WALDORF NW1 R EFERENCE M ANUAL
Waldorf Music GmbH, rev1.0
September 23, 2015
1
• Introduction
• Product development team
Thank you for purchasing the NW1 wavetable module.
NW1 team :
Like any Waldorf product, this NW1 has been developed and produced with
love in Germany, for the most demanding musicians. We sincerly hope it
will bring you fun and musical inspiration.
• Development:
Oliver Rockstedt, Frédéric Meslin, Isabelle Kernhof
Stefan Stenzel, Frank Schneider
• Design:
Stefan Stenzel, Axel Hartmann
Reading this user manual, you will discover all the device features, learn
its basic use and benefits from tips & tricks we gathered during product development.
• Testers:
Dirk Krause, Juergen Driessen, Rolf Woehrman
Your Waldorf-team http://www.waldorfmusic.de
• Manual:
Tom Wies
Frédéric Meslin, Stefan Stenzel
Revision: 1.0, September 2015
• Disclaimer
We would like to thank :
Waldorf Music GmbH is not liable for any erroneous information contained
in this manual. The contents of this manual may be updated at any time
without prior notice. We made every effort to ensure the information herein
is accurate and that the manual contains no contradictory information. Waldorf Music GmbH extends no liabilities in regard to this manual other than
those required by local law. This manual or any portion of it may not be
reproduced in any form without the manufacturer’s written consent.
Joachim Flor, Willie Eckl, Michael von Garnier, Christian Bacaj, Karsten
Dubsch, Daniel Krawietz, Kurt ”Lu” Wangard, Echo Wu, Miroslaw ”Mirek”
Pindus, Erik Norlander, Stephan Gries
Waldorf Music GmbH, Lilienthal Strasse 7, D-53424 Remagen,
Germany
For additionnal information / sound demos / software downloads, please
visit our website :
http://www.waldorfmusic.de/nw1-overview.html
2
3
CONTENTS
CONTENTS
Contents
CONTENTS
CONTENTS
1 General safety guidelines
8
10 Updating firmware
10.1 With the wavetable Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.2 With a System Exclusive File player . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2 Device maintenance
8
11 Technical specifications
42
A Wavetable list
44
3 Package contents
10
4 Device overview
4.1 Front panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2 Back panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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5 Device connection
5.1 Power connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2 Audio connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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6 Playing back wavetables
6.1 Wavetables basics . . .
6.2 Choosing a wavetable .
6.3 Scanning wavetables . .
6.4 Tuning the oscillator . .
6.5 Transforming the sound
6.6 Modulating the sound .
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7 Recording wavetables
7.1 Recording basics . . . . . . .
7.2 Recording setup . . . . . . .
7.3 Recording a wavetable . . . .
7.3.1 Choosing a slot . . . .
7.3.2 Audio source and gain
7.3.3 Prepare recording . .
7.3.4 Arming the recorder .
7.3.5 Recording . . . . . . .
7.4 Advanced options . . . . . .
7.4.1 Compression level . .
7.4.2 Playback quality . . .
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8 Transferring wavetables
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9 Speech wavetables
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5
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1
GENERAL SAFETY GUIDELINES
1 General safety guidelines
Please read the following safety guidelines carefully!
They include precautions you should always observe when dealing with
electronic equipment.
• Use the device indoors only, in a dry atmosphere.
• Never use the device under too damp conditions such as in bathrooms
or near swimming pools.
• Do not use the device in extremely dusty or dirty environments in order
to preserve the device’s surface finish.
2 DEVICE MAINTENANCE
2
Device maintenance
• Do not try to open the device or detach the frontpanel.
• Refer all service and repair tasks to qualified personnel.
• There are no user serviceable parts inside the chassis.
• Use only a soft cloth or brush to clean the device surface.
• Never use cleaning chemicals as they will damage the device surface.
• Make sure that adequate ventilation is available for the device to cool
down. Do not place the device near heat sources such as radiators.
• Do not expose the device to extreme vibrations.
• Unplug the device when you are not using it for longer periods.
• Never place objects containing liquids on top or near the device.
• Make sure no foreign objects find their way into the unit. If this occurs,
switch the power off, unplug the device and consult a qualified repair
center.
This device, used with amplifiers, speakers or headphones, can generate
volume levels that may result in irreparable damage to human hearing.
For this reason, volume should be kept at moderate levels at all times.
This device is designed exclusively to generate low frequency audio
signals for sound generation. Any other use is prohibited and voids the
warranty extended by Waldorf Music GmbH. Damages due to incorrect
use are not the responsability of Waldorf Music GmbH.
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3
PACKAGE CONTENTS
4
3 Package contents
4
NW1 package comes complete with the following material:
4.1 Front panel
DEVICE OVERVIEW
Device overview
• NW1 wavetable module
• 1 x 16-way 20cm ribbon cable
• 4 x M2.5 x 6 screws
• 4 x M3 washers
• 2 x jumpers (already attached on board)
• A quick start poster
• German protective atmosphere
Only a Phillips head screwdriver #0 is needed to mount the module into the
rack frame. No additional tools are needed.
Figure 1: Frontpanel of module
Id Description
8
1
Gate Input
Used for gated wavetable travel and start wavetable recording.
2
Pitch CV input
Set the pitch.
Signal should be 1V / octave, from 0V to 5V (5 octaves).
9
4.1
Front panel
4 DEVICE OVERVIEW
4.1
Front panel
4
DEVICE OVERVIEW
Id
Description
Id Description
3, 4, 5
Modulation CV inputs
Modulate selected destination.
The modulated destination is chosen using the Destination
switches (11, 12, 13).
The amplitude of modulation is set using the Gain potentiometers (8, 9, 10).
6
Oscillator output
Audio output.
Signal can be up to 16V peak-to-peak.
19 Travel mode
Controls the wavetable scanning:
Gated:
Travel the wavetable from start position when gate is asserted,
stop at current position when gate is deasserted.
Step:
Advance the wavetable position on each gate pulse.
Free:
Cycle through the wavetable according to Travel.
7
USB interface
Load and save wavetable data with computer or update
firmware.
8, 9, 10
Modulation gains
Controls depth of each modulation.
11, 12, 13 Modulation destinations
Select the destination for each modulation input.
14
Pitch CV trimmer
Fine-tune the scaling for the pitch CV input.
15
Spectrum control
Transpose spectral envelope of the tone.
Transposition range is from -64 to +64 semitones.
16
Brilliance control
Sharpen or flatten the spectral envelope peaks of the tone.
17
Keytrack
Set wave playback pitch relative to pitch.
18
Noisiness ”Noisy” control
Adjust wavetable rendering from periodic to noisy.
10
20 Travel speed
In playback mode:
Set the wavetable playback speed.
Speed ranges from -120 RPM to +120 RPM (rotation per minute).
In recording mode:
Set the recorded wavetable playback quality.
21 Wavetable position
In playback mode:
Set the wavetable playback start position.
Position ranges from 0◦ to 360◦ .
In recording mode:
Set the recording compression ratio.
22 Tune range
Select the octave.
Octave can be set from -4 (C-4, 16.35Hz) to -2 (C-2, 65.41Hz).
23 Tune pitch
Adjust pitch.
Adjustment range covers 12 semitones.
24 Wavetable dial
In playback mode:
Select wavetable.
In recording mode:
Set the recording threshold level or gate triggering.
11
4.1
Front panel
4 DEVICE OVERVIEW
4.2
Back panel
4
DEVICE OVERVIEW
4.2 Back panel
Id Description
25 Display
In playback mode:
Shows the wavetable in use.
In recording mode:
Show the input signal level and the recording state.
26 Operating mode
Select the operating mode:
Record:
Record user wavetable using Modulation CV input 1 (3) as audio
source.
User:
Play wavetables recorded or transferred using the Editor (U0 to
U9).
ROM / TTS:
Play factory ROM wavetables (00 to 80) or Text-To-Speech (A0 to
E9) wavetables.
27 Recording / gate LED
In playback mode:
Shows the gate signal level.
In recording mode:
Shows trigger state for recording.
Figure 2: Backpanel of module
Id Description
28 Eurorack bus connector
Bus connector providing power and bus CV / Gate signals to the
oscillator module. Regulated +12v and -12v power rails must be
supplied for the module to work.
29 Bus CV jumper
Use CV signal from the Eurorack bus when no jack is inserted
in Pitch CV input. To disable bus CV usage, the jumper must be
detached.
30 Bus Gate jumper
Use Gate signal from the Eurorack bus when no jack is inserted
in Gate input. To disable bus Gate usage, the jumper must be
detached.
12
13
5
DEVICE CONNECTION
5 Device connection
You now own a fantastic wavetable / speech oscillator. It is time to integrate
it in your modular system.
5.1
Power connection
The first step is to provide your module with power. The module only requires stabilized +12v & -12v voltages. These voltage should already be
provided by your modular system power supply.
Before connecting any module to the Eurorack bus, it is mandatory to
switch the modular system power off. Otherwise you may severely damage your module or put yourself at risk.
Please connect the supplied 16-way ribbon cable to the module Eurorack
bus connector (28) and your modular system bus board (Figure 3).
5.2
Audio connection
5 DEVICE CONNECTION
The module can now be installed in the rack using the provided screws,
washers and a Phillips head screwdriver #0. With the module installed,
switch the system power supply on. The module Display (25) will show a
short animation followed by the selected wavetable number.
If the Display (25) stays dark when powered on, please switch it off
immediately. The cable has probably been attached incorrectly, it is
possible nothing has been damaged.
5.2 Audio connection
The second step is connecting the audio output of the module so you can
hear the sound. A mixing desk or an audio amplifier system should be attached to the Audio output (6) of the module. It is essential to use some
volume attenuation before power amplification. The NW1 output level is
rather high (up to 16v peak-peak) compared to line audio standard.
Connections are made using mini patch cables. These cables are standard
mono male-male mini-jacks (3.5mm) and can be bought from any audio
store.
Figure 3: Eurorack bus connector
Eurorack connectors are usually orientated so the Gate signal is on top and
the -12v supply at the bottom. Refer to Figure 3. The NW1 module follows
the same convention.
Please make sure the ribbon cable does not swap the lines.
Figure 4: Mini patch cables
14
15
5.2
Audio connection
5 DEVICE CONNECTION
In modular systems, it is common practice to attach an oscillator Audio output (6) to a VCA module, a mixer module or a filter module. The NW1 has
a broad spectrum range and can generate low frequencies as low as 16Hz.
Therefore its output can be used as a modulation source for another module.
Do not be afraid to experiment crazy patch configurations using other
modules with NW1. The inputs and output are buffered, nothing serious
can happen.
6 PLAYING BACK WAVETABLES
6
Playing back wavetables
This section contains information about the nature of wavetables and the
way they are played by the NW1.
6.1 Wavetables basics
As naive as it may sound, a wavetable is a table of waves. Waves are tiny
audio snippets representing a cyclic waveform. A wavetable contains many
waveforms in succession to store complex and evolving tones.
Figure 5: A wavetable of 4 waves
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6.1
Wavetables basics
6
PLAYING BACK WAVETABLES
Wavetables have the following properties:
Number of waves:
The more waves a wavetable consists of, the more complex and interesting can the sound tonal evolution be.
In NW1, a wavetable can have from from 8 to 4096 waves.
6.2
Choosing a wavetable
6
PLAYING BACK WAVETABLES
6.2 Choosing a wavetable
To play a wavetable, select one of the three available banks using the Mode
(26) switch.
Number of samples per single wave:
The longer a single cycle wave is, the more harmonics can be represented.
In NW1, wave lengths of 32, 64, 128, 256, 512 or 1024 samples are
possible.
Samples bit resolution:
Waves resolution defines the accuracy of the ratios between tone harmonics.
The greater is the resolution, the more subtle an harmonic can sound
compared to the others.
In NW1, resolution is 16 bits.
The principal difference between digital wavetable oscillators and classic
analog-style oscillators (like sine, triangle, saw ...) is the extensive flexibility
of waveform shapes. The waveform shape, and thus the tonal spectrum,
can be freely programmed and can evolve in time in a controllable manner.
Figure 6: Wavetable dial and display
The banks contain:
• User: 10 x user wavetables.
These wavetables can be recorded wavetables or wavetables transfered using the computer Editor.
• ROM: 80 x factory installed wavetables.
These are classic wavetables from Microwave and Nave synthesizers.
The wavetable list can be found in Appendix A.
• TTS: 50 x user text-to-speech wavetables.
These wavetables are created and transferred via the computer Editor.
Select wavetable using the Wavetable dial (24) and Display (25).
If the wavetable does not play as expected, try disabling modulations by
turning down the Modulation input gains (8,9,10).
The best way to preview a wavetable is to:
• adjust the Travel speed (20) for slow wavetable scanning
• set Spectrum (15), Brilliance (16) and Noisy control (18) to 0
• set Keytrack (17) to 100%
18
19
6.3
6.3
Scanning wavetables
6
PLAYING BACK WAVETABLES
Scanning wavetables
The NW1 plays wavetables continuously in a loop. Whenever the wave cursor reaches one of the wavetable boundaries (top or bottom), it continues
from the opposite one. The cursor can travel in either directions.
6.3
Scanning wavetables
6
PLAYING BACK WAVETABLES
Several scanning modes are offered, they can be selected using the Travel
mode (19):
Gated mode: When Gate signal is asserted (high level), the wave cursor
starts from wavetable Position (21) and progresses at Travel speed (20).
Wave cursor stops as soon as Gate signal (1) is deasserted (low level).
Figure 9: Travel - Gated mode
Figure 7: Interpolated wave, position and travel controls
As shown on Figure 7, the wave cursor is not discrete. Rather, played
waves are interpolated between adjacent waves of the wavetable to create
smooth sweeps in the tone’s spectral content.
Step mode: Each wavetable is divided into a predefined number of sections. Every section contains the same number of waves. When Gate signal is asserted, the wave cursor advances at Travel speed (21) by a section
length. Wavetable Position (21) offsets the sections beginning by the number of degrees set.
Refer to Appendix A for the predefined number of sections of the factory
programmed wavetables.
Free mode: Regardless of the Gate, the wave cursor constantly progresses
at Travel speed (20), scanning the wavetable in an infinite loop.
Figure 8: Wavetable scanning controls
Because wavetables are arranged in an infinite loop, wavetable Position
(21) is expressed in degrees and Travel speed (20) in RPM (Rotation Per
Minute).
20
For every Travel modes (19), when Travel speed (20) is assigned to 0
RPM, the wave cursor reverts to the wave defined by the wavetable Position control (21). This allows specific wave selection.
21
6.3
Scanning wavetables
6
PLAYING BACK WAVETABLES
6.4
Tuning the oscillator
6
PLAYING BACK WAVETABLES
6.4 Tuning the oscillator
An oscillator often needs to be tuned when playing along with other sound
sources. The NW1 offers three controls to adjust the basic pitch.
It is recommended to disable any modulation, stop wavetable traveling
and select a basic waveform before calibrating pitch.
Figure 10: Travel - Step mode (4 sections wavetable)
Using a guitar tuner or a tuning application, the root key is adjusted with the
Tune pitch (23) potentiometer. The available range is a little more than an
octave. The root octave is selected with the Tune range (22) toggle switch.
The available range is from -12 to +12 semitones.
Figure 12: Oscillator tuning
Figure 11: Travel - Free mode
The Gated and Step mode of Travel mode (19) switch requires an external
Gate signal. Gate signal can originate from Gate input (1) or from the Eurorack bus gate (28) if no patch cable is inserted.
The use of Eurorack bus gate (28) as trigger when no patch cable is
inserted can be disabled by removing the Bus Gate jumper (29).
When controlling pitch using CV input (2) or Eurorack bus CV input (28), the
input scale must be manually adjusted. The NW1 expects a unipolar Pitch
CV in 1V / octave format, ranging from 0V to 5V, offering a 5 octaves play
range.
Pitch sampled on CV input (2) or any of the Modulation inputs (3, 4, 5) it
is assigned to is summed with the root Pitch set with the Tune pitch(23)
and Tune range (22) controls.
With a precision screwdriver, scale is rectified turning the Pitch CV Trimmer
(14). Trimmer hole can be seen on Figure 9. The pitch scale is properly
adjusted when a specific note’s fundamental frequency is exactly doubled
when played one octave higher.
CV scale can be a little tricky to calibrate and it is easier to adjust using
high pitched notes. The Tune range (22) should be set to +12 semitones.
22
23
6.4
Tuning the oscillator
6
PLAYING BACK WAVETABLES
6.5
Transforming the sound
6 PLAYING BACK WAVETABLES
6.5 Transforming the sound
The NW1 sound engine is a direct descendant of the acclaimed Nave engine. It combines advanced resampling techniques and wavetable synthesis for extended control of tone generation and high quality audio.
The engine employs different algorithms to satisfy the demands of both the
gritty and harsh old school playback of classic Microwave and Wave-series
wavetables and the pristine quality reproduction of Nave.
Figure 13: Scale trimming
In addition to CV Input (28) and Modulation inputs (3, 4, 5) pitch can be
driven by the Eurorack bus CV. This is the default behavior when no patch
cable is inserted in CV Input (28).
Not every module makes use of the Eurorack bus CV, but when it is available, this feature can be quite convenient.
The use of Eurorack bus CV (28) as pitch control when no patch cable is
inserted can be disabled by removing the Bus CV jumper (29).
NW1 is able to produce pitches ranging from 16.35Hz (C-4) to 14.08kHz
(A9), so please handle it carefully.
Figure 14: Sound parameters
The effect of Spectrum (15) and Brilliance (16) on tone is identical to their
effect in Nave. However, the Brilliance control (16) is now bipolar with an
extended range of -100% to 100%.
Spectrum The Spectrum (15) transposes the spectral content without affecting pitch. Setting spectrum to negative values lowers the spectral content. Conversely, positive values move the spectral content to higher frequencies. Set to middle position for conventional wavetable playback.
In Figure 15, from front to back, the Spectrum is increased and the wave
harmonics are shifted to higher frequencies.
24
25
6.5
Transforming the sound
6
PLAYING BACK WAVETABLES
6.5
Transforming the sound
6 PLAYING BACK WAVETABLES
In Figure 16, from front to back, the Brilliance is increased, harmonic peaks
are refined and the contribution of weaker harmonics is improved.
Positive values of Brilliance (16) only affect the tone when the Spectrum
control (15) is not set to 0.
Keytrack Keytrack (17) defines how the spectral content is transposed according to the pitch. A setting of 100% for classic wavetable synthesis like
in Waldorf Microwave. When set off, the result resembles a filterbank defining the spectral contour, very useful for speech wavetables where formant
frequencies must not be affected by pitch.
Figure 15: Spectral envelopes for different settings of Spectrum
Noisy Wavetable playback has adjustable noisiness. When set off, waves
are rendered perfectly periodic. With higher settings, playback becomes
noisier.
Tips and tricks:
Brilliance Brilliance (16) sets the amount of detail of the spectral content.
It controls the spread and definition of harmonic peaks. Set to middle position for conventional wavetable playback.
• Punchy lead sounds can be created controlling the spectrum with
an envelope generator.
• Vocal wavetable sound best with Keytrack set to off.
• When Brilliance is set to extreme negative values, the effect is similar to a high-pass filter.
Figure 16: Spectral envelopes for different settings of Brilliance
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6.6
6.6
Modulating the sound
6
PLAYING BACK WAVETABLES
Modulating the sound
6.6
Modulating the sound
6
PLAYING BACK WAVETABLES
NW1 sound engine has been optimized to quickly track sound parameters evolution. Oscillator FM modulation (in a reasonable frequency
range) is therefore possible.
In order to avoid DC offsets on modulations, each NW1 oscillator comes
factory calibrated. However, due to temperature changes and shipping,
minor offsets may be noticeable. To reduce them, the computer Editor
can recalibrate the modulation inputs. Please refer to the editor section
of this manual for more details on calibration procedure.
Figure 17: Input 2 modulation path
Modulation capabilities are mandatory for any modular system. NW1 provides three assignable modulation paths with dedicated CV input.
All modulation paths follows the same scheme:
Modulation CV input
Modulation CV input (3, 4, 5) is the modulation source signal. This
signal can be bipolar from -12V to +12V.
Modulation gain
Modulation gain (8, 9, 10) defines the amount of modulation. It specifies
how much of the input signal is added to the selected destination. While
Low values allow subtle modulation, high values can drastically change
the sound characteristics.
Modulation destination
Modulation destination (11, 12, 13) assigns the modulation signal to a
specific destination. Depending on the modulation path used (1, 2 or
3), different destinations are addressable.
Using high Modulation gains (8, 9, 10) values in conjunction with strong
CV signals will saturate the modulation input stage. Though there is
no risk of damage, the input signal will inevitably clip, changing the
modulation wave shape.
Experiment a lot!
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29
7
RECORDING WAVETABLES
7 Recording wavetables
The factory classic wavetables have been designed to cover a wide range
of tones. To complement these, the NW1 is designed for users to actively
create their own wavetables using the included original wavetable recorder.
7.1
Recording basics
Recorded wavetables exhibit the following characteristics:
• Number of waves:
Recorded wavetables can contain up to 256 waves.
This corresponds to recording times of roughly 7s.
• Waves length:
Wave length is fixed to 512 samples (in compressed format).
When Oscillator mode (26) is switched to User, 10 wavetables slots (labelled U0 to U9) can be selected for both recording and playback.
7.3
Recording a wavetable
7 RECORDING WAVETABLES
Almost any source can be recorded using the NW1, as long as signal
level is loud enough.
Pay close attention to high impedance or weak signal sources such as microphones or guitars. Before feeding the signal to the Modulation CV input 1
(3), it must be amplified by an external device. For example, condenser microphones require a pre-amplifier and guitars a dedicated amplifier to adapt
their signals levels.
Present day home studio sound cards or mixing desks integrate quality
pre-amplifiers that are sufficient for the task, no need to buy additional
hardware.
7.3 Recording a wavetable
Wavetable recording consists of five steps which must be performed in the
following order:
The recording can be triggered on Modulation CV input 1 (3) level or using
the Gate input (1) (or Bus gate input (28)) signal.
1. Choosing a recording slot
Wavetable recording system is based on real-time sample-to-wavetable conversion. While an audio signal is recorded, it is conditioned, chopped in
pieces that are converted and stored as single waves. Recorded wavetables use a special storage format allowing more detailed envelope representation while ignoring the phase information.
3. Setup recording parameters (optional)
2. Attaching the source and adjusting the gain
4. Arming the recorder
5. Recording the new wavetable
Each step will now be detailed.
Due to nature of wavetables, the result will not sound identical to the recorded
audio material. However, the conversion process does its best to preserve
the harmonic evolution of the recorded sound.
7.2
Recording setup
To record, an audio source must be plugged in the Modulation CV input
1 (3) using a mono mini jack. A variety of sources (electronic instrument,
computer, tape player, ...) can be attached.
30
7.3.1
Choosing a slot
Switch the Mode (26) to User mode and use the Wavetable dial (24) to select the user wavetable taht will be overwritten by the recording. Eventually
switch the Oscillator mode (26) to Record Mode. The selected wavetable is
latched and used for recording.
31
7.3
Recording a wavetable
7
RECORDING WAVETABLES
7.3
Recording a wavetable
7 RECORDING WAVETABLES
7.3.2 Audio source and gain
Attach the audio source to Modulation Input (3) and adjust the Modulation
gain 1 (8). The NW1 Display (25) shows a simple level meter. The left character is an L followed by a glyph representing the current signal level.
Figure 19: Recording in Gate mode
When not armed, the Record / Gate LED (27) shows what would be the
record state given the current audio input. This is a guide to:
• adjust the Threshold level (in trigger on input level mode)
Figure 18: Audio levels, from low to high
To avoid unwanted distortion, the highest levels should only be reached
on signal peaks. It is important to set the gain high enough to maximise
signal to noise ratio.
• control the Gate signal(1) state (in trigger on gate state mode).
7.3.4
Arming the recorder
The recorder is ready to capture audio signal. It is now waiting to be armed
and triggered. The arming procedure prevents unwanted erasure of previously recorded material, it also disables the Trigger on threshold function.
7.3.3 Prepare recording
On module startup, the recorder is configured with default values fitting the
most common usage. However, it is possible fine tune certain parameters
to improve the wavetable generation. Refer to the recording Advanced options section for precision on these parameters.
Note that the recorder lets the Input signal (3) to pass-through for monitoring its quality. To actually record, the recorder must be armed and triggered.
The NW1 allows two triggering mode:
Arming the recorder is done by switching Modulation destination 1 (11) to
Record position (same as Travel). If by accident, Modulation destination 1
(11) is already set to Record position, it needs to be toggled again.
When the recorder is armed, any previously recorded or transferred
wavetable on the selected slot is erased. During the erase, the display
shows a short animation. Depending on settings, recording may immediately start after the erasing process.
• Trigger on input level (default)
As soon as the input level cross the defined threshold, recording starts.
When it falls below the threshold for long enough, recording stops.
The recording threshold level is configured using the Wavetable dial
(24). The Display (25) blinks to indicate the configured threshold level.
• Trigger on gate state
Recording can also be started and stopped using the Gate input (1)
signal. To switch the recording to Gate trigger, the Wavetable dial (24)
must be turned left until the Display (25) shows a blinking GA.
Figure 20: Erasing animation
7.3.5
Recording
Directly after triggering, the recorder converts audio signal to waves. The
Display (25) draws a circle animation showing the recorded time and the
32
33
7.4
Advanced options
7
RECORDING WAVETABLES
7.4
Advanced options
7 RECORDING WAVETABLES
Recording / Gate LED (27) blinks.
Figure 23: Playback quality: High, Low, Aliased
Figure 21: Recording animation
The playback algorithm associated with the next recorded wavetable is
specified using the Travel speed (20) potentiometer.
Recording can be interrupted at any time, either by not satisfying trigger
conditions or by manually disarming it using the Modulation destination 1
(11) switch.
7.4
Advanced options
To enhance wavetable creation, the recorder provides additional controls.
These parameters are optional and intended for advanced users.
7.4.1 Compression level
When recording, the signal level might considerably vary and lead to wavetables which are not consistent in level. A compressor is included to help alleviate this problem.
The compressor normalizes single waves to a defined extent. The compression ratio is set using the Position control (21).
Figure 24: Compression ratio and playback quality controls
The algorithms have the following attributes:
• Nave-grade quality:
Best resampling using multiple filters. Beware, perfection can sound
boring, especially on low pitched notes.
• Microwave quality:
Resampling with additional harmonics at low pitches, not mathematically perfect but has this special 80s feeling.
Figure 22: Compression ratio
Higher ratios can bring background noise when source signal is low. It is
recommended to do several recording tries.
• Aliased:
Crude resampling with a lot of aliasing.
7.4.2 Playback quality
NW1 sound engine includes three algorithms offering different playback
quality and sound character.
34
35
8
TRANSFERRING WAVETABLES
9 SPEECH WAVETABLES
8 Transferring wavetables
9
Coming soon.
Coming soon.
36
Speech wavetables
37
10
10
UPDATING FIRMWARE
10.2
With a System Exclusive File player
10 UPDATING FIRMWARE
Updating firmware
The NW1 connects to computers through its USB interface. Attach the module to a computer to update the firmware.
Waldorf Music regularly offers free updates for all its current products.
Please visit our web site regularly:
http://www.waldorfmusic.de/nw1-overview.html
Keeping your firmware up-to-date gives you access to the latest functionalities, sound engine improvements and bug fixes.
First, download the latest NW1 firmware from Waldorf Music website and
extract the archive content. The archive contains a sysex file and a readme
text) file listing all software evolutions since the first release.
There are two ways to transfer software to the module. The recommended
one is using the Editor.
Figure 25: Updating firmware with the Editor
10.2 With a System Exclusive File player
10.1
With the wavetable Editor
Download the latest version of the NW1 wavetable Editor and launch it.
Connect the NW1 to the computer with USB and check its connection state.
When correctly recognized by the Editor, the module content is displayed in
the Library panel.
Open the Device menu and click on Upgrade Firmware. Once the Firmware
Upgrade window pops up, browse for the *.syx file using the Select file button. If a suitable firmware file is detected, the Start Upgrade will be enabled.
Click on the button to start the update procedure.
Any software able to manage System Exclusive File is apt to update the
module firmware. Example list of capable applications includes:
• MIDI OX
For Windows platforms: http://www.midiox.com
• Sysex Librarian
For MAC-OS platforms: http://www.snoize.com/SysExLibrarian
Before transfering the software, the module must be started in Bootloader
mode. Turning the Wavetable Dial (24) in either direction when powering
the module calls the Bootloader mode. The Display (25) draws bL.
The Firmware Upgrade window from the editor also displays the installed
version of the module firmware.
Figure 26: Bootloader mode
Finally dump, at reasonnable speed, the content of the downloaded sysex
file using the choosen System Exclusive File player.
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39
11
11
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
11 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Technical specifications
The NW1 oscillator technical characteristics are:
Engine
Nave-based wavetable engine
Integrated speech synthesizer
Built-in wavetable recorder
USB for custom / text wavetables transfer and firmware update
Connectivity
Gate triggering wavetable travel and recording
Pitch CV 1V / Octave CV, 0V to 5V pitch input, 100kΩ impedance
Mod. CVs 3 x -12V to +12V modulation inputs, 100kΩ impedance
Output 16V peak-to-peak, 8Hz to 18kHz, 470Ω impedance
USB USB interface with galvanic isolation
Bus: Eurorack 16-pins connector (Power supply, CV & Gate)
Electronics
Storage: Total 8 MB internal flash memory
5 MB (= 80) MW series / Nave factory wavetables
2.5MB (= 10) for user custom / recorded wavetables
0.5MB (= 50) for user text wavetables
Supply: +12V, -12V, 150mA
Mechanics
Width: 32HP, 162.6 mm
Height: 3U, 13.3 mm
Depth: 25mm
Weight: 500g
Technical specifications and design are subject to change without notice.
40
41
A
A
WAVETABLE LIST
Wavetable list
Index
Name
Sections
Index
Name
Sections
0
Resonant
8
25
Echoes
8
1
Resonant2
8
26
Formant 2
4
2
MalletSyn
8
27
FmntVocal
8
3
Sqr-Sweep
4
28
MicroSync
8
4
Bellish
4
29
Micro PWM
8
5
Pul-Sweep
8
30
Glassy
4
6
Saw-Sweep
8
31
Square HP
4
7
MellowSaw
4
32
SawSync 1
8
8
Feedback
4
33
SawSync 2
8
9
Add Harm
8
34
SawSync 3
8
10
Reso 3 HP
8
35
PulSync 1
8
11
Wind Syn
8
36
PulSync 2
8
12
High Harm
8
37
PulSync 3
8
13
Clipper
8
38
SinSync 1
8
14
Organ Syn
8
39
SinSync 2
8
15
SquareSaw
8
40
SinSync 3
8
16
Formant 1
8
41
PWM Pulse
8
17
Polated
4
42
PWM Saw
8
18
Transient
8
43
Fuzz Wave
4
19
ElectricP
4
44
Distorted
8
20
Robotic
8
45
HeavyFuzz
4
21
StrongHrm
8
46
Fuzz Sync
8
22
PercOrgan
8
47
K+Strong1
4
23
ClipSweep
8
48
K+Strong2
4
24
ResoHarms
8
49
K+Strong3
4
42
A
WAVETABLE LIST
Index
Name
Sections
Index
Name
Sections
50
1-2-3-4-5
5
66
Alt 1
8
51
19/twenty
4
67
Alt 2
8
52
Wavetrip1
9
68
Spectrum 1
8
53
Wavetrip2
13
69
Spectrum 2
8
54
Wavetrip3
11
70
Spectrum 3
8
55
Wavetrip4
7
71
Spectrum 4
8
56
MaleVoice
4
72
Drumloop
8
57
Low Piano
4
73
Buzz
8
58
ResoSweep
8
74
Guiro
8
59
Xmas Bell
8
75
Crackle
8
60
FM Piano
4
76
Wire
8
61
Fat Organ
4
77
Metal
8
62
Vibes
4
78
Wood
8
63
Chorus 2
8
79
Glass
8
64
True PWM
4
80
Nave Chant
8
65
UpperWaves
8
43