OPMA M3-G4
User Manual
OPMA M3-G4 User Manual
CONTENTS
iii
Contents
Contents ........................................................................................ iii
Tables .............................................................................................vi
Figures ...........................................................................................vii
Preface........................................................................................... ix
Copyright .................................................................................................................... ix
Document Version and Date ...................................................................................... ix
Trademarks ................................................................................................................ ix
About the OPMA Module ............................................................................................ x
Limited Warranty ......................................................................................................... x
Limitations of Liability .................................................................................................. x
Technical Support ....................................................................................................... x
Chapter 1: The Quick Start Guide .................................................. 1
About the OPMA M3-G4 Module................................................................................. 1
Connecting the OPMA Module to the Host System .................................................... 1
Initial Network Configuration ....................................................................................... 2
Web Interface.............................................................................................................. 2
The Remote Console .................................................................................................. 3
Chapter 2. Introduction .................................................................. 4
General Information .................................................................................................... 4
Features ...................................................................................................................... 4
OPMA add-on Card System Components .................................................................. 5
When the Server is up and running............................................................................. 5
When the Server is dead............................................................................................. 5
Chapter 3. OPMA Installation Guide .............................................. 7
About the OPMA add-on card ..................................................................................... 7
Connectors .................................................................................................................. 7
Connecting the OPMA add-on card to the Host System....................................................................7
Connecting the Ethernet ....................................................................................................................8
10 Mbps Connection..........................................................................................................................8
100 Mbps Connection........................................................................................................................8
Chapter 4. OPMA Modul Configuration........................................... 9
Initial Configuration ..................................................................................................... 9
Initial Configuration via DHCP Server ......................................................................... 9
Initial Configuration via Serial Console........................................................................ 9
Web Interface............................................................................................................ 12
Mouse and Keyboard Configuration.......................................................................... 12
Remote Mouse Modes.....................................................................................................................12
Remote Mouse Settings ..................................................................................................................13
Auto Mouse Speed and Mouse Synchronization .............................................................................13
Host System Mouse Settings...........................................................................................................14
Single and Double Mouse Mode......................................................................................................15
Recommended Mouse Settings.......................................................................................................15
Video Modes....................................................................................................................................15
Resetting the OPMA module to its Factory Settings ................................................. 16
Using the Serial Interface ................................................................................................................16
Using KiraTool .................................................................................................................................16
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Chapter 5. OPMA Module Usage .................................................. 17
Prerequisites ............................................................................................................. 17
Login and Logout to the OPMA Module .................................................................... 18
Login into the OPMA Module ...........................................................................................................18
Navigation ................................................................................................................. 19
Logging out of the OPMA Module ............................................................................. 20
The Remote Console ................................................................................................ 20
General Description .........................................................................................................................20
Main Window ...................................................................................................................................21
Remote Console Control Bar ...........................................................................................................21
Remote Console Options.................................................................................................................24
Remote Console Status Line ...........................................................................................................30
Optimizing the Video Picture............................................................................................................31
Using the OPMA module with low bandwidth ..................................................................................32
Chapter 6. Menu Options .............................................................. 33
Remote Control ......................................................................................................... 33
KVM Console...................................................................................................................................33
Virtual Media ............................................................................................................. 34
Floppy Disk ......................................................................................................................................34
CD ROM ..........................................................................................................................................35
Drive Redirection .............................................................................................................................39
Options ............................................................................................................................................44
Creating an Image ...........................................................................................................................45
System Health ........................................................................................................... 47
Chassis Control ...............................................................................................................................47
Monitor Sensors...............................................................................................................................48
System Event Log............................................................................................................................49
System Alert Management ..............................................................................................................50
User Management..................................................................................................... 52
Change Password ...........................................................................................................................52
Users And Groups ...........................................................................................................................53
KVM Settings ............................................................................................................ 56
User Console ...................................................................................................................................56
Keyboard/Mouse..............................................................................................................................59
Device Settings ......................................................................................................... 61
Network ...........................................................................................................................................61
Dynamic DNS ..................................................................................................................................64
Security............................................................................................................................................66
Certificate ........................................................................................................................................71
USB Device Settings .......................................................................................................................74
Date And Time.................................................................................................................................75
Authentication Settings ....................................................................................................................76
Event Log ........................................................................................................................................79
SNMP ..............................................................................................................................................82
Maintenance.............................................................................................................. 85
Device Information...........................................................................................................................85
Event Log ........................................................................................................................................86
Update Firmware .............................................................................................................................87
Unit Reset ........................................................................................................................................88
Appendix A: Troubleshooting ....................................................... 90
Appendix B. Glossary ................................................................... 92
Appendix C. KiraTool Commands................................................. 94
Supported Operating Systems .................................................................................. 94
Supported Interfaces ................................................................................................. 94
Supported Functionality ............................................................................................ 94
Usage........................................................................................................................ 94
Return Code .............................................................................................................. 97
CONTENTS
v
Appendix D. Configuring the RADIUS Server ............................... 98
Prerequisites ............................................................................................................. 98
Add and configure a RADIUS client.......................................................................... 98
Setup a custom remote access policy ...................................................................... 99
Appendix E. Key Codes .............................................................. 101
Appendix F. Pin Assignment....................................................... 103
OPMA Connector .................................................................................................... 103
RJ45 Connetcor Ethernet........................................................................................ 103
Serial SUB-D9 Connectors ..................................................................................... 103
Appendix G. Specifications ........................................................ 105
Sizes and Weights .................................................................................................. 105
Environment ............................................................................................................ 105
Temperature ..................................................................................................................................105
Humidity.........................................................................................................................................105
Appendix H. Raritan Inc. Warrenty Information......................... 106
Limited Warranty ..................................................................................................... 106
Customer Remedies ............................................................................................... 106
No Other Warranties ............................................................................................... 106
No Liability For Consequential Damages ................................................................ 106
Appendix I. GNU General Public License (GPL)......................... 107
Appendix J. The OpenLDAP Public License............................... 112
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Tables
Table 1 - 1. Initial Network Configuration................................................................................................. 2
Table 1 - 2. Login Settings......................................................................................................................... 2
Table 2 - 1. Hardware Failures .................................................................................................................. 5
Table 2 - 2. Host System Failures and how they are detected ............................................................... 6
Table 4 - 1. Initial Network Configuration................................................................................................. 9
Table 4 - 2. Serial Line Parameters......................................................................................................... 10
Table 4 - 3. Standard User Settings........................................................................................................ 12
Table 5 - 1. Standard User Settings........................................................................................................ 19
Table 5 - 2. Front End Buttons ................................................................................................................ 20
Table 5 - 3. Buttons displaying the Access State.................................................................................. 31
Table 5 - 4. Buttons displaying the Monitor Only State ........................................................................ 31
Table 6 - 1. Event Log Assignments....................................................................................................... 81
Table C - 1. Options Overview ................................................................................................................ 94
Table C - 2. Commands Overview .......................................................................................................... 95
Table C - 3. Return Codes Overview ...................................................................................................... 97
Table E - 1. Key Names.......................................................................................................................... 101
Table F - 1. RJ45..................................................................................................................................... 103
Table F - 2. Serial Sub D9 Connector 1 ................................................................................................ 104
Table F - 3. Serial Sub D9 Connector 2 ................................................................................................ 104
Table G - 1. OPMA Specification........................................................................................................... 105
Table G - 2. Temperature ....................................................................................................................... 105
Table G - 3. Humidity ............................................................................................................................. 105
FIGURES
Figures
Figure 1 - 1. OPMA M3-G4 Module............................................................................................................ 1
Figure 1 - 2. Top Part of the Remote Console for “Windows Operating Systems” .............................. 3
Figure 1 - 3. Top Part of the Remote Console for “Other Operating Systems” .................................... 3
Figure 2 - 1. OPMA M3-G4 Module............................................................................................................ 4
Figure 3 - 1. OPMA add-on Module........................................................................................................... 7
Figure 4 - 1. Remote Console Control Bar: Sync Button...................................................................... 14
Figure 5 - 1. The Internet Explorer displaying the Encryption Key Length......................................... 18
Figure 5 - 2. Login Screen ....................................................................................................................... 18
Figure 5 - 3. Main Page ............................................................................................................................ 19
Figure 5 - 4. Remote Console.................................................................................................................. 20
Figure 5 - 5. Remote Console Control Bar ............................................................................................. 21
Figure 5 - 6. Remote Console Applet Drive Redirection Menu............................................................. 22
Figure 5 - 7. Redirecting a Local Drive ................................................................................................... 22
Figure 5 - 8. Redirecting an ISO Image .................................................................................................. 23
Figure 5 - 9. Successfully Drive Redirection Connection..................................................................... 23
Figure 5 - 10. Remote Console Options Menu....................................................................................... 24
Figure 5 - 11. Remote Console Options Menu: Scaling........................................................................ 25
Figure 5 - 12. Remote Console Options Menu: Mouse Handling ......................................................... 25
Figure 5 - 13. Remote Console Options Menu: Local Cursor............................................................... 26
Figure 5 - 14. Remote Console Options Menu: Chat Window .............................................................. 26
Figure 5 - 15. Remote Console Options Menu: Soft Keyboard ............................................................ 27
Figure 5 - 16. Remote Console Options Menu: Soft Keyboard Mapping............................................. 28
Figure 5 - 17. Remote Console Options Menu: Local Keyboard.......................................................... 28
Figure 5 - 18. Remote Console Options Menu: Hotkey Confirmation Dialog...................................... 28
Figure 5 - 19. Remote Console Options Menu: Encoding Compression............................................. 29
Figure 5 - 20. Remote Console Options Menu: Predefined Encoding Compression ......................... 29
Figure 5 - 21. Remote Console Options Menu: Lossy Compression .................................................. 30
Figure 5 - 22. Remote Console Options Menu: Color Depth ................................................................ 30
Figure 5 - 23. Status Line......................................................................................................................... 30
Figure 5 - 24. Status Line Transfer Rate................................................................................................. 31
Figure 6 - 1. KVM Console....................................................................................................................... 33
Figure 6 - 2. Virtual Floppy Area ............................................................................................................. 34
Figure 6 - 3. Select Image File................................................................................................................. 34
Figure 6 - 4. CD-ROM Selection .............................................................................................................. 35
Figure 6 - 5. The Image File on the Share .............................................................................................. 36
Figure 6 - 6. Explorer Context Menu....................................................................................................... 37
Figure 6 - 7. Share Configuration Dialog................................................................................................ 38
Figure 6 - 8. Drive Redirection ................................................................................................................ 39
Figure 6 - 9. Main View............................................................................................................................. 40
Figure 6 - 10. Selecting the Desired Drive.............................................................................................. 41
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Figure 6 - 11. Selecting Write Support ................................................................................................... 42
Figure 6 - 12. Device Authentication ...................................................................................................... 42
Figure 6 - 13. Tray Info............................................................................................................................. 43
Figure 6 - 14. USB Mass Storage Option................................................................................................ 44
Figure 6 - 15. RawWrite for Windows Selection Dialog ........................................................................ 45
Figure 6 - 16. Nero Selecting Dialog....................................................................................................... 46
Figure 6 - 17. Chassis Control ................................................................................................................ 47
Figure 6 - 18. Monitoring Remote Sensors Screen ............................................................................... 48
Figure 6 - 19. System Event Log Screen ................................................................................................ 49
Figure 6 - 20. System Alert Settings....................................................................................................... 50
Figure 6 - 21. System Alert Policy Settings ........................................................................................... 50
Figure 6 - 22. System Alert LAN Destinition Settings ........................................................................... 51
Figure 6 - 23. Set Password .................................................................................................................... 52
Figure 6 - 24. Set User ............................................................................................................................. 53
Figure 6 - 25. Set Permissions for the Group “user” ............................................................................ 55
Figure 6 - 26. User Console Settings (Part 1) ........................................................................................ 56
Figure 6 - 27. User Console Settings (Part 2) ........................................................................................ 57
Figure 6 - 28. Keyboard and Mouse Settings......................................................................................... 59
Figure 6 - 29. Network Settings............................................................................................................... 61
Figure 6 - 30. Dynamic DNS .................................................................................................................... 64
Figure 6 - 31. Dynamic DNS Scenario .................................................................................................... 64
Figure 6 - 32. Device Security ................................................................................................................. 66
Figure 6 - 33. Example of Use for IP Access Control ............................................................................ 69
Figure 6 - 34. Example of Use for the Group based System Access Control ..................................... 69
Figure 6 - 35. Device Security (Part 2) .................................................................................................... 70
Figure 6 - 36. Certificate Settings ........................................................................................................... 71
Figure 6 - 37. SSL Certificate Upload ..................................................................................................... 72
Figure 6 - 38. USB Device Settings......................................................................................................... 74
Figure 6 - 39. Date and Time ................................................................................................................... 75
Figure 6 - 40. LDAP and other Authentication Settings........................................................................ 76
Figure 6 - 41. Event Log........................................................................................................................... 79
Figure 6 - 42. SNMP Settings .................................................................................................................. 82
Figure 6 - 43. Device Information............................................................................................................ 85
Figure 6 - 44. Connected Users .............................................................................................................. 85
Figure 6 - 45. Event Log List ................................................................................................................... 86
Figure 6 - 46. Update Firmware............................................................................................................... 87
Figure 6 - 47. Unit Reset .......................................................................................................................... 88
Figure E - 1. English (US) Keyboard Layout, used for the Key Codes .............................................. 101
PREFACE
ix
Preface
Copyright
Copyright 2004-2006 Raritan Inc.
All rights reserved.
Peppercon AG
Scheringerstr. 1
08056 Zwickau
Germany
Document Version and Date
Version: 1.9
Date: Thursday, December 13, 2007
Trademarks
This publication contains proprietary information which is protected by copyright. No part
of this publication may be reproduced, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, translated
into any language or computer language, or transmitted in any form whatsoever without the
prior written consent of the publisher, Raritan.
Raritan acknowledges the following trademarks:
•
Intel is a registered trademark of Intel Corporation.
•
Windows 98, Microsoft Windows,Windows NT, Windows 2000 and Windows XP
are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
•
IBM, AT, VGA, PS/2, and OS/2 are registered trademarks and XT and CGA are
trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation.
•
Raritan is a registered trademark of Raritan Incorporated.
Other trademarks and trade names may be used in this document to refer to either the
entities claiming the marks and names or their products. Raritan disclaims any proprietary
interest in trademarks and trade names other than its own.
The firmware of this product uses in part software under GPL licence. See Appendix D for
the license text.
This product includes software developed by the University of California, Berkeley and its
contributors.
This software is based in part on the work of the Independent JPEG Group.
This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project for use in the OpenSSL
Toolkit (http://www.openssl.org/).
Authors: Raritan Team
PRODUCT USER GUIDE
X
About the OPMA Module
The OPMA module (OPMA M3-G4) provides remote server management capabilities: you
can use the OPMA add-on card to manage and monitor components in your servers. The
OPMA M3-G4 offers a comprehensive hardware solution for server management.
Limited Warranty
The buyer agrees that if this product proves to be defective, Raritan is only obligated to
repair or replace this product at Raritan’s discretion according to the terms and conditions
of Raritan’s general trading conditions.
Raritan shall not be held liable for any loss, expenses or damage, directly, incidentally or
consequentially resulting from the use of this product. Please see the Warranty Information
shipped with this product for full warranty details.
Limitations of Liability
Raritan shall in no event be held liable for any loss, expenses or damages of any kind
whatsoever, whether direct, indirect, incidental, or consequential (whether arising from the
design or use of this product or the support materials provided with the product). No action
or proceeding against Raritan may be commenced more than two years after the delivery of
the product to the buyer.
The licensee agrees to defend and indemnify Raritan from any and all claims, suits, and
liabilities (including attorney’s fees) arising out of or resulting from any actual or alleged
act or omission on the part of Licensee, its authorized third parties, employees, or agents, in
connection with the distribution of Licensed Software to end-users, including, without
limitation, claims, suits, and liability for bodily or other injuries to end-users resulting from
use of Licensee’s product not caused solely by faults in Licensed Software as provided by
Raritan to Licensee.
Technical Support
If you need help installing, configuring, or running the OPMA, call your Raritan Technical
Support representative.
We invite you to access Raritan’s Web site (www.raritan.com) where you shall find all
modifications made after the editorial deadline. You may also contact us via e-mail to
support@raritan.com.
CHAPTER 1. THE QUICK START GUIDE
1
Chapter 1: The Quick Start Guide
About the OPMA M3-G4 Module
Figure 1 - 1. OPMA M3-G4 Module
The OPMA add-on card provides remote server management capabilities. You can use the
OPMA add-on card to manage and monitor components in your servers through the
WAN/LAN. The OPMA add-on card offers a comprehensive hardware solution for server
management.
One of the key features of the OPMA Module is an integrated BMC (Board Management
Controller). This allows you to not only collect the data from the motherboard sensors but
the OPMA can take an active role in controlling the motherboard fans and actors.
Connecting the OPMA Module to the Host System
Warning: Please note: the firmware of the OPMA board delivered to you is
customised for use with the specified motherboard. If you use your OPMA
module in a motherboard with a different sensor and actor configuration
it will most probably not operate correctly.
Connecting the OPMA module to the Host System is easy: turn off the host, find the
OPMA slot and carefully insert the OPMA module into the slot.
Note: In order to download the OPMA Specification you may go to
http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_papers_and_tech_docs/32200.pdf
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Warning: You should disconnect the host from the power supply
completely, including disconnecting the power supply cable.
Initial Network Configuration
Initially, the OPMA network interface is configured with the parameters shown in
Table 1 - 1.
Table 1 - 1. Initial Network Configuration
Parameter
Value
IP auto configuration
DHCP
IP address
-
Netmask
255.255.255.0
Gateway
none
Warning: If the DHCP connection fails on boot up, the OPMA will not have
an IP address and will not function on the network.
If this initial configuration does not meet your local requirements, adjust the values to your
needs. To retrieve the IP address of the OPMA add-on card , you could look into the
records on the DHCP server.
Needless to say, there are special tools provided by us to ease the configuration and setup
of the OPMA board. One of these tools is called “KiraTool”. The “KiraTool” is a small
command line based tool which is used for configuring and testing the OPMA module. It
can be used in environments where the web frontend cannot be used. On the delivered CD
ROM is provided a KiraTool version for Windows, LINUX and DOS.
Web Interface
The OPMA add-on card may be accessed using a standard Java enabled web browser. You
may use the HTTP protocol or a secure encrypted connection via HTTPS. Just enter the
configured IP address of the OPMA add-on card into your web browser.
The OPMA module will require you to change the administrators password to one of your
choice during the first login.
The initial login settings for the web interface are as follows:
Table 1 - 2. Login Settings
User
Pasword
super
pass
CHAPTER 1. THE QUICK START GUIDE
3
The Remote Console
The Remote Console is the redirected screen, keyboard and mouse of the remote host
system in which the OPMA is installed. The web browser which is used for accessing the
OPMA has to supply a Java Runtime Environment version 1.4 or higher.
Note: You can get things working with lower numbered versions of the JAVA Environment,
but we cannot guarantee that all features will be available.
The Remote Console will behave exactly the same way as if you were sitting directly in
front of the screen of your remote system. That means that both the keyboard and mouse
can be used in the usual way. Open the console by choosing the appropriate link in the
navigation frame of the HTML frontend. Figure 1 - 2 shows the top of the Remote Console.
Figure 1 - 2. Top Part of the Remote Console for “Windows Operating Systems”
Figure 1 - 3. Top Part of the Remote Console for “Other Operating Systems”
Generally modern operating systems mouse devices are connected to the USB port. In this
case you do not need to worry or configure mouse synchronisation and similar parameters.
This generally applies to all "modern"Windows Operating Systems like Windows 2000 and
2003, XP etc. MacIntosh OS/X is the same. They use "Absolute Mouse Mode".
The following options are ONLY visible and available if you choose the option "Other
Operating Systems" for the mouse.
In this case there are some options to choose from the menu, the most important one being
the following:
Sync Mouse
Choose this option in order to synchronize the local with the remote mouse cursor.
This is especially necessary when using accelerated mouse settings on the host
system. In general, there is no need to change mouse settings there.
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Chapter 2. Introduction
General Information
The OPMA add-on card is a manufacturer-independent remote administration system. It
works as an integrated solution on your server system.
Based on an embedded operating system, the OPMA add-on card provides both exceptional
stability and permanent availability independent of the present state of the servers operating
system.
As a system administrator, you can use the OPMA Module’s BMC to gain full control and
location-independent remote access to respond to critical incidents and to undertake
necessary maintenance.
Figure 2 - 1. OPMA M3-G4 Module
Features
The OPMA add-on card defines a new class of remote access devices. It combines digital
remote access via IP networks with IPMI-based comprehensive and integrated system
management. The OPMA add-on card offers convenient, remote KVM access and control
via LAN or Internet. It captures, digitizes, and compresses video and transmits it with
keyboard and mouse signals to and from a remote computer. Remote access and control
software runs on its embedded processors only but not on mission critical servers, so that
there is no interference with server operation or impact on network performance.
Furthermore, the OPMA add-on card offers integrated remote power management using
IPMI. Key features of the OPMA add-on card are:
•
OPMA Compliance
•
IPMI V2.0
•
KVM (keyboard, video, mouse) access over IP
•
No impact on server or network performance
•
Automatically senses video resolution for best possible screen capture
•
High-performancemouse tracking and synchronization
•
Local Mouse suppression (only when using SUNs Java Virtual Machine)
CHAPTER 2. INTRODUCTION
5
OPMA add-on Card System Components
The OPMA add-on card is an add-on card with the following dimensions: 70mm (L) x
67.5mm (W).
The OPMA add-on card is shipped with:
•
The actual OPMA module
•
CD-ROM with documentation: Installation Guide and User Manual
•
The Quick Start Guide
When the Server is up and running
The OPMA gives you full control over the remote server. The Management Console allows
you to access the remote server’s graphics, keyboard and mouse and to send special
commands to the server.
You can also perform periodic maintenance of the server. Using the Console Redirection
Service you can do the following:
•
Reboot the system (a graceful shutdown)
•
Monitor the boot process
•
Boot the system from a separate partition to load the diagnostic environment
•
Run special diagnostic programs
When the Server is dead
Obviously, fixing hardware defects is not possible using a remote management device.
Nevertheless, the OPMA gives the administrator valuable information about the type of a
hardware failure.
Serious hardware failures can be categorized into five different categories with different
probabilities. 1:
Table 2 - 1. Hardware Failures
Category
Probability
Hard disk failure
50%
Power cable detached, power supply failure
28%
CPU, Controller, motherboard failure
10%
CPU fan failure
8%
RAM failure
4%
Using the OPMA, administrators can determine which kind of serious hardware failure has
occurred (see Table 2 - 2).
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Table 2 - 2. Host System Failures and how they are detected
Type of Failure
Detected by
Hard disk failure
Console screen, CMOS set-up information
Power cable detached, power supply
failure
Server remains in power off state after power
on command has been given.
CPU, Controller, motherboard failure
Power supply is on, but there is no video
output.
CPU fan failure
By IPMI or server specific management
software
RAM failure
Boot-Sequence on boot console
Notes: 1. According to a survey made by the Intel Corp.
CHAPTER 3. OPMA INSTALLATION GUIDE
7
Chapter 3. OPMA Installation Guide
About the OPMA add-on card
The OPMA add-on card redirects local keyboard, mouse and video data to a remote
administration console. All data is transmitted with the TCP/IP protocol family. The
OPMA add-on card is especially useful in a multi-administrator environment.
Figure 3 - 1. OPMA add-on Module
Connectors
Connecting the OPMA add-on card to the Host System
Connecting the OPMA add-on card to the Host System is easy:
a) Turn off the Host and pull the power supply cable of the server,
b) find the OPMA slot and carefully insert the OPMA add-on card into the slot,
c) connect the power plug of the Host into the electrical outlet, but not power on the host,
d) then wait for a first initial boot up of the OPMA module,
e) now the host system has to be started manually for the first time by pressing the
Power button on the host,
f) while the server is booting his BIOS the OPMA module will be informed about the
Board ID, which is needed for the loading process of the appropriate topology of the
server board,
g) this step is important for the correct usage of all System Health features and sensors.
Warning: Please note: the firmware of the OPMA board delivered to you is
customised for use with the specified motherboard. If you use your OPMA
module in a motherboard with a different sensor and actor configuration
it will most probably not operate correctly.
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Warning: You should turn off the power of the Host completely during the
installation of the OPMA module, that includes detaching the power
supply cable.
Connecting the Ethernet
The OPMA add-on card needs a dedicated RJ45 Ethernet connector - this has to be
provided by the native system. The connector may be used either as a 100 Mbps 100BaseTX connection or as a 10 Mbps 10BASE-T connection. The adapter can sense the
connection speed and will automatically adjust to it.
10 Mbps Connection
For 10BASE-T Ethernet networks the Fast Ethernet adapter uses category 3, 4, or 5 UTP
cable. To establish a 10 Mbps connection, the cable has to be connected to a 10BASE-T
hub.
1. Make sure that the cable is wired appropriately for a standard 10BASE-T adapter.
2. Align the RJ45 plug with the notch on the adapter’s connector and insert it into the
adapter’s connector. You should hear an audible click, as the Ethernet plug latches.
100 Mbps Connection
For 100BASE-TX Ethernet networks the OPMA module supports category 5 UTP cabling.
To establish a 100 Mbps connection, the cable has to be connected to a 100BASE-TX hub.
1. Make sure that the cable is wired appropriately for a standard 100BASE-TX
adapter.
2. Align the RJ45 plug with the notch on the adapter’s connector and insert it into
the adapter’s connector. You should hear an audible click, as the Ethernet plug
latches.
Warning: The UTP wire pairs and configuration for 100BASE-TX cable are
identical to those for 10BASE-T cable when using category 5 UTP cable.
CHAPTER 4. OPMA MODULE CONFIGURATION
9
Chapter 4. OPMA Modul Configuration
Initial Configuration
The OPMA module’s communication interfaces are all based on TCP/IP. It comes preconfigured with the IP configuration listed in Table 4 - 1. Additionally you can do some
simple configuration using the serial interface.
Table 4 - 1. Initial Network Configuration
Parameter
Value
IP auto configuration
DHCP
IP address
-
Netmask
255.255.255.0
Gateway
none
IP access control
none
Warning: If the DHCP connection fails on boot up, the OPMA module will
not have obtained an IP address. This means it will not be accessible
over the network.
If this initial configuration does not meet your requirements, the following describes the
initial IP configuration that is necessary to access the OPMA module for the first time.
Initial Configuration via DHCP Server
By default, the OPMA module will try to contact a DHCP server in the subnet to which it is
physically connected. If a DHCP server is found, it may provide a valid IP address,
gateway address and net mask. Before you connect the device to your local subnet, be sure
to complete the corresponding configuration of your DHCP server. It is recommended to
configure a fixed IP assignment to the MAC address of the OPMA module. You can find
the MAC address on the outside of the shipping box and labeled on the bottom side.
If this initial configuration does not meet your local requirements, use the KiraTool to
adjust the values to your needs. The KiraTool can be found on the CD ROM delivered with
this package. An overview of all supported Command Line commands and options are
displayed in Appendix C. KiraTool Commands.
Initial Configuration via Serial Console
To configure the OPMA module via serial interface a null modem cable is required
(available separately) to connect the user computer and the host system, on which the
OPMA add-on card is installed. The communication software can be telnet (Windows) or
kermit (Linux).
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Normally the OPMA board will simply make a connection between the UART on the
motherboard of your device with the Serial Port at the back. However for a few seconds
after startup you can interrupt this switch by typing ESCape.
Indeed for all the lovers of detail there is one more serial mode. This allows the OPMA
module to monitor the serial traffic and listen to SOL sequences. This way you can open a
command session to the OPMA module inside normal serial communication. However this
is rarely used in practice.
The serial line has to be configured using the parameters given in Table 4 - 2.
When configuring with a serial terminal, you need to start up the communication software
and then power-cycle the OPMA add-on card (perhaps by power-cycling the server it is
attached to) and immediately press the ESC key. You will see a => prompt.
At this point you have two useful commands at your fingertips:
•
defaults - this recalls the factory settings fopr the OPMA module.
•
config - this allows you to enter a more detailed configuration menu. Please wait for
a few seconds for the configuration questions to appear.
Table 4 - 2. Serial Line Parameters
Parameter
Value
Bits/ssecond
115200
Data bits
8
Parity
no
Stop bits
1
Flow Control
none
As you proceed, the following questions will appear on the screen. To accept the default
values which are shown in square brackets below, press Enter. Note that you will see two
sets of questions depending if you decide to enable DHCP or a static IP address. The final
message of "Configuring device...Done" means that the configuration was accepted and
written and saved successfully.
Welcome!
Choose a login for the following features:
-Initial IP configuration: "config".
-Unblock currently blocked users: "unblock".
192.168.1.185 login: config
IP autoconfiguration (none/dhcp/bootp) [dhcp]:
Enable IP Access Control (yes/no) [no]:
LAN interface speed (auto/10/100) [auto]:
LAN interface duplex mode (auto/half/full) [auto]:
Are the entered values correct? Enter y for Yes, n for No or c to
Cancel y
Configuring device ...
Done.
CHAPTER 4. OPMA MODULE CONFIGURATION
11
The following is the above interaction, but this time specifying a static IP adress.
Welcome!
Choose a login for the following features:
-Initial IP configuration: "config".
-Unblock currently blocked users: "unblock".
192.168.1.185 login: config
IP autoconfiguration (none/dhcp/bootp) [dhcp]: none
IP [192.168.1.185]: 192.168.1.63
NetMask [255.255.255.0]:
Gateway (0.0.0.0 for none) [192.168.1.1]:
Enable IP Access Control (yes/no) [no]:
LAN interface speed (auto/10/100) [auto]:
LAN interface duplex mode (auto/half/full) [auto]:
Are the entered values correct? Enter y for Yes, n for No or c to
Cancel y
Configuring device ...
Done.
IP autoconfiguration
With this option you can specify whether the OPMA module should get its network
settings from a DHCP or BOOTP server. For DHCP, enter "dhcp", and for BOOTP
enter "bootp". If you do not specify any of these, the IP autoconfiguration is disabled
and subsequently you will be asked for the following network settings.
IP address
The IP address the OPMA module uses. This option is only available if IP
autoconfiguration is disabled.
Net mask
The net mask of the connected IP subnet. This option is only available if IP
autoconfiguration is disabled.
Gateway address
The IP address of the default router for the connected IP subnet. If you do not have a
default router, enter 0.0.0.0. This option is only available if IP autoconfiguration is
disabled.
Enable IP Access Control
Here you should be careful and normally accept the default "no".When you configure
the OPMA module using the serial interface you are usually in some sort of trouble
accessing the module over the Ethernet. If you enable the IP access control by
entering "yes", you may find yourself locked out again, letting the very same problem
arise again that you are trying to fix.
LAN Interface Speed
You may accept the default "auto". In this case the OPMA Ethernet hardware will
auto-sense the interface speed by listening to the heartbeat on the wire. However in
some cases this does not work properly, you should then set the speed manually to
either 10 or 100MB per second.When the Ethernet wire the OPMA module is
attached to is out of spec (like being too long) then auto-sensing can easily cause a
"flapping interface". This makes it very difficult to access the OPMA module and
you should then set a fixed speed.
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LAN interface duplex mode
You may specify "auto" for auto-sensing adjustment or you may force full-duplex or
half-duplex mode by entering the desired value.
Finally, you will be asked if the values are correct and may adjust them if necessary. After
your confirmation the OPMA module performs a reset using the new values.
Web Interface
The OPMA module may be accessed using a standard Java enabled web browser. You may
use the HTTP protocol or a secure encrypted connection via HTTPS. Just enter the
configured IP address of the OPMA module into your web browser. The initial login
settings are:
Table 4 - 3. Standard User Settings
Parameter
Value
Login
super
Password
pass
Changing these settings to user specific values is strongly recommended and can be done
on the "User Management" page (see the Section called Users And Groups in Chapter 6).
Mouse and Keyboard Configuration
Remote Mouse Modes
The proper configuration of a remote mouse is somewhat difficult to understand unless you
know some underlying concepts. Basically mice transmit their movement using two
methods: either absolute or relative mode.
Absolute mode means that the mouse transmits absolute co-ordinates to the OPMA module.
This is information like: "I am moving to screen co-ordinates X,Y". This mode is very easy
to track and most modernWindows versions (XP, 2000, 2003) as well as Mac OS X use this.
This mode is also easiest for the OPMA module to track.
The second mode is "relative mode". In this case the mouse transmits information like "I
am moving 97 pixels vertically and 88 pixels horizontally from my previous position". This
is much more difficult to track. Firstly the OPMA module has to know the starting point of
the movement (hence you need to press a special Synchronize Button, which allows the
OPMA module to enquire the starting point of the mouse). Secondly a lot of other factors
come into play like the mouse acceleration which can be different on the remote system and
the system you are using to talk to the OPMA module. Hence the OPMA module has to do
a lot more conversion work to track the mouse than using absolute mode.
Relative mode is used by most Linux Systems and older operating system like Windows
95/98. Therefore you need to select "Other Operating Systems" if your PC/mouse uses this
mode.
CHAPTER 4. OPMA MODULE CONFIGURATION
13
Remote Mouse Settings
A common problem with KVM devices is the synchronization between the local and
remote mouse cursors. The OPMA module addresses this situation with an intelligent
synchronization algorithm. There are three mouse modes available on the OPMA module:
Auto Mouse Speed
The automatic mouse speed mode tries to detect the speed and acceleration settings
of the host system automatically. See the section below for a more detailed
explanation.
Fixed Mouse Speed
This mode just translates the mouse movements from the Remote Console in a way
that one pixel move will lead to “n” pixel moves on the remote system. This
parameter “n” is adjustable with the scaling. It should be noted that this works only
when mouse acceleration is turned off on the remote system.
Single/Double Mouse Mode
This mode is described in the Section called Single and Double Mouse Mode.
Auto Mouse Speed and Mouse Synchronization
The automatic mouse speed mode performs the speed detection during mouse
synchronization. Whenever the mouse does not move correctly, there are two ways for resynchronizing local and remote mouse:
Fast Sync
The fast synchronization is used to correct a temporary but fixed skew. Choose this
option from the Remote Console Options menu (entry: Mouse Handling). If defined
you may also press the mouse synchronization hotkey sequence (see the Section
called Remote Console Control Bar in Chapter 5 for details).
Intelligent Sync
If the Fast Sync does not work or the mouse settings have been changed on the host
system, use the Intelligent Synchronization, instead. This method adjusts the
parameters for the actual movement of the mouse pointer so that the mouse pointer is
displayed at the correct position on the screen.
This method takes more time than the Fast Sync and can be accessed with the
appropriate item in the Remote Console Option menu (entry: Mouse Handling).
Furthermore, the shape of the mouse pointer has a significant influence on the pointer
detection.We recommend to use a simple, but common pointer shape. In most cases,
the detection and synchronization of animated pointer shapes is likely to fail. In
general, pointer shapes that change during the pointer detection process are rather
impossible to figure out in the transferred video picture.With the usage of a standard
mouse pointer shape the detection is rather simple and the syncronization is at its best.
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Figure 4 - 1. Remote Console Control Bar: Sync Button
The Sync Mouse button on top of the Remote Console can behave differently, depending
on the current state of mouse synchronization. Usually pressing this button leads to a Fast
Sync, except in situations where the KVM port or the video mode changed recently. See
also the Section called Remote Console Control Bar in Chapter 5.
Host System Mouse Settings
The host’s operating system knows various settings for the mouse driver.
Warning: The following limitations do not apply in case of USB and Mouse
Type "Windows >= 2000, MAC OS X".
While the OPMA module works with accelerated mice and is able to synchronize the local
with the remote mouse pointer, there are the following limitations which may prevent this
synchronization from working properly:
Special Mouse Driver
There are mouse drivers which influence the synchronization process and lead to
desynchronized mouse pointers. If this happens, make sure you do not use a special
vendor-specific mouse driver on your host system.
Windows 2003 Server/XP Mouse Settings
Windows XP knows a setting named "improve mouse acceleration" which has to be
deactivated.
Active Desktop
If the Active Desktop feature of MicrosoftWindows is enabled, do not use a plain
background. Instead, use some kind of wallpaper. As an alternative, you could also
disable the Active Desktop completely.
See also the Section called Recommended Mouse Settings for mouse mode
recommendations.
Navigate your mouse pointer into the upper left corner of the applet screen and move
it slightly forth and back. Thus the mouse will be resynchronized. If resynchronizing
fails, disable the mouse acceleration and repeat the procedure.
CHAPTER 4. OPMA MODULE CONFIGURATION
15
Single and Double Mouse Mode
The above information applies to the Double Mouse Mode where remote and local mouse
pointers are visible and need to be synchronized. The OPMA module also features another
mode, the Single Mouse Mode, where only the remote mouse pointer is visible. Activate
this mode in the Remote Console (see the Section called Remote Console Control Bar in
Chapter 5) and click into the window area. The local mouse pointer will be hidden and the
remote one can be controlled directly. To leave this mode it is necessary to define a mouse
hotkey in the Remote Console Settings Panel Press this key to free the captured local
mouse pointer.
Recommended Mouse Settings
For the different operating systems we can give the following advice:
MS Windows 2000, 2003, XP (all versions)
For a PS/2 mouse choose Auto Mouse Speed. For XP disable the option "enhance
pointer precision" in the Control Panel.
Note: The remote mouse is always synchronized with the local mouse if selecting the
option "Windows >= 2000, MAC OS X".
SUN Solaris
Adjust the mouse settings either via "xset m 1" or use the CDE Control Panel to set
the mouse to "1:1, no acceleration". As an alternative you may also use the Single
Mouse Mode.
MAC OS X
We recommend using the Single Mouse Mode.
Linux
First, choose the option "Other Operating Systems" from the the Mouse Type
selection box.
Second, choose the option Auto Mouse Speed. This applies for both USB and PS/2
mice.
Video Modes
The OPMA module recognizes a limited number of common video modes.When running
X11 on the host system please do not use any custom modelines with special video modes.
If you do, the OPMA module may not be able to detect them. We recommend using any of
the standard VESA video modes instead.
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Resetting the OPMA module to its Factory Settings
Using the Serial Interface
Power-cycle the OPMA module (this may require power-cycling the server) and
immediately press the ESC key. On your screen a command prompt "=>" will be visible.
Enter the command "defaults", press the Enter key and wait for a few seconds for the
OPMA module to reboot. Now, you may use the default settings as described in the Section
called Initial Configuration.
Using KiraTool
The OPMA module configuration can be reset to factory defaults by using the KiraTool.
KiraTool can be used locally on the host containing the OPMA module or remotely.
For Example:
For a local access:
kiratool -s -u admin -p password defaults
For a remote access:
kiratool -l 192.168.1.52 -u admin -p password
defaults
CHAPTER 5: OPMA MODULE USAGE
17
Chapter 5. OPMA Module Usage
Prerequisites
The OPMA module features an embedded operating system and applications offering a
variety of standardized interfaces. This chapter will describe both these interfaces and the
way to use them in a more detailed manner. The interfaces are accessed using the TCP/IP
protocol family, thus they can be accessed using the built-in Ethernet adapter.
The following interfaces are supported:
HTTP/HTTPS
Full access is provided by the embedded web server. The OPMA module
environment can be entirely managed using a standard web browser. You can access
the OPMA module using the insecure HTTP protocol or using the encrypted HTTPS
protocol.Whenever possible use HTTPS.
Telnet
A standard Telnet client can be used to access most of the OPMA module’s
functionality, including a text-mode console redirection.
SSH
A Secure Shell (SSH) client can also be used to access the OPMA module, including
a text-mode console redirection as mentioned above.
The primary interface of the OPMA module is the HTTP interface. This is covered
extensively in this chapter. Other interfaces are addressed in subtopics.
In order to use the Remote Console window of your managed host system, the browser has
to come with a Java Runtime Environment version 1.4 or higher. If the browser has no Java
support (such as on a small handheld device), you are still able to maintain your remote
host system using the administration forms displayed by the browser itself.
Important: We recommend you to install a Sun JVM 1.4 or higher version.
For an insecure connection to the OPMA module we can recommend the following web
browsers:
•
Microsoft Internet Explorer version 5.0 or higher on Windows 98, Windows ME,
Windows 2000 and Windows XP
•
Netscape Navigator 7.0, Mozilla 1.6 and Mozilla Firefox onWindows 98, Windows
ME, Windows 2000,Windows XP, Linux and other UNIX-like Operating Systems
In order to access the remote host system using a securely encrypted connection, you need a
browser that supports the HTTPS protocol. Strong security is only assured by using a key
length of 128 Bit. Some of the old browsers do not have a strong 128 Bit encryption
algorithm.
Using the Internet Explorer, open the menu entry "?" and "Info" to read about the key
length that is currently activated. The dialog box contains a link that leads you to
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
information on how to upgrade your browser to a state of the art encryption scheme. Figure
5 - 1 shows the dialog box presented by the Internet Explorer 6.0.
Figure 5 - 1. The Internet Explorer displaying the Encryption Key Length
Newer web browsers support strong encryption by default.
Login and Logout to the OPMA Module
Login into the OPMA Module
Open your web browser. Type in the address of your OPMA module which you configured
during the installation process. The address used might be a plain IP address or a host and
domain name, in case you have given your OPMA module a symbolic name in the DNS.
For instance, type the following in the address line of your browser when establishing an
unsecured connection:
http://192.168.1.22/
In order to use a secure connection type in:
https://192.168.1.22/
This will take you to the OPMA module login page as shown in Figure 5 - 2.
Figure 5 - 2. Login Screen
Warning: Your web browser has to accept cookies or else login is not
possible.
The OPMA module has a built-in super user that has all the permissions to administrate
your OPMA module. See the following table for the default settings. Please note that the
user "super" is not allowed to login via the serial interface of the OPMA module.
CHAPTER 5: OPMA MODULE USAGE
19
Table 5 - 1. Standard User Settings
Parameter
Value
Login
super
Password
pass
Warning: The OPMA module will force you to change the super user
password at first login.
Navigation
After the successful login to the OPMA module, the main page of the OPMA module
appears (see Figure 5 - 3). This page consists of three parts, each of them contains specific
information. The buttons on the upper side allow you to navigate within the front end (see
Table 5 - 2 for details). The lower left frame contains a navigation bar and allows you to
switch between the different sections of the OPMA module.
Within the right frame, task-specific information is displayed that depends on the section
you have chosen before.
Figure 5 - 3. Main Page
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Table 5 - 2. Front End Buttons
Return to the main page of the OPMA module.
Open the OPMA module Remote Console.
Exit from the OPMA module front end.
Logging out of the OPMA Module
This link logs out the current user and presents a new login screen. Please note that an
automatic logout will be performed in case there is no activity for half an hour.
Warning: If there is no activity for half an hour, the OPMA module will log
you out automatically. A click on one of the links will bring you back to
the login screen.
The Remote Console
General Description
The Remote Console is the redirected screen, keyboard and mouse of the remote host
system that the OPMA module controls.
Figure 5 - 4. Remote Console
CHAPTER 5: OPMA MODULE USAGE
21
The Remote Console window is a Java Applet that tries to establish its own TCP
connection to the OPMA module. The protocol that is run over this connection is neither
HTTP nor HTTPS, but RFB (Remote Frame Buffer Protocol). Currently RFB tries to
establish a connection to port #443. Your local network environment has to allow this
connection to be made, i.e. your firewall and, in case you have a private internal network,
your NAT (Network Address Translation) settings have to be configured accordingly.
In case the OPMA module is connected to your local network environment and your
connection to the Internet is available using a proxy server only without NAT being
configured, the Remote Console is very unlikely to be able to establish the according
connection. This is because today’s web proxies are not capable of relaying the RFB
protocol.
In case of problems, please consult your network administrator in order to provide an
appropriate network environment.
Main Window
Starting the Remote Console opens an additional window. It displays the screen content of
your host system. The Remote Console will behave exactly in the same way as if you were
sitting directly in front of the screen of your remote system. That means keyboard and
mouse can be used in the usual way. However, please be aware of the fact that the remote
system will react to keyboard and mouse actions with a slight delay. The delay depends on
the bandwidth and latency of the line which you use to connect to the OPMA module.
With respect to the keyboard, the precise remote representation might lead to some
confusion as your local keyboard changes its keyboard layout according to the remote host
system. If you use a German administration system and your host system uses a US English
keyboard layout, for instance, special keys on the German keyboard will not work as
expected. Instead, the keys will result in their US English counterpart. You can circumvent
such problems by adjusting the keyboard of your remote system to the same mapping as
your local one.
The Remote Console window always tries to show the remote screen with its optimal size.
That means it will adapt its size to the size of the remote screen initially and after the screen
resolution of the remote screen has been changed. However, you can always resize the
Remote Console window in your local window system as usual.
Warning: As different to the remote host system, the Remote Console
window on your local window system is just one window among others.
In order to make keyboard and mouse work, your Remote Console
window must have the local input focus.
Remote Console Control Bar
The upper part of the Remote Console window contains a control bar. Using its elements
you can see the status of the Remote Console and influence the local Remote Console
settings. A description for each control follows.
Figure 5 - 5. Remote Console Control Bar
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Warning: Please note that some of these options are only visible and
usable when you have selected the operating system type "Other
Operating Systems".
Drive Redirection
Opens the virtual media Drive Redirection menu for the Remote Console.
The Dual-channel Virtual Media allows a remote user to transfer installation files and
other media to a target machine over KVM ports. 2 USB Mass Storage Redirection
channels (redirection of Floppy/CD/DVD images, client drives or ISO images) can
access media at the same time, useful for special applications like installing OS with
driver disk.
Figure 5 - 6. Remote Console Applet Drive Redirection Menu
By help of this menu, you can either redirect a local drive (only available under
Windows):
Figure 5 - 7. Redirecting a Local Drive
CHAPTER 5: OPMA MODULE USAGE
23
or redirect an ISO CD/DVD image:
Figure 5 - 8. Redirecting an ISO Image
Finally the established Drive Redirection connection will be displayed.
Figure 5 - 9. Successfully Drive Redirection Connection
Sync Mouse
Choose this option in order to synchronize the local with the remote mouse cursor.
This is especially necessary when using accelerated mouse settings on the host
system. In general, there is no need to change mouse settings there.
Ctrl+Alt+Delete
Special button key to send the "Control Alt Delete" key combination to the remote
system (see also the Section called KVM Settings in Chapter 6 for defining new
button keys).
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Single/Double Mouse Mode
Switches between the Single Mouse Mode (where only the remote mouse pointer is
visible) and the Double Mouse Mode (where remote and local mouse pointers are
visible and need to be synchonized). Single Mouse Mode is only available if using
SUN JVM 1.4 or higher.
To leave the single mouse mode and get your local mouse pointer back, please press
Alt-F12.
Options
To open the Options menu click on the Options button. See the Section called
Remote Console Options for a detailed description of the available options for the
OPMA module.
Remote Console Options
To open the Options menu click on the Options button.
Figure 5 - 10. Remote Console Options Menu
A description of the options follows.
Monitor Only
Toggles the Monitor Only filter on or off. If the filter is switched on no remote
console interaction is possible. The remote screen can be viewed, only.
Exclusive Access
If a user has the appropriate permission, he can force the Remote Consoles of all
other users to close. No one can open the Remote Console at the same time again
until this user disables the exclusive access or logs off.
Note: This option is only accessible for members of the "administrator" group and
the user "super".
A change in the access mode is also visible in the status line. See the Section called
Remote Console Status Line for more information.
CHAPTER 5: OPMA MODULE USAGE
25
Screenshot to Clipboard
This button allows you to capture a screenshot: the OPMA module will automatically
place it onto the "clipboard". This allows you to easily import the screenshot into
your documents or other programs.
Readability Filter
Toggles the Readability Filter on or off. If the filter is switched on in scaling mode, it
will preserve most of the screen details even if the image is substantially scaled down.
This option is only available with a JVM 1.4 or higher.
Scaling
Allows you to scale down the Remote Console. You can still use both mouse and
keyboard, however the scaling algorithm will not preserve all display details.
Figure 5 - 11. Remote Console Options Menu: Scaling
Mouse Handling
Note: Only available when you have selected the option "Other Operating System".
The submenu for mouse handling offers two options for synchronizing the local and
the remote mouse pointer when using Soft Mouse Mode as explained in the Section
called Mouse and Keyboard Configuration in Chapter 4.
Figure 5 - 12. Remote Console Options Menu: Mouse Handling
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Fast Sync
The fast synchronization is used to correct a temporary but fixed skew.
Intelligent Sync
Use this option if the fast sync does not work or the mouse settings have been
changed on the host system.
Mouse Mode
This mode is described in the Section called Single and Double Mouse Mode.
Local Cursor
Offers a list of different cursor shapes to choose from for the local mouse pointer. The
selected shape will be saved for the current user and activated the next time this user opens
the Remote Console. The number of available shapes depends on the Java Virtual Machine,
a version of 1.2 or higher offers the full list.
Figure 5 - 13. Remote Console Options Menu: Local Cursor
Chat Window
This opens a chat window allowing you to interactively "chat" with other users logged into
the OPMA module.
Figure 5 - 14. Remote Console Options Menu: Chat Window
Soft Keyboard
The Soft Keyboard simulates an entire keyboard that is connected to the remote system. It
is necessary in case your remote system runs with a completely different language and
country mapping to your administration machine. By selecting the apropriate button(s) you
CHAPTER 5: OPMA MODULE USAGE
27
can send key codes and also key sequences to the remote system and act as if you would
work with a keyboard that is directly connected to the remote system.
In order to open the Soft Keyboard select the entry Soft Keyboard from the Options menu.
You can send single key strokes like F as well as combinations of keys such as Ctrl+C or
AltGr+Shift+F4.
For a single key stroke you can click on the button with the wanted character. Single keys
such as regular characters and numbers are sent immediately. Special keys like Ctrl,
Shift as well as the function keys F1 to F12 have to be selected twice. The first press
sends the signal "key is pressed", the second press indicated the signal "key is released" to
the remote system. After the first press the button will change its color to signalize that the
according key is pressed, currently. After the second press the button will appear as usual
and signalize that the key was sent.
To send the key combination Ctrl+C select the button Ctrl first. The button will change
its color. Press the button C. The following key (C in our example) will be combined with
the previously selected key. Both the buttons Ctrl and C are released and the key
combination will be sent to the remote system. The button Ctrl will appear as normal
(color change).
In order to send the key combination Ctrl+F5 three steps have to be done. Select the
button Ctrl once and the button F5 twice. The last press will release both buttons and send
the key combination to the remote system.
In order to send the key combination AltGr+Shift+F4 four steps are required. First,
select the button AltGr once. Second, select the button Shift. Finally, choose the button
F4 twice. The last press will release all the buttons and send the key combination to the
remote system.
Figure 5 - 15. Remote Console Options Menu: Soft Keyboard
Show
Displays the Soft Keyboard.
Mapping
Used for choosing the according language and country mapping of the Soft Keyboard.
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Figure 5 - 16. Remote Console Options Menu: Soft Keyboard Mapping
Local Keyboard
Used to change the language mapping of your browser machine running the Remote
Console Applet. Normally, the applet determines the correct value automatically. However,
depending on your particular JVM and your browser settings this is not always possible. A
typical example is a German localized system that uses a US-English keyboard mapping. In
this case you have to change the Local Keyboard setting to the right language manually.
Figure 5 - 17. Remote Console Options Menu: Local Keyboard
Hotkeys
Opens a list of hotkeys defined before. In order to send a registered command to the host
system choose the according entry. A confirmation dialog can be added that will be
displayed before sending the selected command to the remote host. Choose OK to perform
the command on the remote host. For a detailed description see the Section called Remote
Console Button Keys in Chapter 6.
Figure 5 - 18. Remote Console Options Menu: Hotkey Confirmation Dialog
CHAPTER 5: OPMA MODULE USAGE
29
Encoding
These options are used to adjust the encoding level in terms of compression and color depth.
They are only available unless "Transmission Encoding" is determined automatically (see
the Section called Transmission Encoding in Chapter 6).
•
Compression Level: you may select a value between 1 and 9 for the desired
compression level with level 1 enabling the fastest compression and level 9 the best
compression. The most suitable compression level should always be seen as a
compromise between the network bandwith that is available, on your video picture to
be transferred, and on the number of changes between two single video pictures.We
recommend to use a higher compression level if the network bandwidth is low. The
higher the compression level the more time is necessary to both pack or unpack the
video data on either side of the connection. The compression quality depends on the
video picture itself, e.g. the number of the colors or the diversity of pixels. The lower
the compression quality, the more data have to be sent and the longer it may take to
transfer the whole video picture.
If level 0 is chosen the video compression is disabled, completely.
The option "Video Optimized" has its advantages if transferring high-quality motion
pictures. In this case the video compression is disabled, completely and all video data
is transferred via network as full-quality video snippets. Therefore, a high amount of
bandwidth is required to ensure the quality of the video picture.
Figure 5 - 19. Remote Console Options Menu: Encoding Compression
The next two options allow you to set the compression level to a predefined level OR to set
a level for "lossy" compression. This compresses well, but leads to a degradation in image
quality.
Figure 5 - 20. Remote Console Options Menu: Predefined Encoding Compression
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Figure 5 - 21. Remote Console Options Menu: Lossy Compression
•
Color Depth: set the desired color depth. You may select between 8 or 16 bit for
Video Optimized/compression level 0, or between 1 and 8 bit for compression level 1
to 9. The higher the color depth, the more video information has to be captured and to
be transferred.
Figure 5 - 22. Remote Console Options Menu: Color Depth
Note: If displaying motion pictures on a connection with low speed you may achieve an
improvement regarding the video transfer rate by lowering the color depth and disabling
the option "Video Optimized". As a general result, the data rate is reduced (less bits per
color). Furthermore, the OPMA module will not have to do any video compression. In total,
this will lead to less transfer time of the motion picture.
Remote Console Status Line
The status line shows both console and the connection state. Figure 5 - 23 was taken from a
Remote Console with a resolution of 800 x 600 pixels. The value in brackets describes the
connection to the Remote Console. "Norm" means a standard connection without
encryption, "SSL" indicates a secure connection using Secure Socket Layer (SSL).
Figure 5 - 23. Status Line
CHAPTER 5: OPMA MODULE USAGE
31
The status line displays the number of frame buffer updates ("Fps") as well as the incoming
("In:") and the outgoing ("Out:") network traffic in KB per second. A low value of the
network traffic is recommended and can be achieved as described in the Section called
Optimizing the Video Picture. If compressed encoding is enabled, a value in brackets
displays the compressed transfer rate.
Figure 5 - 24. Status Line Transfer Rate
The next button displays the Remote Console Access settings.
Table 5 - 3. Buttons displaying the Access State
One single user is connected to the Remote Console of the OPMA module.
One or more users are connected to the Remote Console of the OPMA module.
Exclusive access is set for you. Any other user may not access the remote host
via Remote Console unless you disable this option.
A remote user has exclusive access. You may not access the remote host via
Remote Console unless the other user disables this option.
The outer right button displays the state of the Monitor Only settings.
Table 5 - 4. Buttons displaying the Monitor Only State
The option Monitor Only is disabled.
The option Monitor Only is enabled.
For more information about Monitor Only and Exclusive Access settings see the according
paragraphs in the Section called Remote Console Control Bar.
Optimizing the Video Picture
The OPMA module detects the video mode with 8 bits (256 colors) automatically. To
improve the picture quality you may select 16 bit (True Color) from the Options Menu of
the Remote Console, sub menu "Encoding", entry "Color Depth" (see the Section called
Encoding for details).
Currently, the video picture with the best quality can be achieved with the settings "16 bit
(High Color)" in the Remote Console or "LAN (High Colour)" in the web frontend. This
option can also be preset in the Section called User Console in Chapter 6.
The sub menu "Compression" from the Options menu has no influence on the picture
quality but on the data rate of the picture that is transferred to the Remote Console.
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Using the OPMA module with low bandwidth
The network connection of the OPMA module has an important influence on the time
between two single video pictures. On a connection with low bandwidth it takes longer to
transfer the video data from the OPMA module to the Remote Console on the local host. If
the remote screen has changed a new picture is sent.
In terms of transfer time there is no difference between text screens and screens in graphics
mode. The video picture is taken as graphics data no matter what the screen looks like and
which video mode is chosen.
In terms of transferred data there can be an improvement. The compression plays an
important role here. You can choose a compression level from the sub menu
"Compression" in the Options menu of the Remote Console.
Please note that the video will be compressed on the OPMA module, transferred to the
Remote Console and unpacked in a Java environment. Depending on the OPMA module
and on the local machine this procedure may take some time and may result in an slowly
updated picture in the Remote Console.
To improve the speed you may also set the picture quality in the Remote Console to either
"8 bit" or even to grayscale. Due to less video data to be processed this is likely to be more
effective than the highest compression level.
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33
Chapter 6. Menu Options
Remote Control
KVM Console
Figure 6 - 1. KVM Console
Remote Console Preview
To open the KVM console either click on the menu entry on the left or on the console
picture on the right. To refresh the picture click on the button that is named Refresh.
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Virtual Media
Floppy Disk
Figure 6 - 2. Virtual Floppy Area
Upload a Floppy Image
With two small steps working on the basis of a certain (floppy) image can be achieved.
•
First the path of the images has to be specified. You can specify up to two images.
You can do that either by hand or by using the file selection dialog of your web
browser. To open the file selection dialog click on the Browse button and select the
desired image file.
Figure 6 - 3. Select Image File
The maximum image size is limited to 1.44MB. To use a larger image mount this
image via Windows Share (or SAMBA) (see the Section called Use Image on
Windows Share (via SAMBA) for details).
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•
35
Secondly, click on the button Upload to initiate the transfer of the chosen image file
into the OPMA module’s on-board memory. This image file is kept in the on-board
memory of the OPMA module until the end of the current session, until you logged
out or initiated a reboot of the OPMA module.
CD ROM
Use Image on Windows Share (via SAMBA)
To include an image from a Windows share select "CD-ROM" from the submenu.
Figure 6 - 4. CD-ROM Selection
The following information has to be given to mount the selected image properly:
Share host
The server name or its IP address. On Windows 95, 98 and Windows ME do not
specify the IP address but the server name ("NetBIOS Name").
Share name
The name of the share to be used.
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Path to image
The path of the image file on the share.
User (optional)
If necessary, specify the user name for the share named before. If unspecified and a
guest account is activated, this guest account information will be used as your login.
Password (optional)
If necessary, specify the password for the given user name.
For an example you may have a look at the previous image: the OPMA module will look
for a server named mysql.acme.com. Then, the entered share name is selected (in our
example we use the share storage) and the image file \cdrom_image.iso is opened. If
this file can only be accessed with both an user name and password enter the according
values in the input fields for user name and password. In our case the file is owned by the
user "johndoe" and protected by an user-specific pass-phrase (displayed as a number of
stars).
To register the specified file image and its location click on the Set button.
The specified image file is supposed to be accessible from the OPMA module. The
information above has to be given from the point of view of the OPMA module. It is
important to specify correct IP addresses or device names. Otherwise, the OPMA module
may not be able to access the referenced image file properly, leave the given file
unmounted and will display an according error message, instead. So, we recommend to
state correct values and repeat this step if necessary.
Figure 6 - 5. The Image File on the Share
Furthermore, the specified share has to be configured correctly. Therefore, administrative
permissions are required. As a regular user you may not have these permissions. You
should either login as a system administrator (or as "root" on UNIX systems) or ask your
system administrator for help to complete this task.
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37
Windows 2000/XP
Open the Explorer, navigate to the directory (or share) and press the right mouse
button to open the context menu. Select Sharing to open the configuration dialog
(see Figure 6 - 6).
Figure 6 - 6. Explorer Context Menu
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Figure 6 - 7. Share Configuration Dialog
Adjust the settings for the selected directory.
•
Activate the selected directory as a share. Select Share this folder.
•
Choose an appropriate name for the share. You may also add a short
description for this folder (input field Comment).
•
If necessary, adjust the permissions (Permissions button).
•
Click OK to set the options for this share.
UNIX and UNIX-like OS (UNIX, Solaris, Linux)
If you like to access the share via SAMBA, SAMBA has to be set up properly. You
may either edit the SAMBA configuration file /etc/samba/smb.conf or use the
Samba Web Administration Tool (SWAT) or WebMin to set the correct parameters.
Also looking at the man-entry of smb.conf is very helpful.
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39
Drive Redirection
The Drive Redirection is another possibility to use a virtual disc drive on the remote
computer.With Drive Redirection you do not have to use an image file but may work with a
drive from your local computer on the remote machine. The drive is hereby shared over a
TCP network connection. Devices such as floppy drives, hard discs, CD ROMs and other
removable devices like USB sticks can be redirected. It is even possible to enable a write
support so that for the remote machine it is possible to write data to your local disc.
Figure 6 - 8. Drive Redirection
Please note that Drive Redirection works on a level which is far below the operating system.
That means that neither the local nor the remote operating system is aware that the drive is
currently redirected, actually. This may lead to inconsistent data as soon as one of the
operating systems (either from the local machine, or from the remote host) is writing data
on the device. If write support is enabled the remote computer might damage the data and
the file system on the redirected device. On the other hand, if the local operating system
writes data to the redirected device the drive cache of the operating system of the remote
host might contain older data. This may confuse the remote host’s operating system. We
recommend to use the Drive Redirection with care, especially the write support.
Drive Redirection Options
As shown in Figure 6 - 8 the following options may be enabled:
Disable Drive Redirection
If enabled the Drive Redirection is switched off.
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Force read-only connections
If enabled the Write Support for the Drive Redirection is switched off. It is not
possible to write on a redirected device.
Click Apply to submit your changes.
Software Requirements
To use this Drive Redirection feature, you can install the Drive Redirection software that is
currently only available for Microsoft Windows. This software can be found on the product
CD ROM.
On the other hand the Remote Console can be used for establishing a Drive Redirection
connection to a CD ROM, Iso Image or other drive on client side. The Java applet offers
the usage of a Drive Redirection menu like shown in Section Remote Console Control
Bar.
Configuration
Figure 6 - 9. Main View
Specify the parameters of the network connection (see Figure 6 - 9).
Device
This is the address (either the DNS name or the IP address) of the OPMA module you
would like to connect to.
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41
Port
This is the network port. By default, OPMA module uses the remote console port
(#443) here. You may change this value if you have changed the remote console port
in your OPMA module’s network settings.
Secure Connection
Enable this box to establish a secure connection via SSL. This will maximize the
security but may reduce the connection speed.
Drive Selection
Figure 6 - 10. Selecting the Desired Drive
Select the drive you would like to redirect. All available devices (drive letters) are shown
here. Please note that the whole drive is shared with the remote computer, not only one
partition. If you have a hard disc with more than one partition all drive letters that belong to
this disc will be redirected.
The Refresh button may be used to regenerate the list of drive letters, especially for an
USB stick.
Write Support
This feature may be enabled here.Write support means that the remote computer is allowed
to write on your local drive. As you can imagine, this is very dangerous. If both the remote
and the local system try to write data on the same device, this will certainly destroy the file
system on the drive. Please use this only when you exactly know what you are doing.
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Figure 6 - 11. Selecting Write Support
Device Authentication
Figure 6 - 12. Device Authentication
To use the Drive Redirection, you have to authenticate on the OPMA module using a valid
username and password. You need permission to change the virtual disc configuration.
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43
Navigation Buttons
Connect/Disconnect
To establish the drive redirection press the Connect button once. If all the settings
are correct, the status bar displays that the connection has been established, the
Connect button is disabled and the Disconnect button is enabled.
On an error, the status line shows the error message. The drive redirection software
tries to lock the local drive before it is redirected. That means that it tries to prevent
the local operating system from accessing the drive as long as it is redirected. This
may also fail, especially if a file on the drive is currently open. In the case of a
locking failure, you will be prompted if you want to establish the connection anyhow.
This should not be a serious problem when the note above is respected. If the write
support is enabled, a drive which is not locked might be damaged by the Drive
Redirection.
With the Disconnect button, a connection via Drive Redirection connection is
stopped.
Exit/Hide
If the Exit button is pressed, the Drive Redirection software is closed. If a Drive
Redirection connection is active, the connection will be closed before the application
terminates.
Using the Hide to Tray button the application is hidden, but not terminated
completely. That means that an active connection will be kept active until it is closed
explicitly. You can access the software by its tray icon. The tray icon also shows
whether a connection is established or not. A double click on the icon shows the
application window, or with a right click you may access a small menu (see
Figure 6 - 13).
Figure 6 - 13. Tray Info
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Options
Figure 6 - 14. USB Mass Storage Option
Set this option to disable the mass storage emulation (and hide the virtual drive) as long as
no image file is currently loaded. If unset and no file image will be found, it may happen
that the host system will hang on boot due to changes in the boot order or the boot manager
(LILO, GRUB). This case was reported for some Windows versions (2000, XP), other OS
may not be fully excluded. This behaviour depends on the BIOS version used in that
machine.
To set this option press the Apply button.
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45
Creating an Image
Floppy Images
UNIX and UNIX-like OS
To create an image file make use of "dd". This is one of the original UNIX utilities
and is included in every UNIX-like OS (UNIX, Sun Solaris, Linux).
To create a floppy image file copy the floppy raw device to a file using the following
command:
dd [if=/dev/fd0] [of=/tmp/floppy.image]
dd reads the entire disc from the device /dev/fd0 and saves the output in the
specified output file /tmp/floppy.image. Adjust both parameters exactly to your
needs (input device etc.)
MS Windows
You can use the tool "RawWrite for Windows". It is included on the CD ROM
shipped with the OPMA module.
Figure 6 - 15. RawWrite for Windows Selection Dialog
Select the tab Read from the menu. Enter (or choose) the name of the file in which you
would like to save the floppy content. Click on the Copy button to initiate the image
creation process.
For related tools you may have a look at the homepage of the fdos project
(http://www.fdos.org/ripcord/rawrite/).
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
CD ROM/ISO 9660 Images
UNIX and UNIX-like OS
To create an image file make use of "dd". This is one of the original UNIX utilities
and is included in every UNIX-like OS (UNIX, Sun Solaris, Linux).
To create a CDROM image file you have to copy the contents of the CDROM to a
file. Use the following command:
dd [if=/dev/cdrom] [of=/tmp/cdrom.image]
dd reads the entire disc from the device /dev/cdrom and saves the output in the
specified output file /tmp/cdrom.image. Adjust both parameters to suit your
needs (input device etc.).
MS Windows
To create the image file use your favourite CD imaging tool to oopy the whole
contents of the disc into one single ISO image file on your harddisk.
For example, with Nero you choose Copy and Backup. Then, navigate to the Copy
Disc section. Select the CD ROM or DVD drive you would like to create an ISO
image from. Specify the filename of the ISO image and save the CD ROM content in
that file.
Figure 6 - 16. Nero Selecting Dialog
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47
System Health
The IPMI support on the OPMA module allows you to power cycle the remote host system
or to perform a hard reset. Additonally you can see the remote event log and interrogate the
state of some system sensors like for example temperature.
Chassis Control
Figure 6 - 17. Chassis Control
Using Chassis Control you can:
•
Obtain information about the selected chassis
•
Switch the remote power on and off (power cycle)
•
Locate the remote host chassis
•
Enable or disable the power and NMI reset buttons on the front panel
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Monitor Sensors
Figure 6 - 18. Monitoring Remote Sensors Screen
On this screen you can see some of the remote hosts sensors and their values or state.
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49
System Event Log
Figure 6 - 19. System Event Log Screen
You can browse the System Event Logs here. Note: these logs are for IPMI events. These
are different from the OPMA module’s own system logs.
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
System Alert Management
Figure 6 - 20. System Alert Settings
This screen shows all of the system alerts. You can also set up filters, policies and LAN
destinations, where the module will send the alerts. Please see the IPMI Specifications for
more details.
Figure 6 - 21. System Alert Policy Settings
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Figure 6 - 22. System Alert LAN Destinition Settings
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
User Management
Change Password
Figure 6 - 23. Set Password
To change your password enter the new password in the upper entry field. Retype the
password in the field below.
Click Apply to submit your changes.
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53
Users And Groups
Figure 6 - 24. Set User
User Management
The configurable settings of the OPMA module are split into user settings (basically
authentication and user information) and group settings (authorization).
There is one predefined user "admin" and two predefined group "admin" and "<unknown>",
which cannot be renamed or deleted.
Each user may be member of one group and inherits permissions set for this group. If a user
is not member of a group, permissions can be set exclusively for that user. The user
“admin” is always member of admin group which has full system access. The <unknown>
group initially does not have any permissions, but is modifiable.
Users can authenticate against a remote authentication service (such as LDAP or RADIUS).
If this remote authentication service returns an invalid or no group assignment, the user is
considered to be member of the <unknown> group.
Upon delivery, the account for the user “admin” has the password “raritan”. Make sure to
change the password immediately after you have installed and first accessed your OPMA
module.
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
List of Available Options
A full list of available options follows. This list can only be seen by the superuser.
Existing users
Select an existing user for modification. Once a user has been selected, click the
Lookup button to see the user information.
New user name
The new user name for the selected account.
Password
The password for the login name. It must be at least four characters long.
Confirm Password
Confirmation of the password above.
Email address
This is optional.
Mobile number
This information may be optionally provided.
Role
Each user can be a member of a group (named a "role") - either an administrator, or a
regular user. Choose the desired role from the selection box.
To create a user press the Create button. The Modify button changes the displayed user
settings. To delete an user press the Delete button.
Note: The OPMA module is equipped with an host-independent processor and memory unit
which both have a limitation in terms of the processing instructions and memory space. To
guarantee an acceptable response time we recommend not to exceed the number of 25
users connected to the OPMA module at the same time. The memory space that is available
onto the OPMA module mainly depends on the configuration and the usage of the OPMA
module (log file entries etc.). That’s why we recommend not to store more than 150 user
profiles.
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55
Permissions
Figure 6 - 25. Set Permissions for the Group “user”
This page allows you to set the permissions for each user or group. You select the item
(user and/or group) from the drop-down menu. All changes you make then affect the
permission set of the selected entity. The user can only access and use the selected function
if the permissions field is set to "yes".
Again most entries are fairly self-explanatory. The fields labelled RC Settings pertain to the
settings of the Remote Console.
A kind of special case is the field "IPMI may use SOL payload". this sets if the user/group
is allowed to use administrative sessions over the serial line.
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
KVM Settings
User Console
The following settings are user specific. That means the super user can customize these
settings for every user. Changing the settings for one user does not affect the settings of
other users.
Figure 6 - 26. User Console Settings (Part 1)
Remote Console Settings for Users
This selection box displays the user ID for which the values are shown and for which the
changes will take effect. Select the desired user from the selection box and press the
Update button. This will result in displaying the according user settings below.
Note: You are allowed to change the settings of other users only if you have the necessary
access rights for this task. For a regular user without the correct permissions it is not
possible to change the settings for any other user.
Transmission Encoding
The Transmission Encoding setting allows changing the image-encoding algorithm that is
used to transmit the video data to the Remote Console window. It is possible to optimize
the speed of the remote screen depending on the number of users working at the same time
and the bandwidth of the connection line (Modem, ISDN, DSL, LAN, etc.).
Automatic detection
The encoding and the compression level is determined automatically from the
available bandwidth and the current content of the video image.
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57
Pre-configured
The pre-configured settings deliver the best result because of optimized adjustment of
compression and color depth for the indicated network speed.
Manually
Allows to adjust both compression rate and the color depth individually. Depending
on the selected compression rate the data stream between the OPMA module and the
Remote Console will be compressed in order to save bandwidth. Since high
compression rates are very time consuming, they should not be used while several
users are accessing the OPMA module simultaneously.
The standard color depth is 16 Bit (65536 colors). The other color depths are
intended for slower network connections in order to allow a faster transmission of
data. Therefore compression level 0 (no compression) uses only 16 Bit color depth.
At lower bandwidths only 4 Bit (16 colors) and 2 Bit (4 gray scales) are
recommended for typical desktop interfaces. Photo-like pictures have best results
with 4 Bit (16 gray scales). 1 Bit color depth (black/white) should only be used for
extremely slow network connections.
Figure 6 - 27. User Console Settings (Part 2)
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Remote Console Type
Specifies which Remote Console Viewer to use.
Default Java Virtual Machine (JVM)
Uses the default JVM of your web browser. This may be the Microsoft JVM for the
Internet Explorer or the Sun JVM if it is configured this way. Use of the Sun JVM
may also be forced (see below).
Sun Microsystems Java Browser Plugin
Instructs the web browser of your administration system to use the JVM of Sun
Microsystems. The JVM in the browser is used to run the code for the Remote
Console window which is actually a Java Applet. If you check this box for the first
time on your administration system and the appropriate Java plug-in is not yet
installed on your system, it may be downloaded and installed automatically. However,
in order to make the installation possible, you still have to answer the according
dialogs with "yes". The download volume is around 11 Mbytes. The advantage of
downloading Sun’s JVM is the usage of a stable and identical JVM across different
platforms. The Remote Console software is optimized for this JVM version and
offers a wider range of functionality when run in SUN’s JVM. (Hint: If you are
connected over a slow connection to the Internet you can also pre-install the JVM on
your administration machine. The software is available on the CD ROM that is
delivered along with the OPMA module.
Miscellaneous Remote Console Settings
Start in Monitor Mode
Sets the initial value for the monitor mode. By default the monitor mode is disabled.
In case you switch it on, the Remote Console window will be started in a read only
mode.
Start in Exclusive Access Mode
Enables the exclusive access mode immediately at Remote Console startup. This
forces the Remote Consoles of all other users to close. Nobody else can open the
Remote Console at the same time again until you disable this feature or log off.
Mouse Hotkey
Allows to specify a hotkey combination which starts either the mouse synchronization
process if pressed in the Remote Console or is used to leave the single mouse mode. This is
only available if you have selected the Mouse Mode "Other Operating System".
Remote Console Button Keys
Button Keys allow simulating keystrokes on the remote system that cannot be generated
locally. The reason for this might be a missing key or just the fact that the local operating
system of the Remote Console is unconditionally catching this keystroke already. Typical
examples are "Control+Alt+Delete" on Windows and DOS, that is always caught, or
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59
the key sequence "Control+Backspace" on Linux that can be used for terminating the XServer.
In order to define a new Button Key or to adjust an existing one have a look at the rules that
describe the setting for a key. In general, the syntax for a key is as follows:
[confirm] <keycode>[+|-|>[*]<keycode>]*
A term in brackets is optional. The star at the end means that you add further keys as often
as required for your case. The term "confirm" adds an confirmation dialogue that is
displayed before the key strokes will be sent to the remote host.
The "keycode" is the key to be sent. Multiple key codes can be concatenated with either a
plus, a minus, or an ">" sign. The plus sign builds key combinations - all the keys will be
pressed until a minus sign or the end of the combination is encountered. In this case all
pressed keys will be released in reversed sequence. So, the minus sign builds single,
separate keypresses and keyreleases. The ">" sign releases the last key, only. The star
inserts a pause with a duration of 100 milliseconds.
As an example, the key combination of Ctrl, Alt and F2 is represented by the sequence
Ctrl+Alt+F2
For a full list of key codes and aliases please refer to the Appendix E. Key Codes.
Note: If you need more button keys than shown use the button "More entries". This will
open a list of additional entry fields.
Keyboard/Mouse
Figure 6 - 28. Keyboard and Mouse Settings
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Key Release Timeout
This is an important option if you are accessing the OPMA module over a slow or
congested network. In such a situation you transmit a network packet containing the key
PRESS to the OPMA module.When you release the key, then the OPMA module will
receive a corresponding RELEASE packet.When the network is slow then it take too long
for the RELEASE packet to arrive. This might mislead the OPMA module to replicate the
key press, this is like you holding down the desired key. The Key Release Timeout in MilliSeconds tells the OPMA module to consider the key released, even if no RELEASE packet
has arrived. This avoids keys being unwantedly repeated.
USB Mouse Type
Enables the USB mouse type. Choose an appropriate option from the selection box. Choose
between "Windows >= 2000, MAC OS X" for MS Windows 2000, 2003 Server, XP, or
"Other Operating Systems" for MS Windows NT, Linux, or OS X.
In "Windows >= 2000, MAC OS X" mode the remote mouse is always synchronized with
the local mouse. For a detailed description about the mouse type and recommended options
for the different operating systems see the Section called Recommended Mouse Settings
in Chapter 4.
Mouse Speed
Auto mouse speed
Use this option if the mouse settings on the host use an additional acceleration setting.
The OPMA module tries to detect the acceleration and speed of the mouse during the
mouse sync process.
Fixed mouse speed
Use a direct translation of mouse movements between the local and the remote
pointer.
You may also set a fixed scaling which determines the amount the remote mouse
pointer is moved when the local mouse pointer is moved by one pixel. This option
only works when the mouse settings on the host are linear. This means that there is
no mouse acceleration involved.
Absolute mouse scaling for MAC systems
Use this option if the host system use an MAC OS X.
To set the options click on the Apply button.
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61
Device Settings
Network
The Network Settings panel as shown in Figure 6 - 29 allows changing network related
parameters. Each parameter will be explained below. Once applied the new network
settings will immediately come into effect.
Figure 6 - 29. Network Settings
Warning: The initial IP configuration is usually done directly at the host
system using the special procedure described in Table 4 - 1 in Chapter 4.
Warning: Changing the network settings of the OPMA module might result
in losing connection to it. In case you change the settings remotely make
sure that all the values are correct and you still have an option to access
the OPMA module.
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Basic Network Settings
IP auto configuration
With this option you can define if the OPMA module should fetch its network
settings from a DHCP or BOOTP server. For DHCP select "dhcp" and for BOOTP
select "bootp" accordingly. If you choose "none" then IP auto configuration is
disabled.
Preferred host name
Preferred host name to request from DHCP server.Whether the DHCP server takes
the OPMA module’s suggestion into account or not depends on the server
configuration.
IP address
IP address in the usual dot notation.
Subnet Mask
The net mask of the local network.
Gateway IP address
In case the OPMA module should be accessible from networks other than the local
one, this IP address must be set to the local network router’s IP address.
Primary DNS Server IP Address
IP address of the primary Domain Name Server in dot notation. This option may be
left empty, however the OPMA module will not be able to perform name resolution.
Secondary DNS Server IP Address
IP address of the secondary Domain Name Server in dot notation. It will be used in
case the Primary DNS Server cannot be contacted.
Miscellaneous Network Settings
Remote Console and HTTPS port
Port number at which the OPMA module’s Remote Console server and HTTPS
server are listening. If lef.t empty the default value (port 444) will be used.
HTTP port
Port number at which the OPMA module’s HTTP server is listening. If left empty the
default value (port 80) will be used.
Telnet port
Port number at which the OPMA module’s Telnet server is listening. If left empty the
default value (port 25) will be used.
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63
SSH port
Port number at which the OPMA module’s SSH (Secure SHell) server is listening. If
left empty the default value (port 22) will be used.
Bandwidth Limit
The maximum network traffic generated through the OPMA module Ethernet device.
Value in Kbit/s.
Enable Telnet
This enables the Telnet client mode.
Enable SSH
This enables the SSH (Secure SHell) client mode.
Disable Setup Protocol
Enable this option to exclude the OPMA module from the setup protocol.
LAN Interface Settings
This entry field displays the current settings for the Ethernet/LAN interface of the OPMA
module. You may choose between auto negotiation and a fixed setting for the Ethernet
transceiver settings "interface speed" and "duplex mode" in case auto negotiation does not
work correctly.
LAN interface speed
Depending on your network connection you may select an according speed value for
this interface. To adjust the interface automatically choose "autodetect" (default
value). If this selection results in misbehaviour of the interface, choose one of other
speed options to work with. The interface will transmit and receive data with that
fixed speed.
LAN interface duplex mode
If necessary you may also select a specific duplex mode. The default value is set to
"autodetect" which leads to an automatic setting of the duplex mode depending on
your network (recommended). As an alternative you may explicitly set the interface
to either "half duplex" or "full duplex" mode.
These settings may also be configured via serial console. See the Section called Initial
Configuration via Serial Console in Chapter 4 for details.
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Dynamic DNS
Figure 6 - 30. Dynamic DNS
A freely available Dynamic DNS service (dyndns.org) can be used in the following
scenario (see Figure 6 - 30):
Figure 6 - 31. Dynamic DNS Scenario
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65
The OPMA module is reachable via the IP address of the DSL router which is dynamically
assigned by the provider. Since the administrator does not know the IP address assigned by
the provider, the OPMA module connects to a special dynamic DNS server in regular
intervals and registers its IP address there. The administrator may contact this server as well
and pick up the same IP address belonging to his card.
The administrator has to register the OPMA module that is supposed to take part in the
service with the Dynamic DNS Server and assign a certain hostname to it. He will get a
nickname and a password in return to the registration process. This account information
together with the hostname is needed in order to determine the IP address of the registered
OPMA module.
You have to perform the following steps in order to enable Dynamic DNS:
1. Make sure that the LAN interface of the OPMA module is properly configured.
2. Enter the Dynamic DNS Settings configuration dialog as shown in Figure 6 - 30.
3. Enable Dynamic DNS and change the settings according to your needs (see below).
Enable Dynamic DNS
This enables the Dynamic DNS service. This requires a configured DNS server IP
address.
Dynamic DNS server
This is the server name where OPMA module registers itself in regular intervals.
Currently this is a fixed setting since only dyndns.org is supported for now.
Hostname
This is the hostname of the OPMA module that is provided by the Dynamic DNS
Server. (use the whole name including the domain, e.g. testserver.dyndns.org, not just
the actual hostname).
Username
You have registered this username during your manual registration with the Dynamic
DNS Server. Spaces are not allowed in the Nickname.
Password
You have used this password during your manual registration with the Dynamic DNS
Server.
Check time
The OPMA module card registers itself in the Dynamic DNS server at this time.
Check interval
This is the interval for reporting again to the Dynamic DNS server by the OPMA module.
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Warning: The OPMA module has its own independent real time clock.
Make sure the time setting of the OPMA module is correct (see the
Section called Date And Time).
The option Delete saved external IP is useful if you would like to update your IP address
saved externally. To delete the saved address press the Delete button.
Security
Figure 6 - 32. Device Security
HTTP Encryption
If this option is enabled, access to the web front-end is only possible using a HTTPS
connection. The OPMA module will not listen on the HTTP port for incoming connections.
In case you want to create your own SSL certificate that is used to identify the OPMA
module refer to the Section called Certificate.
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67
KVM Encryption
This option controls the encryption of the KVM protocol. This protocol is used by the
Remote Console to transmit both the screen data to the administrator machine and keyboard
and mouse data back to the host.
If set to Off no encryption will be used. If set to Try the applet tries to make an encrypted
connection. In case that the connection cannot be established an unencrypted connection
will be used instead. If set to Force the applet tries to make an encrypted connection. An
error will be reported in case the connection establishment fails.
IP Access Control
This section contains settings for the OPMA module’s built-in firewall. The firewall can be
enabled or disabled. When enabled the firewall allows you to explicitly block or allow
connections from certain client IP addresses.
If the default policy is set to DROP, a list of IP addresses or address ranges can be
configured to be exceptionally ACCEPTed. When the default policy is set to ACCEPT, a
list of IP addresses or address ranges can be configured to be exceptionally DROPped.
The network or address range has to be configured in CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain
Routing) notation, e.g. 192.168.1.0/24. It has to consist of a IP address followed by a slash
and the number of relevant bits belonging to the network or address range (counting from
the left).
Warning: The IP access control settings apply to the LAN interface only!
Enable IP Access Control
Enables access control based on IP source addresses.
Default policy
This option controls what to do with arriving IP packets that do not match any of the
configured rules. They can be accepted or dropped.
Warning: If you set this to “DROP” and you have no “ACCEPT” rules
configured, the access to the web front end over LAN is actually
impossible! To enable access again you can change the security
settings via modem or by temporarily disabling IP access control with
the initial configuration procedure (see Table 4 - 1. Initial Network
Configuration).
Rule Number
This should contain the number of a rule for which the following commands will
apply. In case of appending a new rule, this field will be ignored.
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IP/Mask
Specifies the IP address or IP address range for which the rule applies. Examples (the
number concatenated to an IP address with a “/” is the number of valid bits that will
be used of the given IP address):
192.168.1.22/32 Matches the IP Address 192.168.1.22
192.168.1.0/24
Matches all IP packets with sources
addresses from 192.168.1.0 to
192.168.1.255
0.0.0.0/0
Matches any IP packet
Policy
The policy determines what to do with matching packets. They can be either accepted
or dropped.
Warning: The order of the rules is important. The rules are checked in
ascending order until a rule matches. All the rules below the matching
one will be ignored. The default policy applies if no match has been found.
Appending a rule
Enter the IP/Mask and set the policy. Finally, press the Append button.
Inserting a rule
Enter the rule number, the IP/Mask and set the policy. Finally, press the Insert button.
Replacing a rule
Enter the rule number, the IP/Mask and set the policy. Finally, press the Replace
button.
Deleting a rule
Enter the rule number and press the Delete button.
Example of Use:
In the following example (Figure 6 - 33) the OPMA module is configured to be
inaccessible for all IP addresses, except for the IP addresses which follow the two rules
below:
Rule #
IP/Mask
Policy
Effect
1
192.168.5.0/24
ACCEPT
All IP addresses of the Privat Class C (16-bit
block) subnet 5 can access the OPMA module.
2
192.168.1.46/32
ACCEPT
Only the host with the IP address
“192.168.1.46/32” of the Privat Class C subnet 1
can access the OPMA module.
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69
Figure 6 - 33. Example of Use for IP Access Control
Group Based System Access Control
This is similar to the option above, except that you can specify a group of IP addresses and
not a network with a network mask.
Example of Use:
In the following example (Figure 6 - 34) the OPMA module is configured to be accessible
for all IP addresses which passed the IP Access Control rules, except for users with an IP
addresse which follow the rule below:
Rule # Starting IP Ending IP
1
192.168.5.2
192.168.5.254
Group
Admin
Action Effect
Drop
All users of the group “Admin” with
IP addresses of the Privat Class C
(16-bit block) subnet 5 can not access
the OPMA module. Only the
“Admin” with the IP 192.168.5.1 can
login on the OPMA module.
Additional to the one admin all other
user groups which pass the IP Access
Control rules can access the device.
Figure 6 - 34. Example of Use for the Group based System Access Control
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Figure 6 - 35. Device Security (Part 2)
User Blocking
When someone attempts to login to the OPMA module device and fails, you can specify
how many failed login attempts the OPMA module should tolerate before waiting for the
specified number of "Block Time" minutes before it allows further logins. This is useful for
blocking automated hacking and cracking attempts.
Maximum number of failed logins
Enter the maximum number of failed login attempts after which it should not be
possible for this user to login anymore. Leave this field empty to disable the user
blocking feature.
Block time
The number of minutes the user is blocked after he exceeded his maximum number
of failed login attempts. Leave this field empty to block him for an infinite amount of
time until he is manually unblocked again.
Unblocking Users
There are two possibilties to unblock a blocked user.
• A parent user may go to the user management settings (see the Section called
User Management) and press the Unblock button for the user.
• It is also possible to use the serial console for the initial configuration (see Table
4 - 1. Initial Network Configuration) and login as the user “unblock”. The
OPMA module will ask for the superuser password and present a list of blocked
users which may be unblocked.
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71
Login Limitations
Single Loging Limitation
If this option is enabled, the user can access the OPMA module only from one IP
adress with one connection. It is not possible to access the OPMA module from
different IP addresses or web browsers with the same login at the same time. You
have to be logged out or the session has to be timed out to get a new connection on a
different IP address on the OPMA module with this login.
Password Aging
If this option is enabled after a defined interval a reminder will request a new
password for the user. The set interval displays how many days the password is
active.
Certificate
Figure 6 - 36. Certificate Settings
The OPMA module uses the Secure Socket Layer (SSL) protocol for any encrypted
network traffic between itself and a connected client. During the connection establishment
the OPMA module has to expose its identity to a client using a cryptographic certificate.
Upon delivery this certificate and the underlying secret key is the same for all OPMA
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
module ever produced and certainly will not match the network configuration that will be
applied to the OPMA module cards by its user. The certificate’s underlying secret key is
also used for securing the SSL handshake. Hence, this is a security risk (but far better than
no encryption at all).
However, it is possible to generate and install a new base64 x.509 certificate that is unique
for a particular OPMA module card. In order to do that, the OPMA module is able to
generate a new cryptographic key and the associated Certificate Signing Request (CSR)
that needs to be certified by a certification authority (CA). A certification authority verifies
that you are the person who you claim you are and signs and issues a SSL certificate to you.
To create and install a SSL certificate for the OPMA module the following steps are
necessary:
1. Create a SSL Certificate Signing Request using the panel shown in Figure 6 - 36.
You need to fill out a number of fields that are explained below. Once this is done,
click on the Create button which will initiate the Certificate Signing Request
generation. The CSR can be downloaded to your administration machine with the
Download CSR button (see Figure 6 - 37).
2. Send the saved CSR to a CA for certification. You will get the new certificate from
the CA after a more or less complicated traditional authentication process (depending
on the CA).
3. Upload the certificate to the OPMA module using the Upload button as shown in
Figure 6 - 37.
Figure 6 - 37. SSL Certificate Upload
After completing these three steps the OPMA module has its own certificate that is used for
identifying the card to its clients.
Warning: If you destroy the CSR on the OPMA module there is no way to
get it back! In case you deleted it by mistake, you have to repeat the
three steps as described above.
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73
Common name
This is the network name of the OPMA module once it is installed in the user’s
network (usually the fully qualified domain name). It is identical to the name that is
used to access the OPMA module with a web browser but without the prefix "http://".
In case the name given here and the actual network name differ, the browser will pop
up a security warning when the OPMA module is accessed using HTTPS.
Organizational unit
This field is used for specifying to which department within an organization the
OPMA module belongs.
Organization
The name of the organization to which the OPMA module belongs.
Locality/City
The city where the organization is located.
State/Province
The state or province where the organization is located.
Country (ISO code)
The country where the organization is located. This is the two-letter ISO code, e.g.
DE for Germany, or US for the U.S.
Challenge Password
Some certification authorities require a challenge password to authorize later changes
on the certificate (e.g. revocation of the certificate). The minimal length of this
password is four characters.
Confirm Challenge Password
Confirmation of the Challenge Password.
Email
The email address of a contact person that is responsible for the OPMA module and
its security.
Key length
This is the length of the generated key in bits. 1024 Bits are supposed to be sufficient
for most cases. Longer keys may result in slower response time of the OPMA module
during connection establishment.
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USB
Figure 6 - 38. USB Device Settings
In this section, you can disable the USB high speed mode. This helps solving some
compatibility issues with BIOS versions or very old linux versions. However, this reduces
the speed of the virtual media emulation.
To set this option press the Apply button.
Warning: This feature will not be supported if a KIRA100 R01.x is on the
OPMA module.
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75
Date And Time
Figure 6 - 39. Date and Time
This link refers to a page where the internal realtime clock of the OPMA module can be set
up (see Figure 6 - 39). You have the possibility to adjust the clock manually or to use a
NTP time server.Without a time server your time setting will not be persistent, so you have
to adjust it again after the OPMA module loses power for more than a few minutes. To
avoid this you can use a NTP time server which sets up the internal clock automatically to
the current UTC time. Because NTP server time is always UTC, there is a setting that
allows you to set up a static offset to get your local time.
Warning: There is currently no way to adjust the daylight saving time
automatically. So you have to set up the UTC offset twice a year properly
to the local rules of your country.
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Authentication Settings
Figure 6 - 40. LDAP and other Authentication Settings
On this screen you can specify where the OPMA module will look in order to authenticate
the users. You can either use "Local Authentication", this means you need to have created
the user account on the OPMA module and the user/group information residing on the
OPMA module will be used for authentication.
The other options allow you to specify an LDAP or a RADIUS Server to use for the login
authentication. These methods are very useful when you want to map users into specific
groups which have certain privileges. It is usually far easier and simpler to refer to a lready
existing groups, rather than having to re-enter everything into the OPMA module.
Note: Whatever you configure, you can always login over the network as the superuser
"admin". The superuser is always authenticated and authorized locally, so you always have
a "back door" to the OPMA module.
LDAP Access
The OPMA module uses LDAP only for authentication (password verification). User
privileges and private settings are still stored locally at the OPMA. That’s why, a user
account has to be created on the OPMA module before this user can login via LDAP. Also,
all privilege configurations have to be done within the OPMA user management (see the
Section called User Management).
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77
In order to configure the LDAP access, you can set the following options:
User LDAP Server
Here you enter the name or IP address of the LDAP server containing all the user
entries. If you choose a name instead of an IP address you need to configure a DNS
server in the network settings. E.g.: 192.168.1.250
Base DN of User LDAP Server
Here you specify the distinguished name (DN) where the directory tree starts in the
user LDAP server. E.g.: dc=test,dc=domain,dc=com
Type of external LDAP Server
With this option you set the type of the external LDAP server. This is necessary since
some server types require special handling. Additionally, the default values for the
LDAP scheme are set appropriately. You can choose between a Generic LDAP
Server, a Novell Directory Service and a Microsoft Active Directory. If you have
neither a Novell Directory Service nor a Microsoft Active Directory then choose a
Generic LDAP Server and edit the LDAP scheme used (see below).
Name of login-name attribute
This is the name of the attribute containing the unique login name of a user. To use
the default leave this field empty. The default depends on the selected LDAP server
type.
Name of user-entry object class
This is the object class that identifies a user in the LDAP directory. To use the default
leave this field empty. The default depends on the selected LDAP server type.
User search subfilter
Here you can refine the search for users that should be known to the OPMA module.
Active Directory Domain
This option represents the active directory domain that is configured in the Microsoft
Active Directory server. This option is only valid if you have chosen a Microsoft
Active Directory as the LDAP server type. E.g.: test.domain.com
Using the RADIUS Server
RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial In User Service) is a protocol specified by the
Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) working group. There are two specifications that
make up the RADIUS protocol suite: Authentication and Accounting. These specifications
aim to centralize authentication, configuration and accounting for dial-in services to an
independent server. The RADIUS protocol exists in several implementations such as
freeRADIUS, openRADIUS or RADIUS on UNIX systems. The RADIUS protocol itself is
well specified and tested. We can give a recommendation for all products listed above,
especially for the freeRADIUS implementation.
For detailed information on how to setup the RADIUS server, please refer to Appendix D.
Configuring the RADIUS Server.
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Note: Currently, we do not support challenge/response. An Access Challenge response is
seen and evaluated as an Access Reject.
To access a remote device using the RADIUS protocol you have to login, first. You are
asked to specify your user name and password, then. The RADIUS server reads your input
data (Authentication) and the OPMA looks for your profile (Authorization). The profile
defines (or limits) your actions and may differ depending on your specific situation. If there
is no such profile your access via RADIUS will be refused. In terms of the remote activity
mechanism the login via RADIUS works similar to the Remote Console. If there is no
activity for half an hour your connection to the OPMA module will be aborted and closed.
Server
Enter either the IP address or the hostname of the RADIUS Server to connect to. For
the hostname DNS has to be configured and enabled.
Shared Secret
A shared secret is a text string that serves as a password between the RADIUS client
and RADIUS server. In this case the OPMA module serves as a RADIUS client. A
shared secret is used to verify that RADIUS messages are sent by a RADIUS-enabled
device that is configured with the same shared secret and to verify that the RADIUS
message has not been modified in transit (message integrity). For the shared secret
you can use any standard alphanumeric and special characters. A shared secret may
consist of up to 128 characters in length and may contain both lowercase and
uppercase letters (A-Z,a-z), numerals (0-9) and other symbols (all characters not
defined as letters or numerals) such as an exclamation mark (!) or an asterisk (*).
Authentication Port
The port the RADIUS server listens for authentication requests. The default value is
#1812.
Accounting Port
The port the RADIUS server listens for accounting requests. The default value is
#1813.
Timeout
Sets the request time-to-live in seconds. The time-to-live is the time to wait for the
completion of the request. If the request job is not completed within this interval of
time it is cancelled. The default value is 1 second.
Retries
Sets the number of retries if a request could not be completed. The default value is 3
times.
Global Authentication Type
Sets the authentication protocol. This can be the unencrypted PAP (Password
Authentication Protocol) or the encrypted CHAP (Challenge Handshake
Authentication Protocol).
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79
Event Log
Figure 6 - 41. Event Log
Important events like a login failure or a firmware update are logged to a selection of
logging destinations (see Figure 6 - 41). Each of those events belong to an event group
which can be activated separately. For a detailed specification of the existing event groups
and the log events belonging to them, use the "help" link in the HTML frontend.
The common way to log events is to use the internal log list of the OPMA module. To show
the log list click on the item Event Log from the section "Maintenance". In the Event Log
Settings you can choose how many log entries are shown on each page. Furthermore, you
can clear the log file here.
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Event Log Targets
List logging enabled
To log events you may use the internal log list of the OPMA module. To show the
log list click on "Event Log" on the "Maintenance" page.
Since the OPMA module’s system memory is used to save all the information, the
maximum number of possible log list entries is restricted to 1.000 events. Every entry
that exceeds this limit overrides the oldest one automatically.
Warning: If the Reset button on the HTML frontend is used to restart
the OPMA module, all logging information is saved permanently and
is available after the OPMA module has been started. If the OPMA
module loses power or a hard reset is performed, all logging data
will be lost. To avoid this use one of the log methods described
below.
NFS Logging enabled
Define a NFS server where a directory or a static link has to be exported to, in order
to write all logging data to a file that is located there. To write logging data from
more than one OPMA module devices to only one NFS share, you have to define a
file name that is unique for each device.When you change the NFS settings and press
the Apply button, the NFS share will be mounted immediately. That means the NFS
share and the NFS server must be filled with valid sources or you will get an error
message.
Warning: In contrast to the internal log file on the OPMA module, the
size of the NFS log file is not limited. Every log event will be
appended to the end of the file so it grows continuously and you may
have to delete it or move it away from time to time.
SMTP Logging enabled
With this option the OPMA module is able to send Emails to an address given by the
Email address text field in the Event Log Settings. These mails contain the same
description strings as the internal log file and the mail subject is filled with the event
group of the occurred log event. In order to use this log destination you have to
specify a SMTP server that has to be reachable from the OPMA module device and
that needs no authentication at all (<serverip>:<port>).
SNMP Logging enabled
If this is activated, the OPMA module sends a SNMP trap to a specified destination
IP address, every time a log event occurs. If the receiver requires a community string,
you can set it in the appropriate text field. Most of the event traps only contain one
descriptive string with all information about the log event. Only authentication and
host power events have an own trap class that consists of several fields with detailed
information about the occurred event. To receive this SNMP traps any SNMP trap
listener may be used.
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Event Log Assignments
You may choose which actions of the OPMA module will be saved in the log file. Tick the
desired box(es) and click Apply to confirm your selection.
The OPMA module knows the in Table 6 - 1 listed events. All supported events will be
devided into the following groups: Board Message, Security, Remote Console and
Authentication.
Table 6 - 1. Event Log Assignments
Event
Group
Device succesfully started
Board Message
Board Reset performed by user…
Board Message
Firmware upload failed.
Board Message
No firmware file uploaded.
Board Message
Uploaded firmware file discarded.
Board Message
Firmware validation failed.
Board Message
Firmware file uploaded by user…
Board Message
Firmware updated by user…
Board Message
Internal log file cleared by user…
Board Message
Security Violation
Security
Connection to Remote Console
failed: <reason.>
Remote Console
Connection to client ...
established.
Remote Console
Connection to client ... closed.
Remote Console
Login failed.
Authentication
Login succeed.
Authentication
Login failed.
Authentication
Login succeed.
Authentication
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SNMP
Figure 6 - 42. SNMP Settings
The following information is available via SNMP:
•
Serial number
•
Firmware version
•
MAC address / IP address / Netmask / Gateway of LAN interface
•
Server’s power state
•
Server’s POST code
The following actions can be initiated via SNMP:
•
Reset server
•
Power on/off server
•
Reset the OPMA module
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The following events are reported by the OPMA module via SNMP:
•
Login trial at the OPMA module failed.
•
Login trial at the OPMA module succeeded.
•
Denying access to a particular action.
•
Server was reset.
•
Server was powered on/off.
The SNMP settings panel as shown in Figure 6 - 42 are described below, allows you to
change SNMP related parameters.
Enable SNMP Agent
If this option is checked, the OPMA module will reply to SNMP requests.
Hint: If a community is left blank, you cannot perform the according request. E.g. if
you want to disable the possibility to reset the OPMA module via SNMP then do not
set a write community.
System Location
Enter a description of the physical location of the host. The description will be used
in reply to the SNMP request “ sysLocation.0 ”.
System Contact
Enter a contact person for the host. The value will be used in reply to the SNMP
request “ sysContact.0 ”.
Use SNMPv3
The SNMPv3 functionality offers a higher security by DES encrypting of the datas and user
authentification.
DES Encryption
This option activates (Force) or deactivates (Off) the DES encryption.
Read Username
The name of the read community user.
Read Password
Insert the password for the read community user.
Write Username
The name of the write community user.
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Write Password
Insert the password for the write community user.
Use SNMPv1
Hereby will the datas retrieved without encryption.
Read Community
This is the SNMP community, which allows you to retrieve information via SNMP.
Write Community
This community allows you to set options and to reset the OPMA module or the host
via SNMP, i.e. all that affects the host or the OPMA module.
The OPMA module SNMP MIB
This link allows you to download the OPMA module SNMP MIB file. This file may
be necessary for an SNMP client to communicate with the OPMA module.
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Maintenance
Device Information
Figure 6 - 43. Device Information
This section contains a summary with various information about this OPMA module and its
current firmware and allows you to reset the card. You may have a look at Figure 6 - 43 for
an example.
The Data file for support allows you to download the OPMA module data file with specific
support information. This is an XML file with certain customized support information like
the serial number etc.
You may send us this information together with a support request. It will help us to locate
and solve your reported problem.
Figure 6 - 44. Connected Users
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Figure 6 - 44 displays the OPMA module activity. From left to right the connected user(s),
its IP address (from which host the user comes from) and its activity status is displayed.
"RC" indicates that the Remote Console is open. If the Remote Console is opened in
"exclusive mode" the term "(exclusive)" is added. For more information about this option
see the Section called Remote Console Control Bar in Chapter 5.
To display the user activity the last column is used. It contains either the term "active" for
an active user or the according idle time for an inactive user.
Event Log
Figure 6 - 45. Event Log List
Figure 6 - 45 displays the Event Log list. It includes the events that are kept by the OPMA
module extended by the event date, a short event description and an IP address the request
was sent from.
You may use the text buttons Prev and Next to browse within the data. The Prev button
displays the previous page with newer log information whereas the Next button switches to
the following page with older log information.
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Update Firmware
Figure 6 - 46. Update Firmware
The OPMA module is a complete standalone computer. The software it runs is called the
firmware. The firmware of the OPMA module can be updated remotely in order to install
new functionality or special features.
A new firmware update is a binary file which will be sent to you by email or you can
download it from the Raritan Web Site. If the firmware file is a compressed file with
suffix .zip you have to unzip it before you can proceed. In order to extract the archive you
may use WinZip from http://www.winzip.com/ (for Windows OS) or a tool named unzip
that might be already provided in your OS (UNIX, Linux, OS X).
Before you can start updating the firmware of your OPMA module the new and
uncompressed firmware file has to be accessible on the system that you use for connecting
to the OPMA module.
Updating the firmware is a three-stage process:
•
Firstly, the new firmware file is uploaded onto the OPMA module. In order to do that
you need to select the file on your local system using the Browse button of the
Upload Firmware panel (see Figure 6 - 46). Then, click Upload to transfer the
previously selected file from your local file system onto the OPMA module. Once the
firmware file has been uploaded, it is checked whether it is a valid firmware file and
whether there were any transmission errors. In case of any error the Upload Firmware
function will be aborted and the current firmware is kept as is.
•
Secondly, if everything went well, you see the Update Firmware panel. The panel
shows you the version number of the currently running firmware and the version
number of the uploaded firmware.
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•
Pressing the Update button will store the new version and substitute the old one
completely.
Warning: This process is not reversible and might take some
minutes. Make sure the OPMA module’s power supply will not be
interrupted during the update process, because this may cause an
unusable device.
•
Thirdly, after the firmware has been stored, the OPMA module will reset
automatically. After about one minute you will be redirected to the Login page and
requested to login once again.
Warning: The three-stage firmware update process and complete
consistency check are making a mistake in updating the firmware
almost impossible. However, only experienced staff members or
administrators should perform a firmware update. Make sure the
OPMA module’s power supply will not be interrupted!
Unit Reset
Figure 6 - 47. Unit Reset
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89
This section allows you to reset specific parts of the device. This involves the both
keyboard and mouse, the video engine and the OPMA module itself. Resetting the card
itself is mainly needed to activate a newly updated firmware. It will close all current
connections to the administration console and to the Remote Console. The whole process
will take about half a minute. Resetting subdevices (e.g. video engine) will take some
seconds only and does not result in closing connections.
To reset a certain OPMA module functionality click on the Reset button as displayed in
Figure 6 - 47.
Note: Only the user "admin" is allowed to reset the OPMA module.
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Appendix A: Troubleshooting
1. The mouse does not react correctly in the applet screen. The mouse is not in sync
with the mouse of the host.
Navigate your mouse pointer into the upper left corner of the applet screen and move it
slightly forth and back. Thus the mouse will be resynchronized. If resynchronizing fails,
disable the mouse acceleration and repeat the procedure.
2. I have a crazy mouse.
Verify your mouse settings. Disable the mouse acceleration. For instance in Windows
2000 this can be done in ’Settings -> System control -> Mouse’. Make sure that your
mouse settings match your mouse model, i.e. PS/2 or wheel mouse.
3. Login to the OPMA module fails.
Verify both your user login and your password. By default, the user "super" has the
password "pass" . Moreover, your web browser has to be configured to accept cookies.
4. The Remote Console window of the OPMA module does not open.
A firewall may prevent the access to the Remote Console. The TCP ports #80 (for
HTTP) and #443 (for both HTTPS and RFB) have to be open (the server providing the
firewall has to accept incoming TCP connections on these ports).
5. Remote console is unable to connect and displays a timeout error.
Have a look on your hardware. If there is a proxy server between the OPMA module
and your host, then you may not be able to transfer the video data using RFB. Establish
a direct connection between the OPMA module and the client.
Furthermore, check the settings of the OPMA module and choose a different server
port used for RFB transfer. If you use a firewall then check the according port for
accepting connections. You may restrict these connections for the IP addresses used by
the OPMA module and your client.
6. No connection can be established to the OPMA module.
Have a look on your hardware. Is the OPMA module attached to a power supply?
Verify your network configuration (IP address, router). You may send a "ping" request
to the OPMA module to find out whether the OPMA module is reachable via network.
7. Special key combinations, e.g. ALT+F2, ALT+F3 are intercepted by the console
system and not transmitted to the host.
You have to define a so-called "Button Key". This can be done in the Remote Console
settings (see the Section called Remote Console Control Bar in Chapter 5).
Alternatively you can use the soft keyboard feature (see the Section called Soft
Keyboard in Chapter 5).
8. The OPMA module web pages are not displayed correctly.
Check your browser’s cache settings. Make sure the cache settings are not set to
something like "never check for newer pages". Otherwise the OPMA module pages
may be loaded from your browser cache and not from the card.
9. Windows XP does not awake from standby mode.
This is possibly a Windows XP problem. Try not to move the mouse pointer while XP
switches into standby mode.
APPENDIX A. TROUBLESHOOTING
91
10. For SUN computers a USB keyboard does not work.
The OPMA module emulates a USB keyboard. If you attach a USB keyboard to your
host two keyboards are detected. It cannot be predicted which one of these comes first
and you will be able to work with.
SUN supports only one USB keyboard.
11. Cannot upload the signed certificate in MacOS X.
If an "internal error" occurs while uploading the signed certificate either change the
extension of the file to .txt or add a file helper using the Internet Explorer
preferences for this type of file. Make sure that the encoding is set to "plain text" and
the checkbox "use for outgoing" is set. As an alternative, you may also use a Mozilla
based browser (Mozilla, FireFox).
12. Every time I open a dialog box with some buttons the mouse pointers are not
synchronous anymore.
Disable the setting "Automatically move mouse pointer to the default button of dialog
boxes" in the mouse settings of your operating system.
13. The Remote Console does not open with Opera in Linux.
Some versions of Opera do not grant enough permissions if the signature of the applet
cannot be verified.
To solve the problem, add the lines
grant codeBase "nn.pp.rc.RemoteConsoleApplet" {
permission java.lang.RuntimePermission
"accessClassInPackage.sun.*";
to the java policy file of opera (e.g. /usr/share/opera/java/opera.policy).
14. The video data on the local monitor is surrounded by a black border.
This is not a failure. The local monitor is programmed to a fixed video mode that can
be selected in the video settings of the OPMA module. Refer to the Section called
Remote Console Control Bar in Chapter 5 for further planation.
15. The local monitor displays video data but the remote screen remains blank.
If the Remote Console is connected (look at the status line of the Remote Console) you
should verify that the flat panel interface is not switched off by the video driver of your
operating system.
16. I forgot my password. How can I reset the OPMA module to factory defaults?
You may use the serial interface or the reset pins . For a detailed description see the
Section called Resetting the OPMA module to its Factory Settings in Chapter 4.
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Appendix B. Glossary
ACPI
Advanced Configuration and Power Interface
A specification that enables the operating system to implement power management
and system configuration.
ATX
Advanced Technology Extended
A specification that covers the style of motherboards and enclosures introduced by
Intel in 1995.
DHCP
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
A protocol for dynamically assigning IP addresses to host names, especially used in a
local network.
DNS
Domain Name System
A protocol used to locate computers on the Internet by their name.
FAQ
Frequently Asked Questions
HTTP
Hypertext Transfer Protocol
One of the protocols used for communication between single computers, especially
between web browsers and web servers.
HTTPS
Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure
The secure version of HTTP.
IPMI
Intelligent Platform Management Interface
A specification defining a set of common interfaces for operating system independent
platform management and health monitoring.
LED
Light Emitting Diode
A semiconductor device that emits incoherent monochromatic light when electrically
biased in the forward direction.
APPENDIX B. GLOSSARY
93
PS/2
Personal System/2
IBM’s second generation of personal computers, which was released to the
public in 1987. Today, PS/2 is known as a device interface for mouse and
keyboard.
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol
A widely used network monitoring and control protocol.
SSH
Secure Shell
An encrypted network protocol providing a secure replacement for Telnet.
SSL
Secure Socket Layer
An encryption technology for the Internet used to provide secured data transmissions.
SVGA
Super Video Graphics Array
A refinement of the Video Graphics Array (VGA) that provides increased pitch and
resolution performance.
UTP
Unshielded Twisted Pair
A cable with two conductors twisted as a pair and bundled within the same outer
PVC covering.
94
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Appendix C. KiraTool Commands
Supported Operating Systems
• Windows (2000 or newer)
• EFI Shell
• Linux
• DOS
Supported Interfaces
• Remote: LAN (only Windows and Linux version)
• Local:
- SCSI over USB
- SMI (KCS)
Supported Functionality
• Network configuration (IP/mask/gw/MAC)
• Changing admin's name & password
• Showing serial number
• Resetting to factory defaults
• Firmware information and upgrade
• Device self-test
Usage
kiratool [options]
[cmd args]
Table C - 1. Options Overview
Options
-l <ip>
use remote LAN interface instead of local one
-s
use IPMI-over-SCSI interface
-d <device>
use specified SCSI device; default: auto-detect
-u <username>
user name for login
-p <password>
password for login
-P
prompt for password
-f
force: never prompt for user confirmation
-v
verbose: does additional logging
-c
calm: does not print out anything (silent)
-h / -?
help: shows help and usage information
APPENDIX C. KIRATOOL COMMANDS
95
Note: If no interface is given, local interface is used
Table C - 2. Commands Overview
Commands
ver
shows version of kiratool
info
shows vendor and device ID of the connected device
ipsrc set static | dhcp
| bios
sets IP address source
ipsrc [show]
shows current IP address source
ip set <ip addr>
ip [show]
sets IP address (e.g. 192.169.1.123)
shows current IP address
netmask set <netmask>
netmask [show]
sets netmask (e.g. 255.255.255.0)
shows current netmask
gw set <gw addr>
gw [show]
sets gateway address (e.g. 192.169.1.1)
shows current gateway address
mac set <mac addr>
sets MAC address (e.g. "FE:00:00:12:34:56"
"FE0000123456")
shows current MAC address (-c = compact mode, e.g.
"87654321DCBA" instead of "87:65:43:21:DC:BA")
mac [show] [-c]
fw
<fw
fw
<fw
upgrade [-h]
bin file>
validate [-h]
bin file>
or
[-o]
upgrades firmware (-h = cross-hwid, -o = cross-oem)
[-o]
fw [ver]
checks firmware compatibility (-h = cross-hwid, -o = crossoem)
shows firmware version information
serial [show]
shows device's serial number
defaults
resets all settings to factory defaults
reset
hard-resets the module
admin name <name>
admin passwd <passwd>
admin [show]
raw <hex bytes>
changes new admin name
changes admin's password
shows admin's name
send raw command and prints raw response (<netfn>
<cmd> [<d1>] [<d2>] ... [<dN>]:
e.g. 06 01)
test <test>
performs module self test and shows results (return value is
==0 on success and =0 in failure)
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Commands
device
video <subtest>
tests whether the device is vailable at all
tests video interface (DVO/DVI)
status
crc
checks detected video signal and resolution
calculate CRC sum over the captured screen
ddc <subtest>
tests DDC interface
info
queries EDID information from the device and compares it
to the EDID information known by the OS (only available
under Windows)
ipmb <subtest>
tests IPMB interface
bmc
test whether a BMC responds over IPMB
fml <subtest>
tests FML interface
esb2
test whether an ESB2 is responding on FML when TPT
(TCP Pass-Through) is active
usb [-c <channel>]
<subtest>
tests USB interface
status
test whether the device's USB modul is enumerated
nic [-c <channel>]
<subtest>
status
loopback
ping <host>
broadcast
all
test NIC interface
-s <test to skip>
Single tests can be skipped using the -s parameter. You can
both skip a whole component (e.g. -s ddc) and skip a single
test (e.g. -s video crc)
test NIC status and parameters
test NIC loopback functionality
Test whether pinging a host works
Broadcast ping (not yet implemented)
performs all tests and subtests one after another
Included tests:
•
ddc info
•
video status
•
ipmb bmc
•
fml esb2
•
usb status
•
nic status
APPENDIX C. KIRATOOL COMMANDS
97
Return Code
To let the caller know whether an error occured and what went wrong, the tool returns a
return code:
•
If everything went well, 0 is returned
•
For all commands except test, -1 is returned if an error occurs
•
If a test fails, the return code indicated which test failed:
Table C - 3. Return Codes Overview
Test
Return Code
device
1
video status
2
video crc
3
ddc info
4
ipmb ddc
5
fml esb2
6
usb status
7
nic status
8
nic loopback
9
nic ping
10
nic broadcast
11
•
if test all fails, the return code of the first error which occured is returned;
the test will not be stopped after the first error!
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Appendix D. Configuring the RADIUS Server
This appendix describes the necessary steps to configure a RADIUS server in order to be
able to use remote authentication on the OPMA module. This is shown for a Windows 2003
Server Standard Edition system with Active Directory enabled.
Prerequisites
1. Please check if Active Directory is enabled. If not, got to Start -> Run and type
"dcpromo" to enable Active Directory function. Follow the instructions to enable AD.
2. Make sure Internet Authentication Service is installed, enabled and registered to
Active Directory.
•
To install Internet Authentication Service (IAS), go to Start -> Control Panel
-> Add or Remove Programs -> Add/Remove Windows Components.
Select Networking Services by double click on it. Tick Internet
Authentication Service and then click OK. Then Click Next to install IAS.
•
To register IAS to Active Directory, go to Start -> Administrative Tools ->
Internet Authentication Service. Then right click on Internet
Authentication Service (Local), select Register Server in Active Directory.
3. Create a Windows user group which will hold all users that are allowed to login on
the OPMA module. You can allow/deny login for a user just by adding/removing
him/her to/from this group. For this group there will be a custom remote access
policy configured later on.
Groups can be maintained by the Active Directory Users and Groups tool: Start ->
Administrative Tools -> Active Directory Users and Computers -> Users.
4. Create all users to be authenticated from OPMA module. Make sure Remote Access
Permission (Dial-in or VPN) access is set to Allow access where default is Deny
access. To check, double click on user an select the Dial-in tabulator.
Make all users member of the above group.
Add and configure a RADIUS client
This step is necessary to give the RADIUS server some information about the client
(OPMA module) and define a password phrase.
Go to Start -> Administrator Tools -> Internet Authentication Service. Right click on
RADIUS Clients and select New RADIUS Client.
Type a friendly name for this client. In this example, "OPMA at Server3" is used. And type
the IP address of the OPMA module that will be used as RADIUS client. In this example
"192.168.1.198" is used. Select Next after this is done.
Type the share secret that will be used between this RADIUS server and OPMA module.
Note: please keep this secret in mind, this same secret will be asked to key in during
configuration of RADIUS function on OPMA module.
Select Finish after this is done.
A new RADIUS client will now be shown on the display window.
APPENDIX D. CONFIGURING THE RADIUS SERVER
99
Setup a custom remote access policy
This step explicitly allows the group configured above to login remotely.
Go to Start -> Administrator Tools -> Internet Authentication Service. Right click on
Remote Access Policies and select New Remote Access Policy.
Select Next to get on the Policy Configuration Method page. Switch to Set up custom
policy and enter a friendly policy name, e.g. "OPMA Access".
Select Next to get on the Policy Conditions page. Press Add... to add a new policy. Select
Windows-Groups and press Add to create this condition. Now add the previously created
user group by pressing Add... and typing the group name in Enter object name to select.
Leave the sub dialogs and so return to the wizard by pressing OK two times.
Select Next to get to the Permissions page. Select Grant remote access permission.
Select Next to get to the Profile page. Select Edit Profile.... Make sure that both
Encrypted authentication (CHAP) and Unencrypted authentication (PAP, SPAP) is
enabled. And leave with OK.
Select Next and Finish to complete the wizard.
APPENDIX E. KEY CODES
101
Appendix E. Key Codes
Fehler! Verweisquelle konnte nicht gefunden werden. shows the key codes used to define
the key strokes or hotkeys for several functions. Please note that these key codes do not
necessarily represent the key characters that are used on international keyboards. A key on
a standard 104 key PC keyboard with a US English language mapping is named. The layout
for this keyboard is shown in Figure E - 1. However, most modifier keys and other
alphanumeric keys used for hotkey purposes in application programs are on a similar
position, no matter what language mapping you are using. Some of the keys also have
aliases. This means that a key can be named by two different key codes.
Figure E - 1. English (US) Keyboard Layout, used for the Key Codes
Table E - 1. Key Names
Key
Alias Key(s)
0-9
A-Z
~
_
=
TILDE
MINUS
EQUALS
;
´
<
,
.
/
Backspace
TAB
[
]
ENTER
CAPS LOCK
\
LSHIFT
RCTRL
RSHIFT
LCTRL
LALT
SPACE
LESS
SLASH
BACK SLASH
SHIFT
CTRL, STRG
SHIFT
CTRL, STRG
ALT
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Key
Alias Key(s)
ALT Gr
ESCAPE
ESC
F1
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
F7
F8
F9
F10
F11
F12
PRINTSCREEN
SCROLL LOCK
BREAK
INSERT
HOME
PAGE_UP
PAGE_DOWN
DELETE
END
UP
LEFT
DOWN
RIGHT
NUM_LOCK
NUMPAD0
NUMPAD1
NUMPAD2
NUMPAD3
NUMPAD4
NUMPAD5
NUMPAD6
NUMPAD7
NUMPAD8
NUMPAD9
NUMPADPLUS
NUMPAD /
NUMPADMUL
NUMPADMINUS
NUMPADENTER
WINDOWS
MENU
POS 1
DEL
NUMPAD_PLUS, +
/
NUMPAD_MUL, *
NUMPAD_MINUS, -
APPENDIX F. PIN ASSIGNMENTS
103
Appendix F. Pin Assignment
OPMA Connector
The “Open Platform Management Architecture Specification” from AMD with a detailed
description of the OPMA connector structure can be downloaded from the following Website:
http://www.amd.com/us-en/Processors/ProductInformation/0,,30_118_8796_12498,00.html?redir=CPPR31.
In Chapter 4 „OPMA Connector Specification and Pin Assignments” all pins are listed and
described.
RJ45 Connetcor Ethernet
Figure F - 1. RJ45 Connector
Table F - 1. RJ45
PIN
Assignment
PIN
Assignment
1
TX +
5
Not connected
2
TX -
6
RX -
3
RX +
7
Not connected
4
Not connected
8
Not connected
Serial SUB-D9 Connectors
Figure F - 2. Serial Connector
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PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Table F - 2. Serial Sub D9 Connector 1
PIN
Assignment
PIN
Assignment
1
DCD
6
DSR
2
RX
7
RTS
3
TX
8
CTS
4
DTR
9
RI
5
GND
Table F - 3. Serial Sub D9 Connector 2
PIN
Assignment
PIN
Assignment
1
Not connected
6
Not connected
2
RX
7
Not connected
3
TX
8
Not connected
4
Not connected
9
Not connected
5
GND
APPENDIX G. SPECIFICATIONS
105
Appendix G. Specifications
Sizes and Weights
Table G - 1. OPMA Specification
Attribute
Value
Height
8.5mm (0.335‘’)
Width
70mm (2.756‘’)
Depth
67.6mmm (2.661’’)
Weight
16g (0.035lb)
Power Consumption
Up to 1A
Environment
Temperature
Table G - 2. Temperature
Attribute
Value
Operating
0°C to 55°C (32°F to 131°F)
Storage
-18°C to 70°C (-0.4°F to 158°F)
Humidity
Table G - 3. Humidity
Attribute
Value
Operating
10% to 90% (non-condensing)
Storage
5% to 95% (non-condensing)
106
PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Appendix H. Raritan Inc. Warrenty Information
Limited Warranty
Raritan Inc. manufactures its hardware products from parts and components that are new
or equivalent to new in accordance with industry-standard practices. Raritan warrants that
the hardware products including the firmware will be free from defects in materials and
workmanship under normal use. Any implied warranties on the Raritan firmware and
hardware are limited to 24 months, respectively, beginning on the date of invoice. Some
states/jurisdictions do not allow limitations on duration of an implied warranty, so the
above limitation may not apply to you. Additionally Raritan grants a special warranty for 6
months.
Customer Remedies
Raritan’s entire liability and exclusive remedy shall be, at Raritan’s option, either (a) return
of the price paid, or (b) repair or replacement of the firmware or hardware that does not
meet this Limited Warranty and which is returned to Raritan with a copy of your receipt.
Damage due to shipping the products to you is covered under this warranty. Otherwise
warranty does not cover damage due to external causes, including accident, abuse, misuse,
problems with electrical power, servicing not authorized by Raritan , usage not in
accordance with product instructions, failure to perform required preventive maintenance
and problems caused by use of parts and components not supplied by Raritan . Any
replacement hardware will be warranted for the remainder of the original period or thirty
(30) days, whichever is longer. Raritan will repair or replace products returned to Raritan’s
facility. To request warranty service you must inform Raritan within the warranty period. If
warranty service is required, Raritan will issue a Return Material Authorization Number.
You must ship the products back to Raritan in their original or an equivalent packaging,
prepay shipping charges, and insure the shipment or accept the possibility of loss or
damage during shipment.
No Other Warranties
To the maximum extend permitted by applicable law, Raritan disclaim all other warranties,
either express or implied, including, but not limited to implied warranties of
merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose, with regard to the firmware, the
accompanying written materials, and any accompanying hardware. This limited warranty
gives you specific legal rights. You may have others, which vary from state/jurisdiction to
state/jurisdiction.
No Liability For Consequential Damages
To the maximum extent permitted by applicable law, in no event shall Raritan be liable for
any damages whatsoever (including without limitation, special, incidental, consequential or
indirect damages for personal injury, loss of business information, or any other pecuniary
loss) arising out of the use of or inability to use this product, even if Raritan has been
advised of the possibility of such damages. In any case, Raritan’s entire liability under any
provision of this agreement shall be limited to the amount actually paid by you for the
firmware and/or hardware. Because some states/jurisdictions do not allow the exclusion or
limitation of liability for consequential or incidental damages, the above limitation may not
apply to you.
APPENDIX I. GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE (GPL)
107
Appendix I. GNU General Public License (GPL)
Version 2, June 1991
Copyright (C) 1989, 1991 Free Software Foundation, Inc. 59 Temple Place, Suite 330,
Boston, MA 02111-1307 USA Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim
copies of this license document, but changing it is not allowed.
Preamble
The licenses for most software are designed to take away your freedom to share and change
it. By contrast, the GNU General Public License is intended to guarantee your freedom to
share and change free software--to make sure the software is free for all its users. This
General Public License applies to most of the Free Software Foundation’s software and to
any other program whose authors commit to using it. (Some other Free Software
Foundation software is covered by the GNU Library General Public License instead.) You
can apply it to your programs, too.
When we speak of free software, we are referring to freedom, not price. Our General Public
Licenses are designed to make sure that you have the freedom to distribute copies of free
software (and charge for this service if you wish), that you receive source code or can get it
if you want it, that you can change the software or use pieces of it in new free programs;
and that you know you can do these things.
To protect your rights, we need to make restrictions that forbid anyone to deny you these
rights or to ask you to surrender the rights. These restrictions translate to certain
responsibilities for you if you distribute copies of the software, or if you modify it.
For example, if you distribute copies of such a program, whether gratis or for a fee, you
must give the recipients all the rights that you have. You must make sure that they, too,
receive or can get the source code. And you must show them these terms so they know their
rights.
We protect your rights with two steps: (1) copyright the software, and (2) offer you this
license which gives you legal permission to copy, distribute and/or modify the software.
Also, for each author’s protection and ours, we want to make certain that everyone
understands that there is no warranty for this free software. If the software is modified by
someone else and passed on, we want its recipients to know that what they have is not the
original, so that any problems introduced by others will not reflect on the original authors’
reputations.
Finally, any free program is threatened constantly by software patents. We wish to avoid
the danger that redistributors of a free program will individually obtain patent licenses, in
effect making the program proprietary. To prevent this, we have made it clear that any
patent must be licensed for everyone’s free use or not licensed at all.
The precise terms and conditions for copying, distribution and modification follow.
GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE
TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR COPYING, DISTRIBUTION AND MODIFICATION
0.
This License applies to any program or other work which contains a notice placed by
the copyright holder saying it may be distributed under the terms of this General Public
License. The "Program", below, refers to any such program or work, and a "work based on
the Program" means either the Program or any derivative work under copyright law: that is
to say, a work containing the Program or a portion of it, either verbatim or with
modifications and/or translated into another language. (Hereinafter, translation is included
without limitation in the term "modification".) Each licensee is addressed as "you".
108
PRODUCT USER GUIDE
Activities other than copying, distribution and modification are not covered by this License;
they are outside its scope. The act of running the Program is not restricted, and the output
from the Program is covered only if its contents constitute a work based on the Program
(independent of having been made by running the Program).Whether that is true depends
on what the Program does.
1.
You may copy and distribute verbatim copies of the Program’s source code as you
receive it, in any medium, provided that you conspicuously and appropriately publish on
each copy an appropriate copyright notice and disclaimer of warranty; keep intact all the
notices that refer to this License and to the absence of any warranty; and give any other
recipients of the Program a copy of this License along with the Program.
You may charge a fee for the physical act of transferring a copy, and you may at your
option offer warranty protection in exchange for a fee.
2.
You may modify your copy or copies of the Program or any portion of it, thus
forming a work based on the Program, and copy and distribute such modifications or work
under the terms of Section 1 above, provided that you also meet all of these conditions:
a) You must cause the modified files to carry prominent notices stating that you
changed the files and the date of any change.
b) You must cause any work that you distribute or publish, that in whole or in part
contains or is derived from the Program or any part thereof, to be licensed as a
whole at no charge to all third parties under the terms of this License.
c) If the modified program normally reads commands interactively when run, you must
cause it, when started running for such interactive use in the most ordinary way, to
print or display an announcement including an appropriate copyright notice and a
notice that there is no warranty (or else, saying that you provide a warranty) and that
users may redistribute the program under these conditions, and telling the user how
to view a copy of this License. (Exception: if the Program itself is interactive but
does not normally print such an announcement, your work based on the Program is
not required to print an announcement.)
These requirements apply to the modified work as a whole. If identifiable sections of that
work are not derived from the Program, and can be reasonably considered independent and
separate works in themselves, then this License, and its terms, do not apply to those
sections when you distribute them as separate works. But when you distribute the same
sections as part of a whole which is a work based on the Program, the distribution of the
whole must be on the terms of this License, whose permissions for other licensees extend to
the entire whole, and thus to each and every part regardless of who wrote it.
Thus, it is not the intent of this section to claim rights or contest your rights to work written
entirely by you; rather, the intent is to exercise the right to control the distribution of
derivative or collective works based on the Program.
In addition, mere aggregation of another work not based on the Program with the Program
(or with a work based on the Program) on a volume of a storage or distribution medium
does not bring the other work under the scope of this License.
3.
You may copy and distribute the Program (or a work based on it, under Section 2) in
object code or executable form under the terms of Sections 1 and 2 above provided that you
also do one of the following:
a) Accompany it with the complete corresponding machine-readable source code,
which must be distributed under the terms of Sections 1 and 2 above on a medium
customarily used for software interchange; or,
APPENDIX I. GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE (GPL)
109
b) Accompany it with a written offer, valid for at least three years, to give any third
party, for a charge no more than your cost of physically performing source
distribution, a complete machine-readable copy of the corresponding source code, to
be distributed under the terms of Sections 1 and 2 above on a medium customarily
used for software interchange; or,
c) Accompany it with the information you received as to the offer to distribute
corresponding source code. (This alternative is allowed only for noncommercial
distribution and only if you received the program in object code or executable form
with such an offer, in accord with Subsection b above.)
The source code for a work means the preferred form of the work for making modifications
to it. For an executable work, complete source code means all the source code for all
modules it contains, plus any associated interface definition files, plus the scripts used to
control compilation and installation of the executable. However, as a special exception, the
source code distributed need not include anything that is normally distributed (in either
source or binary form) with the major components (compiler, kernel, and so on) of the
operating system on which the executable runs, unless that component itself accompanies
the executable.
If distribution of executable or object code is made by offering access to copy from a
designated place, then offering equivalent access to copy the source code from the same
place counts as distribution of the source code, even though third parties are not compelled
to copy the source along with the object code.
4.
You may not copy, modify, sublicense, or distribute the Program except as expressly
provided under this License. Any attempt otherwise to copy, modify, sublicense or
distribute the Program is void, and will automatically terminate your rights under this
License. However, parties who have received copies, or rights, from you under this License
will not have their licenses terminated so long as such parties remain in full compliance.
5.
You are not required to accept this License, since you have not signed it. However,
nothing else grants you permission to modify or distribute the Program or its derivative
works. These actions are prohibited by law if you do not accept this License. Therefore, by
modifying or distributing the Program (or any work based on the Program), you indicate
your acceptance of this License to do so, and all its terms and conditions for copying,
distributing or modifying the Program or works based on it.
6.
Each time you redistribute the Program (or any work based on the Program), the
recipient automatically receives a license from the original licensor to copy, distribute or
modify the Program subject to these terms and conditions. You may not impose any further
restrictions on the recipients’ exercise of the rights granted herein. You are not responsible
for enforcing compliance by third parties to this License.
7.
If, as a consequence of a court judgment or allegation of patent infringement or for
any other reason (not limited to patent issues), conditions are imposed on you (whether by
court order, agreement or otherwise) that contradict the conditions of this License, they do
not excuse you from the conditions of this License. If you cannot distribute so as to satisfy
simultaneously your obligations under this License and any other pertinent obligations,
then as a consequence you may not distribute the Program at all. For example, if a patent
license would not permit royalty-free redistribution of the Program by all those who
receive copies directly or indirectly through you, then the only way you could satisfy both
it and this License would be to refrain entirely from distribution of the Program.
If any portion of this section is held invalid or unenforceable under any particular
circumstance, the balance of the section is intended to apply and the section as a whole is
intended to apply in other circumstances.
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It is not the purpose of this section to induce you to infringe any patents or other property
right claims or to contest validity of any such claims; this section has the sole purpose of
protecting the integrity of the free software distribution system, which is implemented by
public license practices. Many people have made generous contributions to the wide range
of software distributed through that system in reliance on consistent application of that
system; it is up to the author/donor to decide if he or she is willing to distribute software
through any other system and a licensee cannot impose that choice.
This section is intended to make thoroughly clear what is believed to be a consequence of
the rest of this License.
8.
If the distribution and/or use of the Program is restricted in certain countries either by
patents or by copyrighted interfaces, the original copyright holder who places the Program
under this License may add an explicit geographical distribution limitation excluding those
countries, so that distribution is permitted only in or among countries not thus excluded. In
such case, this License incorporates the limitation as if written in the body of this License.
9.
The Free Software Foundation may publish revised and/or new versions of the
General Public License from time to time. Such new versions will be similar in spirit to the
present version, but may differ in detail to address new problems or concerns.
Each version is given a distinguishing version number. If the Program specifies a version
number of this License which applies to it and "any later version", you have the option of
following the terms and conditions either of that version or of any later version published
by the Free Software Foundation. If the Program does not specify a version number of this
License, you may choose any version ever published by the Free Software Foundation.
10. If you wish to incorporate parts of the Program into other free programs whose
distribution conditions are different, write to the author to ask for permission. For software
which is copyrighted by the Free Software Foundation, write to the Free Software
Foundation; we sometimes make exceptions for this. Our decision will be guided by the
two goals of preserving the free status of all derivatives of our free software and of
promoting the sharing and reuse of software generally.
NO WARRANTY
11. BECAUSE THE PROGRAM IS LICENSED FREE OF CHARGE, THERE IS NO
WARRANTY FOR THE PROGRAM, TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY
APPLICABLE LAW. EXCEPT WHEN OTHERWISE STATED IN WRITING THE
COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND/OR OTHER PARTIES PROVIDE THE PROGRAM "AS
IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED,
INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIEDWARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. THE
ENTIRE RISK AS TO THE QUALITY AND PERFORMANCE OF THE PROGRAM IS
WITH YOU. SHOULD THE PROGRAM PROVE DEFECTIVE, YOU ASSUME THE
COST OF ALL NECESSARY SERVICING, REPAIR OR CORRECTION.
12. IN NO EVENT UNLESS REQUIRED BY APPLICABLE LAW OR AGREED TO
IN WRITING WILL ANY COPYRIGHT HOLDER, OR ANY OTHER PARTY WHO
MAY MODIFY AND/OR REDISTRIBUTE THE PROGRAM AS PERMITTED ABOVE,
BE LIABLE TO YOU FOR DAMAGES, INCLUDING ANY GENERAL, SPECIAL,
INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR
INABILITY TO USE THE PROGRAM (INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO LOSS
OF DATA OR DATA BEING RENDERED INACCURATE OR LOSSES SUSTAINED
BY YOU OR THIRD PARTIES OR A FAILURE OF THE PROGRAM TO OPERATE
WITH ANY OTHER PROGRAMS), EVEN IF SUCH HOLDER OR OTHER PARTY
HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
END OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS
APPENDIX I. GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE (GPL)
111
How to Apply These Terms to Your New Programs
If you develop a new program, and you want it to be of the greatest possible use to the
public, the best way to achieve this is to make it free software which everyone can
redistribute and change under these terms.
To do so, attach the following notices to the program. It is safest to attach them to the start
of each source file to most effectively convey the exclusion of warranty; and each file
should have at least the "copyright" line and a pointer to where the full notice is found.
This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of
the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either
version 2 of the License, or (at your option) any later version.
This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY
WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS
FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU General Public License for more details.
You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along with this
program; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330,
Boston, MA 02111-1307 USA
Also add information on how to contact you by electronic and paper mail.
If the program is interactive, make it output a short notice like this when it starts in an
interactive mode:
Gnomovision version 69, Copyright (C) year name of author Gnomovision comes with
ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY; for details type "show w". This is free software, and
you are welcome to redistribute it under certain conditions; type "show c" for details.
The hypothetical commands "show w" and "show c" should show the appropriate parts of
the General Public License. Of course, the commands you use may be called something
other than "show w" and "show c"; they could even be mouse-clicks or menu items-whatever suits your program.
You should also get your employer (if you work as a programmer) or your school, if any, to
sign a "copyright disclaimer" for the program, if necessary. Here is a sample; alter the
names:
Yoyodyne, Inc., hereby disclaims all copyright interest in the program "Gnomovision"
(which makes passes at compilers) written by James Hacker.
This General Public License does not permit incorporating your program into proprietary
programs. If your program is a subroutine library, you may consider it more useful to
permit linking proprietary applications with the library. If this is what you want to do, use
the GNU Library General Public License instead of this License.
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Appendix J. The OpenLDAP Public License
Version 2.8, 17 August 2003
Redistribution and use of this software and associated documentation ("Software"), with or
without modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:
1. Redistributions in source form must retain copyright statements and notices,
2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce applicable copyright statements and
notices, this list of conditions, and the following disclaimer in the documentation
and/or other materials provided with the distribution, and
3. Redistributions must contain a verbatim copy of this document.
The OpenLDAP Foundation may revise this license from time to time. Each revision is
distinguished by a version number. You may use this Software under terms of this license
revision or under the terms of any subsequent revision of the license.
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE OPENLDAP FOUNDATION AND ITS
CONTRIBUTORS "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES,
INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE
DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE OPENLDAP FOUNDATION, ITS
CONTRIBUTORS, OR THE AUTHOR(S) OR OWNER(S) OF THE SOFTWARE BE
LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO,
PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA,
OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY
THEORY OF LIABILITY,WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT
(INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF
THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
SUCH DAMAGE.
The names of the authors and copyright holders must not be used in advertising or
otherwise to promote the sale, use or other dealing in this Software without specific, written
prior permission. Title to copyright in this Software shall at all times remain with copyright
holders.
OpenLDAP is a registered trademark of the OpenLDAP Foundation.
Copyright 1999-2003 The OpenLDAP Foundation, Redwood City, California, USA. All
Rights Reserved. Permission to copy and distribute verbatim copies of this document is
granted.