FTS - Van`s Aircraft, Inc.

12NPR 04-03-14-1 Reason For Revision
1) RV-12 SkyView Touch Avionics Kit
2) RV-12 SkyView AP-Knob Panels Kit (58)
3) Add instructions for installation of F-00062.
4) Allow use of lighter springs on RV-12 throttle
5) Improve functionality of canopy latch. Add switch to detect open canopy before takeoff. Re-Write ditching instructions in
POH.
6) Placarding changes to match KAI and POH to the actual placarding on the aircraft.
7) Make a new optional section for installation of a rudder trim tab.
FTS Page 04-01 Rev 2: Update index
FTS Page 04-04 Rev 2: Show new version of rudder gust lock. “…then stow in map box.” s.b. “…then stow in baggage
area.”
FTS Page 04-05 Rev 2: Add a new page to describe function of Canopy Closed Safety Switch.
Repaginate remainder of the section.
FTS Page 04-15 Rev 2: “Verify that the rudder hinge bolt is installed.” was “Verify that the rudder upper hinge bolt is
installed.”
FTS Page 05-12 Rev 2: Add information on the new throttle springs and vernier style throttle. Repaginate remainder of
the section.
Move contents of this page to Page 5-13.
Add text for new springs using a lower lb/in spring rate. Add text for new vernier style throttle.
FTS Page 05-13 Rev 2: Move contents of this page to Page 5-14.
Move contents of Page 5-12 to this page.
FTS Page 05-14 Rev 2: Remove “THIS PAGE INTENTIONALY LEFT BLANK”
Move contents of Page 5-13 to this page.
FTS Page 06-01 Rev 2: Under “GENERAL” add to the reference list of avionics G3X, SkyView, GTR200 and GPS MAP.
“Do not attempt to learn the basics of these systems while flying the aircraft.” Was “Do not attempt to learn the
basics of these systems in the aircraft.”
FTS Page 06-05 Rev 2: In the figure at the top of the page “SKYVIEW DISPLAY” was “OVERFLOW VENT”
FTS Page 06-06 Rev 2: Under Autopilot switch “…autopilot and SV-AP-PANEL (if installed).” was “…autopilot (if
installed).”
FTS Page 06-07 Rev 2: Add a new Page for G3X. Repaginate the rest of the section.
FTS Page 06-08 Rev 2: Add a new Page for G3X. Repaginate the rest of the section.
FTS Page 06-10 Rev 2: Add depiction of fuse holder mounted under panel for dual screen installation.
FTS Page 07-01 Rev 1: under choke “Pull detent switch ON” should be
Choke Cold Start “PULL tee handle fully out and hold. Crank engine. When engine starts move control to half way
position and rotate 90o- clockwise to lock.“ was “PULL tee handle fully out (apporx 1 inch) and rotate 90o clockwise to lock”
After choke off remove cold start information as it is redundant.
“Throttle / Choke – 2500 rpm max” was “Throttle – 2500 rpm max”
Make remainder of this page match the FTS
FTS Page 07-02 Rev 1: “Brakes – HOLD” was “Brakes – SET”
Minimum Oil Temp “122° F” was “120° F”
Add to Seatbelt… “…& SNUG”
Taxi rpm “1800…” was “1400…”
Under ignition “(max diff – 115)” was “(max diff – 120)” This changed per latest Rotax operating manual.
FTS Page 08-01 Rev 2: “…raise the nose just clear of the ground as early in the take-off roll as possible with the elevator
control to improve rudder authority and prevent drifting or premature lift-off.” was “…raise the nose to a lower than normal
attitude with the elevator control to prevent drifting or premature lift-off.”
Update index
FTS Page 09-01 Rev 2: “5800 rpm Max 5 min” was “MAX rpm Max 5 min”
FTS Page 14-01 Rev 1: Before “The EFIS and GPS..” add “SkyView Only:”
Make FTS match POH
FTS Page 15-01 Rev 2: Make FTS match POH
FTS Page 15-02 Rev 2: Under “GENERATOR/ELECTRICAL FAILURE” “Turn OFF all non-essential electrical…will
continue on the backup battery.” Was “Turn OFF all non-essential electrical…will continue to operate on their internal
batteries.”
Make FTS match POH
FTS Page 15-03 Rev 2: “NOTE (SkyView Only) Zero oil…” was “NOTE Zero oil…”
Make FTS match POH
FTS Page 15-04 Rev 2: Make FTS match POH
FTS Page 15-05 Rev 2: Make FTS match POH
Under “DITCHING” move “Canopy – UNLATCH” from the first step to the step just before contact.
FTS Page 15-06 Rev 2: Add “Move the Autopilot switch position to OFF” just after “Pull the trim fuse…” under
“RUNAWAY TRIM MOTOR”
Make FTS match POH
FTS: Revision Levels Changed:
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RV-12
FLIGHT TRAINING SUPPLEMENT
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
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RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 2
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
COVER PAGE
i
REVISION SUMMARY
ii
TABLE OF CONTENTS
iii
SECT I
INTRODUCTION
1-1
SECT II
AIRCRAFT DESCRIPTION
2-1
SECT III
PRE-FLIGHT PLANNING
3-1
SECT IV
PRE-FLIGHT INSPECTION
4-1
SECT V
CABIN OVERVIEW
5-1
SECT VI
INSTRUMENTATION, AVIONICS,
& ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
6-1
PRE-TAKEOFF GROUND
OPERATIONS
7-1
SECT VIII
TAKE-OFF
8-1
SECT IX
CLIMB
9-1
SECT X
CRUISE
10-1
SECT XI
MANEUVERING FLIGHT
11-1
SECT XII
DESCENT
12-1
SECT XIII
LANDING
13-1
SECT XIV
SHUT DOWN
14-1
SECT XV
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
15-1
SECT XVI
GROUND HANDLING
16-1
SECT VII
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RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 1
Date: 07/09/09
SECTION I
INTRODUCTION
INDEX
PURPOSE OF THIS MANUAL
RECOMMENDED READING
RECOMMENDED LINKS
1-1
1-1
1-3
Purpose of this Manual
This Flight Training Supplement (FTS) was carefully prepared by the test pilots, flight instructors, and engineers of Van's
Aircraft - the manufacturer of the RV-12. The FTS has been prepared with the goal of enabling the new pilot or pilot
transitioning from another aircraft to quickly and efficiently learn about features and characteristics specific to the RV-12.
This FTS is provided to supplement the information provided in the Pilots Operating Handbook (POH) but does not
replace it. Some sections of the POH are mirrored in this manual but this manual provides expanded, more detailed, and
in-depth information than is practical to include in the POH.
It is, therefore, strongly recommended that the pilot be familiar with this Flight Training Supplement, the Pilots Operating
Handbook, and the aircraft prior to flight.
Definitions
The words “WARNING”, “CAUTION”, and “NOTE” are used throughout the manual with the following definitions:
WARNING
An operating procedure, practice, or condition, etc. which may result in injury or fatality if not carefully
observed or followed.
CAUTION
An operating procedure, practice, or condition, etc. which if not strictly observed may damage the aircraft or
equipment.
NOTE
An operating procedure, practice, or condition, etc.
Recommended Reading
1.
Pilot's Operating Handbook for RV-12
2.
Aircraft Maintenance and Inspection Procedures for RV-12
3.
User Manuals of components and accessories
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
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Date: 07/09/09
Recommended Links
Revision: 1
1. General information about Van's Aircraft as well as drawing and manual revisions:
http://vansaircraft.com/
2. General information about the Sport Pilot rule and Light Sport Aircraft:
http://sportpilot.org/
3. ACK ELT:
http://ackavionics.com
4. Artex ME406 User's Manual:
http://acrartex.com
5. Dynon Avionics:
http://dynonavionics.com/
6. Flightcom FC-403 User's Manual:
http://flightcom.net/
7. Garmin Avionics:
https://buy.garmin.com/
8. Information about Matco wheels and brakes:
http://matcomfg.com/
9. PS Engineering:
http://ps-engineering.com
10. Rotax Owner Assistance Network:
http://rotax-owner.com/
1-2
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 1
Date: 07/09/09
SECTION II
AIRCRAFT DESCRIPTION
INDEX
LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT OVERVIEW
RV-12 DESIGN PHILOSOPY
2-1
2-1
LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT OVERVIEW
A NEW AVIATION HORIZON:
In 2004, the FAA created sport pilot/light-sport aircraft (SP/LSA) regulations. The most significant change in FAA
regulations in 50 years, it allows easier and lower-cost access for those wishing to participate in the joy of flight. With
adoption of SP/LSA, flying has become less expensive and easier than ever before. You can become a sport pilot with
as little as 20 hours of flight instruction. You can fly a one- or two-seat aircraft capable of speeds up to 120 kt (138
mph). And in most cases, you can pass the medical requirements just by showing your driver's license.
BASIC PARAMETERS OF LSA:
The FAA has defined light-sport aircraft as simple-to-operate, easy-to-fly aircraft that, since initial certification, has
continued to meet the following performance definition:








Maximum gross weight of 1,320 lb
Maximum cruise configuration stall speed of 45 kt CAS
Maximum speed in level flight with maximum continuous power of 120 kt CAS
One or two person occupancy (pilot and one passenger)
Fixed or ground adjustable propeller
Fixed landing gear
Single reciprocating engine
Unpressurized cabin
Light Sport Aircraft may seem familiar to us by their appearance, but they are in fact quite different from the traditional
aircraft we are used to. First, LSAs weigh significantly less than many aircraft. With a typical empty weight of 750 lb and
a take-off weight of not more than 1320 lb, they are indeed light aircraft. The light weight, coupled with a generous wing
area means that they have a low wing loading thus making them more susceptible to wind currents than larger, high
wing loading aircraft. A good pilot needs, therefore, to remain vigilant from the time the aircraft first moves under its own
power until after the landing is complete and the aircraft is brought to a full stop. Pilots who may have experience with
traditional aircraft but are new to LSAs need to approach LSAs with an open mind. Open to the fact that a Light Sport
Aircraft is different than a traditional aircraft and open to the reality that pilots can, over time, develop flying habits that
are flat-out wrong or at least inappropriate to an aircraft with the weight, power loading, and wing loading of an LSA.
RV-12 DESIGN PHILOSOPHY
INTRODUCTION:
Let's take a look at the design philosophy and goals that are the basis for this airplane. The goal was to achieve the
maximum overall performance, flying enjoyment, ease of construction, building and flying economy, ease of
maintenance, and pleasing appearance possible for a two-place airplane. Understanding how this was achieved might
help you better appreciate many features of the RV-12 as you encounter them while flying.
The formula for achieving maximum overall performance is amazingly simple: Maximize thrust, minimize drag;
maximize lift, minimize weight. The implementation of this formula is a bit more complex, however. Thrust, for a given
HP engine, has been maximized through use of a good propeller, streamlining of the engine cowl, and directing the
engine outlet rearward. Drag is minimized by keeping the aircraft frontal area to a minimum and shaping all airframe
components to reduce aerodynamic drag. Lift is maximized through use of a wing with adequate area and good airfoil.
Weight is minimized by careful structural design, by using the best airframe materials, and by installation of only
essential instrumentation and equipment.
Most of the literally hundreds of features which comprise the overall RV-12 package have been determined in the
design stage.
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
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Date: 07/09/09
Revision: 1
RV-12 DESIGN FEATURES:
The RV's "traditional" configuration - tractor engine, monoplane, stabilizer in the rear, is an exercise in logic and not
simply a concession to convention. There are many good reasons why light planes have been built this way for
decades, other than the often heard arguments of "entrenched design mentality" from those seeking "technological
breakthroughs". The bottom line is that this configuration has proven to offer the best compromise resulting in the best
all around airplane.
Designers often use the term "Mission Profile" which simply refers to the function an airplane is designed to perform.
The RV-12's mission profile is rather broad -- it is intended to fill nearly all sport flying needs - excellent flying qualities,
maximum speed allowed under LSA rules, low stall speed, good visibility, simple assembly for the home-builder,
economical to own and operate. Meeting all these needs required a design "balancing act''. Favoring one need often
adversely affects others. An example would be emphasizing cross country cruise performance by installing extra
radios, instruments, and upholstery. The weight added would adversely affect all other performance parameters. This
is not a "maybe", it is a certainty.
Given that low cost of ownership is a selling point for any Light Sport Aircraft and is a prime design goal of all RV
designs, the RV-12 incorporates wings that are easily removable. Because the cost of hangar space is typically the
single biggest aircraft ownership expense, removable wings mean that storage costs can be reduced (by sharing of 'onairport' hangar space) or eliminated (by storage 'off-airport' at home). This design feature drove other features such as
placement of fuel tank in the fuselage, selection of full-span drooping ailerons (flaperons) which automatically hook-up
upon wing installation, and location of the pitot tube in the spinner. Because the RV-12 would possibly be trailered to
and from the airport, the wings-removed width had to be sufficiently narrow to allow it to be legally trailered. This limited
the span of the horizontal tail surface to 8 ft. The limited tail span requires that the RV-12 use a long fuselage placing
the tail surfaces well aft for good control authority.
Seating arrangements vary between the RV designs, depending on the primary mission envisioned. Side-by-side
seating was chosen for the RV-12 because this arrangement is generally preferred for its primary mission: Sport Flying.
Specific advantages of the side-by-side configuration include equal visibility for both occupants, more easily achieved
dual control capability, lots of instrument panel space, minimized CG travel for various loading conditions, and a full
cowling with room for engine accessories and plumbing. The RV-12 design places the occupants further forward than
the other side-by-side RV designs. This seating position allows for excellent visibility even in the downward direction
because the wing leading edge is far aft relative to the occupants' eyes. The potential down-side of this 'cab-forward'
arrangement is a CG that is further forward than desired. The selection of the very light Rotax 912ULS engine enables
the RV-12 to balance well even with two heavy occupants sitting forward of the wing spar.
We feel that an RV-12 in its basic form with fixed-pitch prop, modest instrumentation & avionics, and Rotax 912ULS
engine represents the best compromise.
Obviously, we could go on and on, covering every design decision, compromise, or concession. However, it should be
apparent by now that every feature of the RV-12, whether major or minor, was the end product of much deliberation.
2-2
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 0
Date: 07/09/09
SECTION III
PRE-FLIGHT PLANNING
INDEX
GENERAL
BASICS OF LOADING THE RV-12
TAKE-OFF & LANDING CONSIDERATIONS
CLIMB CONSIDERATIONS
CRUISE CONSIDERATIONS
3-1
3-1
3-1
3-2
3-2
GENERAL
This section will give you the basic parameters and considerations for using your RV-12 and guidelines for how to
optimally operate the aircraft (in terms of performance and efficiency) considering the requirements of the flight (load to
be carried and distance to carry it), the atmospheric conditions (temperature and wind vector at the altitudes available to
the aircraft), geographic conditions (mountains, deserts, forests, etc.), and runway elevation and length at both the
beginning and end of the flight.
BASICS OF LOADING THE RV-12
The RV-12 design places the pilot and passenger forward of the CG and everything else aft of the CG. Thus the most
forward loading condition occurs with the heaviest possible pilot and passenger weights and with minimum fuel and no
baggage. Conversely, the most aft loading condition occurs when there is a very light pilot, no passenger, full fuel, and
maximum baggage.
The forward CG limit is established by the strength of the nose landing gear, by the amount of pitch trim authority
required to trim the aircraft to 1.3 times stall speed with power off and flaps fully deployed, and by the pitch control
authority required to rotate the aircraft to a landing attitude in ground effect with power off and flaps fully deployed.
The aft CG limit is established by minimum pitch and yaw stability requirements.
WARNING
Loading the aircraft such that its CG falls outside the allowable range is unwise, foolish, not allowed, not
recommended, compromises safety, and may result in injury or loss of life as well as damage to the aircraft.
TAKE-OFF & LANDING CONSIDERATIONS
The RV-12 when loaded at or near its maximum weight is limited by takeoff distance. Stated another way, if an RV-12
can takeoff from any given runway, it can, when properly flown, easily land on that same runway.
This difference in takeoff and landing distances becomes more extreme when operating at gross weights approaching
1320 lb and at higher density altitudes.
This difference becomes less extreme when the aircraft is lightly loaded and when operating at low density altitude.
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CLIMB CONSIDERATIONS
Use best angle of climb for obstacle clearance immediately following take-off. If necessary for en-route terrain
clearance, it is better to circle while climbing at best rate of climb speed to clear terrain than to try to climb straight ahead
at best angle speed
Use best rate of climb speed immediately after takeoff (unless using best angle speed to clear obstacles) at least until
sufficient altitude has been gained to allow for a return to the airport in the event of an engine failure. Best rate of climb
should be used for training flights when covering distance is not a consideration.
Use a cruise climb during cross-country flying where the objective is to cover distance while efficiently climbing to cruise
altitude without the need to clear terrain.
CRUISE CONSIDERATIONS
Cruising at high altitude makes sense as the aircraft is more efficient when flown high, allows more time for decision
making in the event of in-flight emergencies (such as engine failure), also there is generally less turbulence at high
altitude than when flying closer to the ground. The only time to vary from this is when unfavorable winds occur or if cloud
bases preclude flying higher.
When flying into a headwind, it is best to use higher power settings (maximum cruise power) as it will minimize the
amount of time that the headwind has to slow progress over the ground.
When flying with a tailwind, it is most efficient to use lower power settings (economy cruise power) as it will maximize the
amount of time that the tailwind has to aid progress over the ground.
3-2
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 2
Date: 04/03/14
SECTION IV
PRE-FLIGHT INSPECTION
INDEX
GENERAL
CABIN
LEFT MAIN LANDING GEAR
LEFT WING
FUSELAGE (LEFT SIDE)
EMPENNAGE
FUSELAGE (RIGHT SIDE)
RIGHT WING
RIGHT MAIN LANDING GEAR
NOSE SECTION
4-1
4-3
4-10
4-11
4-13
4-14
4-17
4-20
4-21
4-23
GENERAL
WING
HAND-HOLD
NOSE
LANDING
GEAR
CANOPY
LATCH
TRANSPONDER
ANTENNA
MAIN
LANDING
GEAR
VERTICAL
STABILIZER
STATIC PORT
(ON SIDE OF
FUSELAGE)
RUDDER
STABILATOR
LEFT SIDE VIEW
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Date: 04/03/14
Revision: 2
FLAPERONLEFT
OUTBD
FLAPERON
BRACKET
ANTI-SERVO
TAB
MID
FLAPERON
BRACKET
INBD
FLAPERON
BRACKET
STATIC PORT
(ON SIDE OF
FUSELAGE)
TAIL TIEDOWN
REAR VIEW
FUEL
CAP
COMM
ANTENNA
RIGHT SIDE VIEW
4-2
FLAPERONRIGHT
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
COWL
DOOR
GASCOLATOR
SPINNER
PITOT
MUFFLER
Revision: 2
Date: 04/03/14
COOLING
AIR INLET
RIGHT WING
TIE-DOWN
STALL
WARNING
VANE
LEFT WING
TIE-DOWN
FRONT VIEW
CABIN
 Canopy – UNLATCH
Unless you are quite tall, it will be necessary to stand on the step or even the wing to unlatch the canopy.
LATCHED
UNLATCHED

Canopy – CHECK operation, condition
Lift handles are located on each side of the canopy frame to be used for raising the canopy
ROTATE
UP
LIFT
HANDLE
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CABIN (continued)

Flight Control Locks – REMOVE
Collapse Rudder Lock then stow in baggage area.
Revision: 2
CAUTION: Take care unlocking the controls in gusty conditions.

Fuel tank – CHECK FUEL LEVEL using the mechanical fuel gauge in the top of the tank
WARNING
Do not take off with less than 4 gallons of fuel as shown in the red "NO TAKE-OFF" arc

Fuel tank – Fuel Vent Hardware - SECURELY ATTACHED
FUEL VENT
HARDWARE
MECHANICAL
FUEL GAUGE
4-4
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 2
Date: 04/03/14
CABIN (continued)
 Master switch – ON
D-180

Stall warning vane – ACTUATE

Stall warning horn – ON (tone
through headset) when vane is
actuated when
PS Engineering PM-3000-RV
FlightCom 903, Garmin SL-40
or Garmin GTR-225 is installed.
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Revision: 2
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RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 2
CABIN (continued)
 Master switch – ON

Date: 04/03/14
(If Garmin GTR-200 Installed)
Avionics Switch - ON
SKYVIEW

Stall warning vane – ACTUATE

Stall warning horn – ON (tone
through headset) when vane is
actuated

(If Garmin GTR-200 Installed)
Avionics Switch - OFF
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SKYVIEW/G3X 4-7
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RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 2


Date: 04/03/14
Fuel Shut-Off Valve – OPEN (Push Down)
Gascolator – DRAIN fuel sample, CHECK quick drain valve for leakage
QUICK DRAIN

Fuel Sample – CHECK for water or sediment
contamination
WARNING
Continue sampling fuel until there are no
contaminants detected.

Master switch – OFF
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
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CABIN (continued)
 ELT – CHECK OFF
Revision: 2

Baggage – RESTRAINED

Foreign or Misplaced Objects - CHECK
ACK ELT
ARTEX ELT
WARNING
Any items not stowed (such as glasses cases, water bottles, notebooks, pens/pencils) can fall into
places in the cabin where they are inaccessible in flight.
Additionally, these items may possibly become lodged behind rudder pedals or fall into the area under
the seat pans where they may interfere with free and clear motion of the flight controls, thus presenting
a safety hazard.





LEFT MAIN LANDING GEAR
Tire – CONDITION, proper inflation 25psi
Brake – CHECK condition, NO leakage
Axle Nut – CHECK cotter pin installation
Wheel Bearings – SHAKE top of tire left and right
Wheel Chocks – REMOVE
VERIFY NO TIRE CORDS
SHOWING; TIRE TREAD IN
GOOD SHAPE WITH FEW OR
NO BALD SPOTS
NOTE
Properly inflated tire has no contact between
the outer portion of tread and pavement
BRAKE PADS
INTACT
4-10
VERIFY NO
BRAKE FLUID
LEAKAGE
AXLE NUT
COTTER
PIN
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 2
LEFT WING
 Wing – CONDITION Look at wing in
general, look for dents, wrinkles,
missing or loose rivets (particularly
dents in the leading edge.)

Tie-Down – UNTIE the tie-down
rope/chain, REMOVE eye bolt (if
desired)

Wing Hand Hold - APPLY FORCE fore/aft &
up/down; CHECK no free movement
Date: 04/03/14
UP
FORE
AFT
DOWN
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Date: 04/03/14
LEFT WING (continued)
 Flaperon – CONDITION
Revision: 2
Look at flaperon in general, look for dents
(particularly dents in the trailing edge), wrinkles,
missing or loose rivets.

Flaperon – FREEDOM OF MOVEMENT
Move the flaperon through its full range of motion.
Verify that it hits a definite stop at both ends of its
travel and that there is no binding or limiting friction.
FLAPERON
MOVEMENT
TRAILING
EDGE DOWN
FLAPERON
MOVEMENT
TRAILING
EDGE UP
4-12
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
OUTBD HINGE
BRACKET BOLT
Revision: 2
LEFT WING (continued)
 Flaperon - HINGE BRACKET
ATTACHMENT
Date: 04/03/14
Verify that the outboard, mid, and
inboard flaperon hinge bracket
bolts are installed
MID HINGE
BRACKET BOLT
INBD HINGE
BRACKET BOLT
FUSELAGE (LEFT SIDE)
 Controls – CONNECTED
Verify that the tab on the
inboard end of the flaperon
fully engaged into the slot
in the actuator when the
wing was installed.
FLAPERON TAB
FULLY
ENGAGED IN
ACTUATOR
SLOT
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FUSELAGE (LEFT SIDE) (continued)
 Static Port – CLEAN & OPEN
Revision: 2
LEFT SIDE
STATIC PORT
EMPENNAGE
 Vertical Stabilizer – CHECK
condition and security
Look at vertical stabilizer in
general, look for dents
(particularly dents in the leading
edge), wrinkles, missing or
loose rivets, missing or loose
screws. Confirm solid
attachment to the fuselage.
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RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 2
EMPENNAGE (continued)
 Stabilator – CHECK condition,
freedom of movement
Date: 04/03/14
RUDDER
Look at stabilator in general, look for
dents (particularly dents in the leading
or trailing edges), wrinkles, missing or
loose rivets.
ANTI-SERVO
TAB PUSHROD
Move the stabilator through its full
range of motion. Verify that it hits a
definite stop at both ends of its travel
and that there is no binding or friction.

EMPENNAGE
FAIRING
Empennage Fairing - CHECK all
screws installed, no evidence of
interference with stabilator, anti-servo
tab pushrod, or rudder
STABILATOR MOVEMENT
LEADING EDGE DOWN
EMPENNAGE
FAIRING
UP
AFT
FORE
DOWN
STABILATOR MOVEMENT
LEADING EDGE UP

Anti-Servo Tab – CHECK condition, proper attachment
Look at anti-servo tab in general, look for dents
(particularly dents in the trailing edge), wrinkles,
missing or loose rivets.
ANTI-SERVO TAB
HINGE PINS
Verify that the anti-servo tab hinge pins are installed
and that the anti-servo tab pushrod attach bolt is
installed and that there is no freeplay in the anti-servo
tab rod end bearing. Verify clearance between antiservo tab pushrod in fully up position and rudder in
any position.
ANTI-SERVO TAB
PUSHROD ATTACH
BOLT
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
4-15
Date: 04/03/14
EMPENNAGE (continued)
 Rudder – CHECK condition, proper
attachment, freedom of movement
Revision: 2
Look at rudder in general, look for
dents (particularly dents in the trailing
edge), wrinkles, missing or loose
rivets.
Verify that the rudder hinge bolts are
installed.
EMPENNAGE
FAIRING
RUDDER MOVEMENT
FULL LEFT
VERIFY LOWER
HINGE BOLT
RUDDER MOVEMENT
FULL RIGHT

Look into the slot for the anti-servo
pushrod and check:
RUDDER
HINGE BOLT
Lower Rudder Hinge Bolt
Elevator Cable Bolts
Rudder Cable Bolts
Elevator Trim
4-16
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 2
EMPENNAGE (continued)
 Tie-Down – UNTIE RESTRAINT from
eyelet
Date: 04/03/14
FUSELAGE (RIGHT SIDE)
 Static Port – CLEAN & OPEN
RIGHT SIDE
STATIC PORT

Comm Antenna - CONDITION
Verify that the comm antenna is
securely attached and has not been
damaged. Verify that the skin
surrounding the antenna is not bent or
wrinkled.
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
4-17
Date: 04/03/14
FUSELAGE (RIGHT SIDE) (continued)
 Fuel Vent Line- CLEAR
Revision: 2
FUEL VENT
AIR LINE

Fuel Vent Air Line - CLEAR

Fuel Cap - SECURE WHEN LATCHED
4-18
FUEL VENT LINE
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 2
FUSELAGE (RIGHT SIDE) (continued)
 Controls - CONNECTED
Date: 04/03/14
RIGHT WING
 Flaperon - HINGE BRACKET
ATTACHMENT
Verify that the outboard, mid, and
inboard flaperon hinge bracket
bolts are installed
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
4-19
Date: 04/03/14
RIGHT WING (Continued)
Flaperon – FREEDOM OF MOVEMENT
Revision: 2
Move the flaperon through its full
range of motion. Verify that it hits a
definite stop at both ends of its
travel and that there is no binding
or friction.

Flaperon – CONDITION
Look at flaperon in general, look for
dents (particularly dents in the trailing
edge), wrinkles, missing or loose rivets.
4-20
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 2
RIGHT WING (Continued)
 Wing – CONDITION Look at wing in
general, look for dents, wrinkles,
missing or loose rivets. Particularly
dents in the leading edge.

Wing Hand Hold – APPLY FORCE
fore/aft & up/down; CHECK no free
movement

Tie-Down – UNTIE the tie-down
rope/chain, REMOVE eye bolt (if
desired)
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Date: 04/03/14
4-21
Date: 04/03/14
RIGHT MAIN LANDING GEAR
 Tire – CONDITION, proper inflation 25psi
 Brake – CHECK condition, NO leakage
 Axle Nut – CHECK cotter pin installation
 Wheel Bearings – SHAKE top of tire left and right
 Wheel Chocks – REMOVE
4-22
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 2
Revision: 2
NOSE SECTION
 Transponder Antenna – CHECK condition & security

Date: 04/03/14
Muffler – CHECK condition, security of attachment
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
4-23
Date: 04/03/14
NOSE SECTION (Continued)


Revision: 2
Cowl Door - OPEN
Coolant – LEVEL CHECK
COOLANT
LEVEL

Engine Oil – CHECK quantity, color, and clarity
WARNING
Before performing the engine oil check
procedure, make sure the master and both
ignition switches are at the OFF position.
Remove oil tank cover. Turn propeller by hand
in direction of propeller rotation several times to
pump oil from engine into oil tank.



4-24
Cowl Door - CLOSED
Nose Landing Gear –
CHECK attachment to fuselage
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 2
NOSE SECTION (Continued)
 Tire – CONDITION, proper inflation 22psi (23psi maximum)
 Wheel Chocks - REMOVE


Date: 04/03/14
Cowling – CHECK condition, all screws properly installed
Right Air Inlet – CHECK unobstructed
RIGHT AIR INLET


Propeller and Spinner – CHECK condition, security
Pitot – CLEAN & OPEN
PITOT TUBE
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
4-25
Date: 04/03/14
NOSE SECTION (Continued)
 Cooling Air Duct – CHECK unobstructed

Left Air Inlet – CHECK unobstructed
LEFT AIR INLET
4-26
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 2
Revision: 2
Date: 04/03/14
SECTION V
CABIN OVERVIEW
INDEX
GENERAL
SEAT POSITION ADJUSTMENT
ENTRY & EXIT TECHNIQUE
OCCUPANT RESTRAINT
HEADSET, AUDIO INPUT, &
AUXILIARY POWER RECEPTACLES
FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEM
TRIM
ENGINE CONTROLS
VENTILATION & HEATER
5-1
5-2
5-3
5-4
5-4
5-5
5-7, 5-9
5-11
5-12
GENERAL
This section covers the features of the RV-12 cabin.
FLIGHT
CONTROLS
MAP BOX
(RUDDER PEDALS
NOT SHOWN)
CABIN HEAT
HEADSET
ENGINE
CONTROLS
OCCUPANT
RESTRAINT
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
5-1
Date: 04/03/14
Revision: 2
SEAT POSITION ADJUSTMENT
Proper positioning of the seatback is key to
establishing the correct relationship of the
various controls to the pilot.
The seat must be far enough forward that the
pilot can apply full rudder when required.
Additionally, the seat must be far enough aft that
when stick is held full aft there is minimal or no
contact between the pilots mid-section and the
stick. Optional rudder pedal blocks are available
for shorter legged pilots who are unable to get
full rudder deflection when the seat is as far
forward as possible.
The seatback can be attached to the seat
pan in one of two positions. Lift-up the seat
bottom cushion to access the two hinge
halves mounted to the seat pan.
ALTERNATE
POSITION
Additionally the seatback recline angle can be adjusted by how the hinged spacer on the aft side of the seatback is
positioned. The seatback position and recline angle can be adjusted independently of each other.
HINGED SPACER
5-2
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 2
Date: 04/03/14
ENTRY & EXIT TECHNIQUE
How to get in & out.
Entry method 1: Stand just forward of the wing leading edge facing the cabin. Step up onto the boarding step with your
leg that is closest to the front of the aircraft. Place the hand closest to the rear of the aircraft onto the roll bar. Bring your
other leg over the cabin deck and place your foot on the non-skid area just forward of the seat. Then move your foot
from the step to just forward of the seat and then sit in the seat.
Entry method 2: Put bottom on non-skid on wing. Swing inboard leg over cabin deck. Place outboard foot on step and
push-off with that foot and outboard hand to move from being seated on the wing to being seated on the cabin deck.
(Apply hand pressure only over rivet heads on wing to avoid denting the wing skin.) Swing outboard leg into cabin and
lower bottom from cabin deck to seat.
Lower the canopy by pulling aft on the canopy frame. As the canopy rotates down, reach for and grab the canopy latch
handle and allow the canopy to finish its rotation down to the closed position. Rotate the canopy handle from being
oriented sideways to being oriented fore and aft. The aft ear of the canopy handle rides on a plastic latch block and
clicks or detents into place when latched. Unlatching the canopy requires that the handle be pulled, then rotated back
past the detent before it can be raised up.
Exiting the aircraft is accomplished by doing the reverse of one of the entry methods.
NON-SKID
BOARDING STEP
NON-SKID
CABIN DECK
ROLL BAR
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
5-3
Date: 04/03/14
OCCUPANT RESTRAINT
How to get strapped-in properly and adjust lap belt, crotch-strap, shoulder harness.
RIGHT
SHOULDER
STRAP
RIGHT
LAP
BELT
Revision: 2
LEFT
SHOULDER
STRAP
CROTCH
STRAP
LEFT
LAP
BELT
HEADSET, AUDIO INPUT, & AUX POWER RECEPTACLES
Where to plug-in headsets. Audio input plug location. Aux power jack location.
AUX POWER
HEADSET PLUGS
(MIC AND PHONES)
5-4
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
AUDIO INPUT
Revision: 2
FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEM
Stick, rudder pedals, brakes, trim. What the surfaces do when the cabin control is moved.
Date: 04/03/14
Stick movement controls pitch and roll of the aircraft when in flight. Below each picture explains the position of the
trailing edge of the specified control surface.
Left Flaperon: DOWN
Right Flaperon: UP
Stabilator: UP
Left Flaperon: DOWN
Right Flaperon: UP
Stabilator: DOWN
Left Flaperon: UP
Right Flaperon: DOWN
Stabilator: DOWN
Left Flaperon: DOWN
Right Flaperon: UP
Stabilator: UP
Flap function of the flaperons is controlled using a flap lever. The flap lever has 3 detents. The flap feature will generally
be used for landing and/or take-off, but can be used anytime that the indicated airspeed is below 82 kts.
WARNING
Do not use flaps at an indicated airspeed greater than 82 kts.
FLAPS UP
FLAPS HALF
FLAPS DOWN
FLAPERON
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
5-5
Date: 04/03/14
Revision: 2
Rudder pedals control yaw during flight. Brake pedals are integrated with the rudder pedals. The brakes provide
stopping and turning control while taxiing.
LEFT
BRAKE
PEDAL
RIGHT
BRAKE
PEDAL
RUDDER CONTROL
NOSE TO THE LEFT
NOSE TO THE RIGHT
RUDDER
5-6
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 2
Date: 04/03/14
Trim is adjusted using a momentary switch on the instrument panel. Accurate adjustment can be made easier by
steadying the operating hand on part of the instrument panel during abrupt movements.
D-180
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
D-180
5-7
Date: 04/03/14
Revision: 2
THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
5-8
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 2
Date: 04/03/14
Trim is adjusted using a momentary switch on the instrument panel. Accurate adjustment can be made easier by
steadying the operating hand on part of the instrument panel during abrupt movements.
SKYVIEW/G3X
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
SKYVIEW/G3X 5-9
Date: 04/03/14
Revision: 2
THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
5-10
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 2
Date: 04/03/14
ENGINE CONTROLS
Throttle, choke, fuel shut-off valve
Throttle is used to control the engine RPM. Full
throttle position is when the throttle knob is closest
to the instrument panel. The throttle control can be
set at a specific position by tightening the friction
control.
FRICTION
CONTROL
Choke is used for cold starting. The choke can be
locked in a specific position by rotating the 'T'
handle.
Fuel shut-off valve is used to permit or prevent fuel from
flowing to the engine compartment. It may be pulled up to
the 'OFF' position to prevent fuel flow, or pushed down to
the 'ON' position.
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
5-11
Date: 04/03/14
Revision: 2
THROTTLE RETURN SPRINGS
The strong coil springs attached to the throttle arms of the Bing Carburetors on Rotax 912 ULS engines serve two
purposes:
The primary function of the springs is to assure balanced carburetor operation.
The Rotax 912ULS engine is equipped with dual carburetors, one serving the Right side cylinders, the other serving the
Left.
It is very important that the throttle positions of both carbs remain closely matched to prevent uneven power pulses
(vibration, power loss, engine wear) on both sides of the engine.
To assure uniform throttle positions, Rotax specifies the use of semi-rigid throttle cables that rely on the strong throttleopen springs to offset any slack or free play in these cables.
The throttle arm springs also function to “add power” in the unlikely event of a breakage of the throttle cable or throttle
mechanism.
The constant “Throttle Open” tension on the throttle cables requires a throttle control mechanism with an adjustable
friction device to prevent “throttle creep”. The end result is that the Rotax throttle requires more operator effort to alter
its position than throttles on traditional aircraft engines.
In an effort to achieve lower throttle friction, throttle arm springs have been supplied rated at a lower lbs./in tension per
displacement than the stock spring supplied with the Rotax engine. Use of these springs will require a periodic test of
the spring functionality as described in the maintenance manual.
FRICTION-VERNIER THROTTLE
Operation of the McFarland Friction-Vernier throttle CT DUAL THROTTLE 12V (MCRV12-TV) is identical to the
operation of the standard friction-lock throttle CT DUAL THROTTLE 12 (MCT100D-V) with the exception that small
throttle adjustments can also be made by twisting the throttle knob (clockwise-advance, counterclockwise-retard). The
McFarland Friction-Vernier throttle operation differs from traditional vernier throttles which incorporate a positive locking
mechanism requiring a push-button release action, simply push or pull to override the vernier action.
5-12
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 2
Date: 04/03/14
VENTILATION & HEATER
Vent operation. Heater operation. Optional sunshade.
Vent doors direct outside air into the cabin. There is
one vent door on each side of the fuselage. A tab on
the vent door can simply be pushed or pulled to any
position depending on the amount of outside air
desired.
VENT DOOR CLOSED
VENT DOOR OPEN
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
5-13
Date: 04/03/14
Revision: 2
VENTILATION & HEATER (Continued)
Cabin temperature can be increased using the cabin heat control knob. The cabin heat control knob may be pulled to
allow heated air into the cabin. The air is heated by passing over the coolant heat exchanger. The heated air continues
into the engine compartment, or into the cabin depending on the position of the cabin heat control knob.
An optional sunshade is available which mounts to the inside of the canopy. The sunshade, if installed, may be slid
forward on its rail and held stationary with the lock screw if shade is desired. The sunshade is stowed by sliding it aft
and holding stationary with the lock screw.
CANOPY CLOSED SAFETY SWITCH
When the canopy latch is

closed a switch is closed behind
the roll bar. This is indicated on
a SkyView system in the EMS
section by a green light.
 If the canopy latch is not latched
on a SkyView system the
indicator light within the EMS
section of the display will turn
red.
 For a G3X or SkyView system if
the RPM is greater than 3700
RPM with the canopy open an
audio warning as well as an
onscreen warning will be given.
During run-up or during the
take-off roll as the RPM is
advanced a warning will be
given to the pilot.
5-14
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 1
Date: 04/03/14
SECTION VI
INSTRUMENTATION, AVIONICS, & ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
INDEX
GENERAL
RV-12 ELECTRICAL SYSTEM THEORY
ELECTRICAL SWITCHES
FUSES
DYNON FLIGHTDEK D180
GARMIN SL40 COMM RADIO
GARMIN GTX 327 TRANSPONDER
GARMIN GPSMAP 296/396/495/496
FLIGHTCOM INTERCOM
ELT
6-1
6-1
6-3
6-9
6-10
6-10
6-10
6-10
6-10
6-10
GENERAL
This section covers all the items in the instrument panel...switches and fuses, as well as installed instrumentation,
avionics (G3X, Skyview, D180, SL40, GTR 200, GTX327, GPS MAP2/3/495/6), intercom and ELT.
CAUTION
Please pay attention to the operation manuals for each piece of equipment. Do not attempt to learn the basics
of these systems while flying the aircraft. Preparing by studying the basic operation of this equipment prior to
your first transition training flight will be time well spent.
RV-12 ELECTRICAL SYSTEM THEORY
The electrical system is designed to minimize the workload of the pilot while keeping cost and weight to reasonable
minimums.
Items essential for basic operation of the aircraft are either provided with their own internal batteries (as is the case for
the EFIS and GPS) or are powered-up any time the master switch is on (as is the case for the stall warning system,
pitch trim motor, electric fuel pump, and avionics cooling fans). Fuses, most with LED "trip" indicators, are used for
protection of the various electrical circuits resulting in lower cost and weight with no adverse effect on safety or
functionality. Through use of non-resettable fuses, safety is enhanced because the pilot is not able to override the
protection of the circuit (as would be the case with a resettable breaker) and his/her attention is fully directed toward
flying the aircraft rather than being tempted to "fix" something in flight. Consider that if a fault develops in any circuit,
there is nothing constructive that the pilot can do except fly the aircraft to a safe landing before trying to troubleshoot
any electrical problem.
The electrical system design incorporates a separate avionics master switch so that, in the event of a generator failure,
all non-essential electrical equipment can be taken off-line while allowing the EFIS and GPS to be powered by their own
internal batteries. This design preserves the electrical energy stored in the battery to keep the trim motor, electric fuel
pump, and avionics cooling fans operating long enough to allow the flight to be completed.
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
6-1
Date: 04/03/14
Revision: 1
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6-2
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 1
Date: 04/03/14
DYNON
FUSES
FLIGHTDEK
D180
IGNITION
SWITCHES
MASTER
SWITCH
SPAR PIN UNSAFE
OVERRIDE SWITCH
SWITCHES
GARMIN
SL40 COMM
RADIO
D-180
GARMIN
GPSMAP 496
GARMIN GTX 327
TRANSPONDER
ARTEX ELT
REMOTE
FLIGHTCOM
INTERCOM
ELECTRICAL SWITCHES
Except for the keyed starter switch and spar pin unsafe override switch, all switches are internally lit automotive style
rocker switches.
Starter switch: This is a keyed momentary contact switch that activates the engine starter so long as the master switch
is on and the spar pins are properly installed.
Spar pin unsafe override switch: This is a lighted momentary contact switch that serves primarily as an indicator of an
unsafe spar pin condition. When the indicator is lit, the starter circuit is disabled. Should the spar pin indication system
develop a fault at the same time as an in-flight emergency occurs, this disable function may be overridden by holding
the switch in while activating the starter switch.
WARNING
The spar pin unsafe override switch must never be used when the aircraft is on the ground.
Master switch: This switch connects the battery to the rest of the electrical system via a solenoid. With the master
switch on, the avionics cooling fans, electric fuel pump, stall warning system, and pitch trim system all receive power.
Ignition switches: Each switch controls one of the two electronic ignition modules on the engine.
Avionics switch: This switch controls power to the EFIS, GPS, comm radio, transponder and intercom.
Nav & strobe switch: This switch controls power to the navigation, strobe and cockpit lights (if installed).
Landing light switch: This switch controls power to the landing light (if installed) and controls whether the light is on
continuously (for illumination during night operations) or whether the light pulses on/off/on (for enhanced daytime
visibility to other aircraft).
Autopilot switch: This switch controls power to the autopilot (if installed).
Trim switch: This is a momentary contact switch that operates the pitch trim servo motor in either the nose-up direction
or nose-down direction.
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
D-180
6-3
Date: 04/03/14
Revision: 1
THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
6-4
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 1
MASTER
SWITCH
Date: 04/03/14
IGNITION
SWITCHES
SKYVIEW
ACK ELT
SKYVIEW DISPLAY
GARMIN GTR-200
FUSES/SWITCHES
SPAR PIN UNSAFE
OVERRIDE SWITCH
ELECTRICAL SWITCHES
Except for the keyed starter switch and spar pin unsafe override switch, all switches are internally lit automotive style
rocker switches.
Starter switch: This is a keyed momentary contact switch that activates the engine starter so long as the master switch
is on and the spar pins are properly installed.
Spar pin unsafe override switch: This is a lighted momentary contact switch that serves primarily as an indicator of an
unsafe spar pin condition. When the indicator is lit, the starter circuit is disabled. Should the spar pin indication system
develop a fault at the same time as an in-flight emergency occurs, this disable function may be overridden by holding
the switch in while activating the starter switch.
WARNING
The spar pin unsafe override switch must never be used when the aircraft is on the ground.
Master switch: This switch connects the battery to the rest of the electrical system via a solenoid. With the master
switch on, the control module internal cooling fan, EFIS, GPS, electric fuel pump and pitch trim system all receive
power.
With PS Engineering PM-3000-RV or FlightCom 403 avionics installed, the intercom and stall warning system will also
receive power when the master switch is on.
Ignition switches: Each switch controls one of the two electronic ignition modules on the engine.
Avionics switch: This switch controls power to the transponder, SL-40 or GTR-225 radios or the GTR-200 comm radio &
intercom.
NOTE
With a Garmin GTR-200 installed, you will not hear the stall warning tone unless the avionics switch is on.
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
SKYVIEW
6-5
Date: 04/03/14
Revision: 1
SKYVIEW
Nav & strobe switch: This switch controls power to the navigation, strobe and cockpit lights (if installed).
Landing light switch: This switch controls power to the landing light (if installed) and controls whether the light is on
continuously (for illumination during night operations) or whether the light pulses on/off/on (for enhanced daytime
visibility to other aircraft).
Autopilot switch: This switch controls power to the autopilot and SV-AP-PANEL (if installed).
Trim switch: This is a momentary contact switch that operates the pitch trim servo motor in either the nose-up direction
or nose-down direction.
6-6
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 1
Date: 04/03/14
GDU 46X DISPLAY
MASTER
SWITCH
IGNITION
SWITCHES
SPAR PIN UNSAFE
OVERRIDE SWITCH
G3X
ACK ELT
GARMIN GTR-200
AUTOPILOT
CONTROLLER
FUSES/SWITCHES
ELECTRICAL SWITCHES
Except for the keyed starter switch and spar pin unsafe override switch, all switches are internally lit automotive style
rocker switches.
Starter switch: This is a keyed momentary contact switch that activates the engine starter so long as the master switch
is on and the spar pins are properly installed.
Spar pin unsafe override switch: This is a lighted momentary contact switch that serves primarily as an indicator of an
unsafe spar pin condition. When the indicator is lit, the starter circuit is disabled. Should the spar pin indication system
develop a fault at the same time as an in-flight emergency occurs, this disable function may be overridden by holding
the switch in while activating the starter switch.
WARNING
The spar pin unsafe override switch must never be used when the aircraft is on the ground.
Master switch: This switch connects the battery to the rest of the electrical system via a solenoid. With the master
switch on, the control module internal cooling fan, primary EFIS, electric fuel pump and pitch trim system all receive
power.
In addition, the Master switch arms the backup battery. Should the main bus voltage drop, the backup battery will then
supply power to the EFIS in order to provide attitude, air data and engine information.
If the PS Engineering PM-3000-RV or FlightCom 403 avionics are installed, the intercom and stall warning system will
also receive power when the master switch is on.
Ignition switches: Each switch controls one of the two electronic ignition modules on the engine.
Avionics switch: This switch controls power to the transponder, intercom, comm radio and second display (if installed)
NOTE
With a Garmin GTR-200 installed, you will not hear the stall warning tone unless the avionics switch is on.
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
6-7
Date: 04/03/14
Revision: 1
Nav & strobe switch: This switch controls power to the navigation, strobe and cockpit lights (if
installed).
G3X
Landing light switch: This switch controls power to the landing light (if installed) and controls whether the light is on
continuously (for illumination during night operations) or whether the light pulses on/off/on (for enhanced daytime
visibility to other aircraft).
Autopilot switch: This switch controls power to the autopilot servos and controller (if installed).
Trim switch: This is a momentary contact switch that operates the pitch trim servo motor in either the nose-up direction
or nose-down direction.
6-8
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 1
Date: 04/03/14
FUSES
The fuse panel is located directly on the instrument panel. Replacement fuses are stowed in a special holder and the
holder is velcro'd to the inside surface of the map box door or under the instrument panel.
FUSE HOLDER UNDER PANEL
FUSE HOLDER IN MAP BOX
SKYVIEW/G3X FUSE PANEL
D180 FUSE PANEL
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
6-9
Date: 04/03/14
Revision: 1
DYNON AVIONICS
The user guides can be downloaded - see Section 1.3 Links for internet location.
GARMIN AVIONICS
The user guides can be downloaded - see Section 1.3 Links for internet location.
FLIGHTCOM INTERCOM
The user's guide can be downloaded - see Section 1.3 Links for internet location.
ARTEX ELT
The user's guide can be downloaded - see Section 1.3 Links for internet location.
ACK ELT
The user's guide can be downloaded - see Section 1.3 Links for internet location.
6-10
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 1
SECTION VII
Date: 04/03/14
PRE-TAKEOFF GROUND OPERATIONS
INDEX
PRE-START
ENGINE START
SYSTEMS POWER-UP
TAXIING
BEFORE TAKE-OFF
7-1
7-1
7-2
7-2
7-2
PRE-START










EFIS – POWER-UP (D-180/SkyView) by holding the left button depressed until the screen flashes then
release button.
Passenger Briefing – PERFORMED
Seat Belt/Shoulder Harness/Crotch Strap – FASTENED & SNUG
Canopy – CLOSED and LATCHED
Fuel Valve – OPEN (push down)
Throttle – ADJUST FRICTION
Master – ON
Ignition – BOTH ON
Avionics Switch – ON
Autopilot Switch - ON
ENGINE START
CAUTION
Do not start engine with outside air temperature below
-13 F (-25 C) or above 120 F (50 C).
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Fuel Pressure – NORMAL
Throttle – Cold Start – FULLY CLOSED
Warm Start – 1/8 in OPEN
Choke –
Cold Start – PULL tee handle fully out and hold. Crank engine. When engine starts move control
to half way position and rotate 90o- clockwise to lock.
Warm Start – OFF
Brakes – HOLD
Propeller – CLEAR
Ignition Key – ENGAGE
Throttle / Choke – 2500 rpm max
Oil Pressure – CHECK 12 psi within 10 seconds or immediately shutdown the engine
Ammeter – CHARGING
Choke – OFF
CAUTION
Limit the use of the starter to 10 seconds duration maximum with a two minute cooling off period between
each starter engagement.
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Date: 04/03/14
Revision: 1
SYSTEMS POWER-UP
After engine start, the comm radio and transponder should be set as appropriate. The GPS should be powered-up
and any waypoints designated. Optional lights and autopilot should also be powered-up as desired.
TAXIING
Taxi operations during high winds requires the conventional use of the flight controls. With a head wind or
quartering head wind, place the control stick full aft and into the wind. With a tail wind or quartering tail wind, use
the opposite procedures. The use of the wheel brakes in conjunction with the rudder will assist the pilot in
maintaining directional control. The primary directional control during ground operation is the rudder. Brakes should
be used only if and as required to augment the directional control authority provided by the rudder.



Engine Gauges – CHECK
Brakes – RELEASE
Taxi rpm – 1800–2500 rpm until oil temp 122° F
BEFORE TAKEOFF
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Brakes – HOLD
Flight Controls – CHECK
Flight Instruments – CHECK & SET
Fuel Valve – CHECK OPEN
Fuel Quantity Indication - CHECK (no take-off with less than 4 gallons fuel)
Trim – SET for takeoff
Flaps – SET for takeoff 1st DETENT
Canopy – CHECK Latched
Engine Run-Up
Elevator – STICK BACK
Throttle – 4000 rpm
Ignition – Cycle A – B- BOTH ON
(max rpm drop - 300)
(max diff – 115)
Engine Instruments – CHECK
Normal Indications
Minimum Oil Temp 122° F
Ammeter – CHECK
Throttle – IDLE
Fuses - CHECK
Fuel Pressure – CHECK 2.2 psi minimum
Seat Belt, Pilot and Passenger – FASTENED & SNUG
Brakes – RELEASE
High power operation (above 3000 RPM) and engine run-up should be made into the wind and kept to a minimum
especially during high temperature conditions.
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Revision: 2
Date: 04/03/14
SECTION VIII
TAKEOFF
INDEX
NORMAL TAKE-OFF
OBSTACLE CLEARANCE TAKE-OFF
SOFT FIELD TAKE-OFF
CROSSWIND TAKE-OFF
8-1
8-1
8-1
8-1
TAKE-OFF (Normal)
 Control Stick – Held half way between neutral and full aft
 Throttle – smoothly apply FULL THROTTLE
 Stabilator Control –
RAISE NOSE just clear of ground release back pressure on stick as required
 Rotate – LIFT OFF 50-55 kts CAS
 Climb – 75 kts CAS
 Flaps – UP
 Trim – AS REQUIRED to hold desired airspeed
TAKE-OFF (Obstacle)
During an obstacle take-off, use the normal take-off procedures with the following exceptions:




Flaps – 1st DETENT
Hold Brakes – until application of full power
Lift –Off – 50 to 55 kts CAS
Climb – 60 kts (best angle of climb) until clear of obstacle
TAKE-OFF (Soft Field)
For soft field take-off, use the normal take-off procedures with the following exceptions:

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Flaps – 1st DETENT
Stabilator Control – RAISE NOSE to Take-Off Attitude
Lift-Off – as EARLY as possible
After Lift-Off – LEVEL FLIGHT to obtain safe margin of airspeed prior to climb
WARNING
The aircraft will lift-off at very low CAS but continued climb-out below 60 kts immediately after takeoff is not recommended.
TAKE-OFF (Crosswind)
During crosswind conditions, use the normal take-off procedures as well as place the control stick into the wind (up
wind aileron UP) and raise the nose just clear of the ground as early in the take-off roll as possible with the elevator
control to improve rudder authority and prevent drifting or premature lift-off. After lift-off, point the aircraft into the
wind, level the wings, and hold the slip/skid ball centered using rudder.
When taking off with a left crosswind and full power, right rudder is a limiting factor. Advance the throttle more
slowly and raise the nose wheel as soon as possible as the rudder authority is greater with the nose wheel off the
ground.
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RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revision: 2
Date: 04/03/14
SECTION IX
CLIMB
INDEX
CLIMB FOR BEST RATE
CLIMB FOR BEST ANGLE
CRUISE CLIMB
9-1
9-1
9-1
CLIMB FOR BEST RATE
Use best rate of climb speed immediately after takeoff (unless using best angle speed to clear obstacles) at least until
sufficient altitude has been gained to allow for a return to the airport in the event of an engine failure. Best rate of climb
should be used for training flights when covering distance is not a consideration.



Throttle – FULL
5800 rpm Max 5 min
5500 rpm Max Continuous
Airspeed –
Best Rate 75 kts CAS
Flaps – UP
Trim – AS REQUIRED to hold desired airspeed
CLIMB FOR BEST ANGLE
Use best angle of climb for obstacle clearance immediately following take-off. If necessary for en-route terrain
clearance, it is better to circle while climbing at best rate of climb speed to clear terrain than to try to climb straight ahead
at best angle speed



Throttle – FULL
5800 rpm Max 5 min
5500 rpm Max Continuous
Airspeed –
Best Angle 60 kts CAS
Flaps – 1st DETENT
Trim – AS REQUIRED to hold desired airspeed
CRUISE CLIMB
Use a cruise climb during cross-country flying where the objective is to cover distance while efficiently climbing to cruise
altitude without the need to clear terrain.



Throttle – FULL
5800 rpm Max 5 min
5500 rpm Max Continuous
Airspeed –
Cruise-climb 85 kts CAS
Flaps – UP
Trim – AS REQUIRED to hold desired airspeed
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Date: 07/09/09
SECTION X
CRUISE
INDEX
CRUISE
ALTITUDE, SPEED & EFFICIENCY
CRUISE FOR MAX SPEED
CRUISE FOR MAX RANGE
CRUISE FOR MAX ENDURANCE
10-1
10-1
10-1
10-1
10-1
CRUISE
 Level-off – TRIM
 Airspeed – ACCELERATE to desired cruise airspeed
 Flaps – CHECK UP
 Throttle – SET RPM to cruise power (5500 rpm Max)
 Trim – AS REQUIRED
 Engine Gauges – CHECK
ALTITUDE, SPEED & EFFICIENCY
Cruising at high altitude makes sense as the aircraft is more efficient when flown high, allows more time for decision
making in the event of in-flight emergencies (such as engine failure), also there is generally less turbulence at high
altitude than when flying closer to the ground. The only time to vary from this is when unfavorable winds occur or if cloud
bases preclude flying higher.
When flying into a headwind, it is best to use higher power settings (maximum cruise power) as it will minimize the
amount of time that the headwind has to slow progress over the ground.
When flying with a tailwind, it is most efficient to use lower power settings (economy cruise power) as it will
maximize the amount of time that the tailwind has to aid progress over the ground.
CRUISE FOR MAX SPEED
If the objective of the flight is to get to your destination as quickly as the aircraft is capable of getting you there then
the pilot should fly at as low an altitude as is safe and open the throttle as much as possible without exceeding
engine rpm limitations. This is a very inefficient way to travel and, if the destination is more than 2.5 hours away,
may end-up taking more time because of the need to stop and re-fuel. Cruising at max speed makes sense when
flying into severe headwinds because it minimizes the detrimental effect of the headwind.
CRUISE FOR MAX RANGE
If the objective of the flight is to get to your destination while using as little fuel as is necessary then the pilot should
fly at as high an altitude as is practical and legal and select a throttle setting so as to yield 87 kt indicated airspeed.
The optimum situation is to fly high enough so that the aircraft is flying at its most efficient indicated airspeed when
the throttle is wide open. The altitude required for this to occur is above 12,500 ft which would require use of
supplemental oxygen. Cruising at max range indicated airspeed should be selected for all flights unless wind
conditions or other considerations make cruising at another speed more desirable.
When flying into headwind, the indicated airspeed for max range is 4 kt greater for every 10 kt of headwind.
When flying with a tailwind, the indicated airspeed for max range is 3 kt lower for every 10 kt of tailwind.
CRUISE FOR MAX ENDURANCE
If the objective of the flight is to remain airborne for a given amount of time while using as little fuel as is necessary
then the pilot should select a throttle setting so as to yield 65 kt indicated airspeed regardless of altitude. Cruising
at max endurance indicated airspeed makes sense if the aircraft is being used as an observation platform or for
some other mission when time spent aloft is of greater concern than the number of miles covered.
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Date: 07/09/09
SECTION XI
MANUEVERING FLIGHT
INDEX
GENERAL
SLOW FLIGHT
STALLS, POWER OFF
STALLS, POWER ON
TURNS, STEEP TURNS
11-1
11-1
11-1
11-2
11-2
GENERAL
The ideal is that every pilot is able to accurately maintain control of the aircraft throughout the entire flight
considering the variables of aircraft loading (weight and CG location), and weather (wind, temperature, turbulence).
Maneuvering flight must be practiced so that the appropriate control inputs and the response of the aircraft to those
inputs may be learned. In addition, the pilot will have been exposed and become accustomed to the sights, sounds,
and accelerations of each maneuver. The additional benefit of frequent practice is that the pilot will remain fresh
with skills (muscle memory) and memory (fresh recollection of the physical sensations of different maneuvers).
Practice of the various maneuvers is fun and satisfying for the pilot and the investment of time pays off because the
pilot can see skills improve. Increased pilot awareness shows where more improvement can be made.
SLOW FLIGHT
Proficiency at slow flight is foundational because each approach and landing involves precisely controlling the
aircraft at minimum speed in close proximity to the ground. Practice of slow flight will result in better landings and
minimized risk.
Suggested exercise procedure:
Reduce power and allow the aircraft to decelerate to 60 kt IAS while maintaining target altitude. Trim as required to
minimize pilot workload. Adjust power if/as required to achieve target airspeed while maintaining altitude.
Once established in level, hands-off flight perform left and right turns of 180 to 360° heading change using not
more than 45° bank.
For added challenge, increase maximum bank angle to 60° and/or begin and end turns with the nose pointed at
pre-selected points on the horizon.
Lower flaps to ½ deflection and repeat exercises listed above using target airspeed of 57 kt IAS.
Lower flaps to full deflection and repeat exercises listed above using target airspeed of 55 kt IAS.
Raise flaps and re-establish level hands-off flight at 60 kt IAS.
STALLS, POWER-OFF
The pilot who is proficient with stalls is able to identify and take immediate and appropriate corrective action if/when
an inadvertent stall occurs.
Suggested exercise procedure:
Reduce power to idle and maintain wings level flight while increasing nose-up attitude to maintain target altitude
until aircraft stalls.
Stall will be noted by the nose pitching-down abruptly and rolling right or left up to 15°.
While approaching the stall, maintain wings-level using rudder only and keeping the ailerons neutral. Upon stall,
release stick back pressure and increase power to 18 inches manifold pressure. Allow the aircraft to accelerate to
60 kt IAS and re-establish wings level climbing flight.
Establish 30° bank turn to the right and repeat above exercise.
Establish 30° bank turn to the left and repeat above exercise.
Lower flaps to ½ deflection and repeat exercises listed above.
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Date: 07/09/09
Revision: 0
Lower flaps to full deflection and repeat exercises listed above.
STALLS, POWER-ON
Practicing power-on stalls offers the same benefits as practicing power-off stalls but expose the pilot to more
extreme attitudes and builds the pilot's proficiency at using rudder to counteract p-factor.
Suggested exercise procedure:
Establish full power, wings level climb at 65 kt IAS. Increase nose-up attitude by approximately 15° and maintain
that attitude as airspeed decays to the stall.
Stall will be noted by the nose pitching-down abruptly and rolling right or left up to 15°.
While approaching the stall, maintain wings-level using rudder only and keeping the ailerons neutral. Upon stall,
release stick back pressure and re-establish wings level climbing flight at target airspeed.
Establish 30° bank turn to the right and repeat above exercise.
Establish 30° bank turn to the left and repeat above exercise.
Lower flaps to ½ deflection and repeat exercises listed above.
TURNS, STEEP TURNS
Continuous turns of 360° (or more) are good to practice because it familiarizes the pilot with the sight picture of
being banked at 45° or more for a period of time long enough to complete a full turn. The sight picture in a side-byside aircraft is different for a turn to the left versus a turn to the right. Practicing turns also exposes the pilot to the
physical sensation of additional acceleration and maintaining directional orientation during a period of rapid
heading change. Turn practice also exposes the pilot to how much additional power is required to overcome the
increase in induced drag associated with the g-loading of a steep turn.
Suggested exercise procedure:
Establish full power cruise flight and trim for level flight. Point the nose of the aircraft at a prominent point on the
horizon to use for reference.
Roll into a 45° bank left turn and continue the turn for a full 360° ending with the nose pointed exactly at the preselected reference point. Maintain constant altitude throughout the turn and after rolling-out on point. Note the
amount of back stick pressure required to maintain constant altitude. Maintain altitude by visual reference to the
horizon with only very quick glances at the EFIS to verify altitude.
Repeat the above exercise except perform the turn to the right.
Repeat the above exercise except use 60° of bank.
Repeat the above exercise except perform the turn to the left.
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SECTION XII
DESCENT
INDEX
NORMAL RATE DESCENT
EXPEDITED DESCENT
12-1
12-1
NORMAL RATE DESCENT
For normal operations select a power setting and pitch attitude that will yield a 500 ft/min rate of descent while
maintaining airspeed between 100 and 110 kt indicated air speed. For cross-country operations, the most efficient
way to operate the aircraft is to maintain indicated air speed but with power reduced so as to yield the desired
descent rate. It is most efficient to select a slower descent rate over a longer time than to descend at a high rate but
shorter time. Additionally, a slower rate/longer duration descent will help keep the oil temperature from dropping
below the minimum allowed.
When descending for landing, initiation of descent should be selected so as to arrive over the landing pattern entry
point at proper traffic pattern altitude and target airspeed.
EXPEDITED DESCENT
For situations requiring an expedited descent, placing the aircraft into a slip will increase drag and allow for a more
rapid descent without exceeding airspeed limits. Another technique for expedited descent is to close the throttle
and slow to approximately 80 kt IAS and place the aircraft in a 60 to 70 degree bank descending spiral. The
additional acceleration (2 g for a 60 degree bank turn) increases induced drag and allows for a more rapid descent
without building-up excess speed. The g-loading must be maintained otherwise the aircraft will quickly build speed.
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Date: 08/12/13
SECTION XIII
LANDING
INDEX
TRAFFIC PATTERN
NORMAL LANDING
OBSTACLE CLEARANCE LANDING
SOFT FIELD LANDING
CROSSWIND LANDING
BALKED LANDING
13-1
13-1
13-2
13-2
13-2
13-2
TRAFFIC PATTERN
Enter the landing pattern at traffic pattern altitude. Maintain traffic pattern altitude and adjust power so as to arrive
on downwind opposite the target touch-down point at 80 kt IAS and at target altitude. Smoothly reduce power to
idle maintaining target altitude until airspeed decays to 65 kt IAS. Lower flaps to ½ deflection and allow airspeed to
decay to 55 kt IAS. Maintain target airspeed by allowing altitude to decay.
Choose point for base turn so as to allow for arrival at the target touch-down point while maintaining engine power
at idle. Vary descent rate by lowering flaps to full deflection.
Choose point for turn to final so as to allow for ground contact at the target touch-down point at minimum airspeed
while maintaining engine power at idle.
Descent rate may be increased by slipping the aircraft.
Descent rate may be decreased by addition of engine power.
NORMAL LANDING
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Seat Belt – Pilot and Passenger – FASTENED & SNUG
Brakes – CHECK FIRM then release
Ignition Switch – BOTH ON
Throttle – AS DESIRED to control rate of descent
Trim - AS REQUIRED
Flaps – AS DESIRED (below 82 kts CAS)
Approach Speed – 55-60 kts
Throttle – AS DESIRED to control rate of descent
Touch Down - MAIN WHEELS FIRST
After Touch Down –
Stabilator Control – FULL AFT
Brake as Required
Maintain 55 kt IAS approach speed until the main wheels are approximately 5 feet off the runway. Fully close the
throttle if any power had been added. Smoothly raise the nose to a landing attitude without gaining altitude or
"ballooning". If the aircraft gains altitude then the transition to landing attitude is being made too quickly.
Once the aircraft is in the landing attitude, maintain attitude by continuing to smoothly move the stick aft while
allowing the aircraft to slowly descend until the main wheels contact the runway.
With main wheels on the runway, maintain nose-high attitude by keeping the stick full aft after touch-down. The
nose wheel should be slowly lowered to the runway as speed decays and stabilator effectiveness diminishes.
Apply brakes if/as required to stop before the end of the runway or make the next runway turn-off. For maximum
brake effectiveness after all three wheels are on the ground, retract the flaps, hold stick full aft and apply maximum
possible brake pressure without sliding the tires.
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OBSTACLE CLEARANCE LANDING
Use of normal landing procedures in addition:
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Revision: 1
Flaps – FULL DOWN
Approach Airspeed – 55 kts
Throttle – AS DESIRED to control rate of descent
Slip aircraft a necessary to increase rate of descent
WARNING
A relatively high rate of descent is possible in this configuration when at full gross weight and the
throttle closed. If airspeed is allowed to decrease below 55 kts, level off can only be assured with an
application of power.
SOFT FIELD LANDING
The best technique for use on soft or rough fields is to fly the landing approach at minimum speed carrying power
into the landing flare and using an extreme nose high landing attitude so as to touch down with minimum airspeed.
So as to avoid unnecessary nose gear loads, it is especially important that the nose wheel is gently lowered to the
runway after the speed has diminished.
CROSSWIND LANDING
Crosswind approaches can best be accomplished by using the wing down/top rudder method touching first on the
down wing side main wheel, followed by the other main wheel, and finally lowering the nose wheel all the while
keeping the stick into the wind.
During gusty wind conditions, fly the landing approach at approximately 5 kts above normal and touch down with
the nose slightly lower than for a normal landing.
BALKED LANDING
Use of normal landing procedures in addition at the time of going around:
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Throttle – FULL OPEN
Flaps – 1st DETENT
Airspeed –
Best Angle 60 kts CAS
Flaps – 1st DETENT until clear of obstacle, then
Best Rate 75 kts CAS
Flaps – UP
NOTE
Upon full application of power, expect to hold right rudder to account for p-factor and forward pressure
on the stick until re-trimming to maintain desired climb speed.
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SECTION XIV
SHUT DOWN
INDEX
SHUT DOWN
14-1
SHUT DOWN
Upon arriving at the desired stopping point, throttle idle, ELT check light off, turn ignition switches off, then turn off
the avionics switch, then turn off any other switches, finally turn off the master switch.
SkyView Only: The EFIS and GPS will continue to operate on their internal batteries and will shut down
automatically but in order to preserve the internal battery life, it is recommended that the units be shut down
immediately after the avionics switch has been turned off.
Post Ignition - Due to hot weather
 Ignition – BOTH ON
 Choke – ON
 Ignition – 3 seconds BOTH OFF
NOTE
If high winds are anticipated, the aircraft should be hangered. If the aircraft must be left out, perk into
the wind and use additional tie-down ropes for security. Place the flaps in the full up position and
secure the control stick full aft with the lap belt.
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Date:04/03/14
SECTION XV
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
INDEX
FIRE
ENGINE FIRE DURING START
ENGINE FIRE IN FLIGHT
ELECTRICAL FIRE IN FLIGHT
GENERATOR/ELECTRICAL FAILURE
ENGINE MALFUNCTION
ENGINE FAILURE ON TAKEOFF
ENGINE AIR RESTART
15-4
PARTIAL POWER LOSS/ROUGH RUNNING
ABNORMAL OIL PRESSURE/TEMPERATURE
INDICATIONS
LANDING EMERGENCIES
PRECAUTIONARY LANDING APPROACH
FORCED LANDING (COMPLETE
POWER FAILURE)
BRAKE FAILURE
DITCHING
UNUSUAL FLIGHT CONDITIONS
SEVERE TURBULENCE
STALLS
SPINS
RUNAWAY TRIM MOTOR
IN FLIGHT OVERSTRESS
15-1
15-1
15-1
15-2
15-2
15-3
15-3
15-4
15-4
15-4
15-4
15-5
15-6
15-6
15-7
15-7
15-7
15-7
15-7
15-7
GENERAL
This section covers the recommended procedures to follow during emergency and adverse flight conditions. As it is not
possible to define every type of emergency that may occur, it is the pilot’s responsibility to use sound judgment based on
personal experience and knowledge of the aircraft to determine the best course of action.
It is considered mandatory that the pilot be familiar with this entire manual, in particular, the “Emergency Procedures”
section prior to flight.
NOTE
All airspeeds in this section are calibrated airspeeds (CAS) unless stated otherwise.
FIRE
ENGINE FIRE DURING START
If the fire is believed to be confined to the intake or exhaust system (result of flooding engine):




Continue cranking engine with starter
Choke – PUSH OPEN
Throttle – FULL OPEN
Inspect aircraft thoroughly for damage and cause prior to restart
If fire persists or is not limited to intake or exhaust system:




Fuel Shut-Off Valve – PULL UP - OFF
Electrical and Ignition switches – ALL OFF
Exit Aircraft
Direct fire extinguisher through the air outlet tunnel at the bottom of the cowl
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Revision: 2
ENGINE FIRE IN FLIGHT

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
Fuel Shut-Off Valve – PULL UP - OFF
Ignition switches – BOTH OFF
Effect an expedited descent and land immediately using “Forced Landing Procedures”
WARNING
Do not attempt to restart engine.
ELECTRICAL FIRE
An electrical fire is usually indicated by an odor of hot or burning insulation.




Electrical Switches – ALL OFF (leave master and ignition switches ON)
Air Vent – OPEN if necessary for smoke removal and ventilation
Use hand fire extinguisher if available
Land immediately (or as soon as practical if location for safe landing is not available)
GENERATOR/ELECTRICAL FAILURE (D-180)
WARNING
Electrical fuel pump operation depends upon sufficient battery power. Monitor the fuel pressure provided by the
mechanical engine driven pump if the electrical pump has been shut off using the master switch or fuel pump fuse.
A generator failure is indicated by a steady discharge on the ammeter and voltage indication less than 12.0 volts.

Turn OFF all non-essential electrical equipment to conserve battery power. The avionics switch should be switched
off and the EFIS and GPS will continue to operate on their internal batteries.

Land as soon as possible as the battery will furnish electrical power for a limited time only.
A voltage in excess of 15 volts indicates a runaway generator.




Turn Master OFF
Pull the 30A main bus fuse immediately.
Turn OFF all non-essential electrical equipment to conserve battery power. The avionics switch should be switched
off and the EFIS and GPS will continue to operate on their internal batteries.
Land as soon as possible as the battery will furnish electrical power for a limited time only.
GENERATOR/ELECTRICAL FAILURE (SKYVIEW – G3X)
WARNING
Electrical fuel pump operation depends upon sufficient battery power. Monitor the fuel pressure provided by the
mechanical engine driven pump if the electrical pump has been shut off using the master switch or fuel pump fuse.
A generator failure is indicated by a steady discharge on the ammeter and voltage indication less than 12.0 volts.


Turn OFF all non-essential electrical equipment to conserve battery power.
Land as soon as possible as the battery and EFIS backup battery will furnish electrical power for a limited time only.
A voltage in excess of 15 volts indicates a runaway generator.



Pull the 30A main bus fuse immediately.
Turn OFF all non-essential electrical equipment to conserve battery power.
Land as soon as possible as the battery and EFIS backup battery will furnish electrical power for a limited time only.
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ENGINE MALFUNCTION
ENGINE FAILURE ON TAKE-OFF
WARNING
In the event of engine failure, the control stick must be IMMEDIATELY and AGGRESSIVELY moved forward to
prevent loss of airspeed.

Airspeed – 60 kts (55 kts minimum)
If airborne and sufficient runway remains:
 Throttle – CLOSED
 Land using maximum braking after touchdown.
If airborne and insufficient runway remains for landing, attempt an engine restart if altitude permits:
 Fuel Shut-Off Valve – CHECK ON - DOWN
 Choke – CHECK OPEN - PUSH
 Ignition Switches – BOTH ON
 Fuel Pump - CHECK FUSE (illuminated if blown)
If no restart is possible:
 Select most favorable landing area ahead
 Flaps – FULL DOWN
 Fuel Shut-Off Valve – OFF
 Ignition switches – OFF
WARNING
Maintain flying speed at all times and do not attempt to turn back toward the runway unless sufficient
altitude has been achieved.


Master switch - OFF
Touchdown with minimum airspeed particularly if landing on rough terrain.
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ENGINE AIR RESTART

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



Maintain Airspeed – 60 kts (55 kts minimum)
Ignition Switches – BOTH ON
Fuel Pump – CHECK FUSE (illuminated if blown)
Fuel Shut-Off Valve – CHECK ON - DOWN
Choke – CHECK OPEN - PUSH
If restart not possible, change throttle and/or choke settings in attempt to restart
Follow “Forced Landing Procedure” if unable to restart
NOTE
The engine starter may be engaged in flight should the propeller stop windmilling.
Propeller will not windmill below 80 kt IAS.
PARTIAL POWER LOSS/ROUGH RUNNING


Follow the engine air restart procedures
Land as soon as possible using “Precautionary Landing Approach” procedures
ABNORMAL OIL PRESSURE/TEMPERATURE INDICATIONS
Oil pressure and temperature problems are usually related with one affecting the other. Before any drastic action is
taken, cross check other engine instruments and control settings in an attempt to determine the source of the problem.
High oil temperature is generally a result of loss of oil or overheating (note CHT). If the situation remains unchecked, oil
pressure usually drops resulting in possible engine damage. Power should be reduced while maintaining cruise
airspeed; land as soon as practical.
Little or no oil pressure is usually caused by a failed pressure relief valve, pump, loss of oil, high oil temperature or a
defective gauge. A landing should be made as soon as practical using minimum RPM changes. Plan a “Precautionary
Landing Approach” as complete engine failure is possible at any time.
NOTE (SkyView Only)
Zero oil pressure will be indicated if main bus power is removed.
LANDING EMERGENCIES
PRECAUTIONARY LANDING APPROACH
A precautionary landing approach should be used whenever power is still available but a complete power failure is
considered imminent. Maintain a higher and closer pattern than normal in attempt to remain in gliding distance of
the intended touchdown point. Use the normal landing procedures in addition:



Airspeed – 60 kts recommended (55 kts minimum)
Throttle – CLOSED when in gliding distance of runway
Flaps – LOWER AS NEEDED to increase approach descent angle
NOTE
Slipping the aircraft by cross controlling the rudder and ailerons will increase the rate of descent both
with or without flaps. If a crosswind exists, place the lower wing into the wind.
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RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revsion: 2
Date:04/03/14
FORCED LANDING (Complete Power Failure)
If the engine cannot be restarted in flight, trim the aircraft to the recommended glide speed. Remain within gliding
distance of the intended point of landing. Maintain a higher and closer pattern than normal making allowance for
wind.
Extending flaps or slipping the aircraft can lose additional altitude. Diving the aircraft in an attempt to lose altitude
when flying into a headwind will only increase the required landing distance.









Maximum gliding distance airspeed – 63 kts
Minimum rate of descent airspeed- 60 kts
Fuel Shut-Off Valve – PULL UP - OFF
Flaps – UP to increase glide range
Radio – MAYDAY 121.5 MHz
Attempt to position the aircraft approximately 1000 feet above ground level (AGL) when on downwind and
abeam the intended point of landing.
Ignition switches – BOTH OFF
On Final Approach
a) Airspeed – 60 kts (55 kts minimum)
b) Flaps – DOWN after intended point of landing assured
Master Switch - OFF
Touchdown with minimum airspeed particularly if landing on rough terrain.
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
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Date:04/03/14
Revision: 2
BRAKE FAILURE
At or above approximately 15 kt adequate steering, except in crosswinds, be maintained with aerodynamic rudder
control but at low speeds the RV-12 relies on differential braking for steering. On any landing the pilot has two
basic goals: to bring the airplane to a stop and to keep it going straight enough to remain on the runway. During the
higher speed portion of the roll-out, the aerodynamic rudder control is adequate for steering. Another steering aid
might be a crosswind. While cross winds cause an airplane to weathervane and turn into the wind, this turning
tendency can be used to advantage. Consider the crosswind turning tendency to be the same as a partially applied
brake on that side of the airplane. Thus, if at all possible, plan a landing so that the wind is coming from the side of
the failed brake. Use the good brake to counteract the turning tendency of the crosswind. This translates into
heavier braking and a quicker stop.
If runway length is a problem, shut the engine off as soon as a go-around is no longer an option. This will minimize
the energy dissipation needed. Holding rudder pressure opposite the good brake will permit additional force to be
applied, particularly at higher speeds. If there is a light wind or no wind, opposite rudder pressure is the only
counter force available for the good brake. This means that at low speeds, there is virtually no steering or braking
available.
Should the available runway be sufficiently long or wide, it is possible to coast to a stop within the confines of the
runway. If runway length is not available, the pilot should steer toward the dead brake side of the runway while
rudder steering control is still available. This will keep the maximum runway width available on the good brake side
so that a sharp turn can be executed to bring the airplane to a safe stop.
Possibly the worst moment for the pilot to discover a "no-brake" situation would be just as brake is applied following
touch-down. Unless there is a long, wide runway ahead, power should probably be applied to get the aircraft back
into the air. This would provide time to consider the options mentioned above. This might mean selecting a more
favorable runway or diverting to another airport with more favorable runway options. At the very least, time would
be available to plan for and more calmly execute a failed brake landing.
DITCHING
Should it become necessary to make a forced landing over water, follow the “Forced Landing Procedures” in
addition to the following:





Land into wind if high winds are evident or parallel to swells with calm winds
Flaps – UP (allows higher nose attitude at touchdown)
Canopy – UNLATCH (just before touchdown)
Contact the water with nose high attitude
After coming to complete stop – EXIT AIRCRAFT
NOTE
Aircraft cannot be depended upon to provide flotation after contacting the water.
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RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
Revsion: 2
Date:04/03/14
UNUSUAL FLIGHT CONDITIONS
SEVERE TURBULENCE
To prevent overstressing the aircraft do not exceed 108 kts in rough air. To minimize personal discomfort, decrease the
CAS below 90 kts. Maintain a level flight attitude rather than flying by reference to the EFIS as the pitot-static indications
may become very erratic.
STALLS
The RV-12 stall characteristics are conventional. Additionally, the RV-12 is equipped with a vane-type stall warning
buzzer that activates approximately 7 kt above stall speed.
Aileron control response in a fully stalled condition is marginal. Large aileron deflections will aggravate a near stalled
condition and their use is not recommended to maintain lateral control. The rudder is very effective and should be used
for maintaining lateral control in a stalled condition with the ailerons placed in a neutral position.
To recover from a stall, proceed as follows:



Nose attitude – LOWER with relaxation of back pressure on control stick
Throttle – FULL OPEN simultaneously with relaxation of back pressure on stick
Use rudder to maintain lateral control
SPINS
If a spin is inadvertently entered, immediate recovery should be initiated. The recovery procedure is as follows:




Throttle – CLOSED
Rudder – FULL DEFLECTION opposite direction of rotation
Stabilator – SLIGHTLY FORWARD OF NEUTRAL
Ailerons – NEUTRAL POSITION
When rotation stops (1/2 – 1 turn after recovery initiated)


Rudder – NEUTRALIZE
Nose Attitude – RAISE smoothly to level flight attitude
WARNING
During the spin recovery, the airspeed will build very rapidly with a nose low attitude. Do not use
full or abrupt stabilator control movements.
RUNAWAY TRIM MOTOR
If the trim motor should begin to run uncommanded in one or the other direction the following actions should be
taken:





Pull the trim fuse as soon as runaway condition is recognized
Move the Autopilot switch position to OFF
Stabilator - HOLD against out of trim condition
Airspeed may be reduced as a way to lessen the amount of stick force required to maintain level flight
Land as soon as possible
INFLIGHT OVERSTRESS
Should an overstress occur due to exceeding the airspeed or load factor limits, aggressive maneuvering should be
terminated immediately. Fly at a reduced airspeed (65 – 75 kts) to a suitable landing point. DO NOT under any
circumstances make large control movements or subject the aircraft to additional G loadings above that required
for straight and level flight. After landing, the aircraft should be inspected by a mechanic or repairman prior to the
next flight
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Date: 07/09/09
SECTION XVI
GROUND HANDLING
INDEX
TIE-DOWN PROCEDURE
CONTROL LOCKING PROCEDURE
FUELING PROCEDURE
WING REMOVAL/INSTALLATION
16-1
16-1
16-1
16-1
TIE-DOWN PROCEDURE
If possible, the aircraft should be oriented such that the nose is facing into the wind. Flaps should be retracted. The
wings should be tied-down first with the ropes/chains pulling outward and slightly forward from the wing tie-down points.
With the wings secured, pull the aircraft backward to remove slack from the ropes/chains on the wings then attach the
tie-down rope/chain to the tail tie-down point. If a helper is available, have that person push the tail down and hold it
down while the tail is being secured.
CONTROL LOCKING PROCEDURE
The flaperons and stabilator controls are secured by fastening the pilot side lap belt around the stick. The rudder is
locked by installing the spring-loaded rudder pedal lock.
FUELING PROCEDURE
The recommended fuel is UL 92 basically "super unleaded" auto fuel. If this fuel is used, there is no need for fuel
additives and the engine maintenance intervals are longer (see Rotax service information for more details).
When UL 92 is unavailable, 100LL Avgas may be used so long as the proper fuel additive is used (see Rotax service
information for more details).
WING REMOVAL/INSTALLATION
Removal and installation of the wings requires two people, one to hold the wing at the tip end and the second
person to hold the stub end of the wing. The person handling the tip end of the wing must hold the flaperon
approximately in trail as it will tend to flip around and possibly become damaged when disengaged from the
fuselage.
REMOVAL
1. Withdraw each of the fuselage pins only enough to release the right wing spar.
2. Remove the right wing and set aside.
3. Remove both of the fuselage pins.
4. Remove the left wing and set aside.
INSTALLATION
Installation procedure is reverse of the removal procedure
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RV-12
FLIGHT TRAINING SUPPLEMENT
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
FRONT COVER
Date:04/03/14
Revision:2
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RV-12 FTS
Revsion: 2
Date: 04/03/14
RV-12 Flight Training Supplement
REAR COVER
Date: 04/03/14
Revision: 2
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RV-12 FTS
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