word, phrase or sentence you
wish to highlight in a text (see Fig 45).
Again, you have the option of
selecting the colour and thickness of
your highlighter first.
Fig 45
CREATE TEXT BOX: If you don’t want to use the pointer/electronic pen of your interactive
whiteboard, this is a useful alternative for making notes. Click and drag to create a text
box and type in your notes (see Fig 46).
This is a sample text box:
This is the TEXT
BOX FORMATTING
PANEL.
Fig 46
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Drag the grey
bar to MOVE
the text box.
Click and drag the
arrows to RESIZE
the text box.
Once you have created a textbox, a formatting panel appears so you can customise your
text (see Fig 47).
This indicator shows
that these colours are
applicable to the text.
This indicator shows that
these colours are applicable
to the background.
Click a colour for your text.
Increase font
size by 1 pt
with each click.
Click a colour for
your background.
Click to underline
your text.
Click to make
your text bold.
Fig 47
Decrease font
size by 1 pt
with each click.
Click to make your background
transparent so you can see your notes
superimposed on the screen.
Click to
italicise
your text.
Click to
bullet
your
text.
SELECT PENCIL/HIGHLIGHTER THICKNESS: Once
you have clicked this tool, another options panel
appears (see Fig 48). Click any of the brush
strokes to select the thickness of your pencil or
highlighter.
Fig 48
SELECT PENCIL/HIGHLIGHTER COLOUR: Click to reveal the colour options panel and select
a colour for your pencil / highlighter (see Fig 49). This is a very useful tool if you like to use
colour-coding while teaching.
Fig 49
ZOOM: Once you have clicked this tool, another options panel appears (see Fig 50).
Click this to exit
the zoom mode.
Click and drag this
diagonally over the
part of the screen you
want to zoom into.
Fig 50
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For example, Fig 51 shows a zoomed in area of a screen.
In the bottom right hand corner, there are
four arrows pointing to the top, bottom,
left and right. By clicking them individually
you can navigate the screen.
Fig 51
ERASER and ERASER THICKNESS: When you click
this tool, another options panel appears so you can
select the thickness of your eraser (see Fig 52). Click
the circle of your choice to select the thickness of
your eraser and your pointer turns into an eraser.
Drag it over the area you wish to erase. If you want
to erase a text box, simply click it once and the entire
textbox will be deleted.
Fig 52
HIDE PART OF THE SCREEN: When you click and drag over a selected area with this tool,
you can hide areas such as individual illustrations, paragraphs, words, phrases, etc (see
Fig 53). This will give you the opportunity to explore tasks and texts further.
Fig 53
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ISOLATE PART OF THE SCREEN: When
you click and drag over an area of the
screen with this tool, the section you
have selected will be visible and
therefore focus students’ attention
directly on it. The rest of the screen
fills up with the colour of your choice
(see Fig 54).
Fig 54
PAGE CONTROLS: Clicking this tool will
reveal another options panel so you can
organise your notes in different layers
(see Fig 55). Each layer works as a blank
page you can write your notes on. This
page can be either transparent and
visible over the task screen, or opaque
and function like a conventional
whiteboard. The difference is that now
you can prepare your notes before your
lesson, or save them after the lesson so
as to use them again in the future, with
the same class or a different class of the
same level.
Current
page
Click to
go to the
previous
page.
Click to
go to
the next
page.
Total
number
of pages.
Click to
make a
page
opaque.
Click to
make a
page
transparent.
Click to
add a
page.
Click to
delete a
page.
Fig 55
PRINT: Click this to print the screen you are working on, as it is – with notes. Please note
that the preferred printing mode for this feature is landscape.
CLEAR NOTES: Click this to erase all your notes on a particular screen.
UNDO / REDO: Click to undo or redo any action you have just done.
SAVE and LOAD NOTES: These two tools are especially useful if you want to use
the same notes with another class on a different day. Please note that the
Access 2 IWB notes and annotations can be accessed only through this software;
therefore, they will be saved in a file created by the software and identified by the
software alone.
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Saving Notes
First you need to make notes,
either using the pencil or the
text box tool, as in the
example in Fig 56.
Fig 56
Then click SAVE
. A blue window
appears with the options SAVE and CANCEL.
Type a name for your notes in the field that
appears above these two options and click
SAVE. It is best to name your notes according to
the unit, exercise, page number and possibly the
date you created them (see Fig 57). For example,
you could name a file 3e_Ex1_17Oct08. In
this way, you can locate them easily once you
have accumulated a long list of notes.
Fig 57
It is possible that your system will notify you
that ‘Local’, i.e. this software, is trying to
store a file in your computer (see Fig 58). Click
ALLOW.
Now you have successfully saved your notes.
Fig 58
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Loading Notes
Click LOAD NOTES
to load a page of
notes you have saved. Another blue window
appears with the options LOAD and CANCEL
(see Fig 59). Click the file name of your notes
and then click LOAD.
Fig 59
Your saved notes will appear
in the same manner as they
did when you saved them
(see Fig 60).
Fig 60
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Using Note Exporter on an IBM compatible
As you save notes while using the Access 2 IWB Software, you may wish to share them with other
teachers using this software. You may also wish to use them on a different computer for a
different class of the same level. In order to do either, you have to export your saved notes.
For this purpose, we have included the Note Exporter utility in this software. Please note that this
function is only available for systems that are using the same software and that for Note Exporter
to function correctly, you need to have saved at least one set of whiteboard notes.
To run Note Exporter go to My Computer.
Then, right-click on the icon Access_2
on your disk drive. A drop-down menu will
appear (see Fig 61). Click EXPLORE.
Fig 61
In the new window that appears, double-click
the NoteExporter.exe icon (see Fig 62).
Fig 62
Note Exporter will now start. The new window that
appears will offer you two options (see Fig 63).
Click EXPORT NOTES if you want to transfer
notes from this computer to another computer.
Click IMPORT NOTES if you want to transfer
notes to this computer from another computer.
Fig 63
25
Exporting Notes
N.B.: Before exporting any notes, you will need to have created a folder in your computer into which
your notes will be exported. In this example, we have named this folder Access2IWB.
When you click EXPORT NOTES the computer
will start searching your hard disk for any
interactive whiteboard notes that may exist
on it. You will see the message in Fig 64.
Fig 64
After a few minutes, you will be prompted to
enter the application file identifier (see Fig 65).
This is the file in which the software saves all
your notes. Please type
Access2
in the space provided. Please note that this
file name is case-sensitive, so it is important
that you type it in correctly. Now click OK.
Fig 65
A window will appear that asks you to specify
the folder in your system where you wish to
export your notes. Select the drive and the
folder from the drop-down menu and click
OK (see Fig 66).
Fig 66
26
Please note that, after saving your exported
notes on your computer, you may transfer
them onto a CD or DVD, a floppy disk or a
USB memory stick.
Once you have specified where you want your
notes to be saved, click OK. You will see the
message shown in Fig 67 after a few seconds.
Fig 67
The saved notes files have now been moved to
the folder that the user specified (see Fig 68).
Fig 68
You can rename the file if you wish. However, please DO NOT CHANGE THE FIRST FIVE
CHARACTERS (Acc2_) OR THE EXTENSION, as this will make your notes untraceable by the
application.
You can now store the file(s) you exported on any storage media, or send them by email. When
you want to use these files on another computer, use the IMPORT NOTES function.
27
Importing Notes
To import your exported notes onto another computer that has the same software, run Note
Exporter as described in the previous section (see Exporting Notes).
When you see the window shown in Fig 69,
click IMPORT NOTES.
Fig 69
The message in Fig 70 will appear.
Fig 70
After a few minutes, you will be prompted to
enter the application file identifier (see Fig 71).
Please type
Access2
in the space provided. Again, please
remember that this is a set file name and that
it is case-sensitive. Now click OK.
Fig 71
28
∆he message in Fig 72 will appear. Click OK.
Fig 72
The next window will ask you to specify the
folder in which you have saved the exported
notes (see Fig 73). Scroll down the menu and
select the folder. Then, click OK. In this
particular example, the user has saved their
exported notes on their computer in a folder
called Access2IWB. However, you can import
notes from a CD, DVD, USB stick or any other
portable medium.
Fig 73
When you have successfully imported the
notes, the window in Fig 74 will appear.
Fig 74
In order to view the imported notes, you may now load them using the LOAD NOTES function.
29
Using Note Exporter on a
Note Exporter operates in a slightly different manner on a Mac Os.
To run Note Exporter, insert the disk into your drive. The icon shown in Fig 75 will appear on your
desktop.
Fig 75
When you click it, the contents of the disk
appear in a browser window with the icons
and file names shown in Fig 76.
Fig 76
Click the
icon to run the application.
Note Exporter will now start. The new window
that appears will offer you two options (see
Fig 77).
Click EXPORT NOTES if you want to transfer
notes from this computer to another
computer.
Click IMPORT NOTES if you want to transfer
notes to this computer from another computer.
Fig 77
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Exporting Notes
When you click EXPORT NOTES the computer
will start searching your hard disk for any
interactive whiteboard notes that may exist
on it. You will see the message in Fig 78.
Fig 78
After a few minutes, you will be prompted to
enter the application file identifier (see Fig 79).
This is the file in which the software saves all
your notes. Please type
Access2
in the space provided. Please note that this
file name is case-sensitive, so it is important
that you type it in correctly. Now click OK.
Fig 79
A window will appear that asks you to specify
the folder in your system from which you
wish to export your notes (see Fig 80). Select
the drive and the folder from the drop-down
menu and click CHOOSE.
Fig 80
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Please note that, after saving your exported
notes on your computer, you may transfer
them onto a CD or DVD, a floppy disk or a
USB memory stick.
Once you have specified where you want your
notes to be saved, click OK. You will see the
message shown in Fig 81 after a few seconds.
Fig 81
The saved notes files have now been moved to the folder the user specified. You can rename the
file if you wish. However, please DO NOT CHANGE THE FIRST FIVE CHARACTERS (Acc2_) OR THE
EXTENSION, as this will make your notes untraceable by the application.
You can now store the file(s) you exported on any storage media, or send them by email. When
you want to use these files on another computer, use the IMPORT NOTES function.
Importing Notes
To import your exported notes onto another computer that has the same software, run Note
Exporter as described in the previous section (see Exporting Notes).
When you see the window shown in Fig 82,
click IMPORT NOTES.
Fig 82
The message in Fig 83 will appear.
Fig 83
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After a few minutes, you will be prompted
to enter the application file identifier (see
Fig 84). Please type
Access2
in the space provided. Again, please
remember that this is a set file name and
that it is case-sensitive. Then click OK.
Fig 84
The message in Fig 85 will appear. Click OK.
Fig 85
The next window will ask you to specify the
folder in which you have saved the exported
notes (see Fig 86). Scroll down the menu and
select the folder. Please note that you can
import notes from a CD, DVD, USB stick or
any other portable medium. Click CHOOSE.
Fig 86
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When you have successfully imported the
notes, the message in Fig 87 will appear.
Fig 87
Again, in order to view the imported notes, you may now load them using the LOAD NOTES
function.
34
Troubleshooting
Problem
Solution
I insert the CD in my CD drive but
nothing happens.
Your computer’s autorun feature is
possibly disabled. Go to My Computer
and double click on the Access_2
icon. In the new window that opens,
double-click on the Access_2 icon.
I’ve just written some notes and I
want to go back to using the main
application, but it seems that I cannot
click on anything.
Make sure you return to PC Mode
using the PC mode icon.
Note Exporter cannot find my files.
ñ Make sure you have typed the
application file identifier correctly.
For Access 2 IWB, the file
identifier is Access2.
ñ If the problem persists, avoid using
other applications while running
Note Exporter.
My pages do not print properly.
Make sure your printer is set to print
in landscape mode for optimum
results.
Contact support
In case you have any queries on the use of Access 2 IWB, please contact us at
IWBsupport@expresspublishing.co.uk .
35
A user-friendly Teacher’s Guide on how to use the
Access 2 Interactive Whiteboard Software with Access 2.
Here are some suggestions on how to approach each section/activity type encountered within
the Access course.
MODULES
❏ Module presentation page
This page is meant to be done mainly using the Student’s Book. The IWB software can be used to
facilitate checking answers or having a picture discussion.
We suggest you handle each section/activity type in the following way:
ñ Activities such as Find the page numbers for …, Describe the pictures, Match the pictures to the
words, etc can be done first in the Student’s Book and then checked using the IWB software
by clicking on the key button(s).
ñ Listen and repeat exercises should be done using the IWB software. Play the recording and
invite students to repeat chorally and/or individually.
❏ Reading
Lead-in activities
There are different types of Lead-in activities such as picture-prompted discussion, short listening
extracts, prediction activities, etc. All Lead-in activities should be done using the IWB software. On
completion of the activities, teachers can check the students’ answers by activating the key
button ( ) to reveal the suggested answers.
Reading tasks
Reading tasks are to be done using the Student’s Book. The IWB software can be used for listening
to the text (if audio is available) and/or for the students to check their answers.
Note: Time allowing, we suggest that you do the following extension activities in order to get the
full benefit of the applications on the IWB software. Here are some ideas:
ñ Words/phrases/sentences, etc can be hidden, using the appropriate tool from the toolbar (See
User’s Manual p. 18.), to practise:
– vocabulary (i.e. hide the adjectives, nouns, verbs, adverbs, etc),
– grammar (i.e. tenses, infinitive, gerund, prepositions, conjunctions, etc) and
– comprehension (i.e. what the paragraph is about, summary, etc).
ñ Words/phrases/sentences, etc can be underlined/highlighted, using the appropriate tool (See
User’s Manual p. 18.), in order for the students to provide questions to statements (e.g. Access
3, Module 2, Unit 2a, Ex. 1 – I heard a loud roar. What did you hear?).
Explain the words in bold activities are mainly done using the Student’s Book. First the students offer
their own explanations of the words in bold in context and then the teacher reveals the definitions
on the IWB software by clicking on them.
In cases where the students are unable to offer a definition, the teacher reveals the definition to
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begin with by clicking on the words in bold and then allows the students some time to make up
their own sentence using the word.
❏ Vocabulary
The course includes different types of vocabulary activities such as:
ñ Look up words/phrases in the Word List.
ñ Match words to their synonyms/opposites/definitions, etc.
ñ Spidergrams.
ñ Gap-filling exercises.
ñ Categorising.
All the above activities should be done in the Student’s Book and then checked using the IWB software.
The IWB software can also be used for revision purposes. If this is the case, the teacher goes through
the activities on the IWB with student’s books closed. This is an ideal way to revise vocabulary.
Note: In cases where the vocabulary activities are accompanied by an audio extract, the teacher
should use the IWB software to play the audio by clicking on the audio player/symbol.
These activities are either gap-filling or speaking tasks.
In the first case, the students should complete the task in their books and report their answers
back to the class. The teacher should give feedback to the students through the IWB software.
In the second case, the teacher should instigate a discussion in class with the students. He/She
can use the suggested answer on the IWB software as a model for the students and keep notes
on the board in order to enrich the students’ vocabulary (For further information see User’s Manual.).
As an extension, the teacher can ask the students to write their ideas down before they report
back to the class.
❏ Grammar
There are different ways of approaching the grammar presentation:
ñ If the teacher wishes to do his/her own presentation, he/she can use the appropriate tool from
the toolbar (See User’s Manual p. 18.) to open a blank page and present the grammatical
structure through his/her own examples.
ñ The teacher can refer the students to the grammar reference through the IWB software and
present/review the grammar structure, by highlighting, underlining, etc form and usage.
ñ For a more stimulating, student-friendly explanation of the grammar structure, the teacher can
click on the existing owl symbol and present the grammar with the aid of audio visual prompts.
Exploring Grammar: The students work in their books. Then the teacher checks their answers
through the IWB software.
❏ Listening
All listening activities should be done the following way: The students work in their books while the
teacher plays the audio through the IWB software. Once the activity is completed, the teacher
checks students’ answers through the IWB software.
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Note: 1 In certain listening tasks such as note taking (listening for specific information), the
teacher is advised to go through the gapped text using the IWB software and elicit
what kind of information is missing. Then the teacher plays the audio through the IWB
software and the students complete the task in their books.
2 All listening tasks in the IWB software are accompanied by a script. This gives the
teachers the opportunity to work with the script during the feedback stage.
Listen and repeat.
All the Listen and repeat activities should be completed using the IWB software. The IWB software
provides the teacher with the opportunity to play the audio as many times as is necessary.
❏ Speaking
The course includes several types of speaking activities. The students are asked to work on a variety
of tasks, some on their own and some in pairs or groups. The students are required to engage in
the following activities:
ñ conducting an interview
ñ performing a dialogue
ñ sustaining a monologue (i.e. reporting somebody’s experiences)
ñ improvisations using prompts
We suggest that all types of speaking tasks should be exploited with the use of the IWB software
as follows:
ñ First the teacher explains the task and assigns roles.
ñ Then the teacher uses the model on the IWB software by activating the key button ( ) in
order to elicit ideas/vocabulary, highlight certain key prompts, analyse mind maps, brainstorm
for further ideas, etc.
ñ Then the students prepare the task as the teacher circulates and monitors the activity.
ñ Finally, the students perform the task in front of the class.
Note: We advise that all speaking tasks be recorded in order to be included in the Students’ Portfolios.
❏ Everyday English
These activities should be completed by the students in their Student’s Book. Then the teacher
uses the IWB software to check the students’ answers.
❏ Pronunciation
The teacher plays the audio through the IWB software and the students complete the exercises in
the Student’s Book. Then the teacher confirms the students’ answers and provides feedback via
the IWB software.
❏ Writing/Portfolio
We suggest that all writing activities (Portfolio) are approached exclusively by means of the IWB software.
First the teacher works with the students on the plan step by step (i.e. reading through, eliciting
answers/ideas, etc). The teacher allows the students some time to make notes.
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Then the teacher activates the key button ( ) to reveal the model. The teacher, or a student,
reads through the model (The model can be enlarged using the magnifier by clicking on the
appropriate tool from the toolbar.).
At this stage, the teacher can underline, hide, highlight, etc key phrases on the board and ask the
students to replace the phrases with their own ideas. Then the teacher assigns the writing activity
as homework.
❏ Projects
We suggest that all project work is done through the IWB software.
The teacher explains the task and goes through the information required to complete the project.
The teacher elicits answers and/or suggestions and conducts a general brainstorming.
Then the teacher displays the model on the IWB. He/She can underline, hide, highlight, etc key
phrases on the board in order to provide the students with a skeleton for their project work.
Finally, the project is assigned as homework.
❏ ICT
The ICT sections have been included in order to provide the students with the opportunity for selfaccess. This gives the students responsibility for their own learning and develops their autonomy.
For these sections, if the teacher wishes to use the IWB software, we suggest they approach it in
the following way:
The teacher divides the class into groups and explains the task. He/She displays the model and
instigates a class discussion (i.e. picture discussion, what information is included, the way the
information is organised, etc). At this stage, the students can take notes.
Then the teacher encourages the students to use the Internet in order to obtain the information
required to complete their assignment.
❏ Gap-filling exercises
The students complete the gap-filling exercises in their Student’s Book. On completion, the teacher
checks their answers with the use of IWB software.
❏ Games
In some cases the games on the IWB software do not correspond with those in the Student’s Book.
We suggest that you work with all of the games through the IWB software. To make the games
more fun and competitive, the teacher can divide the class into two teams, A and B.
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SONGSHEETS
The IWB software offers the opportunity to display the lyrics while listening to the audio and also has a
karaoke application, so that the students can listen and sing along. We suggest using the IWB software
for this purpose and the students can complete the remainder of the tasks in the Student’s Book.
SELF CHECK
The students complete the Self Check tasks in the Student’s Book. Then the teacher checks their
answers through the IWB software.
How to approach a module
using the IWB software.
Below the teachers can find a detailed guide for a selected module from Access 2.
1
Module presentation page
(p. 11)
ñ Find the page numbers for …: The students work with the Student’s Book and then the
teacher checks their answers through the IWB software.
ñ Vocabulary (Activities) – Listen and repeat.: This exercise should be done through the IWB
software. The teacher plays the audio on the IWB software and the students repeat chorally
and/or individually. Then the students translate the phrases into their own language.
ñ Which of these activities do you like?...: The teacher presents the task through the IWB
software. He/She refers the students to the example on the IWB and points out the various
time phrases that can be used. He/She also explains the different ways of expressing
preference (e.g. love, like, etc). Then the teacher divides the class into pairs and allows the
students some time to prepare their exchanges. During this stage, the teacher can display the
suggested answers on the IWB for further assistance. Finally, each pair performs their
exchanges in front of the class.
Unit 1a
Ex. 1 (p. 12) (Student’s Books open.) This exercise should be done through the IWB software. The
teacher refers the students to the picture and the title of the text, and instigates a discussion
about the characters (e.g. Do you know their names? Do you know anything about them?, etc). The
teacher activates the key buttons to reveal the answer. Then the teacher plays the audio
through the IWB software while the students read the text in their books.
Ex. 2 (p. 12) (Student’s Books open.) The students read the text in their Student’s Book and complete
the task. The teacher then displays the answers through the IWB software. During this stage,
40
the teacher can show the text and ask from the students justification for their answers.
He/She can underline/highlight the corresponding parts in the texts.
Extension
The teacher hides adjectives (e.g. easy-going, beautiful, handsome, etc), using the appropriate
tool, to provide further reading comprehension practice.
Ex. 3 (p. 12) (Student’s Books closed.) The teacher refers the students to the exercise through the
IWB software. He/She elicits the meaning of the words in the list. Should the need arise, the
teacher can refer the students back to the texts. Then the students use the words in the list
to make sentences about the characters in the pictures. Finally, the teacher verifies the
students’ answers through the IWB software.
Ex. 4 (p. 13) (Student’s Books open.) There are two ways of approaching this exercise:
ñ The students copy the headings and complete the task in their notebooks and the
teacher confirms their answers through the IWB software.
ñ The teacher and the students complete the task together through the IWB software by
clicking and dragging the correct words under the appropriate headings. Then the
students copy the answers into their notebooks.
On completion of the first part of the task, the teacher asks the students to use the words
to describe the Mystery Inc characters. Finally, the teacher divides the class into pairs and
allows them some time to ask and answer questions based on the text, using the model
exchange provided as a guide.
Ex. 5 (p. 13) (Student’s Books open.) The students work in the Student’s Book. They go through the
grammar theory box and complete the task. The teacher checks their answers through the
IWB software.
Note: Should teachers wish to provide a more detailed analysis/presentation of the grammar
structure, please refer to the Grammar section on p. 37.
Ex. 6 (p. 13) (Student’s Books open.) The students work in the Student’s Book. They go through the
grammar theory box and complete the task. The teacher checks their answers through the
IWB software.
Note: Should teachers wish to provide a more detailed analysis/presentation of the grammar
structure, please refer to the Grammar section on p. 37.
Ex. 7 (p. 13) (Student’s Books open.) The students complete the task in the Student’s Book. The
teacher then checks their answers through the IWB software.
Ex. 8 (p. 13) (Student’s Books closed.) The teacher refers the students to the pictures on the IWB.
He/She asks about Jane’s and David’s possessions. Then the teacher explains the task and the
students use the prompts provided to make questions and answers. The teacher checks their
answers through the IWB software.
Ex. 9 (p. 13) (Student’s Books open.) The teacher explains the task and the students work in pairs
using the prompts provided to make questions and answers. Then the teacher displays the
suggested answers through the IWB software.
Ex. 10 (p. 13) (Student’s Books closed.) The teacher refers the students to the task through the IWB
software. He/She brainstorms for ideas and can use the suggested answer for further
assistance. The task can then be assigned as classwork or homework.
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Unit 1b
Ex. 1 (p. 14) (Student’s Books closed.) The teacher plays the audio through the IWB software and the
students listen and repeat chorally and/or individually. Then the students explain the phrases
in their own language.
Extension
The teacher asks the students to say who in their family does each household chore.
Ex. 2 (p. 14) (Student’s Books open.) The students do the quiz in their Student’s Book and find out
if they are busy bees or couch potatoes. Then the teacher checks their scores through the IWB
software through a show of hands for each result. The students use their books to look at
the words in bold in the quiz and try to explain their meaning. Then the teacher provides the
key by clicking on the words in bold through the IWB software.
Note: For variation see the Explain the words in bold section on p. 36.
Ex. 3 (p. 15) (Student’s Books open.) The students work in the Student’s Book. They go through the
grammar theory box and complete the task. The teacher checks their answers through the
IWB software. Finally, the students explain the words in bold in their language.
Note: Should teachers wish to provide a more detailed analysis/presentation of the grammar
structure, please refer to the Grammar section on p. 37.
Ex. 4 (p. 15) (Student’s Books open.) The teacher allows the students some time to complete the
task in their notebooks. During this stage, the teacher can display the suggested answers on
the IWB. Then the students report back to the class.
Ex. 5 (p. 15) (Student’s Books open.) The students work in the Student’s Book. They go through the
grammar theory box and complete the task. The teacher checks their answers through the
IWB software.
Ex. 6 (p. 15) (Student’s Books open.) The teacher allows the students some time to go through the
grammar theory box and complete the task in their notebooks. During this stage, the teacher
can display the suggested answers on the IWB. Then the students report back to the class.
Ex. 7 (p. 15) (Student’s Books open.) The students complete the task in their Student’s Book while
the teacher plays the audio through the IWB software. Finally, the students report back and
the teacher confirms their answers through the IWB software.
Note: The script is provided through the IWB software so that the teacher can do further
work should he/she wish.
Ex. 8 (p. 15) (Student’s Books open.) The teacher goes through the instructions through the IWB
software and explains the task. He/She divides the class into pairs and allows them some
time to prepare their exchanges. Then the teacher invites each pair to perform their
exchanges in front of the class. During this stage, the teacher can use the suggested answer
in order to give the students any further assistance. Finally, the students report back to the
class about their friends and the household chores they do.
Note: The students can record themselves and file their recording in their Portfolios.
Ex. 9 (p. 15) (Student’s Books closed.) The teacher refers the students to the task through the IWB
software. The students use the phrases given and their own ideas to talk about what they
42
do on a typical Monday. The teacher can use the suggested answer on the IWB for further
assistance. The task can then be assigned as classwork or homework.
Unit 1c
Ex. 1 (p. 16) (Student’s Books open.) The teacher refers the students to the exercise on the IWB.
He/She asks the students to read the title and guess which of the activities in the pictures they
think Amy does on Sundays. Then the teacher plays the audio through the IWB software
while the students read in the Student’s Book in order for them to check their answers. The
teacher confirms their answers through the IWB software. Finally, the students label the
pictures and the teacher displays the answers through the IWB software.
Ex. 2 (p. 16) (Student’s Books open.) The students complete the task in the Student’s Book. The
teacher confirms the students’ answers through the IWB software.
Ex. 3 (p. 16) (Student’s Books open.) The students go through the Learning to Learn box and find
examples in the text. The teacher confirms their answers through the IWB software. Then the
students complete sentences 1-5 and the teacher displays the answers on the IWB.
Ex. 4 (p. 16) (Student’s Books open.) The students copy the table in Ex. 2 into their notebooks and
complete it about themselves. During this stage, the teacher can display the suggested
answer for further assistance.
Ex. 5 (p. 16) (Student’s Books closed.) The teacher refers the students to the exercise on the IWB. The
students use their notes from Ex. 4 to talk about their favourite day.
Then the teacher clicks on the button to reveal the model. He/She hides some key words/
phrases (i.e. day, activities, etc) and the students complete the gaps. Alternatively, the teacher
can highlight or underline the parts in the article that need to be substituted. Then the writing
activity is assigned as homework.
Unit 1d
Ex. 1 (p. 17) (Student’s Books open.) The teacher refers the students to the exercise through the IWB
software. He/She asks the students to look at the pictures and instigates a discussion about
different aspects of teenage life in Britain. Then the teacher asks the students to think of a
question for each category. To assist the students, the teacher can display the suggested
questions on the IWB. The teacher then plays the audio through the IWB software while the
students read in their books and try to answer their questions.
Ex. 2 (p. 17) (Student’s Books open.) The students complete the task in the Student’s Book. The teacher
confirms the students’ answers through the IWB software.
Extension
Using the appropriate button on the tool bar, hide certain words/phrases in the text (e.g.
Family life: busy, help around; School life: at 8:45, after-school club; Free time: surfing the Net,
going shopping, etc.). Ask the students to read and complete the text.
Ex. 3 (p. 17) (Student’s Books open.) The students use their books to look at the words in bold in
the texts and try to explain their meaning. Then the teacher provides the key by clicking on
the words in bold through the IWB software. The teacher allows the students some time to
43
read the texts again and make notes under the headings in their notebooks. Then they
report back to the class and the teacher displays the suggested answer on the IWB.
Note: For variation see the Explain the words in bold section on p. 36.
Ex. 4 (p. 17) (Student’s Books closed.) The teacher explains the task and goes through the
information required to complete the project through the IWB software. He/She conducts a
general brainstorming about teenagers’ family life, school life and free time in their country.
Then the teacher displays the model on the IWB. He/She can underline, hide, highlight, etc
key phrases on the board in order to provide the students with ideas for their project work.
Finally, the project is assigned as homework.
Unit 1e
Ex. 1 (p. 18) (Student’s Books closed.) The teacher plays the audio through the IWB software and
invites the students to listen and repeat chorally and/or individually. He/She then asks the
students in which situation they would be likely to hear these phrases.
Ex. 2 (p. 18) (Student’s Books closed.) The teacher plays the audio through the IWB software for the
students to listen and answer the question. The teacher displays the answer on the IWB.
Ex. 3 (p. 18) (Student’s Books open.) The students complete the tasks in the Student’s Book. Then
the teacher uses the IWB software to check the students’ answers.
Extension
The teacher asks the students if they know any additional phrases that can replace the ones
in bold (e.g. Hang on a minute: Just a second. – How about coming?: Would you like to come? –
Yeah, I’d love to: Yeah, that would be great., etc)
Ex. 5 (p. 18) (Student’s Books open.) The teacher goes through the instructions using the IWB
software and explains the task. He/She refers the students to the role-play guide through the
IWB software and invites the students to make suggestions for each exchange. The teacher
then divides the class into pairs and assigns roles. He/She allows the students some time to
prepare their role-play and then invites each pair to perform their dialogue in front of the
class. During this stage, the teacher can use the suggested answer in order to give the
students any further assistance.
Note: The students can record themselves and file their recording in their Portfolios.
Ex. 6 (p. 18) (Student’s Books closed.) The teacher plays the audio through the IWB software. The
students listen and repeat chorally and/or individually. Then the teacher asks the students if
they can think of other words with the same sounds and he/she verifies their answers
through the IWB software.
Unit 1f
Ex. 1 (p. 19) (Student’s Books open.) The teacher invites the students to look at the world map
through the IWB software and instigates a discussion about time in different parts of the
world. He/She plays the audio while the students read the text and complete the task. The
teacher confirms the students’ answers through the IWB software.
44
Ex. 2 (p. 19) (Student’s Books closed.) This exercise should be done through the IWB software. The
teacher asks the students to look at the map, find the cities mentioned and complete the
task. The teacher confirms the students’ answers through the IWB software. As an
extension, the students locate their city on the map and say which time zone they are in (e.g.
Athens is in the same time zone as Istanbul.).
The students use their books to look at the words in bold in the text and try to explain their
meaning. Then the teacher provides the key by clicking on the words in bold through the
IWB software.
Note: For variation see the Explain the words in bold section on p. 36.
Ex. 3 (p. 19) (Student’s Books open.) The teacher presents the task through the IWB software.
He/She divides the class into pairs and allows the students some time to prepare their
exchanges. Then each pair performs their exchanges in front of the class. The teacher
confirms their answers through the IWB software.
Ex. 4 (p. 19) (Student’s Books closed.) The teacher divides the class into groups and explains the task.
He/She displays the model and brainstorms for additional methods/devices of telling the time.
Then the teacher encourages the students to use the Internet in order to obtain the
information required to complete their assignment.
45
Access 2 is designed exclusively for students studying English at
Elementary level. It follows the principles of the Council of Europe
Common Framework of Reference Level A2.
Student’s CD
ook
Grammar B
Workbook
Student’s Book
Class CDs
Teacher’s Res
ource Pack
(W
orksheets, Pairw
ork Activities,
Games & Tests
)
k (interleaved)
Teacher’s Boo
Interactive Whiteboard
Software
USER’S MANUAL
& TEACHER’S GUIDE
ISBN 978-1-84862-277-7